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Monday

Seahawks thriller!

Rain on most of Peninsula, then showers B10

Seattle comes back to beat New England B1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS October 15, 2012 | 75¢

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

Voter system could fall prey to hackers Online security of registrations worries experts BY NICOLE PERLROTH THE NEW YORK TIMES

Computer security experts have identified vulnerabilities in Washington state’s voter registration databases, raising con-

cerns about the ability of hackers and others to disenfranchise voters. The state’s voter registration system makes it easy for people to register to vote and update their address information online. The problem is that all the information required from voters to log in to the system is publicly available. It took The New York Times

fewer than three minutes to track down the information online needed to update the registrations of several prominent executives in the state. Complete voter lists, which include a name, birth date, addresses and party affiliation, can be easily bought — and are, right now, in the hands of thousands of campaign volunteers. Computer security experts and voting rights activists

argue that a hacker could use that information to, say, change a person’s address online to ensure the voter never receives a ballot in the state, where voting is now done entirely by mail. Another concern, critics say, is that large numbers of voters from one political party, or demographic, could have their information changed by automated computer programs.

A program that could change tens of thousands of voter records at once, they say, would require only a dozen lines of code. Rebecca Wilson, co-director of Save Our Votes, a votingrights nonprofit, said her organization did not initially track how states set up their online systems. TURN

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Governor gets plan for Worden

Bright space for bright ideas

Learning center idea nearing final hurdle BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend Mayor David King, center, talks with Co-Lab managers Heather Dudley Nollette and Frank DePalma in the space that Co-Lab hopes to rent.

Business co-op shows itself off Common space for shared resources unfolds above downtown PT cafe BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND— A business symposium designed to promote the idea of sharing resources drew an enthusiastic response, causing the organizers to investigate the idea of speeding up the process. “We originally thought that we’d open our doors in February,” said Frank DePalma, who is one of the developers of the Port Townsend Co-Lab, a collaborative business space. “We’ve had such a good reaction that

maybe we should open sooner in order to maintain the momentum.” More than 70 people attended Friday’s daylong session, which included business seminars and tours around the proposed location, a 2,400-square-foot space above the Silverwater Cafe at 237 Taylor St. The idea behind the Co-Lab is to provide a common space that contains essential business resources, such as a workspace, meeting area and reference material. Additionally, the format promotes interaction among participants, allowing

them to bounce ideas off each other and develop partnerships. “There was one project that three of us worked on.” DePalma said. “I did the Web design and teamed with a writer and a graphic designer,” he said. “It was like it was an ad agency without all of the overhead.” Heather Dudley Nollette, who with DePalma is managing the project, said the collaborative environment would prevent sole proprietors from becoming isolated. TURN

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PORT TOWNSEND — A draft of the Fort Worden Lifelong Learning Center Public Development Authority’s business plan has been submitted to Gov. Chris Gregoire’s office for final vetting. The referral of the plan Friday is in preparation for the submission of the final draft to the state Parks and Recreation Commission on Oct. 25 in time for the commission’s Dec. 6 meeting, when it could be approved. “There is a lot of work we need to do before the commission decides to enter into a co-management agreement with us,” said PDA Executive Director Dave Robison. “There are a lot of detailed questions we need to answer, and the more we do this, a better chance we have of success, although it all boils down to the startup money needed and a definition of roles and responsibilities as to who does what.”

Months of discussions After several months of discussions and public meetings, the PDA began the development of the business plan in June, with the purpose of managing the educational portion of Fort Worden State Park while standard park operations such as camping and hiking remain under the State Parks umbrella. PDA officials presented the proposal to the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce on Oct. 1 and have scheduled a meeting at 6 p.m. Monday at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave. in Port Hadlock. TURN

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Noted volunteer hospitalized after tractor flips, traps him BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Well-known North Olympic Peninsula civic leader and humanitarian Tom Schaafsma was breathing on his own Sunday at a Seattle hospital after a tractor rolled over and trapped him two days earlier. “So far today has been an encouraging day,” wrote wife Jacque Schaafsma on a family

blog Sunday afternoon. Schaafsma, a semiretired carpenter, is a past Clallam County Community Service Award recipient and Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year who is noted for his volunteer participation in the Rotary ShelterBox program. The longtime member of the Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club has promoted fundraising across the

North Olympic Peninsula for the $1,000 disaster-relief kits that provide temporary housing for victims around the world. He has traveled to Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia as part of Rotary relief teams following disasters such as earthquakes and floods. SHELTERBOX USA He met actor Sean Penn durTom Schaafsma of Sequim, left, joins actor and fellow ing relief efforts in Haiti in 2010.

Haitian relief worker Sean Penn in 2010. Schaafsma was

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INJURED/A4 severely injured in a tractor accident Friday. 14706106

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INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 96th year, 248th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

CLASSIFIED B5 B4 COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS A8 B4 DEAR ABBY A7 DEATHS B10 MOVIES A3 NATION A2 PENINSULA POLL B7 PUZZLES/GAMES

SPORTS SUDOKU WEATHER WORLD

B1 A2 B10 A3


A2

UpFront

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Elvis Presley’s Beverly Hills home for sale THE FORMER BEVERLY Hills home of the late Elvis Presley and his wife Priscilla is up for sale for a cool $12.9 million. Real estate website operator Trulia said the home hit the market Wednesday. Like Pre- Presley sley’s home in Memphis, known as Graceland, Elvis fans have for years flocked to visit the property. According to the listing, the four bedroom, five bathroom French Regency estate sits on a 1.18-acre promontory overlooking Los Angeles. According to Elvis Presley Enterprises, Presley first rented the house before the couple bought it in 1967. It was sold in 1973, the same year Elvis and Priscilla divorced. The estate was formerly available to lease for $25,000 a month.

Actress arrested Prosecutors say actress Taryn Manning attacked and choked her personal assistant in a New York City hotel room. The New York Post and The Daily News reported that Manning was

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROCKIN’

TO THE LIMITS

Jack White performs at the Austin City Limits Music Festival on Saturday in Austin, Texas.

arraigned Friday after an early morning fight the day before with assistant Holliann HartManning man inside the Dream Hotel in Chelsea. Manning is charged with misdemeanor assault. She spent more than 24 hours locked up before she

was released. The 33-year-old Manning is best known for playing Eminem’s ex-girlfriend in the 2002 movie “8 Mile.” Her lawyer, Joseph Tacopina, said Manning and the assistant got into a confrontation, but it was not an assault. He said it was “a little misunderstanding between the two.” Manning is due back in court Nov. 13.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL SATURDAY’S QUESTION: How often do you have dessert following dinner? Always

3.5%

Mostly

9.4%

Sometimes

29.9%

Rarely Never

45.7% 11.5%

Total votes cast: 479 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

Passings

Corrections and clarifications

By The Associated Press

ARLEN SPECTER, 82, the outspoken former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania and centrist whose switch from Republican to Democrat ended a 30-year career in which he played a pivotal role in several Supreme Court nominations, died Sunday. Sen. Specter, who announced in late August that he was battling cancer, died at his home in Sen. Specter Philadelin 2010 phia from complications of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, said his son, Shanin. Over the years, Sen. Specter had fought two previous bouts with Hodgkin lymphoma, overcome a brain tumor and survived cardiac arrest following bypass surgery. Sen. Specter rose to prominence in the 1960s as an aggressive Philadelphia prosecutor and as an assistant counsel to the Warren Commission, developing the single-bullet theory that posited just one bullet struck both President John F. Kennedy and Texas Gov. John Connally — an assumption critical to the

argument that presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. In 1987, Sen. Specter helped thwart the Supreme Court nomination of former federal appeals Judge Robert H. Bork — earning him conservative enemies who still bitterly refer to such rejections as being “borked.” But four years later, Sen. Specter was criticized by liberals for his tough questioning of Anita Hill at Clarence Thomas’ Supreme Court nomination hearings and for accusing her of committing “flat-out perjury.” The nationally televised interrogation incensed women’s groups and nearly cost him his seat in 1992. Sen. Specter was Pennsylvania’s longest-serving senator when Democrats picked then-U.S. Rep. Joe

Sestak over him in the 2010 primary, despite Sen. Specter’s endorsements by President Barack Obama and other Democratic leaders. A political moderate, Sen. Specter was swept into the Senate in the Reagan landslide of 1980. In 1995, he launched a presidential bid, denouncing religious conservatives as the “fringe” that plays too large a role in setting the party’s agenda. Sen. Specter, who was Jewish, bowed out before the first primary because of lackluster fundraising. Sen. Specter startled fellow senators in April 2009 when he announced he was switching to the Democratic side, saying he found himself “increasingly at odds with the Republican philosophy.”

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1937 (75 years ago) Veterans of Foreign Wars’ Key City Post No. 1495 of Port Townsend will host delegates from throughout Western Washington for the VFW Fourth District Conference tomorrow. R.O. Mitchell, Port Townsend VFW commander, said District Cmdr. A.J. Bogan will preside, and several prominent VFW members from the Great War will attend. The gathering will be held in the Veterans Hall, with specialized meetings during the day and a general assembly convening at 8:30 p.m.

Resources said more than 400 million board feet of timber was blown down in Western Washington. Cowlitz County in Southwest Washington was hardest hit in what a DNR administrator said was “the worst blowdown I’ve ever seen.”

1987 (25 years ago)

About 50 people gathered at the Jefferson County Courthouse to tell a state hearing their views on proposed fish pen operations in the region. The hearing held by representatives of the departments of Fisheries, Ecology and Agriculture Seen Around Laugh Lines covered what should be in Peninsula snapshots 1962 (50 years ago) a blanket impact statement A FITNESS TWO DOES WITH to be used as a model for Estimates of public and INSTRUCTOR in Maine their fawns nibbling on private property damage in all fish farm operations. has been charged with run- plants on a Port Angeles Speakers were nearly Western Washington as a ning a prostitution busipatio. They casually result of the Columbus Day evenly divided on those ness out of her Zumba departed when confronted storm have risen to $50 mil- who favor fish pens and dance studio. by the patio owner . . . those who oppose them. lion, the state Commerce I’m guessing authorities All expressed eagerness Department announced. WANTED! “Seen Around” first got suspicious when for the state to complete its No estimates have yet items. Send them to PDN News they saw guys going to study, which they said will P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles been given for the North work out at a Zumba dance Desk, help local governments Olympic Peninsula. WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or studio. In addition, the state make decisions on fish pen email news@peninsuladailynews. Jay Leno com. Department of Natural permit applications.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Oct. 15, the 289th day of 2012. There are 77 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Oct. 15, 1917, Dutch dancer Mata Hari, convicted of spying for the Germans, was executed by a French firing squad outside Paris. On this date: ■ In 1858, the seventh and final debate between senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Alton, Ill. ■ In 1860, 11-year-old Grace Bedell of Westfield, N.Y., wrote a letter to presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln, suggesting he

could improve his appearance by growing a beard. ■ In 1928, the German dirigible Graf Zeppelin landed in Lakehurst, N.J., completing its first commercial flight across the Atlantic. ■ In 1937, the Ernest Hemingway novel To Have and Have Not was first published by Charles Scribner’s Sons. ■ In 1946, Nazi war criminal Hermann Goering fatally poisoned himself hours before he was to have been executed. ■ In 1964, it was announced that Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev had been removed from office. ■ In 1969, peace demonstra-

tors staged activities across the country as part of a “moratorium” against the Vietnam War. ■ In 1976, in the first debate of its kind between vice presidential nominees, Democrat Walter F. Mondale and Republican Bob Dole, faced off in Houston. ■ In 1991, despite sexual harassment allegations by Anita Hill, the Senate narrowly confirmed the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, 52-48. ■ In 1997, British Royal Air Force pilot Andy Green twice drove a jet-powered car in the Nevada desert faster than the speed of sound, officially shattering the

world’s land-speed record. ■ Ten years ago: Five Japanese kidnapping victims who’d been abducted in their youth by North Korean spies finally returned home, tearfully hugging their aging parents for the first time in nearly a-quarter century. ■ Five years ago: Americans Leonid Hurwicz, Eric S. Maskin and Roger B. Myerson won the Nobel economics prize. ■ One year ago: The Texas Rangers finished off the Detroit Tigers to become the American League’s first repeat champion in a decade with a 15-5 win in Game 6 of the ALCS.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 15, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Sub, ship collide

Obama

Romney

Campaigning pauses for debate prep BURLINGTON, Mass. — As Mitt Romney’s campaign claimed new momentum in the race for the White House, President Barack Obama’s political advisers Sunday promised that the incumbent would unleash his more aggressive side in Tuesday’s debate. Obama and Romney hunkered down in private debate preparation for much of Sunday as aides offered a pre-debate sparring match on television. Obama spent the day with aides in swing state Virginia, while Romney stayed close to his Boston-area home ahead of Tuesday’s town hall-style debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. The 90-minute debate will be shown on TV and cable networks at 6 p.m. PDT.

NORFOLK, Va. — The Pentagon said late Saturday that it is investigating why a Navy submarine collided with an Aegis cruiser off the East Coast. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command said the submarine USS Montpelier and the Aegis cruiser USS San Jacinto collided at about 3:30 p.m. during routine operations. No one was injured, and the extent of any damage to the vessels was not clear, said Lt. Commander Brian Badura of the Fleet Forces Command.

Hikers missing KALISPELL, Mont. — Rescue teams at Glacier National Park searched in wintery conditions and rugged terrain Sunday for two East Coast hikers reported missing by family members. Park officials said 50 searchers were looking for 32-year-old Neal Peckens of Virginia and 32-year-old Jason Hiser of Maryland. Weather was the biggest challenge facing searchers, who have found 18 inches of snow on the trail at higher elevations and 5-foot drifts in some areas, spokeswoman Denise Germann said. The Associated Press

Briefly: World is known as a protective order that is intended to prevent the release of classified information during the eventual trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who has portrayed himself as the mastermind of the terror BEIRUT — The Syrian attacks, and four co-defendants. regime was accused Sunday of Lawyers for the defendants dropping cluster bombs — indiscriminate scattershot munitions have said the rules, as proposed, banned by most nations — in a will hobble their defense. new sign of desperation and disHuge rally for victim regard for its own people. The international group KARACHI, Pakistan — Tens Human Rights Watch cited of thousands rallied in Pakiamateur video and testimony stan’s largest city Sunday in the from the front lines in making biggest show of support yet for a the allegation against the gov14-year-old girl who was shot ernment of President Bashar and seriously wounded by the Assad. Taliban for promoting girls’ eduSyria and Turkey, meancation and criticizing the miliwhile, declared their skies offtant group. limits to each other amid The Oct. 9 mounting cross-border tensions attack on in Syria’s 19-month-old conflict, Malala Younow a civil war. sufzai as she Turkey is an outspoken was returning backer of rebels trying to oust home from Assad. school in PakiCluster bombs open in flight, stan’s northscattering smaller bomblets west horrified over a wide area. Many of the people inside Yousufzai bomblets don’t explode immedi- and outside ately, posing a threat to civilians the country. long afterward. At the same time, it gave hope to some that the governSecurity rules mulled ment would respond by intensifying its fight against the TaliGUANTANAMO BAY ban and their allies. NAVAL BASE, Cuba — A U.S. But protests against the military judge is considering broad security rules for the war shooting have been relatively small until now, usually attractcrimes tribunal of five Guantaing no more than a few hundred namo prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attacks, including mea- people. That response pales in comsures to prevent the accused parison to the tens of thousands from publicly revealing what of people who held violent prohappened to them in the CIA’s secret network of overseas pris- tests in Pakistan last month against a film produced in the ons. United States that denigrated Prosecutors have asked the judge at a pretrial hearing Islam’s Prophet Muhammad. starting today to approve what The Associated Press

Cluster bombs suspected in Syrian civil war

2013 Social Security increase less than 2% Most retirees to gain under $24 monthly BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

before,” said Polina Vlasenko, an economist at the American Institute for Economic Research, based in Great Barrington, Mass. This year, Social Security recipients received a 3.6 percent increase in benefits after getting no increase the previous two years. Some of next year’s raise could be wiped out by higher Medicare premiums, which are deducted from Social Security payments. The Medicare Part B premium, which covers doctor visits, is expected to rise by about $7 per month for 2013, according to government projections. The premium is currently $99.90 a month for most seniors. Medicare is expected to announce the premium for 2013 in the coming weeks. “The COLA continues to be very critical to people in keeping them from falling behind,” said David Certner, AARP’s legislative policy director. “We certainly heard in those couple of years when there was no COLA at all how important it was.”

WASHINGTON — Social Security recipients shouldn’t expect a big increase in monthly benefits come January. Preliminary figures show the annual benefit boost will be between 1 percent and 2 percent, which would be among the lowest since automatic adjustments were adopted in 1975. Monthly benefits for retired workers now average $1,237, meaning the typical retiree can expect a raise of between $12 and $24 a month. The size of the increase will be made official Tuesday, when the government releases inflation figures for September. The announcement is unlikely to please a big group of voters — 56 million people get benefits — just three weeks before elections Seniors targeted for president and Congress. How important is the COLA? From 2001 to 2011, household Inflation gauge incomes in the U.S. dropped for The cost-of-living adjustment, every age group except one: those or COLA, is tied to a government 65 and older. measure of inflation adopted by The median income for all U.S. Congress in the 1970s. It shows households fell by 6.6 percent, that consumer prices have gone when inflation was taken into up by less than 2 percent in the account, according to census data. past year. But the median income for “Basically, for the past 12 households headed by someone months, prices did not go up as 65 or older rose by 13 percent. “That’s all because of Social rapidly as they did the year

Quick Read

Security,” Certner said. “Social Security has the COLA and that’s what’s keeping seniors above water, as opposed to everybody else who’s struggling in this economy.” Seniors still, on average, have lower incomes than younger adults. Most older Americans rely on Social Security for a majority of their income, according to the Social Security Administration. “It’s useful to bear in mind that no other group in the economy gets an automatic cost-ofliving increase in their income,” said David Blau, an economist at The Ohio State University. “Seniors are the only group.”

Skydiver completes jump of 24 miles THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROSWELL, N.M. — Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner landed gracefully on Earth after a 24-mile jump from the stratosphere in a dramatic, record-breaking feat that might also have marked the world’s first supersonic skydive. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about 9 minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. “Sometimes we have to get really high to see how small we are,” an exuberant Baumgartner told reporters outside mission control shortly after the jump. The altitude he leaped from marked the highest-ever for a skydiver, though it wasn’t immediately certain whether Baumgartner had broken the speed of sound during his freefall, which was one of the goals of the mission. Three hours earlier, Baumgartner, 43, known as “Fearless Felix,” had taken off in a pressurized capsule carried by a 55-story ultra-thin helium balloon. As he exited his capsule

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (2)

Felix Baumgartner, left, celebrates with Art Thompson, technical project director, after Sunday’s jump. from high above Earth, he flashed a thumbs-up sign, well aware that the feat was being shown on the Internet. During the ensuing jump — from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners — Baumgartner was expected to hit a speed of 690 mph. He was believed to have reached speeds that exceeded 700 mph.

The capsule carrying Felix Baumgartner leaves the ground as it’s lifted by a helium balloon.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Space shuttle finds L.A. streets big endeavor

Nation: Search halted for student in New Hampshire

Nation: Two killed in crash of ultralight craft in Florida

World: Tropical storm could grow into hurricane

IN THOUSANDS OF Earth orbits, the space shuttle Endeavour traveled 123 million miles. But the last few miles of its final journey are proving hard to get through. Endeavour’s 12-mile crawl across Los Angeles to the California Science Museum hit repeated delays again Sunday, leaving expectant crowds along city streets and at the destination slowly dwindling. The shuttle finally reached its destination Sunday afternoon. Accumulated hurdles and hiccups caused it to run hours behind. The problems included longer than expected maintenance of the rig carrying the shuttle and physical obstacles.

A PROSECUTOR SAYS the search for the body of a 19-year-old University of New Hampshire student has been suspended ahead of the arraignment for an actor and martial arts instructor who’s been charged in her death. Senior Assistant Attorney General Jane Young said a ground and water search on and around Portsmouth’s Peirce Island was put on hold Sunday, and that officials will decide today what the next step should be. Twenty-nine-year-old Seth Mazzaglia of Dover was charged Saturday with second-degree murder in the presumed death of Elizabeth “Lizzi” Marriott. Marriott is from Massachusetts.

FEDERAL FEDE RAL AVIATION OFFICIALS are investigating a small-plane crash in central Florida that killed two passengers. The ultralight plane crashed before noon Sunday at Winter Haven Municipal Airport. Police said the pilot of the Airborne Windsport experimental aircraft was performing touch and go maneuvers when the plane hit the ground, flipped and slid almost 200 feet. Police said a wind gust might have played a factor in the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation and Safety Board will determine the cause of the crash.

THE OUTER BANDS of Tropical Storm Rafael drenched the Caribbean’s Northern Leeward Islands on Sunday as its center steadily moved over open ocean on a possible track toward Bermuda. There were no immediate reports of any significant damage or injuries. By late Sunday afternoon, it was about 185 miles north-northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and was packing winds of roughly 60 mph. Forecasters at the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Rafael could strengthen into a hurricane by late today as it spins over the open Atlantic.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Co-Lab: Spaces CONTINUED FROM A1 The space will contain several desks, a meeting space, a kitchen area, printers and fax and a seminar room. It will also have a “Superman booth� in which people can conduct conference calls or Skype meetings in private. Additionally, it will have two Northwest essentials, free to members: fast Internet and quality coffee. DePalma said other locations are under consideration, but the Silverwater space fits all of the current needs and has room for expansion. It is wide open and spacious with a panoramic second-floor view of downtown.

Banquet space rental

A variety of membership options are available, from the $20 day-use fee to the top-of-the-line $375 monthly fee that includes a dedicated desk, mail service and 24-hour access to the space.

Flexibility promoted DePalma said the CoLab concept promotes flexibility and is intended for people who are more “project based� and don’t need to have access to a large office during less busy periods. Mayor David King, who visited the Co-Lab space during the symposium, said the concept could attract independently minded knowledge workers to Port Townsend. “This is one way we can promote Port Townsend as a great place to live and work,� King said. “It can be a positive thing to share these spaces and discover the benefits of working together.� For more information, visit wwwptcolab.com.

There is the potential to rent the banquet space on the third floor for larger events or to host presentations in the Rose Theatre, located downstairs. “We didn’t want to start _________ too small,� DePalma said. “We don’t want to be in a Jefferson County Reporter Charplace where we couldn’t lie Bermant can be reached at 360expand in case the idea 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ catches on.� peninsuladailynews.com.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CRAB

CHECK

Julian McCabe of Port Angeles, who is in charge of cooking Dungeness crab, checks on a couple of crab to see if they are ready for serving. More than 2,000 crabs were served at this year’s Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival in Port Angeles.

Worden: ‘Money biggest issue’

Closer to home, Schaafsma has helped with construction projects at the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, the Sequim Food Bank, Sequim Community School and Olympic Theatre Arts. Her and his wife have hosted six exchange students, and he has volunteered with the Clallam County Juvenile Diversion Board.

