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Peninsula Daily News April 14, 2011

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

50 cents

Man hits car intentionally, PA police say 4 in hospital including 2 small children By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Four people — including a 1-year-old girl and a 4-year-old boy — were hospitalized Wednesday after a driver intentionally rammed their car, driving it into a telephone pole, police said. Port Angeles Sgt. Barb McFall said police don’t know why that driver — whom they identified as 28-year-old Michael J. Moyle of Port Angeles — rammed the Subaru carrying two adults and two children, all of Port Angeles. Witnesses told police they saw the driver of a black Ford Mustang chase the Subaru from the Albertsons store at Lauridsen Boulevard and Lincoln Street to

South Laurel Street and hit it in the back at a high rate of speed. The force of the impact drove the Subaru sedan about 150 feet into a telephone pole near Viewcrest Avenue at about 11:20 a.m., McFall said. “From what we can ascertain, it was an intentional assault,” she said. The pole hit the car broadside on the rear driver’s side seat where the boy was sitting. He was listed in serious condition Wednesday evening at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The girl was taken to Olympic Medical Center to be treated for a head injury. McFall said the girl was expected to be released later that day. The children are not identified, police said, because they are minors. The driver of the Subaru, Stewart M. Baker, and the frontseat passenger, 48-year-old Tawny Baker, were taken to OMC for

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Rescue personnel tend to a woman inside a crashed Subaru car on South Laurel Street near the intersection with Viewcrest Avenue in Port Angeles at 11:45 a.m. Wednesday. treatment of serious injuries, McFall said. Tawny Baker was listed in stable condition Wednesday. The girl and Stewart Baker were not listed as being at the hospital, a nursing supervisor said Wednesday evening. Stewart Baker, 24, told police he didn’t know why the other vehicle was chasing them, McFall said. McFall said there is no indication that road rage was a factor. After the collision, Moyle drove his car about another block and a half before it died, apparently

from damage suffered in the crash, she said. He was driven from the scene by a man police identified as Timothy P. Smith, 27, of Port Angeles, McFall said. Both men remained at large Wednesday. Both Moyle and Smith were identified by a Port Angeles police officer who arrived as they were leaving in the Toyota, McFall said. The officer recognized the two men but did not know at the time that the two were involved in the wreck, she said. Moyle is described as 6 feet

3 inches tall and weighing 200 pounds. He has brown hair and eyes. Smith, who drives a light-blue Toyota truck, is 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighs 220 pounds, police said. He has green eyes and brown hair. Police are encouraging anyone with information on Moyle’s and Smith’s whereabouts to phone them at 360-452-4545.

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Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsula dailynews.com.

OMC launches high-tech Attorney general weapon against cancer reviewing report on former mayor

Linear accelerator only one on North Olympic Peninsula

By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The state Attorney General’s Office is reviewing a report that concludes former Mayor Karen Rogers violated state law by not disclosing business relationships while serving on the City Council. Agency spokesman Dan Sytman confirmed in an email that the report, developed by the state Auditor’s Office, is under review, but he couldn’t be reached for further comment. The Attorney General’s Office and Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office are the only agencies that have the authority to level penalties for the violation, said Auditor’s Office spokeswoman Mindy Chambers. Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said in an email that she is leaving it up to the state to seek penalties.

By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Olympic Medical Center has launched a high-tech weapon to fight cancer with precise, high doses of radiation. OMC went live with its $2.7 million Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator Tuesday at the Thomas Family Cancer Center at 844 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim. The machine is the only linear accelerator on the North Olympic Peninsula. Hospital officials said the TrueBeam is the most advanced linear accelerator on the market. It delivers radiation doses 40 percent to 140 percent stronger than earlier versions of the Varian Medical Systems equipment, they said. The next-closest TrueBeam in the U.S. is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Palo Alto, Calif. “That speaks volumes,” said Dr. Rena Zimmerman, director of radiation oncology at OMC.

Possible $500 fine

‘Cream of crop’ “We are among the cream of the crop with radiation therapy options,” she said. “Our neighbors with cancer who need radiotherapy do not need to travel farther than Sequim to receive powerful and advanced treatment.” OMC officials described the technology as “a game changer” for the treatment of lung, breast, head and neck, abdomen, liver and other forms of cancer.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Chief radiation therapist John Engstrom stands next to Olympic Medical Center’s new Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator at the Thomas Family Cancer Center in Sequim on Wednesday. The TrueBeam’s “Gated RapidArc” technology makes it possible to provide fast treatment with minimal damage to surrounding tissues, OMC officials said. Respiratory gating on the

TrueBeam synchronizes the beam with a patient’s breathing, which Zimmerman described as “the optimal approach for our patients.” Turn

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Rogers could be fined $500 for not disclosing the conflict, according to state law. The four-page report released during a special meeting of the Port Angeles City Council on Wednesday found that the former mayor acted improperly by voting for a contract between the city and Capacity Provisioning Inc. in 2007. The contract involved use of the company’s fiber-optic network. The city has paid CPI about $5,000 a month for use of the network since it went live in 2003. Under state law, Rogers was required to disclose that CPI was paying her for “property management services” at the time and abstain from voting on the contract, Kim Hurley, special investigations manager with the state agency, told the council

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Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — City Council members may find it harder after leaving office to immediately work for businesses that have contracts with City Hall as a result of a state auditor’s report released Wednesday. During a meeting on the report that morning, City Council member Max Mania requested that staff members develop a resolution that could legally prevent those who serve on the council from working for companies that do business with the city for a certain period of time after they leave office. Turn

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Wednesday morning. “We did find some instances where the person voted in favor for city contracts where a remote interest existed,” she said. “And that is a violation of the remote code of ethics.” Hurley presented the findings of the report at a public meeting attended by six council members — Mayor Dan Di Guilio, who is working as Jefferson Transit’s interim director, was absent — city administrators and about 30 other people. Turn

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UpFront

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Miof Puzzles chael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942 Circulation telephone: 360-385-7421

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Sheen: May go back to ‘Two and a Half Men’ CHARLIE SHEEN SAID he may be reunited with “Two and a Half Men.” In an interview with a Boston radio station Tuesday, Sheen said there have been disSheen cussions about bringing him back to the hit CBS sitcom he was fired from last month. Sheen put the chances of him returning at “85 percent.” He didn’t offer details in the Sports Hub 98.5 WBZ-FM interview, saying he’d been asked not to divulge anything. CBS declined to comment, and series producer Warner Bros. Television didn’t immediately return

The Associated Press

‘X Factor’

auditions

People wait in line to get a wrist band to audition in the upcoming Fox series the “X Factor” on Wednesday in Newark, N.J. The auditions are the third of six stops, following Los Angeles and Miami, in the search for performers to compete. It’s the American version of a show that’s been on in Great Britain since 2004. a call for comment. The actor also said his profits from the show’s rich syndication deals are being withheld and that’s part of his $100 million lawsuit

against Warner and the show’s executive producer. Sheen was in Boston for his nationwide road show that has drawn mixed audience reaction.

Passings By The Associated Press

SIDNEY HARMAN, 92, au audio equipment millionaire who bought Newsweek magazine last year and oversaw its merger with The Daily Beast, has died in Washington, D.C. Mr. Harman died Tuesday night of complications from leukemia, according to a family Mr. Harman statement in 2007 posted on The Daily Beast website. He learned of his illness about a month ago. “He died in Washington, D.C., a city he loved and supported in so many ways, surrounded by his wife and children,” the family wrote. Mr. Harman is the founder of Harman International Industries, which was based in Washington, D.C., for years before it was sold in 2007 for about $8 billion. Now, the parent company of numerous electronics brands is based in Stamford, Conn. In the Newsweek deal, Mr. Harman paid The Washington Post Co. $1 for the money-losing newsweekly, and the Post Co. agreed to cover up to $10 million of the magazine’s debt. Three months later, Mr. Harman’s negotiations helped install veteran editor Tina Brown as News-

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots A TOURIST IN Forks buying waterproofing spray for her children’s shoes . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

week’s editor-in-chief to lead its merger with The Daily Beast. Mr. Harman said the merger provided an “ideal combination of established journalism authority and bright, bristling website savvy.” Mr. Harman was a philanthropist, arts patron and familiar face in Washington’s social scene. He rarely missed the annual Kennedy Center Honors gala. He was married to former California Rep. Jane Harman, who recently left Congress to lead the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Mr. Harman was born in Montreal in 1918 and moved with his family to New York. He made his fortune in the 1950s as an audio pioneer. In 1977, he joined President Jimmy Carter’s administration as deputy secretary in the Commerce Department.

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HOMER SMITH, 79, a former Army head coach who is regarded as one of keenest offensive minds in the annals of college football, has died. Mr. Smith, coach of the Black Knights from 19741978, died Sunday at his home in Tuscaloosa, Ala., after a four-year battle with cancer.

Mr. Smith was an assistant at several schools in his 39-year career, never staying long enough at any one place to put down roots. He coached at Stanford, Air Force, Alabama, Arizona, the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs and served three stints as offensive coordinator at UCLA. While with the Bruins, Mr. Smith developed seven future NFL quarterbacks, including Tommy Maddox, Jay Schroeder, and current UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel. Mr. Smith also was head coach at Davidson and Pacific. Former UCLA head coach Terry Donahue once called Smith the best teacher of the game he had ever known. Mr. Smith had an economics degree from Princeton, an MBA from Stanford and a master’s in theological studies from Harvard. But it was the ebb and flow of offensive football that captivated him most. While at Alabama, the highlight of Smith’s time there came in 1989 against Mississippi. Trailing by 21 points, the Crimson Tide scored 62 unanswered points.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 3-7-5 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 01-10-14-32-35 Laugh Lines Wednesday’s Keno: 03-04-12-16-18-21-22-26A RADIO SHACK in Montana is giving custom- 27-29-39-42-45-47-58-62ers the choice between a 65-66-68-76 free gun or a Pizza Hut gift Wednesday’s Lotto: card if they sign up for sat03-13-14-25-42-46 ellite TV. The way it works is you Wednesday’s Match 4: can take the gift card and 11-12-17-22 get some free pizza, or take Wednesday’s Powerthe gun — and also get ball: 04-23-39-49-50, Powsome free pizza. Jimmy Fallon erball: 39, Power Play: 3

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How high do you think the price per gallon of regular gas will go on the Peninsula this summer?

$4-$4.25 

$4.26-$4.50 

$4.51-$4.75 

$4.76-$5 

Above $5 

11.9% 21.4% 17.5% 19.9% 29.3%

Total votes cast: 995 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  The city of Sequim will not accept refrigerators, freezers, paint or hazardous materials during a cleanup program for residents of the city Friday. A story on Page A5 Tuesday erroneously said such materials would be accepted.

_________

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) The new Seagrave-Chevrolet fire and pump truck ordered by the city of Port Angeles arrived this morning and was taken immediately to Peabody Heights reservoir for pumping tests. Watching the tests was Paul Braun of the Washington Surveying and Rating Bureau, who must approve the truck before it can be accepted by the city Fire Department. Tests called for three hours of pumping at various pressures and volumes. The new truck is a lightweight, speedy one intended chiefly for use on residential fires.

the prime movers in the proposal. Voters in both districts would go to the polls on the issue if consolidation comes to a vote.

1986 (25 years ago)

The Port Townsend School District board has selected Ron Johnson, assistant superintendent of schools in Federal Way, as the new superintendent in Port Townsend. He will replace Margaret Berry, who will retire in June after eight years as head of the district. Originally from Shelton, Johnson taught fifth and sixth grades in Port Angeles from 1958 to 1961. 1961 (50 years ago) He became an electronA move to consolidate the ics inspector for Boeing in the 1960s, and then current Dry Creek School returned to education. District with Port Angeles Of particular interest to School District No. 17 gets an airing tonight in the Dry Johnson is the Port Townsend district’s failure Creek School gymnasium. A group of school patrons over the past several years in the Dry Creek district are to pass special tax levies.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, April 14, the 104th day of 2011. There are 261 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth during a performance of “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C.; the president died nine hours later. On this date: ■  In 1775, the first American society for the abolition of slavery was formed in Philadelphia. ■  In 1828, the first edition of Noah Webster’s American Dictionary of the English Language was published. ■  In 1910, President William Howard Taft became the first U.S.

chief executive to throw the ceremonial first pitch at a baseball game as the Washington Senators beat the Philadelphia Athletics 3-0. ■  In 1912, the British liner RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic and began sinking. ■  In 1931, King Alfonso XIII of Spain went into exile, and the Second Spanish Republic was proclaimed. ■  In 1949, at the conclusion of the so-called “Wilhelmstrasse Trial,” 19 former Nazi Foreign Office officials were sentenced by an American tribunal in Nuremberg to prison terms ranging from four to 25 years. ■  In 1956, Ampex Corp. demonstrated the first successful video-

tape recorder at the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters Convention in Chicago. ■  In 1960, the musical “Bye Bye Birdie” opened on Broadway. ■  In 1981, the first test flight of America’s first operational space shuttle, Columbia, ended successfully with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California. ■  In 1986, Americans got word of a U.S. air raid on Libya (because of the time difference, it was the early morning of April 15 where the attack occurred.) ■  Ten years ago: The 24 crew members of the U.S. spy plane who’d been held in China for 11 days landed at their home base, Whidbey Island Naval Air Station in Washington state, where they

were greeted by thousands of friends, family members and other well-wishers. ■  Five years ago: President George W. Bush rebuffed recommendations from a growing number of retired generals that he replace Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, saying, “He has my full support.” ■  One year ago: A magnitude 7 earthquake in a remote Tibetan region of China killed some 2,700 people and injured more than 10,000. The Eyjafjallajokul volcano in Iceland erupted, sending out an ash plume that led most northern European countries to close their airspace between April 15 and 20, grounding about 10 million travelers worldwide.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, April 14, 2011

Second Front Page

PAGE

A3

Briefly: Nation Budget deal touted to save $353 million

of the sinking vehicle and swim to shore. The dead youngsters ranged in age from 11 months to 5 years. A relative had called police Tuesday night to report a dispute at the home of Lashanda WASHINGTON — A new Armstrong, 25. budget estimate released Shortly afterward, she drove Wednesday shows that the off a boat ramp several blocks spending bill negotiated away from her apartment in between President Barack this struggling city 60 miles Obama and House Speaker north of New York City. John Boehner would produce Officials believe Lashaun less than 1 percent of the Armstrong, 10, hit the button on $38 billion in claimed savings a power window to escape from by the end of this budget year. the driver’s side as the minivan The Congressional Budget began to sink in the 45-degree Office estimate shows that com- water. Fire Chief Michael Vatter pared with current spending said the vehicle went under rates, the spending bill due for a within two minutes. House vote today would pare just $352 million from the defiCold-case suspect cit through Sept. 30. SAN RAFAEL, Calif. — A About $8 billion in cuts to man accused in four California domestic programs and foreign cold-case killings made his first aid are offset by nearly equal appearance in court to face increases in defense spending. murder charges. The House began prelimiJoseph nary debate on the measure Naso arrived Wednesday with it easily in the Marin advancing over a procedural County courthurdle by a 241-179 vote. room WednesThe measure appears on day in shacktrack to pass the House and les and a redSenate this week before a stopstriped shirt. gap spending measure expires The baldFriday at midnight despite ing and Naso opposition from some of the bespectacled GOP’s most ardent budget cut77-year-old ters. didn’t say anything, and the The budget deficit is projudge postponed his arraignjected at $1.6 trillion this year. ment while the court determines who will be his defense Mom drives into river attorney. The women slain in the NEWBURGH, N.Y. — A woman upset with the father of 1970s and 1990s all had alliterative first and last initials, and her children packed her four authorities are trying to deteryoungsters into her minivan mine whether that’s a coinciand drove into the frigid Huddence or the pattern of a serial son River, killing everyone except her 10-year-old son, who killer. The Associated Press managed to roll down a window

Briefly: World NATO launches airstrikes on Gadhafi targets AJDABIYA, Libya — NATO launched new airstrikes Wednesday on targets held by Moammar Gadhafi as the rebel movement urged a stronger air campaign that will allow them to advance on Gadhafi’s territory. In Tripoli, meanwhile, Gadhafi’s finance minister angrily denounced proposals by rebel leaders that they be given some of the regime’s assets that were frozen as part of international sanctions. “That is financial piracy,” Finance Minister Abdulhafid Zlitni said of the idea. In all, about $120 billion in Libyan assets were frozen as part of international sanctions, Zlitni told a news conference. Concerning Wednesday’s bombings, a NATO official confirmed a strike on at least one ammunition bunker outside the Libyan capital, Tripoli. He asked that his name not be used because the military alliance was not yet releasing the information publicly.

tal, a step prosecutors depicted as a precaution to monitor his health while under questioning. His sons Gamal, once seen as Mubarak’s successor, and Alaa, a wealthy businessman, were jailed in Cairo’s Torah prison, where a string of former top regime figures — including Mubarak’s prime minister, ruling party chief and chief of staff — already are languishing, facing similar corruption investigations. The detention of the man who ruled Egypt unquestioned for 29 years set a new landmark in the already unprecedented wave of upheaval shaking the Middle East.

U.S. Navy tests laser

NAIROBI, Kenya — A shipbased laser tested by the U.S. Navy’s research arm could put the heat on Somali pirates. The Navy for the first time last week successfully tested a solid-state high-energy laser from a ship. The beam, which was aimed at a boat moving through turbulent Pacific Ocean waters, set the target’s engine on fire. The Office of Naval Research said the laser traveled over “miles, not yards.” For now, the test is a proof of Mubarak detained concept, and it’s not yet known when it might be deployed as a CAIRO — Ousted President weapon. Hosni Mubarak and his two The baseball-sized laser sons were detained Wednesday beam, though, could be used to for investigation of corruption, stop small crafts from approachabuse of power and killings of ing naval ships. It could also protesters, bringing cheers of victory from activists who hoped target pirates. The laser is precise, and the it marked a turning point in Egypt’s turbulent transition to strength can be dialed down democracy. from a lethal level to a nuisance The 82-year-old Mubarak level. was under detention in a hospiThe Associated Press

The Associated Press

Pizza World Championships

held in Italy

Kiyakazu Sanpei of Japan performs with his dough during the freestyle event, part of the Pizza World Championships, in Salsomaggiore Terme, northern Italy, on Wednesday. The 20th edition of the championships took place Monday through Wednesday.

Obama: Cut spending, raise taxes on wealthy U.S. must live within its means, reduce deficit, president says By David Espo

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama coupled a call for $4 trillion in long-term deficit reductions with a blistering attack on Republican plans for taxes, Medicare and Medicaid on Wednesday, laying down markers for a roiling debate in Congress and the 2012 presidential campaign to come. Obama said spending cuts and higher taxes alike must be part of any deficit-reduction plan, including an end to Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy. He proposed an unspecified “debt failsafe” that would go into effect if Congress failed to make sure the national debt would be falling by 2014 relative to the size of the overall economy. “We have to live within our means, reduce our deficit and get back on a path that will allow us to pay down our debt,” the president said in a speech at George Washington University a few blocks from the White House.

“Instead, what we got was a speech that was excessively partisan, dramatically inaccurate and hopelessly inadequate to addressing our country’s pressing fiscal challenges,” Ryan said. “What we heard today was not fiscal leadership from our commander in chief. What we heard today was a political broadside from our campaigner in chief.”

“And we have to do it in a way that protects the recovery and protects the investments we need to grow, create jobs and win the future.” Obama’s speech was salted with calls for bipartisanship, but it also bristled with attacks on ‘Serious action’ needed Republicans. Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, noted that the administration has Obama attacks GOP asked Congress to raise the debt They want to “end Medicare as limit but said, “The American we know it,” he said, and to extend people will not stand for that tax cuts for the wealthy while unless it is accompanied by seridemanding 33 million seniors pay ous action to reduce our deficit. “More promises, hollow targets more for health care. “That’s not right, and it’s not and Washington commissions going to happen as long as I am simply won’t get the job done.” The president spoke less than president,” he vowed. Obama spoke to an audience a week after he reached a comprothat included Rep. Paul Ryan, mise with Boehner on an unprecR-Wis., author of the House edented package of $38 billion in Republican budget that drew spending cuts for this year just in time to avoid a partial governrepeated presidential scorn. The Budget Committee chair- ment shutdown. Both houses of Congress are man later told reporters he had been excited to receive an invita- expected to pass the measure in tion to the speech, believing the the next 24 hours or so, closing administration was extending an the books on the current budget year. olive branch.

Are your taxes fair? AP poll shows most in U.S. say yes By Stephen Ohlemacher The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — For all the complaining this time of year, most Americans actually think the taxes they pay are fair. Not that they’re cheering. Fewer people expect refunds this year than in previous years, a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows. But as Monday’s filing deadline approaches, the poll showed 54 percent believe their tax bills are either somewhat fair or very fair, compared with 46 percent who said they are unfair. Should taxes be raised to eat into huge federal deficits? Among the public, 62 percent said they favor cutting government services to sop up the red ink.

Quick Read

Just 29 percent said raise taxes. That’s sure to be a major issue as Congress takes up budget legislation for next year and the 2012 presidential campaign gets under way in earnest. On Wednesday, President Barack Obama revived his proposal to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans to help reduce government borrowing. In the poll, Democrats were more likely than Republicans to think their tax bills were fair. Liberals and moderates were more likely to think so than conservatives. Women more likely than men. Most whites thought their tax bills were fair; most nonwhites didn’t. The young and the old — adults younger than 30 and seniors 65 and older — were much

more likely to say their taxes were fair than those in their prime earning years. Surprisingly, there was little difference in the perception of fairness across income levels. Monday is the filing deadline for federal tax returns — three days later than usual because a local holiday is being observed in the nation’s capital Friday, the traditional deadline. Federal tax receipts are projected to hit their lowest level in 60 years when measured as a share of the overall economy. Tax receipts dipped during the recession and have stayed low in part because Congress has extended Bush-era tax cuts at every income level, leaving federal rates unchanged for much of the past decade.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Inmates accused of killing guard for uniform

Nation: Video of 6-year-old being frisked sparks anger

Nation: Ohio police chief cancels hundreds of tickets

World: Czech president to be sent thousands of pens

TWO SOUTH DAKOTA inmates attacked a 63-year-old prison guard, wrapped his head in plastic shrink wrap and left him to die before using his uniform to sneak past security in an unsuccessful escape attempt, investigators said in court documents released Wednesday. Eric Robert and Rodney Berget, both 48, are charged with first-degree and felony murder. Both were ordered to be held without bond and to have no contact with each other. Public defenders assigned to the men had no immediate comment on the case, though Robert’s attorney said Robert still was deciding whether he wanted to represent himself.

A KENTUCKY MOTHER said Wednesday that federal airport screeners wouldn’t tell her why they were frisking her 6-year-old daughter, whose treatment was captured on a YouTube video that has sparked outrage. Selena Drexel said her family went through body scanners last month at the New Orleans airport, and her daughter, Anna, was selected for a patdown. She asked why but wasn’t given a reason. Drexel said her daughter began to cry after the search and said, “I’m sorry, Mommy. I don’t know what I did wrong.” Drexel said her daughter has since moved on and is showing no ill effects from the incident.

MOTORISTS ARE OFF the hook for more than 900 speeding tickets automatically issued by a mobile police camera in southwest Ohio. The camera had been stationed in a park in Hamilton on April 2 at the same time a youth soccer tournament, the Mid-American Soccer Classic, was being held. Police Chief Neil Ferdelman told The JournalNews of Hamilton that he canceled the tickets because of the tournament, which he said drew many out-of-towners who were unaware the camera was in use. At $95 each, the 900 tickets would have totaled more than $86,000.

SOME SAY THE pen is mightier than the sword. If true, Czech President Vaclav Klaus will soon be a very mighty man. More than 5,000 Czechs have signed up to a Facebook campaign to mail pens to the president after a video of him sheepishly pocketing a pen he took an obvious liking to during an official signing ceremony last week in Chile became widely popular on the Internet. Klaus said it’s customary for leaders to keep pens after signing accords. But the manner in which he sized up the pen and sneakily slipped it into his pocket has seen him ridiculed by some of his countrymen.


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Thursday, April 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

A look at the issues before lawmakers By Molly Rosbach The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — With fewer than two weeks before the regular legislative session ends, it’s time for Washington lawmakers to make the final push to get their bills approved by both houses and signed into law by the governor. Measures related to the state budget are exempt from most deadlines and thus fair game until the Legislature ends April 24. But many bills had to be approved in some form by both the House and Senate by Tuesday evening in order to remain afloat. Here’s a look at the issues that have hung around so far: ■  Domestic partnerships: Gov. Chris Gregoire has signed into law a bill to recognize out-of-state samesex marriages with all the rights and protections given to registered domestic partnerships in Washington state. Rep. Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, said the bill was really a technical change to the wording of current law, which recognizes domestic partnerships and civil unions from out of state but not same-sex marriages. ■  Medical marijuana: The House approved a Senate bill to help bring medical marijuana dispensaries out of the legal gray area in which they currently exist. It establishes a licensing process for cannabis producers and protects qualified patients and physicians who prescribe medical marijuana from arrest. Marijuana is still illegal under federal law, but the Obama administration has said it won’t prosecute users who are in compliance with state law. ■  Surrogate mothers: The Senate passed an amended version of a bill by Rep. Jamie Pedersen, D-Seattle, that would legal-

ize compensated surrogacy contracts. Senate lawmakers gutted the surrogacy portion of the bill and approved the portion that brings Washington state in line with the Uniform Parentage Act. Pedersen said the move buys them time to reinstate the surrogacy provisions before session ends. ■  Tuition-setting authority: A bill by Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, expected to come to the floor later this week aims to mitigate the effects of lost state support for higher education by giving tuitionsetting authority to schools for the next four years. It also tries to help students by requiring colleges and universities that raise tuition above a certain level to increase their contributions to financial aid from 3.5 percent of tuition revenue to 5 percent. That would bring in $25 million at the University of Washington alone, Carlyle said. It also would expand eligibility for the State Need Grant to include households earning 125 percent of the median family income, or $96,000 for a family of four. The bill would allow higher education institutions to charge high school Running Start students a fee equal to 10 percent of that institution’s tuition and fees. The program has been free to students until now. ■  Teacher evaluations: The Senate approved on Tuesday an amended version of a broad education reform bill from the House. The amendment by Sen. Rodney Tom, D-Medina, would make teacher effectiveness, rather than seniority, the main factor in budget-induced layoffs. The bill includes several other reform measures, including new core learning standards for kindergarten-

through-12th-grade students. ■  Math assessments: The governor signed off on a bill that would require students in the graduating classes of 2013 and 2014 to take only one end-of-course exam for math, instead of two, to complete state graduation requirements. ■  Prepaid tuition: Both chambers have passed different versions of a proposal to refine the state’s Guaranteed Education Tuition program, which allows parents to buy credits for future tuition at today’s prices. The Senate version was changed substantially after a state actuary report found the GET program to be essentially sound. It proposes some changes to governance of the program, would not pay for some student fees and would increase the role of the state actuary in the future. ■  Electric-car fees: The Senate’s 2011-2013 transportation budget includes a bill establishing an annual $100 registration fee on electric cars. Senate Transportation committee members said it would ensure electric-car drivers pay their fair share of highway maintenance, which is paid for out of the gas tax. ■  Prison safety: Following the death of Corrections Officer Jayme Biendl, who was slain at the Monroe Correctional Complex in January, the Senate approved a bill to improve safety at state correctional facilities, including increased video monitoring and better training for corrections employees. ■  Coal: The House overwhelmingly passed a measure that would gradually shut down TransAlta in Centralia, Washington’s largest coal-fired power plant. The bill would transition

the plant away from coal by 2025, aiming to help the state meet a statutory target that it reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. ■  Phosphorous: The governor signed into law a bill that restricts the use of phosphorus-based lawn fertilizer in an effort to avoid contributing to harmful algae blooms in lakes and streams. The bill exempts phosphorus-based fertilizer for use in gardens and on agricultural lands, and retailers would still be able to sell it if it’s clearly marked that the product is only for the permitted uses. ■  Mail-in ballots: Gregoire signed off on a bill requiring the entire state to use only mail-in voting. Pierce County was the last holdout. Supporters said getting all counties on the same page tightens up the voting process and eliminates confusion caused by maintaining two different systems. And mail-in voting has a much higher voter turnout and costs half as much to process as ballot-center voting does. ■  Workers’ compensation settlement: A business-backed proposal to add a lump-sum settlement

option to the workers’ compensation system is still alive, having been incorporated into the Senate budget. The proposal is part of a thorny business-vs.-labor fight over workers’ compensation this year. Laborfriendly House Democrats are opposed to the businessbacked idea, but a state estimate shows the option could save $1.2 billion in the next two years. ■  Notarios: A bill to crack down on immigration assistants engaged in the unauthorized practice of law passed the House unanimously and heads back to the Senate for approval of amendments. The bill is in response to several cases of immigration assistants — often known as “notarios” in Spanish — giving bad advice resulting in deportation for immigrants seeking residency. Since immigration is an extremely complex area of law, supporters said only licensed attorneys should provide immigration legal advice.

