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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

February 17, 2011

Peninsula transportation mishaps Ferry misses 5 sailings after it grazes sandbar By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Had strong winds blown the MV Chetzemoka into rocks instead of the soft sandbar it grazed Tuesday night, the Port Townsend-Whidbey Island route could have been without a replacement for a while. Fortunately for commuters, the 3-month-old ferry was blown by 50 mph winds into a sandbar near the Coupeville (Keystone) landing shortly after 6 p.m. Tuesday — and the Chetzemoka was back in service Wednesday morning. All remaining runs were canceled Tuesday night so divers could inspect the hull to ensure the ferry was undamaged, said Washington State Ferries spokeswoman Marta Coursey. “If anything were to happen that prevented the Chetzemoka from serving the route, we would have to devise some emergency response option, depending on the timeline that the vessel would be out of service,” Coursey wrote in an e-mail to the Peninsula Daily News on Wednesday. “The Chetzemoka is sailing strong thus far, but we know this is the most challenging time of year for sailing conditions on that route [and] is difficult for any vessel in the conditions we experience

Just

KOMO News

A Kenmore Air Cessna sits on the runway after having a bit of a bumpy landing Wednesday when a tire blew upon touchdown at Boeing Field.

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

The MV Chetzemoka was back in service Wednesday after it ran aground Tuesday night and missed five sailings. this time of year.” Divers began conducting a full inspection of the hull at around 10 p.m. Tuesday and finished the inspection Wednesday before clearing the vessel’s return to service, Coursey said.

Divers look below Coast Guard inspectors also were on-site and cleared the vessel for service after the hull inspection. Weather conditions at the time of the grounding were severe, with winds at about 44 knots (50 mph) from the southeast and the current running at about 3.3 knots. The canceled sailings were the 6 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.

hangin’

sailings from Coupeville and the 6:45 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. sailings from Port Townsend. The initial Washington State Ferries report characterized the incident as a “soft grounding” and stated sailings would not resume until the vessel was determined to be safe.

No backup vessels Coursey said there are no backup vessels currently available for the Port Townsend-Coupeville route as the Steilacoom II — which serviced the route on an interim basis for three years — has been returned to its owner, Pierce County. Turn

to

Plane lands safely despite deflated tire stopped on the runway, said Tim Brooks, Kenmore operaPORT ANGELES — Kentions director. more Air had to replace a tire “The landing was perfect; it on one of its small planes from was a very smooth landing,” Port Angeles on Wednesday he said. morning after the tire deflated The tire was repaired, and while landing at Boeing Field. the plane was back in service The nine-passenger Cessna after 30 minutes, Brooks said. Caravan, flying from Port The passengers unloaded Angeles, arrived at the Seattle into two vans after a 10-minairport at 6:45 a.m. ute wait. Upon landing, the pilots No other flights were noticed that “something was affected, and no one was injured. not performing right” and Peninsula Daily News

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PT ‘perfect for a 1970s story’ Town chosen for setting of author’s first children’s book By Diane Urbani

de la

Peninsula Daily News

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

A portion of a utility pole that holds wires connecting Broadstripe cables has not been repaired since the September accident that caused the damage.

PT could lose phone, cable, Internet services while pole fragment is being removed By Charlie Bermant

31, of Port Townsend, with three passengers inside, ran into the pole in the northbound lane of PORT TOWNSEND—Cable, Sheridan Avenue near 25th Internet and phone services in Street. Port Townsend may be disrupted early Friday morning. The temporary outage will Pole uprooted, dragged allow for removal of a utility pole The pole was uprooted and fragment and replacement of dragged about 25 feet, then rested lines on a new pole, repairing the at a 45-degree angle, supported by damage caused by a drunken the electrical wires, according to driver nearly five months ago. police. On Sept. 24, a 1999 Chevrolet SUV driven by Chelah Mac Calla, Turn to Pole/A4 Peninsula Daily News

Paz

SEQUIM — Eric Delabarre had had just about enough of television’s “Law & Order.” After seven years on the show’s writing team, he wanted to do something entirely different: a novel for tweens — as in youngsters ages 8 to 13. “I’m looking for a return to story. We’re addicted to explosions; there’s so much [of media] that’s delivering crime and sexual themes,” Delabarre, 45, said this week. And though Delabarre still lives in Santa Monica, Calif., he chose Port Townsend as the setting for his first children’s book, Saltwater Taffy.

Saltwater Taffy author Eric Delabarre.

Treasure hunt It’s the story of five friends on a treasure hunt in their hometown, where they encounter colorful characters all the way. Delabarre knows the area well, since his parents, Del and Sharon Delabarre, live in Sequim and his brother, Garret, lives in Port Angeles. “Port Townsend is quaint, perfect for a 1970s story,” he said, and has the sense of community he was seeking. This Friday at 3:30 p.m., Delabarre will give a reading of Saltwater and discuss the writer’s life at Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim. Admission is free to the presentation, though if attendees want to purchase a copy of the novel, they can visit Pacific Mist Books, about five blocks south of OTA, at 121 W. Washington St. Delabarre will be there to sign books after his talk. Turn

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Business B4 Classified C5 Comics C4 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby C4 Deaths A6 Lottery A2 Movies C2 Nation/World A3

Puzzles/Games C3, C6 Sports B1 Things To Do C1 Weather C10


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UpFront

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

The Associated Press

A self-portrait by Andy Warhol sold for $17 million, double its presale estimate, at a London auction Wednesday.

Warhol art auctions for $17 million A SELF-PORTRAIT by Andy Warhol has sold for 10.8 million pounds ($17 million) — double its pre-sale estimate — at a London auction Wednesday. Christie’s Auction house said the work had been in a private collection since 1974. It is one of a series of 11 self-portraits Warhol created. The image of red and white silkscreen ink on canvas shows the artist with his hand to his mouth. It was executed in 1967, at the height of his career as the most important figure in American pop art. Christie’s said the portrait was bought by an anonymous bidder in its London auction room.

The Associated Press

Holding

court

Aretha Franklin walks on the court with Jesse Jackson after the Detroit Pistons-Miami Heat basketball game in Auburn Hills, Mich., last week. Franklin, who says she’s back at “150 percent,” is planning to return to the stage in May for her first post-surgery performance.

Extortion probe Sheriff’s detectives Wednesday delivered the results of an extortion investigation involving Mel Gibson’s ex-girlfriend to prosecutors in Los Angeles. The District Attorney’s Office will now decide whether to pursue charges against Oksana Grigorieva in the extortion case and against the Academy Award winner on domestic violence allegations.

Detectives began investigating Grigorieva in July after Gibson claimed she tried to extort him while they were working out a child custody agreement. The inquiry was started more than a month after Grigorieva reported she had been hit, and detectives interviewed Gibson about his claims. The agency turned over its results in the domestic violence inquiry to prosecutors in August.

Passings By The Associated Press

JOANNE SIEGEL, 93, who as a Cleveland teenager during the Depression hired herself out as a model to an aspiring comic book artist, Joe Shuster, and thus became the first physical incarnation of Lois Lane, Superman’s love interest, died Saturday in Santa Monica, Calif. Ms. Siegel was married to Shuster’s partner and Superman co-creator, the writer Jerry Siegel. Their Ms. Siegel daughter, in 1940s Laura Siegel Larson, confirmed her death. A high school girl with an ambitious nature and stars in her eyes, young Joanne, like teenagers everywhere, was seeking a way to earn some money when she posed for the first time as Lois Lane. During the modeling session, Ms. Siegel struck various poses — draping herself over the arms of a chair, for example, to show how she might look being carried by Superman in flight — and she and the two men, who were barely in their 20s, became friends. After her Lois Lane debut, she was an artist’s model in Boston and elsewhere. (For a time she used the name Joanne Carter.) “All her life she carried the torch for Jerry and Joe

— and other artists,” said Marc Toberoff, the lawyer for both the Siegel and Shuster families. “There was a lot of Lois Lane in Joanne Siegel.”

_________

BOB COOK, 79, one of the men featured in a Visa credit card television commercial for having never missed a Super Bowl, has died in Milwaukee. Mr. Cook had been to 44 straight Super Bowls but couldn’t make it to Texas to watch his beloved Mr. Cook Green Bay in 2011 Packers defeat the Pittsburgh Steelers on Feb. 6. Instead, Mr. Cook viewed the game from his hospital bed with his wife, who decorated his room with green and gold lights. Mr. Cook, whose obituary ends with “GO PACK GO,” died last week after a blood infection and other chronic issues, including congestive

heart failure, his wife, Sarah Cook, said Monday. She said they had their bags packed and were ready to go, but Mr. Cook told his wife three days before the game that he was too ill to travel to the game. “I’m just a die-hard Packer fan,” he told The Associated Press before the Packers’ win over the Bears in the NFC championship game Jan. 23. “I’d rather watch football than any other sport.” Sarah Cook, 60, said her husband of 28 years enjoyed doing the commercial this summer and all the attention since then. “He had so much fun with this,” she said. “The last couple months of his life were truly enjoyable.”

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 1-0-7 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 01-07-20-37-38 Wednesday’s Keno: 02-03-04-05-07-15-19-2123-24-27-30-33-35-36-37Laugh Lines 46-49-53-79 Wednesday’s Lotto: MICHELLE OBAMA 03-14-28-31-32-43 SAYS her husband, President Obama, has quit Wednesday’s Match 4: smoking. Fox News 02-06-11-17 reported this as “Obama Wednesday’s PowerDestroying the Tobacco ball: 09-13-21-23-48, PowIndustry.” Craig Ferguson erball: 24, Power Play: 2

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you agree with legislation to allow the use of dogs to hunt cougars?

Yes 

No 

45.1% 49.1%

Undecided  5.8% Total votes cast: 1,183

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  Bobby Beeman, who recently earned a graduate degree in communication and leadership studies from Gonzaga University, is a six-year employee of Olympic Medical Center. The headline over a Briefly item Wednesday on Page A10 mistakenly said she is a former employee.

__________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) Seventeen Seattle sportsmen visiting the mile-high winter playground at Deer Park yesterday expressed enthusiasm about the area. Several hundred local people gathered at the park to watch expert and amateur skiiers perform. The Seattleites said they found Deer Park, in Olympic National Forest southeast of Port Angeles, to compare very favorably with the most popular places in the Cascades. They remarked about the magnificent views from the mountain, saying Deer Park is an ideal sport for a recreational center.

1961 (50 years ago) Towns along U.S. Highway 101 on the North Olympic Peninsula are again the scene of a gasoline price war. Since Friday, the price of a gallon of gas has gone down about 5 cents. The current price is

32.9 cents per gallon for regular at most of the major dealer stations. It is even lower at independent stations.

1986 (25 years ago) A Shelton man was killed and five people were injured when two cars collided head-on near Joyce. The collision between the Shelton car and one from Clallam Bay occurred when the first car, a station wagon, encountered slush and slid into the oncoming lane, the State Patrol reported. The crash occurred 2½ miles east of Joyce on state Highway 112.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

SHOPPERS IN A TriArea grocery store stocking up in case it snows . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Feb. 17, the 48th day of 2011. There are 317 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Feb. 17, 1801, the U.S. House of Representatives broke an electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, electing Jefferson president; Burr became vice president. On this date: ■  In 1809, the Ohio Legislature voted to establish Miami University in present-day Oxford; the school opened in 1824. ■  In 1864, during the Civil War, the Union ship USS Housatonic was rammed and sunk in Charleston Harbor, S.C., by the Confederate hand-cranked submarine HL Hunley, which also sank. ■  In 1865, Columbia, S.C.,

burned as the Confederates evacuated and Union forces moved in; it’s not clear which side set the blaze. ■  In 1897, the forerunner of the National PTA, the National Congress of Mothers, convened its first meeting in Washington. ■  In 1904, the original two-act version of Giacomo Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly” was poorly received at its premiere at La Scala in Milan. ■  In 1947, the Voice of America began broadcasting to the Soviet Union. ■  In 1959, the United States launched Vanguard 2, a satellite that carried meteorological equipment onboard. ■  In 1964, the Supreme Court, in Wesberry v. Sanders, ruled that

congressional districts within each state had to be roughly equal in population. ■  In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon departed on his historic trip to China. ■  In 1986, Johnson & Johnson announced it would no longer sell over-the-counter medications in capsule form, following the death of a woman who had taken a cyanide-laced Tylenol capsule. ■  Ten years ago: Former Nation of Islam official Khalid Abdul Muhammad, known for his harsh rhetoric about Jews and whites, died at a hospital in Marietta, Ga., at age 53. ■  Five years ago: Ten U.S. service members died when a pair of Marine Corps helicopters crashed off the coast of Africa. Harry Whittington, the lawyer

shot by Vice President Dick Cheney while quail hunting, left a Corpus Christi, Texas, hospital, saying “accidents do and will happen.” ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama marked the first anniversary of the $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, saying it had staved off another Great Depression and kept up to 2 million people on the job. Eight American missionaries charged with child kidnapping in Haiti were released after nearly three weeks in a Haitian jail. Americans Lindsey Vonn and Julia Mancuso captured gold and silver, respectively, in the women’s Olympic downhill.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, February 17, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Mont. won’t wait for federal OK to kill wolves BILLINGS, Mont. — Defying federal authority over gray wolves, Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer on Wednesday encouraged ranchers to kill wolves that prey on their livestock — even in areas where that is not currently allowed — and said the state will start shooting packs that hurt elk herds. Schweitzer told The Associated Press he no longer would wait for federal officials to resolve the tangle of lawsuits over wolves, which has kept the animals on the endangered species list for a decade since recovery goals were first met. “We will take action in Montana on our own,” he said. “We’ve had it with Washington, D.C., with Congress just yipping about it, with [the Department of] Interior just vacillating about it.” Fish and Wildlife spokesman Chris Tollefson said the agency was working with Montana and other states in the region to address their concerns over the wolf population.

zures, dripping in chemicals so toxic they sickened rescue workers. Nearby, the boy’s father lay on the ground, unresponsive and doused in gasoline in what he later told police was a futile attempt to kill himself. The most horrifying find would come hours later — because the truck was too toxic to search: the deteriorating body of the boy’s twin sister, wrapped in plastic bags, wedged between chemical containers in the enclosed pickup bed. An angry judge grilled state child welfare officials over missed opportunities to help the twins after an anonymous abuse allegation was called in to a hot line Feb. 10 — four days before the children were found. The father and his wife, who adopted the twins, have been the focus of at least three abuse allegations in the past several years.

Briefly: World

The Associated Press

Anti-government demonstrators run away after being attacked by riot policemen in Manama, Bahrain, early this morning.

MANAMA, Bahrain — Riot police firing tear gas and rubber bullets stormed a landmark square occupied by anti-government protesters today, driving out demonstrators and destroying a makeshift encampment that had become the hub for demands to bring sweeping political changes to the kingdom. The main opposition group, Al Wefaq, said at least two people were killed in the pre-dawn assault on Pearl Square. There was no official word on deaths or injuries. After police regained control of the plaza, they chased protesters through side streets and put a ring of vehicles around the area just as the dawn call for prayers rang out. The blow by authorities marked a dramatic shift in tactics. It appeared Bahrain’s lead-

Triceratops

ers had sought to rein in security forces after clashes Monday that left at least two people dead and brought sharp criticism from Western allies, including the U.S. — which operates its main naval base in the Gulf from Bahrain.

Deaths in Yemen SANAA, Yemen — Police opened fire on protesters and killed two people during clashes in a southern Yemeni port Wednesday in the first known deaths in six days of Egypt-style demonstrations across the country’s biggest cities. The demonstrators are demanding the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, a key U.S. ally in battling al-Qaida. Around 2,000 police flooded the streets of the capital, Sanaa, trying to halt protests. A call spread via Facebook and Twitter urging Yemenis to join a series of “One Million People” rallies on a so-called “Friday of Rage” in all Yemeni cities, demanding the ouster of Saleh, in power for 32 years. The Associated Press

statue takes a trip

“Uncle Beazley,” the life-size fiberglass triceratops at the National Zoo in Washington, is lifted Wednesday for a trip to the Smithsonian Institution’s Office of Exhibits Central in Landover, Md. Holes and cracks will be patched and ultraviolet- and weather-resistant paint will be applied. “Uncle Beazley” is named after a dinosaur in the children’s book The Enormous Egg by Oliver Butterworth. Louis Paul Jonas created the statue in 1967.

Role for Gitmo?

WASHINGTON — If the U.S. captures top al-Qaida leaders Osama Bin Laden or Ayman alZawahiri, they would likely be sent to the Guantanamo Bay military prison, CIA Director Leon Panetta told senators Wednesday. This suggests that, given the Toxic deaths choice, President Barack Obama would not try the men in the WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Police shut down a stretch of U.S. court system, opting instead for the Bush adminisInterstate 95 in West Palm tration’s policy that the presiBeach, Fla., on Wednesday because they found a potentially dent has long criticized. Panetta discussed the hypodangerous chemical at the scene thetical capture of two of Ameriwhere an injured boy was discovered in a toxic truck with his ca’s most wanted terrorists in response to a question from a twin sister’s deteriorated body. The boy, 10, was found in the senator during a hearing about worldwide threats. front seat of an exterminator’s The Associated Press red pickup, convulsing from sei-

Police storm Bahrain camp; 2 reported dead

Smithsonian Institution National Zoological Park

‘Depraved acts’ earn pirate 33-year term By Tom Hays

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — A Somali pirate who kidnapped and brutalized the captain of a U.S.-flagged merchant ship off the coast of Africa in 2009 was sentenced to more than 33 years in prison Wednesday by an emotional judge who told him he deserved a stiff punishment for leading a crew of armed bandits bent on committing “depraved acts.” U.S. District Judge Loretta A. Preska choked up as she read at length from letters written by Capt. Richard Phillips and traumatized sailors who were aboard the cargo vessel commandeered by Abdiwali Abdiqadir Muse. The recent spate of piracy on the Indian Ocean and elsewhere “is not a Disneyland-esque problem,” she quoted Phillips of Underhill, Vt., as saying. “These are not Johnny Depps. They threaten seamen’s lives, repeatedly. . . . They deprive us of the rights that they themselves complain about,” Phillips wrote. Another officer from the ship, Colin Wright, appeared in person

to urge the judge to impose a lengthy term. He recalled being shot at and held at gunpoint by Muse and three other pirates. “What happened to us was terrible,” said Wright, 44, of Galveston, Texas. “I’m not the same person I was, and I never will be.” Muse pleaded guilty last year to hijacking, kidnapping and hostage-taking charges.

Culprit apologizes Before he was sentenced, he apologized to the victims, claiming he was a desperate, small-time player in a Somali piracy syndicate that has collected millions of dollars in ransoms. “I’m very sorry for what I did,” he said through an interpreter. “I got my hands into something that was more powerful than me.” Preska imposed the maximum prison sentence of 33 years, nine months. She noted that prosecutors had described the pirates as experienced, coordinated and sadistic — even playing Russian roulette with their hostages — during the

five-day siege of the Maersk Alabama. “They appeared to relish even their most depraved acts of physical and psychological violence,” she said. The federal prosecution in Manhattan was part of a steppedup effort to stem a wave of 21stcentury piracy by seeking justice in U.S. courts, at times using 19thcentury maritime laws. Late last year, a Virginia jury found five other Somali men guilty of exchanging gunfire with a U.S. Navy ship off the coast of Africa. Scholars called it the first piracy case to go to trial since the Civil War, when a New York jury deadlocked on charges against 13 Southern privateers. The Maersk Alabama was boarded by the pirates as it transported humanitarian supplies about 280 miles off the coast of Somalia, an impoverished nation of about 10 million people. The siege ended when Navy sharpshooters on the USS Bainbridge picked off the three pirates in a stunning nighttime operation.

Obama, GOP freshmen win in budget fight vs. jet engine The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Determined to reduce deficits, impatient House Republican freshmen made common cause with President Barack Obama on Wednesday, scoring their biggest victory to date in a vote to cancel $450 million for an alternative engine for the Pentagon’s nextgeneration warplane. “Right here, right now was a surefire way to reduce spending,” declared Rep. Tom Rooney of Florida, a second-term lawmaker whose summons to cut money from the F-35 fighter jet was answered by 47 Republican newcomers. Speaker John Boehner and

Quick Read

other House GOP leaders back the funding. The incursion into the defense budget occurred as the Republican-controlled House debated legislation to cut federal spending by more than $61 billion through the end of the current fiscal year. Nearly all of the reductions are aimed at domestic programs, ranging from education aid to nutrition, environmental protection and farm programs. Obama has threatened a veto if the measure reaches his desk, but he and the GOP newcomers were on the same side when it came to the engine for the F-35, the costliest weapons program in U.S. history. The House vote was 233-198.

Supporters had argued that the alternative engine would save money by injecting competition into the F-35 program. Apart from spending cuts and the defense budget, the broader legislation before the House contains funding needed to keep the government operating normally after current authority expires March 4. House passage is expected by week’s end. Whatever the bill’s final shape, the heavy conservative majority in the House ensures the legislation will face a hostile reception in the Senate, where Democrats generally favor higher spending for domestic programs.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Playful dog leads police to pot-tossing driver

Nation: $1 million lottery prize claimed just in time

Nation: Congresswoman’s friends to hold fundraiser

Nation: Federal funds for high-speed rail too costly

AN OREGON SHERIFF’S deputy didn’t need a drug dog to point out a stash during a recent traffic stop. The driver’s dog did it for him. Sherman County, Ore., sheriff’s Sgt. John Terrel was pulling over a pickup truck Feb. 9 when he saw a sock fly out the window. It turned out to be stuffed with marijuana and hashish. The 32-year-old driver told Terrel he was trying to hide the sock, but his pit bull mix grabbed it and wouldn’t let go, enjoying a tug-of-war game. The dog won and tossed the sock out the window, and the driver was indicted on drug possession charges.

A STALLINGS, N.C., couple claimed a $1 million lotto prize just a day before it expired. Raleigh Hill bought the Mega Millions ticket last summer. He and his wife, Erin, claimed the prize Tuesday. Hill said he only realized a couple of weeks after the Aug. 20 drawing that his ticket matched all five white balls. He waited two or three more weeks to tell his wife, until she came home at the end of a bad day. Hill told the state lottery he hesitated to come in because of the attention, and at one point, he lost track of the ticket before finding where he’d hidden it in a shoe box.

CONGRESSIONAL FRIENDS OF Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, the Tucson, Ariz., congresswoman shot in January, are holding a campaign fundraiser next month for her 2012 election. Democrats Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Rep. Adam Smith of Washington and Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida are co-chairs of the March 15 reception in Washington for the wounded Arizona congresswoman. In a letter included with the invitation, the lawmakers wrote that they were seeking support for the fundraising event so Giffords could focus on the “important work of her recovery.”

FLORIDA GOV. RICK Scott canceled plans for a high-speed train line between Orlando and Tampa promoted by President Barack Obama, saying Wednesday it would cost the state too much even with $2.4 billion in federal help. Cost overruns could put Florida on the hook for another $3 billion and once completed, there’s a good chance ridership won’t pay for the operating cost, meaning the state would have to pump more money into the line each year, Scott said. “This project would be far too costly to taxpayers, and I believe the risk far outweighs the benefits,” he said.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, February 17, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Lavender veteran to head growers’ fest By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Mary Lou Jendrucko, one of the old hands in the SequimDungeness Valley lavender business, is the new executive director of the Sequim Lavender Growers Association. Jendrucko, a lavender grower since 2000 with her husband, Paul, was hired this week to succeed Scott Nagel, who bolted to the new Sequim Lavender Farmers Association last month after its members broke away from the growers group over philosophical and administrative differences.

Manager of festival Jendrucko, who served as the lavender growers’ board president for three years, will manage this year’s 15th Sequim Lavender Festival, which for the first time is running up against a rival festival — Lavender in the Park, about a mile east near the end of Fir Street at Carrie Blake Park. “They were interviewing three people,” Jendrucko

said, “and they said, ‘Why are we looking elsewhere when we have someone involved in the busi- Jendrucko ness?’ “It was kind of dumped in my lap, but what the heck.” The Jendruckos own Sequim Lavender Co., selling their lavender stock at the Port Townsend Farmers Market, where master gardener and lavender expert Paul Jendrucko is fondly known as “Dr. Lavender.” “Everyone in the group has offered to step up and help,” Mary Lou Jendrucko said of the Sequim Lavender Growers Association’s 19 members. “We’ve got a lot of the original [lavender festival] founders, too.” Jendrucko said she has assembled “Team Lavender” from the association’s growers and others, which will manage the lavender festival. Anna Minaldi, former executive director of the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts in Port Angeles, and

Leslie Babbitt-Hamlin have joined the team, she said. Paul Jendrucko will act as media liaison. Minaldi will handle music performances for the festival and work with sponsors, and BabbittHamlin will be Jendrucko’s assistant and also work with sponsors.

