Issuu on Google+

Heat up the night!

Thursday Partly sunny, but rain due overnight B10

Where to hear live music on the Peninsula A8

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS March 8, 2012

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

PT pool to close in April for lengthy fix

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Assistant State Parks Director Larry Fairleigh, left, addresses a meeting of the public development authority Wednesday as the PDA executive director, Dave Robison, listens.

Worden takeover mapped CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Eileen Wright of Port Townsend takes an early swim in the Port Townsend Municipal Pool this week. The pool will be closed for a total of six months this year for work to the pool itself and the building.

BY CHARLIE BERMANT

PT’s only public pool, building to get series of major repairs PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The municipal pool is expected to be closed for a total of six months this year for maintenance and repairs, with closures planned from late April through the Fourth of July and from Sept. 5 through New Year’s Day. The pool at Mountain View Commons, 1919 Blaine St., Port Townsend — the only public pool in town — will be closed to replace systems in need of immediate repair, including plumbing, electrical and the pump. The first phase of repairs will cost

$120,000, which has been allocated in the city of Port Townsend’s capital budget, said City Manager David Timmons. Funding is not now in place for the second phase of the repair, which includes the deck and liner, he added.

In danger of failure The first phase of the repair will be completed by city staff, while a bid process will begin soon for the second phase, the city said in a statement. Many of the systems are in danger of failure, the city said.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

When the Port Townsend pool is closed, the nearest swimming facility will be the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center, 610 N. Fifth Ave. The two-phased closure will leave the pool open to the public for most of July and all of August. The first phase of work will encompass systems in the pump room, replacing valves and pumps and eliminating leaks, with the second phase replacing overhead lighting and the pool liner and resurfacing the pool deck. TURN

TO

PT agency told it must develop plan

POOL/A4

PORT TOWNSEND — The Lifelong Learning Center Public Development Authority must agree to develop a business plan by November before the state Parks and Recreation Commission will consider supporting the group’s takeover of all or part of Fort Worden State Park. The state commission will consider a resolution of support for the idea of a public development authority role in the park during its March 29 meeting in Fort Worden Commons. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. Approval of the resolution is contingent on the public development authority developing a business plan by Nov. 1, according to material presented at a PDA meeting Wednesday morning. A copy of what is expected to be the final resolution was distributed at that meeting by State Parks Assistant Director Larry Fairleigh. TURN

PT water rates to rise annually; sewer fees will hold until 2015 BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Residential utility customers in Port Townsend will be assessed a 3 percent rate increase for water each year for the next five years, beginning in April, while sewer rate increases are not planned until 2015. The water rate change will be reflected in the city’s April water bill. A 4 percent increase in sewer rates is planned in both 2015 and 2016. “We haven’t raised rates since 2006 and even lowered them in 2009,” said City Manager David Timmons after the Port Townsend City Council approved the increases Monday night.

“We are anticipating a sharp increase in cost in the next few years, and this increase will give us the opportunity to catch up,” Timmons added. Timmons said the average increase per water customer would be about 50 cents per month. Timmons said the funds are needed to address maintenance and operations costs. The new residential rate for water service will be $14.57 per month ($7.78 for low-income) for 2,000 gallons. The rate per 2,000 gallons for each following year, with the low-income rate in parentheses, will be: ■ $15.01 ($8.01) in 2013. ■ $15.46 ($8.25) in 2014.

■ $15.93 ($8.25) in 2015. ■ $16.40 ($8.75) in 2016. The city serves about 4,700 water accounts, with a few hundred of them located south of the city limit.

Outside city limit Rates are slightly higher outside the city limit: $16.07 ($9.49) in 2012, $16.55 ($9.77) in 2013, $17.05 ($10.06) in 2014, $17.56 ($10.37) in 2015 and $18.08 ($10.68) in 2016. The cost this year of an additional 1,000 gallons per resident is $2.06 within the city limit and $2.22 outside of it. Commercial rates, which are computed based on the diameter of the utility pipe, also are increasing.

insu www.pen

IC

MERS’ &

2 2012 Spring & Summer

’ GUIDE VISITORS

v s and h vitie Your acti e — wit guide a lo ttion wha explora e Elwh the ti n on rmattio ls. nform info emovals da rem err dam ver Rive

produced Daily News

rtising by the adve

departmen

100,000 distribution 1 Call 417-3541 today to reserve your space! May – October

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

23592420

t

Peninsula nt to the

a suppleme

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire acknowledged Wednesday that a special legislative session will be needed to pass a state budget, but insisted that lawmakers have a deal before midnight tonight. Gregoire said that at this point, it’s logistically and procedurally impossible to pass a budget before the regular 60-day session ends today. But she said she doesn’t want a long, drawn-out extended session and wants a plan in place before she officially calls for a special session. Gregoire met with Republican and Democratic leaders earlier Wednesday. Lawmakers are looking to close a deficit of about $500 million through the two-year budget cycle ending June 2013. Because Gregoire wants reserves of at least $500 million, lawmakers are addressing a $1 billion problem.

RATES/A4

96th year, 59th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

Advertise in the A

FREE

ULA PENINS NEWCO

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1, 2012 TER 201 FALL | WIN ladailynews.com

MP RTH OLY THE NO

TO

WORDEN/A4

Overtime likely over state deficit

The current monthly sewer rate for less than 3,000 gallons will remain unchanged at $33.85, or $23.72 for lowincome, for now but will increase to $35.20 ($24.67) in 2015 and $36.61 ($25.66) in 2016. Timmons said it was not certain how much would be needed to accommodate the city’s increased costs but that doing a five-year increase instead of addressing it each year would save the council time and money. “One of the things that we can do is vote a modest increase now that will forestall a larger increase later,” said Councilman Mark Welch. TURN

TO

BUSINESS A6 B5 CLASSIFIED B4 COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS A9 B4 DEAR ABBY A8 DEATHS B4 HOROSCOPE B10 MOVIES A3 NATION/WORLD

PENINSULA POLL PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER

A2 B6 B1 B10


A2

UpFront

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■ See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Rapper denounces shooting A RAPPER WHO was to perform at an Arizona nightclub until a shootout outside left 14 people wounded said his thoughts and prayers go out to the victims of “this senseless act of violence.” Rapper Nipsey Hussle issued a statement over the weekend saying he strongly opposes gun violence and that his fans know he represents “nothing but peace and progress through hard work.” “I grew up on the streets of south central Los Angeles and have witnessed many tragedies in my lifetime,” Hussle said. “I never glorify any situation like this and think it is disgusting.” Meanwhile, the search continued Sunday for two suspects in Friday night’s shooting outside The Clubhouse Music Venue in Tempe. At least 250 people were lined up outside the venue when three men began arguing and opened fire at

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘10 MINDFUL MINUTES’ Actress Goldie Hawn arrives to sign copies of her new book, 10 Mindful Minutes, in collaboration with acclaimed British poet Wendy Holden, at a bookstore in Piccadilly, London, on Wednesday.

one another, authorities said. Fourteen people were wounded, but police said all were expected to survive. Twelve had relatively minor injuries, while two

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you or would you use a free-run dog park in your community?

were seriously hurt. Police arrested one of the three suspects later that night. Investigators said they believe all three are affiliated with Phoenixarea gangs.

Yes No

37.0%

Undecided 2.9% Don’t have a dog 28.2% Total votes cast: 1,258

Passings By The Associated Press

RALPH MCQUARRIE, 82, the artist who developed the look of the first “Star Wars” trilogy’s signature characters, sets and spaceships, has died. Mr. McQuarrie’s death Saturday at his Berkeley, Calif., home was announced on his official website and Facebook page. John Scoleri, co-author of a book on Mr. McQuarrie’s art, told the Los Angeles Times that Mr. McQuarrie had suffered from Parkinson’s disease. In a statement on the official “Star Wars” website, George Lucas said Mr. McQuarrie was the first person he hired to help him envision what would become some of the topgrossing movies of all time. Mr. McQuarrie’s original concepts included the look of some of pop culture’s most recognizable characters, including Darth Vader, C-3P0 and R2-D2. He also created the look of the Stormtroopers and the light saber. Other movies to which Mr. McQuarrie contributed concept illustrations included “Close Encounters

31.9%

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

of the Third Kind,” “E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and “Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.” He won an Academy Award for Visual Effects for his work on the 1985 film “Cocoon.”

__________ WILLIAM HEIRENS, 83, the notorious “Lipstick Killer” who in 1946 confessed to three horrific murders in Chicago and then spent the rest of his life — more than 65 years — in prison despite questions about his guilt, was found dead Monday at the Dixon Correctional Center in Dixon, Ill. He was pronounced dead at the University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center, where an autopsy was to be performed, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office said. Mr. Heirens was known to have had diabetes.

Mr. Heirens’ notoriety stemmed from the separate killings of two women, Mr. Heirens Josephine in 1946 Ross and Frances Brown, in 1945. At the scene of the second murder, that of Miss Brown, someone had used lipstick to scrawl on a wall: “For heaven’s sake catch me before I kill more. I cannot control myself.”

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ The Indiana town in which a mother lost parts of both legs protecting her children from a tornado was Henryville. The Associated Press dispatch from which a Quick Read item was derived Wednesday on Page A3 gave a wrong name for the town.

__________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ery room and a phone device for transmitting electroThe Port Angeles Merchants Association is asking cardiograms. The device would make it City Hall to pass an ordipossible for doctors’ offices in nance prohibiting door-toPort Angeles and Sequim to door sales — “uninvited soliciting” — in Port Angeles. make an electrocardiogram The association, meeting on a heart patient and downtown, agreed to ask the transmit it via phone to an City Commission to pass an expert for quick diagnosis in emergency cases. ordinance similar to one in Seen Around Meanwhile, commissionChehalis. Peninsula snapshots ers learned that the hospital That ordinance defines A “GARAGE SALE” showed a net income of as a “nuisance” and penalarrow posted on a sign $4,933 in January, largely izes any soliciting by pedstuck in the shoulder of a the result of the biggest Jandlers and others on private roundabout in Sequim. “I uary patient load in recent residential property within drove past it three times Laugh Lines the city limit when the solic- history. before I realized I wasn’t itor has not been invited to getting any closer to the RICK SANTORUM enter the property. 1987 (25 years ago) SAID women might not be garage sale,” a motorist The North Olympic noted . . . suited for military action 1962 (50 years ago) Library System will showbecause their emotions case a new kind of election WANTED! “Seen Around” Olympic Memorial Hosaren’t suited for combat. items. Send them to PDN News pital commissioners are con- for the North Olympic PenWhich can mean only Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles sidering a request by the insula when it asks Clallam one thing: He’s never seen WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or County voters to cast their medical staff for an electroan episode of “The View.” email news@peninsuladailynews. ballots entirely by mail for a surgical unit for the recovJimmy Fallon com.

1937 (75 years ago)

building bond issue. Library trustees approved the all-mail vote at a meeting this week and set the deadline date of May 19. It will be a first in library elections statewide, said Hal Enerson, community relations coordinator for the library system. Vote-by-mail has been tried only in five other counties, Clallam County Auditor Mary Hordyk said, and can legally be used only for special elections, not primary or general elections.

Lottery LAST NIGHT’S LOTTERY results are available on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 or on the Internet at www. walottery.com/Winning Numbers.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, March 8, the 68th day of 2012. There are 298 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On March 8, 1862, during the Civil War, the ironclad CSS Virginia rammed and sank the USS Cumberland and heavily damaged the USS Congress, both frigates, off Newport News, Va. On this date: ■ In 1702, England’s Queen Anne acceded to the throne upon the death of King William III. ■ In 1782, the Gnadenhutten massacre took place as more than 90 Native Americans were slain by militiamen in Ohio in retaliation for raids carried out by other tribes. ■ In 1854, U.S. Commodore

Matthew C. Perry made his second landing in Japan; within a month, he concluded a treaty with the Japanese. ■ In 1917, Russia’s “February Revolution” (so called because of the Old Style calendar used by Russians at the time) began with rioting and strikes in Petrograd. The U.S. Senate voted to limit filibusters by adopting the cloture rule. ■ In 1930, the 27th president of the United States, William Howard Taft, died in Washington at age 72. ■ In 1944, two days after an initial strike, U.S. heavy bombers resumed raiding Berlin during World War II.

■ In 1960, Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon won the New Hampshire presidential primary. ■ In 1965, the United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam as 3,500 Marines were brought in to defend the U.S. air base at Da Nang. ■ In 1971, Joe Frazier defeated Muhammad Ali by decision in what was billed as “The Fight of the Century” at Madison Square Garden in New York. ■ In 1988, 17 soldiers were killed when two Army helicopters from Fort Campbell, Ky., collided in mid-flight. ■ Ten years ago: Kmart Corp., struggling to climb out of Chapter

11 bankruptcy protection, announced the closing of 284 stores and the elimination of 22,000 jobs. ■ Five years ago: President George W. Bush arrived in Sao Paulo as he began a six-day tour of Latin America. ■ One year ago: Voters in Bell, Calif., went to the polls in huge numbers and threw out the entire City Council after most of its members had been charged with fraud. Residents were infuriated to find out that former City Manager Robert Rizzo had been receiving an annual salary of $1.5 million and that four of the five City Council members had paid themselves $100,000 to meet about once a month.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 8, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Police video is played for jury in spycam case NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — “Yes,” Dharun Ravi said in a video of a police interview played for jurors Wednesday, he violated his Rutgers University roommate’s privacy by seeing him in an intimate moment with another man. But, he said, he didn’t mean any harm: “I didn’t realize it was something so private,” he said. “It was my room, too.” Ravi faces Ravi 15 criminal charges, including invasion of privacy. Authorities said he used his webcam to spy on roommate Tyler Clementi on Sept. 19, 2010, then tried to do it again two days later. On Sept. 22, Clementi jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge. The tragedy turned Clementi into a symbol of the difficulties confronting young gays. Now, Ravi is facing up to 10 years in prison if he’s convicted.

Accused madam jailed NEW YORK — Prosecutors and defense attorneys have presented contrasting views of a New York woman jailed on a

seven-figure bail on a charge of promoting prostitution. Anna Gristina’s lawyers have portrayed her as a dedicated suburban mom, animal rescuer and former real estate broker who was working on building an online dating service. But prosecutors contend she’s a multimillion-dollar madam who boasted of ties to law enforcement. “A caring mother of four has been slapped with a $2 million bond,” one of her lawyers, Peter J. Gleason, said after a judge refused to lower the bail. On Tuesday, Gristina — a bespectacled, 44-year-old Scottish immigrant — looked glum in the courtroom for her brief appearance. She was arrested Feb. 22, but news of the case broke with a splash Monday. She has pleaded not guilty.

Courthouse shooting TULSA, Okla. — A sheriff’s deputy and two other people were wounded after an exchange of gunfire Wednesday afternoon outside a courthouse plaza in Tulsa, police said. Police spokesman Leland Ashley said authorities responded to a report of a person firing into the air between the Tulsa County Courthouse and the Tulsa City/County Library. Deputies, including the one who was wounded, exchanged gunfire with the shooter, Ashley said. He said the injuries to the deputy and the bystander did not appear life-threatening. The Associated Press

Briefly: World psychiatric care instead of imprisonment, unless new information about his mental health BEIRUT —- A visit by Valemerges durerie Amos, the United Nation’s ing the trial under secretary general and set to start in Breivik emergency relief coordinator April. was the first inspection of Either way, Breivik could Homs, Syria, by an independent spend the rest of his life in capoutside observer since Syrian tivity, prosecutor Inga Bejer armed forces first besieged it Engh told The Associated Press. more than a month ago. The terror charges carry a Red Cross officials said Amos maximum penalty of 21 years in toured the ravaged Baba Amr prison, but sentences can be neighborhood accompanied by officials of the Syrian Red Cres- prolonged indefinitely for inmates deemed to pose a dancent, the country’s Red Cross affiliate organization, which had ger to Norwegian society. The indictment listed the been waiting for nearly a week to enter because the Syrian mil- names of the eight people killed itary was allowing no outsiders. when a bomb exploded in downIt was unclear precisely what town Oslo and the 69 victims of a shooting spree on Utoya she saw. island outside the capital. But the Red Cross said in a Twitter message that Red Crescent teams stayed about 45 6 British soldiers die minutes in Baba Amr and that KABUL, Afghanistan — Six “the vast majority of inhabitBritish soldiers were killed after ants have fled the neighboran explosion hit their armored hood.” vehicle in southwestern Afghanistan, Britain’s Ministry of Terror indictment Defense said Wednesday. It was the biggest loss of life OSLO, Norway — Anders for British forces in the country Behring Breivik was indicted since a plane crash in 2006. Wednesday on terror and murThe soldiers were on patrol der charges for slaying 77 people in a bomb and shooting ram- in Helmand province Tuesday evening. page, but prosecutors said the The attack is certain to fuel 33-year-old right-wing extremist calls for the acceleration of a likely won’t go to prison. planned withdrawal of all U.S.Prosecutors said they conled coalition troops from sider the confessed killer psyAfghanistan by the end of 2014. chotic and will seek a sentence of involuntary commitment to The Associated Press

Top U.N. official enters besieged area of Syria

Convention fight only hope for Mitt’s foes? BY STEPHEN OHLEMACHER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — No, it’s not over yet. But at this rate, Mitt Romney’s rivals won’t catch him unless they pull off an unlikely fight at the Republican National Convention in August. Romney is on pace to secure the nomination in June. The former Massachusetts governor’s six victories on Super Tuesday netted Romney him more than 200 delegates to the party’s convention — more than twice those of other candidates. To date, Romney has won 55 percent of the Santorum delegates at stake in primaries and caucuses. But at that pace, Romney won’t reach the 1,144 delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination until Gingrich summer. That provides opportunities for slip-ups and intrigue — and plenty of incentive for Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich to stay in the race and try to make up ground.

Projecting confidence “We’ve got the time and the resources and a plan to get all the delegates, and we think that will get done before the convention,” he said Wednesday on CNBC. Still, he also said he was “prepared to fight all the way” to the

Super Tuesday fallout PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

■ Of the 10 states up for grabs Tuesday, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney took the lion’s share (Alaska, Idaho, Massachusetts, Ohio, Virginia and Vermont). ■ Rick Santorum came in second with three states (North Dakota, Oklahoma and Tennessee), while Newt Gingrich took his home state of Georgia, and Ron Paul came up empty. ■ Trounced by fellow Democrat Marcy Kaptur, Ohio’s iconic Democratic Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich lost Kucinich for the first time in 16 years by a margin of 24 points. convention if needed. The delegate math is worse for Santorum and Gingrich. At their current rate, they won’t come close to catching Romney — unless something catastrophic happens to him. Their only hope is to stop Romney from reaching the victory threshold, then wrestle the nomination from him at the convention — a scenario that many GOP insiders see as far-fetched. In the overall race for delegates, Romney leads with 419, including endorsements from Republican National Committee members who automatically attend the convention and can support any candidate they

■ Remember Joe the Plumber? The Ohio man questioned Barack Obama on taxes in 2008. Wurzelbacher “Joe” — alias Samuel Wurzelbacher — won the GOP nomination in Ohio’s 9th Congressional District by a tiny margin. Now he faces Kaptur in the general election. ■ Sarah Palin, the Republican vice presidential candidate last time around, told Fox News she voted for Newt Gingrich at her polling place in Wasilla, Alaska. But don’t count her out in August. She said she would not rule out being an option for Republicans in the case of a brokered convention. choose. Santorum has 178 delegates and Gingrich has 107.

Ron Paul trails Texas Rep. Ron Paul trails with 47, according to the tally by The Associated Press. Santorum has won 24 percent of the delegates so far, while Gingrich has won just 14 percent. Santorum campaign spokesman Hogan Gidley acknowledged that Super Tuesday’s results could feed a growing math problem for Santorum, but he also said the former Pennsylvania senator is determined to fight on. “That’s the way the party structure is set up. We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”

Obama campaign kicks into high gear at N.C. truck plant President appeals for oil alternatives BY ANNE GEARAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOUNT HOLLY, N.C. — President Barack Obama on Wednesday made his most urgent appeal yet for the nation to wean itself from oil, calling it a “fuel of the past” and demanding that the United States broaden its approach to energy. Mindful of the political dangers of high gas prices, he said shrinking demand for oil must drive the solution. Obama, promoting his energy policies in a politically prominent state that will host the Democratic National Convention, called on Congress to provide $1 billion in grants to local communities to encourage greater use of fuel-efficient technologies. The administration’s goal is to make electric vehicles as affordable and convenient as gasolinepowered vehicles by 2020. The president also proposed greater tax incentives to encourage the purchase and use of more

Quick Read

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama makes a Wednesday visit to the Daimler Trucks North America plant in Mount Holly, N.C. oil in our cars and our trucks, and our buildings, and our factories,” Obama said. “That’s the only solution.” The president spoke at a Daimler truck plant in Mount Holly, N.C., a state with political implications for his re-election. Obama traveled there as the ‘Help us use less oil’ Republican field seeking to defeat “We need to invest in the tech- him in November remains unsetnology that will help us use less tled.

fuel-efficient vehicles. Gasoline prices are at their highest levels for this time of year, and Obama has been traveling to promote energy proposals he says will reduce foreign oil dependency over the long term.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Elderly twin sisters with Crosby connection die

Nation: Estrogen-only pills may reduce risk of cancer

Nation: Florida school gunman ID’d as ex-teacher

World: At least 50 dead as avalanche buries village

WHEN THEY WERE young, Patricia and Joan Miller sang and danced for Bing Crosby, troops and their friends. But as the identical twins aged, they became less interested in socializing. Never married, the Miller sisters withdrew into their home in California’s South Lake Tahoe, where they were found dead last week at the age of 73. One was in a bedroom, the other was found in the hallway just outside. There was no sign of foul play. The sisters grew up in Portland, Ore., before moving to San Francisco. They appeared on a 1950s TV show “The Hoffman Hayride” and posed for a picture with Crosby as children.

WOMEN WHO TAKE estrogen after menopause appear to have a lower risk of breast cancer even years after they quit taking the hormone, according to an analysis of a landmark study. The results should reassure women who use the pills to relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause. Previous observational studies have suggested a possible connection between estrogen and breast cancer. The new research found women who had a hysterectomy who took estrogen-only pills for about six years were about 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those who didn’t take the hormone.

THE SHOOTER IN Tuesday’s murder-suicide at the Episcopal School of Jacksonville, Fla., has been identified as a former Spanish teacher. Authorities said 28-year-old teacher Shane Schumerth was fired Tuesday. Later that day, he returned to the school carrying an assault rifle in a guitar case, according to CBS affiliate WTEV. He allegedly killed 63-year-old headmistress Dale Regan, then committed suicide. The gunman’s father, Steve Schumerth of Culver, Ind., told the Florida Times-Union his family is in shock. He said the family sends prayers to the Episcopal School family.

RESCUERS SHOVELED THROUGH deep snow in Jarf, Afghanistan on Wednesday, searching for victims of an avalanche that destroyed a village of about 200 people in northeastern Afghanistan, authorities said. Fifty people were confirmed dead, though most of the rest of the residents of the village also are presumed dead. Only seven people reportedly survived the avalanche, which buried dozens of homes Sunday night in Badakhshan province, said one rescuer. The Defense Ministry sent two helicopters to help with the rescue effort Wednesday, but bad weather prevented them from landing.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Truck on fire driven to Sequim station PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — This time, the fire came to the firefighters. The driver of a commercial paper-shredding truck stopped at the Sequim Fire District No. 3 station at 323

N. Fifth Ave. on Tuesday to report that his truck was on fire. Firefighters found a smoldering blaze in the 6,000 pounds of paper loaded in the truck, which was owned by Recall Americas of

Kent, said Patrick Young, fire district spokesman. A small amount of water was applied to the paper before the truck was moved to the district’s maintenance and training facility in Carlsborg to pull the

paper out of the truck, Young said. At the training facility at 255 Carlsborg Road, the truck was emptied, and six firefighters “climbed the small mountain of paper” to extinguish the blaze,

Young said. No injuries or damage to the truck was reported. The shredded paper was left at the training grounds and will be mixed with composting materials, said Young, who added that none

of the shredded paper had identifiable information. Firefighters surmised that the most likely cause of the blaze was an unknown metal object sending sparks into the paper while it was being shredded, Young said.

Briefly . . . Gardening lecture in PA canceled PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Master Gardeners Green Thumb Gardening Tips brown bag lecture, scheduled for noon today, has been canceled. The speaker has fallen ill, said Amanda Rosenberg, Master Gardener. The next lecture in the series will be at noon March 22 in the county commissioners’ meeting room at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St.

work owns the home and several others in the park and uses them as supervised housing for people with mental illnesses. The agency issued a statement Wednesday saying it was saddened and that sympathies and prayers go to the families.

