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December 27, 2011

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

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Costs seen in volunteer firefighter certification

THE

LEGACY OF A LEADER

If bill OK’d by Legislature, someone will have to pay BY TOM CALLIS PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Volunteer firefighters, the backbone of many fire agencies on the North Olympic Peninsula, may soon have to pay to serve their communities. Emergency-service workers, both volunteer and career personnel, would have to cover the cost of their state certification under a bill before the state Legislature. The proposal — opposed by the Clallam County Fire Chief’s Association, and with an East Jefferson County Fire Chiefs Association vote against it likely next month — puts fire districts and departments alike in the position of having to cover the cost themselves or risk losing volunteers who provide not just backup but in many cases are the only responders to emergency calls. “Volunteers already give their time,” said Trish Hutson, chief of Clallam County Fire District No. 5, located in Clallam Bay. “Trying to impose fees on top of that can be a big hardship.” Hutson and other heads of small fire agencies, who have little or no staff emergency responders, say they would find the funds in their budgets to cover the cost,

$125 every three years, in order to keep volunteers and maintain service. “You can’t lose that pool of people who will donate that time,” Brinnon Fire Department Chief Bob Herbst said. With 16 volunteers, the move could cost the department about $2,000 every certification cycle. The proposal, House Bill 2141, was introduced during the special session that ended Dec. 14, and will be before the Legislature during the regular session that starts Jan. 9.

Legislator/lieutenant Kevin Van De Wege, a Clallam County Fire District No. 3 lieutenant and North Olympic Peninsula representative in Olympia, said he doesn’t expect the bill to go far. But the Sequim Democrat also said he doesn’t think the state, which is facing a $1.4 billion shortfall, has the money to continue to pay for the certifications. “That’s a service the state provides, and I’m not sure that we’re in a position that general fund dollars can pay for those kind of services anymore,” he said. TURN

TO

OMC commissioner Arlene Engel dies PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Arlene Engel, an Olympic Medical Center commissioner and a staunch advocate for health care access and mental health services who received a lifetime achievement award in 2009, died peacefully on Christmas morning, OMC Board Chairman Jim Cammack confirmed. She was 91. Engel suffered a stroke and died at the hospital, Cammack said.

Lasting effect “She is going to be missed,” Cammack said. “She had a big interest in mental health. She also had a big interest in the hospital,

period.” A longtime Sequim resident, Engel had been an OMC commissioner since 2002. She Engel served on numerous boards and committees as a champion for the mentally ill, seniors and the under-served. Engel received the Clallam County Citizen of the Year award in 1992, and in 2009, she was awarded the Clallam County Lifetime Achievement Award and the Red Cross Hero Award. TURN

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Sequim Scouts carry on food bank tradition BY JEFF CHEW PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Steve Blenk died in a tragic U.S. Highway 101 head-on collision in November 2004, but his Scouting legacy lives on in Troop 1491’s annual food drive to benefit Sequim Food Bank. This year, the Steve Blenk Memorial Food Drive, led by Boy Scout Tristan Tosland, netted more than 500 pounds of canned and boxed foods and nearly $900 in donations, which the Scouts will deliver to the food bank after the new year. Tosland, a 16-year-old Sequim High School junior, has been involved in the drive since he was 11. “I’m considering running it next year, too,” the son of Troy and Terra Tosland said with a smile, as he stood near this year’s trailer load of

goods the food bank requested — peanut butter, cereal, mac and cheese, green beans and corn. Troop 1491 Boy Scouts typically collect food donations in early December in front of the QFC supermarket on East Washington Street. Tosland never met the man who started the food drive he now devotes his efforts to.

Established in 2000 Blenk, assistant scoutmaster of Boy Scouts of America Troop 1491, established the drive in 2000, when it collected both food and blankets donations, said his close friend, Jack Grinnell. Blenk also was a woodcrafter with a homebased business whose work was renowned worldwide. TURN

TO

SCOUT/A4

TRAINING/A4

‘Lasting, positive effect’ on the community

BY ROB OLLIKAINEN

JEFF CHEW/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tristan Tosland, 16 and on his way to earning his Eagle Scout rank at Troop 1491, sits among bags of food to benefit Sequim Food Bank, part of the annual Steve Blenk Memorial Food Drive.

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Fire in pillow is stubborn Homeowner thought he had put out sparks PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles-area home was damaged Sunday night when a smoldering pillow was placed in a garbage can and caught fire next to the house. No injuries were reported as a result of the blaze at 270 Cameron Road just west of the city. Clallam County Fire District No. 2 personnel mopped up the blaze at about 9:30 p.m. Capt. Mike DeRousie of the fire district said sparks from an open wood stove landed on the pillow. The pillow was placed in a plastic garbage can next to the house and sprayed with water, DeRousie said.

CLALLAM COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT NO. 2

A fire damaged siding and a soffit of a house in Port TURN TO FIRE/A4 Angeles. 14706106

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INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 95th year, 307th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

BUSINESS A6 B6 CLASSIFIED B5 COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS A8 B5 DEAR ABBY A7 DEATHS B10 MOVIES A3 NATION/WORLD A2 PENINSULA POLL

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UpFront

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■ See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.500), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Actor asks girlfriend to marry him IT WAS A very merry Christmas for Matthew McConaughey, who popped the question to girlfriend Camila Alves. “The Lincoln Lawyer” star revealed the news himself on his WhoSay McConaughey account, writing, “just asked camila to marry me, merry Christmas.” While her answer wasn’t Alves revealed, it certainly appears she said yes, as McConaughey posted a photo of the pair kissing in front of a Christmas tree. They have two children together — son Levi, 3, and daughter Vida, 1.

James hospitalized Etta James’ longtime manager said the terminally ill blues singer has

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SITTING

COURTSIDE

Director Spike Lee, left, sits beside comedian Chris Rock in the first half of the New York Knicks season-opening NBA basketball game against the Boston Celtics at Madison Square Garden in New York on Sunday. been hospitalized after experiencing difficulty breathing. Lupe De Leon said James’ James family is with her at a Southern California hospital where she was taken earlier last week. De Leon, who has been James’ manager for 30 years, said the singer is “in pretty bad shape,” but it

remains unknown whether she will be able to be released. He said James was taken to the hospital on Wednesday evening and is on a breathing apparatus. James’ doctor recently announced the “At Last” singer has been diagnosed with terminal leukemia The Grammy-winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member is also suffering from dementia. She has been receiving mostly at-home care.

SUNDAY’S QUESTION: How often do you return or exchange Christmas gifts? Frequently 2.8% Often 1.7% Sometimes

34.7%

Never

60.8%

Total votes cast: 778 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings By The Associated Press

DR. ROBERT ADER, 79, an experimental psychologist who was among the first scientists to show how mental processes influence the body’s immune system, a finding that changed modern medicine, died Dec. 20 in Pittsford, N.Y. His death followed a long illness and complications of a fracture suffered in a fall, his Mr. Ader daughter, Deborah Ader, said. Dr. Ader, who spent his entire career as a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, conducted some of the original experiments in a field he named himself, psychoneuroimmunology. His initial research, in the 1970s, became a touchstone for studies that have since mapped the vast communications network among immune cells, hormones and neurotransmitters. It introduced a field of research that nailed down the science behind notions once considered magical thinking: that meditation helps reduce arterial plaque; that social bonds improve cancer survival; that people under stress catch more colds; and that placebos work not only on the human mind but also

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

on supposedly insentient cells. At the core of Dr. Ader’s breakthrough research was an insight already obvious to any grandmother who ever said, “Stop worrying or you’ll make yourself sick.”

________ BOB HARE, 80, who opened the Hermosa Beach coffeehouse Insomniac in 1958 that soon became a haven for folk and blues musicians and Beat Generation performers, has died. Mr. Hare, who later became a counselor, died of natural causes Dec. 19 at his home in Glendora, Calif., said his wife, Karen. Mr. Hare called it the Insomniac because it was open until 3 a.m. He brewed his coffee in a 300-pound dry-cleaning boiler and served it to such high-profile performers as Allen Ginsberg and Lenny Bruce. The coffeehouse also became a haven for folk and blues musicians and

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots A PAIR OF adult bald eagles teaching their brood how to hunt. The target of their hunt: The neighbors’ lap dog in their Port Angeles yard . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

other performers. Ginsberg read his poem “Howl” and a 16-year-old Linda Ronstadt sang, Mr. Hare said in 1992 in The Los Angeles Times. As the Insomniac expanded to include a bookstore, art gallery and book and record departments, Mr. Hare billed it as “America’s First Supermarket of Culture.”

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ Julia Haller was the wife of Albert Haller, said Dorothy Haller Munkeby. Her name was erroneously published as Helen in a story on Page C5 Sunday.

________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1936 (75 years ago) The next salmon hatchery to be built in the state will be on the Dungeness River, state Fisheries Director B.M. Brennan announced. Brennan addressed the annual game banquet of the Port Angeles chapter, Izaak Walton League, on Ediz Hook. During his talk, Brennan touched on the “growing menace” of Japanese fishermen operating in the Pacific Ocean just outside the three-mile limit taking fish with huge nets. He also criticized Canada for taking most of the tax-producing Fraser River sockeye salmon this year. British Columbia packed 180,000 cases, compared with 43,000 cases packed in Washington state, he said.

1961 (50 years ago) Shipments of logs from the North Olympic Peninsula to Japan remains

brisk, but it is expected to slow down in 1962, Port of Port Angeles Manager Jack P. Hogan said. The slowdown will come as a result of congestion in Japanese harbors, Japan running out of U.S. dollars to pay for the logs and demands there for a better product, Hogan said. Merrill & Ring Western Lumber Co. Manager Gus Haley said the Japanese won’t place any new log orders until spring.

1986 (25 years ago) Port Angeles city staff members continue to study a long-proposed development on the city’s west side. Representatives of Gund Plaza submitted a new version to city officials that alters a 1980 shopping center proposal to include a 134-unit retirement village in an area bounded by Eighth, 10th, G and I streets.

The project’s local manager, Patrick Downie, said he hopes that new documents submitted to the city Planning Department this month help to address city concerns.

Laugh Lines IN A NEW interview, President Obama was asked to describe Michelle, and he used the words “beautiful, smart and funny.” When asked how he picked those, he used the words, “she’s, sitting and right-next-to-me.” Jimmy Fallon

Lottery LAST NIGHT’S LOTTERY results are available on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 or on the Internet at www. walottery.com/Winning Numbers.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS TUESDAY, Dec. 27, the 361st day of 2011. There are four days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8 and its three astronauts made a safe, nighttime splashdown in the Pacific. On this date: ■ In 1831, naturalist Charles Darwin set out on a round-the-world voyage aboard the HMS Beagle. ■ In 1904, James Barrie’s play “Peter Pan: The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up” opened at the Duke of York’s Theater in London. ■ In 1927, the musical play

“Show Boat,” with music by Jerome Kern and libretto by Oscar Hammerstein II, opened at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. ■ In 1932, Radio City Music Hall opened in New York City. ■ In 1945, 28 nations signed an agreement creating the World Bank. ■ In 1970, the musical play “Hello, Dolly!” closed on Broadway after a run of 2,844 performances. ■ In 1979, Soviet forces seized control of Afghanistan. President Hafizullah Amin, who was overthrown and executed, was replaced by Babrak Karmal.

■ In 1981, composer and bandleader Hoagy Carmichael died in Rancho Mirage, Calif., at age 82. ■ In 1985, American naturalist Dian Fossey, 53, who had studied gorillas in the wild in Rwanda, was found hacked to death. ■ In 2007, opposition leader Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in Pakistan by an attacker who shot her after a campaign rally and then blew himself up. ■ Ten years ago: Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld announced that Taliban and alQaida prisoners would be held at

the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Five years ago: Saddam Hussein urged Iraqis to embrace “brotherly coexistence” and not to hate U.S.-led foreign troops in a goodbye letter posted on a website a day after Iraq’s highest court upheld his death sentence. ■ One year ago: A Russian court found imprisoned oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky guilty of stealing nearly $30 billion in oil from his company, Yukos. His supporters have charged that Khodorkovsky’s prosecution was politically motivated.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, December 27, 2011 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Murder-suicide gunman dressed in Santa suit GRAPEVINE, Texas — Six members of a Texas family apparently opened Christmas presents just before a relative dressed as Santa Claus showed up, opened fire and killed them before killing himself, police said Monday. Grapevine police spokesman Sgt. Robert Eberling said the shooter showed up in the Santa outfit shortly before gunfire erupted and was a member of the family. The identity of the shooter and the victims will be released after autopsies are conducted Monday, he said. Police went to the apartment midday Sunday after receiving a 9-1-1 call in which no one was on the other line. They found four women and three men, aged 18 to 60, dead. A motive for the shootings was unclear.

Copter crash fatal PALATKA, Fla. — Two Mayo Clinic employees and a pilot flying to a University of Florida hospital to retrieve a heart for a transplant were killed when their helicopter crashed Monday in north Florida, officials said. The helicopter departed the Jacksonville hospital around 5:45 a.m. but never arrived in Gainesville, about 60 miles southwest, said Kathy Barbour,

a spokeswoman for the Mayo Clinic. The employees’ names were not released because relatives hadn’t been notified. The helicopter crashed about 12 miles northeast of Palatka. Federal Aviation Administration records show the Bell 206 helicopter is owned by SK Jets.

Spill hurt herring SAN FRANCISCO — A cargo ship accident that dumped tens of thousands of gallons of thick, tarry ship fuel into San Francisco Bay caused lasting damage to the region’s once-plentiful schools of Pacific herring, the bay’s only commercially fished species, according to a study released Monday. Herring embryos collected from shorelines left coated in oil starting about three months after the November 2007 Cosco Busan spill suffered from unusually high death rates and a range of ailments and deformities associated with exposure to the chemicals in crude oil, the study found. By 2010, death rates had returned to normal, but the embryos continued to show heart defects that are a common symptom in herring of oil exposure. The bay’s Pacific herring are the largest coastal population in the continental U.S. and a key element of the bay’s complex food web, according to the study, which was published online by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The Associated Press

Briefly: World

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Police examine blood-stained clothes at the scene of a stabbing in central London on Monday. This stabbing was not fatal, but another nearby was.

Man killed amid post-Christmas sales in London

administer help. Police said 10 people had been arrested in connection with the death. It wasn’t immediately known if the two stabbings were linked.

LONDON — A teenager was fatally stabbed Monday after an argument broke out in a sports store on London’s most famous retail street as thousands of shoppers flocked to Britain’s capital seeking post-Christmas bargains. The killing of the 18-year-old man on Oxford Street — and a second wounding on the same road — did little to deter shoppers crowding into neighboring stores in the landmark shopping district. Bargain hunters were also largely untroubled by a subway strike which badly disrupted the city’s public transport services. Authorities said the teenage victim died before medics could

Rehab center deaths MEXICO CITY — Medical officials said five recovering drug addicts died and dozens of others were sickened by soy sausage served for Christmas dinner at a rehabilitation center in western Mexico. Authorities were investigating whether the poisoning at the center in the city of Guadalajara was accidental or intentional. Drug cartels have taken over rehabilitation centers in parts of Mexico, forcibly recruiting addicts as hit men and smugglers. The invasions have led to mass shootings at the centers that have left dozens dead. The Associated Press

NASA

IMAGE VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The twin Grail spacecraft map the lunar gravity field in the rendering from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Twin probes en route to study moon gravity BY ALICIA CHANG THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — The moon has come a long way since Galileo first peered at it through a telescope. Unmanned probes have circled around it and landed on its surface. Twelve American astronauts have walked on it. And lunar rocks and soil have been hauled back from it. Over the New Year’s weekend, a pair of spacecraft the size of washing machines are set to enter orbit around it in the latest lunar mission. Their job is to measure the uneven gravity field and determine what lies beneath — straight down to the core. Since rocketing from the Florida coast in September, the nearidentical Grail spacecraft have been independently traveling to their destination and will arrive 24 hours apart.

“Both spacecraft have performed essentially flawlessly since launch, but one can never take anything for granted in this business,” said mission chief scientist Maria Zuber of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The nail-biting part is yet to come. On New Year’s Eve, one of the Grail probes — short for Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory — will fire its engine to slow down so that it can be captured into orbit. This move will be repeated by the other the following day. Engineers said the chances of the probes overshooting are slim since their trajectories have been precise. Getting struck by a cosmic ray may prevent the completion of the engine burn and they won’t get boosted into the right orbit. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will spend two months flying in formation and chasing one another

around the moon until they are about 35 miles above the surface with an average separation of 124 miles. Data collection would begin in March. Previous missions have attempted to measure lunar gravity with mixed success. Grail is the first mission dedicated to this goal. As the probes circle the moon, regional changes in the lunar gravity field will cause them to speed up or slow down. This, in turn, will change the distance between them. Radio signals transmitted by the spacecraft will measure the slight distance gaps, allowing researchers to map the underlying gravity field. Using the gravity information, scientists can deduce what’s below or at the lunar surface, such as mountains and craters, and may help explain why the far side of the moon is more rugged than the side that faces Earth.