Festival theme The festival’s theme this year, which can be seen on its promotional poster: “U-Pick, U-Tour, U-Free.” The festival will offer shuttle buses to downtown, and Graysmarsh Farm has been added again to the self-guided tours of farms that will also include Lavender Connection, Lost Mountain Lavender, Martha Lane Lavender, Nelson’s Duck Pond and Peninsula Nurseries. The farms are ownermember lavender operations that have developed over the years from the ground up into successful lavender businesses, according to Jendrucko. “It has been clearly shown that small farming on 1 to 3 acres can be efficient and profitable, as

demonstrated by the popularity and success of local farmers markets and inclusion of locally grown vegetables on supermarket shelves,” she said. “For anyone considering small-scale farming, this is a great opportunity to see what works firsthand and visit with the people who make it work. “And it’s free.”

One band booked Jendrucko said the team was out to draw top-notch entertainment and has already booked Chantilly Lace, an oldies band, for the Sequim Lavender Festival’s Sunday show. Before moving to Sequim, Jendrucko worked in the aerospace and electronics industries in office management and accounting for more than 20 years. While raising two daughters with her husband, Paul, she was an officer on local Parent-Teacher Association boards and active in local fundraising events and with nonprofit groups. As a long-term member of the growers association, she has served on all of its major committees and on

the board of directors. Commensurate with these positions, Jendrucko has many years of hands-on experience with producing prior lavender festivals with its contracted staff, said Terry Stolz, Sequim Lavender Growers Association board president. He said Jendrucko’s talents and varied background “make her a perfect fit for the director’s position. I don’t believe our opportunities for success are always clear until we look to our own members for their entrepreneurial spirit and success stories.” Stolz called Jendrucko an “entrepreneur, inventor, businessperson and festival vendor in her own right.” “She created and holds two U.S. patents for the only known lavender product — a lavender-filled pet bandanna under the DogdotCalm trademark and the No. 1 festival favorite in pet fashion,” he said. “Mary has a great understanding of what’s important for good festival management, its festival visitors and the entire community.” A popular antique car

club will be partnered with the Boys & Girls Club of the Olympic Peninsula in Sequim, and the festival’s “charity through commerce” theme is a huge added attraction, Stolz said.

Other event While Jendrucko and Stolz’s original lavender festival organization, Sequim Lavender Growers Association, will operate its street fair on Fir Street, the newly formed Sequim Lavender Farmers Association will base its separate July 15-17 event at Carrie Blake Park and the James Center for the Performing Arts, christening the event as Lavender in the Park. While Carrie Blake Park’s parking lot will be the central hub for bus tours to six lavender farms, Nagel said, Guy Cole Community Center’s space would be used for management and other needs during that event.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Book: Unfolds in a time before Internet, iPods Continued from A1 the hilltop. In this adventure tale, Saltwater unfolds in the five kids have gotten 1972, a time before texting, their hands on a treasure map that once belonged to iPods and the Internet. Delabarre wanted his the New Orleans pirate characters to be outdoors, Jean Lafitte. And, Delabarre added, outwitting and out-maneuvering the local villains, it’s also a story about friendwho include a one-legged ship and pursuing what you junkyard man and a creepy love, complete with morals old guy who lives on at the end of the chapters.

The author has slipped messages into Saltwater’s pages, “treasure tips” such as “Sometimes a dead end is really a new beginning” at the end of chapter 13 and “Your imagination can lift you up or down; it’s up to you” closing chapter 15. Then there’s “Friendships are memories. Make them often” following chap-

ter 21. Delabarre has been traveling around the country since releasing Saltwater via Seven Publishing, the company he and his wife, Julie, established. Ironically, he’s making appearances in Sequim, Silverdale and Port Orchard but not in Port Townsend, since he said he was unable

to find a bookstore there that could host him. Delabarre added, however, that he plans to spend time in Port Townsend in 2012, while the movie version of Saltwater Taffy is being filmed there. After Friday’s stop in Sequim, the author will head south for talks in San Diego, Fresno and other

California cities. His message to young people will be the same: Go out into your home town, and create your own adventure.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Pole: Common stopgap measure before repairs Continued from A1 messages each day, a lack of communication has delayed A new pole was replaced the repairs. Broadstripe assistant the next day, but a section of the old pole that held manager Steve Jambor said cables for Broadstripe cable the communications comTV and Qwest phone ser- pany contacted the contracvice was secured to the tor about the situation but existing wires until the could not get it scheduled, wires could be cut and reat- blaming the contractor. tached to the new utility Contractor Dan Bohman pole. of D&L Cable in Seabeck Since then, the pole frag- said he did the initial reconment has remained in place, nection but was not aware though minor repairs have that he was expected to occurred to ensure its stabi- remove the pole fragment. lization. While the wires that are Hurry-up scheduling connected to the pole frag“We were going to come ment carry thousands of

back to finish the job, but Broadstripe said they wanted their own people to do it,” Bohman said. “Now that they’ve told us that we should do it, we are going to schedule it right away.” Bohman said Wednesday that he expected to complete the job early Friday morning and that it would take only a few hours to disconnect the cable from the pole fragment, splice it together and reattach it to the new pole. Jambor said he had not heard from Bohman directly and was unaware that it

the situation and referred them to Broadstripe asking that it be repaired but had received no response. Bohman said he had done about 115 pole repairs in Jefferson County during the last year, and leaving a pole fragment with attached wires is a common stopgap measure. Completing the repairs can only be done at certain times, when television and Internet customers don’t need the information. “We used to do the Inquiries to city repairs on the weekends, Clow said he has but you can’t interrupt footreceived inquiries about ball,” he said. was on the contractor’s schedule. Jambor said he did not know how many customers would lose their service during the repair period, but “it could be a large part of Port Townsend.” Jambor, Bohman and Port Townsend Public Works Director Ken Clow said the pole fragment did not cause a safety hazard because it was secured to the wire.

TACOMA — A 25-yearold Tacoma man has pleaded guilty to killing his 23-month-old daughter.

The News Tribune reported that Andrew Houston III pleaded guilty Wednesday to seconddegree murder with aggravating circumstances. He faces a possible 25-year prison term when he’s sentenced in May. Houston has admitted inflicting the fatal injuries

on Briyana Houston in July. Court records said he told investigators he was frustrated over financial issues and the girl’s refusal to eat her dinner. Doctors who examined Briyana said her injuries included skull fractures, liver damage and severe brain injuries consistent with being violently shaken and hit with something blunt.

Wolf Prize winner PULLMAN — A former dean of the Washington State University College of

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Agriculture will be awarded the Wolf Prize for Agriculture. James Cook will share the $100,000 that is awarded annually by the Israel-based Wolf Foundation to promote science and the arts for the benefit of humankind. Cook will share the prize with Harris A. Lewin of the Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois. The presentation will take place at the Israeli Knesset Building on May 23. He is being honored for seminal discoveries in plant pathology and soil microbiology that impact crop productivity and disease management. The Associated Press

Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Continued from A1 measure and will be reviewed by the Legislature While the route will when the transportation have no backup through the budget is considered in current windy season, help early March. will come, Coursey said, when the Chetzemoka’s sis- Opposition ter ferry, the MV Salish, Taking the Salish off the operates alongside the Port Townsend route is Chetzemoka. The Salish is in the final opposed by Senate Transoutfitting stages at Everett portation Committee Chairwoman Mary Margaret Shipyard. Haugen, D-Camano Island, ‘Optimistic’ who through a spokesman Wednesday said she is com“We are extremely optimistic that the [Salish] will mitted to keeping the Salbe available for the route in ish crossing Admiralty Inlet early summer,” Coursey as planned. ________ said. There is a hitch: Jefferson County Reporter The relocation of the Charlie Bermant can be reached at Salish to a San Juan 360-385-2335 or charlie. Islands route has been sug- bermant@peninsuladailynews. gested as a cost-savings com.

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Briefly: State Tacoma man pleads guilty to filicide

“We can only do the repairs when fewer people are watching, like late at night.” Meanwhile, driver Mac Calla was charged with drunken driving, pleaded guilty and is paying $1,300 in fines on an installment plan. She is allowed to drive, but only with an interlock device attached to the automobile.

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Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

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Merchants vote to try daytime dig By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — It took two rounds of voting, but downtown merchants gave their support Wednesday to a compromise work schedule for a stormwater project that will dig up half of First Street. The city’s contractor will go ahead with a daytime and evening schedule for the first four to six weeks of the approximately fourmonth-long project — expected to start next week — and then hold another meeting with the Port Angeles Downtown Association to see if association members want the company to switch to working only at nights — outside of business hours. That next meeting has not been scheduled. The project, which mainly involves tearing up the south lane of the twolane street between Valley and Laurel streets to add a new stormwater pipe, will start in earnest Wednesday as workers begin to prepare to cut into the pavement. Work will continue until June 30 — with most of the work done by Memorial Day, May 30.

Daytime hours Some downtown merchants who feared that construction during business hours would push struggling businesses over the edge had objected to daytime work. But the possibility of moving to a nighttime schedule later and the city’s pledge to promote downtown during construction appeared to be enough to ease some of their concerns. The option adopted received overwhelming support from the approximately 35 members who voted at a meeting held in council chambers at City Hall. But it wasn’t their first vote. After hearing a presentation from city staff and the contractor, Road Construction Northwest Inc., and asking a few questions, the members voted narrowly to have work done only from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., which would extend the length of the project by about a month. Fifteen voted for nighttime work, 14 voted for the compromise solution later adopted, and nine voted to make the daytime and evening schedule final. (Three votes were submitted via e-mail before the meeting.)

Another count with just the top-two options was held after it became known that votes were submitted by people who did not attend the meeting. During that round, 29 voted for the compromise and seven voted for nighttime work only. Barb Frederick, downtown association executive director, said the e-mailed votes were counted both times.

Merchant protests The second vote prompted First Street merchant Don Zeller to stand up and protest. “We took a vote, and we should stand by it,” he said. Zeller, who owns Zeller’s Antique Mall, had organized a petition against the day and evening schedule, which received 53 signatures in two days. He said after the meeting he was still disappointed Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News there was a second vote. Traffic makes its way up the 100 block of West First Street in downtown Port Angeles on “We got what we got now; we have to weather the Wednesday. Portions of First Street from Valley to Lincoln streets will be torn up for storm drain storm and see what hap- replacement starting at the end of this month. pens,” Zeller added. The business owner started the petition out of concern that construction during business hours would be devastating to downtown merchants. Construction will occur from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays — between 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. — By Tom Callis The last phase — paving the with no work between and from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. FriPeninsula Daily News north lane between Valley and 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. — and days, said Brian Menard of Road Laurel streets, applying fog seal to from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. FriPORT ANGELES — Drivers Construction Northwest Inc. the block between Laurel and Lindays, said Brian Menard, may find it slow-going on First Construction will start at the coln streets, adding bike lanes, RCNW superintendent, Street downtown next week — and Valley Street intersection, where replacing the brick crosswalks with after the meeting. each week after that until Memocrews will spend about two weeks concrete stamped with a brick patIn June, crews will pave rial Day — as workers start a installing a stormwater filter, he tern and adding a crosswalk the north lane between Valstormwater project that will said. between Valley and Cherry streets ley and Laurel streets, apply involve placing a new pipe under The next part of the project — will occur between May 19 and fog seal to the block between the south lane between Valley and involves RCNW of Renton, the June 30. Most of that phase will be Laurel and Lincoln streets, Laurel streets. city’s contractor, digging up the done at night. add bike lanes and replace Over the next four months, south lane of First Street between Parking on the south side of the and add crosswalks. workers will install the pipe and Valley and Oak streets, installing road will be eliminated as workers While work will occur give the road a new layer of the stormwater pipe and paving dig into the road, but city staff said during the day, the heavy asphalt. the lane. That is scheduled to fin“demolition” work will be they are talking to the owners of On-site work is scheduled to ish April 12. limited to the evenings, the building that housed Gottbegin Tuesday, and city staff said The south lane between Valley Menard said. schalks to try to open its parking traffic will likely start to be and Oak streets will be covered spaces to the public. impacted Wednesday. with gravel — but still closed to Best option Sidewalks and businesses will The project is expected to finish traffic — until the pipe is installed remain open. June 30 — with the new pipe in Menard, who spoke at between those blocks. ________ the meeting, said afterward place by Memorial Day (May 30). The project’s next phase will that he feels the solution Construction will occur from involve doing the same between Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at adopted by the downtown 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Oak and Laurel streets. That will 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsula association was the best dailynews.com. Thursdays — with no work be finished May 20. option. He said the selling point is “we can be done sooner.” was concerned that her The city is contributing is intended to remove of the dams’ removal. Northwest Fudge and business won’t be able to $150,000 for street paving, enough stormwater from In order to not add to the Confections owner Lindi survive the project. That he said. It has budgeted the city’s sewer system to city’s sewage overflow probLumens — who spoke hasn’t changed, she said. $225,000 for it. offset the contribution of lem, the park service agreed against a daytime-evening The project has a price sewage from the Lower to fund a stormwater disschedule when the idea was Restoration effort tag of about $2.25 million, Elwha Klallam reservation. connect project to offset the first broached Feb. 9 — said Glenn Cutler, city public The tribe will be con- impact. The National Park Sershe now feels more comfortworks and utilities director, vice is covering that cost nected to the city’s sewers ________ able with the project. because the project is part because it’s expected that “The opportunity to reas- said at the meeting. Reporter Tom Callis can be About $2.1 million is of its Elwha River restora- its septic tanks will become reached at 360-417-3532 or at sess it will make a differcovered by the National tion effort. unusable as the ground tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. ence,” she said. The First Street project water level rises as a result com. Lumens had said she Park Service, he said.

Downtown Port Angeles timetable for First Street work

DNR employee remembered for volunteerism By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

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Gaydeski. Other relatives are business owners, mainly in construction and logging, on the West End. His brother-in-law William “Tod” Horton, who was married to his wife’s sister, De Ann Horton, was killed in a logging accident in October.

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In addition to activities such as the Lions Club Kiddies Play Day during the Forks Old Fashioned Fourth of July festival, Gaydeski also participated in volunteer work. “We reroofed the dome at [Tillicum] park,” Ruble said.

Because of his participation in the club, his family requested that memorial contributions be given to the Forks Lions Club in his memory. In addition to longtime friends, Ruble was also a co-worker with Gaydeski at the Department of Natural Resources. Gaydeski was hired by DNR in April 2006 and was promoted to his current position in May 2007. Before working for DNR, Gaydeski and his wife, Deborah, had run the Sappho Junction store, which was destroyed in a fire in October 2004.

Saturday at The Round House, 110 Business Park, at the intersection of state Highway 110 and U.S. Highway 101. He is survived by his wife, Deborah Hurn Gaydeski, and three children, Mason Gaydeski, Marin Gaydeski and Morgan Gaydeski. Gaydeski is a nephew of former Clallam County Commissioner Lawrence

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His ancestors settled a citation is warranted,” Cashomestead north of Forks tro said. Gaydeski’s death was where a road is named for the sixth on-the-job fatality them. this year, including of three Other investigations state employees, Castro said. Because Gaydeski was “We don’t have a lot of killed in an on-the-job inci- information at this point, dent, the Department of but we do understand that Labor and Industries will the employee was doing investigate, said spokes- some brush cutting and man Hector Castro. somehow was pulled into Such investigations typi- the mower,” Castro said. cally take about six months “We will be looking into to complete, Castro said. how it happened and if it “We will be looking at could have been prevented.” exactly what happened, what led to the fatality, and Memorial Saturday we always try to see if there A celebration of life serwere any violations of worker safety laws and if a vice will be held at 2 p.m.

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FORKS — Sam Gaydeski was dedicated to his community, always vested in local events and volunteer work, friends remembered Wednesday. Gaydeski, 50, of Beaver was killed Monday while on the job clearing weeds for the state Department of Natural Resources near Clearwater in West Jefferson County. Guy Ruble, president of the Forks Lions Club, on Wednesday said Gaydeski was a very active participant in the service organization. “We sure enjoyed his time in the Lions Club and with that gang — we will miss him,” Ruble said. “He sure loved this community and was vested in it.” The body was found in the late evening Monday on White Rock Road, said Jefferson County Sheriff ’s Chief Criminal Deputy Joe Nole. Although the Sheriff’s Office is still investigating the events leading up to his death, it appeared to be accidental, Nole has said.

“We cut firewood in Quincy in exchange for food for food banks. “He also participated in raising tons of funds for scholarships for kids in high school going to college. “I couldn’t find a single bad thing to say about him — nobody could.” Gaydeski had been a member of the Lions Club since 1991 and was a past president.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Cutting of presidential primary mulled Lawmakers consider opting for a caucus-only system By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Lawmakers weighed arguments Wednesday on whether Washington state should suspend the 2012 presidential primary to save money and opt instead for a caucus-only system that would appoint party delegates to national conventions. The proposal from Gov.

Chris Gregoire would save the state $10 million in the next two-year budget, but it comes as Democrats say the state party is considering moving away from the caucus system it has operated under for decades. Democratic representatives asked lawmakers at the hearing to delay the suspension of the primary until the party decides what

it’s doing in 2012. “I am a strong advocate of the presidential primary,” said Secretary of State Sam Reed, who oversees the state’s elections. “I’m against using caucuses, but our state is in such a fiscal crisis that to spend $10 million, particularly when the parties, particularly Democrats, haven’t really used, it’d be wasteful.” Currently, Washington has both a presidential primary and a caucus system. The cut would not affect the top-two primary

for other races. A statewide presidential primary had been established in 1989 after voters approved an initiative, but the state’s political parties, especially the Democrats, have largely ignored it, preferring to choose their candidates in caucuses of the party faithful. In 2008, the Republican Party appointed about half of its delegates from the statewide primary, said Peter Graves, spokesman for the state Republican Party. While comparably small

to others, the $10 million cut from the Secretary of State’s Office is part of the governor’s all-cuts budget to tackle a projected deficit of $5 billion in the next twoyear budget. The primary has been suspended in the past, in 2004. Reed, a Republican, said his office has lost 28 percent of its budget, adding that the Elections Department has gone down from 22 workers to 10. “This is our budget cut. As much as I hate to do it, that is what we’re advocating,” Reed said.

The proposal, though, spurred some concerns from the Democratic and Republican parties. Both parties are lobbying lawmakers to delay the decision of the suspension until after April, saying the state would not lose any money by delaying it until then. “Right now, we’re reevaluating whether we’re going to elect delegates via the caucus process or not,” said Cody Arledge of the Democratic Party, adding that there were many complaints in 2008 with the system.

Storm damage spurs emergency declaration Clallam, 16 other counties are included in governor’s proposal By Rob Ollikainen

several days in mid-January, and heavy rains triggered a mudslide that blocked state PORT ANGELES — Highway 112 east of Neah Clallam is one of 17 counties Bay on Jan. 14. for which Gov. Chris Gregoire has declared a state of ‘Extensive rainfall’ emergency for storm damage sustained between Jan. 9 “The extensive rainfall and Jan. 26. and high winds caused High winds rattled the extensive damage to homes, North Olympic Peninsula for businesses, highways and Peninsula Daily News

public facilities,” Gregoire said in a news release. “The estimated cost to repair the damages is currently more than $1.1 million and growing.” The emergency declaration means state agencies can spend money beyond budget appropriations to offer aid to local jurisdictions. The declaration covers Clallam, Chelan, Clark, Cowlitz, Grant, Grays Harbor, King, Kittitas, Klickitat, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Wah-

kiakum and Whatcom counties. Clallam County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Jim Borte said much of the damage occurred on Clallam’s West End.

Tribes reported “That was reported by the Makah and Quileute tribes,” he said. “Clallam County Public Works also filed some damage-response costs associated with the storm.”

The state Department of Transportation hired a contractor to remove 300 to 400 truckloads of mud that blocked the only paved access to Neah Bay on Jan. 16. “That took the total above the qualifying threshold,” Borte said. The qualifying threshold was $210,996.75, Borte said. Gregoire also asked President Barack Obama to declare a federal disaster area in seven Washington counties — Clallam, Cowlitz, Kitsap, Mason, Skagit, Ska-

mania and Snohomish — for damage caused by winter storms between Dec. 8 and Dec. 18.

Snow, high winds Snow, high winds and heavy rain caused flooding, landslides and power outages. Federal Emergency Management Agency grants will defray 75 percent of eligible damage and costs from the December storms if the declaration is approved.

Briefly: State No charges in slaying of woodcarver

Police Chief John Diaz said Birk’s resignation won’t curtail a departmental investigation into his conduct.

SEATTLE — Prosecutors said Wednesday they won’t criminally charge a Seattle police officer who shot and killed a knifewielding, homeless Native American woodcarver during a brief encounter on a street corner in a case that has prompted angry protests and calls for increased scrutiny of police tactics. Officer Ian Birk, who had been on paid leave since the Aug. 30 shooting, resigned hours after King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg’s announcement. Relatives and other supporters of John T. Williams had asked Satterberg to charge Birk, 27, with manslaughter, saying Williams didn’t pose a threat to the officer. The officer said he fired only after Williams failed to drop the 3-inch knife despite being repeatedly ordered to do so. At a news conference, Satterberg said the shooting was a “good-faith mistake, however tragic,” and no charges would be filed. But the Police Department’s Firearms Review Board separately released findings Wednesday that describe the shooting as “unjustified and outside of policy, tactics and training.”

Pastor arrested

Death Notices Stephen Gottlieb Lewis Dec. 14, 1941 — Feb. 11, 2011

Mr. Lewis’ obituary was published Wednesday on Page A7. Services: Feb. 27, 3:30 p.m., Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave., Port Townsend. Potluck will follow. Kosec Funeral Home, Port Townsend, is in charge of arrangements. www.kosecfuneralhome.com

Gertrude Joy Stock May 6, 1918 — Feb. 5, 2011

Police shooting

EVERETT — The city of Everett has settled a lawsuit with the family of a man who was shot and killed by a police officer in 2009. The city has agreed to pay $500,000 to the famInmate assault ily of Niles Meservey, who MONROE — Police was shot outside the were called to the Washing- Chuckwagon Inn. ton state prison complex in The case was set to go Monroe on Wednesday to trial in April. A Seattle after an inmate attacked a layer announced the settlement Wednesday. female counselor from The Herald of Everett behind at about 1 p.m. She was injured, but her reported that Meservey’s

daughter originally filed a $15 million wrongful death claim against the city, which the city wouldn’t pay. They planned to argue in court that Meservey was drunk and belligerent when Officer Troy Meade encountered him and that he was responsible for his own death. A jury in April 2010 acquitted Meade of all criminal charges, but in the second phase of the trial, the jury found the shooting wasn’t in self-defense. Meade has been on paid administrative leave since 2009.

Hoopfest shooting SPOKANE — A man who shot three bystanders during last summer’s Hoopfest basketball tournament in Spokane has pleaded guilty to assault charges. Miguel C. Garcia, 19, was originally charged with 10 counts of attempted first-degree murder but pleaded guilty to two counts of seconddegree assault and unlaw-

Death and Memorial Notice SANDRA L. MUNN September 10, 1951 February 11, 2011 Sandra L. Munn, 59, of Quilcene passed away February 11, 2011, in Bremerton, Washington, of cancer. She was born September 10, 1951, in Bonners Ferry, Idaho, to Noble Dean and Lucille Lila (Knight) Pierce. Sandra married James H. Munn on September 30, 2000, in Quilcene. She was a store manager for Washington State Liquor Control Board in Sequim and resided in Lake Leland. She loved spending weekends in her gardens or on the water with her family and dogs. Sandra loved to travel and was always the first one on the dance floor. She always made the annual trek to

Mrs. Munn the Winthrop Blues Festival. Sandra was a member of the Quilcene Harbor Yacht Club. She is survived by her husband, James H. Munn; daughter and son-in-law, Kae’la and Dave Ramsay; parents, Lucille Lien and Hector and Verna Munn;

brothers and sisters-inlaw, Ron and Nancy Pierce, and Terry and Sharon Pierce; grandchildren, Joshua Irwin, Magnum Jacobs, Samantha Ramsay and Qierstin Ramsay; and great-granddaughter Kayli Irwin. She was preceded in death by her father, Noble Dean Pierce; and grandmother, Francis L. Knight. Every one is welcome to attend memorial services at the Quilcene High School multipurpose room, 294715 Highway 101, Quilcene, February 19, 2011, 2 p.m. A potluck and fun celebration of her life will follow services at the Quilcene Masonic Lodge Memorial donation may be made to the Quilcene Harbor Yacht Club Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 208, Quilcene, WA 98376.

ful possession of a firearm. He’s expected to serve nearly nine years in prison after he is sentenced April 12. Garcia opened fire with a handgun on rival gang members but struck three bystanders. They suffered relatively minor injuries.

