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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

April 12-13, 2013 | 75¢

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Spry, our monthly magazine devoted to your better health, features Jillian Michaels Michaels, “The Biggest Big Loser� trainer, who shares tips to help you get motivated and moving. Look for Spry inside, along with Peninsula Spotlight entertainment magazine, in today’s Peninsula Daily News.

Hatchery fish turn up dead along Elwha River sediment may have damaged gills, some fear BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Piles of dead year-old chinook salmon, numbering at least in the hundreds, were found along the Elwha River’s lower banks and mouth after hatchery smolts were released last week. State Fish and Wildlife Department officials will consider alternatives for future releases of fish, said Mike Gross, Fish and Wildlife fish biologist for Clallam County and West Jefferson County, who called the release “a mistake.â€? Sediment from MIKE MCHENRY the river clogged Dead smolts lie at the mouth the gills of most he of the Elwha on Wednesday. examined, said Mike McHenry, a fish biologist and habitat manager for the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, who saw the dead fish at the river’s mouth and on sandbars Monday and Tuesday. Staff at the department’s Elwha Channel hatchery released 196,575 juvenile fish, ranging from 4 inches to 8 inches in length April 5, about 3½ miles from the mouth of the river, said Randy Aho, hatchery operations manager for the Fish and Wildlife region that stretches from the Long Beach Peninsula to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Grant Street Elementary students Jojo Kitcart, left, and Eunice Lee, both 8, examine seeds during a gardening lesson that is meant to teach kids about nutrition and its origins.

School-farm partnership Grant Street Elementary teaching kids from the ground up BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A small patch of land next to Grant Street Elementary School is being used as a garden, both to teach kids how to grow food and to enjoy it when it comes out of the ground. “The kids love to be outside,� said Cheryl Garrett, who teaches students in second and third grades at the school at 1637 Grant St., “and they realize where food comes from and how they can grow it.� Instructor Candice Cosler, pro-

for science instruction that go into effect next year. “A lot of what the kids learn outdoors incorporates into their work in the classroom,� Sepler said. “They learn the science, and then they have to write about what they’ve learned so it helps them Terminology awareness learn both science and writing.� Cosler asked second- and thirdNutrition is an important compograders Thursday what “dormant� nent, Sepler said. “The kids learn about what they meant, and a boy immediately responded, “It’s like they are asleep.� gain from good nutrition, and they find out that they like eating things Principal Mary Sepler said the like kale,� she said. program is designed to help the school comply with new standards TURN TO GARDEN/A7 gram and school garden director with the Jefferson County Farm to Schools Coalition, offers kids both practical instruction about planting vegetables and the scientific background about how the process works.

TURN

TO

FISH/A7

Tharinger, Van De Wege meet constituents in PT BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State Rep. Steve Tharinger, left, speaks to a crowd at the Port Townsend Community Center on Wednesday as his colleague, Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, listens.

PORT TOWNSEND — The 24th District House delegation was asked about two-boat ferry service, plans for Fort Worden and the state budget process during a special town hall meeting with about 90 people earlier this week. The one-hour session was at the Port Townsend Community Center on Wednesday. “Over the past few years� since 2007, “we have cut over $12 million from the state budget and reduced the state workforce by 14,000 people,� said state Rep. Steve Tharinger, who appeared with fellow Sequim Democrat Rep. Kevin Van De Wege.

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legislative budget process and planned the meeting, which was followed later in the day with a similar meeting in Sequim, a situation that displeased Gene Farr of Port Townsend.

REP. STEVE THARINGER on money for local ferries ‘Grossly unacceptable’ “This has taken place while the population has grown and has also aged, so we need more services, but we are still trying to fund the state at 1984 levels.� Tharinger and Van De Wege represent a district that covers Jefferson and Clallam counties and part of Grays Harbor County. The two representatives made the trip during a break in the

“I am going to take the role of the adult in the room and say that giving us 24 hours’ notice for this meeting is grossly unacceptable,� Farr said. “You should be ashamed of yourselves. When you do it this way, people get the impression this is a ‘check the box’ meeting and you really don’t want any feedback.� TURN TO LEGISLATORS/A7

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BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD

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A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Wash. woman charged with stalking Aiken A WOMAN FROM Washington state has been charged with stalking singer Clay Aiken at his home in North Carolina. Barbara Jean Saylor, 57, of Kirkland was charged with trespassing and misdeAiken meanor stalking, the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release Thursday. Deputies responded to a call from Aiken’s home April 3. They were told a woman had scaled a security fence and entered Aiken’s property. Authorities said she was ordered to leave when she was seen looking through the windows of the home. They said the woman left after being told that law enforcement was notified. Saylor was released on $5,000 unsecured bond and is scheduled to appear April 24 in Chatham County District Court in Pittsboro, N.C. The 34-year-old Aiken came to fame in 2003 when he was the runner-up on the Fox TV show “American Idol.”

Baby name bets Queen Debbie doesn’t quite have the right ring to it. King Bob just sounds wrong. Naming a baby is no easy business, but much more is at stake when it comes to finding the right name for a future monarch. Britain’s bookmakers have some ideas to offer to Prince William and the former Kate Middleton: Alexandra is the clear favorite, with the odds slashed at 2-1 as of Thursday. One of the bookies, Coral, said that at one point, betting on the name became so furious it had to be suspended. Elizabeth, Diana and Victoria are close behind. All things considered, the bookies are likely on the right track. “Royal names tend to be based on previous monarchs, relatives and godparents to ensure continuity,” said historian Carolyn Harris, who lectures at the University of Toronto’s school of continuing studies. “[The names] are not generally something out of the blue. It will be something that fits into the royal lineage, names used by previous kings and queens,” she added. Alexandra appears to be a good bet: It’s the name of Queen Elizabeth II’s great-grandmother, a Danish princess who married Edward VII.

Middleton

Prince William

The full name of Elizabeth herself also includes Alexandra, as well as Mary, her grandmother.

IMDb suit rejected A federal jury in Seattle has rejected a claim brought by a little-known actress who sued Amazon.com and its Internet Movie Database for revealing her age. Huong Hoang goes by the stage name Junie Hoang and has appeared in such films as “Gingerdead Man 3: Saturday Night Cleaver” and “Hoodrats 2: Hoodrat Warriors.” The 41-year-old said offers for roles dried up after the popular online movie database mined her account information to learn her true age. She sued for breach of contract, and the case went to trial this week. The judge dismissed parent company Amazon as a defendant before the trial. IMDb argued that it has a First Amendment right to publish accurate information and that Hoang can’t prove she lost any money because of it.

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: Are legally armed citizens the best solution to gun violence? Yes

55.1%

No

41.2%

Undecided 3.7% Total votes cast: 1,286 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

Passings

Corrections and clarifications

By The Associated Press

MICKEY ROSE, 77, a childhood friend of Woody Allen who co-wrote his movies “Bananas” and “Take the Money and Run,” has died. His daughter, Jennifer, told the Los Angeles Times that he died Sunday of cancer at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. Mr. Rose and Allen met in high school in New York City’s Brooklyn borough and became friends. They shared a love of playing jazz and baseball. Mr. Rose met his late wife, Judy, through a blind date arranged by Allen. Mr. Rose became a TV comedy writer. He wrote for Johnny Carson and Sid Caesar, and for shows including “The Smothers Brothers,” “All in the Family” and “The Odd Couple.” In a statement, Allen said Mr. Rose was one of the funniest humans he’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

known — and a “wonderful first baseman.”

_________ ANDY JOHNS, 62, a sound engineer and producer who worked with Led Zeppelin, Van Halen and the Rolling Stones, has died. Mr. Johns’ family said he died Sunday in Los Angeles after a brief hospital stay to treat Mr. Johns complications from a stomach ulcer. Mr. Johns was born in England and started his career at Olympic Studios in London. He went on to produce dozens of classic

rock ’n’ roll albums, including the Stones’ “Exile on Main Street.” His brother, Glyn Johns, is also a producer and engineer who has worked with artists including The Who, The Beatles and Eric Clapton. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last year.

■ Mazie Tucker, whose story “The Abandoned Winter Field,” won in the youth writing category of the 2013 Tidepools contest of Peninsula College, lives in Port Angeles. A story on Page A5 Tuesday misreported her residence because of incorrect information given to the Peninsula Daily News.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

in west Port Angeles. A boy flew a kite on Golfers from the Wash1,400 feet of string when ington Pulp and Paper mill the line broke. gazed with awe upon one of The string fell over a their fellow workers: Donnumber of high-tension ald Brown, a member of power transmission lines. the chemist’s force. The kite flier attempted Brown shot the first to pull on the line, but hole-in-one of the season at someone on the other end Port Angeles Golf and began pulling — and a tugCountry Club. of-war developed. He sank his tee drive on Seen Around The danger of short-cirthe ninth hole, a 160-yard Peninsula snapshots cuiting the live power lines, uphill carry along the east causing a fatal shock, was A SURE SIGN of boundary of the course. noted by Clallam County spring: a two-man crew Laugh Lines According to golf club Public Utility District Manfrom ASM Signs of Port attendants, Brown nearly ager Elmer Titus. Angeles using a bucket IN AN EFFORT to passed out after the ball compete with Amazon, Wal- truck to wash the winter landed about 10 inches 1988 (25 years ago) dinginess off the tall Red Mart is letting customers from the cup and then Lion Hotel sign on Front Clallam County Fire buy a product online and made one bounce directly District No. 2 commissionthen pick it up in the store. Street . . . into the hole. ers are considering asking The company says it’s WANTED! “Seen Around” voters in the district all the convenience of shopSend them to PDN News 1963 (50 years ago) whether they want a ping online without any of items. Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles 25-cent property tax levy A potential kite-flying the convenience of shopWA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or ping online. danger was avoided by two on every $1,000 of assessed email news@peninsuladailynews. valuation to pay for emerJimmy Fallon com. Lincoln Heights residents

1938 (75 years ago)

gency medical services. The issue came to the forefront earlier in the week when a group of residents told the commissioners they don’t want to lose EMS care in the district in the unincorporated area surrounding Port Angeles. Privately owned Port Angeles Ambulance Association service, which includes EMS, is shutting down April 15 because of rising costs and a low volume of business, its owner said.

Lottery LAST NIGHT’S LOTTERY results are available on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 or on the Internet at www. walottery.com/Winning Numbers.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, April 12, the 102nd day of 2013. There are 263 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On April 12, 1963, civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested and jailed in Birmingham, Ala., charged with contempt of court and parading without a permit. During his time behind bars, King wrote his “Letter from Birmingham Jail”; he was released on bond April 20. On this date: ■ In 1606, England’s King James I decreed the design of the original Union Flag, which combined the flags of England and Scotland. ■ In 1861, the American Civil

War began as Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina. ■ In 1877, the catcher’s mask was first used in a baseball game by James Tyng of Harvard in a game against the Lynn Live Oaks. ■ In 1934, Tender Is the Night, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, was first published in book form after being serialized in Scribner’s Magazine. ■ In 1955, the Salk vaccine against polio was declared safe and effective. ■ In 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man to fly in space, orbiting the Earth once before making a safe landing. ■ In 1981, the space shuttle Columbia blasted off from Cape

Canaveral, Fla., on its first test flight. ■ In 1983, Chicagoans went to the polls to elect Harold Washington the city’s first black mayor. ■ In 1985, Sen. Jake Garn, R-Utah, became the first sitting member of Congress to fly in space as the shuttle Discovery lifted off. ■ Ten years ago: Rescued POW Jessica Lynch returned to the United States after treatment at a U.S. military hospital in Germany. ■ Five years ago: Democrat Barack Obama conceded that comments he’d made privately during a fundraiser about bitter workingclass voters who “cling to guns or religion” were ill-chosen.

The United States won its second women’s world hockey championship, upsetting Canada 4-3 in Harbin, China. ■ One year ago: Florida neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, charged with second-degree murder, made his first courtroom appearance in the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Jury selection began in Greensboro, N.C., for the corruption trial of former presidential candidate John Edwards, charged with six counts of campaign finance fraud. The jury ended up acquitting Edwards of accepting illegal campaign contributions but deadlocking on the other five counts.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday/Friday, April 12-13, 2013 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Jewell wins easy Senate confirmation WASHINGTON — Sally Jewell, CEO of outdoor retailer Recreational Equipment Inc., won easy Senate confirmation Wednesday to be the nation’s next interior secretary. The Senate approved her nomination, 87-11, with all the no votes coming from Republicans. Senate Minority Jewell Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was among those who opposed Jewell. Jewell will oversee more than 500 million acres of national parks and other public lands, plus more than 1 billion acres offshore. The lands are used for energy development, mining, recreation and other purposes. One of her first challenges is a proposed rule requiring companies that drill for oil and natural gas on federal lands to publicly disclose chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing operations. The administration proposed a draft “fracking” rule last year but twice has delayed a final rule amid complaints by the oil and gas industry that the original proposal was too burdensome.

Ga. hostages safe SUWANEE, Ga. — A gaping hole exposed wooden beams and insulation on the side of a house Thursday where a gunman held four firefighters hostage for hours before being killed in a shootout with SWAT officers. Before they stormed the home Wednesday evening, they set off a stun blast to distract the man when they feared the hostages’ lives were in danger. The firefighters, who earlier had responded to what appeared to be a routine medical call, were slightly injured in the blast. An armed man accosted the firefighters, demanding that his cable and power be turned back on at the house, which was in foreclosure. Police didn’t release the name of the dead man.

Saved by belt buckle PHILADELPHIA — A grocery store employee said Thursday that he is thanking God and his belt buckle for saving him from a stray bullet that came through the front door. The bullet lodged in the metal buckle worn by Bienvenido Reynoso, who had just started his job at 8 Brothers Supermarket in Philadelphia. Reynoso, 38, said he was about to wheel a hand truck outside the market when he heard gunshots around 4 p.m. Surveillance footage shows a man on a bike firing a gun. One person outside the store was hit in the abdomen and was hospitalized in critical condition. The Associated Press

Gun control gets past 1st hurdle in Senate 68-31 roll call vote will allow weapons bill to be debated THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Watched by tearful relatives of Newtown school massacre victims, gun control supporters in the Senate won the first showdown over how to respond to the December shootings in Connecticut, defeating an effort by conservatives to derail firearms restrictions before debate could even start. Thursday’s 68-31 roll call gave an early burst of momentum to efforts by President Barack Obama and lawmakers to push fresh gun curbs through Congress. The National Rifle Association, along with many Republicans and some moderate Democrats, say the proposals go too far, and the road to congressional approval of major restrictions remains rocky. “The hard work starts now,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said after the vote. As he spoke, relatives of New-

town victims watched from the visitors’ gallery above the Senate floor. The vote came four months after a gunman killed Reid 20 first-graders and six staffers at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, spurring Obama and legislators to attempt to address firearms violence. Congress hasn’t approved sweeping gun restrictions since enacting an assault weapons ban 19 years ago, a prohibition that lawmakers failed to renew a decade later. On Thursday, 50 Democrats, 16 Republicans and two independents opposed the conservative effort, while 29 Republicans and two Democrats supported it. Gun control supporters needed 60 votes to block the conservatives. The vote opened the door to an

emotional debate on the legislation, which would subject more firearms buyers to federal background checks, strengthen laws against illicit gun trafficking and increase school safety aid. Advocates said the measures would make it harder for criminals and the mentally ill to get weapons.

Right to bear arms Opponents argue that the restrictions would violate the Constitution’s right to bear arms and would be ignored by criminals. Despite their defeat, conservatives were threatening to invoke a procedural rule forcing the Senate to wait 30 hours before it could begin considering amendments. Before the vote, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who was supporting the conservative effort, said the legislation would restrict the constitutionally protected rights of relatives and friends to sell firearms to each other. “This bill is a clear overreach that will predominantly punish and harass our neighbors, friends and family,” McConnell said.