Europe key to economy in ’12 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy will grow faster in 2012 — if it isn’t knocked off track by upheavals in Europe, according to an Associated Press survey of leading economists. However, they expect unemployment to be 8.4 percent, barely below the current 8.6 percent rate, by the time President Barack Obama runs for re-election in November. The three dozen private, corporate and academic economists expect the economy to grow 2.4 percent next year. In 2011, it likely grew less than 2 percent. The year is ending on an upswing. The economy has generated at least 100,000 new jobs for five months in a row — the longest such streak since 2006. The number of people applying

Quick Read

for unemployment benefits has dropped to the lowest level since April 2008. The trend suggests that layoffs have all but stopped and hiring could pick up. And the economy avoided a setback when Obama signed legislation Friday extending a Social Security tax cut that was to expire at year’s end. But Congress could agree only on a two-month extension. The economists surveyed Dec. 14-20 expect the country to create 177,000 jobs a month through Election Day 2012. That would be up from an average 132,000 jobs a month so far in 2011. Dean Maki, chief U.S. economist at Barclays Capital, said the U.S. economy remains vulnerable to an outside shock. A big threat is the risk that Europe’s debt crisis will trigger a worldwide credit freeze like the one that hit Wall

Street in late 2008. A shock to the U.S. economy, he said, might not be as dangerous if it were growing at a healthier 4 percent to 5 percent annual pace. But when growth is stuck at 2 percent or 3 percent, a major global crisis could stall job creation and raise unemployment. Beyond Europe, troubles in other areas could also upset the U.S. economy next year, the economists say. Congressional gridlock ahead of the 2012 elections and unforeseen global events, like this year’s Arab Spring protests, could slow the U.S. economy. Three economists said rising nuclear tensions with Iran are a concern. Fifty-six percent say the economy will get a lift from Federal Reserve policies, and those surveyed also think the economy is strong enough to withstand higher oil prices.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Would-be robber decked by clerk at store

Nation: Facebooking loot gets suspects arrested

World: Kim Jong Il’s heir’s transition smooth so far

World: Monitors arrive amid crackdown in Syria

A WOULD-BE ROBBER who demanded money from a store clerk got a fistful, police said. Before he could run off with any cash Friday, the clerk at the We Buy Gold store in Hendersonville, N.C., punched him in the nose. The 25-yearold man dropped to the floor. The 26-year-old clerk then grabbed the criminal’s gun — which turned out to be a pellet gun — and called police. The clerk was on high alert because the store had already been robbed once recently. Authorities are looking into whether the heists are related

AN 18-YEAR-OLD PITTSBURGH man is accused of burglarizing a market with three teens then posting pictures on his Facebook page showing the suspects mugging with some of the loot. Isaiah Cutler was jailed Friday for the Dec. 12 burglary. Police said Cutler and the teens stole more than $8,000 worth of cash, cigarettes, candy and checks from the business. The younger suspects have been charged in juvenile court and released to their parents. Cutler faces a preliminary hearing Wednesday.

NORTH KOREA’S NEXT leader burnished his diplomatic skills Monday, welcoming a private South Korean mourning delegation as state media revealed a new title that gives Kim Jong Un authority over political matters. The Rodong Sinmun newspaper described him as head of the Central Committee of the Workers’ Party — a post that appears to make him the top official in the ruling party. Kim Jong Un has rapidly gained prominence since the death of his father, Kim Jong Il, on Dec. 17. On Saturday, the North referred to him as “supreme leader” of the 1.2 million-strong armed forces.

THE ARAB LEAGUE sent monitors to Syria on Monday even though President Bashar Assad’s regime has only intensified its crackdown on dissent in the week since agreeing to the Arab plan to stop the bloodshed. Activists said government forces have killed several hundred civilians in the past week. At least 23 more deaths were reported Monday from intense shelling in the center of the country, just hours before the first 60 monitors were to arrive. In Cairo, an Arab League official said the monitoring mission was the Syrian regime’s “last chance” to reverse course.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011 — (C)

Fire:

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Wearable Art show relies on imagination

Orange glow CONTINUED FROM A1 About one hour later, the homeowner noticed an orange glow near the garbage can where the pillow had been placed. Four occupants evacuated the house. The homeowner extinguished the fire with a garden hose. The fire damaged an 8-by-15-foot section of siding and a 2½-by-16-foot soffit.

Damge unknown The cost of the damage was unknown. Nine firefighters, two captains, a paramedic, a chief and a lieutenant from Clallam County Fire District No. 2 made sure the fire was out and installed a working smoke detector. DeRousie reminded the public to refrain from putting hot materials in garbage cans.

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — It’s time to get your art on. Jefferson County Community Foundation’s Fund for Women and Girls is seeking imaginative wearable art designs for the 2012 Beautiful Apparel and Beyond Belief Wearable Art Show. “Artwear which is functional or fantastic, creative, gorgeous, sculptural or unexpected is being encouraged,” said Judith Bird, local artist and event artist contact coordinator. “Garments can be made in any media, and we wish to promote provocative, challenging art,” Bird said. “Students are encouraged to enter,” she said. Best in Show winners for Beautiful Apparel and Beyond Belief categories will receive $250. Winning designers for Best Student Work and People‘s Choice will receive gift certificates. Held in Port Townsend, regional artists are offered the opportunity to enter the juried runway show. Entries must be submit-

wind Gallery in Port Townsend, and the show was taped by Port Townsend Television. The artists’ works included creations fashioned from silk, leather and woven radio wire, as well as found objects such as seashells and beach glass. “People had so much fun at the inaugural show that they couldn’t wait to do it again,” said Debbi Steele, chairwoman of the Fund for Women & Girls. “The event was so popular, in fact, that we have expanded it to two shows,” Steele said. Proceeds will go toward grants from the foundation’s Fund for Women & Girls to local nonprofit JENNIFER JACKSON/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS agencies that “address the Artist Susan Hazard hand-painted her signature red, pink orange and gold root causes of problems affecting women and girls’ poppies on a thrift-store purchase to create this eye-popping wedding dress for last year’s Beautiful Apparel and Beyond Belief fashion show. It well-being,” according to its website at http://tinyurl. was modeled by Mary Lynn Malone with help from Katie Ballard. com/bnr3wjl. Application and guideted by Feb. 1 for the May 12 year and attracted an audi- were worn by live models lines are available at event. ence of more than 170 peo- competing for prizes. http://www.jccfgives.org or ple, a sold-out crowd, to the It raised $3,700 for the by emailing judithbird@ First show sold out Madrona MindBody Insti- Jefferson County Commu- cablespeed.com. ________ The inaugural wearable tute at Fort Worden State nity Foundation’s Fund for Women & Girls. art show — “From Beauti- Park. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be In that show, 18 artists The winning outfits were reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn. ful Apparel to Beyond Belief” — was in May this submitted 27 pieces that put on display at North- rice@peninsuladailynews.com.

Scout: Described as ‘a big guy with a big heart’ CONTINUED FROM A1 himself to help Blenk’s son, Robbie, earn his Eagle Robbie Blenk was travel- Scout rank — Scouting’s ing as a passenger with his highest — after his father’s father in their pickup near death. “I owed him that. He was McDonnell Creek when a a good buddy,” Grinnell said dump truck crossed the U.S. of Steve Blenk, with whom Highway 101 center line he worked with side by side and struck the Blenk truck to help advance local Scouthead-on Nov. 24, 2004. ing. Blenk was 48. Grinnell described Blenk The collision left the as “just a big guy with a big then-13-year-old Robbie heart” who wanted the fatherless and injured. Scouts “to do the best they Grinnell took it upon could in life as well

as professionally. “He inspired parents around him as well as kids.” Robbie Blenk is now studying fisheries and wildlife sciences at Oregon State University. Grinnell has three sons who became Eagle Scouts, and his son, Nick, rose from Cub Scout to Eagle with his pal Robbie Blenk. Today, Robbie’s father is also remembered in a special Troop 1451 award named for him.

The award recognizes the earning of certain merit badges, including outdoorsmanship and citizenship, which are earned on the path to becoming an Eagle. There is a memorial plaque on the wall where the troop meets with Steve’s name at the top. Below, it lists the names of Scouts who have earned the Steve Blenk Award. “In my husband’s patrol, seven achieved Eagle all together,” Steve Blenk’s

widow, Susan, recalled. She still works and lives in the Sequim-area and said she feels “warmth and pride” that the food drive her husband originally led has lived on so long. She also said she was not surprised. “Knowing this Scout troop, they’re so dedicated to community service,” she said. The first year, she said, Steve and Scouts visited downtown Seattle, where

they handed the blankets to homeless people living on the streets. “That was an eye-opener for the Scouts,” she said. “Steve’s idea was to just make the Scouts aware who the blankets benefitted. “Then we decided that we wanted it to benefit something more local.”

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Engel: ‘Very committed to helping our patients’ CONTINUED FROM A1 right up to the last board meeting she attended in Eric Lewis, OMC Chief early December.” “We’re going to miss Executive Officer, said Engel leaves a “lasting, pos- Arlene,” he said. “She has made quite an itive effect” on OMC and impact at OMC and our the communities it serves. “Arlene was an outstand- community.” Cammack said Engel ing board member,” Lewis was instrumental in helpsaid. “She was engaged and ing Sen. Jim Hargrove, a very committed to helping Democrat from Hoquiam our patients and our com- who represents the 24th District, which includes the munity,” he added. Lewis said that Engel North Olympic Peninsula, “did an outstanding job secure mental health funding in the state Legislature. Engel also served the mentally ill through her Sidney work with the Clallam Barthell, LMP County chapter of the WA ST 00023056 National Alliance on Mental Illness — or NAMI. A past president of the

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NAMI board, she was serving as a board member at her death. “She was a real asset to the community,” Cammack said. “She was able to get a lot things done as a Peninsula mental health advocate.” Dr. Tom Locke, pubic health officer for Clallam and Jefferson counties, knew Engel for about 30 years.

Champion of mentally ill “First and foremost, she had been a champion of the mentally ill and mental health services,” Locke said. “That’s been a real uphill battle over the years. “She also really had a

passion for health care access in general,” he added. “It wasn’t just confined to mental health. “She was active in her role on hospital commission and the Access to Health Care Committee.” After moving to Sequim in 1970, Engel and her husband, Paul Engel, helped develop Dominion Terrace, Sequim’s first retirement community. Engel served on the Sequim Planning Commission for 16 years and two years on the Sequim City Council. In addition to her service on OMC’s governing board, Engel served on advisory committees for mental health, hospice care, home

health and health care Washington Administrative access. Code Mental Health Law Rewrite Committee. VIMO board Fellow NAMI board member Kathleen Delgado Engel was also on the quoted Engle in an item in board of Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics, or the group’s August-September newsletter. VIMO. “I would like to share a Locke said Engel was definition of advocacy that “involved and very supportive” of the effort to bring Arleen Engle shared with volunteer medicine to the me,” Delgado wrote. “‘An advocate is someone Peninsula. Other positions Engel who beats the drum for held include board member someone else when their with the Olympic Area drum is broken.’” Said Locke: “Her’s was a Agency on Aging, Western State Hospital and the Pen- life well lived.” ________ insula Regional Support Network, as well as service Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be on the Clallam County reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. Human Services Coordinat- ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. ing Committee and the com.

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Van De Wege said if the bill does make it to a vote, he would like to see more of the burden placed on the larger fire departments to protect the small, rural districts.

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The Port Angeles Fire Department and East Jefferson Fire-Rescue have the largest paid staffs on the Peninsula, and also would be taking a serious hit, their chiefs said, particularly with the loss of any volunteers. “It will have a significant impact on the district,” Port Angeles Fire Chief Dan McKeen said, referring to Clallam County Fire District No. 2, which shares volunteers with the depart-

ment, “and also an impact on the Port Angeles Fire Department.” McKeen and Gordon Pomeroy, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue chief, said they would both expect to cover the cost for their volunteers.

Another decision But they also face another decision: what to do about the cost for their paid staff? Pomeroy said the agency

would likely end up covering those costs as well, while McKeen said it’s too early to say. McKeen said the department is inclined to cover the costs for volunteers. “It’s really difficult to attract and maintain volunteers,”he said. “And then asking them to contributing financially for a certification required of them to volunteer is really asking even more.” Pomeroy, who heads the

East Jefferson County Fire Chiefs Association, said the group has yet to take on the issue but he expects it to vote against it next month. The bill also would require fire agencies to cover the cost of certifying vehicles, which may end up costing as much as the personnel certifications, McKeen said.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Transit to raise price of monthly pass Cash fares to remain same city to the next — will go from $36 per month to $54 per month. PORT ANGELES — Cash fares will remain Clallam Transit is raising the same. the price of a monthly bus pass next week. Budget shortfall The cost of an adult base pass, which is used for getTransit officials have ting around a given city, said the new fare structure will go from $27 per month will help cover a $250,000 to $36 per month Sunday. shortfall in the $7.3 million An adult premium pass — 2012 operating budget. used for getting from one The public agency’s govBY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

erning board approved the changes Oct. 17. One of the goals of the new fare structure was to simplify the pass system for riders. The youth, senior and disabled base pass was folded into a one-size-fitsall $18 “discount” pass. A premium discount pass will be $36 per month. People who ride the bus more than 18 times per month will get a better deal if they buy a pass. A person who rides the bus fewer

■ Eliminate paratransit fare ticket books. ■ Implement locationbased pricing for paratransit trips. ■ Charge paratransit riders $1.50 per mile to travel more than threefourths of a mile off a fixed route. The charge will rise to $3 per mile in 2013 and be reevaluated for 2014. ■ Eliminate pro-rated Other changes bus pass sales to governOther changes in the ment entities and agencies. Agencies that issue more fare structure include:

than 20 passes per month will process their own vouchers and pay within 30 days. Agencies that issue fewer than 20 passes per month will pay in advance. ■ Reduce the 10 percent commission for bus pass outlets to 5 percent. For more information on the changes, visit www. clallamtransit.com.

than 18 times per month will save money with a daily pass. Daily passes cost $1 to get around a city and $1.50 for longer trips. Cash fares were raised in July 2010. The last time Clallam Transit raised the price of a monthly bus pass was in 1997.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Man injured PA to replace aging water pipe when car hits 3-way stop, bike lanes on horses on 112 tap for C Street PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Two horses died and a 41-year-old Port Angeles man suffered lacerations Monday morning when a vehicle collided with the animals on state Highway 112 near Freshwater Bay. Jimmy W. Pennington was treated and released from Olympic Medical Center after the 6:07 a.m. wreck eight miles west of Port Angeles, State Patrol troopers said.

Horses in road

troopers said. The vehicle went off the eastbound shoulder and came to a rest against an embankment, according to the collision memo. State Patrol spokesman Christopher Berg said two horses died as a result of the impact. A third horse was returned to its owner, Berg said. Pennington was wearing a seat belt, troopers said. Drugs or alcohol were not involved, the State Patrol said.

Pennington was driving ________ a 1986 Volkswagen Jetta in the eastbound lane when he Reporter Rob Ollikainen can went around a curve and be reached at 360-417-3537 or struck three horses stand- at rob.ollikainen@peninsula ing in the roadway, dailynews.com.

Peninsula homeless programs receive HUD renewal grants $495,800 given to area agencies PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic Peninsula programs serving the homeless received nearly a half-million dollars in federal grants last week. A total of $495,800 in Housing and Urban Development Continuum of Care renewal funding was awarded to Serenity House of Clallam County and Olympic Community Action Programs. The money is part of $38,610,507 in renewal funding to 208 programs in the state, up from $37,735,249 last year.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A five-year effort to replace 19,000 feet of aging water pipes will begin next year on a small stretch of C Street. Starting sometime in the spring, the city of Port Angeles plans to spend $1.5 million replacing 4,000 feet of the 50-year-old pipe between Lauridsen Boulevard and Glenwood Street. The project is expected to take a couple months. It will involve repaving the 0.2-mile section of C Street, referred to by city Engineer Mike Puntenney as one of the most in need of repairs improvements to its stormwater ditches, and the addition of bike lanes and other traffic-calming measures.

Avoid large rupture The pipe replacement is intended to avoid a large rupture, as seen on Park Avenue in 2004, when 3.8 million gallons of water were lost. “When it ruptures, it goes big time,” Puntenney said.

Residents happy C Street residents Bill and Lois Mair said the project will be the first time they have seen the road repaved since they moved there 20 years ago. But it’s the narrowing of the road, with the addition of bike lanes, a three-way stop at the intersection of C and Glenwood streets that they are looking most forward to seeing. The Mairs said too many people speed down the road, and they hope the new measures will help slow motorists. “They go so fast, and with the kids and animals around, it’s not good,” Lois Mair said. Over the next five years, the city plans to spend $6 million on replacing old

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The funding is to ensure that existing programs continue operating next year. Funds for new projects will be awarded in early 2012. Serenity House of Clallam County received three grants totaling $360,201 for programs in Port Angeles. Evergreen Family Village, a 16-unit transitional housing facility for families with children, was given $138,769, compared with $139,000 last year. Case management and other support services received $142,951, compared with $143,000 last year. Tempest, a 13-unit housing facility for single adults, was given $78,481, compared with $78,000 last year. Olympic Community Action Programs received $135,599 for the Crossroads program in Port Townsend. Last year, it received $1350,000. Crossroads is a 10-unit housing complex that provides two-year transitional housing for people coming out of substance abuse treatment who otherwise

would be homeless. “The grants we’re awarding today will literally keep the doors of our shelters open and will help those on the front lines of ending homelessness do what they do best,” said U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan. “It’s incredible that as we work to recover from the greatest economic decline since the Great Depression, the total number of homeless Americans is declining, in large part because of these funds.” HUD Northwest Regional Administrator Mary McBride said that some communities had seen modest declines in homelessness in 2011 while others saw an increase. “There is, in other words, lots of work to be done,” she said.

BY TOM CALLIS



BY ROB OLLIKAINEN


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, December 27, 2011 PAGE

A6 Briefly Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com MARKETS AND EXCHANGES were closed Monday for the Christmas holiday. They resume trading today.

Finance ties tightened by China, Japan BEIJING — Chinese and Japanese leaders have unveiled initiatives to tighten financial links between East Asia’s economic giants and sometime rivals — measures that could expand use of China’s tightly controlled currency abroad. During a visit to Beijing by Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, the two governments said in a surprise announcement Sunday they will encourage use of their own currencies in bilateral trade, which now is conducted mostly in U.S. dollars. They also agreed to support the sale of bonds denominated in China’s yuan by Japanese companies in Tokyo and foreign markets and by the state-owned Japan Bank of International Cooperation in mainland China’s markets, which are closed to most foreign investors.