Back in jail

SEATTLE — A teen who served a short time in juvenile detention for manslaughter in the Tuba Man killing in Seattle is back in jail, accused of possessing a gun. Police said they caught 18-year-old Kenneth Kelly in a car with a loaded gun Roommate arrest Feb. 26 after a brief chase by gang detectives. PASCO — Police Seattlepi.com reported arrested a roommate in that Kelly is prohibited connection with the stabfrom carrying a gun bing death of a man Tuesday night at a Pasco mobile because he was one of home used for housing the three 15-year-olds convicted in the 2008 death of mentally ill. Edward McMichael. He Officers found the body was known as Tuba Man just outside the front door for playing the tuba outof a unit at the Sundance side sporting events. He Mobile Home Park and was beaten and robbed arrested the 27-year-old near the Seattle Center. roommate after he Kelly and the two other answered the door. teens were released after KNDU reported that no more than 36 weeks in the Franklin County coroner identified the victim as juvenile detention. Peninsula Daily News 53-year-old Rodger Lincoln. and The Associated Press Lourdes Health Net-

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

AFTERNOON

PICK-ME-UP

Addison Harper carries Christine Unrue down Water Street in Port Townsend on Monday afternoon. The two Port Townsend High School students decided spontaneously to try this trick, which drew stares from passers-by. Harper, 16, carried Unrue, 17, for about a block.

Rates: ‘Get us back on track’

Pool: Repairs

CONTINUED FROM A1 transit levy and assumed a lot of expenses. “What concerns me is Councilman Bob Gray voted against the hike that the people don’t underbecause he said it had not stand what they will have to pay in the future.” been planned properly.

CONTINUED FROM A1 unteer can contact Anji Scalf, pool manager, at 360During both phases, 385-7665 or ascalf@cityofpt. repair work will be done to us. More information, the changing rooms, office including the current pool and natatorium walls. Passes purchased for schedule and fees, is availpool use will have their able at www.cityofpt.us/ time extended to accommo- pool.htm. date the closure times. ________ Volunteer labor to paint Jefferson County Reporter and spruce up the complex Charlie Bermant can be reached at will take place during the 360-385-2335 or at charlie. repair process. bermant@peninsuladailynews. Anyone wishing to vol- com.

Stepping up

Vote for increase

“Ever since 2008, the people have stepped up,” Gray said. “They have supported the school levy, the fire levy. They have supported the

Aside from Welch, City Council members Catharine Robinson, Deborah Stinson, Michelle Sandoval, Deputy Mayor Kris Nelson and Mayor David King

voted for the increase. “We are not trying to collect money for no reason,” Nelson said. “I think we deserve a pat on the back for keeping costs down.” The council voted on the increases after receiving a report from FCS Group of Redmond, which the city hired to study rates for city water and sewer utilities. The rate increase covers maintenance and opera-

tions and not capital projects. “This is a way to get us back on track,” Timmons said of the increase. “We haven’t raised rates since 2006, and the cost of living has gone up more than 11 percent since then.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Worden: Nov. 1 deadline to present to Legislature CONTINUED FROM A1 2013 state Legislature, though the business plan It states that his depart- could be submitted at any ment “will consider the time before that date, and transfer of all or part of Fort any transfer could be comWorden State Park to the pleted without legislative [public development approval. Before the state commisauthority] as a means to achieve the goal of becom- sion considers the resoluing a lifelong learning cen- tion March 29, a meeting is set for 7 p.m. March 28 in ter.” Fairleigh said Nov. 1 is the Wheeler Theater to the deadline for the mate- hear public testimony about rial to be presented to the the issue.

EARLY BIRD MENU

Not a simple decision

25

Dinner for 2 – 3 Courses for $ Mondays through Thursdays 3-6pm (Excludes holidays, other offers, discounts, promotions)

“The decision around Fort Worden is not as simple as the people in Port Townsend would like it to be,” Fairleigh said. “Fort Worden is an icon

Starters Chef’s Soup du Jour House Salad Northwest Clam Chowder Main Course Offerings Plank Cut Fish and Chips Flat Iron Steak Cedar Plank Steelhead Filet Coconut Prawns Baked Mac and Cheese

• For New Computer Set-up or Tune-up • Home or Business Location

phrase “willingness to consider the transfer.” “How far do we go with the development of a business plan to invest in something that isn’t even a maybe?” he said. Fairleigh said the eventual agreement could be linked to accomplishments, that the parks department could agree in advance to transfer property if certain conditions were met. “It’s easier for the board to say that it will do more in a situation than commit to something and then have to back away,” he said. Fairleigh said that if the public development authority doesn’t come up with an acceptable business plan, Fort Worden “would continue to be an icon of the parks system, and we will continue our commitment to developing it as a lifelong learning center.”

business plan before proceeding. “If the PDA shows that it can operate the park in a financially viable way, we will make the transfer,” he said. “If it doesn’t pencil out, it can back away.” A new business plan isn’t needed. Instead, it will be a revision of one completed in 2008. Former Fort Worden Park Director Kate Burke began a three-month $21,000 contract to help refine the business plan March 1, and up to $23,000 could be paid to an agreement with PROS Consulting for development of that plan. PDA board Chairwoman Cindy Hill Finnie said after Wednesday’s meeting that the public development authority is raising funds now to cover the cost of Burke’s contract.

________

3 6 0 . 4 5 2 . H E L P 1C560149

22583019

30 Years Experience

L I N E

www.healthyfam.org

• Fast, Competent Service

Port Angeles CrabHouse

C R I S I S

Dave Grainger, CNE 360-379-4881 • 360-774-2467(cell)

( 4 3 5 7 )

• Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, & Child Abuse • Parenting Classes & Support Groups, Safe Shelter • Supervised Visitation & Third Party Transfer of Children • Speakers Bureau

0A5100780

(Vanilla Bean with fresh seasonal berries)

Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

HEALTHY FAMILIES of Clallam County

• Reasonable Rates

Créme Brulee

Parks Commissioner Rodger Schmitt said the public development authority needs to develop a solid

2 4 - H O U R

• I Come to You No Hauling

(with Wild Turkey Bourbon Sauce)

221 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

in the state park system and has an audience that reaches far beyond Port Townsend.” Fairleigh said the commissioners’ ruling about the disposition of the park “is as significant a decision as it has made in a long time.” The commission’s action cannot be assumed, he said. “There are a lot of concerns among public employees and the unions,” he said. “In order for the transfer to take place, the PDA will need to show that it can address all these issues and can prove to the commission that the transfer is a good idea and why.” PDA board member Tim Caldwell said he was worried by the wording of the resolution, specifically the

Financial viability

Dessert White Chocolate Bread Pudding

(360) 457-0424

This will be preceded by a meeting at 7 p.m. March 15 in the Fort Worden Commons, where questions asked during a Feb. 17 public meeting will be addressed. In January, the PDA presented three possible proposals for the administration of the park: a 50-50 comanagement agreement, a split between the learning center and park functions, and complete control of the park by the public development authority.

1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Teacher pleads not guilty to charges of child rape BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Stevens Middle School math teacher Paul A. Brinkmann pleaded not guilty Wednesday in Clallam County Superior Court to eight counts of child rape and two counts of child molestation of a boy who is now 16. Brinkmann, 46, was charged with two counts of first-degree child molestation, four counts of Brinkmann seconddegree rape of a child, three counts of third-degree rape of a child and one count of second-degree rape by forcible compulsion. Judge Ken Williams scheduled a status hearing for 1 p.m. April 26 and a trial date of June 4. Arrested and incarcerated Friday, Brinkmann was put on electronic home monitoring Monday but did not leave the Clallam County jail until Wednesday before the hearing. On Saturday, after Brinkmann tried to slit his

wrist with a comb, he was placed in a crisis cell and put on suicide watch, jail Superintendent Ron Sukert said Wednesday in an interview. “He was not doing well,� Sukert said. The Peninsula Community Mental Health Center cleared Brinkmann for being in the jail’s general population Wednesday before his release, Sukert said.

Packed courtroom More than 50 onlookers packed the courtroom for the five-minute hearing Wednesday afternoon, including Port Angeles schools Superintendent Jane Pryne, who said in an interview that she did not know how long Brinkmann would remain on paid administrative leave. He was placed on administrative leave after his arrest. “We’re in a holding pattern at this point,� Pryne said. “We would have to confer with our attorneys to find out the length of that continuance.� The alleged victim is not a Stevens Middle School

student, Port Angeles Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith said Wednesday. The county Prosecuting Attorney’s Office will seek exceptional sentences for each of the 10 charges against Brinkmann, according to court records. The maximum punishment for each charge of third-degree child rape is five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. The maximum punishment for each of the remaining charges is life in prison and a $50,000 fine.

Allegations

statement, Brinkmann said he had molested the boy and said he had “realized the activity was wrong.� Spencer said Brinkmann denied raping the boy. Brinkmann said he gave the boy back rubs and “might have� touched the boy’s buttocks during the back rubs, according to Spencer’s statement. “When Brinkmann was asked if he loved [the boy], Brinkmann said, ‘He is the only one I want,’� the detective said in his statement. Port Angeles lawyer Karen Unger, representing Brinkmann, said at Brinkmann’s first appearance in Superior Court on Monday that Brinkmann’s accuser is “a troubled young man� who made up the allegations. County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said Wednesday she expects a four-day trial. “The trial sounds to me like it would be a couple of weeks,� Unger said. “That appears to be the case, but we’ll see,� Williams responded.

The boy alleged that Brinkmann began molesting him when he was 11, that it gradually progressed to rape and that it continued until last summer, said Port Angeles Police Detective Kevin Spencer, according to his statement filed in Superior Court. The boy said Brinkmann raped him 10 to 15 times over about five years, according to Spencer’s statement. The teenager said Brink________ mann threatened to hurt Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb him if he told anyone, the can be reached at 360-417-3536 detective said. or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily According to Spencer’s news.com.

PC finalist speaks of large role of community college

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

A5

‘Ghost Stories’ painter to discuss work today in PA Grays Harbor art professor explores ‘mythic figures’ BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — These “Ghost Stories,� with their white mists and deep-blue water, are mysterious. So Erik Sandgren, their painter, will shed some light on the subject in two talks today. Sandgren’s “Stories� art exhibiSandgren tion includes 36 paintings, prints and drawings at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., on display through Saturday. Sandgren’s first discussion of “Ghost Stories� will begin at 12:35 p.m. in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Part of the college’s Studium Generale series, the lecture is free to the public.

Second lecture at 7:30 p.m. The artist will then return to the fine arts center for a second, free talk at 7:30 p.m. The artist’s recurrent subject is “a swirl of earth, water and sky,� said Jake Seniuk, the center’s executive director. “Mythic figures loom and fade,� he said, so in paintings of places such as Neah Bay and the Haida Gwaii islands of Canada, the viewer sees past and present melt together. Sandgren grew up in Corvallis, Ore., the son of Nelson Sandgren, a noted painter and art professor at Oregon State University. Sandgren earned art degrees on the East Coast at Yale and Cornell, then returned, salmonlike, to his native Northwest. He moved to Aberdeen in 1989, to teach art at Grays Harbor College. To learn more about the center and its activities, visit www.PAFAC.org or phone 360-457-3532.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

~RESERVE NOW~ Only 17 days available

Call for best tides (Many days booked)

165 / All 6 $885

$

Single

Afternoon Trips $140pp Welcoming back “Captain Frank� and the “Venture� . All 5 for $750. See video clip at YouTube.com video clip “Halibutcam1.mp4�

7FOUVSF$IBSUFSTr360-895-5424 www.venturecharterboats.com

AUDITIONS FOR PALOA MUSICAL THEATER’S SUMMER 2012 MAIN STAGE PRODUCTION OF

CHRIS TUCKER/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

No ‘main campus’

________

PARK & PEABODY, PORT ANGELES

REHEARSALS WILL BEGIN MID-APRIL, WITH PERFORMANCES JULY 13-21 MANY ROLES, MEN AND WOMEN, 18 AND OVER FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.PALOA.ORG



1506 E. First Port Angeles

457-4611

www.cafegardenpa.com

EARLY ARLY BIRD BIR SPECIAL

9

6IHSV;LMXI ,SYWI;MRI

$ 95 $3

Tues. - Sat. 2:30 - 5:30 per glass 7SYTSV7EPEHTPYW)RXVŠIĹœ'LSMGISJMXIQW 4097;IIOP]7TIGMEPWWIVZIHEJXIVTQ COUPON

BUY an EntrĂŠe KIXWIGSRH 1ĹĄ2 OFF *

+SSH*SV&VIEOJEWX0YRGLSV(MRRIV 1YWXFISJIUYEPSVPIWWIVZEPYI2SXKSSH[MXLER]SXLIVSĹ´IVWTIGMEPW +SSHXMPP%TVMP2SXKSSH7YRHE]WSVLSPMHE]W



Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com.

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 6:30-9PM SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 9:30AM-3:00PM ORCHESTRA ROOM AT PORT ANGELES HIGH SCHOOL

23587726

vost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at Montana State University, Northern, in Havre, Mont., and as dean of the School of Education, Business and Technology at the University of Montana, Western, in Dillon, Mont., where she also was an associate professor of business and department chair. Jimeno and her husband, Tom Yahraes, have five adult children. She has family in the Pacific Northwest, including a sister in Bellingham and a son attending college in Oregon, she said. Each of the four finalists is meeting with Peninsula College trustees this week in closed executive sessions on the Port Angeles campus. Robins met with trustees at 5 p.m. Tuesday and Jimeno at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Langrell is scheduled to meet with them at 5 p.m. today and Duran at 5 p.m. Friday. For more information on the finalists and the college president search, visit www. pc.ctc.edu.



Jimeno sees no “main campus� for community colleges, which serve widely scattered communities. Instead of referring to the Port Angeles campus as the “main campus� and the Port Townsend and Forks offices as “satellite campuses,� Jimeno explained that she prefers the terms “Port Angeles campus,� “Port Townsend campus,� and “Forks campus.� “The Extension sites are just as important as the central campus,� she said. “They just have a different mission.� Jimeno said access to a college education, especially for first-generation students,

is a key component of the community college mission. Access is more than finding the funding and a place for those students, she said; it also entails ensuring those students have the support they need to navigate the college system. “We need to make sure students are where they need to be,� she said. That means not just in recruiting students, she said, but also in student retention and program completion. Jimeno said she is seeking the position at Peninsula College partly because of the school’s academic reputation and partly for the natural wonders the area offers. “This is a beautiful location,� she said. New Mexico State University at Alamogordo, located 70 miles northeast of Las Cruces, in the southern portion of the state, was founded in 1958 and serves nearby Holloman Air Force Base, the Mescalero Apache Reservation and about 20 villages and towns in the area. Working with tribes often means being sensitive to the specific needs of each individual tribe, she said. “We don’t expect one tribe to have the same needs as other tribes,� she said. Jimeno, who grew up in Montana, has served as pro-

23594158

affairs at Iowa Western Community College in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Duran will appear in Forks and Port Angeles today and in Port Townsend on Friday. All candidate public forums in Port Angeles begin at 5:30 p.m. in Keegan Hall on the main campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. The Forks gatherings are at 11 a.m. at the Forks Extension site at 71 S. Forks Ave. The Port Townsend forums are at 1 p.m. at the chapel at Fort Worden State Park.

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s



Cheri A. Jimeno, president of New Mexico State University, Alamogordo, in Alamogordo, N.M., speaks at Keegan Hall in Peninsula College in Port Angeles on Tuesday.



The trustees expect to name a new president at the board’s regular meeting at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, in the Cornaby Center, Room A-12 following a noon executive session on the Peninsula College main campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. in Port Angeles. Once selected, the new president will replace Tom Keegan, who left in February to be Skagit Valley College’s new president after 10 years of leading Peninsula College. Brinton Sprague, a retired community college leader now living in Port Ludlow, is serving as interim president. The other finalists are: ■ Luke P. Robins, chancellor of Louisiana Delta Community College in Monroe, La. Robins visited Port Angeles and Forks on Monday and Port Townsend on Tuesday. ■ John R. (Ron) Langrell III, executive vice president of Riverland Community College in Austin, Minn. Langrell appeared at community forums in Forks and Port Angeles on Wednesday and will attend a forum in Port Townsend today. ■ Dorothy J. Duran, vice president for academic

Season is Set



March 20 deadline

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat!

23594211

PORT ANGELES — Recruiting students, fundraising, community involvement, workforce education, continuing education and sports are all important for a community college, said Cheri A. Jimeno, a finalist for president of Peninsula College, at a Port Angeles public forum this week. In answer to a question about sports at the Tuesday evening forum, she said: “Athletics helps the institution be front and center within the community, “We have to make sure it keeps a nice balance.� Jimeno, 61, has served since 2007 as president of New Mexico State University at Alamogordo, which is a two-year associate degreeawarding school with an enrollment of 4,000 students. It is a branch of the fouryear state university based in Las Cruces, N.M. Trustees chose Jimeno and three other finalists — all of whom hold doctorates — from a field of 23 applicants Feb. 21.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 8, 2012 PAGE

A6

Winery toasts International Women’s Day BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The women-owned Olympic Cellars winery will again open its doors for an International Women’s Day party at 6 p.m. today — to both men and women who like hot soup on a chilly night. This year’s Women’s Day theme is “connecting girls, inspiring futures,” so parents are encouraged to bring their daughters and sons — and children are invited to bring their folks, said winery co-owner Molly Rivard. The winery is in a century-old

barn just east of Port Angeles at 255410 U.S. Highway 101. “Invite somebody who’s new to the area, a neighbor or somebody Rivard new at work,” Rivard added. Rivard began running the tasting room at Olympic Cellars a decade ago. Since then, she’s become a source of their homemade soup, which will be served today. There will several varieties of

soup, including mushroom barley and curry, Rivard said. The winery crew also will lay out fresh breads and cookies, as well as soft drinks and Olympic Cellars’ Working Girl wines.

‘Good cheer’ And this being a get-together for all community members, “good cheer and conversation are always on the menu,” Rivard added. After dinner, First Step Family Support Center Executive Director Nita Lynn will give a short talk on the center’s many programs — which range from par-

enting classes to home visits for new mothers — offered across Clallam County. Admission to today’s event is a suggested donation of $10 for First Step Family Support Center. A portion of wine sales at the event also will benefit First Step. More details about the center, which is at 325 E. Sixth St., Port Angeles, are provided on its Facebook page and at 360-457-8355. International Women’s Day, which has been observed since the early 1900s, is held throughout the world to inspire women and celebrate their achievements.

Apple TV, sharp new tablet debut $ It will go on sale on March 16 in Canada, France, Germany and the United States at the same price as the previous models, which start at $499 for the most basic iPad. An iPad with 16 gigabytes of memory will cost $629 while a 32GB WiFi/4G model will cost $729 and a 64GB version with Wi-Fi and 4G costs $829.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple unveiled a new iPad on Wednesday with a higher resolution display and faster 4G connectivity as it seeks to tighten its grip on the booming tablet computer market. The California company also released an updated version of the Apple TV box used to stream movies, television shows and other content from the Internet to high-definition TV sets. The new iPad screen features 264 pixels per inch, providing the best display ever on a mobile device, Apple executives said during a product presentation in San Francisco, which also was broadcast live to reporters in London. “Images on it look stun-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the new iPad during an event in San Francisco Wednesday. ning,” Apple chief executive Tim Cook said of the sharper resolution known as “retina display.” Wednesday’s press event was the first major product release by Apple since the death of its visionary founder and beloved

pitchman Steve Jobs. The new iPad — the third version of the touchscreen tablet computer introduced in April 2010 — also features a fivemegapixel camera, a faster processor and high-definition video recording.

‘Feet firmly planted’ “Apple has its feet firmly planted in the post-PC world,” Cook said, adding that “the iPad is reinventing personal computing” and spearheading the “post-PC revolution.” Compared with the iPad 2, the new model features a higher-resolution camera on the back, similar to the one in the iPhone 4S.

The March 8 soup-and-community event has become a tradition at Olympic Cellars, thanks to Womanfest, the 29-year-old organization that helps host it. Womanfest also holds a retreat at Lake Crescent every September. For more information, phone Rivard — a Womanfest board member — at Olympic Cellars winery at 360-452-0160 or email her at molly@olympiccellars.com.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly . . .

Home Depot hosts job fair in Sequim SEQUIM — The Home Depot will host a job fair in the Sequim Community School Commons, 220 W. Alder St., from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. Participating businesses and agencies include Costco, Westport Shipyard, Olympic Medical Center, the state Department of Corrections, WorkSource, 7 Cedars Casino, city of Sequim, Express Employment Professionals and The Home Depot.

Taco Bell rollout LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Taco Bell hopes to turn orange Doritos cheese pow-

SHOP LIKE A STAR! Win* a $1000 Macy’s shopping spree Details at macys.com/fashionstar. *No purchase necessary.

SALE 24.99

SALE 319.99

POLOS OR SPORTSHIRTS Reg. $38-$49. From Izod® & our Alfani in stripes & solid colors. S-XXL.

65%-80% OFF

CALVIN KLEIN Reg. $550. Slim-fit suit separates. Jacket. Reg. $400, sale 229.99. Pants. Reg. $150, sale $90. + WebID 618069.

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 30% OFF Orig.* $29-$299, final cost 5.08-104.65. Only at Macy’s. Clearance sportswear from Style & Co. and more. Misses. Selections available for petites & women; women’s prices slightly higher.

SALE 14.99

DURING THIS WEEKEND AT MACY’S SALE! NOW THROUGH SUNDAY, MARCH 11 GUESS Reg. $195, sale $117. Faux leather jackets. Polyurethane. S-XXL.

SEPARATES Reg. $39-$79, sale 23.4047.40. From Cable & Gauge, August Silk, Joseph A., Alfred Dunner, our Style & Co. & more.Misses. Selections available for petites & women; women’s prices slightly higher.

25% OFF

ALL†† FINE JEWELRY Reg. $200-$8000, sale $100-$5600. Diamonds, 14k gold, gemstones & more. In Georgia, jewelry on sale 3/93/11/2012.

SALE 99.99-179.99 KEURIG SINGLE-SERVE BREWERS Reg. 149.99-259.99. Shown: Elite. #B40. + WebID 527513. Also: all K-Cups on sale. Reg. 17.99-47.99, sale 11.99-32.99.

50% OFF

ALL LUGGAGE From Samonsite, Delsey, Travelpro and Ricardo. Reg. $80-$940, sale 39.99-469.99. Shown: Samsonite Silhouette 12. + WebID 526115.

SALE 9.99

SUPER BUY $99

40%-65% OFF

BRAS Reg. $32-$38 ea., sale 2 for $32-$38 ea. + get 1 free. From Bali®, Maidenform®, Vanity Fair® & Warner’s®. Shown: Bali® concealers. + WebID 573747.

30%-50% OFF

WHEN YOU BUY 2 OR MORE PAIRS All regular, sale & clearance shoes for her. Macy’s card/ pass discount doesn’t apply.

BUY 2, GET 1 FREE

DIAMOND-ACCENT HOOPS Reg. $360. In 14k white (+ WebID 434478) or yellow (+ WebID 280248) gold. Macy’s card/pass discount doesn’t apply.

PLUS, TAKE AN EXTRA 15% OR 1O% OFF† when you use your Macy's Card or savings pass during This Weekend Sale. †Exclusions apply, see pass.

WOW! PASS EXTRA SAVINGS ON ALL SALE & CLEARANCE APPAREL! (EXCEPT SPECIALS & SUPER BUYS)

EXTRA 15 OFF %

SELECT SALE & CLEARANCE APPAREL FOR HIM, HER & KIDS, PLUS FINE & FASHION JEWELRY AND SELECT HOME ITEMS EXTRA 1O% OFF ALL SALE & CLEARANCE watches, shoes, coats, suits, dresses, intimates; suit separates & sportcoats for him & electrics & electronics

Excludes: Everyday Values (EDV), specials, super buys, multi-pair shoe purchases for her, furniture, mattresses, floor coverings/rugs, men’s store electronics, cosmetics/fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, previous purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer except opening a new Macy’s account. EXTRA SAVINGS % APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES.

VALID 3/7/-3/11/2012

BOULDER, Colo. — The largest solar storm in five years is threatening to unleash a torrent of charged particles that could disrupt power grids, GPS and airplane flights. The sun erupted Tuesday evening, and the effects should start smacking Earth early today, according to forecasters at the federal government’s Space Weather Prediction Center. “This is a good-size event, but not the extreme type,” said Bill Murtagh, program coordinator for the space weather center.

NEW YORK — Netflix shares jumped higher to close at $105.19 after announcing a partnership with Apple on its corporate blog Wednesday: “Starting today, you can sign up for Netflix directly on your Apple TV and pay via your iTunes account. Plus, with the new thirdgeneration Apple TV, you’ll also be able to watch thousands of hours of great movies and television streaming on Netflix.”

PLUS SAVINGS FOR JUNIORS, KIDS & SHOES FOR HER

40% OFF

Solar disruptions

Netflix piggyback

FOR JUNIORS Reg. 19.50. Screen-printed tees from Awake, Hello Kitty, & more.

