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Afghan peace?

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Sunshine slowly returning C10

Karzai acknowledges talks with U.S. in hopes of ending grisly war A3

Peninsula Daily News Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

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June 19, 2011

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An inspiring Peninsula Woman INSIDE

Tensions rise in Forks as enforcement of immigration laws divides the community

‘It’s just an atmosphere of fear’

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Forks student Carlos Estrada, valedictorian, and Port Townsend Mayor Michelle Sandoval at Saturday’s Peninsula College commencement ceremony.

Mayor: Embrace change Sandoval keynotes Peninsula College graduation of 500 By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

FORKS — Benjamin Roldan Salinas, a forest worker in the country illegally, leapt into the frigid Sol Duc River to escape a Manuel Valdes/The Associated Press pursuing U. S. Border Patrol agent, disappearing into the fastGuatemalan immigrant Virgilio Pablo carries a stack of moving waters. salal leaves on his back down a national forest road For more than three weeks, near Forks last December. his family, friends and volunteers — including other illegal immigrants — scoured the dense forest along the swollen river’s banks for any sign of him. The Border Patrol suspected that Roldan Salinas had survived and fled. Still, as many as 150 people at a time continued to look. “They believed he was out there someTed S. Warren/The Associated Press where because he hadn’t gone home,” U.S. Border Patrol Agent Chris Dyer peers through his binoculars Clallam County to read a license plate number as he sits in his patrol truck near Sheriff’s Sgt. Brian Forks last March.

PORT ANGELES — Port Townsend Mayor Michelle Sandoval told more than 500 Peninsula College graduates Saturday to not only expect change, but also look forward to it. Sandoval, the keynote speaker for the commencement ceremony on the Port Angeles campus, said most of the graduates would have between 10 and 24 jobs by the time they are 38. “Change is inevitable, and it is the only constant in life,” she told a packed gym at the ceremony. “Don’t just be open to it; embrace it,” she later added. An important part of life is education, said the student speaker for the Class of 2011. Carlos Estrada — a member of the All-Washington Academic Team who plans to study engineering at the University of By Paul Gottlieb Washington this fall — recalled Peninsula Daily News how he learned the value of eduSEQUIM — The federal Equal cation. Employment Opportunity Commission is investigating a sexual Importance of education harassment accusation involving It was during the summer Stephen Rosales, a chief volunbreak before sixth grade, which teer for the Sequim unit of the he and his parents spent not on Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic vacation, but picking strawberries Peninsula and a candidate in this and other crops. fall’s election for the Sequim Why must the family spend its School Board. summers that way, he rememRosales strongly denies the bered asking his parents. allegations, made by a female “Without an education, all we employee of the Boys & Girls can teach you is how to work,” Clubs in a complaint to the EEOC. they responded. “It’s not fair . . . at no time did “Right then, I noticed the I do anything wrong,” he told the importance of education,” Estrada Peninsula Daily News. said. Jerry Sinn, board president of Estrada’s family moved to the Boys & Girls Clubs, said the Forks from Mexico when he was allegations were being investiin the first grade, college Presi- gated. He would not comment dent Tom Keegan said while further on them. The “charge of discrimination,” introducing the graduate, who was awarded an associate of arts filed April 20 with the EEOC and the Washington State Human degree. Rights Commission, alleges Turn to College/A7 Rosales subjected Lindsay A.

King said. The search ended June 4 when a family friend spotted the 43-yearold Roldan Salinas’ bloated, decomposing Monohon body entangled in roots downstream, according to the sheriff’s report. His death heightened tensions in what has become a protracted engagement between the Border Patrol and the immigrant population of Forks — the small, remote Washington town best known as the fictional home of the vampire series Twilight. “We talk about Arizona, Texas and the southern border . . . it’s here. It’s in our backyard,” said Forks Mayor Bryon Monohon about immigration enforcement efforts in his town. “It really is just an atmosphere of fear.” Turn

to

Forks/A8

Sequim civic leader investigated Richardson, who still works at the club, to “physical and verbal harassment,” including making sexual comments about other women at the club. The complaint, signed by Richardson “under penalty of perjury,” accuses the Boys & Girls Clubs of not properly addressing the alleged harassment. After Richardson complained to the club’s executive director, her lawyer said, she was demoted to another job “with significantly less responsibility,” and Rosales was not disciplined, according to the complaint.

Board member, contributor

club’s board of directors and a major financial contributor, having donated $60,000 to $70,000 to the organization, he said in an interview. Rosales also serves as interim director of the Sequim Food Bank

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and has worked as a volunteer for A retired state of Texas the Sequim schools and Little employee, Rosales, his wife and League. their two pre-teen daughters He likes to kid that he is a moved to Sequim in 2005. “volaholic” — which, he explains, is a “volunteer-a-holic.” Turn to Rosales/A7

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In addition to being an unpaid Stephen Rosales is shown earlier this year at the Boys & volunteer worker at the club, Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula Sequim unit, where Rosales, 54, is a member of the he is a prominent volunteer and financial donor.

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Rosales denies allegations filed with federal, state rights agencies

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 95th year, 143rd issue — 9 sections, 90 pages

Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C4 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C9 Movies C5 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

E6 B1 C6 C10


A2

UpFront

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Palin calls ex ‘the gnat’ in new book

her on-and-off-again relationship with Johnston, with whom she had a child and was briefly engaged while caught in a media spotlight. She blasts him as “the gnat named Levi Johnston BRISTOL PALIN constantly spreading false WRITES in her new book of accusations against our famlosing her virginity to boyily” and calls him a selffriend Levi Johnston on a involved slacker “who camping trip after getting cheated on me about as fredrunk for the first time on quently as he sharpened his too many wine coolers. hockey skates.” She When she confronted him awoke in about their sexual encounher tent, ter, he said what she wanted alone, with to hear: They wouldn’t do it no memoagain until they were marries of what ried. had hapIt didn’t work out that pened as way, though Palin notes that Johnston Palin when she got pregnant, she “talked with his friends on the other side was on birth control pills prescribed to treat her of the canvas.” cramps. She had vowed to wait When she told her paruntil marriage. And she had ents, they were accepting, lied to her parents about not condemning, she writes, where she was going. Palin, a 20-year-old single and focused on the future, mother and the daughter of particularly her continuing education. former Alaska Republican Johnston’s reaction Gov. Sarah Palin, tells a wasn’t so reassuring: “Better story of “deception and disbe a [bleeping] boy,” he appointment” in the book Not Afraid of Life: My Jour- declared. ney So Far. Treasure auction The memoir, co-written with Nancy French, is Debbie Reynolds still scheduled for publication by knows how to make a William Morrow next week. splash. The Associated Press purShe was a teenage chased a copy Friday. charmer opposite Gene Palin’s book covers grow- Kelly in “Singin’ in the ing up with her family, Rain,” earned an Oscar which she portrays affection- nomination for her gutsy ately, and the excitement of character in “The Unsinkher mother’s political life as able Molly Brown” and, at governor and then, in 2008, 79, is going strong as a as the GOP vice presidential nightclub and theater percandidate. former. But the main theme is On Saturday, Reynolds

demonstrated her flair with an auction of movie memorabilia she’s gathered over four Reynolds decades and which includes costumes evoking some of filmdom’s greatest stars and roles. Among them: The Marilyn Monroe dress that flirted with a subway gust in “The Seven Year Itch,” Audrey Hepburn’s stunning black-and-white Ascot race scene gown designed by Cecil Beaton for “My Fair Lady” and Elizabeth Taylor’s pint-sized race togs from “National Velvet” and towering headdress from “Cleopatra.” “I consider myself a fan. I’m a fan who was lucky enough to be among stars, so I collected them,” Reynolds said during an auction preview at the Paley Center for Media. Profiles in History, the auction house, estimates the nearly 600 items could bring up to $10 million in the sale that will also be conducted online. More of Reynolds’ treasure trove is to be sold in December. Other pieces up for grabs include costumes worn by Yul Brynner in “The King and I,” Greta Garbo in “Anna Karenina” and Marlon Brando in “Mutiny on the Bounty,” along with props such as a guitar used by Julie Andrews in “The Sound of Music.”

Passings By The Associated Press

MIETEK PEMPER, 91, who served as a secretary for a labor camp commander and risked his life to plot the rescue of enslaved workers, died June 7 in Augsburg, Germany. Mr. Pemper was doing his job as a secretary taking dictation. One day his boss, Amon Goeth, Mr. Pemper glanced out the window and saw that a worker did not have a full load of stones in his wheelbarrow. Goeth walked outside and shot the man to death, then returned to his desk and said, “Where were we in the text?” Goeth was commandant of the Plaszow concentration camp just south of Krakow, Poland, and Mr. Pemper was a Jewish prisoner from Krakow whom he had forced to be his secretary. Goeth personally murdered hundreds during the course of World War II, and Mr. Pemper regarded his assignment as a death sentence. So Mr. Pemper, with nothing to lose, plotted against Goeth. His acts of defiance included typing the names on what became known as Schindler’s List, a roster of labor camp workers who were supposedly essential to the German war effort and who were thus spared almost certain extermination.

Oskar Schindler was the flamboyant and controversial German industrialist who overcame his membership in the Nazi Party and willingness to profit from the slave labor of concentration camp prisoners to engineer the rescue of nearly 1,000 of his workers and 200 other inmates. The story was the basis of Schindler’s Ark, a 1982 Booker Prize-winning novel by Thomas Keneally, and the 1993 film adaptation of it by the director Steven Spielberg, titled “Schindler’s List.”

as a boy. Mr. Haast moved to Utah in 1984 but returned to Florida six years later. Mr. Haast had for years injected himself with different types of cobra venom to develop an immunity to bites.

Laugh Lines

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Which one is more important?

Father’s Day  2.0%

Mother’s Day 

Both equally 

Neither important 

18.3% 58.1% 20.0%

Undecided  1.5% Total votes cast: 1,101 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  Nippon Paper Industries USA has not received an air quality permit from the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency for its biomass cogeneration project. A Thursday story on Page A1 in the Jefferson County edition and Page A6 of the Clallam County edition erroneously said the permit had been approved. A hearing on the permit was conducted in Port Angeles in May. The Olympic Clean Air Agency permit would take at least a month to approve or deny, said Director Fran McNair then. ORCAA staff members are recommending approval.

_________

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

ACCORDING TO Peninsula Lookback THE Wall Street Journal, economic experts now fear From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News there may be a second The pool is to be built on recession. A second reces1936 (75 years ago) sion? When did the first One of two new free pub- Fifth Street between Lin_________ one end? lic parking lots in downtown coln and Chase streets. Jay Leno Port Angeles will open The current pool will be BILL HAAST, 100, a closed once the new pool is tomorrow, the city Street snake expert known as a operational. Did You Win? Department announced. pioneer in extracting venom It is located just west of for research, has died in State lottery results 1986 (25 years ago) Lincoln Street and parallel Florida. Friday’s Daily Game: to the Harris and Schuller Nancy Haast said her Although the Port Ange4-9-2 husband died Wednesday. Sheet Metal Co. It’s reached les City Council has agreed Friday’s Keno: 01-05Mr. Haast remained by a ramp from Railroad to build a new City Hall director of Miami Serpentar- 10-16-17-21-23-26-30-32-33- Avenue across from Angeles east of William Shore 34-38-49-51-55-65-66-67-75 Gravel and Supply Co. ium Laboratories near Memorial Pool on Fifth Friday’s Match 4: Punta Gorda until his death. The second parking lot — Street, the council is being Guests would pay admis- 08-13-15-23 between Railroad and Front asked to answer questions Friday’s Mega Milsion to watch Mr. Haast Street and west of the about the new facility’s extract venom from snakes, lions: 12-29-46-47-51, ­Wolten Grocery Co. — will effect on the City Light Mega Ball: 24 something he began doing be ready Monday night. A Department, which is to Saturday’s Daily ramp from Railroad Avenue remain on Front Street. Game: 5-8-3 near Oak Street leads to Seen Around A group calling itself Saturday’s Hit 5: this lot. Peninsula snapshots Citizens Committee for 07-10-14-15-28 Responsible Government Saturday’s Keno: EIGHT ANGRY SAND— which submitted the 03-04-05-15-17-18-21-24-27- 1961 (50 years ago) PIPER birds diving at a questions in writing — is Plans for a new indoor 31-37-44-48-49-58-59-62-64hawk over a field near Seibseeking a public vote on municipal swimming pool 65-71 erts Creek Road, Port Angewere approved by the Port the new City Hall. Saturday’s Lotto: les, on U.S. Highway 101 . . . However, the project is Angeles City Council. 04-13-15-26-29-42 WANTED! “Seen Around” being financed through Saturday’s Match 4: Sale of general obligaitems. Send them to PDN News existing revenue sources 01-03-09-17 tion bonds totalling Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeand doesn’t require a pubSaturday’s Powerball: $300,000 to finance the les, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; 12-21-22-38-41, Powerball: pool’s construction was also lic vote, City Manager or email news@peninsuladaily 18, Power Play: 2 news.com. Dave Flodstrom has said. proposed.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, June 19, the 170th day of 2011. There are 195 days left in the year. This is Father’s Day. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On June 19, 1910, the firstever Father’s Day was celebrated in Spokane. The idea for the observance is credited to Sonora Louise Smart Dodd. On this date: ■  In 1862, slavery was outlawed in U.S. territories. ■  In 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free.

■  In 1911, Pennsylvania became the first state to establish a motion picture censorship board. ■  In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission. ■  In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, N.Y. ■  In 1961, the Supreme Court ruled that illegally obtained evidence was inadmissible in court and struck down a provision in Maryland’s constitution requiring state officeholders to profess a belief

in God. ■  In 1977, Pope Paul VI proclaimed a 19th-century Philadelphia bishop, John Neumann, the first male U.S. saint. ■  In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure. ■  In 1991, actress Jean Arthur died in Carmel, Calif., at age 90. ■  In 1999, author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith in North Lovell, Maine. ■  Ten years ago: Strapped to the same padded gurney on which Oklahoma City bomber Timothy

McVeigh died, drug kingpin Juan Raul Garza received a chemical injection and became the second inmate in eight days to be executed by the U.S. government. ■  Five years ago: Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice warned North Korea it would face consequences if it test-fired a missile thought to be powerful enough to reach the West Coast of the United States. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama used his weekly radio and Internet address to pin blame on Republicans for making life harder for the unemployed and for those who could lose their jobs without new federal intervention.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, June 19, 2011

Second Front Page

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A3

Briefly: Nation Phil Campbells help Ala. town of Phil Campbell

That constant pressure on the network of levees that protect farmland, roads, small towns and big cities from a river running well outside its banks is what worries folks downriver most as the high water heads PHIL CAMPBELL, Ala. — south toward Kansas City and After the small Alabama city of east toward St. Louis. Phil Campbell was ravaged in “The length of the flood will April by a tornado that killed test levees like they’ve never more than two dozen people and been tested before,” Missouri hurt even more, a select group Gov. Jay Nixon said. from around the world offered to help: men named Phil CampHomeless inheritance bell. SALT LAKE CITY — A priPhil Campbells from across vate investigator said he has the globe are converging this weekend on the hard-hit city of tracked down a homeless Utah man and delivered some good 1,150 for the “I’m With Phil” convention, a gathering meant news: He’s inherited a lot of to raise spirits, money and new money. roofs. David Lundberg said he Phil Campbells are cleaning found Max Melitzer pushing a up storm debris, marching in a shopping cart filled with perparade, donating money to build sonal possessions in a Salt Lake a Habitat for Humanity house, City park Saturday afternoon. listening to country music and Lundberg declined to disclose just showing they care. how much money Melitzer will Organizers said 18 Phil be receiving but said the man’s Campbells plan to be here brother, who died of cancer last before the weekend is out, and year, left him a “significant” they’re not picky on the spelling. amount in his will. He said Melitzer was “in Soggy summer shock” after learning of the inheritance. KANSAS CITY, Mo. — It isn’t so much the amount of water churning its way down Today’s news guests the Missouri River that has peon ABC’s “This Week” — Sen. John ple along the nation’s longest McCain, R-Ariz.; Pakistan’s ambassador waterway on edge. It’s how long to the U.S., Husain Haqqani. n NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Sens. all that water will stick around. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and Lindsey Graham, The annual “spring rise” on R-S.C.; Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Vilthe Missouri will last deep into laraigosa. this soggy summer, as a torrent n CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Sens. of early season rains and winter Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Chuck snowpack flow through wideSchumer, D-N.Y.; Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich. open gates of South Dakota’s n CNN’s “State of the Union” — Gavins Point Dam upriver and Defense Secretary Robert Gates; David toward the confluence with the Axelrod, top adviser to President Barack Mississippi River. Obama’s re-election campaign. The Missouri might start to n “Fox News Sunday” — Gates; Jon Stewart. crest soon, but it won’t start to fall until August or later. The Associated Press

Briefly: World NATO airstrike mistakenly hits Libyan rebels

to Islam to rebuild. The scene, like many in Egypt now, was inconceivable before President Hosni Mubarak’s Feb. 11 ouster. Under Mubarak’s autocratic regime, the Brotherhood was TRIPOLI, Libya — NATO banned. Tens of thousands of its said Saturday it mistakenly members were arrested, many struck a column of Libyan rebel tortured, and its gatherings vehicles in an airstrike near an were held largely behind closed eastern oil town two days eardoors. lier and expressed regret for Now, with Mubarak gone, the any casualties that might have Brotherhood is storming into resulted. the open, appealing to religious The alliance has accidentally voters and trying to win over hit rebel forces before in its air Egypt’s poor. campaign to protect civilians in It is likely to be part of the civil war between Moammar Egypt’s next government, with a Gadhafi’s military and the fight- hand not only in ruling, but also ers trying to end his more than in writing a new constitution. four decades in power. And its strength has fueled The rebels have also comfears among many Egyptians plained that NATO’s strikes that it will turn what began as have not helped them gain deci- a pro-democracy uprising in the sive momentum against the Arab world’s most populous Libyan leader’s better trained nation into Islamic rule. and equipped military, which still has firm control over most 9 bodies found of western Libya. MORELIA, Mexico — MexiThe alliance statement gave can authorities said Saturday no figures on casualties from the bodies of nine victims of last Thursday’s airstrike but suspected drug violence have said it regretted “any possible loss of life or injuries caused by turned up in the western state of Michoacan. this unfortunate incident.” The state Prosecutor’s Office said in a statement that authorBrotherhood in open ities found eight bodies in three CAIRO — The night breeze different areas of the port city of blew foul wafts from a nearby Lazaro Cardenas. canal black with garbage and Three of the cadavers had pollution. been dumped in front of the The streets jammed with state public security agency. trucks and motorized rickshaws Another body was found in were so shattered that they the state capital of Morelia. hardly seemed paved at all. Several of the still unidentiIt was to Cairo’s slum of fied bodies were discovered with Munib on a recent evening that messages from a group calling the Muslim Brotherhood, itself the Knights Templar and Egypt’s biggest Islamic group, claiming responsibility for the brought its election campaign killings. The Associated Press message: The country must turn

The Associated Press

Afghan police officers secure an area close to a police station that came under attack in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Saturday.

Peace talks confirmed by Afghanistan leader Suicide attackers launch assault in heart of capital; nine killed By Ahmad Massieh Neshat and Jon Gambrell

rushed inside and began firing, an Interior Ministry statement said. The crackle of gunfire echoed The Associated Press through the usually bustling KABUL, Afghanistan — Presi- streets for about two hours before dent Hamid Karzai acknowledged security forces killed the two Saturday that the U.S. and Afghan remaining attackers. governments have held talks with Taliban emissaries in a bid to end the nation’s nearly 10-year war, 3 police officers killed even as suicide attackers launched Insurgents killed three police a bold assault in the heart of the officers, one intelligence agent county’s capital, killing nine peo- and five civilians in the attack, ple. according to the ministry stateThe attack, which occurred ment. just blocks from Karzai’s office, Taliban spokesman Zabiullah shows the parties have a long way Mujahid claimed responsibility to go to reach a political settle- for the attack in a text message to ment as the Obama administra- The Associated Press. tion weighs a major withdrawal of Attacks in the Afghan capital its forces. have been relatively rare, The White House neither although violence has increased directly confirmed or denied Kar- since the May 2 killing of Osama zai’s statement. bin Laden in a U.S. raid in PakiThree men wearing camou- stan and the start of the Taliban’s flage fatigues that are frequently annual spring offensive. worn by Afghan soldiers stormed The last major attack in Kabul a police station near the presiden- took place last month when a suitial palace, with one of them deto- cide bomber wearing an Afghan nating an explosives vest just police uniform infiltrated the outside the gates as two others main Afghan military hospital in

late May, killing six medical students. A month before that, a suicide attacker in an army uniform sneaked past security at the Afghan Defense Ministry, killing three. Kabul is one of seven areas scheduled to begin to be handed over to Afghan security control in July — part of NATO’s efforts to begin transferring security responsibilities ahead of its planned 2014 withdrawal from the country.

Announcement of peat talks The assault occurred shortly after Karzai announced during a speech to youth at the presidential palace that members of his peace council and the U.S. have begun preliminary peace negotiations with the Taliban, which ruled Afghanistan for five years and sheltered al-Qaida before being driven out of power in the U.S.-led invasion in late 2001. Reports about such talks have surfaced in recent months, but Karzai’s statement was the first public confirmation of U.S. participation. Publicly, the Taliban said there will be no negotiations until foreign troops leave Afghanistan.

Pakistan tips off militants again, U.S. officials say By Kimberly Dozier The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — U.S. officials said Pakistan has apparently tipped off militants at two more bomb-building factories in its tribal areas, giving the terror suspects time to flee, after U.S. intelligence shared the locations with the Pakistani government. Those officials believe Pakistan’s insistence on seeking local tribal elders’ permission before raiding the areas may have most directly contributed to the militants’ flight, though they also suspect low-level security officials may have tipped the militants off. U.S. officials have pushed for Pakistan to keep the location of such targets secret prior to the operations, but the Pakistanis said their troops cannot enter the lawless regions without giving the locals notice. All officials spoke on condition

Quick Read

of anonymity to discuss matters of intelligence. The latest incidents bring to a total of four bomb-making sites that the U.S. has shared with Pakistan only to have the terrorist suspects flee before the Pakistani military arrived much later.

Poor for relations The report does not bode well for attempts by both sides to mend relations and rebuild trust after the U.S. raid May 2 that killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, a Pakistani army town only 35 miles from the capital Islamabad. The Pakistanis believe the Americans violated their sovereignty by keeping them in the dark about the raid. American officials believe bin Laden’s location proves some elements of the Pakistani army or intelligence service helped hide the al-Qaida mastermind, bolster-

ing their argument that the raid had to be done solo. The U.S. officials explained Saturday how they first offered the location of the third and then the fourth site in order to give Pakistan another chance to prove it could be trusted to go after the militants. In the tradition of “trust but verify,” the Americans carefully monitored the area with satellite and unmanned drones to see what would happen after sharing the information a third and fourth time, the officials said. In each case, they watched the militants depart within 24 hours, taking any weapons or bombmaking materials with them, just as militants had done the first two times. Only then did they watch the Pakistani military visit each site, when the terror suspects and their wares were long gone, the officials said.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Ariz., N.M. wildfire evacuees return home

West: Video shows saggy pants dispute at airport

Nation: Library of Congress to get rare map of flat world

World: Sea to rise more than 30 inches, Cuba says

SOME RESIDENTS EVACUATED because of wildfires in Arizona and New Mexico were allowed to return to their homes Saturday as firefighters battled strong winds and hot weather to try to keep more houses, dry forests and stretches of high desert from being consumed by the flames. In eastern Arizona along the New Mexico border, residents of Alpine returned to their homes after being forced out for more than two weeks, but Greer residents remained evacuated by the largest wildfire in Arizona’s history. By late afternoon, authorities were evacuating the small town of Luna, N.M., as a precaution as strong winds pushed the Wallow fire over the border.

A UNIVERSITY OF New Mexico football player who was arrested after wearing saggy pants on a plane at the San Francisco airport insists in a video showing part of his exchange with authorities that his pants were up and he had done nothing wrong. What the video does not show is Marman’s repeated refusal earlier to follow a boarding agent’s advice and pull up his pants, Elise Eberwein, a spokeswoman for US Airways, told The Associated Press on Saturday. The 20-year-old’s pants were so low they were “exposing areas that most people would not want to see” and violating the airline’s expectation that customers won’t dress offensively, she said.

AN OREGON MAN has given the Library of Congress a rare and unusual gift: a 120-year-old map supporting the theory that the Earth is flat. Don Homuth of Salem, Ore., said the map was given to him by his eighth-grade teacher. It was created by Orlando Ferguson of Hot Springs, S.D. Homuth used to live in Fargo and was a North Dakota state senator. Library of Congress spokesman Robert Morris told The Forum newspaper that officials checked more than 75 maps before confirming the design was one-of-a-kind. He said the only other known copy of the map is in the Pioneer Museum in Hot Springs, S.D.

CUBAN SCIENTISTS CALCULATED that median sea levels around the Caribbean nation will rise more than 30 inches by the end of the century due to global climate change, official media said Friday. Models predict the sea will rise 10.6 inches by 2050 and 33.5 inches by 2100, said Abel Centella, scientific director of the country’s Meteorological Institute. There were no details of what preparations the island is undertaking, but scientists are closely monitoring sea levels. Government scientist Marcelino Hernandez warned of the need to protect environments that can mitigate the effects of sea encroachment.


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Sunday, June 19, 2011

Anderson Lake toxins nearly triple detectable amount of either anatoxin-a or the other algae toxin historically found in East Jefferson County lakes, microcystin, which can damage the liver. Microcystin has not been detected this season in the county’s lakes. Sandy Shore Lake also tests below detectable levels for algae toxin. The lake is considered clear for all recreation. The lake has an algae bloom, but there are no toxin-producing algae in it, Thomason said. “An innocuous type of algae is producing the bloom,” he said.

By Leah Leach

Peninula Daily News

Toxins in Anderson Lake have nearly tripled, said Jefferson County environmental health specialist Greg Thomason after tests of samples taken last week were received Friday. “The lake stays closed, of course,” he said. “It’s getting worse.” Anderson Lake was closed to fishing, swimming and any kind of recreation June 10 after samples taken June 6 contained 2.67 micrograms per liter of anatoxin-a, a powerful neurotoxin. Test results of samples taken June 13 showed concentrations of 7.37 micrograms per liter of the algaeproduced toxin, which can cause illness or even death in people and animals. The recreational limit is 1 microgram per liter. Aside from the lake, the 410-acre park between Chimacum and Port Hadlock is open. Hiking, horseback riding and biking — all recreation not related to the 70-acre lake — are permitted in Anderson Lake State Park. Leland, Gibbs, Sandy Shore and Silent Lake are still open, though the cautions were upgraded last week for Lake Leland. The “caution” sign that had been at the lake was replaced with a “warning” sign, Thomason said. While tests show that the level of anatoxin-a is still well below the safe level, the amount is increasing, Thomason said. The latest sample found 0.17 micrograms per liter of the toxin. The week before, the level was 0.04. “The [algae] bloom is getting really heavy, and there are two toxin-producing algae in the lake, so we put a warning sign up,” Thomason said. Fish that have been cleaned with the guts discarded can be eaten from lakes posted with either “caution” or “warning” signs. The difference is that a “caution” sign notes that toxic algae may be present, and that swimmers should avoid scums, while the “warning” sign says toxic algae are present and warns against any swimming at all. In both cases, lake water should not be consumed. Gibbs Lake has a “caution” sign posted because it has a slight algae bloom made up of three types of algae known to produce toxins at times. At present, however, the algae is not producing toxins, Thomason said. “It’s OK,” he said. Tests of samples find no

Silent Lake No sample was taken from Silent Lake last week, but it will be tested next week. Two weeks ago, the lake on the Toandos Peninsula was found to be clear of toxins, but it contained algae that could produce toxins, earning it a “caution” sign on its shore. The algae in Silent Lake “could start producing toxins any minute,” Thomason said. “You want to assume the worst. If you have a dog, keep it from drinking the water.” Thomason said fish caught in the lake could be eaten if cleaned properly, but he advised against swimming in it or drinking from it. Anatoxin-a can cause convulsions and even death by respiratory paralysis. Anderson Lake has been plagued with summertime closures because of high concentrations of toxins since Memorial Day 2006, when two dogs died after drinking lake water with a heavy concentration of anatoxin-a. Anyone who observes an algae bloom at a lake is urged to phone the Jefferson County Public Health Department at 360-3859444. For more information about lake quality in Jefferson County, visit the environmental health website at http://tinyurl.com/6z64ofy. No toxic blue-green algae has been reported in Clallam County, where health officers do not test for toxins. Instead, they visually monitor lakes for signs of algae bloom. Algae blooms in Clallam County lakes should be reported to the Clallam County Department of Health and Human Services’ environmental health division at 360-417-2258.

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Community celebration set in PT to welcome MV Salish By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

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Haugen said the Salish’s presence could double the amount of tourists. “It will mean a lot to people on both sides of the route and make it more convenient,” she said. “People know that if they miss one boat that another will be along shortly,” she said. Currently, sailings are 90 minutes apart. With two boats, that time will be cut in half. Haugen expects to attend the community ceremony. Also scheduled to appear

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

The MV Salish, shown here docked in Port Townsend this week, will host the community in a welcoming ceremony June 30.

Port Townsend-Coupeville ferry service update slated Monday THE PUBLIC IS invited to hear an update on the Port TownsendCoupeville ferry service from the state ferries system chief, David Moseley, on Monday. The meeting is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. in county commissioners’ chambers at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The meeting with the Port Townsend Ferry Advisory Committee and the Jefferson County commissionare House Transportation Chairwoman Judy Clibborn, D-Mercer Island; state Department of Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond; and David Moseley, assistant Transportation secretary, who is in charge of the state ferries system. The Port Gamble S’Klallam, Jamestown S’Klallam and the Lower Elwha Klallam tribes will present a welcoming ceremony with speeches, singing, dancing and drumming. “We are excited that the tribes will be part of the celebration so we can honor their heritage,” said Christina Pivarnik, Port Townsend marketing director.

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tion in November. The Salish and the Chetzemoka will operate in tandem, and both will dock in Port Townsend at the end of each day, said Marta Coursey, state ferries system spokeswoman. Both ferries will operate on the route until Sept. 25, at which time one of the boats will be used to cover routes throughout the system as boats are taken in for servicing, the state ferries system said. Two-boat service on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route will resume in the spring. For more information about the state’s new ferries, visit http://tinyurl. com/27fxjkd.

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PORT TOWNSEND — A community party Thursday, June 30, will celebrate the return of two-boat service on the Port-TownsendCoupeville route sometime in July. The public celebration, planned at 11 a.m. in slip No. 2 at the Port Townsend terminal, will welcome the newly constructed, 64-vehicle MV Salish, which Washington State Ferries hopes to have in service in time for the Fourth of July weekend. A vessel open house is planned from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Salish is the sister ferry to the MV Chetzemoka, which began serving the route in November. “I’m really excited about this,” said Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Camano Island, the chairwoman of the Senate Transportation Committee, who fought to keep the Salish on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route when the state ferries system suggested it could be moved to another route to cut costs. “I promised my constituents that we would get them the boat, although it was a little harder than we expected,” Haugen said. When the Salish begins service on the Port Townsend-Coupeville run, ________ it will be the first time the Managing Editor/News Leah route has been serviced by Leach can be reached at 360-417- two boats since the long3531 or leah.leach@peninsula running Steel Electrics dailynews.com. were taken out of service in 2007.

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A5

Coast Guard to host open house Saturday Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Coast Guard is hosting a party Saturday at its station on Ediz Hook. The free open house, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Coast Guard base in Port Angeles, will mark the centennial of naval aviation and also feature a Safe Boating Expo. In tribute to 100 years of

naval aviation, Coast Guard Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles will host a fly-in for government and commercial aircraft from around the Northwest. A variety of aircraft will be on display. A search-and-rescue demonstration will be conducted by the crew of an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter at 1 p.m. Visitors will be able to tour

the Coast Guard hangar and Coast Guard response boats. The Safe Boating Expo will showcase safety techniques and tools.

Free examinations Boaters can schedule free vessel-safety examinations and inspections of their fire extinguishers and emergency position-indicating radio beacons,

known as EPIRBs. Members representing the CG program “Paddle Smart” will be available to register kayaks. Small Boat Station Port Angeles will demonstrate how to operate a dewatering pump. Such pumps are deployed by the Coast Guard to vessels in distress. Boating vendors will demonstrate safety products

and first aid. Food vendors interested in participating can contact Chief Warrant Officer James O’Brien at 360-417-5870, ext 2. Boating safety or other vendors can phone Lt. Mark Haines at 360-417-5817. For general inquiries, phone 360-417-5840. See a special report on the celebration in today’s Peninsula Daily News.

Daughter’s essay wins dad free flight By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A Sequim dad, described as “all-around amazing” by his 10-year-old daughter, will fly for free on a B-17 after three World War II-era war birds arrive in Port Angeles on Monday. Claire Henninger, the middle child of seven, won an essay contest for a father-child flight aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress that was sponsored by Wings of Freedom stop coordinator Alan Barnard and Ruddell Auto Mall owner Howie Ruddell.

Complementary flight Claire and her dad, Ray, a physical therapist, will be among the sponsors and guests treated to a complementary noon flight on the iconic aircraft. “She described all of the things that all of us fathers would want to be,” said Ruddell, who gave up his seat as a sponsor of the Port Angeles stopover to give a dad a chance to read a heartfelt letter from his child and get a 30-minute ride on the vintage plane. The B-17, along with a B-24 Liberator and a P-51 Mustang, will land at William R. Fairchild International Airport on Monday for a three-day stopover of the Collings Foundation’s Wings of Freedom tour.

“She described all of the things that all of us fathers would want to be.”

Howie Ruddell Auto Mall owner

told her about the contest. “She saw it in the paper [the Peninsula Daily News]. It would be a great Father’s Day gift,” Claire said. In her essay, Claire — who is home-schooled along with siblings Ean, 19; Erin, 16; Kate, 13; Aidan, 8; Jack, 5; and Joseph, 3 — listed several examples of her father’s virtues before concluding: “I love my dad because he is brave, admirable, humble, self-giving, calm, strong, honorable, protective, kind, generous and allaround amazing.

because he is the best,” she wrote. The Henningers, who have lived in Sequim since 1996, also have recently renewed their foster parents’ license. Claire’s essay, one of about 50 entered into the contest announced about one week ago, was chosen Friday by a panel that included Ruddell, Barnard — who also gave up his seat on the complementary flight for the contest — and about five people who work at Ruddell Auto Mall in Told Saturday Port Angeles. The contest was RudClaire’s mom, Ann dell’s idea, Barnard said. Marie, said her daughter and husband were told Missed his dad about the contest results Ruddell said that as Saturday, the day before Father’s Day approached, Father’s Day. “Claire was disbelieving, he was especially missing and her eyes got very big,” his dad, “who gave me more said Ann Marie, who in 29 years than most get in described herself as a a lifetime” before dying 9½ “nurse by training and years ago at the age of 55. He had ridden on the homemaker by vocation.” “Ray was the same, and vintage aircraft before, and he said, ‘I think I‘m going to so he asked himself what his dad would do. cry,’” she said. “He’d say share it with Said Ray: “She was earsomeone else,” Ruddell said. to-ear smiles. “Why not encourage kids “I got a big hug, and I to tell their dads how much was ear-to-ear smiles.” Claire said her mother they love them?”

Wings of Freedom tour till Thursday Peninsula Daily News

“There’s no sweeter words that a father can hear from his son or daughter than ‘I love my dad,’” Ruddell said. “There’s not more magical music or words than that.” He said he thought, “If you only get five letters, then that’s five more dads that would be told that.” His own children surprised him with hand-written notes. “I came to work, and I could see that someone had rustled through my bag,” Ruddell said. “I found four little letters that the kids had stuffed

Claire Henninger, 10, won an essay contest for a father-child flight aboard a B-17 Flying Fortress that was sponsored by Wings of Freedom stop coordinator Alan Barnard and Ruddell Auto Mall owner Howie Ruddell. into my bag,” each with a picture and a few words. Ruddell said he appreciated the sentiment in each of the 50 essays. “Every letter was precious and beautiful,” he said. “There were no bad let-

ters. When you’re a 6-yearold, a 7-year-old — or a 22-year-old or 40-year-old — it’s from the heart.” All of the letters are on display at Ruddell’s dealership at 110 Golf Course Road in Port Angeles. He plans to exhibit them

Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can be reached at 360-4173531 or leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com. Reporter Arwyn Rice also contributed to this story.

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People can tour the inside of the planes at the airport’s east general aviation ramp. The cost for a tour is $12 for adults or $6 for kids younger than 12. World War II veterans can tour the planes for free. No reservations are needed. Hours are from noon to 5 p.m. Monday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. For the ultimate experi-

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ence, people can reserve half-hour flights aboard the B-17 or B-24 for $425 per person. Flights aboard the P-51 are being offered for $2,200 for a half-hour or $3,200 for an hour. “Stick time” will be offered in the dual-control Mustang. Flights fees are taxdeductible. Phone 800-568-8924 for reservations. For more information about Wings of Freedom, visit www.collings foundation.org.

Ruddell said he wrote his dad a letter when he was 12. “After he died, I found the letter . . . It was in his box where he kept special things. “You could tell it had been opened and closed many times,” Ruddell said. “It was very special for me to write it. It was 10 times more important to him.” “He kept it for 16 years or so and looked at it” often. Ruddell, 38, is now the father of four children, one daughter and three sons.

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PORT ANGELES — Those who want to see vintage World War II-era planes or ride in one of them will have an extra day and a half to do so. The Collings Foundation’s Wings of Freedom stopover in Port Angeles, originally planned to end Wednesday, has been extended through Thursday, said area stop coordinator Alan Barnard. The restored vintage aircraft — a B-17 Flying Fortress, a B-24 Liberator and a P-51 Mustang — will land at William R. Fairchild International Airport on Monday for a 31⁄2-day stopover on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Arwyn Rice/Peninsula Daily News

Playing gin rummy at their Sequim home Saturday are, from left, Claire Henninger and her ‘Deserves the best’ parents, Ray and Ann Marie Henninger. Claire, 10, won an essay contest that will give her and her “He deserves the best dad a ride on a B-17 on Monday.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, June 19, 2011 — (C)

2 seats lack Graduation candidates in Clallam Positions stricken from ballot; incumbents to stay in office Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Two Clallam County seats still lack candidates for the Nov. 8 general election. A three-day extended filing period ended Friday. The extension was for positions that drew no candidates during the regular candidate filing period earlier this month. The following seats lack any candidates: ■  Black Diamond Water District, Commissioner District No. 1, incumbent Daniel D. Kauffman. Valley ■  Quillayute Park and Recreation District, Commissioner No. 3, incumbent Jim Smith. Since no one filed for those seats, the positions will be stricken from the general election ballot, the incumbents will stay in office, and the position will come up for election in 2013. If the incumbent resigns, the commission or board on which he or she sat will appoint a member, and the position will be up for election in 2013. Two candidates filed Friday. ■  Incumbent Richard Chesmore filed for Quillayute Prairie Fire District

P

rimary election ballots will be mailed Wednesday, July 27.

No. 6, Commissioner Position No. 1. ■  Laura Huling filed for the Quillayute Valley Park and Recreation District, Commissioner No. 2 now held by Ron Anderson. On Wednesday, the first day of the extended filing period, Juanita Weissenfels filed for the vacant Forks City Council Position No. 1 seat, while Gordon Gibbs filed for the Quillayute Valley Park and Recreation Commissioner No. 5 position. No candidates filed Thursday. If three or more candidates file for a position, they all advance to the Aug. 16 primary, and the top two vote-getters will head to the Nov. 8 general election. Primary election ballots will be mailed Wednesday, July 27. There are 50 positions up for election Nov. 8. More information for voters and potential candidates is at http://tinyurl. com/250mebk.

Peninsula Daily News

celebrations

Sequim High School graduate Dalton Ackley plays around with a friend’s trumpet prior to Friday night’s commencement ceremonies at the school. About 200 graduates received their diplomas as part of the Class of 2011.

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Ian Ward, left, and Blake Yacklin ham it up for photographs before receiving their diplomas from Port Angeles High School on Friday evening. A total of 237 seniors received their diplomas as the Class of 2011, with about 220 students taking part in commencement.

Clallam to mull agreement with Forest Service Peninsula Daily News

The three Clallam County commissioners will consider an agreement with Olympic National Forest for the design, operation and maintenance of Olympic Discovery Trail segments on national forest lands Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Also on the agenda: ■  A local government certification for housing opportunities for people living with AIDS. ■  A Clallam County Districting Commission wrap-up. ■  An agreement with the state Department of Social and Health Services, Department of Behavioral Health and Recovery. ■  An amendment with

the state Department of Corrections updating the fee for offender transport services. ■  An agreement with the State Patrol for the Marijuana Eradication 2011 program. ■  A contract amendment with Built Green of Clallam County increasing funding. ■  An agreement with the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe and the state Department of Fish & Wildlife for restoration work on the lower Dungeness River. ■  Agreements with the University of Washington for habitat work on the Water Resource Inventory Area 20 project and a mapping project. ■  An agreement with King County for services related to enhancement and standardization of benthic macroinvertebrates monitoring and analysis

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tools for the Puget Sound region. ■  A bid opening for Clallam County Courthouse and jail HVAC upgrades. ■  A resolution calling for a July 12 hearing on the proposed sale of surplus property. ■  A resolution accepting the final districting plan from the Clallam County Districting Commission. ■  A call for a July 12 hearing on proposed amendments to the SixYear Transportation Improvement Program. The commissioners will meet in a work session Monday at 9 a.m. to discuss the action items. County work sessions are held in the same boardroom on the main floor of the courthouse.

Council will consider approving the last change order for The Gateway transit center at its Tuesday meeting. The meeting will be at 6 p.m. in the council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. Preceding the regular meeting will be a special meeting at 5:30 p.m. to conduct interviews to fill a vacancy on the city Planning Commission. During the regular meeting, the council will consider appointing a new member to the commission. The council also will consider approval of a settlement agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration for the residential exchange program. It will consider approval of a parks and recreation master plan and the 20112017 capital facilities plan. PA City Council Also on the agenda: ■  Vacating a portion of The Port Angeles City

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The new junior student Sequim School Board representative will be introduced to the board Monday. The School Board will meet at 7 p.m. in the school district’s conference room at Sequim High School, 503 N. Sequim Ave. Also on the School Board’s agenda is approval of a district student performance plan and setting a date for a board workshop. The board also will consider a resolution concerning regulatory relief for America’s schools and make possible changes of meeting dates beginning in September.

Clallam Transit The Clallam Transit board will consider acceptance and payment of change order with Primo Construction for The Gateway transit center Monday. The meeting will start at 1 p.m. at the Clallam Transit System building at 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles.

Public utility district Clallam County Public Utility District commissioners will consider approving a request for an easement to be granted to the Agnew Irrigation District on Monday. The meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. at the PUD’s Port Angeles office, 2431 E. U.S. Highway 101. Commissioners also will hear options for meeting the district’s Tier 2 resource requirements for 2015-2019 under a Bonneville Power Administration power purchase agreement.

The Clallam County Districting Commission is expected to approve the final districting plan at a special meeting Monday. The meeting will be at 7 p.m. in the conference room of the commissioner’s office in the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The after-hours entrance is located off Fourth Street. The meeting is being convened to consider approving the final districting plan, minutes of previous meetings and to accept

The Clallam County Board of Health will hear a briefing on nitrate loading the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area aquifer and considerations for health board policy Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Also on the agenda is a health director’s report on standards for public health and 2011-2013 state budget impacts.

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A7

Rosales: ‘It’s not fair’

Lawmaker not sure if he’ll back E-Verify bill The Associated Press

YAKIMA — Republican Rep. Doc Hastings said he’s not sure yet if he’ll back the new E-Verify bill being considered in Congress, citing concerns over its impact to the agricultural industry. The Yakima HeraldRepublic reported that Hastings said Friday the new bill has to have special consideration for the agricultural industry. E-Verify is a federal program that allows employers to electronically check

agency investigations. Settlements through mediation are more common, Hurtado said. The EEOC’s goal is to make complainants “whole” through monetary compensation, job adjustments or other remedies acceptable to both parties, Hurtado added. Venneberg said it was too early in the case to say Richardson wants monetary compensation. “She would like her old job back, sure,” he said. Richardson is being paid the same in her new job as when she was working at the front desk, but she has significantly less responsibility, Venneberg said.

Unfairly accused Rosales said it was not unusual for him to be unfairly accused by some in the community. He said he has been accused of having “an agenda” by being involved with the Boys & Girls Clubs in order to run for the Sequim School Board. He is running in the fall election against incumbent Walter Johnson. Noting that School Board members don’t take pay for the their work, “it will just be more [unpaid volunteer] work for me,” Rosales said. When he took over as interim Sequim Food Bank director following the resignation of Nina Fatherson in late 2009, “baseless accusations” were leveled at him then, too, he said. In an Oct. 31, 2009, letter posted on the food bank’s door, Fatherson said Rosales “has made mine and my volunteers’ jobs almost impossible and certainly unbearable. “To that end, 12 of my longtime volunteers have resigned, and now, [my husband] Bill and I feel we must, too.” She also told the PDN on Nov. 1, 2009, that Rosales had “sought to take over the food bank” and was “disrespectful to employees.” The food bank today is “better than it’s ever been,” Rosales said last week. “I was accused that I was going to close it down,” he said. “I’m tired of people accusing me of things.”

_______

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Members of the Kenmore & District Pipe Band of Snohomish County lead a procession of faculty and students across campus to the Peninsula College gymnasium for commencement Saturday.

