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Thursday

Rock the night away

Showers likely, with a high near 45 B12

Do some dancing and prancing this week A5

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

December 6, 2012 | 75¢

Spilled items go to Auburn food bank PT charity had asked for groceries of retail support, said the semi’s contents that weren’t destroyed, perishable or liquor-related were taken to CHIMACUM — The food recov- the food bank. ered in the dramatic spill of a large Ericksen said he did not have an supermarket semi this week is going accurate estimate of the food in the to a food bank. truck or the amount donated. But not one in the area where first responders spent more than 10 Approached local manager hours working along chilly state Port Townsend Food Bank DirecHighway 19 on Monday afternoon tor Shirley Moss said she approached and evening. The food from the Safeway Inc. the manager of the Port Townsend truck was taken to the chain’s Safeway store asking if some of the regional distribution center in south- food could be donated to her bank in ern King County and donated to the Mountain View Commons, 1925 nearby Auburn Food Bank. Blaine St. Nick Ericksen, Safeway’s director But Moss said she was not disapBY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

pointed when this did not occur. “Food banks are all in this together, and I’m glad that someone was able to benefit from this unfortunate accident,” Moss said. Some items that were discarded included paper goods and disposable diapers that were used as a makeshift dam to keep oil from the jackknifed semi out of an adjacent creek. The accident happened at about 2 p.m. Monday about 10 miles south of Port Townsend. The state highway, also known as Beaver Valley Road, was closed in both directions at Milepost 6 until almost midnight, authorities said. The State Patrol said the driver, CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Bradley Billingsley, 54, of Seattle, had fallen asleep at the wheel. He Food spills from a wrecked Safeway truck on state Highway 19 after Monday’s accident near Chimacum. was cited for negligent driving.

Court won’t hear lawsuit against PUD

Peninsula author retires hero

PT resident claimed utility unlawfully had levied tax BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A challenge to the Jefferson County Public Utility District’s right to levy taxes on Port Townsend residents for use in regional water planning won’t be heard by the state Supreme Court. That apparently ends the legal challenge. “You win some, you lose some,” said Ted Shoulberg of Port Townsend, who filed the action.

‘A citizen who believes in a cause’ “This shows that a citizen who believes in a cause must go all the way through the system to correct an injustice.” Shoulberg claimed the PUD unlawfully levied a tax, making property owners within the city limit pay for water service they already get from city government. In October 2010, Clallam County Superior Court Judge Brooke Taylor ruled for the PUD, stating that while a utility district is prohibited from levying taxes to purchase private utilities that compete with municipal utilities offering the same service, it is authorized to make purchases that conserve water and resources. TURN

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BOB LAMPERT

Sequim novelist Aaron Elkins, with dog Tayac critiquing his work, crafts his next mystery.

Oliver’s last stand Aaron Elkins closes book on sleuth after 3 decades BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — In his latest mystery novel, Aaron Elkins jets his readers off to Tuscany, where the sun shines, the wines pour and Michelangelo’s art projects preside. Dying on the Vine, set in Italy’s countryside with forays to Florence, is Elkins’ 18th book starring forensic anthropologist Gideon Oliver. This time, the “skeleton detective,” as he’s known, looks into the apparent murder-suicide of a wine-making family patriarch and his wife. But Oliver figures out that this

“I love the guy. [But] I’m running out of things to say without repeating myself.” AARON ELKINS of his book series’ hero, Gideon Oliver

The character inspired a TV series in 1989. “I love the guy,” Elkins said this week. “[But] I’m running out of things to say without repeating myself.”

Oliver retiring; author is not was a double homicide — and is thrust into a morass of family antipathies and mistrust. Elkins, a longtime Sequim resident, will give only one reading from Dying on the Vine, this Friday. He’s finished with this hero, having written about 1.5 million words about Oliver’s adventures since 1978.

Elkins took care to add that while Oliver is retiring, the author himself is going strong. He just finished a follow-up to A Dangerous Talent, a mystery starring art expert Alix London in a series he created with wife, Charlotte Elkins. TURN

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Gun sting nets conviction for Peninsula man BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Sequim man arrested in a 2010 sting operation was convicted by a Clallam County Superior Court jury Wednesday of bail jumping and unlawful possession of a “dangerous” machine gun that had been created from a semiautomatic rifle. Jesse L. Spencer, 46, will be sentenced at 9 a.m. Jan. 10. County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg will recommend eight months of jail time for Spencer, who is disabled and lives on a disability allowance, Troberg said Wednesday. Lawyer Ralph Anderson of Port Angeles, representing Spencer, will recommend no jail time. TURN TO GUN/A4

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 96th year, 294th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS MOVIES NATION/WORLD PENINSULA POLL

B4 B7 B6 A7 B6 A6 B12 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES B5, B8 B1 SPORTS B5 3RDAGE B12 WEATHER


A2

UpFront

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Aussies sorry for crank call about Kate TWO AUSTRALIAN RADIO disc jockeys apologized Wednesday after impersonating Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles in a prank call and getting a London hospital to tell them all about Kate Middleton’s condition. The King Edward VII hospital in London acknowledged that the Australian radio station made the hoax call to the hospital in the early hours Tuesday — and that the hospital fell for it. The 30-year-old Duchess

of Cambridge is pregnant and is being treated at the hospital for severe morning Middleton sickness. A woman using the often-mimicked voice of Britain’s monarch asked after the duchess’ health — and was told by a nurse that Kate “hasn’t had any retching with me, and she’s been sleeping on and off. “She’s sleeping at the moment, and she has had an uneventful night. She’s been given some fluids. She’s stable at the moment,” the

kindly nurse informed the supposed queen and prince on the station’s recording. The duchess is married to the queen’s grandson, Prince William. The hospital said the call had been transferred to the ward, and the conversation was held with one of its nursing staff. Its telephone protocols are now being reviewed, the hospital said in a statement. The Australian station 2DayFM placed the recording of the conversation on its website. Australian radio personalities Mel Greig and Michael Christian later apologized for the hoax — along with their station.

fellow Texan and legendary 21-year Democratic House Speaker Sam Rayburn in the state’s conMr. Brooks gressional in 2008 delegation. Mr. Brooks was in the Kennedy motorcade and is in the famous photo taken later that day aboard Air Force One at Dallas’ Love Field, standing immediately behind the griefstricken Jacqueline Kennedy as Lyndon Johnson, his right hand raised, takes the oath of office from U.S. District Judge Sarah Hughes.

from gigantism, with a tumor on her pituitary gland disrupting her levels of growth hormone.

Passings By The Associated Press

DAVE BRUBECK, 91, a jazz composer and pianist whose pioneering style in pieces such as “Take Five” caught listeners’ ears with exotic, challenging rhythms, has died in Hartford, Conn. Mr. Brubeck died Wednesday morning of heart failure after being stricken while on his way to a carMr. Brubeck diology appointment in 1956 with his son Darius, said his manager, Russell Gloyd. Mr. Brubeck would have turned 92 today. Mr. Brubeck had a career that spanned almost all American jazz since World War II. He formed The Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951 and was the first modern jazz musician to be pictured on the cover of Time magazine — Nov. 8, 1954 — and he helped define the swinging, smoky rhythms of 1950s and ’60s club jazz. The seminal album “Time Out,” released by the quartet in 1959, was the first ever million-selling jazz LP and is still among the best-selling jazz albums of all time. “When you start out with goals — mine were to play polytonally and polyrhythmically — you never exhaust that,” Mr. Brubeck told The Associated Press in 1995.

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_________ DAME ELISABETH MURDOCH, 103, a prominent Australian philanthropist and mother of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, has died. News Ltd., the Australian media company headed by her son, confirmed her death. She died peacefully Wednesday surrounded by family members in her garden estate outside Melbourne. She had been hospitalized in September after a bad fall in which she broke her leg. Rupert, 81, has said his mother’s long life was evidence he would be able to continue leading News Corp., the global media company which he founded, for many years.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

_________ TUESDAY’S QUESTION: When marijuana

BESSE COOPER, 116, becomes legal in Washington state the woman listed as the Thursday (today), are you likely to use world’s oldest person, died it? Tuesday in a Georgia nursing home. Yes 16.8% She died Maybe 8.1% peacefully Tuesday in 72.9% No Monroe, Ga., I can’t decide 2.2% according to her son, SidTotal votes cast: 1,436 ney Cooper. Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com “It’s a Ms. Cooper sad day for NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those in 2011 peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be me,” said assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole. Robert Young, Guinness senior consultant for gerontology. He recalls meeting Setting it Straight Ms. Cooper when she was 111 and took note of her Corrections and clarifications mental agility. The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fair“At that age, she was ness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to doing really well. She was clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417able to read books,” he said. 3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1937 (75 years ago) John Hallahan, Clallam County’s pioneer Democratic County Central Committee chairman, died the evening of Dec. 3 after a brief illness. Born in Ireland 76 years ago, he came to Clallam County about 48 years ago. Almost from the day he arrived, Hallahan took a prominent part in Democratic politics in a county that was overwhelmingly Republican in its early days. Although a stern fighter along political lines, the veteran Democrat was of such sterling honesty that he won the praise of his political enemies. Hallahan said he got the greatest satisfaction of

his life when he had the opportunity to shake hands and speak with President Franklin D. Roosevelt when Roosevelt visited Port Angeles last Sept. 30.

1962 (50 years ago) Tyna Barinaga and Caroline Jensen of Port Angeles swept to victories in both singles and doubles to win the Western States Badminton Open in Los Angeles. By winning, the girls clinched a tryout for the

America’s 1963 Uber Cup team. The Uber Cup is also known as the World Team Championships for Women. Dorothy Parsons, chief Uber Cup scout for the U.S. team, told Port Angeles coach Vern Burton that the girls definitely would receive an invitation for the trials in March.

1987 (25 years ago)

Property owners in Forks are paying a comJACK BROOKS, 89, bined $13,120 too much in who spent 42 years in ConYAO DEFEN, 39, the property taxes this year gress representing his world’s tallest woman, has because of an error made Southeast Texas district and died in eastern China. Seen Around by the Clallam County was in the Dallas motorcade Chinese state media Peninsula snapshots Assessor’s Office. in 1963 when President said she died Nov. 13 at The mistake, apparently LINGERING CAMJohn F. Kennedy was assas- her home in China’s eastmade when the departPAIGN SIGNS in the sinated, has died. ern province of Anhui. ment calculated the 1987 Dungeness Valley and Mr. Brooks died Tuesday Guinness World tax rates last fall, caused East Jefferson County in Beaumont, Texas, after a Records in January 2010 county officials to levy promoting candidates in sudden illness, according to had certified her as the property taxes in the city of the Nov. 6 election . . . Laugh Lines the Jefferson County Sherworld’s tallest living Forks higher than state iff’s Department. woman at 7 feet and 7 WANTED! “Seen Around” law allows. Mr. Brooks was among MY VEGETARIAN inches. Send them to PDN News Taxes in other jurisdicFRIEND won’t play poker items. the last links to an era when The local Xin’an EveDesk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles tions in Clallam County Democrats dominated Texas ning News did not give the with us anymore unless we WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or are unaffected, said County politics and was the last of cause of death but said in get rid of the stakes. email news@peninsuladailynews. Assessor Bruce Erlwein. Your Monologue com. “Mr. Sam’s Boys,” protégés of a report that she suffered

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Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Dec. 6, the 341st day of 2012. There are 25 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 6, 1922, the AngloIrish Treaty, which established the Irish Free State, came into force one year to the day after it was signed in London. On this date: ■ In 1790, Congress moved to Philadelphia from New York. ■ In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop the obelisk. ■ In 1889, Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America, died in

New Orleans. ■ In 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as 362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah, W.Va. ■ In 1942, comedian Fred Allen premiered “Allen’s Alley,” a recurring sketch on his CBS radio show spoofing small-town America. ■ In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by President Harry S. Truman. ■ In 1957, America’s first attempt at putting a satellite into orbit failed as Vanguard TV3 rose about 4 feet off a Cape Canaveral, Fla., launch pad before crashing down and exploding. ■ In 1962, 37 coal miners were killed in an explosion at the

Robena No. 3 Mine operated by U.S. Steel in Carmichaels, Pa. ■ In 1971, the original AutoTrain, which carried rail passengers and their motor vehicles from Lorton, Va., to Sanford, Fla., went into operation. Although the privately owned line went out of business in 1981, Amtrak revived the service in 1983. ■ In 1989, 14 women were shot to death at the University of Montreal’s school of engineering by a man who then took his own life. ■ Ten years ago: Actress Winona Ryder was sentenced to community service as part of a probationary term for stealing more than $5,500 worth of merchandise from a Saks Fifth Avenue store in Bev-

erly Hills, Calif. ■ Five years ago: CIA Director Michael Hayden revealed that the agency had videotaped its interrogations of two terror suspects in 2002 and destroyed the tapes three years later out of fear they would leak to the public and compromise the identities of U.S. questioners. ■ One year ago: Declaring the American middle class in jeopardy, President Barack Obama, speaking in Osawatomie, Kan., outlined a populist economic vision that would drive his re-election bid, insisting that the United States must reclaim its standing as a country in which everyone can prosper if provided “a fair shot and a fair share.”


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 6, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Obama to ask for $50 billion in Sandy aid WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama plans to ask Congress for about $50 billion in additional emergency aid for states hit by superstorm Sandy, Democrats said Wednesday. House Secretary Shaun Donovan told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee that the administration still is working on a Donovan request for a supplemental spending bill to provide the aid. The price tag is expected to be anywhere between $45 billion and $55 billion. Two Senate Democratic aides, speaking on condition of anonymity, put the number at around $50 billion. “The president isn’t going to leave New York, New Jersey or the entire region to fight for itself,” Donovan, who is coordinating the government’s Sandy recovery efforts for Obama, told reporters after the hearing.

Subway push arrest NEW YORK — A suspect was arrested Wednesday in the death of a man who was pushed onto subway tracks and photographed just before a train struck him. Naeem Davis, 30, was taken

into custody Tuesday after security video showed a man fitting the suspect’s description working with street vendors near Rockefeller Center. Police said Davis made statements implicating himself in KiSuck Han’s death, and he was arrested on a second-degree murder charge. Witnesses told investigators they saw a man talking to himself Monday before approaching the 58-year-old Han of Queens at the Times Square station, got into an altercation and pushed him into the train’s path. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday the suspect in Han’s death appeared to have had “a psychiatric problem.”

Breast cancer pills SAN ANTONIO — Breast cancer patients taking tamoxifen can cut their chances of having the disease return if they stay on the pills for 10 years instead of five years as doctors recommend now, a major study finds. The findings could change treatment strategies and came as a surprise because earlier research suggested taking the hormone-blocking drug for longer than five years didn’t help. In the new study, presented Wednesday at a breast cancer conference in San Antonio, researchers found that women who took tamoxifen for 10 years lowered their risk of a recurrence by 25 percent and of dying of breast cancer by 29 percent compared with those who took the pills for just five years. The Associated Press

‘Fiscal cliff’ offer hints at added defense cuts Military is probably looking at losing another $15 billion THE ASSOCIATE PRESS

WASHINGTON — House Republicans’ “fiscal cliff” counteroffer to President Barack Obama hints at billions of dollars in military cuts on top of the nearly $500 billion that the White House and Congress backed last year, and even the fiercest defense hawks acknowledge that the Pentagon faces another financial hit. The proposal that House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and other Republican leaders sent to the White House this week calls for cuts of $300 billion in discretionary spending to achieve savings of $2.2 trillion over 10 years. The blueprint offered no specifics on the cuts, though the Pentagon and defense-related depart-

ments such as Homeland Security and State make up roughly half of the federal government’s discretionary spending. By any credible calculation, the military, which is still coming to grips with the half-trillion-dollar cut in last year’s deficit-cutting law, is looking at an additional $10 billion to $15 billion cut in projected defense spending each year for the next decade.

The new reality It’s a prospect that Republicans recognize is the new reality, with wars in Iraq and Afghanistan ending. “Not too devastating,” said Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

That’s especially true compared with the alternative that McCain dreads — the double hit of tax hikes and automatic spending cuts dubbed the fiscal cliff. If Obama and Congress are unable to reach a deal this month, the Pentagon would face acrossthe-board cuts of some $55 billion after the first of the year and nearly $500 billion over a decade. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and military leaders have warned that such a meat-ax approach to the budget would do considerable harm. “My job is to stop sequestration,” McCain said, using the budgetary term for the automatic cuts. Pentagon spending still has its congressional protectors, especially with job-producing weapons, aircraft and ships built in nearly every corner of the country. In the past decade, the base defense budget has nearly doubled, from $297 billion in 2001 to more than $520 billion.

Briefly: World NATO diplomat leaps to death in airport garage BRUSSELS — Serbia’s ambassador to NATO was chatting and joking with colleagues in a multistory parking garage at Brussels Airport when he strolled to a barrier, climbed over and flung himself to the ground below, a diplomat said. By the time his shocked colleagues reached him, Branislav Milinkovic was dead. His motives are a mystery. Three diploMilinkovic mats who knew Milinkovic said he did not appear distraught in the hours leading up to his death Tuesday night. He was picking up an arriving delegation of six Serbian officials who were to hold talks with NATO, the alliance that went to war with his country just 13 years ago. Belgian authorities confirmed he had killed himself. Milinkovic, 52, had mentioned to colleagues that he was unhappy about living apart from his wife, a Serbian diplomat based in Vienna, and their 17-year-old son.

Turmoil in Egypt CAIRO — Supporters and opponents of Egyptian leader

Mohammed Morsi fought with rocks, firebombs and sticks outside the presidential palace Wednesday in large-scale clashes that marked the worst violence of a deepening crisis over the disputed constitution. Egypt’s Health Ministry said 126 people were wounded. Three more of Morsi’s aides resigned in protest of his handling of the crisis, bringing to five the number who have left. Mohamed ElBaradei, a leading opposition advocate of reform and democracy, said Morsi’s rule was “no different” from that of former President Hosni Mubarak, whose authoritarian regime was toppled in an uprising nearly two years ago. “In fact, it is perhaps even worse,” the Nobel Peace Laureate told a news conference after he accused the president’s supporters of deliberately attacking peaceful demonstrators.

Cargo ship sinking THE HAGUE, Netherlands — Dutch media are reporting that a cargo ship is sinking after a collision in the North Sea and that a rescue operation is under way. National broadcaster NOS said the Baltic Ace, with a crew of around 23, was transporting cars to Finland when it is believed to have collided with a container ship near Rotterdam on Wednesday night. NOS reported that the Coast Guard dispatched rescue boats to the scene, about 50 miles off the southern Netherlands. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILIPPINES

TYPHOON KILLS

300

A resident of Andap, New Bataan township in the southern Philippines loses his balance looking at damage caused by Typhoon Bopha on Wednesday. Whole families were reported among the missing following floods and landslides.

Grizzly bear hunting poised to be legalized in Rockies Protections could be lifted by 2014

ing on plans to lift those protections as soon as 2014 for bears in the Yellowstone area. Bears around Glacier would follow. Authority over the animals — which can top 600 pounds and THE ASSOCIATED PRESS live for 25 years — would transfer BILLINGS, Mont. — Trophy to state agencies. grizzly bear hunts are under consideration for the Northern Rock- Idaho, Montana, Wyoming ies in the surest sign yet that And with human-bear conflicts more than 30 years of federal protection for the fearsome ani- and livestock attacks on the rise, mal is nearing an end across wildlife officials in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming said hunting much of the region. An estimated 1,600 bears would help them deal with probinhabit the landscape around Yel- lem bears. Yet officials stressed that any lowstone and Glacier national parks, and for now, they’re pro- grizzly season would differ significantly from the aggressive wolf tected as a threatened species. But federal officials are work- hunts under way in the region.

Quick Read

Idaho and Montana have lifted quotas on wolves with the explicit aim of driving down pack numbers. Hunters killed roughly 200 wolves in just the past few months in the two states, and 57 have been killed in Wyoming. By contrast, “you could probably count on one hand” the number of bears that could be legally killed if hunting is allowed, said Chris Servheen, grizzly bear recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “The wolf hunt is really targeted at reducing the number of wolves,” he said. “We’re not trying to reduce the bear population. . . . It would be a very careful, limited hunt.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: Los Angeles port reopens after major strike

Nation: Government acts in baby-recliner complaint

World: Sick girl safe, being treated in Mexico, dad says

World: Moderate quake reported in eastern Iran

WORK RESUMED WEDNESDAY at the nation’s busiest port complex after a crippling strike was settled, ending an eight-day walk-off that affected billions of dollars in cargo. Gates at the Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors reopened, and dockworkers were ready to resume loading and unloading ships that had been stuck for days, Los Angeles port spokesman Phillip Sanfield said. “It’s going to take a few days, maybe a week or two, to get back to normal,” said Art Wong of the port. Auto parts, retail merchandise and repair parts for Redbox video kiosks were among items that could be late.

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT is taking action against the makers of a portable baby recliner called the Nap Nanny after five infant deaths. The Consumer Product Safety Commission filed an administrative complaint Wednesday alleging that a new model, called the Chill, and two earlier versions “pose a substantial risk of injury and death to infants.” The commission is seeking an order that would require Nap Nanny maker Baby Matters LLC of Berwyn, Pa., to notify the public about what the agency deems a serious product defect. The agency also wants the company to offer consumers a full refund.

THE FATHER OF a girl with leukemia who was taken out of an Arizona hospital said his daughter is doing well and is being treated in Mexico. Phoenix police have been looking for 11-year-old Emily since Tuesday, when surveillance video showed the girl’s mother walking her out of Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Authorities said the girl had been treated for an infection that forced doctors to amputate her arm. The girl’s father, Luis Bracamontes, told NBC News he blames the Phoenix hospital for the loss of his daughter’s arm and said the family was being pressured about medical bills.

A MODERATE EARTHQUAKE shook eastern Iran on Wednesday, injuring two people and causing damage to rural buildings, Iranian TV said. State TV said the 5.5-magnitude quake hit South Khorasan province in eastern Iran near the border with Afghanistan on Wednesday. The semi-official Fars news agency said the quake caused panic and prompted residents of provincial capital Birjand to flee their homes. No other details were immediately available. Even moderate quakes have killed thousands of people in the Iranian countryside, where houses are often built of mud bricks.


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Patrol: Wrong-way driver arrested on 101 California man allegedly forced car off road while under influence BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — A California man has been arrested near Forks after allegedly driving the wrong way on U.S. Highway 101 and forcing a car off the road, all while shoeless and allegedly under the influence of marijuana. Kirill S. Chumak, 30, of Los Gatos, Calif., was arrested Monday and charged Tuesday in Clallam County Superior Court with one count each of hitand-run on an attended vehicle, driving under the influence and first-degree malicious mischief. Chumak is set to be arraigned Friday at 1:30 p.m. in Clallam County Superior Court.

the southbound side of U.S. Highway 101 early Monday morning near the intersection of the highway and LaPush Road, forcing an oncoming pickup truck off the road and — after being arrested by a State Patrol officer — kicking out the rear window of the trooper’s patrol car.

In Chumak’s first court appearance Tuesday, Superior Court Judge Kenneth Williams ordered him to turn over his passport if he wanted to be released from the Clallam County jail, where he was being held on Alleged hit-run no bond or bail as of Wednesday morning. Chumak first came to local law enforcement’s Passport in California attention after Forks Police Julie Goode Attorney Douglas Kresl, Officer responded to a reported hitthe Clallam County public defender assigned to Chu- and-run at 5 a.m. Monday mak, told the court that on Highway 101 near the Chumak’s passport was in bridge over the Calawah California — Chumak’s River, according to Goode’s listed place of residence — incident report. A woman driving a white and that it would be a day or two before it could be Toyota pickup truck south across the Calawah bridge mailed to Port Angeles. The charges against had to steer into the guardChumak stem from him rail to avoid a black passenallegedly driving north on ger car headed north in the

southbound lane, Goode wrote in her report. The truck sustained minor damage, and the woman was not injured, according to the report, while the wrong-way driver continued north in the southbound lane without stopping. About a half-hour later, a State Patrol officer came across Chumak’s black BMW with California license plates parked facing north in the southbound lane of Highway 101 at Milepost 201, a few miles north of the junction of Highway 101 and LaPush Road, according to a State Patrol narrative report filed with the motion for determination of probable cause in Clallam County Superior Court. As the state trooper approached Chumak’s car, Chumak allegedly resumed driving north in the south-

bound lane of Highway 101 and stopped when the trooper told him to through the patrol car’s loudspeaker, according to the trooper’s report. After Chumak got out of his BMW, the state trooper asked him why he had been driving in the wrong lane, to which Chumak replied, “I hit a deer or something, and I was getting away from it,” according to the report. The trooper also noted that Chumak wasn’t wearing any shoes or socks on his feet, with Chumak saying he didn’t normally wear shoes “because it is the new ‘in’ thing,” according to the trooper’s report. During the interview with the state trooper, Chumak told the trooper he recently had “smoked weed” but was not sure how long ago. The trooper conducted

field sobriety tests designed to identify marijuana intoxication and developed enough information to arrest Chumak for investigation of driving under the influence.