Briefly: World The Dutch food-safety authority said it was trying to trace meat sold to 130 companies in the Netherlands and 370 in 15 other countries, including France, Germany and Spain. The Dutch suppliers of the PYONGYANG, North Korea meat, in which traces of horse — Hinting at a missile launch, meat were discovered, were North Korea delivered a fresh round of war rhetoric Thursday unable to say where the 50,000 tons in question originated, said with claims it has “powerful Tjitte Mastenbroek, a spokesstriking means” on standby. Seoul and Washington specu- man for the Netherlands Food lated that it is preparing to test- and Consumer Product Safety Authority. fire a missile designed to be capable of reaching the U.S. terMassacre suspect dies ritory of Guam in the Pacific. On the streets of Pyongyang, BELGRADE, Serbia — The North Koreans shifted into Serbian veteran suspected of party mode as they celebrated killing 13 people in a shooting the anniversary of leader Kim rampage and then turning the Jong Un’s appointment to the gun on himself and his wife country’s top party post — one died Thursday, hospital officials in a slew of titles collected a said. year ago in the months after his Ljubisa father Kim Jong Il’s death. Bogdanovic, But while there was calm in 60, died from Pyongyang, there was condemhead wounds, nation in London, where foreign Belgrade ministers from the Group of Emergency Eight nations slammed North Hospital said. Korea for “aggressive rhetoric” His wife that they warned would only Javorka Bogfurther isolate the impoverBogdanovic danovic, 60, ished, tightly controlled nation. was recovering from surgery and her condiHorse meat scandal tion is serious but stable. Bogdanovic went on a preLONDON — After disappearing briefly from public view, dawn, house-to-house rampage Tuesday in a village near Belthe scandal over horse meat sold as beef re-emerged Wednes- grade, including killing his mother, his son and a 2-year-old day with an alert about 50,000 tons of meat sold across Europe cousin, police said. Authorities are searching for and an earlier recall of a prodmotives in the worst peacetime uct in Britain containing a vetshooting rampage in Serbia. erinary drug banned from the human food chain. The Associated Press

N. Korea hints at imminent missile launch

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rescue personnel work the scene of a Cardinal Coach Line charter bus accident on state Highway 161 in Irving, Texas, on Thursday,

Charter bus wreck kills 2 More than 40 passengers hospitalized in N. Texas THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

IRVING, Texas — At least two people were killed and more than 40 hospitalized after a charter bus careened off a North Texas highway and flipped onto its side Thursday, drawing a large emergency response as rescue crews struggled to reach victims inside, authorities said. The Cardinal Coach Line bus was on its way to a casino in Oklahoma when it suddenly weaved across the busy highway and struck two concrete barriers before toppling over in the center median, witnesses said. The wreck occurred along President George Bush Turnpike in Irving, just east of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Quick Read

“We ended up swirling and weaving and then ended up on the side,” Daniel Risik, 73, told The Dallas Morning News. “People were screaming and hollering, a very traumatic situation to say the least.” The bus was carrying about 45 people, mostly senior citizens, law enforcement officials said. Risik said most of the passengers weren’t wearing seat belts.

‘Piled on top of each other’ “People were piled on top of each other,” he said. “A lady had pinned me. Rescue got there and started pulling people out of a roof emergency hatch. People were hollering, screaming, there was blood all over the place.”

A man who answered the phone at Cardinal Coach’s offices in Mansfield, just south of Dallas, confirmed that one of the company’s buses was involved in the Irving accident. Cardinal Coach had reported no crashes in the past two years that resulted in deaths or injuries, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The company operates five buses and employs seven drivers, records show. Public transportation buses with Dallas Area Rapid Transit were used to transport some passengers with lesser injuries. The National Transportation Safety Board is sending investigators to Irving, board spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Crick’s Nobel medal sells for $2 million-plus

Nation: Storms, tornados sock the Midwest; 1 dead

Nation: Millionaire indicted on sex assault charges

World: Mom says teen hanged herself after rape

THE NOBEL PRIZE won by Francis Crick in 1962 for his discovery of DNA was sold Thursday at auction for more than $2 million. Heritage Auctions identified the buyer as Jack Wang, CEO of Biomobie, a regenerative medicine technology company located in California’s Silicon Valley and Shanghai. The price surpassed the pre-sale estimate of $500,000. On Wednesday, a letter Crick wrote to his son describing the discovery sold at Christie’s for $6 million. It was a record for a letter, eclipsing a record price for an Abraham Lincoln letter that went for $3.4 million in 2008.

AT LEAST ONE death has been blamed on a spring storm system that’s brought everything from tornadoes to ice and snow to much of the Midwest. Mississippi Emergency Management Agency spokesman Greg Flynn said one person died, and several were injured after a reported tornado in Kemper County in that state And in Missouri, the National Weather Service said that the St. Louis suburb of Hazelwood was hit by an EF-2 tornado Wednesday night. A National Weather Service meteorologist said crews were still assessing whether tornadoes caused other damage in Missouri and neighboring Illinois.

A TEXAS GRAND jury has indicted eccentric millionaire artist Stanley Marsh 3 on charges that he sexually assaulted six teenagers, according to documents released Thursday. Marsh, 75, was indicted on four counts of sexual assault of a child, eight counts of sexual performance by a child and two counts of indecency with a child. If convicted, Marsh, the son of an oil tycoon, faces up to 20 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000 on each count. Special prosecutor Matt Powell said Wednesday that Marsh would be eligible for probation as he has no felony convictions.

A GRIEVING NOVA Scotia mother said her daughter hanged herself after she was allegedly raped by four teenage boys, leaving her deeply depressed and bullied in her community. Leah Parsons of Halifax said she took her 17-year-old daughter, Rehtaeh, off life-support Sunday after she hanged herself last week. She said one boy took a photo of the alleged assault in 2011, and her daughter was subjected to bullying after it went viral. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Cpl. Scott MacRae said there was insufficient evidence after a yearlong investigation to proceed with charges against the four boys.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

No one hurt in U.S. 101 rollover crash Road blocked at Sutherland nearly hour PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAKE SUTHERLAND — A single-vehicle rollover blocked U.S. Highway 101 in both directions at Lake Sutherland for about an hour Thursday morning. Neither driver Bill Gallauher, 48, nor his passenger, Shawn Peterson, 22, both of Port Angeles, was hurt when Gallauher’s 1998 Toyota Tacoma overturned several times near Milepost 233 at Maple Grove Road, said Clallam County Fire District No. 2 Fire Chief Sam Phillips. The pickup truck came to rest in the center of the two-lane highway. Traffic was blocked at about 9:55 a.m. The state Department of Transportation reported that one lane

had been reopened by 10:30 a.m., and both lanes were reopened at 11:02 a.m. A State Patrol trooper removed the truck and debris from the roadway, Phillips said. Gallauher and Peterson freed themselves from the upside-down vehicle and did not require medical assistance, the fire chief said.

Swerved to avoid van Fire department personnel said witnesses told them that a westbound passenger van slowed to turn left onto Maple Grove Road when Gallauher, who was following the van, swerved to avoid a rear-end collision. The truck left the roadway before it lost control and rolled over, the fire department said. Fire District No. 2 CLALLAM COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT NO. 2 responded with a medic unit, fire engine, command The 1998 Toyota Tacoma pickup driven by Bill Gallauher of Port Angeles lies on its roof after vehicle and eight firefight- Gallauher rolled the vehicle after swerving to avoid hitting a van in front of him, according to ers/medics. Clallam County Fire District No. 2 personnel. Neither he nor his passenger was injured.

Clallam probes origins of Briefly . . . for pipe bomb found at home Training Red Cross State Patrol squad disarms device BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County deputies are investigating the source of pipe bomb found in a home southeast of Port Angeles late Wednesday night. The State Patrol bomb squad disarmed the 8-inch explosive device, and no one was injured, said Ron Cameron, chief criminal deputy for the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office. Nearby residences were not in danger, Cameron said Thursday in a report on the incident. At about 11:30 p.m. Wednesday, deputies were dispatched to a home on

Patterson Road off Monroe Road in response to reports of a disturbance and possible shots fired, after which they contacted a resident at the home. “The resident told deputies that he and a friend had shot off a couple of firecrackers, but there were no gunshots, and no disturbance had occurred,� Cameron said.

Deputies find in search

referred to as a pipe bomb,� Cameron said. Deputies evacuated the residence and contacted the State Patrol Bomb Squad. Cameron said that once the home was cleared, deputies obtained a search warrant and took some additional evidence, but there was no indication the pipe bomb had been constructed at the Patterson Road home. Investigators plan additional interviews and will continue the investigation to determine the origin of the item and the person or persons responsible for its construction, he said.

With the resident’s permission, deputies searched the house and located an ________ item approximately 8 inches long and in the shape Reporter Arwyn Rice can be of a flashlight. reached at 360-452-2345, ext. “The deputy recognized 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula it as what is commonly dailynews.com.

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CARLSBORG — A volunteer orientation for the Olympic Peninsula chapter of the American Red Cross will be held at the Red Cross office, 151 Ruth’s Place, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday. The course provides basic information about the Red Cross and the work it does, both nationally and locally, and offers potential volunteers an overview of the many different ways to work with the organization. Preregistration is not required, but anyone interested in attending is asked to phone the Red Cross office at 360-457-7933.

Monday Musicale PORT ANGELES — Music lovers are invited to Monday Musicale, set for noon Monday in the St. Anne’s Room of Queen of Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St. A meeting will be held, followed by the program. To RSVP, phone Marilynn Hillhouse at 360-9283015 or 360-461-5105.

Oil export lease HOQUIAM — Port of Grays Harbor commissioners have granted a lease option to a company that plans to export oil from a terminal at Hoquiam. KBKW reported that the option granted Tuesday

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Letter grades OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee is pushing lawmakers to continue working on a new system to give letter grades to schools. He wants the grading approach to be nuanced but not so complicated that no one understands it. Last week, Inslee shot down a Senate proposal to give letter grades to schools, saying he likes the concept but not the execution. Inslee discussed his ideas during a meeting with reporters. He wouldn’t give just one letter grade to each school, as lawmakers have proposed; he wants to see schools get grades for various things, including graduation rates and test scores. The governor also has alternatives to other school reform ideas coming out of the Legislature, including helping kids learn to read by the end of third grade.

Florist lawsuit RICHLAND — The American Civil Liberties

Union of Washington is representing two men who were denied flowers by a Richland florist opposed to gay marriage. The ACLU wants the owner of Arlene’s Flowers to apologize to Robert Ingersoll and Curt Freed in a letter to the Tri-City Herald. The ACLU said the men have been a couple for almost nine years and plan a wedding in September. When they went to the flower shop March 1, the owner told them she wouldn’t provide flowers for the wedding because of a religious objection. The Washington attorney general is suing the shop owner for discrimination. Her lawyer said she sells flowers to homosexuals but can’t support a same-sex marriage. The ACLU wants Arlene’s to agree to provide flowers for gay marriages.

Public hearing PORT ANGELES — The City Council will take comment on proposed amendments to the 2013 budget at a public hearing Tuesday. The hearing will be at 6:30 p.m., or soon thereafter, during the City Council meeting at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Manuscript deadline set for April 26

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

More hearings likely in strangulation case BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Poetry workshop open to students, community PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Poetry manuscripts must be submitted by Friday, April 26, for a writing workshop to be taught by Peninsula College’s 13th writerin-residence, Jane Mead. Ten participants will be chosen for the workshop, which is set from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 16, said Peninsula College English Professor Janet Lucas. The workshop, which will be on the college campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., is open to community members as well as Peninsula College students, staff and faculty. To be considered for the workshop, it is necessary to submit a short manuscript of poetry (limit of five pages). Manuscripts may be submitted by mail or online to Lucas at jlucas@pencol. edu.

Notified by May 8 Those who are selected for the workshop will be notified by May 8. Mead is the author of Money Money Money/Water Water Water, forthcoming from Alice James Books, as well as three previous books of poetry, and has been published in numerous literary journals and magazines. A recipient of grants and awards from the Whiting, Lannan and Guggenheim

foundations, she serves on the faculty of the Drew University Low Residency MFA Program in Poetry and Poetry in Translation. Mead spent some of her childhood in Cambridge, Mass., where her father was a Harvard professor of ichthyology. She then lived in New Mexico, London and Cambridge, England, and later graduated from Vassar College, Syracuse University and the University of Iowa. In an interview for her award-winning book, The Lord and the General Din of the World, she was asked about ways her poetry breaks from the mold of more typical work of the recovery genre. She said: “The minute one feels found, one’s lost again. [‌] Many of my poems are written out of the dynamics of this process, so it’s not surprising that they don’t seem headed toward some absolute.â€? Mead now lives in Northern California managing her family’s ranch, where she raises hunting dogs, teaches poetry and calls herself “pretty sociable for a recluse.â€? The writer-in-residence program is sponsored by the Peninsula College Foundation.

Briefly . . .

PORT ANGELES — A Clallam County Superior Court Judge has scheduled an April 25 hearing on a recently completed pre-sentencing investigation for Kevin A. Bradfield, a Port Angeles man who pleaded guilty to the October 2011 murder of Jennifer Pimentel. Bradfield, 23, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in January for the strangulation death of the 27-year-old developmentally disabled woman. His March 3 sentencing was postponed because the state Department of Corrections had not completed a court-ordered pre-sentencing investigation, or PSI.

Response to report “We have received the PSI,� said Loren Oakley, Bradfield’s public defender, in a Thursday court hearing. “We’re working on a response to it.� Bradfield may be sentenced April 25, depending on whether Oakley disputes the facts contained in the pre-sentencing report and how many witnesses are called to the stand, Clallam County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Ann Lundwall said. “We’ll have to see how it goes,� Oakley said in a later interview. “We have some disputes with the PSI.� Oakley and Lundwall told Clallam County Superior Court Judge George L.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Kevin A. Bradfield enters Clallam County Superior Court in January before entering a guilty plea for first-degree murder for the death of Jennifer Pimentel.

criminal assistance for helping Bradfield hide the body. Huether maintains her innocence on two counts of witness tampering for allegedly asking two acquaintances after Pimentel’s death to lie about seeing Pimentel leave the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival with an unknown man. Huether’s trial is scheduled for April 22. Court papers said Bradfield and Huether initially claimed Pimentel accidentally fell down some steps and died from a broken neck. They said they panicked and decided to fabricate a story about Pimentel having run off with an unknown man. Bradfield and Huether led authorities to Pimentel’s remains 10 days after her disappearance. Bradfield originally was charged with second-degree murder, but Lundwall raised the charge to firstdegree premeditated murder after a corrections officer intercepted a letter from Bradfield that indicated he “planned to murder Pimentel to prevent her from accusing Bradfield of rape,� court papers said. Bradfield, who is developmentally disabled, had a mental evaluation that found his disability did not rise to the level of insanity or diminished capacity.

will serve 20 years in prison, with credit for time served. A judge has the authority to impose a longer sentence than the recommended term. Bradfield awaits his sentencing in the Clallam County jail. Port Angeles police said Bradfield strangled Pimentel in a Port Angeles apartment and left her remains in a wooded area near the ________ 20 years in prison Hood Canal Bridge. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be Under the terms of a His then-girlfriend, Ken- reached at 360-452-2345, ext. plea deal that Oakley and dell K. Huether, agreed to 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula Lundwall struck, Bradfield plead guilty to rendering dailynews.com. Wood that they had other matters scheduled for April 25. “I think this takes priority,� Wood said. “We’ll just make one judge available to make sure this is done and everybody’s aware it’s going to happen on that day.� The two-hour “real facts� hearing will begin at 9 a.m., Wood ordered.

DNR wildfire season begins Monday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — Regardless of the wet, rainy spring, wildfire season officially begins Monday, as specified by state law, and summer fire rules on state Department of Natural Resources land will go into effect then. The rules, which extend each year from April 15 through Oct. 15, apply to the 12.9 million acres of private and state forestlands protected from wildfire by DNR. They are intended to prevent forest fires and to

ensure that small fires are extinguished before they spread. The regulations affect loggers, firewood cutters, land clearers, road builders, bulldozer operators and offroad motorcyclists, among others.

Spark arresters During fire season, those using motorized equipment in the woods must have approved spark arresters and follow fire safety precautions. Those working in the

woods must have fire prevention and extinguishing equipment in good working order at the job site and staff trained in its proper use.

Smoking restricted Cigarette smoking is restricted in forested areas to roads, gravels pits or other clearings. Fireworks are prohibited. Although conditions are damp now, they can change quickly, DNR said in a statement, pointing out that as of Monday, 17 forest

fires had been reported this year on lands protected by DNR. Last year, 794 fires burned about 68,347 acres of DNR land, with 94 percent fewer than 10 acres in size and 79 percent caused by people, the department said. For more information about prevention, visit www.fireadapted.org. Those who work in the woods can get daily updates on fire-risk ratings by phoning 800-527-3305 or visiting www.dnr.wa.gov.

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safety meeting at 9 a.m. at the Quilcene Ranger Station, 295142 U.S. Highway 101, before driving into the forest for the cleanup. The Quilcene River PORT ANGELES — A watershed supplies drink24-hour Pickleball Maraing water for Port thon benefit for the CapTownsend. tain Joseph House FoundaThe event is held in tion will run from 9 a.m. partnership with the JefSaturday, April 20, to 9 ferson County 4-H Stewa.m. Sunday, April 21. ardship Program, the city The event will be held of Port Townsend and the at the Vern Burton ComU.S. Forest Service. munity Center, 308 E. Fourth St. Volunteers need to regCost is $10 for adults, ister beforehand so orgafree for ages 12 and nizers can supply tools and younger with an adult, and organize groups. $5 for ages 5-17 without an Youths 12 and younger adult. must be accompanied by The second annual coman adult. munity pickleball maraTo register, contact Jefthon offers instruction, play ferson County 4-H coordiand refreshments. nator Sue Hay at 360-379Loaner paddles and equipment are available. 5610, ext. 208, or shay@ The Captain Joseph jefferson.wsu.edu. House Foundation is raisPeninsula Daily News ing funds to provide a place of respite for families of fallen service members. Register for the event with the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., or phone 360-4577004.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

2 arrested in assault on professor Both in custody after tip given unidentified person THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PULLMAN — Two Washington State University students were arrested Wednesday in connection with a March 30 beating that left a professor critically injured. Police said they’re looking for two more male suspects. Joshua W. Nantz, 23, of Pullman was arrested for investigation of first-degree assault Wednesday night after he came to the police station, Police Chief Gary Jenkins said in a statement. Nantz was expected to make a court appearance Thursday. Madeline A. Fouts, 21, was arrested earlier in the day for investigation of rendering criminal assistance and providing false statements to a public servant. Fouts was not directly involved in the assault on David Warner, Jenkins said. She was released from custody Wednesday evening.

