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Rangers look for missing hiker 71-year-old Seattle man fails to return from trek BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Rangers searching the Ozette area for a missing hiker had found no signs of the missing Seattle man by 4:30 p.m. Thursday afternoon. Bryan Lee Johnston, 71, was

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reported overdue Wednesday, when he failed to return home from a planned two- to three-day trip to Olympic National Park, said Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman. Johnston has white hair worn in a ponytail, blue eyes and is 5 feet, 10 inches tall. When last seen, he was wear-

ing blue jeans and carrying a black day pack. Johnston left his Seattle home Aug. 22, and told friends and family he planned a day hike on the Johnston Ozette Loop Trail. Family members told park officials he was not equipped for an overnight hike, and park records show he did not apply for an over-

night permit, Maynes said. On Thursday, six ground search teams and two search dog teams searched the Ozette Loop Trail, while a boat team searched Lake Ozette, she said. Rangers found Johnston’s truck at the Ozette Ranger station parking lot Wednesday afternoon.

Receipts dated Aug. 22

A helicopter that was used in the search Wednesday could not take flight Thursday because of weather conditions, she said. Family members described Johnston as active and physically fit, Maynes said. Anyone who has seen Johnston or has information regarding his whereabouts is asked to phone Olympic National Park at 360565-3120.

_________ Several receipts dated Aug. 22 from Port Angeles businesses Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at were found in the truck, Maynes 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn. said. rice@peninsuladailynews.com.

Air Affaire is flying into Sequim

2013 Best of the Peninsula

WHAT ARE READERS’ favorite restaurants? Favorite veterinarians? Favorite places to take out-of-town visitors? These favorites and dozens more for Jefferson and Clallam counties appear in the 2013 Best of the Peninsula magazine. Look for this 44-page bonus supplement to the PDN.

———— INSIDE TODAY! ————

Recreational pot’s future assured here Justice Department says it won’t sue Washington

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JoNelle Hill, 10, inspects the 1962 Cessna 172 owned by Sequim Police Chief Bill Dickinson while taking a sneak peek at planes at Sequim Valley Airport ahead of the Olympic Peninsula Air Affaire.

BY PETE YOST THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Despite 75 years of federal marijuana prohibition, the Justice Department said Thursday that states can let people use the drug, license people to grow it and even allow adults to stroll into stores and buy it — as long as the weed is kept away from kids, the black market and federal property. In a sweeping policy ALSO . . . announcement, the Justice ■ Medical Department outlined eight top marijuana priority areas for its enforcement untenable, of marijuana laws. prosecutor They range from preventing claims/A4 the distribution of marijuana to minors to preventing sales revenue from going to criminal enterprises, gangs and cartels and preventing the diversion of marijuana outside of states where it is legal under state law. Other enforcement areas include preventing state-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover for trafficking other illegal drugs and preventing violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana. The top areas also include preventing drugged driving, preventing growing marijuana on public land and preventing marijuana possession on federal property. The announcement follows the first-in-thenation legalization of recreational marijuana use by the states of Washington and Colorado. Last December, President Barack Obama said it makes no sense for the government to go after recreational drug users in a state that has legalized recreational use of small amounts of marijuana. TURN

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Event to celebrate planes, hot air balloons, more to land under clear skies at Sequim Valley Airport near Carlsborg for the past 30 years. SEQUIM –– In 1983, pilots referred “It was a good spot, and I think a to the “Blue Hole” over Sequim as a lot people thought there was a need notable reference point when flying for a real airport instead of the landover the North Olympic Peninsula. ing strips that were scattered around Thanks to the efforts of the Sallee back then,” said Andy Sallee, president family that year, pilots have been able of the airport at 468 Dorothy Hunt BY JOE SMILLIE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Three large, loud helicopters seen flying through the Port Angeles area Wednesday night were from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, a joint base spokesman said Thursday. Joe Kubistek said three UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters flew from the base near Tacoma at about 8 p.m. Wednesday to Bremerton and later to William R. Fairchild International Airport in Port Angeles for a training exercise. The three helicopters, flying with the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord,

“They were out there doing training — what type of training I’m not aware of.” JOE KUBISTEK Joint Base Lewis-McChord spokesman were scheduled to come back to the joint base at about 11 p.m. Wednesday. “They were out there doing training — what type of training I’m not aware of,” Kubistek said, adding that he didn’t know if the helicopters actually landed at Fairchild airport. At least a dozen people reported between two to three helicopters flying

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on the east side of Port Angeles or to the south of town between about 8:45 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday. Local law enforcement had received no prior notice. Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict said that he had not been notified of such activity. He added that he didn’t expect to be, based on what witnesses reported the helicopters were doing. “The point is they weren’t doing maneuvers over heavily populated areas, which is when [we] would have expected notice,” Benedict said. TURN

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Jewish group urges snub of Waters show A JEWISH GROUP in the German city of Duesseldorf is urging a boycott of an upcoming concert by former Pink Floyd band member Roger Waters for using an inflatable pig featuring a Star of David during his show. The director of the Jewish Community in Duesseldorf, Michael SzenteiWaters Heise, said in a statement Thursday that Waters was an “intellectual arsonist” whose stage act used “anti-Semitic and National Socialist” imagery. Waters, who could not immediately be reached for comment, is scheduled to perform his show “The Wall”

in Duesseldorf on Sept. 6. The English musician previously has rebuffed critics of the show, which has been performed about 200 times in the past three years, by saying it isn’t intended to be anti-Semitic. The inflatable pig features other religious, political and corporate symbols.

‘Avengers’ villain The “Avengers” sequel has its villain. Marvel announced Thursday that James Spader will play Ultron in its “Avengers: Age of Ultron.” In the comics, the character is a robot with artificial intelligence. “Age of Ultron” is the sequel to the 2012 box office hit “The Avengers.” Disney will release it in May 2015. The film will be directed by Joss Whedon and will star Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo and Scarlett Johansson. The 53-year-old Spader is well-known for his TV work, including roles on

“The Practice,” “Boston Legal” and the upcoming NBC drama “The Blacklist.” His films Spader include 1989’s “Sex, Lies and Videotape,” 1994’s “Stargate” and last year’s “Lincoln.”

Liberace home sold A mansion once owned by Liberace has sold for a half-million dollars. The Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors reported the all-cash sale closed Aug. 23 for $29,000 less than the listing price. The two-bedroom, 10-bathroom home with nearly 15,000 square feet of space was built in 1962 and sits on a half-acre lot near the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Liberace bought the home in 1974. It was sold in 1989, two years after he died.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: At this 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, how much progress toward his dream of racial equality do you think America has achieved?

Passings By The Associated Press

STEPHENIE MCMILLAN, 71, a set decorator who created the look of all eight Harry Potter films and won an Oscar for the 1996 romance “The English Patient,” died Aug. 19 at her home in England. The cause was cancer, Stuart Craig, who worked with her on the Potter films, wrote in an article in The Ms. McMillan Guardian. in 2004 Ms. McMillan created sets that were opulent and cluttered, like Hogwarts Academy, or spare, like the bedroom in the bombed-out monastery where the protagonist of “The English Patient” lives. Both she and Craig, a production designer, received Oscars for their art direction and set decoration on “The English Patient,” an adaptation of the Michael Ondaatje novel. The film earned nine Academy Awards altogether, including for best picture. Ms. McMillan thought that even the most elaborate sets should not upstage the actors. “The production designer has the vision,” she told the British Academy of Film and Television Arts in an interview in 2012, “and as set decorator, you have to bring this vision to life. “Set decorating should never steal thunder from actors, nor should it ever be so showy that you’re looking at the furniture rather than the action.” Ms. McMillan also designed sets for the romances “Notting Hill” (1999) and “Chocolat” (2000), and for the John Cleese

comedies “A Fish Called Wanda” (1988) and “Fierce Creatures” (1997). She and Craig were nominated for three BAFTA Awards and four Academy Awards for their work on the Harry Potter films.

_________ ANTHONY PAWSON, 60, a Canadian cell biologist whose groundbreaking insights about how cells communicate with one another resolved one of science’s oldest mysteries and helped spur the development of a class of drugs that target cancer, diabetes and other diseases, died Aug. 7 in Toronto. Family members and colleagues declined to disclose the cause. In his 1990 breakthrough, Dr. Pawson and his research team identified the specific protein interactions involved in cell signaling, the process by which cells tell one another what to do, when to do it and when to stop. Scientists had long known that cells communicated, but no one knew the exact cellular mechanism involved until Dr. Pawson’s research pinpointed it: a protein structure on the surface of every cell membrane. The structure, which he

Laugh Lines THE MAKERS OF drones want the media to stop calling their unmanned aircraft “drones.” They don’t like the name drones. I believe the manufacturers prefer the term “surprise visitor.” Conan O’Brien

called the SH2 domain, serves as a landing pad for signaling proteins, which in turn set off a Mr. Pawson molecular in 2009 chain reaction carrying information to the cell’s nucleus. SH2 domain proved to be the linchpin of the cell communications system, and its discovery basically confirmed Dr. Pawson’s initial theory, that “when cells fail to communicate properly, disease happens,” as he defined it in an interview.

A lot

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A little None at all

16.1% 6.4%

Undecided 1.5% Total votes cast: 1,010 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) Two canoes manned by the Malahat First Nations of Vancouver Island and Nooksack tribe of Deming came in first and second, respectively, in the Coupeville international races on Whidbey Island. The two young Quileute crews, representing the Olympic Peninsula, placed among the second half of finishers in both races — but the LaPush tribe attracted great attention at Coupeville because of their youthful bumptiousness in daring to compete against grown men who are experienced paddlers. The respect was demonstrated when the Quileute canoes rounded the judges’ boat at Sunday’s finish. Seven crews that preceded them spontaneously cheered and waved their paddles in salute to the Quileute teenagers.

1963 (50 years ago) Classified advertising: ■ Five acres in Port Angeles city limit includes three-bedroom home, large threecar garage, good barn and lots of berries. $11,500. Aldwell and Wenner Co., Realtors. ■ RCA console black-and-white TV, $38.50. McCrorie-Thompson Furniture and Appliances.

■ Furnished apartment, ideal for woman, near Eighth and Laurel streets in Port Angeles. $35 a month. ■ Nails, all sizes, 15 cents a pound or $12.95 a keg. Peninsula Iron and Metal Co.

1988 (25 years ago) Illegal drug growing in Olympic National Forest is small compared with operations discovered in Oregon and California national forests, said Mike Nitsch, Olympic National Forest law enforcement officer. The biggest marijuana planting found in Olympic so far was uncovered recently near Beaver: 60 plants and no arrests. A berry picker found 18 more marijuana plants on Forest Service land near Forks last week. Again, there are no suspects.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

A BOAT TOWED along West Sequim Bay Road with its side fenders swinging about the hull . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Aug. 30, the 242nd day of 2013. There are 123 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Aug. 30, 1983, Guion S. Bluford Jr. became the first black American astronaut to travel in space as he blasted off aboard the Challenger. On this date: ■ In 1861, Union Gen. John C. Fremont instituted martial law in Missouri and declared slaves there to be free; however, Fremont’s emancipation order was countermanded by President Abraham Lincoln. ■ In 1862, Confederate forces won victories against the Union at the Second Battle of Bull Run in

Manassas, Va., and the Battle of Richmond in Kentucky. ■ In 1905, Ty Cobb made his major-league debut as a player for the Detroit Tigers, hitting a double in his first at-bat in a game against the New York Highlanders. The Tigers won, 5-3. ■ In 1945, Gen. Douglas MacArthur arrived in Japan to set up Allied occupation headquarters. ■ In 1963, the “Hot Line” communications link between Washington and Moscow went into operation. ■ In 1967, the Senate confirmed the appointment of Thurgood Marshall as the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ■ In 1986, Soviet authorities

arrested Nicholas Daniloff, a correspondent for U.S. News & World Report, as a spy a week after American officials arrested Gennadiy Zakharov, a Soviet employee of the United Nations, on espionage charges in New York. Both men later were released. ■ In 1987, a redesigned space shuttle booster, created in the wake of the Challenger disaster, roared into life in its first full-scale test-firing near Brigham City, Utah. ■ In 1997, Americans received word of the car crash in Paris that claimed the lives of Princess Diana, Dodi Fayed and their driver, Henri Paul. Because of the time difference, it was Aug. 31 where the crash occurred.

■ Ten years ago: A Russian submarine being towed to a scrap yard sank in a gale in the Barents Sea, killing nine of the 10-member crew. ■ Five years ago: Hurricane Gustav slammed into Cuba as a monstrous Category 4 storm, damaging 100,000 homes and causing billions of dollars in damage but no reported fatalities. ■ One year ago: The Justice Department announced it had ended its investigation into CIA interrogations of terrorist detainees without bringing criminal charges. Twin satellites were launched by NASA on a quest to explore Earth’s treacherous radiation belts and protect the planet from solar outbursts.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 30-31, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation IRS issuing tax rules for gay spouses WASHINGTON — The government is issuing the regulations needed to allow gay couples married in states that recognize same-sex marriages to file joint federal tax returns. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said the new rules will provide “clear, coherent tax filing guidance for all legally married same-sex Lew couples nationwide.” Lew said the regulations also make clear that legally married same-sex couples will be able to move freely throughout the country and their federal tax filing status will not change. The new rules implement the tax aspects of the Supreme Court’s ruling in June that invalidated a section of the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act. The new regulations from Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service implement the court’s decision on how legally married same-sex couples should be treated for federal tax purposes.

Gay therapy ban upheld SAN FRANCISCO — A federal appeals court Thursday upheld the nation’s first-of-its-

kind law in California prohibiting health practitioners from offering psychotherapy aimed at making gay youths straight. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled that the state’s ban on so-called conversion therapy for minors doesn’t violate free speech rights of licensed counselors and their patients. The activities of pastors and lay counselors who are unlicensed but provide such therapy through church programs would not be covered under the law. The case before the appeals court was brought by professionals who practice sexual-orientation-change therapy.

Grisly Facebook post MIAMI — A man accused of killing his wife, then posting a confession and a bloody picture of her body on Facebook has pleaded not guilty in Florida. Prosecutors said 31-year-old Derek Medina fatally shot 26-year-old Jennifer Alfonso at their South Miami townhome earlier this month. A judge Thursday set a tentative trial date of Nov. 4. Medina is charged with second-degree murder, but prosecutors will likely seek a firstdegree murder indictment when the grand jury returns in September. Medina’s attorney Sam Zangeneh said that his team hasn’t decided on a defense strategy yet. Court records indicate Alfonso was shot six to eight times. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Russia calls U.N. meeting about Syria UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. Security Council’s permanent members are meeting for the second time in two days to discuss Syria’s crisis. Envoys from the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China entered the meeting Thursday afternoon at U.N. headquarters. A tension-filled meeting Wednesday ended with the council bitterly divided over a U.K.-proposed resolution to authorize the use of military force against Syria in retaliation for an alleged chemical weapons attack that killed hundreds near Damascus. Russia remains opposed to such action, saying there is no evidence the Syrian regime was responsible for the attack, as the U.S. and its allies contend. A Western diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Russia called Thursday’s meeting. Russia’s U.N. mission refused to comment.

Appeal for release PYONGYANG — Robert King, the U.S. special envoy for North Korean human rights issues, will fly to Pyongyang today to make an appeal for the release of a Seattle-area man. This is the first public trip to North Korea by a U.S. official in more than two years.

The State Department said it was “deeply concerned” about Bae, a Lynnwood tour operator who suffers from diabetes. Bae Bae was taken to a hospital last month after he lost more than 50 pounds. “He’s considerably weaker,” Bae’s sister Terri Chung told NBC station King 5. Echoing his family’s concerns, the White House released a statement Tuesday urging North Korea to release the 45-year-old Washington native.

Doctor to be retried PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A senior judicial official Thursday overturned the sentence of a Pakistani doctor who helped the CIA find Osama bin Laden and ordered his retrial, citing procedural problems at the first trial. The official, Sahibzada Mohammad Anis, issued the ruling because the person who sentenced Dr. Shakil Afridi to 33 years was not authorized to hear the case, said government administrator Feroz Shah. Afridi was convicted in May 2012 of ‘‘conspiring against the state’’ by giving money and providing medical treatment to Islamic militants in Pakistan’s Khyber tribal area, not for helping the CIA track down bin Laden. The doctor’s family denied the allegations. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CREWS

CONDUCT BURNOUT NEAR

YOSEMITE

U.S. Forest Service and Davis, Calif., firefighters monitor Evergreen Road in the Stanislaus National Forest, where they were conducting a burnout of dry fuel in the underbrush by a stand of pine trees Wednesday night. They are trying to prevent flare-ups from a huge wildfire from crossing the road.

White House proposes new gun control steps Reimporting military arms may be curbed THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Striving to take action where Congress would not, the Obama administration announced new steps Thursday on gun control, curbing the import of military surplus weapons and proposing to close a little-known loophole that lets felons and others circumvent background checks by registering guns to corporations. Four months after a gun control drive collapsed spectacularly in the Senate, President Barack Obama added two more executive actions to a list of 23 steps the White House determined Obama could take on his own to reduce gun violence. With the political world focused on Mideast tensions and

looming fiscal battles, the move signaled Obama’s intent to show he hasn’t lost sight of the cause he took up after 20 first-graders and six adults Biden were gunned down last year in Newtown, Conn. Vice President Joe Biden, Obama’s point man on gun control, who thrust guns into the national spotlight, unveiled the new actions Thursday at the White House. “It’s simple, it’s straightforward, it’s common sense,” Biden said in the Roosevelt Room. One new policy will end a government practice that lets military weapons, sold or donated by the U.S. to allies, be reimported by private entities, where some may end up on the streets. The White House said the U.S. has approved 250,000 of those guns to be reimported since 2005; under the new policy, only muse-

ums and a few other entities like the government will be eligible to reimport military-grade firearms. The Obama administration is also proposing a federal rule to stop those who would be ineligible to pass a background check from skirting the law by registering certain guns, like machine guns and short-barreled shotguns, to a corporation or trust.

Background checks The new rule would require people associated with those entities, like beneficiaries and trustees, to undergo the same type of fingerprint-based background checks as individuals if they want to register those types of guns. “It’s a very artful dodge to get around people who are not capable, constitutionally or legally, of owning a weapon,” Biden said. The National Rifle Association dismissed the moves, arguing that background checks for corporations and a ban on reimporting outdated guns wouldn’t keep criminals from getting weapons.

U.S. car culture waning as Americans drive less? THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Driving in America has stalled, leading researchers to ask: Is our love affair with the automobile over? After rising for decades, total vehicle use in the U.S. — the collective miles people drive — peaked in August 2007. It then dropped sharply during the Great Recession and has plateaued since, even though the economy is recovering and the population is growing. Just this week, the Federal Highway Administration reported

Quick Read

vehicle miles traveled during the first half of 2013 were down slightly, continuing the trend. Even more telling, the average number of miles that drivers individually rack up peaked in July 2004 at just over 900 per month, according to a study by Transportation Department economists Don Pickrell and David Pace.

At 1990s levels By July of last year, that had fallen to 820 miles per month, down about 9 percent. Per capita automobile use is now back at the

same levels as in the late 1990s. Until the mid-1990s, driving levels largely tracked economic growth, according to Pickrell and Pace, who said their conclusions are their own and not the government’s. Since then, the economy has grown more rapidly than auto use. Gross domestic product declined for a while during the recession but reversed course in 2009. Auto use has yet to recover. Meanwhile, the share of people in their teens, 20s and 30s with driver’s licenses has been dropping significantly.

. . . more news to start your day

West: 8-year-old driving car kills sister by crashing

Nation: Conjoined twins in Dallas safely separated

Nation: Scammed lottery winner receiving $5 million

World: Woman accused of gouging out eyes sought

AN 8-YEAR-OLD PHOENIX boy was driving his mother’s car on a nighttime joyride with his 6-year-old sister when it crashed into a pole, fatally injuring the girl, police said Thursday. The girl and her brother, who was slightly injured, were both in their pajamas, said Sgt. Steve Martos. The children’s mother had put them to bed, then couldn’t find them in their home a half-hour later, Martos said. The frantic mother went door-todoor, fearing the children had been kidnapped. Meanwhile, the accident had occurred a short distance away. “It’s just an unfortunate tragedy,” Martos said.

HOSPITAL OFFICIALS SAID conjoined boys born last month in Dallas are doing well after surgery. Officials at Medical City Children’s Hospital said Owen and Emmett Ezell are in stable condition. The boys weighed a combined 11 pounds, 15 ounces at birth July 15. Hospital authorities said the twins had grown to more than 16 pounds when the surgery was done last Saturday. Owen and Emmett were joined from the breast bone to the belly button. The babies shared a liver and bowels. They also had a birth defect that left their intestines outside of their bodies and covered by a thin layer of tissue.

A SYRACUSE, N.Y., maintenance worker duped out of a winning $5 million scratch-off ticket will get his money next month, seven years after being scammed out of the jackpot, state lottery officials said Thursday. The Gaming Commission verified that the ticket belongs to Robert Miles. He’s expected to receive his jackpot within the next couple of weeks. Miles bought the ticket in 2006 at a convenience store owned by Nayef Ashkar. Ashkar’s two sons, Andy and Nayel, convinced Miles the ticket was worth only $5,000 and paid him $4,000 for it, authorities said. The brothers waited until 2012 to claim the jackpot.

POLICE IN NORTHERN China launched a massive search Wednesday for a woman accused of gouging out the eyes of a 6-year-old boy. Authorities in the city of Linfen in Shanxi province offered a 100,000 yuan ($16,000) reward for her capture. State media said the boy was recovering in a hospital but had lost his sight permanently from the Saturday ordeal. State media previously raised the possibility that the boy’s corneas were taken for sale because of a donor shortage in China. A news report showed the boy writhing in pain on a hospital trolley, with bandages around his head.


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Portland pair’s wedding plans to fly sky high BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– Air lovers are cordially invited to the sky-high wedding of Portland, Ore., couple Misty Collard and Cory Adcox, who will get married aboard Capt. Crystal Stout’s hot air balloon at 7:30 a.m. Sunday during the Olympic Peninsula Air Affaire. “I tried to pick out a venue where he couldn’t run away if he got nervous,� said Collard, who is 33. Adcox is 36. The couple have invited anyone who wants to see the ceremony to attend as Stout pilots the balloon and acts as the officiant marrying the couple. Stout said she has married a dozen other couples, both in and out of her balloons.

50 feet in the air

“I always wanted to get married in a hot air balloon,� Collard said. “It’s something a little bit different and fun.� The couple met on separate vacations in Las Vegas, parted ways and later bumped into each other in a Portland, Ore., elevator.

Four-year relationship That chance meeting kicked off their four-year relationship, which will be sealed in the sky above Sequim on Sunday. “We’ve vacationed up here several times. It’s a great place to go play on the beaches,� Collard said. Fortunately, Collard said, she is an early riser, JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS which means preparing for sunrise ceremony will not Morning Star Balloon Co.’s hot air balloon will be part of the Olympic Peninsula Air Affaire this be too difficult. weekend at Sequim Valley Airport. She did choose a 1920s “flapper-style� dress for the wedding to make it easier to get into the balloon. “If I had a more traditional dress, there would be no way I could get inside the basket,� she said.

Affaire: Weekend event will

The balloon will be anchored 50 feet in the air during the ceremony at Sequim Valley Airport, 468 Dorothy Hunt Lane. ________ After the “I dos,� the CONTINUED FROM A1 Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editether will be cut, and the tor Joe Smillie can be reached at newlyweds will sail into the 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at “It’s going to be a ball,� said Emily sky to celebrate their union. jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com. Westcott, Air Affaire co-organizer and local pilot. “We wanted to thank the Sallees for having this airport for us for the last 30 years, and it was perfect that this fell during the city’s 100th birthday.� The Air Affaire will include a number of vintage aircraft flying in for the weekend bash, along with hot air balloons, stunt pilots, wing walkers, remote-controlled planes and a classic car show. Events will run from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free. Parking is $5 per vehicle. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS $135 with reservations A group of Diamond Point pilots in at www.westcoastspin SEQUIM — The Globe Swift aircraft will make a spedoctors.com, vendors Olympic Peninsula Air cial flight at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, and live music. Affaire will be from doing three or four passes over the ■ 10 a.m. both 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturrunway. days — Car show and day and Sunday at Mike and Marilyn Mason of shine, no fee. Phone 360Sequim Valley Airport, Sequim will offer rides in their 1943 417-0676 for more infor468 Dorothy Hunt Road. mation. Stearman biplane for $135 at various times throughout the event. Admission is free. ■ 10 a.m. both Hot air balloon rides will be offered Parking is $5 per cardays — Skydiver. for $250 per ride from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. load. ■ 10:30 a.m. Saturboth days. Landowners may enter a ■ 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. day — Swift formation drawing for free rides by placing a both days — Hot air smoke planes. white sheet in their open field so balballoon rides. $250 per ■ 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. loon pilots know they have a safe ride. Reservations both days — Hot air landing zone. required. Contact Capt. balloon tethers. Crystal Stout for more ■ 1 p.m. both days Grass strip start information at 360-601- — Wing walker demon2433 or airboss@ stration. Jack Sallee flew jets commercially nwplace.com. For more informafor Braniff International and in the ■ 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. tion, visit http://tinyurl. military for the Navy and Air Force. both days — Remotecom/AirAffaire, phone He met his wife, Winnie, in Engcontrolled plane demon- 360-670-6294 or email land and brought her back to the strations, plane show olympicpeninsulaair Dungeness Valley, where they passed and shine, biplane rides affaire@gmail.com. along their love of the skies to their family, with three of four sons becom-

include many vintage aircraft

Air Affaire to rise early this weekend

“We wanted to thank the Sallees for having this airport for us for the last 30 years, and it was perfect that this fell during the city’s 100th birthday.� EMILY WESTCOTT Air Affaire co-organizer and pilot

an airport overlay district around it to protect it for future development. Winnie also oversaw the installation of a taxiway and made sure the runway was in shape for landing mail planes, commercial aircraft and even the occasional military plane.

The next 30 years Andy Sallee took over as president of the airport after his mother’s death. He flies with Allegiant Air as a commercial pilot shuttling passengers around Florida. But he hopes to move to Bellingham to be closer to help grow the Sequim airport. “It’s a key asset to the community. And it’s something that should continue to be useful for a long, long time,� Andy said. Under his leadership, the airport has installed a 24-hour fuel station, installed a webcam to show updated conditions oand acquired ground for future expansion. Andy sees new hangars, a terminal building, a paved main road to the airport and perhaps a cafe in its future. “It’s always been slow, small development,� he said. “That’s how you make it grow in a way that keeps growing.� For more on the airport, visit its website, www.sequimvalleyairport. com. For information on the Olympic Peninsula Air Affaire, visit http:// tinyurl.com/AirAffaire.

ing professional pilots. “The skies are a big thing for our family,� Andy Sallee said. Jack lost his job flying after Braniff went bankrupt and turned his attention to developing an airport in Sequim. The couple turned a hayfield into a grass landing strip and began adding aviation structures to it. “It’s off the wind and the fog by the water, and out of the rain by the mountains. It was just a great spot,� Andy said. In 1985, the family paved the 3,500-foot runway, which can hold 12,500-pound commercial aircraft. The next year, they added a maintenance hangar for pilots to work on their planes, and in 1988 added more hangars for aircraft storage. Andy credited volunteers for helping raise funds for the airport. “This place wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for their help,� Andy said. Jack Sallee died in a forklift accident in 1997, leaving Winnie to lead the airport’s operations. “She believed in it, and she wanted ________ to carry on what they started together,� Andy said of his mother. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie Winnie was president of the air- can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or port and instrumental in developing at jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Marijuana: Supporters welcome federal policy CONTINUED FROM A1 between the federal government and states that enact The action, welcomed by recreational drug use. In a memo to all 94 U.S. supporters of legalization, could set the stage for more attorneys’ offices around states to legalize mari- the country, Deputy Attorney General James Cole juana. said the federal government Alaska is scheduled to expects that states and vote on the question next local governments authorizyear, and a few other states ing “marijuana-related conplan votes in 2016. duct� will implement strong The policy change and effective regulatory embraces what Justice and enforcement systems Department officials called that address the threat a “trust but verify� approach those state laws could pose

to public health and safety. “If state enforcement efforts are not sufficiently robust . . . the federal government may seek to challenge the regulatory structure itself,� the memo stated.

Federal priorities States must ensure “that they do not undermine federal enforcement priorities,� it added. Gov. Jay Inslee also laid

out guidelines for marijuana entrepreneurs. “If you don’t sell this product to children, if you keep violent crime away from your business, if you pay your taxes and you don’t use this as a front for illicit activity, we’re going to be able to move forward,� Inslee said. Following the votes in Washington and Colorado last year, Attorney General Eric Holder launched a review of marijuana

enforcement policy that included an examination of the two states. The issue was whether they should be blocked from operating marijuana markets on the grounds that actively regulating an illegal substance conflicts with federal drug law that bans it. Peter Bensinger, a former head of the Drug Enforcement Administration, said the conflict between federal and state law is clear and can’t be

reconciled. Federal law is paramount, and Holder is “not only abandoning the law, he’s breaking the law. He’s not only shirking his duty, he’s not living up to his oath of office,� Bensinger said. A Pew Research Center poll in March found that 60 percent of Americans think the federal government shouldn’t enforce federal anti-marijuana laws in states where its use has been approved.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

A5

Man found dead off PT 1 arrested, had relocated recently one sought in car thefts Daughter says he had history of seizures

Officials looking for ‘person of interest’ in Sequim investigation

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A woodworker who was found dead in the waters off Port Townsend earlier this week had just moved to town to make a new start, his daughter said. Robert Letinich, 58, had lived on his boat, Axa, in the Olympia area for about 20 years but had decided to relocate to the town he had loved for many years, said Hannah Letinich of Seattle, who was in Port Townsend to settle her father’s affairs. Letinich’s body was found about a mile away from shore between Port Wilson and Port Hudson near a small skiff that was overturned Monday. “We will never know what happened or what he was doing out there all by himself,� said Hannah Letinich, 28. “But he had a history of seizures, and it is possible that he had one when he was on the boat and didn’t know what to do.�

Autopsy results No cause of death has been determined, according to Jefferson County Deputy Prosecutor David Alvarez, who is acting as coroner. An autopsy has been done, but results have not been received. A celebration of life will take place Sept. 14 in Olympia at a time and place to be announced. Hannah Letinich said the Sheriff’s Office told her the death was not due to foul play, and there were no signs of suicide. At the time of his death, Robert Letinich was living on his 28-foot sailboat,

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — A Port Angeles man remained in the Clallam County jail Thursday after he was arrested for investigation of two car thefts at least 30 miles apart. Joshua Michael Wilson, 30, was arrested Monday for investigation of the theft of a minivan and a car. Clallam County sheriff’s deputies suspect that the car, a Honda, was driven to the location of the minivan and then abandoned while the minivan was taken to the Walmart Supercenter at 2411 Kolonels Way, Port Angeles. Deputies now seek to identify a second man potentially involved whom Detective Sgt. John Keegan called Thursday “a person of interest� in the car theft investigation. “We are still trying to identify who that individual is,� Keegan said. “We want to get that person’s statement.� Wilson was arrested in the Walmart parking lot after he was found with a stolen Ford Windstar and attempted to run on foot, alongside the other man, from a sheriff’s deputy, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Robert Letinich, whose body was found in the waters off Port Townsend on Monday, is shown on his boat, Axa, in an undated family photo. which was anchored near Union Wharf, and used the small skiff to get to and from the boat. The area is subject to severe tides that could have carried a small craft out to sea very quickly, Hannah Letinich said she was told by police. After living on the boat for more than two decades, Robert Letinich was hoping to sell the craft, which was built in 1948, and move to a small house or a cabin, his daughter said. She said the family plans to sell the boat, and it will be on display at the Wooden Boat Festival, which takes place in Port Townsend on Sept. 6-8. Port Townsend was one of Letinich’s favorite places, and he had visited for several years but only recently decided to make a move, arriving in town earlier this month with the intention to find a permanent job, Hannah Letinich said. He soon found work at Rain Shadow Woodworks in Port Townsend, where he hit it off with Sebastian

Eggert, who owns the business. “He took command almost immediately,� Eggert said. “He didn’t need any guidance or supervision. “It was like a gift from the gods that I had found a perfect employee because he brought a new energy to the place which hasn’t been here for a while.�

‘Gift from the gods’

jacket,� Hannah Letinich said. “When you are familiar with your boat, you don’t always follow all the rules. “I’m sad because if my dad had his life jacket, it might have saved him, but we’ll never really know what happened.� Robert Letinich was born in Gary, Ind., in 1954 and grew up in Wisconsin, serving in the Coast Guard before moving to Washington state in the 1980s. Those who want information about the celebration-of-life service or who just want to talk can email Hannah Letinich at hletinich@yahoo.com. “If any of his friends want to contact me, I am willing to speak to them about what happened,� she said. “When something like this happens, talking about it can help people to let go.�

Eggert said his business has suffered from the economy, and having Letinich as an employee was going to help him complete several unfinished projects. “I only knew him for about three weeks, but it was like we were twins,� said Eggert, who was only a year older than Letinich. “We had the same tools in our tool bags. It was uncanny, since the tools that you have in your tool bag are personal and almost ________ like a fingerprint.� “Some liveaboards get Jefferson County Editor Charlie too comfortable on the Bermant can be reached at 360water and forget to do 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula things like wear a life dailynews.com.

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Charges dismissed in case of heroin possession in PA BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Criminal charges have been dropped against a Port Angeles man arrested in May after police investigated a report of a heroin overdose. Adam Dartagnan Clevenger, 26, initially was charged with one count of heroin possession after he and Cree Nichole Stone, 22, were arrested May 25 at a home in the 800 block of 12th Street.

Jesse Espinoza, deputy Clallam County prosecuting attorney, dismissed the heroin possession charge Monday, according to an order of dismissal filed in Clallam County Superior Court. “The state’s witness will be unavailable for at least a three-month period,� Espinoza wrote in the motion. “There is insufficient evidence to proceed to trial.� The case was dismissed without prejudice, meaning charges still could be filed based on addi-

front porch. The woman was taken to Olympic Medical Center, treated for a suspected heroin overdose and discharged. According to police accounts, heroin, scales and unused plastic bags and syringes were found at the Police accounts 12th Street home when Port Angeles police first Clevenger and Stone were were called to the 12th arrested. Street home where ________ Clevenger and Stone were Jeremy Schwartz can found after a neighbor be Reporter reached at 360-452-2345, ext. called 9-1-1 about a woman 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula slumped over on the house’s dailynews.com.

tional evidence. Stone was sentenced Aug. 8 to 70 days in jail, with credit for time served, after pleading guilty to one count each of possession of heroin and possession of methadone.

