Issuu on Google+

Monday

Seattle routs Buffalo

Rain, high winds gusting to 60 mph B10

Wilson leads Seahawks to a 50-17 victory B1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

December 17, 2012 | 75¢

New fire Port Townsend’s merry gentlemen panelist eyes cuts Phillips: Don’t hire new chief just yet BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — A newly appointed Quilcene fire commissioner said the district needs to pay close attention to its finances and defer hiring a chief until the budget is resolved. “Our budget is my biggest concern right now,” Gary Phillips, who was selected by the Jefferson County Board of Commissioners on Dec. 3 to replace Mike Whittaker, who was recalled by voters Nov. 13. “Right now, our yearly expenditures are about $110,000 more than our Phillips revenues, and our reserves have gone from $940,000 to about $250,000 in 2009. By my projections, we’ll be at about zero by mid-2015.” Phillips said the department needs to have a fair amount of reserves in case it has to replace a large truck or an ambulance.

Workshop set for Wednesday A budget workshop is scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday at the fire station, 70 Herbert St., with ratification set for a meeting Dec. 26. Once ratified, the department can continue the search for a chief, which was put on hold when Whittaker was recalled along with fellow commissioner Dave Ward. “When we hire a chief, we need to make sure we have the money to pay on a three-year contract,” Phillips said. TURN TO QUILCENE/A4

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Nathan Barnett, left, plays a holiday tune on the hurdy-gurdy with the approval of Father Christmas, who greeted visitors to the Gilded Age Yuletide Salon in Port Townsend on Saturday. Out-of-towners and local shoppers were invited to a Victorian parlor on Water Street to enjoy festive food and drinks at the event sponsored by the Port Townsend Main Street Program.

County gets $1.1 million in salmon recovery funds PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Jefferson County tribes and groups received $1.1 million — and Clallam groups got $1.2 million — in salmon recovery money from the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board. In total, $19.2 million in grants to 28 counties were announced. Don “Bud” Hover, chairman of the state funding board, said in a news release the grants “give local groups the money they need to fix the rivers, estuaries and bays in their communities and they put local people to work.” Jefferson County grants are: ■ $345,275 to Jefferson County for conserving land along the Dosewallips and Duckabush rivers. ■ $288,680 to the North Olympic Salmon Coalition for removing the Discovery Bay railroad grade. ■ $207,900 to Jefferson County for conserving land along the Big Quilcene River. ■ $126,100 to the Jefferson County Land Trust for conserv-

NOAA Fisheries survey PORTLAND, Ore. — The federal agency in charge of saving salmon has hired two consensus-building groups to ask Northwest leaders what long-term steps should be taken to overcome persistent conflicts over restoring dwindling salmon and steelhead runs. NOAA Fisheries Service has hired the Oregon Consensus program at Portland State University and the William D. Ruckelshaus Center in Washington state to interview 150 people. Their initial report is due this summer. Barry Thom, deputy regional administrator for the agency, said they are looking for a regional picture of what people think it will take to bring about recovery for the embattled species. States, Native American tribes, conservation groups, fishermen and farmers have long had different views on how to regulate fishing, dam operations, hatcheries and irrigation withdrawals. The Associated Press ing Snow Creek. ■ $104,278 to the Pacific Coast Salmon Coalition for opening passages in the Christmas Creek tributaries. The Clallam grants are: ■ $288,950 to the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe for replac-

ing a culvert with a steel bridge on a logging road near the Hoko River. ■ $200,000 to the Lower Elwha tribe for designing the Pysht River estuary restoration project. TURN

TO

GRANTS/A4

AQUABOUNTY

VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A genetically modified salmon is at rear, with a non-genetically modified salmon of the same age in the foreground.

Genetically modified salmon tabled by FDA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Salmon that have been genetically modified to grow twice as fast as normal could soon show up on your dinner plate. That is, if the company that makes the fish can stay afloat. After weathering concerns about everything from the safety of humans eating the salmon to their impact on the environment, AquaBounty was poised to become the world’s first company to sell fish whose DNA has been altered to speed up growth. The Food and Drug Administration in 2010 concluded that AquaBounty’s salmon was as safe to 14706106

Post any service needs FREE Bid on service needs FREE

1C565189

Post the service you’re looking for on WhoCanHelp.com FREE through peninsuladailynews.com

eat as the traditional variety. The agency also said that there is little chance that the salmon could escape and breed with wild fish. Such interbreeding could disrupt the fragile relationships between plants and animals in nature.

Still not FDA approved But more than two years later, the FDA still has not approved the fish, and AquaBounty is running out of money. “It’s threatening our very survival,” said CEO Ron Stotish, chief executive of the Maynard, Mass.based company. TURN

TO

MODIFIED/A4

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 96th year, 303rd issue — 2 sections, 18 pages

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL PUZZLES/GAMES

B5 B4 A7 B4 B4 B10 A3 A2 B6

SPORTS SUDOKU WEATHER WORLD

B1 A2 B10 A3


A2

UpFront

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

‘SNL,’ Stones honor victims of shooting “SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE” made a rare departure from its comedic opening to pay tribute to the children and adults killed at a Newton, Conn., elementary school. Not known for treating anything seriously or tenderly, the show made a fitting exception during the first moments of its show Saturday. Rather than the usual comedic sketch, a children’s choir appeared on camera and angelically sang “Silent Night,” with the touching refrain, “Sleep in heavenly peace.” Then the members of the New York City Children’s Chorus shouted out the NBC show’s time-honored introduction: “Live from New York, it’s ‘Saturday Night!’” It was the night’s sole reference to the tragedy and struck just the right tone. Later, the chorus returned to join musical guest Paul McCartney in a rendition of his “Wonderful Christmas Time.” At a New Jersey concert that included appearances by Bruce Springsteen, Lady Gaga, Black Keys and John Mayer, The

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lady Gaga joins Mick Jagger, center, and Ronnie Wood of The Rolling Stones on stage at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., on Saturday. Rolling Stones took a moment to acknowledge the shooting deaths of the 20 children and six adults. “We just wanted to send our love and condolences to all the people who lost loved ones in the tragedy in Connecticut,” Mick Jagger said early on in the concert as the audience applauded.

King honored Carole King has a friend in the Library of Congress. She’s the first woman to win the library’s Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. In her five decades of songwriting, King’s hits

have included “You’ve Got a Friend,” ‘‘So Far Away” and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A King Natural Woman.” The library said Thursday that King will be the fifth person to receive the prize. Prior recipients include Stevie Wonder and Paul McCartney. Librarian of Congress James Billington said King’s work has been recorded by many artists to communicate universal human emotions like love, joy and pain.

FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: At what age should a child have his or her first cellphone? 10 or younger 11-13 years old

3.6% 16.5%

14-17 years old

31.3%

When kid can afford it Undecided

45.3% 3.6%

Total votes cast: 1,544 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings By The Associated Press

DR. WILLIAM F. HOUSE, 89, a medical researcher who braved skepticism to invent the cochlear implant, an electronic device considered to be the first to restore a human sense, died Dec. 7 at his home in Aurora, Ore. The cause was metastatic melanoma, his daughter, Karen House, said. Dr. House pushed against conventional thinking throughout his career. Over the objections of some, he introduced the surgical microscope to ear surgery. Tackling a form of vertigo that doctors had believed was psychosomatic, he developed a surgical procedure that enabled the first American in space to travel to the moon. Today, more than 200,000 people in the world have inner-ear implants, a third of them in the United States. A majority of young deaf children receive them, and most people with the implants learn to understand speech with no visual help. Dr. House’s cochlear implant electronically translated sound into mechanical vibrations. His initial device, implanted in 1961, eventually was rejected by the body. But after refining its materials, he created a long-lasting version and implanted it in 1969.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

GUSTAVO ARCHILLA, 96, whose marriage in Canada in 2003 after almost six decades of a quiet and committed relationship inspired supporters of same-sex marriage, died Nov. 27 on Marco Island, Fla., where he lived. The cause was complications of an aneurysm of the aorta, his niece Christina Dean said. Mr. Archilla Mr. in 2003 Archilla was strolling across Columbus Circle in New York in September 1945 when he met Elmer Lokkins. The men fell in love quickly but not publicly. For 58 years, they lived together in Manhattan at a don’t-ask-don’t-tell distance from the rest of the world — stable and secure in their mutual devotion but expertly practiced at not drawing attention to it, even as they lived for many years in the same house with some of Mr. Archilla’s younger siblings. In time, the secret became harder to keep. They mostly were accepted by their families, but their relationship was not openly discussed. Well into their 80s, they married, eloping to Canada in 2003 shortly after samesex marriage became legal

there. For the first time, they began showing affection for each other in public. They marched in gay rights parades, including the annual Wedding March in New York.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

that the next legislative session will mash out a A rock breakwater at state ferry consolidation Neah Bay, recently recommended by the Seattle dis- plan nobody likes if people trict engineer for the Army don’t adopt some “intelligent attitudes.” Corps of Engineers as a The Clallam County worthy government project, Democrat noted that “you would cost $1.38 million, according to a federal esti- people are vitally affected by ferries.” mate. He added: “Frankly, we The recommendation is part of a 22-page report by on the Olympic Peninsula don’t give a tinker’s damn Lt. Col. H.J. Wild to the where the ferry runs to, chief of the Army Corps of just so we can get our milk Engineers in Washington, to Seattle cheaper. . . . D.C., where funding must “We were extremely be legislated. happy when the LegislaWild’s report suggests ture started building the that the cost of operating Hood Canal Bridge and put the hundreds of fishing in faster boats. boats would be materially “But I must agree that reduced by the establishment of “certain industries with rising operation costs, that would probably follow the state can no longer the construction of a break- keep parallel ferry runs to water, such as cold-storage Seattle.” plants, boat-repair yards and the improved terminal 1987 (25 years ago) and transfer facilities.” A group of young skate-

1937 (75 years ago)

boarders and bicycle acrobats asked the city Parks State Sen. Gordon Sand- Board for support in securison of Port Angeles, speak- ing a facility for them. The teenagers have ing to a Kiwanis Club in Port Orchard, predicted been gathering signatures

1962 (50 years ago)

on petitions in support of their plan to build a small concrete arena at a site to be determined. Said one 13-year-old petition signer: “I hope we can get it so it can liven Port Angeles up a bit.”

Laugh Lines ACCORDING TO THE Associated Press, China will soon overtake the United States as the world’s No. 1 global trader. Which is actually good news for most Americans. Didn’t you think China overtook us already? Jay Leno

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

DRIVER BRUSHING TEETH while driving over one of the Eighth Street bridges in Port Angeles . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Dec. 17, the 352nd day of 2012. There are 14 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 17, 1992, President George H.W. Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in separate ceremonies. On this date: ■ In 1777, France recognized American independence. ■ In 1865, Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 8, called the “Unfinished” because only two of its

movements were completed, was performed publicly for the first time in Vienna, 37 years after the composer’s death. ■ In 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright of Dayton, Ohio, conducted the first successful manned powered-airplane flights near Kitty Hawk, N.C., using their experimental craft, the Wright Flyer. ■ In 1939, the German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee was scuttled by its crew, ending the World War II Battle of the River Plate off Uruguay. ■ In 1944, the U.S. Army announced it was ending the

internment of Japanese-Americans. ■ In 1957, the United States successfully test-fired the Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile for the first time. ■ In 1975, Lynette Fromme was sentenced in Sacramento, Calif., to life in prison for her attempt on the life of President Gerald R. Ford. She was paroled in August 2009. ■ In 1981, members of the Red Brigades kidnapped Brig. Gen. James L. Dozier, the highest-ranking U.S. Army official in southern Europe, from his home in Verona,

Italy. He was rescued 42 days later. ■ Ten years ago: Playwright Frederick Knott, who wrote “Dial M For Murder” and “Wait Until Dark,” died in New York City at age 86. ■ Five years ago: Gov. Jon S. Corzine signed a measure making New Jersey the first state to abolish the death penalty in more than 40 years. ■ One year ago: North Korean leader Kim Jong Il died after more than a decade of iron rule; he was 69, according to official records, but some reports indicated he was 70.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, December 17, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Boehner talks tax increase on millionaires WASHINGTON — Signaling new movement in “fiscal cliff” talks, House Speaker John Boehner has proposed raising the top rate for earners making more than $1 million, according an anonymous source. President Barack Obama, who wants higher top rates for households earning more than $250,000, has not accepted Boehner the offer, this person said. The offer, made in a phone call Friday between the two leaders, marked the first time Boehner has entertained an increase in income-tax rates. As part of a broader budget deal, Boehner is seeking more spending cuts than Obama has proposed, particularly in mandatory health-care spending. Boehner has asked for a long-term increase in the eligibility age for Medicare and for lower cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security.

47-gun cache found CEDAR LAKE, Ind. — A northern Indiana man who allegedly threatened to “kill as many people as he could” at an elementary school near his

home was arrested by officers who found 47 guns and ammunition hidden in his home. Von. I. Meyer, 60, of Cedar Lake was arrested Saturday after prosecutors filed charges of felony intimidation, domestic battery and resisting law enforcement against him. He was being held Sunday without bond at the Lake County Jail, police said. Meyer threatened to enter nearby Jane Ball Elementary School “and kill as many people as he could before police could stop him,” the statement said. Meyer’s home is less than 1,000 feet from the school. Police said they notified school officials and boosted security at area schools Friday — the same day 26 people were shot and killed at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

Nuke plant shutdown BERWICK, Pa. — An energy company said it’s trying to figure out why a central Pennsylvania nuclear power plant reactor shut down unexpectedly. PPL Corp. said Unit 2 at the Susquehanna nuclear facility near Berwick shut down early Sunday. The company said the reactor was safe and stable. Allentown-based PPL said the shutdown occurred during routine testing of a valve on the unit’s main turbine system. The plant’s other reactor was reportedly operating normally. The Susquehanna plant is owned jointly by PPL and Allegheny Electric Cooperative. The Associated Press

Democratic senators want assault-gun ban Commission being mulled THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Democratic lawmakers and Independent Sen. Joseph Lieberman said Sunday that military-style assault weapons should be banned and that a national commission should be established to examine mass shootings in the United States. The proposals were among the first to come from Congress in the wake of Friday’s school shooting in Newtown, Conn. Gun rights activists remained largely quiet on the issue, all but one declining to appear on the

Sunday talk shows. Meanwhile, Democrats said they wanted to hear from voters — not gun lobbyists — on how to prevent the next shooting. The time for “saying that we can’t talk about the policy implications of tragedies like this is over,” said Rep. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who won a Senate seat in the November elections.

NRA has powerful clout President Barack Obama and Senate Democrats haven’t pushed for new gun controls since rising to power in the 2008 national elections. Outspoken advocates for stricter laws, including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, said that’s because of the powerful sway of the National Rifle Association.

But advocates also said the latest shooting is a tipping point that could change the dynamic of the debate dramatically. Feinstein, D-Calif., said she will propose legislation next year that would ban big clips, drums and strips of more than 10 bullets. “It can be done,” she said Sunday of reviving the 10-year ban that expired in 2004. Lieberman, an independent from Connecticut who is retiring, supports such a ban but said there also should be a national commission to scrutinize gun laws and loopholes, as well as the nation’s mental health system and the role that violent video games and movies might play. Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin of Illinois said he would support such a panel.

Briefly: World Egypt election called tainted by rights groups CAIRO — Egyptian rights groups called Sunday for a repeat of the first round of the constitutional referendum, alleging the vote was marred by widespread violations. Islamists who back the disputed charter claimed they were in the lead with a majority of “yes” votes, though official results have not been announced. Representatives of seven rights groups said there was insufficient supervision by judges in Saturday’s vote in 10 of Egypt’s 27 provinces, and independent monitors were prevented from witnessing vote counts. The representatives told a news conference that they had reports of individuals falsely identifying themselves as judges, of women prevented from voting and that members of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood were allowed inside polling stations. They also complained that some polling centers closed earlier than scheduled and that Christians were denied entry to polling stations.

Japan opposition wins TOKYO — Japan’s conservative Liberal Democratic Party returned to power in a landslide election victory Sunday after three years in opposition, polls

showed, signaling a rightward shift that could heighten tensions with rival China. The victory means hawkish former Abe Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will get a second chance to lead the nation after a one-year stint in 2006-2007. He would be Japan’s seventh prime minister in 6½ years. The results were a sharp rebuke for Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda’s ruling Democratic Party of Japan, reflecting widespread unhappiness for its failure to keep campaign promises and get the stagnant economy going.

Syria rebels take base BEIRUT — An Islamist faction of Syrian rebels said its fighters have taken control of an infantry base in the northern city of Aleppo. The al-Tawheed Brigade, one of the largest rebel groups in Aleppo, said the rebels, fighting to topple President Bashar Assad, “fully liberated” the military facility in Syria’s largest city Saturday. The statement was posted on al-Tawheed’s official website Sunday. It said the brigade’s commander was killed in the battle for the base, the second major military installation in Aleppo overrun by rebels in a week. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cheryl Girardi of Middletown, Conn., kneels before a memorial of 26 teddy bears near a sidewalk in Newtown, Conn. Each bear represented a victim of Friday’s school shooting.

Shooter used mother’s guns; federal agents probe motive High-powered rifle recovered THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWTOWN, Conn. — A Connecticut official said the mother of the gunman in Friday’s school massacre was shot four times in the head before her son went to the elementary school where he gunned down 26 people in the largest mass shooting of schoolage children in U.S. history. The official, who said the gunman’s mother was found in bed in pajamas, also said Adam Lanza, 20, killed himself with a single bullet to the head from a 10 mm gun. The bullet was recovered in a classroom wall. Lanza used a high-powered rifle to kill 20 children and six adults, including the principal who tried to stop him, police said. The unthinkable bloodshed might even have been worse. Gov. Dannel Malloy said Lanza shot himself as first responders entered the building. Lanza also was found to be car-

Quick Read

rying clips holding hundreds of rounds of ammunition — enough to kill just about every child in the school, which enrolled 670 students, if given enough A. Lanza time. As President Barack Obama prepared a visit, and churches opened their doors to comfort the grieving Sunday, federal agents went to dozens of gun stores and shooting ranges across Connecticut, chasing leads they hoped would cast light on Lanza’s life.

Mother had guns Among the questions: Why did his mother, a well-to-do suburban divorcee, keep a cache of highpowered weapons in the house? What experience did Lanza have with those guns? And, above all, what set him on a path to go classroom-by-classroom, massacring 6- and 7-year-olds? After killing his mother, Nancy Lanza, at the home they shared

Friday, Adam Lanza drove to Sandy Hook Elementary School in her car with at least three of her guns, forced his way in by breaking a window and opened fire, authorities said. All the victims at the school were shot with a rifle, at least some of them up close, and all were apparently shot more than once, Chief Medical Examiner Dr. H. Wayne Carver said. Asked whether the children suffered, Carver said, “If so, not for very long.” Parents identified the children through photos to spare them some shock, Carver said. School officials were trying to determine what to do about sending the survivors back to class. Plans were being made for some students to attend classes in nearby Monroe, said Jim Agostine, superintendent of schools there. Residents and faith leaders reflected Sunday on the mass shooting and what meaning, if any, to find in it. Obama planned to attend an interfaith vigil — the fourth time he will have traveled to a city after a mass shooting.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Man fires 50 shots at Southern California mall

Nation: ‘Hobbit’ is best ‘Rings’ with $84.8 million

Nation: Diet Pepsi quietly changes drink’s sweetener

World: Bombs kill eight in disputed areas of Iraq

A MAN WAS arrested Saturday after firing about 50 shots in the parking lot of a Newport Beach, Calif., shopping mall, prompting a lockdown of stores crowded with shoppers. Marcos Gurrola, 42, of Garden Grove was taken into custody by bicycle police officers patrolling the openair Fashion Island mall at 4:30 p.m., police spokeswoman Cathy Lowe said. She said Gurrola fired into the air and onto the ground in the parking lot near a Macy’s department store. The mall was packed with holiday shoppers. Witnesses said they ran, screaming and ducking for cover. No one was hurt.

THE PETER JACKSON movie “The Hobbit” led the box office last weekend $84.8 million, a record-setting opening that bested three previous “Lord of the Rings” films. The Warner Bros. Middle Earth epic was the biggest December opening ever, surpassing Will Smith’s “I Am Legend,” which opened with $77.2 million in 2007. Paramount’s “Rise of the Guardians” was second with $7.4 million. Oscar contender “Lincoln” from Walt Disney added another $7.2 million to bring its six-week total to $107.9 million. And Sony’s James Bond film “Skyfall” drew another $7 million domestically.

IF THAT CAN of Diet Pepsi tastes sweeter than normal, there’s a reason: PepsiCo. is quietly changing the sweeteners in the drink in some markets. Cans of Diet Pepsi now list a mix of two artificial sweeteners, a pairing that is commonly found in newer diet sodas. Previously, Diet Pepsi used only aspartame, which is sensitive to heat and breaks down more easily. Now, in addition to aspartame, cans of Diet Pepsi found in New York, Omaha, Neb., and the San Francisco area now list as an ingredient acesulfame potassium, which can be found in such foods as baked goods, chewing gum and gelatin desserts.

BOMBINGS RATTLED TWO cities in disputed areas in Iraq’s north Sunday, killing at least eight people and raising concerns that extremists are trying to exploit ethnic tensions. The deadliest series of blasts struck Shiite Muslim targets in the disputed northern city of Kirkuk, where Imad Qadir, who is responsible for the Kirkuk hospital’s security, said those attacks killed six people and wounded 36. Kirkuk is home to a mix of Arabs, Kurds and Turkomen. Earlier in the day, an explosion near the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan political party office in Jalula killed two and wounded five, police officials said.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Modified: FDA

is still working on final review CONTINUED FROM A1 lars each year into the potentially lucrative field “We only have enough that could help reduce food money to survive until Jan- costs and improve food uary 2013, so we have to safety. Already, biotech scienraise more. “But the unexplained tists are changing their delay has made raising plans to avoid getting stuck in FDA-related regulatory money very difficult.” The FDA said it’s still limbo. Researchers at the working on the final piece of University of California, its review, a report on the Davis have transferred an potential environmental experimental herd of genetimpact of the salmon that ically engineered goats that produce protein-enriched must be published for commilk to Brazil, due to conment before an approval cerns about delays at the can be issued. FDA. That means a final decision could be months, even Approval concerns years away. While the delay could mean that the fasterAfter investors raised growing salmon will never concerns about the slow KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS wind up on American din- pace of the FDA’s Aquner tables, there’s more at abounty review, Canadian PONY FOR HRISTMAS researchers in April pulled stake than seafood. their FDA application for a Mya Callis, 2, of Port Angeles is held by Rio Mowbray, 17, a member of the Ranahan biotech pig that would proOnly U.S. company Pony Club as the pair pet Tony the Christmas Pony at the Port Angeles Farmers Market duce environmentally AquaBounty is the only friendly waste. on Saturday at The Gateway center. Club members offered photos with Tony mounted on U.S. company publicly seek“The story of Aqubuttons for sale with proceeds benefiting the club’s educational activities. ing approval for a geneti- abounty is disappointing cally modified animal that’s because everyone was hopraised to be eaten by ing the company would be a humans. clear signal that genetic Scientists worry that its modification in animals is experience with the FDA’s now acceptable in the U.S.,” lengthy review process said Professor Helen Sang, highway at Smokey Point smoking when two people could discourage other U.S. a geneticist at the UniverTrooper shooting drove up, said something to companies from investing sity of Edinburgh in ScotCLEARVIEW — A state with at least one flat tire, them and opened fire and troopers clocked it on in animal biotechnology, or land who is working to trooper shot and wounded before speeding off. the science of manipulating develop genetically modistate Highway 9 at 93 a man after a chase in SnoA 23-year-old man was animal DNA to produce a fied chickens that are resismph. They cornered the homish County. shot in the head and killed. desirable trait. truck at a gas station in tant to bird flu. The Herald of Everett Three others were seriThat would put the U.S. “Because it’s gotten so Clearview. reported the chase began SUMNER — An overat a disadvantage at a time bogged down — and pre- night shooting at a Sumner ously injured. One of the troopers shot about 6:30 a.m. Sunday, Police and medics arrived when China, India and sumably cost AquaBounty a motel left one person dead when the driver appeared to almost immediately, and the after a trooper saw a Ford other foreign governments huge amount of money — I and three injured. accelerate toward them. The pickup driving north on three injured victims were are pouring millions of dol- think people will be put off.” driver was hit in the shoulInterstate 5 at more than KOMO-TV reported rushed to the hospital. der and taken to Harborview that it happened just after One was hit in the abdo- 100 mph. Medical Center in Seattle. Trooper Mark Francis midnight Sunday outside men, another in the arm The Snohomish County said the pursuit was disthe Sumner Motor Inn. and abdomen, and the Multiple Agency Response continued at one point for Police said a group of third in the leg. Team is investigating. safety reasons. construction workers from Police said the victims The Associated Press The truck exited the California were outside did not know the suspects.