Measures that failed

_________ While there’s no guarantee a bill won’t show up Associated Press writers Phulater on as a provision in ong Le and Donna Blankinship the budget, these measures contributed to this report.

State jobless rate inches up to 9.2% The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Washington stateadded an estimated 1,100 jobs in March, though the overall unemployment rate increased slightly from 9.1 percent to 9.2 percent, state officials said Wednesday. Figures for Clallam and

Jefferson counties will be available next week. The professional and business services industry saw the biggest gains, adding 2,700 jobs last month, according to the latest report from the Employment Security Department. That industry has been a

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don’t appear to be moving forward anytime soon: ■  Cougar hunting: A Fish & Wildlife-backed Senate bill to extend a current pilot program allowing the use of hounds in cougar hunting never made it to the House floor. Hound-hunting is still permitted in public safety and livestock depredation instances. ■  Stormwater fee: Bills in the House and Senate that would have charged a 1 percent fee on the wholesale value of petroleum products, pesticides and fertilizers to raise an estimated $100 million a year never made it out of committee. The fee was opposed by oil, agriculture and other business interests. A similar bill failed in 2010. ■  Education reform: Neither the governor’s education reform proposal, which would have established a new cabinet-level Education Department and consolidated nine state agencies into one, nor an alternative proposal from the House survived the deadline.

standout over the past year, adding nearly 23,000 jobs, said Dave Wallace, the department’s acting chief economist. Other industries that experienced growth in March include wholesale trade, manufacturing, financial activities, mining and logging, and leisure and hospitality. The department also revised the state’s job growth figure for February to 8,800, up from the original estimate of 800. February’s preliminary unemployment estimate of 9.1 percent remained unchanged. Washington has added more than 33,000 jobs since March 2010, when unemployment stood at 9.9 percent. Most of those gains occurred in the first three months of this year, the report said. In January, the state saw a jump of about 17,500 nonagricultural positions, which officials said was the strongest month of job growth since November 2007, the month before the national recession began. Wallace acknowledged that the March numbers “weren’t stunning” but said he felt “pretty good” about where things stand in Washington state and nationally, where the unemployment rate dropped to 8.8 percent last month. The industries that took the biggest hit in March were construction, which lost 2,400 jobs, and education and health services, which lost 1,800. Government, retail trade, transportation, warehousing and utilities also saw losses. More than 340,000 people were unemployed and looking for work last month, the Employment Security Department said. Nearly 229,000 people received unemployment benefits. Wallace said he expected to see the state’s labor force — currently 3.5 million workers — continue to grow in the coming months, which would likely lead to a corresponding rise in unemployment figures, at least temporarily, as people who had stopped looking for work resumed their job search. In addition, rising gas prices throughout the country could take a toll on the state economy and industries such as retail and leisure and hospitality as people adjust their spending habits, Wallace said. “You’re going to see more money going toward [gas] and less money going toward discretionary expenditures,” he said. “You’re going to see fewer purchases, fewer trips away from home.”


Peninsula Daily News

First Clallam districting forum today Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The first public forum presenting Clallam County data for changing boundaries of county commission districts will be today. The five-member Clallam County Districting Commission will host the forum at 2:30 p.m. in the commissioners’ meeting room (Room 150) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Boundaries will shift for all three commissioner districts in Clallam County, effective in 2012, and the lines are likely to be redrawn somewhere between McDonald Creek in the east and Dry Creek in the west, said Don Corson, one of the two districting masters responsible for recommending new boundaries for the county’s three districts based on Census 2010 data. Gene Unger, lead districting master, and Corson will present Census data, show growth in the county’s precincts, outline the process of realignment, display a map of present districts and seek public input. Much of Clallam County’s population growth over the past 10 years was in the Sequim area, which is District No. 1. The county grew by 6,879 people during that period, rising from 64,525 to 71,404. “A significant part of the growth was in the Sequim area,” Corson said. District No. 2 extends from Agnew into the east

Briefly . . . Sequim spring cleanup set this weekend SEQUIM — A cleanup only for residents of the incorporated area of Sequim is planned Friday and Saturday. Trash will be accepted during the city’s annual Spring Clean Up program from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day at the Sequim City Shop at 169 W. Hemlock St. The city of Sequim will accept one vehicle load of trash in exchange for two cans of food for the local food bank and a coupon that was mailed to Sequim residents in the city’s utility billing April 1. No refrigerators, freezers, paints or hazardous materials will be accepted. The city also does not accept yard waste. It will accept appliances such as washers, dryers, ranges, microwaves and other items such as furniture and tires. The city will accept one vehicle load per coupon. Additional loads will cost $10 to $25, depending on the size of the load. The city asks people to recycle computers and televisions at Goodwill or at EcycleNW in Blyn. For more information, visit www.ecyclewashington.org. For more information about the cleanup, phone the city Public Works Department at 360-6834908.

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he Districting Commission will host the forum at 2:30 p.m. in Room 150 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St. side of Port Angeles. District No. 3 covers the west side of Port Angeles and extends through the West End. Because of a “ripple effect” west from District No. 1, “there’s no doubt” that boundaries will shift for all three Clallam County districts, Corson said. The county charter requires the districting master to submit a draft proposal for the new districts to the commissioners by June 30. Clallam is one of six charter counties in the state and the only county using the home-rule form of government on the North Olympic Peninsula. The county charter requires a reconsideration of district boundary lines every 10 years using federal Census information to ensure that all three county commissioners have similar population bases, within 5 percent of each other. District boundary lines run north-south. The districting commission hired Unger and Corson on March 22. The Clallam County commissioners have approved an $8,500 contract for the districting masters.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

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look at aquatic life

Bob Campbell, left, and Deborah Moriarty of the Feiro Marine Life Center pull in a skein net with a collection of aquatic life from the water of Port Angeles Harbor on Wednesday for a group of students from St. Therese School of Seattle. The group was visiting the center at Port Angeles City Pier as part of a science field trip.

Tax Day rallies protest corporate tax practices

corporations are paying absolutely nothing.” MoveOn.org Political Nationally, MoveOn has Action groups in Sequim collaborated with US and Port Townsend will proPeninsula Daily News Uncut, said Carol Gallup of test tax breaks for Bank of the Jefferson County America and other corporaSEQUIM — Concerned Citizens of Clallam MoveOn council. tions Monday. County, or FourC, will take to the streets for a Tax The demonstrations on The rallies are scheduled Day Rally on Friday. the North Olympic Peninat noon in Port Townsend Members will be at the corner of Washington sula will be among about and at 5 p.m. in Sequim on Street and Sequim Avenue from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 300 nationwide MoveOn Tax Day, the deadline for “The community is welcome to join us as we filing federal income taxes, events on Tax Day and are show our concern for how our state and national which is Monday this year part of a weekend of US governments are spending our tax dollars,” said because of a Washington, Uncut Tax Day protests, FourC member Pat Tenhulzen. D.C., holiday on the tradishe said. The deadline for filing federal income tax this tional April 15. For more information year is Monday. Both protests will be about the Port Townsend For more information, phone 360-681-8450. held near Bank of America rally, email mts2@olypen. offices — in the park across com or mo368@olypen.com, from the building at Water or phone Crawford at 360“But in this period of paign called “Make Them and Adams streets in Port 379-4716 or Mark StevenPay,” said Richard Gray, drastic cuts in health care, Townsend and at Washingson at 360-385-9037. Clallam County MoveOn education and other essenton Street and Sequim AveFor more information coordinator, adding that the tial public services, knownue in Sequim. about the Sequim rally, protests are targeting ing that big corporations Organizers of both said they expect a “visit from dodge up to $100 billion in “wealthy corporations that phone Gray at 360-477drunk drivers and the Uncle Sam” to present a tax taxes every year creates a are doing everything in 4533. things they should be doing bill to the bank. For more about the certain feeling of irony,” he their power to avoid paying through a little training,” national MoveOn group, taxes in America.” “We may find it painful, said. said Hargrove, who repre“Responsible citizens visit http://front.moveon. but we’re not at all against sents the 24th District, have paid their taxes by org. paying our taxes,” said Den- ‘Make Them Pay’ which includes Clallam For more about US this day,” Gray said in a nis Crawford, Jefferson and Jefferson counties and County council co-chairThe event is part of a statement. Uncut, visit www.usuncut. a portion of Grays Harbor “But most of our largest org. man, in a statement. nationwide Tax Day camCounty. “Some groups that wear certain paraphernalia occasionally have been stopped and have felt that they’ve been profiled simply Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 because of what they look www.peninsuladailynews.com like,” said Hargrove, a The Associated Press motorcycle rider. he Sheriff’s Office eninsula aily ews SEATTLE — The King The legislation requires said the girl was law enforcement to review County Prosecutor’s Office and audit existing proceraped in her said bail has been set at dures, practices and train$1 million for a man arrested bedroom early ing and also work with on investigation of rape, child motorcycle clubs in their molestation and burglary in Tuesday as her parents communities to address the an attack on a 13-year-old slept in the next room. profiling issue. Woodinville girl. The Sheriff’s Office said Wednesday before a King Docent tea the girl was raped in her County District Court judge, bedroom Tuesday as her par- who found probable cause to PORT TOWNSEND — ents slept in the next room. The Friends of Rothschild hold him and also set bail. The father heard a noise House will host a getThe judge was told and went into his daughter’s Cardwell had worked as a acquainted tea for potenroom, scaring off the intruder. housesitter for the family but tial docents Thursday, The Seattle Times said did not have permission to April 21. The tea will be at 2 p.m. 28-year-old Jacob S. Cardwell come into the house while at the historic home at 418 waived his appearance they were there. Taylor St., Port Townsend. People interested in history and architecture are invited to come learn about both the house and opportunities to volunteer as a tour guide, gardener or for special projects such as a summer history camp. April 15–17, 2011 • Hollywood Beach/Red Lion Hotel The Rothschild House, built in 1868 by one of Port Townsend’s leading merchants, is today a state park managed by the Jefferson County Historical Society. For more information, For More Info: (360) or (888) 452-1443 phone Phyllis Snyder, Register online @ Rothschild House manager, www.RAFTandKAYAK.com at 360-385-1003. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press Peninsula Daily News

Tax Day Rally set Friday

Suspect arrested Get home delivery. in 13-year-old’s rape

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Novice Friendly

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We thank you in advance for your participation.

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The Olympic Area Agency on Aging needs you! Help us improve senior services in Clallam and Jefferson Counties by taking a short survey to provide your input. There are 3 ways to access the survey: • Go to our website - www.03a.org - and click on the link “Area Plan Survey” to open and complete the survey. • Call 1-866-720-4863 and give your responses by telephone to a staff person during business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. most days. • Receive a paper copy (with a postage paid envelope for return) by mail: call 1-866-720-4863 and provide your address or email this information to laaseca@dshs.wa.gov

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OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire has signed a bill that will ensure that issues of motorcylist profiling are addressed in law enforcement training. Senate Bill 5242, sponsored by Sen. Jim Hargrove, was signed into law Wednesday. Hargrove, D-Hoquiam, acknowledged that biker profiling is not a widespread problem, but he felt it is enough of an issue among many law-abiding bikers that the need to include it in officer training exists. “I certainly think law enforcement is doing a great job. This will help focus them on speeders and

PeninsulaNorthwest

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Peninsula Daily News

Report: Former Mayor Rogers not at meeting Continued from A1 organizations that she served with as a board Rogers, who served from member, such as the Port 2002 through 2009 as a Angeles Regional Chamber City Council member and of Commerce, received from from 2006 until 2008 as the city when she filed to mayor, could not be reached run for the City Council. for comment. She was not Penalties for that violation would be up to the state present at the meeting. Public Disclosure Commission. Citizen complaint Commission spokesThe Auditor’s Office con- woman Lori Anderson said ducted the investigation in Rogers may simply be response to a complaint required to add that inforfiled with its citizen hotline mation to the filings. in 2009. The complaint alleged Findings of no fault wrongdoing by Rogers The agency exonerated involving business relation- Rogers for other actions ships and financial disclo- mentioned in the complaint, sure laws, but it also ques- such as writing a letter on tioned cost overruns on The city letterhead in 2007 to Gateway transit center and the state Department of whether the city could Ecology encouraging the legally award a large con- agency to hire The Remeditract to CPI without seek- ators — a company that she ing other bids. worked for as a consultant The only other violation the following year — for noted in the report was a environmental cleanup in failure on Rogers’ part to Port Angeles. “Nothing in state law disclose how much money

involved a local winery. She said she didn’t know the name of the winery and couldn’t confirm if the allegations were proven. The report, which found no wrongdoing on the matter, said the City Council in 2006 approved an amendment to Port Angeles’ contract with the EDC that allocated $2,000 for the study. Exeltech: No wrongdoing

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Kim Hurley, special investigations manager with the state Auditor’s Office, addresses the Port Angeles City Council on Wednesday. prohibits a mayor from promoting local businesses,” the report said. The Auditor’s Office also investigated an allegation that Rogers got city funding for a study conducted by a

friend of hers by channeling the work through the Clallam County Economic Development Council, which the city later reimbursed. Chambers said the study

consultant on the First Street stormwater project. The Auditor’s Office said it found no wrongdoing with the city not bidding a contract with CPI for establishing a fiber-optic network in the city. The city claimed “special market conditions” for the sole-source contract. The report said that is allowed under state law but couldn’t confirm whether such conditions existed at the time. Although mentioned in the complaint, the Auditor’s Office said it did not review change orders with construction of The Gateway since it had made recommendations to the city on the subject through a previous audit.

Additionally, the report said Rogers didn’t violate any laws by working after she left office for Exeltech, a company that has received numerous contracts with the city. “No law prohibits that in the city,” Hurley said. Exeltech has received $5.8 million in city contracts over approximately ________ the past eight years, including work on the Eighth Reporter Tom Callis can be Street bridges and The reached at 360-417-3532 or at Gateway transit center. The tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. company is currently a sub- com.

Conflict: Sessions on state laws to be considered Continued from A1 didn’t break any laws by working for the company The report, which but said the city could go a focused on allegations made long way in gaining public against former Mayor trust by making it tougher Karen Rogers, found she for council members to didn’t break any laws by cross “between these two working for Exeltech four worlds.” “I think it would be valumonths after she left office able — even if it was just a at the end of 2009. symbolic thing for people to The company has do — to make that statereceived $5.8 million in city ment that we understand contracts over approxi- there is a public concern mately the past eight years about the appearance of a and hired Rogers in April conflict of interest,” he said. 2010 to oversee the compaCity staff said they will ny’s regional development develop a resolution for the efforts. council to consider. Mania acknowledged in Staff said they also will an interview that Rogers consider holding work ses-

sions more often on state was absent, said he doesn’t laws regarding conflicts of think the report leaves a stain on the City Council, interest. adding that it’s difficult to avoid conflicts of interest. Training on conflicts “We’re involved in everyThe report found that thing that happens in our Rogers violated state law by town,” he said. voting for a contract with a “To know all the rules company in 2007 that was and regulations and restricpaying her for “property tions . . . it takes a lot of management services.” effort and a lot of time.” City Attorney Bill Bloor But Perry also said he said he provides a work ses- thinks it’s the responsibility sion on state law to the of council members to make council after each election sure they avoid such conbut added he may start flicts. holding them annually. “It’s our responsibility to Deputy Mayor Don make sure we don’t do it,” Perry, who led the meeting he said. Perry said Di Guilio since Mayor Dan Di Guilio

couldn’t attend the meeting because he was in Port Townsend working as Jefferson Transit’s interim general manager.

City attorney not aware

council members, and now, you also have to tell us everything that you belong to, every contact you have,’ things like that,” he said. Bloor said Rogers had talked to him about concerns regarding potential conflicts of interest when she was on the council. He said he doesn’t recall “any situation” involving Rogers “that would have been brought to my attention that would have been a problem.”

Bloor, who has been the city attorney since 2004, said he wasn’t aware of a conflict of interest when Rogers voted on the contract, adding that it’s the responsibility of council members to ensure they comply with the law. ________ “I’m not sure how the Reporter Tom Callis can be council people would feel reached at 360-417-3532 or at about it if we told them, tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. ‘Today, you get sworn in as com.

Briefly: State Police officer is charged in kicking case

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

The Thomas Family Cancer Center in Sequim on Wednesday.

Accelerator: Can give

‘fast, accurate’ treatment Continued from A1 “We can deliver fast and accurate image-guided treatments within just a few minutes per day instead of 10 to 30 minutes,” Zimmerman said. The new linear accelerator is located in the same building where other cancer services, including medical oncology, are offered.

Patient comfort “A top priority for Olympic Medical Cancer Center is patient comfort,” said Dr. Thomas Kummet, director of the cancer center.

“Patients undergoing cancer treatment spend a significant amount of time here, and we want them to be comfortable, and we want to offer them convenience. “We are excited to have all our services back under one roof.” During the four-month installation, OMC treated cancer patients in a temporary vault behind the cancer center. The old linear accelerator that OMC used for eight years is now treating patients in Mississippi, said John Engstrom, chief radiation therapist.

Solution to Puzzle on C3 M C F L Y

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Zimmerman has compared the difference between the old linear accelerator and the new one to the difference between 35mm film and a digital camera.

Coming to Canada Engstrom said there are two hospitals in British Columbia that are in the process of installing the TrueBeam. There are 56 other TrueBeams operating in the world. Last September, OMC commissioners voted unanimously to approve the purchase of the TrueBeam and the $500,000 temporary vault and linear accelerator that was used during the transition. A $225,000-per-year maintenance contract for the new linear accelerator runs from 2012 to 2015. “It is unprecedented for a rural hospital to offer such a robust cancer center with the advanced technology not even offered in the nearest urban center,” said Rhonda Curry, assistant administrator for strategic development. For more information about cancer services at OMC, visit www.OMC forhope.com.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

several incidents of force used against minorities.

Kids kept in cage

VANCOUVER, Wash. — A Vancouver couple accused of keeping two SEATTLE — A Seattle police officer accused in the young children caged in a room have been arrested. videotaped kicking of a Clark County jail youth inside a convenience records show that 30-yearstore has been charged with fourth-degree assault. old John Eckhart and 26-year-old Alayna Higdon The city attorney charged 42-year-old Officer are accused of unlawful imprisonment and secondJames Lee on Wednesday after reviewing an indepen- degree criminal mistreatdent State Patrol investiga- ment. The couple made an inition. The patrol was brought tial court appearance into the case at the request Wednesday, and a judge set of Seattle Police Chief John bail at $25,000 each. Vancouver police Diaz. spokeswoman Kim Kapp Conviction on the gross misdemeanor is punishable said an officer found two by a maximum year in jail boys, ages 5 and 7, locked in a bedroom with a cageand $5,000 fine. like door at the couple’s Lee’s lawyer, Peter Offenbecher, told The Seat- apartment Tuesday. Police said Higdon told tle Times his client is innocent and they plan a vigorous defense. The Oct. 18 encounter happened shortly after Seattle police were IRENE MARY attacked nearby during a narcotics buy-bust operaLYLE tion. September 12, 1926 The African-American April 11, 2011 youth has filed a claim against the city for Irene Mary Lyle, 84, $450,000. of Auburn, Washington, The U.S. Justice Departpassed away on April 11, ment recently launched a 2011. formal civil rights investiShe was born to gation into the Seattle Frank Paul Emil and Police Department after Augusta Mary (Mackenthun) Sperling on September 12, 1926. Irene married Lloyd N. Lyle on June 17, 1946. Betty B. Cornaby He preceded her in Feb. 6, 1931 — April 12, 2011 death in August of 2008. Betty Cornaby, 80, died She is survived by her in Port Angeles. sons and daughter-inHer obituary will be publaw, Lloyd N. Lyle Jr. and lished later. Nancy of Kent, WashingDrennan-Ford Funeral ton, and Robert Lyle of Home, Port Angeles, is in Fullerton, California; charge of arrangements. daughter and son-in-law, www.drennanford.com

them she didn’t want the two boys running wild. Kapp said the case has been forwarded to the Clark County Prosecutor’s Office for review.

Search for student SEATTLE — The family of a missing University of Washington student has searched Seattle’s Discovery Park with dog teams but did not find anything useful. Seattle Parks representative Dewey Potter said relatives of Marizela Perez obtained permits to search the park in hopes of finding the 18-year-old who has been missing since March 5. Potter told The Seattle Times that Wednesday’s search found nothing that appeared linked to Perez’s disappearance. The Associated Press

Death and Memorial Notice

Death Notices

Louise and Jerry Simpson of Kent, Washington; brother, Delbert Sperling of Kent, Washington; sister-in-law, Mary Sperling of Port Angeles; five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Graveside service will be held at Mount Angeles Memorial Park on Friday, April 15, 2011, at 1 p.m. The Reverend Patrick Lovejoy will officiate. Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel of Port Angeles is in care of arrangements. Please sign our guestbook at harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading

at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at   www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, April 14, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

Perfect time for an Ayn Rand movie TWENTY-NINE YEARS after her death, novelist Ayn Rand is coming to a theater near you. After many failed attempts, Cal her 1957 novel Thomas Atlas Shrugged has been made into a film. In an age when overspending, overreaching, higher-taxing and overregulating government increasingly strangles the private sector, robbing us of our liberties and transforming the country into the model of a socialist state, Rand’s story reminds us how far ahead of her time she was and just how dangerous a time we live in now. At least one member of Congress has recognized Rand’s intuitiveness. Rep. Paul Ryan, the author of the Republican budget proposal, reportedly directed his staff to read Atlas Shrugged back in 2010. Ryan, writes Christopher

Beam of New York magazine, even credits Rand as “the reason I got involved in public service.” Atlas Shrugged is a novel, but its plot is anything but fiction. In it, successful businesswoman, Dagny Taggart, the head of one of the largest railroad companies in America, struggles to keep her company alive in challenging economic times. Searching for innovative ways to stay afloat, she teams with steel magnate Hank Rearden, the developer of an innovative metal alloy, thought to be the strongest metal in the world. Success seems assured. Then the federal government steps in. The government proclaims the Taggart-Rearden partnership “unfair” to other steel producers and passes a law regulating how many businesses an individual can own. The law is euphemistically titled the “Equalization of Opportunity” bill. If the language and scenario sound contemporary, they should. President Barack Obama, who plays at cutting spending and wants to raise taxes, is the embodiment of the philosophy

about which Ayn Rand warned. Just how smooth Obama is at this was even noticed by The Associated Press, which tends not to think in such cynical terms when it comes to the administration. In a headline about the negotiations that supposedly led to $38 billion in spending cuts, AP wrote: “Budget Tricks Helped Obama Save Favorite Programs From Cuts.” Atlas Shrugged is about those who would penalize individual achievement and subsidize “the collective.” It is the embodiment of Karl Marx’s philosophy, “From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.” To put it another way, the collective believes that if you earn $2 and I make $1, you owe me 50 cents to make things “fair.” This is redistributionist or, to paraphrase the president, “spreading the wealth around.” Ayn Rand is not for everybody. Her philosophy is rooted inobjectivism, which, Wikipedia says, “holds that reality exists independent of consciousness,

Peninsula Voices

that human beings have direct contact with reality through sense perception . . . that the proper moral purpose of one’s life is the pursuit of one’s own happiness or rational self-interest and that the only social system consistent with this morality is full respect for individual rights, embodied in laissez faire capitalism.” Objectivism is a philosophy devoid of God and the opposite of what Thomas Jefferson rightly believed to be the source of our rights, that they are “endowed by our Creator.” This religious vacuum does not mean Rand was not on to something, just as Dwight Eisenhower was when he warned in his 1961 farewell address against the dangers of the “militaryindustrial complex.” Like a human body that is bombarded with viruses, some of which manage to penetrate the immune system, freedom, capitalism and entrepreneurship are under constant assault, not just from foreign enemies, but also domestic ones. The film has some problems;

Our readers’ letters, faxes

chiefly it’s setting in an age when trains reigned supreme. Younger people will need some historical background before seeing it, or some context afterward. I had to explain it to my daughter, but once I did, she “got it.” Some will inevitably conclude “it can’t happen here” and this is just more conspiratorial posturing from the Far Right. It can happen here and, in fact, with a country so much in debt to the Chinese and that no longer celebrates individual achievement, but seeks to punish, regulate and tax it to death, it is happening here. Go see “Atlas Shrugged.” It’s in theaters, appropriately, starting April 15.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

Pay fair share

(taking its profits) in foreign countries, but then As Tax Day approaches leases the software back to and we prepare our returns, it is a good time to consider itself in the U.S., claiming the expense on its tax the unconscionable inequireturn and thus avoiding a ties being perpetrated by tax obligation but paying corporate tax cheats. off shareholders. By using obscure loopThis is only one example holes in the tax code, these cheats avoided paying any of corporate tax avoidance. The middle class and income tax at all for 2010 poor ought to be enraged at in spite of earning billions this unfair situation and in profits. According to the website should demand redress. www.alternet.org, these are If all tax cheats paid a few of the most egregious their fair share of taxes, it examples of tax cheating: would go a long way Google $10.8 billion, News toward solving our federal Corp. $3.3 billion, Boeing deficit-spending and $8.5 billion, Pfizer $9.4 national-debt problems. billion, Oracle $8.2 billion, It is time for action on Altria (Phillip Morris), this issue to be sure that $5.7 billion, IBM $19.7 everyone, including the corbillion, Time Warner $3.9 porations, pays a fair share Peninsula Voices titled billion, Morgan Stanley of taxes. $6.2 billion and Microsoft Joe Raab, “Nutrition Nazism.” My choice of words was $25 billion. Recently, GenSequim admittedly stupid. eral Electric joined the As a fellow born in Gerranks of these cheats. ‘Ambushed’ man-occupied Norway, and One example of how On March 9 I had a this is done is Google, having worked on an which patents its software letter published in Israeli kibbutz with Holo-

caust survivors as a teenager, I really should have known better. But, sure enough, a Port Townsend sniper ambushed my letter in the March, 13 Peninsula Voices, [“Overusing ‘Nazi’”].