College Spanish, English Continued from A1 Estrada, the valedictorian for Forks High School’s 2009 class, presented his high school speech in both English and Spanish. Sandoval recognized Estrada during her address. “The circumstances under which we were born don’t have to define us,” she said, before noting his accomplishments. Neither of his parents speaks English, said Estrada, but that didn’t stop them from setting goals and dreaming of a better future in

Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

E

strada, the valedictorian for Forks High School’s 2009 class, presented his high school speech in both English and Spanish. Neither of his parents speaks English, said Estrada, but that didn’t stop them from setting goals and dreaming of a better future in another country. another country. “Today, I stand here a little closer to achieving my goals,” he said before urging his fellow graduates to achieve their own. “We are the new leaders. We are the new generation,”

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Continued from A1 a week.” Venneberg would not The community activist identify other employees was named Citizen of the referred to in the complaint, Year for 2007 by the would not say if he had Sequim-Dungeness Valley been contacted by women Chamber of Commerce and referred to in the complaint was one of seven individu- and would not make Richals who received the 2011 ardson available for an Clallam County Commu- interview by the PDN. nity Service Award, which is sponsored by Peninsula Complaint against club Daily News and SoroptiThe complaint takes the mist International of Port Sequim unit of the Boys & Angeles (noon club). Girls Clubs to task for failAt the ing to address the alleged April 28 serharassment. vice award Richardson “told ceremonies, [Rosales] she did not appre2010 award ciate his comments,” Venrecipient neberg said. Joe Borden “She made it clear to him l a u d e d the comments and conduct Rosales and Rosales were unwelcome.” noted that He said Richardson also he worked 60 hours a week complained about it to Boys as a Boys & Girls Clubs & Girls Clubs Executive volunteer. Director Mary Budke. A 2010 PDN story called When contacted by the Rosales “the bus-driving, Peninsula Daily News, fundraising, child-herding Budke would not comment volunteer at the Boys & about the complaint and Girls Clubs.” referred the PDN to Sinn. In addition to Sequim, “[After I had complained the club has a facility in to Budke about Rosales] I Port Angeles. Richardson, described by was given the choice of her Gig Harbor-based attor- transferring out of the ney, Terry A. Venneberg, as Sequim facility, or having in her 20s, said in the EEOC my job changed to one with complaint that she had significantly less responsibeen re-hired at the club as bility,” Richardson said in a substitute worker in June her complaint. “Mr. Rosales was not dis2010. ciplined in any manner, and “Beginning in December 2010, I was assigned to was left in his position at work at the Front Desk of the Front Desk. “By failing to take approBGCOP with a volunteer priate remedial action in and BGCOP Board Memresponse to my complaint of ber, Stephen Rosales . . . sexual harassment, thereby “Mr. Rosales made sexsubjecting me to different ual remarks concerning mothers of children who terms and conditions of participated in activities at employment, the Boys & Girls Club[s] of the Olympic the BGCOP, and asked me Peninsula engaged in disto ‘hook him up’ with sevcrimination against me eral of those women. based on sex, in violation of “He screamed and yelled Title VII of the Civil Rights at me on numerous occaAct of 1964, as amended.” sions. “He has subjected other No longer at front desk female employees to this type of harassment, and Richardson is still workhas not engaged in this type ing at the Sequim unit of of conduct with male the Boys & Girls Clubs, but employees.” not at the front desk, VenVenneberg said the neberg said. physical harassment conSinn said Rosales “is sisted of “an incident where performing his duties as a he had pushed her chair director of the board” but and she was in it.” that Rosales no longer works at the front desk. Denies allegations When asked about his absence from the front desk, In interviews with the Rosales said it was volunPDN last week, Rosales tary — “I’m running for repeatedly denied the alle- political office, and I did not gations. want anyone thinking I was He said he had not seen using a nonprofit for runthe complaint but knew of ning for political office.” its existence. An EEOC investigator “I’ve dealt with thou- interviewed Richardson sands of parents, and not a “several weeks ago,” Vennesingle complaint. This is berg said. causing distress to my famHe did not know the staily, my daughters are cry- tus of the investigation or if ing,” he said Thursday, add- other Boys & Girls Clubs ing that they are hearing volunteers and employees about the complaint in had been interviewed. school. It typically takes a year “People are telling peo- for the EEOC to resolve a ple. case, Venneberg said. “It’s destroying me. It’s EEOC spokesman not fair. I am a good human Rudy Hurtado said a being. I am a good human federal charge of discrimibeing. nation under Title VII “I’ve done nothing wrong. of the Civil Rights Act I’m tired. I haven’t slept in sometimes grows out of

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Forks: Crackdown has spurred warning system Continued from A1 land Security — ordered U.S. Customs and Border Border Patrol agents Patrol to beef up its preshave questioned citizens ence on the U.S.-Canada and arrested illegal immi- border, which is almost grants leaving the Forks twice as long as the U.S.Mexico border. court building. Starting in 2007, the fedThey’ve chased migrants working as pickers for the eral government began decorative floral industry in increasing immigration enforcement efforts in nearby forests. The crackdown has Washington state and along spurred immigrants and the northern border. Before that, Monohon their allies to develop a warning system using said, the Border Patrol was phones and text messages rarely seen in Forks. Border Patrol enforceany time a Border Patrol car is spotted, according to ment practices common on interviews with Border the southern border, such Patrol officials, town lead- as highway checkpoints, ers and immigrant advo- were implemented, miffing residents of the North cates. The agency said it is Olympic Peninsula, the simply following its man- area’s congressman and date: enforcing the coun- local authorities. Agents also conducted try’s immigration laws, protecting the border and more Northwest-accented shoreline from terrorists, actions, including checking drug smugglers and other cars on state ferries. As objections mounted, the illegal activity. Forks is just another road checkpoints were cut locale where the nation’s back. immigration laws are being Routine efforts violated, officials said. “We continue to go out Agents still board some there and do the same mis- passenger buses bound for sion as we would right Seattle as part of their roualong the border,” said Bor- tine security efforts. der Patrol agent Chris Dyer The Border Patrol has after a patrol of the town in the authority to conduct March. enforcement actions within “Our style doesn’t really 100 miles of the border. change. I think they just There are about 30 officers don’t understand the full now on the Olympic Peninscope of our duties.” sula, the mayor said. “I understand . . . that After Ressam it’s not right for people comThe northwest border ing unchecked. But it’s not was thrust into the spot- our community’s failure. It’s light when Ahmed Ressam, a failure of the entire counan Algerian national try that we have to try to trained in Osama bin Lad- rectify somewhere, someen’s camps in Afghanistan, how,” Monohon said. “But at the same time, was caught by U.S. Customs Service agents in 1999 as there are still civil-rights he drove off the MV Coho issues. It’s very disturbing ferry in Port Angeles with that we have people just up explosives in the trunk of and disappear. But it’s just Forks, we’re a long ways his rented car. Ressam was convicted away, and nobody pays on multiple counts for his attention.” Straddling U.S. Highway millennium plot to bomb Los Angeles International 101, Forks is small, with about 3,200 residents. Airport. After the Sept. 11, 2001, Some 40 percent of the attacks, President George Quillayute Valley School W. Bush — armed with a District’s students receive new Department of Home- free or reduced lunches, a

The Associated Press

U.S. Border Patrol Agent Chris Dyer stands in a forested area near Forks on March 17 to show a reporter where he once pursued an immigrant accused of stabbing a man to death in a fight. poverty indicator. Forks is an unusual Border Patrol town in that there’s no road or land crossing directly to Canada. Instead, the U.S.-Canada maritime border is about 30 miles to the north in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The 1,441-square-mile Olympic National Park is to the east and west. The area is home to whites, Native Americans, Latinos and indigenous people from Guatemala and Mexico.

Latino community Starting in the mid1990s, the Latin American immigrant community began to grow, Monohon said. Now, about 15 percent of students in the Forks school district are Latin American. For decades, the town was reliant on timber. When the industry collapsed, Forks suffered an

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arrest them for those immigration violations.” That was the scenario on the day Roldan Salinas fled. According to the Sheriff’s Office, Forest Service and Border Patrol, Roldan Salinas and a woman were returning from a day harvesting salal. They were stopped by a Forest Service officer, who then called the Border Patrol. Forest Service spokeswoman Donna Nemeth said the officer suspected Roldan Salinas and the woman were harvesting salal illegally. When a Border Patrol officer arrived, Roldan Salinas ran and was chased.

Request translation

673 arrests During the last fiscal year, the agency recorded 673 arrests in the Blaine sector, which covers Western Washington, parts of Oregon and Alaska. The Border Patrol would not say how many of the arrests involved illegal immigrants with criminal records. The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office has no record of a criminal history for Roldan Salinas. Much of the local criticism of the Border Patrol has come from the arrests of migrant workers picking salal. Dyer said they don’t specifically target salal workers, but when the Forest Service calls for aid, agents respond. “We can do our job by determining what their immigration status is,” Dyer said. “And if they’re in the country illegally, we’ll

“It’s not uncommon to request [Spanish] translation from the nearest available resource. And in this case, it was the Border Patrol,” Nemeth said. Roldan Salinas was last seen jumping into the river. The woman was arrested on an alleged immigration violation and was sent to the Tacoma detention center. She was later released. “We did the best we could to try to come up with the individual,” Border Patrol spokesman Richard Sinks said. “It’s not like we gave up on him and drove off with what we had. It’s unfortunate, and our heartfelt condolences go to his family and friends. “Basically, we feel we did our job.” In a statement, Roldan Salinas’ family said his body would be flown to Mexico this week for burial.

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quiet of the forest. “Sometimes, you just hear things and get scared.” Pablo and his wife pick together to make a living. He uses his machete to mark trees. Inexperienced pickers often lose their way in the dense forests, said Pablo, who was deported after his asylum application was denied. Forest Service officers patrol these woods, too. The penalty for picking salal or other forest-based products outside of designated areas can start at $275. As he drove around Forks, agent Dyer said the Border Patrol tries to focus on illegal immigrants who have criminal records.

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Immigrants — both legal and illegal — make up another economic driver: collecting leaves from the leathery-leaved shrub salal, used in the floral green ornament industry. The floral greens are a $150 million-a-year business in Washington, according to the state Farm Bureau. Dressed in heavy rain gear, dozens of immigrants file into vans and trucks every morning from Forks and head to the forest, driving down isolated forest roads to designated areas during picking season. The U.S. Forest Service hands out permits to the men and women, who then sell what they pick in Olympic National Forest to wholesalers. For hours, they cut branches off the shrubs, cleaning out the bad leaves and collecting the profitable ones. They gather dozens of little bundles that are worth a dollar or so each.

“Sometimes, it’s a little scary being out here,” said Virgilio Pablo, a 23-year-old Guatemalan immigrant, while picking during a damp December day in the

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economic depression. Now, Twilight fans from around the globe make pilgrimages here to see the inspiration behind the books and movies that feature Forks as a dreary backdrop to the feuding teen vampires and the forestdwelling teen werewolves. The tourists bring muchneeded cash.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

A9

Clallam commissioner line shifts OK’d Final plan settled after 3rd hearing By Rob Ollikainen

Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News

112

PORT ANGELES — When the boundaries between the Clallam County commissioner districts shift in 2012, the current county commissioners won’t have to worry about moving. The Clallam County Districting Commission settled on a final districting plan Thursday night after a public hearing at the Clallam County Courthouse in Port Angeles. It was the third hearing held over three days in Forks, Sequim and Port Angeles.

be as bad when they have to do this in 10 years.” Other members of the commission noted that all five proposals were well within the 5 percent threshold and that Proposal C has a clean, north-south boundary. (

Clean boundary

101 

Olympic National Forest

Sequim

101 

101 

New boundaries The new boundaries will run north and south along Valley Creek in the heart of Port Angeles and along Boyce Road in Carlsborg. “Valley Creek looks like a nice, natural break point,” said District No. 2 Commissioner Mike Chapman, whose residence is just east of Valley Creek. Chapman, whose present term ends in December 2012, admitted he was initially concerned about being ousted from his own district as the population of the county shifted to the east in the 2010 Census. “I’m glad it’s not happening,” he said. Commissioner Mike Doherty, whose District No. 3 extends from Port Angeles to the Pacific Ocean, will see the boundary between his district and Chapman’s district move father away from his West Port Angeles residence. Doherty was elected to a fourth four-year term last year. Commissioner Steve Tharinger, who also is a state legislator, announced in April that he will not seek a fourth term on the county commission in this year’s election. His Dungeness neighborhood will remain in District No. 1.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Populations for new Clallam County commissioner districts THE TOTAL POPULATION of Clallam County rose by 6,879 — from 64,525 to 71,404 — between 2000 and 2010. In the new districting plan, which will come into effect in 2012, county commission district populations are: ■  District No. 1 — 24,641, or The two candidates running for his seat in the Nov. 8 general election — Republican Jim McEntire and Democrat Linda Barnfather — both live in Sequim within the newly drawn district.

Precincts move Changes in store for 2012 include: ■  Voter precincts 20 and 25 in West Port Angeles — and voter precinct 17 between the Eighth Street bridges in Port Angeles — will move from District No. 2 into District No. 3. ■  Voter precinct 14 in Port Angeles south of Albertsons and west of Laurel Street will move from Dis-

34.51 percent of the county. ■  District No. 2 — 22,853, or 32.01 percent of the county. ■  District No. 3 — 23,910, or 33.49 percent of the county. The difference between the largest district and the smallest is 2.5 percent. Peninsula Daily News

trict No. 3 into District No. 2. ■  Voter precincts in the Robin Hill and Klahhane areas between Port Angeles and Sequim will move from District No. 1 into District No. 2. The action taken by the districting commission Thursday becomes official Monday. The five-member panel will hold its final meeting at 7 p.m. in the county courthouse.

Proposal C The districting commission voted 4-1, with Commissioner Earl Archer opposed, to select Proposal C, one of five options developed by Districting Masters

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Child rape TACOMA — A 33-yearold Lower Elwha Klallam tribal member was sentenced Friday in federal court to 87 months in prison for sexually abusing a child. Tribal police arrested Louis Hunter Bennett last summer after the victim disclosed the abuse. A statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office said the child was younger than 16. The case was prosecuted in U.S. District Court because the crime occurred on tribal land. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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The Clallam County charter requires a districting commission to reconsider the boundaries every 10 years when new U.S. Census data is released. The most populous district cannot exceed the size of the least populous district by more than 5 percent, according to the charter. The boundaries are supposed to run from north to south. All five proposals that Unger and Corson developed shifted the boundaries

“To show you how crazy the system used to be, I’ve lived in the same house since 1973, and I’ve lived in all three county commissioner districts,” Turner said. “The third district used to sweep around the back side of Port Angeles.” Port of Port Angeles districts mirror county commissioner districts. No other government body is affected by Thursday’s redistricting. Clallam County commissioners are elected countywide in the general election. However, only residents within an individual commissioner’s district can vote for that commissioner in the primary. The districting commission will make a presentation at the next Clallam County commissioners’ meeting Tuesday. Later in the 10 a.m. meeting, county commissioners will consider a resolution accepting the final districting plan.

Archer voted for a Proposal D, which would have kept the same boundary between Districts No. 2 and No. 3 but moved the Macleay precinct from District No. 2 into District No. 1. Archer said the equal population provision of the charter should have been the primary consideration. In Proposal D, District No. 3 is larger than District No. 1 by just 283 people, a difference of four-tenths of 1 percent. In Proposal C, which the other members of the commission voted for, District No. 1 is larger than District No. 2 by 1,788 people, a difference of 2.5 percent. “We should take at least passing note that District 1 is growing much faster than the other districts,” Archer said. “I think D is by far the ________ superior one. It brings us in Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be closer [to equal population]. reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. District 3 is slightly larger ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. so that the change will not com.

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — On the first day of summer, entry into the park will be free. Olympic National Park is marking the official start of summer with a fee-free day, waiving its usual $15-per-car admission Tuesday. Most park roads and campgrounds remain open, with the exception being the Elwha Valley. Olympic Hot Springs Road within the park has been closed since May 31 while road repairs are made at Fisherman’s Corner about one mile south of the park boundary. Altair and Elwha campgrounds also are closed because of the roadwork, which is expected to last through the end of this month. Only entrance fees will be waived. Fees will be collected for camping, reservations,

tours and use of concessions. Park entrance stations will have Interagency Senior and Annual Passes available for those who wish to purchase them. While visitors who arrive Tuesday will be allowed to enter the park free of charge, those who plan to spend time in the park beyond that day will be expected to pay the entrance fee for the remainder of their stay. Additional fee-free days this year will be National Public Lands Day on Sept. 24 and Veterans Day weekend Nov. 11–13.

Gene Unger and Don Corson. Unger and Corson used a scoring system to analyze their proposals based on equal population, northsouth boundaries, geographical compactness and whole voting precincts. Unger and Corson analyzed all 99 voter precincts to make their proposals.

to the east to account for growth during the past decade in the Sequim area. District No. 1, the eastern third of the county, runs from McDonald Creek near Agnew to the Jefferson County line. Its population swelled from 21,225 in 2000 to 26,444 in 2010 — making it 6.13 percent larger than the smallest district on the West End, No. 3.

“It just seems to me that Valley Creek is a very logical boundary,” said Districting Commissioner and Forks Mayor Bryon Monohon. Districting Commission Chairman John Marrs said the Macleay precinct north of Carlsborg is “by all traditions a Sequim precinct.” “I think it should stay there, absent any compelling reason to move it,” Marrs said. Districting Commissioner Paul Martin moved to accept Proposal C. Eric Foth seconded. The only public testimony taken in the three public hearings was from Norma Turner of Port Angeles, who spoke Thursday. Turner was on the charter review commission when it drafted the rules for redistricting.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, June 19, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A10

Now I know what prison is like WHEN I SHOW up at the airport two hours before my flight, I am unaware that my arrival will be the only on-time part of the trip. Security has changed from the days when W. Bruce they would ask Cameron you at the counter if anyone you “didn’t know” asked you to “carry something” on the flight and “light the fuse.” Now, they instruct you to take off your belt to see if your pants fall off in a suspicious fashion, remove your shoes so your socks can be inspected for terrorist slogans and take off your “outer garments” because one of the perks of working in security is to see people in their “inner garments.” Attractive travelers are selected out for a pat-down, so I breeze right through the line and am soon at the gate, where I’m

informed that my flight will depart on time at 6:30 p.m. At 6:30, I notice that I am not on my way to St. Louis. “Is the flight delayed?” I ask the gate agent. “They’re not telling us anything,” she says. “OK, but it’s supposed to be leaving now, so it’s not on time,” I point out. “Can I help who’s next?” she replies. A few minutes later, the status on the electronic board changes from “On Time” to “Delayed,” and the departure time is now shown to be 8:30. “If it’s mechanical, they have to give us a voucher,” a man says to me out of the side of his mouth. He acts surreptitiously, as if he’s telling me to back Misty Eyes to place in the fourth. “If it’s weather, they don’t have to do nuthin’.” “Is it weather,” I ask the gate agent, “or mechanical?” “They aren’t telling us anything,” she advises me informatively.

Speaking Out

“You know, this used to be the nation’s premier airline,” I say. “Thank you!” she gushes. The TV monitor has a weather program playing. “The skies are clear over the United States,” the weatherman intones. “So, Bruce, if you’re flying to St. Louis, it’s gotta be mechanical. Meanwhile, in sports, Misty Eyes takes second in the fourth.” At 11 p.m., all the stores close, though you can still look at the novels and magazines through the bars — I wonder if this is what it is like to shop at a bookstore in prison. The seats in the airport were shipped there from Guantanamo because they were considered inhumane — you can only lie down on them if you are able to separate your body into segments. Apparently, the people who purchased them didn’t realize that flights are sometimes delayed — maybe the airlines didn’t tell them anything, either. The airline people hand out

pretzels and bottled H2O. They seem to feel they can keep the whole prison theme going with a little bread and water. At midnight, they announce the good news that we’ve been assigned a new airplane. “So it was mechanical,” I say shrewdly. “They’re not telling us anything,” the gate agent replies. I sit and watch a woman practice a presentation she’s giving at 10 a.m. She’s terrified that lack of sleep will cause her to mess up, so she does it over and over again. After the fifth recitation, I’m completely sold: I will never buy any other brand of neurointerventional devices, I’ll tell you that much. The only problem with the new plane is that it is in Dayton and apparently refuses to leave. “How long do you think it will be before we board?” I ask the guy who gave me the voucher tip. He shrugs.

“How fast can you drive to Dayton?” At 1 a.m., the gate agent advises us that our new plane is in the air, on its way to pick us up. We celebrate, hugging and kissing each other as if we’ve just won the World Series. We grow slightly less enthusiastic when we’re told that the people flying the new plane decided to turn around and go back. “To Dayton? Why?” I demand. The tipster guy shrugs. “It’s really nice this time of year.” At 3 a.m., we’re on an even newer different plane, nine hours late to St. Louis. I don’t blame the gate agents, though — nobody would tell them anything.

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/3p56epk.

When you think of your father, what comes to mind?

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Charlotte Lundgren

Mark Livingston

Claudia Waddington

David McComas

Felicia Wilcox

Monty Burt

Sandy Larson

Fifth-grader Port Angeles

Retired homemaker Port Townsend

Marketing director Port Townsend

Business owner Sequim

Home-care aide Port Angeles

Retired teacher Forks

Cancer volunteer Port Angeles

“He’s a good helper with my problems, like in school. He always asks me if I am staying out of trouble. I like it when we go camping and fishing.”

“I raised six boys, and I owe it to the values my father passed on to me. He was a hard worker, a churchgoer, and he taught me how to be a parent.”

“My father taught me baseball and driving. It was hard on both of us, and a lot of yelling was involved, but I’m a good driver and a better ballplayer.”

Retired medical secretary Sequim

“Years ago, I remember picking Dad up at work, and he’d always have a little treat for us, like a bubble-gum ring. We kids felt special. I learned my fix-it mentality from him.”

“Strong provider and family man. A caring, hard worker. He started right here in PA building yachts. Now, he’s over in China doing that. He’s home for graduation and Father’s Day.”

“He taught me the love of sports. I remember he said, ‘Always begin the day with a smile, and end it with a smile, too.’ He gave me a positive outlook on life.”

“I think of honesty and integrity. He gave me a strong Christian foundation for life. He said many times, ‘Let the circle be unbroken,’ which is a song about heaven.”

“He loved auto racing of any kind. He was a fairly quiet person, though. He used to go to the track once a week. Years ago, he was a crew member. He passed away in ’93.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices An explanation As a follow-up to information I gave for an editor’s note for a June 3-4 letter to the editor, “Expecting more,” about why 24th District state legislators Kevin Van De Wege and Steve Tharinger did not attend the May 23 FourC meeting, an email was sent from Rep. Van De Wege’s office before the meeting that stated that it was 100 percent certain that they would not be available to attend the meeting, at which they were the featured speakers. I had said for the editor’s note I was told there was a 30 percent chance they would attend. The error concerning their attendance is regretted. Pete Church-Smith, Sequim Church-Smith is an organizer of FourC.

‘Don’t feel safer’ My condolences to the family of Mr. Benjamin Roldan Salinas [“Body Of Missing Forks Man Found,” June 6 PDN].

Ben did something unwise by jumping in the Sol Duc River. He probably didn’t understand how cold it was and the rules of hypothermia. Unfortunately, it cost him his life. I don’t think he was a terrorist, felon or even a wanted criminal beyond the fact he may have been here illegally. I’m not sure how he supported himself, but it probably was not by taking a job away from another. My experience with migrants (and probably some illegals) is that they are hardworking, family-oriented and kind and generous people. They frequently do jobs that are physically tedious, dangerous or just plain distasteful. They work for wages that do not encourage unemployed locals to challenge them. I have a hard time with the Border Patrol, Forest Service and law enforcement focusing on people who are not a threat to national security. I don’t feel safer with the very visible presence of the Border Patrol.

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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n

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Rex Wilson

Suzanne Delaney

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Executive Editor

Michelle Lynn

Advertising Director

Sue Stoneman

Circulation Director

Advertising Operations Manager

Dean Mangiantini

Bonnie M. Meehan

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Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

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Business/Finance Director

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Dave Weikel

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Our readers’ letters, faxes

by

Dave Logan

and

Steve Mullensky

and email

Hopalong Cassidy arrives in the nick of time to uncover the plot, rescue the damsel and save the water for all to share. The Statesman Group’s Garth Mann isn’t that sleazy bank president, yet his aims are much the same. As a corporate developer, he “buys” instead of steals and profitably exploits as he alone sees fit. Garth would have us believe that his Pleasant Harbor Master Planned Resort will bring much health and happiness to the townspeople of Brinnon and will say anything to help him get his way. He, for instance, boasts of a thousand jobs to be created, yet fails to mention that the best jobs won’t last. Once build-out is achieved, low-paying service Brinnon resort plans the same thing? sector gigs would be the rule In the Hopalong Do we need the Border of the day. Patrol burning all the gas it Cassidy film “False Colors,” Then, too, there may be a sleazy bank president sets zero jobs created. takes an SUV to cover the in motion a plan to steal a North Olympic Peninsula? We’ve absolutely no assurance that Statesman Nancy Talbot, ranch and its water rights from a damsel in distress. will be able to move ahead Sequim Under new management, on the project once the the rights to water would required permits have been ‘Faithful servant’ belong to one man alone to granted. Relative to the June 13 profitably distribute as only Turn to Voices/A11 PDN article on the removal he sees fit.

of the Elwha River dams [“Going With The Flowing: Lake Aldwell’s Level Lowered By 18 Feet,” June 13 PDN]: PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA says being a I feel sad at the killing of dad is sometimes his hardest job, but also the most a faithful servant that has rewarding. powered many on the North Just ahead of Father’s Day, the president devoted Olympic Peninsula for his Saturday radio/Internet address to fatherhood. almost 100 years, and now He talked about growing up without a dad, his it is dead. own failings as a father and the values he hopes to Why? teach his daughters Malia, 12, and Sasha, 10. The river still flows, the He described the responsibilities that all fathers wind and sun still lift the have to their children and said his administration is water, but now it flows from trying to help during tough economic times and long the mountains to the sea, deployments for U.S. troops. polishing the stream bedThe president spoke of helping to coach Sasha’s rocks and warming itself basketball team: ever so slightly to “In the end, that’s what being a parent is all dissipate the energy that about — those precious moments with our children could have cooked our that fill us with pride and excitement for their breakfast, charged my elecfuture; the chances we have to set an example or tric bike or turned a saw at offer a piece of advice; the opportunities to just be a local mill. there and show them that we love them.” Vic Patton, Turn to Father’s Day/A11 Sequim

On Father’s Day

The customs agents in Port Angeles caught the terrorist [Ahmed Ressam, on Dec. 14, 1999], not the Border Patrol. The Coast Guard has done a very credible job of intercepting drug-runners and people trying to cross illegally. Do we really need Border Patrol boats to do

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Philip L. Watness, contributing freelance reporter, 360-379-3703; whatnews@olypen.com

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Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Sunday, June 19, 2011

and email

zens of Israel, she won’t achieve it. Kit is not a citizen of the world, but a pawn of Hamas. Continued from A10 Hamas is the mastermind for the flotilla action. OBAMA, WHO WAS raised largely by his The U.S. State Departgrandparents in Hawaii after his father left when ment lists Hamas as a forObama was very young, also talked about what he eign terrorist organization. wishes he’d done differently. Kit is placing herself “I felt his absence. And I wonder what my life with those whose goal is to would have been like had he been a greater preskill the citizens of Israel and ence,” the president said. those who cherish democ“That’s why I’ve tried so hard to be a good dad racy, the USA way of life. for my own children. Food and medical sup“I haven’t always succeeded, of course — in the plies are already available to past, my job has kept me away from home more the people living in Gaza. often than I liked, and the burden of raising two People on the flotilla will young girls would sometimes fall too heavily on do whatever they can to Michelle.” bring media attention to The president said he’s learned that what chiltheir cause with the intendren need most is their parents’ time and a struction of saying Israel does not ture that instills self-discipline and responsibility, have the right to exist. Caregivers noting that even in the White House, Malia and Waters owns RainImagine if this were Sasha do their chores and walk the dog. shadow Home Services, a happening here. We need the help of “Above all, children need our unconditional home health agency in We set up a blockade to voters. love,” the president said, “whether they succeed or Sequim. protect our citizens from We are the quiet, longmake mistakes; when life is easy and when life is those who would harm us (a term care workers who are Complicit on Israel tough.” real threat since previous trying to obey the law. attacks killed hundreds of There is a group out Several recent letters The Associated Press our fellow countrymen). there, the Service Employattack Kit Kittredge for her Imagine if someone from ees International Union, activism in ending the another country decides to that is trying to drive the Israeli siege of Gaza. We are asked in one of hostage-taking, land theft, break through the blockade cost of caregiving out of They cite the threat of the letters [“Israeli economic deprivation and and challenge the right of reach to all of us. rockets from Gaza as justifiblockade,” June 16 PDN] to civil rights violations. our country to defend itself. They are lying to you, the cation for the siege. “deplore Americans who act Unfortunately, America Would you be ready to public. They fail to point out as terrorist propaganda has made itself complicit in say we can’t defend ourThere are two initiatives, that since 2001, those rockagents.” these Israeli atrocities by selves, that we should just I-1167 and I-1163, that will ets have killed about 30 We need to be more congiving unconditional support let our citizens be murmost likely appear on the Israelis, according to the cerned about Americans to Israel. dered? ballot this fall. Israeli Ministry of Foreign who put the interests of Our unconditional supI’d like to think not. They will make it sound Affairs. port for Israel is a large part Israel above those of the There are people working like the current law does not During the same period, United States. diligently to make a true protect our seniors. Israel has killed 6,163 Pales- of the reason terrorists The truth is that unconattack us. peace. That is not Hamas’ This is simply not true. tinian civilians, and Palesditional support for Israel is agenda. It is a large part of the The SEIU is lying to us. tinians have killed 1,043 Let’s make sure our repThey are making it Israeli civilians, according to reason we are at war in Iraq bad for Israel and bad for the U.S. and Afghanistan. resentatives know that sound like the Legislature the Israeli Center for It removes the incentive Not satisfied with all Israel is not alone and that voted to repeal background Human Rights in the Occufor peacemaking. America has done, Israel’s all righteous people of the checks for long-term care pied Territories. Malcolm D. McPhee, world want peace for all of unconditional supporters in workers. So, the issue is really Sequim her children. This also is not true. more about protecting Pales- America now urge an AmerRespect, peace, Shalom. Background checks have tinians than it is about pro- ican war against Iran. Hamas’ ‘pawn’ Linda Cutler, been required for all caregiv- tecting Israelis. Americans fear retaliaPort Angeles ers since the 1980s, and this It is not just about the tion from those Americans In response to the June 9 will not go away. killing of Palestinians. who support Israel uncondi- letter to the editor “Flotilla I-1029 was a bill passed It is also about Israel ter- tionally. to Gaza,” by Kit Kittredge, if Proud of youth in 2008 that required 75 rorizing Palestinians with That retaliation was evi- Kit wants peace-and-justice I was sad to see the ongohours of training for all torture, mass punishment, dent in the defamatory letaction to break the blockade, ing problems with teens in assassination, incarceration, ters against Ms. Kittredge. legitimate caregivers. which is to protect the citidowntown Port Angeles The Legislature voted to postpone this law. Though Jefferson County It would have cost milCommissioner John Austin lions of taxpayer dollars and and a few townies remain millions more of private starry-eyed at Garth’s feet, a money to implement, and much wiser financial comthe current law already munity has rejected his requires initial training and attempts to obtain the funds continuing education for he desperately needs to workers. begin work on the project. Now, the SEIU is trying We can only hope that to reinstate this law. matters remain as they We can stop them. Don’t stand or, alternatively, that be fooled. Vote no on I-1167 plans might be revised to and I-1163. better address the needs of The only thing these bills long-neglected Brinnonites will do is make it and protect the integrity of possible for the SEIU to line their precious, natural its pockets with your tax setting. dollars. Todd Wexman, Sharon Waters, Port Townsend Sequim Continued from A10

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Father’s Day

[“Teens Say Log Removal Won’t Make Them Leave. Hotel-Pier Site On PA Waterfront Hangout For Kids,” June 10-11 PDN]. Just know, they do not represent the majority of our youth. As a member of “Team: Walk Around the Clock,” I had the awesome pleasure of meeting and spending camp-time with some youths to be proud of at the recent American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life event. These groups (teams) represented the high school, junior high, grade schools and churches of our community. They raised money, had drawings and made goodies and items to sell to raise money in the fight against cancer. They are such fabulous kids. I can see the outstanding adults they will one day be. They are our future. Parents, be proud. In fact, all who participated, from the survivors, private individuals and donors to the teams, the relay walkers and the committees to the great entertainment — it all made such a fabulous 24-hour event successful. We had live music, karaoke, contests, fresh crab and many other fundraisers. If you missed it this year, make a date to come join us next year. You will see so many familiar faces. Where else can you get the likes of Jimmy Hoffman Band, Mister Sister and other great musical groups? Our own Dr. Maxwell and his band played some very fine tunes. We are adult-, youthand child-friendly. Our event truly rocks. Sandy Larson, Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week THANK YOU TO the person who returned the stolen oak toy chest to the Sequim Vineyard Church. This chest had great sentimental value to our family. God bless you.

. . . and other Raves CONGRATULATIONS TO THE North Olympic Skills Center (Port Angeles) and its recent awards ceremony. It was a pleasure to see a very dedicated staff and motivated students. The skills center is a great example of preparing students for in-demand jobs. EXTREME RAVES FOR the new bike lanes in downtown Port Angeles. Hope to see more all over town. Also, I really like the new crosswalks. Thank you. HUGE RAVE TO Expeditions NW, Olympic Cellars winery, Necessities & Temptations and Renaissance for a fabulous “Girls Night Out” cruise. Thanks to all who made this cruise possible and all the wonderful ladies on board. WHAT AN AWESOME American Cancer Society Relay

For Life (Port Angeles)! A special thank-you to Mark de Rousie (Realtor’s Association) for cooking up burgers and “dawgs” for the cancer survivors every year. You rock! The local bands provided awesome music. You rock, too! RAVES TO DR. Maxwell and his band mates, String Theory, for starting off Relay For Life on such a high note. Great music for a great cause. I WANT TO rave for Alissa Kilmer of Forks, who found cash in the grocery cart and turned it in. And then the next cart had a wallet. She turned that in. RAVES FOR THE amazing Helen Haller Elementary School Rising Stars Talent Show (Sequim). What a wonderful evening. We can’t wait until next year to see more talented students! RAVE FOR THE Olympic National Park quarter and the ceremony presenters and a thank-you to First Federal for getting the quarters available to customers and free ones to children. A BIG THANKS from a surprised group of 11 to the bighearted gentleman who anonymously bought our breakfast at IHOP (Sequim) on Monday, June 13.

Generosity and kindness are still very much alive in this overburdened economy. A RAVE FOR Dana Shaltry, orthodontist (Port Angeles). They took my son in two different times when they were not even open, and we are not even patients there. And they did not even charge us. I just want to show my appreciation for them. THIS IS A great big thankyou to Mark Harvey and Mr. Larson on Saturday’s radiostation program talking about medical marijuana. Keep it up. It’s looking good. A HUGE RAVE for the maintenance crew that maintains the restrooms at Erickson Park (Port Angeles) in such nice condition. Great job. Keep up the good work. A MEGA-RAVE TO the Port Angeles Food Bank, especially to Josie, Carlos, Mary and your crew of volunteers. Those of us who have received food each month at Highland Commons give you a big thanks for all your hard work. FOUR PAWS UP to the community for its support of the Welfare for Animals Guild garage sale. So many items were donated and then taken by you. We will be able to care for many more dogs thanks to your

generosity!

of Highway 112 (Clallam Bay). We still have a huge pothole on a blind curve. A RAVE FOR Sandy Keys, Options: Drive into oncoming former high school Contemporary lane, hit the guardrail or hit hole Issues teacher and news announcer at KONP for decades. and ruin front suspension. Per DOT, it’s PUD’s responsiHe is well-educated and bility. informed and very well-liked Per PUD, it’s DOT’s. by all. Thanks, Sandy, from a 1980s RANT TO A retirement comstudent. plex that refuses to transport We are very privileged to residents to memorial services, know you. reunions, weddings and similar gatherings that people regularly attend. Rant of the Week What is your problem here? You have no business denying TO THOSE WHO would residents access to these types of drive off a harmless, quiet, sick events that mark a rite of older man who will probably die passage in one’s life! without his car, remember this: “Do unto others . . . ” and “What goes around comes around.” (CLIP AND SAVE)

. . . and other Rants RANT TO SPEEDING drivers who come off Sequim-Dungeness onto Taylor Boulevard and try to use SunLand as a cutoff to their homes east of SunLand. You’re driving well over the 25 mph speed limit and threatening elderly walkers and pet owners. Stop your stupid actions, and observe the 25 mph speed limit, especially on Emerald Drive. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION? Public utility district? Who wants credit for a highway fatality? On March 1, water line rupture prompted excavation of one lane

To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


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Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, June 19, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

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U.S. Open

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Phlailing for Felix Ackley shot all M’s can muster in loss the right-field seats to make it 5-1. His four RBIs were a seaSEATTLE — Shane Victorino finished a single shy of son high. He tripled in the third. Rookie Michael Stutes (1-0) the cycle and drove in four runs, earned his first career victory in and the Philadelphia Phillies beat Felix Hernandez and the his 23rd big league appearance. Seattle Mariners 5-1 Saturday. He went 1 2/3 innings, but left the seventh with two Hernandez (6-6) on and two outs. lasted seven innings, Antonio Bastardo allowing the three came in and struck runs on eight hits. He out Adam Kennedy. walked two and Bastardo had a roustruck out five. tine eighth then Victorino snapped handed it off to Ryan a 1-all tie in the seventh when he hit a Next Game Madson, who pitched the ninth. ground-rule double Today Dustin Ackley, with the bases loaded vs. Phillies who made his big down the left-field league debut for the line off Hernandez, at Safeco Field Mariners Friday, Time: 1:10 p.m. scoring two runs. connected on his Then with two On TV: ROOT first home run in the The Associated Press outs in the ninth, second, a dozen rows Seattle’s Dustin Ackley hits a solo home run in the second after Jimmy Rollins’ third single, Victorino followed into the right-field seats. inning of Saturday’s game against the Philadelphia Phillies with his eighth home run into Turn to Mariners/B4 in Seattle. The shot was his first major league home run

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland reacts to his birdie putt on the 11th hole during the third round of the U.S. Open in Bethesda, Md., on Saturday.

McIlroy roaring at Open By Eddie Pells

The Associated Press

Fight night at 7 Cedars

BETHESDA, Md. — Rory McIlroy kept punishing the golf course and the record book Saturday, setting himself up with an eight-shot lead at the U.S. Open with 18 holes left between him and his first major championship. In a third round that felt more like a regular day on tour than the toughest test in golf, McIlroy shot 3-underpar 68 to finish at 14-under 199, breaking Jim Furyk’s record for the best 54-hole score by one stroke. McIlroy leads Y.E. Yang (70) by eight and Lee Westwood (65), Jason Day (65) and Robert Garrigus (68) by nine. The 22-year-old from Northern Ireland will sleep on the lead heading into the final day of a major for the second straight time. But this lead is double the size of the one he held at the Masters two months ago, when he blew up on the back nine, shot 80 and finished 15th. “Overall, I’m very happy with the way I played today,” McIlroy said. “Now, I just have to do that for 18 more holes.” Knowing their chances were slim to catch the leader, the rest of the field took its frustration out on Congressional, a softy of a course thanks to forgiving rough and rain-soaked greens. There were 26 rounds under par, a record for the third round of the U.S. Open, and the 72 players carded a total of 224 birdies. Could’ve been a scary scene for McIlroy, who saw the mid-60s on the board before he ever reached the first tee box, but he didn’t waver. He played scrambling golf over the first few holes, while he was having trouble finding the fairway, then made birdies on No. 5, 9, 11 and 14 to get to 14-under, a number never seen before on a U.S. Open scoreboard.

Turn

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Sounders win north of border The Associated Press

Record-breaking performance Of course, that’s old news by now. On Friday, McIlroy reached 13 under for the first time in U.S. Open history and took a record-tying sixstroke cushion into the weekend. His eight-shot advantage is two short of the lead Tiger Woods took to Sunday at Pebble Beach in 2000, when he routed the field by 15 shots. Though McIlroy and his performance during a near-perfect week of golf are drawing comparisons to Woods, he wants no part of it. “I’m still looking for my first one,” McIlroy said. “That’s all I can say. I’m looking for my first one. “I put myself in good position to do it [today] and we’ll see what happens.” The way he’s playing, and with a cushion as soft as the golf course he’s overrunning, it would take something of epic proportions to prevent it. The biggest final-day lead ever surrendered at a major was six strokes, when Greg Norman lost to Nick Faldo at the 1996 Masters. “When you go in 12 behind somebody, you can play as well as you’d like to play but it’s still going to be a matter of the leader coming back to you,” Westwood said. “No use thinking about what Rory’s doing. But I’ve played with big leads in the past. It’s not easy. We’ll see what happens.” Yang will be paired with McIlroy for the second straight day. He came into the third round six shots behind and had the best chance to apply pressure.

MLS Soccer

Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Jeremy Holden, left, grapples with Matt Spry of Sequim during their 145-pound Mixed Martial Arts match Saturday night at 7 Cedars Casino in Blyn. Holden won by technical knockout in the second round. The fight was one of 13 matches held during a special MMA event put together by Sequim’s Bristol Marunde. Look for complete results in future PDN editions.

TORONTO — Fredy Montero sent home a free kick late in the second half and the Seattle Sounders defeated Toronto FC 1-0 on Saturday. The SeatALSO . . tle striker beat Toronto ■ Soccer goalkeeper finding Stefan Frei in foothold in the 90th minNorthwest ute into the region /B3 top right corner after Reds defender Doniel Henry committed a foul just outside the penalty area. “It’s incredible we lost the game. We deserved to win. We played very well and in the end we have given it away,” Toronto coach Aron Winter said. “At that moment it’s not clever for us to foul in front of the box.” With Toronto up a man and pressing, Henry fouled Seattle’s Mauro Rosales on a Sounders counterattack to set up Montero’s winner. “Very frustrating. I feel like we got robbed of a pretty decent performance,” Frei said. “I don’t like the way we gave away that foul. I don’t even know if it was a foul. It’s the 90th minute, the guy goes down extremely soft. Down a man they’re looking for that.” Toronto (2-6-9) couldn’t take advantage of Jhon Kennedy Hurtado’s second yellow card and is winless in eight matches (0-3-5). The Reds haven’t won in MLS play since a 2-1 defeat of Houston on May 7. Turn

to

Sounders/B3

Eagles blitzed Semipro team dropped by Bellingham Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Eagles picked the wrong time to break in a pair of new quarterbacks. The Eagles offense fell flat against the Western Washington Football Alliance’s top team, the Bellingham Blitz, in a 52-0 loss at Roosevelt Elementary School on Saturday. With new additions Ray Simpson and Michael Henderson splitting time under center, Olympic managed just four first downs in the first half as the Blitz rolled to a 36-0 lead and never looked back.

“I knew today was going to be difficult because of [the two QBs] getting throw into the fire,” Eagles coach Mike McMahan said. “Considering what they got thrown into I was extremely proud of both of them. “The team is very excited as far as the potential they see in these guys.” The loss was the Eagles’ fourth in a row after opening the season with a 30-0 win over the Cascade Xtreme in early May. With the team missing its starting quarterback from that game, Steve Monger, McMahan had to call on Simpson and Henderson to face a squad riding a four-game win streak. The Eagles (1-4 overall) turned the ball over three times in the first half — two on botched handoffs — with two of them leading to Blitz (5-1) touchdowns.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Olympic Eagles’ Rick Tierney, left, looks for a way around a Bellingham defender after receiving a block from teammate Michael Henderson in the first quarter Turn to Eagles/B4 on Saturday at Roosevelt School in Port Angeles.


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Sunday, June 19, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling 2011 SPRING CLASSIC No. 2 Men’s high game: Jeff Edwards, 254; men’s high series: Jeff Edwards, 686. Women’s high game: Linda Chansky, 193; women’s high series: Linda Chansky, 597. Leading team: JACE.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB June 16 Men’s Club Throw Out Three Worst Holes Individual Event Gross: Mike DuPuis, 55; Paul Reed, 57; Rick Hoover, 58. Net: Bart Irwin, 41; Dale Doran, 46; Bob Reidel, 47; Brian Doig, 47; Brian Duncan, 48; Dave Boerigter, 48; Stand Feldman, 48. Team Event Gross: Mike DuPuis and Rob Botero, 66; Mike DuPuis and Kevin Russell, 67; Mike DuPuis and Greg Senf, 68; Rob Botero and Kevin Russell, 68. Net: Bill Lindberg and Kevin Borde, 58’; Lawrence Bingham and Frank Randall, 58; Stan Feldman and Frank Randall, 59; Steve Callis and Bart Irwin, 59; Dale Doran and Jack Munro, 60; Brian Doig and Harry Thompson, 60. June 12 Two Man Scramble Low Gross: Greg Thomas and Larry Aillaud, 64; Bob Brodhun and Rick Parkhurst, 66. Low Net: Don Dundon and Tom Hainstock, 57.3; Scott Spencer and Troy Atwell, 59.2; Leroy Chase and Brian Doig, 59.8; Dave Boerigter and Gene Middleton, 61.3; Jim Cole and Larry Bourm, 61.5. June 11 Men’s Club Better Nine Individual Event Gross: Dennis Swope, 36; Gerald Petersen, 37; Kerry Perkins, 37. Net: Rudy Arruda, 30; Dave Peterson, 31; Stan Feldman, 31. Team Event Gross: Rick Parkhurst and Kerry Perkins, 70; Gerald Petersen and Greg Thomas, 72; Gerald Petersen and Jeff Colvin, 72; Gerald Petersen and Larry Aillaud, 72; Kevin Russel and Greg Senf, 72. Team Event Net: Dave Peterson and Stan Feldman, 58; Ray Dooley and Gary Murphy, 60; Rudy Arruda and Andy Duran, 61; Dave Peterson and Lawrence Bingham, 61; Rudy Arruda and Jack Morley, 62. Ladies Net: Sherry Henderson, 33.5; Denise Clarke, 34; Duffey DeFrang, 34.5; Rena Peabody, 34.5. SUNLAND GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB June 16 SWGA Better Nine Flight 1 (0-31) 1. Alice Myers, 30.5; 2. Marine Hirschfeld, 32; 3. Dana Burback, 32.5. Flight 2 (32 plus) 1. Eileen Larsen, 31; 2. Willadee Tallman, 35.5; 3. Effie Bentley, 36. June 16 Lady Niners Flag Day 1. Jancie Orth; 2. Patricia Palmeri; 3. Gwyen Boger. June 15 Sunland Men’s U.S. Open Mixer 1. John Sims, Wes Stoecker, John Palmeri and Jim Elvert, 54; 2. Dick Baughn, Frank Herodes, Steve Zipser and Ed Elko, 55; 3. Fritz Field, Bill Dickin and Don Claussen, 56; 4. Dennis Powell, Jim Hanley, Dave Fluke and Aubrey Verstegen, 57; 5. Dave Anderson, Marty Obrien, Jerry Kasher and Allen Weinert, 58. CEDARS AT DUNGENESS June 16 Merchant League Standings Team Points 1. Kettel’s 76 43 2. Dungeness Plumbing 41 3. America’s Finest 38.5 4. Eric’s RV Repair 37 5. AM Systems 36.5 6. Raske Insurance 36.5 7. Eagle Home Mortgage 35 8. Jamestown Aces 31.5 9. Bigg Dogg 29.5 10. Dungeness Golf Shop 29.5 11. The Alternates 25.5 12. Mischmidt 23 13. Yurjevic Cabinets 20.5 14. McAleer Team USA 19 15. Stymie’s Bar and Grill 19 16. Olympic Synthetics 15 Individual Results Low Handicap Division Gross: Sid Krumpe, 35; Rob Wright, 38; Jeff Jones, 39; Konrad Sutterlin, 40; Dean Kruse, 41. Net: Jake Tjernell, 33; John Raske, 34; Mike Clayton, 34; Brian Flanders, 34; Matt Warren, 34. Closest to the Pin: Nole No. 4 Low Handicap Division: Jeff Jones, 6 ft. 10 in. High Handicap Division: Dusty Henry, 16 ft. High Handicap Division Gross: Matt Dotlich, 39; Pete Nesse, 43; Bill Bailey, 45; Casey Crumb, 46; George Penic, 47. Net: Ryan McCartney, 25; Dean Rhodefer, 30; Tim Collins, 30; Dave Sharman, 33; Rob Thompson, 34; Dean Norman, 34. Closest to Pin: Hole No. 8 Low Handicap Division: Dean Kruse, 5 ft. 2 in. High Handicap Division: Dave Sharman: 16 ft. 4 in. DISCOVERY BAY June 16 Ladies Play Net Of Odd Holes Net: Sheila Kilmer, 34.5; Barb Aldrich, 37.5; Lyn Pierle, 38.5; Norma Lupkes, 39; Marianne Ott, 43.