A

C

Briefly: State

1 killed in drive-by shooting

Grants: Funds

for projects on North Peninsula Quilcene: ‘Lots of little cuts’ will help make up budget shortfall

CONTINUED FROM A1 vice roads along the North Fork of the Calawah River. ■ $44,445 to the Makah ■ $179,245 to the Makah tribe to replace the Crooked tribe for restoration of the Big River floodplain. Creek tributary culvert. The projects are based ■ $166,527 to the Washon regional salmon recovery ington Water Trust for plans, which are approved designing projects to store by the federal government. and recharge the DungeEach project is reviewed ness River acquifer. by regional salmon recovery ■ $116,737 to the Pacific organizations and the Coast Salmon Coalition for Salmon Recovery Funding replacing a drainage pipe Board’s technical review on Sands Creek. panel. ■ $110,727 to the North “This process ensures Olympic Land Trust for that we fund the projects land conservation on the that the local citizens feel Clallam River. are most important and ■ $62,893 to the Pacific that scientists agree will do Coast Salmon Coalition for the most to recover salmon,” repairing a U.S. Forest Ser- Hover said.

Health Notes DIABETIC FEET INFECTIONS

by Joe Cammack, R.Ph. More than half of foot sores in patients with diabetes develop into foot infections. In patients with diabetes, even a small foot wound can worsen and ultimately lead to amputation, so prevention of foot infections is vital. Diabetic neuropathy can result in a lack of sensation so that injury goes undetected, and peripheral vascular disease can reduce blood flow to the foot which impairs wound healing. All infected foot wounds in patients with diabetes should be treated with antibiotics, and debridement and wound care may also be needed. Diabetics should check their feet every day for sores, cuts, blisters or redness, especially in between the toes; keep their feet clean and dry; always wear socks and shoes or slippers; and wear properly fitted shoes to prevent blisters or sores. Be sure to see a doctor immediately at the first sign of infection, and see a podiatrist regularly for preventative care. Ask our pharmacist for recommendations on how to stabilize your blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity.

“If we default on the chief’s contract — or any contract — there is a penalty. “Hopefully, we can agree on enough cuts at the workshop for me to agree that it is time to hire a new chief.” Phillips said that he expects “lots of little cuts” will add up to make the necessary budget adjustments. One cut would be to decrease the number of residents [fire department trainees] from six to four once their current contract is up. Another will result from Phillips and commissioner Debbie Randall, who was nominated to replace Ward, declining to take any per diem payment for the meetings they attend.

Commissioners are authorized to receive $140 per meeting along with vehicle m i l e a g e . Randall They also can attend training sessions at district expense. The budgeted amount for commissioners’ per diem in 2012 was $6,000 but actual expenses were $8,632 due to the additional meetings scheduled this year. “If a volunteer goes out on a fire, they get $10 — going out in the middle of the night, missing sleep and getting dirty,” Phillips said. “With a commissioner, it takes a certain amount of research to understand the job, but it’s clean and doesn’t

Pain-Free Is The Point!© 26628896

Expert care, compassionately given. Focusing on eliminating pain & improving wellness.

Pat Flood 417-8870 M.S., L. Ac.

Need to resolve a conflict?

Visit our website 2C703147

www.jimsrx.com 452-4200

CONTINUED FROM A1

424 East 2nd • Open 8 to 7 daily 8 to 5 Sat. • 12 to 4 Sun.

‘Clear idea’

“In past budgets, we haven’t given the chief a clear idea of how the money should be spent,” he said. “There hasn’t been enough of a distinction between our operations budget and our capital budget.” “There has also been a problem with the commissioners playing too much a role in the day-to-day operation of the department. “With the new budget, we need to give the chief a clear idea of how the money should be spent and allow him to work within those guidelines.” Phillips said once the bud_______ get is in place, and cuts have been made, the department Jefferson County Reporter Charmay seek additional money lie Bermant can be reached at 360from the voters but should 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com. not do so before that time.

1-800-452-8024 www.pdrc.org Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties

HARDWOODS & LAMINATES 0RElNISHEDs3AND&INISH

360-670-5188

821 First Street, Port Angeles #!20%4s4),%s,!-).!4%s7//$s6).9,

29667442

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

he said. Herb Beck, the third commission member, said Friday that he planned to collect his per diem. Developing what Phillips called “a clear budget” also will benefit the new chief.

We carry a large selection of 1BSFOUJOH1MBOTr%JTTPMVUJPOTr'BNJMZ 8PSLQMBDFr4NBMM$MBJNT /FJHICPSIPPE 2B695623

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Beck

The district now collects 73.3 cents per $1,000 of property value. Raising it to $1.03 would raise an additional $100,000, and a raise to $1.25 would gain $175,000. “When the time comes, we can ask the people for more revenue,” Phillips said. “But selling higher taxes in Quilcene right now, with the way the economy is, is not a good idea. With current conditions, I don’t think it is a good idea or even possible to get more money from the people in the district.” Phillips, who served as fire commissioner from 1990 to 2001, said this stint on the board will be different. “Quilcene has changed. It used to be a working town, and now it’s more of a retirement town,” Phillips said. “It used to be there were 60 people working at the forest service, a lot of young guys who were volunteer firefighters. Now we don’t have a pool of young guys to pull the volunteers from.” “The town’s in transition,” he said. “We need to be able to live within these demographic changes.”

Mediate... A Path to Resolution

Where you find products you want and the attention you need

Get home delivery.

take a lot of work. So I have problems if the commissioner is getting more than a volunteer firefighter,”


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

A5

Time capsule dedication wraps PA’s 150th Kidd thanked Donnelly and all the other volunteers on the subcommittee that organized all the items for the capsule and drove home the importance of keeping history alive. “The community has said this is our history, so let’s make it special,� Kidd said.

Special cabinet to be installed in courthouse BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — With roughly 30 attendees watching, a tan cloth was pulled off a time capsule honoring Port Angeles’ 150th birthday year at a dedication ceremony at the historic Clallam County Courthouse on Saturday. Clallam County Commissioners Mike Doherty and Jim McEntire attended the dedication, hosted by Port Angeles Mayor Cherie Kidd. “Port Angeles has 150 years of colorful history, and we’re adding to it today,� Kidd said at the ceremony. Alice Donnelly, co-chair with Kidd of the city’s sesquicentennial committee, joined the mayor in pulling the covering off the time capsule and revealing it to the gathered crowd.

Last official event The ceremony was the last official event in celebration of Port Angeles’ 150th birthday. The capsule, a knee-

Historic courthouse

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Alice Donnelly of the Clallam County Historical Society, left, and Port Angeles Mayor Cherie Kidd unveil a Port Angeles sesquicentennial time capsule during a dedication ceremony Saturday at the Clallam County Courthouse in Port Angeles. high, two-drawer file cabinet encased in a cherry wood casing custom built by Westport Shipyard’s cabinet shop staff, will be moved to the historic courthouse’s Lincoln-Street-facing flight of marble stairs. The wooden casing featured a sesquicentennial logo designed by Johnnie Montice from Captain T’s

Gift Shoppe and Custom Stuff in Port Angeles. “Our youth will be here in 50 years to open it and reveal the treasures,� Kidd said.

ment, a 2011 model cellphone, and drawings and essays detailing what Port Angeles elementary school students think Port Angeles will look like in 2062, when the capsule will be opened for the city’s bicentennial. Items placed inside City and county docuTreasures in the capsule ments, and special festival include patches from the sections from the Peninsula Port Angeles Police Depart- Daily News also are included.

Commissioner Doherty congratulated Kidd and the City of Port Angeles on the time capsule and the city’s 150th birthday and also spoke a bit about the history of Port Angeles and the construction of the courthouse, built in 1912 with a wood frame and a brickand-mortar outer structure for about $57,000. The courthouse’s 1912 construction price is equivalent to about $1.3 million in 2012 dollars, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator. The ceremony also featured an appearance by the family of the city’s “Sesquicentennial Baby,� the first child born in Port Angeles in 2012. “We started the year with this baby, and we’re ending the year with this baby,� Kidd said, referring

to Sesquicentennial Baby Melania Cristine Burke. Melania Burke was picked as the first baby born in Port Angeles this year by Olympic Medical Center staff, said Melania’s mother, Becca Burke. In an interview after the ceremony, Burke said nurses approached her while she was in labor about the city being interested in honoring her daughter by making her the city’s “Sesquicentennial Baby.�

‘A blessing’ Burke said she and her husband, James, were hesitant at first but decided to go for it once they realized what an honor it would be. “We graciously accepted,� Burke said. “It was a blessing.� Burke and her husband, who works for the city’s public works department, have lived in Port Angeles for four years and have two other children: 5-year-old Maria and 2-year-old Nicholas.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Forks school board seeks levy renewal Funds cover costs unpaid by the state BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The district plans to resurface the Spartan Stadium track; add safety upgrades to crosswalks and sidewalks on South Elderberry Avenue; add new drain vents on the Forks Middle School roof; re-roof Forks Alternative School and the Independent Learning Center Annex; replace district motor pool vehicles; replace the middle school freezer and 1970s-era carpeting at Forks Elementary School; purchase textbooks; and fund annual technology upgrades. “Without the passing of our levy, the district would lose over $2 million in Levy Equalization funds from the state yearly,� Reaume said. Levy equalization allows districts with lower property values to be funded at a rate similar to high property value districts through added state financing.

FORKS — The Quillayute Valley School Board approved last week a resolution asking voters to renew the district’s maintenance and operations levy, for the upkeep of facilities and educational programs. A majority vote in the Nov. 12, 2013, special election would authorize funding for the district to meet the educational needs of its students, said Superintendent Diana Reaume said at the board’s regular meeting Tuesday. The proposed levy would replace the current one, which is set to expire in 2013, and would collect Existing levy $628,000 a year, with a projected rate of $1.45 per Reaume said the district $1,000 worth of assessed used the existing levy to property value. complete several replacement and upgrade projects. No change in amount In 2012, the district replaced the roof of Forks There is no change in the Elementary School, purlevy amount from the existing two-year levy, Reaume chased a new walk-in freezer for the district’s food said. The levy is structured, program; paved the transshe said, to pay for expenses portation parking area and not covered by state fund- bus shed; replaced siding on ing, such as maintaining the middle school gymnabuildings and grounds, sium; and bought new books and other educational musical instruments for the materials, technology costs music program, she said. With the rest of the and extra-curricular activities. Those activities include existing levy, the district athletics, drama, art, music plans to upgrade the security camera system, and field trips. A maintenance and upgrade elementary school operation levy is different heating pumps, and replace from a bond levy, Reaume a failing roof on the high school auxiliary gym. explained. __________ Bond levies are used for construction, such as the Reporter Arwyn Rice can be one that paid for the recent reached at 360-452-2345, ext. replacement of Forks High 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula School, she said. dailynews.com.

come see our

NEW FABRICS and sign up for our

Forks High School student Jordan Pegram assists kindergartner Martha Kenney build a gingerbread house in teacher Lorie Morris’ classroom at Forks Elementary School on Thursday. Parents and other helpers aided Morris’ students construct the houses, using paste to attach crackers, candies and cookies to milk carton frames. Paper plates served as yards for the students’ sweet homes.

Briefly . . . Light display tours planned this season PORT ANGELES — All Points Charters & Tours again is offering Christmas light tours this season. The two-hour tours will begin at the Safeway parking lot on Third Street. Tours will be held at 6:30 p.m. each day from this coming Tuesday through Dec. 28, with an exception on Christmas Eve, when tours will start at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The fare is $7.50 for adults, $3.50 for children

Raffle items include a Lib Tech snowboard and gift certificates to restaurants and businesses. Auction items such as vacation rentals, guided fishing trips, spa packages Benefit tonight and more will be offered. PORT ANGELES — Admission is $10 for “Donate December,� a benefit for the Operation Uplift adults, $5 for children 12 and younger. For more cancer support group, will information, phone Callobe held at Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., from 6 p.m. to way at 360-460-6984. 9 p.m. today. The event, complete with Drum circle raffles, a silent auction, a PORT ANGELES — A bake sale and live music, drum circle and seasonal will be hosted by Cayte Calaltar will be open at the loway and Steve Higgs. Scott Sullivan and Casey Northern will provide live music. 6 through 15 and free for ages 5 and younger. Reservations may be made by phoning 360-4607131 or 360-565-1139.

Give the Gift of Cruising 10s0on $ per per

• For New Computer Set-up or Tune-up • Home or Business Location • I Come to You No Hauling • Reasonable Rates

Gift Certifi cates Availa ble

• Fast, Competent Service

692-9611 69 9 92 or 1-800-221-7447 1 1-80 8 www.chsilverdale.com il 9119 Ridgetop Blvd #240, Silverdale, WA 98383

Longhouse at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., this Tuesday. All ages are welcome to take part in the dancing, singing and drumming from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Participation is free. No drumming experience is necessary to join the circle. Participants are encouraged to bring drums, rattles or just loving hearts, according to the invitation from Penny Burdick. For more details, phone 360-452-1212. Peninsula Daily News

30 Years Experience

1C560149

3FQBJSTr1BSUTr/FX6TFEr"MM.BLFT 88BTIJOHUPOrrTFRVJNTFX!ZBIPPDPNrXXXTFRVJNTFXJOHDFOUFSDPN

CONSTRUCTION

2C710829

Karen’s Sequim Sewing Center

UNDER

s Deposit s a as low 21576529

NEW CLASSES

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dave Grainger, CNE 360-379-4881 • 360-774-2467(cell)


A6

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Royal B.C. Museum plans redo Face-lift of Victoria attraction expected to be done by 2017 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kelly Miller, left, and Lindsey Miller of Port Orchard walk down the steps in the Capitol Rotunda as they prepare for their marriage ceremony during a bevy of same-sex weddings in the rotunda in Olympia on Saturday. The two met in Japan in 2010.

Sealed with a kiss Same-sex couples mark big day in Rotunda MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

OLYMPIA — Sealed with a kiss and a wave to a cheering crowd on the north balcony of the Capitol Rotunda, Tina Roose and Theresa Guajardo became wife and wife — a milestone in their 14-year relationship they never thought possible. About 20 couples joined them to tie the knot in ceremonies using one of eight officiants throughout the Rotunda on Saturday afternoon, with several couples standing up together, side by side, for a group wedding. Intermittent rounds of applause could be heard over 90 minutes as more couples became legally joined. The range of ceremonies included a simple exchange of vows and an elaborate tribal wedding. “It’s pure, unadulterated joy,” Guajardo, 43, said. “It’s like it is something you wanted for so long, and way back in the beginning we weren’t even sure we wanted it because we

couldn’t have it.” They stood in line to be among the first to be wed at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Oregon in March 2004 during the brief time same-sex marriage was legal in Portland. After exchanging vows in the street in front of a local pub, the couple later were told their marriage was invalid. “It’s kind of weird to be told your marriage doesn’t count,” Roose, 68, said.

Three certificates Their original marriage certificate hangs on the wall at their home next to their domestic-partnership documentation. Those now will be joined by a license issued by the state of Washington. Four months after their invalidated wedding, the couple exchanged vows again during a commitment ceremony in front of family members and friends. Guajardo wore the same dress she wore in 2004 to Saturday’s ceremony, only instead dyed the ivory-col-

ored dress purple to match Roose’s velvet dress. The other couples watched, sitting next to each other holding hands along the steps or standing along the balconies to watch the first wedding of the afternoon. “I am fulfilling a longtime dream with the person I chose . . . to become legal partners, legal spouses,” Roose told Guajardo. “Never in my lifetime did I think I could marry the person I love.” That feeling was shared by many of the couples Saturday. Dennis Godwin, 65, and Rick Johnson, 55, of Olympia have been together for 19 years. They wore matching black tuxedos and white ties.

‘Spouse and spouse’ The couple had a commitment ceremony in 1994 but are happy they are now legally married and can avoid legal issues involving home ownership and medical care. “I now pronounce you

spouse and spouse,” said an officiant over the crowd. “You may seal it with a kiss.” While they feel accepted in their home state, Godwin said he isn’t holding his breath to have his new marriage recognized at the national level. “I don’t know if I will live that long,” he said. Kelley Miller, 27, and new wife Lindsey Miller, 28, of Port Orchard, met in Japan and found out about the Capitol group wedding Saturday after reading an article in a newspaper. Lindsey was stationed with the Navy in Japan, and Kelley was a civilian when they began dating in 2010. Lindsey was wearing her Navy dress uniform, while Kelley was in a strapless, floor-length wedding gown. The well-dressed couple attracted stares as they had their pictures taken throughout the building. “I’m excited to be taking the next step and can finally claim her as my dependent,” said Lindsey, who is still active-duty military. “I can take her with me.”

VICTORIA — The Royal British Columbia Museum, just two blocks east of the MV Coho ferry dock, expects to unveil a new master plan by next September and finish a major redevelopment of its 6.6-acre property in time for Canada’s sesquicentennial in 2017. No costs or plans are in place on the project, although new zoning would permit towers of 12 stories and 14 stories — and some existing buildings that now house such features as the National Geographic IMAX theater would come down.

Goal is consolidation Museum officials said the goal is to consolidate operations and better preserve collections and archives while enhancing the visitor experience. Angela Williams, director of business and operational services, said federal and provincial governments will be approached on financing, and a fundraising campaign is planned. Williams is hoping for cross-Canada support for the endeavor. The master plan plays a key role. “It will help us create

all of the documents and all of the information we need to cost out this proposal,” Williams told reporters earlier this week. The Victoria City Council approved a comprehensive rezoning plan in 2011 for the museum’s property at Belleville and Government streets. The museum is one of Victoria’s premier tourist attractions, bringing in between 300,000 and 350,000 visitors a year. The museum is currently housed in a sixstory building and 14-story structure. Williams said the primary purpose of the redevelopment is to ensure that the museum and archives collections are maintained for future generations, she said. Although there will likely always be offsite storage, Williams said the idea is to “consolidate the collection as much as we can.” A visit to the archives, built in 1969, reveals that its extensive collection of the late Victoria artist Emily Carr’s works is stored on panels in a vault located below ground. “We have been really lucky that we haven’t had a major flood down here,” Williams said.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Royal B.C. Museum in Victoria is planning to redevelop its 6.6-acre property along the Inner Harbour in a major expansion project.

Congress to consider 2013 defense budget Chambers to remain in session while ‘fiscal cliff’ bill hashed out PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — This week, both chambers will take up the conference report on the fiscal 2013 defense budget. They also may vote on a “fiscal cliff” bill, aid to victims of Hurricane Sandy and the Violence Against Women Act, among other measures. House and Senate leaders said Congress will not adjourn this year until it has resolved fiscal issues.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Belfair). Contact information — The address for Cantwell

Eye on Congress and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Dicks, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Dicks, 800-947-6676 (fax, 202-226-1176). Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; house.gov/dicks. Dicks’ North Olympic Peninsula office is at 332 E. Fifth St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. It is open from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays and by appointment. It is staffed by Judith Morris, 360-452-3370 (fax: 360-452-3502).

Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. aspx.

Learn more

Websites following our state and national legislators: ■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — State legislators How special interest groups Jefferson and Clallam rate legislators on the counties are represented in issues. the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van ■ OZONE LAYER De Wege, D-Sequim, the DEPLETION: Voting 229 House majority whip; Rep. for and 182 against, the

House on Wednesday failed to reach a twot h i r d s majority needed to pass a bill (HR 6190) Dicks allowing the sell-off of inventories of a certain asthma inhaler that has been banned from sale since Dec. 31, 2011, because its chlorofluorocarbon emissions damage the ozone layer. The product is Primatene Mist, a “CFC epinephrine” inhaler manufactured by Armstrong Pharmaceuticals. This bill would legalize the sale of existing stocks of more than 1 million units through July 2013. The Environmental Protection Agency has banned the sale of Primatene Mist and more than a dozen other inhalers containing CFCs under a U.S. law that implements the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. A yes vote was to pass the bill. Dicks did not vote.

Paul, R-Texas. A yes vote backed the amendment. Dicks did not vote.