Farms in Sequim called 9-1-1 to report a 1999 Ford Windstar minivan used at the farm had been stolen from Graysmarsh Lane, not far from the farm itself. Two other vehicles the employee owned also had been rummaged through and the employee’s wallet stolen from one of the vehicles. A Graysmarsh-owned house also had been entered illegally, with two 5-gallon gas cans and some firewood taken. At about 3:30 that same morning, Sgt. John Hollis with the Sheriff’s Office found a 1992 red Honda abandoned on Holland Road, about a mile from Graysmarsh Farm. The Honda, which had been reported stolen Sunday morning from a home on Crescent Beach Road about 37 miles to the west, had been backed into the woods and into a tree, likely totaling the car. “Due to the proximity of the recovered stolen Honda to my crime scene on Graysmarsh,� Millet wrote in his arrest report, “I believe the stolen Honda was used to transport the culprits to the Graysmarsh farm where they abandoned it and stole the Graysmarsh Ford Windstar and also committed other crimes while on the Graysmarsh property.� About 20 minutes after the Honda was found, Deputy Laticia Wells found two men and the stolen van at the Port Angeles Walmart. Both men fled on foot, and Wells arrested one of them, later identified as Wilson. The other escaped. Wilson was found with two credit cards stolen from a Graysmarsh employee in his wallet, and the key to the red Honda was found in the van. Roughly 1 gram of heroin, thought to belong to Wilson, also was found in the van, in addition to a credit card receipt for socks and a cellphone. The last four digits of the credit card number on the receipt matched one of the credit cards allegedly stolen from the Graysmarsh employee.

Wilson remained in jail on $20,000 bond as of Thursday. Wilson was booked for investigation of two counts each of first-degree theft of a motor vehicle and/or motor vehicle parts, second-degree vehicle prowling and possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver. He also was booked for investigation of one count each of residential burglary, second-degree theft and first-degree malicious mischief. According to Clallam County Superior Court minutes from Wilson’s preliminary hearing Tuesday, Wilson did not want an attorney and wanted to plead guilty. Judge S. Brooke Taylor did not accept Wilson’s guilty plea and appointed him an attorney from Clallam Public Defender, according to the minutes. ________ An arrest report filed by Deputy Mark Millet gave Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can this account. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. At about 2 a.m. Monday, 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula an employee at Graysmarsh dailynews.com.

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PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Chain Gang and city police removed 2,900 pounds of trash from illegal campsites used by vagrants in and around downtown Port Angeles last week. Police Department Downtown Resource Officer Dallas Maynard identified 10 illegal campsites along Front Street, the Waterfront Trail, under City Pier and around Estuary Park. Maynard accompanied Clallam County Corrections Officers Nate Clark, Luke Brown, Ray Cooper and two jail inmate work crews, known as the Chain Gang, for the daylong cleanup Aug. 21. No citations were issued. “All of the campsites were very recently occupied,� Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith said. The county-supervised work crews removed bedding, clothing, trash and shopping carts belonging to downtown businesses. The shopping carts

were returned. Most people camping illegally over the summer are doing so by choice, Smith said. He cited a “vast social safety net� available in Port Angeles, including the Serenity House of Clallam County, Salvation Army, soup kitchens and shelters. “These people are choosing an outdoor lifestyle,� Smith said.

‘Give each other space’ Serenity House of Clallam County Executive Director Kathy Wahto said some people living in crowded households camp in the summer to “give each other space.� “It’s like giving yourself a vacation, but you don’t have any money to go anywhere,� she said. Serenity House, which was not involved in the campsite cleanup, leads the local Point in Time Count homeless census every winter. Data from the nationwide count are used to help local agencies draw in state

and federal funds for programs aimed at reducing homelessness. Volunteers counted 38 people who were living on the streets in January’s census, down from 200 in 2006 and 79 last year. “Right now, we do have empty beds in shelter facilities,� Wahto said. “We are not seeing any unusual pattern in people seeking services.� Wahto cautioned that she had no way of knowing the circumstances of the people living in the campsites. Police had warned those who were suspected to be camping illegally about an impending cleanup, Smith said.

Impact environment He said illegal campsites, which are less of a problem in the winter, have a “significant impact� on the environment and quality of life. “It doesn’t take much to trash something, especially if you’re putting garbage in the ground and leaving

human waste and then you’re moving on,� Smith said. Those who camp illegally on public property are committing a crime and can be cited and held responsible for some of the cleanup costs. “We have written citations in the past,� Smith said. Maynard has identified other illegal campsites that will be removed in the coming weeks. Clallam County chain gangs have helped the city remove illegal campsites three times within the past year. Much of the chain gang work occurs along county and U.S. Forest Service roads and trails. “We greatly appreciated the assistance from the chain gang,� Smith said. “They’re fantastic guys to work with.� Anyone who finds an illegal campsite in the city is asked to phone the Police Department at 360-4524545.

Stabbing suspect pleads to lesser charge BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man accused of stabbing another on the Waterfront Trail last month has pleaded guilty to a reduced charge and has been released from the Clallam County jail. Edward Paul Horner, 56, pleaded guilty Wednesday to one count of fourthdegree assault after originally being charged with

assault in the first degree after James Hann was stabbed in the chest July 23. Hann was taken to Olympic Medical Center that evening, treated and later released. Horner was sentenced to 30 days in jail with credit for time served and ordered to pay $1,200 in victim assessment and court fees. He had been in jail since the July incident. He also was ordered not

to have contact with Hann started harassing her. for two years. Horner reportedly did not leave when Hann told Police accounts him to, leading to an arguAccording to police ment between the two men accounts, the stabbing hap- that ended with Hann being pened on a stretch of trail stabbed in the upper left near Hollywood Beach at chest. Police arrested Horner about 10 p.m. After Port Angeles police without incident that night. ________ were called, Hann told arriving officers he had Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can been sitting with a woman be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. friend on Hollywood Beach 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula that night when Horner dailynews.com.

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Clallam County corrections officer Nate Clark leads jail inmates in a cleanup of illegal campsites on Front Street at Estuary Park on Aug. 21.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

A9

Man in jail after bullet hits PA home BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Forks man remained in the Clallam County jail Thursday after a fight at Jesse Webster Park in Port Angeles that resulted in an occupied house being hit by gunfire Wednesday. Clallam County sheriff’s deputies arrested Marshall Craig Petrovich, 23, on Wednesday night and booked him for investigation of one count of firstdegree assault, said Brian Smith, deputy Port Angeles police chief. No bond had been set as of Thursday. Petrovich is thought to be one of at least two people who drove away from the park at about 11:15 p.m. Wednesday night in a large white Ford diesel pickup truck after a fight involving multiple people, Smith said. Investigators with the Police Department are looking for the truck and want to talk to others who might have information about the circumstances of the fight. “We have other people of interest we’re looking for,” Smith said. “Our investigators aren’t to the point where we want to name them.”

Several 9-1-1 calls

nvestigators with the Police Department are looking for a large white Ford diesel pickup truck and want to talk to others who might have information about the circumstances of the fight.

I

“At least two [people] left in the vehicle,” he added. Through interviews with witnesses, police learned that at least three people had been involved in a fight, with one suffering minor injuries that did not require hospital treatment, Smith said. Investigators believe Petrovich intended to shoot the person who suffered the injuries and missed.

Arrested in Forks After speaking on the phone with officers, Petrovich surrendered and was arrested in the Forks area without incident later Wednesday night, Smith said. Police still are looking for the firearm, which investigators believe to be a .357 Magnum revolver, Smith added. “All our evidence indicates [Petrovich] fired this firearm at and toward our victim,” Smith said. Detectives are working with the West End extension of the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and the state Department of Corrections on the investigation. Smith said anyone with any additional information about the incident should phone the Police Department at 360-452-4545 or the North Olympic Crime Stoppers’ anonymous tip line at 800-222-TIPS (8477).

Police initially came to the north end of Jesse Webster Park after multiple 9-1-1 calls about someone reportedly hit by a bullet from a single gunshot, Smith said. Police soon found out no one had been hit, though the bullet had broken the window of an occupied house in the 600 block of East Second Street west of the park, Smith explained. No one inside the house was injured, Smith said, adding that the house did not appear to be the intended target. ________ The white truck was Reporter Jeremy Schwartz seen leaving the area imme- can be reached at 360-452-2345, diately after the round was ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@ peninsuladailynews.com. fired, Smith said.

6 injured in truck, bus, car crash on interstate THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Authorities say a semitruck, a charter bus and two cars crashed on Interstate 5 in Seattle on Thursday, leaving a halfdozen people injured. The Seattle fire department said six people were taken to Harborview Medical Center, with one bus passenger in critical condition. Some of the people seriously injured were reporting

neck and back pain. The driver of the semitruck was in serious condition. The crashed happened where Interstate 5 and the West Seattle bridge merge. The roads were wet after heavy showers. The semitruck did not have a trailer attached to it. State Patrol Trooper Chris Webb said the crash blocked two lanes on I-5, snarling traffic.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SLAIN

VETERAN GIVEN MILITARY HONORS

Members of the Spokane Police Motor Unit escort the family of Delbert Belton to a graveside service in Greenwood Memorial Terrace on Thursday in Spokane. The World War II veteran Belton, who died Aug. 21 after being beaten during a robbery, was buried with full military honors.

Woman Choppers: No 9-1-1 calls rescued “I think sometimes we’ll have a few at Lena [Army] helicopters a week up here to get Lake some fuel and conduct CONTINUED FROM A1

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — A 20-year-old student on a school backpacking trip was treated and discharged from Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after suffering a back injury in a remote area of Olympic National Forest and being rescued by a Navy helicopter. University of Puget Sound student Anne Paden was struck by a 6-inchdiameter falling tree at about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night and suffered a concussion and possible cervical spine injury, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said Thursday. Paden was treated and released Wednesday, according to a Harborview spokesperson. Paden was about 3 miles and 1,300 vertical feet from the Lena Lake trailhead, which is located on the Hamma Hamma River Road, when she was hurt, according to the Sheriff’s Office. One of Paden’s student group made an emergency call with a satellite telephone to JeffCom 911 at about 4 a.m. The delay between the injury and the emergency call was not explained, according to Chief Criminal Deputy Joe Nole. A 13-member rescue team was assembled and set up base camp at a trailhead, with three members hiking to Paden, arriving at about 8:30 a.m.

Benedict added that he knew of no 9-1-1 calls made last night about the helicopters. “I wasn’t notified, nor did I expect to be notified.” Lt. Jared Hylander, public affairs officer with Coast Guard Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles on Ediz Hook, also said the Coast Guard was not notified of any Army helicopter activity. Jeff Well, owner of Rite Bros. Aviation based at Fairchild airport, said Thursday the three helicopters did come to the airport but did not take on fuel. He said he did not know for sure if they landed. Army helicopters flying to the airport to take on fuel as part of training is not uncommon, Well said. “I think sometimes we’ll have a few [Army] helicopters a week up here to get some fuel and conduct training,” Well said, adding that the a Black Hawk helicopter was last at the airport Aug. 23. The 16th Combat Aviation Brigade, known as the Raptors, switched their headquarters from Fort Wainwright, Alaska, to Joint Base Lewis-McChord in June 2011, according to the brigade’s website. The brigade has been deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to the website.

Routine training Capt. Jesse Paulsboe, public affairs officer for the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade, said the Wednesday evening flight was part of routine training meant to keep pilots familiar with flying aircraft at night using only cockpit instruments. Paulsboe said public

training.” JEFF WELL owner, Rite Bros. Aviation notice is not typically put out for such training. Pilots from the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment flying Black Hawk and MH-47 Chinook helicopters from the joint base had flown over Port Angeles to the Coast Guard base in the late evening of July 11 while conducting a training exercise. The exercises prompted dozens of concerned calls from Port Angeles residents, after which Mayor Cherie Kidd met with joint base garrison commander Col. H. Charles Hodges Jr. about notifying local law enforcement and city officials about such exercises in the future. Hodges apologized for the lack of prior notification at a City Council meeting in the days following the training exercises and said notification would be made before future exercises.

Witnesses

with the helicopter flying in front of the other two showing a bright light on its nose. “I couldn’t see anything but their running lights,” Armond said. About 45 minutes later at 9:30 p.m., Armond said she saw the same three helicopters flying eastward, with a different helicopter seemingly flying in front. She said the aircraft were flying slower than before, and the two tailing helicopters seemed to be changing positions in their formation. “It was like they were switching places, going in front and going in back,” Armond said, adding that she heard the helicopters first and then went outside to watch them. “They were going quite a bit slower [than before].”

Two flying east Marni Rice, who lives on 10th Street between E and F streets in Port Angeles, said she heard the helicopters for about 30 to 45 seconds and saw two flying east at about 9:30 p.m. Wednesday. She said they appeared to be flying over 11th and 12 streets south of her house at about the altitude a police helicopter would fly if it were searching for someone on the ground. Rice said she watched the helicopters from her home office and could only see their lights, one with a red light visible and the other with a brighter white light. She said she did not think enough about seeing the helicopters to go outside to investigate. “This did not bother me at all,” Rice said.

Rebecca Armond, who lives along Blue Mountain Road east of Port Angeles, said she saw and heard three helicopters that were louder than the ones the Coast Guard uses flying north of her home Wednesday night. Armond said the three helicopters, flying higher than the tops of tall trees, _________ were moving west at about 8:45 p.m. Wednesday. Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can She described the helicop- be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. ters as “all blacked out” and 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula displaying landing lights, dailynews.com.

NIPPON PAPER INDUSTRIES USA

WORKING TOWARD THE FUTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY Nippon’s Biomass Cogeneration Plant is entering into the startup phase of

the project. This “start-up” will take place over a period of about two months and mill management recognizes that it will be of interest to the community. Startup consists of operational checks of systems, steam piping cleaning, refractory curing, operational testing at design capacity, and environmental compliance tests. The startup phase will also result in some short-term periods of additional steam and/or air emissions due to the complexity of the startup process. The process will be conducted under guidelines contained in the mill’s environmental permits and in close cooperation with regulating agencies, such as Olympic Region Clean Air Agency (ORCAA).

August 28, 2013 www.npiusa.com

Nippon greatly appreciates the on-going community support of this project and we will strive to minimize community impacts during this startup process. The mill remains on target for meeting its objectives of producing power by the end of 2013.

38864262

Cogeneration Plant nearing Startup

One of the initial steps in the startup process is curing the boiler refractory. This curing requires slowly heating the boiler to evaporate the moisture out of the refractory over a 2- to 3-day time period and will be performed using the boiler’s auxiliary oil burner. Initiation of the curing process will be the boiler’s first firing -a significant milestone event for our project that we expect to occur within the next week.

BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE NIPPON PAPER INDUSTRIES USA CO.,LTD.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 30-31, 2013 PAGE

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The problem that has two names BY PAMELA PAUL

What exactly does this mean? FIFTY YEARS AFTER Officially, a passBetty Friedan’s Feminine Mysport is supposed to tique and countless principledmatch a person’s but-unwieldy hyphenated names driver’s license, Social later, the problem of married ver- Security card, paysus maiden names should be check and tax good and solved. returns. But many The IRS is pretty women are still clear that if newlycaught in an inweds take their between purgaspouse’s names, they tory: need to change their Why have to Social Security card choose? and file taxes under Like others the new name. This wanting it both could cause problems ways, I held on processing a return to my profesor delay a refund. Paul sional name But lining up all while also takthe paperwork can be ing on my husband’s. arduous. For years, I’ve gone by both, Moreover, you can fearing that at some point I will get away — most of be called out or, worse, arrested. the time — with letThough I moved my last name ting a document here to my middle, this has left me in or there go. a muddle: For several years Under what name do I travel? after I married, I Who pays taxes? What if I, er, traveled blithely with still haven’t switched over my a passport (profesSocial Security card? sional name) that These are questions that for didn’t match my driv10 years I’ve been unable to er’s license (married). answer. This worked even In an era in which identity post-9/11, as I traveled in and out theft is the ultimate crime, I of the New York airport. skulk around on a regular basis It wasn’t until I took a reportfearing that somehow, my othering trip to rural West Virginia, named double is getting me in 8½ months pregnant with my trouble. third child, that the disparity Academics refer to us as “situ- caused a problem. ational name users.” The boarding agent at the According to several studies, Charleston, W.Va., airport took the number of women who keep one look at my mismatched their names after marriage ticket and identification form and peaked in the 1990s, falling from shuffled me into an ominous 23 percent to roughly 18 percent unmarked room. a decade later. Images of giving birth in Women are marrying, at older downtown Charleston swirling in ages, on average five years into my head, I was released after 40 their postcollegiate careers. minutes of panicked phone calls. They’ve already established For the most part, my twoprofessional reputations and net- name status doesn’t get in the works of contacts who know way of major life events even if it them by their given names. results from one. Setting aside the shoulds and But that doesn’t release me the whys behind which name to from other minor entanglements. pick, the obvious answer for the Building security guards often usher me in to work appointambivalent is to use both.

JEANNE DETALLANTE/THE NEW YORK TIMES

ments with my married name emblazoned on a temporary-ID card, or calls up to whomever I’m meeting asking if they’re expecting a person they’ve never heard of. Even on the home front, the double-identification system has its tripwires. Which name should I use at my children’s schools? How do we register for the school auction, and should I have my credit cards changed as well? Can my husband get away with using my Costco card, and how on Earth do we straighten out matters with Zipcar? My young children are all in a permanent state of confusion about the bylines they see under one name and the family name we use at home. Isn’t our shared name part of what unites us as a family? Why

Peninsula Voices Syrian intention The U.S. president has signaled his intention to attack a Middle Eastern nation run by a brutal dictator, citing clear evidence of chemical weapons. A young legislator declares his opposition, calling it “a dumb war” and “a rash war” [that would further] distract us from domestic scandals, against a dictator who . . . poses no imminent threat to the United States. [Sens.] Rand Paul or Ted Cruz on Syria? No, [Illinois State Sen.] Barack Obama in 2002 on Iraq. (A full transcript of the Oct. 2, 2002, speech is available here: tinyurl. com/2002speech.) How times have changed. The United Nations has barely begun its investigation. But why wait? [Vice President] Joe Biden has “no doubt,” and surely that’s good enough. No authorization from the U.N.? What do we need that for? No declaration of war from Congress (those went out of style after World War II) and not even a congressional resolution like those authorizing the use of force against Iraq by President George H.W. Bush and

George W. Bush? Everyone knows that Democrats are so peaceloving that when a Democratic president decides to attack a country, he obviously is right and needs no authorization from Congress. We’d be strengthening an opposition heavily influenced by al-Qaida? Oh well, let’s not talk about that inconvenient truth. Anyway, we did the same in Libya. Do we think an attack on Syria that will almost certainly kill Syrian civilians will earn us the gratitude of the Arab street? Think again. We just add fuel to the arguments of those like Russian Deputy Prime Minister [Dmitry ]Rogozin, who compared the West’s actions in Syria to those of a “monkey with a hand I served a single tour in grenade.” Vietnam, and I know how Kaj Ahlburg, it screwed me up. Port Angeles Bales had served four tours [in the Mideast], and Army sentencing he obviously reached the For the first time in my point that he was unable to reasonably know what he life, I am ashamed of the was doing. U.S. Army for the vicious I can only guess that way it attacked Staff Sgt. those officers on the jury Robert Bales for the killhad never been under ings in Afghanistan enemy fire, as it is some[“Afghans Unsatisfied by thing that you cannot Soldier’s Sentence,” PDN, understand until it hapAug. 25}.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

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would I want to set myself apart? Recently, my 4-year-old rather poignantly declared that he wished his first name were Paul. On occasion, I find myself reading emotional tea leaves into which name my husband uses when referring to me. Shouldn’t the anniversary dinner reservation be under our shared name? Why did he write a check for me made out to “Pamela Paul”? Given my family history, I should have this sorted by now. When my mother divorced my father nearly four decades ago, she had established a career in advertising under her married name and kept it. So when my father remarried, to a woman with the same first name, his new wife couldn’t take his name — if she wanted to — unless she wanted the same

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES

name as his ex. Moreover, I was briefly married while in my 20s to someone else. Then, too, I changed my name, only to change it right back a year later. Processing the paperwork lasted longer than the actual marriage. For now, I continue to use the two-name system, feeling like a comical yet suspect figure out of Dostoyevsky. Don’t ask me to reveal my secret alias now — if I ever decide to one day write a detective novel, I’ll already have my pseudonym.

________ Pamela Paul is the editor of The New York Times Book Review. Her essay originally appeared in The New York Times.

AND EMAIL Americans die from poor health, suicide and just plain neglect. This so-called “war on terrorism” is an excuse for implementing a police state. If the NSA is interested in saving Americans, then its strategy is all wrong. The new surveillance cameras in Port Angeles are disgraceful. The police and the military are merging. The United Nations is slowly but surely dictating policy. Americans have given up on liberty. Maybe liberty is overrated? It’s too bad my uncles and their friends fought for a lost cause. Evan Bradow, Port Angeles

pens to you. To destroy his life and those of his family is a travesty to the idea of “supporting our troops.” I can only hope that one day Bales will be pardoned so that he may return to his family. And to those jury members, I can only say that you have failed your fellow soldier. Terry L. Casey, Port Angeles

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Domestic spying

False signal

I wonder if the National Security Agency is misguided in their effort to protect the American people. Wouldn’t its spying tools save more lives if it were to read every email and intervene in cases of domestic violence and suicide? Terrorism [represents] a fraction of a fraction of danger to the American public.

These warm-weather days, a lot of drivers are extending their arms out their car windows, giving other drivers the false impression that they are about to make a left turn. Please refrain from this motion, as it could cause an accident. Kurt Vieten, Sequim

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CommentaryViewpoints

Some in GOP get impeachment fever ON THIS WEEK’S 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, Kerry Bentivolio, a Michigan congressman, has a dream, too: to impeach the nation’s first black president. “If I could Maureen write that bill and submit it, Dowd it would be a dream come true,” the freshman Republican told a local GOP club meeting Monday in Birmingham, Mich., in a video posted on YouTube and reported by BuzzFeed. Bentivolio graciously conceded that he’d have to come up with some grounds first. “I went back to my office and I have had lawyers come in,” he said. “And these are lawyers, well — Ph.D.’s in history — I said, ‘Tell me how I can impeach the president of the United States. What evidence do you have?’ You’ve got to have the evidence.” The tea party congressman, a member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, hopes to find e-mails linking the White House to the IRS examination of groups with a “tea party” label seeking taxexempt status. “I stood 12 feet away from the guy and listened to him and I couldn’t stand being there,” he said of President Barack Obama, “but because he is president, I have to respect the office.” Bentivolio is the perfect avatar of the impeachment fever gripping a GOP that’s unmoored from reality, given that he once admitted in a court deposition: “I have a problem figuring out which one I really am, Santa Claus or Kerry Bentivolio.” That’s why he sometimes used the pronoun “we.” He’s been playing Santa Claus

— as part of a business he started 19 years ago called Old Fashion Santa — with his own six reindeer. “To project authenticity, he’s even sought clearance from Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Mount Clemens to fly his sleigh in its airspace on Christmas Eve,” Kathleen Gray wrote in The Detroit Free Press. He told National Review that he takes being called crazy as a compliment, so “it didn’t really bother me when people were saying, ‘That guy’s kooky because he has reindeer.’ “No, they’re kooky because they don’t have ’em.” The Free Press reported that Bentivolio, no Edmund Gwenn in “Miracle on 34th Street,” left a teaching job in 2011 “after complaints he bullied students, even telling one class on its first day that his goal was to make all the students cry once during the year.” How much more gratifying to bully the president. Not content with fighting off a popular immigration overhaul or threatening to shut down the government and set off the first federal default, hard-core congressional Republicans want to nullify the election. And as David Axelrod told me, there isn’t a “scintilla of justification.” It’s lucky the president got another dog if Tom Coburn is his friend. At a town hall in Muskogee, on Wednesday, when an audience member called the administration “lawless,” the Oklahoma senator said his buddy was “getting perilously close” to the standard of high crimes and misdemeanors. “I wonder what Coburn is saying about his enemies,” Axelrod says dryly. In Texas recently, another Republican congressman, Blake

Farenthold, answered a birther at a town hall: “If we were to impeach the president tomorrow, we would probably get the votes in the House of Representatives to do it,” he said, but added that it would never pass in the Senate. At another Texas session Monday, someone asked Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Canada) why they couldn’t impeach Obama. “It’s a good question,” Cruz replied, before noting that Democrats control the Senate. Earlier this month, the president’s motorcade pulled into the Orlando Hilton and was greeted by about 50 protesters holding signs saying “Kenyan Go Home,” “Impeach Obama” and “Obama Lies.” BuzzFeed had a pictorial on the “Overpasses for Obama’s Impeachment” fad, where people hold up homemade signs on overpasses. And they reported on 100,000 preorders for the book Impeachable Offenses: The Case for Removing Barack Obama from Office, covering sore points from Benghazi to Obamacare to TSA screenings. The Democrats never impeached W., and they had real grounds: starting a war on false premises and sanctioning torture. “The Republican Party is in a constant struggle between its ego and its id,” Axelrod says, “and the id has mostly won out lately.” It isn’t the president who should leave. It’s the misguided lawmakers trying to drive him out. For some of the rodeo clowns clamoring for impeachment around the country, Barack Obama’s real crime is presiding while black.

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

How many more Hasans in our ranks? A MILITARY JURY sentenced unrepentant Fort Hood jihadist Nidal Hasan to death Wednesday. But if another murMichelle derous Muslim soldier’s case is Malkin any indication, Hasan may be sitting in the catbird seat for years to come. And our men and women in uniform will remain endangered by Islamic vigilantes in their own ranks. Remember Sgt. Hasan Akbar? On March 23, 2003, this hatefilled soldier with the 326th Engineer Battalion lobbed stolen hand grenades and shot his M-4 automatic rifle into three tents filled with sleeping commanding officers at the 101st Airborne Division’s 1st Brigade operations center in Kuwait. The grenade attack claimed the lives of two American patriots: Capt. Christopher Seifert and Maj. Gregory Stone. Like Hasan, the militant Muslim Akbar gave plenty of notice that he was a threat to his fellow servicemen. His bosses pegged him as a menace with an “attitude problem” well before the fragging. Despite several incidents of insubordination and prior invocation of his Islamic beliefs to skip out of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Akbar’s superiors dispatched him to Kuwait on the eve of the invasion of Iraq — and put him in charge of clearing land mines. Sensitivity trumped soldier safety. At Akbar’s court martial, prosecutors read vengeful quotes from his diary, in which he vowed: “I am going to try and kill as many of them as possible,” and “My life will not be complete

unless America is destroyed.” Eyewitnesses said that after his arrest, he inveighed against his fellow troops: “You guys are coming into our countries, and you’re going to rape our women and kill our children.” This soldier of Allah, not America, was sentenced to death in April 2005 on two counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of premeditated attempted murder. But Akbar, unlike his victims, still lives. And so does his Quaran-inspired hatred of our soldiers (a pathology addressed specifically in the slide presentation Nidal Hasan gave to his colleagues at Walter Reed Army Hospital). As I reported exclusively during the trial, Akbar stole a pair of scissors and stabbed an attending MP in the shoulder and neck. The judge downplayed the new attack as an “opportunistic stabbing.” Meanwhile, Akbar’s lawyers are using every opportunity to exploit the legal system. Eight years after his sentencing and 10 years after his jihad attack, Akbar’s case remains on appeal. It is likely headed for the Supreme Court — and even after that, no execution will take place until the president gives it a green light. I can guarantee you there’s a snowball’s chance in hell that the Obama administration, which deemed Nidal Hasan’s jihad at Fort Hood “workplace violence,” will be rushing to send Akbar to meet his 72 virgins anytime soon. You can also mark my words on this: Despite the blood-red flags and warnings of these soldiers of Allah, our feckless feds have done little to prevent the next Nidal Hasan or Hasan Akbar from striking again. Past al-Qaida-linked Muslim soldiers inside the U.S. military include:

■ Army soldier Ali Mohamed, who pleaded guilty to conspiring with Osama bin Laden to “attack any Western target in the Middle East” and admitted his role in the 1998 African embassy bombings. ■ Naval reservist Semi Osman, who was linked to a terrorist training camp in Oregon. ■ Jeffrey Leon Battle, Army reservist who pleaded guilty to conspiring to levy war against the United States. ■ Navy sailor Hassan AbuJihaad (you read that right), who was convicted on espionage and material terrorism support charges after serving aboard the USS Benfold and sharing classified information with al-Qaida financiers, including movements of U.S. ships just six months after al-Qaida operatives had killed 17 Americans aboard the USS Cole in the port of Yemen. ■ Army Pfc. Naser Jason Abdo, an overt anti-American agitator who plotted to kill his fellow soldiers to “get even” with the military and strike at kafirs (non-Muslims). The common thread tying these infiltrators together? Nidal Hasan spelled it out for his deaf, dumb and willfully blind military superiors: “We love death more then [sic] you love life!” He recommended that the military allow Muslim soldiers “the option of being released” to “increase troop morale and decrease adverse events.” Hasan’s report was ignored by his superiors, excluded from his trial and goes unheeded at the Pentagon today. Political correctness is an American soldier of Allah’s best friend.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Board delays again

Karaoke Idol wraps series of concerts PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Tom Heintz’s renditions of “Unforgettable” and “Can’t Help Falling in Love with You” earned him first-place status and a $100 prize at the Sequim Karaoke Idol contest earlier this week. An estimated 125 to 150 people gathered at the James Center for the Performing Arts amphitheater for the amateur singing contest Tuesday, event coordinator and Sequim Deputy City Clerk Bobbie Usselman said.

‘Fun’ The karaoke contest was the final concert in the city’s summerlong Music in the Park series. “It was fun,” Usselman said. Each of the 16 performers in the contest sang one initial song.

Five finalists then were chosen to sing a second song and compete for bragging rights and cash prizes. Kristy Douglas earned the $50 second-place prize for her versions of “I’m Alright” and “Shoop Shoop.” Jon Wall took third place and a $25 prize for singing “The Chair” and “Old Red” with some help from his 4-year-old daughter, Rebeckah. Usselman said there was “quite a variety” in the types of music performed. “Country always goes over well,” she said. The audience sang classics such as “YMCA” and “King of the Road” as the judges were deliberating. Children especially enjoyed doing the “Hokey Pokey,” Usselman said. “It sprinkled right before it started,” she added. “As soon as it finished, the skies opened.”

Health plans awaiting OK for exchange BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jon Wall of Sequim sings George Strait’s “The Chair” while his daughter, Rebeckah, 4, sits next to him Tuesday at the James Center for the Performing Arts in Sequim. The duo won the “cuteness” award and third place. Thirteen contestants sang as part of the final concert in Sequim’s Music in the Park 2013 series.

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OLYMPIA — The board for the state health exchange Thursday once again delayed a vote on approval of 31 plans proposed to be part of the system. After previously delaying a vote last week, the board of the Washington Health Benefit Exchange voted 7-2 to delay the final vote until next Wednesday, to coincide with an already scheduled meeting to consider additional companies that are appealing exclusion by Washington’s insurance commissioner. Earlier this month, Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler approved four insurance companies to join the exchange and rejected proposals by five others because he said their plans didn’t fit all the rules set up by the federal government as part of the new federal health law. Some of those companies have appealed Kreidler’s decision and are in the middle of an appeals process. Michael Marchand, spokesman for the exchange, has said the delay in finalizing insurance plans for Washington will not affect the state’s open enrollment period, set to begin Oct. 1. “This board action was taken in order to provide as many health coverage options to consumers as possible,” Richard Onizuka, CEO for the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, said in a written statement after the vote.

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Preliminary approval Of the nine companies that applied to sell health plans in the exchange, the four that were preliminarily approved were Bridgespan, Group Health Cooperative, Premera Blue Cross and LifeWise, a subsidiary of Premera. The companies that applied but were not approved for the exchange were Moda Health Plan Inc., Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, Community Health Plan of Washington, Coordinated Care Co. and Molina Healthcare of Washington Inc. Only insurance companies approved by the upcoming vote will be able to offer individual health insurance through Washington’s exchange during the open enrollment period, between Oct. 1 and March 31. Other companies will have to wait to join next year during the second open enrollment period, Oct. 15-Dec. 7, 2014

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Outside the exchange Group Health Cooperative, LifeWise and Premera also have approved individual plans for outside of the exchange, and six additional insurers have applied for plans outside of the exchange, but Kreidler has until the end of September to approve those plans and rates. Kaiser is the only company that has applied to sell small-employer plans inside the exchange, and it was approved by Kreidler to sell nine plans in Clark and Cowlitz counties. That approval also requires a vote by the health exchange board. The state’s call center will open Tuesday to take questions from people about the open enrollment period.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 30-31, 2013 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

B

Of

MOUNTAINS

MEN

&

Re-enactors demonstrate an earlier way of life

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (2)

“Mountain man” Charlie Stowe of Black Diamond fires his Monarch 41-caliber black powder derringer at a target during the annual Green River Mountain Men Rendezvous on Slab Camp Road in 2011.

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Flintlocks, Dutch ovens and canvas tents will become a way of life for four days over the Labor Day weekend for re-enactors who will transform a meadow in the Olympic Mountains foothills above Sequim into an early 19th-century trading camp. The Green River Mountain Men present their annual Rendezvous from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today through Monday at the Peninsula Long Rifles property on Slab Camp Road, just off Lost Mountain Road, accessed by Taylor Cutoff Road. Directional signs to guide visitors to the event will be placed along the way. Admission is free for “flatlanders” — the Mountain Men term for visitors — who are encouraged to wear period costumes if they have them. The entry fee for shooting competitions is $20 per person for shooters 13 and older. Flatlanders can learn to shoot a period weapon at the firing range for a small fee. Campsites cost $20 for tents or “tin teepees,” also known as RVs. The Mountain Men create a re-enactment of the annual fur trappers’ gatherings that took place between 1820 and 1840. The gathering features historic-style campsites and period-dressed re-enactors with hands-on opportunities for adults and children. “It’s all very historically accurate,” said Lance Mertz, past “booshway,” or boss, of the camp.

Rusty Young, left, builds a fire in his blacksmith forge as Carson Edminster of Rainier, center, and Austin Michal of Chehalis watch at the Green River Mountain Men Rendezvous in 2011.

