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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS April 19-20, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End ARDEN HOME & GAN TS | IID EA S

Bail bondsman from PA killed taking into custody a man who skipped bail. David Brickert, 37, and Wesley Kampen, Brickert 39, were shot and killed Monday night after trying to take into custody Anthony Brian Giunta, 25, at a Phoenix house, 3TV News in Phoenix said. The two reportedly

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PHOENIX — A 1993 Port Angeles High School graduate working as a bail bondsman and a bounty hunter in Phoenix was shot and killed this week while

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struggled with Giunta before handcuffing him and taking him outside. That’s when another man showed up and shot Brickert and Kampen, Phoenix police said. Giunta was arrested, but the unnamed shooter is still on the loose, police said. Brickert, who had lived in Phoenix for at least nine years, leaves behind a fiancee and four children ranging in age from 18 months to 15 years old, said his older brother, Dan Brickert. TURN

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WE ARE IN the midst of one of the best buyer’s markets in recent real estate history, with low interest rates, affordable home prices and significant inventory to select from. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer, homeowner or considering an investment, you don’t want to miss the Peninsula Daily News’ special section today that features information and photos of area open houses this weekend. The 24-page section is loaded with more than 100 open houses to be

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INSIDE: All about homes in two bonus sections! shown Saturday and Sunday by local Realtors during Nationwide Open House Weekend. Also in today’s PDN, get great ideas for spring decorating and landscaping your house with the annual Home & Garden section. Look for both special sections along with regular Friday features Peninsula Spotlight entertainment magazine, Sports Pullout on Page B5, a roundup of things to do this weekend starting on Page B1, plus many other features found only in the PDN.

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Volunteers to converge on coastline

BLOOMING NICE DISPLAY

Tons of trash, debris will be taken off 26 beaches BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Vistas of sea and sand — and plenty of beach debris — await volunteers on the Olympic Peninsula’s Pacific coastline Saturday. During this year’s annual Earth Day Washington Coast Cleanup, 26 beaches are expected to be cleaned of tons of everyday trash and perhaps some debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami, organizers said. The cleanup happens every April on Earth Day. For the years 2000-2012, a total of 10,729 volunteers collected about 320 tons of marine trash. Registrations at www.coastsavers.org allow volunteer beachcleaners to choose spe- ■Local cleanups, other events cific beaches and pro- set across Peninsula/B1 vide detailed information about each beach and its location. Washington CoastSavers, which organizes the cleanup, rated 18 of the beaches in West Clallam and Jefferson counties as offering “easy access� for families and small children. Eight are listed as “challenging.� Volunteers can be asked to make 2-mile hikes to the beach and carry bags full of debris back out of the wilderness areas.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A row of tulips blooms in an outdoor planter at First and Laurel streets in downtown Port Angeles on Thursday. With the coming of spring, flowers are blossoming all over the North Olympic Peninsula.

Lower Elwha ‘cancer fighter’ in good spirits after surgery Derek Charles ‘awake and joking’ after 9½-hour operation

Accepting reservations apy, Levi Charles, Derek Charles’ brother and family spokesman, said Thursday. “Derek is awake and joking around with his nurse already,� Levi Charles D. Charles said. “The nurse said he was great through the night and is going to get out of ICU today already,� he added. “He is in his normal good spirits and looks good for someone who

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man who has been fighting cancer for nearly half his life was recovering Thursday from surgery to remove a stomach tumor. Derek Charles, 39, a Lower Elwha Klallam tribal member, was expected to be moved out of the intensive care unit at Seattle’s University of Washington Medical Center late Thursday, family members said. Doctors felt Wednesday’s surgery successfully removed the tumor that had proven resistant to chemother-

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Those beaches include Shi Shi Beach, Point of Arches, Ozette River South, Sand Point North, Sand Point South, Hole in the Wall and Mosquito Beach South — all of which were still accepting reservations as of Wednesday — as well as Cape Alava, which already was fully staffed. Volunteers can check in between 7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. High tide is at 8:30 a.m. and low tide at 3 p.m., so more beach areas are exposed and accessible in late morning and early afternoon. Check-in locations include Hobuck Beach campground — where the Olympic Peninsula chapter of the Surfrider Foundation will host the beach cleanup — Ozette Ranger Station, Forks Transit Center, Quillayute Fire Hall at the intersection of Mora and LaPush roads, Hoh Reservation and the Kalaloch campground.

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went through a 9½-hour surgery.� The tumor was removed and with it small portions of his liver and small intestine, Levi Charles said. Doctors found radiation damage to his small intestines and hope it heals. But Levi Charles said another surgery to repair his intestines may be needed, he said. Derek Charles began his first battle with cancer when he was 3 years old in 1977. He has spent 18 years of his life dealing with the disease. TURN TO CHARLES/A4

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INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 94th issue — 6 sections, 82 pages

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD

B8 C1 B11 A8 B11 B10 B11 *PS A3

*PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA POLL A2 C3 PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS PULLOUT B5-B7 B12 WEATHER


A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

World, former winners feted in Cannes list THE CANNES FILM Festival’s 2013 lineup announced Thursday features work from some of the globe’s most dangerous locales for artists, and a sprinkling of works by old favorites, including Roman Polanski, the Coen brothers and Steven Soderbergh. Celebrating world cinema from countries with limited freedom of expression is clearly one of this year’s Polanski stories, with 19 films competing for the Palme d’Or, one of cinema’s most coveted prizes. “The festival is a house that shelters artists in danger,” said President Gilles Jacob, who announced the nominees Thursday. Harking from Africa, “Grigris” by Chadian filmmaker Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, will feature alongside “The Life of Adele” from French-Tunisian director Abdellatif Kechiche.

Cannes’ 2013 nominees Nominations for 2013’s Cannes Film Festival, which runs May 15-26 in France, were announced Thursday. Here’s a list of the 19 films that will compete for the top prize, the Palme d’Or: ■ “A Chateau in Italy,” by Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi. ■ “Inside Llewyn Davis,” by Ethan and Joel Coen. ■ “Michael Kohlhaas,” by Arnaud Despallieres. ■ “Jimmy P. (Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian),” by Arnaud Desplechin. ■ “Heli,” by Amat Escalante. ■ “The Past,” by Asghar Farhadi. ■ “The Immigrant,” by James Gray. ■ “Grigris,” by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun. ■ “A Touch of Sin,” by Jia Zhangke. ■ “Like Father, Like Son,” by Kore-Eda Hirokazu. ■ “The Life of Adele,” by Abdellatif Kechiche. ■ “Shield of Straw,” by Takashi Miike. ■ “Young and Pretty,” by Francois Ozon. ■ “Nebraska,” by Alexander Payne. ■ “Venus in Fur,” by Roman Polanski. ■ “Behind the Candelabra,” by Steven Soderbergh. ■ “The Great Beauty,” by Paolo Sorrentino. ■ “Borgman,” by Alex van Warmerdam. ■ “Only God Forgives,” by Nicolas Winding Refn.

Old favorite filmmakers also fared well. Joel and Ethan Coen, who won the Palme d’Or in 1991 for “Barton Fink,” will show their latest film “Inside Llewyn Davis,” set in New York’s 1960s folk music scene, starring Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake and John Goodman. Soderbergh, who caused controversy with 1989’s winner “Sex, Lies and Videotape,” is back with “Behind the Candelabra,” based on

the book by Scott Thorson recounting his relationship with the flamboyant pianist Liberace. Polanski’s “Venus in Fur” could give the Oscar-winning Polish director his second accolade. He won in 2002 with “The Pianist.” Organizers sifted through 1,858 submissions over recent months, some submitted as late as Wednesday night, 12 hours before the official selection would be announced.

Passings

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think the Boston Marathon bombings were orchestrated by foreigners, or were they an “inside job” by Americans? Foreigners

19.5%

Americans Undecided

39.5% 6.9%

Wait and see

34.2%

Total votes cast: 1,434 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

By The Associated Press

GEORGE BEVERLY SHEA, 104, who escaped a life of toil in an insurance office to become a Grammy-winning gospel singer and a longtime associate of the Rev. Billy Graham, appearing before an estimated 200 million people at Graham revival meetings worldwide, died Tuesday in Asheville, N.C. His death was announced by the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association in Charlotte, N.C., of Mr. Shea which Mr. Shea was the official singing voice for more than a half-century. Canadian-born, he lived in Montreat, N.C., for decades, just a mile from the home of Graham, a close friend. Through the Billy Graham crusades, as the stadium-size revival meetings begun by Graham are known, Mr. Shea was perhaps the most widely heard gospel artist in the world, singing before worshipers throughout the United States and around the globe. On a more intimate scale, he sang at the prayer breakfasts of a series of United States presidents, including Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson and the first George Bush.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

Mr. Shea recorded more than 70 albums, including “In Times Like These” (1962), “Every Time I Feel the Spirit” (1972) and “The Old Rugged Cross” (1978). In 1966, he won the Grammy Award for best gospel or other religious recording for his album “Southland Favorites,” recorded with the Anita Kerr Singers. Mr. Shea received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Recording Academy, which administers the Grammys, in 2011.

_________ STORM THORGERSON, 69, an English graphic designer whose eye-popping album art for Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin encapsulated the spirit of 1970s psychedelia, died Thursday. In a statement, Mr. Thorgerson’s family said his death “was peaceful, and he was surrounded by family and friends.” The statement gave few further details but said the artist, who had suffered a

stroke in 2003, had been ill for some time. Even those not familiar with Mr. Mr. Thorgerson Thorgerson’s name in 2008 will have seen his work gracing vinyl collections and CD racks. He was best known for his surreal Pink Floyd covers, which guitarist David Gilmour said had long been “an inseparable part of our work.” Some of Mr. Thorgerson’s covers — the disturbing image of a burning man in a business suit featured on Pink Floyd’s “Wish You Were Here” or the stark prism on the band’s “Dark Side of the Moon” — have become icons in their own right. Mr. Thorgerson also made covers for Led Zeppelin, Peter Gabriel, Phish, Styx and Muse.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

Laugh Lines NORTH KOREAN OFFICIALS reportedly are planning a cyberattack on the U.S. in an effort to bring our economy to a halt. Nice try, guys. You’re five years too late. Jay Leno

A STREET CORNER busker in Port Hadlock whose instrument is an air guitar . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) Bremerton Mayor Jesse Knabb visited city halls in Port Townsend and Port Angeles to confer about telephone service. Knabb said Bremerton’s telephone franchise is expiring shortly, and he is studying franchise ordinances of neighboring cities before framing a new one. Before departing for Hoquiam and Aberdeen, Knabb recalled his first visit to Port Angeles in 1908, when he was a Navy enlisted man aboard the battleship USS Ohio. “Somebody came out to the ship at that time and tried to sell me some lots in Port Angeles,” he laughingly told Port Angeles city commissioners. “I didn’t buy any.”

1963 (50 years ago) Veteran workers of Crown Zellerbach Corp. in Port Angeles were awarded service pins during the com-

pany’s awards banquet. Resident Manager F.W. Flynn presented the awards, including 40-year pins to Earl D. Watson of the wood mill and George C. Johnson of the hydroelectric power division. Flynn went on to describe the newest developments in various Crown Z mills around the nation, including construction of a chemical-producing facility in Port Townsend.

1988 (25 years ago) About a dozen old and severely pruned trees at the shuttered Lincoln School in Port Angeles were cut down. Many of the trees threatened City Light power lines, so a tree-trimming contractor working for the city removed them. A neighborhood group is pressing the Port Angeles School District either to clean up the old schoolhouse, which was closed in the 1970s, or tear the brick building down.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, April 19, the 109th day of 2013. There are 256 days left in the year. Today’s Highlights in History: ■ On April 19, 1993, the 51-day siege at the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas, ended as fire destroyed the structure after federal agents began smashing their way in; dozens of people, including sect leader David Koresh, were killed. ■ On April 19, 1995, a truck bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people. Bomber Timothy McVeigh later was convicted of federal murder charges and executed.

On this date: ■ In 1775, the American Revolutionary War began with the battles of Lexington and Concord. ■ In 1912, a special subcommittee of the Senate Commerce Committee opened hearings in New York into the Titanic disaster. ■ In 1933, the United States went off the gold standard. ■ In 1943, during World War II, tens of thousands of Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto began a valiant but ultimately futile battle against Nazi forces. ■ In 1951, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, relieved of his Far East command by President Harry S. Truman, bade farewell in an address to Congress in which he

quoted a line from a ballad: “Old soldiers never die; they just fade away.” ■ In 1960, South Korean students began an uprising that toppled the government of President Syngman Rhee a week later. ■ In 1973, the science-fiction film “Soylent Green,” starring Charlton Heston, was released. ■ In 1982, astronauts Sally K. Ride and Guion S. Bluford Jr. became the first woman and first African-American to be tapped for U.S. space missions. ■ In 2005, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany was elected pope in the first conclave of the new millennium; he took the name Benedict XVI.

■ Ten years ago: Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo won a new term in an election denounced by opponents as fraudulent. ■ Five years ago: A Russian capsule carrying South Korea’s first astronaut, Yi So-yeon, touched down 260 miles off target in northern Kazakhstan after hurtling through the atmosphere in a bonejarring descent from the international space station. ■ One year ago: Republicans pushed an election-year $46 billion tax cut for most of America’s employers through the House, ignoring a White House veto threat. The measure went down to defeat in the Senate.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for FrIday/Saturday, April 19-20, 2013 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Ricin suspect held in Miss., facing charges

Ex-lawmaker indicted

LAS VEGAS — A former Nevada lawmaker has been indicted on a felony firearms charge stemming from an arrest that began a public spiral that OXFORD, Miss. — A Missis- ended with his expulsion from sippi man charged with mailing the Legislature, authorities said Thursday. letters with suspected ricin to Steven John Brooks, 41, is national leaders believed he had uncovered a conspiracy to sell accused of possession of a firehuman body parts on the black arm by a prohibited person, market, and on Thursday, his which could get him up to four attorney said he maintains he is years in state prison. innocent. A grand jury that indicted Paul Kevin him Wednesday found that he Curtis, 45, shouldn’t have had a gun when wore shackles he was arrested because he and a Johnny used marijuana, Deputy AttorCash T-shirt ney General Thom Gover said. Thursday in a federal courtWife ID’d as driver room. He KAUFMAN, Texas — faces two Authorities said the wife of a charges on Curtis former justice of the peace was accusations of the driver of the vehicle used in threatening President Barack the killing of a North Texas Obama and others. If convicted, he could face up assistant prosecutor. They said she was a passento 15 years in prison. ger when her husband allegedly He did not enter a plea on the two charges. The judge said later shot a district attorney and his wife. a preliminary hearing and a An arrest affidavit shows Kim detention hearing are scheduled Williams implicated husband, for 3 p.m. today. Curtis was arrested Wednes- Eric Williams, as the shooter of day at his home in Corinth and Kaufman County Assistant Diswas being held in the Lafayette trict Attorney Mark Hasse in January and District Attorney County jail in Oxford, Miss. Mike McLelland and wife, CynAn FBI affidavit said Curtis thia, last month. sent three letters with susAuthorities Thursday said pected ricin to Obama, U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker and a Mississippi Kim Williams was the getaway driver when her husband allegjudge. The letters read: edly approached Hasse as he “No one wanted to listen to me before. There are still ‘Miss- walked into work and fatally shot him. ing Pieces.’ Maybe I have your The Associated Press attention now.”

Briefly: World Musharraf flees Pakistan court to avoid arrest

Beatings at orphanage

MOSCOW — Russia’s state investigative agency filed charges against two nurses accused of severely beating three small children at an orphanage, one of them into a coma. ISLAMABAD — Former The Investigative Committee Pakistani military ruler Pervez said Thursday that the two Musharraf and his bodyguards pushed past policemen and sped nurses went on a drinking binge away from court in the country’s and beat a 3-year-old boy and a capital Thursday to avoid arrest 10-month-old girl to stop them from crying. They also wrapped after his bail was revoked in a a 7-month-boy in a blanket and case accusing him of detaining put him in a plastic container to senior judges while in power. silence him. The Russia’s Channel 1 state 69-year-old television said that the youngMusharraf est victim has been taken out of jumped into a coma and is recovering. The black SUV nurses have been on the run. and escaped as a member of his security Canadian election team hung to TORONTO — The eldest son the side of the of late Prime Minister Pierre Musharraf vehicle in a Trudeau is the new leader of dramatic Canada’s once-dominant Liberal scene that was broadcast live on Party after winning a landslide Pakistani TV. vote announced Sunday. He raced to his large comJustin Trudeau, a charispound on the outskirts of Islam- matic member of Parliament abad, which is protected by high since 2008, won 80 percent walls, razor wire and guard tow- party support on the first ballot. ers. He holed up inside as dozThe 41-year-old takes over a ens of police and elite comman- party that dominated Canada dos blocked the main road that for much of the last century but runs to the compound and kept was relegated to third-party stathe converging crowd at bay. tus in the last election. Musharraf, who seized power Pierre Trudeau, who died at in a coup in 1999, returned last age 80 in 2000, was prime minmonth after four years in selfister for almost all of a 16-year imposed exile to try to make a stretch from 1968-1984. political comeback. Pierre Trudeau’s sophistiA Peshawar court Tuesday cated, sometimes irreverent disqualified Musharraf from style fascinated Canada, but it running in the parliamentary riled conservatives. election slated for May 11. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This combination of images taken from surveillance video at Monday’s Boston Marathon shows two men whom the FBI has dubbed Suspect 2, left, and Suspect 1, right.

FBI releases images of bombing suspects Agency wants public’s help THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — The FBI released photos and video Thursday of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing and asked for the public’s help in identifying them, zeroing in on the two men on surveillance-camera footage fewer than three days after the deadly attack. The photos depict one man in a dark baseball cap and the other in a white cap worn backward. The men were seen walking one behind the other in the crowd, and the one in the white hat was seen setting down a backpack at

the site of the second explosion, said Richard DesLauriers, FBI agent in charge in Boston. “Somebody out there knows these individuals as friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members of the suspects. Though it may be difficult, the nation is counting on those with information to come forward and provide it to us,” DesLauriers said.

Presidential visit The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the three people killed and more than 180 wounded in the twin blasts Monday. The men, dubbed Suspect 1 (in

the dark hat) and Suspect 2 (in the white hat), are considered armed and extremely dangerous, DesLauriers said, and people who see them should not approach them. “Do not take any action on your own,” he warned. The break in the investigation came days after the attack that tore off limbs, shattered windows and raised the specter of another terrorist attack on U.S. soil. Within moments of the announcement, the FBI website crashed. In the images, both men appear to be wearing dark jackets. Suspect 1 seems to be wearing a backpack. The planting of the backpack is not depicted in the video footage. The FBI made no mention of the men’s height, weight or age.

Rescuers seek victims near blast site in Texas Fertilizer plant now a crater THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WEST, Texas — Rescuers searched the smoking remnants of a Texas farm town Thursday for survivors of a thunderous fertilizer plant explosion, gingerly checking smashed houses and apartments for anyone still trapped in debris or bodies of the dead. The accident killed as many as 15 people and injured more than 160 others. Daylight revealed a breathtaking band of destruction extending for a four- or five-block radius around the West Fertilizer Co. in the small community of West, about 20 miles north of Waco. The blast leveled homes, apartments, a school and a nursing home. Its dull boom could be heard dozens of miles away. Waco Police Sgt. William Patrick Swanton described ongoing search-and-rescue efforts as “tedious and time-consuming.”

Quick Read

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A destroyed car sits as firefighters search the rubble of an apartment complex in West, Texas, on Thursday. Swanton could not say how than an industrial accident, he said. The Wednesday night explomany people had been rescued. sion rained burning embers and debris down on terrified residents. Industrial accident Morning exposed a landscape There was no indication that the wrapped in acrid smoke and blast, which sent up a mushroom- strewn with the shattered shaped plume of smoke and left remains of buildings, furniture behind a crater, was anything other and personal belongings.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Ex-travel association exec to lead gaming lobby

Nation: Food poisonings up from raw milk, poultry

World: App helps avoid accidental incest in Iceland

World: Iran’s president holds rare massive rally

THE NEW HEAD of the U.S. casino lobby is a 38-year-old with ties to the travel industry who says he will seek consensus on Internet gambling. The American Gaming Association nominated Geoff Freeman as its new president and CEO in Las Vegas. Freeman, who was chief operating officer at the U.S. Travel Association, will replace president Frank Fahrenkopf, 73, in July. Among his priorities, he said, will be navigating the burgeoning online gambling industry. Last year, Fahrenkopf called online gambling one of the biggest threats to the U.S. casino industry.

BACTERIA COMMONLY LINKED to raw milk and poultry are causing more and more food poisonings, health officials said Thursday. Campylobacter cases grew by 14 percent in the past five years, a government study found. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found there were no significant jumps in cases from most other food bugs, including salmonella and E. coli. But campylobacter accounted last year for more than a third of food poisoning illnesses in 10 states surveyed: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Oregon and Tennessee.

YOU MEET SOMEONE, there’s chemistry, and then come the introductory questions: What’s your name? Come here often? Are you my cousin? In Iceland, a country with a population of 320,000 where most everyone is distantly related, inadvertently kissing cousins is a real risk. A new smartphone app is on hand to help Icelanders avoid accidental incest. The app lets users “bump” phones and emits a warning alarm if they are closely related. Some are hailing it as a welcome solution to a very Icelandic form of social embarrassment.

IRAN’S PRESIDENT MAHMOUD Ahmadinejad thanked government workers in a massive rally that was seen as a show of his power ahead of the June presidential election. The IRNA news agency said that an estimated 70,000 people attended the rare gathering Thursday, which was held in a football stadium. Opponents of Ahmadinejad had accused him of planning the rally to promote his favorite candidate for the upcoming presidential election. But he did not refer to the election at the rally, and his favorite potential candidate, Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, did not appear there.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013 — (C)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bondsman: Job CONTINUED FROM A1 Dan Brickert of Longview, who said he generally spoke with his brother by phone several times a week, said he’d heard about the fatal shooting a few hours after it happened. “I miss him,� he said.

Lived in Port Angeles Dan Brickert, who no longer has family in Port Angeles, said his brother and parents lived in Port Angeles in 1984, moved away two years later and came back in 1989 before moving again after his brother finished high school in 1993. David Brickert had worked for Sanctuary Bail Bonds, a company he coowned, for the past three years and never really spoke about the danger inherent in his job, his brother said. “I know that he liked it and had a lot of fun,� Dan Brickert said. “I think this was the first time they ever actually had a shooting involved [in an arrest].� Ryan Mullinax, a fellow bail bondsman at Sanctuary Bail Bonds, said David Brickert had “the biggest heart of anyone I’ve ever known,� adding that David would take in dogs left abandoned by those he brought in who went on to serve prison time. “He was truly a kind heart and a very caring person,� Mullinax said in an

“I know that he liked it and had a lot of fun. I think this was the first time they ever actually had a shooting involved [in an arrest].� DAN BRICKERT brother of David Brickert email Thursday. “He will be missed by all.� Dan Brickert said his brother and most of his family enjoyed living on the dangerous side of life and frequently went skydiving, cliff rappelling and rock climbing — “anything that’s man-powered and outside.�

Last there for funeral David Brickert, originally from Monroe, was last in Washington state in December to attend the funeral of a family member, his brother said. “I don’t think he’s been in Port Angeles in a long time, but he’s been back in Washington,� Dan Brickert added. Sanctuary Bail Bonds has set up a fund to help support the families of David Brickert and Kampen, and donations can be made by visiting the company’s website at http:// tinyurl.com/d2fkndp.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Clallam County Fire District No. 3 responds to a collision between a motorcycle and a pickup truck on Mill Road just south of East Runnion Road in Carlsborg.

21-year-old man taken to OMC after motorcycle vs. truck wreck in Carlsborg PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CARLSBORG — A 21-year-old Seattle man was transported to Olympic Medical Center on Thursday with moderate injuries after the motorcycle he was riding and a pickup truck collided in Carlsborg. Emergency crews from

Clallam County Fire District No. 3 arrived at the scene of the wreck at Mill Road just south of the intersection with East Runnion Road at 1:57 p.m. to find the man alert, talking and lying roughly 10 feet from his motorcycle, fire department spokesman Patrick

injuries, though,� Young said. The driver of the truck, who also was not identified, was not injured, Young said. The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the cause of the wreck, Chief Criminal Deputy Ron Cameron said.

Young said. The man’s name was not immediately available Thursday. Young said the man was taken to OMC with what appeared to be lacerations to his hands and possible other injuries. “The medics said they were not life-threatening

Cleanup: Camping free Surgery CONTINUED FROM A1 Dogs are not allowed on beaches within the Olympic National Park boundaries. Camping will be free at three Olympic National Park campgrounds — Kalaloch, Mora and Ozette — for registered cleanup volunteers tonight and Saturday night, and free picnic lunches will be held at Kalaloch and Mora campgrounds from noon to 3 p.m. Those who wish to pick up free camping permits should bring a copy of their volunteer registration to the Olympic National Park Wilderness Information Center at 3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles, or the Forks Transit Center, 551 S. Forks Ave. Backcountry backpack permits also will be issued free to volunteers.

Hobuck Beach area

IKKATSU PROJECT

Jason Goldstein, cartographer for the Ikkatsu Project, catalogs beach debris last summer at an isolated beach near Portage Head, which is south of Hobuck Beach near Neah Bay.

team of about 20 volunteers from the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Coast Guard Station Neah Bay and the Ikkatsu Expedition will rappel into the isolated cove on Portage Head, 1 mile south of Hobuck Beach.

A

of beach trash is smaller than usual this year. “This has been one of the cleanest winters ever,� he said. “There isn’t even as much as the regular trash from before the tsunami.� Surfriders will provide a coffee-and-doughnut breakfast and a barbecue lunch. Volunteers at that location will receive an annual Makah Reservation beach pass — a $15 value, Wood said.

Sanctuary, Coast Guard Station Neah Bay and the Ikkatsu Expedition will rappel into the isolated cove on Portage Head, 1 mile south of Hobuck Beach. There, three kayakers from the Ikkatsu Expedition found the densest accumulation of plastic debris of their summer 2012 journey along the coast of Washington.

CONTINUED FROM A1

He beat the first cancer, a rare type called Ewing’s sarcoma, in the 1980s but was left with damage to his right leg and a struggle to find employment. In 2007, cancer returned when he was diagnosed with rectal cancer. Surgery removed that tumor, though it caused partial paralysis of his legs, but in 2012, doctors discov‘Bad in July’ ered that cancer had metas“It was really bad in tasized to his stomach. July,� said Ken Campbell, who was part of the small Father caretaker group of ocean kayakers His father, Alfred who surveyed the coast from Neah Bay to Ruby Charles Sr., 70, has been his Beach near LaPush and full-time caretaker and has around Destruction Island. been at his son’s side in A return to Portage Seattle. As a member of the Head in November showed a lower concentration of Lower Elwha Klallam tribe debris, some of which as well as a large family, Campbell said he believed Derek Charles has a lot of to have been on the beach people behind him. “We have received lots of for years. Campbell said he support from back home,� thought it had been pulled Levi Charles said. His brother will go off the beach by winter through another round of storm waves. “It was still bad,� he said. chemotherapy to attack any cancer cells that may have ________ been missed during Reporter Arwyn Rice can be Wednesday’s surgery.

While Hobuck Beach is listed as one of the easily accessed beaches, Surfrider volunteers will attempt to reach more distant beaches, requiring greater physical Portage Head effort, said Darryl Wood, A team of about 20 vol- reached at 360-452-2345, ext. chairman of the Surfrider unteers from the Olympic 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula chapter. First Federal fund Wood said he has heard Coast National Marine dailynews.com. from others that the amount The trip, the stay at the hospital and expenses for family members who will be in Seattle to support Derek Charles during his initial recovery add up quickly, and the family has said it needs some help. An account has been set up at First Federal bank to help the family, and donors can deposit funds in his or his son’s name at any branch of the bank, Alfred Charles said.

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PENINSULA PROFILE Every Sunday in PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

A5

Man guilty in assault on deputy BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Interim Fort Worden State Park Director Brian Hageman’s suggestion resulted in a rules change, where those using the park for special events can essentially rent a parking lot for the event guests.

New Fort Worden policy eases event parking rules BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A new policy at Fort Worden State Park will allow organizers the option of renting an entire parking lot for a special event instead of requiring that each driver attending it display a Discover Pass. The policy, which was proposed by interim Park Director Brian Hageman, was approved by the state’s Parks and Recreation Commission on March 21 and is now in effect. “Rentals were down,� Hageman said. “We thought this option would make Fort Worden a more palatable option for them to hold a family reunion or a similar event.�

Previously, every person who attended an event on the park grounds had to display a Discover Pass to park. That discouraged attendance at events, according to several park tenants. The policy also discouraged facilities rental and was a factor in locating the upcoming Washington City/ County Management Association statewide conference at the Northwest Maritime Center instead of Fort Worden, according to City Manager David Timmons. The city is hosting the statewide conference, which will be Aug. 13-16. Under the new policy, the park will print a specific number of day-use parking passes geared to the event, Hageman said. Event sponsors may rent

a facility such as the USO Building, with visitors encouraged to use the adjacent lots. The arrangement won’t be exclusive.

Options

fee, which is based on $4 per car. This ranges from $40 to rent the 10 stalls outside of building 204DN to the $800 required for the 200 stalls adjacent to McCurdy Pavilion. Hageman said an agreement already has been reached for attendees to all Centrum events to park on campus without a requirement of the Discover Pass. The Discover Pass, which went into effect in 2011, costs $30 per year or $10 per day. It is required for vehicle entry to all state parks and other state lands.

Visitors coming for the event will be allowed to park anywhere in the park, while regular visitors with Discover Passes will be allowed to park in the designated lot. “If someone comes for a wedding and then wants to drive down to the [Point Wilson] lighthouse for a while, they have that option,� Hageman said. ________ Fort Worden has a schedJefferson County Editor Charlie ule of 24 facilities, listing Bermant can be reached at 360the cost of rentals with or 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ without a group parking peninsuladailynews.com.

Funding cuts keep testing at Anderson Lake to visual survey BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

But no sample was taken because the state Department of Ecology will no longer fund routine weekly tests, instead directing that tests be done only when a bloom can be seen in the lake, said Greg Thomason, environmental health specialist with Jefferson County Public Health. In the past, Ecology had paid for weekly tests — which range from $200 to $300 — for potentially dangerous levels of toxins, regardless of whether algae blooms were visible. Samples taken Mondays were sent to King County Environmental Labs for testing, with results received by the following

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On cross-examination, McDaniel said Millet became upset when he didn’t immediately comply with the deputy’s demands. McDaniel said he shoved Millet after the lawman slammed him against his sport utility vehicle and put his hands around his neck, cutting off his airflow. Millet denied that he choked or attempted to strangle McDaniel. The deputy was investigating a trespass at the Sequim park, which closes at dusk. He was advised by dispatchers that the ________ owner of the vehicle had a concealed-pistol license, Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be which made him “a little reached at 360-452-2345, ext. more cautious,� Millet 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula said. dailynews.com.

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Now, county health department staff will have to rely more heavily on visual inspections of Lake Anderson, as well as county lakes in East Jefferson County. “Ecology is not able to fund weekly monitoring for toxicity testing when there are not algal blooms,� said Linda Kent, Ecology spokeswoman, in an email, adding that the measure is statewide. Kent said Ecology still will pay for the analysis of samples taken after an algae bloom is spotted, just as the department does for

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Visual inspections

lakes across the state. Ecology also cut the amount it provides for administrative costs. It is providing $15,000 for testing in 2013 and 2014, half of the $30,000 it gave the county in 2011 and 2012, said Jared Keefer, Jefferson County environmental health and water quality director. Keefer said Jefferson County has set aside $10,000 of its own money for testing and still plans to rely on that for any tests needed that Ecology will not fund. Following the reduced testing schedule for this year, Thomason said he inspected Anderson, Leland, Gibbs and Crocker lakes Monday but took water samples only from Leland because it had a visible algae bloom.

Standing 6 feet tall and weighing 265 pounds at the time of his arrest, McDaniel got out of the vehicle and overpowered the deputy after Millet grabbed his wrist to try to control him, Millet wrote. Millet drew his stun gun and gave orders to McDaniel, who then “squared up toward me and continued yelling obscenities.� The deputy fired his stun gun and placed McDaniel in handcuffs. “We don’t take these things lightly,� said county Chief Criminal Deputy Ron Cameron on Wednesday after the verdict was announced. “We don’t take any assault lightly, and when an officer is trying to do his duty and gets assaulted in the process, we certainly aren’t going to turn our backs to it.� The case drew more publicity when McDaniel mistakenly was released from the jail. McDaniel turned himself in when he found out about the error. Troberg said he spoke with two jurors after the trial, who indicated that they simply had followed the law. “The defense [Loren Oakley] certainly did a good job with what they had,� Troberg added.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

34759962

Look who is turning

Funding cut

Friday, in a weekly routine that began in April and continued until September or October. Those test results determined if lakes were safe.

McDaniel’s testimony

Overpowered deputy

34760108

PORT TOWNSEND — A visual survey will have to suffice as the basis for a decision next week on whether Anderson Lake State Park will be reopened for the start of a statewide trout-fishing season Saturday, April 27. Mike Zimmerman, the ranger who manages the state park, said Wednesday that the earliest he’ll announce it is this Monday, with his decision dependent on receiving a recommendation from Jefferson County Public Health Department staff. “The latest [day his decision would be announced] would be dependent upon if the health department decides they want to do one more visual [inspection] prior to the Saturday opening,� Zimmerman said. Anderson Lake has at times in past years had the highest levels of a potent nerve toxin, anatoxin-a, in the state. The toxin is created by blue-green algae. Although it occurs naturally and is usually benign, the algae, which is fueled by warm weather and nutrients such as phosphorus, can begin for reasons unknown to

researchers to produce toxins dangerous to people and animals. Since 2006, when two dogs died after drinking lake water Memorial Day weekend, tests of samples have been done to see if Anderson Lake is safe for recreational use, including fishing. The statewide start of the trout-fishing season is April 27. Officials had planned to test Anderson Lake before deciding if it could be reopened.

PORT ANGELES — A Clallam County jury has found Matthew K. McDaniel guilty of assaulting a Clallam County sheriff’s deputy at Railroad Bridge Park. McDaniel, 27, was sentenced to 81 days and released from the Clallam County jail because he had earned credit for good time served, said John Troberg, the county deputy prosecuting attorney who handled the case. McDaniel was convicted Wednesday of third-degree assault of a law enforcement officer for shoving Deputy Mark Millet after McDaniel was awakened in his vehicle shortly before midnight Feb. 3. “I think the jury did the right thing,� Troberg said. Clallam County Superior Court Judge George L. Wood did not impose state Department of Corrections supervision because McDaniel has no felony or misdemeanor criminal history and plans to seek employment in another state. McDaniel is a certified welder who recently had lost his job when he was arrested.

