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Monday

A’s rout M’s in Oakland

Mostly cloudy; chance of showers B10

Athletics win 10-2, avoid Mariner series shutout B1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS June 17, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Cruise ships returning in September Meantime, good vibrations flowed from spring visitors BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Between 200 and 300 American Cruise Line cruise passengers passed through the North Olympic Peninsula’s largest cities this spring, and tourism promoters from both said the visitors definitely left their mark. Russ Veenema, executive director of the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce,

BUILDING

said the May cruise ship visits helped expose Port Angeles to a wider audience and usher in the tourist season. “It gave a visual lift to the [Port Angeles] community, that summer is here and tourism season is here,” Veenema said. “Having that cruise ship at the dock created that excitement.” Christina Pivarnik, marketing director for the city of Port Townsend and lead organizer for the city’s cruise visit reception

efforts, said her staff and volunteer reported nothing but favorable reactions from cruise ship visitors to the historic Victorian seaport. “I only heard really positive things from everybody who was involved,” Pivarnik said. The American Cruise Line vessel American Spirit brought between 200 and 300 passengers to Port Angeles and Port Townsend in May, with eight more total stops in each city planned for this September and October. American Spirit is slated to return to Port Angeles Sept. 9, 16, 23 and 30; and Oct. 7, 14, 21 and 28. The ship is scheduled to stop in

Port Townsend Sept. 11, 18 and it hadn’t been a port of call. 25; and Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. “That’s all information that’s hard to put a dollar figure on, but Financial impact still gives you exposure,” he said. The five visits in May averaged Veenema estimated the cruise between 50 and 60 passengers visits’ financial impact on Port each, Veenema said. Angeles to be close to $25,000, Fall visits will meet, or exceed based on the money brought it in that number, Veenema expects. from the Hurricane Ridge, Lake “We’ll get at least that many Crescent and historical downtown on the second half of the season,” Port Angeles tours that were the Veenema said. basis of the city’s cruise passenger Port Angeles City Councilman reception. Patrick Downie, who helped orgaVeenema said Port Angeles’ nize the city’s reception to the spot on American Cruise Lines’ cruise ship at Port Angeles’ City Puget Sound itinerary put the Pier, said he had heard nothing city’s name on the cruise line’s but positive comments from cruise website and in a handful of tourpassengers about Port Angeles. ism-related publications Port TURN TO CRUISE/A5 Angeles might not have been in if

Bulldozer hearing set for July 19

CASTLES IN THE SAND

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man who has been accused of damaging four homes in the Gales Addition area during a roughly 10-minute bulldozer rampage in May next will appear in Clallam County Superior Court in July after his status hearing was moved last week. Barry Swegle, 51, is expected to be back in court July 19 although John Troberg, the Clallam County deputy prosecuting attorney assigned to the case, requested Friday that the hearing be moved to July 5. Karen Unger, Swegle’s Swegle attorney, told the court Friday that July 19 was the earliest she could appear for the status hearing, a date to which Troberg and presiding Judge George Wood agreed.

Pleaded not guilty

MARGARET MCKENZIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Giuseppe Ciarlo, the 3-year-old son of Jennifer and Romeo Ciarlo of Sequim, plays Saturday near the sand castle that artist Kali Bradford is building on East Washington Street in Sequim. The sculpture’s completion is geared to coincide with Lavender Weekend in July. See story, Page A5.

Swegle, who remains in the Clallam County jail on $1 million bond, pleaded not guilty last month to one count of first-degree assault with a deadly weapon, four counts of first-degree burglary with a deadly weapon — “to wit, a bulldozer” — and four counts of first-degree malicious mischief. TURN TO SWEGLE/A5

Pooch & Papa Walk: Dads and dogs Funds from PA event go to Operation Uplift

with his daughter, River, 12, and their 9-month-old dog, Felony. “When she’s good, we call her Miss Demeanor,” Zenonian said of the boxer pup. A 6-year-old yellow Labrador retriever named Cooper barked his enthusiasm at the BY ARWYN RICE starting line. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS His owner, Gailin Hester, 55, of Sequim, PORT ANGELES — If dogs are man’s said Cooper had been a patient of Wilcox, best friend, Port Angeles dads had a Father’s the now-retired Port Angeles veterinarian Day date with their best friends, large and who founded the fundraising walk. small, at the Dennis Wilcox Pooch & Papa Walk and 5k walk/run on the waterfront A cop and his K-9 trail Sunday morning. Other walkers included Sequim’s K-9 About 38 dogs were registered for the late morning walk, a fundraiser for Pink-Up Officer Mike Hill and his police dog, Chase, Port Angeles, and led participants from Hol- who was there with Port Angeles Detective lywood Beach near City Pier along the Kori Malone, who said she was walking waterfront trail, to Francis Street Park, and Chase’s “little sister,” a French bulldog named Riley. back to their starting point. A group of groomers from Westside Jesse Zenonian of Port Angeles walked

Grooming — Teresa Adams, Ryan Adams and Michelle Johnson, all of Port Angeles — arrived at the race with Belle the bloodhound, Olive the pug mix and Cali, a chow puppy. All of the dogs at the event were given treats, toys and pink bandannas, while their human companions got black or pink “PinkUp” T-shirts. “It’s a really good turnout,” said Lynn Fraser, a Soroptimist member and volunteer at the event, for which the amount of money raised was not available by late Sunday afternoon. The weeklong campaign is a fundraiser for Operation Uplift, a Port Angeles-based group that provides education, information, support meetings, a 24-hour phone line, free clinics, prostheses and wigs for both women and men with all types of cancer. TURN TO WALK/A5

The Peninsula Daily y News each week is supplying more than 2,000 free newspapers to teachers who request them, using local news to bridge the gap between the classroom and the community they live in. There are ways you can help.

Jesse Zenonion of Port Angeles plays with Felony on Sunday.

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 144th issue — 2 sections, 18 pages

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UpFront

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

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Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Kardashian, West baby arrives early REALITY STAR KIM Kardashian gave birth to a baby girl Saturday, according to E! News. This is the first child for both Kardashian and her boyfriend, Kanye West. No word yet on what the baby’s name is. The little girl arrived a few weeks early. Kardashian Kardashian said during a visit to “Today” that she was due in July. The new parents and the Kardashian West family have been mum online about the new addition to their family. Grammy-winner West announced that Kardashian was pregnant during an Atlantic City concert in December. “Can we make some noise for my baby mama right quick?” West asked his fans from the stage. Kardashian revealed the sex of the baby in the season premiere of E!’s “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” in early June. “I just don’t want to talk to America about my family,” the rapper told The New York Times in the interview published earlier this week. “Like, this is my baby,” he told the paper. “This isn’t America’s baby.”

HEATHER DENNO

VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actor Robert Downey Jr., right, comforts Jaxson Denno after he burst into tears after expecting, but not getting, Iron Man.

Downey calms boy upset at not seeing Iron Man ROBERT DOWNEY JR. may not be a real superhero, but he sure acted like one for a little Massachusetts boy. Heather Denno took her 1½-year-old son Jaxson to watch filming for the movie “The Judge,” starring Downey, in her hometown of Sunderland, Mass., this week. Downey, star of the “Iron Man” movies, spotted the little boy and went over to say hello. Denno told Jaxson that Downey was “Iron Man.” Confused because of the lack of the trademark metallic red-and-gold suit, Jaxson burst into tears. Downey put a comforting hand on the boy and calmed him. Denno told The Boston Globe that Downey was “sweet and nurturing,” and she could tell he’s a dad.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: Which do you consider more important — Father’s Day or Mother’s Day? Father’s Day 2.9% Mother’s Day It’s a tie Neither

52.8% 16.9%

Total votes cast: 1,338

Lopez on Latinos Jennifer Lopez says Latinos in the United States are starting to realize their power in politics and media, and that makes the timing good for her latest undertaking: Lobbying for greater diversity in TV programming. The entertainer spoke

Wednesday at the Cable Show, a communications convention, ahead of new programming set to launch July 18 on the NUVOtv network. Lopez added, “We’re really growing as a community, and we’ve come into a place where we deserve to be considered and served and catered to.”

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Passings

Peninsula Lookback

By The Associated Press

From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THOMAS PENFIELD JACKSON, 76, who as a federal judge in Washington presided over a Microsoft antitrust case and declared the software company a monopoly, has died. The death was confirmed Sunday by Mr. Jackson’s wife, Patricia. She said her husband Mr. Jackson died of can- in 1999 cer at the couple’s home in Compton, Md. Mr. Jackson presided over a closely watched antitrust trial that resulted in his 2000 order that Microsoft be broken into two companies. An appeals court reversed the breakup order and appointed a different judge to determine a new punishment. Mr. Jackson also presided over the drug possession trial of then-District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry.

27.4%

Barry unsuccessfully appealed his six-month sentence, arguing that Mr. Jackson had shown bias in comments made to a Harvard University audience after his trial.

________ PAUL SOROS, 87, a successful innovator in shipping, philanthropist and the older brother of billionaire financier George Soros, died in New York City on Saturday after a long bout with a host of illnesses, said his son Peter Soros. Mr. Soros, an engineer and businessman, founded Soros Associates, a world leader in the design and development of bulk handling and port facilities. The company has operations in 91 countries. Mr. Soros also held a number of patents and wrote more than 100 technical articles on the transportation of materials and related shipping design issues.

1938 (75 years ago) The House-Senate compromise bill creating Olympic National Park that was approved on Capitol Hill yesterday provides that President Franklin D. Roosevelt cannot enlarge the park area before eight months. After then, he can expand it to 898,292 acres, needing only the prior approval of Washington state Gov. Clarence Martin and the federal secretaries of Agriculture and Interior. The legislation that is now on the president’s desk calls for a 634,000-acre park carved from the existing Mount Olympus National Monument and parts of Olympic National Forest.

1963 (50 years ago) A new Clallam County Public Utility District operating center is being constructed off 16th Street near Clallam County Airport in west Port Angeles. The prefabricated steel

structure contains 13,500 square feet of space for use as a warehouse, vehicle repairs, truck storage and equipment testing. Total cost of construction is $110,000, and the PUD expects to move in Aug. 1.

1988 (25 years ago) It was legal for the state to collect tolls on the Hood Canal Bridge in an arrangement to deal with the costs of reconstruction after part of the floating bridge was destroyed in a 1979 storm, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. Reversing a trial court decision that favored the Fair Toll Coalition made up of North Olympic Peninsula interests, the judges sent the case back to U.S. District Court in Seattle. After the bridge was repaired and reopened in October 1982, the state increased the one-way $1.50 toll to $2.50 even though the state received $30.5 million in insurance

proceeds from the damage as well as Federal Highway Administration emergency funds. The Fair Toll Coalition won a 1985 decision that enjoined the state from collecting additional tolls. It was that decision that the appellate court overturned.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

WOMAN REMARKING TO her husband that flossing is a pain in the butt. His answer? “Then you’re doing it wrong” . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Laugh Lines ATHEISM IS A nonprophet organization. Your Monologue

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, June 17, the 168th day of 2013. There are 197 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On June 17, 1963, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Abington (Pa.) School District v. Schempp, struck down, 8-1, rules requiring the recitation of the Lord’s Prayer or reading of Bible verses in public schools. On this date: ■ In 1397, the Treaty of Kalmar was signed, creating a union between the kingdoms of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. ■ In 1775, the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill resulted in a costly victory for the British, who suffered heavy losses. ■ In 1885, the Statue of Lib-

erty arrived in New York Harbor aboard the French ship Isere. ■ In 1928, Amelia Earhart embarked on a trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland to Wales with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Louis Gordon, becoming the first woman to make the trip as a passenger. ■ In 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act, which boosted U.S. tariffs to historically high levels, prompting foreign retaliation. ■ In 1933, the “Kansas City Massacre” took place outside Union Station in Kansas City, Mo., as a group of gunmen attacked law enforcement officers escorting federal prisoner Frank Nash. Four of the officers and Nash were killed.

■ In 1953, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas stayed the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, originally set for the next day, the couple’s 14th wedding anniversary. They were put to death June 19. ■ In 1961, Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev defected to the West while his troupe was in Paris. ■ In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon’s eventual downfall began with the arrest of five burglars inside Democratic national headquarters in Washington, D.C.’s Watergate complex. ■ Ten years ago: A federal appeals court ruled the government properly withheld names and other details about hundreds

of foreigners who were detained in the months after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. ■ Five years ago: Hundreds of same-sex couples got married across California on the first full day that gay marriage became legal by order of the state’s highest court. However, California voters later approved Proposition 8, which restricted nuptials to a union between a man and a woman. ■ One year ago: Rodney King, 47, whose 1991 videotaped beating by Los Angeles police sparked widespread outrage and who struggled with addiction and repeated arrests, died in Rialto, Calif., in an apparent drowning.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, June 17, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation a pickup truck lost control and rolled the vehicle. Names of the victims in the Sunday morning crash near Browning have not yet been identified. The Montana Highway McALLEN, Texas — Budget Patrol said the truck was driven cuts have hampered the Border by a 28-year-old man from Babb. Patrol’s work in its busiest secThe other victims included tor on the Southwest border, one male and three females, all agents said, with the agency between the ages of 17 and 24 introducing fuel conservation measures in the Rio Grande Val- years old. The male passenger and two ley that have agents patrolling of the females were from Brownon foot and doubling up in vehiing. cles. Two more passengers were The Border Patrol instituted the changes after the across-the- treated for injuries and released. The cause of the crash board government spending cuts remains under investigation. known as sequestration. The constraints come as Con- But authorities say speed was a factor and that none of the gress moves deeper into the debate over immigration reform, seven people inside the truck and Republican legislators push was wearing seatbelts. for stronger border security 150-mph speeder components as a precursor to any path to citizenship for NEW HAMPTON, N.H. — immigrants who have entered Police say a motorcyclist has the country illegally. been charged with topping The Rio Grande Valley sector speeds of 150 mph on a New — a stretch of border from Hampshire interstate highway. Brownsville to Laredo, Texas — State police said a trooper in has become the agency’s hottest an unmarked car spotted the area along the border. motorcyclist on Interstate 93 in The Border Patrol’s arrests of New Hampton on Saturday people trying to cross the border afternoon. illegally jumped 65 percent in The trooper said he clocked that area last year. him driving 130 to 152 mph in a In a prepared statement Fri- 65-mph zone while weaving in day, the Border Patrol said, and out of traffic. “Sequestration continues to The officer called ahead to have serious impacts on [Cusanother trooper, who stopped toms and Border Protection’s] the rider at a toll plaza, 45 miles operations including nearly south in Hooksett $600 million in cuts.” Police said 44-year-old Edson A spokesman declined to Barbosa of Stoneham, Mass., address the fuel restraints spehas been charged with felony cifically. reckless conduct. A phone number in his name Mont. rollover kills 5 isn’t listed. Lt. John Marasco said he’s HELENA, Mont. — Authorinever heard of anybody charged ties in northern Montana say with going that fast. five people were killed and two more injured when the driver of The Associated Press

Fuel-saving measures curb Border Patrol

Briefly: World 5 aboard plane diverted in U.K. claiming asylum

Egypt appointees

CAIRO — Egypt’s president has appointed 17 new provincial governors, including seven members of his Muslim Brotherhood, adding to its power. MohamLONDON — Five passengers from an EgyptAir flight diverted med Morsi’s appointments to a Scottish airport over an Sunday come apparent threat to destroy the before the plane are seeking asylum in Britain, authorities said Sunday. June 30 anniversary of takNew York-bound Flight 985 ing office, from Cairo was forced to make when the liban emergency landing Saturday eral and secuafter a threatening note was lar Egyptian Morsi found in the plane’s lavatory. opposition British Typhoon fighter jets plans mass demonstrations to escorted the plane to Glasgow’s demand his ouster. Prestwick Airport, where it was The appointments mean the met by a heavy police presence, Brotherhood controls the goverbut no arrests were made, and norships in 10 out of the counthe flight was eventually cleared try’s 27 provinces. to continue on to the U.S. A spokeswoman for Police 51 die in Iraq attacks Scotland said that five people BAGHDAD — A blistering out of the flight’s roughly 300 string of apparently coordinated passengers are now claiming bombings and a shooting across asylum in Britain. Iraq killed at least 51 and EgyptAir CEO Tawfeek Asi wounded dozens Sunday, identified the passengers as spreading fear throughout the Syrians, though the Scottish county in a wave of violence police spokeswoman said she that is raising the prospect of a could not provide any informareturn to widespread sectarian tion about their nationality. killing a decade after a U.S.-led She spoke on condition of invasion. anonymity, saying office rules Violence has spiked sharply forbade her from identifying in Iraq in recent months. The Associated Press herself publicly.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS AIR SHOW

STARTS TODAY

The 50th International Paris Air Show opens for business today, bringing hundreds of aircraft to the French capital. Above, a French military officer walks past a Eurofighter on the tarmac at Le Bourget, north of Paris.

Leak gives company cybersecurity lesson Access may be tightened THE NEW YORK TIMES

WASHINGTON — When the United Arab Emirates wanted to create its own version of the National Security Agency, it turned to Booz Allen Hamilton to replicate the world’s largest and most powerful spy agency in the sands of Abu Dhabi. It was a natural choice: The chief architect of Booz Allen’s cyberstrategy is Mike McConnell, who once led the NSA and pushed the United States into a new era of big-data espionage. Yet as Booz Allen profits handsomely from its worldwide expansion, McConnell and other executives of the government contractor have a lot of questions to answer. Among them: Why did Booz Allen assign a 29-year-old with scant experience to a sensitive NSA site in Hawaii, where Edward Snowden was left loosely

supervised as he downloaded highly classified documents about government monitoring of Internet and telephone communications, appar- McConnell ently loading them onto a portable memory stick barred by the agency? The results could be disastrous for a company that sells itself as the gold standard in protecting classified computer systems and boasts that half its 25,000 employees have top-secret clearances.

$5.8 billion a year Until a week ago, Booz Allen had one of the best business plans in Washington, with more than half its $5.8 billion in annual revenue coming from the military and the intelligence agencies. Last week, the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Dianne Feinstein, whom McConnell regularly briefed when he was in government, suggested

for the first time that companies such as Booz Allen should lose their broad access to the most sensitive intelligence secrets. “We will certainly have legislation which will limit or prevent contractors from handling highly classified and technical data,” said Feinstein, D-Calif. Senior Obama administration officials said they agreed. Yet cutting contractors out of classified work is a lot harder in practice than in theory. Booz Allen is one of many companies that make up the digital spine of the intelligence world, designing the software and hardware systems on which the NSA and other military and intelligence agencies depend. McConnell has spoken about the need for the private sector to jolt the government out of its attachment to existing systems, noting, that the Air Force fought the concept of drones for years. Removing contractors from the classified world would be a wrenching change: Of the 1.4 million people with top-secret clearances, more than one-third are private contractors.

U.S. officials back data collection THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Current and former top U.S. officials Sunday defended the government’s collection of phone and Internet data following new revelations about the surveillance programs In interviews on Sunday talk shows, guests ranging from White House chief of staff Denis McDonough to former Vice President Dick Cheney and former CIA and National Security Agency head Michael Hayden said the government’s reliance on data collection from both Americans and foreign nationals was constitutional and carefully overseen.

Quick Read

A new Washington Post report Sunday described the massive intertwined structure of four major data collection programs set up since the 9/11 attacks. Two secret programs, the Post reported from more disclosures provided by NSA contractor Edward Snowden, are aimed at phone and Internet metadata.

Program called Nucleon A third program, which intercepts telephone calls and routes their contents to government listeners, is called Nucleon. A fourth program, Prism,

forces major Internet firms to turn over the detailed contents of Internet communications. Prism is aimed at foreign users but sometimes also sweeps up the content of Americans’ emails. “The Prism story is about foreigners,” Hayden told NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Cheney worried that Snowden, who went to Hong Kong, would give secrets to the Chinese. Cheney added that he has “trouble believing” Snowden had access to all the materials he has disclosed, suggesting the possibility that Snowden had an accomplice inside U.S. security circles.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Crews work to get more Colo. evacuees home

Nation: Strong $125 million debut for ‘Man of Steel’

Nation: Scientists moving 15-ton magnet 3,200 miles

World: Pope Francis gives Harley cycles his blessing

FIREFIGHTERS WORKED TO get more people evacuated by Colorado’s most destructive wildfire back home Sunday by digging up and extinguishing hot spots to protect homes still standing near Colorado Springs. The labor-intensive work is necessary because extremely dry grass and trees could quickly ignite if wind stirs up one of those hot spots. Nearly 500 homes have been burned by the fire, which is 55 percent contained after advances in recent days thanks in part to lighter winds. It’s now estimated to be about 22 square miles, and crews hope to have it fully contained by Thursday.

“MAN OF STEEL” leaped over box office expectations in a single weekend. The Warner Bros. superhero film earned $125 million in its opening weekend at the box office if Thursday totals are included. “Man of Steel,” which stars Henry Cavill as Superman and Amy Adams as Lois Lane, also toppled the record for biggest opening in June. Sony’s “This Is the End,” opened in second place with $20.5 million. The comedy stars Seth Rogen, James Franco, Jonah Hill and Craig Robinson. In third place was the Lionsgate illusionist heist film, “Now You See Me,” which earned $10.3 million.

SCIENTISTS ON NEW York’s Long Island are preparing to move a 50-footwide electromagnet 3,200 miles to its new home at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. The trip is expected to take more than a month. The electromagnet, which weighs at least 15 tons, was the largest in the world when it was built in the 1990s, said Bill Morse, a physicist at Brookhaven National Lab in New York. Brookhaven scientists no longer have a need for the electromagnet, so it is being moved to the Fermi laboratory, where it will be used in a new experiment called Muon g-2.

BIKER CULTURE CAME to the Vatican on Sunday as Pope Francis blessed thousands of Harley-Davidsons and their riders celebrating the manufacturer’s 110th anniversary with a loud parade and plenty of leather. Thundering Harley engines nearly drowned out the Latin recitation of the “Our Father” prayer that accompanied Francis as he greeted the crowd before Mass. Once the service got under way, bikers in their trademark leather Harley vests sat in the square alongside nuns and tens of thousands of faithful Catholics taking part in an unrelated, twoday pro-life rally.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Smooth move to electronic records in PT Jefferson Healthcare switches to same digital system as OMC PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson Healthcare hospital’s conversion to an electronic record system went smoothly, according to the project manager. “It went really well,” said John Nowak, project manager for Epic at Jefferson Healthcare, after the hospital went live with the new system at 2 a.m. Saturday. “The staff has done an amazing job of dealing with this transition,” he added. The state-of-the-art electronic health record system lets doctors throughout the region access patients’ medical charts in real time.

Already using Epic Most hospitals in the state — including Swedish Medical Center and its partner, Providence Health & Services, both of which are affiliated with North Olympic Peninsula hospitals — already use Epic. Olympic Medical Center, based in Port Angeles, went live with Epic on May 4. Forks Community Hospital has no plans to switch.

Preparing for the change at Jefferson Healthcare was a massive job, Nowak said, About 450 of the 500 employees at the hospital required some kind of training. “The vast majority of people here have been touched by this transition,” Nowak said.

40,000 demographics Jefferson Healthcare staff converted 40,000 patient demographics — names, addresses, account numbers — to the electronic system, Nowak said. That total number represented the people who visited the 25-bed hospital or any of its 40 providers in its nine clinics in the past two years. Specialists now will be adding information about medications, allergies and other data, Nowak said. Full medical records will be converted manually as patients arrive for scheduled visits, a process that could take six months. “In the first 24 hours, we’ve had no major problems,” Nowak said.“We’ve got a long way to go, but we’re off to a really good start.”

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

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CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bill Short is working to clean up his land, which has accumulated many items, by Nov. 15.

Yard that irks neighbors slowly being cleaned up BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A man who has drawn criticism from his neighbors for his accumulation of scrap wood and metal has agreed to a city-mandated schedule to clean up the public areas of his land. Bill Short, who has lived in the house at 1124 Van Ness St., for all of his 76 years, has spent the past few weeks cleaning a corner of the property and plans to tackle the remainder of the 9,000-square-foot lot in keeping with a Nov. 15 deadline. In the meantime, city officials are satisfied that

no hazardous materials are on the property, according to an email distributed Friday by Rick Sepler, the city’s development services director. Sepler reported that East Jefferson Fire-Rescue Assistant Chief Bob Low and code enforcement volunteer Jerry Speickerman visited the property last Wednesday and determined there were no safety hazard or toxic materials on site.

No liquid hazards The officers reported that containers that could have held hazardous liquids were either empty or contained properly stored motor oil and that while some rotten wood will need to be removed, there is no immediate fire hazard. Aside from four city officials, the email’s recipients included residents of the neighborhood who either complained or expressed concern about the situation. “Many of you will not be satisfied with this information and believe that a hazard exists and the schedule for cleanup should be accel-

erated,” Sepler wrote. “The City is not in a position to take action without evidence of hazard (which does not exist). “We believe the approach and timetable is appropriate given that we are dealing with a decades-long situation, and we are making progress and providing . . . the opportunity for voluntary correction.” Short has not been charged with a criminal violation or fined but was notified that he is in violation of the city’s nuisance and fire codes, Sepler said. Jim Patton, who used to live a few houses away, is helping Short, he said, because Short always has been generous and helpful to the neighbors. Said Jeanne Boyer, who lives adjacent to Short: “We want to be good neighbors. But we are concerned about any fire or safety hazards.”