Anonymous tip Both arrests came after an anonymous tip was received last weekend, Jenkins said. Warner remains in critical condition at a Spokane hospital. Police said he was beaten at about 2 a.m. March 30 while intervening in a fight between an acquaintance and a group of college-age people. On Tuesday, WSU President Elson Floyd donated $10,000 to the reward fund to help catch the assailants. “I strongly encourage anyone who knows anything about what happened that night or recognizes any of the individuals in the videos that have been pub-

licly distributed to come forward,” Floyd said in a statement. Pullman Police Lt. Chris Tennant said earlier that witnesses had been slow to provide information. Surveillance video showed up to 15 people in the area of the fight, but only about half have come forward, Tennant said. The incident occurred outside a bar located near campus, he said.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Sedro-Woolley company is offering a $500 reward for the return of a section of a log with tree rings dating back to 1600.

Incident Warner was walking with an acquaintance who exchanged words with a group of young people. Warner stepped between them and was struck, police have said. Warner, 41, is Native American and teaches in the WSU Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies. Police have said there’s no indication race was a factor in the beating. But Floyd on Tuesday announced that he was creating a Commission on Campus Climate to address what he called “an underlying fear and anger among some on campus regarding issues of race and marginalization.” University spokesman Rob Strenge said Floyd does not necessarily believe race was a factor in the attack, but he was responding to members of the community who are speculating that race might be involved. “Since the night of the attack there has been a great deal of concern among some students that it might be a hate crime,” Strenge said. “His intention is to address those concerns.”

Sedro-Woolley company is stumped by log theft $500 reward for return of 400-year-old section THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEDRO-WOOLLEY — A Sedro-Woolley company is offering a $500 reward for the return of a section of a log with tree rings dated

Forks chamber hashes out impact of pot legalization Drug counselors will continue treating users, case manager says BY ROB OLLIKAINEN

In online charity, Seattle among most giving cities THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A new ranking of the most generous cities in online donations shows Seattle residents give the most money to charity, followed by three cities in the Washington, D.C., region. Blackbaud, a technology provider for nonprofits,

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found Seattle ranked first for the second year in 2012, followed by Alexandria, Va.; Washington, D.C.; and Arlington, Va. The Charleston, S.C.based company ranked cities with more than 100,000 people based on individual donations online. The report Thursday found donors in 265 cities gave $509 million last year, up 15 percent from 2011. Blackbaud provides technology for online fundraising. The top 10 also includes Ann Arbor, Mich.; Cambridge, Mass.; Berkeley, Calif.; San Francisco; St. Louis; and Minneapolis. Regionally, the South has the most cities in the top 25, followed by the West, Midwest and Northeast.

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back to 1600. Events such as the Declaration of Independence and Civil War are marked by the ring growth. The tree died in 1895 when it was

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Despite the legalization of marijuana in Washington, drug counselors will continue to treat the drug like any other mindaltering substance, a West End Outreach Services case manager told members of the Forks Chamber of Commerce earlier this week. “Alcohol is a legal form, right?” Juan Ruiz told about two dozen chamber members at JT’s Sweet Stuffs on Wednesday. “If it’s legal, we are going to be accepting in treatment somebody that’s drinking alcohol. The same thing is with marijuana.” Voters last fall legalized the recreational use of marijuana for adults older than 21 by passing Initiative 502. Ruiz and others in his field will monitor how the state regulates the federally banned substance, he said. Once these rules and regulations are in place,

West End Outreach will consider how it will address the issue, Ruiz said. “So far, it still is a controlled substance until it’s determined how it’s going to be regulated,” he said. “When those regulations are in place, it is more likely that we are going to be treating that as other substances like pain medication,” he added. “It has to be monitored.” The state likely will have its marijuana rules in place by March 2014, Ruiz said.

Level of intoxication Ruiz, who specializes in mental health, chemical dependency and co-occurring disorders, said it’s difficult to detect the level of marijuana intoxication in lab tests. “Marijuana is a substance that stays in the body for probably longer than most substances because it attaches to fats and body tissues, so it can

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Ruiz, who moved from Seattle to Forks in 2007, told West End business leaders that many of his teenage clients are using heroin. “Right now, it seems like it’s stronger than methamphetamine,” Ruiz said, citing the availability of heroin and its low cost. “So that is a main concern, although another main concern is prescription medication.” ________ Ruiz encouraged families and employers to order lab Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be tests for those suspected of reached at 360-452-2345, ext. abusing drugs. Regular test- 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula ing can determine whether dailynews.com.

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Escalator strangling Legislators: death investigated

(J) — FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

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Two-boat service

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The state Department of Labor & Industries is investigating the death of a 42-year-old man who was strangled to death when he fell on an escalator in downtown Seattle and his clothing got caught in the mechanism. The Seattle Times reported that Maurecio Bell was found unconscious and unresponsive at the bottom of an escalator at the Benaroya Hall Metro Station early Sunday. The King County Medical Examiner’s Office said

Bell choked to death. Seattle Fire Department spokesman Kyle Moore said Labor & Industries is investigating how Bell’s clothes got caught in the escalator.

Earlier investigation Bell’s death came a day before Labor & Industries announced it had completed an investigation of a Bellevue Square escalator, where seven people were injured Dec. 6. State officials found 32 code violations at the Bellevue Square escalator.

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When Tharinger pointed out that many people attended, Farr responded, “There would have been a whole lot more if you had advertised.� The Sequim gathering drew about 75 people. Port Townsend City Councilwoman Michelle Sandoval, who is a former mayor, urged that the Legislature maintain two-boat ferry service between Port Townsend and Coupeville, which is offered from May 12 through the summer — and continue to view state Highway 20, which leads to the ferry terminal, as an important part of the highway system.

‘Not a lot of new money’

their awareness of health’ issues CONTINUED FROM A1 Sepler said. The farm-to-schools “It builds their aware- coalition is a communitybased group working to ness of health.� Sepler said the program improve the nutritional is a partnership between value of food served in the school and the farm-to- schools. It also has a partnership with the Quilcene school coalition. It costs about $8,000 a School Garden. For more information year and is subsidized by the Port Townsend School about the Jefferson County District, the Parent-Teacher Farm-to-School Coalition, Association and other visit www.jcfarm2school. sources, including grant org. For more about Grant funding. Custom-made “I Dig It� Street Elementary, visit buttons, which are on sale w w w . p t s c h o o l s . o r g / at the school and in loca- domain/19. tions around town for $5 ________ each, also subsidize the proJefferson County Reporter gram. Charlie Bermant can be reached at “The most important 360-385-2335 or at charlie. thing is that the kids learn bermant@peninsuladailynews. how to eat correctly,� com.

“There isn’t a lot of new money that can go into transportation, but I do think we will be able to maintain the status quo,� Van De Wege said. “The service that we have now should remain.� Said Tharinger: “The current budget does include two-boat service, but maintaining this level is an ongoing challenge. “Increased funding for transportation usually got pretty good support until the need to fund education added $1 billion we need to find. “Until that gets sorted out, it is hard for anyone to focus on the transportation piece.� Tharinger said two-boat service in the summer most likely would remain, though some of the later evening sailings could be cut. Van De Wege said he is confident that an amendment to a State Parks funding bill that would require legislative approval for any agreement between the

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State Rep. Steve Tharinger addresses the crowd during a town hall meeting at the Port Townsend Community Center on Wednesday. parks and the management of parks. “We are in the process of explaining that the PDA is a way of saving that park,� Van De Wege said. The plan is for the PDA REP. KEVIN VAN DE WEGE D-Sequim to manage an educational campus while the state oversees state park funcState Parks system and pri- tions. vate entities would be removed. Education ruling That would clear the way for the Lifelong LearnTharinger said budget ing Center Public Develop- difficulties were exacerment Authority to jointly bated by the state Supreme manage Fort Worden State Court’s McCleary ruling Park with the parks sys- that mandates the state tem. fund basic education by “I think we’ll be able to 2018. He suggested that closget that out,� Van De Wege ing tax loopholes was a way said. “We’ve been talking to to accomplish this. “One of the loopholes we Rep. Zack Hudgins, D-Tukwila, who put in the lan- can close has to do with givguage, and he just has real ing high-tech development concerns about giving away exemptions to companies

“We are in the process of explaining that the PDA is a way of saving that park.�

like Google and Amazon,� he said. “I think it’s smart to close this exemption as a way to fund education and use it to fund math and science programs. The lack of people with adequate math and science training is one of the things that are holding our economy back.� Van De Wege said one area that will be funded is support for community colleges, which should benefit plans to fund the renovation of Building 202, expected to be finished in 2014, for Peninsula College and Goddard College on the Fort Worden grounds.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Fish: Cause of death has yet to be determined CONTINUED FROM A1 of April 5 at about 7 a.m. before beginning the “We feel that theseâ€? — release, Aho said. “[Staff] took some visual the dead fish — “are fish released from our facility,â€? observations of the river [Friday morning] and didn’t Aho said. Silt in the river increased see anything that made rapidly after the fish were [them] suspicious of the turreleased, according to U.S. bidity levels,â€? Aho said. “Later in the day, [staff] Geological Survey data. The cause of death had checked turbidity levels, not been confirmed as of and they had increased, but Thursday, though Mike by then, the fish were Gross, Fish and Wildlife already moving out.â€? The sediment coursing fish biologist for Clallam County and west Jefferson down the Elwha has been County, said he suspected freed by the removal prothe fish died of suffocation. cess for the once-towering “Suffocation from the Elwha dams, part of a $325 inability to uptake oxygen million river restoration would be the expected diag- project still under way. nosis for the cause of death,â€? Cost of fish Gross said. McHenry, after finding The cost of the fish is difdirt in the fish gills, said he ficult to estimate, Aho said. expected few smolts made it The smolts ate roughly out of the river and into the $29,000 worth of food while Strait of Juan de Fuca. “I’m guessing the sur- they were being reared, vival for this release is according to numbers progoing to be very low,â€? vided by Aho, though staff time is not broken down per McHenry said. The smolts were released hatchery duty, such as feedin accordance with the ing specific groups of fish. “We pay our staff to be hatchery’s release schedule, there for a month, so it’s Aho said. really difficult to break out,â€? Aho said. Turbidity doubled The Fish and Wildlife The amount of sediment hatchery has an annual in the water, or turbidity, budget of $303,367, accorddoubled shortly after the ing to the facility’s hatchery fish were released, USGS and genetic management plan. measurements showed. McHenry said he saw The river’s turbidity, measured in formazin dead fish on the sand banks nephelometric units (FNU), in the body of the river was at about 800 FNU the stretching from the mouth evening of April 4 and to the Fish and Wildlife peaked later in the day hatchery, which is about 3½ April 5 at about 1,600 miles upstream from the FNUs. mouth of the river. Hatchery staff checked Numerous kinds of predturbidity levels the evening atory birds and some mamof April 4 and the morning mals, including otters, could

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be seen feasting on the salmon carcasses as they washed onto the Elwha banks and sandbars, McHenry said. “[There was] lot of predator activity between the

Alternative release methods include transporting the young salmon to the Strait using specially designed trucks, Aho added. Gross agreed that different release methods likely will be discussed because of heavy sediment loads, though he could not predict what specific techniques might be used. “If we can figure out ways to avoid mortality, ________ we’ll pursue them undoubtReporter Jeremy Schwartz can edly,� Gross said. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. “We’ll try not to make 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com. the same mistake.�

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The timing of the release was to make room for younger salmon and to ensure the yearlings could find their way out into the salt water of the Strait, Aho explained. “[The salmon] want to leave,� Aho said. “And if you hold on to them too much longer, you can take out that migration response, and that would just kill them for sure.� This release strategy also allows the fish to slowly get used to the salt water as they swim downstream rather than be deposited directly into the Strait, which Aho said could cause health issues. Aho said staff don’t monitor mortality rates of the hatchery-raised fish once they are released, adding that the fish are left to fend for themselves once they leave the facility. “We generally don’t know survival rates until that release population returns to the river system and hatchery,� Aho said. Aho said Fish and Wildlife hatchery staff released 212,900 year-old chinook and about $1.5 million fish younger than 1 in 2012, adding that staff generally see a couple thousand adults return to spawn each year.

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into the Strait. No dead fish were observed along the Elwha mouth or on the banks roughly 1,500 feet upstream late Wednesday afternoon. Aho said Wednesday he heard reports of hundreds of dead fish seen, though those counts could not be confirmed. Aho said the dead fish are “absolutely a worry� for Fish and Wildlife, adding that potential alternative release methods will be discussed before roughly 900,000 salmon, less than a year old, are released from the hatchery this June. “That’s something we will discuss prior to release,� Aho said. “I’m not saying we’ll make definite plans, but we’ll definitely discuss it.�

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 12-13, 2013 PAGE

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Prevention pressures on budgets PREVENTION COMES NEITHER cheaply nor easy. The various regions of the Martha M. state DepartIreland ment of Children and Family Services are competing to be chosen to be the first to use a less-confrontational approach for handling reports of possible child abuse or neglect. Family Assessment Response — or FAR — is a presently unfunded program mandated by Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6555. Passed by the state Legislature in March 2012, FAR is supposed to roll out this coming January. “The focus is prevention,” said Tom Stokes, Child and Family Services’ area supervisor for Clallam and Jefferson counties. “That’s a big philosophical shift for our agency.” FAR would turn the department’s approach upside down for an estimated 65 percent of cases it investigates.

The idea is to solve the problem within 45 days to 90 days, without making matters worse, in cases with low to moderate risk of future child maltreatment. When suspected child neglect is reported, the standard Child and Family Services investigation starts with interviewing the child — which can traumatize the child and can lead to unnecessary placements into foster care. The process also frequently creates a legal record that can make it harder for the parent to get a job, education or housing for the family. Fear of those unintended and counterproductive consequences discourages people from reporting possible abuse. Conversely, FAR investigations would start by talking to the parents to identify and address the real problems. A community-readiness team of volunteers would be ready to step in to provide help with specific needs. Such help might be parenting classes, fencing to enclose a safe play area or funding for child care. Stokes tasked longtime Child

and Family Services case manager Maureen Martin with writing a proposal to bring FAR to the Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Forks offices. Building “family engagement and trust” is a pleasant change from years of enforcement work, said Martin, who aims to retire within two years. Current FAR funding will serve only 250 families statewide — about the number Stokes and Martin project in this one small region. Prevention carries heavy “front-end” costs, Stokes observed. FAR should have a significant beneficial effect on court costs, foster care and other big-ticket services, but those savings will not be seen immediately. As the state Legislature wrangles over budget priorities, FAR and all other social service prevention programs are at risk. The old saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth of pound of cure,” is right on the money, yet the initial budget passed by the Senate cuts funding for prevention programs regardless of documented success. State Sen. Jim Hargrove’s innovative replacement for more expensive, less effective welfare

Peninsula Voices Firearms I The gun-control argument is frustrating to responsible gun owners. Someone opens fire on a soft target and racks up a body count shooting children or other defenseless people. One shooter got off 200 rounds from pistols before being shot by police. One surrenders after shooting up a theater. Another drops partially depleted AR-15 magazines between classrooms and takes his own life (evidently acting out some kind of violent fantasy) after shooting children and adults. In each case, the reaction includes a call for tighter restrictions on gun owners or buyers. Two of my friends recently offered opinions in the PDN that would discourage gun use or purchase by individuals. One suggested that semiautomatic weapons be banned. That would cover all automatic pistols. Is the writer of “Church and Firearms” [Peninsula Voices, April 7] serious? Bless his heart. He was upset because a church was sponsoring training classes for gun owners. I guess that he must be worried about armed citizens walking around just looking for a shoot-out. (I would worry about that, too.)

programs, is one example. The Housing and Essential Needs program was instituted last year. Since then, people served by HEN have used correctional facilities 86 percent less, according to Department of Commerce data. The Senate budgeters responded by slashing HEN by 57 percent. Hargrove, the Hoquiam Democrat who represents the North Olympic Peninsula and part of Grays Harbor County, is weary but not worried. “I’m seeing a lot of positioning with the various budgets,” he said. “I’m just glad we’re moving on it.” Unlike the 2012 Legislature, the current session is “in the right time frame as far as budget releases,” and can be expected to end on time, he said Wednesday. Hargrove cast the swing vote for a Senate budget — much of which he does not like — put through in three days. He hopes the House also can put its budget out in three days. “We’ve got to move vehicles along to get to the table and see what works,” he said. Between sessions, a commit-

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tee reviewed some of the more than 500 tax code exemptions and identified some possible changes that “are not so controversial,” Hargrove said. State Supreme Court rulings on estate taxes and telecommunications exemptions also opened opportunities “to help fix things,” he said. “I can almost guarantee [the budget] will be bipartisan,” he said. “If it were perfect, I’d be the only one voting for it,” he quipped.