Slowpitch PORT ANGELES RECREATION LEAGUE STANDINGS THROUGH JUNE 18 Women’s Division Team W L Alan Millet Law Office 14 0 Shaltry’s Orthodontics 9 4 California Horizon 8 5 Shirley’s Cafe 8 5 Link Roofing 7 7 Elwha River Casino 6 6 High Tide’s/Zak’s 6 8 Airport Garden Center 2 11 Pink Militia 0 14 Men’s Purple Division Team W L R Bar 12 2 Westport/Resurrected 10 4 The Hanger 8 6 Elwha Young Gunz 5 9 Pen Ply 4 10 Bar N9ne 3 11 Men’s Gold Division Team W L Castaway’s 12 2 Link Roofing 10 4 United Concrete 9 5 Snow Valley 5 9 Titan Builders 3 11 Elwha Braves 3 11

The Associated Press

What

a riot

Boston Bruins captain Zdeno Chara carries the Stanley Cup as fans reach to touch the trophy during a rally in celebration in Boston on Saturday of their NHL hockey Stanley Cup championship over the Vancouver Canucks.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Interleague Games

American League Texas Seattle LA Angels Oakland

W 38 36 34 32

L 34 35 38 40

PCT GB .528 - .507 1.5 .472 4 .444 6

Boston NY Yankees Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore

W 42 40 38 36 31

L 28 29 33 35 37

PCT .600 .580 .535 .507 .456

Cleveland Detroit Chicago Sox Kansas City Minnesota

W 38 38 34 31 30

L 31 33 38 40 39

PCT GB .551 - .535 1 .472 5.5 .437 8 .435 8

GB - 1.5 4.5 6.5 10

WEST HOME ROAD 20-13 18-21 20-18 16-17 15-20 19-18 18-16 14-24 EAST HOME ROAD 20-14 22-14 23-17 17-12 17-18 21-15 17-18 19-17 20-18 11-19 CENTRAL HOME ROAD 22-12 16-19 22-14 16-19 16-17 18-21 21-20 10-20 13-16 17-23

RS 334 252 264 263

RA DIFF STRK L10 311 +23 Won 2 4-6 262 -10 Lost 1 5-5 279 -15 Lost 1 4-6 276 -13 Won 4 5-5

RS 369 362 291 337 274

RA 295 272 274 328 319

RS 302 320 297 318 258

RA DIFF STRK L10 293 +9 Won 2 4-6 310 +10 Lost 2 5-5 307 -10 Won 1 5-5 354 -36 Lost 1 5-5 316 -58 Won 6 8-2

DIFF +74 +90 +17 +9 -45

STRK Lost 1 Won 1 Won 2 Won 2 Lost 2

L10 8-2 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6

National League San Francisco Arizona Colorado LA Dodgers San Diego

W 39 39 35 31 30

L 31 33 35 40 42

Philadelphia Atlanta NY Mets Washington Florida

W 44 39 35 35 32

L 27 33 36 36 39

Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Cubs Houston

W 40 39 37 35 29 26

L 32 33 35 35 41 45

WEST PCT GB HOME ROAD RS RA .557 - 19-12 20-19 245 248 .542 1 22-16 17-17 332 313 .500 4 19-18 16-17 317 299 .437 8.5 15-20 16-20 274 308 .417 10 14-26 16-16 238 266 EAST PCT GB HOME ROAD RS RA .620 - 28-12 16-15 294 235 .542 5.5 18-17 21-16 279 249 .493 9 16-18 19-18 301 304 .493 9 19-12 16-24 282 272 .451 12 15-22 17-17 275 317 CENTRAL PCT GB HOME ROAD RS RA .556 - 25-9 15-23 315 291 .542 1 19-13 20-20 343 317 .514 3 20-17 17-18 347 318 .500 4 15-18 20-17 260 273 .414 10 16-21 13-20 287 352 .366 13.5 13-25 13-20 284 358

Softball PORT ANGELES RECREATION June 16 Results High Tide’s/Zak’s 14, Shaltry’s Orthodontics 6 Law Office of Alan Millet 18, Shaltry’s Orthodontics 10 Law Office of Alan Millet 11, Pink Militia 0

BMX June 17 PABMX Earned Double 7 Girls 1. Taylor Tolliver; 2. Cora Olson; 3. Janel Church. 10 Girls 1. Maddie Cooke; 2. Makenzie Wilson; 3. Eliza Church. 26-30 Cruiser 1. Zach Slota; 2. Zack Warren; 3. Gabe Dorsey. 36-40 Cruiser 1. Jon Linberg; 2. Tony Church; 3. Bredan Shimp. 41-45 Cruiser 1. Brad Wilson; 2. Damon Johnson; 3. Dino Mattoni. 51-55 Cruiser 1. George Williams; 2. Robert Williams; 3. Dale Nelson. 26-30 Girls Cruiser 1. Laura Cooke; 2. Crystal Youngblood; 3. Geri Thompson. 5 and under Novice 1. Trey Hill; 2. Antonio Wagner; 3. Ryan Albin. 6 Intermediate 1. Shayne Vidovic; 2. Oscar Ruiz; 3. James Hampton. 7 Novice 1. Talon Northern; 2. Cannon Cummins; 3. Ahydon Vail. 7 Intermediate 1. Marshall Adams; 2. Donny Vidovic; 3. Miles Wilson. 8 Expert 1. Jacob Nelson; 2. Jaiden Albin; 3. Sebastian Carroll. 10 Novice 1. Colton Ruddock; 2. Ezra Northern; 3. Prestin Hadfield. 10 Intermediate 1. Christian Carroll; 2. Keegan Hogan; 3. Garrett Burrow.

DIFF -3 +19 +18 -34 -28

STRK Lost 2 Lost 1 Won 4 Lost 4 Lost 4

L10 5-5 6-4 7-3 3-7 2-8

DIFF +59 +30 -3 +10 -42

STRK Lost 1 Lost 2 Won 1 Won 8 Lost 9

L10 8-2 5-5 6-4 8-2 1-9

DIFF +24 +26 +29 -13 -65 -74

STRK Won 1 Won 1 Lost 2 Lost 2 Lost 1 Won 1

L10 5-5 2-8 5-5 5-5 5-5 3-7

11 Intermediate 1. Mariah Fortman; 2. Tee-Jay Johnson; 3. Gabe Dorsey. 13 Intermediate 1. Dylan Church; 2. Cory Cooke; 3. Tate Kinsey. 14 Intermediate 1. Anthony John son; 2. Laura Cook; 3. Rebecca Wouton. 41 and over 1. Chris Austin; 2. Walt Dorsey; 3. Chris Glen.

Baseball Mariners 4, Phillies 2 Friday Philadelphia Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 3 1 0 0 Ichiro rf 4 3 3 0 Victorn cf 4 1 2 1 Ryan ss 3 0 2 2 Utley 2b 3 0 1 1 AKndy dh 3 0 0 0 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 1 0 1 1 Polanc 3b 4 0 0 0 Peguer lf 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 1 0 Halmn lf 0 0 0 0 BFrncs dh 3 0 1 0 Olivo c 4 1 2 1 DBrwn rf 4 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 4 0 1 0 Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 Figgins 3b 4 0 0 0 FGtrrz cf 4 0 0 0 Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 31 4 9 4 Philadelphia 000 001 010—2 Seattle 001 110 10x—4 DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Philadelphia 6, Seattle 8. 2B—Ichiro (13). 3B—Ryan (2). HR—Victorino (7), Olivo (11). SB—Ryan (2). CS—B. Francisco (4). S—A.Kennedy. SF—Smoak. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Oswalt L,4-5 6 1-3 8 4 4 23 Contreras 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 Herndon 1 1 0 0 0 1 Seattle Pineda W,7-4 6 2 1 1 3 5 Laffey H,3 2 2 1 1 0 1 League S,20-23 1 2 0 0 0 0 HBP­— by Pineda (Utley). Umpires—Home, Doug Eddings; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Kerwin Danley. T—2:26. A—34,345 (47,878).

Saturday’s Games Washington 4, Baltimore 2 N.Y. Yankees 4, Chicago Cubs 3 Texas 5, Atlanta 4, 10 innings Cleveland 5, Pittsburgh 1 Tampa Bay 7, Florida 4 N.Y. Mets 6, L.A. Angels 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 2 Minnesota 1, San Diego 0 Toronto 4, Cincinnati 0 St. Louis 5, Kansas City 4 Chicago White Sox 6, Arizona 2 Colorado 5, Detroit 4 Philadelphia 5, Seattle 1 Oakland 4, San Francisco 2 Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-4) at Cleveland (Masterson 5-5), 10:05 a.m. L.A. Angels (Chatwood 3-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-5), 10:10 a.m. Toronto (C.Villanueva 4-0) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 5-6), 10:10 a.m. Baltimore (Jakubauskas 1-0) at Washington (Gorzelanny 2-4), 10:35 a.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-3) at Boston (Wakefield 3-2), 10:35 a.m. Texas (Ogando 7-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 8-3), 10:35 a.m. Florida (Volstad 2-7) at Tampa Bay (Shields 6-4), 10:40 a.m. San Diego (Moseley 2-6) at Minnesota (Liriano 4-6), 11:10 a.m. Kansas City (Duffy 1-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 6-2), 11:15 a.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-3) at Colorado (Cook 0-1), 12:10 p.m. San Francisco (Cain 6-4) at Oakland (Cahill 6-5), 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Humber 6-3) at Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 1:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 9-2) at Seattle (Vargas 4-4), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 8-4) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-1), 5:05 p.m.

National League Saturday’s Game Houston at L.A. Dodgers, late Today’s Game Houston (Norris 4-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-8), 1:10 p.m.

Phillies 5, Mariners 1 Saturday Philadelphia Seattle ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 4 2 3 0 Ichiro rf 5 0 1 0 Victorn cf 4 1 3 4 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 AKndy 3b 4 0 1 0 Howard 1b 4 0 2 1 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 Polanc 3b 4 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 2 0 Peguer lf 3 0 0 0 Gload dh 4 1 1 0 FGtrrz ph-cf 1 0 0 0 DBrwn rf 4 1 1 0 Ackley 2b 4 1 1 1 Ruiz c 4 0 0 0 Carp dh 3 0 0 0 Halmn cf-lf 3 0 2 0 Totals 36 5 12 5 Totals 32 1 6 1 Philadelphia 100 000 202—5 Seattle 010 000 000—1 DP_Seattle 2. LOB_Philadelphia 8, Seattle 9. 2B_Victorino (10), Howard (17), Do.Brown (6), Smoak (16). 3B_Victorino (7). HR_Victorino (8), Ackley (1). SB_Rollins (15), Halman (2). S_Ryan. SF_Howard. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia Worley 5 5 1 1 2 3 Stutes W,1-0 1.2 0 0 0 2 1 Bastardo H,7 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 Madson 1 1 0 0 0 1 Seattle F.Hernandez L,7-6 7 8 3 3 2 5 Pauley 1 2 0 0 0 0 J.Wright 1 2 2 2 0 1 HBP_by J.Wright (Utley). WP_Worley, F.Hernandez. Umpires_Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Dana DeMuth; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Doug Eddings. T_3:09. A_35,829 (47,878).

Basketball Storm 68, Fever 54 INDIANA (54) Catchings 4-11 0-0 8, T.Smith 1-9 4-4 6, Sutton-Brown 0-4 2-2 2, January 1-3 0-0 2, Douglas 4-7 2-4 11, Phillips 0-3 2-2 2, Davenport 2-7 3-4 7, Pohlen 3-6 3-3 9, Zellous 1-2 3-3 5, Ely 0-2 2-4 2, Bobbitt 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 16-55 21-26 54. SEATTLE (68) Cash 4-14 5-8 14, Little 2-3 1-2 5, Jackson

SPORTS ON TV Today 10 a.m. (31) TNT NASCAR Auto Racing, Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips 400 at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich. 10:30 a.m. (5) KING USGA Golf, U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Md. 10:30 a.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, Milwaukee Brewers at Boston Red Sox. 11 a.m. (26) ESPN College Baseball, California vs. Virginia in College World Series at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Neb. 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO IndyCar Auto Racing, Milwaukee 225 at The Milwaukee Mile in West Allis, Wis. 1 p.m. (25) ROOT MLB Baseball, Philadelphia Phillies at Seattle Mariners. 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 College Baseball, Texas A&M vs. South Carolina in College World Series at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Neb. 5 p.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, New York Yankees at Chicago Cubs. 5:30 p.m. (6) KONG WNBA Basketball, Seattle Storm at Los Angeles Sparks. 7 p.m. (25) ROOT MLS Soccer, New York Red Bulls at Portland Timbers. 2-11 4-5 9, Bird 5-13 1-1 12, Wright 3-9 1-1 7, K.Smith 2-7 2-2 6, Willingham 3-6 4-4 10, Snell 1-1 0-0 3, Robinson 0-0 2-2 2, Ibekwe 0-2 0-0 0, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 22-66 20-25 68. Indiana 10 9 14 21—54 Seattle 15 22 21 10—68 3-Point Goals­— Indiana 1-15 (Douglas 1-2, Ely 0-1, Phillips 0-1, January 0-2, Pohlen 0-3, T.Smith 0-3, Catchings 0-3), Seattle 4-20 (Snell 1-1, Cash 1-3, Jackson 1-4, Bird 1-6, Willingham 0-1, Wright 0-2, K.Smith 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 46 (Catchings 14), Seattle 47 (Cash 8). Assists— Indiana 8 (January 3), Seattle 16 (Cash 5). Total Fouls—Indiana 22, Seattle 22. Technicals—Davenport. A—8,178 (9,686).

Golf U.S. Open Third Round Top 50 Bethesda, MD 1. Rory McIlroy 65,66,68—199 2. Y.E. Yang 68,69,70—207 3. Robert Garrigus 70,70,68—208 3. Jason Day 71,72,65—208 3. Lee Westwood 75,68,65—208 6. Sergio Garcia 69,71,69—209 6. Matt Kuchar 72,68,69—209 6. Fred Jacobson 74,69,66—209 9. Kyung-tae Kim 74,69,66—210 10. Davis Love III 70,71,70—211 10. Heath Slocum 71,70,70—211 10.Henrik Stenson 70,72,69—211 10. Brandt Jobe 71,70,70—211 10. Bo Van Pelt 76,67,68—211 15. B. Snedeker 70,70,72—212 15.Zach Johnson 71,69,72—212 15.Pat Cantlay 75,67,70—212 15.Peter Hanson 72,71,69—212 15.Kevin Chappell 76,67,69—212 15.Webb Simpson 75,71,66—212 21.Alvaro Quiros 70,71,72—213 22.Russell Henley 73,69,71—213 23.L. Oosthuizen 69,73,71—213 24.Steve Stricker 75,69,69—213 25.G. McDowell 70,74,69—213 26. H. Frazar 72,73,68—213 27.John Senden 70,72,72—214 28.Ryan Palmer 69,72,73—214 29.Marc Leishman 73,69,72—214 30.Cha Schwartzel 68,74,72—214 31.Bill Haas 73,73,68—214 32.Do-Hoon Kim 73,71,70—214 33.Seung Noh 72,70,73—215 34.Dustin Johnson 75,71,69—215 35.Rory Sabbatini 72,73,70—215 36.Chez Reavie 70,75,71—216 37. Johan Edfors 70,72,74—216 38.Alex Noren 75,67,74—216 39. Martin Kaymer 74,70,72—216 40. P. Harrington 71,73,72—216 41.Sung Kang 74,72,70—216 42.Robert Rock 70,71,76—217 43.Gary Woodland 73,71,73—217 44.Bud Cauley 71,72,74—217 45.Retief Goosen 73,73,71—217 46.Robert Karlsson 79,67,71—217 47.Gregory Havret 77,69,71—217 48.Ed Molinari 74,70,74—218 49.Brian Gay 73,71,74—218 50.Ryo Ishikawa 74,70,74—218

-14 -6 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5

Transactions Baseball Major League Baseball: Reduced the suspension of Boston RHP Jonathan Papelbon for bumping umpire Tony Randazzo during a June 4 game from three games to two. American League Boston Red Sox: Placed SS Jed Lowrie on the 15-day DL. Recalled UT Drew Sutton from Pawtucket (IL). Agreed to terms with LHP Miguel Pena, 1B Travis Shaw, 3B Matt Gedman, RHP Brenden Shepard, RHP Corey Vogt, LHP Kevin Brahney, RHP Mike McCarthy, RHP Andrew Jones, OF Drew Turocy, 1B David Chester, C Carlos Coste and RHP Jadd Schmeltzer. Cleveland Indians: Activated DH Travis Hafner from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Travis Buck to Columbus (IL). Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Sisco, C Jake Lowery, RHP Mason Radeke, RHP Robert Nixon, INF Todd Hankins, INF Casey Serna, RHP Drew Rucinski and INF Jerrud Sabourin. Minnesota Twins: Activated C Joe Mauer from the 60-day DL and LHP Glen Perkins from the 15-day DL. Assigned OF Brian Dinkelman and LHP Chuck James to Rochester (IL). Texas Rangers: Agreed to terms with LHP Kevin Matthews and OF Zach Cone. Assigned Matthews to the Rangers (Arizona) and Cone to Spokane (NWL). National League Atlanta Braves: Placed RHP Tommy Hanson on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Randall Delgado from Mississippi (SL) and RHP Jairo Asencio from Gwinnett (IL). Optioned INF Brandon Hicks to Gwinnett.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

B3

Making sense of King James LeBron spout speaks to nasty side of sports

The Associated Press (2)

Portland Timbers forward Kenny Cooper hangs from the crossbar as he celebrates his goal during the first half of a game against Real Salt Lake in Portland, Ore., two months ago.

Soccer hip in ‘PNW’ Northwest embraces MLS, beautiful game By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. — Fans in the Pacific Northwest have done something for Major League Soccer that David Beckham and a million soccer moms couldn’t. They’ve made MLS cool. Young urbanites in a region that gave America grunge music and Starbucks are flocking to see the Seattle Sounders, the Portland Timbers and the Vancouver Whitecaps — and the marketing departments for all three teams are wisely tapping into that demographic. The trend was evident last month when the first MLS match between the Sounders and the expansion Timbers drew more than 36,000 fans to Qwest Field in Seattle. It played out again recently when the Whitecaps visited Seattle, the second of the fan-created Cascadia Cup rivalry between the teams. The atmosphere at both matches has been called European — and that’s a big compliment. “Is there a reason going to a soccer match in the Pacific Northwest seems like going to a European soccer match more than anywhere else in the United States? Well, yes,” said Paul Swangard, managing director of the Warsaw Sports Marketing Center at University of Oregon. “There’s a culture here that was really accepting of it. “It’s a younger audience; young professionals, that pub culture you talk about.” In the early days of MLS, the focus was on families and capitalizing on the legions of kids across the nation who play soccer. In more recent years, stars like Beckham and Landon Donovan have been trumpeted. But teams in the Pacific Northwest — or the PNW, as it is affectionately known — appealed directly to 20- to 30-something tech-savvy professionals.

The teams already had an added advantage in that all three clubs dated back to 1970s with the old North American Soccer League, so they had a history of sorts. “We already had a brand, we already had the young, urban relevancy. And I think we just built on that with MLS. We know who we are,” Timbers owner Merritt Paulson said.

Sounders set standard The Sounders, who joined the MLS in 2009, set the standard. Their fans made match day a ritual, priming in trendy downtown bars before a raucous prematch march to the team’s stadium. The sustained buzz surrounding the team — which competes in a market that is also home to the NFL’s Seahawks and MLB’s Mariners — has been enough to regularly draw an average of more than 35,000 fans per game, by far best in the MLS. Their gear is also the league’s most popular. Portland and Vancouver jumped into the fray this season as MLS expansion teams. Portland launched the “We are Timbers” ad campaign that featured everyday fans posing with axes and other logging tools. The word “Timbers” did not appear in the campaign, just a logo and “2011” for the team’s inaugural season. “We had a very unique marketing strategy, and it was critical that it reflected this city, our fans and really the Timbers’ brand — the authenticity that’s unique to Portland,” Paulson said. “We went with a focused campaign that I think was edgy and attention grabbing.” The Whitecaps drew attention — not all of it positive — with a television spot that featured an attractive young woman and body painting to ethereal music. It didn’t have much to do with soccer — except that a team jersey was painted on her skin — but it certainly got noticed.

Seattle Sounders FC supporters cheer during a MLS soccer match against the Portland Timbers in Seattle. All three groups also embraced social media to promote their teams. “That is your driving force,” Sounders goalkeeper Kasey Keller said. “Your driving force is the adults and if you can get that fan base then that is where you’re going to win. “And then your kids become fans because of it.”

Soccer tradition Keller, who played at the University of Portland, noted that the Pacific Northwest has always been partial to the beautiful game. He joked that the Pilots soccer team always got the hottest girls. But what ultimately made the biggest difference was the teams’ appeal to their fan groups. Seattle has the Emerald City Supporters, Portland has the Timbers Army and Vancouver has the Southsiders. The groups work tirelessly to make the gameday experience well, European — there’s that word again — with their tireless chants and coordinated displays known as tifos. The Timbers Army was given the honor of singing

the national anthem at the team’s home opener, while Sounders supporters have a say whether the team’s GM should be fired. “They gave supporters almost a sense of ownership of the team, something that’s getting harder and harder to do with big teams in the NFL and the NBA,” Swangard said. But truth be told, fans bristle when the suggestion is made that they’ve helped make soccer hip. “When you start talking about cool, that implies you’re just doing it for the appearance,” Timbers fan Nikki Suydam said at a recent match. “And nobody is here just because it is cool. We’re here because we love the sport, we love the team and we love the city.” Fellow Portland fan Seth Hunt, 30, said any popularity the teams have ultimately comes from their fostering a sense of community. “We come with our friends. We all like soccer,” Hunt said. “We’re from all walks of life and were drawn together by love of the game and supporting a team.”

Open: Event McIlroy’s to lose Continued from B1 But he moved backward, not closer, and he was sensing the inevitable. “I’ll try and catch up with Rory as much as possible, as much as I can,” Yang said. “But if he doesn’t let go, it’s going to be a race for second place. “I’m playing some good golf right now, actually.” Not good enough. And if he felt any glimmer of hope when McIlroy made his single bogey of the day — on No. 10, after hitting tee shot into a back bunker — it was gone in a flash. McIlroy answered by hitting an approach shot from the rough to 18 feet on No. 11, then sinking the putt and pumping his fist as he walked to grab the ball from the hole.

That put him back at 13-under par. On 14, he hit his approach to 6 feet and made that. On the front side, McIlroy wasn’t nearly as locked in early Saturday as he was during the first two rounds, when he set the 36-hole U.S. Open scoring record at 11-under 131. He missed fairways on 1, 3, 8 and 9 on the front side and pushed his approach into a greenside bunker on No. 4. But he made par or better on all those holes and his lead — six shots at the beginning of the day — never shrank. The tone for the day and the course was set early, when Webb Simpson shot 5-under 66 to move to 1 under.

“The golf course is pretty soft. The greens are soft,” said Simpson, who made seven birdies. “I got a couple good lies in the rough today that I probably didn’t deserve. I think you’ll see some pretty good scores like mine, and some pretty high scores, too.” The USGA prides itself on setting up the toughest courses on the planet. But Congressional hasn’t lived up to that reputation. All the players knew it, even the ones who weren’t taking advantage. “The rough isn’t quite as gnarly as at some other U.S. Opens,” world No. 1 Luke Donald said after shooting 3-over 74. “It has a different feel. It almost feels like the Firestone or something.

“But it’s still tough out there. Some tough pins and you’ve got to play well to shoot a good score.” Day was among those with the good scores. The 23-year-old, who finished second at the Masters, didn’t make a bogey and finished the day with a birdie on No. 18. He scoffed at the idea that everyone but McIlroy was playing for second. But as the day wore on and McIlroy’s play kept getting better, the inevitable was starting to set in. “He’s playing awesome,” said Sergio Garcia, whose 2-under par would be in contention during most years at the U.S. Open. “I would expect him to play the same way [today] and probably win.”

His cluelessness was evident in the NBA finals, in the presence of more purposeful players on both sides. James has the right to entertain his right-backJUST EXACTLY atcha contempt for the WHAT did LeBron James mob, overstimulated by have in mind with his brutal sound and light stream-of-consciousness shows, with goodness rant last week? knows what in their sysIn the wake of tems, and paying Miami’s loss to fortunes just to be George Dallas last Sunday, in the arena. James said he did Vecsey At today’s not care that the gouge prices, the public was glad to mob wants blood. see him fail. Clip joints like Then he spoke Madison Square totally gratuitously Garden cater slavabout fans in Ohio ishly to the corpoand around the rate trade and world who had basically tell longbecome rabid Mavtime patrons to get ericks fans because lost, you cheapskates. of him. And what are athletes “They have to wake up to think of “fans” who have tomorrow and have the multiple action going on, same life that they had between their real teams before they woke up today,” and their fantasy teams? James began. Are they loyal to their “They hearts or their wallets? It’s have the complicated. same perWherever he was in sonal probrecent days, James could lems they turn on the television and had today. see people rioting in Van“I’m couver, one of the most going to favored corners of North continue to James America, because their live the team lost the seventh game way I want to live and con- of the Stanley Cup finals. tinue to do the things that What is an athlete to I want to do with me and make of all this? my family and be happy Intellectually, James and with that.” his colleagues know that James was not done. fans “pay their salaries.” He continued, “They But it would not take much can get a few days or a few for athletes to shade into months or whatever the cynicism toward people case may be on being who pay so much money happy about not only and harbor so much venom. myself, but the Miami To be fair, some crowds Heat not accomplishing are still positive toward their goal, but they have to the home team, but gone get back to the real world are the days when Brookat some point.” lyn Dodgers fans could These words, no doubt respect Stan Musial of the from his heart of hearts, hated Cardinals — could have been reverberating nickname him Stan the ever since. Man for life — or Madison Were they merely some Square Garden fans could self-pitying whine like the applaud visiting stars like one Richard M. Nixon Bob Cousy, Elgin Baylor, uttered after losing the Tom Gola, Jerry West and election for California gov- Oscar Robertson because ernor in 1962, “You won’t they were cool. have Nixon to kick around The world has become anymore.” (He promised!) nastier in the age of MurOr is there something doch and Trump and deeper in the way a promi- Steinbrenner. And so have nent athlete regards the the news media. fans, or whatever they are Derek Jeter was always called? a bit arch when he was hitAs much as spectators ting .330, but now that he gape at athletes on display is hitting .260, the mob is in the arena, at the same forming outside the gates time, the performers are despite the respect his taking their measure of Yankees teammates have the species on the other for him at the core of a side of the figurative bars. contending team. The great country musiAnd Jeter has never cian Tom T. Hall wrote a sullied his own image the song called “Last Hard way James did (unless you Town” about sitting on the count Jeter’s waterside tour bus and thinking mansion, which Letterman about the crowd he had displays just about every just left behind. night). “They applauded as we Somehow, it does not killed ourselves/But angels seem likely that LeBron don’t have bourbon on James was making a their breath,” Hall wrote. poetic eye-in-the-sky obserHe added, “They came vation about the flawed to see the people that they but still beautiful human thought we were/And condition. never changed their If he could elucidate his minds.” innermost feelings, James Hall concluded with a was probably referring spesalute to the audience, cifically to sports fans, who “The thing that keeps us pay so much money, who goin’ is the good folks in feel so strongly about a guy the last hard town we who legally jumps teams, met.” when he mentioned “perCountry fans are admi- sonal problems.” rably loyal to their favorA rich, young and calites, but in sports, the low celebrity like James towns have gotten much can probably never get harder in the social-media back toward what he called age, when everybody can “the real world.” send an opinion (or worse) But in his blurted Nixowinging outward into the nian diatribe, James just ozone. indeed may have been on James earned much of to something. the disdain by choosing to ________ desert his home region of northern Ohio in a tawdry George Vecsey is a national television production last sports columnist for the New year. York Times.

Sounders: Win Continued from B1 Seattle, which played Vancouver to a 2-2 draw last weekend at home, improved to 6-4-7. “That goal was amazing,” Montero said. “I was looking to score in the past four or five games and I just want to keep working hard.” The Reds came closest in the 81st minute when second-half substitute Javier Martina hammered a shot off the post before Joao Plata sent the rebound over the Seattle cage.

Hurtado was sent off in the 49th minute for a second yellow card. The Seattle defender clattered into Toronto FC forward Alen Stevanovic from behind. Sounders goalkeeper Kasey Keller said his team played well after going down a man. “I thought we played smart,” Keller said. “We rode our luck at times. “They hit the post and had some other balls bounce around our box but the guys worked hard.”


B4

SportsRecreation

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Owners could be splintering

Youth Sports PA Power continues its title tradition PORT ANGELES — PA Power Equipment won its third title in three years after dropping Jim’s Pharmacy 7-1 in the 12U softball city championship game Thursday night. The victory finished off a perfect season for PA Power, which went 14-0 on its way to the three-peat. Ashlynn Uvila gave up just three hits and struck out five to earn the win on the mound. Meanwhile, teammate Emily Copeland was 2-for-3 at he plate, and Payton Harding 1-for-2 with a big triple that sparked a four-run rally in the fourth inning. Also getting hits for PA Power were Natalie Steinman, Nikaila Price and Uvila. Rachel Webb pitched well in defeat for Jim’s, striking out six and giving up six hits. Kiki Costante, Rachel Webb and Madeline Carvell all had hits for Jim’s.

Meeting may determine fate of NFL lockout By Barry Wilner

The Associated Press

PA Power Equipment won the 12U softball city championship Thursday at Lincoln Park. Team members are, in front, from left, Emily Copeland and Payton Harding. In the second row, from left, are Emily Boyd, Nikaila Price, Natalie Steinman, Madeline Doherty and Skylar Tomason. In back, from left, are Rebecca Kiesling, Genna Orr, Ashlynn Uvila, Nitika Wood and Avi Noble.

Babe Ruth champs PORT ANGELES — Local 155 left little doubt which Olympic Junior Babe Ruth team deserved to be crowned champion this season. After wining the regular season title with a record of 12-2, Local claimed the eight-team, week-long postseason tournament with three straight wins. That included a 5-0 victory over Swain’s, a 9-2 triumph against Sequim COOP and a 9-4 win versus Forks Outfitters in the championship game at Volunteer Field. Left-hander Jordan Shepherd registered a complete game victory in the title game, striking out 15 and scattering five hits. Peninsula Daily News

Local 155 won the Olympic Junior Babe Ruth championship after going 15-2 on the year. Seated in front is Austin Scarpa. In the second row, from left, are Jacob Matney, Cameron Burns, Jace Bohman, Jordan Shepherd, Jake Thomas and Nathan Angevine. In back, from left, are coach Cameron LeDuke, coach Buck Gieseke, John Boesenberg, Colton Kish, Chase Jangula, Larsson Chapman, Ryan Mudd and coach Mike Mudd.

Briefly . . . Elite hoops camp set for this week PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Elite Basketball Camp is scheduled for this Wednesday through Saturday at Roosevelt Elementary School. The camp is open to ages 8 through 13, with sessions going from 9:30 a.m. to noon each day. Peninsula College men’s basketball coach Lance Von Vogt — fresh off leading the Pirates to an NWAACC title — will direct the four-day camp. His players will also be on hand to assist. The camp will teach players fundamental skills while focussing on the effort and attitude that will help them enjoy a successful camp experience. The cost is $65, and each camper will receive a camp T-shirt. Registration is at the Vern Burton Community Center. For more information, contact Bill Peterson at 360417-4553.

Dates changed

the Port Angeles High School gym. Grades 6-9 will have sessions from 9 a.m. to noon while grades 1-5 will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Cost is $40 per camper. For more information, contact Port Angeles coach Wes Armstrong at 360-2701113 or visit paathletics.com.

Volleyball camps PORT ANGELES — Three summer volleyball camps will be held at the Port Angeles High School gym starting in July. The camps are open to female volleyball players from kindergarten through high school. For athletes entering sixth through eighth grades, camp will be July 11-14 from 9 a.m. to noon each day. Athletes entering ninth through 12th grade will meet July 11-14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The camp cost is $50, which includes a T-shirt. Campers can register through Port Angeles volleyball coach Christine Halberg at 360-504-2654. The third camp is for kindergartners through fifth graders and will be July 18-21 from 9 a.m. to noon each day. For the third camp, registration is through the Clallam County Family YMCA. Cost is $40 for YMCA members and $50 for nonmembers.

To register, contact the YMCA at 360-452-9244. Camp coaches include Halberg and Roughrider assistant Jennifer Reynolds along with volunteers.

Klahhane Gym PORT ANGELES — Summer registration is now open for Klahhane Gymnastics. Registration encompasses a full schedule of summer classes and camps July 5 through Aug. 25. Gymnastics classes for ages 3 through grade eight for all abilities are scheduled for afternoon and early evenings. All classes have size limits and pre-registration is required. Registration for individual classes is open until classes fill but early registration is encouraged. A series of four KinderFit Gymnastics camps for ages 5 through 7 will be offered during July and August. Starting dates for camps are July 5 and 19 as well as Aug. 9 and 23. For further information and tuition rates for all summer programs, visit paathletics.com or call 360457-5187 between 3 p.m. through 7 p.m. weekdays.

Russell ace PORT ANGELES — Kevin Russell sunk a holein-one last Saturday at the Peninsula Golf Club.

The ace came on 14th hole, with Russell using his 7-iron to drive the ball into the cup 156 yards away. The hole-in-one was witnessed by Greg Senf. Russell has been playing for 35 years and this is his second ace to date.

Allen hole-in-one SEQUIM — Robin Allen scored a hole-in-one Monday at the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. The Sequim resident used a 6-iron on the 150yard fourth hole to score the first ace of his life. Witnessing the feat were Bob Young, Cave Johnson and Ken Ulin.

Soccer camp CHIMACUM — The Chimacum High School boys soccer program will host a coed youth soccer camp June 27 through July 1 at H.J. Carroll Park. The camp is open to ages 4-15 at a cost of $110 per camper. Money raised will benefit the Cowboy boys soccer team. Camper will learn technical and tactical skills at the camp, which returns to the Tri-Area for the third year in a row. Partial and whole scholarships are available. Those interested can contact Kevin Coate via email at chssoccer11@hotmail.com. Peninsula Daily News

Eagles: Blitz pull away early Continued from B1

“They are stacked,” McMahan said. “That’s a bunch of Western football players that all live in Bellingham. They’ve definitely got the best team hands down in the league.” Olympic turned things around some in the second half, holding Bellingham scoreless in the third quarter. Ron Wright Jr. and Luke Dixon both recorded sacks, while Stephan Baker came up with an interception near the Eagles goal line that ended a Blitz drive. Dixon and Baker were responsible for most of the Eagles’ yards, with the two combining for a little more

than 80 total on the ground. “I’m extremely proud of every one of my guys who showed up,” McMahan said. “They never quit and they never gave up, and it showed in the second half. “That team expected to come in here and score 100, I guarantee they did. We held our own. We never backed down and showed them any fear. “That’s about all I can ask for as a coach.” The Eagles next travel to Renton to take on the Ravens next week. Renton lost to the same Blitz team 70-0 last week. Olympic’s next home game will be July 9.

“I know that we’ve been talking pretty extensively over the last few weeks,” said Saints quarterback Drew Brees, one of 10 players on an antitrust suit brought against the league on March 11, hours before the lockout began. “It seems like things are moving in the right direction, which is very positive. It’s what we always hoped for as players because obviously we’re getting to crunch time here. “We’re nearing July and there’s a lot of work that needs to be done [footballwise] between now and when the season will start, and obviously we’d love to have a settlement in place.” One item of contention likely is the minimum teams can spend on salaries each year and how it is determined, a key for smallmarket franchises such as Buffalo, Jacksonville and Cincinnati. Under rules of the previous CBA negotiated in 2006 — owners opted out in 2008 — teams were allowed to spread guaranteed signing bonuses over the duration of a contract. That reduced the salary cap hit each year. The Bills, however, preferred to count bonuses as dollars spent for each specific season no matter the contract’s length, so their payroll essentially was limited to all the salaries on their books for that one season — including potential bonuses and salaries owed to players that had been cut or bought out. Whether teams would have that kind of flexibility in the next CBA is important to the lower-revenue franchises. Until now, the owners have appeared unified, from when they opted out to when they locked out. But as negotiations have ramped up, a faction of owners skeptical about the dynamics of a new deal has appeared. That will make next week’s owners’ meetings critical as July approaches.

NEW YORK — Reaching a labor deal soon is hardly a done deal in the NFL. Team owners will be updated on recent negotiations with the players when they meet in Chicago on Tuesday. They’ve been told to prepare to stay an extra day because of the complexity of the proposals both sides have discussed in sessions over the last three weeks. Getting the required 24 of 32 owners to agree on anything can be difficult, let alone something as complex as a new collective bargaining agreement. And there has been enough pushback from owners familiar with those proposals that progress made recently might not lead to an agreement in the next few weeks. Still, according to a person with knowledge of the negotiations, the faction of unhappy owners that exists isn’t yet large enough to derail an agreement. That could lead to some heavy lobbying in Chicago at the first owners’ meeting specifically scheduled to deal with the lockout. The person, speaking on condition of anonymity because details of the negotiations are not supposed to be made public, said a new CBA is not imminent. Owners, Commissioner Roger Goodell and lead negotiator Jeff Pash have been silent about recent developments, citing an agreement with U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan not to discuss mediated talks. Players association chief DeMaurice Smith and several players on hand for the negotiations also have avoided comment. But it’s clear that deadlines are approaching. Training camps normally would open in about five weeks, and any lengthy delays in striking a deal will endanger them and the preseason. The first preseason game ________ is at the Pro Football Hall of Fame inductions; the Bears AP Sports Writers John Wawrow and Rams are scheduled to in Buffalo and Brett Martel in New play Aug. 7 in Canton, Ohio. Orleans contributed to this story.

Mariners: Lose Continued from B1 with two outs in the first but escaped by inches. KenIt came on a 3-2 chan- nedy singled then Justin Smoak doubled off the wall geup from Vance Worley. Rollins opened the game in left-center. The ball missed carrying with a first-pitch single to right off Hernandez then out by fewer than six moved to second on a wild inches. Third-base coach Jeff pitch. Victorino followed with a Datz, initially waving Kennedy around, put up the walk. Chase Utley’s left-side stop sign as he hit the bag. grounder forced Victorino at Kennedy and Smoak were second, with Rollins moving left stranded when Miguel Olivo grounded out to first. to third. Hernandez has an AmerRollins scored on Ryan Howard’s sacrifice fly to ican League-leading 108 deep center. strikeouts, three more than Worley met with trouble Detroit’s Justin Verlander.

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Olympic drove inside Bellingham’s 40-yard line just once during that time, only to see the drive stall out after a false start penalty. “We moved the ball, but with a new quarterback you can’t really sustain a lot,” McMahan said. “Everything is timing [in the offense], and when the timing is off everything is off. “We had a couple of turnovers today where it’s just we didn’t get enough reps [to run the plays correctly]. “We have some talented guys out there. It’s just getting them all together on the same page.”

The Blitz offense was also able to take advantage of an Eagles defense that was missing several key players, including defensive back Eric Johnson Jr. Bellingham got much of their first-half offense from former Stanwood High School star Vann Vetch. The Class of 2007 graduate ran for 147 yards and three touchdowns on 18 carries during the first two quarters. That included a 37-yard run that left one Eagle tackler grasping at air. Bellingham out-gained the Eagles 260 yards to 13 in the first half, with the Blitz defense racking up 10 tackles for a loss.

NFL Labor

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PORT ANGELES — The dates for the second annual Rider Hoopshooter and Lil’ Rider Hoopshooter basketball camps has been moved to July 6-8. The camp will be held at

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, June 19, 2011

Our Peninsula

c

SECTION

THINGS TO DO, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEATHS, WEATHER In this section

Frank Russo

In memorium 5 years after death, skateboarder’s monument moves forward By Paul Gottlieb

Jeff Mauger, both of Port Angeles. Peninsula Daily News “It is the hope and prayer of Frankie’s family and friends that PORT ANGELES — On Frihis death will remind and day, five years after helmetless encourage his friends, peers and 14-year-old Frank Russo died skateboarders everywhere to while skateboarding at Port wear safety equipment, espeAngeles Skate Park, efforts cially a helmet, when enjoying moved forward to build a monuthis sport,” it will say. ment that honors the teenager A giant reminder of that and urges skateboarders to wear reminder will shelter Frank’s helmets. memorial and other skateboardFrank, who would have gradu- ers when it rains — a helmet 9 ated Friday from Port Angeles feet by 6 feet wide atop a 13-footHigh School, constantly wore his tall frame that will become a sighelmet, often even to the store, nature feature of Erickson Park, his mother, Lisa Laidlaw of Port already bejeweled by the Dream Angeles, said last week. Playground. For some unknown reason, on June 16, 2006, he didn’t. Brainchild of sculptor The initial account of the misThe brainchild of Port Angeles hap — according to friends, he sculptor Bob Stokes is still in the had loaned the helmet to someone — wasn’t true, Laidlaw said. planning stages. But Stokes plans to get Head unprotected, Frank was together with Reiss this week to skateboarding from one concrete get moving on it now that he bowl to another at the park on knows the monument is a go, Race Street when he hit his Stokes said. head, suffered seizures and fell Stokes would build the steel into a coma. frame. He’s talked to skateboard He died the following day, manufacturers about donating leaving behind his mom and two skateboard blanks that would be brothers, Zach Armstrong, now painted by skateboarders and 17, and Robert Taylor, 25. attached to the frame to form the “I’m having a rough day,” helmet. Laidlaw, 46, said Friday. “Then you walk inside the helAll day, she made trips with met and look up and see art by family members and friends to skateboarders,” Stokes said. Frank’s grave at Ocean View “It would be like a little catheCemetery, where she placed flow- dral.” ers and cleaned up the site. The shelter also would provide “I call it cleaning his room,” a “subliminal” reminder for Laidlaw said. skateboarders to wear helmets, Others Friday also rememhe added. bered the Stevens Middle School Of 42 skateboarding fatalities seventh-grader known to friends in the United States that year, as Frank the Tank, a kid who Frank’s was the only death while wanted to become a professional skateboarding in a skate park, skateboarder when he grew up. according to www.skatepark.org. The city-owned skate park Monument plans includes a posted suggestion for skateboarders to wear safety Doc Reiss of the Port Angeles gear. Nor’wester Rotary Club, who helped spearhead construction of the skate park at 300 S. Race St., met Friday with fellow Rotarian and engineer Steve Zenovic to finalize plans for the monument. It will be erected in the western corner of the skateboard park just outside the fenced skateboarding area. Footings will be poured July 5, and the $3,800 monument will completed by the end of that month, Reiss said. “This is something we’ve wanted to do and wanted to do, and now we’re getting it done,” he said. The narrow, 6½-foot-tall rectangular memorial will include a plaque. On one side, it will review the history of the park, built in 2005 by the Rotary Club. To build it, the club raised $385,000 in contributions — part of that will be used for the monument — from merchants, civic groups and individuals. On the other side will be a tribute written by Frank’s grandfather, Ken Laidlaw, and uncle,

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Lisa Laidlaw sits in her Port Angeles home near a photograph of her son, Frank Russo, on shelf, on Wednesday. reach to do that. Skating is seasonal — it’s only spring and summer.” Lisa Laidlaw understands how tough it is to get some skateboarders to wear helmets.

‘No control’ When children are out of sight, parents “have no control,” she said. “Frank had a choice, and he didn’t wear it that day, but with

Frankie, there wasn’t a whole lot of preaching behind it because he just did, he wore it,” she said. “That’s what was so shocking about the whole incident. It was so out of character for him not to wear it.” Lisa Laidlaw’s ultimate wish would be that “parents would learn from Frankie’s passing,” she said. “You could talk to your kids until you’re blue in the face, but

just keep on ’em and use Frank’s story as a reminder; that doesn’t bother me in the least,” she said. “Use our experience as a family and what happened as a lesson for their children. “Don’t forget, because it’s a possibility. “It can happen. It did.”

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul. gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

Use of helmets After Frank died, Ken Laidlaw helped lead an effort to pass a city ordinance requiring skateboarders at the park to wear helmets. It failed. “There’s no way with our staffing models or with the parks department’s to ensure people consistently wear helmets in the skate park, even if we did require it,” said Port Angeles Police Chief Terry Gallagher. Gallagher added that there has not been a significant increase in the number of skateboarding accidents since Frank’s death. Nor has there been an increase that he’s noticed in the use of helmets. But the city of Port Angeles “took on a responsibility” by allowing the park on city property, Lisa Laidlaw said. “Why not put on the full responsibility and have some Joseph Davis of Port Angeles flies through the air on his skateboard at the Erickson safety for those kids?” she said. Park skate park Thursday. “I don’t think it’s out of their


C2

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Work program set June 29 Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness will present a free talk on returning to the work force for Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income benefits recipients. The lecture will be held at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, June 29. Patt Buff from the state Employment Security Division’s Plan to Work program will provide information on Social Security Disability Insurance and Social Security Income work incentives. Work incentives give

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Study

T

he lecture will be at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 29. choices to the disabled to help them return to work with support for a successful outcome and assurance that benefits will not disappear as soon as work begins. Information about Medicare and Medicaid will be included. A question-and-answer session will follow. For more information, phone 360-385-1503 or 360379-9949.

Soroptimist International

of

Port Angeles-Jet Set

help

From left are Soroptimist International of Port Angeles member Ruth Thomson, scholarship winner Xuan-Mai Thi Pham, club member Jill Oakes and club member Laurie Fineout. Pham’s son, Dustin Flansburg, stands in front. Pham, a student at Peninsula College who in February was awarded a $1,000 scholarship from Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set, recently received a $3,000 regional Soroptimist International regional scholarship to continue her studies. Pham plans to continue her education in radiology technology. To learn more, visit www. soroptimist.org.

Class of

Congratulations 2011 David Roberts

Katie Loghry

Rebekka Maria Butcher

Tony Bush

Rylan Spencer

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School We are so proud of you. Good luck in Boot Camp! Love, Uncle Ray, Aunt DeAnna & Grandpa Beiber.

Peninsula College

You are proof, you changed your life totally around. Love, Mom and Dennis.

Port Angeles High School

May your journey ahead be full of excitement, discoveries, adventures, and challenges. So proud of you and your achievements. Best wishes for a continued success. Congratulations!! Love, Mom, Dad, & Cody.

Parker Brye

Jason M. Fox

Nathan Cristion

Kevin Frederick

Katie Vaal

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School and Peninsula College

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Crescent High School

Congratulations! We are very proud of you and are so blessed you are our son. Love always, Mom & Dad

Gallant young man, Independent in thought; The world’s at your feet, What blessings you’ve brought! From Nashville to Coeur d’Alene to Port Angeles, we’re so proud of you! All my love, Gramma

Off to dental hygienist school. Love you, Grandpa and Grandma.

We are so proud of you. Way to go! Love, Grandpa & Grandma

You’re a great kid! Good luck in Iowa– Wrestle tough! We love you!

We are very proud of you. You are an awesome son. Love, Mom, Dad and Ryan.

Way to go Katie!! Proud just doesn’t cover it. Always & Forever!!

Noelle Ciaciuch

Kevin Frederick

James Willis

Della Lucas

Sandra Gudgel

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Sequim High School

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

We are so proud of you, Sweet Pea! You are a blessing to our family! Congrats! Love, Mom, Dad, Logan, Molly & Josie.

We knew you were great way back then! Love Aunt Sue, Aunt Barb & Grandma.

Congratulations James! Love, Mom, Dad & Grandma C.

We are very proud of you, Della! Congrats! Love, Mom, Dad and family.

You are amazing, so proud. Love, Mom

Jack Harmon III

Julie L. Leaf

Benny Wetzler

Taylor Thomas-Price

Joey RNH Reiss

Port Angeles High School

Seattle Pacific University

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Congratulations to teacher Julie! We are proud of your accomplishment! Love, Mom & Renee.

You have achieved so much, and know that you will be successful in life. Love, Dad, Mom & Alyssa.

Congratulations, Tay! We are so proud of you! Love you bigger than the sky. Mom, Dad, Ian and all the rest!

Way to go, Booger Butt! Ya did it, Sport! Congratulations on a great achievement. We’re very proud of you. Richard, Doc, Joey & George

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Congratulations! You are the best! Love you more!

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Enroll by July 5 for college welding class PORT ANGELES — Starting Tuesday, July 5, community residents can enroll in a seven-week, hands-on welding course at Peninsula College. The class has been has been designed for all skill levels. Students will work individually with the instructors to determine which welding process they would like to focus on: shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding or gas tungsten arc welding. Welding instructors Eoin Doherty and Jeramie O’Dell said the class is perfect for those who might wish to take up welding as a career or for current welders who are in between jobs and would like to keep their welding skills current. The beginner/advanced welding class will meet Tuesdays and

Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and again in the afternoon from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. through Aug. 18. Cost for the seven-week course is $400. For more information, check the Peninsula College online summer bulletin under “Business Training Institute” at www. pencol.edu or phone 360-5429277.

Sponsor flowers SEQUIM — The SequimDungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce is seeking businesses, service organizations and individuals to sponsor its community flower basket program. Community flower baskets are made by horticulture students at Sequim High School. The flower baskets are hung along Washington Street each year. Each pole will bear the name of the sponsor and the student who made the basket. Sponsorships are $100. The chamber can accept credit

card payments by telephone at 360-683-6197 or 360-683-0183 or at the chamber office at 1192 E. Washington St.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

C3

Youth volunteers sought downtown

Sol Duc Falls hike

Peninsula Daily News

The Olympic Peninsula Explorers will hold a Sol Duc/ Lover’s Lane Trail walk Saturday. The walk will go through a forest with elements of rainforests to the west, plants of the rain shadow to the east and a view of Sol Duc Falls. Hikers can choose from 6.2- or 3.7-mile hikes. The group will meet at Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, at 9 a.m. before heading off to the trailhead. A carpool will leave the Sequim QFC parking lot at 8:30 a.m. Pets aren’t allowed, and the trail isn’t suitable for strollers/ wheelchairs. For more information, phone Mary Allen Clark 360-452-0593. Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Downtown Association is embarking on a new youth volunteer group to provide a chance for 10- to 18-year-olds to be involved with downtown. Kids will have the opportunity to help plan and run events, dress in costume, build references for scholarships and learn about the history of Port Angeles and how business works.