Berkshire deal OMAHA, Nebraska — Berkshire Hathaway Inc. has completed the purchase of Chairman Warren Buffett’s hometown newspaper, the Omaha World-Herald. The $200 million deal announced Nov. 30 included $50 million in debt. Under the agreement, Berkshire acquires the World-Herald and daily newspapers in Kearney, Grand Island, York, North Platte and Scottsbluff in Nebraska; the Council Bluffs Nonpareil in Iowa; a number of weekly newspapers; and World Marketing, a direct-mail company with operations in Omaha, Chicago, Dallas, Atlanta and Los Angeles. World-Herald spokesman Joel Long said Monday that the deal closed Friday. He said World-Herald shareholders — about 275 employees and retirees and the Peter Kiewit Foundation — approved the sale by an overwhelming vote. The Associated Press

Nuclear disaster response failed Lack of communication, planning cited in report

public distrust. “This accident has taught us an important lesson on how we must be ready for soteigai,” it said.

BY YURI KAGEYAMA

Ill-prepared

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOKYO — Japan’s response to the nuclear crisis that followed the March 11 tsunami was confused and riddled with problems, including an erroneous assumption an emergency cooling system was working and a delay in disclosing dangerous radiation leaks, a report revealed Monday. The disturbing picture of harried and bumbling workers and government officials scrambling to respond to the problems at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant was depicted in the report detailing a government investigation.

The 507-page interim report, compiled by interviewing more than 400 people, including utility workers and government officials, found authorities had grossly underestimated tsunami risks, assuming the highest wave would be 20 feet. The tsunami hit at more than double those levels. The report criticized the use of the term “soteigai,” meaning “outside our imagination,” which it said implied authorities were shirking responsibility for what had happened. It said by labeling the events as beyond what could have been expected, officials had invited

public, such as using evasive language to avoid admitting serious meltdowns at the reactors, the report said. The government also delayed disclosure of radiation data in the area, unnecessarily exposing entire towns to radiation when they could have evacuated, the report found. The government recommended changes so utilities will respond properly to serious accidents. It recommended separating the nuclear regulators from the unit that promotes atomic energy, echoing frequent criticism since the disaster. Japan’s nuclear regulators were in the same ministry that promotes the industry, but they are being moved to the environment ministry next year to ensure more independence.

Sheriff may hawk copter naming rights Budget cuts could ground aircraft in 2012 BY BEN DOBBIN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A high-tech helicopter has helped Sheriff Kevin Walsh chase down fugitives, airlift accident victims and spearhead search-and-rescue missions in the Syracuse region of central New York since 1999. In 2012, Air-1 could be grounded by budget cuts. Walsh’s proposed solution? Slap a corporate logo on the Bell 407 chopper to raise ad revenue and keep her flying. “We [police] have put up with doughnut jokes for our entire existence. I think we can tolerate jokes about the Price Chopper chopper or the Wegmans whirlybird showing up,” Walsh said, referring to two supermarket chains.

Options “I don’t like the idea of our having to fund public services with private donations, but the option is not to have that public service.” While hawking naming rights for municipal stadiums, parks, mass-transit stations and other public entities is nothing new for the nation’s cash-strapped cities, sponsorship deals

LITTLETON (MASS.) POLICE DEPARTMENT

VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Littleton, Mass., Police Department cruiser bears a Donelan’s Supermarkets sticker. with police agencies are has been adorned for nine much less common, and years with a modest Donelan’s Supermarkets typically less lucrative. bumper sticker. Kelly said he’s endured Conflict of interest? plenty of flack, but “my On top of that, watchdog position is I have to give my groups — and many in uni- officers tools to provide the form — are wary about necessary services our citipotential conflicts when law zens paid for. enforcement cozies up with advertisers, such as officers Victims don’t care possibly looking the other way on matters involving “At 2:30 in the morning, corporate sponsors. someone laying out on a “I feel very confident my local highway because of an officers wouldn’t be compro- accident really doesn’t care mised,” said John Kelly, who’s paying for the cruiser police chief of Littleton, or what it says on its side.” Mass. In 2002, dozens of cities A town-approved jumped at an offer by a $12,000-a-year contract Charlotte, N.C., company to with a grocery chain pays provide new police cars for for one of Kelly’s five patrol $1 each in exchange for fescars. tooning them with race carIn return, the cruiser style logos.

The venture fizzled, in part because the line between tactful and tacky advertising can be a narrow one, and the company has gone out of business. “We can’t let cutesy things” subtract from “making us look serious,” said police Chief Philip Thorne in Springfield, Fla., which turned down a chance to save $500,000 over three years. “It sounded like a good idea,” recalled Bruce Owens, police chief in Summerville, S.C. “But the main concern is the potential ethical issues you might encounter, because no one gives something for nothing.” Russ Haven of the New York Public Interest Research Group fears the drive to find sponsorship arrangements in budgetstrapped times “may in some instances seem unseemly or feel like it’s going too far. “When it comes to law enforcement, you have this additional layer of concerns,” Haven said. “If the sponsor becomes a target of an investigation, does the public have confidence they’ll be treated equally under the law?” In addition, “what’s the appropriate valuation for naming rights?” Haven said. “Does it put government in the position of deciding what is an inappropriate sponsor, which could raise First Amendment issues?”

In Syracuse, the sheriff’s budget woes in recent years deepened this fall when the county Legislature eliminated $591,000 in taxpayer aid in 2012 for the helicopter known by its radio call sign. Bought for $2.3 million, Air-1 costs around $500,000 on average to operate and maintain each year. Walsh has appealed for private donations and hopes to secure federal grants to help pay for Air1’s four-pilot roster. Getting a commercial operator’s license from the Federal Aviation Administration to allow him to charge fees for medical flights might come through soon, potentially raising $125,000 to $200,000 a year. Selling naming rights could prove vital in filling the gap. Landing private funding wouldn’t be a first for a police airborne unit. In Missouri, St. Louis County police got cash donations and electronic equipment worth upward of $200,000 from three helicopter manufacturers in 2004 in exchange for putting the companies’ decals on three of its six choppers, said Capt. Kurt Frisz, a pilot. “It kept us flying at a critical time and got us equipment we wouldn’t have been able to afford otherwise,” said Frisz, who says the decals are hardly visible from the ground.

Coffee drinking may cut endometrial cancer risk THE NEW YORK TIMES

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reduction, and the authors drew no conclusions about whether caffeine or some other ingredient in coffee causes the effect. The lead author, Youjin Je, a doctoral student at the Harvard School of Public Health, said that for healthy non-pregnant women, drinking four cups of coffee a day has no known negative effects. But, she said, “a subIngredient unknown stantial amount of sugar, Neither decaffeinated cream or milk added to cofcoffee nor tea drinking was fee can negate the potential associated with a risk benefits.”

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The report, set to be finished by mid-2012, found workers at Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that ran Fukushima Dai-ichi, were untrained to handle emergencies like the power shutdown that struck when the tsunami destroyed backup generators — setting off the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. There was no clear manual to follow, and the workers failed to communicate, not only with the government but also among themselves, it said. Finding alternative ways to bring sorely needed

water to the reactors was delayed for hours because of the mishandling of an emergency cooling system, the report said. Workers assumed the system was working, despite several warning signs it had failed and was sending the nuclear core into meltdown. The report acknowledged that even if the system had kicked in properly, the tsunami damage may have been so great that meltdowns would have happened anyway. But a better response might have reduced the core damage, radiation leaks and the hydrogen explosions that followed at two reactors and sent plumes of radiation into the air, according to the report. Sadder still was how the government dallied in relaying information to the

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

A7

Inside and out, eatery expands options Colonel Hudson’s to offer customers indoor dining they opened Colonel Hudson’s Famous Kitchen, serving homemade fare through PORT ANGELES — a walk-up window to cusWhen they bought the tomers standing on the building at 536 Marine sidewalk. Drive in 2006, Malik Atwater and his wife, Vivian Wai, Sit-down dining had planned to eventually Now, in taking the buildopen an English-language school for foreign students. ing further back to its roots, Then people started Atwater and Wai are makflooding them with memo- ing $60,000 in renovations ries about the site, which for sit-down dining inside for many years had been about half the structure, Smitty’s restaurant and for doing so with help from a a short time after that was matching $10,000 facade Brickie’s restaurant, which grant from the city of Port moved there from another Angeles. The couple hopes to be Marine Drive site after being inundated by a mud- up and running by the end of January in a more conslide. In its last incarnation, ventional setting, with Atwater and Wai’s new pur- inside seating for 50 and a chase was Mickey’s, a mini- conference-meeting room. An outside deck for sumcasino that later moved to Front Street before closing. mer dining is in the works, The couple, former too, and maybe a beer and teachers of English in Tai- wine license as well. wan who met in that coun“Everyone kept saying try, sharply changed course. what good memories people After testing recipes and had of this place as a resconcocting them for their taurant,” Wai, 39, an Idaho own fry batter, sauces and native, said Friday as she buns — they grind their stood in the seating area, own beef for hamburgers red booth seats bought on and hand-cut their fries — Craigslist arrayed in neat BY PAUL GOTTLIEB

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Malik Atwater and Vivian Wai sit in a booth in what will become the dining area of Colonel Hudson’s Famous Kitchen along Marine Drive in Port Angeles. rows next to still-naked walls. Atwater, from Illinois, recalled one man who, as a boy, collected beer bottles from under the building for refunds. Another person recalled how servers roller-skated food to customers, Atwater said.

ter said, adding he’s received stitches twice for his efforts. Atwater and Wai have added an awning to the outside of the building, are replacing siding and have added large windows to the Cedar Street side of the building. “The awning really adds the dimension it needed for that building to look less industrial,” city Planning Manager Sue Roberds said. Roberds added that $88,246 in facade grants, which are funded by lodging taxes, have been distributed to city businesses to spruce up their exteriors. But Smitty’s nondescript look did not make it less of a draw, Roberds suggested, calling it “quite the place to go.” Atwater and Wai have three children, including a girl born June 18. The couple may have been destined to carry on the restaurant tradition. Married in 1996, they said in their wedding vows that they like to eat and cook.

The building, as nonde- layers of floor, including script as it is historic, was carpet and tile, before getbuilt in 1923, but all that ting to the base. Out of the basement he history came at a price. lugged a car axle and toilets, and disposed of a mumLayers of history mified cat. ________ Atwater peeled off three “Every time I would Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb different roofs when he start in one direction, I canSenior be reached at 360-417-3536 replaced the roof. would find something else or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily He peeled off about five to fix and fix and fix,” Atwa- news.com.

Forks woman wins $1,000 Santa Bucks BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Forks resident Misty Mate won the $1,000 top prize in the West End Business and Professional Association’s annual Santa Bucks drawing last weekend. When Mate stepped up to claim her prize on Christmas Eve, her teenage daughter accompanied her and burst into tears, said Pat Soderlind, Forks Community Food Bank director and member of the West End Business and Professional Association. “I like it when people who really need the money win the prize,” Soderlind said. Mate and her family received $1,000 in Santa Bucks, to be used as they wish. Santa Bucks can be redeemed as cash with members of the association. Members include not only retailers, such as Forks Outfitters, but also profes-

“I like it when people who really need the money win the prize.” PAT SODERLIND director Forks Community Food Bank sional services, such as several dentists. Santa Bucks also can used to pay bills at two other members of the association: Forks Community Hospital and the Clallam CHRIS COOK/FORKS FORUM County Public Utility DisMisty Mate of Forks, center, won $1,000 in Santa Bucks during the West End Business and trict.

Successful year

Professional Association’s annual drawing at Forks Outfitters on Christmas Eve. Posing with her are Leith Grahn of Lunsford & Associates, who is president of the association, left, and Santa Claus, played by Lloyd Lee.

On Monday, West End Business and Professional Association President Leith Grahn didn’t yet know how many of the $1 tickets were sold, but Soderlind on Sunday said it was clear it was a successful year. “The drum was really full,” Soderlind said. Once the winner is paid, remaining funds go toward future downtown holiday

decorations and lights, she said. Beginning in November, the association gives away turkeys every Saturday, Grahn said. Since Thanksgiving, the group also has given away gift certificates in a weekly drawing, leading up to the grand finale on Christmas Eve.

During the holiday weekend, Soderlind, in her role with West End Outreach also helped to deliver holiday gifts and food baskets. West End Outreach collected gift and food baskets for 257 families who registered, and also distributed baskets to families who did

not sign up but needed help, she said. “Many don’t sign up,” Soderlind said. Some have jobs and don’t feel it’s right to sign up, or they feel others need help more, or their pride stops them, she said. Soderlind said that in the small Forks community,

Remembering a Lifetime

TEMPS DIP BUT SLIDING GOES ON

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com.

Death Notices Carol June Grail June 7, 1941 — Dec. 23, 2011

Carol June Grail of Port Angeles died in Port Angeles. She was 70. Her obituary will be published later. Services: Thursday at 1 p.m., graveside service at Mount Angeles Memorial Park followed by a celebration of her life at The Landing mall. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

We wish to thank everyone that brought food and sent so many lovely cards after the loss of my beloved husband,

Fred Wilson. Also thank you for the memorials given to the Salvation Army in Fred’s memory. We will always remember the kindness you have shown us. Alta Wilson & Family

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Beau Sturdivant, 2, goes down while Sam Mugrage, 4, goes up at the Port Townsend Recreation Center last week. Though temperatures were in the low 40s, they didn’t let a little chilly weather cut into their slide time.

■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

word of mouth is often the best way to find out where services are most needed, even if they aren’t asked for. “It helps to be in touch,” she said.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, December 27, 2011 PAGE

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A new Kim . . . a new chance? ON MY FIRST trip to North Korea in 1989, I made a nuisance of myself by randomly barging into private homes. I wanted to see how ordiNicholas nary North Kristoff Koreans actually live, and people were startled but hospitable. The most surprising thing I found was The Loudspeaker affixed to a wall in each home. The Loudspeaker is like a radio but without a dial or off switch. In the morning, it awakens the household with propaganda. (In his first golf outing, Comrade Kim Jong Il shoots five holes-inone!) It blares like that all day. The Loudspeaker underscores that North Korea is not just another dictatorship but, perhaps, the most totalitarian country ever. Stalin and Mao were murderous but low-tech; the Kim family added complex systems of repression. Anyone disabled is considered an eyesore, for example. So people with disabilities are often expelled from the capital, Pyongyang. Government propaganda is shameless. During a famine, North Korean news media warned

starving citizens against overeating by recounting the cautionary tale of a man who ate his fill, and then exploded. Once in North Korea, I stopped in a rural area to interview two high school girls at random. They were friendly, if startled. So was I when they started speaking simultaneously and repeating political lines in perfect unison. They could have been robots. When videos (of movies, music or religion) began to be smuggled in from China, police began to turn off the power to entire buildings. Then the police would go door to door and examine what video was stuck inside players. A smuggled tape could mean the dispatch of an entire family to a labor camp. What do we make of this country? For Americans, a starting point should be to recognize some failures of American policy. A few lessons: ■ Don’t assume that the end of the regime is imminent. I’ve been covering North Korea on and off since 1987, and outsiders have always been whispering about rumored uprisings or suggesting that the government is on its last legs. Yes, North Korea’s regime could collapse tomorrow — or it could stagger along for another 20 years. The “Great Successor” Kim Jong Un could outlast President Obama.

denounced her. ■ Don’t Her own assume that husband then everybody stepped fordetests the ward, pleading regime. to be allowed All those to execute her. North Koreans This crying because request was of Kim Jong granted, and Il’s death? the husband Their grief is probably sincere. then shot his In conversawife to death. tions with ■ Don’t try North Korean to isolate defectors, I’m North Korea. struck by how The West many lambaste has reacted to the Kim North Koreregime but add an’s nuclear that their relaprogram by tives left sanctioning ARCADIO ESQUIVEL/CAGLE CARTOONS and isolating behind still believe in it — Kim Jong Un the country. because they But isolaknow nothing else. tion has mostly backfired. Many also are passionate It’s one of the things that nationalists, preferring a homekeeps the Kim family in power, grown despot to any hint of forand we’re helping enforce it. eign economic colonialism. Moreover, economic pain is not Faith and fear combine to going to destroy the regime. keep people in line. In the mid-1990s, perhaps one In a book about North Korea, million people died in famine, Bradley Martin tells how one of and the regime was unhurt. Kim Jong Il’s aides told his wife Our failures in North Korea about his boss’s womanizing. are manifest. The wife truly believed in the In 1994, we came close to war basic decency of the North on the Korean Peninsula, avertKorean system and wrote to the ing it with a nuclear deal that leadership to protest the rested on false hope. debauchery. The Clinton administration The letter was passed on to thought the regime would colKim Jong Il, who brought the lapse before the West had to woman in front of a crowd and deliver civilian nuclear reactors

as its part of the agreement. Confronted with evidence of cheating by North Korea, the Bush administration then backed out of the deal. The result was even more disastrous. North Korea accelerated its nuclear assembly line and accumulated enough plutonium for perhaps eight weapons. American officials blame China for coddling North Korea, but at least Beijing has a strategy. It is to encourage the Kim regime to replicate the opening and reform policies that transformed China itself. These days, Chinese traders, cellphones, DVDs and CDs are already common in border areas of North Korea, doing more to undermine Kim rule than any policy of the United States. There are no good solutions. But let’s take advantage of the leadership transition to try a dose of outreach. If we can inch toward diplomatic relations, trade and peopleto-people exchanges, we’re not rewarding a monstrous regime. We just might be digging its grave.

________ Nicholas D. Kristof is a twotime Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for The New York Times. E-mail him via http://tinyurl. com/kristofmail.