CONTINUED FROM A1 mined — in future negotiations. The State Parks sysIn a letter to Fred Olson, Gregoire’s deputy chief of tem’s potential contribution staff, PDA board President will depend on funding by Cindy Hill Finnie said the the state Legislature, with PDA is committed to raising the possibility that funding $550,000 “to support the could be cut to zero, State transition of a working part- Parks officials have said. nership� but that some seed money from the State Parks Visitors to park system will be needed to get According to the plan, the partnership started. the 434-acre Fort Worden she said. “Money is the biggest State Park draws more “We are issue,� said PDA board than 1 million visitors to still very member Gee Heckscher. the area each year and genconcerned “We plan to take over erates more than about his many operations that will $11,600,000 in local and b r a i n benefit the Park Service, state revenues, not includhealth, but but we will need funds to ing the direct revenues of overall the begin this operation.� the park. family is Schaafsma The draft plan contains The PDA is proposing to feeling a bit no request for funds, but take on all reservation sermore optimistic,� she said. board members said they vices for accommodations, “As always thank you all plan to ask for seed money meeting rooms and campfor your prayers, messages, — at an amount to be deter- grounds. and support. Please keep them coming.�

Tractor rolls over

Condition updates

Schaafsma, 63, suffered partially collapsed lungs and 10 broken ribs Friday afternoon when a tractor, used in the removal of a tree in woods behind the family’s Holleman Way home, flipped over and landed on top of him, family members said. Because Schaafsma was deprived of oxygen for nearly 10 minutes as he lay under the tractor, doctors and the family have been concerned about brain function. On Sunday morning, doctors asked him to squeeze his left and right hands and wiggle his toes, to all of which he appropriately responded, Jacque said. He appears more comfortable than before, she said, and underwent a breathing trial during which the ventilator was turned off to allow him to breathe on his own. But he still has some ventilator assistance,

Updates on Schaafsma’s condition are available at a medical blog http://tinyurl. com/pdn-schaafsma. Friends of the family are asked not to call the hospital, Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The tractor incident took place in the woods behind the Schaafsma property Friday as he and son Ryan Schaafsma were attempting to fell a tree. “The tractor on which Tom was sitting on flipped up and fell back on him, pinning his body under the tractor,� Jacque said. She said Ryan ran to the house to get a truck, used it to pull the tractor off the unconscious Schaafsma, and then preformed cardiopulmonary resuscitation until emergency services arrived. “They were able to put him on life support and airlift him to Harborview Trauma Center in Seattle,� she said. “We are seeing a few smiles today in the ‘family camp’ up here on floor 9.�

Injured: Aids

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Under the plan, the ________ State Parks system would manage the campgrounds; Jefferson County Reporter Charserve as steward of natural, lie Bermant can be reached at 360historic and cultural 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ resources; oversee facility peninsuladailynews.com.

it difficult to vote if an address is recently changed. “In theory, the same scenario is possible online, where it is much easier to do,� said Charles Stewart III, a political scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“We thought, ‘How badly could you mess that up?’ Well, we learned,� Wilson said. “Now, anyone in the world can write a computer program that commits absentee-ballot fraud on a mass scale.� State officials said concerns of a widespread cyberattack are exaggerated. They pointed out that voters who do not receive their ballots still can print them online, and they say they have never received a complaint about an address being unknowingly changed.

‘Captchas’

PA

Voter Guide out Friday BALLOTS FOR THE Nov. N 6 all-mail election will be b distributed to voters starting late this we week, and so will the North Olympic Peninsula Voter Guide, produced by the Peninsula Daily News. The magazine-style guide will profile candidates — most in their own words — for North Olympic Peninsula, state and congressional offices, as well as state and local ballot measures. Look for the Voter Guide in Friday’s PDN as well as online at www.peninsuladailynews.com. But security experts say the measures are not enough to prevent a determined hacker from disenfranchising scores of voters and influencing an election. Critics say hackers could use botnets, networks of infected computers, to change voters’ addresses. And new machine learning technologies can beat captchas, or people can be paid to type them in, in real time, for as a little as a penny per captcha or less. “They could influence an

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election with 20,000 votes for less than a penny a head,� said J. Alex Halderman, one of the computer scientists who discovered Washington state’s loophole along with a similar one in Maryland. “That would be a great return on investment for them.� In Florida last month, Republican state officials paid a company $1.3 million to register voters, but county election officials noticed several registrations contained unauthorized address changes and names of dead people. Laws in the state make

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Online: Voter roll alterations?

Officials also cited their use of “captchas,� which are meant to help weed out humans from computer programs. Captchas — those puzzles used by e-commerce sites that require people to type in a set of distorted let________ ters and numbers — are Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. easy for humans to read 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsu- and retype but difficult for machines to decipher. ladailynews.com.

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That was suggested by businesses and agencies involved in Fort Worden to help coordinate programs and hospitality services for all visitors to the park. The plan also proposes that the PDA manage the 16 tenant agreements in the state park. That also was suggested by the tenants, who said it would take a load off the State Parks system since it could deal directly with the PDA instead of with individual businesses and agencies.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(J) — MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

A5

Kilmer, ex-general discuss vets’ issues BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Veterans in Clallam County are most concerned about gaining better access to veterans’ health care services close to home and having a representative in Washington, D.C., who is accessible. That was the most common message state Sen. Derek Kilmer of Gig Harbor said he heard at a round table discussion of veterans’ issues he co-hosted with Maj. Gen. Timothy Lowenberg, the recently retired adjutant general of Washington state. Lowenberg — who has endorsed Kilmer in his Nov. 6 general election race against Tacoma businessman Bill Driscoll for the 6th Congressional District seat, which includes the North Olympic Peninsula — recently became the chairman of Veterans for Kilmer advisory group in support of Kilmer’s campaign to succeed Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Belfair, who is retiring.

hasn’t come from a community member,� Kilmer said.

The roughly 56 veterans who attended the open house, which was held at the Port Angeles Democratic Headquarters on Oct. 6, told Kilmer, 39, and Lowenberg they need access to veterans’ health care in Port Angeles or at least somewhere in Clallam County, Kilmer said. “So an 80-year-old veteran doesn’t have to get up at 3 a.m. to go to a medical appointment out of Clallam County,� Lowenberg said.

Concerns about jobs Veterans at the round table discussion also shared concerns they have with getting hired in the civilian world, Lowenberg said. Kilmer said he has sponsored laws against veterans being discriminated against when applying for jobs and to ensure experience veterans gain in the military will count in the civilian job market. “It’s a good thing to do for own economy now to get more skilled workers,� Kilmer said. From 1999 to his retirement in July, Lowenberg commanded the state’s Army and Air National Guard forces and was the director of the state’s emergency management and enhanced 9-1-1 programs.

Closest places

Lowenberg said Seattle and a center in Pierce County are the closest places to Clallam County for veterans’ health care. Kilmer, a Port Angeles native, said he has historically used community input gleaned from forums and meetings like the one Oct. 6 to craft bills dealing with veterans’ issues as a state senator ________ and plans to do the same if Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can elected to U.S. Congress. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. “I can’t think of a [veter- 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula ans’] bill I’ve sponsored that dailynews.com.

CLALLAM COUNTY DEMOCRATS

Maj. Gen. Timothy Lowenberg, the recently retired adjutant general of Washington state, center, talks with Peninsula veterans about their concerns during a round table discussion at the Clallam County Democratic Headquarters in Port Angeles as U.S. congressional candidate state Sen. Derek Kilmer, right, listens.

Briefly: State Sewer outflow project to close portion of PA’s Waterfront Trail Soldier killed self,

Man dies in jail

report says

Crews to begin digging trench 15 feet wide BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PAUL GOTTLIEB

AND

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Mauricio Benitez, left, and Bret Wassink, both of Port Angeles, ride their bicycles on a section of the Waterfront Trail at the edge of the former Rayonier mill site in Port Angeles. cubic yards, Neal said, enough to fill all eight bins. The material will be sample-tested for pollutants already determined to be present at the site, “metals, PCBs, things like that,� Snyder said. The 75-acre property, the largest undeveloped waterfront parcel on the North Olympic Peninsula, became a state Department of Ecology cleanup site in 2000 due to concentrations of petroleum, metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins and pesticides left behind after Rayonier’s mill closed and was torn down in 1997, after 68 years of production. Earlier this year, an agreement pushed the date

Heart of the CSO The piping “is kind of the heart of the [CSO] project,� Neal said, adding that workers are also restoring a 5-million-gallon tank that the city purchased from Rayonier to store excess

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Dirt in bins The excavated dirt will be stockpiled on the Rayonier mill site in eight bins, each with a capacity of about 2,000 cubic yards, or about 200 dump-truck loads, Rayonier cleanup project manager Warren Snyder said Friday. The estimated volume of excavation of all the trenching that will be done on the Rayonier property is 16,100

for a cleanup plan to December 2014. The additional sewer lines are designed to prevent untreated wastewater and storm water from flowing into the harbor during heavy storms. Ecology is giving the city until 2016 to complete the project or face fines of up to $10,000 per day during sewage overflows.

21576520

PORT ANGELES — A portion of Waterfront Trail will close beginning today when crews begin digging a 15-foot-wide trench for the city’s $41.7 million combined sewer overflow project and depositing the dirt in giant bins on the defunct Rayonier pulp mill site. Construction work will close a portion of the trail stretching from the Olympic Medical Center to the trail’s intersection with North Ennis Street until Nov. 30, city project manger James Burke said last week. Starting Monday, pedestrians will be detoured starting at Francis Street east along Georgiana Street and back to the trail north along Ennis Street. Crews from Ferndalebased IMCO General Construction will complete the work as part of Phase I of the city’s larger combined sewer overflow — or CSO — project, which will eventually extend sewer lines along the Waterfront Trail from downtown Port Angeles through the former Rayonier mill site to the city’s wastewater treatment plant. The trench, which will be from 6-feet to 8-feet deep, will hold three pipes for the project. It will run parallel to Waterfront Trail and from the west end of the Rayonier site east to the west end of a soon-to-be-built 105-foot bridge over Ennis Creek, Burke said. Sixteen piles have been installed for the new bridge and dirt excavated for the bridge abutments, city Public Works & Utilities Engineering Manager Kathryn Neal said Friday. The span will carry the new sewer lines over Ennis Creek and eventually become part of the Waterfront Trail. Crews will fill in the trench with clean dirt, Burke said.

EVERETT — A 22-yearold man with severe food allergies died in the Snostorm water runoff and homish County jail after a sewage. pot bust, and now his The city purchased the mother says she wants to LONGVIEW — A new tank and 12 acres of Ray- report says a female soldier know why. onier property for $995,000. from Longview killed herThe Herald of Everett Burke estimated crews self in Afghanistan last and KIRO-TV of Seattle could finish the trenching year as she served alone in reported that Michael Safand pipe installation before a guard tower, where she fioti died a day after turnNov. 30 but are taking their was stationed despite a ing himself in to face a time in case unexpected long history of mental misdemeanor marijuana harmful substances or health issues that were not charge July 2. archaeological remains are communicated to her Saffioti’s mother, Rose found. Saffioti, said her son supervisors. Neal said archaeological brought along a bag of The Daily News of investigations last summer Longview reported that an medications needed to condon’t suggest significant Army investigation detertrol his allergies and material will be found, asthma, and he had mined that Spc. Mikayla though archaeologists and Bragg’s commanding officers expected to be placed in the representatives from the jail’s medical unit. Instead, were never told she had Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe he was placed in the genwill be monitoring construc- made an apparent previous eral population. suicide attempt while servtion since the area was once Rose Saffioti said she the site of an ancient Klal- ing stateside in Fort Knox, has spoken with other even though officials at the lam village. inmates who were there, “[Archaeological con- Kentucky base knew of it. and the cause might have Her superiors also didn’t cerns] have been a factor in been what he was served know she had spent 45 this project since the beginfor breakfast. days in an Army hospital at ning,� Neal said. The medical examiner’s Fort Knox for mental The larger combined office determined Thursday sewer overflow project will health treatment just that he died from bronchial increase the capacity of months before she asthma brought on by his sewer lines running from deployed. She had been milk allergy. hospitalized after telling downtown Port Angeles to Saffioti has hired Seatthe city’s wastewater treat- doctors she wanted to crash tle attorney Anne Bremner a car and injure herself. ment plant. to pursue the case. The One behavioral health Ecology estimates 32 Sheriff’s Office said it’s still million gallons of untreated officer wrote to investigainvestigating. wastewater and storm tors that Bragg “fell The Associated Press water flow into the harbor through the cracks.� over 67 separate events each year. After the combined sewer overflow is completed, the city estimates the annual overflow event 4MJEJOH4DSFFOTt4DSFFO%PPST number will drop to 1.3.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Family hopeful Music and lunch on menu as 3-year-old Tuesday at Sequim church battles cancer BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Treatment may take toddler across country

SEQUIM — The Music Live with Lunch series begins again this Tuesday with one enthusiastic performer. Organist Paul Roy of Bainbridge Island will give a concert at noon at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., and then join his audience for lunch in the parish hall. “Come and hear some great classical organ gems performed on the King of Instruments,â€? said Roy, who will offer the Grand Choeur by ThĂŠodore

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — A Sequim family is fighting for its future: Their 3-year-old son, Brody Neal, is fighting brain cancer and began chemotherapy while his mother delivered his younger sister prematurely. The Neal family — parents Shane and Alicia, 3-year-old Brody, 1-year-old Taylor and 3-week-old Myha — spent the past week at Seattle Children’s Hospital living in a travel trailer while Brody began his first week of chemotherapy, said Kristy Traband, a family friend acting as spokeswoman for the family while they are out of town. “So far through this all, Brody has been very strong and has recovered very well for what he has been through,� said his mother, Alicia Kuznek-Neal. “I know he is strong enough to overcome this, and with positive energy and all the love and support of family and friends, we will fight and survive this cancer.�

Began in April

Brody Neal neuroectodermal embriogenic tumor� or a mixed glioma tumor. Because of the complexity of the cancerous cells found, doctors aren’t certain exactly which kind of brain cancer Brody has, and whether it is at stage 3 or 4, she said. As the stress of Brody’s illness continued as chemotherapy approached, Alicia, due to give birth to the couple’s third child in late October, went into early labor, Traband said. Myha Neal was born Sept. 27, just days before Brody was scheduled to begin chemotherapy, she said.

Dubois, a prelude by C ĂŠ s a r Franck, Buxtehude’s “Jigâ€? Fugue in C M a j o r, J a c q u e s - Roy Nicolas Lemmens’ “Fanfareâ€? and works by Charles Callahan and Johann Pachelbel. All of this fits into Roy’s 30-minute performance; lunch is served at 12:30 p.m., and admission is $10 for music and meal. No reservations are needed, said series coordinator Sammy Greenwood.

The family’s ordeal began April 26 when Brody woke up in the family car, began vomiting and had chills. An hour later, he was lethargic, became incoherent and didn’t know where he was or who he was, his mother said. He was taken to Olympic Medical Center, but medical personnel could not find the cause, she said. Follow-up testing with a pediatrician also showed no results. In June, the family was referred to a neurologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where a series of brain scans revealed a large brain tumor, which was removed Sept. 6. “It was such an unusual tumor that they sent it to numerous specialists around the country for a second opinion,� Alicia said. About a week later, the family met with an oncologist and learned that Brody _________ had brain cancer. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be His mother reported reached at 360-452-2345, ext. that Brody was diagnosed 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula with either a “primitive dailynews.com.

Classical music

and a delicious lunch� — which he knows from having performed four times before for the Music Live series. The noontime concerts are held every third Tuesday of the month at St. Luke’s, October through May excepting December, Greenwood noted. Music lovers can purchase season tickets for $50 at the St. Luke’s office. For more details, phone the church at 360-683-4862.

The idea is simple: live classical music, then a hot lunch for anybody who can get away for an hour. Music Live with Lunch happens thanks to players such as Roy, who volunteer their time. The only payment received: two lunch tickets. ________ When asked what inspired him to come all Features Editor Diane Urbani the way from Bainbridge de la Paz can be reached at 360Island, Roy replied: “Great 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. venue [and] audience . . . urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

Meeting to tackle Social Security benefits questions PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Questions about Social Security benefits will be answered by at the next meeting of the Shelter Providers Network of Clallam County. Kirk Larson, Western Washington public affairs specialist for the Social Security Administration, will speak at the Wednesday meeting of the group. The meeting will convene at 9 a.m. in Holy Trinity Lutheran Church’s downstairs fellowship hall, 301 Lopez Ave., Port Angeles. Sign-in begins at 8:30 a.m. The group’s usual reports and discussion related to ending homelessness will be condensed. Larson will speak at 9:30 a.m. He said he will include ample time for questions and answers. Shelter Providers meetings generally end by 10:30 a.m., but Larson has volunteered to stay longer. “Everyone can benefit

Travel expected Traband said the family is living in a travel trailer outside of the hospital during the stay at Children’s Hospital, and some members of the family will need to fly to Boston or Houston with Brody so that he can get more advanced treatment. There are several opportunities for the community to help the family, she said. Donations to the family can be made at http:// tinyurl.com/pdnbrody. A benefit dinner and silent auction will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday, at Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave. “There are some really cool silent auction items, like a cord of firewood,� Traband said. The dinner and auction are open to everyone, she said. Benefit for Brody’s Battle Golf Tournament on Oct. 21 will begin with lunch at 11:30 a.m. and tee time at 1 p.m. at SkyRidge Golf Course, 7015 Old Olympic Highway in Carlsborg. The four-person scramble costs $55 per person, including lunch.

“Music Live with Lunch has been an outreach program at St Luke’s for more than 20 years,� she added.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CRESCENT HIGH

ROYALTY

Beau Bamer and Kelly Belford are crowned Homecoming king and queen during halftime at Crescent High School in Joyce on Saturday. The Crescent Loggers defeated Tulalip Heritage Hawks 47-14. The rest of the court were princes Luke Leonard, Zach Fletcher and Sage Fadness and princesses Larissa Garrison, Lauren Hartley, Shannon Williams and Olivia Ambriz.

ALSO . . . ■ Next year’s Social Security increase to be less than 2 percent/A3

from a better understanding of Social Security,� said Larson, who has presented Social Security information to groups in Washington and California, in numerous published articles and on television and radio shows during his more than 19 years with the agency. “We scheduled Kirk’s presentation especially for social service workers who help clients access benefits for which they qualify, but we are issuing a special invitation to the public to also attend,� said Martha Ireland, Shelter Providers coordinator. For more information, contact Ireland, who also writes a commentary column for the Peninsula Daily News, at 360-452-4737 or email shelterproviders network@gmail.com.

Power surges knock out portions of Clallam County emergency dispatch BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County’s emergency dispatch center, PenCom, lost a portion of its phone and radio services Sunday after a bird knocked out portions of the city’s phone system. At about 2 p.m., the PenCom offices at the Port Angeles Police Department

were hit by a pair of power surges, which knocked out the radio and outgoing telephone services, said Karl Hatton, PenCom supervisor. “The radio system was down for about 15 to 10 minutes,� Hatton said. Telephone service was restored in about an hour. Neither the incoming 9-1-1 emergency call system nor the emergency computer-

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aided communications system was affected by the communications outage, he said. Hatton said PenCom dispatchers were able to use the 2-year-old computer system, which enables PenCom and units in the field to communicate via written message, to notify police and fire units of the dispatch center’s communication outage. “We were able to give officers updates,� Hatton said.

Port Angeles police and fire departments tracked reports of a transformer fire near Fifth Street and found the problem at a transformer in an alley between Fifth and Sixth streets, near Lincoln Street. “A sea gull got into a transformer,� he said.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

UW scientist finds security holes for connected devices possible to improve privacy, should companies do so?� Kohno is the only professor at the UW whose area is computer security, but his work crosses other disciplines in the department. He was attracted to the university in part by the collaborative reputation of the its computer science and engineering department. “There’s definitely a culture of tinkerers here, people who like to learn on their own, to build systems that understand vulnerabilities,� he said. “It is through being inquisitive that we start to ask, ‘Are there vulnerabilities? Are there ways of misusing this technology?’ “ Kohno teaches an undergraduate class in computer security, and one of the assignments he gives students is to scan announcements for new products, then figure out if these new devices could be vulnerable to hackers.

PBS show to feature professor BY KATHERINE LONG THE SEATTLE TIMES

SEATTLE — For most people, computer security means just that: Keeping viruses off your desktop or laptop, your PC or your Mac. But when Tadayoshi Kohno thinks of computers and security, he thinks about the vulnerabilities inherent in a whole range of devices that are increasingly connected wirelessly to the Internet, to cellphones or to each other. A computer scientist at the University of Washington, Kohno has proved that you can hack and take over the circuitry of a pacemaker, an implantable defibrillator, a child’s toy, a mileagetracking device for runners, and — perhaps most chilling of all — a car. Kohno, 34, is so good at what he does that government regulators and manufacturers habitually beat a path to his door, in the UW’s computer science and engineering department, where he is an associate professor. Kohno will be featured Wednesday on PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW, in an episode that examines whether science can help solve crime.

Hacks into car Appearing at the end of the hourlong show, Kohno demonstrates how he hacks into a car — opening its doors, starting the engine and then, dramatically, taking control of its brakes to bring the vehicle to a skidding stop. “Every system out there could be compromised in some way, by some adversary,� Kohno said. “My biggest concern about the future is we’re going to have this ubiquitous ‘Internet of things,’ but we haven’t thought adequately about computer security.� At the UW, Kohno plays a kind of “what-if� game with his colleagues, trying to stay one step ahead of the bad guys by imagining how all kinds of devices that could be hacked and used for malicious intent. The boyish scientist, who dresses like a student, describes his work as “very fun.� “Yoshi has been on our radar for a while,� said Julia Cort, executive producer of

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University of Washington computer scientist Tadayoshi Kohno sits outside his office. “There’s definitely a culture of tinkerers here,� he says of the UW. NOVA scienceNOW. “What he’s discovering is going to be so surprising to some people — he’s hunting down these weaknesses in systems we have all around us.� Kohno has published numerous papers and received several awards, including a Sloan Research Fellowship and a MIT Technology Review Young Innovator Award. He’s been at the UW since 2006. He’s quick to point out that many of the risks he investigates are somewhat theoretical, even though they make for good TV.

No ‘perfect security’ “There’s no such thing as perfect security, and no such thing as insecurity,� he said. “The question is, is this system sufficiently secure for my purposes?� Kohno shared his research about car-hacking, published with colleagues at the University of California-San Diego, with the auto industry and government regulators. As a result, the U.S.

Council for Automotive Research and SAE International, an automotive-engineering society, both created task forces to examine what should be done to make cars more secure, Kohno said.

Auto industry response The U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have taken notice, too. “I’ve been very impressed with the response from the automotive industry, and very pleased by how much they’re focusing on security these days,� he said. Kohno has proved that it’s technically possible to hack into medical devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators. He’s also shown that it’s possible to use a consumer product, the Nike+ iPod sport kit, to track a runner’s location — although, “to be honest, in that case, the risk is pretty low,� he said. Still, it raises an interesting question for Kohno: “Even if the risk is low, if it’s

Wolves subject of land trust lecture PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

Briefly . . .

Professional photographers David and Casey Gluckman will present “Images of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge,� like this of a greater sage grouse, at an Admiralty Audubon Society meeting at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., at 7 p.m. Thursday.

Talk to focus on national wildlife park PORT TOWNSEND — Professional photographers David and Casey Gluckman will present “Images of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge� at a meeting of the Admiralty Audubon Society on Thursday. The free event will be held at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., at 7 p.m. The presentation will describe the many faces of this refuge, located above 4,000 feet in east-central Oregon. It will include images of the greater sage grouse, as well as a wide variety of migratory and resident bird activity. The discussion also will include where to find different birds in the spring.

He and the other faculty and students in the UW’s Security and Privacy Research Lab have also created a card game, ControlAlt-Hack, designed to teach high school and college-age students about computer security. Players take on the role of “white-hat hackers� — or ethical hackers — and perform security audits and provide consultation services. Production of the game was funded, in part, Square dance set by Intel Labs and the PORT TOWNSEND — National Science FoundaThe Third Saturday Square tion, and it will be distrib- Dance at Quimper Grange, uted for free to educators. 1219 Corona St., will feature caller Rita Mandoli ‘Lives his work’ with local band Skookum “One of things that I Boys playing the tunes. The dance will be held really liked about Yoshi for a profile is that he really from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. lives his work,� said Cort, Saturday. The suggested donation the PBS producer. “It’s clear is $5 to $10, free for ages his work reflects his world 16 and younger. view. He’s looking for security holes everywhere.� Grange potluck set Growing up in Boulder, JOYCE — A community Colo., Kohno said he had eclectic interests. He was potluck will be held at drawn to computers because Crescent Grange, 50870 he enjoyed experimenting state Highway 112, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. with them, treating a comMusical group Serendipputer as a kind of labora- ity will provide entertaintory for his creativity. ment at the event. “I feel computer security The group, which plays is a very interesting subdis- music from the 1940s to cipline of computer science the ’60s, came together because of the cat-and- through a chance meeting mouse game we play,� he that inspired their name. said. “It’s like a game of Group members are Ed chess, always trying to out- Murray on guitar; Mona Murray on violin; Waynne think the other party.�

Sheilds on violin, viola and keyboard; Ray Mason on bass; and vocalist Jinny Longfellow. Members of Clallam County Pomona also will be present for this annual Booster night. A silent auction will aid the community food drive.