Secret location The initial informational meeting will be held in a secret, underground location and will begin with a free pizza party. Interested youths and their parents should meet at the fountain at Laurel and First Streets at 6 p.m. Thursday. The program provides an

opportunity to gain community service credits or begin work on a senior culminating project. “This group will be future consumers and business owners, and we want to provide them with a chance to see firsthand everything it takes to make a successful business and to be a smart consumer,” said committee Chairwoman Grace Kauffman, a PADA board member.

‘Young minds, energy’ “We’re excited to have young minds and energy as part of our team,” she continued. All activities will be mentored by approved adults. For more information, phone Kauffman at Sterling Impressions Photographic at 360-4173001 or visit www.portangeles downtown.com.

Congratulations CLASS OF

2011 Kerri McHenry Port Angeles High School You have conquered one mountain and will summit many more. We love you, Mom, Dad, Kyle.

Jenny Grauberger Port Townsend High School

We are so proud of you. We love you, Dad, Mom and Justin

Gage & Ethan Jackson

Blake Yacklin

Tyler Fish

Kenneth Sewell

Jefferson Elementary

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

(6th grade & Kindergarten) Congratulations boys! Mom and Dad and Emery love you both!!

Congratulations! You are such an inspiration. We love you so much! Dad, Mom and Sister.

We’re all so proud of you! Love you, Mom, Dad, Cassi, Grama and Aunt Mary.

Congratulations, we are so, so proud of you, enjoy WSU! Love, Grandpa and Grandma

Coral Don Southard

Anita Macomber

Tavish E. Casey

Mallory Maloney

Cassidy Joan Butler

Port Angeles High School and Peninsula College

Port Angeles High School

Port Angeles High School

Sequim High School

Port Angeles High School and Peninsula College

I am very proud of you. Love you, Grandma Bakker

Congratulations on becoming a certified nail tech and graduation PAHS! Love, Grandma

Congratulations son! Now go show the world what you’re made of! Love, Mom & Dad.

Megan James

Kamii Jean

Port Townsend High School

Kids Kampus Preschool

We are so very proud of you Honey! Work hard, follow your dreams and may God bless and guide you always. Love, Dad, Mom, Dane, Bo and Ty

We are all so proud of you, Megan Rose! We love you, Your Family

We are so proud of you, Honey! We love you the mostest!! MaMa, Gramma, PaPa, Uncle Ryan, Auntie Cami & Riley

Cyanide Cynder-BlockHer Cyndi Stark Fairy FlickHer Tricia Coville Four’ 9” Loko Delaney Ronish Stone Cold Stunher Molly Crabtree Our EMT-Mr. Gothzilla John Barrett

Our Peninsula College Graduates PSRD is so proud of you all!

GO MEAT!

Thanks for being amazing! Love, Mom, Dad, Norman Jr. and Vivian Hansen.

Slade McLaughlin Franklin Elementary Very proud of you for all your hard work and excellent grades. You’re Awesome! Love, Mom & Dad

165124470

Makenzy Smith-Bradow Port Angeles High School

Our dear Mal, We are so thankful for and proud of the loving, respectful, accomplished and fun young man you are. WE LOVE YOU SO MUCH! Happy Graduation! With our love and prayers, Mom, Rolan, Brit, Cort & Blaire.

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!

CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS! CONGRATULATIONS!

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C4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Lady friend not yet ready to move on DEAR ABBY: I’m a 38-year-old man who is in love with a 45-year-old woman. She was married for 20 years and has three children. She was separated for two years before we started dating. She and her ex are extremely civil, and she spends nights at his house in order to see the children. I support her in this because I don’t ever want her to feel like I’m making her choose. Her ex doesn’t want her back, nor does she want to reconcile. They are friends. This morning, she had an appointment with a divorce lawyer and came home saying she isn’t ready to do it. She’s afraid her ex will become vindictive and use the kids as leverage.

separated from her husband, but she’s not yet ready to move on. I told Abigail Or the lawyer may have Van Buren her there said something that frightare custody ened her. arrangeYou’re doing all you can ments that protect both to comfort her. But she may need proparents. She says fessional counseling and more time before she’s she loves ready to take the next step me, but and end the marriage. she’s worried that it Dear Abby: My husisn’t fair for me. band comes from a line of I told her relationships men in his family who aren’t always “fair.” don’t like to go to the docShe expressed that tor. when she’s with her kids, I can’t remember the she misses me and vice last time he went for a versa. I don’t know what to say physical. He puts off going even or do. when he has an ailment. I love her, but how do I We have three young comfort her? Standing By children, and I’m genuinely in Pennsylvania concerned that my husband could one day have a sudden health emergency Dear Standing By: or a life-threatening illness Your lady friend may be

DEAR ABBY

that could have been prevented if it had been discovered in time. We love him with all our hearts and just want him to get an annual physical to stay healthy and be with us for many, many years to come. Please help him see the importance of regular exams. Loving Wife in Ohio Dear Loving Wife: Let’s do it together. There are reasons why men have a shorter life expectancy than women in this country. I’m sad to say that one of them is fear of going to the doctor. Because today is Father’s Day, remind your husband that he has a family who loves him and needs him healthy. Remind your husband

that if anything should happen to him, he would leave all of you not only heartbroken, but also likely struggling financially. He needs to understand that the greatest gift he can give all of you would be to schedule an appointment with his physician for a baseline checkup. Dear Readers: I offer good wishes not only to fathers everywhere, but also to those caring individuals who donate their time to mentor youngsters whose fathers are absent or deceased. Many readers have asked me for a prayer in memory of a father who is no longer living. The following prayer is from the Hebrew Union Prayer Book and is recited on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement:

IN MEMORY OF A FATHER Thy memory, my dear father, fills my soul at this solemn hour. It revives in me thoughts of the love and friendliness which thou didst bestow upon me. The thought of these inspires me to a life of virtue; and when my pilgrimage on earth is ended and I shall arrive at the throne of mercy, may I be worthy of thee in the sight of God and man. May our merciful Father reward thee for the faithfulness and kindness thou has ever shown me; may He grant thee eternal peace. Amen.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles

Square dance club

The Strait Wheelers Square Dance Club meets Sons of Italy the second and fourth SatSons of Italy invites par- urday of every month from ticipants to join with others 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. at of Italian descent to share Mount Pleasant Commuan afternoon of companion- nity Hall, 2432 Mount ship and potluck the third Pleasant Road. Sunday of each month at The cost is $5. 1:30 p.m. in the St. Anne For more information, Room of the Queen of phone 360-452-6974. Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St. Newcomers’ lunch Social members of nonReservations need to be Italian descent with an made by Thursday, interest in the Italian culture are welcome to attend. June 30, for the Newcomers’ luncheon Tuesday, For more information, phone Pat Restaino at 360- July 5, at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. 452-1222. A social hour will start at 11:30 a.m., followed by a Parkinson’s group noon luncheon. The Port Angeles ParThe speakers at the kinson’s Support Group meeting will be Mark meets the fourth WednesOzias, who owns and operday of each month at ates the Red Rooster Grocery, and Samantha Good10:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 man, one of the local farmers who supply the Red E. Seventh St. Rooster with locally grown All are welcome. groceries. For more information, The presentation is phone Darlene Jones at titled “Local Food: The Pen360-457-5352. insula’s Bounty.” For the required reserKiwanis Club vations, phone 360-582The Juan de Fuca 0659. Kiwanis Club meets every Thursday at 10 a.m. at the Sequim and the Vern Burton Community Dungeness Valley Center, 308 E. Fourth St. This week’s speaker will be Col. Pete Flood, a retired Car club meets U.S. Air Force chaplain. The Sequim Valley Car All are welcome to Club meets the third Monattend. day of every month at 6 p.m. at the Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road. For more information, The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at phone 360-681-0413. noon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, Poetry reading 221 N. Lincoln St. The Poetry Alliance There will be a reading hosts a poetry reading the of minutes and other club third Monday of each business. month from 7 p.m. to For information about 8:30 p.m. at the Sequim the Lions’ hearing aid and Senior Activity Center, 921 eyeglass recycling program, E. Hammond St. phone 360-417-6862 The event is free.

PA Lions Club

Pilots breakfast The Clallam County Pilots Association Safety Breakfast will be Friday at 7:30 a.m. at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101.

Stockhounds meet The Stockhounds Investment Club meets every third Tuesday of the month to share knowledge, do research on prospective stocks and evaluate the

Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Dinner is at 5:30 p.m., followed by a meeting at 6:30 p.m. For more information, phone 360-683-9999.

American Legion The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 62 meets the fourth Thursday of the month at 11 a.m. at the American Legion Hall, 107 E. Prairie St. Female relatives of veterans are invited to attend. For more information, phone 360-683-5915 to leave a message.

meets Monday at 7 p.m. in the Madrona Room of the WSU Learning Center, 201 W. Patison St., Port Hadlock. The meeting begins with an open discussion, and participants may bring questions, tips, tricks or whatever pertains to Linux. For more information, visit the club’s website at http://NOPLUG.us. The meeting is open to the public.

Republican forum

The Jefferson County Republicans will host a forum, ”Parks, PartnerThe General Aviation is requested for 6:50 p.m. group’s current portfolio. ships and Paying for It,” on Pilots Experimental AirMembers are of the area Guests are welcome. Tuesday following a social craft Association Chapter from Port Angeles to Port For more information, hour featuring hors Townsend. 430 will meet Saturday at phone the president and d’oeuvres and beverages For more information, chairman at 360-808-2088. 10 a.m. at Sequim Valley phone Merlyn Wursher at Airport Hangar No. 10, 468 beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Tri-Area Community 360-379-5412 in Port Freethinkers meet Dorothy Hunt Lane. Townsend or Mike Zuspan Jeff Bocott, the builder Center, 10 West Valley The Juan de Fuca Free- of the Rotoway Elite Heliat 360-582-1345 in Sequim. Road, Chimacum. thinkers will meet Wednes- copter, will present the proThe issue before Jefferday at the Sequim Library, gram “Flying in to Sequim son County citizens is, in Friends chapter 630 N. Sequim Ave. Valley.” partnership with the city of The North Olympic PenThe meeting, which will The program will be fol- Port Townsend, how to insula Chapter of the Com- begin promptly at 7 p.m., lowed by a noon potluck. fund development and passionate Friends meets will be preceded at maintenance of all the the third Tuesday of each 6:30 p.m. by a social time Pulmonary support parks and recreation promonth at 6 p.m. at St. with refreshments availLuke’s Episcopal Church, The Pulmonary Support grams in the county, able. 525 N. Fifth Ave. Group for people who have including Memorial Field Ken Winters will presand the Port Townsend TCF is a nonprofit selftrouble breathing and/or ent the program “Global Recreation Center, both of help support organization their caregivers meets the Warming, Just the Facts, which are owned by the that assists bereaved fami- Ma’am.” fourth Saturday of every county but are within the lies in their grief journey month at 11:30 a.m. at The presentation is not city limit. after the death of a child. political and will not advo- M&G Mariners Cafe, 707 Will voters be willing to For more information, E. Washington St. cate for or against any legapprove a separate parks phone 360-457-7395 or All are welcome. islation. and recreation district with 360-417-1885. For more information, The meeting is open to its own funding source outphone 360-452-1473. the public. side the county’s general Gems and minerals For more information fund? Railroaders Club and to arrange carpooling, The Clallam County Bob Sokol, former port Gem and Mineral Associa- phone Clover Gowing at The North Olympic Pencommissioner, will moder360-683-5648. tion will meet Tuesday at insula Railroaders Club The Juan de Fuca Free- meets the last Saturday of ate the forum composed of 7 p.m. in the upstairs thinkers is a nonprofit edu- each month at 3 p.m. at the county Administrator Philmeeting room of The Fifth lip Morley, Parks and Reccational and social group Avenue, 500 W. HendrickSequim Library, 630 N. reation Manager Matt consisting of local secularson St. Sequim Ave. Tyler and a member of the For further information, ists who use science and Everyone interested in newly constituted Explorreason to increase one’s phone Ed Bourassa, presimodel railroading is welatory Regional Parks Planunderstanding of the unident of the group, at 360come to attend. verse and to improve the 977-5994 or visit www. For further information, ning Committee. They will discuss and human condition. SequimRocks.com. phone 208-413-7313. evaluate the options and potential plans going forSequim Lions Toastmasters ward. Port Townsend and The Sequim Valley The SKWIM ToastmasdonaJefferson County tionAnfor$8-per-person Lions Club meets the secters meets the first and the social hour is ond and fourth Thursday of third Tuesday of every suggested. every month at the month promptly at 7 p.m. For further information, Linux users Islander Pizza and Pasta at Blue Sky Real Estate, phone 360 343-4041. Shack, 380 E. Washington The North Olympic Pen190 Priest Road. Arrival at the meeting Turn to Clubs/C5 insula Linux Users Group St.

All pilots welcome

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

C5

Bird book takes you ‘into the field’ “THIS IS BEAUTIFUL!” My spouse had just picked up a book sitting beside the desk. He’s been photographing birds for decades, so the remark was a high compliment. Our Pacific Northwest Birds and Habitat by Craig and Joy Johnson is more than a collection of beautiful bird pictures; these are Northwest birds in Northwest habitats. Every page is covered with photos and in some cases of the same bird. Short paragraphs provide additional information about the pictures and the birds. The quality of the book’s photos makes them appear to be almost three-dimensional. Over and over, you ask the same question. “How did he get so close?” Not only do the birds in the photos appear to be inches away from the photographer, their detail is so sharp you want to touch the bird’s feathers. More than 90 pages of bird photographs make up the book. It’s clear that the hardest part of putting it together was selecting which photos to use. To assemble such a collection means taking thousands of pictures, many of equal quality. Craig Johnson is one of the top bird photographers in the country, and he lives in the Northwest and photographs our birds. He is also an artist, and his paintings show a skill that brings life to his subject. When Joy and he wrote and illustrated the children’s book The Amazing Story of Red Rufous, their combined talents created a book for children that

BIRD WATCH adults also enjoy. Carson The Johnsons are Northwest treasures because their work focuses on this region and its birds. They live on Whidbey Island and for years have been using their talents “to help others see and understand these marvelous creatures.” When you look at the collection of photographs contained within the pages of Our Pacific Northwest Birds and Habitat, it’s hard to imagine that all of them were taken with a handheld camera. You would assume the camera was mounted on a tripod. Craig is generous in sharing how and where he takes his photos. Camera details as well as a map showing where the birds were photographed, introduce the book. He does, however, caution would-be bird photographers. “A successful photo was one where I captured the image without startling the bird and left it in the same location as when I first noticed it,” he said. “No photo is worth jeopardizing a bird’s well-being.” This book isn’t a field guide, but it does take you “into the field.” That’s where “habitat” fits into the title.

Joan

Paul Carson

A Clark’s nutcracker holds a piece of pretzel in its beak. Birds are in most cases grouped according to families, but they are primarily grouped in their preferred habitats. Chapter titles include “Beach-Offshore,” “Foothills-Mountains” and “Woodland-Riparian.” In their ongoing dedication to sharing not only Craig’s photos of Northwest birds, the Johnsons have enlarged and added to their website, www.pugetsoundback

Briefly . . . Register by July 5 for Cub Scout camp PORT ANGELES — Mount Olympus District of the Boy Scouts of America will hold a Cub Scout Twilight Camp at the Fairview Grange, 161 Lake Farm Road, from 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 19, to Friday, July 22. The camp is open to boys age 6-10 from Clallam and Jefferson counties who will be entering first through fifth grade in the fall. Activities will include sports, wood crafts, BB guns and archery. Cost is $80 for Boy Scout members and $87.50 for nonmembers. Registration is open until July 5. For more information, phone 360-683-4921 or

Peninsula Births Olympic Medical Center Crystal and Travis Berglund, Port Angeles, a daughter, Sophia Grace, 7 pounds 15 ounces, 3:36 a.m. May 27. Christina and Brad Hardy, Sequim, a daughter, Claire Elizabeth, 7 pounds 6 ounces, 5:40 p.m. June 7.

Continued from C4

Park Pals’ board The Sequim Park Pals’ board meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at 1011 New Meadows Loop. All are welcome, and dog park users and volunteers are encouraged to attend. For further information, phone 360-683-1515.

Dosey Dux meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 11 a.m. at the Brinnon Booster Club building, 32 Corey St., Brinnon.

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“Green Lantern” (PG-13) “Kung Fu Panda 2” (PG) “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” (PG-13) “Super 8” (PG-13) “X-Men: First Class” (PG13)

“X-Men: First Class” (PG13) “Midnight in Paris” (PG-13))

n  Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-3853883)

“The Hangover: Part II” (R)

n  Wheel-In Motor Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859) “Kung Fu Panda 2” (PG) “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” (PG-13)

mini

0A5099905

819 Georgiana St., Suite B • Port Angeles • 360-452-2228

Your Style, Our Expertise

Get up-to-date information, ask questions and join the discussion about the new Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system The City of Port Angeles has started installing the AMI system and replacing water and electric meters, which will give customers more information and control over their electricity use—and help the City and customers keep costs down. At this Town Hall meeting we’ll discuss: • The upcoming Bonneville Power Administra- tion’s (BPA) rate increases and changes to the way they charge for power • How the new meters work and the advantages over our old system

Thursday June 30th at 12:15 p.m. Thursday June 30th at 6:00 p.m. City Hall Council Chambers 321 East 5th Street For more information about the AMI system: Go to www.cityofpa.us/newmeters.htm, Email us at newmeters@cityofpa.us or Call 360-417-4595.

“Come in & have some fun creating a sanctuary for the way you live. Choose hand-scraped wood for that old world charm or glass tiles for something more contemporary. Let your home reflect your style. Call for your FREE in-home consultation!” Mae Graves Sales/Design Consultant Mae@mccrorie.com • 360-461-1922

Voluntary Peak Power Project info will be provided in an upcoming utility bill and is available now at www.cityofpa.us/drpower.htm.

165123821

STORE HOURS: MON.-SAT. 9 AM-5:30 PM

THE

165123727

PORT ANGELES

547 N. Oakridge (across from Wal-Mart) • 457-7500

PDN gardening columnist Andrew May is off this week. His column, “A Growing Concern,” will resume upon his return.

Town Hall Meetings

Axio ST is more powerful than any other hearing aid technology available today.

Creating Beautiful Homes Since 1958

The Port Townsend Lions Club meets the fourth Thursday of each

month at 6 p.m. at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend. Meetings are open to all parties interested in assisting the hearing- and visionimpaired members of the community. For further information, phone 360-379-4686.

• And, introduce the Voluntary Peak Power Project where customer volunteers can try additional energy-saving technology

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PT Lions Club

SayHELLO to the

C ERTIFIED H EARING

All women from Quilcene and Brinnon are welcome. For further information, phone Judy Hart at 360796-0391.

No ‘A Growing Concern’?

Find out the latest about the City of Port Angeles’ New Electric and Water Meters

n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

“Bridesmaids” (R) “The Hangover: Part II” (R) “Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer” (PG) “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” (PG)

Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Dosey Dux

Now Showing

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

________

NEXT

Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

PORT ANGELES — The Rotary Club of Port Angeles is holding its 11th annual bulb sale. The club is selling more than 60 colors and varieties of flowers, from snowdrops and crocuses to daffodils and tulips, all sourced from Holland. Proceeds from the bulb sale support local scholarships, many local organizations, plus international projects such as the attempt to eradicate polio worldwide, disaster relief and other humanitarian endeavors. Information about the bulb sale is available at www.parotary.org. For more information, phone 360-477-2162. Peninsula Daily News

get a good book on local birds?” This book is a good one to look at (pun intended). If you are a bird person, you will enjoy looking at its pages over and over.

Clubs and Organizations

email jheintz@olypen.com.

Rotary bulb sale

yardbirds.com. It includes slide shows, video clips with bird songs and additional bird information. It also contains a list of where Our Pacific Northwest Birds and Habitat can be purchased. It retails for $24.95, and copies are also available by writing direct to Craig and Joy Johnson, 575 Dolphin Drive, Freeland, WA 98249. I am often asked, “Where can I


C6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Things to Do Today and Monday, June 19-20, in: ■ Port Angeles ■ Sequim-Dungeness Valley ■ Port TownsendJefferson County ■ Forks-West End

Crescent, Camp Hayden, the Spruce Railroad and early logging. 15 miles west of Port Angeles on state Highway 112, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 360928-3568. Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, $1 youth, children younger than 2 free. Phone 360-417-6254.

Port Angeles

Serenity House Dream Center — For youths ages 13-24, homeless or at risk for homelessness. 535 E. First St., 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Housing and planning help, plus basic needs: showers, laundry, hygiene products, etc. Meals served daily. Volunteers and donors, phone 360-477-8939 or 360-565-5048.

Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. For women 45 and older and men 50 and older. Elks Playfield, 14th and Pine streets, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360683-0141.

Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics health clinic — 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health care. For appointments, phone 360-457-4431.

Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, $1 youths, children younger than 2 free. Phone 360-417-6254.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Campground at LaPush. Family-friendly event. Phone Darrell Wood at 360-460-0453.

Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Business Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Port Angeles Fine Arts Open to public. Phone Bill Center — “ArtPaths: Portfolio Monday Musicale — Thomas at 360-460-4510 or 2011.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Show Queen of Angels Church, 109 Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655. runs till July 3. Phone 360-457- W. 11th St., noon. Phone 360457-4585. Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 3532. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. First Step drop-in center Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks Karaoke for Kids — Allages karaoke, Salt Creek Res- — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 and pull tabs available. Phone taurant and Lounge, 53821 p.m. Free clothing and equip- 360-457-7377. state Highway 112, corner of ment closet, information and Argentine tango dancing Camp Hayden Road and the referrals, play area, emergency highway, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free. supplies, access to phones, — 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sons of computers, fax and copier. Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St. $3 Phone 360-928-9942. Phone 360-457-8355. donation. Phone 360-9127007. Sons of Norway dance — Blood drive — 1 p.m. to 7 Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 min- p.m. at Vern Burton Community Sequim and utes of instruction, followed by Center, 308 W. Fourth St. folk and ballroom dance. $2 Dungeness Valley General discussion group members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments at 9 p.m. Phone — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to Today 360-457-4081. 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open Sea Breeze Market — Corto public. Monday ner of Third and Washington The Answer for Youth — streets, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays Overeaters Anonymous — St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Drop-in outreach center for through Sundays. Handcrafted 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone youths and young adults, pro- jewelry from Unicorn and viding essentials like clothes, Rose, birdhouses, baked 360-477-1858. food, Narcotics and Alcoholics goods. Vendors wanted; phone WSU-Clallam Master Gar- Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 360-683-9426. deners plant clinic — WSU E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. VFW breakfast — 169 E. Extension Office, Clallam Mental health drop-in cen- Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ter — The Horizon Center, 205 p.m. Cost $5 a person. Free. Open to the public. Bring E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sequim Museum & Arts samples of plants for identifica- For those with mental disortion. Phone Muriel Nesbitt, pro- ders and looking for a place to Center — Combined exhibit by gram coordinator, at 360-565- socialize, something to do or a the Olympic Driftwood Sculp2679. Through Oct. 25. No hot meal. For more information, tors and the Olympic Peninsula phone Rebecca Brown at 360- Camera Club. 175 W. Cedar clinic July 4, Sept. 3. St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through 457-0431. Saturday. Free. Phone 360Walk-in vision clinic — Senior meal — Nutrition 683-8110. Information for visually impaired and blind people, program, Port Angeles Senior Peonies on Parade — including accessible technol- Center, 328 E. Seventh St., ogy display, library, Braille 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Peony garden display. 11 a.m. training and various magnifica- per meal. Reservations recom- to 4 p.m., Peony Farm, 2204 tion aids. Vision Loss Center, mended. Phone 360-457-8921. Happy Valley Road. Through July 6. Armory Square Mall, 228 W. International Surfing Day First St., Suite N. Phone 360Adult Scrabble — The 457-1383 for an appointment — Olympic Peninsula Surfrider or visit www.visionloss Foundation will host a fund- Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 raiser celebrating International p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. services.org/vision. Surfing Day at Bar N9ne, 229 Sequim City Band concert Guided walking tour — W. First St., 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Historic downtown buildings, Program starts at 7 p.m. Nar- — James Center for the Peran old brothel and “Under- rated video of Washington forming Arts, 563 N. Rhoderfer ground Port Angeles.” Cham- state and Olympic Peninsula Road, 2 p.m. ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- surf history from 1963 to presroad Ave., 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. ent. Includes a Surf Swap Trivia night — Oasis Sports Tickets $12 adults, $10 senior where people can bring used Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washingcitizens and students, $6 ages surfing gear to be sold. Pro- ton St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 3606 to 12. Children younger than ceeds from event will go to 582-3143. 6, free. For reservations, phone Surfrider Foundation. Free. 360-452-2363, ext. 0. Sells T-shirts, sweatshirts, auc- Monday tions, raffles. Club pays for outWalk aerobics — First BapJoyce Depot Museum — houses at Mouth of Elwha 1915-era log depot houses, River and Twin Rivers and tist Church of Sequim, 1323 photographs and historical maintenance of Twin Rivers Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 information regarding Joyce, parking lot; recently installed a a.m. Free. Phone 360-683Port Crescent, Twin, Lake shower at Lonesome Creek 2114. Senior Singles Hiking Group — Walks short walks close to Sequim, approximately three miles. Everyone welcome. Meet at Safeway gas station at 8:50 a.m. to leave for

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Exercise classes — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning class, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or email jhaupt6@wavecable. com. Free blood pressure screening — Faith Lutheran Church, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360683-4803 Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., noon. Phone 360-6814308 or partnership at 360683-5635. Women’s weight loss support group — Dr. Leslie Van Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim Ave. Family Caregivers support group — Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn Lindley at 360-417-8554. German class — Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-6810226 or 360-417-0111. Look Good Feel Better program — For women diagnosed with cancer. Learn hairstyling and makeup application tips. Olympic Medical Cancer Center, 844 N. Fifth Ave., 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by Olympic Medical Cancer Center and American Cancer Society. Registration required. Phone 360-582-2845 or 360582-5675. Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or underinsured. Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. Cultural Connections — The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 W. Evergreen Farm Way, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Free. Visit www.sequimartsalliance.org or phone 360-460-3023. Presented by Sequim Humanities and Arts Alliance.

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Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission $5 for adults, $3 for youth and free to center members. Phone 360-3855582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

Rothschild House — Franklin and Taylor streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults, $1 for children 3 to 12, free to Jefferson County HisPuget Sound Coast Artil- torical Society members. lery Museum — Exhibits inter- Phone 360-385-1003 or visit pret the Harbor Defenses of www.jchsmuseum.org. Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Fort Worden Commanding Officer’s State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quarters museum tour — Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for Fort Worden State Park, 11 children 6 to 12, free for chil- a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for dren 5 and younger. Phone children. Phone 360-385-1003. 360-385-0373 or email artymus@olypen.com. Quilcene Historical Museum — Artifacts, photos Rothschild House — and documents tell story of JefFranklin and Taylor streets, 11 ferson County. New displays on a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for Brinnon, shellfish and people adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; in uniform join established free to Jefferson County His- exhibits. 151 E. Columbia St., 1 torical Society members. p.m. to 5 p.m. No admission, Phone 360-385-1003 or visit but donations appreciated. www.jchsmuseum.org. Phone 360-765-4848, email quilcenemuseum@olypen.com Commanding Officer’s or visit www.quilcenemuseum. Quarters museum tour — org. Open until Sept. 18. Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for Silent war and violence children. Phone 360-385-1003. protest — Women In Black, Jefferson County Histori- Adams and Water streets, 1:30 cal Museum and shop — p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Exhibits include “Jefferson Uptown walking tour — County’s Maritime Heritage,” Jefferson County Historical “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese Society offers an enhanced in Early Port Townsend.” 540 walking tour beginning at the Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rothschild House Museum, Admission $4 for adults; $1 for corner of Franklin and Taylor children 3 to 12; free to histori- streets. 2 p.m. Cost is $10 for cal society members. Phone the public or free for historical 360-385-1003 or visit www. society members. Museum admission included. Visit www. jchsmuseum.org. jchsmuseum.org. Port Townsend Marine SciFree bike clinic — ence Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear marine exhibits, 11 a.m. to 5 offers “Port Townsend ReCyp.m. Admission $5 for adults, clery,” Food Co-op, 414 Kear$3 for youth and free to center ney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone members. Phone 360-385- 360-643-1755. 5582, email info@ptmsc.org or Team Survivor Northwestvisit www.ptmsc.org. PT exercise class — DiscovQuilcene Historical ery Physical Therapy, 27 ColMuseum — Artifacts, photos well St. (off Rhody Drive), Port and documents tell story of Jef- Hadlock, 4:20 p.m. to 5:20 p.m. ferson County. New displays on For more information, visit Brinnon, shellfish and people www.tsnw-pt.org. in uniform join established Overeaters Anonymous — exhibits. 151 E. Columbia St., 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. No admission, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, but donations appreciated. 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-765-4848, email Phone 360-385-6854. quilcenemuseum@olypen.com Port Townsend Ananda or visit www.quilcenemuseum. Meditation Group — Azaya org. Open until Sept. 18. Wellness Center, 1441 F St., 7 Community Yoga — Begin- p.m. Meditation instruction at ner-level class. Learn to move, 6:45 p.m. All welcome to join breathe and relax. Room to meditation, chanting and Move Yoga, second floor, 1008 teachings of Paramahansa Lawrence St., 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 Yogananda. Phone 360-531p.m. By donation. All levels 3308. welcome. For more details or questions, visit www.roomto Discussion — Quimper moveyoga.com or phone 360- Grange, 1219 Corona St., 7 385-2864. p.m. For monthly topics, phone 360-379-2536.

Today Hike — The Olympic Outdoor Club hikes the Lower Big

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Fort Worden

Forks Timber Museum — Next door to Forks Visitors Center, 1421 S. Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $3 admission. Phone 360-374-9663.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Farmers Market will celebrate the opening of its Wednesday Afternoon Farmers Market with the second annual Dinner at the Market at The Gateway transit center Wednesday. The event will celebrate

the start of the summer market season and will serve as a fundraiser for the farmers market. Dinner at the market will be served from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and is hosted by the team at Nash’s Organic Produce. New farm chef Karolina Tracz will be preparing the market meal.

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cake at the booster tent to all who attend. The market’s annual booster campaign gives market supporters a chance to contribute directly to the financial success of the market by becoming a booster. Summer market sponsors First Federal and Olympic Medical Center will be officially announced at the event. The Wednesday market will be held each week from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. through September.

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“Karolina’s Kitchen” will be serving locally sourced lasagna with meat and vegetarian/gluten-free options, salad with a choice of dressings and crostini with arugula pesto.

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Port Townsend Aero Museum — Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6.

Women’s barbershop chorus — Singers sought for Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., Monday 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster Forks and Cabin Fever Quilters — Triat 360-683-0141. Area Community Center, 10 the West End West Valley Road, Chimacum, Port Townsend and 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Jefferson County Laura Gipson at 360-385-0441. Monday

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Peninsula Daily News


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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

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Stranded marine mammal training set Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A free training session on how to help marine mammals that become stranded on local beaches will be offered by the Port Townsend Marine Science Center on Thursday. The training will be held at the center’s Marine Exhibit at Fort Worden State Park from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. “This is a great opportunity to learn how to respond to calls about marine mammal strandings and/or seal pup sightings,” said Chrissy McLean, PTMSC Marine Program coordinator. “After training, your name will be on a call list to respond in the geographic area(s) you specify. “If you’re available when the call comes in, you can respond if you wish, but you’re not obligated to drop everything and

I

t’s important for volunteers to understand that in the majority of cases of injured animals, volunteers document incidents rather than save or rehabilitate individual marine mammals. respond instantly.” Attendees will learn about changes in PTMSC’s stranding program and goals for local and regional groups in the coming year. There will be a review of species identification and documentation and a beach session to practice skills. The more trained volunteers that are on the call list, the more the responses can be spread around, especially when seal pups need “pupsitting” to keep dogs and people away while they rest on the beach. It’s important for volunteers to understand that in the majority of cases of

injured animals, this cadre of volunteers is documenting incidents rather than saving or rehabilitating individual marine mammals. The data collected becomes part of a nationwide database that tracks marine mammal strandings and looks at larger trends in order to address possible problems that might be causing the strandings. No previous knowledge about marine mammals is required. For more information or to sign up for the free training, phone Jess Swihart at A free training session on stranded marine mammals like this seal pup 360-385-5582, ext. 113, or will be held at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Marine Exhibit on Thursday. email jswihart@ptmsc.org.

Student, 9-year-old winners on piano Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School junior Curry Winborn recently won the Washington State Music Teachers Association’s local chapter piano competition for the second year in a row. He will perform Debussy’s “Prelude” from the Pour le piano suite at the 2011 state conference in Pasco on Tuesday, June 28. He is the son of Joel and Mary Ellen Winborn and studies piano at the studio of Kayla Dyment.

Winners of competition Winborn was also the winner of the 2011 Solo and Ensemble piano competition and recently performed at Central Washington University as a representative

of Port Angeles. He has been the jazz pianist for Port Angeles High School for the past Winborn three years and performs in a variety of venues.

Alternate The competition alternate was Nathanael Mullins, who played “Grieg’s Wedding Day at Troldhaugen.” Nathanael’s parents are Mark and Diana Mullin. He is taught by Thelma McCoy. Tyler Messinger, the 9-year-old son of Becky and Justin Messinger, also recently won the 2011 Wash-

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ington State Young Composer Contest with his composition “The Marching Bears,” composed for solo Messinger piano. He will be performing it at the State Music Teachers Conference in Pasco on June 27. Messinger will also be presenting his second solopiano recital later this summer. He is also a student of Dyment. Both Winborn and Messinger will perform in Dyment’s studio’s awards recital along with the rest of her students at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., at 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Briefly . . . Medication lecture set for Thursday SEQUIM — The Olympic Area Agency on Aging’s Nurse Services Department will hold a free “Medication Solutions” presentation Thursday. The presentation will be held at Avamere Olympic Rehab, 1000 S. Fifth Ave. Topics will include common medications, over-thecounter drugs and communicating with health professionals. For more information, phone 360-538-2457 or 866-582-1487.

Poker run benefit PORT TOWNSEND — Life Care Center of Port Townsend will hold a poker run and car rally Saturday. The rally will begin at Life Care Center of Port Townsend, 751 Kearney

Greybird art sale

St., at 3 p.m. At each of five checkpoints, teams will pick up a poker card and face a special challenge to earn extra points. Those points are accumulated for prizes, and the best poker hand also earns a prize. At the last checkpoint, each team will receive a clue for a mystery checkpoint. Those who find it will get a wild card for their poker hand. A barbecue with live music provided by Dr. Love and the King of Hearts will follow the poker run. Entry fee is $15 per vehicle (up to four people per vehicle) or $20 on Saturday. All proceeds will benefit the Port Townsend Relay for Life event for the American Cancer Society. For more information or a registration form, phone Sandi Bird at 360-6433555.

PORT TOWNSEND — Five area artists will be showing their work at Greybird Barn, 11 Carroll Ave., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, June 26. The third annual sale will feature jewelry, ceramics and art for the home. Diane Gale will be offering wood-fired and glazed ceramics for the kitchen and home. Linda Jarvis’ mixedmedia paintings, sculpture and assemblages often feature crows, ravens and other animals. Along with photo-etched jewelry and narrative boxes, Shane Miller will show her new translucent mixedmedia boats. Shirley Moss will demonstrate how she makes her handmade sterling silver and gold chains both days. Beverly Saito’s will show beaded jewelry and sculptural ceramics. Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News

Charles Rogers/Kiwanis Club

of

Port Angeles

Port Angeles Kiwanis Club scholarship recipients are, from left in background, Derek Crain, Kirby Uranich, Jenna Moore, Jason Fox, Connor Spurr, Tally Swanson, Haley Powless, Alison Maxwell and Kiwanis Scholarship Committee Chairman Steve Charno. Not pictured is Louisa Rogers.

Kiwanis Club names 2011 scholars The winners were event’s master of ceremotreated to lunch at the club nies. PORT ANGELES — A Scholarships and recipiluncheon and congratulated group of nine high school by the membership. ents are: seniors representing Port ■  Louie Cnockaert Angeles and Lincoln high Memorial Scholarship, Master of ceremonies schools were recently. $1,000 to Louisa Rogers. awarded the 2011 Kiwanis Kiwanis Scholarship ■  George Charno Club and Kiwanis Founda- Committee Chairman Steve Memorial Scholarship, Charno served as the $1,000 to Derek Crain. tion scholarships. Peninsula Daily News

■  Norris Academic Scholarship, $1,000 to Alison Maxwell. ■  Palmquist Academic Scholarship, $1,000 to Kirby Uranich. ■  Charles Willson Citizenship Scholarship, $1,000 to Jenna Moore. ■  Glenn Gallison Key

Club Scholarship, $1,000 to Connor Spurr. ■  “Dutch” Haag Academic Scholarship, $1,000 to Jason Fox. ■  Fred Owens Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 to Tally Swanson. ■  Graham Ralston Vocational Scholarship,

$1,000 to Haley Powless. Powless is a Lincoln High School student. Other recipients are from Port Angeles High School. The Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles was chartered in 1921 and will celebrate its 90th anniversary this summer.

2011 Rayonier grant Hospital guild raises winners announced $72,500 during events Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

SILVERDALE — Rayonier recently announced the award of more than $39,000 from The Rayonier Foundation to nonprofit organizations serving Northwest communities and local students. Recipients of 2011 grants were recognized at special awards breakfasts hosted by Rayonier in Aberdeen and Forks.

Support variety The funds support a variety of educational, civic, cultural and health programs and include a scholarship for Tanner Phair from Port Angeles High School The foundation also donated more than $1,300 to Clallam County United Way as part of the compa-

ny’s matching-funds program for Rayonier employee fundraising campaigns. The following organizations received support from Rayonier: American Cancer Society Forks and Grays Harbor Relay For Life; Boy Scouts of America/Coastal Waters District; Bremerton Symphony Association; Caring Place of West Clallam County; Centrum — High School Summer Arts Camp; Citizens for Children’s Fund; city of Aberdeen/Sam Benn Park; Clallam County Historical Society; Clallam County Literacy Council; Coastal Harvest Distribution Center Coastal Community Action-Student Needs Assistance Program of Grays Harbor; Forks Alternative School; Forks Food

Bank; Grays River Grange No. 124; Healthy Families of Clallam County; Mary Bridge Children’s Foundation — Tree House; Montesano Community Outreach After-School Program; Raindrop Cooperative Preschool; Serenity House of Clallam County-One Family One Home West End; Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics; Washington Agricultural & Forestry Education Foundation; Aberdeen Business Week; Willapa Harbor Regional Business Week; and Washington Business Week Summer Program Washington Contract Loggers Log a Load for Kids The Rayonier Foundation, established in 1952, serves as the principal entity for Rayonier’s charitable contributions.

SEQUIM — The Trey Green Guild of Seattle Children’s Hospital recently raised $72,500 for uncompensated care during a recent weekend of activities. Guild members held their second annual Trey Green Guild Golf Tournament at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course and a “Miles for Miracles” fun run as part of the North Olympic Discovery Marathon. The weekend’s main event, the sixth annual Wine Gala & Auction, was also held at Cedars at Dungeness. More than 200 attendees were greeted by guild members and sent along to mingle on the grounds, in winetasting tents and to auction items. Double Eagle Restaurant catered a buffet of meatballs, wings, shrimp, rollups and more.

The food lasted all night and kept guests coming back for more. Two golf course tee boxes were converted into the location of two winery tents. Local wine vendors Damiana’s Best Cellars, Harbinger Winery and Olympic Cellars Winery offered wine-tasting, and guests used their commemorative 2011 wine glass to sample offerings. Silver City Brewery offered tastes of two of its beers, as well. Darci Ulin of the Trey Green Guild welcomed attendees with local statistics on Children’s Hospital usage. Clallam County sent 744 patients to the hospital last year and received $828,000 in uncompensated care. A majority of funds raised by the Trey Green Guild comes from the live auction and a “raise the

paddle” opportunity. Guests gave from the heart after hearing Suzy Matter share her son Colton Matter’s compelling story about his two bone marrow transplants, including one as recent as three months ago. Colton and his family’s presence was the highlight of the evening, and most guests went home wearing one, two or three of the bracelets brought by Colton, each of them bringing another $5 to the night’s total, according to event organizers. The Trey Green Guild was named in memory of Trey Green. “It is complete honor for the guild to give to the hospital in his name, on behalf of his family, friends and the generous community,” said club President Janet Gray.

Retirees association provides mini grants to Clallam teachers Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County School Retirees Association recently provided mini grants to classroom teachers in Clallam County. The following received grants to assist with class projects: ■  Lora Brabant, DECA adviser and business teacher at Port Angeles High School, requested assistance with transportation costs to a pro sports

career day event so students could meet and interact with individuals working at a professional level. ■  Deb Volturno of Lincoln High School received funds to construct an electric car from popsicle sticks and dowels powered by DC Motors. Students worked with design, construction, measurement, remodeling, record-keeping and evaluation. ■  Melissa McBride of Stevens Middle School

received funds for a unit on the history of Port Angeles. An emphasis was placed on the “Lady of the Lake” story, a crime investigation and an underground tour of Port Angeles. ■  Daniel Cobb of Hamilton Elementary School allowed students to combine music and art by making a digeridoo using PVC pipes. ■  Jeff Lunt of Hamilton Elementary used funds for an orienting activity

using compasses and the school grounds. Students used math and science concepts and a compass to measure degrees of direction, distance and map reading. ■  Clarie Rausch of Franklin Elementary requested assistance with the purchase of copies of the book Windsong for a class unit on the Yukon Quest and Iditarod Sled Dog Races. ■  Geoffrey Cobb of

Roosevelt Elementary used funds to purchase books for the Six Books for Summer Reading program, where students would receive six books to take home with them for the summer. ■  Katharine Fors of Roosevelt created “Steps for a Healthier You,” a program that combines nutrition, movement and the ability to create healthy snacks and meals. ■  Mary O’Keif of Roosevelt used funds for a trip to

Sequim Education Foundation director meets with students Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Sequim Education Foundation student enrichment director Jodi Olson recently met with elementary school students Johnnie Young, Blake Wiker, Riley Scott and Erin Gordon of Sequim’s Team Lugnuts to present them with $4,800 in SEF fellowships to help with their trip to Knoxville, Tenn.

14th in world Team Lugnuts placed 14th in the world in the Destination ImagiNation Global Finals that included teams from 30 countries. One of their most memorable activities was trading pins with students from other nations. Last April, teacher Tricia Billes asked Sequim Education Foundation to help fund Team Lugnuts’ extracurricular learning pursuit with Destination ImagiNation. Billes oversees Sequim

School District’s Highly Capable Student Program. The youngsters rolled up their sleeves and got busy. They held a mini-golf fundraising event and began asking for help from the community. After some discussion, the Sequim Education Foundation board agreed to make up the shortfall after the students and their parents had exhausted their personal fundraising efforts.

View birds of prey at raptor center June 26 Peninsula Daily News

In a few weeks In a few short weeks, Team Lugnuts raised $3,493 toward their $4,800 goal, and Sequim Education Foundation made up the $1,307 difference with a Student Enrichment Fellowship. “The youngster’s enthusiasm and effort was amazing,” Billes said. “We are very grateful for Sequim Education Foundation’s help and encouragement.” The Sequim Education

the Makah Museum in Neah Bay. ■  William Prorok at Roosevelt requested assistance with materials for a “Mask Making to Enrich Ancient Cultures” program. Students will make masks like the ones used in Greek theater. ■  Jan Van Rossen used funds for quilting materials for an Alphabet Quilt project for kindergartners.

Sequim Educational Foundation

Sequim Education Foundation student enrichment director Jodi Olson, left, stands with Team Lugnuts members Johnnie Young, Blake Wiker, Riley Scott and Erin Gordon, who recently placed 14th in the Destination ImagiNation Global World Finals against teams from 30 countries. Foundation is hoping to tunities for Sequim’s stu- realize their dreams. raise $40,400 this year to dents not only to dream big, To learn more, visit continue to provide oppor- but also to be inspired to www.sequimed.org.

GARDINER — Jaye and Gary Moore of the Northwest Raptor & Wildlife Center will bring rehabilitated live birds of prey for demonstration at Wild Birds Unlimited, 275953 U.S. Highway 101, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 26. The Northwest Raptor & Wildlife Center has been working on the Peninsula for the past 30 years and is dedicated to the rehabilitation of local wildlife and to the education of the public on wildlife issues. In addition to financial donations, the center is seeking donations of aquariums in good condition, dog food, small animal-watering bottles, baby bottles to feed deer, powdered goats milk, KMR, alfalfa, chain-link fencing and an enclosed trailer for the release of wildlife.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Surplus sale set for Sequim School District

and bread. For more information, phone First Step at 360-4578355 Meals will be provided at: ■  Lower Elwah Tribal Center, 2851 Lower Elwah SEQUIM — The Sequim Road, from 11 a.m. to School District will hold a 11:30 a.m. sale of surplus property ■  The Gathering from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. FriPlace, 247 N. S’Klallam day. Drive, from 11 a.m. to The sale will be held at 11:30 a.m. 911 S. Third Ave. ■  Roosevelt ElemenA general description of tary School, 106 Monroe property is available at Road, from 11:20 a.m. to www.sequim.k12.wa.us. 11:40 a.m. ■  Franklin ElemenSummer meals set tary School, 2505 S. Washington St., from 11:20 a.m. PORT ANGELES — to 11:40 a.m. First Step Family Support ■  Mount Angeles Boys Center will sponsor the 2011 & Girls Club, 2620 S. FranSummer Food Program for cis St., from noon to Children. Free meals will be made 12:20 p.m. ■  Jefferson Elemenavailable to children 1 year tary School, 218 E. 12th to 18 Monday through FriSt., from noon to 12:20 p.m. day from June 27 through ■  Erickson Playfield, Aug. 26, except for July 4. The USDA Summer Food Race Street across from Program, sponsored by First Civic Field, from 12:50 p.m. to 1:10 p.m. Step and Share Our ■  Evergreen Family Strength, will serve a lunch each day that will include Village, 2203 W. 18th St., milk, a meat or protein from 12:50 p.m. to 1:10 p.m. source, fruits and vegetables, Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice MURRAY EUGENE THOMPSON April 27, 1931 June 13, 2011 Murray was born on April 27, 1931, in Port Angeles and graduated from Crescent High School in June 1950. He was first married to Patsy Norma Simmons, and from that marriage came a daughter, Hannah Marie, and a son, Randall “Randy” Eugene. Subsequently, he married Vicki Gail Luttrell, and from that marriage came two sons, Michael Joseph and Mark Jason. Murray spent nearly all his life on the Olympic Peninsula working as a truck driver, but he will be remembered as one of the best “cat-skinners” on the Peninsula. His friends and family swear that he could operate nearly anything on wheels or treads. He greatly enjoyed hunting and fishing with his nephews, sons and grandchildren, but most of all, he was a family man who loved spending time with his family and friends. Murray, a peaceful man who rarely complained, was held in high regard by several generations of family and

C9

Jefferson library to host summer reading program Peninsula Daily News

PORT HADLOCK — Jefferson County Library’s 2011 Summer Reading Program “One World, Many Stories” encourages children to discover the world’s diversity of cultures and the stories they offer. The program features reading, prizes and events for the entire family. The program kickoff will be held at the library, 620 Cedar Ave., from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, June 27. Attendees will pick up a passport and join the Summer Reading Program. Kids travel from “country to country” enjoying crafts, food, books and music from other lands. Participants are asked to read, keep track of the time spent reading and come to the library or bookmobile for prizes. Children who finish the program will have their name put in a drawing for additional prizes, including the grand prize. One lucky child will have the Jefferson County Library Bookmobile come to his or her house. Reading records will be available at the library and on the bookmobile begin-

ning June 27. The program’s goal is to read 8,760 hours, the equivalent of one year. For each half-hour participants read, they will turn the crank of the Readerator 10 times, while the globe turns and the clocks count time. The Readerator will keep track of how many hours all of the children of Jefferson County read throughout the summer. Programs include Read to Rover, Magician Jeff Evans, Museum of Flight’s Flying Gizmo Show, weekly movies set in other lands, art with Sidonie Wilson, toymaker Rick Hartman, a puppet show and more. The program will end Thursday, Aug. 11, with a party at H.J. Carroll Park for participants and their families. Drop by the library or bookmobile or visit www. jclibrary.info for a complete “One World, Many Stories” calendar of events. Children do not need to be enrolled in the reading portion of the program to attend these events. All events are free and open to the public.