The Hudson’s Bay Co., with the blessing of the British government, essentially controlled the Pacific Northwest during Period-accurate activities and demonstrations will include black-powder shoots that period, including trade and authorization to make and enforce laws. with derringer pistols and flintlock and The event is dusty, primitive and raw, caplock rifles; primitive archery and knife according to Mertz. throwing; a Dutch oven cooking competi“Kids are great there. They love it,” he tion; scrimshaw art; traditional music; mountain-style storytelling; and children’s said. Period costumes will be available for games. The historical experience is a living les- purchase at the Rendezvous. Vendors at the Rendezvous also will son in early Pacific Northwest lifestyles, Mertz said. offer a wide variety of period reproduction

Shoots, demonstrations

camping gear, cooking utensils, tools and weapons. Water is not available at the site, and fires will not be permitted. All cooking will be done using gas stoves. Conditions at the event site are very dry, which may restrict some traditional activities, Mertz said. “We will observe the current fire ban unless it is lifted,” he said. An auction for traders, also known as vendors, is planned at 5 p.m. Sunday. Vendors began setting up Thursday.

Fees to be a vendor are $20, plus $15 in items for the auction. The Green River Mountain Men is a nonprofit organization of men and women dedicated to educating the community about the pre-1840s fur trade era. For more information, phone Mertz at 206-384-9496 or email lance.mertz@gmail. com.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-4522345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladaily news.com.

Little something for everyone Other Historical society to open area doors on huge garage sale events BY ARWYN RICE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Historical Society will open the doors today to the former Lincoln School for a garage sale so big it is organized like a department store. The 19th Clallam County Historical Society garage sale is set from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Saturday at the historical brick school located at the corner of Eighth and C streets. It will continue next weekend, with half-price day from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 6 and a special sale Saturday, Sept. 7, when remaining items will be sold for a “buck a bag.”

Like a department store Garage sale enthusiasts and curious wanderers can dive into a vast array of items, including tools, clothing, books, household items, furniture, crafts and collectibles. Each type of item has its own department within the old classrooms and hallways. “We have a lot of really nice

collectibles this year,” said Kathy Monds, executive director of the historical society. Many of the items are Asian in origin or style, Monds said. She added that the society experienced an unexpected flurry of donations of chairs and rolling pins.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Lots of donations There were so many donations this year that the many boxes of items had to be stored upstairs and will be moved to the sale floor as shelf space becomes available, so there will be something new each day, she said. The giant sale is the historical society’s biggest annual fundraiser. It helps fund the Museum at the Carnegie and other historical society operations as well as restoration of the old school site. The 1916 brick schoolhouse that will house the sale is also a primary recipient of the money raised, but this year, the historical society’s research library also will be a beneficiary, Monds said. The library, located in a building behind the school, will be

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County Historical Society Executive Director Kathy Monds, left, and board member Virginia Fitzpatrick display a table of collectible items at Lincoln School. The society’s garage sale begins today at 8 a.m. and continues through Saturday. expanded and improved, she said. Memberships can be purchased at the event. They are $35 for families, $30 for individuals, $25 for senior citizens and $10 for youths.

Renovation efforts The sale provides visitors an annual look at the progression of renovation efforts at the former Lincoln School, which was purchased by the historical society in 1991 at a cost of $210,000 and

which will house the Clallam County Museum and Resource Center. Proceeds from this year’s sale will go toward the renovation of the research library, Monds said. In a recent incident, a large multi-paned, wood-framed window fell from the second floor of the school building, but miraculously, none of the windows, nor the wooden frame, was broken, Monds said. TURN

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A drive-in theater celebration, lavender distillation, a gun show and dramatic reading are among the activities offered on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For arts and entertainment news, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in today’s edition.

Port Townsend Maritime tour PORT TOWNSEND — The Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St., will offer free rides on the support vessel Martha J and tours of the center’s pilothouse simulator from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday. For more information on the center’s classes and services, visit www.nwmaritime.org. TURN

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A good, old-fashioned backyard street party 8th Quilcene Shindig set BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — The Quilcene Shindig is a big block party. The eighth annual event, which will be Saturday on Old Church Road at U.S. Highway 101 across the street from the post office, will provide music, food and a chance to hang out with friends and neighbors. “Many people say it’s truly the most fun event that happens in Quilcene every year,” said Linda Herzog of Quilcene. “You can bring your lawn chair, your kids, your friends, your dog and your fun-loving spirit.” The event is free, but donations are accepted and will be used to pay the performers and contribute to the restoration of the Quilcene Theater, the old movie theater that has been

closed for several years. Activities are slated to start at noon Saturday and end at 8 p.m., but the times are more suggestions than rules. “Those of you who’ve participated in Shindig in past years know that it ends when the party is over, and that’s not 8 p.m.,” Herzog said.

Band debut

Groove Merchants, Static Illusion, the Machete Sisters, Scott Wilson and Elizabeth Frantz. A special guest will be Lynval Golding, a British reggae musician who was a member of The Specials and Fun Boy Three who now lives in the area. Plaid Pepper’s Hot Dog Stand will be there, along with other food vendors. Additionally a “tarpologist,” or tarp artist, will be on hand to provide shelter in case of rain. “So rain or shine, we will be ready,” Herzog said. Brotherton said the event’s success depends on volunteers. “It can be a struggle to get this done,” he said. “But the more people who come in to help, the easier it gets.”

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County Historical Society Executive Director Kathy Monds prepares a wreath for a display of Christmas items on a staircase at Lincoln School. The society’s garage sale begins today at 8 a.m. and continues through Saturday.

Quilcene Community Store manager Greg Brotherton’s band, the Village Idiots, will have its debut at the event. “It’s a good, old-fashioned street party,” Brotherton said. “It’s a backyard barbecue for the whole community where everyone can ________ come and have a good time.” Jefferson County Editor CharAside from Brotherton’s lie Bermant can be reached at band, performers will be 360-385-2335 or cbermant@ Locust Street Taxi, The peninsuladailynews.com.

Sale: Museum-quality

YMCA’s hiking club takes first trek today PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Youths younger than 14 must be accompanied by adults. Those younger than 18 need written consent from a parent or guardian to hike. Transportation to the trailhead is provided for the first nine registered participants. Each hike requires a minimum enrollment of four people.

PORT ANGELES — The first hike for a new club formed by the Olympic Peninsula YMCA is today. The hike will be from Hurricane Ridge to Hurricane Hill. The new club, Summit Seekers, is for people of all ability levels. Kyle Cronk, the CEO of the YMCA, will lead the Friday hikes, which are free Suggested equipment and open to all. The YMCA suggests that participants bring “a small Begins 8 a.m. backpack, water (1 liter for Hikes begin at 8 a.m., every 5 miles or two to three unless otherwise noted, and hours), food, rain gear, hikare completed within four ing boots or sturdy foothours. wear, layered clothing, sun-

screen, hat, sunglasses, insect repellent and enthusiasm.” Hikes have been scheduled through Nov. 1. They are: ■ Obstruction Point to PJ Lake on Friday, Sept. 20. ■ Hurricane Ridge to Mount Angeles on Friday, Oct. 4. ■ Marymere Falls on Friday, Oct. 18. ■ Spruce Railroad Trail on Friday, Nov. 1. To reserve a spot, sign up at the front desk, phone 360-452-9244 or email Jennifer Veneklasen at jennifer @olympicpeninsulaymca. org.

CONTINUED FROM B1 any department except collectibles. The collectibles depart“I was stunned,” she ment remained off-limits said. Monds said the window until the public sale begins, will be cleaned and rein- according to historical society rules. stalled. Every year, a handful of Eventually, the windows museum-quality items with will be replaced, she said. Members and volunteers connections to Clallam who worked at least 10 County history are donated hours in preparation for the for the sale and are added sale were allowed to pur- into the museum collection. Membership applicachase items during a members-only sale Thursday in tions can be picked up at

the society’s administration office at the Lincoln School site or at www.clallam historicalsociety.com. For more information about the garage sale, phone the historical society’s office at 360-452-2662 or email artifact@olypen. com.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

Dogs, owners invited to Bark For Life benefit PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Dogs and their owners will walk and participate in contests and games to raise money for cancer research at the American Cancer Society’s Bark For Life of Port Angeles on Saturday. Bark For Life will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clallam County Fairgrounds, 1609 W. 16th St., on Saturday.

Registration will begin at 8 a.m. The noncompetitive walk will start at 9 a.m. Registration is $10 for one dog and an additional $5 for a second dog.

Dog contests Contests for the dogs will award trophies for the best costume, best trick, smallest dog and largest dog. Games for people will include a three-legged race.

The winners of the cutest-dog contest held on www.facebook.com/Bark ForLifePortAngeles will be announced Saturday. The top 12 dogs will be invited to be in the group’s first calendar, which will be sold to raise money for the Port Angeles Relay For Life. To find out more about Bark For Life and Relay For Life in the community, phone 800-227-2345 or visit www.relayforlife.org.

Fair results online

WHITE CRANE SEMINAR SERIES

The Clallam County Amateur Radio Club will hold a Technician and General License instruction classes and exam, beginning September 7, 14, 21 (95), based on chapters from the ARRL Technician or General Class Manual.   The class is free and is taught by the Ham Radio Operators of the Clallam County Amateur Radio Club and the Amateur Radio Emergency Service group. There is a $15.00 processing fee for the exam. Call Chuck at 452-4672 or Dennis at 452-1217.

September 7th & 8th Patriot Days annual event with 3 Grandmasters and 8 Masters. Ju-Jitsu, Judo, Hapkido, pressure point study all day Saturday and Sunday, at least ten hours of instruction. Weekend pass for all events $50! Olympic Judo coach Leudtke, White Crane Headmaster Nicholls, Pacific Northwest Taekwondo president Rohr. Instructors from Oregon, Washington and elsewhere! Held at White Crane in Downtown Port Angeles. 808-2271 or 477-4926

CPR-AED/ FIRST AID CLASS!

CAGEWORX MMA & BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU

Clallam County Fire District 2 is offering a CPRAED/First Aid Class on Saturday,  September 7, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. All classes meet American Heart Association guidelines. Cost is $40.00. Half day classes are also available. For further information call 360-417-4790 or email admin@clallamfire2.org or visit our website at www. clallamfire2.org.

CageworX (CwX) Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and MMA 103 Elwha Rd. is the Olympic Peninsula’s premier training facility. CwX offers classes 6 days a week in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Kickboxing, Wrestling, Boxing and MMA as well as our popular Women’s Only Kickboxing and Youth/Teens MMA program. Head coach and manager Cody Houston

has over 18 years experience in the martial arts and is the areas only Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt under the highly respected Professor Marcelo Alonso. If you’re a first day beginner or a seasoned competitive athlete CwX’s classes are structured for you to learn at your own pace in a safe and friendly environment. Memberships are tailored to meet your specific training needs and CwX is the states only martial arts facility that offers 24/7 gym access with cardio machines, weights, mats, bags and cage. Law enforcement/Military/ Competition discounts available. For questions and info: www.cageworx. com or 360-504-2751.

Advertise in Classes & Lessons Only $20 per week for up to 75 words. 25¢ each additional word. Also listed online at peninsuladailynews. com. Submit by calling Margot at  360-452-8435  or  1-800-826-7714  or email her at  mconway@ peninsuladailynews. com. You may also come to our office at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday publication.

38863824

AMATEUR RADIO CLASSES & EXAM

THE HUNDREDS OF winners from this month’s Jefferson County and Clallam County fairs are being posted on the Peninsula Daily News’ website as the results are received. To view the results, simply visit www.peninsuladailynews.com, scroll down the homepage to the buttons “Clallam Fair Results” and “Jefferson Fair Results,” and click on a button. Adobe Acrobat Flash Player is required to view the documents. The PDN annually posts the fairs’ results as a public service on the North Olympic Peninsula’s most visited website, with more than 1.5 million page views monthly. Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

B3

Events: Drive-in celebrates anniversary Free CONTINUED FROM B1

Sequim

Rummage sale benefit

Lavender how-to

PORT TOWNSEND — A rummage sale to benefit local women and children will be at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, corner of Jefferson and Tyler streets, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. As well as the usual furniture, tools, household/garden items, appliances, jewelry and more, there will be a raffle for a doll with homemade clothing and hand-painted crib, and a special handbag table. Refreshments also will be available for purchase.

‘Mongrel Folk’ music PORT TOWNSEND — The Kings of Mongrel Folk, Orville Johnson and Mark Graham, will bring their musical instruments and satire to the Key City Playhouse tonight. Johnson, known for guitar and country singing, and Graham, noted for harmonica and comedy, will step up at 8 p.m. in the playhouse at 419 Washington St. in this Key City Cabaret series show. Tickets are $15 at www. KeyCityPublicTheatre.org and 360-385-KCPT (5278).

Drive-in celebration PORT TOWNSEND — A special celebration of the Wheel-In Motor Movie’s 60th anniversary is planned for Sunday. A pre-show barbecue and prize drawing will be held beginning when the box office opens at 7 p.m. A triple feature is planned with two animated films from Disney/Pixar — “Monsters University” (G) and “Despicable Me 2” (PG) — followed by “Iron Man 3”

SCOTT HERRICK

Orville Johnson, left, and Mark Graham pair up for country, roots and folk music at the Key City Playhouse in Port Townsend tonight. (PG-13). A special pancake and sausage breakfast will be available for the “Iron Man 3” nightcap. The Wheel-In Motor Movie currently is competing for a new digital projector in Honda’s Project Drive-In Contest. The public can vote for the Wheel-In at www. projectdrivein.com.

Nordland

Port Ludlow

Flagler concert NORDLAND — Eric Miller will perform at Fort Flagler State Park’s Battery Bankhead, 10541 Flagler Road, at 7 p.m. Saturday. He will be joined by Sabu, Anna and Denali Williams on drums.

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TURN

TO

EVENTS/B4

The 62-foot-long medically equipped Lions Health Screening Unit travels throughout the state and northern Idaho to provide free health screenings. Patients will be checked for glaucoma, diabetes, high blood pressure and sight and hearing loss. Screening are open to all, and no appointments are needed. The screenings are a program of the Northwest Lions Foundation for Sight and Hearing. For information on the Port Angeles screening, phone Irma Stennes at 360417-6862. For information on the Sequim event, phone George Dooley at 360-4522185.

peninsuladailynews.com

The Port Angeles School District applies pesticides as needed throughout the year. Pesticides are only utilized when it is determined that there is no alternative treatment that will be successful. As much as possible, the district relies on an environmentally sensitive, common sense approach to pest control that focuses on custodial practices, landscaping, and other preventive measures. The district approach to pest control is devoted to removing the root causes of landscape and structural pest infestations and only calls for the use of pesticides as a last resort. The School District will continue to make every effort to minimize the use of pesticides in schools. When pesticide use does become necessary, every effort will be made to schedule applications so they do not take place while students or staff members are present. For information regarding the use of pesticides in the school district, please contact the Maintenance Department at 360.457.0949 (RCW 28A.320.1651; RCW 17.21.415[2]).

It is a requirement that all local education agencies conduct a re-inspection of all facilities every three years for the purpose of assessing previously identified location of ACBMs. This inspection was completed in 2012 by Brooks Technical Services, an EPA-accredited asbestos inspection company. The results of the re-inspection are included in the Facility Management Plan located in each school building’s administrative office. It is the policy of the School District to provide a safe environment for all students, faculty, staff and visitors. This goal is accomplished by providing safe working conditions, programs of training and education related to safe working environments. We review and improve our facilities and practices on a regular basis. For more information, please contact the Maintenance Department at 360.457.0949. Visit 2013-14 Public Notices at www.portangelesschools.org for additional Notification Information. Port Angeles School District 216 East Fourth Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.457.8575 www.portangelesschools.org

38858445

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SEQUIM — The Olympic Peninsula Air Affaire — a combination celebration of Sequim Valley Airport’s 30th anniversary and the city of Sequim’s centennial — takes place at the airport, 468 Dorothy Hunt Road from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. (See story on Page A1 today.) Admission is free; parking is $5 per vehicle.

Mobile unit

In compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulations covering asbestos-containing building materials (ACBMs) in schools, this notice is the Port Angeles School District’s annual notification to parents/ guardians, students, staff and community members that ACBMs are present in the buildings.

38863186

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Lions clubs in Clallam County will offer free mobile health screenings in Port Angeles and Sequim in September. The Port Angeles screening will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in Swain’s General Store’s parking lot, 602 E. First St. The Sequim screening will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, in the Safeway parking lot, 680 W. Washington St.

To keep parents/guardians, students, staff and community members informed of any application of pesticides, Port Angeles School District provides this annual notification.

added hormones antibiotics preservatives

EVER

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Port Ludlow Beach Club, 121 Marine Drive off Oak Bay Road. Admission is free after 10 a.m., but a $5 admission charge from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. will apply to early buyers who would like the opportunity to seek out preferred books. Hardback books will sell for $1.50; paperbacks, 75 cents; books on tape, $3; DVDs and board games, $1; and puzzles and CDs, 50 cents. From 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., attendees can fill bags for $2 each. All proceeds from the sale will go to the Community Enrichment Alliance’s scholarship fund. Last year, three scholarships were awarded to Chimacum High School students in addition to funding other educational requests.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

2013-14 SCHOOL YEAR ANNUAL NOTIFICATIONS

Reg $10.49

added hormones antibiotics preservatives

NO

PORT LUDLOW — The Port Ludlow Community Enrichment Alliance will hold its annual preownedbook and -media sale Saturday. The sale will be from

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The band’s music combines the genre of American folk with rock, country and blues. Cost is $8 for adults and free for children 13 and younger. Attendees are encouraged to bring a picnic and beverages. A Discover Pass is required. To hear Miller’s music, visit www.ericmillersongs. com. For concert information, email fofflagler@ gmail.com.

SEQUIM — Five farms will cap off the lavender harvest season with demonstrations of cleaning, debudding and distilling lavender oil Saturday and Sunday. Farms participating in the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association event will open their doors between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. both days. Guests may check out operations at one or all of the farms, which include Jardin du Soleil, 3932 Sequim-Dungeness Way; Lost Mountain Lavender, 1541 Taylor Cutoff Road; Purple Haze Lavender, 180 Bell Bottom Road; Victor’s Lavender Farm, 3743 Old Olympic Highway; and Washington Lavender, 965 Finn Hall Road. Lavender distillation demonstrations are planned at Jardin du Soleil Lavender at 10 a.m. Saturday, at Purple Haze at 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, and at Washington Lavender from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The “budder” and cleaner will run throughout the day Saturday and Sunday at Lost Mountain Lavender.

health checks slated


B4

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Fort Townsend trail run scheduled Sunday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The 14th running of the Fort Townsend 4-Mile Trail Run/Walk will begin at 9 a.m. Sunday. Registration for the run, which is open to the public, will be from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. in the Friends’ Barn at Fort Townsend

State Park off state Highway 20 in Port Townsend. The registration fee is $15 for adults and $10 for children 16 and younger. Awards will be presented for first-place overall male and female, and the first three finishers in eight age categories.

Brian Taylor, a ranger at Fort Friends of Fort Townsend Flagler State Park, began the maintain the 6.5 miles of park event 14 years ago. trails and continue to sponsor the event. Perfect for competition Members of the PT Running A runner himself, Taylor Club handle course layout and viewed the trails at Fort Townsend run finisher statistics. as perfect for a competitive trail Trails used for the event are run. part of the park trail system that

was laid out and prepared by Larry Stevens, ranger at Fort Townsend State Park in the 1970s. A state Discover Pass or oneday pass is required to park at Fort Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-1792 or 360-385-2998.

Events: Driftwood art demonstration at MAC CONTINUED FROM B3 Grange’s Macleay Hall, 290 Macleay Road, from 9 a.m. Aerial demonstrations to 5 p.m. Saturday and from will include stunt pilots, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. General admission is $5 skydivers, wing-walkers and remote-controlled air- for adults, $7 for families. Those 17 and younger craft. A classic car show, live will be admitted free but music and food vendors also must be accompanied by an adult. are planned. Vendor tables are availHot-air balloon rides will be offered for a fee from able for $35. Display tables for clubs 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. both days. or individual for-profit programs are $20 each day. Driftwood demo There is no charge for SEQUIM — Local artists nonprofit shooting organifrom a variety of disciplines zations that wish to staff a are giving free programs at display table. the Museum & Arts Center Setup will go from 6 p.m. — better known as the MAC to 9 p.m. today. — through this summer Food and drink will be and fall. available at the show. This Saturday, awardGuards will be on duty winning driftwood artist tonight until 4 p.m. Sunday. and certified LuRon method For more information, instructor Tuttie Peetz will phone Don Roberts at 360talk driftwood from 11 a.m. 457-1846 or email donr@ to 2 p.m. olypen.com. Barbara Ralph, also an accomplished driftwood art- ‘Inspecting’ tryouts ist, will join Peetz for the SEQUIM — Olympic free demonstration. Theatre Arts and director Light refreshments are Lee Harwell will hold audilaid out during the program tions for the fall production at the MAC, 175 W. Cedar “Inspecting Carol” at the St. OTA playhouse, 414 N. For more on this and Sequim Ave., at other MAC activities, visit 11 a.m. Saturday and again www.macsequim.org or at 1 p.m. Sunday. phone 360-683-8110. The play, described as “A

Gun show SEQUIM — The Pacific Northwest Shooting Park Association will hold a gun show at the Sequim Prairie

Christmas Carol” meets “The Government Inspector” meets “Noises Off,” has roles for four women and seven men ages 25 to 75, plus one boy aged 11 to 14.

days from Nov. 15 to Dec. 1, phone Harwell at 360-6833022. For more about activities at OTA, visit www.Olympic TheatreArts.org or phone the box office weekdays between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at 360-683-7326.

Port Angeles Club tackles classic

SUE CHICKMAN

Driftwood artist Tuttie Peetz, here with her “Enchanted Heron” sculpture, will give a free demonstration at Sequim’s Museum & Arts Center on Saturday. In “Inspecting,” a man who asks to audition at a small theater is mistaken for an informer for the National Endowment for the Arts. Everyone caters to the bewildered actor, and he’s

given a role in the current production, “A Christmas Carol.” All goes astray after that. For details about “Inspecting Carol,” which will take the OTA stage Fridays, Saturdays and Sun-

PORT ANGELES — Norman Maclean’s A River Runs Through It and Other Stories will be discussed by Man Up for the Book Club at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., at 6:30 p.m. tonight. The collection of stories, based on Maclean’s experiences as a young man, has been hailed as a modern American classic. A River Runs Through It focuses on the troubled relationship between two brothers who share the deep bond and rivalry of dedicated fishermen. “From his childhood fishing in the Blackfoot River to coming of age in logging and U.S. Forest Service camps, Maclean leads the reader through the rugged landscape of Montana, where the wilderness divides boy from man,” according to the library. Print copies of the book are available at the library. Man Up is a new book club that will explore the

working man’s experience on the frontiers of land, family, labor and discovery. Pre-registration for this program is not required. Drop-ins are always welcome. For more information, visit www.nols.org and click on “Events” and “Port Angeles,” or contact Lorrie Kovell at 360-417-8500, ext. 7750, or lkovell@nols.org.

Tourism talk tonight PORT ANGELES — Mary Brelsford, communications manager of the Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau, will talk on “YearRound Tourism on the Peninsula” at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. tonight. Her free presentation is part of the hotel’s Basecamp Adventure Talk series. The hotel launched the series of free talks on Friday nights to showcase outdoor activities and locations that can be explored on the North Olympic Peninsula throughout the summer. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served, and Happy Hour “Basecamp” drink specials will be offered.

Big Lots ribbon-cutting PORT ANGELES — Big Lots celebrates the grand opening of its newest store in the Port Angeles Plaza at 1940 E. First St. today. TURN

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EVENTS/B10

38837095


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 30-31, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Boats not needed

Plenty of fish Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-452-2357) in Port Angeles said that boat anglers in the Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca have been enjoying favorable conditions lately. “The water has been awesome,” he said. “It has been flat all the way until night.” Aunspach said that more silvers are being caught, and many are weighing as much as 8 to 10 pounds. The pinks, meanwhile, have grown to 6 to 8 pounds. Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, said pinks are still the most common catches for beach and boat anglers, but the coho are on their way. “Right now the catches are about 90 percent humpy and 10 percent coho, but that will begin changing this weekend as the humpy run starts winding down — it is already past its peak in [Marine] Area 9,” Norden said. Menkal said that many pinks have been reported in the Pacific Ocean, so there could be even more humpies on the way. And since the silvers have yet to make their big run through the Strait, the salmon fishing season is far from over. “There’s just lots of fish out there,” Aunspach said. “We have another good month of good fishing yet with silvers.” TURN

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HORTON/B7

6-1 victory, stats might not count BY LEE HORTON PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TUKWILA — The Peninsula College women’s soccer team beat Trinity Lutheran 6-1 at the NWAACC Friendlies Tournament at Starfire Complex. But, what that definitive victory means has yet to be defined. Everett-based Trinity Lutheran, a member of the National Christian College Athletic Association, didn’t have 11 players, so the NWAACC needs to decide whether the game counts as an official game or a scrimmage. “We don’t want them to call it a scrimmage,” Peninsula coach Kaynon Anderson said of Wednesday’s game. Defining it as a scrimmage would have an unfortunate impact on the Pirates and the program. If it is a scrimmage, then freshman forward Larkyn Nelson’s first college goal would be nullified. Perhaps even worse, senior Bri Afoa’s two goals would be erased, which could affect where she plays after Peninsula College. Anderson said that coaches at four-year schools like to know a potential recruit’s statistics, particularly their early season stats.. If the game is called a scrimmage, then it would leave Peninsula with only 19 games. TURN

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JEFF HALSTEAD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula College forward Bri Afoa, left, battles for the ball during the Pirates’ 6-1

PIRATES/B7 win over shorthanded Trinity Lutheran. Afoa scored a pair of goals for Peninsula.

UW going up-tempo this season Sarkisian returns to offensive roots BY TODD DYBAS MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterback Keith Price (17) and the Huskies hope an up-tempo offense will help them improve their recent string of 7-6 win-loss records.

SEATTLE — The flat screens, in-ground ice baths and barber chair aren’t the only new things in renovated Husky Stadium. One of the more noticeable changes this fall is quarterback Keith Price’s screaming. “Let’s go! Let’s go!” Hustling practice referees run up the sideline to spot the ball while Price is lording a few feet behind center with his message just barked out. Signs flash on the sideline. Price uses a quarter shoulder turn to take a peek at the call, then the snap is off in a snap. Washington’s move to a fulltime up-tempo offense this season is a result of personnel and philosophy change.

The hope is that the rapid snapping of the ball helps vault the First Game H u s k i e s past their Saturday repetitive vs. Boise State 7-6 records. at Seattle Wa s h Time: 7 p.m. ington head On TV: FS1 coach Steve Sarkisian was taught offense by mentors who had links to “Air Coryell,” the offensive style named after passinggame innovations brought to football by former Washington defensive back Don Coryell. Sarkisian’s junior-college coach, John Featherstone, was on staff with Coryell at San Diego State after playing for him in the late 1960s. TURN

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DAWGS/B7

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SPORTS/BUSINESS

HIT THE BEACH this Labor Day weekend. “It has been slow for boat Lee fishermen, but Horton beach fishing has been great,” Eric Elliott of The Fishin’ Hole (360-385-7031) in Port Townsend. Elliott said Fort Worden and Fort Flagler have been popular spots for beach casters near Port Townsend. To the west, Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360683-1950) in Sequim said that anglers have been having success beach casting at Gibson Spit and Sequim Bay. Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, has some gear advice for those trying to catch salmon from the beach. “For beach casters, it is time to start switching from pink jigs to green or chartreuse jigs like Buzz Bombs,” he said.

Pirates win, but . . .


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Baltimore New York Toronto

Calendar Today No events scheduled.

Saturday Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (Richmond, B.C.), 11 a.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Simon Fraser University (Burnaby, B.C.), 4 p.m.

Sunday Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at University of the Fraser Valley (Chilliwack, B.C.), 11 a.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at University of the Fraser Valley (Chilliwack, B.C.), 9:30 a.m.

Area Sports Adult Softball Port Angeles Coed League Wednesday GOLD DIVISION Smuggler’s Landing 9, Koastalz 7 Shirley’s Cafe 3, Smuggler’s Landing 5 PA Hardwoods 6, Shirley’s Cafe 7 Koastalz 2, PA Hardwoods 9 Gold Division Champion: Smuggler’s Landing SILVER DIVISION Elwha River Casino 15, Higher Grounds 5 Stamper Chiropractic 13, Elwha Bravos 19 Elwha River Casino 10, NW Motorsports 3 NW Motorsports 17, Butch’s Ballers 10 The Daily Grind 11, Butch’s Ballers 9 Silver Division Champion: Elwha River Casino

College Soccer NWAACC Friendlies Tournament Starfire Complex, Tukwila Tuesday Men’s Results Olympic 5, Shoreline 4 Skagit Valley 2, Bellevue 0 SW Oregon 5, Rogue CC 0 S. Puget Sound 3, Wenatchee Valley 0 Whatcom 1, Chemeketa 1 (tie) Highline 3, Columbia Basin 0 Clark 1, Edmonds 0 Walla Walla 7, Pierce 2 Peninsula 4, Everett 0 Spokane 2, Tacoma 1 Women’s Results Yakima Valley 3, Chemeketa 1 Columbia Basin 3, SW Oregon 1 Skagit Valley 3, Lower Columbia 1 Green River 0, Olympic 0 (tie) Walla Walla 3, Clackamas 0 Highline 2, Shoreline 1 Whatcom 10, Rogue CC 0 Spokane 7, Pierce 0 Bellevue 2, Everett 0 Tacoma 3, Wenatchee Valley 0 Edmonds 3, Clark 0 Peninsula 6, Trinity Lutheran 1

61 .534 7½ 63 .526 8½ 74 .448 19

Wednesday’s Games Texas 12, Seattle 4 Toronto 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Oakland 14, Detroit 4 Boston 4, Baltimore 3 Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 1 Chicago White Sox 6, Houston 1 Kansas City 8, Minnesota 1 Thursday’s Games Oakland at Detroit, late. Kansas City at Minnesota, late. L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay, late. Baltimore at Boston, late. Cleveland at Atlanta, late. Seattle at Houston, late. Today’s Games Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 11-11), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 8-7) at Toronto (Buehrle 10-7), 4:07 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 7-7) at Detroit (Porcello 10-7), 4:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-7) at Boston (Dempster 6-9), 4:10 p.m. Minnesota (Hendriks 0-2) at Texas (Darvish 12-5), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee (W. Peralta 8-13), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Walker 0-0) at Houston (Peacock 3-4), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 8-5) at Oakland (J.Parker 10-6), 7:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Boston, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Oakland, 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Kansas City at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 10:08 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Boston, 10:35 a.m. L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. Seattle at Houston, 11:10 a.m. Minnesota at Texas, 12:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.

West Division W L Los Angeles 78 55 Arizona 68 64 Colorado 63 72 San Diego 60 73 San Francisco 59 74 Central Division W L St. Louis 78 55 Pittsburgh 77 55 Cincinnati 75 59 Milwaukee 58 74 Chicago 56 77 East Division W L Atlanta 80 52 Washington 67 65 Philadelphia 61 72 New York 59 72 Miami 49 82

American League West Division W L Texas 78 55 Oakland 75 57 Los Angeles 59 72 Seattle 59 73 Houston 44 88 Central Division W L Detroit 77 56 Cleveland 71 61 Kansas City 68 64 Minnesota 57 74 Chicago 56 76 East Division W L Boston 79 55 Tampa Bay 75 56

70 70 60

National League

Baseball Pct .586 .568 .450 .447 .333

GB — 2½ 18 18½ 33½

Pct .579 .538 .515 .435 .424

GB — 5½ 8½ 19 20½

Pct GB .590 — .573 2½

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pct GB .586 — .515 9½ .467 16 .451 18 .444 19 Pct GB .586 — .583 ½ .560 3½ .439 19½ .421 22 Pct .606 .508 .459 .450 .374

GB — 13 19½ 20½ 30½

Wednesday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 4, Chicago Cubs 0 Washington 4, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 7, Milwaukee 1 Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 2 Cincinnati 10, St. Louis 0 Colorado 5, San Francisco 4 San Diego 5, Arizona 1 Thursday’s Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, late. Miami at Washington, late. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, late. Cleveland at Atlanta, late. Friday’s Games Philadelphia (Halladay 3-4) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 8-11), 11:20 a.m.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

N.Y. Mets (Gee 9-9) at Washington (Zimmermann 15-7), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 12-8) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 14-6), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Fernandez 10-5) at Atlanta (Teheran 10-7), 4:30 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee (W. Peralta 8-13), 5:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-9) at Colorado (Manship 0-4), 5:40 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 7-13) at Arizona (Delgado 4-4), 6:40 p.m. San Diego (Stults 8-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 12-5), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati at Colorado, 5:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 5:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 6:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Cincinnati at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 1:10 p.m. Miami at Atlanta, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 5:05 p.m.

Football National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 88 Arizona 2 1 0 .667 36 San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 55 St. Louis 0 3 0 .000 52 East W L T Pct PF Washington 3 0 0 1.000 76 Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 67 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 72 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 51 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 76 Carolina 2 1 0 .667 67 Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 54 Atlanta 0 3 0 .000 49 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 2 1 0 .667 84 Detroit 2 1 0 .667 72 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 29 Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 43 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Denver 2 1 0 .667 47 Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 52 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 65 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 62 East W L T Pct PF Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 71 New England 2 1 0 .667 65 N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 78 Miami 1 3 0 .250 80 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 74 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 67 Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 40 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 79 Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 57 Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 46

PA 30 31 37 73 PA 41 64 69 57 PA 56 58 85 88 PA 78 50 41 81 PA 72 52 79 71 PA 66 83 60 68 PA 61 62 65 95

Pittsburgh at Carolina, 4:30 p.m. Tennessee at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. Green Bay at Kansas City, 5 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 5 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Arizona at Denver, 6 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 7 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 7 p.m. End of preseason

College Football AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press preseason college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, 2012 records, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and final ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (58) 13-1 1,498 1 2. Ohio St. (1) 12-0 1,365 3 3. Oregon 12-1 1,335 2 4. Stanford 12-2 1,294 7 5. Georgia (1) 12-2 1,249 t5 6. South Carolina 11-2 1,154 8 7. Texas A&M 11-2 1,104 t5 8. Clemson 11-2 1,083 11 9. Louisville 11-2 1,042 13 10. Florida 11-2 894 9 11. Florida St. 12-2 845 10 12. LSU 10-3 802 14 13. Oklahoma St. 8-5 755 NR 14. Notre Dame 12-1 748 4 15. Texas 9-4 677 19 16. Oklahoma 10-3 579 15 17. Michigan 8-5 531 24 18. Nebraska 10-4 382 25 19. Boise St. 11-2 328 18 20. TCU 7-6 323 NR 21. UCLA 9-5 286 NR 22. Northwestern 10-3 199 NR 23. Wisconsin 8-6 185 NR 24. Southern Cal 7-6 134 NR 25. Oregon St. 9-4 129 20 Others receiving votes: Michigan St. 95, Baylor 92, Virginia Tech 86, Miami 85, Arizona St. 53, Kansas St. 43, Fresno St. 36, Vanderbilt 19, Washington 17, N. Illinois 16, Mississippi 11, Utah St. 8, Georgia Tech 6, Arizona 3, Cincinnati 3, North Carolina 3, Penn St. 2, BYU 1.