A pistol was discovered inthe vehicle after McDaniel was arrested. Millet wrote in the arrest nar- McDaniel rative that McDaniel yelled an expletive when he asked him to step out of the vehicle. McDaniel “began using his arms and legs to scoot toward the door in a fastpaced uncontrolled manner,� Millet wrote. “McDaniel’s actions made me feel that my safety was in jeopardy and that he was about to assault me.�


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Teacher on leave during PA school review Rape, molestation charges dismissed two weeks ago tion� while the Port Angeles School District conducts its own review, Superintendent Jane Pryne said this week. “Under the law, the teacher has been presumed innocent,� Pryne said Tuesday in an email. “However, as a precaution, the teacher had been on administrative leave pending further investigation.� Brinkmann, arrested

BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Stevens Middle School teacher Paul Brinkmann remains on administrative leave after rape and molestation charges were dismissed. The charges were dropped two weeks ago. He remains on administrative leave “as a precau-

March 2, 2012, had b e e n charged with two counts of first-degree child molestation, four Brinkmann counts of second-degree rape of a child, three counts of thirddegree rape of a child and one count of second-degree rape by forcible compulsion. He has been on leave since his arrest. Clallam County Superior Court Judge S. Brooke

this matter. “The district is unable to comment further at this time.� Port Angeles lawyer Karen Unger, representing Brinkmann, said he is working elsewhere. She said it was her “understanding� that Brinkmann, whose initial court appearances drew courtrooms packed with supporters, is now on paid administrative leave. Pryne did not return calls this week asking if his leave is paid or unpaid. Unger said she did not

Taylor dismissed the charges April 5 after the alleged victim refused to testify at Brinkmann’s trial, which was scheduled to begin Monday.

Not a student The alleged victim was not a student at Stevens, where Brinkmann, 47, teaches math. “We have taken the criminal allegations very seriously,� Pryne said. “Now that the charges have been dismissed, the district is in the process of re-evaluating

know how long the school district investigation would last. “We are not driving this train, so we just have to wait until we go through their process,� Unger said. “He’s devastated by this whole experience,� she added. “He was accused of being a sex offender, and that’s what everybody remembers.�

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Nippon, union talks scheduled Representatives for both to meet for mediation session on May 7 BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — They are talking again. A federal mediation session has been scheduled for Tuesday between Nippon Paper Industries USA and the Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers, which represents 130 millworkers who went on a fiveday strike beginning March 20. Representatives of the union and paper mill also will meet May 7, union organizing coordinator Paul Cloer and Nippon supervisor Gary Holmquist said this week. The mediation sessions will take place while the National Labor Relations Board reviews allegations by the union, which Cloer said total 17, that Nippon engaged in unfair labor practices during and after the strike. The sessions, being overseen by federal mediator Kathleen Erskine, are being held to resolve a 23-month contract dispute. The two sides also met April 12 in their first mediation session after the strike. It was unclear if progress was made. “Our position is, we won’t comment on negotiations, so there is no comment on what occurred or didn’t occur at the session,� Holmquist said. Cloer said Thursday he did not know if any issues were resolved during the April 12 mediation session. AWPPW International Vice President Greg Pal-

“Our position is, we won’t comment on negotiations, so there is no comment on what occurred or didn’t occur at the session.� GARY HOLMQUIST Nippon supervisor lesen, who helped coordinate the March 20-24 strike, did not return calls this week for comment. Japanese-owned Nippon manufactures paper for telephone books and catalogs, and makes newsprint for newspapers, including the Peninsula Daily News. Workers walked off the job March 20 over stalled negotiations two days after Nippon imposed the company’s contract offer, which had been rejected by union members.

Hash out differences During mediation, union and company representatives will attempt to hash out their differences with Erskine presiding over the negotiations but also can meet privately to come to an agreement. Company and union officials have not released copies of their contract proposals. In a statement issued when the contract was imposed March 18, mill manager Harold Norlund said the company is facing increased competition and higher costs. Norlund did not return

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The surveillance did not consist of tapping phones or other undercover measures, Cloer said. “Basically, they are just trying to find out what people are doing,� he said of the alleged activity. “You don’t have the right to monitor union activities,� Cloer said. “The [National Labor Relations] Board considers it surveillance.� Cloer said the charges could be dropped if Nippon and the union reach a contract agreement. “If we get a contract settlement, that frequently happens,� Cloer said. Hooks said the NLRB’s investigation could take up to two months. “Given the numerous new charges, it could be a couple of months before a decision is reached,� Hooks said.

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BLYN — The flashing lights, whooping sirens and delighted screams that accompany slot machine wins will come at a much faster clip Saturday at 7 Cedars Casino Resort as hundreds compete in the TournEvent of Champions slot machine contest. The casino awarded 400 golden tickets to the tournament over the past month and a half, and those entrants will hit the onearmed bandits for a shot to win the local title and a ticket to the national finals tournament in Las Vegas. The all-day tournament begins at 11 a.m., and Judy Walz, marketing director at 7 Cedars, said the quick, aggressive style of slot play and the popping of balloons

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Cloer said Nippon still faces rulings by the National Labor Relations Board on 17 total unfairlabor-practice allegations — which the NLRB calls charges — that he said were filed between Jan. 3 and April 12. Of those, 16 were submitted beginning March 26, the day after employees returned to work, Cloer said. If the NLRB finds merit to the allegations, the agency will try to reach a settlement between Nippon and the union, NLRB Regional Director Ron Hooks said Thursday. If a settlement cannot be reached, the NLRB will issue a complaint, which sets the matter for a hear________ ing before an administrative law judge. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb The initial allegation, can be reached at 360-452-2345, filed Jan. 3, accuses Nippon ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ of refusing to bargain in peninsuladailynews.com.

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good faith and later was amended to claim Nippon unilaterally changed the conditions of employment by implementing, on its own, the company’s “last and final offer.� In the newer allegations, the union also accuses the company of restraining employees from peacefully picketing, stopping automatic deductions for union dues, harassing an employee by “physically following him around and engaging in surveillance,� and by “engaging in surveillance and spying� on workers, according to the filing.

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calls for comment this week. The unratified contract offer “changed everything� in wages and benefits and lowered the workers’ pay, company material handler Justin Martinez of Port Angeles said March 25, the day workers returned to the plant. He was among those who gathered along Marine Drive east of the plant, located at the base of Ediz Hook, holding pickets during the strike, which effectively shut down the plant. As of 2010, Nippon was Clallam County’s fifth-largest private employer behind 7 Cedars Casino, Westport Shipyard, Wal-Mart and Safeway, according to the county Economic Development Council’s 2010 Clallam Community Profile.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

A7

Comptroller given Florist sued for denial crash course on pot of service to gay men BY GENE JOHNSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Mike Steenhout knows spreadsheets, statistics and beancounting. He has worked as a budget assistant to the governor, managed local operations for the U.S. Census Bureau and analyzed juvenile crime databases. Now, the married, minivandriving father of a small child is a weed guy — one of the doz- Steenhout ens of Washington state workers involved in the creation and regulation of the nation’s first legal marijuana industry. So he spends his days studying a substance that until recently he knew almost nothing about, beyond the few joints he smoked in college. It feels like cramming for a final exam, he said. “It’s very surreal,� Steenhout said recently as he stood in a darkened room full of blossoming pot plants. “I generally go to work fairly early, around 6:30 or 7, and leave about 5 or 6, and I’m pretty much talking about marijuana in one way or another every

ized before the agency begins issuing licenses to retail stores in December. Steenhout is traveling to marijuana grow operations, processors and testing labs in California, Colorado and Washington. One morning recently, dressed in a green sweater, jeans and sneakers, Steenhout walked into a firstfloor office in Seattle’s University District — the Care Wellness Center, a clinic that writes authorizations for medical pot patients. Steenhout was there for presentations from Cale Burkhart, who makes marijuana-infused lotions, creams and tinctures, and from the proprietors of Analytical 360, a Seattle lab that tests marijuana and marijuana products for strength and impurities. In another room, Jim Andersen, with a company called XTracted, showed Steenhout how he uses a closed-system extraction device — a contraption of metal cylinders and tubes — to make hash oil from marijuana buds or leaves. Andersen offered to send him home with some samples. Steenhout politely declined. “I get that all the time,� he said later. “These people are proud of what they do.�

single hour.� Steenhout’s cannabis crash course could be for naught if the U.S. Justice Department sues to keep legal pot sales that Washington and Colorado voters approved last fall from taking effect. Marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington, voters legalized pot for adults older than 21 and set up a system of state-licensed pot growers, processors and stores. The state has hired a Massachusetts firm to serve as its official marijuana consultant, but the Liquor Control Board, which collects taxes and fees from booze sales and licensing, also is doing its own research into how best to regulate pot.

Quality assurance Steenhout, the agency’s comptroller, has new duties that include researching quality assurance: how the pot can be produced, processed and tested to ensure the final product doesn’t have contaminants such as mold and that there is a consistent potency when it reaches store shelves. His research will help inform the board’s three voting members as they decide what to require of the industry. All rules need to be final-

BY MANUEL VALDES THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The American Civil Liberties Union in Washington state filed a lawsuit Thursday on behalf of a Kennewick gay couple denied service at a flower shop for their upcoming wedding. The lawsuit is in response to a March 1 incident in which Barronelle Stutzman refused to provide flowers for Robert Ingersoll and Curt Freed’s wedding, despite the two men being longtime patrons of her shop — Arlene’s Flowers and Gifts in Richland, about 200 miles southeast of Seattle. Thursday’s lawsuit is the second legal action taken against Stutzman. Last week, state Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a consumer protection lawsuit. Ferguson had sent a letter in March asking her to comply with the law but said Stutzman’s attorneys responded saying she would challenge any state action to enforce the law. Her attorney, Justin D. Bristol, has said he expects to take the legal battle to federal court and argue Stutzman’s refusal of service based on the First Amendment’s right to free speech. Stutzman was not available at her flower shop Thursday. A message left at Bristol’s office was not imme-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gay couple Rob Ingersoll, left, and Curt Freed pose with their dogs in Kennewick this week. diately returned. While Washington voters legalized gay marriage this past November, protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation were codified in 2006 in one of the first initial pushes to expand civil rights to the gay community. “The refusal to sell flowers to the couple is a disturbing reminder of the unequal treatment that gay men and women have experienced over the years,� said ACLU of Washington legal director Sarah Dunne in a statement. “When a business serves the general public, the business owner’s religious beliefs may not be used to justify discrimination.� Ingersoll and Freed had

been customers of Stutzman’s for years, and she knew the two men were in a relationship. But once Ingersoll informed her they were getting married, she told him she wouldn’t sell him flowers, the lawsuit said. “The shock and hurt, it took Rob back,� Freed said Thursday, who added that the incident happened on Ingersoll’s birthday. Freed said the couple are ready for a long legal battle. They have been together for nine years and plan to wed in September. Under state law, it’s illegal for businesses to refuse to sell goods, merchandise and services to any person because of their sexual orientation.

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How you’re predicted by big data OVER THE PAST few centuries, there have been many efforts to come up with methods to help predict human behavior — what Leon Wieseltier of The New Republic calls mathematizing the subjective. The current one is the David effort to underBrooks stand the world by using big data. Other efforts to predict behavior were based on models of human nature. The people using big data don’t presume to peer deeply into people’s souls. They don’t try to explain why people are doing things. They just want to observe what they are doing. The theory of big data is to have no theory, at least about human nature. You just gather huge amounts of information, observe the patterns and estimate probabilities about how people will act in the future. As Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier write in their book, Big Data, this movement asks us to move from causation to correlation. People using big data are not like novelists, ministers, psychologists, memoirists or gossips, coming up with intuitive narratives to explain the causal chains of why things are happening. “Contrary to conventional wisdom, such human intuiting of causality does not deepen our understanding of the world,” they write. Instead, they aim to stand

back nonjudgmentally and observe linkages: “Correlations are powerful not only because they offer insights, but also because the insights they offer are relatively clear. “These insights often get obscured when we bring causality back into the picture.” This method has yielded some impressive observations. Analysts can look at Google search terms and pick up where flu outbreaks are occurring. In doctor’s offices, statistical predictions often make better diagnoses than clinical predictions. Wal-Mart executives looked at the data and noticed that, as hurricanes approach, people buy large quantities of strawberry Pop-Tarts. They began to put Pop-Tarts at the front of the stores with storm supplies. I’m trying to appreciate the big data revolution, but also probe its limits. One limit is that correlations are actually not all that clear. A zillion things can correlate with each other, depending on how you structure the data and what you compare. To discern meaningful correlations from meaningless ones, you often have to rely on some causal hypothesis about what is leading to what.

You wind up back in the land of human theorizing. Another obvious problem is that unlike physical objects and even animals, people are discontinuous. We have multiple selves. We are ambiguous and ambivalent. We get bored, and we selfdeceive. We learn and mislearn from experience. Thus, the passing of time can produce gigantic and unpredictable changes in taste and behavior, changes that are poorly anticipated by looking at patterns of data on what just happened. Another limit is that the world is error-prone and dynamic. I recently interviewed George Soros about his financial decision-making. While big data look for patterns of preferences, Soros often looks for patterns of error.

Peninsula Voices

People will misinterpret reality, and those misinterpretations will sometimes create a self-reinforcing feedback loop. Housing prices skyrocket to unsustainable levels. If you are relying just on data, you will have a tendency to trust preferences and anticipate a continuation of what is happening right now. Soros makes money by exploiting other people’s misinterpretations and anticipating when they will become unsustainable. Then there is the distinction between commodity decisions and flourishing decisions. Some decisions are straightforward commodities: what route to work is likely to be fastest. Big data can help. Flourishing decisions are things like who to marry, who to befriend, what career calling to pursue and

OUR READERS’

________ David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times. He can be reached via email by visiting http://tinyurl.com/nytdbrooks.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL using guest-worker programs. Lois Danks, Port Angeles Danks is coordinator of the Stop the Checkpoints committee.

Immigration bill The proposed immigration fix is not “for real” as Froma Harrop’s column [Commentary, April 15] claims. It’s a hoax — a hoax designed to gain political points by claiming a victory on immigration reform. What is “for real” is that it’s designed to benefit corporations who profit from low-wage labor and building border walls, drones, and detention centers. In my opinion, the White House and congressional immigration reform proposals are not based on human rights. They are based on the economic greed of Wall Street. Billions of dollars of our tax money will be diverted from education, social services and infrastructure maintenance to go to the enforcement “triggers” — building border fences, buying drones, more for-profit detention centers, mandatory e-Verify with national ID cards.

what college to choose. These decisions involve trying to find people, places and things that harmonize with your subjective self. It’s a mistake to take subjective intuition out of this decision because subjectivity is the whole point. One of my take-aways is that big data are really good at telling you what to pay attention to. They can tell you what sort of student is likely to fall behind. But then to actually intervene to help that student, you have to get back in the world of causality, back into the world of responsibility, back in the world of advising someone to do x because it will cause y. Big data are like the offensive coordinator up in the booth at a football game who, with altitude, can see patterns others miss. But the head coach and players still need to be on the field of subjectivity. Most of the advocates understand data are a tool, not a world view. My worries mostly concentrate on the cultural impact of the big data vogue. If you adopt a mind-set that replaces the narrative with the empirical, you have problems thinking about personal responsibility and morality, which are based on causation. You wind up with a demoralized society. But that’s a subject for another day.

Sea gull control

The so-called path to citizenship is an expensive, long and convoluted maze that very few will be able to navigate. And it won’t even start until the border is under 100 percent surveillance and other enforcement triggers are met.

Worst of all are the expanded guest-worker programs that union bureaucrats have signed off on — creating a new “W” visa for year-round hotel, restaurant, health care and food-processing workers. This creates more layers of “under-class” workers

to be exploited. I do agree with Harrop that “the usual way to attract workers is to raise their pay.” Higher pay, better working conditions, unions and more respect would be a better way to fill agricultural job vacancies than

I was quite disappointed and upset by a recent mention of the consideration of implementation of an eggoiling program in Port Townsend to control the gull population from littering downtown sidewalks with excrement [Port Townsend Merchants to Meet on Sea Gull Abatement Plan,” PDN, March 28]. The article indicated that the citizens in Port Townsend will have the opportunity to choose whether or not the municipality should participate in the program, and mentions that Port Angeles has been participating in a similar program for years. After further exploration, I struggled to find any

information about the reasons behind the city’s decision to partake in this endeavor. One must assume that the decision was made to lessen the excrement in downtown Port Angeles, as most city officials across the country would prioritize clean sidewalks over the health and well-being of local wildlife. Egg-oiling is a process by which bird eggs are covered in an oily substance to prevent air from reaching the baby bird trying to develop inside of the egg. This prevents the egg from hatching, and limits the number of offspring produced by the mother. To know that Port Angeles is intentionally killing these birds with unnatural substances is disturbing. I call for citizens throughout the Peninsula to ask Port Angeles to stop the egg oiling program, and for Port Townsend to not start participating in it. Patrick Johnson, Port Angeles

Gulp! Smaller is bigger in soda pop sales, research shows AFTER NEW YORK Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg unveiled his plan to ban the sale of sodas larger than 16 ounces, comedian Jon Stewart complained that the proposal “combines the draconian government overreach people love with the probable lack of results they expect.” It turns out “The Daily Show” host was on to something. New research shows that prompting beverage makers to sell sodas in smaller packages and bundle them as a single

unit actually encourages consumers to buy more soda — and gulp down more calories — than they would have consumed without the ban. Not only would thirsty people drink more, but circumventing the big-drink ban by offering consumers bundles of smaller drinks also would mean more revenue for the beverage purveyors, according to a study published this month in the journal Plos One. The sales boost would probably offset

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the added cost of producing more cups, lids and straws to hold those extra drinks, the researchers found. The results reveal “a potential unintended consequence that may need to be considered in future policymaking,” wrote the study authors, psychologists from University of California, San Diego. The findings come a month after a New York judge struck down a bid by New York City’s health department to halt the sale of super-sized soft drinks at

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

restaurants, movie theaters and sports venues across the city, calling the proposed measure “arbitrary and capricious.” The effort’s legal failure sparked a round of soul-searching by public health officials, whose anti-obesity efforts have focused heavily on reducing Americans’ consumption of soft drinks and other sweetened beverages laden with sugar and calories. Los Angeles Times

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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CommentaryViewpoints

Roles of CIA, Pentagon blurring OVER THE WINTER, I heard military commanders and White House officials murmur in hushed tones about how they would have to figure out a legal and moral framework for the flying killer robots executing targets around the globe. They were starting to realMaureen ize that while the American Dowd public approves of remotely killing terrorists, it is a drain on the democratic soul to zap people with no due process and little regard for the loss of innocents. But they never got around to it, leaving Rand Paul to take the moral high ground. After two bloody, money-sucking, never-ending wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the idea of a weapon for war that precluded having anyone actually go to war was too captivating. Our sophisticated, sleek, smart, detached president was ensorcelled by our sophisticated, sleek, smart, detached war machine. In an interview with Jon Stewart last year, President Barack Obama allowed that he was in the grip of a powerful infatuation. “One of the things that we’ve got to do is put a legal architecture in place,” he said, “and we need congressional help to do that, to make sure that not only am I reined in but any president is reined in.” America’s secret drone program, continually lowering the bar for lethal action, turns the president, the CIA director and counterterrorism advisers into a star chamber running a war beyond war zones that employs a scalpel rather than a hammer, as the new Langley chief, John Brennan, puts it. But as The New York Times’ Mark Mazzetti notes in his new

book, The Way of the Knife, “the analogy suggests that this new kind of war is without costs or blunders — a surgery without complications. This isn’t the case.” Mazzetti raises the issue of whether the CIA — which once sold golf shirts with Predator logos in its gift shop — became “so enamored of its killer drones that it wasn’t pushing its analysts to ask a basic question: “To what extent might the drone strikes be creating more terrorists than they are actually killing?” Mazzetti writes that Sir Richard Dearlove, the head of MI6, the British Secret Intelligence Service, watched one of the first drone strikes via satellite at Langley a few weeks after 9/11. As he saw a Mitsubishi truck in Afghanistan being blown up, Dearlove smiled wryly. “It almost isn’t sporting, is it?” the Brit asked. In the run-up to the Iraq war, Donald Rumsfeld and his hawkish inner circle were disgusted that the CIA dismissed their spurious claims of a connection between Saddam and al-Qaida, so they set up their own CIA at the Pentagon. Soldiers became spies. Meanwhile, the CIA was setting up its own Pentagon at Langley, running the everexpanding paramilitary drone operation. Spies became soldiers. Mazzetti writes that after 9/11, the CIA director morphed into “a military commander running a clandestine, global war with a skeleton staff and very little oversight.” Why did the CIA, as Gen. James Cartwright asked when he was the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, need to build “a second Air Force”? Leon Panetta made the CIA far more militarized and then went to the Pentagon. When an actual military commander, David Petraeus, became head spook in 2011, he embraced the drone program, pushed to

expand the fleet and conducted the first robo-targeted killing of an American citizen. “A spy agency that on September 11, 2001, had been decried as bumbling and risk-averse had, under the watchful eye of four successive CIA directors, gone on a killing spree,” Mazzetti writes. The CIA now has a drone base in Saudi Arabia, and both the Pentagon and the spy agency are running parallel drone wars in Yemen, each fighting for resources. And the Pentagon continues its foray into human spying. As W. George Jameson, a lawyer who spent 33 years at the CIA, lamented: “Everything is backwards. You’ve got an intelligence agency fighting a war and a military organization trying to gather onthe-ground intelligence.” Mazzetti observes that the CIA, playing catch-up through so much of the Arab Spring, has turned a perilous corner, where a new generation at Langley much prefers “the adrenaline rush of being at the front lines” hunting and killing to the more patient, tedious, “gentle” work of intelligence gathering and espionage. Relying on foreign spies for counterterrorism information can blind you to what is really happening on the ground. President Obama, who continued nearly every covert program handed down by W., clearly feels tough when he talks about targeted killings, and considers drones an attractive option. As Mazzetti says: “Fundamental questions about who can be killed, where they can be killed, and when they can be killed” still have not been answered or publicly discussed. It almost isn’t sporting, is it?

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

‘See Something, Say Something’ still true IN BRIEF REMARKS to the nation after the Boston Marathon bombings, President Barack Obama said that “we all have a part to play in alerting authorities. If you see something suspicious, speak up.” In Washington, D.C., elecMichelle tronic signs urged commut- Malkin ers to be on guard. Law enforcement, big-city mayors and security experts all echoed that famous postterrorism refrain: “If you see something, say something.” But who really means it? In post-9/11 America, the truth is that our politically correct guardians only want you to see, say or do something if it can’t be construed by grievancemongers as racist, sexist, Islamophobic, homophobic, nativist or any other “-ist” or “-ic.” Face it: We live in a selfdefeating culture that pays lip service to heroic action in times of crisis, yet brutally punishes the very kind of snap judgments and instant security profiling that make such heroism possible in the first place. Just take a look at some of the caustic reactions to citizens and watchdogs who stuck out their necks during and after the Boston Marathon bombings. A quick-thinking spectator at the race reportedly tackled a 20-year-old Saudi Arabian student visa holder he believed was acting suspiciously. The student is not considered a suspect at this point but remains a “person of interest” in the case. The student’s home was searched Monday night in

Revere, Mass., by a phalanx of law enforcement agencies. Time magazine correspondent Michael Crowley clucked: “It’ll be a real shame if a Saudi guy was tackled and held simply for running in fright — and for being an Arab.” Indian television anchor Gargi Rawat called the civilian’s actions “sad.” Gawker editor Max Read declared: “This poor Saudi kid should sue the guy who tackled him.” For what? For taking all those “See Something, Say Something” ads seriously? In 2007, when passengers reported concerns about a group of rowdy flying imams, the Council on American-Islamic Relations threatened to sue the unnamed “John Does” who went to authorities. Thankfully, Congress passed legislation protecting whistleblowers. As GOP Rep. Bill Shuster said at the time: “No American should ever be sued because they tried to stop a terrorist act.” Nobody knows what’s going on behind closed doors as the current bombing investigation continues, yet media scribes, foreign journalists and social media sideliners are convinced: The tackler is racist. Anyone who mentions the nationality of the tackled student is racist. The same unserious response greeted anyone who breathed public mention of the fact that the Boston Police Department issued a BOLO alert Monday afternoon for a suspicious individual. Investigators warned police officers to be on the lookout for a “darker-skinned or black male” with a “possible foreign accent.” Incredibly, BPD got blasted for issuing an alert that was both too broad and too specific.

“That’s all of Boston,” one critic carped. The Shut Up Brigade struck again after a U.S. Airways plane at Boston’s Logan Airport was evacuated Tuesday because of suspicions about two passengers seated apart and speaking Arabic. “This is ridiculous,” fumed Arabic language educator Jinanne Tabra. Ridiculous? Tell that to shellshocked marathon runners and their families traveling home after the Boston terror bombing. I still haven’t forgotten the passengers and crewmembers who tackled al-Qaida shoebomber Richard Reid on American Airlines Flight 63 before he had a chance to blow up the plane over the Atlantic Ocean. I still haven’t forgotten Brian Morgenstern, the teenage Circuit City worker who contacted authorities in 2007 when suspicious Middle Easterners brought in tapes of themselves shooting off guns and shouting “Allahu Akbar.” The men were convicted of plotting to kill American soldiers at Fort Dix. I still haven’t forgotten the alertness of actor James Woods, who notified a flight attendant that several Arab men sitting in the first-class cabin on an August 2001 flight were behaving strangely. The men turned out to be 9/11 hijackers on a test run. Hindsight hypocrites will only give you immunity from public excoriation if you can guarantee in advance that your fears or suspicions are 100 percent right. And no one can. I would rather be damned if I do than dead if I don’t.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

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Boston

STRONG Cartoonists interpret the events and aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 19-20, 2013 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

B

Go ahead: Rain Other area events on their parade PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

light, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide that is part of today’s PDN.

Student films, a tree giveaway, poetry, films, lectures and other educational events are planned on the North Olympic Sequim Peninsula this weekend. For more on the “God of Carnage,” a play at Olym- Student film festival pic Theatre Arts, and SEQUIM — The 2013 other news of the lively Sequim Education Founarts, see Peninsula Spot-

Forks fetes showers with festival

dation Student Film Festival will be held at Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave., tonight. A spaghetti dinner fundraiser will run from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the school cafeteria, with the film festival starting at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. TURN

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BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Team challenge for 5 -15 runners per team

FORKS — The wet weather common on the West End will be celebrated in Forks this weekend at RainFest 2013, a festival featuring a threeday show of cozy quilts that begins today and the town’s signature Umbrella Parade on Saturday. Rain is the natural companion of the Umbrella Parade, in which children and adults march with decorated umbrellas, galoshes and raincoats even when it’s bright and sunny.

Registration fee $100 per team. All proceeds go to Relay for Life supporting cancer survivorship

Sunny, usually “Traditionally, it has not rained on RainFest,” said Lissy Andros, executive director of the Forks Chamber of Commerce. The early organizers of the Umbrella Parade chose a weekend when it hardly ever rains, Andros said.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pat Soderlind leads the Umbrella Parade in downtown Forks during the 2012 RainFest. With an average annual have plenty of, so we want rainfall measured in feet — to celebrate it,” Andros somewhere between 10 and said. 12 — rain “is something we TURN TO RAIN/B2

Cup

Angela Wade of Port Angeles carries trash bags, while her son, Sai Wade, 4, pokes between rocks with a stick during an Earth Day cleanup of the inside of Ediz Hook in Port Angeles in 2012.

Join the Team Challenge! May 19, 2013 11 am race start Businesses and Organizations sign up your fastest employees

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Have Fun - Be Fit - Claim the Cup!

Cleanups, events mark Earth Day on Peninsula PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles Klallam challenge PORT ANGELES — During the Klallam Earth Day Challenge on Saturday, volunteers will work on cleaning up beaches and creeks from Pillar Point to Dungeness Spit. Headquarters will be The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave. Teams assigned to areas will work from 8 a.m. to noon. From noon to 4 p.m., a celebration is set at The Landing mall, with music by Howly Slim, food and awards. For more information and to sign up, visit www. klallamearthday.org.

Go to RhodyRun.com for full details and to register

115 E. Railroad Ave. A $5 donation is suggested. The program is free to Feiro members. TURN

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Marine debris talk PORT ANGELES — Olympic National Park coastal ecologist Steven Fradkin will present “Earth Day, Marine Debris and Us!” from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. today. The talk, part of the

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Communities across the North Olympic Peninsula are planning to spruce up in honor of Earth Day today, Saturday and Sunday throughout the North Olympic Peninsula. Celebrations, hikes, lectures and films also are planned. Here is a sample:

April Lecture Series sponsored by the Feiro Marine Life Center and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, will be in Room 205 of The Landing mall,

Registrations for teams and their team members due by May 1st


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FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Eagle Fest to take flight in Neah Bay BY LEAH LEACH PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NEAH BAY — The eagles of Neah Bay are so plentiful they have inspired their own festival. “Pretty much you can look up and see an eagle anywhere,” said Tinker Lucas, president of the Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce. The chamber sponsors Neah Bay Eagle Fest, which will be from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday. This time of year, bald eagles and golden eagles “are usually out on the docks or on the masts of the boats. There’s a few in the trees,” Lucas said. “This is the best time for this festival because they’ve finished mating, and they are nesting now,” she said. The festival is coordinated with the Earth Day Washington Coast Cleanup on Saturday,

which will include volunteer work at Hobuck Beach and other nearby areas. “While people are out here, they have all these other activities they can do after helping to clean up the beach,” Lucas said, adding that the cleanup is expected to draw about 100 people to Neah Bay. Events in the third edition of Eagle Fest will be at four locations.

Makah Marina ■ Eagle lecture — Wildlife biologist Rob McCoy, wildlife division manager for the Makah tribe, will talk about eagles at 10 a.m. at the marina at 1321 Bayview Ave. ■ Chowder and bread — A traditional halibut chowder and buckskin bread meal will be available for a fee from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

■ “Walk with a Doc” — Participants can walk about 1 mile with Dr. Jessica Ange at 11 a.m. and ask questions and get ideas on how to improve their lifestyles. ■ Bird walks — Guided bird walks with naturalist Jon Scordino will begin at 1 p.m. ■ Fish dinner — A fish dinner with live Irish music will be served from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Jazz music also is planned, as well as a jam session after the meal. “It will be kind of a fun evening,” Lucas said. “It’ll stop when it wants to.” The cost of the meal is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Advance tickets are available from any chamber of commerce member. Also, Lucas will sell dinner tickets and Eagle Fest T-shirts

from about 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at hosted by the Neah Bay Commuthe Makah Community Hall. nity Garden Club, which also will sell plants. $15.

Makah Community Hall

A bazaar with at least 10 vendors selling goods that include native art, activities for children such as a coloring contest and crafts using feather, and food such as Indian tacos, hot dogs and chili will be available from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Makah Museum

An eagle exhibit is available for viewing from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Makah Cultural and Research Center at 1880 Bay View Ave. Admission is $5. Neah Bay is at the west end of state Highway 112, at the most Makah Village Market northwestern tip of the contigu■ Eagle nest watching — ous United States. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The state highway becomes Lucas said several eagle nests Bayview Avenue, the main roadare in the area of the village mar- way through Neah Bay. ket, which is set up in front of ________ Washburn General Store at 1450 Bayview Ave. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach can ■ Crab plate lunch with be reached at 360-417-3531 or at leah. bread — From noon to 1 p.m., leach@peninsuladailynews.com.

Events: Mastodon dig lecture Rain: Quilting CONTINUED FROM B1

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Dinner tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students. Film festival tickets are $5 for both adults and students. Preschool children are admitted free. Festival winners will be awarded up to $6,750 in scholarship funds, plus cash and merchandise prizes. Trophies will be given for best actor and actress, and the “people’s choice” Elkie Award will go to the winning video chosen by the audience. Information on SEF is available at www.sequimed. org.

The annual parade will begin at noon Saturday, rain or shine, at the Peninsula College Forks Extension site, 71 S. Forks Ave. It will move up and down Forks Avenue, ending where it began. Preparation for the parade will begin at 10 a.m. with an umbrella-decorating workshop at the Peninsula College site. The workshop will provide decorations and umbrellas, unless children want to provide their own umbrellas, and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., children also are invited to take part in a book giveaway and crafts activities.

Mastodon lecture SEQUIM — Clare Manis Hatler will discuss “The Manis Mastodon Archaeological Site” at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, at 10 a.m. today. Admission is $5, and refreshments will be served. The Manis Mastodon brought worldwide attention to Sequim when it was discovered by Hatler’s late first husband, Emanuel Manis, on their Happy Valley property in 1977. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978, and excavations led by Washington State University archaeologist Carl Gus-

RENEÉ MIZAR

Clare Manis Hatler and Museum & Arts Center Executive Director DJ Bassett stand next to the National Register of Historic Places plaque that marks the former Manis Mastodon dig site in Happy Valley. Manis Hatler will discuss the dig during a lecture today. offering a free field workshop on landscaping with native plants today. The workshop will be at 1 p.m. at the Dungeness Recreation Area. Due to space limitations, preregistration is required. It involves a 2-mile hike through the county park. More than 25 native Native plant workshop trees and shrubs will be SEQUIM — The Clallam described, along with their Conservation District is cultural requirements, aestafson continued at the site into the mid-1980s. Hatler donated the property to the National Archaeological Conservancy in Manis’ memory in August 2002, and numerous Manis Mastodon fossils remain on display at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St.

thetic attributes and environmental and wildlife habitat benefits. Conservation district manager Joe Holtrop will lead the workshop. To register or for more information, phone the Clallam Conservation District at 360-452-1912, ext. 5.

Gem open house SEQUIM — The Clallam County Gem & Mineral Association will hold its spring open house at the club’s shop, 81 Hooker Road, Unit 5, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. TURN

Peninsula B Behavioral

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Saturday only events In addition to the parade, several other events are Saturday only. A pie social benefit is planned for Sarge’s Place Shelter for Veterans from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the college extension site. Also beginning at 10 a.m. will be the West End Sportsmen Club’s Rimfire Shoot at the end of Sportsmen Club Road. Participants should bring a .22-caliber long rifle or pistol for shooting silhouettes and for the “steel challenge” speed shooting competition. No prices were available Wednesday. Beginning at 10:30 a.m. will be the free “Trail of Senses” interpretive hike at the Elk Creek Conservation Area on Calawah Way, 1.9 miles from downtown.