The “Readerator” will count the hours that children in the Jefferson County Library’s Summer Reading Program read using a crank and gear mechanism. The Readerator, created by Drew Elicker, counts minutes, hours, tens of hours, hundreds of hours and thousands of hours. The program’s goal is to reach 8,760 hours of reading, equivalent to one year.

Sequim student wins essay contest for ‘Blue Highways’ Mr. Thompson friends who were drawn to him through his storytelling, which entertained while keeping everyone in touch with the past. He will be greatly missed. Murray was preceded in death by his mother, Alva Rose Thompson; father Louis Thompson; sister Florence Sands (Lincoln); and brother George Thompson (Audrey). He is survived by daughter Hanna Bowen (Peter); sons Randy Thompson (Doreen), Michael Thompson and Mark Thompson; daughter-in-law Jennifer Thompson; granddaughters Amanda Ashby, Erica Thompson, Kaylee Thompson and Abreanna Thompson; and grandsons Robert Ashby, Eli Thompson and Emmett Thompson.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Gwuinifer Carradine of Sequim has been selected by the Peninsula College English department as the winner of the Outstanding English Essay Award for 2011. The Outstanding English Essay Award is being given for the first time this year.

Winning essay Carradine’s winning essay, “Blue Highways: The River’s Role in Literature,” was written for Janet Lucas’ English 245: American Literature II class during win-

Death Notices James Berwyn Ball

Richard Lee Skates

Nov. 18, 1925 — June 11, 2011

Aug. 4, 1931 — June 15, 2011

Sequim resident James Berwyn Ball died at Avamere Rehabilitation after an extended illness. He was 85. Services: To be announced later. The Neptune Society, Lynnwood, is in charge of arrangements.

Richard Lee Skates died in Port Angeles of agerelated causes at 79. His obituary will be published later. Services: Private family service. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Robert Edward McMahan

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Feb. 18, 1930 — June 15, 2011

James G. Coma

Robert Edward McMahan died in his Port Angeles home of age-related causes. He was 81. Services: At his request, none. Kosec Funeral Home, Port Townsend, is in charge of arrangements. www.kosecfuneralhome.com

Aug. 28, 1923 — June 15, 2011

James G. Coma, 87, died of cancer in his Sequim home. His obituary will be published later. Services: Private family service. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Lucas invited Dr. Underwood, a PC ecologist and economist, to share with our class via Web conferences; he offered a vibrant scientific counterpoint to some of the more subjective pieces on which we’d been focused.”

Nominated by teacher Carradine’s essay was selected from among the top essays written in composition and literature classes this year. Each essay was nominated by a PC English faculty member. The essays, with the authors’ names removed, were judged by the English faculty on analytical depth,

development and organization of ideas, and writing style. Carradine received the Outstanding English Essay Award at a recent meeting of the college’s board of trustees meeting. It includes a certificate and $100, money donated to the PC Foundation for use by the English department. Carradine was born in Northridge, Calif., near Los Angeles and moved to the North Olympic Peninsula with her husband 11 years ago. They have lived in Sequim for the past four years.

Death and Memorial Notice ARNDT LORENZEN March 18, 1942 June 7, 2011 Arndt was born during World War II to Gunther and Anna Lorenzen in Hamburg, Germany. After the war, his parents wanted to relocate the family to the United States. There were no quotas for entering the United States, so they first spent three years in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Finally Ford Motor Company sponsored his father into the U.S., and the family lived in Ohio for the requisite six months, after which they moved to southern California. Arndt studied math at Long Beach State and then, as an Air Force 2nd Lieutenant, he studied meteorology at San Jose State. Arndt was stationed at Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Oscoda, Michigan, and then was stationed in Thailand at the beginning of the Vietnam War. Mr. Lorenzen married

Remembering a Lifetime available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

Mr. Lorenzen Susan Rae State on September 4, 1990. Arndt worked as a meteorologist and then chief meteorologist at the California Air Resources Board in Sacramento, California, for 35 years, retiring in 2005. Arndt was a very pleasant, congenial man with strong principles and great integrity. He had a ready smile for any person he met. He was kind and patient and loved by all who knew him.

He will be greatly missed in the lives of so many. He was a very special person. Arndt’s personal priority was one of service to others. He filled his days with time spent as a reading tutor at Helen Haller Elementary or meeting with people experiencing financial difficulty on behalf of Sequim Community Aid. He was diligent and active in his Lions Club positions and in his church callings. Arndt was a loving husband, father, son, brother and friend. We love you, Arndt, and we will miss you terribly. He is survived by his wife, Susan Lorenzen of Sequim; sons Wendall Lorenzen, 13, a seventhgrader at Sequim Middle School, Tyrone Lorenzen of Canby, Oregon, and stepson Geoff Olander of Sacramento, California; stepdaughter Heidi Olander-Evans of Ripon, California; mother Anna Lorenzen of Cherry Valley, California; brothers and sisters-in-law Ralf Loren-

zen and wife Mindy of Orange, California; Eric Lorenzen and wife Amy of Yucaipa, California; sisters and brothers-in-law Dorothy Aitken and husband Dave of Lake Almanor, California, Traute Tate and husband Frank of Apple Valley, California; Kristin Morgan and husband Jack of Buena Park, California; and grandchildren Rachel, Marissa and Toni Lorenzen of Canby. Arndt was preceded in death by his father, Gunther Lorenzen. A funeral service was held at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 815 West Washington Street, Sequim, on Monday, June 13, 2011, at 10 a.m. The burial took place at Tahoma National Cemetery on Tuesday, June 14, 2011. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sequim Valley Lions Club, P.O. Box 1414, Sequim, WA 98382; or to Sequim Community Aid, P.O. Box 1591, Sequim, WA 98382.

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■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is

ter quarter 2011. “As a working mother and nontraditional student, I’ve found the Carradine availability of online classes [such as Lucas’] to be a huge convenience. I would not have been able to return to college without them,” Carradine said. “In Lucas’ class, we explored American literature from the colonial era through the present, with an emphasis on environmental and nature writing.


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 60

Low 50

63/49

66/48

62/47

61/47

A blend of sun and clouds.

Partly cloudy.

Partly sunny.

Sunshine and patchy clouds.

Times of clouds and sun.

Pleasant with times of clouds and sun.

The Peninsula An upper-air trough will begin to shift to the east today as high pressure aloft starts to build off the Pacific Northwest coast. This will allow for a rain-free day with a mixture of clouds and sunshine. Temperatures will still run several degrees below average Neah Bay Port for this time of the year. Tonight will be partly cloudy. High 57/50 Townsend pressure at the surface and aloft will build over the area Port Angeles 62/51 Monday, bringing a partly sunny sky with more season60/50 able temperatures. Tuesday will be a nice day with Sequim sunshine and patchy clouds.

Victoria 67/51

64/50

Forks 62/49

Olympia 67/49

Seattle 67/54

Spokane 68/51

Marine Forecast

Clouds and sun today. Wind from the west-northwest at 10-20 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Patchy clouds tonight. Wind from the west at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Partial sun tomorrow. Wind from the west at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Sunshine and patchy clouds. Wind west at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

3:03 a.m. 4:21 p.m. 4:24 a.m. 7:19 p.m. 6:09 a.m. 9:04 p.m. 5:30 a.m. 8:25 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Low Tide

Ht

7.7’ 7.2’ 5.6’ 7.4’ 6.8’ 8.9’ 6.4’ 8.4’

9:39 a.m. 9:58 p.m. 12:24 a.m. 11:44 a.m. 1:38 a.m. 12:58 p.m. 1:31 a.m. 12:51 p.m.

-0.7’ 2.2’ 4.5’ -0.8’ 5.8’ -1.1’ 5.5’ -1.0’

High Tide Ht 3:47 a.m. 4:58 p.m. 5:22 a.m. 7:51 p.m. 7:07 a.m. 9:36 p.m. 6:28 a.m. 8:57 p.m.

7.1’ 7.1’ 5.1’ 7.2’ 6.1’ 8.7’ 5.7’ 8.2’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

10:19 a.m. 10:46 p.m. 1:34 a.m. 12:27 p.m. 2:48 a.m. 1:41 p.m. 2:41 a.m. 1:34 p.m.

4:32 a.m. 5:34 p.m. 6:26 a.m. 8:19 p.m. 8:11 a.m. 10:04 p.m. 7:32 a.m. 9:25 p.m.

10:59 a.m. 11:38 p.m. 2:42 a.m. 1:09 p.m. 3:56 a.m. 2:23 p.m. 3:49 a.m. 2:16 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

New

First

Full

Seattle 67/54 Billings 64/51

-0.2’ 2.3’ 4.0’ -0.1’ 5.2’ -0.1’ 4.9’ -0.1’

6.6’ 7.0’ 4.6’ 7.1’ 5.5’ 8.5’ 5.2’ 8.0’

0.5’ 2.2’ 3.4’ 0.8’ 4.4’ 1.0’ 4.1’ 0.9’

July 1

July 7

July 14

City Hi Lo W Athens 91 72 s Baghdad 109 72 s Beijing 93 71 pc Brussels 64 46 sh Cairo 92 70 s Calgary 60 50 sh Edmonton 61 51 sh Hong Kong 90 83 sh Jerusalem 77 57 s Johannesburg 65 38 pc Kabul 97 55 s London 69 50 c Mexico City 78 54 t Montreal 75 52 s Moscow 72 65 sh New Delhi 94 80 t Paris 71 51 sh Rio de Janeiro 81 71 s Rome 81 58 s Stockholm 62 55 r Sydney 64 51 s Tokyo 75 68 r Toronto 76 62 pc Vancouver 67 53 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Minneapolis 76/55 Chicago 81/68

San Francisco 70/55 Denver 83/50

0s

AFFORS*06503

Washington 86/70

Atlanta 94/73

El Paso 104/80

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

New York 85/65

Kansas City 90/72

Los Angeles 68/59

Houston 99/80 Miami 90/77

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 96 64 61 94 82 85 70 64 78 74 80 76 94 73 81 88 64 73 102 83 88 81 69 78 67 88 99 60

Lo W 61 s 53 pc 53 pc 73 t 61 t 67 t 40 s 51 t 60 t 52 pc 60 s 60 pc 75 t 47 t 68 t 72 t 50 t 49 pc 76 s 50 t 69 pc 66 t 46 pc 53 c 47 t 74 pc 80 s 49 sh

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 90 95 98 68 90 78 76 95 94 85 102 88 95 94 86 101 68 95 77 87 96 62 102 63 70 82 62 86

Lo W 72 pc 76 s 75 s 59 pc 77 t 64 t 55 t 73 t 76 s 65 pc 73 pc 69 pc 74 t 70 s 68 t 80 s 54 pc 70 t 55 pc 58 s 75 t 51 t 77 s 59 pc 55 pc 60 pc 44 t 70 t

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 112 at Laredo, TX

Low: 28 at Stanley, ID

683-9619 385-2724 452-0840

✔ Trusted Experts ✔ Senior Discount ✔ Lifetime Warranty

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

Detroit 81/66

145118410

A

Moon Phases

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 81/48 81/49

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Ht

Sunset today ................... 9:17 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 5:14 a.m. Moonrise today .............. 11:40 p.m. Moonset today ................. 9:34 a.m.

June 23

Everett 65/51

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

Sunday, June 19, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 56 51 0.07 9.97 Forks 58 50 0.27 71.64 Seattle 58 53 0.31 22.95 Sequim 59 53 0.13 10.41 Hoquiam 62 54 0.18 43.36 Victoria 62 53 0.10 19.77 P. Townsend* 63 50 0.10 10.96 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Last

Port Ludlow 63/51 Bellingham 67/53

Aberdeen 60/52

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, June 19, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

 $ Briefly . . . DNR region lands chief to speak FORKS — The state Department of Natural Resources’ new Olympic region manager will speak to the Forks Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday. Sue Trettevik, appointed to the post by Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark Trettevik earlier this spring, is a familiar face in Forks. She is a longtime Forks resident who began her DNR career in timber sales in 1982 at the Forks office. As Olympic regional manager, she now oversees 371,000 acres of state forest, agriculture and urban lands in Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor counties. Open to the public, Wednesday’s Forks chamber membership meeting starts with a no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup, $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-374-2531 for further information.

Politics and Environment

A sign of spring in Sequim

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch June 17, 2011

Dow Jones industrials Nasdaq composite Standard & Poor’s 500

+42.84 12,004.36 -7.22 2,616.48 +3.86 1,271.50

Russell 2000

+0.21 781.75

NYSE diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged:

1,904 1,132 110

Volume:

4.4 b

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged:

1,365 1,294

Volume:

95 2.3 b

AP

Editors: All figures as of: 5:29 PM EDTlunch­ Monday’s chamber

eon begins at noon in the Port Angeles ­CrabHouse Restaurant’s upstairs banquet room at the Red Lion Hotel, N.061711: Lincoln MARKET221 BRIEF ChartSt. shows dailyLuncheon market figures tickets for Dow, S&P, are Russell 2000 and Nasdaq, along with $13 and can be purchased NYSE and Nasdaq diary; stand-alone; from the meeting 1c x 4 1/2 inches; 47mm xroom 114 mm; ETA 7:15 p.m. cashier.

NOTE: Figures reflect market fluctuations after close; may not match other AP content

HR seminar

The Sequim Roosevelt elk herd makes an unusual appearance visible from U.S. Highway 101 southeast of Sequim on Friday morning. The elk were grazing in a field of grass just beyond a rise covered in wild daisies.

United Airlines computer glitch strands thousands Travelers deal with canceled, delayed flights By Barbara Rodriquez The Associated Press

CHICAGO — A five-hour computer outage that virtually shut down United Airlines on Friday night and early Saturday is a stark reminder of how dependent airlines have become on technology. Passengers saw their flight information vanish from airport screens, and thousands were stranded as United canceled 31 flights and delayed 105 worldwide. The airline still had no explanation for the outage Saturday afternoon. Delays could last for days as the system gets caught up. But things could have been much worse. A blizzard in the Northeast wiped out more than 10,000 flights over three days in December, a mid-January storm led airlines to cancel nearly 9,000 flights. Friday’s shutdown occurred late enough in the day that many of the canceled flights were the last planes out for the day, said Henry Harte-

The Associated Press

Stranded passengers spend the night at La Guardia Airport in New York after United Airlines’ computer system went down. veldt, an airline analyst with Forrester Research. On a Monday morning, the results could have been catastrophic. “It happened as a lot of the airline was going to sleep for the night,” Harteveldt said. That doesn’t mean affected travelers were happy. “I’m just amazed at how cata-

strophic the failure was,” said Jason Huggins, 35, who was trying to fly home to Chicago from San Francisco. “All the computer screens were blank, just showing the United logo.” Huggins paid $1,200 to book one of the last three seats left on an American Airlines flight home. Turn

to

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15701128

PORT ANGELES — A presentation on human resource management will be given to the Port Angeles Business Association by Sequim-based consultant Michelle Rhodes on Tuesday. Rhodes, a 10-year Tribal leader set veteran of PORT TOWNSEND — human resources Ron Allen, the longtime with large chairman of the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe, will and small compaspeak to this week’s lunnies, will cheon meeting of the JefRhodes ferson County Chamber discuss of Commerce on Monday. new state laws and pracAllen tices relating to HR, tips is exand ideas for employers pected to and other suggestions for discuss a happy and productive the tribe’s workplace. holdings Open to the public, in Blyn Tuesday’s PABA breakand the fast meeting begins at Dunge7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s ResAllen ness Valtaurant, 113 DelGuzzi ley as well as plans for a Drive, Port Angeles. resort in Blyn and a tribal There is a $2.16 minivillage center on the site mum charge by Joshua’s of a now-dismantled Ray- for those who do not onier Inc. pulp mill in order breakfast. Port Angeles. The tribe also has been Mixer Tuesday involved in the preservaSEQUIM — The tion of Tamanowas Rock Sequim-Dungeness Valley habitat near Chimacum Chamber of Commerce with the Jefferson Land will hold this month’s Trust. “after hours” business Open to the public, mixer at Rainshadow Monday’s luncheon meetRoasting Co., 157 W. ing of the Jefferson County Cedar St., from 5 p.m. to chamber, combining for7 p.m. on Tuesday. mer chamber organizaThe event will be spontions in Port Townsend, sored by Mystery Bay Port Ludlow and the TriSeafood & Catering. Area, begins at noon at the It will include a drawPort Townsend Elks Lodge, ing for gifts. 555 Otto St. More information is Subway of Port available by phoning the Townsend provides a vari- chamber at 360-683-6197. ety of sandwiches available to the chamber audi- Sidewalk talk ence for $8 each. Credit PORT TOWNSEND — cards are not accepted. The Port Townsend Main Monday’s meeting Street Program will hold sponsor is Alchemy Bistro a Main Street Merchant & Wine Bar. Breakfast at The Public House, 1038 Water St., from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 Boat builder talk a.m. Wednesday. PORT ANGELES — The city of Port Cory Armstrong, vice president and production Townsend is in the assessment phase of the manager of aluminum“Downtown Port boat builder Armstrong Townsend Sidewalk Lid Marine Inc., will keynote Stabilization Project,” and this week’s luncheon this is the topic of the meeting of the Port Ange- merchant breakfast. les Regional Chamber of Speakers include city Commerce on Monday. Public Works Director ArmKen Clow, Planning strong is Director Rick Sepler and expected Scott Sawyer, senior projto cover ect manager for Shea the comCarr Jewell of Olympia. pany’s The city has contracted rapid engineering services with growth Shea Carr Jewell. Sawyer since 2004 Armstrong will head up the team of building civil and structural engisingle-hull and catamaneers on this project. ran craft for civilian, law A continental breakenforcement and military fast will be served. The cost is $5 for memuse from the Armstrong Marine plant east of Port bers, $7 for nonmembers, Angeles just off U.S. High- and is payable at the door. RSVP to the Port way 101. A slide show of various Townsend Main Street Program by Monday at Armstrong boat models can be seen at www.arm- 360-385-7911 or email admin@ptmainstreet.org. strongmarine.com. Open to the public, Turn to Briefly/D5

Rex Wilson/Peninsula Daily News


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Classic tug returns to the water ELMORE, A VENERABLE tug whose keel has cut through the waters of the Pacific Northwest since Benjamin Harrison was president of the United States, is back at her berth in Port Hadlock after being on the hard in the Port Townsend Shipyard for the past seven months. She was nearly sunk last November. It collided in the stormtossed waters of Port Hadlock Marina with a steelhulled commercial fishing boat. The collision stoved in the bow of the wooden Elmore. Dee and Sara Meek, who have been stewards of the 122-year-old tug since 1990, made emergency repairs, drove her to Port Townsend and hauled her out at the Port Townsend Shipyard. Almost immediately, shipwrights went to work removing the damaged wood and putting Elmore back together using purpleheart wood in place of the original Douglas fir. The tug was put back into the water Tuesday but remained in the slings of the TraveLift overnight as a precautionary measure

ON THE WATERFRONT and to give the Sellars wood time to swell. According to Sara Meek, water seepage was minimal — a “great sign of good craftsmanship,” she said. Dee and Sara are effusive in their praise of the individuals who worked on rebuilding their tug. The lead shipwright was Clint Thompson, who partnered with Ossian Smith on the project. They were assisted by Dan Stringam and Pete Stein. Sara said the philosophy of the crew members as they approached each phase of the reconstruction project was how to best perform the perfect marriage between the new bow section and the remaining hull to give Elmore many more years of life. At times it’s difficult to

David G.

David G. Sellars (2)/Peninsula Daily News

The 122-year-old Elmore, with her reconstructed bow, is back in the water at Port Hadlock. not become anthropomorphic about describing what I see, but I could have sworn a smile crossed Elmore’s bow as she sat in the water at the Boat Haven, her newly repaired and freshly painted hull holding steady at the dock just itchin’ to get under way and splash around in open waters. But it was probably just a spot on my eyeglasses.

The Capt. Frank Moody is a new tug destined for Alaskan waters. Although built primarily as a pusher tug, she can tow, too.

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opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills required to become career officers, cultivate seamanship skills and promote friendly relations with the countries they are visiting. According to the Consulate-General of Japan’s website: “This year’s visit to the U.S. is especially meaningful to Japan which has received significant assistance from the U.S. and its military in response to rescue and recovery efforts immediately following the devastating earthquake and tsunami which struck the Tohoku region this past March.”

Finishing touch Armstrong Marine, the aluminum-boat fabricator on U.S. Highway 101 between Sequim and Port Angeles put Wildcat, a new 32-passenger aluminum boat, in the water Friday. For the next three or four days, the catamaran will undergo sea trials and the Coast Guard will conduct final inspections. Bob Candopoulos, who represents the company that had the boat built, Northern Maritime Logistics of Anchorage, Alaska, said she will be used in Prudhoe Bay to transport men and supplies to the various manmade islands that serve as platforms for oil drilling rigs. Within the next couple of days, Wildcat will get under way on her bottom for Anchorage, where she will be put on a trailer and trucked to Fairbanks, then onto the Dalton Highway — known as the Haul Road to ice road truckers — to Deadhorse on the North Slope.

________

David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats, ships and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. Email ­dgsellars@hotmail. com or phone him at 360-808-3202.

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Center in Port Townsend featured Terry Christian Capt. Frank Moody, a who spoke at length about new tug, was moored to D the art of scrimshaw — Dock in the Port Townsend etchings done on ivory and Boat Haven on Wednesday. bone. She was built by Foss I caught the tail end of Shipyard in Rainier, Ore., his presentation and had for Delta Western, a disan opportunity to view the tributor of petroleum prod- numerous lovely pieces ucts throughout Alaska. that he created that were Capt. Frank Moody was on display. built primarily as a pusher He etches his art onto tug but maintains tradi10,000-year-old mammoth tional stern towing capabil- ivory, 100 year old walrus ities. ivory and a synthetic prodThe vessel is 76 feet uct called eco-ivory that long, has a 32-foot beam mimics the properties of and draws 3 feet 6 inches the real thing. of water. To view Terry’s creHer shallow draft will ations, which include naube particularly beneficial in tical themes, wildlife the coastal waters and riv- scenes, portraits and more, ers of Western Alaska. visit his website at www. The crew onboard the scrimgallery.com. new tug was dealing with numerous last-minute Japanese visitor items in preparation for Last Tuesday, TV-3508 the 10-day trip to Bristol was seen heading east Bay, including bringing through the Strait of Juan aboard stores as well as de Fuca on her way to boxes and boxes of supElliott Bay, where she plies. anchored in the afternoon. Pending the resolution The vessel is JDS of a minor radar glitch, it Kashima, the flagship of was anticipated that Capt. the training fleet for the Frank Moody would get Japan Maritime Self under way Wednesday Defense Force. night. She is 469 feet long with a beam of 59 feet and Waterfront house draws 15 feet. Her current complement There is a house being of 416 officers and enlisted built on the waterfront in personnel includes 116 offithe Port Townsend Shipcer cadets who are berthed yard — but not to worry in two-person staterooms for it will soon float away. which allows male and Little and Little Construction of Port Townsend female cadets to train together. is building a houseboat on On Wednesday, a 30-foot by 40-foot platKashima, with the help of form that will be two stothe Crowley tugs Hunter ries tall and have a little and Chief, shifted to Pier more than 2,000 square 66 for the duration of her feet of living space. visit, which concluded SatI understand that construction will be completed urday. The ship will be visiting by Jan. 6, 2012. numerous ports in the The houseboat will be launched the following day United States, Canada, and towed to its permanent Mexico, Panama, Peru and Chile. mooring on Lake Union in The first port of call on Seattle. her four-month voyage was earlier this month in The art of scrimshaw Anchorage, Alaska. Wooden Boat WednesThe primary purpose of day in the Chandlery at Kashima’s deployment is to the Northwest Maritime provide junior officers the

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that currently dominates the market. A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted 10-0 Friday that Regeneron’s drug is a safe and effective treatment for a condition that can lead to blindness in seniors, according to an agency spokeswoman. More than 200,000 new cases of the condition, called wet macular degeneration, are diagnosed each year. The FDA is not required to follow the group’s advice, though it often does. If approved, Regeneron’s injectable drug will be the first product to compete with Roche’s Lucentis, which posts sales of $1.5 billion annually. The FDA is scheduled to make its final decision on approval by Aug. 20. If approved, Regeneron and its partner Bayer Pharmaceuticals will co-market the drug under the brand name Eylea.


Peninsula Daily News

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, June 19, 2011

D3

‘Barefoot Bandit’ to wear prison shoes Ex-teen who mocked law pleads guilty By Manuel Valdes The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Colton HarrisMoore gained authority-mocking, cult status as he ran from the law for two years in stolen boats, cars and planes. Now he faces years in prison. Dubbed the “Barefoot Bandit” for a cross-country crime spree, the 20-year-old pleaded guilty Friday to seven felony charges, ranging from stealing an aircraft to possessing a firearm. “We’re here today to say that Mr. Harris-Moore’s flight from justice has ended,” U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan said after the hearing. He will “spend a significant time in prison and will not make one dime from his crimes.” Under a plea agreement, Harris-Moore would forfeit any future earnings from movie, book, or other deals from selling his story. Earnings would be used to pay off the $1.4 million in restitution

he owes to his many victims. Harris-Moore could receive between 5¼ and 6½ years in prison when he’s sentenced in October, defense attorney John Henry Browne said. However, he still faces state charges in several counties, including the county where his crimes began. Prosecutors have said HarrisMoore hopscotched his way across the United States, frequently crash-landing planes in rural areas and stealing cars from parking lots at small airports. His escapades were widely followed in print and the Internet, earning him the “Barefoot Bandit” moniker by committing some of crimes without shoes.

Smiling and quiet Harris-Moore smiled and greeted his lawyers as he entered the court room Friday. He sat quietly — sometimes smiling, sometimes holding his hands and looking down — as federal judge Richard Jones went over the details of the crimes. The federal charges, which included stealing an aircraft, possession of firearms and piloting without a license, stemmed from a spate of crimes in late 2009 and

early 2010, when Harris-Moore was accused of flying a stolen plane from Anacortes in northwestern Washington to the San Juan Islands. Authorities say he later stole a pistol in eastern British Columbia and took a plane from a hangar in Idaho, where investigators found bare footprints on the floor and wall. That plane crashed near Granite Falls in Washington after it ran out of fuel, prosecutors said. He made his way to Oregon in a 32-foot boat stolen in southwestern Washington — stopping first to leave $100 at an animal shelter in Raymond. From Oregon, authorities said, Harris-Moore traveled across the United States. In Indiana, he stole another plane, flew across half of the united States, and crash landed in the Bahamas, where he was captured last July. Harris-Moore also faces several dozen charges in four Washington counties, with the most serious charge being burglary where a handgun was involved. Those charges will likely be consolidated and a hearing should take place in about a month, San Juan County prosecutor Randall

Peter Millett/The Associated Press

Colton Harris-Moore is shown in federal court in Seattle on Friday in this sketch. Photography is not allowed in federal courtrooms. K. Gaylord said. Friday’s agreement calls for Harris-Moore to serve his federal sentence concurrently with whatever prison time he may get from the state. But the state charges could mean more time in prison beyond what the federal judge decides, as well as an increase in the restitution owed, according to federal and local prosecutors.

“All of this is up to the judge,” Browne said. “We’re very hopeful it’ll be around the same sentence.” Browne added that HarrisMoore’s story would attract enough attention to pay off all the restitution. Asked what Harris-Moore plans to do after he’s done with prison, Browne said that he’d like to go to college to study engineering.

Gregoire begins week’s Political roundup: Paul, trade mission in Europe Huntsman top straw poll Gregoire said she also wanted to promote the state’s education system. OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire During the trade mission’s first day, began a weeklong trade mission in officials signed an agreement that will Europe on Friday, saying the overseas give University of Washington students trip could spur Washington exports and the opportunity to teach English in the state’s economic recovery. Spain. Gregoire’s first stop The governor will later travel to was in Spain, where she France to attend the Paris Air Show met with executives of and support the state’s aerospace the construction comindustry. pany Dragados. The Europe trip is the sixth foreign The company’s U.S.trade mission during her time in office, based subsidiary was according to the governor’s office. selected to build the Last year, she visited China and tunnel to replace SeatGregoire Vietnam. tle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct, and Gregoire said she wanted a Europe visit in 2005 first-hand look at a project Dragados She previously did a Europe expedirecently completed ahead of schedule tion, with a stop at the Paris Air Show, in Madrid. in 2005. She also has meetings with renewThe state will spend about $40,000 able energy firms and wants to encouron the tour, according to the governor’s age them to locate or expand in Washoffice. ington. “This trade mission is about WashGregoire believes it is a good investington’s economic recovery,” Gregoire ment, pointing to millions of dollars in said in a statement. new sales and contracts that came “It’s about selling Washington state from her trade mission to Asia last and its products, and increasing our year. exports to ensure job growth in areas Gregoire announced last week that like aerospace, life-sciences, automotive she will not seek a third four-year term production and green energy.” — and said her final 18 months will be Washington’s delegation includes focused heavily on the economy. Washington has a 9.1 percent unemdozens of industry leaders in those secployment rate. tors. The Associated Press

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NEW ORLEANS — Rep. Ron Paul of Texas has won the presidential straw poll at the Republican Leadership Conference. The perennial libertarian candidate won 612 votes from the gathering that brings presidential candidates, party elders, grassroots activists and donors. Coming in second place was former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, who served three Republican administrations and then worked as President Barack Obama’s ambassador to China. Huntsman got 382 votes, but did not address the conference. Aides said he was ill. His wife, Mary Kaye Huntsman, came to meet privately with activists. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, a tea party darling, collected 191 votes. Former pizza executive Herman Cain won 104 votes and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney skipped the event and picked up 74 votes. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich got 69 votes.

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By locking or chaining He said he won’t lock it, (EDITOR’S NOTE: See related story on the Border so that if border agents have the gates, Hill said resiPatrol and Forks, Page A1 to get onto his property they dents are hoping to deter can, but he hopes the extra agents from “snooping today.) work makes them think around.” twice about being respectful The Associated Press to private property. BELLINGHAM — A few “They have the pretty residents increasingly frus- strong idea that ‘I can go trated by federal agents where I want, when I want,’” driving through their prop- Ehlers said. “This changes the tune erty near the U.S.-Canada border chained, and in some to make them take heed. Peninsula Daily News “You’ve got other people cases, locked their gates with other feelings.” PORT ANGELES — last week to stop the vehicles from coming on their Real estate broker Pili More signs land. Meyer will discuss at a Real estate agent Dennis More residents are meeting Thursday an effort Hill, who is an advocate for expected to participate this by the National Association the residents, said that in week when more signs will of Realtors to create a fund addition to locking gates, be made available during a dedicated to private proplandowners would be dis- Tuesday meeting at the erty and home ownership playing signs that read, “No Mount Baker Rotary Buildissues. government vehicles ing in Lynden. Meyer, who is affiliated beyond this point.” Hill said locking up the with Coldwell Banker It is up to the landown- gates was not a “protest,” ers how long they want to but “an effort to create bet- Uptown Realty in Port leave their gates locked, he ter communication” between Angeles, is also a former residents and border agents. local and state president as said. “Most [residents] would well as an officer of the Friction between residents and U.S. Customs and like it if they knew [the bor- National Association of Border Protection agents der agents] on a first-name Realtors. has increased since Lynden basis,” Hill said. She will discuss the If border agents are in resident Wayne P. Groen National Association of was found guilty in April of pursuit of someone, they Realtors’ recently approved should be able to enter a incapacitating a Customs’ Party Political Survival Inipilot by shining a spotlight property, Hill said. on a helicopter. His sentencing is set for August. Hill said he knew of at least three landowners who Sean G. McDonald and Victoria were locking their gates Thursday. Jane McDonald filed Chapter 7 “A lot of people along the border are tired of them Bankruptcy on April 28, 2011 with going in and out of their property,” Hill said. the United States Bankruptcy Court, Berry farmer Darryl Ehlers, 74, is one of the Western District of Washington. people chaining up his fence.

NEW ORLEANS — An actor impersonating President Obama mocked the Republican presidential hopefuls and made jokes about the real president’s biracial roots to a room full of conservative activists on

a more active role on Twitter, 140 characters at a time. Obama’s campaign said in a posting on its website Friday that Obama will tweet regularly from the popular social media service and his personal tweets will be signed “-BO.” The campaign said it will now manage both Obama’s Twitter account and Facebook page. Obama tweeted personally early Friday evening, welcoming followers to “a new (at)BarackObama. From now on, (hash) Obama2012 staff will manage this account; tweets from the President will be signed ‘-BO.’” The campaign said on its website that the changes “will give us new opportunities to make the most of these channels, using them not only to report what the president is doing every day but to connect to the millions of supporters who will be driving this campaign.” Obama has more than 8.69 million followers on Twitter, making him the third most-followed account among Twitter users, according to Twitter statistics website twittercounter. com. Obama to tweet Obama trails only enterMINNEAPOLIS — tainers Lady Gaga and JusPresident Obama is taking tin Bieber in followers. Saturday. T h e Republican Leadership Conference turned the podium over to impersonator Reggie Paul Brown, who drew raucous applause from the GOP’s supporters when he projected lewd photos of disgraced and resigned Rep. Anthony Weiner. Brown returned to Weiner when describing former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s campaign: “His supporters are dropping faster than Anthony Weiner’s pants.” The room grew more uncomfortable as Brown turned to the candidates who are looking to make Obama a one-term president. Brown took a shot at former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, who missed the conference because “he’s having his foot surgically removed from his mouth. “Don’t worry: it’s covered under Obamneycare. Along with spinal transplants,” Brown added.


D4

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

10 summer TV shows that show promise

M

is also the only new scripted show premiering this summer on a broadcast network. LOS ANGELES — As the broadcast It’s set in Afghanistan in 2006 and networks slammed the brakes on their tells the stories of doctors and nurses 2010-11 TV season, cable networks working with NATO’s security force. already were revving their engines for a n “Suits,” 10 p.m. this coming Thursfast start to summer. day, USA. Expect a traffic jam as more than 80 A buddy “dramedy” about lawyers, shows debut or return by August. “Suits” doesn’t have any right to feel as Fran Drescher and her ex-husband, Some of these shows are on broadcast fresh as it does. Credit, possibly, the castPeter Marc Jacobson, created this surTV: “America’s Got Talent,” “The Voice,” ing of Patrick J. Adams, billed as a prisingly charming new sitcom. “So You Think You Can Dance” and “The “heartthrob” from “Pretty Little Liars” Drescher stars as Fran, a long-marBachelorette.” but largely unknown to viewers out of ried florist whose husband (John Michael But finding first-run comedy or drama their teens. Higgins) surprises her with the news will mostly require turning to cable, n “Wilfred,” 10 p.m. this coming that he’s gay. where 11 networks will debut 15 scripted Thursday, FX. He can’t afford to move out, though. shows this summer. Elijah Wood stars as Ryan in a n “Outcasts,” 9 p.m. Saturdays, BBC Here are 10 of the new dramas and strange but also strangely sweet comedy. comedies arriving this summer that crit- America. Ryan is paralyzed by anxiety until he Pioneers from a disintegrating Earth ics say are worth a look: finds unlikely support from a dog. build a new society in this absorbing n “Teen Wolf,” 10 p.m. Mondays, Well, not exactly a dog. His pretty British science-fiction drama set on a MTV. neighbor sees Wilfred (Jason Gann) as habitable planet called Carpathia. Less like the Michael J. Fox comedy her dog, while Ryan sees a guy in a dog If you saw the premiere last night you suit who speaks, offers advice and freand more in the “Twilight” vein, this might have thought you’d missed an eardark new “Teen Wolf” stars Tyler Posey quently leads Ryan astray. lier season, but no; the opener was meant as a high-school student who is bitten n “State of Georgia,” 8:30 p.m. June more to intrigue than to inform. and becomes a werewolf. 29, ABC Family. n “Falling Skies,” 9 p.m. tonight on Teen angst ensues as Scott tries to figSilly and a bit too noisy but hard to TNT. ure out what’s happening to him, while dislike, this new sitcom stars RavenSteven Spielberg is an executive proalso connecting with new girl Allison Symone as Georgia, a confident aspiring ducer of this drama about survivors of an actress, and Majandra Delfino as her (Crystal Reed), who has a secret of her alien invasion trying to stay alive while own. best friend, a science geek. fighting back. Noah Wyle stars as Tom “The Protector,” 10 p.m., Lifetime. Together, they take on New York City. Mason in a thriller that might remind Ally Walker (“Profiler”) returns to TV, n “Torchwood: Miracle Day,” 10 you of Stephen King’s “The Stand” or this time as LA homicide detective and p.m. July 8 on Starz. even “The Walking Dead” minus the zomsingle mother Gloria Sheppard. In this extension of the BBC’s “Torchbies. “The Protector” feels familiar, but its wood,” people all over the world somehow n “Combat Hospital,” 10 p.m. Tues- stop dying, threatening to stretch the easygoing mix of procedural and family drama will appeal to fans of the Lifetime day, ABC. Earth’s resources to the breaking point. The only one of the 10 spotlight shows brand and, especially, to fans of Walker. Mekhi Phifer is CIA agent Rex that wasn’t available for preview, “Comn “Happily Divorced,” 10:30 p.m., Matheson, who tries to figure out what’s bat Hospital” (formerly “The Hot Zone”) TV Land. happening. Peninsula Daily News

ore than 80 shows debut or return by August — and finding first-run comedy or drama will mostly require turning to cable.

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Settlement close in WaMu lawsuit, execs’ lawyer says The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The top Washington Mutual executives who were sued by federal regulators over the mortgage giant’s 2008 collapse are in talks to settle the lawsuit, an attorney for two of them confirmed. But attorney Barry Ostrager cautioned that the discussions, conducted “intermittently” for a “relatively short time,” may not lead to a deal for the two executives he represents or for WaMu’s longtime chairman and CEO Kerry Killinger. The suit accuses Killinger, former WaMu chief operating officer Stephen Rotella, and former homeloans president David Schneider of recklessly pushing WaMu into making billions in high-risk home loans — despite knowing the nation was in the midst of an unprecedented housing bubble and being warned the company was unprepared to handle so much risk. Killinger’s wife, Linda, and Rotella’s wife, Esther, also are named in the complaint, for allegedly helping their husbands transfer homes and cash into

Experts split over whether it’s simply lousy behavior

trusts to keep them out of creditors’ hands. According to court papers, the two sides have been working with a mediator to strike a deal. Additional mediation sessions are set for June 29 and 30, assuming they haven’t reached agreement by then. Friday had been the deadline for the executives to formally respond to the suit, filed in March by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

By Frank Eltman

The suit says that from 2005 to 2008, Killinger earned $65.9 million from WaMu, Rotella earned $23.4 million and Schneider earned $5.9 million. It doesn’t say how much in damages the FDIC seeks to collect. The WaMu suit is one of just seven similar suits, naming 52 former officers and directors of failed banks, that the FDIC has filed since the financial crisis hit. However, the agency says it has authorized suits against 186 more individuals, with total damage claims of at least $6.8 billion.

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Available clinics If he has opted for an inpatient treatment facility, experts say there are a handful of places where he could be that specialize in sexual conduct, including a Mississippi clinic where Tiger Woods reportedly sought help for his litany of marital indiscretions. Or he could be getting outpatient advice on addiction. “He’s exhibiting behavior of an addict: the secrecy, the risk-taking, the denial,” said Robert Weiss, founder of the Sexual Recovery Institute in Los Angeles. Kimberly Young, clinical director of the Center for Online Addiction in Bradford, Pa., said that in many

ways, Weiner’s behavior was “very commonplace.” Plenty of men and women secretly live out their fantasies on the Internet, sometimes in compulsive fashion. The treatment, she said, is usually twofold. Patients have to first modify their online behavior; that might mean not using the computer during certain hours, or at certain locations, or only communicating with certain types of people online. Next, they must examine what mental health issues might be causing the behavior. “Is he depressed? Is he anxious and stressed out?” she said. “First you need to deal with the behavior, then deal with the reasons why that happened. “It will probably take more than a 28-day rehab program. The treatment has to fit the person.”

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acknowledged that cuts to future benefits may be necessary to improve the program’s finances, he said. “Our policy for decades has always been that we basically support a package that would include revenue enhancements and benefit adjustments to get Social Security to long-term solvency,” Certner said.

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destroy their lives, and despite the imposition of a sanction will continue doing GARDEN CITY, N.Y. — it.” Married men sometimes behave badly. Real, or an excuse? They covet. They flirt. Doctors assessing They philander. And when they get whether an illness is the caught, they occasionally real deal, or a convenient adopt the insanity defense, excuse, would likely take telling spouses that an into account whether inner demon made them patients were causing themselves real harm, and lose control. Doctors say the line whether they had lost some between legitimate clinical or all of their ability to condisorder and plain old lousy trol themselves, he said. There seems to be no behavior isn’t well-underquestion about whether stood. That makes it hard to Weiner’s behavior has been assess U.S. Rep. Anthony self-destructive. “He certainly has a Weiner’s announcement last week that he was seek- media relations nightmare ing “professional treatment” and saying he needs treatfollowing a scandal over ment sounds a lot better lewd photos and messages than the alternatives,” said he sent to women he didn’t Dr. Jeffrey T. Parsons, a sex addiction expert and psyknow. Weiner, who has now chology professor at Hunter resigned as a congressman, College in New York City. “It’s a lot harder to bash hasn’t specified what type of someone who says he is care he is getting, or for seeking treatment and what, leaving constituents help.” to wonder whether he is Some experts said Weinseeking treatment as simer’s actions — making elecply a ploy to buy time and tronic sexual contact with sympathy. strangers, despite the enorSexual addiction is not mous risk to his political recognized as a mental ill- career — do resemble the ness in the Diagnostic and characteristics of drug Statistical Manual of Men- addicts, alcoholics, problem tal Disorders, an encyclope- gamblers, or even overeatdic bible for psychologists. ers. Exhibitionism, though, “People know they are does make the cut. not supposed to be overThere has also been talk weight, and if they truly had about including a passage control over it, they should in the next edition on hyper- just be able to make a decisexual disorders, involving sion to lose weight, and then an overheated sex drive. “It’s still a very controversial diagnosis. There are a lot of people who think this is a lot to do about nothing,” said Dr. Richard The Associated Press Krueger, an associate proWASHINGTON — fessor of psychiatry at AARP, the powerful lobby Columbia College of Physi- for older Americans, was cians & Surgeons and direc- hammered Friday by fellow tor of the Sexual Behavior activists for refusing to Clinic at the New York State oppose any and all cuts to Psychiatric Institute. “On the other hand,” he Social Security benefits, a said, “practitioners will see position the group says it people who are completely has long held as a way to out of control, and will just extend the life of the masThe Associated Press

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1

Top auto shops PORT ANGELES — Three Port Angeles auto shops have earned AAA Top Shop Awards from the AAA Washington auto club: n Evergreen Collision Center, 820 E. Front St. n Wilder Auto Center, 97 Deer Park Road. n Wilder Toyota, 95 Deer Park Road. Each year, AAA Washington evaluates the quality of repair work, courtesy of employees and the shop cleanliness of each AAA Approved Auto Repair facility in Washington and northern Idaho. Measured by customer satisfaction surveys and feedback, the “best of the best” earn a AAA Top Shop Award. AAA said the facilities that earn this honor typically have received customer satisfaction rates close to 100 percent during the past calendar year.

Open house set PORT ANGELES — Anytime Fitness, 112 DelGuzzi Drive, will hold an open house on Saturday. The public is invited to tour the facility beginning at 10 a.m. and meet with the staff and personal trainers. Free food and drinks will be served. Anytime Fitness is a 24-hour secure-access fitness facility with strengthtraining equipment, free weights and a cardio-workout area with rowing machines, bikes, treadmills and low-impact cross trainers, all with personal TV viewing screens. Showers, hydro-massage and tanning rooms are also available. New members may sign up during the open house and receive free summer membership. Current members are also invited to Saturday’s event. They can review their workout program with trainers — and can earn benefits if they bring a nonmember to the open house.

Career help for over-50 set to be sponsored by library

Send us your business news

TRANSITION YOURSELF, A free career service offered by Port Townsend Public Library, will offer a workshop on finding a job if you are 50 or older. The workshop will be held at the Charles Pink House, 1256 Lawrence St., from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday. Registration is required. To register, email Susan Wilson at ptplhardtimes@gmail.com or phone 360-344-4608. In addition, the Transition Yourself Network Group is open to job seekers

DO YOU HAVE a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ Email it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

lated into a full strike when Canada Post locked out workers last week. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers and Canada Post are deadlocked over pension and wage issues. Federal Minister of Labour Lisa Raitt has also raised the specter of backto-work legislation to end the strike.

Sega hacked

Peninsula Daily News

ments, and Karen ­Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled Hahn lineup: ■  Monday: Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers. ■  Tuesday: Bill Wrobel and Jim Mraz discuss the Petals to Pathways Master Gardeners Garden Tour. In a separate segment, Soroptimist Club member Linda deBord discusses the Pink Up Port Angeles campaign. In the final segment, U.S. Forest Service researcher Dave Kretschmann discusses how his research has led to fewer broken baseball bats. ■  Wednesday: Cheryl Smith, the “Petsmith.” In the second segment, Cmdr. Tony Hahn, comJoins association manding officer of the Port Angeles Coast guard base, SEQUIM — Catherine Van Os and Vicki Anderdiscusses Saturday’s base son, owners of North Star open house for the public. Concierge, have been ■  Thursday: Preaccepted into the national empted by Seattle MariReal Estate Staging Associ- ners baseball game. ation. ■  Friday: Kent CrowThe association proley, author of Surf Beat: motes professionalism and Rock ’n’ Roll’s Forgotten excellence in real estate Revolution. staging, which prepares The second segment will your home for sale. feature John and Colleen North Star is a locally Marzluff, authors of Dog owned, bonded and insured Days, Raven Nights who business. will make a personal For more information appearance in Port Angeabout their services, phone les. 360-797-1217 or email The final segment feainfo@northstarcllc.com. tures Mary Lou Sanelli “From a Writer’s Point of KONP talk guests View.” PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedNation/World ule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at High-stakes battle 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and VICTORIA — A British www.konp.com on the Columbia shipbuilder Internet outside the Port which runs a shipyard near Angeles area. Victoria is on the short list Station manager Todd of one of two Canadian Ort­loff hosts the Monday government shipbuilding through Thursday seg-

packages worth a total of $33 billion. Seaspan is one of the finalists. Based in North Van- Clark couver, it owns Victoria Shipyards in Esquimalt as well as Vancouver Shipyards and Vancouver Drydock on the mainland. British Columbia Premier Christy Clark will meet with Prime Minister Stephen Harper later this month. The more lucrative package — a military project — would create about 8,000 direct jobs in B.C., while the non-combat work would result in about 3,000 jobs, Clark said. Seaspan is bidding on both packages but hopes to win the combat work.

LONDON — Video game developer Sega says it has been hacked, making it the latest in a string of games companies to be attacked. The company sent an email to users of the Sega Pass system on Friday to warn them that email addresses, dates of birth and encrypted passwords had been stolen from online database. The email stressed that no financial information was at risk and that it has launched a probe into the extent of the breach. It is not immediately clear how many users were affected. The company says its online system has been taken offline and all users’ passwords have been reset. The security breach comes after Sony and Nintendo suffered similar attacks by hackers. Millions of computer game users had their data stolen in those attacks.

Greece brightens

ATHENS, Greece — Greece appeared to step No Canada mail back from the prospect of a WASHINGTON — devastating debt default Canadians waiting for that Friday after its prime minletter from the United ister quelled chaotic politiStates will have to wait a cal infighting and Germany little longer. softened a contentious As of this weekend, the demand on the participaUnited States Postal Sertion of the private sector in vice no longer accepts mail a new European bailout. destined for Canada. After two “Due to days of disthe expectasent inside tion by Canhis Socialist ada Post party that officials threatened that the to bring strike by down his the Canagovernment, Papandreou dian Union Raitt Prime Minof Postal ister George Papandreou Workers will last until at named his main internal least sometime next week, rival as finance minister. the U.S. Postal Service will The move is expected to suspend accepting mail solidify the support from destined to Canada — lawmakers Papandreou effective Saturday, June 18, needs to pass a 28 billion 2011, 11:59 p.m. CDT — euro ($39.5 billion) package with the exception of of steep tax hikes and budGlobal Express Guaranget cuts so despised inside teed shipments,” the Postal Greece that riots exploded Service said on its website. outside parliament this The Canada Post strike week. European donors and began as a series of rolling work stoppages more than the International Monetary Fund require Greece to two weeks ago, but esca-

mately 240 workers called back. The plans are to add more staff and operations in July.