My basically lighthearted dig at current hypocrisies and political correctness run amok was nonetheless twisted and turned out of all recognition. So why an ideological

“drive-by shooting?” After a month of thinking, I have a two-fold answer. And second, Peninsula Voices manifests two mainstreams of (humorless) thought in direct confrontation: A supremely selfassured resident population of “sturdy folk” (think Fox News) pitted against evergrowing numbers of pale, spandex-clad ectomorphs (mostly) fleeing the failed state of California (think NPR). All they have in common is their virulent and unyielding hostility, which hardly makes for civil discourse. Indeed, I am convinced that this mutual antipathy coupled with the facelessness learned in cyberspace accounts for the creeps and curs hidden along the communications highway. Chris Bay-Hansen, Port Angeles

Human rights vs. military stake in Bahrain THREE DAYS AFTER Hosni Mubarak resigned as the longstanding dictator in Egypt, people in the small Persian Gulf state of Bahrain took to the streets, marching to their version of Tahrir, Pearl Square, in the capital city of Manama. Bahrain has been ruled by Amy the same family, the House Goodman of Khalifa, since the 1780s — more than 220 years. Bahrainis were not demanding an end to the monarchy, but for more representation in their government. One month into the uprising, Saudi Arabia sent military and police forces over the 16-mile causeway that connects the Saudi mainland to Bahrain, an island. Since then, the protesters, the press and human-rights organizations have suffered increasingly violent repression. One courageous young Bahraini pro-democracy activist, Zainab al-Khawaja, has seen the

brutality up close. To her horror, she watched her father, Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, a prominent human-rights activist, be beaten and arrested. She described it to me from Manama: “Security forces attacked my home. They came in without prior warning. “They broke down the building door, and they broke down our apartment door, and instantly attacked my father, without giving him a chance to speak and without giving any reason for his arrest. “They dragged my father down the stairs and started beating him in front of me. “They beat him until he was unconscious. The last thing I heard my father say was that he couldn’t breathe. “When I tried to intervene, when I tried to tell them, ‘Please to stop beating him. He will go with you voluntarily. You don’t need to beat him this way,’ they told me to shut up, basically, and they grabbed me . . . and dragged me up the stairs back into the apartment. “By the time I had gotten out of the room again, the only trace of my father was his blood on the stairs.”

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Human Rights Watch has called for the immediate release of al-Khawaja. Zainab’s husband and brother-in-law also have been arrested. Tweeting as “angryarabiya,” she has commenced a water-only fast in protest. She also has written a letter to President Barack Obama: “If anything happens to my father, my husband, my uncle, my brother-in-law, or to me, I hold you just as responsible as the AlKhalifa regime. “Your support for this monarchy makes your government a partner in crime. “I still have hope that you will realize that freedom and human rights mean as much to a Bahraini person as it does to an American.” Obama condemned the Gadhafi government in his speech justifying the recent military attacks in Libya, saying: “Innocent people were targeted for killing. Hospitals and ambulances were attacked. Journalists were arrested.” Now that the same things are happening in Bahrain, Obama has little to say. As with the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, the sentiment is nationalist, not religious.

The country is 70 percent Shia, ruled by the Sunni minority. Nevertheless, a central rallying cry of the protests has been “Not Shia, Not Sunni: Bahraini.” This debunks the argument used by the Bahraini government that the current regime is the best bulwark against increased influence of Iran, a Shia country, in the oil-rich Gulf. Add to that Bahrain’s strategic role: It is where the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet is based, tasked with protecting “U.S. interests” like the Strait of Hormuz and the Suez Canal, and supporting the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Surely, U.S. interests include supporting democracy over despots. Nabeel Rajab is the president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights — the organization formerly run by the recently abducted Abdulhadi al-Khawaja. Rajab is facing a possible military trial for publishing the photograph of a protester who died in custody. Rajab told me: “Hundreds of people are in jail for practicing their freedom of expression. People are tortured for expressing their freedom of expression. “Thousands of people sacked

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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from their jobs. . . . And all that, because one day, a month ago, almost half of the Bahraini population came out in the street demanding democracy and respect for human rights.” Rajab noted that democracy in Bahrain would lead to democracy in neighboring Gulf dictatorships, especially Saudi Arabia, so most regional governments have a stake in crushing the protests. Saudi Arabia is well-positioned for the task as the recent beneficiary of the largest arms deal in U.S. history. Despite the threats, Rajab was resolute: “As far as I’m breathing, as far as I’m alive, I am going to continue. “I believe in change. I believe in democracy. I believe in human rights. “I’m willing to give my life. “I’m willing to give anything to achieve this goal.”

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Quilts accepted today for Rainfest By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — “Let It Rain, Let It Pour” is the annual theme of Forks’ Rainfest, which will celebrate its trademark weather with quilts, art, music and an umbrella parade this weekend. T h e Rainfest, which celebrates the r a i n y weather of Forks — a town that gets more Diehl than 120 inches of rain annually — will begin Friday and run through Sunday. West End quilters, from Joyce and all points west, may take their quilts to the Forks High School Auxiliary Gym at 191 Spartan Ave. between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. today to show them off during the Fabric of the Forest Quilt Show, said organizer Marcia Yanish. People who have participated in past Rainfest workshops also may enter finished quilts, even if they are not from the West End. The quilt show will be from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission will be by donation. This year’s Rainfest will feature the needlework of quilter Kim Diehl, who will teach classes Friday and Saturday nights as well as show her talents at a trunk show Friday, Yanish said. Diehl, who hails from Idaho, has been featured in American Patchwork and Quilting magazine and has recently published her fifth book on quilting, Simple Graces. She’s known for her “tradition with a twist” designs, Yanish said. Both Friday and Saturday’s classes — which are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Department of Natural

Sequim hires city engineer Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The city of Sequim has hired a city engineer and assistant public works director. David Garlington is a licensed professional engineer. For the past 20 years, he has worked in the design/ construction department of the state Department of Transportation in Port Angeles. For the past seven years, he has worked as assistant project engineer, assisting in running a staff of 23 designers, inspectors, surveyors and support personnel for Transportation. He served as contract manager of construction projects worth $10 million in 2010. Garlington will begin his new position Monday, April 25. “I am thrilled that David has accepted this key position with the city of Sequim,” Public Works Director Paul Haines said. “Hiring David will let us move forward on the capital improvement needs of the city. He will also be a key player in the development review process.” Key projects Garlington will be involved in include a capital improvement program, implementation of Transportation Benefits District projects, developing a road preservation plan, rethinking transportation and the utility master plans. The city engineer position has been vacant since Bill Bullock left in 2008.

Resources Conference Center, 411 Tillicum Lane — will focus on applique work. Each costs $50. Friday’s Cottage Garden Table Runner Class was filled by Wednesday, but a few spaces remain in Saturday’s Gathering Garden Class. To sign up for the class, phone Yanish at 360-3273770 or email marcia@ centurytel.net. Those who wish to hear Diehl speak about her work can attend the truck show lecture, scheduled from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday at the Department of Natural Resources Conference Center, for $15 per person. Diehl will offer some quilts for sale. No registration is needed. Admission will be taken at the door. “We usually have 45 or so people come, but we could easily hold 100, and it would be nice of people to take advantage of the fact that she is here because she is so good and she has become so famous in the quilting world,” Yanish said. Vendors at the Fabric of the Forest Quilt Show will include Chinook Pharmacy, Bear Paw Quilts, Island Quilter, Friends of Forks Animals, Quilt Harbor Too, Scentsy Candles, The Applique Society of Forks, Jeanne Buttons in Forks and the Sleepy Valley Quilt Co. Karen’s Sewing Center in Sequim will offer machine cleaning and scissor sharpening. Kate Dihm of Aberdeen will have quilted items available. “It is really delightful that she will have items available because there are many people who come who enjoy quilts but don’t necessarily do it themselves,” Yanish said. “So it is nice to have some ready-made items available.” In addition to the quilt-

Art show and more

■  A Relay For Life Baked Potato Sale at the Bank of America, 418 S. Forks Ave., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. ■  Rainfest Archery Competitions, with the youth shoot beginning at 12:30 p.m. and the adult shoot beginning at 1 p.m., at the Old Mill Archery Range, 100 LaPush Road. Registration will begin at noon. Competitors pay $5 for the youth shoot and $10 for the adult shoot. For more information, phone 360-374-4090. ■  Lecture on the wreck of the Nikoli at 6:30 p.m. Saturday by Chris Cook at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 120 S. Forks Ave.

The Far West Art League Art Show will be at Bank of America, 481 S. Forks Ave., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Other scheduled events are: ■  A Forks Community __________ Orchestra performance at Reporter Paige Dickerson can Prince of Peace Lutheran be reached at 360-417-3535 or at Church, 250 N. Blackberry paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily Ave., at 7 p.m. Friday. news.com.

This black quilt with the applique flowers is a Gathering Garden Class quilt, also a project for Rainfest. A few spaces remain in Saturday’s class.

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SAVINGS PASS DISCOUNTS DISCOUNTSDO DONOT NOTAPPLY APPLYTO TOSPECIALS. SPECIALS. SAVINGS PASS 14406500

Every Friday in Peninsula Daily News

ing events, the festival will also celebrate the rain by parading through town Saturday with decorated umbrellas. Decorating will commence at 10 a.m. at the Forks branch of Peninsula College at 71 S. Forks Ave., followed by the Rainfest Parade at noon down Forks Avenue.

SHOP 9AM-1OPM FRIDAY & 9AM-11PM SATURDAY HOURS MAY VARY BY STORE. VISIT MACYS.COM AND CLICK ON STORES FOR LOCAL INFORMATION. SHOP 9AM-1OPM FRIDAY & 9AM-11PM SATURDAY HOURS MAY VARY BY STORE.

Keep up with the sights and sounds on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Spotlight

A Cottage Garden Table Runner Class quilt, a class project for Rainfest. Friday’s class was filled by Wednesday.

★★ Enter thethe WebID Shop,share shareand andconnect connectanytime. anytime. Enter WebIDininthe thesearch searchbox boxatatMACYS.COM MACYS.COMtotoorder. order. FIND FINDMACY'S MACY'S EVERYWHERE! EVERYWHERE! Shop, Savings pass discount does fine jewelry. jewelry. Savings pass discount doesnot notapply applytotospecials. specials.Fine Finejewelry jewelryspecials specialsare areonly onlyavailable available at stores that carry fine REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE NOT IN IN EFFECT EFFECTDURING DURINGTHE THEPAST PAST9090DAYS. DAYS.ONE ONEDAY DAYSALE SALEPRICES PRICESININEFFECT EFFECT 4/15 & 4/16/2011. REG. & ORIG. PRICES AREOFFERING OFFERINGPRICES, PRICES,AND ANDSAVINGS SAVINGSMAY MAYNOT NOTBE BEBASED BASEDON ONACTUAL ACTUAL SALES. SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT 4/15 & 4/16/2011. *Intermediate price reductions mayhave havebeen beentaken. taken.‡All ‡Allcarat caratweights weights(ct. (ct.t.w.) t.w.)are areapproximate; approximate;variance variance may be .05 carat. Jewelry select stores; loglog onon to to macys. *Intermediate price reductions may Jewelryphotos photosmay maybe beenlarged enlargedororenhanced enhancedtotoshow showdetail. detail.Fine Finejewelry jewelryatat select stores; macys. com locations. Almost gemstoneshave havebeen beentreated treatedtotoenhance enhancetheir theirbeauty beautyand andrequire requirespecial specialcare, care, log on to macys.com/gemstones reduced prices, “special” prices com forfor locations. Almost allall gemstones macys.com/gemstonesororask askyour yoursales salesprofessional. professional.Extra Extrasavings savingstaken takenoffoffalready already reduced prices, “special” prices reflect extra savings. Orig. items availablewhile whilesupplies supplieslast. last.Luggage Luggage&&electric electricitem(s) item(s)shown showncarry carry warranties; to see a manufacturer’s to:to: Macy’s Warranty Dept., POPO reflect extra savings. Orig. items areareavailable manufacturer’swarranty warrantyatatno nocharge chargebefore beforepurchasing, purchasing,visit visita store a storeororwrite write Macy’s Warranty Dept., 1026 Maryland Heights, 63043,attn attnConsumer ConsumerWarranties. Warranties.Advertised Advertisedmerchandise merchandisemay maynot not be be carried at your local Macy’s macys.com. N1030058 BoxBox 1026 Maryland Heights, MOMO63043, Macy’sand andselection selectionmay mayvary varybybystore. store.Prices Pricesand andmerchandise merchandisemay maydiffer differatat macys.com. N1030058 OPEN MACY’SACCOUNT ACCOUNTFOR FOREXTRA EXTRA20% 20%SAVINGS SAVINGSTHE THE FIRST FIRST 22 DAYS DAYS WITH MORE REWARDS new account OPEN A AMACY’S REWARDS TO TO COME. COME.Macy’s Macy’scredit creditcard cardisisavailable availablesubject subjecttotocredit creditapproval; approval; new account savings validthe theday dayyour youraccount accountisisopened openedand andthe thenext nextday; day;excludes excludes services, services, select licensed departments, mattresses and savings valid departments,gift giftcards, cards,restaurants, restaurants,gourmet gourmetfood foodand andwine. wine.OnOnfurniture, furniture, mattresses and rugs/floor coverings,the thenew newaccount accountsavings savingsisislimited limitedto to$100; $100;application application must must qualify for immediate rugs/floor coverings, immediateapproval approvalto toreceive receiveextra extrasavings; savings;employees employeesnot noteligible. eligible. N1030058W.indd1 1 N1030058W.indd

4/11/11 AMAM 4/11/119:32:56 9:32:56


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, April 14, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Outdoors

Some hanky panky going on IN MOST CASES, it doesn’t take very long to distinguish a hatchery steelhead from a wild one. Apart from size and body type — hatchery Matt fish tend to be Schubert smaller and more torpedolike — one can always examine the adipose fin located near the tail end of the fish. If that thing is clipped, you’ve got yourself a hatchery fish. If not, it’s more than likely a wild fish. Of course, fish don’t always make that distinction. For all we know, they might view a fin-clipped cohort the same way we do someone with gapped teeth — distracting at first, but by no means a deal-breaker (especially in England). In recent years, biologists have discovered evidence of wild and hatchery fish breeding together in rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest. A recent study conducted by biologists from Olympic National Park, state Department of Fish and Wildlife and Hoh tribe went about examining that issue (among others) on the Hoh River. Biologists collected tissue samples from 1,344 adult winter steelhead returning to the Hoh, South Fork Hoh, Sol Duc, Bogachiel, Queets, Salmon and Calawah rivers mostly between 2008-10 to study their genetic information. A geneticist then established profiles for fish from each river — as well as six different hatcheries — and compared that information to determine the extent to which hatchery and wild fish breed on the Hoh. The answer: Not as much as some might have feared, according to Olympic National Park Chief Fisheries Biologist Sam Brenkman. “When you look collectively at the population of samples as a whole, there really was minimal influence,” Brenkman said. “Basically, it suggests that there hasn’t been a lot of influence from hatchery fish on wild fish in the Hoh.”

A few effects Of course, that’s not to say hatchery fish have no influence on their wild counterparts. Biologists did find evidence of some spawning between hatchery and wild fish in individual cases on the Hoh. The study also provided proof of hatchery strays from facilities unrelated to the Hoh swimming deeper into the river’s tributaries. The origins of 140 clipped fish sampled from the Hoh varied between four separate hatcheries, despite the fact that only Cook Creek National Fish Hatchery releases fish into the river each year. In all, 66 percent came from Cook Creek, 18 percent from Bogachiel, 13 percent from Salmon River (Queets) and 2 from Skamania (Columbia River system) A great deal of those were found miles into the river, Brenkman said. “The general belief with some of these hatchery strays is they sort of just dip in the lower rivers and may not go that high in the system,” he said. “But, in fact, when we looked at fish above [U.S. Highway] 101 on the Hoh and below 101, we still saw a significant percent of fish above 101. “It kind of shows that these fish are penetrating into the system.” One other effect of the hatchery fish has come on the front end of the wild runs. Harvest data collected by the Hoh tribe in the 1950s suggests that the Hoh may have once had a large early timed run of native steelhead that entered the river in December and early January. Now, that time of year is typically dominated by hatchery returners, Brenkman said, with natives coming in larger numbers in February and March. Turn

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Schubert/B3

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles first baseman Katie Loghry grimaces as the ball gets past her as Sequim’s Lea Hopson slides head first into a muddy first base in the fourth inning in the Olympic League softball game at Dry Creek Elementary School athletic fields Wednesday.

Sequim holds off PA Port Angeles ace Stacy Webb in the top of the sixth inning that put Sequim ahead for good, 5-4. “They were pitching me all over the place, so I was just trying to keep up,” Hopson said. “The first one out was just a unfamiliar territory before it stinger, and the second one I caught fire. was just trying to battle and get “A lot of people were coming base hits.” up to us at the boys games and they were like, ‘So if we come Fifth home run watch PA, you’re going to play seven innings right?,’” said HopShe did a lot more than that, son, whose team had 10 straight blasting her second shot of the mercy-rule victories to start out game, and fifth of the season, the season. more than 20 feet beyond the “I guess we gave them what fence. they wanted.” Demiree Briones hit a laser Hopson, in particular, deliv- beam to left field two batters ered for the Sequim faithful. later for a two-run home run of Sporting her trademark eye her own. black smears, the senior shortAnd that was just enough for stop finished 2-for-4 with three Briones, Sequim’s top pitcher, to RBIs and three runs scored. hold off a game Roughrider Both of her hits landed well squad that had 10 hits on the over the center-field fence, game. including a two-run bomb off The junior right-hander went

Perfect Wolves are now in sole possession of 1st By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Sequim softball team didn’t have to just play its first full game of the season Wednesday. It also had to survive. Sequim scored seven runs in the final two innings to complete a rally from an early three-run deficit and beat Port Angeles 10-6 in a battle of Olympic League unbeatens at drizzly Dry Creek Elementary School. The Wolves (8-0 in league, 10-0 overall) bashed three home runs, two off the bat of Lea Hopson, as their normally potent lineup waited until it got into

the distance for her 10th win of the season, striking out 10, walking four and allowing five earned runs total. “That’s a huge win,” Briones said, “especially being able to score 10 runs on them. Everyone thought is was going to be a close game.” Indeed, a matchup of the Olympic League’s two most dominant pitchers turned into a slugfest. Not only did Sequim have its three home runs, but Port Angeles’ Kelsey Hinsdale (1-for-2, three RBIs, walk) knocked one out of the park as well. Hinsdale’s shot, a two-run homer to left, put Port Angeles on top 2-1 in the bottom of the first inning. The Riders (7-1 in league and overall) added two more in the second on an Emily Drake single to go up 4-1. Turn

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Rivals/B3

M’s spoil strong Vargas start Six-run eighth dooms Seattle The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Eric Wedge decided to stick with the roles that are already being established in Seattle’s bullpen. It had worked for the previous 17 innings of relief pitching — all of which were scoreless. That plan melted down on Wednes- Next Game day afterToday noon. Chris Ray vs. Royals was at the at Kansas City heart of the Time: 5 p.m. b u l l p e n On TV: ROOT blowup. The veteran righty was tagged for five hits and five earned runs in the eighth inning as Toronto rallied for an 8-3 win over the Mariners, denying Seattle a threegame sweep of the Blue Jays. The biggest blow was Jose Bautista’s three-run homer when the Toronto slugger

The Associated Press

Seattle second baseman Adam Kennedy (4) and shortstop Brendan Ryan can’t stop a single by Toronto’s Yunel Escobar in the eighth inning Wednesday at Seattle. turned on a hanging slider and deposited it into the visitors’ bullpen — where Blue Jays’ reliever Jon Rauch caught it while warming up. That turned a 2-1 Seattle lead into a 4-2 deficit and the Blue Jays went on to score six runs in the inning and send 11

batters to the plate. “I ended up hanging a 2-1 slider. It was a bad pitch,” Ray said. “I threw a good one to him 1-1 and just missed. I came back and it just hung. He’s known for his power and he got it.” The struggles by Seattle’s

bullpen ruined a strong effort from starter Jason Vargas, who bounced back well from being knocked around last Friday for seven earned runs in the Mariners’ home opener against Cleveland. Turn

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Mariners/B3

Montesano beats Forks 3-2 in OT Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — Juan Carlos Beltran scored two goals within a minute of each other in the second half but the Forks boys soccer team fell 3-2 in overtime to Montesano on Wednesday.

“It’s been frustrating because we have lost three games now despite dominating the three Except for Beltran’s two goals, teams,” Forks coach Brian Bowwhich put the Spartans ahead ers said. 2-1, Forks had problems scoring “It’s been a frustrating seadespite having 24 shots on goal. son.”

Preps

Montesano had only 12 shots on goal but three of them went in, including one in the 36th minute to go ahead 1-0 just before halftime and again in the 54th minute to tie the game 2-2. Turn

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Preps/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Baseball: Rainier Christian at Quilcene, 3:45 p.m.; Seattle Christian at Chimacum, 4 p.m. Softball: Seattle Christian at Chimacum, 4 p.m. Boys Soccer: North Mason at Port Angeles, 6:45 p.m., Kingston at Port Townsend, 6:45 p.m. Track: Port Angeles at Olympic, 3:15 p.m.; Chimacum at Charles Wright, 3:30 p.m. Girls Tennis: Port Angeles at Sequim, 4 p.m.

Friday Baseball: Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 3:30 p.m.; Kingston at Port Townsend, DH, 3 p.m.; Chimacum at Life Christian, 4 p.m. Softball: Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 3:30 p.m., Kingston at Port Townsend, DH, 3 p.m.; Chimacum at Life Christian, 4 p.m. Girls Tennis: Bremerton at Chimacum/Port Townsend, 4 p.m.; Kingston at Sequim, makeup match, 4 p.m. Boys Soccer: Chimacum at Orting, 4 p.m.

Saturday Baseball: Cascade at Sequim, noon; Quilcene vs. Chief Leschi, at Sprinker Recreation Center in Tacoma, 3:30 p.m. Girls Tennis: Port Angeles at South Kitsap Invitational, TBA. Track: Crescent Invitational, 11 a.m. Lacrosse: North County vs. Olympic Mountaineers at Storm King Soccer Fields, 2 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Women’s League results April 12 Pirates 50, Halberg Chiropractic 46 Leading Scorers: Linsay Rapelje, 22; Megan Smith, 17; Ardis Pullen, 16; Becky Gundersen, 9 Avalanche Varsity 60, Elwha River Casino 59 Leading Scorers: Krista Johnson, 33; Tricia Buckingham, 20; Jenny Wendel, 13; Maddy Henrichs, 11

Golf Peninsula Golf Club Ladies Club Competition April 13 18 Hole Ladies First: Dolly Burnett, 33.5 Second: Chris Anderson, 35.5 Third: Rena Peabody, 36 Fouth: Doris Sparks, 36 Port Townsend Golf Annual Men’s Club Spring Fling and Steak Feed Golf Tournament April 9 First Net: Bruce Madsen, 52; Gene Yantz, 52; Gabriel Tonan, 52 Second Net: Carlton Patterson, 54.8; Doug Collins, 54.8; Cody Piper, 54.8 Third Net: Terry Berge, 55.8; Scott Maxwell, 55.8; Sean Anderson, 55.8 Fourth Net: Crad Verser, 57.6; Dale Bidlake, 57.6; Roger Ramey, 57.6

Baseball Wednesday Blue Jays 8, Mariners 3 Toronto Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi YEscor ss 5 1 3 1 Ichiro rf 5 1 0 0 CPttrsn cf 5 1 2 0 AKndy 2b 4 0 2 0 Bautist rf 5 1 1 3 Bradly lf 5 0 1 1 JRiver lf 3 0 0 0 Cust dh 5 0 1 0 Snider ph-lf 2 1 1 0 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 1 J.Nix 3b 5 1 2 0 Lngrhn cf 2 1 0 0 Arencii dh 4 0 1 1 LRdrgz 3b 3 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 4 1 1 1 Ryan ss 3 0 1 1 JMcDnl 2b 4 1 0 0 CGmnz c 3 0 1 0 JMolin c 4 1 3 2 Totals 41 8 14 8 Totals 33 3 7 3 Toronto 001 000 061—8 Seattle 001 001 010—3 E—J.Nix (2). LOB—Toronto 9, Seattle 10. 2B—Y.Escobar (1), J.Nix (2), Encarnacion (3), J.Molina 2 (3), Bradley (4). HR—Bautista (3), Smoak (1). SB—Snider (3), J.Nix (2). S—L. Rodriguez. IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Drabek 5 2/3 6 2 2 4 5 Rzepczynski W,1-0 2 0 1 1 1 2 Rauch 1 1/3 1 0 0 1 1 Seattle Vargas 6 2/3 5 1 1 1 7 J.Wright H,2 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 Ray L,1-1 BS,2-2 2/3 5 5 5 0 0 Lueke 1/3 2 1 1 1 1 Wilhelmsen 1 2 1 1 1 1 WP—Drabek. Umpires—Home, Wally Bell; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Scott Barry; Third, John Hirschbeck. T—3:23. A—12,407 (47,878).

Tuesday Mariners 3, Blue Jays 2 Toronto Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi YEscor ss 3 1 0 0 Ichiro rf 4 0 1 0 CPttrsn cf 4 0 2 2 JWilson 2b 4 1 0 0 Bautist rf 4 0 1 0 Bradly dh 3 0 1 1 Lind 1b 4 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 Arencii c 3 0 0 0 LRdrgz 3b 3 0 0 0 Snider lf 3 0 0 0 MSndrs lf 3 0 0 0 Encrnc dh 3 1 2 0 Ryan ss 3 1 1 0 J.Nix 3b 3 0 0 0 Lngrhn cf 2 1 1 2 Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 29 3 5 3 Toronto 000 000 020—2 Seattle 003 000 00x—3 E—J.Nix (1), Smoak (2). DP—Toronto 1, Seattle 1. LOB—Toronto 4, Seattle 4. 2B—Ichiro (2). HR—Langerhans (3). SB—C.Patterson (1), J.Wilson (4). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto R.Romero L,1-1 8 5 3 2 2 8 Seattle Pineda W,1-1 7 1/3 5 2 1 2 7 Ray H,1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 League S,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 PB—Olivo. Umpires—Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Wally Bell; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Scott Barry. T—2:19. A—15,500 (47,878).