Transactions Baseball MLB — Suspended Philadelphia minor league RHP Gustavo Armas (Venezeula Summer League) 50 games for testing positive for a metabolite of Nandrolone; Detroit minor league SS Moises Bello (Venezeula Summer League) 50 games after testing positive for a metabolite of Boldenone and Chicago White Sox minor league C Nicholas Parent (Bristol-Appalachian) 50 games after testing positive for metabolites of Stanozolol. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Released RHP Brett Myers. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed 3B Chris Nelson on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Luis Jimenez from Salt Lake (PCL). National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Recalled LHP Sam Freeman from Memphis (PCL). Optioned RHP Michael Wacha to Springfield (Texas) and RHP Michael Blazek to Memphis.

Basketball PA 73 53 52 68

Today Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Detroit at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Jacksonville at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at New England, 4:30 p.m.

National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Named JoHan Wang athletic trainer, Drew Yoder assistant athletic trainer, Keke Lyles director of athletic performance/assistant coach and Michael Roncarati strength and conditioning coach. PHOENIX SUNS — Signed C Alex Len. Traded F Caron Butler to Milwaukee for G Ish Smith and C Viacheslav Kravstov.

Football National Football League KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Named Tyler Epp vice president of business development.

Teary Errani gone from US Open; Serena moves on BY EDDIE PELLS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Only a few spots separate them in the seedings. Still, the considerable gulf between No. 1 Serena Williams and No. 4 Sara Errani was hard to ignore in their back-to-back matches Thursday at the U.S. Open. Williams, seeking her 17th Grand Slam title and second straight at Flushing Meadows, brushed off an ungainly slide onto her backside en route to a typically easy second-round victory, 6-3, 6-0 over Galina Voskoboeva in half-full Arthur Ashe Stadium. Barely worth talking about by Williams’ standards: “I’ll have to think about it and see what I can do better, but it was OK,” she said. Only an hour before on the same court, a much different scene: Errani imploded in a 6-3, 6-1 loss to her Italian teammate, 83rd-ranked Flavia Pennetta. Then, with tears welling in her eyes, Errani conceded that she’s struggling to handle her high ranking and the high expectations that have come with that. “My problem isn’t that I lost. I’ve lost a million times in my life,” Errani said. “My problem is trying to find the desire to fight and be on the court ready to fight.

For a few weeks, I haven’t felt like I wanted to be on the court. That’s the problem.” That concession was the most unexpected development on Day 4 of the U.S. Open, where the tournament got back on track after a rainy Wednesday that postponed eight women’s matches and shuffled the lineups. Among the results from Thursday’s full slate: ■ No. 4 seed David Ferrer overcame an error-filled secondset tiebreaker to top Roberto Bautista Agut 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-2. ■ Second-seeded Victoria Azarenka defeated Aleksandra Wozniak of Canada 6-3, 6-1. ■ Sixth-seeded Caroline Wozniacki beat Chanelle Scheepers 6-1, 6-2 to open the night session, with No. 2 Rafael Nadal playing the late match. Williams got through her win unscathed, and when she was done in Ashe Stadium, five-time champion Roger Federer, the seventh seed, dispatched Carlos Berloq 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 in 1 hour, 35 minutes. “It’s one of those matches I expect myself to win if possible in straight sets and gain confidence in the process,” Federer said. “All those things happened, so, yeah, I’m pleased about it.” American Christina McHale won a three-setter over Elina Svi-

tolina, while another U.S. player, 81st-ranked Allison Riske, had an easier time in a 6-4, 6-2 victory over Mona Barthel. “You never know at these things,” Riske said after making the third round of her second straight Grand Slam tournament. “Anything can happen. That’s kind of the beauty of tennis in general. Ranking is kind of just a number.” Victoria Duval, the 296thranked, 17-year-old American who earned her first victory in a Grand Slam tournament Tuesday, was also in action later. The top U.S. man, No. 13 John Isner, had a late match. He was the last seeded American in the men’s draw after No. 26 Sam Querrey lost in four sets to Adrian Mannarino. Another U.S. man, 20-year-old Jack Sock, moved to the third round with a 7-6 (3), 1-6, 7-5, 6-2 win over Maximo Gonzalez of Argentina. Williams was pushed only briefly against Voskoboeva, ranked 77th from Kazakhstan. Serving at game point trailing 5-3, Voskoboeva drew Williams to the net, and as Williams reached for the ball, her feet slid out from under her and she fell hard onto her backside, her racket slamming to the ground. Before she fell, however, she reached the shot to win the point.

Two points later, she closed out the set. The second set took all of 27 minutes. When it was over, Williams was sitting at the same table where Errani had cried earlier, being asked how she would advise the Italian, who said she was “destroyed by the pressure” of returning to the French Open this year, where she followed her 2012 appearance in the final with a run to the semifinals. “I really wouldn’t know what to say,” Williams said. “I can only say that I think she’s doing a good job. I mean, sometimes you have a tough day at the office, and it doesn’t mean that you don’t handle the pressure well.” But Errani said she didn’t. She is 5-foot-4½ with energy to spare, but with loopy, unthreatening groundstrokes and a serve that maxes out at around 85 mph. It has been, even by her account, heart and grit that helped her get to the 2012 French Open final, then follow that with a trip to the U.S. Open semifinal, where she lost 6-1, 6-2 to Williams. Those results, plus a tournament win and three second-place finishes on tour this year, made her the highest-seeded Italian woman ever in a major for this trip to Flushing Meadows.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Wales Open, Round 2, Site: The Celtic Manor Resort - Newport, Wales 9:30 a.m. (47) GOLF Web.com, Hotel Fitness Championship, Site: Fort Wayne, Ind. 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Men’s Second Round and Women’s Third Round, Site: USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center - Flushing Meadows, N.Y. 11:10 a.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Philadelphia Phillies vs. Chicago Cubs Noon (47) GOLF Golf PGA, Deutsche Bank Championship, Site: TPC Boston 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Safeway Classic, Site: Columbia Edgewater Country Club - Portland 3:30 p.m. PAC-12 NET Women’s Soccer NCAA, Baylor at Washington 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Men’s Second Round and Women’s Third Round 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Texas Tech vs. SMU 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Houston Astros, Site: Minute Maid Park - Houston 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Football NCAA, Northern Arizona at Arizona

Saturday 5:30 a.m. (47) GOLF Golf EPGA, Wales Open, Site: The Celtic Manor Resort Newport, Wales 8 a.m. (7) KIRO Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, Men’s and Women’s Third Round 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Buffalo vs. Ohio State 9:30 a.m. (5) KING Soccer EPL, Sunderland vs. Crystal Palace, Site: Selhurst Park - London 10 a.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Rice vs. Texas A&M 10 a.m. (47) GOLF Web. com, Hotel Fitness Championship, Site: Fort Wayne, Ind. Noon (47) GOLF PGA, Deutsche Bank Championship, Site: TPC Boston Noon (25) ROOT Football NCAA, Colgate vs. Air Force 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO Football NCAA, Mississippi State University vs. Oklahoma State or Syracuse vs. Penn State 12:30 p.m. (5) KING Football NCAA, Temple vs. Notre Dame 12:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Mississippi State vs. Oklahoma State or Syracuse vs. Penn State 1 p.m. FS1 Football NCAA, Nicholls State at Oregon 2:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Alabama vs. Virginia Tech 3 p.m. PAC-12 NET Football NCAA, Eastern Washington at Oregon State 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Safeway Classic 4 p.m. ESPNU Football NCAA, Washington State at Auburn 4 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Houston Astros, Site: Minute Maid Park - Houston 4 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Chicago White Sox vs. Boston Red Sox 4:30 p.m. (6) KONG Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC vs. Columbus Crew 4:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Great Clips- Grit Chips 300, Nationwide Series, Site: Atlanta Motor Speedway 5:05 p.m. (4) KOMO Football NCAA, Georgia vs. Clemson 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, LSU vs. TCU 7 p.m. FS1 Football NCAA, Boise State at Washington 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Football NCAA, Nevada at UCLA 7:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Northwestern vs. California 5:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Wales Open Site: Newport, Wales


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

B7

Pirates: Men’s team rolls to win over Everett insula Girls Soccer MVP, is in her freshman season at Edmonds.

CONTINUED FROM B5 But even worse, it would impact the Pirates’ spring. NWAACC teams are allowed to play 20 games and four scrimmages. Peninsula played two scrimmages last week — wins over the University of Victoria and Vancouver Island University — and planned to play two more in the spring. If Wednesday’s game is ruled a scrimmage, then the Pirates will likely be limited to playing only the Rumble in the Rainforest in the spring. Also, if called a scrimmage, the trip to Tukwila would have been a waste of money for the Pirates. According to Anderson, Trinity Lutheran’s program was depleted when it had to hire a new coach late in the offseason. The new coach wasn’t left with many players, or a lot of time to recruit and sign more. Anderson hopes the NWAACC will make its ruling before the weekend. On the field, Anderson liked what he saw from the Pirates. “We moved the ball really quick, and attacked better than we have been,” he said. “The backline was fantastic in the second half.” Afoa opened the scoring off an assist from Annie Armstrong, and Nelson’s goal made it 2-0.

Men’s Soccer Peninsula 4, Everett 0

JEFF HALSTEAD (2)/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Edmonds freshman and Port Townsend graduate Irina Lyons tracks down the ball during the Tritons’ 3-0 win over Clark. Afoa’s second goal was assisted by Alyssa Bertuleit. Trinity Lutheran scored on a corner kick before halftime to make it 3-1. In the second half, Katelyn Raatz set up Bronte Fitzsimmons for a goal, and then Raatz scored a goal of her own off an assist by Briana Estrellado. Shelbi Vienna-Hallam closed out the scoring off an assist by Port Angeles High School graduate Paxton Rodocker.

Peninsula heads to Canada for pair of weekend games. The Pirates play at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C., on Saturday, and the University of the Fraser Valley in Chilliwack, B.C., on Sunday morning.

Lyons scores Port Townsend graduate Irina Lyons scored on a penalty kick for the Edmonds on Wednesday, helping the Tritons to a 3-0 win over Clark. Lyons, the 2012 All-Pen-

TUKWILA — The Pirate men moved to 2-0 on the year with a dominating win over the Trojans on Wednesday at the NWAACC Friendlies Tournament at Starfire Complex. Alex Martinez and Ashkanov Apollon again scored for Peninsula, Apollon in the 33rd minute and Martinez in the 38th minute. Christopher Galea assisted on Apollon’s goal and Erick Urzua set up Martinez. The Pirates add a pair of quick goals near the end of the game, with Kalei Gallarde setting up Musa Kamara for a 67th-minute goal and Galea scoring two minutes later off a Victor Sanchez assist. Peninsula’s backup goalkeepers, Edwin Guandique and Aaron Zavolokin, each had two saves. The defending NWAACC champion Pirates have started their season outscoring Edmonds and Everett 8-1 at the two-day Friendlies Tournament. “Both games played out about the same,” Peninsula coach Andrew Chapman said. “We got to play everybody and move players around. Didn’t pick up any

Peninsula College sophomore Alex Martinez fights for the ball during an NWAAACC friendly against Everett. injuries which is a huge plus. “We had a lot of success being able to move the ball around.” Like the women’s team, the Peninsula men will play a pair of weekend games in Canada, Saturday against Kwantlen Polytechnic Uni-

versity in Richmond, B.C., and Sunday at University of the Fraser Valley.

________ Sports reporter/outdoors columnist Lee Horton can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.

Horton: Crab season ending; catch cards due CONTINUED FROM B5 mining how much of a winter crab season we will Menkal goes one month have. further Let the chum run “We have two really good months of fishing Norden saw something coming up in September saw something from the and October,” Menkal said. bridge of the Big Quilcene “There is a whole bunch River: “An unusually high of fish. percentage of Puget Sound “Things are starting to summer chum salmon.” happen.” But, anglers can’t catch these fish. Crab closing “This subspecies of salmon is officially listed The crab season will [as] endangered/threatend at the end of the day ened, and rightfully so, Monday. After you’ve pulled your unlike chinook or steelpots up for the final time, head,” Norden said. send your summer catch “Tell anglers [to] do no reports to the state Depart- harm to these salmon. ment of Fish and Wildlife. They are hard to miss All crabbers must subsince they are significantly mit these cards by Oct. 1, larger than the hatchery even if they didn’t harvest coho. any crab. “The commercial fishers The catch report cards in the bay will likely have are important for deterto quit until the chum run

passes.” Norden said that in the early 1990s, only about 150 chum remained. “Through the hard work and agreements between the USFWS, the WDFW, and the Skokomish Tribe, these mysterious fish have been brought back from extinction. “This is the greatest story of salmon recovery in the last 50 years. I am proud to say I played a miniscule role in the effort. “As a fishery biologist, I have given lectures from time to time on the mystery of this fish’s natural history and how it was saved from extinction. “Seeing all of them a few moments ago brought a smile and a tear.”

No fin for the win The Clallam Bay-Sekiu

Chamber of Commerce is hosting it “No Fin, You Win” salmon derby next Saturday, Sept. 7. Derby tickets cost $15, and are available at Van Riper’s Resort (360-9632334) and Olson’s Resort (360-963-2311) in Sekiu. First prize is 50 percent of the overall ticket sales, second place receives 20 percent, and third place takes home 10 percent. The derby ends at 3 p.m. Weigh-in is at Olson’s Resort.

Sekiu kids derby Christopher Evans of Lacey came within threehundreths of a pound from repeating as champion of the annual Lions Club Kids Derby in Sekiu last month. Despite catching a larger fish than last year,

the 13-year-old Evans finished second this year with an 8.2-pound coho. Aidan McKinney, age 12, of Port Orchard edged Evans with a coho that weighed 8.23 pounds. Third place was 6-yearold Gabe Barros of Clallam Bay with a 8.08-pound coho. Rounding out the topten award winners were Nora Parker (age 9) of Clallam Bay, Nick Young (14) of Clallam Bay, Josef Babbitt (12) of Bonney Lake, Dyxsan Martin (5) of Maple Valley, Devan Martin (11) of Maple Valley, Kalin Duncan (11) of Clallam Bay, and Madison Evans (8) of Lacey.

Dawgs: Up-tempo helps Price CONTINUED FROM B5 tight end the following season, which made him turn Featherstone installed to other adjustments. In 2011, when quarterthe single-back, play-action approach for Sarkisian to back Keith Price excelled, run as quarterback at El the Huskies used most of Camino College in the early those pro-style spread techniques to help with a wide 1990s. When Sarkisian left El distribution of passes. Last season, Washington Camino for BYU, LaVell Edwards ran a similar dabbled in an up-tempo approach. spread system. Against Stanford and its It’s an approach Sarkisian knew and was hard- stout defense, the Huskies ened into by the time he tinkered with the pace of arrived at Washington in the game by using a faster offensive approach. They 2009. went on to use it in other spots throughout the seaPrior success son, often seeing an effecHe adapted some of the tive result in a down offenstyle that year because of sive season. the size and speed of quarThis year, it’s a full shift for the Huskies into the terback Jake Locker. Sarkisian didn’t have a football’s latest trend.

The majority of the Pacific-12 Confrence uses the manic approach. Texas A&M used it to upset Alabama last season, when the Aggies were one of just two teams to score more than 20 points against the national champions. “If you look at us when we struggled last year, we were trying to match up,” offensive line coach Dan Cozzetto said. “When we started going fast pace, we eliminated the thinking, the guessing; then you just go. “There’s no what-ifs sitting in your stances, you just load it up. When that snap’s over you just go to the next snap. “You have to learn how to play one at a time because

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________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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you can’t waste time worrying about what you did the last time. “I think it helped Keith, too.” Sarkisian agrees. “I think it was effective for us in minimizing the paralysis by analysis aspect of it for the quarterback,” Sarkisian said. “I think that it allowed him to just go play the game in a setting he’s comfortable in, which is where he’s a more spontaneous, reactivetype player and not over analytical.” The Huskies previously used constant motion for deception. This season’s offense will look to the pace to force defensive misalignment and confusion.

Fred’s Hobbies & Guns Gun Safes Have Arrived

Fifty-three young anglers ages 5-14 participated, and 44 kids brought in fish.

PORT TOWNSEND


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, August 30-31, 2013 PAGE

B8

PT a site to ‘reinvent’

$ Briefly . . . Medical clinic moves locale on Water St.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend recently was named one of the “Nine Best Places to Reinvent Yourself” by the Estately national real estate blog (blog.estately.com). Other locations included Nome, Alaska; Trinidad, Colo.; Bar Harbor, Maine; Miami; and Houston. The blog called Port Townsend “a haven for independent boat-builders, starving artists and urban castaways who’ve fled the city. “Port Townsend’s fleet of wooden boats and cozy cabins provide ideal habitat for those nursing broken hearts and professional burnout. “The sky can be a gray soup for much of the year, but that just hides the transformative properties of the town. “For some unknown reason, Port Townsend is where loggers become yoga teachers, and investment bankers become boatwrights, and lawyers become farmers. “Newcomers usually find their own community in town, and stand a good chance of meeting some likeminded soul and living happily ever with some cats aboard a sailboat . . .” To read the article, visit tinyurl.com/ ptreinvent.

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FLOWERS

FOR

JEFFERSON

CLERK

Jefferson County Commissioner John Austin presents County Clerk Erin Lundgren with flowers to go with the certificate she earned from the International Institute of Municipal Clerks. Lundgren, who is the board’s clerk and the county’s human resources director, completed a three-year course of study to earn the certificate.

Fast-food workers protest pay levels across nation THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Fast-food protests are underway in cities including Seattle, Detroit, Chicago and New York, with organizers expecting the biggest national walkouts yet in a demand for higher wages. Similar protests organized by unions and community groups in the past

few months have brought media attention to a staple of the fast-food industry — the so-called “McJobs” known for their low pay and limited prospects. But it’s unclear what impact, if any, they will have on business. In Seattle, organizers said demonstrations were held at Subway, Jimmy Johns and Wendy’s. Demonstrators also pro-

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tested outside Starbucks stores Thursday. In New York, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn joined 300 to 400 workers and supporters in a march before flooding inside a McDonald’s near the Empire State Building. Shortly afterward, the restaurant seemed to be operating normally, and customers said they hadn’t heard of the movement. The same was true at a McDonald’s a few blocks away.

Lack of awareness The lack of awareness illustrates the challenge workers face. Participating workers, who are asking for $15 an hour and the right to unionize, represent a tiny fraction of the industry. The federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour, equaling about $15,000 a year for full-time workers. The movement comes amid calls from the White House, some members of Congress and economists to hike the federal minimum wage, with President Barack Obama wanting to boost it to $9 an hour. The minimum wage in Washington state is $9.19. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez compared the protests to the demands of demonstrators in the 1963 March on Washington, who sought a national minimum

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wage to give workers better living standards. “For all too many people working minimum-wage jobs, the rungs on the ladder of opportunity are feeling further and further apart,” said Perez, who’s taking a lead role in Obama’s push for a higher minimum wage. The Service Employees International Union, which represents more than 2 million workers in health care, janitorial and other industries, has been providing financial support and training for local organizers in the fast-food strikes. Organizers said the walkouts would hit more than 50 cities Thursday. The biggest effort so far was over the summer when about 2,200 of the country’s millions of fast-food workers staged a one-day strike in seven cities. Ryan Carter, a 29-yearold who was walking out of the McDonald’s where workers demonstrated Thursday, said he “absolutely” supported workers’ demands for higher wages. “They work harder than the billionaires in this city,” he said. But Carter, who was holding a cup of the chain’s coffee he bought for $1, said he didn’t plan to stop frequenting McDonald’s. McDonald’s Corp. and Burger King Worldwide Inc. said they don’t make decisions about pay for franchisees that operate the majority of their U.S. restaurants.

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Medical Advocacy and Services Headquarters — JC MASH — medical clinic is moving to a new location on Water Street in Port Townsend, where physicians and support staff will provide free medical care to patients beginning Tuesday. The clinic’s new office is located at 1136 Water St., Suite 109, in the former Port Townsend Clinic building across from Don’s Pharmacy. The building is on the Jefferson Transit bus line and adjacent to parking. The clinic will be open Tuesdays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. to receive patients on a first-come, first-served basis. No patient is turned away because of a lack of ability to pay. JC MASH was founded in 1993 with the support of the American Legion and local churches. James K. Rotchford, M.D. was a founding board member and continues as medical director. Drs. Cathy Parkman and Douwe Rienstra have contributed their professional time. Registered nurse Joan Cole serves as manager and volunteer coordinator of the Port Townsend and Port Hadlock clinics. Rotchford and Rienstra contribute their professional time to provide free care for patients. JC MASH operates a second clinic in Port Hadlock at 121 Oak Bay Road in Kively Center. Advanced registered nurse practitioner Ken Brown donates his professional time to serve patients from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Thursdays. JC MASH is a nonprofit organization administered by a board of directors with funding provided by United Good Neighbors, Rotary Club of Port Townsend, churches and private donors. The board expressed its appreciation and gratitude to the American Legion Post 26 for its generosity through 20 years of donating its space to the clinic for $1 per year. For information, visit JCMASH.com.

The court’s decision upholds a curtailed version of the original project, which reduced the number of wind turbines from 50 to 35 in order to protect views in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. An appeal by Friends of the Columbia Gorge and Save Our Scenic Area argued that the proposed wind farm and agencies that approved it didn’t properly consider potential environmental harm and other impacts to the area. But the Supreme Court ruled in a decision released Thursday that many of the petitioners’ arguments held the Whistling Ridge project to an unreasonably high standard that goes beyond legal requirements.

New Tylenol cap WASHINGTON — Bottles of Tylenol sold in the U.S. will soon bear red warnings alerting users to the potentially fatal risks of taking too much of the popular pain reliever. The unusual step comes amid a growing number of lawsuits and pressure from the federal government. Johnson & Johnson said the warning will appear on the cap of each new bottle of Extra Strength Tylenol sold in the U.S. in October and on most other Tylenol bottles in coming months.

Gold and silver Gold futures for December delivery fell $5.90, or 0.4 percent, to settle at $1,412.90 an ounce on Thursday. Silver for September delivery fell 30 cents to end at $23.09 an ounce.

Health exchange OLYMPIA — The state Supreme Court has voted unanimously to allow the Whistling Ridge Energy Project to move forward, turning back a legal challenge from two advocacy groups.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

B9

Every day ‘precious’ with God WE USE MANY adjectives to qualify a day: Happy day. Sad day. Fun day. Boring day. Trying day. Workday. Busy day. Lots of busy days. But how often do you describe a day as precious? Theologian and profound writer Frederick Buechner says: “In the entire history of the universe, let alone in your own history, there has never been another day just like today, and there will never be another just like it again. “Today is the point to which all your yesterdays have been leading since the hour of your birth. It is the point from which all your tomorrows will proceed until the hour of your death. “If you were aware of how precious today is, you could hardly live through it. “Unless you are aware of how precious it is, you can hardly be said to be living at all.” Don’t gulp that quote. Sip it. Savor it.

Some ‘precious’ days You undoubtedly can recall some precious days: Graduation day. Wedding day. The day a child or grandchild was born. For me, I even consider the day I got my driver’s license as a precious day. But the most precious day in my life is the day I finally put my trust in Jesus Christ, resulting in being saved from my life of sin and being given the promises of abundant and eternal life (Romans 10:10, John 10:10). Buechner challenges me because I admit I sometimes still classify a day as bad or boring, and I shudder to think of days I have wasted. He reminds me that every day is precious. Don’t misunderstand. A day can certainly be filled with heartache or tragedy, but neither heartache nor tragedy needs to negate the precious quality of the day. Recalling precious days recently among a group of friends, one said he consid-

ISSUES OF FAITH Greg Reynolds

ered the day he had a tragic accident on the interstate resulting in a severe back injury as one of his most

precious days. Really? Really. He went on to describe how that day changed the course of his life to draw him closer to his family and closer to God. In the beginning of the biblical narrative, we read that when God creates a day, it is a “good” day.

‘Good’ and ‘very good’ And at the culmination of his creation, after creating the first man and the first woman, “God saw all that he had made, and it was very good” (Genesis 1:26). Those are the two categories: good and very good. This will sound strange when you read it, but I dare say it was still a precious day when Adam and Eve made the choice to sin. No, it wasn’t precious because they sinned. Sin is always bad, always tragic. What made the day precious was the fact that God created it and immediately implemented his plan to redeem it. Today, because of God’s redemption plan, I can count myself “dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus” (Romans 6:11). I can truly consider every day precious knowing that God has designed a plan for it, and he has given me his spirit to fully engage in that plan. Have a precious day.

_________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Rev. Greg Reynolds is pastor of Joyce Bible Church. His email is jbc@joycebiblechurch.org.

Briefly . . . Open house set to send off minister

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HANGING

ON HIGH

People form a human pyramid as they try to reach an earthen pot filled with curd during celebrations to mark Janmashtami in Mumbai, India, on Thursday. Janmashtami is the festival that marks the birth of the Hindu god Krishna, the eighth avatar of Vishnu.

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Free Gospel Opry

PORT TOWNSEND — A free Gospel Opry perforPORT ANGELES — An mance is set for 6 p.m. open house to recognize the Sunday, Sept. 8, at New Life Church, 1636 Hastings ministry of Lay Pastor Ave. Shirley Cruthers will be The Reids will perform. held at First Presbyterian For more information, Church, 139 W. Eighth St., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tues- phone Arielle Vodder at 360-385-7717 or email day. newlifeptwa@gmail.com. A member of the church Peninsula Daily News since 2000, Cruthers has served as lay pastor for four years. Primarily responsible for the development of a monthly worship service at Park View Villas, Cruthers SUPPORT EDUCATION: also has supplied pulpit When you go on vacation, supply for congregations in donate the credit for your suspended copies to proevery community on the vide the PDN to schools. North Olympic Peninsula Phone 360-452-4507 from Forks to Quilcene. She is moving to HonoPENINSULA DAILY NEWS lulu, where she lived for 45

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INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. September 1, 10:30 Amanda Aikman

Romancing the Wind Spiritualadvancement,perhapsthrough activtiesthatapproachself-transcendence, kite-flying anyone? Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 301 E. Lopez Ave., PA (Disciples of Christ) 452-2323 Park & Race, Port Angeles Pastor Richard Grinstad 457-7062 Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. Pastor Joe Gentzler & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided SUNDAY Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 11 a.m. most Sundays 10:00 a.m. Worship www.htlcpa.com

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

& Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Summer Breakfast 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Family friendly

34569893

195132206

• Free In Home Estimates • Call Jan Perry to schedule an appointment (360) 457-9776

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

“The Sacrifice of Praise”

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH

Confession:

years before coming to Port Angeles.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service


B10

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Rainforest Players’ comedic reading tonight and Saturday night of “Mr. Pim Passes By” features Liane White, left, Curt White, Dr. Steve Kriebel and Ellen Matheny. Other cast members not pictured are Gerry Morris, Warren Brown and Lela Kriebel, who also directs the play.

Briefly . . . and drop-ins are always welcome. For more information, visit www.nols.org and click on “Events” and “Sequim,” or contact branch manager Lauren PORT ANGELES — The Dahlgren at 360-683-1161 Clallam County Amateur or Sequim@nols.org. Radio Club will hold technician and general license Coastal cleanup instruction classes and a Registration for the final exam in September. International Coast Free classes will meet Cleanup on Saturday, Sept. Saturdays, Sept. 7, 14 and 21, at the Port Angeles Fire 21, is underway at www. coastsavers.org. Station, 102 E. Fifth St. Volunteers can select These three days will be based on chapters from the from dozens of beaches to clean from Cape DisapARRL technician or genpointment to Cape Flattery. eral class manuals. Worldwide, thousands of The session Sept. 21 will volunteers are expected to consist of a class and a participate in the global review before the final cleanup event, with a goal exam at 1 p.m. of protecting the marine The class is free and is taught by local members of environment. Volunteers who aren’t the Ham Radio Operators physically able to carry filled of the Clallam County bags off the beach are welAmateur Radio Club and come and can participate by the Amateur Radio Emerserving as registration stagency Service group. tion beach captains, assistClass candidates can ing with registering volunorder the books directly teers and ensuring they fill from the American Radio Relay League at www.arrl. out the proper paperwork and follow protocol. org/catalog or purchase Those unable to particithem through Dennis Tilpate can visit www.coast ton at 360-452-1217. savers.org and donate to There is a $15 processhelp with cleanup efforts. ing fee for the exam. One dumpster costs To register, phone approximately $1,000 to Chuck Jones at 360-452rent and dispose of the 4672 or Tilton. trash once it’s filled, according to the group. Book discussion The Washington coast SEQUIM — Mary Ann cleanups typically involve Shaffer’s posthumously renting at least 10 dumppublished novel The Guernsters for every event. sey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society will be disSave the date cussed at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim PORT ANGELES — Ave., at 3 p.m. Saturday, Tickets are on sale for Sept. 14. Habitat for Humanity of In January 1946, writer Clallam County’s fifth Juliet Ashton receives a annual Soiree by the Sea letter from a stranger, a on Saturday, Oct. 19. founding member of the The event will be at the Guernsey Literary and Port Angeles Yacht Club, Potato Peel Pie Society. 1305 Marine Drive, from And so begins a remark3 p.m. to 6 p.m. able tale of the island of There will be hors Guernsey during the recent d’oeuvres, fine wines, bevGerman occupation and of erages, and an array of the society itself. auction items. Copies of the book are Tickets are $20 and are available at the Sequim available at the Habitat for Library, including large print, Humanity Store, 728 E. as well as the audio book on Front St. CD and downloadable audio Proceeds support Habiand e-book formats. tat’s mission of “Building They can be requested Homes, Building Lives.” online through the library Sponsors for the fundcatalog at www.nols.org. raiser are First Federal Pre-registration for this and Kitsap Bank. program is not required, Peninsula Daily News

Ham radio classes, test scheduled

RAINFOREST PLAYERS

Events: PAHS band fundraiser CONTINUED FROM B4 mattress set, table, washer, bikes, a PlayStation 3 and As part of the celebra- gaming chair, clothes and tion, Big Lots will make a more.” $1,500 donation to Roosevelt Elementary School PAHS Band benefit during its ribbon-cutting PORT ANGELES — The ceremony at 9 a.m. Port Angeles High School Band will host a car wash Book clearance at Angeles Pawn, across from Swain’s General Store, PORT ANGELES — The 619 E. First St., from Port Angeles Friends of the 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. SaturLibrary will host a book day. clearance sale this weekBand members are raisend. ing funds to support their The sale will be from spring trip to Washington, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. today D.C. and from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. While in the nation’s Saturday at the library, capital, students in the 2210 S. Peabody St. Concert, Symphonic, Wind Attendees can fill a bag Ensemble and Jazz bands supplied by the Friends of will take part in an educathe Library with books for tional and performance $2. opportunity. Students will There are no limits on perform at the Lincoln the number of bags attend- Memorial at Cherry Blosees can purchase and fill som Festival, visit historical with books. sites and museums, and take in a theater perforDerby garage sale mance. For more information, PORT ANGELES — phone 360-452-2536. Port Scandalous Roller Derby will hold a garage sale benefit at 2024 W. Seventh St. from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Saturday. Items include “tons of computer electronics, bags, Harley-Davidson parts and gear, cellphones and accessories, knickknacks, a full

Death and Memorial Notice his wife, Carol; his two sons, David and Charles; and sister Cherri Kenney. Dad was a person of few words and was great at making you see his point of view. He also had a soft and romantic side but wouldn’t admit it. He was also someone you would definitely want to have fighting on your side. He was a great man and will truly be missed by all of us who loved him. LYNP, Dad. There will be a celebration of his life near the family’s home in Port Angeles.

DAVID DEAN ‘RED DOG’ HOWE March 2, 1943 July 28, 2013 He was born in Port Townsend to Rose and Kenneth Howe. David served his country in the U.S. Navy. David married Carol Ann Shinn on September 16, 1967, and they spent 46 wonderful years together. He worked many years in the logging industry, both in Washington and Alaska. David was a devoted husband and loving father as well as a great friend

Mr. Howe to many and an amazing father-in-law. David is survived by

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PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Genealogical Society will hold an open house at the research center, 402 E. Lauridsen Blvd., between noon and 4 p.m. Saturday. An introductory class for “Beginners Who Know Nothing” will be offered from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Advanced researchers can attend the “Brick Wall Forum” beginning at 2:30 p.m. Both sessions are offered free of charge for society members; a $5 donation will be requested of nonmembers to help cover the cost of materials.

PORT ANGELES — Olympic National Park rangers are guiding free interpretive walks along the Elwha River where Lake Aldwell once existed at 1 p.m. each Saturday through Sept. 7. Rangers take visitors through the landscape being created by the river following the removal of the Elwha Dam in March 2012 and the draining of the lake. The walks begin at the former boat launch, located at the end of Lake Aldwell Road. Dogs on leashes are permitted. To get there, take U.S. Highway 101 and drive about 8 miles west of Port Angeles. Turn north — a sharp right — off Highway 101 onto Lake Aldwell Road immediately after the Elwha River Bridge. Visitors should wear sturdy walking shoes or boots and be prepared for windy conditions with no shade. The guided portion of the walk lasts about an hour; visitors are then free to continue exploring the lakebed area. The land is controlled by ONP but technically is not part of the national park. No park admission pass is needed. For more information about the Elwha Discovery Walks, phone the Elwha Ranger Station at 360-4529191.

drop-in center for homeless and at-risk youths and young adults, will host a bake sale Saturday. The sale will be at Swain’s General Store, 602 E. First St., from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. An array of treats, including Blue Ribbon Baked Goods made by Cookie Allison, will be offered. For more details, phone Susan Hillgren at 360-6704363.