Anti-mercury rule stirs toxic politics HERE’S WHAT I wanted for Christmas: something that would make us both healthier and richer. And since I was just making a wish, why Paul not ask that Krugman Americans get smarter, too? Surprise: I got my wish, in the form of new Environmental Protection Agency standards on mercury and air toxics for power plants. These rules are long overdue. We were supposed to start regulating mercury more than 20 years ago But the rules are finally here, and will deliver huge benefits at only modest cost. So, naturally, some Republicans are furious. But before I get to the politics, let’s talk about what a good thing the EPA just did. As far as I can tell, even opponents of environmental regulation admit that mercury is nasty stuff. It’s a potent neurotoxicant. The expression “mad as a hatter” emerged in the 19th century because hat makers of the time treated fur with mercury compounds, and often suffered nerve and mental damage as a result. Hat makers no longer use mercury (and who wears hats these days?), but a lot of mercury gets into the atmosphere from old coalburning power plants that lack modern pollution controls. From there it gets into the water, where microbes turn it into methylmercury, which builds up in fish. And what happens then? The EPA explains: “Methylmercury exposure is a

particular concern for women of childbearing age, unborn babies and young children, because studies have linked high levels of methylmercury to damage to the developing nervous system, which can impair children’s ability to think and learn.” That sort of sounds like something we should regulate, doesn’t it? The new rules would also have the effect of reducing fine particle pollution, which is a known source of many health problems, from asthma to heart attacks. In fact, the benefits of reduced fine particle pollution account for most of the quantifiable gains from the new rules. The key word here is “quantifiable.” EPA’s cost-benefit analysis only considers one benefit of mercury regulation, the reduced loss in future wages for children whose IQs are damaged by eating fish caught by freshwater anglers. There are without doubt many other benefits to cutting mercury emissions, but at this point the agency doesn’t know how to put a dollar figure on those benefits. Even so, the payoff to the new rules is huge — up to $90 billion a year in benefits compared with around $10 billion a year of costs in the form of slightly higher electricity prices. This is, as David Roberts of Grist.org says, a very big deal. And it’s a deal some Republicans very much want to kill. With everything else that has been going on in U.S. politics recently, the GOP’s radical antienvironmental turn hasn’t gotten the attention it deserves. But something remarkable has happened on this front. Only a few years ago, it seemed possible to be both a Republican

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A fisherman reels in a bass in view of the coal pile near a coal-fired generating station, regulated by new Environmental Protection Agency rules, in Pekin, Ill. in good standing and a serious environmentalist. During the 2008 campaign, John McCain warned of the dangers of global warming and proposed a cap-and-trade system for carbon emissions. Today, however, the party line is that we must not only avoid any new environmental regulations but roll back the protection we already have. And I’m not exaggerating. During the fight over the debt ceiling, Republicans tried to attach riders that, as Time magazine put it, would essentially have blocked the EPA and the Interior Department from doing their jobs. Oh, by the way, you may have heard reports to the effect that Jon Huntsman is different. And he did indeed once say: “Conservation is conservative. I’m not

ashamed to be a conservationist.” Never mind: he, too, has been assimilated by the anti-environmental Borg, denouncing the EPA’s “regulatory reign of terror,” and predicting that the new rules will cause blackouts by next summer, which would be a neat trick considering that the rules won’t even have taken effect yet. More generally, whenever you hear dire predictions about the effects of pollution regulation, you should know that special interests always make such predictions, and are always wrong. For example, power companies claimed that rules on acid rain would disrupt electricity supply and lead to soaring rates; none of that happened, and the acid rain program has become a shining example of how environmentalism and economic growth can go hand in hand.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ ROY TANAKA, news editor; 360-417-3539, roy.tanaka@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ JEFF CHEW, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ CHARLIE BERMANT, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

But again, never mind: mindless opposition to “job killing” regulations is now part of what it means to be a Republican. And I have to admit that this puts something of a damper on my mood: the EPA has just done a very good thing, but if a Republican — any Republican — wins next year’s election, he or she will surely try to undo this good work. Still, for now at least, those who care about the health of their fellow citizens, and especially of the nation’s children, have something to celebrate.

________ Paul Krugman is a university economics professor and columnist for The New York Times. In 2008, Krugman won the Nobel Prize in Economics. E-mail him via http://tinyurl.com/yswr9f.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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Death on Rainier fuels religious fight County wanted to perform autopsy on Jewish man THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TACOMA — The death of a 54-year-old Jewish man on a snowy slope on Mount Rainier set the stage for a Pierce County court fight pitting religious belief against scientific certainty. Brian Grobois of New Rochelle, N.Y., died on a solo snowshoe hike, apparently from hypothermia. His body was recovered Dec. 13. Three days later, a judge upheld an appeal barring Pierce County’s medical examiner from conducting an autopsy on Grobois’ body because of religious objections from the family, The News Tribune reported in Sunday’s newspaper. The case attracted the interest of Gov. Chris Gregoire and Jewish leaders from around the country. Jewish law requires a fast burial and no autopsy, but the Pierce County medical examiner fought for an autopsy because questions remain about the New York man’s death.

Death and afterlife “This is not a matter of life and death. This is a matter of death and afterlife,” said Rabbi Zalman Heber, director of Chabad Jewish Center of Pierce County, on Friday. But Pierce County Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Clark said state law clearly empowers him to investigate unnatural deaths, and an autopsy was needed to answer questions that arose in his mind about how Grobois died. “Their concerns were very real to them,” Clark said in an interview Friday. “But they’re in conflict with Washington law and our charge to accurately determine deaths, and I can’t make everybody happy.” State law doesn’t allow families to stop autopsies on religious grounds. Heber said the Jewish community intends to ask state lawmakers in the upcoming legislative session to change the law to accommodate such requests.

He said 11 states have similar exemptions. “This case is a classic example of why this is needed so there is no confusion in the future,” Heber said. “The family [members] shouldn’t have had to go through what they went through.” Clark said such a change would have significant implications for medical examiners around Washington state and could jeopardize the integrity of death investigations. Grobois realized a dream Dec. 11 when he arrived at Paradise at Mount Rainier National Park for a snowshoe excursion, but something went amiss. The family called the park the next morning to report him overdue.

Likely lost his way A helicopter crew found him later that afternoon lying in the snow at the top of the Stevens Creek drainage at an elevation of about 5,400 feet. A park spokeswoman said he likely lost this way, became exhausted, sat down and succumbed to the brutal cold. Paradise reached a low of 14 degrees that Sunday night, and Grobois was not equipped to spend the night outdoors. Grobois was taken by helicopter to Madigan Army Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead. Attending Madigan doctors wrote on medical records that Grobois died of “hypothermia/cardiac arrest,” according to Clark. Heber said the doctors told him and Grobois’ wife, daughter and son, who had flown in the morning of Dec. 13, that there was no need for an autopsy; they were confident about the cause of death. A chief investigator for the National Park Service told Heber he reached the same conclusion independently, Heber said Friday. “From all angles, there was no need for an autopsy,” Heber said. But Clark reached a dif-

ferent conclusion. The circumstances of Grobois’ death and the fact that he was in good health and no one witnessed his death made Clark determine he needed to conduct his own investigation. “They wrote the only thing they knew, which is the body was cold,” Clark said. “The body can get cold and cause death, or death can happen for some other reason and then the body can get cold, and they don’t have any basis for telling the difference.” He also noted the body was covered in bruises, inconsistent with a finding that he wandered lost, fell asleep and died. Heber said the situation put incredible stress on the Grobois family. Jewish law prevents the family from starting its seven days of mourning until a body is buried. “It was agony for them,” he said.

Judge bars autopsy After a hearing Dec. 16, a judge signed an order barring the medical examiner’s office from conducting an autopsy and ordering the body to be released to the family. Clark, in consultation with the prosecuting attorney’s office, decided against another appeal. “We were afraid that if we lost the second level of appeal that would set a precedent that would be dangerous not just for us, but for every other medical examiner system in the state,” he said. He said he wasn’t influenced by calls the Grobois family and their supporters made to his office and to other officials. Grobois was buried in Jerusalem on Monday. Heber said the family is confident that Grobois died of hypothermia doing what he loved. The case ended with no such certainty for Clark and his office. On Grobois’ death certificate, it listed his cause and manner of death as “undetermined.” Another line gives the reason: “Examination prohibited by court order.”

Briefly: State Winter storm claims life of 9-year-old

hitched a ride. She says it’s been a blessing to be part of the community and to watch the kids grow up.

Wrong-way driver

OLYMPIA — The State Patrol said an 86-year-old man drove more than two miles in the wrong direction down U.S. Highway 101 and Interstate 5 through Olympia and Tumwater on Christmas Day, causing at least one crash. KOMO-TV reported the incident began when the driver pulled onto Highway 101 from Crosby Boulevard, then started heading 43 years of busing south in the northbound PASCO — The year the lanes toward the interfirst Boeing 747 was deliv- change with I-5. ered and The Beatles’ “Hey After the interchange, Jude” topped the charts, the man continued heading Marilyn Van Hollebeke south in the northbound took a temporary job drivlanes of I-5. He caused at ing a school busy for the least one crash when tiny Star School District another driver swerved to northeast of Pasco. avoid him. She stuck around a litA state trooper stopped tle longer than expected. the man near the intersecThe Tri-City Herald tion of I-5 and Trosper reported Hollebeke is retirRoad. ing after 43 years driving a The state patrol said the little yellow bus to and man was issued a citation from a small elementary for negligent driving and school. She drove her last route was referred for a license re-evaluation. this past week. The Associated Press She said she has no idea how many miles she has driven over the years, but How’s the fishing? she does have a lot of memMatt Schubert reports. ories from the time she Fridays in encouraged a rattlesnake to move along with a stick PENINSULA DAILY NEWS to the baby bat that

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CLINTON — A Christmas Day wind storm cut power to thousands around the region and snapped a large tree branch that fell and killed a 9-year-old Whidbey Island girl. Trooper Keith Leary said the branch that fell onto a Ford Explorer just before 1 p.m. Sunday was estimated to be a foot in diameter and at least 15 feet long. Leary told The Seattle Times the accident could not have been avoided. CPR was tried, but Tobiah Leonard died at the scene. Four other people in the truck — a woman who was driving, a man in the front passenger seat and 18-year-old and 12-year-old girls — were taken to Whidbey General Hospital with what initially were believed to be minor injuries. However, the man later was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle for neck and back injuries. The five people were believed to be family members, but Leary said he couldn’t confirm that. They were on their way from Langley to a Christmas gathering in the south part of the island when the accident happened near Cultus Bay.

Some 37,000 customers across the region lost power during the day, many for hours, as winds gusting at more than 45 mph blew down tree limbs and power lines. Strong winds knocked a 40-year-old kite-surfer into Lake Washington on Sunday morning, the Coast Guard reported. Petty Officer Michelle Mosley said the man had left from Magnuson Park and was about threefourths of the way to Kirkland when he fell into the chilly lake. He was rescued by a boater and was not injured.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, December 27, 2011 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B No. 1 Seed

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Green Bay fans celebrate the Packers’ romp over the Chicago Bears on Sunday.

To win or rest players? BY CHRIS JENKINS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Now that the Green Bay Packers have wrapped up the No. 1 seed in the NFC, Mike McCarthy is free to rest some of his starters in the regularseason finale. And while McCarthy’s natural inclination might be playing to win — especially with the NFC North rival Detroit Lions coming to Lambeau Field on New Year’s Day — the coach acknowledged after the Packers’ 35-21 victory over the Chicago Bears on Sunday night that his team’s injury situation might dictate his strategy. “We’ll look at all of our options,” McCarthy said. “But I’m not going to stand here and tell you we want to give away opportunities to win the game. “We’re going to play to win the game next week. I’m not real excited about a division opponent coming in here and think we’re not going to do everything we can to get to 15-1. “But health is an issue for us. I think that’s stating the obvious.” Aaron Rodgers threw five touchdown passes in a game for the first time in his NFL career, breaking a close game wide open by leading three quick scoring drives in the second half. The Packers (14-1) nailed down the No. 1 seed in the NFC and claimed another round of bragging rights in the storied rivalry by eliminating the Bears (7-8) from the playoff chase. Chicago’s loss also put the Atlanta Falcons in the playoffs. Rodgers threw a pair of touchdown passes to Jordy Nelson, another two to James Jones, and found tight end Jermichael Finley for a score. Rodgers was 21 of 29 for 283 yards and no interceptions when backup Matt Flynn took over with 7:54 left in the game. Rodgers has 45 touchdown passes this season — only shy of Tom Brady’s single-season record set in 2007. But when asked about the possibility of breaking Brady’s record, Rodgers made it sound as if he didn’t expect to see much of the field next Sunday. “I think that’s probably safe,” Rodgers said. Rodgers said he expected McCarthy to weigh the pros and cons of playing to win. “There’s something to be said about finishing the season well,” Rodgers said. “The Bears tried to keep us out of the playoffs last year in the last game of the year and it would be nice to finish out the season the way we started it, with a strong showing in a home game. “That being said, I think you have to take into account the health of your football team. “We have some guys banged up. We’ll see what Mike says this week. But until we hear differently, we’ll prepare as if we’re going to play.” Rodgers might not get a shot at Brady’s touchdown record, but he did break a franchise record Sunday. TURN

TO

PACK/B3

CHRIS TUCKER (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend’s Will O’Brien plays in a jamboree at Port Angeles High School in November. O’Brien and his teammates will be competing in the 14-team Crush in the Slush tournament Wednesday and Thursday.

Two prep tourneys set PA, PT both host own hoops events this week PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Area prep basketball fans who stayed home for the holidays could be into a little slice of heaven this week because there will be two major tournaments going on at the same time. The popular annual Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School will feature 14 boys and girls varsity teams Wednesday and Thursday. There will be eight boys teams and six girls squads. And just down the road at Port Angeles High School will be the first Winter Classic Basketball Tournament that will showcase four varsity boys and four JV boys teams Wednesday and Thursday. Port Angeles boys basketball coach Wes Armstrong said that the Roughriders aren’t looking to compete with the granddaddy Port Townsend tourney but that they just wanted to stay home for Christmas vacation. “Normally, we travel a lot during the holidays,” Armstrong said. “We just wanted to host our own tourney so we could stay home for the holidays. Both Port Angeles and Port Townsend are great places for other teams to come and spend the holidays and look over.” While Armstrong said he expects the influx of outside teams will help the Port Angeles economy, it won’t do a lot to raise money for the school. “We expect to break even after playing the refs, and any extra money we will give to the ASB fund, but it probably won’t

Preps be a lot.” Port Angeles athletic director Dwayne Johnson said the price of admission for each day would be the same for a regular basketball game. “And it will be good for all day,” Johnson said.

PA vs. Overlake Besides host Port Angeles, other varsity teams at the tourney will be Overlake of Redmond, King’s of Seattle and Anacortes. The Riders will open against Overlake, which is a private school like King’s, at 8 p.m. Wednesday. King’s will take on Anacortes at 6 p.m. the opening day while the JV schedule will have Port Angeles playing Kingston at 2 p.m. and King’s playing Crescent varsity at 4 p.m. Armstrong said he is expecting a competitive tourney. “King’s is always a 1A state contender while Overlake and Anacortes both play in strong leagues,” he said. Wednesday’s winners play Thursday in the championship game at 5 p.m. while the losers play for third place at 1 p.m. The JV winners play Thursday at 3 p.m. for all the marbles while the losers compete for third at 11 a.m. The Riders varsity may not be at full force because of inju- Port Angeles point guard Cameron Braithwaite plays in the Port Angeles jamboree earlier in the season. He ries to two key players.

will direct the Roughriders at the Winter Classic

TURN

TO

TOURNEYS/B3 tourney in Port Angeles on Wednesday and Thursday.

Bengals trying to fill up stadium Players begging fans to purchase tickets to finale BY JOE KAY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CINCINNATI — Hot dogs, cotton candy, hot chocolate and water. The Bengals offered refreshments Monday to fans who lined up for a ticket promotion aimed at filling Paul Brown Stadium for the final game. The Bengals made a buyone, get-one-free offer to season ticket holders for the final regular season game Sunday. Cincinnati (9-6) would clinch

a wild-card playoff berth by beating the Baltimore Ravens (11-4). The challenge is to fill the 65,500-seat stadium, which has been one-third empty for most games this season. The Bengals have sold out only one home game, when Pittsburgh brought thousands of fans. Cincinnati sold 41,273 tickets for its victory over Arizona on Saturday that gave the Bengals only their third winning record in the last 21 years. Fans are upset over the franchise’s dismal showing and ownership’s reluctance to change. The team sold a “couple thousand” tickets Monday morning, said Jeff Berding, the team’s

“We’ll do some incredible things. We’ll do some things I wish we didn’t quite do, I’ll tell you that. But we’ll do some incredible things. It will be a good football game.” MARVIN LEWIS Bengals head coach director of ticket sales. “We have a lot of tickets to sell,” Berding said. “The response has been great.” If the team doesn’t sell out with this promotion restricted to season-ticket holders, it will consider a discount offer to the public. After Saturday’s win, Bengals players practically begged fans to fill the stadium for the final game.

“We had a very enthusiastic stadium last week,” coach Marvin Lewis said Monday. “I tell these guys, ‘I can’t wait to see us play.’ I think people that haven’t seen us play in person will have a good time. “We’ll do some incredible things. We’ll do some things I wish we didn’t quite do, I’ll tell you that. But we’ll do some incredible things. It will be a good football game.”


B2

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SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Today’s

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

1:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Western Michigan vs. Purdue, Little Caesars Pizza Bowl, Site: Ford Field - Detroit (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Pittsburgh vs. Notre Dame (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Louisville vs. North Carolina State, Belk Bowl, Site: Bank of America Stadium - Charlotte, N.C. (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Boston Celtics vs. Miami Heat, Site: American Airlines Arena - Miami (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Wisconsin vs. Nebraska (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Utah Jazz vs. Los Angeles Lakers, Site: Staples Center - Los Angeles (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Neah Bay at Tulalip Heritage Tournament, TBA. Girls Basketball: South Kitsap at Port Angeles, 5 p.m.; Neah Bay at Tulalip Heritage Tournament, TBA.