The Associated Press

Drawing

a crowd

Barry Bonds, left, and his attorney, Allen Ruby, face the media outside a federal court building in San Francisco on Wednesday. The former baseball player was convicted of one count of obstruction of justice. The jury failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone, and lied to a grand jury about it.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL American League

American League Texas LA Angels Oakland Seattle

W 9 7 6 4

L 3 5 6 8

PCT .750 .583 .500 .333

W L PCT NY Yankees 6 4 .600 Baltimore 6 4 .600 Toronto 6 6 .500 Tampa Bay 3 8 .273 Boston 2 9 .182 W L PCT Cleveland 8 4 .667 Kansas City 7 4 .636 Chicago Sox 7 5 .583 Detroit 5 7 .417 Minnesota 4 7 .364

WEST GB HOME - 6-0 2 4-2 3 1-2 5 2-4 EAST GB HOME - 5-2 - 3-3 1 4-2 3.5 0-5 4.5 2-3 CENTRAL GB HOME - 4-2 .5 4-2 1 4-3 3 3-3 3.5 2-3

ROAD 3-3 3-3 5-4 2-4

STRK Lost 2 Won 2 Won 1 Lost 1

L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 2-8

ROAD 1-2 3-1 2-4 3-3 0-6

STRK Won 1 Lost 3 Won 1 Won 2 Lost 2

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 2-8

ROAD 4-2 3-2 3-2 2-4 2-4

STRK Lost 2 Won 1 Lost 1 Won 2 Lost 1

L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6

National League Colorado LA Dodgers Arizona San Diego San Francisco

W 8 6 5 5 5

L 2 5 5 6 6

PCT .800 .545 .500 .455 .455

Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta NY Mets

W 8 6 5 5 4

L 3 5 6 7 7

PCT .727 .545 .455 .417 .364

Cincinnati Milwaukee Chicago Cubs Pittsburgh St. Louis Houston

W 8 6 6 5 4 3

L 4 5 6 6 7 9

PCT .667 .545 .500 .455 .364 .250

Basketball NBA Standings All Times PDT WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB z-San Antonio 61 20 .753 — x-Dallas 57 25 .695 4½ y-L.A. Lakers 56 25 .691 5 y-Oklahoma 55 27 .671 6½ x-Denver 50 32 .610 11½ x-Portland 48 33 .593 13 x-Memphis 46 35 .568 15 x-New Orleans 46 36 .561 15½ Houston 43 39 .524 18½ Phoenix 39 42 .481 22 Utah 39 43 .476 22½ Golden State 35 46 .432 26 L.A. Clippers 31 50 .383 30 Sacramento 24 57 .296 37 Minnesota 17 65 .207 44½ EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB z-Chicago 62 20 .756 — y-Miami 58 24 .707 4 y-Boston 56 26 .683 6 x-Orlando 52 30 .634 10 x-Atlanta 44 38 .537 18 x-New York 42 40 .512 20 x-Philadelphia 41 41 .500 21 x-Indiana 37 45 .451 25 Milwaukee 35 47 .427 27 Charlotte 34 48 .415 28 Detroit 30 52 .366 32 New Jersey 24 58 .293 38 Washington 23 59 .280 39 Toronto 22 60 .268 40 Cleveland 19 63 .232 43 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Wednesday’s Games Utah 107, Denver 103 Chicago 97, New Jersey 92

WEST GB HOME - 3-1 2.5 3-1 3 3-2 3.5 3-5 3.5 3-2 EAST GB HOME - 5-1 2 3-3 3 2-3 3.5 2-3 4 1-4 CENTRAL GB HOME - 5-1 1.5 5-2 2 3-3 2.5 1-4 3.5 2-4 5 2-4

ROAD 5-1 3-4 2-3 2-1 2-4

STRK Won 4 Lost 1 Won 1 Won 1 Won 1

L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5

ROAD 3-2 3-2 3-3 3-4 3-3

STRK Won 1 Won 1 Lost 1 Lost 1 Lost 3

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6

ROAD 3-3 1-3 3-3 4-2 2-3 1-5

STRK Lost 1 Won 3 Won 1 Lost 3 Lost 1 Lost 1

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 3-7

Dallas 121, New Orleans 89 Houston 121, Minnesota 102 Milwaukee 110, Oklahoma City 106, OT Boston 112, New York 102 Charlotte 96, Atlanta 85 Cleveland 100, Washington 93 Orlando 92, Indiana 74 Detroit 104, Philadelphia 100 Miami 97, Toronto 79 Portland at Golden State, LATE Memphis at L.A. Clippers, LATE San Antonio at Phoenix, LATE L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, LATE Today’s Games No games scheduled

Hockey NHL Playoffs All Times PDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver vs. Chicago Wednesday, April 13: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 4:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday, April 14: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles,

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 3, Texas 2 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5 Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Toronto 8, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 4 L.A. Angels 4, Cleveland 3, 12 innings Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain Today’s Games Minnesota (Pavano 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Shields 0-1), 3:40 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Fister 0-2) at Kansas City (Chen 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Coke 0-2) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 2-0), 7:05 p.m.

National League Wednesday’s Games San Diego 3, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 3, Washington 2 Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Florida 5, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 9, Houston 5 St. Louis at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. Dodgers at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m. Today’s Games Colorado (G.Reynolds 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-1), 9:10 a.m., 1st game Colorado (De La Rosa 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Capuano 1-0), 12:40 p.m., 2nd game Milwaukee (Wolf 0-2) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 1-1) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 1-0) at Atlanta (Beachy 0-1), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Moseley 0-2) at Houston (Norris 0-1), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-0), 7:10 p.m.

7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Anaheim vs. Nashville Wednesday, April 13: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, 5:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington vs. New York Rangers Wednesday, April 13: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 12 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Malaysian Open, Round 1, Site: Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Valero Texas Open, Round 1, Site: TPC San Antonio San Antonio (Live) 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF NWT, Fresh Express Classic, Round 1, Site: TPC Stonebrae - Hayward, Calif. (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Montréal Canadiens vs. Boston Bruins, Stanley Cup Playoffs, Eastern Conference Quarterfinal Game 1, Site: TD Garden - Boston (Live) 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Kansas City Royals, Site: Kauffman Stadium - Kansas City, Mo. (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MLS, Chicago Fire vs. Portland Timbers, Site: JeldWen Field - Portland, Ore. (Live)

Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 12 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday, April 14: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 12 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday, April 14: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD

Transactions Baseball Major League Baseball: Named Chuck Meriwether and Ed Montague umpire supervisors. 1B Carlos Delgado announced his retirement. American League Baltimore Orioles: Placed SS J.J. Hardy on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 10. Recalled RHP Brad Bergesen from Norfolk (IL). Texas Rangers: Placed OF Josh Hamilton on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Davis from Round Rock (PCL). National League Arizona Diamondbacks: Recalled RHP Esmerling Vasquez from Reno (PCL). Optioned RHP Kam Mickolio to Reno. New York Mets: Announced RHP Blaine Boyer has cleared waivers and elected to become a free agent. Pittsburgh Pirates: Recalled C Chris Snyder from Bradenton (FSL) and activated him from the 15-day DL. Optioned C Jason Jaramillo to Indianapolis (IL). St. Louis Cardinals: Placed RHP Brian Tallet and RHP Bryan Augenstein on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Fernando Salas and RHP Eduardo Sanchez from Memphis (PCL). American Association St. Paul Saints: Signed OF Brandon Tripp. Winnipeg Goldeyes: Signed 1B Brian Myrow.

Basketball NBA NBA: Suspended Detroit F Charlie Villanueva five games for initiating an on-court altercation with Cleveland F Ryan Hollins and attempting to escalate the altercation by entering the Cavaliers’ locker room on two occasions following his ejection during Mondays game. Fined L.A. Lakers G Kobe Bryant $100,000 for using a derogatory term at an official during Tuesdays game against San Antonio. Los Angeles Lakers: Signed G Trey Johnson. Recalled F Derrick Caracter from Bakersfield (NBADL).

Hockey NHL Anaheim Ducks: Recalled G Igor Bobkov, D Mat Clark, LW Nicolas Deschamps, LW Josh Green, D Nate Guenin, C Peter Holland, LW Patrick Maroon and RW Kyle Palmieri from Syracuse (AHL). Phoenix Coyotes: Recalled F Mathieu Beaudoin, F Dane Byers, F Bracken Kearns, F Alexandre Picard, F Viktor Tikhonov, D Maxim Goncharov, D Brandon Gormley, D Garrett Stafford, D Chris Summers and G Matt Climie from San Antonio (AHL).

Horse Racing Kentucky Horse Racing Commission: Denied trainer Rick Dutrow Jr. a license to race in the state this year.

Swimming Usa Swimming: Named Bryce Elser open water program manager.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, April 14, 2011

B3

Briefly . . . Eagles erupt for 11 runs vs. Tranco PORT ANGELES — The Eagles beat Tranco Transmissions 11-1 in Cal Ripken action Tuesday. It was the first game for both teams. Ben Basden struck out six of the nine batters he faced in the Eagles victory. The Eagles led by only one run going into the fourth inning before heating up to drive in nine runs in two innings. Daniel Basden went 2-for-3 for the Eagles while Tristan Dodsen got two hits for Tranco. Ethan Miles and Derek Hinsdale pitched well for Tranco.

Local scores 8

Tournament

champions

The Port Angeles 12U Impact softball team captured first place at the USSSA Fastpitch Tournament in Federal Way last weekend. Impact won five games in a row in their first tourney of the year. They beat the Sumner Crushers 2-0 in the championship game. Teammates include, bottom row from left, Callie Hall, Ashley Adamire, Jaidyn Larson, Natalie Steinman, Kylee Reid and Ashley Howell. Back row from left, coach Randy Steinman, Ashlynn Uvila, Lauren Lunt, Hunter Anne Coburn, Nizhoni Wheeler, Brennan Gray, Emily Copeland, Payton Harding and coach Brian Coburn.

Rivals: Sequim holds off PA Continued from B1 Yet Briones managed to pitch out of some jams after that, including holding the Riders to just one run out of two bases-loaded chances between the fifth and sixth innings. Port Angeles stranded nine runners total on the game. “I scatter my good hitters throughout the lineup, it’s just that they had a tough day,” Port Angeles coach Buddy Bear said. “I’m not into the wins and losses, it is how you play the game. And I’m very proud of my girls. “I’m very proud of them for hanging in there.” Webb pitched all seven innings for the Riders, giving up 13 hits, nine earned runs and three walks while striking out eight. Other than Hopson’s solo home run in the first inning and a two-run Wolves rally in the top of the fourth, she was able to keep Sequim’s bats at bay early on. It wasn’t until the sixth, when Hopson and Briones both went deep, that things began to unravel. After the big four-run sixth inning, Sequim added three more in the seventh to put the game away and

PORT ANGELES — Local 155 shut out Rotary 8-0 on Monday in Cal Ripken competition. Janson Pederson and Kody Kuch allowed only one hit while striking out 14 for Local. Kuch went 2-for-4 from the plate with a triple, double and two RBIs. Bailey Early was 2-for-3 with three RBIs. Rotary’s Jeff Glatz struck out five in the loss. Local 155 is 1-0 and Rotary is 0-1 on the season.

Area wrestlers FERNDALE — Olympic Mountain Wrestlers had five out of six members bring home medals at Saturday’s competition. Wrestlers had to place at least third in order to medal. Tyler Gale took home first in the Schoolboy 84 division and Tim O’Keefe took top honors in the

Schoolboy 210 division. Israel Gonzalez wrestled well to place second in the Bantam 44 division. Andrew Symonds took home third in the Junior 152 division as well as Riley Gale in the Intermediate 94 division. Olympic Mountain will compete next Saturday at Auburn’s Mountainview High School.

Local beats Blake’s PORT ANGELES — Local 155 opened up for 17 hits and 17 putouts in Tuesday night’s 15-8 Junior Olympic League Babe Ruth win over Blake’s Sand and Gravel. Jace Bohman was 3-for3, Chase Jangula was 4-for-5 and Jordan Shepherd went 3-for-4 for Local 155. Zach Lovik, Justin Roon, Joseph Danz and Julian Erin all picked up hits for Blake’s.

Wrestling for all PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Mountain Wrestlers will be hosting a Freestyle Challenge on April 23 at Port Angeles High School. Weigh-ins will be from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. with wrestling beginning at 10 a.m. The top three placers will receive medals with the top six receiving T-shirts. Entry fee is $12 and ages Pee Wee through Junior are welcome. This is a non-USA Wrestling sanctioned event, so USA Wrestling Cards and Singlets are optional. For more information, contact Erik Gonzalez at 360-565-1584 or egonzalez@portangelesschools.org. Peninsula Daily News

Mariners: Lose Continued from B1 Escobar before finally getting a strikeout of Patterson Going to Ray (1-1) so to end the inning. Toronto reliever Mark quickly was a bit of a surprise after Jamey Wright Rzepczynski (1-0) got the had struck out Jose Molina win in relief of rookie Kyle for the final out of the sev- Drabek. enth inning, throwing just Rzepczynski threw two five pitches. innings of hitless relief, But Wright was on the striking out a pair. bench and Ray on the His biggest out was his Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News mound to start the eighth. first, when he got Ichiro on Sheri Adams of Port Angeles, left, takes her lead off first base as “We’ve done a good job in strikes to end the sixth Sequim first baseman Alexas Besand watches the pitch Wednesday. the bullpen. The guys have inning with runners on first been set up and we’ve had hand Port Angeles its first Maddy Zbaraschuk went that’s all it took. We just them in roles,” Wedge said. and third. Seattle was poised for loss of the year. 2-for-3 with three runs kept battling.” “Jamey came in and did the sweep with the way Var“They are mistake hit- scored while Rylleigh Zbarhis job and Chris just didn’t gas was pitching and after Sequim 10, Port Angeles 6 ters,” Bear said. “We made a aschuk was 2-for-4, Cindy have it today.” Justin Smoak led off the couple of mistakes, that’s Miller 2-for-4 and Briones Sequim 1 0 0 2 0 4 3 ­— 10 13 2 Trouble began almost sixth inning with an oppoPort Angeles 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 — 6 10 3 just the way it goes. We’ve 2-for-4. immediately. LP- Webb site-field homer to left that got to learn from that. “This is really good for WP- Briones (10-0); The eighth started inno- snapped a 1-all tie. Pitching Statistics “Its a big game, yes. But us, to know that we can Sequim: Briones 7IP, 10H, 5ER, 4BB, 10K. cently enough with a broBatting from the left it’s now, ‘What do we get play at the next level,” Port Angeles: Webb 7IP, 13H, 9ER, 3BB, 8K. ken-bat single up the mid- side, where Smoak entered Hitting Statistics from this? What do we learn Sequim coach Joel Lewis dle by Yunel Escobar, but Wednesday hitting just Sequim: Hopson 2-4 (2HR, 3RBI, 3R); Briones from this?’” said. Corey Patterson followed .188, the young first base2-3 (HR, 3RBI, BB, R); M. Zbaraschuk 2-3 (3R, RBI, Sequim had five differ“I think after going BB); R. Zbaraschuk 2-4 (SB, R); Miller 2-4 (R). with a bunt single. man took a 3-2 pitch from ent hitters end up with two- through the order one time Port Angeles: Hinsdale 1-2 (HR, 3RBI, BB, R); Bautista, who struck out Drabek and drove it into the and seeing [Webb], I think Loghry 2-3 (2B, SB, R); Drake 2-4 (2RBI, R). hit games. twice earlier and fouled out Toronto bullpen in left field. down the left-field line in a It was Smoak’s first key spot in the fifth, then homer of the season, and his deposited Ray’s pitch. first at Safeco Field after his The Jays weren’t done as Jayson Nix doubled and trade from Texas last sumlater scored on Edwin mer. Vargas threw 6 2/3 Encarnacion’s two-out douinnings, allowing just five ble. Ray was finally pulled, hits and striking out seven. The only run he allowed leaving to a smattering of came on consecutive douboos from the tiny afternoon crowd on a chilly and damp bles by Molina and Escobar in the third. day. “I wasn’t worried about Ray, who made the club out of spring training after making some type of comegoing to camp on a minor- back,” Vargas said. “I’ve gone out there league deal, has allowed 11 enough and proved I can hits, eight earned runs and two homers in 4 2/3 innings pitch. “I don’t think I have to so far this season. Josh Lueke took over worry about my previous and didn’t fare much better. outing.” NOTES: For the second He walked John McDonald, then gave up a two-run time in three games, the Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News double to Molina, his third Mariners set a new record hit and second double of the low for attendance at Safeco Wilson Avila-Luna of Forks, with ball, kicks the ball towards the goal in afternoon, and a single to Field on Wednesday: 12,407. the SWL-Evergreen Division boys soccer game Wednesday.

Preps: Forks in heartbreaker Continued from B1

Montesano scored on a corner kick with two seconds to go in the first overtime and held on in the second overtime for the SWL-Evergreen Division victory. Beltran’s goals came in the 49th and 50th minutes to give the Spartans a 2-1 lead. “We had three shots from about six yards in the first half that didn’t go in,” Bowers said. “We have to convert those goals when we have point-blank shots.” The Spartans kicked right to the Montesano “If we kick to either side ing ball possession but goalkeeper all three times of the goalkeeper, the shot hasn’t been scoring enough instead of kicking to the goes in,” Bowers said. to win, according to Bowers. Forks has been dominatForks, now 2-5 in league side of him.

and 2-6 overall, will try to get back into the winning column at Rochester on Friday.

Kobe Bryant fined $100,000 for gay slur The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The NBA fined Kobe Bryant $100,000 on Wednesday for using a derogatory gay term in frustration over a referee’s call. NBA Commissioner David Stern issued a swift disciplinary ruling after the Los Angeles Lakers’ five-

time NBA champion guard cursed and used the homophobic slur when referee Bennie Adams called a technical foul on him during the third quarter of a victory over the San Antonio Spurs. “Kobe Bryant’s comment during last night’s game was offensive and inexcusable,” Stern said. “While I’m fully aware

that basketball is an emotional game, such a distasteful term should never be tolerated. “Kobe and everyone associated with the NBA know that insensitive or derogatory comments are not acceptable and have no place in our game or society.” Stern’s action drew praise from gay-rights orga-

nizations that had demanded a fuller apology from Bryant and condemnation of his words by the Lakers. Bryant, the sixth-leading scorer in NBA history, issued a statement earlier Wednesday saying his words came strictly out of anger and shouldn’t be taken literally.

Schubert: Fish Continued from B1 may actually help account for the fact that there isn’t much breeding between the “One of the things that two on the Hoh, he said. has happened across a lot Whatever the case, the of our rivers is we’ve sort of lost a lot of the early timed fact there isn’t much wildhatchery hanky panky wild fish, and we’re left more with this later-timed going on is undeniably good news. curve,” Brenkman said. “That’s not to say there ________ is not early timed wild fish, Matt Schubert is the outdoors but this segment of a lot of and sports columnist for the Peninthe runs has been sort of sula Daily News. He can be reduced.” reached at 360-417-3526 or at The segregation of those matt.schuber t@peninsuladaily news.com. fish because of run timing


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, April 14, 2011

Business

PAGE

B4

Politics & Environment  $ Briefly . . . BPA wants to suspend wind power

Canadian Pacific Railroad (2)

Steamships, including those that sailed to Port Angeles and Seattle, are docked behind the CPR Steamship Terminal on Victoria’s Inner Harbour in this photo taken in the 1930s. The terminal building later hosted a wax museum until last year.

Historic Victoria boat terminal future up in air Peninsula Daily News

SEATTLE — The Bonneville Power Administration wants to shut down Northwest wind farms this spring when hydroelectric dams are generating plenty of electricity as a huge mountain snowpack melts. The Portland, Ore.based BPA may have to limit production from wind farms to free space in the regional power grid, The Seattle Times reported Wednesday. “We’re looking at doing everything we can to avoid the shutdowns, but you have to be able to do something when your back is against the wall,” said Doug Johnson, a BPA spokesman. Before shutting down wind farms, BPA would reduce coal, natural gas and nuclear power plant production as low as possible, he said.

news sources

VICTORIA — The former steamship terminal for boats to Port Angeles and elsewhere won’t become a museum or Pike Place-style market. The owner of the historic Canadian Pacific Railroad Steamship Terminal, the Provincial Capital Commission, on Wednesday rejected the proposals of three companies vying to occupy the building. The imposing 21,000-square-foot structure, which is undergoing earthquake retrofitting after 40 years as a wax museum, is next door to the Black Ball Ferry Line landing at which The interior of the CPR Steamship Terminal about 12 years before the the MV Coho from Port terminal was closed and the space became the Royal London Wax Museum. Angeles docks. The future of the building It was designed by noted is up in the air, although one he CPR Steamship Terminal was designed by architects P.L. James and person connected with the commission suggested that Francis Rattenbury, who noted architects P.L. James and Francis the building could become a designed the nearby ParliaRattenbury, who designed the nearby terminal again for passenger ment Buildings and The ferries from Seattle and Bell- Parliament Buildings and The Empress hotel, and Empress hotel, and included ingham and possibly even included huge fireplaces, ornate wood and period huge fireplaces, ornate wood the Coho. and period furniture.

T

Turned away Applications to become the old terminal building’s main tenant came from Matt MacNeil, founder of the Victoria Pub Co.; Bob Wright, founder of the Oak Bay Marine Group; and the Maritime Museum of British Columbia, which is now in Bastion Square off Government Street. All said they found out via a phone call from accounting firm Ernst and Young, which

furniture.

is working on behalf of the commission. “Yeah, that was it, they read a script from the Ernst and Young office which said at this time they won’t be going any further with any of the proposals — they said they didn’t have sufficient information, whatever that means,” MacNeil told the Victoria Times Colonist. MacNeil’s proposal envisaged a scaled-down version

of Seattle’s Pike Place Market in a boutique waterfront marketplace. The commission could not be reached for comment late Tuesday, but had said there were concerns over the long-term viability of the proposals. The terminal building was built in 1924 and was home to the Royal London Wax Museum for 40 years until it vacated last fall.

Undergoing retrofit Except for a modern glassed-in entrance on the west side, the CPR terminal maintains its Neoclassical Revival appearance. The building is currently undergoing a $3 million upgrade that includes seismic improvements paid for under provincial and Canadian federal government infrastructure stimulus plans.

FAA suspends more dozing controllers; 1 at Boeing Field By Joan Lowy

The Associated Press

Angeles — including two in the morning hours — land at Boeing Field daily.] The Boeing Field controller was already facing disciplinary action for falling asleep on two separate occasions during an early evening shift in January, the agency said. Two controllers at the airport in Lubbock, Texas, have been suspended for an

incident in the early morning hours of March 29, the agency said. In that instance, a controller in Fort Worth had to try repeatedly to raise the Lubbock controllers in order to hand off control of an inbound aircraft. The controllers also failed to hand off a plane departing Lubbock to the Fort Worth radar center, FAA said.

Pinnacle

PORT ANGELES — Strait Health and Healing, 213 E. Eighth St., Suite B, was recently purchased by licensed massage practitioner Jodie Hall. The practice focuses mainly on deep-tissue/ injury-management work, as well as relaxation and hot-stone massage. Spa treatments are no longer available. Some insurances are accepted. Strait Health and Healing also has Zumba classes three times a week and Pilates class twice a week. For further information regarding gift certificates purchased before Feb. 16, phone 360-417-1800.

Chase earnings NEW YORK — JPMorgan Chase’s earnings soared 67 percent in the first quarter on higher fees from investment banking and as fewer customers fell behind on their credit card bills. The bank recorded more losses from its mortgage business, and CEO Jamie Dimon said he didn’t expect those problems to go away soon. Outside of real estate, JPMorgan did well. The nation’s second-largest bank by assets said more of its customers were paying on time. Only 3.25 percent of loan payments were late by 30 days or more, a drop of 0.41 percentage point from the previous quarter. Chase operates branches in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend.

Oil prices rise NEW YORK — Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude for May delivery gained 86 cents to settle at $107.11 per barrel on

Cat. Jet black male, sutures around both eyes, missing from PA High School area.

the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract is still down more than 5 percent for the week. In other Nymex trading for May contracts, gasoline futures gained 7.83 cents to settle at $3.2424 a gallon. In London, Brent crude rose $1.90 to settle at $122.33 per barrel on the ICE Futures exchange.

More retail buying WASHINGTON — Consumers spent more in March on furniture, electronics and at restaurants, but also paid more for gas. Retail sales increased 0.4 percent last month, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. It was the ninth consecutive monthly gain. The increase shrank to a 0.1 percent when sales at gasoline stations were excluded. Still, the biggest decline in auto sales in more than a year also pulled down overall sales. When taking out sales at gas station and of autos, retail sales rose 0.6 percent.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.1942 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.3860 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.2885 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2879.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.1180 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1457.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1454.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $40.465 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $40.235 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1790.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1781.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

LOCAL COIN BUYER PAYS CA$H 452-3358

SPRING OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND April 16 & 17

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WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration is immediately adding a second controller at night at 26 airports and a radar facility after finding two more cases of controllers snoozing on duty — including one sleeping in Seattle. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood’s announcement Wednesday came hours after a medical flight carrying at least three people landed at RenoTahoe International Airport

in Nevada without assistance because the pilot was unable to raise a controller in the airport tower. FAA said in a statement that the controller, who has been suspended, had fallen asleep. The incident occurred at 2 a.m. PDT, when the controller was alone on duty. Another controller, at Boeing Field-King County International in Seattle, has also been suspended for falling asleep during his morning shift on Monday, FAA said. [Four Kenmore Air Express flights from Port

New owner

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, April 14, 2011

c Our Peninsula Hit the dance floor for fun, exercise SECTION

IT’S APRIL, AND it’s warming up outside (really), and more outside activities are looming (mowing, gardening, etc.). Did you know dancing is a great way to get in shape? Dancing to music is a great cardiovascular exercise — just look at all the commercials for different regimens on TV. However, I think it would be more fun going out with friends and dancing to live music. Where there is no dance floor; just move to the groove where you’re sitting. Even tapping your toes to the beat of live music is better than watching commercials on TV. Besides, it will lift your spirits on these gray, rainy days.

Port Angeles ■  Tonight at Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, the Sundowners will host a jam from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. You can’t help but have a fun time with these guys. On Friday and Saturday, country up to Denny Secord Jr. and Haywire from 8 p.m. to midnight. Now, it ain’t all country; there’s some rock ’n’ roll to get your heart rate up, too. ■  On Friday, the Jimmy Hoffman Band heads downtown to the R Bar, 132 E. Front St., with some country, blues and rock ’n’ roll from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. $3 cover. ■  On Friday, BBR plays classic ’50s to ’70s rock ’n’ roll at Bar N9ne, 129 W. First St., from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tom Svornich will be guesting on drums. Proceeds will benefit Relay For Life. ■  On Saturday at Wine on the Waterfront, in The Landing mall at 115 Railroad Ave., it’s a welcome return for Sarah Shea and Chez Jazz at 7:30 p.m. When she sings, my heart starts pounding. $3 cover. ■  On Friday, Chuck Grall, Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Country will perform at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday marks the return of Dave and Rosalie Secord and the Luck of the Draw Band,

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

LIVE MUSIC playing acoustic country, Nelson bluegrass and old-time music from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  Monday sees the final appearance of Dave and Rosalie Secord and the Luck of the Draw Band at Smuggler’s Landing, 115 Railroad Ave., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Special guests are Joe Hunt and Ramona Wright. ■  On Saturday, come strut your stuff at the Spring Swing at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., featuring the Port Angeles High School Jazz Ensemble. These young men and women are a product of the fine music program at the high school and really know their music. $3 suggested donation. On Tuesday, Wally and the Boys will be playing ballroom dance favorites for the dancing pleasure of all adults 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free! ■  The Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 five miles west of Port Angeles, features its Sunday and Wednesday night lineups. On Sunday, the Goodfellas have taken over the Junction Jam from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Next Wednesday, banjo craftsman Jason Mogi and bassist Paul Stehr-Green will play from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

John

Sequim and Blyn ■  On Friday at the Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., those rascally Discovery Bay Pirates perform from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

On Tuesday, stop in for the Irish Session from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Wednesday, Denny Secord Sr. hooks up with Jubilee at 5:30 p.m. ■  On Saturday, Paul Sagan will play at the 3 Crabs Restaurant, 11 Three Crabs Road, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  Every Wednesday at Mugs ’n’ Jugs Bar & Grill, 735 W. Washington St., Jimmy Hoffman and friends perform unplugged from 7 p.m. to midnight. Donations welcome. ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, the lovely Robin Lynn sings for your supper from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■  On Friday at Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, dance to the wide variety of music by Author Unknown from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, have some Rock Candy with Rachel and dance to top 40 hits from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, two-step and boogie to the country and rock ’n’ roll of Denny Secord Jr. and Haywire from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Monday, we be jammin’ with host Barry Burnett and friends, so bring your ax and/or vocal talents for the fun from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Port Hadlock ■  On Friday at the Ajax Cafe, 271 Water St., Ahmad Baabahar will perform his soulful originals on guitar with vocals at 6 p.m. On Saturday, Howly Slim will play guitar and sing original songs as well as old-time faves at 6 p.m. On Sunday, Jim Nyby will play piano and harmonica with vocals of blues, ballads, jazz and soul from 5:30 p.m.