Short cooperating

Sepler said the case was ________ “one of the most extreme” Jefferson County Editor Charlie he has ever dealt with, not Bermant can be reached at 360only due to the potential 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula violations but for the con- dailynews.com.

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troversy it has caused in the neighborhood. Since a plan was agreed upon Jan. 13, Short has completed the first phase of the cleanup. Two more phases are planned. Sepler said that if the conditions are not met, Short could face a fine or a sanction, but if safety requirements were met, the city would take no action. “We want to protect people’s safety, but we also need to protect the rights of the individual,” Sepler said. “We have no right to tell anyone what to do with their private property.” The items are mostly wood and metal that are stacked in an organized way, Short said, and much of the wood and scrap metal is still used. “I grew up with no money, so if you needed something you made it from what you already had,” he said. “I have use for all this stuff. I still fix airplanes, boats and cars.”

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PORT ANGELES — Registration is under way for St. Matthew Lutheran Church’s Kingdom Chronicles Vacation Bible School. Children ages 3 to 11 can attend the free school, held at the church, 132 E. 13th St., from 9 a.m. to noon July 8-12. Attendees will learn a Bible lesson, participate in crafts and singing, have snacks and work on skits. A barbecue for children and their families will be held July 12. To register, phone 360457-4122. Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

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Sequim artist tapped for sandy tribute to lavender BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Michelle Johnson of Westside Grooming shows off Cali, an 8-month-old chow, before the Dennis Wilcox Pooch & Papa Walk on Sunday morning.

Walk: More fun

slated this week CONTINUED FROM A1 The first Pink Up event was Friday, as the Soroptimist International of Port Angeles raised about $800 at a bake sale at Swain’s, said the Soroptimists’ Debbie Hinds. A breast health clinic at OMC MRI Digital Imaging Center took place Saturday. Upcoming Pink-Up events this week include: ■ Pink Out the Pier, 5 p.m. Wednesday. The event includes pink cookies, cancer information and Zumba & Fitness exhibit ■ Pink Take Over of the Chestnut Cottage, 5 p.m. Thursday. This is an all-you can eat spaghetti feed with local celebrity waiters/waitresses. ■ Pink Up Golf Tournament, noon Friday at Peninsula Golf Club ■ Pink Up Finale dinner at CrabHouse, 6 p.m. Saturday, featuring silent and live auctions. ■ De-Pinking Port Angeles, 9 a.m. Sunday. Meet at Cornerhouse for breakfast and meeting. For more information about Pink Up Port Angeles, go to www.pinkuppa. com. For more information about the Soroptimists International of Port Ange-

Not a ‘memorial’

SEQUIM –– A regal palace is forming on Sequim’s east end out of a mound of glacial leftovers. World-class sand sculptor Kali Bradford of Sequim is sculpting a sand castle on a vacant lot next to the Adagio Bean and Leaf coffeehouse, 981 E. Washington St., for the Sequim Lavender Weekend, which takes place July 19-21. “People love to watch it develop,” Bradford said. “I have people stop by to take a look every day.” When finished, the sculpture will include a woman leaning against the castle holding bundles of lavender. The material for the castle — glacier sand from the Asbury Quarry near Silverdale — was piled up June 7. Slowly each day, Bradford and the occasional helper carve out the castle’s turrets and pinnacles to give it a shape.

July deadline

PARAPHRASING MARK TWAIN, the reports of retired Dennis Wilcox’s death were greatly exaggerated. Although the walk is listed as the Dennis Wilcox Memorial Pooch & Papa Walk and 5k walk/run on the Pink Up website and in information sent to the Peninsula Daily News, Wilcox, 67, the retired Port Angeles, veterinarian who founded the walk, “is alive and well, and attended the walk with his dog, Fred,” Soroptimist member and walk volunteer Debbie Hinds said Sunday. — Arwyn Rice, Peninsula Daily News

les (Noon Club), visit www. sipawa.org.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

Her deadline to complete the castle is July 18, the day before the lavender weekend begins. The weekend will be made up of separate celebrations: the Sequim Lavender Farm Faire, organized by the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association, and the 17th annual Lavender Festival, organized by the Sequim Lavender Growers Association. Bradford has spent a lifetime perfecting her sand-sculpting prowess and has done it around the world for more than 30 years. She recalled her first detailed sculpture was built with her daughter, now 35, stowed in a baby backpack. Since then, she has sculpted sand competitively in China, India, Belgium and San Diego, among many other places. She has built sculptures in Hawaii but said the material on the beaches there hampered the building process. “The grains of sand are round there,” she

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim artist Kali Bradford sculpts the top of a 10-foot sand castle she is building at the city’s east end for July’s Lavender Weekend. said. “Everything keeps rolling off the top.” Bradford sprays her castle in Sequim with a 10-to-1 mixture of water and glue to make sure it compacts solidly enough to last through the entire building process.

‘A lot of time’ “It takes a lot of time and attracts a lot of attention,” she said. “It really is a kind of performance art.” It also takes a little craftiness. Birds landed on some of the castle’s early spires this

year, prompting Bradford to stick kabob sticks out of the peaks. “They don’t stick around there for too long, no pun intended,” she said. Along with sand-sculpting, Bradford also paints, writes poetry and teaches. She was one of the city’s artists who painted special milk cans that have been displayed around town to mark Sequim’s centennial. She has a Web page set up to display her sand art — sandart.tumblr.com — and is available for workshops or special projects by calling 360-775-9463.

For more information about the Sequim Lavender Weekend, see the city’s website at http://tinyurl.com/ lxswpwm. The Sequim Lavender Growers Association website is www.lavender festival.com. The Sequim Lavender Farmers Association website is http://sequim lavenderfarmersassociation. org.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Cruise: PA benefits from delays Swegle: Four CONTINUED FROM A1 the altered schedule had the vessel leave on WednesDownie cited one batch day in the evening instead of visitors on the third or of the originally scheduled fourth cruise stop, mostly noon departure time — and from the Seattle area, who that kept passengers in the said they had never been to city longer. Veenema said he and Port Angeles before, though they had lived in Seattle all Downie have suggested to the cruise line making the their lives. “They enjoyed it and Tuesday morning arrival they intended to come permanent, though nothing has been decided. back,” Downie said. “We haven’t heard if “And you can’t put a that’s officially going to be price tag on that.” Though unexpected, done,” Veenema said. Downie said high winds in the Strait of Juna de Fuca PT response that forced the American The delays, however, Spirit to come into Port were not looked on favorAngeles on Tuesday morn- ably in Port Townsend. ings on a number of the “We probably would visits rather than Monday have enjoyed more shopevenings worked better for ping business if they had Port Angeles. come in as they scheduled “Quite frankly, [the or a little bit earlier,” Pivardelays] benefitted us,” nik said, adding that the Downie said, adding that weather delayed most of the

arrivals in Port Townsend from the originally scheduled 5 p.m. Wednesdays to about 9 p.m. “We would have liked it if they have made it earlier.” Pivarnik could not quantify the economic impact of the cruise visits on the Port Townsend area, though cruise passengers were clearly shopping in downtown Port Townsend shops. “I was always happy to see them come back to the ship with shopping bags in their hands,” Pivarnik said. Mari Mullen, executive director of the Port Townsend Main Street Program, said her program volunteers provided the cruise passengers with 400 shopping bags and coupon books filled with special offers from myriad Port Townsend businesses, adding that at least six businesses she

poled had direct sales from the passengers. “The feedback I have heard is that [the passengers] really enjoyed their time here, and hopefully they will decide to visit us again in the future,” Mullen said in an email. Looking toward the fall cruise visits, Pivarnik said she can’t say for sure if any of the major attractions set up for the passengers, which included van tours of historic Port Townsend and trips to Fort Worden State Park, will change. “We’ll get together and figure that out as we get a little closer,” Pivarnik said. “It’s too soon to say what might change now.”

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CONTINUED FROM A1 cutting power to an estimated thousands for a few The charges stem from hours. Authorities said that the damage wrought when Swegle allegedly drove a Swegle had a long-running bulldozer he owned through property dispute with a multiple properties near neighbor. After about 10 minutes the intersection of North Baker Street and East Pio- on his bulldozer, Swegle neer Road in Gales Addi- surrendered without incition just east of Port Ange- dent to Clallam County les the morning of May 10. sheriff’s deputies. Swegle allegedly dam________ aged four homes; destroyed Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can a pickup truck, several out- be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. buildings and boat; and 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsuknocked over a power pole, ladailynews.com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

House to examine abortion limitations Immigration bill on tap for Senate PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — This week, the House will take up a bill to restrict abortions, while the Senate will debate amendments to an immigration bill.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Kilmer, 202-225-5916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula is located at 332 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. It is staffed by Judith Morris, who may be contacted at judith.morris@mail.house.gov or 360797-3623.

State legislators Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. aspx.

Learn more Websites following our state and national legislators: ■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues. ■ 2014 MILITARY BUDGET: Voting 315 for and 108 against, the House on Friday approved a $638.4 billion military budget for fiscal 2014, including $85.8 billion for actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, more than $60 billion for activeduty and retirement healthcare and $17.8 billion for Department of Energy nuclear-weapons programs. The bill (HR 1960) sets a 1.8 percent military pay raise; bars closure of the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison; recommends a missile-defense shield for the East Coast, bars another round of baseclosings and takes several steps to prevent sexual assaults in the military.

Eye on Congress Addressing sexual assaults, the bill strips commanders of their historical authority to dismiss the Cantwell findings of a court-mart i a l ; deprives commanders of power to reduce guilty verdicts to l e s s e r Murray offenses; sets minimum-sentence guidelines for sex offenses; provides specially trained counsel to Kilmer represent victims of sex-related crimes; allows victims of assaults to apply for transfer to a new unit and permits reassignment of those charged with but not convicted of sexual assaults. The bill requires Pentagon report to Congress on America’s military strategy in Afghanistan after most U.S. military operations end by Dec. 31, 2014. It withholds funding of Afghan security forces until the two countries reach a long-term security agreement satisfactory to Congress. The bill hinges U.S. military aid to Pakistan on its performance in allowing the U.S. troops and supplies to move through its territory. A yes vote was to send the bill to the Senate. Kilmer voted yes. ■ W I T H D R AWA L FROM AFGHANISTAN: Voting 305 for and 121 against, the House on Thursday urged that a congressional vote be held to authorize any U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan after Dec. 31, 2014. President Barack Obama has set that target date for ending most U.S. military involvement there. This non-binding amendment was added to HR 1960 (above). A yes vote backed the amendment. Kilmer voted yes. ■ OFFSHORE DERIVATIVES TRADING: Voting 301 for and 124 against, the House on Wednesday sent the Senate a bill (HR 1256) to weaken the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-regulation law as it applies to derivatives trading by foreign subsidiaries of U.S. banks and other financial institutions. This bill creates a presumption that these overseas entities are exempt from Dodd-Frank if their host countries have “broadly comparable” derivatives regulations. This would reverse the presumption in current law that overseas subsidiaries are covered automatically by the strict Dodd-Frank derivatives rules unless U.S.-government regulators act to exempt them. Financial institutions enter into derivatives contracts to hedge, or provide insurance against, other investments they have made. Lacking value of their own, derivatives are priced according to the value of some underlying asset, with their purchasers, in effect, betting on the future value of the base asset (or assets). In 2008, the sudden collapse of the derivatives industry when the housing bubble burst helped crash the global economy, resulting, in part, in the $182 billion U.S.-taxpayer bailout of the AIG, an insurance firm. AIG held the losing side

of numerous derivatives contracts with Wall Street firms linked to the value of securitized home mortgages. To guard against such breakdowns in the future, the 2010 Dodd-Frank law requires most derivatives contracts to be traded openly on exchanges and cleared by a third party, and also requires derivatives buyers to post adequate reserves against potential losses. A yes vote was to pass the bill. Kilmer voted yes. ■ I M M I G R AT I O N OVERHAUL: Voting 84 for and 15 against, the Senate on Tuesday agreed to start what will be weeks of debate on an immigration bill (S 744) that would tighten U.S. borders; create a 13-year path to citizenship for the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants; crack down on foreign visitors who overstay their visas; require all states to adopt the E-Verify system by which employers check on the legality of new employees; streamline family visas to reduce lengthy waits for overseas relations to join family members in the U.S.; and establish new or streamlined employment visas for low-skilled and high-tech workers. A yes vote was to start debating the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted yes. ■ DISPUTE OVER BORDER CONTROL: Voting 57 for and 43 against, the Senate on Thursday killed a bid to require six months of tight U.S. government control of the border with Mexico before any undocumented immigrant could take even the first step on the 13-year road to citizenship offered by S 744 (above). The bill already requires the Department of Homeland Security to ramp up security on the U.S.- Mexico border before accepting applications for provisional status or lawful permanent residency. Because it called for still more triggers, this amendment was seen by foes as a poison pill intended to bring down the bill. A yes vote was to kill the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted yes. ■ FIVE-YEAR FARM BILL: Voting 66 for and 27 against, the Senate on Monday sent the House a bill (S 954) to renew federal agriculture and nutrition programs for five years at a projected cost of nearly $1 trillion over 10 years, down $24 billion from current spending levels. About $800 billion of the outlay is for food stamps and other food and nutrition programs, with the remainder allocated to programs to protect farm incomes, boost exports, expand domestic markets, promote land conservation and fund rural development. The bill ends the decades-old system of direct payments that has been sending $5 billion annually to farmers regardless of whether they grow crops, turning instead to taxpayersubsidized crop insurance to help growers and farm investors turn a profit in the face of weather risks and price drops beyond their control. The bill extends sugar and peanut programs in essentially their present forms while replacing dairy producers’ price supports and subsidies with a new insurance program to stabilize their incomes. A yes vote was to pass the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FLEA

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Bob Sheldon of Port Angeles looks over a box of fishing lures during a flea market hosted by the Port Angeles Yacht Club on Saturday at west Boat Haven. The event offered mariners to search for bargains or sell unwanted nautical gear.

Briefly . . . World War II aircraft land in PA today PORT ANGELES — The Collings Foundation’s Wings of Freedom tour will land at William R. Fairchild International Airport at noon today for a threeday visit to the North Olympic Peninsula. Fans of an earlier era of aviation can tour or take flight in a B-17 Flying Fortress, a B-24 Liberator or a P-51 Mustang. Visitors can tour the inside of the planes at the airport’s east general aviation ramp. The cost for a tour is $12 for adults or $6 for kids younger than 12. World War II veterans can tour the planes for free. People can reserve halfhour flights aboard the B-17 or B-24 for $425 per person. Flights aboard the P-51 are being offered for $2,200 for a half-hour or $3,200 for an hour. Hours of ground tours and display are from noon to 5 p.m. today, from

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday and from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday. The 30-minute flight experiences normally are scheduled before and after the ground tour times. Phone 800-568-8924 for reservations. For more information about Wings of Freedom, visit www.collings foundation.org.

United Way funds PORT ANGELES — The United Way of Clallam County received 10 donations totaling $1,045, plus another $94.36 from the “stretch pool,” during the Seattle Foundation’s third annual GiveBIG. During the 24-hour online fundraiser, which was from 12:01 a.m. to midnight May 15, more than $11.1 million was donated to 1,344 nonprofit organizations. An additional $1 million was donated to a “stretch pool” to match online donations. GiveBIG donations to United Way will be added to the annual fundraising campaign in support of

Community Solutions programs and United Way’s 24 partner agencies. Donations can be made at www.unitedwayclallam. org/give or by calling the office at 360-457-3011.

Knitting class set PORT ANGELES — Knitters Anonymous is offering a free knitting class on making quick and simple items, with an emphasis on scarves. The classes will be held in the meeting room at the Carnegie Library, 207 S. Lincoln St., from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. this Wednesday and Wednesdays, June 26 and July 3. Students are invited to bring their own projects, whether incomplete or not yet started. If there isn’t a project, bring yarn and appropriate-sized needles. The instructor will provide a selection of patterns. There is no charge for the class, though a donation is appreciated to offset the cost of the room rental. For more information, phone 360-457-1080. Peninsula Daily News

State eyes way to gather online sales tax revenue BY JORDAN SCHRADER MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

OLYMPIA — Online shopping soon might become more lucrative for state government. Even if Congress doesn’t open the Internet to state sales taxes, a more modest change is brewing in Olympia — but drawing some of the same opponents. For months, the Senate has been looking into how to grab more sales tax from out-of-state sellers, but it took a state House budget offer for details to emerge. The House plan calls for raising $39 million by forcing online brokers such as eBay to collect taxes as part of connecting a buyer and seller. It’s a tax increase, said a group representing eBay, Overstock.com and other e-commerce companies, which wrote a letter to lawmakers last Wednesday. “Right now, there’s no way that eBay would be due for the tax on merchants that happen to sell to Washington residents,” said Steve DelBianco, executive director of NetChoice, in an interview. He said if the change is approved, “this isn’t really money that comes from outof-state retailers. . . . It’s paid by the consumers in Washington.”

Quietly brewing No one is publicly defending the new proposal, which could figure into budget negotiations as lawmakers try in a special session to put together a more than $33 billion budget

Eye on Olympia that complies with a court ruling that found state government has shorted Washington public schools. The Senate’s first budget plan counted on a similar sum of extra revenue, but it provided no explanation of how to collect it. It’s simple, Senate budget writer Andy Hill said at the time: Some out-of-state companies should be collecting sales tax and aren’t. The Redmond Republican hasn’t publicly endorsed this latest proposal, and he declined comment through a spokesman, saying it’s part of ongoing budget talks. House Democrats added the online sales tax proposal only as a way to move toward the Senate, said House Finance Chairman Reuven Carlyle. The Seattle Democrat still sees it as unreasonable to assume the extra revenue can be achieved.

‘Train wreck’ “I personally think it’s a train wreck of a policy,” Carlyle said. But while Carlyle didn’t make a case for the latest proposal, he did say there is “a legitimate public interest in getting fairness” between online and brick-and-mortar retailers. Retailers, including Walmart and many momand-pop shops, have pushed for changes at the federal level, saying they are undercut by online merchants.

The courts have ruled that states can’t force outof-state sellers to collect sales tax. Instead, buyers are supposed to hand over the money to government in the form of a use tax — which few do. But what happens when someone goes to the website of a company with a physical presence in Washington state — say, eBay, Amazon or Google — to buy from a third party who lives out of state? The Department of Revenue encourages such facilitators to collect tax, with mixed success. “It’s more on a voluntary basis than us clearly being able to order them to do it,” spokesman Mike Gowrylow said. The budget proposal aims to make it mandatory.

Law change needed But Gowrylow said that would require a change in the law, not just budget language. The e-commerce group, meanwhile, complains lawmakers are trying to sneak it through in a budget. DelBianco warned that sellers would move their business to companies with no presence in Washington, and that eventually would push some companies out of state. When a different proposal targeting online sales was passed in Illinois, the company FatWallet moved to Wisconsin.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, June 17, 2013 PAGE

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Why the spying is needed (reluctantly) I

’M GLAD I LIVE IN A COUNTRY with people who are vigilant in defending civil liberties. But as I listen to the debate about the disclosure of two government Thomas L. Friedman programs designed to track suspected phone and email contacts of terrorists, I do wonder if some of those who unequivocally defend this disclosure are behaving as if 9/11 never happened — that the only thing we have to fear is government intrusion in our lives, not the intrusion of those who gather in secret cells in Yemen, Afghanistan and Pakistan and plot how to topple our tallest buildings or bring down U.S. airliners with bombs planted inside underwear, tennis shoes or computer printers. Yes, I worry about potential government abuse of privacy from a program designed to prevent another 9/11 — abuse that, so far, does not appear to have happened. But I worry even more about another 9/11. That is, I worry about something that’s already happened once — that was staggeringly costly — and that terrorists aspire to repeat. I worry about that even more, not because I don’t care about civil liberties, but because what I cherish most about America is our open society, and I believe that if there is one more 9/11 — or worse, an attack involving nuclear material — it could lead to the end of the open society as we know it. If there were another 9/11, I fear that 99 percent of Americans would tell their members of Congress: “Do whatever you need to do to, privacy be damned, just make sure this does not happen again.” That is what I fear most. That is why I’ll reluctantly, very reluctantly, trade off the government using data mining to look for suspicious pat-

I believe that if there is one ❝ more 9/11 — or worse, an attack involving nuclear material — it could lead to the end of the open society as we know it.

terns in phone numbers called and email addresses — and then have to go to a judge to get a warrant to actually look at the content under guidelines set by Congress — to prevent a day where, out of fear, we give government a license to look at anyone, any email, any phone call, anywhere, anytime.

S

O I DON’T BELIEVE THAT Edward Snowden, the leaker of all this secret material, is some heroic whistle-blower. No, I believe Snowden is someone who needed a whistle-blower. He needed someone to challenge him with the argument that we don’t live in a world any longer where our government can protect its citizens from real, not imagined, threats without using big data — where we still have an edge — under constant judicial review. It’s not ideal. But if one more 9/11-scale attack gets through, the cost to civil liberties will be so much greater. A hat tip to Andrew Sullivan for linking on his blog to an essay by David Simon, the creator of HBO’s “The Wire.” For me, it cuts right to the core of the issue. “You would think that the government was listening in to the secrets of 200 million Americans from the reaction and the hyperbole being tossed about,” wrote Simon. “And you would think that rather than a legal court order, which is an inevitable consequence of legislation that we drafted and passed, something illegal had been discovered to the government’s shame. “Nope. . . . The only thing new here, from a legal standpoint, is the scale on which the FBI and NSA are apparently

PETAR PISMESTROVIC/CAGLE CARTOONS

attempting to cull anti-terrorism leads from that data. . . . “I know it’s big and scary that the government wants a database of all phone calls. “And it’s scary that they’re paying attention to the Internet. “And it’s scary that your cellphones have GPS installed. . . . “The question is not should the resulting data exist. It does. . . . “The question is more fundamental: Is government accessing the data for the legitimate public safety needs of the society, or are they accessing it in ways that abuse individual liberties and violate personal privacy — and in a manner that is unsupervised. “And to that, The Guardian and those who are wailing jeremiads about this pretend-discovery of U.S. big data collection are noticeably silent. “We don’t know of any actual abuse.” We do need to be constantly on guard for abuses. But the fact is, added Simon, that for at least the past two presidencies, “this kind of data collection has been a baseline logic of an American anti-terrorism effort that is effectively asked to find the needles before they are planted into haystacks, to prevent even such modest, grass-rooted conspiracies as the Boston Marathon bombing before they occur.”

T

O BE SURE, SECRET programs, like the virtually unregulated drone attacks, can lead to real excesses that have to be checked. But here is what is also real, Simon concluded: “Those planes really did hit those buildings. And that bomb did indeed blow up at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. “And we really are in a continuing, lowintensity, high-risk conflict with a diffuse, committed and ideologically motivated enemy. “And, for a moment, just imagine how much bloviating would be wafting across our political spectrum if, in the wake of an incident of domestic terrorism, an American president and his administration had failed to take full advantage of the existing telephonic data to do what is possible to find those needles in the haystacks.” And, I’d add, not just bloviating. Imagine how many real restrictions to our beautiful open society we would tolerate if there were another attack on the scale of 9/11. Pardon me if I blow that whistle.

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email him via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

High heels and workers’ rights ONE OF THE strangest artifacts of American culture is the spiked heel as a symbol of female power. Many waitresses at Amer- Froma ica’s casinos Harrop feel otherwise. From Las Vegas to Atlantic City, women balancing trays of drink have been forced to walk miles a day in high heels. Such labor practices, had they occurred in some faraway, impoverished country, would have evoked international censure. Waitresses negotiating their first union contract at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Ledyard, Conn., have made the heels an issue. They are painful and, over time, foot-deforming, they say. Some regard the requirement as a sneaky effort to get rid of older employees. Dr. Eric Levine is a podiatrist in Norwich, a few miles from Foxwoods. He’s seen the feet. He shows high-heel patients a

cartoon of an elephant, standing with all four feet on a thumbtack. “It equals the pressure when you wear a 4-inch heel over an extended period of time,” he told me. Or, to use another image: “It’s like driving your car all on one wheel.” In fairness, the Native American-owned Foxwoods demanded only a 2-inch heel, and in recent negotiations dropped even that rule. “A 2-inch heel is biomechanically and structurally wonderful compared to a 4-inch heel,” Levine said. Still, heels take their toll, especially as women age. (A high heel at a party now and then is OK, according to Levine.) Some foot doctors refuse to do bunion surgery unless the patient agrees not to wear high heels afterward. But some women won’t give them up, and for compelling reasons. Levine: “I’ll never forget when I heard a patient say, ‘No matter how much my feet hurt, the higher the heel, the higher the tip.’” Which brings us to another

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issue for women in the hospitality business: sex. Night spots, however shabby, often try to sell themselves as sexy venues. Some want cleavage bared, in addition to spindly high heels. One theory goes that high heels are sexy because they suggest bondage. A woman in high heels is unable to run. That is an ironclad law, no matter how many James Bond movies you’ve seen.