Cantwell

Murray

ing 399 for and four against, the House on Thursday called upon the U.S. military to step up efforts to ensure the rights and physical safety of women and girls in Afghanistan during and after the ongoing transition of power from coalition to Afghan security forces. With this non-binding vote, members endorsed language to protect Afghan women and girls that is in the Senate version but not the House version of the fiscal 2013 military authorization bill (HR 4310). Now in a House-Senate conference committee, the $631.6 billion military budget was expected to receive final congressional passage within days. The four members voting against the measure to protect Afghan women and girls are Reps. Justin Amash, R-Mich., Walter ■ PROTECTION OF Jones, R-N.C., Thomas AFGHAN WOMEN: Vot- Massie, R-Ky., and Ron

■ UNLIMITED DEPOSIT INSURANCE: Voting 50 for and 42 against, the Senate on Thursday failed to advance a bill (S 3637) to extend the Transaction Account Guarantee Program through 2014. This effectively ends the program, which was begun during the 2008 financial collapse as a temporary measure to boost liquidity in a failing banking system. TAG provides unlimited federal deposit insurance — above the standard cap of $250,000 per depositor per institution — for non-interest-bearing accounts held by large corporations, small businesses, local governments, nonprofits and wealthy individuals in banks and credit unions. Businesses typically use these checking accounts to meet recurring expenses such as payroll. Participating financial institutions, not taxpayers, cover the cost of the program. A yes vote was to advance the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, December 17, 2012 PAGE

A7

Egypt: The next India or Pakistan? I WANT TO discuss Egypt today, but first a small news item that you might have missed. Three weeks ago, the prime Thomas minister of India appointed Friedman Syed Asif Ibrahim as the new director of India’s Intelligence Bureau, its domestic intelligencegathering agency. Ibrahim is a Muslim. India is a predominantly Hindu country, but it is also the world’s third-largest Muslim nation. India’s greatest security threat today comes from violent Muslim extremists. For India to appoint a Muslim to be the chief of the country’s intelligence service is a big, big deal. But it’s also part of an evolution of empowering minorities. India’s prime minister and its army chief of staff today are both Sikhs, and India’s foreign minister and chief justice of the Supreme Court are both Muslims. It would be like Egypt appointing a Coptic Christian to be its army chief of staff. “Preposterous,” you say. Well, yes, that’s true today. But if it is still true in a decade or two, then we’ll know that democracy in Egypt failed. We will know that Egypt went

the route of Pakistan and not India. That is, rather than becoming a democratic country where its citizens could realize their full potential, instead it became a Muslim country where the military and the Muslim Brotherhood fed off each other so both could remain in power indefinitely and “the people” were again spectators. Whether Egypt turns out more like Pakistan or India will impact the future of democracy in the whole Arab world. Sure, India still has its governance problems, and its Muslims still face discrimination. Nevertheless, “democracy matters,” argues Tufail Ahmad, the Indian Muslim who directs the South Asia Studies Project at the Middle East Media Research Institute, because “it is democracy in India that has, over six decades, gradually broken down primordial barriers — such as caste, tribe and religion — and in doing so opened the way for all different sectors of Indian society to rise through their own merits, which is exactly what Ibrahim did.” And it is six decades of tyranny in Egypt that has left it a deeply divided country, where large segments do not know or trust one another, and where conspiracy theories abound. All of Egypt today needs to go on a weekend retreat with a facilitator and reflect on one question: How did India, another former

British colony, get to be the way it is (Hindu culture aside)? The first answer is time. India has had decades of operating democracy, and, before independence, struggling for democracy. Egypt has had less than two years. Egypt’s political terrain was frozen and monopolized for decades — the same decades that political leaders from Mahatma Gandhi to Jawaharlal Nehru to Manmohan Singh “were building an exceptionally diverse, cacophonous, but impressively flexible and accommodating system,” notes the Stanford University democracy expert Larry Diamond, the author of The Spirit of Democracy: The Struggle to Build Free Societies Throughout the World. Also, the dominant political party in India when it overthrew its colonial overlord “was probably the most multiethnic, inclusive and democratically minded political party to fight for independence in any 20th-century colony — the Indian National Congress,” said Diamond. While the dominant party when Egypt overthrew Hosni Mubarak’s tyranny, the Muslim Brotherhood, “was a religiously exclusivist party with deeply authoritarian roots that had only recently been evolving toward something more open and pluralistic.” Moreover, adds Diamond, compare the philosophies and political heirs of Mahatma Gandhi

Peninsula Voices Cultural entropy Cultural entropy is the amount of energy that is consumed in unproductive work. Having no consensus concerning long-term goals and not being sure of our short-term goals, we are floundering. Religion in our government represents entropy. Elected people stating that they are there to serve Jesus, not our government is disgusting. They are the “C” street people, and their salary is

still $174,000-plus a year. The tea party/ Republican/Democrats in the House of Representatives and Senate who are resisting raising the debt limit should be in Guantanamo, not behind oak desks in the Senate and House. These idiots threaten to destroy our government and society by defaulting on our debt just so they can best [President Barack] Obama. Raising the debt limit should be automatic and

not political blackmail. Who do you think spent and borrowed us into this mess — the very people who are resisting paying the bills that they incurred? By ignoring the environmental crisis, borrowing money to run government to avoid raising taxes on their wealthy sugar daddies, elected officials (Reagan, et. al.) have brought our country to the brink of collapse. Mental degenerates like

and Sayyid Qutb, the guiding light of the Muslim Brotherhood. “Nehru was not a saint, but he sought to preserve a spirit of tolerance and consensus, and to respect the rules,” notes Diamond. He also prized education. By contrast, added Diamond, “the hard-line Muslim Brotherhood leaders, who have been in the driver’s seat since Egypt started moving toward elections, have driven away the moderates from within their party, seized emergency powers, beaten their rivals in the streets, and now are seeking to ram a constitution that lacks consensus down the throats of a large segment of Egyptian society that feels excluded and aggrieved.” Then there is the military. Unlike in Pakistan, India’s post-independence leaders separated the military from politics. Unfortunately, in Egypt after the 1952 coup, Gamel Abdel Nasser brought the military into politics and all of his successors, right up to Mubarak, kept it there and were sustained by both the military and its intelligence services. Once Mubarak fell and the new Brotherhood leaders pushed the army back to its barracks, Egypt’s generals clearly felt that they had to cut a deal to protect the huge web of economic interests they had built. “Their deep complicity in the old order led them to be compromised by the new order,” said Diamond. “Now they are not able to act

OUR READERS’

as a restraining influence.” Yes, democracy matters. But the ruling Muslim Brotherhood needs to understand that democracy is so much more than just winning an election. It is nurturing a culture of inclusion, and of peaceful dialogue, where respect for leaders is earned by surprising opponents with compromises rather than dictates. The Noble Prize-winning Indian economist Amartya Sen has long argued that it was India’s civilizational history of dialogue and argumentation that disposed it well to the formal institutions of democracy. More than anything, Egypt now needs to develop that kind of culture of dialogue, of peaceful and respectful arguing — it was totally suppressed under Mubarak — rather than rockthrowing, boycotting, conspiracymongering and waiting for America to denounce one side or the other, which has characterized too much of the postrevolutionary political scene. Elections without that culture are like a computer without software. It just doesn’t work.

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email Friedman via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan and Eric Cantor who have declared it their goal to defeat anything President Obama tries to accomplish, even if they formally sponsored or supported some particular bill, indicates of how sick these “people” are. In addition, as supporters of vulture capitalism, they are gnawing on the corpse of the middle class by destroying what is left of the labor movement. Bill Lowman, Sequim

Two salvos to end the War on Drugs AH, THE GREAT American West, where man can generally breathe free and also inhale — woman, too. Thank you, thank you, vot- Froma ers in Colorado Harrop and Washington state, for legalizing marijuana. But will Washington, D.C., leave you alone? Attorney General Eric Holder said last week [before President Barack Obama said that the administration won’t go after pot users in the two states] that the Justice Department will weigh its response to the state referenda. A new national poll finds 58 percent of Americans in favor of making marijuana legal and only 39 percent against. A raft of other state laws easing the prohibition on pot and growing public contempt for the existing law should be enough to

change the policy. And so should a basic sense of decency. We persecute ordinary Americans for using an illegal drug smoked by the last three inhabitants of the White House. President Obama admitted — and George W. Bush all but admitted — to having experimented (don’t you love the word “experimented”?) not only with pot but with cocaine. Courts rarely inflict heavy prison terms on users of marijuana these days, Tony Ryan, a retired lieutenant from the Denver Police Department, told me, “but it’s still a drug arrest, so if you’re 18 years and older, it goes on your record.” That means you may not be able to get a job at a steel plant, join the Navy, obtain a student loan or keep your child in a custody battle. But wide knowledge that you smoked pot is apparently not enough to stop you from becoming commander in chief of the United States armed forces. Ryan is on the board of a group called Law Enforcement

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Against Prohibition — former police and other law officers calling for the end to the War on Drugs. A Denver cop for 36 Hickenlooper years, he’s intrigued at what the Obama administration will do next. In Colorado, the feds decided to mostly leave medical marijuana alone. But to flex their muscles, they started picking on medical marijuana dispensaries within 1,000 feet of schools. “I said, OK, what high school student is going to go to convince a doctor under threat of losing his license that he is ill and needs to have medical marijuana,” Ryan commented, “when he can just walk down the halls of the school and get whatever he wants?” In 2008, candidate Obama said he would not use Justice Department resources to frus-

trate state laws allowing medical marijuana. But President Obama did just that, even letting attorneys general threaten government employees at state-run medical marijuana facilities. Ignoring the scientific evidence, the feds deem marijuana a dangerous substance that allegedly acts as a “gateway” to harder drugs. The political reality is that legalizing marijuana is a gateway to ending the ludicrous War on Drugs — a $40 billion-a-year failure off which many Americans find employment. Last year, 80 percent of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration’s seizures were of marijuana. If marijuana were legalized, what would those agents, lawyers, judges and prison guards keeping us safe from marijuana do? Oddly, liberal Democrats seem more afraid of letting go of the ban on marijuana than libertarian Republicans and even some social conservatives. (Evangelist Pat Robertson says it ruins the lives of too many young people.)

In the Colorado vote, former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a hard-right Republican, supported the constitutional amendment regulating marijuana like alcohol, and Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper opposed it. To his credit, Hickenlooper subsequently declared the amendment official and put a legalization advocate on the committee setting up a regulatory process. The successful ballot measures in Colorado and Washington give the Obama administration another opportunity to find its bearings and stop throwing billions down the hole of marijuana prohibition. That money could be put elsewhere, so we’re told.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her via info@ creators.com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

NEWS DEPARTMENT

HAVE YOUR SAY

Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 margaret.mckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525 brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

The “Original� Since 1957

/PEN4ODAYAMTOPM $EC n $ECn n $EC n $EC n

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. Š 2012 Swain’s General Store Inc.

Our Gift To You

REAT G 3DAY the

HOLIDAY BONUS

7)4(4()3#/50/.

7)4(4()3#/50/.

7)4(4()3#/50/.

December 16 thru 18

YOUR $75.00 OR MORE SWAIN’S PURCHASE

YOUR $100.00 OR MORE SWAIN’S PURCHASE

3 Days Only December 16-18

3 Days Only December 16-18

3 Days Only December 16-18

Not good with any other offer or Gift Card purchase, previous purchases, rain checks or special orders.

Not good with any other offer or Gift Card purchase, previous purchases, rain checks or special orders.

Not good with any other offer or Gift Card purchase, previous purchases, rain checks or special orders.

%&IRST3Ts0ORT!NGELES 7!s sWWW37!).3).#COM

2C707645

YOUR $50.00 OR MORE SWAIN’S PURCHASE


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, December 17, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B Preps

Devils hold off Oakville PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OAKVILLE — Leyton Doherty, Abraham Venske and Zeke Greene combined for 43 points to spark Neah Bay to a 60-50 nonleague boys basketball win over Oakville on Saturday. The Red Devils used the press to force turnovers in the first half and race past the Acorns. Doherty led Neah Bay with 16 points while Venske sank 14 and Greene was right behind with 13. Marcus Youckton led the Acorns (1-3) with 16 points and seven assists. Gary Ortivez scored 12 points. Geo Jack added 11 points and grabbed eight rebounds for Oakville. The Red Devils (3-0) jumped out to a 35-21 halftime lead and never looked back. The Acorns got within three points in the second half but that was as close as they would get to the Red Devils. Neah Bay next plays the North Kitsap JV team in Poulsbo on Wednesday night and then will have a rematch against Oakville at home Saturday.

Neah Bay icon Johnson dies Ron Johnson coached three sports for years PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NEAH BAY — The Neah Bay community lost a sports icon when former longtime coach and athletic director Ron Johnson died Thursday night. Johnson, who coached football, boys basketball and track and field for many years at Neah Bay High

School, passed away at Harborview Hospital in Seattle after an illness. He was 72. Dwayne Johnson, the Port Angeles High School athletic director, is Ron Johnson’s son. Ron Johnson, athletic director at the high school for several years, also was a past West Central District executive board member and president. The district honored him with the Meritorious Award. David Bingham, Crescent athletic director and associate principal, wrote in an email: “Ron [Johnson] coached football, basketball and track at

Neah Bay for many years. “Ron was a winner in the truest sense of the word. “On a personal note, Ron was a great mentor to me. I loved to coach against him, I enjoyed his passion for sports, kids and community. “He had a great heart, sense of humor and dedication for school, community, the North Olympic League, sports and most importantly his family. “I cannot say enough about how Ron influenced me as a coach and how he educated me about his native culture and the kids he taught and

coached for many years.” Bingham coached against Ron Johnson in football for about 10 years and the Red Devils and Loggers had some epic battles during that time. “Dwayne Johnson and I have been discussing about nominating Ron for the WIAA Hall of Fame, and driving into work Friday morning I was thinking a lot about Ron.” It wasn’t soon after that Dwayne called Bingham on Friday morning to give him the bad news about his father. TURN

TO

ICON/B3

Neah Bay 60, Oakville 50 Neah Bay Oakville

19 11

16 14 11— 60 10 13 16— 50 Individual scoring

Neah Bay (60) Doherty 16, Venske 14, Z. Greene 13, Moss 4, Buttram 6, McCaulley 3, Claplanhoo 4. Oakville (50) M. Youckton 16, Orticvez 12, Lopez 9, Jack 11. S. Youckton 2.

Wishkah Valley 52, Clallam Bay 40 WISHKAH — Pulling away by hitting three 3-point baskets in the fourth quarter, unbeaten Wishkah went on to top Clallam Bay in nonleague action Saturday. Kevin Hess led the Bruins with 12 points while Kelly Gregory added nine and Justin Welever sank seven. Ryan Willis was close behind with six points. “We’re getting better, we just missed a lot more shots than they did,” Clallam Bay coach Kelly Gregory said. “We are much improved. We are working at it.” Kelly Gregory and Matt Mohr led on the boards with nine boards each while Hess brought down seven. The Loggers, 5-0, led 28-16 at halftime and held on for the win. Brady Anderson knocked home six treys for the Loggers in leading all scorers with 27 points. “Anderson can shoot it,” Gregory said. “He can shoot from way beyond the 3-point line.” The Bruins, 0-4, play at Port Angeles C on Tuesday and will host Crescent on Wednesday night in nonleague play. Wishkah 52, Clallam Bay 40 Clallam Bay Wishkah

8 10

8 9 15— 40 18 9 15— 52 Individual scoring

Clallam Bay (40) Hess 12, Gregory 9, Wellever 7, Ritter 2, Randall 3, Willis 6, Mohr 1. Wishkah (52) B. Anderson 27, Thein 2, Arnold 2, Baltzell 12, Berge 9.

Girls Basketball Taholah 69, Crescent 14 JOYCE — Dominating the glass and limiting Crescent to two points in the second half, Taholah breezed to a nonleague victory Saturday. Laura James led the Chitwhins with 21 points, 12 steals, eight rebounds and six assists. Dramikha Skaar added 15 points and eight rebounds while Trisha Dunn pulled down 12 rebounds for Taholah (2-1). Lauren Hartley led the Loggers with eight points while Kellie Belford added six. Taholah 69, Crescent 14 Taholah Crescent

17 2

19 19 14— 69 10 2 0— 14 Individual scoring

Taholah (69) Laura James 21, Leeza James 2, Walther 9, Skaar 15, Dunn 8, R. Cheney 4, Hildalgo 4, Waugh 2, Mowitch 4. Crescent (14) Hartley 8, Belford 6.

TURN

TO

PREPS/B3

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson (3) eludes Buffalo Bills outside linebacker Nick Barnett during the second half of their game Sunday in Toronto.

Hawks rip Bills 50-17 Seattle scores 108 points in past two NFL contests THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO — Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks are not only surging toward a playoff berth. They showed they can pile up the points on either side of the border. A week after a 58-0 win at home against Arizona, Wilson ran for three touchdowns and threw for another in a 50-17 rout of the Bills in Buffalo’s annual game in Toronto on Sunday. Wilson’s scores all came in the first half. The Seahawks’ opportunistic defense then took over by forcing three consecutive turnovers to start the second half, includ-

ing safety Earl Thomas scoring on 57-yard interception return. The 108 combined points over two weeks matched the NFL’s third-highest total. The New England Patriots also scored 108 points in consecutive games last month, according to STATS. And the Seahawks became the NFL’s third team to score 50 points in consecutive weeks, joining the Los Angeles Rams and New York Giants, who both did it in 1950, according to STATS. In winning for the fifth time in six games, the Seahawks (9-5) inched closer to clinching a playoff berth and still aren’t out of the running to win the NFC West.

They return home to host division-leading San Francisco in what’s become a key showdown. Wilson, the rookie thirdround draft pick, scored on 14-, 25- and 13-yard runs to become the NFL’s first quarterback to run for three scores in one half since Daunte Culpepper did it against Chicago on Sept. 3, according to STATS. And Wilson’s 4-yard touchdown pass to Zach Miller was his 21st of the season, moving into a tie for second with Cam Newton among NFL rookies. Only Peyton Manning, with 26 in 1998, has more. Wilson had 92 yards rushing to give him 402 on the season, setting a Seahawks record by passing Rick Mirer, who had 343 yards rushing in 1993. He also went 14 of 23 for 205 yards before giving way to backup Matt Flynn with 5 minutes left. Wilson ran circles around the

Bills (5-9), who were entirely outclassed in being mathematically eliminated from playoff contention for a 13th season. That’s the NFL’s longest active drought. And their performance further raises questions about coach Chan Gailey’s job security. C.J. Spiller scored on a 14-yard run, while Stevie Johnson scored on a 20-yard catch from Ryan Fitzpatrick. This was an utter meltdown by a Bills defense that had allowed an average of 16.75 points and 254.25 yards offense over its past four games. Buffalo’s now allowed 45 or more points three times this season. The Seahawks scored 31 points on their first five possessions, and 40 points on their first eight, a stretch in which Canadian-born Jon Ryan punted just once. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B3

Pirates pound Walla Walla PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ROSEBURG, Ore. — The Peninsula College men’s basketball team cruised into the Umpqua Crossover Tournament championship game with a 91-82 semifinal win over Walla Walla. The Pirates, 5-4 on the season, are an undefeated 2-0 against NWAACC competition after spending the first month of their season competing against professional teams, traveling all-star teams and

nationally ranked NJCAA programs. Against Walla Walla, the Pirates broke a 23-23 tie and took control of the game midway into the first half when Xavier Bazile and Djuan Smith led a 12-0 run with each Pirate scoring six points during the run. “We are still evolving as a team and tonight we were tested by an exceptional team that plays the game completely different than us,” head coach Lance Von Vogt said. “We didn’t play our best bas-

ketball, but that is to be expected Pirates played 40 minutes of when you are still figuring out man-to-man defense. who you are like we are trying In the end, the Pirates’ supedo right now.” rior athleticism and depth overwhelmed Walla Walla. Different styles After taking a 46-37 lead into halftime, Peninsula extended The Pirates and the Warriors the lead to 18, 61-43, with a 15-6 showcased two starkly contrastrun to start the second half. ing styles to the game. The game, never in question Walla Walla is known for its after this point, allowed the prolific 3-point shooting while Pirates to play nine players Peninsula looked to push the more than 13 minutes each with tempo and attack the basket. all nine scoring in the contest. The Warriors played 40 minutes of zone defense while the TURN TO PIRATES/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar Today Boys Basketball: Crescent at Sequim JV, 6:30 p.m. Girls Basketball: Crescent at Sequim JV, 5 p.m.

Tuesday Boys Basketball: Cascade Christian at Chimacum, 5:15 p.m.; Port Townsend at Bremerton, 7 p.m.; Sequim at North Kitsap, 7 p.m.; Hoquiam at Forks, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Mount Rainier Lutheran, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Hoquiam at Forks, 5:30 p.m.; Quilcene at Mount Rainier Lutheran, 5:30 p.m.; Bremerton at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; North Kitsap at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Cascade Christian at Chimacum, 7 p.m.

Wednesday Boys Basketball: Neah Bay at North Kitsap JV, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Neah Bay at North Kitsap JV, 5:15 p.m. Wrestling: Forks at Mount Baker Invitational, 9:30 a.m.

Preps Basketball Saturday’s Scores BOYS BASKETBALL Bethel 78, Todd Beamer 71 Bothell 57, Bellevue 49 Brewster 62, Quincy 43 Cashmere 82, Omak 48 Centralia 62, Ridgefield 61 Chelan 68, Tonasket 22 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 66, University 51 Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy, Idaho 78, St. Michael’s 53 Connell 42, Columbia (Burbank) 30 Curtis 71, Rogers (Puyallup) 40 Cusick 60, Odessa-Harrington 43 Dayton 34, Waitsburg-Prescott 31 East Valley (Spokane) 67, Sandpoint, Idaho 38 East Valley (Yakima) 58, Othello 41 Eastmont 72, Davis 66 Ellensburg 59, Ephrata 49 Emerald Ridge 49, Spanaway Lake 44 Enumclaw 47, Kingston 45 Federal Way 68, Graham-Kapowsin 24 Franklin Pierce 65, Black Hills 47 Grandview 79, Selah 58 Granger 64, Mabton 52 Hockinson 61, Prairie 42 Kamiakin 51, Chiawana 47 Kent-Meridian 54, Kentridge 50 Kentwood 65, Auburn Riverside 61 La Salle 68, Cle Elum/Roslyn 51 LaConner 54, Tacoma Baptist 32 LaCrosse/Washtucna 57, Touchet 39 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 67, Deer Park 56 Liberty (Spangle) 65, Davenport 55 Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 57, Springdale 28 Mansfield 45, Wilson Creek 24 Mercer Island 60, Mount Si 51 Neah Bay 60, Oakville 50 Newport 54, Kettle Falls 43 Northport 59, Curlew 51, OT Northwest Christian (Colbert) 63, Colfax 60 Northwest School 73, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 53 Ocosta 58, South Bend 32 Orcas Island 46, Darrington 33 Oroville 80, Columbia (Hunters) 39 Raymond 60, North Beach 43 Richland 90, Pasco 71 Seattle Lutheran 37, Shoreline Christian 25 Shorecrest 57, Cedarcrest 44 South Whidbey 69, Overlake School 51 St. George’s 80, Reardan 52 Sumner 64, Peninsula 54 Sunnyside Christian 59, Kiona-Benton 55, OT Tahoma 82, Auburn 71 Thomas Jefferson 65, Mt. Rainier 56 Toledo 82, King’s Way Christian School 31 Tri-Cities Prep 52, DeSales 29 University Prep 59, Bear Creek School 35 Wahluke 50, Royal 46 Walla Walla 49, Kennewick 48 Wapato 62, Prosser 52 Warden 27, River View 23 Washougal 63, North Salem, Ore. 48 Waterville 70, Columbia Basin 20 Wellpinit 75, Klickitat 27 Wenatchee 50, Eisenhower 34 Willapa Valley 75, Lake Quinault 40 Wishkah Valley 52, Clallam Bay 40 Zillah 48, Naches Valley 39 GIRLS BASKETBALL Bickleton 47, Columbia (White Salmon) 29 Bothell 48, Kentlake 46 Burlington-Edison 63, Shorecrest 55 Centralia 56, Hockinson 50 Chiawana 63, Kamiakin 49 Clallam Bay 43, Wishkah Valley 25 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 59, Shadle Park 41 Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy, Idaho 60, St. Michael’s 29 Colfax 48, Northwest Christian (Colbert) 47 Colville 45, Chewelah 34 Connell 67, Columbia (Burbank) 40 Crosspoint Academy 48, Chief Leschi 25 Curlew 55, Northport 42 Cusick 51, Odessa-Harrington 30 Darrington 54, Orcas Island 36 Davenport 63, Liberty (Spangle) 30 Dayton 37, Waitsburg-Prescott 34 DeSales 46, Tri-Cities Prep 40 East Valley (Spokane) 57, Sandpoint, Idaho 18 East Valley (Yakima) 49, Othello 25 Eastmont 60, Davis 40 Ellensburg 55, Ephrata 48 Emerald Ridge 53, Spanaway Lake 48 Enumclaw 40, Sumner 30 Evergreen Lutheran 50, Quilcene 19 Federal Way 64, Graham-Kapowsin 37 Goldendale 39, Highland 15 Grandview 80, Selah 57 Granger 50, Mabton 34 Granite Falls 41, Concrete 34 Kentwood 38, Auburn Riverside 36 La Salle 65, Cle Elum/Roslyn 19 LaConner 46, Tacoma Baptist 32 Lake Washington 49, Sammamish 31 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 55, Deer Park 20 Lakeside (Seattle) 43, Decatur 17 Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 52, Springdale 38 Marysville-Getchell 56, Sedro-Woolley 37 Montesano 45, South Bend 44 Moses Lake 70, Sunnyside 64