Port Townsend ■  Tonight at The Upstage,

923 Washington St., the Marcia Ball Band will play at 8 p.m. Marcia Ball is a four-time Grammy nominee and 2010 Gulf Coast Music Hall of Fame inductee. Winner of eight Blues Music Awards, she’s a legend and a piano wizard. $35 cover. On Friday, Repo Zest will open for Bub Pratt and the Two Beat Kings from 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. $6 cover. On Saturday, the David Vest Band will play barrel house boogie-woogie and blues at 8 p.m. David Vest is not only known for his piano playing, but also wrote the first songs recorded by country diva Tammy Wynette. $10 cover. On Sunday, two events will brighten your day. First up is the jazz/rock of Locust Street Taxi at 3 p.m. $3 cover. Jazz players are free ’cuz it’s followed by Rex Rice’s Penultimate Sunday Jazz Jam at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, drop in for Annie Clark’s Music Jam at 6 p.m. On Wednesday, Martha Gallagher with David Michael promise to put on a harp concert like you’ve never heard before at 7:30 p.m. They’ll cover several genres of music including blues, world jazz and more. $8 cover. Phone 360-385-2216 for reservations. ■  On Friday at the Undertown, 211 Taylor St., the Solvents, with June Madrona, will play at 8 p.m. $3 cover. On Saturday, there’s a “Star Wars” party with Locust Street Taxi at 9 p.m. $6 cover. On Wednesday, Clay Bartlett plays at 6 p.m. ■  It’s a big night at the Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, Saturday when Northwest blues giant Kenny “Blues Boss” Wayne plays from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $20 cover. ■  Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., will host new folk artists Misner & Smith and their originals with vocal harmonies Friday at 9 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, jazz and pop/ rock vocalist Eleanor Frye will entertain at 9 p.m. $5 cover. Next Wednesday, there will be a special Gypsy jazz treat with Willie & Lobo. The cost is $20, and the time hasn’t been

announced. Phone 360-379-1100. ■  On Friday, Locust Street Taxi makes its first stop of the weekend at the Uptown Pub and Grill, 1016 Lawrence St. $5 cover. ■  Ol’ Howly Slim will be at the Banana Leaf Bistro, 609 Washington St., on Friday at 6 p.m. ■  Steve Grandinetti will play solo piano at Lanza’s Ristorante, 1020 Lawrence St., every Wednesday in April from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Music notes ■  Olympic Peninsula Dance presents Maia Santell and House Blend at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. They play swing, big-band, jump blues and rhythm and blues to Latin and country. Open to all ages, smoke-free, adults $15, students with ID and disabled people $10, ages 12 and younger $7. There will be a free (with admission) pre-dance lesson in the Charleston with Scot Thomas and Mary Beth Conners at 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.olympicpeninsuladance.com or phone 360-385-6919 or 360385-5327. ■  The Quilcene Historical Museum, 151 E. Columbia St., will celebrate its 20th anniversary and reopening for the season with free grilled hot dogs, cake and music by Denny Secord and the Northwest Country Boys on Saturday from noon to 3 p.m. Donations appreciated. Now get out there and get your heart rate up because there’s plenty of music to dance to.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-5651139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

Briefly . . . Pre-registration is encouraged for Esprit event PORT ANGELES — Esprit, the Pacific Northwest’s largest and longest running transgender conference, will be held at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., from May 15-22. The attendees will enjoy an action-packed and educational week filled with workshops, presentations, day-trips and unique special events that include the renowned Friday evening talent show and dance (open to the public) and the Saturday evening formal dinner and dance. Both the talent show and dance and the Saturday night dance are open to the public. Esprit is also an active participant in the Port Angeles Downtown Merchants Association Girls Night Out Thursday evening shopping event. Some classes and events also are devoted solely to the attendee spouses. Pre-registration is encouraged and can be performed either online or at the event. Register at www.Espritconf.com. The conference is sponsored by Emerald City of Seattle, Northwest Gender Alliance of Portland, Ore., and the Cornbury

Society of Vancouver, B.C.

Students honored PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Noon Rotary Club recently named Port Angeles High School seniors Ian Ward and Tally Swanson as its students of the month. Ward carries a 3.54 grade-point average and has played football and basketball and served as an Associated Student Body officer for his school. Ward He also plays piano and percussion instruments. He is the son of Tino and Rachel Ward. Swanson holds a 3.875 gradepoint average. She plays soc- Swanson cer, track and field, and gymnastics and is on the equestrian team. Swanson is a member of the school’s wind ensemble and has served as an Associated Student Body officer. She also volunteers with the Clallam County Teen Court. Swanson is the daughter of Thomas and Robin Swanson. Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles School District

Class

of

’76

helps out in beautification

Members of the Port Angeles High School Class of 1976, represented by Zoe Hansen, fourth from left, and Vicki Anderson, fifth from left, recently donated $1,500 to the Port Angeles School District for Port Angeles High School campus beautification. The funds will enable the high school to purchase materials for a replica of the Roughrider sign in front of the high school. From left are Port Angeles School Board President Cindy Kelly, Superintendent of Port Angeles Schools Jane Pryne, Port Angeles High School Assistant Principal Mary Ann Unger, Hansen, Anderson and PAHS Principal Garry Cameron during the presentation at a recent School Board meeting.

Port Angeles School District honors Soroptimist members Organization makes $1,000 donation to Jefferson school Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles School District

From left, Port Angeles School Board President Cindy Kelly and Port Angeles Soroptimist-Jet Set members Tina Smith-O’Hara, Billie More, Jean Fairchild and Superintendent Jane Pryne were honored at a recent Soroptimist meeting.

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles School District Board of Directors recently honored Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set members for a $1,000 donation to the Jefferson Elementary School playground “Dream” project. Jefferson teacher Margi Ahl-

gren, the force behind the project, has been writing grants and asking for donations to fund a “dream” playground that would allow young students to play and work on necessary skills. “Already a local contractor has donated work to resurface and fence a 120-foot-by-40-foot area complete with an asphalt tricycle track,” said Ahlgren. Other funds will purchase rubberized playground surfacing, a tire swing, seesaw, sand and water table, and sandbox. Still to be funded is the final addition to the play area: a large

climbing deck with slides and tunnels. Other donors to date are Leonard Lewicki, Ameriprise Financial, Joe Lavin and Sue-Ellen Kraft, Les Schwab Tire Centers, Home Depot, Lakeside Industries, Jefferson Parent Teacher Organization, Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Noon Club and Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set. For more information on the project, email Ahlgren at mahlgren@portangelesschools or phone 360-565-1921.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Things to Do Today and Friday, April 14-15, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Women 45 and older and men 50 and older. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683-0141 for information, time of day and location.

Newborn parenting class — “You and Your New Baby,” third-floor sunroom, Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-417-7652.

Clallam County Literacy Knit, crochet and spin — Council — Raymond Carver room, Port Angeles Library, All ages and skill levels, Veela 2210 S. Peabody St., 10 a.m. Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. to 11:30 a.m. Community to 6 p.m. members are welcome. Volunteers in Medicine of Guided walking tour — the Olympics health clinic — Historic downtown buildings, 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 an old brothel and “Under- p.m. Free for patients with no ground Port Angeles.” Cham- insurance or access to health ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- care. For appointment, phone road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 360-457-4431. p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 Relay For Life — Learn to senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children put together a Relay for Life younger than 6, free. Reserva- team and fundraising. Orchards tions, phone 360-452-2363, on 14th Clubhouse, Butler and West 14th streets, 6 p.m. ext. 0. Phone or text 360-477-7673. Serenity House Dream Tai chi class — Ginger and Center — For youth ages 13-24, homeless or at risk for Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., homelessness. 535 E. First St., 6:30 p.m. $12 per class or $10 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Housing for three or more classes. No and planning help, plus basic experience necessary, wear needs: showers, laundry, loose comfortable clothing. hygiene products, etc. Meals Phone 360-808-5605. served daily. Volunteers and donors phone 360-477-8939 or Bariatric surgery support 360-565-5048. group — Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 Port Angeles Fine Arts p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. Center — “Strait Art 2011” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 Celebrate Recovery — a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360- Christ-based recovery group. 457-3532. Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest Ave., 7 p.m. to Mental illness family sup- 8:30 p.m. Phone 360-452port group — For families and 8909. friends of people with mental disorders. Peninsula Commu- Friday nity Mental Health Center, 118 Serenity House Dream E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360- Center — For youth ages 13-24, homeless or at risk for 457-0431. homelessness. 535 E. First St., 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Housing Veterans Wellness Walk — and planning help, plus basic Port Angeles Veterans Clinic, needs: showers, laundry, 1005 Georgiana St., noon. hygiene products, etc. Meals Open to all veterans. Phone served daily. Volunteers and 360-565-9330. donors phone 360-477-8939 or 360-565-5048. Studium Generale — Peninsula College web/instrucPlay and Learn Port Angetional designer Eric Waterkotte les — For children for ages 0-5 presents “Making Sense of the to attend with parent, grandSocial Network.” Peninsula parent or caregiver with indiCollege, Little Theatre, 1502 E. vidual and group play, songs Lauridsen Blvd., 12:35 p.m. to and story time. 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Phone 360-452-5437 for loca1:25 p.m. Free. tion and information. First Step drop-in center Elwha Mule Barn Day — — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free clothing and equip- Olympic National Park and ment closet, information and Backcountry Horsemen of referrals, play area, emergency Washington present mule supplies, access to phones, packing demonstration. Elwha computers, fax and copier. Mule Barn, 4 miles in on Olympic National Park’s Elwha ValPhone 360-457-8355. ley on Olympic Hot Springs Museum at the Carnegie Road, just past the Elwha — Second and Lincoln streets, Ranger Station, 9 a.m. to 4 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by p.m. Free and open to public donation $2 per person; $5 per Bring a pack lunch. For more family. Main exhibit, “Strong information, visit http://pbchw. People: The Faces of Clallam org or phone Tom Mix at 360County.” Lower level, changing 582-0460. exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. Walk-in vision clinic — Elevator, ADA access parking for visually in rear. Tours available. Phone Information impaired and blind people, 360-452-6779. including accessible technolGastric bypass surgery ogy display, library, Braille support group — 114 E. Sixth training and various magnificaSt., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. tion aids. Vision Loss Center, Open to the public. Phone 360- Armory Square Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. Phone for an 457-1456.

SayHELLO to the

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula Kathy Burrer at 360-582-9309.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-457-8921.

appointment 360-457-1383 or visit www.visionlossservices. org/vision. Insurance assistance — Statewide benefits advisers help with health insurance and Medicare. Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. 3425. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Strait Art 2011” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360457-3532. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. Reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0.

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Magic of Cinema Film Series — Rwandan/USA film “Munyurangabo.” Peninsula College, Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. General admission is $5, student admission is $1. “American Hero Quilts: The Story” — Presented by Readers Theatre Plus. Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 per person or $20 for two at Odyssey Bookstore, 114 W. First St., or at the door. Proceeds benefit American Hero Quilts, a group that provides handmade quilts to wounded U.S. soldiers.

of

paying

Friday Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

Tax-Aide — Free assistance with tax preparation provided by trained volunteers. Bring any and all necessary documentation. Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. By appointment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone 360-732-4822.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden Walk aerobics — First Bap- State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 children 6 to 12; free for chila.m. Free. Phone 360-683- dren 5 and younger. Exhibits 2114. interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait Circuit training exercise of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360class — Sequim Community 385-0373 or email artymus@ Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 olypen.com. a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360Northwest Maritime Cen477-2409 or email jhaupt6@ ter tour — Free tour of new wavecable.com. headquarters. Meet docent in Line dancing lessons — chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 Beginning dancers. Sequim p.m. Elevators available, chilElks Lodge, 143 Port Williams dren welcome and pets not Road, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. $3 per allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or class. Phone 360-681-2826. email sue@nwmaritime.org. Sequim Great Decisions Balance lecture — Physical Group Discussion — Sequim Public Library, 630 N. Sequim therapist Nora Regan presents Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. Topic: “My World Is Spinning: Balance “Responding to the Financial and Vestibular Disorders.” Crisis.” Discussion topics are Enter water side of Olympic taken from the Foreign Policy Room of Physical Therapy Association’s Great Decisions Department, Jefferson Healthpublication and current articles care, 834 Sheridan St., 5:30 in Foreign Affairs magazine. p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Free. For more information, visit the Sequim Great Discussion Quilcene Lions bingo Group at www.fpa.org/info-url_ fundraiser — Quilcene Comnocat4728, phone 360-683- munity Center, 294952 U.S. 9622 or email jcpollock@ Highway 101, 6:30 p.m. Funds olypen.com. New members are go to local scholarships and welcome. clubs. Sequim Museum & Arts Poetry reading — NorthCenter — “The Art of Sustain- wind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferability: Considerate Creativity son St., 7 p.m., then open mic. Taking Personal Responsibility for the Future.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Friday Phone 360-683-8110. Yoga classes — Room to Move Yoga, Second floor, 1008 Tax Day Rally — Con- Lawrence St. For more details cerned Citizens of Clallam or questions, visit www.roomto County host. Corner of Wash- moveyoga.com or phone 360ington Street and Sequim Avenue, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more 385-2864. information, phone 360-681Port Townsend Aero 8450. Museum — Jefferson County Sequim Duplicate Bridge International Airport, 195 Air— Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ave., noon. Phone 360-681- Admission: $10 for adults, $9 4308, or partnership 360-683- for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger 5635. than 6. Features vintage airFrench class — 2 p.m. For craft and aviation art. more information, phone 360Tax-Aide — Free assis681-0226. tance with tax preparation proSequim Education Foun- vided by trained volunteers. dation’s Student Film Festi- Bring any and all necessary val and Spaghetti Dinner — documentation. Port Townsend Sequim High School, 601 N. Recreation Center, 620 Tyler Sequim Ave. Dinner in high St. By appointment, 10 a.m. to school cafeteria, 5 p.m. to 6:30 2 p.m. Phone 360-385-9007. p.m. Film festival in performing Turn to Things/C10 arts center, 7 p.m. Tickets $15

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Chess Club — Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Today Sequim Ave., 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 Yoga classes — Room to p.m. Bring clocks, sets and boards. All are welcome. Phone Move Yoga, Second floor, 1008 Lawrence St. For more details 360-681-8481. or questions, visit www.roomto Health clinic — Free medi- moveyoga.com or phone 360cal services for uninsured or 385-2864. under-insured, Dungeness ValPort Townsend Aero ley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airp.m.. Phone 360-582-0218. port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Meditation class — 92 Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Plain Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admis- for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger sion by donation. than 6. Features vintage airGamblers Anonymous — craft and aviation art. Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Chimacum TOPS 1393 — Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360Evergreen Coho Resort Club 460-9662. House, 2481 Anderson Lake Adventure travel discus- Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visision — Adventurer Chris Duff tors welcome. Phone: 360-765discusses upcoming attempt to 3164. row from Scotland to Iceland in East Jefferson County a modified lifeboat named Northern Reach as well as Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. past trips. Sequim High School Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Cafeteria, 601 N. Sequim Ave., Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission by donation. noon. Open to men 50 and Proceeds fund Duff’s trip. For older and women 45 and older. more information, phone 360- Phone 360-437-5053 or 360437-2672 or 360-379-5443. 775-7364.

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Alzheimer’s support group — Room 401, Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Phone

adults, $10 student/child at Pacific Mist Books or door. $5 Spanish class — Prairie at door for film festival. Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681Port Townsend and 0226.

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

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Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Phone 360-457-7377.

Olympic Minds meeting — Conference room, Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way, 1 p.m. Open to the public. Phone 360 6818677.

mini

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Friendship Dinner — First United Methodist Church, Seventh and Laurel streets. Doors open, 3 p.m. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-8971.

Bingo — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Enter Stage Left series — St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone “Virtual Expression and Immer360-457-7004. sive Art: Exploring Second Life” with Renne Emiko Brock-RichMuseum at the Carnegie mond. Port Angeles Fine Arts — Second and Lincoln streets, Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by Blvd., 7:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation $2 per person; $5 per donation. family. Main exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam Sequim and the County.” Lower level, changing exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. Dungeness Valley Elevator, ADA access parking in rear. Tours available. Phone Today 360-452-6779. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Introduction to line dance Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206for beginners — Port Angeles 321-1718 or visit www. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh sequimyoga.com. St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 Strength and toning exermembers, $3 nonmembers. cise class — Sequim ComPhone 360-457-7004. munity Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per The Answer for Youth — class. Phone Shelley Haupt at Drop-in outreach center for 360-477-2409 or email youth and young adults, provid- jhaupt6@wavecable.com. ing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Line dancing lessons — Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 High-beginner, intermediate E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and advanced dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Mental health drop-in cen- Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Dropter — The Horizon Center, 205 ins welcome. $3 per class. E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Phone 360-681-2826. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to Sequim Senior Softball — socialize, something to do or a Co-ed recreational league. hot meal. For more information, Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for phone Rebecca Brown at 360- practice and pick-up games. 457-0431. Phone John Zervos at 360Senior meal — Nutrition 681-2587. program, Port Angeles Senior Sequim Museum & Arts Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Center — “The Art of Sustain4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recom- ability.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 mended. Phone 360-457-8921. a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360683-8110. PA Peggers Cribbage Club Parent connections — — Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn St. Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 6 p.m. New members welcome. 10 a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. For more information, email Chair yoga — Bend and papeggers@hughes.net, phone 360-808-7129 or visit reach to a chair instead of the floor/ground. Pacific Elements, www.papeggers.com. 163 Lost Mountain Road, 11 a.m. Phone 360-683-3571 before attending.

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SEQUIM — The Sequim All-School Reunion, celebrating 100 years of Sequim schools, will be held Aug. 13. All past students from Sequim are invited to attend. The reunion will include a golf tournament, barbecue lunch, assembly and dinner at 7 Cedars Casino. Registration will be available beginning Friday. To register, fill out the forum in The Ditchwalker, the Sequim Alumni Association newsletter, or visit www.sequimschools.com. For more information, phone Leanne Brown at 360-683-1107.


3

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula D,aily News Thursday April 14, 2011

Thursday, April 14, 2011C3C3

rdAge

Civilian view of Medicare distilled TOMORROW IS THE 15th day of April. If that is news to you, I uncharacteristically suggest that you panic because our red, white and blue Uncle has an ever-diminishing sense of humor when it comes to individuals not paying their taxes, as opposed to corporations not paying taxes, which he finds infinitely more endearing. If your situation is such that you are not required to pay taxes due to the fact that you are (a) a corporation or (b) “low income,” this may be the one time of the year when you can unabashedly celebrate your circumstances. We who are about to pay salute you. (The tax deadline is moved this year to Monday because of a holiday in Washington, D.C.) Speaking of large, governmental undertakings, a couple of weeks ago, to our unanimous relief, I finished up a three-week medley on “The Medicare Machine from 30,000 Feet.” Since that happy ending, however, a rather considerable number of you have expressed various and sundry opinions on the matter of Medicare, with a few miscellaneous questions thrown in about the state and the origin of said Machine. The phrase “conspiracy theory” pathetically understates the gist of most submissions. Nonetheless (or less-the-none),

Thus, the money they paid for health insurance would stay squarely where it belonged, which was in the pockets of the people that people sent money to, so they would pay that money for something that, as it turns out, people were afraid to use. Whew! But that’s not all because here’s the most conspiratorial piece of the Conspiracy Theory: As a subset (or “fringe benefit”) of the above: If this health insurance/Medicare “thing” could adequately confuse, frustrate and intimidate (think, stressed out!) unrich, old people to the point of medical capitulation, they would, likely, die sooner, providing the ever-elusive answer to reducing the number of poor people — Population control! — which is why Medicare has never paid for “long-term care.” And the latter could be most effectively achieved by inventing concepts like “deductible,” “copay,” “benefit limits,” “managed care,” “benefits coordination,” etc. ad infinitum, which would, eventually, replace the old cliche “It isn’t rocket science” with “Well, it isn’t health insurance!” OK, maybe not, but it does make you stop and think — or stop thinking . . . But as is often the case on this fascinating planet where God is considered to have no sense of

to pockets that were chuck-full of dollars. Dismiss “value-added,” and being the true- think, “opportunity.” Mark blue journalist Thus was born “health insurHarvey that I am, I feel ance” and, in there somewhere compelled to (because we are steadfastly share a distilla- avoiding being confused by facts), tion of these Medicare, and the approach is observations, elegant in its simplicity: courageously If health care could continue dismissing to escalate its cost to the level of “fact,” “history” being unaffordable, people could and even politi- probably be convinced that it cal persuasion made sense to send money to in my usual people who would, ostensibly, swashbuckling, send back that money to people journalistic style. who were providing health care Thus, near as I can tell, the to people who needed health care civilian view of Medicare (which because the people who needed flies in the face of conventional the health care didn’t have political wisdom, a phrase that enough money to pay the people defines “oxymoron”) goes somewho provided it. thing like this: And if, again, the costs of In the early days of our health care could be driven national odyssey toward confusupward to point of orbital, people ing the term “health care” with could probably be convinced that the phrase “health insurance,” it made sense to pay some money people who made decisions for out of pocket before the people people who were considered inca- you sent money to would send pable of making decisions, noted money to the people who protwo distinct facts: vided you with health care, on First, there was getting to be the off-chance you needed health a lot of old, and relatively poor, care, or — Better yet! — drive up people, and second, should the the costs of this thing called number of old, poor people con“health insurance” to the point tinue to grow, there appeared to where people were afraid to use be an entrepreneurial niche in it because using it would which to develop a lucrative increase the costs of their health industry that accomplished virtu- insurance, so they would die ally nothing except to add dollars without using health care.

HELP LINE

humor, there is an unintended, and somewhat contradictory, side effect to all of this. Consider: As our national life expectancy has continued to increase in spite of health insurance, various forms of dementia (think Alzheimer’s disease) have emerged as a leading means of retiring retirees. Now how does one attempt to prevent dementia? Right! By developing new neuron pathways. And how does one develop new neuron pathways? Right! By learning new things and attempting to master the unmasterable. And what is the most unmasterable thing you can imagine? Right: Medicare! So, belay the Sudoku, cancel the crossword, relegate the quantum physics text to the doorstop and simply perseverate on your Medicare “Explanation of Benefits!” And try to remember that income taxes are due Monday

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Briefly . . . Anderson Lake walk set April 29

hill through second-growth forest to an overlook of the Chimacum Valley and Tamanowas Rock; then back down, passing by a skunk cabbage swamp before returning to the CHIMACUM — The starting point. Olympic Chapter of the Washington Native Plant The hike will be about Society will hold a free four miles, with a very walk at Anderson Lake short side trip to see the State Park on Friday, sea blush. April 29. Because this is a botany Participants will meet at hike, participants will prothe park entrance at ceed at an average rate of 10 a.m. or at Shold Busiabout 1 mile per hour. ness Park along Rhody Attendees should bring Drive at 9:45 a.m. a lunch, a favorite plant This hike is co-sponfield guide and a hands sored with the Jefferson lens. Land Trust. Hikers should wear footParticipants will hike wear appropriate for wet along Anderson Lake past conditions. some of the largest Sitka To sign up, phone Fred spruce and western red cedar trees on the Quimper or Ann Weinmann at 360Peninsula; make a stop at a 379-0986 or email fweinmann@cablespeed. small prairie remnant (chocolate lilies, etc.); up the com.

Youth poetry slam PORT ANGELES — In honor of National Poetry Month, the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., will host a poetry slam for youths in grades six through nine at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21. Students will compete by reading an original poem or performing a published poem. The public is invited to attend. Prizes include an iPod Nano, an iPod Shuffle and gift certificates for local bookstores. Light refreshments will be served. Contestants entered the slam either through classroom elimination or through independent entries. Many teachers throughout Clallam County encouraged their students to enter the contest and

2210 S. Peabody St., at 7 p.m. Friday, April 22. Attendees will witness a spectacle of light, color, optical illusions and other visual phenomena that “dazzle and confuse perceptions.” Patterson is a local artist and a former lecturer at San Francisco’s Morrison Planetarium. This is a free, familyfriendly program, and refreshments will be provided. For more information, phone 360-417-8500 or email PAprograms@nols.org.

held classroom competitions. Judges for the contest include Friends of the Library board member Larry Welch, Peninsula Daily News reporter Diana Urbani de la Paz, Tidepools editor Michael Mills, Port Book & News owner Alan Turner and Odyssey Bookstore owner April Bellerud. The contest is designed to encourage young adults to express themselves through poetry and is part of the North Olympic Library System’s ongoing programming for young adults. For more information, phone 360-417-8502 or email youth@nols.org.

the North Beach parking lot at the end of Landes Street. This is the third in a series of walks exploring local habitats within the city limits of Port Townsend. This year’s walk will roughly follow the historic portage through Happy Valley. The hazards of boating around Point Wilson were so treacherous that carrying a boat through the valley was an easier option. The entire walk is around 4-5 miles and will cover several floral habitats. The final destination is the Port Townsend Park and Ride. A car shuttle back to North Beach Park can be set up if desired. For more information, phone Dixie Llewellin at 360-385-6432 or email dixie@cablespeed.com. Peninsula Daily News

Portage walk set PORT TOWNSEND — The Olympic Chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society will hold a Cross Quimper Peninsula Historic Portage Crossing walk from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 22. Participants will meet at

‘A Visual Feast’ PORT ANGELES — Ken Patterson will present “The Seeing Eye: A Visual Feast” at the Port Angeles Library,

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

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BY PAULA GAMACHE / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 62 Blot with a paper towel, maybe 63 Like food that’s acceptable to cattle? 67 Inuit relatives 69 Checked, say 70 Italian sportswear name 73 They come with turndown service 74 Soviet ___ 75 Burial site of early Scottish kings 77 Rents 78 Pipe material, for short 79 Memorable theatrical performance? 83 Shell, e.g. 86 Warning from a driver 87 Extremely, in 1970s slang 88 Joyce’s land 89 Bottom-line bigwigs, in brief 91 Head-turning sound 93 Abstain happily? 99 Fairy 102 Steven who co-wrote “Freakonomics” 103 New Guinea port 104 Life-threatening 107 Blow away 108 Is well-endowed? 111 One giving an order 112 Declared

113 Dammed river in North Carolina 114 Maurice of Nixon’s cabinet 115 Region conquered by Philip II of Macedon 116 Mounts DOWN 1 “Back to the Future” family name 2 “Get ___!” 3 California missions founder Junípero ___ 4 Scottish poet James known as “The Ettrick Shepherd” 5 Southern university that shares its name with a biblical judge 6 Form a splinter group 7 Sled dog with a statue in New York’s Central Park 8 Elizabeth in the cosmetics department 9 Abbr. following op. and loc. 10 The Wildcats of the Big 12 Conf. 11 Attack from the air 12 2010 chart-topper for Ke$ha 13 Like ___ in the headlights 14 Old Ottoman governor

15 Rural setting, in poetry 16 Green gemstone 17 Place in a Carlo Levi memoir 18 Scout’s mission 19 David’s weapon 24 Western tribe 28 Preposterous 31 Once, a long time ago 32 “Family Guy” creator MacFarlane 33 Ignore, imperatively 34 Barely beat 35 Oahu offering 38 In ___ (confused) 39 Mr. Burns’s teddy bear on “The Simpsons” 40 Typical cemetery enclosure 41 Driver’s target 42 Balloonhead 43 Seller of space or time, for short 44 Showy craft? 45 ___’acte 46 ___-deucy 48 Tennis’s 1977 U.S. Open champ 49 Salon, e.g., informally 50 Accustom 51 ___-masochism 56 False deity 57 Baloney and then some 59 Dinner scraps 60 Memorable time

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AC R O S S 1 Reduces to pulp 7 Betray, in a way 15 They’re unoriginal 20 Haitian ___ 21 Haiti’s first democratically elected president 22 Iconoclast 23 Skip Thanksgiving leftovers? 25 Early spring bloomers 26 Operagoer’s accessory 27 Broke bread 28 Longfellow’s words before “O Ship of State!” 29 Singer Sumac 30 Say “No,” “Never” and “Uh-uh”? 34 Mrs. Robert ___ (Mary Custis) 36 Make a big stink 37 Chacon of the 1960s Mets 38 Put up with 41 One may be original 43 Hopelessly lost 47 Plea for immediate absolution? 52 Abbr. on a cover letter 53 Wind in front of a stage 54 Kin of fairies 55 Not 56 Crested ___, Colo. 58 Chairlift alternative 60 Shake

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C4

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Fun ’n’ Advice

Fighting couple strain friendship

Tundra

DEAR ABBY: We have been friends with “The Bickersons” for quite some time. They never have a kind word to say to each other. Mr. B. now has a terminal illness, and you would think they’d be kinder to each other at a time like this. On the contrary, their fights are more groundless and vicious than ever. It is becoming increasingly difficult to be around them. This is when they need friends more than ever, but they’re driving everyone away! What can we do? Love Is All We Need

For Better or For Worse

Dear Love: While you might imagine that when a spouse has a terminal illness it would bring the couple closer together, that is not always the case. Mr. B. may be frightened, angry, in pain and taking it out on his wife. Mrs. B. may be furious at her husband for being sick and dependent and requiring her to have gone from being a wife to a caregiver. Also, they both may be settling old scores. Because it’s painful to watch what’s going on but you want to be supportive, consider socializing with them separately. They may appreciate the time they get to spend away from each other.