Website addresses

WASHINGTON — Coming soon to the Internet: website addresses that end in “.bank,” “.Vegas” and Cargo halted “.Canon.” LONDON — Shipping The organization that firm UPS has been ordered oversees the Internetto stop moving air cargo address system is preparthrough some of its U.K. ing to open the floodgates facilities because of secuto a nearly limitless selecrity flaws, the British govtion of new website sufernment said Friday. fixes, including ones in The order is the result Arabic, Chinese and other of a planned security check scripts. rather than a new threat to That could usher in the aviation — and a sign of most sweeping transformaheightened concerns about tion of the Domain Name the vulnerability of cargo System since its creation in in the wake of an al-Qaida the 1980s. plot that saw bombs disMore than 300 suffixes guised in toner cartridges are available today, the shipped on freight flights bulk of them country-code from Yemen. domains, such as “.uk” for Britain’s Department the United Kingdom and “. for Transport said that “fol- de” for Germany. lowing careful considerHundreds or even thouation, the department has sands more suffixes could restricted the number of be created, categorized by sites in the U.K. at which everything from industry UPS Ltd. are permitted to to geography to ethnicity. screen air cargo until it has satisfied current security Oil prices still fall requirements.” NEW YORK — BenchIt gave no details of the mark West Texas Intermesecurity issues and didn’t diate crude for July delividentify the locations ery lost $1.94, or 2 percent, involved. to settle at $93.01 per barNo other air freight companies were mentioned rel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. in the statement. Oil has retreated about Mill sets comeback 6 percent this week. In London Brent crude, GORHAM, N.H. — A which is used to price cheaper source of fuel, a many international oil dedicated sales team and varieties, declined 81 cents work force and an investto settle at $113.21 per ment in a tissue machine barrel on the ICE Futures will help the last paper exchange. mill in northern New Hampshire succeed, state and mill industry represen- Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous tatives say. The changes come to the metal prices Friday. Aluminum - $1.1407 per lb., mill in Gorham as the London Metal Exch. papermaking industry Copper - $4.0871 Cathode full fights growing competition plate, LME. from overseas plants in Copper - $4.1030 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. recent years. Lead - $2471.00 metric ton, Some mills in northern London Metal Exch. New England have had Zinc - $0.9946 per lb., London staying power because they Metal Exch. have developed business in Gold - $1537.50 Handy & Harspecialized papers. man; $1538.60 troy oz., NY Merc Others have had to con- spot Fri. Silver - $35.665 Handy & Hartend with rising oil costs to run the plants and a loss in man; $35.739 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. demand as email and the Platinum -$1752.00 troy oz., Internet have replaced the N.Y. (contract). need for some types of Platinum -$1752.10 troy oz., paper. N.Y. Merc spot Fri. The Gorham mill, shut Peninsula Daily News, down for eight months but Victoria Times Colonist newly acquired by a New and The Associated Press York private equity firm, is scheduled to reopen Wednesday with the startup of its paper towel machine and at least 70 of its approxiA sprightly little market

McPhee’s Grocery ore

Port Angeles Hardwood LLC 333 Eclipse Industrial Pkwy Port Angeles, WA 98363 Tel: (360) 452-6041 • Fax: (360) 417-6805

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! KEEP YOUR ALDER SAWLOGS ON THE PENINSULA!

Contact Randy Bartelt at (360) 739-6681

SPECIAL

Any color shirt, 2 colors, 1 side, No screen fees with order of 100 or more, Free delivery.

flatbedscreenprinting.com

145116818

125109795

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TenM Reasons to Shop at McPhee’s Grocery 1. We provide free brown paper bags with all purchases over $12.99 2. There are no birds’ nests in our store, except in some soup packages and in our white fungus drinks. 3. Walking is good for your health, and wokking is good for your food. 4. We guarantee that our large bottles of Russian Kvass contain more than the small ones. 5. Frank McPhee strongly believes that we should welcome all political opinions, unless they’re weird. 6. Frank’s opinions are not weird. Do not listen to what Frank’s wife says. 8. Our 89¢ Frito Lay chips cost less than their 99¢ ones. 9. Our powdered Alka-Seltzer works faster than their solid one. 10. We maintain a strict policy regarding numerical order. 7. Our giant marshmallows are bigger than their giant marshmallows.

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Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

pass the austerity measures before releasing the next 12 billion euro ($17 billion) loan from a 110 billion euro package agreed on last year to keep Greece afloat until it can get its struggling economy back on track.

unlike any you’ve seen

Snafu: Efforts in Seattle Continued from D1 nel said only that it was fuller this summer than ever caused by “a network connec- before. United’s were 86.8 percent booked on average in At Seattle-Tacoma Inter- tivity issue.” May, which in reality meant Airlines rely on computnational Airport, United many flew without a single crews were working Satur- ers today more than ever. empty seat. Reservations and cusday to find space on flights So rebooking passengers for people whose original tomer service are largely from canceled flights is much automated, even flight paths flights were cancelled in the are increasingly computer- trickier and more time-condisruption, said SeaTac suming than in the past. generated. spokesman Perry Cooper. United and Continental Most passengers are “We don’t have a big asked to check-in online, at merged in May 2010. group of folks hanging out, airport kiosks or via mobile They are slowly integratstranded,” he said. phone — not with an agent ing their systems but still Business travelers are — and paper tickets are a operate independently. So usually hurt less by such thing of the past. Continental was able to disdisruptions than people flyAirplanes also are flying patch flights normally. ing for vacation or personal reasons because airlines first help passengers with elite status in frequent flier programs and those who bought more-expensive, unrestricted tickets. Our SMART rehab program offers Mary Clark, a United spokeswoman, said she a 7 day-a-week therapy program. couldn’t say how many pasYou are able to start therapy faster sengers were delayed or how & get home sooner! many still needed to reach their destination by midday 360-582-3900 Saturday. 1005 S. 5th Ave, Sequim About the outage itself, AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner she and other airline person-

and those developing a small business. It meets at the Pink House from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. The group discusses job searches, business ideas and strategies based on action plans that fulfill individual goals. Puget Sound Energy provided a $2,000 grant to Friends of the Library for the Transition Yourself workshop and the networking group. Peninsula Daily News

717 RACE ST. PORT ANGELES


D6

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

ROADSHOW PAYING CASH ON THE SPOT FOR ANTIQUES, GOLD JEWELRY, SILVER COINS AND MORE! By Jason Delong

STAFF WRITER

Got gold? This week, visitors can cash in on antiques, collectibles, gold, silver, coins

Clean out your attics, closets and lock boxes, because the Treasure Hunters Roadshow is coming to Port Angeles. Roadshow specialists are in town examining antiques, collectibles, gold and silver. While the Roadshow will accept anything that’s old, they will be focusing on: gold and silver coins made before 1964, military items, toys and trains, musical instruments, pocket and wrist watches. Scrap gold is expected to be a popular category this week due to soaring gold prices. Buyers for the roadshow have noticed a tremendous increase in the amount of gold coming

Roadshow staff will test it for free. Other gold items of interest include gold coins, gold ounces, gold proof sets and dental gold. Other types of items Roadshow specialists hope to see include old toys and train sets. Archie Davis, the Roadshow’s toy specialist, spoke about some of the top toys getting great offers. “Old tin wind-up toys from the late 1800’s through the 1960’s are in great demand right now,” said Davis, “especially those that are character related. Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, the Flintstones or any other character toys are sought after. Old Buddy L toys from the 1920’s to the 1960’s are especially in high demand.” Basically any toys made before 1965 are wanted. Train sets made by Lionel, American Flyer, Marklin and others have the potential to fetch a large sum. Davis a l s o s t r e s s e d , “ To y s w i t h boxes and in mint condition bring sensational prices. Most of the toys that come to the Roadshow are not in perfect shape, but can still bring good prices from collectors.” W h e n s p e c i a l i s t To m Above—Roadshow specialist, Mike Delong, sits with a gentleman Fuller was asked what he who is eagerly anticipating the assessment of his collectibles. enjoyed most about working to the Roadshow, and for good reason. Record at the Roadshow, he was quick to answer, “Old gold prices have Roadshow guests cashing in on coins and paper currency—for as long as I can broken or outdated jewelr y with our fair and remember, I have been fascinated with collecthonest purchase offers. ing coins. I would go through the change in my The Roadshow encourages anyone planning parents’ grocer y store, looking for rare dates a visit to take a minute and examine their jewand errors. Once, I found a silver quarter that I elry box or their lock box at the bank and gather sold for $300. Not bad for an 8 year old.” anything that is gold. If a guest is not sure if Fuller went on to explain that any U.S. coins something is gold, bring it anyways and the made before 1964 are the most sought after by collectors. Coins made before 1964 are 90%

CHECK IT OUT! WHO

TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW

WHAT

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

WHERE DAYS INN 1510 EAST FRONT STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362

WHEN JUNE 21ST - 25TH TUES–FRI 9AM–6PM SATURDAY 9AM–4PM

DIRECTIONS 360.452.4015

“U.S. COINS MADE BEFORE 1964 ARE THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER BY COLLECTORS. COINS MADE BEFORE 1 9 6 4 A R E 9 0 % S I LV E R , A N D VALUABLE BECAUSE OF EITHER THE SILVER CONTENT OR EVEN MORE VALUABLE IF ONE HAPPENS TO BE A RARE DATE.” silver, and valuable because of either the silver content or even more valuable if one happens to be a rare date. Fuller explained, “We help people sort through their coins for unique dates. We buy all types of coins at the Roadshow—from wheat pennies to buffalo nickels, and from single coins to entire truckloads. See you at the Roadshow.”

INFORMATION 217.787.7767

WE BUY SCRAP GOLD & GOLD JEWELRY WHAT WE BUY COINS Any and all coins made before 1964: silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted!

GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Krugerrands, gold bars, Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

JEWELRY Gold, silver, platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires, all types of stones and metals, rings, bracelets, necklaces, etc. (including broken jewelry) Early costume jewelry wanted.

WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.

TOYS, TRAINS, DOLLS All makers and types of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, Battery Toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets—Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains (all gauges, accessories, individual cars), Barbie dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, characters, German.

WE BUY ALL OIL PAINTINGS AND WATERCOLORS

HOW IT WORKS

•Gather items of interest from your attic, garage, basement, etc. There is no limit to the amount of items you can bring. •No appointment is necessary. •If you decide to accept the offer, we will pay you on the spot and ship the item to the collector. The collector pays all shipping and handling charges. •You get 100% of the offer with no hidden fees.

SEE YOURSELF

ON TV

FILMING THIS WEEK IN BOISE, ID

MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII, etc: swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters. The older the swords, the better.

GUITARS & INSTRUMENTS

Fender, Gibson, Martin, Rickenbacker, Gretsch, new and vintage amps, saxophones, wood winds, mandolins and all others. 165124528

T R E A S U R E H U N T E R S R O A D S H O W.COM


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME

SPACIOUS

Sunday, June 19, 2011

COMFORTABLE HOME

E1

NEW LISTING

16406977

Cape style 3 BR/2 BA home on an acre in the country. Privacy with a babbling brook. Some of the acre is fenced for horses. Home is in great condition. $299,000. ML#260569/ 197739 Call Thelma

Dave Stofferahn

WRE/Port Ludlow

WRE/Port Angeles Thelma Durham

477-5542 dstofferahn@olypen.com

Bryan Diehl

477-5322 heidi@olypen.com

NORTHWEST STYLE

D CE U D RE

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

WATER VIEW!

0 00 0, 1 $

Affordable home in great neighborhood. Mt. view, peekaboo water view. Very light and bright. Located on a corner lot. Wood flooring. New back exterior landing and steps. Level lot. Good place for a garden. $125,000 MLS#260979 Ask for Vivian

16406997

16406985

16407002

16406998

This gently sloping, 2.6-Acre parcel is located on the south side of Bell Hill. Southern exposure, Mt. views await you and your dream home plans. Watch the eagles soar and the deer & elk graze as the sun sets over the Olympic Mountains. Only minutes from downtown Sequim. Definitely check this one out! ML#261265 Only $129,900 Call Tammy!

Beautiful cedar-sided home on 1.16 acres close to town. Mountain view from living room, kitchen and nice deck off kitchen/dining area. City water plus irrigation water, lots of outdoor storage. 3 BR/2 BA, recently updated with new flooring throughout, new range and hood, new ductless heat pump. Attached direct access garage. Recent price change to $229,000 ML#260395 Call Gail 360-477-9361

UPTOWN REALTY

REALLY CUTE HOUSE

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

Unique 2 BR/2 BA home on 2.97 acres with water and Mt. views. Bamboo floors, marble countertops and free standing wood stove with brick accents. Enjoy your beautiful, tranquil gardens from your deck with wonderful Mt. views. Horse lovers, we have a 30x60 barn or storage building. Nice pasture area, too. 2-car garage with a wine cellar or bunker, you decide. $279,000 Call Jean for information!

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

Heidi Hansen

(360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

16406984

16406971

16406979

Custom Moriarty built resort home. 3 BR/1.75 BA, 2,006 SF, located close to amenities and park. Very comfortable & luxurious floor plan and deck. MLS#228294 $254,900.

4 BR/2 BA home on a half acre within the city limits with city services. Large yard includes garden space, fenced area for pets and access to seasonal stream. Mature fruit trees on property provide privacy in a serene setting. Home has fireplaces in living room and family room, patio and wraparound deck. Move-in ready. Lots of parking space for all your vehicles and RV hookups. $226,500 MLS#261191/232244

This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint & lots of other updates. Wonderful family home, or, lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen...perfect for mother-in-law unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ & water view. Just listed at $189,000

®

Gail Sumpter

CE

AN

190 Priest Rd. PO Box 1060 Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

360-477-9361 gail@gailsumpter.com

360.417.8598

Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

tammy@jacerealestate.com

1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

WONDERFUL COUNTRY HOME

Kathy Love

UPTOWN REALTY VIVIAN LANDVIK, GRI

Tammy Newton

www.gailsumpter.com

www.portangelesrealty.com

MT. VIEW SUNLAND HOME

CHARMING WESTSIDE HOME

VIEW HOO! D

CE

CE

I PR

Office: (360) 417-2783 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: timriley@olypen.com

Beautiful, level & gently sloping pastured 5-Acre parcel on Lisel Lane off Deer Park Road. Absolutely stunning Mt. views with a southern exposure. PUD water, power & telephone waiting for your dream home. Parcel is fenced on three sides. Water meter is installed. Newer & nicer homes nearby. ML#260970 Only $114,900 Always call JACE for Land! Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

Jace Schmitz, REALTOR®

360.565.2020

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

DON'T JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER

W

www.calljace.com jace@jacerealestate.com

www.u-saverealestate.com

1234 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362

A LOTTA HOUSE FOR A LITTLE PRICE

FANTASTIC VIEWS NE

16407003

Perched atop a nearly 10 acre wooded ridge with spectacular Mt. views. Perfect for those seeking the quiet, country life. Custom built in 2005 with beautiful hardwood floors and an expansive dream kitchen. Upgrades include granite counters, metal roofing, Hardiplank siding, covered wrap-around porch, Trex deck, heat pump, 9’ ceilings and Bliemeister cabinets. Living room features a built-in entertainment center and river rock gas fireplace $569,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

tom@sequim.com

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

E RIC

BEST VALUE WATER VIEW!

P

Want to live close to town and still have elbow room? Here’s a home on 1 acre just off the highway. The extra land gives you flexibility for gardening or even animals. 2 BR/2 full BA, fireplace, heat pump, built-in vacuum system. The barn has lots of work and storage with a separate hobby room above. Great buy at $169,000! ML#260718

16406978

Strait, City lights, Victoria & Mt. Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue & groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace w/propane insert & two free standing propane stoves, separated MBR. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking w/dump, water & electric. $355,000 ML#251615/109577 Call KAREN

16406988

16406992

16406972

1-800-786-1456 360-457-0456

16406990

Wow! Newer 3 BR/2 BA home on 3.10 acres of land only a short ride away from the Discovery Trail. The home features an open living area with vaulted ceilings and wood stove. The barn is 960 SF with heated tack room. In addition there are 4 paddocks adjacent to the barn along with a sandfilled riding arena. $269,000 ML#260811

TOM BLORE

UPTOWN REALTY

The outside of this home needs paint, but the inside is in good shape. The seller will install a new roof before closing. You can live and work from this 2 BR/1 BA home. Commercial Neighborhood Zoning and desirable Cherry Hill location. $115,000 ML#261224

'S' IS FOR STUNNING

16406996

16406987

In desirable Sunrise Heights on 1.5 lots. 1,865 SF, spectacular spacious kitchen, 3 BR/2 BA, gleaming wood floors, vinyl windows, new roof - all living space including laundry on entry level. 2-car plus garage is 720 SF w/10’ door for RV/boat, etc. Spotless & ready to move in! ML#261205 Team Thomsen Realtors® $244,000

Office: (360) 457-1111 Cell: (360) 460-7652 rightguy@olypen.com

PRIVATE COUNTRY ESTATE

AFFORDABLE HORSE PROPERTY

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED

Dick Pilling

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 (360) 797-4802 tpeterson@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

Tim Riley

360-461-9014 cdana@olypen.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Terry Peterson

UPTOWN REALTY

Carol Dana

TERRY NESKE

ML#261245/235358 $159,000

Enjoy the Mt. view from the wraparound porch from this nearly new 2 BR/2.5 BA home on 5 acres. Relax in the spacious living area with vaulted ceiling. Retreat to the private master suite w/FP. Let your inner chef whip up gourmet delights in the beautifully equipped kitchen and serve in formal dining room. Store cars and toys in the extra large dbl. garage. $255,000 ML#260575 Call Dick

WRE/SunLand

WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Port Angeles

• Southern Exposure Offers Privacy • Well Maintained Established Landscaping • Thoughtful Floor Plan Minimizes Housework • Maximizes Time to Enjoy SunLand Amenities

R

16406989

What a great buy with beautiful saltwater and Mt. views. This 4 BR/1 BA home, with nearly 1,500 SF has recently been updated and is very clean. Wood stove and newer roof! Move in ready at just $159,000 ML#260813. Ask for Tim.

16406983

16406986

16406991

Beautiful panoramic view of Olympic Mts. Propane brick fireplace, large MA BA w/ separate tub/shower & walk-in closet. Large, built-in pantry. 725 SF attached garage & additional 352 SF garage/workshop area. Sunroom off MABR. Gorgeous landscaping, fruit trees, sprinkler system. In area of newer home. Call CAROL. ML#261180/231580 $249,000

U ED

Outstanding views of Protection Island, Victoria, shipping lanes and Mt. Baker. Remodeled to like-new condition. 2,100 SF, 3 BR/3 BA. Great room living area, propane fireplace, gourmet kitchen, huge master suite with private viewing deck & park-like landscaping. $309,000 ML#260884/216851

WRE/Sequim-East

Karen Kilgore

477-5718 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 KarenK@olypen.com

UPTOWN REALTY

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

Dan Tash

461-2872 dantash@olypen.com


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

A TRULY PANORAMIC SALT WATER AND ISLAND VIEW! Beautifully remodeled 3 Br. home on .32 acre in Port Angeles. Borders Olympic Natl. Park. Convenient to downtown waterfront and college. Great home, great location. www.bitly.com/PAho me. $248,000. (360) 452-8770

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Homes

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Homes

AFFORDABLE HORSE PROPERTY Wow! Newer 3 Br., 2 bath home on 3.10 acres of land only a short ride away from the Discovery Trail. The home features an open living area with vaulted ceilings and wood stove. The barn is 960 sf with heated tack room. In addition there are 4 paddocks adjacent to the barn along with a sand filled riding arena. $269,000. ML260811. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 Beautiful remodeled home in desirable Sunrise Heights on 1.5 lots. 1,865 sf, spectacular spacious kitchen, 3 Br., 2 bath, gleaming wood floors, vinyl windows, new roofall living space including laundry on entry level. 2 car plus garage is 720 sf with 10’ door for RV/boat, etc. Spotless and ready to move in! $244,000. ML261205. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEST VALUE WATER VIEW Outstanding views of Protection Island, Victoria, shipping lanes, and Mt. Baker. Remodeled to likenew condition, 2,100 sf, 3 Br., 3 baths. Greatroom living area, propane fireplace, gourmet kitchen, huge master suite with private viewing deck, and park-like landscaping. $309,000. ML260884/216851 Dan Tash 461-2872 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME Custom Moriarty built resort home. 3 Br., 1.75 bath, 2,006 sf, located close to amenities and park. Very comfortable and luxurious floor plan and deck. $254,900. ML228294. Brian Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs:

COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CONVENIENCE Home is a 2 Br. 2 bath, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre parcel. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim and Port Angeles; it’s just a short drive either way. You won’t find many newer homes on an acre for this price! $174,000. ML252040 Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today!

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BLACK DIAMOND GEM 3+ acres of idyllic pasture that includes a seasonal pond. Boasting 4 Br., and 2 baths, the home has been lovingly maintained and has been recently treated to a tasteful kitchen updated along with new paint inside and out plus new windows. $244,500. ML251628 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CHARMING WEST SIDE HOME What a great buy with beautiful saltwater and mountain views. This 4 Br., 1 bath home, with nearly 1,500 sf, has recently been updated and is very clean. Wood stove and newer roof! Move in ready. $159,000. ML260813. Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY COMFORTABLE HOME Cape style 3 Br., 2 bath home on an acre in the country. Privacy with a babbling brook. Some of the acre is fenced for horses. Home is in great condition. $299,000 ML260569/197739 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Homes

DON’T JUDGE A BOOK BY IT’S COVER! The outside of this home needs paint but the inside is in good shape. The seller will install a new roof before closing. You can live and work from this 2 Br., 1 bath home. Commercial Neighborhood Zoning and desirable Cherry Hill location. $115,000. ML261224 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME Solar powered 3 Br., 2 bath, close distance to Sequim amenities, beautiful mtn views with open floorplan, fully landscaped with trex deck, arbor, and southern exposure. $259,000 ML234714/261229 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FANTASTIC VIEWS Strait, city lights, Victoria and Mount Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue and groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace with propane insert and two free standing propane stoves, separated master Br. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking with dump, water and electric. $355,000. ML251615. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

From Whidbey to the Cascades! 1.49 acres, bright open one level home. LR with fireplace, custom cabinets in kitchen, family room. 3 Br., 1-3/4 bath, deck, 2 car garage, Sep. studio apt. $355,000. 379-1434. 206-300-2505 Great water and mountain views on .62 private ac near schools and shopping. Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great room, rec rm. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on 1st floor. Shop. Warm, south facing, tiled patio. Fruit trees/garden. $325,000. 457-2796.

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Homes

Looking for a community with a easy place to stay active and healthy? Great turnkey with 1 year dues paid and furnished. 2 Br., 1.75 bath, 1,281 sf. An easy move and great choice. Includes athletic court, cable TV, club house, disabled access, elevator, exercise room, fire sprinklers, hot tub, lobby entrance, pool indoor, sauna, security gate, trails. $254,950. ML222317. Patti Hartley 206-253-3353 RSVP Real Estate NEW LISTING Unique 2 Br., 2 bath home on 2.97 acres with water and Mt. views. Bamboo floors, marble counter tops and free standing wood stove with brick accents. Enjoy your beautiful tranquil gardens from your deck with wonderful Mt. Views. Horse lovers, we have a 30x60 barn or storage building. Nice pasture area too. 2 car garage with a wine cellar or bunker, you decide. $279,000. ML260575 Jean Irvine 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEW STUNNING STRAIT VIEW CONDO 4 large Br. 3 baths, + den, large rec room and chef’s kitchen, luxurious master bath with jetted tub and step-in tile shower. Teak hardwood floors in entry, great room, and kitchen. Across street from Sunland clubhouse. $449,000 ML231952/261204 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NORTHWEST STYLE Beautiful cedar sided home on 1.16 acres close to town. Mountain view from living room, kitchen and nice deck off kitchen/dining area. City water plus irrigation water, lots of outdoor storage. 3 Br., 2 bath, recently updated with new flooring throughout, new range and hood, new ductless heat pump. Attached direct access garage. Recent price change. $229,000. ML260395. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

Homes

MTN VIEW SUNLAND HOME Southern exposure offers privacy, wellmaintained established landscaping, thoughtful floorplan, minimizes housework. Maximizes time to enjoy Sunland amenities. $159,000 ML235358/261245 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

OPEN HOUSE $189,000 3 Br., 2 bath 1 story home, 1,440 sf. Enjoy nature from your walkout deck. Directions: 60 Stratus Loop, Sequim. East Washington turn to Rhodefer Rd. At Rhodefer/West Sequim Bay Rd turn Right on W. Sequim Bay to Fairweather Dr. (across Caboose B B) Turn Right on Stratus Loop. 360-797-4200 PRIVATE COUNTRY ESTATE Perched atop a nearly 10 acre wooded ridge with spectacular mountain views. Perfect for those seeking the quiet, country life. Custom built in 2005 with beautiful hardwood floors and an expansive dream kitchen. Upgrades include granite counters, metal roofing, hardiplank siding, covered wraparound porch, Trex deck, heat pump, 9foot ceilings and Bliemeister cabinets. Living room features a built-in entertainment center and river rock gas fireplace. $569,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

RAMBLER ON 1.44 ACRES. 2 Br. home. 1.44 acres. 1 acre fenced. Great for kids and animals!! Heat pump, new interior paint. Sprinkler system in front yard. Close to schools. $220,000 Sell by owner. Call Jeff 360-461-3785. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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Homes

REALLY CUTE HOUSE Affordable home in great neighborhood. Mtn view. Peek-aboo water view. Very light and bright. Located on a corner lot. Wood flooring. New back exterior landing and steps. Level lot. Good place for a garden $125,000. ML260979. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY REMARKABLE BUY Over 3,000 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath home. Grand living room with propane fireplace, kitchen with island cooktop, master bath has double sinks, separate shower, jetted tub. Lower level has 2 large Br., full bath, plus bonus room. $225,000 ML22753/260996 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND REMARKABLE BUY Over 3,000 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath home. Grand living room with propane fireplace, kitchen with island cooktop, master bath has double sinks, separate shower, jetted tub. Lower level has 2 large Br., full bath, plus bonus room. $225,000 ML22753/260996 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS 4 Br., 2 bath home on a half acre within the city limits with city services. Large yard includes garden space, fenced area for pets, and access to seasonal stream. Mature and fruit trees on property provide privacy in a serene setting. Home has fireplaces in living room and family room, patio and wrap-around deck. Move-in ready. Lots of parking space for all your vehicles and RV hook ups. $226,500. ML261191/232244 Heidi Hansen and Dave Stofferahn 477-5322/477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Homes

SPACIOUS 4 Br. home, private setting on 5 acres with excellent view of Strait of Juan de Fuca and mountains. CC&R’s protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $429,000. ML261181. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Stunning contemporary home, light and bright with nice marine view. Originally designed for two living quarters with separate entrances. Central location, over 2,600 sf of living space, workshop area and heated floors. Home is unfinished as reflected in the price. Bring your tools and imagination for one of a kind experience. $180,000 ML261214/215282 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO 2 Br., 2 baths, nice sunroom, propane stove, murphy bed, shoji screen. $185,000 ML145314/252226 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND VIEW HOO! Enjoy the mountain view from the wraparound porch from this nearly new 2 Br., 5 bath home on 5 acres. Relax in the spacious living area with vaulted ceiling. Retreat to the private master suite with fireplace. Let your inner chef whip up gourmet delights in the beautifully equipped kitchen and serve in formal dining room. Store cars and toys in extra large double garage. $255,000. ML260575 Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

Want to live close to town and still have elbow room? Here’s a home on 1 acre just off the highway. The extra land gives you flexibility for gardening or even animals. 2 Br., 2 full baths, fireplace, heat pump, built in vacuum system. The barn has lots of work and storage with a separate hobby room above. Great buy. $169,000. ML260718. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WATER VIEW This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint and lots of other updates. Wonderful family home; or, lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen; perfect for mother-inlaw unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ and water view. $189,000. ML Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY WONDERFUL COUNTRY HOME Beautiful panoramic view of the Olympic Mountains. Propane brick fireplace, large master bath with separate tub/shower and walk-in closet. Large built-in pantry. 725 sf attached garage and additional 352 sf garage/ workshop area. Sun room off master Br. Gorgeous landscaping, fruit trees, sprinkler system. In area of newer homes. $249,000. ML261180. Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East WONDERFUL HOME 2,300 sf of living space. Open kitchen, spacious Br., den/ office, and easy maintenance landscaped yard. Attached ADU/mother-in-law apartment quarters, additional bonus garage with RV bay, and 12’ door. Enjoy great mtn views from rear patio. Additional covered patio off the master Br., too. Fenced garden area. $485,000. ML260296. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

16407005

ONE OWNER

PRICE REDUCED!

Adorable cottage between bridges on corner lot. 3 BR/2 BA, 1,429 SF home perfect for first time home buyer. Sunken family room creates space to retreat and detached dbl. garage has space for crafts or storage. Large deck perfect for a hot tub. Cozy fireplace in living room to enjoy on long winter evenings. $198,000 Contact Janet at 460-7456 MLS#260792

www.portangeleslandmark.com

www.portangeleslandmark.com

330 E. 1st ST., Ste. 1 • Port Angeles

330 E. 1st ST., Ste. 1 • Port Angeles

360-452-1326 Fax: 360-457-3212

360-452-1326 Fax: 360-457-3212

Looking for a community with an easy place to stay active & healthy? Great turn-key with 1 year dues paid and furnished. 2 BR/1.75 BA, 1,281 SF. An easy move and great choice for only $254,950 ML#222317 Amenities include: Athletic Court, Cable TV, Clubhouse, Disabled Access, Elevator, Exercise room, Fire Sprinklers, Hot Tub, Lobby Entrance, Pool-Indoor, Sauna, Security Gate, Trails. Call Patti

09405017

16407001

16407000

16406999

Well maintained craftsman style home that was built as solid as they come. One-owner 3 BR/1.5 BA, 1,662 SF home. Sunken den, wood heat, park-like backyard w/view of Olympic Mts. Vegetable garden, fruit trees, berry bushes. Single-car garage w/workshop and craft room. $169,900 Contact Janet at 460-7456 MLS#261201

AMAZING OCEAN VIEW

GREAT TURN-KEY

Views of Discovery Bay and beyond to Mt. Baker from most rooms, decks and the sunroom of this quality home on 1.6 acres. Look closely at the landscaping, it includes many types of berries and an orchard of mature apple & plum trees. 4 BR/2.5 BA and large hobby room in a home with an excellent floor plan. Attached double garage plus detached RV barn and huge shop. ML#251919 $599,000

DIANN DICKEY

Patti Hartley Cell: 206 235-3353 pattihartley@comcast.net PattiHartley.com

mL

Toll Free: 1-877-683-3564 Cell: (360) 477-3907 www.realestatesequim.com ddickey@olypen.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 52

Manufactured Homes

‘81 Fleetwood, 14x 70’, 3 Br., 2 bath. $3,000. 681-2428. P.A.: ‘89 Liberty 14x60 mobile, in senior park, interior updated, very nice. $18,500 furnished. 477-2118 P.A.: Beautiful, bright, ‘93 Redman dbl. wide, 2 Br., 1.75 ba, skylights, vaulted ceilings, handicap ramp to front door, Super Good Cents, secluded dead end cul-de-sac with creek, remodeled kitchen/bath, carpet and hardwood floors, storage shed, carport, adult park. $52,999. Appt. only. 460-1993

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Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. PORT ANGELES lot @ 222 W Park Ave Half acre+ CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water $69,000. Owner financing. Call 253-549-3345. BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME This gently sloping 2.6 acre parcel is located on the South side of Bell Hill. Southern exposure, mountain views await you, and your dream home plans. Watch the eagles soar, and the deer and elk graze as the sun sets over the Olympic Mountains. Only minutes from downtown Sequim. Definitely check this one out! $129,900. ML261265 Tammy Newton 417-8598 JACE The Real Estate Company LAKE SUTHERLAND 11 acres, family getaway on the East Shore with 400+’ waterfront. 1/5 ownership in 11 acres includes dock, beach, covered outdoor kitchen, private lot with RV hook-up with spectacular lake views. $79,000. 457-0226 ‘S’ IS FOR STUNNING Beautiful, level and gentle sloping pastured 5 acre parcel on Lisel Lane off Deer Park Road. Absolutely stunning mountain views with a southern exposure. PUD water, power and telephone waiting for your dream home. Parcel is fenced on three sides. Water meter is installed. Newer and nicer homes nearby. $114,900. ML260970. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company TOWERING EVERGREENS And an open forest floor make this truly a park like setting. A very distinctive plateau would make for an excellent home site with sweeping views of the strait. 2.28 acres conveniently located just west of Port Angeles. $79,900. ML225476 Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WATER VIEW 9.5 acres in Clallam Bay. Two identified build able areas, one on each end. $103,000. ML260391. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

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Apartments Furnished

Central P.A.: Clean, quiet, upstairs 2 Br., in well managed complex. Excellent references required. 457-7149, leave msg.

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Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. upstairs, in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $438$480, 2 Br. $514$541, 3 Br. $685 + util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258.

Apartments Unfurnished

COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D. $600, $600 dep., no pets. 1226 Craig Ave. 452-3423. P.A.: 1 Br. $600 mo., $250 deposit, utilities incl. 457-6196. P.A.: 1 Br., W/D, dishwasher, $32 background check. $550 + dep. 457-0747 or 477-9716, lv. msg. P.A.: 2 Br., owner pays W/G, great location. $585. 417-6638.

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P.A.: Over 950 sf, 1 & 2 Br. 4016 Newell Rd. Under new mgmt. 452-4524. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: New 2 Br., $750 includes W/S/G 683-3339

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Duplexes

Large, quiet, redone 2 bed. With garage: $800/mo. No garage: $725. No smoke. 321 W. Park. 457-9641.

64

Houses

506 1/2 H ST PA: 2 Br. $550, 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-3423. BRINNON: 2 Br. mobile home, near Senior Center. $300 mo. 360-796-4270.

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Houses

AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $725. 460-9710.

DIAMOND PT., SEQ 3 Br., 2 ba. $895. 360-681-0140

CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., fenced yard, $600 mo. 461-0644.

P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $600, last, dep. 452-1694 eves.

Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer near beach, utilities furnished. $600. 928-3006.

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba rental. W/D, kitchen appl. $1,150. 460-3748.

COTTAGE P.A.: Small 1 Br., dog friendly. $750. 683-3457. DIAMOND PT., SEQ 2 Br., 2 ba, $795. 360-681-0140

P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, no pets/smoke. $675, 1st, last, dep. Available July. 417-5137. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. great view, $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409

Houses

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSE/APT IN P.A. Studio.................$400 A 2/2 util inc....$550 A 2 br 2 ba......$650 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$700 H 2 br 1 ba..... $850 H 2 br 1 ba......$950 H 3 br 2 ba....$1050 H 2 br 5 acres.$1200 FURN. HOUSES P.A. H 4 br 1 ba....$1200 H 2 br 2 ba....$1350

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com Large country home, 4 bdrm, 3 bath, family room, living room, office, lg Utility rm, oversized 2 car garage on 3 acres. All new floors and counter tops. Large decks, flower and herb gardens. Available July 1. Call for showing. 457-8472 or 460-2747. ONE OWNER Well maintained craftsman style home that was built as solid as they come. One-owner, 3 Br., 1.5 bath, 1,662 sf home. Sunken den, wood heat, park-like backyard with view of the Olympic Mtns. Vegetable garden, fruit trees, berry bushes. Single-car garage with workshop and craft room. $169,000. ML261201. Janet Stevenson 460-7456 Properties by Landmark

P.A.: 520 E. 8th St., 2 Br., 1 ba, fenced yard, parking, excellent condition. $750 mo., 1st, last, damage dep. 457-1032. P.A.: 535 E. 7th. 3 Br., 2 ba, newer, no smoke/pets, $1,125 mo., 1st, last, $750 dep. 460-9816. P.A.: Cute home/yard, W. 5th St. 2 Br., extra room, 1 bath, carport. No pets. $950. 360-374-3259 PRICE REDUCED Adorable cottage between bridges on corner lot. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,429 sf home perfect for first time home buyer. Sunken family room creates space to retreat and detached double garage has space for crafts or storage. Large deck perfect for a hot tub. Cozy fireplace in living room to enjoy on long winter evenings. $198,000. ML260792. Janet Stevenson 460-7456 Properties by Landmark Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: 1 Br., 1 bath. Detached garage/ shop. $600, plus dep. 681-2611. SEQ: 2 Br. log home, 2 ba, jetted tub, W/D, refrigerator. $950. 460-4680, 683-3296 SEQUIM: Happy Valley. Newer 3 Br., 1.75 ba, 2 car garage. Deck. Woodstove. Large windows. Mtn view. $1,100. No pets/smoking. 683-9847

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

Furnished Br., pvt bath, equipped kitchen. $450. $225 dep. No smoke/pets. Incl. util., cable, WiFi. 3 blocks from college, female pref. 808-3502 HOUSESHARE Master Bd pvt bath New carpet furn .5 mi to Sequim Equipt kitchen W/D Elec TV Wifi $500 mo $200 dep NO PETS Prefer non smoker For more info 460-7594. P.A.: 1 room for rent. Organic farm. $350, utilities. 452-4021. ROOMMATE: Large home. $475 incl. util. and cable, internet, etc. 360-504-2344. WANTED: M/F to share 2 Br., with a 56 yr old male, located between P.A. and Seq. Lt. dk, smk ok. $350 incl utl., +dep (neg.) 452-6045.

68

Commercial Space

525 E. 8TH ST., P.A. Formerly Sassy Kat Salon, 1,486 sf, handicapped accessible and parking lot. 452-5381, 460-3824 Commercial building, 2839 E. Hwy 101, P.A. $595. 452-5050. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 WAREHOUSE: by UPS 1,200 ft. 3 doors 9’x8’, 1 with opener. Heated 12x12 office, (2) 1/2 baths with hot water. Avail. approx. July 1. Can show now. $725, first, last, $300 deposit. 457-9527 or 460-1809.

Clallam County Timothy E. Flynn, residential addition, 4027 Mount Pleasant Road, $5,644. OlympicAuto Racing Inc., demolition of grandstands, 77 Octane Lane, $2,000. Cindy Clardy, replacement of single wide manufactured home with double-wide manufactured home, 211 W. Deytona St., $25,000. Robert and Mary Jane Duncan, swap out existing gas insert, 122 Inner Bay Lane, $789. Daryl and Kim Wakefield, 100-gallon above-ground propane tank placement and installation of gas fireplace, 78Thompson Point Road, $3,534. Department of Correction Clallam Bay Correction Center, installation of dryer heat recovery system on four dryers, 1830 Eagle Crest Way, $150,000. Department of Correction Clallam Bay Correction Center, installation of diesel oxidation units on two existing generators, 1830 Eagle Crest Way, $25,000. Country Inn Corporation, single family dwelling, 2275 E. Sequim Bay Road, $262,182. Daniel and Julie D. Hjelmeseth, double-wide manufactured home placement, 3611 S. Critchfield Road, $115,000. Sherry and Eddie O’Neal, demolition of single level portion on single family dwelling, 772Taylor Cut-off Road, $1,000.

Port Angeles Walter G. Davison, re-roof, 1369 E. Eighth St., $7,950. Donald and Sandra Bettger trust, signs, 1121/2 E. First St., $50. WHC 839 LLC, fire alarm system, 221 N. Lincoln St., $4,000. Robert W. Eastman, carport, 1309 Caroline St., $8,640. B.G. and L.A. Edwards, move bathtub and toilet, 210 W. 13th St., $500. Lestice Enterprises LLC, commercial remodel, 114 E. Front St., $50,000. North Olympic Peninsula SVCS, install vent fan on roof, 139 W. First St., $1,766. Elizabeth M.Tschimperle, re-roof, 1325 E. Fourth St., $3,272. City of PortAngeles, storage building, 1608 W. 16th St., $9,701. LouisA.Torres II. two heat pumps, 1620 W. 13th St., $20,352. GenevraA. Harris trust, remodel basement, 1120 W. 10th St., $19,000. Delhur Industries Inc., two exhaust fans, 4333TumwaterTruck Route, $2,625. Randall E. McCoy, fire abandon tank inspection, 112 E. 11th St., $600. David and Janet Erickson, two shampoo bowls, 211 W. First St., $200.

Sequim Walmart Real Estate BusinessTrust, fire sprinkler, 1284 W. Washington St., $74,887. Olaf and Charlotte Protze, place caboose on railroad pad, 24 Old Coyote Way, $1,200. City of Sequim, install Lions Club signs at East and West Washington Street entrances to Sequim, $0. Reef Sequim, LLC, grocery outlet fire alarm, 1045 W. Washington St., $9,541. Reef Sequim, LLC, shelving and racking, 1055 W. Washington St., $50,000. Melvin L. Hendrickson, bedroom addition, 512 N. SeventhAve., #68, $19,564. Cecilia Kellogg-Kilmer and Larry Kilmer, portion of fence, 81 Rolling Hills Way, $300. Excel Utility Construction Inc., trench from QWest Pd to PUD pole, West Sequim Bay Road, $2,000. Sharla Dewan, re-roof, 126 W. Hammond St., $5,600. Reef Sequim, LLC, fire alarm system, 1055 W. Washington St., $5,694. William E. and IsobelA. Johnston joint trust, re-shingle, 305 N. FifthAve., $1,335.

Jefferson County Richard Linzer, interior remodel of single family residence, 391 Beach Sr., $70,000. G.S. Properties No. 2 Inc., tempo `rary fireworks stand for July 4, 11602 Rhody Drive, $0. Robert Rogers, addition to carport, 10 W. Maple St., $2,846. Ludlow Maintenance Comm, replace heat pump, 121 MarinaView Dr., $4,850. Evergreen Coho Escap Retreat, install 120-gallon above-ground propane tank and lines, 2481Anderson Lake Road, #622, $0. Christopher Nielsen, swap-out 500-gallon above-ground propane tank, 179 Galloway Lane, $0.

Port Townsend Dale Jeff, Metro Bagels, commercial tenant improvement ofADA bathroom and added dining room, 1980 Sims Way, $1,500. Stephen C. and Deborah J. Moriarty, residential addition/remodel replacing foundation and windows, 1041 Jefferson St., $16,400. Jeffery M. Jackson trustee and SallyA. Warren trustee, single family residence with accessory dwelling unit on lower level, 693Taft St., $270,473.14.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 43 building permits issued from June 610 with a total valuation of $1,254,945.14.14: PortAngeles, 14 at $128,656; Sequim, 10 at $170,121; Clallam County, 10 at $590,149; PortTownsend, 3 at $288,373.14; Jefferson County, 6 at $77,696.

165124656

CENTRAL P.A: Clean, 2 Br., W/D inc. $625. 360-460-4089 mchughrents.com

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SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


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Classified

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

SPACIOUS

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-3:30

WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Sequim-East

CHUCK MURPHY (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

SUNLAND HILLTOP CONDO

NEW STUNNING STRAIT VIEW CONDO

• Solar Powered 3 BR/2 BA • Walking Distance to Sequim Amenities • Beautiful Mt. Views w/Open Floor Plan • Fully Landscaped w/Trex Deck (Arbor & S. Exposure) ML#261229/234714 $259,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

Home is a 2 BR/2 BA, 2005 model in excellent shape situated on a beautiful country acre. The location? You can have it both ways being perfectly positioned between Sequim & Port Angeles - it’s a short drive either way. You won’t find any newer homes on a one-acre parcel for this price! $174,000 ML#252040 Call DAVE

WRE/Sequim-East

Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

16406980

CONVENIENCE & CHARM 1,952 SF, 3 BR/2 BA, LR, FR, den/office. Kitchen w/granite countertops, oak cabinetry & formal dining. Fenced yard, out-bldg & Mt. view. Call CHUCK $259,900 ML#260250/179616 Directions: Sequim Ave. North to Old Olympic Hwy. West, through 5th Ave. to #9523.

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

16406995

16406994

16406993

4 bedroom home, private setting on 5 acres with excellent view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca & mountains. CC&Rs protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $429,000 ML#261181/231468 Call the DODDS

ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME

COUNTRY LIVING CITY CONVENIENCE

WRE/SunLand

DAVE SHARMAN

Deb Kahle

(360) 683-4844 842 E. WASHINGTON ST. SEQUIM, WA 98382 dsharman@olypen.com

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

WATER VIEW

TOWERING EVERGREENS W NE

WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

STUNNING CONTEMPORARY HOME

WRE/Port Angeles Quint Boe

Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

16407006

16406976

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

and an open forest floor make this truly a park-like setting. A very distinctive plateau would make for an excellent home site with sweeping views of the Strait. 2.28 acres conveniently located just west of Port Angeles. $79,900 ML#225476.

BLACK DIAMOND GEM

16406975

WRE/Port Angeles Paul Beck

WRE/Port Angeles DOC REISS

Kim Bower

Brenda Clark

Light and bright with nice marine view. Originally designed for two living quarters with separate entrances. Central location, over 2,600 SF of living space, workshop area and heated floors. Home is unfinished as reflected in the price. Bring your tools and imagination for a one-of-a-kind experience. $180,000 MLS#261214/215282

9.5 acres in Clallam Bay. Two identified buildable areas, one on each end. Contact Doc Reiss for more information. $103,000 ML#260391

16406974

• Two Bedrooms & Two Baths • Nice Sunroom • Propane Stove • Murphy Bed • Shoji Screen ML#145314/252226 $185,000 Visit www.kimbower.mywindermere.com

16406973

16406982

16406981

• 4 Large BD, 3 BA + Den • Large Rec. Room & Chef’s Kitchen • Luxurious Master BA (Jetted Tub & Step-in Tile Shower) • Teak Hardwood Floors (Entry, Great Room & Kitchen) • Across Street from SunLand Clubhouse ML#261204/231952 $449,000 www.brendaclark.mywindermere.com

CE PRI

3+ acres of idyllic pasture that includes a seasonal pond. Boasting 4 BR/2 BA, the home has been lovingly maintained and has been recently treated to a tasteful kitchen update along with new paint inside and out plus new windows. $244,500 ML#251628

WRE/Port Angeles Jennifer Felton (360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com

$AVE $$ on your subscription Choose Auto Renewal Credit card required 135114440

Call us today 360-452-4507 1-800-826-7 714

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

A FLEA MARKET Vendors Welcome Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-3 p.m Vendors in gate at 8 a.m. At yard behind Les Schwab, in P.A. $10 per large space. Call 452-7576 to reserve. AKC German Shorthair Pointer Pups. 5 boys & 1 sassy girl, $600. See online ad. Call Karoline at: 253-686-4580 All around handyman, anything A to Z. 360-775-8234

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following job opportunity: • Investment Rep for the North Olympic Peninsula For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

BLACKBERRY CAFE 50530 Hwy. 112 W. Father’s Day Specials: Prime rib, 16 oz tbone, and pan fried oysters. 4 p.m. serving time. Now featuring the Sasquatch Burger! Call for reservation 928-0141 CHEV: ‘90 4x4 3/4 ton. Custom shell, well maintained, 1 owner, 160K. $3,711. 683-1792 CHRYSLER: ‘01 PT Cruiser. Great grad gift! Everything in great shape, no dents, well cared for. Custom aftermarket body kit. 105K orig. mi. 26 mpg. Color purple. $4,500/obo. 452-4269 COTTAGE P.A.: Small 1 Br., dog friendly. $750. 683-3457.

CLALLAM COUNTY ROAD MAINTENANCE WORKER I $16.34 to 19.91 hr., fulltime (40 hrs wk), union and retirement eligible with benefits. Closes Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. (postmark accepted). CODE COMPLIANCE OFFICER II $21.45 to 26.13 hr., fulltime (37.5 hrs wk), union and retirement eligible with benefits. Prior experience required. Closes Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. (postmark accepted). Applications and complete job announcements available online at www.clallam.net/em ployment/, in front of Human Resources at 223 E 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or by calling Clallam County Jobs Line 360-417-2528. Resume in lieu of application not accepted. Faxed or emailed applications not accepted. EOE/ Drug Free Workplace ESTATE Sale: Sat., 82 p.m., At All Animal Hospital, 1811 W. Hwy 101. Diesel Gen.Set, lg air compressor, numerous tools, household items, Quadrafire wood stove, everything goes.