3O%- 8O% OFF STOREWIDE 40% OFF

der into green — as in cash from its latest invention. The fast-food chain rolled out Doritos Locos Tacos at midnight Wednesday at its nearly 5,600 restaurants nationwide. The chain calls the tacos using shells made out of Nacho Cheese Doritos the biggest product launch in its 50-year history.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $0.9856 per lb., LondonSpot nonferrous metal prices W. Aluminum - $0.9990 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.7807 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.7310 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2068.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9107 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1677.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1671.40 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $33.380 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $32.741 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1628.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1611.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

SCREENPRINTED TEES Reg. 12.99. From Belle du Jour and more. Girls' 7-16.

SALE & CLEARANCE HANDBAGS Reg./Orig.* $18-$248. Sale/Now 6.30-148.80. Shoppers, totes, crossbody bags and more from Nine West, our Giani Bernini, Style & Co. and more.

SALE 199.99

FULL/QUEEN COMFORTER COVER Reg. $270. Only at Macy’s. Meridian by Hotel Collection. + WebID 560701. King. Reg. $340, sale 249.99.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

40% OFF

HOTEL COLLECTION DINNERWARE Reg. $6-$232, sale 2.99-138.99. Only at Macy’s. Open stock and serving pieces.

FREE ONLINE SHIPPING EVERY DAY + EXTRA 15% OR 1O% OFF

FREE SHIPPING WITH $99 PURCHASE. USE PROMO CODE: RELAX FOR EXTRA SAVINGS; OFFER VALID 3/7-3/11/2012. EXCLUSIONS APPLY; SEE MACYS.COM FOR DETAILS.

23592323

Free bras are at time of purchase & must be of equal or lesser value than the purchased items; returns must include the purchased and free items. ³ REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. SALE PRICES IN EFFECT THROUGH 3/11/12. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. ‡All carat weights (ct. t.w.) are approximate; variance may be .05 carat. Savings off reg. prices. ††Does not include watches, designer collections, Donatella™, fashion jewelry or diamond engagement rings. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced sale prices; “final cost” prices reflect extra savings; does not apply to Everyday Values, super buys, specials or trunk shows. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys. com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance their beauty and require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Orig./ Now and Special Purchase items will remain at advertised prices after event and are available while supplies last. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s and selection may vary by store. Luggage & electric items shown carry warranties; to see a manufacturer’s warranty at no charge before purchasing, visit a store or write to: Macy’s Warranty Dept., PO Box 1026 Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties. Prices and merchandise may differ at macys.com. + Enter the WebID in the search box at MACYS.COM to order. N2020018


3

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

A7

rdAge

Diabetes training covered by Medicare STILL GOT SOME of that Valentine’s Day chocolate lying around? Or cleverly stashed away where the others won’t find it? I thought so. Please don’t tell me that you’ve still got Halloween leftovers left over. Care to hazard a guess about how I knew that? Anyway, try answering a few questions (answer them silently to yourself; otherwise, you’ll frighten the pets): Do you have diabetes? Do you think you might? Do you know and like anybody who does have diabetes? Are you on Medicare? Are you going to be on Medicare soon? Do you know and like anybody who has diabetes and is on Medicare? If you answered “No!” to all of the above, I can only say, “Wow!” and refer you back to the biobubble in which you, apparently, reside because the rest of this is going to bore you out of your I-don’t-know-anybody-and-nevergo-anywhere mind. The rest of us, who answered “Yes” to one or more of the above, might want to stick around. One could write a book about what Medicare does and doesn’t cover. In fact, a number of people have. In fact, the manuals that do

doesn’t mention it. And yes, this training is available around here. Now, try this one, which it’s taken me this long to finally get to: Did you know that Medicare will also cover “medical nutrition therapy?” Yes! And what does that mean? Well, it means that you’ll be able to sit down with a registered dietitian (or somebody a lot like one) and get an initial assessment plus one-on-one counseling (what to eat, what not to eat, how to follow an individualized meal plan, etc.), help with managing “lifestyle factors” (you know what that means as well as I do) and follow-up visits and whatever else. Think “teacher” and think “coach.” You know what else tends to happen when you’re getting this teaching and coaching? You tend to find out about other services around to help you manage this diabetes thing — services and resources and people that you likely wouldn’t know about unless somebody who cared took the time to tell you. That, friends and neighbors, is a “deal.” Well, of course you need a prescription. And if your doc doesn’t mention it, then you mention it. Why wouldn’t we take all the help we can get in order to handle this thing?

your life and how much you do or don’t enjoy it and how much you can or can’t do and how long you exist on what Mark might like it to go on. Medicare covI get it. Me, too. Harvey ers (and how) And you likely already know generally need that Medicare Part B (plus whatto be transever supplement plan you have, ported with if you have one) covers things farm equiplike blood glucose monitors and ment, which test strips and lancets and lancet explains why I devices and insulin and insulin don’t usually pumps, depending. get too deep You may even know that Part into it. I don’t B will cover custom-molded or own a tractor. depth-inlay shoes and accompaBut given nying inserts and what-not, plus the demographics of our area and the services of a pro (and believe the fact that I know a lot of peome, you want a “pro” for this, not ple who do have diabetes and are just any old body who waves on Medicare (or soon will be), I shoes at you) to fit them and want to give you a heads-up make them work and monitor about something that you may what’s happening, etc. not know. Remember, your feet do a lot I’m not going to try to scare more than just keep the ends of you into paying attention with all your legs from fraying. kinds of deadly and/or debilitating statistics. Self-management training If you live in this world, you You may know a lot of stuff already know. about what Medicare will cover And I’m not going to go on for folks with diabetes, but did about how diabetes is a “chronic you know that it also covers diadisease” that requires a lot of betes self-management training? self-management and how Yes! You can actually get chronic diseases account for training on how to get on top of 64-ish percent of health care costs in the good ole US of A and this sucker so you can get on with your life. blah, blah, blah. Your doctor (or somebody a lot You probably already know or like a doctor) has to prescribe it, very likely don’t particularly of course, but a smart patient care. might ask about it if the doc What you do care about is

HELP LINE

Briefly . . . PA AARP driver course slated; enrollment open

Because we want to pretend that we don’t really have it and bad things won’t really happen, so we can go home and pull that candy stash out of the nightstand drawer? Good luck with that. If you don’t particularly like health care or health insurance, then get a handle on handling this yourself, so you can use a lot less of both. And fine. Don’t take my word for it. Go to http://tinyurl. com/7my2gs6 and read it for yourself. Don’t know if you’ll remember all this and you don’t have a tractor, either? OK, then cut this out and take it with you to your physician or whoever you’re seeing about this diabetes thing. They’ll get it because they’re on your side. The operative phrases are “nutrition therapy” and “selfmanagement training.” Look: “Help” only helps if it helps. This will help.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Duplicate Bridge Results Colombia talk set

SEQUIM — Sequim Gazette reporter Mark Couhig will present “Colombia: Public Perception vs. Reality” at a Travelers’ Journal presentation Thursday, March 15. The event, presented by the PORT ANGELES — AARP Peninsula Trails Coalition as a driver safety classes will be benefit for the Olympic Discovery offered at the Port Angeles Trail, will be held in the Sequim Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh High School cafeteria, 601 N. St., from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday Sequim Ave., at 7 p.m. and Wednesday. Couhig has been traveling The course emphasizes defen- since 1975 when he bought a copy sive-driving techniques. of Europe on $10 a Day. A $14 fee covers the cost of Thirty-plus years of travel materials, and AARP members have taught him that “beyond a receive a $2 discount. certain point, spending money on For more information or to travel doesn’t improve the experienroll, phone 360-457-7004. ence and in fact diminishes it,

mostly by removing you from the local culture.” A decade ago, Colombia was a nation in turmoil. In the past 10 years, however, Colombia has turned itself around, becoming one of the safest nations in all of Latin America, Couhig said. Couhig will share his observations of the people, the politics and the peace he found in Colombia. Admission is $5 at the doors, with children 18 and younger admitted free. Proceeds are used to buy food and project materials for volunteers working on trail projects. For more information, visit www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com. Peninsula Daily News

Sequim Tom Loveday directed the game Friday, Feb. 24, with winners: Eileen Deutsch-Bonnie Broders, first; John AndersonTom Loveday, second; Ted MillerLarry Phelps, third; Pat KarlsSonja Schoenleber, fourth. Sharon Hills directed the game Monday, Feb. 27, with winners: Carol Keller-Larry Phelps, first; Frank Brown-Jim Wiitala, second; Paula Cramer-Wilma Lambert, third; Frank HerodesNancy Herodes, fourth (north/ south); Ed Bauer-Chris Class, first; Vern Nunnally-Ted Miller, second; David Jackson-John

Anderson, third; Ruth BrunoMarle Brandt, fourth (east/west).

Chimacum The winners Tuesday, Feb. 28, were: Fay Coupe-Mike Edwards, first; Ted Rogers-Bob MacNeal, second; Tom Loveday-Suzanne Berg, third; Eileen Deutsch-Bonnie Broders and Sueann SwanWilma Lambert, tied for fourth.

Port Townsend The winners for Wednesday, Feb. 29, were: Betty AbersoldMike Edwards, first; Jean Gilliland-Bob MacNeal, second; Mary Norwood-David Johnson, third.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

LOVE STORY ACROSS 1 “___ Mucho” (#1 oldie) 7 Sublime, in hip-hop slang 10 Former Mercury model 15 ___ Grand 18 Dragon slayer of myth 19 Stick on a table 20 Prayer opener 21 Big Apple baseball name 23 An elderly woman was having dinner with her husband and was … 27 Biblical verb endings 28 Pen pal? 29 At sea 30 Guilty ___ 31 ___ polloi 32 Africa’s bygone ___ Empire 34 Big tug 35 Big shots they’re not 37 Geom. shapes 38 She said “After all these years …” 43 Foursomes 44 Squeeze (out) 45 Big name in makeup 46 Supped 47 Spanish bear 48 Destination NW of LAX 50 Colorful moths

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

12

13

14

15

BY DAVID J. KAHN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

18

51 Then she remarked “…” 58 Clock sound 60 Verbalized 61 Be sociable, say 62 Barack Obama’s mama 63 Jug part 64 Card game similar to écarté 66 Domestic 69 Old despots 71 Bribe 72 Med. plan 74 ___ kiss 75 St. Pete stadium, with “the” 77 She, in Siena 78 Her husband asked “…?” 83 Diplomat: Abbr. 84 “Home away from home” grp. 85 Halftime staples 86 Game cry 87 One whose star is dimmed 90 Hit sign 91 Places to find people lying 95 Then he asked “Or …?” 99 Dr. Jekyll creator’s monogram 100 Single 101 Botanical balm 102 Word with free or bound 103 Average 104 Architect Saarinen

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

17 Winner of 2009’s Best Supporting Actress Oscar for “Precious” 22 Places to relax 24 Underwater breathing aids 25 Smooth finish 26 Quick end to a boxing match? 32 Mazda roadster 33 Pilgrims John and Priscilla 34 Comedian Smirnoff 35 It’s a wrap 36 Toe woe 39 They sometimes divide neighborhoods 40 Some royalties 41 Printing problem DOWN 42 Baseball manager Ned 1 Single, say 47 Grab bag 2 Perfect example 48 Make some waves 3 Skillful reasoner 49 Obsessed about 4 Bernese ___ 51 With no warmth 5 Mid 11th-century 52 Deep border lake year 53 Board that’s 6 Long stretch disposable 7 Like Steve Jobs, e.g. 54 Sported 8 Blockhead 55 Alcohol producer 9 Grazing ground 56 Dinghy duo 10 Maryland, once 57 ___ Minor 11 Skagway locale 58 Lacking depth, in 12 Blogger’s bit brief 13 They make 59 Cairo’s river 39-Down: Abbr. 65 Bowling ball 14 Courtroom words feature 15 Gaping mouths 67 Titan’s place 68 Portfolio options, 16 Gil ___, original for short lead role on “CSI” 106 Reminder of a sort 107 Have 108 ___ dixit 109 The woman replied “…” 115 Terse denial 116 Sci-fi film with an android named Ash 117 “What am ___ do?” 118 “As good as done” 119 L.A. hours 120 Man with a mission, maybe 121 Go-ahead 122 Serenaded

19

11

31

32

38

33

39

46 51

65

71

72

44

45 48

66 73

55

61

62

63

68

81

83

84

85

100

110

115 119

SOLUTION ON PAGE B10

92

94

98 102

103

107

108

112

113

116

117

118

120

121

122

81 Raymond’s mother on “Everybody Loves Raymond” 82 Christmas 73 Comic British decoration character who 87 Toboggan ride’s rarely speaks starting point 76 J.F.K. transport 88 Stat for Steve Nash 79 Hops dryer 89 When to tour Tours? 80 Petunia Dursley, to Harry Potter 90 Like 14-Down 70 Beach debris also known as rockweed

93

77

86

97

111

57

70

91

106

109

56

82

101

105

76

90 96

69

75

80

99

50 54

74

89

37

53

79

88

36

22

42

49

67

95

104

41

60

64

87

40

52

59

78

35

47

17

21

34

43

58

20

16

91 Knievel feat 92 Lacing (into) 93 Perturbed 94 Sign off on 96 Virus carrier, maybe 97 Musical star Paige who played the original Evita 98 1994 biopic 99 Pull (in)

114

105 Let out 106 Declined a bit 107 ___ von Bismarck 108 Game cry 110 Select 111 ___ française 112 Game cry 113 How-dos 114 Australian runner


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

Forget about Mother Nature and partake of music scene IT’S MARCH, AND Old Man Winter doesn’t seem to want to let go. Sure, it’s nice today, but what about the weekend? Forget Mother Nature and her whims — get out and enjoy live music. Whether you just sit and listen, tap your toes or swing and sway on the dance floor, live music is good for the soul, so partake and enjoy all across the beautiful Olympic Peninsula.

LIVE MUSIC John Nelson

boldt and Olde Tyme Country perform at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, from

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stop in Sunday for a ■ At the Junction great jam from 5 p.m. to Roadhouse, junction of 7:30 p.m. U.S. Highway 101 and On Tuesday, Dave and state Highway 112 five Rosalie Secord and the miles west of Port Angeles Luck of the Draw Band on Tuesday, Ches Ferguplay old-time music with son stops by for some pick- the solo side of Jimmy ing and grinning at 7 p.m. Hoffman with original ■ Today at Castaways and cover tunes from Restaurant and Night 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Club, 1213 Marine Drive, ■ Every Tuesday evecome on down for Jerry’s ning at the Port Angeles Country Jam from 5 p.m. Senior Center, Seventh to 8 p.m. and Peabody streets, the ■ At Bar N9ne, 229 W. Port Angeles Senior SwingFirst St., the Second Friday ers present Wally and the Art Rock gives you wings Boys playing ballroom — the Americana roots of dance favorites for the Redwing, that is, at 8 p.m. dancing pleasure of all Port Angeles artist Jeff adults 45 years and older Tocher will be artist-in-res- from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. idence. $3 cover. $5 cover, first-timers free. Justin Scott Rivet, ■ On Wednesday at recent Juan De Fuca Festi- Dupuis Restaurant, val of the Arts talent con256861 U.S. Highway 101, test winner, entertains solo Bob and Dave play blues with acoustic jazz, blues, with a brew and barbecue rock and country Monday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. from around 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sequim and Blyn ■ Kate Lily will pro■ On Friday at the vide the musical entertainOasis Bar and Grill, 301 ment during the All Girl E. Washington St., Ruby Pop Art Show reception Jean performs at 5:30 p.m. Saturday from 5 p.m. to On Saturday, Mister 8 p.m. at Studio Bob, Sister rocks at 9 p.m. with 118 ½ E. Front St. ■ On Saturday at Wine Rachael and the boys putting out top-40 hits from on the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Ave., Kelly Hoch several decades. On Wednesday, Final and Barry Burnett perform country-meets-rock ’n’ Approach plays its “boomer” music from roll/Miranda Lambert5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. meets-Buddy Holly start■ On Saturday at ing at 7:30 p.m. $3 cover. Three Crabs RestauSunday’s “live in the bar” series features harpist rant, 11 3 Crabs Road, Denny Secord Jr. and John Manno from 3 p.m. Bobby perform country until 5 p.m. from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ On Sunday at the ■ At The Buzz, 128 N. Next Door Gastropub, Sequim Ave., Kelly 113 W. First St., Twisted Thomas and Victor Roots plays at 4 p.m. ■ On Friday, Les Wam- Reventlow host the very

Port Angeles

popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, Sammy Eubanks brings his straight-ahead, all-out, full-steam-ahead, no-holdsbarred rocking country blues for an evening of great dancing fun from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, 4-More plays current chart-topping dance music from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, Sammy Eubanks returns to shake up your Sunday from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., today and Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Today, classical guitarist Trevor Hanson plays at Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine, 1208 Water St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ The Robin Bessier Trio performs at Castle Key, 751 Cleveland St., on Saturday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Robin combines a wide range of music, including a mix of songs from the Great American Songbook — swing, Latin, blues, ballads and bop and a growing body of Brazilian jazz, new gospel, Motown, R&B and originals. ■ Every Monday, Port Townsend Trevor Hanson plays gui■ Today at the tar at Alchemy, 842 WashUpstage, 923 Washington ington St., from 6 p.m. to St., Thistle Breath, Kia Ochun’s “solo band,” pres- 9 p.m. ■ Steve Grandinetti ents “Music Shot Out of the plays and sings at the Sky.” $3 to $7 sliding-scale Northwest Maritime cover. Center Cafe, Port On Friday, the Sound Townsend, on Thursdays Posse Band plays country and Fridays from noon till rock, soul, blues, rock and 2 p.m. more starting at 7:30 p.m. $5 cover. High notes On Saturday, there are two shows. The first show ■ On Friday at the is Eliza Rickman at Port Angeles Library, 6 p.m., followed by Santana 2210 S. Peabody, Art Blast, tribute band Mantra at the community drum circle, 8 p.m. $10 cover. takes place starting at On Wednesday, the Ben 7 p.m. Rice Blues Trio performs ■ Here’s a heads-up for at 7:30 p.m. $8 to $3 slidan event coming up Suning-scale cover. day, March 18, at the Phone 360-385-2216 for Sequim High School details and reservations. auditorium, 601 N. ■ On Friday at Sirens Sequim Ave. Pub, 823 Water St., The Washington Old Southern Skies presents Time Fiddlers will hold acoustic music of southern its annual concert titled Appalachia and its home“Rosin the Bow” at 2 p.m. towns in the Ozarks at More details next week. 10 p.m. $5 cover. ________ On Saturday, Leif John Nelson is a self-styled Totusek’s freestyle canmusic lover and compulsive night owl dela on African rumba who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live soukous guitar starts at Music Alive” on the North Olympic 10 p.m. $5 cover. ■ Today at the Under- Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. town, 211 Taylor St., Are you performing in or promoting Nathaniel Talbut from a live music gig? Contact John by Portland, Ore., plays indie/ phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing folk at 8 p.m. $5 cover. news@peninsuladailynews.com, with On Friday, the WithJohn Nelson in the subject line. And erow & Gibson duo play note: Nelson’s new deadline is MonNorthwest alternative folk day at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s at 8 p.m. $3 cover. column. On Saturday, the Stray Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing Dogs play bluegrass and of entertainment at nightspots across more at 7 p.m. the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine. ■ Steve Grandinetti

Death and Memorial Notice MARGO LOU COSTELLO February 10, 1942 February 29, 2012 Born Margo Lou Aanestad on February 10, 1942, in Devils Lake, North Dakota, to Eleanor Lou Magnusson and Sylfest Orwoll Aanestad, Margo just turned 70 years young. She had a passion for life and was a fighter and survivor of life. As a young child, Margo was taught by her grandfather to catch nightcrawlers, package them and sell the worms for a quarter to the local fishermen. She was a doer and always was involved in some activity. Her family moved to Livingston, Montana, where she attended Park High School. There she was voted “Mayorist.” Her family moved to Santa Barbara, California. When she was only 16, she drove her 1946 Studebaker all the way to Santa Barbara by herself. She completed her high school education at Santa Barbara High. Margo had many jobs during her career. One was at GTE where she was a “ringy dingy operator” for the telephone company, and she was also voted their “Snow Queen.” She worked as the office manager for the International Brotherhood

Mrs. Costello of Electrical Workers union. Margo had several businesses under M.O.M. (Margo’s Office Management). Her favorite was gardening and opening a nursery selling produce, flowers and wood products that she hand-made. She had many hobbies and talents such as cooking, baking, crocheting, making rag rugs, blankets and cards. She loved to play cribbage and was an avid game player. She refinished old furniture and sold it. There wasn’t anything she couldn’t do, and everything she did, she did well. Margo also loved to travel and fly fish. Margo had a great sense of humor and a quick wit about her. She sure loved to play practical jokes. Margo’s first love was

her family. She married the love of her life, Roy Leo Costello, in 1984 and was 16 days away from celebrating their 28th wedding anniversary. She was preceded in death by her mother, father and baby sister, Nancy. She is survived by her husband, Roy Costello; her children, Garret, Kristen, Westen, Keena Mae (husband Paul), Richard (wife Monica) and LaTeresa (husband Scott); her sister, Diane; six grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. She will be dearly missed by all her family and friends. She was laid to rest next to her mother and father-in-law at Sequim View Cemetery with graveside services on Wednesday, March 7, 2012. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Olympic Medical Center Cardiac Care Rehabilitation Center at 840 North Fifth Avenue, Sequim, WA 98382. Her family would like to thank all the wonderful doctors and nurses who took such loving and tender care of her in CCU at Olympic Medical Center. I love you, Sissy . . . No, I love you more . . . Love, Ka-Mae. Always and forever, I love you, Margo . . . Love, Hubbies.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PA school principal resigns to take job in Alaska district PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Roosevelt Elementary School Principal Doug Hayman is leaving for a position in Alaska after nearly 21 years with the Port Angeles School District. Superintendent of Port Angeles Schools Jane Pryne announced Hayman’s resignation, which will be effective in June at the end of the school year, on Wednesday. Hayman and his wife, Michelle Hayman, will move to the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska, where he has Hayman accepted a position as principal at Tustumena Elementary School in the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District. “We wish Doug the very best in this new life adventure,” Pryne said. “He has had a tremendous impact on many students and their families throughout the Port Angeles community and will be greatly missed.” Hayman’s resignation is pending School Board approval at its next meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the Central Services Building, 216 E. Fourth St. A job announcement for the new principal position will be made prior to the end of March, Pryne said.

District transitions Hayman was “an integral part of several school district transitions,” Pryne said. As principal of Fairview Elementary School, he was deeply involved in the closure of the school at 166 Lake Farm Road in 2007. After the closure, he became principal of Roosevelt Elementary School. “Doug has worked tirelessly and successfully to build a sense of community at Roosevelt Elementary, and for that, we are very grateful,” Pryne said. Said Hayman: “My experience in Port Angeles has prepared me well for this next adventure. “I will miss the people of Port Angeles, especially my Roosevelt family. “My former students and my ‘grand-students’ (children of my students) are throughout the school system from high school to new kindergartners. “I have enjoyed being a part of their lives.” Hayman said Tustumena Elementary is a kindergarten-through sixth-grade rural school 15 miles south of Kenai, Alaska. It has about 160 students. Hayman began his teaching career in the district in 1991 as a fifth-grade teacher at the former Monroe Elementary School. From 1997 through 1999, he taught science at Stevens Middle School, where he became interim assistant principal while serving as a teacher on special assignment in 1999-2000. After that, he became assistant principal at Stevens for an additional two years. He served as Fairview principal beginning in 2002. Hayman received his bachelor’s degree in elementary education and teaching certificate from the University of Idaho and his master’s degree in education, majoring in educational technology, from City University of Seattle.