Not surprisingly, waitresses at Foxwoods talk dolefully of the day a consultant arrived, demanding a certain kind of “look.” You know what that means. But we must be open-minded. Employers generally do have a right to insist on a uniform as a term of employment. In the entertainment sector, the look is often extraordinary. Should we shutter Playboy Clubs for requiring their waitresses to wear those silly little satin corsets? If a bunny thinks she’s getting too old for this, perhaps it is time to find other employment. (Age sidelines baseball and tennis players all the time.) Let me reassure the sisterhood that I hold establishments obliging female servers to flaunt their sexuality in low regard. And there are certain cases —

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

that of flight attendants comes to mind — where the campaign to reform the “look” and age limits for women brought a victory for female dignity. But again, there are businesses profiting off carnal instincts, and they contribute to our economy. And many young women — Dr. Levine’s foot patient, for one — strut their stuff to enhance their paltry wages with generous tips from admiring-to-lecherous males. Who am I to stop the dance? There is a difference, though, when it comes to high heels. Showing cleavage does not create a condition demanding surgery. Tottering on heels week after week after month can. Heck, there’s a movement to make offices provide ergonomic chairs to protect workers’ backs. Shouldn’t there be one to free female servers from walking all day on tacks?

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears Mondays. Contact her at fharrop@gmail. com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forum to look at benefits of music on brain BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BRIAN HARMON/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Valedictorian Megan Wonderly makes final adjustments in the mirror just before graduation at Clallam Bay High School.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Crescent High School graduate Bonny Hazelett examines the Hawaiian leaves and kukui nut necklace around the neck of Kaialii Story. Relatives in Hawaii sent him traditional Hawaiian graduation adornments.

Three schools send graduates into the world

PORT TOWNSEND — “Music and the Brain: A Forum on Neuroscience, Song & the Oral Tradition� comes to the Cotton Building, 609 Water St., this Tuesday night. Live music will start the evening as doors open at 6:30 p.m., and at 7 p.m., the discussion will bring together Dr. Kenneth Isaacs, a neurologist whose talk is titled “Why Music is Good for Healthy Aging,� and Dr. Mark Jude Tramo, whose program is “How the Brain Lights up on Music.�

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Other speakers

Crescent, Quilcene and Clallam Bay high school conducted commencement ceremonies Saturday. They were the last of the graduation ceremonies on the North Olympic Peninsula In Joyce, 17 graduates and two foreign-exchange students were recognized from Crescent High School, while Clallam Bay High School’s 12 graduates received diplomas and Quilcene High School and Crossroads Community School had 15 graduates. Twelve received diplomas from Port Angeles’ Lincoln High School on Thursday night. Sequim, with an estimated 199 graduates, and Port Angeles, with between 190 and 195 graduates, conducted ceremonies Friday evening. High schools in Port Townsend, Chimacum, Neah Bay and Forks and Quileute Tribal School in LaPush had their ceremonies earlier this month.

Port Townsend singer and storyteller Daniel Deardorff, Songwriting Works founder Judith-Kate Friedman and Fisher Qua of the Washington Health Foundation also will join Tuesday’s conversation, which will be all about how music and old-fashioned storytelling can help heal people and their communities. Tickets to “Music and the Brain� are $20 for general admission and $12 for seniors, students and those on fixed incomes, but no one

Quilcene High School Principal Jeff Youde takes a photo of graduating seniors Crystina Griffith and Cole Owens before the 2013 commencement program at Quilcene High School on Saturday.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

nance and administration of these organizations. A l s o named to the council were Alma Grier Navarro of The Nonprofit Coalition, Yakima; Jim Daly of the Grays Harbor Community Foundation, Hoquiam; Mary Giannini of Witherspoon

Moonwater of the Whatcom Dispute Resolution Center, Bellingham. Agency representatives on the 16-member council include Sarah Shifley of the Attorney General’s Office and three from the Secretary of State’s Office: Corporations and Charities Division Director Pam Floyd, Charities Program Manager Rebecca Sherrell and Charities and Nonprofit Education Coordinator Teresa Glidden.

Kelley, Spokane; Adam Borgman of the YMCA of the Inland Northwest, Spokane; Carrie Green of the Three Rivers Community Foundation, Richland; Tamara Watts of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle; and Pam Toal, Olympia. Returning council members are attorney Judith Andrews, Seattle; Stuart Grover, Tacoma; CPA Mike Phymale, Vancouver; and

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by Joe Cammack, R.Ph. It has been known for over a decade that some oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac are associated with more cardiovascular complications than other NSAIDs such as naproxen. According to a Science Daily article published recently in PLOS Medicine (an open-access, peer-reviewed medical journal provided by the Public Library of Science), when taken orally, diclofenac’s risk is almost identical to that of VioxxŽ (rofecoxib), which was withdrawn from worldwide sales in 2004 because of cardiovascular risk. Diclofenac has no advantage over other NSAIDs in terms of gastrointestinal safety and some researchers are calling for diclofenac to be removed from the market. Yet, an in-depth analysis found that diclofenac prescribing/sales were three times higher than that of naproxen, likely due to marketing efforts by pharmaceutical companies. Check with your doctor if you take diclofenac, particularly if you have other cardiac risk factors. And, ask our compounding pharmacist about the value of transdermal NSAIDs for relief of pain and inflammation.

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PORT ANGELES — The Northwinds Homeschool Jazz Band will host its Spring Pops Concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The free concert will be at the Independent Bible Church worship center at 116 E. Ahlvers Road in Port Angeles. Selections will showcase music from such films as “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,� “Les Miserables,� “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian,� “Patton� and “Man from La Mancha.� The Northwinds Homeschool Band was recently awarded second place at the Clark College Jazz Festival in Vancouver, Wash. Also, the band’s lead trombonist, David Ken-

will be turned away for lack of funds. For VIPs — “very interested persons,� as Friedman puts it — there are premium seats for $50. Tickets are available at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., and at www.Brown PaperTickets.com, while more information and reservations are available at Songwriting Works at 360385-1160 and www. SongwritingWorks.org. “Since 2007, Songwriting Works has worked closely with researchers in health and aging to document the impacts of music on the brain,� Friedman noted. Now, as the organization’s yearlong National Endowment for the Arts “Music and Memory� project, Tuesday’s “health through song� forum will mix music, lecture and discussion on the power music has in communities.

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Jazz concert

OLYMPIA — The internal operations manager for the United Way of Clallam County is among the new appointments to a state advisory council formed to identify emerging issues and trends affecting charitable organizations. Nola Grier of the United Way of Clallam County, based in Port Angeles, was among the eight new members that Secretary of State Kim Wyman appointed to the Charitable Advisory Council. Artist Trading Cards, The 2013-2014 council like this one by Jean will meet for the first time Wyatt of Sequim, will today in Olympia. At that be created during a time, it will be determined if worskhop Tuesday. the appointment is for two or three years, Grier said. nedy, received an outstandUnder state law, the ing soloist award. Charitable Advisory CounThe band is now in its cil advises the secretary of 14th year and serves about state on training and edu60 children between the cational needs of charitable ages of 8 and 18. organizations and model Peninsula Daily News policies related to gover-

33747399

SEQUIM — The Sequim Humanities & Arts Alliance invites creative people of all stripes to an art-making party at the Museum & Arts Center, 175 W. Cedar St., this Tuesday night. The event, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. will be all about making Artist Trading Cards, 2½-by-3½-inch cards that can be traded, given away and included in art shows, all to introduce local artists to the community. Size is the only restriction for these cards, and all art media are welcome at Tuesday’s card party. Supplies will be available, while artists are also welcome to bring some of their own, too. The Artist Trading Cards, once finished, can be entered in the “Small Art with Big Dreamsâ€? tradingcard exhibition at the Musem & Arts Center this summer. For the show, which will stay on display through August and September, artists are invited to submit up to 24 trading-card entries. The entry fee is $5 per set of six, though artists may choose to submit fewer cards. To find out more, phone 360-460-3023 or visit the Sequim Humanities & Arts Alliance at www.Sequim ArtsAlliance.org.

Friedman

United Way employee named to state council

Briefly . . . Trading cards to feature local artists

Deardorff


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, June 17, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B Prep Notes

High school sports wrap-up THIS WAS MY first full year covering preps on the North Olympic Peninsula, and it never ceased to be interesting and never failed to be fun. When fall sports ended, I Lee thought that the Horton rest of the year would be a letdown, but there was never a drop-off during the winter and spring seasons. To mark the completion of my first full year on the prep sports beat, I will take a page from my predecessor Matt Schubert’s notebook by handing out awards for this high school sports year. I have kept the categories but changed the name of these awards from the Schubies to the Horties, because I believe it has a more modern feel. Also eligible for these awards are athletes and events that happened the last month-and-a-half of the 2012 sports season, since they weren’t recognized a year ago. Take a shower and put on your best clothes, because this awards show is a black-tie affair.

The Horties ■ Top team performance — This goes to the Neah Bay football and boys basketball teams, which are made up in large part by the same kids. Both Red Devils teams were state runners-up, and both overcame large deficits in the championship game before falling just short. I still think, based on what I saw in the 1B football championship game won by Liberty Christian, that Neah Bay wins the football title eight or nine times out of 10. The Red Devils made some uncharacteristic mistakes early in the game, and Liberty Christian was good enough to hold off the comeback. Before my first time seeing the Neah Bay boys basketball team play, at the Crush in the Slush tournament at Port Townsend High School, I didn’t know what to expect. The Red Devils put on an amazing display of relentless defensive pressure combined with an uptempo and unselfish offense from a team that went nine or 10 deep. Those kids were basketball players, not athletic football players playing basketball. I wasn’t the only one impressed. Throughout the rest of the day, while big schools like Auburn Mountainview and Jackson played, I kept overhearing spectators say to each other, “Were you here when Neah Bay played?” The smallest school had become the talk of the tournament. The exciting news is that most of the Red Devils return next year to attempt to turn a pair of runner-up finishes into a pair of state championships. Runner up: Sequim softball. First, for the run through the consolation bracket to claim fourth at the 2012 state tournament. Second, for the offensive tear they went on this April. ■ Game of the year — Easy. The five-overtime Quimper Quarrel between the Port Townsend and Chimacum football teams in late October. The Cowboys 27-25 after running back Mel Thornton ran in a touchdown on a fourth-and-goal from the 12-yard line to tie the score, and Derek Ajax scored on the ensuing two-point conversion. Defense and mud dominated the game, especially the second half when it seemed neither offense was able to advance beyond the other team’s 40-yard line. TURN

TO

HORTON/B2

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma lost his first game since April on Sunday against Oakland. The Athletics also snapped Iwakuma’s streak of not allowing an earned run.

A’s beat M’s, Iwakuma Seattle pitcher has long streaks end in 10-2 loss THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND, Calif. — Bartolo Colon worked seven strong innings to win his sixth straight decision, Josh Reddick homered and matched a career high with four hits, and the Oakland Athletics avoided a sweep with a 10-2 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Sunday. Sean Smith and Brandon Moss each homered and drove in two runs for the Athletics, who moved three games ahead of Texas in the AL West — their largest lead since ending the 2006 season four games up. Josh Donaldson also went

deep, and Yoenis Cespedes, Coco Crisp and John Jaso each drove in runs for Oakland. Colon (9-2) allowed two runs on eight hits, did not walk a batter and struck out three to extend his home win streak to seven. Hisashi Iwakuma (7-2) lost for the first time since April 23, giving up four runs on a season high-tying eight hits. He also walked Jaso three times and struck out three. Iwakuma’s streak of not allowing an earned run was stopped at 31 2/3 innings, second longest in Mariners’ history

to Mark Langston’s 34-inning streak in 1988. E n d y Chavez had two hits and drove in two Next Game runs for the Today M a r i n e r s, vs. Angels who were at Anaheim looking for their first Time: 7 p.m. sweep of the On TV: ROOT season. Michael Morse, Jason Bay and Mike Zunino each singled to open the second inning for Seattle. After Colon struck out Brendan Ryan, Chavez delivered a two-run single. Nick Franklin singled to reload the bases, but Colon got Kyle Seager and Ken-

drys Morales on short fly balls to limit the damage. Iwakuma allowed his first earned run since May 26 when the A’s got to him in the fourth. Donaldson and Smith hit backto-back doubles to open the inning and Reddick followed with an RBI single. Cespedes and Moss each drove in a run in the fifth to make it 4-2. Colon slammed the door on the Mariners after the second, retiring 11 straight before allowing Morse’s single in the sixth. Colon induced a double play ball from Bay and then worked a perfect seventh. A’s pitchers faced the minimum over the final seven innings. TURN

TO

M’S/B3

Rose wins U.S. Open; Lefty falters Two-stroke victory ends England’s 43-year U.S. Open title drought BY JOSEPH WHITE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARDMORE, Pa. — Fly the Cross of St. George next to those red wicker baskets. The U.S. Open has an English champion for the first time in 43 years. Justin Rose shot a closing 70 Sunday at Merion Golf Club for a 1-over 281 total and his first major championship. He finished two shots ahead of Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. The 32-year-old Rose overcame his share of misadventures on a course that challenged all comers despite being the shortest at a major in nine years. He took the solo lead for good because of others’ mistakes at No. 15: Mickelson and Hunter

Mahan, playing in the final group, both lost shots on the hole to fall out of a tie for first. Rose’s last shot was a tap-in for par at the 18th, after his caddie removed the pin with the wicker basket on top, the symbol of Merion that replaces the familiar flag. He had chipped it there from the rough just behind the green, nearly becoming the only player to birdie the finishing hole over the final two rounds of the championship. It’s been a long wait for England since Tony Jacklin won the trophy in 1970. Rose has been in contention before, tying for fifth at Olympia Fields in 2003 and tying for 10th at Oakmont in THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 2007. Justin Rose reacts after a putt on the 18th hole during TURN TO GOLF/B3 the final round of the U.S. Open.

Spurs and Heat models of continuity NBA finalists show rewards of stability BY HOWARD BECK THE NEW YORK TIMES

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich, right, chats with Tony Parker (9) during Game 2 of the NBA Finals. At 17 years, Popovich is the longest-tenured NBA coach.

SAN ANTONIO — Springtime drama in the NBA unfolds on parallel tracks, one lined with elation and triumph, the other with futility and despair, not all of it confined to 94 feet of hardwood. You can watch LeBron James duel Tim Duncan for championship glory on most of your television screen, or you can watch a different sort of spectacle on the news crawl beneath them. George Karl, fired despite leading the Denver Nuggets to nine straight playoff berths. Lionel Hollins, fired after

taking the once-hapless Memphis Grizzlies to the Western Conference finals. Vinny Del Negro, dismissed after presiding over the best season in Los Angeles Clippers history. Lawrence Frank, fired after just two seasons in Detroit. Mike Dunlap, fired after just one season in Charlotte. Larry Drew, fired by Atlanta and hired in Milwaukee. Rarely has the NBA coaching carousel appeared so precarious or capricious or just plain irrational. Twelve teams have dumped their head coaches since the conclusion of the regular season. Six of those teams made the playoffs. TURN

TO

NBA/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today No events scheduled.

Tuesday Baseball: Sequim U18 at Wilder (doubleheader), at Civic Field, 5 p.m.

Area Sports BMX Racing Port Angeles BMX Track Sunday 26-30 Cruiser 1. Greg Faris 2. Rick Lee 3. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 41-45 Cruiser 1. Scott Gulisao 2. Larry Moroles 3. Robert “Face Plant” Williams 5 & Under Novice 1. Cameron Colfax 2. Lincoln Bear 3. Caitlin Humphries 4. “The Dominator” Johnson 5. Dion Johnson 6. TT Connary 8 Novice 1. Kason Albaugh 2. Cholena Morrison 3. Anthony Brigandi 4. Harmony Colfax 10 Novice 1. Kaina Pawai-Pang 2. Bodi Sanderson 3. Amber Johnson 7 Intermediate 1. Taylee Rome 2. Jesse Vail 3. Jaron Tolliver 9 Intermediate 1. Toppy Robideau 2. Aydan Vail 3. James Hampton 15 Intermediate 1. Greg Faris 2. Trenton Owen 3. Moose Johnson 4. Johntay Tolliver 5. Colton Barnett

Baseball Mariners 4, Athletics 0 Seattle EnChvz rf Frnkln 2b Seager 3b KMorls dh Ibanez lf Morse 1b MSndrs cf HBlanc c Ryan ss Totals

Saturday’s Game Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi 5 0 1 0 Crisp cf 4020 5 0 1 0 Jaso c 2000 3 0 0 0 DNorrs ph 0000 4 1 1 0 Cespds dh 4010 4 0 1 0 Moss 1b-lf 4020 4 1 3 0 Dnldsn 3b 4000 3 1 1 0 Lowrie ss 3010 4 1 1 4 S.Smith lf 2000 4 0 0 0 Freimn ph-1b 1 0 0 0 CYoung rf 3000 Sogard 2b 3000 36 4 9 4 Totals 30 0 6 0

Seattle 000 004 000—4 Oakland 000 000 000—0 DP—Seattle 3. LOB—Seattle 7, Oakland 5. 2B—Franklin (6), Morse 2 (9), Lowrie (19). HR—H.Blanco (1). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle F.Hernandez W,8-4 7 5 0 0 1 8 Furbush 1 1 0 0 0 1 Medina 1 0 0 0 1 1 Oakland Griffin L,5-6 6 8 4 4 2 3 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 0 Otero 1 1 0 0 0 0 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0 Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. WP—Medina. Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Bill Welke. T—2:47. A—24,378 (35,067).

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SOCCER

SUPERMAN

Uruguay’s Edinson Cavani, front, collides with Spain’s Sergio Busquets during the soccer Confederations Cup group B match between Spain and Uruguay in Recife, Brazil, on Sunday. Spain won, 2-1. Athletics 10, Mariners 2 Sunday’s Game Seattle Oakland ab r hbi ab r hbi EnChvz cf 4 0 2 2 Crisp cf 4011 Frnkln 2b 3 0 1 0 CYoung cf 0000 Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 Jaso c 1111 KMorls dh 4 0 0 0 Cespds dh 5121 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 Moss 1b 5122 Morse 1b 3 1 2 0 Dnldsn 3b 5221 Triunfl ph 1 0 0 0 S.Smith lf 5222 Bay rf 3 1 1 0 Reddck rf 5242 Liddi ph 1 0 0 0 Rosales ss 4 1 1 0 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 Sogard 2b 4020 Ryan ss 30 00 Totals 33 2 8 2 Totals 38101710 Seattle 020 000 000— 2 Oakland 000 220 42x—10 DP—Seattle 1, Oakland 2. LOB—Seattle 5, Oakland 10. 2B—Cespedes (9), Donaldson (20), S.Smith (16), Sogard (9). 3B—Reddick (1). HR—Moss (12), Donaldson (10), S.Smith (6), Reddick (3). S—Rosales. SF—Jaso. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Iwakuma L,7-2 5 8 4 4 3 3 Beavan 11/3 6 4 4 0 1 2 /3 1 0 0 1 0 Wilhelmsen Capps 1 2 2 2 0 1 Oakland Colon W,9-2 7 8 2 2 0 3 Doolittle 1 0 0 0 1 0 Otero 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Bill Welke; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Adrian Johnson. T—2:59. A—36,067 (35,067).

American League West Division W L Oakland 42 29 Texas 38 31 Seattle 31 39 Los Angeles 30 39 Houston 26 44 Central Division W L Detroit 38 29 Cleveland 34 34

Pct GB .592 — .551 3 .443 10½ .435 11 .371 15½ Pct GB .567 — .500 4½

Kansas City Minnesota Chicago Boston Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Toronto

33 34 30 36 28 38 East Division W L 42 29 40 30 38 31 36 33 32 36

.493 5 .455 7½ .424 9½ Pct GB .592 — .571 1½ .551 3 .522 5 .471 8½

Saturday’s Games Boston 5, Baltimore 4 Toronto 6, Texas 1 Tampa Bay 5, Kansas City 3 Houston 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Minnesota 6, Detroit 3 L.A. Angels 6, N.Y. Yankees 2 Seattle 4, Oakland 0 Washington 7, Cleveland 6 Sunday’s Games Cleveland 2, Washington 0 Baltimore 6, Boston 3 Kansas City 5, Tampa Bay 3 Houston 5, Chicago White Sox 4 Detroit 5, Minnesota 2 Toronto 7, Texas 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, L.A. Angels 5 Oakland 10, Seattle 2 Today’s Games Kansas City (Shields 2-6) at Cleveland (Carrasco 0-2), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 7-4) at Toronto (Jo. Johnson 0-2), 4:07 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 1-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 9-0), 4:08 p.m. Oakland (Straily 4-2) at Texas (Tepesch 3-6), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-2) at Houston (B.Norris 5-6), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Harang 3-6) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 5-4), 7:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 10:05 a.m., 1st game Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Colorado at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Baltimore at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 4:10 p.m., 2nd game Oakland at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 5:10 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.

National League West Division W L Arizona 37 32 Colorado 37 33 San Francisco 35 32 San Diego 35 34 Los Angeles 29 39 Central Division W L St. Louis 44 25 Cincinnati 42 28 Pittsburgh 41 28 Chicago 28 39 Milwaukee 28 40 East Division W L Atlanta 40 28 Washington 34 34 Philadelphia 33 37 New York 25 39 Miami 21 47

Pct GB .536 — .529 ½ .522 1 .507 2 .426 7½ Pct GB .638 — .600 2½ .594 3 .418 15 .412 15½ Pct GB .588 — .500 6 .471 8 .391 13 .309 19

Saturday’s Games Chicago Cubs 5, N.Y. Mets 2 L.A. Dodgers 5, Pittsburgh 3, 11 innings Atlanta 6, San Francisco 5 Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 0 Colorado 10, Philadelphia 5 St. Louis 13, Miami 7 Washington 7, Cleveland 6 San Diego 6, Arizona 4 Sunday’s Games Cleveland 2, Washington 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Cincinnati 5, Milwaukee 1 Miami 7, St. Louis 2 Pittsburgh 6, L.A. Dodgers 3 San Diego 4, Arizona 1 Colorado 5, Philadelphia 2 San Francisco at Atlanta, late. Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 5-5) at St. Louis (S.Miller 7-4), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Haren 4-8) at Philadelphia (Lannan 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 7-4) at Toronto (Jo. Johnson 0-2), 4:07 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Gee 5-6) at Atlanta (Hudson 4-6), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Liriano 5-2) at Cincinnati (Leake 6-3), 4:10 p.m.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 11:45 a.m. (26) ESPN Soccer FIFA, Nigeria vs. Tahiti, Confederations Cup, Group B, Site: Estadio Mineirao Belo Horizonte - Brazil (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Baseball NCAA, Louisville vs. Oregon State, Division I Tournament, Site: TD Ameritrade Park - Omaha, Neb. (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Baseball MLB, Chicago Cubs vs. St. Louis Cardinals, Site: Busch Stadium - St. Louis (Live) 5 p.m. (2) CBUT/NBCSN Hockey NHL, Chicago Blackhawks vs. Boston Bruins, Stanley Cup Final, Game 3, Site: TD Garden Boston (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Baseball NCAA, Mississippi State vs. Indiana, Division I Tournament, Site: TD Ameritrade Park - Omaha, Neb. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Los Angeles Angels, Site: Angel Stadium - Anaheim (Live) Miami (Ja.Turner 1-0) at Arizona (Corbin 9-0), 6:40 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 5-5) at San Francisco (Zito 4-5), 7:15 p.m. Tuesday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 10:10 a.m., 1st game L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Colorado at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m., 2nd game Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 5:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. Miami at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Basketball NBA Playoffs Finals (Best-of-7) Miami 2, San Antonio 2 Thursday, June 6: San Antonio 92, Miami 88 Sunday, June 9: Miami 103, San Antonio 84 Tuesday, June 11: San Antonio 113, Miami 77 Thursday, June 13: Miami 109, San Antonio 93 Sunday: Miami at San Antonio, late. Tuesday: San Antonio at Miami, 6 p.m. x-Thursday: San Antonio at Miami, 6 p.m. (x-if necessary)

Hockey NHL Playoffs STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) Boston 1, Chicago 1 Wednesday, June 12: Chicago 4, Boston 3, 3OT Saturday: Boston 2, Chicago 1, OT Today: Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. Wednesday: Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. Saturday, June 22: Boston at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 24: Chicago at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 26: Boston at Chicago, 5 p.m. (x-if necessary)

Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned RHP Rubby De La Rosa to Pawtucket (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Pedro Beato from Pawtucket. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Sent RHP Chris Perez to Lake County (MWL) for a rehab assignment. Agreed to terms with RHPs Cole Sulser and Ben Heller and OF Thomas Pannone on a minor league contract.

Horton: Brocklesby excelled at hoops, track CONTINUED FROM B1 had an incredible year on the track, in the field and on the court. The score was 7-7 at the end Brocklesby won a state title in of regulation, and neither team the high jump, and a district title scored in the first to overtime in the 400-meter dash. periods. He broke or tied district meet The game might have gone on records in both events, and set for days if not for the overtime new school records in both (high rules that put the ball at the 10-yard line starting in the third jump: 6 feet, 6 inches; 400: 40.67 seconds). overtime. The senior also recorded the Runner up: The Port Townsend girls basketball team’s top 200 time, and third-best 100 52-49 overtime win over Charles time. In basketball, he helped lead Wright in the 1A tri-district playthe Wolves to a sixth-place state in game. More on this game later. finish, averaging 20.4 points on ■ Most surprising team — the season. This is a tough one, since I didn’t He finished his career as have enough prior knowledge to Sequim’s second all-time leading have expectations, but I’ll go with scorer, and broke the school the Port Townsend football team. record for most games with 30 or The Redskins carried a more points (six). 20-game losing streak into the He was named to the All-State season, but finished the season Second Team, and I’m still trying with a competitive 4-6 record. to figure out why he didn’t win Runner up: Port Townsend the Olympic League MVP. boys basketball for slowly Runner up, Part 1: Neah Bay’s improving throughout the seaTyler McCaulley setting a new son, to the point where they went 1B state tournament record by three games deep into the postsinking eight 3-pointers in the season. Red Devils’ 77-60 win over ■ Top individual performance LaCrosse-Washtucna-Kahlotus in — Sequim’s Jayson Brocklesby the 1B semifinal.