Wednesday Boys Basketball: Port Townsend vs. Chimacum at Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School, 5:45 p.m.; Port Angeles hosts Roughriders Winter Basketball Classic, Port Angeles varsity vs. Overlake, 8 p.m.; Port Angeles JV vs. Kingston, 2 p.m.; Crescent varsity vs. King’s, 4 p.m.; Neah Bay at Tulalip Heritage Tournament, TBA. Girls Basketball: Neah Bay at Tulalip Heritage Tournament, TBA; Chimacum vs. North Mason at Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School, 9 a.m.; Port Townsend vs. Orting at Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School, 4 p.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College vs. Yakima Valley at Clackamas, Ore., Tournament, 3 p.m.

Thursday Boys Basketball: Port Angeles hosts Roughriders Winter Basketball Classic, TBA; Forks at North Beach Christmas Classic, TBA; Clallam Bay at Quilcene, 7 p.m.; Port Townsend and Chimacum at Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School, TBA. Girls Basketball: Forks at North Beach Christmas Classic, TBA; Clallam Bay at Quilcene, 5:30 p.m.; Port Townsend vs. Chimacum at Crush in the Slush tourney at Port Townsend High School, 4 p.m. Wrestling: Port Townsend at Tenino Duels, TBA; Sequim at North Mason Classic, 9:30 a.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Clackamas, Ore., Tournament, 5 p.m.

Football

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SUN BOWL, HERE

WE COME

Utah coach Kyle Whittingham flashes the Utah “U” while wearing a sombrero during a reception for the team at El Paso International Airport on Monday in El Paso, Texas. Utah will take on Georgia Tech on Saturday in the Sun Bowl.

National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF y-San Fran 12 3 0 .800 346 Seattle 7 8 0 .467 301 Arizona 7 8 0 .467 289 St. Louis 2 13 0 .133 166 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 363 Dallas 8 7 0 .533 355 Philadelphia 7 8 0 .467 362 Washington 5 10 0 .333 278 South W L T Pct PF x-New Orleans11 3 0 .786 457 x-Atlanta 9 5 0 .643 341 Carolina 6 9 0 .400 389 Tampa Bay 4 11 0 .267 263 North W L T Pct PF y-Green Bay 14 1 0 .933 515 x-Detroit 10 5 0 .667 433 Chicago 7 8 0 .467 336 Minnesota 3 12 0 .200 327 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF y-New England12 3 0 .800 464 N.Y. Jets 8 7 0 .533 360 Buffalo 6 9 0 .400 351 Miami 5 10 0 .333 310

PA 202 292 328 373 PA 386 316 318 333 PA 306 281 384 449 PA 318 342 328 432

PA 321 344 385 296

South L T Pct 5 0 .667 7 0 .533 11 0 .267 13 0 .133 North W L T Pct x-Baltimore 11 4 0 .733 x-Pittsburgh 11 4 0 .733 Cincinnati 9 6 0 .600 Cleveland 4 11 0 .267 West W L T Pct Denver 8 7 0 .533 Oakland 8 7 0 .533 San Diego 7 8 0 .467 Kansas City 6 9 0 .400 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division W y-Houston 10 Tennessee 8 Jacksonville 4 Indianapolis 2

PF 359 302 224 230

PA 255 295 316 411

PF 354 312 328 209

PA 250 218 299 294

PF 306 333 368 205

PA 383 395 351 335

Thursday’s Game Indianapolis 19, Houston 16 Saturday’s Games Oakland 16, Kansas City 13, OT Tennessee 23, Jacksonville 17 Pittsburgh 27, St. Louis 0 Buffalo 40, Denver 14 Carolina 48, Tampa Bay 16 Minnesota 33, Washington 26 Baltimore 20, Cleveland 14

New England 27, Miami 24 N.Y. Giants 29, N.Y. Jets 14 Cincinnati 23, Arizona 16 Detroit 38, San Diego 10 San Francisco 19, Seattle 17 Philadelphia 20, Dallas 7 Sunday’s Game Green Bay 35, Chicago 21 Monday’s Game Atlanta at New Orleans, late Sunday, Jan. 1 Chicago at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m. Buffalo at New England, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Miami, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. San Diego at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1:15 p.m. Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 5:30 p.m. End of regular season

Basketball National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct New York 1 0 1.000 New Jersey 0 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 0 .000 Toronto 0 0 .000 Boston 0 1 .000 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 1 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 0 .000 Charlotte 0 0 .000 Washington 0 0 .000 Orlando 0 1 .000 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 1 0 1.000 Cleveland 0 0 .000 Detroit 0 0 .000 Indiana 0 0 .000 Milwaukee 0 0 .000 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct Houston 0 0 .000 Memphis 0 0 .000

B3

GB — ½ ½ ½ 1 GB — ½ ½ ½ 1 GB — ½ ½ ½ ½

GB — —

New Orleans 0 0 .000 — San Antonio 0 0 .000 — Dallas 0 1 .000 ½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 1 0 1.000 — Denver 0 0 .000 ½ Minnesota 0 0 .000 ½ Portland 0 0 .000 ½ Utah 0 0 .000 ½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 1 0 1.000 — Phoenix 0 0 .000 ½ Sacramento 0 0 .000 ½ L.A. Lakers 0 1 .000 1 Golden State 0 1 .000 1 Sunday’s Games New York 106, Boston 104 Miami 105, Dallas 94 Chicago 88, L.A. Lakers 87 Oklahoma City 97, Orlando 89 L.A. Clippers 105, Golden State 86 Monday’s Games Toronto at Cleveland, late Milwaukee at Charlotte, late Detroit at Indiana, late Houston at Orlando, late New Jersey at Washington, late Oklahoma City at Minnesota, late Denver at Dallas, late Memphis at San Antonio, late New Orleans at Phoenix, late L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, late Philadelphia at Portland, late Chicago at Golden State, late Today’s Games Atlanta at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Sacramento at Portland, 7 p.m. Utah at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Indiana at Toronto, 3 p.m. Miami at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Boston at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Denver, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Phoenix, 6 p.m. New York at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Tourneys: Crush in the Slush slated for PT CONTINUED FROM B1 Hayden McCartney is still nursing an injury he received in the North Kitsap game and is doubtful for the tourney while bit 6-foot-8 center Easton Napiontek is still dealing with a back injury. “Easton probably won’t play because he is too valuable,” Armstrong said. “We don’t want to rush him. There is still plenty of basketball season left and then there is the baseball season ahead.” Napiontek signed a letter-ofintent in fall to play baseball at

Central Washington University.

Crush in the Slush PORT TOWNSEND — The annual Crush in the Slush tourney turns national with the Santa Fe Christian girls team from Solana Beach, Calif., scheduled for this year. Jefferson County archrivals Port Townsend and Chimacum will have both their teams at the tourney with the two boys teams meeting each other at 5:45 p.m. Wednesday and the two girls squads going head-to-head Thursday at 4 p.m.

The Chimacum boys will put their perfect 7-0 record on the line at the tourney. Wednesday’s opening schedule for the boys will have Seattle Academy vs. Orting at 10:45 a.m., Kingston vs. Woodinville at 2:15 p.m., the Redskins vs. the Cowboys as 5:45 p.m. and Lake Stevens vs. Ingraham at 7:30 p.m. In girls action, North Mason plays Chimacum at 9 a.m., Santa Fe Christian vs. Seattle Academy at 12:30 p.m. and Port Townsend vs. Orting at 4 p.m. In second-day boys action Thursday, the losers between

Seattle Academy and Orting, and Port Townsend and Chimacum play at 10:45 a.m., and the losers between Kingston and Woodinville, and Lake Stevens and Ingraham compete at 2:15 p.m. In the victory circle, the Port Townsend-Chimacum winner plays the Seattle Academy-Orting winner at 5:45 p.m. for the Division 2 championship, and the Kignston-Woodinville winner plays the Lake Stevens-Ingraham winner at 7:30 p.m. for the Division 1 title. In second-day girls action, Seattle Academy plays Orting at

9 a.m., North Mason takes on Santa Fe Christian at 12:30 p.m. and the Redskins play the Cowboys at 4 p.m. Admission for adults is $6 per day or $10 for two days; students, senior citizens and children $3 per day or $5 for two days. Port Townsend Basketball Club sponsors the event and the proceeds benefit youth sports. Corporate sponsors include Homer Smith Insurance, Edward Jones, The Leader, Russ Hoover, Charlie Kaniesky, CPA and Dr. Jay Lawrence.

Pack: Green Bay may rest players vs. Lions CONTINUED FROM B1 line, as the Packers were without three of their top four tackles. Chad Clifton returned to pracWith 4,643 yards passing, he tice this week after sitting out surpassed Lynn Dickey’s singleseason total of 4,458 set in 1983. since October because of ham“It’s obviously an award that’s string and back injuries, but isn’t bigger than an individual award,” ready to play. Bryan Bulaga was inactive Rodgers said. Sunday because of a left knee “It takes obviously the offensprain, and backup Derek Shersive line pass-blocking for you rod is out for the season with a and your guys getting open and broken right leg. delivering a catchable ball, and But the line played well, and then making plays. We’ve got a Rodgers wasn’t sacked. great group of guys to work with. “We felt that was going to be a This is a record we all share.” huge challenge for us up front, Rodgers’ offensive feats came dealing with their defensive line,” behind a patchwork offensive McCarthy said. “I can’t say

enough about our offensive line.” Green Bay also was missing wide receiver Greg Jennings because of a sprained left knee, and defensive lineman Ryan Pickett because of a concussion. With so many players banged up, will the Packers be cautious with starters in the finale? “I enjoy playing this game, but at the same time, we have to be smart,” Clay Matthews said. “We like winning around here. It’ll be interesting to see where we go. Like I said, we have to be smart.” Missing the playoffs is a disappointing end to what was once

a promising season for Chicago. The Bears have lost five straight games since losing quarterback Jay Cutler to a broken right thumb in a Nov. 20 victory over San Diego. And they had a chance Sunday, trailing by only four early in the third quarter before Rodgers found his rhythm. Third-string running back Kahlil Bell rushed for 121 yards with Marion Barber and Matt Forte sidelined by injuries. “When you play the Super Bowl champions, you have to be on top of your game,” Bears coach Lovie Smith said.

“Offensively, we did enough things to keep us in the game and have a chance to win the game at the end. But defensively we just didn’t have it.” The Bears started Josh McCown on Sunday after backup Caleb Hanie struggled to fill in for Cutler. McCown’s most recent start came with the Oakland Raiders in 2007, and he was out of the NFL last season. “It’s a tough assignment, but you’ve got to find a way to pull it off,” McCown said.


B4

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (2)

Trainers tend to Cleveland quarterback Colt McCoy after he was hit by Pittsburgh linebacker James Harrison on Dec. 8 in Pittsburgh.

Some NFL players hiding injuries BY HOWARD FENDRICH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ask Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew whether he would try to play through a concussion or yank himself from a game, and he’ll provide a straightforward answer. “Hide it,” the NFL’s leading rusher said. “The bottom line is: You have to be able to put food on the table. No one’s going to sign or want a guy who can’t stay healthy. I know there will be a day when I’m going to have trouble walking. I realize that,” JonesDrew said. “But this is what I signed up for. Injuries are part of the game. If you don’t want to get hit, then you shouldn’t be playing.” Other players say they would do the same: Hide it. In a series of interviews about head injuries with The Associated Press over the last two weeks, 23 of 44 NFL players — slightly more than half — said they would try to conceal a possible concussion rather than pull themselves out of a game. Some acknowledged they already have. Players also said they should be better protected from their own instincts: More than two-thirds of the group the AP talked to wants independent neurologists on sidelines during games. The AP spoke to a crosssection of players — at least one from each of the 32 NFL teams — to gauge whether concussion safety and attitudes about head injuries have changed in the past two years of close attention devoted to the issue. The group included 33 starters and 11 reserves; 25 players on offense and 19 on defense; all have played at least three seasons in the NFL. The players tended to indicate they are more aware of the possible longterm effects of jarring hits to their heads than they once were. In a sign of the sort of progress the league wants, five players said that while they would have tried to conceal a concussion during a game in 2009, now they would seek help. “You look at some of the cases where you see some of the retired players and the issues that they’re having now, even with some of the guys who’ve passed and had their brains examined —

Concussions you see what their brains look like now,” said Washington Redskins linebacker London Fletcher, the NFL’s leading tackler. “That does play a part in how I think now about it.” But his teammate, backup fullback Mike Sellers, said he’s hidden concussions in the past and would “highly doubt” that any player would willingly take himself out of a game. “You want to continue to play. You’re a competitor. You’re not going to tell on yourself. “There have been times I’ve been dinged, and they’ve taken my helmet from me, and I’d snatch my helmet back and get back on the field,” Sellers said. “A lot of guys wouldn’t say anything because a lot of guys wouldn’t think anything during the game, until afterward, when they have a headache or they can’t remember certain things.” San Francisco 49ers defensive lineman Justin Smith captured a popular sentiment: Players know of the potential problems, yet would risk further damage. “It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out if you have a concussion, you’re probably damaging your brain a little bit. Just like if you sprain your wrist a bunch, you’re going to have some wrist problems down the road. “Yeah, I’d still play through it. It’s part of it. It’s part of the game,” Smith said. “I think if you’re noticeably messed up, yeah, they’ll take you out. But if you’ve just got some blurry vision, I’d say that’s the player’s call. And most guys — 99 percent of guys in the NFL — are going to play through it.” Smith said he sustained one concussion in high school (”You don’t know who you are,” is how he described it) and another in college (”Walking around the whole time, but I don’t remember anything until six hours later”). The NFL likes to say that views about concussions have shifted from simply accepting they’re part of the sport to doing what’s possible to lessen impacts. Commissioner Roger Goodell talks about “changing the culture,” so players don’t try to “walk it off” after taking hits to the head. Yet the AP’s conversa-

tions with players showed there is room for more adjustments, which did not surprise Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, co-chairman of the NFL’s head, neck and spine committee. “The culture change takes awhile,” Ellenbogen said in a telephone interview. “Why would these guys want to go out? They love playing the game. They don’t want to leave their team. They want to win. I understand all that. And that’s why we have to be on our toes with coming up with exams that are hard to beat, so to speak.” New Orleans Saints offensive lineman Zach Strief put it this way: “We all grew up with, ‘Hey, get back in there. You only got your bell rung.’ And while it’s changing now, I think it’s going to take time for the mindset to change.” A few players said they’d be particularly inclined to hide a concussion if it happened in a playoff game or the Super Bowl. Some said their decision would depend on the severity of a head injury — but they’d hide it if they could. Clearly, there is a stigma associated with leaving the field, no matter the reason. Indeed, one player who said he’d exit a game if he thought he might have a concussion didn’t want to be quoted on the subject. Other findings from the interviews: —Asked whether the NFL should have independent neurologists at games to examine players and determine if they should be held out because of concussions, 31 players said “yes,” and 10 said “no.” Three didn’t answer. “They’ve got guys looking at your uniform to make sure you’re wearing the right kind of socks,” St. Louis Rams safety Quintin Mikell said. “Why not have somebody there to protect your head? I think we definitely should have that.” He said he’s tried to clear his head and stay on the field “many times.” “I’ll probably pay for it later in my life,” Mikell said, “but at the same time, I’ll probably pay for the alcohol that I drank or driving fast cars. It’s one of those things that it just comes with the territory.” —Specifically regarding concussions, 28 of the 44 players think playing in the NFL is safer now than in 2009, while 13 think it’s the

Washington linebacker London Fletcher reacts after hurting himself in the final moments of a game with Arizona on Sept. 18 in Landover, Md. same, and two think it’s more dangerous. One wasn’t sure. Those who think safety has improved gave credit to the rise in awareness; more fines for illegal hits; this season’s changes to kickoff rules that have cut down on the number of returns; and the new labor contract’s reduction in the amount of contact allowed in practice. “When I first came into the league, it was like, ‘Whatever goes.’ It was more of that old-school, just ‘beat-him-up’ football. “Not wanting to hurt anybody, but show how tough you were. Back in the day, it was like if you come out of a game with a slight concussion, then you

weren’t giving it all for your team,” Buffalo Bills linebacker Andra Davis said. “But now, they’re taking that option away from you.” Davis, a 10th-year veteran who turned 33 on Friday and said he’s had a couple of concussions, is one of those whose view on seeking help for such injuries has changed. “The younger me would definitely hide it,” Davis said. “But the older me now — with wife and kids and looking more at life after football — I would say something about it.” —Asked whether more can be done to protect players from head injuries, 18 players said “yes,” and 24

said “no.” Two did not respond. Not surprisingly, there were divisions according to position, and players on opposite sides of the ball generally drifted toward opposing views: Those on offense seemed more likely than those on defense to say more can — and should — be done to improve safety. Linemen, meanwhile, often complained that there is no way to improve their plight, with the helmet-tohelmet banging that takes place at the snap on play after play. One player described those collisions as “microepisodes that build up over time.”