Mountain View 65, Washougal 54 Mt. Rainier 63, Thomas Jefferson 40 Newport 68, Kettle Falls 30 Oroville 53, Columbia (Hunters) 19 Reardan 64, St. George’s 23 Republic 51, Inchelium 28 Richland 69, Pasco 31 River View 45, Warden 37 Riverside Christian 46, Soap Lake 14 Rogers (Puyallup) 53, Curtis 39 Shoreline Christian 49, Seattle Lutheran 29 Skyview 76, Mountain View, Ore. 56 South Whidbey 42, Overlake School 29 St. John-Endicott 50, Rosalia 23 Sunnyside Christian 62, Kiona-Benton 42 Taholah 69, Crescent 14 Tahoma 47, Auburn 26 Tekoa-Oakesdale 60, Liberty Christian 39 Todd Beamer 67, Bethel 37 Toledo 44, Stevenson-Carson 32 Touchet 45, LaCrosse/Washtucna 26 Walla Walla 62, Kennewick 33 Wapato 54, Prosser 44 Wenatchee 51, Eisenhower 47 Willapa Valley 65, Lake Quinault 29 Zillah 60, Naches Valley 45 North Marion Tournament Sutherlin, Ore. 35, Evergreen (Vancouver) 30

College Basketball Men’s Basketball Saturday’s Scores FAR WEST Arizona 65, Florida 64 Arizona St. 61, Dartmouth 42 BYU 78, Weber St. 68 CS Bakersfield 69, La Verne 49 Creighton 74, California 64 Denver 82, Nebraska-Omaha 47 Gonzaga 68, Kansas St. 52 Idaho 91, Walla Walla 47 Long Beach St. 82, BYU-Hawaii 65 Nevada 59, San Francisco 51 New Mexico 73, New Mexico St. 58 Oregon 60, Nebraska 38 Portland St. 85, George Fox 74 S. Dakota St. 68, Montana 67, 2OT San Diego St. 72, San Diego 56 Santa Clara 75, Pacific 71 Southern Cal 70, UC Riverside 26 Stanford 75, UC Davis 52 UC Irvine 58, Fresno St. 51 UC Santa Barbara 87, San Diego Christian 60 UCLA 95, Prairie View 53 Utah St. 69, Utah Valley 63 Washington 75, Jackson St. 67 MIDWEST Ball St. 80, South Dakota 73 Butler 88, Indiana 86, OT Dayton 81, FAU 56 Detroit 80, Akron 73 Evansville 80, Alabama St. 67 Ill.-Chicago 74, E. Michigan 48 Indiana St. 75, IUPUI 61 Iowa 80, N. Iowa 73 Iowa St. 86, Drake 77 Kansas 89, Belmont 60 Loyola of Chicago 59, Mississippi St. 51 Marquette 71, Savannah St. 51 Michigan St. 92, Tuskegee 56 Notre Dame 81, Purdue 68 Ohio St. 90, UNC Asheville 72 S. Illinois 72, Green Bay 70 Saint Louis 73, UT-Martin 51 Tennessee Tech 69, Milwaukee 58 Valparaiso 62, Missouri St. 54 Winthrop 50, Ohio 49 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 97, Alcorn St. 59 Hartford 58, Rice 51 Houston 85, Louisiana-Lafayette 63 Oklahoma 64, Texas A&M 54 Stephen F. Austin 78, Lubbock Christian 67 Texas 75, Texas St. 63 Texas-Pan American 75, Lamar 70 UALR 72, Tulsa 65 EAST Bucknell 74, La Salle 66 Fordham 63, Princeton 60 Georgetown 81, W. Carolina 68 Loyola (Md.) 79, Mount St. Mary’s 57 Michigan 81, West Virginia 66 N. Dakota St. 65, Towson 48 Penn St. 80, Delaware St. 76, OT Pittsburgh 89, Bethune-Cookman 40 Rhode Island 72, SMU 50 Robert Morris 91, Duquesne 69 St. Bonaventure 87, Cleveland St. 53 St. John’s 77, St. Francis (NY) 60 Syracuse 85, Canisius 61 UMass 78, Elon 73, OT Wagner 77, Coppin St. 65, OT Wright St. 63, Hofstra 57 SOUTH Auburn 64, Furman 50 Cincinnati 72, Marshall 56 Clemson 80, Florida A&M 57 Davidson 77, UNC Wilmington 61 Gardner-Webb 71, The Citadel 58 Georgia Southern 78, Virginia Tech 73 Howard 60, Liberty 53 Iona 81, Georgia 78, OT Jacksonville St. 66, Presbyterian 59, OT Kentucky 88, Lipscomb 50 Louisville 87, Memphis 78 NC State 84, Norfolk St. 62 North Carolina 93, East Carolina 87 Northwestern St. 95, Missouri Valley 78 Richmond 76, Stetson 57 Sam Houston St. 73, Samford 57 Southern Miss. 93, Grambling St. 45 Troy 57, Georgia St. 56 VCU 73, Alabama 54 Vanderbilt 71, Alabama A&M 46

Washington 75, Jackson St. 67 JACKSON ST. (0-8) Gregory 0-1 0-1 0, D. Taylor 3-7 3-3 9, Nelson 3-19 2-3 8, Howard 8-11 3-3 23, C. Williams 5-13 1-2 15, Stubbs 3-7 0-0 6, Stewart 0-1 0-0 0, Lewis 0-0 0-0 0, Coleman 2-4 1-2 5, P. Williams 0-3 1-2 1, Jones 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 24-66 11-16 67. WASHINGTON (6-4) Simmons 2-3 0-0 5, N’Diaye 5-8 2-9 12, Gaddy 4-6 4-6 12, Suggs 5-10 4-6 17, Wilcox 9-19 0-1 21, Stewart 0-2 0-0 0, Breunig 0-0 0-0 0, Jarreau 2-5 0-0 4, Kemp, Jr. 1-2 2-4 4. Totals 28-55 12-26 75. Halftime_Washington 40-34. 3-Point Goals_ Jackson St. 8-23 (Howard 4-6, C. Williams 4-8, Stubbs 0-1, Stewart 0-1, Nelson 0-7), Washington 7-21 (Suggs 3-5, Wilcox 3-11, Simmons

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Women’s Basketball Saturday’s Scores FAR WEST BYU 70, Tulsa 48 Loyola Marymount 73, Oregon St. 62 San Diego 67, Long Beach St. 49 San Francisco 92, San Jose St. 64 Stanford 78, Pacific 43 Texas A&M 79, Southern Cal 61 UC Santa Barbara 54, Washington 46 Utah 71, Houston Baptist 33 Utah Valley 62, N. Arizona 44 Washington St. 62, Ohio St. 55 MIDWEST Akron 67, Cincinnati 54 DePaul 68, N. Illinois 46 E. Michigan 74, UMKC 69 Michigan 60, W. Michigan 41 Missouri St. 83, Arkansas St. 60 South Dakota 93, Peru St. 37 Toledo 82, Marquette 71 Wichita St. 81, Ark.-Pine Bluff 43 Wisconsin 76, E. Illinois 47 Wright St. 66, Xavier 65 SOUTHWEST Rice 60, Stephen F. Austin 41 Texas St. 69, Texas A&M-CC 51 EAST George Washington 61, Howard 60 Longwood 60, Bucknell 52 Stony Brook 63, St. Peter’s 41 Syracuse 68, Binghamton 45 SOUTH Alabama 80, Troy 71 Albany (NY) 79, Delaware St. 57 Campbell 66, Jacksonville St. 53 FIU 64, Dartmouth 57 Florida St. 96, Grambling St. 60 MVSU 66, Tuskegee 45 Md.-Eastern Shore 54, North Florida 52 NC A&T 60, Liberty 56 NC State 76, Presbyterian 30 Ohio 55, Marshall 48 Southern Miss. 79, Loyola NO 63 Stetson 78, FAU 66 UNC-Greensboro 71, Norfolk St. 63 Winthrop 63, NC Central 44 TOURNAMENT Chartwells Holiday Classic First Round St. John’s 58, Tennessee Tech 46 UCLA 76, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 62

Football Seahawks 50, Bills 17 Seattle Buffalo

14 7

17 16 3—50 10 0 0—17 First Quarter Sea_Wilson 14 run (Hauschka kick), 10:00. Sea_Wilson 25 run (Hauschka kick), 5:46. Buf_Spiller 14 run (Lindell kick), :34. Second Quarter Sea_FG Hauschka 19, 12:03. Sea_Miller 4 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 10:10. Sea_Wilson 13 run (Hauschka kick), 5:31. Buf_St.Johnson 20 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 1:10. Buf_FG Lindell 41, :00. Third Quarter Sea_Lynch 13 run (kick blocked), 12:18. Sea_FG Hauschka 33, 7:29. Sea_Thomas 57 interception return (Hauschka kick), 6:13. Fourth Quarter Sea_FG Hauschka 23, 9:17. A_40,770. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

1-1, Stewart 0-2, Gaddy 0-2). Fouled Out_ None. Rebounds_Jackson St. 35 (D. Taylor 11), Washington 43 (N’Diaye, Simmons 9). Assists_ Jackson St. 12 (Nelson 4), Washington 18 (Gaddy, Simmons, Wilcox 4). Total Fouls_Jackson St. 23, Washington 14. Technicals_Gregory, Suggs. A_7,836.

Sea 22 466 32-270 196 3-20 3-66 2-81 14-23-0 2-9 2-39.5 0-0 4-32 28:57

Buf 21 333 21-118 215 0-0 5-139 0-0 24-43-2 3-32 4-48.5 1-1 4-20 31:03

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING_Seattle, Lynch 10-113, Wilson 9-92, Turbin 10-31, Robinson 1-29, Washington 2-5. Buffalo, Spiller 17-103, Fitzpatrick 3-8, Choice 1-7. PASSING_Seattle, Wilson 14-23-0-205. Buffalo, Fitzpatrick 21-38-2-217, Thigpen 3-5-0-30. RECEIVING_Seattle, Rice 4-76, Tate 3-64, Miller 3-26, Robinson 1-20, Lynch 1-14, Baldwin 1-8, Turbin 1-(minus 3). Buffalo, St.Johnson 8-115, Chandler 5-58, Graham 3-32, B.Smith 3-26, Spiller 3-(minus 2), Dickerson 1-10, Martin 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS_None.

National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF San Francisco9 3 1 .731 316 Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 East W L T Pct PF Washington 8 6 0 .571 381 Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 South W L T Pct PF y-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 North W L T Pct PF y-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330

PA 184 219 315 302 PA 350 338 304 375 PA 259 379 349 319 PA 292 308 240 380

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF y-N. England10 3 0 .769 472 N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 South W L T Pct PF y-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 North W L T Pct PF x-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 West W L T Pct PF y-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

SPORTS ON TV

PA 274 306 279 402 PA 280 358 386 383 PA 307 293 291 310 PA 274 312 402 367

Thursday’s Game Cincinnati 34, Philadelphia 13 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 21, Chicago 13 New Orleans 41, Tampa Bay 0 Minnesota 36, St. Louis 22 Houston 29, Indianapolis 17 Atlanta 34, N.Y. Giants 0 Washington 38, Cleveland 21 Miami 24, Jacksonville 3 Denver 34, Baltimore 17 Carolina 31, San Diego 7 Arizona 38, Detroit 10 Seattle 50, Buffalo 17 Oakland 15, Kansas City 0 Dallas 27, Pittsburgh 24, OT San Francisco at New England, late Today’s Game N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 22 Atlanta at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 23 Tennessee at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Kansas City, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Dallas, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Houston, 10 a.m. Oakland at Carolina, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. New England at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 1:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 1:25 p.m. San Francisco at Seattle, 5:20 p.m. 41

College Football 2012 Bowl Games Gildan New Mexico Bowl Saturday Arizona 49, Nevada 48 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Saturday Utah State 41, Toledo 15 Poinsettia Bowl Thursday, 5 p.m., ESPN BYU vs. San Diego State (Played in San Diego, CA) Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl Friday, 4:30 p.m., ESPN UCF vs. Ball State (Played in St. Petersburg, FL) R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl Saturday, 9 a.m., ESPN East Carolina vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (Played in New Orleans) MAACO Bowl Las Vegas Bowl Saturday, 12:30 p.m., ESPN Washington vs. (19) Boise State (Played in Las Vegas) Sheraton Hawaii Bowl Mon., Dec. 24, 5 p.m., ESPN Fresno State vs. SMU (Played in Honolulu) Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Wed., Dec. 26, 4:30 p.m., ESPN Western Kentucky vs. Central Michigan (Played in Detroit) Military Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, Noon, ESPN San Jose State vs. Bowling Green (Played in Washington, D.C.) Belk Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, 3:30 p.m., ESPN Cincinnati vs. Duke (Played in Charlotte, NC) Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Baylor vs. (17) UCLA (Played in San Diego) AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl Fri., Dec. 28, 11 a.m., ESPN Ohio vs. Louisiana-Monroe (Played in Shreveport, LA) Russell Athletic Bowl Fri., Dec. 28., 2:30 p.m., ESPN Rutgers vs. Virginia Tech (Played in Orlando, FL) Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas Fri., Dec. 28, 6 p.m., ESPN Minnesota vs. Texas Tech (Played in Houston) Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 8:45 a.m., ESPN Rice vs. Air Force (Played in Fort Worth, TX) New Era Pinstripe Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 12:15, ESPN West Virginia vs. Syracuse (Played in Bronx, NY) Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Navy vs. Arizona State (Played in San Francisco) Valero Alamo Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 3:45 p.m., ESPN (23) Texas vs. (13) Oregon State (Played in San Antonio, TX) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 7:15 p.m., ESPN TCU vs. Michigan State (Played in Tempe, AZ) Music City Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 9 a.m., ESPN NC State vs. Vanderbilt (Played in Nashville, TN) Hyundai Sun Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 11 a.m., CBS USC vs. Georgia Tech (Played in El Paso, TX) AutoZone Liberty Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 12:30 p.m., ESPN Iowa State vs. Tulsa (Played in Memphis, TN)

11:55 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer EPL, Arsenal vs. Reading, Site: Madejski Stadium - Reading, England (Live) 2 p.m. (25) ROOT Soccer EPL, Sunderland vs. Manchester United, Site: Old Trafford Stadium - Manchester, England 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Detroit vs. Syracuse, Gotham Classic, Site: Carrier Dome - Syracuse, N.Y. (Live) 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, New York Jets vs. Tennessee Titans, Site: LP Field - Nashville, Tenn. (Live)

Chick-fil-A Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 4:30 p.m., ESPN (8) LSU vs. (14) Clemson (Played in Atlanta) TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 9 a.m., ESPN2 Mississippi State vs. (20) Northwestern (Played in Jacksonville, FL) Heart of Dallas Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 9 a.m., ESPNU Purdue vs. Oklahoma State (Played in Dallas) Outback Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 10 a.m., ESPN (10) South Carolina vs. (18) Michigan (Played in Tampa, FL) Capital One Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 10 a.m., ABC (7) Georgia vs. (16) Nebraska (Played in Orlando, FL) Rose Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 2 p.m., ESPN Wisconsin vs. (6) Stanford (Played in Pasadena, CA) Discover Orange Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (15) Northern Illinois vs. (12) Florida State (Played in Miami) Allstate Sugar Bowl Wed., Jan. 2, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (21) Louisville vs. (3) Florida (Played in New Orleans) Tostitos Fiesta Bowl Thur., Jan. 3, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (4) Oregon vs. (5) Kansas State (Played in Glendale, AZ) AT&T Cotton Bowl Fri., Jan. 4, 5 p.m., FOX (9) Texas A&M vs. (11) Oklahoma (Played in Arlington, TX) BBVA Compass Bowl Sat., Jan. 5, 10 a.m., ESPN Pittsburgh vs. Ole Miss (Played in Birmingham, AL) GoDaddy.com Bowl Sun., Jan. 6, 6 p.m. ESPN Kent State vs. Arkansas State (Played in Mobile, AL) BCS National Championship Mon., Jan. 7, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (1) Notre Dame vs. (2) Alabama (Played in Miami)

Basketball National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct New York 18 5 .783 Brooklyn 13 10 .565 Boston 12 11 .522 Philadelphia 12 12 .500 Toronto 6 19 .240 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 15 6 .714 Atlanta 14 7 .667 Orlando 10 13 .435 Charlotte 7 16 .304 Washington 3 18 .143 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 13 9 .591 Milwaukee 12 10 .545 Indiana 13 11 .542 Detroit 7 19 .269 Cleveland 5 20 .200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 19 6 .760 Memphis 15 6 .714 Houston 11 12 .478 Dallas 11 13 .458 New Orleans 5 17 .227 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 Minnesota 12 9 .571 Denver 13 12 .520 Utah 13 12 .520 Portland 10 12 .455 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 17 6 .739 Golden State 16 8 .667 L.A. Lakers 11 14 .440 Phoenix 9 15 .375 Sacramento 7 16 .304 Saturday’s Games Golden State 115, Atlanta 93 New York 103, Cleveland 102 Orlando 107, Charlotte 98 Indiana 88, Detroit 77 Miami 102, Washington 72 Chicago 83, Brooklyn 82 Minnesota 114, Dallas 106, OT San Antonio 103, Boston 88 L.A. Clippers 111, Milwaukee 85 Memphis 99, Utah 86 Sunday’s Games Toronto 103, Houston 96 Denver 122, Sacramento 97 L.A. Lakers 111, Philadelphia 98 New Orleans at Portland, late Monday’s Games Minnesota at Orlando, 4 p.m. Houston at New York, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Memphis, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Phoenix, 6 p.m.

GB — 5 6 6½ 13 GB — 1 6 9 12 GB — 1 1 8 9½ GB — 2 7 7½ 12½ GB — 6 7 7 8½ GB — 1½ 7 8½ 10


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

B3

Hawks: Wilson sparks Seattle to rout of Bills nam Style� at midfield. Many fans stuck around and stood during the performance, with some doing the dance the song has inspired.

CONTINUED FROM B1 The Bills rallied by scoring 10 unanswered points in the final 1:10 of the first half to cut the Seahawks’ lead to 31-17. But any chances of a comeback ended on Buffalo’s first possession of the second half, when Fitzpatrick forced a pass over the middle and was intercepted by linebacker K.J. Wright, who returned it to the Bills 20. Two plays later, Marshawn Lynch scored on a 13-yard run. On the next possession, Fitzpatrick had the ball stripped from his hand by defensive end Chris Clemons and the fumble recovered by teammate Bruce Irvin. That led to Steven Hauschka hitting a 33-yard field goal to make it 40-17. And then it got ugly.

Performance

Turnovers Fitzpatrick turned the ball over a third straight time, when he was intercepted by Thomas. The touchdown was reviewed, and the crowd cheered loudly when referee Scott Green announced that Thomas had caught the ball before it hit the turf. The announced crowd of 40,770 was well below the

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle safety Earl Thomas leaves the Buffalo Bills in the dust as he romps to a touchdown with an interception Sunday in Toronto. downtown domed Rogers Centre’s capacity of 54,000. The Bills dropped to 1-4 in regular-season games at Toronto since the series began in 2008, with their lone win coming last year

when they beat Washington tions are closing in on a deal to extend the series, 23-0. which expired after this game. Extend the series Torontonians might The Bills and Toronto- want to reconsider after based Rogers Communica- this. With 5:20 left, fans in

one end zone began chanting “Let’s Go Blue Jays!� At least they were entertained by both the Seahawks and at halftime by Korean pop star PSY performed his hit “Gang-

Bills in Toronto series organizers hired PSY to perform in a bid to boost ticket sales for a game that has had difficulty selling out over the previous four years. PSY was greeted by loud cheers and performed in front of a group of cheerleaders and youngsters dressed in blue shirts who all wore PSY-styled sunglasses. The crowd was slowarriving and featured a wide diversity of NFL fans. While there were numerous fans dressed in Bills and Seahawks colors, fans were spotted wearing a Steelers’ Troy Polamalu jersey, and another wearing a Tom Brady No. 12 Patriots jersey. The Seahawks wore their third uniforms — “wolf grey� jerseys and pants with green numbers and names — for the first time since introducing them this offseason.

Moments of silence in NFL for shooting victims THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — The New England Patriots silenced their “End Zone Militia� on Sunday night, paying tribute to the victims of the Connecticut school shooting by canceling the traditional scoring celebration in which men dressed as Revolutionary War soldiers fire muskets into the air. Two days after 20 children and six adults were shot to death at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., the Patriots joined teams across the NFL that honored the vic-

tims’ memory by asking for a moment of silence and darkening their scoreboards. New York Giants receiver Victor Cruz, after learning that he was the favorite player of one 6-year-old victim, wrote “R.I.P. Jack Pinto,� ‘‘Jack Pinto, my hero� and “This one is for you� on his shoes for the Giants game against the Falcons in Atlanta. Cruz said he called the boy’s family after hearing he was a Giants fan and was told they planned to bury him in one of Cruz’s No. 80 jerseys. “I don’t even know how

to put it into words,� Cruz said. “There are no words that can describe the type of feeling that you get when a kid idolizes you so much that unfortunately they want to put him in the casket with your jersey on. I can’t even explain it.� The Patriots, the closest team to Newtown that was home on Sunday, wore a helmet sticker with the city seal and a black ribbon on it. The Giants, another popular team in southwestern Connecticut, affixed a decal with the school’s initials —

“SHES� — on their helmets. Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt wrote “Newtown, CT� on one of the gloves he wore in warmups and on both of his shoes for the game. “We’re playing football, and there’s something much bigger going on in this world,� Watt said. “I just wanted them to know, and I wanted everyone to know, that our thoughts are with them. “Nothing is bigger than that. We played our game today, but honestly our thoughts are with them, the families, the teachers, the

friends, the first responders, who had to go see that. My dad is a first responder. They were just kids.� Giants coach Tom Coughlin said the fact that the town was only about 90 minutes from New York City made the loss hit even harder. “Being close to home, the players were greatly upset about it,� he said. “Many of the players have young children so they can empathize with the parents who had young children killed. There was no one that escaped the

effect of it, but that’s not an excuse for why we played the way we played today.� In St. Louis, the players who wear No. 26 — Rams running back Daryl Richardson and Vikings cornerback Antoine Winfield — joined hands in a circle with their coaches at midfield before their game, surrounded by dozens of children wearing jerseys. “I have a son that’s in kindergarten. It choked me up because I would hate to be one of those parents,� Rams running back Steven Jackson said.

Preps: Clallam Bay girls stomp Wishkah CONTINUED FROM B1

Clallam Bay 43, Wishkah Valley 25 WISHKAH — The undefeated Bruins used strong defense to pull away in the second half to top the Loggers in nonleague action Saturday. “We created a lot of turnovers,� Clallam Bay coach Kathleen Winter said.