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: When does dieting become rude? I have always enjoyed inviting friends and family over for dinner. But lately, it seems everyone is on some kind of diet and “can’t eat that.” I fix healthy meals — free of fats, sugars and salt. If someone has a dietary restriction or wants to pass on dessert, I am fine with that, of course. I don’t like it, though, when my carefully prepared meals turn into leftovers or get thrown away off someone’s plate. Why would anyone accept a dinner invitation and then turn into a picky guest? Would eating an average serving of a good meal once a week blow someone’s diet? Lost the Joy of Cooking

Garfield

Dear Lost the Joy: I’ll answer

Momma

DEAR ABBY your questions in reverse order. Van Buren Eating an “average serving of a good meal” once a week COULD blow someone’s diet, depending on the kind of diet the person is on. And the reason someone who is on a severely restricted diet would accept a dinner invitation on a weekly basis might be because he or she wants to see you, wants to see some of the other guests or doesn’t want to be left out. But for a conclusive answer, you need to query the dieter.

Abigail

Dear Abby: My mother and I are very close, and I love her very much, but I have a problem. Mom goes on every single field trip with my class. There have even been times when she was the only parent in attendance. The teachers are grateful for her, but it’s becoming embarrassing. I’m a freshman in a private high school, and I want to start doing things more independently. What’s the best way to tell Mom before my next trip that I prefer she not go without hurting her feelings? I’m a Big Girl Now Dear Big Girl: Talk to your mother at a time when you are both calm. She needs to understand that her hovering is making you self-conscious when you need some independence. However, keep in mind that she may be the only parent who is volunteering and has the time to assist in the field trips — which is why the teachers are grateful. What I’m trying to convey is how important it is for you and your mother to communicate honestly with each other.

––––––––

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology

Rose is Rose

By Eugenia Last

decision. 4 stars

4 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do the best you can when it comes to earning your living. Hold your temper if someone complains or tries to make you look bad. It’s only a matter of time before your professionalism is appreciated and you are rewarded for your diplomacy and ability to deal with people. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t feel an obligation to spend on anyone looking for a handout. Invest in yourself, not frivolous, luxury items or entertainment. A business trip or attending a conference will bring you greater knowledge or help you improve your skills. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You will face someone who isn’t happy with your recent decisions. Instead of running for the hills, face things head-on. Focus on home and family and what you can do to make your personal life less stressful. 2 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll have plenty to consider before you make a financial, legal or medical decision. Don’t let anyone pressure you into doing something you aren’t sure you want to do. Bide your time until you feel you have better control. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The choices you make will determine the outcome of an encounter with an organization, government agency or institution. A power play on your part will catch whoever is challenging you off-guard, allowing you the upper hand. 5 stars

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

Peninsula Daily News

Doonesbury

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Speak your mind, especially concerning affairs of the heart. Listen to what’s being asked of you and assess whether or not you can offer what’s required. An unexpected cost will transpire if you promise to help someone who is in a financial bind. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Emotional blackmail or deceptiveness will develop at home. Don’t give in to someone who doesn’t deserve your help. Taking care of your personal papers and making changes that will give you greater control and power should be your intent. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Expect someone to be upset with you if you have neglected your responsibilities. Problems at home or when dealing with older or younger family members can develop. Overreacting or overindulgence will lead to greater uncertainty in partnerships. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A lack of sincerity can be expected from colleagues who feel you are the competition. Ask questions and, if you aren’t happy with the answers you receive, go higher up until you have sufficient information to make a

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Discuss your plans and options with someone who can make a difference to your status or career advancement. High energy and enthusiasm will help you motivate the people around you. Love is in the stars.

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Call on old friends to help you out now, recalling things you have done in the past. You can take on a lot more than you think and should be volunteering or applying for positions requiring both mental and physical skills. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your intuition will help you make the right decision regarding how to deal with colleagues and superiors. Love is on the rise, so make plans that will help you meet someone new, if you are single, or that will ensure a romantic evening with your current partner. 3 stars


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

C5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Infant Toddler Specialist in Port Angeles Full-time year round, 30 hours per week with benefits. Requires a minimum of a CDA in Infant Toddler Caregiving and experience working with children ages birth to 3. Apply online at www.olycap.org or call 360385-2571 x6337. Closes when filled. AIR COMPRESSOR New Speedaire 3 phase, upright, single stage. $800 offer. 417-5583

BLUEWATER: 19.5’ I/O. Excellent. $13,000 invested. Yours for $6,000. All new or re-built by Anchor Marine. 9hp kicker, dual batts, elec downrigger, FFinder, hyd pump, carb, fuel pump, control cables, full covers, etc. Trouble free and RTG. 360-417-2096 3+ Br., 2 bath 4 acres new hottub, fenced yard, W/D, pet neg, 12 min west P.A. $1,375 mo. $750 dep. 461-4278.

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, $600 1st, last and deposit W/D, fenced yard, No smoking, Pets OK. 477-6648 CLALLAM BAY: 3 Br., 1.5 ba, newly remodeled, fireplace, references required. $750. 417-0304. CONSIGNMENT & RUMMAGE SALE Sat., 8-3 p.m., 114 E. 6th St., Terrace Apts. Community Room, use parking lot entrance. Furniture, some antique items. Dining Room Set: Table and 6 chairs. Table is 44”W, extends to 96”L. Mission Style design, excellent condition. $550. 681-0137.

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22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

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Community Notes

Did you record TCM on Sunday, 4-32011? I am interested in finding the background music. 360-928-3577

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard Pick your ad package and rate that works for you. Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday Pay for your ad on our secure site.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

RESPONDING TO HUMAN TRAFFICKING COMMUNITY FORUM Sponsored by Forks Abuse Program and Soroptimists April 14, 2011, 4-8 p.m., 196283 Hwy 101. Leading state experts discuss human trafficking. Register/RSVP: Forks Abuse Program. 360-374-6411 The man who bumped into me at OMC at midnight on 3/25/11, call Gary. 457-0068.

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Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Young female cat, short hair, tiger stripes, green eyes, wearing collar. Found near Cherry Hill in PA. 681-2025 FOUND: Dog. Black, near Airport Rd., P.A. 461-0047 FOUND: Dog. Large, black male dog 1 mile up O’Brien Rd, PA. Leather collar, very sweet. 360-670-2292 FOUND: Dog. Terrier, peach/white, C St. area, P.A. Now at Humane Society. FOUND: Puppy. Black Lab, 3-4 mo. old, camo collar, Gales Addition area, P.A. 477-5483 LOST: Cat. Jet black male, sutures around both eyes, missing from P.A. High School area. 582-0697

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., corner of 8th and D Streets. Steamer trunk, bistro set, folding rocker, small tables, Parsons chairs, too much to list. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-? 820 Joshua St., off W. 10th St. Pottery Barn hammock, front load LG washer and dryer, furniture, tools, clothes, kids stuff, (2) Hugos, and lots more! GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-3 p.m., 316 W. 14th St. Furniture, dressers, scrapbooking supplies, toys, treadmill, bunk beds, bikes, much more. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-3 p.m., in alley at 107 E. 13th St. Rattan furniture, area rugs, plus and lg. size clothing, books, and misc. Gardiner Community Center presents a Great Garage/Plant Sale. Sat, April 30, 83 p.m., for info or space rentals, 360-797-7981 INDOOR Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-5 p.m. 50 W. Egg And I Rd., Chimacum. Womens blouses, jackets, love seat, and lots of household items. MOWING. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142

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OLDS: ‘00 Intrigue. 138K, good condition, all power. $3,500. 452-9424. Owner selling 1978 Kit 24x66 3 Br., 2 ba, new comp roof, lap siding, new appliances, remodeled bath, fireplace, clean home, great condition. Must be moved. $23,950. Contact Don Nelsen at 425-239-4689 P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409. PEDICURIST/ MANICURIST 683-3302 Professional mature woman seeks quiet shared housing 4 nights a week in exchange for elder care, pet care, light housekeeping and meal prep. References available. Call 425-387-8627 PUPPIES: Cute, cute, cute! Just turned 8 weeks. Mixed breed, must see. 1 boy brown and white, 1 girl white with black markings, 1 girl black/brindle while markings. $300. 360-477-3879 RIDING MOWER ‘03 Honda automatic, 2 cylinder, well serviced. $800. 683-1943 SALE: Happy Valley Estates, Sat., 8-4, five homes, Stampede Drive through Morgan Drive. Tools, antiques, home decor, books, teaching supplies, hobby, craft items, furniture, framed prints, cookbooks.

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31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

Personals

Friendly, talkative female, aged 22-24, willing to talk once or twice a month to an incredible male currently incarcerated at Clallam Bay Correctional Center. No long term or short term relationship-just friendly talk. Must have an available vehicle, gas expenses reimbursed. Earn $40 a visit, visit times are: Fri., Sat., Sun., Mon., 10:15-5:30. Email: csantor16@gmail.com if you are interested. Yes, I am his mother!

Caregivers Needed Friendly, cheerful, dependable people needed to assist seniors with personal and home helper services. CNA is a plus, very rewarding work. Part-time, days, evenings, weekends. Call M-F, 9-5. 360-681-2511 City of Sequim Needs 2 Seasonal Maintenance Workers. $15-$17.50 hr. DOQ. Work at Water Reclamation Facility and park. No benefits. Positions will last up to 6 mo. Flagger card required. Visit www.ci.sequim.wa.u s/jobs/index.cfm to view job description. Download application and skills checklist or pick up at City Hall. Return to Human Resources, Attention Cindy, 152 W Cedar, by Friday April 22th. Call 6813423 for more info. EOE

CNA’S AND LPN Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com Dispensing Optician Email resume to dreye@olympus.net Grandview Grocery is in need of a clerk and stocker, eves and weekends. Apply at 802 S. C St., Mon.Thurs., by 11 a.m.

PEDICURIST/ MANICURIST 683-3302

Personals

Looking for a lady height/weight proportionate, nonsmoker, sense of humor, likes the outdoors, animals and home life, who’s affectionate and caring for the right man that comes into her life. This is for a white male, 60, 6’, height/ weight proportionate that is still looking for that partner, best friend and lover to share his life with. Email response to: wildcard@olypen.co m

CAREER OPPORTUNITY SALES Immediate sales position is open at Wilder Toyota. If you are looking for a positive career change, like working with people and are income motivated, this could be for you. Whether you have sold cars or not, we have an extensive training program for your success. Joining the Wilder Team has great benefits: 401(k), medical and dental insurance, vacations and a great work schedule. Guaranteed income while you learn. Call Rick or Don for an appt. 457-8511.

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

Lost and Found

FOUND: Walkie Talkie American Legion Hall, Sequim. 681-2382

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AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

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Retirement mobile home court needs a manager. Immediate opening. For inquiries, please call 206-232-1935.

Help Wanted

Infant Toddler Specialist in Port Angeles Full-time year round, 30 hours per week with benefits. Requires a minimum of a CDA in Infant Toddler Caregiving and experience working with children ages birth to 3. Apply online at www.olycap.org or call 360385-2571 x6337. Closes when filled. BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Experienced, needed in Northern Olympic Peninsula area. Experience in AR, AP, HR, and payroll preferred. Strong knowledge base in medical billing is required. Excellent wages and benefits package. If you are interested in working for a great company, email resumes to: RustyTLyons@ gmail.com

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

RN, HOUSE SUPERVISOR Interesting opportunity to work at our friendly, professional hospital on an as needed basis. Previous experience as an acute care House Supervisor or Nursing supervisor with current RN licensure required. BS preferred. Apply: Human Resources Olympic Medical Center 939 Caroline Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Call: 360.417.7231 Fax: 360.417.7307 Email: Nbuckner@olympic medical.org EOE RNA/CNA: Lead aide. Golden Years Personal Care 452-3689 Sequim area, P-T to F-T, must know current Quickbooks, Excel, bookkeeping, accounting, inventory, and payroll. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#209/Office Pt Angeles, WA 98362

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Help Wanted

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Service Representative Port Townsend Lincare Center. Warm, caring personalities age 21+ Must lift 50 lbs frequently 120 lbs occasionally. CDL w/DOT required. 3 year clean driving record. Full time w/growth opp. $13/hr DOE excellent benefits. Resume to: jobs@lincare.com Subject line must be tagged “Port Townsend Service Rep”. www.lincare.com The Olympic Lodge Port Angeles #1 hotel on Trip Advisor is currently offering the following career opportunities: Front Desk Agent Health Insurance, Vacation plus Competitive Wages based upon experience. Room Attendants & Breakfast room Attendants Please submit your resume in person at 140 Del Guzzi Drive. WEB ADVERTISING DESIGN SPECIALIST Be a part of the Peninsula Daily News team! Fulltime. Medical and vacation benefits. Design and create internet ads to customer specification. Manage Internet ad traffic to fulfill page views and sales campaigns. Assist with site development and design for the PDN website using design patterns and layered architecture. Manage third party vertical content and relationships. Insure search optimization for WebPages. Track and analyze website traffic using Web analytical tools. Provide periodic reports to customers and managers. 2 years experience with HTML, Java Scripting. Knowledge of database using MS SQL servers and PHP/ MySQL a plus. Excellent knowledge of XML, Macromedia Flash Photoshop and Dreamweaver. Please email resume to: ann.ashley@ peninsuladaily news.com

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Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. Best Choice Lawn Care. Mowing and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/P.A. 360-683-6296 Ground Control Lawn Care. Mowing, trimming, mulch, and more. Reasonable rates, great service! Call for free estimates. 360-7975782. Ground Control Lawn Care. Handyman service. JTL Handyman services. All types of home and appliance repair and installations, Landscaping and lawn care available. No job too small, affordable prices, free estimates. Licensed, bonded, & insured contractor #JTLHAHS906Q3. Phone: 360-797-1512 E-mail: jml4455@msn.com Happy Day Cleaning. Residential, Offices, Move-Outs, or Move-Ins, Recreational Vehicles, Excellent service with a positive attitude. call 808-3017 for an estimate, Port Angeles and surrounding area. Lawn Mowing/Maintenance by Robinsnest Landscape. We are ready to maintain your lawn for the mowing season! Also have brush-hog for field mowing. Reasonable rates. 360-477-1282

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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Work Wanted

MOWING. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142 PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek. com Robinsnest Landscaping. Mowing and yard maintenance at reasonable rates! Brushhog for field mowing, also. 477-1282. Yard work, mowing, pruning, clean up, handyman, reasonable. 452-2951. Young Couple, early 60’s. available for misc gardening services, as well as hauling, gutter and deck cleaning, moss removal, seasonal cleanup, weeding, general maintenance and repair. Hard working and reliable with excellent references. 457-1213.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

ARCHITECTURALLY DESIGNED HOME Great view of the 7th fairway. Beautifully landscaped lot, new large Trex deck, pleasing floor plan and views throughout. $259,000. ML203944/260676 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTIFUL 23.5 ACRE RANCH New driveway off Hidden Highlands allows for even more privacy. Mtn views, pond, and a 2,880 sf barn, tack room and storage. Fenced and partially fenced. Possible uses include horse or livestock ranch, vineyard, corporate retreat, wildlife lookout and more. $595,000. ML250659/206063 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL CONDO IN SUNNY SEQUIM Great mountain view. 2 Br., 2 bath located in Sunland. Enjoy many amenities including golf, swimming and tennis. $179,900. ML167794. Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CLOSE TO EVERYTHING Completely remodeled 2 Br., 2 bath home in senior park. New paint, new windows and doors, new flooring, new plumbing fixtures, new cooktop. Located close to shopping, medical facilities, banks, etc. Apricot and peach trees in back yard. Large storage area behind carport. $49,900. ML260290/181807 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

COME HOME TO THE RESORT AT PORT LUDLOW! This Talbot model features custom window treatments, all appliances, custom built cherry cabinets around the hearth, cherry hardwood floors in the living room, dining room, hall way and entry. Light and bright with skylights. Huge deck for entertaining. $339,500. ML201533. Nancy Rathke 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow COME SEE ME Flexible floor plan. 2 Br., 2.75 bath, 3,400+ sf home on 2.5 beautiful private acres. Huge 42’x 28’ garage/shop with 12’ x14’ doors. Owner financing possible $245,000. ML260643. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East DOMINION TERRACE Remodeled home in 2006 with new flooring, counters, appliances, provides good views, and short walk to clubhouse. Enclosed storage in carport area, and off covered patio. Wood burning grill in patio area for outdoor cooking. HOA fees include electricity, water, sewer, trash, and cable. Pets restricted to 2 per household. $109,000. ML252350. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East DOUBLE LOT WITH VIEWS Stunning views of the Strait, Mt. Baker and the Olympic Mountains from this solid 3 bed home on two lots. Some new windows, updated electrical in the home & garage, freshly painted exterior and new gutters. Dry, unfinished basement with tons of storage, a workbench and a 3/4 bath. $199,000. ML260098 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

3 Br., 2 ba, mfg home on large P.A. city lot, open floor plan, lovely landscaping, sprinkler system, single car detached garage, partly fenced, huge patio and mtn view from yard. Many extras. $159,900. 452-9297 AMAZING VIEWS Open living spaces, great kitchen with propane fireplace and cook stove, full deck and fully fenced yard, RV parking and hookup, easy care landscaping. $372,500 ML201216/260629 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst. Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11. Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim. AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare (compare at www.medicare.gov)

135114495

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Community Notes

FORD: ‘02 Ford Explorer Sport (2 door) Silver 4X4. Diamond Point One owner, all maintenance records since purchase. V-6, automatic, 4WD, AM/FM/CD, power sunroof, power windows, power doors, key pad entry and remote locking, cruise control, AC, running boards, roof rack, privacy glass, leather, fold-flat second seats, never used carpets, Weather Tech rubber mats throughout, tow package, Toyo tires, extra hub covers, 185K miles (mostly highway). $5,600. 360-683-7075 GARAGE Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun., 9-4 p.m., 93 Madrona Way in Diamond Point. Stuff-a-bag sale! Everything must go!

LADDERS: 20ft alum ext ladder $75. Grizzly fold up ladder, $75. Both in like new condition. 457-6426. LIONS CLUB GARAGE Sale: 2,400 sf of sale at the old 2nd hand store from 9-3 p.m., Sat. and Sun. 40 Frontier St., Clallam Bay. Lots of things for men, women and kids! MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. 101 McLaughlin Road off Thornton. Electric start mower, wheelbarrow, walker, shovels, axes, rakes, bug killers too. Plus much more.

Help Wanted

5000900

BIG SALE!! Fri., April 15th, 9-2 p.m, Gardiner Community Center.

Dispensing Optician Email resume to dreye@olympus.net DOWNSIZING Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. only, turn west on 16th and C, left on D, follow green signs to 1037 W. 18th St. Some retro and antiques, microwave, coffee table, dressers, many household items, wall hangings, night stands, knickknacks, lots of stuff. DRY CREEK GRANGE FLEA MARKET Fri., 8:30-3 p.m., 3520 W. Edgewood Drive. Vendors inside and out, lunch available. DUMP TRAILER: ‘08 PJ 14’, gooseneck, 14,000 lb. GVWR, powder coated, in Sequim. $7,000. 683-7643 ESTATE SALE COLLECTIBLES 505 S. WASHINGTON ST. FRI.-SAT., 9-2 P.M. Pine table, chairs and corner hutch, end tables, gate leg table and chairs, recliner, mirrors, queen brass and white head and foot rail, dressers, queen mattress, wicker head board, twin mattress and great wood head and foot board, Feather Weight sewing machine, military dress uniform and pea coat, vintage kimono, trunks, quilts, doll and Boyd Bear collection, doll display cases, 2 Schoenhut pianos, child’s table and chair, Flow blue large teapot foo dog mount old, kitchen items, peach tree, 3 new french screen door sets and hardware (6’ and 8’), yard stuff, and more! Enter at back door. ESTATE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2591 Lower Elwha Rd. 50 years of household. glassware, furniture, guns, jewelry, clothing, tools. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FREEZER: Upright Whirlpool, 15 cf. $200. 452-5460. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m., 1404 Shirley Ct., 14th and N Streets.

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Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM


ACROSS 1 Flying group 5 Comic Johnson 9 Hyphenated dessert name 14 Half dodeca15 Liner danger 16 Hater of David, in Dickens 17 Theater giant? 18 In __: confused 19 High humor? 20 Pan? 23 Relative of -like 24 Wine bar offerings 25 Moshe Dayan’s “oxygen of the soul” 29 Guff 30 Moo chew? 33 With 44-Across, ten? 35 Change genetically 37 Former lover of Riker on “Star Trek: T.N.G.” 38 Pontiff’s wear 40 Foreshadowing 41 Service station vessel 44 See 33-Across 47 Org. whose members are concerned with lies 48 Birling roller 50 Radius, e.g. 51 San __: San Francisco Bay city 53 Airline to Copenhagen 54 Kin? 60 Centipede maker 61 Spice 62 Yes-__ question 63 Veal piccata ingredient 64 Part of Caesar’s boast 65 N.L. East squad 66 Country sound 67 Golden Fleece vessel 68 Sin in the film “Se7en” DOWN 1 Very smart 2 San __ 3 Student’s stressor

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Classified

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

Homes

EXQUISITE CUSTOM HOME Built in 2005 with a separate office/den. Exceptionally landscaped with a large deck and a private wooded backyard. Beautiful hardwood floors and a large gourmet Kitchen. Three car garage and RV parking! $314,900 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD Light, bright and comfortable best describe this one. 2 Br., toasty woodstove, great kitchen with big windows. Enjoy the private backyard with raised beds storage building. This one is a winner! $135,000. ML260600/199499 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. HOME SWEET HOME Beautifully maintained 4 Br., 2 bath, 1,980 sf home with a nearly 800 sf garage/shop. Covered porch, hardwood floors, fruit trees and more. $219,900. ML251514. Jim Newton 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company INCREDIBLE PRICE Great starter or scale down home. Conveniently located near airport for those out of town relatives’ visit. Nice and Clean 3 Br. home offers Master Br. with walkin closet and a large yard. Open floor plan allows you to enjoy company while cooking. Come and see! $132,000. ML260605/199597 Mark Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NEED A MANCAVE? Perfect starter home located about a block from Robin Hill Park and access to the discovery Trail from the park. The attached garage has been converted to a recreation room and laundry. But buyers don’t despair, there is a 2 car garage detached with room for shop and benches. There’s a freestanding wood stove to help on the cold winter nights. $154,900. ML260582. Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. FORGIVENESS IS BEST Solution: 9 letters

G T E C A  R N C G X  A E I E R  T N M D R  I P O O N  T N F I T  U H E K S  D E R O I  E L A O P  C P C A D  A E R O N  R E N ҹ H I  B E ҹ O J E  M ҹ P E R O  ҹ E M E R C By Daniel A. Finan

4 Emulate Cyrano 5 It may be reckless 6 Update mtge. terms 7 Band 8 Quaff garnished with nutmeg 9 Technique of ancient samurai 10 Some native New Yorkers 11 Afro-sporting “Mod Squad” character 12 Vacation location 13 Cries of understanding 21 Hill worker 22 Buggy relative 25 Depth-of-field setting 26 Outfit again 27 __ Gay 28 George Strait label 30 Actor’s day job? 31 SEC school that retired Peyton Manning’s number 32 Pasta al __ 34 Santa’s 21Down 36 O.K. Corral town Homes

LEVEL LOT READY TO CLEAR Large lot on cul-desac in Sunshine Acres. Community water; power and phone to property. Soils test done; conventional system. Mfg homes OK. Amenities include community beach and airstrip. $59,900. ML252265. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Panoramic saltwater, island and mountain view 3 Br. home. Overlooks Port Angeles, Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island. Borders Olympic Nat’l Park. Watch ships from your living room! Great home, great location. By appointment. Photos www.bitly.com/ myviewhome FSBO. $248,000. 360-452-8770 PRIVACY AND ELEGANCE Custom designed home with breathtaking views of the Straits and Vancouver Island on 2.5 private acres. Surrounded on every side with beautifully landscaped gardens. French doors open to brick patio and gardens. Formal dining room, sunny kitchen with nook and bay window. Exquisite craftsmanship. Totally private and peaceful setting. $438,000. ML260591. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY STUNNING VIEWS Custom built with attention to detail. 3 Br., 3 bath, and over 2,100 sf on 20 plus acres. View of the Strait, San Juans, Mt. Baker. Secluded, semi-parked out with numerous mature trees, two shops and so much more! This is the log home you’ve been waiting for. $699,000. ML251461 Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroof, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $185,000 ML145314/252226 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

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4/14/11

© 2011 Universal Uclick

E A G A R A I S N O N Z V N Y

P E P A H O T O I D L E O G E

T G E P F C C S N M N A M I Y

www.wonderword.com

R H R X E F S H R A E E E A C

E A P I C A E I A E L R S H N

L H T A P U S C D R D I A S E

E R E M I T S E T G I N F S M

N B O N D E F E N D G T U E E

T C A F K O O L R E V O Y I L

D I S M I S S L N E S S E L C

4/14

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Affect, Amend, Appease, Bond, Care, Change, Charity, Clemency, Compassion, Condone, Correct, Defend, Discharge, Dismiss, Embrace, Emotional, Enjoy, Excuse, Exempt, Fact, Forget, Gratitude, Grip, Heal, Heart, Help, Hope, Ignore, Kindness, Lessen, Lies, Life, Mercy, Move, Overlook, Pardon, Path, Peace, Relent, Remission, Remit, Spare, Understanding Yesterday’s Answer: Fairways

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FIRTD ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

RAAVL (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 It’s usually uplifting 42 Diced and served in a mushroom cream sauce 43 “Don’t look at me!” 45 Hall of fame 46 Ally Financial Inc., formerly 49 City on the Rhone

Homes

51

Homes

For Sale By Owner Zoned commercial, 609 S. Peabody, P.A. $110,000 425-485-4326 SWEEPING WATER VIEW Well-built home with mother-in-law suite that currently rents for $675 per month. Home features great location, 4 Br., 3 baths, huge master Br., southern exposure and fantastic water view! $259,900 ML260589/99521 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

WOW! WHAT A VIEW That is what you will say when you walk through the front door of this 3 Br. 2 bath home on 1.25 organic acres. Watch the wildlife and the changing weather while sitting in your warm sunroom. Peace and quiet end of the road setting, fruit and nut trees, greenhouse, 24x36 shop. $349,000. Seq. 360-504-2504.