Runner up, Part 2: Port Townsend’s Daniel Charlton and Port Angeles’ Miki Andrus scoring four goals each in the Redskins’ 6-5 overtime win in March. It was the first-ever high school soccer game for both players. ■ Best example of why Peninsula prep sports are great — Port Townsend’s 52-49 overtime win over Charles Wright in the 1A tri-district play-in game. Redskins post Codi Hallinan’s shot and free throw with 26 seconds remaining in the overtime period that gave Port Townsend a 51-49 lead, and essentially, the game. A few minutes into the third quarter, Hallinan looked completely devastated as she sat on the bench after picking up her third and fourth fouls. Her teammates stepped up to help the Redskins survive Hallinan’s absence. Jewel Johnson hit big shots and kept the team calm. Gabbi Hossack, in foul trouble herself, held down the post. Enani Rubio made a big steal and layup. Patricia Reeves and Megan Lee slowed Charles’ Wright’s

Shoni Pritchett, who still finished with 26 points, but most came earlier in the game. When Hallinan returned, she put her disappointment from earlier in the game behind her and help Port Townsend grind out a victory. That included making the shot, which the entire gym seemed to give up on, until it bounced on the rim a few times and dropped through the net. Runner up: The dramatic relationship between Port Townsend sports and myself. It seemed that every time I attended a Redskins game, it either went into overtime or down to the wire. The aforementioned five-OT football game. The girls basketball team’s overtime win over Charles Wright. That same team’s twopoint loss to Olympic on a layup at the buzzer. There also was the baseball team’s 6-5 nine-inning loss to Sequim. ■ Best example of sportsmanship — Sequim track and field coach Brad Moore, who reported a scoring error that turned a

meet win by the Wolves’ boys into a second-place finish. “Coach Moore told me about the error,” Port Angeles athletic director Dwayne Johnson said in an email. “What he really told me was the integrity, truthfulness and responsibility for trust that encompasses his coaching standards.” Runner up: Chimacum basketball coaches and players sitting in the stands for Port Townsend’s boys and girls play-in games in February. Chimacum-Port Townsend was the best rivalry on the Peninsula this season, so it was cool to see some Cowboys show up to watch their rivals’ games. And they weren’t rooting against the Redskins, at least not openly. In fact, it appeared the Chimacum girls basketball players were rooting for their Port Townsend counterparts.

————— Sports reporter Lee Horton can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

B3

NBA: Spurs, Heat share similar, stable culture CONTINUED FROM B1 the San Antonio Spurs’ guiding force since 1994, Three of those teams — and their coach for the last the Nuggets, Grizzlies and 17 seasons. Pat Riley has been steerClippers — set franchise ing the Heat, as coach or records for wins. The trend is even worse executive, since 1995. Spoelstra, a studied disthan it appears. ciple of Riley’s, is in his fifth Since 2010, 25 of the NBA’s 30 teams have season as head coach, which changed coaches at least ranks him third in the once. The Bobcats have had league in longevity, behind four coaches in that span, only Popovich and Boston’s Doc Rivers (nine years). and the Pistons three. “We don’t see it as a coinThe Cavaliers have cidence,” Spoelstra said, replaced Mike Brown with referring to the Heat and Byron Scott (2010) and the Spurs meeting in the replaced Byron Scott with finals — the Heat’s fourth Mike Brown (2013). appearance since 2006 and “I think it’s really a the Spurs’ fifth since 1999. shame for the profession of You can argue that succoaching that it’s been so cess begets security, but volatile,” Heat Coach Erik that clearly is not always Spoelstra said. the case (as Karl and Hol“But I’m also very grate- lins will attest), and the ful that our organization best coaches and executives doesn’t behave in that man- will tell you that the inverse ner.” is true. It is worth noting, amid “True success in the this spring of coaching car- NBA, you must have consisnage, that the two fran- tency of culture,” Spoelstra chises now vying for the said. championship are among “When you see that type the smartest and the most of turnover over and over stable in the league. and over, it’s impossible to Gregg Popovich has been create any kind of sustain-

after year. able consistent culture.” “The continuity, I think, The Heat and the Spurs have more in common than breeds — it breeds trust,” the ability to recruit and Popovich said. “It breeds camaraderie. retain All-Star talent. It breeds a feeling of responsibility that each member Spurs’ formula holds towards the other. Each franchise has a rec- The ability to be excited for ognizable culture, a tradi- each other’s success, not to tion of accountability, integ- develop territory and walls, rity, trust, loyalty and pru- but to stay participatory. To dence that extends from be able to discuss, to argue ownership to the front office and come out at the end on to the coaching staff. the same page with the They hire smart people same passion and the same and empower them to make goals. smart decisions. “And I think without The Spurs rarely over- continuity, that’s pretty spend on players, though impossible, because all the they make the occasional immediate tendencies of mistake (see Richard Jef- instant success starts to ferson). take over, and that just They rarely gamble on breeds failure.” volatile personalities, Find a meddling, parathough they will make the noid, impulsive owner — occasional exception (see James L. Dolan in New Stephen Jackson). York, Donald Sterling in If a player fails to con- Los Angeles — and chances form, he is gone (see Ste- are you will find a dysfuncphen Jackson). tional culture. They honor their star The Knicks and the Clipplayers, but they do not pers are enjoying momencede authority to them. tary success, but they have These values persist never built anything susbecause the people espous- tainable under their curing them endure, year rent leadership.

Hardly an interview goes by in which Spoelstra doesn’t refer to “our identity” — a corporate-sounding phrase that is easily mocked but also easily defined. As Spoelstra noted, the Heat — regardless of coach or personnel — have prided themselves on being “tough, competitive, defenseminded, disciplined.” “I would hope that if somebody turned on a Heat game now, you could say that the ultimate compliment would be that we look like a Pat-Riley-coached team,” Spoelstra said. “We know what that means.” The same could be said for San Antonio. The cast supporting Duncan, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili has been overhauled multiple times over the last decade, but the Spurs consistently find the selfless role players who make it all work, from Bruce Bowen to Kawhi Leonard, Fabricio Oberto to Tiago Splitter. We know what it means to see a Popovich team, a

Riley team, a Rivers team, a Phil Jackson team. We can identify the kind of players they want, the style of game they play, the jargon and the values that define them. What, exactly, is the culture of the Washington Wizards? What values define the Charlotte Bobcats? Or the Toronto Raptors? Or the Sacramento Kings? For the last eight-plus years, you knew that Karl’s Nuggets would be an uptempo, high-scoring, passhappy team. For the last four seasons, you knew that Hollins’s Grizzlies would be bruising and defensive-minded. Now, bizarrely, Karl and Hollins are interviewing for each other’s old jobs, vying to take over teams that fit the other guy’s personality. “The change, change, change, change, change thing doesn’t really work,” Popovich said. “You can see that in a lot of organizations.” For a seminar on smarter management, all those teams have to do is watch the finals.

After 10 periods, time for Stanley Cup Game 3 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Tyler Seguin knew something had to be said. And he was pretty sure it wouldn’t be fit for public consumption. After the Chicago Blackhawks badly outplayed the Boston Bruins in the first period of Game 2 of the Stanley Cup finals Saturday night, Seguin ditched the microphone he had been wearing as part of the TV broadcast.

Then he headed back into the dressing room so the team could hash out its problems in peace. “It was really a mix of everybody saying something,” Seguin said. “I definitely knew it was coming, so I threw my shoulder pads in the training room and put a towel over it so no one could hear what we were saying. “I think we needed that team wake-up call.” The 2010 and ‘11 Stanley Cup champions were in

Boston on Sunday for the third game of the best-ofseven finals tonight. Neither team skated on the off-day, instead choosing to conserve their energy after playing 10 periods while trading overtime victories that left the series tied at one game apiece. “It’s a lot about getting your rest,” Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith said after arriving in Boston about an hour late because of air traffic. “It’s not rocket science,

you just get sleep and do as best you can and do all those little things to get ready to go.” Chicago took the first one, winning a triple-OT thriller after 52 extra minutes. Then the Blackhawks started Game 2 by sending 19 shots — to Boston’s four — at Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask in the first period to take a 1-0 lead. “Not much needed to be said after that first period,” said Chris Kelly, who was

one of the more vocal players in the dressing room. “I think Tuukka pointed out that was a pretty terrible period by our team. If it wasn’t for Tuukka, it would have been a lot worse.” Neither Kelly nor coach Claude Julien nor any of the other Bruins would divulge what was said in the room. But something snapped them out of their funk. “Claude came in a little bit later, but I think we were all equally upset about

that first period,” said Daniel Paille, who scored at 13:48 of overtime to end the game. “Definitely, Claude let us know and it was a way for us to wake up. “And, also, players were keeping each other accountable, too, so it was good.” Whatever was said, the Blackhawks managed only 15 shots over the next twoplus periods to Boston’s 24. For the game, the Bruins had 50 hits — 10 by Milan Lucic — to 34 for Chicago.

Golf: Mickelson can’t hold lead on birthday CONTINUED FROM B1 The day appeared to set up well for Mickelson to finally win his first U.S. Open. It was his 43rd birthday, it was Father’s Day, and it was the first time he had held a solo 54-hole lead at the event. He made eagle from the rough at the 10th hole to retake the solo lead. Instead, he’s a runner-up for the sixth time, extending a record he already held. He was in a three-way tie with Rose and Mahan when his approach rolled back down the fairway at 15. He chipped well past the hole and 2-putted for bogey.

Mahan was the steadiest player on the course, with 13 pars in his first 14 holes, until his tee shot found the rough at 15. He hit into more rough before 3-putting for double bogey. Rose joins Olin Dutra, Ben Hogan, Lee Trevino and David Graham as U.S. Open champions who conquered the tough little course in the Philadelphia suburbs. His day consisted of five birdies and five bogeys. He missed a 5-footer for par at No. 3, but he sank long birdies on the 6th and 7th, then moved ahead of Mickelson with a 20-footer at No. 13. It was hard to count out anyone who had a place near the top on the board.

Merion turned out to be a place where golfers could post big numbers and live to tell the tale — or at least tread water with everyone else. But some fell out of contention quickly. Steve Stricker was just one stroke off the lead at the beginning of the day, but his hopes for a first major took a hit when he put two shots out of bounds at No. 2 and settled for an 8. He shot a 76. Luke Donald also started the round just one shot to make up, but he hit a volunteer with a tee shot on No. 3 and on No. 4, took off his left shoe and sock to play his ball next to Cobbs Creek. He shot a 75.

M’s: Smacked by A’s CONTINUED FROM B1 in the second inning, the home for the first time this first time he’s thrown 30 or year. Donaldson and Smith more in an inning this year. ■ RHP Aaron Harang ■ First baseman Justin (3-6, 5.60 ERA) takes the hit back-to-back home runs with one out in the seventh Smoak (strained right mound for Seattle against against Blake Beaven. oblique) could return to the Crisp later walked with the Mariners lineup as early as the Los Angeles Angels today. bases loaded and Jaso hit a tonight in Anaheim. He threw a two-hit shutsacrifice fly against Tom ■ The A’s hit more than Wilhelmsen to make it 8-2. two home runs in a game at out in his last start. Moss and Reddick each went deep in the ninth against Carter Capps. Sean Doolittle and Dan Otero pitched an inning apiece to close it out. © Notes: Mariners LHP prospect Danny Hultzen Expert care, compassionately (rotator cuff strain) remains given. Focusing on eliminating at extended spring training. pain & improving wellness. The former first-round draft pick last appeared in 417-8870 a game on April 19 with M.S., L. Ac. Triple-A Tacoma. www.olympicacupuncture.com Manager Eric Wedge said before the game that Hultzen would remain in Peoria while he continues to build arm strength. ■ A’s INF Jed Lowrie was given the day off as manager Bob Melvin con4MJEJOH4DSFFOTt4DSFFO%PPST tinues to deal with the effects of Thursday’s 8JOEPX4DSFFOTt$VTUPN4DSFFOT 18-inning game against the 3PMMBXBZ4DSFFOTt4PMBS4DSFFOT New York Yankees. ■ Cespedes will likely 1FU4DSFFOTt4DSFFO3PPNT return to the outfield when the A’s open a four-game 220 Carlsborg Rd. series at Texas today. Sequim, WA ■ Colon threw 31 pitches #PENIN*961CF

Pain-Free Is The Point!

32732714

Pat Flood

Charl Schwartzel went briefly under par, then went the other way with a streak of bogeys that led to a 78. Mickelson was the overnight leader at 1-under, but Lefty was scrambling from the start. His tee shot at the first landed in the rough, but he nearly birdied the hole when his 30-footer lipped out. He was in the sand at No. 2 yet missed a short putt for birdie. He finally paid the price for his waywardness when he put one in a bunker at the par-3 No. 3 and then

3-putted for a 5 that left no one under par for the tournament. While the leaders were waiting to tee off, Tiger Woods went through the motions of extending his majors drought into a sixth year. It was an unfamiliar sight to see the world’s No. 1 golfer teeing off on a Sunday more than three hours before the top pairing, but he was 10 strokes off the lead after a third-round 76 that matched his worst U.S. Open round as a pro. Woods wore his usual

Sunday red shirt, but it didn’t keep him from quickly achieving a dubious double — out of bounds and a 3-putt on the same hole. That made for a triplebogey 8 at No. 2. He shot a 74 to finish 13 over par. Sunday was five years to the day since Woods won the U.S. Open at Torrey Pines. His running tally of majors wins is stuck on 14, four shy of Jack Nicklaus’ record. “I did a lot of things right,” Woods said. “Unfortunately, I did a few things wrong as well.”

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B4

Fun ’n’ Advice

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

Dilbert

Pickles

Momma

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have five kids, all younger than 6 years of age. The youngest are 7-month-old twins. A family in our church has offered to watch them so my husband and I can go out on a date. We haven’t been alone together in a year. We have no family or friends nearby to offer respite. I would like to accept their kind offer, but two things are holding me back. First, I don’t think they realize the enormity of the task, and it feels like we might be imposing. Second, I don’t have anything to say to my husband. A date would be awkward and most likely consist of “relations.” I like my husband, but I’d rather be left alone. What would you do? Frazzled Mom with No Support

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Frazzled mom needs some help

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

DEAR ABBY entertain/grill/ vacation/walk the Van Buren dog, etc. Again, I appreciate your thoughtfulness.” That’s it! If showing good manners isn’t incentive enough, remember this: These are the people you will be inviting to weddings, baby showers and your own children’s graduations and weddings in the not-so-distant future. A little courtesy goes a long way. Appreciative in Hitchcock, Texas

Abigail

Dear Frazzled: Before placing your small children in the care of others, invite the family over to see exactly how much work would be involved in watching them. Then discuss with your husband what date night will entail and see if you can agree on what would be a fun night out. You definitely need a break, and some alone time should be something to look forward to. That it isn’t is of concern to me. It’s possible you could benefit from marriage counseling to help re-establish a line of verbal communication. And equally important, because you suspect the evening “might” result in relations, make sure you have birth control to prevent an accidental pregnancy.

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Appreciative: While letter-writing may always seem like a chore to some people, there are occasions when a written message is the proper means of communication. Acknowledging the generosity of others is one of those times. Failure to do so indicates that the person’s gesture was of so little importance that it was not noticed by the recipient. And frankly, it also indicates a distinct lack of manners. Dear Abby: How do you politely tell friends and relatives who are guests in your home that your computer and TV are off-limits? Once they take control of the remote or the computer, they seem to go crazy and change all the settings to their preferences and never put the settings back when they leave! What can I do, Abby? Frustrated in Lewis Run, Pa.

Dear Abby: In this season of graduations and weddings, I would like to urge the honorees to send proper thank-you notes to friends and family who give them gifts and money. Time, money and preparation are put into these events, and the effect is spoiled when guests have to contact stores or scrutinize their bank statements to learn if their gifts were, indeed, received but simply not acknowledged. Thank-yous aren’t difficult. Some “rules”: Rather than text or email, write a note on paper and mail it with a stamp via the U.S. mail. If you do, you will be forever known as “that polite young couple” or “the young man/woman who sent the nice note.” Three lines are all that are needed: “Thank you for the ----. I look forward to using/enjoying it when we

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

by Mell Lazarus

Dear Frustrated: “Remind” any guest who uses your electronic equipment that it must be returned to your original settings before the person leaves your house. If you have already done that and it hasn’t worked, then you must find the courage to say, “I’m not letting anyone use my computer or remote control because I have a hard time getting the settings back to where I put them after you leave.”

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

Rose is Rose

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take care of personal and domestic responsibilities. Think about the changes you want to make and what you need to do to make your dreams come true. Sign up for a course, rebuild your resume or consider a change of location. 4 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ask questions, find out what’s expected of you and take your time when it comes to money matters. Put a cap on how much you spend when it comes to someone you are trying to impress. Don’t try to buy love. 4 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speak up and you can resolve issues that bother you. An unusual approach to something you do at work or the way you present a skill or your resume will give you an advantage. Put aside time for someone special. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Keep a close watch on any competition you face at work or school. You need to express your concerns and find solutions to any existing problems to prove you can handle whatever challenge you face. Avoid excess and indulgent people. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Keep life simple and don’t fold under pressure. If someone is pressing you to make a snap decision or to indulge in something you feel is wasteful, back away or offer an alternative that you feel is cost-effective. 2 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Share what you have with those you love. Express your emotions and get rid of any concerns you’ve been harboring. Put greater emphasis on making the changes that will improve your life and help you reach your goals. 5 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Re-evaluate your current professional position and your domestic situation. Look at the big picture and consider what you can do to get ahead. Knowledge is key, and being more diverse presenting what you have to offer will play a role in your success. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An open mind will pick up valuable information. Engage in talks and communicate with people who have information you want to acquire. Expand your interests and your friendships, and you will be able to make changes that will enhance your personal life. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Networking, researching and spending time with people who enjoy the same things you do will put a positive spin on your day. Good fortune is heading your way. You will get news regarding an investment or money someone owes you. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Problems at home will cost you if you aren’t prepared to take action and cut your losses. Do not get into an argument when change is what’s required. Size up your situation and do what’s necessary. Love is highlighted. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Avoid impulsive behavior that has the potential to lead to an irreversible situation. Work quietly behind the scenes and you will have a better chance of getting what you want done without interference. Protect what you have and don’t fold under pressure. 2 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get any responsibilities or chores out of the way before you move on to other interests. Complaints will be made if you haven’t honored a promise. Planning a vacation, travel and communicative activities will all lead to a positive outcome. 3 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 3010 Announcements

ADOPT: Actor/Director & Executive long for 1st b a by ; s p o r t s , p l ay f u l pup, home cooking awaits! Expenses paid. 1-800-989-8921

3020 Found FOUND: Branch tr immer, East of Race St. P.A., between 5th and 6th. Call to ID: (360)775-8318

F O U N D : C a t . Yo u n g , white, tiger stripes, red string around neck, near Peabody RV Park, P.A. Humane Society, (360)457-8206

FOUND: Dog. Male yellow shepard mix found W. P.A. off W. 14th st. cute and friendly! please call/txt brandi ASAP, (360)808-1627

F O U N D : Ke y s . M a n y key s, D o d g e r e m o t e, etc., downtown Port Angeles. (360)452-8435.

F O U N D : K e y s . Tw o keys, downtown Port Angeles. (360)452-8435.

3023 Lost LOST: Camera. GE digital, possibly outside Baker and Ennis Creek Rd., P.A. (360)808-2473.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013 B5

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General General General General General

3023 Lost

LOST: Cat. Black and Assistant Planner white, female, bowCity of Port Angeles legged, older, last near F/T with benefits. Salary N and 12th, P.A. DOQ. Requires BA de(360)460-2386 gree in planning, urban studies or related field LOST: Cat. Dar k Sia- and one year of profesm e s e, bl u e eye s, 5 t h sional planning experiand D Streets, P.A. ence. MA degree may (360)670-5982 be substituted for year of experience. To view full LOST: Cat. Male, recr uitment go to orange and white, neu- www.cityofpa.us. First tered, last seen on Bent review is June 28, 2013. C e d a r s Way, M t . A n - COPA is an EOE. geles, P.A. 640-0305. AUTO PARTS LOST: Keys. One pink, COUNTERPERSON one car key, somewhere Quality worker needed. in Port Angeles on Mon- HS graduate min. Must day morning. Call have full knowledge of (239)776-5554 auto systems and operations, heavy duty knowlLOST: Women’s Fast- edge and shop skills a p i c h G e a r. 3 4 i n / 2 4 o z plus, computer skills, Easton Stealth pur ple ability to learn and apply and white bat and Reeb- specific computer prook 13.5”-14” lefty glove. grams pertaining to the $50 Reward. 461-1092 job, be able to follow directions, display a positive attitude and ability to 4026 Employment be a team player, excelGeneral lent communication skills and ability to multi-task APPLIANCE SERVICE is required, job can be TECH NEEDED fast paced. Wor king (360)683-5193 weekends is required. Pa i d h o l i d ay s, s a l a r y Dishwasher and Din- DOE. Only qualified reing Room Aid. Par t- sumes will be accepted. t i m e . E v e n i n g a n d Mail to: Peninsula Daily News We e ke n d s . P i ck u p PDN#706/Auto applications at: 550 W. Hendr ickson Port Angeles, WA 98362 Rd. Sequim WA 98382 GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

CAREGIVER needed, prefer CAN, HCA, but n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l Cherrie, (360)683-3348 CLINICAL MANAGER, RN CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. No phone calls.

JOURNEY LEVEL LINEMAN City of Port Angeles $38 hr. plus benefits. M u s t h ave c o m p l e t e d state approved apprenticeship, have a good driving record and WA ST DL and CDL plus Flagging and First Aid/CPR card. To view full recr uitment go to www.cityofpa.us. Position is open until filled. COPA is an EOE.

CHEMICAL Dependency Professionals. “Building Better Lives One Step At A Time.” Spectrum Health Systems, a contractor with the Dept of Corrections and a leading provider of chemical dependency services in Washington, has full time openings in Aberdeen (Stafford Creek Correction Center) and at our Montesano Field Office Your exper tise and your Wa s h i n g t o n S t a t e CDP Certification (required) will be valued by a team whose mission is to make a difference in the lives of others. We offer a competitive salar y benefits package and encourage you to apply by visiting our website: www.spectr umsys.org. AA/EOE.

Tw o y e a r s H o m e Health Case management experience, with managerial/ supervisory experience in home health. RN required, BSN or related field p r e fe r r e d . We o f fe r competitive salaries, excellent benefits, while working with a fr iendly and professional staff. Apply: nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org or online at www.olympic medical.org EOE

DRIVER: Part-time, oncall, shuttle vehicles between company branches and Sequim maintenance facility. Current WSDL, and completion of company driving course required. Applications available at Olympic Ambulance Maintenance Office, 601 W. H e n d r i c k s o n , S e quim.

Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center

Fleet Mechanic City of Port Angeles F/T with benefits. $28.447 hr. Automotive or diesel mechanic education or training is desirable. 4 years experience as an equipment mechanic, including heavy diesel and automotive wor k, welding, equipment fabr ication and hydraulic repair and maintenance and a WA ST Driver License is required. Closes 6/28/13. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us. For more info call Human Resources at 360-417-4510. COPA is an EOE.

MEDICAL OFFICE Must be experienced in billing, full charge bookkeeping and receptionist duties. Full-time with officies in P.A. and Sequim. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#707/Medical Port Angeles, WA 98362

Correctional Officer 1 On- Call Pay starts at $16.48 hr., Plus full benefits. Closes 07/09/13.

Cook Adult Correctional Custodian Permanent and On-Call City of Port Angeles P / T 2 4 - 4 0 h r s . w k . Pay starts at $14.67 hr., Plus full benefits. $11.34 hr no benefits. 4 Closes 06/30/13. month position. Please call Human Resources Apply on-line: at 360-417-4510 or www.careers.wa.gov. e m a i l a g a t e s @ c i t yo f For further information pa.us for more informaplease call Roxann tion. Go to www.cityofp a . u s t o d o w n l o a d at (360)963-3207. EOE. COOK: Creative, enthu- application: closes June siastic and dependable 17th. COPA is an EOE. NURSE: RN, LPN, or i n d i v i d u a l , 3 2 - 4 0 h r s. M A fo r p r i m a r y c a r e wk., exp. necessary. Apmedical office, FT, office ply at Fifth Avenue Re- M E C H A N I C : E x p e r i - exp. preferred. tirement Center, 500 W. enced, top notch leaderPeninsula Daily News Hendr ickson, Sequim. ship, environment, pay. PDN#708/Nurse (360)452-4890 Wage DOE, full benefits. Port Angeles, WA 98362

HOUSEKEEPERS Detail oriented. Wage based directly on quality of work, with bonus oppor tunities. May top $11 an hour. Apply in person at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles. No calls please.