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Three-day quilt show The Piecemakers Quilt Club “Fabrics of the Forest,” quilt show, which is free, will include vendors and as many as 150 quilts from noon to 6 p.m. today, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Forks High School’s auxiliary gym at 261 S. Spartan Ave. “Garden Bouquet,” a queen-size quilt by Roxanne Carter of Quilting with Roxanne, will be raffled Sunday, with raffle tickets available at the show. The guest of honor will be Marti Michell of Atlanta, whom show organizer Marcia Yanish described as one of the top designers of the quilting world. Michell was one of the first to bring rotary cutters from Japan to the U.S., introduced the first quilt kits and was a leader in bringing quilting back as a common craft in the years just before the U.S. bicentennial celebrations, Yanish said. “She is the most prestigious guest we’ve ever had,” she said. In 2004, Michell was awarded the Silver Star at the Houston International Quilt Festival, a lifetime achievement award for quilting. In 1991, she received the first Michael Kile award given for commitment to creativity and excellence in the quilting industry. Michell will offer lectures and demonstrations today and Saturday at the Department of Natural Resources Conference Center, 411 Tillicum Lane. Classes are limited to 25 students on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants for the classes had to register in advance and must bring the required supplies to class. A supply list was provided with confirmation of registration. The lecture/demos have no class limit and may be paid for at the door. For information, visit www.piecemakersquiltclub. org or contact Karla Lewis at 360-374-9201 or quilter@ centurytel.net. Presented today will be: ■ Sedona Star technique class — 8:30 a.m. to noon. Registration is $45. ■ Dresden Dreaming technique class — 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Registration is $45. ■ “Short Cuts, Top Tips and Secrets” lecture and demonstration — 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Registration is $20. Presented Saturday will be: ■ “Log Cabin Fat Quarters,” a log cabin blocks techniques class — 8:30 a.m. to noon. Registration is $45. ■ “Exploring Log Cabin” lecture and demonstration — 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Registration is $40.

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The North Olympic Land Trust will sponsor the hike. From 5:30 to 8:30 that night, the Emblem Club will present a prime rib dinner for $17 at the Forks Elks Lodge, 941 Merchants Road.

Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

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Events: PA PoetrySlam CONTINUED FROM B2 Attendees can bring rocks for identification; learn how to cut rocks and polish stones for use in jewelry or display; watch demonstrations of wire-wrapping polished stones, faceting and creating chain-mail jewelry; and see facilities for silver smithing, casting and other lapidary activities. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.sequimrocks.com or phone President Dean Carnes at 360-681-2576.

Arborist lecture SEQUIM — Certified Arborist Christina Pfeiffer will present “Trees through the Seasons” at a lecture at McComb Gardens, 751 McComb Road, at 1 p.m. Saturday. The lecture will highlight tree selection with an emphasis on seasonal attributes and key tree-care tasks at different seasons. Pfeiffer is a Seattle horticulturist consultant, writer and instructor. Her education was completed at Michigan State University and the University of Washington. Active with the Washington Park Arboretum, Pfeiffer is certified by the International Society of Arboriculture.

Thrift shop open SEQUIM — The SequimDungeness Hospital Guild’s Thrift Shop, located at Second and Bell streets, will be open Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This month will feature spring fashions for women, men and children, jewelry and fashion accessories, home furnishings, kitchenware, tools and sporting goods. All white-tagged items will be marked half-price during this sale. Volunteers and consigners are always needed. For more information, phone 360-683-7044.

Birding class set

Indoor flea market set SEQUIM — The Sequim High School Future Business Leaders of America will host an indoor flea market in the school cafeteria, 601 N. Sequim Ave., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Proceeds will support Sequim FBLA students’ trip to the state conference.

Plowing demonstration SEQUIM — Vintage tractors, some dating back to the 1920s, will put on a plowing demonstration at Lamar Road, just east of Cays Road near Dungeness. The demo begins at 10 a.m. Saturday. Dave Bekkevar and company are using the tractors to plow fields. The public is invited. For more information, phone 360-460-2760.

Port Angeles PoetrySlam tonight PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Library is hosting young people’s poetry contests — also called a PoetrySlam — at 6:30 tonight. The free event will be at the library, 2210 S. Peabody St. More than 60 poets and actors in grades 6-8 will read original poetry or recite from other poets’ work. Judges for the middle school poetry competition will be Alan Turner, owner of Port Angeles’ Port Book and News; Peninsula Daily News Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz; Odyssey Books owner April Bellerud; North Olympic Library System board member Betty Gordon; and Port Angeles Friends of the Library member Margaret Klover. For more information, visit www.NOLS.org or phone 360-417-8500.

Tree giveaway in PA PORT ANGELES — The North Olympic Timber Action Committee is hosting its annual tree giveaway at the Green Crow parking lot, corner of Eighth and Francis streets, from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday. These trees will grow large and need to be planted immediately. Species are Douglas fir, hemlock and cedar. There will be a limited quantity of Christmas-tree stock available for purchase, with proceeds going to the committee’s scholarship fund.

Barbecue benefit

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Aimee Ringle and Saratone, a pair of singers and song leaders, will host “River Back to the Ocean,” a fundraising concert and singalong, at the Madrona MindBody Institute at 7 p.m. Sunday. This will be an evening of folk music with plenty of opportunities to join in, Ringle promised. “What we’re going for that night is funk-folk,” she said. Admission is a suggested donation of $10 or more. Proceeds will help Saratone and local filmmaker Jeff Eichen make a music video of Saratone’s original

song “River Back to the Ocean.” The song is about the freeing of the Elwha, a river whose salmon runs Saratone w e r e blocked for nearly 100 years before removal of its two dams began in 2011.

Celebrating a victory

munion,” Ringle said. “We’re all singing beings, all creative beings.” Sunday’s gathering will be in the Madrona Room at the Madrona MindBody Institute, which is in Building 310 at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way. The smaller studio is ideal, Ringle said, since it’s a more intimate setting than the institute’s upstairs ballroom. For more information, phone Madrona at 360-3444475 or visit www.Aimee Ringle.com and www. SaraToneHome.org.

“We’re celebrating a major victory,” Ringle said. She and Saratone, who is from Ashland, Ore., believe in the power of song ________ to highlight common dreams. Features Editor Diane Urbani So Sunday “is definitely de la Paz can be reached at 360going to be an evening of 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. celebration, of sweet com- urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

Dance, memoir to blend at reading

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Sequim’s A s p i r e Academy of Expressive Arts, as well as another guest: actor Charles Duncan as Sanelli “Aretha Franklin.” The Immigrant’s Table is Sanelli’s personal account of weaving Old World and New World together, as a first-generation American born to parents from Italy. In her performance Saturday, Sanelli will introduce her family in the most Italian of settings: around a table. Then, she will reveal

some old recipes — for meals and for spirited interaction. Sanelli is the author of eight books, including another memoir, Among Friends (2009); the essay collection Falling Awake (2007); and Craving Water (2004), a book of poems. She is also a columnist for the Peninsula Daily News and has contributed to The Seattle Times and National Public Radio. To find out more about Sanelli’s program and other offerings at Nash’s Farm Store, phone 360-681-6274 or visit www.NashsOrganic Produce.com.

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PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles High School Choir Spring Swing will be held in the school cafeteria, 304 E. Park Ave., from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday. The annual choir booster scholarship endowment fundraiser features a barbecue lunch of grilled burgers and all the fixings. Silent- and live-auction items from the community also will be available for PENINSULA DAILY NEWS bidding. DUNGENESS — A perThe Port Angeles High formance blending dance, School Choir will perform. Lunch is $5 per person. memoir and Italian flavor arrives as Mary Lou Sanelli appears at Nash’s Farm Dance classes Store at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. PORT ANGELES — A writer and dancer Adapted dance classes for based in Port Townsend, people with Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Sanelli will read from her acute arthritis and other memoir, The Immigrant’s disorders are taught once a Table, at the store at 4681 month at the Sons of Nor- Sequim-Dungeness Way. Admission is free, and way Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., with the next one this Sat- coffee and tea will be served. urday. Trained teachers Corrie Sequim dancer Befort and Deborah Planning to join Sanelli Magallanes lead the 10 a.m. for a dance segment is class, which is also open to 16-year-old Alexis Ottowaycaregivers and other family Chung, a student at members. The session runs for 90 minutes, and admission is $10 for patients and free for caregivers.

Draperies Northwest

M–Th Friday Saturday Sunday

Concert fetes freeing of Elwha River waters

Sequim Doce Pares/ Sequim Martial Arts 452 Riverview Dr., Sequim (off of McComb Rd.) Mon. & Thurs. 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.Traditional Filipino martial art of Eskrima stickfighting. Students learn single stick, double stick, stick and blade techniques, forms, disarms, joint locks and control methods. Rank promotion encouraged but not required. Smart, safe training in a really nice studio. $60 per month. Contact Kathrin Sumpter at 360-6834799. Visit us at www. sequimmartialarts.com.

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Beginning week of April 28th Are you tight, can’t touch the floor or out of shape? New beginner classes on Monday at 6:15 p.m., and Saturday at 9:45 a.m. This will be a great way to head into summer, your back and legs

will thank you. Additional classes available, check website; www.olympiciyengaryoga.com or call 360-452-3012.

CAGEWORX MMA & BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU ACageworX (CwX) Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and MMA 103 Elwha Rd. is the Olympic Peninsula’s premier training facility. CwX offers classes 6 days a week in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Kickboxing, Wrestling, Boxing and MMA as well as our popular Women’s Only Kickboxing and Youth/ Teens MMA program. Head coach and manager Cody Houston has over 18 years experience in the martial arts and is the areas only Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Black Belt under the highly respected Professor Marcelo Alonso. If you’re a first day beginner or a seasoned competitive athlete CwX’s classes

are structured for you to learn at your own pace in a safe and friendly environment. Memberships are tailored to meet your specific training needs and CwX is the states only martial arts facility that offers 24/7 gym access with cardio machines, weights, mats, bags and cage. Law enforcement/Military/ Competition discounts available. For questions and info: www.cageworx. com or 360-504-2751.

Advertise in Classes & Lessons Only $20 per week for up to 75 words. 25¢ each additional word. Also listed online at peninsuladailynews. com. Submit by calling Margot at 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 or email her at mconway@ peninsuladailynews. com. You may also come to our office at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday publication.

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SEQUIM — A free firsttime-homebuyer class will be held at Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The keynote speakers will be Michele Adkisson and Claire Koenigsaecker.

SEQUIM — Castell Insurance, 426 E. Washington St., will host document shredding from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The event is free and open to the public. Bring documents such as old tax returns, account statements or any paperwork with account or Social Security numbers or other personal information.

PORT ANGELES — A bunco party benefit to support the Olympic Peninsula Senior Games will be held at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. today. Tickets are $10 and are available at Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., and the senior center. There will be refreshments and door prizes. Sponsors include Angel Crest Nursery, Pen Print, Park View Villas and senior center. For more information, Singer Aimee Ringle, above, and Saratone will offer music in honor of email dbellamente@ the free-flowing Elwha River in a “River Back to the Ocean” concert cityofpa.us or phone 360- Sunday in Port Townsend. 417-4554.

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Homebuyer class

Castell hosts shred

Bunco party benefit

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SEQUIM — Admiralty Audubon member Ron Sikes will present “Spring Gardening for Birds” at the Dungeness River Audubon Center, 3151 W. Hendrickson Road, at 10 a.m. Saturday. The lecture is the sixth in the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society’s “Backyard Birding” series. Cost is $5 for adults, free for ages 18 and younger. Sikes will provide information about preparing garden settings and plants that may attract migrating and resident birds. Following the presentation, participants are invited to tour McComb Gardens to see a variety of garden areas and plants available in the Pacific Northwest. The series of classes, hosted by members of the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society, is intended for residents who are interested in knowing more about birds seen locally each season and learning how to develop good habitats for wild birds. “Backyard Birding” can be taken either as individual classes or in a series. The cost of each session is $5, free for anyone younger than 18. After the completion of five sessions, participants will be offered free membership in OPAS for one year. The final lectures in the series will be “Enjoying Spring Sounds,” presented by Dow Lambert and Ken Wiersema, on May 18 and Wiersema’s “Birds Out of the Nest” on June 8.

A free lunch and coffee will be provided. The class is sponsored by the state Housing and Finance Commission. To register, phone 360683-2688.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Archive, heirloom preservation class CONTINUED FROM B3 dispose of sensitive documents in a secure way is set More classes are set for at First Federal’s Port May 18, June 15 and July Angeles east-side branch, 20, while details are avail- 1603 E. First St., from able by phoning 360-457- 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. People can bring sensi5352 or emailing djones@ tive paper for shredding onolypen.com. site by LeMay Mobile Shredding, a professional Archival class shredding company. PORT ANGELES — The There is no charge. Clallam County Historical The event is limited to Society is sponsoring a five bags or five boxes per workshop on archival fram- vehicle. ing from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attendees should be preSaturday. pared to keep bags/boxes. The class will be at the society’s research and Virtuous relationships administrative center at PORT ANGELES — 931 W. Ninth St. behind the “Building Strong Relationformer Lincoln School. The cost of the class is $8 ships: The Seven Virtuous for members of the Clallam Relationship Unities” will be presented at the Port County Historical Society Angeles Library, 2210 S. and $10 for nonmembers. Peabody St., from 7 p.m. to Class size is limited. 9 p.m. Saturday. For further information The teaching will focus on and to register for the class, the Buddhist Seven Relationphone the society’s office at ship Unities, a way to resolve 360-452-2662 or email differences and increase harartifact@olypen.com. mony among family, friends and co-workers. Instructor Devan Miller PORT ANGELES — A is an authorized dharma free community shredding teacher in the Dzogchen event to help individuals Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism under the guidance of His Eminence Dzoghen Khenpo Choga Rinpoche. This teaching is offered free in accordance with Buddhist tradition. Offerings to support Dharma teachings are suggested. For more information, email port.angeles. dzogchen.sangha@gmail. com or phone 360-477-5445.

Spring shred

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

PENINSULA PROFILE Every Sunday in PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pie sale benefit PORT ANGELES — The Relay For Life team Walk Around the Clock will hold its semiannual pie sale at Swain’s General Store, 602 E. First St., starting at 9 a.m. Saturday. The sale will offer a large

Pickleball marathon

COHO

PORT ANGELES — A 24-hour pickleball marathon benefit for the Captain Joseph House Foundation will run from 9 a.m. Saturday to 9 a.m. Sunday. The marathon will be at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. The cost is $10 for adults, free for ages 12 and younger with an adult, and $5 for ages 5-17 without an adult. The second annual community pickleball marathon offers instruction, play and refreshments. Loaner paddles and equipment are available. The Captain Joseph House Foundation is raising funds to provide a place of respite for families of fallen service members. Register for the event with the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., or phone 360-4577004.

SALMON RELEASED

Emily Bundy, Makayla Peabody and Elliot Hill, from left, of Elizabeth Allen’s Queen of Angels School sixth-grade class release coho salmon into Valley Creek in Port Angeles. The 500 coho salmon were reared at Hurd Creek Hatchery in Sequim. assortment of homemade pies, including wild blackberry, apple, coconut, banana cream, pecan and lemon. Sales will continue until 1 p.m. or 2 p.m., or until pies run out. All proceeds will be given to the American Cancer Society.

offer children’s arts and crafts, snacks, face painting, storytime and door prizes. Three Bears Educare Center is a licensed nonprofit child-care center operated by First Step Family Support Center. More information is available at www.firststep family.org/3bears, by phonOpen house ing 360-452-3263 or emailPORT ANGELES — ing dede_fstep@olypen.com. Three Bears Educare will host an open house at 323 Window open house E. Sixth St. from 11 a.m. to PORT ANGELES — A 3 p.m. Saturday. replacement-window open The free open house will house will be held at Hartnagel Building Supply, 3111 E. U.S. Highway 101, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Attendees will learn how energy-efficient windows can save money and energy, find out if they qualify for local weatherization rebates and meet local contractors. Visitors should bring a list of window sizes for a free estimate on replacement windows. For more information, email Donna Hoyt at donnah@hartnagels.com or phone 360-452-8933.

Clallam Spring Clean Up Sunday, April 21, 2013 • 9am–3pm

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* Admission Benefits

Port Angeles Food Bank

Free game day PORT ANGELES — A free game day for kids will be held at Anime Kat, 110 W. First St., from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Attendees will learn to play a card game called Kaijudo and receive a free deck of game cards while supplies last. The event is for 8- to 12-year-olds and their families, but all are welcome. For more information, phone Drew Schwab at 360797-131, email animekat@ email.com or visit www. facebook.com/Anime KatLLC.

Celebrate Earth Day by cleaning up your property and taking the materials to the Regional Transfer Station in Port Angeles for recycling and disposal.

Bring for Recycling: Tires (limit of 4) Appliances (limit of 4) Metal Waste Oil and Antifreeze Auto Batteries

Bring for Garbage Disposal: Large household items you are unable to donate for reuse Household Garbage

PORT TOWNSEND — The Olympic Peninsula Dance group wraps up its season tonight. The dance will be at the Elks Club, 555 Otto St. This time around, Jim Nyby and the F Street Band will provide music from 8 p.m. First, though, a samba dance lesson will start the evening at 7 p.m. Admission is $15 to this final Olympic Peninsula Dance event until September. Pancake breakfast More details are at www. PORT ANGELES — A OlympicPeninsulaDance.com. pancake breakfast will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Free tours given Sunday at the Naval Elks PORT TOWNSEND — Lodge, 131 E. First St. behind-the-scenes The menu includes Free scrambled eggs, bacon, sau- tours of the Jefferson County sage, hash browns, pan- Historical Society Research cakes, biscuits and gravy, Center, 13694 Airport Cutoff Road, are planned from plus coffee, tea and juices. Cost is $10 for adults, $8 noon to 3 p.m. Saturday. Volunteers with the Jeffor seniors and $6 for chilferson County Historical dren 10 and younger. Society and Jefferson County Genealogical SociJoyce ety will lead tours of the facility, which was given a $1.6 million expansion in Crescent car wash 2012 to add space for archiJOYCE — The Crescent val storage, artifact processSchool senior class will hold ing, exhibit preparation, a a rummage sale and car conservation laboratory wash fundraiser from and a loading dock. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Visitors will see rare The car wash is set for documents and unique artithe Joyce General Store facts ranging from Native parking lot, 50893 state American baskets to 1930s Highway 112, while the children’s toys to recent rummage sale will be held work by local artists. across the highway in the Crescent Water/Joyce Fit- Lincoln Day luncheon ness parking lot. PORT TOWNSEND — To donate rummage sale items, phone trip adviser Jefferson County RepubliLinda Sage at 360-928- cans will meet for their annual Lincoln Day Lun3311, ext. 1000. cheon on Saturday. The luncheon at the Port Port Townsend Townsend Elks Club at 555 Otto St. will begin at 11 a.m. with a social hour Scandia dinner set and silent auction. At noon, the Pledge of PORT TOWNSEND — Nordic culture will be cele- Allegiance and an invocabrated at the ninth annual tion will precede the lunch Scandia Dinner at 6 tonight. and speakers. The cost of the luncheon, The dinner hosted by members of Thea Foss which will feature wild Lodge No. 45 of the Daugh- salmon or grilled sesame ters of Norway will be in the chicken, is $40 per person Parish Hall of St. Mary Star or $75 for a couple. Attendof the Sea Catholic Church, ees are asked to prepay or make reservations. 1335 Blaine St. Kirby Wilbur, chairman of Tickets are $20. Jack Anderson’s fiddle the state Republican Party, and Jane Johnson’s button will be master of ceremonies. Scheduled guests are accordion will provide musiLuanne Van Werven, vice cal accompaniment. Tickets are available at chairwoman of the state Maricee Fashion, 913 Water Republican Party; Dani St., or by phone at 360-379- Bolyard, past chairwoman of the Grant County 1802. Republicans; and Chris Tibbs, chairman of the KitBoat safety course sap County Republicans. PORT TOWNSEND — An eight-hour boating seaTURN TO EVENTS/B9

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manship and safety course will be offered by the Point Wilson Sail & Power Squadron today and Saturday. A four-hour session will run from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. today, with the second half following from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Each session will be held at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St. To register or for more information, phone Bob Monica at 360-385-2634.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 19-20, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Hood Canal worth a try

Octopus meeting Last October, 20-year-old Dylan Mayer emerged from the water near Alki Point in Seattle with a giant Pacific octopus. He had a license, and his harvest was done legally, but it nonetheless set off a firestorm of controversy. Following the public outcry, including three petitions signed by hundreds of scuba divers and other members of the public seeking protection for octopuses from recreational harvest, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife has reviewed the rules and has approved four options for managing Puget Sounds’ giant Pacific octopus population. Before making its decision, the state will hold two meetings in which it will seek public input on the issue. One of those meetings will be held Tuesday at the Cotton Building (407 Water St.) in Port Townsend, lasting from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information about the four options under consideration or to post public comments, visit www. tinyurl.com/OctoOptions.

Kids derby Port Angeles Parks and Recreation’s kids fishing derby was held at the Lincoln Park Ponds last Saturday for children ages 5 through 14. The following are the top three winners for each age group, including the combined length of their respective catches. ■ 5 to 6 years: Lacy Sue Flower, 48.1 inches; Brian Lester, 33.9 inches; Keira Gedelman, 29.1 inches. ■ 7 to 8 years: Kaler Oldemeyer, 47.5 inches; Carlee Dewater, 29.4 inches; Leilani Frances, 29.3 inches. ■ 9 to 10 years: Blake Williams, 54.6 inches; Lenora Cepeda, 49 inches; Zoie Harris, 48.6 inches. ■ 11 to 12 years: Caleb Martin, 48 inches; Skyler Wilbur, 45.5 inches; Rivers Nuvum, 29 inches. ■ 13 to 14 years: Jack Drennen, 29.1 inches; Dillon Martin, 28.3 inches; Derrick Hensdale, 28.1 inches. TURN

TO

HORTON/B7

Sequim finishes second to Olympic in boys meet PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The Sequim and Port Angeles boys and girls track and field teams split in their Olympic League head-tohead meet while Olympic also competed in the three-way meet. The Roughrider girls won with a score of 78.5 with the Wolves not too far behind at 66.5 and the Trojans trailing with 42. “Our girls worked hard to hold off Sequim,” Port Angeles girls track coach Bill Tiderman said. “Great times and distances were hard to come by on a cold, windy track and field but the ladies got the places they needed to stay undefeated in the league so far.” A few personal bests were recorded for the Port Angeles girls despite the weather, Tiderman added. The Olympic boys, meanwhile, barely nudged out Sequim for first place, 78.5-77.5, while the Riders settled for third with 22. There were five double winners between Port Angeles and Sequim as Jolene Millsap and Willow Suess captured two wins each for the Riders and Jasmine McMullin took two events for the Wolves on the girls side. Jayson Brocklesby and Lopaka Yasumura claimed two wins apiece for Sequim in boys action. On the girls side, Port Angeles led everyone with seven individual wins while Sequim had five and Olympic three. Each school earned one relay victory each in the three relays. Millsap took two of the three sprint events by winning the 100 meters in 13.01 and the 200 in 27.33 while Sequim’s Waverly Shreffler claimed the 400 in 1:07.83. Suess took over in the distance events, taking the 800 run in 2:41.14 and the 3,200in 12:50.49. McMullin, meanwhile, was first in long jump with a leap of 15 feet, 2 inches, and she took the gold in triple jump at 33 feet even. Other area individual winners were Port Angeles’ Elizabeth Stevenson in the 1,600, Alexis Hefton in the discus and Brittany Norberg in the javelin, and Sequim’s Sarah Hutchison in 100 hurdles and Emily VanDyken in pole vault. Norberg won by more than 20 feet as she threw the spear 104-04. The second-place throw was 83-10. In addition, Olympic won the 4x100 relay while Sequim took the 4x200 event with McMullin, Hutchison, Hannah Hudson and Heidi Vereide, and Port Angeles won the 4x400 relay with Cassidy Hodgin, Madison St. George, Elyse Lovgren and Millsap.

Preps In boys action, the Wolves won six individual events and swept the two relay races while Olympic won six events and the Riders took two. Earning two wins were Sequim’s Yasumura in the 100 in 11.77 and the shot put with a heave of 48-09.5, a season best, and Brocklesby, who captured the high jump with a 6-foot even height, and the 400 in 52.88. Other area individual wins went to Sequim’s Joshua Cibene in pole vault (10-06), Alex Barry in triple jump (38-05), and Port Angeles’ Kyle Tupper in 1,600 (4:38.74) and Tony Dalgardno in 800 (2:17.56). The Wolves also won the 4x100 relay with Christian Miles, Yasumura, Brocklesby and Dylan Chatters in 46.01, and the 4x400 relay with Oscar Herrera, Judah Breitbach, Chatters and Hamish Peers in 3:53.97. The Roughriders next will participate in the Bellevue Invitational, which features more than 500 athletes, on Saturday.

Softball Sequim 10, North Kitsap 0

KEITH THORPE (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim’s Katie Rogers crosses the finish line ahead of Olympic’s Keelin Balzaretti and Port Angeles’ Madison POULSBO — Makayla St. George in the 4x200 relay during the Olympic Bentz threw a complete-game League tri-meet in Sequim. two-hit shutout and Alexas Besand knocked in four runs for the Wolves in the Olympic League game. Sequim remained undefeated on the year, improving to 8-0 in league and 9-0 overall while the Vikings fell to 4-5, 4-6. Bentz struck out seven and walked just two in the fiveinning game. Besand led the offensive attack by going 2 for 3 with a double, four RBI and three runs scored while Columbia Haupt went 2 for 3 with three RBI. MaryLu Clift also had a strong game with a double. two RBI and run in a 2 for 3 outing. Shelby Lott scored two runs and went 2 for 3. It wasn’t all muscle for the Wolves, though, as they produced seven stolen bases. Rylleigh Zbaraschuk led the team with two thefts while Bentz, hannah Grubb, Lott, Clift and Haupt. Sequim 10, North Kitsap 0, 5 innings Sequim 2 0 3 5 0 — 10 9 2 North Kitsap 0 0 0 0 0 — 0 2 2 WP- Ma. Bentz; LP- Keller Pitching Statistics Sequim: Bentz 5IP, 2H, 0R, 7K, 2BB. North Kitsap: Keller 5IP, 9H, 10R, 3ER, 5K, 2BB. Hitting Statistics Sequim: Besand 2-3, 2B, 4RBI, 2R; Haupt 2-3, 3RBI, SB; Clift 2-3, 2B, 2RBI, R, SB; Lott 2-3, RBI, 2R, SB.

Kingston 13, Port Townsend 3 KINGSTON — The Buccaneers remained in the chase for

the top of the Olympic League standings with the victory over the winless Redskins. The Bucs exploded for eight runs in the bottom of the sixth inning to break open a close 5-3 game. Kingston stays in third place with a 7-2 record, just a halfgame behind Port Angeles and 1.5 behind league-leading Sequim. Port Townsend falls to 0-9, 0-10. Natalee Taylor and Baili Shaw both batted 2 for 3 for the Redskins while Gen Polizzi went 1 for 2. Kingston 13, Port Townsend 3, 6 innings Port Townsend 0 0 3 0 0 0 — 3 6 4 Kingston 0 3 0 1 1 8 — 13 9 2 WP- Hammetmeister; LP- G. Polizzi Pitching Statistics Port Townsend: G. Polizzi 6IP, 3K, 7BB. Kingston: Hammetmeister 6IP, 3K, 4BB. Hitting Statistics Port Townsend: Taylor 2-3; Shaw 2-3; G. Polizzi 1-2. Kingston: Gowenlock 2B; Hilse 2-4, 2RBI; Bartell 2-3 (2RBI).

Rochester 8, 10, Forks 0, 4 ROCHESTER — The Spartans rallied for three runs in the seventh inning of the second game in SWL-Evergreen Division action. Brooke Jacoby, Alissa Shaw, Sassy Price and Courtnie Paul all had hits for the rally in the Nick Fritschler of Port Angeles competes in the seventh.

triple jump. Fritschler

TURN

TO

PREPS/B7 ended up taking fifth.

Seager’s hit keys M’s win THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Kyle Seager hit a two-out RBI double off Justin Verlander in the seventh inning to break a scoreless tie and help give the Mariners a 2-0 victory over the Detroit Tigers on Thursday. The teams played the series finale about 13 hours after the conclusion Tigers’ 2-1 victory in 14 innings on Wednesday, a game that had a combined 40 strikeouts and had Justin Smoak tagged out at home in a collision with catcher Brayan Pena for the final out. Verlander (2-2), who threw 126 pitches in seven innings, gave up a two-out single to Robert Andino. Seager then hit the first pitch into the left-field corner, and Andino raced around from first. Endy Chavez followed with a single to left, scoring Seager. Tiger catcher Alex Avila caught the throw from left fielder Andy Dirks, but did not position him-

self in front of the plate to block Seager, who slid under the tag. Verlander struck out 12 — two short of his career high — and gave up nine hits, two runs and walked one. Carter Capps (1-1) worked two innings for Seattle to pick up his first major league victory. Tom Wilhelmsen earned his sixth save. Mariners starter Hisashi Iwakuma continued his strong start to the season. He matched up well with Verlander until he developed a blister in the middle finger of his right hand, forcing him to leave after just six innings and 70 pitches. He allowed three hits with one walk and two strikeouts. In his four starts this season, Iwakuma has given up just 12 hits, five runs, two walks and has 18 strikeouts and a 1.69 ERA One of the Tigers’ best scoring chances came in the first when Miguel Cabrera sent Chavez to the warning track, but Chavez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Kyle Seager, left, leaps up after sliding safely into home as Detroit catcher Alex Avila makes his case to the umpire in the seventh inning Thursday. went to the left-center wall to make the catch. Chavez also made an outstanding diving catch in the ninth inning on a Prince Fielder blooper. The Mariners struck out 12

times on Thursday, one game after they set a club record with 21 strikeouts on Wednesday. Notes: After Wednesday,’s game, the M’s needed to add to their bullpen, so the club promoted RHP Hector Noesi.

SPORTS/BUSINESS

ANGLERS ON THE North Olympic Peninsula are down to two options for the saltwater salmon season. First is to Lee cross the Strait of Juan de Fuca Horton and fish Marine Area 7 (the San Juan Islands). Blackmouth fishing there seems to be doing much better than it did, considering the daily limit was decreased from two salmon to one last week. The second option is Hood Canal (Marine Area 12). As was the case with the areas on the Strait, the Hood Canal blackmouth fishery has been under utilized this season. But now might be a good time to fish the Canal for anglers with a blackmouth craving. “I haven’t seen a soul out there for a while,” fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist Ward Norden said. “This is not surprising, given what I haven’t seen in other marine areas. Hardly anyone has fished saltwater this winter. “Now is the time to be out on the Canal, however. Historically, early spring is the best time for blackmouth between Pleasant Harbor and Point Whitney. “You have to be out at first light, though. By the time the sun hits the water, the fish are off the bite.” The daily limit on Hood Canal is two hatchery salmon, with a 22-inch size minimum. In Marine Area 7 and 12, the blackmouth fishery closes on Tuesday, April 30.

PA girls capture tri-meet


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Baseball: Rainier Christian at Quilcene (DH), 3:45; North Mason at Port Angeles, Civic Field, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; Port Townsend at Bremerton, 4 p.m.; Eatonville at Chimacum, 4 p.m. Softball: Quilcene at Muckleshoot (DH), 3:30 p.m.; North Mason at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Klahowya, 4 p.m.; Port Townsend at Bremerton, 4 p.m.; Eatonville at Chimacum, 4 p.m.

Seattle F.Hernandez 8 4 1 0 0 12 Wilhelmsen 2 1 0 0 0 3 2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Capps O.Perez 11⁄3 0 0 0 2 2 Furbush L,0-1 1 1 1 1 2 3 Beavan 1 0 0 0 0 0 Furbush pitched to 2 batters in the 14th. Dotel pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. WP—F.Hernandez. Umpires—Home, Bob Davidson; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, James Hoye; Third, John Hirschbeck. T—4:27. A—14,981 (47,476).