_________ Martha M. Ireland was a Clallam County commissioner from 1996 through 1999 and is the secretary of the Republican Women of Clallam County, among other community endeavors. Martha and her husband, Dale, live on a Carlsborg-area farm. She works at Serenity House in Port Angeles, the nonprofit agency that provides emergency shelter, transitional housing and supportive services to homeless individuals and families. Her column appears every other Friday. Her next one will be published April 26. Email: irelands@olypen.com.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

But is he arguing that evil is never to be resisted by force? An opposing opinion is that good men should oppose evil. Responsible training emphasizes that both morally and legally, shooting anyone would have to be a last resort, like defending lives. Bad people will get guns despite all of our laws. I don’t think that disarming good people is a good strategy. Ken Bockman, Port Angeles

Firearms II In light of recent shootings in schools, malls and movie theaters, why is it that you don’t headline with it? Your paper (online) did not even mention the Newtown, Conn., shootings the day it happened. You were talking about a Christmas lights contest and Emblem 3, then you put up a poll. As a newspaper, I think you failed. As far as gun control, how many kids have to die before we hold the adult who legally owns a gun accountable for the fact that he or she doesn’t have his or her guns locked up? There should be a law change. Guns are made to kill, plain and simple. We need a license to drive, licenses to get married and license to fly, but

down header “Nation/ World” on the home page takes the user to “AP News.” That’s where national and world news — including the Newtown tragedy last Dec. 14 — is constantly updated with full reports 24/7 from the world’s largest newsgathering organization, The Associated Press. This free service always is available to readers of peninsuladailynews.com.

not for a gun. We have to carry insurance to drive, but not to own a gun. They both kill — cars kill thousands a year; guns kill thousands a year. I don’t think we have one congressman who has the guts, to stand up to the National Rifle Association. We are not a Christian nation, we are a gunner nation. Do we really want to go back to the wild, wild West? Susan Gile, Port Angeles

Firearms III

EDITOR’S NOTE: Regarding the writer’s reference to the Peninsula Daily News’ website, peninsula dailynews.com, the drop-

The Democrat “control freaks” have pushed background checks as their next incremental assault on lawabiding citizens owning firearms.

Citizens know at some point that we may need to protect ourselves from the non-law-abiding government thug control freaks. Five years ago, the Low Accountability Media — Low Information Press (LAMe-LIP) and the gutless clueless Republican establishment should have done a background check on Barack Hussein Obama, but did not. Their negligence has profoundly and negatively impacted our nation’s history. Despite the mainstream media’s systematic indoctrination of the masses, there are still plenty of ways to acquire the information needed to understand the

Home refinance program gets extension A POPULAR GOVERNMENT program enabling underwater borrowers who are current on their home mortgages to refinance at lower rates will be extended for two more years. The Obama administration’s HARP — Home Affordable Refinance Program — had been scheduled to expire at the end of this year. HARP now will run through 2015, regulators said Thursday. More than 2.2 million borrow-

ers with little or no home equity have refinanced using the 4-yearold HARP — and consumer advocates and lenders welcomed the news of the extension. “It’s a godsend for people who have kept making mortgage payments even though they owe more than the house is worth,” said Barry Zigas, director of housing policy at the Consumer Federation of America. The program is available to certain borrowers whose loans are

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owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-controlled home finance companies that back about twothirds of all residential mortgages. Since Fannie and Freddie already are on the hook for losses if these loans default, their risks actually go down if borrowers who have diligently paid on underwater mortgages can lower their payments by refinancing at today’s low mortgage rates. To qualify, borrowers must owe

more than 80 percent of the current home value. They can’t have missed a payment for the last six months and are allowed to have been late by 30 days only once in the last year. Borrowers can go to a Fannie Mae website, www.knowyouroptions.com/loanlookup, or to a Freddie Mac site, ww3.freddiemac.com/corporate, to find out if their loans were sold to the companies. The Associated Press

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

many ways our nation is threaten by our political class and the quintessential slick politician Obama. ‘Alinsky-ite’ Obama epitomizes the radical progressive Democrat Party. He’s as greasy as snake oil, mesmerizing as a cobra and lies like a sociopath. He has established a pattern of telling us what we want to hear and doing the opposite. Just one of these purposeful deceptions is that when running for president, he told us he would cut the national deficit by half, then doubled it. His apparent ineptitude and lack of suitability to serve as the leader of the free world doesn’t seem to matter. Being in the known associates file of Bill Ayers, [his campaign comment] thinking there are “58 states,” his sissy throwing of a baseball and his 2 for 22 sinking of hoops are the little things that may finally convince half the voters that they picked the wrong guy. Karl Spees, Port Angeles

Power by fusion In your April 1 Peninsula Poll, you ask what power source the U.S. should emphasize. I voted “other.” In case you’re wondering, that other is fusion. Benjamin G. Komar, Port Angeles EDITOR’S NOTE: “For meeting domestic electrical power demands, the U.S. should emphasize which one of the following methods,” the April 1 results from 1,075 online participants noted: Coal, 5.2 percent; oil, 2.7 percent; hydro, 14.0 percent; nuclear, 15.4 percent; wind, 15.3 percent; solar, 25.2 percent; natural gas, 13.8 percent; biofuel/waste, 5.6 percent; other, 2.9 percent, and undecided, 0.0 percent — the only time in the decade of the daily Peninsula Poll that “undecided” registered no response.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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Tale of three women: Annette, Lilly, Maggie ONE GOT FAMOUS wearing mouse ears. One got famous wearing brightly colored shifts. And one got famous wearing down the oppo- Maureen sition while car- Dowd rying a handbag. The trio of famous deaths this week seems incongruous. Yet these spirited women — two quintessential Americans known by their first names and one quintessential Brit known by her nickname — were all vivid emblems of their time. Three very different worlds are conjured up when you think about Annette Funicello, Lilly Pulitzer and Margaret Thatcher. As a tot, I spent every afternoon in my Mickey Mouse Club ears and underwear, clutching a red patent purse full of Milky Ways, glued to the television watching Annette and company. For my older brother and other boys on the brink of their teens, the blossoming Annette sparked the first frisson of hormones. The comely daughter of an auto mechanic, she grew up in California’s San Fernando Valley and came across as the unpretentious Italian girl-next-door who might actually be your friend, or date. She was so shy she asked Walt Disney if she should see a shrink; he said no, that she might cure herself of the very quality that people loved. Even later, donning two-piece bathing suits in her goofy beach party movies with Frankie Avalon, she seemed as innocent as Sally Field in her flying nun outfit. Mr. Disney, as she always called the man who discovered her at 12 in “Swan Lake” at the Bur-

bank Starlite Bowl, implored her to cover her navel. Annette was the avatar for carefree childhood and carefree summer. Maybe that’s why it was such a shock when she revealed in 1992 that she had MS. The merry Mouseketeer and mother of three handled that merciless illness with grace, becoming the face of MS, founding a fund to benefit research and serving as an ambassador for the Multiple Sclerosis Society. “Like Cinderella, I believe a dream is a wish your heart makes,” she said, sweet-tempered even as the disease ravaged her. “I’ve had a dream life.” Pulitzer, another ambassador of fun, fashioned her dream life by branding a sweet slice of the American dream. Like her fellow Palm Beach resident Jimmy Buffett, she cleverly patented Paradise Found. She made citrus-bright resort wear that was, as Vanity Fair put it, “shorthand for WASP wealth at play.” The clothes had down-toEarth snob appeal, as the magazine said in 2003, noting that Jackie Kennedy and her maid both wore Lillys. Just as Annette did not give in to her disease, Lilly, the daughter of a Standard Oil heiress, did not give in to the dictates of her stuffy old-money background. After she married a Pulitzer heir and moved to Palm Beach, she wandered the town barefoot, threw wild parties, had three kids and suffered a nervous breakdown. A doctor told her, “You’re not happy because you’re not doing anything.” Unconcerned about making a spectacle of herself, she opened a stand on Worth Avenue to sell the fruit from her husband’s orchards; then, she and a partner, wearing cheap, brightly patterned sheaths to hide fruit stains, had a eureka moment.

Style is more than fashion, she said, and being happy “never goes out of style.” While Lilly was known as “the ultimate party girl,” Maggie was “the ultimate conservative pinup.” Margaret Thatcher, the grocer’s daughter and mother of modern conservatism, had her faults, heaven knows. The New Yorker’s John Cassidy called her a combination of Ronald Reagan, Ayn Rand and Dr. Strangelove. François Mitterrand said she had the eyes of Caligula and the mouth of Marilyn Monroe. The Iron Lady could be harsh, but she was that rarest of creatures: a female leader who stayed womanly yet transcended gender. She “handbagged” opponents and offending underlings. She handled pols in the global boys’ club deftly — as little boys, when they needed it, or as swains, when she needed it. My favorite Thatcher moment came while covering a Group of 7 meeting in Paris in 1989. President Mitterrand had given her bad placement twice compared with other world leaders: once at the opera and once on the reviewing stand for a parade marking the bicentennial of the French Revolution, held where King Louis XVI was guillotined. Also, Michel Rocard, the Socialist French prime minister, chastised her for “social cruelty.” So as Maggie left Paris, she offered a pointed message about the excesses of the French Revolution, slyly presenting Mitterrand a book bound in red leather: A Tale of Two Cities.

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

Dems twist Chicago crime data their way PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S hometown of Chicago still goes by the old nickname “Windy City.” But after three miserable Michelle decades of Malkin strict gun control and permanent Democratic rule, Chicago has cemented its reputation as America’s Bloody City. No amount of statistical whitewashing can cover up the stains of the left’s ideological failures there. But as Obama continues to wage war on law-abiding gun owners, his home team is trying its hardest to spread smiley-face lies upon damned lies to downplay Chicago homicide statistics. On April Fools’ Day, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy held a news conference to tout a “dramatic” drop in the city’s homicide rate. Emanuel trumpeted the drop as a “good sign.” He hyped statistics to The Associated Press showing that first-quarter 2013 murders in Chicago tied the same time period in 2009. Murders decreased 69 percent compared with the same month last year; first-quarter homicides fell by 42 percent compared with the same time frame last year. Emanuel insisted: “We are clearly having an impact on the homicides.” But it’s all in how you slice, dice and spin it, of course. Let’s face it: Gun-grabbers in Democratic-dominated cities have an institutional incentive to fudge the numbers. In New York City, which rivals Chicago when it comes to out-ofcontrol gun-control regulations, a Police Department whistleblower recently exposed systemic

manipulation of crime data. As anti-Second Amendment crusader Michael Bloomberg made the rounds last spring touting the Big Apple as “the safest big city in America,” an internal NYPD report confirmed that more than a dozen crime reports had been manipulated — including felonies downgraded and incident reports deep-sixed — to lower the crime rate. As punishment for exposing the tampering and corruption, the whistle-blowing officer, Adrian Schoolcraft, who secretly taped the manipulation, was suspended and forced into a psych ward. He’s still fighting for justice, and has never received an apology. So, call me crazy, but I wouldn’t put it past Team Obama’s Chicago theater directors to goose their numbers to improve the optics for Dear Leader. Speaking of the lobbyist-inchief, he parachuted into Colorado last week and surrounded himself with Denver police officer human props during a gun-control campaign event. The rank-and-filers were none too happy with being exploited for political purposes. “To protect and serve” is supposed to be a public safety imperative, not a campaign imperative. But back to the Bloody City. In 2012, Chicago racked up the nation’s deadliest death toll, with 506 of its residents murdered. The murder rate has simply returned to its bloody business as usual over the past five years. Here’s the first-quarter death toll breakdown: ■ 2013: 70 ■ 2012: 120 ■ 2011: 75 ■ 2010: 75 ■ 2009: 70 The Second City Cop crime blog adds that Emanuel’s claim regarding the homicide rate

dropping to levels not seen since the 1950s “is based solely on the population decrease in the city of Chicago. This is an amazing Emanuel abuse of numbers, but as Mark Twain said, ‘There are lies, damned lies and statistics.’ “Welcome to ‘statistics.” Chicago TV reporter Jay Levine didn’t buy the whitewashing bunk, either. He challenged City Hall with a piece entitled: “City Touts Lower Homicide Stats, But Context Reveals Return To Normal.” Put simply, “2013’s 70 firstquarter homicides was a major improvement over 2012’s 120 — but not over 2011 or 2010 or 2009.” While Emanuel sang “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” for the press, the Bloody City was still reeling after a 6-month-old baby was shot and killed in gang crossfire. On Easter weekend, a mob of violent teens terrorized shoppers in the Magnificent Mile district. Similar outbreaks of racially driven attacks have escalated in Chicago under the reign of Daley-Emanuel-Obama. By some police estimates, gang violence accounts for up to 80 percent of the city’s homicides. Plagued by juvenile delinquency, organized crime, ruinous government dependency, corruption and out-of-control spending, these liberal-dominated hellholes have proved impervious to progressive “social justice” engineering. It’s the insane demagogues blaming guns who need their heads examined.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

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FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

House, Senate push rival capital budgets BY JONATHAN KAMINSKY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — The state House and Senate are moving ahead with competing capital budget proposals similar in size but with differing priorities. The House plan, coming in at $3.6 billion — about $130 million more than the Senate version — puts more money into the Military Department, environmental programs and higher educa-

tion construction. The Senate plan puts $131 million into a largescale water-retention project in the Yakima River Basin — well above the $45 million the House proposal would allocate. House Capital Budget Committee Chairman Hans Dunshee, D-Snohomish, said he is wary of putting more money into the Yakima water project, which eventually could total more than $4 bil-

lion, before he is confident tion in the coming biennium the federal government is from the capital budget to fully committed to it. the operating budget, replacing it with bonds. Betting on money The Senate plan also “It’s an OK project,” said would move $76 million Dunshee. “But it’s just a mas- from public works projects sive amount of money to bet in the capital budget to on federal money coming K-12 spending in the operthat I’m pretty suspicious of.” ating budget. Sen. Jim Honeyford, Another difference between the two budget pro- R-Sunnyside, the Senate posals: The Senate plan capital budget writer, said shifts roughly $166 million those shifts were not made in cash for school construc- by him.

“It was not my decision to make,” he said. “I had to live with it.” Dunshee said the cash transfers make for a Senate capital budget plan that is more austere in other areas. The Senate budget proposal advanced from the Senate Ways and Means Committee on Thursday. The House capital budget is expected to move out of the House Capital Budget committee today.

Among the projects included in the House plan but absent in the Senate proposal are $47.6 million to replace the Military Department’s armories in Puyallup and Olympia with a new Thurston County Readiness Center and $10 million for a new building for Everett Community College. Dunshee expressed optimism that the differences between the two sides eventually would be resolved.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

James Yoder with ELM, a utility line location services contractor working with Avista Utilities, marks where the gas lines are buried in the front yard of a house in Spokane Valley on Tuesday.

More penalties for unearthing utilities Diggers should dial 8-1-1 2 days before excavation BY SCOTT MABEN THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Rod Wesselma of Moses Lake, who serves on the board of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association, cuts up beef Thursday next to the Capitol in Olympia. Association members and other groups put on the annual “Beef Day” to promote cattle, ranching and dairy industries in the state.

SPOKANE — Digging up buried utility lines may give you the shock of a lifetime — but it will zap your wallet as well. Anyone who fails to use Washington’s free “Call Before You Dig” service and who unearths gas or electric lines faces stiffer penalties this year. As homeowners, landscapers and excavators get busy outdoors each spring,

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utilities and state regulators ramp up their reminders to call 8-1-1 at least two business days before digging. It’s required by state law and is intended to prevent injuries, property damage and outages. Initial violations remain $1,000 but now rise to $5,000 for subsequent violations within a three-year period. Damaging a hazardous liquid or gas transmission pipeline can lead to a $10,000 fine and a misdemeanor charge. “We wanted to send a message to people that this really is important and if you break the law, then there’s going to be some consequences to that,” said Anna Gill, pipeline program specialist for the state Utilities and Transportation Commission. Last year, 1,289 incidents of damage to gas pipelines caused by individuals digging were reported in Washington. The state hasn’t col- What to know

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lected damage reports on other types of utility lines but will do so beginning this year. The UTC sought the stiffer penalties and more rigorous enforcement of the dig law during the 2011 legislative session, and the new law took effect Jan. 1. Excavators and utilities now must report any damage to underground lines within 45 days. Previously, only damage to regulated natural gas and hazardous liquid lines had to be reported. The new law also created a 13-member dispute resolution board to hear complaints of alleged violations and recommend enforcement action to the UTC. Anyone who thinks the dig law is being violated can file a complaint. “The [8-1-1] system is used a lot, which is good, but it’s hard to reach every single homeowner or nonprofessional digger,” Gill said. “They don’t always realize that there is that requirement. And unfortunately, we don’t have the funding to do a large outreach campaign to make them all aware of it.”