MEDICAL Office data processor, PART TIME. 20 hrs/week. Experience using data management software required, scanning, MS Office Suite. Peninsula Daily News PDN#709/Data Port Angeles, WA 98362

FULL TIME, Accounts Paya bl e / r e c e i va bl e, $16.91-$23.29/hr., DOE. Full job posting found at www.sequim.k12.wa.us (360)582-3260

KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

SERVICE SERVICE Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

OFFICE MANAGER Full-time, days, busy vehicle maintenance facility, requires a selfs t a r t e r w i t h ex c e l l e n t clerical, scheduling and computer skills, must communicate easily with vendors, shop personnel and department drivers. Ability to purchase, receive and catalog vehicle par ts. WSDL required. $12 hr to star t plus benefits. Applications available at Olympic Ambulance Mainten a n c e O f f i c e, 6 0 1 W. Hendr ickson, Sequim. Positions closes 6/24/13

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

B6 MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses Clallam County General General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County

FINANCE MANAGER The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position o f F i n a n c e M a n a g e r. Primary functions include: monthly variance reports & financial statement analysis; cash flow repor ts & monitoring bank and investment accounts; budget preparation; project & financial analyses; capital & grant project tracking; acts as assistant treasurer & deputy port auditor; reviews payroll & accounts payable & signs checks. Additional duties include: reconciling key accounts, managing bad debt accounts including seizure/auction of vessels; assisting with risk management & insura n c e c l a i m s ; w r i t i n g policies & procedures; p r i m a r y r e s o u r c e fo r Por t’s information systems & technology contracts. Assists the Director of Finance with other tasks as assigned. Expert user in Excel with strong financial analysis skills, a BA/BS in accounting, business or related field & 5 to 8 years of financial or accounting & management related work is preferred. Salary is DOE with an anticipated hir ing range of $65,000 to $80,000. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Por t Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Por t Angeles between 8am & 5pm M-F or online at www.portofpa.com. Applications will be accepte d u n t i l 5 p m Fr i d ay, June 21st. Letters & resumes without an application will not be accepted. Drug testing is required.

Port Townsend Paper Corp. Customer Service Rep Excellent customer service skills required. Manage customer accounts from order receipt to final delivery and customers’ satisfaction. Track order production and shipment. Two years office experience required. Qualified applicants are encouraged to email resume to debrar2@ptpc.com

Power Resources Analyst City of Port Angeles P / T, t e m p o r a r y, n o benefits. Salar y DOQ. A A d e gr e e i n e n e r g y technology, engineering, business admin or closely related field. Experience in electric utility is desired. Must demonstrate high level of proficiency with computer applications including Microsoft Word, Excel & PowerPoint. To download application go to www.cityofpa.us or contact Human Resources at (360)417-4510 or agates@cityofpa.us to find out more information. Apply ASAP. COPA is an EOE.

Quillayute Valley School District Is accepting applications fo r Fo r k s E l e m e n t a r y School Principal. Please visit the district website www.forks.wednet.edu or contact QVSD Administration Office at (360)374-6262 ext. 267 for position details and application procedure.

RECEIVING MANAGER Coordinate all functions relating to incoming freight. Abilities required are: proficient with computers, attention to detail, strong work ethic, ability to wor k alone, ability to lift over 50 lbs., drive lifting equipment. Full-time, benefits, $12 hr. Apply at The Co-op Farm & Garden. (360)683-4111

The Hoh Tribe has the following jobs opening Housing Director Minimum qualifications; High School graduate, some college preferred and minimum two years’ experience as a Housing Director or assistant. Program Manager/ Victim Advocate Preferred qualifications; Associates Degree and/or a minimum two years professional experience in related field preferably with Native A m e r i c a n s, o t h e r m i norities and/or within rural communities. Victim Advocate Assistant: preferred qualifications; Experience training in working with adults and/or children who have survived domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and/or stalking situations. For a complete job description and application you can contact Kristina Currie at the Hoh Tribe; kristinac@ hohtribe-nsn.org or (360)374-6502. You can also visit our website hohtribe-nsn.org All positions close June 27, 2013 or until filled.

The Quileute Tribe has a job opening for a Chief Cour t Clerk/Cour t Administrator. The selected person will be responsible for ensuring that all aspects of court administration are operating effectively and efficiently. Responsibilities include super vision and management of Tr ibal Court staff, preparing the court’s budget, as well as drafting, updating and researching court codes, cour t rules, and cour t forms, overseeing court reports, public information, and ensuring court documents are processed and filed effectively. Must have AA deg r e e i n Pa r a l e g a l o r related field. Must have at least five years’ experience in a court setting as a supervising clerk or administrator with a strong preference to applicants with prior tribal court experience. Must have recent experience performing or supervising the duties of court clerk. Must have good interpersonal skills. Must have a valid driver’s license. Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills. Closes June 28th or until filled visit the website for complete job application and job description at www.quileutenation.org or call (360) 374-4366.

4062 Employment Transportation/Drivers

DUMP TRUCK DRIVER with CDL needed for Poulsbo construction company. Other positions: exp. septic installer, exp. excavator operator, demo, clearing, excavation. Transfer trailer exp. a plus

Fax resume to: 360-297-8047 or email skzimmer@live.com

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034

CAREGIVER available REPAIR PLUMBER Full-time, good driving for private care. Very experienced, good local record. (360)683-7719. refs. Seeking 8-24 Hr. shifts. $10-15/hr. RESIDENTIAL AIDE (360)504-2227 Promote daily living skills of residents. Reg. HOUSECLEANING PT & On-Call Req. H.S./ GED & cooking/house- $ 2 0 / h r . R e f e r e n c e s avail. (360)461-4767. keeping skills. Work exp.

with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to: PBH,118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at http://peninsula behavioral.org EOE

JUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or Sequim Excavating Con- cell 460-8248. tractor is seeking an Estimator/Project Manager MOWING, PRUNING, for Residential and ComBARKING mercial Projects. Under- Honest and dependable. ground Construction/Site (360)582-7142 Prep Exper ience preferred. Fax or email re- PROVIDING full-service bookkeeping to you and sume and references to your business. $25 per (360)681-3165 fax hour. (360)460-9326. cjexcav_susan@ hotmail.com RETIRED general contractor available for conSHELLFISH Hatchery: sultation on home reCoast Seafoods has modeling projects. Be immediate openings at your own general conthe hatchery in Quil- tractor. Save your hardcene. Entry level posi- earned money. Let me tions, no experience help you! Call Jeff W. at necessary. Please ap(360)477-9750 ply by fax: (360)7653 0 4 5 , by m a i l : P. O. RUSSELL B ox 3 2 7 , Q u i l c e n e, ANYTHING WA 98376, or in perCall today 775-4570. son at 1601 Linger SCUBA DIVER Longer Road. FOR HIRE Call 681-4429 Support/Care Staff To work with developmentally disabled adults, SEEKING ft position as no exper ience neces- executive assistant/ofsary, will train. $10 hr. to fice manager. Seattleite start. CNAs encouraged relocating. to apply. Apply in person jgordon65@earthlink.net at 1020 Caroline, P.A. TAY L O R ’ S L a w n from 8-4 p.m. Maintenance Available T E AC H E R S N e e d e d . all year around for any HS Math/Science Clal- l a w n c a r e n e e d e d , lam Bay; MS Math/Sci- moss removal and odd ence and HS CTE - j o b s . J u s t c a l l N e a h B a y. Te a c h i n g ( 3 6 0 ) 5 6 5 - 6 6 6 0 o r Cer t required Exper i- (360)565-6298. ence preferred Always done to your www.capeflattery.wed satisfaction! net.edu Contact Evelyn Wonderwww.peninsula ly (360)963-2249. dailynews.com

SITTIN’ IN SUNNY SEQUIM Gently used 3 Br., 2 bath triple wide on an acre in S u n n y S e q u i m . Ve r y spacious with an open floor plan that flows nicely throughout the house. Large kitchen and formal dining room. Huge 2 car garage for cars and toys with lots of room left over for the workbenches and tools to complete the “mancave.” Located nearly midway between Por t Angeles and Sequim. MLS#271308. $198,000. Dick Pilling (360)417-2811 NEW LISTING-WITH COLDWELL BANKER VIEWS! UPTOWN REALTY Northwest contemporary with salt water and Spacious and private 3 mountain views. Triple level deck with hot tub bed, 3 bath one level and fire pit, double level home on 8+ acres. Livs u n r o o m , s a l t wa t e r ing room with vaulted view balcony, gorgeous c e i l i n g s a n d p r o p a n e landscaping and beauti- fireplace; family room ful interior. Master craft- with wet bar, deck and e d s t a i r c a s e, l o f t o n propane fireplace; kitchu p p e r l eve l c u r r e n t l y en with large pantry; dinused as office and me- ing room with built in dia room. Vaulted ceil- hutch and a master suite ings and perfectly placed with vaulted ceilings. All windows and skylights of these rooms surround throughout the home. So the solar heated pool much storage too! Fin- and patio. This is truly a ished basement current- home made for enterly being used as family taining! Please put the r o o m a n d e x e r c i s e photo gallery link at the space. One room ready $299,900. MLS#271282. (800)453-9157 for sauna and more storWINDERMERE age! 3 bed 2 ½ bath PORT ANGELES 2,839 sf. MLS#271304. $365,000. SPACIOUS IN Brooke Nelson SUNLAND (360)417-2812 Move in ready condo! COLDWELL BANKER Located on water view UPTOWN REALTY side of hilltop, vaulted ceilings with fp on main NEW LISTING-WITH level, knotty pine panelVIEWS! ing and woodstove Salt water views of the (basement), wood deck Strait of Juan de Fuca, and cour tyard entr y Victoria, Mt. Baker and patio, sunland sweeping views of the amenities-pool, tennis, O l y m p i c s. T h i s 3 b r. , beach. with office, 3 bath, 2,740 ML#498367/271216 sf home has it all! Locat$210,000 ed a little bit of country Tyler Conkle but close to ser vices. (360)683-6880 Large home with beautiWINDERMERE ful built ins, open room SUNLAND concept with large kitche n w i t h wa t e r fa c i n g STARTER? patio attached, dining INVESTMENT? area-living room with CONVENIENCE? vaulted ceilings and win- 2 Br., 1 bath, 856 sf, dows to capture the gor- m ove - i n r e a d y, r e f i n geous views, den and ished oak flooring, newlarge family room down- er roof, mud room, garstairs too! Master bed- a g e , s t o ra g e, room features soaking greenhouse, convenient tub, separate shower, central location, near double sinks and walk in college and olympic park closet. headquar ters, fenced MLS#271145. $420,000. yard / partial water view Brooke Nelson MLS#271259. $115,000. (360)417-2812 Team Thomsen COLDWELL BANKER (360)808-0979 UPTOWN REALTY COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY OPEN PASTORAL FIELDS WATER VIEW HOME! This 1,620 Sf., home This 2 br., 2 bath home has attached garage and is located in Por t Anshop on beautiful pasto- g e l e s o n . 6 1 a c r e s . ral Mountain View level Easy living on one level. 3.31 acres in a very de- A detached RV garage, s i r a b l e l o c a t i o n w i t h 3 fireplaces, awesome easy commuting to all views and a big fenced a m e n i t i e s. M a i n a r e a yard with fruit trees inhas great room, kitchen, cluded. Call Jeanine for bath, utility room and Br. more information. loft with extra bath. Fully MLS#271300. $375,000. finished detached garJeanine age with heating. Plenty 360-460-9221 of ground to build an- JACE The Real Estate other home. Company MLS#264572. $199,950. JEAN WATER VIEW! (360)683-4844 Largest lot in Juan De Windermere Fuca Bluffs. Close to Real Estate Discover y Trail, water, Sequim East s ewe r, a n d p owe r. CC&R’s to protect your investment. MLS#271198. $245,000. (800)453-9157 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

WEEDING: Fast, effiMOUNTAIN VIEW cient, reliable. HOME (360)477-1969 Must see 1,670 sf 3 Br., 2 bath, with 320 sf sunYoung couple early six- r o o m a n d p r o p a n e ties. available for spring stove, country setting on cleanup, weeding, trim- 1.25 acres, 2 car atming, mulching, moss t a c h e d g a r a g e + d e removal, complete gar- t a c h e d s h o p , g r e e n d e n r e s t o ra t i o n a n d house, fenced yard, misc. yard care. Excel- deck with hot tub,updatlent references. ed flooring , appliances (360)457-1213 and fixtures. ML#477784/270881 $249,000 105 Homes for Sale Patty Terhune Clallam County (360)912-1530 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

3 BR., 2 bath, propane fireplace, 1,600 sf on 1.07 acres, Mt. View, orchard, raised bed gardens, 2 car carport with attached 200 sf shop, detached 28’ X 36’ shop with loft, storage barn and more. For sale by Owner $250,000.00 11 Mapleton Way Pt. Angeles. By appointment only. (360)460-1235, Sheryl (360)460-3708, Kristi BEST PRICE AT THE RIGHT TIME Hole in one! Come enjoy the natural beauty of the D u n g e n e s s M e a d ow s Community and recreational features right from this well built 3 Br., 2 bath rambler style home with 2 car attached gara g e. P l ay a r o u n d o f golf, have a swim at the clubhouse pool, take a relaxing stroll on the trail by the Dungeness River. MLS#271233. $178,000. Chuck (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East BUILD YOUR CABIN OR BUILD YOUR CASTLE Gently used 3 Br., 2 bath triple wide on an acre in S u n n y S e q u i m . Ve r y spacious with an open floor plan that flows nicely throughout the house. Large kitchen and formal dining room. Huge 2 car garage for cars and toys with lots of room left over for the workbenches and tools to complete the “mancave.” Located nearly midway between Por t Angeles and Sequim. MLS#270655. $193,795. Daphne Eshom (360)417-2791 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CHARMING LAKE SUTHERLAND CABIN with guest cabanas, on 50 feet of low bank waterfront. Enter tainment sized deck and dock. $249,000. MLS#271272. CHUCK TURNER 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE Very comfortable 3 bed/ 2 bath home at the end of the road privacy. Detached garage & partially fenced backyard, with an apple tree and mature shrubs along the fence line. MLS#271095. $119,000. Emilie Thornton (360)912-3934 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Owner financing in Sequim. 5 private acres of timber with new building in Sequim. You finish turning into residence. Septic approved, water in. Mostly complete with many extras! See to believe money maker priced just above county assessment. By appointDRAMATIC ment only, no agent listNORTHWEST STYLE Don’t miss this home on ings please. $250,000. (360)461-1707 5 acres! With high, open-beam ceilings and PARK-LIKE SETTING all the quality extras, its perfect for entertaining. 2 Br., 3 bath home, over 1,800 sf with 2 master Bright with natural light from artfully placed win- suites, bonus/rec room, dows, the large open landscaped (raised and c o n c e p t l i v i n g / d i n i n g flower beds), sep. workarea is joined by a kitch- shop and RV par king en appointed with all the area, minutes from town gourmet extras. The two with country feel. ML#498958/271302 master bedroom suites $329,000 offer indulgent luxur y. Deb Kahle Relax in the li(360)683-6880 brary/den/office, so cozy WINDERMERE and peaceful you’ll never SUNLAND want to leave. MLS#270957. $445,900. RIGHT PRICE AT THE Lynn Bedford RIGHT TIME (360)417-2806 2004 custom home on COLDWELL BANKER Bell Hill with one acre of UPTOWN REALTY park like setting. Cozy front room with propane HOME WITH A fireplace. Very spacious HANGAR master bedroom with the Calling all pilots. Large 3 Br, 3 bath home with a guest bedrooms at op32’ x 42’ hangar located posite end. Den/office, on the Diamond Point separate dining room runway. Views of Protec- p l u s e a t i n g a r e a o f f tion Island and Mount k i t c h e n . L a r g e u n f i n ished basement ready to Baker. The hangar also makes an excellent RV c r e a t e a fa m i l y / g a m e or multi-car garage or room. Great view from the deck. workshop. MLS#271313. $475,000. $349,000 Chuck ML#271203/494467 (360)683-4844 Roland Miller Windermere (360)461-4116 Real Estate TOWN & COUNTRY Sequim East LAKE SUTHERLAND SECLUDED PROPERTY RIVERFRONT One of a kind home on one level acre, beautiful- Ver y special riverfront ly landscaped and a no h o m e s i t e . E n j oy 1 2 + bank waterfront! Enjoy acres of fabulous Little the southern sun, as this Quil riverfront with excelproperty is on the north lent soils, large everside of the lake! 2 br., 2 g r e e n s a n d p a s t u r e d bath, 2,100 sf wonderful- area. Secluded homesite ly remodeled including with 25 gpm well and large carport, a 2 car de- several outbuildings. Ent a c h e d g a r a g e w i t h joy complete privacy and g u e s t b e d r o o m / b a t h - the soothing sounds of room, a detached huge the river. New Zeland shop with wood stove/ fencing and perfect for 1/2 bath. Ver y private animals, farming, and a and has a large private h o m e by t h e r i ve r. I t dock too! Don’t miss out really doesn’t get any call for a private show- better than this one ! $149,000. MLS#316019. ing! Jim Munn MLS#271237. $430,000. (360)765-4500 Holly Locke MUNN BRO’S (360)417-2809 HOOD CANAL COLDWELL BANKER PROPERTIES UPTOWN REALTY

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes MOBILE HOME: ‘84 14’ x 6 0 ’ , 2 B r. , 2 b a t h . $17,000, price will be reduced if mobile home is removed from park. (360)461-0907

EAST P.A.: Beautiful 3 Br., 2 ba, 6 ac, water inc., fireplace, mtn. view, carport. $1,250 mo. (970)712-0523 or (360)477-3143 FOR rent: 2 br., 1 3/4 bath, east P.A. $700/mo incl W/S/G. No smoking, 1st/last/dep, avail 7/1. (360)457-3194 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba..............$500 A 2 br 1 ba..............$650 A 3 br 1 ba..............$700 H 2 br 2 ba..............$875 H 4 br 1.5 ba...........$950 H 3 br 2 ba...........$1,100 H 4 br 2 ba...........$1,120 DUPLEX/4-PLEX P.A. D 1 br 1 ba..............$575 D 2 br 1 ba..............$600 D 3 br 1 ba..............$800 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A. MOBILE: 2 br., 1 ba, single wide, 14’ wide, on 2.5 acres, pond. $700, $700 dep. No pets/smoke. 683-3961. P.A. 1121 E. Park Ave., nice 3 Br., 2 ba, fp, appli., 2 car gar., fenced yd. No smoking. $1,200. $1,000 dep. 452-3423. P.A.: Amazing 2 Br., 2 ba, fenced. $875 mo., no pets. (360)452-1395.

FORD: Windstar minivan, doesn’t run, needs trans, otherwise good. $200. (360)452-1157.

PIPES: 4” aluminum irrig a t i o n p i p e s, ( 9 ) 2 0 ’ pipes, (1) 16” pipe. $1 per foot. (360)417-3507.

AUTO PARTS: ‘68-’72 FREE: (3) truck tires, Chevy. Hood, bumper, 9 0 0 X 2 0 , m o u n t e d , fender, window assem- useable. (360)379-6456. bly. $200. 457-9650. FREE: Boat. ‘64 Bellboy B A C K P A C K S : ( 2 ) 16’, no trailer or motor. (360)681-4841 Beautiful cats on front, never used. $5 and $10. F R E E : Fill, clean, in (360)457-6343 Forks. (360)640-0556. BAR STOOLS: (4) wooden, matching, 26” FREE: Gelatin capsules, e m p t y, s i ze 1 , 1 , 0 0 0 high, $40. 775-0855. boxed. (360)457-1994. BATHTUB: White, enamel, brand new, 54” x FREE: Pool Equipment. (360)452-7746 31, drain on left side, tub surrond. $200. 374-7513 FREE: Range, (4) burnBED FRAME: Pine pole, ers, made by Kitchen head and foot boards. Aid, works like new. You haul. (360)775-8830. full size, excellent. $199. (360)452-5180 FREE: Vintage enlarger, Beseler 23 CII. BED RAIL: Small medi(360)681-4293 cal bed rail. $25. (360)775-4979 FREE: Wood stove, large, heavy. BEER STEIN: Sonics (360)379-6456 ‘79 champs. $175.

POND: Preformed, 65” l o n g , 4 6 - 1 8 ” W, 2 2 ” D, pear shaped. $100/obo. (360)928-3447

AUTOGRAPHS: Herbert Humphrey autographed photos and letters. $200. (360)681-2968

(360)670-2946 BIKE FRAMES: (1) lightweight, silver, $100. Heavy one, dark gray, $65. (360)797-3829. P.A.: Nice 2 Br., 1 ba with 1/2 basement. Utilities include washer, dryer, stove and fridge. H a r d wo o d f l o o r s a n d e l e c t r i c f i r e p l a c e. N o smoking, pet possible. Located r ight above downtown. $900. For details call Jon at (360)460-1071 P.A.: Small but cute 2 Br., $650 mo., 1st, last, damage. 457-6252. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: 3 Br., on Discovery Trail. $925 mo. tourfactory.com/581670 SEQUIM: Downtown, 3 Br., 2 ba, garage. $900, 1st, last dep, no smoke/pets 797-7251 call evenings.

605 Apartments Clallam County $99 MOVES YOU IN! FIRST MONTH FREE EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today to schedule a tour

of your new home. Managed by Sparrow, Inc. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540. COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br, W/D, fireplace. $600, 1226 Craig Av. (360)452-3423 P.A.: 1 Br. Apt., water view, quiet, clean. $615 mo. (206)200-7244 PA: 1 Br., no pets/smoking, $550. (360)457-1695 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com ROOMMATE WANTED To share home and rent, $800-$1,000. Share utilities. Sequim area. Call Dave: 360-477-1493

SEQUIM: ‘07 dbl. wide in park, 1,250 sf, 2 Br., den, 2 bath, ramp, finished outside room, must sell, consider trade SEA BREEZE APTS. $50,000/obo. 683-3031. Now accepting applications. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Br. SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide Income limits apply. Call mobile home, 55+ park, (360)683-5858 8-noon, 2 Br., 2 bath, garage Mon.-Fri. 525 W. McCurwith spare room, large dy Rd., Sequim. covered deck. $29,500/ obo. (360)385-4882.

408 For Sale Commercial

SEQUIM: 2nd Stor y Downtown. Large 800 sf 1 b r. , 1 b a t h w i t h INVESTMENT study/office. No pets or PROPERTY smoking. Includes w/s/g A home plus a duplex on and laundry. $650/m 1st a 1 acre lot centrally lo- lst, damage. 460-6505. cated in the Carlsborg area with easy access to WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br. shopping and Hwy 101. $$600, 1st, last, damBoth dwellings are in age. (360)457-6252. good condition, the home is 1,736 sf., 3 br 620 Apartments and 2 ba, 2 car garage. Jefferson County The duplex is 1,774 sf., with each unit being 887 sf., 2 br., 1 bath, plus 1 P.T.: Fur nished, 1 br. car garage. Great oppor- apt. Incl. W/S/G, launtunity for someone to dry, electric, heat, interl i ve i n t h e h o m e a n d net, cable TV, pr ivate h ave s o m e r e n t a l i n - entrance. Phone not incl. come from the duplex or No smoke/pets. Credit to use all 3 units for ren- check req. $980. Avail. 7/1. (360)379-8282. tal income. $349,000. MLS#271336. Tom Blore 665 Rental (360)683-4116 Duplex/Multiplexes PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Fireplace, garage. 505 Rental Houses W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r pets. $800. 460-8797. Clallam County SEQUIM: 2 Br. duplex, 130 W. 11th, P.A.: Nice d e n , 2 b a , W / D, n o 2 Br., no smoke/pets. smoke, pets neg., 1 yr. $850. 1st, last, dep. $900. (360)452-4701. (360)457-9776. CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 2 story, 2 car gar $1,100 plus dep. (360)461-6608

AQUA R I U M : 1 0 g a l . , PICTURE FRAMES FOOD PROCESSOR with electric hood, pump, Cuisinart, DLC-8, extra Glass, brass, (15) 8” x filter, plants. $30. blade, large feed tube, 10”, (8) 5” x 7”, (4) 3” x (360)681-8713 5”. $10. (360)452-6974. like new. $65. 681-7579.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

EAST P.A.: Roommate C U T E C O U N T R Y wanted, nice home. HOUSE. Freshly-painted $450 mo., share utilities. and cozy! 1 bd + lg of(360)477-6083 fice, fenced backyard, deck. App. 700 sf, end of ROOMMATE pr iv. rd near Deer Pk WANTED Thtr. Avail immed! $750 To share expenses for plus elec. 461-3859. very nice home west EAST P.A.: 1 Br. cot- of P.A. on 10+ acres. tage, incl. water, sewer, $ 5 0 0 m o. , i n c l u d e s garbage, on bus line. utilities, DirectTV. Must $ 4 5 0 , 1 s t , l a s t , $ 2 0 0 see. Call Lonnie after 5 p.m. (360)477-9066. dep. (360)670-5615.