The Bruins had 18 steals, led by Jeddie Herndon’s five. Clallam Bay (4-0) has beaten Wishkah Valley (0-2) twice this year. The Bruins beat the Loggers 35-17 on Dec. 1. Kenna Welever led the Bruins with 13 points while Kyla Wilson was right behind with 12. Inga Erickson distributed five assists for Clallam

Clallam Bay (43) Bay. Wellever 13, Wilson 12, Lachester 4, Herndon 2, Freshman Ryan Ander- Larrechea 2, Erickson 6, Signor 4. son accomplished a double- Wishkah (25) double for the Loggers with West 1, R. Anderson 10, E. Anderson 8, Marbut 6. 10 points and 16 rebounds. The Bruins next travel Ever. Lutheran 50, to Port Angeles C on TuesQuilcene 10 day night and then host QUILCENE — The Crescent in nonleague Rangers, shorthanded action Wednesday night. again because of illness, were handed another SeaClallam Bay 43, Wishkah 25 Tac League loss against Clallam Bay 7 7 12 17— 43 Evergreen Lutheran on Wishkah 4 5 6 10— 25 Individual scoring Saturday.

“We were outsized and outmatched in all positions on the court,� coach Ken Weller said. In addition, starting guard Allison Jones missed yet another game due to illness. “We struggled from the beginning,� Weller said. “We couldn’t get our shots to fall, failed to execute our offense, had too many turnovers, and per-

formed poorly in the rebounding department. “I have to keep reminding myself that this team is very young and inexperienced. “We have a long way to go but are improving week by week.� The Rangers are now 3-5 on the season and 2-3 in league play.

Icon: Johnson Pirates: Roll to title contest CONTINUED FROM B1 the game was over, just to keep in shape. Gary Kautz, a former “He was my motivation Crescent standout football to start basketball in eleplayer who watched Ron mentary school — the old Johnson play football for gym was always stocked Neah Bay, later coached with basketballs to play against Ron Johnson in football, Crescent vs. Neah with. “Soon as recess started, Bay. Kautz wrote the follow- I would sprint to the gym to grab one before anyone ing in a blog about Ron Johnson: “I can remember else could get there, never watching [Ron Johnson giving it up till forced to go play for Neah Bay in midback to the classroom.� 50s] when I was in [CresServices for Ron Johncent] grade school in the son are scheduled for Friold building. day at 1 p.m. at Holy Trin“The old cracker box gym back then. Ron would ity Lutheran Church in Port Angeles. run laps around the gym Dwayne Johnson wasn’t the minute he arrived, then at halftime and even after available for comment.

CONTINUED FROM B1 11 rebounds while Anderson scored 10 points and “Our depth can over- collected 10 rebounds. whelm our opponents because we are bringing Off the bench starter-quality players off Daniel Sims came off the the bench consistently,� Von bench to contribute 13 Vogt said. The Pirates’ bench out- points, eight rebounds, four scored the Warriors’ bench assists and four steals. “The guys are excited 44-9 on the evening. about playing in the championship [Sunday] and I 22 points told them winning the Bazile led the Pirates crossover would be a great with 22 points while Smith way to start our Christmas and Arnold Anderson con- break,� Von Vogt said. Peninsula won the tributed double-doubles to Chemeketa Crossover Tourthe game. Smith had 20 points and nament last year and has

GAS WELDING OUTFIT: Acetylene and oxygen tanks, 48"

David J. Kanters, ARNP Deborah Wheeler, ARNP

20% OFF

Wa l k - i n s We l c o m e A ny t i m e Monday thru Saturday 9 am to 5 pm

s%AST&RONTs0ORT!NGELES

$885/obo or trade. dee. (360)461-3869 ( 60)4 (3 ) 61-3869 551571

#PENIN*961CF

220 Carlsborg Rd. Sequim, WA

FA MILY HEA LTHC A R E 27641248

360.681.2442

and 38" tall, comes with power craft cutting torch, scrapper’s torch, two Montgomery Ward fuel and oxygen regulators, two Victor gas and oxygen regulators, 50' of hose, and wheeled dolly carrying case.

Primary family care along with immediate medical attention for illnesses and injuries. Anyone in your family can be seen for earaches, sore throats, cuts, sprains, broken bones, minor surgery, Women’s healthcare, immunizations, etc. 26639251

4MJEJOH4DSFFOTt4DSFFO%PPST 8JOEPX4DSFFOTt$VTUPN4DSFFOT 3PMMBXBZ4DSFFOTt4PMBS4DSFFOT 1FU4DSFFOTt4DSFFO3PPNT

won three of the last four Peninsula disposed of NWAACC tournaments it the Highline Thunderbirds has participated in dating in blowout fashion, 81-56, on opening night of the back to 2010-11. tournament Friday. All 11 players who Division rival dressed for the contest Fellow North Division scored in the game with rival Edmonds Titans, 7-1, nine players playing more led by high scoring guards than 12 minutes each. Shaquille McKissic, 25 Salim Gloyd led the points per game, and Rico Pirates in the game with 19 Maxwell’s 18 points per points and 12 rebounds game, were Peninsula’s while Bazile added 15 opponent for the champion- points. ship game late Sunday.


B4

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: Twice in recent years, my husband has bought a gift for himself for Christmas, wrapped it, put it under the tree and then opened it on Christmas morning, gleefully exclaiming that it was a great gift and just what he wanted. The first time he did it, he wrote my name on the gift card as the giver. The second time he didn’t bother. When I asked him why, he said it was something he saw in the store and wanted. When I asked why he didn’t just ask me to get it, he didn’t have an answer. He also has bought cards for himself for Valentine’s Day. On both of them he wrote, “To Larry from ‘Hon,’” his pet name for me. I was flabbergasted and upset and asked him why he would do such a thing. He said he ran across the “perfect card” for him while looking for one for me. I don’t know what to make of his behavior, but it is demeaning, and I feel angry for days afterward. He has a habit of comparing my gifts with those from his son or those he bought for himself, and it makes me feel as if mine don’t measure up. My husband is 77. What’s wrong with him? Perplexed in Florida

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Generosity and graciousness will be key when dealing with your peers. You don’t have to overspend, but making a contribution based on the skills you have to offer will align you with interesting people throughout the upcoming year. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Speak up about the changes you want to make. Don’t be afraid to take a different path or to change your direction if you feel it will better suit your current goals. Love, self-improvement and new beginnings are highlighted. 4 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Stay focused and you will whittle away at the many pressing matters that must be taken care of without suffering the anxiety and pressure you normally undergo. Take a unique approach to maintaining your traditions. 2 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Travel plans or getting together with your peers will improve your professional position, outlook and future. Don’t let the pressure being put on you at home hinder your ability to network. Attend industry events that will boost your visibility. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take a serious look at your current position and consider what you should do in order to reach your personal and professional goals. Don’t believe everything you hear. Empty promises based on someone’s bragging must be put in context. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Open up conversations with people you feel have knowledge or experience you would like to tap into. Travel plans or events that will bring you in contact with potential partners or old associates will lead to an interesting suggestion. Love is highlighted. 5 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Reach out to someone and the outcome will be good. Your ability to intuitively see how others are feeling will allow you the chance to make a difference. Love is in the stars, and a change of plans will lead to romance. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Put your creative mind to work and you will come up with ways to please the ones you love. Determination coupled with a dedicated approach to helping others will bring good results and enhance your reputation. 3 stars by Hank Ketcham

Dear “Guest”: I’m glad you asked. I agree with your sentiments. Your boss should be ashamed of herself for trying to use you and the other employees in the guise of having you as guests at her birthday party. How tacky!

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Spend time with someone you love or enjoy doing things with. Putting together a plan for the future that enables you to save for something special will give you something to look forward to. Contact old friends and readdress unfinished goals. 4 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Go over your future plans. Consider what you have to offer and how you can spice up your resume or personal image to help you advance. Honesty regarding your capabilities will be key. Personal and business partnerships are on the rise. 5 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

they had a “conflict.” Van Buren If someone doesn’t have the time or money to host a party, there are plenty of inexpensive foods, disposable tableware, etc., that can be used in a pleasant, cost-effective event without burdening — financially or otherwise — invited guests. What matters is getting together to celebrate and socialize and have a good time with friends and family. Abby, your thoughts? Unhappy “Guest” in Missouri

Abigail

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: I’m attending a wedding in a few months. The bride has requested that female guests not wear heels because they’re a short Dear Perplexed: It appears you couple. I don’t have any flats that married someone who likes to buy on will go with my dress, so I either will impulse and is insensitive to how his have to buy new shoes or “disapwords and actions affect others. Look point” the bride. on the bright side: He’s solved the I’ve been hearing stories about problem of what to get the man who wedding guests being told what colhas everything for you! ors to wear. I think brides (and couHowever, because this is a recent ples) like this are going too far. change in his behavior, consider What do you think? reporting it to his doctor. Put Out in British Columbia Dear Abby: I have received several invitations to parties recently in Dear Put Out: I think that if the which I was asked to do part of the bridal couple would like to feel a few work or participate in some of the inches taller on their big day and expenses. buying a new pair of shoes would The one that really took the cake stretch your budget, you should conwas to a party hosted by my boss. She sider having an old pair of flats dyed had decided to celebrate her birthday to match your dress or skip the fesat her house, and when I and my cotivities and send your good wishes. workers RSVP’d, we were asked what _________ type of dish we planned to bring. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, We also discovered that invited also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was employees only were asked to bring founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letfood. Her “real friends” weren’t asked ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box to bring anything. Needless to say, 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by all but one employee remembered logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Husband buys his own holiday gifts

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Refrain from letting anyone know exactly what you think or what you are going to do next. An original approach to the way you run your home or operate your business will give you an edge that will allow you to diversify. 2 stars

The Family Circus

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Keeping a secret will determine your position. Meddling will backfire on you, causing a rift with someone who will be difficult to reverse. Do what you can to help others without interfering. A kind word, a hug or just listening is all that’s required. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 B5

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It! D

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T

BALDWIN CONSOLE PIANO: Beautiful cherry finish with matching storage bench. One owner. Very good condition. Well maintained under smoke-free and pet-free environment. $1,350. (360) 582-3045

3010 Announcements

Girlfriend wanted 20s50s. I am loner type, handsome man in Western Washington with no kids. Hear recorded message, toll free (888)339-0897

3020 Found FOUND: JVC remote. Fairmount area, P.A. (360)457-6507

3023 Lost LOST: Rings. Diamond and white gold fused wedding and engagem e n t , Po r t Tow n s e n d area, Sat. Dec. 1st. possibly at Food Coop or Safeway. Generous Reward. (360)379-6414.

4026 Employment General ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE The Peninsula Daily News is expanding it’s sales force. Opening for a well organized, creative professional with the ability to develop strong customer relationships. Manage an existing account base as well as developing new clients to meet ever changing marketing needs. Solid presentation skills a m u s t . C o m p e t i t i ve compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. Submit cover letter and resume to: Steve Perry Advertising Director Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 steve.perry@ peninsuladaily news.com

s

Developmental Disabilities Case/ Resource Manager NEW CLASSIFIEDS! FT/Permanent position, BEAUTY BY OWNER i n t h e Po r t A n g e l e s 2250sf home sell/lease DSHS, Division of De$ 2 5 0 K / $ 1 2 0 0 2 M a s - velopmental Disabilities ters,3ba,CALL 360-477- office. Requires a BA 3552 pics/info 1/6/13. degree in Social Services or closely allied field & 2 yrs work exp. w/individuals w/develJUAREZ & SON’S HANopmental disabilities. DY M A N S E R V I C E S . Applicant must possess Quality work at a reaextensive knowledge in sonable price. Can hanDevelopmental dle a wide array of probDisabilities, experience lems projects. Like home fa c i l i t a t i n g m e e t i n g s, maintenance, cleaning, strong networking skills, clean up, yard maintew o r k i n d e p e n d e n t l y, nance, and etc. Give us ability to prioritize work a call office 452-4939 or l o a d & wo r k w i t h i n a cell 460-8248. multi-disciplinary team environment. Must have strong computer skills. avel is required. 4026 Employment Tr Background clearance General required. Salary range $3355-$4406/mo. Apply on-line at www.car e e r s . w a . g o v, j o b i d #12439 by December 19, 2012.

APPLY NOW! CNAs and NARs Come join our growing community, 1 day and 1 evening shift available. A positive attitude and team spirit a must! 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER (Part-time) - Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County. Complete details at PDN on-line. Get required application packet by sending email to bob@habitatclallam.org, or at the store at 728 E. Front St, Port Angeles. Application deadline: 4:00 pm, Friday Jan 4. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

FREE Training - Peninsula College Composites Program. Peninsula College is offering a tuition-free, 10-credit course starting January 3rd. COMPOSITES 101 is a prerequisite for short and long-term composites courses and focuses on the skills necessary to succeed in manufactur ing settings. Contact Darren Greeno at 360-417-6337 for more info.

HELP DESK TECHNICIAN Diagnose and resolve technical hardware & software issues, on request. Req. working knowledge of Windows 7, Windows Ser ver 2008, MS-Office Suite. 20 hrs. wk., $15 hr. to start; partial benes. Resume & cvr ltr to Peninsula Behavioral Health, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. http:// BARTENDER: Must be peninsulabehavioral.org AA/EOE experienced, self-motivated, and personable. Bring resume to El Cazador, Sequim. Chemical Dependency P r o fe s s i o n a l Tr a i n e e Paid position-$10 per hour. Must be available eve n i n g s. S u b m i t r e sume by 12-20-12 to: Trillium Treatment Center, 528 West 8th Street, Port Angeles, WA. COOK: Creative, enthusiastic and dependable individual, 32-40 hrs. wk., exp. preferred. Apply at Fifth Avenue Reitrement Center, 500 W. Hendr ickson, Sequim. Wage DOE, full benefits. DENTAL ASSISTANT Full-time, in Forks. Min. 2 yr. exp., salary DOE. Email: newhiredental 123@gmail.com Substitute Carrier for Motor Route Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Substitute Motor Rout in Port Angeles. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insura n c e. E a r l y m o r n i n g delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. No calls.

PRODUCTION POSITIONS ACTI is actively hiring for mechanical assembl y, p a i n t p r e p a n d painting positions at t h i s t i m e . To a p p l y contact WorkSource at 228 W First Street, Por t Angeles or call 360.457.2103 for job information and application. Only people who can pass a preemployment drug test and ongoing random t e s t i n g n e e d a p p l y. Medical marijuana is not an exception to drug policy. S E N I O R E m p l oy m e n t Training vacancy Clallam Co. 16 hrs/wk/min. wage. Qualify: 55+, unemployed, low-income guidelines. Update your skills. Call O3A for info (866)720-4863. EOE.

4080 Employment Wanted

HOUSECLEANING DOUBLE YOUR Experienced, reasonable PLEASURE! rates, excellent referenc- Beautifully updated, this es. Call Shelly fully handicap accessible (360)670-3550 home has 2 living areas under one roof. Also a JUAREZ & SON’S HAN- fa m i l y r o o m , a w o o d DY M A N S E R V I C E S . stove, and much more. Quality work at a rea- $199,000. ML#262610. sonable price. Can hanCHUCK TURNER dle a wide array of prob452-3333 lems projects. Like home PORT ANGELES maintenance, cleaning, REALTY clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us EVERY ROOM HAS A a call office 452-4939 or VIEW cell 460-8248. This home offers both saltwater & mountain M E LY N DA ’ S O r i g i - views. Spacious rooms nals: For all your sew- make it perfect for entering needs. Alterations, taining; wet bar in the Repairs, Custom De- family room, sunroom & s i g n s , a n d R e c o n - over 2,000 sf outbuilding struction of clothing. perfect for your busiCall (360)797-1399. ness, hobbies or car colR e a s o n a b l e p r i c e s lection. Big enough to with pick up and deliv- build an airplane! Located near the Strait for ery available. crabbing, fishing, kayaking & hiking. SCUBA DIVER $499,000 FOR HIRE ML#264245/ Call 681-4429 406275 Heidi Hansen Yardwork & Oddjobs (360)477-5322 Experienced DeTOWN & COUNTRY pendable services of all kinds. mowing, OPEN PASTORAL weeding, pruning, FIELDS hedge trimming, leaf This 1,620 sf home has c l e a n u p, a n d m u c h attached garage & shop m o r e . 2 0 p e r h o u r o n b e a u t i f u l p a s t o ra l call/text Mike at m o u n t a i n v i ew, l eve l 461-7772 acres in a very desirable location with easy com4082 Schools & muting to all amenities. The main area has great Training room, kitchen, bath, utility room & Br. There WANTED: Slingerland is a loft with extra bath. trained teacher to work Fully finished detached with one 7 yr. old boy. garage w/heating. Plenty Please call of ground to build an(360)301-3966 other home. $209,950. OLS#264572. JEAN 105 Homes for Sale 683-4844 Clallam County Windermere Real Estate BEAUTY BY OWNER Sequim East 2250sf home sell/lease $250K/$1200 2 MasOWN ACREAGE IN ters,3ba,CALL 360-477CITY! 3552 pics/info 1/6/13. This 4.38 acre parcel is located within the city BLUE MOUNTAIN limits of Por t Angeles. ROAD All city utilities available. This 4 br, 3.5 bath, 2516 Sub-dividable potential. s f h o m e wa s bu i l t i n $150,000. ML#262647. 1993 and is located on a Jeanine 2.23 acre parcel in the (360)565-2033 foothills. Large attached JACE The Real Estate garage plus 1200 sf deCompany tached garage/shop building. This one-ownPRICE REDUCTION er home is ready to oc- Easy living is the watchcupy! word for this gently-used $349,000 MLS #264623. double wide in the highly Mark N. McHugh desirable 55+ commuREAL ESTATE nity of Monterra where 683-0660 you actually own your Come with an open mind land. The open floor plan to all the potential this g e n t l y m e r g e s d i n i n g h o m e h a s ! I n c r e d i bl e and leisure areas and water view! This 3 Br., 2 provides an air of spabath home has a great ciousness normally asdeck off the kitchen to sociated with much large n j oy t h e v i ew s t o o ! e r h o u s e s . L o w Fenced back yard and maintenance yard (no attached 1 car garage. grass to mow), hot tub, Home is 1,480 sf, but access to the club house has an additional 888 and facilities, etc. makes Square feet in the base- life in Monterra hard to ment. Home will require beat. $122,000. MLS#264231. some TLC. Dick Pilling $134,000. MLS#263944. 417-2811 Jennifer Felton COLDWELL BANKER (360)457-0456 UPTOWN REALTY WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES ROOM TO ROAM 2 . 9 A p a r c e l m i nu t e s DON’T MISS OUT This market has created from town, quiet rural many opportunities and road, fine homes in area, this is certainly one of septic site registration in them. This Grant Street p l a c e , h o u s e p l a n s lot is in a great neighbor- available for review. $160,000 hood near the College ML#26129670/223083 and the Park HeadquarDeb Kahle ters. Don’t miss out call 683-6880 today! WINDERMERE $34,900. ML#262670. SUNLAND Dave Ramey 417-2800 WHY PAY COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SHIPPING ON

Aaron’s Garden Serv. AIDES/RNA OR CNA Pruning, weeding, fall Best wages, bonuses. clean up. (360)808-7276 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 1920s Wright’s. 457-9236. c r a f t s m a n c h a r m e r, ALL around handyman, original character with CAREGIVER jobs Station for lease in up- most anything A to Z. 2012 update, must see. available now. Benefits (360)775-8234 scale beauty salon in $119,900 included. Flexible hours. Sequim. (360)582-1301. Call (360)461-2438 Call P.A. (360)452-2129 RUSSELL Sequim (360)582-1647 ANYTHING Peninsula Classified www.peninsula P.T. (360)344-3497 Call today 775-4570. 1-800-826-7714 dailynews.com

RUDOLPH LEADS THE WAY To this lovely home on a quiet cul de sac. The yard is beautifully landscaped and the interior i s j u s t a s we l l m a i n tained. Skylights keep it light and bright. Whether you want to resize up or down, this home is ready for new folks to move int o. B o nu s : b a ck ya r d garden plot. $169,900. MLS#263705. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY RURAL ELOQUENCE! This 2005 three bedroom custom house is a perfect choice. Beautiful sweeping mountain views to enjoy from the patios and landscaped yards. Open kitchen has plenty of cabinets and a walk-in pantry. Separated bedrooms, attached two car garage. The onsite septic is for 4 bedrooms in case you want to make an addition. Call for a showing and see if you feel at home. $247,500. OLS#264603. Chuck 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SEQUIM: Immaculate 1 owner, 1,875 Sf home. 2006 Ranch home with huge open floor plan. 3 Br with walk-in closet, Septic built for 2 ded bedrooms+office/den. HOA inc all septic and water. 2 bath, 2 car garage. Tile entr y/wood floors in great room & kitchen, top of the line appliances incl washer, dryer, granite countertops, custom blinds in all rooms, vaulted ceiling, laundr y room, central heat & air. Price $210,000. Call 360-683-3431 SUNRISE HEIGHTS Desirable neighborhood near college, hospital, shopping etc. Light and bright home with 2,450 total sf. Spacious living room with attractive fireplace. Hardwood flooring, formal dining, coffered ceilings. Very well built home. Full basement includes large 2nd kitchen/laundry room with lots of cabinets. Rec room has pool table and bar. 75x140 lot. Nice 2 car garage. This is a well loved home. $225,000. MLS#264614. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Tidy 2 bedroom 2 bath home on 1.72 acres. Master bedroom has large closet and spacious master bath which includes tub and separa t e s h ow e r. S e c o n d bedroom in located at opposite end of home with second bathroom. Covered front porch with ramp. Large 2 car detached garage and additional storage shed. Covered RV parking. $99,900 MLS#264494. Quint Boe (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures!

INTERNET PURCHASES?

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

SHOP LOCAL

www.peninsula dailynews.com

peninsula dailynews.com

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it. 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County WATERFRONT PROPERTY – 5 ACRES 233 feet of high bank waterfront property with amazing views of Freshwater Bay, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Vancouver Island. Enjoy the ship and cruise boat traffic glide by as well as sea life and wild life! Easy access to beach and boat launch. Water and power are on the property. $299,000. MLS#264633. Team Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

120 Homes for Sale Jefferson County

408 For Sale Commercial

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

Nice Professional Office in Class A Building A p p r ox . 8 0 0 s f, o f f street parking, corner suite, lots of visibility. Other tenants include a baker y, an escrow service and a financial s e r v i c e s c o m p a n y. $800 mo. and FREE utilities! Call for appointment or photos. (206)225-4656 explorerproperties@ gmail.com

WEST SIDE P.A.: 3 Br., 1 bath, recently painted inside and out, newer car peting. No pets, No smoking firm. Single car attached garage. Available after the first of the year. Drive by at 1835 W. 16th Street, do not disturb current renters! $650 per mo., 1st, last, $700 deposit. Email 1835W16th@ gmail.com

505 Rental Houses Clallam County C E N T R A L P. A . : N i c e 2,400 sf, 2 Br., 2 ba, 1 level, no pets/smoking. Avail Dec. 1. $1,150 mo. (360)452-7743

OLD AGE FORCES SALE 68 acres, energy effiJAMES & cient 1,700 sf house, ASSOCIATES INC. 1,500 sf shop plus large Property Mgmt. hay barn, mtn. and water view. Quilcene. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. $895,000 A Studio..................$550 (360)765-4599 A 2 br 1 ba ..............$600 H 2 br 1 ba ..............$700 311 For Sale H 3 br 1 ba...... .........$850 Manufactured Homes A 3 br 2 ba ...............$875 H 4 br 1 ba..... ........$1000 M O B I L E H O M E : ‘ 8 4 H 5 br 2 ba .............$1000 Single-wide. 14’ x 60’, 2 H 4 br 2.5 .............$1350 HOUSES IN SEQUIM B r. , 2 b a t h . $ 2 8 , 0 0 0 , price will be reduced if H 3 br 2 ba ..............$895 mobile home is removed H 3 br 2 ba............$1250 360-417-2810 from park. 461-0907. More Properties at SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide www.jarentals.com mobile home, 55+ park, 2 Br., 2 bath, garage Joyce, Whiskey Cr.Bch with spare room, large Rd Remodeled 3 bdrm. covered deck. $31,500. one bath home, covered (360)385-4882 deck, nice yard, woods, orchard, pond, kennel, b c h . a c c e s s Wo o d + 408 For Sale elect. heat. $1,050. Avail Commercial Jan. Call 907-530-7081 see more online. DUNGENESS AREA Two adjacent 5 acre par- P.A.: 2222 E. 3rd Ave., cels , 3 br, 2 bath double cute, clean 1.5 Br. loft, wide home, plus several full bath, laundry hookcommercial sized green ups, no smoking, pets houses all being sold as negotiable. $645 mo., 1 package. The proper- deposit. Contact Bob at ty is currently being used 452-5319 or 461-3420 as a nursery, the mobile home and green houses P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, water are all located on the v i e w, d e c k , c o v e r e d front 5 acre parcel. The p a r k i n g , l g . s t o r a g e property includes Matri- r o o m . 3 1 5 W o l c o t t . otti Creek frontage. $750. (360)670-6160. $300,000. P.A.: Nice studio, 1 Br., PETER BLACK 1 bath, water view, deck. REAL ESTATE $550. (360)670-6160. 683-4116

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

5000900

ADOPT ~ A loving family longs to provide everything for 1st baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-8315931. Matt & Serafina

4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County

605 Apartments Clallam County

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540.

COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 B r, W / D. $ 5 7 5 , $ 5 7 5 dep., pets upon approval. (360)452-3423. P.A. 1 Br. dplex. $575 P.A. 2 Br. 1 ba apt. $650 P.A. 3 Br. 1 ba apt. $650 (360)460-4089 mchughrents.com P.A.: 2 Br., $600, includes W/G. Great loc. 452-9195 or 809-3290

P.A.: Lg. Studio, $485. 1st, last, $350 deposit. (360)452-4409 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SEQUIM: 2 Br. in quiet 8-plex, excellent location. $700. (360)460-2113

6040 Electronics TV: 40” Samsung flat screen. $300. (360)683-9829.

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment FREE: Clean sawdust, you load. (360)417-0232

K A B OTA ‘ 0 5 B 7 5 1 0 : Tractor, Front loader, hydrostatic trans., 4 wheel drive, 3 point hitch, very low hours, great condiWANTED: Rent to own tion. $8,500 FIRM. (360)928-1231 home or land. (360)457-9138 TRACTOR: ‘49 FerguPeninsula Classified son TO20. $1,900/obo. P.J. (360)928-0250. 360-452-8435


Classified

B6 Monday, December 17, 2012

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizon­ tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. BARBARA ANN SCOTT (1928-2012) Solution: 10 letters

B A L L E R I N A Y T U A E B 12/17/12

By C.C. Burnikel

DOWN 1 Demi Moore military movie 2 Hardy’s comedy partner 3 Next to bat 4 “I did it!” 5 Suffix with stamp 6 Wine, on le menu 7 “That’s gross!’’ 8 Revolutionary Allen 9 Showery mo. 10 Opera text 11 Flourish 12 Colorful shawls 15 Japanese electronics giant 17 Squid’s squirt 21 Formicarium insect 24 “The Grapes of Wrath” surname 25 Old Dodge hatchbacks 26 Works by Salvador 28 Cavs, on scoreboards 30 Drop by 31 CPR specialist 32 Trendy aerobics regimen 34 Satirist Swift 35 Narrow the gap

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

P E R F O R M A N C E E E N N

D O U B L E L U T Z L B F E I

© 2012 Universal Uclick

G N I P A E L D O E A L I U K

S N I W G R L C R O N A G Q M

D S A E E O A H C T D D U E O

E R N L G U D A H T N E R S T

www.wonderword.com

D D R B D T E M N O E S E U C

I A U M U I M P C N T E R P I

C U L U J N R I N K S N V R S

A T E D T H O R E S L N H W Y I J U M P ◯ ◯ ◯ ◯ E W P S C I I K O N C A A T L T C E U I H R B N C T P G I O E A O M T T U M S T

Join us on Facebook

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

MUBAL ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

YANOG (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

36 Prime meridian hrs. 37 Mexican border city 38 Gift for a handyman 41 Hersey’s bell town 42 Say no to 44 U.S. capital nearest the Arctic Circle 45 Take down the tents and move on

EXERCISE BIKE: Life c y c l e, w i t h c o m p u t e r screen. $150. (360)775-8881 FIGURINE: Lladro, Boy with dog, perfect. $95. (360)681-7579 FILE CABINET: 4 drawer, with hanging files. $65. (360)457-9148.

FIRE STARTERS: Box C.B.: Emergency C.B., DOG RAMP: Aluminium, of 60, wood stove or fire40 channels, hand-held, telescoping, 18” x 72” place. $10. Call John. in case. $50. (360)452-7967 extended. $20/obo. (360)797-1508 (360)928-3692 FISHING REEL: Diawa, C H A I R S : ( 2 ) L i v i n g DREMEL TOOL: With 50-H, filled with 50lb room chairs. $15. braid. $80. extras. $25. (360)670-2946 (360)379-4134 (360)683-9295 CHINA HUTCH: Large, D R E S S E R : M i r r o r, 9 FISH POND: Pre-formed good condition, in stor- drawers, maple, Hay- p o n d , p e a r s h a p e d , age. $60. large. $100.00 wood Wakefield $199. (360)460-7118 (360)928-3447 (360)582-1292

12/17/12

46 Pool workers 48 Judo schools 49 Not suited 50 Youngster’s “play catch” partner 53 D-Day fleet 55 Gen. Eisenhower’s arena: Abbr. 57 Month after avril 58 Go down the wrong path

TUMEAT

GEAVOY

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: FAINT GLADE SESAME VORTEX Yesterday's Answer: When he answered questions about all the touchdowns scored against his team, he — GOT DEFENSIVE

HOLIDAY JEWELRY: MOBILITY EQUIP. REEL: Ambassador C-3 F LY V E S T : S i m m ’ s Master Guipe fly vest, Handmade, many differ- Wheelchair, $150. Walk- LR, steelhead reel, new. ent styles. $13.02. er, $35. Women’s cane, $70. (360)452-8953. new. $125. (360)582-5254 $15 firm. (360)681-2968. (360)452-8953 RIFLE: Mauser 95 carFREE: Dark blue glass JACKET: Goretex, red, M O D E L K I T: H o u s e , bine, MF6-6ER, Argenb o t t l e, c o u l d u s e fo r Women’s M, tags on. Teifoc-build, with real tine. $200. crafts, Harvey’s Bristol $125. (360)683-5284. (360)379-4134 bricks. #8002. $45. Cream. (360)504-2433. (360)452-6842 RIFLES: Stevens 22LR, JACKET: Mens, 3 butFREE: Enter tainment ton, black, leather, car M O N I T O R S : ( 2 ) H P and Marlin 22LR. Both center, 6’ long. jacket. XLT $70 monitors, for computer. for $200, or $125 each. (360)477-8708 (360)379-4134 (360)683-1065 $150. (360)504-2665. GOLF ACCESSORIES: JACK: Hi Lift. $50 cash. R I M S : V W r i m s, w i t h NATIVITY SCENE: Bags and car ts, large ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 1 - 2 2 4 7 l e ave tires, for Jetta or Golf, 5 Large, 12 piece, selection. $10-$25. lug. $200. message. $150/obo. (360)385-2776 (360)452-9685 (360)461-9522 GOLFCLUBS: One set KEYBOARD: Yamaha, RING: Men’s, 14 karat, PAPER CRAFT KITS RH ladies w/bag, $100. new in box, PSR240. Gold, 5 diamonds, val$100/obo. (2), Working clock and ued at $825. $200. One set LH mens, $100. (360)461-6462 carrousel, Wrebbit. $25 775-1372. Nick. (360)606-2008 ea. (360)452-6842. HEADBOARD: Arched, LITHOGRAPH: Rie MuROMANCE NOVELS noz, limited edition, unwith lighted mirror, nice. PLANER: 12” Makita Historical. 3 for $1.00. fraimed. $200/obo. $50. (360)775-0335. p l a n e r. $ 1 3 5 / c a s h / (360)457-5500 (360)681-2968 trade/obo. HELMET: Large. $30. (206)941-6617 RUG: Karastan, wool, LOGGER’S PEAVEY (360)477-9742 Old, large, good condi- POOL TABLE: Full size, runner, 2.5’ x 9’, black, cream, and red. $200. H E L M E T: O ’ N e a l W F tion. $75. in storage. $125. (360)681-3492 546 Motorcross helmet (360)457-4971 (360)460-7118 size medium red/black RUGS: Matching, one 5’ LUGGAGE: Samsonite, used. $25. 460-4589. PUZZELS: (3) Vintage x 7’, one runner. $49 for new, wheels, and pull-up both. (360)775-0855. jigsaw puzzels. $50. HELMETS: Motorcycle handle. $185. (360)452-6842 helmets, great shape, (360)202-0928 SAFE: Fireproof. $50 black, large. $25 each. c a s h / t r a d e / o b o. C a l l (360)460-9853 MAGAZINES: Motorcy- RAMP: Aluminum fold- Dan, (206)941-6617. i n g ra m p, fo r q u a d . cle, about 200. $20. $100. (360)477-9742. HIDEABED: Excellent (360)457-4383. SAW: B/D 2-speed jigcondition, gold fabric, all saw, with carr y case. steel, bedding. $50. MATTRESS SET: Dou- RANGE: Hotpoint, elec- $10. 419-575-1728. (360)457-3115 ble, with brass style tric, ever ything works. headboard, no frame. $100. (360)681-7983. SCROLL SAW: CraftsHIGH CHAIR: Nice. $35. $80. (360) 681-7558. man, 16”, variable (360)461-2241 RECLINER: Beige, wall- speed. $75. hugger recliner. $75. (360)683-0146 HIPBOOTS: Men’s, 30”, MIRROR: Bevelled, 23” (509)630-4579 x 29”. $25. size 12. $30. (360)683-7668 SEWING MACHINE: (360)928-1108 RECLINERS: (2) Swivel, Pfaff Overlook, Hobbyrocking recliners. $50 lock 4870, with manual. HITCH: Reese equalizer MIRRORS: (50), with each. (360)461-6150. $100. (360)460-9853. hitch, all complete. $ oak frames. $20 each. (360)452-9685 130. (360)808-0142 anyRECORD PLAYER: SEWING MACHINE: time. MISC: Vintage hats (4), Maemarox, with radio, Singer Featherweight nice furniture. $75. $50. Oval mirror, $20. 221, case, good condiHUTCH: $130. (360)797-1508 (360)775-0335 tion. $200. 457-0245. (360)670-2946

E E F R E Eand Tuesdays A D SS R F Monday AD

M a il to : Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

SHELVING: (2) metal TIRES: Studded, 4 bolt, f r a m e , ( 6 ) 1 2 ” g l a s s (2) 185/70 R14, wheels, fit Honda Civic. $100. shelves, 32” x 72”. $70. (360)457-4066 (360)928-3692 SHOES: Ladies Ferra- TO O L C H E S T S : Tw o g a m o, l e a t h e r, 1 0 M , p i e c e, C ra f t s m a n , 1 2 taupe. $55. drawers. $175. (360)681-3492 (360)683-9295 SHOTGUN SHELLS: TOY: Piano, like new, 100 rounds, 12 Ga., 00 can go in crib. $5. buck. $60. (360)417-5159 (360)457-8227 TOYS: (25) M&M stuffed SHOTGUN: Side/side, characters. $50. 12 Ga., savage. $200. (360)460-7968 (360)457-4290 SLIPPERS: Homedics, T R E A D M I L L : I n c l i n e plush, massaging, boot- treadmill. $100. (360)457-9148 ies, fit W Size 6-10, new in box. $10. 683-5284. TUB/SHOWER DOOR: SNOW TIRES: On rims, Excellent condition. $35. 5 lug pattern. $100. (360)457-9037 (360)683-7668 T.V. STAND: Like new, STATIONARY BIKE flat screen T.V. stand, With digital readout. $25. glass shelves. $100. (360)457-3843 (360)461-2241 STEREO: AM/FM with dual cassette record- VERILUX: Happy Lite, er/player, speakers. $20. like new, in box, 18” x 12”. $85. 683-0146. (360)452-4583 WALL POCKET TABLE: Coffee/end table, light yellow, 28” x R o o s e v i l l e , p e r f e c t . $135. (360)681-7579. 22”, excellent condition. $25. (360)797-1179. WHEEL LOCK: Steering TABLES: Chrome/glass wheel lock for car or coffee table, (2) end ta- truck. $5. bles with 3/8” glass. $95 (360)452-6974 for all. (360)477-6985. WII: Wii system, extra TIRES: (2) Car tires, controllers. $150. P235 75R15. $25 ea. (360)681-4202 (360)928-0236 TIRES: (4) 31x10.50 R WINDBREAKER: Wom15, with about half the en’s, white, silver lining, hood, new, size 12. $15. tread. $25 each. (360)797-1179 (360)452-8322 TIRES: 4 Months old, YOGA BODY BRIDGE: Less than 8,000 miles. For stretching. Sturdy, folds, like new. $50/obo. Size 205/70R-15. $200. (360)808-6040 (360)460-7477

B rin g yo u r a d s to : Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., PA

For items $200 and under

• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood

o r FA X to : (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

NO PHONE CALLS

5A246724

S D A E E E R E F FR

E E R F

12/17

Author, Award, Ballerina, Barbara Ann Scott, Beauty, Blades, Canadian, Champion, Club, Coach, Dedicated, Double Lutz, Figure, Gold, Humble, Icon, Judge, Jump, Land, Leaping, Legend, Medal, Minto, Move, Music, Olympic, Otto, Performance, Queen, Rink, Routine, Rules, Salon, Sequence, Skating, Speed, Spin, Step, Tom King, Torch, Turn, Wins, Winter Yesterday’s Answer: Bao Yu THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

AREA RUG: Very plush, DRESSERS: (2), All CHRISTMAS TREE bu r g a n d y / t e a l b o r d e r 10’, slim, perfect for ca- wood. $29 ea. main color is cream. 7.5’ thedral ceiling. $50. (360)928-0236 x 11’. $175. 477-6985. (360)457-5500 DRILL: B/D 3/8” drill, BED: Captain’s bunk, CLAW FOOT TUB: 5’ comes with case, accessolid oak, mattress, and long, needs TLC. $50. sories. $10. (360)928-9460 bedding. $75. (419)575-1728 (360)457-3115 CLOTHES: Boys, 12m, D RY S TO R E : H e a r i n g BED FRAME: Captain like new. $10 for all. aid dehumidifier, with dry (360)417-5159 bed frame, oak, twin, 3 blocks. $50. drawers, headboard. (360)681-2247 C L OT H E S : L e a t h e r $200. (360)461-6150. vest, tan, size 46, $10. D R Y S U I T : S t e r n s , BED: Queen size, Sim- (2) spor t jackets, size men’s, size L. $30. 36, $10 ea. 452-6974. mons, new. $199. (360)928-1108 (360)582-1292 CLUB: Steering wheel ENDTABLE: With door, BIKE: Mountain bike, club. $10. light color, 26” diameter, (360)457-4971 n e w, s t i l l i n b ox , 2 4 clean. $5. speed, with disc. $200. (360)452-4583 COLLECTION: JFK Col(360)452-7221 lection, books, maga- E N T. C E N T E R : O a k , zine, newpaper, coins, smoked glass doors, 3 BLUE-RAY PLAYER: etc. $95/obo. 452-6842. As new. $50. shelves, On casters. (360)477-9742 $65. (360)477-6985. C O U C H : B l a ck , fo l d down, new condition, BOAT MOTOR: Electric, E N T E R TA I N M E N T p a i d $ 4 0 0 . A s k i n g CENTER: Solid oak. Diehard. 1.5 hp. $60. $175/obo. 461-6462. (360)681-2747 $100. (509)630-4579. DICTIONARY: Krausz’s BOOKS: Harr y Potter Prac. Auto Dictionar y, hardcover, books 1-7. printed 1906. $50. $69 for set. (360)379-4134 (360)775-0855 DINING SET: Solid oak, CANOPY: White, win- 48” round, with 4 cloth dows, for 8’ box, heavy chairs. $200. duty R.G. $35. (360)437-7708 (360)683-2743 DIRTBIKE: Suzuki 400, C - B B A S E : C o b r a , older, doesn’t run, needs model 90, include anten- TLC. $50. na. $30. (360)477-9742. (360)928-9460

C A N A D I A N O L A S H C G

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Mop & __: cleaning brand 4 “Fiddler on the Roof” dairyman 9 Hannibal crossed them 13 Author Fleming 14 On __: counting calories 15 Cathedral topper 16 “Shakespeare in Love” Oscar winner 18 Ann __, Michigan 19 Sporting site 20 “Brian’s Song” actor James 22 Johannesburg’s land: Abbr. 23 Part of a bottle 24 “Pirates of the Caribbean” series star 27 Moose relative 28 Cousin of edu 29 Perfectly 30 Venus, e.g. 33 USPS pieces 34 The Yankee Clipper 37 ’Vette roof option 39 Cooks over boiling water 40 Sea west of Greece 43 Drill insert 44 Law school grads, briefly, and an apt title for this puzzle 47 “Slouching Towards Bethlehem” author 50 Song for two 51 Final: Abbr. 52 Nerve cell part 53 “It’s Not About the Bike” author Armstrong 54 Pale 56 “East of Eden” co-star 59 “Cool beans!” 60 Eye-fooling pictures 61 First of a Latin threesome 62 Periodic table fig. 63 Uses a swizzle stick 64 Good times

Peninsula Daily News


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MUZZLE LOADER: In- PORK: Free-range, hapline black powder MK py, vegetarian, $3.00 per 85, 54 caliber, all acces- lb, half or whole. (360)732-4071 sories. $450. (360)460-5765 RIFLES: Custom made Remmington 7mm magnum, with Remmington action Pac Nor stainless steal barrel, 2.5 x 8 Leopold scope, custom stock, incredible shooter, $900. Weatherby .22, excellent condition, made in Italy, $500. (360)461-7506

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

6075 Heavy Equipment

BULL DOZER: “Classic” John Deere, model 40-C with blade, winch and c a n o py. R e d u c e d t o $3,200. (360)302-5027. DUMPTRUCK: ‘68 International, does run, scrap out or parts. $1,500. (360)797-4418 MINI-EXCAVATOR: ‘05 Kubota 121. 1,900 hrs., 4 buckets. $22,000. (360)460-8514 SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 32’. Electric tarp system, high lift tailgate, excellent condition. $15,000. (360)417-0153.

FIREWOOD: Seasoned 6080 Home fir, ready to burn, $200 Furnishings full cord, $110 1/2 cord. Also have maple, $175+. CARPETS: Matching, Free local delivery. Pe r s i a n , h a n d wove n 360-461-6843 wool, 5’x5’, runner 9’9”x2.5’, beautiful pasWOOD STOVE AND tels with cream backFIREWOOD: ground. $375. Stove, 28”x25”x31”, (360)457-4399 takes 22” wood, includes pipe with damper and MISC: Blue La-Z-Boy screen. $400. Fire logs, sectional with hideabed dump truck load $330 + and recliner at one end, gas. Split firewood $230/ $ 2 0 0 . C o u n t r y - s t y l e cord + gas. Call Chuck loveseat, $75. Beds, as(360)732-4328 sorted prices and sizes, excellent condition. Livi n g r o o m c h a i r s, $ 5 0 6065 Food & each. Leather recliner, Farmer’s Market $50. Large square dark oak table with leaf, $100. ORGANIC BEEF: Here- Super bass sub profesford. $2.20 lb. hanging sional quality, box 2’ x 2’ weight. 683-8352. x 3’ approx, and mixer, $600. (360)461-4084.

NEED EXTRA CASH!

MISC: Twin bed matt r e s s s e t , $ 1 0 0 / o b o. Roper upright freezer, $200/obo. Both in good condition. (360)385-0834

Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

S TA C K E D WA S H ER/DRYER: Heavy duty, yellow. $535. Call (360)452-3643

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

TRACTOR

MISC: 120 bottle wine rack, natural pine, $75. New 50 gal. aquarium, pump and gravel, $75. 1970s McDonald’s collectors highchair, $25. DANCE FLOOR: Lots of misc. shelving, Portable, oak, (54) 3’ x 3’ $30 all. 3 dog carriers, 1 panels, with (2) steel small, 2 medium, $10 c a r t s w i t h w h e e l s . ea. New in dash Pioneer $2000/obo. AM/FM CD player, $15. BALDWIN CONSOLE (360)460-8632 Beautifully framed duck PIANO: Beautiful cheror (360)477-6441 p r i n t , $ 3 0 . ( 4 ) t i r e s , ry finish with matching 2 1 5 / 5 5 Z R 1 7 , 5 0 % storage bench. One DOLL HOUSE: Cus- tread, $40 set. English owner. Very good contom built, electrified, made kerosene lamp, dition. Well maintained Victor ian, measures electrified, John Scott under smoke-free and a p p r ox . 2 9 ” x 4 9 ” x late 1800s, three ar m pet-free environment. 46”, amazing detail, brass floor lamp, with $1,350. (360) 582-3045 great gift for that big or glass chimneys, beautilittle girl for Christmas. ful and rare, 77” height, B u i l t b y r e n o w n e d $325. Please call for de- GUITAR: Behringer beginners electric guitar, 6 Stan Ohman of Little tails and location (360)808-1176 string, gently used. $60. Habitats in Por t Or(360)912-2655 chard. $300. MISC: Sun Vision Pro (360)683-8790. sun bed, $400. Yamaha GUITARS/AMP ‘04 Blaster quad, $1,400 GENERATOR: Generac, Honda ‘07 CRF 150R, 100kw, commercial/resi- extra parts, $2,000. dentail, single phase, (360)461-3367 enclosed, gas or propane, 147 original hrs., MOBILITY SCOOTER Fender Jazz load tested, with 500 gal. Pace Saver, chair, like Bass Special. p r o p a n e t a n k , n e w new. $500. $26,000. Asking (360)928-1231 Made in Japan. $14,000/obo. 808-1254. C A S H fo r o l d s t u f f, c l o ck s , t oy s , s i l ve r coins, cameras, and more. (360)461-3297

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS

MOVING: Household GENERATOR goods and cut fireTRANSFER SWITCH GenTran model 30310, wood. Must sell. (360)681-5095 manuel, 30 amp, U.S.A. made, wired complete, Perfect Wedding Gift with 60’ 30 amp connect 8 place setting, Lenox cable. $285. Rhodora, many serving (360)821-9318 pieces. $250. MINI BACKHOE: Tow (360)457-1900, Sequim behind, new motor, hyRETIRING: Beauty shop draulic pump. $1,800. equip, furniture, 75% off (360)683-8142 retail. (360)417-9022 or MOVING: Pair twin Hol- (360)457-7356. l y wo o d b e d s w / c l e a n mattresses/innersprings, TOTES: 275 gal. plastic $100/pr ; cedar chest, caged totes, used. $75. (360)565-2045 $80; low-boy dresser, $40; pair chaise lounges TRAILER HITCH: Load w/pads (new), $100/pr. Woman’s Sun Drifter flat equalizing, Reese, HD. $300. (360)809-0536. foot seating bike (26”)(new); Trailer hitch TRAILER: With sides, bike rack; Man’s Ross fold-down tailgate with 10-speed Europa (27”), grate, 15” tires. Used to $50. 360/379-3397, P.T. haul lawn-mowers and landscaping eqipment. SEWING MACHINE Has new cedar floorBernina Serger sewing boards. $600/obo. machine 2000DE, excel(360)683-7173 lent condition, very little use, comes with instrucEMAIL US AT tion books and all accesclassified@peninsula sories. $300/obo. dailynews.com (360)681-4244

WINDOW WASHING Window Washing

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Pressure Washing

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

#LUNDFF*962K7

Reg#FINIST*932D0

RDDARDD889JT

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

AKC Golden Retriever BUYING FIREARMS Pup: 1 big male pup, Any & All - Top $ Paid gentle and kind, run to One or Entire Collec- you when called, love tion Including Estates k i t t i e s , s m a r t , g r e a t Call 360-477-9659 nose, love family, play and sleep outside under POOL TABLE: 8.5’, all your chair, sleep in p.m., accessor ies included, love our kitchen, and like new. $250/obo. well raised babes. $550. (360)385-0993 (360)681-3390 TREADMILL: Sears Profor m Cross Walker XP850, folds for storage. $500. (360)452-6447.