Death and Memorial Notice BRIANA JEANNE (CULVER) HOVIND May 10, 1976 February 29, 2012 Briana Jeanne (Culver) Hovind passed away in Sequim at the age of 35 on February 29, 2012, after a long battle with cancer. She was born in Los Gatos, California, on May 10, 1976, and raised in Morgan Hill, California. She married Zachary Emerson in 1994 and moved to Oak Harbor, Washington, where she had her son, Daniel, in 1996. She attended Peninsula College, earning her health care assistant certificate. In 2007, she married Meric Christopher Hovind, and they moved to Sequim in 2008. She loved painting, reading, photography,

Mrs. Hovind horses and dogs. She owned and trained several dogs, plus fostered several rescue dogs. She also loved off-road four-wheeling with Meric in their Jeeps, and she won a trophy in the mud drags at the Port Townsend/Jeffco Expo while battling cancer. She enjoyed travel as well, with Iceland, Norway and

Ireland special favorites. She is survived by her husband, Meric; her son, Daniel Forrest Emerson; and her parents, Clark and Janet Culver, all of Sequim. Her brother, James Culver, (Rebecca) and nephew, Johnathan, of Mountlake Terrace, Washington, also survive her. A memorial potluck gathering will be held at the Agnew Community Center, 1241 North Barr Road, in Port Angeles, at noon on Saturday, March 10. This will be hosted by the Peninsula Outriders, as Briana spent time on their flag line giving honor to veterans at their funerals. In lieu of flowers, she requested friends donate blood or give to WAGS dog rescue or Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Death Notices

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday. A convenient form to guide you is available at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Milton W. Nesse Dec. 13, 1919 — March 4, 2012

Milton W. Nesse died in his Port Angeles home. He was 92. Services: Saturday, March 17, at 2 p.m., memorial at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., Port Angeles. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 8, 2012 PAGE

A9

Limbaugh’s apology seems sincere THE FIRST APOLOGY by Rush Limbaugh, posted on his website over the weekend, sounded forced, qualified, almost defensive. The second, broadcast live Cal on his Monday Thomas show, sounded sincere and heartfelt. Limbaugh did something not usually associated with either himself or bombastic talk radio. He apologized for calling a woman a “slut” and a “prostitute.” The woman, 30-year-old Sandra Fluke, a law student at Georgetown University, wants the Catholic school to pay for contraceptives in its insurance policy because, she says, she and her friends cannot afford the cost otherwise. Apparently Fluke is not aware that contraceptive pills, according to John McCormack of The Weekly Standard, “can be purchased for as low as $9 per month at a pharmacy near Georgetown’s campus.” Or that some places dispense

them for free, along with condoms. Back to the Limbaugh apology. I have known Rush for some years (he wrote a forward to one of my books), and I think I can tell when he is sincere. A lot of what he does is theatrics designed to rev up his audience with red meat and to dramatize a point. It isn’t that he is insincere about his positions; rather, it is because the media environment, in which we are all forced to live, requires some to be louder and more emphatic than others to attract attention and ratings. Limbaugh opened his Monday show sounding contrite: “I acted too much like the leftists who despise me. I descended to their level using names and exaggerations to describe Sandra Fluke. “It’s what we have come to know and expect from them, but it’s way beneath me. And it’s way beneath you. It was wrong and that’s why I’ve apologized, ’cause I succumbed. . . . “Don’t be mad at them or mad at her. Everybody here was being true to their nature except me. “I’m the one who had the failing on this, and for that I genuinely apologized for using those

to forgive. words to In fact, describe Ms. Fluke went on Fluke.” ABC’s “The That sounds View” on sincere to me Monday and should end morning to the controversy, say that Limbut it probably baugh’s apolwon’t. ogy changed Limbaugh’s nothing. political eneAs noted in mies have many other never demonplaces, there strated anyis often a douthing approachble standard ing contrition when it comes when it comes to their desire to speech. to destroy him. Horrible They have DARYL CAGLE/CAGLE CARTOONS things have succeeded in been said getting several about consersponsors to drop ads from his vatives and especially conservashow and calls for a boycott of tive women, but have a conservahis show continue. tive said anything close to those Limbaugh’s detractors have things about a liberal woman the example of Glenn Beck, late and you have the Sandra Fluke of Fox News Channel, as inspira- controversy. tion. That network dropped Beck Rush is right, though. Such in part because, though his ratthings ought to be beneath conings were high, few sponsors servatives. wanted to be associated with his That civil discourse may be on controversial remarks. life support is not news to anyLimbaugh’s apology shifts the one paying attention to political burden to his critics, including rhetoric. Fluke. If they keep attacking Part of this has to do with Limbaugh, they risk damaging fundraising, which mostly relies their own character for refusing on negatives, not positives,

Peninsula Voices Property taxes III In response to the taxpayer who asked me to give it one more shot trying to explain why property taxes can go up when property evaluations go down [“Property Taxes I,” Peninsula Voices, March 4], I would like to point out that a handout explaining “Your 2012 Property Tax Bill” is available both at the front counter of the Treasurer’s Office at the Clallam County Courthouse at 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles, as well as online at http:// tinyurl.com/clallamtaxes. My staff and I are also available to answer questions at 360-417-2344. Selinda Barkhuis, Port Angeles

Barkhuis is Clallam County treasurer.

Property rights As I understood the State of the Union message, President Barack Obama said that he had the right to rewrite any existing contracts as to what was provided and who would pay for it, and that if any existing constitutional obstacles got in the way, he would work around them. Written laws and the divisions of power will no longer be considered binding on him and private property will not be respected. Looks like his pals Bill and Bernadine and the Rev. Wright have gotten through to him. Along related lines, on

Jan. 14 the Republican National Committee adopted a resolution quite similar to one passed locally against ICLEI [International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives] and Agenda 21. National sovereignty is deemed a social injustice and private property is called a threat to the environment. Somehow they forgot the rivers of Poland were unfit for industrial use, something not produced by private property. Agenda 21 is the ultimate bad medicine and affects us all. Robert W. Robinson, Sequim

Wild Olympics A forester hired by the

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES Wild Olympics Campaign now tells us not to worry as there is little timber to harvest on 132,000 acres of land planned for a wilderness designation. Really? That’s like saying there are no salmon to catch in Alaska. You may make rules that deny access to renewable resources, but first assure yourself that they are no longer needed, forever. Common sense says otherwise. Timber-dependent communities in the West are still dependent. Their county coffers are empty, and every year on bended knees, the commissioners lobby for

because as a fundraiser once told me, you can’t raise money on a positive. Part of it is also ratings. In an uncertain world, people like to tune into programs — liberal and conservative — that reinforce views they already hold. Limbaugh might resist this next suggestion, but I speak from experience, having had to apologize for a recent misstatement of my own. Limbaugh should invite Sandra Fluke to lunch and get to know her as a person, not a label. At the very least, he would send an important message that civility and strong political speech do not have to be contradictory. Who knows, he might even persuade her to become a conservative. From his perspective and mine, that would be a win-win for everybody, except liberals.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

AND EMAIL

federal help. Does our new fiscal norm provide any bailouts, forever? Of course not. Sound forest management is essential as it is in places like Germany and Scandinavia, where the harvest of trees is skillfully and perpetually done out of necessity. Are we less needful with over 300 million people consistently importing one third of our softwood requirements? If you want to believe in the tooth fairy, that’s your prerogative. However, it would not be wise to believe in a toothless one. Glenn Wiggins, Port Angeles

Idle minds This letter is to address the issue of people who have too much time on their hands, creating problems for those of us who are making a difference for others in the community through volunteer or paid work and enjoying the simple pleasures in life: TV, radio, etc., during our leisure time at home. As the saying goes, “an idle mind is the devil’s workshop.” It would behoove you to take this saying to heart and find more positive and fulfilling pursuits to fill those idle moments with each day. Elizabeth J. Burritt, Port Angeles

Nuclear campaign cash fuels new nukes SUPER TUESDAY DEMONSTRATED the rancor rife in Republican ranks, as the four remaining major candidates slug it out to see how far to the right of President Obama they can go. While attacking him daily for the Amy high cost of Goodman gasoline, both sides are traveling down the same perilous road in their support of nuclear power. This is mind-boggling, on the first anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, with the chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission warning that lessons from Fukushima have not been implemented in this country. Nevertheless, Democrats and Republicans agree on one thing: They’re going to force nuclear power on the public despite the astronomically high risks, both financial and environmental. One year ago, on March 11,

2011, the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami hit the northeast coast of Japan, causing more than 15,000 deaths, with 3,000 more missing and thousands of injuries. Japan is still reeling from the devastation — environmentally, economically, socially and politically. Naoto Kan, Japan’s prime minister at the time, said last July: “We will aim to bring about a society that can exist without nuclear power.” He resigned in August after shutting down production at several power plants. He said that another catastrophe could force the mass evacuation of Tokyo, and even threaten “Japan’s very existence.” Only two of the 54 Japanese power plants that were online at the time of the Fukushima disaster are currently producing power. Kan’s successor, Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, supports nuclear power, but faces growing public opposition to it. This stands in stark contrast to the United States. Just about a year before

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Fukushima, President Obama announced $8 billion in loan guarantees to the Southern Company, the largest energy producer in the southeastern U.S., for the construction of two new nuclear power plants in Waynesboro, Ga., at the Vogtle power plant, on the South Carolina border. Since the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania and then the catastrophe at Chernobyl in 1986, there have been no new nuclear power plants built in the U.S. The 104 existing nuclear plants are all increasing in age, many nearing their originally slated life expectancy of 40 years. While campaigning for president in 2008, Obama promised that nuclear power would remain part of the U.S.’s “energy mix.” His chief adviser, David Axelrod, had consulted in the past for Illinois energy company ComEd, a subsidiary of Exelon, a major nuclear-energy producer. Obama’s former chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, played a key role in the formation of Exelon. In the past four years, Exelon employees have contributed more than $244,000 to the Obama campaign — and that is not

counting any soft-money contributions to PACs, or direct, corporate contributions to the new superPACs. Lamented by many for breaking key campaign promises (like closing Guantanamo or not accepting superPAC money), President Obama is fulfilling his promise to push nuclear power. That is why several groups sued the Nuclear Regulatory Commission last month. The NRC granted approval to the Southern Company to build the new reactors at the Vogtle plant despite a no vote from the NRC chair, Gregory Jaczko. He objected to the licenses over the absence of guarantees to implement recommendations made following the Japanese disaster. Jaczko said: “I cannot support issuing this license as if Fukushima never happened.” Stephen Smith, executive director of the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, one of the plaintiffs in the suit against the NRC, explained how advocates for nuclear power “distort market forces,” since private investors simply don’t want to touch nuclear:

“They’ve asked the federal government for loan guarantees to support the project, and they have not revealed the terms of that loan guarantee . . . it’s socializing the risk and privatizing the profits.” The Nuclear Information and Resource Service, noting the ongoing Republican attack on President Obama’s loan guarantee to the failed solar power company Solyndra, said: “The potential for taxpayer losses that would dwarf the Solyndra debacle is extraordinarily high . . . this loan would be 15 times larger than the Solyndra loan, and is probably 50 times riskier.” As long as our politicians dance to the tune of their donors, the threat of nuclear disaster will never be far off.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

NEWS DEPARTMENT

HAVE YOUR SAY

Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-417-3539, margaret.mckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hot line: 360-417-3506


A10

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

ANGELES FURNITURE

THE PENINSULA’S LARGEST SELECTION OF QUALITY HOME FURNISHINGS

is offering its

Preferred Customer Sale Prices

to the public

FINAL 3 DAYS, MARCH 8 , 9 , & 10 TH

TH

TH

s For our preferred customers whose letters found their way to incorrect addresses s For our preferred customers whose names have slipped from our mailing list s For our preferred customers who were unable to attend our 6-hour sale s For our future preferred customers. (Preferred customers are deďŹ ned as anyone who has previously purchased from Angeles Furniture.)

R U F S

GELE

AN

ENIN THE P

E R U NIT

SUL A

’S

ST LARGE

SELEC

OF TION

QUALI

TY

H

OME

FURNIS

HING

S

23590847

%AST&IRST3Ts0ORT!NGELESsWWWANGELESFURNITURECOM   s   s-ON 3AT 


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 8, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Morning clam digs to start PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — It’s a go. Clam diggers received the green light to hit those ocean beaches to look for the makings of clam chowder this weekend. Those clams will be safe to eat. Kalaloch Beach, the closest to the North Olympic Peninsula, is still closed in March. But area diggers who have been patient and waiting several months for Kalaloch to open should circle April 7-9 on their calendars. Those three days are tentative opening dates for Kalaloch as long as the toxin reports come back good on the last week of March. State fishery managers approved a morning razor clam dig at four ocean beaches this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, after marine toxin tests confirmed that the clams on those beaches are safe to eat. The dig, scheduled at Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks beaches, marks the first time this season that clam diggers will be allowed to harvest razor clams on morning tides. No digging will be allowed after noon at any of those beaches. “This is the first in a series of multi-day morning digs tentatively scheduled in the coming weeks,” said Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “A lot of people wait all year to dig razor clams on morning tides.” Well, this is your chance, diggers.

Low tides Morning low tides and beach openings for this weekend are: ■ Saturday, (7:39 a.m., -0.3 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks. ■ Sunday, (9:28 a.m., -0.4 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks. Ayres recommends that diggers hit the beach about two hours before morning low tide for best results. He also reminds prospective diggers that daylight-saving time begins Sunday, which is why there is an extra hour between the low tides this weekend. “It’s important that everyone is operating on daylight-saving time for the dig on Sunday, because the beaches close to digging at noon,” Ayres said. Under state law, diggers can take 15 razor clams per day, and are required to keep the first 15 they dig. Each digger’s clams must be kept in a separate container. All diggers age 15 or older must have a 2011/2012 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach.

Need that license Licensing options range from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, which can be purchased on WDFW’s website (https://fishhunt.dfw. wa.gov) and from license vendors around the state. Shellfish managers have also tentatively proposed two other morning digs through early April, although final approval will depend on the results of future marine toxin tests. Proposed beach openings, along with morning low tides, for those digs are: ■ March 24, Saturday, (8:25 a.m., +0.3 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks. ■ March 25, Sunday, (8:59 a.m., +0.3 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Mocrocks. ■ April 7, Saturday, (7:36 a.m., -1.2 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks and Kalaloch. ■ April 8, Sunday, (8:23 a.m., -1.5 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Mocrocks and Kalaloch. ■ April 9, Monday, (9:11 a.m., -1.5 ft.): Long Beach, Twin Harbors and Kalaloch. Updated information on razor clam seasons is available on WDFW’s toll-free Shellfish Hotline at 866-880-5431.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oregon State’s Ahmad Starks(3) drives to the basket against Washington State’s Mike Ladd (2) and D.J. Shelton during the second half of their Pac-12 Conference tournament game in Los Angeles on Wednesday.

1 and out for Cougs Huskies await Beavers today in Pac-12 tourney BY GREG BEACHAM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — After Jared Cunningham dressed at Kobe Bryant’s locker in the Los Angeles Lakers’ dressing room, he went out and had his worst game of the season in Oregon State’s Pac-12 tournament opener. Luckily for the conference’s leading scorer, Cunningham’s fellow Beavers stepped up to shut down Washington State. Devon Collier scored 19 points, Eric Moreland scored all nine of his points in the second half and high-scoring Oregon State excelled in a defensive struggle, beating Washington State 69-64 Wednesday. Oregon State will face topseeded Washington today at noon on ROOT in Staples Center.

Burton comes up big Joe Burton scored five of his 15 points in the final 3 minutes as the ninth-seeded Beavers (1813) survived despite getting just four points from Cunningham, the smooth shooting guard from Oakland. “When I’m not scoring, I’m not worried, because I know everybody else can contribute,” said Cunningham, who went 1 for 8 and scored just two points in each half.

“[Today] I’ve just got to get into Kobe mode and try to play hard.” Oregon State managed just one field goal in the final 7 minutes, yet held Washington State without a basket in the final 4:06 to snap a four-game skid against the ninth-seeded Cougars (1516). Oregon State finished on an 11-4 run.

Streak ends Cunningham’s streak of 22 straight double-digit games ended in a meeting with secondleading Pac-12 scorer Brock Motum, who had 18 points and six rebounds. “If you told me before the game that would be his line and we would win, I would have to ask you what you had to drink,” Oregon State coach Craig Robinson said. “But for us to win when Jared has a so-so game shows maturity for our team. What Jared didn’t do on offense, he made up for on defense.” Cunningham said he forced too many shots against Washington State’s aggressive defense, but his teammates compensated. Collier went 7 for 8 and had six rebounds, while the 280pound Burton played through a Washington State’s Reggie Moore, left, goes up for a minor ankle injury. TURN

basket as he is defended by Oregon State’s Roberto

TO

COUGS/B3 Nelson.

Colts release Peyton Manning THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — Sent packing by his only NFL team, one he transformed from afterthought to Super Bowl champion, Peyton Manning said goodbye to the Indianapolis Colts with a shaky voice and tear-filled eyes, then got ready to find a new place to play quarterback. At a podium alongside owner Jim Irsay, who cut the injured star Wednesday rather than pay a whopping $28 million bonus due this week, Manning was by turns wistful, nostalgic — he got choked up while praising the Colts’ equipment managers — and forward-looking. The only four-time MVP in NFL history now figures to become as coveted a free agent as the league has ever seen, assuming he can assuage any

lingering concerns about the series of neck operations that forced him to miss all of 2011. Arizona, Miami, Seattle, Tennessee, Washington and the New York Jets all have been rumored as possible destinations; Manning’s former offensive coordinator in Indianapolis, Tom Moore, worked for the Jets as a consultant last season. “Nobody loves their job more than I do,” said Manning, who turns 36 this month. “Nobody loves playing quarterback more than I do. I still want to play. But there is no other team I wanted to play for.” Still, he acknowledged: “We all know that nothing lasts forever. Times change, circumstances change, and that’s the reality of playing in the NFL.” TURN

TO

MANNING/B3

Hawks may woo Manning PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

INDIANAPOLIS — Indianapolis Colts and quarterback Peyton Manning are parting after a 14-year star turn that included one Super Bowl title and a record four MVP awards. And according to ESPN’s Rich Cimini, the Seattle Seahawks will come out “checkbook blazing” to sign him. Arizona, Miami, Tennessee, Washington and the New York Jets have also all have been rumored as possible destinations; Manning’s for-

mer offensive coordinator in Indianapolis, Tom Moore, worked for the Jets as a consultant last season. A big part of the reason for Manning’s success for more than a decade in Indianapolis has been continuity. While new pass catchers have often been integrated into the offense well, Manning always had either Marvin Harrison or Reggie Wayne as his main target. Wayne is also a free agent, and according to Sports Illustrated’s Peter King, the Seahawks would be willing to sign both Manning and Wayne.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports Laurel Lanes Laurel Lanes Seniors Men’s High Game: Paul Schoville 196. Men’s High Series: Paul Schoville 500. Women’s High Game: Barbara Ross 167. Women’s High Series: Gladys Kemp 472. Mixed Up Mixed Men’s High Game: Michael Manley 249. Men’s High Series: Michael Manley 651. Women’s High Game: Jess Edgmon 211. Women’s High Series: Jess Edgmon 576. League-leading Team: Edison’s Medicine and OMC Basement Dwellers, tie. Tuesday Brunch League Women’s High Game: Nancy Hilt 186. Women’s High Series: June Larsen 509. League-leading Team: Sunrise Meats. Monday Night Mixed Men’s High Game: Calen Walz 236. Men’s High Series: Calen Walz 631. Women’s High Game: Nancy Van Winkle 267. Women’s High Series: Nancy Van Winkle 607. League-leading Team: Lee Coups De Veine. Les Schwab Mixed Monday Men’s High Game: James Paulsen 255. Men’s High Series: Fred Platt 686. Women’s High Game: Louise Demetriff 223. Women’s High Series: Louise Demetriff 588. League-leading Team: Don Edgmon Realtor. Baxter Auto Parts Old Timers Monday Men’s High Game: Cliff Silliman 186. Men’s High Series: Jay Cameron 533. Women’s High Game: Joan Wright 164. Women’s High Series: Joan Wright 469. 7 Cedars Mixed Friday Men’s High Game: Dan Feriera Jr. 243. Men’s High Series: Dan Feriera Jr. 647. Women’s High Game: Louise Demetriff 203. Women’s High Series: Louise Demetriff 556. League-leading Team: Seahawk Nation. Pee Wee Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Maddox VanAuken 102. Girls High Game: haley Willard 85. Bantam Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Elijah Chapman 51. Boys High Series: Elijah Chapman 127. Girls High Game: Sierra Burkett 119. Girls High Series: Sierra Burkett 304. Junior Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Nathan Dewey 176. Boys High Series: Nathan Dewey 458. Girls High Game: Malyssa Gannon 113. Girls High Series: Malyssa Gannon 280.

Golf Peninsula Golf Club Men’s Club Sub Par Any Two Holes Saturday Gross: Mike DuPuis 67, Gary Thorne 70. Net: Perry Keeling 61, Mel Triggs 65, Chuck Burkhardt 66, George Peabody 67, Bob Dutrow 67, Tom Humleker 67. Team Gross: Mike DuPuis-Gary Thorne 63, Mike DuPuis-Tim Lusk 65. Team Net: Perry Keeling-Matt Gochnour 60, Mel Triggs-Tom Humleker 62, Perry Keeling-Jan Hardin 63, George Peabody-Bob Dutrow 64, George Peabody-Chuck Burkhardt 64, Leo Greenawalt-Jim Cole 64, Gary Murphy-Dave Henderson 64, Gary Thorne-Kevin Russell 64, Mike DuPuis-Kevin Russell 64, Mike DuPuisRob Botero 64, Mel Triggs-Al Osterberg 64.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HIS

OWN FOLLOWING

Students from Japan react as Texas Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish (cq) arrives at the bullpen before making his first start of spring training baseball Wednesday against the San Diego Padres in Peoira, Ariz.

Basketball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Men’s City League Thursday Northwest Builders 87, Peninsula College 78. Highlights: Northwest, Jim Slowey 26, Steve Kiele 18; Peninsula, Dustin Walsh 29, Jesse Judd 18. Middle School Scores Thursday Queen of Angels 49, Clallam Bay 25. Queen of Angels Highlights: Alex White 37, Gretchen Sotebeer 10.

College Basketball Pac-12 Tournament Oregon State 69, Washington State 64 OREGON ST. (18-13) Brandt 2-7 0-1 5, Moreland 3-6 3-5 9, Collier 7-8 5-9 19, Cunningham 1-8 2-4 4, Starks 4-11 1-2 13, McShane 0-1 0-0 0, Barton 0-2 0-0 0, Burton 5-7 5-6 15, Murphy 0-0 0-0 0, Nelson 1-2 2-2 4. Totals 23-52 18-29 69. WASHINGTON ST. (15-16) Motum 6-10 4-4 18, Lodwick 2-3 0-0 6, Capers 6-7 2-5 14, Moore 3-16 3-5 10, Lacy 2-7 0-0 5, Ladd 2-4 0-0 4, Shelton 3-3 1-2 7.

Totals 24-50 10-16 64. Halftime_Washington St. 39-38. 3-Point Goals_Oregon St. 5-16 (Starks 4-9, Brandt 1-2, Nelson 0-1, Cunningham 0-4), Washington St. 6-15 (Motum 2-2, Lodwick 2-3, Moore 1-4, Lacy 1-6). Fouled Out_Capers. Rebounds_Oregon St. 34 (Moreland 12), Washington St. 30 (Capers 8). Assists_Oregon St. 12 (Cunningham 4), Washington St. 14 (Moore 10). Total Fouls_Oregon St. 16, Washington St. 22. A_NA.

Baseball Mariners 6, Angels 4 Seattle ab r Figgins cf 3 0 T.Robinson cf1 2 Ackley 2b 3 0 S.Romero 2b 2 1 Seager 3b 3 0 V.Catricala 3b2 1 J.Montero c 3 0 Jaso c 11 Carp lf 30 Ford lf 10 Olivo dh 20 Wilson ph-dh 1 0 M.Saunders rf3 0

Los Angeles h bi 10 10 10 11 00 12 20 00 00 11 00 00 20

ab r h bi Aybar ss 3010 An.Romine ss 2 1 0 1 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 1 0 T.Lindsey 2b 2 0 2 2 B.Abreu lf 1000 D.Deeds lf 3000 Tor.Hunter rf 2 0 1 0 M.Long rf 1000 Iannetta c 3000 Langerhans cf 1 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3110 A.Rosario c 1 1 1 0 Conger dh 4011

J.Chavez rf 1 0 0 1 E.Navarro 1b 3 0 0 0 Ryan ss 3 0 1 0 Diaz ph 1110 B.Miller ss 2 0 0 0 Trumbo 3b 0000 Rodriguez 1b 5 1 1 0 Cantu ph-3b 2 0 0 0 Jimen ph-3b 2 0 1 0 Totals 39 612 5 Totals 37 410 4 Seattle 000 000 420—6 Los Angeles 000 000 103—4 E_L.Rodriguez (1), L.Van Mil (1), T.Lindsey (1). DP_Los Angeles 1. LOB_Seattle 12, Los Angeles 8. 2B_Ackley (2), L.Rodriguez (1), Conger (1). 3B_T.Lindsey (1), Bourjos (1). HR_V.Catricala (1). SB_T.Robinson (1), S. Romero (1). S_T.Robinson. SF_J.Chavez. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Beavan 4 2 0 0 1 3 Furbush W,1-0 2 2 0 0 0 1 Marquez 1 1 1 1 0 1 Robles 1 1 0 0 1 1 S.Patterson 1 4 3 3 0 0 Los Angeles Weaver 2 3 0 0 0 2 Walden 1 1 0 0 0 1 M.Shoemaker 2 2 0 0 0 3 Van Mil L,0-1 1 1/3 3 3 2 1 2 N.Maronde 0 1 1 1 2 0 O.Arenas 1 2/3 2 2 2 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBP_by O.Arenas (Ford). WP_Furbush.

Briefly . . .