Battle ax attack YAKIMA — A man who attacked a neighbor with a battle ax in 2009 in a Union Gap trailer park has been sentenced to more than 10 years in prison. The Yakima HeraldRepublic reported that 43-year-old Russell Fiske had earlier pleaded guilty to

Death and Memorial Notice PHYLLIS CREHAN MARTY January 9, 1913 February 14, 2011 Phyllis Crehan Marty, longtime resident of Port Angeles, died on February 14, 2011, at the age of 98. She was born to William J. and Georgine (Yearian) Crehan on January 9, 1913, in Junction, Idaho. Her father was a rancher in Lemhi County. She lived an interesting life as a rancher’s child. When she was 2 years old, her mother registered the livestock brand “Bar Quarter Circle C” in Phyllis’ name for the fee of $1. In the early 1920s, the family moved to Seattle, Washington, to escape the cold Idaho winters and the hardships of ranching. They lived in the Queen Anne neighborhood, where Phyllis and her brother both attended school. Phyllis graduated from St. Anne’s School in Seattle in 1929, and then attended high school at Holy Angels Academy in the Ballard area. Later she went to business school in downtown Seattle. During World War II,

downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

she worked as a “Rosie the Riveter” at the Boeing plant in Seattle. She often commented that she worked with her father even though he was in another building. She moved to the Port Angeles area after the war, where one of her first jobs was transporting Foss tug crews by car between Seattle and Neah Bay. Phyllis spent a great deal of time exploring Olympic National Park and photographing the beauty of the area. She also bartended for many years and talked of how much she enjoyed visiting with people. Every spring she looked forward to the new baseball season and the chance to watch the Seattle Mariners on TV. She declared that one of the main reasons for having cataract surgery was so she could watch her favorite pitcher, Jamie Moyer. She is survived by cousins Ted and Calvin Yearian, and two nephews. She will be buried at Holyrood Cemetery, Shoreline, Washington, alongside of both parents and her brother, Stephen.

“Thank you all for your kindness”

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

first-degree assault in Yakima County Superior Court. Deputy Prosecutor Sam Chen said the victim, who is in his 30s, was left permanently disabled and not able to work. The man suffered a skull fracture, and his left cheek was almost cut off. Fiske’s defense attorney had questioned his mental capacity, which likely would have been an issue if the case had gone to trial. In exchange for the guilty plea, the prosecutor did not ask for two more years in jail because of weapons enhancement to the charges. The Associated Press

Perhaps you sent a lovely card, Or sat quietly in a chair. Perhaps you sent a floral piece, If so we saw it there. Perhaps you spoke the kindest words, As any friend could say; Perhaps you were not there at all, Just thought of us that day. Whatever you did to console our hearts, We thank you so much whatever the part.

125112319

Former West End resident Gertrude Joy Stock of Bellingham died of cardiac arrest. She was 92. Her obituary will be published later. Services: March 5, 2 p.m., Clallam Bay Presbyterian Church with the Rev. George Eastman officiating. A reception will follow. Burial will be in Mount Angeles Memorial Park, Port Angeles. Jerns Funeral Chapel, Bellingham, is in charge of arrangements. www.jernsfuneralchapel.net

PORT ORCHARD — The Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office said a 32-yearold Port Orchard pastor has been arrested for investigation of child rape. The Sheriff’s Office said the rapes are alleged to have occurred between 2002 and 2003 when the victim attended the Manchester Christian Academy and the man was her teacher. The man has been booked into the county jail, with bail set at $250,000.

injuries are not life-threatening, police said. The Monroe Correctional Center has been on lockdown since Jan. 29, when Corrections Officer Jayme Biendl was killed in the chapel at the Washington State Reformatory. The Monroe Correctional Center has five separate units. Last year, there were four assaults on staff at Monroe that were considered severe enough to require a police investigation.

The family of

Olive, Randy & Annie, Gordy & Beth,

Newt Dale & Rachael, Kenny & Julie, Marcella Dawley & Larry Tveit, Sandra & Bruce Meyer


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, February 17, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

Obama’s budget: Same old, same old ON THE HOME page of the Office of Management and Budget website (www.whitehouse. gov/omb), President Obama is quoted: “Rather than Cal fight the same tired battles Thomas that have dominated Washington for decades, it’s time to try something new.” If only he would, but the president’s proposed $3.7 trillion budget is more of the same — taxing and spending for which liberal Democrats are known and “cuts” as in Pell Grants and home heating assistance for the poor he knows congressional Democrats are unlikely to approve. It is also full of assumptions about revenue and a rosy scenario on economic growth that is more than double current growth. Rep. Jim Jordan, (R-Ohio), chairman of a Republican Study Committee made up of economic

and socially conservative members, told me over breakfast Tuesday: “The $1.1 trillion savings claim made by the president over 10 years is nothing. This year’s deficit is $1.5 trillion.” The president’s budget is more a political document designed to trap Republicans into going first with serious entitlement reform than a serious proposal. The Washington Post and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, both historically liberal newspapers, say he “punted” on the budget and “kicks the hard choices further down the road” (Post) and the projected deficit “would be larger, in inflationadjusted dollars, than any deficit between 1940 and 2008” (Journal-Constitution). The proposed spending cuts in the budget are, according to Investors Business Daily, “beyond absurd. The expected deficit this year alone . . . is greater than all ‘deficit cuts’ Obama has in 10 years.” While House Republicans

want to cut $100 billion from monstrous spending in the current and fiscal 2012 budgets, and Democrats are in their familiar full-throated cry about how such “deep cuts” would be cruel toward the “needy.” But even Democrats know what must be done to get spending under control — entitlements, such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, which make up nearly two-thirds of the federal budget, must be reformed now. Congressman Jordan tells me that in spite of the potential for political fallout, House Republicans will offer a plan for entitlement reform by the August recess. He believes it will include means testing and some form of vouchers that will allow people to shop for their own health care in the private sector and for younger workers to have the opportunity to invest their money in a personal retirement account that earns interest and belongs to them. “The American people are ready for truth, facts and some tough love measures,” says

Peninsula Voices Newspaper fan I recently looked at the “news” on the Internet. I found this tiring and time-consuming wading through the commercials for the following: Every “story” came with at least one time-consuming commercial. The stories were edited and produced like a show instead of straightforward news. The comics, classifieds, ads, notices and general relevant information were not there. The “news” reporters acted like a not-wellrehearsed beginning acting class. I read newspapers daily, including the Peninsula Daily News. I am able to scan a paper by looking at the (headings at the beginning of a story?) and decide if I want to read further. I can also scan through an article to determine if I

Jordan, adding, “the window to fix our country is closing rapidly, and it will only get worse if we don’t act now.” The key to what is bound to be hand-to-hand combat in the coming debate will be whether Republicans can change our “entitlement” mentality and cause people to focus instead on economic liberty and personal freedom. Can government do more for you than you can do for yourself? If Medicare and Social Security are going broke, why would anyone trust even bigger and costlier government to do better with more of our money? Some Democrats, like Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.), are concerned about the continued level of deficit spending. Conrad believes the nation needs “a much more robust package of deficit and debt reduction over the medium and long term. “It is not enough to focus primarily on cutting the non-security discretionary part of the budget, which accounts for just

Our readers’ letters, faxes

have any interest. There is at least once a month that I cut out something out in the PDN that is relevant and informative to my activities. I have enough electromagnetic stimulation in my daily life, and reading the “paper” anytime, anyplace, in any position, and I can carry it in my back pocket. Don Cooper, Port Angeles

School needs Thanks, Port Angeles, for passing our school district levy. I and other local teachers appreciate your support. However, don’t forget that our schools remain woefully underfunded. Here are but three examples: n First, perhaps most importantly, our schools need full-time, trained psychological counselors. It’s shocking how many of our kids are suffering

from psychological trauma or other mental health issues. It’s naive to think that kids’ untreated psychological needs are not affecting their education. n Second, there is a

great injustice to many of our kids who need specialized help. Did you know that kids with “low IQs” who are performing academically near their “ability level” do not qualify for extra help?

12 percent of spending this year. “Instead, we need a comprehensive long-term debt reduction plan, in the size and scope of what was proposed by the President’s Fiscal Commission.” President Obama ignored the commission’s recommendations. Changing the way we think about entitlements, economic liberty and personal responsibility will be a challenge for congressional Republicans. They’ve tried before and Democrats demagogued them into submission. They will try to re-run the same play this time. One hopes Rep. Jordan is right that the country is ready for truth, facts and tough love. ________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. Thomas can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

n And third, but not last, we don’t have the money to provide full-time librarians for our schools. This adversely affects the classroom teachers’ ability to provide enrichment experiences for our children. Libraries should be the living hearts of our schools, not neglected stepchildren. We need to get our priorities straight. What’s more important, spending billions on wars with dubious goals and results, or strengthening our nation from within with strong and vital public schools? We should quit kowtowing to corporations and their tunnel vision on the almighty dollar and build a Because the lack of nation with true inner money drives the screening strength. criteria for helping our lowThis can be accomachieving kids, many chilplished by faithfully and dren who need specialized robustly supporting our help are left to their teach- public schools. ers’ overburdened responsiCraig Chambers, bilities to help. Port Angeles

Obama’s budget: Military takes the cake PRESIDENT OBAMA UNLEASHED his proposed 2012 budget this week, pronouncing, proudly: “I’ve called for a freeze on annual domestic spending over the next five years. “This freeze would cut the deficit by more Amy than $400 bilGoodman lion over the next decade, bringing this kind of spending — domestic discretionary spending — to its lowest share of our economy since Dwight Eisenhower was president.” Focus on the word “freeze.” That is exactly what many people might do, if this budget passes as proposed. While defense spending increases, with the largest Pentagon funding request since World War II, the budget calls for cutting in half a program called Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, or LIHEAP. LIHEAP offers block grants to states so they can offer financial assistance to low-income households in order to meet home

energy needs, mostly for heating. Most of its recipients are the elderly and disabled. The program is currently funded at more than $5 billion. Obama is calling for that to be slashed to $2.57 billion — roughly half. This life-or-death program — which literally can help prevent people from freezing to death — represents less than one-tenth of 1 percent of the proposed $3.7 trillion annual budget. Compare this with the proposed military budget. “Defense spending” is a misnomer. Until 1947-48, the Pentagon was officially, and appropriately, called the War Department. In the proposed budget released on Valentine’s Day, the Department of Defense request is $553 billion for the base budget, an increase of $22 billion above the 2010 appropriation. The White House has touted what it calls “$78 billion” in cuts that Defense Secretary Robert Gates is considering. But as the Institute for Policy Studies notes: “The Defense Department talks about cutting its own budget — $78 billion over five years — and most reporting

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takes this at face value. “It shouldn’t. The Pentagon is following the familiar tradition of planning ambitious increases, paring them back and calling this a cut.” The $553 billion Pentagon budget doesn’t even include war. To Obama’s credit, the costs are actually in the budget. President George W. Bush repeatedly called those expenditures “emergency” needs — and pressured Congress to pass supplemental funding, outside of the normal budget process. The Obama administration, nevertheless, has given the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan the Orwellian moniker “Overseas Contingency Operations” and is asking for $118 billion. Add to that the $55 billion for the National Intelligence Program (a budget item for which the amount has never before been revealed, according to government secrecy expert Steven Aftergood), and the publicly revealed military/intelligence budget is at close to three-quarters of a trillion dollars. Obama’s 216-page budget doesn’t mention “Pentagon” once. He does invoke the name of President Eisenhower, though.

Two times he credits Eisenhower for creating the national interstate highway system, and, as mentioned, boasts of the proposed spending freeze: “This freeze would be the most aggressive effort to restrain discretionary spending to take effect in 30 years and, by 2015, would lower nonsecurity discretionary funding as a share of the economy to the lowest level since Dwight D. Eisenhower was president.” If he is going to reference his predecessor, he should learn from Eisenhower’s prescient warning, given in his farewell speech in 1961: “In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. “The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.” Another Eisenhower speech that should guide Obama was given in April 1953, before the American Society of Newspaper Editors, just two weeks after he was inaugurated as president. The general-turned-president said:

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.” This is one of the coldest winters on record. One in eight people in the United States is on food stamps, the largest percentage of Americans ever. More, as well, are without health insurance, despite the initial benefits of the health-care reform act passed last year. Americans are cold, hungry and unemployed. By increasing military spending, already greater than all of the world’s military budgets combined, we are only spreading that misery abroad. We should get our priorities straight. ________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. E-mail Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, February 17, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Outdoors

Will clams bounce back? THE FEARED DEMISE of Kalaloch Beach’s razor clam population will be put to the test this weekend. Surf conditions are Matt expected to be Schubert good, and the weather fair for this weekend’s set of openers at the Olympic National Park beach. So if there’s something wrong with Kalaloch’s clams, as some park biologists suggest could be the case, we should have a good idea after Friday and Saturday. As park coastal ecologist Steve Fradkin said after the last set of digs in January produced poor harvest rates, the park service will certainly be paying attention. “I think we’re really looking at these next set of digs [to see what] we have,” Fradkin said. “It will really be interesting to see what that next set of digs is in terms of whether we get a bounce back in digger success.” Diggers averaged approximately one clam per person during the two openers in late January. The two digs before that around the New Year’s holiday weren’t much better (4.1 clams per digger). A large part of that, however, could be attributed to poor digging conditions. The New Year’s digs had positive low tides (minus tides are preferred), while the late January harvests were accompanied by rough surf and poor weather. Still, Fradkin and company are keeping a close eye on Kalaloch when it opens to afternoon digging Friday and Saturday. “It raises a little bit of concern because the last set of digs we saw a marked decrease in the catch per effort,” Fradkin said in late January. “This certainly seems to be a drop in the digger success, but the last two sets of digs we’ve not had really optimal conditions. “On New Year’s they were positive tides, but we didn’t see where the clam beds were exposed. We didn’t see a whole lot of [clam] shows, and we did see some dead razor clam shows on the beach.” Obviously, that last part raises an eyebrow. Dead clams washed ashore right before the Kalaloch razor clam population went in the tank four years ago. That led to complete closures of the beach to razor clam digging for two straight years. If diggers can rebound a little bit this weekend at Kalaloch, perhaps we can all breath a sigh of relief. Four other ocean beaches (Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks and Long Beach) will open to digs this weekend. That begins with Twin Harbors opening today through Saturday to afternoon digging and includes Friday and Saturday digs at Copalis, Mocrocks and Long Beach. It is recommended that diggers get on the beach at least one hour before low tide. Here are the tides for each day: ■ Today — Minus 0.9 feet at 5:53 p.m. ■ Friday — Minus 0.9 feet at 6:33 p.m. ■ Saturday — Minus 0.5 feet at 7:13 p.m. For more information on coastal razor clams, visit wdfw.wa.gov/ fishing/shellfish/razorclams.

BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Olivo to help young pitchers Catcher back in M’s camp The Associated Press

PEORIA, Ariz. — Be it in Spanish or English, in the clubhouse or bullpen, Miguel Olivo comes in loud and clear. He might be calling out to get a teammate’s attention or merely to let his pitcher know to give him the offspeed stuff. Whatever the reason, Olivo is no longer the quieter, more observant guy he was the last time he wore a Seattle Mariners uniform in 2005. He played for four other teams before returning to the Mariners as a free agent this offseason.

He’s a better hitter with more power, and to hear him tell it, he’s much more mature. “I’m happy to be back and I hope everything that happens here is good,” Olivo said. “I’m glad to be playing another year in the big leagues.” With an overall young pitching staff, adding Olivo to help guide the Mariners pitchers was key. “I’ve been around and I’ve caught a lot of good pitchers,” Olivo said. “Now I get to work with a lot of youngsters and it’s something I can do to help the team.” Olivo arrived in Seattle in 2004 when the Mariners dealt one of their best all-time pitchers, Freddy Garcia, to the Chicago White Sox for three prospects,

including Olivo. But Olivo struggled, especially with the bat, during the parts of 2004 and 2005 he was with the Mariners. That made him trade material, and he was shipped to the San Diego Padres in July 2005. That’s when Olivo’s fortunes turned for the better. He appeared in the 2005 NL Division Series for San Diego after batting .304 in 37 games for the Padres. Then came two decent years with the Florida Marlins followed by two more with Kansas City, including the 2009 season, when Olivo represented his native Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic and hit a careerJohn Lok/The Seattle Times high 23 home runs for the RoySeattle catcher Miguel als. Turn

Olivo participates in a drill

to

Mariners/B3 in spring training.

Sequim, PA boys advance Wolves, Riders are a victory away from going to state Peninsula Daily News

TACOMA — Corbin Webb sank 21 points to spark the Sequim boys basketball team to within one win of the state tournament. The Wolves (16-7) took a big lead against Renton and held on to win the first-round West Central District game 59-54 at Foss High School on Wednesday night. Port Angeles, meanwhile, beat Sumner 55-45 right behind the Sequim game in a doubleheader to advance to the district quarterfinals against Fife on Friday night at Foss High School. Sequim, the No.11 seed out of 12 seeds, advances to the championship quarterfinals against Olympic League champion and No. 3 seed Kingston (16-4) on Friday at Foss at 6 p.m., just before the Riders in another doubleheader featuring the longtime North Olympic Peninsula rivals.

Playoffs The Kingston-Sequim winner earns a trip to state while the loser must battle its way through the consolation bracket in the double-elimination tourney. Against Renton, the No. 6 seed, the Wolves built an early lead 16-11 lead at the end of the first period, and held on to a 26-25 advantage at halftime and led most of the second half. Sequim led by 12 points in the second half but let Renton back in the game by making fouls in the fourth quarter. “This was definitely a big win for us,” Glasser said. The last time the Wolves won on district, two years ago, they advanced to the state tourney. Three players scored in double figures for Sequim as Nick Camporini canned 11 points and Gabe Carter had 10.

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Sequim’s Gabe Carter (11) and Renton’s Darren Briggs Turn to Preps/B3 (15) go for the rebound in a district game Wednesday.

PA is a Knowles family affair Dad-daughter duo sparks Rider girls team By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

Derby days The legal briefs have all been put away (I hope). The boundaries have been set. The Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby — formerly the Discovery Bay Salmon Derby — comes to the area this Saturday through Monday. All that remains is for one lucky (Or is it skillful?) angler to haul in the biggest fish in the ladder (hatchery only) and bring home enough cash ($10,000) to start paying off all of those fishing debts. Turn

to

Schubert/B3

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles basketball head coach Mike Knowles talks to his daughter, Alison Knowles, on the bench during Friday night’s game against Port Townsend. The two are concluding a lifelong coach-student relationship that started when Alison was a little girl. The Knowles are hoping to help lead the Roughriders to state.

PORT ANGELES — It’s the second quarter of a blowout against Olympic League rival Port Townsend, but Mike Knowles isn’t happy. His starting point guard just needlessly committed her third foul of the game and is standing only a few feet away from the seething Port Angeles girls basketball coach. “Stop pressing!” he screams loud enough that the Roughrider gymnasium comes to a standstill. Just another tense moment between player and coach? Sure, but with one notable exception: The subject of Mike’s ire is also the youngest of his two children, senior guard Alison Knowles. Not exactly the sort of fatherdaughter moment you’d find in a Hallmark card, but it’s one Alison and Mike know better than most after four years together in the Rider basketball program. “There is a fine line between dad and coach, and no one will understand that line unless you’ve been through it,” said Alison, the Riders’ top passer at 5.5 assists per game this year. “It’s really hard to go from the person who is screaming their guts at you to it’s my dad sitting across at the table from me [at home] when deep down you want to yell at him.” Somehow, the two have managed to do just that the past four years without affecting the Riders’ chemistry on the court. Perhaps that’s because basketball has been a part of their father-daughter relationship since Alison “was in diapers.” Turn

to

Knowles/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Girls Basketball: Port Angeles vs. Olympic at Class 2A West Central District Tournament at Foss High School in Tacoma, 6 p.m.

Friday Boys Basketball: Sequim and Port Angeles at West Central District Tournament in championship second round if they win on Wednesday; Neah Bay vs. Christian Faith in winner-to-state, loser-out at Class 1B tri-district tournament, at Mountlake Terrace High School, 2 p.m. Girls Basketball: Neah Bay vs. Lopez in tridistrict tournament championship and stateseeding game, at Mountlake Terrace High School, 6 p.m. Wrestling: Mat Classic XXIII state championships for all classifications at Tacoma Dome, 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. sessions. Boys Swimming: Port Angeles and Sequim at state championships at King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way, Class 2A preliminaries start at 2:30 p.m.. Gymnastics: Port Angeles at state championships at Tacoma Dome, Class 2A 1:15 p.m. and 6:05 p.m. march-ins.

Preps Basketball AP State Poll BOYS SEATTLE (AP) — How a state panel of sports writers rates Washington high school basketball teams in the weekly Associated Press poll of 2011, by WIAA divisions, total points (first-place votes in parentheses): Class 4A School Points Last Week 1. Garfield (5) 68 1 2. Ferris (2) 65 2 3. Jackson 54 3 4. Curtis 46 7 5. Auburn 34 4 6. Gonzaga Prep 33 6 7. Davis 27 9 8. Olympia 26 8 9. Kentridge 16 5 10. Puyallup 14 NR Others receiving votes: Richland 1. Rogers (Puyallup) 1. Class 3A School Points Last Week 1. O’Dea (7) 70 1 2. Kamiakin 56 3 3. Rainier Beach 51 2 4. Lincoln 49 5 5. Seattle Prep 43 4 6. Lakes 41 6 7. Glacier Peak 24 7 8. University 17 9 9. Wilson 14 8 10. Bellevue 10 10 Others receiving votes: Chief Sealth 6. West Valley (Yakima) 3. Mercer Island 1. Class 2A School Points Last Week 1. Clover Park (7) 70 2 2. Grandview 62 1 3. Burlington 52 3 3. West Valley 52 4 5. Clarkston 33 5 5. River Ridge 33 7 7. Wapato 27 NR 8. Sehome 23 8 9. Ellensburg 12 6 10. Fife 10 9 Others receiving votes: Squalicum 7. Pullman 4. Class 1A School Points Last Week 1. Cascade (7) 70 1 2. Onalaska 63 2 3. Mabton 52 5 4. Hoquiam 48 4 5. Goldendale 39 3 6. Lynden Christ. 36 7 7. Nooksack 30 8 8. Zillah 19 6 9. Granger 11 NR 10. University 8 9 Others receiving votes: Chelan 7. Life Christian Academy 2. Class 2B School Points Last Week 1. Colfax (4) 49 1 2. White Swan 42 2 3. NW Christian 41 3 4. Bear Creek (1) 35 4 5. Lake Roosevelt 26 6 6. Napavine 25 5 7. Adna 20 7 8. Waitsburg 18 8 9. LaConner 12 9 10. NW Christian 4 10 Others receiving votes: Shoreline Christian 1. Toutle Lake 1. Willapa Valley 1. Class B School Points Last Week 1. Almira (5) 50 1 2. Sunnyside 44 2 3. Rosalia 41 3 4. Wellpinit 35 4 5. Cusick 24 5 Others receiving votes: Mansfield 6. GIRLS Class 4A School Points LastWeek 1. Chiawana 60 4 2. Auburn Riverside (1) 59 5 3. Bellarmine Prep (5) 57 2 4. Federal Way 48 1 5. Gonzaga Prep 42 7 6. Richland 36 6 7. Mt. Rainier 23 9 8. Edmonds-Woodway 22 3 9. Battle Ground (1) 10 NR T10.Kentwood 9 10 T10.Lake Stevens 9 10 Others receiving votes: Woodinville 6. Emerald Ridge 2. Eastlake 2. Class 3A School Points LastWeek 1. Holy Names (7) 70 1 2. Prairie 63 2 3. Timberline 53 3 4. Kennedy 48 5 5. Cleveland 40 4 6. Shadle Park 28 9 7. Lakes 27 8 8. Auburn Mtn. 22 T6 9. Shorecrest 19 10 10. Lynnwood 7 T6 Others receiving votes: Eastmont 5. Mount Si 2. West Valley (Yakima) 1. Class 2A School Points LastWeek 1. Prosser (7) 70 1 2. River Ridge 62 T2 3. White River 51 5 4. Clarkston 42 7 5. Lynden 38 4 6. Sumner 33 9 7. West Valley 25 6

The Associated Press

Earnhardt’s

pole-winning car wrecked

Crew members move the damaged car of driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. out of the garage on Wednesday at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Fla. Earnhardt, who crashed during Wednesday’s practice for the NASCAR Daytona 500, now will have to drive a backup car in Sunday’s Daytona 500. 8. Tumwater 22 10 9. Archbishop Murphy 16 8 10. Port Angeles 15 T2 Others receiving votes: Burlington-Edison 7. Kingston 2. W. F. West 1. Sehome 1. Class 1A School Points LastWeek 1. Freeman (6) 60 1 2. La Salle 50 3 T3.Lynden Christian 47 2 T3.Bellevue Christian 47 4 5. Seattle Christian 31 6 6. Rainier 29 7 T7.King’s 21 9 T7.Okanogan 21 5 9. Connell 10 NR 10. Colville 5 10 Others receiving votes: Cascade Christian 4. Granger 3. Cedar Park Christian (Bothell) 1. Onalaska 1. Class 2B School Points LastWeek T1.Darrington (1) 37 1 T1.Reardan (3) 37 2 3. Toutle Lake 32 3 4. Napavine 30 4 5. Brewster 23 T5 6. Waitsburg-Prescott 17 7 7. North Beach 16 8 8. White Swan 14 T5 9. Entiat 7 9 10. Colfax 6 10 Others receiving votes: Adna 1. Class B School Points LastWeek 1. Colton (4) 40 1 2. Almira 36 2 3. Sunnyside Christian 31 3 4. Columbia (Hunters) 29 4 5. Pomeroy 12 NR Others receiving votes: St. John-Endicott 6. Taholah 6.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Feb. 15 Mixed Up Mixed Men’s High Game: Bill Gannon, 268 Men’s High Series: Bill Gannon, 725 Women’s High Game: Jess Edgmon, 210 Women’s High Series: Jess Edgmon, 550 League Leaders: Team 9 Feb. 15 Tuesday Brunch League High Score: Lila Petroff, 200 High Series: Barbara Thompson, 467 League Leaders: Avon/Louise Ensor Feb. 15 Laurel Lanes Seniors Men’s High Game: Pat Flanigan, 216 Men’s High Series: Rick Leffler, 544 Women’s High Game: Barbara Ross, 200 Women’s High Series: Gladys Kemp, 495