DOG: 5 month old Jack Russell, had all shots, neutered, microchipped. $500. (360)457-6811

360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Columbus Construction

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Excavation and General Contracting • All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes • Land Clearing and Grubbing • Septic Systems • Rock Walls & Rockeries

• Raods/Driveways • Grading • Utilities • Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling • Snow Removal

Call (360) 683-8332 116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

REPAIR/REMODEL

Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

Lena Washke Accounting Services, Inc. • Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

360/460•9824

TV Repair

LCD • Plasma • Projection • CRT

CLEANING

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

2C711136

New Custom Wood Furniture Repair and Refinishing

benchmarkwoodworkspa.com 2C717555

(360) 640-4659 Email: jr1953@hotmail.com

360-683-4881

FURNITURE/WOODWORKING

JR CG SVICE Serving P.A., Sequim & Forks Riial & Cocial

Northwest Electronics

29667464

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

• Small Excavating JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER • Utility Install & contact@jkdirtworks.com Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm LIC #JKDIRKD942NG Clean-up

TV REPAIR

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

26631940

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

23597511

Full 6 Month Warranty

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

1-888-854-4640

tmccurdy@olypen.com Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

Master Arborist

BAGPIPER

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131 Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

DIRT WORK

Specializing In Ornamental Tr e e s & S h r u b s

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

PRUNING

24614371

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

1-800-826-7714

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

2A691397

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

Call for details or check us out on Facebook.

2B5075404

APPLIANCES

(360) 582-9382

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

or

26636738

360-452-2054

(360) 460-3319

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

360-452-8435

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

Contractor # GEORGED098NR Mfd. Installer Certified: #M100DICK1ge991KA

LARRYHM016J8

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

24608159

22588145

Port Angeles Sequim Port Townsend

Turn your trash into treasure!

LAWN CARE

To Advertise

Contr#KENNER1951P8

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

Call us today to schedule your garage sale ad!

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

7035 General Pets

BICYCLE: Specialized hybrid, like new condi- ADORABLE KITTENS All colors and sizes. $85. tion, cyclocomputer. PFOA (360)452-0414. $375/obo safehavenpfoa.org (360)452-1246

Call NOW

Done Right Home Repair

AA

CEDAR Fence Boards: 3/4 x 5.5” x 6’, $2 each. (360)774-6470

You won’t believe how fast the items lying around your basement, attic or garage can be turned into cold hard cash with a garage sale promoted in the Peninsula Classified!

LAWN CARE

No Job Too Small

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

360-434-3296

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

From Curb To Roof

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

6135 Yard & Garden

Is your junk in a funk?

22588172

HOME REPAIR

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789.

23590152

22588179

461-4609

6140 Wanted & Trades

$590 OBO~PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFT! Poulsbo, Kitsap county

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair 1C562759

Call Bryan or Mindy 360 Lic#buenavs90818

M I S C : D e Wa l t ra i d i a l arm compound slide miter, 12”, 2 blades, like n e w, $ 4 0 0 . B o s t i t c h Crown stapler, with staples, $75. Senco Frame Pro, $90. 20 lb. abrasive blster, $60. 8.25”x12’ concrete siding, 21 pieces or 252’, $100. (360)452-4820 or (360)477-3834

WANTED: Used Laser sailboat, good condition, sailable, resonable. (360)477-9144

23595179

Chad Lund

Free Estimates Senior Discounts 20% Discount on Interior Painting

23597507

Moss Prevention

www.LundFencing.com

PAINTING

GAS WELDING OUTFIT Acetylene and oxygen tanks, 48” and 38” tall, comes with power craft cutting torch, scrapper’s torch, two Montgomery Ward fuel and oxygen regulators, two Victor gas and oxygen regulators, 50’ of hose, and wheeled dolly carrying case. $885/obo or trade. (360)461-3869

1984-1987 SWR Workman’s Pro Bass Amp. 100 watt.

6115 Sporting Goods

7035 General Pets 7035 General Pets 7035 General Pets

23590413

Lund Fencing

452-0755 775-6473

6125 Tools

2C688614 - 12/16

FENCING

6105 Musical Instruments

4C235417

www.peninsula dailynews.com

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 B7

David Reynolds 360.457.7774 Cell 360.670.6121

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

B8 MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes

9802 5th Wheels A L U M A ‘ 9 0 T LV 5 t h Wheel: Clean, seldom used. $2,000, or reasonable offer. (360)531-4462

FREE: Kitten. To loving home, beautiful, unique gray and white mar kings, spayed, shots. (360)681-4129

MOTOR HOME: ‘90 34’ Bounder. 35,000 miles, gas ‘454’ Chev V8, good condition, needs work. $6,700/obo. 452-9611.

FREE: Large orange tom cat, bobbed tail, not kid or cat friendly, but likes dogs, good hunter, indoor/outdoor. (360)504-2647 or (360)775-6603

PRICE REDUCED: ‘92 9808 Campers & 34’ Bounder. 2,000 mi. Canopies on new 454 Chev 950 hp engine. $6,995/obo. CAMPER: 9.5’ Alpenlite (360)683-8453 Ltd. All extras, generaWINNEBAGO ‘95 Ad- tor, A/C, dinette roll-out. venturer 34’, 45,500 m. $14,000. (360)417-2606 Gas 460 Ford, Banks ex h a u s t s y s t e m , n ew tires and brakes, rear view camera, hyd leveling jacks, 2 tv’s, new hot water tank, non smoker, Drivers side door, 5.5 o n a n g e n e ra t o r, l i g h t neutral interior, everything works and is in ex- CANOPY: Super Hawk, for full size pickup, like cellent shape. $17,700. new, insulated, lights, (360)460-1981 sliding front window, 2 doors swing out or back 9832 Tents & swing up, sliding side windows, all hardware Travel Trailers included. $895/obo. (360)461-3869 ALJO 1991 24’ trailer, ver y good condition, WA N T E D : 8 . 5 ’ t r u c k camper, cash. $5,500. 460-8538. (360)770-2410

KITTENS: Cute, cuddly kittens! Born October 2, ready to go to a good home. (360)452-4361. PUPPIES: AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. One male, two females. Salt/Pepper or Black with silver. Parents on site. Dewclaws removed and tails d o cke d . $ 5 0 0 e a c h . Call Don at (360)460-7119 PUPPIES: English Mastiff, Purebred fawn color, 6 weeks on Dec. 14, dewormed and first shots, parents on site. $550. (360)640-4752 or (360)301-9420 PUPPIES: Mini-Dachshund Puppies. We have one adorable chocolate smooth coat male and one black and tan smooth coat male available. 1st shot and dewormed. Ready now. $400. (360)452-3016.

NASH 2000 26’, excellent condition. $8,000.(360)460-8538.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

Cruising boat. 1981 Sea Ranger sedan style trawler 39’ LOA. Single engine Per kins diesel with bow thruster. Fully enclosed fly bridge. Comfor table salon; stateroom with queen bed; full shower in head;full-sized refrigerator/freezer plus freezer b ox i n l a z z a r e t ; n ew Westerbeke genset with “get-home” alternate power source from genset; new smar t charger/inver ter and battery bank; good electronics including radar and AIS receive. Cruises at 7.5 Kts on 2.5 gph. Max speed 9.0 Kts, 150 gal water and 535 gal fuel capacity. 15 hp Yamaha O/B on dinghy. Anchor with 300’ chain and stern tie spool. Fully equipped as USCG Auxiliary Ope ra t i o n a l Fa c i l i t y. We have cruised throughout Salish Sea and Inside Passage in this comfortable and sea-worthy boat. She works well in t h e N W e nv i r o n m e n t . Suitable for 2 people cruising or live-aboard. S e e i n Po r t L u d l o w. $99,500. (360)437-7996.

A Captains License TENT TRAILER: ‘99 Dutchman. King/queen No CG exams. Jan. 14, bed, excellent cond., re- eves. Capt. Sanders. (360)385-4852 frigerator, furnace, A/C, www.usmaritime.us tons of storage. $4,000. (360)460-4157 BELL BOY: 22’ cuddy cabin, V8 engine needs TRAILER: ‘55 14’ Shas- work. $1,800. ta, no leaks/mold, nice. (360)385-9019 $3,500/obo. 461-6999. BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, trailer, 140 hp motor, 9802 5th Wheels great for fishing/crab. $5,120. (360)683-3577.

9817 Motorcycles

9742 Tires & Wheels

PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County File No.: 7314.21868 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RALI 2006QA10 Grantee: Kimberley J. Kettel, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1189365 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033020 610300 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 16, Flauras Acres #2 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On December 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 16, Flaura’s Acres No. 2, Clallam County, Washington, according to plat thereof recorded Volume 6 of Plats, Page 59, Records of said County. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 920 East Blair Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/06/06, recorded on 10/11/06, under Auditor’s File No. 2006 1189365, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kimberley J. Kettel, a single person, as Grantor, to Callam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homecomings Financial, LLC (F/K/A Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Homecomings Financial, LLC (F/K/A Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.), its successor and assigns to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RALI 2006QA10, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1268619. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/21/2012 Monthly Payments $17,209.02 Late Charges $699.47 Lender’s Fees & Costs $277.00 Total Arrearage $18,185.49 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $621.00 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,413.52 Total Amount Due: $19,599.01 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $163,999.99, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 28, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kimberley Kettel aka Kimberley J. Kettel 920 East Blair Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Kimberley Kettel aka Kimberley J. Kettel 440 America Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kimberley Kettel aka Kimberley J. Kettel 920 East Blair Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kimberley Kettel aka Kimberley J. Kettel 440 America Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/15/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/16/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/21/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.21868) 1002.196250-File No. Pub: Nov. 26, Dec. 17, 2012 Legal No. 439987

SABERCRAFT: 21’. 302 Inboard, Lorance GPS 5” screen with fish/depth finder, VHS, 15 hp kicker, good interior. Selling due to health. $4,000. 683-3682 TIDERUNNER: ‘03, 17’, cuddy, ‘03 suzuki 90hp, 4 stroke, 230 hrs, 012 Yamaha 9.9 4 stroke, 0 hrs, scotty electric downriggers. Call (360)4522 1 4 8 fo r m o r e i n fo. $16,000/obo. WANTED TO BUY Boat 18-20’ O/B. Up to $5,000. 452-5652.

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others

HARLEY: ‘04 Soft Tail Studded Snow Tires Heritage. Black with lots 4 l ow m i l e a g e, D e a n of extra chrome. 24,500 W i n t e r c a t X T 2 2 5 / 6 0 mi., Beautiful bike, must R16 on 5 hole rims. see to appreciate. $325/obo $11,000. (360)477-3725. (360)379-8288 HONDA: ‘05 CRF80. Like new. $1,400. 9180 Automobiles BU I C K : ‘ 0 0 L e S a b r e. (360)460-8514. Classics & Collect. 115K, like new, loaded, runs great. HONDA ‘06 CRF450R $3,500. (253)314-1258. Low hrs, frequent oil, filter and trans fluid changCHRYSLER: ‘02 Town & es. Just don’t ride the Country Limited. Full bike enough. The motor power, excellent. is very strong and pulls $4,900. (360)452-4827. like a tractor.Aluminum stand incl. $2900 C H RY S L E R ‘ 0 4 S E (360)461-2356 1978 CADILLAC SE- BRING: All the power V I L L E . B E AU T I F U L options, $3,395. H O N DA : ‘ 7 4 Tra i l 9 0 . “LIKE NEW” CLAS(360)417-3063 1,600 mi. $1,200. SIC. GOLD, LT YEL(360)582-7970 LOW LEATHER, SUN- DODGE: ‘92 Dynasty. 4 HONDA: ‘79 CM400T R O O F , W H I T E dr, only 78K, fine cond. road bike. 24,000 mi. W A L L S , W I R E $3,500. (360)457-3903. WHEELS. 75K MILES. FORD ‘01 Mustang Co$900. 683-4761. M U S T S E E TO A P HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing P R E C I AT E . $ 7 , 5 0 0 bra, blue book $11,700, Aspencade. 1200cc, ( 3 6 0 ) 9 2 8 - 9 7 2 4 N O S F l o w m a s t e r s , $12,000. Call for more black/chrome, exc. cond. (206) 697-2005 details. (360)775-1858. $3,500/obo. 417-0153. FORD: ‘05 Mustang GT. CHEV: ‘53 pickup restoH O N DA : ‘ 8 5 M a g n a . V8, 5 speed, 61K mi., ration project. $3,800. Runs excellent. $1,600. new tires. $14,900. Cell (562)743-7718 (360)385-9019 (360)582-0358 Classic, all original, 1966 F O R D : ‘95 Mustang. F-250 Ford Camper 9805 ATVs Special. 390 Auto, origi- M a n u a l , n e e d s h e a d gasket, tires. $1,000. nal owner. $6,000/obo. (360)809-0781 (360)390-8101

G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n cr uiser, flying br idge, single Cummins diesel engine, low hours, radar, VHF radio, CB, dept/fish finder, dingy, down riggers, 16’x32’ boathouse. $27,500. (360)457-0684. POLARIS: 2011 Razor LE Bobby Gorden seLANDSCAPE ‘94 dump- ries, excellent condition, truck: $5,995 or trade. low hours, used for fami(360)928-3193 ly fun, no extreme riding, well maintained and alLIVINGSTON: 13’. With w a y s s t o r e d i n s i d e , BOAT: Fiberglass, 12’, all the necessary equip- windshield and roof top $200. 4.5 HP Merc mo- ment, price is right and ex t r a s. $ 1 1 , 4 0 0 o b o, t a r, $ 3 0 0 . ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 3 - ready to go, let’s talk. 460-0187 or 460-9512 4761. evenings. $2,650/obo. 452-2712.

PUPPY: Min Pin/Chihuahuha. Female, born 9/14/12, all shots and wor med, ver y friendly and playful. So small she could be a stocking stuffer! Asking $400. (360)808-7265 5TH WHEEL: ‘00 35’ Alfa. 3 slides, perfect condition, everything works, many extras, must see to appreciate. $22,500/ ROWING BOAT: Wood obo. (360)683-2529. Lapstrake Whitehall, with traveling sail, 2 pair of spruce spoon blade oars, Sprit sail with mast and 2 rudder options, includes trailer bunk but not trailer, will deliver in Puget Sound area. 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 1 3 5 ’ $4,000. (360)775-5955. Hitchhiker Champagne SEA SWIRL: 16’. 140 edition. Two slide-outs, Chev engine, Merc outrear kitchen, fully fur- drive, 4 stroke Honda nished. Permanent skirthp kicker, Calkins 360-452-8435 or i n g a l s o a v a i l a b l e . 7.5 galv. trailer, 2 new Scot$10,000. (360)797-0081 ty downriggers, fishfind1-800-826-8435 er, good deck space, 5TH WHEEL: ‘97 35’ g o o d f i s h i n g b o a t . Road Ranger. Toy haul- $3,000. (360)477-3725. peninsula er, big slide, gen. set, r e e h i t c h , a w n i n g . WANTED: 14’ Jet Sled. dailynews.com f$8,500. (360)461-4310. Cash. (360)770-2410.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula!

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

GEO: ‘91 Metro. Runs excellent, 5 sp, 133K. $1,700. (360)683-7173.

GMC ‘84 S15: 3000k miles on new long block, p a i n t a n d b o d y ve r y good. No rust. Mounted studs on wheels. $2,500 FORD 1950 F-1 Pickup: firm. (360)670-6100. 239 Flathead, V8, 3-speed overdrive, runs LEXUS: ‘99 ES300. 84K a n d l o o k s g r e a t ! Mom’s V6, leather, mnrf. $8,700. (360)643-3363. $15,500/obo. (360)379-6646 LINCOLN ‘02 LS: nice shape. $8,000. FORD ‘69 F-250 Camp(360)457-3645 er Special: with factory air, air shocks, tranny MERCURY: ‘96 Sable. QUAD: ‘05 Honda TRX cooler, tow hitch, beauti- sedan, good shape, new 450R. Excellent cond. ful truck! $8,500. tires, needs transmis$2,500. (360)461-0157. (360)681-2916 sion. $450. 457-0578. QUAD: ‘07 Yamaha 700 PONTIAC: ‘99 Sunfire. Raptor. Like new, extras. PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Good cond., 5 speed. Price reduced to $4,500. Custom, new inter ior, $1,800/obo. 460-1001. tires, rims, wiring and (360)452-3213 more. $9,250. 683-7768. PORCHE: ‘02 Boxster S. QUADS: ‘00 Blaster nice 65K mi., black with black cond, $1,200. ‘08 250 9292 Automobiles leather interior, 6 speed, Raptor, like new, 25 hrs., all options, nice car. Others $2,400. (360)460-9097. $18,500. (360)461-9635.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

AC U R A : ‘ 8 8 I n t e g r a . TOYOTA ‘ 0 2 C e l i c a : Runs excellent, 122ZK. 2002 silver Toyota Celi$1,350. (360)683-7173. ca in fair condition. Some cosmetic work BMW ‘04 330i Convert. n e e d e d . R u n s w e l l , Black,vry good. 100k mi. 6 4 , 0 0 0 m i l e s. A s k i n g Fast/fun/luxury. $11,700. $4500. but price is nego(360)477-8377 tiable. (360)774-6759.

SATURN: ‘01 SCI. 3 dr, 5 sp, sunroof, CD player, good tires, new brakes/ c l u t c h , p e r fe c t fo r a young person, excellent condition, 86K mi., well maintained, all records. $4,000. (360)417-0600 or (360)477-3879. T OYO TA : ‘ 0 9 P r i u s . White, 58K, Nav, stereo, B.U. camera. $18,000. (805)478-1696 VW: ‘71 1600 Baja Bug. Runs great. $1,000. (360)928-1231

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

DODGE ‘99 Flatbed: V8 Dodge Ram Flatbed pickup 4x4. White with detachable metal sideboards and tool box. Good condition, $4200 obo. For more information or to see call (360)461-4151.

FORD ‘00 F250 Extended Cab Lariat: V10, CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton 4x4, heavy-duty, 160k, 5th extra cab, ‘350’ 5 sp, w h e e l , o n e o w n e r . gr e a t s h a p e, c a n o py. $6,000/obo. 460-7131. $6,888. (425)344-6654. FORD: ‘08 F150 XLT. C H E V: ‘ 9 2 S - 1 0 l o n g 4x4 crew cab. Low mi., bed. 136K, 6 cyl., 5 sp loaded! $18,500. manual, reliable, Les (360)912-1599 Schwab tires. $1,500. (360)775-7728, msg. FORD: ‘79 F250 Super Cab. ‘460’, AT, tow pkg., DODGE ‘00 DAKOTA Banks power pack, QUAD CAB SPORT 141K, runs/drives great. 4X4 $2,200. (360)460-7534. 4.7L Magnum V8, autom a t i c , a l l oy w h e e l s , FORD: ‘86 F150. Excelg o o d r u bb e r, r u n n i n g lent cond., runs great, boards, tow package, recent tune up. $3,000/ trailer brake controller, obo. (360)531-3842. spray-in bedliner, keyless entr y, power win- FORD ‘98 EXPEDITION dows, door locks, and EDDIE BAUER 4x4 mirrors, cruise control, 5.4L Triton V8, automatt i l t , a i r c o n d i t i o n i n g , ic, alloy wheels, running cd/cassette stereo, infor- boards, tow package, mation center, dual front roof rack, privacy glass, a i r b a g s . O n l y 1 0 3 K key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r miles! Hard to find Quad w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, Cab! Room for the whole mirrors, and drivers seat, g a n g ! E y e - c a t c h i n g leather seats, 3rd row Electric Blue color! Stop seating, cruise control, by Gray Motors today! tilt, air conditioning, rear $8,995 A/C, 6 CD stereo, rear GRAY MOTORS stereo controls, mach 457-4901 audio system, informagraymotors.com tion center, dual front airbags. only 1 previous DODGE: ‘01 Dakota. 4.7 owner! top of the line edliter, V8, 5 sp, rear limit- die bauer edition! handed slip axle, 4x4, 1 own- picked to offer the best er, 117K mi., very clean in value and comfor t! interior, never smoked R o o m f o r t h e w h o l e in, maintenance records. family! Stop by Gray Mo$5,800. (360)683-2914. tors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS DODGE: ‘72 3/4 ton. 457-4901 Runs great, no dents, graymotors.com some rust. $700/obo. (360)531-3842 GMC: ‘08 Canyon. FORD: ‘91 F250. Ext. Cruise, air conditioning, c a b X LT, ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , a u t o, o n l y 1 4 , 0 0 0 m i . O n l y 105K orig. mi., goose- $12,000. 360-385-3025 neck/trailer hitches, trailer brakes, runs great. GMC: ‘77 Sierra 6000 $2,495. (360)452-4362 series. New 12’ bed. or (360)808-5390. $1,300/obo. 775-1139.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County File No.: 7037.93937 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Marian T. Needham, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2004 1141176 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043025 149120 / 41777 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 4 Condon SP V5 P97 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On December 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel 4 of M. Condon Short Plat recorded October 27, 1978 in Volume 5 of Short Plats, Page 97, under Clallam County Auditor’s File No. 488536, being a portion of the South half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, State of Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 94 West Pheasant Street Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/07/04, recorded on 09/13/04, under Auditor’s File No. 2004 1141176, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Marian T. Needham and Frank Needham, wife and husband, as joint tenants., as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Residential Mortgage Concepts, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Residential Mortgage Concepts., its successors and assigns to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1279195. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/20/12 Monthly Payments $22,571.98 Late Charges $998.48 Lender’s Fees & Costs $56.00 Total Arrearage $23,626.46 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $775.00 Title Report $602.70 Statutory Mailings $20.90 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,498.60 Total Amount Due: $25,125.06 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $114,692.04, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 28, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Marian T. Needham 94 West Pheasant Street Seqium, WA 98382 Frank Needham 94 West Pheasant Street Seqium, WA 98382 Marian T. Needham 103 Charles Roberts Road Seqium, WA 98032 Frank Needham 103 Charles Roberts Road Seqium, WA 98032 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/16/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/16/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/20/12 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7037.93937) 1002.216116-File No. Pub: Nov. 26, Dec. 17, 2012 Legal No. 439990