‘Run into the woods’ With Chumak in the back seat of the State Patrol car, the trooper reporting hearing a loud thumping sound and turned to see the rear passenger-side-door window shatter. Chumak’s feet came out through the opening. “I asked Chumak why he kicked out the window, and he replied, ‘Because I needed to get away and run into the woods,’” the trooper wrote in the incident report.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Trial delayed for man accused in shooting Judge continues case until after New Year’s Day

a little more than $1 million bond after allegedly firing a shotgun at a man outside a home in the 200 block of Cameron Road in west Port Angeles on Sept. 20.

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

Truck damaged

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The year 2013 will have been about a month old, at least, by the time a Port Angeles man accused of attempted murder and unlawful posCHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS session of a firearm sits before a jury on those charges. OLIDAY GIFTS The jury trial of Mario Grant Street Elementary School students Tuba Hoyer and Wayne Hackney, 45, has been pushed back to Sophia Frank, from left, inspect along with school secretary Jill Jan. 28, roughly six weeks Phillips some of the wool hats that will be distributed to kids as from the original trial date part of the Holiday Gift program. The school is collecting gifts of Dec. 17. and donations for kids whose family cannot afford them. Clallam County Superior Court Judge Kenneth Williams ordered the jury trial continuation at a Tuesday status hearing for Hackney, who had eluded police capture for about a month before being arrested in October. In a Tuesday interview, attorney Loren Oakley, the Wednesday to review the Clallam County public applications and recommend three candidates for the commissioners to interview and consider the foltisan position, to serve lowing week. BY ROB OLLIKAINEN through 2014. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Applications are due FriCONTINUED FROM A1 The appointed judge can PORT ANGELES — reside anywhere in the day. County Administrator Clallam County has formed county; however, candidates He plans to appeal Spena five-member screening who run in 2014 must live Jim Jones said the applica- cer’s conviction. committee to help find a in the West End judicial tion packet is “very, very Spencer has no criminal comprehensive.” replacement for departing district. record, Anderson said District Court 2 Judge Erik Wednesday. General election Rohrer. Anderson said Spencer’s Screening committee Rohrer, who has preRohrer, 54, defeated girlfriend purchased the sided over the Forks-based Commissioners voted county Hearing Examiner weapon as a gift for SpenDistrict Court since 2001, unanimously Tuesday to Chris Melly with 55.7 per- cer, who holds a gun-carry resigns Dec. 31 because vot- appoint members to the cent of the vote in the Nov. 6 permit, at a Port Angeles ers elevated him to the screening committee for general election. pawn shop without knowSuperior Court bench in the judicial recruitment. He will join Judges ing it had been modified. Nov. 6 election. Members are Forks George L. Wood and S. Once Spencer realized He will be sworn in as a Mayor Bryon Monohon, Brooke Taylor on the Supe- the weapon fired a machineSuperior Court judge in West End Sheriff’s Sgt. rior Court bench in Clallam gun burst, he tried selling early January, replacing Brian King, District Court 2 County, which adjudicates the weapon back to the retiring Judge Ken Wil- staffer Sabrina Bees, county felony crimes and juvenile, pawn shop, which refused liams. Human Resources Director- family and drug court matthe return, Anderson said. County commissioners designate Rich Sill and ters. Troberg said the weapon must appoint the new Dis- Rohrer. was a Panther Arms AR15 ________ trict Court judge, a nonparThe committee will meet 5.56 mm rifle, a civilian verReporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. sion of the military M16 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula 5.56 mm rifle. “The appearance and dailynews.com.

H

Clallam appoints panel to screen judge recruits 5-member committee to review, recommend three candidates

luxurious, pillowy, softness

defender assigned to Hackney, requested the trial continuation so the defense could track down additional ________ witnesses of the incident from which the charges Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can against Hackney stem. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Hackney is being held in 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula the Clallam County jail on dailynews.com.

condition of the trigger sear surface and disconnector mechanism suggests the alteration of the mechanism was intentional for the purpose of manufacturing a machine gun, as the alteration would require disassembly of the mechanism to perform the alterations,” according to the certificate of probable cause. The modifications were done “by grinding, filing and polishing,” the statement said. The modifications “were done in such a way that it would malfunction, and the malfunctions themselves are really quite dangerous because the gun could blow up,” Troberg said. The conversion created a risk of jamming while firing. “We can’t prove who altered it,” Troberg said.

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The shotgun blast did not hit the man but damaged the pickup truck in which the man was hiding. The man later injured his hands when he fell running along Cameron Road for help, eventually calling 9-1-1 at a nearby truck repair shop. Hackney then led law enforcement on a four-week manhunt that ended when he was taken into custody without incident at the home in which the shooting originally took place. Hackney pleaded not guilty to the charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm Oct. 26.

Dave Grainger, CNE 360-379-4881 • 360-774-2467(cell)

lor Cutoff Road and U.S. Highway 101, Troberg said. “The cops were there, waiting for Spencer,” he said. Possession of a machine gun is broadly illegal under state law for anyone except police, military personnel and people who repair such weapons for police or the military. The maximum penalty is five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Troberg said machine guns are legal under federal law if the owner obtains a federal firearms license.

Five rounds a second A fully automatic weapon is defined as one that fires more than one round for each pull of the trigger, has a detachable magazine or ammunition clip and fires more than five rounds a second, Troberg said. Superior Court Judge George L. Wood presided over the trial. It was the second time Spencer had been tried on the weapons charge. A mistrial was declared at Spencer’s first trial in June, Anderson said. A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent had testified — in violation of a court ruling — that Spencer, also known as “Biker Jesse,” was suspected of being a motorcycle-gang member.

When Spencer tried to sell it to a person identified by Troberg as an adult male from the Sequim area, the man notified authorities. They listened to Spencer’s phone conversation with the potential buyer while Spencer made arrangements to meet the man, Troberg said. Spencer warned the man that he should not fire it around people “because people will go to the cops when they find it’s a fully automatic rifle,” Troberg said. ________ Spencer said he would sell it to the man for $2,500 Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb and set up a meeting place can be reached at 360-452-2345, for May 19, 2010, at a gas ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ station at the corner of Tay- peninsuladailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

A5

’Tis the season to get out and boogie AS WE GET closer to the Christmas holiday, don’t let the frenzy of the season get to you. It’s OK to go shopping, bake and decorate the home, but be sure to make some time for yourself and listen to the music of the season.

Port Angeles ■ Today at Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, pick country-style at a jam hosted by High Country from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Saturday, dance to Dee Coburn and the Night Beats from 8 p.m. to midnight. ■ On Sunday at the Junction Roadhouse, 242701 U.S. Highway 101, bring your instrument to Bob Dryver’s Sunday

LIVE MUSIC Music Jam from Nelson 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Wednesdays through the NFL football season, find Jason Mogi and Paul Stehr-Green headlining the Deadwood Experiment at 8 p.m. â–  On Friday at Wine on the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Ave., Dan Maguire and the Juan de Fuca Band play at 7:30 p.m. $3 cover. The group includes Clark Driese, Paul Stehr-

John

Green and Zorina Wolf. On Saturday, Bob and Marty of Twisted Roots will have a release party for their new CD, “Coming Home,� at 7:30 p.m. $3 cover. On Sunday at 4 p.m., Erin Hennessy debuts on traditional Irish fiddle backed by David Rivers on guitar. ■ On Monday at the Bushwhacker Restaurant, 1527 E. First St., Charlie Ferris presents classic songs and stories of the Christmas season from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Saturday at Elliot’s Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St., Hawaii Amor performs Hawaiian music from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Justin Scott Rivet goes solo Mondays at Bar

N9ne, 229 W. First St., from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■ On Friday, Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Country play at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Sunday, join the country jam from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Dave and Rosalie Secord and the Luck of the Draw Band play with musical guest Terry Roszatycki from 6 p.m. 8 p.m. ■ Every Tuesday at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 Seventh St., the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally’s Boys playing ballroom dance favorites from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover; first-timers free.

Family Night At Kokopelli Grill

â–  At Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues Friday and Saturday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn ■ On Friday at the Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., the Discovery Bay Pirates board at 5:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Final Approach lands with a load of boomer music (1950s-1970s) at 5:30 p.m. ■ It’s “All the Buzz� Wednesday at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St., with Victor hosting the open mic from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, Al Harris performs

Port Townsend ■ Today at The Upstage, 923 Washington St., is the first of three “Showcase of Blues� weekend performances. The Nikki Hill Band, hailing from St. Louis, debuts at 7:30 p.m. $12 cover. TURN

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Port Angeles Community Playhouse 1235 E Lauridsen Blvd - 360-452-6651 Produced by special permission of Dramatic Publishing Inc, Woodstock Illinois

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Music: Grange dance planned CONTINUED FROM A5 On Friday, Chris Thomas King of “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” and “Ray” fame sings at 7:30 p.m. $12 in advance; $15 at the door. On Saturday, the Mark DuFresne Band rounds out the weekend at 7:30 p.m. $12 advance, $15 at the door. Phone 360-385-2216 for details and reservations. ■ On Friday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., it’s the Spotty Records Portland Showcase with Fine Pets, Needles and Pizza, Havania Whaal and K-Tel ’79. The fun starts at 10 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, Cort Armstrong and Blue Rooster play at 10 p.m. $5 cover. ■ On Friday at the Uptown Pub and Grill, 1016 Lawrence, Greg Vinson plays at 6 p.m. On Saturday, Groove Merchant plays at 9 p.m. ■ On Friday at the Undertown,

Tyler and Water streets, Meg and Julie entertain at 5 p.m. On Saturday at 9:30 p.m., Port August performs at 9 p.m. On Tuesday, singer/songwriter Autococoon entertains at 7 p.m. ■ On Saturday at Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, the Crow Quill Night Owls perform from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $8 cover. ■ Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., today from m 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

■ Today, classical ssi guitarist Trevor Hanson plays at Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine, 1208 Water St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ Steve Grandinetti plays at

November 25, 1937 November 24, 2012 Dr. Fredrick Brause Antrobus III passed away at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona, on Saturday, November 24, 2012, one day before his 75th birthday. He died of complications from a fall the Wednesday before. Fred was born on November 25, 1937, in Longview, Washington. He attended R.A. Long High School and Western Washington State College, and later received his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Southern California in educational administration, his chosen career path. He married his high school sweetheart, Shirley Jean Smelser, in 1956, and together, they estab-

lished careers in education and later in real estate. They raised three children, two sons and one daughter, while living life to the fullest during 26 years of exceptional experiences in Europe with the Department of Defense Dependent Schools and later as partners for 10 years in Antrobus Properties, a real estate enterprise in Washington state. After retiring from education in 1992 and real estate in 2002, they divided their time between homes in both Washington and Arizona and as much traveling as they were able to fit into their schedules, with major trips to Alaska, the Caribbean, South America, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, India, Egypt, the Middle East, Israel, Turkey and Greece. His passion for learning and doing were unsurpassed. His motto was

High notes ■ The Second Saturday Community Dance at Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port Townsend, features the Contradictions, with Nan Evans calling from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Adults, $6; younger than 18, $3; younger than 3, free.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladaily news.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

“Too much is never enough,” which was displayed and lived in every facet of his life. Fred is survived by his wife of 56 years, Shirley; sons Frederick IV and Craig; daughter Christine Chambers; eight grandchildren, Fredrick V, Nicholas and Benjamin Antrobus, Marie, Alicia, Morgan and Kristopher Chambers, and Danielle Gilfeather Antrobus; and three greatgranddaughters, Jennifer, Zoey and a new baby girl due in January. All live in Washington state. A memorial service will be held Saturday, December 8, 2012, at 1 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1550 South 14th Avenue in Yuma, Arizona. An open house will follow the service at the family home at 11336 East Via Montana in the foothills. At a later date, a second service will be held in Washington for family and friends there.

Death Notices Lewis Harsh June 3, 1939 — Dec. 4, 2012

Port Angeles resident Lewis Harsh died of agerelated causes at the age of 73. Services: 11 a.m. today,

graveside service at Mount Angeles Memorial Park, 45 S. Monroe Road, Port Angeles. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3527.

F O L K H A S H E S H A R F A V O A M E R U N S S S L O W W E N O R A N R O I L D I R E B C U P

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A N C L U B L I B A B A F A C T O R R V A N E B I T E C L A S S S A T T E S O L O O N Y E W R S L A L A T A G V O T E R E S I N C G L O A P P T O R S C L O I E R I N N S O E D T E F L O U T T O P P S S W E

S E A L O I F A F N M O M H E S S M I A F U T D

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John G. Ramsey of Redmond, Oregon, died November 29, 2012, at the age of 61. John was born November 2, 1951, in Oregon City, Oregon, to Buddy L. and Lillian F. (Fisher) Ramsey. John graduated from Clackamas High School. After graduating, he moved to Tacoma, Washington, and worked as a laborer in the shipyards. He is survived by a son, Brent Q. Ramsey, and his wife, Amber Ramsey, both of Forks; four grandchildren; son James Wilbur of Neah Bay; brothers Ronald L. Ramsey, Michael R. Ramsey and James L. Ramsey, all of Redmond,

Mr. Ramsey Oregon; and a dear friend, Ann Roelle of Redmond. A memorial service will be held in the spring of 2013. Please sign our guestbook at www.redmond memorial.com.

Death and Memorial Notice CLAIRE BORHAVEN June 28, 1919 December 1, 2012 Claire Borhaven went home to be with the Lord and her beloved husband, Jack, on December 1, 2012. She was one of nine children born to George and Dora (Schlechter) Lechtenberg on June 28, 1919, in Polo, South Dakota. She married Jack Borhaven, the love of her life, on August 28, 1953, and he preceded her in death in April 1995. She graduated from Miller High School in 1937 in Miller, South Dakota. Claire worked from 1938 to 1946 at the agriculture office in Miller and Rapid City, South Dakota. She also worked as a medical secretary from 1947 to 1962 at Fort Worden and Camp Hanford

C O N J

U S D O

ROBERT L. SPRINGFIELD JR. March 17, 1926 November 29, 2012 Longtime local resident Robert (Bob) L. Springfield Jr., 86, died peacefully of natural causes at Golden Years Personal Care in Port Angeles. He was born in Hondo, Texas, on March 17, 1926, to Robert L. Springfield Sr. and Flora (Spear) Springfield. He and his three younger half-sisters, Marie, Arlene and Laverne, spent most of their childhoods living in Arizona and Colorado. Bob started his lifetime of hard work in the logging camps of Colorado, learning to drive trucks at the age of 11. After his junior year of

Mr. Springfield high school, he and five friends joined the Navy to fight the remainder of World War II in the South Pacific. When his Navy tour was complete, he returned to finish high school at Cortez, Colorado. After graduation, while

Death and Memorial Notice

Solution to Puzzle on B5 O A H U

November 2, 1951 November 29, 2012

Mrs. Borhaven in Washington. She moved to Sequim with Jack in 1962 and helped run their fishing charter service while working at Olympic National Park in Port Angeles until her disability retirement in 1970. She was a longtime faithful member of St.

Joseph Catholic Church in Sequim. Her beautiful red hair was an indication of her fiery and feisty personality. It was apparent how loved she was by the number of family and friends who helped her celebrate her 90th birthday. Claire will be dearly missed but always loved and remembered. A rosary recitation will be held at 10 a.m., followed by Mass and a reception on Friday, December 7, 2012, at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 121 East Maple Street in Sequim. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent in Claire’s name to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, www.stjude.org; or to your favorite charity.

Death and Memorial Notice

Remembering a Lifetime

P C T S

JOHN G. RAMSEY

the Northwest Maritime Center Cafe, Port Townsend, on Thursdays and Fridays from noon to 2 p.m.

Death and Memorial Notice FREDRICK BRAUSE ANTROBUS III

Death and Memorial Notice

B E O K

E S M E

L O A D E L K E D W A R F I F O O N C I N G E D D S I Z E A M A V T A B L E P U E R A P E S T N E T A I N S E S D A Y E A R N D S C S

visiting a friend in Port Angeles, Bob met Lee Kirkpatrick, his first love. They married on November 6, 1948, and had two children together, Patrick and Cheri. Bob started his career at the Peninsula Plywood mill in 1952. He rose through the ranks, taking a few business classes along the way, and achieved the position of plywood superintendent. He remained working there for more than 30 years until his retirement. After nearly 55 years of marriage, Bob’s first love, Lee, passed away. Two years later, Bob met his second love, Velma Winters (widowed the same year as Bob), at a dance. They married on September 16, 2005, and remained together until the end.

Death and Memorial Notice

JOSEPH E. JAMESON

STANN CHARLES STRAITE

January 19, 1936 November 29, 2012

May 1, 1943 November 28, 2012

Joe left us on November 29, 2012, surrounded by loving family and friends. Joe was born to Roy and Winifred on January 19, 1936, in Buffalo, New York. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy after high school and retired after a 20-year career. Joe came to Port Angeles in 1984 from San Diego, California. He resided in Port Angeles until his death. No memorial service is scheduled. In lieu of flowers, donations are requested

Stann Charles Straite was born in Hartford, Connecticut, to Stanley C. Straite and Eveline (Nystrom) Straite. As a young man, he served a tour in the Air Force, then married Linda in 1970. They lived in Seguin, Texas, and had four children, Eva, Emily, Michael and Amanda. Stann started International Concepts Incorporated, a computer sales and service company. Since 1994, he resided in Port Townsend, where he worked at several differ-

Mr. Jameson to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. There will be a celebration of life at a later date.

Bob is survived by his wife, Velma; his children, Cheri of Anchorage, Alaska, and Patrick of Port Angeles; his sisters, Laverne Calhoun of Cortez and Arlene Hespe of Texas; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Bob is preceded in death by his wife, Lee; his sister Marie; and his greatgranddaughter Kaylee Springfield. At his request, there will be no memorial service. Private inurnment will be at Mount Angeles Memorial Park in Port Angeles after cremation. In lieu of flowers, you may donate in Bob’s name to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth, Port Angeles, WA 98362; or to the Peninsula Home Fund, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

ent jobs, his favorite as a pilot car driver. He was known for his friendly and engaging personality, BMWs, crossword puzzles, being a friend of Bill W. and his love of chocolate. Stann went peacefully in his sleep after a long battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Many thanks to all the hospice workers and volunteers who brought so much joy to his last months on Earth! Farewell, my friend. Rest in peace. There will be a public remembrance from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, December 13, at 1538 Fir Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 6, 2012 PAGE

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Where are the government stewards? AN INTERNET SEARCH is inconclusive as to where the phrase “no skin in the game” originated. Some ascribe it to the Cal late columnist William Safire; Thomas others to investor Warren Buffett. Politicians often use the phrase to justify policies to their liking. It can also be applied to the latest in a long list of their outrageous behaviors, as well as to those of President Barack Obama. Like an increasing number of politicians, the president has never served in the military, nor has he ever run a business. He has never headed a company that needed to make a profit (and thus employ people

who create things people wish to purchase). He has likely never had to produce a balance sheet. His entire career — and that of too many other politicians — appears to have been about redistributing other people’s money and organizing “communities” to receive government benefits. Very few elected officials see themselves as stewards; even fewer practice stewardship. It’s an old word, stewardship, but it is a word that carries weight and authority. One entry on dictionary.com defines it as “the responsible overseeing and protection of something considered worth caring for and preserving.” We the people grant power to political leaders. Along with that power goes — or ought to go — a presumption that the men and women we elect are stewards, or caretakers of America; that they will behave

as responsible overseers of what has been entrusted to them. We expect them to see our country as worthy of protection and preservation, for us and for future generations. Can this president and Congress credibly say their irresponsible spending and the “fiscal cliff” they are driving us toward meet this definition? Have you ever been entrusted with someone else’s property? A car, a family heirloom? Unless you are terribly irresponsible, you probably took care of it, making sure it was not damaged and that you returned it to its owner in the same, or better, condition than when you received it. Politicians operate differently. They take what is not theirs and irresponsibly tax, spend or over-regulate it. Too many are not invested in America. They have no skin in the game. And so they treat America’s economy as unworthy

Peninsula Voices This U.S. unconditional alliance with Israel is at It is time to end the U.S.-Israel war against Pal- the core of most of America’s most intractable probestinians [Amy Goodman column, Commentary, Nov. lems. Terrorists attack us for 21]. our unconditional support This is a grossly onefor Israel’s crimes against sided war against the PalPalestinians and our wars estinian people by two of and threats against Middle the most powerful militarEast nations. ies in the world. Our wars in the region This slaughter against were started in part for the Palestinians includes the killing of civilians, assassi- protection of Israel. These wars seriously nation, blockades, destrucexacerbate our national tion of homes and infrastructure, land confiscation, security, debt and economic wrongful incarceration and problems. They cause unconscionable loss in torture. American lives. Contrary to common Unfortunately, American media coverage, both sides engage in egregious acts of politicians and the media are paralyzed by fear of terror. This human catastrophe defamatory attacks by the powerful Israel lobby and is damaging to the interests of Israel as well as the its supporters in the U.S. It was degrading to see Palestinians. However, the damage to U.S. politicians capitulate to this lobby and Israel in the the U.S. is unspeakable.

of their care and do not feel it their responsibility to protect it. Democracy as practiced in our constitutional republic is fragile. It is not the natural state of humanity. Look around the world and see how many nations come close to America in economic strength, endowed rights and standards of morality. What we have is not inherited, as from a will. It must be fought for, sometimes in war, but always against our lower nature, which too often succumbs to the temptation to give people what they want, rather than what they need; to trade goodies for votes, preserving not the country, but political careers. A self-indulgent nation cannot long exist, at least not as the nation delivered to us by our forefathers. Our ancestors learned to do without in order to retain things of real value. I was taught that excessive

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debt was a great evil because it contributed to a loss of freedom. If that is true for individuals, it is truer still for our country. America is slowly descending into a kind of economic slavery. We are increasingly in servitude to others who are financing our debt. We are shackling our posterity with a debt load we are unlikely to pay off. Things might be different if the president and Congress saw themselves as stewards. Instead, they behave as they do because they have little or no skin in the game.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. Thomas can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

One-sided war

last election by swearing their unconditional and undying allegiance to Israel. Instead of lecturing the world about democratic government, America needs to get serious about its own

democracy by removing the influence of big money from our elections, our financial industry and our foreign policy. Malcolm D. McPhee, Sequim

Annoying calls This is a follow-up on “New Abuses in Reverse Mortgages” [PDN, Nov. 30]. I received this call on my answering machine Nov. 29 at 4:55 a.m.: “Government-

insured reverse mortgage. If you are interested, press 1 to talk to a live agent. If you wish to be removed from our calling list, press 2.” A friend of mine got this same call at 3:30 a.m. I’ve also received many calls over the past year and more “concerning your credit; there is nothing the matter with your credit but we can get you lower interest rates.” About the last six or eight calls, I’m told to “act now — this will be your final call. I’ve pressed 2, to no avail. Once I pressed the “1 to talk to” someone to ask to be removed, I got hung up on by a rude agent. My friend and I are both on the “do not call list” that came out a few years ago. I was wondering how many others are being pestered like this, and what we can do to end it. James K. Mann, Sequim

Doha summit takes on ‘carbon cliff’ From Doha, Qatar THE 18TH U.N. climatechange summit is taking place in the small but immensely wealthy Gulf emirate of Qatar, the largest per capita emitter of greenhouse gases in the world. Delegates, press, dignitarAmy ies and the Goodman legions of lowpaid, foreign guest workers here at the opulent Qatar National Convention Center all pass under an enormous spider, a 30-foot-high cast-bronze statue called “Maman,” by the French-American sculptor Louise Bourgeois. It was chosen by the emir’s wife and snapped up for a reported $10 million. The Obama administration has been accused, rightly, of derailing the U.N. climate negotiations in recent years, which makes the spider an appropriate symbol, as famously described by the lines from an 1808 poem by Sir Walter Scott,