Saturday

American League

Calendar Today

Track and Field: Sequim at Bremerton, 9 a.m.; Crescent, Clallam Bay and Neah Bay at Forks Invitational, 11 a.m.; Port Angeles at Bellevue Invitational, 11 a.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Women’s League Wednesday 7 Cedars Casino 71, Windermere Lady Riders 41 Scoring Leaders: 7 Cedars: Ashley Payne 26, Kathleen Kiele18; Windermere: Maddy Hinrichs 20, Macy Walker 6 Peninsula Lady Pirates 58, Halberg Chiropractic 40 Scoring Leaders: Peninsula: Allison Knowles 17, Jesse Ellis 12; Halberg: Beth Krause 15, Jen Halberg 12

Preps JV Softball Port Angeles 5, Sequim 2 at Sequim Wednesday Highlights: Port Angeles: Hope Wegener, winning pitcher; Dawn Oliver 2 for 2, HR, 2R; Jaidyn Larson 2 for 4, 2RBI

Baseball Mariners 2, Tigers 0 Thursday’s Game Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi AJcksn cf 4 0 0 0 EnChvz cf 3021 Dirks lf 4 0 0 0 Bay rf 4000 MiCarr 3b 4 0 1 0 KMorls dh 4010 Fielder 1b 4 0 2 0 Morse lf 4000 VMrtnz dh 2 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 4010 JhPerlt ss 3 0 1 0 Shppch c 3010 Avila c 3 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 3010 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 Andino 3b-ss 3 1 2 0 D.Kelly rf 3 0 1 0 Ryan ss 2000 Seager ph-3b 1 1 1 1 Totals 30 0 5 0 Totals 31 2 9 2 Detroit 000 000 000—0 Seattle 000 000 20x—2 DP—Detroit 1, Seattle 2. LOB—Detroit 5, Seattle 6. 2B—Fielder (6), K.Morales (5), Seager (8). CS—En.Chavez (1). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander L,2-2 7 9 2 2 1 12 Coke 1 0 0 0 0 0 Seattle Iwakuma 6 3 0 0 1 2 Capps W,1-1 2 2 0 0 1 3 Wilhelmsen S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, James Hoye; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third, Bob Davidson. T—2:52. A—15,742 (47,476). Detroit

Tigers 2, Mariners 1, 14 innings Wednesday’s Game Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi AJcksn cf 7 0 1 0 FGtrrz cf 6020 TrHntr rf 5 0 2 0 Seager 3b 6010 MiCarr 3b 6 0 1 0 KMorls dh 4010 Fielder 1b 6 0 0 0 Bay pr-dh 2010 VMrtnz dh 6 1 1 0 Morse rf 5110 D.Kelly pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Ibanez lf 6011 Dirks lf 4 0 1 0 Smoak 1b 5010 Tuiassp ph-lf 0 0 0 0 JMontr c 5010 JhPerlt ss 4 0 0 1 Ackley 2b 5020 B.Pena c 6 0 1 1 Ryan ss 2000 Infante 2b 6 0 0 0 EnChvz ph 1 0 0 0 Andino ss 1000 Totals 50 2 7 2 Totals 48 111 1 Detroit 000 010 000 000 01—2 Seattle 000 000 100 000 00—1 E—O.Perez (1), Ryan (2). DP—Detroit 3. LOB—Detroit 11, Seattle 10. 2B—A.Jackson (3), Tor.Hunter (6), Dirks (1), F.Gutierrez (3), Morse (1), Ackley (1). S—Jh.Peralta, Ackley. IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Scherzer 8 6 1 1 1 12 Dotel 0 1 0 0 1 0 Coke 1 0 0 0 0 1 2⁄3 0 Villarreal 0 0 2 1 1 D.Downs ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Alburquerque 2 1 0 0 0 3 Smyly W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Benoit S,1-1 1 2 0 0 0 0 Detroit

West Division W L Oakland 12 4 Texas 9 6 Seattle 7 10 Los Angeles 4 10 Houston 4 11 East Division W L Boston 10 4 New York 8 5 Baltimore 7 7 Toronto 6 9 Tampa Bay 5 9 Central Division W L Detroit 9 6 Kansas City 8 6 Chicago 7 8 Minnesota 6 7 Cleveland 5 8

Pct .750 .600 .412 .286 .267

GB — 2½ 5½ 7 7½

Pct GB .714 — .615 1½ .500 3 .400 4½ .357 5 Pct GB .600 — .571 ½ .467 2 .462 2 .385 3

Wednesday’s Games Kansas City 1, Atlanta 0 Oakland 7, Houston 5 N.Y. Yankees 4, Arizona 3 Boston 6, Cleveland 3 Tampa Bay 6, Baltimore 2 Chicago White Sox 7, Toronto 0 Texas at Chicago, ppd., rain L.A. Angels at Minnesota, ppd., rain Detroit 2, Seattle 1, 14 innings Thursday’s Games Chicago Cubs 6, Texas 2 Seattle 2, Detroit 0 Arizona at N.Y. Yankees, late Boston at Cleveland, late Tampa Bay at Baltimore, late Chicago White Sox at Toronto, late Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 2-1) at Baltimore (Hammel 2-1), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 2-0) at Toronto (Morrow 0-1), 4:07 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 1-2) at Boston (Buchholz 3-0), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 1-2) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Seattle (J.Saunders 1-1) at Texas (Darvish 2-1), 5:05 p.m. Cleveland (Myers 0-2) at Houston (Harrell 0-2), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Worley 0-2) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 2-1), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 2-0) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 1-1), 7:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Kansas City at Boston, 10:10 a.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 12:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Kansas City at Boston, 10:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Cleveland at Houston, 11:10 a.m. Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 11:10 a.m. Seattle at Texas, 12:05 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m.

National League West Division W L Colorado 11 4 Arizona 8 6 San Francisco 9 7 Los Angeles 7 8 San Diego 5 10 East Division W L Atlanta 12 2 Washington 9 6 New York 7 7 Philadelphia 6 9 Miami 3 12 Central Division W L St. Louis 8 6 Cincinnati 8 7 Pittsburgh 7 7 Milwaukee 6 8 Chicago 5 9

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Pct GB .733 — .571 2½ .563 2½ .467 4 .333 6 Pct .857 .600 .500 .400 .200

GB — 3½ 5 6½ 9½

Pct GB .571 — .533 ½ .500 1 .429 2 .357 3

Wednesday’s Games Kansas City 1, Atlanta 0 Cincinnati 1, Philadelphia 0, comp. of susp. game N.Y. Yankees 4, Arizona 3

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 0 Cincinnati 11, Philadelphia 2 Washington 6, Miami 1 Texas at Chicago, ppd., rain Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3 N.Y. Mets at Colorado, ppd., snow San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 Thursday’s Games Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 2 Chicago Cubs 6, Texas 2 Colorado 11, N.Y. Mets 3 Arizona at N.Y. Yankees, late Atlanta at Pittsburgh, late St. Louis at Philadelphia, late Miami at Cincinnati, late Today’s Games Atlanta (Hudson 2-0) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez 1-0), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 2-1) at Baltimore (Hammel 2-1), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at Philadelphia (Halladay 1-2), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Slowey 0-2) at Cincinnati (Latos 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 1-2) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 3-0), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 1-2) at Milwaukee (Estrada 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Arizona (Kennedy 1-1) at Colorado (Chacin 2-0), 5:40 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 0-3) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-0), 7:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Miami at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 12:05 p.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 5:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Miami at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m.

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct y-San Antonio 58 24 .707 x-Memphis 56 26 .683 x-Houston 45 37 .549 Dallas 41 41 .500 New Orleans 27 55 .329 Northwest Division W L Pct z-Oklahoma City 60 22 .732 x-Denver 57 25 .695 Utah 43 39 .524 Portland 33 49 .402 Minnesota 31 51 .378 Pacific Division W L Pct y-L.A. Clippers 56 26 .683 x-Golden State 47 35 .573 x-L.A. Lakers 45 37 .549 Sacramento 28 54 .341 Phoenix 25 57 .305 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct y-New York 54 28 .659 x-Brooklyn 49 33 .598 x-Boston 41 40 .506 Philadelphia 34 48 .415 Toronto 34 48 .415 Southeast Division W L Pct z-Miami 66 16 .805 x-Atlanta 44 38 .537 Washington 29 53 .354 Charlotte 21 61 .256 Orlando 20 62 .244 Central Division W L Pct y-Indiana 49 32 .605 x-Chicago 45 37 .549 x-Milwaukee 38 44 .463 Detroit 29 53 .354 Cleveland 24 58 .293 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

GB — 2 13 17 31 GB — 3 17 27 29 GB — 9 11 28 31 GB — 5 12½ 20 20 GB — 22 37 45 46 GB — 4½ 11½ 20½ 25½

Wednesday’s Games Denver 118, Phoenix 98 Dallas 99, New Orleans 87 Chicago 95, Washington 92 Memphis 86, Utah 70 Minnesota 108, San Antonio 95 Milwaukee 95, Oklahoma City 89 New York 98, Atlanta 92 Brooklyn 103, Detroit 99 Charlotte 105, Cleveland 98 Toronto 114, Boston 90 Miami 105, Orlando 93 Philadelphia 105, Indiana 95 L.A. Lakers 99, Houston 95, OT Golden State 99, Portland 88 L.A. Clippers 112, Sacramento 108 End of Regular Season

NBA Playoffs FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Milwaukee vs. Miami Sunday, April 21: Milwaukee at Miami, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: Milwaukee at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25: Miami at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 28: Miami at Milwaukee, 12:30 p.m. Boston vs. New York Saturday, April 20: Boston at New York, Noon Tuesday, April 23: Boston at New York, 5 p.m. Friday, April 26: New York at Boston, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 28: New York at Boston, 10 a.m. Atlanta vs. Indiana Sunday, April 21: Atlanta at Indiana, 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 24: Atlanta at Indiana, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: Indiana at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Monday, April 29: Indiana at Atlanta, TBD Chicago vs. Brooklyn Saturday, April 20: Chicago at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Monday, April 22: Chicago at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. Thursday, April 25: Brooklyn at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: Brooklyn at Chicago, 11 a.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City vs. Houston Sunday, April 21: Houston at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24: Houston at Oklahoma City, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 27: Oklahoma City at Houston, 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Houston, TBD San Antonio vs. L.A. Lakers Sunday, April 21: L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24: L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 26: San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 28: San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 4 p.m. Denver vs. Golden State Saturday, April 20: Goldsen State at Denver, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: Golden State at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 26: Denver at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 28: Denver at Golden State, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers vs. Memphis Saturday, April 20: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 22: Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: L.A. Clippers at Memphis, 1:30 p.m.

Football National Football League Seattle Seahawks 2013 Regular Season Schedule Week 1 Seattle at Carolina, 10 a.m., Sunday, Sept. 8 Week 2 San Francisco at Seattle 5:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 15 Week 3 Jacksonville at Seattle, 1:25 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 22 Week 4 Seattle At Houston, 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 29 Week 5 Seattle At Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Week 6 Tennessee at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.,, Sunday, Oct. 13 Week 7 Seattle At Arizona, 5:25 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 17 Week 8 Seattle At St. Louis, 5:40 p.m., Monday, Oct. 28 Week 9 Tampa Bay Seattle, 1:05 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 3 Week 10 Seattle at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 10 Week 11 Minnesota at Seattle, 1:25 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 17 Week 12 Bye Week 13 New Orleans at Seattle, 5:40 p.m., Monday, Dec. 2 Week 14 Seattle at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 8 Week 15 Seattle at New York Giants, 10 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 15 Week 16 Arizona at Seattle, 1:05 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 22 Week 17 St. Louis at Seattle, 1:25 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 29

C.J. Wilcox to return to Washington THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — C.J. Wilcox is bypassing a shot at the NBA and returning to Washington for his senior year, giving the Huskies one more season with their leading scorer as they try to get back to the NCAA tournament after a two-year absence. The school announced Wilcox’s decision on Thursday. Wilcox submitted his name for evaluation by NBA executives and most came back believing Wilcox would be a late first or likely second-round selection if he left after his junior year. “The main thing is that my

dad and I were talking and thinking back to about when I first got here, and the vision to redshirt my first year and have that last year to become the best player that I can be and lead the team,” Wilcox said in comments provided by the school. “We were not expecting the NBA to come into the picture so fast. That kind of got off track and we lost track of the vision. “We started seriously considering it and meeting with agents, but at the end of the day we went back and wanted to finish what we started.” Wilcox led the Huskies averag-

ing 16.8 points per game, good for sixth in the Pac-12. He was a second-team allPac-12 selection and played most of the conference season while battling a foot injury. He topped 20 points in 14 games and was the Huskies’ leading scorer in 22 of their 34 games. Wilcox spent his first two years with the Huskies mostly as a perimeter shooter, before expanding his game last season when he was asked to take on the bulk of the scoring load. Wilcox said he was surprised how many of the NBA evaluators believed he was just a

spot-up shooter. “A lot of the NBA doesn’t know that I’m athletic and that I’m more than a stand-still shooter,” he said. “I need to continue to work on ball-handling and getting to the free-throw line more. I need to be more of a leader and help the team get more wins.” Washington coach Lorenzo Romar expects Wilcox to be able to show that versatility next season. The Huskies should have more scoring depth around Wilcox next season, allowing him to take less of the load and display the versatility to do more than just shoot.

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Open de Espana, Round 2, Site: Parador de El Saler Valencia, Spain (Live) 9:30 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Greater Gwinnett Championship, Round 1, Site: TPC Sugarloaf - Duluth, Ga. (Live) Noon (26) ESPN X Games - Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, RBC Heritage, Round 2, Site: Harbour Town Golf Links - Hilton Head Island, S.C. (Live) 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, LOTTE Championship, Round 3, Site: Ko Olina Golf Club - Oahu, Hawaii (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN X Games - Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil (Live) 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Texas Rangers, Site: Rangers Ballpark - Arlington, Texas (Live) 5:25 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MFL, Leon vs. Chiapas Jaguares (Live)

Saturday 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Open de Espana, Round 3, Site: Parador de El Saler Valencia, Spain (Live) 6:55 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer EPL, Arsenal vs. Fulham, Site: Craven Cottage - London (Live) 8 a.m. (26) ESPN X Games - Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, RBC Heritage, Round 3, Site: Harbour Town Golf Links - Hilton Head Island, S.C. (Live) 11:30 a.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Detroit Tigers vs. Los Angeles Angels, Site: Angel Stadium - Anaheim, Calif. (Live) Noon (2) CBUT Curling, Grand Slam (Live) Noon (4) KOMO Basketball, Boston at New York, NBA Playoffs (Live) Noon Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Utah spring game (Live) Noon (7) KIRO Golf PGA, The Heritage (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Alabama spring game (Live) Noon (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Greater Gwinnett Championship (Live) 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC Golf PGA, The Heritage (Live) 1 p.m. (5) KING Boxing, Fight Night Fury (Live) 2 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Washington State spring game (Live) 2:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball, Golden State at Denver, NBA Playoffs (Live) 3 p.m. (6) KONG Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC at Colorado Rapids (Live) 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, LOTTE Championship (Live) 4 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Washington spring game (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Toronto Maple Leafs at Ottawa Senators (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball, Chicago at Brooklyn, NBA Playoffs (Live) 5 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Texas Rangers, Site: Rangers Ballpark - Arlington, Texas (Live) 5:30 p.m. (10) CITY Soccer MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps vs. FC Dallas, Site: FC Dallas Stadium - Frisco, Texas (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 X Games - Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil (Live) 7 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Baseball NCAA, UCLA at Oregon (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Detroit Red Wings vs. Vancouver Canucks, Site: Rogers Arena - Vancouver, B.C. (Live) 7:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball, Memphis at Los Angeles Clippers, NBA Playoffs (Live)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

B7

Horton: VideOlympics entries due next week CONTINUED FROM B5

Anderson Lake open? In case you missed it, Thursday’s Jefferson County edition of the Peninsula Daily News included a story about Anderson Lake’s status for the lowland lake opener next week. (For Clallam County, the story is in today’s edition.) It appears the lake will be open to fishing next Saturday, April 27. But it doesn’t appear there will be actual toxin tests until the blue-green algae is visible. I predict Lake Anderson is closed again before May 1. Read the story online here: www.tinyurl.com/ AndersonUpdate.

Razor clams Another round of morning razor clam digs has been approved and will begin Wednesday at Twin Harbors and next Friday (April 26) at Long Beach, Copalis and Mocrocks. Lonnie Archibald, a freelance photographer for the PDN, went digging in Ocean Shores, near Copalis, last weekend. He said that when the weather cooperated, the digging was good. Here are the razor clam digging dates, morning low

360-452-5144. The deadline for submissions is Saturday, April 27. Each submission will be judged before the event by a panel of judges for technical merit, production values, and “stoke� factor. This year’s judges include Jason Hummel of Jason Hummel Photography, Jason Thompson of Jason Thompson Photography, splitboarder extraordinaire Kyle Miller, Tyler Hamlet of Poor Boyz Productions and Dan Grund of Level 1 Productions. The winning filmmakers will receive more than $1,000 in cash and prizes. There is also an award for the crowd favorite. The film festival will be held at Wine on the WaterLONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS front on Saturday, May 11, Diggers search for razor clams at Ocean Shores last weekend. Another from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. All dig has been approved for next week. ages are welcome, and there is a suggested donation of $5. a.m., -1.7 feet — Twin Har- brates outdoor sports on tides and participating Proceeds for the event bors, Long Beach, Copalis the Peninsula. beaches: and Mocrocks. go to the Hurricane Ridge All submissions must be ■Wednesday, April 24: ■ Monday, April 29: Winter Sports Education 6:10 a.m., -0.3 feet — Twin in digital format. 10:01 a.m., -1.5 feet — Harbors. Films can be submitted Foundation, a nonprofit Twin Harbors, Long Beach organization that promotes ■ Thursday, April 25: electronically to Frank 6:54 a.m., -1.0 feet — Twin and Mocrocks. Crippen by email at frank@ winter sports education at ■ Tuesday, April 30: the Ridge. Harbors. nxnwsurf.com, by mail to 10:55 a.m., -1.0 feet — ■ Friday, April 26: 7:38 Hurricane Ridge Winter College fishing classes a.m., -1.5 feet — Twin Har- Twin Harbors. Sports Club c/o North by bors, Long Beach, Copalis Northwest Surf Co. 902 S. The first of this quarVideOlympics and Mocrocks. Lincoln St., Port Angeles, ter’s Peninsula College ■ Saturday, April 27: WA, 98362, or in person at fishing classes, taught by The Hurricane Ridge 8:24 a.m., -1.7 feet — Twin Winter Sports Club is North by Northwest Surf Ron Link, begins next Harbors, Long Beach, Co. (same as mailing accepting entries for the week. Copalis and Mocrocks. third annual VideOlympics, address). These classes consist of ■ Sunday, April 28: 9:11 a film festival that celeThe phone number is class time and a Saturday

field trip. Here are the class dates and times: â– Fishing for Steelhead: Friday, April 26, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, April 27, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. â–  Fly Fishing: Thursdays from May 2 to May 16, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, May 18, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. â–  River Fishing: Friday, May 10, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. â–  Fishing the Peninsula: Friday, June 7, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for these classes, phone Peninsula College at 360-417-6340. For more details on these classes, read my column from a few weeks ago: www.tinyurl.com/ PCfishing.

Send photos, stories Have a photograph, a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique? Send it to sports@ peninsuladailynews.com or P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton @peninsuladailynews.com.

Preps: Quilcene scores 11 unanswered runs CONTINUED FROM B5 runs on four hits while striking out two for Sequim. Cameron Harrison had Forks had seven hits in the second game while an RBI in the game and being held to two in the first went 1 for 2 for the Wolves. contest. North Kitsap 4, Sequim 1

Darrington 6, Quilcene 5

Darrington 6, Quilcene 5 Quilcene Darrington

0 0 0 3 1 1 0 —5 5 3 1 0 1 0 4 0 0 —6 6 2 Pitching Statistics Quilcene: Keiffer 6IP, 2K, 3ER. Hitting Statistics Quilcene: Weller 2 3B, R, RBI; Ward 1-3, RBI; Gray PH 2B; Viloria 1-3, R.

Baseball North Kitsap 4, Sequim 1

CHIMACUM — Errors and walks hurt the youthful Cowboys in the Nisqually League game. Charles Wright scored all four runs in the top of the seventh to erase a 2-0 Chimacum lead at that time. The Cowboys scored another run in the bottom of the seventh to make the game close. Myles Hundley struck out eight while walking three in 6 1/3 innings. Drew Yackulic went 2 for 3 and scored two runs for Chimacum. Charles Wright 4, Chimacum 3 Charles Wright 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 — 4 8 0 Chimacum 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 —3 6 2 WP- Chenley; LP- Hundley Pitching Statistics Chimacum: Hundley 6.2IP, 8K, 3BB. Hitting Statistics Charles Wright: Mondou 2-4, 2B; Reynolds 2-3, R. Chimacum: Yackulic 2-3, 2R.

Quilcene 11, Darrington 2

0 0 0 0 3 3 5 — 11 11 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 — 2 3 2 Pitching Statistics Quilcene: Pleines 2IP, 6K, H, BB; Murphy 3IP, 2H, 2K; Harrison IP; King IP, K. Hitting Statistics Quilcene: Pleines 2H, 3B, R, 2RBI; McEdwards 2H, 2B, 2R, RBI; Prater 2H, 2B, R, 2RBI; Smith 2H, R, RBI; King H, BB, HBP, 2R, RBI; Weller 2H, R, 2RBI; Harrison H, BB, R; Murphy BB, R.

Rochester 3, 8, Forks 2, 7 ROCHESTER — The Spartans dropped a pair of competitive one-run games to the Warriors, including a 3-2 nine-inning loss in the opener. “It was a really good allaround game,� Forks coach Wayne Daman said of the first game. The Spartans took a 2-0 lead in the fourth inning on runs by Mark Jacobson and Reis Lawson. But, that was all the runs they would score in the game.

Hitting Statistics Forks: Contreras 2-4; Leppell; Jacobson; Lawson; Moody; Gilmore.

Second Game Rochester 8, Forks 7 Forks 1 0 2 0 4 0 0 —7 14 3 Rochester 0 0 3 3 2 0 x — 8 10 5 WP- Fosnant; LP- Jacobson Hitting Statistics Forks: Lawson 4-4, RBI; Leppell 2-4, R; Gilmore 2-4, RBI; Contreras 1-4; Pederson 1-3; Moody 1-3; Hagan 1-3, 3B.

Lacrosse PA/Sequim 7, South Kitsap 4 PORT ORCHARD — Port Angeles/Sequim secured its first win of the boys high school lacrosse season with the road victory at Veteran’s Memorial Park.

Led by Port Angeles sophomore Connor Leslie’s four goals and an assist, Port Angeles advanced its record to 1-6-0. Sequim sophomore goaltender Ryan Root had 14 saves on 18 shots to set the tone for the squad of student-athletes from Port Angeles and Sequim high schools. Also having goals for Port Angeles were Elliott Siltier, Jamison Williamson and Logan Alward. Port Angeles/Sequim next faces Peninsula-Gig Harbor (9-1-0) on Monday in a 6 p.m. start at Storm King Soccer Fields in Port Angeles.

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DARRINGTON — The 1B Rangers overcame a slow start to pound the 2B Loggers. Quilcene’s four pitchers — Jacob Pleines, Luc Murphy, Eli Harrison and Josh King — combined to limit Darrington to four hits and strike out nine batters. The Rangers threw 100 pitches in the game, with 67 being strikes. The Loggers scored a run apiece in the first and second innings and remained in the lead until the Quilcene bats awoke in the fifth inning. The Rangers scored three runs in the fifth inning, three in the sixth and five in the seventh. Pleines had two hits, including Quilcene’s first triple of the season, and drove in a pair of runs. Freshman Dillon McEdwards had two hits, two runs and an RBI. Fellow freshman A.J. Prater and Nate Weller

Quilcene 11, Darrington 2 Quilcene Darrington

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POULSBO — The Vikings rallied for four runs in the fifth inning to hold off the Wolves and remain one game behind Olympic League-leading Bremerton. North Kitsap, which had a total of only four hits in the game, now sits at 9-2 in league while the Knights are 10-1. The Wolves fell to 3-7 in league and 5-7 overall. Austin Clement went the distance on the mound, giving up just two earned

Charles Wright 4, Chimacum 3

“From that point, they shut down our sticks,� Daman said. Rochester score a run in the sixth and another in the seventh to force extra innings, and then won the game with a bases-loaded walk-off hit in the bottom of the ninth. Forks’ Javier Contreras pitched seven innings for the third straight outing. “He was really effective on the mound,� Daman said. “We got the lead and he held it for as long as he could.� The second game was more of an offensive slugfest. The Spartans jumped out to a 3-0 lead, but the Warriors responded with six straight runs. Forks fought back to take a 7-6 lead with four runs in the top of the fifth inning before Rochester plated two in the bottom of the fifth. Lawson was 4 for 4 at the plate and drove in a run for the Spartans. Forks returns to action Tuesday when it plays at Montesano.

2A687353

DARRINGTON — A solid outing by eighth-grade pitcher Bailey Kieffer was spoiled by fielding errors and subpar hitting. Kieffer pitched all six innings for the Rangers, who were without ace Sammy Rae. “Boy, she pitched a good won,� Quilcene coach Mark Thompson said. “Offensively, we just weren’t very good.� The Rangers struck out 13 times and in the seventh inning stranded the tying run on second base with no outs. Quilcene also committed three errors, which led to three unearned runs. “We beat ourselves,� Thompson said. “That was a game we should have won.� Freshman Megan Weller had two triples and an RBI, and Alexis Gray came of the bench to belt a pinch-hit double in the sixth inning. Emily Ward and Jerrica Viloria had Quilcene’s other hits. Rae missed the game with a minor back strain. Thompson said she probably could have played, but the decision was made to err on the side of caution. The Rangers travel to Auburn today to play a doubleheader with Muckleshoot.

Sequim 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 —1 5 2 North Kitsap 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 — 4 4 1 WP- Tamm; LP- Clement Pitching Statistics Sequim: Clement 6IP, 4H, 4R, 2ER, 2K, 4 BB.. North Kitsap: Crowell 4IP, 4H, 1ER, 4K, 1BB; Tamm 3IP, 1H, 0R, 6K, 3BB. Hitting Statistics Sequim: Harrison 1-2, RBI. North Kitsap: Ekin 1-2, RBI, R; Crowell 1-3, 2RBI.

drove in two runs each. Quilcene coach Forrest Thomson was happy to see Rangers’ freshmen play such a big role in the victory. “I was pleased with the freshmen,� he said. “That’s what we need to get to where we want to be.� Quilcene (3-0, 4-4) hosts Rainier Christian for a Sea-Tac League doubleheader this afternoon.

PORT TOWNSEND


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 19-20, 2013 PAGE

B8

PT’s Concerts on the Dock seeking sponsors for series PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Downtown Port Townsend will rock with all-ages free concerts Thursdays from July 1 through Aug. 29 at the Pope Marine Park/City Dock Civic Plaza. This music on the waterfront is made possible by local businesses, the Port Townsend Main Street Program, and the city of Port Townsend. A beer/wine and cider garden will be available at the concerts. Kitsap Credit Union is the lead event sponsor for the 2013 Concerts on the Dock series.

Beer/wine/cider garden slots Stage sponsorships and beer/wine/ cider garden sponsorship slots are available. Stage sponsorships are $500 per show; beer/wine cider garden sponsorships are $250 per show. Phone the Port Townsend Main Street Program at 360-385-7911 for details and available slots. “This popular summer music series is made possible by generous local businesses, and we are very pleased Kitsap Credit Union has stepped up as a major sponsor for the 2013 series,” according to Heather Dudley Nollette, president of the Port Townsend Main Street Program.

DAVID CONKLIN

As in years past, the summer Concerts on the Dock series will bring hundreds of people to downtown Port Townsend. “These free, fun concerts contribute to our quality of life as an arts community, and the setting at the renovated Pope Marine Civic District Plaza is ideal to highlight our waterfront town,” she said. “The concerts provide excellent visibility for business owners wanting

to connect with locals and visitors,” Nollette said. For updates, visit www.ptmain street.org or Port Townsend Main Street Program’s Facebook page, or follow Port Townsend Main Street Program on Twitter.

State jobless rate drops to 7.3% 7.5 percent for three months, but with to Anneliese Vance-Sherman, a labor the newest dip, it’s the lowest rate since economist with Employment Security. In March 2012, the state’s unemDecember 2008, the state Employment OLYMPIA — The state unemploy- Security Department said. ployment rate was 8.4 percent. Since ment rate dropped to 7.3 percent in then, Washington gained 53,000 jobs. March, the lowest rate in more than New numbers From February to March, governfour years, but the state still saw a net ment jobs were down by 4,600 jobs, Earlier this year, state economists professional and business services loss of 5,500 jobs from the prior month, according to numbers released had reported that new numbers were down 2,500, and other services this week. showed the state gained 24,200 jobs were down 1,000. Figures for Clallam and Jefferson for January and 5,500 for February. Meanwhile, the national unemcounties will be released Tuesday. “The trend over the past year ployment rate last month was The state’s jobless rate had been at shows we’re gaining jobs,” according 7.6 percent. BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

$ Briefly . . . PA soda firm: Orange Creme is new flavor PORT ANGELES — Bedford’s Soda of Port Angeles has just released Orange Creme, the sodamaker’s fifth flavor, following bottling the first week of this month. Orange Creme soon will be showing up in Peninsula stores and restaurants. Bedford Founder and owner Ed Bedford said he has been developing the Orange Creme flavor since September. He said he believes the soda will be a nice addition to an already wellestablished line of cane sugar soft-drink flavors. Bedford will celebrate his 30th year of product sales and development next year. All products can be ordered from Olympic Distributing Co. of Port Angeles at 360-452-8966.

Garden Show set PORT HADLOCK — Hadlock Building Supply, 901 Ness’ Corner Road, will hold its sixth annual Garden Show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 27. The event will have a learning corner with representatives from Red Dog Farms, Bailey Nurseries and Skagit Gardens. Also featured will be experts on mutual materials and garden design,

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

and Hadlock Building Supply’s Ron Jahoda and Leandra Wiley. A water feature demonstration is planned plus other do-it-yourself tips and demonstrations. Giveaways and prizes are planned. For more information, phone 360-385-1771 or visit www.facebook.com/ HadlockBuildingSupply.

Gold and silver Gold futures for June delivery rose $9.80, or 0.7 percent, to settle at $1,392.50 an ounce on Thursday. Silver for May delivery fell 6 cents, or 0.3 percent, to end at $23.24 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Fear takes on several roles in life FEAR IS AN ever-present reality, inherent in animal life, elemental in human life. A sound, a sight, a taste, a touch, a smell, and our fear instantly makes its presence known to us. Here, briefly stated, are four roles of fear in our lives. First, fear is our primary protector; we depend on our own fear and the like fears of others to protect all of us. People’s normal fear of accident, for example, keeps them on their side of the road while driving. When normal fear is absent, there is trouble. Suicide bombers, who don’t play by the normal “fear rules,� are dangerous to the rest of society, which maintains its normal fear of death. Second, fear is a great motivator. If you were to take the time to recount the ways in which fear motivates you, such an exercise may take awhile to complete, for our motivations are not only the pleasure of pleasing but the fear of displeasing, not only the urge to do well but the fear of doing badly.

ISSUES OF FAITH Bruce Bode

endured.� The human mind, says Tillich, is a “permanent factory of fears,� and it is so in order to “escape

anxiety.� Finally, fear is not our enemy but a potential ally. We fear our fear because of what it might point us toward. But if we don’t resist our fear, we have a chance of dealing with the issue the fear points us to. It’s the avoidance of fear that makes us neurotic, violent — not the fear itself.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A variety of offbeat and nonfiction films are on their way during the coming week, courtesy of the Port Townsend Film Institute. ■First up is “Girl Rising,� a view of nine girls from nine nations. Their life stories will light the screen at the Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St., at 11 a.m. Saturday. Tickets are $10 at the Rose box office or at www. RoseTheatre.com. After the movie, Janette Force of the Port Townsend Film Institute will moderate a discussion with educators and activists, including Yvonne Pepin-Wakefield, Chris Jones-

He has a doctorate in ecumenical and interfaith dialog and a post-doctoral certificate in Muslim Christian studies. Hewson describes his calling in life as “to build bridges across the things that divide us, doorways through the barriers that separate us and windows into the knowledge that can erase the ignorance of hate and fear between us.� The setting will be informal, and a question-andanswer session will follow the talk.

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Halted auction The auction was halted, and then-U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar invalidated it. When DeChristopher was indicted on two federal felonies, Patrick Shea, a former Bureau of Land Management director under President Bill Clinton, stepped forward to represent him pro bono. DeChristopher, who went to federal prison, is scheduled for release this month.

■Next week, the Port Townsend Film Institute will start this season’s Global Lens film series at a new location: the schoolhouse at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way. Beginning Thursday, the institute and partner Goddard College will present the series of foreign films for no admission charge and invite viewers to stay for discussions afterward. Spring’s first Global Lens series movie is “The Fantastic World of Juan Oral� from Mexico at 7 p.m. Thursday. To find out more about these screenings and other film institute activities, visit www.PTFilmFest.com or phone 360-379-1333.

volunteer sign. Volunteers should dress for the weather and bring work gloves. Cookies, hot tea, water, weed pullers and garbage bags will be provided. For more information, phone Rosemary Sikes at Kah Tai work party 360-385-0307 or email PORT TOWNSEND — rosemarysikes@olympus. Admiralty Audubon will net. hold a monthly work party from 9 a.m. to noon Sunday Port Hadlock at Kah Tai Park. Attendees should park at Chase Bank at Sims Way Open house slated and Kearney Street and look for a white Chevy PORT HADLOCK — pickup truck and a green Sunfield Waldorf School

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m.

“Hearing Jesus’ Voice�

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST & Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

FAITH BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 74(34s0ORT!NGELES 360-452-4551 A ministry of Faith Baptist Church of Sequim (GARBC) SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. April 21, 10:30 a.m. Rev. Amanda Aikman Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

will host an open house, “The Joyful Work of Learning: Experience Waldorf Education,� on Saturday. Interested adults are invited to become a student from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. to experience firsthand the qualities of Waldorf education. Child care will be offered. Sunfield Waldorf has more than 100 students in grades pre-K-8. It is located at 111 Sunfield Lane off Rhody Drive behind Fiesta Jalisco. Phone 360-385-3658 or visit www.sunfieldfarm.org.

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race 0/"OXs  Pastor Neil Castle

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline�

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 Pastor Neil Allen

301 E. Lopez Ave., PA 452-2323 Pastor Richard Grinstad Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. SUNDAY Nursery Provided Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. most Sundays www.htlcpa.com

.3EQUIM!VEs  www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

"IBLECENTEREDs&AMILYFRIENDLY

34569893

PORT ANGELES — Unity in the Olympics will celebrate Earth Day during the Rev. John Wingfield’s talk, “Earth Song.� Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. A Course in Miracles group will meet at the

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

Earth Day worship PORT ANGELES — Celebrate Earth Day on Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Avenue, with a Creation Worship Service and free lunch featuring local foods. After lunch, Paul Crawford, retired national park ranger, will talk about the “Peaks, Pearls and Perils of the Olympic National Park.� Phone the church at 360-457-4862 for more information. Peninsula Daily News

ing of lands slated for oil and gas leasing. DeChristopher, not content to protest outside, signed up as Bidder 70. He proceeded to bid for and win 22,000 acres worth $1.7 million.

CONTINUED FROM B4 ferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St. After each name is read, Attendees should make reservations by email at a formal presentation of the gop@broadstripe.net or by flag, a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps is phone to 360-343-4041. For more information, planned. visit www.jcrcc.blogspot.com.

360.683.6076

church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., at noon Wednesday. On Saturday, April 27, Unity in the Olympics is sponsoring a dance and silent auction at the Port Angeles Eagles, 2843 E. PORT HADLOCK — Myrtle St., from 8 p.m. to Guest speaker the Rev. 11 p.m. Local band HayDarryn Hewson will diswire will perform. cuss Islam at Community Admission is $10 per United Methodist Church, person, and proceeds sup130 Church Lane, at 1 p.m. port the church and comSaturday. munity organizations Hewson’s talk will focus Unity contributes to. on understanding the traEvents are open to the ditions and culture of public. Islam while exploring the For more information, Palestinian side of the Midphone 360-457-3981. dle East conflict.