Forks Dramatic reading

FORKS — In their first production since a catastrophic fire burned down the Rainforest Arts Center, the Rainforest Players will present a dramatized reading of “Mr. Pim Passes By,” a send-up of high British society by A.A. Milne of “Winnie the Pooh” fame. Curtain time for “Mr. Pim Passes By” is 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday in the conference room at the state Department of Natural Resources building, 411 Tillicum Lane. Admission is by donation. The 1920s-era comedy takes place in a proper British household that is thrown into turmoil with the arrival of Mr. Carraway Pim, played by Dr. Steve Kriebel. Longtime Rainforest Players member Lela Kriebel, Steve’s wife, directs the play, while Ellen Matheny, Liane and Curt Bake sale White, Warren Brown and PORT ANGELES — The Gerry Morris fill out the Answer For Youth, a local cast.

Death Notices She was 54. Services: None announced. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Port Ludlow resident Robert R. Sexauer Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. died of cancer at his residence. He was 80. www.harper-ridgeviewfuneralchapel.com His obituary will be published later. Services: Funeral service at 11 a.m. Saturday at Community United Methodist William Hennessey Church, 130 Church Lane off Chimacum Sept. 29, 1953 — Aug. 28, 2013 Road in Port Hadlock. William Hennessey died of a Kosec Funeral Home, Port Townsend, is brain tumor at his Port Angeles home. in charge of arrangements. He was 59. Services: Open house at 1 p.m. Monday at the Hennessey home, 907 Black DiaCheryl Irene Phifer mond Road, Port Angeles. Oct. 22, 1958 — Aug. 27, 2013 Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Port Angeles resident Cheryl Irene Phi- Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com fer died at her home of age-related causes.

Robert R. Sexauer

Jan. 3, 1933 — Aug. 27, 2013

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■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for publication assistance. A form is at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. For further information, call 360-417-3527.

Ancestry open house

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• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

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Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Mike Du Jour

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Mike Lester

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have two beautiful, hardworking daughters we brought up as loving, respectful parents. Recently, “Kellie,” 25, got tattoos covering her right arm, leg and ankle as well as her shoulders. They are visible unless she wears long sleeves and long pants. This has ruined our relationship because it shows how little she thinks of us as parents and how disrespectful of our feelings she is to put the tattoos where everyone can see them. She knows we don’t like tattoos because we have mentioned it to her and voiced our disappointment when she got the first one on her ankle. I can’t sleep at night or look at my daughter knowing how little she cares about our feelings. I feel it’s a slap in the face that she doesn’t honor, respect or love us. What do you think? Beside Myself in Fort Worth

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Mell Lazarus

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Jump into action and take control of a situation that has the potential to turn sour if you don’t intervene. Your courage, determination and practicality will convince others to take heed of what you suggest and offer. 4 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Problems deciphering what someone wants or expects from you will surface. Ask direct questions but use your charm and diplomacy to ensure that you don’t raise suspicion. Positive change based on the way you handle situations and people is coming your way. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t feel pressured to make a change or to indulge in something that doesn’t interest you. Make your objectives clear and show others how disciplined you can be. Turn the tables on anyone pushing you and push back. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

When you see the mother again, Van Buren ask if he has an advance directive for medical decisions in place. In it, a person can specify that only palliative care is preferred. A group that offers guidance in drafting these important documents — and one to which I contribute — is Compassion and Choices. The toll-free number is 800-2477421. If your friend does not have an advance directive, it’s important that he make one now.

Abigail

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Accept the inevitable. Personal change will leave you questioning what’s next. Take on a challenge that will help get you into shape mentally and physically. Embrace new beginnings and learn from past mistakes. Minimize problems by curbing impulsive behavior. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: Our across-the-street neighbors feel they need to mow Dear Beside Yourself: I think it their lawn three (excessive) times a is time you toned down the high week. drama. What’s done is done. This includes using a weed-eater If you do not appreciate the perand two mowers — a push mower son your daughter is beneath her and a large riding mower. skin, you will lose her. Quite often, the husband chooses And that would be a tragedy. to mow after 8 p.m. He doesn’t work and could do it during the morning Dear Abby: I have a 20-plus-year hours if he wants it cooler. high school friend who is fighting The noise is loud and extremely ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). disruptive, and lasts about an hour I have developed a close relation- because he goes over and over the ship with him and his parents. same area. His mom has shared some of his We work and would like to enjoy comments with me, but he hasn’t the few hours we have in the eveshared those thoughts with me him- ning and relax. Any ideas? self. The comments are, “I want to Tired of the Noise die,” or, “I want to go home to God.” in Montana I think listening and being a supportive friend is what I can do for Dear Tired of the Noise: If you’re him, but I’m at a loss as to what to on speaking terms with this neighbor, say to his mother. you should ask him if he would please I don’t know what advice to give manicure his lawn at a different time her so she can be supportive in her because the noise is disruptive. conversations with her dying son. If he is unwilling to cooperate, Deep Sorrow in Ohio check with the city to find out if there are any noise ordinances in Dear Deep Sorrow: I agree that place. If there are, you can report the listening and being supportive is noise as a nuisance. what you can do best for your friend. _________ When the son raises the subject Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, again with his mother, she should also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was tell him that she loves him and will founded by her mother, the late Pauline Philsee that his wishes are carried out, lips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. even though losing him will be losing Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via a part of herself. email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Jim Davis

B11

Mom distraught over daughter’s body art

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Being helpful will encourage others to return the favor. Make positive changes to the way you live and the people with whom you fraternize. Consider ways to use your skills and talents in ways that fit the current economic market. 4 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You can offer suggestions but don’t allow anyone to take advantage of you. Call in favors and work on your own successes. Prosperity is within reach, but your motives have to be genuine. A better living arrangement will lift your spirits. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Question what doesn’t make sense and be honest when assessing a personal situation, even if it disappoints you. You cannot move forward successfully without understanding where you have come from. Open up, be honest and strive to be your best. 2 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put more time and effort into your plans for the future. Firm up deals or revisit pending settlements or contracts that you want to pursue. Partnerships that are unstable should be re-evaluated. Let your intuition guide you. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Keep life simple. Don’t let the little things bother you. You’ll be inclined to overreact or attract melodramatic people who like to meddle. Make whatever little motions or alterations you can to keep the peace and remain calm. 2 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Learn from each experience, but back away from nowin situations. Protect what you have worked so hard to achieve and refrain from taking risks or chances. Gather information and plan your actions carefully. Stick close to home and plan your financial strategy. 5 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A change will help you view your current situation from a different perspective. The more information you gather, the easier it will be to make the changes to your finances, personal contracts or your relationship with someone you love. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Follow through with your plans. Make changes to your home that will make your life easier. Expand your interests and your friendships with people who are after similar goals. A financial gain is apparent if you invest, sign contracts or collect debts. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 Neah Bay 61/54

ellingham elli el e ling ng g 71/55

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AY A.M. FOG

Forks 71/53

64/53

A.M. FOG

Olympics Snow level: 10,500 ft.

Townsend 64/53

Sequim 66/53

SH

Port Ludlow 69/55

OW

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 71 57 0.23 11.03 Forks 71 64 0.79 59.43 Seattle 80 66 0.23 17.49 Sequim 68 61 0.01 6.06 Hoquiam 69 62 0.62 32.64 Victoria 71 58 0.06 14.29 Port Townsend 71 58 0.48* 11.82

National TODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Friday, Aug. 30

Billings 95° | 68°

San Francisco 73° | 61°

S

Aberdeen 70/58

Last

New

First

Chicago 93° | 73°

El Paso 93° | 68° Houston 99° | 79°

Full

Low 53 Cloudy across Peninsula

65/53 Partly sunny

Marine Weather

SUNDAY

65/54 Sun with clouds

MONDAY

62/53 Mostly cloudy Labor Day

Washington TODAY

TUESDAY

Miami 91° | 79°

Fronts

63/53 Clouds continue

Sept 26 Sept 5

7:58 p.m. 6:31 a.m. 1:51 a.m. 4:31 p.m.

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 86 Casper 93 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 91 CANADA Albany, N.Y. 64 PCldy Charleston, W.Va. 87 Victoria Albuquerque 71 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 89 68° | 55° Amarillo 69 PCldy Cheyenne 92 83 Anchorage 52 .40 Rain Chicago 95 Asheville 70 Cldy Cincinnati Seattle 78 Atlanta 72 PCldy Cleveland Spokane 73° | 63° Atlantic City 67 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 93 79° | 61° Columbus, Ohio 90 Austin 70 PCldy Ocean: S wind 10 to 20 Tacoma 87 Baltimore 71 .01 Cldy Concord, N.H. Olympia kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W 73° | 64° Billings 62 PCldy Dallas-Ft Worth 98 77° | 61° swell 5 to 7 ft at 8 seconds. 91 Birmingham 70 PCldy Dayton Yakima Morning fog. Chance of 93 Bismarck 67 .82 Clr Denver 82° | 61° Des Moines 99 showers. Tonight, S wind to Boise 72 PCldy Astoria 84 Boston 63 Cldy Detroit 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. 73° | 59° 87 77 PCldy Duluth ORE. © 2013 Wunderground.com Brownsville W swell 5 ft at 9 seconds. El Paso 79 Buffalo 65 PCldy Evansville 94 Fairbanks 58 Fargo 91 TODAY TOMORROW SUNDAY Flagstaff 78 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Grand Rapids 84 92 LaPush 9:20 a.m. 5.5’ 2:51 a.m. 1.1’ 10:21 a.m. 5.8’ 3:52 a.m. 0.9’ 11:08 a.m. 6.2’ 4:43 a.m. 0.6’ Great Falls 8:43 p.m. 7.0’ 2:39 p.m. 3.6’ 9:43 p.m. 7.1’ 3:46 p.m. 3.4’ 10:37 p.m. 7.4’ 4:42 p.m. 2.9’ Greensboro, N.C. 85 Hartford Spgfld 87 Helena 85 Port Angeles 1:23 p.m. 6.0’ 5:08 a.m. 0.9’ 2:03 p.m. 6.2’ 6:05 a.m. 0.8’ 6:53 a.m. 0.7’ Honolulu 86 10:10 p.m. 5.4’ 6:26 p.m. 5.2’ 11:17 p.m. 5.4’ 7:19 p.m. 5.0’ 2:34 p.m. 6.2’ 7:54 p.m. 4.7’ Houston 95 Indianapolis 94 Jackson, Miss. 89 Port Townsend 3:00 p.m. 7.4’ 6:21 a.m. 1.0’ 7:18 a.m. 0.9’ 12:54 a.m. 6.7’ 8:06 a.m. 0.8’ Jacksonville 90 11:47 p.m. 6.7’ 7:39 p.m. 5.8’ 3:40 p.m. 7.6’ 8:32 p.m. 5.6’ 4:11 p.m. 7.7’ 9:07 p.m. 5.2’ Juneau 68 Kansas City 92 Dungeness Bay* 2:06 p.m. 6.7’ 5:43 a.m. 0.9’ 6:40 a.m. 0.8’ 12:00 a.m. 6.0’ 7:28 a.m. 0.7’ Key West 86 10:53 p.m. 6.0’ 7:01 p.m. 5.2’ 2:46 p.m. 6.8’ 7:54 p.m. 5.0’ 3:17 p.m. 6.9’ 8:29 p.m. 4.7’ Las Vegas 100 Little Rock 94 *To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Nation/World

Tides

Pressure Low

High

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

67 58 74 73 73 61 66 73 73 73 71 62 76 68 65 73 68 67 66 71 50 74 52 65 53 73 66 55 74 76 72 66 70 44 72 77 82 73

.02

.07 .53

.60 .04 .06 .01 .01 .04

.04

Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr PCldy Clr Clr PCldy Rain Cldy PCldy Rain Rain Rain PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Clr Cldy Clr

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

89 96 90 93 87 91 76 92 93 87 86 87 97 94 97 91 91 76 107 83 78 81 84 83 91 89 83 91 97 93 93 99 83 75 90 87 83 102

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 115 at Death Valley, Calif. ■ 37 at Lakeview, Ore.

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

92 69 Clr 67 Clr Sioux Falls 75 PCldy Syracuse 88 64 PCldy 69 PCldy Tampa 91 76 PCldy 73 Clr Topeka 93 74 PCldy 77 .18 PCldy Tucson 100 77 Rain 67 Clr Tulsa 94 78 Clr 67 PCldy Washington, D.C. 83 74 .01 Cldy 75 .03 Cldy Wichita 93 72 PCldy 74 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 81 68 .05 Cldy 71 Clr Wilmington, Del. 79 71 .32 Cldy 71 .43 Cldy ________ 73 .20 Cldy 58 Clr Hi Lo Otlk 71 PCldy 60 45 Clr 74 Clr Auckland 112 74 Clr 73 Cldy Baghdad 84 59 Clr 58 PCldy Beijing Berlin 75 56 Clr 71 1.04 Cldy 72 54 PCldy 81 Rain Brussels 98 72 PCldy 70 Cldy Cairo 75 46 Clr 64 .04 Cldy Calgary Guadalajara 81 59 PCldy 66 .09 Rain Hong Kong 87 81 Ts 64 Cldy 91 67 Clr 75 Cldy Jerusalem 74 36 Clr/Wind 69 Clr Johannesburg 89 63 Clr 58 Cldy Kabul London 74 58 PCldy 72 2.07 Cldy 76 56 Ts 62 Clr Mexico City 79 65 PCldy 75 Clr Montreal 68 54 PCldy 80 PCldy Moscow 91 79 PCldy 73 .03 PCldy New Delhi 77 58 PCldy 76 PCldy Paris Clr 70 PCldy Rio de Janeiro 80 60 83 66 Clr 61 Cldy Rome 80 .03 PCldy Sydney 77 53 PCldy 61 PCldy Tokyo 94 81 PCldy/Wind 63 PCldy Toronto 84 68 Ts 73 PCldy Vancouver 70 56 Sh

38837050

Going on NOW!

Hi 87 87 92 62 85 90 78 96 84 95 89 93 95 73 94 83

Warm Stationary

Sept 12 Sept 19

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

Strait of Juan de Fuca: E wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Morning fog. Chance of showers. Tonight, Light wind becoming W 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less.

New York 79° | 70°

Detroit 88° | 68°

Atlanta 86° | 73°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

SATURDAY

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 82° | 72°

Los Angeles 88° | 68°

Cold

TONIGHT

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 90° | 72°

Denver 93° | 63°

Almanac

Brinnon 73/58

Sunny

Seattle 73° | 63°

*Reading taken in Nordland

ER

A.M. FOG

Yesterday

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

38858951


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C2 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A DE ’t Miss It!

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Don

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, Fr i . - S a t . , 9 - 3 p. m . , Household items, tools. Come join us for a large space, just $15 per day. 452-7576 for info.

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . , Aug. 31 and Sun., Sept. 1, 9-4 p.m., 60 Tyee Ln., P o r t L u d l o w, f o l l o w signs. They just keep getting better! 7th semiannaul garage sale. There’s just about everything at this sale! Don’t A M M O : 2 2 l o n g r i f l e miss this one. Watches, Aguila Super Extra. $12 jewelr y, tools, linens, box. 20 boxes left. collectibles, fur niture, (360)582-3065 and antiques. ATTENTION Snowbirds! House, pet and plant sitter available for winter months, beginning November. Shor t or long term placement. Ref available upon request. Call Gina: (360)797-3473

G R E AT S T U F F S a l e : Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 621 N. Lees Ck. Rd., near east side Safeway. Come see if you need any of our stuff.

3010 Announcements 3010 Announcements A Father’s Love Jaidyn Cade W. Tara Marie W. 10-11-2003 From Grand Lake Stream, Maine

3020 Found

YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat., 8-4 p.m., 102 Christian Lane, off Sequim D u n g e n e s s Way a n d Brigadoon. Inverter, batt e r y c h a r g e r, b o o g i e boards, wet suits, exercise equipment and much more.

peninsula dailynews.com

Plant Operations Assistant Provide secretarial support to the department. Must have strong organizational, communication, and computer skills. High school diploma or equiv. required, associate degree preferred. T h r e e t o f i ve ye a r s secretar ial exper ie n c e, 1 0 - key, t y p i n g 45+ wpm, extensive knowledge of Word, Outlook, and Excel required. Exper ience with Powerpoint, Access, Project, Visio and Total Maintenance Suppor t (TMS) preferred. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org EOE

3020 Found

3023 Lost

FOUND: Glasses. Prescription, on Hwy. 101 between Sequim and 7 Cedars Casino. (360)461-3997

LOST: Dog. Lab/Rott mix, female, if you picked her up, kids are devastated. Last seen 8/26, 7th and Liber ty, Peninsula College area, P.A. Please call (360)460-2984

RUNABOUT: ‘78 14’ boat, ‘78 EZ Load trailer, 7 0 h p O / B M e r c u r y, good cond Must sell! $1,500. (360)928-1170. YA R D S a l e : 2 5 1 0 W. 10th St., P.A., Fri. 8-2 p.m. only. Good stuff!

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

3023 Lost

LOST: Gas can. Red, plastic, possibly on west FOUND: Dog. Female, e n d o f M a r i n e D r i ve, white, small. On Towne P.A. (360)452-7367. Rd., Sequim. Call to ID (360)582-0725 LOST: Cat. Completely black, blue collar, Hamilton area, P.A. (360)912-4309

LOST: Cat. Maine Coon, black and tan tabby cat, FOUND: Cat. Gray Tab- female, no collar, last by, male, C Street be- seen around 11th and tween 15th and 16th, Eunice St. GENEROUS REWARD! 461-2432. P.A. (360)477-0374. LOST: Dog. Chihuahua, F O U N D : C a t . S m a l l , white with brown head gray, very sweet, on W. and spots, limps, Lake 5th between C and D, Sutherland area, P.A. (360)461-9564 P.A. Call to ID (360)417-5342 L O S T: D o g . Fe m a l e , lab/ rottweiler mix, she IS microchipped. CresF O U N D : Fe r r e t . Ve r y thaven area right below friendly, above P.A. High Pen. Col., P.A. School. (360)457-0133. (360)460-2984

4070 Business Opportunities

MORGAN’S CUSTOM FARM SLAUGHTERING Well established, $30,000 potential. Truck and tools are ready to go! Wor k is available RIGHT NOW! Schedule book included! Get started for just $10,000. (360)452-7823

4026 Employment General CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659

BREAKFAST AND DINNER CHEF Apply within, Cafe Garden, 1506 E. 1st Street, P.A. CAREGIVER needed, prefer CNA, HCA, but n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l Cherrie, (360)683-3348

Equipment Mechanic Opening ·Minimum 5 years vehicle and heavy equipment maintenance experience ·Understanding and ability to maintain and repair, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical systems ·Proven welding and fabrication skills ·Excellent and describable troubleshooting abilities ·Strong attention to detail ·Excellent written and verbal communication skills ·Experience with maintaining heavy duty lift trucks is a plus ·Comprehensive knowledge of heavy duty rolling stock including Letourneau’s, Log Loade r s , L u m b e r Tr u c k s , Forklifts.

Excellent wage and benefits pkg. CNA/RNA: Immediate Apply in person: openings, part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home 143 Sitkum Sol Duc Rd., Fo r k s , WA 9 8 3 3 1 o r Care (360)457-9236. send resume to: PO Box 2299 Forks, WA 98331 CWSLS - Caregivers of or fax: 360-374-4331. WASHINGTON Equal Opportunity Supported Living Employer Services Starting Wages $11.08 Training available. EXECUTIVE Chef Flexible hours. Call Now. Culinary Professional (360)457-1644 needed. Lead with and inspire excellent customer service to our ENTRY LEVEL senior residents. ManMILL RELIEF N I P P O N PA P E R I N - age day to day operaDUSTRIES USA is re- tion of the dining room, cruiting for Extra Board staff, budgets, and enpositions used to fill mill sure exquisite food is operations’ vacancies as ser ved. Plan menus, n e e d e d . R E Q U I R E - develop/follow stanM E N T S : H i g h s c h o o l dardized recipes and graduate (not G.E.D.); food production schedage 18 or older. Able to ules. Apply directly to: wor k rotating 12-hour Seaport Landing Reshifts and perform work tiremetn and Assisted classified with Heavy L i v i n g C o m m , 1 2 0 1 Strength requirements. H a n c o c k S t . , Po r t Must meet requirements Townsend, WA 98368. for consideration. Please send cover letter and reHOME CARE AIDES sume to jobs@npiusa.com or NPIUSA Attn: Concerned Citizens in HR, PO Box 271, Por t P.A. and Forks. FT and Angeles, WA 98362. No PT. Must be able to pass phone calls or drop ins background clearance, drug test, have valid DL please. AA/EEO. and ins. Apply at 805 E. 8th St., P.A. HUMAN RESOURCE (360)452-2396 or DIRECTOR 87 Sportsman Club Rd. HR Director’s job is to Forks (360)374-9130 implement HR programs and policies, and to manage every aspect of employee development and relations. The main responsibility of the HR director is to manage recruiting and staffing, performance management, HR GENERALIST benefits and compensa- Responsible for HR tion administration, or- L aw s o n m o d u l e i n ganizational develop- cluding daily entry of m e n t , e m p l o y e e data, running reports, counseling services, and maintaining codes and training. Most HR direc- tables. Works closely tors report to the Finan- with benefits, payroll, cial Officer. Must have and managers to exeither Bachelor’s degree plain system requirein Business or Human ments, and problem Resources from an ac- solve, etc. Prior Lawcredited university or in- s o n t ra i n i n g / ex p e r i stitution. AA in Business ence required. or Human Resources. At Apply online at least four years’ experiwww.olympic ence in Human Remedical.org sources. Salary: or nbuckner@ $33,280-$41,600 DOE/Q olympicmedical.org. For complete job description and application KWA HOMECARE you can contact Kristina Curr ie; Administrative Part/full-time Caregivers. A s s i s t a n t , p h o n e : Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 (360)374-6582 email: Sequim (360)582-1647 kristinac@ P.T. (360)344-3497 hohtribe-nsn.org

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General MEDICAL ASSISTANT Excellent oppor tunity, benefits pkg., computer skills, up to $16.50 hr. DOE. Contact Human Resource Dept. (855)401-5350 RESIDENTIAL AIDE 3 Po s i t i o n s. F T s h i f t work & on-call. Promote daily living skills of residents, cooking/housekeeping skills. Work exper ience with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred, Req. H.S./GED. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. EOE. Details at http://peninsula behavioral.org

NOW HIRING!

NURSE: RN, LPN, or M A fo r p r i m a r y c a r e medical office, FT, office exp. preferred. Peninsula Daily News PDN#708/Nurse Port Angeles, WA 98362

Nursing Assistants Certified Full Time, Part Time and Per Diem All shifts available! Apply online: www.teamavamere.com Avamere Olympic Rehab of Sequim 1000 S. 5th Ave (360)582-3900

PERSON FRIDAY Seasoned in Quickbooks and/or Excel, with particular attention to minute details. From $12/hr, 3 0 h r s / we e k . Fa x r e sume to (360)364-2777

VETERINARY RECEPTION Pa r t - t i m e , w e e k e n d s req. Apply in person, G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y Hospital, Sequim.

VET KENNEL/ JANITORIAL POSITION Part-time, weekends required. Apply in person, G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y Hospital, Sequim.

WILDER AUTO

YO U C A N CO U N T O N U S ! NISSAN • VW • JEEP • HONDA • TOYOTA • SCION CHRYSLER • DODGE • RAM

Career Opportunity

Wilder Auto has the largest selection of new and used vehicles on the Olympic Peninsula. Come join our team of friendly sales professionals. No experience necessary, extensive training program and a great working environment await you. Benefits include a 401K program, medical and dental insurance, paid vacation and a great college tuition package for your children. Please call Rick or Don at 452-3888 – or send your resume to: hr@wilderauto.com for more information and the opportunity to experience the Wilder difference.

97 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles

1-800-927-9379 • 360-452-9268

36809850

SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeks to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of love, opportunity, and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at 206-920-1376, 877290-0543 or AndrewCorley@ outlook.com or our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

To dispel the rumors that we sell out at ESP: WE NEVER SELL OUT!! Purchase your tickets at extremesportspark.net or at one of our many local ticket outlets in Port Angeles or Sequim.. or on the day of the event at the park. See you at the Sprint Boat races!!!

To dispel the rumors that we sell out at ESP: WE NEVER SELL OUT!! Purchase your tickets at extremesportspark.net or at one of our many local ticket outlets in Port Angeles or Sequim.. or on the day of the event at the park. See you at the Sprint Boat races!!!

Plant Operations Supervisor Supervises plant operations, repair and maintenance prog r a m s. D i r e c t s a n d oversees work of maintenance staff. Trade certification preferred, five years of hospital experience in building maintenance a n d f a c i l i t i e s . Tw o years of management experience in a hospital setting preferred, strong computer skills required. Must have working knowledge of Plumbing, Fire, Electrical, OSHA Codes as well as Joint Commission standards.

BE A NEWSPAPER CARRIER FOR OUR HOMETOWN PAPER! Earn extra $$ per month. Applicant must be dependable, have reliable vehicle, possess a valid WA driver’s license and proof of insurance. No carrier collections. Apply in person at: 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Ask for Dave in Circulation.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

5000900

GUN SHOW Sequim Prairie Grange CHEV: ‘91 1500. Ext. Aug. 31-Sept.1. Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3. Admission $5, Cab, new motor/trans. $1,850. (360)460-6647. Family $7. Tables both days $35. Don Roberts (360)457-1846 C H E V: ‘ 9 7 4 X 4 . 5 Donr@olypen.com speed, Vor tec, mint cond. $6,500/obo or M I S C : E l e c t r i c w o o d trade for late model splitter, $350. Kenmore t r i ke, a l s o ‘ 7 7 Fo r d r e f r i g e r a t o r , $ 1 0 0 . pick-up can be part of Downrigger, $75. Dinotrade. (360)452-5891. glo heater, $100. (916)479-4811 ESTATE Sale: At Yard Sale Prices. 234 Monter- MOVING IN, Moving Out r a D r. , S e q u i m . A r t , Sale: Fri., 8-5 p.m., Sat., Fur n, Cllctbles, Dolls, 8-12 p.m., 525 and 527 more. 8am this Fri., Aug W. 12th St., between the 30, through Sun., Sept. bridges. One sale will be 1. All indoors. Prices ne- in the garage, and one gotiable, sales final. will be in the house! Cash Only. ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., M OV I N G S a l e : S a t . 9-4 p.m., 2012 Camp Sun., 10-6 p.m., 2605 Hayden Rd. 2 or 3 gen- W. Edgewood Dr. Turn e ra t i o n s o f s t u f f, a n - off of Hwy 101 to Redtiques, china, cr ystal, dick Rd., follow to Edgefurniture, tools, kitchen wood. First driveway after 45 MPH Speed limit stuff, plus lots of misc. sign on right. Lots of ever ything! Fur niture, P.A.: Apt. 2 Br. $595. clothes, household Apt. 2 Br. $650. items, dolls. Sale is inSEQ: Dplx 2 Br. $750 doors! Come rain or (360)460-4089 www.mchughrents.com shine!

P.A.: Centrally located, 2 br., 1 bath, 1 car gar., W / D. $ 7 0 0 , f / l / d . N o smoke, pets neg. (360)678-7484.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Chorus from adoring fans 2 Hatch of Utah 3 Nitrogen compound

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. PROCRASTINATION Solution: 6 letters

E R U T A N O I T C E F R E P By Jeffrey Wechsler

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

C A A T T E N T I O N E E D S

K O I R E S E A R C H E M I T

© 2013 Universal Uclick

D A U N T I N G T N E V E R P

P Y E N E S M Y L T S O C F O

F E A R S D U P T S L A O G N

K C A L B E E R U E U L A V I

www.wonderword.com

T L U S E R L P F L I K F S N

Y D U T S D P I O E S X N T G

P E E L S E R A W A I N T H D O O T T A P R V L P ‫ګ‬ O ‫ګ‬ L A A T F Z ‫ګ‬ E E I Y A E ‫ګ‬ H V N T C B E A G R T S I A O D T I L F N E N V E I E C A E B M N I L D I

Join us on Facebook

8/30

Acts, Adaptive, Anxiety, Attention, Avoid, Aware, Belief, Bind, Brain, Break, Costly, Counseling, Daunting, Delay, Denial, Esteem, Fact, Fear, Force, Frustrate, Goals, Health, Help, Idling, Impulsive, Lack, Lazy, Mental, Nature, Needs, Overcome, Perfection, Personal, Postponing, Prevent, Research, Result, Sleep, Study, Support, Task, Time, Value Yesterday’s Answer: Wrapped THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

PARCM ©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

NOORM (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

36 Real end? 37 Commercial sign 42 Targets of many searches 43 Unexpected pleasure 44 Marshy wasteland 45 Red in the face 49 Fanfare 50 Van Gogh’s “Starry Night Over the __”

8/30/13

51 Nighttime disorder 53 Dramatic device 54 Frankincense or myrrh 55 Black-ink entry 57 Lights-out signal 58 Inferno 59 Rub the wrong way 60 Word of feigned innocence 61 Subtle assent

WONDAR

TUDNIP

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

4 Unger player 5 “This skull hath __ in the earth ...”: Hamlet 6 E’en if 7 __ passage 8 Knock the socks off 9 Eastern segment of the Louisiana Purchase 10 Purse 11 Unoriginal 12 Tribute in verse 13 Word with flung or reaching 19 Sumatran ape 21 Put in a word or two? 25 Win by __ 26 Ancient Mesopotamian kingdom 27 Buffing board 29 Flat-bottomed boat 31 Brought forth 32 Ancient gathering place 33 Towers (over) 34 Conciliatory offering 35 Advice after an injury, perhaps

8/30/13

L T U L A T N E M O C R E V O

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A:

-

ACROSS 1 Use an updraft, say 5 Pacific veranda 10 Shoe site 14 “__ la Douce” 15 Mission attacked by Santa Anna 16 “Betsy’s Wedding” director 17 Alfred E. Neuman expression 18 “I can’t believe ...” 20 See 56-Across 22 Winner of a record 82 PGA tournaments 23 Cheer from Charo 24 Bring down 28 Top 30 Book between Micah and Habakkuk 31 See 56-Across 38 Id checker 39 Get up 40 Comparative suffix 41 See 56-Across 46 Mail at a castle 47 SSA IDs, e.g. 48 Discrimination 49 Gay Nineties, e.g. 52 Catherine of “A Mighty Wind” 56 Some slogans, and what 20-, 31and 41-Across are? 59 Response to an awkwardly timed call 62 Whiff 63 Bed or bar attachment 64 Discussion group 65 Actress McClurg 66 “__ these days ...” 67 Signal to a runner 68 Negative impression?

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 C3

Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: FENCE THANK PURELY ASSURE Answer: Danica Patrick’s success at such a young age was a result of her being a — FAST LEARNER

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General General General General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

PARK VIEW VILLAS, An Independent and Assisted Living Community Now accepting applications for CNA, Housekeeper and Line Cook. Both full and par t-time positions ava i l a bl e . F u l l - t i m e NOC shift available n o w. G r e a t b e n e f i t package with generous 401k. Pick up application or drop off res u m e a t Pa r k V i ew Villas at the corner of 8th and G street, P.A. No phone calls, please PART-TIME SPORTS WRITER The Peninsula Daily News has an immediate opening for a spor ts writer to help with Nor th Olympic high school football coverage as well as other fall athletics on the prep and community college levels. This is a temporar y, part-time position. The writer will cover selected games and write follow-up game stories as well as feature articles. The job requires Friday night and Saturday work; other times can be worked out according to the applicant’s personal schedule. Requirements include good and accurate wr iting skills, and a knowledge of sports — particularly football.