SARC group meets SEQUIM — A Friends of SARC (Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center) meeting will be held at the facility, 610 N. Fifth Ave., at 9 a.m. Thursday. The purpose of the volunteer group is to increase local awareness of SARC and what SARC offers to the community. The public is welcome to attend and is encouraged to bring proactive suggestions and ideas. Attendees do not have to be SARC pass-holders to attend. Refreshments will be served.

Park friends meet PORT ANGELES — Historian and Peninsula Daily News columnist Alice Alexander will present Lake Crescent, Gem of the Olympics: A History of Early Resorts at Thursday’s meeting of the Friends of Olympic National Park. The event will be held at the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road, at 7 p.m. Dave Colthorp will be presented with the “Most Inspirational Friend of Olympic National Park� Award at the meeting. He will be honored “for integrating historic preservation into park maintenance.� The event is free and open to the public. For more information, phone Dan Peacock at 360928-3626 or contact Rod Farlee at 360-681-4518 or rodfarlee@olypen.com. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice ERIC DAVIDSON July 13, 1965 October 8, 2012 Eric was a man of laughter. He enjoyed a good joke, a skillful ribbing and even a little mocking. He thought his charming smile could fix anything. Music made him happy, as did reading and creative writing. He was spontaneous and always up for an adventure. A talented man, Eric flourished in a variety of jobs throughout his life, including commercial fishing, car sales, hospital

A7

phlebotomy and landscaping. He could be counted on in times of crises to be strong and caring. Nothing brought a bigger smile to his face than a well-made slice of apple pie, especially if it was to be followed by a nice long nap. He was preceded in death by his father, Donald Davidson II. He leaves behind his wife of 19 years, Autumn Davidson, and his two children, Asa, age 17, and Brenna, age 15. Other family members

mourning his passing include his mother, Linda Davidson; his two brothers, Donald and Ben, along with their families; and his sister, Sarah Davidson. Eric was well-loved by his immediate and extended family, who will continue to nurture his greatest legacy: his son and daughter, whom he loved. Services will be held on Saturday, October 20, at 3 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Church, 91 South Boyce Road in Sequim.

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is avail-

able at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.� ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.� For further information, call 360-417-3527.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 15, 2012 PAGE

A8

Your computer is your chauffeur DRIVERLESS CARS ARE on the horizon, and we can all start feeling ancient now. The youngest among us will remember the Froma days when we had to Harrop keep our hands on the steering wheel and foot near the brake. Joining “icebox” and “fire stable” will be such terms as “behind the wheel,” “pedal to the metal” and “in the driver’s seat.” Hipsters yet to be born will laugh at worried talk of “blind spots” and complaints of “backseat drivers.” Windshields with suction-cup marks from primitive GPS devices may become wall art, just as those old blue-glass Delco batteries now hold sunflowers. I can’t wait. The notion of dropping into some soft leather seat, saying, “Take me to the movie theater” (if there still are movie theaters), then pouring a nice glass of cabernet is most appealing. There will be no such thing anymore as drunken drivers because there will be no drivers. Drunken passengers, sure. Radar will detect objects, including pedestrians and brick walls. Cameras will record lane lines, and infrared versions will see better at night than a raccoon. Some of the newer driverless models go 70 mph. There will be fewer traffic jams because the computer-run cars will know not to smash into their neighbors. Most accidents are caused by human error, explains traffic expert Tom Vander-

bilt in Wired magazine. The driverless car’s computer “is better than human in every way.” Driverless cars will reduce the need for new pavement. Did you know that vehicles take up only 5 percent of the road surface on even the most congested highways? “Hyperalert and algorithmically optimized” cars should be able to safely cruise bumper to bumper, according to Vanderbilt. I keep using the future tense, but actually, some driverless cars are already on the roads. A fleet of Google driverless cars now ply the byways of the San Francisco Bay area. They have signs on them saying “self-driving car,” lest a shocked driver think he’s encountered a vehicular headless horseman. California recently legalized driverless cars, following the lead of Nevada and Florida. Bear in mind that driverless cars were never officially banned — for obvious reasons. A legal question for the 21st century: If your driverless car does get in an accident, whom is to blame, you or the software developer? A philosophical question: Are driverless cars computerized vehicles or computers on wheels? Clearly, Google believes in the latter. But the auto industry is hard at work making its case. Traditional cars are already highly computerized. Some advanced features, such as automatic parallel parking, involve driverless movement. Several major carmakers have research centers in Silicon Valley. So go forth, motorists: Write text messages till your thumbs turn blue.

Peninsula Voices Wild Olympics An article in the Oct. 4 Peninsula Daily News (“PA Taking Up Wild Olympics”) described me as a board member of North Olympic Land Trust (NOLT). I do serve on that board, but I spoke to the City Council without mentioning any organization. I respect land trust policies permitting advocacy

only after examining how a proposal might fit with its mission “to protect the biodiversity, natural resources and cultural heritage of the North Olympic Peninsula,” as well as such other considerations as the organization’s available expertise and resources. The board has not taken such action. My support for the pro-

posal from Sen. [Patty] Murray and Congressman [Norm] Dicks that modified the Wild Olympics proposal does stem from similar motivations to those inspiring my volunteer work with the land trust. NOLT permanently protects many acres of timberland as well as land that produces food, provides habitat for salmon and

Gesticulate wildly as you argue on the phone. Play around with your 2,000 stations. Neck in the backseat — or the front seat, for that matter. You are no longer in charge, which means the driving time is all yours. Ooooh. But what’s going to happen to that time? The utopian side says the hours our eyes were glued to the road will be spent in leisure or intellectual pursuits. The dystopian side says that the effort the technology saves us will create more time for work. Have smartphones freed up your day? The possibilities are endless. Children

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES other wildlife, and ensures that other qualities we value will be there for present and future generations. I think it is important to protect and improve the economy as well as the environment that contributes to our quality of life. Information I researched states that the proposed legislation, as revised by Sen. Murray

will take themselves to clarinet lessons. The elderly will no longer worry about losing their ability to drive. On a sour note, computer hackers will be able to commit crimes against passengers yet unimagined. But this part of our future is inevitable: Everyone will have a chauffeur, and leave the driving to it.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her via info@creators.com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

AND EMAIL

and Congressman Dicks, “will not close roads, restrict access or cost a single timber job.” I also talked with the highly regarded forester and Merrill & Ring timber company vice president, Norm Schaaf, and confirmed that he supports this proposal. I then wrote and spoke to City Council as an indi-

vidual who cares deeply about our area’s well-being. Robbie Mantooth, Port Angeles

Driver courtesy The traffic circle yield signs are an improvement. But a signal of which way a driver is going would be a great courtesy. Kurt Vieten, Sequim

Unraveling the mystery of Benghazi TWENTY-FOUR HOURS AFTER the American compound in Benghazi, Libya, was attacked and our ambassador murdered, the tragedy seemed more likely to help President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign than to damage it. The White House already Ross enjoyed more public credibil- Douthat ity on foreign policy than on almost any other issue. When Mitt Romney reacted to the attack with a partisan broadside, portraying a news release sent out by the Cairo embassy before any violence began as a White House apology to the attackers, the president’s path forward seemed clear. He would be disciplined and careful, show anger and steel but also coolness under pressure, and let the rally-round-the-flag effect do its natural work. What happened instead was very strange. Having first repudiated the embassy’s apology to Muslims offended by a movie impugning their prophet, the Obama admin-

istration decided to embrace that apology’s premise, and insist that the movie was the crucial ingredient in the Sept. 11 anniversary violence. For days after the attack, as it became clearer that the Benghazi violence was an al-Quaida operation rather than a protest, White House officials continued to stress the importance of the “hateful” and “disgusting” video, and its supposed role as a catalyst for what Susan Rice, the ambassador to the United Nations, insisted was a spontaneous attack. This narrative was pushed on Sunday morning programs, on late-night talk shows and at news conferences, by everyone from Rice to Hillary Clinton to the president himself. When Obama spoke at the United Nations shortly after the attacks, the video was referenced six times in the text; al-Qaida was referenced only once. Eventually, the White House let the video slip quietly out of its public rhetoric, and refocused on terrorism instead. But everything else that’s come out about Benghazi has seemed much more damning because the administration practiced a strange denial at the outset. The missed warnings, the

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weaknesses in security, the dripdrip of detail unspigoted by reporting and congressional hearings — all of it would have been received differently if the White House hadn’t spent a week acting as if it had something big to lose by calling terrorism terrorism. What explains this self-defeating strategy? One possibility is that Romney’s oft-repeated “apology tour” charge is right, and this White House can’t resist the urge to appease our enemies when America comes under attack. But Romney’s portrait of Obama as Neville Chamberlain has always been just a caricature, and nobody who watched the Democratic convention should doubt Obama’s comfort wrapping himself in the mantle of the war on terror. Another, more plausible possibility is that precisely because this White House wants to be seen as tough on terrorism, it’s loath to acknowledge the possibility that it doesn’t have alQaida completely on the run. But even this seems insufficient to explain the White House’s Benghazi blundering. Surely acknowledging the persistence of al-Qaida wouldn’t undercut the administration’s (justifiable) boasts about having

taken out its leader. Indeed, if Osama bin Laden’s organization is still with us, why wouldn’t Americans want to keep the president who gave the Abbottabad order so he could finish the job? Perhaps, then, the real explanation for the White House’s anxiety about calling the embassy attack an act of terror has less to do with the “who” than with the “where.” This wasn’t al-Qaida striking just anywhere; it was al-Qaida striking in Libya, a country where the Obama White House launched a not-precisely-constitutional military intervention with a not-precisely-clear connection to the national interest. In a long profile of President Obama published last month by Vanity Fair, Michael Lewis suggested that the president feared the consequences of even a single casualty during the Libyan incursion, lest it create a narrative about how “a president elected to extract us from a war in one Arab country got Americans killed in another.” How much more, then, might the president fear a narrative about how our Libyan intervention helped create a power vacuum in which terrorists groups can operate with impunity? That’s clearly happened in

nearby Mali, where the ripple effects from Moammar Gadhafi’s overthrow have helped empower an al-Qaida affiliate. In this context, it’s easy to see why the administration would hope that the Benghazi attack were just spontaneous mob violence rather than a sign of alQaida growing presence in postintervention Libya as well. The only good news for Obama in this mess is the fact that Romney, always intent on projecting toughness, hasn’t attacked the original decision to go to war in Libya, or tied the intervention itself to al-Qaida’s North African advances. If the Republican nominee were less reflexively hawkish, the White House might be facing the more comprehensive critique that it deserves — and the story wouldn’t be about just the specifics of Benghazi, but also the possibility that Obama’s entire policy in the region has put American interests and lives at risk.

________ Ross Douthat is a columnist for The New York Times and film critic for National Review. He can be emailed via his blog at http://douthat.blogs.nytimes. com. Thomas L. Friedman, whose column usually appears Mondays, is off this week.

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Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 margaret.mckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525 brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 15 , 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B Preps

Loggers smash Tulalip PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOYCE — The Crescent Loggers gave their big homecoming crowd plenty to cheer about by taking down the Tulalip Heritage Hawks 47-14 on Saturday. With the win, ALSO . . . Crescent moves to ■ Neah Bay 6-1 on the season, pounds its best start since Lopez into the Loggers’ 1996 ground, state champion50-0/B3 ship run. Playing in front of friends, family and classmates — who had come to honor the seniors in their last home game — the Loggers got off to an auspicious beginning. Tulalip grabbed a quick 6-0 lead with only 10 seconds elapsed from the game-clock by jumping the opening on-side kickoff attempt by Crescent and taking it 50 yards to the end zone. But the Loggers countered quickly with Derek Findley doing the early damage, first running the ensuing kickoff back 31 yards, then taking a Beau Bamer pass for 12 more to set up Mike Zapien and fleet-footed Eric Larson to rip off consecutive runs of 11 and 12 yards. Larson hit pay-dirt on a 12-yard sprint, and with Findley adding the PAT kick, it was a 7-6 Logger lead, an advantage they would never relinquish. The Logger defense then took over, forcing Tulalip into a threeand-out series. Following a 12-yard punt return by Findley, it took the Loggers’ explosive offense only two plays to score: a Bamer strike to Findley for 41 yards followed by a 5-yard Zapien scoring plunge.

Nine-point lead The successful Bamer run on the conversion moved the score to 15-6 at the end of period one. Tulalip responded with its only scoring drive of the day by going to air and then the final one yard on the ground by Robert Miles Jr. The successful two-point conversion cut the Crescent lead to 15-14 at the 6:52 mark of the second quarter. But that close score wouldn’t last long. The Loggers immediately went to work on offense, putting together a 74-yard scoring drive, the last 50 on a classic Larson off-tackle sprint through the secondary. The 21-14 halftime score remained close for just two minutes into the third quarter. That’s all the time it took for Larson to put the Loggers on his back as he accounted for 54 yards on the drive, the last 39 on another legchurning sprint to pay-dirt to move the scoreboard to 27-14. Larson would pop off two more scoring runs of 27 and 45 yards as he went for more than 270 yards and five touchdowns on the day. Findley found the end zone on one final drive as Crescent scored the game’s final five touchdowns for a convincing 47-14 win. “Just a great performance from the seniors in their final home football game,” Crescent coach Darrell Yount said. “They had resolved to go out on top, to put together one final epic performance for themselves, their team and for the home fans; just a nice win and a nice rebound from one week ago.” Lummi crushed the Loggers last week in Joyce. “We were finally successful in putting together a fairly complete game,” Yount said. “We did leave 21 points laying out on the field what with a few miscues, but offensively, we do what we do. “The real difference was a defense that really stepped up to stuff a pretty talented and explosive Tulalip team. “Gene Peppard, Zapien and Josh Sowders simply took over up front. And with Hutto and Larson sealing the edges, that makes life pretty nice for their teammates at the second level. TURN

TO

PREPS/B3

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Sidney Rice comes down with a game-winning touchdown reception in the final minutes against Tom Brady and the New England Patriots on Sunday in Seattle. The young Seahawks defense kept Brady and New England out of the end zone in the final 1:18 to win 24-23.

Hawks stun Patriots Wilson calmly rallies team for late victory BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Tom Brady and the best offense in the NFL got upstaged by an undersized rookie. And an outstanding young defense. In the final minutes, it was Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks making all the big plays. Wilson found Sidney Rice behind the secondary for a 46-yard touchdown with 1:18 remaining, and the Seahawks rallied for 14 points in the final 7:31 to stun the New England Patriots 24-23 Sunday. The matchup between the Patriots’ No. 1 ranked offense and Seattle’s No. 1 defense instead turned in to a starring performance for Wilson, and a

shocking rally. Wilson hit Braylon Edwards on fourth down for a 10-yard touchdown to get the Seahawks within 23-17. After a pair of holds by Seattle’s defense, Wilson found Rice streaking open on a double move for his third touchdown pass of the game. Steven Hauschka’s extra point gave Seattle (4-2) the lead with 78 seconds remaining. Brady had a final chance to make up for all the opportunities the Patriots (3-3) squandered. Starting at his 20 with 1:14 left, Brady missed Brandon Lloyd, then was sacked by Jason Jones, the first sack all day by Seattle. His pass for Aaron Hernandez, back after being out since

Week 2 with an ankle injury, was incomplete, and Wes Welker was Next Game stopped short on Thursday fourth down. vs. 49ers That gave at San Francisco former Patri- Time: 5:20 p.m. ots coach On TV: Ch. 6 Pete Carroll one of his biggest pro victories. Wilson finished 16 of 27 for 293 yards, the best day of his young career. He added Brady to an impressive list of quarterbacks he’s topped this year: Tony Romo, Aaron Rodgers and Cam Newton. Brady finished 36 of 58 for 395 yards and touchdown passes of 1 yard to Hernandez and 46 yards to Welker in the first half. Welker had 10 catches for 138 yards, his fourth straight game over 100.

Brady topped 300 yards passing for the 49th time, but was intercepted in the second half by Richard Sherman and Earl Thomas after going 179 attempts without being picked off. One of Brady’s interceptions came in the end zone, yet another squandered chance by the Patriots. Seattle gained 158 yards in the first quarter, then just 70 in the second and third quarters combined. But Wilson had a big rally left. Stephen Gostkowski’s third field goal, a 35-yarder, with 9:21 remaining gave the Patriots’ a 23-10 lead, the third time New England settled for field goals. There was also a Patriots drive at the end of the first half when coach Bill Belichick opted to throw with 6 seconds remaining instead of kicking the field goal from the Seattle 3. Brady was flagged for intentional grounding and the ensuing time runoff ended the half.

PT runs over Life Christian Redskins roll 30-14 despite losing top player in 2nd half BY LEE HORTON PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend showed it can excel even without starting quarterback Jacob King in the Redskins’ 30-14 win over Life Christian Academy on Saturday night at Memorial Athletic Field. King limped through much of the first half with a deep thigh bruise, but the pain became too much and he was forced to spend the entire second half on the sidelines. Leading just 13-7, the Redskins would have to play the final two quarters without their best player. “In the locker room there was kind of a blank stare on their faces when [they found out] their team leader’s gone, the guy that’s been leading them all season long,” Port Townsend head coach Nick Snyder said. “But, they stepped up.” The early signs of trepidation didn’t follow the remaining Redskins onto the field. Life Christian fumbled the opening kickoff of the second half. Port Townsend recovered and backup quarterback Jeff Seton led them on a drive that was finished off by an 11-yard Matt Cain touchdown run.

Football On second play of the ensuing drive, Cain stepped in front of Life Christian quarterback’s Taylor Roelofs and raced down the sidelines for a 47-yard interception return for a touchdown. Just four minutes into the third quarter, the Port Townsend lead had grown to 27-7. “My concern was how are we going to handle the adversity of losing Jacob, and maybe coming out flat, and just the opposite happened,” Snyder said. “We rose up because of it, and I thought we played better in the second half.” The Redskins had a lot to replace when King went down: ■ Big plays — Cain took care of these with his two touchdowns. ■ A go-to offensive player — the Redskins repeatedly called Tim Russell’s number for runs up the middle. He finished with 18 carries and 95 yards. “Tim Russell pounding off tackle was — he was the man in that second half,” Snyder said. ■ A free safety — Layne Zack filled in nicely here. “Defensively, Layne Zack had to go to free safety [after King went out],” Snyder said. TURN

TO

FOOTBALL/B3

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend’s Skyler Coppenrath hauls in a 36-yard pass as Life Christian’s Hunter Haley tries to defend in the Nisqually League game at Memorial Field in Port Townsend on Saturday night.


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

8 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Greater Hickory Classic, Final Round, Site: Rock Barn Golf & Country Club - Conover, N.C. Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Frys.com Open, Final Round, Site: CordeValle Golf Club - San Martin, Calif. 1 p.m. (25) ROOT Soccer EPL, Newcastle United vs. Manchester United 5 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants, National League Championship Series (Live) 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, Denver Broncos vs. San Diego Chargers, Site: Qualcomm Stadium San Diego (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

Today Volleyball: Bellevue Christian at Chimacum, 5:45 p.m.

Tuesday Volleyball: Crescent at Clallam Bay, 5 p.m.; Sequim at Port Townsend, 6:15 p.m. (Senior Night); North Mason at Port Angeles, 6:15 p.m.; Montesano at Forks, 7 p.m.; Evergreen Lutheran at Quilcene, 6 p.m. Girls Soccer: Cedar Park Christian at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Montesano at Forks, 6 p.m.; Sequim at Port Townsend, 6:45 p.m. (Senior Night); Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 6:45 p.m.

Wednesday Volleyball: Chimacum at Vashon Island, 5:45 p.m. Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College vs. Bellevue at Starfire No. 1 in Tukwila, 3 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Bellevue, 1 p.m.

New Orleans 1

Area Sports BMX Racing Port Angeles BMX Track Potluck Race Saturday 36-40 CRUISER 1 RYAN GENTRY 2 SCOTT GULISAO 3 GERI THOMPSON 1 2 3 4

5 & UNDER NOVICE JARON TOLLIVER RYAN ALBIN DION JOHNSON DOMINIK “DOMINATOR” JOHNSON

6 INTERMEDIATE 1 JOSEPH RITCHIE 2 KAIDEN CHARLES 3 JEREMY CHARLES 1 2 3 4

9 INTERMEDIATE TOPPY ROBIDEAU ARIK HEACOX BODI SANDERSON ANDREW HEACOX

1 2 3 4 5

14 EXPERT GREG FARIS ZACHARY SLOTA MOOSE JOHNSON TRENTON OWEN NOAH GENTRY

Darts Port Angeles Soft Tip Dart Association League Oct. 7-8 Notables Nine Mark: Jesse Patterson and Lorie Richardson A Flight Top Shooters Men: Craig Baker 9.02, Jesse Patterson 6.85. Women: Lorie Richardson 2.06, Jody Batchelor 1.55. B Flight Top Shooters Men: Davy Graham 6.21, Jon Gowdy 3.39. Women: JoAnne Crawford 1.24, Phyllis Criel 1.20. The Matches A Flight Alibi Sandbaggers 12, My Alibi 9 Sergio’s Pounders 8, Alibi Dam Darts 13 B Flight Sergio’s 9, Alibi Newbies 10 Salt Creek BFE 9, Alibi Ghostriders 10 Alibi Misfits 10, RBar Wrecking Crew 9

Preps Washington Football How Fared Class 4A 1. Skyline (7-0) beat Newport 56-28. 2. Federal Way (7-0) beat Spanaway Lake 42-13. 3. Camas (7-0) beat Union 22-0. 4. Gonzaga Prep (7-0) beat Rogers (Spokane) 52-14. 5. Kentwood (7-0) beat Tahoma 35-13. 6. Bellarmine Prep (6-1) beat Yelm 56-7. 7. Mead (6-1) beat Central Valley 26-16. 8. Ferris (6-1) beat Lewis and Clark 17-0. 9. Curtis (6-1) beat Auburn Riverside 49-0. 10. Skyview (5-2) beat Evergreen (Vancouver) 44-7. Class 3A 1. Bellevue (7-0) beat Mount Si 49-10. 2. Mount Si (6-1) lost to Bellevue 49-10. 3. Meadowdale (6-1) lost to Eastlake 16-0. 4. Eastside Catholic (7-0) beat O’Dea 35-21. 5. O’Dea (5-2) lost to Eastside Catholic 35-21. 6. Oak Harbor (6-1) beat Marysville-Getchell 28-14. (tie) Ferndale (7-0) beat Bellingham 48-0. 8. Shelton (6-1) lost to North Thurston 21-20. 9. Glacier Peak (6-1) beat Shorewood 24-14. 10. Timberline (6-1) beat Mount Tahoma 40-6. Class 2A 1. Othello (6-0) beat Selah 48-0. 2. Lakewood (7-0) beat Cedarcrest 55-0. 3. Lynden (6-1) beat Burlington-Edison 34-7. 4. Prosser (6-1) beat West Valley (Yakima) 19-8. 5. Tumwater (6-1) beat Centralia 48-0. 6. Capital (5-2) beat Black Hills 56-7. 7. Mark Morris (6-1) beat Ridgefield 21-14. 8. W. F. West (5-2) beat River Ridge 44-26. 9. East Valley (Spokane) (5-2) lost to West Valley (Spokane) 30-27. 10. West Valley (Spokane) (6-1) beat East Valley (Spokane) 30-27. Class 1A 1. King’s (7-0) beat Granite Falls 57-7. 2. Royal (7-0) beat Connell 47-0. 3. Cashmere (7-0) beat Brewster 83-0. 4. Cle Elum/Roslyn (6-1) lost to Zillah 42-35. 5. Hoquiam (7-0) beat Rainier 63-0. 6. Cascade Christian (6-1) beat Cedar Park Christian (Bothell) 28-0. 7. LaCenter (7-0) beat Seton Catholic 71-0. 8. Blaine (6-1) beat Meridian 34-27.