Homeowners and professionals should know where buried utility lines are located before planting a tree, putting up a mailbox post, building a fence or digging more than 12 inches deep in a yard or garden, experts say. “You just never can be sure that you know where those lines are,” Gill said. When someone calls 8-1-1, a utility representative will come out and locate and mark all utility lines in the ground. Residents are advised to dig carefully around marked areas with a hand tool because buried electrical lines or natural gas pipes can be dangerously close to the surface. Accidental contact with a shovel or backhoe is risky and potentially fatal. Spokane-based Avista Utilities had 80,629 locates performed on its underground lines last year, with 517 reports of dig-ins to lines. Avista has about 6,000 miles of underground electric distribution lines and 7,650 miles of natural gas distribution lines in the Northwest. Lines are buried an average depth of 3 feet, the utility said.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 12-13, 2013 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

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Other area events slated PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Revelers from Louisiana are on their way to Port Townsend for Saturday night’s Clambake, a dinner and dance to celebrate Centrum’s 40th anniversary. The band is, from left, Daniel Coolik, Glen Fields, Blake Miller, Chas Justus and Eric Frey; Chris Miller is not pictured.

A screening of “Bicycle Dreams,� volunteer training and a tomato grafting workshop are among the varied activities offered on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For more on the Port Angeles Symphony’s weekend concerts and other news of the lively arts, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide that is part of today’s PDN.

Centrum turns the big 4-0 Port Townsend nonprofit celebrates with Clambake BY DIANE URBANI

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — This crowd has no problem with turning 40. Centrum, a nonprofit presenter of music and literary festivals for four decades now, will celebrate this birthday with the first-ever spring Clambake, a dinner and dance starring Mystery Bay Seafood and the Revelers from Louisiana. The festivities start with the catered dinner at 5 p.m. Saturday at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds’ Erickson Building, 4907

pop, a mix of French Cajun and rock ’n’ roll music. “It’s so fun. You don’t have to know any special steps. You can’t help but have a good time; it’s natural,� Justus emphasized. Landes St., and progress with The Revelers are made up of dancing from 6:30 p.m. until members of two other bands known about 10:30 p.m. to Port Townsend: the Pine Leaf Tickets are $25 for dinner and Boys and the Red Stick Ramblers. Those outfits have played dance or $10 for just the dance; the children’s dinner menu is $10. Centrum events such as the Fes“We do Louisiana roots music,� tival of American Fiddle Tunes, which began in the mid-1970s at Revelers guitarist Chas Justus Fort Worden State Park. promised in an interview this Since its founding in 1973, week from his home in Lafayette, Centrum has hosted writing conLa. ferences and workshops in dance, blues and jazz, along with Fiddle Acadiana Tunes and Voice Works, the That’s “the center of Acadiweeklong set of singing classes ana,� he noted, adding that his and concerts. six-piece band will bring Cajun, This Sept. 11-15, the Port zydeco and what they call swamp Townsend Ukulele Festival will be

a new kid on the Fort Worden block, with workshops for uke players and a pair of public concerts. The workshops are proving beyond popular, said Centrum program manager Jordan Hartt. “We had 115 spots,� he said this week, “and only 10 spots are still open.�

Clallam libraries closed All libraries in the North Olympic Library System will be closed today to allow staff to attend in-service training. The libraries in Port Angeles, Sequim, Forks and Clallam Bay will reopen at 10 a.m. Saturday. The library’s website is always available at www.nols. org. For more information, contact library Director Paula Barnes at 360-417-8500, ext. 7715, or director@nols.org.

Centrum festivals Centrum’s festivals start in early summer with Voice Works from June 24-30 and carry on with Fiddle Tunes from June 30-July 7, the Port Townsend Writers’ Conference from July 7-21, Jazz Port Townsend from July 21-28, the Port Townsend Acoustic Blues Festival from July 28-Aug. 5 and DANCE This from Aug. 5-10. TURN

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Virginia-based storyteller and songwriter Kim Weitkamp will arrive at the RoseWind Common House in Port Townsend this Sunday.

Storyteller to gallivant on PT stage BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Kim Weitkamp, an internationally known tale-teller and singer, describes herself as a wild-hearted, wondering little girl inside the body of a seasoned artist. Her stories, she says, are the fruit of growing up free-range in the Amish country around Locust Grove, Pa., with all outdoors feeding her imagination. And though the adults tried again and again to curb her rambunctious behavior, she gallivants to this day — and to Port Townsend on Sunday.

through organizer Brian Rohr at www.BrianRohr. com. When asked what some of her topics will be this Sunday, Weitkamp demurred.

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“I have an extremely eclectic repertoire,� she said. “I never know what I’m going to tell until I see the audience. Their age, as well as other things, dictates what I tell. “I love telling my original, suspenseful tales that have a Hitchcock feel,� she added, “but I also love the stories from growing up. Then I have tall tales I’ve written.� Singing and telling So no, she cannot pick Weitkamp will sing and any favorites. That’s “like tell stories at the RoseWind asking me what kid I love Common House, at Umabest: impossible.� tilla and Haines streets, in When she came to Penan event presented by Port insula College in 2010 for Townsend’s Mythsinger the Forest Storytelling FesFoundation. tival, Weitkamp talked Tickets to her 2 p.m. about what she hopes to Sunday show are $15, give her listeners. while more details can be found at 360-531-2535 and TURN TO GALLIVANT/B2

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Blood

pressure checks CONTINUED FROM B1 lights from his Home School video series — which he started in 1996 and ended Port Angeles with Home School 9 in 2009 — as well as some of his ‘Bicycle Dreams’ film recent work with snowPORT ANGELES — board manufacturer Mervin Magic of Cinema fans are in Manufacturing of Carlsfor a double treat tonight, borg. when Peninsula College Some video content may screens “Bicycle Dreams,” include mild profanity, its first film of the spring party footage and heavyquarter. metal music (played at The screening of the respectable levels), the award-winning film is co- group warned. sponsored by the Bike Proceeds will benefit the Garage, which will offer Hurricane Chasers profree brake and gear tune- gram, which provides snowups outside Maier Hall an board and winter ecology hour before the film, start- instruction for youths in the ing at 6 p.m. Boys & Girls Clubs of the The film will begin at Olympic Peninsula. 7 p.m. in the Maier Performance Hall on the PeninBlood-pressure checks sula College campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. PORT ANGELES — Admission to the film is Free blood-pressure checks $5 or free with student are now offered by Clallam identification. County Fire District No. 2 “Bicycle Dreams” details from 9 a.m. to noon every the highs and lows of the Friday. Race Across America, a The checks are available 3,000-mile bicycle race from at Station 21, 508 N. Baker the Pacific to the Atlantic. St., and Station 22, 700 Top riders finish in fewer Power Plant Road west of than 10 days, riding more Port Angeles. than 300 miles per day and High blood pressure sleeping a few hours per increases the risk for heart night. disease and stroke. Many With little prize money people don’t realize they at stake, the fundamental have high blood pressure goal of the race is simply to because it often has no finish, a challenge half of all warning signs or symptoms. riders fail to meet. For more information, The documentary has phone 360-417-4790. captured more than 15 awards, including Best Doc- Tour the second story umentary at the Las Vegas PORT ANGELES — The Film Festival and the Los Angeles Sports Film Festi- annual Second Story Story val, and Best Foreign Film tour will take participants at the Moscow Film Festi- to rarely seen areas of three downtown buildings Saturval. day. The free tour, hosted by Snowboarding videos the Port Angeles Downtown PORT ANGELES — Association, will begin at Videographer Tim Stanford 9 a.m. at the Conrad Dyar will show videos from his Memorial Fountain, First Home School series as well and Laurel streets. as work documenting a After participants gather snowboard manufacturing at the fountain, tour guides company in Carlsborg when will lead them to the third he speaks at 7 p.m. Satur- and fourth floors of the Elks day. Naval Lodge at First and Stanford will present his Lincoln streets, as well as videos during the next the Independent Order of installment of the Hurri- Odd Fellows Hall at 314 W. cane Ridge Winter Sports First St., which was renoClub’s Second Saturday vated by Maureen Wall, Series. who is seeking a buyer. The lecture will be at The third location is 7 p.m. Saturday at Wine on White Crane Martial Arts the Waterfront, 115 E. Rail- at 129 W. First St. road Ave. The tour will take about A $5 donation is two hours. requested. Stanford will show highTURN TO EVENTS/B3

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Jefferson display curated by state historical society

grams produced locally are planned. Among them will be a presentation on 1930s movies by film critic Robert Horton on June 20.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson Museum of Art & History, one of seven places in the state chosen to display a state exhibit on the Great Depression, will open the show with a ribbon-cutting at 2 p.m. Sunday. “Hope in Hard Times: Washington During the Great Depression” will be on display through July 7 at the Jefferson County Historical Society’s museum at 540 Water St. It is the only place it will be seen on the North Olympic Peninsula. “This exhibit focuses on the adversity and triumph of everyday Americans, comparing the struggles of the 1930s with those faced today,” Bill Tennent, historical society executive director, said in a statement. The exhibit is built

around 10 interpretive panels featuring stories, photographs and artwork from Washington’s Depressionera past. It is curated by the Washington State Historical Society and based on a larger exhibit of the same name that appeared at the Washington State History Museum in 2012.

Comparisons “We were very pleased to have been selected to receive this traveling exhibit,” Tennent said. “It gives us an opportunity to compare Jefferson County with the rest of the state during the Great Depression.” The historical society has created a supplemental exhibit showcasing both work and play in Jefferson County in the 1930s. Also, a variety of pro-

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“Head Bone Rattles,” a compilation of original ghost stories and songs, and “The Lap,” a limited-release story and song. These days, the storyteller travels the continent full time, performing in theaters and at festivals. She also does some television and, now and again, delivers a keynote speech at a corporate meeting. “Kim studs her performances with bits of musical Americana that match the sweet, gentle tones of her narrative,” noted one writer at The Oregonian. Weitkamp added: “No matter how technology changes, story is the essence of human communication.”

She doesn’t worry about technology rendering her obsolete. In fact, Weitkamp has called herself a “gearhead” and has been known to carry a deluxe Bluetooth device among other gizmos. And she sees those people texting at storytelling festivals. “I’m not concerned,” she said, because “it’s in every human to have that eye-to________ eye communication,” and people will always search it Features Editor Diane Urbani out. de la Paz can be reached at 360Weitkamp has six audio 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. collections, the latest being urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

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The Jefferson Museum of Art & History is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $4 for adults and $1 for children ages 3 to 12, and is free to members of the Jefferson County Historical Society. Admission also is free the first Saturday of every month for Jefferson County residents. For more information on the museum, visit www. jchsmuseum.org. For more information on Humanities Washington’s Traveling Exhibit, visit w w w. h u m a n i t i e s. o r g / programs/exhibits.

CONTINUED FROM B1 tickets to Saturday’s Clambake can be purchased at For Centrum members 360-385-3181, ext. 103. — those who make an Tickets also will be on annual donation of $50 or sale at the Erickson Buildmore — tickets to the vari- ing door after 4:30 p.m. Satous concerts go on sale this urday. Monday. For everyone else, ________ the box office opens May 1. Information about perFeatures Editor Diane Urbani formers, workshops and de la Paz can be reached at 360public events can be found 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. at www.Centrum.org, while urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

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own stories” with family and others they love. “I’m considered a humorist and a storyteller. You’re laughing, and then suddenly, you’re crying. I can’t help it,” Weitkamp added. “That’s who I am.”

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Those who attend the ribbon-cutting are asked to bring a can of food to donate to Jefferson County food banks. Roger Loney, outgoing president of Port Townsend Paper Corp., has been tapped to cut the ribbon. “Roger is the perfect person to open the exhibit since it was the mill that helped us through the Depression,” said Julie Marston, historical society board president. “Hope in Hard Times” was developed in partnership with Humanities Washington and the Washington State Historical Society. It comes to Port Townsend from Clarkston and will move on first to Naselle, then to Burien, Walla Walla, Spokane and Ilwaco. “The exhibit looks at real

people dealing with tough times,” said Humanities Washington Executive Director Julie Ziegler. “In our current recession, this exhibit reminds us we are not alone, our fortunes are interconnected, and we get through hardships as a community. “‘Hope in Hard Times’ emphasizes that hope exists in all times.”

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Men using a wheelbarrow as a makeshift stove are captured in Chapin Bowen’s photo “Breakfast Outside the Tacoma Commons Mission,” taken in 1930. This image is one of many examples of ingenuity in “Hope in Hard Times,” an exhibit opening Sunday in Port Townsend.


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Concerts to commemorate Civil War sesquicentennial PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUE REID

Leslie Lewis leads the Community Chorus of Port Townsend in three concerts: tonight in Port Townsend, Sunday in Chimacum and Wednesday in Quilcene.

Three concerts — two this weekend and another Wednesday — will mark the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. The Community Chorus of Port Townsend and East Jefferson County will offer its spring program, “The Blue & the Gray: A Civil War Commemoration,” at three venues. The first will be at 7:30 tonight at First Presbyterian Church, 1111 Franklin St., Port Townsend. That will be followed by a 3:30 p.m. Sunday concert at the Lutheran

Church of the Redeemer, 45 Redeemer Way, Chimacum. At 7 p.m. Wednesday, the concert will be performed at the Quilcene School, 294715 U. S. Highway 101. Tickets are a suggested $15 at the door.

sides of the conflict, including AfricanAmerican spirituals, and wartime songs. Singers also will provide excerpts of Civil War speeches and letters.

Songs of the era

A handmade quilt designed by chorus board member Linda Atkins will be the prize in a drawing whose winner will be announced in December. Tickets are $3. For concert or raffle information, phone 360-385-1402 or visit www. PTchorus.org.

Leslie Lewis, the chorus’ director, has assembled a varied program, with popular songs of the era such as “Beautiful Dreamer” and “Some Folks,” both by Stephen Foster, along with songs from both the Union and Confederate

Handmade quilt

Events: Speaker to discuss preserving heirlooms CONTINUED FROM B2 Coin club to meet

Preserve heirlooms PORT ANGELES — Port Townsend resident Laura Reutter will discuss the preservation of family heirlooms at a workshop hosted by the Clallam County Historical Society from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The workshop will be in the society’s research and administrative center at 931 W. Ninth St. behind Lincoln School. The cost is $8 for society members and $10 for nonmembers. Class size is limited. Reutter, a self-employed artist and object conservator, will suggest ways to preserve a family’s heirlooms for future generations. Attendees are encouraged to bring a small object for discussion on condition and storage options, not value. For more, phone 360452-2662 or email artifact@ olypen.com.

To register or for more at the Sequim Prairie information, phone 360- Grange Hall, 290 Macleay PORT ANGELES — 809-0401 or email Road. Those interested in coins dragonfly@olypen.com. Lunch will be provided and currency can attend the from noon to 1 p.m. Port Angeles Coin Club’s The refuge’s annual Beekeepers group meeting at 4:30 p.m. Saturrefresher for current volunday. PORT ANGELES — teers will follow from 1 p.m. The club will meet at the “Introduction of Package to 3 p.m. Port Angeles Library, 2210 Bees” will be presented at a Primary volunteer S. Peabody St. meeting of the North OlymThe group meets the sec- pic Peninsula Beekeepers’ duties include greeting visiond Saturday of every Association at 1 p.m. Sun- tors and providing information about the refuge’s trails month to discuss coin col- day. and wildlife. lecting and evaluate coins The group will meet at Additional opportunities and currency. the Port Angeles Library, include wildlife surveys, The public is welcome to 2210 S. Peabody St. invasive-species mitigation, attend. A beginners beekeeping maintenance, trail roving, class will be held at noon. beach cleanup and adminisEnergy medicine class For more information, tration. PORT ANGELES — phone Mark Urnes at 360For more information Port Angeles energy medi- 477-7934. and to reserve a space at cine practitioners Kelmie the training, phone the refBlake Spires and Christine uge office at 360-457-8451 Sequim Rose will present “What Is or email david_falzetti@fws. Energy Medicine, and How gov. Can It Benefit My Health Refuge training set and Well-being?” on SaturBook discussion SEQUIM — Volunteer day. SEQUIM — The ImmorThe free class will be training for those interheld at the Living Well Nat- ested in helping the Dunge- tal Life of Henrietta Lacks, ural Health Center, 525 W. ness National Wildlife Ref- by Rebecca Skloot, will be uge will be held today. discussed at the Sequim Eighth St., at 1 p.m. The refuge will hold its Library, 630 N. Sequim Attendees will learn new-volunteer Ave., at 3 p.m. Saturday. Donna Eden’s daily energy annual Her name was Henrietta training from 8 a.m. to noon routine, Spires said.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot will be discussed Saturday at the Sequim Library. Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor, black Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells — taken without her knowledge — became one of the most important tools in medicine. They have been used to develop worldwide medical advances and have been bought and sold by

the billions. Skloot narrates the science, tracks the racial politics of medicine and tells the Lacks family’s history. Copies of the book, including large-print and audio formats, are available at the Sequim Library, as well as in downloadable audio or e-book formats. They can be requested online through the library catalog at www.nols.org. Preregistration for this program is not required. For more information, visit www.nols.org or contact Sequim Library manager Lauren Dahlgren at 360-683-1161 or Sequim@ nols.org.