THIS HOME COULD BE YOURS Located in desirable Cresthaven neighborhood and across from the college, this 3 Br. home is in great condition. The floor plan flows well for today’s busy lifestyles. Spend time on your hobbies, not your house $249,900. ML260604. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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‘U’ IS FOR UNIQUELY SECURE Previous owner said “safety first” and installed fire sprinklers throughout the home. Home has 3 year old roof, a beautifully maintained and fenced backyard with storage and vast mountain view. Access to beach, golf and equestrian facilities. $217,000. ML252157 Eileen Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. CALL 253549-3345 PORT ANGELES lot at 222 W. Park Ave. Half acre + CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water. $69,000. Owner financing.

UNBELIEVABLE VALUE Look what you get: 3 homes, 2 parcels, 5.03 acres close to town! Main house is geodesic dome style with 3 Br., 3 bath, large kitchen and living areas plus huge finished daylight basement. Two additional houses are 4 Br., 2 bath each plus kitchenette. Conference center, family retreat, bed and breakfast? Plus large 4 car garage. $299,000. ML260124. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9189 WON’T LAST Excellent floor plan, vaulted ceilings, 3 Br., 2 baths, 2 car garage, 1,811 sf on a quiet dead-end street in a great neighborhood of newer homes. $254,900. ML260690. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Manufactured Homes

Owner selling 1978 Kit 24x66 3 Br., 2 ba, new comp roof, lap siding, new appliances, remodeled bath, fireplace, clean home, great condition. Must be moved. $23,950. Contact Don Nelsen at 425-239-4689

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Lots/ Acreage

BEAUTIFUL DIAMOND VISTA Looking for a couple of prime acres nestled in the foothills for your dream house? Don’t miss this 2.53 acre parcel in Diamond Vista Estates! This water view lot will accommodate a variety of house plans perfectly. In the country with a close to town feel. $130,000. ML242153. Dan Gase 417-2804 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT HOME For the equestrian lovers or those who prefer the extra privacy. Very level 2.49 acre parcel with plenty of elbow room. Private and beautiful grounds. Friends can bring their RV and camp in comfort. Fruit trees, cedars, plenty of room for dogs or other pets. Shop building, too. $225,000. ML260001. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

4/14/11

51 Jerk 52 Stare master? 54 Ratatouille, for one 55 Doll’s word 56 Did some selling out 57 Mashhad is its second-largest city 58 Airing 59 Intrusive 60 PC key

54

YTETWN Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: Yesterday’s

Commercial

GREAT OPPORTUNITY For purchasing a prime commercial property. 2 contiguous vacant lots bordering very busy Race St. Race St. is one of the main thoroughfares in Port Angeles, traveled by locals and tourists for year round exposure. This property has many permitted uses. $195,000. ML251067 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY MINI STORAGE 12 unit mini storage in downtown Sequim. Nine units are 10x22, two units are 12x22, and one unit is 11x22. Great opportunity for someone who has entirely too much stuff of their own and is willing to rent out the spaces they do not need for themselves. $153,000. ML251173. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

(Answers tomorrow) MINUS COYOTE LENGTH Jumbles: BLUSH Answer: Saving your pennies could be considered this — “CENTSIBLE”

64

Lots/ Acreage

PERFECT GET-AWAY 5.38 private acres close to Freshwater Bay and Salt Creek Rec. All utilities in and paid for. Includes 32’ travel trailer. $95,000. ML260649 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. STUNNING VIEWS OF DISCOVERY BAY Awesome building lot in Diamond Point, community water available, partial mountain view, paved streets, protective CC&R’s, beach access and more. $153,000. ML260298/182353 Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East TEAM TOPPER Brand new garage built in 2006, adjacent to airport, residential site ready to build on. Water, septic, electric, cable and telephone installed, 12x10 room with loft inside garage. $115,000. ML26644/250356 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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LITRLH

Houses

BLUE MTN: 2 Br., 2 bath on 5 ac, garage, nice area, privacy, pet ok, n/s, $950 + dep. 452-2988.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. upstairs, in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540.

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, $600 1st, last and deposit W/D, fenced yard, No smoking, Pets OK. 477-6648 CLALLAM BAY: 3 Br., 1.5 ba, newly remodeled, fireplace, references required. $750. 417-0304.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. RENTALS NEEDED Tenants Inquiring About Homes 2 & 3 Bedroom $900 - $1500

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $395$500, 2 Br. $514 + util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St. #3, P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423.

Call: Terry James for management information.

360-417-2810 More Properties at www.jarentals.com

McHugh Rentals Apt 2 Br.,1 ba. $650 mchughrents.com 360-460-4089 P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267 P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409. P.A.: 1 Br., 1 bath, 1 car gar., small yard, nice neighborhood. $475. References, avail. May. 504-2599 or 775-4563. P.A.: Over 950 sf, 1 & 2 Br. avail. Now accepting pets. 360-452-4524 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113. SEQUIM: New 2 Br., 1 bath centrally located apartments. $750 includes W/S/G. 683-3339

Lakefront Condo 2 Br., 1.5 bath, wash/dryer, fireplace, boat slip, dock. $950 month w/ lease. 461-4890. P.A.: 1 Br. in quiet neighborhood, freshly painted, W/D, free cable, very nice, no smoking/pets. $700 mo. plus deposit. 457-3887 P.A.: 3 Br., 2.5 bath beauty. 2 car, yard, location. No pets, non-negotiable. $1,200. 452-9458.

Houses

SEQUIM: 3+ Br., 2 bath dbl wide on part fenced half acre near schools. N/S, good dog OK. $795 + electric. 683-1179. Pictures on www.olypenhomes.co m

Appliances

FREEZER: Upright Whirlpool, 15 cf. $200. 452-5460.

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $420/mo. 797-1245. Professional mature woman seeks quiet shared housing 4 nights a week in exchange for elder care, pet care, light housekeeping and meal prep. References available. Call 425-387-8627 Room for rent. Pvt. bathroom, kitchen privileges, quiet nice area 10 minutes from Sequim. No drugs, must have a job. First / and one half months rent to start. 460-7301. SEQUIM: Room for rent. $400. 808-4758

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Commercial Space

OFFICE / RETAIL Excellent Port Angeles location (KONP Bldg, 721 E. First St). Call for details 457-1450. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 P.A.: Office/retail/storage. 4,400 sf, 50¢/ sf. All/part. 457-5678 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 SEQUIM: 2 buildings, Hwy. 101, next to Sunny Farms, great location. 808-3953.

P.A.: Dbl lot, remodel, 5’ chain link, 2 Br., 2 ba, 24x24 gar., $925. 1st, last, dep. 360-452-1992 P.A.: Furnished 2 or 3 Br. Weekly or monthly. www.pacr.biz 360-417-1277

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Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

P.A.: 4 Br., 1.75 ba, 2 story, on cul-de-sac, close to bus. $1,000, deposit. 460-3032.

Houses

3+ Br., 2 bath 4 acres new hottub, fenced yard, W/D, pet neg, 12 min west P.A. $1,375 mo. $750 dep. 461-4278.

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JOYCE: 2 Br. cottage, $850 plus dep. Util. & DirecTV incl No pets/ smoke. 928-9705.

COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, $600, $600 dep., no pets. 452-3423

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71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, side-byside, ice maker and water, 26 cf, white, like new. $399. 417-0826

Furniture

Complete queen size bed set. Includes carved wood headboard, footboard, new Serta mattress used only occasionally as guest bed. $225. 504-4205. Dining Room Set: Table and 6 chairs. Table is 44”W, extends to 96”L. Mission Style design, excellent condition. $550. 681-0137. DINING TABLE Granite and oak dining set, seats 6, has one leaf extension, great shape. $950. 457-3078 DINING TABLE Solid oak, nice shape, 4 chairs. $300/obo 452-6439 FURNITURE SET Indoor/Outdoor Black Rattan Red Upholstery Set. 7’ couch, 2 oversize chairs, 2 ottomans, coffee table with glass cover. 5 pillows. Purchased last year for $1,750. Selling for $850. Call Bill at 360-452-5983 MATTRESS: Sterns & Foster queen size mattress and box spring, firm, under a yr. old. $500. 457-3672 MISC: 6 dining room chairs, like new, beautiful fruit and floral fabric, $300. Round pedestal table with same pattern, $50. Walnut pew bench, 4’x6’, with carved ends, $150. Beveled glass table top, 3.5’x6’, $100. Computer shelf w/compartments, $25. Ceramic light, SW design, $25. Spanish iron cross, 2.5’x4’, $45. 360-379-6688 MISC: Antique oak 4 drawer filing cabinet, ca. 1900-1920, $375. Mahogany sideboard, 1950s, 3 drawers, 3 cabinets, raised front panel design, $490. Landscape mirror, gold frame, beveled glass, 49”x35”, $250. OBO, delivery available, all items excellent condition. 681-5326. MISC: Large dining table with 4 chairs, light blond finish, $135. 2 matching coffee tables, 1 large $40, 1 small $30. Very nice, must see to appreciate. 681-4429 MISC: Sofa, love seat set with coffee table, clean, $150 all. Queen size bed, almost new, $200. 457-6043


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

C7

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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advertise call PENINSULA To360-452-8435 or DAILY NEWS 1-800-826-7714

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anthonystreetop@gmail.com 24 HR Emergency Don’t Wait Until it’s Too Late

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#JKDIRKD942NG

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Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

contact@jkdirtworks.com

035075404

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JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

MOLE/PRUNING

145116562

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025073138

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Specializing in Trees

AS LITTLE AS

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LIC

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360

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LANDSCAPING

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945036615

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914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

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360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

expires: June 17, 2011

0A5100336

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0A5100969

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ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


C8

ClassifiedAutomotive

Thursday, April 14, 2011

High-mileage cars can mix oil Dear Doctor: I am switching to a high-mileage synthetic blend 5-30 oil in my 1999 Ford F-150 with about 145,000 miles. When I need to add a quart of oil between changes, can I safely use regular 5-30 oil? I have a few quarts of regular that I hate to waste if they can be used in a limited amount with the synthetic blend. Paul Dear Paul: The rule of thought about mixing oil is old school. Adding a different brand, viscosity, type regular, synthetic or synthetic blend will not cause any harm on vehicles with high mileage (70,000 miles and higher). On vehicles still under factory warranty, you do have to stay with the factory recommendation for oil viscosity and type. Highmileage oil does have a different makeup with an additive package for engines with wear. I do not recommend the use of high-mileage oil on engines with fewer than 70,000 miles, unless the engine has internal problems, such as leaks and burns oil.

Performance chips worth it? Dear Doctor: I own a 2005 Cadillac STS, 3.6L V6 with 75,000 miles. I have been the owner for three years and purchased it certified used with 14,000 miles. Although the 22-23 mpg average I am getting is acceptable, I

72

Furniture

Queen-size wall bed with side cabinet. Excellent condition. $1,500. Can e-mail pictures. 385-6000.

73

would like your take on Damato performance chip products. Are there any pitfalls? Also, the dealer has replaced the timing chains (at 62,000) in this engine. I have always felt that the shifting in this drivetrain has never been consistently smooth since I bought it. The dealer said that all updates are present and that the car is operating correctly. Donald Dear Donald: Most aftermarket performance chips bring out the best driving experience for the driver. The performance chip or computer download can reprogram automatic transmission shift points and firmness, ignition timing and lower coolant fan temperature operation. I have downloads in all my vehicles, including my trucks. Other options to consider with the computer performance upgrade would be a low-temperature thermostat, performance low-restriction exhaust and coldair intake system. The only drawback is premium gas is required

General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: $150 full cord. 457-4042 or 808-4328.

AIR COMPRESSOR New Speedaire 3 phase, upright, single stage. $800 offer. 417-5583

MISC: 300 cedar fencing, 6’x6”, $1.50 ea. Aluminum planks for scaffolding, (2) 10’, (2) 8’, $200. 400 bricks, 4x6x12, 50 ea. Crab pot puller plus davit, 4 hp Honda, $350. Motorcycle boots size 9, $25. Chest guard, $15. 477-6188.

BOWFLEX ELITE Like brand new, only used 3 hours, paid $1,000. Asking $649/ obo. 457-7311.

MISC: Porter cable Hinge butt template, $100. Bostich nailer and 30,000 staples, $99. 452-4820.

DOORS: Used prehung metal, 2’8”, insulated. $30-$40 ea. 808-1902.

RIDING MOWER ‘03 Honda automatic, 2 cylinder, well serviced. $800. 683-1943

DUMP TRAILER: ‘08 PJ 14’, gooseneck, 14,000 lb. GVWR, powder coated, in Sequim. $7,000. 683-7643

STAIR LIFT: Acorn. New, $8,000, asking $1,000. Hinged bottom rail, 2 carriages, set up for tri-level, easy convert to 1 flight. All manuals, lots of extra parts. 683-9394

73

General Merchandise

FILE CABINETS: Four drawer legal size file cabinets, black, in excellent condition. $100. Contact Al at 683-2429 FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-477-8832 FIREWOOD: $130 cord. 477-3243. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com GENERATOR: Honda, 2,000i, excellent condition. $500 firm. 504-2113 GLUCOSE METER: Ultra 2 One Touch. 250 lances, 1000 test strips, Penlet, meter. Value $1,200 sell for $400. 681-7076 between 10 a.m-2 p.m. LADDERS: 20ft alum ext ladder $75. Grizzly fold up ladder, $75. Both in like new condition. 457-6426. MINI LATHE: 7X10 precision. Works Great, $400. Call for details. 808-0864.

System-One Aluminum Ladder Rack for 6’ pickup bed. $300. 360-683-0033. UTILITY TRAILER ‘07 33’, tandem axel g.n., deck length 25’, 14K lbs GVWR, 5’ spring loaded pop up, dove tail with 5’ ramps. $4,500. 452-5457, 808-3899 WANTED: Usable building materials, scrap lumber, appliances, etc. We are building a mini house so if you have something we can take off your hands, please email n_knoles@hotmail.com with description and a contact number. WHEELCHAIR Electric, Pride Z Chair, 1 yr. old, new batteries, great condition, was $5,600 new. Sell for $2,000. 457-3887

74

Home Electronics

75

76

Musical

GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200/obo. “Estrada” handmade acoustic guitar from Paracho, Mex., red with black accent, comes with soft case, $100/obo. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $200/ obo. All in new condition, great sound! 481-8955, 477-0903 Please leave msg PIANO: Grand Piano Company, small upright with matching bench, good cond. $395/obo. 360-344-3243

76

Sporting Goods

BIKE: Specialized Hard Rock, like new, extras. $375. 775-2792 CANOE: 17’ Grumman aluminum square stern with three adjustable paddles, Alaska veteran. Old but very strong. $500. 457-9999 FLY TYING EQUIP. Includes manuals, vice, hooks, bobbins, threads, feathers and all, $1,000 value. $500/obo. 683-8437, leave msg.

GUN SHOW

SEQUIM PRAIRIE GRANGE April 23-24 Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3 Admission $5 Family $7 Food Available Setup 4/22 6-9 p.m. Tables $25 day Both days $35 Tables: Don Roberts 457-1846 Donr@olypen.com

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Rapping sound from engine Dear Doctor: I own a 2004 Chevy Tahoe Z71 with the 8100 Vortec engine. It’s been well maintained and has 55,000 miles on it. Recently, I brought it to the dealership after it began making a loud rapping sound coming from the top part of the engine. The dealership diagnosed the noise as coming from the lifters. To repair it would be quite expensive. Do you think the motor could seize on me if I ignore the problem? Are there cheaper alternatives to a major engine repair? Brendan Dear Brendan: At 55,000 miles with the large 8.1-liter V-8 engine, lifter failure is rare. The engine should not fail or seize. I would suggest a second opinion. You can also upgrade to full-synthetic oil that reduces engine moving part friction. To replace the noisy lifter is not a major expense if needed. I would recommend the repair if you plan to keep the vehicle.

––––––––

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Sporting Goods

GOLF: PING K-15 driver, $175 .Sun Mountain speed cart, $100. 681-5323. HAND GUN: CZ-97B, .45 auto, new in box. Blued (2) 10-round magazines. $650. 461-7647 MISC: New black composite stock for Springfield M1A (M14), $85. New Nikon scope 3x9x40 BDC, $275. M1A scope mount, $80. 452-4803 PISTOL: Ruger SR9 semi automatic, carrying case, manual, box of ammo, like new condition. $475 firm. 460-9080. TREX: 750 multi track street bike. $185 or trade for good off road mountain bike. 461-2788 WANTED: Gun parts, reloading items, ammo. 379-6519.

78A

Car of the Week

in most cases.

THE AUTO DOC Junior

Peninsula Daily News

Garage Sales Central P.A.

CONSIGNMENT & RUMMAGE SALE Sat., 8-3 p.m., 114 E. 6th St., Terrace Apts. Community Room, use parking lot entrance. Furniture, some antique items. ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-3 p.m., 318 Hillcrest Drive, above high school off Peabody. Bed, dining set, patio set, freezers, piano, lots of misc. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-3 p.m., in alley at 107 E. 13th St. Rattan furniture, area rugs, plus and lg. size clothing, books, and misc. GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-3 p.m., 316 W. 14th St. Furniture, dressers, scrapbooking supplies, toys, treadmill, bunk beds, bikes, much more. HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN PRESCHOOL Rummage Sale Fri. April 15 Sat. April 16 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 301 Lopez

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

Home/office moving sale. Fri.-Sat., 4/154/16, 8-4 p.m. 519 S. Peabody Street, P.A. Desk with hutch, glass-top table, printers, rug, colonial canopy four-poster bed, fireproof filing cabinet, clothing, books, tapes, toys, a bit of everything. Call 360-452-9519 for photos.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

AMAZING SALE Fil Bygolly’s Affordable, fun decor. Wed. 10-5, Thurs., Fri., Sat., 10-4, Sun. noon-4. 8th & L, P.A.

BUILDERS’ SURPLUS SALE & TOOL SWAP Saturday, April 16 Noon to 3 p.m. Clallam Fairgrounds Sheep Barn Bargains on Surplus Building Materials. Donations of “sellable” items from the public welcome. Call NPBA 452-8160 info@npba.info DOWNSIZING Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. only, turn west on 16th and C, left on D, follow green signs to 1037 W. 18th St. Some retro and antiques, microwave, coffee table, dressers, many household items, wall hangings, night stands, knickknacks, lots of stuff. DRY CREEK GRANGE FLEA MARKET Fri., 8:30-3 p.m., 3520 W. Edgewood Drive. Vendors inside and out, lunch available. ESTATE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 2591 Lower Elwha Rd. 50 years of household. glassware, furniture, guns, jewelry, clothing, tools.

78B

2011 BMW X3 BASE PRICE: $36,750 for non-turbo model; $41,050 for turbo model. AS TESTED: $53,105. TYPE: Front-engine, all-wheel-drive, five-passenger, compact crossover sport utility vehicle. ENGINE: 3-liter, dual overhead cam, TwinPower Turbo, inline six-cylinder. MILEAGE: 19 mpg (city), 26 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 130 mph. LENGTH: 183 inches. WHEELBASE: 110.6 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 4,222 pounds. BUILT AT: Spartanburg, S.C. OPTIONS: Premium package (includes garage door opener, auto-dimming mirrors, lumbar support, panoramic moonroof, interior light package) $3,450; technology package (includes navigation system, parking sensors, rearview camera, real time traffic info) $3,200; sport activity package (includes aluminum satin roof rails, sport automatic transmission, sport steering wheel with paddles) $1,250; double-spoke light alloy wheels $600; Silver Mineral metallic paint $550; heated front seats $500; keyless remote entry $500; power rear liftgate $500; Sirius satellite radio with one-year subscription $350; heated steering wheel $190. DESTINATION CHARGE: $875. The Associated Press

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-? 820 Joshua St., off W. 10th St. Pottery Barn hammock, front load LG washer and dryer, furniture, tools, clothes, kids stuff, (2) Hugos, and lots more! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., corner of 8th and D Streets. Steamer trunk, bistro set, folding rocker, small tables, Parsons chairs, too much to list.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

ESTATE SALE COLLECTIBLES 505 S. WASHINGTON ST. FRI.-SAT., 9-2 P.M. Pine table, chairs and corner hutch, end tables, gate leg table and chairs, recliner, mirrors, queen brass and white head and foot rail, dressers, queen mattress, wicker head board, twin mattress and great wood head and foot board, Feather Weight sewing machine, military dress uniform and pea coat, vintage kimono, trunks, quilts, doll and Boyd Bear collection, doll display cases, 2 Schoenhut pianos, child’s table and chair, Flow blue large teapot foo dog mount old, kitchen items, peach tree, 3 new french screen door sets and hardware (6’ and 8’), yard stuff, and more! Enter at back door. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m., 1404 Shirley Ct., 14th and N Streets.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

BIG SALE!! Fri., April 15th, 9-2 p.m, Gardiner Community Center. GARAGE Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun., 9-4 p.m., 93 Madrona Way in Diamond Point. Stuff-a-bag sale! Everything must go!

78E

79

Garage Sales Sequim

Gardiner Community Center presents a Great Garage/Plant Sale. Sat, April 30, 83 p.m., for info or space rentals, 360-797-7981 MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. 101 McLaughlin Road off Thornton. Electric start mower, wheelbarrow, walker, shovels, axes, rakes, bug killers too. Plus much more. SALE: Happy Valley Estates, Sat., 8-4, five homes, Stampede Drive through Morgan Drive. Tools, antiques, home decor, books, teaching supplies, hobby, craft items, furniture, framed prints, cookbooks.

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

INDOOR Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-5 p.m. 50 W. Egg And I Rd., Chimacum. Womens blouses, jackets, love seat, and lots of household items. LIONS CLUB GARAGE Sale: 2,400 sf of sale at the old 2nd hand store from 9-3 p.m., Sat. and Sun. 40 Frontier St., Clallam Bay. Lots of things for men, women and kids!

79

Wanted To Buy

BOAT MOTORS WANTED Running or not, cheap or free. 808-7018. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs and drives. $750. 477-2202 WANTED: Farm tractor attachments and haul trailer. 477-6098 WANTED: Oneida stainless steel flatware pieces, in pattern Brahms. 683-2139

Wanted To Buy

WANTED: White canopy for ‘99 Ranger, 7’ bed. 477-1576.

82

Pets

PUPPIES: Blue heeler, 3 males. $300. 452-8713 PUPPIES: Registered Chocolate Labradors, 7 weeks old, first shot and wormed. $400 males, $450 females. 457-0720

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

TREE PLANTING TIME! Locally grown 1’-3’ Doug Fir, Hemlock, W Red Cedar, Noble. $5-$20. 681-8180.

82

Pets

EASTER PUPPIES Parson Russell Terriers, registered, shots, etc. $600 ea. Reserve for $200. 808-0379

PUPPY: Pembroke Welsh Corgi, 8 week old female, all shots, dewormed. $325. 360-640-5417

83

Farm Animals

COWS: (2) Curved long horn cows, and a 60 day old black angus calf. $1,500 for all. 452-0837. HAY: Good quality grass hay, $5.50 bale. 461-5804.

84

Horses/ Tack

SADDLE: Barely used, 17” saddle, we sold the horse! $200/obo. 683-7297.

JAGD TERRIER: 1 yr old male, AKA German hunting dog. AKC registered, shots, healthy, needs to hunt. $300/obo. 360-645-2238 PEKINGESE/ SHIH-TZU PUPPIES (2) males, ready to go, need good home. $350 ea. 452-9553. PUPPIES! Golden Retriever/Lab/Shepherd Mix. 6 weeks, adorable! First shots, dewormed, very socialized. $250 F, $200 M. Mother is AKC Golden. See online ad for pics. Call to make appt! 360-775-8423 PUPPIES: Cute, cute, cute! Just turned 8 weeks. Mixed breed, must see. 1 boy brown and white, 1 girl white with black markings, 1 girl black/brindle while markings. $300. 360-477-3879

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

93

Marine

19’ Lightening sailboat, full sails. Teak woodwork, new seats, extended tiller arm, trailer. Good condition, and newly laminated bottom. Must sell, moving. $2,000/obo. 253-245-4531

14406509

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS 2003 MAZDA PROTEGE PR5 HATCHBACK

2005 NISSAN SENTRA 1.8S SPECIAL ED. SDN

2005 TOYOTA 4RUNNER SR5 4X4

2005 DODGE NEON SXT SEDAN

2.0L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, SUNROOF, ROOF RACK, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, LEATHER, CRUISE, TILT, AC, 6 CD, DUAL FRT & SIDE ARIBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $9,795! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 58K MILES! 1 OWNER, STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

1.8L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, KEYLESS ENTRY, ROCKFORD FOSGATE 6 CD, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $9,405! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! LOADED W/OPTIONS! PRICE REDUCED! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.0L VVT-i V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, TOW PKG, ROOF RACK, RUNNING BOARDS, TINTED WINDOWS, 3RD ROW SEATING, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, ALPINE MP3 CD W/iPOD CTRLS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $23,060! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! CLEAN CARFAX! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.0L 4 CYL, AUTO, AFTERMARKET ALLOYS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PIONEER CD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $7,390! ONLY 68K MILES! EXTRA CLEAN! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

$8,995

GRAY MOTORS

$6,995

GRAY MOTORS

$19,995

GRAY MOTORS

$5,995

GRAY MOTORS

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

93

Marine

ARIMA: ‘96 17’ SeaRanger. 90 hp Johnson V-4 Oceanrunner, canvas top, VHF radio, compass, depth/fish finder, USCG safety package, Shoreland’r Trailer. Excellent condition. $12,900. 360-681-2638

BLUEWATER: 19.5’ I/O. Excellent. $13,000 invested. Yours for $6,000. All new or re-built by Anchor Marine. 9hp kicker, dual batts, elec downrigger, FFinder, hyd pump, carb, fuel pump, control cables, full covers, etc. Trouble free and RTG. 360-417-2096

94

HONDA: ‘07 Shadow 750, 900 miles. $5,400. 460-4126. HONDA: ‘82 GL-500 Silverwing. 30K miles, w/extras. $950 457-0049, 775-5814 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. QUAD: ‘04 Kawasaki 700 KFX. Very good shape. $3,200/obo. 461-2056 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 YAMAHA: ‘06 Virago 250. Garaged, 9.8K. $1,995 firm. 797-4009 YAMAHA: ‘07 TTR125 LE. Big wheel, electric start, excellent condition. $1,600. 681-2594

95 FOR SALE BY OWNER BOAT SHOW & MARINE SWAP Saturday April 16th The show will feature privately owned boats in the water and on trailers and is open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kayaks, Dinghies, Sailboats, Power boats Register your vessel or to sign up for the Flea Market call 360-437-0513. FREE: 27’ fiberglass hull. 460-9680. HEWES: 16.3’ Sea Runner. Fully equip. $14,000. 457-4049. HEWESCRAFT: ‘97 17’ 90 hp Johnson, 6 hp Evinrude, both run good, ready to fish. $8,500. 360477-5650, 452-9950. Livingston Model 12T Resort, seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer, extras, show room condition. $6,800. 681-8761 OWENS: 16’ I/O, 125 hp Mercury motor, needs work. $700/ obo. 681-0828. RUBBER BOAT: 9’ Sea Eagle, with accessories. 3142 Undi Rd., Forks. $450. 360-374-5812. TOLLY: ‘66 38’. Twin 318s, 200 hrs., loaded. Trade for 20’ alum. $25,000. 360-770-2410

94

Motorcycles

DIRT BIKES: ‘05 Suzuki 110, $900. ‘06 CRF 70, $1000. Both in excellent condition. 461-6000 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. Will trade for sidecar bike/small truck. $4,800. 457-4020. HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘11 Soft Tail Deluxe. Pearl blue, lots of chrome, bags, windshield, never driven, must sell due to health. $19,000/obo. 360-681-4245

HARLEY: ‘03 FLSTFI Fat Boy Custom. Only 3,100 mi., $38,000 invested. Just a few custom features; Harley custom paint set, Thunder Star chrome wheels, D&D Slash Cut exhaust system, Headwins custom headlights with turn signals, Lepera custom seat, chrome passenger back rest, custom foot board, custom windshield (easy removable), leather bag kit, leathers, helmets, and more. All goes. Never outside on a rainy day, must see. $13,900. Call Jim at 360-379-3646 HARLEY: ‘06 Soft Tail Deluxe, special edition, 123rd of 150, 1450cc, fully dressed, immaculate, always garaged, never in rain, in parades and won lots of awards. $17,000/obo. 360-808-3444 HD: ‘96 Ultra classic. 20,657 mi., stored in garage. $7,500. 360-374-5755 HONDA: ‘03 Shadow 600cc. Saddlebags, 2,400 miles, showroom quality, stored in heated area. Health forces sale. $3,500. 385-2065 HONDA: ‘04 CRF50. New training wheels, kids helmet, never used. $800. 417-9531

FREE GARAGE SALE KIT With your

2 DAY

Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Motorcycles

Recreational Vehicles

2001 5th Wheel 36 ' Cardinal by Forest River This was our home on wheels. 3 axle, 3 slides, hydraulic disc brakes, Air Cushion hitch, two air conditioners, inverter, Lots of extras. $26,000. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ Jayco. Big slide, sleeps 6-8, barely used, in great shape. Priced to sell at $10,900. 461-9054.