BIKE: Men’s 26: Schwimm Sidewinder. $25. (360)452-4485. BOATING BOOTS West Marine, yellow, 15” high. $15. (360)452-7967 BOOK ENDS: Itialian, rock crystal, ballerinas. $30. (360)683-9295. BOOKS: (30) Louis L’ A m o u r b o o k s, h a r d cover, $3 ea. (360)683-4856 BOOTS: Army 11 1/2 R, spike protective, $75. Red Wing work boots, 11 1/2 D, $45. 452-7439. BUFFET: Duncan Phyfe style. $150/obo. (360)582-0180 CAMPAING ITEMS Herber t H oover 1928 campaign items, framed. $200. (360)681-2968. CANOPY: Older Snug Top, fits old full size truck. $200. 460-9680. CARPET: Green/black, low nap, 11’ 3’’ x 15’, plus 5’ 3’’ x 2’ 5’’. $40. (360)457-0643 CARPET PAD: 11’ 2’’ x 15’, plus 5’ 3’’ x 2’ 5’’. $20. (360)457-0643. CHAIRS: ( 2) outdoor c h a i s e l o u n g e s, w i t h coushins. $15 ea. (360)683-9609 CHAIRS: Retro, green, clean. $40 each, or $75/pair. (360)808-5141 CHART BOOK: Jer vis Inlet and Desolation Sound, 29 pages. $25. (360)452-7967 C H E S T: ( 6 ) d rawe r s, solid wood, white, 46” x 34”. $65. (360)457-6431 CHINA: Bavaria Royal Duchess Mountain. Bell. 61 pieces. $75. (360)683-7161 COPIER: Canon Pc-6RE, great, enlarges and shrinks copies, more. $100. 928-3447. C R A B P OT S : L a r g e , ropes, bait box, weights. $35. (360)681-8761. DECOYS: (24) duck decoys, like new. $50. (360)452-1260 DESK: Harold and Shultes, nice and small. $50. (360)457-5000. DESK: Real wood, inlaid veneer, 50” x 27”, excellent condition. $175. (360)640-8286 DINING TABLE: $35. (360)670-2946 DISPLAY TABLE. Beveled glass top, 3 drawers, 36” x36”. $50. (360)582-0009 DOG FEEDER: For lg. dog, finished pine, enclosed storage, 2 bowls. $40. (360)531-2737. DOG HOUSE: Dog igloo, medium. $50. (360)452-1661 DUTCH OVENS: Cast iron, 3 legs, never used. 12 qt, $50. 16 qt, $75. (360)683-0934 END TABLE: Solid walnut, few scratcgesm 23” x 26” x 21”. $20. (360)531-2737 ENGINE HOIST: $100 firm. (360)928-9645. ENGINE HOIST: 2 ton hoist with leveler. $125. (360)582-0009 ENGINE STAND: $25 firm. (360)928-9645. E N T. C E N T E R : W i t h Cabinets, good condition. $50. (360)460-5402 FISHING POLES: (2), with carrying cases. $60. (360)683-4173 FISHING ROD: Diawa 50-H Reel, 50 lb braid. $70. (360)379-4134. FISHING ROD: St. Croix Premier 9’. $200. (360)379-4134 FLEECE: Llama fleece. $25. (360)461-6188.

PRINTER: HP printer, scanner, copier, includes instruction book, extra ink. $35. (360)457-7112. PUMP: Irrigation pump, 2 HP, Jacuzzi. $150. (360)683-7899 RECUMBENT BIKE Stamina 4825, like new. $135. (360)452-7967. REFRIGERATORS: (2). Sears, nice, $75. For the garage, $25. (360)452-1661 RIMS: Chrome, with tires, 8 lug, usable tires. $40. (360)681-2747.

R I M S : W i t h t i r e s, fo r Toyota Tacoma. All four for $100/obo. (360)683-7899 FREEZER: Chest freeze r, w h i t e, l o o k s n ew, ROCKER: Swivel rockruns well, 4 cubic feet. er, dark brown. $20. $50. (360)374-7513. (360)457-9091 F R E E Z E R : G . E . 1 1 . 6 ROOFING: (4) rolls to cubic foot, white. $80. torch down roofing. $25. (360)460-2260 (360)681-2747 FREEZERS: (1) Chest R O T O T I L L E R : Tr o y and (1) upright freezer, built, 5 HP, runs. $100. $25 ea. (360)452-7746. (360)460-2211 GLASS TABLE: 48”, (4) RV TOILETS: (2) RV toichairs, great condition. lets. $10. $200. (360)452-7967. (360)460-6213 GOLF CLUBS: 9 irons, SCREW GUN: DeWalt 3 woods, bag and Kaddy Quick Drive, exc. cond. Cart, like new. $150. $100. (360)460-2260. (360)683-0934 SEWING MACHINE GOLF CLUBS: Ladies’ Vintage, Kenmore cabigolf clubs and bag, $10. net, attachments. $25. Men’s 2-3-4 irons, $3. (360)681-4293 (360)452-6974 SHELF: Toy/bookshelf, GRILL: George Forman laminate, walnut finish, 2 Lean Mean FAT Grilling shelves, 36” x 30”. $20. Machine, large size, very (360)457-6431 clean. $25. 582-1345. SHOES: ASICS gel runGRINDER/SANDER: 7”, ning, womens 8.5, onyx Black and Decker, heavy new in box. $100. duty, 9’ cord. 55. (360)457-9498 (360)452-7439 SHREDDER: Paper HARDWARE: Barn door shredder, new in box, hardware kit, new, 60” x never opened. $25. 36”. $75. (360)457-6343 (360)504-2374 SINK: Outdoor barbecue HOLDING TANKS: (2) sink, good cond. $40. RV holding tanks, gray (360)477-7421 and black water. $50 ea. (360)460-6213 SLEEPING BAG Heavy-duty, extra clean. HUMMEL: “Alpine Danc- $20. (360)452-8478. er” #4807/200000 collector set 156114. $200. S O FA : 3 c o u s i n s o fa (360)681-2968 with walnut accents, you haul, excellent shape. HUTCH: Maple, 2 piece, $100. (360)379-5386. 73” x 42 3/4”. $75/obo. (360)457-0238 SOFA: Excellent condition, beautiful wood trim, JEWELRY: Frogs, jew- must see. $185. e l r y, w a t c h e s , m i s c . (360)452-5180 $150 takes 5 pieces. (360)681-2968 SOFA: Flowered pattern, for two, with throw JOINTER: Stanley Bai- p i l l o w s , g o o d c o n d . , l e y # 6 j o i n t e r h a n d P.T., $75. 379-4154. plane. $100. 457-6845. S O FA : L a r g e, c l e a n , LAWN EDGER: Electric, comfortable, low price. B&D lawn edger. $35. $75. (360)681-7579. (360)582-0709 STEAM MOP: Bissel, LAWN MOWER: Sears, new in box. $60. 22”, self-propelled, 6.75 (360)775-4979 HP, excellent. $95. (360)683-7161 S U N C AT C H E R S : ( 5 ) stained glass, mostly LIGHT: Bathroom vanity birds and flowers. $10 to light, 3 globes. $18. $40. (360)683-0791. (360)457-9091 SWIVEL ROCKER LUGGAGE: New, large New, ear th tone, ver y Samsonite, wheels, and comfortable, not recliner. pull-up handle. $185. $125. (360)775-2288. (360)202-0928 TABLE: 42” oak formiMINI-FRIDGE: White, ca, drop-leaf dining tacompact patio fr idge, b l e , ( 4 ) c h a i r s , ( 2 ) good cond. $40. leaves. $195. 582-0709. (360)477-3834 TABLE: Dining table, MISC: Reptile aquarium, glass top, (4) chairs, $ 7 5 . 2 - b i ke c a r ra ck , nice condition. $75. $20. Truck canopy, $20. (360)460-5402 (360)797-3829 TABLE: Drop-leaf, (2) MITER SAW: 10”, on chairs, very nice. $150. aluminum stand. $100. (360)457-0238 (360)683-9320 TABLE: Drop-leaf table, MITER SAW: DeWALT drawers, (2) mattching DW705 12”, with tool chairs, good cond. $100. stand. Excellent condi(360)379-4154 tion. $95. 582-0896. TA B L E S : C o f fe e a n d MOTOR: Chev. ‘92 S10 end tables, oak color, m o t o r , r u n s , 2 . 5 L $40. (360)457-9091. 12,400 miles. $200. (360)457-5299 TABLE: Walnut, dropleaf, dining, good cond. MOTORCYCLE JACK $80. (360)504-2374. 1,500 lbs. $50. (360)452-5891 TACKLE BOX: Fishing tackle box, full, with (2) M O T O R C Y C L E : Tr i - spinning reels. $75. umph. Tach, $100. Lock(360)683-4173 ing gas cap, new in box, $25. (360)452-9591. TIRES: (4) Four P185/60R 15 Goodyear MOTOR: Electric, 30 lt. tires. 60%. $100. $75. (360)681-8761. (360)460-7712 ORGAN: Antique pump TOILET: White, Kohler, organ (1890), playable, 1.6 gal., ex. cond. $50. in working order, needs (360)457-5000 refurb. $200. 683-0904. TOOLS: Ax, maul, (3) OVEN/BROILER: Toastwedges. $20. master, excellent. $40. (360)457-4971 (360)457-1994 TOOL SET: 52 piece, PADDLE TIRES: Rear. metric and standard Fits Honda, Suzuki, sockets. $20. 20x11-10 with rims. (360)452-8478 $200. (360)460-7712. TOW BAR: Roadmaster PA I N T: 1 0 g a l . , n ew, cables, cords, pins, (2) Radda, interior satan labars. $200. tex paint, “Ordinar y (360)452-5891 Day.” $150. 683-9320. TRANSMISSION: Auto, PAINT: Epoxy Paint II, ‘92 Chev S10, 700 R4 wholesale $65, 9 gal(4160), 112,400 miles. lons, assor ted colors. (360)457-5299 $75 for all. 477-3834. VHS CAMCORDER PA I N T G U N S : B i n k s primer, $25. DeVilbiss, 3.2” color LCD monitor, 23.1 power zoom. $50. $30. (360)457-4971. (360)681-8713 PEN: Animal, 8’ x 8’ x 6’, with lockable door, chain WINDSHIELD: Motorcycle windshield. $35. link. $75/obo. (360)417-3507 (360)460-2211 WRENCHES: (2) large PHOTO ALBUM: Victo18” pipe wrenches. $25. rian celluloid cover. $75. (360)457-6845 (360)683-9295

FLOAT TUBE: With fins, POKER CHIPS: With like new. $50. metal case, extra cards. (360)460-2211 $25. (360)683-4856.

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DOWN 1 DVD case promo

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. IT’S SOUR Solution: 10 letters

F P A W F L A V O R A D I S H By Patti Varol

2 Fisherman who supplies a sushi bar 3 Two-wheeler for two 4 Wanted-poster abbr. 5 Indian princes 6 “__ run!”: “Time for me to leave!” 7 Play-__: kids’ clay 8 Marine eagle 9 Not cooked 10 Sarge’s superior 11 Pro or con, in a debate 12 Guinness of “Star Wars” 13 Actress Daly 19 “__ upon a midnight dreary ...” 21 Wee bit 24 Ouzo flavoring 25 American or World follower, in school 26 Bygone gas station 27 “__ my heart in ...” 30 Pattern-seeking information analysis 31 With, to François 32 “Speak” response 33 Ahab or America: Abbr.

6/17/13

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Space saucers, briefly 35 Money, in slang 37 __ diminishing returns 39 Not new 40 “Pick someone else, pleeease?” 45 Hand over 46 Old German leader 48 Collected, as downed leaves

MISC: Dining sets; Glass tops, 1 dark Chippendale, $150, 1 light ash, needs minor repair,. $100. Large oil painting by Daniels, The Musicians, 4x6’, beautifully framed, $1,500. (360)683-2338

MOVING: Sleep Number adjustable foundation, split king, with massage and mattress, $2,000 will separate. Pier 1 coffee table, black/glass, $40. M a t c h i n g l a m p t a bl e, $15. Bicycle, $40. 3 black armoire/cabinets, $50 ea. Mirrors, $10$20. 2 small bistro tables with chairs, $25 ea. S t a n d i n g l a m p, $ 2 0 . (360)477-8311.

S H OT G U N : L e feve r double-barrel shotgun. 12 ga., 30” full and modified, excellent b o r e s , t i g h t a s n e w. $400/obo. (360)681-4188

SEQUIM: Office/retail space 850 sf. $800 mo. (360)460-5467

6005 Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE: Antique Oak English Wardrobe/Armoire, excellent condition. $495/obo. Call (360)582-9782

6035 Cemetery Plots BURIAL SPACES Three prime adjoining, in the beautiful Garden of Devotion; Mt. Angeles Memorial Park. $1,900 each. (206)322-0665.

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment TRACTOR: ‘52 Ferguson. 6-way back blade, scraper box, and ripper t o o t h , g o o d r u n n e r. $2,500. (360)710-4966.

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

FIREWOOD: 6 cord special, $895. Limited time only! 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

6100 Misc. Merchandise CHINA: Complete set of fine china, service for 12. Pastel, floral pattern $100. (360)683-2338. MISC: 2 BBQ propane tanks, 5 gallon, $20 each. Kids 3-wheel scooter, Radio Flyer, $15. (360)477-8832

BULLDOZER: TD-6 International diesel hybrid. W i d e t ra ck , 9 ’ bl a d e, winch, all in good shape. MISC: (8) Newer vinyl $6,000. (360)457-8824. windows, insulated, variSEMI END-DUMP ous sizes, $20 ea/obo. TRAILER: 30’. Electric 200+ sf, wide southern tar p system, excellent ye l l o w p i n e f l o o r i n g , condition. $6,500/obo. $200. Husqvarna self(360)417-0153 propelled lawnmower, used twice, $175/obo. TREE DELIMBER (360)457-9218 or PTL20 Danzco. Excel(360)775-4581 lent condition, ready to use. $9,500 firm. MISC: Hot tub, needs (360)477-1157 circulating motor, paid $8,000 5 yrs. ago, $985. Electric fireplace, like 6080 Home new, 1500 watt, 110 volt, Furnishings $200. TV cabinet, oak with 2 glass display casBAR: Mediterranean es and 4 drawers, $200. style, por table, wine IRobot vacuum, spare rack and bar glasses. b a t t e r y a n d b r u s h e s, $100. , (1) small free- $100. Electric treadmill standing refrigerator, and exercise machine, $25. (1) refrigerator $ 2 5 0 . C a t s c ra t c h i n g for cabinet, $15. Call t r e e , $ 5 0 . R e c l i n e r, $ 2 0 0 . M i t e r s aw a n d Jodie, stand, $150. Oak kitchen (360)683-2338. upper cabinets, $200. BRASS BEDS: (1) trun- W h e e l b a r r o w , $ 5 0 . dle bed, (1) twin bed. (360)683-4384. Both in excellent condition, and come with mat- MISC: TV, New in box tresses. Trundle has off- Seiki, flat screen, 40” w h i t e s c r o l l wo r k w i t h L C D, H D, $ 2 7 5 / o b o. b ra s s a c c e n t s, $ 2 0 0 . Pool table, regulation Twin is beautiful, brass size, with accessories, has white scrollwor k, $800/obo. Jazzy mobility chair, $300/obo. Work$100. (360)681-2446. suit, Mustang anti-expoFURNITURE: (4) cus- sure flotation, coverall, t o m h a r d - b a c k o a k $200/obo. Playground chairs, upholstered, $99 slide, 16’, fiberglass, each or $350 for four. $200/obo. (360)681-4537 Carved mahogany headboard, full size, $150. MOVING SALE: Moving, Variety of table lamps, Down-Sizing many items from $35 to $50 each. have to go. 42” maple (360)683-4503 drop leaf table with 4 MATTRESS: Temerped- matching chairs and 2 ic Cloud Supreme, Cali- extra leaves near perfect fornia king size, medium condition, $250. 40” oak firm, like new, paid over oval coffee table $100. $2,500 in Aug. 2011, no Generecs 5K generator, frame, selling because $300. Husky Portable air softer mattress is need- compressor, $50. Dolmar chain saw 14” bar, ed. Asking $1,395. $100. All items in excel(360)683-5731 lent condition. Diamond MISC: Ashley bunk bed Point. (360)582-0709. k i t w i t h m a t t r e s s e s , 9 a.m-5 p.m. Cash only. $300. Nice 8 pc living room set, $600. WEDDING DRESS (360)461-6659 Capped sleeve, satin, size 12, white, 10 years EMAIL US AT old, very pretty. $350, classified@peninsula cash only. dailynews.com (360)681-2569

6140 Wanted & Trades

6105 Musical Instruments PLAYER PIANO: Beautiful oak and stained glass player piano, model 9500, with bench. CASINO by Wurlitzer, 120 piano rolls. $2,500. (360)683-7994, msg. YA M A H A D G X 6 2 0 Keyboard. Lightly used Por table Grand with 88 Full size Keys. Incl. stand, bench, AC a d a p t o r, fo o t sw i t c h FC5, music rest, accessor y CD-ROM, Owners Manual +more. $550 See online. (360)343-4052.

6115 Sporting Goods

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central Port Angeles Friends of the Library Bag of Books sale. Thursday June 20th. Fill a bag with as many books as possible and pay only $2. Por t Angeles Library, 2210 Peabody St., 9:30 to 5:30.

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6/17

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: Yesterday's

PUPPIES: Black lab p u p p i e s . Ve r y g o o d hunting stock. (3) males at $250 each. (360)461-1273

9820 Motorhomes

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. (360)452-7870 after 6. MOTORHOME: ‘77 Ford. 27’, A/C, excellent condition. $2,500 firm. (360)457-5649 MOTORHOME: ‘84 30’ Spor tscoach III. 454 eng., rear queen bed, full bath, new convection micro, new fridge, wood cabinets, runs well, clean, 47k miles. $7,900. (360)683-1851 MOTORHOME: ‘88 Champion, 21’. Self-contained, clean, runs good, 70k miles. $3,600. (360)452-4827

7035 General Pets

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: PUPIL ABOVE AUBURN UNLOCK Answer: The hot-air balloon sank after they ran out of fuel, but he had a — BACK-UP PLAN

7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes

MOTORHOME: ‘92 31’ Holiday Ramber. 59,250 7030 Horses mi., Onan generator, oak c a b i n e t s, qu e e n b e d , bathroom separate from HORSE TACK: Western shower, new refrigerator. a n d E n g l i s h s a d d l e s, $9,850. (360)683-4710 $350-$400. Saddle pads, $25-$35. Bridles, $65-75. Halters, $15. Blankets, $45. Etc. 360-379-6688.

BICYCLE: 3-speed, 3 AU S S I E - P O O S : H a l f wheel with large basket. Australian shepherd, half standard poodle, 12 $275. (360)374-5726. weeks old, shots and wo r m e d . G i r l s, $ 3 5 0 . BUYING FIREARMS Boys, $250. Ask for WilAny & All - Top $ Paid liam, (360)561-6916. One or Entire Collection Including Estates CHICKS: Top quality naCall (360)477-9659. tive egg layer chicks. $4, $6, $8, $10. We take KAYAKS: For sale. Ea- your rooster, exchange syRider Eskimo CRX 3G for chick any time. Ferkayaks. 18.6 Ivory with tile eggs available, will g r e e n t r i m , a s k i n g hatch in as early as 3 $3,800. 17 Yellow with days, $4, $2, $1. Jon, (360)809-0780 Orange trim, asking $4,000. Each equipped MINIATURE Dachshund with unused Bat Wing sail, outrigger (10’), lee puppies! Darling Dapb o a r d a n d f u l l s p r ay ples. Companions. $600. skirt. Connects to form Call (360)461-9121. catamaran. M I N I AU S S I E P U P S 360-683-4441 J U S T TO O C U T E ! 3 cuddly boys- two black P I S T O L : S & W . 3 5 7 t r i s, o n e bl u e m e r l e. Magnum, model 586, re- Whelped 3-15, ASDR, volver. L frame, 6” bar- shots, dewormed, health rel, adjustable rear sites. guarantee. Farm raised Beautiful gun. $650 firm. with love. 360-385-1981 (360)681-0309 Port Townsend. R I F L E : B U I LT B Y W E AT H E R B Y. L ove l y. Cal. 378. $1,000. (360)379-4134

ROBWOR

BLUE Ox. aventa 2 tow BOOKS WANTED! We bar never used, $425. SS 22.5” wheelcovers, love books, we’ll buy 150. (360)582-9983. yours. 457-9789.

SCANOE: 16’ with oars, e x c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n , WANTED: Adult Electric tricycle. $500. (360)683-0626. (360)683-2259 UTILITY TRAILER: 1964 with new tires and 6135 Yard & tags. 9.5x6.5 wide. ReGarden movable sides. $$600/ obo. 683-0763. TOP SOIL: Free delivery U T I L I T Y T R A I L E R : 2 in P.A. $20 yd, lawn/garaxles, with sides, electric den ready. 452-1010 or (360)460-1032. brakes. $800/obo. (360)460-1870

6/17/13

49 Chip-making giant 50 Greeted with enthusiasm 51 Toaster waffles 52 Skier’s transport 53 Guideline 54 Business maj.’s focus 58 Sugar meas. 59 Fib 60 Keogh plan relative: Abbr. 61 Apple dessert

FIREWOOD For Sale. Ready to burn fir, maple, and hemlock mix. Cut to an average length of 16” for only $165 a cord. Free delivery inside of Port Angeles out of town extra. please call leave message at (360)477-2258

S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h Ave., Boardwalk Square. (360)683-3256

www.wonderword.com

L D U E I E N T D E M A E M A

Acidic, Bread, Cabbage, Cheese, Cherries, Cider, Citrus, Cocktails, Cocoa, Cream, Dough, Fermented, Flavor, Grapefruit, Grass, Kiwi, Kumquat, Lemon, Lime, Margarita, Martini, Mash, Melon, Milk, Mustard, Orange, Pickles, Pineapple, Plum, Products, Pungent, Quark, Radish, Salt, Sauces, Sharp, Soup, Syrup, Tamarinds, Taste, Tupelo, Wine, Yeast Yesterday’s Answer: Networks

BOLBY

WANTED: Room to rent i n P. A . Fe m a l e, n o n smoker with own furniture. (360)460-7118.

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

E O O U C I P E L A M L E I T

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

6115 Sporting Goods

6075 Heavy Equipment

P R D U R U T P R A K L U L A

DEICH

6100 Misc. Merchandise

CAMERON U PICK STRAWBERRIES Open June 12 683-5483

© 2013 Universal Uclick

U P A A N N P G R C O R I K S

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

6080 Home Furnishings

L I G H T I n d u s t . W. o f PA, 2 spaces avail at 1 9 2 1 W. H w y 1 0 1 : (1) 4,000 sf., with offices, restroom, 3 phase p ow e r, wa t e r, c o m pressed air, basic heat in shop area. $2,100/mo., (2) 2700 sf., with office, 3 phase p ow e r, wa t e r, c o m p r e s s e d a i r, b a s i c shop heat. $1,300. Adjoining space can be rented for a total 4,700 sf space for $2,000. Call (360)417-1828 for appt. to view.

E T A S E M M G E E R A I A P ‫ ګ‬T L I ‫ګ‬ U N ‫ګ‬ M I ‫ګ‬ D C O A U M E T

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market

T N R N I N B C H E E S E C Q

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

1163 Commercial Rentals

T E I T I T I U R F E P A R G

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Phi __ Kappa 5 Legislative addendum 10 Future atty.’s exam 14 Security problem 15 Greek marketplace 16 Opposite of dry, as skin 17 Radius neighbor 18 Longtime UCLA coach known as the “Wizard of Westwood” 20 Caught __handed 21 Used a stool 22 Family reunion attendee 23 Cracks a little joke to ease tension, say 28 6, on a cellphone button 29 Theater walkway 30 Blot gently 33 Picasso’s movement 36 Chicago-toAtlanta dir. 37 Volcanic overflow 38 One no longer in his comfort zone 41 Pig in a __ 42 Baja bear 43 Hitting sound 44 Mao __-tung 45 Attorney general’s intern 47 __ Kippur 48 Command sequence before shooting 52 Bald tire’s lack 55 Suffix with salt 56 Henpeck 57 Once-in-a-lifetime agenda, or an apt description of the ends of 18-, 23-, 38- and 48-Across 61 Half of table tennis? 62 Burn balm 63 “Yes __!” 64 Avid about 65 Tear to shreds 66 Oyster bead 67 Self-perceptions

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013 B7

MOTORHOME: ‘94 Fleetwood Tioga. 21’, class C, 122,300 mi., new Ford 460 engine, exhaust system and manifold headers, 114,150 mi. New rear tires, 115,116 mi., new “ O p t i m a ” AG M h o u s e batteries (3) on 8/14/12. Fully equipped and always garaged. Must see! $11,500. (360)683-2925 or (360)460-5016 MOTORHOME: Dodge ‘76 Class C. 26’, good c o n d . , n ew t i r e s, l ow miles, nonsmoker, in PA. $5,000 firm. 460-7442.