Crubaugh, Martha Trolin, Mark Saran and Abby Jorgenson, on the effect of the American educational model in other countries. ■T o mark Earth Day on Monday, a free screening of “Bidder 70,� the story of T i m DeChristopher DeChristopher’s bidding against industry giants for Utah wildlands, is set for 11 a.m. at the Rose Theatre. Admission is first-come, first-seated until the movie house is full. “Bidder 70� recounts the highly unusual outcome of a December 2008 auction-

Events: Kah Tai work party set

www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Guest to talk on Islam in Port Hadlock

B9

PT Film Institute sets week of movies

PORT TOWNSEND — A ceremony to honor Jefferson County veterans and Welcome fear military service personnel Don’t push the fear who have died in the past away; turn toward it, welsix months is planned at come it, inquire of it. 1 p.m. Saturday. Your fear is on your The ceremony will be on side, always ready and will- the front steps of the Jefing to work with you. In this regard, I once had an instructive dream Manipulative power in which I was being chased by a horrific monBecause fear is such a ster. great motivator, it is often As I was fleeing, a voice used to manipulate us. within the dream said, Fears for our health and “You must stop, turn and safety are used to sell prodface this monster.� ucts; political parties prey When I did so — turned, on our fears at each eleclooked and continued to tion season; our fears follook at what was chasing lowing 9/11 were used to me — remarkably, in a QUEEN OF ANGELS lead us into two wars. series of quick successive CATHOLIC PARISH Third, there is differsteps like a camera shutter 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles ence between fear and anx- quickly clicking, the mon360.452.2351 iety. ster reduced itself in size www.queenofangelsparish.org “Anxiety,� says Paul Til- until it stood before me as Mass Schedule: lich in The Courage to Be, Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. a small, friendly creature. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. “is the state in which a From this, I learned Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. being is aware of its possithat the face you turn Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. ble non-being.� Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th toward your fear is the face It’s impossible, he says, Sunday 2:00 p.m. it will turn toward you. Confession: “to stand naked anxiety for _________ 30 minutes prior to all Masses more than a flash of time.� Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m. This horror of “naked Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders anxiety� is avoided by on the North Olympic Peninsula. transforming free-floating Rev. Bruce Bode is minister anxiety into concrete fears, The of the Quimper Unitarian Univerfor fears have “a definite salist Fellowship in Port Townsend. ST. JOSEPH object, which can be faced, His email is bruceabode@gmail. CATHOLIC PARISH analyzed, attacked, com. 101 E. Maple St., Sequim

Briefly . . .

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013


B10

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Earth: Cleanups to take place across Peninsula Bay/Sekiu Lions Club. For more information, PORT TOWNSEND — phone 360-963-2442 or 360Jefferson County Home 963-2212. Builders will host a free Home & Garden Expo at Hoh River habitat tour the Port Townsend CommuFORKS — Mike Hagen, nity Center, 620 Tyler St., from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat- executive director of the Hoh River Trust, will lead a urday. Half-hour presentations tour of habitat restoration on such topics as rain gar- sites along the Hoh River dens, roof care, home energy, on Saturday. Participants will meet at low-impact development, community gardens, solar the Peak 6 Store parking power installations and lot, 4883 Upper Hoh Road, at 11 a.m. for the free twoirrigation are planned. Booths inside the center hour tour. RSVP to Betsy Bermingand on the center lawn will offer information, tips and ham at bbermingham@ anchorqea.com. advice. For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/ Quilcene hohriverwalk.

Homebuilders expo

CONTINUED FROM B1 Fradkin will talk about the Japanese dock that washed ashore in December near LaPush. He will discuss the removal process and other coastal debris, where it is coming from, what is being done. For more information, visit www.feiromarinelife center.org or phone 360-4176254.

Cleanup benefit PORT ANGELES — The annual Clallam Spring Clean Up, a benefit for the Port Angeles Food Bank, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. City and county residents can clean their homes, yards and neighborhoods, and haul the waste materials to the Regional Transfer Station, 3501 W. 18th St. Household garbage and large items will be accepted. Yard waste, tires, large appliances and other metals will be recycled. The $10 admission benefits the Port Angeles Food Bank. Checks and cash only will be accepted. No credit cards or food donations will be accepted. Loads will be limited to one per household and can be no larger than a full-sized pickup truck or a 5-foot-by8-foot trailer. No commercial loads or vehicles. Tires, metals, waste oil, antifreeze, auto batteries and yard waste must be separated for recycling, and there is a limit of up to four tires and four appliances per household. Computers and televisions can be recycled at the Goodwill or at EcycleNW in Blyn. For information, visit www.ecyclewashington.org. For more information, contact the Solid Waste Division Recycling at 360417-4874 or visit the city’s Transfer Station webpage at www.cityofpa.us/transfer station.htm.

Climate change film PORT ANGELES — A free screening of a new climate change documentary “Do the Math” is set for 7 p.m. Sunday. The screening at the Elwha Klallam Heritage Training Center at 401 E. First St. is one of more than 700 community screenings that are part of Earth Night, a nationwide event organized by the international climate campaign 350.org. “Do the Math” follows Bill McKibben, an environmental author and the founder of 350.org, on last November’s 21-city tour that helped spark a new fossil fuel divestment campaign. After the film, at 8 p.m., 350.org will livestream a panel discussion with McKibben, Hansen and others.

Sequim City cleanup days

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Kelly Johnson, left, and Lori Taylor pick up litter from the Waterfront Trail near Port Angeles Boat Haven in 2012 as part of an Earth Day cleanup crew. SEQUIM — The city’s annual Spring Clean Up program will be from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. today and Saturday. The program is open only to those living within the city limit. Coupons will be in the April issue of Sequim News, which is mailed with the city’s utility bill. Those who do not receive a utility bill and newsletter can bring proof of city residency to City Hall, 152 W. Cedar St., or the Public Works/Community Development Building, 615 N. Fifth Ave., to pick up the coupons. With coupons, residents can bring pickup loads, one each or about 1 square yard, of trash such as appliances, furniture or tires to the Sequim City Shop at 169 W. Hemlock St. Without a coupon, the cost is $10 for the same amount. No refrigerators, freezers, paints or hazardous materials will be accepted. Cascade Bark at 11 Washington Harbor Road will offer the facility as a drop-off point for brush and yard waste from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday only. Residents must bring the coupon for yard waste. For more information, phone the Public Works Department at 360-6834908. For household hazardous waste, use the Moderate Risk Waste Facility at the Regional Transfer Station, 3501 W. 18th St. in Port Angeles. Phone 360-417-4875 or visit www.clallam.net for

more information.

Earth Day festival SEQUIM — Sequim Pre-3 will host an Earth Day festival at Jardin du Soleil Lavender Farm, 3932 Sequim-Dungeness Way, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. A $2-per-child donation (cash only) is requested at the door, with all proceeds benefiting Sequim Pre-3. Family-friendly entertainment by local music and dance groups is planned. Crafts will focus on using recycled materials. Local vendors will have booths. Families are encouraged to bring picnic lunches. Refreshments also will be available for purchase. For more information about Sequim Pre-3, visit www.pre3.org.

Armstrong and FarmStrong, a Northwest bluegrass band, will perform. Clandestine Caterers will serve pizza made in their mobile wood-fired oven. Among other groups with booths will be Discovery Bay Bird Rescue, The Wind People-Traditional Northwest Native Wooden Flutes, Chocolate Serenade, Dungeness River Audubon Center, Tribal Edge Primal Arts Training center, Trinity River Marine, Peninsula Friends of Animals, Eagle Creek NW Native Plants, North Olympic Salmon Coalition, Jefferson County Water and Beach Watchers, Wild Olympics campaign, Sierra Club, Power Trip Energy Corp., Bay Watch of Discovery Bay and artists Natalie Brown, Carmele Minor and Jason Hines. For more information, phone 360-797-7100 or visit www.gardiner.wbu.com.

Gardiner Port Townsend Earth Day celebration GARDINER — Wild Birds Unlimited, 275953 U.S. Highway 101, will hold its eighth annual Earth Day celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The event is dedicated to local organizations that work to preserve, promote and rehabilitate local native wildlife and habitat. Northwest Wildlife & Raptor Center founders Jaye and Gary Moore will present rehabilitated birds of prey. Donations will be collected for the center. Bluegrass musician Cort

Main Street cleanup PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend’s Main Street Program will host an Earth Day Spring Clean Up from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. Volunteers will meet at Adams Street Park at the corner of Water and Adams streets to spread gravel at the park, repair garbage cans on Water Street with the PT Foundry, do some weeding and add a bench to the park. To RSVP, phone the Main Street office at 360385-7911 or email admin@ ptmainstreet.org.

Death and Memorial Notice PHYLLIS COOLURES December 25, 1931 April 11, 2013

Mrs. Coolures University of California. In 1960, they moved to Los Gatos, California, and in 1992, after Chris retired, they moved to Sequim. Phyllis enjoyed cooking and entertaining friends and relatives during the holidays and special occasions. She loved camping, fishing, boating and traveling. They kept their boat

Land trust

QUILCENE — Volunteers will remove trash and invasive plants from the Quilcene River watershed Saturday. Participants will start the day with a required safety meeting at 9 a.m. at the Quilcene Ranger Station, 295142 U.S. Highway 101, before driving into the forest for the cleanup. The Quilcene River watershed supplies drinking water for Port Townsend. Volunteers need to register beforehand so organizers can supply tools and organize groups. Youths 12 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. To register, phone Jefferson County 4-H coordinator Sue Hay at 360-379-5610, ext. 208, or email shay@ jefferson.wsu.edu.

The North Olympic Land Trust will host two Earth Day events Saturday. Two guided hikes of the 255-acre Elk Creek Conservation Area near Forks are set, with hikes leaving from the Elk Creek Conservation Area parking lot, about 2 miles up Calawah Way, at 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The 2.5-mile hike starts in a young forest and transitions to an old-growth forest along Elk Creek. As part of the Klallam Earth Day Challenge, the land trust will sponsor cleanup of beaches west of Joyce, followed by a tour of the Pysht River Conservation Area restoration. Participants will meet at the Crescent High School parking lot at 9 a.m., with return set for mid-afternoon. Attendees should bring waterproof boots, gloves and lunch. Some snacks and drinks will be served. RSVPs are appreciated but not necessary. For more information, email Lorrie Campbell, stewardship director, at lorrie@nolt.org or phone 360-417-1815, ext. 7.

West End Earth Day cleanup CLALLAM BAY — An Earth Community Beach Cleanup is planned for Clallam Bay/Sekiu on Saturday. Volunteers will remove refuse from local beaches from Pillar Point to Bullman Beach. A trash bag and gloves handout will be offered at 9 a.m. at Compass Rose and Ray’s Grocery in Clallam Bay, in the Hoko River area by the mailboxes in the Vista neighborhood, in the Sekiu River area at the northwest corner past the bridges and at the historic marker pullout at Shipwreck Point. A dump bin will be available at Clallam County Park in Clallam Bay. From 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., volunteers will find refreshments, music and a “Most Unusual Find” display and contest with prizes to follow at Chito Beach Resort, 7639 state Highway 112. Entry deadline is 3 p.m. “Unusual finds” also can be entered at the Dumpster in Clallam Bay. The event is sponsored by the Clallam Bay/Sekiu Chamber of Commerce, the Clallam Marine Resources Committee and the Clallam

Quinault work day LAKE QUINAULT — Olympic National Forest, in partnership with the National Forest Foundation and Lake Quinault Lodge, will celebrate Earth Day on Saturday by working on restoration projects to enhance the rain forest and Quinault Loop Trail. The work will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lake Quinault Lodge, 345 S. Shore Road. Volunteers must register before the event. Lunch and tools will be provided. Volunteers can choose to perform trail maintenance such as cutting brush and clearing winter debris from the trail, clear areas of nonnative plants or move gravel to trail areas to divert water off the trail. To register and obtain a list of what to bring, visit http://tinyurl.com/d4kwjj4. For more information, contact Sandra Miller at 360-288-2922 or MillerSandra2@aramark.com.

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday-Friday.

st ce Voted 1 Pla 2008 - 2012 e Hom Best Funeral nty Cou in Clallam

A form is at www.peninsuladailynews. com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. For further details, call 360-417-3527.

The ONLY Locally Owned Funeral Home and Crematory Serving the people of Clallam County Scott Hunter

Immediate, Dependable and Affordable services 24 hours a day • Our staff has over 100 years experience

Douglas Ticknor Jim Drennan

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Phyllis Coolures passed away in Sequim on April 11, 2013, after a courageous battle with lung cancer. She was born in Fullerton, California, on December 25, 1931, to her parents, Thomas Phillip and Katherine Anne (Gerhart) Doerr. She graduated from Ventura High School in 1949 and attended the University of California in Santa Barbara, California. In January 1955, Phyllis married Chris Peter Coolures from Oxnard, California. They made their first home in Berkeley, California, where Chris attended the University of California. Phyllis worked at the Bank of America and the

at the John Wayne Marina, and she was a member of the Sequim Bay Yacht Club. Phyllis is survived by her husband, Chris; their two children, Katherine and Bobby Coolures; daughter-in-law Dana; and twin grandsons Mathew and Ryan. She is also survived by her sister, Trudy Alison of Enterprise, Oregon. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel, 108 West Alder Street. In lieu of flowers, you may make donations to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements. Please leave condolences at www.sequimvalleychapel. com.

Watershed cleanup

Leah & Steve Ford

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I am a 47-year-old male, married for 26 years. I am hopelessly in love with my wife and still see her as the most beautiful woman in the world. I have always been self-employed and have sometimes been at the extremes of feast or famine. During the bad times, I often worked 110-plus-hour weeks to save the ship. Each time things have gotten really bad, my wife has had an affair to make up for the time, money and attention I can’t provide her. I found out about her latest affair (her third) when I found a secret cellphone in her purse. For the past eight months, when she visited our daughter at college, she would check into a hotel with her lover. I feel responsible for failing to meet her needs. She doesn’t want a divorce but admits she doubts she will ever fully stop dating and says the effort she puts into deceiving me is proof she loves me and doesn’t want to hurt my feelings. I am amazed at the number of men willing to have sex with a married woman. My heart is broken, and I feel like a failure. Am I a fool to keep fighting for her? Hopelessly in Love

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

DEAR ABBY tive. In it were several envelopes for Van Buren my family. One of them was for my sister, who lives 40 miles away. I gave my sister a call and told her it looked like it contained a stack of pictures. She said I should go ahead and open it. Inside were photos taken at my husband’s funeral — pictures of the funeral home, inside the church, the casket and some of me and my daughter sitting at the gravesite. Abby, it was like going to the funeral all over again! The latter were particularly disturbing. To me, it felt like voyeurism. Why would someone take pictures of such a sad event? I hope you print this and tell me and others what your opinion is so they may heed your advice — particularly my in-laws. Grieving Widow in Indiana

Abigail

Dear Grieving: Please accept my sympathy for the loss of your husband. Dear Hopelessly in Love: I hope I can only imagine the shock you expeyou realize that as “beautiful” as your rienced when you saw the photos. wife may be, your relationship with No one should take pictures at her isn’t a healthy one. Please go funerals without first having received online and look up the definition of the permission from the immediate surviword “codependency.” vors such as the widow, widower or If your wife loved you, she would children. prove it by doing everything in her That said, the practice is not as power to help you through the rough uncommon as you might think. After a periods, including finding a job to help period of time, family members have with the bills, not sneaking around been known to find comfort in having with other men. That she would claim them. her deceit is “proof of her love,” and Short of asking your permission, that you would believe her, is amazing. your trauma could have been avoided This woman has shown no had the relative who sent the pictures remorse; she has told you she doesn’t thought to label the envelopes or plan to be faithful in the future. include a note explaining what was Do not let her hoodwink you into inside them. believing her infidelity is your fault That way, you wouldn’t have had to because you worked yourself nearly view them until you were ready — if into a physical collapse trying to save ever — and prepared emotionally. your business and provide for her. _________

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dear Abby: What is proper etiquette for someone who takes pictures at a funeral? I am a recent widow who received a package from an out-of-town relaby Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Plan to do something exciting or challenging. Getting out and networking or incorporating physical activity into your day will result in new friendships that can help you get ahead personally and professionally. Live in the moment. 5 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your ideas are stellar and the people you approach will help turn your plans into a reality. Communication executed with charm, not pressure, is all it will take to get your way. Don’t neglect a personal promise or you will face domestic problems. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Altering your living arrangements will improve your outlook and attitude. Physical activity will be exhilarating and rewarding. A partnership will turn out to be beneficial as long as you both deliver what you promise. 5 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Tie up loose ends. Take care of domestic matters quickly or you will be faced with complaints. Rethink your work strategy and how you can become more efficient and unique. Love is highlighted. Plan a romantic evening. 2 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put more emphasis on pleasure and engaging in a little fun with colleagues or close friends. How you get along with others will make a difference to the outcome of a project or concern you have. Make a personal change that boosts your confidence. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Express caution when discussing important issues with friends, relatives or people in your community. You will be misinterpreted if you don’t specify what you want. Stick close to home and take care of domestic issues and the ones you love. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Listen to suggestions, but consider the motives behind what’s being proposed. The adjustments or reforms you feel strongly about must be voiced in order to counter anyone you feel is not being fair. Remember, charity begins at home. 4 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A joint venture will grab your attention. Go over all the fine details and you will reap the rewards. A last-minute change of plans will end up working in your favor. Don’t fight the inevitable; make it work for you. 4 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Choose your words carefully. You will end up in a dispute if you aren’t willing to compromise. Look at the big picture and make adjustments that will allow you to keep moving forward. Love and romance are in the stars. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

B11

Hubby blames self for wife’s 3 affairs

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Keep your emotions in check, especially when dealing with situations that can alter your status or reputation. Focus more on home and relationships and how you can make little improvements that will add to your comfort and enhance your connections. 2 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Share your interests with people you have something in common with and a good partnership will develop. Your inventive outlook will bring about solutions to existing problems. Express the way you feel and positive changes will take place. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Get back to activities you used to enjoy. Physical, mental and creative outlets will help ease stress and set you on a journey that will be enlightening and entertaining. A new friendship will turn into a worthwhile partnership. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

Neah Bay 51/37

ellingham elli e llin n 55/42

Olympic Peninsula TODAY DA AY REEZY B

RAIN

RAIN

54/40

Forks 52/39

Olympics Snow level: 5.500 ft.

Yesterday ➥

Port Townsend T 54/41

Sequim 54/40

RA

Port Ludlow 56/40

IN

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 52 43 0.12 6.12 Forks 56 44 0.10 43.81 Seattle 59 44 Trace 12.27 Sequim 57 44 0.07 3.76 Hoquiam 55 45 0.04 26.67 Victoria 60 43 Trace 10.14 Port Townsend 58 41 0.03* 7.30

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NationalTODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Friday, April 19

Sunny

➥

Aberdeen 52/42

Billings 57° | 34°

San Francisco 68° | 48°

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Minneapolis 36° | 32°

Denver 52° | 19°

Chicago 45° | 36°

Los Angeles 82° | 57°

Almanac Last

New

First

Full

Detroit 52° | 50°

Atlanta 79° | 63°

El Paso 72° | 39° Houston 68° | 48°

Low 40 Showers overnight

SATURDAY

52/38 Bit of sun; bit of clouds

Marine Weather

SUNDAY

MONDAY

53/35 Drying out a little bit

56/37 More sun; warmer temps

May 2

60/39 Sunshine blazes forth

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

CANADA

Seattle 55° | 48°

Spokane 55° | 41°

Tacoma 54° | 48°

Olympia 54° | 45°

Ocean: W wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. Morning rain; afternoon showers. Tonight, W wind 15 to 20 kt. Wind waves 2 to 3 ft. W swell 6 ft.

Yakima 64° | 45° Astoria 57° | 46°

ORE.

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 7:28 a.m. 6.5’ 1:39 a.m. 3.8’ 8:55 p.m. 6.5’ 2:15 p.m. 1.5’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 8:41 a.m. 6.5’ 2:52 a.m. 3.3’ 9:44 p.m. 7.0’ 3:13 p.m. 1.5’

9:19 a.m. 4.6’ 11:55 p.m. 6.2’

5:59 a.m. 4.5’ 4:25 p.m. 1.7’

10:46 a.m. 4.6’

12:56 a.m. 7.7’ 10:56 a.m. 5.7’

7:12 a.m. 5.0’ 5:38 p.m. 1.9’

Dungeness Bay* 12:02 a.m. 6.9’ 10:02 a.m. 5.1’

6:34 a.m. 4.5’ 5:00 p.m. 1.7’

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend

May 9

Hi Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Cold

May 17 Apr 25 8:10 p.m. 6:14 a.m. 1:33 p.m. 3:31 a.m.

Nation/World

Victoria 57° | 41°

New York 72° | 55°

Miami 86° | 77°

SUNDAY

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 10 to 20 kt to 30 kt in the afternoon. Morning rain; afternoon showers. Tonight, W wind 25 to 35 kt. Wind waves 5 to 8 ft.

Tides

■101 at Dryden, Texas Washington D.C D.C. and Laredo, 79° | 63° Texas ■ -10 at Lake Yellowstone, Wyo.

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

Fronts

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Seattle 55° | 48°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 55/41

Pt. Cloudy

Lo Prc 64 35 62 33 49 28 33 23 76 57 83 62 70 43 84 74 74 57 33 21 86 66 34 20 54 26 66 45 90 76 57 46

Otlk Cldy Clr .02 Clr Clr .31 Cldy PCldy Cldy Rain Cldy .01 PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr PCldy Clr

SUNDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 9:46 a.m. 6.7’ 3:54 a.m. 10:26 p.m. 7.5’ 4:05 p.m.

Ht 2.5’ 1.4’

6:31 a.m. 4.0’ 5:23 p.m. 2.0’

12:24 a.m. 6.3’ 12:11 p.m. 4.8’

6:56 a.m. 6:16 p.m.

3.1’ 2.3’

1:32 a.m. 7.7’ 12:23 p.m. 5.7’

7:44 a.m. 4.4’ 6:36 p.m. 2.2’

2:01 a.m. 7.8’ 1:48 p.m. 5.9’

8:09 a.m. 7:29 p.m.

3.5’ 2.6’

12:38 a.m. 6.9’ 11:29 a.m. 5.1’

7:06 a.m. 4.0’ 5:58 p.m. 2.0’

1:07 a.m. 7.0’ 12:54 p.m. 5.3’

7:31 a.m. 6:51 p.m.

3.1’ 2.3’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Burlington, Vt. 56 Casper 22 Charleston, S.C. 83 Charleston, W.Va. 78 Charlotte, N.C. 84 Cheyenne 21 Chicago 46 Cincinnati 77 Cleveland 56 Columbia, S.C. 86 Columbus, Ohio 67 Concord, N.H. 64 Dallas-Ft Worth 84 Dayton 72 Denver 30 Des Moines 45 Detroit 57 Duluth 34 El Paso 83 Evansville 85 Fairbanks 31 Fargo 35 Flagstaff 44 Grand Rapids 51 Great Falls 40 Greensboro, N.C. 80 Hartford Spgfld 68 Helena 41 Honolulu 84 Houston 77 Indianapolis 74 Jackson, Miss. 87 Jacksonville 78 Juneau 48 Kansas City 50 Key West 87 Las Vegas 66 Little Rock 87

The Lower 48:

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

35 Clr Los Angeles 5 .05 Clr Louisville 63 PCldy Lubbock 56 .04 PCldy Memphis 62 .01 Cldy Miami Beach 10 .14 Snow Midland-Odessa 45 4.69 Rain Milwaukee 63 PCldy Mpls-St Paul 49 Cldy Nashville 63 Cldy New Orleans 61 Cldy New York City 28 PCldy Norfolk, Va. 48 .76 Rain North Platte 62 Clr Oklahoma City 14 .14 Cldy Omaha 40 3.47 Rain Orlando 45 .22 Rain Pendleton 30 .23 Snow Philadelphia 47 Clr Phoenix 70 Clr Pittsburgh 13 PCldy Portland, Maine 30 .13 Clr Portland, Ore. 15 Clr Providence 45 3.73 Rain Raleigh-Durham 25 PCldy Rapid City 64 Cldy Reno 36 .06 PCldy Richmond 18 Cldy Sacramento 74 Clr St Louis 74 MM Rain St Petersburg 63 .02 Rain Salt Lake City 67 Cldy San Antonio 61 PCldy San Diego 32 .06 Cldy San Francisco 39 .48 Rain San Juan, P.R. 79 PCldy Santa Fe 50 Clr St Ste Marie 74 .03 Rain Shreveport

76 78 92 86 86 94 42 42 88 84 71 82 32 77 44 85 55 73 75 67 63 60 69 80 28 51 82 70 85 86 48 80 68 67 87 59 43 88

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

53 Clr Sioux Falls 37 31 .03 Snow 65 Clr Syracuse 57 38 .05 Cldy 32 Clr Tampa 89 70 PCldy 72 Rain Topeka 50 39 .83 Rain 76 PCldy Tucson 69 47 Clr 40 Clr Tulsa 82 45 .86 Clr 40 2.17 Rain Washington, D.C. 81 61 .05 Cldy 33 .30 Snow Wichita 47 34 .31 Clr 67 Clr Wilkes-Barre 64 46 Cldy 72 Cldy Wilmington, Del. 73 53 Cldy 51 PCldy ________ 62 PCldy 25 .03 Snow Hi Lo Otlk 39 2.39 Clr 71 61 Sh 34 1.04 Snow Auckland 90 64 Clr 66 PCldy Baghdad 61 43 PCldy 36 Cldy Beijing 59 41 Cldy 52 Cldy Berlin Brussels 50 36 Rain 57 Clr 76 55 Clr 59 Cldy Cairo 52 31 Cldy 32 Cldy Calgary 93 52 Clr 47 .01 Cldy Guadalajara 78 71 Ts 39 Clr Hong Kong Jerusalem 65 44 PCldy 62 PCldy 60 51 Rain 22 .15 Clr Johannesburg 72 51 PCldy 32 Clr Kabul 55 35 PCldy 60 Cldy London 85 54 Ts 47 Clr Mexico City 76 43 Sh/Wind 65 .51 Rain Montreal 69 45 PCldy 72 Cldy Moscow 102 75 Clr 31 Clr New Delhi Paris 56 40 PCldy 75 Rain Clr 53 Clr Rio de Janeiro 79 67 73 56 Clr 47 Clr Rome 67 54 Ts 74 .30 PCldy Sydney 20 .01 PCldy Tokyo 57 49 Cldy 37 .01 Rain Toronto 63 34 Ts/Wind 75 Rain Vancouver 54 45 Rain

Lease a

2013 Subaru 2.0i Premium MODEL CODE: DJD OPTION PACKAGE: 02

KOENIG Subaru Since 1975

3501 HWY 101, E., PORT ANGELES

s

171

$

82 per mo.*

UP TO

27/36 MPG (city/hwy)^

34754985

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www.koenigsubaru.com 36 month lease, cap cost (Selling price) $19,670 less $350.00 lease rebate. Amount due at lease signing: $1 $1,999.00 999 00 cashh or trade t d equity it ddown plus l fifirstt payment and license. $0 Security Deposit required. Includes 10,000 miles per year. 15¢ per mile over. Lease end value $12,723.35. *Payment of $171.82 is plus tax. A documentary service fee in an amount up to $150 may be added to sale price or the capitalized cost of a vehicle. ^EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. Ad expires 4/30/13.

34754840


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B A R K - TA S T I C D o g Walking/Care is a new licensed, bonded and insured business serving Sequim. Reach us by phone (360)504-2008, email bark.tastic@aol.com. Check out our Facebook page for more info.

new

classifieds!

HOUSE CLEANING Charges by the house. (360)461-4767

TABLE: Solid teak table, seats 4-12, 8 chairs, 2 leaves, pads, and linens, matching buffet, excelM U LT I - FA M I LY s a l e : lent condition. $1,500. Sat. 8-2, 1640 Deer Park (360)808-4001 Rd., Lots of Misc!

NEIGHBORHOOD Sale: Sat., 10-4 p.m., take Airpor t Rd. to Duvall Pl., then on to 3821 Old BLOOMING Rhododen- Time Place. Guy stuff, drons: $26. Large, easy gal stuff, lots of stuff. planting and care. Hun- Low prices! dreds to choose from. 151 D street, Port Hadlock. (360)379-6456.

GARAGE/Moving sale: Saturday, 9-3 p.m., 151 Hart Rd. GARAGE SALE! Sat.Sun., 8-4, 1625 E. Scrivner Rd. Lots of Variety! HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153.

3010 Announcements

OPEN HOUSE Sun.-Mon. April 21 & 22 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 20 Conifer Ct., Sequim Diamond Point 3 Br., 3 ba. $327,000. 670-5336 or 775-0314

4070 Business Opportunities

3023 Lost FOUND: Earring. In front of Golden Gate Restaurant, P.A. Call to identify. (360)452-8435 L O S T: C h i l d ’s b l a n let/”snuggly.” Small blanket with bear head, blue and brown, poss. at P.A. Walmart. 452-9693. L O S T: D o g . I t a l i a n G r ey h o u n d , c h e s t n u t brown, silver chain collar, Costco parking lot, Sequim, Sat. 4/13. (949)278-3187 LOST: Earr ing. Black and silver, above Por t Angeles High School. (360)457-7184 LOST: Key. On yellow band in the area of Walkabout Way on April 15. (360)797-4288.

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

WA N T E D : O l d fe n c e boards. (360)457-1936.

4026 Employment General BOOKKEEPER: Experie n c e i n Q u i ck B o o k s, A / R , A / P, d a t a e n t r y, acct. balancing, payroll, bank and balance sheet reconciliation, gen. admin. tasks and more. Pay: $15-$20+ DOE, 20 hrs per week. job@allweatherhc.com

·Minimum 5 years vehicle and heavy equipment maintenance experience ·Understanding and ability to maintain and repair, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical systems ·Proven welding and fabrication skills ·Excellent and describable troubleshooting abilities ·Strong attention to detail ·Excellent written and verbal communication skills ·Experience with maintaining heavy duty lift trucks is a plus Excellent wage and benefits pkg. Apply in person: 143 Sitkum Sol Duc Rd., Fo r k s , WA 9 8 3 3 1 o r send resume to: PO Box 2299 Forks, WA 98331 or fax: 360-374-4331. Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED dental assistant wanted for prosthodontist office. Please Fax resume to (360)385-1277 HOOK TENDER Well-established logging company looking for a qualified hook tender. Call (360)477-5791 K E N M O R E A I R : Pa r t time CSA/driver. Computer skills, must be able to lift 50 lbs. Email resumes to robinm@kenm oreair.com

Communications KWA HOMECARE Officer/911 Dispatcher Part/full-time Caregivers. City of Por t Angeles: Benefits, Flexible Hours. L o o k i n g t o s e r ve t h e Call P.A. (360)452-2129 community and start a Sequim (360)582-1647 career in Public Safety? P.T. (360)344-3497 The Port Angeles Police Depar tment currently LEGAL ASSISTANT has two vacant dispatchFamily law. e r p o s i t i o n s. $ 1 8 . 6 1 Peninsula Daily News $23.74 hr. plus benefits. PDN#654/Legal A p p l i c a n t s mu s t t a ke Port Angeles, WA 98362 dispatcher test thru PubLost Mountain Lodge AIDES/RNA OR CNA lic Safety Testing before Bed and Breakfast Best wages, bonuses. applying. To view testing Sequim, WA Wright’s. 457-9236. s c h e d u l e g o t o w w w. Morning chef, part-time. publicsafetytesting.com. Suite attendant, par tFor more info contact time. Send resume to HR at (360)417-4510 kathy@lostmountain or email lodge.com. 683-2995 agates@cityofpa.us COPA is an EOE NANNY and housekeeping help needed: full MENTAL HEALTH Provide peer suppt to time. And part-time help APPLY NOW! consumers of behavioral and housekeeping/erHEALTHCARE JOBS health svcs. Req history rands, 2-4 hours a day. Due to growth new of mental health condi- Apply at positions available for SunnySequim92 t i o n ; d i p l o r G E D. 2 5 NAC/NAR/HCA’s @gmail.com hrs/wk. $11.13-13.09/hr, Additional opening for DOE. Resume & cvr ltr LN ON-CALL MEDICAL to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., 408 W. Washington ASSISTANT Port Angeles, WA 98362 Sequim. Join multi-disciplinar y peninsulabehavioral.org team supporting consu360-683-7047 EOE reception@ mers with chronic mental discovery-mc.com illnesses in an outpatient LICENSED NURSE setting. Must be proAUTO PARTS Looking for versitle, gram grad & license-eliCOUNTER PERSON caring individual, come gible. Mental health exHere we grow again. Aujoin our great team! per pref ’d. Base Pay: tomotive parts or service Contact Cherrie $ 1 3 - $ 1 5 . 2 9 h r. D O E . experience requred. Ap(360)683-3348 Resume to PBH, 118 E. ply in person, Baxter 8th St., Por t Angeles, Auto Parts, 221 W. 1st, WA 98362. http:// P.A. No phone calls. peninsulabehavioral.org EOE BLONDIE’S Plate in Sequim hiring all postions. MUSIC DIRECTOR and Support/Care Staff Mail resume to: 216 other responsibilities as To work with developCenter Park Way, Se- assigned, 20 hrs/week. mentally disabled adults, C o m p e t i t i v e s a l a r y. no exper ience necesquim, WA 98382. S e n d r e s u m e t o S a n sary, will train. $10 hr. to LEGAL ASSISTANT Ju a n B a p t i s t C h u r c h , start. CNA’s encouraged Part time, reception du- 1704 Discovery Rd., PT, to apply. Apply in person ties in busy front office. 98368. (360)271-1430 or at 1020 Caroline, P.A. Computer skills in MS (360)385-2545. from 8-4 p.m. Word, Excel, and AcMEDICAL BILLING cess. Experience Pref. GARAGE SALE ADS Sequim, part-time, expePeninsula Daily News Call for details. PDN#656/Legal Assist. rienced. Email resume to 360-452-8435 Port Angeles, WA 98362 nicejob1989@gmail.com 1-800-826-7714

THE BLACKBIRD COFFEEHOUSE For sale. Great price, thriving and profitable. 3020 Found Contact Adam for details: (360)224-9436, F O U N D : C a t . Yo u n g , blackbirdcoffee small female, black and @gmail.com g o l d s h o r t h a i r, ve r y f r i e n d l y, D u r r wa c h t e r 4026 Employment Rd., west of P.A. (360)928-9764 General F O U N D : P u r s e. Z i p s, embroidered with glasses inside. Sunny Farms area, Sequim. (360)477-8306

THE ESTATE SALE! Fri.-Sat, 9-3 p.m., 215 S e q u i m Ave . S e w i n g machines, looms, sewing, collectibles, clothing. 2,700 sf of stuff!