Race-day sign-ups Race-day registration will open at 8:45 a.m. Cost is $30. Riders must wear a helmet. For more information, phone Mike Van Doren at 360-775-7796 or 360-4175257.

Volleyball tourney

Start Your Spring Garden Now! High School gym, 304 E. Park Ave., at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, March 17. Any gender combo is allowed, and there will be A and B divisions.

Winners get prizes Prizes will be awarded to division winners. Games will be played with a women’s height line, men will hit behind the 3-meter line and men cannot block women. Cost is $80 per team.

Rider top athletes PORT ANGELES — Student-athletes of the week for Port Angeles High School were girls basketball player Kiah Jones and boys basketball player Jordan Norberg last week. Earlier athletes of the week were boys diver Austin Fahrenholtz and girls basketball player Mariah Frazier. Jones was the leading scorer for the Roughriders at the state Class 2A championships last weekend in Yakima.

27 points in two games Jones netted 15 points in an overtime loss to Lynden and 12 points in her final game as a Roughrider against Burlington-Edision in the consolation semifinals. In addition, Jones

earned a sportsmanship award in four of the six district, regional and state games the Riders played in. “Her leadership and talent both contributed to a successful season for her team,” girls basketball coach Michael Poindexter said. Norberg ended his high school basketball career by starting the last two games for the Riders and was one of our leading rebounders in the district tournament. “His exceptional work ethic and his attitude on the basketball court will be greatly missed,” boys basketball coach Wes Armstrong said.

State champion Fahrenholtz, meanwhile, ended his prep diving career on an exceptional note as he captured the state 2A championship for the second year in a row and set the meet record for the second straight season. He scored 376.10 points at state as a junior and improved that amount to 427.20 this year. Fahrenholtz’s state meet performance has been submitted for consideration as a high school All-American. Frazier averaged 12 points per game in the two district games a couple of weeks ago. Against Renton, she led

the Riders with 13 rebounds, four steals and two blocked shots. “She played with both passions and discipline, leading the team into the district championship game against White River,” Poindexter said. Peninsula Daily News

SPECIAL SALE 4DAYS ONLY!

Fri - Sat - Sun Mar. 9-11 NOON - 6pm

Located Inside The Kitsap Mall Silverdale, Washington Next to Kohl’s & Whistle Workwear

Please join us for the

Tides of March Benefit Auction Saturday, March 10th at 5pm Jefferson County Fairgrounds $40 in advance for early registration (non-members) ~ $45 at the door Don’t miss the food, fun, friends and fantastic finds at this year’s auction! We have LOTS of great experiences to bid on too! Taste local culinary delights with our Chef’s Showcase featuring appetizers from 18 of our top area chefs! Come join the fun! Sponsored by

www.ptmsc.org

Port Townsend Sails

385.5582 ext. 104

22587340

PORT ANGELES — The Four-Leaf Clover Reverse 4’s adult coed volleyball tournament will be held at the Port Angeles

9 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 9 a.m. (25) ROOT Women’s Basketball NCAA, Iowa State vs. Kansas State, Big 12 Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 9:30 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Kansas State vs. Baylor, Big 12 Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF WGCCadillac, Championship, Round 1, Site: Doral Golf Resort and Spa - Miami (Live) 11 a.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 11:30 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Big 12 Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) Noon (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Oregon State vs. Washington, Pac-12 Tournament, Quarterfinals, Site: Staples Center Los Angeles (Live) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Northwestern vs. Minnesota, Big-10 Tournament, Second Round, (Live) 2:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, To Be Announced vs. Arizona, Pac12 Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 4:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Purdue vs. Nebraska, Big-10 Tournament, Second Round (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Orlando Magic vs. Chicago Bulls (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Big East Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 6 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, To Be Announced vs. California, Pac-12 Tournament, Quarterfinal (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Dallas Mavericks vs. Phoenix Suns (Live) 8:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, To Be Announced vs. Oregon, Pac12 Tournament (Live)

23589358

SEQUIM — The 2012 Tour De Dungeness cycling race will be held Saturday. Riders in different categories will compete on a 12-mile course through the Dungeness Valley, which includes Lotzgesell, Cays, East Anderson, Woodcock and Kitchen-Dick roads and Sequim-Dungeness Way. Race organizers expect 400 to 450 riders from around the state. The start-finish line and parking for the event is located at the north end of Kitchen-Dick Road across from Dungeness Recreation Area.

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling

Tour De Dungeness set Saturday

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

B3

Manning: Open market for elite QB CONTINUED FROM B1 Another reality: Manning should command plenty of offers on the open market. It’s not very often that teams get a crack at a QB who’s thrown for more than 50,000 yards and nearly 400 touchdowns, been picked for 11 Pro Bowls, and been a Super Bowl MVP. Manning’s importance to the Colts’ success was never more apparent than last season, when their record plummeted to 2-14 without him. Reports of other clubs’ interest began emerging a while back, and they’ll only intensify now. Because he was released and went on the waiver wire Wednesday, Manning is allowed to negotiate and sign with any club immediately; he does not need to wait until the free-agent period that begins next Tuesday. “I’m throwing it pretty well. I’ve still got some work to do; I’ve got some progress to make,� Manning said. “But I’ve come a long way. I’ve really worked hard. I can’t tell you the hours and the time I’ve put in.�

Twitter reaction Reaction poured into Twitter feeds from all around the sports world — not merely from NFL players publicly lobbying for their teams to sign Manning. Dwyane Wade of the NBA’s Miami Heat urged Manning to head to that city’s Dolphins, while tennis’ Andy Roddick, the 2003 U.S. Open champion, observed: “The colts cutting Peyton feels like the north pole kicking out Santa.� That’s about right. The stark first sentence of the official team statement read: “The Indianapolis Colts today released quarterback Peyton Manning.� Even if the news first leaked out Tuesday — and

Mackey. Indianapolis needed to cut Manning this week to avoid paying him a bonus from the $90 million, fiveyear contract he signed in July, although both owner and player insisted the decision was not really about money. The Colts are widely expected to begin moving on by taking Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck with the No. 1 overall pick in April’s draft. Irsay repeatedly used the word “rebuilding� and acknowledged: “We’re definitely a few years away.� Manning, Irsay said, “is on the mend to try to resume his career.�

Wants to play

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay, right, listens as quarterback Peyton Manning speaks during a news conference in Indianapolis on Wednesday. had been anticipated for weeks, if not months — it was odd to see those words written about a player so synonymous with the horseshoe helmet that Irsay said Manning’s No. 18 will never again be worn by a Colts player. Fans of various teams can start imagining what Manning might look like in their colors. Picture Joe Montana heading from the 49ers to the Chiefs or Emmitt Smith switching from the Cowboys to the Cardinals. “For those of us who are so used to him being there day in and day out, it would be a little like [Yankees captain] Derek Jeter changing teams,� said former Colts vice chairman Bill Polian, who drafted Manning out of Tennessee with the No. 1 overall pick in the 1998

Cougs: Lose CONTINUED FROM B1

A 24-6 run

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

“I’m just going to keep working on pounding the ball down.� Angels ace Jered Weaver, making his first start of the spring, allowed three hits and struck out two in two innings. He got out of a secondinning jam by getting Luis Rodriguez to fly out to center with the bases loaded and two out. “I’m just trying to get a feel of that flow again,� Weaver said. “It’s easy to get amped up and get rushed out there.� Weaver finished second in the AL Cy Young race in 2011 after going 18-8 with a 2.41 ERA , only the fourth

TEMPE, Ariz. — Seattle right-hander Blake Beavan allowed two hits over four innings as the Mariners beat the Angels 6-4 Wednesday, Beavan, a former firstround draft pick by Texas who was acquired in the Cliff Lee deal, is an early spring favorite to make the back end of the Mariners’ rotation. He went 5-6 with a 4.27 ERA in 15 starts for Seattle in 2011. “What you really try to do in spring training is throw your fastball where you want it and get everything down,� Beavan said.

â?– Living Trusts â?– Probates â?– Health Care Directives â?– Adoptions

â?– Trust Amendments â?– Powers of Attorney â?– Wills â?– Pre-Nuptial Agreements

2 WILLS, 2 HEALTHCARE DIRECTIVES & 2 POWER OF ATTORNEYS

time in Angels history a pitcher has won at least 18 games and had an ERA lower than 2.50 in a season. The Mariners scored first in the seventh when Angels right-hander Loek Van Mil mishandled Trayvon Robinson’s bunt and

threw wildly to first, allowing Rodriguez to score from second. Stefan Romero hit a single to bring Robinson home for a 2-0 lead. Vinnie Catricala added a two-run homer in the eighth.

LOST:

Men’s silver wedding band. Possibly on Olypmic Discovery Carlsborg Trail between Carlsb borg Road. and Kitchen-Dick Ro oad.

REWARD 360-461-4806

– $800 FLAT FEE

Olympic Peninsula Law OfďŹ ces, LLC Free initial consultation by phone.

Call today (360)437-4172 Home Visits for No Extra Charge

in Port Ludlow Amanda Wilson, Esq.. Estate Planning Attorneyy

WWWOLYPENLAWOFlCESCOMsAMANDA?WILSON OLYPENLAWOFlCESCOM

enjoy luxurious, pillowy, softness without sacrificing support

enjoy the SOUNDS of LIFE

We specialize in... Comprehensive hearing exams, hearing aid evaluations & repair. Our clinic also fits the latest technology, does hearing aid performance check & reprogramming.

Offering Hearing and Swim Protection.

360-452-2228 • 1-800-723-4106

CERTIFIED HEARING

819 Georgiana St., Suite B • Port Angeles

1114 East First, Port Angeles

457-9412 1-800-859-0163 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 - 5:30

1B5139058

But Washington State recovered with a 24-6 run, reclaiming the lead on a 3-pointer by DaVonte Lacy with 5:06 left in the half. Cunningham picked up a flagrant foul early in the second half for an apparently overzealous response to a screen, allowing Washington State to take a sixpoint lead. Motum scored 11 points in the first 12 minutes of the second half, but Moreland scored nine in the same tight stretch as Oregon State evened it. “We need to learn from this game,� Motum said. “We need to take care of our defensive possessions better.�

M’s, Beavan defeat Angels 6-4

21573173

Cunningham’s free throw with 3:16 left tied it, and Collier put the Beavers ahead 62-60 on two more free throws. After D.J. Shelton missed a potential tying free throw for Washington State, Burton hit two more to put Oregon State up 64-61. After Capers’ misses, Burton hit an easy layup with 57 seconds left and another free throw with 37 seconds to play. “We couldn’t have won a game like earlier in the season,� the Beavers’ Ahmad Starks said. Starks got Oregon State off to a fast start with four 3-pointers in the first 6:20, with the diminutive point guard getting a boost from Gary Payton. The nine-time NBA All-

Star watched the game courtside next to fellow exBeavers star A.C. Green. Starks hit a fast-break 3-pointer to put Oregon State up 22-8 just 6:20 in, and Payton gave him a standing ovation as he ran back down the court gesticulating to the small crowd. “Oregon State came out and threw the first punch and landed it pretty hard,� Washington State coach Ken Bone said. “We were lethargic in the first 8 or 10 minutes, but it was impressive the way our guys came back and took the lead at halftime.�

That is why Wednesday provided such an awkward and unusual scene for Manning and Irsay. Their NFL lives have been so closely intertwined, yet they stood inches apart in jackets and ties while discussing their separation. Rarely do star athletes who are not retiring show up at a news conference to let the world know they’ve been dumped. And while Manning and Irsay — indeed, all of the

22579030

Tie at 3 minutes left

KEN BONE Washington State coach

Awkward moment

557315

“The maturity level of our team has been growing all season long,� Robinson said. “We have been acting like we’re in the next (season) already. We’ve always gotten better, which is what we expect.� Motum had another strong game, but his Cougars went 7 for 25 in the second half. Marcus Capers had 14 points and eight rebounds but missed two important free throws with 1:21 to play. Reggie Moore endured a horrific 3-for-16 shooting performance largely against Cunningham’s defense. “Who knows what would have happened if we would have come out and played stronger early in the game?� Motum asked. “We need to value each possession. The little things we didn’t do hurt us late in the game.�

“We were lethargic in the first 8 or 10 minutes, but it was impressive the way our guys came back and took the lead at halftime.�

NFL — was aware this profitable partnership was due to end now, the emotions showed by both seemed raw and real. “This has not been easy for Jim,� Manning said, “and this has certainly not been easy for me.� Each paused frequently to try to compose himself while speaking during their appearance in a room at the Colts’ complex normally reserved for celebratory news conferences, such as the hiring of a new coach or general manager — two other significant steps Irsay took recently as he essentially starts from scratch. The room is lined with banners honoring some of the team’s greatest stars, including, of course, Manning himself, flanked by Pro Football Hall of Famers Eric Dickerson and John

draft and was fired this January. “He really is that iconic guy that represents the franchise. It’s a hackneyed phrase, but he truly is the face of the franchise, and has been. “It will be a little strange not having him there.�

Manning hopes to be playing in the NFL at the start of next season. Still, he said Wednesday: “I’ll always be a Colt. I always will be. That’ll never change.� When the news conference ended, Manning reached over to shake hands with Irsay, who instead tried to offer a hug, and they wound up settling for pats on the shoulder before walking off together and leaving the room. Clearly, this was not an easy adieu for Manning. Mentioning Colts employees he’ll no longer be around, Manning paused to collect himself while noting: “We’ve got the greatest equipment guys in the world.� “I think about those type of relationships — not necessarily always on the field, and the touchdown throw to win the game. “It’s the behind the scenes. The laughs. The stories. The times spent together. Those are the memories. Those aren’t going away,� he said. “Those will be with me for the rest of my life.� Manning will forever be thought of around these parts as the QB who led the Colts to an NFL champion-

ship, barking out signals while waving his arms at the line of scrimmage to change a play after reading the defense — something he did as well as anyone. He’ll be remembered, too, for turning a basketball-loving city into a football hotbed that hosted the Super Bowl a month ago. During that Super Bowl week, the hottest topic of conversation was Peyton Manning, not his younger brother Eli, who wound up leading the New York Giants to the title. “There will be no other Peyton Manning,� Irsay said, adding that he hoped Wednesday’s joint appearance would serve to “honor incredible memories and incredible things that he’s done for the franchise, for the city, for the state.� Manning started every meaningful game for 13 seasons — 227 in a row, including the playoffs — and took Indianapolis from perennial also-ran to one of the NFL’s model franchises and the 2007 Super Bowl title. In the two decades before he arrived in town, the Colts won 116 games, one division title and made the playoffs three times. With Manning taking snaps, the Colts won 150 games, eight division titles, two AFC championships and the franchise’s first league championship since moving from Baltimore in 1984. Indianapolis broke the NFL record for most regular-season wins in a decade (115), and tied Dallas’ mark for most consecutive playoff appearances (nine). Manning broke all of the franchise’s major career passing records, previously held by Hall of Famer John Unitas. Unitas, of course, played 17 years for the Colts when they were in Baltimore, then finished his career with one season in San Diego at age 40. Now it’s Manning’s turn to move on.


B4

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I’m writing to respond to the letter from the mother of the 12-year-old boy whose grandmother can’t spell his name right. (“His Name Is Joe!”). The same thing happened to my husband. His grandmother spells his name with a C instead of a K. I have always put K on our cards and letters to her, but I think at her age, she’s stuck in her habit. Once she sent my husband a beautiful silver money clip for which she had spent several hundred dollars. She had it engraved with the wrong initials — including the C. She’s such a sweet, lovely woman that, at that point, I insisted he never make reference to the correct spelling of his name again. Engraved items can rarely be returned, and I knew how hurt she’d be knowing she had spelled his name wrong. He called and thanked her profusely for such a generous gift, and we’ve never brought up the matter since. Anne in Texas

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Abby: I made the same mistake with my granddaughter’s name — for 10 years. No one told me her name ended with an “i” and not a “y.” Boy, was I ever embarrassed. The misspelling was not deliberate, and I sure wish someone would have pointed out my error sooner. Just Uninformed in Alabama Dear Abby: My late mother and my father-in-law both misspelled my children’s names. Mom even took liberties with my name after I was married. I don’t think either one was sending me a message. They just weren’t familiar with the particular spelling. “HNIJ” should give Grandma a framed photo of her grandson with his name (and date of birth, maybe) on a label at the bottom. Seeing his name daily may be all the woman needs to learn the correct spelling. Been There, Too

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dear Abby: My sweet grandmother misspelled my name every time she wrote to us. She had only a by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

third-grade education, lived in a Van Buren home with no electricity, raised four girls alone after her husband died and continued to maintain the family farm. She wrote with a pencil that was sharpened with a knife and spelled my name — Karen — the way it sounded to her, “Kron.” I was never insulted. I always laughed about the fact that it looked as if my name were that of a cave person. Of course, I knew she loved me unconditionally. Maybe that is why “HNIJ” seems to have a problem with her son’s grandmother. Could it be she feels Grandma doesn’t show enough love to the boy? Cave Woman Kron

Abigail

Dear Abby: I suspect that Grandma doesn’t like that particular spelling of the child’s name. These days, people have come up with unusual spellings for common names. Instead of Rebecca, you have Rebekka. For Ashley, you have Ashlee, Ashleigh and Ashli. Karen can now be Caryn or Caren. This makes it especially difficult for anyone with an unusually spelled name. You can bet that no one will get it right. So I imagine this is Grandma’s way of expressing her disapproval of the spelling of the child’s name. Only the Spelling Has Been Changed

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get a grip on what’s important and leave trivial matters for later. Taking advantage of opportunities that will help you reach realistic goals will eventually bring you success and recognition in your field. 3 stars

B.C.

DEAR ABBY

Dear Anne: Thank you for writing. I guessed that the grandmother might not have been pleased with the name the boy had been given. Other readers also had hunches about why the grandmother would continue to misspell it. Their comments:

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Name’s spelling issue for grandma

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

by Mastroianni and Hart (Elderberries has been retired; we’re auditioning new strips — let us know at pdncomics@aol.com.)

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Keep moving and you’ll avoid trouble and criticism, allowing you to accomplish your goals. Don’t be afraid to change your opinion if you discover information that warrants a review. Your ability to show fairness will be appreciated. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll be torn between what you want and what you can have. Alterations to your living arrangements will help you get closer to your goals. What you learn through the experience will help you come up with a viable solution. 2 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take advantage of an opportunity to try something new. Keep your eyes wide open and let your enthusiasm lead you to a better place. What you learn now will help you explore ways to turn what you have to offer into a viable commodity. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Call the shots, share information and spend time marketing and presenting your skills, services and current goals. A partnership will play an important role in the decisions you make regarding your future lifestyle, routine and beliefs. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Investments will pay off. Look at property or improve your assets by adding something that is in demand. Making a service, product, asset or even your own personal appeal more enticing will bring greater rewards. Love is highlighted. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let your emotions run wild or your temper flare up. Concentrate on what needs to be done to stabilize your life mentally, emotionally and financially. Secret affairs will be tempting, but deception will lead to trouble. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t allow uncertainty to cloud your mind or interfere with decisions necessary to personal or professional advancement. Make changes at home that allow you the time and space to develop and do your own thing. Take care of paperwork. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t let someone’s melodrama ruin your day or take up your time. You have to concentrate on your own life and how you can make it better. Avoid taking on someone who has ulterior motives. Ask questions and make decisions based on facts. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t let what someone says ruin your day or depress you. Focus on home, family and relationships with the people who really count in your life. Love and romance are highlighted, making this an important day to share your feelings. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put more time and effort into partnerships and you will be rewarded with the response you get. A joint venture will result in a far better product, service or outcome. Communication will help you work toward a fair and equal arrangement. 4 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Passionate encounters will bring rewards if you remain objective and concentrate on the positive. A new beginning using old ideas can lead to an interesting comeback if you are willing to reunite with people who can contribute. 3 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

Peninsula

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 8, 2012 B5

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK T O DAY ’ S

HOTTEST

6108 Sneak-apeek

NEW

CLASSIFIEDS!

6108 Sneak-apeek

2ND SATURDAY BOOK SALE March 10, 10-3 p.m., Sequim Librar y. Special this month: Gardening and crafts.

3010 Announcements

Looking for a country lady to build a special friendship and see what life brings from t h e r e fo r u s . I ’ m a white male, 61, 6’, excellent health, HWP, non smoker, very affectionate, caring, and romantic. Love the out doors, home-life, animals also. I have a sense of humor and enjoy life and would want the same with the lady that comes into my life. Email responses to: oceansunset@ olypen.com

3023 Lost

MISC: Sofa, $100. Osmosis water system, $100. Trucker antennae, $50. Dresser, $45. Lg propane BBQ, $100. 6 pc. wicker outdoor furniture, $25. Rocking chair, $25. Swivel rocker, $25. Sit down walker, $75. (360)791-3402 MOBILITY SCOOTER Guardian Microlite Ruby, electric, used twice, purchased new for $1,400. Has new battery, used twice. $750/obo. Call for details. (360)683-3056 or (360)683-8560 MULTI-FAMILY HUGE GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m.,156 Guy Kelly Rd., off Lake Farm Road. Table, tons of kids stuff, household items. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, remodeled, yd, all appl., W/D. $750 + dep. 808-3815. P.A.: Prime downtown retail space, 1,435 sf storefront available for lease, T.I. negotiable. Please call 452-7631 ext. 11. PARTS: ‘73 Dodge Slant 6 engine and transmission. $300. Chevy MSD ignition 6AL, complete, $300. (360)457-6540. RIDING MOWERS: Reconditioned for mowing s e a s o n . M u r r ay w i d e body, 12 hp, 38” cut, $ 4 0 0 . Tu r f P o w e r b y NTD, 12 hp, twin bagg e r, 4 2 ” c u t , $ 5 5 0 . Craftsman 42” cut, 19 hp, $500. In Sequim. (206)940-1849 RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. S E RV E R S : E X P E R I ENCED ONLY, over 21 with alcohol card a MUST. Apply in person, Mariner Cafe, Seq. M-F. SPINGFIELD M1A Scope, mount, bipod. Serious inquiries ONLY. $1,800. (360)775-0434. U-Line free standing home ice maker. $400. (360)683-3967

www.peninsula dailynews.com

4026 Employment General

CARRIER ROUTE FOUND: Pocket watch, AVAILABLE on Peabody Creek Trail, below Information Cen- Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. ter, P.A. Call to identify. Is looking for an individu(360)460-8434 als interested in a Port LOST: Cell phone. Pen- Angeles area route. Intek, black, slide, IBK on terested parties must be phone, Masonic Temple, 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State P.A. 452-9553. Dr ivers License and LOST: Dog. American proof of insurance. Early Eskimo female, small, morning delivery Monred collar, from I and day through Friday and 11th St., P.A. (360)808- Sunday. Fill out applica5621 or (360)-808-2498. tion at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. LOST: Men’s silver wedding band. Possibly on Olympic Discovery Trail between Carlsborg and Kitchen-Dick Rd. REWARD 360-461-4806

L O S T: We i n e r d o g , young male, black , very fr iendly, was wear ing collar w/rabies tag. Black CNA’S AND LPN’S Diamond Rd., P.A. 3020 Found Due to growth, new full 360-477-3052 and part-time positions FOUND: 2 cats, water- M I S S I N G : B a n d s a w available. lumber mill from my yard front area, P.A., call and 408 W. Washington on Little River Road, describe to claim. Sequim. P.A. 16’ bed mounted on (360)452-2130 360-683-7047 orange trailer. Reward. office@ FOUND: Dog. Lab/ (360)808-5293 discovery-mc.com Husky mix, female, white yellow, 1 white eye, 1 COOK: Expereicned. brown and white eye, 4026 Employment Apply in person at General curly tail, white streak on Downriggers fo r e h e a d , Fa i r m o u n t area P.A. (360)477-0374 CAREGIVER: Live-in. S E RV E R S : E X P E R I ENCED ONLY, over 21 Room & board + salary. with alcohol card a Visit our website at Call 360-477-9938. MUST. Apply in person, www.peninsula CAREGIVERS needed. Mariner Cafe, Seq. M-F. dailynews.com E x p. a n d c r e d e n t i a l s Or email us at Place your ad at classified@ pref’d. 12 hr shifts avail. peninsula peninsula 360-457-1644 or dailynews.com dailynews.com 360-379-6659