SEKIU: PT cook/server, willing to train. Apply at (360)963-2894

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Plant Operations Assistant Provide secretarial support to the department. Must have strong organizational, communication, and computer skills. High school diploma or equiv. required, associate degree preferred. T h r e e t o f i ve ye a r s secretar ial exper ie n c e, 1 0 - key, t y p i n g 45+ wpm, extensive knowledge of Word, Outlook, and Excel required. Exper ience with Powerpoint, Access, Project, Visio and Total Maintenance Suppor t (TMS) preferred. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org EOE RESIDENT Care Coordinator / LPN. Responsible for the health services department. Hires/trains/ supv/schedules our care-giving staff. Coordinate, monitor and evaluate the services for resident care needs. Must be exp in staff dev, medication admin, scheduling, regulations and geriatr ics. Apply direct to Seaport Landing Retirement Assisted Living Comm, 1201 Hancock St, Por t Townsend, WA 98368 or send resumes to Employment@ LiveBSL.com

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

T h e Q u i l e u t e Tr i b a l Council has a job opening for a Payroll Technician II: The payroll tech will perform accounting tasks related to payroll for the Quileute Tribe. Must have two years of related experience and/or training in processing payroll. Must have experience with the use of a computerized p ay r o l l s y s t e m . M u s t have High school diploma or GED with lower level college accounting courses/degree. Must be bondable. Indian Prefere n c e a p p l i e s. S a l a r y DOQ/E, Must submit job application and reference s by S e p t e m b e r 0 6 , 2013. Visit our website a t w w w. q u i l e u t e n a tion.org for job application and job description or call the Personnel Dept. (360)374-4366.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

VICTIM ADVOCATE ASSISTANT This position, funded by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women and will provide direct intervention and related assistance for victims/survivors of domestic v i o l e n c e, d a t i n g v i o lence, sexual assault and/or stalking who live on the Hoh Indian Reservation and/or are enrolled Hoh Tribal members living offreservation. Victim Advocate Assistance will contribute to the service of adult, youth and child victims as well as family and household members of victims/survivors and those collaterally affected by the victimization (except for the perpetrator/offender). The Victim Advocate Assistance will provide assistance to the Program Director in working with the community to create education a n d p r eve n t i o n c a m paigns and facilitating or organizing related trainings for staff and stakeholders. Preferred qualifications are experience training in working with adults and/or children who have survived domestic v i o l e n c e, d a t i n g v i o lence, sexual assault and/or stalking situations. Training and experience in cr isis inter vention. DOE/Q. For complete job description and application you can contact Kristina Curr ie; Administrative Assistant, phone: (360)374-6582 email: kristinac@ hohtribe-nsn.org

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 ADULT Tender Care. Personalized In Home Care. Excellent References, Available September 1st. (360)461-0913 ATTENTION Snowbirds! House, pet and plant sitter available for winter months, beginning November. Shor t or long term placement. Ref available upon request. Call Gina: (360)797-3473 RENT-A-MAN Labor for hire. Inside or out. Call and we’ll talk. John (360)775-5586

EXP. ADMIN Position Wanted. Highly Qualified Adm Mgr/Ex Asst 9-yrs exp const ind. Skilled cust serv, Mktg asst, AA acctg, HR and Paralegal certs, RE exp. You will BEAUTIFUL HOME on be pleased you hired 19.6 acres between Seme. 360.775.1573 quim and Port Angeles, 5 br., 5 bath, great for enter taining, gour met HOUSEKEEPER kitchen, deck, dramatic Reasonable, efficient, reliable. (360)581-2349. master suite, fireplace, walk-in shower, hydrot h e ra py t u b. G a r d e n s and vineyard. Perfect mother-in-law apt with own entrance or home office or B&B. 3182 Blue Mountain Road. $799,900 NWMLS 40941 Appt (360)461-3926 I am a loving and compassionate person with several years of experience in the Seq u i m c o m m u n i t y. I f you or your loved one need help in your home, please call Deanna, (360)565-6271. JUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248. RE-SCREEN WINDOW/DOOR 775-4570 or 681-8582 RUSSELL ANYTHING 775-4570 or 681-8582

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County ACREAGE Need about 12 acres of pasture with a mountain view to create your own n i r va n a ? Fr a m e d i n home for a 3 br., 2 bath needs completing, while the pasture is waiting for your critters. Lots of hillside trails to ride nearby. Crescent water share included. This is a farmette in the rough waiting for your ideas. Washington Federal offers an owner-builder construction loan. Call for more information. MLS#270576 $125,000 Michaelle Barnard (360) 461-2153 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

END OF THE ROAD RANCH PROPERTY The secluded living on this 78 acre parcel allows many opportunities. Create your own horse ranch or far m on this beautiful view acreage. Level acreage in front and a forest with tax advantages in the rear portion. Adjacent to miles of DNR land to explore. Well cared for home with large carpor t and outbuildings. Open and sunny setting with Quilcene Bay nearby for recreational fun and seafood! Year round creek and possible water rights. Owner will carry contract. MLS#500297. $425,000. Jim Munn CHERRY HILL (360)301-4700 CHARMER MUNN BRO’S You’ll love this 2 Br., 1 HOOD CANAL bath with an updated PROPERTIES kitchen with new cabinets, custom tile counter top and back splash and E S TA B L I S H E D c o n tile floor. Dining room signment business for with door to the multi sale. Fabulous business level deck with beautiful opportunity to purchase views of the Strait of a loved business with Juan de Fuca. Living loyal customers and cliroom with wood stove ents . Ebay opportunity and views of the Moun- and constant flow of new tains. Newer roof, updat- inventor y! Wanting to ed wiring and plumbing, s e l l t o c o n t i n u e m y double pane windows health career. Don’t let and upgraded insulation this chance to be a new in the attic. Fully fenced b a ck ya r d . 2 c a r d e - bu s i n e s s ow n e r p a s s tached garage plus an you by! $10,000. Call for details, Michele, RV/Boat garage. MLS#271862. $142,500. (360)461-4799. Kelly Johnson (360) 477-5876 EXCELLENT WINDERMERE CONDITION PORT ANGELES Roomy 2 Br., 2 bath + Rec Room, Over 1,900 sf of cozy living, overCLEAN AND COMFY! sized garage + storage This 3Bd, 2BA manu- shed, rv parking by garfactured home offers an age (water, sewer and open floor plan, over 50 amp), 3 decks and 1500 sq. ft. a 2 car car- fenced backyard, distant port with plenty of on- water and mt. views site parking & a fenced MLS#473981/270810 backyard with a patio, a $225,500 storage building & lovely Deb Kahle landscaping. The pride (360)683-6880 in ownership is evident WINDERMERE throughout. SUNLAND MLS#271824. $139,000. Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

FRESHWATER BAY Beautiful home built to enjoy the view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Mt. Baker and Vancouver Island in a private setting on 5 acres just 1 mile to the public boat launch and beach which is known for the best fishing and kayaking. The main level features a living room w/pellet stove, dining room, kitchen with pantry, laundr y room, main bathroom, 2nd bedroom and the master suite with tile shower. The loft can be a fa m i l y r o o m , g u e s t bedroom or office. 2 car garage + shop, shed, garden and orchard. MLS#271878. $399,900. Kelly Johnson (360) 477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES GREAT RAMBLER On 2.5 park-like acres a n d eve n i n c l u d e s a wonderful barn, used as the ideal shop with wo o d s t ove a n d l a r g e loft. Beautiful setting with paved circular drive & privacy trees that surround the proper ty. 3 Br., 2 bath. A must see! MLS#270998. $269,000. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

FRESHWATER BAY This casually elegant, 4-star, green-built home by Dave Bukovnik is on 5.1 acres of high bank waterfront with unbel i eva bl e v i ew s o f t h e Strait of Juan de Fuca. This home features 4 bedrooms, 2 baths and 3,828 square feet including the basement, as well as an exquisite local wood, r iver rock fireplace designed in a Nor thwest rustic style. Also includes a guest cabin, a separate studio, native landscaping, privacy and beach access. MLS#271879 $1,500,000 Jean Irvine (360)417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PRICED RIGHT AT THE RIGHT TIME One acre landscaped property with plenty of elbow room. Very large metal shop with 2-10’ high oversized bay doors. Gardeners will relish the park-like back yard, including various fruit trees and garden areas. Enjoy leisurely retreats on the back deck. Front yard has lovely Olympic Mountain views MLS#271888. $289,000. Chuck Murphy (360)808-0873 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, Aug 31 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

39863277

Please email Rex Wilson, executive editor, at rex.wilson@peninsula dailynews.com with questions as well as a letter of interest and resume.

Plant Operations Supervisor Supervises plant operations, repair and maintenance prog r a m s. D i r e c t s a n d oversees work of maintenance staff. Trade certification preferred, five years of hospital experience in building maintenance a n d f a c i l i t i e s . Tw o years of management experience in a hospital setting preferred, strong computer skills required. Must have working knowledge of Plumbing, Fire, Electrical, OSHA Codes as well as Joint Commission standards.

RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Full time, great benefits, M-F! Support the well-being of our residents through the creation of care plans, interaction with family members, and being a key m e m b e r o f o u r team. Must be a WA State licensed RN. Ideal candidate is experienced, personable, dependable, and enthusiastic. Give us a call to talk about the position and schedule a tour! Contact HR: (360)683-3348 550 W. Hendrickson Sequim, WA 98382

320 Lupine, Sequim

Outstanding water views! Quality and pride French Country home with substantial updates. Master en-suite with sun ELEGANT SUNLAND deck, friendly neighborhood, take walks, HOME enjoy the sunrises and sunsets. So much 3 Br., 2.5 bath on 4th to offer including separate guest cottage. Fairway, remodeled with q u a l i t y fe a t u r e s , t o p FOR SALE By Owner. MLS#270971 $439,500 $185,000. Immaculate, quality appliances, cherry cabinets and built-ins, tile floors with in floor heat, cozy librar y and golf course view atrium. MLS#527355/271791 $380,000 TEAM SCHMIDT Mike: 460-0331 Irene: 460-4040 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

spacious 1,848 sf on 1.01 acres, between Sequim and Port Angeles. 2004 doublewide, 3 br., 2 bath, large kitchen, with breakfast bar, dining room, living room, large family rm. Attached 2-car garage, storage shed. Private septic and well. (360)457-8345.

Directions: 101 East to Diamond Point Rd. proceed into Diamond Pt. turn left on Lupine Dr. to 320

Bill Humphrey 360-460-2400

Office: 360-683-4131 Email: billhumphrey@olypen.com


Classified

C4 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

GARAGE G ARAGE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

&

YARD SALES O n t h e Pe n i n s u l a 8120 Garage Sales 8120 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales Jefferson County Jefferson County Sequim Sequim Sequim PA - Central PA - West PA - West PA - East ESTATE Sale: Thurs.Fri.-Sat, 9-4 p.m., 11325 Rhody Drive, Port Hadlock. Ceramic business going also. Kilns, molds, brushes, paint, etc. Household items, furnit u r e, c o m p u t e r d e s k , beds, books, clothing and misc. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-5 p.m., 2044 McNeill, off 19th and San Juan, Port Tow n s e n d . F u r n i t u r e, rug, tools, lawn mower, clothes, jewelry, paint, linens, toys, misc. kitchen items and more.

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . , Aug. 31 and Sun., Sept. 1, 9-4 p.m., 60 Tyee Ln., P o r t L u d l o w, f o l l o w signs. They just keep getting better! 7th semiannaul garage sale. There’s just about everything at this sale! Don’t miss this one. Watches, jewelr y, tools, linens, collectibles, fur niture, and antiques. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . S u n . , 9 - 4 p. m . , 6 9 5 0 Oak Bay Rd., Pt. Ludlow. Take Hwy 104 to Hood Canal Bridge, turn on Paradise Bay Rd., then on Oak Bay. O N E D a y O n l y Ya r d Sale: (Saturday 8/31/13) 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.! Cookbooks, misc appliances, men’s lg xlg camo’s, misc huntng accessor ies, men’s clothes, crab shrimp pots, plus much more. 51 Hawks Prair ie Rd, Gardiner off Gardiner Beach Rd. CASH ONLY!

SALE: Sporting goods a n d To o l s : F i s h i n g tackle, tools, sporting goods, zodiac motor, house hold items. 9-3 p.m. at 62 Kala Pt. Dr., Sept. 1-2.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat, 9-3 p.m., 340 Matriotti Ave., off E. Fir. Tools, furniture, collectibles, 2 freezers, canning supplies. Everything goes. No earlies.

MULTI-Family Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8/30-31, 9:00-3:00 p.m. 432 Parrish Rd. Clothes (kids, baby, adult), household i t e m s, b a by k i d t oy s, books, horse things, kayak, guy stuff more. No earlies!

GARAGE Sale: Fri. 8-3, Sat. 8-noon, 733 E. PUMPKIN PATCH Spruce St. Cleaning out FLEA MARKET extra furniture, lamps, Sat., 8-4 p.m., corner of ANTIQUE/Garage Sale: linens, and other odds Hwy. 101 and KitchenL a b o r D ay We e ke n d ! and ends. Dick Rd. Absolutely no S a t . - S u n . , 9 - 5 p. m . , early sales. $15 per Mon., 9-12 p.m., 207 W. space, no reservations Maple St., Take Wash- GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat. needed. More info: ington Ave. to 2nd Ave., 9-4 p.m., 219 N. Dunlap (360)461-0940 on cor ner of 2nd and A v e . A n t i q u e p i a n o , vanity with mirror, sewMaple. Antique furniture, SATURATED BY figurines, and more! We ing machine, tons of STUFF GARAGE Sale also have a lot of cloth- beads and wire, patio taSat., 9-3 p.m., 34 E. ble and chairs. Please ing and household Pheasant Ln., off SilNo early birds! goods! berhor n and Falcon. Cash only. No ear ly DOWNSIZING Garage Sale. 883 Weston Pky, G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . - birds. Sat.-Sun.-Mon., 10-5, All Off Hwy. 101 at Louella, Sequim. Fri., 9-2 p.m., Safe Mini Storage, 101 S a t . , 9 - 2 p. m . S o fa s, Grant Rd. #51. Tools, S o f a Ta b l e , C h a i r s , power tools, golf clubs, Lamps, Ent Ctr, China surfboard, bikes, winCur io, Butcher Block, dows, doors, household, Teac Ipod/CD Station, collectibles, Christmas, L i n e n s , C h a n d e l i e r, name brand women’s/ Patio Bench, Pictures, m e n ’s c l o t h e s / s h o e s, K i t c h e n a n d D é c o r shear ling and leather Items, Antiques, Books coats, stetson, electroni c s , r e c o r d s , DV D s , SOLMAR Community and MORE! VHS, kids, crafts, trailer Yard Sale: Multi FamiESTATE Sale: At Yard wheels, ladders, books. ly Yard Sale, SaturSale Prices. 234 Monterday, Sept. 14, 9AM to r a D r. , S e q u i m . A r t , 4PM. From 101 take Fur n, Cllctbles, Dolls, GARAGE Sale: Thurs.- Dryke Road north and more. 8am this Fri., Aug F r i . , 9 - 2 p . m . , 2 6 0 follow the signs. From 30, through Sun., Sept. Dungeness Meadows. Old Olympic Hwy take Overload! 1. All indoors. Prices neVautier south and folgotiable, sales final. low the signs. QuesCash Only. tions? John @ MOVING Sale: Saturday (360)681-2924. ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., O n l y. 8 a . m . 1 2 7 6 8-2 p.m., 4596 Wood- Woodcock Rd. Sequim. SEE THE MOST cock Rd. 50 plus years Tr e a d m i l l , c h a i n s a w, CURRENT REAL of “Treasures”! Antique weedeater, framed ar t ESTATE LISTINGS: student desk, furniture, s o m e f u r n i t u r e, m i s c www.peninsula art, every holiday decor tools, household items, dailynews.com clothes/coats, more. AND MORE!

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat., 8-4 p.m., 102 Christian Lane, off Sequim D u n g e n e s s Way a n d Brigadoon. Inverter, batt e r y c h a r g e r, b o o g i e boards, wet suits, exercise equipment and much more. YARD Sale: Sat. only! 9-3 p.m., What variety! Five families offer : Tools, outboard, boat, ‘63 Buick Skylark, small motorcycles, hunting/ fishing gear, household goods/decor, stylish size small clothes and 7.5 narrow shoes in great condition, pottery/woodworking supplies, exercise equipment. We’re in the field opposite 136 Forrest Rd., just 1/2 mile n o r t h o f J o h n Way n e Marina. Find us off West Sequim Bay Rd. We’re at the end of Forrest Rd on your left. Go to the earlier-star ting sales first, and then come visit us! Easy parking. (Dogs and children with thoughtful parents are most welcome). Have a fun day on a beautiful field.

MOVING IN, Moving Out Sale: Fri., 8-5 p.m., Sat., 8-12 p.m., 525 and 527 W. 12th St., between the bridges. One sale will be in the garage, and one will be in the house!

ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-4 p.m., 2012 Camp Hayden Rd. 2 or 3 gene ra t i o n s o f s t u f f, a n tiques, china, cr ystal, furniture, tools, kitchen stuff, plus lots of misc.

Port Angeles Friends o f t h e L i b ra r y b o o k clearance sale Fr i., Au g . 3 0 , 9 : 3 0 - 5 : 3 0 p.m., and Sat., Aug. 31, 9:30-4:00 p.m. Fill our bag with books for only $2, no limit on the number of bags you purchase. Hundreds of books to choose from. Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St.

FUNDRAISING GARAGE SALE Fr i . - S a t . , 8 - 2 p. m . , 2024 W. 7th St. Tons of computer electronics, Harley parts and gear (including brand new helmets, leathers, boots, cover), cell phones and accessories, Oakley sunglass cases, hubcaps, wet s u i t , h o l i d ay d e c o r, dresser, blizzard proof overalls, quality men’s jackets, sliding glass dog door, RC gear bag and RC car multi charger, golf clubs, giant Cabelas canvas duffle, microwave, rugs, bean bag chairs, 100’s of great condition CDs all in original cases, full mattress set, table with 6 chairs, Playstation 3 and high e n d g a m i n g c h a i r, books, pet supplies, computer manuals, and SO MUCH MORE! Port Scandalous Roller Derby

SHED/YARD Sale: Fri. only, 8:30 a.m., no earli e s , 2 3 3 W. 1 1 t h S t . Household, garden, drop leaf table and antique oak table, antique curio secretary, recliner, rattan chair and more.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

ASTRONOMICAL: Clallam County Histor ical Society GARAGE SALE and C Streets Mem8180 Garage Sales 8th bers only August 29, 4-6 PA - Central Public Sale Aug., 30 and aug. 31, 8-2. Call for GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 more info about sale or p.m., 511 W. 6th St., in to become a member. (360)452-2662 a l l e y, b e t w e e n P. A . br idges. China hutch, t i r e s . R V s t u f f : t o w ASTRONOMICAL Sale: breaking system, water Clallam County Historip u m p, fa n t a s t i c fa n s, c a l S o c i e t y G A R AG E tools and much more! SALE 8th and C Streets Rain or shine! 1/2 Price Day Sept. 6, 8 - 2 B u c k - a - B a g D ay M U LT I - F a m i l y S a l e : S e p t . 7 , 8 - 2 C a l l fo r Sat., 10-3 p.m., 315 S. more info about sale or Ennis St., below college. to become a member. (360)452-2662 Cash only, please.

FSBO $237,000 Open plan triple wide 2300 sf, 3 br., 2 bath, large bonus room or 4th bedroom. Mountain view on 1.01 acres, close to Discovery Trail, not in the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, extra large 28 x 36 (1008 sf) detached garage and workshop. (360)582-9782 LIVE IN FARM COUNTRY 2.47 acres, fenced and surrounded by trees, 3 br, 3 bath, 1,610 sf, built in 1996, 1,100 sf 3-car garage plus workshop, 2 rv parking spaces with all utilities, irr igation, well, fruit trees, enclosed g a ze b o, w ra p a r o u n d deck. MLS#271887. $240,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEAR NEW 1,626 sf 3 Br., 2 ba on 0.66 acres east of P.A. Quiet tree setting, end of r o a d . L i v i n g , f a m i l y, laundry, dining rooms, walk-in closets, storage shed, 2 car att. garage. Price reduced. $174,000 (360)640-0556

PARKWOOD LIVING Well maintained 3 Br., 2 bath home, newer roof and front deck, new windows, carpet and paint throughout, updated bathrooms, bonus room off kitchen. MLS#271877/532602 $84,500 Tyler Conkle (360)670-5978 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

SALE or RENT 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. built in surround sound, French doors to patio, big backyard, shed, double garage, fireplace, crown molding. Cul-de-sac neighborhood! Rental price $1200 monthly. Call Tammy now (360)457-9511 or (360)461-9066!

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SPACIOUS Lovely 2,400 sf custom home with a beautifully landscaped 1/2 acre of manicured grounds. This expansive and well maintained home has new car pet and has been freshly painted. This home is perfectly designed for entertaining and for hosting large gatherings. $249,900 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 UNDER CONSTRUCTION Located in a nice west side neighborhood. The main level features a living room, kitchen with breakfast bar dining area and pantry, family room, mud room with laundry and half bathroom and an entrance to the 2 car garage. Upstairs features the master bedroom with attached full bath and walk-in closet, two other bedrooms with views of the Strait and a full bathroom. There is still time to pick colors. MLS#271863. $229,000. Terry Neske (360) 477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

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DISPLAY/LEGAL ADS AD DEADLINE Wed., Aug. 28; 2 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 29; 2 p.m. Fri., Aug. 30; 2 p.m. Fri., Aug. 30; 2 p.m. Wed., Sept. 4; 2 p.m.

CLASSIFIED LINE ADS AD DEADLINE Fri., Aug. 30; 4 p.m.

38862160

ISSUE Tue., Sept. 3

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

BEAUTIFUL secluded 4 acres in Port Angeles urban growth area near Hwy 101 and Mt. Pleasant Road, fabulous mountain views, development potential. $150,000, some shor t ter m owner financing considered. (360)808-7107 roger@gmail.com Agents protected.

SEQUIM COTTAGES 1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no •Brand new 1 Br., 1 car smoking/pets. $700, ref- gar., small pet ok, 101 erence check. 928-2165. Ritter Rd. $850 mo. •Studio cottage with beach access, br ight, modern, $850 mo. JACE the Real Estate Company. Call or text (360)808-0338

605 Apartments Clallam County

1927 Bungalow: 2-3 bed 1 bath, fenced, garage, CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 w o o d s t ove. C u t e. N o ba, no smoking/pets . smoking. Rent $750. $500. (360)457-9698. Call 457-9641. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, DISCO BAY: Waterfront, quiet, 2 Br., excellent newly renovated 3 Br., 2 references required. $700. (360)452-3540. ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. $900. (360)460-2330. DOWNTOWN SEQUIM 1,800 sf, 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 car gar., fenced, clean, extras, near park/ schools. $1,200 mo. 582-9848 or 477-5070 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 A Studio-Furn ..........$500 A 1 br 1 ba ..............$575 H 2 br 1 ba ...............$600 H 2 br 2 ba ...............$795 A 3 br 1 ba ...............$875 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1200 A Penthouse ..........$1200 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1200 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1350 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 br., and 2 br. Apts. 2nd floor, clean, light, $553-$661 incl. util! No Smoke/pet maybe, (360)504-2668. Enjoy Your One Month FREE and Pay Only $99 TO MOVE IN! EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today! Managed by Sparrow, Inc.

P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, carport, no pets. $775, dep. 311 For Sale P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 (360)457-7012 Manufactured Homes mo., $300 dep. Studio apt., $550, $300 dep., P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, like Util. included, no pets. MOBILE HOME: 2 Br., new, dead end st. $850 (360)457-6196. good condtion, soaking mo., dep. (360)452-6118 tub, ready to move. P.A.: 2831 E. Hwy 101, $4,000. (360)460-5358. P. A . : 2 B r. , 1 b a t h , come by! Large, $725, washer/dr yer hookup, W/G incl. (360)452-9195 900 sf., 1 car det. gar. P.A.: Apt. 2 Br. $595. $795. (253)761-1613. Apt. 2 Br. $650. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ SEQ: Dplx 2 Br. $750 (360)460-4089 pets. $650, last, dep. www.mchughrents.com 452-1694 eves. SEQUIM: 24x48 dbl wide ‘84, heat pump & wood stove, in park but can be moved. $24,000/ obo. (360)683-9229.

The following are early advertising deadlines:

ISSUE Tuesday, Sept. 3 Wednesday, Sept. 4 Thursday, Sept. 5 Pen. Profile, Sept. 8 TV Book, Sept. 15

VERY WELL CARED FOR Newer roof and furnace. Just repainted inside for a fresh palate and new blinds in the living/dining room. Kitchen has a breakfast bar, pantr y, and lots of cabinets. All appliances stay. Newer roof and furnace. There are lots of beautiful smaller trees on the property included apple. Property also has a storage garage and green building for lawn equipment. Brand new septic being installed. MLS#271595/514609 $200,000 Dave Stofferahn Cell: 477-5542 TOWN & COUNTRY

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba., gar. $1,100 mo. $1,100 security. (360)417-0153.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 P.A.: 3 br., 2 miles up Br., great location, unfurnished, $700, or furRace St., $800. nished, $750. 809-3656. (360)461-1500 SEQUIM: 24x60 2 Br., 2 b a m o b i l e , n ew w i n dows, heat pump, shop/ P. A . : 4 B r. , 1 . 5 b a , 665 Rental storage building, fenced, fenced yard. $900, 1st, Duplex/Multiplexes last, dep. (360)452-7530 carport. $28,500. (360)460-9999 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, view, 1 bath. Fireplace, garage. yr. lease. Small dog 35 W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r 408 For Sale lb. or less negotiable. pets. $800. 460-8797. $ 1 , 1 5 0 , $ 1 , 1 5 0 d e p. Commercial Avail. now. 457-3099. 683 Rooms to Rent PICTURE PERFECT Roomshares Beautiful 1,760 sf triple P.A.: Centrally located, wide home in Clausen 2 br., 1 bath, 1 car gar., C o v e . T h i s s p o t l e s s W / D. $ 7 0 0 , f / l / d . N o SEQUIM: Master bed home features laminate smoke, pets neg. and bath on one acre. (360)678-7484. flooring in the kitchen, $435/month + utilities. living and dining areas, Garden space, quiet, Properties by kitchen with plenty of stable. No smoke/ cabinets, comfor table Landmark. portangelesdr inking. Must have landmark.com fa m i l y r o o m , m a s t e r references, cat must suite with office or sitting approve you. area, utility room with SEQ.: 3 br., 2 bath, 2 (360)582-3189 cabinets, garage with car gar. $950, f/l/d. Open plenty of storage, private Sept. 1. (360)460-0380. patio, and much more. 1163 Commercial MLS#271764. $184,000. S E Q U I M : B e a u t i f u l Rentals house in Sunland, 2,495 Tom Blore sf, dbl garage, fenced (360)683-4116 PROPERTIES BY yard. $1,400, plus dep. PETER BLACK LANDMARK (360)681-8723 REAL ESTATE 452-1326

YA R D S a l e : 2 5 1 0 W. 10th St., P.A., Fri. 8-2 p.m. only. Good stuff!

8183 Garage Sales PA - East A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, Fr i . - S a t . , 9 - 3 p. m . , Household items, tools. Come join us for a large space, just $15 per day. 452-7576 for info.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-4 p.m., 2309 E. Third Ave., on the bluff. Crabbing equipment and water boots, shop smith and some tools, Weber console piano, clothing and household items, 1950 working Silvertone console upright radio, roadmaster towing and brake system, and lots INDOOR Sale: Fri.-Sun., of misc. 10-5 p.m., 52422 Hwy 112 W., about 2 miles GARAGE Sale: Sat. oneast of Joyce General ly, 8-2 p.m., 94 Baker Store. Household items, Far m Rd., off Monroe a few antiques, dolls, Rd. Fine antiques, crab etc. Early birds will not pots and misc. housebe admitted. hold items. YARD Sale: Fri. 10-4, Sat. 9-4:30, Sun. 9-3, 1804 W. 4th St. Puzzles, b o o k s, c l o t h e s, t oy s, some fur niture, more. Come check it out!

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 1163 Commercial Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Rentals P.A.: 2 houses on approx. 1.5 acres, with app r ox . 3 , 0 0 0 s f s h o p. $425,000. (360)452-7743

M OV I N G S a l e : S a t . Sun., 10-6 p.m., 2605 W. Edgewood Dr. Turn off of Hwy 101 to Reddick Rd., follow to Edgewood. First driveway after 45 MPH Speed limit sign on right. Lots of ever ything! Fur niture, clothes, household items, dolls. Sale is indoors! Come rain or shine!

P.A. Commercial warehouse, 5,000 sf, 4 14’ roll up doors, lots of parkign, visibility. $2,500 plus dep. (360)460-7200

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com REAL FIREWOOD (360)460-3639

YARD Sale: Sat., 9-3 p. m . , 1 1 4 0 C r a i g S t . Misc. tools, furniture and more.

YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-1 p.m., 314 John Jacobs Rd., off O’Brien Rd. 30 years of stuff! Sea k aya k s , g r e e n h o u s e , coal stove, craft supplies, small appliances, u n i ve r s a l g y m , w o o d stove for hot tub and much more!

8435 Garage Sales - Other Areas

G R E AT S T U F F S a l e : Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 621 N. Lees Ck. Rd., near east side Safeway. Come see if you need any of our stuff.

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

CAPTAINS BED: Full size, birch hardwood, 8 drawers and 3 doors, excellent condition. $500/ obo. (360)808-4237.

MISC: Front Coilovers, Subaru STI, AST 4100 series, never installed, $300. MTX 81000D T h u n d e r a m p. , 1 5 0 0 watts, class D amplifier, never installed, $250. Kicker SX 1250.1 Amplifier, 1,250 watts, class D amp., $300. 12” kicker Solo Baric L7 Subwoofer, dual sealed box, (2) for $300. 2.0 Farad Capacitor, never opened, $ 5 0 . P I O n e e r Av l t P3200BT DVD receiver, bl u e t o o t h , $ 1 0 0 . C a l l Brian, (808)348-7542.

6100 Misc. Merchandise

AIR CONDITIONER Por table A/C, with remote, new, never used. $175. (360)374-2624. FUEL TANK with tool box for pickup, 100 gallon, hand pump, $400/obo. (360)374-6661.

MISC: 3 hanging shop heaters, 5800 watts, 220 volt, $150 ea. Propane gas free standing stove, 6065 Food & $400. 8” radial arm saw Farmer’s Market with stand, $200. 10” miter saw, $100. PanBLUEBERRIES: Certi- c a ke a i r c o m p r e s s o r, fied organic, Dungeness $150. (360)460-6891. Meadow Farm. U-Pick. MISC: Electric wood $3.25/lb. (360)582-1128. splitter, $350. Kenmore r e f r i g e ra t o r, $ 1 0 0 . 6075 Heavy Downrigger, $75. DinoEquipment glo heater, $100. (916)479-4811 SEMI END-DUMP M O D EL TRAINS: NTRAILER: 30’. Electric tar p system, excellent scale, (3) engines, 38 various cars, 8 buildings, condition. $6,500/obo. 8 switches, 660” of (360)417-0153 track, lots of misc. pieces. Purchased new for 6080 Home over $1,600. Will sell all for $500. (360)437-0908. Furnishings B E D : B ra n d n ew, q u e e n , Te m p u r - Pe d i c with box spring, never been slept in. Just too large for my room! Paid over $2,000. Asking only $1,500. (360)928-9525.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-5 p.m., 269030 Hwy 101, about 4 miles east of Sequim Ave. overpass. Too much stuff! Sears cartop carr ier, fur niture, tools, computer, automotive, pet stuff, clothing, and anything else you c o u l d t h i n k o f ! We ’r e headed out and we need your help--come take our stuff! Will take donations! Everything goes.

VINTAGE/Collectors Sale: 50 years of collecting! Movies, trains, clocks, Indiana Jones, misc. If you collect, Don’t Miss This Sale! 611 Ford Ave, Bremerton Sat-Sun.-Mon., Au g . 3 1 - S e p t . 2 , Sept. 7-9, 9 - 1 p.m. Cash only.

SEQUIM: Office/retail C U S TO M B u i l t B u n k Bed. Hand crafted bunk space 850 sf. $800 mo. bed for sale. Kids are (360)460-5467 grown and gone, no longer needed in our hrinking household. 6010 Appliances sUsed for about 10 years. Side rails show some FRIDGE: Kenmore, 6 wear but overall still in m o n t h s o l d , w i t h i c e great shape! Assembles maker. Excellent condi- with lag bolts, included. Solid 2 x 6 and 2 x 10 tion. $300. wood construction! Two (360)457-8700 large storage drawers on casters roll away be6050 Firearms & neath lower bunk. Bed is convertible to be made Ammunition into two separate beds. A M M O : 2 2 3 P M C 5 5 One mattress is includg r a i n , 1 , 0 0 0 r o u n d s , ed. $500. Call Laura at (360)531-1510 FMJBT. $700. (360)417-0539 DINING ROOM SUITE A M M O : 2 2 l o n g r i f l e Pine. Table, 2 leaves, 6 Aguila Super Extra. $12 c h a i r s, l i g h t e d c h i n a cabinet. $750 all. Will box. 20 boxes left. separate, photos avail(360)582-3065 able (360)504-2581 or email golfgirl44@ GUN SHOW wavecable.com Sequim Prairie Grange Aug. 31-Sept.1. Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3. Admission $5, FURNITURE: Couch/ Family $7. Tables both B e d , f u t o n c o u c h days $35. Don Roberts black metal frame with (360)457-1846 burgandy full size fuDonr@olypen.com ton mattress, $150. Executive desk chair, HUNTING Rifles: Stain- g r a y p a d d e d , $ 2 0 . less Savage 116 bolt ac- Twin box spring and tion 300 WSM, $525. rack, $40. All in great Stainless Tikka T3 bolt shape! action 7 Rem Mag, (360)461-5731 $550. Browning BLR take down lever gun 300 MISC: Dining room set WSM, $550. Winchester w i t h 4 c h a i r s , $ 2 0 0 . S X R s e m i a u t o 3 0 0 K i t c h e n t a bl e w i t h 2 WSM, $550. chairs, $75. Twin bed (360)775-1544 with mattresses, etc., MISC: Ruger 22 Mark III $ 7 5 . 2 e n t e r t a i n m e n t Hunter, stainless, 4.5” centers, $150 and $25. 2 barrel, $675. Beretta end tables, $40 ea. Tom Cat, 32 cal, auto, 8 Desk, $50. Cedar chest, $25. (360)683-4611. shot, $475. (360)452-3213

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-4 p.m., 1143 Campb e l l Ave. , o f f R a c e above college. End of summer sale, downsizing, large screen TV, piano, fur niture, CDs, c l o t h i n g , t oy s, t o o l s, books, formal dresses. Everything must go!

MISC: Large china cabin e t , $ 3 0 0 . Ke n m o r e washing machine, $300. Whirlpool dr yer, $200. Kenmore standing freezer, $400. Queen hide-abed, $350. Leather double recliner, $150. Curio cabinet, $150. Yamaha keyboard, $75. Filing cabinet, 4 drawers, $40. Storage cabinet, double doors, 2 drawers, $75. Elongated table, underneath storage unit, $100. Dresser, 5 drawer, $50. Will take best offer on anything. (360)452-3761

6105 Musical Instruments

TROMBONE: Conn, was $900 when purchased. Asking only $400! (360)683-1037.

YAMAHA: Console piano with bench, model M2E, restored to new condtion. $949. (360)683-2331

6115 Sporting Goods

B OW S : 3 l e f t - h a n d bows, 1 compound, 2 recurve. Extras. $300. (360)683-8418

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

6125 Tools

SNAP-ON TOOLBOX TR1001, 6’ wide x 4’ high x 30” deep, is empt y, p a i d $ 6 , 5 0 0 n ew. Asking $4,000, firm. No payments! (435)406-9595

6140 Wanted & Trades

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789.

WANTED: Old tractors, no junk, no lawn mowers. (360)452-2145.

6135 Yard &

UTILITY TRAILER Garden ‘82, metal frame, wood box, new wir ing, new FRONT SCOOP: Front lights, new tags. $550. end loader. Tractor at(360)683-0763 tachment, Craftsman, ROTOTILLER: Troy-Bilt. new $560. Asking $250. $400. (360)683-9229 (360)477-4573


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

For Better or For Worse

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

by Lynn Johnston

S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n 26’. Project boat. $3,500/obo, or trade. (360)477-7719

6135 Yard & Garden RIDING MOWER C r a f t s m a n LT 2 0 0 0 , 42”,17.5 hp w/pres. lubed eng., mulch kit, extra blades incl. Runs good. $590. 38” Lawn Sweeper $75. Will deliver either within 20 mi. of Sequim. (360)681-2779.