Golf Peninsula Golf Club Feb. 15 Odd or Even Individual Gross: Parkhurst, 34 Individual Net: Aillaud, 321⁄2; Goodman, 321⁄2; Henderson, 33; Andrus, 33 Team Gross: Parkhurst/Main, 68 Team Net: Jones/Goodman, 59; Jones/Vernon, 60; Pruss/Vernon, 62

Volleyball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Coed results Feb. 15. Dave’s All-Around Repair 3, Elwha River Casino 0: (25-15), (25-16), (29-27) Michael’s Seafood & Steakhouse 3, Drake’s Pizza and Subs 0: (27-25), (25-10),(25-23) D.A. Davidson 3, Les Schwab Tire 0: (25-20) (25-22) (25-10) A Brewed Awakening Espresso 2, Captain Zak’s 1: (22-25) (25-23) (25-14)

College Basketball AP Rankings 1. Kansas (22) 2. Ohio State (14) 3. Texas (23) 4. Pittsburgh (6) 5. Duke 6. San Diego State 7. Brigham Young 8. Notre Dame 9. Georgetown 10. Wisconsin 11. Purdue 12. Arizona 13. Connecticut

MEN Record 24-1 24-1 22-3 23-2 23-2 25-1 24-2 21-4 20-5 19-5 20-5 21-4 19-5

Points 1,549 1,536 1,535 1,478 1,348 1,256 1,217 1,212 1,103 1,044 941 795 786

14. Florida 20-5 775 15. Villanova 19-6 710 16. Louisville 19-6 683 17. Syracuse 20-6 496 18. Vanderbilt 18-6 471 19. North Carolina 18-6 420 20. Missouri 19-6 404 21. Texas A&M 19-5 377 22. Kentucky 17-7 320 23. Temple 19-5 208 24. Xavier 18-6 83 25. Utah State 23-3 75 Others receiving votes: West Virginia 58, Saint Mary’s 52, Coastal Carolina 32, UCLA 32, George Mason 28, St. John’s 26, Washington 23, Alabama 13, Florida State 11, Marquette 6, Baylor 5, Belmont 5, Colorado State 5, Minnesota 4, UNLV 3 WOMEN Record Points 1. Baylor (24) 23-1 982 2. Connecticut (15) 24-1 972 3. Stanford (1) 22-2 918 4. Tennessee 24-2 881 5. Texas A&M 21-2 838 6. Xavier 21-2 776 7. Duke 23-2 755 8. Notre Dame 22-4 729 9. UCLA 21-2 679 10. DePaul 23-3 638 11. Michigan State 22-3 609 12. North Carolina 22-4 510 13. Miami (FL) 22-3 504 14. Oklahoma 18-6 447 15. Florida State 20-5 428 16. Maryland 20-5 355 17. Green Bay 24-1 354 18. Georgetown 20-6 338 19. Kentucky 19-6 303 20. Iowa State 17-7 179 21. West Virginia 20-6 170 22. Marquette 19-5 156 23. Penn State 21-6 138 24. Marist 22-2 106 25. Gonzaga 22-4 52 Others receiving votes: Iowa 40, Houston 38, Georgia 34, Georgia Tech 19, Louisiana Tech 17, Temple 16, St. John’s 10, Boston College 3, Vanderbilt 3, Brigham Young 2, Princeton 1

Basketball NBA Standings The Associated Press All Times PST WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 35 19 .648 — Portland 31 24 .564 4½ Denver 32 25 .561 4½ Utah 31 26 .544 5½ Minnesota 13 43 .232 23 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 38 19 .667 — Phoenix 27 26 .509 9 Golden State 26 29 .473 11 L.A. Clippers 21 35 .375 16½ Sacramento 13 40 .245 23 Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 46 9 .836 — Dallas 39 16 .709 7 New Orleans 33 24 .579 14 Memphis 31 26 .544 16 Houston 26 31 .456 21 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 40 14 .741 — New York 28 26 .519 12 Philadelphia 27 29 .482 14 New Jersey 17 40 .298 24½ Toronto 15 41 .268 26 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 41 15 .732 — Orlando 36 21 .632 5½ Atlanta 34 21 .618 6½ Charlotte 24 32 .429 17 Washington 15 39 .278 25 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 37 16 .698 — Indiana 24 30 .444 13½ Milwaukee 21 34 .382 17 Detroit 21 36 .368 18 Cleveland 10 46 .179 28½ Wednesday’s Games Orlando 101, Washington 76 Miami 103, Toronto 95 Boston 94, New Jersey 80 Cleveland 104, L.A. Lakers 99 Detroit 115, Indiana 109, OT

New York 102, Atlanta 90 L.A. Clippers 98, Minnesota 90 Dallas 116, Sacramento 100 Philadelphia 114, Houston 105 Golden State 107, Utah 100 Denver 94, Milwaukee 87 New Orleans at Portland, LATE Today’s Games San Antonio at Chicago, 5 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings The Associated Press All Times PST WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 58 37 12 9 83 196 137 Calgary 60 30 22 8 68 181 175 Minnesota 57 30 22 5 65 148 152 Colorado 58 25 26 7 57 173 198 Edmonton 57 17 32 8 42 141 194 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Phoenix 58 30 19 9 69 165 162 Anaheim 57 32 21 4 68 159 157 Dallas 58 31 21 6 68 162 166 San Jose 58 31 21 6 68 160 152 Los Angeles 57 32 22 3 67 160 135 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 56 34 16 6 74 187 163 Nashville 57 30 19 8 68 151 135 Chicago 57 29 22 6 64 180 159 Columbus 57 28 23 6 62 155 172 St. Louis 55 25 21 9 59 148 164 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 57 38 14 5 81 190 144 Pittsburgh 59 36 19 4 76 176 143 N.Y. Rangers 58 30 24 4 64 162 144 New Jersey 57 23 30 4 50 123 160 N.Y. Islanders 57 21 29 7 49 155 189 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 31 19 7 69 175 139 Montreal 58 31 20 7 69 153 146 Buffalo 56 27 23 6 60 165 166 Toronto 58 25 27 6 56 150 178 Ottawa 57 18 30 9 45 129 190 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 57 34 17 6 74 175 176 Washington 57 29 18 10 68 153 143 Carolina 58 27 23 8 62 170 178 Atlanta 58 25 23 10 60 167 188 Florida 56 24 25 7 55 148 152 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Los Angeles 4, Columbus 3, SO Toronto 2, Buffalo 1 New Jersey 3, Carolina 2 Philadelphia 4, Florida 2 Chicago 3, Minnesota 1 Pittsburgh 3, Colorado 2, OT Calgary 4, Dallas 2 Washington at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Today’s Games Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Nashville, 5 p.m. Montreal at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Washington at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Cleveland Indians : Agreed to terms with INF Orlando Cabrera on a one-year contract. Minnesota Twins : Agreed to terms with OF Delmon Young on a one-year contract. New York Yankees : Released LHP Neal Cotts. Toronto Blue Jays : Agreed to terms with OF Scott Podsednik on a minor league contract. National League Los Angeles Dodgers : Agreed to terms with RHP Lance Cormier on a minor league contract. Milwaukee Brewers : Agreed to terms with 2B Rickie Weeks on a four-year contract. Washington Nationals : Designated RHP Luis Atilano for assignment. American Association Lincoln Saltdogs : Signed RHP Nick Schreiber. Frontier League Evansville Otters : Signed 1B Jon Waltenbury to a contract extension.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Avantha Masters, Round 1, Site: DLF Golf and Country Club - New Delhi, India 7 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Daytona 300 Nationwide Series Practice, Site: Daytona International Speedway - Daytona Beach, Fla. (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Northern Trust Open, Round 1, Site: Riviera Country Club - Pacific Palisades, Calif. (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Minnesota vs. Penn State, Site: Bryce Jordan Center - State College, Pa. (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Clemson vs. North Carolina State, Site: RBC Center - Raleigh, N.C. (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, San Antonio Spurs vs. Chicago Bulls, Site: United Center - Chicago (Live) 5:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. Arizona (leave in progress) (Live) 6 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Montréal Canadiens vs. Edmonton Oilers, Site: Rexall Place - Edmonton (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Alabama vs. Louisiana State, Site: Pete Maravich Assembly Center Baton Rouge, La. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, DePaul vs. Providence, Site: Dunkin Donuts Center - Providence, R.I. (Live) 6 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Santa Clara vs. Gonzaga (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Dallas Mavericks vs. Phoenix Suns (Live) 8 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, UCLA vs. Stanford (Live)

Joliet Slammers : Named Carmen Pignatiello pitching coach. Traverse City Beach Bums : Signed RHP Jesse Rasner. Washington Wild Things : Signed RHP Alex Casillas, LHP Brooks Cullum, LHP Blake Hennington, C Greyson Schram and LHP Alan Williams. Windy City Thunderbolts : Traded RHP Jake McMurran to Rockford (North American) for LHP Paul Fagan.

Basketball NBA Charlotte Bobcats : Promoted interim coach Paul Silas to coach and signed him to a oneyear contract extension. International Turkish Basketball Federation : Lifted the provisional doping suspension of G Diana Taurasi.

Football NFL Arizona Cardinals : Promoted passing game coordinator Mike Miller to offensive coordinator. Buffalo Bills : Released DL Marcus Stroud. Indianapolis Colts : Reassigned quarterbacks coach Frank Reich to receivers coach, receivers coach Ron Turner to quarterbacks coach and offensive assistant Jim Bob Cooter to assistant to the offensive coordinator. Kansas City Chiefs : Designated LB Tamba Hali their franchise player. Tennessee Titans : Named Tracy Rocker defensive line coach. Washington Redskins : Named Sean McVay tight ends coach.

Hockey NHL Anaheim Ducks : Reassigned G Marco Cousineau from Syracuse (AHL) to Elmira (ECHL). Placed G Jonas Hiller on injured reserve. Recalled G Timo Pielmeier from Syracuse (AHL). Boston Bruins : Reassigned F Yannick Riendeau from Providence (AHL) to Reading (ECHL). Columbus Blue Jackets : Activated LW Ethan Moreau from injured reserve. New York Rangers : Recalled F Kris Newbury from Connecticut (AHL).

SOCCER Major League Soccer Chivas Usa : Traded M Sal Zizzo to Portland for allocation money. D.C. United : Signed F Charlie Davies for the 2011 season on loan from FC Sochaux (France-Ligue 1). Houston Dynamo : Acquired D Jermaine Taylor from St. George’s (Jamaica).

COLLEGE Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference : Named John Wooding director of special activities. Albany, N.y. : Named Trevor Gorman men’s soccer coach. Florida State : Signed football coach Jimbo Fisher to a five-year contract. Jacksonville State : Announced the retirement of athletic director Oval Jaynes, effective April 30. Maryland : Promoted linebackers coach Todd Bradford to defensive coordinator. Named Keith Dudzinski linebackers coach. Nebraska : Named Tim Beck offensive coordinator, Corey Raymond secondary coach, Ross Els linebackers coach and Rich Fisher wide receivers coach. Reassigned tight ends coach Ron Brown to running backs coach. Announced offensive coordinator Shawn Watson and receivers coach Ted Gilmore will not return. Ramapo : Promoted interim men’s and women{rsquo}s tennis coach Raza Baig to permanent coach. Richmond : Named Zac Lowe tight ends coach. TCU : Named Trey Haverty safeties coach.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

B3

Pirates lose a shootout Peninsula Daily News

Roughriders

to state

Port Angeles High School is sending six swimmers and divers to the 2011 Class 2A state boys swimming championships for Friday and Saturday at King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way. The six athletes are, from left, Avery Koehler, Charlie Parks, Sam Beasley, C.J. Urnes, Tyler Burke and Austin Fahrenholtz.

Preps: Riders blast Sumner Continued from B1 Wheeler submitted a terrific all-around game with Sequim 59, Renton 54 15 points, six assists, four Sequim 16 10 16 17 — 59 rebounds and four steals. Renton 11 14 8 21 — 54 Teammate Ian Ward Individual Scoring added 12 points, six Sequim (59) Hill 6, Meier 2, Carter 10, Webb 21, Brocklesby 6, rebounds and three blocks Guan 3, Camporini 11. in the post, while Tanner Renton (54) Cheathem 4, Pienh 2, Saario 2, Briggs 17, Phair came off the bench to Edwards 6, Lee 1, Bennett 10, Hafey 10, Patterson score eight points, all com2. ing in the fourth quarter. Trailing early on in the Port Angeles 55, third, Armstrong said he Sumner 45 challenged the Rider TACOMA — The Riders defense to turn around an turned up the defense in effort that allowed Sumthe third quarter of Wednes- ner’s Zeb Glissmeyer to day night’s 2A West Central score 16 first-half points. Glissmeyer was limited District playoff at Foss High to six points the rest of the School. As a result, they are only game, and the Riders one win away from reaching turned the ball only two the state tournament for times as they outscored the first time in four years. Sumner 34-18 in the second Port Angeles held the half. “We had to chew on them Spartans to four thirdquarter points to take a a little bit in the huddle 33-31 lead into the final because our defense just frame and never relented wasn’t where it needs to be,” from there on its way to a Armstrong said. “The guys just responded convincing 55-45 win. The Riders (16-7) will and we played like we’re face No. 2 seed Fife (16-6) capable of playing and just on Friday in the same gym, played great team defense.” Port Angeles will play with the winner earning a spot in Saturday’s district Fife at 8 p.m. on Friday at semifinals and a place in Foss High School, immedithe 2A state regional round. ately after Sequim takes on “We really don’t talk Olympic League champion about what’s going on at the Kingston. Fife finished second in next level until we get there, but this is a huge the South Puget Sound win,” Port Angeles head League this season and lost coach Wes Armstrong said. the 2A sub-district champi“We’re one win away onship to Clover Park 61-47 from getting to the final 16, last weekend. “They are playing very and we’re looking forward well right now,” Armstrong to the challenge. “I think it’s really great said. “They’ve got a really for this group to get another good shooter, and they have playoff victory under our a good post player, so we’re definitely going to have to belt.” Senior forward Colin bring our best game and

Whatcom 102, Peninsula 97 Peninsula Whatcom

33 64 — 97 41 61 — 102 Individual Scoring

Peninsula (97) Freeman 12, Musgrow 12, Vinson 11,Jeremiah Johnson 7, Clark 28, Williams 3, Waller 22, Jerry Johnson 2. Whatcom (102) Frost 2, Doeut 22, Nicholes 17, Pillard 8, Peters 7, Coulter 20, Welch 16, Elwell 10.

Women Whatcom 78, Peninsula 51 BELLINGHAM — A big night from sophomore Danika Goodwin wasn’t enough to keep the Pirates (2-11, 5-17) from dropping their sixth in a row Wednesday night. The former Port Angeles High School standout had 22 points, five assists and three steals in the Peninsula loss. Megan Smith added 12 points. That did not trump nine Orcas scorers led by Ashley Honeycutt (20 points) and Sara Paponjak (23 points). Whatcom 78, Peninsula 51 Peninsula Whatcom

25 26 — 51 35 43 — 78 Individual Scoring

Peninsula (51) Goodwin 22, Pullen 7, Thein 2, Carter 2, Jackson 4, Smith 12, Monfrey 2. Whatcom (78) Anderson 3, Valentine 10, Wolf 9, Stoltenberg 4, Leech 4, Holterman 2, Osborn 3, Honeycutt 20, Paponjak 23.

Earnhardt Jr. in shadow of dad The Associated Press

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

Colin Wheeler of Port Angeles, left, scores over a Sumner defender during the Class 2A West Central District tournament Wednesday night at Foss High School in Tacoma. play well on both ends of the court.” Port Angeles 55, Sumner 45 Port Angeles Sumner

10 11 12 22 — 55 10 17 4 14 — 45

Individual Scoring Port Angeles (55) Phair 8, Braithwaite 5, Walker 5, Antioquia 6, Ward 12, Wheeler 15, Smith 4. Sumner (45) Clark 1, Salsbury 5, Dan Devries 4, Fulmer 2, Dave Devries 5, Kendall 6, Glissmeyer 22.

Knowles: Father-daughter duo Continued from B1 spent on the hardwood. He served as an assistant Alison tagged along with coach one year for Alison’s Mike’s girls teams as much AAU team, then took over as as she could when he the head coach the year coached Port Angeles to a after that. The way Alison tells it, 112-21 record and four state just about all of her developberths from 1997-2002. If she wasn’t on the bench ment as a player can be cheering the Riders on, she linked to her father. “It’s always been him and was serving as their ball girl as an impressionable 8- or me on the court together,” Alison said. “That’s how we 9-year-old. And whenever her made a connection. It wasn’t mother, Laura, would allow awkward at all, and it will it, she’d join them on the be sad when it’s over.” As she moved on to midteam bus for the ride home. “[The players] were like dle school, Mike took a job as gods. They were just the an assistant to ex-Rider world to me,” Alison said, boys basketball coach Erik recalling former Riders like Lathen while Jay was in the Mandy Wood, Ashley Payne program. It was then that Mike got and Lindsay Sather. Added Mike, “I would a lesson in just how hard it have her in my arms when is to coach your own child in she was 3 and 4 years old high school. “He was a little harder to walking around the floor coaching. She was just glued coach just because he got a little more angry and had a to what I said.” Once Alison was 9 years little more emotions and old and her brother, Jay, 11, stuff,” Mike said. “He played hard, but [AliMike decided to resign his position from the girls pro- son] and I were able to leave the father-daughter [relagram. He had a new job as a tionship] off the floor. My student counselor at Roos- son struggled with that. “He always saw me as evelt Middle School and he said he wanted to spend dad, and he couldn’t separate the dad-coach [thing].” more time with his family. It hasn’t always been Not surprisingly, a lot of those extra hours were easy for father and daugh-

BELLINGHAM — The Peninsula College men’s basketball team had little choice but to turn Wednesday night’s game against Whatcom into a track meet. The ploy nearly worked. Peninsula rallied from a 17-point second-half deficit only to come up just short in a 102-97 loss to Whatcom in NWAACC North Division play. “It was a tremendous game,” Pirates coach Lance Von Vogt said. “It was two really good teams and it ended up being a war.” Unfortunately for the Pirates (10-3 in North, 15-7 overall), they had to go to battle short-handed. Forward DeShaun Freeman played only 13 minutes after fouling out of the game early in the second half. With their main post presence suddenly unavailable, Von Vogt opted for a four-guard lineup that turned up the pace and helped bring the Pirates back from a 64-47 hole with 14 minutes to go. Peninsula eventually took a 79-78 lead with 6:43 to go but was unable to hold on for the win against Whatcom (9-3, 17-4). “It was a well-played game by both teams,” Von Vogt said. “It was a good experience for our guys. We’ll learn from it.” Mitrell Clark finished with 28 points to lead the Pirates, while teammate Sam Waller added 22. Peninsula actually clinched a playoff berth

Wednesday by virtue of Shoreline’s loss to Seattle. More important to the Pirates, however, was their fall back into second place in the North. They will be on the road Saturday against Edmonds (3-9, 5-15) before returning for their final home game of the year next Monday against Everett (3-10, 3-17).

ter, either.

Proving ground Alison always thought she’d end up playing for her dad as a Rider. Yet after Mike re-applied for the girls coaching position when it opened back up following the 2006-07 season (Alison’s freshman year), he lost out to area AAU coach Kevin Ruble. Only after Ruble resigned one game into the 2007-08 season because of health reasons did Mike regain his old job. It turned out to be a blessing in disguise for Alison, who had a chance to prove herself to another coach before Mike took over. He has yet to show her any special treatment since, according to four-year varsity post Taylyn Jeffers. “I wouldn’t want to say he’s harder on her all the time, but he definitely expects her to push herself as much as everyone else does,” said Jeffers, a teammate of Alison’s since middle school. “He definitely doesn’t let her attitude go. He jumps on her as soon as he sees it.” And whenever he yells at Alison?

“It’s just him yelling at another player,” Jeffers said. “I’ve gotten it. Jessica [Madison] has gotten it. We’ve all gotten that Mike yells at least once a season. It’s nothing new.” The Riders have had loads of success ever since Knowles returned, winning four league titles and going 67-21 overall with Alison a major contributor. Despite all of that winning, there have been a few bumps in the road. Alison pointed to her junior year in particular as one that she had a hard time dealing with her dad as a coach. But things have gone much more smoothly this season, she said. “This year we’ve really made a connection, and I think we understand each other a lot more this year,” Alison said. “It’s made it a lot more fun.” Now that the Riders (18-4 overall) are just one win away from clinching their first state berth since 2004 — they play Olympic tonight at 6 p.m. at Foss High School in the second round of the Class 2A West Central District tournament — it could be even better.

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — There’s a restaurant outside North Carolina Speedway where all the racers used to go for steak and socializing whenever NASCAR was in town. Dale Earnhardt Jr. knew the routine, had lived it with his famous father. But he was a reluctant participant when he began his racing career, once recruiting his publicist to skip the steak in favor of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in their motel room. Earnhardt didn’t think it would be a problem until his father came through the door of their adjoining room, saw the half-eaten loaf of bread and his son watching “Batman” reruns. The Intimidator lit into him.

“As he was opening the door, he was hollering, ‘Y’all got 15 minutes to get ready to go and eat,’” Earnhardt recalled, “and once he opened the door to see what we were doing, he was really upset because we weren’t more professional. He thought we should do what other drivers do, and what he was doing is the best thing to do. So he thought we were kind of lazy. “Tons of moments like that . . . where we would be lazy, do something goofy, and Dad would just get so mad for us not taking things more seriously.” Those are the memories of Dale Earnhardt his son has chosen to share in the days leading up to Friday, the 10th anniversary of his father’s death on the last lap of the Daytona 500.

Mariners: Olivo Continued from B1 opened up my mind as far as how to be a better Olivo spent 2010 with catcher. “It’s like 100 percent, the Colorado Rockies. Over the course of those years how much I’ve learned and since Seattle, he developed matured,” he added. “I have a reputation for being fiery way more abilities and confidence.” and intense. Notes: RHP Yusmeiro Olivo has been suspended three times for two Petit joined the club at to six games for in-game spring training Wednesday, altercations and bumping his international visa issues an umpire. resolved. Petit took his But Mariners manager physical and worked out Eric Wedge prefers the with teammates in the toughness and feisty side of morning. his catcher, having been one Position players are himself. trickling in and should all “That’s good. You need to be in camp Friday for physihave that,” Wedge said. “He has an edge to him that I cals, with the first full-team workout on Saturday. like.” LHP Erik Bedard threw Olivo feels he’s come a his second bullpen session long way over the years. “I’ve grown a lot with my of the spring Wednesday, thinking, catching and how and Wedge said all looks I call a game,” Olivo said. good with his left shoulder, “Since I’ve been around which required surgery last with a lot of teams, that has year.

Schubert: Clam Continued from B1 and event rules, visit www. GardinerSalmonDerby.org. Tickets for the event ________ cost $40 for one day or all three days, and can be Matt Schubert is the outdoors found at several Peninsula and sports columnist for the Penmerchants. insula Daily News. His column Look for more on the regularly appears on Thursdays derby in Friday’s outdoors and Fridays. He can be reached at column. matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com. For more information


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, February 17, 2011

PAGE

B4

Business

Politics & Environment

IBM computer trumps ‘Jeopardy’ champions

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Peninsula Daily News

Same-sex unions

Jeopardy Productions Inc. via The Associated Press

Contestants Ken Jennings, left, and Brad Rutter and a computer named Watson compete on the game show “Jeopardy!” in Yorktown Heights, N.Y.

Deep Blue won at chess by crunching millions of mathematical possibilities to determine the best possible move. Watson, named after IBM founder Thomas J. Watson, was designed instead to understand the more complex domain of words, language and human knowledge. New era To emulate the human But Watson confirms the mind, and make it competiopening of a new era in the tive on the TV quiz show, age-old contest between Watson was stuffed with millions of documents — man and machine.

including dictionaries, anthologies and the World Book Encyclopedia. After reading a clue, Watson mines the database, poring over 200 million pages of content in less than three seconds. Researchers developed algorithms to measure Watson’s level of confidence in an answer in order to decide whether it should hit the “Jeopardy!” buzzer. IBM is now trying to commercialize Watson. The company plans to

announce a research agreement to develop commercial applications of the Watson technology for the health care industry. Columbia University Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine are joining the research effort. “Human intelligence is a whole other leap,” said Dave Ferrucci, the IBM scientist who led the development of Watson. “A computer doesn’t know what it means to be human.”