Oh! what a tangled web we weave When first we practice to deceive! Here at the summit, referred to as the COP 18 (18th Conference of Parties), I met up with climate scientist Bill Hare, one of the lead authors of a new World Bank report, “Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4 Degree C Warmer World Must Be Avoided.” With the U.S. media focused on the so-called “fiscal cliff,” I asked Hare how the world’s historically largest emitter of greenhouse gases, the United States, could be expected to contribute to a global fund to combat climate change: “We have a climate cliff. . . . We’re facing a carbon tsunami, actually, where huge amounts of carbon are now being emitted at a faster rate than ever. “And it’s that carbon tsunami that’s likely to overwhelm the planet with warming, sea-level rise and acidifying the oceans.” Just a day after I interviewed Hare, a powerful typhoon hit the Philippines. I spoke with the lead climate negotiator from the Philippines, Naderev Sano, just minutes after the news of the typhoon broke. “It is sobering for us to know that a typhoon like this normally

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doesn’t hit that part of the country,” he told me. “In half a century, this is the first time that a typhoon that has crossed as far south as Bopha has.” I asked Sano what he was hoping for in Doha: “The single biggest measure of success in Doha is, first and foremost, the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. That is something we hold very dearly, because that is the jump-off base for enhanced ambition for the whole world.” The Kyoto Protocol is the only legally binding global treaty that forces nations to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Unless action is taken, it will lapse at the end of this month. Sano explained: “When we reach the first day of 2013, if we don’t have any success here in Doha, then we end up with nothing. We end up with a . . . system where climate change faces a world that has not found the political will to address the climate crisis.” Another participant at the summit is Kumi Naidoo, the executive director of Greenpeace International. I last interviewed him via

phone as he was hanging from a Russian Gazprom oil rig in the Arctic, getting hosed down with water intended to dislodge him. Naidoo wrote before coming to COP 18: “Doha is already infamous for dead-end trade talks. One more failure and it will be forever known as the place where global deals go to die.” At a press conference held here, Naidoo directed his own rhetorical fire hose at the Obama administration. Noting Barack Obama’s reference to climate change in his Nov. 6 victory speech, Naidoo said, naming Obama’s climate negotiators, “Todd Stern and Jonathan Pershing have come to Doha with their needle stuck in the groove of obstructing the U.N. process, an art they have perfected. “It is disrespectful of President Obama to inflict on us two negative negotiators who act as if the comments he made after his election were never made. He should either pick up the phone and tell his delegates to follow his lead or alternatively call them back to Washington.” When I asked Pershing to respond to Naidoo, whether he was following President Obama’s wishes, he replied, “No comment.” While the expectations for the

Doha climate summit are low, even grim, and while attendance at this summit is a fraction of what we saw at the last three in Copenhagen, Cancun and Durban, there is here a strong core of committed people who care about the future of the planet, who are taking action to protect it from human-induced climate change. It is these people who the giant spider in the lobby also represents. The sculpture is protecting a sac of eggs, and, as Louise Bourgeois explained: “The Spider is an ode to my mother. . . . Like a spider, my mother was a weaver. Spiders are helpful and protective.” From Typhoon Bopha in the Philippines to superstorm Sandy in the United States, the web of climate activists is not tangled, but growing stronger, leading the way. If only the politicians would follow.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

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Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 margaret.mckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525 brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 — (J)

Case shut before tot found dead Child-neglect probe closed a few hours before girls located THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TULALIP — State social workers closed a child-neglect investigation Oct. 8 just hours before two little girls were found in a car on the Tulalip Reservation suffering from malnutrition and dehydration so severe that one of them died. Records obtained by The Daily Herald show that the case was closed because social workers could not find the mother, Christina Carlson. The family had been living in the car on the reservation near Marysville. The Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office said year-anda-half-old Chantel Craig died from parental neglect. Her 2½-year-old sister was rushed to a hospital and survived. Police said the girls were covered in waste and infested with fleas. The 36-year-old mother has pleaded not guilty to criminal charges in Tulalip Tribal Court.

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Indian Island cited for Navy award in environmental community action PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

“With eight active bald eagle nests, seven tribal shellfish beaches, more than 300 blacktail deer, 11 Native American archaeological sites and 2,100 acres of coniferous forest, Indian Island hardly seems like a Navy base,� said Martin. “So it’s no surprise that every employee strongly believes in the command’s objectives to be a good neighbor and a good steward of the environment.� The Environmental Stewardship Flagship, which is sponsored by N4, is one of five flagships in the Navy Community Service program. The other four flagships include Personal Excellence Partnership, Project Good Neighbor, Campaign Drug Free and Health, Safety and Fitness.

PORT HADLOCK — Naval Magazine Indian Island has been named the winner of a 2012 Navy Community Service Environmental Stewardship Flagship Award. These awards recognize Navy commands that engage in exemplary voluntary community service activities that promote good stewardship of environmental resources. Indian Island won in the category of a small shore command, which has fewer than 200 personnel. “Preserving the environment and being energy-efficient are priorities for us, so I am thrilled that we were recognized for our team’s efforts,� said Cmdr. Gary Martin, commanding officer. “This award certainly SCOTT A. MCCALL/U.S. NAVY energizes us to continue Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Anthron Shuler spreads manila clams on the shore engaging with the community to promote environ- of Naval Magazine Indian Island. Sailors from Navy Region Northwest helped local Native American tribes seed 3 million manila clams while participating in a mental stewardship.�

Naval Magazine Indian Island clam seeding project in August.

More than 25 activities From July 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, Indian Island personnel hosted or participated in more than 25 environmental-related community activities, including community group tours of the base, emergencyresponse exercises with the

county, tribal shellfish seeding and traditional plant gathering, Earth Day beach cleanup and tree-planting with Boy Scout troops and research and restoration projects with federal and state agencies, Native American tribes and envi-

ronmental nonprofit organizations. Indian Island personnel logged about 742 volunteer hours over the course of the

year while engaging in these activities, through which they were able to reach more than 800 people of all ages, Martin said.

Elkins: ‘Jotting endlessly’ hands, and you’re jotting, jotting, jotting endlessly,� he said. “Still, for me, the best part of Dying on the Vine was the same as it’s been for every other book: the writing,� he said. “Doesn’t sound like much, sitting alone in a room all day long staring at a computer monitor and being frustrated threequarters of the time because you can’t get it right. “And yet, like every other novelist I’ve ever met, there’s nothing I’d rather be doing. I guess it’s because every now and then, you do get it right, and what a pleasure that is.�

Keep your warmth. Not your sweat. Trying stuff since 1938

________

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CONTINUED FROM A1 Turner said. “You know you could go to Florence,� he said, “and As for Oliver, “I just didn’t have the heart for find the obscure alley, that doing a sort of melancholy shuttered door he writes farewell tour. Port Angeles about, and it would be is different, though,� since exactly as Aaron described readings on the North it.� This book is classic Olympic Peninsula are like get-togethers with old Elkins, he added: delicious comfort food for a wintry friends. Elkins will read from night. “You know what to and sign copies of Dying on the Vine at 7 p.m. Friday in expect, and you have fun,� the Raymond Carver Room said Turner, who just of the Port Angeles Library, started reading Vine a second time to pick up more of 2210 S. Peabody St. the clues Elkins sprinkles As always, admission is among the pages. free. One of Elkins’ old friends Tuscany research and readers is Alan Turner, owner of Port Book and For Elkins, Tuscany was, News in downtown Port of course, a lovely place to Angeles. conduct a couple of weeks of Vine is set in “one of research. those locales we’ve all heard “Your notebook and camabout, dreamt about,� era are never out of your

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. urbani@peninsuladailynews.com. The “Original� Since 1957

PUD: Panel tryouts eyed

PORT ANGELES ANGELES, WA U U.S.A. SA

CONTINUED FROM A1 The state Court of Appeals upheld Taylor’s ruling in the PUD’s favor in July. Shoulberg took the case to the state Supreme Court, which Tuesday unanimously declined to hear the case. “We’re elated,� said PUD Commissioner Wayne King. “This has been a long deal.� King said the case cost the PUD $200,000 in legal fees that will be captured in utility rates.

‘Will affect everyone’

High interest

King said many people have expressed interest in serving on such a committee. The application deadline is Jan. 31. The commissioners will select finalists from the applicants, according to Parker. Those interested in serving on the advisory committee should submit a letter of interest (include their address and telephone Citizens board number) to the Jefferson The PUD also is solicit- County PUD Board of Coming volunteers to serve on a missioners, P.O. Box 929, Port Hadlock, WA 98339. citizens advisory board.

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“This will come from the taxpayers,� King said. “It will affect everyone in Jefferson County.� The PUD now is preparing to assume East Jefferson County electrical service from Puget Sound Energy, scheduled to occur April 1. In preparation, the PUD has hired a superintendent, a finance director and two office positions, and is now filling lineman positions, according to PUD Manager Jim Parker. The PUD is in discussions with PSE as to how to achieve the transfer of accounts, Parker said.

Š 2012 Swain’s General Store Inc.

The proposed board will have nine members, three from each commissioner district. It will meet periodically to recommend to PUD commissioners on pertinent matters related to the operations of the PUD’s water, sewer, telecommunications and electrical utilities. The board has no decision-making authority, but its recommendations will be valuable, King said. King compared the responsibilities of the committee with the county Planning Commission, which makes recommendations on land use that are then addressed by the county commissioners. “This is a way to get people involved with the issues,� King said.

Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 6, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Season for gift giving OUTDOORS LOVERS CAN be difficult to give Christmas gifts to because they spend the entire year accumulating the gear they need. They just couldn’t wait a Lee few months to get their rods, Horton guns and other accessories. It can be frustrating, but the state Department of Fish and Wildlife has a few ideas. Namely, give your favorite outdoors lover the gift of permission. The first idea is a Discover Pass. To the chagrin of many, the Discover Pass is necessary to enter state parks and other state-managed recreation lands. This year, it comes with some flexibility: you can choose the start date for the annual pass. You can activate the pass right when you buy it or any day within a year of purchase. Discover Passes can be purchased online at www.DiscoverPass.wa.gov or at retailers across the state. See a list of venders here: www.tinyurl. com/WDFWvendors. The cost is $35. State parks receive 84 percent of revenue from Discover Pass sales. The Department of Fish and Wildlife and Department of Natural Resources each receive eight percent. Another gift idea is a fishing or hunting license. The 2013 licensing year doesn’t begin until April 1, but hunting and fishing licenses became available for purchase earlier this month. These licenses can be purchased at the same vendors as the Discover Pass. They can also be purchased online at https://fishhunt.dfw. wa.gov, or by phoning 866-246-9453.

Bad gifts My gig as an outdoors writer makes me susceptible to receiving emails from public relations firms representing authors of books and the makers of new products. Some of the products being peddled are downright silly. For the last few months, most of these emails open with a line such as, “Were you planning to do an article on holiday gift ideas?” I wasn’t planning to write such a column; but since they asked, here are my two favorite gift ideas: ■ Zap-N-Trash is an insect zapper that, as the email from Oakdale Solutions said, “turns killing flies into entertainment.” This might be a fantastic product, but the way it’s being promoted is strange. “The Zap-N-Trash is the life of the party,” Zap-N-Trash inventor Mike Filonczuk said. “Everyone likes to watch the flies get zapped. We turned it into a drinking game until flies were going in every nine seconds — that’s a lot of drinking.” I know that flies are annoying, and eliminating them is something most of us want. But it’s really odd to see killing flies promoted as an fun-filled activity. Apparently, Zap-N-Trash isn’t an actual product . . . yet. Zap-N-Trash is asking for donations to get the product off the ground. The email was sent to me to ask to spread the news on how my readers can get in on this fun. So far, only $150 of the $50,000 goal has been raised. Only a few more days are left, so hurry up and donate if you want. Go here to pitch in or learn more about the product: http://tinyurl. com/ZapNTrash. ■ I don’t know why I was sent an email for this product, as it has nothing to do with the outdoors. But I have a feeling it will help many of you. TURN

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STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chimacum’s Derek Ajax (22) drives around Bellevue Christian’s Michael Crosby during their Nisqually League boys basketball game at Chimacum.

Chimacum falls 55-32 Sequim drops 3-point heartbreaker to Olympic PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHIMACUM — Bellevue Christian’s top two scorers outscored Chimacum in Nisqually League boys basketball action. Jake Marvin scorched the nets for 31 points while 6-foot-9 senior Jake VandenBrink added 11 as the two combined for 42 points in their 55-32 victory Tuesday night. Rafael Pagasian led the Cowboys with 14 points while Kevin Miller added 7. Bellevue led only 22-17 at halftime but dominated the second half by outscoring the Cowboys 33-15 to break away for the easy win. Chimacum next plays at Charles Wright Academy in

Tacoma on Friday night. Bellevue Christian 55, Chimacum 32 Bellevue Chimacum

9 13 21 12— 55 10 7 6 9— 32 Individual scoring

Bellevue (55) Marvin 31, VandenBrink 11, Crosby 4, Hazen 2, Foster 2, Schubert 3, McQuaid 2. Chimacum (32) Pagasian 14, Miller 7, Carthum 2, Settje 2, Downs 1, Anderson 2, Weller 4.

Olympic 49, Sequim 46 BREMERTON — The Wolves lost an Olympic League heartbreaker on the road Tuesday night. The game went back and forth with Sequim going on a

Preps 12-0 run at one point and the Trojans going on a 7-0 run at another point to take a 13-point lead in the fourth quarter. The Wolves didn’t fold, though, charging back to get back into the game. Olympic’s Brian Tyson nailed a 3-pointer with less than a minute to go to give the Trojans the lead for good. “We played really hard,” Sequim coach Greg Glasser said. “I was really pleased with how we battled back.” Quentin Phillips sparked Olympic with 15 points to keep the Trojans undefeated (2-0 in league, 3-0 overall). Gabe Carter led three Wolves in double figures with 18 points while Rory Kallappa sank 11 and Jayson Brocklesby added 10.

Pirates beat Rampage Peninsula men beat ABA squad PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Peninsula College took a professional team to school Tuesday night. Four players scored in double figures as the Pirates defeated ABA team the Washington Rampage 78-73. Daniel Sims paced Peninsula with 16 points. He also brought down 12 rebounds and dished out eight assists. Djuan Smith contributed 15 points and eight boards, TreShawn King Dunbar scored 11 points and Gatpan Panaom scored 10 points. Arnold Anderson just missed double figures with nine points, but he had a nice all-around statistical effort with seven rebounds, four assists and four steals. Donald Gaddy added seven points to the Pirates’ win. Dudley Ewell scored 21 points for the Rampage, who are based in Everett. The game was the last in Port Angeles for the remainder of 2012. Peninsula will continue its difficult schedule by hitting the road for three tournaments over the next month. The Pirates face Eastern Utah on Friday in the Farmer’s Insurance Challenge at the College of Southern Idaho. On Saturday, Peninsula will face the host Golden Eagles. KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Next weekend, the Pirates will play in the Umpqua Cross- Peninsula’s TreShawn King Dunbar, front, and over Tournament in Roseburg, Washington Rampage’s Laron Daniels fight for a rebound in the first half in Port Angeles. Ore.

Sequim, which will next host Kingston on Monday night, fell to 1-1, 1-2. Olympic 49, Sequim 46 Sequim Olympic

9 14 10 13— 46 9 15 17 8— 49 Individual scoring

Sequim (46) Carter 18, Kallappa 11, Brocklesby 10, Barry 4, Guan 2, Christensen 1. Olympic (49) Phillips 15, Moseley 2, Neal 6, Tyson 9, Makaleb McInnis 3, Makiah McInnis 4, Setten 8, Samuel 2.

North Mason 55, Port Angeles 48 BELFAIR — Devonte Davenport scored 18 points and Daniel Burggraaf brought down 12 rebounds to lead the Bulldogs to the Olympic League win Tuesday night. The teams were tied 22-all at halftime but the Bulldogs pulled away to outscore the Roughriders 33-26 in the second half. TURN

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Hawks

Browner to miss 4 games Drops appeal, out for regular season BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks are about to find out how much losing at least one of their top cornerbacks means to their defense. Brandon Browner has dropped the appeal of his suspension for using performanceenhancing substances and will miss the final four games of the regular season, the league announced Wednesday. Browner’s loss leaves the Seahawks without a Pro Bowl cornerback whose size and physical play has flustered wide receivers for much of the past two seasons.

Thurmond to start Walter Thurmond, who was a starter for a short time during the 2011 season before suffering a leg injury, will take Browner’s spot. Browner will be eligible to rejoin the team on Dec. 31 and will be able to play in the postseason should the Seahawks make the playoffs. TURN

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SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Quilcene at Puget Sound Adventist, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Quilcene at Puget Sound Adventist, 5:30 p.m.

Friday Boys Basketball: Chimacum at Charles Wright, 5:15 p.m.; Olympic at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Kingston at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Forks at Elma, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Taholah, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Crosspoint Academy at Sequim, 5 p.m.; Forks at Elma, 5:30 p.m.; Crescent at Taholah, 5:30 p.m.; Neah Bay at Wishkah Valley, 6 p.m.; Port Townsend at Olympic, 7 p.m.; Port Angeles at Kingston, 7 p.m.; Chimacum at Charles Wright, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Sequim at Blaine, 7 p.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College vs. Eastern Utah at College of Southern Idaho, TBD. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula College vs. Clackamas at Pierce Holiday Tournament in Lakewood, 6 p.m.

Preps Basketball Tuesday’s Scores BOYS BASKETBALL Arlington 54, Stanwood 49 Auburn 59, Kent-Meridian 55 Auburn Adventist Academy 52, Northwest School 44 Auburn Mountainview 58, Interlake 51 Bainbridge 74, North Kitsap 37 Bear Creek School 57, Overlake School 40 Bellevue Christian 55, Chimacum 32 Bellingham 69, Meridian 59 Bothell 72, Redmond 39 Bremerton 62, Klahowya 48 Burlington-Edison 68, Sedro-Woolley 55 Bush 60, Darrington 28 Cascade (Everett) 53, Meadowdale 47 Cedar Park Christian (Bothell) 63, Vashon Island 47 Central Valley 61, Mead 54 Charles Wright Academy 58, Life Christian Academy 55 Chewelah 62, Deer Park 56 Chiawana 54, Moses Lake 50 Chief Sealth 56, Eastside Catholic 54 Christian Faith 74, Muckleshoot Tribal School 56 Clarkston 51, Lewiston, Idaho 48 Cle Elum/Roslyn 60, Cascade (Leavenworth) 53 Clover Park 76, Fife 60 Colfax 68, Waitsburg-Prescott 32 Concrete 67, Mount Vernon Christian 40 Connell 55, Othello 37 Curtis 64, Graham-Kapowsin 21 Cusick 63, Clark Fork, Idaho 51 Davenport 71, Wilbur-Creston 28 East Valley (Spokane) 60, Freeman 41 Eastlake 52, Inglemoor 43 Eastmont 81, Cashmere 59 Eatonville 60, Seattle Christian 42 Federal Way 69, Emerald Ridge 39 Franklin 69, Blanchet 54 Garfield 73, Newport 58 Garfield-Palouse 61, Potlatch, Idaho 17 Glacier Peak 90, Kamiak 77 Gonzaga Prep 58, Shadle Park 35 Grace Academy 39, Lopez 15 Grandview 56, Sunnyside 53 Granger 68, Warden 46 Hanford 63, Hermiston, Ore. 50 Issaquah 51, Roosevelt 44 Kamiakin 58, Davis 57, OT Kelso 50, R.A. Long 43 Kentwood 61, Kentridge 42 Kettle Falls 46, Springdale 35 Kingston 69, Port Townsend 35 Kiona-Benton 58, Mabton 30 Kittitas 57, Columbia Basin 34 La Salle 56, White Swan 41 LaCenter 69, Stevenson-Carson 26 LaConner 67, Nooksack Valley 40 Lake Stevens 60, Marysville-Pilchuck 39 Lakes 50, Shorewood 43 Lakeside (Seattle) 74, West Seattle 43 Lewis and Clark 62, North Central 50 Lyle-Wishram 69, South Wasco County, Ore. 55 Manson 58, Entiat 55 Mark Morris 61, Cottage Grove, Ore. 56 Medical Lake 31, Reardan 18 Monroe 61, Everett 56 Mossyrock 60, Napavine 48 Mount Baker 61, Blaine 53 Mount Vernon 89, Marysville-Getchell 50 Mt. Rainier 59, Kentlake 29 Mt. Spokane 60, Rogers (Spokane) 42 Naselle 49, Ilwaco 45 North Mason 55, Port Angeles 48 O’Dea 52, Nathan Hale 44 Oak Harbor 58, Snohomish 49 Okanogan 74, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 40 Olympia 70, River Ridge 62 Olympic 49, Sequim 46 Onalaska 56, Toutle Lake 33 Post Falls, Idaho 57, Kennewick 54 Puget Sound Adventist 75, Rainier Christian 52 Pullman 51, Moscow, Idaho 37 Quincy 49, Wahluke 44 Rainier Beach 110, Ingraham 52 Raymond 47, Tenino 40 Republic 59, Oroville 37 River View 46, Dayton 25 Rochester 66, Ocosta 57 Sammamish 74, Cedarcrest 68 Seattle Prep 69, Cleveland 51 Selah 65, Highland 64 Selkirk 76, St. Michael’s 35 Shorecrest 85, Lynnwood 45 Spanaway Lake 61, Puyallup 59 St. George’s 69, Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 27 Steilacoom 50, Franklin Pierce 46 Sumner 66, Orting 41 Tacoma Baptist 54, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 43 Tahoma 83, Auburn Riverside 53 Timberlake, Idaho 76, Riverside 46 Todd Beamer 82, Rogers (Puyallup) 53 Toledo 74, Woodland 57 Tualatin, Ore. 85, Union 84 Tulalip Heritage 58, Shoreline Christian 17 University 42, Ferris 39 University Prep 57, Coupeville 25 W. F. West 54, North Thurston 30 Wahkiakum 63, Winlock 58 West Valley (Spokane) 63, Lakeland, Idaho

GOING

FOR THE GOLD

Ten of Port Angeles Swim Club athletes are going to attend the upcoming 2012 Pacific Northwest Swimming Short Course Championships at King County Aquatic Center. Nine Port Angeles swimmers will participate in the 14 and under meet Friday through Sunday, and Tracie Macias will participate in the Senior Championships on Dec. 14-16. The championship swimmers include, front row from left, Nadia Cole, age 10; Erin Edwards, 12; Kenzie Johnson, 11; Jaine Macias, 13; and Bella Money, 10. Back row from left, Lum Fu, 12; Taylor Beebe, 12; Sierra Hunter, 11; Sydnee Linnane, 12; and Tracie Macias, 17. 57, OT White River 60, Washington 43 Willapa Valley 65, Lake Quinault 44 GIRLS BASKETBALL Aberdeen 49, Elma 37 Auburn Riverside 42, Tahoma 32 Bremerton 37, Klahowya 34 Bridgeport 28, Waterville 25 Cascade (Leavenworth) 65, Cle Elum/Roslyn 36 Castle Rock 62, Seton Catholic 11 Cedarcrest 66, Lake Washington 60 Charles Wright Academy 46, Life Christian Academy 26 Chewelah 44, Deer Park 24 Chiawana 57, Moses Lake 36 Colfax 59, Waitsburg-Prescott 19 Concrete 55, Mount Vernon Christian 47 Connell 67, Othello 21 Curlew 48, Northport 44 Curtis 45, Graham-Kapowsin 31 Cusick 50, Clark Fork, Idaho 40 Darrington 56, Bush 13 Dayton 48, River View 24 Eatonville 48, Seattle Christian 27 Entiat 49, Manson 35 Enumclaw 51, Yelm 34 Evergreen (Vancouver) 27, Washington School For The Deaf 18 Federal Way 61, Emerald Ridge 56 Ferndale 56, Lynden Christian 49 Ferris 59, University 57 Franklin Pierce 51, Steilacoom 26 Freeman 55, East Valley (Spokane) 47 Gonzaga Prep 79, Shadle Park 51 Grace Academy 38, Lopez 31 Grandview 69, Sunnyside 63, OT Granger 59, Warden 19 Hanford 47, Hermiston, Ore. 45 Highline 39, Decatur 29 Hoquiam 47, Centralia 41 Kentwood 55, Kentridge 38 Kingston 47, Port Townsend 45 Kiona-Benton 48, Mabton 42 La Salle 45, White Swan 34 LaCenter 44, Stevenson-Carson 36 Lake Roosevelt 60, Tonasket 36 Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 55, St. George’s 26 Lewis and Clark 68, North Central 36 Lewiston, Idaho 62, Clarkston 38 Liberty (Spangle) 47, Valley Christian 28 Lyle-Wishram 53, South Wasco County, Ore. 42 Mead 54, Central Valley 45 Medical Lake 50, Royal 17 Mt. Rainier 67, Kentlake 19 Mt. Rainier Lutheran 51, Evergreen Lutheran 31 Mt. Spokane 64, Rogers (Spokane) 36 Nooksack Valley 36, LaConner 33 Northwest Christian (Colbert) 38, Lake City, Idaho 29 Northwest Christian (Lacey) 41, Tacoma Baptist 39 Northwest School 39, Auburn Adventist Academy 28 Okanogan 68, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 31 Olympic 57, Sequim 47 Port Angeles 55, North Mason 30 Post Falls, Idaho 74, Kennewick 15 Potlatch, Idaho 51, Garfield-Palouse 42 Prairie 72, Mark Morris 71 Pullman 57, Moscow, Idaho 32 Puyallup 66, Spanaway Lake 36 Quincy 35, Wahluke 30 Republic 44, Oroville 23 Riverside 45, Timberlake, Idaho 34 Sehome 41, Squalicum 31 Selah 66, Highland 25 Shorewood Christian 43, Northwest Yeshiva 32 Skyview 64, Ridgefield 34 South Bend 51, Rochester 49, OT Sumner 53, Orting 7 Todd Beamer 55, Rogers (Puyallup) 46 Tulalip Heritage 49, Shoreline Christian 46 University Prep 59, Annie Wright 24 Vashon Island 32, Cedar Park Christian