Plow Day breakfast SEQUIM — The Sequim Prairie Grange and the Sequim Valley Collectors will have a Plow Day Pancake Breakfast on Saturday. The meal will be at the Grange Hall, 290 Macleay Road, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. TURN

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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Plant, seed exchange set Events: Rally at Quimper Grange in PT over taxes set BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — People can trade plants, bulbs or seeds for something they want in their gardens during a plant and seed exchange Saturday. The second annual exchange takes place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St. “We are looking for any kinds of plants that you no longer want, pots that you haven’t planted or seeds that you haven’t used,” said event organizer Ashley Kehl. “People can bring what they want to exchange and come away with something they want.” Plants, seeds and bulbs will be displayed on tables Jennimae Hilliard, holding baby Forest, stands with her fiance Ashley outside the hall or, if the Kehl outside the Quimper Grange during last year’s seed exchange. The weather is bad, inside the second annual event takes place Saturday in Port Townsend. grange hall. Kehl added that no playing in the dirt, seed “The seed exchange Books available saving, food preservation money will be used at the encourages plant diversity,” he said. In addition to plants, and trading with friends,” exchange. “I think a good practice “Maybe in the future, we books will be available to Kehl said. Kehl grew up in a farm- will expand and be able to is: ‘Food, not lawns.’ help answer plant and seed “People spend a lot of questions, and Mountain ing family and traveled take money, but we haven’t Spirit Herbal Co. will pro- with his father, Michael worked that out yet,” Kehl time maintaining their lawns, which isn’t very usePilarski, to festivals and said. vide hot tea. ful when they can spend Kehl and his fiancee, other events that promoted that time growing plants Jennimae Hilliard, adopted agricultural sustainability Everyone invited they can eat,” he added. the idea for Port Townsend and permaculture. “But we want people to For more information, Pilarski hosted a plant after noting a nationwide and seed exchange for many come, whether they have phone 360-821-1092. trend. ________ “A few years ago, we dis- years in Okanagan, B.C., stuff to trade or not.” Kehl said seed exchanges covered a mutual excite- and was the main source of Jefferson County Editor Charlie ment for gardening and inspiration for the upcom- happen every spring in Bermant can be reached at 360bartering which has led us ing plant and seed exchange, small and large towns 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ down the path of lots of Kehl said. peninsuladailynews.com. across the country.

Birthday Ann Gagnon Ann Gagnon will celebrate her 100th birthday Saturday. She was born to Glenn and Ivy Fulkerson on April 13, 1913, in Mrs. Gagnon the kitchen of the family farm in MaCaw, Montana, weighing in at 10 pounds. The family, including her two brothers, Ray and Harry Fulkerson, and sister, Helen (Killeen), later moved to Clallam Bay, where they owned and operated the Clallam Bay Inn and where her strong work ethic was instilled

CORNER

and put to use at an early age. She was in the first graduating class of Clallam Bay High School. She married Howard Gagnon in Tacoma on June 14,1934, and became an instant mother to his two boys, Lad (age 7) and Buzz (age 4). The Gagnons later added two more children, Cindy and Brent. She and Howard spent the majority of their married life in the Clallam Bay and Sekiu area until Howard’s death in September 1962. In 1963, she moved to Forks into the unfinished home she and Howard were in the process of building at the time of his death. Ann found work at the Forks Motel and later at Lefler’s General Store. She was a member of the Eastern Star, was

very involved with Olympic Community Action Programs and belongs to Forks Bible Church. Becoming legally blind in her 70s, she has maintained her faith and positive attitude, and never met a stranger. Her activities became limited, but not her spirit, and she is an inspiration to everyone who meets and knows her. She was determined to live on her own until a fall mandated a move to Forks Long Term Care, where is involved in all the activities and social gatherings. She loves visiting and reminiscing with family and friends. She is amazed at her 100 years of life and attributes it to being positive even in hard times, her faith and family. She has been blessed with four children, eight

grandchildren, 25 greatgrandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

Pet food drive SEQUIM — The Clallam County Fair royalty will host a pet food drive at Petco, 1205 W. Washington St., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The public can meet this year’s royalty, get a photo with their pets and the royal court, and make a donation of food or other pet-related items. All donations will be divided between the Clallam County Humane Society and Peninsula Friends of Animals. For more information, phone Christine Paulsen at 360-461-1866.

Invites you to please join them for a

FREE EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR Sponsored by

Computer group meets

WHEN: April 26TH, 2013 – Friday TIME: 10:00 am until 2:30 pm WHERE: John Wayne Marina Main Meeting Room, 2577 West Sequim Bay Rd., Sequim, WA GUEST PRESENTERS:

STEPHEN THIELKE, MD, MSPH, MA (Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center; Assistant Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, UW)

TOPIC:

ALZHEIMER’S, DEPRESSION & DEALING WITH BEHAVIORAL CHANGES (Most commonly seen symptoms of early Alzheimer’s)

“Breakfast worth a drive”

(Director of Recruitment, UW/VA Memory Wellness Program, Educational Coordinator)

TOPIC:

AGING & MEMORY LOSS: WHAT IS NORMAL, WHAT IS NOT?

- Sunset Magazine March 2012

Please RSVP to 360-582-9309 34755294

Home Instead Senior Care

34763694

AND

JULIE MOORER, RN

Lunch will be provided by

CONTINUED FROM B3 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Featured this month are Menu items are eggs, ham and all the pancakes gardening, crafts and selfhelp books. Friends memyou can eat. The cost is $5 for adults bers also have a large supand $3 for children ages 10 ply of quilt pattern books. The gardening books and younger. Proceeds from the break- cover all subjects, with fast will benefit the Sequim some specific to growing in High School Future Farm- the Pacific Northwest. ers of America. Proceeds from the sale The Sequim Valley Col- fund programs at the lectors, a group with old Sequim Library. tractors, plows, discs and other farm equipment, will Kids book signing start plowing at about SEQUIM — Gene Brad10 a.m. on Lamar Lane. They invite the public to bury will read and sign copattend to watch the differ- ies of his newest children’s ent tractors do a mass plow- book, Mischievous Max: A Teddy Bear Story, at Dungeing of the field. ness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Sequim Genealogy event Ave., from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. SEQUIM — Jesse Stew- Saturday. art will present a program Bradbury will read from on using newspapers for the book at 1:30 p.m. research when the Clallam Refreshments will be County Genealogical Soci- served. ety meets at Dungeness Copies of the book will Valley Lutheran Church, be available for purchase. 925 N. Sequim Ave., from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. Tomato grafting The event is open to the SEQUIM — A tomato public. Attendees are asked grafting workshop will be to arrive early. Stewart is past presi- offered by the Washington dent of the Jefferson County State University Clallam Genealogy Society and cur- County Master Gardeners rent chair of the education and Sequim High School committee. AgriScience Department Besides teaching a from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satbeginning genealogy class, urday. she has authored a 600The workshop will be in page book on her Acklin the Sequim High School family and is “hoping to find greenhouse, 601 N. Sequim someone to fill in the Ave. blanks.” A fee of $20 is requested Refreshments will be to cover the cost of grafting served. supplies. For more information, Gardeners will learn phone 360-417-5000. about grafting methods, types of rootstock and heirMoveOn rally loom scion, how to make SEQUIM — Clallam and establish the graft, and County MoveOn will host a how to prepare grafted rally concerning taxes at plants for planting. They will perform graftnoon Saturday. The rally will be at the ing and take home up to six corner of Washington Street grafted tomato plants. Participants should and Sequim Avenue. “As workers ready their bring a spray bottle with personal taxes for the April fresh water. Reservations are 15 deadline, Clallam County MoveOn will rally required. To RSVP, phone to protest big banks not Amanda Rosenberg at 360paying theirs,” said Andrea 683-7652. Radich, MoveOn Clallam County co-organizer. Port Townsend For more information, phone Radich at 360-4576884. Family photographs

32400 RAINIER AVE. NE | 360.297.7636 WWW.PORTGAMBLEGENERALSTORE.COM

SEQUIM — The Sequim PC Users Group, or SPCUG, will discuss “Organizing Your Digital Files Using Windows Explorer” at 10 a.m. Saturday. The presentation will be in the computer lab, Room E-3, at Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted. The presentation will show how to find and organize digital files by creating file structures and folders using Windows Explorer (now called File Explorer in Windows 8). Moving files around into and out of File Explorer using the “drag and drop” method also will be discussed. For more information, email spcug1@gmail.com or visit www.spcug.net.

PORT TOWNSEND — Artist and author Judith Kitchen of Port Townsend will present “Picture Your Life,” a free workshop, today. Kitchen, whose memoir Half in Shade explores family history through old pictures, will offer her class from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Port Townsend Library Learning Center, 1256 Lawrence St. The workshop gives attendees a chance to explore and write about old family photographs. Seniors especially are encouraged to join in. To find out more about today’s workshop and other free activities at the Library Learning Center, visit www. PTPublicLibrary.org or phone 360-385-3181.

Spring shred set

PORT TOWNSEND — The First Federal branch at 1321 Sims Way will host a free community shredding event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Individuals are encouraged to bring sensitive documents for shredding onsite by LeMay Mobile Shredding, a professional shredding company. Shredding documents helps ensure privacy and prevent identity theft. Types of documents to bring include old tax returns, account statements or any paperwork with account or Social Security numbers or other personal information. There is a limit of five bags or five boxes per vehiFriends book sale cle. SEQUIM — The Friends Attendees should be preof Sequim Library will con- pared to keep the bags or duct its monthly book sale boxes. at the Friends building TURN TO EVENTS/B10 behind the Sequim Library,


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 12-13, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Ocean salmon season is set

San Juan limit Starting today, the salmon limit in the San Juan Islands (Marine Area 7) will drop to one salmon per day, down from two fish per day. Unlike Marine Areas 6 (Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca) and 9 (Admiralty Inlet), the blackmouth season in the San Juans has been going strong since December. The Marine Area 7 salmon season ends Tuesday, April 30. Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) closes that same day. Sekiu, Port Angeles and Sequim closed earlier this week, and Marine Area 9 closes Monday.

River fishing update The wild steelhead photo fishery is winding down, and closes on the Hoh River on Monday. Native steelhead can be fished for on the other West End rivers until Tuesday, April 30. “It’s OK; not great by any means,” Bob Gooding of Olympic Sporting Goods (360-374-6330) in Forks said. TURN

TO

HORTON/B7

Wolves nip PA in tilt of unbeatens BY LEE HORTON PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — When a pair of undefeated softball rivals face off, their game is supposed to go down to the last inning. Or extra innings, as was the case when Sequim and Port Angeles met. Hannah Grubb was the hero for the Wolves in their 6-5 win in eight innings. Grubb stepped to the plate with one out and tripled to score Rylleigh Zbaraschuk, who led off the bottom of the eighth with a long double to center field, and tie the game at 5-5. “I just knew I had to hit it,” Grubb said. “I had struggled a little bit throughout the day, but when I got up there, I didn’t think about anything. I just hit the ball.” Melissa Lewis batted next for Sequim, and hit the ball hard to left field. Roughriders outfielder Haley Gray caught the ball in shallow left and immediately threw the ball to home plate, but Grubb beat the throw and scored the winning run. “I had to tag up and [Sequim coach Mike McFarlen] said, ‘You’ve got to get there. You are going to get there,’ ” Grubb said. “So, I’m running hard the whole way, and I beat the ball there.” With the Wednesday win, the Wolves (7-0, 8-0) claim sole possession of first place and are the last undefeated team in the Olympic League. There was no shame in losing for Port Angeles (6-1, 7-1).

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles’ Sarah Steinman, left, fails to make it to first ahead of the throw to Sequim first baseman Alexas Besand in the fourth inning in Sequim.

Softball “You couldn’t have asked for a better game,” Riders coach Randy Steinman said. “It was great. “We lost to a great team. We can’t hang our heads or anything. “The play at the end there was exactly what we wanted —

we had our outfield in, [the hit was a] line drive right there, and we had a shot at the plate. The throw was just a little off the line. “[Sequim] was aggressive and did a good job.” The game was a battle from the start. Both teams had chances, but neither could score in the first three innings.

Port Angeles finally broke through in the top of the fourth when a hit by Dove Lucas scored Ashlee Reid, and then Gray after an overthrow by Sequim. A few batters later, Raelyn Lucas hit a bases-loaded, ground-rule double down the left-field line that brought home Khason Politika and Dove Lucas. TURN

RIVALS/B6

TO

Cascade shades Cowboys Chimacum drops a 1-0 heartbreaker PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHIMACUM — Zach Stevenson pitched a complete-game, two-hit shutout to lead Cascade Christian to a 1-0 win over Chimacum in Nisqually League baseball action. It was a pitchers’ duel that Derek Ajax lost despite giving up just five hits and no earned runs. Cascade scored its lone run in the third inning on a dropped third strike, an error, a fielder’s choice and a sacrifice fly to score without a hit. Stevenson was extremely accurate in the game, striking out only one but walking none. “Stevenson probably threw something like 12 pitches in the game,” Chimacum coach Jim Dunn joked. Cascade Christian has a strong pitching staff as the Cougars also beat Eatonville in a 1-0 two-hit shutout last week. Ajax, meanwhile, gave up just the unearned run while striking out one and walking one in six innings. Chimacum’s Johnny Rogers came in for relief in the top of the

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chimacum’s Chris Bainbridge makes the tag and gets the out on a Cascade Christian runner during a Nisqually League game in Chimacum.

Preps

Chimacum: Hundley 1-2, Bainbridge 1-3.

Port Angeles 8, Sequim 5

seventh for a three-up, threeSEQUIM — The Roughriders down inning. Chris Bainbridge and Myles exploded for seven runs in the Hundley had Chimacum’s hits top of the seventh inning to beat in the game, played Wednesday. the archrival Wolves in Olympic League play on a sunny but Cascade Christian 1, Chimacum 0 windy and cold day. Port Angeles scored five of the Cascade 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 —1 5 1 Chimacum 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 —0 2 2 runs with two out after coming WP- Stevenson; LP- Ajax into the seventh behind 5-1. Pitching Statistics Chase Jangula had the clutch Cascade Christian: Stevenson 7IP, 2H, 0R, 1K, 0BB. Chimacum: Ajax 6IP, 5H, 1R, 0ER, 1K, 1BB; Rogers 1IP, hit with two on and two outs. He 0H, 0R. smashed the ball on a 2-2 count Hitting Statistics to deliver the game-winning Cascade Christian: Custain 1-2.

runs. Brady Konopaski smacked a two-RBI double in the seventh. “It was an amazing comeback and I am very proud of my kids for never giving up,” Port Angeles coach Chad Wagner said. “These kids are going to make me lose all my hair. “We still have to learn to not wait around till the last few innings. We have done a great job of coming from behind all year, but we need to learn to get ahead and keep building on a lead.” TURN

TO

PREPS/B7

First OAT Run set for Saturday Half-marathon, 12K west of PA PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A full field of 200 runners is set for the first-ever Olympic Adventure Trail (OAT) on Saturday on the all-purpose trail west of Port Angeles. Registration officially ended Tuesday for the 13.1-mile halfmarathon run after the 12-kilometer run filled up a few days

before that. There are 100 runners signed up for each event. “It’s incredible that it sold out,” race director Laurie Campbell of Port Angeles said. Campbell started the event along with Scott Tucker, who also helps run the Northwest Cup mountain biking races on Dry Hill. Campbell is a longtime runner who specializes in half-marathons, while Tucker is a devoted mountain biker. Like Tucker, who doesn’t par-

ticipate in the Northwest Cup at Dry Hill because he is too busy co-directing the event, Campbell too must forego the activity she loves this weekend to direct the OAT Run. “I’ll run it next week,” she joked. Packet pickup is today from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Harbinger Winery, 2358 U.S. Highway 101 West in Port Angeles, and beginning at 7:45 a.m. on Saturday. There is no parking at the run site. There will be free shuttles to the site from Harbinger.