Dems, GOP reach agreement on deficit-cutting package The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Democratic and Republican lawmakers said Wednesday that they have reached an agreement on a package that patches most of a halfbillion-dollar deficit in this year’s state budget. The agreement trims several state programs, including the state’s health care program for the poor and aid for the disabled, as well as transfers funds from other programs. In total, the plan cuts the deficit by about $360 million, with about $245 million in cuts and $125 million in transfers. “Many of the decisions found in this budget agreement are extremely painful ones — they aren’t necessarily the decisions we’d embrace if we had a wider set of options before us, but that’s a luxury we don’t

have,” said Sen. Ed Murray, D-Seattle, chairman of the state Senate’s Ways and Means committee. “Our obligation is to bring the current budget into balance, and we intend to meet our obligation.” A vote is expected Friday on the package.

$5 billion deficit next Lawmakers have spent more than a month of the 105-day legislative session trying to come up with this agreement, and once this package is approved, Gov. Chris Gregoire and legislators will have to tackle an estimated $5 billion deficit in the next two-year budget, which is roughly $37 billion. The Senate GOP’s budget negotiator, Sen. Joe Zarelli, R-Ridgefield, said the agreement moves the Legislature closer to “reforming three large, visi-

ble state-only entitlements, which is important because reforms need to have a prominent role in the development of the next biennial budget.” The agreements include: n Maintaining cash grants to the Disability Lifeline program, but reducing them by 50 percent and moving to eliminating the cash grant in the next twoyear budget. n Limiting enrollment of children to the state’s Children’s Health Program to families at 200 percent of the federal poverty level. n Limiting eligibility to the Basic Health Plan to those who qualify for Medicaid, essentially filtering out illegal immigrants who may be on the plan. The agreement came from negotiations between Democrats and Republicans in the House

and Senate. House Republican leaders, though, said their members, who are the minority, would not vote in favor of this package, pointing to education funding in which $25 million was taken from class-size reduction initiatives. They said they would have preferred eliminating the cash grants for Disability Lifeline, which provides cash and medical care to unemployable disabled adults who aren’t covered by federal social security benefits. Rep. Ross Hunter, D-Medina, said that the $25 million was cut from class sizes because there could more dips in revenue projections. “I don’t have another set of cuts we can take instead,” Hunter said.

Borders, slow to get message, files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy The Associated Press

ity of e-books and e-book readers. After Amazon launched its popular Kindle e-book reader in 2007, Barnes & Noble followed with the Nook in 2009 and invested heavily in its electronic bookstore. Borders entered the electronic book market with Canada's Kobo Inc. last year but failed to garner much traction. Borders also didn't react

quickly enough to declining music and DVD sales and hired four CEOs without book-selling experience in five years. Barnes & Noble, which has 29.8 percent of the book market compared with Borders' 14.3 percent according to IBIS World, has done better by adapting to e-commerce and electronic books more quickly and keeping management stable.

HONOLULU — Hawaii lawmakers approved a bill Wednesday to allow civil unions for same-sex couples, marking an end to what the governor called an “emotional process” for a longtime battleground in the gay rights movement. Democratic Gov. Neil Abercrombie's office said he intends to sign the bill into law within 10 business days. Civil unions would begin Jan. 1, 2012, making the state the seventh in the nation to grant essentially the same rights of marriage to same-sex couples without authorizing marriage itself.

Suspended teacher BELLINGHAM — Western Washington University has suspended without pay a theater professor because of student complaints. It is the second time the university has suspended associate professor Perry Mills without pay. University spokesman Paul Cocke said two students filed complaints about Mills this quarter. Mills has been a tenured associate professor in the Theater Arts Department since 1994. He will be suspended while university officials investigate the allegations. Mills took the university to court after he was suspended in 2004 with pay and 2006 without pay because of previous complaints. The state Supreme Court ruled earlier this month that the university acted properly when disciplining Mills at that time.

Furloughs

tricts across the state for this year. School district central office staff also will be taking furloughs. The unpaid days will be scheduled by the individual administrators. School officials said the furloughs will help them prevent mid-year staff cuts. They are still waiting to hear what lawmakers in Olympia decide before making plans for the 2011-2012 school year.

Coal-fired plant OLYMPIA — How quickly should the state’s only coal-fired plant transition to cleaner energy sources? Canadian-based TransAlta’s facility in Centralia is the state’s single largest source of greenhouse gas emission. It is seen as key to state efforts to reduce global warming pollution. Environmentalists are rallying support for House Bill 1825, which would transition the plant off coal as early as 2015. Another measure in the state Senate sets 2020 as a deadline. TransAlta said it needs to operate the facility until 2025 to protect jobs and provide enough time to bring cleaner resources on line.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.1257 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.5838 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.4660 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2653.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.1314 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1371.25 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1374.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $30.780 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $30.630 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1836.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1834.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

SPOKANE — Spokane Public Schools administrators have agreed to take two unpaid days off to help close the district’s budget gap. The decision by principals and vice principals comes in response to actions by the state LegisPeninsula Daily News lature that will cut the dollars going to school dis- and The Associated Press

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superstores dotted the U.S. and seemed to be the future of bookselling. Its sprawling stores, comfortable chairs, cafe and widespread discounts epitomized the “bigger is better” retail philosophy that spelled the end of many mom-andpop bookstores that couldn't compete on selection or price. Americans today are more likely to pick up the latest best-seller anywhere from Costco to Amazon.com, or download a digital version, than make an extra trip to a strip mall. Analysts say a key error for Borders came in 2001, when it contracted out its e-commerce business to Amazon. “Amazon had no incentive whatsoever to promote Borders,” said Simba Information senior trade analyst Michael Norris. “It really marked the beginning of the end.” That relationship lasted until 2007. By then, Borders lagged far behind Barnes & Noble, which began selling books online in 1997. Borders also was slow to react to the growing popular-

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NEW YORK — Borders was slow to get the message as the big-box retailer lost book, music and video sales to the Internet and other competition. The result: It filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday and will close nearly a third of its stores. Less nimble than rival Barnes & Noble, Borders now begins what analysts expect will be a quickly resolved struggle for the survival of its remaining stores. Borders plans to close about 200 of its 642 stores over the next few weeks, from San Francisco to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., costing about 6,000 of the company's 19,500 employees their jobs. The closures are also a blow to publishers already owed tens of millions of dollars by the company, which stopped paying them in December. Borders said it is losing about $2 million a day at the stores it plans to close, all of them superstores. The company also operates smaller Waldenbooks and Borders Express stores. Fifteen years ago, Borders

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PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Farmers Market has added breads and baked goods from Pane d’Amore, a Port Townsend artisan bakery, to its lineup of local food vendors. Founded in 2003, the bakery is certified organic and has won several awards for excellence. The farmers market is on the corner of Front and Lincoln streets in downtown Port Angeles. It is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

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Answer: This IBM computer system crushed humans in a “Jeopardy” competition. Question: What is Watson? In the end, humans were no match for the machines. In a nationally televised competition, the Watson talking computer system built by International Business Machines Corp. handily defeated two former “Jeopardy” champions. Watson took an early lead and maintained it throughout the last game Wednesday until the final clue. All three contestants correctly guessed the final clue: Who is Bram Stoker? So Watson came away the winner with a final three-day tally of $77,147. Contestant Ken Jennings came in second with $24,000, and Brad Rutter came in third with $21,600. It wasn’t the first time that humans have taken it on the chin from technology. In 1997, an IBM supercomputer named Deep Blue defeated Gary Kasparov, then considered the greatest living chess player.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, February 17, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

Area students nursing aides High-schoolers now certified Peninsula Daily News

fied before entering their programs.” The medical careers program prepares students for Hopper entry-level positions as a nursing assistant or for further training in a variety of health and medical Clark fields.

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School student Mollie Clark and Crescent High School student Savannah Hopper recently passed the Washington State Nursing Assistant Certification examination. Both became eligible for certification by enrolling in the medical careers course offered through the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center. Center

Considering careers

Soroptimists

help children’s program

Cynthia Martin, left, president of First Teacher, a resource for parents of birth to schoolage children, accepts a $500 donation from Missy Church-Smith, president of Soroptimist International of Sequim. Soroptimist International is a volunteer service organization for business and professional women who work to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and throughout the world.

Things to Do Today and Friday, Feb. 17-18, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-457-8921.

PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Women 45 and over and men 50 and over. Knit, crochet and spin — Phone Gordon Gardner at 360- All ages and skill levels, Veela 452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360- Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. 683-0141 for information to 6 p.m. including time of day and location. Sacred meditation healing — Unity in the Olympics Port Angeles Pre-3 Coop- Church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., erative — For ages 10 months 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. To registo 18 months. First Baptist ter, phone 360-457-3981. Church, 105 W. Sixth St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Amy Volunteers in Medicine of Brilhart at 360-681-7883 or the Olympics health clinic — e-mail prethree@yahoo.com. 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Free for patients with no Port Angeles Fine Arts insurance or access to health Center — “Outbreak.” 1203 E. care. For appointment, phone Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 360-457-4431. p.m. Free. Phone 360-4573532. Tai chi class — Ginger and Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., Guided walking tour — 6:30 p.m. $12 per class or $10 Historic downtown buildings, for three or more classes. No an old brothel and “Under- experience necessary, wear ground Port Angeles.” Cham- loose comfortable clothing. ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- Phone 360-808-5605. road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Greenhouse Gardening senior citizens and students, Seminar — “Informed Expec$6 ages 6 to 12. Children tations for a Successful Greenyounger than 6, free. Reserva- house.” Sons of Norway Hall, tions, phone 360-452-2363, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m., $3. ext. 0. Benefit for Volunteers in Medicine to the Olympics. Mental illness family support group — For families and Olympic Peninsula Entrefriends of people with mental preneurs Network — Coldwell disorders. Peninsula Commu- Banker Uptown Realty, 1115 E. nity Mental Health Center, 118 Front St., 6:30 p.m. Inventors, E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. innovators and entrepreneurs Phone Rebecca Brown, 360- of all ages welcome. Members 457-0431. cane share resources and talent. Phone Tim Riley at 360Studium Generale — Pen- 460-4655. insula College economics and environmental science profesBariatric surgery support sor Dr. Daniel Underwood on group — Terrace Apartments, Rainy Creek Biodiversity Proj- 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 ect. Little Theater, Peninsula p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 12:35 p.m. Free. Celebrate Recovery — Christ-based recovery group. First Step drop-in center Lighthouse Christian Center, — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 304 Viewcrest Ave., 7 p.m. to p.m. Free clothing and equip- 8:30 p.m. Phone 360-452ment closet, information and 8909. referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, Friday computers, fax and copier. Play and Learn Port AngePhone 360-457-8355. les — For ages 0-5 to attend Museum at the Carnegie with parent, grandparent or — Second and Lincoln streets, caregiver with individual and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by group play, songs and story donation $2 per person; $5 per time. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone family. Main exhibit, “Strong 360-452-5437 for location and People: The Faces of Clallam more information. County.” Lower level, changing Walk-in vision clinic — exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. for visually Elevator, ADA access parking Information in rear. Tours available. Phone impaired and blind people, including accessible technol360-452-6779. ogy display, library, Braille Gastric bypass surgery training and various magnificasupport group — 114 E. Sixth tion aids. Vision Loss Center, St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Armory Square Mall, 228 W. Open to the public. Phone 360- First St., Suite N. Phone for an appointment 360-457-1383 or 457-1456. visit www.visionlossservices. Newborn parenting class org/vision. — “You and Your New Baby,” Insurance assistance — third-floor sunroom, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline Statewide benefits advisers St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. help with health insurance and Medicare. Port Angeles Senior Phone 360-417-7652.

“This was a good choice as Mollie and Savannah are considering careers in the field of nursing,” said program instructor Donna Moreau. “Many nursing programs are now recommending that applicants have completed a nursing assistant course and are certi-

The skills center offers technical training for area high school students from Cape Flattery, Chimacum, Crescent, Port Angeles, Port Townsend, Quillayute Valley and Sequim school districts. For more information about the medical careers program, phone the Skills Center at 360-565-1533.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula sequimyoga.com.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. 3425.

ing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Port Angeles Pre-3 Cooperative — For ages 18 months to 3 years. First Baptist Church, 105 W. Sixth St., 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Phone Amy Brilhart at 360-681-7883 or e-mail prethree@yahoo.com.

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Friday

Soroptimist International of Sequim call for artists — For artwork to display during 14th annual Gala Garden Show on March 18 and 19, 2012. Submit flower and/or garden themed works by March 31. Visit www.sequim Line dancing lessons — gardenshow.com for an artist High-beginner, intermediate agreement and contract inforand advanced dancers. Sequim mation. Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Dropins welcome. $3 per class. Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www.sequim Phone 360-681-2826. yoga.com. Sequim Senior Softball — Walk aerobics — First BapCo-ed recreational league. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for tist Church of Sequim, 1323 practice and pick-up games. Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 Phone John Zervos at 360- a.m. Free. Phone 360-6832114. 681-2587.

Strength and toning exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per class. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable.com.

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Student Art Show.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360-6838110.

Meditation class — Learn different meditation techniques. Willow Pond Consulting and Intuitive Development Center, 131 Kitchen-Dick Road, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. To register, phone Marie-Claire Bernards Port Angeles Fine Arts at 360-681-4411, e-mail Center — “Outbreak.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 Senior meal — Nutrition willowpond@olympus.net or p.m. Free. Phone 360-457- program, Port Angeles Senior visit www.thewillowpond.com. 3532. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Parent connections — 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Toddler storytime — Ages per meal. Reservations recom- First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 18 months to 3 years. Port mended. Phone 360-457-8921. 10 a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. Angeles Library, 2210 S. PeaOlympic Minds meeting — body St., 10:15 a.m. PA Peggers Cribbage Club — Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn Conference room, Lodge at Free Baby and Me pro- St. Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, Sherwood Village, 660 Evergram —For parents and their 6 p.m. New members welcome. green Farm Way, 1 p.m. Open children (0-12 months). First For more information, e-mail to the public. Phone 360 681Baptist Church, 105 W. Sixth p a p e g g e r s @ h u g h e s . n e t , 8677. St., 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. phone 360-808-7129 or visit Phone Maggie Garcia at 813- www.papeggers.com. Spanish class — Prairie 846-9848 or e-mail maggie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. lgarcia@yahoo.com. Friendship Dinner — First Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681United Methodist Church, Sev- 0226. Guided walking tour — enth and Laurel streets. Doors Historic downtown buildings, open, 3 p.m. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. Chess Club — Dungeness an old brothel and “Under- Free. Phone 360-457-8971. Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. ground Port Angeles.” ChamSequim Ave., 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 ber of Commerce, 121 E. RailBingo — Masonic Lodge, p.m. Bring clocks, sets and road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. boards. All are welcome. Phone p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, 360-681-8481. senior citizens and students, drinks and pull tabs available. $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Phone 360-457-7377. Health clinic — Free mediyounger than 6, free. Reservacal services for uninsured or tions, phone 360-452-2363, Peninsula College Magic under-insured, Dungeness Valext. 0. of Cinema Series — “Whee- ley Health & Wellness Clinic, dle’s Groove” Little Theater, Preschooler storytime — Peninsula College, 1502 E. 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Ages 3 to 5. Port Angeles Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. Admis- p.m.. Phone 360-582-0218. Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., sion $5 adults, $1 students with Meditation class —92 Plain 10:15 a.m. Peninsula College ID. Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admission by donation. Bingo — Port Angeles Sequim and the Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Gamblers Anonymous — Dungeness Valley 360-457-7004. Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360Today Museum at the Carnegie 460-9662. Sequim High School Choir — Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by Booster Club— Sequim High Food Addicts in Recovery donation $2 per person; $5 per School choir room, 601 N. Anonymous — Calvary Chafamily. Main exhibit, “Strong Sequim Ave. Phone Jim Stoffer pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. People: The Faces of Clallam at 360-775-9356. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit County.” Lower level, changing www.foodaddicts.org. Soroptimist International exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. Elevator, ADA access parking of Sequim call for artists — Travelers Journal series at rear of building. Tours avail- For artwork to display during —Byron Rot presents “Beauty 14th annual Gala Garden able. Phone 360-452-6779. Show on March 18 and 19, and the Beast: Travels in West Introduction to line dance 2012. Submit flower and/or Papua, Indonesia.” Sequim for beginners — Port Angeles garden themed works by High School cafeteria, 601 N. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh March 31. Visit www.sequim Sequim Ave., 7 p.m. Admission St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 gardenshow.com for an artist is $5. Kids 18 and younger are members, $3 nonmembers. agreement and contract infor- free. One photo enlargement given away as a door prize. mation. Phone 360-457-7004. Fundraiser for Peninsula Trails The Answer for Youth — Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Coalition. Phone Dave ShrefDrop-in outreach center for Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206- fler at 360-683-1734 for more youth and young adults, provid- 321-1718 or visit www. information.

Circuit training exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ wavecable.com. Line dancing lessons — Beginning dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per class. Phone 360-681-2826. Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Student Art Show.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.Free. Phone 360-683-8110. Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group — Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. Topic: “The Digital Disruption; Connectivity and the Diffusion of Power.” Topics taken from Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions and articles in Foreign Affairs magazine. For more information, visit the Sequim Great Discussion Group at www.fpa.org/info-url _nocat4728/. Phone 360-6839622, or e-mail jcpollock@ olypen.com. New members welcome. Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., noon Phone 360-6814308, or partnership 360-6835635. French class — 2 p.m. For more information, phone 360681-0226. “Nunsense”— Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., 7:30 p.m. Tickets $26.50, available online at http:// olympic-theatre.tripod.com or at box office.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Today Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Chimacum TOPS 1393 — Evergreen Coho Resort Club House, 2481 Anderson Lake Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visitors welcome. Phone: 360-7653164.

Turn

to

Things/C10


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PeninsulaNorthwest Now Showing Briefly . . .

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-452-7176) “The Green Hornet” (PG-13) “Just Go With It” (PG-13) “The King’s Speech” (R) “The Rite” (PG-13) “Sanctum” (R) “True Grit” (PG-13)

“Gnomeo and Juliet” (G) “The Mechanic” (R) “No Strings Attached” (R)

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend

(360-385-1089)

“The King’s Speech” (R) “The Company Men” (R)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-385-3883)

“Black Swan” (R)

“Another Year” (PG-13)

No ‘Live Music?’ PDN columnist John Nelson is taking the week off. His column, “Live Music,” will resume upon his return. In the meantime, you can turn to Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in Friday’s PDN, and “Things to Do,” which is published in every edition. “Things to Do starts on Page C1 today.

Duplicate Bridge Results Port Townsend Winners for Wednesday, Feb. 9, were: Betty Abersold-Mike Edwards, first; Caroline Wildflower-Clint Weimeister, second; Jean Gilliland-Bob MacNeal, third.

OMC looking for experts in health fields

360-417-7122.

Arabic rhythms

SEQUIM — A Basic Arabic Rhythm Workshop will be held at the Sequim Senior Center, 921 E. HamPORT ANGELES — mond St., from 5 p.m. to Olympic Medical Center’s 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Wellness Committee is Attendees can bring any looking for health, fitness, healthy cooking and stress- object that can be used as a rhythm instrument for the reduction experts to offer workshop. activities and educational Participants also will opportunities for Olympic learn about Middle Eastern Medical Center employees culture and music. on a limited trial basis. Cost is $3. Activities, classes and The event is open to all educational opportunities ages, and no musical expeshould be geared to introrience is necessary. duce employees to healthy For more information, options available in the Clallam County community. phone Lydia Samperi at 360-683-9059. For more information, phone Communication and Health Promotions Coordi- PEG grants Peninsula Credit Union nator Bobby Beeman at

is accepting applications for its 2011 Peninsula Education Grant. Grants are available to educators in all primary or secondary classes for both public and accredited private schools in Jefferson, Clallam, Mason, Kitsap and Grays Harbor counties. Grant amounts are between $300 to $500 for implementation of new programs, continuation of existing programs, materials, equipment or supplies. Application forms are available online at www. pcfcu.org and at all Peninsula Credit Union branches. Applications are due by April 29. For more information, phone 800-426-1601. Peninsula Daily News

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3

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

C3

rdAge

Medicare can help one be and stay well OK, IT’S THREE days after Valentine’s Day, and it’s pretty clear to me that I should attempt to redeem myself after last week’s column. For those of you who completely lost your minds last Thursday or spent it in another time zone or experienced any other aberration that prevented you from catching last week’s effort, I essentially implied (well, OK, I said it out loud) that chocolate and other nutritional sins might actually have their place, particularly if you happen to be in the situation of caring for someone with dementia. While that seems pretty specific to me, some of you undoubtedly took that as a recommendation (if not a prescription) to go forth and consume vast quantities of bad food. So, since our February excuse for indulgence has passed, I’ll gloss over the excuse that I may have provided and direct your attention, instead, to “wellness” and “prevention.”

Wellness, prevention Look: You know as well as I that the only way to avoid the astronomical costs of health care and the

by all means, do so. Just visit: http://tinyurl. com/33d7sad and have a real nice day.)

■  Medical and family history. ■  Establishing a list of comacurrent medical providers, Mark inducing suppliers and medicines. Harvey experiGet checked ■  Personal risk assessence of ment. The “Welcome to Medihealth ■  Review of functional insurance care” physical exam has ability and level of safety. that usu- been available for a while, but a lot of us don’t seem to ■  Detection of any cogally be real sharp about getting nitive impairment. comes with it is it done. ■  Screening for depresBeginning Jan. 1 of this sion (very common for a lot to utilize either (or year, there is no longer a of us!). both!) as co-insurance or deductible ■  Establishing a schedpayment required for it, so ule for Medicare’s screenlittle as now we have even less of possible. ing and preventive services an excuse to avoid it. Thus, for those of us Remember, not knowing for the next five to 10 who have yet to achieve years. immortality, we’re forced to what might be wrong will ■  Any other advice or confront the daunting real- not make “what’s wrong” go referrals that come up. away. ities of wellness and preSo besides getting on Also beginning last vention. the front end of anything In other words, don’t get Jan. 1, we Medicare types that might be wrong have access to an “annual seriously sick. wellness visit.” Even Medicare has (which often includes nothYou do not need to get begun to figure this out. ing), you’re establishing a the “Welcome to Medicare” base line. It makes absolutely no physical before getting the difference to most of us Subsequent wellness whether this stuff has been “annual wellness exam” — visits will pretty much but if you do get it first, available for a while or if retrace the same steps, the then you have to wait 12 it’s a product of “health idea being to see if anymonths to get your first care reform.” thing that might have “wellness” exam. The fact is, here we are Your call, because doing changed is a “problem.” and here it is and we might I realize that this isn’t something beats the heck as well use Medicare exciting stuff. out of doing nothing. (which is “health insurIf you’re looking for The initial annual wellance”) to avoid having to “exciting,” try spending ness visit includes: use health insurance! your spare time in a hospi■  Routine measureAnyway, here we go. tal bed, trying to figure out (And if you’d like to ments (height, weight, research all of this yourself, blood pressure, etc.). whether you’re there under

HELP LINE

Birthday Martha Allison Port Angeles resident Martha Allison will turn 90 on Tuesday, Feb. 22. Friends are invited to celebrate this milestone birthday with her Sunday, Feb. 20, at 2 p.m. at the Family Life Center of the Independent Bible Church, 112 N. Lincoln St. Pastor Mike Jones will have some special Mrs. Allison words, and there will be musical entertainment. Born in Seattle, Mrs. Allison married Vic Allison in 1942. Mr. Allison was in the Coast Guard, stationed in Port Angeles during the war. After 10 years of service, the beauty of the Peninsula had captured the couple’s hearts, and they knew they

“inpatient” or “observation.” doctor visit for these serNo? Then this is looking vices: a little better all the time. ■  Cardiovascular screening tests. Cost-sharing ■  Diabetes screening tests. Also beginning Jan. 1 ■  HIV screening tests. (yes, Jan. 1 was a busy Now, wasn’t that simday!), cost-sharing was eliminated for the following ple? Of course not! This is Medicare-covered services, Medicare! assuming that your doc But the fact remains “accepts assignment,” which means she/he agrees that the game has changed and, for once, it’s swinging to accept what Medicare our way, meaning that prepays as payment in full: vention and wellness ■  Abdominal aortic makes more sense than the aneurysm screening. ■  Bone mass measure- high drama (and higher cost!) of heroic medical ment. ■  Breast cancer screen- intervention. No, you probably won’t ing and mammograms. live forever, and the fact is, ■  Certain types of most of us don’t want to. colorectal cancer screenWe just want to “live” ings. until it’s time to do some■  Flu shots. thing else. ■  Hepatitis B shots. This is a way to help us ■  Pap tests and pelvic do that. exams. ■  Pneumococcal shots. ________ ■  Prostate cancer Mark Harvey is director of screening. Clallam/Jefferson Information & ■  Smoking cessation. Assistance, which operates ■  Medical nutrition through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at therapy services (for those 360-452-3221 (Port Angeleswith diabetes or kidney Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson disease, or who had a kidCounty) or 360-374-9496 (West ney transplant in the past End); or by e-mailing harvemb@ 36 months). dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be You’ll probably pay 20 found on Facebook at Olympic percent of the MedicareArea Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance. approved amount for the

CORNER

were home. The Allisons raised four children and a niece: Stephen, Laura, Gloria, Tim and Elaine. The couple were both active in the Clallam County Art League. Mr. Allison died in 1985. Mrs. Allison has been active in many areas of community service, including the election board and the Clallam County Fair, and she still volunteers at the Port Angeles Senior Center. Her first love has always been her Christian service. She is the eldest living member of the Independent Bible Church, where she has served in many areas and is still a faithful attendee.

for years enjoyed dancing and swimming. She once swam across Lake Crescent. She currently resides at St. Andrew’s Place.