9802 5th Wheels

9829 RV Spaces/ Storage

5TH WHEEL: 26’ Alpenlite. New fridge/freezer, SEQUIM AREA: Full toilet, A/C, micro, dual hookup, TV, internet. batteries and propane $350. (360)460-5435. tank, nice stereo, queen air adustable bed, awn9050 Marine ing, all in good condition, Miscellaneous clean and ready to go. $3,850/obo. Leave message at (360)452-4790. BAYLINER: ‘03 17.5’. 3.0L MerCruiser Alpha 1 5TH WHEEL: 30’ Cross- $5,900. (360)808-3136. roads Patriot upgrade model, used twice over- BAYLINER: 17’, 70 hp night, immaculate, tow- Yamaha, needs some able with half ton. Below engine work but runs. book value at $38,750 $1,500. (360)460-9365. includes slider hitch. 683-5682 or BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, 541-980-5210 trailer, 140 hp motor. $4,980. (360)683-3577. 5TH WHEEL: ‘94 27’ Coachman Catalina. CANOE: 13’, square Great cond., single slide, stern, Old Town, excellenew tires. $3,900/obo. nt. $600. (360)797-1771. (360)417-8840 COLUMBIA: ‘75 14’. 15 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 6 2 6 ’ HP O.B., trolling motor, 9832 Tents & Jayco Eagle. Clean con- many extras, 1981 traildition. $4,500. Travel Trailers er. $580/obo. Will con(360)452-1646 sider a 30-06 rifle or fireCAMPER TRAILER: ‘80 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ Al- wood splitter in trade. Holiday Rambler, Presi- pen Lite, single slide, (360)912-1783 dential 28’. New fridge l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t CRAB POTS: Commerand furnace. $3,500. shape. $11,500/obo. cial style. $30-$40. (360)928-9436 (615)330-0022 (360)912-0192 or (360)683-7342 TRAILER: ‘06 23’ Kom- KOMFORT: 1997 23F fort. Loaded, immculate, 5th Wheel. Great condiDEATH TAKES OWNsmooth sides, 1 slide- tion, New tires, water out, $19,000 new. Sell pump (2012) 2 skylights ER OF FISHING BOAT 20 ft. Robolo Boat,Cenfor $12,000/obo. 2 twi n b e d s, Aw n i n g , t e r C o u n s e l , w i t h 4 (360)797-1771 Purchase option of de- stroke 115 Yamaha Moluxe hitch, Chev PU tailTRAILER: 24’ Nomad gate, 1000 Trails Mem- tor, has 400 hrs. on it. Lite. Loaded, front walk bership, Por table grey Electronics, trailer, (gal i va n i z e d ) d u a l a xe l , around bed, rear bath, water tank. $5,500. many extras. $23,500 a i r, m i c r o, d u a l t a n k , (360)683-4552 takes all. 800-619-8723. dual battery, front/rear entry, exellent. $9,500. 9808 Campers & G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n (360)457-6372 cr uiser, flying br idge, Canopies single Cummins diesel TRAILER: ‘90 27’ Hi-Lo. G o o d s h a p e. $ 2 , 0 0 0 / CAMPER: ‘11 10’ Alas- engine, low hours, radar, obo. (360)683-8059. kan cab-over. Original VHF radio, CB, depth/ owner, excellent cond. f i s h f i n d e r , d i n g h y, downriggers, 16’x32’ $9,000. (360)452-8968. boathouse. $27,500. 9802 5th Wheels CANOPY: Fits ‘80-’97 (360)457-0684 full size Ford, fiberglass. JET SKI: Kawasaki STX $100. (360)452-5803. 12F, 3 seater, ‘06, excel5TH WHEEL: ‘00 35’ lent condition, trailer. Alfa Ideal. 3 slides, $6,200. (360)460-2689. with awnings, 2 a/c, excellent cond., must LONESTAR: 17’, 100 hp see! $20,000/obo. Johnson motor, 9.5 kick(360)683-2529 er, motor in great shape, g a l va n i ze d E Z - l o a d e r t r a i l e r, d e p t h f i n d e r, $2,500. (360)928-9436.

RV: 3 8 ’ RV a n d To w C a r. 2 0 0 1 N ew m a r Mountainaire and a 2009 Honda CRV tow car offered together or separa t e l y. T h e R V h a s 61,400 miles on a gas driven Trident V10 with a Banks system added. The interior is dark cherr y wood with corian counter tops. The RV is in very good condition. We just returned from a trip to Arizona which was trouble free. The CRV tow car is in excellent condition with 47,000 miles. Asking $35,000 for the RV and $20,000 for the CRV or $53,000 together. Please call Bill or Kathy at (360)582-0452 to see the vehicles.

5TH WHEEL: $13,750 /obo cash only, must sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ Lots of extras, lamin a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 slideouts, clean, comfor table, queen bed, central vac & more! Come see in Sekiu. Text/call 582-7130.

PRICED TO GO! 1990 Fleetwood 34’ motorhome. Good condition, low milage, nonsmoker, 454 Chev with B a n k s P o w e r P a c k , 5th WHEEL: 19’ AlpenOnan generator. Steal at lite. No leaks. $3,295. (360)775-1288 $4,995. See at 1638 W 12th. (360)452-9611. 5TH WHEEL: Fleetwood ‘98 Wilderness. Hitch inWA N T E D : C l a s s A cluded, 24L5C, clean, m o t o r h o m e. A p p r ox smoke-free, 1 slide, full 26’-32’, Vortec engine, bath, A/C, elec. jacks. slide. (360)631-9211. $5,195. (360)452-7967.

LANCE Lite: 2003 845 Truck Camper. Great condition-used twice. Roof air, queen bed, d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o bed. Shwr stall/pan full h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. Lots of storage. Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. Call (360)681-0172

LUND: WC-12 boat, Merc 15 HP Extras Bought new. $1800. (360)582-9983 MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, I/O . Needs work. $1,500. (360)461-2056

NORDIC: 11’ sailing dinghy. Stored many yrs. Near new cond. $1,950. (360)457-3903

PACKAGE: ‘85 Dodge 350 and 11.5’ self con- OUTBOARD MOTOR: 5 tained camper. HP Mercur y, excellent $1,900. (360)457-1153. cond., never used in salt water. $575. Visit our website at (360)452-3613 www.peninsula S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e dailynews.com Or email us at tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 classified@ HP motor, exceptionally peninsula clean. $3,950. dailynews.com (360)477-7068


Classified

B8 Monday, June 17, 2013 9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9805 ATVs

SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C with sails and new 8 hp engine, sleeps 4, toilet/sink. $4,500/obo. (360)808-7913 SAILBOAT: ‘83 14’ fiberglass Omega. Open. $600/obo. 417-3959. SEA RAY: ‘74 24’ HT Cruiser. Reconditioned/ e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / rough weather fishing/ cruising with ALL NEW equipment and features: repowered w/ Merc Horizon Engine/Bravo-3 (dual prop), stern drive (117 hrs.), complete Garmin electronics, reinforced stern, full canvas, downriggers, circ water heating, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, EZ Load trailer, w/disk brakes (1,200 mi.), electric winch. Other extras, $52,000 invested. Sacrifice for $18,500. (360)681-5070 SILVERLINE: 17’ 1979 85 HP Evenr ude on 2 0 0 1 E Z - l o a d t ra i l e r. only used in fresh water $1800/obo. (360)460-2406

SUZUKI: ‘05 LT-Z 250 Quadspor t ATV. Excellent condition. About 20 hours run time with Big Gun exhaust K & N air filter. Sport quad white with blue frame. $1,995. (360)460-0405.

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

AMC: Rare 1970 AMX 2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd, 95% original. $18,000/ obo. (360)928-9477.

CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonSLICKCRAFT: 1976 23’ smoker, gold, 76K mi. inboard/outboard. 302 $4,850. (360)928-9724. engine, boat and trailer. CHEV: ‘56 Belair. 6 cyl., $5,200. (360)457-8190. auto, 4 door, paint, inTRAILER: EZ Loader, terior, chrome, re-done tandem axle, 22-24’. to stock, California car, $1,250. (360)460-9680. 2nd owner, always garaged. $21,000. (360)683-7789

9817 Motorcycles

C H E V: ‘ 7 9 C o r ve t t e . L82, runs great, lots of APRILIA: Scarabeo mo- new parts! $6,000/obo. torcycle/scooter 2009. (360)457-6540 This is a pristine motorcycle with less then LASALLE: 1938 472 1000 miles on it! Hardly C a d . w i t h t 4 0 0 , d i s c u s e d ! N O T A S R . brakes. Hot rod project. S C O O T E R ! 5 0 0 C C s New glass, pr imered. Needs a battery charge. $5,700/obo. (360)504-2583 $3600/obo. (360)808-6160 MUSTANG: 1991 h/b. BMW: ‘74 R75/6. Air- 5.0 5-sp leather, PS, pb, head Boxer, excellent pdl, CD 91k, new tires, condition, 29K mi., new rotors. $3,800. James, (360)504-2583 powder coat, shocks, always garaged. $3,500/ ROLLS ROYCE: 1970 obo. (360)912-2679. Silver Shadow. Blue with B M W : ‘ 9 9 K 1 2 0 0 R S . red and tan leather. Algaraged. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 w a y s miles. Throttlemiester. $7,500/obo. James, (360)504-2583 BMW touring hard cases. Corbin saddle. BMW a f t e r m a r k e t a l a r m . 9292 Automobiles $9,000. Others Goldspace@msn.com (425)508-7575 BUICK: ‘01 Regal TourDIRTBIKE: Honda ‘04 ing. 107+K mi. $3,000/ C R F 1 0 0 . L o o k s a n d obo. (702)366-4727. runs great. $750/obo. CHEV: ‘96 Lumina LS 4 (360)670-5282 DR. V6, 115k. See at GOLDWING: ‘90 1500. 101/Mt. Pleasant, P.A. Runs great, well main- $1,975. (360)457-0311. tained. $3,000. CHEVROLET ‘02 IMPA(360)461-2619 LA LS SEDAN HARLEY: ‘05 Dyna Cus- 3.8L series II V6, Automatic, alloys, new tires, tom. Low mi., upgrades. $8,000/obo. Call before sunroof, rear spoiler, keyless, PW/DL/MR, 4:30 (360)460-7777. leather pwr seats, HARLEY Davidson: ‘97 cr uise, tilt, A/C, dual 1 2 0 0 S p o r t . R e d a n d zone climate control, inBlack, 15K miles, new formation center, onstar, tires and battery, custom dual front airbags. Only painted tank, extra tank, 7 , 0 0 0 o r i g i n a l m i l e s ! 4 extra seats, lots of Clean Carfax! This Imchrome, blinkers integral pala is in like new condiin mirrors, detachable tion inside and out! You sissy bar, custom fen- won’t find one nicer than der, 2 into 1 exhaust, ad- this! Loaded with leather justable shocks. Have and all the options! Why o r i g i n a l p a r t s t o o . buy new when you can $4,250. (360)460-7893 find one with this low of H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only miles? Come see the 500 ever made. 33.4k Peninsula’s most trusted original miles, too much auto dealer for over 50 to list. Call for details. years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,000 to loving home. $11,995 (360)460-8271 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 HONDA: ‘00 XR100R. graymotors.com Excellent cond., low miles. $1000/obo. C H RY SLER: ‘02 PT (360)477-9777 Cruiser LTD. Silver. 93K. HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. $4,500/obo. 457-0238. Excellent shape. $2,900. C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 3 P T (360)461-3415 C r u i s e r. 1 1 5 k m i l e s , Shar p and well mainHONDA: 2003 VT750 A c e D e l u xe C r u i s e r. tained. $4,250. (360)796-4270 Showroom Condition Must see. Lots of CHRYSLER: 2002 LTD Chrome, Many Extras. Will not find another bike PT Cruiser. 78k miles l i k e t h i s . N e v e r l e f t New battery. Black with o u t , n e v e r d r o p p e d . c h r o m e t r i m , ex t r a s . 1 0 , 3 8 7 L o w M i l e s Moonroof, great stereo and a gas to drive. too $4,500. (360)477-6968. much fun in the sun! HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing One owner who loved it! A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , $5500/obo. (360)808-6160 black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153. DODGE: ‘00 Intrepid. 115k, 28 mpg, front MOTOR SCOOTER 2008 Jetmoto, 50cc, 350 wheel drive, new tires and chains. $3,500/obo. miles, like new. $650. (360)379-8755 (360)681-7560

SCOOTER: 2007 Roketa Bali 250 Scooter. Fun and economical, 60 mpg. Original owner selling. 1055 miles on it. This bike gets up and goes! Includes helmet and gloves. (360)374-6787 SUZUKI: ‘08 V-Strom 650. Like new condition. 7 9 5 0 m i l e s. N o A B S. $5,750/obo. Scott (360)461-7051 YAMAHA: ‘74 DT360. 4k original miles, runs good, amazing cond. $2,500/obo. 452-7253. YAMAHA: ‘77 TT500. Custom and spare parts. $1000/obo. (360)477-4007 YAMAHA: ‘79 XS 1100. 35K, fairing, saddle bags excellent cond. $1,650/ obo. (360)808-1922 or (360)681-3023 after 6.

9805 ATVs HONDA: TRX200 4WD ATV. $600. (360)477-6547 QUAD: 90 cc Eton. 2 s t r o ke, l i ke n ew. R e duced $1,300. 452-3213

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

CHEV: ‘76 1-Ton Dually. 100k miles, runs good. $400. (360)457-4383 .

FORD: ‘93 Explorer XLT. 4x4 auto, dark green, tan interior, looks great, runs great, 116K orig. mi., new front suspens i o n , n ew t ra n s, n ew brakes/wheel bearings, new head gaskets/timing chain, new rocker arms/ push rods, new radiator. $4,900. (360)457-3744.

TOYOTA: ‘92 4Runner. 4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, 199,500 mi., fair to good cond. $1,950. 461-0054.

KIA ‘05 SPECTRA EX 4 DR 1 ow n e r, w i t h o n l y 83,000 miles. 4 cyl, 5 speed, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM/CD, power sunr o o f, t i n t e d w i n d ow s, r e a r s p o i l e r, a l l oy wheels, remote entr y and more! Extra clean and only $6,995. VIN#154232 Expires 06/22/13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear axle, 3’ deck with 13’ dump bed, 70 gal. diesel tank. $2,000/obo. (360)457-4521 or 477-3964 after 6 p.m. CHEV: ‘81 3+3. Dump b ox , 4 W D, 4 5 4 a u t o. $3,000/obo. 460-6176. CHEV: ‘88 Dually. Crew cab. $1,500. (360)477-1761

CHEVROLET: ‘03 Silverado HD crew cab LS. 4 wheel drive, Truck has 158,xxx miles. $10,5000. KIA 2010 SOUL + (360)461-4847 The name says it all. Youthful, distinctively CHEVY ‘05 SILVERAstyled unique looks, with DO LT K2500HD many features at an afCREWCAB SB 4X4 fordable price. You get 6.0L Vor tec V8, auto, that soulful feeling cruis- l o a d e d ! W h i t e ex t i n ing down the road, lis- great cond! Black leather tening to the rich sound int in excel shape! Dual system equipped with pwr htd seats, 6 Disk CD S i r i u s s a t e l l i t e ra d i o, with Bose, dual climate, Bluetooth and steering OnStar, cruise, tilt with wheel audio controls. cont, prem alloys, and Yo u c a n c h a n g e t h e m u c h m o r e ! W e ’ r e tunes with fingertip con- $ 5 , 0 0 0 b a c k o f K B B trols. All of the above an atour No Haggle price of over 30 mpg to boot. only 38K miles. $17,995! $14,900 Carpenter Auto Center Preview at: 681-5090 heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors DODGE: ‘06 Ram. 111 E. Front, P.A. Manual, 59k miles, ex(360)912-3583 cellent cond., reg. cab. $9,800. (360)477-6149. MITSUBISHI: ‘03 E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t cond., 188k miles. $5,700. (360)460-2536.

NISSAN: ‘89 300 ZX. Red. V6. Automatic. Ttop. Many new par ts. $4,500/obo. (360)681-3579 PONTIAC: ‘03 Bonneville SSEi. Great-riding car, 90k miles, power everything, always garaged. $7,000/obo. (360)809-0356 PONTIAC ‘06 G6 GTP CPE V6, 6 speed, A/C, tilt w h e e l , c r u i s e, p wo e r windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, power sunroof, l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r, w i t h heated seats, AM/FM/CD, premium alloy wheels, and more! One week special at only $7,995. VIN#151869 Expires 06/22/13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

DODGE: ‘99 Ram 4X4 Flatbed tr uck. Low miles, recent oil change, transmission flush and filter changes. 3/4 ton 360 engine. call 461-4151. Photos available by request. Price reduced to $3500/obo.

FORD: ‘00 F250 Sup e r C a b. Au t o 2 W D, 147K miles, tow package, power seat and windows, power sunroof, sliding rear glass window. Recent tune up and underbody spray treatment. $5,500/obo. (360)504-0300 F O R D : ‘ 0 0 R a n g e r. 4WD, 4 door, on road/off road, 79,000 mi., $8,500. 360-683-8392.

P O R C H E : ‘ 8 8 9 4 4 . 1 FORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, owner, 129,500 mi. , ex- matching canopy, good cellent condition. $6,995. running. $6,500. 1-360-269-1208 or (360)452-4890 1-360-269-1030 SATURN: ‘07 Aura. Low FORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. mi. $8,000. Matching canopy. (360)796-4762 $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 SCION: ‘08 XB. 40K, ex- or 1-3601269-1030. cellent. $12,500. FORD: ‘88 3/4 ton. Runs (360)928-3669 good. $1,000. (360)775-9669 TOYOTA ‘10 COROLLA LE Very economical 1.8 liter 4-cyl, auto, A/C, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, only 38,000 miles, very very clean 1-owner factor y lease return, non-smoker, balance of factor y 5/60 warranty, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. E.P.A. rated 26 city / 34 hwy. mpg. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

TOYOTA ‘12 CAMRY LE Very economical 2.5 liter 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, bluet o o t h , key l e s s e n t r y, power window,locks and seat, side airbags, only 16,000 miles, balance of factor y 3/36 and 5/60 warranty. beautiful 1o w n e r, n o n - s m o k e r, spotless “Autocheck” veFORD: ‘90 Taurus Wag- hicle history report. near on. Runs fine, body OK, new condition. has some issues. $18,995 $850. (360)457-4399. REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 FORD: ‘94 Crown Vicreidandjohnson.com toria. New tires, good shape. $2,500. TOYOTA ‘87 SUPRA (360)928-9920 6 c y l , a u t o, A / V, t i l t HONDA: ‘06 Accord LX. w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r V6, 49K. orig. owner, re- windows, locks, mirrors, seat, AM/FM/CD, alloy cent maint. $12,500. wheels and more. Only (360)417-8859 $3,495. VIN#042585 HONDA: ‘07 Civic HyExpires 06/22/13 brid. $9,000. Dave Barnier (425)508-7575 Auto Sales L I N C O L N : ‘ 8 8 To w n *We Finance In House* C a r. C o z y 2 0 M P G . 452-6599 Runs great. Good body davebarnier.com and interior with some 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA rust spots. Good tires. Brakes redone. All acVOLVO ‘99 S70 AWD cessories work, includSEDAN i n g A / C, 1 3 0 k m i l e s. 95k orig mi! 2.4L DOHC $1,500 or best offer. Call 5cyl turbo, auto, loaded! (360)683-1683 Gray met ext in great shape! Black leather int Write ads that get in great cond! Pwr seat, RESULTS dual htd seats, CD/Cass, moon roof, side airbags, Description cruise, tilt, climate, wood Description trim, alloy wheels with Description 80% rubber! 2 owner! Real clean low mileage Let your potential Volvo at our No Haggle buyer get a price of only mental picture $5,995! of your item Carpenter Auto Center OR 681-5090 add a picture to your ad! VW: 1973 Beetle. $2,250/obo. Classified (360)477-3725 customers are smart consumers. VW: ‘66 Bug. Excellent The ones with shape. $5,000. money call the (360)457-7022 good ads first!

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Peninsula Daily News

VW: ‘72 Super Beetle. Great shape. $2,300/ obo. (360)809-3656. VW: ‘74 Classic conver tible Super Beetle. $9,500/obo. Call after 6 p.m. (360)460-2644.

FORD: ‘95 F-150. Matching canopy, bedliner, 92k, clean. $5,000. (360)452-1646 FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. 6 cylinder, manual transmission, 2 WD, clean, runs great. 153,000 miles. Has new tires, Tonneau cover. Call (360)477-4195 FORD: ‘98 F150. Rims, tinted, black, extended cab. Quick sale. $2,075/obo. 460-0518. FORD ‘98 F150 XLT SUPERCAB LB 4X4 149k orig mi! 5.4L Triton V8, auto. 2 tone green/silver ext in great shape! Gray cloth int in great cond! Pwr seat, 6 disk CD with Cass, cruise, tilt, A/C, dual airb a g s , t o w, r u n n i n g boards, bed liner, canopy! Nearly $3,000 less than KBB at our No Haggle price of only $5,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

GMC ‘96 SIERRA 1500 EXTENDED CAB Z71 4X4 5.7L (350) vortec V8, automatic, alloys, running boards, tow package, bedliner, toolbox, tinted windows, PW/DL/MR, cruise, tilt, A/C, CD, drivers airbag. Only 117,000 original miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Tried and true 350 Vortec V8 engine! Eaton G80 Locking Rear Differential! They just don’t make them like this anymore! You won’t find a more solid, dependable, and red-blooded American truck than the Chevy/GMC K1500! Come s e e t h e Pe n i n s u l a ’s truck dealer for over 50 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

9730 Vans & Minivans Others

CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. CARGO van. Only 13K FORD: ‘95 Bronco 4X4. orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. Good rubber, runs great, $8,800. (360)457-3903. 139k. $4,500/obo. (360)457-9148 CHEVROLET ‘10 G1500 EXPRESS AWD CARGMC ‘99 YUKON SLT GO VAN 4X4 6 PASSENGER 99 GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 5.3 liter V8, auto, A/C, 6 passenger, 125k orig “All Wheel Drive”, cruise, mi! 5.7L Vortec V8, auto, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power loaded! Dk met red ext windows, locks and seat, i n g r e a t s h a p e ! Ta n power heated outside leather int in great cond! mirrors, security sys., P w r s e a t , C D / C a s s , s a fe t y bu l k h e a d , b i n cruise, tilt, A/C, pri glass, p a c k a g e , s e c u r i t y roof rack, barn doors, screens, side airbags, tow, 16” alum wheels! beautiful, black , 1-ownR e a l c l e a n 2 o w n e r er corporate lease reYukon at our No Haggle turn, non-smoker, spotprice of only less “Autocheck” vehicle $4,995! history report. this is a Carpenter Auto Center ver y nice and unique 681-5090 cargo, a proud addition to your business. $14,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MAZDA ‘99 B300 4X4 Oly 99,000 miles, V6, a u t o, A / C, t i l t w h e e l , cruise, AM/FM/CD, rear slider, spray-on liner, tool box, alloy wheels and more! Only $6,995. VIN#MO9633 Expires 06/22/13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 ISUZU: ‘01 Rodeo LS. davebarnier.com Looks good runs great! 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA Under 78,000 original PAC K AG E : ‘ 8 5 C h ev miles. Black with gray interior. Power locks, wintruck, ‘85 Lance camper. dows and driver seat, $3,000. (360)417-0951. p r e m i u m s o u n d , A / C, tow package. Original owner. $7000/obo. 9556 SUVs (360)912-2296 Others

LINCOLN: ‘04 Navigat o r. 9 5 k , AW D, 4 X 4 , leather, seats 7 comfortably, good family vehicle, new compressor and tabs, 6 disc changer and Bose sound syster m, ver y reliable. $12,000/obo. DODGE: ‘01 Durango (360)460-5421 S LT. N e w t i r e s . $4,800/obo. 683-0763. MITSUBISHI ‘011 ENDEAVOR LS F O R D : ‘ 0 2 E x p l o r e r 3.8 liter V6, auto, all XLT. Runs good. $2,700 wheel drive, A/C, cruise, firm. (360)504-5664. tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, priFORD: ‘04 Explorer. Ex- v a c y g l a s s , l u g g a g e cellent condition, new rack, alloy wheels, side tires/brakes, all power, a i r b a g s, o n l y 3 2 , 0 0 0 trailer hitch, 102K mi. miles, balance of factory $7,000. (360)683-5494. 3/36 and 5/60 warranty, non-smoker, like new 1F O R D: ‘ 8 7 B r o n c o I I . owner, spotless “Auto4x4. $1,500. 1-360-269- check” vehicle histor y 1208 or 1-360-269-1030. report. these are one of the best buys in a SUV. SEE THE MOST shop and compare at CURRENT REAL $17,995 ESTATE LISTINGS: REID & JOHNSON www.peninsula MOTORS 457-9663 dailynews.com reidandjohnson.com C H E V: ‘ 0 1 B l a z e r. 4 door, clean inside/out, overdrive, good rubber, 4WD, auto, seats fold down, r uns great, air bags, A/C. $3,000. (360)417-0277 by appt.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County NO. 13 4 00194 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In the Matter of the Estate of: DOROTHY EILEEN WASANKARI, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against he decedent must, before the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative, or the personal representative’s attorney, at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 17, 2013. Personal Representative: Douglas A. Wasankari Attorney for Personal Representative: Joseph B. Wolfley Address for Mailing or Service: 713 E. First St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Dated: 5/11/13 Douglas A. Wasankari, Personal Representative WOLFLEY & WOLFLEY, P.S. By Joseph B. Wolfley, WSBA #44782 Attorney for Petitioner Pub: June 17, 24, July 1, 2013 Legal No. 489430 NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for: The improvement of various County roads with the installation of new guardrail and other related work.