Shuttles leave for the halfmarathon at 8:45 a.m. and at 10 a.m. for the 12K. The half-marathon race starts at 9:30 a.m. and the 12K, half of the half-marathon, begins at 10:30 a.m. at the halfway point of the half-marathon. Two aid stations will have refreshment drinks and food for runners, and there will be a post-run part with free hot lunches for the participants at Harbinger. TURN

TO

RUN/B7

SPORTS/BUSINESS

THIS YEAR’S OCEAN salmon fishing season has been announced by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. At its meeting in Portland Lee earlier this week, the Pacific Horton Fishery Management Council approved a recreational chinook catch quota of 48,000 and a coho quota of 74,760. The chinook quota is 3,500 fewer than last year, while the coho quota is about 5,000 fish greater than 2012. The Pacific Fishery Management Council establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters 3 to 200 miles off the Pacific coast in Washington, Oregon and California. In Marine Areas 3 (LaPush) and 4 (Neah Bay), the salmon fishing season will begin with two Friday and Saturday openings for hatchery chinook on May 10-11 and May 17-18. Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, said this May opening is “quite interesting” because it is the first time in years Neah Bay has been open to sport anglers during the migration of the Columbia River summer chinook. Under the right ocean conditions — water temperatures and food availability — this could provide anglers some great catches. “Those Columbia River summer chinook are big, and because of their oil-rich meat, are especially good eating,” Norden said. “In a normal year, fishing will be excellent. But if it is like last May, those fish will pass through at a depth of 75 fathoms or more . . . out of reach for all but the commercial trollers. “I have my fingers crossed that the Pacific [Ocean] will be its normal, cool self at Neah Bay in May, and plankton productivity is high, so those big kings will be up and feeding at the old ‘garbage dump hole.’” The hatchery chinook fishery will reopen Saturday, June 22, and be open seven days a week. The daily catch limit will be two hatchery chinook. The sport coho season in Neah Bay and LaPush will begin Saturday, June 29. The daily limit is two salmon — either chinook or hatchery coho, or a combination of the two. Anglers fishing off LaPush and Neah Bay also will be able to retain two additional pink salmon, which will make their odd-year-only run this year. The coho and chinook fisheries will end when their respective quotas are reached.

An extra-inning thriller


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Noon (26) ESPN Golf PGA, Masters Tournament, Round 2, Site: Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. (Live) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, Nationwide Series, Qualifying, Site: Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas (Live) 3 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Softball NCAA, Utah at Oregon State (Live) 4 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Chicago White Sox vs. Cleveland Indians, Site: Progressive Field - Cleveland (Live) 5 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Softball NCAA, Washington at Arizona State (Live) 5:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, O’Reilly Auto Parts 300 (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Texas Rangers vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live) 7:30 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Men’s Volleyball NCAA, USC at UCLA (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Boxing, Friday Night Fights, Ramos vs. Gonzalez - Shelton (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

Today Baseball: Quilcene at Mount Rainier Lutheran, 3:30 p.m.; Chimacum at Sequim, 4 p.m. Softball: Chimacum at Sequim, 4 p.m. Boys Soccer: Forks at Rochester, 6 p.m.; Port Angeles at Sequim, 6:45 p.m.; Klahowya at Port Townsend, 6:45 p.m. Girls Tennis: Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 4 p.m.; Sequim at Kingston, 4 p.m. Lacrosse: Port Angeles-Sequim at Burlington-Edison, 5 p.m.

Saturday Softball: Lake Quinault at Quilcene (doubleheader), 1 p.m. Track and Field: Sequim at Larry Eason Invitational at Snohomish High School, 8 a.m.; Crescent, Forks, Port Angeles, Port Townsend, Clallam Bay, Neah Bay at Crescent Invite, 11 a.m.; Port Angeles at Tacoma Invitational, 11 a.m. Lacrosse: Port Angeles-Sequim at Lynden, 5 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Women’s League Wednesday Peninsula College Women 82, Sequim Lady Wolves 39 Top Scorers: Peninsula College: Jesse Ellis 16, Abby Jones 15; Sequim: Elise Beuke 11, Emma Anderson 10

Baseball

Saturday

Astros 8, Mariners 3 Wednesday’s Game Houston Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi Altuve 2b 5 0 1 0 MSndrs rf 0000 Maxwll cf 5 0 2 0 Bay rf 4000 JCastro c 5 2 1 0 FGtrrz cf 3111 Carter dh 5 2 3 2 KMorls dh 3010 C.Pena 1b 5 2 3 1 Ibanez lf 3010 JMrtnz lf 3 0 1 2 Seager 3b 4000 Barnes lf 1 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 4000 Ankiel rf 4 1 1 2 Ackley 2b 3100 Dmngz 3b 4 0 1 0 Shppch c 3132 MGnzlz ss 3 1 2 1 Ryan ss 4000 Totals 40 815 8 Totals 31 3 6 3 Houston 032 000 210—8 Seattle 001 011 000—3 E—F.Gutierrez (1). DP—Houston 2. LOB— Houston 7, Seattle 6. 2B—J.Castro (2), C.Pena 2 (3), J.Martinez (1), Dominguez (2), Ibanez (2), Shoppach (1). HR—Carter (3), Ankiel (2), Ma.Gonzalez (2), F.Gutierrez (3), Shoppach (1). CS—Maxwell (1). SF—J.Martinez. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Peacock W,1-1 5 4 3 3 1 3 Keuchel H,1 2 0 0 0 2 1 R.Cruz 1 1 0 0 1 0 Veras 1 1 0 0 0 1 Seattle Beavan L,0-1 52⁄3 9 5 4 1 4 Capps 12⁄3 5 3 3 0 2 2⁄3 1 Pryor 0 0 0 1 LaFromboise 1 0 0 0 0 2 Peacock pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. HBP—by Peacock (Ackley). Umpires—Home, Wally Bell; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Manny Gonzalez. T—3:38. A—10,493 (47,476).

American League West Division W L Oakland 7 2 Texas 6 3 Seattle 4 6 Houston 3 6 Los Angeles 2 6 Central Division W L Kansas City 6 3 Detroit 5 4 Chicago 4 4 Minnesota 4 5 Cleveland 3 5 East Division W L Boston 5 3 Baltimore 4 4 New York 4 4 Tampa Bay 4 5 Toronto 3 6

Pct GB .778 — .667 1 .400 3½ .333 4 .250 4½ Pct GB .667 — .556 1 .500 1½ .444 2 .375 2½ Pct GB .625 — .500 1 .500 1 .444 1½ .333 2½

Wednesday’s Games Toronto 8, Detroit 6 Tampa Bay 2, Texas 0 Washington 5, Chicago White Sox 2 N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, ppd., rain Baltimore 8, Boston 5

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OUT

OF THE ROUGH, INTO THE LEAD

Sergio Garcia, of Spain, chips out of a bunker on the second green during the first round of the Masters golf tournament on Thursday in Augusta, Ga. Garcia finished the day with a 6-under par 66, which tied him for first place with Australia’s Marc Leishman.

Kansas City 3, Minnesota 0 Oakland 11, L.A. Angels 5 Houston 8, Seattle 3 Thursday’s Games Detroit 11, Toronto 1 Chicago White Sox at Washington, late. N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, late. Baltimore at Boston, late. Oakland at L.A. Angels, late. Texas at Seattle, late. Today’s Games Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 1-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 0-0) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-0) at Boston (Doubront 0-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-0) at Minnesota (Worley 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 1-0) at Kansas City (Mendoza 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 1-0) at Oakland (Colon 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Houston (B.Norris 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Darvish 2-0) at Seattle (Iwakuma 1-0), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 10:05 a.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 6:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 6:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 10:35 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. Toronto at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 1:10 p.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m.

National League West Division W L San Francisco 7 3 Arizona 6 3 Los Angeles 5 3 Colorado 5 4 San Diego 2 6

Pct GB .700 — .667 ½ .625 1 .556 1½ .250 4

Central Division W L Cincinnati 5 4 St. Louis 5 4 Chicago 3 6 Pittsburgh 3 6 Milwaukee 2 6 East Division W L Atlanta 8 1 Washington 6 2 New York 5 4 Philadelphia 4 5 Miami 1 8

Pct GB .556 — .556 — .333 2 .333 2 .250 2½ Pct GB .889 — .750 1½ .556 3 .444 4 .111 7

Wednesday’s Games St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 0 Arizona 10, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 10, Colorado 0 Washington 5, Chicago White Sox 2 Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 3 Atlanta 8, Miami 0 Milwaukee at Chicago, ppd., rain L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 3 Thursday’s Games San Francisco 7, Chicago Cubs 6 Chicago White Sox at Washington, late. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, late. Today’s Games San Francisco (M.Cain 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 0-0), 11:20 a.m. Atlanta (Teheran 0-0) at Washington (Detwiler 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 0-0) at Pittsburgh (A.Burnett 0-2), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Lannan 0-0) at Miami (Nolasco 0-1), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-0) at Minnesota (Worley 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 0-0) at St. Louis (S.Miller 1-0), 5:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-0) at Arizona (Corbin 1-0), 6:40 p.m. Colorado (Garland 1-0) at San Diego (T.Ross 0-1), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 10:05 a.m. San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 1:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 5:10 p.m. Colorado at San Diego, 5:40 p.m. Sunday’s Games Philadelphia at Miami, 10:10 a.m. Atlanta at Washington, 10:35 a.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m.

N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 11:15 a.m. San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Colorado at San Diego, 1:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 1:10 p.m.

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct y-San Antonio 57 21 .731 x-Memphis 53 25 .679 x-Houston 44 34 .564 Dallas 38 40 .487 New Orleans 27 52 .342 Northwest Division W L Pct x-Oklahoma City 57 21 .731 x-Denver 54 24 .692 Utah 41 38 .519 Portland 33 45 .423 Minnesota 29 49 .372 Pacific Division W L Pct y-L.A. Clippers 52 26 .667 x-Golden State 45 33 .577 L.A. Lakers 42 37 .532 Sacramento 28 50 .359 Phoenix 24 55 .304 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct y-New York 51 26 .662 x-Brooklyn 46 32 .590 x-Boston 40 38 .513 Philadelphia 31 47 .397 Toronto 30 48 .385 Southeast Division W L Pct z-Miami 62 16 .795 x-Atlanta 43 36 .544 Washington 29 50 .367 Orlando 20 59 .253 Charlotte 18 60 .231 Central Division W L Pct y-Indiana 49 29 .628 x-Chicago 42 35 .545 x-Milwaukee 37 41 .474 Detroit 27 52 .342 Cleveland 24 54 .308 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

GB — 4 13 19 30½ GB — 3 16½ 24 28 GB — 7 10½ 24 28½ GB — 5½ 11½ 20½ 21½ GB — 19½ 33½ 42½ 44 GB — 6½ 12 22½ 25

Rivals: Battle between unbeatens CONTINUED FROM B5 Clift, and Rhodefer stole home to tie the game at 4-4 in the sixth Alyssa Wetzler also crossed inning. In the top of the eighth inning, home plate, but was sent back to third base when it was ruled the Dove Lucas singled and stole two ball went pass the outfield fence bases. She scored on an error after swiping third base. and out of play. But Sequim again came back, “She did a great job; came up and had a clutch hit,” Steinman in the bottom of the eighth. “The girls, they never quit. said of Raelyn Lucas. “If that ball stays in and They’ve got a lot of heart, and doesn’t go to the left and by the they always find a way to get it fence or it’s an enclosed park, done. They just do,” McFarlen said. then we score one more on that. “It seems like when they’re “That kind of hurt us that the down, they find a way to just get ball went out of play.” Sequim responded with a pair back up and fight back. “PA’s a good team, though. We of runs in the bottom of the fourth. Bailey Rhodefer tripled to had our hands full.” The wind played a factor in the score Shelby Lott, and Columbia Haupt’s sacrifice fly scored Rho- game, making fly balls difficult to read and catch, and turning hits defer. Grubb scored in the fifth into outs or foul balls, and it probinning on a single by MaryLu ably robbed both teams of home

runs. McFarlen said Zbaraschuk’s eighth-inning hit likely would have cleared the fence on a normal day. “It hit the fence in the air,” McFarlen said. Steinman said it forced the Riders to tweak their strategy. “The wind was not our friend tonight,” he said. “Pop ups that we just couldn’t catch — they were drifting everywhere. And it was the same for both teams. “You try to play a little small ball and stuff, just because the wind, if you get it up in the air, it’s going to be an our or be out of play.” The wind also played a part in the game being a duel between pitchers, Makayla Bentz for Sequim and Sarah Steinman and

Dove Lucas for Port Angeles. Bentz pitched all eight innings and threw 165 pitches. It was her second complete game in 24 hours, as she threw a 105-pitch shutout against North Mason on Tuesday. Sequim plays a nonleague game today when it hosts Chimacum (2-4). The Riders next game is at Olympic (5-2, 5-5) on Monday. Sequim 6, Port Angeles 5 (8 innings) Port Angeles 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 1 — 5 4 4 Sequim 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 —6 7 4 WP- Ma. Bentz; LP- D. Lucas Pitching Statistics Port Angeles: Steinman 5IP, 4H, 3 R, 2 ER, 7BB, 9K; D. Lucas 2 2/3IP, 3H, 3R, 2ER, 2BB, 2K. Sequim: Ma. Bentz 8IP, 5R, ER, 8K, 4H, 7BB. Hitting Statistics Port Angeles: R. Lucas 1-4, 2B, 2RBI, SB; Politika 1-3, R; D. Lucas 2R, 2SB. Sequim: Zbaraschuk 2-3, R, 2 2B; Grubb 2-3, 3B, 2R, RBI, 2BB; Rhodefer 1-2, 3B, 2R, RBI, 3BB.

9:30 a.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Tampa Bay Rays vs. Boston Red Sox, Site: Fenway Park - Boston (Live) 9:30 a.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Colorado Spring Scrimmage (Live) 11 a.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Arizona State Spring Scrimmage (Live) Noon (7) KIRO (8) GBLBC Golf, Masters, Round 3, Site: Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. (Live) Noon (26) ESPN Football NCAA, To Be Announced vs. Texas A&M, Spring Game, Site: Kyle Field - College Station, Texas (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, South Carolina vs. Florida, Global Select vs. Harlem Globetrotters (Live) 1 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Arizona and USC Spring Scrimmage (Live) 1 p.m. (2) CBUT Figure Skating ISU, World Synchro Championships - Boston (Live) 1 p.m. (6) KONG Soccer MLS, New England Revolution vs. Seattle Sounders FC, Site: CenturyLink Field Seattle (Live) 1:30 p.m. (5) KING Horse Racing NTRA, Blue Grass Stakes - Lexington, Ky. (Live) 2 p.m. (26) ESPN Softball NCAA, LSU vs. Texas A&M (Live) 2:55 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MFL, Tijuana vs. Cruz Azul (Live) 3 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Football NCAA, Stanford Spring Scrimmage (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Montréal Canadiens vs. Toronto Maple Leafs, Site: Air Canada Centre Toronto (Live) 4 p.m. (13) KCPQ Auto Racing NASCAR, Texas 500, Sprint Cup Series, Site: Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Hockey NCAA, Frozen Four, Championship - Pittsburgh (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball H.S., Jordan Brand Classic (Live) 6 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Texas Rangers vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Calgary Flames vs. Edmonton Oilers, Site: Rexall Place - Edmonton (Live) 7 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Softball NCAA, Washington at Arizona State (Live)


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

B7

Preps: Redskins shout out Roughriders, 3-0 CONTINUED FROM B5 assisted by Nick Silberman. Arthur scored 2 minutes Michael Konopaski later on a Silberman assist, earned the win as he gave and he scored his final goal up just three earned runs at the 52nd minute unassisted. (five total) in six innings. Daniel Charlton and He fanned seven, walked Michael Shively along with two and gave up six hits. Freshman Curan Brad- Silberman controlled the ley came in the seventh midfield all night for the inning and retired the first Redskins, Port Townsend batter before issuing two coach Steve Shively said. walks. “We had some of our best Sequim’s Nick Johnston passing and possession of gave up just two earned the year early in the first runs in 6 2/3 innings, strik- half, but were unable to ing out eight while walking sustain it in the second three. half,” Port Angeles coach Brady Konopaski then Chris Saari said. came in to strike out the “Port Townsend finished next batter before getting a with pace and accuracy in ground ball for the last out the second half. Credit to and earning the save. them for a well-played Jangula and Ryan Mudd match and some clinical finwere both 2 for 4 with two ishing.” RBI and a run scored each Saari named Doryland while Zack Lovik was 2 for the Riders’ defensive player 4 with an RBI and a run. of the match for his very strong play in the net. Port Angeles 8, Sequim 5 He also picked Jeremy Port Angeles 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 — 8 11 1 Sequim 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 —5 7 2 Choe as offensive player of WP- Michael Konopaski, S-B. Konopaski; LP- Johnmatch and Abinet Hayden ston Pitching Statistics as transition player of the Port Angeles: Michael Konopaski 6IP, 5R, 3ER, match for the Riders. 6H, 7K, 2BB; Bradley 1/3IP, 0H, 0R, 2BB; B. Konopaski 2/3IP, 0R, 0H, 1K, 0BB. Port Townsend improved Sequim: Johnston 6 2/3IP, 8R, 2ER, 10H, 8K, to 4-5-0 in league play while 3BB; Rhodefer 1/3IP, 0R, 1H, 0K, 0BB. Hitting Statistics Port Angeles fell to 1-8-0 in Port Angeles: Jangula 2-4, 2RBI, R; Mudd 2-4, league. 2RBI, R; Lovik 2-4, RBI, R’ B. Konopaski 1-4, 2B, 2RBI. The Redskins won the Sequim: Rhodefer 2-4, Donahue 1-3, 2B, 2RBI; JV game 8-0. Jones 1-4, 2RBI. The Class 1A Redskins next host another 2A OlymBoys Soccer pic League opponent, KlaPort Townsend 3, howya, today with the kickoff at 6:45 p.m. Port Angeles 0 The Riders, meanwhile, PORT ANGELES — Brady Arthur scored two travel to archrival Sequim second-half goals to spark today for a 6:45 p.m. start. the Redskins over the Kingston 2, Roughriders in Olympic League competition at Civic Sequim 0 Field on Wednesday. KINGSTON — Olympic Port Townsend possessed the middle field in League-leading scorer Nick the first half but couldn’t Boles scored the game-wincrack Port Angeles’ net ning goal at 28 minutes for thanks to five outstanding the Buccaneers on Wednessaves by Rider goalkeeper day. Boles, who now has 10 Jack Doryland. The Redskins, however, goals on the season, also unleashed laser shots in assisted on the insurance scoring three goals early in goal, made by Jake Waterthe second half to take con- man in the 53rd minute. Kingston remains in sectrol of the game. Max Meier scored 2 min- ond place at 7-2-0, just utes into the second half, three points (24-21) behind

league-leading North Kitsap (8-1-0). “Kingston played a really nice game against us,” Sequim coach Dave Brasher said. The Bucs played solid defense, paying close attention to Sequim’s top scorer, Mason Barrett. “They didn’t let Mason do too much,” Brasher said. Kingston outshot Sequim 9-2 but the Wolves just missed scoring a goal in the first half on a series of three corner kicks in a row. Brasher named junior defender Hector Baylon the player of the match. “Hector played really well in the back; he was strong for us,” Brasher said. Royhon Agostine also played well for the Wolves, stepping in the back on the right side for Bailey Collins, who was sick, Brasher added. The Wolves have lost to both the Vikings and the Bucs this week on the road in turf stadiums to fall to 5-4-0, in fourth place with 17 points. “We need to get more used to playing on turf,” Brasher said. “We need to get some passing linked together.” The Wolves now host archrival Port Angeles today at 6:45 p.m. “We need to regroup and be ready for Port Angeles,” Brasher said. “We know they will be ready for us. “[Coach] Chris Saari always has them ready to play. It should be a fun game.”