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

DEAR ABBY: As a clinical psychologist, I believe your advice to “Protective Mom in the Midwest” was oversimplified. You told her she was right in not permitting her husband’s brother, a registered sex offender, to visit the family during the holidays. She didn’t want her 10-year-old daughter around him. You have made the common mistake of seeing everyone who carries the “registered sex offender” label as alike. They are no more alike than are people who drink too much. Some alcoholics get drunk, angry and violent, but most do not. Some sex offenders act like Ted Bundy, but most do not. Some are guilty only of having a younger girlfriend. Many do not directly injure anyone because they only download illegal sexual images. Some do not use force, threats or physical violence. I do not minimize what they do. They all have a mental illness and/or addiction and need intervention and treatment. Mom and her husband should talk to the brother about what he did and what kind of rehabilitation has occurred. They can then make a better decision about a visit and what safety measures might be appropriate. Dr. William S. in Miami

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

DEAR ABBY Dear Abby: If Mom allows Jake Van Buren in the house, local child protective authorities will consider it failure to protect the child, putting the girl at risk of being removed from the home. I am a former child protective worker who went to homes to inform parents of this. I also had to keep my own daughter away from my former in-laws because they allowed a sex offender to visit while she was there. It was difficult being the only one willing to stand up for her safety, but I will never regret knowing I did everything I could to keep my daughter safe. Another Protective Mom in New England

Abigail

Dear Abby: I am a sex offender and have learned through therapy why I did what I did and how to not go around where “it” may happen again. Would Jake even accept an offer to stay over? If he’s like me, he’d say, “Thanks, but no thanks,” and not put himself in a situation where someone could cry rape or accuse him of unwanted fondling. Moving On

Dear Dr. S.: Your point about lumping all sex offenders together is well-stated. Another reader pointed out that something like urinating outdoors could result in this classification. However, most readers agree with me that the safety of the 10-year-old must be the primary concern. Their comments:

Garfield

Momma

by Mell Lazarus

Elderberries

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t sit still when you should be checking out opportunities or looking into a skill you want to learn in order to advance in the new year. Do your research now and be prepared to make a life-changing move. 2 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Get your game plan up and running. It may be a quiet workweek, but what you do now in terms of looking for future opportunities will pay off. Love is in the stars, and getting together with someone you fancy will pay off. 5 stars

by Corey Pandolph

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be tempted to follow someone who talks a good talk. Before you make a decision that can alter your life, make sure that the people affected by your decision will give you their blessing. A mistake will cause a ruckus. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take time to reevaluate your plans for the upcoming year. A chance to enhance your love life is evident if you network and socialize with people you can learn or benefit from. Your charm will capture attention. Live, love and laugh. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

Dear Abby: We have a registered sex offender living in our neighborhood. Despite the fact that I have young children, I am not concerned that he presents a threat. When he was 19, he had sex with a 17-year-old girl. He was tried and served his time, but he now gets to spend the rest of his life on “the list.” If he had been 40, or the girl 12, I’d be concerned. Without knowing the particulars of the crime, it seems rash to sentence Uncle Jake to family purgatory. Andy in Louisiana

Dear Abby: Stand your ground, “Protective Mom”! As a victim of abuse, I can tell you that the abuser is sick. She should not leave it up to her daughter to find out if the uncle could still be a predator. My stepfather’s abuse 30 years ago was never reported to the police. He supposedly got “counseling” and was “a changed man.” Well, he’s currently serving prison time for having molested his granddaughter a year and a half ago. Knows the Score in Anaheim, Calif.

by Jim Davis

B5

Most agree on sex offender advice

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Downtime will be good for you, as long as you spend it doing something that challenges you physically or allows you to enjoy the company of someone special. Socializing, visiting and travel will build your confidence and do you good. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put some effort into self-improvement and doing things that will broaden your awareness. What you offer others will show your intent and your responsibility to the people you care about most. Travel plans should be part of your agenda. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Stick close to home and nurture relationships with people who are important to you. Domestic improvements will add to your comfort and lessen your stress. Romance is highlighted. Look for innovative ways to improve your love life. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Be careful what you say to your lover, a friend or a relative. You will be taken seriously and may end up being stuck in a no-win situation if you make a frivolous promise while trying to be a nice person. 2 stars

The Family Circus

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You need to burn energy, but don’t take risks or sign up to do things that could become dangerous. Spend time on selfimprovement, but don’t overspend in the process. A change is good, but it needs to be made within. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Loosen up and let your mind wander. Innovative ideas will come when you relax and forget about money, contracts and your professional situation. An old acquaintance will be a healthy reminder of what you should do. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Secretive action will make the best surprise and bring you the most support when you finally divulge your plans. Love is in the stars, and a display of emotion will lead to a better understanding of personal goals. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Review your personal and business partnerships and reevaluate whether you are dealing with people who have something to offer. It’s time to start fresh by stepping away from anyone taking advantage of your generosity. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B6

Classified

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

31

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

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31

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

Best gift ever, Wild Rose Care Home gives love year round. We have a vacancy. 683-9194.

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Dog. Great Dane, west of P.A. Call to identify. 452-8192 FOUND: Dog. Near Place and Ranger St., P.A. Older male Shih-Tzu, well behaved. Call to identify. 461-7736. FOUND: Dog. Small back and white female, Forks area. 808-0895 LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268 LOST: Hearing Aid. P.A. area. 457-5127.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CARING AIDES Needed at 680 W. Prairie, Sequim. Bring any certs. and apply in person at Prairie Springs.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

Help Wanted

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individual interested in assuming delivery carrier contract routes in the Port Townsend area. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insurance. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Contact Port Townsend District Manager Linda Mustafa 301-2747 for information.

DENTAL ASSISTANT Sequim office seeking an experienced and responsible dental assistant to join our caring and dedicated dental team. Exp. with Dentrix and digital X-rays preferred. Send resumes to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#240/Dental Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Director of Engineering, Planning and Public Works The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Director of Engineering, Planning and Public Works. The Director is responsible for all capital construction, maintenance and small works projects involving marinas, terminal dock facilities, log yard facilities, airport, industrial rental properties and equipment. Qualified candidates must have extensive engineering, planning, public works and project/construction management experience preferably in the public sector. Must have in-depth knowledge of local/state/ federal law as it relates to public works projects and planning and environmental issues. The ideal candidate will have a BS or AS in civil or related engineering field with at least 5-10 years of applicable work experience. Salary is DOE with an anticipated hiring range of $65,000 to $85,000. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Port Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Port Angeles between 8am & 5pm M-F or online at www.portofpa.com Applications will be accepted until 5pm December 30, 2011. Letters and resumes without an application will not be accepted. Drug testing is required.

31

5000900

DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Help Wanted

ELECTRICIAN: Journeymen, residential or commercial. Vehicle provided, WSDL. Call 360-477-1764 Facilities Manager The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Facilities Manager. The Facilities Manager is responsible for the daily operations of the Facilities Maintenance department & personnel. The Facilities Manager also manages maintenance at the following facilities: marinas, industrial properties/buildings, airports, waterfront properties, marine terminal docks, piers, log yard facilities, boat launch facilities, boat yards & rental properties. Qualified candidates must have 5-10 yrs of experience in facilities management preferably in the public sector & sufficient knowledge of the methods, materials, tools, & equipment used in all phases of facilities maintenance, including a basic general knowledge of electricity, plumbing, carpentry, HVAC systems, etc. Experience with marinas, docks, piers & marine work preferred. Salary is DOE with an anticipated hiring range of $60,000 to $75,000. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Port Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Port Angeles between 8am & 5pm M-F or online at www.portofpa.com. Applications will be accepted until 5pm January 6, 2012. Letters & resumes without an application will not be accepted. Drug testing is required. LOG TRUCK DRIVER Experienced, immediate opening. 360-417-8022 or 360-460-7292 ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE Order Fulfillment/ Customer Service Must lift 50 lbs. consistently, Customer and computer experience a must, team player, detail oriented, part-time (32 hrs) $9 hr. Please email resume to: jdickson@starmaninc. com

Help Wanted

Permit Technician City of Port Angeles: $3,347-$3,996 mo. plus benefits. Requires some technical or vocational coursework plus 3 yrs. cust. serv. exp. AND 3 yrs technical exp in the building trades reviewing building const. plans, processing permits and/or conducting inspections. Municipal exp. is desirable. To apply go to www.cityofpa. us or call Human Resources at 4174510. CLOSES 1/13/ 12. COPA is an EOE. SEQUIM PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER Seeks experienced licensed physical therapist for private practice outpatient therapy clinic. Manual therapy skills preferred, will consider part or full-time. Contact Jason Wilwert at 360-683-0632.

34

Work Wanted

I Sew 4U HOLIDAY SPECIAL Continues till 1/1! 3 pr. pants hemmed for the price of 1! $10.84. Other projects $20/hr. Call today! 417-5576 isew4U.goods.officel ive.com I'm Sew Happy! LAND MINE Lawn Care. We will pickup and dispose of dog feces. Small dog, $10 week. Large, $15 week. 360-504-2443 Mowing, Weeding, Pruning/Trimming, Hauling, Gutter cleaning, ornament decoration/hanging & many other services. Many references. Experienced, Honest and Dependable. $20 hr. or flat rate. 461-7772

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

2 MASTER SUITES Attached tiled sunroom, nice mountain views, on both levels, wood burning fireplace in great room, new laminate flooring/fresh paint. Custom patio and covered front porch. $285,000 ML303148/262388 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

51

Homes

A FEW NICKS & BRUISES Yet solid basics make this budget priced 5 plex a wise investment. Good rental history and location. $200,000. ML262234. Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. A VIEW WITH A HOME For you Harbor Master wanna-bes! Monitor ship traffic or just enjoy the panoramic country-side views from your deck. Or from your spacious living room through those huge windows! This meticulously maintained 3 Br., 2 bath is a real gem. Spacious kitchen. Great garden patio. Two car garage with a really serious workshop plus carport for boat and RV. Almost 2 acres. Oh yeah, don’t forget the view! $270,000. ML262347. Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY AMAZING VIEWS Open living spaces with great kitchen, propane fireplace and cook stove, full deck and fully fenced yard, 800 sf attached garage, RV parking and hookup, easy care landscaping. $349,900 ML201216/260629 Tanya Kerr 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTIFUL MTN SUNSETS Architect designed home. 8th tee at Cedars Dungeness Golf Course, maximum advantage of solar gain, new bamboo and tile floors, nicely landscaped with garden shed. $259,000 ML284048/262053 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTY AND CONVENIENCE 1,889 sf of living space in this single floor plan, 2 Br., plus den home. Greatroom, gas fireplace, spacious kitchen, sunny breakfast nook, formal dining room, oversized doors, windows and doorways provide spaciousness and natural light. Fenced rear yard. Front yard maintenance included in HOA dues. $315,000. ML260430. Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East BEST VALUE & JUST LISTED Immaculate residence located in an exceptional neighborhood between Sequim and P.A. 1,755 sf, 3 Br., and 2 bath contemporary. Built in 2004 and in like-new condition. Excellent floor plan, with separate tub and shower in master Br. Open floor plan, wood stove, large kitchen accessible to family and living rooms. Beautifully landscaped 1acre site with end of road privacy. Agnew Irrigation, too! An absolutely special home in a park-like location. $224,900. ML262386/303146 Dan Tash 461-2872 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

Centrally located in Port Angeles. 1,296 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath in a quiet neighborhood. Open living area, kitchen with lots of counter space. Bright windows with views of mountains and the Strait. Private fenced in yard, large detached 2 car garage. $189,000 Call 360477-9597 for more info. Offers with a Buyer's agent considered. CUTE BUNGALOW IN THE CITY 2 Br., 1 bath, 936 sf. Vaulted ceilings. 1 car detached garage. Clean, wallto-wall carpet and vinyl floors. Fenced yard. City water and sewer. $115,000. ML262330/298746 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY ‘G’ IS FOR GORGEOUS SUNRISES Ideal 3 Br., 2 bath, view home makes single story living great. Island and water views right from the kitchen window. This immaculate home features a bright and airy family room with fireplace, great decks and luxurious double walkin closets in the master suite. $275,000. ML261128 Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company GET SET FOR SUMMER FUN Dream view 1.9 acre property right on the beachfront of Clallam Bay. Immaculate park model home with covered deck, bunkhouse with bath and extra storage. Fish processing area with everything – even a smoker! RV hookups, too! $245,000. ML261237. Barclay Jennings 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company GORGEOUS OLYMPIC MTN VIEW Located on a very nice .93 acre of land right on the corner of Billy Smith and Monroe Rd.1934 cottage that has been freshly painted and has new carpeting. Newer propane stove to keep you cozy. Deck on the south has southern exposure and has great mtn view. Very cute house and a great piece of property fenced and cross fenced. $149,500. ML262140 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HO! HO! HO! Santa has a late gift waiting for you at Highland Estates. 2 Br. plus 2 baths and open living area use the space efficiently. Some of the most beautiful granite ever graces the island and counters in the well equipped kitchen. Fantastic garage has a canning area to keep that work out of the kitchen, plus loads of storage. Nice mountain and marine views. $260,000. ML261765 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

51

Homes

Great investment property, or make this cute little bungalow your home. Updated electrical, plumbing, and double pane windows. This property has numerous fruit trees, partial views of the straits and mountains. All of this on an oversized lot. $99,500 ML261959/277355 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE This home has roomy main level with 3 Br. and 2 baths. Lower daylight basement features an 804 sf finished recreational room and an unfinished workshop. Water view is not panoramic, but is very nice. Attached two car garage. A little updating would make this home truly beautiful. $249,900. ML262390 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East RIVER FRONTAGE 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home on 3.5 riverfront acres. Home built in 1992 and has a generous 1,836 sf, split floor plan, wood stove and lots of room to roam down to the Dungeness River. $180,000. ML262367. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 SPACIOUS RAMBLER On oversized west side lot. 3 Br., 2 bath, family room with fireplace, formal dining room plus kitchen nook. A private south side patio and much more! $199,000. ML261905 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY STYLISH AND SOPHISTICATED NW Contemporary style with water view. Architecture optimizes space and dramatic windows/ skylights infuse home with natural light. Hardwood floors, 11’ ceilings, large family room, kitchen with large bar/island and walkin pantry. $349,900. ML260341 Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND BARGAIN Wonderful and Affordable Sunland home. New carpets and freshly painted. Large backyard patio is perfect for entertaining. Large spacious rooms and even an extra room that would be perfect for a hobby or craft room. $169,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 THE MORE THE MERRIER The convenient work island makes the cook’s life easier in this 5 Br., 3 bath home on .45 acres in Port Angeles. This open floor plan delivers a spacious great room with fireplace, remodeled kitchen with granite countertops, fenced back yard, 2 car attached as well as a 2 car detached garage with workshop. $344,000. ML261939. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

EXCELLENT CONDITION 2 Br., 2 bath, nice floor plan, over 1,400 sf, separate great room, enjoy parkwood amenities. $53,500. ML255353/261603 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND This home is a wonderful 1st time home buyer investment property! 3 Br., 2 bath, rambler on a 0.26 acre lot. 2 car attached garage and a fully fenced yard. It abuts a greenbelt, so lots of privacy is assured. Sellers are giving a $3,000 credit at closing for a flooring allowance. $159,900. ML262062. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY VIEW! VIEW! VIEW! Ideal Sequim home makes single story living great. Open kitchen with pantry and your water view right from the kitchen sink window. Large living and great room has views and fireplace and deck. Master suite has two walk-in closets and the master bath has two sinks. Immaculate, viewy, and easy cul-de-sac location. Bright and airy with oodles of windows. Low, low maintenance yard in an area of pretty, viewsome and nicely maintained homes. Island and water views with gorgeous sunrises guaranteed! 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company WATER VIEW Beautifully updated 3 Br., 2 bath home with views of the Strait and shipping lanes. Located in the city limits of Sequim. Features include kitchen with solid surface counters, oak cabinets, laminate and tile flooring, heat pump, den or office, fenced in back yard, private patio, circular drive. $198,000. ML262395. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

52

Manufactured Homes

BRAND NEW Marlette double-wide manufactured home. Landscaped front yard, spacious fenced rear yard w/view of Olympic Mtns. Attached garage, electric door opener. Parkwood is an eloquent, well maintained community for 55 and older. Clubhouse activities and features include sauna, spa, game room, full kitchen and exercise room, too. $124,900. ML262375 Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Let’s make it a happy New Year for you and me! Buy my single wide with low down and low payments - will carry contract. 2 Br., 1 bath, with new shower stall, appliances, W/D, fridge, stove, and new flooring through out the home. Attached large laundry room or shop. Large deck and carport. 55 park located between Sequim and P.A. Small yard with garden shed and established perrenials and trees. Must see to appreciate. Asking $12,000/obo. 452-4165 or 360-301-5652

54

Lots/ Acreage

2FER Two great lots for the price of one. These lots are in an excellent neighborhood on Grant Street, near the college and the Park Headquarters. Don’t miss out! $69,900. ML260880. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Beautiful parcel close to both Port Angeles and Sequim. Power and water in street on O’Brien Rd. Mountain views. $129,000. ML250687. Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. TOWERING EVERGREENS And an open forest floor make this truly a park like setting. A very distinctive plateau would make for an excellent home site with sweeping views of the strait. 2.28 acres conveniently located just west of Port Angeles. $79,900. ML225476 Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

58

Commercial

CLEAN UP! This is your opportunity to own Sequim’s leading dry cleaning and laundry business. Full service, well equipped with mostly newer environmentally friendly equipment. Complete turn key operation. Owners willing to train and assist new owner. Perfect corner location with high visibility window frontage. $165,000. ML262073 Dave Sharman or Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished $478. 2 Br. $514-541. 3 Br. $695. + fixed util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258. CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $575 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423

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DOWN 1 Commercials 2 Congregated 3 Remove from, as a stormthreatened area

62

Apartments Unfurnished

COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, fireplace $575, $575 dep., no pets. 452-3423. P.A.: 1 Br. $475-$530. Some pets ok. Dwntown. 425-881-7267. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $575 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

63

Duplexes

CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no smoking. $650 mo., $650 deposit. 457-5352.