She came to the Olympic Peninsula at the age of 13, living with her family in the Lake Crescent area. Her parents ran resorts on Lake Crescent. After attending Crescent School, she Mrs. was home-schooled Gallagher when her family moved to Port Angeles. Mrs. Gallagher had four sons and one daughter. Her daughter and three sons are living, and one son, Dave is in Ketchikan, Alaska, studying at a seminary for priesthood. She says her children Mary Helen Gallagher and numerous grandchildren are the Mary Ellen Gallagher of Port Angeles joys of her life. She worked first for the telephone will celebrate her 90th birthday on company and later at Olympic Memorial Wednesday, Feb. 23. Hospital until retirement. She was born Feb. 23, 1921, in MisMrs. Gallagher is an avid reader and soula, Mont.

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks BEFORE the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

BARGAINING

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BY IAN LIVENGOOD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 119 Author of the 2009 book subtitled “A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis” 120 Protest sign 121 Quagmire 122 Midday meeting 123 Chic DOWN 1 Mitt 2 Kyrgyzstan city 3 Attica, e.g., informally 4 Carry-on 5 Lund of “Casablanca” 6 Headwear worn over dreadlocks 7 Eye problem 8 Day ___ 9 Coastal fliers 10 Home under the midnight sun 11 Silver-tongued 12 Actress Suvari 13 New ___ 14 DreamWorks’s first animated film 15 Where an Englishman might get a break? 16 George Orwell, e.g. 17 Agate alternative 20 Storage spot 21 Jet black 23 With 25-Across, a puzzle 27 Picture, commercially 28 Small bit of power 29 Injury-monitoring org.

31 High-end French retailer 35 Aid in lost and found 36 Co-worker of Homer on “The Simpsons” 37 Underworld activities 38 Singer Anthony 39 El Prado hangings 40 Union deserter, maybe 43 The King Henry who founded the Tudor dynasty 44 Push 45 Show of pride 46 “Our Gang” girl 47 Spanish hero of yore 52 Subj. of Form 1040’s line 32 54 Tiny complaint 55 How to address a maj.? 56 Small part of a pound? 57 Modern communication 58 Opposite of leg., in music 59 Prefix with -pod 60 Annual baseball events 64 Some campfire makers 65 Home of Kansai International Airport 66 Special delivery on Sun. 67 Divide up 68 Some sweet wines 69 Rembrandt van ___

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70 N.Y.C. avenue ACROSS 1 Little reminders 71 “Welcome to the Jungle” rocker 8 Bad record, e.g. 14 Coiled killers 73 Support provider 18 Home of Elaine, in 74 Crux Arthurian legend 75 Where dimwitted 19 Pirate’s support people pay to 20 Donne piece drink? 22 “Should I say 82 Won ‘Come here often?’ or ‘Hey, babe!’”? 83 Some potatoes 24 Recite, as a prayer 84 Smoothie ingredients 25 See 23-Down 88 Starts of some 26 Area banning pub reproductions regulars? 28 Heartache 90 Like a former 97-pound 30 “Before I forget …” weakling? 32 Losing tic-tac-toe row 93 It’s bad to be over it 33 Actor Penn of “Van 94 To be, to Augustus Wilder” 95 Chemical suffix 34 Kind of jelly 37 Connecting word 96 When Macbeth asks “Is this a dagger 38 Pirate’s support? which I see before 41 Capitol Records’ me?” parent co. 97 “Holy smokes!,” to 42 Lines on a Dan a teen Brown best seller? 98 Montréal’s ___ des 48 “Riddle-me-___” Soeurs 49 Like some yoga 100 No. 2: Abbr. 50 Sworn secrecy 102 Little guy 51 Settled (on) 53 E.T.’s ability to use 103 Dramatic production about the lower part of a Ivory or Dial? keyboard? 108 1974 hit whose 58 Carpet option title is sung twice 61 Subject for gossip after “Como una 62 Easily swayed promesa” 63 ___ Dan (Israeli 113 Horn of Africa archaeological native site) 114 Certain cases of 64 Guidebook the munchies? recommendation 67 Not in the country 118 Early online forum

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85 Score on a night out 86 Lamb not found on a farm 87 Tried to make it home, say 88 Pouch bearer 89 Skedaddle 91 Tack 92 A.T.M. button 98 Suffix with contempt

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C4

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Coinciding events cause friction

Tundra

DEAR ABBY: My family was invited to my cousin “Kirk’s” wedding — a small affair for family and close friends only. My brother “Ryan” and his wife, “Dawn,” decided to schedule their daughter’s first birthday party on the same day and not attend the wedding. The birthday party was at 4 p.m., the wedding at 6 p.m. The locations were an hour apart. We attended the birthday celebration and left early to get to the wedding on time, as did Mom and Dad. As a gift, we chipped in to get Kirk and his bride, “Kallie,” an upgrade on their cruise cabin. They loved it. Ryan and Dawn contributed as well. The bridal couple asked that, since Ryan and Dawn didn’t attend, I thank them — although they planned to send written formal thank-yous after their honeymoon. I called Ryan the next day to tell him Kirk and Kallie were appreciative, the wedding and reception were beautiful, and they were missed. Six weeks have passed, and my brother and sister-in-law refuse to speak to me. I learned they felt the phone call I placed after the wedding was “inappropriate.” I was “throwing the wedding in their faces” and “had no right” to leave the birthday party. I apologized, but they still won’t talk to me, though they’re speaking to our parents. Ryan and I were inseparable as kids, but now what? Hurt Sibling in Michigan

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Abigail

to let it go.

Van Buren

Dear Abby: My sister “Mimi” died two years ago. Throughout her 40-year marriage, she and her husband lived away from family and barely kept in touch, although we were close while growing up. Since her death, my husband and I have tried to keep in touch with her husband, “Clint.” The problem is, when I call him, all he talks about is the past, when we were all in school. That’s OK, but it invariably has some kind of sexual overtone — about what I wore or did as a teen. I have tried redirecting the conversation to Mimi — anything — to no avail. Now I’m wondering if my sister kept Clint away from the family for a reason. He was always like this to a degree, but it was under more control when she was alive. What do I do when the conversation heads in this direction? I don’t want to lose contact with him and their children. Uncomfortable in New Mexico

Dear Uncomfortable: The next time it happens, tell Clint in plain English that he’s making you Dear Hurt Sibling: Unless there uncomfortable and tell him to quit dwelling on the past because it’s boris more to the estrangement than ing. what you have written, the problem If that doesn’t discourage him, could be that your brother has discall him only with your husband on placed his anger at your parents for another extension. not staying at the birthday party And as to staying in contact with and directed it solely at you because your sister’s children — if their parit’s “safer.” ents were married for 40 years, they Is it wrong? Yes. Childish? Yes. Can you do anything more than you are adults now. already have to fix it? Probably not. Contact them directly and let Your parents might take a them know you care about them and moment to remind Ryan that they want them to be a part of your lives because you are all family. also left to attend the wedding and that it would have been better to –––––––– schedule the festivities earlier so Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, that everyone could have stayed lonalso known as Jeanne Phillips, and was ger. founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. LetBut if Ryan and Dawn choose to ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box hold a grudge, nothing you can do 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com. will change that until they’re ready

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last

lead to loneliness. 3 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your philanthropic attitude will set you apart from anyone trying to outdo you. A serious look at a partnership will reveal whether or not you should cut ties or try to make it work. Don’t take on more than you can handle. 5 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let everyone know what your plans are and you will receive help getting to where you want to go. There is money to be made and deals to be struck. A proposal you weren’t expecting will catch you off guard. Don’t hesitate. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll be forced to deal with a one-sided situation. If it will help you out professionally, proceed but, if not, walk away. You don’t want to become emotionally entangled in something that infringes on your time and possibly your code of ethics. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Offer advice or alternatives to what’s being presented and you will gather a following as well as the support you need to get your own ideas up and running. A celebration with someone you share your secrets with will enhance your relationship. 4 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ask someone who is up to date with the latest craze or technology to help you integrate your personal and professional lifestyle to meet current standards. Love is in the stars but so is disappointment. Don’t let negativity

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Doonesbury

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Secrets are being withheld. You have to dig deep in order to know exactly what you are dealing with. Focus more on home, family and your own emotional wellbeing and you will figure out what’s required to improve your life and your relationships. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The encounters you have with friends and colleagues will help you make an important decision, influencing your personal life, relationships and current residence. Consider the feelings of those your decision will affect. 4 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be caught in the middle of an emotional situation that can disrupt your home, family and emotional well-being. You have to look past current circumstances if you are going to reach your goals. 2 stars

The Family Circus

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Extra cash is heading your way. Job interviews, advancement and taking on greater responsibility will all help to improve your life and bring you in contact with people who have more to offer you personally and professionally. 5 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You will burn out fast if you take on too much. Limitation and frustration are apparent if you have to deal with someone negative or with authority figures that have the potential to make your life miserable. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t let poor financial or emotional choices stand in the way. You can excel if you are disciplined about work, finances and trying to make the most out of your life. A good offer should be accepted. Do what’s best for you. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Being unpredictable can be to your advantage sometimes, but it can also cause people to keep their distance. Be careful what signal you send. You may find it hurts your reputation and your chance to advance. 3 stars


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

C5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK

23

AWESOME 2 STALL MOVING Sale: Sat., GARAGE Sale: Sat. 8-4 p.m., 160 Petal only, 9-2 p.m., alley Lane, off Silberhorn. of 227 W. 11th. Furniture, electronMulti-family. Mega ics, kids things, fabric, quilting, knits, home decorating. books, candles, mirrors, ironware, sun- P.A.: West side 2 Br., dries, dishes, size 12 $515. 360-379-6642 ladies clothes, pictures, lots of crafting, P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. By baskets, self proappt. 452-4409. pelled lawn mower, lots to see, all cheap. SUBARU: ‘01 ForeDo you need your dog ster L Original owner, walked? Are you too reliable ride. $3,200 busy during the day? 417-2191 Call 640-4366

LOST: Dog. Tiny male Chihuahua, gray with white marks, very tiny, red collar, needs meds ASAP, Joyce area. 360-809-3160.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m. 713 W. Fir Street, Sequim. 360-460-7580

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T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

22

Community Notes

DEDICATED DRUMMER NEEDED For P.A. based metal band. Serious inquiries only. Practice 3 times weekly. Call Jason 460-6900. 22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

DANCE LESSONS Argentine tango, six lesson beginner series, starts Feb. 20, at Eagles, 5 pm. Call Cliff, 912-7007 FREE CLASSES Volunteer Hospice is offering 6 classes: Death & Dying Attitudes, Legal Issues, Grief & more. Runs March 3-April 7 in Sequim. Become a trained volunteer. Open to all. Register at 452-1511

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

PRENATAL YOGA Feel a sense of support and community with other pregnant women as you increase flexibility, strength, circulation and balance. A regular yoga practice can help to reduce swelling, insomnia, back and leg pain commonly associated with pregnancy. The class is safe for all three trimesters. 8-week class for expecting moms begins Sunday, March 13. For more information or to register, please e-mail Jennifer Veneklasen at jennven@hotmail.c om or phone 360775-8746. Space is limited.

We are working on our Cub Scout badge, our Troop number is 4686. Hello from Grayson and Braydon! Thank you for visiting us at The PDN.

23

Lost and Found

$500 REWARD For return of lost dog. Female, long strawberry blonde hair, large lump on right side. 360-461-4642 FOUND: Bicycle. Call to identify or bring key that fits lock. 452-7601 FOUND: Cat. Loving Persian near Bell St., Sequim. Call to describe. 809-3403. LOST: Cat. Black Himalayan, 16 lbs, red tint to end of fur, Monroe and East Arnette, Rd., last lived at Peabody and 9th, P.A. 775-5264. LOST: Cat. Blind, Calico, Livengood Ln., Sequim. 477-2272. LOST: Cat. Small black and white female with half a kinked tail from River Rd. area in Sequim. 460-6904 LOST: Dog. Black and tan Coon Hound. Trophy 5 yr. female, Gardner Beach Rd on Sunday 2/13. 360-301-4939 LOST: Dog. Female tan colored black muzzle, 7-8 mo. old, last seen on Carlsborg Rd., Sequim. 360-912-2714

LOST: Dog. Tan and white, American Pit, red collar, Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim. 797-4847

LOST: Dogs. 1 female Golden Retriever, 1 female Westin Scotty, Freshwater Bay area, P.A. 928-2404. LOST: Earring. Silver wired, white/clear glittery glass 1” teardrop shape, Feb. 12th, downtown Port Angeles area. 452-4255

Personals

I’m 6’5” tall, single, white male, 47 yrs. old, 265 lbs, average build, love to cuddle and cook, seeking single white female, 28-40 yrs. old. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#196/Cuddle Pt Angeles, WA 98362 SINGLE DISABLED MAN SEEKS SINGLE DISABLED WOMAN 29-55, CAR OR NOT, JOB OR NOT, BUT WITH INCOME, ENJOYS A WALK AND ETC. SEND RESPONSE TO PDN103@peninsuladailynews.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

School Bus Mechanic Needed Port Angeles School District. 5 hrs. daily. $17.59 per hour. For information, please call 452-9714 or Human Resources at 457-8575. PASD is an EOE. AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Bookkeeper - MHF is seeking a part-time person accounting experience. Duties include filing, dataentry, check reconciliation. Please send resume and references to: MHF P.O. Box 698 Carlsborg, WA 98324. CAREGIVERS KWA Homecare. Call 452-2129.

Caregivers Needed Friendly, cheerful, dependable people needed to assist seniors with personal and home helper services. Non-medical, very rewarding work. Part-time, days, evenings, weekends. Call M-F, 9-5. 360-681-2511 CARPENTER’S APPRENTICE Mail resume to: 74 Wellman Rd. Pt Angeles, WA 98362 DIETARY SERVICES Park View Villas is hiring all positions in dietary services. Full and part-time positions available. Stop by in person to pick up an application. 8th and G St. in Port Angeles. No phone calls please. EXCAVATING FOREMAN Operator experience required. Apply online www.jamestowntribe. org or pick-up an application at 257 Business Park Loop, Sequim.

31

Help Wanted

DRIVER: Class B CDL, repetitive lifting and carrying of drywall. 452-4161. K-12 Principal Clallam Bay School Salary DOE Open until filled with first review on March 14, 2011. Information available at www.capeflattery.w ednet.edu or by contacting Evelyn Wonderly at 360-963-2249 LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LEGAL ASSISTANT Family law attorney. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#195/Legal Pt Angeles, WA 98362 MECHANIC The Port of Port Angeles is seeking a qualified individual for the position of Mechanic. Applicants must have 5 yrs of auto/ diesel mechanics experience with heavy equipment such as LeTourneaus, Wagners L90s, CAT 980s. Must be a certified welder & have experience with fleet vehicles & boats. Must also have extensive diagnostic skills. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Port Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., PA between 8am-5pm M-F & also online at www.portofpa.com . Applications will be accepted until 5pm February 25, 2011. Starting salary range is $25.39 - $27.33 per hr. Drug testing is required. Other testing may be required. PAINT SALESPERSON Needed to develop and market retail/ commercial paint department, plus match colors, mix paint, maintain equipment, inventory. Detailed, selfstarters. Send response to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#192/Paint Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Port Townsend Goodwill Now Hiring PT Cashier Apply in person 602 Howard St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

34

Work Wanted

Do you need your dog walked? Are you too busy during the day? Call 640-4366 Happy Day Cleaning. houses,offices, new construction, moveouts, recreational vehicles. No JOB too BIG or too SMALL. call 808-3017 for a free estimate. Port Angeles and surrounding area. HOUSE CLEANING Ask for Naomi. 461-1906 Learning Coach Your child will reach full academic potential while being privately tutored for only minutes a day. Your child, safe in your home, learning your values. Let me help. Pre-K & elementary. Call Mary Somero. 360-477-4691 Stillwater Early Learning Support Professional Computer Repair HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us at 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek.c om

34

Work Wanted

In-home care available for your loved ones. Experienced caring RN available, flexible hours, salary negotiable. Call Rae at 360-681-4271. Lupe’s house cleaning. Excellent work. Provides supplies. 360-808-6991

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeli ve.com I'm Sew Happy! Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513 Yardwork & Odd jobs. Experienced & dependable, tree & hedge trimming, mowing, hauling, weeding and gutter cleaning, etc. 1-2 men at $17.50 ea/ph. Flat Rates. $40 min. 461-7772 w/ References. Not Hiring.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

3 Br., 3 baths; upper level has 2 Br., 2 baths, lower level has 1 Br., and 1 bath. Formal dining and nook, 2 fireplaces, oversized garage, enjoy Sunland amenities. $264,000. ML260258/180244 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND A MUST SEE Looking for a quality, custom home with amazing views of saltwater, Victoria, Mt. Baker, farmland, and Hurricane Ridge? This is it! Single level 3 Br., 2 bath home, ADA accessible, separate art studio/hobby room, daylight basement with full guest quarters. Top quality materials throughout. $399,000. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9361

A Must See! This home has 3 Br., 2 ba, living room, fireplace, family room, wet bar, den, deck w/hot tub, garage, new windows and flooring, in a cul-de-sac with a mtn view 1 mile up Mt. Pleasant. Asking $192,000, incl closing. 360-457-0070 for showing.

51

Homes

BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEWS From this 2 Br., 2 bath home on 1.25 level acres between Sequim and Port Angeles. Newer laminate floors, carpets, windows and roof. Two sided rock mantel with a fireplace on the living room side and a wood stove on the dining room side. Large kitchen with a separate pantry. $189,900. ML252417. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CUL-DE-SAC QUIET! Affordable, nice 3 Br., 1 bath on near 1/2 acre, located near Robin Hill Farm Park and Discovery Trail. Centrally located between Sequim and Port Angeles. Partially fenced yard. New interior paint and vinyl flooring, roof is 3 years old. Owner financing available! $139,900. ML251915 Neil Culbertson Brokers Group Real Estate Professionals 681-8778 ext 110 CUSTOM BUILT 3 BR., 2 BATH Beautiful home in wonderful neighborhood. Impeccably maintained. Super clean. Vaulted ceiling, fireplace, 2 car garage and expansive deck! $253,019. ML176550 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow CUSTOM HOME SEQUIM This gorgeous 3,189 sf home, with 3 Br., 2 full and 2 half baths, built in 1995, is located on 3.37 acres on Bell Hill. Soaring ceilings, hardwood floors, beautiful tile, three car garage – too much to mention here! $499,000. ML260038 Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660 EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY FRIENDLY HOME Mature Rhodys and tall trees create a special NW setting for this 4 Br., 2.5 bath home with 2,326 sf. Impressive sky lit vaulted ceiling entry opens to angled stairway, formal living room and dining room. “Hub” kitchen/family room combo enjoys a propane fireplace. Fenced backyard. Wood deck. Double. attached garage. $289,000. ML260262. Margo Petersen-Pruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY GREAT HOME With saltwater views on the east side. 3 Br., 3 baths and large bonus room with fireplace insert. Front and back decks and a large corner lot. 2 car garage with workshop area and paved parking for RV or boat or both. $229,000 ML260216/178051 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY P.A.: 2 Br. house on 9.2 acres, 2 outbuildings, 1 acre pond, bordered by year round creek, Salt Creek area, Hwy. 112 frontage. $300,000. 808-2045 PARKWOOD HOME 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,998 sf home, master Br. with sitting area, oversized 2 car garage with work bench, enclosed patio and landscaped yard, large corner lot. $120,000. ML251593/108036 Den Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

51

Homes

SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME Situated on the 13th fairway, saltwater and golf course views, granite kitchen counters, gas stove and cherry cabinets, 2 decks off kitchen/dining, 2 master suites. $515,000 ML250630/46530 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Step across the threshold and back in time to the days of opulence. This beautifully restored Victorian will take you back to days when rooms were ample and homes were comfortable places to gather. Three porches, seven gardens, a dining room big enough to serve 15, a two-story shop with water view. Just begin the list of amenities. Priced below value. $385,000 ML250558/42161 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SUNLAND CHARMER Outstanding 3 Br., 2 bath rambler located on the 11th fairway of SunLand Gold Course. Kitchen and bathrooms have been tastefully upgraded with granite countertops, ceramic cooktop, new plumbing fixtures and shower. Large sunroom provides nice view of the golf course and mountains. $275,000 ML260240/179196 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY SUNNY FENCED BACKYARD Comfy 2 Br., 1.5 bath rambler with laminate floors, vinyl windows and detached garage. Bring your paint brush and elbow grease and make this home sparkle again. $119,900 ML260234/179035 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Trees, creek, and privacy just minutes from Safeway and town. Inviting rambler with a full daylight basement. All amenities on the main floor leaves the daylight basement useful as an in-law unit with it’s own kitchen, 2 Br., bath, dining room, and living room. 7+ wooded acres and house for only $320,000. ML251042/49300 Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

51

Homes

Very well cared for home on a corner lot in a great neighborhood. Many amenities including fresh exterior pain and cedar deck, freestanding propane stove in the living room, off street RV parking pad, fenced back yard and detached finished shop/outbuilding. $189,900 ML242226/29135198 Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WANTED: Great opportunity for income & increased value before selling, seeking to lease 5 Br. or 4 Br. plus den in Sequim, excellent credit, adults only. No Agents 477-4942

52

Manufactured Homes

Cute single wide mobile between Sequim and P.A. 2 Br., 2 bath, updated inside, easy to maintain yard, workshop, long carport, must see inside of this home. All updated appliances, hot water heater, club house, and walking areas. 1 small pet. Rent $305, free W/S/G, 55+ park. $22,500 461-2554, 681-0829 LIKE NEW Five year old 1,791 sf manufactured home with attached double car garage in Hendrickson’s mobile home park. Great location with easy access to downtown and shopping. This home has a heat pump, 10x40 patio with motorized awning, low maintenance landscaping. $118,000. ML252235. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 MOBILE HOME: 2 Br., 1 bath, copper wire, newly remodeled. Must be moved. Very clean. $8,000/obo. 360-301-9109

54

Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE by owner. Port Angeles lot at 222 W. Park Ave., half acre + close in town. Water, power, and sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and high school. $99,000. Owner financing. Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water, $69,000. Owner financing. Call 253-549-3345.

54

5000900

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m. 207 Blue Jay Pl., off Deer Park Rd. Tools, lumber, household items, tons of great stuff!

We are working on our Cub Scout badge, our Troop number is 4686. Hello from Grayson and Braydon! Thank you for visiting us at The PDN.