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock ALFALFA GRASS: $5 bale. Grass, $4 bale. (360)683-5817 BEEF: Grass fed. $1.80 per pound for hanging weight. (360)683-5441 or email at tcsmiths@ wavecable.com

9820 Motorhomes MOTORHOME: Winnebego ‘93 Adventure. 34’, ex. cond., nonsmokers, 65k miles, 2 roof air, hydraulic levelers, Onan generator, microwave, ice maker/fridge, 4 burner stove, laminate flooring, lots of storage, very livable. Possible trade for smaller pull trailer. $13,000. (360)565-6221.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers KO M F O R T: ‘ 8 6 , 2 4 ’ , sleeps 6, reconditioned 2013, has full bath, tub a n d s h o w e r, A / C , 4 burner stove with oven, ever ything works. $3,750. (360)683-8567.

BOAR: Young, proven R O A D M A S T E R To w Duroc. $240. Dolly. Model RM440, ex(360)452-2615 cellent condition, good CATTLE: Polled Here- t i r e s , s e l f s t e e r i n g fo r d , 4 c o w s , 2 w i t h wheels,electric brakes calves, 1 yearling steer. for easy secure transport. 620 lbs. empty with With calves: $1,000 ea. max weight of towed veWithout: $800 ea. hicle 4,380 lbs. Steer: $800. $1,400/obo. (360)928-3733 (360)912-0030

9050 Marine Miscellaneous BOATS: 14’ Livingston, with Shorelander trailer, $495. New, 10’ Walker B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, $995. (360)452-6677. CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson cedar strip, made in Port Townsend. $750. (360)683-0146

WEANER PIGS: Nice TRAVEL TRAILER pigs. $75 each. Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide KAYAK: Hydrotech in(360)460-7196 out, great cond., $9,500. flatable Kayak with pad(360)452-6677 dles, manual and storage/carrying bag. Like 7035 General Pets new! Only used once! 9802 5th Wheels $160 AFRICAN GRAY Call (360)417-7685 Male Congo, large cage, 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 30’ Laweekdays m e l l o w b i r d , o w n e r s kota. Ver y nice cond., MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, w a n t t o t r a v e l , b i r d kept in shed. $12,500. I/O . Needs work. needs to be with people. (360)452-1308 $1,500. (360)461-2056 $ 4 0 0 . A l s o, Pe a c h Fa c e d L ove B i r d , fe - 5 t h W H E E L : ‘ 0 3 3 2 ’ OUTDRIVE: Mercruiser male, with cage, FREE. Thor. 3 sliders with slide Bravo 1. Complete with (360)809-3480 toppers, rear kitchen, S. S. P r o p, ex c e l l e n t wood cabinets, roomy BEARDED DRAGONS and ready to roll or park. cond. $2,200. (360)417-3936 2 Bearded Dragon liz- Chimacum. $9,500. ards, full-grown, with (760)415-1075 RACING SAILBOAT tank, light, screen, 28’ Star. Sails, genoa bowls, other habitat fea- 5TH WHEEL: 30’ Cross- and trailer. $3,500. roads Patriot upgrade tures. $400 for ever y(360)963-2743 model, used twice overthing. (360)452-2527. night, immaculate, towFREE: 2 sweet and so- able with half ton. Below book value at $38,750 cialized de-scented ferincludes slider hitch. rets. (360)775-9117. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 MISC: Great Pyrenees Mountain Dog, 7 years 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 4 2 7 ’ old, good family dog, C o a c h m a n C a t a l i n a . $200. Quarter/Arabian, Great cond., single slide, 20 years old, 16 hands, new tires. $3,900/obo. good western trail, $200. (360)417-8840 Pigeons, 6 for $50. 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ Al(360)477-1706 pen Lite, single slide, PUPPIES: Bullmasador, l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t avail. 9/12/13, 3 male, 4 shape. $11,500/obo. (615)330-0022 female, available to show now. Call for de5TH WHEEL: Carriage tails. $300. ‘04 Cameo. Three (360)460-1481 slides, center kitchen with island. King bed. WALKER Coonhounds: Automatic HDTV Sat. on Born July 25. Be the first roof. In great condition, to out your pup! Ready this has been a nonSept. 10. Males, $150. smoking unit and no aniFemales, $200. Will be mals. $19,250. Contact dewormed, first shots. via e-mail: Only 2 females left! bjgarbarino@hot (360)457-4838 mail.com or (360)390-8692

9820 Motorhomes MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. (360)452-7870 after 6. MOTORHOME: ‘85 21’ Toyota Rogue. 56K mi., manual trans, sound engine, 6 new tires, needs work, rear bath, A/C cab a n d b o d y, s l e e p s 4 . $5,000/obo. (360)504-2619 or (360)477-8807 mornings

9808 Campers & Canopies CAMPER: ‘92 10’ S&S. Self-contained, barely used, with generator. $2,100. (360)683-4175. CAMPER: ‘97 10’ Alpenlite. TV, micro, self cont., excellent cond. $6,000. (360)928-9770 after 5. CAMPER: Outdoorsman, bed, refrigerator, stove. $1,800. (360)417-9223

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9817 Motorcycles 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect. Others

HARLEY: ‘04 Davids o n N i g h t Tr a i n FXSTBi. 15300 miles. Extras! Can Deliver. Awesome bike! Brad (360)683-2273. Price reduced. $6,995. brad@stinton.com

SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard M50. Mid size 800 cc cruiser. As new condition, only 650 miles. Eye catching color combination. Electronic fuel injection, shaft drive, water cooled. Selling for health H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only reason. also have hel500 ever made. 33.4k m e t s a n d j a c k e t s . original miles, too much $4,000. (360)385-6370. to list. Call for details. $12,000 to loving home. 9740 Auto Service (360)460-8271

SAILBOAT for sale: 21’ Aquarius Sailboat, on t ra i l e r. 8 h p M e r c u r y 9050 Marine Outboard, 1 hr on motor. Miscellaneous Many extra sails. Life PORTLAND PUDGY ‘06 j a c k e t s , o t h e r m i s c . multi-function dinghy, $1,500. (360)681-8017. samk@olypen.com unsinkable, double hulled, 7’8”x4’5”, can be SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speedused as life raft. $1,000. s t e r . Tw i n R o t e x . HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. (360)437-0908 $5,000. (360)452-3213. Excellent shape. $2,900. R OW / M o t o r / S a i l : 1 0 ’ (360)461-3415 molded hull boat. Elec. motor, galv. trailer, all like-new. $1,650. (360)681-8761

D AV E S C A D D E N : 2 man pontoon boat, will take Class IV rapids. RUNABOUT: 16’ fiber$1,000 cash. 808-0422. glass. Closed bow, high gunnel and transome, 30 HEWE: 17’ River Runh p E v i n r u d e , ex t r a s . ner. 115 Mercur y jet, $1,750/obo. new 5 hp Ricker, depth (520)403-1910 sounder, GPS, lots of extras. $7,950. RUNABOUT: ‘78 14’ (360)452-2162 boat, ‘78 EZ Load trailer, 7 0 h p O / B M e r c u r y, good cond Must sell! $1,500. (360)928-1170. KAYAK: $1,900. Cust o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . Newfound Boat Works E x p l o r e r. B e a u t i f u l sculptured cedar and basswood strip planked deck. A work of art. Paddled once, I have too many Kayaks! (360)774-0439

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 C5

S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n Oughtred whilly, sailing/rowing, better than n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h oars, trailer, many upgraded accessories. $7,250/obo. (360)774-6720

SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra Cuddy Classic. 120 Johnson, 7.5 Honda kicker. galv. trailer, life jackets, 2 downriggers, ski pole, water skis, rope, canvas and many extras. $4,995/obo. Located in Sequim. (360)477-1011

9817 Motorcycles

H O N DA : ‘ 0 9 R e b e l . Only 10 Original Miles! S h o w r o o m p e r fe c t ! M a n y e x t r a s ! Yo u must see this to believe it! $2,650/obo. (360)775-0703 HONDA: ‘75 360 CBT. Runs great. Blue. Windshield. Includes helmut. $850/obo. (360)417-9403

BMW: ‘99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 miles. Throttlemiester. BMW touring hard cas- HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing es. Corbin saddle. BMW A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , black/chrome, exc. cond. S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e - a f t e r m a r k e t a l a r m . $3,500/obo. 417-0153. tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 $4,350. (425)508-7575. HP motor, exceptionally Goldspace@msn.com K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X clean. $3,950. CRF 250, ‘08, $3,200. 250F. Few aftermarket (360)477-7068 TTR 230, ‘06, $1,700. accessories, 2 stands, Both ready to ride. Brush set of tires. $2,500. SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, gaurds, spare parts for (360)670-5321 Yanmar diesel, wheel CRF. May accept trades. s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, (360)461-6282 sleeps 4. $9,995. (360)457-8221 DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K yellow, pristine, many SAILBOAT: ‘69 Victory upgraes. $4,900. 21’. With trailor. $1,500. Bryan (360)681-8699 (360)509-4894 HILLCLIMB SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C Aug. 31 - Sept, 1. Gates with sails and new 8 hp open 7 a.m. Entrance 1 SCOOTER: 2007 Rokeengine, sleeps 4, toi- mi. up Deer Park Rd., ta Bali 250 Scooter. Fun let/sink. $3,500/obo. P.A. Follow signs. 1st a n d e c o n o m i c a l , 6 0 mpg. Original owner sell(360)808-7913 bike up at 10 a.m. ing. 1055 miles on it. (360)417-7509 This bike gets up and TIDE RUNNER: 18’, great boat, good shape, H A R L E Y : ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 goes! Includes helmet lots of extra goodies. Sportster, 7k miles, mint. and gloves. (360)374-6787 $9,000/obo. 374-2646. $6,900. (360)452-6677.

F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000 (360)461-4665 FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net

FIAT 2012 500 POP This compact car took Europe by storm when it came out in 2007. It was introduced to the U.S. market in 2012. It’s peppy, ver y fuel efficient, and most of all fun to drive! Auto, 4 cyl, antilock brakes, A/C, CD, power windows/locks, alum. wheels, and more. Vin# posted at dealership. $12,500 Trades Welcome! Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

MAZDA: ‘94 RX7. Twin t u r b o, l o t s o f p ow e r, FORD ‘12 FOCUS SEL many modifications, SEDAN 59K, $15,000. Serious One of the best selling M I S C : C a n o py fo r 6 ’ buyers only. 461-0847. cars in the world today. bed, good condition, Auto, 4 cyl. Excellent l i g h t bl u e, $ 3 0 0 / o b o. PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am performance, handling Stow Master tow bar, Original silver, 400 mo- and economy. This SEL like new, $350. tor, auto. $10,000. is fully equipped, leather, (360)710-4966 (360)457-6462 moonroof, 6-way power seat, CD, SYNC, power 9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles windows/locks, aluminum wheels, and more. Others Classics & Collect. the gray metallic paint is striking when cruising AMC: ‘78 Pacer. Nice CHEV: ‘06 HHR. Excel- down the road with the l e n t c o n d . , 5 5 K , n ew body. $1,000. roof open and the tunes tires, 1 owner. $8,500. (360)452-2892 playing. Vin# posted at (360)808-2974 dealership. CADILLAC: ‘72 Sedan $15,490 Deville. Mint condition, CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. Preview at: original owner, 74,874 O r a n g e , T- t o p , 6 5 K heckmanmotors.com miles. $7,000. Call for mi., garaged. $4,500. Heckman Motors (360)683-1288 afternoon details. (360)775-9996. 111 E. Front, P.A. CHRYSLER ‘04 (360)912-3583 CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. SEBRING TOURING Looks and runs like new, FORD: ‘92 Mustang SEDAN always garaged, non- 53k orig mi! 2.7L DOHC C o nve r t a bl e. S e c o n d smoker, gold, 76K mi. V6, auto. Silver ext in owner, new tires, new al$4,850. (360)928-9724. great shape! Black cloth ternator, new front end, int in great cond! Pwr new starter. $5,300. (360)681-0532 seat, CD/Cass, cruise, tilt, dual airbags, A/C, p r e m a l l oy w h e e l s ! 1 FORD: ‘94 Crown Vicowner! Very nice locally toria. New tires, good owned Sebring at our No shape. $1,500. (360)928-9920 CHEV: ‘86 El Camino, Haggle price of only $6,995! Conquista package. PS, GMC ‘00 P B , P W , P D , A / C , Carpenter Auto Center SAFARI CARGO VAN 681-5090 cr uise, filt, full gages Economical 4.3 liter V6, i n c l . t a c h . , V 8 , a u t o, Gaylord bed cover with CHRYSLER: ‘94 New auto, A/C, power locks, Yorker. Sharp, loaded, key l e s s e n t r y, a l a r m , l i n e r, f a c t o r y r a l l e y wheels, low miles, not t i n t e d , 2 8 m p g . M u s t s a fe t y bu l k h e a d , b i n smoked in, garage kept, s e e . $ 1 , 3 0 0 / o b o o r package, ladder rack, nearly new tires, 82,000 gold/brown color, tan int. trade. (360)461-6642. miles, very clean 1-ownVery original! DODGE: ‘03 Caravan. er corporate lease re$10,750 Looks good. $3,500. turn, spotless Autocheck (360)683-7789 (360)457-9162 Vehicle History Report. Proud addition to your DAT S U N : ‘ 7 2 2 4 0 Z D O D G E : ‘ 0 4 a n d ‘ 0 2 business, economical race car and trailer. Neon. $4,000 each. Call too! (360)457-8729 Red, spare engines, $6,995 trans., wheels, tires HONDA: ‘07 Civic HyREID & JOHNSON and more! $10,000. MOTORS 457-9663 brid. $9,000. (360)385-5694 reidandjohnson.com (425)508-7575

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9050 Marine

MOTORHOME: ‘86 Ford Miscellaneous Shasta Class C. 52K, good condition, recently purchased, not being 12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiused, want to sell. ak, set up with a 30 HP $5,900. (360)457-6434. Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Toyota Slumberqueen. Motor has just been to Low miles, 4 cyl., good the shop for a complete s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup health. $6,900/obo. for rivers or salt water. (360)452-7246 $3,500. Inquiries please call, (360)531-0402. MOTOR HOME: ‘88 38’ Beaver Motorcoach. Cat APOLLO: 17’ Classic 300 diesel, Allison trans, Runabout. 140 hp OMC 53K mi., has everything I / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t but slide-out. $27,000. condition. $3,300. (360)477-1261 (360)683-0146 MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ Fleetwood Southwind, Class A, 27,500 original miles, dual roof AC, lg. s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy draulic levelers, 2 TVs, rear camera, Onan generator, neutral interior, must see. $23,999. (360)452-4136 MOTOR HOME: ‘99 40’ Monaco Exec. Excellent cond., ‘450’ Cummins M11, Allison trans., lots of extras. $65,000/obo. (360)460-7200 MOTORHOME: Bounder ‘93, 31’. 454 Banks Power Pack, 55k, extras. $11,250. Avail ‘02 CRV tow. (206)920-0418.

APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, new 165 OMC with heat exchanger, recently serviced outdrive, custom trailer, new tires and brakes, pot puller, extras. $3,600/obo. (360)582-0892 BAYLINER 2859. Price reduced from $26,000 to $20,000. Selling because of health. Engine overhauled last year, outdrive replaced 3 yrs ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp kicker. Great electronics including radar, color fish finder, GPS char t plotter. Diesel heater, custom cabinets and master bed. Great boat for fishing. Electr ic downriggers, rods and gear. Comfortable weekend travel with stove, refrigerator, shower and head. Excellent condition. Call 327-3695.

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04915

MOTORHOME: Georgie boy Persuit. 25’, coach, ve r y c l e a n , ex c e l l e n t condition, 39.7k, brand new batter ies, walkaround bed, trailer hitch, BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruisbody straight. $14,750. er, freshwater cooling. (360)477-2007 $3,900/obo. (360)775-9653 MOTORHOME: Rexhall ‘ 0 2 R o s e a i r . 3 2 ’ , 2 BOAT: 14’, aluminum, slides, basement model, with an E-Z loader trailhy d r a u l i c j a ck s, f i r e - e r, 1 8 H P E v e n r u d e place, GM Motor. 47k elec. start motor and 4 miles, comes with every- H P E v e n r u d e m o t o r. thing! Can be sold with $2,200. (360)683-4175. or without tow car, Isuzu ‘98 Oasis, with breaking BOAT HOUSE: Excelsystem. Will give $2,500 lent shape, 43’ x 20’, allowance for the tires. P.A. Marina. $5,000 firm. (360)452-2039 $50,000/obo. 452-6318.

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Classified

C6 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others Others Others Others Others Others

GMC ‘00 SAFARI CARGO VAN Economical 4.3 liter V6, auto, A/C, power locks, key l e s s e n t r y, a l a r m , s a fe t y bu l k h e a d , b i n package, ladder rack, nearly new tires, 82,000 miles, very clean 1-owner corporate lease return, spotless autocheck vehicle histor y repor t. Proud addition to your business, economical too! $6,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com HONDA ‘07 CIVIC Si SEDAN This is one of Honda’s best-kept secrets. A true 4 d o o r s p o r t s c a r, 6 speed manual combined with VTEC 4 cyl engine g i ve s t h i s c a r l o t s o f p owe r a n d i n c r e d i bl e handling characteristics. This Si is fully loaded w i t h p ow e r w i n d ow s, locks, moonroof, 17” aluminum wheels, anti-lock breaks and much, much more! 79k miles. Vin# posted at dealership. $13,950 Trades Welcome! Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

TOYOTA ‘10 PRIUS Very economcial 1.8 liter 4-cyl, gas/electric hybrid, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/C, power windows and locks, keyless entry, alloy wheels, only 35,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 and 8/100 w a r r a n t y, v e r y v e r y clean 1-owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Autocheck Vehicle History Report. “Reduced $2,000.” New no haggle price. $17,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

DODGE: ‘92 Dakota DODGE ‘01 GRAND CHEV: ‘93 1500. 4x4, 4WD. $2,000/ obo. CARAVAN SPORT lumber rack, AM/FM CD. (360)797-1198 3.3L V6, auto. Dk red ext $3,000/obo. 461-0657. in great shape! Taupe cloth int in great cond! FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed Pwr seat, dual sliding utility SCELZI. 11’ comdump. $6,800. 457-3120 doors with pwr pass b o b o d y w i t h ra ck , or (360)808-1749. door, Panasonic CD with 36,000 miles. $27,000. (360)531-1383 aux, dual climate, rear CHEVROLET ‘98 S10 a i r, 3 r d s e a t , Q u a d s, FORD: ‘84 Bronco. ReEXTENDED CAB LS side airbags, pri glass, liable. $500. 2WD PICKUP roof rack, alloy wheels! (360)808-0565 4.3L Vor tec V6, Auto- Clean 2 owner Caravan m a t i c , A l l oy W h e e l s , at our No Haggle price FORD: ‘89 4X4 LongM a t c h i n g F i b e r g l a s s of only bed. Auto/air, runs great. Canopy, Spray-In Bed$4,495! liner, Tow Package, Air Carpenter Auto Center $2,500/obo. 457-5948. Conditioning, Cassette 681-5090 FORD: ‘90 F-150. 4WD, S t e r e o, Fo l d i n g R e a r 5 speed, 6 cyl., longbox, Seat, Dual Front Air- D O D G E : ‘ 0 6 R a m . canopy, runs ex. $2,000. bags. Only 44,000 Origi- Manual, 59k miles, ex(360)683-2172 nal Miles! Carfax Certi- cellent cond., reg. cab. fied One-Owner With No $9,800. (360)477-6149. F O R D : ‘ 9 0 R a n g e r. Accidents! Immaculate Canopy, recent tune up, condition inside and out! 5 speed. $2,000. DODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton This S10 looks and 452-2766 or 477-9580 drives like it just rolled white 4x4, 1 owner, FORD: ‘99 box tr uck. off the showroom floor! very good condition. $23,000 14’, Diesel, 133k, good You just won’t find one (505)927-1248 truck. $7,200. 452-4738. n i c e r t h a n t h i s ! S ave yourself a bundle over new by buying a barely 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices used pickup! Come see Clallam County Clallam County the Peninsula’s truck experts for over 55 years! INVITATION TO BID (ITB) ADVERTISEMENT Stop by Gray Motors today! SEALED BIDS shall be received at Port of Port An$6,995 geles office located at 338 West First Street, Port GRAY MOTORS Angeles, WA by 2:00 PM on Wednesday, Septem457-4901 ber 18, 2013 for: graymotors.com

BRUSHFIRE TRUCK 1981 4X4 1 ton dually, 4 speed manual with granny low, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O tank, 4 yr old Honda GX690 generator, dual side diamond plate tool boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! Vin# posted at dealership. $10,500 Trades Welcome! H O N DA : ‘ 1 1 C i v i c . 4 Preview at: d o o r, 1 2 k m i l e s, l i ke heckmanmotors.com new. $15,500. 461-5913. Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. CHEVY: ‘01 S-10 EnLINCOLN ‘03 (360)912-3583 hanced Cab 4-spd LS SEDAN Auto V6, 2WD. Runs 96k orig mi! 3.0L DOHC CHEV: ‘73. 2wd, runs great; good looking; V6, auto, loaded! Silver good. $1,300/obo t o n n e a u c ove r ove r ext in great shape! Black (360)775-9496 lined bed. 93,200 mi. leather int in great cond! AM/FM w/cassette. 4.3 Dual pwr htd/cooled s e a t s, p w r a d j w h e e l CHEV: ‘91 1500. Ext. liter V6; auto fuel inj. $5,800/obo. with cont, dual climate, Cab, new motor/trans. Call (360)477-4697 cruise, trac cont, side $1,850. (360)460-6647. a i r b a g s , 6 d i s k C D, wood trim, moon roof, prem chrome wheels! 9932 Port Angeles 9932 Port Angeles Very nice Lincoln at our Legals Legals No Haggle price of only $5,995! Summary of Ordinance Adopted by the Carpenter Auto Center Port Angeles City Council 681-5090 On August 20, 2013 MERCEDES: ‘79 240D (diesel). 4 sp manual trans., excellent condition mechanically and physically, extensive upgrades, work orders in my file. $4,980/obo. Call me for details. Alan at (360)461-0175, Port Angeles. MERCURY ‘02 SABLE GS SEDAN 80k orig mi! 3.0L V6, auto! Silver ext in great shape! Gray cloth int in great cond! Pw, Pdl, Pm, Cassette stereo, A/C, dual airbags, cruise, tilt, 7 0 % + + Toyo R u b b e r ! VERY clean little Sable at our No Haggle price of only $3,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 MITSUBISHI: ‘03 E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t cond., 188k miles. $5,700. (360)460-2536. M U S TA N G : ‘ 8 5 G T 5 Speed convertable. 302 HO, loaded. $3,400/obo. (360)460-8610 P O N T I AC : ‘ 0 0 G ra n d Prix. Ex. cond., high miles. $4,500/obo. (360)457-1019 PONTIAC: 2001 Bonneville SSEi. Bose Stereo, H e a t e d Powe r S e a t s, K e y l e s s E n t r y, F o g Lights, Leather, new battery and tires, A/C, Power Windows, plus much more. Only 74,000 miles. 6,500. (360)452-4867 PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero SE Coupe. Rare automatic. Clear title. V6. Nice shape. Black with gray interior. 171,500 miles. Sunroof. Good transmiss i o n , ex c e l l e n t s p o r t tires. Power windows. Not a show car but a great driving fun sports car. $2,000. (360)452-1049 PORCHE: ‘88 944. 1 owner, 129,500 mi. , excellent condition. $6,995. (360)452-4890

TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE V6 SEDAN 3.0L V6, automatic, new tires, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 46,000 original miles! C a r fa x c e r t i f i e d o n e owner with no accidents! You just don’t find them like this every day! Low mileage means years of trouble-free service from this Toyota! Come see t h e Pe n i n s u l a ’s m o s t trusted source of used cars for over 55 years! stop by Gray Motors today! $8,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA ‘04 COROLLA CE 4 door, automatic transmission with overdrive, VVT-1 16 valve 4 cylinder engine, very fuel efficient, AM/FM/CD stereo, great MPG, power mirrors, A/C, tilt wheel, Viper Alarm system with remote, hard to find and priced to sell! $7,450 Lipman’s Automotive IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE (360)452-5050 www.lipmansauto.com 2840 E Hwy 101 E P TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, white, nav., leather, 5 CD change. $18,990. 1 (805)478-1696 VW: ‘78 Super Beetle conver tible. Runs good, good cond., manual trans. $5,500. (360)683-8032 VW: ‘79 Dasher. 4-door, good shape. $2,000. (360)452-2711

PORT OF PORT ANGELES FIRST STREET SIDEWALK REPLACEMENT Address Bids to Port of Port Angeles, P.O. Box 1350, Port Angeles, WA 98362 or hand deliver to 338 West First Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sealed Bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, “ITB - PORT OF PORT ANGELES - FIRST STREET SIDEWALK REPLACEMENT”. Bids delivered to other offices and received late will not be considered nor will Bids received by facsimile or email. Bids will be publicly opened and checked for completeness by an authorized representative of the Port of Port Angeles shortly after 2:00 PM on September 18, 2013. Scope of Project consists of removal and replacement of concrete sidewalk and secondary electrical feed to street lights. Additional detail and incidental work items included in bid documents. Bid documents are made available for electronic transfer by contacting Chris Hartman by email at chrish@portofpa.com. Office Informational copies of plans and specifications are on file for inspection at the Port of Port Angeles Office at 338 West First Street, Port Angeles WA 98362.

FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. 6 cylinder, manual trans- GMC: ‘86 Step side. V6, mission, 2 WD, clean, runs great, rusty. $900. (360)670-6160 runs great. 153,000 miles. Has new tires, Tonneau cover. Call NISSAN ‘02 FRONTIER (360)477-4195 XE KING CAB Carfax certified two ownFORD: ‘96 F350 460 cid er, 82k miles, 4 cylinder 4x4 Crew Cab. 114k 5 engine, 5 speed manual speed A/C, good tires, trans, ver y clean little m a t c h i n g c a n o p y . truck, Dual front airbags, $7,850 firm. Call AM/FM/CD player, slid(360)477-6218 ing rear window, nice tires, A/C, bedliner, and FORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 more! This is a great litdoor, king cab, 4WD, au- tle truck for the money, to, air, CD, new trans., why pay more? radiator, alternator, bat$8,250 tery. $5,500/obo. Lipman’s Automotive (360)683-8145 IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE FORD: ‘99 F350 Crew (360)452-5050 Cab, short bed, 7.3 die- www.lipmansauto.com sel 4x4. $8,200/obo. 2840 E Hwy 101 E P (360)683-9645

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Mary M. B l a c k w o o d , D e c e a s e d . N O. 1 3 - 4 - 0 0 2 9 8 - 1 P R O B AT E N OT I C E TO C R E D I TO R S R C W 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as o t h e r w i s e p r ov i d e d i n R C W 1 1 . 4 0 . 0 5 1 a n d 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: August 23, 2013 Personal Representative: Martha Carolyn Weiss Attorney for Personal Representative: Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 13-4-00298-1 Pub: Aug. 23, 30, Sept. 6 2013 Legal No. 506457

Ordinance No. 3484 THIS ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, amends the 2013 budget and funds. Port of Port Angeles is an equal opportunity emNEED EXTRA ployer. Small, minority- and women-owned busiCASH! nesses are encouraged to submit Bids. All work The full texts of the Ordinances are available at City performed on this project will be subject to WashSell your Hall in the City Clerk’s office, on the City’s website ington State prevailing wage rates. at www.cityofpa.us, or will be mailed upon request. Treasures! Office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:30 All Bids shall be accompanied by a Bid deposit in a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Friday 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 cash, certified check, cashier’s check or surety 360-452-8435 p.m. These Ordinances shall take effect five days bond in the amount equal to five percent (5%) of 1-800-826-7714 following the date of publication by summary. the amount of such Bid. All bidders and their subcontractors shall have a contractor’s license to work Janessa Hurd, CMC www.peninsula in the State of Washington. City Clerk dailynews.com Pub: Aug. 30, 2013 Legal No. 508963 Construction Timeframe: 12 calendar days from Notice to Proceed PENINSULA CITY OF PORT ANGELES Engineers Cost Estimate: $12,000 INVITATION TO BID for CLASSIFIED Pub: Aug. 30, Sept. 1, 2013 Legal No. 507992 Wood Power Poles Purchase Contract No. LO-13-018 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-502932-SH APN No.: 0630015800200000 Title Sealed bids will be received by the Public Works Order No.: 120097820-WA-GNO Grantor(s): MICHAEL A. WARREN, PATRIand Utilities Director until 3:00 PM, Tuesday, Sep- CIA A. WARREN Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Intember 17, 2013, and will be opened and read in strument/Reference No.: 2009-1239440 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Jack Pittis Conference Room, Port Angeles City Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washing- 9/6/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, ton 98362. 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of Bids will be taken for the following: cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at Wood Power Poles: 40 & 45 feet class 2 and 3 the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 2 OF SAMARA WOODS DIVIBidders shall bid all item. Bid documents may be SION 1, AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 9 OF PLATS, PAGE(S) 75 AND 76, obtained at the Public Works and Utilities Depart- RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE ment, City Hall, between the hours of 8:30am and COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known 3:30pm, at 321 E. 5th Street, Port Angeles, Wash- as: 2321 W 14TH, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that cerington 98362, or at City website http://www.cityof- tain Deed of Trust dated 6/30/2009, recorded 7/1/2009, under 2009-1239440 pa.us/pw-bids.htm. Questions shall be directed to records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from MICHAEL A WARREN, AND Lucy Hanley, Contract Specialist at contracts@city- PATRICIA A WARREN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to NORTHofpa.us or (360) 417-4541. WEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor Pub: Aug. 30, 2013 Legal No. 509198 of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest CITY OF PORT ANGELES and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITY OF obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which PORT ANGELES PLANNING COMMISSION will this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the followconduct a public hear ing in consideration of ing amounts which are now in arrears: $27,066.17 IV. The sum owing on the AMENDMENTS TO THE PORT ANGELES MU- obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $141,934.74, NICIPAL CODE in compliance with City’s respon- together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2011, and such othsibilities per the FEDERAL EMERGENCY MAN- er costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real AGEMENT ACT (FEMA) and AMENDMENT TO property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured Section 10 of the PORT ANGELES MUNICIPAL by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without CODE relative to allowing non motorized use of the warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances City’s Waterfront Trail, also known as the Discovery on 9/6/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by Trail. Interested parties are encouraged to com- 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the ment on the proposal and to attend the public hear- sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before ing that will be conducted on September 11, 2013, 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is at 6 PM, City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port An- cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or geles, Washington. Information may be reviewed with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The at the City Department of Community & Economic sale may be terminated any time after the 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale Development, City Hall, P.O. Box 1150, Port An- date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any regeles. City Hall is accessible to persons with corded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus disabilities. costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of DeAPPLICANT: COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC fault was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and GranDEVELOPMENT DEPT. tor at the following address(es): NAME MICHAEL A WARREN, AND PATRILOCATION: City wide CIA A WARREN, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 2321 W 14TH, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in For fur ther information contact: Sue Roberds, the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally (360) 417-4750 served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Pub: Aug. 30, 2013 Legal No. 509275 Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/8/2012. VII. The Trustee 9935 General 9935 General whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone Legals Legals requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the No. 13-4-01326-9 sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those NONPROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-deRCW 11.42-030 scribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if THE STATE OF WASHINGTON they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidatIn the Matter of the Estate of ing the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purJEAN R. USHAKOFF, Deceased. chaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the The Notice Agent named below was elected to give 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the Notice to Creditors of the above named Decedent. owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including ocAs of the date of the filing of a copy of this Notice cupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaswith the court, the Notice Agent has no knowledge er has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedof any other person acting as Notice Agent or of the ings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser appointment of a personal representative of the de- shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. cedent’s estate in the state of Washington. Accord- THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF ing to the records of the court as are available on YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice the date of the filing of this Notice with the court, a to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR cause number regarding the Decedent has not OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situabeen issued to any other Notice Agent and a per- tion and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your sonal representative of the Decedent’s estate not home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing bee appointed. counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If Any person having a claim against Decedent must, you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep before the time the claim would be barred by any your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housthe claim in the manner as provided in RCW ing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Notice W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r Agent or the Notice Agent’s attorney at the address ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Departstated below, a copy of the claim and filing the origi- ment of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or Nanal of the claim with the court in which the Notice tional Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling Agent’s declaration and oath were filed. The claim agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/inmust be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty dex.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc days after the Notice Agent served or mailed the The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housNotice to the creditor as provided under RCW ing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: 11.40.020(2)(c); or Four (4) months after the date of http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not pre- if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entisented within this time frame, the claim is forever tled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purbarred, except as otherwise provided in our RCW chaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further re11.42.050 and 11.42.060. This bar is effective as to course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s claims against both the decedent’s probate and Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged non-probate assets. through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this Date of First Publication: Aug. 30, 2013 loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s The undersigned Notice Agent declares under pen- against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT alty of perjury under the laws of the state of Wash- A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT ington that the foregoing is true and correct. PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit Signed at Tacoma, Washington this 21st day of Au- report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report gust 2013. agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: MAY 06, FRANK CUTHBERTSON, NOTICE AGENT 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael DowAttorney for the Notice Agent: Tanya Pemberton ell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. Address for Mailing or Service: PO Box 7406 of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, Tacoma, WA 98417-0406 CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Court of Notice Agent’s oath and declaration: Pierce Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 County Superior Court (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com Cause number: 13-4-01326-9 TS No.: WA-12-502932-SH A-4380702 08/09/2013, 08/30/2013 Pub: Aug. 30 Sept. 6, 13, 2013 Legal No. 509060 Pub: Aug. 9, 30, 2013 Legal No. 503285

TOYOTA: ‘00 Tacoma. V6, super charger and exhaust, 2 sets of wheels and tires, 161K mi. $10,000/obo. (360)683-8479, after 6 TOYOTA: ‘93 2WD pickNISSAN: ‘08 Frontier up. Canopy, runs good. 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 $3,960. (360)452-5126. door, low miles 82,400. Extended warranty. 6’ bed. Excellent Condition. ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR G o o d T i r e s . To w i n g ONLY $10! Package. V6 4 liter. Bed www.peninsula Tool Box. $16,900. dailynews.com (360)504-2374

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County CR RESOLUTION 07, 2013 TEMPORARY CLOSURE OF CEDAR PARK DRIVE - NO. 40770 THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows:

1. The County Engineer has determined that Cedar Park Drive, between milepost 0.05 and milepost 0.15, needs to be closed completely for 45 calendar days during the period beginning September 3, 2013 and ending October 28, 2013, in order to begin work building the new “Deer Park Loop” road that will pass under US101 as a part of the County Road Project CRP C1202.