64

Houses

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 2 br 1 ba......$475 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 4 br 2 ba....$1000 HOUSES/APT SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825 H 3 br 2 ba......$900 H 2+ br 2 ba....$950 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1350

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com Newly remodeled farmhouse, 3 Br., close in. $950. Also, 2 Br., 1.5 bath 2 story, $750. No pets. 457-6181

64

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ANDY ROONEY (1919-2011) Solution: 11 letters

S U N D A Y N N U F R O M U H By Jeff Chen

Houses

P.A.: Great 1 Br., lots storage, no pets. $575 mo. 452-4671. P.A.: Small 2 Br., 1 ba on dbl lot. $795 mo. 461-0520 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 car garage, no smoking/pets, W/D freezer, c;ose to QFC. $1,200 mo. 460-9499, 460-7337

Share Rentals/ Rooms

ROOMMATE wanted, Hadlock area, $400, + util w/extras. $200 dep. 360-301-9521. SEEKING female roomate to share quiet home. 360-797-1397 SEQUIM: Bedroom with bath, private entrance, water view, kitchen privlidges. Must love dogs. $500, dep. 683-2918

68

Commercial Space

EAST P.A.: Warehouse/workshop. 22x32 $250 ea. 457-9732 or 457-9527. PORT ANGELES 8th Street Office w/great straight & mountain views. 800 sf. $600 month plus $85 utilities. 808-2402. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290.

P.A.: 315 Columbus, 3 Br., 2 ba, lease. $1,050. 457-4966.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Furniture

BED: Mismatched plus California king mattress and box springs, great shape, over $1,000 new. Sell for $400/obo. 681-3299

S N Y U Y O R N E L L E T E Y

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12/27

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40 Tot’s wheels 41 Fought-over food in old 1-Down 43 Author Bombeck 46 Resistance measurement 47 Follower of a Chinese “Chairman” 48 Builds a deck for, say 49 Negotiator’s turndown

Furniture

DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429 or 417-7685 MISC: Beautiful hardwood lighted show case, 51” tall, 60” wide, two glass shelves, mirror back, $700. (3) antique gold velvet captains chairs, $75 each. 360-374-2633 REDECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Victorian wall sconce lamps, $25 ea. Recliner chair, $50. Camel back sofa, brown/plumb tapestry, $150. Small vintage tole painted table, $25. Sewing machine in wood cabinet, $140. Two vintage upholstered side chairs, $50 ea. Wood kitchen table with 4 chairs, $45. Camel back love seat, red pattern, $45. Elegant sofa with exquisite woodwork, $500. Victorian tapestry print and frame, $40. Small stain glass table lamp, $15. These items would make great gifts! 460-0575. SOFA: Elegant sofa with exquisite carved trim and claw arms, burgundy and cream tapestry fabric, 66” long x 45” wide, excellent condition, paid $1,500 from upscale store. Selling for $500. 460-0575

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73

General Merchandise

12/27/11

54 Longtime Utah Jazz coach Jerry 56 FDA and NFL, e.g. 58 Give a little 59 Beer base 62 Carrere of “Wayne’s World” 64 Mary __ cosmetics 65 Pigs out (on), briefly

73

General Merchandise

BIRD CAGE: Prevue-Hendryx Parakeet/ Finch Flight Cage. Model F030 White powdercoat, 3/8” bar spacing. Easy care, sturdy, wheels, 37.25”x 27.5”x49”h interior space, 42”x 32”x 68”h. $150/obo. 457-8385

FIREWOOD: Dry. $200. 477-8832 Mobility Scooter 3-wheel, Go-Go Elite traveler. $300. 582-0749 RAINIER YERT: 30’, 2008 Eagle Model, insulated, 6 windows, platform included. $14,000. Natalia 360-774-1445

ELECTRIC BIKE: By “City Bike”. With charger, new condition. $800. 683-6813

SEWING MACHINE Montgomery Ward convertible bed sewing machine. Model UHT J 1414 in wood cabinet. Both excellent condition. Includes all parts and manual. Recently serviced. Used very little. $140. Susan 460-0575

ELECTRIC FIREPLACE Cherry wood color, 47.5” wide x 18” deep x 40” high. Great condition. Great use for a classy TV stand. $300. 460-0575. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com GENERATOR: 4,600/ 5,000 watt propane generator. $400. 928-9404 GENERATOR: Coleman Powermate, 3.5 hp, 1850 watts, 68 lbs. $350. 928-3692. MISC: 6-wheeled Jazzy electric scooter, $150. New 4wheeled walker, $100. Electric bed, $50. 457-7605 or 360-384-1592 MISC: Antique woman’s bike, 3 spd, $300. Gas stove, new, $1,200, asking $600. 452-5803. MISC: Dona Marie pool table, 8’ solid oak, Italian slate, have all accessories, $2,500/obo. 36” convectional Gen-Air gas stove, stainless steel, $700/obo. Parrot cage, used for chinchilla with accessories, 44”x 37x24, $150/obo. Set of U2 20x7.5 and 5x114.3 with offset of -/+ plus 40 chrome wheels, $600/ obo. 206-496-4549 MISC: Freezer, small upright, 5 cf, Kemmore, excellent condition, $50. Juicer, excellent condition, $25. Patio table with 4 chairs, aluminum, $50. 683-1143. MISC: Lumber rack, new Surefit, fits F250, $220. Handheld marine VHS radio, $125. Garmmand 45 GPS, $80. 360-796-4502

TOOLS: Like new Forney elec. welder, 225 amp ac/150 amp dc, w/face shield, chip hammer, 2 boxes of electrodes, $250/obo. Clean wheel weight metal in 1 lb ingots, $1.50/lb. 5th wheel trailer hitch w/canvas cover, $50. New tire chains, 13”, 14”, 15”, $20/obo. 797-1900, 460-6776 TREADMILL: Excellent condition, $125. 457-4379 UTILITY TRAILER ‘03 Eagle, 6.5’x13’ deck with side boards, ramps, load on all sides, hauls 3 quads, new tires. $950. 360-640-0320 WANTED Riding lawn mowers, running or not. 206-940-1849.

74

Home Electronics

Desktop Computer Dell Optiplex GX280. Windows XP Pro. 19” Flat Panel Monitor. Stereo speakers and subwoofer. Includes keyboard and mouse. Excellent condition. $195 Call 460-0405. iPAD 2: 16GB, white color, compatible WiFi and blue tooth, original pkg, unopened from Apple. Model A1395. $475. 683-7072.

75

Musical

DRUM SET: Pearl Export, 5 piece, all hardware, cymbals and throne. $500. 457-7158 GUITAR: Fender, 12 string, dreadnought acoustic. $300 cash. 460-3986

75

GHUTTA

SCHETK Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) WHIRL BEAVER STODGY Jumbles: POISE Answer: The Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees on 12-26-1919.The problem was that he later — VISITED

Musical

GUITAR: Very rare Fender Stratocaster, 30th Anniversary #199 of only 250 made. $800. 452-1254 or 460-9466 ORGAN: Kimball, includes extras. $750. 683-8033. PIANO: Upright. Werner, great shape, $600. 565-6609. VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: 1981 Colt 1911 Shooting Ace, 22 cal., like new, $1,500. 1971 Colt single action Frontier Scout revolver, like new, $500. 928-3015 POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746. RUGER: Stainless steel Blackhawk 44 mag with ammo. $500. 452-3213. Walther PPK/S 380 ACP Collector James Bond by Interarms stainless w/box & 2 mags, Superb cond., manual and 2 mags $550. 360-477-0321

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 Wanted to Buy Male Parakeet. 457-8385 Marybeth. WANTED: Used chainsaw chain grinder. 360-461-7506

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

A Winter Lap Warmer Cats and kittens available for adoption. $85. PFOA 452-0414

ACOUSTIC GUITAR 36” Synsonics. Great cond., extras. $100/obo. 477-4838. AMMO: 44/40. Box of 50, $18. 477-4563. ANTIQUE: School clock, brass pendulum, exc. cond. $100. 504-5636. BAR CHAIR: Wrought iron, swivel, for breakfast bar. $25. 477-1490 BAR STOOLS: (2) 24” counter height, black/cherry wood . $100 pair. 683-3744. BASKET CHAIR Handcrafted, cedar. $50. 808-3983. BASKETBALL GOAL Lifetime portable, adjustable 7-10 ft. $100 cash. 683-9333. BED FRAME: Queen. $100/obo. 797-3088. Bedroom Furniture $200. 452-4349. BOAT MOTOR: Minnkota 35A, electric. $25. 683-9295. CAMPING COT: King size, aluminum frame, w/carry case. $65/obo. 683-4856. CARRY ON: New, paid $89. Asking $59. 360-202-0928. CELL PHONE: LG enV 3. $40 452-7418 CELL PHONE: SciPhone i68 for AT&T or TMobile. $40. 452-7418 CHAIN SAW: Old and works. $20. 707-241-5977 CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5’, white lights, used once. $15. 683-3434 CHRISTMAS TREE Expensive Costco, 1500 lights, 3 yrs. old. $50. 681-8879. CHRISTMAS VEST New, black wool, Santas and bells, very nice. $20. 504-5636.

CLOTHES RACK On wheels, w/top shelf, 38Wx64T. $20. 683-4063 CURIO CABINET: 2 doors, lighted, glass shelves, walnut finish. $150. 683-3744. DIRT BIKE: For parts, will run. $125. 928-3464 ENGINE LIFT: Like new, used once. $100. 241-5977. Exercise Machine Cardio-Fit, excellent cond. $25. 477-1490 FLY ROD: Fenwick Eagle graphite, 6 wt w/Pflueger Medalist reel. $99. 457-6494 FREE: Metal desk. 5’x 32”, side drawers, You haul. 452-9347 FREE: Packing boxes. 683-4063 FREEZER: Frigidaire, stand up. $120. 681-2775 GUITAR: Classical, w/ hard case, strings, music books. $150 cash. 683-9333. HEATROLA: Estate, wood burning, for garage/shop/cabin. $150. 457-8834. HYDRAULIC JACK: 2 1/4 ton capacity. $25. 683-9295. LADDER: Aluminum 6’, “A” frame, $10. 457-6139 LOVESEAT: Beautiful handcrafted cedar loveseat rocker. $100 808-3983. LUGGAGE: Samsonite, new, dark red, wheels, handle. $195. 360-202-0928. Mini Motorcycle $120. 681-2775. MISC: Collector plates, $10/obo. Jeans, size 12-14, $1. 928-3464. WASHER: Kenmore. $40. 452-5302.

EE E A D S FFRREMonday and Tuesdays S

FR

D A EE

PENDANT: Turquoise nugget and silver, multi-strands. $200. 683-2175 PET TAXI: For medium dog, weekend feeder and water. $50/obo. 683-0146. QUEEN BED: Frame, (2) sheet sets, comforter set. $150. 775-0028 RAMP: Light weight, 2 piece, 6’. $75/obo. 683-4856 RARE: ‘45 USCG life boat/raft rations. $25/obo. 452-6842. SEAHAWK GIFTS New flag, $5. Throw, $12. Coasters, $5. 457-5746 SHIPPING SCALE Royal Digital, wireless remote. $50. 460-4172 SOFA: Brown leather look, 87”, great shape. $75. 681-6050 SPOT LIGHT: 12V for RV, car, truck. In plastic wrap. $8. 457-6139 STEMWARE: Libbey, new, (6) champagne flutes, festive decor. $3 each. 797-1179. STUDDED TIRES (3) mounted, P215/70 R15. $15 each. 457-5817 TENNIS: (2) used rackets, Donnay & Wilson, carry bag, balls. $20. 452-6842. THERAPY WRAP Gel Caldera, new, large, hot/cold. $20. 683-4063 TOW BAR: Taylormade, for older Chevy S10, like new. $100. 417-3006. TYPEWRITER: Remington. $10. 797-1179 WHEELS: (4) Toyota, from Camry. $40. 457-5817

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P.A.: 40’ 5th wheel, 3 slide outs, W/S/G cable and Wifi included. $550. 457-9844, 460-4968

72

D I R E C T A L E N T E D T A

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Monday’s Puzzle Solved

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT

P.A.: 2 Br., 606 S. Laurel. $695. 3 Br., 119 W. 5th St., $1,000. Ref. req. 808-2340.

P.A.: 2035 W 6th St. 3 Br, 2 ba, newer, single level. $895 mo. F/L/Dp, no smoking/ pets? 360-457-5089.

12/27/11

4 Bogeyman deterrent, so it’s said 5 Warmonger 6 Inventor Whitney 7 “Amazing” magician 8 Organization leader, in slang 9 Lacking water 10 Whacked gift holder 11 “Love” concoction 12 Puts away for later 14 “I’d just as soon kiss a Wookiee” speaker 21 Unobstructed progress 23 Liquid in un lago 24 “Push-up” garment 25 Rip apart 26 Airport handlers, and in a way, what the first words of 4-, 8-, 21- and 32-Down are 30 U.K. record label 32 Chatterbox’s output 38 Gear part

P.A.: Efficient 1 Br., carport, storage. $550 mo. 457-3614.

65

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011


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92

Pets

BOXER PUPPIES CKC, only 2 left so hurry. Both females, one brindle, one fawn. $450. 360-460-7858 or 360-460-5485 JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! 3 Chihuahua mix male puppies. 8 wks., 1 tan, 2 brown. Shots. $200/ obo each. 360-504-2140 KITTENS: CUTE 10 week old black and white kittens. $25. 417-5236, 417-3906 LABRADOODLES 1/2 Lab, 1/2 Standard Poodle, black, born Oct. 1st shots, wormed, very sweet. $600. Will hold for Christmas. 360-259-6347 PEKINGESE 1 female, 4 mo. Adorable. $300. 452-9553 or 360-461-6855 POODLES: Offering AKC Poodles, males and females in a variety of colors (Parti’s and solids), sizes and ages. Rehoming fee set at $150$700. For more information and pictures: 360-452-2579 PUPPIES: Black Lab mixed breed. $50. 452-5290 PUPPIES: Blue/Red Heelers, purebred, no papers. 5 weeks old. $100 each. 360-796-4236 or 360-821-1484

83

Farm Animals

HAY: Good quality grass hay. $5.50 bale. 461-5804.

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight load. $2,000. 360-808-2295

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071.

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 9, eves. Capt. Sanders. 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BAYLINER: ‘87 3450 Tri-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 683-5099. BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506. CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 1973 Larson 16’ Shark, open bow. New cushion and floor board, with Calkins roller trailer. $950/obo. 1984 Johnson 25 hp short shaft, good cond., $650/obo. 461-7979. DURABOAT: ‘08 14’ aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, trailer. $1,500. 360-580-1741 DUROBOAT: 12’. 15 and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calkins trailer. $1,500. 683-6748. GLASPLY: 21’ boat and trailer, BMW B220 Inboard, brand new Honda 15 hp 4 stroke kicker. $10,000 or make offer. 452-4338. SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 360-504-2623 SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347.

94

Motorcycles

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519. HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $10,900 452-2275 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today!

EXCAVATOR: Runs great! $8000. Call 360-928-0273 for details.

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘01 XR 250. Low hrs., $1,500. 683-4761 HONDA: ‘01 XR50R. Low hr, helmet $800 452-9194, 452-6160 HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. 7K miles. $4,700. 504-2599. HONDA: ‘03 XR50. Low hrs, must see! $650. 417-3978. HONDA: ‘05 CR85R. Low hours, never raced. $1,500/trade. 360-460-6148 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096. HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. $1,200. 360-963-2659 HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. Runs good, looks fair. $745. 683-9071 HONDA: ‘83 Ascot. $1,500. 360-963-2659

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘94 XLR. 600 cc, hardly used, good cond. $1,600. 452-5412 HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263 HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $950. 460-1377. QUAD: ‘87 Honda TRX 125. W/trailer. $1,495/obo. 681-6300 QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 YAMAHA: ‘04 Raptor 660 limited edition, black. Brand new clutch, carrier baring in back axel, extra header and pipe. aluminum wheels and meaty tires. this a great looking quad not to mention fast. I’m asking $2,800. Great price. 360-670-6366 YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165.

YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st $3,100 cash. Street/Trail. 670-2562

95

Recreational Vehicles

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, great storage. $20,000. 477-7957

www.peninsula dailynews.com

5TH WHEEL: ‘90 28’ Kit. Average cond. $3,500/obo. 360-683-6131

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/ obo. 460-9556. DODGE: ‘68 200 pickup. Camper, good hunting/camping rig. $2,000. 797-1508. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Brave. Low mi., always garaged, must see/ Vortec 8.1, $35,000. 683-4912 MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTORHOME: Southwind by Fleetwood and a Honda Accord tow car, a package deal. Will not separate. We are the original owners. $18,500 COD. Less than the cost of a new car! Call 360-681-0144 TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514 TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Very nice, Porta-Potty, micro. $9,500. 683-5871. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 29’ Terry. $5,900. 681-7381 TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 WANTED: Award travel trailer. 683-8810

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4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘03 S10 ZR5 CREWCAB 4X4 82K orig. miles, 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, loaded! Black exterior in great cond! Black leather interior in exc. shape! Dual power seats, CD, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, air, dual airbags, bedliner, tow, diamond plate tool box, and bed caps, alloy wheels! Very nice S10 at our no haggle price of only $9,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $7,950. 360-477-6969 CHEV: ‘05 Colorado Ext Cab. 61,600 miles with Z71, Toyo A/t tires, bed liner, tool box, running boards. Interior options include Cruise, A/C, Tilt, power windows and doors, cd/mp3 player. $12,800. Call 460-3586 CHEV: ‘91 K5 Blazer. 93k, Immaculate. Loaded, ALL original, 350FI, Auto, 4x4, Adult Owned, non smoker, never off roaded. Build sheet, owner’s and shop manuals. Runs and Drives Like New. $10,750. 360-452-7439

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER • 2ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER • Bargain BoxAds will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & • Private parties only Tuesdays • 4 lines,2 days • No firewood or lumber • No pets or livestock • No Garage Sales

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3A181257

Peninsula Daily News Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles Port Angeles, WA 98362 or 150 S. 5th Ave. Ste 2, Sequim NO PHONE CALLS or FAX to: (360) 417-3507

DODGE ‘04 DAKOTA CLUB CAB 4X4 SLT PICKUP 4.7 liter V8, 5 speed manual, alloy wheels, new tires, spray-in bedliner, tow package rear sliding window, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, air, CD, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $12,240! Clean inside and out! Only 81,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD ‘00 RANGER XLT 4 DOOR 4X4 OFF ROAD 4.0 liter V6, 5 speed manual trans, blue metallic exterior in great shape! Gray cloth interior in great cond! Power windows, door locks, mirrors, Pioneer CD, sliding window, air, spray-in bedliner, 17: polished aluminum American Racing wheels, privacy glass, 2 owners! Clean little ranger at our no haggle price of only $5,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

97

4 Wheel Drive

97

4 Wheel Drive

GMC: ‘84 Jimmy 4x4. $500. 460-9776. JEEP: ‘98 Wrangler Sport. 89K hwy. mi. $7,900. 360-580-1741 CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $3,900. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $5,500. 683-4830. CHEV: ‘97 Blazer. Runs great. $3,150/ obo. 681-6300. DODGE: ‘07 Durango. White, gray leather int., 87K, power, exc. cond., seats 8. $15,850. 460-6155. FORD ‘04 F350 XLT 4X4 SUPERDUTY CREWCAB LB DUALLY 103K original miles! 6.0 liter Powerstroke turbo diesel V8, 6 spd manual trans, white exterior in exc. cond! Tan cloth interior in great cond! Pioneer touch screen head unit, cruise, tilt, sliding window, spray-in bedliner, running boards, alloy wheels, tow, no 5th wheel or goose neck! $6,400 below Kelley Blue Book at our no haggle price of only $18,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, new tires/battery. $8,000/obo. 452-2225 FORD: ‘00 Ranger XLT. 4x4 Off Road edition, 4.0 V6, 160K, extended cab, auto, tow, bedliner, clean. $5,950. 457-4363. FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, new Nokian tires, dark green/tan, very nice. $12,500. Curt at 460-8997.