(Mountlake Terrace) 31 West Valley (Spokane) 58, Lakeland, Idaho 44 White River 51, Washington 23 Willapa Valley 50, Lake Quinault 27

College Football 2012 Bowl Games Gildan New Mexico Bowl Sat., Dec. 15, 10 a.m., ESPN Nevada vs. Arizona (Played in Albuquerque, NM) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Sat., Dec. 15, 1:30 p.m., ESPN Toledo vs. Utah State (Played in Boise, ID) Poinsettia Bowl Thur., Dec. 20, 5 p.m., ESPN BYU vs. San Diego State (Played in San Diego, CA) Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl Fri., Dec. 21, 4:30 p.m., ESPN UCF vs. Ball State (Played in St. Petersburg, FL) R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl Sat., Dec. 22, 9 a.m., ESPN East Carolina vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (Played in New Orleans, LA) MAACO Bowl Las Vegas Bowl Sat., Dec. 22, 12:30 p.m., ESPN Washington vs. (19)Boise State (Played in Las Vegas, NV) Sheraton Hawaii Bowl Mon., Dec. 24, 5 p.m., ESPN Fresno State vs. SMU (Played in Honolulu, HI) Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Wed., Dec. 26, 4:30 p.m., ESPN Western Kentucky vs. Central Michigan (Played in Detroit, MI) Military Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, Noon, ESPN San Jose State vs. Bowling Green (Played in Washington, DC) Belk Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, 3:30 p.m., ESPN Cincinnati vs. Duke (Played in Charlotte, NC) Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl Thur., Dec. 27, 6:45 p.m., ESPN Baylor vs. (17)UCLA (Played in San Diego, CA) AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl Fri., Dec. 28, 11 a.m., ESPN Ohio vs. Louisiana-Monroe (Played in Shreveport, LA) Russell Athletic Bowl Fri., Dec. 28., 2:30 p.m., ESPN Rutgers vs. Virginia Tech (Played in Orlando, FL) Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas Fri., Dec. 28, 6 p.m., ESPN Minnesota vs. Texas Tech (Played in Houston, TX) Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 8:45 a.m., ESPN Rice vs. Air Force (Played in Fort Worth, TX) New Era Pinstripe Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 12:15, ESPN West Virginia vs. Syracuse (Played in Bronx, NY) Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 1 p.m., ESPN2 Navy vs. Arizona State (Played in San Francisco, CA) Valero Alamo Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 3:45 p.m., ESPN (23)Texas vs. (13)Oregon State (Played in San Antonio, TX) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl Sat., Dec. 29, 7:15 p.m., ESPN TCU vs. Michigan State (Played in Tempe, AZ) Music City Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 9 a.m., ESPN NC State vs. Vanderbilt (Played in Nashville, TN) Hyundai Sun Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 11 a.m., CBS USC vs. Georgia Tech (Played in El Paso, TX)

AutoZone Liberty Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 12:30 p.m., ESPN Iowa State vs. Tulsa (Played in Memphis, TN) Chick-fil-A Bowl Mon., Dec. 31, 4:30 p.m., ESPN (8)LSU vs. (14)Clemson (Played in Atlanta, GA) TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 9 a.m., ESPN2 Mississippi State vs. (20)Northwestern (Played in Jacksonville, FL) Heart of Dallas Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 9 a.m., ESPNU Purdue vs. Oklahoma State (Played in Dallas, TX) Outback Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 10 a.m., ESPN (10)South Carolina vs. (18)Michigan (Played in Tampa, FL) Capital One Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 10 a.m., ABC (7)Georgia vs. (16)Nebraska (Played in Orlando, FL) Rose Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 2 p.m., ESPN Wisconsin vs. (6)Stanford (Played in Pasadena, CA) Discover Orange Bowl Tue., Jan. 1, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (15)Northern Illinois vs. (12)Florida State (Played in Miami, FL) Allstate Sugar Bowl Wed., Jan. 2, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (21)Louisville vs. (3)Florida (Played in New Orleans, LA) Tostitos Fiesta Bowl Thur., Jan. 3, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (4)Oregon vs. (5)Kansas State (Played in Glendale, AZ) AT&T Cotton Bowl Fri., Jan. 4, 5 p.m., FOX (9)Texas A&M vs. (11)Oklahoma (Played in Arlington, TX) BBVA Compass Bowl Sat., Jan. 5, 10 a.m., ESPN Pittsburgh vs. Ole Miss (Played in Birmingham, AL) GoDaddy.com Bowl Sun., Jan. 6, 6 p.m. ESPN Kent State vs. Arkansas State (Played in Mobile, AL) BCS National Championship Mon., Jan. 7, 5:30 p.m., ESPN (1)Notre Dame vs. (2)Alabama (Played in Miami, FL)

College Basketball Men’s Basketball Tuesday FAR WEST Arizona 63, Southern Miss. 55 Pacific 78, Nevada 72, OT San Diego 67, S. Utah 53 San Francisco 81, St. John’s 65 UC Irvine 94, San Diego Christian 52 UNLV 68, Portland 60 MIDWEST Bradley 72, George Washington 68 Illinois 72, W. Carolina 64 Iowa 87, South Dakota 63 Iowa St. 83, Florida Gulf Coast 72 Michigan 73, W. Michigan 41 Minnesota 88, S. Dakota St. 64 Missouri 81, SE Missouri 65 Purdue 72, Lamar 39 Wisconsin 86, Nebraska-Omaha 40 Wyoming 81, Illinois St. 67 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 81, Oklahoma 78 Houston 54, TCU 48 Northwestern 74, Baylor 70 Texas Tech 75, N. Kentucky 69 UALR 91, St. Gregory’s 30 EAST Army 91, Marist 57

SPORTS ON TV

Today 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Long Beach State vs. Syracuse (Live) 5 p.m. (47) GOLF APGA, Australian Open (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, New York Knicks at Miami Heat (Live) 5 p.m. NFL Network Football NFL, Denver at Oakland (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Phoenix Suns (Live) 10 p.m. (47) GOLF AsianTour, Thailand Championship (Live) 3:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Nelson Mandela Championship (Live) Bucknell 76, Kent St. 60 Delaware 68, Radford 59 Georgetown 64, Texas 41 Harvard 79, Boston College 63 Lafayette 61, St. Francis (Pa.) 58 Lehigh 81, Fordham 63 NC State 69, UConn 65 Seton Hall 68, NJIT 59 St. Bonaventure 58, Siena 43 UMass 72, Northeastern 66 Wagner 52, Hofstra 44 SOUTH Belmont 100, Lipscomb 66 Charleston Southern 101, The Citadel 73 E. Kentucky 63, NC Central 57 East Carolina 111, St. Andrews 59 Elon 71, Dartmouth 49 Florida A&M 87, Edward Waters 69 George Mason 74, UMBC 63 Georgia Tech 62, Georgia 54 Howard 55, American U. 50 Kentucky 88, Samford 56 Liberty 76, S. Virginia 51 Louisville 80, Coll. of Charleston 38 Mississippi St. 53, UTSA 42 Murray St. 76, Bethel (Tenn.) 54 New Mexico St. 58, South Alabama 52 Northwestern St. 89, Louisiana Tech 83 Richmond 80, Old Dominion 53 Robert Morris 61, Campbell 58 Saint Joseph’s 67, Coppin St. 55 Tulane 65, Nicholls St. 48 Winthrop 77, Brevard 54

Women’s Basketball Tuesday FAR WEST BYU 81, Utah St. 77 Gonzaga 65, E. Washington 50 New Mexico 52, Cal St.-Fullerton 43 San Diego 81, Point Loma 56 Utah Valley 68, Weber St. 56 MIDWEST Belmont 58, Indiana 54 E. Illinois 70, Evansville 57 Indiana St. 58, N. Illinois 52 Kansas St. 48, Wichita St. 43 Miami (Ohio) 72, Wright St. 54 Milwaukee 116, Bradley 112, 2OT N. Iowa 81, Chicago St. 41 North Dakota 76, Air Force 42 S. Dakota St. 66, E. Michigan 65 Tulsa 49, Nebraska-Omaha 48 Valparaiso 82, IPFW 73 SOUTHWEST Ark.-Pine Bluff 87, LeMoyne-Owen 57 Cent. Arkansas 99, Central Baptist 21 Texas A&M 77, Louisiana Tech 26 Texas-Pan American 59, Texas-Arlington 57 UALR 64, Southern Miss. 45 EAST Army 52, Manhattan 47 Colgate 67, Columbia 48 Georgetown 61, Monmouth (NJ) 48 Harvard 73, Providence 59 Navy 69, William & Mary 64 Stony Brook 51, Sacred Heart 46 Syracuse 66, Wagner 28 Yale 67, Fordham 53 SOUTH East Carolina 65, NC Central 28 Florida 87, Troy 62 Georgia 80, Mercer 38 Liberty 60, James Madison 48 Middle Tennessee 70, Austin Peay 56 Prairie View 63, Northwestern St. 31 South Alabama 86, Spring Hill 52 Stetson 65, Lynn 51 Vanderbilt 77, W. Kentucky 67 Wake Forest 80, Florida A&M 60 West Virginia 64, Marshall 48

Football National Football League Today Denver at Oakland, 5:20 p.m. Sunday Chicago at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Washington, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 10 a.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Dallas at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Miami at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 1:25 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 1:25 p.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m. Monday Houston at New England, 5:30 p.m.

Basketball National Basketball Association Today’s Games New York at Miami, 5 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Golden State at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Charlotte at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Utah, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 7 p.m.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

B3

Hawks: Browner to miss four games CONTINUED FROM B1 “I’ve thought all along that we are very fortunate to have Walter with some background that has started for us in the past,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “He’s an excellent athlete. He played very well for us this last week and he’ll step right up into that mode.” News broke after Seattle’s loss at Miami on Nov. 25 that Browner and fellow starting cornerback Richard Sherman were facing suspensions after testing positive for PEDs. A day later, Browner’s agent, Peter Schaffer, said his client had no knowledge of how any banned substance got into his system, but he did not provide specifics on when an appeal might take place. Messages left for Schaffer on Wednesday were not immediately returned. Sherman is going forward with his appeal and he can play while that is under way. “I’m still not commenting about it, but I’m disappointed when we lose anybody by injury or whatever,” Carroll said. “These guys work so hard to be here and all of that, and you come to rely on guys, and when you lose guys, it’s always disappointing. “But really where the focus goes for us is right to the guys who are stepping up.” Browner has 44 tackles, three interceptions and six passes defensed this season.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall (15) is tackled by Seattle Seahawks cornerback Brandon Browner (39) and safety Earl Thomas (29) on Sunday in Chicago. He is in his second season with the Seahawks after getting pulled from the Canadian Football League because he fit the mold of what Carroll wants: big, physical cornerbacks who can play man coverage. He was voted as a Pro Bowl alternate in his first NFL season, and ended up playing in the game. Last season he had 54 tackles and six interceptions, two of which were

returned for touchdowns. Browner is the fourth Seahawks player to be suspended for a PED violation in the past calendar year, joining John Moffitt, Allen Barbre and Winston Guy. “I’ve been disappointed about the whole situation, that it is something that he had to deal with it and we had to deal with it, but there is nothing we can do at this point,” Carroll said. Thurmond has played in

just one game in the past 13 months, that coming last week in Chicago when he took over as Seattle’s defensive back in nickel situations with veteran Marcus Trufant out with a hamstring injury.

Started three games Thurmond played in six games and started three during the 2011 season before suffering a broken

ankle at Cleveland. Thurmond’s injury opened up a chance for Sherman, who has developed into one of the best cover cornerbacks in football. “It felt like I hadn’t missed a step from where I was last year. I’m just trying to make progress and get better,” Thurmond said. “It’s really just being patient, just getting back to my technique and my form

of where I was last year and continuing to get better each week.” With the Seahawks still unsure whether Trufant will be back this week, rookie Jeremy Lane will get the first chance at being the Seahawks’ nickel cornerback. Lane, a sixth-round pick out of Northwestern State in Louisiana, has yet to play a down on defense this year, but he has been a standout on special teams, especially in punt coverage. Behind Lane is secondyear cornerback Byron Maxwell. “We have some concern about it, but I also know we have forced them to compete with our best guys throughout the time and we’re always anticipating with the younger guys that they are going to have to play, so they’re ready to go,” Carroll said. “They are as ready as they can be.” Carroll also announced that wide receiver Sidney Rice has cleared all concussion tests and is expected to play against Arizona. Rice took a shot from Major Wright on the gamewinning touchdown in overtime in Chicago last Sunday. Defensive end Red Bryant played against Chicago despite a foot injury and is expected to be able play versus Arizona. Carroll was also hopeful about linebacker Leroy Hill, who missed the Bears game with an ankle injury and was replaced by Malcolm Smith.

Preps: PA girls rip Bulldogs

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Mets outfielder Jason Bay is close to signing with Seattle.

Jason Bay close to deal with Seattle Mariners THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A person familiar with the deal tells The Associated Press that free agent outfielder Jason Bay has reached a one-year contract with the Seattle Mariners. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday because there was no announcement by the team. The 34-year-old Bay is hoping to resurrect his career with the Mariners after three disappointing and injury-plagued seasons with the New York Mets. Last month, Bay and the

Mets agreed to terminate his contract with one guaranteed year remaining on his $66 million, four-year contract. The agreement let the Mets spread out the $21 million they still owed him. Bay hit .165 with eight home runs and 20 RBIs last season. He was slowed by concussions and rib injuries while with the Mets and played only 288 games in three years with them. Bay is familiar with the Pacific Northwest. He grew up in British Columbia and went to Gonzaga in Spokane.

Horton: Gifts CONTINUED FROM B1 fellow certainly has to contend with a tummy that’s Poo-Pouri products elim- all a rumble.” inate bathroom odors that This email was allapparently can ruin a fami- around terrible, but you ly’s Christmas. can learn more here: “Poo-Pourri wishes one http://poopourri.com. and all a merry holiday On the website there is season that’s free of the a photo of a girl with the odors a house full of good food and people can bring,” quote, “This product saved my life.” the email said. “But if well wishes won’t Just awful. be enough to hide Uncle Take my advice and just Jim’s bathroom presence, buy a candle without “poo” then stock up on Poo-Pour- in its name. ri’s before-you-go bathroom sprays and new candles.” ________ The email goes on to mention that Santa Claus Outdoors columnist Lee Horton would also appreciate the appears here Thursdays and Frigift of Poo-Pouri, because, days. He can be reached at 360“After a night full of milk 452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com. and cookies, that bearded

CONTINUED FROM B1 night. The Riders won 55-30 to Hayden Gunderson improve to 2-0 in league swished the nets with a and 2-1 overall. Hinrichs sank a gamegame-high 23 points for the Riders. Teammate Caleb high 24 points while Walker Trieder added 10 points to added 15. Mariah Frazier also score in double figures. just missed scoring in douThe Riders, still looking ble figures with nine points. “Our top three scorers for their first win after falling to 0-2 in league and 0-3 performed well against Mason’s zone overall, next will host North defense,” Port Angeles coach Kingston on Friday night. The Bulldogs earned Michael Poindexter said their first win and are now about Hinrichs, Walker and Frazier. 1-1, 1-3. “Maddy Hinrichs shot 58 percent from the field and North Mason 55, Port Angeles 48 scored from a variety of spots on the floor,” PoindexPort Angeles 8 14 9 17— 48 North Mason 13 9 14 19— 55 ter said. Individual scoring “Macy Walker shot 50 Port Angeles (48) Gunderson 23, Trader 10, Andrus 3, Calciuch 2, percent from the field, Pauley 1, Elliott 6, Schumacher 3. including three 3-pointers, North Mason (55) Davenport 18, Price 6, McKean 6, Duckworth 3, and Mariah Frazier’s drives Dailey 9, Allen 4, Roland 6, D. Burggraaf 3. inside were effective in getting her to the free throw Kingston 69, line. “As the game progressed, Port Townsend 35 our passing decisions and KINGSTON — The Buc- technique became more and caneers scored a school- more effective, allowing us record 28 points in the sec- to get the ball inside more.” ond quarter to romp past North Mason was led by the Redskins in Olympic Jennifer Hicks with 10 League action Tuesday points. night. Riders are 2-1 overall, The Bucs outscored Port 2-0 in league. Townsend 28-4 in the secThe Riders next play at ond period to lead 47-16 at Kingston on Friday night. halftime. KT Deam scored 25 Port Angeles 55, points, 20 in the first half, North Mason 30 and Hans Schippers North Mason 8 6 4 12— 30 grabbed 11 rebounds for Port Angeles 20 15 15 5— 55 Individual scoring Kingston (1-1, 2-1). North Mason (30) Jacob King led the Red- Hicks 10, Johnson 8, Nelson 5, Miller 3, Q. Satran skins (0-2, 0-2) with 13 3, E. Satran 2. Angeles (55) points while Cody Russell Port Hinrichs 24, Walker 15, Frazier 9, Hofer 2, Jeffers added 10. 2, Millsap 2, Jones 1. Port Townsend next hosts undefeated Olympic Kingston 47, on Friday night.

Port Townsend 45

Kingston 69, Port Townsend 35 Port Townsend 12 4 11 8— 35 Kingston 19 28 12 10— 69 Individual scoring Port Townsend (35) King 13, Russell 10, O’Brien 3, Coppenrath 4, LeMaster 7, Spaltenstein 3, Arthur 2. Kingston (69) Deem 25, Chiquiti 1, Wahl 12, B. Rabideaux 3, C. Rabideaux 7, English 10, Schippers 6, Hamal 4.

Girls Basketball Port Angeles 55, North Mason 30 PORT ANGELES — Maddy Hinrichs and Macy Walker combined for 39 points to spark the Roughriders to the easy Olympic League win over the Bulldogs on Tuesday

KINGSTON — The Redskins dropped an Olympic League heart-breaker on the road Tuesday night. This was a close game the whole way with a 12-all tie after one, a 22-21 lead by the Buccanners at halftime and a 36-33 Kingston lead at the end of three. The Redskins outscored the Bucs 12-9 in the fourth quarter to end up losing by the width of a hair. Codi Hallinan led the Redskins with 11 points while Irina Lyons scored nine and Jewel Johnson had eight. Skyler Bakkan led the Bucs with 18 points while

Savannah Turrieta netted 11. Both teams now are 1-1 in league and overall. The Redskins next play at Olympic on Friday night.

after overcoming a ninepoint deficit by outscoring the Trojans 17-9 in the third period. Caitlin Srossvrahn led Sequim (0-2, 0-3) in scoring with 26 points. A majority Kingston 47, of her points came off seven Port Townsend 45 3-pointers. Kingston 12 10 14 9— 47 The Wolves also got Port Townsend 12 9 12 12— 45 seven points from Alexis Individual scoring Besand. Kingston (47) Bakkan 18, Turrieta 11, Carper 6, Beaulieu 6, Olympic was led by Ashli Smith 2, Clark 6, Kaye 2. Payne’s 25 points. Olivia Port Townsend (45) Hallinan 11, Lyons 9, Johnson 8, Rubio 6, Hos- Williams chipped in nine sack 5, Reeves 4, Meek 2. points. Sequim is now 0-3 on the Crescent 27, season and 0-2 in conference play. The Wolves host Quilcene 24 JOYCE — Tori McGowan Crosspoint Academy of scored 15 points and Bremerton on Friday night. grabbed 19 rebounds to Olympic 57, Sequim 47 lead the Loggers over the 14 12 8 23— 57 Rangers on Tuesday night. Olympic Sequim 6 11 17 13— 47 Crescent came from Individual scoring behind to rally for the win Olympic (57) Payne 25, Williams 9, Hayes 6, Balzaretti 4, after trailing 15-8 at the Romero 3, Timoteo 2, Guevara 2, Pond 2. end of the first quarter and Sequim (47) Stossvrahn 26, Besand 7, Guan 6, Haupt 2, Wall15-11 at halftime. ner 2, Beuke 2. The Loggers held the Rangers scoreless in the second and third periods to Bellevue Chrst. 56, mount the comeback. Chimacum 37 Despite the scoreless CHIMACUM — The quarters, Quilcene was only Cowboys were outscored two points behind going 21-6 in the third quarter, as into the fourth quarter, a 26-21 halftime deficit 17-15. turned into a 47-27 disadMcGowan also had six vantage heading into the steals while Lauren Hart- final period. ley added eight points and Hailee Johnson paced seven boards. Chimacum with 11 points. The Loggers were tough Mallori Cossell added eight on the boards as Catherine points, Lauren Thacker had Youngman brought down seven and Kiersten Snyder 11 rebounds and senior finished with six. Jandi Frantz had 11 The Cowboys next play rebounds, four blocked Charles Wright Academy in shots and three steals. Tacoma. “Jandi Frantz was tremendous on defense, and Bellevue Christian 56, she had a great rebounding Chimacum 37 game for us,” Crescent Bellevue Christian 14 12 21 9— 56 coach Brian Scott said. Chimacum 8 13 6 10— 37 Individual scoring Sammy Rae led the Rangers with 13 points and Bellevue Christian (56) Osborn 22, Vitalone 4, Crosby 11, Hall 2, Berg 2, 10 rebounds while Megan Knight 2, Williams 10, Vandenbrink 3. Weller had four points. Chimacum (37) Quilcene next plays Castillo 2, Thacker 7, Cossell 8, Johnson 11, tonight in Sea-Tac League Snyder 6, Sutherland 1, Nelson 2. action against Puget Sound Chimacum JV girls Adventist. CHIMACUM — Athletic Crescent 27, Quilcene 24 director Gary Coyan has Quilcene 15 0 0 9— 24 announced that Chimacum Crescent 8 3 6 10— 27 will cancel its JV girls games until coaches can Olympic 57, find more girls to particiSequim 47 pate. “We are working hard to SEQUIM — The Wolves’ comeback fell apart in the get girls to come out, but so fourth quarter when they far we are short,” Coyan were outscored by 10 points said.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 6, 2012 PAGE

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Citigroup announces 11,000 jobs to be cut Move by company’s new CEO affects consumer banking unit THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Citigroup said Wednesday that it will cut 11,000 jobs, a bold early move by new CEO Michael Corbat. The cuts amount to about 4 percent of Citi’s workforce of 262,000. The bulk of the cuts, about 6,200, will come from Citi’s consumer banking unit, which handles everyday functions like branches and checking accounts. Citi said it will sell or scale back consumer operations in Pakistan, Paraguay, Romania, Turkey and Uruguay, and focus on 150 cities around the world with “the highest growth potential in consumer banking.” The bank did not say how many jobs it will cut in the United States. About 1,900 job cuts will come from the institutional clients group, which includes the investment bank. The company also will cut jobs in technology and operations by using more automation and moving jobs to “lower-cost locations.” Investors appeared to like the

move. They sent Citi stock up more than 4 percent on a day when most bank stocks were up only slightly. Citi was up $1.48 at $35.77 in midday trading. Job cuts are a Corbat familiar template in a banking industry still under the long shadow of the 2008 financial crisis. Banks are searching for ways to make money as new regulations crimp some of their former revenue streams, like marketing credit cards to college students.