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 36’ Lakota. Stored inside, very nice inside and out, king bed, 3 slides, built for year around living, lots of storage, supreme 84 mo. extended warranty, interested in trade for motor home, more pics at elgreengos@hotmail.com NADA MSRP is $50,974. Offers welcome. $35,330. 683-7411 5TH WHEEL: Terry. $1,500. 808-5722

33’

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Coachmen. 12’ slide, rear kitchen, A/C, a must see. $8,900. 452-4132 5TH WHEEL: ‘98 29’ Alpenlite. Non-smokers, great cond. $14,500. 460-9680.

5TH WHEEL: ‘99 25’ Artic Fox. $10,850. This particular fifth wheel is heavily insulated and ideal for the great northwest. Rv cover included. Please call for more information. 360-732-7540 MOTOR HOME: ‘00 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft. 3 slides, 6 speed Allison trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner stovetop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table,light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, 6 KW generator, leveling sys, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k) gently used, non smokers. $108,000/obo 360-683-3887

MOTOR HOME: 2002 Newmar Kountry Star Class A Diesel 37' 59,000 miles, Generator, Leveling System, 2 Slideouts, Backup Camera, New Tires, W/D, Queen Bed, No Pets, Non-Smoking. Must See. Only $59,500. Bill 360-301-5735 MOTOR HOME: ‘77 Chinook. New tires, shocks, muffler, other upgrades. $3,200/obo 457-1457, call after 1 p.m. TRAILER: ‘08 26’ Komfort Ridgecrest. Original owner. http://sites.google.co m/site/mmc2retire/ $16,900 253-359-4375 TRAILER: ‘02 25’ Layton. Excellent condition. Call for details. $8,500. 928-2404, evenings TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Arctic Fox. Silver Fox edition, aluminum super structure, 12’ tip-out, new cond., stored under cover. $19,000. 417-1151. TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $12,500. 477-3695.

95

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘87 29’ Regal. Great shape, air, awning. See to appreciate! $3,500. 360-460-1029

97

4 Wheel Drive

CADILLAC ‘04 ESCALADE ALL WD 6.0 V8, auto, dual air and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, AM/FM CD stacker, navigation system, power sunroof, rear DVD, leather interior with 3rd seat, premium alloy wheels with new tires and 4 studded snow tires, tow package, remote entry and much more! Expires 4-1611. VIN#310625. $16,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEV: ‘94 Blazer Silverado 4WD. Very good cond., 5.7L, auto, ABS, all power, tinted, air, tow pkg., luggage carrier, 177K $3,800. 457-8917. CHEV: ‘94 pickup. Ext. cab, lifted wheels/tires, call for more info. $5,000/ obo. 461-4665.

DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $26,995. 971-226-0002 DODGE: ‘99 Ram 2500. Cummins turbo diesel, 47,400 mi. $17,800. 379-0575. FORD ‘03 ESCAPE XLT 4X4 3.0 liter DOHC V6, auto, alloy wheels, tow package, roof rack, keyless entry, privacy glass, sunroof, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, air, 6 CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,990! This little SUV has what it takes to get you there and back again! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘01 F150. Gettin’ right with God. Crewcab Lariat. Tow pkg, 4.6L, auto, hard tonneau cover, bedliner. Must sell. $9,800. 457-4185. FORD: ‘02 F150 XLT Triton V8. Extended cab, 4 door, 4x4, bedliner, storage box, tow pkg, 100,925 miles, great shape inside/out. $11,995. 360-385-3579

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘86 F350 Crew cab. Utility box. $1,500. 460-5765. FORD: ‘92 F150. 302 V8, runs great. $1,400. 360-970-2877 FORD: 97 Expedition XLT. 7 pass, power options. $3,990. 461-2145/417-3063 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $5,500. 460-9323. GMC: ‘83 Jimmy 4WD. $500. 460-9776 GMC: ‘98 Jimmy. Super clean and everything works. 30K on crate motor, 130K total miles. Super clean. Power locks, windows, mirrors, seat. Runs/looks great! AC, moonroof, cruise, new brakes. $5,295. 452-6611.

JEEP: ‘09 Jeep Commander Sport 4x4. 23,549 miles, V6 (better fuel economy than the V8), full time four wheel drive stability/traction control, front and side airbags, CD player with built-in Sirius radio, tow package. $19,499 305-915-0432 JEEP: ‘86 Comanche PU. 86K miles, recent tune up. $1,900. 582-9701. KIA ‘10 SPORTAGE LX V6 2.7 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, side airbags, alloy wheels, luggage rack, privacy glass, only 12,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, super clean 1 owner, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. Expires 5/7/11. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com LANDROVER: ‘65 88. 250 Chevy 6 cyl, ready for restoration. $2,500/obo. 360-643-2056 NISSAN ‘01 FRONTIER CREW CAB SE 4X4 OFFROAD 3.3 liter V6, 5 speed manual transmission, alloy wheels, good rubber, running boards, roof rack, bedliner, tow package, keyless entry, privacy glass, power windows, door locks and mirrors, leather seats, cruise, tilt, air, 6 CD stereo, dual front airbags. Only 68,000 miles! Hard to find 5 speed! Stop by Gray Motors today! $11,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘02 Ford Explorer Sport (2 door) Silver 4X4. Diamond Point One owner, all maintenance records since purchase. V-6, automatic, 4WD, AM/FM/CD, power sunroof, power windows, power doors, key pad entry and remote locking, cruise control, AC, running boards, roof rack, privacy glass, leather, fold-flat second seats, never used carpets, Weather Tech rubber mats throughout, tow package, Toyo tires, extra hub covers, 185K miles (mostly highway). $5,600. 360-683-7075 FORD: ‘08 F350 LARIAT DIESEL. 4x4 crew cab, dually, 23K mi., new cond., leather interior, dual heaters and heated seats, auto, air, power rear windows, door locks, seats, mirrors, windows, tilt keyless entry, cruise, tow pkg., alloy wheels, moonroof, tinted, adj. pedals, deluxe stereo, limited slip rear end, plus $3,000 aftermarket accesor. $36,750. 452-3200, 452-3272

CHEV ‘07 UPLANDER LS EXTENDED MINIVAN 3.9 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, OnStar ready, 7 passenger with quad seating, privacy glass, spotless interior, near new condition, only 28,000 miles, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. Expires 5/7/11. $13,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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101

Legals Clallam Co.

TOYOTA: ‘09 Venza AWD. 13,000 miles, 3.5L V6, excellent condition, metallic dark grey, leather interior, auto climate control, "Star Safety System", power everything, keyless remote $27,450 Call 360-385-4267 or cell 360-390-5267.

98

Pickups/Vans

Legals Clallam Co.

Case No.: 11-4-00088-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF H. GORDON BUNNELL, Deceased. The personal representatives named below have been appointed as personal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita¬tions, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representatives or the personal representatives’ lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 31, 2011 PATRICIA F. BUNNELL Personal Representative MARGARET S. (“PEGGY”) MCCALLUM Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: March 31, April 7, 14, 2011

98

Pickups/Vans

98

Pickups/Vans

(2) late ‘70s Ford trucks, parts or rebuild. $500/obo. 683-8193

FORD: ‘95 F350. Service body, 145K mi., 5.8L V8, auto. $2,850. 461-1835.

CHEV: ‘03 S10, 5 speed. $5,800/obo. 457-7014

GMC: ‘72 3/4 ton pick up. $500. 460-9776.

CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. Crew cab, 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $16,500. 681-0103. CHEV: ‘69 3/4 ton pickup. Excellent mechanical condition, many new parts, lift bed. $925/obo 457-3005, 461-7478

GMC: ‘97 V-8 SLE 3 door 5.8l, auto/OD new battery, locking bed cover, bed liner. Alloy wheels/new tires. CD, power, tinted, dual bags, antilock, cruise, tilt, flow exhaust, 123,000. $4,000/obo. 775-7048

CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Mark III, auto, 232K mi., runs excellent. $800. 683-7173.

JEEP EAGLE: ‘95 Minivan. AWD, 4 new tires, runs good. $3,000. 457-3521.

DODGE: ‘89 Custom van. Great for camping, new tranny, low mi., will trade for car in good condition or $2,500/obo. Cell 940-391-9957

PLYMOUTH ‘94 GRAND VOYAGER LE ALL WD Local van with only 88,000 miles, 3.8 V6, auto, dual air and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM cassette, 7 passenger seating, dark glass, roof rack, and more! Expires 4-1611. VIN#166347. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. 4 cyl. runs excellent. $2,500. 809-3215. FORD: ‘76 1 ton van. Fresh tune up, road ready! $800/obo. 797-3232 FORD: ‘85 Clubwagon. 8 passenger, great shape, diesel. $2,800. 360-460-3162 FORD: ‘90 Aerostar van. Runs good $1750/obo 808-4661 FORD: ‘95 F350. Powerstroke EFI diesel, AT, PB, PS, three fuel tanks, 5th wheel towing w/electronic brake, regular tow package w/electric brake, 164K miles. White color, crew cab, one owner, excellent condition. $8,500/obo. 360-450-3767 FORD: ‘98 E350. 110K miles, power locks/windows, A/C, cruise. Ladder rack, all inside racks. $6,000/obo. 460-0556

TOYOTA ‘97 TACOMA EXTRA CAB 2WD PICKUP 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, bedliner. This truck is in immaculate condition! Low mileage! One owner! No accidents! A real mustsee! Price reduced! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

1952 MGTD: Exclnt cond, great history, long term local owner (25 yrs). Car is being sold to benefit Sequim School Dist and Boys & Girls Club. $22,500. Call for details 683-3311 (ext 123) or 683-3300

101

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SALE OF TIMBER CHARLOTTE PETERSON LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the Charlotte Peterson Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday May 31, 2011, for the purchase of timber on the Charlotte Peterson Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 109 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 3,802 MBF of sawlogs including 3,742 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 26 MBF of Sitka spruce sawlogs, and 34 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species except western redcedar). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs are removable at the Purchaser’s option, except western redcedar. Western redcedar salvage operations are not permitted. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Thirty Five Thousand Six Hundred Dollars ($35,600.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Sixty Thousand Dollars ($60,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this day of April 8, 2011 at Taholah, Washington, Greg Masten Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: April 14, 28, 2011

102

Legals City of P.A.

99

Cars

BMW: ‘94 530i. 3L, V8 5 spd. $2,950. 425-753-1666 CHEV: ‘04 Impala LS. Low mi., leather, all power, great gas mi., excl. cond. $7,500. 452-6174. FORD ‘01 TAURUS SE 4 DOOR Extra sharp, V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, alloy wheels, and more! Expires 4-1611. VIN#206051. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com FORD: (2) ‘88 Mustangs GT. $2,500 for both. 797-3784. FORD: ‘59 2 door wagon, V8, stick, good shape, 105K. $4,900. 683-7847. FORD: ‘93 Escort Wagon. Must sell. $1,400/obo. 670-6883 FORD: ‘95 Mustang GT. 5 sp, V8, black, very nice, 114K mi. $5,850. 460-9078. GEO ‘93 PRIZM 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, 5 speed, power steering, power brakes, AM/FM cassette, built by Toyota, motor just replaced. Expires 4-16-11. VIN#034509 $2,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ‘04 Element EX. Dark blue, front WD, 25 mpg, good cond., 36K mi., one owner, garage kept. $12,272. 379-2474.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

FORD: ‘98 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 106,500 miles; 6 cyl 4.0 liter 5 sp. man trans; A/C CD AM/FM; power windows & doors; alloy wheels; bed liner; shell; air shocks; very good tires. No body damage, never wrecked. $3,600. 306-797-1624

Legals Clallam Co.

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

102

Legals City of P.A.

CITY OF PORT ANGELES PUBLIC NOTICE OF DEVELOPMENT APPLICATION On April 7, 2010, the City of Port Angeles received a clearing and grading application and environmental checklist with regard to a construction activity that will result in placement of a maximum of approximately 1,000 cubic yards of material on undeveloped industrial zoned property. Preliminary application materials were determined to be complete on April 8, 2011 with the exception of particular site grading plans. A public hearing WILL NOT be held on this issue but written comments on the proposal will be accepted to the Port Angeles Department of Community & Economic Development, P.O. Box 1150, Port Angeles, Washington, 98362, no later than April 29, 2011. Application materials may be reviewed at the City’s Department of Community & Economic Development. Interested parties are invited to comment on the application. City Hall is accessible for persons with disabilities. STATE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT: The optional review process identified in WAC 19711-355 is being used in this review. It is anticipated that a determination of non signficance will be issued for the project following the required review period that ends on April 29, 2011. APPLICANT: REGGIE NASON LOCATION: 3238 West 18th Street For additional information please call Scott Johns at (360) 417-4752. Pub: April 14, 2011

peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

HYUNDAI ‘10 ACCENT GLS 4 door, very economical 1.6 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, AM/FM CD and MP3, side airbags, 31,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, ideal student or commuter car. Expires 5/7/11. $10,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. Low mi. $9,900. 797-3130, after 5. HYUNDAI: ‘99 Accent Engine runs great, clutch needs replacing, body fair. $950. 681-6259.

99

C9

Cars

SAAB: ‘90 Model 90. Runs. $1,500. 683-3544 TOYOTA ‘08 COROLLA S SEDAN 1.8 liter VVT-i 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission, alloy wheels, spoiler, side skirts, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $14,355! Sparkling clean inside and out! Super sporty! Great gas mileage! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

LINCOLN: ‘95 Towncar. exc. cond., 81K orig. miles. $5,000. 602-677-7453 MAZDA: ‘97 Miata. Red, new top/tires, 67K mi. $5,500. 417-3965 MERCURY ‘09 GRAND MARQUIS LS ULTIMATE 4.6 liter V8, auto, air with climate control, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, keyless entry, full leather, alloy wheels, 32,000 miles, very clean 1 owner, non-smoker, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty. Spotless Carfax report. Expires 5/7/11. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

TOYOTA: ‘03 Sequoia. Immac., runs perf, Carfax, all eqpt + rear A/C, dual pwr sts, moonroof (slide, tilt), run brds, priv glass, grill grd, tow pkg, alloys, wnd deflects, 2 rem keys, sir XM & boost, grt tires. 133K. Can't beat this deal! $11,000/obo. 360-461-1595 TOYOTA: ‘84 Corolla. Runs/drives well. $650/obo. 797-3232 VOLVO: ‘86 Wagon. Runs great. $800. 360-820-0339 VW: ‘04 Passat GLX. AWD SW, 86K miles, original owner. EC $10,500/obo. 457-9999 VW: ‘70 Karmann Ghia. Project. $700. 681-2382

PORSCHE: ‘86 944. Auto, black, receipts for updates. $6,900. 775-5836

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,895/obo. 775-9648

SATURN: ‘96. Manual, 33 mpg, 214K, looks/runs good. Sequim. $1,500/obo. 461-1184

VW: ‘86 Golf. 30K miles on complete overhaul, needs 5 spd. trans. $1,500. 683-5479

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101

OLDS: ‘00 Intrigue. 138K, good condition, all power. $3,500. 452-9424.

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.11-2-00100-1; 11-9-00100-6 Sheriff’s No.11000246 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB, Plaintiff, VS DONNA LEWIS, Defendant(s) TO: DONNA LEWIS THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $4,573.38 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Lot 14 of Four Seasons Park, Division 3, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, (page(s) 38, records of Clallam County, Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-2-00958-5; 10-9-01008-2 Sheriff’s No.11000242 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB Ron Scott, agent Plaintiff, VS JAMES AND JULIE HOUK Defendant TO: JAMES HOUK AND JULIE HOUK THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY 04/22/2011, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $3,859.16 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 LOT 32, Four Seasons Park Division No. 5, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page(s) 56, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-9-00768-5, 07-2-00811-2 Sheriff’s No.11000205 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam KAPPERT'S ENTERPRISES, INC., D/B/A KAPPERT’S WATERFRONT CONSTRUCTION, Plaintiff, VS JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH AS TRUSTEES OF THE JAMES W. AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED MAY 14, 1997, Defendant TO: JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY A CIACIUCH THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 04/22/11 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $66,779.72 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 LOT 2 OF BECKLEY SURVEY, RECORDED APRIL 6, 1992 IN VOLUME 24 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 8, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 666580, BEING A SURVEY OF PARCEL 12, EAGLE RIDGE, AS RECORDED APRIL 9, 1979, IN VOLUME OF SURVEYS, PAGE 142, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494268 AND RE-RECORDED APRIL 12, 1979 IN VOLUME 3 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 143, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494423, BEING A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 46

Low 33

48/34

46/34

49/36

50/36

Chilly with rain.

A little evening rain; otherwise, cloudy.

Some sun, then clouds, a shower; chilly.

Cloudy with a few showers possible.

Mainly cloudy with a shower possible.

Mostly cloudy, rain possible; chilly.

The Peninsula With the jet stream dipping over the Pacific Northwest, a potent storm system will bring rain and mountain snow to the area today. Snow Victoria levels will lower to around 2,000 feet, with 3-6 inches of snow 47/37 falling. This storm will push east of the area tonight, with any Neah Bay Port rain and snow tapering off. Clouds will linger across the 46/37 Townsend area Friday, and there can even be a stray shower or two. Port Angeles 49/38 With the jet stream remaining over the Pacific Northwest 46/33 this weekend, expect clouds and a few showers to Sequim persist.

50/36

Forks 44/31

Olympia 49/35

Everett 49/38

Seattle 50/39

Spokane 47/34

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Chilly today with rain. Wind southeast 10-20 knots becoming southwest. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. A bit of rain during the evening; otherwise, plenty of clouds tonight. Wind west-southwest 8-16 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Mostly cloudy and chilly tomorrow with a passing shower. Wind east-northeast 7-14 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times.

LaPush

9:45 a.m. 10:34 p.m. Port Angeles 12:32 a.m. 11:58 a.m. Port Townsend 2:17 a.m. 1:43 p.m. Sequim Bay* 1:38 a.m. 1:04 p.m.

New

First

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

7.3’ 7.8’ 6.7’ 5.4’ 8.1’ 6.5’ 7.6’ 6.1’

3:48 a.m. 4:12 p.m. 6:43 a.m. 6:24 p.m. 7:57 a.m. 7:38 p.m. 7:50 a.m. 7:31 p.m.

1.8’ 0.5’ 2.8’ 1.2’ 3.7’ 1.5’ 3.5’ 1.4’

10:50 a.m. 11:19 p.m. 1:01 a.m. 1:20 p.m. 2:46 a.m. 3:05 p.m. 2:07 a.m. 2:26 p.m.

7.6’ 8.4’ 6.9’ 5.8’ 8.3’ 7.0’ 7.8’ 6.6’

SaTurday

Low Tide Ht 4:46 a.m. 5:03 p.m. 7:23 a.m. 7:17 p.m. 8:37 a.m. 8:31 p.m. 8:30 a.m. 8:24 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

High Tide Ht

0.7’ 0.4’ 1.7’ 1.8’ 2.2’ 2.3’ 2.1’ 2.2’

11:50 a.m. ----1:31 a.m. 2:31 p.m. 3:16 a.m. 4:16 p.m. 2:37 a.m. 3:37 p.m.

7.9’ --7.1’ 6.3’ 8.5’ 7.6’ 8.0’ 7.1’

Low Tide Ht 5:40 a.m. 5:53 p.m. 8:05 a.m. 8:07 p.m. 9:19 a.m. 9:21 p.m. 9:12 a.m. 9:14 p.m.

Apr 24

May 2

May 10

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 54/33 62/40

Today

Moon Phases Last

Seattle 50/39

Billings 46/29

San Francisco 61/48

-0.2’ 0.5’ 0.6’ 2.4’ 0.8’ 3.1’ 0.8’ 2.9’

City Hi Lo W Athens 67 51 s Baghdad 76 49 s Beijing 84 54 s Brussels 53 43 sh Cairo 80 65 s Calgary 43 23 sn Edmonton 34 19 sf Hong Kong 80 71 s Jerusalem 65 48 s Johannesburg 65 48 t Kabul 71 46 t London 57 47 sh Mexico City 84 55 pc Montreal 52 32 pc Moscow 41 28 sh New Delhi 97 68 s Paris 59 44 pc Rio de Janeiro 91 76 s Rome 63 50 c Stockholm 54 37 pc Sydney 76 59 s Tokyo 72 55 s Toronto 54 35 c Vancouver 47 37 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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Chicago 57/39

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

New York 67/45

Denver 58/26

Washington 70/50

Kansas City 71/48

Los Angeles 75/55

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Detroit 55/37

Atlanta 77/56

Houston 83/68

Fronts Cold

Miami 85/72

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 66 46 49 77 64 70 48 46 43 53 59 54 79 46 57 70 47 54 83 58 64 55 51 33 48 85 83 48

Lo W 38 s 26 pc 39 r 56 s 42 s 47 s 27 c 29 sn 28 c 37 c 39 s 30 pc 53 s 26 sn 39 c 47 pc 33 sh 44 r 56 t 26 sh 46 sh 37 c 42 r 10 s 28 sn 70 sh 68 pc 31 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 71 70 78 75 85 45 49 77 80 67 79 65 84 86 68 82 51 75 60 67 72 49 85 65 61 49 43 70

Lo W 48 t 54 s 60 c 55 s 72 pc 34 c 32 c 54 s 68 pc 45 s 46 pc 49 r 62 s 58 s 45 s 59 s 40 r 48 s 33 pc 41 pc 54 pc 33 pc 64 pc 54 s 48 pc 37 r 26 sn 50 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 97 at Edinburg, TX

Low: 10 at Lake Yellowstone, WY

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Minneapolis 49/32

El Paso 81/52

Sunset today ................... 8:02 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:25 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:09 p.m. Moonset today ................. 4:24 a.m.

Apr 17

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

Thursday, April 14, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 47 33 0.04 7.22 Forks 49 38 0.27 58.90 Seattle 48 42 0.11 16.84 Sequim 53 37 0.03 7.32 Hoquiam 51 42 0.13 35.04 Victoria 52 37 0.01 15.51 P. Townsend* 51 39 0.01 7.93 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 50/37 Bellingham 48/34

Aberdeen 49/37

Peninsula Daily News

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Things to Do

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Peninsula Daily News

Continued from C2 quilcenemuseum@olypen.com Free-will donations welcome. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360-385-0373 or email artymus@olypen.com. Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youth and free to PTMSC members. Phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

or quilcenemuseum@embarq mail.com.

Email interfaithinaction@gmail. com or phone 360-385-8282.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-3853628, ext. 102, or email sue@ nwmaritime.org.

Port Ludlow Village Players’ “I Bet Your Life” — Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, 7 p.m., $12 at club or online at http://brownpaper tickets.com.

Jefferson-WSU Master Gardeners plant clinic — Alcove, Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Bring a sample or a few photographs for help with plant problems, gardening advice, general questions or plant identification.

Overeaters Anonymous — Conversation Cafe — The St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Upstage, 923 Washington St. 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. noon. Phone 360-385-6959 or Phone 360-385-6854. visit www.conversationcafe.org. Topic: Tolerance. Rhody O’s Square Dances — Gardiner Community Center, Quilcene Historical 980 Old Gardiner Road, 6:30 Museum — 151 E. Columbia p.m. St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and Interfaith Earth Day Family photos of Quilcene and sur- Celebration — “Nurturing the rounding communities. New Web of Life” featuring Earthexhibits on Brinnon, military, mil- care traditions of Buddhist, linery and Quilcene High Christian, Native American, School’s 100th anniversary. Pagan, Baha’i, Judaism and Phone 360-765-0688, 360-765- more. Northwest Maritime Cen3192 or 360-765-4848 or email ter, 431 Water St., 6:45 p.m.

Olympic Peninsula Dance presents Maia Santell & House Blend — Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Adults $15, students with ID and disabled $10, 12 and younger $7. Free (with admission) “Charleston” lesson with Scot Thomas and Mary Beth Connors, 7 p.m. All ages and smoke-free. For more information, visit www.olympic peninsuladance.com or phone 360-385-6919 or 360-385-5327.

Forks and the West End Today Human trafficking forum — “Responding to Human Trafficking Community Forum.” Clallam County Sheriff’s Office West End Detachment, 196283 U.S. Highway 101, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. To RSVP, phone the Forks Abuse Program at 360-3746411. 14701099

Now Showing n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Arthur” (PG-13) “Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules” (PG) “Hop” (PG) “Paul” (R) “Source Code” (PG-13) “Sucker Punch” (PG-13)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) “The Lincoln Lawyer” (R) “Rango” (PG) “Soul Surfer” (PG) “Your Highness” (R)

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Hanna” (PG-13) “Hop” (PG)

VOT E D B E S T M E X I C A N R E S TAU R A N T

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Serving up authentic Mexican food in a fun, festive environment. With every dish, you’ll receive generous portion of all your favorites, from sizzling fajitas to delicious burritos.

Now accommodating large groups and parties with our NEWLY EXPANDED DINING ROOM AND LOUNGE! Sun - Thurs 11 am to 9:30 pm Fri & Sat 11 am to 10 pm

452-3928 • 636 E. Front St. • Port Angeles

145117518

“The Lincoln Lawyer” (R)

1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811

135114431

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

STRIKE OUT SEXUAL ASSAULT BOWL-A-THON – APRIL 30


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