WANTED: Reflexolog i s t / l m t fo r u p s c a l e SHEEP: Registered Ja- s u bl e a s e. 3 s p a c e s cob wool sheep. $100 available in LUXURY ea. (360)477-1706. r e t i r e m e n t c e n t e r. Must be honest and STORAGE AUCTION Sat., April 20, 11 a.m. All reliable with referencSafe Mini Storage, 74 e s . Yo g a i n s t r u c t o r Grant Rd., Sequim. a l s o w e l c o m e d . Please call: Units 23, 47, 140. (309)737-8709 (360)683-6646

ADOPT: A loving family longs to provide everyt h i n g f o r 1 s t b a b y. Beaches, laughter, financial security. Tina 1800-933-1975 Expenses paid NOTAC: Tree giveaway, 4/20, 8:30-11:30 a.m., 8th & Francis. 452-6645.

TAY L O R ’ S L a w n Maintenance Available all year around for any lawn care needed, moss removal and odd jobs. Just call (360)565-6660 or (360)565-6298. Always done to your satisfaction!

Equipment Mechanic Opening

THE HOH TRIBE Has two (2) Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST) Field Te c h n i c i a n p o s i t i o n available. This position will suppor t the PST smolt trapping and summer snorkel survey program with direction from the Lead PST Technician and the Fisheries Management Biologist. Work week is 40 hours with occasional work on weekends and at night during high flow/heavy stor m events. A high school diploma or GED and applicable field experience are highly desirable. A valid WA state dr iver’s license is required. Native American preference. For a Hoh Tr ibe job application, contact Kristina Currie (360)374-6502 kristinac@ hohtribe-nsn.org

ENVIOUS GREENS C o m p l e t e Ya r d C a r e Proper ty Mntnce. Specialty Pruning Gutters Weed Pulling/Whacking D e l i ve r y a n d S p r e a d Bark/Rock Brush Clearing Debris Hauling Sequim/P.A. area 681-3521 cell: 808-9638 HOUSE CLEANING Charges by the house. (360)461-4767 JUAREZ & SON’S HANDY M A N S E R V I C E S . Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problems projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248.

RENT-A-MAN Labor for hire. Inside or out. Call and we’ll talk. John The Silverwater Cafe (360)775-5586 Is accepting applications for line cooks and dishRUSSELL weashers. Join our crew ANYTHING for summer or permaCall today 775-4570. nent employment. 237 Taylor, Port Townsend. SCUBA DIVER (360)385-6448 FOR HIRE VETERANARY RecepCall 681-4429 tion: Par t-time, weekends req., apply in pers o n , G r e y w o l f Ve t Hospital, Sequim. WANTED: Reflexolog i s t / l m t fo r u p s c a l e s u bl e a s e. 3 s p a c e s available in LUXURY r e t i r e m e n t c e n t e r. Must be honest and reliable with reference s . Yo g a i n s t r u c t o r also welcomed. Please call: (309)737-8709

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805 B A R K - TA S T I C D o g Walking/Care is a new licensed, bonded and insured business serving Sequim. Reach us by phone (360)504-2008, email bark.tastic@aol.com. Check out our Facebook page for more info.

BIZY BOYS LAWN & YA R D C A R E : Yo u r work is our play! We enjoy mowing, weeding, edging, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance and gene r a l ya r d c l e a n - u p ! Free job quotes! Call Tom at 460-7766

COMPUTER Care-Assistance. In home assistance or instruction with your computer. 25 years experience working with windows based computers. No service call fee within Sequim city limits. Chet 681-0522 or cell, 808-9596.

SEWING. I Sew 4U *Hemming *Alterations *Zippers replaced *Any project Don’t wait! Call today for an appointment Patti Kuth, 417-5576. I’m Sew Happy!

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

9912 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE Sun.-Mon. April 21 & 22 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 20 Conifer Ct., Sequim Diamond Point 3 Br., 3 ba. $327,000. 670-5336 or 775-0314

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

12 Pastured Acres The value is in the land, b a r n, and unfinished SMALL Excavation and rambler. Rambler is deTractor Work. Call Joe at signed to be a 3 br., 2 (360)460-7220 bath, with great room. Rambler has roof, sidT A Y L O R ’ S L a w n ing, windows, and entry Maintenance Available doors. Finish the interior all year around for any the way you want. The l a w n c a r e n e e d e d , 12 acres has a couple of moss removal and odd seasonal ponds and is j o b s . J u s t C a l l fenced for horses. The ( 3 6 0 ) 5 6 5 - 6 6 6 0 o r small old farmhouse is not finance-able. (360)565-6298. $135,000 Always done to your MLS#270575 satisfaction! Holly Coburn (360)461-2153 TAY L O R ’ S L a w n WINDERMERE Maintenance Available PORT ANGELES all year around for any lawn care needed, 2.06 ACRES IN THE moss removal and odd CITY! j o b s . J u s t c a l l Zoned Rs-9 per city. 2 ( 3 6 0 ) 5 6 5 - 6 6 6 0 o r bedroom bungalow nes(360)565-6298. tled on 2 plus acres. Always done to your Home has cozy woodsatisfaction! stove, vinyl windows, forced air heat, great YARD MAINTINENCE: laundry area with tons of storage. South side has Free estimates. window filled den with (360)912-2990 skylights and big winYO U N G c o u p l e e a r l y dows looking out to the s i x t i e s . a va i l a b l e fo r deer and nature. Despring cleanup, weeding, t a c h e d g a r a g e w i t h t r i m m i n g , m u l c h i n g , workspace and storage moss removal, complete room. 8 foot fenced gargarden restoration and den spot too. This is a misc. yard care. Excel- truly unique property. $140,000 lent references. MLS#263854 (360)457-1213 Jennifer Holcomb (360)460-9513 2040 General WINDERMERE Financial PORT ANGELES Discover the “Success and Money Making Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know a b o u t . To g e t yo u r FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD please call 206-745-2135 gin

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

E-MAIL:

504 E. 6th St. Classic 2 Br., 1 bath, bungalow. Recently updated, preserved 1920s craftsman charm, centrally located, fenced yard, detached garage, offers at $118,500. Call (360)461-2438

5000900

DESK: Antique honeycolored oak roll-top desk, with secret compartment, pigeon holes and large drawers. Was purchased almost 100 years ago, and wasn’t new then. $500. (360)683-6127

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment General General Wanted

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County ADORABLE! 2 Br., 1929 bungalow, with fresh paint, new carpet and linoleum. Updated kitchen with all a p p l i a n c e s. O r i g i n a l hardwoods in bedrooms. Electrical and plumbing has been updated. Concrete foundation. Centrally located on dead end street. $89,900. ML#270739. PAM CHURCH 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY BEAUTIFUL VICTORIAN home with mountain views. Seller has has made a great outdoor entertaining off the large back deck to the East and a graveled fire pit area with raised flower beds to the West. Home has been updated with new siding, vinyl windows, gutters and has been recently painted. Inside, the home boasts a large formal dinning area with french doors, a living room and a separate sitting area off the kitchen. All three bedroom are upstairs, a full bathroom on each floor. $199,000 MLS#270305 Jennifer Felton (360)460-9513 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

ELEGANT WATERFRONT HOME Architectural elegance and exceptional design in this beautiful custom waterfront home in Sequim. This lovely home was intricately designed so that each room has s t u n n i n g wa t e r v i ew s and great views of Protection Island and the San Juan Islands. This home’s no-bank waterfront location allows for easy beach access right out your back door. Situated near the end of a quite seaside lane this home is the ultimate in waterfront living. $679,000. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

L U X U RY e s t a t e w i t h views of the Olympics b e t we e n S e q u i m a n d Po r t A n g e l e s, 1 9 . 6 acres, 5 br., 5 bath, perfe c t fo r e n t e r t a i n i n g , gourmet kitchen, deck, dramatic master suite, fireplace, walk-in shower, hydro-therapy tub. Artistic landscaping, gardens and vineyard. Perfect mother-in-law apt with separate entrance or home office or B&B. BIRD LOVERS $799,900 DELIGHT! NWMLS#40941, Appt. Newly built home, state (360)461-3926 of the art kitchen, alder cabinets with easy close drawers, 3 bedrooms + MOBILE HOME: 1971 den and over 1,700 sf, Brookwood, shop and irrigation water available garage on 2 lots at 415 Dungeness Meadows. for outdoor use. $98,000. (907)229-7349. $222,500 ML#469080/270720 NO BINOCULARS Deb Kahle NEEDED (360)683-6880 1.84 high bank waterWINDERMERE f r o n t a c r e s, r e a d y t o SUNLAND bu i l d . A l s o a q u a r t e r share of 12 treed acres, PERSONALITY PLUS C h a r m i n g 1 9 0 0 fa r m that can never be develhome updated in 1980 oped. Power and phone and move in ready - 3 in at road. CC&R’s to br., 2 bath, 2,079 sf on protect your investment $149,000 2.97 acres; hardwood MLS#264512 floors, large master bedQuint Boe room, newer windows, (360)457-0456 water and mountain WINDERMERE v i ew s. G r e a t fe n c e d PORT ANGELES garden area off rear deck plus acreage to spare! Detached garage Visit our website at with basement/wine celwww.peninsula lar plus 30’ x 60’ dailynews.com shop/barn. Or email us at $224,900 ML#270741 classified@ Gail Sumpter peninsula Blue Sky Real Estate dailynews.com Sequim - 360-477-9189


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S S W I S H C N U R C S N G Y

4/19

Accessories, Blonde, Bouncing, Brunette, Buns, Care, Celebrities, Chopsticks, Clip, Color, Confidence, Curly, Dark, Extensions, Flare, Flirtation, Fringe, Glowing, Healthy, Layers, Locks, Long, Natural, Nourish, Options, Pins, Ponytail, Power, Scent, Scrunch, Shine, Silky, Straight, Strands, Strong, Stylish, Swish, Texture, Timeless, Up-do Yesterday’s Answer: Celebrate THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

CUDEN Š2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LROTL (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

36 Atheist activist Madalyn Murray __ 37 Dennis the Menace neighbor 38 German opener 39 Super Fro-Yo sellers 40 Eat at 41 Drop zone? 45 Dole’s running mate 46 Put forth without proof

4/19/13

48 City SE of Roma 49 Ate (at) 50 “__ Scissorhands� 52 Checked for the last time? 54 Like one who is 52-Down 56 Fast horse 59 Pen’s mate 60 Brief commitment 61 Crow’s croak 62 Pen filler

BURTAP

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

DOWN 1 Art movement 2 Elude 3 Code talkers’ tribe 4 5-Across’s home: Abbr. 5 Lose it 6 Member of a large kingdom 7 Clear 8 Spa specimen 9 Lacking siblings 10 President with a B.A. from Columbia 11 Shoulder-length hair styles 12 The “you� in the 1968 lyric “Gee I think you’re swell� 13 Imitated 19 Brain tests, briefly 21 “Put up your dukes, then!� 24 Break up 25 Statistician’s input 26 Common folk group 28 __ Perce tribe 31 Seaweed extract 34 Beige relative

N M G N O L I A T Y N O P H E

SAUCAB Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

“

�

-

ACROSS 1 Their first parts are geog. indicators 5 Her last film was “Two-Faced Woman� 10 Newspaper page 14 Injure, in a way 15 __ dome 16 Denpasar’s island 17 __ mentality 18 *Celebrating the big five-oh, say 20 __-Locka, Florida 21 Sum, sometimes 22 Country across the sea from Eritrea 23 *Small museum piece 27 Oil-rich African country 29 City on the Rhone 30 “__ Theme�: “Doctor Zhivago� song 32 Tram contents 33 Hog : sow :: rabbit : __ 35 Freak (out) 36 Court cry 37 What the answers to starred clues end in, in more ways than one 40 Pigeon-loving Muppet 42 Fjord cousin 43 __ Victor 44 Bargainer with GM 45 LeVar’s “Roots� role 47 Bender 51 Icky coating 53 *Dancer with many fans 55 Its young are called crias 57 Rock’s __ Lobos 58 Touch clumsily 59 *Profit factors 62 Siouan tribe 63 __ d’amore 64 Terse observation 65 W.S. winner in four of the last five years 66 Flex 67 Leafy recess 68 Pirate played by Laughton

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013 C3

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: GRAND FROND SCENIC FEWEST Answer: Tensions mounted between the lemonade sellers when neither of them would — STAND DOWN

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 671 Mobile Home Clallam County Clallam County Spaces for Rent Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

NO EXPENSE SPARED Beautiful country home, various upscale flooring used throughout, granite counters, stainless applia n c e s , d o u b l e o ve n , see-through propane fp ( i n m a s t e r b r. t o o ) , above 3-car garage is 1,100 sf 1 br., 1 bath apt. $549,000 ML#430571/264647 Team Schmidt (360)460-0331 WINDERMERE SUNLAND TAKE 2 You’ll be proud to own the 2 views from this great Diamond Point location along with all of the community a m e n i t i e s. T h e h o m e borders the lagoon and overlooks the strait. This large daylight basement, 2 level home has 2 of everything! 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 kitchens, 2 rock fireplaces, 2 large great rooms and all surrounded by a walk around, covered deck. The large double lot has a guest cottage and a separate enclosed 2 stall carport. Approx. 2000 sf of roominess! Check out the community air port, beach access, boat launch, etc. $279,822. MLS#264412 2 Brokers Call Barc or Jeanine 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

P.A.: 1926 Craftsman Bungalow. Old school charm with modern details. Historic Cherry Hill neighborhood. 2 Br., 1 bath, detached garage, large covered front porch with swing, hard wood floors, propane fireplace and stove, all s t a i n l e s s a p p l i a n c e s, h e a t p u m p, l a u n d r y room with front load w a s h e r / d r y e r, s m a l l basement used as wine storage, ADT security/fire system with 16 c a m e ra DV D s y s t e m , private 2-person hot tub, raised garden beds with self water ing system, small greenhouse, immaculate yard, propane fire place with pub seating under large alumin u m g a z e b o, fe n c e d backyard for kids and pets, alley access, partial mountain view, convenient location within walking distance to d o w n t o w n , S a f e w a y, Countr y Aire, cour thouse, and city hall. Call for appointment (360)417-6613.

POPULAR RESTAURANT CAFÉ In the heart of the tourist downtown Sequim walk. Well equipped kitchen features nearly new top of the line equipment. Totally tur n key business. Selling for less than invested. Clean, modern and in a prime location. Friendly staff happy to stay. Licensed for Beer & Wine too. $150,000. MLS#270644. DAVE (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP Wonderful corner lot in Sunland, immaculate low maintenance landscaping, knot free cedar siding and 40 year roof, open floor plan with wood vaulted ceilings, baker’s delight kitchen, hobby room and sunroom. $259,500 ML#270666/468391 Terry Peterson 360-683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

SINGLE LEVEL TOWNHOUSE Second fairway of SunLand, updated kitchen, den off living room, large master br., oversized 2 car garage. $285,000 ML#469242/270723 Patty Terhune (360)912-1530 WINDERMERE SUNLAND THE VIEWS WILL “WOW� YOU! Opportunity knocks with this home and property located in a ver y desirable neighborhood on over a 1/3 of an acre with a buildable lot. The mountain and water views will justify some updates you might make to this 3 Br., 2 bath, two level home. $275,000. ML#270662. Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

SHOP LOCAL

VERY WELL MAINTAINED One level home located in Sunland on the 16th fairway/green. Many updates done, this home is move in ready with mature landscaping including a flagpole and golf cart storage. $239,900 ML#270641/270641 Robert Sexton (360)460-8769 TOWN & COUNTRY

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

peninsula dailynews.com

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

This country colonial farm home is stately and o f fe r s a s p e c t a c u l a r mountain. view on 5+ acres close to town. Served by both PUD and a high capacity well for l aw n s, g a r d e n s, l i ve stock. 4-stall barn built in 2 0 0 1 w i t h fe e d , t a ck room, hayloft and 20x30 shop too. Picturesque wooded area with gazebo, trails & a spring. $401,250 MLS#264372 Holly Coburn (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES WELCOME HOME Unobstructed views of the Strait and shipping l a n e s . L a r g e 3 b r. , 2 1/2 bath home with updated kitchen. Under counter lighting, oak cabinets, view of the Olympics out kitchen w i n d ow. L a r g e d e ck with hot tub. Bamboo flooring in family room downstairs with area for second kitchen for living area. Nicely landscaped with sprinkler system. $259,000. MLS#270562. Jean Irvine (360)460-5061 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

WHAT A DELIGHT Two blocks from downtown sequim, 2 br. home with wonderful views, enclosed private stairway, lots of storage and efficient kitchen, enjoy clubhouse privileges. $92,500 ML#462926/270538 Patty Terhune (360)912-1530 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes CARLSBORG Mobile Home: 2 br., 1 bath mobile home in quiet park in desireable area. Vaulted celings, composition roof, eat in kitchen, great yard, storage shed, enclosed front porch, small deck. $34,000. 425-213-7262. Manufactured Home For Sale: 3 br., 2 bath d o u bl ew i d e m a nu fa c tured home. Newly renovated and move in ready. Owner financing available OAC. $39,500. Located at the Lake Pleasant Mobile Park in Beaver. Also have a singlewide manufactured home available as well. Homes will not be moved from park. Call (360)808-7120 for more information. SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide mobile home, 55+ park, 2 Br., 2 bath, garage with spare room, large covered deck. $31,500. (360)385-4882

919 W. 15th, P.A.: 4 Br., S E Q U I M : 2 , 5 0 0 S f . home for rent, 1.5 ba, garage, fenced. $1,100. (360)452-6144. $ 1 , 2 5 0 / m o , o n g o l f course. 4 Br., 3 bath, F O R K S : 3 B r. , 2 b a , new car pet and wood huge 2 car gar, close to floors throughout, double ever ything. $875 mo., g a ra g e, 2 f i r e p l a c e s, $1,000 dep., small dog huge family room, deck ok. (543)689-1743. with view, new septic, community well $36/mo. JAMES & One year lease required. ASSOCIATES INC. No smoking. Pets negoProperty Mgmt. tiable. Scott at 360-388-8474 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. Immediate occupancy. A 2 br 1 ba ...............$550 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$585 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, A 2 br 1 ba ...............$600 close to town. $1,200. H 2 br 1 ba ...............$650 (405)640-7314 H 2 br 1 ba ...............$750 H 3 br 2 ba ..............$850 WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $850. H 3 br 2 ba ...............$990 No smoking/pets. (360)452-6750. H 3 br 2 ba .............$1100 HOUSE/APT IN SEQ A 2 br 1.5 ba ............$875 605 Apartments H 2 br 1 ba .............$1000 Clallam County More Properties at www.jarentals.com CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 story, 2 car ba, close to Safeway, no garage, 619 E. Laurid- smoking/pets. $550 mo. (360)460-5892 sen. Ready 7/1. $1,000, plus dep. (360)461-6608 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, P.A.: Classic Tudor style quiet, 2 Br., excellent house, 3 story, 3,000 sf, r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . 4 Br., 4.5 ba, full base- $700. (360)452-3540. ment, paved par king, water/mtn. views, com- P.A.: 1 Br. lg. apt., wap l e t e l y r e s t o r e d , n o ter view, quiet, clean. smoke/pets. $2,500 mo., $615 mo. (206)200-7244 1 yr. lease, 1st, dep. Properties by lawn care included. 131 Landmark. portangelesE. 12th. (360)460-6457. landmark.com Properties by Landmark. portangeles665 Rental landmark.com

3ATURDAY !PRILs 

3ATURDAY !PRILsn

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares ROOMMATE WANTED To share expenses for beautiful home on 10+ acres, quad trails. $515, includes utilities, DirectTV. Call Lonnie after 5:00 p.m. PA. (360)477-9066

1163 Commercial Rentals PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Restaurant Space for Lease Seeking restaurant operator for 700 sf. space in the newly renovated Josephine Campbell Building on Highway 101 in Quilcene. 400 sf. deck for outdoor seating overlooking a wooded area; 550 sf. storage area below. Ready for tenant improvements; build-out negotiable. Ideal location on Hwy 101 – approx. 1.6 million cars dr ive Quilcene each Duplex/Multiplexes through year. See our website at SEQUIM: Water view, 3 www.thecampbellbuild Br., 2 ba. No smoking or SEQUIM: Duplex, 2 Br., ing.com. Contact Chuck p e t s , r e f . r e q u i r e d . $700+dep. 460-4089. Thrasher at www.mchughrents.com $1,100 mo. 477-4192. 360-808-2388 or c_thrasher@mind spring.com

OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE 3ATURDAY !PRILsTO

S E QU I M : L a z y A c r e s M H P, 5 5 + , n o R V s . $325 mo. (360)683-6294

3ATURDAY !PRILsTO

S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h Ave., Boardwalk Square. (360)683-3256

SEQUIM: Office/retail space 850 sf. $800 mo. (360)460-5467

IN THE

CITY -

313 Hancock, Port Angeles

s"2PLUS$ENn"!n3& s!CREn3UNNY0ATIO s.%7+)4#(%.(EAT0UMP s&IREPLACEn7OOD3TOVE s&ENCED/RGANIC'ARDEN s0VT&ENCED"ACK9ARDW$ECK MLS#264668 $212,000

s"2 "! 3& !CRE,OT LOTS s5PDATED+ITCHEN s$ECK 0ATIOW(OT4UB  #AR'ARAGE s3PACIOUS-ASTERW7ALK IN#LOSET0VT"ATH MLS#270190 $232,500

Directions: Hwy 101 East of Port Angeles>North on Old Olympic Hwy>West on Olympian Way

Directions: South on Lincoln>Stay right onto Lauridsen Blvd>South on Laurel >West on Hancock

UPTOWN REALTY

UPTOWN REALTY

Team Thomsen

Team Thomsen

Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

- FAMOUS BUNGALOW – FABULOUS MTN VIEWS -

34770857

UPTOWN REALTY

Team Thomsen Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

- HIDDEN

120 Olympian Way, Port Angeles

34770853

Directions: West on 8th>South on Pine>East on 11th St.

- GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD & LOCATION -

34770856

34770852

- SWEET COMFORTABLE BUNGALOW -

430 W. 11th St. Port Angeles s"2n"!n3&n"ORNIN s!CRE,OTn%NDOF$EAD%ND3Tn0ATIO s,ARGE'ARAGEnWORKSHOPLOFTn'REENHOUSE MLS#270313 $135,000

915 W. 7th St. Port Angeles

s"2n"!n3&n"ORNIN s7OOD3TOVEn&ENCED"ACK9ARDW$ECK s'ARAGE3&n(EATED3TORAGE"UILDING MLS#270408 $139,900 Directions: West on 8th St.>North on “B� ST.>West on 7th

UPTOWN REALTY

Team Thomsen Previews Property Specialists (360) 808-0979 mthomsen@olypen.com

SPACE NEEDED Non-profit sports league seeking 10,000 sf space for practice and spor ting events, etc. Warehouse, shop, garage, hangar, empty storage area, etc. Any flat space sitting empty, give us a call! (206)890-8240

6005 Antiques & Collectibles

DESK: Antique honeycolored oak roll-top desk, with secret compartment, pigeon holes and large drawers. Was purchased almost 100 years ago, and wasn’t new then. $500. (360)683-6127

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

C4 FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013 6042 Exercise Equipment

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

B OW F L E X : U l t i m a t e H o m e G y m . H a r d l y AR-15: Bushmaster rifle. Brand new in box, with used. $700/obo. a c c e s s o r i e s . (360)461-2811 $1,300/obo. (360)640-1171

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment

TIRES: (2) 11.2x28 rear tractor tires. $575. (360)683-6464 TRACTOR: ‘52 Ferguson. 6-way back blade, scraper box, and ripper t o o t h , g o o d r u n n e r. $2,500. (360)710-4966.

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market

6080 Home Furnishings

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

G&G FARMS FRUIT TREES: Pears and Asian pears, apples, cherries, peaches, plum, walnuts, filberts, thunder clouds, maples, quaking aspen, cypress, BERSA: 380 auto. Nickblueberries, strawberries le-plated, 8 shot clip, like F I R E W O O D : 6 c o r d and many more. new. $450. special, $895. Limited 95 Clover Ln. off Taylor (360)452-3213 time only! 360-582-7910. Cutoff, Seq. 683-8809. www.portangeles firewood.com RELOADING EQUIP. 6075 Heavy Dies, powder, etc., variety of ammo. $500/obo. Visit our website at Equipment Jim at (360)457-0943 www.peninsula dailynews.com SEMI END-DUMP Or email us at WANTED: Private party, TRAILER: 30’. Electric classified@ 22 cal DA pistol, Colt or tar p system, excellent peninsula S&W, nice cond. Leave condition. $7,500. dailynews.com msg. (360)681-0309. (360)417-0153

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

6100 Misc. Merchandise

OAK TV CABINET Honey Oak, 46� x 61� x 20�, storage excellent condition includes 32� ToshibaTV. $300. (360)457-8715.

6100 Misc. Merchandise

BOAT TRAILER: 1994 FUEL TANKS: 500 gal., C a u l k i n s g a l v a n i z e d $200. 125 gal., for truck, boat trailer. 17’-20’ boat $150. (360)683-3119. length. (360)461-2811.

6115 Sporting Goods

6140 Wanted & Trades

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789. WANTED: IBM Electrolux 2 or 3 typewr iter, new/used. 797-1465.

TABLE: Solid teak table, seats 4-12, 8 chairs, 2 leaves, pads, and linens, matching buffet, excellent condition. $1,500. (360)808-4001

B O O K S : 1 1 1 L o n d o n HALIBUT: Fresh, whole Folio Society Editions fish only. (360)963-2021. plus 20 Letter Press editions for, $655. 51 InterLUMBER RACK national Collectors’ Library books, faux leather Kargo Master, for full size short box. $375. binding, for $75. Phone (360)461-9014 457-4348 to view. Ask for Dick. PIANO: Ivers and Pond piano. $200. CARGO TRAILER (360)683-9146 Wells cargo 2001 6’x10’ enclosed trailer great condition. low POWER CHAIR: Used, Invacare Pronto. $1,500/ mileage $1,900. obo. (360)504-2710. (360)461-9014

POOL TABLE: Full size, with accessories, good 6135 Yard & condition, could use new Garden rails. Buyer disassembles and moves the table. $200. BLOOMING Rhododen(360)681-2478 drons: $26. Large, easy planting and care. HunPlace your ad at dreds to choose from. peninsula 151 D street, Port Haddailynews.com lock. (360)379-6456.

WINDOW WASHING TREE SERVICE

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

REPAIR/REMODEL

TREE SERVICE

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

SET: Decorative glass dining table, 4 chairs, glass hutch to match, very beautiful. $100 firm, worth more. 681-8034.

6125 Tools

WA N T E D : O l d fe n c e boards. (360)457-1936.

33688614

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

Call Bryan

360-461-4609

22588179

452-0755 775-6473 #LUNDFF*962K7

27648136

ANTHONY’S SERVICE  

360-460-0518

RDDARDD889JT

360-452-2054

582-0384

LANDSCAPE DESIGN

PAINTING

Transforming Land with Imagination

FOX PAINTING

Call for details or check us out on Facebook.

(360) 582-9382

Mole Control

Innovative Landscape Design for all situations

(360) (360)

457-6582 808-0439

Licensed Cont#FOXPAPC871D7

683-8328

Bill Reid / SITE +

   

SPRING IS HERE AND IT’S TIME FOR NEW CONCRETE!

HOME REPAIR/REMODEL

We do all phases of concrete including patios, driveways & decorative areas.

GARAGES & MORE

Exterior Painting

W OO D

Interior Painting

/$+1*($$$#,2')',&$#*."&4

DESIGN & BUILD

MAINTENANCE

HOME

"Give Haller a Holler!!!"

CELL

457-6512 908-5510 #GRAYSHC870C0

Since 1987

INC.

PAINTING

POWER WASHING OOF SERVICES ASPHALT SEALING & STRIPING

Davis Painting

WWW.HALLERINC.COM

    



         

SALON SERVICE

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

Julie’s

FREE Estimates Owner: Steve Davis    

34764246

(360) 457-8102

Salon Service S

Salon Services In Your Home Haircuts, Color, Perms, Styling, Manicures, Pedicures, and Mini Facials

(360) 670-6381

360-452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

34763896

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

CALL NOW To Advertise

32740271

32743911

Tree Service

#360-461-6441

     

SHACKS & SHEDS

33757296

Insured Bonded

$% 

ROD KREBS

34764872

BIG License #BIGWOWT884P6

All Repairs Needed & Siding & Windows & Gutters Exterior Chemical Treatment & Power Washing Gutter Cleaning & Window Washing

+$$,-'(!-$,3$)'*+',"*.)-, '"$),$#*)#$#3),.+$#

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

TREE SERVICE

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing 32736526

Painting The Peninsula Since 1988

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

34764203

Westside Concrete Inc. (360) 461-4336

Serving the entire Peninsula

ARLAN

33746190

23597511

$400 OFF NEW ROOF Honest & Reliable at a reasonable price

PAINTING

Call today for a FREE quote!

360-683-4881

SPRING SPECIAL:

GROOFINGD 457-5186

25 Years

    

PAINTING G

ROOFING

3 6 0 - 4 52 - 3 7 0 6  w w w . n w h g . n e t

3Licensed 6 0and. Bonded 4 5 2Contr.. 7#ESPAI*122BJ 938

TV REPAIR

TV Repair

STSIDE CONCRETE E W

Orange Peel - Knock Down - Hand Trowel

 Small Excavating JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER  Utility Install & contact@jkdirtworks.com Lot Clearing  Spring & Storm LIC 

  Clean-up

29667464

34763901

360.379.5211

CONCRETE

Removal of popcorn or acoustic ceilings & Water Damage & Smoke Damage Removal of wallpaper & Repair of cracks and holes & Texture to match

360/

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

34 yrs. experience Free 1 hr. consult

Appliances

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Expert Pruning

24614371

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showrooms for lowest prices on

Flooring

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

  !457-9875

Cabinets

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

DIRT WORK

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

Painting & Pressure Washing 32743866

AA

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

195133545

APPLIANCES

* !(#"#%! *& !!$#  &""!#% * &$ $$%#%&"$ ! $&%%! *)#! )#!($ * ($(%&# $ 

LAWNCARE

PRUNING

No Job Too Small

Lena Washke Accounting Services, Inc.

2A691397

Port Angeles Sequim Port Townsend

26636738

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

Visit our website: 999(,'-,0510):'%8%6,10'1/ Locally Operated for since 1985

24608159

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Call (360) 683-8332

(360) 460-3319

3 32741372

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

22588145

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

✔ Senior Discount ✔ Yard Service ✔ Odd Jobs ✔ Hauling ✔ Brush Removal ✔ Hedge Trimming ✔ Roof/Gutter Cleaning ✔ Tree Pruning

Contr#KENNER1951P8

$ $ $   $ ! 

COLUMC*955KD

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

360-460-6176 Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

  

$" $  $#" 

    

1064%'614! ! *(056%..)4)46,*,)(

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Jami’s

Done Right Home Repair

<!%1(5 4,8)9%;5 <4%(,0+ <#6,.,6,)5 <%0(5'%2,0+,).( 19,0+!16,..,0+ <"019!)/18%.

116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

$ "$

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

Excavation and General Contracting <..",6) 4)2,0'.7()5 %07*%'674)(1/)5 <%0(.)%4,0+%0( 47&&,0+ <")26,'";56)/5 <!1'-$%..5!1'-)4,)5

Quality Work

22588172

HOME REPAIR

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

23590152

Chad Lund

Grounds Maintenance Specialist % #% % "%! %   % Installation and Repair

23595179

www.LundFencing.com

# !" ! # #       #  !

Columbus Construction $ $    $! " $  

23590413

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

035076142

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss & Mildew Removal Window Cleaning


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

For Better or For Worse

6135 Yard & Garden

by Lynn Johnston

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9802 5th Wheels 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 Prowler Lynx 215. New raised a x l e s, 1 2 0 vo l t r e fe r, great shape, fully equipped, comes with hitch. Reduced $2,750. (360)460-6248, eves.

FRONT SCOOP: Tractor attachment, Craftsman, new $560. Asking $300. (360)477-4573.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 9-4 p.m., 3924 Deer Pa r k R d . N o E a r l i e s P l e a s e. L o n g n a r r ow d r i vew ay. G O S L OW. RIDING MOWER: 2012 Shop equipment, higher Cub Cadet, SLTX1054, end tools, tools, tools, V- Tw i n H y d r o s t a t i c , floor jack, glassware, used 8 hrs. $2,000. books, household items, (360)460-0989 day bed, double sinks w i t h fa u c e t s , b r i c k s , 8142 Garage Sales mower trailer, too many items to list. Sequim ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sun., 1 0 : 0 0 - 5 : 0 0 p. m . , 8 1 M e a d o w D r . To o l s , clothes, jewelry, fishing, dining table, books, and collectibles, kitchen items, fridge, freezers, stove, washer and dryer, glassware, shoes, gardening tools and supplies, etc. ESTATE Sale: Saturday, 9-3 p.m., 123 Sanford Ln. California King bedroom set, twin beds, oak dining table and chairs, 3 piece sectional couch, 2 white couches, outd o o r p a t i o t a bl e w i t h chairs, leather papasan chairs, teak bar, bone china dish set, small fridge, lamps and pictures, microwave, entertainment center. Cash only! No earlies, please!

2006 Wells Cargo Trailer : Wells Cargo Utility Trailer, Inside dimensions 6’x12’. With fold down ramp rear door and side access door. Lightly used and in excellent condition. Please call ACTI @ 452-6776.

MOVING Sale: Fri. 9-3, Sat. 9-?, 73 Marsden Rd. Kids clothes, household items, kitchen items, 3 bike, 16’ flat bed 2 axle trailer, too much 7x16 Interstate Cargo / to list. Utility Trailer 2008 Black $3800 Excellent condition, less than 300 miles MOVING SALE on it! Call 360-928-0214 WILDER RV 1536 E. Front, next to Bushwhacker. Satur- TERRY ‘98: 30’ long, 1 d ay, 8 : 3 0 - 1 : 3 0 p. m . large slideout, $5,200/ Desk, chairs, file cabi- obo. (360)460-4408. nets, computer towers, assorted glass tops for TRAILER: ‘04 27’Q Forrest River Cherokee. Exdesks. cellent condition, new M U LT I - FA M I LY s a l e : flooring, slide out with Sat. 8-2, 1640 Deer Park large window/skylights. $8,700. (360)379-5136. Rd., Lots of Misc!