Nervous to borrow Customers are still nervous about borrowing money in an uncertain economy. And they are still filing lawsuits over industry sins, like risky mortgage lending. Citi had to take two taxpayerfunded bailout loans, and became the poster child for banks that had grown too big and disorderly.

After a long stretch of empirebuilding, it has been shrinking for the past several years, shedding units and trying to find a business model that’s more streamlined and efficient. Corbat became CEO in October after Vikram Pandit unexpectedly stepped down. Pandit reportedly had clashed with the board. While the job cuts are among the first major moves by Corbat, they are in line with Pandit’s blueprint. Citi’s roster of 262,000 employees is down from 276,000 at this time in 2009. Bank of America and Morgan Stanley also have shed jobs. In a statement Wednesday, Corbat said his bank remains committed to “our unparalleled global network and footprint.” However, he added: “We have identified areas and products where our scale does not provide for meaningful returns.” He promised that the bank would continue to trim, whether in “technology, real estate or simplifying our operations.” The paring hasn’t always gone as well as Citi has hoped. This fall, for example, when Citi negotiated the sale of its stake in the retail brokerage Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, it got far less than it wanted from the buyer, Morgan Stanley.

Starbucks planning to add 1,500 cafes to U.S. market THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Another Starbucks may soon pop up around the corner, with the world’s biggest coffee company planning to add at least 1,500 cafes in the U.S. over the next five years. The plan, which would boost the number of Starbucks cafes in the country by about 13 percent, was announced at the company’s investor day in New York on Wednesday. The Seattle-based company also said it will eventually serve a new brand of tea in its cafes. Rather than its Tazo tea, Starbucks is turning to Teavana, which it said it would acquire last month. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle-based Starbucks announced Wednesday it will boost its Worldwide, the company said it number of cafes to about 20,000 by 2014.

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1,000 new cafes in the country over the next five years. The upbeat expansion plans mark a turnaround from Starbucks’ struggles during the recession. After hitting a rough patch, the company brought back Schultz as CEO in 2008 and embarked on massive restructuring effort that included closing 10 percent of its U.S. stores. Cliff Burrows, who heads Starbucks’ domestic business, said the problem wasn’t that Starbucks was oversaturated but that the company hadn’t been careful about its store openings.

C R I S I S

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In the years leading up to the downturn, the company was opening well over 1,000 stores a year. That led to cafes in locations where signs or traffic might not be optimal, he said, adding that Starbucks has gotten more sophisticated. Sales at new cafes average about $1 million a year, for example, above the target of $900,000. It costs about $450,000 to build a new cafe. The company’s expansion is intended to “deepen” its presence with additional stores in markets across the country, said Troy Alstead, Starbucks’ chief financial officer.

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Workfit today PORT ANGELES — Peninsula WorkFit will celebrate three years of service with a holiday open house from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. today. The clinic is located at 330 E. First St. Suite 10. Wine and snacks will be served. Peninsula WorkFit is an advanced practice occupational therapy clinic focusing on the treatment of persistent musculoskeletal pain. Interventions include myofascial release combined with muscle energy work, ergonomic consultations and physical capacity evaluations. Services are provided by occupational therapist Nancy J. Johns For more information, phone 360-797-4667. LONGVIEW — The Forest Service has said that a mining company can prospect for gold, copper and other minerals near Mount St. Helens. The agency said Tuesday that drilling planned by Ascot Resources 12 miles north of the volcano would not have a major impact on the environment of Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The drilling still needs approval from the Bureau of Land Management, which could weigh in later this week. Once it has a permit, Ascot could begin drilling at 23 sites as soon as next summer. This allows only exploration; there’s no approval to develop a mine.

Coal comments SPOKANE — Hundreds of people attended a hearing at the Spokane County Fairgrounds to comment on a proposed coal export terminal near Ferndale. Coal trains from Mon-

tana and Wyoming headed for the terminal would pass through Spokane. Supporters see the $600 million project as a boost to the economy. Opponents are concerned about coal dust and damage to the environment. Other public comment meetings on the project will be next Wednesday in Vancouver, Wash., and Dec. 13 in Seattle.

Airport certified EVERETT — The Federal Aviation Administration has released a longanticipated report that gives a green light to commercial passenger flights at Paine Field south of Everett. The report reinforces the agency’s earlier opinions that such flights would not significantly increase noise, traffic or pollution in nearby communities. Before flights could begin, Snohomish County would need to build a small terminal and would need a certificate authorizing commercial flights at the airport. Interested airlines would need to obtain certificates to operate out of Paine Field. The airport has been used primarily for private planes, Boeing service and test flights and military operations.

Gold and silver Gold futures for Februaryr delivery shed $2, or 0.1 percent, to settle at $1,693.80 an ounce on Wednesday. Silver for March delivery added 15 cents or 0.5 percent to end at $32.96 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Amazon is launching Kindle service with kids’ content THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811

Real-time stock quotations at

QUILCENE — The Timberhouse Restaurant has reopened at 295534 U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene. Hours are from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursday,s 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays. A new lounge area has been added to the restaurant, and the establishment is decorated for the holidays. For more information or reservations, phone 360-765-0129.

Drilling permit

Mostly in China will have more than 20,000 cafes by 2014, up from its current count of about 18,000. Much of that growth will come from China, which the company said will surpass Canada as its second-biggest market. Although Starbucks has been intensifying its growth overseas and building its packaged-goods business back at home, the majority of its revenue still comes from its more than 11,100 cafes in the United States. CEO Howard Schultz said the U.S. expansion plans are based “on the current strength of our business” Just a few months ago, the company had predicted it would open just

$ Briefly . . .

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NEW YORK — Amazon is launching a subscription service for children’s games, videos and books aimed at getting more kids to use its Kindle Fire tablet devices. Amazon.com Inc. announced Wednesday that the Kindle FreeTime Unlimited service will be available in the next few weeks as part of an automatic software update. Amazon said subscribers will have access to “thousands” of pieces of content, though the company did not give a specific number. Kids will be able to watch, play and read any of the content available to them as many times as they want. Parents, however, can set time limits. The service, aimed at children aged 3 to 8, will

AMAZON

VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Kindle FreeTime Unlimited service will be available in the next few weeks, Amazon says. cost $4.99 per month for one child and $2.99 per child for members of Amazon Prime, the company’s premium shipping service. Amazon Prime costs $79 a year for free shipping of merchandise purchased in

the company’s online store. Family plans for up to six children will cost $9.99 a month and $6.99 for Prime members. The Kindle already allows for parental controls through its FreeTime service.

Parents can set up profiles for up to six children and add time limits to control how long kids can spend reading, watching videos or using the Kindle altogether. With the content subscription service, kids can browse age-appropriate videos, games and books, and pick what they want to see. They won’t be shown ads and will be prevented from accessing the Web or social media. Kids also won’t be able to make payments within applications. Amazon is launching the service as competition heats up in the tablet market among Apple, Barnes & Noble, Microsoft and Samsung. Amazon’s strategy is to offer the Kindle at a relatively low price and make money selling the content.


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

B5

On free meals, paper checks, benefits IT’S THE HOLIDAYS! I know this to be true because tomorrow is the last day for Medicare’s “open enrollment” for Part D and Advantage plans. So, what’s something a lot us enjoy doing during the holidays? OK, what’s another thing a lot of us enjoy doing during the holidays? Right. Eat. I know what you’re thinking: You’re thinking I’m going to go on a binge about overeating and obesity and all the bad health stuff that comes from all of that and blah, blah, blah . . . Wrong. I’m going to go on a binge about not eating enough. Look: If you can’t afford to buy food (or enough of it), it’s tough to eat. Or if you can’t, for any number of good reasons, shop or cook or whatnot (at least, very well), it’s tough to eat — at least, very well. And if you spend most of your time alone, it can be tough to get excited about eating . . . or shopping . . . or cooking. So sometimes, we just don’t. In 2010, the agency that was providing “senior meals” in Sequim, Olympic Community Action Programs, had to cut back from providing meals five nights per week to three nights per week. Now, think about that. Well, a number of good folks in

the column, and decent people will help you — for free. And as long as I’ve drifted into Sequim got to Mark the realm of Social Security, I thinking about might as well answer some of the Harvey that and miscellaneous questions that have decided that come along because if one asks, 10 they didn’t like want to know: what they ■ OK, since you brought it up, thought about when are Social Security benefits it, so they actually paid? decided to The answer is: It depends on revive the prowhen your birthday is. gram to five If you were born on the first nights per through the 10th day of whatever week, which month, your Social Security they did. money shows up the second So here’s the deal: Wednesday of the month. If you’re a “senior,” and food If your birthday falls on the 11th through the 20th day, look isn’t your strong suit for whatever for the money the third Wednesreason, consider giving this a try. No more paper checks day, and if your birthday is on the No, the money isn’t going away, 21st through the 31st day of the Sequim senior meals but the paper checks are, so by month, you can celebrate with Meals are served at 4:30 p.m. March 1, you’re going to have to money on the fourth Wednesday. Mondays through Fridays at Sun- have made arrangements for a And if you’re receiving benefits crest Village Retirement Apartdirect deposit into a bank or as a spouse, the money appears ments, 251 S. Fifth Ave. in credit union account or get your based on the spouse’s birthdate. Sequim, and the “suggested dona- payment directed into a “Direct Wednesdays are good days. tion” is $5. Express” debit card account. ■ How can I get a copy of my Give them a call the day before Now, the fact is that the vast “Social Security Statement? at 360-683-8491 to let them know majority of us have long since Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/ you’re coming, OK? arranged for direct deposit and statement and have at it. Why? Because they’d like there appear to be living happily ever This is a swell little tool. You to be enough food for you without after, but if you haven’t, heads up can get pretty good estimates for wasting any, which a) makes because come March, you’re going retirement, disability and/or sursense and b) is just simple human to have to do something. vivors’ benefits as well as making courtesy. You can visit www.godirect.org sure your earnings have been If food isn’t an “issue” for you, to get more details, or you can call accurately recorded. any of the numbers at the end of but you qualify as a decent (NOTE: This is just smart

HELP LINE

human being who would just like to help, you could send a taxdeductible donation to TUMCSequim Senior Meals, P.O. Box 878, Sequim, WA 98382. If money isn’t your strong suit, but you’d like to help, phone 360683-8491 and tell them that. Awww, come on. It’s the holidays. Food matters. Now, just a casual little reminder about a little something that has nothing to do with food, but it does have to do with money: Are we remembering that this March 1, paper checks for Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans Affairs, Railroad Retirement, etc., are going away?

Birthday J.C. Penney, then was employed as Sequim resident Margaret a secretary Witt will celebrate her 90th for the state birthday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. of California, Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, retiring after 28 years. 921 E. Hammond St. She During requests no gifts, just sharing World War II, Mrs. Witt the afternoon with friends. she met her Born to Italian immigrant future husparents, she and a younger band, Howard Witt, who was brother were raised in Stockstationed at the Stockton Field ton, Calif. Air Base, at a New Year’s Eve She graduated from St. party. They married four years Mary’s High School and spent a later. year at Humphreys Business Her husband became a barCollege. ber after the war, owning his own shop in Sacramento, Calif., She worked in an office at

Margaret Witt

because if there is a mistake, you have only three years to correct it.) Social Security now sends paper statements only to folks 60 or older and (starting last July) to folks the year they turn 25. I have no idea why they picked 25.

‘Swell little tools’ Well, as long as we’re talking about “swell little tools,” if your retirement and/or Social Security is something you’re even beginning to think about (or wondering if there’s any point in thinking about it at all), try Social Security’s online “Retirement Estimator” at www.socialsecurity.gov/ estimator. You can learn a lot, play with some “what-if’s” and generally get smarter, so give it a shot. ■ How can I get rid of last year’s fruitcake? You can’t. They’re not biodegradable.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

CORNER

for 25 years. The Witts had one son, who became a teacher in Park City, Utah. He died of cancer at age 49. His 31-year-old son and Mrs. Witt have a very special relationship. In 1979, the Witts moved to Sequim in their motor home, living on a lot on the hillside behind the senior center, then returned to their home in Sacramento for the winter months. In 1995, they moved permanently to Sequim. Mr. Witt died five years ago. Mrs. Witt moved to a new condo in Jennie’s Meadow. She has been a longtime

to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

advocate for the physically disabled and mobility-challenged people. She continually seeks new opportunities to educate people about her passion for transportation for the disabled. A member of the senior center since it has been in its present location, she enjoys going to potlucks and is a frequent volunteer for special events. She also enjoys going to casinos and taking an annual trip to Hawaii in January, utilizing the timeshare unit she and her husband bought years ago.

________ Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

LO AND BEHOLD!

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BY STEVEN E. ATWOOD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 58 Rock’s ___ Fighters 59 Seeks, as office 61 Artistic expression on the slopes? 64 Levels 66 Thrust upward 67 Causing Election Day delays? 73 Car category 77 Skin growth 78 Negatives 79 Time ___ 80 Mideast capital 81 Dallas player, for short 82 Jungle critter 84 Chart indicating the progression of darkness after sunset? 87 Disturb 88 Sched. listing 91 Eve preceders 92 Boy: Lat. 93 Power in Hollywood? 98 “Don’t be ___” 99 Caught in ___ 100 Thick skin 101 Prop for Mr. Monopoly or Mr. Peanut 103 Paintball weapons? 107 Voluminous ref. 108 Comes by 112 Salsa specification 113 When there might be a two-for-one special on ice cream drinks?

116 Beat in a price war 117 Props for Mr. Monopoly and Mr. Peanut 118 Make 119 Building support 120 Some printers 121 Curse 122 Mil. awards

22 Like superhighways 24 Actress Lena 30 Counter orders 32 To the same extent 33 SeaWorld attraction 34 Offshore bank, e.g., for tax purposes 35 Normandy campaign city 36 Writer Fleming 37 Writer Wallace DOWN 38 11th-century king 1 Loan figs. of Denmark 2 Nuuanu Pali 39 City on the Little Lookout locale Cuyahoga 3 Grp. that has held 40 Clear, in a way summit meetings 42 Italian port on the in Caracas and Tyrrhenian Sea Riyadh 43 Attic’s purpose 4 Paul Bunyan, e.g. 47 Sport involving 5 Used a FedEx Office paddles service 48 Olive ___ 6 Actress Woodard 49 Grazing area 7 Actress Vardalos 50 “Wise” one 8 Source of northern 51 Patronized, as a exposure? restaurant 9 Belarus neighbor 55 Fr. title 10 Old minelayers 56 Unyielding 11 Critic Clive 57 Lunatics’ outbursts 12 Quarantine 60 Denver-to13 Composer Salieri Albuquerque dir. 14 1957 #1 R&B hit 61 ___ Paulo for Chuck Willis 62 Quaker cereal 15 Or or nor: Abbr. 63 Contents of jewel cases 16 “Let ___ good unto all men”: 65 Ones going through channels? Galatians 6:10 67 Fencing unit? 17 Suffice 68 “Vive ___!” 18 Salinger girl

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104 Legal scholar Guinier 105 Quaintly antique 106 German quaff 109 Actress Lupino and others 110 Undercover agent 111 Bits and pieces, e.g.: Abbr. 114 “That’s it!” 115 Roofing material


B6

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are a growing epidemic in America. Frequently, coworkers are the ones who notice a decline in functioning. Could you please remind your readers to speak up to a family member when they see their co-workers struggling? My 62-year-old husband recently was diagnosed, and I have since learned that his co-workers spotted his troubles long before I did at home. Had I been informed, he could possibly have retired on disability and have Medicare today (which he does not now). Additionally, he would have known to have structured his retirement to include survivorship on his pension, which he did not. I realize his co-workers were in a difficult spot, so I’m not blaming them, but I’m hoping a few words from you might get the word out to others: Friends, when you notice someone is declining, please speak up. Donna in Virginia

by Lynn Johnston

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Hank Ketcham

Abigail Van Buren

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY something else. To learn the 10 early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s, visit alz.org/10signs or phone 800-2723900.

Dear Abby: Twenty years ago, my brother told me his wife had been having an affair. Needless to say, they divorced, and I sided with my brother. A few days ago, I learned that my brother was actually the one who had been having the affair, not my sisterin-law. He and his current wife had a child they claimed was her first husband’s, and when they married, he “adopted” all of her children from her first marriage. Because we lived in different states at the time, it was easy to believe what I was told. Dear Donna: I’m sorry about I think my ex-sister-in-law your husband’s diagnosis. deserves an apology from us all. Although there have been warnAt the same time, I want to conings that it was coming for years, the Alzheimer’s epidemic is here now, and front my brother about the lie. We are millions more families will be touched still not sure if the child, who is now by this progressive — and ultimately an adult, knows my brother is really her biological father. fatal — disease unless its course can Lied to in California be altered. As you have so poignantly stated, Dear Lied To: I don’t think it is there are benefits to the early detecever too late to offer an apology tion of Alzheimer’s, including the where one is needed, so contact your opportunity to take advantage of former sister-in-law and tell her you available treatments, leverage now know the truth, and you are resources in the workplace, plan for sorry. the future and seek help. Because you feel the need to speak According to the Alzheimer’s Association, knowing the warning signs of your mind to your brother, do so. However, whether your niece Alzheimer’s and speaking up when you notice them are critical to early knows your brother is her biological detection and receiving the best posfather is not your business, and you sible care. certainly should not be the person to While this may be an uncomfortenlighten her if she doesn’t know. able conversation, if you notice these That news should come from her signs in anyone — including a colparents. league — it is extremely important to _________ share your concerns with the family Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, or with someone in human resources. known as Jeanne Phillips, and was The person should be evaluated by also founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Leta physician. A doctor will be able to ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box determine whether the symptoms are 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by caused by Alzheimer’s disease or logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Speak up if signs of dementia seen

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Bide your time. Keep a watchful eye over what’s going on around you. A mistake must be caught before someone points the finger at you. Patience, precision and plenty of detail will help you avoid a mishap that is preventable. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Expect to face a domestic challenge. Quick decisions will have to be made if you don’t want things to spin out of control. A residential move, renovation or decorating will be painstaking if too many want to have a say in the outcome. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Watch your back. If you have shared personal information, you may want to request that you aren’t the topic of conversation. Your future will depend on how you handle the changes heading your way now. Be fair but savvy in negotiations. 2 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Check your options and call in people you know you can rely on. A partnership will help make a difference to a project you want to pursue. You will have an influence on peers and can benefit from face-to-face meetings. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Jump in and do what you do best, but don’t overdo or make promises that are unreasonable. Take care of your own business and issues first and foremost, and make suggestions for those looking for hands-on help. Love is magnified. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Push through paperwork that needs to be addressed before the year ends. Make your point heard and your decisions made regarding your financial future and your professional path. Luck is with you and money is headed your way. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Honesty and integrity in your personal and professional life will make the difference to the outcome of a situation that develops. Don’t downplay an event that obviously means something to someone who is important in your life. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get your priorities straight with regard to how you are living and what you are going to do to maintain your status quo next year. Tie up loose ends and cut your losses before you get so far behind you have no maneuverability. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t look for handouts or rely on what someone else tells you. Do your own legwork and make things happen. Now is not the time to be a follower, especially if you want to set the record straight and start anew. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Get involved in a creative project or social event that utilizes your expertise in making a situation warm and cozy. Romance is in the picture. Making plans to spend time with someone special will turn a decent day into one of grandeur. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t back away from change. Embrace whatever comes your way and make it work for you. Partnerships and updating the way you do things and whom you do things with will make a difference that will shape things to come. 4 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Make last-minute changes if it will help you gain momentum and sprint to the finish line. A commitment made will help you finalize a deal that will set you up financially. Love and romance are highlighted, and personal plans should be made. 3 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 B7

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

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3023 Lost

LOST: Dog. White and black male, neutered, h a l f w h i t e h a l f bl a ck fa c e, C l . C o. Fa i r grounds area, P.A. (360)477-5798

ADOPTION: Adoring successful magazine journalist, loving family awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid. Alison 1-888-843-8969 Girlfriend wanted 20s50s. I am loner type, handsome man in Western Washington with no kids. Hear recorded message, toll free (888)339-0897

3020 Found FOUND: Cat. Male, Miller Rd. and Bell Hill, Sequim. Call to describe (360)681-6648

FREE: 7 year old female cat, indoor/outdoor, all va c c i n e s u p t o d a t e, spayed, white with tortoise shell coloring, comes from a very loving home. She will come with her covered litter box, toys, and her great personality. Must go to good home! 460-8517. M E LY N DA ’ S O r i g i nals: For all your sewing needs. Alterations, Repairs, Custom Designs, and Reconstruction of clothing. Call (360)797-1399. Reasonable pr ices with pick up and delivery available.

4026 Employment General

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE The Peninsula Daily News is expanding it’s sales force. Opening for a well organized, creative professional with the ability to develop strong customer relationships. Manage an existing account base as well as developing new clients to meet ever changing marketing needs. Solid presentation skills a m u s t . C o m p e t i t i ve compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. Submit cover letter and resume to:

COME JOIN THE WAVE TEAM! Wave Broadband is now seeking an Account Steve Perry Representative in JefferAdvertising Director son County to expand Peninsula Daily News our business solutions PO Box 1330 services! Prior sales exPort Angeles, WA per ience encouraged. 98362 For a full job description, steve.perry@ visit www.wavebroad peninsuladaily band.com/careers news.com Competitive salary and benefits including service discount! To apply, send resume and cover AIDES/RNA OR CNA letter to hrmgr@ Best wages, bonuses. wavebroadband.com Wright’s. 457-9236. COOK: Creative, enthuANGELES CLINIC siastic and dependable FOR ANIMALS individual, 32-40 hrs. wk., exp. preferred. Ap- H a s t w o p o s i t i o n s ply at Fifth Avenue Reit- available: Receptionist rement Center, 500 W. and Recover y Nurse/ Hendr ickson, Sequim. Kennel Attendant. SubWage DOE, full benefits. mit application and resume in person at 160 Del Guzzi Dr., P.A. No phone calls please.

OUR SALES STAFF IS GROWING HEADING INTO THE HOLIDAYS!

Send resume to:

2C710906

Our new location has increased volume dramatically and we are setting new sales records each and every month. We are looking for three well rounded sales professionals that know the meaning of working smarter not harder. Honesty, integrity, good communication skills and a great work ethic required! Six figure earning potwential, weekly bonuses, 401K, medical, paid vacation, 5 day work week, a great work environment, and a complete training program. Perfect for the professional looking for a career change.

NewCareer@PriceFord.com

TRAILER HITCH: Load equalizing, Reese, HD. $350. (360)809-0536. WANTED: Rent to own home or land. (360)457-9138 WANT TO RUN A BEAUTY SALON? Successful Port Angeles salon seeks wor king/ partner/manager. Compensation is no chair lease and major ity of lead chair, net profit, including leased chairs’ income. Candidates must have existing clientele, proper licenses, strong skills and a desire to succeed. Computer skills a plus. Respond with background by email to howham@ olypen.com or snail mail to The Hamlin Group, PO Box 2101, 98362 for a n i n t e r v i ew. D o n o t miss this outstanding opportunity.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

LOST: Cat. Overweight, brown, with stub tail, Mockingbird Lane area of Sequim. 504-2363.

ADOPT ~ A loving family longs to provide everything for 1st baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-8315931. Matt & Serafina

CHRISTMAS Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 111 Dr yke Rd. #17. Rope lights, icicle lights, vill a g e bu i l d i n g s, o r n a ments, rope light train, battery operated Santas and much more.

HELP DESK TECHNICIAN Diagnose and resolve technical hardware & software issues, on request. Req. working knowledge of Windows 7, Windows Ser ver 2008, MS-Office Suite. 20 hrs. wk., $15 hr. to start; partial benes. Resume & cvr ltr to Peninsula Behavioral Health, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. http:// peninsulabehavioral.org AA/EOE

APPLY NOW! CNAs and NARs Come join our growing community, 1 day and 1 evening shift available. A positive attitude and team spirit a must! 408 W. Washington Sequim. (360)683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com CAREGIVER jobs available now. Benefits included. Flexible hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Dr ivers License and proof of insurance. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. No calls.