New Job Opportunities Mowing, Weeding, Now Available! C o m e j o i n t h e Po r t P r u n i n g / Tr i m m i n g , Townsend Broadstripe Hauling, Gutter cleanTe a m , r e c e n t l y p u r - ing & many other. Odd chased by Wave Broad- job services. Many refband! We are currently erences. Experienced, Honest and Deseeking: • C a b l e B r o a d b a n d pendable. $20 per hr. Technicians: Basic or Flat-rate. Call or txt 360-461-7772 installations, disconnects and ser vice RENT-A-MAN Labor for changes. • C a b l e H e a d e n d hire. Inside or out. Call Technicians: NCTI and we’ll talk. John 775-5586 or SCTE certification preferred. Respon- Roses, Rhododendrons sible for delivery of Fruit Trees, Berries reliable, high quality Prune Weed product to customProblem Solving ers! Sunshine Gardening Competitive salary and 360-452-9821 benefits package! Semd resume/cover letRUSSELL ter to hrmgr@waveANYTHING broadband.com Call today 775-4570. www.wavebroadband.com 105 Homes for Sale for more information! Office Manager Wanted for Naturopathic Medical P ra c t i c e. L o o k i n g fo r creative and compassionate individual to to carry out reception services and office management, including billing. Accounting & Marketing encouraged. Good communication and ability to work independently are required. H r s We d - Fr i , 1 6 - 2 4 hrs/wk. Send resume to drjdoolittle@msn.com

Clallam County

4 SEASONS RANCH Updated 3 Br., 2 bath home located at 4 Seasons Ranch. Home includes open kitchen with work island, large family room, living room, pantry, and laundry room. Large front deck and fenced backyard with garden. Near the Disc ove r y Tra i l . B e a c h , pool, stable, and golf course access. Knock out mountain view. $199,000 PUMPER/DELIVERY Jean Irvine Driver, full-time w/good 417-2797 driving record. Apply at COLDWELL BANKER 425 S. 3rd Ave., Seq. UPTOWN REALTY RECREATION Beautifully maintained COUNSELOR AND Craftsman updated to SITE LEAD restore the original feaNeeded for Parks and tures and improve the Rec Summer Day functionality. 2 blocks Camp. Experience with from schools and downkids preferred. Pick up town Sequim. 1/2 block application at the Vern from transit bus. UpdatBur ton Gym. For more ed bathrooms have claw info call 417-4523. foot tubs, freshly painted interior, and an enclosed front porch. Master Br. and bath on main floor. 2 Br., 1/2 bath, den/office, and sitting room upstairs. $196,500. ML262690/323254 Social Services Michaelle Barnard Supervisor, RN 457-0456 Will supervise Social WINDERMERE P.A. Services and utilization review. Assists in BEAUTIFUL WATER providing continuity of VIEWS health care planning Perfect getaway “cabin”. and social services to patients and families Easy maintenance mfg a s w e l l a s q u a l i t y h o m e. O ve r s i ze d d e initiative data collec- tached 1 car garage, tion. RN required with s t o r a g e s p a c e / w o r k two years experience shop. $134,900. ML297515/261789 in a hospital setting Tanya Kerr with Utilization Man683-6880 a g e m e n t p r e fe r r e d . WINDERMERE Super visor y exper iSUNLAND ence required. EOE. Apply: CABANA AT LAKE Nbuckner@olympicSUTHERLAND medical.org Located in the exclusive or apply on line at Maple Grove neighborwww.olympicmedihood, a gated commucal.org nity at Lake Sutherland. The cabana has a 3/4 4080 Employment bath and a separate Br. This recreational lot also Wanted has complete RV hookups with concrete pad, ALL around handyman, parking and its own boat anything A to Z. slip. Have fun in the sun 360-775-8234 at any time by owning H I G H E R G R O U N D your own spot at Lake GARDENERS. Mark and Sutherland! $75,000. ML262673. Gina install new vegetaMarc Thomsen ble or flower beds or re417-2782 new old beds. No tilling, d o u b l e d i g m e t h o d . COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Weeding, mulching, composting.PT,and SeCOMFORTABLE quim Call 360-301-4787. CAREFREE LIVING M o u ntain views and HOME cleaning. Metic. a n d h o n e s t , ex c . r e f. beautiful sunsets. Adjacent to greenbelt. Open Amie P.A (360)452-4184 floor plan with chef ’s INVENTOR 4 hire kitchen. Silestone counExperienced. $25/hr. ters and breakfast bar. (360)457-0505 Access to Sunland pool, tennis cour ts, and L a w n / G a r d e n C a r e beach. $285,000. ML254333/261570 ENVIOUS GREENS Team Schmidt Fa s t , r e l i a bl e , r e a 683-6880 s o n a b l e r a t e s . Fa l l WINDERMERE clean-up, gutter cleanSUNLAND ing, weed pulling/whacking, br ush FORECLOSURE clearing, debris haulNice 4 Br., 2 bath home ing. Sequim/P.A. area. in Agnew area. Built in Local: 360-681-3521 2007 and feels new with Cell: 541-420-4795 fresh paint and new carpet. Setting on 1 acre LAWN MOWING with large detached garMark’s Yard and Lawn. age. $333,500. Refs. Mark 452-3076. ML262706/324122 Thelma Durham Professional green 457-0456 housecleaning WINDERMERE P.A. (360)670-3310

HOME SWEET HOME This home has been in this family for 3 generations. Great back yard for gardening and enjoying mountain view. Generous living space in the living room and “parlor”. Conveniently located on bus line and close to grocery. You’ll love the vintage touches throughout. $149,000. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY HORSE PROPERTY Beautiful home on 2.8 cross-fenced acres with guest quarters above the garage make this minifarm an ideal proper ty for horse lovers. Recently remodeled. Close to town. Lovely location. Four stalls. New metal roof on older barn. Second barn has six tons of hay and room for plenty more. $209,000. ML261811/268971 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. IN THE HEART OF TOWN L o ve l y 2 B r. , 1 b a t h home with a fully fenced, southern exposure back yard. Living/dining room with a propane fireplace, kitchen with breakfast nook and pantry. 570 sf in the attic for additional space and a basement with a workshop. Large f r o n t p o r c h , c o ve r e d patio and a 2 car det a c h e d g a ra g e. D o n ’ t miss this well kept home! $149,900. ML262725/324530 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

311 For Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Manufactured Homes Clallam County Clallam County NEW PRICE Money making 5-plex in town recently reduced to a great price. $189,900 for a good income producer. $189,900. ML262234 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

PRICED TO SELL! Neat and tidy 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,296 sf home across from Elks Playf i e l d . Fo r m a l d i n i n g room and breakfast nook and a spacious master suite with walk-in shower. Southern exposure back yard with a garden shed. $99,900. ML262708/324263 JUST LISTED! Terry Neske Traditional Cherr y Hill 457-0456 home with lots of charm. WINDERMERE P.A. Immaculately cared for with hardwood floors, PRICE IMPROVEMENT and updated kitchen has Quaint home with 4 Br., tile floor and new appli- 1 a n d 3 / 4 b a t h . We l l ances. Two Br., upstairs maintained, centrally loa n d t wo o n t h e m a i n cated, beautiful partial floor. Propane stove in mountain view from back family room. Great loca- deck. Entire yard is fully fenced. Br ight cheer y tion! $189,900. kitchen with off-kitchen ML262646 dining. Electrical outlet Kathy Love on deck ready for hot 452-3333 tub. 1115 S. Cedar, P.A. PORT ANGELES $170,000. ML262108. REALTY Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

MOVE IN READY, FOR SALE BY OWNERS $232,500, lease to own negotiable 1631 feet sq Built: 2007 Lot: 0.16 Acres 3 Bed, 2 1/2 Bath 2 car attached garage Most appliances included Quiet neighborhood Hannah Hope 360-7751258 olympicweaver@wavecable.com Or Aaron Hope 360-4601874 or Kodiakjive@gmail.com NEAT, CLEAN, AND MOVE-IN READY N e w e r m a n u fa c t u r e d home with vaulted ceilings and many windows. Fenced back yard with patio. Many upgrades. Clasen Cove is a co-op, not a mobile home park. Landscaping w/sprinkler system installed. Oversized garage w/lots of cabinet storage and shop area. $157,000. ML261896 The Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEW CONSTRUCTION New home at an affordable price. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,401 sf with beautiful hardwood floors in an open floor plan kitchen, granite countertops, attached finished garage and great mountain views. All of this just minutes from town. $179,900. ML262704. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 683-3900

E-MAIL:

5000900

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m. 150 Tyee Rd., Mains Farm. Recumbent bike like new, toddler i t e m s, s m a l l d r e s s e r, garden items, new motorcycle helmets, table Accepting applications saw and edger, leather for studio apts, $300. 1 l ove s e a t , a n d l o t s o f Br., $450. Plus electric. misc. Income limits apply. 360-457-7785 G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8:30-3 p.m., 650 W. Anderson Rd. Clothing, household furniture, Bell Hill Moving Sale. misc. 816 Washington Place, S e q u i m , Fr i - S a t , M a r HAY: Grass hay. $4.50 9-10, 9-4 (no earlies): bale. (360)683-8352. Nordictrack Eliptical and Stationary bike, house- LANDSCAPE RAKE: 8’ hold items, Mongoose heavy duty. $700. (360)732-4457 IBOC road bike, pre-lit Christmas trees, ottomans, clothing, etc. LIQUIDATION SALE B e n s o n R o a d P. A . Please join us on SatCharming 2 br. 2 bath, u r d a y, M a r c h 1 0 t h freshly painted, appl. f r o m 9 - 3 a t M o u s e outside storage, deck, Trap Antiques, 124 “A” w a t e r v i ew, n o p e t s / W. First St., in Port Ansmoking. $1,000 1st/last, geles, for a huge liqui$ 1 , 0 0 0 d e p o s i t . M u s t dation sale. This is a one day sale with all have good credit. items 75% off the (360)457-7549 or: kjensen102@gmail.com marked price all day, ever ything must go. CADILLAC: ‘97. 108 K We will be offering for your consideration anmiles. Runs great. tique/collectible glass, $3,500. 360-797-4843. c h i n a , t oy s, b o o k s, ESTATE Sale: Contrac- TOOLS, primitives, furtor tools, hand and elec- niture, brass, copper, tric. China by Spode Ha- ar t wor k, hardware, viland. Cut glass and v i n t a g e a d ve r t i s i n g crystal. Antique furniture signs, linens, and so a r t wo r k . H i g h q u a l i t y much more. See you holiday decorations. Fri- there! Sat 11-4. Sun 11-3. Sale Mouse Trap Antiques will be running next 3 will be relocating to weeks with new items Sequim and joining us weekly. 103 Chimacum in our new location in Rd Pt Hadlock. Lehman’s Plaza. Swallow’s Nest FORD: ‘60 F100. CC, Antiques & BBW 292V8 3spd. Estate Sales $1,750/trade. 681-2382. www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com GARAGE Sale: Friday only, 8-2 p.m. 80 Burnt Mountain Place, off Riv- M I S C : 3 bl a ck c u s h er Rd. and Silberhorn, ioned swivel stools, 28” follow signs. Bike rack, H, 17” dia, $200. 3 glass lots of baby and kids top hand crafted rolling items and toys, double c o f f e e t a b l e s , $ 2 0 0 . stroller, play pen in great Poulan Pro 7.0 hp, 21” shape, mainly kid’s stuff. cut, self propelled lawn mower, $100. Wine rack, M I S C : N a v y c o l o r e d 3 glass qt liquor conleather sofa and love tainers, $40. 301-2484. seat, good condition, $550. Double recliner, SEQUIM: 3 Br., 3 ba, beige/navy plaid, good d ay l i g h t b s m t , u n o b s t r u c t e d S t r a i t v i e w. condition, $200. $1,600. (360)683-8411. (360)379-1099

6108 Sneak-apeek

4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale General Wanted Clallam County

STYLISH & SOPHISTICATED NW contemporary style w/water view. Architect u r e o p t i m i ze s s p a c e and dramatic windows/skylights infuse h o m e w / n a t u ra l l i g h t . Large family room, kitchen with large bar/island and walk-in pantry. $349,900. ML260341. Alan 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

BLYN: New 3 Br., 2 bath home. $55,000 and rent space. 360-681-4860.

BRAND NEW M a r l e t t e d o u bl e - w i d e mfd home. Landscaped front yard, spacious fenced rear yard with view of Olympic Mtn. Attached garage, electric door opener. Located in Par kwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse with sauna, spa, game room, full kitchen and exercise room, too. $124,900. ML262374 VIEW, ACRE, SHOP Chuck and Lori GREAT VALUE 683-4844 Functional 1,188 sf Windermere home on a mountain Real Estate view acre in a desirable Sequim East area. Comfortable living area on main level and MFG HOME: ‘84, 3 Br. 2 master Br. upstairs with bath, in senior park in bath and walk-in closet. Seq., animals allowed. Living area can be ex- $28,500. (360)461-4529. pandable above huge 1,152 sf garage/shop. P.A.: Lees Creek Senior Well established area Park, many upgrades. $6,000. (253)226-3470. with beautiful homes. $159,950. ML262682. P.A.: Well maintained Jean MH, 12x60 + add ons, 683-4844 50+ park, see to appreWindermere ciate. $5,000. Real Estate (360)452-7098 Sequim East

WEST SIDE P.A.: Lg. 4 Br., 1.75 ba, family and living room, kitchen, vinyl windows, single car g a r a g e / s h o p, m o s t l y fenced yard, 1,775 sf. QUALITY SINGLE County assessed value LEVEL HOME $170,120. For sale by Great location and curb owner $119,900. appeal. Custom built and (360)457-3438 impeccably maintained, excellent floor plan, conWONDERFUL crete circular driveway, COMMUNITY low maintenance land- Close to town, quiet and scaping. $249,500. peaceful. Enclosed patio ML272874/261876 off master. Propane fireBrenda Clark place. Pool, clubhouse, 683-6880 golf course. $160,000. WINDERMERE ML251727/116759 SUNLAND Deb Kahle 683-6880 READY TO GO WINDERMERE This proper ty has the SUNLAND views, 12.87 acres, ready to build on having You won’t believe the 4 Br. septic installed, condition of this lovely well with holding tank little home. Appliances and all utilities under- i n c l u d e d . H a r d w o o d ground. This property is f l o o r s, 2 c a r g a ra g e, in a development and wood burner and a great comes with RV garage corner lot. $135,000. with a one Br., one bath ML260837 w/shower so you can Pat Holland live in it while building 452-1210 your dream home. All JACE The Real Estate engineering has been Company done. Boasts a water and mountain view. 120 Homes for Sale $269,000 Jefferson County Becky Jackson 417-2781 SPACIOUS INNER COLDWELL BANKER HARBOR UPTOWN REALTY CONDOMINIUM Open kitchen/great SALTWATER VIEW room, living room with HOME Lindal Cedar Home, built wood burning fireplace in 2000. 2 Br., one full and study/den, could be and two 3/4 baths, lot 2nd Br. Large master size is 28,614 sf. 1,000 suite, master bath with gal propane tank, 2 car soaking tub and separattached garage, septic, ate shower. 2 generousPUD water, composition ly sized decks. Single roof, landscaped with a car garage. $175,000. ML316541 pond, circulating hot waLouis Scheck ter system, built-in Miele 360-437-1011 espresso machine, granWINDERMERE ite counters. $599,000. PORT LUDLOW ML262626/319991 Team Topper Place your ad at 683-6000 peninsula COLDWELL BANKER dailynews.com TOWN & COUNTRY

408 For Sale Commercial

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Price reduced - owner says “Sell!” Sequim’s leading full service laundry and dry cleaning business. Complete turnkey business. Very we l l e q u i p p e d . G r e a t c u s t o m e r b a s e. H i g h visibility Washington St. location. Will train new owners if desired. $154,900. ML262073. Dave or Robert 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

HIGH FLYERS Calling all pilots! Don’t miss this opportunity to own one of the nicest hangers at William Fairchild Airport. A 2,400+ sf box hanger built in 2006 with bi-fold doors 14’ clearance, insulated walls, skylights, tile floor and more. $115,000. ML262618. Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

P.A.: Prime downtown retail space, 1,435 sf storefront available for lease, T.I. negotiable. Please call 452-7631 ext. 11.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

3BR, 1.5ba, 2 Car Gar. Wood stove. W/D,D/W, hot tub, Dispos. $ 1 , 1 0 0 / m o, 1 s t / l a s t , damage, 1yr lease. Cont. 206-898-3252. Avail. March 1st.

P.A.: 3 Br. 2 bath, newly r e m o d e l e d , s m g a r. $ 9 7 5 , 1 s t , l a s t , d e p. (360)452-1992 lv. msg.


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Classified

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis B6 Thursday, March 8, 2012

DOWN 1 Household chore

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizon­ tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. SOLAR RADIATION Solution: 8 letters

R A Y S P A C E C R A F T D T 3/8/12

By Julian Lim

2 Healthy smoothie ingredient 3 2000 Ben Kingsley crime drama 4 __-appropriate 5 "Who shot J.R.?" e.g. 6 __ dixit: unfounded claim 7 Hosp. area for heart patients 8 Alsatian dadaist 9 People, for one 10 Male people 11 Needing nourishment 12 Marsh of mysteries 13 Squabble 15 Piquant sushi choice 20 Google success 23 Hair very apparent? 25 Zenith 26 Field for a fold 28 Infinitesimal division of a min. 29 Middle harmony part 33 Easily angered, or what the answers to 3-, 5-, 9- and 15-Down appear to be?

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

B e n s o n R o a d P. A . Charming 2 br. 2 bath, freshly painted, appl. outside storage, deck, w a t e r v i ew, n o p e t s / smoking. $1,000 1st/last, $1,000 deposit. Must have good credit. (360)457-7549 or: kjensen102@gmail.com EAST P.A.: Small 2 Br., mobile home. $500 mo. 457-9844 or 460-4968 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

P.A. City east, 3BR 2BA view, clean, new kitchen & paint, garage,storage HOUSES/APT IN P.A. $995/mo $500 dep. A 1 br 1 ba................$400 360-808-3721 H 2 br 1 ba .............$600 A 2/1 util. incl.............$650 P.A. COUNTRY: 2 Br. H 2 br 2 ba................$800 $750 incl. utilities. No H 3 br 1.5 ba.............$800 dogs. (360)417-9207. H 3 br 1.5 ba.............$990 H 4 br 1 ba ...........$1200 PA : H o s p A r e a 1 0 2 2 C a r o l i n e 2 B r. , 1 b a . HOUSES/APTS SEQ A 2 br 1.5 ba.............$875 $700 + deposit. ReferH 2 br 1 ba..............$1000 ences. http://home.olympus.net/~jnovak/1022/10H 3/2 Custom......$1,200 22.htm. 457-1431. 360-417-2810 More Properties at PORT HADLOCK www.jarentals.com Beach front, 2 Br., 2 ba. $650 mo. (360)797-7722 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Properties by Property Mgmt. Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 2/2 .5 acre.............$800 H 3 br 1 ba .............$950 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 3 ba, H 5 br 1.5 ba...........$1000 d ay l i g h t b s m t , u n o b H 3 br 2 ba..............$1100 s t r u c t e d S t r a i t v i e w. H 4 br 2 ba..............$1200 $1,600. (360)683-8411. H 4/d BLUFF...........$1500 Sequim: Single wide. 1 DUPLEX P.A. lg br, craft rm, new paint/ D 1 br 1 ba................$525 carpet. All appl., carport, D 2 br 1 ba................$600 golf, swim, security. No D 3 br 2 ba..............$795 smoking. $750, 1st, last, D 3 br 1.5 ba...........$900 dep. 360-683-0139.

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, remod- Peninsula Classified eled, yd, all appl., W/D. 1-800-826-7714 $750 + dep. 808-3815.

A A R A E L C L I R I P W R L

© 2012 Universal Uclick

P R P N N L L M M R E I E O B

R R S E A O E T S U E W T S S U L E A U O F B R W U I A I R E L T U S A C T A M E A T O L R D S R B N P H O I H E A ◯ T U ◯ ◯ ◯ A T H E R S B A H T A W E N E

www.wonderword.com

S D T A E O T I G U J C R A R

O A V R L A R O V A S E I C E

Join us on Facebook

N E O A E Q U A T I O N C T E

S T R I K E I N T E N S I T Y

S H O R T P O L L U T A N T S 3/8

Absorbed, Atmosphere, Clear, Convert, Direct, Dust, Earth, Electricity, Equation, Heat, Insulation, Intensity, Natural, Objects, Pass, Pollutants, Power, Rate, Rays, Renewable, Savor, Season, Short, Solar, Source, Spacecraft, Store, Strike, Technology, Temperature, Thermal, Time, Useful, Vapor, Visible, Water, Waves, Weather, Wind, Year Yesterday’s Answer: Connected

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FNIEK ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

TDHPE (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Stink 35 "Ghost Hunters" network 37 Dog in Kansas 39 Sports analyst Hershiser 42 River project 45 Mystery writer Josephine 47 Iraqi seaport 48 Go through the page

P.A.: 1 Br. studio, ocean AGNEW: Pr ivate, wopeek from deck, $475. o d e d 1 B r. o n 5 a c . 2.5 Br., 2 ba, gar., new $695. 360-460-9710. rugs and paint, $900. (360)670-6160 605 Apartments

Awesome Views of Victoria by Golf Course. 2 Br., 1 bath house with spacious br ight living room and pelet stove. $850 per month with $850 deposit. No pets and no smoking. Must have good references. 360-460-0405

S T R E V N O C I T E D M B E

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 539 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Port Angeles

P.A.: Available March 1st. House FOR RENT: 2 Br., 1 ba, separate utility room, attached 1 car garage. Fenced yard, with covered patio or carport. All appliances, including washer/dryer. Lots of storage in garage with work bench area. Pets/Smokers ok. $950 a month, $200 non-refundable pet deposit. Open to view Saturday, 2/25/12 or Sunday, 2/26/12. Call Mark at 253-561-2452.