SPORTS ON TV

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TIGERS

LEAD

2-0

Detroit Tigers’ Phil Coke, left, and Alex Avila celebrate after beating the New York Yankees 3-0 in Game 2 of the American League championship series Sunday in New York. The series continues Tuesday in Detroit. 9. Charles Wright Academy (6-0) beat Chimacum 34-7. 10. Montesano (5-2) beat Tenino 50-7. Class 2B 1. Morton/White Pass (7-0) beat Wahkiakum 51-6. 2. Waitsburg-Prescott (6-1) beat Mabton 54-8. 3. Willapa Valley (6-0) idle. 4. Wahkiakum (6-1) lost to Morton/White Pass 51-6. 5. Tekoa-Oakesdale/Rosalia (6-1) lost to DeSales 38-12. 6. Lind-Ritzville/Sprague (6-0) beat Reardan 34-0. 7. Colfax (4-1) beat Springdale 40-6. (tie) DeSales (5-1) beat Tekoa-Oakesdale/ Rosalia 38-12. 9. Naselle (4-2) lost to Raymond 14-6. 10. Reardan (4-2) lost to Lind-Ritzville/ Sprague 34-0. Class 1B 1. Liberty Christian (7-0) beat Colton 56-8. 2. Neah Bay (7-0) beat Lopez 50-0. 3. Cusick (7-0) beat Selkirk 52-12. 4. Lummi (5-2) beat Clallam Bay 73-18. 5. Almira/Coulee-Hartline (6-1) beat WilburCreston 48-6.

College Football College Football Major Scores FAR WEST Air Force 28, Wyoming 27 Boise St. 20, Fresno St. 10 Cal Poly 56, N. Colorado 28 California 31, Washington St. 17 E. Washington 27, Montana St. 24 Nevada 42, UNLV 37 New Mexico 35, Hawaii 23 Oregon St. 42, BYU 24 S. Utah 30, Montana 20 Sacramento St. 19, Weber St. 14 San Diego 44, Campbell 0 San Diego St. 38, Colorado St. 14 Southern Cal 24, Washington 14 UC Davis 52, Idaho St. 45 UCLA 21, Utah 14 Utah St. 49, San Jose St. 27 MIDWEST Alabama 42, Missouri 10 Ball St. 30, W. Michigan 24, OT Bowling Green 37, Miami (Ohio) 12 Cincinnati 49, Fordham 17 Dayton 41, Morehead St. 27 Drake 35, Valparaiso 21 E. Illinois 31, Jacksonville St. 28 Illinois St. 35, Youngstown St. 28 Indiana St. 17, N. Dakota St. 14 Iowa 19, Michigan St. 16, 2OT Kansas St. 27, Iowa St. 21 Michigan 45, Illinois 0 Missouri St. 27, South Dakota 24 N. Arizona 45, North Dakota 38 N. Illinois 45, Buffalo 3 Northwestern 21, Minnesota 13 Notre Dame 20, Stanford 13, OT Ohio 34, Akron 28 Ohio St. 52, Indiana 49 Oklahoma St. 20, Kansas 14 S. Dakota St. 31, W. Illinois 10 S. Illinois 34, N. Iowa 31 Tennessee St. 40, SE Missouri 28 Toledo 52, E. Michigan 47 Wisconsin 38, Purdue 14 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 49, Kentucky 7 Arkansas St. 36, South Alabama 29 Houston 39, UAB 17 Lamar 52, McMurry 21 Oklahoma 63, Texas 21 Rice 34, UTSA 14 TCU 49, Baylor 21 Texas St. 38, Idaho 7 Texas Tech 49, West Virginia 14 EAST Albany (NY) 36, St. Francis (Pa.) 13

Bryant 38, Robert Morris 35 Butler 17, Marist 14 CCSU 38, Duquesne 31 Colgate 51, Holy Cross 35 Cornell 41, Monmouth (NJ) 38 Georgia St. 41, Rhode Island 7 Harvard 35, Bucknell 7 Kent St. 31, Army 17 Lafayette 20, Yale 10 Lehigh 17, Georgetown 14 Louisville 45, Pittsburgh 35 New Hampshire 44, Richmond 40 Penn 24, Columbia 20 Princeton 19, Brown 0 Rutgers 23, Syracuse 15 Sacred Heart 27, Dartmouth 10 Temple 17, UConn 14, OT Towson 24, Maine 19 SOUTH Alcorn St. 21, Alabama A&M 20 Appalachian St. 28, Samford 25 Cent. Arkansas 27, McNeese St. 26 Charleston Southern 32, VMI 14 Chattanooga 31, Furman 10 Delaware St. 31, SC State 17 E. Kentucky 45, Austin Peay 14 East Carolina 41, Memphis 7 Florida 31, Vanderbilt 17 Florida A&M 44, Savannah St. 3 Florida St. 51, Boston College 7 Gardner-Webb 30, Mid-Am Nazarene 28 Georgia Southern 17, Wofford 9 Hampton 28, Norfolk St. 14 Jackson St. 37, Alabama St. 34 Jacksonville 34, Davidson 24 James Madison 27, William & Mary 26, 2OT LSU 23, South Carolina 21 Liberty 56, Presbyterian 7 Louisiana-Monroe 35, FAU 14 MVSU 45, Grambling St. 21 Maryland 27, Virginia 20 Middle Tennessee 34, FIU 30 Mississippi 41, Auburn 20 Mississippi St. 41, Tennessee 31 NC A&T 38, Howard 10 NC Central 24, Morgan St. 20 North Carolina 18, Miami 14 SE Louisiana 27, Northwestern St. 22 Sam Houston St. 41, Nicholls St. 0 Southern U. 34, Texas Southern 7 Stony Brook 27, Coastal Carolina 21 Texas A&M 59, Louisiana Tech 57 The Citadel 45, W. Carolina 31 Tulane 27, SMU 26 UCF 38, Southern Miss. 31, 2OT UT-Martin 66, Murray St. 59 Villanova 38, Old Dominion 14 Virginia Tech 41, Duke 20

AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 13, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (60) 6-0 1,500 1 2. Oregon 6-0 1,436 2 3. Florida 6-0 1,361 4 4. Kansas St. 6-0 1,296 6 5. Notre Dame 6-0 1,283 7 6. LSU 6-1 1,153 9 7. Ohio St. 7-0 1,071 8 8. Oregon St. 5-0 1,050 10 9. South Carolina 6-1 1,042 3 10. Oklahoma 4-1 994 13 11. Southern Cal 5-1 874 11 12. Florida St. 6-1 836 12 13. Georgia 5-1 753 14 14. Clemson 5-1 673 16 15. Mississippi St. 6-0 591 19 16. Louisville 6-0 574 18 17. West Virginia 5-1 552 5 18. Texas Tech 5-1 444 NR 19. Rutgers 6-0 405 20 20. Texas A&M 5-1 379 22

21. Cincinnati 5-0 294 21 22. Stanford 4-2 242 17 23. Michigan 4-2 177 25 24. Boise St. 5-1 133 24 25. Ohio 7-0 104 NR Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 92, TCU 88, Louisiana Tech 38, Texas 25, NC State 11, Northwestern 6, Washington 6, Wisconsin 6, Nebraska 4, North Carolina 2, Tulsa 2, Arizona 1, Iowa St. 1, Penn St. 1.

Football Seahawks 24, Patriots 23 New England Seattle

7 10 3 3—23 10 0 0 14—24 First Quarter Sea_FG Hauschka 34, 7:35. NE_Welker 46 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 5:49. Sea_Baldwin 24 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 1:50. Second Quarter NE_Hernandez 1 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 10:33. NE_FG Gostkowski 25, 2:12. Third Quarter NE_FG Gostkowski 35, 9:21. Fourth Quarter NE_FG Gostkowski 35, 9:21. Sea_Edwards 10 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 7:21. Sea_Rice 46 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 1:18. A_68,137. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

NE 26 475 26-87 388 4-68 2-43 0-0 36-58-2 1-7 3-44.3 0-0 6-80 34:00

Sea 17 368 26-85 283 2-29 2-40 2-23 16-27-0 2-10 4-60.0 3-2 4-35 26:00

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING_New England, Ridley 16-34, Bolden 6-28, Woodhead 4-25. Seattle, Lynch 15-41, Turbin 5-27, Wilson 5-17, Ryan 1-0. PASSING_New England, Brady 36-58-2-395. Seattle, Wilson 16-27-0-293. RECEIVING_New England, Welker 10-138, Lloyd 6-80, Gronkowski 6-61, Hernandez 6-30, Woodhead 5-46, Fells 1-35, Branch 1-5, Ridley 1-0. Seattle, Rice 3-81, Tate 3-47, Baldwin 2-74, Miller 2-29, Edwards 2-21, Turbin 2-21, Lynch 1-11, Washington 1-9. MISSED FIELD GOALS_None.

National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 4 2 0 .667 110 Arizona 4 2 0 .667 110 San Francisco4 2 0 .667 152 St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 110 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 178 Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 103 Washington 3 3 0 .500 178 Dallas 2 3 0 .400 94 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 6 0 0 1.000 171 Tampa Bay 2 3 0 .400 120 Carolina 1 4 0 .200 92

PA 93 97 94 111 PA 114 125 173 119 PA 113 101 125

4 0 .200 141 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 1 0 .800 149 Minnesota 4 2 0 .667 146 Green Bay 2 3 0 .400 112 Detroit 2 3 0 .400 126 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 133 New England 3 3 0 .500 188 Miami 3 3 0 .500 120 Buffalo 3 3 0 .500 137 South W L T Pct PF Houston 5 0 0 1.000 149 Indianapolis 2 3 0 .400 100 Tennessee 2 4 0 .333 114 Jacksonville 1 4 0 .200 65 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 5 1 0 .833 161 Cincinnati 3 3 0 .500 149 Pittsburgh 2 3 0 .400 116 Cleveland 1 5 0 .167 134 West W L T Pct PF San Diego 3 2 0 .600 124 Denver 2 3 0 .400 135 Oakland 1 4 0 .200 87 Kansas City 1 5 0 .167 104

154 PA 71 117 111 137 PA 141 137 117 192 PA 73 145 204 138 PA 118 163 115 163 PA 102 114 148 183

Thursday’s Game Tennessee 26, Pittsburgh 23 Sunday’s Games Atlanta 23, Oakland 20 Tampa Bay 38, Kansas City 10 N.Y. Jets 35, Indianapolis 9 Cleveland 34, Cincinnati 24 Detroit 26, Philadelphia 23, OT Miami 17, St. Louis 14 Baltimore 31, Dallas 29 Buffalo 19, Arizona 16, OT Seattle 24, New England 23 N.Y. Giants 26, San Francisco 3 Washington 38, Minnesota 26 Green Bay at Houston, late Open: Carolina, Chicago, Jacksonville, New Orleans Today’s Game Denver at San Diego, 5:30 p.m. Thursday Seattle at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21 Arizona at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Green Bay at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Houston, 10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Dallas at Carolina, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Oakland, 1:25 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 1:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 5:20 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Denver, Kansas City, Miami, Philadelphia, San Diego Monday, Oct. 22 Detroit at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.

Baseball Playoffs LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League All games televised by TBS Detroit 2, New York 0 Saturday: Detroit 6, New York 4, 12 innings Sunday: Detroit 3, New York 0 Tuesday: New York (Hughes 16-13) at Detroit (Verlander 17-8), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday: New York (Sabathia 15-6) at Detroit (Scherzer 16-7), 5:07 p.m. x-Thursday: New York at Detroit, 1:07 p.m. x-Saturday, Oct. 20: Detroit at New York, 5:07 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 21: Detroit at New York, 5:15 p.m. National League All games televised by Fox Sunday: St. Louis at San Francisco, late Today: St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 14-9), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17: San Francisco at St. Louis, 1:07 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18: San Francisco at St. Louis, 5:07 p.m. x-Friday, Oct. 19: San Francisco at St. Louis, 5:07 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 21: St. Louis at San Francisco, 1:45 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 22: St. Louis at San Francisco, 5:07 p.m. WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 24: at National League (n) Thursday, Oct. 25: at National League (n) Saturday, Oct. 27: at American League (n) Sunday, Oct. 28: at American League (n) x-Monday, Oct. 29: at American League (n) x-Wednesday, Oct. 31: at National League (n) x-Thursday, Nov. 1: at National League (n)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

B3

Giants rout San Francisco 49ers THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — The New York Giants gave the San Francisco 49ers another reason to simmer. Antrel Rolle intercepted two passes by Alex Smith, Prince Amukamara picked off another and the Giants shut down San Francisco in a 26-3 victory over the 49ers on Sunday in a rematch of last season’s NFC championship game. After outscoring the Bills and Jets by a combined 79-3 the last two weeks, the 49ers (4-2) met their match again with Eli Manning and New York’s top team. No overtime needed this time, and not much of Manning either. Manning threw for 193 yards and one touchdown, Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 116 yards and a score and New York (4-2) rode a dominant defense and four fields by Lawrence Tynes to hand outspoken 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh the most lopsided loss of his tenure. What a San Francisco treat. The Giants grinded out a 20-17 overtime win at rainsoaked Candlestick Park on Jan. 22, capitalizing on two fumbles by fill-in returner Kyle Williams en route to another Super Bowl title over the Patriots. All week some San Francisco players talked about “unfinished business,� and Harbaugh added to the hype when he fired back a strongly worded statement

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Alex Smith (11) walks off the field after throwing three interceptions against the New York Giants in San Francisco on Sunday. criticizing Giants offensive coordinator Kevin Gilbride for saying All-Pro defensive end Justin Smith often “gets away with murder� holding linemen. For all the hoopla, the rematch was never close. Amukamara’s interception in the second quarter started a surge of New York offense. Smith, who wore tape around his sprained middle

finger, lofted the pass too high and allowed Amukamara to leap underneath the ball before tight end Delanie Walker even had a chance at the Giants 33. At one point in the first half, Manning completed eight consecutive passes for 142 yards and had the usually stout San Francisco defense out of sorts. Domenik Hixon caught passes of 39 and 16 yards

on consecutive third downs, and Victor Cruz followed with a 6-yard touchdown catch and his usual salsa dance in the end zone to give the Giants a 7-3 lead in the second quarter. New York’s next drive stalled and Tynes kicked a 34-yard field goal to go ahead 10-3. Tarell Brown blocked a 40-yard attempt by Tynes, San Francisco took over with 8 seconds

left before half and wildcat quarterback Colin Kaepernick completed a 36-yard pass to Mario Manningham — the former Giant — before David Akers missed wide left from 52 yards as time expired. Akers, who tied the NFL record with a 63-yard field goal in a Week 1 win at Green Bay, also hooked a 43-yard field goal wide right on San Francisco’s first

drive. He made a 42-yarder from the same right hash mark. The All-Pro kicker is 11 of 16 this season. Once the break was over, the Giants sent San Francisco spiraling down and out in a New York minute. David Wilson returned the second-half kickoff 66 yards to set up Bradshaw’s 1-yard TD run. That extended New York’s lead to 17-3 and quieted the Candlestick crowd — except for the Giants fans that sprinkled the stands blue on a sunsplashed day along the bay. On San Francisco’s next two possessions, Rolle intercepted Smith’s passes to foil any 49ers rally. The first came on an overthrown pass intended for Manningham that Rolle returned 20 yards to the San Francisco 12. And on the next possession, he stepped in front of a pass to Williams and ran 22 yards to the San Francisco 5. The only downside for New York is it settled for field goals both times. Then again, not many points were needed. The Giants had Smith under constant pressure, made worse when left tackle Joe Staley left with a concussion in the third quarter. Smith finished 19 of 30 for 200 yards, and the 49ers were held to 80 yards rushing.

Preps: Neah Bay shuts out Lopez 50-0 CONTINUED FROM B1 “So we’ll enjoy this one over the weekend and then get to the task of gameplanning for Neah Bay. It never gets easy in this league.� The Loggers next travel to defending state champion and undefeated Neah Bay on Friday night. Crescent 47, Tulalip 14 Tulalip Crescent

6

8

0

0— 14

15

6

14

12— 47

First Quarter T— Miles 50 kickoff return (run failed) C— Eric Larson 12 run (Derek Findley kick) C— Zapien 5 run (Bamer run) Second Quarter T— Miles 1 run (Hamilton pass from Kidd) C— Larson 50 run (kick failed) Third Quarter C— Larson 45 run (kick failed) C— Larson 27 run (West run) Fourth Quarter C— Larson 45 run (kick failed) C— Findley 6 run; (run failed) Individual Stats Rushing— C: Larson 17-274, Zapien 13-85, Findley 7-22, Bamer 1-3, West 1-3. Passing— C: Bamer 5-6-0, 81 yards. Receiving—C: Findley 5-81.

Leyton Doherty and Tyler McCaulley also caught touchdown passes MARYSVILLE — It from Josiah Greene. took only one-half of a The Josiah to McCaulgame for the defending ley score went for 80 yards. state champions to put Cody Cummins also had aside previously undea 2-yard run for a score feated Lopez in Northwest and a final touchdown Football League action Sat- came on a defensive play. urday at Marysville High Doherty also scored a School. touchdown on a 29-yard Junior quarterback interception return. Josiah Greene, the 1B state Josiah Greene ran for a player of the year in 2011, game-high 97 yards and appears to be vying for passed for another 131 that honor again after yards. passing for four touchThe Red Devils are now downs and having the a perfect 7-0 on the year, hand in a fifth score. including a forfeit from Two of those touchdown Muckleshoot, and will try strikes went to Zeke to add on to that win Greene. streak with a home game Zeke and Josiah Greene this Friday night against also had a hand in a third speedy Crescent, which is touchdown together as DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 6-1 on the year after Josiah threw for five yards pounding Tulalip Heritage Crescent fullback Mike Zapien, at 240 pounds, lumbers his way through to Zeke, but Zeke tossed a 47-14 on Saturday. several Tulalip Heritage tacklers. Crescent quarterback Beau Bamer (11) lateral back to Josiah, who watches the play. went the remaining of the Neah Bay 50, Lopez 0 20 yards to score. failed) NB— Tyler McCaulley 80 pass from Josiah Greene 5-21, Tyler McCaulley 3-17, Cole Svec 7-14, Tommy at Marysville High School A Joey Monje intercepNB— Cody Cummins 2 run (kick fails) (pass failed) Tyler 1-14, Michael McGee 3-7, Joey Monje 1-3. Neah Bay 20 30 X X— 50 Second Quarter NB— Zeke Greene 24 pass from Josiah Greene Passing—NB: Josiah Greene 7-12-0, 131 yards; tion that went for 30 yards Lopez 0 0 X X— 0 NB— Leyton Doherty 9 pass from Josiah Greene (Joey Monje run) Kenrick Doherty 1-2-0, 6 yards. First Quarter led directly to the Zeke to Individual Stats Receiving—NB: Zeke Greene 4-39, Leyton NB— Zeke Greene 7 pass from Josiah Greene (Tyler McCaulley pass from Josiah Greene) Josiah lateral pass touchNB— Josiah Greene 20 pass from Zeke Greene Rushing— NB: Josiah Greene 5-97, Cody Cum- Doherty 1-9, Tyler McCaulley 2-83, Reggie Buttram (Cody Cummings run) NB— Leyton Doherty 29 interception return (pass (Zeke Greene pass from Josiah Greene) mins 7-94, Zeke Greene 1-23, Kenrick Doherty 1-6. down.

Neah Bay 50, Lopez 0

Football: Redskins blast Life Christian 30-14 CONTINUED FROM B1 drive at the steering wheel, Snyder said he wasn’t wor“He hadn’t played it all ried about Seton being overyear and got two intercep- whelmed by the moment. “I don’t think it would tions. He’s got a real nose matter to him at all if we for the ball.� ■ A quarterback — Oh, started at [our own] one and the Redskins also [yard line]. The kid’s got a needed someone to take the ton of confidence,� Snyder snaps from center and exe- said. “It cracks me up because cute the offense. Enter Seton, a sopho- he’s always wanting to call more who had seen limited his own number. “You know, the option game action at quarterback plays where he carries the coming into the game. While it definitely didn’t ball or the bootleg plays hurt that the Redskins set where he throws the ball, or Seton up deep in Life Chris- something other than just tian territory on his first handing it off and watching

FIRE/SECURITY ALARMS PROTECTED BY

Third Quarter PT—Matt Cain 11 run (Ralls kick) PT—Cain 47 interception return (Ralls kick) Fourth Quarter PT—Ralls 25 field goal LC—Roelofs 1 run (Beasinger kick) Individual Stats Rushing— LC: Taylor Roelofs 10-24. PT: Tim Russell 18-114, Matt Cain 11-92, Jacob King 9-60, Mitiku Little 10-55, Wesley Wheeler 2-19, Jeff Seton 1-11. Passing— LC: Taylor Roelofs 13-23-3, 164. PT: Jacob King 2-6-0, 38 yards; Jeff Seton 0-1-0. Receiving— LC: Kyle Goodman 7-81, Wyatt Dunlap 5-22, Haley 1-61. PT: Skyler Coppenrath 1-36, Matt Cain 1-2.

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ball game.’ � tist on Friday night in Port Cain led Port Townsend Townsend’s homecoming on defense with 12 total game. tackles, six solo, and an Port Townsend 30, interception for a return of Life Christian 14 51 yards. Spencer Bond had nine Life Christian 0 7 0 7— 14 6 14 3— 30 total tackles and a sack that Port TownsendFirst7 Quarter cost Life Christian five PT—Jacob King 7 run (Dillon Ralls kick) yards while Layne Zack colSecond Quarter lected two interceptions for PT—King 1 run (kick failed) a total of 43 return yards, LC—Hunter Haley 61 pass from Taylor Roelofs and Tyler Mantie recovered (Tyler Beasinger kick) a fumble. The Redskins (2-2, 4-3) will next host Tacoma Bap-

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the ball run.� Snyder said the blocking deserves a lot of credit, too, for giving the runners lanes to run through. “The O-line stepped up, too, and we were blasting some holes and some good long drives,� he said. “Especially the offensive line, because I think the fear of losing Jacob, kind of just said, ‘Hey, we’ve got to get going here. We lost our best athlete and we need to rise up and take over the


B4

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I work in a professional office where nearly all my coworkers are married and live rather uneventful lifestyles. I was divorced a few years ago and have not remarried. I have dated a lot of women, and it has become an issue with my coworkers. They insist on hearing about the dates I go on and ask for the details of what took place, and I usually oblige them. Lately, there has been more and more gossip about my so-called “wild lifestyle,” and I have become the talk of the office. Some co-workers have called me names like “skank” because I refuse to settle down with one girl. I’m looking for the right one, and it may take many wrong ones to get there. I think my co-workers are jealous. I’m living my life to the fullest and having fun and because they can’t do what I do, they resort to gossip and name-calling. It really frustrates me. How can I make this stop without causing unnecessary tensions in my workplace? Man in Motion in Indiana

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

DEAR ABBY Abigail Van Buren

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Abby: My daughter and her husband have a wonderful little boy, “Matthew,” who is 3. They say they don’t plan on having any more children. I am upset that they won’t be giving my grandson a sibling. They claim the reason is to be earthfriendly, but I think it is selfish. I know my urging won’t change the situation, but it weighs heavily on my mind and makes me sad for Matthew. My daughter has a brother she is close to. Her husband has two siblings. I think the main reason they don’t want any more children is my son-in-law is 17 years older than my daughter. Is there any good way for me to tell her how upset this makes me? Disappointed in Oregon

Dear Abby: I am engaged and have been for a while. From the beginning, I knew my fiance and I would have to pay for our own wedding. During a recent discussion with my father, who is divorced from my mother, he offered to chip in a reasonable amount and asked me to see if my mother would match it. My mother thought it was a great idea and agreed. A week or so later, she wrote me a check for the amount, and I deposited it into my savings account. At the time, I had a high-paying job and a “roundabout” wedding date set. I have since left my job, and the wedding has been postponed indefinitely. My mother has now requested that I return the money because she’s behind on bills. Frankly, I think it is inappropri-

by Mell Lazarus

Dear Disappointed: No, there isn’t. There may be reasons that go beyond your son-in-law’s age for their decision to limit the size of their family to one child. And they are none of your business.