CLALLAM COUNTY DISTRICT II COURT JUDGE (Part-time) Clallam County District II C o u r t ( Fo r k s , WA ) , $7085.50 month. Par ttime (24 hrs. week). Medical, dental, vision and retirement eligible. Performs statutor y responsibilities of a District Cour t Judge. The successful candidate must provide documentation that demonstrates they are a registered voter of the District II court district and electoral district as of the date of appointment. Completed application must be received in Human Resources no later than 4:30 PM on Dec. 7, 2012. Job announcement and required application materials available online at www.clallam.net/employment/, in front of Human Resources, 223 E 4th St, Por t Angeles, WA 98362, or by calling Clallam County Jobs Line 360-417-2528. Resume in lieu of application not a c c e p t e d . Fa xe d o r emailed applications not accepted. EOE/Dr ug Free Workplace.

RESPIRATORY THERAPIST Excellent opportunity to work 30 hours w e e k . M u s t h ave a WA license with two years experience in all aspects of respiratory care; your ability to work independently is i m p o r t a n t . E n j oy a great wor k environment, excellent pay and benefits, with breathtaking views from every window of the hospital. EOE. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org Substitute Carrier for Motor Route Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Substitute Motor Rout in Port Angeles. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insura n c e. E a r l y m o r n i n g delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. No calls.

Construction and logging co. seeking following positions: Grapple Cat Operator, Feller Buncher, Shovel Operator, Qualified Log Truck Drivers, Shop Mechanic, and Personal Safety Manger position. Benefits DOE. 4080 Employment Send resume to: PO Box Wanted 392, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Positions star t ALL around handyman, Jan. 1st, 2013. most anything A to Z. (360)775-8234 DAYS INN Is hiring for Night Audi- HANDYMAN: Most anytor, Maintenance, Front t h i n g w i t h i n t h e ya r d Desk Clerk, experience work, handyman range preferred. Apply in per- $10-$20Hr. 683-6069. son at 1510 E. Front, P.A. No phone calls. HOUSECLEANING Experienced, reasonable DRIVER: Class B CDL rates, excellent referencor valid drivers license, es. Call Shelly drywall delivery, heavy (360)670-3550 lifting, good pay. (360)452-4161 Experienced CFO/CPA Par t-time to full-time. Possible benefits depending on hours. Wage: DOQ. Maintain all financial and managerial accounting systems and records. Adheres to A-131 audit guidelines fo r a u d i t p r e p a r a t i o n consistent with GASB34. Bachelors degree from accredited college or university in accounting, f i n a n c e o r bu s i n e s s C PA d e s i g n a t i o n r e quired QuickBooks experience required. This position is Indian preference in hiring in accordance with P.L. 93-638. Open November 28, 2012 until filled. Send application and resume to the address below. Pick up application and job description at Lower Elwha Housing Authority 22 Kwitsen Drive, Port Angeles, WA 98363 or at elwha.org

WANT TO RUN A BEAUTY SALON? Successful Port Angeles salon seeks wor king/ partner/manager. Compensation is no chair LIVE-IN Care Giver: For lease and major ity of older gentleman. Call lead chair, net profit, in- 457-3124 or 808-3123. cluding leased chairs’ income. Candidates must WHY PAY have existing clientele, proper licenses, strong SHIPPING ON skills and a desire to INTERNET succeed. Computer skills a plus. Respond PURCHASES? with background by email to howham@ olypen.com or snail mail SHOP LOCAL to The Hamlin Group, PO Box 2101, 98362 for a n i n t e r v i ew. D o n o t peninsula miss this outstanding opdailynews.com portunity.

IN HOME Caregiver available. Please call 360-565-6271 if you or your loved one need help in your home. JUAREZ & SON’S HANDY M A N S E R V I C E S . Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248. M E LY N DA ’ S O r i g i nals: For all your sewing needs. Alterations, Repairs, Custom Designs, and Reconstruction of clothing. Call (360)797-1399. Reasonable pr ices with pick up and delivery available. RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE Call 681-4429

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

BOOKS make great Christmas gifts! IN TIME is written by local author Lila L. Pinord. It’s about a young lad called Cowboy since he does not know his name or where he comes from since he began his “time travels” as a toddler. His mother Ellie also begins to pass through the “misty curtain of time” as she searches for her missing son. Along the way she BALDWIN CONSOLE meets other travelers PIANO: Beautiful cher- who all have tales to tell. ry finish with matching This novel mixes truth storage bench. One with fiction. For instance, owner. Very good con- Cape Alava plays a big dition. Well maintained part in Cowboy’s story, under smoke-free and as well as Queets and pet-free environment. N e a h B a y a r e m e n $1,350. tioned. He meets Lewis (360) 582-3045 and Clark at Fort Clatsop and Chief Coboway. HANDYMAN: Most any- This book will fascinate t h i n g w i t h i n t h e ya r d r e a d e r s o f a l l a g e s . work, handyman range $19.95. (360)452-4339. $10-$20Hr. 683-6069.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Mountain view home on 1.13 acre in great area. Easy care acre with RV par king and dump. T h r e e o u t bu i l d i n g i n clude studio, shop and storage. New roof on home and carport. Lots of privacy and wildlife n e a r by. B e t w e e n S e quim and Port Angeles for shopping and services. $139,000 MLS#264358 Clarice Arakawa (360)457-0456 EXQUISITE HOME WINDERMERE Quality craftsmanship PORT ANGELES abounds in this exquisite MOVE IN READY! home located in an ultra private desirable location On a quiet cul-de-sac, in the city residing on and in excellent condijust shy of 2 acres. Main tion, this 3 Br, 2 bath, home is 4 Br, 3 full & 2 2 0 0 4 m a n u f a c t u r e d half baths, 3,527 sf with home even has a partial no detail spared, includ- m o u n t a i n v i e w. N e w ing hand crafted trim. paint & new carpet. Grand entry, with 2 stair- $125,000 MLS#263784. KATHY LOVE cases leading upstairs, 2 452-3333 propane fireplaces, high PORT ANGELES end appliances, granite REALTY c o u n t e r t o p s, c u s t o m mahogany cabinetry, & New Price heated tiled flooring. Attached garage & shop Seller is motivated and ready to look at offers! and detached shop, garage, apartment and loft. This house has tons of character ; hardwood Park-like grounds. $649,000. MLS#263182. floors, built-ins, crown molding plus it has a Brooke Nelson wood stove, sits on an 417-2812 over sized lot and has a COLDWELL BANKER fully fenced backyard. UPTOWN REALTY $135,375. ML#263973. Kimi GREAT PRICE (360)461-9788 Great price for this 17+ JACE The Real Estate acre parcel. Community Company well serves four parcels. Power & phone to propOPEN PASTORAL erty. Septic system reFIELDS quired. Plenty of recreat i o n a l o p p o r t u n i t i e s , This 1,620 sf home has Lake Sutherland, Elwha attached garage & shop River, Olympic Adven- o n b e a u t i f u l p a s t o ra l ture route hiking & biking m o u n t a i n v i ew, l eve l trail. New manufactured acres in a very desirable home allowed, minimum location with easy com1,300 sf. Possible owner muting to all amenities. The main area has great financing. room, kitchen, bath, $89,900 utility room & Br. There MLS#264571/264571 is a loft with extra bath. Holly Coburn Fully finished detached (360)457-0456 garage w/heating. Plenty WINDERMERE of ground to build anPORT ANGELES other home. $209,950. OLS#264572. PLACE YOUR JEAN AD ONLINE 683-4844 With our new Windermere Classified Wizard Real Estate you can see your Sequim East ad before it prints! www.peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com dailynews.com

COMMERCIAL IN SEQUIM C h e c k o u t t h i s t i d y, 1,310 sf home (previously used as a professional o f f i c e ) i n a bu s i n e s s zone downtowm. Paved parking area on the street and alley access. Updated with new windows, flooring, paint, etc. $149,900 MLS#264528. Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660

Price Improvement Newly priced at $119,900, this cute house was built by LBR Construction. 3 bedrooms ideal for starting out or scaling down. 1 car garage for all your extra stuff. Fenced back yard keeps your pets in and others out. Soon to be repainted exterior. $119,000. MLS#264191. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PRICE REDUCED Quality built home with lots of upgrades and extras galore. New flooring throughout . Large wat e r v i ew k i t c h e n w i t h open dining room. French doors that lead to fenced yard and rose g a r d e n . RV a n d b o a t parking. Even a claw foot tub! $259,500. MLS#263714. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

REDUCED AGAIN! Now only $169,900 Make an offer! Beautiful unobstructed harbor view. 4 Br, 2 bath. Family MUST sell. $169,000. MLS#264040. Amy Powell 417-9871 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SALTWATER VIEWS Beautiful saltwater views from this updated home on 1 acre. 2 Br., 1 bath, 1120 sf with large sunroom and updated floors, new car pets, cabinets, interior doors, and fixtures. Nice fireplace and new paint inside and out. Septic system will be replaced b y c l o s e o f e s c r o w. Don’t miss this one! $159,000. ML#263136. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-808-1712

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

B8 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

DOWN 1 Grain holder 2 Jai __ 3 Mass robes

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. SHOWER CURTAINS Solution: 5 letters

A S L A I R E T A M D U C K S By C.C. Burnikel

4 Raspy-voiced “Like a Rock” singer 5 Where the anther is 6 Dallas-toHouston dir. 7 Wedding dances 8 HI hi 9 Highest peak in the Calif. Cascades 10 “Sprechen __ Deutsch?” 11 Single-andlooking group 12 Do a makeup job? 13 Stoop 18 “Unfaithful” costar 22 One that stands to prevent a strike 24 More strange 25 Soft-spoken painter Bob 26 Liberal subject? 27 1939 Garland costar 28 Defroster alternative 32 “Who am __ say?” 33 Moral principle

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

408 For Sale Commercial

SEQUIM: Immaculate 1 owner, 1,875 Sf home. 2006 Ranch home with huge open floor plan. 3 Br with walk-in closet, Septic built for 2 ded bedrooms+office/den. HOA inc all septic and water. 2 bath, 2 car garage. Tile entr y/wood floors in great room & kitchen, top of the line appliances incl washer, dryer, granite countertops, custom blinds in all rooms, vaulted ceiling, laundr y room, central heat & air. Price $210,000. Call 360-683-3431

MOTIVATED SELLER Beautiful 3,300 sf 3 Br, 2.5 bath home on 2.76 acres with great mountain views . Features include a large kitchen with granite counters, plenty of cabinets & pull o u t s . Fo r m a l d i n i n g room, living room with vaulted wood ceiling & exposed beams, master suite, private deck, and attached 3 car garage. Plus a detached 2,400 sf RV garage/shop, established garden & fruit trees. $450,000 PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE 683-4116

SHORT SALE APPROVED Renovated 3 Br, 2 bath, neutral colors, good condition. Now Only $146,000. Don’t miss out, see today. $146,000. MLS#264226. Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SUNNY SUNLAND CONDO 3 Br, 3 bath, just under 1 , 8 0 0 s f, s k y l i g h t s & large windows private patio, strait view from living/deck, oversized attached 2 car garage. $199,500 ML#264553/424759 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Unique property nestled in Blyn, bordering Chicken Coop Creek. Private setting. 2+ acres. Detached 3 car garage/shop. Spacious home. Old gold prospect o r ’s c a b i n - - c o u l d b e gr e a t a r t i s t s t u d i o o r reading retreat. Small h o r s e s h e d . F u l l RV hook up with permanent septic dump, water & RV 110V service. $199,000 ML#263797/378847 Patty Brueckner (360)460-6152 TOWN & COUNTRY

505 Rental Houses Clallam County C E N T R A L P. A . : N i c e 2,400 sf, 2 Br., 2 ba, 1 level, no pets/smoking. Avail Dec. 1. $1,150 mo. (360)452-7743

COZY Country Comfort. 2 Bedroom, 1 3/4 bath, attached carpor t, storage shed. On 1.25 acres between Seq and PA. New carpet,freshly painted. Well insulated with heat pump furnace. $900 a month, 1st, last $500 deposit required. N / S N o Pe t s , F I R M . Credit repor t excellent references required. (360)460-4830 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

N C T I E Y R O V I S N L I A

H S I S O A I F R B P O L L ‫ګ‬ L F ‫ګ‬ U K ‫ګ‬ P T ‫ګ‬ I R C Y N E B S R I

© 2012 Universal Uclick

T N I L R A S A A I L I D L E

O B O F P I C S C B G E E L T

D C U I A N E T E E R P R A Y

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A L W T T N O N E C E I O T E

K O A S T P C L D R C L C S M

L T T H E E O Y Y L I A E N O

O H E E R S R A B N Y A D I H

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12/6

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Absorb, Accessories, Antibacterial, Bars, Beige, Blue, Butterfly, Care, Change, Circles, Clear, Cloth, Colorful, Decor, Ducks, Ecofriendly, Ecoprene, Fabric, Fancy, Fish, Fits, Home, Install, Ivory, Lines, Materials, Nylon, Options, Patterns, Plain, Polka Dots, Prints, Pull, Reds, Repel, Replace, Sale, Satin, Variety, Velcro, Vinyl, Wash, Water, Yellow Yesterday’s Answer: Thumbtacks THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ADDEZ ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ROYIV (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Con 36 Summer intern, often 38 Plural medical suffix 39 Stock holders? 40 John Wayne classic 45 Campanella of Cooperstown 47 North of Paris 48 Mascara mishaps 49 Sank, in a way

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

605 Apartments Clallam County

12/6/12

50 High class 51 Cary of “The Princess Bride” 52 Blond comic strip teenager 56 Secretary of Education Duncan 57 Get whipped 58 Fancy pitcher 60 Org. with Eagles 61 Hardly shows of support 6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, water P.A.: Lg. Studio, $485. FIREWOOD: $179 delivv i e w, d e c k , c o v e r e d 1st, last, $350 deposit. ered Sequim-P.A. True (360)452-4409 parking, lg. storage cord. 3 cord special for room. 315 Wolcott. $499. Credit card acProperties by $750. (360)670-6160. cepted. 360-582-7910. Landmark. portangeleswww.portangeles landmark.com P.A.: Big 2 Br., 2 ba, refirewood.com modeled mfg. home with SEQUIM: 2 Br. in quiet covered parking/storage 8-plex, excellent loca- FIREWOOD: Seasoned, on acreage. See at 1544 $170 a cord. tion. $700. W. Hwy. 101. $850 mo. (360)461-9701 (360)460-2113 (360)457-6161 FIREWOOD: Seasoned P.A. East side, 1+ BR 6005 Antiques & fir, ready to burn, $200 m o b i l e , fe n c e d ya r d , Collectibles full cord, $110 1/2 cord. Pets OK, $650+400 dep. Also have maple, $175+. 2034 E. 5th AVE. CHRISTMAS VILLAGE Free local delivery. (360)461-1497 Dickens Village, 27 360-461-6843 buildings, 17 accessoSEQUIM: 55+ quiet se- ries, all in original boxes. WO O D S TOV E : E a r l y, cluded living. $800-$900 $2,000. (360)452-6580. large, Earth, this is the mo. Good rent for good real deal with beautiful tenants. Action Property orange, yellow ceramic Mgmt. (360)681-4737. 6040 Electronics medallion on door, thermostat, new gasket on SEQUIM: In town, great door, works fine. $300. location, 3 Br., 2 ba, T. V. : 4 7 ” V i z i o , f l a t (360)460-6300 1,600 sf, fenced back- screen, E-series. $300. (360)452-9347 yard, storage shed, new 6065 Food & paint/flooring. 1st, last, Farmer’s Market security. $950 mo., wa6042 Exercise ter/sewer included. Equipment (626)232-0795 ORGANIC BEEF: Hereford. $2.20 lb. hanging WANTED: Clean, updat- B O W F L E X S P O R T weight. 683-8352. ed, 1-2 Br. home or apt. HOME GYM. Full body by Dec. 15. for stable work out. Power rods, PORK: Free-range, hapsingle senior female, re- sliding bench, rowing, py, vegetarian, $3.00 per s p o n s i b l e , r e l i a b l e , u p p e r t ow e r, l e g l i f t , lb, half or whole. clean, neat. Must allow 2 c h e s t b a r , c a b l e s (360)732-4071 small, obedient service hand/wr ist/ankle gr ip. dogs, and must be quiet S e e p h o t o s o n l i n e . 6075 Heavy location. Excellent refer- $300.00 cash only. (360)775-7886. Equipment ences. Willing to consider house-shares. $600- E X E R C I S E E Q U I P $800 mo. (360)600-0242 MENT! Bowflex Xtreme, BULL DOZER: “Classic” Ver y under used, paid John Deere, model 40-C with blade, winch and WEST SIDE P.A.: 3 $ 2 , 2 0 0 , a s k i n g c a n o py. R e d u c e d t o Br., 1 bath, recently $1,200/obo. Magnetic $3,600. (360)302-5027. painted inside and out, s t a t i o n a r y b i ke, p a i d newer car peting. No $120, asking $60/obo. DUMPTRUCK: ‘68 Interpets, No smoking firm. W o u l d m a k e g r e a t national, does run, scrap Single car attached Christmas presents! out or parts. $1,500. (360)452-4606 garage. Available after (360)797-4418 the first of the year. Drive by at 1835 W. 6045 Farm Fencing MINI-EXCAVATOR: ‘05 16th Street, do not disKubota 121. 1,900 hrs., & Equipment turb current renters! 4 buckets. $22,000. $650 per mo., 1st, last, COMPACT Tractor. Ise(360)460-8514 $700 deposit. Email ki TS 1700, 17 HP, 2 SEMI END-DUMP 1835W16th@ Cyl, diesel, front loader, gmail.com tiller, 3 point hitch, 3 TRAILER: 32’. Electric PTO Gears, 6 forward tarp system, high lift tailgate, excellent condition. 605 Apartments a n d 2 r e v e r s e . $15,000. (360)417-0153. $4,200/obo. Clallam County (360)437-0836.

6080 Home

A PA RT M E N T: 2 b e d - TRACTOR: ‘49 FerguFurnishings room 2 BR. 1 Bath/Laun- son TO20. $1,900/obo. dry. $750/mo. Utilities in- P.J. (360)928-0250. BEDROOM SET: (2) Excluded. (360)477-6165. twin beds, foot6050 Firearms & tra-long board, headboard, rails, CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, Ammunition boxspring and mattressquiet, 2 Br., excellent es. Like new. (2) kneer e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . MUZZLE LOADER: In- hole nightstands. Can $700. (360)452-3540. line black powder MK come with sheets. $400. C E N T R A L P. A . : C o n - 85, 54 caliber, all acces(360)417-5201 venient Unfur n. Apts. sories. $450. (360)460-5765 CARPETS: Matching, 1BR $477 to $493 + Pe r s i a n , h a n d wove n fixed util. Storage Rooms. No smoke/pet RU G E R : . 4 5 Va q u e r o w o o l , 5 ’ x 5 ’ , r u n n e r r evo l ve r, s t a i n l e s s, 3 9’9”x2.5’, beautiful pasmaybe. (360)504-2668. boxes ammo, belt and tels with cream backholster. $500/obo. P.A. 1 Br. dplex. $575 ground. $375. (360)912-2801 P.A. 2 Br. 1 ba apt. $650 (360)457-4399 leave message P.A. 3 Br. 1 ba apt. $650 MATTRESS SET (360)460-4089 #1 Online Job Site Queen Ser ta Supreme mchughrents.com on the Olympic plush mattress, low box Peninsula P.A.: Central, newer 2 s p r i n g , u s e d 6 m o. , www.peninsula Br., DW, W/D, no pets/ clean, you haul. $500 dailynews.com smoke. $600. 796-3560. cash. (360)683-5626.

ORPCEP

MUSOFA Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer A here: Yesterday’s

6080 Home Furnishings

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: EAGLE CRAMP STEREO POISON Answer: The rock climber saw these when he went to buy new climbing equipment — STEEP PRICES

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MISC: Twin bed matt r e s s s e t , $ 1 0 0 / o b o. Roper upright freezer, $200/obo. Both in good condition. (360)385-0834

MISC: Chest freezer, $50. 8’ couch, $400. 8’ oak table, with leaf, (6) chairs, $450. Full-size bed, with mattresses, $350. Propane tank, $ 1 0 0 . D r a f t i n g t a bl e, NICE! 3 piece, dark oak $200. OBO on ever yenter tainment center, thing! (360)452-5412. $325. (360)460-2881. GENERATOR S TA C K E D WA S H TRANSFER SWITCH ER/DRYER: Heavy duty, GenTran model 30310, yellow. $535. Call manuel, 30 amp, U.S.A. (360)452-3643 made, wired complete, with 60’ 30 amp connect 6100 Misc. cable. $285. Merchandise (360)821-9318 C A S H fo r o l d s t u f f, c l o ck s , t oy s , s i l ve r coins, cameras, and more. (360)461-3297

MOVING: Household goods and cut firewood. Must sell. (360)681-5095

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6100 Misc. Merchandise

SEWING MACHINE Bernina Serger sewing machine 2000DE, excellent condition, very little use, comes with instruction books and all accessories. $300/obo. (360)681-4244

MOBILITY SCOOTER Pace Saver, chair, like new. $800. (360)928-1231

RETIRING: Beauty shop equip, furniture, 75% off retail. (360)417-9022 or (360)457-7356.

GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT! W h i t e g o l d d i a m o n d TRAILER HITCH: Load bracelet (tennis). equalizing, Reese, HD. $850/obo $350. (360)809-0536. Deb (360)683-8913 CHRISTMAS TREE Pre-lit, 7.5’ Christmas tree with 1500 lights. $95. Call (360)681-6848. TOTES: 275 gal. plastic caged totes, used. $75. (360)565-2045

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Because B ecause you can never have too much! have

Need Cash?

HAVE A GARAGE SALE! up to 15 lines of text for only

$20.95 includes a

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT! CALL TODAY 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

Where buyers and sellers meet!

61246814

HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba ..............$500 A 1 br 1 ba .............$500 A 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$600 A 2 br 1 ba ..............$650 H 3 br 1 ba...... .........$875 H 3 br 1 ba shop ....$1000 H 4 br 3 ba......... ....$1350 308 For Sale HOUSES IN SEQUIM Lots & Acreage H 2 br 1.5 ba...........$950 H 3 br 1 ba .............$1000 PALO ALTO: 2.5 Wood- H 3+ br 2.5 ba......$1350 ed acres, potential water 360-417-2810 view, power and phone More Properties at in, good well area. www.jarentals.com $50,000 cash for quick sale. Ask for Jerry: P.A.: 2222 E. 3rd Ave., (360)460-2960 cute, clean 1.5 Br. loft, full bath, laundry hookups, no smoking, pets 311 For Sale $645 mo., Manufactured Homes negotiable. deposit. Contact Bob at 452-5319 or 461-3420 EAST P.A.: 2 Br., mobile home in family park. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, near $1,500. 452-7582. college. $695, 1st, last dep. (360)461-1500. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. WANTED: Rent to own 360-452-8435 home or land. 1-800-826-7714 (360)457-9138

12/6/12

E N E R P O C E C O R C L E V

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Sundsvall rollers 6 Trickeries 11 Pops 14 Portion out 15 Knighted conductor 16 Took in 17 Typically pinkflowered bloomer 19 Paris pronoun 20 Title words preceding “beneath the milky twilight,” in a 1999 hit 21 “So relaxing!” 22 Worrisome engine sound 23 Gateway Arch architect 26 Set straight 29 Hit, maybe 30 Breeders’ Cup event 31 Loses on purpose 34 Light touch 37 Key Egyptian artifact unearthed in 1799 41 Coll. applicants 42 Big name in beer 43 Mindless process 44 Manitoba tribe 46 Blood sugar regulator 49 Postwar reception 53 Neutrogena rival 54 Like “ifs” and “buts”: Abbr. 55 Throw a feast for 59 Back talk 60 Tools of the mischievous god hidden in 17-, 23-, 37- and 49-Across 62 Cézanne’s summer 63 Pad user 64 Light wash 65 Le counterpart, in Leipzig 66 Like-minded gps. 67 Guide

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 6100 Misc. Merchandise

6105 Musical Instruments

6115 Sporting Goods

BOOKS make great Christmas gifts! IN TIME is written by local author Lila L. Pinord. It’s about a young lad called Cowboy since he does not know his name or where he comes from since he began his “time travels” as a toddler. His mother Ellie also begins to pass BALDWIN CONSOLE through the “misty cur- PIANO: Beautiful chert a i n o f t i m e ” a s s h e ry finish with matching searches for her missing storage bench. One son. Along the way she owner. Very good conmeets other travelers dition. Well maintained who all have tales to tell. under smoke-free and This novel mixes truth pet-free environment. with fiction. For instance, $1,350. (360) 582-3045 Cape Alava plays a big part in Cowboy’s story, as well as Queets and Neah Bay are men6115 Sporting tioned. He meets Lewis Goods and Clark at Fort Clatsop and Chief Coboway. This book will fascinate BICYCLE: Specialized r e a d e r s o f a l l a g e s . hybrid, like new condi$19.95. (360)452-4339. tion, cyclocomputer. $375/obo (360)452-1246

6105 Musical Instruments

GUITAR: Behringer beginners electric guitar, 6 string, gently used. $60. (360)912-2655

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call 360-477-9659

TRACTOR

2ND SATURDAY POOL TABLE: 8.5’, all BOOK SALE accessor ies included, Nov. 10, 10-3 p.m., Selike new. $250/obo. quim Librar y. Specials (360)385-0993 this month: Christmas POOL TABLE: ESTN, 4’ books and CDs. x 8’, slate, all accessories included, new, in ex- CHRISTMAS Sale: Fri.c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n . Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 111 Dr yke Rd. #17. Rope $500/obo. lights, icicle lights, vil(360)681-4224 l a g e bu i l d i n g s, o r n a T R E A D M I L L : S e a r s ments, rope light train, Profor m Cross Walker battery operated Santas XP850, folds for storage. and much more. $500. (360)452-6447. STORAGE AUCTION Sat., Dec. 8, 11 a.m. All 6140 Wanted Safe Mini Storage, 485 W. Spruce St., Sequim. & Trades Unit 0070. Cash only. (360)683-6646 BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789. 7025 Farm Animals

6135 Yard & Garden WO O D C H I P P E R : D r Rapid-Feed wood chipp e r. 3 p t H i t c h / P TO. Powered by your tractor’s engine. Handles l i m b s t o 4 - 1 / 2 ” t h i ck . Most material will selffeed. Great condition. $1,200. You haul. 360-457-2195.