S E R A E Y G O L O N H C E T

Clallam County

Accepting applications for studio apts, $300. 1 Br., $450. Plus electric. Income limits apply. 360-457-7785

P. A . : L g 1 B r. , wa t e r view, $615. 1 Br., $550. 206-200-7244

6050 Firearms & Ammunition GUNS FOR SALE. EAA SAR K2 4.5” barrel 45 acp 4 mags hold 14+1 adj rear sight perfect condition ideal for target/home protection $420 BULGARIAN MAKAROV 3.7” barrel 2 mags holster 9x18mm ex c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n 2 boxes ammo $220 ROMANIAN TOKAREV 7.62x25mm rounds= 1500 ft/sec 4.5”barrel 3 mags easy carr y over 500 rounds with gun excellent condition $240. Cash only. 360-809-0164

P.A.:. Studio, cute and cozy. $395. Storage, no pets/smoking. Dep req. 360-809-9979

Mossberg Mariner, Just i n C a s e . N ew, n eve r shot, 12 gauge shotgun, pump action, pistal grip, P.A.: Upstairs 2 Br., 1 stainless. In waterproof cylinder with tools and bath, remodeled. $650. extra straps. Call: 360-670-9418 (360)683-5758 Penn Place Apartments 1 Br., $550 + $550 dep. RIFLES: Norinko SKS, 2 Br., $650 + $650 dep. $350. Sportorized mausW/D, dishwasher. 1/2 off e r 9 8 , 6 m m , $ 4 5 0 . FN270, $450. Model 95 1st months rent! mauser, 6.5 Japanese, 457-0747 or 477-9716 $325. (360)670-8918. S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 B r. , i n q u i e t 8 - p l e x . RIFLES: Norinko SKS, $350. Sportorized maus$700. 360-809-3656. er 98, 6mm, $450. FN270, $450. Model 95 665 Rental mauser, 6.5 Japanese, Duplex/Multiplexes $325. (360)670-8918. SPINGFIELD M1A P.A: 1 & 2 Br. duplex. Scope, mount, bipod. $575 to $650. 460-4089 Serious inquiries ONLY. mchughrents.com $1,800. (360)775-0434.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

P.A.: Room, $450 mo. (360)452-2737

1163 Commercial Rentals Boardwalk Square 5th Ave. Seq. Spaces for rent. 360-683-3256

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

FIREWOOD: Seasoned fir, ready to burn, $205 C o m m e r c i a l B u i l d i n g full cord, $110 1/2 cord. 2839 E. Highway 101 Also have maple, $175+. 360-461-6843 Frontage, parking, billboard. Ideal business location. $500. 6075 Heavy 360-452-5050 Equipment PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Lots

of local Homes

360-452-8435

3/8/12

49 Techspeak, e.g. 53 Cup-a-Soup direction 55 Abba of Israel 57 Lug 58 Publicist's job 60 L.A.-to-Helena dir. 61 Kernel holder 63 Merged comm. giant 6080 Home Furnishings

REUNNO ATAMUR Print answer here: Yesterday’s

6100 Misc. Merchandise

M I S C : 3 bl a ck c u s h ioned swivel stools, 28” H, 17” dia, $200. 3 glass top hand crafted rolling coffee tables, $200. Poulan Pro 7.0 hp, 21” cut, self propelled lawn mower, $100. Wine rack, MAKE AN OFFER To- 3 glass qt liquor conshiba projection TV, 61”, tainers, $40. 301-2484. $200. Dining table, 7 2 ” W, r e d u c e s 4 4 ” W, M I S C : 6 0 s O l y m p i c $400. 6 matching chairs, typewriter, case, good $300. Full size bed and condition. $80. New deframe, $100. Day bed, luxe 9x6 rug pad for all with trundle, pillows, ex- floor types, $40. Epoxy tra bedding, $300. An- paint, $17 for 5 gal. Vintique cushion chair, $50. t a g e bu i l d e r / s u r veyo r 20’ aluminum extension transit and level, $165. ladder, $125. Stihl FS 452-4820 or 775-1624 1 1 0 R w e e d t r i m m e r, $75. (360)301-2484 MISC: Brother Intellifax Leave message. and toner, $65. ComputMISC: 10 beds, all sizes, er chair, $20. Ceramic $50-$100 ea. 3 sofas, heater, $15. Food Saver $50 ea. 5 recliners, $50 and bags, $65. (2) TV’s, $25. Brother sewing maea. (360)461-4084. chine, $45. Epson scanMISC: 10 beds, all sizes, ner, $45. Antique silver$50-$100 ea. 3 sofas, plate, $1 ea/obo. (360)437-7846 $50 ea. 5 recliners, $50 ea. (360)461-4084. MISC: EverGo portable MISC: (2) Tiffany style ox y g e n c o n c e n t r a t o r. side lamps, $65. Antique N ew, $ 2 , 9 0 0 . A s k i n g c a n e d c h a i r , $ 1 2 5 . $1,000. Nebulizer, $25. (360)683-4897 1930s crackletop chrome table, $195. MISC: Schwinn recumQueen sofa bed, mint, $195. White wicker wing bent and Airdyne exerchair, $45. 1950s 2 tier cise machines, like new, parchment shade lamps, $600 for both. Antique Stromberg and Carlson $95 ea. (360)437-7846. o a k wa l l p h o n e, ve r y MISC: Kitchen table and nice, all original. $350. (360)457-6845 chairs, from Ashley Furniture, excellent condiMISC: Sofa, $100. Ostion, too big for my mosis water system, home, $450/obo to good $100. Trucker antennae, home. 2 high back $50. Dresser, $45. Lg peach living room chairs, propane BBQ, $100. 6 $20 both. (360)457-6584 pc. wicker outdoor furniM I S C : N a v y c o l o r e d ture, $25. Rocking chair, leather sofa and love $25. Swivel rocker, $25. seat, good condition, Sit down walker, $75. (360)791-3402 $550. Double recliner, beige/navy plaid, good MISC: Stihl 64 power condition, $200. saw, $300. 54 caliber (360)379-1099 Hawkins muzzle loader, PATIO SET: In/out, like $200. (360)457-7146. new, 4 piece hand-wovMOBILITY SCOOTER en resin wicker, 2 chairs, Guardian Microlite Ruby, l o v e w i t h r e v e r s i b l e electric, used twice, purcushions and wicker ta- chased new for $1,400. ble with glass top. Nice! Has new battery, used $195 firm twice. $750/obo. Call for (360)452-1277 details (360)683-3056 or (360)683-8560 ROCKER RECLINER KING SIZE BED: Includes frame, twin box springs, full size King Beauty Rest deluxe mattress. Good condition, very clean! $100. (360)683-4503

43220691

LANDSCAPE RAKE: 8’ heavy duty. $700. Red microfiber, in good (360)732-4457 MOBILITY SCOOTER shape. Paid over $700 Rascal 600 Model, red, new. Asking $300/obo. almost new, new batter6080 Home (360)681-3299 ies, 2 baskets. Furnishings $995. 452-5303. 6100 Misc. CHINA CABINET: Early REFRIGERATOR: True Merchandise American, dark maple commercial, single door, finish. 50”Wx78”H. Exalmost new, perfect conFIREWOOD: Seasoned, dition. $1,200/obo. cellent condition. $195. all types. $200 delivered. (360)681-7418 (360)457-7774 360-477-8832 CHINA HUTCH: Light RIDING MOWERS: Reoak, 5’ wide. Top has 3 GENERATOR/WELDER conditioned for mowing divided light glass doors, Lincoln Ranger 8, 8,000 s e a s o n . M u r r ay w i d e glass shelf with lighted watt, 115 or 230 volt, body, 12 hp, 38” cut, interior. Bottom has 6 motor Onan, used 51 $ 4 0 0 . Tu r f P o w e r b y d r a w e r s a n d 2 c u p - h r s . A s k i n g $ 2 , 5 0 0 . NTD, 12 hp, twin bagboards. Photo available (360)681-2519. g e r, 4 2 ” c u t , $ 5 5 0 . via email. $400/obo. Craftsman 42” cut, 19 LOVE SEAT: Stressless hp, $500. In Sequim. (360)582-0339 brand, less than 1 yr. (206)940-1849 F U TO N S : B l a c k a n d old, double ottoman with metal, $40. Wood and table, new condition. Peninsula Classified beige, $50. 683-8119. $3,250. 360-457-6887 360-452-8435

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Condiment often mixed with soy sauce 7 Cowboys-andIndians toys 14 Help, metaphorically 15 Scrape together 16 Bobby __: '40s'50s adolescent girls 17 Teen dieter's target, perhaps 18 "Stop right there!" 19 Classic pop 21 Start of a personal trainer's motto 22 ASCAP competitor 24 Phrase from one who sees 27 __-wop music 28 Song of thanksgiving 30 Workaholic's personality pattern 31 Talk on the street? 32 Zoom 33 Santa's laughs 36 And the following, in a bibliog. 37 James Bond's outfit 38 Given to gloom 40 Spot for a snooze 41 Asian soup noodle 43 Trump's "The __ the Deal" 44 Vex supremely 46 Guggenheim Museum Bilbao architect 47 OPEC measure 50 Campfire treat 51 Dogfish Head product 52 Sought-after group 54 Courtroom cry 56 "That's the spot!" 59 Watchman 62 Much-anticipated time 64 Like Little League World Series qualifying games 65 Dealer's demand 66 One who decks the halls, say 67 Tachometer part

Peninsula Daily News

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: BLINK ADMIT SUFFIX GROCER Answer: Elvis liked to eat meals that were this — FIT FOR A KING

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6115 Sporting Goods

SCOOTER: Go Go Elite POOL TABLE: 3” solid Traveler. Almost new. slate. 96.5” x 110”, new $720. (360)797-1776. felt. Includes pool stick rack, sticks, carry case, SEWING MACHINE o n e s e t b i l l a r d b a l l s, Montgomery Ward con- snooker balls, triangle, 2 vertible bed sewing ma- granny sticks, misc. acc h i n e . M o d e l U H T J c e s s o r i e s . $ 7 5 0 / o b o. 1414 in wood cabinet. 460-9512 after 4:30 pm Both excellent condition. Includes all par ts and manual. Recently ser6125 Tools viced. Used very little. $90. Susan 460-0575. Stand Assist Lift. For TOOLBOX: 16 drawer Sale. Invacare RPS350- Snap-on. $1,000. 360I. Bought new June 460-4859 after 3pm 2011. Excellent condi- weekday/anytime weektion. Includes extra bat- end. ter y, wall charger and 6140 Wanted large transport sling. We are asking $1,800/obo .If & Trades interested contact us at Richandrae@waveBOOKS WANTED! We cable.com love books, we’ll buy Tearing down shop, sell- yours. 457-9789. ing 18x6” 31’ I-beam $900/obo, and 11’4” rise WA N T E D : To b u y o r s t e e l s p i ra l s t a i r c a s e rent, 8 mm video camera $ 6 0 0 / o b o. W i l l a s s i s t recorder. Pref. Pentex with loading but both for copying old tapes. (360)681-7400 yo u - h a u l . To d d t d u m die@yahoo.com best, or 452-5290 hard to get. 6135 Yard &

Garden U-Line free standing home ice maker. $400. CURB-KING: Dual au(360)683-3967 ger landscape curbing UTILITY TRAILER: 4 equipment, 3 stamps yrs. old, ramps, brand ( c o b b l e s t o n e , b r i c k , new tires, used to haul stone) complete with sod quad but has many pur- remover and mixer on poses. $1,500. 452-3213 trailer. $4,500 firm. (480)540-8173 6105 Musical Instruments

P I A N O : We b e r B a b y Grand, ebony finish, pristine, new condition. $5,495/obo. (360)582-3082

8120 Garage Sales Jefferson County

ESTATE Sale: Contractor tools, hand and electric. China by Spode Haviland. Cut glass and crystal. Antique furniture 6115 Sporting a r t wo r k . H i g h q u a l i t y holiday decorations. FriGoods Sat 11-4. Sun 11-3. Sale will be running next 3 BOWFLEX ELITE $1,000 new, comes with weeks with new items weekly. 103 Chimacum dust. Will deliver. Asking Rd Pt Hadlock. $450. (360)457-7311. BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection. 360-477-9659

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m. 150 Tyee Rd., Mains Farm. Recumbent bike like new, toddler i t e m s, s m a l l d r e s s e r, garden items, new motorcycle helmets, table saw and edger, leather l ove s e a t , a n d l o t s o f misc.

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 8:30-3 p.m., 650 W. Anderson Rd. Clothing, household furniture, misc.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m. 91 Wilcox Lane, off East Woodcock Rd.

S TO R AG E AU C T I O N Sat., March 10, 11 a.m. All Safe Mini Storage, 101 Grant Rd., Sequim. Unit 909. Cash only. 360-683-6646 STORAGE UNITS SALE BANK FOREC L O S I N G E V E R YTHING MUST GO: Fri & Sat 9-5, Sun 9-2. 22 Collins & Seq Dungeness by 3 Crabs. Area rugs, furniture, ArtDeco buffet, dressers, Shoeshine chair, A/C, Vintage items, CB Radio, shotgun, Porch sw i n g , M a t t r e s s e s , Mirrors, 2005 Chevy PU (no kid stuff) Ca$h only.

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

MULTI-FAMILY HUGE GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m.,156 Guy Kelly Rd., off Lake Farm Road. Table, tons of kids stuff, household items.

7020 Dogs

AKC show quality, Standard Poodle puppies. Born 11.11.11, 1 black & 3 white. $695 and up/cash. Thurs or weekends 360.582.7203

7025 Farm Animals

& Livestock 2ND SATURDAY BOOK SALE March 10, 10-3 p.m., Se- GRASS HAY: $2.50 per FISHING GEAR: Satisfy quim Librar y. Special bale. (360)460-0462, afyour fishing fantasies this month: Gardening ter 5 p.m. with: Sage 9’ 2-piece fly and crafts. G R A S S H AY: $ 4 . 5 0 rod, 10 weight, graphite 3 RPLX, $300. Temple Bell Hill Moving Sale. bale. 360-452-8713 or 360-808-1842 Fork 14’ 4-piece Spey fly 816 Washington Place, r o d , 9 w e i g h t , $ 1 5 0 . S e q u i m , Fr i - S a t , M a r HAY: Good quality grass Both rods like new. 9-10, 9-4 (no earlies): hay. $5.50 bale. (360)457-4288 Nordictrack Eliptical and 360-461-5804 Stationary bike, houseG U N C A B I N E T: 3 7 ” hold items, Mongoose HAY: Grass hay. $4.50 wide x 74” tall. Glass IBOC road bike, pre-lit front, locking doors, with Christmas trees, otto- bale. (360)683-8352. b o t t o m c a b i n e t , a l s o mans, clothing, etc. HAY: Quality grass hay. locking. $150/obo. $5 bale. 808-1052. (360)582-0339 GARAGE Sale: Friday PLACE YOUR WANTED: Guns. One or only, 8-2 p.m. 80 Burnt AD ONLINE whole collection. New Mountain Place, off River Rd. and Silberhorn, With our new and old, but older the follow signs. Bike rack, Classified Wizard b e t t e r. E s t a t e s e t t l e lots of baby and kids you can see your ments. Call 452-1016. ad before it prints! items and toys, double www.peninsula stroller, play pen in great www.peninsula dailynews.com shape, mainly kid’s stuff. dailynews.com


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 8, 2012 B7

23560600-3/4

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

LOG HOMES

SERVICES

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Window Washing

Baur Log Homes

Jami’s

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

Lund Fencing

Pressure Washing Roof & Gutter Cleaning

HOME REPAIR

Done Right Home Repair

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair Larry Muckley

681-0132

Visit our website www.dungenesslandscaper.com Certified Horticultural Specialist

Lena Washke

Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

Accounting Services, Inc.

Licensed – Bonded – Insured

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR –

21575023

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

river1966@msn.com Lic# DELUNE*933QT

We recently moved downstairs. Stop by and see our new suite of offices. 3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

360/460•9824

Full 6 Month Warranty

21575014

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

SPANISH CLASSES

ALL LEVELS

Top Soil, Compost, Firbark, Sand Drain Rock, Crushed Rock, Wall Rock And More...

WE DO LANDSCAPING

HOME WATCH

ROOFING

FREE

Need A NEW NEW ROOF? ROOF?

WINDOW WASHING

in a new location with new prices.

360.912.2371 Lic#PENINCR890DM

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

Dry Wall Repair

Removal of popcorn or acoustic ceilings Removal of wallpaper • Repair of cracks and holes • Texture to match

Expert Pruning

683-8328 PA & PT

$100 FOR 4 WEEKS!

Peninsula Since 1988

Interior Painting Orange Peel - Knock Down - Hand Trowel

21569329

22583759

Mole Control

FOR

AS LITTLE AS

Painting The

MOLE/PRUNING

#JKDIRKD942NG

ADVERTISE DAILY

23590099

March 1

st

Free Estimate PENINSULA ROOFING

contact@jkdirtworks.com

235900104

Classes start on

23590097

OFF

ANY NEW ROOF!

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER LIC

PAINTING

$500

Print out coupons from our website.

for Delivery

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

21575012

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

Now Offering

LANDSCAPE PRODUCTS

21572253

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

Contr#KENNER1951P8

EXCAVATING

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

DIRT WORK

Small Jobs A Specialty

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

22588172

Deluna ’s Ent erpris e T REE S ERVIC E

anthonystreetop@gmail.com

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

SPECIALIZING IN TREES

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

COLUMC*955KD

TREE SERVICE

(360) 460-0518

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

Free Estimates Plants • Design Construction Sprinkler Systems

TREE SERVICE

22588182

AA

. 35 yrse on th la su Penin

Reg#FINIST*932D0

(360) 477-1805

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

FREE ES AT ESTIM

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Columbus Construction

Cockburn.INC

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

APPLIANCES

REPAIR/REMODEL

LANDSCAPING

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

LARRYHM016J8

tmccurdy@olypen.com

Landscapes by

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

(360) 683-8332

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

125111256

Port Angeles Sequim Glen Spear Port Townsend Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

Larry’s Home Maintenance

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

22585523

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

582-0384

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

PAINTING

21572242

22588145

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

No Job Too Small

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

23590413

360-460-6176

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

#BAURLH*023DJ

LAWN CARE No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

Home & Bus.

360-681-7878

2 23590158

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

24 yrs. experience

Paul Baur, owner 22588184

#LUNDFF*962K7

Call Bryan or Mindy 22588179

452-0755 775-6473

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

23590152

Moss Prevention

Chad Lund

21575016

www.LundFencing.com

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

1C562786

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE ✔ Rates starting at $15 hr. ✔ Senior Discount ✔ Yard Service ✔ Odd Jobs ✔ Hauling ✔ Brush Removal ✔ Hedge Trimming ✔ Roof/Gutter Cleaning ✔ Tree Pruning

Sign up for Exterior Painting NOW!

3Licensed 6 0and. Bonded 452 .7938 Contr. #ESPAI*122BJ

RATES

1 1 1 2 2 2

AND SIZES: X 1” X 2” X 3” X 1” X 2” X 3”

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON advertise call PENINSULA To360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 DAILY NEWS

Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go! We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale. Say as much as you want* for 2 days

Only $20.95

Make easy cash – invest in Peninsula Classified.

4B235385

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

*15 line maximum


B8 Thursday, March 8, 2012

What’s New?

Classified

@ www.peninsuladailynews.com THINGS TO DO

The Peninsula’s comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds, updated daily.

CLALLAM CRIME TRACKER

Use the map to find the location of theft, assaults, sex offenders & more.

Palomino Shetland/Mini For Sale. Angel is a perfe c t fa m i l y p o n y. We bought her for our 3 girls to learn to ride on. Our 2 y r. o l d g o e s o u t a n d feeds her. She comes with 2 child western saddles, 2 br idals and 1 pony blanket. $750. (360)457-8999

Siberian Husky Puppy Purebred Siberian H u s k y P u p p y. A K C sired. Female 6 weeks old. red and white. House Broke. 1st shots. Puppy Kit included. $850 Call Mike 360-640-5338. Serious buyers only.

9820 Motorhomes

MINI POODLES Adorable Mini Poodles looking for there forever home. 9 weeks old, party colors apricot/white. 4 boys left star ted potty training. Mom and dad on site, very loving $290. Janet at 360-808-0105.

Subscribe and pay for your home delivery online.

NW FARM TERRIER 3 pups left to approved homes. 2 tri-colors, 1 red, excellent pups. 10 weeks old. Shots, wormed. Early training. $400. 417-0605.

17www-PDN

DAILY DEALS

Local businesses offer 50% off on products and services.

And don’t forget:

Breaking Local News 24/7

9817 Motorcycles

TRAILER: ‘03 29’ Terry. Dbl door, front Br., large slide, great for living or pulling. $9,200. 457-9038

OLYMPIC: ‘98 22’ Re- SUZUKI: ‘03 DRZ 400 sorter. 200 hp Evinrude. Dual Spor t. Excellent $22,000/obo. 477-5568. shape, lots of upgrades, s e r v i c e d r e g u l a r l y. YA M A H A : ‘ 0 9 R h i n o $3,200/obo. 683-8027. Sport ATV 700. Excellent cond., $8,500. YAMAHA: ‘07 TW 200. 9802 5th Wheels 670-6100 or 457-6906. 1,050 mi., saddle bags and Versahaul carrier. $2,500. 360-477-9339. 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big 9817 Motorcycles Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, spacious, beautiful! 9030 Aviation $18,000. 461-3980.

VW: ‘85 Westfalia Vanagon camper. Good cond. $7,500/obo. (360)385-4680 5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th Wheel. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has ever ything you’ll need for a comfortable vacation. $4,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. at 360-460-2634

9050 Marine Miscellaneous B OAT / T R A I L E R : 2 4 ’ Road Runner trailer, tandem axle, serge brakes, fully galvanized, 8,500 lb. rated, excellent cond, comes with 24’ cuddy cabin Seabird, 383 Chev. I/O, 20 hp electric start kicker, electronics, downriggers and more. First $4,000. 797-7446.

SAFARI SERENGETI: Ivory Edition, 1997 40’ D i e s e l P u s h e r, p r o f. decorated, low miles, lg. slide. $69,500. For info D U R A B OAT: ‘ 0 8 1 4 ’ & photos, contact: aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, PLPatt2@yahoo.com PARROTS: Proven Pair trailer. $1,500. or 360-683-2838 of Lilac Crown Amazons 360-580-1741 must stay together-$750. 9832 Tents & DURABOAT: 14’ 20 hp Rare Female Hawk Merc less than 20 hrs., Travel Trailers Head, $750. Bonded xtras. $3,200. 452-8092. Pa i r o f Ye l l o w H e a d Amazons, $450/obo. CARGO TRAILER: 16’ D U R O B OAT: 1 2 ’ . 1 5 360-452-8092 Mirage ‘07. Tool cabs and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calbuilt in. Great tires, few kins trailer. $1,500. 683P U P P I E S : P u r e b r e d dings. $3,200. 683-3219. 6748. Chocolate Lab, 8 wks. old, dewclaws removed, T E N T T R A I L E R : ‘ 0 8 LIVINGSTON: 12’ 18 hp 1st shots, wormed, 1 fe- R o c k w o o d Fr e e d o m , N i s s a n O / B, c ove r e d male. $350. used twice. $6,000. steering station. $1,250. (360)775-8207 (360)681-2329 (360)452-6714

A powerful tool for connecting people. List services you need. Service providers will bid on them. View the hottest real estate deals on the North Olympic Peninsula, updated weekly.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9808 Campers & Canopies

LABS: 1 black male, 3 yrs old. 1 yellow female, 4 yrs old. Both purebred. $100 for both. (360)301-6990

Place your classified ad online 24/7.

Celebrate your loved one’s life, share memories and connect with friends and family.

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES HOT PROPERTIES

7035 General Pets

7035 General Pets

View, share and purchase PDN local news and sports pictures. Put your favorite photo on a mug!

ONLINE OBITUARIES WHO CAN HELP?

7030 Horses

Jefferson County Crime Tracker coming soon.

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE PHOTO GALLERY

Peninsula Daily News

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Road King FLHRI 4,950 miles! Fuel-Injection, removable windshield, foot pegs, back rest,hard saddle bags, foot boards, heel-shift, oval-tip pipes,and many other extras. $10,900. 360-808-4176

U LT R A L I T E : Av e n g er/Hurricane, 503 Rotax engine, low hours, 10 gal. tank, new tires, 4 yr. old sails, always hangered, full instruments i n c l u d i n g C H T, E G T, RPM, airspeed recording G meter, hr meter, hydraulic disc brakes, balH O N DA : ‘ 0 5 C R 8 5 R . l i s t i c c h u t e s. $ 8 , 5 0 0 / Low hours, never raced. obo. 360-374-2668 or $1,500/trade. 360-640-1498 ask for 360-460-6148 Carl. HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. Runs good, looks fair. 9740 Auto Service $575. 683-9071. & Parts QUAD: ‘07 Yamaha 700 Raptor. Like new, extras. $5,500 firm. 452-3213. SCOOTER: Honda Reflex, side car, helmets. $3,500. (806)778-2797. SUZUKI: ‘02 DRZ 400 d u a l s p o r t . Ve r y l o w miles, super clean, extras. $3,750. 360-457-8556 360-460-0733

CHEV: 350 small block, fresh build, long block. Hear it run. $1,500. (360)683-8183 from 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

23594219

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS 1999 FORD RANGER EXT CAB XLT 2WD

2001 CHEVROLET S10 LS PICKUP 2WD

2001 TOYOTA COROLLA LE SEDAN

2004 DODGE 1500 QUAD CAB SB LIFTED 4X4

3.0L V6, AUTO, CHROME WHLS, MATCHING FIBERGLASS CANOPY, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, AC, CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, LIKE-NEW COND INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 86K MILES! SHOWS THE VERY BEST OF CARE! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

2.2L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, CD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB VALUE OF $6,611! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! SAVE GAS WITH A 4 CYLINDER! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

1.8L VVT-I 4 CYL, AUTO, NEW TIRES, KEYLESS ENTRY/ALARM SYS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 81K MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! GREAT GAS MILEAGE! YOU WON’T FIND ONE NICER THAN THIS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

5.7L HEMI V8, AUTO, BIG LIFT KIT, BRAND NEW 37” TOYO MUD TERRAINS! TEFLON-COATED ALLOYS, DUAL EXHAUST, K&N SHORT-RAM INTAKE, OPTIMA BATTERY, RUNNING BOARDS, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, KEYLESS ENTRY, TINTED WINDOWS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, AC, PIONEER CD, INFO CENT, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, IMMACULATE TRUCK IN AMAZING COND! LOADED W/EXTRAS! NICE BIG LIFT! ONE SWEET RIG!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2002 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

2002 SATURN SL1 SEDAN

2004 FORD F350 LARIAT SUPERCAB LB DUALLY 4X4

2004 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT GLS SEDAN

4.7L V8, AUTO, LOADED! DK MET RED IN EXCELL SHAPE W/ BLACK LEATHER IN GREAT COND! DUAL PWR SEATS, MOONROOF, CD/CASS, CRUISE, TILT W/CTRLS, TINT, SIDE AIRBAGS, ROOF RACK, FACT. 17” CHROME WHLS, 2 OWNER, EXCELL COND! A TON OF JEEP @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

97K ORIG MILES! 1.9L SOHC 4 CYL, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, CD, DUAL AIRBAGS, TINTED WINDOWS, LOCAL TRADE-IN! GREAT LITTLE 34 MPG CAR @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

95K ORIG MILES! 6.0L POWERSTROKE DIESEL! AUTO, LOADED! 2-TONE WHITE/SILVER IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY LEATHER IN EXCELL COND! PWR SEAT, 6 DISC CD, PWR SLIDING WINDOW, TINT, CRUISE, TILT, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, PARKING SENSORS, WOOD TRIM, PREM ALLOYS W/70% RUBBER! 2 OWNERS! OVER $6,000 LESS THAN BOOK @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

79K ORIG MILES! 1.8L DOHC TURBO 4 CYL, TIP-TRONIC AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN GREAT SHAPE W/BLACK LEATHER IN EXCELL COND! CD/CASS W/MONSOON PREM SOUND, MOONROOF, CRUISE, TILT/TELE W/CTRLS, F&R AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, 2 OWNER! GREAT LITTLE 28 MPG SEDAN @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

$7,995

GRAY MOTORS

$6,995

$5,995

GRAY MOTORS

$3,995

$7,995

GRAY MOTORS

$18,995

GRAY MOTORS

$8,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

2006 DODGE STRATUS SXT

2007 HONDA CIVIC LX 4DR

2007 SCION (TOYOTA) tC COUPE

2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS 4DR

2.7L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 31K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER US GOV’T LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! EPA-RATED EXT. 28 MPG HWY! JUST REDUCED!