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Greater acknowledgment is heading in your direction. Flaunt your talents and exercise your rights. It’s your beliefs and the way you present what you do best that will lead to future advancement. Simple but effective will lead to victory. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t let insecurity take over. Pipe up instead of down. Express your opinions, and welcome challenge or opposition. In the end, your views will be heard and solutions will be found. Compromise is not backing down, it’s finding a way forward. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Protection from injury, arguments and overdoing it emotionally, physically or financially will be necessary. Focus on completing what you start and doing the job or task that needs your undivided attention first. Re-evaluate your next move. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take on a creative challenge or get involved in an event that leads to new friendships or a closer bond with your lover. Personal changes will turn out well and set the stage for things to come. Let your imagination lead to new beginnings. 5 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

ate for her to ask me to return “her” money when it was a gift that I did not request at the time. Am I wrong, or should she leave the money be? Engaged in Virginia

Dear Engaged: When your mother gave you the money toward your wedding, both of your financial situations were different than they are today. This isn’t a question of etiquette. Because you won’t be needing it in the near future, return the money to your mother so she can pay her bills. It’s not as if she’ll be using it for a Caribbean cruise. She needs the money!

Dear Man In Motion: You are not a “skank.” You are a bachelor. I hope you realize that you started this by regaling your coworkers with the intimate details of your “adventures.” None of it was appropriate workplace conversation. If you want this to stop, you’ll have to draw an iron curtain between your work life and your social life. Start today.

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Don’t kiss, then tell at workplace

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t leave anything to chance, especially if it has to do with your home, family and your future finances. Secure your position and show greater versatility when expressing your thoughts and considering your choices. Use a past connection to advance now. 4 stars

by Eugenia Last

can be expected. Slow down, avoid stressful situations and don’t overdo it physically. Rely on good friends or a partner who can pick up the slack and give you a timeout. Pampering and regrouping will be your best bet. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your emotions aside VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): and face whatever situation You’ll learn by observing others. comes your way. Force will not Listen to what’s offered and be the answer, but common choose what interests you the sense and practical solutions will most. Limiting what you take on be. Erratic behavior is the enemy will allow you to perfect what and must be avoided, whether you do by adding details that it’s you or someone else who is result in greater returns. 3 stars being impulsive. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Emotional matters are exalted and sharing and expressing your true feelings will help you get your point across. Indulge in a little reminiscing and you will spark an old interest that can lead to a new beginning. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): All work and no play will not lead to happiness. Put a little love and excitement into your day and you will prosper in ways that will rejuvenate and accelerate your personal life. Don’t limit what you can do because you aren’t a participant. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Minor mishaps

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Keep your thoughts private. Focus on getting ahead by dealing with medical, legal or financial matters swiftly. Discipline will be required and end up being your ticket to success. Work and money will lead to a better lifestyle and home environment. 5 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t get into an argument. Concentrate on making deals and financial gains. Letting trivial matters lead you astray will be your downfall. A partnership is prominent, and a promise made will lead to an interesting offer you cannot refuse. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 B5

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It! D

IN PRINT & ONLINE

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Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM Employment 4026 Employment 4040 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 3010 Announcements 4026 General General Media Clallam County Clallam County ✿ ADOPT ✿ A loving family longs to provide everything for 1st baby. Happy home, Laughter, Adventure, Security. Expenses paid. Stephanie 1-800-243-1658

3020 Found FOUND: Bicycle wheel, rim and tire. On Marrowstone Islane, Sun., Oct. 7. Call to identify. 683-4518

3023 Lost LOST: Dog. Pit/Lab mix, brown and white, no coll o r, W. 1 3 t h b e t we e n bridges, P.A. 461-7128 or (206)777-5786.

4070 Business Opportunities

RESTAURANT: Downtown P.T., great walk-in location, water views, on main street. $85,000 or offer. (360)316-9424.

4026 Employment General AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Nursing Assistant REGISTER NOW FOR October 29th through November 21st CLASSES BEGIN A CAREER AS A NURSING ASSISTANT AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN SOMEONE’S LIFE! YOU BECOME PART OF THE “ELITE TEAM” WHEN YOU TRAIN, then WORK, AT CRESTWOOD CONVALESCENT CENTER REGISTER NOW FOR THE FREE NURSING ASSISTANT TRAINING PROGRAM (limited seating) Crestwood Convalescent Center 1116 E. Lauridsen Blvd. (360)452-9206 ask for Lee CAREGIVER jobs available now. Benefits included. Flexible hours. Call P.A., 452-2129, Seq u i m , 5 8 2 - 1 6 4 7 , P. T. 344-3497.

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad!

Busy commission based salon now interviewing for a stylist that is detail oriented, works well under pressure and be a great team member. Att e n d s a l o n m e e t i n g s, educational events, available Saturdays and evenings. Priority will be given to stylists with experience. Bring resume t o E n v y H a i r Te c h niques, 516 S. Peabody, Port Angeles. CAREGIVERS NEEDED Come join our team! A great place to work! We provide all training needed for state license. Contact Cherrie 360-683-3348

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

CPA office in Sequim needs BOOKKEEPER with 2+ yrs. of bookkeeping and accounting write-up, experience with various industries. Must h ave a d va n c e k n ow l e d g e i n Q u i ck B o o k s, payroll. Send resume to 8705 Canyon Road East Suite A, Puyallup, WA 98371. Dental assistant wanted in Sequim! Looking for a lively, personable dental assistant to work 3-4 days/week. Please send your resume via email to cedarcreekdental@ yahoo.com or fax to (360)683-9683 HOME CARE ATTENDANTS Full and par t time, all shifts. Must be able to pass background cleara n c e, d r u g t e s t , a n d h ave va l i d d r i ve r s l i cense. Apply at 805 E. 8th St., P.A. 452-2396. HR Business PartnerMervin Manufacturing. Mervin is looking for a hands-on HR exper t that formulates par tnerships across the c o m p a ny t o d e l i ve r value added service to management and employees for the Production Facility located in Sequim, Washington. We offer a great b e n e f i t p a ck a g e i n cluding Medical, Dental, Vision, Vacation, Sick, Holiday Pay and Product discounts. Mervin is a subsidiary of Quiksilver Inc. Job Requirements: 7+ years HR Generalist experience. Bachelors Degree or related exp e r i e n c e p r e fe r r e d . Previous experience with administering s a fe t y p o l i c i e s a n d procedures, specifically dealing with OSHA compliance. Working knowledge of multiple human resource disciplines including emp l oy e e a n d p e r fo r mance management, federal and state respective employment l aw s, e t c . S e n d r e sumes to brian.bustillos@ quiksilver.com PAINTERS WANTED Long term work in P.T. 360-379-4176 REPAIR PLUMBER Full-time, good driving record. (360)683-7719.

Childcare Director Three Bears Educare. Half to Full-time. Must have 45 ECE credits. Call 457-8355 for info.

Borders

Bold Lines Yellow Highlight on Sunday 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

CNA’s AND NAR’s PT and FT positions. 408 W. Washington Sequim 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com

REPORTER The Sequim Gazette, a weekly community newspaper located on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state, is accepting applications for a full-time general assignment reporter. The ideal candidate will have solid repor ting and writing skills, have up-to-date k n ow l e d g e o f t h e A P Stylebook, be able to shoot photos, be able to use InDesign and contribute to staff blogs and Web updates. We offer vacation and sick leave, and paid holidays. If you have a passion for community news repor ting and a desire to work in an ambitious, dynamic newsroom, we want to hear from you. E.O.E. Email your resume, cover letter and up to 5 nonreturnable writing and photo samples to

hr@soundpublishing.com Or mail to SQMREP/HR Dept. Sound Publishing 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106, Poulsbo, WA 98370

4080 Employment Wanted

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEW Shy 5 acres perfect for horse property with Nor thwest Contemporary Cedar home fenced entirely with chain link fence. Impressive 2934 sf of easy one level living, 760 sf attached garage, 364 sf carport, and wooden decks across e n t i r e s p a n o f h o m e. Two outdoor buildings for equestrian activity. $489,000. ML#263670. Jean 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Beautiful new one level home with unobstructed views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Dungeness Spit, Mt. Baker and Protection Island. The great room features plenty of windows to enjoy the views and let in the sun light. Covered wrap around porch for BBQ’s and watching the ships. 2 bedrooms plus a den/office. $239,000. MLS#261930. Terry Neske (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

BETTER THAN NEW Looking for a “move in ready” home in an esAaron’s Garden Serv. Pruning, weeding, fall tablished neighborhood? Looking forward to enclean up. (360)808-7276 joying your own yard this ALL around handyman, summer? This is it! 3 most anything A to Z. bedroom home in Sea(360)775-8234 mount Estates has been updated significantly in BIZY BOYS LAWN & the last two years. New YARD CARE: Mowing, floor ing, new faucets, W e e d i n g , E d g i n g , new lighting fixtures to H e d g e Tr i m m i n g , n a m e a fe w. Fe n c e d L a n d s c a p e M a i n t e - backyard is beautifully n a n c e a n d G e n e r a l landscaped and you’ll love spending time on Clean-up. Tom at the spacious deck. (360)452-3229 $247,000. ML#263824. Pili Meyer Exp. Home Care Work417-2799 er. Housekeeping, launCOLDWELL BANKER dry, cooking, shopping, UPTOWN REALTY companionship, appointments, references. Char B is for Bluff Property (360)565-8039 This 2,200 square foot JUAREZ & SON’S HAN- home sits right on the DY M A N S E R V I C E S . bluff and has a fabulous Quality work at a rea- view of all harbor traffic. sonable price. Can han- Three bedrooms and 3+ dle a wide array of prob- bathrooms on a double lems projects. Like home lot. maintenance, cleaning, $265,000. ML#264364. Jeanine Cardiff clean up, yard mainte(360)460-9221 nance, and etc. Give us JACE The Real Estate a call office 452-4939 or Company cell 460-8248. Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fa s t R e l i a bl e R e a s o n a bl e R a t e s Fa l l Clean-up Gutter Cleaning Weed Pulling/Whacking Br ush Clearing Debris Hauling Sequim/P.A. Area Local: 681-3521 cell: 541-420-4795.

NEED A Wor king with children HELPING HAND? and families. Must pass background clearance. N o n - l i c e n s e d ex p e r i Apply at 805 E. 8th St., enced cancer caregiver, born and raised in ClalP.A. 452-2396. lam County, willing to shop, dr ive to appts., Grab Their light cooking (lunch), pets to the vet, provide ATTENTION! company for loved ones. Client must be ambulaAdd: tory, flexible with caregivers hours, cash only, reference provided upon Pictures request. (360)477-1536 or (360)457-4242.

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C o u n t e r t o p Fa b r i c a tor/Installer. Experience preferred. Will train the right person. Apply at Curtis Interiors; 845 W. Washington St; Sequim

RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE Call 681-4429 Young couple, early sixties. available for fall clean up, moss removal, clean gutters and misc yard care. Excellent references. 360-457-1213

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

CITY GOES COUNTRY A bit of country in the city. Perfect for those who desire the peace and quiet of the country but want to be within walking distance of city amenities. A producing rental for many years and could continue in that category or, alternatively, it could be a great starter home. Motivated seller would like offer. $76,000. ML# 261888. Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Custom chalet style waterfront home on over two acres. This 3 bedroom, 3 bath home comes with over 4700 s q u a r e fe e t o f l i v i n g space, a full daylight basement and 2,600 square foot barn. Price below recent appraisal . $489,000 MLS#264170/402250 Doc Reiss (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES GARDENERS DELIGHT Light & bright 3 BD 2 BA home, sunny kitchen & spacious great room, 3 out buildings & attached 2 car garage, garden space & fruit trees. $137,500. ML#352375/263319 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

GARDENERS TAKE NOTE This is the site of Freshw a t e r B a y N u r s e r y. Beautiful setting with gr e a t s o u t h e r n ex p o sure. Too many green houses and out buildings to list all. Freshwater Bay Nursery specialized in Rhododendrons so the proper ty is full of beautiful mature Rhododendrons. $279,000. MLS#264082. Quint Boe (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES GET MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK With this stylish 2006 manufactured home with its light and open floor plan, skylights, 3 Br., 2 bath, attached 2 car garage & a fenced backyard. $145,000. ML#264360. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT DEAL In Alta Vista Estates. Large master bedroom with attached bath. Kitchen with walk-in pantr y, skylight, & island, den/office space. 2 car attached garage, private fenced rear yard. Beautiful MTN views. Close to stores, Discovery Trail & G r ey wo l f E l e m e n t a r y. Community water system, private septic with connection to community drain field. $149,999. ML#263116. Chuck 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East INVEST IN DUPLEX Very attractive 2 story contemporary architecture with attached carport. Living room, kitchen, cozy dining area & 1/2 BA on main level. 2 Br. & full bath upstairs. Fireplace, skylight, & small deck upstairs for each unit. Private deck d ow n s t a i r s, s e p a r a t e storage, & private backyard. $210,000. ML#263590. Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it. 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County MOUNTAIN VIEW + SHOP Granite counters in kitchen & wall pantr y with pull-out shelving; separate dining area. Den with french doors to great room & access to deck & hot tub. Spacious master with walk-in closet & smaller closet. Large laundry room. 2car attached garage has space for workbenches; 32x26 detached shop/ garage with wood stove, & 10-foot doors at both ends. Greenhouse too. $319,000. ML#262394. DODDS 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PRICE IMPROVED! From the moment you set your eyes on this home on a quiet cul de sac, you’ll know it’s special. The yard is beautifully landscaped and the interior is just as well maintained. Skylights keep it light and bright. Whether you want to resize up or down, this home is ready for new folks to move into. Bonus: back yard garden plot. $169,000 MLS #263705 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY PRICE REDUCTION Energy efficient home, solar panels & insulated siding, koi pond, waterfall & easy care landscaping, upscale kitche n , 2 B r. s u i t e s , 2 fireplaces, garden space, green house, outbuilding. $399,000. ML#263139/261727 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

NEW HOME-MOVE IN READY 3 B r. , 2 b a , c l o s e t o shopping in Sequim location. Upgrades include heat pump, tile, additional cabinetry, and upgraded appliances. Currently, lawn care is provided by a local landscaper for a nominal fee. $194,950. ML#262246. Call Dave or Robert ROOM FOR 683-4844 EVERYONE AND Windermere Last chance for COUNEVERYTHING! Real Estate TRY IN THE CITY. Brick 5 bedrooms 2 full baths Sequim East home on 6.3 acres just and convenient location. minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Five acres Nice private setting on a Home has HUGE living f o r e s t e d w i t h Va l l e y d e a d e n d s t r e e t a n d room, cozy fireplace, Creek. Three Bedrooms, close to the Discovery h a r d wo o d f l o o r s, s p a one Bath, eating area in Trail. Home has some cious corner lot with big Kitchen and formal Din- s p e c i a l t o u c h e s l i k e yard and lots of parking. ing, Laundry and stor- g r a n i t e c o u n t e r t o p s Detached garage with age. Stone fireplace with throughout, hardwood work area too. insert. Fenced Backyard floors in kitchen and din- $195,000. MLS#263694. Jennifer Holcomb a n d G r e e n h o u s e. A t - ing nook, propane stove (360)457-0456 tached Garage and de- in living room, and eleWINDERMERE tached Carport. All this gant coffered ceilings in PORT ANGELES and mountain view for formal dining room and $264,900. FSBO by ap- master bedroom. pointment, call $229,000. MLS#263961. Spiffy 3 Br., 2 bath home on .87 acres near Se(360)477-0534 Thelma Durham quim. Features vaulted (360)457-0456 ceilings and skylights. MOTIVATED SELLER! WINDERMERE Master bonus sitting Custom built Lindal cePORT ANGELES room. Large country dar home with unobstr ucted views of the One bedroom cottage k i t c h e n . A d d i t i o n a l Straits of Juan De Fuca. for rent at 819 West 10th 6 0 0 + / - g r a n d s t u d i o. The corner lot fronts on Street - lst and last mths Also spacious double two streets and it pro- rent with $500 security garage shop, separate 3 vides some privacy with deposit. One Small pet stall kennel plus equipwild roses and large lot negotiable with deposit. ment shed. beautifully landscaped. hardwood floors new tile $188,952. MLS#263596. Paul Beck Master bedroom is on washer/dryer included. (360)457-0456 the upper level with 3/4 Call (360)452-4933. No WINDERMERE bath, main level has the smoking. $675 mth. PORT ANGELES second bedroom with full bath. Laundry is on the OWNER FINANCING main level. Kitchen has STRIKING AVAILABLE been updated nice. CRAFTSMANSHIP Roomy main level with 3 $245,000. ML#263585. E x c e p t i o n a l q u a l i t y, bedrooms and 2 baths. s k i l l e d c ra f t s m a n s h i p Jean Irvine L owe r d ay l i g h t b a s e - a n d ex q u i s i t e d e s i g n 417-2797 ment features an 804 sf characterize this 3 Br., 2 COLDWELL BANKER finished recreational ba, 2,837 sf custom UPTOWN REALTY room and an unfinished home. A beautiful liworkshop. Water view is brary, gourmet kitchen, PERFECT not panoramic, but is media room, beautiful RETIREMENT HOME In 50+ community. Wa- very nice. Attached two m a s t e r w i t h t i l e t e r v i e w, h a r d w o o d car garage. A little up- bath/heated floor, formal floors. 2 Br., 2 ba plus li- dating would make this dining, stunning wood brary. Easy maintenance home truly beautiful. finishes. Close to Port $199,900. ML#262390. and close to shopping. Angeles. Linda $199,000. ML#263615. $489,000. ML#264283. 683-4844 CHUCK TURNER Team Thompsen Windermere 452-3333 417-2782 Real Estate PORT ANGELES COLDWELL BANKER Sequim East REALTY UPTOWN REALTY

5000900

FOR SALE: Own an exciting business and cont r o l yo u r f u t u r e ! T H E BLACKBIRD COFFEEHOUSE is well established & producing GREAT PROFITS. Contact Adam for details: 3 6 0 - 2 2 4 - 9 4 3 6 ; bl a ck birdcoffee@gmail.com

B u s i n e s s L e n d e r. Craft3 is looking for a Business Lender for our Port Angeles, WA office. Responsible for generating and underwriting new business loans, and servicing a loan por tfolio that meets Craft3’s mission, financial and risk goals. This position is l o c a t e d i n Po r t A n geles, WA targeting micro, small and medium businesses in the O l y m p i c Pe n i n s u l a , specifically those owned by minorities, women, immigrants, and low-income. Inc u m b e n t i s a bl e t o identify and prioritize Craft3 risks in a potential or existing borrower; develop appropriate risk mitigation strategies; read, analyze, and inter pret general business periodicals, professional journals, technical procedures, or gover nmental regulations; write reports, business correspondence, and procedure manuals; effectively present information and respond to questions from groups of managers, clients, customers, and the general public; calculate figures and amounts such as discounts, interest, commissions, proportions, percentages, area, circumference, and volume; apply concepts of basic algebra and geometry. Proficiency with major software programs; e.g. Contact Management Systems, Word Processing and Spreadsheet software. Bachelor’s degree or relevant experience required. Significant coursework in accounting, finance or economics required; five (5) years relevant wor k exper ience required. Fluency in a second language is desirable. Craft3 is an equal opportunity employer; women and minor ities are encoura g e d t o a p p l y. To apply: Complete the a p p l i c a t i o n ; https://home.eease.ad p . c o m / r e cruit/?id=2530621 To learn about Craft3, visit www.craft3.org. Application deadline is November 1, 2012

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

SUNLAND CHARMER 3 Br., 2 Bath, on quiet cul-de-sac, natural wood vaulted ceilings family room w/propane Fp, sunroom, deck, fenced yard and fr uit trees, seller financing available. $239,900 ML#264377 Tanya Kerr 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

SEQUIM: ‘79 dbl. wide, 2 Br., 2 ba, 2 sheds, 55+ park, upgrades in/out, lg. patio $45,000. 683-6294

314 Real Estate for Sale - Other Areas

MOCLIPS: 3-20 ACRE Ocean View Lots. Starting price $60,000. 1-20 acre riverfront lot. Horses and RVs welcome! 360-289-3963

408 For Sale Commercial

BE YOUR OWN BOSS Landmark restaurant building with living quarters underneath is located between Sequim and Port Angeles. The building. Is around 5,326 sf, is on approx. 1.3 acres of land, and offers easy access to Hwy 101. Included in the sale is most of the restaurant furniture and appliances. This building is grandfathered as a restaurant. $300,000. ML#263574. PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE 683-4116 P.A.: Professional office condo, 800 sf, 8th and Race. (360)460-7195.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

1725 W. 11, P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, wheelchair friendly, $1,100, $400 dep., refrences. (360)460-9590.

4 b r / 3 b a . D bl G a ra g e. ODT & beach access. Pets ok; NS; $1600/mo $ 1 5 0 0 s e c u r i t y. 360.461.9434. Info: www.rejww.net/4rent

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


Classified

B6 MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County 919 W. 15th, P.A.: 4 Br., 1.5 ba, garage, fenced. $1,100. (360)452-6144. C A R L S B O R G : 1 B r. mobile home, some storage. No dogs/smoking. $500 mo., $300 dep. 683-2011 or 461-4959 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. craftsman home. $800 mo.360-808-1737 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 b a t h , n o p e t s / s m o ke. $750. (360)477-0408. Central P.A.: 2+ BR fully furnished house $1250 to 1800 www.athomepor tangeles.com 360461-6484 COTTAGE: 1 Br. NS, no pets, 1st, last, dep. $750 + utils. 360-775-9840.

P.A.: Big 2 Br., 2 ba, remodeled mfg. home with covered parking/storage on acreage. See at 1544 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. W. Hwy. 101. $900 mo. A 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$550 (360)457-6161 H 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$650 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$700 539 Rental Houses H 3 br 2 ba ...............$790 Port Angeles H 4 br 2 ba............ .$1200 H 3/2 Cresthaven.$1500 P.A.: 805 S. D St. 4 Br., HOUSES IN JOYCE H 1 br 1 ba ...............$600 2 b a , v i ew s ! , fe n c e d H 3 br 1 ba ...............$850 yard, garage, all appliH 3/2 10 acres.....$1300 ances plus W/D, $1,080 plus dep., 1 yr. lease. No 360-417-2810 smoking. 477-6532. More Properties at www.jarentals.com JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

605 Apartments Clallam County

JOYCE: Whiskey Creek Beach Rd. 3 Br., 1 ba, S h o p, k e n n e l , p o n d . Wood/elec heat. $1,050 mo. Ready 11/2012. (907)530-7081

2 Br., 1.5 bath condo. All appliances including W/D. Great P.A. location. No yard care. Easy living. $750. 452-2070 or P.A.: 2413 Ryan Dr. 3 417-2794. Br., no pets/smoking. $ 7 0 0 , 1 s t , l a s t , $ 7 0 0 WEST P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. dep. 417-1688 msg. apt., 7 mi. west Hwy. 112, all utils., appl., launP. A . : 2 B r. , W / D, n o dry included, most pets/ pets/smoking. $575 mo. garden ok. $800 mo. $500 dep. 809-9979. 452-7714 or 461-2906

P.A.: Newer secluded 2 Br. house, refrigerator, s t ove, wa s h e r, d r ye r, walk-in closet, walk-in shower, attached heated garage. 6.5 miles west o f A l b e r t s o n ’s . $ 8 0 0 P. A . : 2 B r. , ya r d . N o P.A.: 1 Br., $495. Some month. References. smoke/pets, gar. $750 pets ok, no stairs. DownCall (360)460-1071 mo., deposit. 457-4023. town. 425-881-7267.