Lost and Found

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Lots/ Acreage

Beautiful, flat parcel with mountain view. Mostly pasture and some trees. Manufactured homes are allowed. Irrigation on north side of property. PUD water and power to the property. Perked at one time for a conventional system. $126,900. ML260081. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘L’ IS FOR LOVELY LOT Privately set lot in great west side location with easy topography and plenty of trees. Creativity welcome in designing your own floor plan. Quiet neighborhood, come and see! $44,900. ML252415. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company LAVENDER POTENTIAL Plant your selection of lavender. Breathtaking mountain views. Beautiful acreage in Agnew, owner financing available. $199,000 ML250847/56475 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND O’BRIEN ROAD P.A. Beautifully treed 2.5 acres. New outbuildings and septic system. Young orchard. $149,000. 360-7974659 leave message.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


ACROSS 1 __ effort 5 Without restraint 9 “__ luego” 14 Merrill in movies 15 Microwave 16 “__ Smith and Jones”: 1970s TV Western 17 List maker 18 Swank’s “Amelia” co-star 19 Stealthy Easterner 20 Fancy greens dish 23 Storm hdg. 24 Out of sorts 25 Cloud in Orion 30 Spay or neuter 32 #1 tennis player for much of the ’80s 35 “I can help” 36 2012 Ryder Cup captain Davis Love __ 37 News organ? 38 In reverse position 42 Cross over 45 Be less than healthy 46 Greek with lessons 50 Feminist’s concern 53 __ myrtle: tree or shrub in the loosestrife family 54 Skirmish 55 Where Eth. is 57 Chess pieces 58 Bit of modern folklore 62 Howled 66 Upscale hotel chain 67 Without thinking, with “by” 68 Tequila plant 69 It often involves steady losses 70 Privy to 71 With 72- and 73Across, what this puzzle does literally at six different intersections 72 See 71-Across 73 See 71-Across DOWN

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Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br. $695, 2 Br. $514, 2nd floor 1 Br. $478 + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258

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HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ONE-ON-ONE INTERVIEWS

E R N O S R E P O L L S T E R By Elizabeth A. Long

1 Supplementary items 2 He plays Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter films 3 Where the teacher might casually sit 4 Rajah’s wife 5 Guardian, maybe 6 Vegan’s morning meal 7 Cajun staple 8 Stabilizing part 9 “Water Music” composer 10 Clay, today 11 Offense 12 Atlantic City casino, with “The” 13 “__ matter of fact ...” 21 Sly female 22 Musical based on a comic strip 26 Binge 27 A quarter of cuatro 28 Mormons, initially 29 Bar option 31 Corrects, as text 33 Instrument in Schubert’s “Trout Quintet” 34 __ conditioning Houses

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

SEQUIM: Studio. $500, utilities paid 683-4250 after 5 p.m

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SEQ: Furn., own bath, no pet/smoke. $400 incl. util. 504-2208.

68 Very Nice P.A. apartment home. 3-4 bed, 2 ba w/ office/ nursery. Includes: Internet, cable, W/S/G. Avail. 2/1 $1,175. 670-6996.

Houses

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $680. 417-6786

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. A Studio..........$400 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 H 2 br 1 ba......$565 A 2/1 all util.... $600 H 2 br 1 ba......$650 H 5 br 1.5 ba...$1000 H 4 br 1.5 ba..$1200 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 2 br 1 ba.......$575 A 2 br 1 ba.......$725 H 2 br 1 ba.......$900

Share Rentals/ Rooms

Commercial Space

LEE PLAZA Prime downtown retail space. 1 storefront available, 1,000 sf. 452-7563 afternoon. 457-7785 mornings. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 SEQUIM: 850 sf warm, sunny office space. 460-5467.

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, shop/carport, W/D, sm pet. 3143 E. Hwy. 101. $750. 417-8250 P.A.: 2 Br., 606 S. Laurel, $695. References 808-2340 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, $990. 3 Br., 2 ba, $925. 452-1395. P.A.: Very nice 3 Br., 2 ba on dbl. corner lot. $1,100 mo., 1st, last, dep. 360-640-1613. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ/P.A.: 3 Br., mtn. view. $895. tourfactory.com/517739

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

MISC: Like new, Carrier electric furnace, used 1 year, $600. Stackable Whirlpool washer and dryer, front loader, 3 years old, $700 for pair. 452-5145

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39 Provocative sort 40 __ leaf 41 Mother-of-pearl 42 Certain NCO 43 Little, in Lille 44 “Jeopardy!” ques., really 47 Identical item 48 Summer shoe style 49 Hanging 51 Gets by 52 Gave one star,

Appliances

Furniture

BED: Single, extra long, pillow top mattress, box spring, frame, nice head and foot board. $200. 460-8709 COFFEE TABLES: 2 blonde finish coffee tables, 1 large, $40 and 1 small $30, very good condition. 681-4429 DINING TABLE: 73” large dining room table with 4 chairs, light blond finish, nice set. $150/obo. 681-4429

LIFT CHAIR: Electric, like new, $600/obo. 683-7397 MISC: Trundle bed, $50. Handmade bookcase, $35. TV entertainment center, $75. 360-452-0768. MISC: Very nice traditional dining table with 4 upholstered chairs with leaf, seats 8, $400/obo. 19th century walnut drop leaf table, $950. Small oak antique table with slide-out leaf, $450. 460-6505. MOVING SALE Oak roll top desk, $300. Kitchen cart, $100. Cocktail table, $75. All new. 360-775-5950 SET: 2 piece sofa with corner wedge, $450. Matching chair, $200. Light sage, gently used. 683-2383

General Merchandise

CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

R P N C I V A J T U T T D A K

AWNTY

Angeles Furniture has a huge clearance area that you must stop by and check out. Shop for your living room, dining area and bedroom all at close out prices. 1114 E. First St., Port Angeles. 457-9412. angelesfurniture.com See us on Facebook

73

S O A A I M R E W S N A U O C

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HEADBOARD Henredon Fine Furniture king headboard, $250. 457-1780. Great location, high visibility on Hwy 101, 2,400 sf, office, restroom, lots of signage. $1,000 per mo. Rusty 460-5892.

C R R E L I A B L E R M O D S

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

72

SEQUIM: Palo Alto Rd. newly remodeled 1 Br. with loft. $700. 683-4307

P T W N O I H S A F S B O J Y

Solution: 7 letters

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

SEQUIM: 1 Br., in town, very clean, sec. sys, W/D, W/S/G incl. $560. Yr lease. 460-8978. SEQUIM: 4 Br., 1st, last, deposit. $1,000 each. Avail. March 1. No pets. 775-8856

D E S I G N E R S U S U C O F

© 2011 Universal Uclick

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

MINI-FRIDGE: Kenmore. $30. 477-2322

P.A.: 1 Br. Downtown location, mountain view, no pets. $525. 582-7241

P.A.: West side 2 Br., $515. 360-379-6642

71

2/17/11

SEQ: Close to Safeway, 3 Br., 2 ba, extra garage. $890. Lease/ rent. 461-9242.

SEQUIM: Palo Alto Rd. new log cabin, 1 Br. $800, utilities paid. 683-4307.

P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. By appt. 452-4409.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS By DAVID OUELLET

EAST P.A.: 1 Br., W/S/G paid, no pets /smoking. $475, plus $425 dep. 683-1012.

64

Classified

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Do you have an old car, truck or tractor in your garage, basement or backyard? It could be worth $$$ Call 461-2248 FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com GAS FIREPLACE Regency-Hampton, 18K BTU, like brand new, cost $1,400+. $650/obo. 457-1860 msg.

73

General Merchandise

2/17/11

say 56 Moves like a moth 59 Portend 60 Exiled African tyrant 61 Dreadful 62 Bit of Lagasse lingo 63 Turkish title 64 Asian ox 65 First lady?

76

Sporting Goods

78E

THOUPS

YABSUW Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

Garage Sales Sequim

FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-477-8832

BOWFLEX: Revolution, like new, barely used. $2,200. 452-4338

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m. 713 W. Fir Street, Sequim. 360-460-7580

LEITZ FARMS, INC. Wood Stove Pellets $185 ton. 452-1400.

GUN & KNIFE SHOW

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-4 p.m., 160 Petal Lane, off Silberhorn. Furniture, electronics, kids things, home decorating.

MISC: ‘95 F150 4x4, parts truck or fix, $500. Topper, commercial, $500. 6 aircraft headsets, $50 ea. 461-8060. MISC: Box scraper, 5’ Rankin, $500. Cherry wood armoire, very expensive, asking $800. Norwegian cherry wood executive desk, asking $800. 477-9591. MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Queen size brass bed, with mattress & accessories, $500. Oriental art and vases, $100-$250. 681-0131 MISC: Husqvarna 61 chain saw, 20” bar, $70. Lincoln AC225S welder with L2645 carbon arc torch and 4 waterproof rod tubes, $150. 15 hp Evinrude, L/S motor, $250. 541-913-9708. TOOLS: 20” Jet wood planer, $1,000/obo. 44” Performax, $1,000/obo. Small Jet combo sander, $150. 452-7609. UTILITY TRAILER ‘07 33’, tandem axel g.n., deck length 25’, 14K lbs GVWR, 5’ spring loaded pop up, dove tail with 5’ ramps. $4,500. 452-5457, 808-3899 UTILITY TRAILER 23’ V nose, enclosed, car carrier/utility trailer, rear drop down ramp, side door, built in tie downs, less than 2,000 mi. $6,700 new. Sell for $4,700. 504-2599. WANTED: Watches, working or not, watch tools. 461-1474.

74

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429. TV: 36” Toshiba color TV with stand, great shape, great picture, includes VCR, not a flat screen! $300/ obo. 681-3299.

75

Musical

GUITAR: Tacoma. Acoustic electric, 6 string, with hardshell case, in new condition. Asking $1,000. 452-6573 PIANO: Roland electric with bench, several voicings, recording capability, synthesizer, many extras. Value, $1,000. Sell, $300. 681-3045

Buy*Sell*Trade Feb. 19 & 20 Sat. 9-5 Sun. 9:30-3 Sunday Door Prizes MASONIC TEMPLE 622 S. Lincoln, P.A. $6 general admission $1 OFF with this ad

360-202-7336 MISC: Winchester Rifle Model 9422 NRA like new $450. Remington Shotgun Model 1100 12 gauge w/extra slug bbl NRA Perfect $650. Humminbird Fishing Buddy II w/mounting bracket batteries incl. $100. Humminbird Piranha Max 215 Dual Beam w/transducer max depth 600 ft batteries incl. $150. Tel: 360-437-2171 RIFLE: Custom .2506 Mauser action, stainless heavy barrel, 2 boxes of ammo, base and rings, $400/obo. 460-2602 RIFLE: High Standard AR15 .223/Nato, 16” ch H-bar, 6 pos stock, Bayo lug, mil spec comp, 30 rd mag, factory warranty, new in box. $880. 683-7716 Treadmill and Bow Flex Elite. Weslo treadmill with weights, $150. Like new. BowFlex Elite new still in box, paid $995, asking $750. 360-683-3887

77

Bargain Box

PLANTERS: Set of 3, clay chickens, large. $20. 683-9295.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

AWESOME 2 STALL GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 9-2 p.m., alley of 227 W. 11th. Multi-family. Mega fabric, quilting, knits, books, candles, mirrors, ironware, sundries, dishes, size 12 ladies clothes, pictures, lots of crafting, baskets, self propelled lawn mower, lots to see, all cheap.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: 16’ boat trailer, prefer galv. EZ Loader. 457-4532. WANTED: Vintage woodworking tools, planes, chisels, compass, etc. 457-0814.

(Answers tomorrow) BASIS VANITY CAUCUS Jumbles: DRAWL Answer: Why they staged a sit-in to save the trees — IT WAS A “STAND”

82

Pets

MISC: Large cage with (4) beautiful parakeets, all accessories, value $300. sell, $50. (2) pet bunnies, in cages, $10 each. 681-3045. PUPPIES: COLLIE/ NWFT. Very cute, born 12/22/10, have been wormed and vaccinated. Both parents are really great dogs. $300. For more info call 360-928-0273 or 360-928-3319 or email sg1953@yahoo.com.

SCHIPPERKIES Puppies, born new years eve. Girls, $300. Boys, $250. 417-0234 Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Port Townsend’s Pane d’Amore bread is now available in Port Angeles at the Blackbird Coffee House, 338 E. 8th St. Beginning February 19th you will find us at the Port Angeles Farmer’s Market.

82 1

Pets

year old Male Yorkie/Chihuahua named Charlie. He’s very hyper and needs a good home that can give him lots of attention and training. Please see online add for more info. $200/obo. Contact Noelle at 360-461-6115

AKC GOLDEN RET PUPS A sweet blond male, a gentle golden female, 11 wks, rest gone to best of homes. Vigorous, semi-trained by voice. $350. 360-681-3390

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m. 207 Blue Jay Pl., off Deer Park Rd. Tools, lumber, household items, tons of great stuff!

FREE: To good home. 5 year old female cat. Declawed, long hair, tortoise color, very friendly lap cat, and very active, perfect health, current on her shots. 582-9798

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

MISC: Anatolian Shepherd 9 mo. old, need a home without cats, good guard dog, $100/obo. Also 2 male cockatiels, with large cage, $100. 565-0105, after 6 p.m.

93

Marine

JACK RUSSELL & HUNT TERRIERS Puppy to 1 yr. old. Call for pricing and information. $200-$700. 477-4427

PUPPIES: Super cute Chihuahua/Min-Pin. Sweet and friendly. $250. 360-780-2911 days, 360-963-2959 eves.

81 82 83 84 85

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

C6

TOY POODLE MIX 4 mo. old, female. $250. 417-1546

83

Farm Animals

HAY: Barn stored, top quality ORTA blend. $5 bale. 681-8180. HAY: Good quality grass hay, $5.50 bale. 461-5804. WANTED: Land/pond lease for 2011-12 duck season. Larry 457-9200 (work)

85

Farm Equipment

BOX SCRAPER: 5’ Rankin. $500/obo. 477-9591

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $14,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813. MOTOR: ‘03 25 hp Yamaha electric start, 4 stroke long shaft hand tiller. $2,700. 683-3289 eves. MOTORS: ‘72 18 hp Evinrude outboard motor, $200. ‘78 10 hp Mercury motor, long shaft, electric start, very clean $400. 809-0168. OWENS: 16’ I/O, 125 hp Mercury motor, needs work. $700/ obo. 681-0828. TOLLY: ‘66 38’. Twin 318s, 200 hrs., loaded. Trade for 20’ alum. $25,000. 360-770-2410 TROPHY: ‘06 21’ model 2002. Walkabout, Alaskan pkg., 150 hp Mercury, 15 hp kicker, downriggers, radar, 2 depth finders, GPS, Winless, 2 canvas tops, many extras. $39,995. 681-0717.

94

Motorcycles

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

93

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023. KAWASAKI ‘02 1500 MEANSTREAK V-twin, Vance & Hines exhaust, bags, windshield. VIN000073. Expires 2/16/11 $4,900 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973. MISC: ‘67 Honda 90, runs good $750. ‘07 Eton 90 quad, like new $1,250. 461-1860 QUAD: ‘04 Kawasaki 700 KFX. Very good shape. $3,200/obo. 461-2056 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213.

V-STAR: ‘08 1300 Tourer. Silver/gray with 8,000 miles, 48 mpg, nice clean bike. Asking $6,250. Call Mike, 360-683-7445 eves.

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘99 25’ Artic Fox. $10,850. This particular fifth wheel is heavily insulated and ideal for the great northwest. Rv cover included. Please call for more information. 360-732-7540

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

Marine

BOAT TRAILER: ‘05 King galvanized 13’15’. $450. 461-7979.

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 DYNA WIDE GLIDE FXDWG, 88 ci, 5 speed, Vance & Hines pipes, custom paint. VIN317149. Expires 2/16/11 $7,900 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

94

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft. 3 slides, 6 speed Allison trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner stovetop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table,light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, 6 KW generator, leveling sys, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k) gently used, non smokers. $115,000 360-683-3887


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

C7

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAWN/YARD CAREPAINTING RESTORATION

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

www.LundFencing.com

Chad Lund

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

93313234

#LUNDFF*962K7

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss Prevention Window Washing

461-4609

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360

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning ��� Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Larry Muckley

670.1122

The 7% Solution

LIC#OSCARLP964LA 115110083

Very Reasonable Prices

APPLIANCES

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

797-1428

Make your rugs look SO much better and last longer, too.

ROOFING

SE EMM P PER ER F I T R E EE E SE ER R VIC VIC E

WANTED: Wind Damaged

G

D

ARLAN ROOFING

457-5186

EXCAVATING

360/460•9824

BY APPOINTMENT

(360) 460-0518

Call NOW To Advertise 360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

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Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured Reg#FINIST*932D0

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125111253

125111256

MARK BAKER 360-808-0174 360-452-4548

683-8328

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

OUT ON A LIMB

Landscape Services

AMERICAN PLUMBING, INC.

offers a new service to do-it-yourselfers

5% OFF All new construction until June • Specializing in new construction and remodel • Radiant Heat and ALL plumbing Services • Prompt Customer Service

360-808-0174 360-452-4548 Lic#MARKSAP960J6

On-Site Garden Coaching C reate an A ctio n P lan

What to do; when & how to do it!

CALL KRISTINA TODAY!

(360) 457-8479

125111793

NOW AVAILABLE FOR SCHEDULING HOME INSPECTIONS

Tr e e s Shrubs Hedges

LANDSCAPING SERVICES

125111254

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

360-417-8862

PLUMBING SERVICE

HOME INSPECTION SERVICE AMERICAN HOME INSPECTION SERVICES

Mole Control

035075404

Scott A. Campbell, Owner afterhours.upholstery@q.com

anthonystreetop@gmail.com

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

#JKDIRKD942NG

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0C5106860

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115108508

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• Hazardous Tree Removal • Storm Damage • Bluff Work • Ornamental Pruning • Total Clean-up • Senior Discounts

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945036615

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JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

MOLE/PRUNING

After Hours Upholstery

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“Service and Quality Above All”

Dry Wall Repair

UPHOLSTERY

Specializing in Trees

WINDOW WASHING

Interior Painting

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

TREE SERVICE

452-9995

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

LIC

LANDSCAPING

Peninsula Since 1988

360

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

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FREE

Painting The

Asbestos

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

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We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

PAINTING

ASBESTOS

DIRT WORK

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Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

Full 6 Month Warranty

COLUMC*955KD

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360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

0A5100969

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0A5100336

river1966@msn.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

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360

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125111791

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125111249

115108502

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Oscar Lopez

s Handyman Services

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LARRYHM016J8

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call Marc

Jeff Hudson

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JP

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72289360

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9C5066307

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For details on how your ad can be on the internet call: 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7724


C8

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

2009 TOYOTA PRIUS

2008 FORD RANGER REGULAR CAB LB

2004 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE SE

4.8L V8, AUTO, AM/FM/CD, MATCHING CANOPY, SLIDER, TOW PKG, SPRAY-ON BEDLINER, PREM ALLOYS, PERFORMANCE CHIP, ONLY 68K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER LOCAL TRADE, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

1.5L GAS HYBRID, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALLOYS, 34K MILES! VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER, NON-SMOKER, BAL OF FACT WARR, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

4.0L V6, AUTO, AC, 42K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

BEAUTIFUL BLACK! ECONOMICAL 3.8L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, KEYLESS ENTRY, REAR DECK SPOILER, 78K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN LOCAL TRADE-IN, NON-SMOKER

$10,995

$17,995

$10,995

$7,995

2003 CHEVROLET K1500 SILVERADO LB

12406127

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS 4X4

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

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2008 FORD ESCAPE XLS 4X4

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2001 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW HARLEY-DAVIDSON ED. 2WD

2005 NISSAN SENTRA 1.8S SPECIAL EDITION

VERY ECONOMICAL 2.3L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/ FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, PRIV GLASS, ONLY 35K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX REPORT, SERVICE HISTORY, NEAR-NEW COND!

FRT WHL DRIVE, ECONOMICAL 1.8L 4 CYL, AUTO, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, CLEAN & RELIABLE LOCAL TRADE-IN, NON-SMOKER

72K ORIG MI. 5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! BLACK EXTERIOR ON BLACK LEATHER INTERIOR IN EXCEL SHAPE! PWR SEAT, MOONROOF, SLIDER, TOW, CHROME 20” WHEELS, PRI GLASS, 6 DISC AND MORE! SPOTLESS CARFAX, $2,500 LESS THAN KBB RETAIL @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

62K ORIG MI. 1.8L DOHC 4CYL, AUTO, LOADED. SILVER EXT ON GRAY CLOTH INT IN EXCEL SHAPE! CD W/ FACTORY ROCKFORD FOSGATE SOUND SYSTEM W/ FACTORY SUB WOOFER IN TRUNK, PREM ALLOY WHEELS, REAR SPOILER, AND MORE!! OVER 30MPG!! NICE LITTLE NISSAN @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$16,995

$1,995

$14,995

$8,995

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles M O T O R S 457-9663

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles M O T O R S 457-9663

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

1994 BMW 525i SEDAN

1994 BMW 750iL

2004 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER AWD

2003 FORD RANGER EDGE EXT CAB 4X4

2.5L DOHC I6 CYL, AUTO, LOADED! GOLD EXT ON TAN LEATHER INT IN GREAT SHAPE! DUAL PWR HTD SEAT, SUN ROOF, SONY CD PLAYER W/ AUX, WOOD TRIM, DUAL CLIMATE, DUAL AIRBAGS, TRACTION CONT, ALLOY WHEELS, CRUISE, SPOTLESS CARFAX. VERY CLEAN LITTLE 5 SERIES @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

42K ORIG MI!!! 5.4L V12, 5SP AUTO, BEYOND LOADED!!! BLACK EXT ON BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT COND! NAVIGATION, PWR HTD SEATS FRONT AND REAR, TINTED WINDOWS, CHROME 20” WHEELS, HID LIGHTING, 6 DISK CD W/ PREM SOUND, SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX, AND MUCH MUCH MORE!! $120,000 NEW!!!! OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE IS ONLY

76K ORIG MI! 4.0L SOHC V6, AUTO, LOADED! 2 TONE SILVER EXT ON BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR SEAT, CD, 3RD ROW SEAT, TOW, ROOF RACK, MOON ROOF, DUAL AIRBAGS, TINTED WINDOWS, RUNNING BOARDS, CRUISE, TILT, ALLOY WHEELS, SPOTLESS CARFAX! VERY NICE MOUNTAINEER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

26K ORIG MI!!!!! 4.0L SOHC V6, AUTO, LOADED. BLUE MET EXT ON GRAY CLOTH INT IN EXCELL COND!! 6 DISK CD, 4DR, PRI GLASS, MATCHING RAIDER CANOPY, BED RUG, CRUISE, TILT, FACTORY RUNNING BOARDS, ALLOYS, TOW, SPOTLESS CARFAX, 1 LOCAL SENIOR OWNER!!! VERY NICE 26K RANGER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$3,995

$15,995

$11,995

$13,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2005 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE SEDAN

1998 GMC SONOMA ZR2 EXT CAB 4X4

2003 TOYOTA RAV-4 AWD SUV

1993 DODGE 250 PICKUP CLUB CAB LB LE 4X4

2.4L VVT-I 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES, BACKUP SENSORS, SUNROOF, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PWR LEATHER SEATS, 6 CD CHANGER, CASS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, INFO CENT, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $14,940! ONLY 67K MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! CLEAN CARFAX!

4.3L HO VORTEC V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, 3RD DR, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD/ CASS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, THIS LIL’ SONOMA IS SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ZR2 STOCK LIFT KIT! MIRROR-LIKE BLACK PAINT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.0L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, NERF BARS, ROOF RACK, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD/ CASS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $16,135! BEAUTIFUL DK GREEN METALLIC PAINT! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

5.9L CUMMINS 12V TURBO DIESEL, 5 SPD MAN TRANS, AFTERMARKET ALLOYS, CARR SIDE STEPS, TOW PKG, MATCHING HIGH-RISE CANOPY, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CASS, THIS TRUCK IS IN GREAT SHAPE! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! STRONG RUNNER WITH MINIMAL BLOW-BY! HARD-TO-FIND MANUAL TRANSMISSION! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

www.reidandjohnson.com

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

www.reidandjohnson.com

$11,995

$6,995

$12,995

$7,995

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

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Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Court needed over private sale of SUV Dear Doctor: I purchased a 1996 Ford Explorer from a private party, but when I went to register the vehicle, I was told I needed to have it smogged. Within one hour after the purchase, the “check engine” light came on. The diagnostic codes came up for smog: po420, po761, po153. The paperwork I was given was a mess. Apparently, the mom signed the title to her son, who never registered it. I believe he unhooked the battery to turn off the “check engine” light because all presets were reset when I test drove it. What can I do? Eric Dear Eric: The fault codes on your SUV indicate a major expense. Your only option in this case is a small-claims court action against the seller. I always suggest that before you transfer any money for a private vehicle sale that you have the vehicle inspected by a qualified technician.

Floor vent not working Dear Doctor: I own a 2000 GMC Jimmy. I get heat from all of the climate control vents but not on the floor setting.

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Recreational Vehicles

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which was repaired in 2003 THE AUTO DOC at my local Buick dealer, but repair costs were not When I covered as it was out of Junior select at 69,000 miles. Damato “floor,” the warranty My current 2002 Buick heat comes Century had the same out of the internal leakage problem. defroster. It was repaired All other March 5, 2008, at the settings Buick dealer at operate 68,000 miles (again out of fine. Where warranty). The same interis the prob- nal leakage failed again at lem? Brian 78,000 miles. I also own a Dear 2006 Buick LaCrosse with Brian: The only 19,000 miles and fear heater box is controlled by the same type of GM small electrical actuator engine failure will occur. motors. On some models, What should I do? Nic we can use a scan tool and Dear Nic: There is no read trouble fault codes, question that some of the and also use the scan tool GM V-6 engines have had to operate each blend door. throttle body, intake maniI have seen faulty actu- fold and intake gasket failators and/or faulty heater ure. There are many differcontrol panels. ent brand vehicles with There’s the possibility longer warranties, includthat something has fallen ing some of the newer GM into the heater box and models. jammed that position of the As for the same possible door from operating in a failure occurring on your full direction. If you want 2006 Buick, I recommend to do the inspection youryou change the antifreeze self, visit alldata.com. every two years, as this It will give you step-by- could help delay the probstep instructions and trou- lem. bleshooting.