1.8L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 29K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN! NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! EPA-RATED EST. 40 MPG HWY!

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, PWR MOONROOF, ALLOYS, SIDE AIRBAGS, ****ONLY 4,000 MILES****, VERY, VERY CLEAN LOCAL CAR, SENIOR OWNED GARAGE-KEPT, TRUELY LIKE-NEW COND! SPOTLESS CARFAX, EPA-RATED EXT 30 MPG HWY!

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, ONSTAR-READY, SIDE AIRBAGS, BAL OF FACT 5/100 WARR, ONLY 25K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! EPA EST. 31 MPG HWY! JUST REDUCED!

Expires 4/5/12

$9,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Expires 4/5/12

$14,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$15,495

Expires 4/5/12

$14,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

Expires 4/5/12

$14,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-417-3541 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Find repair procedures online Dear Doctor: I own a 2008 BMW 5 Series and try to do most of the maintenance myself. The service light illuminated on the dash panel, so I called the local shop to find out how to reset the light, and he said to check with the dealer. I called the dealer, and it said it would be $75 to reset the light. Where can I get the procedure and tuneup specifications? Gary Dear Gary: The best and easiest way to locate any and all information for any vehicle is by subscribing to Alldata. The cost of a one-year subscription is $25 for your vehicle. With this subscription, you get any information you want online (www.alldata. com) with downloadable and printable troubleshooting procedures. I use Alldata on a regular basis to assist my readers with repair questions for this advice column.

THE AUTO DOC gasoline. As you Damato know, the price of gas is out of sight — and premium gas is 20 to 40 cents higher than regular. Is there any longterm damaging effect using the 87-octane gasoline in our BMW and Lexus? Gerald Dear Gerald: All of my own personal vehicles also require 93-octane gasoline. My wife wanted to start using 87 octane, too. I will tell you the same thing I told her: no. The higher-octane gasoline burns hotter, slower and cleaner than the loweroctane gas. The higher-octane gas leaves less carbon and deposits on the internal combustion area.

Junior

93-octane gas use

Full-synthetic worth it

Dear Doctor: My car, along with my wife’s car, according to the owner’s manual needs 93-octane

Dear Doctor: I read your column every week. Is full-synthetic oil really worth the extra price over

the regular petroleum-based oil? I have gotten many different opinions on the subject. What are your views on this subject? Ronda Dear Ronda: There is no question in my mind that full-synthetic oil is worth the extra expense, and yes, it will improve gas mileage. The mileage increase will vary from car to car. Driving habits, tire inflation, clean air filter and fresh spark plugs also contribute to fuel mileage. The full-synthetic oil does not thicken in cold weather and makes cold weather start-ups easier on the electrical system and internal engine parts. Many car manufacturers are now using full-synthetic oils, even entry-level vehicles, not just the high-line vehicles. Some manufacturers are even using full-synthetic transmission and differential oils.

Four-cylinder power Dear Doctor: What can you tell me about the new Jeep Compass 4x4 with the four-cylinder engine? Sherry Dear Sherry: There is no question that with the

price of gas rising daily, people who want a 4x4 are now showing interest in four-cylinder power. In years past, four-cylinder engines had trouble moving front-drive vehicles, let alone 4x4 vehicles. I had the Jeep Compass Latitude 2.4-liter four-cylinder CVT automatic and 4x4 option for a week and was surprised in all areas, including the power and performance. A low entry point into the cabin seating and rear tailgate area make it userfriendly for many types of buyers and passengers. The suspension is unlike the hard, bouncy Jeeps of yesteryear. Pricing on our test Jeep was $23,445, plus $780 destination. The Compass city mileage was 23 mpg and 27 mpg highway. Our average combined driving was 25 mpg.

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

9740 Auto Service 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks & Parts Others Others Others Others PARTS: ‘73 Dodge Slant 6 engine and transmission. $300. Chevy MSD ignition 6AL, complete, $300. (360)457-6540.

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

Car For Sale. Pontiac Grand Am 4D 2003, 2.2 L 4 Cyc., Plus extra 4 new snow tires. 133,000 CHEV: ‘58 Bel Aire sport miles. No problems, well coupe, 350 cu, 3 spd, maintained, runs great. new stuff, nice car. $4,300. 518-396-0419. $15,000. (360)504-2440 CHEV: ‘84 El Camino FORD: ‘23 T Bucket. Conquista. New exaFiberglass body, 350 haust, shocks, starter. Chev engine, auto, $1,300. (360)452-2575. wheelie bars. $14,000. CHRYSLER: ‘04 Cross(360)477-1777 before fire, 80K, 6 sp, excellent. 7 p.m. $12,000. 452-8092. FORD: ‘27 T Bucket. Blower, new brakes and wiring, all steel body. $17,500. Before 7 p.m. (360)477-1777.

DODGE: ‘96 Intrepid. Runs great! $1,800/obo. (360)461-3980 FIAT: ‘80 convertible. Needs a loving owner. $1,500. (360)582-7727.

SATURN: ‘96 SL wagon. CHEV ‘95 C2500 LONG Auto, body/interior excelBED 2WD lent, needs mechanical 7.4 liter V8 engine, auto work. $900. 457-3425. trans, tow package, trailer brake controller, bed SUBARU: ‘92 Legacy mat, power door locks wagon. Needs love! and windows, air condi$500. (360)461-3980. tioning, cruise, cassette stereo, vinyl floor, cloth TOYOTA ‘98 AVALON seat. Only 83,000 miles! XLS SEDAN 3.0 liter V6, automatic, Great condition inside alloy wheels, sunroof, and out! Great allkeyless entry, power around truck! Ready to windows, door locks and work and priced to sell! mirrors, power program- Stop by Gray Motors tomable leather seats, day! $3,995 cruise, tilt, air, CD/casGRAY MOTORS sette stereo, dual front 457-4901 airbags. Priced at Kelley graymotors.com Blue Book! Only 85,000! Like new inside and out! DODGE: ‘02 Dakota One owner! You won’t SLT. 4x4, 4.7, Leer find on this nice any- canopy. $10,000/obo. where else! Stop by (360)963-2156 Gray Motors today! $7,995 DODGE: ‘07 Durango. GRAY MOTORS White, gray leather int., 457-4901 87K, power, exc. cond., graymotors.com seats 8. $15,500. 460-6155 VOLVO: 2001 Volvo S4. For Sale: 2001 Volvo FORD: ‘01 F250 Super S4. Black 4 door. Sun- Cab. 4x4, camper shell, roof. 97K miles. Excel- cargo rack, 12K lbs warn lent condition! Carefully winch, 116K mi. $9,950. maintained. $4,000 or (360)821-1278 best reasonable offer. Call 360-385-6386. FORD: ‘60 F100. CC, BBW 292V8 3spd. VW: ‘84 Rabbit. 2 door $1,750/trade. 681-2382. auto, reliable, 40 mpg, on local rebuilt engine. FORD: ‘68 1/2 ton. Re$2,500/obo. 457-4577. built 300 ci, 6 cyl, 4 sp man., clear title with 9410 Pickup Trucks parts truck. $1,500. 360-808-2563 Dodge

Car of the Week

2012 Volvo S60 BASE PRICE: $31,300 for T5; $38,450 for base T6; $42,950 for R-Design. PRICE AS TESTED: $47,325. TYPE: Front-engine, all-wheel-drive, five-passenger, mid-size, performance sedan. ENGINE: 3-liter, double overhead cam, turbocharged and intercooled, inline six cylinder with CVVT. MILEAGE: 18 mpg (city), 26 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 134 mph. LENGTH: 182.2 inches. WHEELBASE: 109.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,877 pounds. BUILT IN: Ghent, Belgium. OPTIONS: Multimedia package (includes premium sound system, rear park assist camera, navigation system) $2,700; climate package (includes heated front seats and windshield washer nozzles, headlight washers) $800. DESTINATION CHARGE: $875. The Associated Press

9556 SUVs Others FORD ‘03 ESCAPE XLT 4X4 SPORT UTILITY 3.0 liter 24V V6, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air, 6 CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,736! Clean inside and out! Only 94,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

GMC: ‘80 3/4 ton with lift FORD: ‘90 Bronco Eddie on back. Runs good. Bauer. EFI 5.8, OD, po$1,500/obo. 808-6893. si., CD, clean, straight, GMC: ‘94 Sierra SLE. exc! $2,500. 808-0153. 2WD, 3/4 ton, long bed, JEEP: ‘07 Wrangler. w/shell, tow pkg. 122K. 45K mi. Excellent cond., $3,850. (360)681-7055. 4 door, new tires/brakes. $18,000. (360)461-4799. MAZDA: ‘84 Pickup. $1,950. (360)452-5126. SUZUKI: ‘89 Sidekick. MAZDA: ‘88 pickup with 4WD, 2 dr, convertible. $2,950. (360)460-6308. Topper. Very clean. $1,500. (806)778-2797.

9556 SUVs Others

B9

9730 Vans & Minivans Others

CHEV ‘00 VENTURE LT MINIVAN CADILLAC: ‘02 Escalade. Black, 6.0L V8, 3.4 liter V6 engine, alloy 135K, totally loaded. wheels, privacy glass, tow package, keyless $9,250. (360)477-5129. entry, power windows, CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe 4x4. door locks, and mirrors, Low mi., great shape. power sliding door, $7,800/obo. Call before cruise, tilt, air, rear air, 7 p.m. 360-477-6969. CD/cassette stereo, inFORD: ‘84 Bronco 4x4. 300-SIX, 4 speed gran- CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe LT. formation center, dual front airbags. Kelley ny. $999/obo/trade. 4WD, 164K. $6,000. Blue Book value of (360)681-2382 (360)477-2501 $7,047! Only 77,000 miles! Sparkling clean CHEV: ‘88 S-10 Blaz- inside and out! 8 recliner. 4WD, 2 dr, auto, ing seats! Stop by Gray runs, great tires. $995. Motors today! (360)670-9840 $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 FORD: ‘84 F250. graymotors.com $4,500. 417-1587. CHRYSLER: ‘05 Town FORD: ‘85 F250 diesel. and Country LTD. 1 Utility box, runs good. CHEV: ‘91 K5 Blazer. owner, great cond. $3,500/obo. 460-0357. 93k, Immaculate. Load- 73,200 miles. $10,500. ed, ALL original, 350FI, 360-683-1957 FORD: ‘91 Bronco. Body Auto, 4x4, adult owned, and interior are in good non smoker, never off FORD: ‘93 Aerostar Ext. condition. Needs a new roaded. Cargo van. 3.0L, V6, Build sheet, steering column. About owner’s and shop manu- shelving and headache 70,000 miles on the en- als. Runs and Drives rack, ladder rack, runs gine. Selling as is. Like New. $9,500. good, 5 speed stick. $2,500/obo. Call Kim af$1,500/obo. 360-452-7439 ter 6 p.m. at 360-808-6706 360-460-2634 JEEP: ‘97 Grand Cherokee Limited Edition 4X4, TOYOTA: ‘98 Sienna. FORD: ‘96 Ranger Su- automatic, well main- 218K, strong, tow pkg., per cab, 4x4, 76K, exc. tained. $3,500. great running/looking. $6,650. (806)778-2797. $2,750. (360)301-3223. 360-809-3175

Whether you are selling or buying, browsing or creating, looking or booking… classified has it all! As low as 4 days for $16.50

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

4C235413

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

4C235420

FORD: ‘28 2 dr sedan, restored in 1980, + parts FORD: ‘00 Exporer XLS. $15,000/obo. 452-8092. 4WD, auto, V6, 4.0L, great condition, 170K. FORD: ‘51 2 dr, orig., 6 $2,800. (360)417-9137. cyl., needs restoration, 3 FORD: ‘07 Mustang consp. $2,000. 452-8092. vertible. Mint condition, FORD: ‘54 F7 water low mi., spoilers, side air truck, 283, restored, 2x4 bags, always garaged. spd. $3,500. 452-8092. $26,000. 683-5682 or (541)980-5210 cell NASH: ‘47. 4 dr suicide doors. See to appre- FORD: ‘54 Victoria. New ciate! $1,000. 670-8285. 302/4 speed $15,000/ PONTIAC: ‘78 Firebird obo. 360-504-5664. Formula. California car, FORD: ‘64 1/2 Mustang. no rust. $5,500. Has not been restored. 360-457-6540 $3,500. 670-6100 or 457-6906. DODGE: ‘00 Dakota 9254 Automobiles quad cab. 92K, exc. Jaguar JAGUAR: ‘90 XJS cond., matching canopy, Coupe. Black, tan int., Rhinoguard, auto, CD, only 42K mi., car is A/C, cruise, extra set JAGUAR: ‘90 XJS tires/wheels. like brand new in/out, snow Coupe. Black, tan int., mechanically. $11,750 $7,200/obo. 477-9755 only 42K mi., car is Call John, Euro Auto like brand new in/out, Works: 683-3876. 9434 Pickup Trucks mechanically. $11,750 Call John, Euro Auto MERCURY: ‘04 Grand Others Works: 683-3876. Marquis LS. 58K mi. CHEV: ‘01 Silverado $7,900/obo. 457-4668. 1500. V8, 4.8L, 4x4, au9292 Automobiles NISSAN: ‘01 Altima to, 152K, tool box, good Others cond. $5,200. 477-5775. GXE 4 door. 65K, auto. $6,500. (360)683-3015. BUICK: ‘95 LeSabre. Leather interior, power OLDS: ‘85 Cutlass Suseats and windows, preme. 72+K mi., 3.8L. cruise control. $3,500. $2,500. (360)461-4194. Chris (360)683-8119 PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero. CADILLAC: ‘97. 108 K 91K miles, well taken miles. Runs great. care of. Great Gift! Col$3,500. 360-797-4843. lector’s item! Good mpg! CHEV: ‘98 S-10 Ext Cab many extras call for info $3,000. 775-9754. GEO: ‘96 Metro. Auto, 4 $4,500. 360-460-2362. dr, 147K, 30 mpg, runs PONTIAC: ‘96 Boneville 01 Explorer great, good cond. Must SE. Looks and runs FORD: great, all options. Sport truck. 148K mi., see to believe! $2,300. V6. $6,100. 670-3361. $1,600/obo. 670-2092. (360)417-0288

FORD: ‘99 F350, 4X4 Crew Cab, 7.3 Powestroke, all stock, 172,000, auto trans, gold/tan color with tan leather. Good brakes, new plugs and U joints. 70% tires. priced to sell. $10,500. 360-477-7243

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescis sion of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


B10

WeatherNorthwest

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

High 48

Low 37

47/33

46/35

45/31

45/35

Partly sunny.

Becoming cloudy with a few showers late.

Rather cloudy with a couple of showers.

Mostly cloudy with spotty showers.

Cloudy and chilly with a chance of rain.

Rather cloudy, rain possible; breezy.

The Peninsula A ridge of high pressure aloft will remain over the Pacific Northwest today, while surface high pressure slides to the southeast into the Great Basin. This will provide a partly sunny and rain-free day across the Peninsula with slightly milder temperatures. Afternoon highs will be in the upper 40s to the middle 50s in most places. The next storm system will bring increasing amounts of clouds tonight. There will be a couple of showers later at night and during the day Friday. Yet another storm system will bring a couple of showers on Saturday.

Victoria 54/35 Neah Bay 51/42

Port Townsend 52/41

Port Angeles 48/37

Sequim 52/40

Forks 55/41

Port Ludlow 54/40

Olympia 57/36

Seattle 54/40

Spokane 47/30

Yakima Kennewick 51/27 52/31

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š 2012

Marine Forecast Partly sunny today. Wind from the southeast at 3-6 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Increasing cloudiness tonight with a couple of showers late. Wind south at 6-12 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mostly cloudy tomorrow with a couple of showers. Wind south-southwest 6-12 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 2 miles at times. TABLE Location High Tide LaPush

12:12 a.m. 12:17 p.m. Port Angeles 2:33 a.m. 2:22 p.m. Port Townsend 4:18 a.m. 4:07 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:39 a.m. 3:28 p.m.

TODAY Ht 8.4’ 8.6’ 7.2’ 6.6’ 8.7’ 8.0’ 8.2’ 7.5’

TOMORROW

Low Tide 6:13 a.m. 6:32 p.m. 8:32 a.m. 8:41 p.m. 9:46 a.m. 9:55 p.m. 9:39 a.m. 9:48 p.m.

National Forecast Thursday, March 8, 2012 Seattle 54/40 Billings 56/36

San Francisco 62/43

SATURDAY

Ht

High Tide

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

0.5’ -0.2’ 2.1’ 1.0’ 2.7’ 1.3’ 2.5’ 1.2’

12:49 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 3:01 a.m. 3:22 p.m. 4:46 a.m. 5:07 p.m. 4:07 a.m. 4:28 p.m.

8.8’ 8.6’ 7.3’ 6.6’ 8.8’ 8.0’ 8.3’ 7.5’

6:59 a.m. 7:13 p.m. 9:14 a.m. 9:23 p.m. 10:28 a.m. 10:37 p.m. 10:21 a.m. 10:30 p.m.

-0.1’ 0.0’ 1.2’ 1.7’ 1.6’ 2.2’ 1.5’ 2.1’

High Tide Ht 1:26 a.m. 1:54 p.m. 3:31 a.m. 4:23 p.m. 5:16 a.m. 6:08 p.m. 4:37 a.m. 5:29 p.m.

9.0’ 8.3’ 7.5’ 6.6’ 9.0’ 8.0’ 8.5’ 7.5’

Low Tide Ht 7:44 a.m. 7:54 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:07 p.m. 11:14 a.m. 11:21 p.m. 11:07 a.m. 11:14 p.m.

-0.5’ 0.4’ 0.5’ 2.5’ 0.7’ 3.2’ 0.7’ 3.0’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Denver 36/25

Moon Phases Last

New

Mar 14

Mar 22

First

Mar 30

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 56 53 sh Baghdad 71 50 s Beijing 44 24 c Brussels 44 32 sh Cairo 72 53 pc Calgary 52 39 pc Edmonton 45 33 s Hong Kong 77 70 r Jerusalem 60 46 s Johannesburg 80 57 t Kabul 46 20 s London 50 41 pc Mexico City 80 48 pc Montreal 52 27 r Moscow 16 3 c New Delhi 83 49 pc Paris 50 34 sh Rio de Janeiro 84 70 s Rome 57 42 sh Stockholm 34 27 pc Sydney 72 65 r Tokyo 52 47 c Toronto 50 30 r Vancouver 52 39 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

$IIRUGDEOH'HQWXUHV$QG,PSODQWV 7R/RRN$QG(DW<RXU%HVW

Los Angeles 78/52

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Washington 72/48

Kansas City 48/32

Atlanta 71/58

Houston 78/57

Fronts Cold

Miami 82/72

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 40 25 56 71 65 70 55 56 44 51 64 54 77 37 46 58 46 57 68 36 54 53 55 13 54 80 78 41

Lo 27 13 42 58 50 49 30 36 17 34 42 28 56 19 25 33 27 36 41 25 28 30 39 -7 24 67 57 34

W sn pc pc pc pc pc s s pc s pc r c pc r r s pc t c pc r s c s pc c sn

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 48 62 72 78 82 42 40 68 78 69 52 53 83 74 71 70 57 71 55 64 56 42 78 72 62 46 39 72

Lo 32 48 42 52 72 24 17 41 65 44 38 29 63 55 46 52 38 54 26 36 34 27 45 51 43 22 27 48

W r s t s sh pc pc r pc pc r pc c s pc s s pc s s r pc t s s pc s pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 90 at Fort Stockton, TX

Low: -20 at West Yellowstone, MT

:K\VNLSIRRGV\RXORYHRU IHHOHPEDUUDVVHGWRVPLOH" )5((HYDOXDWLRQ&DOOWRGD\

*UHJ%DUU\''6

1C564290

4XDOLW\PDNHVDELJGLIIHUHQFHLQWKHORRNVÂżWFRPIRUWDQG IXQFWLRQ\RXÂśOOH[SHULHQFH:HKHOS\RXDIIRUGWKHEHVW\RXU EXGJHWDOORZV6HHRQHSUDFWLWLRQHUSD\RQHSULFHIRU\RXU SHUVRQDOL]HGWUHDWPHQWÂąSUHSDUDWLRQÂżWWLQJDQGIROORZXSV

New York 69/44 Detroit 53/30

El Paso 56/31

Sunset today ................... 6:09 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:39 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 7:14 p.m. Moonset today ................. 6:22 a.m.

Full

Minneapolis 40/17 Chicago 46/25

Sun & Moon

Mar 8

Everett 52/40

Shown is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather.

TIDE

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 45 33 0.00 4.10 Forks* 45 24 0.01 31.06 Seattle 45 29 0.00 10.83 Sequim 46 29 0.01 3.55 Hoquiam 46 27 0.00 17.79 Victoria 45 27 0.00 9.03 P. Townsend* 43 33 0.00 4.51 *Data from Tuesday

-10s -0s

Bellingham 53/39 Aberdeen 55/44

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

 

0DMRUFUHGLWFDUGVRUWHUPVRQDSSURYDO

Briefly . . . Scholarship fund accepts applications PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; First Presbyterian Church of Port Townsend is accepting applications for the Sarah â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dustyâ&#x20AC;? Westall Scholarship. This scholarship is for students of East Jefferson County who will attend a Christian college. Preference is given to students participating in First Presbyterian Church of Port Townsend.

Westall was a longtime member of the church and a beloved and skilled primaryschool teacher in Port Townsend. Before her death in 2009, Westall expressed the desire to assist in the educational pursuits of Christian students in East Jefferson County. Through her generous gift, the church established the endowed scholarship fund. The deadline for applications is April 16. Visit fpcpt.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Traveling pottyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The

Solution to Puzzle on A7 B A S E H I T

T W O D

R E I N

E P I T O M E

S O P H I S T

O H I O

I C I L Y

H I L L T O P

A S S I S T S

A M E I L L O C P I N G O S I N M A L I T I L L C R A D S A T E O C A N T L K S A I S T H O H M O O U R E A A M B U S B E E N T H A T T O N E E L S M E T A L I A L I T P A D

L L C U E O N A G L K L O Y A N R A Z Y E K E S O S I V E W D M I U S E M A I R L L Y M S O A S R H E W I A L O E C A R K I N G E N I R E N

A L A S K A F I X A T E D O N O T T O

P R I M O R D A S S O F W T A S B B S B O U T Y L A N C O O I O S T H O U T A N N I D T S R O P E A N T H A S B O O S O L A E T A L K D U T Y W N I O T H E W O I M O D S U N

G R I S S O M

M O N I Q U E

Y E A S T

O A R S

U R S A

R I P P I N G

I N A S N I T

A G R E E T O

D E N S

Port Angeles Association of Realtors Relay For Life teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;traveling pottyâ&#x20AC;? fundraiser will be back by pop-

ular demand from Monday to Friday, March 23. To request the traveling potty be delivered to some-

Painting Season is Here

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Time Painters Day Open House to Paint Wed., March 14 the House!

Port Angeles (360-4527176)

Come to Angeles Millwork to learn about: 9Parker Paint and Superdeck stain 9 Meet our Parker Paint reps 9 Enter our drawing for Parker Paint 9 Receive 15% OFF paint & stain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; single gallons & five gallons! NEED A PROFESSIONAL PAINTER? Come talk to painting pros about your project: 9 J Power Painting, John Pearce, 670-5319

9 Northwestern Painting, Ryan McGarvie, 460-9257

SAVE

15%

â&#x2013;  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Act of Valorâ&#x20AC;? (R)

Port Townsend (360385-1089)

ON 1 & 5 GALLONS OF

PAINT & STAIN Applies to regular retail price, March 14-17, excludes primer. Limited to stock on hand. Coupon valid at Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. and Hartnagel Building Supply.

Clip & Save!

Authorized Dealers of Parker Paint

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Separationâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Albert Nobbsâ&#x20AC;? (R)

â&#x2013;  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Loraxâ&#x20AC;? (PG)

23593411c

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Loraxâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeanceâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goneâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Journey 2: The Mysterious Islandâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safe Houseâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Vowâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Project Xâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wanderlustâ&#x20AC;? (R)

â&#x2013;  The Rose Theatre,

FREE Event

from 11 am to 2 pm

Now Showing â&#x2013;  Deer Park Cinema,

minimum donation. All proceeds benefit Relay For Life. Peninsula Daily News

one in Port Angeles, phone Loni Gores at 360-4572000. Deliveries require a $10

1601 S â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;? St., Port Angeles 457-8581 Â&#x2021;angelesmillwork.com

www.facebook.com/ AngelesMillwork.Hartnagel

Thank you for shopping locally at our employee owned and operated stores!


PDN20120308J