7035 General Pets ADORABLE KITTENS All colors and sizes. $85. PFOA (360)452-0414. safehavenpfoa.org

AKC Golden Retriever Pup: 1 big male pup, gentle and kind, run to you when called, love kitties, smar t, great nose, love family, play and sleep outside under & Livestock your chair, sleep in p.m., love our kitchen, and BU L L : 4 y r. o l d , h a l f well raised babes. $550. (360)681-3390 Limousin, half white face. $3,000. POODLES: Various ag(360)683-2304. es, colors, toy F R E E : C a t , ex c e l l e n t miniature sizes. Rehome mouser, neutered, shots. fe e s t a r t a t $ 1 5 0 fo r m a l e s a n d u p fo r fe (360)681-4129 males on pet limited regPEACOCKS: Pied and istration only. Full regisBlue Indies, 6 at $35 tration available on a each. Cheer Pheasants, limited basis. $75 trio. (360)477-9590. 360-452-2579

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

457-6582 808-0439

23595179

23597507

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Call (360) 683-8332

22588179

Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

ACCOUNTING SERVICES Lena Washke Accounting Services, Inc.

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

23597511

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY ADVERTISE DAILY FOR AS LITTLE AS $100.08 FOR 4 WEEKS!

Northwest Electronics

360-683-4881 ROOFING

WANTED: Wind Damaged

& Leaky Roofs Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable

ARLAND GROOFING

457-5186

75289698

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

TV Repair

LCD • Plasma • Projection • CRT 29667464

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

• Small Excavating JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER • Utility Install & contact@jkdirtworks.com Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm LIC #JKDIRKD942NG Clean-up

TV REPAIR

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

26631940

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

360/460•9824

Specializing In Ornamental Tr e e s & S h r u b s

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

tmccurdy@olypen.com

Full 6 Month Warranty

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

1-888-854-4640

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

Master Arborist

24614371

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

DIRT WORK

BAGPIPER

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

PRUNING

2B5075404

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

26636738

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

360-452-2054

(360) 582-9382

Call for details or check us out on Facebook.

2A691397

1C562759

Reg#FINIST*932D0

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

(360) 460-3319

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business. 24608159

22588145

Free Estimates Senior Discounts 20% Discount on Interior Painting

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

22588172

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

COLUMC*955KD

LAWN CARE

Contr#KENNER1951P8

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

Contractor # GEORGED098NR Mfd. Installer Certified: #M100DICK1ge991KA

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

APPLIANCES

AA

• Raods/Driveways • Grading • Utilities • Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling • Snow Removal

Quality Work

23590152

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Excavation and General Contracting • All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes • Land Clearing and Grubbing • Septic Systems • Rock Walls & Rockeries

116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

Larry Muckley

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

Port Angeles Sequim Port Townsend

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

23590413

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

(360) (360)

24601258

Pressure Washing

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

No Job Too Small

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Columbus Construction

LARRYHM016J8

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

www.peninsula dailynews.com

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Painting & Pressure Washing

PAINTING

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Larry’s Home Maintenance

HOME REPAIR

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

Sell your Treasures!

FOX PAINTING

461-4609

360-460-6176

NEED EXTRA CASH!

Window Washing

360 Lic#buenavs90818

Done Right Home Repair

FREE: Cat. Affectionate 10 mo. old, female, gray tabby, not fixed, can’t keep. Call April: (360)417-3906

WINNEBAGO ‘95 Adventurer 34’, 45,500 m. Gas 460 Ford, Banks ex h a u s t s y s t e m , n ew tires and brakes, rear view camera, hyd leveling jacks, 2 tv’s, new hot water tank, non smoker, Drivers side door, 5.5 o n a n g e n e ra t o r, l i g h t neutral interior, everything works and is in excellent shape. $17,700. (360)460-1981

REPAIR/REMODEL

Call Bryan or Mindy

From Curb To Roof

AMERICAN BULLMASTIFF PUPPIES Ready N o w ! ! ! 3 Fe m a l e s , 1 Male Awesome Family Dogs! $600 Price Negotiable, Looking for Great Homes! Vet Check & 1st Shots Call to come see (360)808-3075

FERRET: Playful and l o v i n g fe m a l e fe r r e t , comes with cage and all the extras, de-scented and spayed. Great with PUPPIES: Mini-Dachskids. $100/obo. hund Puppies. We have (360)912-1003 one adorable chocolate smooth coat male and FREE: 7 year old female o n e b l a c k a n d t a n cat, indoor/outdoor, all s m o o t h c o a t m a l e va c c i n e s u p t o d a t e, available. 1st shot and spayed, white with tor- dewormed. Ready now. t o i s e s h e l l c o l o r i n g , $400. (360)452-3016. comes from a very loving home. She will come with her covered litter PUPPIES: Mini-poodles, box, toys, and her great one male, two female, personality. Must go to cream-color, first shots, wormed, paper-trained, good home! 460-8517. ready now. Will be 7lbs full-grown. $500. F R E E : C a t , ex c e l l e n t (360)385-4116 mouser, neutered, shots. (360)681-4129 WELSH CORGI: Purebred, adult, neutered, LAB PUPPIES very affectionate, loves $50. (360)670-5768. to play fetch, gets along with any animals, great WANTED: Female Him- with kids. Perfect family alayan or Persian older dog. $100. kitten. (360)808-4892. (360)374-0749

PRICE REDUCED: ‘92 34’ Bounder. 2,000 mi. on new 454 Chev 950 hp engine. $6,995/obo. (360)683-8453

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Moss Prevention

RDDARDD889JT

AKC Alaskan Malamute Puppies. 7 weeks old, champion bloodlines, adorable and ver y loving, wor med and shots. $1000. JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! (360)701-4891

PUPPIES: AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. One male, two females. Salt/Pepper or Black with silver. Parents on site. Dewclaws removed and tails d o cke d . $ 5 0 0 e a c h . Call Don at (360)460-7119

LAWN CARE

Chad Lund

#LUNDFF*962K7

CHIHUAHUAS: FREE: 4 year old male, 1 year old male, 2 year old female. ALSO: 1 male tri-color, 1 male black/tan, $250 ea. (360)670-5118

LAWN CARE PAINTING

www.LundFencing.com

452-0755 775-6473

SHEEP/LAMB: (4) Lambs, grass fed, $160 each, est. live weight 80-90 lbs. Ram, Border L e i c e s t e r, 2 0 m o n t h s old, $250. Pictures can be emailed. (360)681-8891

WINDOW WASHING

Lund Fencing Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

8142 Garage Sales 7025 Farm Animals 7035 General Pets 7035 General Pets 7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes Sequim & Livestock

2C688614 - 12/02

FENCING

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 B9

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

RATES AND SIZES: 1 COLUMN X 1” $100.08 1 COLUMN X 2” $130.08 1 COLUMN X 3” $160.08 2 COLUMN X 1” $130.08 2 COLUMN X 2” $190.08 2 COLUMN X 3” $250.08 DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714


Classified GET A HOT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS!

B10 Thursday, December 6, 2012

Peninsula Daily News

2003 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X AWD WAGON

KBB VALUE $12,498!

2004 CHEVROLET CAVALIER LS SEDAN

2004 TOYOTA TACOMA TRD EXT CAB SR5 4X4 ONLY

ONLY

AWD

69K MILES!

68K MILES!

4.8L V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW BALL, BEDLINER, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, KEYLESS ENTRY, 4 OPENING DRS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS, REAR JUMP SEATS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $12,498! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! ALL THE RIGHT OPTIONS! YOU WON’T FIND ONE NICER THAN THIS! BUY A LIKE-NEW TRUCK FOR A USED CAR PRICE!

2.5L 4 CYL, AUTO, NEW TIRES! ROOF RACK, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD W/WEATHER BAND, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 83K MILES! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! READY FOR WINTER WITH AWD! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.2L ECOTEC 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 68K MILES! LIKE-NEW COND INSIDE & OUT! GAS SAVING ECOTEC MOTOR! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

3.4L V6, AUTO, REAR LOCKING DIFF, ALLOYS, NERF BARS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, PIONEER CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 69K MILES! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ALL THE RIGHT OP0TIONS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2005 GMC W4500 CAB OVER 16’ BOX-CUBE VAN

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS 4DR

2008 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER 4X4

2009 KIA SPECTRA EX 4 DOOR

$10,995

GRAY MOTORS

$10,995

GRAY MOTORS

$6,995

GRAY MOTORS

DIESEL!

GREAT MPG!

4X4

ECONOMICAL 5.2L ISUZU 4 CYL TURBO DIESEL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CASS, 16’ BOX, ROLL-UP DR, 1600 LB “TUCK AWAY” HYDRAULIC CARGO HOIST, DUAL REAR WHL, TILT, CAB, 14500 LB GVW, 96K MILES, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, VERY SIMILAR ISUZU NPR, SAVE ON FUEL COSTS FOR YOUR BIZ BY GOIN’ W/DIESEL PWR!

VERY ECONOMICAL 1.6L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, AM/FM/CD/XM/MP3, SIDE AIRBAGS, 38K MILES, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, NONSMOKER, PERFECT COMMUTER CAR!

4.0L V6, AUTO, ALL WHL DRIVE/4X4, DUAL AC & HEAT, CRUISE, TILT, AM/ FM/CD W/SYNC, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, LEATHER, 7 PASS, PWR 3RD SEAT, SIDE AIRBAGS, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, PRIV GLASS, FOG LAMPS, LUGGAGE RACK, ALLOYS, ONLY 30K MILES! BEAUTIFUL LOCAL TRUCK! NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT!

Expires 1/3/13

$17,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Expires 1/3/13

$10,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Expires 1/3/13

$18,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

2C713189

2001 FORD RANGER XLT SUPERCAB 4X4

$17,495

GRAY MOTORS

GREAT MPG!

ECONOMICAL 2.0L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, SIDE AIRBAGS, 50K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” VEHICLE REPORT! NON-SMOKER Expires 1/3/13

$10,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

2004 CHEVROLET MALIBU MAXX LT H/B

2006 FORD FIVE HUNDRED LIMITED 4DR

2007 FORD FOCUS SE WAGON

2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA TOURING AWD

THE ORIGINAL WE FINANCE IN HOUSE! BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL IN HOUSE FINANCING BUYAVAILABLE! HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL WE FINANCE IN HOUSE! BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL IN HOUSE FINANCING BUYAVAILABLE! HERE! PAY HERE!

1 OWNER CAR W/ONLY 75K MILES & LOADED! V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, LEATHER HTD SEATS, AM/FM/CD, PWR SUNROOF, ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#223396

V6, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, LEATHER, PWR SUNROOF, AM/FM/CD, ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#155029

4 CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/CD, ROOF RACK, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#229347

V6, FRT & REAR AC/HEAT, TLT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DUAL PWR LEATHER SEATS, 3RD ROW SEATING, AM/FM/CD STACKER, REAR DVD, PWR SUNROOF, PRIV GLASS, PWR TAILGATE, PREM ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#776805

Expires 12/15/12

Expires 12/15/12

Expires 12/15/12

Expires 12/15/12

$8,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

1998 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4

$6,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

1995 GEO PRIZM (TOYOTA COROLLA)

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

$6,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

1999 FORD F250 XLT SUPERDUTY SUPERCAB SB 4X4

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

www.reidandjohnson.com

$12,995

360-452-6599

Visit us online @ www.davebarnier.com

1997 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCAB SB 4X4

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

125K ORIG MILES! 4.0L I6, 5SPD MAN, RED IN EXCEL SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! CD, TILT, FOG LIGHTS, RUNNING BOARDS, ALLOYS, BESTOP “HALFTOP”, VERY CLEAN, NEARLY STOCK JEEP @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

1.6L 16V 4CYL, AUTO, LT MET GREEN IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! DUAL AIRBAGS, PIONEER CD, PWR STEERING, PWR BRAKES, EXCELL MPG! A GREAT LIL’ FUEL SIPPER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

90K ORIG MILES! 6.8L TRITON V10, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! CASS, PRIV GLASS, CRUISE, TILT, BEDLINER, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW, 16.5” POLISHED ALLOYS W/80% BFG RUBBER! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! REAL NICE SUPERDUTY @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

123K ORIG MILES! 4.6L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! 2-TONE GREEN/SILVER IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! CASS, CRUISE, TILT, TOW, BEDLINER, MATCHING CANOPY, PRIV GLASS, SLIDING WINDOW, ONLY 2 OWNERS! VERY NICE F-150 @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

$7,995

$2,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

1996 SUBARU LEGACY

2002 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM

4X4s IN STOCK!

MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

Check Out Our Website:

NO CREDIT CHECKS!

AUTO, 4 CYL, AWD

V6, AUTO, LOW MILES!

WE HAVE THE LOWEST INHOUSE RATES!

$5,995 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

Check Out Our Website:

theotherguysauto.com

Financing your future, not your past!

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$5,995

MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

theotherguysauto.com

WHY PAY MORE?

$8,995

90

DAYS SAME AS CASH!

BUY HERE! PAY HERE! LOWEST IN-HOUSE RATES!

Financing your future, not your past!

$6,295 WE FINANCE

90

DAYS SAME AS CASH!

(360) 417-3788

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-452-2345 ext. 4060 TODAY for more information!


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Gas nozzle keeps clicking off Dear Doctor: I have a 2003 Hyundai Elantra with 135,000 miles. Occasionally when I fuel up, the pumping continually stops. I then have to gingerly continue fueling until the tank is full. Also, the car sometime runs with a rough idle and sometimes stalls. This disappears when I run the car a bit. Victor Dear Victor: Today’s vehicles have a system to keep the gas fumes in a charcoal canister vs. emitting into the air: the evaporative emission system. Connected to the gas tank by plastic hoses, electronic and vent solenoids, the canister traps fumes while driving and especially when filling the tank. There is another valve that opens as needed called a purge valve. This valve opens and sucks the fumes out of the canister, then burns the fuel in the engine. If the vent valve fails, then the pressure builds up and shuts off the pump nozzle. As for the car running rough after the fill-up, gas vapors travel to the engine

THE AUTO DOC Junior Damato

and cause a rich condition until the gas is sucked out of the canister. Have a technician check all systems.

Service difference Dear Doctor: We’re considering the purchase of a new Subaru Outback. My daughter has a 2005 Subaru Legacy that required a major service at 30,000 miles. I learned the new Outback also requires a major service at 30,000 miles, with an estimated cost of $600. Another major service is suggested at 60,000 miles. Our 2004 Toyota 4Runner didn’t require such a service until 60,000 miles. Do you know why there is a difference? Jane Dear Jane: All cars need service at certain intervals. You can ask your local service center what the services would cost from it or

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

ALJO 1991 24’ trailer, very good condition, $5,500. 460-8538.

BOAT: Fiberglass, 12’, $200. 4.5 HP Merc mot a r, $ 3 0 0 . ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 3 4761.

SEA SWIRL: 16’. 140 Chev engine, Merc outdrive, 4 stroke Honda 7.5 hp kicker, Calkins galv. trailer, 2 new Scotty downriggers, fishfinder, good deck space, good fishing boat. $3,000. (360)477-3725.

NASH 2000 26’, excellent condition. $8,000.(360)460-8538. TENT TRAILER: ‘99 Dutchman. King/queen bed, excellent cond., refrigerator, furnace, A/C, tons of storage. $4,000. (360)460-4157 TRAILER: ‘55 14’ Shasta. Ver y nice. $5,000/ obo. 417-3959 message.

9802 5th Wheels 5TH WHEEL: ‘00 35’ Alfa. 3 slides, perfect condition, everything works, many extras, must see to appreciate. $22,500/ obo. (360)683-2529.

Cruising boat. 1981 Sea Ranger sedan style trawler 39’ LOA. Single engine Perkins diesel with bow thruster. Fully enclosed fly bridge. Comfor table salon; stateroom with queen bed; full shower in head;full-sized refrigerator/freezer plus freezer b ox i n l a z z a r e t ; n ew Westerbeke genset with “get-home” alternate power source from genset; new smar t charger/inver ter and battery bank; good electronics including radar and AIS receive. Cruises at 7.5 Kts on 2.5 gph. Max speed 9.0 Kts, 150 gal water and 535 gal fuel capacity. 15 hp Yamaha O/B on dinghy. Anchor with 300’ chain and stern tie spool. Fully equipped as USCG Auxiliary Ope ra t i o n a l Fa c i l i t y. We have cruised throughout Salish Sea and Inside Passage in this comfortable and sea-worthy boat. She works well in t h e N W e nv i r o n m e n t . Suitable for 2 people cruising or live-aboard. S e e i n Po r t L u d l o w. $99,500. (360)437-7996.

5TH WHEEL: ‘91 35’ Hitchhiker Champagne edition. Two slide-outs, rear kitchen, fully furnished. Permanent skirting also available. $10,000. (360)797-0081 G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 7 3 5 ’ cr uiser, flying br idge, Road Ranger. Toy haul- single Cummins diesel er, big slide, gen. set, engine, low hours, radar, f r e e h i t c h , a w n i n g . VHF radio, CB, dept/fish finder, dingy, down rig$8,500. (360)461-4310. gers, 16’x32’ boathouse. $27,500. (360)457-0684.

9808 Campers & Canopies

LANDSCAPE ‘94 dumptruck: $5,995 or trade. (360)928-3193 CAMPER: 9.5’ Alpenlite Lmtd. Like new, all bells LIVINGSTON: 13’. With and whistles. $16,000. all the necessary equip(360)417-2606 ment, price is right and ready to go, let’s talk. CANOPY/CAMPER Custom overhead, fits $2,650/obo. 452-2712. small truck, bed length OLYMPIC: 84 XL 18’. 6’8” or less, 375 lbs, sky- 3.8 OMC inboard, new light, windows, tailgate 9.9 mercury kicker, easy with 3 rear doors, 1 hori- load trailer. $4,500. zontal, 2 vertical. $650. (360)457-6448 (360)683-2743 WA N T E D : 8 . 5 ’ t r u c k camper, cash. (360)770-2410

9050 Marine Miscellaneous OLYMPIC: ‘92 26’ Super XL. Less than 800 hours on original engine and o u t d r i ve , S u z u k i , 1 5 h o r s e k i cke r h a s l ow hours. Rebuilt trailer with BLUE WATER: ‘91 16’ five like new tires. Hot V 6 M e r c C r u i s e r w i t h and cold water, heater, trailer. $3,800/obo. stove, dinette. $24,750. (360)460-0236 457-6162 or 809-3396 BELL BOY: 22’ cuddy cabin, V8 engine needs work. $1,800. (360)385-9019

BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, trailer, 140 hp motor, great for fishing/crab. $5,120. (360)683-3577.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

ROWING BOAT: Wood L a p s t r a ke W h i t e h a l l , with traveling sail, 2 pair of spruce spoon blade oars, Sprit sail with mast and 2 rudder options, includes trailer bunk but not trailer, will deliver in Puget Sound area. $4,000. (360)775-5955. SABERCRAFT: 21’. 302 Inboard, Lorance GPS 5” screen with fish/depth finder, VHS, 15 hp kicker, good interior. Selling due to health. $4,000. 683-3682 TIDERUNNER: ‘03, 17’, cuddy, ‘03 suzuki 90hp, 4 stroke, 230 hrs, 012 Yamaha 9.9 4 stroke, 0 hrs, scotty electric downriggers. Call (360)4522 1 4 8 fo r m o r e i n fo. $16,000/obo.

WANTED: 14’ Jet Sled. Cash. (360)770-2410.

9817 Motorcycles

check your owner’s manual.

Gas gauge reading

tion problem, and I am going to the dealer every 1,000 miles to have the oil topped off. The dealer says this is acceptable. The Suburban only has 35,000 miles on it. Can you tell me the amount of oil loss there should be every 3,000 miles? Kenny Dear Kenny: Oil consumption is common in a lot of today’s engines. The 1,000-miles-perquart-of-oil usage is in line with a lot of manufacturers. What can you do? Ask the dealer to check the PCV system and breather system to ensure they’re working as designed. The dealer will not suggest a change in oil type or viscosity, but I would suggest a change in the oil viscosity to 10W40 or 15W40. There is also a high-mileage full-synthetic available.

Dear Doctor: I own a 2012 Lexus CT200 Hybrid. The original outside temperature gauge never reads correctly, but I was told there was nothing wrong with it according to the electrical diagnostics. Also, the gas gauge doesn’t register properly. The car holds 11.9 gallons, so when the needle is on half full, it should take about 6 gallons, but it takes somewhere roughly between 3.8 to 4.2 gallons. The service department keeps telling me its diagnostics say the gauge is fine. Mel Dear Mel: The outside temperature reading uses a small sensor that is located in the front grille area. We replace faulty temperature sensors often, and they are inexpensive. ________ As for your gas gauge, it is a small float device. Junior Damato is an accredIt’s only a gauge and will ited Master Automobile Techninever be completely accurate. cian, radio host and writer for

Topping-off oil Dear Doctor: I have a 2009 Chevy Suburban with a 5.3-liter engine. There’s an oil consump-

Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012

Car of the Week

2013 Cadillac XTS BASE PRICE: $44,075 for FWD Standard; $48,690 for FWD Luxury; $50,915 for AWD Luxury; $53,585 for FWD Premium; $55,810 for AWD Premium. PRICE AS TESTED: $56,730. TYPE: Front engine, all-wheel-drive, five-passenger, large, luxury sedan. ENGINE: 3.6-liter, double overhead cam, directinjection V-6 with continuously variable valve timing. MILEAGE: 17 mpg (city), 26 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 130 mph. LENGTH: 202 inches. WHEELBASE: 111.7 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,215 pounds. BUILT IN: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada. OPTIONS: None. DESTINATION CHARGE: $920. The Associated Press

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Classics & Collect. Others Others Others CHRYSLER: ‘02 Town & Countr y Limited. Full power, excellent. $4,900. (360)452-4827.