ESTATE SALE Fri., 9-4 p.m. Sat., 9-2 p.m. 1932 W. 6th St. Fishing/camping gear, table/chairs (8), full size bed frame, gardening, tools, table saw, kitchen, linens, lamps, moose antlers, military, old typewriter, pottery, and more. SATURDAY IS 1/2 PRICE DAY!

Driver needed with CDL. 702-538-3675.

FORD: ‘95 Thunderbird LX. 58K original miles, 1 owner, always garaged. $6,500. 379-0575.

FUN volunteer opportunities available for kids age 10-18 and adult mentors. Port Angeles Downtown Association Youth Volunteer Group. Call Grace at 360-4173001 for details. www.portangelesdow ntown.com/youth Funeral Home Looking for a parttime person; flexible hrs., lifting required. Good communication skills, compassionate, professional dress. Please send resume to: Randall.Baugh@ Dignitymemorial.com Garden RR. G gauge, 3 locomotives with sound, 13 cars, remote control and track, some trestles, lots of buildings and die cast vehicles. $1,100 for all. Port Townsend. 379-0209

RN | LPN OPPORTUNITY Life Care Center of Port Townsend RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Full-time position is available. Must be a Washington-licensed RN or LPN with experience in longterm care. We offer excellent pay and benefits, including medical coverage, 401(k) and paid vacation, sick days and holidays. Please apply in person, or send résumé to Rachel_Sondie@LC CA.com 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D-24238

Become a CNA CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT Life Care Center of Port Townsend FREE TRAINING OPPORTUNITY! Applications are now being accepted for our nursing assistant certification program. Classes will start around the middle of July. Space is limited so hurry and apply. Full-time employment opportunities are available for qualified graduates. Please apply in person. 360-385-8143 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D-24242

LEXUS: ‘00 RX3004WD. Original owner, dealer maintained (records available). Fully loaded. Including tow pkg. 135K miles. Excellent condition. $9,200. 928-2585

Large, quiet, redone 2 bed. With garage: $800/mo. No garage: $725. No smoke. 321 W. Park. 457-9641. MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Oriental art and vases, $100-$250. 681-0131

MOTOR HOME: ‘99 34’ Coachman Catalina. Class A, nonsmoker owned, slide, Ford V10, wide body, jacks, huge basement, many upgrades, 19K. See 2,000 below NADA at $29,500/obo 582-9640 P.A.: ‘89 Liberty 14x60 mobile, in senior park, interior updated, very nice. $18,500 furnished. 477-2118

23

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

WANTED: Tutor for Spanish conversation, Port Angeles. Must know grammar. 457-4930

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add: Pictures

Peninsula Classified is here to lend a helping hand. Computers, vehicles, jobs, real estate, pets… you name it!

Logos Bold Lines Yellow Highlight on Sunday 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

FOUND: Cat. Black, friendly, white on chest, Mill Creek area, Forks. 360-374-6623 FOUND: Cat. Older, tortoise colored female, vicinity of Old Olympic Hwy and Towne Rd., Sequim. 808-1164. FOUND: Dog. Small Beagle, Shore Rd., Agnew area. Is now at Olympic Peninsula Humane Society. FOUND: Parakeet. 6/16 800 block of W 6th. It misses you. 928-600-6594 FOUND: Thumb drive, off Ennis, in alley between 1st and 2nd Street, P.A. Has initials, call 565-1438. LOST: 2 keys on large decorative safety pin. From Port Townsend/Hadlock area. Silver, turquoise and coral. My spare car key! Please call Bridgett, 360-301-2717 LOST: Basketball from Port Townsend/Hadlock area. Black, with the wording “Roddy” on it. X-mas gift, sentimental. Please call Bridgett, 360-301-2717 LOST: Cat. Black and white spayed female from 14th and O area, PA. Missing since Wednesday. 452-7781

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

P.A.: Cute home/yard, W. 5th St. 2 Br., extra room, 1 bath, carport. No pets. $950. 360-374-3259 P.A.: 2 Br., owner pays W/G, great location. $585. 417-6638. STATIONARY ENGINEER 3 Clallam Bay Correction Center Full Time-Permanent Position. Pay starts at $4,167.00 Monthly, plus benefits. Closes 6/26/11. Also CORRECTIONAL OFFICER 1 On-Call, Starting pay $16.61 Hourly, plus benefits. Closes 6/26/11. Apply online at www.careers.wa. gov. For further information, please call Tanja Cain at 360963-3208 or Jennifer White at 360-9633207. EOE. RECLINERS: (2) matching. Comfortable, like new. $50 ea. $100 for pair. 683-0999 SALES: P/T. Exp. fundraising/sales professional to establish new contacts, make proposals to business sponsors for the Olympic Discovery Trail. Commission. Info online at: www.OlympicPeninsul a.org/page/media SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $11,000. 452-9857.

23

Lost and Found

LOST: Cat. Small female short hair tuxedo, Fairview area, P.A. 452-4336. LOST: Glasses. Transit center or on one of the transit busses in P.A., old fashion type with pink frame, prescription reading glasses, Port Angeles. 360-809-3349. STOLEN: Wells Cargo trailer taken 6/13/11 at 3:30 a.m. from Albertson’s area. Last known to be in Power Plant Road area west of P.A. Trailer filled with outdoor Christmas decorations. $1,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of the bad guys. Tips will remain confidential. Call Elwha Klallam Police at 452-6759.

24

Personals

Bank note for sale. 8% interest. Call for details, 461-2232.

25

Personals

Looking for a lady of retirement age in good health to spend the summer exploring Alaska in a group of three RVs. Private bedroom, all expenses paid, some cooking and light housekeeping in motor home. Possible long term commitment. Winter in Arizona. Leaving in mid June. WL7SD@juno.com

SEQUIM: Happy Valley. Newer 3 Br., 1.75 ba, 2 car garage. Deck. Woodstove. Large windows. Mtn view. $1,100. No pets/smoking. 683-9847

Sewing. I Sew 4U. Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don’t wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy!

SWING SHIFT JOURNEY LEVEL SAW FILER Well established, progressive Company seeks a high quality, flexible, team oriented individual with a minimum of 3-years Saw Filing experience for the Randle, WA operations. Excellent work environment and benefits. Please send resume by 6/24/11: Hampton Lumber Mills, P.O. Box 189, HR Dept., Randle, WA 98377. EEO/AA, women & minorities encouraged to apply. www.HamptonAffiliate s.com TOYOTA: ‘04 Camry LE. Silver, exc. cond. 70K mi. $12,000. 681-6325 TUBER/ASSEMBLY Part-time, must have good manual dexterity, eye sight, attention to detail a must. Send resume to: hpatterson@starmani nc.com WAREHOUSE: by UPS 1,200 ft. 3 doors 9’x8’, 1 with opener. Heated 12x12 office, (2) 1/2 baths with hot water. Avail. approx. July 1. Can show now. $725, first, last, $300 deposit. 457-9527 or 460-1809.

25

Personals

Retired 63 yr. old D/W/M seeks female 50-65, NS/ND, tall preferred 5’8”-6’2”. I like the beach, camping, sports, biking and travel. tbear1948@hotmail.c om

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

INFANT TODDLER SPECIALIST In Sequim. Full time year round, with benefits. Requires a minimum of a CDA in Infant Toddler Caregiving and experience working with children ages birth to 3. Apply online at www.olycap.org or call 360-385-2571 ext. 6337. Closes when filled.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

Are you looking to make great things happen in your community? Become a part of our energetic team at our Port Angeles Branch! We are seeking dedicated customer service professionals with cash handling and sales experience to be our Personal Banker. Apply now! www.usbank.com/car eers U.S. Bank is an equal opportunity employer, committed to creating a culturally diverse workforce.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

Peninsula Daily News ADVERTISING DIRECTOR WE'RE LOOKING FOR an experienced, entrepreneurial, innovative and results-oriented Advertising Director with a keen understanding of today's print and digital advertising platforms to drive the continued growth of the Peninsula Daily News. If you have at least five years’ proven leadership experience in daily newspaper retail, classified, online and niche product advertising and budget management, with a proven track record for results, we invite you to submit your resume by mail or online. A strong understanding of audience-based selling is critical. Experience in developing and executing strategies across multiple platforms including the core newspaper, niche publications, digital web sites and mobile websites is vital. The Advertising Director must motivate and coach a department of 25 staffers to achieve strategic and budget objectives; have a record of demonstrated individual sales goal achievement and sales management success; be proficient in MS Office, particularly Excel. Please send your resume -- with a detailed cover letter addressing our requirements above and your salary requirements -- to John Brewer Publisher and Editor Peninsula Daily News 305 W. First St. (P.O. Box 1330) Port Angeles, WA 98362. Or e-mail john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com with "Advertising Director" in the subject line.

Home Care Assistants Needed throughout Clallam & Jefferson Counties

3 3

We Offer:

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

10.31 /hr to start 10.41 /hr to start for CNAs or experienced caregivers Additional $0.50 /hr for weekend work Mileage Reimbursement Medical, Dental, Vision Paid Travel Between Clients Paid Leave Paid Training Up to $0.75 /hr other differential

3 3 3 3

18 Years of Age or Older Must have valid Drivers License Auto Insurance/Reliable Vehicle Must pass Criminal History Background Check

Minimum Requirements:

165123540

4C235382

We’re here to meet your everyday needs!

Borders

Lost and Found

Nurse Practitioners 2 Jobs Jamestown Health Clinic seeks chronic pain mgmt ARNP & SNF, LTC & home visiting ARNP for patient care with physicians. Requires current WA RN & ARNP license, grad of accredited school with advanced Nurse Practice ARNP, current board & DEA certs and BLS. Prefer PALS & ACLS. Part time, 32hrs/wk, good benefits, schedule varies, some night/weekend calls. Indian preference. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com Gene: 360.683.5900

CONTACT CATHOLIC COMMUNITY SERVICES 417-5420 OR 1-855-582-2700

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword 98 Big foot letters “BROADWAY SHOWSTOPPERS” 99 Fleeting By PAMELA AMICK celebrity KLAWITTER 103 Some kitchens 104 Gossip ACROSS 105 Moral slip 1 Cotton-picking 106 Cellist awarded handful a posthumous 5 Like pro football Lifetime players Achievement 9 Libreville is its Grammy in capital 1989 14 Seasonal crew? 110 Second-deepest 19 Moises of U.S. lake baseball 113 Convertible 20 One often alternatives thickens on 117 Burst of activity stage 120 Relax 21 Word with soap 123 Come to terms 22 Corporate 124 Many a chat reward room visitor 23 Airport pickup 125 __ Center: N.J. spot arena 26 Ballet __ 126 Italian hot spot 27 “__ and his 127 Like some bulls money ...” 128 Hoity-toity types 28 Toledo toast 129 British tax 29 Certain Honshu 130 Voicemail resident accumulation: 31 __ Sauer: Abbr. handgun 33 Library ID DOWN 35 Urges 1 Radner’s Wawa 39 Norman landmark 46 Prop- suffix 47 Captain Hook’s last words are its motto 48 Gives an earful 49 Frat characters? 50 Some HDTVs 52 Sunscreen additive 54 Alas., once 55 Iona College athletes 56 Troublemaker’s credo? 61 British miler Steve 62 One in a pool 63 Trendy tea 64 Some NFL linemen 67 Class unit 69 Assistants and such 72 Like a wake 74 2000 Gere title role 75 It may be fenced 78 Mrs. Gorbachev 81 Relative of -ish 82 One might prompt a curtain call 86 Dressing target 89 “Let __!” 90 Inventor Sikorsky 91 Cheese holder 92 Nutmeg covering 93 Like most sandals 96 Fictional futuristic race 6/19/11

31

31

Help Wanted

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following job opportunity: • Investment Rep for the North Olympic Peninsula For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

2 Minnesota’s St. __ College 3 Company symbol 4 1931 count portrayer 5 SUV stat 6 Some draft picks 7 Like “la vida” in a Ricky Martin hit 8 And others, to Cicero 9 Splitting word? 10 Springfield storekeeper 11 Carlos’s kiss 12 Mined finds 13 “The Lion King” lioness 14 Slips 15 Takeoff place 16 Before and after “à,” compared with 17 Safe opener? 18 Have a look 24 Better way to be wanted? 25 Needing practice 30 Clan attire 32 Gain access to

34 “Peaceful Warrior” actor 36 Flimflam 37 Silents star Jannings 38 Sign of freshness 39 Find out 40 Most handy 41 Massages deeply 42 Hoity-toity type 43 Took off 44 “Hamlet” courtier 45 Olympic volleyball medalist __ Kiraly 46 Big name in traitors 51 Match parts 53 Part of a Spanish 101 conjugation 55 Seuss, actually 57 Not easily excited 58 “The Closer” channel 59 Stock and then some 60 “The Jungle Book” python

 I G O D E R A C H T L A E H  I

C N N A L P E G A R U O C N E

S A C I S E G N A H C A V C M

L D S R C R E D R O O E O O I

A J Y T E I C O S R S N D M N

O U G R U A R T P T O E P P C

G S N O G C S P M M R R R E E

S T I P N E A E Y N O O O T N

www.wonderword.com

E M T E I R N F I V G A V I T

R E A R L T I Z E R W D I T I

U N R V O D E M A G E N S I V

S T G C O D E M A E N E I O E

A E S E E T M A P T N S S I ҹ O N ҹ L S ҹ D ҹ U E R G A O N N C S E

M E T S Y S S L A T I P S O H

6/18

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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

GIHMT ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

USPHL

ONOSIP

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

RTMEOH

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: Friday’s

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

31

Help Wanted

Boarding facilities looking for a self motivated, multitasking individual with dog handling exp. to help with caring for dogs, 40 hrs/wk. Serious applicants only. Pay DOE. 582-9048 msg.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Tanker Drivers Wanted! is looking for Class A CDL Drivers in Belfield & Ross, North Dakota. Other employment opportunities are available. We offer great pay and benefits. For more information about our exciting career opportunities, please visit our website

CAREGIVERS KWA Homecare. Call 452-2129. CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in assuming delivery carrier contract routes in the Port Townsend area. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insurance. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Contact Port Townsend District Manager Linda Mustafa 301-2747 for information.

CLALLAM COUNTY

www.missouribasinwell.com 165122998

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst.

Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11. Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim. AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare

165122437

(compare at www.medicare.gov)

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. MARKET-BASED REFORMS Solution: 8 letters

Adjustments, Agenda, Approach, Changes, Code, Competition, Costs, Cuts, Economy, Encourage, Goals, Health Care, Hospitals, Improvements, Incentives, Increase, Insurance, Investment, Land, Measures, Modernize, Modify, Order, Plan, Pooling, Pricing, Programs, Provisions, Rating, Renew, Report, Society, Sold, State, System, Target Friday’s Answer: Bottled

CAMPFIRE USA is seeking an Executive Director. Fundraising and grant development will be a priority. To apply, submit resume to: campfire@olypen.com, or Campfire USA, 619 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362.

or call

94 Lochinvars 95 Turkey’s place, in song 97 “__ Lovin’ That You Want”: Rihanna hit 100 Crown cover 101 Like some restaurants 102 Game opener 107 It might precede bad news 108 2009-’11 CIA director Panetta 109 City of NW France 111 Slow flow 112 “The Dukes of Hazzard” deputy 114 Porridge base 115 Ball game opener? 116 Ladies of Sp. 117 It’s tapped for syrup 118 FedEx Cup org. 119 Ernst collaborator 121 Belle of the ball 122 People people, briefly

© 2011 Universal Uclick

Help Wanted

701-575-8242

64 Passing notes? 65 Chairman of the board, for one 66 Blessed event? 68 Fireside quaff 70 __ Schwarz: 5th Avenue toy store 71 ’30s-’40s actress D’Orsay 73 Former despot 76 Hunter of the stars 77 Carved pole 79 Prudent advisers 80 Skating gold medalist __ Anton Ohno 82 Latvia-Sweden separator 83 Grapefruit relative 84 Eternally 85 Faculty mems. 86 Heist target 87 La Scala highlight 88 Garage apparatus 93 Angel Clare’s love, in an 1891 novel

By DAVID OUELLET

ROAD MAINTENANCE WORKER I $16.34 to 19.91 hr., fulltime (40 hrs wk), union and retirement eligible with benefits. Closes Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. (postmark accepted). CODE COMPLIANCE OFFICER II $21.45 to 26.13 hr., fulltime (37.5 hrs wk), union and retirement eligible with benefits. Prior experience required. Closes Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. (postmark accepted). Applications and complete job announcements available online at www.clallam.net/em ployment/, in front of Human Resources at 223 E 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or by calling Clallam County Jobs Line 360-417-2528. Resume in lieu of application not accepted. Faxed or emailed applications not accepted. EOE/ Drug Free Workplace

31

Help Wanted

CAREGIVERS wanted: No experience necessary, training available, flexible hours. Caregivers Home Care Team 457-1644, 683-7377, 379-6659

CNA’S AND LPN Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com COOK: Dinner/saute, must be experienced long term professional, full-time. Apply in person at Cafe Garden. CREATIVE AND CHALLENGING IN HOUSE WEBSITE MANAGEMENT. Intermediate to advanced front end website developer/ designer needed immediately. A good eye for content development, Flash and Adobe Master Suite CS5 (PC) a must. Full time. Resume and portfolio to jo@levx.com Electrical Engineering Specialist I or II City of Port Angeles Level I $3996-$4773 mo. Level II $4240$5063 mo. plus benefits. Level I – 2 yr degree in engineering tech or related field and 2 yrs exp performing technical engineering functions related to electrical utility construction and maintenance. Level II – 2 yr degree in engineering tech or related field and 5 yrs progressive exp performing technical engineering functions related to electrical utility construction and maintenance. Combo of required education and experience may be considered. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us or call 417-4510. Apply immediately, first review of applications 6/27/11. COPA is an EOE.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

31

The Last Word in Astrology

Help Wanted

Driver needed with CDL. 702-538-3675. FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST PT, prefer medical assistant. Bring resume and fill out application at Peninsula Children’s Clinic, 902 Caroline Street, P.A. No phone calls please. FUN volunteer opportunities available for kids age 10-18 and adult mentors. Port Angeles Downtown Association Youth Volunteer Group. Call Grace at 360-4173001 for details. www.portangelesdow ntown.com/youth Funeral Home Looking for a parttime person; flexible hrs., lifting required. Good communication skills, compassionate, professional dress. Please send resume to: Randall.Baugh@ Dignitymemorial.com Inside Sales. Energetic, problem solver with a great attitude. Must have general const. knowledge, retail sales and computer experience. See full description online. Cover letter & resume to: P.O. Box 4112, Sequim, WA 98382. RN | LPN OPPORTUNITY Life Care Center of Port Townsend RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Full-time position is available. Must be a Washington-licensed RN or LPN with experience in longterm care. We offer excellent pay and benefits, including medical coverage, 401(k) and paid vacation, sick days and holidays. Please apply in person, or send résumé to Rachel_Sondie@LC CA.com 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D-24238

(Answers Monday) DEPTH LATELY HEALTH Jumbles: CURVE Answer: Where the zombies found their new home — DEATH VALLEY

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Getting along with friends, family and new acquaintances will require realism and a down-to-earth approach to whatever you do. Trying too hard to make an impression by overspending or exaggeration will make you appear wasteful. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): The only thing that will stand in your way is dishonesty or exaggeration. Stick to what you know and do best and you will leave an impression. Erratic behavior will end up costing you financially. Stick to your plans. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll be torn between what you want to do and what you must do. Take care of your responsibilities first. Don’t let someone you are emotionally attached to dictate what you do and when. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You’ll be reminded of someone or something that meant a lot to you in the past if you attend a reunion or you visit an old hangout. A change at home will add to its value or allow you greater freedom to pursue old goals. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You will impress someone who takes an interest in you and your talent. Don’t be afraid to put your fingerprint on whatever you do. Your creativity will separate you from any competition. There is money heading your way from an unusual source. 5 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your ability to pick up information and skills quickly will enable you to attract someone who wants to partner with you personally or professionally. You can position yourself well as long as you don’t overspend in order to make an impression. Love is in the stars. 5 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Look at past relationships and you will have a better idea how to handle the people in your life now. You can form a close bond with someone who has similar goals and interests. A change at home will do you good and help you see your situation differently. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Visit places that will have an impact on the way you think and do things in the future. Don’t limit the possibilities because you are afraid to make a move, or be overwhelmed when you should embrace new beginnings. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t let your emotions stand in the way of a wise choice. Be realistic, especially when it comes to money matters. Back up your plans with solid evidence that you can, in fact, turn them into something tangible. 2 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ll face many challenges but that doesn’t mean you have to alter your course. Question the motives of anyone trying to coerce you in a direction that goes against your better judgment. The choices you make now will determine your future. 3 stars

31

Help Wanted

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You will feel good about what you can offer those in need. A relationship with someone you find exciting has the potential to turn into a moneymaking partnership, if you combine your talents to offer a unique service. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Before you disagree with someone, make sure you have the facts. You may end up in an awkward position if you let your stubbornness lead to an angry dispute. Keep things simple and let moderation reign. 2 stars

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. Become a CNA CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT Life Care Center of Port Townsend FREE TRAINING OPPORTUNITY! Applications are now being accepted for our nursing assistant certification program. Classes will start around the middle of July. Space is limited so hurry and apply. Full-time employment opportunities are available for qualified graduates. Please apply in person. 360-385-8143 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D-24242

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

31

ELECTRICIAN: Journeymen/apprentices, min. 1 yr. exp. Vehicle provided, prevailing wage. WSDL. Call 360-477-1764

KWA HOMECARE Now hiring housekeepers. 452-2129 Nurse Practitioners 2 Jobs Jamestown Health Clinic seeks chronic pain mgmt ARNP & SNF, LTC & home visiting ARNP for patient care with physicians. Requires current WA RN & ARNP license, grad of accredited school with advanced Nurse Practice ARNP, current board & DEA certs and BLS. Prefer PALS & ACLS. Part time, 32hrs/wk, good benefits, schedule varies, some night/weekend calls. Indian preference. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com Gene: 360.683.5900

31

Help Wanted

Licensed Dental Asst. 30hrs/wk, wage DOE. Applicants must have exceptional communication skills and be dedicated to comprehensive patient care. Please email resume/ license to: zbardental@yahoo.c om PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF THE GREAT NORTHWEST Nurse Practitioner Openings - Per Diem. Help us serve those in the Clallam County Community! Planned Parenthood is seeking clinicians - NPs, ARNPs, CNMs - to serve our patients in our Sequim, Port Angeles and Forks Health Centers. Previous reproductive health experience needed. Position is per diem. Please apply at: www.ppgnw.org/job s EOE Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

31

Help Wanted

Hair stylist or booth renter, Changes Salon. 683-7559. NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com STATIONARY ENGINEER 3 Clallam Bay Correction Center Full Time-Permanent Position. Pay starts at $4,167.00 Monthly, plus benefits. Closes 6/26/11. Also CORRECTIONAL OFFICER 1 On-Call, Starting pay $16.61 Hourly, plus benefits. Closes 6/26/11. Apply online at www.careers.wa. gov. For further information, please call Tanja Cain at 360963-3208 or Jennifer White at 360-9633207. EOE.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

72

Furniture

DOUBLE RECLINER Lane, good condition. Contemporary design of denim blue and taupe. $250. 360-797-1215 email dddingle@ wavecable.com for pictures. MISC: Table lamps several varieties to choose from, $18 each or 2 for $25. Call 417-7685 weekdays or 681-4429 evenings before 9 p.m. RECLINERS: (2) matching. Comfortable, like new. $50 ea. $100 for pair. 683-0999 SOFA: Double reclining. Green plaid with fold down table in middle, with cup holders. Great shape. $400/obo. 681-3299

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. NOW HIRING Insulation installers and experienced spray foam installer. Good driving record, work ethic, respectful. Apply in person at 261372 Hwy. 101, Sequim. 582-9600. RCA/CNA Looking for a great place to work? Go no further! Flexibility a must. Contact Cherrie 360-683-3348

Retail Associates Ross Dress for Less, Seq. P/T. Please apply online www.rossstores.com ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SALES: P/T. Exp. fundraising/sales professional to establish new contacts, make proposals to business sponsors for the Olympic Discovery Trail. Commission. Info online at: www.OlympicPeninsul a.org/page/media

SWING SHIFT JOURNEY LEVEL SAW FILER Well established, progressive Company seeks a high quality, flexible, team oriented individual with a minimum of 3-years Saw Filing experience for the Randle, WA operations. Excellent work environment and benefits. Please send resume by 6/24/11: Hampton Lumber Mills, P.O. Box 189, HR Dept., Randle, WA 98377. EEO/AA, women & minorities encouraged to apply. www.HamptonAffiliate s.com THE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Circulation Department Customer service/ telemarketer/ kiosk sales position available. Must be comfortable working with public and answering phones, self starter, multitasker, willing to be flexible and eager to learn. Part-time 20 hrs. week hourly wage plus commission Please apply in person at 305 W 1st St. Port Angeles to fill out an application or email resume and cover letter to Jasmine.birkland@p eninsuladailynews. com

There's never been a better time to start a new career, especially one where you can reach out and make a difference in someone's life. We're seeking quality people who are truly committed to working at least 20 hours a week: days, evenings, overnights, weekends, and holidays. Please call 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 360681-2511. TUBER/ASSEMBLY Part-time, must have good manual dexterity, eye sight, attention to detail a must. Send resume to: hpatterson@starmani nc.com WANTED: Front office person for busy family practice. Insurance and coding exp. preferable. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#221/Office Pt Angeles, WA 98362

34

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034.

34

73

Work Wanted

All around handyman, anything A to Z. 360-775-8234 Best Choice Lawn Care. Mowing and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/P.A. 360-683-6296 “Chris’s Concierge Services”. Just think of me as your Personal Assistant,tailored just for you. Errands, Transportation anywhere,Light housekeeping, Caregiving, light meals. Personal shopper, Would you just like to have someone to talk to? I can make your life easier. Call Chris at 360-775-5077 or 360-797-1167 Experienced vacation house and pet sitter available. 417-8908. FEELING OVERWHELMED? Not enough time in your day, or just not able to do the things you used to? Help is just a call away! Whatever you need, I provide quality service with care. Cleaning, cooking (down-home/gourmet), yardcare, pet care, run errands or be your transport. Event planning; weddings, showers, dinner parties, etc. (decor, cater, cleanup). Interior painting/ murals. For a helping hand that’s honest and affordable, call Angie at 460-0960. Ground Control Lawn Care. Mowing, trimming, mulch, and more. Reasonable rates, great service! Call for free estimates. 360-7975782. Ground Control Lawn Care. Housecleaning, pet walking, errands. Mature, reliable. 683-4567 Licensed/bonded family contractors will save you $. Foreclosure cleans $300. Estate & Rental cleans @ $120-$250 based on size w/48 hr turnarounds. Graeme & Beth Sandlin at 970-208-2910 #GRAEMEBS890D5 Mowing, and clean up. Reasonable rates. 360-797-3023.

Private Caregiver and Housecleaning Service. Kind, caring, and dependable service with excellent work history and references. Serving the Pt. Angeles and Sequim area. Call for a free estimate 670-3008 Registered nurses aid available. I’m an aid who has a flexible schedule, and can work nights as well. I will treat your loved one with compassion dignity and respect, for their well being is of up most importance. I am here to serve you. Call 360-670-6329 RNA available for home care. Will help with personal care, housekeeping, grocery shopping, running errands and more. 360-912-0225.

Sewing. I Sew 4U. Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don’t wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy!

41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

43

Money Loaned/ Wanted

$$$ PAID $$$ For Deeds of Trust/ Notes. Existing or New. Call 681-2798.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

Household items for sale: Amana Fridge, $200. Kenmore Dishwasher Insert, $150. Kenmore W/D Set, $300. Range, $150. Riding Mower, $450. (360) 460-6292 P.A.: Washer Dryer Pair. Kenmore, almond, great condition, approximately 12 years old, pair only. $300. 360-452-9458

72

Furniture

ARMOIRE: From Mexico, suitable for clothes or electronics, 6’ tall. $350. 360-385-3223 COFFEE TABLES 2 sizes to choose from for $35/each or both for $60. 681-4429. DINETTE SET: Oak table with tile inlay, 4 padded swivel chairs. $275. Also, 2 matching bar high chairs, $40 ea. 452-4760 DINING SET: Seats 6, 1 extension. In good condition. $750. 457-3078 DINING TABLE Solid oak, nice shape, 4 chairs. $300/obo 452-6439 DINING TABLE: Must sell! Large light blond pedestal table with 4 chairs. Great shape! $140/obo. 681-4429. DINING TABLE: Solid maple 54” round drop leaf, with 4 leaves and 4 chairs, extends to 54”x90”, seats up to 8. $400. 417-3693. GORGEOUS Traditional Stylish Furniture. Formal Cherry Dining Table with leaves, custom cover and six chairs, $800; Matching Cherry Vatrine with lights and glass shelves $600 or $1,200 for the matching dining set. 4-Poster Cherry Queen Bed, Matching cherry Dresser with Mirror, Cherry Armoire, Tall Cherry Dresser, almost new queen mattress $1,200 for entire bedroom set. Comfy Leather couch $500, Leather Chair with ottoman $400. Glass, decorative iron and leather kitchen table set $350. Big Screen TV $350, Trendy Pier One Couch $200. Beautiful wood decorator book case $150. Make your home beautiful now. Call 360-775-6389. HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. Solid oak dining table, $300. Solid maple kitchen table, $150. Each table has 6 chairs. Rocker glider, 2 each rocker recliners, $100 each. Solid oak queen size bedroom set w/ chest, $300. Coffee table, end table 2 table lamps, $25. 360-460-3426 MISC HOUSEHOLD. 51” rear projection TV, $75. Excellent. secretary hutch w/drawers $100. Complete queen bed set, $125 Four poster Queen bed with frame, wood and wrought iron, $100. Antique dresser, $50. Glass and brass coffee table, $30. 461-3793. MISC: Ethan Allen dining set, $250. Hide-a-bed, $125. Queen bed, $65. Recliners, $40-$80. Computer desk, $40. Wooden office desk, $75. Misc. tables, $25-$40. Lamps, $20-$40. 385-7093.

General Merchandise

ANTIQUES: Parlor table, tiger oak, eagles claw $450. 582-0972 BLACKBERRY CAFE 50530 Hwy. 112 W. Father’s Day Specials: Prime rib, 16 oz tbone, and pan fried oysters. 4 p.m. serving time. Now featuring the Sasquatch Burger! Call for reservation 928-0141 CAMERA: Nikkormatic FTN Camera with sets of Vivitar lenses. Neck strap and leather cover go with. In great shape. $325. 457-3078. CEDAR FENCING 8’, $8 each. 7’, $5 each. Cedar rails, 12’, $12 each. Delivery available. 461-1996 CONCRETE MIXER Multi-Quip. Towable, Honda power, very good condition $650. 460-4420 EXERCISE: iGallop core and abs exerciser. Excellent condition. Asking $175. 683-4441 FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-460-3639 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com Garden RR. G gauge, 3 locomotives with sound, 13 cars, remote control and track, some trestles, lots of buildings and die cast vehicles. $1,100 for all. Port Townsend. 379-0209 HERBALIFE 1/2 PRICE SALE My friend left the area and gave me her Herbalife inventory of more then 100 bottle and some skin care products that have been in storage. There was a catalogue with the inventory so all products are ? of the listed price or best offer for all of it. Call 417-7691. IPOD Received as a gift and never used. (1) black iPod Nano 8GB, (1) gummy 3.3’ stereo headphones, (1) E-Matic 11-in-1 accessory kit. All yours for only $130. 417-7691 MISC: 1950s solid mahogany side board, 3 drawers, 3 cabinets, brass handles, $395. Whirlpool washer and dryer, $275. Landscape mirror, gold frame, beveled glass, 49”x 35”, $200. 681-5326 MISC: 2 axle flatbed equipment trailer with ramps, 5’7”x16’ blank bed, $1,000/ obo. Grader blade for small tractor, 4’ blade, 3 point hitch, $300/obo. 457-4533, leave msg. MISC: 47” Toshiba high definition TV, $400. Double recliner chair/sofa, $200. 4 oak Winsor chairs, $50. French walnut pie safe, $800. (2) Matching curio cabinets, $250 ea. 360-643-0536 MISC: Craftsman lawn tractor trailer, new, $100. New 3/8” rachet, $20. 1/2” Campbell Hansfeld air wrench, new $40. Metric air deep sockets, $10. Automotive paint gun, 1 quart, $25. Camper icebox, $20. Propane campstove, $30. 2” hitch mount bicycle carrier, $35. Big Chief top loader smoker, $35. 683-2761 MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Oriental art and vases, $100-$250. 681-0131 MISC: Downrigger, 625 Penn, swivel mount, $200. Crab cooker and tank, $40. Salmon rods, $15-$30. Lead weights, $2-$3. Charts, areas 3-4-5-6 and inside passage, $5-$10. 683-3639. MISC: Front end loader for tractor, with bucket, $200. 5 hp Troy-Bilt rototiller, $300. Will trade. You haul. 360-452-8607.

73

General Merchandise

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 MISC: Piano Howard built by Baldwin, cherry wood, $500. NordicFlex Ultra Lift exercise machine, many accessories, CD, weight lifts, $200. 360-379-9300. MISC: Stackable washer and dryer, Kenmore, $500. 4 poster Mahogany bed set, with frame, mattress and box springs, 2 night stands, queen, $600. 460-8021 SALMON: Fresh kings Lowest prices. 360-963-2021 SCALE: Sears “Doctor’s Scale.” Balance beam. Excellent condition. $125. 683-4441

79

74

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

Carpenter Cleaning Out Work Shed Tools, bldg materials, household. Sat. 8-4, Sun. 10-3. 40 Fleming Dr. off Diamond Point Road. Multi-Family Indoor/ Outdoor Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m. 201 Valley View Drive. Clothes, woman’s S-XL, girls, man’s M-XL, small appliances, dishes, household items, books, bookcases, entertainment center, DVD/VHS speaker sys, hutch, Christmas decos, car, car parts, man’s stuff, fishing equipment, many misc items.

Wanted To Buy

WANTED: Clean fill dirt, no cement or wood. Also wanted, rock. 461-1996. WANTED: Older slot machine, must be reasonably priced. 681-0695

PA EQUIP: Mackie amplified PA equipment, 2 SR1521 loud speakers, 1 SWA1801 subwoofer, like new. $2,400. 808-3370.

76

Sporting Goods

GOLF CART: Older in very good condition, all new batteries. $1,100/obo 681-2291 GOLF CART: Yamaha. Good running order. $800/obo. 681-7902 GUN: Navy Arms 44 black powder revolver and holster. $135. 681-7704. KAYAKS FOR SALE. Feathercraft K-1 Expedition Kayaks. 1997 Model Turquoise, $1,200. 1998 Model, red, $1,500. 4 piece Werner paddles available, $300 each. Minimal use. 360-385-9027 PISTOL: Rossi .38 2” stainless, excellent condition, 2 holsters, Pachmayr grip, 2 speed loaders. $450. 681-3023

RIFLE: French Lebel Model 1886 8mm Lebel rifle. $599/obo 760-702-7192 SHOTGUN: CZ USA 12 gauge model CZ712, 6 chokes, like new. $415. 461-6808 SKS: With bayonet and 700 rounds of ammo. $500. 928-9436

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 10-5 p.m., 323 E. 13th St. Multi-Family Garage Sale. Sat.-Sun., 8 a.m. 117 E 13th St., in alley. Name brand womens clothes and shoes, kids clothes, electronics, furniture, decorative items, jewelry, saddle, lots of guy stuff, girls bikes, subwoofer, 2008 quad.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

ESTATE SALE Fri., 9-4 p.m. Sat., 9-2 p.m. 1932 W. 6th St. Fishing/camping gear, table/chairs (8), full size bed frame, gardening, tools, table saw, kitchen, linens, lamps, moose antlers, military, old typewriter, pottery, and more. SATURDAY IS 1/2 PRICE DAY! ESTATE Sale: Sat., 82 p.m., At All Animal Hospital, 1811 W. Hwy 101. Diesel Gen.Set, lg air compressor, numerous tools, household items, Quadrafire wood stove, everything goes. HUGE 2-FAMILY SALE!! Our years of accumulation are your gain! ALL must go!! Remnant building supplies: ext fir door, light fixtures, drywall heater, much more. Fencing, bikes, skis, power washer, pet items, BBQ, foot spa ... Quality items; make us an offer. 2114 W 8th (off S. N) Sat & Sun 8-3 (no early sales).

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

A FLEA MARKET Vendors Welcome Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-3 p.m Vendors in gate at 8 a.m. At yard behind Les Schwab, in P.A. $10 per large space. Call 452-7576 to reserve. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m. 535 Larch Ave., across from IGS/Mt. Pleasant.

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE: Need home for 20 yr. old Arabian mare, gentle. $150/ obo. 457-3157. TRAILER: Old GN 4 horse trailer for utility use. $400/obo. 457-7767, eves.

85

Farm Equipment

Chipper 6 cyl 1969 Asplundh contiuous feed and 1968 Ford 1 Ton DmpTrk rebuilt V8 4 spd man trans. 2 sets of new blades, manual. $5000 cash or cashiers check. Gregg 360-385-6088 9:00 AM-9:00 PM. HAY CONVEYOR 30’ can be reduced to 24’, runs on 110v or 220v. Like new. $1,000/obo. 360-701-2767

HAY: Stored in barn. Dry, never wet. Need the room for this year’s hay. $3/bale. 808-7085

82

Pets

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘87 Ford dbl axle, Cat 3208, Allison auto. $8,500/obo. 457-5299 Semi-trailer with various building materials and other items. $3,500/obo for all and trailer. 797-7063 after 9 a.m.

Beautiful Ragdoll Cat & Kittens TICA. 3yo NM $200, $150 to senior. 2M kittens $675. 360-551-3185 after 10am.

19’ Lightening sailboat, full sails. Teak woodwork, new seats, extended tiller arm, trailer. Good condition, and newly laminated bottom. Must sell, moving. $2,000/obo. 253-245-4531

FREE: Adult male cat to good home. Moved and need to find a new home. Loving, neutered 360-797-4016 MISC: 11 parakeets, lg. cage on wheels, all accessories, $100 Wanted: Polish rooster. 452-2615.

93

Marine

4 WINNS: ‘90 17.5’, 90 hp Johnson. $3,500. 775-6662. ARIMA: ‘96 17’ SeaRanger. 90 hp Johnson V-4 Oceanrunner, canvas top, VHF radio, compass, depth/fish finder, USCG safety package, Shoreland’r Trailer. Excellent condition. $12,900. 360-681-2638

PARAKEETS: (5) With cage. $50 for all. 683-6597 PUPPIES: 9 wks. old, Pure Lab, black. $350. 683-4756. PUPPY: Purebred Dachshund. Smooth dapple coat, 7 week old male, has first shots. $300. 681-0298 Training Classes June 21. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106. WANTED: Bichon Pup. 360-398-0048.

83

Farm Animals

BURRO’S FOR SALE!! $200 each, male or female. Great horse companions or for eating your field grass. Please call 6834295 if interested. COWS: For breeding or meat, $900 ea./ obo. Yearling steer and heifer, $1,000 ea./obo. 457-3157. FREE HAY!!. Field grass hay, baled last year, stored outdoors under tarp. All must go!! 1423 Ward Rd, Sequim, 683-4295. HAY: Will be selling nice grass hay when weather allows cutting and baling. P.T., Chimacum and Disco Bay areas. 50 bale minimum. $4 bale. 360-732-4545. HEFERS: (3) Open Hereford for meat or breeding. Organic. $1,000 ea. firm. 452-2615, evenings. Nash’s Weaner Pigs Hampshire/Yorkshire cross, 8-16 wks. old, pasture raised. Start at $80. 477-1149.

84

Horses/ Tack

Moving & must find good home for my horses ASAP 19 yr 15.3hh Thoroughbred gelding & 13 yr 15.1hh Paint mare. Both need to be restarted. Beautiful sweet horses. Please help 6835574.

Motorcycles

3-WHEELER: ‘84 Yamaha YT60L. $500 firm. 681-7904.

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘11 Soft Tail Deluxe. Pearl blue, lots of chrome, bags, windshield, never driven, must sell due to health. $19,000/obo. 360-681-4245 HARLEY: ‘06 Soft Tail Deluxe, special edition, 123rd of 150, 1450cc, fully dressed, immaculate, always garaged, never in rain, in parades and won lots of awards. $17,000/obo. 360-808-3444 HARLEY: ‘88 883. Low miles. $3,800/ obo. 457-1289. HD: ‘08 1200c. Black beauty, detachable windshield, extra mufflers and forward controls, 460 mi. $7,995. 452-6448. HD: ‘81 XLS Sportster. 1,000 cc, 9K. $2,900. 461-1501. HD: ‘96 Ultra classic. 20,657 mi., stored in garage. $7,500. 360-374-5755 HONDA: ‘04 CRF50. New training wheels, kids. Great learner bike. $700. 417-9531 HONDA: ‘09 CRF50. Like new, flawless. 950 firm. 461-1981.

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org AKC German Shorthair Pointer Pups. 5 boys & 1 sassy girl, $600. See online ad. Call Karoline at: 253-686-4580

Brittany Puppies excellent family/ hunting dogs. 10 weeks, First shots, $300. Call 360-4172939.

94

TRACTOR: 1301D Yanmar, with tiller. $4,000. 461-1194.

Food Produce

Cameron’s Strawberry Farms will open for U-pick Monday, June 20th. Call 683-5483 for day by day info.

O/B: ‘80 85 hp Johnson, Glastron boat, EZ Loader trailer. $1,800. 928-9645. SAILBOAT: ‘75 26’ American. Trailer and Achilles, nice combo, all the goodies. $4,750/obo. Sequim 425-417-0572 SNARK: 1 boat, all uses! Sail, motor, row, fish. 115K sold. $3,927 + frt. Sound Sailboats. 457-3903. SPORTLINE: ‘86 20’ Cabin. Exc. cond., 165 hp eng., 2 downriggers, extras, located in Clallam Bay. $5,200. 327-3775. WATER QUEST: 9.4 lake boat, 2 hp Honda 4 stroke, 2 oars, 6 sp elec. motor, 2 life jackets, $500/obo. 670-1560

DIRT BIKE: ‘05 Suzuki 110. $900. Excellent condition. 461-6000

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Marine

TAARUP: Hay mower/ conditioner. Spare parts and manual, field ready. $3,200. 683-5441

TRACTORS: International model 350, late 1950s. $4,999 for both. 582-9869, leave message.

81 82 83 84 85

93

BAYLINER: ‘86 32’, 3270 twin diesel, 8 knots at 2,100 rpm, tops out 12-14 knots, all standard features plus radar, gps, depth sounder, anchor, windless, RIB tender, G14 John Wayne. $42,000. 683-0865. Boat Trailer Wanted. For 27’ Catalina sail boat. Wanted to rent or buy. Call 460-5533 BOAT: 10’ fiberglass with new oars. $390. 452-9598 BOAT: 13’ fiberglass, with trailer and electric motor, pole, net, etc. $900. 452-1106. FOUR WINNS: 245 Vista, only 285 hrs., V8, galv trailer, appraised at $20,000. Sell for $10,000. 619-320-4002 HEWES: 16.3’ Sea Runner. Fully equip. $13,000. 457-4049. LIVINGSTON: 12’ fiberglass, Calkins trailer, brand new Honda 5 hp 4 stroke, 2 seats, fishfinder/ fathometer, numerous extras. Cancer forces sale. Reduced, $4,450. 457-9689 NELSON: ‘80 fiberglass boat, newer Suzuki 25 hp, 4 stroke, electric start and tilt, less than 50 hrs., color fathometer GPS, trailer. $4,000. 452-5356. O/B: 6 hp Evinrude long shaft, excellent mechanical, extras. $625. 360-379-8207. SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new gps, depth finder, roller furling jib. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. $15,000. 760-792-3891

HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,750/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘88 NX250. Street legal, off road capable, free helmet, jacket, ramp. $900. 928-0116 HONDA: ‘95 Goldwing 1500 GL Interstate. Excellent condition, always garaged. $7,000/ obo. 360-808-9526 or 360-808-5809. HONDA: ‘98 XR100. Excellent condition. $1,200. 797-4518. KTM: ‘08 XCFW 250. New, about 30 hrs. $4,500. 417-8840. QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 QUAD: ‘07 Polaris Sportsman X2 800 twin. 874 mi., brushguard, wench, dump bed, ramps, cover, spare wheels/tires. $6,500/trade 1200 Harley. 460-5768. SUZUKI: ‘06 C-50 Boulevard. 4,600 mi. $4,900. 460-9556.

SUZUKI: 2005 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, 800cc, well maintained, garage stored. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. $3,000/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com WANTED: Pre 1970 motorcycles and parts. 457-6174. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 1,650 mi., 2 racks. $4,500. 374-5463.

95

Recreational Vehicles

2001 5th Wheel 36 ' Cardinal by Forest River This was our home on wheels. 3 axle, 3 slides, hydraulic disc brakes, Air Cushion hitch, two air conditioners, inverter, Lots of extras. $26,000. 582-0803

5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ FT Wildcat by Forest River with Auto-Cam Pullrite Super Glide hitch. Rear living room model 27RL with one slide. Four extra stabilizers. In excellent condition. $15,895. Call 360-385-1594 for additional details.

95

E7

Recreational Vehicles

5th WHEEL: ‘04 Jayco Eagle. 3 slides, very good condition. $20,000 obo. 360-302-0966

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 36’ Lakota. Stored inside, very nice inside and out, king bed, 3 slides, built for year around living, lots of storage, supreme 84 mo. extended warranty, interested in trade for motor home, more pics at elgreengos@hotmail.com NADA MSRP is $50,974. Offers welcome. $35,330. 683-7411 5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroad. Fireplace, used one trip. $45,000. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210.

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $5,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Coachmen. 12’ slide, rear kitchen, A/C, a must see. $8,900. 452-4132 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 31’ Alpenlite Hillcrest RX. 2 slide outs, extras. Excellent condition. $13,500. 859-248-7566 5TH WHEEL: ‘97 28’ Salem. A/C, slide, add-a-room. $4,500. 928-9770, 460-8761 5TH WHEEL: ‘98 29’ Alpenlite. Non-smokers, great cond. $14,500. 460-9680. CAMPER: 11’. 1991 Cascade. Queen size overhead bed, appliances, gas and water systems function properly, thermostat controlled furnace, 1 piece molded shower with lavy and toilet. Lots of storage. Couch and overhead cabs make into beds. Very comfortable camper! Needs refrigerator. $1,800. 683-5432 CAMPER: ‘91 11.5’ Caribou. Good condition, stove, oven, air, furnace, TV, DVD, everything works. $4,000. 385-0558. IMMACULATE Motor home: 35’ ‘98 Cruz Air Chv 454. With slide, all cust upgrds, non-smoking, 42K miles. $22,000. 301-9362. MOTOR HOME: ‘00 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $45,000/obo. Cal Mary 452-2287 or 360-477-6675. MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tipout. $50,000/ obo. 360-808-6392. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slide out, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, 8 CD player, video camera, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty, plus a ‘03 PT Cruiser tow car. Great condition and ready to go! $73,000. 683-2958. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Winnebago Itasca Suncruiser. Better than new, only 17K mi., 3 slides, many extras, price includes ‘07 Honda CRV, ready to tow with brake system. $120,000. Call for more info or to make an appt. to come check it out. 360-683-1679 MOTOR HOME: ‘07 31.6’ Winnebago Outlook. Good condition, extras, located Chimacum, WA. $58,950 928-210-7044 www.rollinrollin.com/ motorhome MOTOR HOME: ‘77 Chinook. New tires, shocks, muffler and other upgrades. $3,200/obo 457-1457, call after 1 p.m. MOTOR HOME: ‘81 23’ Dodge Jamboree. Runs good, Health forces sale. $2,995/obo. Jim, 477-4774 MOTOR HOME: ‘84 22’ Itasca. Runs great. $3,400/obo. 460-5435 MOTOR HOME: ‘85 24’ Ford Eldorado. Fully self contained, good condition Only $2,700/obo 360-390-8287


E8

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

95

Recreational Vehicles

95

MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. All work great! Ready to go. $9,500. 460-4420. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 21’ Damon Ford Hornet. Close to 70K mi., good condition. Fast sell for college student. $9,500. 461-0867

MOTOR HOME: ‘99 34’ Coachman Catalina. Class A, nonsmoker owned, slide, Ford V10, wide body, jacks, huge basement, many upgrades, 19K. See 2,000 below NADA at $29,500/obo 582-9640 Roadmaster towbar and Breakbuddy. Only used several times. Great shape. $500. 452-6508.