TRACTOR

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes

6010 Appliances

CENTRAL P.A.: Cute 1 Br. duplex. $600 mo., plus dep. (360)460-4089 mchughrents.com

MISC: 2 refrigerators, Kenmore and GE, older, hardly used, $125 ea. Kenmore dr yer, older, P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, laundry good condition, $25. 2 room, no pets/smoking. K e n m o r e a n d G E $ 6 0 0 m o. , $ 6 0 0 d e p. stoves, older, good condition, $50. 775-5032. CENTRAL P.A.: Con- (360)452-2577, eves. venient Unfur n. Apts. 1 B R $ 4 7 7 t o $ 4 9 3 + 683 Rooms to Rent Samsung Dr yer. 2011 electric dryer with pedfixed util. Storage Roomshares estal, color beige. $250. Rooms. No smoke/pet (360)683-3887 maybe. (360)452-4258. HOUSESHARE SEQUIM 2 FURN BDRS CENTRAL P.A.: Nice 2 in Lg Mobile $450/400 6045 Farm Fencing Br., 1.5 ba, mtn./water W/D TV WIFI All util inc. & Equipment Po s s s t o r a g e / g a r a g e view, quiet, pets ok. Walk to town Bus rte Fe$895. (360)460-9580. m a l e N o n S m o k i n g / TRACTOR: ‘49 FerguCOLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Drinking pref. See On- son TO20. $2,500/obo. Br, W/D, fireplace, new line Ad References $200 P.J. (360)928-0250. paint/carpet. $625, $625 Deposit. First/Deposi t / N e g o t i a b l e Pa r t i a l T R AC TO R : ‘ 8 9 J o h n dep., no pets. 452-3423. Last. (360)460-7593. Deere model 1050, excellent condition, 534 P.A.: 1 Br. $500. 1st mo. hrs., front bucket, box 1170 Getaways free! Cat or small dog ok scraper, PTO roll bar Vaction Rentals with pet fee. 452-4409. and canopy cover, diesel engine. $12,000. P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., Rv Lot, Yuma Foothills (360)385-7700 Walled, gated, large lot. 1 bath, W/D. $725. 2 hookups: $500 mo. (360)808-4972 TRACTOR: John Deere + util. 360-683-1958 diesel 25 hp 4x4. Model Properties by 770 with front loader, turf EMAIL US AT Landmark. portangelesclassified@peninsula tires, only 550 hours, landmark.com $7,500. 360-808-0626 dailynews.com

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6075 Heavy Equipment

MISC: Colt 1911, manufactured in 1913, $900. Ta u r u s 9 m m , $ 4 5 0 . Ruger 9 mm, $400. Savage model 24 deluxe, 222 cal/20 gauge, $500. (360)683-9899

BULLDOZER: “Classic” John Deere, model 40-C with blade, winch and c a n o p y. R u n s g o o d . $4,200. (360)302-5027.

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6080 Home Furnishings

MINI-EXCAVATOR: ‘05 Kubota 121. 1,900 hrs., 4 buckets. $22,000. (360)460-8514

SEMI END-DUMP: ‘85 FIREWOOD. 16 ft. Alder Freightliner. 400 Cumlogs delivered by dump mins BCIII, 13 sp SQHD tr uck. 5+ cords $550. exc. cond. $18,000. Call 360-301-1931. (360)417-0153 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Cord $170, delivered. Proceeds to P.A. Senior Class ‘13. (360)808-5999

6080 Home Furnishings B E D. Q u e e n S l e e p Number, Limited Edition, Mattress and Base, 2 Chamber, Remote Control with all instructions. L i ke b ra n d n ew, o n l y u s e d 1 m o n t h . Pa i d $2,200 asking $1,200/ obo. Please call (360) 457-4668 leave message.

WOOD STOVE: 28x25x 31, takes 22” wood, includes pipe with damper and screen. $550. MISC: Grandfather clock (360)732-4328 H o w a r d M i l l e r, p a i d $3,200 sell for $1,500. Place your ad at S o fa s l e e p e r, q u e e n peninsula size, new condition, dailynews.com $500. (360)385-2475.

Englander Mattress Bed Set. ENGLANDER (one of the elite bedroom set makers) Box spring, mattress and frame, a complete bed! 3 years old in excellent condition. Queen size. Sleep like a baby on this bed. $900.00 complete. (360)385-3322 Chimacum

MISC: Table & chairs on rollers, cane backs, $75. Roll top desk, $75. Microwave, $15. Vacuum, $15. Full size headboard, $10. Small kitchen appliances, $10-25. 681-7218.

MISC: Woodward patio set, 6 chairs, 48” table, custom cushions, cover, umbrella, $800. 6’ solid w a l n u t s o fa , c u s t o m cushions, excellent, $250. Walnut kitchen table, 48” plus leaf, includes 4 high back chairs, $400. (360)681-6526

2A560600-10/14

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605 Apartments Clallam County

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Bothersome insect 2 Exercise woe 3 Nickel or dime 4 Tiny toymaker

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. NEIL ARMSTRONG (1930-2012) Solution: 12 letters

T H O U S T O N I N I M E G G By Nancy Kavanaugh

5 Periodical publisher 6 Sound from a water cooler 7 Fat-reducing procedure, briefly 8 Poem of praise 9 “__ the ramparts ...” 10 Punishment’s partner 11 Is wearing 12 Poker concession 13 Have in stock 18 Midafternoon hour 19 __ parking 23 Winesap, e.g. 24 Most capable 25 Draw up a schedule for 26 Kid around 27 Oscar-nominated Peter Fonda role 28 “__ Flanders”: Defoe novel 29 Social divisions 30 Wolf pack leader 33 Muscat resident 34 “Surely you don’t mean me” 35 Hairdo 36 Seaside swooper

AIRIMPACT WRENCH $30. (360)683-9295.

CARTRIDGES: Pair of 104 mm brass cartridges, from USMC Ontos. A M M O : 5 0 0 r o u n d s , $40 firm. (360)928-1108. 7.62 x 39 mm, 124gr. CD COLLECTION: Top HP, WOLF, steel case. blues discs. $50. $120. (360)808-2126 (360)681-7579 APPLIANCES: Fridge, CERAMIC POT: Large, $75. Washer and Dryer, g l a ze d bl u e, c e ra m i c $125. (360)683-7708. garden planter. $60. (360)457-5790 BABY CLOTHES: Newborn to 24 mos., good shape, over 50 pieces. CHAINSAW: Home Lite chainsaw, 20” bar. $100/ $20. (360)452-9693. obo. (360)928-3464. BED: Double, mattress, CHAIR: Antique chanbox springs. $150. nel-back chair. $75. (360)457-3274 (360)457-3414 B E D : t w i n , l i ke n ew, CHAIRS: Folding chairs, mattress and box spring. Atlas, metal, padded. (2) $150. (360)417-1277 for $10. (360)457-6343 B E N C H E S : O u t d o o r, park like, very good con- CHEST OF DRAWERS dition. $15, each, $20 for 9 Drawers, wood, black, both. (360)681-3522. 36”H x 13”D x 33” W. $25. (360)457-6431. BISCUIT PLANER KIT New, never used. $150. CHEST WADERS: new, (360)457-3414 camo, Hodgman, size 9, 1200 gram, 5mm. $10. B O OT S : R e d w i n g s, (360)452-3133 mens, 10-3E, never CHILD BED: Used only worn, paid $165. Asking 3 n i g h t s, c o m e s w i t h $60. (360)457-8729. princess bedding. $40. BREAKFAST NOOK (360)683-8781 Nice 3 pc cor ner unit with round table. $150/ CHIMNEY CAP: 18x18 stainless steel, like new, obo. (360)417-3410. GELCO. (360) 452-8770. C A B I N E T : “ s h a b b y - $95 cute,” 2 piece, long cabiCLAMPS: (10) Wood, net, with drawers. $125. (4) metal. $40 for all. (360)928-9705 (360)683-9295 CAMERA: KR 30s RiCLUBS:10 piece formed coh, 35mm, with colored set of Maxfli irons, (4) filters. $50. wedges, new grips. $75. (360)460-4107 (360)385-2776 CARPET CLEANER CLUBS: Tommy Armour Carpet/rug spray clean- “Silver Scot” “845” iron er. $85/obo. set, steel shafts. $75. (360)928-3464 (360)385-2776 CARRY-ON: Matching COMPRESSOR: Dualred, paid $89. Asking tank, like new. $150. $59. (360)202-0928. (360)417-9011 CAR SEAT INSERT Ortho car seat, heat and massage. $20. (360)582-9622

COSTUME: Inflatable cowboy & horse, hat, battery pack, new, tags. $25. (360)683-5284.

10/15/12 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

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C T Q E K O A O E U E Y L D S

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N A R B A E E O S E E Y T T R S R I E O O B O N N R H L A A N L E J U M O O N T ‫ګګګګ‬ O R E H I M  A R K C E C A P S T O R W T F R I A E C H N L P O R Y K S 10/15

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Aeronautics, Aerospace, Air Force, Astronaut, Aviator, Blume, Boy Scout, Carol, Deist, Engineer, Eric, First, Flying, Gemini, Hero, Honors, Houston, Janet, Karen, Landing, Launch, Leap, Lunar, Mark, Moon, NASA, Naval, Navy, Ohio, Orbit, Pilot, Plaque, Professor, Skyrocket, Space Shuttle, Spacesuits, Star, State, Step, Test, Time, Train, Walk Yesterday’s Answer: Glad You Came THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

LUSKK ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ZAPTO (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Contented sounds 41 Exams for sophs or jrs. 42 Winter Olympics entrant 44 Swank of “Amelia” 45 Move furtively 46 Scandalous newsmaker of 2001-’02 47 Alaskan native

10/15/12

48 Outplays 51 “Goodness gracious!” 52 Earth sci. 53 O’Hara homestead 54 Opinion website 55 IRS form entries 57 Inexperienced, as recruits 58 Go wrong 59 Moral wrong

NISDIG

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Trot or gallop 5 Home with a domed roof 10 Stylish 14 Earth Day sci. 15 Playground chute 16 Avatar of Vishnu 17 Four-to-midnight production overseer, say 20 Bill of Rights amendment count 21 “Les Misérables” author Victor 22 Parisian love 23 “What __ the odds?” 24 In liberal amounts 26 Dead battery hookup 31 Get hitched in a hurry 32 Without warning 37 Unload for cash 38 Colorado ski city 39 Secure in the harbor 40 Mind readers 42 Luxurious bedding material 43 Encased dagger 45 Popular restaurant fish 49 18-Down, on a sundial 50 Shoreline feature 51 Stare at impolitely 53 Time Warner “Superstation” 56 Dry runs, and a hint to the starts of 17-, 26- and 43-Across 60 Clumsy one 61 Mail for King Arthur 62 Wrinkle remover 63 MDs for otitis sufferers 64 With tongue in cheek 65 Maddens with reminders

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 B7

BLONOG Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday's

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: FABLE DRAWL MISERY EXCUSE Answer: When the Jumble creators realized they’d forgotten to turn in a puzzle, they — SCRAMBLED

COSTUME: Inflatable DRESSER: Victor ian- H A L L T R E E : D a r k M O D E L : W h a l e b o a t RANGE: Whirlpool, 30”, SPIN ROD AND REEL pur ple adult ballerina, style, 7 drawers, white, wood, mirror, 5 hooks, model, 1:25 scale, Arte- almond, replaced by pro- Like new. $75. sania-Latina. $55/obo. very nice. $85. (360)452-8953 battery pack, new, tags. gilded hardware. $95. pane range. $100. (360)452-6842 (360)797-3730 $25. (360)683-5284. (360)598-2800 (360)374-7513 STEELHEAD REEL COSTUMES: Adult size, D R Y E R : K e n m o r e , M O N I TO R : 1 7 ” , V i ew R E C L I N E R : H u n t e r A m b a s s a d o r C - 3 - L R HEATING ELEMENT jester, 3 pieces, $15. works. $100. Smoker Luhr Jensen L. S o n i c, w i t h key b o a r d green, leather, fabulous reel, new. $70. Ghost, 3 pieces, $5. and attachments. $25. (360)452-8953 L. Chief, clean. $55. (360)374-7513 shape. $150. (360)928-3447 (360)452-3133 (360)681-4293 (360)417-1615 STONE: Cronin stone, ENGINE HOIST: 2 ton. CRAB TRAPS: (2) Crab JARS: Princess house NAILER: Makita siding R I M S : ( 4 ) Fo r d t r u ck earth tones, 24.5 square $200 cash traps, rect., bait box, Fantasia cr ystal spice nailer, light use. $200. (360)452-5673 rims, 17 x 7.5/ 14mm in- feet, edging. $110/obo. bouy, rope. $25. (360)417-9011 (360)683-7435 jars with metal rack. $30. set, 5 lug, center caps. E N T. C E N T E R : S o l i d (360)681-4293 (360)457-5299 NISSAN: 1985, 2-door, $200. (360)457-0568. STORM WINDOWS dark wood, 4x9L 3x11H DART BOARD: Official 1x6W. $50. Many sizes, mostly K E Y B OA R D : Ya m a h a no title, runs rough. ROCKING CHAIR: Ma- 35x58. Each $5. British Bristle dart board, $200. (360)928-9460. PSR-6, with books and (360)461-4622 p l e , “ L i t t l e M o t h e r ’s for your favorite tavern. (360)452-5180 stand, good condition. OFFICE FURNATURE Chair.” $60. $25. (360)683-0033. FILE CABINET: 2 draw- $75. (360)582-9622. (360)683-3891 S T O VES: Colman Desks, $100. File cabiers, metal, needs paint. D E H Y D R ATO R : D e n - $20. (360)374-7513. camping stove, $15. Prinet, $25. (360)683-7708. KITCHEN STOOL SAFE: Fire-safe, dial mark, 6 tier, like new. mus stove, $12. Chrome, padded seat OFFICE FURNITURE combination. $200/obo $30. (360)928-3692. (360)452-9530 FLOURESCENT LIGHT and back, folding steps. Desk, chair, and matchor trade. $30. (360)302-0239. 4’, puff light, with new DESK: Cherry, corner, ballast. $65. STREET LIGHTS: (2) ing file cabinet. $100. (206)941-6617 c o m p u t e r, k e y b o a r d Victorian street lights. (360)797-1062 L A M P : Ta b l e l a m p , (360)457-1392 SAFE: Sentry safe, 16” $100. (360)477-1134. slideout, slate-color top. leaded glass shade, very ORGANIZER: Desk-top, x 17” x 17”, Port Town$90. (360)681-7418. nice. $45. FORMAN GRILL STROLLER: Umbrella 31-day bill ticker system, send area. $50. (360)681-7579 $10. (360)457-3274. DESK: Computer desk, s t r o l l e r, l i ke n ew $ 5 . (2) drawers. $40/obo. (360)344-3445 like new. $30. Evenings 452-9693. (360)452-6842 FREE: 5’ tall plant stand, LATTICE: (3) 4’ x 8’ ce(360)683-2164 dar sheets, new, paid SALON CHAIRS: Beauwhite, 3 shelves. PAINT: 10 Gal, Behr Ul$25 each. Asking $10 ty salon dryer chair, new Studless Snow Tires.4 (360)582-9987 DESK: Corner desk, ext r a P r e m i u m i n t e r i o r shampoo chair. $150. Toyo Observe GaritHT each. (360)457-6343. cellent condition. $50. paint, semi-gloss. $200. 195/50R16 84H. Great FREE: Aluminum storm (360)460-0621 (360)452-7125 (360)808-6456 tread. $60. 582-9227 LEATHER JACKETS door, windows of various (4), sports & motorcycle. DINING TABLE: 66” x sizes, possibly for cold $50 ea. (360)452-9685. P H O N E : S a m s u n g S E AT C OV E R S : ( 2 ) S U R R O U N D S O U N D 44”, 2’ gear-driven leaf, frame. (360)683-1958. R455C Straight Talker, sheepskin, bucket seat E Q U I P M E N T: Po w e r covers, black. $50. (5) chairs. $150. Woofer, etc., all papers! FREE: Magic Chef re- LOVE SEAT: Reclining, slider, 1,000 min. card. (360)683-0033 (360)460-4107 $70. (360)928-1108. $85. (360)683-389. very comfy, good condifridgerator, like new. tion. $100/obo. (360)582-9987 SEWING MACHINE D O G H O U S E : I g l o o, P O L E S AW: B a t t e r y SWEATER: Cashmere (360)797-3730 largest available size. powered, for tree prun- Antique Singer 66. $100. men’s large, crew neck, FREE: Strawberry (360)683-7397 $100. (360)808-8423. dusty blue, new, Italian. L U G G AG E : M a t c h i n g ing, with extras. $125. plants. (360)457-7942 $20. (360)457-6431. two-suiter and duffel. (360)457-3492 DOG RUN: Large, SHOES: Women’s size $65. (360)457-7942. Portable Antenna: HD 6, like new. $5-$10. TA B L E S : O a k , d r o p chain-link. $95. FREEZER: Amana, 17 LUGGAGE: Samsonite, Directv, with tripod long leaf, (2) chairs, $90. Ma(360)452-9530 (360)928-3447 cf, works great. $100. ple, round, (4) chairs, new, dark red, wheels, c a bl e, mu l t i - s a t e l l i t e. (360)457-7600 DOORS: (2) new, preS H R E D D E R : M e d i u m $75. (360)681-7418. pull-up handle. Asking $15. (360)681-7568. hung, 28”, hollow core duty, cut cross, like new, FREEZERS: Chest and $195. (360)202-0928. Portable HD Directv AnTABLE: Wood drop-leaf doors. $25 each. u p r i g h t f r e e z e r, $ 7 5 MIRROR: Large, oval, tenna. with tripod long does mult. pages, CDs. table. $75. (360)681-3339 $35. (360)452-5180. each. c a bl e, mu l t i s a t e l l i t e. (360)928-9705 oak frame, door-sized. (360)452-7746 DRAFTING TABLE $15. 670-3587. $200. (360)457-6845. SKEET SHOOTER TAILGATES: 1965 Ford Hamilton electric drafting with clay targets. $35. pick-up, and 1985 Chev. table, track assembly. FURNATURE: Oak cof- MISC: (2) color TVs, $25 POWERSNAKE: rigid. (360)683-0146 fee table, $40. Oak end each. (2) speaker sets, $200/obo, or trade. p i ck - u p t a i l g a t e, $ 7 5 $75. (360)683-7881. table, $20. (206)941-6617 $25 each. Slide Projector: Kodak each. (360)928-9460. DRESSER: 13” x 17” x Evenings 452-9693 (360)452-9685 PRINTER: Wireless, HP C a r o u s e l 4 6 0 0 , n ew, TIRES: (4) Mountaincat, 32”, takk, refinish poswith 100-150mm zoom t r u c k t i r e s , M T S 3 i x F U TO N : Q u e e n s i ze, M I S C : Fe e d s t o ra g e Photosmart, new. $59. sibility. $25. lens. $125. 452-7439. great condition. $75. (360)417-1693 10.50, Rl5lt. $100. (360)374-7513 bin, $40. Queen mat(360)461-4622 (360)683-2164 tress and box spr ing, D R E S S E R : C h i l d ’s P U L L E Y S : ( 4 ) Wo o d SOFA: 7’, leather, top $100. (360)452-7746. stitching, nailhead trim. GATES: (2) 7’, galvaTOASTER OVEN: New dresser, solid with wood pulleys, (3) with hooks. $200 firm. in box, Kenmore. $55. s h e l ve s, ( 2 ) d rawe r s. nized. $75. $120/obo. www.peninsula (360)457-1704 (360)683-0146 (360)457-1392 $115. (360)417-1301. (360)683-7435 dailynews.com

E E F R E E A D S R F Monday S and Tuesdays D A

M a il to : Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

TIRES: Goodyear Fortera, P245/65/R17, all season. $75 each, or 3 for $200. (360)598-2800. TOYS: Step 2 kitchen w i t h a l l a c c e s s o r i e s. $45. (360)683-8781. TRAIN TABLE: Christmas train table, N scale. $75. (360)477-1134. TRUCK BOXES: (2) top mount, 5’ diamond plate aluminum, with keys. $200. (360)457-5299. TV-AM-FM radio combo 9” BW, good for garage or shop. $8. (360)452-6974 TV: Sony 42”, theater quality, must see! $150/ obo. (360)452-1259. TV STAND: (2), one is 30”, the other is 24”, with storage shelves. $25. (360)681-3339 TV: Toshiba, 27”, not flat screen. $10. (360)681-4234 TV: Toshiba, 36”, not flat screen. $20. (360)681-4234 WEEDEATER: Shiadaiwa straight short, recent upgrade. $200. (360)457-6845 WHEEL LOCK: Car protection steering wheel lock, car or truck. $5. (360)452-6974 WO O D S TOV E : C a s t barrel type, good for garage or small cabin. $200. (360)457-0568.

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Classified

B8 MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 6100 Misc. Merchandise

6135 Yard & Garden

BEAUTIFUL PATIO WINDOWS 4, unused, tempered, c o s t $ 1 , 2 0 0 , s e l l fo r $395 all. Can deliver. (360)643-0356

N E A R LY N E W CRAFTSMAN 42” LAWN TRACTOR. $1200. Bought in April. Excelnt condtn. Auto, tight turn, 21 HP B&S, + mulch kit. Mowing seaCEILINGS PANELS s o n m ay b e e n d i n g Armstrong ceiling pan- savings will pay off in els, 2’x4’, 18 boxes, 8 spring. 809-0567. pieces each. $300. (360)457-1533 DUMP TRAILER: Tandem axle, 10’ long, 7’ wide, 6’ tall (4’ solid metal, 2’ steel mesh on top), all steel construction, good for hauling, landscaping, etc. Priced to sell. $2,900/obo. Won’t last. (360)460-0518.

9802 5th Wheels

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

1998 Kit RoadRanger 5th Wheel. 1998 Kit Road Ranger 5th Wheel with 13’ Slide-Out. All appliances in working order including air cond. Furnace. Must Sell $8,000. Call Terry (360)477-2756

FORMOSA 41 KETCH ‘70. Beautiful sailboat, cabin totally rebuilt, new engine (Yanmar), new sails, needs bowsprit, great liveaboard, was $79,500. Now $59,500. (360)452-1531

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

MUST SELL: Reliable r i d i n g , m e a t p a ck i n g mule with gear. $1,700/obo. 461-1768.