2. During the closure, Cedar Park Drive traffic will be routed to the North and onto Buchanan Drive in order to access US 101.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact:

1. That Cedar Park Drive will be closed completely for 45 calendar days during the period beginning September 3, 2013 and ending October 28, 2013. 2. That the Clallam County Public Works Department post and publish notices as required by R.C.W. 47.48.020.

PASSED AND ADOPTED this twenty-seventh day of August 2013

BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman., Chair Jim McEntire Howard V. Doherty, Jr. ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Aug. 30, 2013 Legal No. 509416

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01-ALT-001598 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on September 6, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST FOURTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington: THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; BEGINNING AT A POINT 773 FEET WEST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4. WHICH POINT IS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO E.A. EMERSON BY DEED RECORDED IN VOLUME 117 OF DEEDS, PAGE 412, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 130898, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; THENCE NORTH 120 FEET ALONG THE EAST LINE- OF SAID EMERSON TRACT TO THE SOUTH LINE OF COUNTY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES EAST 162 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF TRUST CONVEYED TO IVAN L. SHEARER, BY DEED RECORDED IN VOLUME 115 OF DEEDS. PAGE 538, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 121775, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; THENCE SOUTH 218 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID IVAN L. SHEARER TRACT TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER; THENCE WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE 128 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO THE CITY OF FORKS, BY CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 2006 1181944. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON.. Tax Parcel No: 13-28-04-440230, commonly known as 650 CALAWAH WAY , FORKS, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/19/1999, recorded 8/19/1999 , under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 1999 1034744, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, and modified by document dated 8/2/2002 and signed 8/29/2002 from ROBERT B. KEENE, III AND TRACY L. KEENE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, as Trustee, in favor of TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, AS TRUSTEE FOR C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2001-CB3. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/1/2009, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of June 7, 2013 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 44 payments at $ 406.01 each $ 17,864.44 (11-01-09 through 06-07-13) Late Charges: $ 954.10 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TSG GUARANTEE POLICY $ 455.28 SELECTED FEES $ 4,528.12 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 23,801.94 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $53,251.52, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 6, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by August 26, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 26, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph II! is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after August 26, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: ROBERT B. KEENE III, 650 CALAWAH WAY, FORKS, WA, 98331 ROBERT B. KEENE III, PO BOX 592, BURLINGTON, WA, 98233 ROBERT B. KEENE III, 2141 WEST LITTLE EGYPT ROAD, SHELTON, WA, 98584 TRACY L. KEENE, 650 CALAWAH WAY, FORKS, WA, 98331 TRACY L. KEENE, 2141 WEST LITTLE EGYPT ROAD, SHELTON, WA, 98584 TRACY L. KEENE, PO BOX 592, BURLINGTON, WA, 98233 by both first class and certified mail on 4/30/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 4/30/2013, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-984-4663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc wide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 6/3/2013 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee MELANIE BEAMAN, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4391949 08/09/2013, 08/30/2013 Pub: Aug. 9, 30, 2013 Legal No. 503298


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 C7

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-505259-SH APN No.: 043017-540100 Title Order No.: 120118527-WA-GNO Grantor(s): RUBY L HENNING, JOSHUA L HENNING Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR M and T BANK Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1242167 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 9/27/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1 OF SOLMAR NO. 5, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 9 OF PLATS, PAGES 56 AND 57, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 610 DRYKE RD, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/24/2009, recorded 8/28/2009, under 2009-1242167 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from RUBY L HENNING AND JOSHUA L HENNING, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MandT BANK, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MandT BANK (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $35,525.98 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $276,953.10, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 10/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 9/27/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME RUBY L HENNING AND JOSHUA L HENNING, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 610 DRYKE RD, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/8/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 05/24/2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-505259-SH A-4388560 08/30/2013, 09/20/2013 Pub: Aug. 30, Sept. 20, 2013 Legal No. 508010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-546803-TC APN No.: 053026-449020 Title Order No.: 130061713-WA-GSO Grantor(s): TODD MANCHESTER Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1231161 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 9/6/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 2 OF PAGE SHORT PLAT RECORDED JULY 23,1999 IN VOLUME 29 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 20, UNDER RECORDING NO. 1999 1033332, BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 5 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHIGNTON. More commonly known as: 206 GOA WAY, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 1/11/2009, recorded 1/16/2009, under 20091231161 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from TODD MANCHESTER , A SINGLE PERSON, as Grantors), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, RAIL No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $11,358.69 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $197,204.34, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 12/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 9/6/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 8/26/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME TODD MANCHESTER, A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 206 GOA WAY, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 4/2/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/3/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-546803-TC, A-4379405 08/09/2013, 08/30/2013 Pub: Aug. 9, 30, 2013 Legal No. 497154

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-544535-SH APN No.: 06300053 10000000 Title Order No.: 130043512-WA-DTI Grantor(s): MICHAEL A SHADFORTH Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SECURITY NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY, A UTAH CORPORATION Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1234495 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 9/27/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK 10, PUGET SOUND COOPERATIVE COLONY’S SUBDIVISION OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 5, RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 320 NORTH LIBERTY STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/25/2009, recorded 3/27/2009, under 20091234495 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from MICHEAL A SHADFORTH, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SECURITY NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY, A UTAH CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SECURITY NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY, A UTAH CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $12,391.79 The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $169,638.37, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 9/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 9/27/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 9/16/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME MICHAEL A SHADFORTH, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY ADDRESS 320 NORTH LIBERTY STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph 1 above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 4/23/2013. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 05/24/213 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-544535-SH A-4385383 08/30/2013, 09/20/2013 Pub: Aug. 30, Sept. 20, 2013 Legal No. 508242

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Classified

C8 FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013 9434 Pickup Trucks Others

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

GMC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 SIERRA SLE EXTENDED CAB 4X4 5.3L Vor tec V8, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, tow package, trailer brake controller, bed mat, privacy glass, keyless entr y, third door, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD/Cassette stereo, dual front a i r b a g s. O n l y 8 7 , 0 0 0 or iginal miles! Carfax certified one-owner with no accidents! Great condition inside and out! Priced well under Kelley Blue Book value for a quick sale! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHRYSLER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 PACIFICA WAGON 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, A/C, cruise, t i l t , A M / F M / C D, d u a l power seats, power windows and locks, power moonroof, keyless entry, pr ivacy glass, alloy wheels, 68,000 miles, v e r y c l e a n 1 - o w n e r, spotless autocheck vehicle history report. nice price! $9,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEVY â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 BLAZER ZR2 4X4 107k orig mi! 4.3L Vortec V6, auto. Pewter ext in great cond! Charcoal cloth int in excel shape! P w r s e a t , C D, A / C , cruise, tilt, dual airbags, pri glass, roof rack, tow, alloys with 31â&#x20AC;? BFG rubber, fender flares, ect!! Ve r y c l e a n 2 o w n e r Blazer at our No Haggle price of only $5,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 Explorer. Excellent condition, new tires/brakes, all power, trailer hitch, 102K mi. $7,000. (360)683-5494.

NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 XTERRA SE A true outdoor enthusiastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SUV, the Nissan XTERRA is equipped with everything a person 9556 SUVs needs to get away anywhere, including roof Others rack and skid plate. This C H E V : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 1 1 Tr ev e r s e . XTERRA is in great condition. Fully loaded, runGray, great condition. ning boards, auto, V6, $18,500. (605)214-0437 low miles. Vin# posted at dealership. C H E V: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 7 4 X 4 . 5 $15,950 speed, Vor tec, mint Trades Welcome! cond. $6,500/obo or Preview at: trade for late model heckmanmotors.com t r i ke, a l s o â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 7 7 Fo r d Heckman Motors pick-up can be part of 111 E. Front, P.A. trade. (360)452-5891. (360)912-3583

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Durango S LT. N e w t i r e s . $4,800/obo. 683-0763. FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 EXCURSION LIMITED 4X4 6.8L Triton V10, auto, loaded! Dark met red ext i n g r e a t s h a p e ! Ta n leather int in great cond! Pwr seat, 6 disk CD, A/C, rear air, 3rd seat, cruise, tilt, dual airbags, wood trim, tinted wind o w s , t o w, r u n n i n g boards, alloys with 80% rubber! Very nice Excursion at our No Haggle price of only $8,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

9556 SUVs Others

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Bronco 4X4. Good rubber, runs great, 139k. $4,500/obo. (360)457-9148 GMC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 YUKON 4WD SLT This Yukon is a full-sized premium SUV powered by a 285 HP V8, with plenty of space for up to 8 passengers and cargo! Combine this power to tow up to 5,000 pounds and you have one fine SUV! This is a one-owner luxur y trade-in immaculate condition. New tires, leather, moonroof, full power amenities and more! $13,950 Trades Welcome! Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 GMC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 Suburban 4x4. Auto trans, A/C, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;350â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 247,900 mi, seats 8, great cond, well cared for. $1,999. Call (360)531-0854

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

G M C : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 9 Yu ko n 4 x 4 . NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 XTERRA SE 4X4 173K mi., A/C not working, good shape. $2,000/ 3.3L V6, Intake, automatic, alloy wheels, runobo. (360)477-6501. ning boards, roof rack, sunroof, rear spoiler, tow HUMMER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 H2 4WD p a ck a g e , t i n t e d w i n 3/4 TON SUV d o w s , key l e s s e n t r y, Full size luxury SUV this p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r 2005 Hummer H2 is a l o c k s , a n d m i r r o r s , powerful off-roader that cruise control, tilt, air cruises down the high- conditioning, Sony CD w a y e x c e p t i o n a l l y stereo, dual front airsmooth, this 4 door bags. Only 111,000 s e a t s 6 v e r y c o m - original miles! Immacufortably. This H2 has it late condition inside and all; leather, 6-way power o u t ! B e a u t i f u l fo r e s t heated seats, full power green color! Experience p k g . , m o o n r o o f, t ow w h y t h e X T E R R A i s pkg., premium 17â&#x20AC;? alumi- such a popular SUV for num wheels and tires, the Pacific Nor thwest! roof rack, chrome run- Come see the guys with n i n g b o a r d s, b r u s h 50+ years providing guard and more. Low quality vehicles! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t 81K mi. Vin# posted at settle for less, stop by dealership. Gray Motors today! $24,950 $8,995 Preview at: GRAY MOTORS heckmanmotors.com 457-4901 Heckman Motors graymotors.com 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 TOYOTA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 4 Runn e r LT D. E x . c o n d . JEEP: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80 CJ5 Rene- One owner, leather, g a d e. O r i g i n a l , g o o d heated seats, navigashape. $3,750. tion, towing package, (360)385-2792 near new tires. Miles, 133,500, mostly highTOYOTA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 4Runner. way. Mtce/svc records 4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, ava i l . , n o n - s m o ke r. 199,500 mi., fair to good $12,500 firm. cond. $1,950. 461-0054. (360)460-0060

9556 SUVs Others

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 RAV4 4WD 4WD, automatic trans, 4 cylinder 16 valve engine, 63,900 original miles, ver y clean inside and out, power windows, power mirrors, remote keyless entry, tilt wheel, cruise control, A/C, roof racks, tinted windows, and more! Kelley Blue Book priced at $15,660, average price on autotrader $18,714, our price $14,750! You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find one in better shape for less money. This one features seating for 5 passengers with plenty of room left over for your groceries or gear with a roof rack for your oversized cargo! If you are in the market for a small SUV that will get the groceries home through any of the wild weather the northwest can throw at you and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break the bank at the fuel pump this is the one for you! Stop in, give us a call, or check us out online but this one wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last at this price! $14,750 Lipmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Automotive IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE (360)452-5050 www.lipmansauto.com 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA

9556 SUVs Others

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 TACOMA DOUBLE CAB TRD 4X4 This is one beautiful Toyota 4x4. Auto, V6, full power package, steering wheel audio controls, CD changer, brake assist, traction control, bead liner, tow package and much, much more. This Tacoma is as close to new as one can find. Balance of factor y warranty. Only 29k miles! $29,950 Trades Welcome! Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 CRV EX Au t o, A / C, l e a t h e r, m o o n r o o f, f u l l p ow e r package, aluminum wheels, this CRV has been well-maintained inside and out! Nice compact SUV. Vin# posted at dealership. $13,950 Trades Welcome! Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

9730 Vans & Minivans Others

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90 Ram 150 work van. 110 A/C inverter, bulkhead, 3.9 V6, could be camper. Runs great. $1,500/obo. (360)808-4237

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Ram Van. Good work van. $800. (206)861-5790

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Windstar SEL. 144k, lots of new par ts, looks and r uns great. $3,995. (360)452-9002.

F O R D : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 7 A e r o s t a r. 160k, new bat., radiator, heater core, runs great. $1,500. (360)452-6052.

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KEN ANSTED

Peninsula

Polecat in concert | This week’s new movies

Bex Marshall brings her band and her brand of rock and blues to Port Townsend’s Highway Twenty Roadhouse this Wednesday night.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF AUGUST 30 - SEPTEMBER 5, 2013


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

It’s last call before fall

Olympic Music Fest’s finale set this weekend

Polecat wraps winery’s series of concerts

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — The season finale of the Olympic Music Festival comes this weekend with two last concerts out on the farm at 7360 Center Road. The farm, a 55-acre spread with a restored dairy barn, is the setting for 2 p.m. performances both Saturday and Sunday, this time of music by Beethoven and Debussy. The featured artists are pianist Julio Elizalde and violist Alan Iglitzin, the artistic directors of the Olympic Music Festival, alongside cellist Patrick Jee and violinists Jessica Lee and Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu. The gates of the farm open at 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, so music lovers can stroll, picnic and shop in the Milking Shed store before settling in for the concerts. The barn doors open at 1 p.m. Patrons can choose to sit inside or out on the lawn where the music is broadcast. Either way, the dress

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — “We are so lucky,” fiddler Cayley Schmid says of her band. The group is four young men and herself, playing six kinds of music, within their sets — and sometimes inside a single song. This is Polecat, the band finishing off Olympic Cellars’ summer concert series this Saturday night. The quintet has become wellknown on the North Olympic Peninsula, and plans on dishing up its signature blend of rock, folk, roots, Americana, Celtic and “stomp-grass” — and “we haven’t stopped evolving,” Schmid adds. Show time is 7 p.m. at the winery just east of Port Angeles at 255410 U.S. Highway 101, and tickets are $13 in advance at www.OlympicCellars.com or $15 after about 4 p.m. Saturday. Gates will open at 6 p.m.

Jessica Lee will appear this weekend in the last two Olympic Music Festival concerts of the season. is casual, as befitting the rural place. Tickets can be reserved in advance online or by phoning the festival office, while lawn seating is first-come, first-served at the farm gate. Prices range from $18 to $33, and directions, details and reservations await at 360732-4800 and www. OlympicMusicFestival. com.

2010 beginning

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Schmid has lived there most of her life, and received a family-heirloom fiddle at age 12. She took some classical lessons, then switched to Irish music after a year or so. “My teacher was a wonderful Celtic [and] blues fiddler, Anna Schaad, who helped me explore different types of music and develop my own style,” she said.

Only woman Every so often, Schmid is asked that “how is it being the only woman in the band?” question. She answers with a generous compliment — that might not fit with your idea of stomp ’n’ rockers. “Luckily for me, all of

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water bar. Lawn chairs, blankets and warm clothes are advised for those breaks in the dancing. While the summer concerts bringing in bands from out of town will wrap up this weekend, Olympic Cellars has another bash planned: the Grape Stomp and Harvest Party on Saturday, Sept. 14. The event from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. will have a harvest costume contest, grapetossing and other activities for all ages; the band Fat Chance will play. Tickets are $13 in advance and $15 on stomp day. Proceeds will benefit The Girlfriend Factor, a nonprofit awarding educational grants to adult Designer hot dogs women. For more event details, CRAVEcart, specializing see OlympicCellars.com or in “designer hot dogs,” will be set up near the wine and phone 360-452-0160. the guys are kind, courteous and responsible,” she says. Schmid and singer Guest, stand-up bassist Richard Reeves, drummer Karl Olson and lead guitarist Jeremy Elliott “have a ton of fun traveling and playing.” Each player has his or her particular strengths, she adds, “that contribute to our overall Polecat-ness.” As usual with Olympic Cellars’ summer concerts, the Polecat party will raise money for a local nonprofit. This time, it’s Port Scandalous, the Port Angeles roller derby team (www. PortScandalous.com). Also as typical, a local food vendor will offer supper.

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

Polecat started up in 2010 when lead singer Aaron Guest brought the players together, having seen each one playing in a different band around Bellingham.

Polecat, purveyors of “stomp-grass,” Americana and beyond, comes to Olympic Cellars this Saturday. The band is, from left, Aaron Guest, Jeremy Elliott, Cayley Schmid, Karl Olson and Richard Reeves.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

3

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

Make room on your calendars Social dance classes begin next week PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — East Coast, West Coast swing and that European glide known as the waltz: These social dances will be taught Tuesday nights starting next week at the Sequim Prairie Grange Hall, 290 Macleay Road. Longtime instructors Pam and Derek Perkins have retired, but instructors Carol Hathaway, Steve Johnson and Darlene and Michael Clemens are stepping in to offer a slate of new classes. It all starts with Johnson, along with partner Ann Ashley, teaching East Coast swing classes every

week through Oct. 1. The beginners’ workshop will go from 7 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.; then comes the “beyond beginning” intermediate session from 8 p.m. to 8:50. Ashley will assist Johnson in the beginning class; then Dana Knight will help coach the intermediate dancers. The cost is $7 per class, or $12 for those who want to take both on a given evening. Waltz will be the dance to learn in October, with Hathaway guiding beginners and intermediates Tuesday nights from Oct. 8 through Nov. 5. Her classes will also be at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.

The last session for fall will have Darlene and Michael Clemens teaching West Coast swing Nov. 12 through Dec. 10, and to cap the season, a dance party will take over the Sequim Prairie Grange Hall on Dec. 17. A winter series of classes will start up again Jan. 7, with dance styles to be announced closer to that date. For information about these classes, phone the Clemenses at 360-457-2001 or contact Hathaway at 360-460-3836 or hathaway 00@gmail.com. Johnson can be reached at LazyJTreeFarm@msn.com and 360-461-4157.

Labor Day 215 W. First St.

Bay Variety Cottage Queen 119 W. First St.

Rissa’s Barely Consignment

Rainshadow Artists

109 W. First St.

130 W. Front St.

Odyssey Bookshop 114 W. Front St.

Brown’s Outdoor

Unique Treasures Mall 105 W. First St.

Port Book & News 104 E. First St.

Jette Monahan Suzi Morris Brenda Newman Betsy Robins Sandy Wolf

Family Shoe

117 W. First St.

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Presents the work of

P.A. Antique Mall

135 W. First St.

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The Gallery at the Fifth

August 30th - September 2nd Athlete’s Choice

DIANE URBANI

Steve Johnson, seen earlier this month with partner Ann Ashley on an outdoor dance floor at the Clallam County Fair, will teach East Coast swing classes throughout September at the Sequim Prairie Grange Hall.

Seasoned Woman

Artist Reception Sunday, September 1 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.

127 W. First St.

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On dispay through the month of September


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Life & times of

Victoria Art, music, theater fills streets of neighbor across the Strait BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

while others charge admission. Shows run from 11 a.m. till after 9 p.m. in nine venues in and around downtown Victoria. A few titles: “Fools for Love,” “The Last Show You’ll Ever See,” “Wolf Trek: Alone in the Woods,” “Promise and Promiscuity: a New Musical by Jane Austen and Peggy Ashton.” For a schedule, see www. IntrepidTheatre.com. The 36th annual Victoria Classic Boat Festival arrives today and sails through Sunday on the Inner Harbour. In this juried celebration, more than 100 sail, power and steam boats from all over the world gather. Admission is free while the festival is open from noon to 8 p.m. today and 9 a.m. to about 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Among the big attractions: the dory races at Robillard 1 p.m. Saturday and the Duke Robillard takes Sailpast and Salute at the Ship Point stage at 11 a.m. Sunday. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, with For details, see www. tickets at $30; on Sunday classicboatfestival.ca. at 7:30 it’s a Quebec blues Also near the Inner double-bill with Adam Harbour, the Royal British Karch and the Stephen Columbia Museum beckons Barry Band for $25. with “Race to the End of A pass to both is $45, the Earth,” a major exhibiand information awaits at tion about the quest to the Victoria Jazz Society at reach the South Pole in 250-388-4423 and the 1911 and 1912. Royal & McPherson box In it are photographs office at 250-386-6121. and artifacts — clothing, The Victoria Fringe The- skis, medical gear — from atre Festival, 11 days of Norwegian Roald Amundcomedies, dramas, musicals sen and British Royal Navy and physical theater, finCapt. Robert Falcon Scott’s ishes up today, Saturday expeditions. and Sunday. TURN TO VICTORIA/7 Some offerings are free

ticketed evening shows — “blues in every shade for PENINSULA DAILY NEWS your soul,” the slogan goes — Saturday through MonVICTORIA — Festivals day. Ship Point on the converge on British Colum- Inner Harbour is where the bia’s capital this weekend, outdoor stage awaits, with bringing lots of live blues, details at JazzVictoria.ca. classic boats and edgy theThe free shows start at ater. noon, 1:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m. For those with enhanced and 4 p.m. all three days; driver’s licenses or passhere’s the lineup of bands ports, Victoria is an MV in order by those time Coho ferry ride away, with boats departing the terminal slots. ■ Saturday: Cruel at 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Shoes; McKinley Wolf; Angeles, at 8:15 a.m., David Vest; Bill Johnson 12:45 p.m., 5:20 p.m. and Blues Band. 9:30 p.m. That’s the sched■ Sunday: Curl; The ule through Sept. 8; return Kingmixers; The Roper trips from Victoria to Port Show; Jason Buie Band. Angeles are at 6:10 a.m., ■ Monday: Groove 10:30 a.m., 3 p.m. and Kitchen; The Push Band; 7:30 p.m. The HiFi; The Midnights. The Vancouver Island The Blues Bash also Blues Bash means free presents a pair of evening afternoon concerts and concerts.

Duke Robillard is among the headliners of the Vancouver Island Blues Bash, which will bring live music to Ship Point on Victoria’s Inner Harbour from noon till nighttime Saturday through Monday.

Capt. Robert Scott’s man-hauled sledges are seen in historical photographs in the “Race to the End of the Earth” exhibition at Victoria’s Royal British Columbia Museum. BETTMANN/CORBIS


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

5

Journey INTO THE

blues Globe-trotting musician makes stop in PT BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — When Rebecca “Bex” Marshall was an 11-year-old girl, she was handed a Hummingbird. This was a 1963 Gibson Hummingbird guitar, a gift from a man who was and is her inspiration. He’s her uncle David Kiely — an entertainer who is still making music today — who has an unforgettable voice. When he sang, “my hair would fly back,” said Marshall. She hopes to likewise blow listeners away this week on her first trip to the Pacific Northwest. blues singer originally from Devonshire, England, Marshall lives in London now. She’s touring in the wake of “House of Mercy,” the follow-up to her 2008 CD “Kitchen Table,” and will arrive, band in tow, for an Upstage Presents concert Wednesday at the Highway Twenty Roadhouse. Show time is 7:30 p.m. at the bar and restaurant at 2152 W. Sims Way, and

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tickets are $7 via 360-385-2216. That’s the old Upstage Theater and Restaurant number, while Upstage owner Mark Cole continues his efforts to reopen his music venue somewhere new. Tickets will be available at the Roadhouse door, where there’s “plenty of room,” Cole promised, adding that dinner is available there too. For directions to the venue, phone 360-3857747.

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t’s ironic that this will be Marshall’s first foray to the upper corner of the continent. The singer, who’s been described as a musical adventuress and tireless traveler, took off at age 18 to hitchhike around Australia, guitar on her back. To earn a living, she trained as a croupier, working the gaming tables on cruise liners. She also busked on the streets in Australia, “bumming around . . . until I realized I needed to start bumming around professionally,” she quipped in an interview this week. “I’ve never looked back,” added Marshall, who’s been a full-time blueswoman for 12

the education she wanted. “I’m still being inspired today. There is never a day,” she said, “when I don’t learn something about music from musicians on the road, and not necessarily from someone famous.”

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his Wednesday at the Highway Twenty Roadhouse, “Come British rock, roots and blues player Bex Marshall arrives at Port early,” she Townsend’s Highway Twenty Roadhouse on Wednesday night. instructed, “and be ready to have your ner-up for Best Female Vocalist years now. On this tour, she’s heart ripped out and put back in and third place in the Album of traveling through Colorado, again. In the mostest possible the Year category for “House of Oklahoma and South Dakota, way.” Mercy.” then west to Port Townsend, to Then, as if to soften a little, Cozmic Pizza in Eugene, Ore., Marshall added that she hopes to o hear Marshall tell it, and to the Spar in Tacoma. “tell some stories.” yet, making music is the Then, U.S. jaunt done, she’ll go She’s sought to do that ever richest reward. to Brazil for a month. since her uncle gave her that “I caught the passion Marshall is feeling especially Hummingbird. The instrument, very early,” she said. As a girl, it good right now, having won two now 50 years old, adorns a wall was listening to the blues, on records and live, that gave her British Blues Awards: first runin her home.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PS At the Movies: Week of August 30 — September 5 Port Angeles “Despicable Me 2” (PG — Animated) — Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal in this sequel to the 2010 animated hit. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 5:05 p.m. today through Monday, plus 3:05 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “Elysium” (R) — Set in the year 2154, where the very wealthy live on a man-made space station while the rest of the population resides on a ruined Earth, a man (Matt Damon) takes on a mission that could bring equality to the polarized worlds. Directed by Neil Blomkamp (“District 9”). At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:25 p.m. daily, plus 5:15 p.m. and 9:40 p.m. today through Sunday, plus 3 p.m.

hopelessly afraid of heights. With the support of his mentor Skipper and a host of new friends, Dusty sets off to make his dreams come true. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:15 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 12:30 p.m., 1:25 p.m. and 3:20 p.m. Saturday through Monday.

Saturday through Monday. “Kick Ass 2” (R) — The costumed high-school hero Kick-Ass joins in this sequel to the 2010 film with a group of normal citizens who have been inspired to fight crime in costume. Meanwhile, the Red Mist plots an act of revenge that will affect everyone Kick-Ass knows. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 9:20 p.m. today through Sunday. “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” (PG13) — An African-American’s eyewitness accounts of notable events of the 20th century during his tenure as a White House butler. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:15 p.m. today through Monday, plus 8 p.m. and 9:05 p.m. today through Sunday, plus 2:30 p.m. and 5:15 p.m. Saturday through Mon-

Where to find the cinemas ■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. ■ Wheel-In Motor Drive-In: 210 Theatre Road, Port Townsend; 360-385-0859.

day, plus 4:45 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. “Monsters University (G-animated) — This “Monsters Inc.” sequel looks at the relationship between Mike and Sully during their days at Monsters University — when they weren’t necessarily the best of friends. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 12:35 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones” (PG-13) — When her mother disappears, Clary Fray learns that she descends from a line of warriors who protect our world from demons. She joins forces with others like her and heads into a dangerous alternate New York called Downworld. At Deer Park Cinema.

Showtimes 4:40 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:40 p.m. today through Sunday, plus 1:10 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters” (PG) — Percy Jackson, the son of Poseidon, continues his epic journey to fulfill his destiny, as he teams with his demigod friends to retrieve the Golden Fleece, which has the power to save their home and training ground, Camp HalfBlood. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:55 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “Planes” (PG — Animated) — Dusty is a cropdusting plane who dreams of competing in a famous aerial race. The problem? He is

“Star Trek Into Darkness” (PG-13) — After the crew of the Enterprise find an unstoppable force of terror from within their own organization, Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a war-zone world to capture a one man weapon of mass destruction. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:45 p.m. today through Monday, plus 3:15 p.m. Saturday through Monday, plus 7 p.m. Wednesday. “We’re the Millers” (R) — A veteran pot dealer creates a fake family as part of his plan to move a huge shipment of weed into the U.S. from Mexico. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m., 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:35 p.m. today through Monday, plus 2:50 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “The Wolverine” (PG-13) — Summoned to Japan by an old acquaintance, Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) becomes embroiled in a conflict that forces him to confront his own demons. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 9:25 p.m. today through Sunday. “World War Z” (PG-13) — United Nations employee Gerry Lane traverses the world in a race against time to stop the Zombie

2SHQIR UÀUVW Friday Art Walks

pandemic that is toppling armies and governments, and threatening to destroy humanity itself. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 8:15 p.m. today through Sunday, plus 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

Port Townsend “Blue Jasmine” (PG-13) — A life crisis causes a vapid and narcissistic socialite to head to San Francisco, where she tries to reconnect with her sister. At Rose Theatre. Showtime 4:20 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. today and Tuesday through Thursday, plus 12:15 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:25 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” (PG13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listing. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 12:40 p.m. Saturday through Monday. “Planes” (PG-animated) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listing. At the Uptown Theatre. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. “Monsters University” (G-animated) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. “Despicable Me 2” (PG-animated) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. “Iron Man 3” — When Tony Stark’s world is torn apart by a formidable terrorist called the Mandarin, he starts an odyssey of rebuilding and retribution. (PG-13) At the WheelIn Motor Movie. Box office opens at 7 p.m. today through Sunday with showtime at dusk.

Lake Ozette Steering Committee Meeting

Fridays & Saturdays September 6, 7, 13, 14, 20 & 21 at 7:30 and Sundays September 8, 15 & 22 at 2:00

Weds., Sept. 4th • 10:00 am–3:15 pm

SEKIU COMMUNITY CENTER 42 Rice Street, Sekiu, WA

38857994

Community members are invited to attend the Steering Committee’s discussion about Lake Ozette Sockeye Salmon recovery, public outreach, and project implementation.

Join us after the show on Friday, Sept. 6. for the

Opening Night Actor’s Champagne Reception

facebook.com/olympictheatrearts 38829783

Olympic Theatre Arts • 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim, WA

38863263

Like us for show updates, backstage photos and videos, and much more!

For more information, please contact Sarah Saviskas at (206) 583-0655 or at ssaviskas@triangleassociates.com


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Barhop Brewing (124 W. Railroad Ave.) — Eggplant (rock), tonight, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) — DJ Esteban, tonight, 9 p.m.; DJ Square, Saturday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Jerry’s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Old Tyme Country Band with special guest Mark Williams, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; country jam, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Junction Roadhouse (242701 U.S. Highway 101, junction with state Highway 112 ) — The Soulshakers, tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight; Joy in Mudville (roots), Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Chesnut Junction, (rock/ blues), Thursday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Next Door Gastropub (113 W. First St.) — The Soul Ducks, Saturday, 9 p.m. to close. No cover. Olympic Cellars (255410 U.S. Highway 101) — Benefit for Port Scandalous Roller Derby with Polecat (bluegrass, country, Celtic, rock and more), Saturday at 7 p.m. Tickets $13 advance, $15 at the door. Port Angeles Senior Center (328 E. Seventh St.) — Wally’s Boys (ballroom dance), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, firsttimers free. R Bar (132 E. Front St) — Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn Nourish Restaurant (1345 S. Sequim Ave.) — Open mic, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign ups start at 6 p.m.) Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Blue Hole Quintet, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

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Victoria: New IMAX movies CONTINUED FROM 4 dian elders from Victoria’s Chinatown, as well as hisThe museum, at 675 torical photos and artifacts. Belleville St., also has “TraThese exhibitions await dition in Felicities,” an alongside the museum’s Natexhibition of video interural History, Modern History and First People’s Galleries. views with Chinese-Cana-

In the adjacent IMAX movie theater, “Titans of the Ice Age” and “Man of Steel,” the Superman feature, open today. These join “Kenya: Animal Kingdom” and “Shackleton’s Antarctic

Adventure” on the gigantic screen at the Royal British Columbia Museum. For more, see http:// royalbcmuseum.bc.ca or phone 250-356-7226 or toll free 888-447-7977.

Jefferson County Port Ludlow The Resort at Port Ludlow (1 Heron Road) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Townsend Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — open mic, Thursday, 8 p.m., sign-ups at 7 p.m., all-ages. Highway Twenty Roadhouse (2152 Sims Way) — Bex Marshall Band (roots rock and blues guitar), Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. $7 at door. The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Port Townsend Brewing Co. (330 10th St.) — Ian McFeron Band (folk), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Electric Blue (jazz), Sunday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.; BBR (classic rock, rhythm and blues), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Pourhouse (2231 Washington St.) — Shed Boys (rock, folk), tonight from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sirens Pub (823 Water St.) — Robert Sarazin Blake (folk), tonight, 9 p.m. $5. Blue Holiday Band (blues, soul, jazz), Saturday, 9 p.m. $5. Fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, Thursday, 9 p.m. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Sue Logg, tonight 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Matt Sircely, tonight, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. open mic, Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m.; This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.

38859565

7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Crazy Texas Gypsies (southern rock blues), tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Larry Hill (piano), tonight 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Thom Davis (blues) with special guest Mr. C, Saturday, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; The Nasty Habits (top 40 dance music), Saturday, 9 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Danny Vernon and “Illusion of Elvis,” Sunday, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) —Taylor Ackerly and Chuck Easton (jazz) tonight, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Trevor Hanson, Craig Buhler, George Radebaugh, Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013


8

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

EVENT CENTER

Live MMA Saturday, September 14th Doors open 5:00 PM | Fights start 6:00 PM

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Leave the ordinary behind. Go extraordinary. The Peninsula’s New Home for Entertainment

Tickets $35 & $55

EVENT CENTER

Williams & Ree Indian & The White Guy Comedy Saturday, September 28th Doors open 7:00 PM | Show 8:00 PM Tickets $10 and $15

Spike & The Impalers TWO SHOWS Fri & Sat, September 20th & 21st Doors open 7:00 PM | Show 8:00 PM Tickets $10 and $15

EVENT CENTER Kingston, WA www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468

Thunder from Down Under The Ultimate Girls’ Night Outback Friday, October 4th

Tickets available now at these locations: In the gift shop | On our website For more information Call 866.547.6468 | Ages 21 and over The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Some restrictions may apply. Point Casino promotions, offers, coupons and/or specials may not be combined without marketing management approval. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, to attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

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Doors open 7:00 PM | Show 8:00 PM Tickets $15 and $20

Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.®


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