FORD: ‘99 14’ box truck. Complete plans and specifications may be obtained Diesel, 133k, good truck. from the office of the Public Works Department, Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, $7,800. (360)452-4738. WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions reFORD RANGER XLT garding this project may be directed to Ray BradSUPER CAB 2WD ford at (360) 417-2530 or Joe Donisi at (360) 417PICKUP 2404. 3.0L V6, automatic, new tires, bedliner, rear slid- The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outer, cruise, tilt, A/C, cas- side of the envelope, “BID PROPOSAL - COUNTYsette, dual front airbags. WIDE SAFETY PROJECT CRP C1223”. Address O n l y 4 2 , 0 0 0 o r i g i n a l bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commismiles! That is not a typo, sioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA this Ranger is in like new 98362-3015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room c o n d i t i o n ! E x t r e m e l y 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents declean inside and out! livered to other offices and received late by the Shows the very best in Commissioners’ Office will not be considered nor care! Find out why these will bids received by facsimile or e-mail. were the best selling small pickup all the way Clallam County will determine the lowest responup until Ford stopped sible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam making them! Now that County Code Section 3.12.080 and reserves the you can’t buy a new one, right to reject any and all bids and to waive inforwhy not choose a very malities in the process or to accept the bid which in gently used one? Come its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam s e e t h e Pe n i n s u l a ’s County. truck experts for over 50 years! Stop by Gray Mo- Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the tors today! Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. $6,995 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal GRAY MOTORS Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle 457-4901 A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscriminagraymotors.com tion in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 The attached contract plans, these contract providoor, low miles 82,400. sions and the Standard Specifications for the Extended warranty. 6’ above-described project are hereby bed. Excellent Condition. G o o d T i r e s . To w i n g APPROVED THIS fourth DAY OF June, 2013 Package. V6 4 liter. Bed BOARD OF Tool Box. $17,900. CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS (360)504-2374 Michael C. Chapman, Chair ATTEST: M A Z DA : ‘ 8 4 P i c k u p. Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Runs good, low miles. $1,200. (360)452-5126. Pub: June 7, 11, 17 2013 Legal No. 487444

FORD: ‘91 Van. Wheelchair lift, 97k miles, engine purrs. $3,800. (360)681-5383

FULL SIZE VANS Chevrolet Express 12 passenger (2 available), Chevrolet Express 3500 C a r g o ( 1 a va i l a b l e ) , Dodge 2500 Cargo (2 Available). We recently made a bulk purchase of Full-Size vans. Whether you need passenger or cargo vans, we have you covered. Call or stop by Gray Motors for more details. $CALL$ GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com GMC: ‘75 Van Dura. 1 ton dually, 10’, box van. walk-through, radials, runs and drives, insulated, shelves and bench. $650. (360)379-6456.

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County

S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Laura Jane Browning, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00208-6 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 10, 2013 Personal Representative: Constance Denise Graham Attorney for Personal Representative: Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 13-4-00208-6 Pub: June 10, 17, 24, 2013 Legal No. 487343

NO. 13-4-00171-3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In the Matter of the Estate of: ADELINE E. SMITH, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against he decedent must, before the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative, or the personal representative’s attorney, at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 17, 2013. Personal Representative: Douglas A. Wasankari Attorney for Personal Representative: Theresa Parker Address for Mailing or Service: 713 E. First St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Dated: Theresa Parker, Personal Representative WOLFLEY & WOLFLEY, P.S. By Joseph B. Wolfley, WSBA #44782 Attorney for Petitioner Pub: June 17, 24, July 1, 2013 Legal No. 489431

File No.: 7037.94488 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Michael Ray Dunn, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1170914 Tax Parcel ID No.: 1328-03-129000 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 1 SP 18/62, PTN GOC LOT 3 & SW4NE4 S3-T28N-R13WWM Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telep h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On June 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Dunn Short Plat, recorded September 26, 1988 in Volume 18 of Short Plats, Page 62, under Clallam County Recording No. 608430, being a Short Plat of Lot 6 of Palmer Tracts Survey Recorded in Volume 6 of Surveys, Page 48, being a portion of Government Lot 3 and the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 3, Township 28 North, Range 13 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1209 Palmers Road Forks, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/29/05, recorded on 12/08/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1170914, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Michael Ray Dunn and Betty L. Dunn, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Onestop Signing Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Chase Bank USA, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Chase Bank USA, N.A. to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121280327. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/13/2013 Monthly Payments $60,735.33 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,906.12 Total Arrearage $63,641.45 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $506.25 Statutory Mailings $65.90 Recording Costs $16.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $25,105.87 Total Costs $25,764.02 Total Amount Due: $89,405.47 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $358,778.80, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 05/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 28, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Michael Ray Dunn 1209 Palmers Road Forks, WA 98331 Michael Ray Dunn PO Box 1834 Forks, WA 98331 Betty L. Dunn 1209 Palmers Road Forks, WA 98331 Betty L. Dunn PO Box 1834 Forks, WA 98331 Michael Ray Dunn Rt. 3 Box 3344 Forks, WA 98331 Betty L. Dunn Rt. 3 Box 3344 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael Ray Dunn 1209 Palmers Road Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Betty L. Dunn 1209 Palmers Road Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael Ray Dunn PO Box 1834 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Betty L. Dunn PO Box 1834 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Michael Ray Dunn Rt. 3 Box 3344 Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Betty L. Dunn Rt. 3 Box 3344 Forks, WA 98331 Betty L. Dunn c/o Moore Law Group PC 4248 Galewood Street Lake Oswego, OR 97035 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/23/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/23/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttr ustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/13/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.94488) 1002.223467-File No. Pub: May 27, June 17, 2013 Legal No. 483687


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MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013 B9

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 8701.20101 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Planet Servicing, LLC Grantee: David L. Cooper, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2011-1263067 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043015 330125 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of 15-30-4 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On July 19, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The East half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, EXCEPT the East 168.00 feet of the North 259.29 feet of said East half of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter, Section 15. Commonly known as: 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/11, recorded on 02/18/11, under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1263067, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David L. Cooper, unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, its successors and assigns to Green Planet Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121284206. The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/15/2013 Monthly Payments $10,788.90 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,643.02 Total Arrearage $12,431.92 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $168.75 Recording Costs $14.00 Total Costs $182.75 Total Amount Due: $12,614.67 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $145,914.05, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 19, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David L. Cooper aka David Cooper 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David L. Cooper aka David Cooper 83 Davidson Drive Sequim, WA 98382-7465 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/07/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/07/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/15/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 9 8 0 0 9 - 0 9 9 7 C o n t a c t : N a n c i L a m b e r t ( 4 2 5 ) 5 8 6 - 1 9 0 0 . ( T S # 8701.20101) 1002.244607-File No. Pub: June 17, July 8, 2013 Legal No. 488549

File No.: 7301.28377 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Rick A. Boucher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2010-1259300 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063001-540280 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 28 9/12. Clallam County, Washington. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On June 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 28, Highland Hills Division 1, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page 12, records of Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 1340 Eva Cove Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/31/06, recorded on 11/17/10, under Auditor’s File No. 2010-1259300, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Rick A. Boucher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corp (fka Cendant Mortgage Corp), its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corp (fka Cendant Mortgage Corp), its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1267624. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/19/2013 Monthly Payments $74,516.01 Late Charges $2,905.46 Lender’s Fees & Costs $17,202.08 Total Arrearage $94,623.55 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $472.50 Title Report $634.14 Statutory Mailings $88.36 Recording Costs $79.00 Postings $260.00 Sale Costs $812.24 Total Costs $2,346.24 Total Amount Due: $96,969.79 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $145,128.14, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 28, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Rick A. Boucher 1340 Eva Cove Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Rick A. Boucher 1340 Eva Cover Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/03/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/03/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/19/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.28377) 1002.212261-File No. Pub: May 27, June 17, 2013 Legal No. 483659

File No.: 7021.15579 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Jason D. Dickson, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1180866 Tax Parcel ID No.: 023016510026 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 18 BLK F, 2ND PLAT SUNSHINE ACRES CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On July 19, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 18 in Block F of the Second Plat of Sunshine Acres, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, page 19, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 273 Madrona Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/18/06, recorded on 05/23/06, under Auditor’s File No. 2006 1180866, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Jason D. Dickson, a single individual, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Eagle Home Mortgage, Inc., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012 1278206. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/12/2013 Monthly Payments $19,857.30 Late Charges $718.48 Lender’s Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $20,575.78 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $673.16 Statutory Mailings $21.08 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,778.24 Total Amount Due: $22,354.02 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $167,567.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 19, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/08/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jason D. Dickson 273 Madrona Way Sequim, WA 98382 Jason D. Dickson 2809 North Shian Tacoma, WA 98407-4633 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jason D. Dickson 273 Madrona Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jason D. Dickson 2809 North Shian Tacoma, WA 98407 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/28/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/29/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/12/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.15579) 1002.240712-File No. Pub: June 17, July 8, 2013 Legal No. 488553

File No.: 7314.03480 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RALI 2006-QS18 Grantee: Brian D. Gruendell and Tina L. Gruendell, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20061187918 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033019 650148/21753 Abbreviated Legal: LT 5, BLK 1 SPRAGUES 2ND ADDT. Clallam County, Washington. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On June 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5 in Block 1 of Sprague’s Second Addition to the Town of Sequim, as recorded in Volume 5 of plats, page 74, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 454 West Fir Street Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/15/06, recorded on 09/19/06, under Auditor’s File No. 20061187918, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Brian D. Gruendell and Tina L. Gruendell, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., its sucessors and/or assigns to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RALI 2006-QS18, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1277354. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/19/2013 Monthly Payments $46,931.66 Late Charges $1,868.36 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,648.15 Total Arrearage $50,448.17 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $790.24 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,894.24 Total Amount Due: $52,342.41 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $222,538.30, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 28, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brian Gruendell aka Brian Douglas Gruendell 454 West Fir Street Sequim, WA 98382 Brian Gruendell aka Brian Douglas Gruendell 1032 Desert Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Tina Gruendell aka Tine Lee Gruendell 454 West Fir Street Sequim, WA 98382 Tina Gruendell aka Tine Lee Gruendell 1032 Deseret Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/02/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/02/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/19/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.03480) 1002.238384-File No. Legal No. 483688 Pub: May 27, June 17, 2013

File No.: 7021.14921 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Rhonda L. Rose, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1222699 Tax Parcel ID No.: 023015-500020/12972 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 3 BLK 1 JOHNSON’S DISCOVERY BAY VIEW TRACTS, CLALLUM COUNTY, WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On June 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 3, Block 1, Johnson’s Discovery Bay View Tracts, Clallam County, Washington, according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 5 of Plats at Page(s) 29, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 301 Discovery Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/05/08, recorded on 06/17/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1222699, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Christian H Petersen and Rhonda L Rose, husband and wife, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/18/2013 Monthly Payments $25,772.24 Late Charges $1,041.82 Total Arrearage $26,814.06 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $1,160.96 Statutory Mailings $15.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $2,259.96 Total Amount Due: $29,074.02 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $415,866.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 28, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Heirs and Devisees of Christian H Petersen, Deceased 301 Discovery Way Sequim, WA 98382 Rhonda L Rose 301 Discovery Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Rhonda L Rose 301 Discovery Way Sequim, WA 98382 Rhonda L. Rose PO Box 2668 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 12/27/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 12/27/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/18/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 9 8 0 0 9 - 0 9 9 7 C o n t a c t : W i n s t o n K h a n ( 4 2 5 ) 5 8 6 - 1 9 0 0 . ( T S # 7021.14921) 1002.238013-File No. Pub: May 27, June 17, 2013 Legal No. 483691

File No.: 7037.99900 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2007-AR6 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AR6 Grantee: Robert L. Williams and Josephine A. Williams, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants and not as Community Property Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007 1201346 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000 531430 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 7 BK 14 PSCC SUBD Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On June 28, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 7, Block 14, Puget Sound Co-Operative Colony’s Subdivision of the Townsite of Port Angeles, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, page 5, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington.. Commonly known as: 1312 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/10/07, recorded on 05/15/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007 1201346, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Robert L. Williams, Josephine A. Williams, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc. its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc. its successors and assigns to Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2007-AR6 Mortgage PassThrough Certificates Series 2007-AR6, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1287083. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/12/2013 Monthly Payments $5,831.70 Lender’s Fees & Costs $138.20 Total Arrearage $5,969.90 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $625.47 Statutory Mailings $20.90 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,480.37 Total Amount Due: $7,450.27 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $158,042.53, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 28, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/17/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Robert Williams 1312 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362-4517 Robert Williams PO Box 4008 Port Angeles, WA 98363-0997 Josephine Williams 1312 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362-4517 Josephine Williams PO Box 4008 Port Angeles, WA 98363-0997 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/11/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/11/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/12/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.99900) 1002.239297-File No. Pub: May 27, June 17, 2013 Legal No. 483697


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

Yesterday

Neah Bay 56/50

Bellingham B elli el e lin n 68/56

➥

Olympic Peninsula TODAY Y ERS SHOWERS

ER OW SH

Forks 66/50

SHO

Port Angeles 59/53

Olympics Snow level: 7,500 ft.

W

61/53 Sequim 61/53

Port Ludlow 63/52

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 68 43 0.00 9.60 Forks 75 49 0.00 54.66 Seattle 78 55 0.00 15.48 Sequim 68 50 0.00 5.29 Hoquiam 72 56 0.00 31.73 Victoria 70 48 0.00 13.17 Port Townsend 70 47 0.00 9.75

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National TODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Monday, June 17

Billings 79° | 52°

San Francisco 66° | 54°

Last

New

First

Chicago 84° | 63°

Full

Miami 90° | 79°

➥

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TUESDAY

Low 53 Mostly cloudy

WEDNESDAY

61/52 Showers likely

Marine Weather

61/51 Cloudy with showers

Fronts

FRIDAY

59/51 Most cloudy; chance of rain

Jun 29

62/51 Clouds dominate day

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. A chance of showers. Tonight, W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft.

CANADA

Seattle 75° | 55° Olympia 73° | 52°

Spokane 79° | 55°

Tacoma 81° | 55° Yakima 84° | 61°

Astoria 72° | 54°

ORE.

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 7:21 a.m. 5.5’ 1:37 a.m. 1.9’ 7:54 p.m. 7.6’ 1:17 p.m. 1.5’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 8:38 a.m. 5.5’ 2:43 a.m. 1.2’ 8:44 p.m. 8.1’ 2:17 p.m. 2.0’

Port Angeles

10:21 a.m. 4.0’ 10:01 p.m. 6.9’

4:46 a.m. 2.1’ 3:25 p.m. 3.1’

12:20 p.m. 4.4’ 10:36 p.m. 6.9’

5:27 a.m. 1.0’ 4:29 p.m. 4.0’

Port Townsend

11:58 a.m. 4.9’ 11:38 p.m. 8.5’

5:59 a.m. 2.3’ 4:38 p.m. 3.5’

1:57 p.m. 5.4’

6:40 a.m. 1.1’ 5:42 p.m. 4.5’

Dungeness Bay* 11:04 a.m. 4.4’ 10:44 p.m. 7.7’

5:21 a.m. 2.1’ 4:00 p.m. 3.1’

1:03 p.m. 4.9’ 11:19 p.m. 7.7’

6:02 a.m. 1.0’ 5:04 p.m. 4.0’

LaPush

Jul 8

Jul 15

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Jun 23 9:16 p.m. 5:13 a.m. 2:38 p.m. 1:45 a.m.

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 77 Casper 80 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 85 Albany, N.Y. 52 Rain Charleston, W.Va. 81 Albuquerque 69 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 84 Amarillo 68 PCldy Cheyenne 78 Anchorage 50 Cldy Chicago 80 Asheville 58 .01 Cldy Cincinnati 83 Atlanta 67 PCldy Cleveland 79 Atlantic City 59 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 87 Austin 75 PCldy Columbus, Ohio 80 Baltimore 62 Rain Concord, N.H. 78 Billings 50 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 90 Birmingham 74 PCldy Dayton 81 Bismarck 50 Clr Denver 84 Boise 54 Clr Des Moines 82 Boston 61 Cldy Detroit 80 Brownsville 80 PCldy Duluth 75 Buffalo 62 Rain El Paso 98 Evansville 88 Fairbanks 84 WEDNESDAY Fargo 84 80 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 75 9:52 a.m. 5.6’ 3:45 a.m. 0.3’ Great Falls 75 Greensboro, N.C. 83 9:35 p.m. 8.6’ 3:19 p.m. 2.3’ Hartford Spgfld 80 77 1:46 p.m. 5.1’ 6:09 a.m. -0.1’ Helena Honolulu 84 11:14 p.m. 7.0’ 5:36 p.m. 4.9’ Houston 94 Indianapolis 83 12:13 a.m. 8.5’ 7:22 a.m. -0.1’ Jackson, Miss. 91 86 3:23 p.m. 6.3’ 6:49 p.m. 5.4’ Jacksonville Juneau 83 Kansas City 90 2:29 p.m. 5.7’ 6:44 a.m. -0.1’ Key West 89 11:57 p.m. 7.7’ 6:11 p.m. 4.9’ Las Vegas 102 Little Rock 91

Nation/World

Victoria 70° | 54°

Ocean: E wind 10 kt... becoming S in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft. SW swell 3 ft at 16 seconds. A chance of showers. Tonight, S wind to 10 kt...becoming SE 5 to 15 kt after midnight. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft.

Tides

THURSDAY

New York 86° | 70°

Detroit 84° | 64°

Atlanta 88° | 72°

El Paso 104° | 77° Houston 99° | 79°

Cold

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 86° | 70°

Los Angeles 77° | 61°

Almanac

S

Aberdeen 64/52

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 73° | 61°

Denver 90° | 54°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 70/54

Sunny

Seattle 75° | 55°

Hi 77 94 88 70 81 84 82 91 83 78 88 79 84 80 94 69

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

54 43 65 60 65 53 69 69 66 65 69 47 74 68 58 68 65 54 77 70 61 55 42 65 40 66 52 46 73 75 66 71 68 51 65 81 77 73

.17 .19 .01 .01 .28

.01 .82

.04 .02 .30

Rain PCldy PCldy Rain Cldy PCldy PCldy Rain Rain Clr Rain Cldy Cldy Rain PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Rain PCldy PCldy Clr Cldy Clr Clr Cldy

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

76 87 88 90 91 91 73 76 90 91 80 85 84 84 83 91 88 83 107 78 76 81 79 85 77 87 85 88 90 88 84 91 76 62 92 93 71 92

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■110 at Death Valley, Calif., and Ocotillo Wells, Calif. ■ 27 at Stanley, Idaho GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

62 PCldy Sioux Falls 81 51 .26 73 Cldy Syracuse 76 58 70 PCldy Tampa 89 75 73 Cldy Topeka 90 68 .05 79 PCldy Tucson 101 76 69 PCldy Tulsa 87 71 .03 66 1.12 Clr Washington, D.C. 85 69 60 .02 Clr Wichita 89 69 68 Cldy Wilkes-Barre 78 55 78 .40 Cldy Wilmington, Del. 82 60 65 Cldy ________ 68 Cldy 57 Rain Hi Lo 70 .14 Cldy 62 53 68 Cldy Auckland Baghdad 103 77 77 .07 Cldy 91 68 54 Cldy Beijing 77 61 64 Rain Berlin 78 61 85 Clr Brussels Cairo 93 71 63 .14 Rain Calgary 73 48 50 Cldy 87 64 56 Cldy Guadalajara 87 81 55 Cldy Hong Kong 83 61 62 Cldy Jerusalem Johannesburg 64 42 50 Cldy Kabul 83 57 53 Clr 67 55 65 Cldy London 80 56 56 Clr Mexico City 73 53 69 1.17 Rain Montreal Moscow 77 55 80 Cldy 84 80 59 Clr New Delhi 84 67 76 PCldy Paris 47 Cldy Rio de Janeiro 85 67 86 69 52 Cldy Rome 65 48 78 PCldy Sydney 84 73 60 PCldy Tokyo 74 56 54 .19 Cldy Toronto 68 54 77 Cldy Vancouver

PCldy Rain Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Rain Cldy Rain Rain

Otlk Sh Clr PCldy PCldy Sh PCldy PCldy Ts Ts Clr Clr Clr PCldy PCldy Ts Cldy Ts Rain PCldy Clr PCldy Cldy Ts PCldy

Briefly . . .

Now Showing â– Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

Library book drop set up at PT co-op

“After Earth� (PG-13) “Epic� (PG) “Fast and Furious 6� (PG-13) “Man of Steel� (PG-13) “Now You See Me� (PG-13) “Star Trek Into Darkness� (PG-13)

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Food Co-op and Port Townsend Public Library have partnered to place a library book drop at the Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St. ■Lincoln Theater, Port Keith Darrock, the Angeles (360-457-7997) library’s technical services manager, recently delivered “The Internship� (PG-13) a library book drop that was “The Purge� (R) installed near the north “This Is the End� (R) entrance of the Food Co-op. “This will give our cus■ The Rose Theatre, tomers the convenience of Port Townsend (360only making one trip to 385-1089) shop and return books, saving them time and gas,� “Before Midnight� (R) “Deceptive Practice: The said Kenna Eaton, Food Mysteries and Mentors of Co-op general manager. Ricky Jay� (UR) “It’s a measure to “Kon Tiki� (PG-13) decrease the collective car“Mud� (PG-13) bon footprint.� Books and other materi■ Uptown Theatre, Port als borrowed from the Port Townsend (360-385Townsend or Jefferson 3883) County libraries may be returned to the book drop, “Man of Steel� (PG-13) which will be emptied every day of the week ■ Wheel-In Motor except Sundays. Movie, Port Townsend It was obtained at no (360-385-0859) cost from a library in Van“The Great Gatsby� (PG-13) couver, Wash., and a new “The Hangover Part III� (R) paint job and installation

KATHIE MEYER/PORT TOWNSEND FOOD CO-OP

Keith Darrock, Port Townsend Public Library’s technical services manager, shows off the book drop installed outside the Port Townsend Food Co-op. The book drop was recycled free of charge from a library in Vancouver, Wash. were covered by the Port Townsend Library. The co-op also will set aside funds on an annual basis to donate books to the library’s collection on such topics as healthy cooking, organic gardening and farming, and sustainable living. So far, seven titles and one DVD have been added to the library’s collection,

including Michael Pollan’s latest book, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, and Real Snacks: Make Your Favorite Childhood Treats Without All the Junk, by Lara Ferroni.

Watercolor classes SEQUIM — Free watercolor classes for caregivers in the community are being

Wed-Fri 10am-6pm

Sat 9am-4pm

Self-Service Dog Wash

and Kennel

Between Sequim and Port Angeles

35792608

1-800-859-3463

PORT ANGELES — Registration is open for a Jr. Grange Summer Camp at Camp David Jr. on Lake Crescent from July 7-12. Activities include hiking, crafting, canoeing, campfires and more. A brochure and registration forms are available by clicking on the “Camp David� tab at http:// tinyurl.com/7zumoa7. Registration fee is $180 for non-grange-affiliated campers and $150 for affiliated campers. Peninsula Daily News

Donate... Shop... Volunteer.

www.stinkydogubathe.com 360-477-2883

728 E. Front St., Port Angeles,WA 360-417-7543swww.facebook.com/HFHClallamCounty

32732490

NORTHWEST, INC.

SEQUIM — Arnold Schouten will present “Raising Sea Ducks: A Long Tail� at an Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society meeting and potluck Wednesday. The free event will be held at the Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, with

Jr. grange camp

35773957

SECURITY SERVICES

SSNWHQ.COM

PROTECTED BY

Audubon meeting

the potluck at 6 p.m. and the lecture from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Attendees are asked to bring a dish or finger food to share. Arnold and his wife, Debbie Schouten, live at Dry Creek on a 50-acre piece of land, where they have developed numerous ponds, water features, wetlands and waterfowl aviaries. Over the years, Arnold has worked with more than 40 different waterfowl species at this location.

Donate to us! Volunteer with us! Shop the Habitat Store

FIRE/SECURITY ALARMS Local Monitoring

offered by Shirley Mercer of the LARC Gallery. “If you find yourself caring for a loved one, your life turned upside-down with your senses and nerves left raw, escape for two hours,� Mercer said. “Get lost in the art and give your mind and body time to reset and recharge.� These classes are held Tuesdays through Thursdays and Saturdays at the LARC Gallery, 166 E. Bell St. All materials will be supplied. For more information and class times, phone Mercer at 360-460-9874, visit www.larcgallery.com or email sm-art@qwest office.net.

Bob’s Kickin’ Cancer Soap Townsend Bay Soap Company

A fun evening filled with bargains on the silent auction and a great event on the live auction.

NOW OPEN!

Starting at 5:30 pm Port Angeles CrabHouse

peninsuladailynews.com

Sponsored by Union Bank, Wilder Auto Center, & Elwha Klallam Heritage Training Center

Quad Kick Pack $20 Single Bar $5.45

36793066

$EER0ARK2Ds0ORT!NGELESs 

$40 each Tickets are available at Jim’s Pharmacy, or by calling Jeanne’ Sparks at 452-9813 or Ida McKeown at 461-1131. Limited number of tickets will be for sale at the door.

36810478

3679581 36795818

Full Service Pack & Ship Center Personal Mail Boxes .OTARYs#OPYs&AX

Saturday, June 22

$5 of every bar sold goes to sarcoma cancer research. Help Bob Make His Goal!

Lavender Mist, Hawaiian Hut, Sunny Day, Olympic Woods

Available at Tickled Pink 825 Water St., Port Townsend townsendbaysoap.com

LIMITED TIME FREE SHIPPING

PDN20130617C  

PDN20130617C

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