WAGUA ANGUS HERDSIRE 3/4 Wagua, 1/4 Angus, G E N E R AT O R : 5 0 0 0 12 yr. old son of Michi watt Coleman generator. Fuku. 2,000 lbs. ver y Low hours, well main- nice, gentle. $2,500/obo. tained. $300. 360-765-3473 32 ft. 5th. wheel, 2003 360-582-0009 WEANER PIGS: York- Mirage. Low road miles, 3 slides, power awning, H OT T U B : C a l d e r a Duroc, and some Hamp, r e a r k i t c h e n , p u l l - o u t Cumberland installed B e r k , $ 6 5 e a c h . Few pantry, ceiling fan, com2 0 0 7 b y T h e S p a feeders, $75 ea. 1 BBQ p u t e r d e s k , a l l - w o o d Shop, works perfectly, Gilt, $120. cabinets. $13,000. 360-775-6552. just winterized, in good Chimacum. Email condition. $1,900. haroldberger@mac.com (360)670-5844 7030 Horses 5TH WHEEL: ‘00 35’ Alfa. 3 slides, perfect conMISC: Shuttle, 3 wheel electric mobility scooter, HORSE: Beautiful fe- dition, everything works, $450. 10” Craftsman ta- male Arabian, 22 years many extras, must see ble saw, $75. old, needs experienced to appreciate. $22,500/ (360)385-5536 r i d e r, ow n e r c a n n o obo. (360)683-2529. MOTORCYCLE SEAT: longer ride, must go to 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 8 3 2 3 ’ Fleetwood. Needs furniCorbin Close Solo Seat good home. $100. (360)457-6584 ture and weatherizing. with backrest. It fits any AS IS. $2,000. 797-7575 1984 - 1999 Harley Davidson Softail. Sells for 7035 General Pets $750.00 new...a steal at $395! Contact Kelly at 360.461.3255 ADORABLE KITTENS All colors and sizes. $85. OIL STOVE: With tank. PFOA (360)452-0414. $600. 565-6274. safehavenpfoa.org Powered Wheelchair Bernese Mountain Dog 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 1 3 5 ’ 1014 W. 10th, P.A. AKC pups. For breeders Hitchhiker Champagne $300. (360)457-9722. r e fe r r a l s e e w e b s i t e edition. Two slide-outs, Quad/Utility Trailer. Haul www.bmdcgs.org/breed- rear kitchen, fully furQuads, Motorcycle, Yard ers Is available to the nished. Permanent skirtTractor, Firewood, Hay, new owner for support i n g a l s o a v a i l a b l e . Furniture with this easy for the life of the dog. $10,000. (360)797-0081 t ow g e n e r a l p u r p o s e Don’t hesitate to call or 5TH WHEEL: ‘98 29’ Altrailer. 6.5’ x 14’ single email for more info. penlite. 1 tip-out, extras, axle. Better than new Bernese@shiretech.com ver y clean, ver y good www.bmdcgs.org with added rebar for secondition. $12,500. (360)368-5455 cure tie down, under(360)460-9680 coating, finished nice. DOG HOUSE: Large, Ig$1,550. Call (360)460loo style, like new. $85. 9808 Campers & 3458, leave message. (360)775-5032 Canopies SAUNA: Health Mate Infared. Seats two. Radio. PUPPY: Pekingese, 6 CAMPER: ‘03 Pasttime. N e a r n e w c o n d i t i o n . mo. old, very adorable. L i ke n ew, m a ny a d d $300. (360)452-9553 or $1,800/obo. 457-9218. ons, solar panels, awn(360)460-3020. ing, air cond., TV. STORAGE BUILDING $5,500. (360)461-6615. 6x8, vinyl with double Purebred Beagle Pupdoors, wood floor, like pies. Beagle Puppies, $250. each. Ready new. $275. 10/24/12. Call or Text (360)681-4045 (360)640-1610

6105 Musical Instruments

9820 Motorhomes

PIANO: Spinett, excellent condition. $600. (360)808-2123

6115 Sporting Goods BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates. Call (360)477-9659 BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call 360-477-9659 Va l l e y A q u a n a u t LV 17’1” Poly Sea Kayak w/skeg used a dozen times over the last few years and kept in the garage when not in use. Some accessor ies included. $1300. Contact Kelly at 461-3255.

6125 Tools ARC WELDER: Old Lincoln fleet-arc 280 amp A/C welder mounted on dolly. Very heavy duty. $325/obo. 681-8788. SHOPSMITH: Mark V, 5 in 1 tools, all wood working tools included. $450/ obo. (360)460-8695.

25’ 2004 Georgie Boy Landau 34K miles. Compact, easy to drive and maneuver, sleeps 4.2 slide outs, Wo r k h o r s e c h a s s i s, 8.1L Vor tec gas, tow package, BrakeMaster towing sys, 4KW Onan gen, hydraulic jacks, rear camera, driverside door, awning, 6 gal water heater, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD player, huge outside storage, bathroom with tub and shower, outside shower, roof A/C, wall htr, large dual power fridge, queen bed, microwave, range and oven. $40,000. (360)681-3020

LAWN MOWER: Scag 36” commercial mower, walk behind, Kawasaki engine, grass catcher, great condition. $850. (360)683-0146.

With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

PACKAGE: ‘85 F250 Supercab with 10’ cabover camper. $2,500/ obo. (360)417-0163.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

BAYLINER: ‘95 2452 on trailer, low hrs., 9.9 hp Yamaha, plus many extras, excellent. $17,495 (360)681-0632

BELL BOY: 22’ cuddy cabin, V8 engine needs work. $1,800. (360)385-9019 MOTOR HOME: ‘95 32’ Winnebago Adventurer. BLUE WATER: ‘91 16’ Excellent condition, 70K V 6 M e r c C r u i s e r w i t h mi. $8,250. 681-4045. trailer. $3,800/obo. (360)460-0236 MUST SELL: ‘92 34’ Bounder. 2,000 mi. on B OAT T R A I L E R : 1 9 ’ new 454 Chev 950 hp single axle, galvanized, engine. $7,995/obo. E Z L o a d b o a t t ra i l e r. (360)683-8453 $1,350/obo. 809-0700. E350, 65K mi. $8,500. (360)457-6434.

Native Plant Sale. It’s a great time to plant Native Plants just before it starts to rain. Many va9832 Tents & rieties and sizes of trees Travel Trailers and shr ubs at end of season pricing. Please T E N T T R A I L E R : ‘ 0 3 call (360)582-1314 for C o l e m a n : W e s t l a k e , more information. sleeps 9, furnance, water tank, water heater, indoor/outdoor shower and more, ever ything works. $5,000. (360)452-4327

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT

HUNTER’S SPECIAL 22’ camper. $900. (360)797-4041

2012 RANGER 25SC TUGBOAT. Loaded with MOTOR HOME: ‘82 23’ custom features. Clean, Travel Craft. 108K, runs new appearance. Locate d i n S e q u i m . Wa r m , good, good condition. $3,000/obo. 928-3015 or d r y, c o m fo r t a bl e fo u r season cruising. Go to (360)461-5105. rangertugs.com/R-25sc for vir tual tour. Illness forces sale. $119,500. (509)312-0704.

W O O D W O R K E R TA BLE: Maple, 2 vises, MOTOR HOME: ‘90 34’ t o o l w e l l , 2 d r aw e r s. A i r ex . Fo r d c h a s s i s , $200. 360-379-9520. 4 8 K , n e a r n ew t i r e s, 3-way refrigerator, clean and comfortable. $5,400, 6140 Wanted consider part trade for & Trades older Ford pickup. (360)797-1945 BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy MOTOR HOME: ‘92 25’ yours. 457-9789. Tioga Monterra Special.

6135 Yard & Garden

CAMPER: ‘09 LANCE 830 (Short Bed) Cab o ve r w i t h r e a r fo l d down tent. Cold weather package, A/C, M i c r owave, aw n i n g , side entry, side door. Great for campers with children and or pets. Euro design interior in b e i g e c o l o r s . “ Fa s t Gun” turnbuckles, “Super Hitch” available. Used on Ford F350. Reduced to $15,500 (360)301-6261

TENT TRAILER: ‘99 Dutchman. King/queen bed, excellent cond., refrigerator, furnace, A/C, tons of storage. $4,000. (360)460-4157 TRAILER: ‘00 25’ Komfor t. Slide, air, bunks, queen bed, rear bath and shower, microwave, skylight, deluxe cabinets, AM/FM CD stereo. $9,000. (360)457-6066 or 460-6178, call or text. TRAILER: ‘00 26” Fleetwood slideout, $9,800. (360)452-6677 TRAILER: ‘04 27Q Forest River Cherokee. Pop out, large window, 2 skylights, excellent condition. $9,700. (360)379-5136

Cruising boat. 1981 Sea Ranger sedan style trawler 39’ LOA. Single engine Per kins diesel with bow thruster. Fully enclosed fly bridge. Comfor table salon; stateroom with queen bed; full shower in head;full-sized refrigerator/freezer plus freezer b ox i n l a z z a r e t ; n ew Westerbeke genset with “get-home” alternate power source from genset; new smar t charger/inver ter and battery bank; good electronics including radar and AIS receive. Cruises at 7.5 Kts on 2.5 gph. Max speed 9.0 Kts, 150 gal water and 535 gal fuel capacity. 15 hp Yamaha O/B on dinghy. Anchor with 300’ chain and stern tie spool. Fully equipped as USCG Auxiliary Ope ra t i o n a l Fa c i l i t y. We have cruised throughout Salish Sea and Inside Passage in this comfortable and sea-worthy boat. She works well in t h e N W e nv i r o n m e n t . Suitable for 2 people cruising or live-aboard. S e e i n Po r t L u d l o w. $99,500. (360)437-7996.

TRAILER: ‘55 14’ Shasta. Ver y nice. $5,000. DRIFT BOAT: With trail417-3959 message. er. $2,000. 461-6441.

GLASPLY: 17’, 90 hp like new Yamaha O/B. $5,500. (360)683-8738. G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n cr uiser, flying br idge, single Cummins diesel engine, low hours, radar, VHF radio, CB, dept/fish finder, dingy, down riggers, 16’x32’ boathouse. $27,500. (360)457-0684. LIVINGSTON: 13’. With all the necessary equipment, price is right and ready to go, let’s talk. $2,650/obo. 452-2712. MARINE. Westcoaster Aluminum Boat 14.3 feet. 9.9 Yamaha outboard motor. Bimini Top, EZ Pull Electric Pot Puller, Portable/Fish Depth Finder, Trailer and other extras. $2,500. Firm. (360)681-7824 MERRY WHERRY TWO Rowing vessel, 2 seat design, equipped with one sliding seat, custom RowWing, Dreher oars, 19’ long with 39” beam, 70 lbs. $2,000. (360)379-9225

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

SELL OR TRADE 13’ Livingston, new paint, trailer rebuilt, 30 hp Yamaha, front steering, new eats, downrigger mounts, Lowrance f i s h f i n d e r. Tr a d e fo r travel trailer or 4x4 quad, OLYMPIC: ‘92 26’ Super etc. $2,000/obo. XL. Less than 800 hours (360)460-1514 on original engine and o u t d r i ve , S u z u k i , 1 5 STARCRAFT: ‘73 12’. h o r s e k i cke r h a s l ow aluminum, E. downrigger hours. Rebuilt trailer with $800. (360)928-3483. five like new tires. Hot and cold water, heater, UNIFLITE: ‘64 23’. Radio,, fathometer, GPS, stove, dinette. $24,750. radar, crab pot puller, 457-6162 or 809-3396 Yanmar diesel, trailer. PONTOON: ‘06 10’ Out- $6,000/obo. 460-1246. cast. Stainless steel frame, comes with flipper, oars, padded seats, 9817 Motorcycles K-pump. $600/obo. (360)670-2015 HARLEY: ‘04 Soft Tail RIENELL: 16’ ski/speed Heritage. Black with lots boat, EZ Load trailer, 88 of extra chrome. 24,500 hp Johnson motor, must mi., Beautiful bike, must see to appreciate. sell. $2,250/obo. $11,000. (360)477-3725. (360)808-0611 ROWING BOAT: Wood Lapstrake Whitehall, with traveling sail, 2 pair of spruce spoon blade oars, Sprit sail with mast and 2 rudder options, includes trailer bunk but not trailer, will deliver in Puget Sound area. $4,000. (360)775-5955.

SABERCRAFT: 21’. 302 Inboard, Lorance GPS 5” screen with fish/depth finder, VHS, 15 hp kicker, good interior. Selling M I S C. M G B a ck a bl e due to health. $4,000. Towing System. Used 683-3682 o n a F o r d E x p l o r e r. $200/obo. Sailboat: 19’ Lightning (360)681-7824 Sailboat on trailer ready M O O C H E R ; ‘ 9 1 1 6 ’ to go. Asking $1,500 or glass solid boat, Yama- will take best offer. The ha ‘07 50 HP tiller with boat is very solid for its full power, ‘08 6 HP high age-the sails are ver y thrust, Scotty electrics, serviceable including the Lowrance electronics, spinnaker. (360)460-6231 excellent condition. $6,500. (360)452-2148. S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n O/B MOTOR: Honda 2 26’. Cr uise proven, a hp, excellent condition, real steal, lots of equipment. As is. $3,500 or little use. $500. trade. (360)477-7719. (360)683-0146

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9817 Motorcycles

9742 Tires & Wheels

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, m a n y ex t r a s , a l w ay s garaged. $9,500. (360)461-1911

Snow tires. Bridgestone Blizzaks 215/55R16 on rims. Nearly new. $300 firm. Call 360-683-0750.

FORD: ‘27 T-Bucket, ‘350’ blower, rag top, f a s t a n d n i c e , C D. $17,500. Call before 7 p.m. (360)457-8388.

9805 ATVs

2005 Suzuki LT-Z 250 Quadspor t This quad has approximately 20 hours of ride time. It has a K&N Air Filter, Big Gun exhaust, Acerbis Handguards, and new battery. I t i s w h i t e w i t h bl u e frame. $2,250. 460-0405

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

1978 CADILLAC SEV I L L E . B E AU T I F U L “LIKE NEW” CLASSIC. GOLD, LT YELLOW LEATHER, SUNR O O F, W H I T E WALLS, WIRE WHEELS. 75K MILES. M U S T S E E TO A P P R E C I AT E . $ 7 , 5 0 0 (360)928-9724 (206) 697-2005

HUNTER’S DREAM Max IV 6 wheel dr ive ‘74 CHEVY LUV P/U Amphibious. $4,950. project. Spec ed, short H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 (360)477-9585 bed, rear fenders, mag S p o r t s t e r. 7 K m i l e s , wh, lwrd. $500 (360)681mint. $7,900. 452-6677. 8881 daily 9-5. H A R L E Y: ‘ 9 1 F X L R . CHEV: ‘53 pickup restoc u s t o m s h o w r e a d y, ration project. $3,800. S&S powered, wins eveCell (562)743-7718 ry time. $11,500/obo. (360)452-4612, msg. CHEV: ‘56 Belair. 6 cyl., HONDA: ‘05 CRF80. POLARIS: 2011 Razor auto, 4 door, paint, inLike new. $1,400. LE Bobby Gorden se- terior, chrome, re-done (360)460-8514. ries, excellent condition, to stock, California car, 2nd owner, always garHONDA: ‘08 CRF150R. low hours, used for fami- aged. Not smoked in. ex t ra p a r t s i n c l u d e d . ly fun, no extreme riding, $22,500. (360)683-7789. well maintained and al$2,000. ways stored inside, (360)461-3367 windshield and roof top CHEV: ‘63 Nova SS. 2 door hard top, V8, 2 sp HONDA: ‘79 CM400T ex t r a s. $ 1 1 , 4 0 0 o b o, power glide, project car. road bike. 24,000 mi. 460-0187 or 460-9512 $5,200. (360)461-2056. evenings. $1,100. 683-4761. HONDA: ‘80 CB-900C. QUAD: ‘05 Honda TRX CHEV: ‘79 L82 Corvette. Motor needs work. S i l ve r. $ 1 , 5 0 0 / o b o o r 450R. Excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 809-0700. t r a d e fo r g u n s / s m a l l $2,500. (360)461-0157. truck. (360)460-3756. CROSLEY: ‘51 Wagon. HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing 9740 Auto Service Good body/runner. $4,000. (360)683-7847. & Parts Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. D ODGE: ‘71 1/2 ton $3,500/obo. 417-0153. ENGINE HOIST: 2 ton. short bed. V8, auto, fac$200 cash H O N DA : ‘ 8 5 M a g n a . tory power steering, Ad(360)452-5673 Runs excellent. $1,600. venturer Sport, paint, in(360)385-9019 terior and chrome re9742 Tires & done, California truck, QUAD: ‘07 Yamaha 700 Wheels black on black, garaged. Raptor. Like new, extras. $15,000. (360)683-7789 Price reduced to $4,500. SNOW TIRES: (4) stud(360)452-3213 ded on rims. Hankook DODGE: ‘83 Rampage. Red, PK, needs work. SUZUKI: ‘05 DRZ110. 205/65R15. Like new. $1,900/obo. 582-0389. BBR shift kit, new plastic $300 firm. 582-9758. & graphics, lots of extras 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices $800. (360)477-2322.

FORD: ‘29 Model AA. 1 1/2 ton flatbed truck, complete frame off restoration. Updated 4 cyl. e n g i n e, hy d r. b ra ke s. $22,000. (360)683-3089.

FORD: ‘50 F1 pickup. 239 flathead V8, 3 sp, overdr ive, r uns and drives great. $17,500. (360)379-6646

FORD: ‘54 Victoria. New 302, 4 speed. $8,000/ obo. (360)504-5664.

FORD: ‘62 Galaxie Sunliner Convertible. 69,400 mi., 390 ci and 300 hp a u t o, P / S, P / B, P / W, P/Se, radials, running lights, skirts, car cover, original paint, upholstery and carpets, new top. $24,500. (360)683-3385. Email for pictures Rrobert169@qwest.net

MAZDA: ‘79 RX-7. Twin rotor, sport coupe, nice car, great driver. $2,250. (360)683-5871.

MERCEDES: ‘82 380SL. C o nve r t i bl e h a r d / s o f t top, new tires/brakes, Looks great. $5,750. (360)683-5614 or (253)208-9640

PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Performance upgrades. $9,250. 683-7768.

T- C O U P E : ‘ 2 7 . G r e a t body, no rust, no motor. $4,000. (360)683-7847.

9292 Automobiles Others

CADILLAC: ‘78 Eldorado. 86K mi., looks very O/B MOTOR: Yamaha SEA SWIRL: ‘82 16’. good, runs great. $3,000 15 hp long shaft. $950. 140 Chev engine, Merc firm. (360)928-5185. (360)683-3682 outdrive, 4 stroke Honda 75 kicker, Calkins galv. DATSUN: ‘64 Fair Lady OCEAN KAYAK: Prowl- t r a i l e r, 2 n ew S c o t t y Convertible. Project car. er Big Game, 12’ 9”x34”, downriggers, fishfinder, $1,500 firm. 452-6524. retail $980, never used. good deck space, good $850. (360)303-2157. fishing boat. $3,000. 9931 Legal Notices (360)477-3725 OLYMPIC: 84 XL 18’. Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County SUZUKI: ‘05 DRZ110. 3.8 OMC inboard, new S E A S W I R L : ‘ 9 0 2 1 ’ . BBR shift kit, new plastic File No.: 7081.23127 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar 9.9 mercury kicker, easy 190ob. $3,500. & graphics, lots of extras load trailer. $4,500. Bank, FSB Grantee: Casey Osborn and Sheleen Osborn, husband and wife, (360)452-6677 $800. (360)477-2322. (360)457-6448 who acquired title as Casey Osborn, a single man and Sheleen Mountfield, a single woman Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1203512 Tax Parcel ID No.: 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 02-30-31-140150 (14229) Abbreviated Legal: LOT 1 SVY 13/19 PTN SE4NE4 S31-T30N-R2WWM Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE File No.: 7307.25911 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the Inc. Grantee: Gerald I. Martin and Patricia S. Martin, husband and wife Ref to recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONDOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1159276 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033018550320 Ab- TACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHbreviated Legal: Lt. 32 Sunway Pk. 9/28 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to INGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determinDELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LI- ing your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the folCENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to lowing: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and le- To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : gal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like as- h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r sistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Departmay contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and ment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Com- 4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLismission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: tAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r - hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Depart- Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569- clear. I. On October 26, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clal4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLis- lam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State tAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what- at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the clear. I. On November 16, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel A: Parcel 1 of Survey, ReClallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, corded July 10, 1987 in Volume 13 of Surveys, Page 18 under Clallam County State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions im- Recording No. 593250, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, east Quarter of Section 31, Township 30 North, Range 2 West, W.M., Clallam payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situat- County, Washington. Parcel B: An easement for ingress, egress and utilities ed in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 32 of Sunway Park over, under and across the South 30 feet of the West 200 feet of parcel 2 of recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Page 28, Records of Clallam County, Washing- survey Recorded July 10, 1987 in Volume 13 of surveys, Page 18, under Clalton. Commonly known as: 180 Elizabeth Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is lam County Recording No. 593250, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/17/05, recorded on 06/24/05, un- the Northeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 30 North, Range 2 West, W.M., der Auditor’s File No. 2005 1159276, records of Clallam County, Washington, Clallam County, Washington, as disclosed by Clallam County Auditor’s file No. from Gerald I. Martin a married man and Patricia S. Martin a married woman, 2000 1045693. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Comas joint tenants, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar monly known as: 282 Pierce Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that Bank, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mort- certain Deed of Trust dated 06/11/07, recorded on 06/15/07, under Auditor’s gage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Franklin File No. 2007-1203512, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Casey Mortgage, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by S. Osborn and Sheleen M. Osborn, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Joan H. Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Franklin Mort- Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligage to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments re- gation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. corded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1278841. *The Tax Parcel ID number solely as nominee for Franklin Mortgage, its successors and assigns, as Beneand Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the re- ficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic cording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Franklin Mortgage, its sucProperty’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by cessors and assigns to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1274490. *The Tax ParObligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the cel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comObligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of ply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/09/12 Monthly Payments commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek $24,337.71 Late Charges $959.20 Lender’s Fees & Costs $375.50 Total Ar- satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrearage $25,672.41 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $775.00 rower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The BenefiTitle Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $40.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Post- ciary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following ings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,591.68 Total Amount Due: amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by $27,264.09 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obliga- 06/20/2012 Monthly Payments $42,308.42 Late Charges $1,010.58 Lender’s tion is: Principal Balance of $179,956.42, together with interest as provided in Fees & Costs $4,278.30 Total Arrearage $47,597.30 Trustee’s Expenses the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/11, and such (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $200.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by $28.00 Postings $0.00 Total Costs $228.00 Total Amount Due: $47,825.30 IV. statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Ob- The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $470,122.69, togethligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or er with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obliwarranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or gation from 07/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obcondition of the Property on November 16, 2012. The default(s) referred to in ligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/05/12 (11 days before the made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 26, 2012. and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent pay11/05/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in para- ments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured graph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, by 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/05/12 (11 days before close of the Trustee’s business on 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), the the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent paythe holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire bal- ments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and ance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time afand advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed ter 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrowof Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was trans- er, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encummitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the follow- brance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed ing address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Gerald I. Martin 180 Elizabeth Lane of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of Sequim, WA 98382 Gerald I. Martin 163 Mariners Drive Sequim, WA 98382 the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Patricia S. Martin 180 Elizabeth Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Patricia S. Martin notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower 163 Mariners Drive Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Casey S. Partner of Gerald I. Martin 180 Elizabeth Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Osborn aka Casey Sherman Osborn 282 Pierce Road Sequim, WA 98382 Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Gerald I. Martin 163 Mariners Drive Se- Sheleen M. Osborn aka Sheleen Marie Osborn 282 Pierce Road Sequim, WA quim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Patricia S. 98382 Casey S. Osborn aka Casey Sherman Osborn 1208 South Machias Martin 180 Elizabeth Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Do- Road Snohomish, WA 98290 Sheleen M. Osborn aka Sheleen Marie Osborn mestic Partner of Patricia S. Martin 163 Mariners Drive Sequim, WA 98382 by 1208 South Machias Road Snohomish, WA 98290 by both first class and eiboth first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/30/12, ther certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/11/12, proof of which is in the proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/30/12 Grantor possession of the Trustee; and on 01/12/12 Grantor and Borrower were perand Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the sonally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real proper- was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paraty described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of graph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opafforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a law- portunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain suit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trus- in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOtee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the TICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day follow- is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as ing the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. Afare not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the ter the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occuright to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under pants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall pro- RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with vide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trus- written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auctee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are tion may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.north- this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/09/12 and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/20/2012 Northwest Trustee Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 9 8 0 0 9 - 0 9 9 7 C o n t a c t : N a n c i L a m b e r t ( 4 2 5 ) 5 8 6 - 1 9 0 0 . ( T S # 7081.23127) 1002.207004-File No. 7307.25911) 1002.217740-File No. Pub: Sept. 24, Oct. 15, 2012 Legal No. 423822 Pub: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2012 Legal No. 429042


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 B9

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others Others Others Others CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA AWD touring, V-6, auto, dual A/C and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, pwr wind ow s, l o ck s, m i r r o r s, dual pwr heated seats, leather interior, 3rd row seating, AM-FM CD stacker, rear entertainment center, pwr tailgate, privacy glass, pwr sunroof, premium alloy wheels, remote entr y and more! Expires 10-20-12 Vin#776805 ONLY $12995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com

2008 Lexus 430SC: Pebble Beach Addition. I f yo u eve r wa n t e d a 1995 CADILLAC STS, b e a u t i f u l L ex u s , l o w 4 DR AUTO, LEATH- mileage (19,200) for a E R , AC, B O S E R A - 2008 Lexus 430 SC. It is DIO, CD, CASSETTE. a dark gray with the enR E B U I LT T R A N S , tire Pebble Beach AddiN E W E R T I R E S , tion ad on’s. The top reCHROME RIMS WITH tracts to the trunk in 19 EXTRA RIMS/TIRES. seconds. It really is a E L E C T E V E R Y - see to appreciate condiTHING. BEAUTIFUL tion. The only reason I CAR LIKE NEW WITH am selling is I have 5 vehicles and am cutting 108,000. down to just two. If inter(360)670-3841 OR DODGE: ‘95 Van. Wheeested call (360)681-8650 lchair lift, good condition. (360) 385-0424. This will not last long. $6,000. (360)457-8484. 1995 TOYOTA PASEO Rodney 30+mpg, 5 sp manual FORD: ‘01 Escor t SE. with apprx 223k New tires, CD changer miles,factory alarm sys34 mpg hwy, 26 mpg t e m , a f t e r m a r ke t c d city. $2,295. 809-3457. player, tinted windows, FORD: ‘01 Mustang. V6, well maintained and serauto, good condition, viced regularly. $2500 runs good, low mi. OBO,Please call $5,495. (360)582-0358. 360-477-8852.