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘92 32’ Jayco. 2nd owner. $6,500. 379-0575.

Classified 95

95

Recreational Vehicles

FORD: ‘94 E150 camper van. $8,800. 460-0658

TENT TRAILER: ‘86 Coleman Pop-top. Sleeps 6, gally, stove & ice box, AC/DC, good cond. $1,950. 457-9653, after 11 am

TIFFIN: ‘95 35’ Allegro Bus. DP 230hp Cummins, 3060 Transmission. Reduced $6,000! 230HP Cummins, MD3060, Oshkosh Chassis, exhaust brake, propane genset Corian counter tops, all records. $23,400. 417-9401 TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508. TRAILER: ‘00 24’ Wilderness. A/C, thermostatic controller heater, awning, microwave, tub/shower, sway bars, garage stored. $7,500. 452-8075.

TRAILER: ‘02 30’ Prowler. Immaculately clean, 14' power slide chair, TV, VCR, CD, DVD, PS2, full kitchen, large refer, separate freezer, micro oven, stove double sinks, skylights, heat/AC, sleeps 6-8, 14K. 670-1163

TRAILER: ‘07 24’ Keystone Cougar. Rear kitchen, sofa slideout, exc. cond. $16,500. 681-2620. TRAILER: ‘89 24’ Shasta. New floor installed in 2010. All appliances work. Full bathroom including small tub with shower. New toilet. Queen bed. Trailer is watertight as of recent rainstorms. $2,500. 360-379-2989 WANTED: Clean travel trailer for starving student daughter. 452-8301

96 TRAILER: ‘05 Fleetwood folding tent trailer. Clean, ready to go. 3 burner stove, water heater, furnace, refrigerator, water pump, attachable outdoor grill, king bed, double bed, and more! Stored indoors. $6,500. 360-437-8223

Recreational Vehicles

Parts/ Accessories

BIG BLOCK CHEVY, ALL ROLLER MOTOR. 477CID. RECENT REBUILD, CAN HEAR IT RUN. $5,000. FOR MORE INFO AND SPECIFICS CALL 360-477-9766 Early Ford parts, 1936 Banjo rear end, 4048 backing plates and rear drums. $200/obo. 457-6174

96

Parts/ Accessories

WHEELS: 18”x9.5” Ultra 8 lug chrome, came off of a Dodge 2500. Must sell. $400. 307-670-3858.

97

4 Wheel Drive

1981 Subaru Brat 4x4 rebuilt 1800 engine, manual, dual exhaust. Runs great! Dependable. Good tires, glass, brakes, locking canopy. 2730 mpg. $1650/obo/ trade? 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘00 Suburban. 3rd row seat, leather interior, exc. cond. $11,500/obo. 360-460-7475 CHEV: ‘05 Trailblazer LS. AC, PS, PW, PDL, CC, towing pkg., 4.2 auto 4WD, white/gray, 81K miles. $10,900/obo. Must sell. 683-7789.

97

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘83 3/4 ton diesel. Good mpg. $2,900. 477-6098. CHEV: ‘83 Suburban. 4x4, newer ‘454’ engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 CHEV: ‘89 Ext. cab 350 4 spd stick, 200K, fresh service, $2,000/obo. 461-2021 DODGE ‘02 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 PICKUP 4.7 liter V8, flowmaster exhaust, auto, alloy wheels, oversize offroad tires, running boards, bedliner, tow package, tinted windows, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, CD/cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $10,280! Local trade-in! Great sounding exhaust! Clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today and save some bucks on your next truck! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘90 4x4 3/4 ton. Custom shell, well maintained, 1 owner, 160K. $3,711. 683-1792 CHEV: ‘94 1/2 ton 4x4 pickup. Runs good, 5K miles on tires. $3,750. 683-3682 CHEV: ‘94 pickup. Ext. cab, lifted wheels/tires, call for more info. $5,000/ obo. 461-4665. CHEV: ‘95 Suburban 1500. 4WD, 7 pass., tow pkg., well cared for, low mi., priced well below book. $2,500. 457-0406. DODGE ‘04 RAM 1500 SHORTY 4X4 4.7 liter V8, 5 speed manual transmission, K&N air filter, alloy wheels, sprayin bedliner, CD stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,060! Sparkling clean inside and out! One owner, no accidents! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

97

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘95 Short Box. Great shape, extras. $4,000/obo. 461-9244 DODGE: ‘97 3/4 Ton. Green/silver, V10 engine overdrive, new tires, new front brakes, new catalytic conv. Loads of factory options. $6,950/ obo. 417-3893. DODGE: ‘99 Ram 2500. Cummins turbo diesel, 47,400 mi. $17,800. 379-0575. FORD: ‘01 F150. Gettin’ right with God. Crewcab Lariat. Tow pkg, 4.6L, auto, hard tonneau cover, bedliner. Must sell. $9,000. 457-4185. FORD: ‘79 F150 4WD. 6 cyl, excellent tires, canopy, Ramsey winch. $1,000. 643-1112 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘95 F150. Red, 351, 5.8L, low miles. $4,200/obo. 477-3638 FORD: 97 Expedition XLT. 7 pass, power options. $2,995. 461-2145/417-3063 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $4,900. 460-9323. FORD: ‘99 F150 Sport 4x4. V8, ext. cab, 111K mi., excellent cond, Sony Xplod sound system, remote start, no A/C, located in Flagstaff. $6,000 delivered to P.A. Phone Brandon at 928-221-8564 (will email photos). GMC: ‘02 Sierra SLE. Ext. cab, 4WD, 75K, excellent. $13,900. 683-6935 GMC: ‘89 3/4 ton. V8, runs/looks good. $1,500. 460-1760. GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. 4.3 Vortec, 2” lift kit, grill guard, shift kit, running boards, roof rack, excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 477-4838 HONDA: ‘07 CRV LX. Auto, exc. cond., only 8,500 mi. $18,900. 582-0150.

165124219

FENCING

TRACTOR

LAWN/YARD CARE RESTORATION LOG HOMES

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

HOME REPAIR

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

HANDYMAN

PAINTING

PAINTING

AIR DUCT CLEANING

SERVICES

REPAIR/REMODEL

ASBESTOS

Call NOW To Advertise 360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

WINDOW CLEANING

ROOFING

APPLIANCES M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

DIRT WORK

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges Full 6 Month Warranty

72289323

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

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Call NOW To Advertise 360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

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Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

CLEANING SERVICES

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

98

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP: ‘09 Jeep Commander Sport 4x4. 23,549 miles, V6 (better fuel economy than the V8), full time four wheel drive stability/traction control, front and side airbags, CD player with built-in Sirius radio, tow package. $19,499 305-915-0432 LANDROVER: ‘65 88. 250 Chevy 6 cyl, ready for restoration. $2,500/obo. 360-643-2056 SUBARU: ‘92 Loyale Wagon AWD. 169K, extra set mtd studded wheels. $1,350. 461-1766 TOYOTA: ‘03 Tundra. Access cab, V8 auto, off road pkg., power windows and locks, keyless entry, 48K. $15,995. 457-7401. TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma TRD. 4 door, V6, auto, 48K. $23,500. 452-6316

98

FORD: ‘95 F350. Powerstroke EFI diesel, AT, PB, PS, three fuel tanks, 5th wheel towing w/electronic brake, regular tow package w/electric brake, 164K miles. White color, crew cab, one owner, excellent condition. $8,500/obo. 360-450-3767 GMC: ‘76. Auto, 350 eng., runs great. $1,500. 327-3775.

GMC: ‘97 V-8 SLE 3 door 5.8l, auto/OD new battery, locking bed cover, bed liner. Alloy wheels/new tires. CD, power, tinted, dual bags, antilock, cruise, tilt, flow exhaust, 123,000. $3,400. 775-7048

MAZDA: ‘94 B3000 SE Long Bed with canopy & sports pkg, V6, manual 5sp OD, PS/PB, 23-30MPG;, 200K miles. $3,700/ obo. 360-582-0411. TOYOTA: ‘99 Sienna XLE. 170K, sunroof, Michelin. $5,500. 461-1319

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs and drives. $650. 477-2202 CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton. Extended cab, clean. $5,500. 457-6156. CHEV: ‘93 Tahoe. 2WD, auto, power windows, cruise, canopy, seats 6, 163K, new tires/battery. Comfortable and fun to drive! $3,500/obo. 504-2001 CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWN & COUNTRY EX TOURING MINIVAN 3.8 liter V6, auto, traction control, alloy wheels, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, power opening side door and rear hatch, cruise, tilt, air, rear air, factory DVD video, CD/cassette stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Loaded with all the options! Immaculate inside and out! Only 71,000 miles! None nicer! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘66 Flatbed. Recent rebuilt engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 FORD: ‘72 390. Excellent condition. $1,200. 504-5664. FORD: ‘76 1 ton van. Fresh tune up, road ready! $800/obo. 797-3232 FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709 FORD: ‘91 Explorer. Good shape. $1,750. 582-0360 lv msg.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘01 Seville SLS. 120K, nice. $5,495. 460-9556. CADILLAC: ‘76 Seville. Only 76K, silver with red leather interior, looks great, runs great. $1,800. 683-1006 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado. Excellent condition, loaded, 112K. $2,800. 809-0697. CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $15,000. 582-1260. CHEV: ‘95 Cavalier. Needs parts. $500. 681-2190 CHRYSLER: ‘01 PT Cruiser. Great grad gift! Everything in great shape, no dents, well cared for. Custom aftermarket body kit. 105K orig. mi. 26 mpg. Color purple. $4,500/obo. 452-4269 CHRYSLER: ‘09 300 Touring. 35K mi., in good shape. $18,500. 683-0771. CHRYSLER: ‘92 Imperial. 106K mi., new tires/brakes, new vinyl top, also set of studded tires, showroom condition, loaded. $3,000 360-683-2529

BUICK: ‘90 Regal. V6, 3.8, runs, looks great, new parts, new paint. $1,500. 460-8243

DATSUN: ‘64 Roadster. $2,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728. FORD: ‘27 T-Bucket. Steel body, 350, auto, Ford rear-end, supercharged. $15,000/obo. 452-4136 FORD: ‘56 Courier. Candy apple gold, ghost flames, ‘302’ with 750 Halley, C4 trans, black Diamond tuck. $8,500. 683-6958 FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958 FORD: ‘69 Galaxy 500. $3,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FORD: ‘69 Mustang. 43K original mi. $12,500. 928-9645.. FORD: ‘82 Thunderbird. Collectible 2 door, sunroof, runs great, 6 cyl. $1,999. 582-9869, lv. msg. FORD: ‘89 Escort Demo Car. Hatchback, New Michelian tires, runs good. $400. 452-2224, msg. or 460-2282. FORD: ‘93 Escort Wagon. Must sell. $1,400/obo. 670-6883 FORD: ‘95 Mustang GT. 5 sp, V8, black, very nice, 114K mi. $5,850. 460-9078.

101

101

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘68 S20. One owner, 8,228 miles on new engine, good shape, bench seat, auto transmission. Red with white canopy. $1,800/obo. Call 360-385-4805

99

1952 MGTD: Exclnt cond, great history, long term local owner (25 yrs). Car is being sold to benefit Sequim School Dist and Boys & Girls Club. $22,500. Call for details 683-3311 (ext 123) or 683-3300 2002 VW NEW BEETLE. 2002 Volkswagen New Beetle GLX Turbo - 82,910 miles - Auto - Under Warranty - Red with sunroof Great little car! $6990 ONO. PH: 360 670 2922

2008 Volkswagen Beetle S Convertible. Red with blk top. 2.5L 5cyl. 5-spd. 36k miles. Blk interior. Fun car. Comes with almost $1000 in extras. Also Class 1 Hidden hitch installed. $15000. Call 360-460-7119 BUICK: ‘73 Centurion Convertible. ‘455’ engine, new top and interior, recent white paint. $6,995/obo. 683-8567

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Small Works Roster RCW 28 A.335.190 require that school districts establish a Small Works Roster of licensed and responsible contractors who desire to receive bidding information on building, improvement, repair or other public works projects, the cost of which is estimated to be in excess of ten thousand dollars but less then fifty thousand dollars. In compliance with this statute, applications are being accepted at the Business Office of the Port Angeles School District No. 121 from contractors who wish to be placed on the District’s Small Works Roster. The Small Works Roster must be revised each year. Contractors on the previous year’s list must apply for renewal. Interested contractors may obtain copies of the District’s policy and procedures, application forms and further information at the Central Service Building, 216 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; 457-8575. Minority owned and women owned businesses are encouraged to respond. Gail Frick Business Operations Supervisor Pub: July 12, 19, 2011

BUDGET RESOLUTION 8, 2011 CALL FOR HEARING FOR DEBATABLE EMERGENCIES IN THE FUNDS LISTED BELOW THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows: 1. Pursuant to RCW 36.40.140, the following facts constitute a public emergency in the following funds that could not reasonably have been foreseen at the time of making the budget: Sheriff’s Equipment Reserve – Additional costs associated with radio system upgrade/$31,000 Public Works – Lake Dawn Management – Increase to reimburse the Road fund for payments received for the road improvement district/$594 East UGA Sewer – Reopens fund to complete last transaction/$97,243.18 (Step 1 of 2) Opportunity Fund – Reopens East UGA Sewer fund to complete transaction/$97,243.18 (Step 2 of 2) Superior Court – Increased adult felonies and expert services costs, and overage on use of conflict attorneys and pro-tem commissioners/$183,000 Department of Community Development, Environmental Quality – Additional tasks required for Streamkeepers/$4,147 Document Preservation – Additional help for scanning project in Assessor’s office and replacement of equipment due to failure/$22,000 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact that a public hearing on the debatable emergencies shown above be held on June 28, 2011 at 10:30 a.m. in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles. PASSED AND ADOPTED this seventh day of June 2011 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Stephen P. Tharinger Michael C. Chapman

ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: June 19, 2011

99

Cars

FORD: ‘95 Thunderbird LX. 58K original miles, 1 owner, always garaged. $6,500. 379-0575. FORD: ‘99 Taurus. New tune up, 107K mi $3,495. 460-9556 GEO: ‘97 Metro. Runs well. $1,600. 808-1052 HONDA ‘99 CIVIC EX 2 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, power sunroof, and more! Expires 6-2511. VIN#085112. $4,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

HYUNDAI: ‘10 Elantra Tour SE. NO dent/scratch, 4,075 mi. Quicksilver with black interior, bought at Ruddell, mpg 30, transferable warranty. 2.0, 138hp, 4 speed AT, AM/FM/ XMCD/MP3. Always garaged, student friendly. $18,250 360-379-6453 LEXUS: ‘00 RX3004WD. Original owner, dealer maintained (records available). Fully loaded. Including tow pkg. 135K miles. Excellent condition. $9,200. 928-2585

99

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘98 Camry LE. $6,400. 683-4232

MITSUBISHI: ‘94 Eclipse. Blown head gasket/still barely runs. Brand new tires. $700/obo. Mechanic’s special. 360-670-3110

VOLVO: ‘86 Wagon. Runs great. $800. 360-820-0339

NISSAN: ‘95 Maxima. 200K, exc. body. $600/obo. 461-7384. OLDS: ‘90 3.8L V6, runs/looks good. $600. 460-1760. PONTIAC: ‘68 Tempest. ‘350’ auto, runs great, rare, fun. $3,500. 670-3634.

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,895/obo. 775-9648

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SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $11,000. 452-9857. TOYOTA ‘00 COROLLA CE SEDAN 1.8 liter VVT-i 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission, power windows and door locks, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo, dual front airbags, sparkling clean inside and out! Desirable 5 speed! 34 highway mpg! Excellent condition! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

MAZDA: ‘97 Miata. Red, new top/tires, 67K mi. $5,500. 417-3965

TOYOTA: ‘04 Camry LE. Silver, exc. cond. 70K mi. $12,000. 681-6325

MERCURY ‘95 SABLE LTS 4 DOOR V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, leather interior, AM/FM CD, alloy wheels, new motor and tranny rebuild at 59K by Ford dealer. Expires 6-25-11. VIN601757. $2,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

TOYOTA: ‘08 Prius Touring. Blue, excellent condition, 18K. $23,000. 683-0999. TOYOTA: ‘89 Corolla SR5. 2 door, auto. $1,800 452-8663 after 5 p.m.

MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $3,600. 379-0575.

VW: ‘10 VW Jetta TDI 6spd manual, 12,978 miles, gray ext, sunroof, heated seats, excel cond. $22,500. Fred 360-477-8278.

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Cars

VW: ‘04 Passat GLX. AWD SW, 86K miles, original owner. EC $10,500/obo. 457-9999 WANTED: Private party wants to buy, late model Toyota Sienna, Highlander or Rav 4. 477-4396. ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Public hearing on Joyce Fire District Draft Vision 2030 Plan

SAAB: ‘90 Model 90. Runs. $1,500. 683-3544

LINCOLN: ‘95 Towncar. exc. cond., 81K orig. miles. $5,000. 602-677-7453

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Cars

MERCURY: ‘01 Grand Marquis, very nice. $4,495. 582-0347.

TOYOTA ‘90 CAMRY LE 4 DOOR Only 64,000 miles and loaded, including V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, leather interior, AM/FM cassette, power sunroof, alloy wheels, and more! Expires 6-2511. VIN112547. $3,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, excellent condition. $2,200 452-9693 eves.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing got receive public comment on the Clallam County Fire Protection District No. 4 (Joyce Fire District) draft Vision 2030 Plan will be held during the regular meeting of the district’s Board of Commissioners on Wednesday evening, July 27, 2011, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Joyce Fire Hall. Copies of the materials detailing the information to be presented will be available prior to the public meeting and hearing at the Joyce Fire District office or phone 928-3132. Marcus “Ben” Pacheco Chairman Clallam County FPD No. 4 Board of Commissioners Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011 PENINSULA HOUSING AUTHORITY Request for Proposals Legal Services The Peninsula Housing Authority (PHA) is seeking proposals from legal firms to provide a variety of legal services on an as-needed basis for the next two to five years. Legal counsel has frequent contact with senior management and the Executive Director on an as-needed basis. Periodic contact by counsel also is made. Legal services required by the PHA typically fall into one of the categories listed below. Any legal firm submitting a proposal may offer services in any one or more of these categories. The PHA reserves the right to select more than one firm to provide such services. 1. Tenant/Landlord Relations, Unlawful Detainer Pleadings, Evictions 2. Employment Law/ADA 3. Real Estate Acquisition, Development, Construction Bidding and Contract Matters 4. Tax Exempt Bond Issues, Indentures, Regulatory Agreements, Tax Credit Issues 5. Land Use Law, Environmental Law 6. Liability and General Legal Matters, e.g., Corporate Counsel Services 7. State Open Meetings Act 8. Civil Rights/Discrimination 9. Federal Housing Laws and Rules Complete proposal packets outlining submittal requirements may be obtained on our website at http://www.hacc-housing.org/Opportunitiespage.html or by calling 360/452-7631 Ext. 32. All proposals must be submitted to the address below not later than 12:00 noon Monday, July 18, 2011: Pamela J. Tietz Executive Director PENINSULA HOUSING AUTHORITY 2603 S. Francis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Pub: June 12, 19, 2011

www.peninsula dailynews.com

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&$+ FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

135114426

JEEP ‘04 GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4 4.0 liter 6 cylinder, Laredo package, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD, trip computer, dark glass, roof rack, alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Expires 6-25-11. VIN295198 $7,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

Pickups/Vans

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

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NOTICE OF BUDGET REDUCTIONS IN THE FUNDS LISTED

Notice is hereby given Clallam County will adopt by Resolution of the Board, reductions in the funds listed below on June 28, 2011 at 10 a.m. in the Commissioners' Meeting Room (160), Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles, Washington. Health and Human Services, Alcohol/Substance Abuse – Elimination of special project as a result of state budget cuts/($18,676) Health and Human Services, Developmental Disabilities – Funding reduction/($90,262) A copy of the budget change forms may be reviewed at the office of the Board of County Commissioners from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Date: June 7, 2011 Pub: June 12, 19, 2011 NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS BUDGET MEETING Notice is hereby given Clallam County will adopt by Resolution of the Board supplemental budget appropriations pursuant to RCW 36.40.100, at 10 a.m. on June 28, 2011 in the Commissioners' Meeting Room (160), Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street, Port Angeles, for the following: Department of Community Development – Environmental Quality • Additional funding from the Recreation and Conservation Office/$25,000 • Additional funding from the Washington State Department of Ecology/$1,385 • Additional funding for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block grant/$7,750 • Additional US Forest Service grant funding/$3,456 Health and Human Services, Environmental Health – Additional funding for BEACH program/$3,500 Health and Human Services, Operations – Additional federal funding from Department of Health/$275 Alcohol/Drug Abuse – New contract with the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery/$53,902 Copies of the budget change forms may be viewed at the office of the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Date: June 7, 2011 Pub: June 12, 19, 2011

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File No.: 7763.28116 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorLegals gan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Robert C. Copeland and Clallam Co. Vicki M. Copeland, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006

File No.: 7763.28144 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Christina Clark, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1203294 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063014540500 Abbreviated Legal: Lts 1, 2 & 3, Bk. 5, 1/71 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 1, 2 and 3 in Block 5 of Illinois Addition to Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 71, records of Clallam County Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Commonly known as: 1156 Campbell Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/01/07, recorded on 06/12/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1203294, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Christina Clark a married woman, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, F.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 04/15/2011 Monthly Payments $12,988.08 Late Charges $514.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $21.22 Total Arrearage $13,524.10 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $23.02 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,359.59 Total Amount Due: $14,883.69 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $167,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 22, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Christina Clark 1156 Campbell Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Christina Clark 1156 Campbell Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Colin Clark 1156 Campbell Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 11/16/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 11/16/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 04/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.28144) 1002.177055-FEI Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011

1179793 Tax Parcel ID No.: 03-30-19-500428 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 15, BLOCK 4, OF FIRST PLAT OF SEQUIM Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 15, Block 4, First Plat of the Townsite of Sequim, as per plat recorded in Volume 3 of Plats, Page 90, records of Clallum County, Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 15, Block 4, First Plat of Sequim, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 3 of Plats, Page 90, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 172 West Maple Street Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/01/06, recorded on 05/05/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1179793, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Robert C. Copeland and Vicki M. Copeland, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, F.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 04/15/2011 Monthly Payments $17,634.60 Late Charges $707.19 Lender's Fees & Costs $342.00 Total Arrearage $18,683.79 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $29.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,446.90 Total Amount Due: $20,130.69 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $203,892.46, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 22, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Robert C. Copeland 172 West Maple Street Sequim, WA 98382 Vicki M. Copeland 172 West Maple Street Sequim, WA 98382 Robert C. Copeland 158 Windy Way Sequim, WA 98382 Vicki M. Copeland 158 Windy Way Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/17/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/18/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 04/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.28116) 1002.174390-FEI Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011


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File No.: 7777.14306 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Bank of America Funding 2007-1 Trust Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1190328 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-010180 Abbreviated Legal: 18/101 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 1, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 18 in Block 101 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 809 West Sixth Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/11/06, recorded on 10/26/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1190328, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Bank of America Funding 2007-1 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1260591 and re-recorded on 3/18/11 under Auditor's File No. 2011 1264089. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 3/23/2011 Monthly Payments $14,552.88 Late Charges $608.04 Lender's Fees & Costs $145.00 Total Arrearage $15,305.92 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $3.00 Total Costs $1,373.69 Total Amount Due: $16,679.61 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $170,676.09, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 1, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS JOHN W RICKENBACHER 809 West Sixth Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 JOHN W RICKENBACHER 121 East 2nd Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JOHN W RICKENBACHER 809 West Sixth Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JOHN W RICKENBACHER 121 East 2nd Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 12/05/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 12/06/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has t he right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 3/23/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7777.14306) 1002.178733-FEI Pub: May 29, June 19, 2011

File No.: 7763.27358 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") successor to Washington Mutual Home Loans, Inc. fka PNC Mortgage Corporation of America from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. degrees Grantee: Henry C. Jernigan and Mary K. Jernigan, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1207226 Tax Parcel ID No.: 093136-220150 Abbreviated Legal: NWNWNW 36-31-9 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The North 208 feet of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, Section 36, Township 31 North, Range 9 West, except Right of Way conveyed to Clallam County by deed recorded under Auditor's File No. 297137. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 182 Whiskey Creek Beach Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/13/07, recorded on 08/14/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1207226, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Henry C. Jernigan and Mary K. Jernigan, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, F.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 04/15/2011 Monthly Payments $26,200.86 Late Charges $1,063.58 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,074.80 Total Arrearage $30,339.24 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $250.00 Title Report $726.28 Statutory Mailings $84.94 Recording Costs $79.00 Postings $473.84 Sale Costs $859.12 Total Costs $2,473.18 Total Amount Due: $32,812.42 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $214,702.96, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 22, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Henry C. Jernigan 182 Whiskey Creek Beach Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Mary K. Jernigan P.O. Box 3052 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Henry C. Jernigan 182 Whiskey Creek Beach Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Mary K. Jernigan P.O. Box 3052 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/06/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/06/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 04/15/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27358) 1002.162431-FEI Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7104.15200 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for MASTR Asset Backed Securities Trust 2003-WMC2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates,Series 2003WMC2 Grantee: Bradley E. Norman and Trayce J. Norman, each as to an undivided one-half interest as tenants in common Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003-1108409 Tax Parcel ID No.: 032904-228020 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 2 Blume LLS 1/42 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of the Blume Large Lot subdivision, as recorded June 28, 1996 in Volume 1 of Large Lot Subdivisions, Page 42, under Clallam County recording No. 741447, being a portion of Government Lot 4 in Section 4, Township 29 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1799 HAPPY VALLEY RD SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/13/03, recorded on 05/15/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003-1108409, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Bradley E. Norman and Trayce J. Norman, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Bishop & Lynch of King County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for WMC Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for MASTR Asset Backed Securities Trust 2003WMC2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates,Series 2003-WMC2, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1251487. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 04/13/2011 Monthly Payments $64,076.93 Late Charges $2,275.60 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,872.57 Total Arrearage $68,225.10 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Total Costs $0.00 Total Amount Due: $68,225.10 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $330,802.43, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 22, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS BRADLEY E. NORMAN 1799 HAPPY VALLEY RD SEQUIM, WA 98382 BRADLEY E. NORMAN PO BOX 2908 SEQUIM, WA 98382 TRAYCE J. NORMAN 1799 HAPPY VALLEY RD SEQUIM, WA 98382 TRAYCE J. NORMAN PO BOX 2908 SEQUIM, WA 98382 BRADLEY E. NORMAN PO BOX 1136 SEQUIM, WA 98382 TRAYCE J. NORMAN PO BOX 1136 SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/29/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/29/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 04/13/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7104.15200) 1002.154962-FEI Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011

File No.: 7763.28276 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Chrispatrick Bueno and Susan L Bueno, who acquired title as Susan L. Linrand, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1223880 Tax Parcel ID No.: 073009410010 Abbreviated Legal: NE SE 9-30-7 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 1, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The North half of the North half of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 9, Township 30 North, Range 7 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington; Except any portion thereof lying within County Road No. 2800 (Dan Kelly Road) along the Easterly line thereof. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 566 Dan Kelly Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/03/08, recorded on 07/14/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1223880, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Chrispatrick A. Bueno and Susan L. Bueno, who acquired title as Susan L. Lindstrand, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/22/2011 Monthly Payments $50,070.72 Late Charges $2,503.44 Lender's Fees & Costs $317.00 Total Arrearage $52,891.16 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $540.00 Title Report $959.34 Statutory Mailings $27.36 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,596.70 Total Amount Due: $54,487.86 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $354,779.40, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 1, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Chrispatrick A. Bueno 566 Dan Kelly Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Susan L. Bueno aka Susan L. Lindstrand 566 Dan Kelly Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Chrispatrick A. Bueno PO Box 2734 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Susan L. Bueno aka Susan L. Lindstrand PO Box 2734 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 11/16/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 11/16/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/22/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.28276) 1002.177061-FEI Pub: May 29, June 19, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7037.09350 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Susan J. Grantham, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 518931 Tax Parcel ID No.: 998300017 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 17, 6/66 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 1, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 17, Tamarack Village, as per plat recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, page 66, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 40 EVERGREEN LN PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/13/06, recorded on 12/26/08, under Auditor's File No. 518931, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Susan J. Grantham, a single woman, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homestone Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homestone Mortgage, Inc. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 554191. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/30/2011 Monthly Payments $32,830.80 Late Charges $1,335.50 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,447.57 Total Arrearage $35,613.87 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $72.50 Total Costs $72.50 Total Amount Due: $35,686.37 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $175,390.59, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 1, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 06/20/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Susan J Grantham 40 Evergreen Ln Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Susan J. Grantham 40 EVERGREEN LN PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/31/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/31/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/30/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.09350) 1002.168448-FEI Pub: May 29, June 19, 2011 File No.: 7037.07083 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Jason Thompson, as his separate estate and Kendra R. Rezendez, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 522222 Tax Parcel ID No.: 952800606 Abbreviated Legal: E 1/2 Lt 11, All Lt. 12 & E 1/2 Lt. 13, Blk 6, Garfield's Add'n Vol. 2 Pg 39 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On July 22, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The East 1/2 of Lot 11, all of Lot 12, and the East 1/2 of Lot 13, Block 6, Garfield's Addition to Harrisburg, according to the plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 39, records of Jefferson County, Washington; Together with that portion of vacated Pine Street, under Resolutions 21 - 01 of the County Commissioner of Jefferson County, that would attach by operation of law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 51 EAST FITCHBERG AVENUE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/09/07, recorded on 04/09/07, under Auditor's File No. 522222, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Jason D Thompson, an unmarried man, Kendra M Rezendes, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 552032. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 04/14/2011 Monthly Payments $30,077.41 Late Charges $1,229.52 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,179.37 Total Arrearage $34,486.30 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Total Costs $472.50 Total Amount Due: $34,958.80 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,203.87, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 22, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/11/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS JASON D. THOMPSON 51 EAST FITCHBERG AVENUE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 KENDRA M. REZENDES 51 EAST FITCHBERG AVENUE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of KENDRA M. REZENDES 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of JASON D. THOMPSON 51 E FITCHBERG AVE PORT HADLOCK, WA 98339 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/18/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 04/14/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07083) 1002.157108-FEI Pub: June 19, July 10, 2011


PENINSULA

Janet Getzendanner U.S. Masters swimmer

Inside ■  Generations: If you could teach a class on how to be a dad, what  would be the No. 1 lesson?

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, June 19, 2011

■  Hubby’s chronic tardiness irks wife ■  Man is the problem, not Internet dating Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman


2

Hubby’s habit of tardiness irks wife DEAR JOHN: I have been arguing with my husband over the fact he is always late. I’m not talking about staying late at the office now and then. I know that can’t be helped. I’m talking about the times when he is working in the garden or playing golf or doing some other activity. Just this past week, he was supposed to meet me after a golf game at 6:30 p.m. I phoned him at 5:30 p.m. to see if he was on schedule. He suggested that I arrive at 7 p.m. At 6:50, he phoned and said he was on the last hole, and I should come right now. When I countered that he might need time to take a shower and

Mars vs.

Venus John Gray change, he answered, “That will only take five minutes.” Well, I jumped in my car and drove straight to the club, only to see him walking off the course. I ended up waiting 20 minutes while they all showered and changed. I was so mad I brought it up at dinner with the two other couples present. Turn

to

Gray/7

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned. Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

Let hard-to-buy-for dads eat cake or other goodies EACH YEAR, WE try to figure out what to buy for our grandfather, uncle and dad for Father’s Day. Are there some unique gift ideas that are really different than the tie and cologne items?

in some highly pleasing temptations of the palette. These are unusual tasty and edible gifts that are purely unique items that people seem to adore but rarely request. The first has been Jodie Lynn inspired by an authentic French recipe. Donsuemor, Kansas reader a delicious and wholesome If it’s been a while since bought, but he really cookie and tea cake, prides you’ve actually asked them enjoys it. itself on the finest in allwhat they want, try asking. — Carla S. natural ingredients. in Topeka, Kan. You might be surprised Besides being an all-natwhat they come up with. ural cookie and lightly From Jodie Just remember, whatsweet, they are great for ever may seem strange to Try finding at least four dads because they are not you, may be just what messy, which is perfect for items for each person and they’ve been wanting for a then ask them to choose a eating on the run, at the couple of years, so go ahead few that they really like table, in the car on the way and get it. and rate them accordingly. to work or at work for a snack My husband wanted a or dessert for lunch. Visit You can make the final new hand-held car wash decision knowing that they www.donsuemor.com for machine that he now varieties, where to buy or will get gifts that they proudly uses each Saturorder and lovely close-up really appreciate. pictures to make him drool. day. I thought it was Or just let them eat For something strikingly cake by throwing caution strange, just because it is beautiful and terrifically to the wind and indulging not what I would have yummy, there’s the new designer “cake ups” which mimic a push-up Popsicle. These are created by Annette Starbuck, aka The Goodie Girl. Starbuck is opening her first walk-in store in Glendale, Calif., and is well known for having the ultimate flair for creating amazing cupcakes like If you have been on strawberry lemonade, the cover of salted caramel, coconut and orange dreamsicle Peninsula Woman, among others, including Karon's Frame Center her lifelong love of PB&J will frame it for you and blueberry pancakes. FREE! Starbuck will be attending the Cup Cake Wars

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competition this month. For more details on how to order these stand-alone delectables, visit http:// www.thegoodiegirls.com. If he enjoys baking, Adelia Gourmet makes incredible cookie and brownie mixes that are super easy for the men in your life to share with the rest of the family or mix up a batch all for themselves. They use ingredients such as unbleached flour and aluminum free baking powder to ensure that there are no chemicals that are normally used in typical baking mixes. They’re moist and remind you of the ones grandma used to make, yet with a tad more of today’s taste. For more information and how to place an order, see http://www.adelia gourmet.com

Can you help? Our 5-year-old has been selected for the gifted program at school and will be attending sessions for premath skills this summer. How can we prepare him better to fit into the normal classes beginning in the fall?

_______ Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2 contact@parenttoparent.com via e-mail. Tips and questions can also be sent through the contact form at ParentToParent.com.

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Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

www.peninsuladailynews.com Click on “Photo Gallery”


Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Generations Perspectives of three Peninsula women Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

This week’s question: If you could teach a class on how to be a dad, what would lesson No. 1 be?

“I can go by my own dad and say always be there and be supportive. “My dad praised us kids a lot. He did not do spanking or yelling. Instead, he would take us aside and try to explain what happened and how to improve. We lived a lot by ‘The Golden Rule.’ I remember hearing the saying ‘Don’t try to keep up with the Joneses, be who you are.’ “Also I remember my dad saying, ‘No matter what, things will work out.’”

“I would say that you need to be a dad who can set a good example. “It’s a personal thing with me. I have a relative who doesn’t live here, who is a useless bum, and he’s teaching his kids to live on welfare. I really don’t like the situation. He needs to show them responsibility and do the right things. “I’d say show up and show the responsibilities expected of a dad. Be a dad, not a dud.”

Cindy Conner, 60 retired hairdresser/ floral designer Port Angeles

Katy Laporte, 46 business owner Sequim

“It would have to be, be there for your kids. I mean physically, mentally, spiritually and emotionally, no matter what. “My dad was a truck driver, and it seemed like he was always gone. So my husband and I attend events with our kids. We sit down and talk to them, especially my 5-year-old. “My husband travels a lot, too, but he made an effort to attend our son’s preschool graduation. He was there.” Summer Schneider, 29 homemaker Port Angeles

Sunday, June 19, 2011

3

Man is the problem, not Internet dating DUNCAN RECENTLY HAD some very negative things to say about Internet dating, especially the women whom he’s met there. Well, today we hear from two women who think the problem is Duncan!

Shari All Duncan needs to do is read his own letter out loud to see what his problem is. Would he want to hang out with him? He’s beyond bitter. He refers to “how easy it is for women to create a profile and lie,” as if ovaries give us superpowers, and poor men are physically incapable of deception. Duncan, the disappointment and rejection you’ve found likely have little to do with your looks or financial situation. I know many men and women who bring neither looks nor money to the table, yet they find happy, fulfilling longterm relationships. Why? Because they’re genuinely good people and fun to be around. I feel bad for you, Duncan, I really do. As long as you think “a lot of women are conceited, shallow, ignorant and lazy,” those are likely the only women you’ll find. The rest of us are out there with guys who know how to be happy.

Delia I’ve been on paid sites and on Craigslist, and I have two pieces of advice for Duncan. The first is to treat dating like a job interview, minus the resumes

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

and references, of course. You don’t go on your first job interview thinking that Company X will be your “soul mate.” As if. The first few interviews will be hard if you’re out of practice, but after that, it gets easier. Your intuition will improve, and your ego will be less bruised by rejection. The second is to get your attitude adjusted and try again. A little humor might help. One Craigslist date actually told me that he and his friends would trade information on the “dinner whores” — women just looking for a free dinner. Apparently there’s a slew of such trolls on Craigslist, although it made me wonder about him too. One awkward moment happened when I met someone for coffee and got him confused with another person of the same first name. He called me a slut and then bolted off. Good riddance. Some guys believe that, somehow, a woman on a dating site should only date them, even if it’s their first date. I had a rule about always doing a phone screen before meeting in person. How those conversations went would determine for me whether it was a coffee date, a lunch date or a dinner date. You don’t want to spend two hours with someone who’s not

that interesting. Another awkward moment occurred the one time I didn’t do a phone screen. When I saw the guy’s face — flaccid, staring, slack-jawed — I knew I couldn’t stand to be with him for even an hour over a salad. I bolted. I ran like a jackrabbit into the San Francisco Ferry Building and looked at expensive cheeses for an hour.

Peter I met my fiancee on JDate four years ago. Things progressed nicely from the day that we first met face to face. Everything just clicked, and we’ve been inseparable ever since. Not only is this woman a kind, loving, warm and compassionate person, but if you’re alone with her for 30 minutes, she’ll find a way to make you feel better about yourself.

Helen My son, a father of two, was 50 and divorced but not soured on marriage. He was looking for a wife. So, since everybody else was doing it, he tried an Internet dating site. He met a 50-year-old widow with two children who was looking for a husband. They dated for a year and then got married. They’re still happily married today, nine years after their wedding in May 2002.

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront.com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.


Sunday, June 19, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

‘Swimyourself’ for

4

Lori James

Janet Getzendanner prepares to race in April’s U.S. Masters Swimming Spring Nationals in Mesa, Ariz. By Diane Urbani

Discovery Bay’s Getzendanner places at regional, world meets

for

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

DISCOVERY BAY — When Janet Getzendanner learned her younger sister was planning to swim in the World Masters Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden, last year, she unhesitatingly said: “I want to come watch you break some records.” But her sister, Charlotte Davis of Lake Forest Park, said no. No, you’re not coming unless you get in the pool — and race. Turn

to

Getzendanner/6


Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Anniversary

Sunday, June 19, 2011

5

Wedding

Alicia and Jerrod Brown

Brown — Shertzer Alicia Ann Shertzer of Sequim and Jerrod James Brown of Silverdale were married May 7 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Sequim. Nicolette Dewey officiDick and Winona Bekkevar today. ated at the 1 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Barry Shertzer of Sumner and Sheila and Troy Grahn of Sequim. The groom is the son of Elizabeth and Kenny Nutt of children in East Clallam County. large Labor Day barbecue they share Malvern, Alaska, and Terri and Errol Brown of Chico, Mr. Bekkevar was a logger, heavy- with family and friends each year. Calif. equipment operator and a well driller. The couple’s family includes their Aliyah Tegan Mendizza was flower girl, and Dillon Mrs. Bekkevar worked in Sequim and four daughters, Chris Baker, Aleta Wise was ringbearer. raised the children on the farm on Smith, Loretta Grant and Dorinda The bride graduated from Sequim High School in which the couple reside today. Becker, and two sons, Dave and Jim, 2010. She is employed by Parr Ford Mazda. Retired now, they both enjoy activ- all in Sequim. They also have 14 The groom is in the Navy. ities with the Grange and Elks and grandchildren, 15 great-grandchilThe couple will honeymoon in May 2012 with a cruise Masonic lodges. They also enjoy help- dren and three great-great-grandchil- to Hawaii. ing with the annual farm tour and a dren. They live in Silverdale.

Winona and Dick Bekkevar on their wedding day.

The Bekkevars

Dick and Winona Bekkevar of Sequim celebrated their 65th anniversary June 16. Mr. Bekkevar’s family from Norway settled in the area in 1910. He was working on the farm belonging to Winona’s father, Leroy Lotzgesell, when he and Winona met. Soon after, they married in Port Angeles and raised a family of six

Marriage Licenses Clallam County

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in Peninsula Daily News

Chuck and Carolyn Rondeau of Port Angeles announce the engagement of their son,

Dylan Tyler Rondeau to Dannielle Marie Crewdson, both of Bellingham, WA. Dannielle is the daughter of Mike and Marcia Crewdson of Kirkland, WA. An August 7, 2011 wedding is planned at Evergreen Gardens in Bellingham.

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Sequim, and Michiko Lewis, 64, of Lacey. Teresa Jeanne Oakley, 54, and Chi-Chung Hung, 41, and Thomas Earl Hines, 57; both of Port Chung-Chun Chen, 32; both of Port Angeles. Angeles. Sandra Joy Dittebrandt, 45, and Cory David Fischer, 32, and Erin Shawn Patrick O’Donnell, 37; both Margaret Nelli, 35; both of Sequim. of Port Angeles. Erica Manuelita Sisneros, 19, Danielle Renee Durkee, 26, and and Tyler Gregory Roragen, 20; Michael Charles Smith, 37; both of both of Sequim. Port Angeles. Alfred Brosing Racey, 52, of Jefferson County Sequim and Tamara Rae Bradley, 49, of Port Angeles. Carli Ann Fager, 28, and Daniel Ryan Jon Riegler of Sequim and Krebs, 30; both of Fair Oaks, Calif. Stephanie Jo Drabek of Port Jean Marie Hall, 35, and Rob Angeles; both 22. Roy MacGreggor, 46; both of Port Hadlock. Kazuki Nishimori, 81, of

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.


6

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Getzendanner: Swimming has many perks Continued from 4 not commence to ticking off times or showing off medals. Oh, she’ll bring them It had been years since out if asked again, but this Getzendanner, 68 at the athlete prefers to tout the time, had really tried to other benefits she enjoys, swim at any distance or speed. But she started train- daily, thanks to waterborne exercise. ing anyway, at the Sequim These perks were neatly Aquatic Recreation Center, aka SARC, and at the pool in summed up at a swimming seminar she attended Shoreline where Davis was recently. The keys to staygetting ready for Sweden. ing young — in heart and At first, Getzendanner body — include having would have to stop in the middle of her workout, just friends who support you, and whom you encourage to catch her breath. in return, and in lots of “My lane mates kept saying, ‘You can do it,’” she physical activity. Swimming covers those remembers. bases. “The fun part [of MasQualified for ‘Worlds’ ters swimming] is that In fact, she can. you’re on a team,” GetzenIn early 2010, Getzendanner said. “Your teamdanner qualified to race in mates show up to cheer “Worlds,” as the internayou on” at every meet, “and tional swim meet is called, you’re friends for life.” and traveled to Sweden in July. She and her sister Sweet tonic had a great time — and Jumping into the pool, Getzendanner took home a she added, provides a medal for eighth place in sweet tonic. the 200-meter backstroke. “You swim for yourself Since then, she’s been . . . and I find it’s just fun. I competing in regional always feel good after a events, and in April swam in the U.S. Masters Spring workout, no matter how hard it’s been,” she said. “I Nationals meet in Mesa, have the high” from the Ariz. exercise. Inquire about how she U.S. Masters Swimming did at Nationals, and Getis a national organization zendanner, now 70, does

Mad Maggi

Lori James

Janet Getzendanner reacts to the news that she broke a personal record — by about six seconds — at the U.S. Masters Swimming Spring Nationals in Arizona. that not only holds competitions but also provides clinics and workouts for swimmers from age 18 through 80-something. The national program’s website, www.USMS.org, emphasizes that it’s about fitness and not necessarily

winning races. There’s no Masters program, however, near Getzendanner’s Discovery Bay home. Not that she lets that deter her. She’s been getting faster and fitter at SARC by mixing her pool time with weight training,

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yoga and more of that support from other swimmers. One of her SARC friends is a woman who’s had hip and shoulder surgeries — and who plans to swim a 5-kilometer race in Federal Way in August.

1 minute 50 seconds. When she finished swimming that distance at the championship meet, she couldn’t see the board displaying her time and had to be told she had done it considerably faster, in 1:44. At that moment, a friend, Lori James of Phoenix, Turning up the heat snapped a picture of Getzen“We push each other,” danner’s face, which wore a Getzendanner said. look of utter disbelief. She and her sister also In yet another event at engage in some friendly the Spring Nationals, Getpushing. Davis emails her zendanner took second workout distances and place, swimming the times to Getzendanner, and 50-yard backstroke in earlier this year, Getzen48.75 seconds. danner began turning up “I don’t know what got the heat on her own sesinto me,” she quipped, sions in the pool. “except that I worked Shortly before the really hard.” Spring Nationals, she was Turn to Getzendanner/7


Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

7

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Getzendanner: ‘She has an

Gray: Explain

inner strength,’ her sister says it’s disrespect Continued from 6 Along with achieving these personal-best times, she enjoys other results of her swimming. The back trouble she once had is gone. Her husband, Mark, and their sons, Mark and Charlie, cheer her on; her grandchildren simply say, “You’re awesome, Grandma.” Getzendanner has traveled many distances since she was a girl growing up in Seattle. She and Mark were sweethearts in sixthgrade dance class, but they lost touch when she went to Roosevelt High School and he to Shoreline. Getzendanner grew up to be a flight attendant on Trans World Airlines, aka TWA, and was based in New York City at the beginning of the 1960s. Then a friend told her that Mark was at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., and she ought to look him up. She did, thinking, “He might have some goodlooking friends.” She was 21 when she met him again — and not long after that, she decided she wouldn’t need to look any farther. The Getzendanners will celebrate their 50th anniversary in February. Davis, meantime, doesn’t take much of the credit for inspiring her sister to become a Masters swimmer. “She is an inspiration to all of us,” said Davis, 61. Getzendanner may have

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

“The water is really forgiving. And it’s easy to maneuver once you get a little more in shape,” she said. And unlike jogging or walking on pavement, time in the swimming pool can give the body a workout while going easy on the joints. Getzendanner, who has osteoporosis, added that swimming, weight lifting and yoga are helping her stay strong, and to “age

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gracefully,” as she puts it. With a brilliant smile, she quotes her sister: “Just put your face in the water and get going. Just try and try a little harder — and if you keep working at it, it’s amazing how quickly you can improve.”

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said no at first to embarking on this new path, “but deep down inside, she knows she can do it. She has an inner strength.” Like her sister, Davis is a believer in the power of camaraderie. “It’s hard to go swim on your own,” she said. Davis encourages anyone starting a new fitness endeavor to find buddies. And swimming is a good pursuit regardless of body type, Davis believes.

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Diane Urbani

Janet Getzendanner’s U.S. Masters Swimming medals from a regional meet in Federal Way, the World Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden, and April’s Spring Nationals in Mesa, Ariz.

Continued from 2 ria of “disavowed resistance.” It’s time that you I know that I explain how disrespectful shouldn’t have gotten this chronic lateness is in upset, but I could not your view. hold my anger any Be gentle but persistent longer. each time this tardiness Is there anyway to occurs, and hopefully, he make him understand this behavior is inconsid- will begin to make the desired change. erate and unfair? If this behavior contin— Time Matters in St. Louis ues, ask him to consider joint counseling as a means Dear Time Matters: to work toward a lasting We all deserve to be val- solution. ued and respected by our ________ partner. John Gray is the author of Too often, one partMen Are From Mars, Women Are ner’s inconsiderate From Venus. behavior or chronic bad If you have a question, write to habits become a conten- John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@mars tious issue, particularly if that partner makes no venusliving.com. effort to address and resolve the issue. This is a perfect example of one such scenario. This behavior is possibly “passive aggressive” in its nature, which can take various forms of disavowed resistance in interpersonal situations. Certainly, a chronic pattern of keeping you waiting meets the criteChris Jurden 565-2363

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

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