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $3,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649 FORD: ‘90 Bronco Eddie Bauer. EFI 5.8, OD, air, CD, clean, straight, runs excel. $2,900. 808-0153. FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F-150 XLT 4X4 Triton. 5.4L 110K Mi. Moving! MUST SELL. $6,500/ obo. GREAT DEAL! 206-300-9007 FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. GMC ‘05 SIERRA CREW CAB Z71 SLE 4X4 PICKUP 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, spray-in bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, dual zone air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $22,377! Only 58,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some serious bucks on your next truck! $16,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. Rebuilt 4.3 Vortec engine, fully loaded, 181K, good condition. $3,500/obo. 477-4838 TOYOTA ‘01 SEQUOIA LIMITED 4X4 4.7 liter I-Force V8, auto, loaded! Dark metallic green exterior in great condition! Gray leather interior in great shape! Dual power seats, moon roof, 6 disc CD with JBL sound, VHS entertainment, 3rd seat, rear air, cruise, tilt, side airbags, tint, running boards, tow, chrome 17” wheels! Local trade! Very nice Sequoia at our no haggle price of only $8,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘92 E250 van. Ladder rack, interior racks, good runner. $1,800. 460-9257.

GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425.

TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner 4x4. As is. $1,800. 477-0577.

HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey EX. Runs great, 212K $3,900. 385-2012.

TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. 452-9693

HONDA: ‘95 Accord. Runs excellent, very clean, 48K, 4 cylinder. $4,000. 360-797-3865

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘06 Silverado 4x4 p/u, 3/4T. Ex cab, 6L V8 <36k mi. Lots of extras. Ex cond. $21,500. 360-460-8285 CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K Onan generator, 3 air tanks, 110 outlets, etc. $3,980. 360-302-5027 CHEV: ‘95 Lumina minivan. V6, 7 pass. $2,000. 457-1053. CHRYSLER: ‘05 Town and Country LTD. 1 owner, great cond. 73,200 miles. $10,500. 683-1957. DODGE ‘02 GRAND CARAVAN ES ALL WD 3.8 liter V6, auto, loaded! Dark metallic blue exterior in great cond! Gray leather interior in great shape! Dual power seats, dual power sliding doors, 4 disk CD changer, cruise, tilt with controls, quads, 3rd seat, privacy glass, roof rack, premium alloys with 75% rubber! A ton of van at our no haggle price of only $6,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero. 91K miles, well taken care of. Great Christmas gift! Collector’s item! Good mpg! $3,000. 775-9754

99

Cars

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154. BUICK ‘05 LACROSSE SEDAN 3.8 liter Series III V6 engine, auto, alloy wheels, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and driver seat, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, OnStar, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,015! Sparkling clean inside and out! One owner! Only 29,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

DODGE ‘05 GRAND CARAVAN SE 3.3 liter V6, auto, loaded, white exterior in excellent cond. Gray cloth interior in great condition! Power seat, dual sliding doors, CD, dual airbags, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, roof rack, dual climate, rear air, aftermarket 16” alloys with 70% rubber! Great little van at our no haggle price of only $6,995

CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093.

FORD ‘95 F350 XL CREWCAB LB 2WD 69K original miles! 1 owner! 7.5 liter (460ci) V8, auto, blue exterior in great condition! Blue cloth/ vinyl interior in great shape! Cassette stereo, running boards, spray-in bedliner, matching canopy, 16” alloy wheels, front captains chairs, tow. Extremely low mileage F-Series at our no haggle price of only $4,995

COLLECTORS: Olds Cutlass 442 1986, sharp lines, new int. $5,500. 683-8332.

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. 360-808-1242. FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX convertible. 5.0 auto, 71K mi., excellent condition. $3,800. 928-0213.

FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363.

TOYOTA: ‘79 Land Cruiser. Mil-spec inline 6, 67K, barn doors w/jump seats. $5,700. 670-1146.

98

99

CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377. CHEV: ‘80 Chevette. $500. 460-7131. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374.

DODGE: ‘07 Caravan Town & County LX. Low mi., excellent condition. $10,600 firm. 457-8129.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

The Clallam Conservation District Board of Supervisors plans to adopt a resolution setting the date, time, and location of an election to fill the expiring term of Donald Hatler during the regular monthly Board meeting scheduled for 3:00 pm on January 10, 2012 at the USDA Service Center, 1601 E. Front St., Bldg. A, Port Angeles, WA. Pub: Dec. 27, 2011

Case No.: 11 4 00323 0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF GEORGE E. BAIN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: December 13, 2011 DAVID TUCKER, Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Dec. 13, 20, 27, 2011

FORD: ‘92 Taurus GL. V6, 139,000 miles. Nearly new tires and new battery. Good cond. $1,700/obo. Call 360-808-2523. FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. $5,500. 452-9693, 461-6506 HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191. JAGUAR: ‘90 XJS Coupe. Black, tan int., only 42K mi., car is like brand new in/out, mechanically. $11,750 Call John, Euro Auto Works 683-3876. JAGUAR: XJS-V12. Excellent cond., $9,600. 775-5827. KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040 MERCEDES-BENZ ‘01 E430 ALL WD SEDAN 4.3 liter V8, auto, 4Matic All WD, 20” rims, tinted windows, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, seats, and headrests, leather seating, dual zone climate control, air, cruise, tilt, 6 disc CD changer, 8 airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $15,609! Extra clean inside and out! Only 79,000 m i l e s ! G o o d mechanical condition! Loaded with options! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

B9

Cars

HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. Mechanic’s special Nissan ‘99 Sentra GXE. 109K. $1,500. Needs minor work. 452-7737 MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606. MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 PONTIAC: ‘98 Sunfire. Auto, 4 dr, clean, well maintained, red, 26-30 mpg. $2,750/ obo. 360-808-5800. STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed flat head 6 cylinder engine, all original, excellent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810. STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963 TOYOTA ‘97 TERCEL COUPE 1 owner! 1.5 liter 4 cylinder, 5 spd manual trans, red exterior in great shape! Tan cloth interior in good cond! Pioneer CD player, dual airbags, rear spoiler, alloy wheels! 35+ mpg! Great little fuel sipping Toyota at our no haggle price of only $2,795

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

TOYOTA: ‘02 Echo. 77K mi., 5 spd, 37+ mpg, exc. cond., maintain., 1 owner. KBB $4,100. Asking $3,500. 460-8723. TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669. VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,200. 681-7381. VW: ‘67 Red Classic. Good engine and body, exc. interior, new tires. $6,500/obo. 461-4025 VW: ‘74 Sunbug Special Edition gold. $2,400. 683-7397. VW: ‘88 Fox. As is. Needs some electrical work. $500/obo. 457-0277

101

Legals Clallam Co.

No: 11-7-00432-6 Notice and Summons by Publication (Termination) (SMPB) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF CLALLAM JUVENILE COURT In re the Welfare of: KWYNCIE JACE THROWER D.O.B.: 11/17/2006 To: OLEE THROWER, Father A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on December 12, 2011; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: February 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at Clallam County Juvenile and Family Services, 1912 W. 18th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DSHS at Port Angeles, at (360) 565-2240 or Forks DSHS, at (360) 374-3530. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM.aspx. Dated: December 15, 2011 COMM. W. BRENT BASDEN Judge/Commissioner BARBARA CHRISTENSEN County Clerk by Linda Smith Deputy Clerk Pub: Dec. 20, 27, 2011 and Jan. 3, 2012 No: 11-7-00333-8 Notice and Summons by Publication (Termination) (SMPB) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF CLALLAM JUVENILE COURT In re the Welfare of: LINCOLN TERWILLIGER D.O.B.: 03/22/2009 To: ASHLEY BURTON, Mother A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on October 11, 2011; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: February 29, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at Clallam county Juvenile and Family Services, 1912 W. 18th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DSHS, Port Angeles, at (360) 565-2240 or Forks DSHS, at (360) 3743530. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM.aspx. Dated: December 21, 2011 KEN D. WILLIAMS Judge BARBARA CHRISTENSEN County Clerk by Linda Smith Deputy Clerk Pub: Dec. 27, 2011 and Jan. 3, 10, 2012

91190150

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B10

WeatherWorld

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

High 44

Low 43

48/39

47/33

46/36

44/34

Cloudy with a little rain.

Windy with rain.

Rain.

Rather cloudy, chance of a little rain.

Rain, heavy at times.

Rather cloudy, chance of a little rain.

The Peninsula A cold front will bring lingering rainfall to the Peninsula this morning with a couple of showers in the afternoon. Temperatures will remain seasonable with highs in the 40s. Snow levels will hover between 3,000 and 4,000 feet. A warm front will bring a steady rainfall tonight with snow levels climbing to 5,000 feet. Rainfall will diminish for a time Wednesday morning before another round of moderate to heavy rainfall moves across the region during the afternoon. Snow levels will remain near 5,000 feet.

Victoria 45/43 Neah Bay 45/41

Port Townsend 45/42

Port Angeles 44/43

Sequim 46/40

Forks 45/42

Port Ludlow 45/41

Olympia 46/42

Seattle 48/42

Spokane 37/36

Yakima Kennewick 44/36 49/38

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast Dull and dreary today with a little rain. Wind south 3-6 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain tonight. Wind south 10-20 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Rain tomorrow. Wind south 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Thursday: Mostly cloudy, chance of a little rain. Wind west 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. TABLE Location High Tide LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

2:22 a.m. 1:47 p.m. 5:18 a.m. 3:08 p.m. 7:03 a.m. 4:53 p.m. 6:24 a.m. 4:14 p.m.

TODAY

TOMORROW

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.1’ 8.6’ 8.1’ 6.3’ 9.7’ 7.6’ 9.1’ 7.1’

7:51 a.m. 8:20 p.m. 10:49 a.m. 10:24 p.m. 12:03 p.m. 11:38 p.m. 11:56 a.m. 11:31 p.m.

2.3’ -0.6’ 4.7’ -0.8’ 6.1’ -1.0’ 5.7’ -0.9’

High Tide 3:02 a.m. 2:32 p.m. 5:52 a.m. 4:06 p.m. 7:37 a.m. 5:51 p.m. 6:58 a.m. 5:12 p.m.

National Forecast Tuesday, December 27, 2011 Seattle 48/42

Sunset today ................... 4:26 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:04 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 9:47 a.m. Moonset today ................. 8:22 p.m.

Moon Phases First

Full

Last

New

THURSDAY

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.0’ 8.0’ 7.9’ 5.7’ 9.5’ 6.9’ 8.9’ 6.5’

8:39 a.m. 9:00 p.m. 11:53 a.m. 11:06 p.m. 1:07 p.m. ----1:00 p.m. -----

2.3’ -0.1’ 4.2’ 0.1’ 5.5’ --5.2’ ---

High Tide Ht 3:39 a.m. 3:17 p.m. 6:24 a.m. 5:10 p.m. 8:09 a.m. 6:55 p.m. 7:30 a.m. 6:16 p.m.

7.8’ 7.4’ 7.8’ 5.1’ 9.4’ 6.1’ 8.8’ 5.7’

Low Tide Ht 9:27 a.m. 9:41 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 11:47 p.m. 12:20 a.m. 2:14 p.m. 12:13 a.m. 2:07 p.m.

2.4’ 0.6’ 3.7’ 1.1’ 0.1’ 4.8’ 0.1’ 4.5’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Jan 8

Jan 16

Jan 22

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 53 42 c Baghdad 58 37 s Beijing 38 26 s Brussels 43 37 c Cairo 62 44 s Calgary 45 28 pc Edmonton 34 12 pc Hong Kong 64 59 s Jerusalem 55 38 s Johannesburg 73 54 t Kabul 47 21 s London 50 43 pc Mexico City 67 41 s Montreal 36 30 pc Moscow 37 26 i New Delhi 77 41 s Paris 50 40 c Rio de Janeiro 83 71 r Rome 53 36 s Stockholm 45 36 pc Sydney 72 63 sh Tokyo 48 36 s Toronto 38 20 r Vancouver 45 42 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Minneapolis 26/17

Billings 47/30

New York 49/41 Chicago 39/19

Denver 50/23

San Francisco 57/48

Washington 47/39

Los Angeles 68/49 Atlanta 51/32

El Paso 53/32

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Houston 64/37 Miami 81/63

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 49 15 49 51 53 48 42 47 31 43 48 42 66 46 39 39 38 48 57 50 35 39 49 -14 40 80 64 31

Lo 28 7 46 32 42 37 32 30 18 37 42 21 39 26 19 24 34 46 35 23 23 21 46 -30 28 69 37 23

W s sf r r r r c pc s c pc sn r pc sn sn sn r s pc pc sn r sf c s s sn

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 42 62 55 68 81 37 26 49 60 49 51 37 82 70 51 65 46 57 48 57 45 43 63 63 57 29 37 47

Lo 26 40 30 49 63 19 17 31 41 41 28 23 50 44 39 44 43 37 30 40 28 30 36 48 48 19 25 39

W s s s s t c pc r s r s pc t s r s r r c s s c s s s pc c r

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 84 at Fort Myers, FL

Ancient seal linked to ritual discovered Artifact found in Jerusalem near wall of temple

Low: -13 at Moriarty, NM

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “The Adventures of Tintin” (PG) “Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked” (G) “Hugo” (PG) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (PG-13) “War Horse” (PG-13) “We Bought a Zoo” (PG)

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JERUSALEM — A rare clay seal found under Jerusalem’s Old City appears to be linked to religious rituals practiced at the Jewish Temple 2,000 years ago, Israeli archaeologists said. The coin-sized seal found near the Jewish holy site at the Western Wall bears two Aramaic words meaning “pure for God.” Archaeologist Ronny Reich of Haifa University said it dates from between the first century B.C. to 70 A.D. — the year Roman forces put down a Jewish revolt and destroyed the second of the two biblical temples in Jerusalem. The find marks the first discovery of a written seal from that period of Jerusalem’s history, and it appeared to be a unique physical artifact from ritual practice in the Temple, said Reich, co-director of the excavation. Very few artifacts linked to the temples have been discovered so far. The site of the temple itself — the enclosure known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary — remains off-limits to archaeologists because of

Detroit 39/21

Kansas City 42/26

Sun & Moon

Dec 31

Everett 46/45

Shown is today’s weather.

TIDE

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 42 33 0.02 17.32 Forks* 49 37 0.80 113.60 Seattle 42 37 trace 34.46 Sequim 44 32 trace 16.32 Hoquiam 42 38 0.02 64.63 Victoria 45 41 0.06 30.28 P. Townsend 43 37 0.00 16.57 *Data from Sunday

-10s -0s

Bellingham 45/44 Aberdeen 47/46

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

■ Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) “The Darkest Hour” (PG-13) “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” (R) “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol” (PG-13) “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn” (PG-13)

■ The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” (R) “Hugo” (PG) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A rare clay seal is displayed during a news conference at the archaeological site known as the City of David in east Jerusalem on Sunday. its religious and political sensitivity. Archaeologists said Sunday the seal was likely used by temple officials approving an object for ritual use — oil, perhaps, or an animal intended for sacrifice. Materials used by temple priests had to meet stringent purity guidelines

stipulated in detail in the Jewish legal text known as the Mishna, which also mention the use of seals as tokens by pilgrims. The find, Reich said, is “the first time an indication was brought by archaeology about activities in the Temple Mount — the religious activities of buying and

offering and giving to the temple itself.” The site where the seal was found is on the route of a main street that ran through ancient Jerusalem just outside the temple compound. Aren Maeir of Bar-Ilan University, a biblical archaeologist not connected

■ Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

“Sherlock Holmes: A Game to the dig, said the seal was special because it “was of Shadows” (PG-13) found right next to the temple and is similar to what Follow the PDN on we see described in the Mishna.” “It’s nice when we can connect an activity recorded in ancient sources with FACEBOOK TWITTER archaeological finds,” he Peninsula Daily pendailynews said.

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