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

HORSESHOEING FLEA MARKET Port Angeles, Sequim, AND BAKE SALE and Joyce. Call Logan Sat., April 20th, 8 a.m.-3 at (360)808-0423. p. m , S e q u i m P r a i r i e Grange, 290 Macleay R d . L u n c h ava i l a bl e . SHEEP: Registered Jacob wool sheep. $100 Tailgaters Welcome. ea. (360)477-1706. GARAGE Sale: Fri.- Sat. 8-4, Sunday 9-2, 2241 YAKS: 2 bulls, 4 yrs. Atterberry Rd. 2 quads, and 1.5 yrs. old. 2 cows, old fishing gear, viola, 4 yrs. and 3 yrs. $500clothes, golf clubs, tools, $800. (360)582-3104, Sequim. much more. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 61 Camelot Rd. off Spath Rd. Cash only.

7035 General Pets

STORAGE AUCTION Sat., April 20, 11 a.m. All Safe Mini Storage, 74 Grant Rd., Sequim. Units 23, 47, 140. (360)683-6646

FREE: Basset Hound, purebred, 6 yr. old female, up to date with shots, spayed, wonderful dog, moving to senior living, cannot take with us. (360)797-1014.

KOMFORT: 1997 23F 5th Wheel. Great condit i o n N ew t i r e s w a t e r pump (2012) 2 skylights 2 twin beds Awning Purchase option of deluxe hitch, Chev PU tailgate, 1000 Trails Membership Po r t a b l e g r e y w a t e r tank. $7,000. (360)683-4552

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013 C5

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

Automobiles 9817 Motorcycles 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect.

B E L L B OY : ‘ 6 4 1 8 ’ Classic. Very good condition, Volvo I/O, 7.5 hp Johnson kicker, fullc anvas, new EZ Load trailer, new tires, 2 downr igg e r s , l o t s o f ex t r a s . $2,600. (360)417-1001.

S E A R AY: 1 9 7 9 S RV 1 9 5 . O r i g . o w n e r, 8 ’ beam, 305 Chev V8, 228 hp, Mercrusier, equip. for salmon fishing, water s k i i n g , ve r y l ow h r s, used mostly in fresh water, many extras, incl. all electronics and fishing gear, EZ Load trailer, in storage 24 yrs., health forces sale. $4,575/obo. (360)928-2518

YAMAHA: ‘72 Enduro 100LT2. Ready to ride, 3K original miles. $750/ obo.(360)683-0146.

BELLBOY: ‘78 24’ 20 KT Cruiser, 80 gal. fuel, 30 gal. water, 1,750 watt i nve r t e r, 1 2 0 V s h o r e power, 4 batteries, microwave, refr igerator, new depth finder, compass, GPS, VHF, dinette, new galley, new Wallas ceramic diesel stove/heater, auto leveling trim tabs, enclosed head, trailer with new disc brakes, wheels and tires. $8,000/obo. (360)683-9645 CHRIS CRAFT: 26’ Cavalier with trailer, 350 MerCruiser inboard, Bow Thr uster, radar, GPS, sounder, toilet with Electro Scan. $14,995. (360)775-0054

DEATH TAKES OWNER OF FISHING BOAT 20 ft. Robolo Boat,Center Counsel, with 4 stroke 115 Yamaha Mo9808 Campers & tor, has 400 hrs. on it. Electronics, trailer, (gaCanopies l i va n i z e d ) d u a l a xe l , CAMPER: ‘11 10’ Alas- many extras. By appointkan cab-over. Original ment. $22,000. (360)417-0277 owner, excellent cond. $9,000. (360)452-8968. EASTERN: ‘11 18’ cenPACKAGE: ‘85 Dodge ter console, premium 350 and 11.5’ self con- boat, like new, completely equipped, 50 hp tained camper. Yamaha, under 50 hrs. $1,900. (360)457-1153. in warranty, Load-r ite galv. trailer, many ex9050 Marine t ra s, D ow n e a s t s t y l e. Miscellaneous See easternboats.com $26,500. (360)477-6059 TRAVEL Trailer: ‘96 29’ BAYLINER: 17’, 70 hp H o l i d ay R a m bl e r, 1 Yamaha, needs some G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n slide. $5,500. engine work but runs. cr uiser, flying br idge, (360)460-3708 single Cummins diesel $1,850. (360)460-9365. engine, low hours, radar, BAYLINER: 1987 Capri VHF radio, CB, depth/ 9802 5th Wheels 1750. GM 4 Cyl 3.0L en- f i s h f i n d e r , d i n g h y, gine with OMC stern downriggers, 16’x32’ drive. Runs great! Elec- boathouse. $27,500. tronic ignition, Dual bat(360)457-0684 teries, Hummingbird 5 8 7 c i F i s h f i n d e r w i t h GLASTROM: 16’ open GPS. More info on PDN bow boat, 25 hp Johnonline. $3,800/obo. son, Calkin trailer. $750/ (360)460-0460 obo. (360)385-3686. 5TH WHEEL: $13,750 BAYLINER: 27’ Bucca- PONTOON BOAT: 10’ /obo cash only, must neer 3500 obo or trade sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ for ‘land yacht’ +6’ head- ODC 1018, white water Lots of extras, lami- r o o m ; 8 H P M e r c u r y and still water, oars and n a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 longshaft recently ser- wheel mount. $295/obo. (360)912-1759 slideouts, clean, com- v i c e d : r u n s g r e a t ! ’ for table, queen bed, Main+jib sail; small row- SLICKCRAFT: 1976 23’ central vac & more! ing skiff. Many extras inboard/outboard. 302 Come see in Sekiu. Call Rob to see engine, boat and trailer. Text/call 582-7130. $5,200. (360)457-8190. (360)390-8497

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05 SOFTAIL DEUCE FXSTD, 88 cube inch, stage 1 kit, Scream Eagle exhaust, lots of extras! Only 8,800 miles. 0 down financing available, ask for details. Competitive finance rates! VIN#026157 $10,500 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports SEA RAY: ‘74 24’ HT 457-7272 Cruiser. Reconditioned/ e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / HARLEY DAVIDSON rough weather fishing/ ‘06 FATBOY cruising with ALL NEW FLSTFI, 88 cube inch, equipment and features: repowered w/ Merc Hori- s t a g e 1 k i t , Va n c e & zon Engine/Bravo-3 (du- Hines exhaust, like new! al prop), stern drive (117 Only 9,700 miles. Buy hrs.), complete Garmin here, pay here! Trades electronics, reinforced welcome! VIN#028443 stern, full canvas, down$12,500 riggers, circ water heatRandy’s Auto Sales ing, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, & Motorsports EZ Load trailer, w/disk 457-7272 brakes (1,200 mi.), electric winch. Other extras, $52,000 invested. Sacri- HONDA: ‘80 CB-900C. S i l ve r. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / o b o o r fice for $18,500. t r a d e fo r g u n s / s m a l l (360)681-5070 truck. (360)460-3756.

9817 Motorcycles APRILIA: Scarabeo motorcycle/scooter 2009. This is a pristine motorcycle with less then 1000 miles on it! Hardly used! NOT A SR. S C O OT E R ! 5 0 0 C C s Needs a battery charge. $3600/obo. (360)808-6160

YAMAHA: ‘74 DT360. 4k original miles, runs good, amazing cond. $2,500/obo. 452-7253.

AMC: Rare 1970 AMX YAMAHA: ‘79 XS 1100. 2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd, 35K, fairing, saddle bags 95% original. $19,950. (360)928-9477 excellent cond. $2,750/ obo. (360)808-1922 or BUICK: 1976 Skylark. (360)681-3023 after 6. Rare, 2 door, V-6, stick. $1,600/obo. 460-8610.

9805 ATVs

CHEV: ‘63 Nova SS. 2 door hard top, V8, 2 sp ETON: 90 cc Quad, 2 power glide. $5,200. (360)461-2056 stroke, like new. $1,500 firm. (360)452-3213. C H E V: ‘ 7 9 C o r ve t t e . HONDA: TRX200 4WD L82, runs great, lots of new parts! $6,000/obo. ATV. $600. (360)457-6540 (360)477-6547

9740 Auto Service & Parts

MERCEDES: ‘85 SL380. Both tops, excellent condition. $10,000/obo. (360)460-6764

ATTENTION BIG BOAT AND RV OWNERS Low miles, Diesel Cummings V8 engine, model #504, with Allison HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing 4-speed trans with comA s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , plete power train and rablack/chrome, exc. cond. diator. $30,000 value for $7,500 firm. Don at $3,500/obo. 417-0153. (360)670-2204 MOPED electric scooter PARTS: Model-A Ford. E600. Like new, classi$25-$150. fied as an electric bicy(360)683-5649 cle. No motorcycle certification is required. 9742 Tires & Range 25 miles. Speed Wheels up to 25 mph. Red. $900. (360)460-0060.

S T U D E BA K E R : 1 9 5 0 S t a r l i g h t C o u p. C o m plete restoration, black cherry color, runs good, looks excellent. $11,000. (360)683-8810

BMW: ‘74 R75/6. Airhead Boxer, excellent condition, 29K mi., new powder coat, shocks, always garaged. $3,500/ obo. (360)912-2679. HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 ELECTRA GLIDE FLHTCI, 88 cube inch, 95 inch Big Bone Kit, oil cooler, custom exhaust. We finance ever yone! Home of the 5 minute approval! VIN#603603 $10,500 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports 457-7272 HONDA: 2003 VT750 A c e D e l u xe C r u i s e r. Showroom Condition Must see. Lots of Chrome, Many Extras. Will not find another bike like this. Never left out,never dropped. 10,387 Low Miles $4,500. (360)477-6968.

S C O OT E R : V K - E 5 0 0 electric, 48V/15AM, lithium battery, almost new, less than 20 mi., top speed 35 mpg, 30 mi. on 1 charge, paid $1,450. $600/obo. 504-2113. TRIUMPH ‘10 THUNDERBIRD 1600 1600 cc twin, windshield, b a g s , b a ck r e s t , o n l y 11,000 miles, must see! 11 roadbikes in stock! We bu y AT V s, b i ke s, Harley cash--paid for or not! VIN#439696 $10,500 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports 457-7272

BRAND NEW WHEELS S t i l l i n b ox ! M i ckey Thomson Classic II, black, 16x8 with bolt pattern 8x6.5. Didn’t fit our Toyota 4-Runner and don’t want to pay the restock fee. $550/obo (360)460-1301

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

9292 Automobiles Others

AUDI ‘95 90 SERIES With sunroof, sport tires, leather int., runs great. $4397/obo. 477-3834.

BUICK ‘06 ALLURE CXS SEDAN 3.6L VVT V6, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, sunroof, rear par king sensors, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, power leather seats, cruise control, air conditioning, dual zone automatic climate control, CD stereo, informat i o n c e n t e r, O n S t a r, HomeLink, dual front and side curtain airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $15,034! Only 42,000 original miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Clean Carfax! Exactly the same as a Buick LaCrosse! Loaded with all the options! Stop by Gray Motors today! $11,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 3 P T C r u i s e r. 1 1 5 k m i l e s , Shar p and well maintained. $4,250. (360)796-4270

THE ESTATE SALE! Fri.-Sat, 9-3 p.m., 215 S e q u i m Ave . S e w i n g machines, looms, sewing, collectibles, clothing. 2,700 sf of stuff!

MISC: Staffordshire Terrier puppies, 5 wks. old, born March 7, $650. Fish tank, 55 gal. with stand, lid, lights, filter, all accessories, $175. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., (360)628-6672 or 10-4 p.m., 110 Green (360)628-7944 Briar Ln., off Priest Ln. Household items, ama- N O R T H W E S T F a r m t e u r ra d i o e q u i p m e n t Terrier Puppies for sale: Bor n 2/16/13. Papers, and tools. worming, vaccinations, flea and tick treat8180 Garage Sales and ment included. MediumPA - Central size, intelligent, loving, versatile, and healthy. ESTATE Sale: Sat., 9-4 Great dogs! $400. Call p.m.,117 W. Park Ave. (360)928-0273 60 years accumulation, Singer sewing machine PUPPIES: Golden Rewith attachments, ar t trievers, male $700, fecanvases, easels, Mag- male $750. n avox c a b i n e t s t e r e o (360)912-2227 system, furniture, household items, lots of picture 7045 Tack, Feed & frames.

Supplies

GARAGE SALE! Sat.Sun., 8-4, 1625 E. ScrivHAY: 1st crop, $7 bale. ner Rd. Lots of Variety! 2nd crop, $10 bale. 477-0274 or 460-1456 HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN SADDLE: For sale or PRESCHOOL trade. Old saddle won’t Rummage Sale fit new horse, which has Fri. April 19 high withers. 15”, light, Sat. April 20 western. $125, or trade 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for wider saddle. 301 Lopez (360)732-4966 MOVING Sale: 219 Dogwo o d P l . , Fr i d ay a n d Saturday, April 19th-20th 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM Tools, Furniture, Craft Wedding Reception Supplies, Womens clothes size L some new and lots more.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West ESTATE Sale: Everyt h i n g mu s t g o ! S a t . 4/20 and Sun. 4/21, 10-4 p.m. 3909 Old Time Place, Port Ang e l e s , WA , 9 8 3 6 3 . Furniture, tools, d i s h e s, a p p l i a n c e s, pots/pans, books, clothes/handbags and more. Make an offer on anything and everything! Cash only please. Also for sale: 1988 wheelchair accessible Dodge Caravan, $1,950; 1985 Ford Bronco II, $2,750. Wheelchair, $ 1 5 0 . 2 d o u bl e c a r steel carports, $1,000 each.

9820 Motorhomes

10008 for 4 weeks!

$

other papers charge $80 for one ad once a week. • More space to promote your business daily. • A variety of low priced ad sizes available • 18,000 Peninsula Daily News subscribers daily. 1 column x 1”...........................$100.08 (4 Weeks) 1 column x 2”...........................$130.08 (4 Weeks) 2 column x 3”...........................$250.08 (4 Weeks)

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M OTO R H O M E : 1 9 8 9 Fleetwood Limited 37J. new 460 Ford Banks exhaust system, HYD leveling jacks, 2 tvs, nonsmoker, 5.5 Onan generator, driver and passenger side doors, oak cabinets, corian countertops, hardwood floors. $20,000. (360)417-0619

$100

08

(4 Weeks)

only

$190

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16008

only $

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Deadline: Tuesdays at Noon

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call Holly at 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

04915

MOTOR HOME: 2001 36’ Southwind Limited Edition. Very good condition. 16k mi., 2 slides, new levelers, rear cameGARAGE/Moving sale: ra, drivers side door, lots Saturday, 9-3 p.m., 151 of storage inside and Hart Rd. out. Many extras. NonNEIGHBORHOOD Sale: smokers. $40,000. (360)683-5359 Sat., 10-4 p.m., take Airpor t Rd. to Duvall Pl., RV: 3 8 ’ RV a n d To w then on to 3821 Old Time Place. Guy stuff, C a r . 2 0 0 1 N e w m a r gal stuff, lots of stuff. Mountainaire and a 2009 Honda CRV tow car ofLow prices! fered together or separa t e l y. T h e R V h a s 8183 Garage Sales 61,400 miles on a gas driven Trident V10 with a PA - East Banks system added. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t , The interior is dark cher8:00-4:00 p.m., and Sun. r y w o o d w i t h c o r i a n 9 : 0 0 - 3 : 0 0 p. m . , 2 6 2 counter tops. The RV is B r e e z e Way. L o t s o f in very good condition. plus-size clothing (some We just returned from a brand new), Fender gui- trip to Arizona which was tar, Cuisinart water filter, trouble free. The CRV collectible wildlife ar t tow car is in excellent (Doolitte, Bateman, Har- condition with 47,000 r i s o n a n d K e n n e d y ) miles. Asking $40,000 p u r s e s , s h o e s , C D s for the RV and $20,000 ( s o m e b ox s e t s ) a n d for the CRV or $58,000 DVDS - all it great shape together. Please call Bill - p e t g e a r, a c h a i r, or Kathy at (360)582-0452 dishes, glassware, china to see the vehicles. and crystal.

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Classified

C6 FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others Others Others

CADILLAC ‘07 STS ALL WD V6 The ultimate in luxur y a n d h a n d l i n g p e r fo r mance, this car is immaculate inside and out, stunning white pearl paint, 66K mi. $18,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

L I N C O L N : ‘ 8 8 To w n C a r. C o z y 2 0 M P G . Runs great. Good body and interior with some rust spots. Good tires. Brakes redone. All accessories work, includi n g A / C, 1 3 0 k m i l e s. $1,500 or best offer. Call (360)683-1683

TOYOTA ‘07 PRIUS HYBRID Very economical 1.5 liter 4-cyl gas/electric hybrid, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, keyless entry, power windows and locks, side airbags, 73,000 miles, very clean local car, senior owned, garage kept, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y repor t. E.P.A. rated 60 city / 51hwy mpg. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MERCEDES-BENZ ‘00 E320 93k orig mi! 3.2L V6, auto, loaded! White ext in great cond! Tan leather CADILLAC ‘94 ELDORADO TOURING int in great shape! Dual pwr seats, moon roof, EDITION NorthStar, leather, this AMFM stereo with Bose, car has it all, it’s a dia- dual climate, cruise, pwr tilt wheel, tinted winmond. Actual 72K miles. TOYOTA ‘12 dows, F&R side airbags, $6,450 CAMRY LE c h r o m e w h e e l s w i t h Economical 2.5 liter 4Preview at: 70%+ rubber! Very nice cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, heckmanmotors.com Benz @ our No Haggle AM/FM/CD, power winHeckman Motors price of only 111 E. Front, P.A. dows, locks and seat, $8,995! (360)912-3583 keyless entry, side airCarpenter Auto Center bags, only 19,000 miles, CARS: VW ‘64 Bug, 681-5090 balance of factory 3/36 $3,950. Eagle ‘95 Talon and 5/60 warranty, very SATURN: ‘07 Aura. Low clean 1-owner factor y TSI, $1,000. 477-3495. mi. $8,000. program vehicle, near CHEV: ‘70 Nova. High (360)796-4762 new condition, save performance 350. SCION: ‘08 XB. 40k, ex- t h o u s a n d s o ve r n ew. $5,000. (360)645-2275. spotless “Autocheck” vecellent. $13,500. hicle history report. CHEV ‘99 CAMARO (360)928-3669 $18,995 Z28 CONVERTIBLE REID & JOHNSON V 8 , a u t o , v e r y r a r e SUBARU: ‘97 Legacy MOTORS 457-9663 ground effect pkg. with O u t b a ck . Pow e r w i n reidandjohnson.com rear spoiler, this was a dows/locks, AWD. 1999 Seafair display car $3,600. (360)775-9267. TOYOTA ‘12 CAMRY at the hydroplane races LE in Seattle. Extremely low Fully loaded, very nice 43K miles. c a r , l i k e n e w, o n l y $12,500 16,000 miles. Preview at: $19,900 heckmanmotors.com Preview at: Heckman Motors heckmanmotors.com 111 E. Front, P.A. SUBARU: AWD Legacy Heckman Motors (360)912-3583 Wa g o n N ew M o t o r. 111 E. Front, P.A. S u b a r u AW D 1 9 9 8 (360)912-3583 CHEVROLET ‘07 L e g a c y Wa g o n . N e w IMPALA 3.9LT M o t o r b r a k e s . G o o d TOYOTA : ‘ 9 9 C a m r y 3.9 liter V6, auto, A/C, tires. All receipts. Recruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, liable, good mileage. 2 XLE. Great shape, all options, 4 cyl. auto OD. power windows, locks owners. $3,000. $4,250. (360)460-1207. and seats, full leather in(360)504-2374 terior, power moonroof, VOLVO ‘04 S40 heated seats, side air- SUZUKI ‘02 GRAND VI- Super cute! 5 Cyl, auto, bags, alloy wheels, fog TARA XL7 loaded. Lowest in-house lamps, rear deck spoiler, 4X3, third row seating, financing, making your very clean local trade in, s u p e r fo r s u m m e r o r money go further! Buy spotless “Autocheck” ve- winter. Lowest in-house here, pay here! hicle history report, non- financing! Buy here, pay $7,995. smoker, br ight red, a here! The Other Guys real looker! $6,995. Auto and Truck Center $9,995 The Other Guys 360-417-3788 REID & JOHNSON Auto and Truck Center MOTORS 457-9663 VOLVO ‘99 S70 AWD 360-417-3788 reidandjohnson.com SEDAN TOYOTA : ‘ 0 1 S o l a r a . 95k orig mi! 2.4L DOHC CHRYSLER: 2002 LTD Auto, 2 door, loaded. Turbo 5cyl, auto, loaded! PT Cruiser. 78k miles $4,300/obo. 461-5193. Met gray ext in great New battery. Black with shape! Black leather int TOYOTA ‘05 CAMRY c h r o m e t r i m , ex t r a s . in great cond! Pwr seat, SOLARA SE Moonroof, great stereo dual htd seats, CD/Cass, and a gas to drive. too V6, 2 door coupe, previ- moon roof, side airbags, o u s l y o w n e d b y t o p much fun in the sun! wood trim, cruise, One owner who loved it! notch high performance tilt/telescoping wheel, alengine technician who $5500/obo. loy wheels with 80%+ would not allow the car (360)808-6160 rubber! Very clean low to leave the garage on DATSUN: ‘64 Fairlady rainy days. This car is mileage Volvo @ our No convertable. Project car. mechanically perfect, ex- Haggle price of only $5,995! $1,700/obo. 452-6524. pensive upgrade tire and Carpenter Auto Center wheel package, low 681-5090 FORD ‘02 MUSTANG miles. Sharpest, tightest CONVERTIBLE Solara I have ever seen. VW: ‘66 Bug. Excellent 5.0L V8, auto, air, premi$10,900 shape. $5,000. um wheels and tires, Preview at: (360)457-7022 b r a n d n e w t o p, f u l l y heckmanmotors.com loaded, nice car! And by Heckman Motors VW: ‘72 Super Beetle. the way, it’s equipped 111 E. Front, P.A. Great shape. $3,200. with nitrous oxide that (360)912-3583 (360)809-3656 can get 100 more horsepower, like it needs it? TOYOTA ‘07 MATRIX VW: ‘74 Classic conIt’s a rocket! XR WAGON ver tible Super Beetle. $5,990 1.8L VVT-i 4 Cylinder, 5 $9,500/obo. Call after 6 Preview at: s p e e d m a n u a l , a l l oy p.m. (360)460-2644. heckmanmotors.com wheels, sunroof, keyless Heckman Motors entr y, power windows, 111 E. Front, P.A. door locks, and mirrors, 9434 Pickup Trucks Others (360)912-3583 cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo FORD ‘02 TAURUS FORD ‘03 F150 115v outlet, dual front, SES 4DR SUPER CREW side impact, and side 89,000 miles, loaded. In- c u r t a i n a i r b a g s. O n l y 4x4 XLT, 5.4L V8, fully cludes V6, auto, A/C, tilt 46,000 original miles! loaded, this is a state w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r One owner, clean Car- Fish & Wildlife truck, well windows, locks, mirrors fax! Immaculate condi- maintained, super clean and seat, AM/FM/CD, al- tion! 5 speed for better inside and out. loy wheels, remote entry gas mileage! Stop by $9,500 and more! Preview at: Gray Motors today! VIN#184773 heckmanmotors.com $12,995 Expires 4/27/13 Heckman Motors GRAY MOTORS Only $4,995 111 E. Front, P.A. 457-4901 Dave Barnier (360)912-3583 graymotors.com Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 452-6599 Clallam County Clallam County davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA No. 13 4 00151 9 FORD ‘07 FOCUS SE NOTICE TO CREDITORS WAGON IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE 4 c y l , a u t o, A / C, t i l t STATE OF WASHINGTON w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM windows, locks, and mir- Estate of rors, AM/FM/CD, roof GEORGE WALTER SMITH, rack, remote entry and Deceased. more! The personal representative named below has VIN#229347 been appointed as personal representative of this Expires 4/27/13 estate. Any person having a claim against the deceOnly $5,995 dent must, before the time the claim would be Dave Barnier barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitaAuto Sales tions, present the claim in the manner as provided *We Finance In House* in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the 452-6599 personal representative or the personal representadavebarnier.com tive’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later G M C : ‘ 9 8 S U V. 4 W D, of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative low miles on new motor. served or mailed the notice to the creditor as pro$3,695. (360)452-6611. vided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the HONDA ‘11 CIVIC Si 4 door, 16K mi., 197 hp, claim is not presented within this time frame, the 2 liter VTEC 4 cyl, 6 sp claim is forever barred, except as otherwise providmanual trans, limited slip ed in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is efdifferential, aluminum fective as to claims against both the decedent’s propedal plates, moon roof, bate and nonprobate assets. 17” alloy wheels, rear DATE OF FIRST PUBLCIATION: April 19, 2013 spoiler, balance of facto- Personal Representative: DEBRA KNAPP ARD Attorney for Personal Representative: ry warranty. ROBERT W. STROHMEYER Price reduced to Attorney at Law $20,000 Address for Mailing or Service: 1125 E. First Street, Preview at: Port Angeles, WA 98362 heckmanmotors.com Telephone: (360)457-9525 Heckman Motors Pub: April 19, 26, May 3, 2013 Legal No. 473967 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 HYUNDAI: ‘06 Accent. 42k miles. $7,000. (360)452-7489 LEXUS ‘03 ES300 Fully loaded, we seldom see cars this age in this fine condition, don’t miss this level of quality at this low price. $12,200 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 LINCOLN ‘00 LS 111k orig mi! 3.0L DOHC V6, auto, loaded! Tan ext in great cond! Tan leather int in great shape! Dual pwr seats, moon roof, 6 disk CD with Alpine audio, cruise, tilt/telescoping wheel, trac cont, side airbags, wood trim, alloy wheels! Real clean little Lincoln @ our No Haggle price of only $4,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 MERCEDES: ‘97 SL320. Both tops, gold/tan. $10,500. (360)683-7420.

9935 General Legals

9935 General Legals

No. 13-4-00537-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE In re the Estate of VLADIMIR M. USHAKOFF, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: April 12, 2013 Personal Representative: Jackie A. Beery Attorney for the Estate: TANYA PEMBERTON Address for Mailing or Service: Attorney at Law P.O. Box 7406 Tacoma, WA 98417-0406 Pub: April 12, 19, 26, 2013 Legal No. 472170

BRUSHFIRE TRUCK 1981 4X4 1 ton dually, 4 speed manual with granny low, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O tank, 4 yr old Honda GX690 generator, dual side diamond plate tool boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! $12,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD ‘09 F150 KING RANCH 4X4 SUPER CREW This truck literally has it all! Full luxur y power, power moonroof, heated and cooled leather captains chairs, navigation system, SYNC voice activated communications and entertainment system. KING RANCH! Awesome truck! Priced right at $30,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

C H E V: ‘ 9 5 3 5 0 0 H D. 8’x15’ wood deck, 84,760 mi., GTX 10-30 every 3,000 mi., original owner. $8,500. (360)301-0050

FORD: 1976 F350 SuperCab. Camper Special, 460 engine, automatic trans., 66,133 miles, runs great, tires excellent, good interior, clean title, some body rust. $1,200. (360)461-0606.

DODGE ‘98 1500 REGULAR CAB SLT SHORTBED 4X4 5.2L (318) V8 Magnum, automatic, short ram intake, dual magnaflow exhaust, alloy wheels, tow package, tonneau cover, side steps, power w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, Sony CD stereo, dual f r o n t a i r b a g s . Ke l l e y B l u e B o o k Va l u e o f $7,393! Accident-free Carfax! Sparkling clean inside and out! Runs and drives great! Priced to sell! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘88 3/4 ton. Runs good. $1,000. (360)775-9669 FORD: ‘88 Ranger 4x4. V6, 5 speed, rebuilt tranny, runs great, low miles. $2,200/obo. 461-6970. FORD: ‘94 F150 XLT. Low mi., 4x4, runs good, looks good. $4,500. (360)452-6758

FORD: ‘95 F-250 Regular Cab. Auto, positive traction 2WD, powerstroke diesel, 108k miles, good tires and breaks, cruise, remote entr y, power windows, Glastite fiberglass canoD O D G E : ‘ 9 8 D a ko t a . py, 2 owner. $6,900. (360)681-3714 1 6 0 K , 5 . 2 L V 8 , gr e a t running truck. $4,500/ obo. (360)461-7210. FORD: ‘96 Ranger. Super cab, good cond., 4 FORD: ‘05 F150. 4x4 c y l . , 2 . 3 L , 5 s p e e d , quad cab, automatic 5.4 m a t c h i n g s h e l l , A C , L t , w i t h c h i p fo r i m - cruise. $3,499. 670-9087 proved milage, 121,000 miles, leather interior, FORD ‘97 RANGER power locks windows, and mirrors, heated and XLT SUPERCAB 2WD p o w e r s e a t s , w i t h 22,000 original miles! memory, center console 2.3L 4cyl, 5sp manual and overhead console. trans! Met red ext in ex20” wheels, 10 ply tires, cel shape! Gray cloth int tunnel cover with spray- in great cond! Cassette bed-liner, and bed ex- stereo, pr ivacy glass, tension, tinted windows, sliding rear window, ale x c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n . loy wheels! Local 2 own$13,000. (360)941-6373. er Port Townsend truck! Very low mileage RangFORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. e r @ o u r N o H a g g l e Runs GREAT, 4.0 V6, price of only $5,995! automatic with overdrive, custom wheels, AM/FM, Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 cruise control, tilt wheel. ext cab with two rear LONG DISTANCE side seats, slider window No Problem! in rear, 226,000 miles $2,700 or trade for travPeninsula Classified el trailer 18-25’ in good 1-800-826-7714 wo r k i n g o r d e r. L e ave message (360)452-2970

FORD ‘99 F250 XLT SUPERDUTY SUPERCAB SB 2WD 7.3L Powerstroke Turbo Diesel, auto! White ext in great shape! Tan cloth int in great cond! Panasonic CD with aux, dual airbags, A/C, sliding rear window, cruise, tilt, pri glass, tow, spray-in bed liner, Airaid intake, 4” stainless turbo back exhaust, NO 5th wheel or Goose neck! Real clean and very well-kept truck @ our No Haggle price of only $7,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

FORD: ‘99 F-350 V10 XLT Super Duty Crew Cab. 1999 F-350 V10 Super Duty Crew Cab, seats 6 comfortably, 8 ft. bed, one-ton chassis, 4x4, with spray in bedliner, tow package and cd disc changer. 145,900 miles. Great condition and regularly maintained. Please call ACTI @ 360-4526776 for information.

TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma. 90K miles, 4X4. 2005 Toyota Tacoma. Great tr uck, just over 90k miles. Small Lift. Ride and dr ives perfect. $15,500/obo. Call Ryan (425)422-6678 this truck is located in Sequim.

9556 SUVs Others C H E V : ‘ 0 1 B l a z e r. 4WD, power windows, white, good cond. $2,900. (360)460-8155

C H E V: ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n 4x4. ‘454’, needs some work, body great shape, m a ny ex t ra s. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / obo. (360)461-6970. FORD: ‘97 Expedition XLT. 4x4, 3rd row seat. $2,790. (360)461-2145.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: WA-BVS-12012666 Loan No. 588736 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, PEAK FORECLOSURE SERVICES OF WASHINGTON, INC., will on May 24, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST FOURTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK 160 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 063000 016050, commonly known as 601 W 7TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/10/2007, recorded 7/12/2007, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 2007-1205042, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor, to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 9/1/2011, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Other potential defaults do not involve payment to the Beneficiary. If applicable, each of these defaults must also be cured. Listed below are categories of common defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary. Opposite of each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT ACTION NECESSARY TO CURE Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that alt taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are pain current and that no other defaults exist Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insure against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust Waste Cease and desist from committing waste, repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust Unauthorized sale of property (Due on sale) Revert title to permitted vestee Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $205,864.96, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on May 24, 2013. The defaults) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by May 13, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before May 13, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after May 13, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, 601 W 7TH ST, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 06/28/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 6/29/2012, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 days from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OT AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to access your situation and refer you to mediation if you eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep house, you may contact the following: o The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1 -877-894-4663) Web site: www.wshfc.org o The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: www.hud.gov o The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Web site: www.ocla.wa.gov X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceeding under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: January 14, 2013. PEAK FORECLOSURE SERVICES OF WASHINGTON, INC., AS TRUSTEE Smith Tower, 26th Floor, 506 Second Ave., Seattle, W A 98104 By: Lilian Solano, Trustee Sale Officer A-4352845 04/19/2013, 05/10/2013 Pub: April 19, May 10, 2013 Legal No. 472621

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

9730 Vans & Minivans Others

C H E V : ‘ 9 6 B l a z e r. 4x4, 184K, fully loaded, clean, exc. condition. $4,000/obo. (360)460-8631

HONDA ‘07 ELEMENT SC Auto, premium sound, fully loaded, 18” wheels with brand new Michelin tires, 4 cyl, new brakes, excellent condition inside and out. $14,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA TOURING AWD V6, auto, front and rear A/C and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and dual power seats, leather interior, third row seating, A M / F M / C D s t a cke r, power sunroof, rear entertainment center with DV D, p r i v a c y g l a s s , power tailgate, premium alloy wheels, remote entry and more! VIN#776805 Expires 4/27/13 Only $10,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA

CHEVY ‘04 SUBURBAN LT K2500 4X4 6.0L Vor tec V8, auto, l o a d e d ! W h i t e ex t i n great shape! Gray leather int in great cond! Dual p w r h t d s e a t s, m o o n roof, DVD, 6 disk CD with Bose, pwr adj pedals, cruise, tilt, side airbags, rear air, 3rd seat, dual climate, tinted windows, roof rack, tow, 18” chrome wheels! Extremely nice Chevy @ our No Haggle price of only $10,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

JEEP ‘03 GRAND CHEROKEE LOREDO 4X4 6 cyl, auto, fully loaded, very nice local trade in, runs great, very clean inside and out, super buy at $7,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. FORD: ‘93 Explorer XLT. (360)912-3583 4x4 auto, dark green, tan interior, looks great, runs great, 116K orig. LINCOLN: ‘04 Navigami., new front suspen- t o r. 9 5 k , AW D, 4 X 4 , s i o n , n ew t ra n s, n ew leather, seats 7 combrakes/wheel bearings, fortably, good family venew head gaskets/timing hicle, new compressor chain, new rocker arms/ and tabs, 6 disc changer and Bose sound syspush rods, new radiator. ter m, ver y reliable. $4,900. (360)457-3744. $12,000/obo. GMC: ‘90 Jimmy.Rebuilt. (360)460-5421 Call for details. $2,500. (360)452-6649 NISSAN ‘02 XTERRA 4X4 GMC: ‘96 Yukon. 4x4, 4 3.3l V6, automatic, alloy door auto, 109K. $3,300/ wheels, good tires, tow obo. (360)582-0373. package, running boards, privacy glass, HONDA ‘07 CRV LX 4WD, auto, fully loaded, roof rack, keyless entry, very nice, excellent con- power windows, door dition inside and out, l o c k s , a n d m i r r o r s , cruise control, tilt, air well appointed options. conditioning, CD stereo, $12,900 dual front airbags. Only Preview at: 107,000 miles! Sparkheckmanmotors.com ling clean inside and Heckman Motors out! Accident-free car111 E. Front, P.A. fax! This Xterra has all (360)912-3583 the right options and is S AT U R N : ‘ 0 3 V u e . in great condition! Stop AWD. New trans and CD by gray motors today! $8,995 player, clean 4 cyl. 2.2L GRAY MOTORS engine, 114K, seats 5, 457-4901 family car, kids grown. graymotors.com $4,950. (360)461-7566.

DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. Newer trans, needs front struts/module. $1,000/ obo. (206)999-6228.

FORD ‘06 E-350 SUPERDUTY 14’ BOX VAN 5.4 liter V8, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, pass through door, 14’ supreme intercity aluminum box, roll u p d o o r, d u a l r e a r wheels, 11,500 lb. G . V. W. , o n l y 2 1 , 0 0 0 miles. super clean 1o w n e r, n o n - s m o ke r, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. $17,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

FORD: ‘91 Van. Wheelchair lift, 97k miles, engine purrs. $3,800. (360)681-5383 ISUZU: ‘00 16’ van. Diesel engine, 179,166 mi., runs great, auto tail lift. $7,000. Call Cookie at (360)385-6898, lv msg. V W : ‘ 8 4 Va n a g o n Camper Van. $5,000. (360)460-6860.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-516590-SH APN No.: 0630126204901000 0630126204902001 Title Order No.: 120217603-WA-GSO Grantors): BETTY MICHAELIS, ANDREW MICHAELIS, HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ANDREW MICHAELIS, HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF BETTY MICHAELIS, ESTATE OF BETTY MICHAELIS, ESTATE OF ANDREW MICHAELIS Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ENCORE CREDIT CORP. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2006 1192353 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/17/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE SITUATED IN THE CITY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON: LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF ENGLEWOOD ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 115 RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ANDREW MICHAELIS AND BETTY MICHAELIS, HIS WIFE BY DEED FROM OBERT J. MCNEECE AND BEULAH B. MCNEECE, HIS WIFE RECORDED 09/15/1976 IN DEED BOOK 470 PAGE 70, IN THE LAND RECORDS OF CLALLAM, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 2354 EAST 5TH AVENUE, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/20/2006, recorded 12/4/2006, under 2006 1192353 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from ANDREW MICHAELIS AND BETTY MICHAELIS , HIS WIFE, as Grantors), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ENCORE CREDIT CORP., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ENCORE CREDIT CORP. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-HE1. IF. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $63,290.71 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $163,324.22, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/17/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME ANDREW MICHAELIS AND BETTY MICHAELIS, HIS WIFE ADDRESS 2354 EAST 5TH AVENUE, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 12/14/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RC W 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 01/15/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-516590-SH, A-4346325 04/19/2013, 05/10/2013 Pub: April 19, May 10, 2013 Legal No. 472045


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FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013 C7

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-533 865-SH APN No.: 0630000285100000 Title Order No.: 120364486-WA-GSO Grantor(s): JAMEY D RUDD, LESLIE BOND Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007-1203366 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/17/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 285 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 728 E NINTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/4/2007, recorded 6/13/2007, under 2007-1203366 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAMEY D RUDD, A SINGLE MAN, AND LESLIE BOND, A SINGLE WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $19,606.42 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $212,300.51, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/17/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JAMEY D RUDD, A SINGLE MAN, AND LESLIE BOND, A SINGLE WOMAN 728 E NINTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 12/8/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: JAN. 15, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-533865-SH A-FN4350802 04/19/2013, 05/10/2013 Pub: April 19, May 10, 2013 Legal No. 472620

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-527889-SH APN No.: 0430035801300000 Title Order No.: 120310261-WA-GSO Grantor(s): KATHERINE M. HAUGSTAD, BRIAN E. HAUGSTAD Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No. : 2008-1229611 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/17/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 13 OF MOUNTAIN VIEW FARM TRACTS, PLAT ALTERATION RECORDED MAY 7,1998 IN VOLUME 13 OF PLATS, PAGE 94, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 95 DICKINSON ST, SEQUIM, WA 98382-8026 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/26/2008, recorded 12/1/2008, under 2008-1229611 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from BRIAN E. HAUGSTAD AND KATHERINE M. HAUGSTAD , HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $24,050.09 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $205,959.72, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 2/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/17/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME BRIAN E. HAUGSTAD AND KATHERINE M. HAUGSTAD, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 95 DICKINSON ST, SEQUIM, WA 98382-8026 by both first class and certified mail on 11/13/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 1/15/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-527889-SH, A-FN4343716 04/19/2013, 05/10/2013 Pub: April 19, May 10, 2013 Legal No. 472619

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-502570-SH APN No.: 063000530930 Title Order No.: 120095276-WA-GNO Grantor(s): TRAVIS J LESTER, SUMMER D LESTER Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2008-1218563 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/17/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 9, PUGET SOUND COOPERATIVE COLONY’S SUBDIVISION OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 5, RECORDS OF CLALLUM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1306 CAROLINE ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/22/2008, recorded 3/31/2008, under 2008-1218563 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from TRAVIS J LESTER AND SUMMER D LESTER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successorsin-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $23,284.95 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $154,678.06, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/17/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 5/6/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): TRAVIS J LESTER AND SUMMER D LESTER, HUSBAND AND WIFE 1306 CAROLINE ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 11/21/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: JAN. 15, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-502570-SH A-4350810 04/19/2013, 05/10/2013 Pub: April 19, May 10, 2013 Legal No. 472399

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‘The Shadow Box’ | This week’s new movies

Peninsula

‘God of Carnage’

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Philip Young portrays a lawyer glued to his mobile device while Charisa Silliman plays his wife, whose occupation is “wealth management,” in “God of Carnage.” The dark comedy opens tonight at Olympic Theatre Arts in Sequim.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF APRIL 19-25, 2013


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

‘Bach at his very best’ Singers, orchestra to bring composer’s ‘B Minor Mass’ to performing arts center BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — This music, written some 264 years ago, has been called “a cathedral in sound.” Johann Sebastian Bach’s Mass in B Minor, replete with 48 singers and orchestra, will fill the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center for the first time this Sunday afternoon. Dewey Ehling, conductor of the Peninsula Singers and the Port Townsend Community Orchestra, first imagined this event a year ago.

Rehearsing 3 months He and his musicians have been rehearsing Bach’s most famous masterwork since January; when they take the stage at 2 p.m. Sunday, an ensemble of singers and players from across the

United States will come together. The alto soloist in the Mass will be Esther Morgan-Ellis, who grew up in Port Angeles and who is about to receive her doctorate in music history from Yale. She’s coming home to sing on Sunday with the choir, and with four vocalists from Seattle: sopranos Sharon Annette Lancaster and Janeanne Houston, tenor Ross Hauck and baritone Glenn Guhr.

Soloist from PA Morgan-Ellis, 28, is the daughter of well-known musicians and teachers Phil and Deborah MorganEllis. She left Port Angeles in 2002 to earn a degree in cello performance from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, and went on to Yale, where she has added singing to her repertoire. As a member of the Yale Schola Cantorum, a professional choir, she first sang the Mass in B Minor in

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‘Spirituality in it’ “I think people will find the spirituality in it,” whatever their beliefs. In addition to the professional singers, Ehling will bring a set of baroque trumpeters from Seattle: Ed Castro, George Steward and Zachary Lyman. “The trumpeters make it or break it,” said the maestro, and these three will make it. The list goes on: Allison Tutton, daughter of Valerie and Dan Tutton of Port Angeles, will play the

French horn solo in “Et in Spiritum Sanctum,” a part of the Mass. Tutton is studying French horn in Chicago. Other orchestra players having solo roles will be violinist Kate Dean, oboe d’amore player Anne Krabill and flutist Judy Johnson. Several in the orchestra are from Port Townsend; “they flocked over,” Ehling said.

Admission Tickets to Sunday’s performance are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students and free for children 12 and under. Outlets include Elliott’s Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St., Port Angeles, and Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St. in Sequim. Remaining seats will be sold at the door. Yet another longtime Port Angeles resident is returning for this occasion. Cellist Fred Thompson, who played for years with the Port Angeles Symphony, now lives in Oregon, but he will come north with his cello, while his wife Jean will sing in the chorus. “Fred was up here last fall,” Ehling recalled. “I told him we were doing the B Minor Mass, and he said, ‘Say no more. I’m in.’”

Esther MorganEllis, top left; Sharon Annette Lancaster, top right; Ross Hauck, middle left; Glenn Guhr, above; Janeanne Houston, left, are among the singers and soloists to perform in Bach’s ‘B Minor Mass’ on Sunday in Port Angeles.

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

2009 on a tour of China and South Korea. This year, the singers are doing it again in Japan and Singapore. This music is “Bach at his very best. It has a little bit of everything,” said Morgan-Ellis. “The B Minor Mass is one of the great masterpieces of Western music. And it’s terrifically interesting: Bach thoughtfully interpreted every passage of the Mass, and he used every musical style and technique in his repertoire.” Ehling likewise adores the work. “I’m not even Catholic,” the conductor said, adding that Bach wasn’t either. But Ehling loves the concept of the Latin Mass in a musical setting.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

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D ANCE while you can Play looks at life at the end of the road BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Carol Swarbrick Dries remembers being asked, “What would you do if you had one day to live?” It was a minister, years ago, who posed that question. But Swarbrick Dries was reminded of it this spring, as she began rehearsing “The Shadow Box,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning play to open tonight at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road. “The Shadow Box” is about three households where three people face the end of their lives. It is about hospice care and about saying goodbye. But it is also about living the moments you’re given, said Swarbrick Dries.

Benefits nonprofit The actress, who lives in Dungeness when not performing in theaters across the West, is entranced by “The Shadow Box.” It’s the spring Readers Theatre Plus production, with six performances this weekend and next. As with all Readers Theatre Plus events, “The Shadow Box” is a fundraiser for a local nonprofit; the beneficiary this time is Peninsula Friends of Animals (www. SafeHavenPFOA.org).

This is the story of Joe (Ric Munhall), a blue-collar worker who, when we meet him, hasn’t seen his family in many months. We get to know him along with his son Steve, played DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS by 13-year-old James Simonson, and his Michael Aldrich and Barbara Drennan star in “The Shadow Box,” a Readers Theatre Plus drama wife Maggie, played opening tonight at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. by Debbie Leach. In their cottage, to take part in a psychological For Drennan, who portrays between Beverly and Mark and the family goes through the experiment. They’re living in Brian are just hilarious,” for the wheelchair-bound Felicity, stages of grief, Leach said. Her small cottages, together like a instance. “The Shadow Box” speaks to the character has her feet firmly shadow box. While they converse need for celebrating life. “Dance planted in the disbelief phase. on stage, an interviewer is seated Award-winning while you can,” she said. Then there is the terminally opposite them. This story, added Swarbrick “The Shadow Box” debuted on ill Brian (Pat Owens), with his Swarbrick Dries, reminds us to Broadway in 1977; Michael Crislover Mark (Michael Aldrich) and Brings it all together show up for each day of life. It’s tofer’s play won the Pulitzer as Brian’s ex-wife Beverly. She’s about “seizing every opportunity,” well as a Tony Award for best This ringleader, played by Jim played by Swarbrick Dries. Dries, learns a lot from the fami- play. In 1980, the late Paul New- she said, “to live, to relate, to care.” This character is facing her Curtain times are 7:30 tonight lies, said Owens, who is directing man made a television movie of former spouse’s death in much it starring his wife Joanne Wood- and Saturday as well as next Frithe same way she’s lived her life: the play as well as playing the day and Saturday, April 26-27; at ward. part of Brian. by being inebriated a lot of the 2 p.m. this Saturday; and finally The Readers Theatre Plus Roger Pressley was initially time. at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 28. Tickproduction runs about 105 mincast in that role, but a family The third family group has utes with an intermission, Owens ets are $15 each at the door or emergency required him to drop Felicity (Barbara Drennan), a two for $25 if purchased in said. And this play, said disabled woman whose daughter out, Owens said. advance at Pacific Mist Books, “The Shadow Box” may sound Swarbrick Swarbrick Dries, is Agnes (Grace Yelland) cares for like a sad story, Owens acknowl- filled with poignancy and laugh- 121 W. Washington St. in Sequim, her. Her body and mind are failor Odyssey Books, 114 W. Front edged, but he finds it to be noth- ter. The dying and their loved ing; she passes the days in a ones travel through the stages of St., Port Angeles. More informaing of the kind. wheelchair, remembering Agnes’ tion, awaits at www.Readers disbelief, anger, bargaining and The play “is very goodsister, who was her mother’s TheatrePlus.com and 360-797acceptance at each one’s own hearted. It’s full of humor,” he favorite. All three families have agreed said. “Some of the exchanges pace. 3337.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PS

Coming Up

‘Footloose’ boot scoots in Sequim SEQUIM — Tickets are on sale now for “Footloose,” the musical to break loose across the Sequim High School Performing Arts Center stage May 2-18. As many remember from the 1984 movie starring a young, nimble Kevin Bacon, this is the story of Ren, a boy who moves from Chicago to a small farming town. Ren isn’t prepared for the local preacher’s ban on dancing. Then the reverend’s rebellious daughter sets her sights on Ren, and her roughneck boyfriend tries to sabotage the new kid’s reputation. Many of the locals are eager to believe the worst about Ren, and “Footloose” is off and running. “Footloose” is Sequim High School’s spring operetta starring local students, and arrives at May 2 for its three-week run. Show times are Thursdays at 6 p.m. on May 2, 9 and 16; Fridays at 7 p.m.

HACIENDA

on May 3, 10 and 17; Saturdays at 7 p.m. on May 11 and 18. One matinee is set for 2 p.m. Saturday, May 4. Premium seats are $12, while regular seats are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and students with an Associated Student Body card. To order, visit www. SHSoperetta.org and click on ShowTix4U at the bottom of the page. A ticket hot line is also available at 866-967-8167. For more information about tickets for families, phone 360-460-1432 or e-mail info@SHSoperetta. org.

Glittering ‘House’ PORT TOWNSEND — “Heartbreak House,” George Bernard Shaw’s mix of farce and tragedy about wealthy people at a glittering party on the eve of World War I, is the next Key City Public Theatre production. A benefit preview is set for this Wednesday for Olympic Mountain Pet Pals, with tickets at $25. The venue for the 7 p.m. show is the Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., and the evening will

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include wine beforehand, dessert during intermission and a reception afterward. For details, visit www. OMpetpals.org; to find out more about “Heartbreak House,” which runs April 25 through May 19 at the Key City Playhouse, visit www.KeyCityPublicTheatre. org.

‘Crimes’ auditions SEQUIM — Auditions for “Crimes of the Heart,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama to open at Olympic Theatre Arts in July, will be held next Monday and Tuesday, April 29-30. Director Roger Briggs is looking to fill roles for two men and four women — as well as volunteer crew positions — and experience is not required. Tryouts will start at 6:30 p.m. both days at Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. Copies of “Crimes of the Heart,” the story of three young Mississippi sisters betrayed by their passions, are available for borrowing from OTA, whose office is open from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For details phone the office at 360-683-7326 or Briggs at 360-681-3198. “Crimes” will run Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons July 5-21. Peninsula Daily News

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Twisted Roots — Marty Kaler, left, and Bob Lawrence-Markarian — will bring their acoustic music to two Port Angeles venues Saturday: Coog’s Budget CDs, 111 W. Front St., in the afternoon and Wine on the Waterfront, 115 E. Railroad Ave. in The Landing mall, on Saturday night.

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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

5

Autoharpist-storyteller earns his keep Bowers brings tales to PA, PT BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bryan Bowers loves it when he hears it: a song that has a sweet melody and a good tale running through. “I have great reverence,” says the singer and autoharpist, “for songs that have a story, that follow a plot line.” He’s told such yarns for some 44 years now, and is about to bring some to Port Townsend and Port Angeles. So whether the listener wants a night of storytelling or a night of acoustic music, both are on tap. Bowers, who lives in the woods outside Sedro-Woolley, is coming to Port Townsend’s Quimper Grange on Sunday and to the Port Angeles Library on Monday.

both at both gigs: 6 p.m. Sunday at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port Townsend, and at 7 p.m. Monday in the Raymond Carver Room at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Sunday’s concert will also feature an opening set by local country-bluegrass artists Jim Faddis and Cort Armstrong, for a ticket price of $10 in advance via www.Brown PaperTickets.com or $15 at the door. Bowers plans on carrying on stage four or five autoharps along with his mandocello. His appearance Monday is presented by the Story People, a Sequim- and Port Angeles-based group hosting Story Swaps several times a year. Admission is free to all swaps. “I was raised around fiddle tunes and story songs,” Bowers said. “If people like a tune, they teach it to their kids,” and that’s how folk music stays vibrant. The same goes for

good stories. You know they’re good, added Bowers, when they make your heart race and the hair on the back of your neck rise. That happens to him a lot. And one day earlier in this decade, Bowers went to the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, Tenn., on the recommendation of cowboy poet Waddie Mitchell. “I went there with some trepidation,” Bowers recalled. He was wondering whether he, an autoharp player, would be accepted. “They were warm and embracing,” he said of the festival crowd. At that gathering, Bowers learned how every last phrase in a story must earn its keep. No fluff allowed. “I’m just a guy who loves the autoharp, and I learned to play it really good,” Bowers said. And in the act of telling, and listening to stories, “I was illuminated.”

Autoharp Hall of Fame inductee, singer and storyteller Bryan Bowers arrives on the Olympic Peninsula for two performances: at Port Townsend’s Quimper Grange on Sunday and at the Port Angeles Library on Monday night.

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Bowers is well-known most of all for his inventive ways with the autoharp; he’s been inducted into the Autoharp Hall of Fame. But his youth in New Bohemia, Va., made him into a storyteller as well. “I was raised in a farm culture,” the artist said in an interview earlier this week. “We had a story philosophy of stretching the truth as far as we could, without breaking it. “I’m a guy who’s lived a big, wild life, who’s got a lot of wonderful stories,” said Bowers, 72. These tales are about people extraordinary and ordinary, moving through tragedy and happiness. Naturally Bowers’ autoharp playing is woven into his tale-telling. He’ll do


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FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

When people stop being polite OTA to present ‘God of Carnage’ riorates. Rapidly. “God of Carnage,” a drama about two SEQUIM — It all starts out sets of parents doing with “Love and Marriage,” verbal battle in crooned sweetly by Frank SinaBrooklyn, N.Y., opens tra. But the song is about the tonight for a threeonly smooth part of this play. week run at Olympic Our two marrieds, Alan and Theatre Arts, 414 N. Annette Raleigh and Michael Sequim Ave. Olivia and Veronica Novak, appear genShea of Sequim is teel at first. Their sons got into a the director of this fight on the playground, and they 2009 Tony Awardare meeting in the Novak home winning play, by to resolve the situation. DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS The four are polite. A snack is Yazmina Reza. Charisa Silliman, left, and Laura Eyestone star in “God of Carnage,” opening tonight at Olympic After five weeks of served. But as they talk at one Theatre Arts in Sequim. rehearsals, the four another, their “civilization” deteactors in “Carnage” are keyed up — as is Alan’s young wife Annette is the “God of Carnage” title, he Curtain times for “God of Carappropriate for this story. played by another well-known believes, refers to that force of nage” are 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Laura Eyestone, a Port Ange- actor, Charisa Silliman, in a brutality that lurks behind peoSaturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, les schoolteacher, plays Veronica sharply tailored black suit and ple’s interactions. tonight through May 5. Tickets while Mark Valentine, also a knife-point red pumps. Eyestone, meanwhile, calls are $16 for adults and $11 for teacher, portrays her husband They face off against the this a dark comedy, and promises youth, while Olympic Theatre Michael. Novaks: Veronica the self-righthat theatergoers will see “a lot Arts members and active-duty teous writer and Michael the of humor — and a lot of truth.” military service members receive Control freaks household-goods wholesaler. Silliman added that when a $2 discount. There are social-class differShea asked her to read for the “I have everything figured out To reserve seats, visit www. ences here, Young said, which role of Annette, she didn’t hesiand under control,” Laura EyeOlympicTheatreArts.com, phone feed the conflagration. The politi- tate. stone says of Veronica. Of course, cally and socially incorrect state360-683-7326 or see Olympic “You never turn down a each one of the others in this Theatre Arts’ page on Facebook. ments the four hurl at one chance to work with Olivia,” she play thinks he or she knows best another don’t help. The playhouse opens an hour said. “She has such a clear pichow to handle the kids’ fight and, before each show, and remaining ture of what she wants.” for that matter, how to bring up ‘Crumbling facade’ tickets will be available at the children. Not so far door. There’s Alan the attorney who “I have no manners,” Young “Carnage” races along, Shea is just about constantly attending added of his character. The message of “Carnage,” said. There’s no intermission in to his mobile device. He’s played “It’s really about the crumShea mused, is that this human the 90-minute play. For the direcby Philip Young, an actor who bling of the facade” of politeness, race hasn’t come so very far. has appeared in dozens of Claladded Silliman. “Scratch the surface,” she said, tor and actors, there’s “a sense of urgency,” added Shea. “Strong lam County theater productions; Valentine, for his part, calls “and you find a cave man.” Or “Carnage” is his 40th local play. language, though,” she warned. Reza’s script extraordinary. And woman. BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Charisa Silliman portrays the uptight Annette Raleigh.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

7

BangDRUM your

On Ensemble brings Japanese taiko to Port Angeles BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Their mission is loud and clear. Fearless exploration — and expansion — of taiko drumming. The On Ensemble, four men from the east and west coasts of the United States, travel the country playing Japanese taiko and beyond. Their next stop is the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center, 304 E. Park Ave., for a show at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets to this Juan de Fuca Foundation concert are $15, or $9 for children 12 and younger, at www.JFFA.org. Together since 2001, the On (pronounced “own”) Ensemble infuses traditional taiko drumming with the sounds of jazz, hip-hop, electronica and rock. It doesn’t take ensemble member Kristofer Bergstrom long to explain taiko’s wide appeal. “The drum is the universal instrument, next to voice,” said Bergstrom, a California-bred player who spent three years studying traditional music and dance in Japan.

American approach “We have a contemporary and very American approach to [taiko],” Bergstrom said. At the same time, the On Ensemble blends instruments from around the globe: Japanese koto, Javanese bonang gongs, various flutes, percussion instruments from Brazil and the Middle East. “We all sing,” Bergstrom

AYUMI KAMEDA

The On Ensemble arrives in Port Angeles for a taiko-and-then-some concert Saturday. added. “We do something called throat singing,” a form of chanting originally practiced by the people of Asia. The On Ensemble — Bergstrom, Masata Baba, Shoji Kameda and Kelvin Underwood — is based in Los Angeles. Port Angeles is one of many Northwest communities on their current tour of the Northwest.

Saturday night’s performance is the last of the Juan de Fuca Foundation season concerts before next month’s Juan de Fuca Festival. That music and arts extravaganza is set for May 24-27 in Port Angeles, and information about it as well as the On Ensemble date awaits at www. JFFA.org, 360-457-5411 and the

Juan de Fuca Festival page on Facebook. Festival passes and On Ensemble tickets also are available at Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., Port Angeles, and Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim. As they do in many of the towns on their itinerary, the men of the On Ensemble will teach a

workshop for middle and high school students. This time at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Port Angeles High School. The class is sponsored by WESTAF, the Western States Arts Federation. The players bring with them rich personal histories. Baba started playing taiko at age 6, and is considered one of the top taiko musicians in North America today. Bergstrom began his taiko career as a member of Stanford Taiko at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. He now teaches taiko technique, turntable scratching and shamisen, a Japanese traditional instrument. Kameda has played taiko since he was an 8-year-old growing up in Mount Shasta, Calif. In 2006, he was chosen to be an Asian Pacific Performance Exchange fellow, and has collaborated with musicians from Malaysia, Java, Bali, Mongolia and French Guiana. Today he’s part of a trip-hop duo with Christopher Tin called Stereo Alchemy. Underwood, a North Carolinian, has performed with the internationally known taiko group Ondekoza, at New York City’s Carnegie Hall and Tokyo’s Suntory Hall. He later earned a degree in professional music at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, studied the Brazilian martial art of capoeira and moved to Ashland, Ore., where he teaches and plays taiko.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Quartet to play in PT on Sunday BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Sunday promises an afternoon of music by Beethoven, Mozart and the Brazilian composer Osvaldo Lacerda as the Arianna String Quartet, a world-traveling foursome, arrives in Port Townsend. Alongside pianist Lucinda Carver, the Arianna quartet will step up at 2 p.m. Sunday to play Mozart’s String Quartet in G Major, Lacerda’s String Quartet No. 1 and, for the finale, the eighth string quartet by Beethoven. This is another Port Townsend Chamber Music

The Arianna String Quartet — from left, Joanna Mendoza, Kurt Baldwin, Julia Sakharova and John McGrosso — will offer Mozart, Beethoven and more this Sunday afternoon in Port Townsend.

Festival event, at the Wheeler Theater at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way. Tickets range from $27 to $32 at www. Centrum.org and 800-7461982, and will be available after 1 p.m. Sunday at the Wheeler Theater box office.

The players The Arianna — violinists John McGrosso and Julia Sakharova, violist Joanna Mendoza, cellist Kurt Baldwin — enjoys praise around the globe, having won top prizes at festivals from Carmel, Calif., to Bordeaux, France. The string quartet is based at the University of Missouri in St. Louis, but

this year the four have already performed in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, Md. “Quartet playing doesn’t get much better than this,” a Chicago Tribune critic wrote upon hearing the Arianna ensemble. Carver, the artistic director of the chamber music series, comes up to Port Townsend from Southern California, where she performs with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Capella Salisburgensis and other groups. To find out more about Centrum’s musical offerings this spring, see Centrum.org.

Fort Worden Wedding Expo!

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String Quartet in E minor

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

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Hollywood Montana Skies to brighten songs to fill Coyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saturday evening Ludlow club BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

COYLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Montana Skies may seem an unlikely name for a cello-guitar duo, but for Jennifer and Jonathan Adams, it makes sense. Montana and skies are big and wide; they feel like freedom. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the feeling the Adams pair wants to give the people who come to

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Singer Franc Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ambrosio, longtime star of San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Phantom of the Opera,â&#x20AC;? comes to Port Ludlowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Club this Saturday for a night devoted to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs of the Silver Screen.â&#x20AC;?

here last spring. Their repertoire travels from Pink Floyd and Rush to Vivaldi and Bach, while they offer originals such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gringo Flamencoâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Montana Skies,â&#x20AC;? the first song they wrote together.

Cello, guitar Jenn Adams plays the electric cello while Jonathan likes his blues and rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;roll guitar; together they add a jazz-

fusion sensibility. To sample the pairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound and see videos of them playing, visit www. MontanaSkiesMusic.com, and to find out more about Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert, phone Johnson at 360-765-3449, 206-459-6854 or johnson5485@msn.com. Information about this and other performances at the Laurel B. Johnson Community Center, 923 Hazel Point Road, can be found at www.hazelpoint.info.

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PORT LUDLOW â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known as the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest-running Phantom in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phantom of the Opera,â&#x20AC;? but Franc Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ambrosio has much more in his repertoire. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ambrosio, who played the title role in Andrew Lloyd Webberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical for six years in San Francisco, will arrive on the Olympic Peninsula this weekend for a concert at the Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hollywood Songs of the Silver Screenâ&#x20AC;? is the name of Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ambrosioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, and concert-goers can plan on listening to the tenor offer â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some Enchanted Eveningâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;South Pacific,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bring Him Homeâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les Miserables,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Speak Softly Loveâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Godfather,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Impossible Dreamâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man of La Mancha,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music of the Nightâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Phantom of the Opera.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are $24 at the Bay Club and at www. BrownPaperTickets.com. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. so patrons can choose their seats and enjoy an art show by Jeanne Joseph of the Port Ludlow Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; League. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acrylic paintings, colored-pencil drawings and floor cloths are on display at the Bay Club. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ambrosioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance is the finale of the Port Ludlow Arts Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert season. For more details, phone the Bay Club at 360-437-2208.

hear their music. The duo, who play several kinds of guitar and cello, will return to the Laurel B. Johnson Community Center this Saturday night for an all-ages concert at 7:30 p.m.; as always with these shows presented by Norm Johnson, admission is by donation. Montana Skies, which hails from Atlanta, Ga., has been out to the Coyle peninsula, and to Port Townsend, playing gigs

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Bar N9NE (229 W. First St.) — Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Jimmy Hoffman Band (classic and contemporary county), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Jerry’s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Coog’s Budget CD’s (111 W. First St.) — National Record Store Day concert with Twisted Roots; The Estafets; MCFD; Decapitate the Disciples; AK47; Inside Defiance; and Hunt and Distinction, Saturday, 4 p.m. Free. Dry Creek Grange (3130 W. Edgewood Drive) — Serendipity, Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the Draw Band, and Chuck and Gene, Saturday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. No cover.

Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) — Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Country, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; country jam, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Blues Bentley, tonight, 8 p.m.

Presents

to midnight;Jason Mogi and Paul Stehr-Green, Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Ches Ferguson, Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) — Victor hosts an open mic, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign up 6 p.m.)

Port Angeles Senior Center (Seventh and Peabody streets) — Wally’s Boys (ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free.

7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — The Andy Madson Band (classic rock), tonight, 8 p.m.; Afrodisiacs (disco-themed party), 10 p.m.; Stardust Big Band, Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; Shivering Denizens, Thursday, 6 p.m.

R Bar (132 E. Front St) — Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Wine on the Waterfront Washington St.) — Linda (115 E. Railroad Ave.) — Twisted Roots, Saturday, 7 p.m. Dowdell and Craig Buhler, tonight, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn The Cedars at Dungeness Stymie’s Bar and Grill (1965 Woodcock Road) — Trevor and Sam the Pirates, tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Gil Yslas, today, 5:30 p.m.; Nolan Murray and Bruce Coughlin, Saturday, 5:30 p.m.; Testify, Saturday, 9 p.m.; Buck Ellard (country), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 20, 2013 7:30 pm Port Angeles High School Auditorium Reserved Seating: $15

Port Townsend Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — Open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue. Elks Lodge (555 Otto St.) — Jim Nyby and the F Street Band, tonight, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. $15 adults, students with ID and disabled $10. Highway 20 Roadhouse (2152 Sims Way) — Hip hop concert with Wildcard, Endgame, KP tha One, Zany the Micsmith, Nuvo, Steel and Idle Thoughts, 9 p.m. Saturday, $12.

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Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine (1208 Water St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m. The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Quimper Grange (1219 Corona St.)— Third Saturday Square Dance with caller Anne Marie Schaefer and music from Cobbler, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. $5 adults, age 16 and younger free; Bryan Bowers (autoharp) with Jim Faddis and Cort Armstrong, Sunday, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. $15 at door. Sirens (823 Water St.) — The West, today, 10 p.m. $5; Stephanie Niles, Jack Klatt, Saturday, 10 p.m. $5; fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, Thursday, 9 p.m. The Upstage (923 Washington St.) — Kings of Mongrel Folk with Mark Graham and Orville Johnson, today, 7:30 p.m.; Kevin Selfe & The Tornadoes (blues) Saturday, 8 p.m.; Jazz Jam Sunday, 6 p.m.; open mic, Monday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Jazz vocalist evening with Jenny Davis, Wednesday, TBA Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Sue Logg, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Dream City Roots (reggae), tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; open mic hosted by Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m.

Quilcene Laurel B. Johnson Community Center, (923 Hazel Point Road, in Coyle at the end of Toandos Peninsula) — Montana Skies, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., admission by donation. This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

11

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PS At the Movies: Week of April 19-25 Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Port Angeles

“G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (PG13) — In this sequel, the G.I.

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“Oblivion” (PG-13) — On a future Earth that has evolved beyond recognition, one man’s confrontation with the past will lead him on a journey of redemption and discovery as he battles to save mankind. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:35 p.m. and 7:05 p.m. daily, plus 9:35 p.m. today and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Olympus Has Fallen” (R) — Disgraced former presidential guard Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) finds himself trapped inside the White House in the wake of a terrorist attack. Using his inside knowledge, Banning

works with National Security to rescue the president from his kidnappers. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 5 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:40 p.m. today and Saturday. “The Place Beyond the Pines” (R) — The film explores the consequences of motorcycle rider Luke’s (Ryan Gosling) fateful decision to commit a crime to support his child. The incident renders him targeted by policeman Avery (Bradley Cooper). The two men become locked on a collision course which will impact both their families. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:20 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 9:45 p.m. today and Saturday, and 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“42” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings.

“Oblivion” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theatre. 5 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. Saturday and

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Ryan Gosling stars as Luke in “The Place Beyond the Pines,” screening at Deer Park Cinema in Port Angeles and the Rose Theatre in Port Townsend.

At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4:20 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. daily, plus 1:30 p.m. Saturday.

“Girl Rising” (PG-13) — 10x10 is a social action organization seeking educational equality for underprivileged girls across the globe. Director Richard Robbins tells the moving stories of several of these girls, Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Selena Gomez, Cate Blanchett and more. At the Rose Theatre. Showtime is 11 a.m. Saturday.

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“Evil Dead” (R) — In the much anticipated remake of the 1981 cult-hit horror film, five 20-something friends become holed up in a remote cabin. When they discover a Book of the Dead, they unwittingly summon up demons living in the nearby woods, which possess the friends until only one is left intact to fight for survival. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 5:15 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:15 p.m. today and Saturday.

Lincoln Cinema. Showtimes 6:45 p.m. daily, plus 4:45 p.m. today through Sunday and 8:45 p.m. today and Saturday.

“The Place Beyond the Pines” (R) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes are 4 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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“The Croods” (PG — Animated) — When their cave is destroyed, the Crood family must embark on a comedy adventure into strange and spectacular territory in search of a new home. As if patriarch Grug didn’t already have enough to handle, it goes from bad to worse when they encounter an imaginative nomad named Guy. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:45 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. daily, plus 8:45 p.m. today and Saturday and 12:45 p.m. and 2:45 p.m.Saturday and Sunday.

■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

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“42” (PG-13) — The story of two men — the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brooklyn Dodgers GM Branch Rickey — whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Rickey (Harrison Ford) puts himself at the forefront of history when he signs Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) to the team, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:25 p.m. and 6:55 p.m. daily, plus 1:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and 9:20 p.m. today and Saturday.

Where to find the cinemas


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

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