File No.: 7777.18127 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee under the Trust Agreement for the Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-9 Grantee: Shane Robins and Jennifer Robins, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants with Rights of Survivorship and not as Tenants in Common nor as Community Property Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20051160437 Tax Parcel ID No.: 05-30-10-500148 & 05-30-10-500128 Abbreviated Legal: LOTS 18, 29-31 BK 1 UNION PACIFIC ADD Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On December 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 18, 29, 30 and 31, Block 1, Union Pacific Addition to Port Angeles, as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 67, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 31 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/06/05, recorded on 07/12/05, under Auditor’s File No. 20051160437, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Shane Robins and Jennifer Robins, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of New Century Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by New Century Mortgage Corporation to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee under the Trust Agreement for the Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, Mor tgage Pass-Through Cer tificates, Series 2005-9, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121280619. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2012 Monthly Payments $23,518.74 Late Charges $996.87 Lender’s Fees & Costs ($751.37) Total Arrearage $23,764.24 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.47 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,336.97 Total Amount Due: $25,101.21 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $153,887.71, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 28, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneiciary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Shane Robins 31 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jennifer Robins 31 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Shane Robins 272 House Road Sequim, WA 98382 Jennifer Robins 272 House Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/24/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/25/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Neang Avila (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7777.18127) 1002.217113-File No. Pub: Nov. 26, Dec. 17, 2012 Legal No. 440011


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others FORD ‘98 RANGER XLT EXTENDED CAB 2WD PICKUP 3.0L V6, 5 Speed manual, alloy wheels, good tires, power steer ing, tool box, rear sliding window, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, sony cd stereo, dual front airbags. Only 81,000 Miles! Mirror-like black paint! T h i s t r u ck s h ow s t h e very best of care! Stop by Gray Motors today to s ave s o m e bu ck s o n your next truck! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

HONDA ‘93 CIVIC EX SEDAN 1.6L VTEC 4 Cyl., 5 speed manual, sunroof, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, d r i ve r s a i r b a g . L o c a l trade-in from the original owner! Well maintained its entire life! Great fuel economy! Priced to sell fast! Stop by Gray Motors today! $2,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

HONDA ‘08 CIVIC 4 door, 1.8 litre, auto, air cruise, power windows and locks, only 35k. Bal of factory, 5/60 factory warranty. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

JEEP(ers-creepers) ‘95 Santa-Red GCL 6 4 W D w a g o n , fo r t h e roads ahead. $2,650. (360)457-9484

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai 4x4. 48K drive mi., like new, original mint cond., new top, tires, clutch, rebuilt trans, CD, tape, PONTIAC ‘08 VIBE Reese tow bar, superior 1 . 8 l i t r e, 4 c y l . Au t o, snow travel. First $4,500 cruise, power windows, takes. (360)460-6979. locks, side air bags, 53k. $11,995 9730 Vans & Minivans REID & JOHNSON Others MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD ‘98 Econoline E150 Conversion Van WHY PAY (Red). 4.6 V8 Engine, 9556 SUVs 116,000 miles, Excellent SHIPPING ON Others Condition, Non SmokINTERNET i n g , D u a l a i r B a g s, A i r PURCHASES? C o n d i t i o n f r o n t / r e a r, CHEV ‘84 3/4 ton 4x4: Quad seats,3r seat,Must 140K miles, runs good, $2,300/obo. 477-6098. SHOP LOCAL see. $6250. Call Bob 360-452-8248 JEEP ‘88 Cherokee Lopeninsula rado: Needs work. 9931 Legal Notices dailynews.com $1,000. (360)681-3588.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County File No.: 7037.96641 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association successor in interest by purchase from the FDIC as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank fka Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Jeffrey Newlin, also shown of record as Jeffrey B. Newlin, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1211712 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-540245/61950 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 15, Block 107 of E.C. Baker’s Subdivision Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On January 18, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 15, Block 107 of E.C. Baker’s Subdivision of Suburban Lot 19, Port Angeles, as per Plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 7, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1019 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/29/07, recorded on 11/05/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1211712, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jeffrey B. Newlin, also shown of record as Jeffrey Newlin, as his separate estate., as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/12/2012 Monthly Payments $7,590.84 Late Charges $269.80 Lender’s Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $7,860.64 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $875.00 Title Report $673.16 Statutory Mailings $30.90 Recording Costs $16.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,665.06 Total Amount Due: $9,525.70 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $168,861.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 18, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 1019 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 15532 Southwest Pacific Highway #C1B Portland, OR 97224-4110 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 1019 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 15532 Southwest Pacific Highway #C1B Portland, OR 97224-4110 Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 12070 Southwest Fischer Road Apt H304 Portland, OR 97224-2326 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jeffrey B. Newlin aka Jeffrey Newlin 12070 Southwest Fischer Road Apt H304 Portland, OR 97224-2326 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/07/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/07/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/12/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.96641) 1002.224721-File No. Pub: Dec. 17, 2012 , Jan. 7, 2013 Legal No. 443981

Clallam County

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 B9

Case No.: 124 00391 2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030)IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF ROMA G. COX, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: Dec. 17, 2013 FRANK L. SHARP Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Dec. 17, 24, 31, 2012 Legal No. 444984

TS No.: WA-10-395867-SH APN No.: 07-30-10-229010 Title Order No.: 100632953-WA-GNO Grantor(s): BRANNON D ROE Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, A BANK Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2005 1169440 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant To The Revised Code Of Washington 61.24, et. seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee will on 12/28/2012, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 223 East 4th, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: PARCEL 1 OF J. ROWLAND SHORT PLAT RECORDED ON FEBRUARY 20, 1984 IN VOLUME 9 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 84, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 517142, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER- IN SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON.; SITUSTE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON More commonly known as: 59124 HWY 112 PORT ANGELES WA, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/3/2005 recorded 11/15/2005, under 2005 1169440 records of Clallam County, Washington, from BRANNON D ROE , AN UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA, TITLE, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, A BANK, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, A BANK (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006PR1 Trust. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $38,617.71 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $180,054.40, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/28/2012. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/17/2012 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/17/2012 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated at any time after the 12/17/2012 (11 days before the sale date) and before the Sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME BRANNON D ROE , AN UNMARRIED INDIVIDUAL ADDRESS 59124 HWY 112 PORT ANGELES WA, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 7/27/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee, and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property, described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS- The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORCLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 days from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National web site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attor neys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 8/27/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-10-395867SH P974948 11/26, 12/17/2012 Pub: Nov. 26, Dec. 17, 2012 Legal No. 438704

What’s New? @ www.peninsuladailynews.com THINGS TO DO

The Peninsula’s comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds, updated daily.

HOT PROPERTIES ONLINE OBITUARIES

Celebrate your loved one’s life, share memories and connect with friends and family.

CLALLAM CRIME TRACKER WHO CAN HELP?

Subscribe and pay for your home delivery online.

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES View the hottest real estate deals on the North Olympic Peninsula, updated weekly.

Place your classified ad online 24/7.

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE Use the map to find the location of theft, assaults, sex offenders & more.

Jefferson County Crime Tracker coming soon.

DAILY DEALS

PHOTO GALLERY

View, share and purchase PDN local news and sports pictures. Put your favorite photo on a mug!

Local businesses offer 50% off on products and services.

And don’t forget: Breaking Local News 24/7

17www-PDN

A powerful tool for connecting people. List services you need. Service providers will bid on them.

File No.: 7037.94127 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Norma E. Edwards, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2010-1252967 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630-10-439070 Abbreviated Legal: Lot A SP 34/7 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 18, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot A of Fall Properties Short Plat SHP 09-01 recorded in Volume 34 of Short Plats, Page 7, under Clallam County recording No. 2009 1238817, being a portion of Government Lot 2 in Section 10, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 529 Whidby Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/11/10, recorded on 06/16/10, under Auditor’s File No. 2010-1252967, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Norma E. Edwards, an unmarried person, as Grantor, to Clallam Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for M&T Bank, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for M&T Bank, its successors and assigns to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1279749. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/10/2012 Monthly Payments $11,016.26 Lender’s Fees & Costs $152.40 Total Arrearage $11,168.66 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $506.25 Title Report $455.28 Statutory Mailings $20.90 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,052.43 Total Amount Due: $12,221.09 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $86,482.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 18, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Norma E. Edwards 529 Whidby Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Norma E. Edwards 1063 Strait View Drive Port Angeles, WA 98362-9157 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Norma E. Edwards 529 Whidby Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Norma E. Edwards 1063 Strait View Drive Port Angeles, WA 98362-9157 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/02/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/03/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/10/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.94127) 1002.224383-File No. Pub: Dec. 17, 2012 , Jan. 7, 2013 Legal No. 443979

File No.: 7283.26998 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Keith Joseph Koehler and Nicole D. Koehler, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1201795 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-017840 Abbreviated Legal: LT 9, BLK 178 TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On December 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 9, Block 178, Townsite of Port Angeles. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1102 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/18/07, recorded on 05/25/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1201795, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Keith Joseph Koehler, Nicole D Koehler, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Betts, Patterson & Mines, P.S., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for USAA Federal Savings Bank, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for USAA Federal Savings Bank, its successors and assigns to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121281672. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/20/2012 Monthly Payments $15,814.11 Late Charges $663.18 Total Arrearage $16,477.29 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $634.14 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,502.14 Total Amount Due: $17,979.43 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $140,845.80, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 28, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/17/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Keith Joseph Koehler 1102 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Keith Joseph Koehler 232 Signal Rock Drive North Kingstown, RI 02852 Nicole D. Koehler 1102 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Nicole D. Koehler 232 Signal Rock Drive North Kingstown, RI 02852 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/17/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/17/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/20/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26998) 1002.222995-File No. Pub: Nov. 26, Dec. 17, 2012 Legal No. 439989


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2012 Neah Bay 42/35

Bellingham B ellli e lin n 40/32

Olympic Peninsula TODAY V V E RY W I N DY

Y IND

W

✼✼ ✼

Y IND

VE

Forks 42/31

RY

W

Port

E RY W I N DY

Port Angeles 43/31

42/36

WIND ✼ ✼ Sequim Y Olympics ✼ 43/31 Port Ludlow Snow level: 1,000 ft. Y 43/34 ND

W

WI

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 46 34 0.13 13.91 Forks 41 34 0.69 112.06 Seattle 40 38 0.16 44.01 Sequim 41 33 0.00 12.49 Hoquiam 45 38 0.59 77.35 Victoria 43 34 0.03 31.09 Port Townsend 40 37 0.02* 22.82

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Nation NationalTODAY forecast

Forecast highs for Monday, Dec. 17

IN DY

✼✼ ✼ Brinnon 43/33

Aberdeen 44/33

Billings 45° | 23°

San Francisco 59° | 54°

New

First

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: Chicago 41° | 36°

Los Angeles 61° | 48°

Atlanta 70° | 54°

El Paso 59° | 34° Houston 77° | 57°

Full

Miami 82° | 70°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

✼✼ ✼

40/33 43/38 43/39 Low 31 Partly sunny; Mostly cloudy; Cloudy with Rain, snow mix; then snow afternoon showers 50% rain chance chance of rain

Washington TODAY

Marine Weather Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 40 to 50 kt easing to 35 kt. Wind waves 10 ft. showers. W wind 25 to 35 kt easing to 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 10 ft subsiding to 5 ft.

Fronts

CANADA

Seattle 46° | 43°

Spokane 37° | 32°

Tacoma 43° | 41°

Olympia 43° | 41°

Yakima 45° | 32° Astoria 45° | 43°

ORE.

© 2012 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 3:27 a.m. 8.3’ 9:16 a.m. 2.7’ 2:58 p.m. 8.5’ 9:44 p.m. -0.3’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 4:16 a.m. 8.2’ 10:16 a.m. 2.7’ 3:56 p.m. 7.6’ 10:31 p.m. 0.7’

Port Angeles

6:24 a.m. 7.9’ 12:22 p.m. 4.8’ 4:50 p.m. 5.6’ 11:38 p.m. -0.1’

7:03 a.m. 7.8’ 6:05 p.m. 4.9’

Port Townsend

8:01 a.m. 9.7’ 12:03 a.m. -1.3’ 6:27 p.m. 6.9’ 1:35 p.m. 5.3’

8:40 a.m. 9.6’ 12:51 a.m. -0.1’ 7:42 p.m. 6.1’ 2:57 p.m. 4.5’

Dungeness Bay*

7:07 a.m. 8.7’ 12:57 p.m. 4.8’ 5:33 p.m. 6.2’

7:46 a.m. 8.6’ 12:13 a.m. -0.1’ 6:48 p.m. 5.5’ 2:19 p.m. 4.0’

LaPush

Jan 4

Jan 11

1:44 p.m. 4.0’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Dec 19 Dec 28

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

4:21 p.m. 8:00 a.m. 10:51 a.m. 10:11 p.m.

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 27 Casper 34 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 61 Albany, N.Y. 25 Snow Charleston, W.Va. 58 Albuquerque 33 .03 Cldy Charlotte, N.C. 59 Amarillo 42 Clr Cheyenne 41 Anchorage -04 Clr Chicago 50 53 Asheville 43 .05 Rain Cincinnati 47 Atlanta 52 Rain Cleveland Atlantic City 38 Rain Columbia, S.C. 61 Austin 56 .39 Cldy Columbus, Ohio 51 40 Baltimore 42 Rain Concord, N.H. Billings 18 Cldy Dallas-Ft Worth 74 52 Birmingham 60 Rain Dayton 47 Bismarck 20 Snow Denver 51 Boise 33 .03 Cldy Des Moines 46 Boston 33 Snow Detroit 36 Brownsville 72 Cldy Duluth 54 Buffalo 38 .01 Rain El Paso Evansville 57 Fairbanks -29 Fargo 29 WEDNESDAY 29 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 44 36 5:05 a.m. 8.2’ 11:21 a.m. 2.6’ Great Falls 5:02 p.m. 6.8’ 11:20 p.m. 1.5’ Greensboro, N.C. 59 Hartford Spgfld 44 28 7:41 a.m. 7.6’ 12:26 a.m. 1.2’ Helena Honolulu 82 7:39 p.m. 4.5’ 2:58 p.m. 3.1’ Houston 81 Indianapolis 51 9:18 a.m. 9.4’ 1:39 a.m. 1.3’ Jackson, Miss. 71 Jacksonville 69 9:16 p.m. 5.5’ 4:11 p.m. 3.5’ Juneau 37 City 52 8:24 a.m. 8.5’ 1:01 a.m. 1.2’ Kansas Key West 77 8:22 p.m. 5.0’ 3:33 p.m. 3.1’ Las Vegas 51 Little Rock 71

Nation/World

Victoria 43° | 36°

Ocean: W wind 40 to 50 kt easing to 25 to 35 kt in the afternoon. Combined seas 25 ft Tonight, W wind 20 to 30 kt. Wind waves 8 ft subsiding to 5 ft. W swell 20 ft at 13 seconds.

Tides

44/39 Clouds with rain possible

New York 52° | 46°

Detroit 43° | 39°

Washington D.C. 57° | 48°

Cold

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Minneapolis 21° | 10°

Denver 55° | 19°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 46° | 43°

*Reading taken in Nordland

✼✼ ✼

Sunny

Hi 37 44 58 10 58 60 50 74 51 38 62 27 40 40 85 41

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

16 21 51 47 49 22 47 50 43 52 48 19 53 50 23 36 43 33 43 49 -43 14 12 43 25 46 29 14 71 72 50 64 55 32 33 72 38 49

.06 .34 .09 .02 .01 .01 .09 .16 .43 .04 .29 .46

MM .12 .11 .03

Snow PCldy Cldy Cldy Rain Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Snow PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr Rain Snow Cldy PCldy Rain Cldy Rain Cldy Snow Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy

The Lower 48:

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

62 57 56 64 79 62 45 37 62 75 47 53 48 60 48 80 36 51 62 50 35 40 44 58 40 38 54 46 65 78 36 71 59 49 84 36 32 73

53 57 38 58 67 43 45 33 59 62 43 42 23 40 28 59 32 43 46 45 19 39 30 48 19 29 42 42 43 68 33 57 54 48 71 12 32 62

.20 .06 .07 .36 .31 .02 .56 .04 .02 .20 .01 .32 .02 .23 .21 .01 .07 .03 .11 .12 .18 .07 .15 .54

Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Rain Rain Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Rain PCldy Cldy Snow Rain Rain Rain Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Cldy PCldy Snow PCldy Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Rain Rain

■ 88 at

Weslaco, Texas

■ -11 Presque Isle, Maine

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls 38 20 .28 Cldy Syracuse 43 33 .01 Cldy Tampa 78 61 PCldy Topeka 52 31 Cldy Tucson 57 47 PCldy Tulsa 64 41 PCldy Washington, D.C. 54 46 .03 Rain Wichita 61 36 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 44 39 .01 Rain Wilmington, Del. 50 43 Rain _________________ Hi Lo Otlk Auckland 74 64 Rain Baghdad 61 42 Clr Beijing 25 12 Clr Berlin 37 32 Cldy Brussels 45 37 Sh Cairo 71 51 Clr Calgary 21 14 Snow Guadalajara 81 47 PCldy Hong Kong 65 54 Cldy Jerusalem 56 41 PCldy Johannesburg 77 56 Clr Kabul 43 29 Sh London 47 39 PCldy Mexico City 78 48 PCldy Montreal 34 30 Rain/Snow Moscow 4 -2 PCldy New Delhi 73 55 Clr Paris 50 38 Sh Rio de Janeiro 90 78 Ts Rome 58 42 Sh Sydney 80 66 PCldy Tokyo 54 37 PCldy Toronto 46 37 Sh Vancouver 39 31 Sh

Briefly . . . Club honors woman for her service SEQUIM — Sequim resident Isabelle J. Dunlop recently received a Paul Harris Fellow for Community Service Award from Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club. Dunlop was selected for “her many years of dedicated service to the community.” Retired Dunlop from careers in real estate and nursing, Dunlop is a member of the Red Cross and volunteers in disaster relief. She also works at the Sequim Food Bank and for KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Meals on Wheels, and volunteers in a kindergarten OLIDAY CRUISE AROUND ARBOR class and as a driver for the American Cancer SociA festively lit cabin cruiser sails around Port Angeles Harbor as a tanker ship lights up ety. the night in the distance during Saturday night’s boat parade in Port Angeles. Seven Dunlop donates blood vessels sporting Christmas lights took to the water for a cruised around the harbor to the many times per year and delight of spectators at City Pier and other vantage points along the bluffs. has given almost 12 gallons in her lifetime. The Paul Harris award is named after one of the are “Mamma Mia!” at at Olympic Unitarian Uni- phone Andrea Radich at MoveOn potluck founders of Rotary and sigversalist Fellowship, 73 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, 360-457-6884. PORT ANGELES — nifies that the recipient Howe Road. and “Ted” at 2 p.m. SaturClallam County MoveOn has dedicated his or her Steve Hamm of the Port ‘Snow White’ film day, Feb. 23. will hold a Christmas potlife to the ideals of the Townsend Occupy Working “At the Movies” is a proSEQUIM — “Snow Rotary Foundation by per- luck at 6 p.m. Wednesday Group will discuss the stagram partnered by the city White and the Huntsman” The event will be held forming community service. tus of the proposed constiwill be screened at Olympic and Olympic Theatre Arts. tutional amendment overFor more information, Theatre Arts, 414 N. turning the 2010 Citizens contact City Clerk Karen Sequim Ave., at 7 p.m. United Supreme Court Kuznek-Reese at 360-681Wednesday. decision. 3428 or kkuznek@sequim The screening is part of Hamm and his group “Red Dawn” (PG-13) wa.gov. ■ Deer Park Cinema, the city’s “At the Movies” oversaw passage of the “The Twilight Saga: BreakPort Angeles (360-452program. first resolutions to this ing Dawn — Part 2” (PG-13) 7176) Doors will open 30 min- Cleanup volunteer amendment in this state. utes prior to the start of ROCKAWAY, N.Y. — The potluck starts at ■ The Rose Theatre, “The Hobbit: An Unexthe movie and close five Kobi Albright recently 6 p.m., with a general pected Journey” (PG-13) Port Townsend (360minutes after the start. joined 272 fellow U.S. Mermeeting at 7 p.m. “Life of Pi” (PG) 385-1089) Admission is $5 per per- chant Marine Academy New members are wel“Playing for Keeps” (PG-13) “The Hobbit: An Unexson. midshipmen in helping come. “Rise of the Guardians” (PG pected Journey” (PG-13) Individuals 16 and with superstorm Sandy — animated) MoveOn is a community “Lincoln” (PG-13) “The Twilight Saga: Breakyounger must be accompa- cleanup in one of the hardof citizens advocating proing Dawn — Part 2” (PG-13) gressive public policy. nied by an adult. est-hit areas of New York. ■ Uptown Theatre, Port For more information, Other films in the series Academy volunteers ■ Lincoln Theater, Port Townsend (360-385-

H

PA H

Now Showing

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Lincoln” (PG-13)

worked side-by-side with relief groups to clean homes and remove sand from area streets. They removed tons of debris and erected a large distribution tent to protect donated items from the elements. Academy crews returned a week later to assist in a neighborhood where entire blocks of housing were burned to the ground or washed to sea. “The level of devastation was indescribable,” Albright said. Albright is the son of Donn and Cher Albright of Port Hadlock and grandson of Kelly West and Bill White of Port Townsend. He is studying marine engineering and logistics at the academy.

Kiwanis celebrates PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Olympic Kiwanis Club celebrated the holiday season with a special potluck party. As part of the festivities, longtime club member Gary Colley, who is moving to Eastern Washington next year, was honored with some special farewell gifts. Colley has been a member of Olympic Kiwanis for 30 years, and he received a Kiwanis Legion of Honor pin and certificate honoring that accomplishment. At a special auction held during the party, the club raised $250, which is being used to purchase Christmas gifts for children on the Angel Tree at Walmart. Olympic Kiwanis, one of three Kiwanis clubs in Port Angeles, meets every Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Cornerhouse Restaurant in downtown Port Angeles. For more information, phone President Nancy Martin at 360-457-7441. Peninsula Daily News

3883)

Katherine Ottaway, MD

“Life of Pi” (PG)

Come see the new footwear line

AN INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE

AFFORDABLE HOUSING WITH ALL THE LUXURIES

C OMPARE

Soft Style

THESE FEATURES

New & Medicare Patients Welcome



Rent is 30% of your adjusted income and includes utilities (except Phone & Cable TV). Income Limits Apply.

360-681-3800 TDD 711 251 S. Fifth Ave., Sequim

suncrestvillage@gres.com

22576541

You could be enjoying your retirement years, right now!

Quimper Family Medicine 2120 Lawrence St. at Kearney, Port Townsend

360-385-3826

21578130

2C707843

130 West Front St., Port Angeles 360-452-3741



Let’s discuss your health history, questions and goals to collaborate on your health plan.

-Kitchens in all Apartments -Extra Storage in Each Apartment -Delicious & Nutritious Daily Meals -Bi-Weekly Housekeeping -Recreation & Activity Programs -Scheduled Transportation

by Hush Puppies

Takes time to listen and explain


PDN20121217J