2 0 0 2 L ex u s L S 4 3 0 . Excellent condition, Mystic Sea Opal with cream leather interior, V- 8 , 5 - s p e e d a u t o, 4-door sedan, 63K original miles, one owner, Leather, Navi, Sun/Moon roof, Luxury pkg., up to 28 MPG highway, garaged entire life. Email phone number to lsa@wr iteme.me for more information and owner contact. We will call you back. This is a beautiful luxury vehicle. $19,950. CADILLIC: ‘91. Front damage, engine/tranny good $500/obo. 457-3425. CHEV: ‘97 Camaro convertible. 6 cyl. new motor, R16’s, mag wheels $5,000. 452-1106.

FORD ‘02 FOCUS SE BU I C K : ‘ 0 0 L e S a b r e. 115K, like new, loaded, 4 door, 88,000 mi., 4cyl, 5 speed, A/C, tilt wheel, runs great. c r u i s e, p w r w i n d ow s, $3,500. (253)314-1258. locks, and mirrors, AMBUICK ‘95 REGAL 4DR F M C D, a l l oy w h e e l s V-6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, and more! Expires: 10-20-12 c r u i s e, p w r w i n d ow s, Vin# 12748 locks, mirrors, seat, AM$5,995 FM cassette, alloy Dave Barnier wheels, remote entr y, Auto Sales and more! Low miles! *We Finance In House* VIN# 435490 452-6599 ONE WEEK SPECIAL davebarnier.com $2,995 Expires 10/20/12 FORD: ‘03 Mustang conDave Barnier vertabile. $6,800/obo. Auto Sales (360)808-1242 *We Finance In House* 452-6599 HYUNDAI: ‘05 Elantra. davebarnier.com New clutch/timing belt. $3,200. (360)457-1056. CHRYSLER: ‘02 Town & C o u n t r y L i m i t e d . F u l l KIA: 2003 Rio. 5 spd, 4 cylinder, less then 40K power, excellent. $5,500. (360)452-4827. miles. $7,500/obo. (360)808-1303 MERCEDES: ‘07 SUV LEXUS: ‘99 ES300. 83K ML 320 cdi diesel. AWD, only 9,500 mi., like new, Mom’s V6, leather, mnrf. inside/out, leather, sun- $8,900. (360)643-3363. roof, navigation, dual cli- MERCURY: ‘96 Sable. m a t e c o n t r o l , h e a t e d sedan, good shape, new seats and much more. tires, needs transmis$33,750. (360)452-3200. sion. $450. 457-0578.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7233.22610 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., f/k/a JPMorgan Chase Bank Grantee: Luella L. Luciano, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1189636 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-440270 Abbreviated Legal: LT 27 2nd Phase of Eagle’s Lair 13/18 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On November 16, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 27, of Second Phase of Eagle’s Lair, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 13 of Plats, Page 18, records of Clallam County Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1724 South “O” Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/29/06, recorded on 10/16/06, under Auditor’s File No. 2006 1189636, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Luella L. Luciano, as Grantor, to Stewart Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/12/2012 Monthly Payments $11,456.91 Lender’s Fees & Costs $125.00 Total Arrearage $11,581.91 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $506.25 Title Report $411.92 Statutory Mailings $39.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,041.69 Total Amount Due: $12,623.60 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $46,673.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/25/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 16, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/05/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 11/05/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/05/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Luella L. Luciano 1724 S “O” Street Pot Angeles, WA 98363 Luella L. Luciano PO Box 1935 Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Luella L. Luciano 1724 S “O” Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Luella L. Luciano PO Box 1935 Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/22/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/22/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/12/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 9 8 0 0 9 - 0 9 9 7 C o n t a c t : H e a t h e r L . S m i t h ( 4 2 5 ) 5 8 6 - 1 9 0 0 . ( T S # 7233.22610) 1002.191294-File No. Pub: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2012 Legal No. 429039

OLDS: ‘99 Bravada. Loaded, leather $4,295/ obo. (360)928-2181. P O N T I AC : ‘ 0 4 G ra n d Prix GT. $7,000. (360)461-4665 PORCHE: ‘02 Boxster S. 65K mi., black with black leather interior, 6 speed, all options, nice car. $18,500. (360)461-9635.

1951 Dodge truck. Beautiful maintained collector’s truck. Must see to appreciate. Original miles 47K. $14,000. (360)385-0424

T OYO TA : ‘ 0 9 P r i u s . White, 58K, Nav, stereo, B.U. camera. $18,000. (805)478-1696

Toyota: ‘11 Prius 18K, pristine condition! Red, non-smoker. 55+ HWY, 50+ CITY - tags and ToyotaCare thru March, 2013 + carpet mats and W e a t h e r Te c h r u b b e r mats. No accidents $22,700 firm. (360)477-4758 TOYOTA ‘87 SUPRA 6 C y l , a u t o, A / C , t i l t wheel, cruise, pwr windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM-FM CD, alloy wheels, and more! Expires 10/20/12. VIN#042585 $3,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com TRIUMPH: ‘79 Spitfire. Both hard/soft tops. $1,500. (360)460-2931. VW: ‘03 Passat. 70K, 6 sp manual, W8 sedan, b l a c k / b l a c k l e a t h e r, great condition. $12,000. (360)461-4514 VW: ‘84 Rabbit Convertible. 120K mi., it will start. $300. (360)683-7173

CHEVROLET 2004 K2500 SILVERADO LT CREW CAB 4X4 6.6L Duramax turbo-diesel, Allison automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, running boards, tow package, trailer brake controller, privacy glass, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, and telescopic mirrors, power heated programm a bl e l e a t h e r s e a t s, cruise control, tilt, dual zone air conditioning, CD stereo, Bose sound, information center, OnStar, dual front airbags. only 20,000 miles! This truck is in like new condition! Ever popular Duramax with an Allison transmission! Loaded with options! Stop by Gray Motors today! Price reduced! $29,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

1994 GMC 4WD Sonoma Pick-up. 1994 GMC 4WD Sonoma pick-up. Extended cab. V-6. Automatic. 139,000 miles. Excellent condition. Garaged. Recent tune-up. R u n s gr e a t . A / C, c d , canopy, bed liner, boat D O D G E : ‘ 7 2 3 / 4 t o n . rack, tow package, new Runs great, no dents, tires. $3995. some rust. $700/obo. Call 460-5404 (360)531-3842 CHEV: ‘93 Pickup, good b o d y, n e e d s e n g i n e work. $800/obo. (360)301-4721 FORD ‘95 F150 SUPER CAB XLT 4X4 5.0L (302) EFI V8, autom a t i c , a l l oy w h e e l s , g o o d t i r e s, d u a l f u e l tanks, running boards, bedliner, tow package, trailer brake controller, r e a r s l i d i n g w i n d o w, power windows and door locks, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, Pioneer premier CD stereo, drivers airbag. Only 97,000 miles! Incredible condition! You won’t find one nicer than this! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

DODGE: ‘91 Ram pu. V6, auto, low mi., new paint, tool boxes, . $5,700 invested. Sell $3,700. (360)775-6958

FORD: ‘05 F350 King Ranch LOADED W/EXTRAS. Truck is like new w/more options than can list: Diesel/5 sp automatic w/OD/Leather Interior/ 4x4/ Long Bed/2nd 50 gal fuel tank, AM/FM/ CD/PW/PS/PB. $27,850. (951)541-2675 FORD: ‘72 F100 1/2 ton. Runs/stops great, it’s 40 years old too! $1,200. (847)302-7444

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County File No.: 7081.23338 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar Bank, FSB Grantee: David C. Updike Jr and Lara C. Updike Husband And Wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1205618 Tax Parcel ID No.: 22680 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 10 of Flaura’s Acres No. 2 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On October 26, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 10 of Flaura’s Acres No. 2, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Pages 59 and 60, records of Clallam County, Washington. Together with a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress over the East 15 feet of Lot(18) of Flaura’s Acres as recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 75, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 851 East Belfield Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/17/07, recorded on 07/20/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1205618, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David C. Updike, Jr and Lara C. Updike, husband and wife as joint tenants with rights of survivorship, not as tenants in common or community property, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on Behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. “MERS” as nominee for Goldfinch Mortgage Inc., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. “MERS” as nominee for Goldfinch Mortgage Inc. to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1280203. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/21/2012 Monthly Payments $14,378.67 Late Charges $575.82 Lender’s Fees & Costs $50.50 Total Arrearage $15,004.99 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $775.00 Title Report $712.19 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,595.19 Total Amount Due: $16,600.18 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $187,143.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 26, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David C. Updike, Jr 851 East Belfield Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Lara C. Updike 851 East Belfield Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/14/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/14/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/21/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7081.23338) 1002.215863-File No. Pub: Sept. 24, Oct. 15, 2012 Legal No. 423856

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

FORD: ‘86 F150. Excel- CHEV: ‘85 S10 Blazer. lent cond., runs great, L o w m i . , ve r y c l e a n . recent tune up. $3,000/ $1,450/obo. 460-7453. obo. (360)531-3842. CHEV: ‘99 Suburban. 1 FORD: ‘88 Ranger Su- owner vehicle with comper cab. Auto, front/rear p l e t e m a i n t e n a n c e tanks, power windows/ records, clean, well kept, seats, power steering, tilt s t r o n g r u n n i n g t r u ck , NISSAN: ‘97 Pathfinder. wheel, cruise control, 251K mi., priced $1,000 4x4. Runs great. $3,875/ below lowest Blue Book obo (530)432-3619. 92,384 mi. $2,900/obo. value. $3,850. 452-2768. (360)457-0852 T OYO TA : ‘ 0 1 R a v 4 . FORD: ‘91 F250. Ext. DODGE ‘01 DURANGO loaded tow hitch, 99K SLT 4X4 c a b X LT, ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , a u t o, miles. $8,500. 683-6242. 105K orig. mi., goose- 4.7l Magnum V8, autoneck/trailer hitches, trail- m a t i c , a l l oy w h e e l s , TOYOTA ‘02 4RUNNER er brakes, runs great. g o o d t i r e s , r u n n i n g SR5 4X4 $2,495. (360)452-4362 boards, roof rack, key- 3.4L V6, automatic, alloy less entry, privacy glass, or (360)808-5390. p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r wheels, good tires, roof rack, sunroof, running FORD: ‘94 F250 diesel. locks, and mirrors, powboards, tow package, New tires, bad tranny. er heated leather seats, 3rd row seating, cruise p r i va c y g l a s s, p ow e r $1,500/obo. 460-0518. control, tilt, air condition- w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, FORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. ing, rear air, CD/cassette a n d m i r r o r s , l e a t h e r Ext. cab, 4WD, 4.0L 6 stereo, information cen- seats, cruise control, tilt, cyl, auto, premium tires/ ter, dual front airbags. air conditioning, JVC wheels, spray-in bedlin- Sparkling clean inside C D / M P 3 s t e r e o w i t h e r, C D, s u p e r c l e a n , and out! Local trade-in! iPod inputs, dual front 180K. $4,100. 461-7566. O n l y 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 m i l e s ! airbags. Only 104,000 R o o m f o r t h e w h o l e miles! Immaculate condiFORD: ‘96 F150. 4x4, family! Stop by Gray Mo- t i o n i n s i d e a n d o u t ! Shows the very best of l o n g b e d , ex t r a c a b, tors today! care! Stop by Gray Mo5.0L, A/T, A/C, power, $5,995 tors today! 162K miles. $2,000/obo. GRAY MOTORS $12,995 (360)912-1100 457-4901 GRAY MOTORS graymotors.com 457-4901 GMC: ‘00. 3500 6.5L graymotors.com diesel utility truck, 151K, JEEP: ‘04 Grand Cheronew injector pump, glow kee Laredo. 123K, 6 cyl., plugs and electric fuel all power, 4WD, CD. 9730 Vans & Minivans $7,800. (360)452-9314. pump. $7,150. Others (360)683-3425 JEEP: ‘83 CJ7. Rebuilt DODGE: ‘99 Grand G M C : ‘ 0 8 C a n y o n . title. $6,500. Caravan SE. 165K mi., (360)379-1277 Cruise, air conditioning, many options, well cared only 14,000 mi. Only SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai for. $3,000. 457-6066 or $12,000. 360-385-3025 4x4. 46K drive mi., 30K (360)460-6178. GMC: ‘77 Sierra 6000 tow mi., tan, very excellent condition, extremely FORD: ‘91 Aerostar van. series. New 12’ bed. clean, original, stock, V6, 5 speed, lots of new $1,300/obo. 775-1139. new black top, rebuilt p a r t s , n e e d s t r a n n y G M C : ‘ 8 6 1 t o n 4 x 4 . t r a n s , c l u t c h , t i r e s , work. $450. 457-4383. Fuel tank/pump, r uns R e e s e t o w b a r, C B , PLYMOUTH: ‘91 Voyagtape. $5,000. 460-6979. good. $4,000. 327-3342. er van. WHEELCHAIR TOYOTA: ‘89 4 wd, ex- Visit our website at LIFT. $1,600. 797-1508. www.peninsula tended cab, V-6, 5 spd. TOYOTA : ‘ 0 5 S i e n n a . dailynews.com $3,500. (360)928-3863. Excellent condition, 1 Or email us at owner, 89K, 20K on new classified@ TOYOTA: ‘93 Ext. cab. peninsula tires/brakes. $12,300. V6, lots new. dailynews.com (360)681-3714 $3,500. (360)775-9707.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7314.21954 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. GMAC Mortgage, LLC Grantee: Kalman E. Reistetter, III, a Single Man and Khristian A. Reistetter, a Single Man, as joint tenants with right of survivorship Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1241308 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033034 329020 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 1 SP #740451 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telep h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On October 26, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1, of short plat recorded August 8, 1994 under auditor’s file no. 740451, located within the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 34, Township 30 North, Range 3 West W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Except Clallam County Road No. 9537, known as Palo Alto Road, Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 32 Michaels Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/20/09, recorded on 08/10/09, under Auditor’s File No. 2009-1241308, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kalman E. Reistetter, III, a Single Man and Khristian A. Reistetter, a Single Man, as joint tenants with right of survivorship, as Grantor, to FNTG - Ticor, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., its Successors and Assigns to GMAC Mortgage, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2011-1267469. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/19/2012 Monthly Payments $30,152.90 Late Charges $1,271.60 Lender’s Fees & Costs $229.45 Total Arrearage $31,653.95 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $826.01 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,619.53 Total Amount Due: $33,273.48 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $273,096.54, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 26, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/15/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Khristian A. Reistetter 32 Michaels Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Khristian A. Reistetter 32 Michaels Road Sequim, WA 98382 Kalman E. Reistetter, III 32 Michaels Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kalman E. Reistetter, III 32 Michaels Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/11/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/12/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/19/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.21954) 1002.192977-File No. Pub: Sept. 24, Oct. 15, 2012 Legal No. 423827

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2012 Neah Bay 55/58

Bellingham B ellli e lin n 60/51

Olympic Peninsula TODAY BREEZ

Forks 57/47

Y

Port Townsend 59/49

Port Angeles 57/47

Sequim 58/48

WIN

Olympics Snow level: 7,000 ft.

➥

Port Ludlow 59/50

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Yesterday

Nation TODAY National forecast

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 65 51 0.14 8.35 Forks 58 55 3.14 77.60 Seattle 62 56 0.15 26.07 Sequim 64 53 0.01 9.03 Hoquiam 59 56 2.48 45.15 Victoria 61 52 0.50 17.44 Port Townsend 59 51 0.15 13.66

Forecast highs for Monday, Oct. 15

Billings 71° | 48°

DY

➥

Aberdeen 59/50

Denver 75° | 41°

New

First

Chicago 58° | 44°

Atlanta 75° | 54°

El Paso 77° | 52° Houston 86° | 64°

Full

Miami 87° | 78°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

Low 47 Rain across Peninsula

TUESDAY

55/41 70 percent chance of rain

Marine Weather

Ocean: S wind 10 to 20 kt rising to 20 to 30 kt in the afternoon. Swells 11 ft at 14 seconds. Chance of morning showers. Afternoon rain. S wind 25 to 35 kt becoming W 15 to 25 kt after midnight.

LaPush

THURSDAY

Fronts

54/41 Cloudy with sun breaks

FRIDAY

CANADA

Seattle 61° | 55°

Spokane 62° | 49°

Tacoma 62° | 53° Yakima 69° | 43°

Astoria 62° | 52°

ORE.

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 12:42 a.m. 7.9’ 6:40 a.m. 1.1’ 12:36 p.m. 9.3’ 7:21 p.m. -1.2’

Oct 15

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

Š 2012 Wunderground.com

Hi Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Lo Prc 52 45 65 44 76 51 36 31 63 47 75 59 57 43 85 75 58 44 66 48 82 65 70 27 69 50 53 47 89 77 51 48

.34 .08

.06

.02 .11 .55

-10s

6:24 p.m. 7:36 a.m. 9:16 a.m. 6:20 p.m. Otlk Rain Clr Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr Rain PCldy PCldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Rain PCldy Rain

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 1:31 a.m. 8.0’ 7:22 a.m. 1.4’ 1:15 p.m. 9.6’ 8:07 p.m. -1.6’

WEDNESDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 2:21 a.m. 7.9’ 8:06 a.m. 1:56 p.m. 9.6’ 8:54 p.m.

Ht 1.8’ -1.6’

Port Angeles

3:30 a.m. 6.5’ 2:37 p.m. 7.0’

8:53 a.m. 3.5’ 9:23 p.m. -0.9’

4:26 a.m. 6.9’ 9:39 a.m. 4.1’ 3:10 p.m. 7.0’ 10:06 p.m. -1.6’

5:22 a.m. 7.0’ 10:27 a.m. 3:47 p.m. 7.0’ 10:52 p.m.

4.7’ -1.9’

Port Townsend

5:07 a.m. 8.0’ 10:06 a.m. 3.9’ 4:14 p.m. 8.6’ 10:36 p.m. -1.0’

6:03 a.m. 8.5’ 10:52 a.m. 4.6’ 4:47 p.m. 8.7’ 11:19 p.m. -1.8’

6:59 a.m. 8.7’ 11:40 a.m. 5:24 p.m. 8.7’

5.2’

Dungeness Bay*

4:13 a.m. 7.2’ 3:20 p.m. 7.7’

5:09 a.m. 7.7’ 10:14 a.m. 4.1’ 3:53 p.m. 7.8’ 10:41 p.m. -1.6’

6:05 a.m. 7.8’ 11:02 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 7.8’ 11:27 p.m.

4.7’ -1.9’

9:28 a.m. 3.5’ 9:58 p.m. -0.9’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-0s

0s

10s

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geles (360-452-7176)

(360-457-7997)

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Pressure Low

High

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

Burlington, Vt. 53 Casper 64 Charleston, S.C. 73 Charleston, W.Va. 74 Charlotte, N.C. 68 Cheyenne 59 Chicago 64 Cincinnati 73 Cleveland 64 Columbia, S.C. 75 Columbus, Ohio 70 Concord, N.H. 52 Dallas-Ft Worth 84 Dayton 69 Denver 55 Des Moines 77 Detroit 55 Duluth 45 El Paso 77 Evansville 79 Fairbanks 30 Fargo 65 Flagstaff 62 Grand Rapids 54 Great Falls 66 Greensboro, N.C. 65 Hartford Spgfld 55 Helena 63 Honolulu 87 Houston 89 Indianapolis 69 Jackson, Miss. 84 Jacksonville 83 Juneau 49 Kansas City 68 Key West 85 Las Vegas 75 Little Rock 82

40 34 54 48 44 37 64 62 57 50 64 36 65 63 46 59 55 40 55 68 22 35 32 55 46 46 46 49 78 76 67 70 66 40 58 77 59 64

.22

.26 .47 .23 .29 1.02 .14 1.63 .65 .03 .04 .02 1.36 .03 .03

.01 1.50 .71 .89

Rain Clr PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr Rain Rain Clr PCldy Rain Rain Clr Rain Clr Rain Rain Cldy Clr Rain Snow PCldy Clr Rain Clr PCldy Rain Cldy Clr Rain Rain Cldy Cldy Rain Clr Cldy Clr Cldy

Townsend (360-385-1089)

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

77 75 77 83 85 86 62 53 79 85 53 63 79 75 73 85 67 59 81 66 52 65 53 67 74 71 63 76 78 84 61 87 73 72 88 62 45 85

90s 100s 110s

Laredo, Texas ■ 24 at Yellowstone Lake, Wyo. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

61 Clr Sioux Falls 74 42 Clr 64 Rain Syracuse 53 45 .53 Rain 50 Clr Tampa 87 70 PCldy 65 .27 Rain Topeka 71 60 .43 Clr 79 .05 Cldy Tucson 78 53 Clr 53 Clr Tulsa 78 59 2.37 Clr 60 .75 Rain Washington, D.C. 60 51 Clr 47 .04 Cldy Wichita 77 55 .08 Clr 64 Rain Wilkes-Barre 55 45 Cldy 72 Cldy Del. 57 49 PCldy 50 Cldy Wilmington, _________________ 49 PCldy Hi Lo Otlk 41 Clr 61 54 PCldy 58 2.56 Clr Auckland 97 67 Clr 54 .65 Clr Baghdad 67 41 Sh/Wind 70 PCldy Beijing Berlin 54 40 Cldy 49 .03 Cldy 54 46 Sh 49 PCldy Brussels 88 70 Clr 63 Clr Cairo 58 Cldy Calgary 61 42 Clr 41 .12 Rain Guadalajara 84 59 Ts 56 Cldy Hong Kong 85 78 PCldy 41 Cldy Jerusalem 84 64 Clr 44 Clr Johannesburg 74 58 PCldy 39 Clr Kabul 67 48 Cldy 46 PCldy London 56 49 PCldy 45 Clr Mexico City 77 50 PCldy 55 Clr Montreal 66 45 Sh 64 .84 Cldy 50 42 PCldy 75 PCldy Moscow New Delhi 95 70 Clr 46 Clr 59 48 PCldy 74 Cldy Paris PCldy 62 Clr Rio de Janeiro 77 62 72 56 Rain 57 Cldy Rome 87 66 Clr 80 .13 Rain Sydney 70 59 Clr 38 Clr Tokyo 58 41 Sh/Wind 45 .27 Rain Toronto 54 51 Rain/Wind 67 2.02 Rain Vancouver

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

â–  Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-385-3883) “Argo� (R)

of r e e Pow h t l Fee that

80s

â–  98 at

Get home delivery.

“Liberal Arts� (NR) “Samsara� (PG-13)

g Checkin

70s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Now Showing â–  Deer Park Cinema, Port An-

Warm Stationary

Oct 22 Oct 29

Nation/World

Victoria 60° | 46°

Olympia 61° | 53°

Nov 6

55/46 55/45 Mostly cloudy; Lots of clouds; sun, maybe shower, maybe

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: E wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. A chance of morning showers. Afternoon rain. W wind 20 to 30 kt.

Tides

WEDNESDAY

New York 73° | 61°

Detroit 53° | 41°

Washington D.C. 74° | 56°

Cold

TONIGHT

Cloudy

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Los Angeles 91° | 64°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 61° | 37°

San Francisco 68° | 56°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 59/59

Sunny

Seattle 61° | 55°

The Lower 48:

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PDN20121015J  

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