1978 CADILLAC SEV I L L E . B E AU T I F U L “LIKE NEW” CLASSIC. GOLD, LT YELLOW LEATHER, SUNR O O F, W H I T E WALLS, WIRE WHEELS. 75K MILES. M U S T S E E TO A P P R E C I AT E . $ 7 , 5 0 0 (360)928-9724 (206) 697-2005

C H RY S L E R ‘ 0 4 S E BRING: All the power options, $3,995. (360)417-3063 FORD ‘01 Mustang Cobra, blue book $11,700, NOS Flowmasters, $12,000. Call for more details. (360)775-1858. FORD ‘02 FOCUS SE 4DR 4 c y l , 5 s p d , A / C, t i l t wheel, cruise, pwr wind ow s, l o ck s, m i r r o r s, A M / F M / C D, a l l oy w h e e l s, a n d l ow, l ow m i l e s ! We f i n a n c e i n house! VIN#120748. Expires 12/8/12 ONLY $5,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com

HARLEY: ‘04 Soft Tail Heritage. Black with lots of extra chrome. 24,500 mi., Beautiful bike, must CHEV: ‘53 pickup restosee to appreciate. $11,000. (360)477-3725. ration project. $3,800. Cell (562)743-7718 HONDA: ‘05 CRF80. Classic, all original, 1966 Like new. $1,400. F-250 Ford Camper (360)460-8514. Special. 390 Auto, origiHONDA ‘06 CRF450R nal owner. $6,000/obo. (360)390-8101 Low hrs, frequent oil, filter and trans fluid changes. Just don’t ride the FORD: ‘27 T-Bucket, bike enough. The motor ‘350’ blower, rag top, FORD: ‘03 Mustang conis very strong and pulls fa s t a n d n i c e , C D. vertabile. $6,800/obo. like a tractor.Aluminum $17,500. Call before 7 (360)808-1242 stand incl. $2900 p.m. (360)457-8388. FORD: ‘05 Mustang GT. (360)461-2356 V8, 5 speed, 61K mi., new tires. $14,900. H O N DA : ‘ 7 4 Tra i l 9 0 . (360)582-0358 1,600 mi. $1,200. (360)582-7970 FORD: ‘95 Mustang. Manual, needs head HONDA: ‘79 CM400T gasket, tires. $1,000. road bike. 24,000 mi. (360)809-0781 $900. 683-4761. FORD: ‘29 Model AA. HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing 1 1/2 ton flatbed truck, G M C ‘ 8 4 S 1 5 : 3 0 0 0 k A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , complete frame off res- miles on new long block, black/chrome, exc. cond. toration. Updated 4 cyl. p a i n t a n d b o d y ve r y good. No rust. Mounted $3,500/obo. 417-0153. e n g i n e, hy d r. b ra ke s. studs on wheels. $2,500 $22,000. (360)683-3089. firm. (360)670-6100. H O N DA : ‘ 8 5 M a g n a . Runs excellent. $1,600. FORD ‘69 F-250 CampHONDA ‘07 CIVIC LX (360)385-9019 er Special: with factory COUPE air, air shocks, tranny 1.8L i-VTEC 4 Cylinder, SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard cooler, tow hitch, beautiAutomatic, Keyless EnC90T. 342 mi., like new, ful truck! $8,500. t r y, Po w e r W i n d o w s , m a n y ex t r a s , a l w ay s (360)681-2916 Door Locks, and Mirrors, garaged. $9,500. Cruise Control, Tilt, Air (360)461-1911 PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Conditioning, CD Stereo, Custom, new inter ior, Information Center, Dual tires, rims, wiring and Front Airbags, Front and 9805 ATVs more. $9,250. 683-7768. Rear Side Curtain Airbags. Kelley Blue Book E-TON ‘ 0 7 R X L 9 0 R 9292 Automobiles Value of $15,611! Only 11,000 Miles! Like new Others QUAD: Like new, less inside and out! Great than 10 hrs on it. $1800. (360)461-1392 AC U R A : ‘ 8 8 I n t e g r a . fuel economy! Why buy Runs excellent, 122ZK. new when you can find one gently used! Stop by $1,350. (360)683-7173. Gray Motors today! $13,995 BMW ‘04 330i Convert. GRAY MOTORS Black,vry good. 100k mi. 457-4901 Fast/fun/luxury. $11,700. graymotors.com (360)477-8377 H O N DA ‘ 8 5 A c c o r d . Runs good, needs water POLARIS: 2011 Razor pump. $350. 683-7173. LE Bobby Gorden seLEXUS: ‘99 ES300. 84K ries, excellent condition, Mom’s V6, leather, mnrf. low hours, used for fami$8,700. (360)643-3363. ly fun, no extreme riding, well maintained and alLINCOLN ‘02 LS: nice ways stored inside, windshield and roof top BU I C K : ‘ 0 0 L e S a b r e. shape. $8,000. (360)457-3645 ex t r a s. $ 1 1 , 4 0 0 o b o, 115K, like new, loaded, 460-0187 or 460-9512 runs great. MERCURY: ‘96 Sable. $3,500. (253)314-1258. evenings. sedan, good shape, new tires, needs transmisBUICK ‘01 LESABRE QUAD: ‘05 Honda TRX sion. $450. 457-0578. CUSTOM 4-DOOR 450R. Excellent cond. 3.8 liter V6, auto, A/C, O L D S : ‘ 9 9 B r a v a d a . $2,500. (360)461-0157. cruise, tilt, AM/FM/cas- Loaded, leather $4,295/ QUAD: ‘07 Yamaha 700 s e t t e / C D, p owe r w i n - obo. (360)928-2181. Raptor. Like new, extras. dows, locks and seat, Price reduced to $4,500. keyless entry, side air- PORCHE: ‘02 Boxster S. b a g s , a l l o y w h e e l s , 65K mi., black with black (360)452-3213 98,000 miles, very clean leather interior, 6 speed, and reliable local trade all options, nice car. 9742 Tires & in, non smoker, spotless $18,500. (360)461-9635. Wheels “Autocheck” vehicle history report, stop by and T OYO TA : ‘ 0 9 P r i u s . Studded Snow Tires check out a really nice White, 58K, Nav, stereo, B.U. camera. $18,000. 4 l ow m i l e a g e, D e a n affordable car! (805)478-1696 Wintercat XT 225/60 $5,995.00 R16 on 5 hole rims. REID & JOHNSON VW: ‘71 1600 Baja Bug. $325/obo MOTORS 457-9663 Runs great. $1,500/obo. (360)379-8288 reidandjohnson.com (360)928-1231 TIRES: For truck or RV, CHEV: ‘97 Camaro conPlace your ad at 6 Michelin 235/80R 22.5, vertible. 6 cyl. new mopeninsula used for 15,400 mi. tor, R16’s, mag wheels dailynews.com $350. (360)681-4989. $5,000. 452-1106.

FORD: ‘91 F250. Ext. c a b X LT, ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , a u t o, 105K orig. mi., gooseneck/trailer hitches, trailer brakes, runs great. $2,495. (360)452-4362 or (360)808-5390. VW: ‘07 New Beetle Converible. Ver y good condition Only 62,250 miles Auto transmission Located in Sequim. (206)499-7151

9434 Pickup Trucks Others DODGE: ‘01 Dakota. 4.7 liter, V8, 5 sp, rear limited slip axle, 4x4, 1 owner, 117K mi., very clean interior, never smoked in, maintenance records. $5,800. (360)683-2914.

B11

GMC: ‘00 Sierra 2500 SLE. Ext. cab, 4x4, big blk, 128K, gr t shape, nice tires/whls. $6,700/ obo. (360)477-6361. GMC: ‘08 Canyon. Cruise, air conditioning, only 14,000 mi. Only $12,000. 360-385-3025 GMC: ‘77 Sierra 6000 series. New 12’ bed. $1,300/obo. 775-1139.

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

HYUNDAI ‘11 SANTA FE GLS Economical 2.4 liter 4cyl, auto, all wheel drive, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, privacy glass, luggage rack, balance of factor y 5/60 warranty, spotless carfax report, non-smoker, near new condition, only 27,000 miles, just reduced, very nice, highly rated SUV. $18,995.00 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

JEEP ‘88 Cherokee Lorado: Needs work. $1,000. (360)681-3588.

9730 Vans & Minivans Others D O D G E ‘ 9 4 C a rava n : runs good. $700. (360)457-4383 FORD ‘10 TRANSIT CONNECT XLT MINI CARGO VAN Economical 2.0 liter 4cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows, locks and mirror, safety bulkhead, dual sliding side doors, side airbags, privacy glass, only 27,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5 / 6 0 wa r r a n t y, s u p e r clean 1-owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y repor t. ideal for deliveries, great mpg, fun to drive! just reduced. $17,995.00 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

NISSAN ‘99 GMC ‘88 Sierra: 2x4, PATHFINDER SE very clean, 119k. 4X4, V6, auto, A/C, tilt $1,795. (360)775-8830. w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r windows, locks, and mirMAZDA ‘01 B3000 rors, Bose AM/FM/CD EXTENDED CAB SE DODGE: ‘72 3/4 ton. and cassette, roof rack, 4X4 Runs great, no dents, 3.0L V6, Automatic, Al- tube running boards, prisome rust. $700/obo. loy Wheels, New Tires, vacy glass, tow pack(360)531-3842 Bedliner, Tool Box, Tow age, alloy wheels, and Package, Rear Sliding more! In-house financing Window, Privacy Glass, available! VIN#374311. Expires 12/8/12 Power Windows, Door ONLY $5,995 Locks, and Mirrors, Dave Barnier FORD ‘98 Econoline Cruise Control, Tilt, Air Auto Sales E150 Conversion Van Conditioning, CD Stereo, Dual Front Airbags. Only *We Finance In House* (Red). 4.6 V8 Engine, 452-6599 116,000 miles, Excellent 67,000 Miles! Just like a davebarnier.com Condition, Non SmokFord Ranger! Immacui n g , D u a l a i r B a g s, A i r late condition inside and C o n d i t i o n f r o n t / r e a r, out! None Nicer! Stop by EMAIL US AT DODGE ‘99 Flatbed: Gray Motors today! classified@peninsula Quad seats,3r seat,Must V8 Dodge Ram Flatsee. $6250. Call Bob $8,995 dailynews.com bed pickup 4x4. White 360-452-8248 GRAY MOTORS with detachable metal 457-4901 sideboards and tool graymotors.com 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices box. Good condition, $4200 obo. For more Clallam County Clallam County 9556 SUVs information or to see call SALE OF TIMBER Others (360)461-4151. HARRY SHALE #408 LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON CHEV ‘02 TRAILBLAZDODGE ‘99 RAM 2500 ER: 139k miles, straight SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled “Proposal for the HARRY SHALE #408 LogCLUB CAB LONGBED 6 Vortec, loaded. $5000. ging Unit,” addressed to the Superintendent, Taho(360)452-2807 SLT 4X4 lah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. 5.9L Cummins 24V Turbo-Diesel, Automatic, CHEV ‘84 3/4 ton 4x4: Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be re140K miles, runs good, ceived until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, January Chrome Wheels, Run22, 2013, for the purchase of timber on the HARRY ning Boards, Matching $2,300/obo. 477-6098. SHALE #408 Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, F i b e r b l a s s C a n o p y, Spray-In Bedliner, Tow H O N DA ‘ 0 7 C RV: 5 Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main Package, Trailer Brake door, AWD, Model EX- conference room of the Quinault Division of Natural Controller, Rear Sliding L, automatic, navaga- Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, WashingWindow, Privacy Glass, tor, rear-view camera, ton. This logging unit contains approximately 49 4 Opening Doors, Power 6 disk CD, XM radio, acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume Windows, Door Locks, h e a t e d s e a t s , s u n / of 1319 MBF of sawlogs including 860 MBF of and Drivers Seat, Cruise moon roof, newer all- western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 196 Control, Tilt, Air Condi- weather tires, leather MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs, 120 MBF of red alder t i o n i n g , C D / C a s s e t t e interior, mud mats, sil- and other hardwood sawlogs, 107 MBF of Sitka Stereo, Dual Front Air- ver and gray, original spruce sawlogs, and 36 MBF of western redcedar bags. Sparkling clean in- owner, 45k miles, all sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and side and out! Reliable records. $19,500/obo. utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder 5.9L Cummins Diesel! In Port Angeles. must state the total purchase price that will be paid (831)588-8851. All the right options! for timber and salvage on this unit. The minimum Never hauled a 5th qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility W h e e l ! S t o p by G ray HONDA ‘08 CIVIC logs (except western redcedar) are removable at Motors today! LX 4-DOOR $14,995 Very economical 1.8 liter the Purchaser’s option. No western redcedar salGRAY MOTORS 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, vage operations will be allowed. A deposit in the 457-4901 tilt, AM/FM/CD, power form of a certified check, cashier’s check, bank graymotors.com windows and locks, side draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau airbags, keyless entry, of Indian Affairs, in the amount of thirteen thousand FORD ‘00 F250 Extend- like new condition, very dollars ($13,000.00) must accompany each sealed e d C a b L a r i a t : V 1 0 , very clean 1-owner cor- bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reheavy-duty, 160k, 5th porate lease return, non- ject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the w h e e l , o n e o w n e r . smoker, spotless “auto- apparent high bidder, and of others who submit $6,000/obo. 460-7131. check” vehicles history written requests to have their bid considered for acreport, balance of factory ceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance FORD: ‘08 F150 XLT. 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y, o n l y or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. 4x4 crew cab. Low mi., 35,000 miles. great mpg. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on loaded! $18,500. $1,3995.00 this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated dam(360)912-1599 REID & JOHNSON ages if the bidder does not execute the contract MOTORS 457-9663 and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of FORD: ‘79 F250 Super reidandjohnson.com twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) within Cab. ‘460’, AT, tow pkg., B a n k s p o w e r p a c k , SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional 4x4. 48K drive mi., like 141K, runs/drives great. new, original mint cond., damages which may result from bidder’s failure to $2,200. (360)460-7534. new top, tires, clutch, re- execute or perform under the terms of this bid offerFORD: ‘86 F150. Excel- built trans, CD, tape, ing. The performance bond, payments, and subselent cond., runs great, Reese tow bar, superior quent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by recent tune up. $3,000/ snow travel. First $4,500 electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full intakes. (360)460-6979. obo. (360)531-3842. formation concerning the timber, conditions of the FORD: ‘88 Ranger Su- Visit our website at sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 www.peninsula per cab. Auto, front/rear Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, dailynews.com tanks, power windows/ Washington 98587. Dated this 21st day of NovemOr email us at seats, power steering, tilt ber, 2012 at Taholah, Washington, Gregory K. Masclassified@ wheel, cruise control, ten, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. peninsula 92,384 mi. $2,900/obo. Pub: Dec. 6, 20, 2012 Legal No. 441458 dailynews.com (360)457-0852

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


B12

WeatherWatch

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2012 Neah Bay 42/36

Bellingham B elli el e lin li n 4 42/37

Olympic SHPeninsula TODAY AYS O WERS

45/37

BR

Olympics Snow level: 2,500 ft.

Forks 44/35

ER B R E OW SH

Sequim 45/37

EZ

Nation NationalTODAY forecast

Yesterday

ZY S R EE WE SHO

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 50 36 0.28 13.14 Forks 48 37 0.32 109.10 Seattle 52 41 0.13 42.66 Sequim 50 43 0.09 12.09 Hoquiam 52 43 0.35 74.75 Victoria 50 38 0.38 29.83 Port Townsend 52 40 0.13* 22.28

Y

43/40

Port Ludlow 44/36

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forecast highs for Thursday, Dec. 6

Aberdeen Ab 46/39

Billings 37° | 30°

San Francisco 61° | 54°

New

First

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: Chicago 50° | 34°

Los Angeles 66° | 55°

SATURDAY

46/36 Showers and clouds

Low 37 Cloudy and showery

Marine Weather

42/33 Mostly cloudy; sun possible

Fronts

MONDAY

43/34 Chances of showers

Ocean: W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming NW. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. Showers. W wind 5 to 15 kt. rising to 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 to 5 ft. W swell 8 ft at 11 seconds.

CANADA

Seattle 45° | 43°

Spokane 36° | 32°

Tacoma 43° | 37° Yakima 46° | 34°

Astoria 46° | 43°

ORE.

© 2012 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 5:44 a.m. 7.6’ 12:02 p.m. 3.1’ 5:34 p.m. 6.4’ 11:53 p.m. 1.8’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 6:32 a.m. 8.0’ 6:55 p.m. 6.2’ 1:11 p.m. 2.4’

Port Angeles

8:19 a.m. 7.3’ 8:13 p.m. 4.1’

1:01 a.m. 1.7’ 3:35 p.m. 3.3’

8:52 a.m. 7.3’ 10:07 p.m. 4.4’

1:53 a.m. 2.7’ 4:13 p.m. 2.2’

Port Townsend

9:56 a.m. 9.0’ 9:50 p.m. 5.1’

2:14 a.m. 1.9’ 4:48 p.m. 3.7’

10:29 a.m. 9.0’ 11:44 p.m. 5.4’

3:06 a.m. 3.0’ 5:26 p.m. 2.4’

Dungeness Bay*

9:02 a.m. 8.1’ 8:56 p.m. 4.6’

1:36 a.m. 1.7’ 4:10 p.m. 3.3’

9:35 a.m. 8.1’ 10:50 p.m. 4.9’

2:28 a.m. 2.7’ 4:48 p.m. 2.2’

LaPush

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Dec 13 Dec 19 Dec 28

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset tomorrow

4:20 p.m. 7:51 a.m. 12:50 a.m. 12:43 p.m.

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 55 Casper 47 Hi Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 76 Albany, N.Y. 55 43 .12 Cldy Charleston, W.Va. 68 Albuquerque 58 35 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 74 53 Amarillo 61 37 Clr Cheyenne 57 Anchorage 05 04B Clr Chicago 64 Asheville 69 52 Rain Cincinnati 62 Atlanta 74 56 Rain Cleveland Atlantic City 63 53 Clr Columbia, S.C. 75 Columbus, Ohio 63 Austin 78 50 .01 PCldy 41 Baltimore 70 54 PCldy Concord, N.H. Billings 51 39 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 73 64 Birmingham 71 61 .10 Cldy Dayton 57 Bismarck 25 17 Cldy Denver Des Moines 60 Boise 55 49 .40 Rain 61 Boston 54 53 .01 Rain Detroit 23 Brownsville 87 66 .30 Cldy Duluth 69 Buffalo 65 38 .27 Snow El Paso Evansville 66 Fairbanks -31 Fargo 24 SATURDAY Flagstaff 58 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Grand Rapids 53 55 7:22 a.m. 8.5’ 12:51 a.m. 2.4’ Great Falls 8:13 p.m. 6.3’ 2:17 p.m. 1.6’ Greensboro, N.C. 72 Hartford Spgfld 47 Helena 51 9:26 a.m. 7.3’ 2:54 a.m. 3.8’ Honolulu 82 11:59 p.m. 5.0’ 4:53 p.m. 1.0’ Houston 83 Indianapolis 63 Jackson, Miss. 73 11:03 a.m. 9.0’ 4:07 a.m. 4.2’ Jacksonville 77 6:06 p.m. 1.1’ Juneau 22 Kansas City 62 10:09 a.m. 8.1’ 3:29 a.m. 3.8’ Key West 78 5:28 p.m. 1.0’ Las Vegas 67 Little Rock 72

Nation/World

Victoria 46° | 39°

Olympia 43° | 39°

Dec 6

46/36 More showers than sunshine

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Showers. W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming SW 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less, to 2 to 4 ft.

Tides

SUNDAY

Christi, Texas

■ 2 at Hibbing, Minn.

Miami 79° | 66°

Cold

FRIDAY

■ 89 at Corpus

Atlanta 59° | 48°

El Paso 75° | 39° Houston 75° | 55°

Full

New York 39° | 30°

Detroit 41° | 32°

Washington D.C. 45° | 37°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 45° | 37°

Denver 52° | 34°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 45° | 43°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 45/37

Sunny

46 .47 Cldy Los Angeles 43 Clr Louisville 49 PCldy Lubbock 44 .13 Clr Memphis 53 Cldy Miami Beach 38 Clr Midland-Odessa 28 PCldy Milwaukee 32 .33 PCldy Mpls-St Paul 37 .46 Cldy Nashville 51 Cldy New Orleans 33 .64 PCldy New York City 38 .06 PCldy Norfolk, Va. 43 Clr North Platte 36 .49 PCldy Oklahoma City 37 Cldy Omaha 28 PCldy Orlando 30 .18 PCldy Pendleton 08 Cldy Philadelphia 38 Clr Phoenix 35 .31 Clr Pittsburgh -36 Clr Portland, Maine 14 Clr Portland, Ore. 25 PCldy Providence 30 PCldy Raleigh-Durham 50 Clr Rapid City 58 Cldy Reno 47 .03 PCldy Richmond 49 PCldy Sacramento 74 Cldy St Louis 56 .07 Cldy St Petersburg 35 .14 Clr Salt Lake City 56 1.43 Rain San Antonio 47 PCldy San Diego 20 Snow San Francisco 38 PCldy San Juan, P.R. 68 .45 Cldy Santa Fe 50 Cldy St Ste Marie 45 .72 Cldy Shreveport

68 66 64 70 80 66 56 34 67 78 62 75 55 66 61 80 60 66 78 65 50 56 53 71 52 57 75 59 57 78 50 79 67 62 86 52 43 73

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

52 PCldy Sioux Falls 46 22 Cldy 40 .38 Clr Syracuse 70 43 .52 Cldy 35 PCldy Tampa 80 60 Cldy 53 .33 Cldy Topeka 64 28 PCldy 68 Cldy Tucson 79 50 Clr 34 PCldy Tulsa 65 31 Clr 24 PCldy Washington, D.C. 72 57 Cldy 19 Cldy Wichita 63 31 PCldy 50 .24 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 63 45 .25 PCldy 64 2.81 Cldy Del. 64 52 Clr 53 .03 Cldy Wilmington, _________________ 56 Cldy Hi Lo Otlk 24 Cldy 64 58 Sh 38 Clr Auckland 68 46 PCldy 31 Cldy Baghdad 30 13 PCldy 56 Cldy Beijing 31 21 Snow 45 .01 PCldy Berlin 37 32 Rain/Snow 55 .01 Clr Brussels Cairo 71 54 Clr 55 PCldy 37 .47 Cldy Calgary 17 4 PCldy 50 .02 Rain Guadalajara 80 46 PCldy 43 .77 Cldy Hong Kong 71 61 PCldy 53 .03 Rain Jerusalem 58 46 Sh 57 Cldy Johannesburg 74 58 Sh 28 Cldy Kabul 56 36 PCldy 45 .14 Rain London 42 36 Sh 54 Cldy Mexico City 72 43 PCldy 55 .15 Rain Montreal 31 25 Clr 37 .08 PCldy 26 19 PCldy 65 Cldy Moscow 77 49 PCldy 40 Rain New Delhi 38 34 Clr 49 Clr Paris Clr 59 Cldy Rio de Janeiro 92 75 49 33 PCldy 59 Rain Rome Sydney 74 63 Cldy 75 .06 Cldy 52 42 Clr 32 PCldy Tokyo 38 34 PCldy 22 .05 Clr Toronto 42 39 Sh 56 .01 Cldy Vancouver

Briefly . . . YMCA plans coat drive this month PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County YMCA is holding a coat drive this month. Drop off a lightly used youth or adult winter coat at any of the snowflakecovered drop boxes. Drop boxes are located at Grant Street Elementary School, Blue Heron Middle School, Port Townsend High School, Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Chimacum Creek Primary School, Kitsap Bank, Port Townsend Athletic Club and the YMCA office. For more information on coat donations or to acquire a coat, phone the YMCA at 360-385-5811.

discuss the state’s Concealed Carry Law and include information on the law’s background, who is eligible, the procedure to secure a carry permit, reciprocity in other jurisdictions, where concealed carry is prohibited, interactions with police and selfdefense law. For more information, phone Tom Brotherton at 360-385-9180 or email tbrotherton@co.jefferson. wa.us.

Cooking demo set SEQUIM — Port Angeles chef Annie McHale will present a cooking demonstration of a winter-warming sweet potato and sausage bisque with good morning biscuits at Nash’s Farm Store, 4681 Sequim-Dungeness Way, at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. The demo is free and open to the public. Recipes will be provided. Through her business Roots: An Underground Cooking Experience,

McHale offers weekend retreats or personal culinary consultations that educate participants on planning, shopping for, preparing and enjoying organic whole foods for their own health and the environment. “It is my desire to lessen people’s anxiety by injecting some fun and creativity into their kitchens, to help them truly embrace this change and learn to love it and the food they’re creating.”

For more information, phone Nash’s at 360-6816274.

Fiddle workshop PORT TOWNSEND — Cliff Self will present a Christmas Fiddle Workshop as part of Crossroads Music’s “Fiddle Flavor of the Month” on Saturday. The event will be held at Crossroads Music, 2100 Lawrence St., from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Self will teach a number of Christmas tunes “that

lie nicely on the fiddle.” He’ll also throw in some harmonies to use when accompanying singers or other melody instruments. Attendees should bring a fiddle and a recording device. The cost is $20. The workshop is tailored for beginners with one year of experience or more. For more information, phone 360-385-1471. Peninsula Daily News

* FOR THE HANDYPERSON ON YOUR LIST *

Legal seminar set QUILCENE — A concealed-weapon/self-defense law seminar presented by the Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and the Jefferson County Bar will be held at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday. The free seminar will

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PDN20121206J