Cars with same trouble Dear Doctor: I had a 1996 Buick Century with cylinder gasket failure,

4 Wheel Drive

5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ Jayco. Big slide, sleeps 6-8, barely used, in great shape. Priced to sell at $10,900. 461-9054. CAMPER: ‘90 9.5’ Northland. Excellent condition, new mircro, new hydraulic jacks, new carpet. $2,800. 460-0825. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512

Top of the line unit in excel condit w/all the extras: 2 queen beds, pvt toilet/ shower combo, 3burner stove, oven, refrig, microwave, slide-out dinette, cable TV hook-up, radio/CD player, furnace, water htr. Asking price: $8,900. Tel: 360-683-5388 TRAILER: ‘02 29’ Fleetwood Prowler. $14,000/obo. 360-670-1163

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4 Wheel Drive

'68 Bronco 4X4. Nice 1968 classic 4X4. 289 with a 3 speed Duff shifter. Good running vehicle with a soft top and doors. Great for summer! Call 360-928-0208 and leave message. Or contact- sellingmystuff68@hotmail.com. $6500 or best offer. FORD ‘02 ESCAPE XLT 4X4 SPORT UTILITY 3.0 liter 24V DOHC V6, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, roof rack, Thule ski rack, privacy glass, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seating, cruise, tilt, air, 6 disc CD stereo, dual front and side impact airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Immaculate condition inside and out! Mirror black! They don’t come any nicer than this! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD ‘03 F150 SUPER CAB LARIAT FX4 4X4 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, spray-in bedliner, tow package, 4 opening doors, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, heated leather seats, automatic climate control with air, cruise, tilt, adjustable pedals, Sony CD stereo, dual front airbags, Kelley Blue Book Value of $14,445! Immaculate condition inside and out! None nicer! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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4 Wheel Drive

HONDA: ‘00 CRV. Good condition, white, 212K. $4,000. 477-5568 DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $26,995. 971-226-0002 FORD ‘03 F250 EXTENDED CAB 4X4 Short bed, 5.4 liter Triton V8, XLT package, local trade, nice truck! 190K miles, must see and drive! Loaded! VINB28856. Expires 2/16/11 $7,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 FORD ‘94 F250 4X4 7.3 liter turbo diesel, 5 speed, air. VINA34259 Expires 2/16/11 $5,950 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 FORD ‘96 F350 CREW CAB LONG BED 4X4 7.5 liter V8, auto, weld Typhoon wheels, 35” BFG A/T’s, matching canopy, dual fuel tanks, running boards, power windows and door locks, Sony CD stereo, air, cruise, tilt, air. Sparkling clean inside and out! Lifted with 35” tires! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘01 F250 Supercab. 116K, diesel, auto, power equip., new tires, good cond. $13,900. 683-7342 eves/wkds 360-912-0192 days.

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘08 F350 DIESEL. 4x4 crew cab, dually, 23K mi., new condition, leather interior, dual heaters and heated seats, auto, air, power rear windows, door locks, seats, mirrors, windows, tilt keyless entry, cruise, tow pkg., alloy wheels, moonroof, tinted, adjustable pedals, deluxe stereo, limited slip rear end, plus $3,000 aftermarket accesor. $38,750. 452-3200, 452-3272 FORD: ‘90 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ fuel injection, 33” tires, rims, call for details. $1,500/obo. 457-7412 FORD: ‘97 Expedition. 3rd row seat, runs excellent. $3,500. 809-3215 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $6,500. 460-9323. GMC: ‘97 pickup 4WD Runs good, 140K mi. $3,500. 683-4401. GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. JEEP: ‘00 Wrangler. Auto, blk/blk, alloys. $8,495. 477-6018.

Is buying a rental OK? Dear Doctor: I read good things about buying a pre-owned vehicle from rental companies. Do you

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Pickups/Vans

DODGE: ‘79 Dump. HD dump bed. $2,700/obo. 452-4820 DODGE: ‘89 Custom van. Great for camping, new tranny, low mi., will trade for car in good condition or $2,500/obo. Cell 940-391-9957 EAGLE: ‘95 Summit. All WD, 91,800 mi., runs good. $4,000. 457-3521 FORD: ‘85 Clubwagon. 8 passenger, great shape, diesel. $2,800. 360-460-3162 FORD: ‘89 E150 cargo van. 300-6, 5 spd. $550. 452-4158 FORD: ‘90 Aerostar van. Runs good $1750/obo 808-4661 FORD: ‘94 E150 Van. 300, 6 cylinder auto tranny, runs well. $500. 452-5457.

JEEP: ‘06 Liberty 4WD. Under 40,000 miles, new 10 ply tires, fully loaded. like getting a new car at a used car price! Serviced 10 miles ago, and a full tank of gas. $13,500. Contact 360-7971103 or 907-4010633 located in Sequim.

JEEP: ‘86 Grand Wagoneer Vintage Woody. Runs & drives, rebuilt tran, 4WD, works great. Stock alloy wheels. Straight body, minor repair. $750. 808-1821 JEEP: ‘97 Cherokee. Leather, Runs excellent. $3,500. 809-3215 MERCURY: ‘00 Mountaineer. AWD, V8, auto, 100K, tow pkg., leather, great tires and battery, body and interior excellent, 1 owner. Free bike rack. $6,000. 681-2619.

TOYOTA: ‘02 Lifted Toyota Tacoma SR5. V6, 5 speed, 79,000 miles, 6" Fabtech lift, 35" BFG's, Leer canopy, tinted windows, exhaust, MTX sub and amp, power windows/locks, MP3 player. $16,500/obo. 360-460-0723

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Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘03 S10, 5 speed. $5,800/obo. 457-7014 CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. Crew cab, 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $16,500. 681-0103. CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Mark III, auto, 232K mi., runs excellent. $800. 683-7173. CHEV: ‘92 Astro Van. AWD, good cond. $1,250. 683-2426.

SHOP LOCAL

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $4,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

peninsula dailynews.com

DODGE: ‘67 1 ton flat bed. ‘318’ 4 speed, runs great. $700/ obo. 461-7406.

FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133. FORD: ‘95 F350. Service body, 145K mi., 5.8L V8, auto. $2,850. 461-1835. GMC ‘00 SAFARI CARGO VAN Economical 4.3 liter V6, auto, air, power locks, safety bulkhead, BIN package, ladder rack, back up sensor, 77,000 miles, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return. $5,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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think buying a rental car from Hertz, for example, is a good way to score a value-oriented deal? Secondly, I have a 1999 Nissan Maxima with 180,000 on the odometer. I know that keeping a car long after it’s paid off makes economic sense, but I’m looking at having to make $2,000 in maintenance and repair costs. I know the V-6s in these cars can last a very long time, but it seems like everything around it is slowly falling apart, and I’m concerned about it becoming a money pit. David Dear David: Buying a used car from a rental car company is not a bad thing. You should ask if there are any rental units available that carry the remainder of the warranty. As for investing $2,000 in your 1999 Maxima, if the rest of the car and under carriage are in good condition with no heavy rust or rot, then the $2,000 is well-spent.

––––––––

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

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Cars

BMW: ‘94 530i. 3L, V8 5 spd. $2,950. 425-753-1666 BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915 FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. Low mi. $10,900, 797-3130, after 5. LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387.

TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 2WD, 5 speed, 124,500 miles, AM/ FM/CD, great tires, new brakes, 21 MPG, bed liner & canopy, GOOD condition. $5,050. 452-6965

NISSAN: ‘01 Xterra XE, 3.3L V6, Automatic, 2WD, 113,300 miles, $5,300. 360-640-4714 or 360-477-9915 SUBARU ‘01 FORESTER L ALL WD WAGON 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission, new clutch and starter, keyless entry, power windows, locks, and mirrors, Panasonic CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air. Clean inside and out! Everpopular all wheel drive sport utility! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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MISC: ‘04 GMC Savana 8 Passenger Van, $7,800. ‘96 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 2WD Pickup, $2500. Both well maintained vehicles. Call for details or see online add. 360-374-6850

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to CCC 26.10.410, that the Clallam County Department of Community Development, Planning Division, has scheduled a public hearing before the Clallam County Hearings Examiner for March 9, 2011, beginning at 1:00 p.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. The purpose is to review public testimony regarding the following permit application: APPLICATION: (VAR2011-00002) The applicant, Chuck Steel, is requesting a variance from the maximum size requirement noted in CCC 33.50.040(1a) in order to construct a singlefamily residence inside an existing historical barn while maintaining the existing 1440 square foot farmhouse as an accessory dwelling unit (ADU). Detached ADU’s shall not exceed 1250 square feet in gross floor area under the current code. Variances from this requirement are allowed to be applied for under CCC 33.30.020 and shall meet the criteria for approval of CCC 33.30.030. LOCATION OF PROPOSAL: The subject property is located south of the Cline Spit, at 712 Clark Road, being within a portion of Section 26, Township 31 N, Range 4 W, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. The property is referenced by Assessor’s Tax Parcel Number 043126-449040. COMMENTS & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Any interested person may submit written or oral comments on the proposal prior to the close of the open record hearing. DCD will prepare a staff report seven days prior to the hearing. The decision on the application will be made by the Hearing Examiner within 10 days after the record closes. Any person may also submit a written request to DCD to receive a notice of the decision once it is made. The application and above referenced material is available for public review at the DCD, Planning Division Monday through Friday, between 8:30AM-4:30PM. For additional information please contact the project planner Donella Clark at DCD, 223 East Fourth Street, Suite 5, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Phone (360) 417-2594. Pub: Feb. 17, 2011

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Cars

MAZDA: ‘94 Miata. Red, 5 speed, 99K, runs good. $3,900. 360-437-0428. MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385. SUBARU ‘88 GL WAGON Front wheel drive, economical, 1.8 liter 4 cylinder, auto, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, clean and reliable local trade in, nonsmoker. $1,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Car of the Week

2011 Nissan Quest BASE PRICE: $27,650 for S; $30,900 for SV; $34,350 for SL. AS TESTED: $37,430. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, sevenpassenger minivan. ENGINE: 3.5-liter, double overhead cam, 60-degree V-6. MILEAGE: Estimated 19 mpg (city), 24 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 200.8 inches. WHEELBASE: 118.1 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,480 pounds. BUILT AT: Japan. OPTIONS: Entertainment system (includes two wireless headphones, two monitors, DVD player and wireless remote control) $2,100; floor mates $180. DESTINATION CHARGE: $800. The Associated Press

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Cars

LEXUS: 1990 LS400. Loaded, exlnt cond. $4,250. 683-3806. NISSAN: ‘05 Altima. Excellent condition. $9,800. 775-340-2652 PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. SUBARU: ‘01 Forester L Original owner, reliable ride. $3,200 417-2191

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959

TOYOTA: ‘03 Sequoia. Immac., runs perf, Carfax, all eqpt + rear A/C, dual pwr sts, moonroof (slide, tilt), run brds, priv glass, grill grd, tow pkg, alloys, wnd deflects, 2 rem keys, sir XM & boost, grt tires. Can't beat this deal! $12,000/obo. 360-461-1595 VW: ‘00 New Beetle. 1.8 liter turbo, only 25K mi. on factory purchased motor. Sunroof, ABS, loaded. $4,200.385-2318 VW: ‘70 Karmann Ghia. Project. $700. 681-2382 VW: ‘71 Camper. Good cond. $2,500. 360-820-0339

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Legals Clallam Co.

C9

Legals Clallam Co.

Case No.: 11 4 00028 1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF LOMA B. THEADE, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: February 3, 2011 JO DEE AHMANN Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Feb. 3, 10, 17, 2011 Case No.: 11 4 00033 8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF DANIEL LEE SULLIVAN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: February 10, 2011 THEODORE W. SULLIVAN Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 WSBA#9436 Pub: Feb. 10, 17, 24, 2011

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEARING US 101 SHORE RD. TO KITCHEN-DICK RD. WIDENING

Purpose of Notice The Federal Highway Administration and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) issued an environmental assessment on February 15, 2011 for the US 101 – Shore Rd. to Kitchen-Dick Rd. - Widening project. It is the purpose of this notice and of the hearing to provide for the exchange of information regarding the effect of the proposal on the community. This is in accordance with and pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and the Federal Highway Act (Title 23 U.S.C. 101 et seq.) and amendments. Description of Proposed Project This project will complete construction of about three and one half miles of four lane roadway between the cities of Port Angeles and Sequim in Clallam County. WSDOT will construct two additional lanes on the south side of the existing highway from west of Shore Road at milepost 256.91 to east of the Dryke/Pierson intersection at milepost 259.5. The new lanes will then switch to the north side of the existing highway to the end of the project east of Kitchen-Dick Road at milepost 260.38. Completion of this project will establish four-lane continuity on the north Olympic Peninsula’s most heavily traveled route. This project will relieve congestion, increase capacity, and improve safety for the traveling public. The key environmental issues of the project are wetland impacts and relocations of residents and businesses. WSDOT has scheduled a combined open house and environmental public hearing to answer questions and receive comments on the environmental assessment. Spanish interpretation will be available. Combined environmental hearing and open house: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 17, 2011 Greywolf Elementary 171 Carlsborg Rd. Sequim, WA The hearing will use an open house format, which is an informal arrangement that allows for one-on-one discussion while still providing the opportunity to give testimony to a certified court reporter. Plans, maps, environmental documents and other pertinent information about this project will be on display at the hearing. Participants will have the opportunity to present testimony either orally to the court reporter or in writing. Individuals should anticipate the process taking about one hour of their time. Project questions and comments can also be submitted in writing to the Project Engineer, Steve Fuchs or Jeff Sawyer, the Olympic Region Environmental Manager using the following contact information: Steve Fuchs PO Box 47375 Olympia, WA 98504-7375 Telephone: (360) 570-6660 fuchss@wsdot.wa.gov Jeff Sawyer PO Box 47417 Olympia, WA 98504-7417 Telephone: (360) 570-6701 sawyerj@wsdot.wa.gov Comments are requested by March 31, 2011, to be considered by the project administrators and included in the formal hearing record. Copies of the environmental assessment are available by calling (360) 570-6700 for the cost of $20.00 for a hard copy and $2.50 for a CD, which does not exceed the cost of reproduction and distribution. The environmental assessment is also available for review at the following locations: • WSDOT Port Angeles Project Office, 1707 South C Street, Port Angeles, WA. • Port Angeles Main Library, 2210 South Peabody Street, Port Angeles, WA. • Sequim Branch Library, 630 North Sequim Avenue, Sequim, WA. • The environmental assessment can be viewed online: www.wsdot.wa.gov/projects/us101/shoretokitchendick/ Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Information Individuals requiring reasonable accommodations may request written materials in alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility accommodations, or other reasonable accommodations by contacting Debbie Clemen at (360) 704-3204 by March 3, 2011. Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing may contact the event sponsor through the Washington Relay Service at 7-1-1. Title VI Statement to the Public The Federal Highway Administration and the Washington State Department of Transportation assure that no person shall, on the grounds of race, color, national origin and sex, as provided by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise discriminated against under any of its federally funded programs and activities. Any person who believes their Title VI protection has been violated, may file a complaint with WSDOT's Office of Equal Opportunity. For Title VI complaint forms and advice, please contact the WSDOT Title VI Coordinator at (360) 705-7086. Pub: Feb. 17, 22, 2009


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 42

Low 29

43/28

41/31

43/29

39/27

Variable clouds with a shower; chilly.

Cold with showers of rain and snow.

Mostly cloudy and chilly with a shower.

Partial sunshine; rain and snow at night.

Cloudy with a few showers possible.

Periods of clouds and sunshine.

The Peninsula Another cloudy, chilly day is expected across the Peninsula today. There will be a shower or two, but most of the day should be dry. It may be cold enough for a few flakes of snow to mix in down to sea level. It will stay cold tonight and Friday. There could be Neah Bay Port more snow mixed with rain. There is a chance it will be cold 42/34 Townsend enough for light accumulation of snow at night. High presPort Angeles 44/35 sure will build in on Saturday, bringing sunshine back 42/29 to the region. A cold front will move in on Sunday with Sequim more rain and possibly snow.

Victoria 44/35

44/33

Forks 44/31

Olympia 42/26

Seattle 44/31

Spokane 36/22

Yakima Kennewick 42/18 47/23

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Variable cloudiness today with a passing shower; chilly. Wind west-southwest 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. A couple of showers of rain or snow tonight. Wind southwest 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 4 miles at times. Mainly cloudy tomorrow with a passing shower. Wind north-northeast 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times.

LaPush

11:17 a.m. ----Port Angeles 2:36 a.m. 12:50 p.m. Port Townsend 4:21 a.m. 2:35 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:42 a.m. 1:56 p.m.

Today

Moon Phases Last

New

Seattle 44/31

Billings 32/14

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

9.0’ --7.3’ 6.9’ 8.8’ 8.3’ 8.3’ 7.8’

5:19 a.m. 5:53 p.m. 7:47 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 9:01 a.m. 9:14 p.m. 8:54 a.m. 9:07 p.m.

1.8’ -0.9’ 4.2’ -0.8’ 5.4’ -1.0’ 5.1’ -0.9’

12:23 a.m. 12:09 p.m. 3:01 a.m. 1:54 p.m. 4:46 a.m. 3:39 p.m. 4:07 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

8.2’ 9.1’ 7.5’ 6.9’ 9.0’ 8.3’ 8.5’ 7.8’

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht 6:08 a.m. 6:35 p.m. 8:32 a.m. 8:43 p.m. 9:46 a.m. 9:57 p.m. 9:39 a.m. 9:50 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.0’ -1.0’ 3.3’ -0.3’ 4.3’ -0.4’ 4.0’ -0.4’

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

1:02 a.m. 12:59 p.m. 3:28 a.m. 2:57 p.m. 5:13 a.m. 4:42 p.m. 4:34 a.m. 4:03 p.m.

6:56 a.m. 7:17 p.m. 9:19 a.m. 9:25 p.m. 10:33 a.m. 10:39 p.m. 10:26 a.m. 10:32 p.m.

8.7’ 9.0’ 7.6’ 6.7’ 9.2’ 8.1’ 8.6’ 7.6’

0.5’ -0.7’ 2.5’ 0.4’ 3.2’ 0.5’ 3.0’ 0.5’

Feb 24

Mar 4

Minneapolis 52/25

Detroit 50/43 New York 57/45

Chicago 58/38

San Francisco 52/43

Denver 58/22

Washington 64/44

Kansas City 70/37

Los Angeles 59/50

Atlanta 68/49

El Paso 72/46

Sunset today ................... 5:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:16 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 5:26 p.m. Moonset today ................. 6:36 a.m.

Feb 18

Everett 42/31

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

Thursday, February 17, 2011

First

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice -10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 46 31 0.09 3.10 Forks 39 33 1.41 28.97 Seattle 44 35 0.02 6.70 Sequim 48 31 0.00 2.78 Hoquiam 41 33 0.88 15.68 Victoria 46 34 0.16 7.94 P. Townsend* 44 39 0.00 3.27 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 43/34 Bellingham 42/27

Aberdeen 46/34

Peninsula Daily News

Mar 12

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 63 52 pc Baghdad 64 43 s Beijing 46 27 s Brussels 47 34 pc Cairo 68 52 s Calgary 5 -6 sn Edmonton 2 -19 c Hong Kong 68 61 r Jerusalem 57 44 pc Johannesburg 81 53 t Kabul 44 18 pc London 50 41 pc Mexico City 79 41 s Montreal 37 37 sh Moscow 0 -5 c New Delhi 69 44 pc Paris 53 38 pc Rio de Janeiro 87 76 pc Rome 57 49 r Stockholm 23 19 pc Sydney 86 72 pc Tokyo 57 50 pc Toronto 48 44 c Vancouver 40 32 sh Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Affordable Dentures And Implants To Look And Eat Your Best

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 78/65

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 60 25 46 68 54 61 36 32 36 40 48 48 72 48 58 66 35 46 76 58 62 50 42 10 32 81 75 20

Lo W 31 pc 15 sf 31 c 49 pc 42 pc 42 pc 18 sf 14 sn 2 sn 27 sh 38 pc 42 c 52 pc 21 pc 38 r 51 pc 21 sf 29 c 56 sh 22 pc 33 c 43 c 27 c 3 sn 14 sn 68 pc 59 c 8s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 70 58 72 59 78 54 52 70 72 57 76 64 78 68 59 68 46 68 39 45 66 41 76 60 52 52 31 64

Lo W 37 c 43 pc 55 sh 50 pc 65 pc 36 r 25 c 52 pc 57 pc 45 pc 46 s 30 c 55 pc 44 pc 43 pc 47 pc 30 c 50 pc 27 sf 38 r 50 r 27 sf 59 r 48 pc 43 r 18 c 18 sn 44 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 91 at Pecos, TX

Low: -17 at Presque Isle, ME

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Things to Do

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Continued from C1 Townsend Recreation Center, 0373 or e-mail artymus@ photos of Quilcene and sur- clinic — Alcove at the Food Daline. Key City Playhouse, 419 East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360437-2672 or 360-379-5443. Tax-Aide — Free assistance with tax preparation provided by trained volunteers. Bring any and all necessary documentation. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road. By appointment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone 360-732-4822. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Rotary Club of East Jefferson County — Learn about Key City Players. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 11:45 a.m.Phone Ray Serebrin at 360-385-6544 for details or visit www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/ Home.aspx?cid=705.

620 Tyler St. Silent auction, 9 olypen.com. a.m. Meeting, 10 a.m. Free. Open to public. Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden Tax-Aide — Free assistance State Park. Natural history and with tax preparation provided by marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. trained volunteers. Bring any Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for and all necessary documenta- youth (6-17); free for science tion. Port Townsend Recreation center members. Phone 360Center, 620 Tyler St. By appoint- 385-5582, e-mail info@ptmsc. ment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone org or visit www.ptmsc.org. 360-385-9007. Conversation Cafe — The Puget Sound Coast Artil- Upstage, 923 Washington St. lery Museum — Fort Worden noon. Phone 360-385-6959 or State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. visit www.conversationcafe.org. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Topic: Fanaticism. children 6 to 12; free for children Quilcene Historical 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Museum — 151 E. Columbia Puget Sound and the Strait of St., by appointment. Artifacts, Juan de Fuca. Phone 360-385- documents, family histories and

rounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360-7653192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@olypen.com or quilcenemuseum@embarq mail.com.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-3853628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@ nwmaritime.org. Master Gardeners-Port Townsend Food Co-op plant

Washington St, 8 p.m. General admission $15; students $10. Advance tickets at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., or phone 360-379-0195 with a credit card. More information and fesOvereaters Anonymous — tival passes at www.keycity St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, publictheatre.org. 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854. Olympic Peninsula Dance — Buz Whiteley Big Band plays Rhody O’s Square Dances “hot swing.” Port Townsend — Gardiner Community Center, Elks, 555 Otto St., 8 p.m. to 11 980 Old Gardiner Road, 6:30 p.m. Adults $15; students with p.m. school ID and disabled $10; 12 and younger $7. Dancers and Playwrights’ Festival — listeners asked to come in tropiWorkshop productions of “Ran- cal/Hawaiian theme. Open to som” by Richard Weston, “The all ages. Smoke-free. Free (with Glass Kingdom” by Judith Glass admission) lesson in “Freestyle Collins and “How My Big 5-0 Foxtrot” with Sonja Hickey and Turned Toxic” by Deborah Steve Johnson, 7 p.m.

Meet Local Roofing Pros February 23 – Open House Need a new roof, but don’t know

where to start or who to call?

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org.

Stop by Hartnagel Building Supply to visit with these local, professional roofers on Wednesday, February 23rd any time from 11 am - 2 pm.

Admiralty Audubon meeting — Rick Jahnke on “The History of Kah Tai Lagoon Nature Park.” Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Lawrence St., 7 p.m. Free. Open to the public.

• Get your roofing questions answered. • Ask about composite and metal roofing, flat roofs & more. • Learn about valuable energy rebates for re-roofing projects. • See our wide selection of roofing materials on display.

Playwrights’ Festival — Workshop production of a new musical “Early Retirement” by Linda Dowdell. Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 7 p.m. Pay what you wish Advance tickets at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., or phone 360-3790195 with a credit card. More information and festival passes at www.keycitypublictheatre.org.

Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Bring a sample or few photographs. Will assist with problems, advice, general questions or plant identification.

Advanced Constr. & Roofing Joe Campbell, 461-7747

Diamond Roofing Cliff & Duffy Fors, 452-9518

Jason Meyer, 928-1037

Emerald Roofing Travis Quent, 452-4681

S-n-S Ro. o. fing Sean Marshall, 681-2333

HARTNAGEL

SHOP

Friday

AAUW Port Townsend meeting and silent auction— Beroz Ferrell on “Leading Effectively in a Diverse World.” Port

THE largest supplier of ls roofing materia on the Peninsula.

Come see our extensive display of roofing samples.

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Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art.


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