Girls Golf Port Angeles 304, Bremerton 340 PORT ANGELES — Dana Fox of Port Angeles dominated the Olympic League dual match at Peninsula Golf Club on Wednesday. Fox took medalist honors with a 49, six shots better than runner-up and teammate Kate Haworth, who

Run: Trail open to all CONTINUED FROM B5 River to Lake Crescent. Campbell said she is The trail, which is open impressed with the amount to walkers, joggers and of community support she horseback riders, will be has had for the races. “I’m excited,” she said. open to the public during Campbell is leaning the races. toward making the OAT Campbell asks that the Run an annual event but a public use the west end of second run in 2014 isn’t set the 25-mile trail because in stone yet. the races will be on the east “If the community supside. ports it and wants it, we The Olympic Adventure probably will have one next Trail goes from the Elwha year,” she said.

Some runners who were late for signing up for this year’s event are wanting to run next year, Campbell added. Sponsors of the 2013 event include Harbinger Winery, Adventures Through Kayaking, Air Flo Heating Co., Elwha River Casino, Dungeness Line and Sound Bikes and Kayaks and Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau.

scored 55. Other Roughriders who played well were Kylee Jeffers with 64 Taylor Rutz and Chloe Brown, 68 each, and Monica Gasper with 72. Bremerton’s top shooter was Sabrina Powell with 64.

18-hole affair while Barnes was right behind with 77. No one else was closer to first than eight strokes as Alex Atwell of Port Angeles claimed third place with 84. Other Rider golfers who placed were Austin Underwood, fourth at 90, and Michael Needham, fifth at 91. Sequim second Derrick Baker had in 3-way meet Bremerton’s top score of 93 SEQUIM — North Kit- for sixth place. sap took team honors while Kingston’s Aimee Zehrung Girls Tennis earned medalist honors at Port Angeles 5, the Sequim girls golf Seven Olympic 2 Cedars Invitational at Cedars at Dungeness Golf PORT ANGELES — The Course on Wednesday. Roughriders claimed two The Vikings took first singles and three doubles with a team score of 261 matches in winning the while the Wolves were close Olympic League dual match behind with 271 and the with ease Wednesday on a Buccaneers trailed at 294. sunny but windy day. Zehrung shot 7-over on In singles action, Kyrie the front nine in windy con- Reyes blanked Krystal ditions with a low score of Scriben 6-0, 6-0 at No. 2, 44. and Krissy Marvelle outNorth Kitsap took sec- lasted Ally Galeski 6-4, 6-4 ond and third with Karin at No. 3. Muggli the runner-up with The Riders won the top 47 and Maddy San Fellipo three doubles matchs. third at 48. At No. 1, Bradi McFarlin Sequim’s Elisa Salle and and Hannah Little beat Maddy Fisher tied for Max Vanichkol and Adrifourth place along with anne Llmagui 6-3, 6-3. North Kitsap’s Chloe At No. 2, Lydia CornelOhnhaus with scores of 51 son and McKenna Thompeach. son defeated Patrizia Borie Also shooting well for and Jessica Peralta 6-2, 6-1. the Wolves were Caitlin Cornelson and ThompStofferahn with a 54, son were named players of Annika Lawrence with 55 the match for their positive and Brienna Kettel with 60. teamwork on the court. The format was double At No. 3, Emily Basden par pick up with the best and Khaya Elliott beat five scores used for team Mydah Elkedes and CC scores. Zorcell 6-2, 0-6 (7-5). Sequim’s overall record Port Angeles improved is 3-3-1 and its Olympic to 2-2 in league play. League mark is 3-1.

Boys Golf Port Angeles 418, Bremerton 503 PORT ANGELES — Roughrider teammates Garrett Payton and Joe Barnes were in a zone by themselves in the Olympic League meet at Peninsula Golf Club on Wednesday. Payton captured medalist honors with a 76 in the

Chimacum/PT 4, Port Angeles 3 CHIMACUM — Chimacum/Port Townsend dominated doubles, dropping just one match, and one of the singles competition to squeak past the Roughriders in Olympic League action Tuesday. Chimacum won the top two doubles matches as Rachel and Rebecca Ramsey

Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the Puget Sound Anglers will focus on how to fish for halibut in Marine Area 6. Club members will provide demonstrations of equipment and advice on places to fish. The meeting will be Thursday, April 18, at 6:45 p.m. at the Trinity United Methodist Church at 100 S. Blake Ave. in Sequim. For more information, phone 360-582-0836 or visit www.psanop.com.

Videographer speaks

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The Seattle Mariners have acquired right-handed pitcher Aaron Harang from the Colorado Rockies in exchange for right-hander Steven Hensley and cash. The Rockies acquired Harang on April 6 when they traded catcher Ramon Hernandez to the Los Angeles Dodgers. Harang went 10-10 with a 3.61 ERA last season for

the Dodgers. The Rockies never intended to keep Harang, and the Mariners needed another starter after allowing Jon Garland to opt out

SEQUIM — The Wolves remained undefeated on the year with the Olympic League victory Wednesday. Sequim swept the singles to improve to 4-0 in league and 6-0 overall. Winning at singles were Anna Prorok beating Jennifer Hicks 6-2, 6-1 at No. 1; Hillary Smith defeating Bree Abplanalp 6-2, 7-5 at No. 2; and Hannah Gauthun defeating Danielle Bosch 6-1, 6-1 at No. 3. The Wolves also won three of the four doubles matches as Melanie Guan and Karen Chan beat Sarina Tygart and Savannah Orlob 6-0, 6-0 at No. 1; Kortney Oen and Anna Mittman defeated Sateeva Harris and Sarah Flores 6-0, 6-1 at No. 3; and Tenisha Powless and Andrea Tjemsland beating Samantha Stark and Katie Clifford 6-1, 6-0 at No. 4.

of his contract this spring rather than adding him to their roster. The Rockies scooped up Garland and put him in their rotation.

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Fly fishing class Menkal is teaching part one of his fly fishing class this Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., with part two taking place the following Tuesday (April 23), at the same time. Cost for the class is $25. Bring a notepad, pen or pencil and a chair. Class attendance is limited to 12 participants. To reserve a spot or for more formation, phone Menkal at 360-683-1950. The classes are held at Brian’s Sporting Goods and More at 542 W. Washington St. in Sequim.

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Send photos, stories Have a photograph, a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique? Send it to sports@ peninsuladailynews.com or P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.

34756874

Area videographer Tim Stanford will be the speaker at the Second Saturday Series, hosted by the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club, on Saturday at 7 p.m. at Wine on the Waterfront. Stanford created the Home School video series — videos given to friends which recapped the previous years shred and exploited a fun, adventurous action sports lifestyle — from 1996 through 2009. The series is currently on hold, but Stanford continues to make videos for Mervin Manufacturing, the largest U.S.-based snowboard manufacturer. Wine on the Waterfront

Sequim 6, North Mason 1

M’s acquire Harang from Rockies

Horton: Lake Leland slowing CONTINUED FROM B5 +0.1 feet — Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis and Mocrocks. Most anglers, however, are waiting for the deliLeland decline cious spring chinook to make their run on the rivAnglers are still finding ers. success at Lake Leland, “It’s a phenomenal fish, but it has declined signifia great fighting fish,” Goodcantly from what it was a ing said. few weeks ago. “Pretty good on the old It seems many of the barbecue.” Brian Menkal of Brian’s cutthroat that were planted last month have Sporting Goods and More been caught, so the fishing (360-683-1950) in Sequim might slow until the state said a few springers are plants more fish. being seen, but the run “Fishing in Lake Leland hasn’t yet begun. has slowed quite a bit in There have, however, the last week, as the numbeen reports of summerber of those large, good eatrun steelhead showing up ing holdover rainbows and early in the West End rivcutthroats have been ers. thinned dramatically,” Norden said. Shellfish time “Even the cormorants Menkal said many are now sitting on their log, anglers are using this lull waiting for the planting in the action to go after truck. oysters or razor clams. “There are still quite a Here are the razor clam few of those 15- to 17-inch digging dates, morning low trout there, but you will tides and participating have to earn them. Espebeaches: cially since the lake water ■ Today: 8:34 a.m., -0.4 temperature has dropped feet — Twin Harbors, Long two degrees in the last Beach, Copalis and week.” Mocrocks. ■ Saturday: 9:11 a.m., Puget Sound Anglers -0.2 feet — Twin Harbors, With halibut season Long Beach, Copalis and opening May 2, the next Mocrocks. meeting of the North ■ Sunday: 9:49 a.m.,

beat Hannah Little and Bradi McFarlin 6-4, 6-1 at No. 1; Sarah Allen and Rachel Maki defeated Lydia Cornelson and Audra Perrizo 6-1, 6-1 at No. 2; and Olivia Garten and Irina Lyons beat Jessica Zhu and Ashlyn Johnson 6-0, 6-1 at No. 4. Chimacum also won at No. 3 singles as Olivia Baird outlasted McKenna Thompson 6-4, 1-6 (10-5). The Riders, meanwhile, won two singles matches as Callie Peet beat Frances Sheldon-O’Neal 6-2, 6-1 at No. 1, and Krissy Marvelle defeated Justina Sutherland 6-1, 6-1 at No. 2. Port Angeles also won at No. 3 doubles as Khaya Elliott and Emily Basden beat MaryJane Richardson and Abby Robocher 6-3, 4-6 (10-7). Elliott and Basden were chosen as players of the match for the Riders for their doubles win. After losing the second set, the two players battled to win by making key shots in their super tiebreaker.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, April 12-13, 2013 PAGE

B8

Facebook CEO launches political group: Fwd.us Zuckerberg says new policies sorely needed THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other Silicon Valley leaders have launched a political group aimed at revamping immigration policy, boosting education and encouraging investment in scientific research. Zuckerberg announced the formation of Fwd.us (pronounced “forward us�) in an Op-Ed article in The Washington Post late Wednesday. In it, he said the U.S. needs a new approach to these issues if it is to get ahead economically.

Path to citizenship This, he wrote, includes offering immigrants a path to citizenship. “We have a strange immigration policy for a nation of immigrants,� Zuckerberg wrote. “And it’s a policy

Mark Zuckerberg Entering immigration debate unfit for today’s world.� The move comes as a bipartisan Senate group is expected to roll out a comprehensive immigration bill in the coming days. Zuckerberg, whose great-grandparents were immigrants, said he wants “comprehensive immigration reform that begins with effective border security, allows a path to citizenship and lets us attract the most talented and hardest-working people, no matter where they were born.�

He also calls for higher standards and accountability in schools and increased focus on learning about science, technology, engineering and math. Today’s knowledge and ideasbased economy, the 28-year-old Harvard dropout wrote, is very different from the economy of the 20th century that was based on natural resources, industrial machines and labor. Fwd.us, he said, was created to “to build the knowledge economy the United States needs to ensure more jobs, innovation and investment.� Also backing the group are tech leaders such as LinkedIn Corp. CEO Reid Hoffman, venture capitalists John Doerr and Jim Breyer, as well as Ruchi Sanghvi of Dropbox, who was Facebook Inc.’s first female engineer. Joe Green, founder of Causes.com, a social network for community organizing, serves as the group’s president and founder. Major financial contributors include Google Inc. Chairman Eric Schmidt, Netflix Inc. CEO Reed Hastings, Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer, SpaceX and Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk, Zynga Inc. CEO Mark Pincus and former Groupon Inc. CEO Andrew Mason.

Olympic Peninsula papers have a new vice president Sound group gives Maxim added duties PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

POULSBO — Lori Maxim, vice president of West Sound Newspaper Operations for Sound Publishing Inc., will be assuming the additional responsibilities of vice president of the company’s Olympic Peninsula newspapers, the Peninsula Daily News, Forks Forum and Sequim Gazette.

Lori Maxim Working with publishers Maxim’s title will not change, and she remains vice president of Sound newspapers for the San

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Juan Islands, Vashon Island, Whidbey Island and in Kitsap County, as well as 14 Little Nickel publications distributed in Western Washington and Oregon. The change means the publishers of the Olympic Peninsula newspapers now work directly with Maxim rather than the president of the company. Sound Publishing bought the Olympic Peninsula newspapers in 2011. “Sound Publishing’s recent growth has given us a chance to reconsider or reimagine our leadership structure,� Sound Publishing President Gloria Fletcher said in an announcement to staff. “Effective immediately, Lori Maxim will begin to oversee and work with our teams at the Peninsula Daily News, Sequim Gazette and Forks Forum. “Lori has a wealth of experience given her tenure with Sound Publishing/ Black Press. “In her almost 25 years with the company, she has worked with a multitude of paid and free products of every shape and size. “The Olympic Peninsula news products are certain to enjoy her leadership and many talents.� Maxim has more than 30 years of newspaper experi-

ence. She joined Sound Publishing in July 1988. Maxim holds a bachelor’s degree in business and marketing from Seattle University. She serves on the board of directors for the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association and the Olympic College Foundation. She is also a past board member of United Way of Kitsap County.

Based in Poulsbo Maxim and her husband, Glen, live in Poulsbo. Founded in 1987, Sound Publishing (www.sound publishing.com) is the largest community news organization in Washington state, with more than 40 publications in 86 communities and almost 800,000 circulation. Circulation, distribution, printing and online readership are audited to provide an accurate picture of each publication’s market penetration and reach. Besides delivering news in print and digital formats, Sound Publishing’s services include commercial printing, classified advertising, print display advertising, digital display advertising, mobile advertising, preprints, print and deliver, poly bags and legal notices.

$ Briefly . . . Oral surgeon announces her retirement

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

SEQUIM — Oral and maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Denise E. Clarke officially retired at the end of March. Clarke operated a practice with offices in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Clarke Townsend for 20 years. In December 2012, Clarke sold her practice to Dr. Alan L. Peet, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon in Sequim. Since then, Clarke has been helping Peet with the transition of ownership by continuing to serve patients in the Port Angeles office. Clarke said she is most appreciative of the trust, support and friendship she has received during her years of living and working on the North Olympic Peninsula. Clarke added that she is looking forward to retirement and the free time that will allow her to pursue her “many and varied interests.�

from 2002-03, and approximately 92,000 Odyssey vehicles from 2002. Nissan Motor Co. recalled 480,000 vehicles globally, but was still determining how many in North America. The models recalled in Japan include the Cube and Maxima, both sold in the U.S. General Motors Co. said it would recall about 55,000 Pontiac Vibes from the 2003 model year sold in the U.S. and Canada. Massive recall Mazda Motor Corp. DETROIT — A faulty said it recalled 20,000 airbag part that can vehicles, but less than 200 explode and send shrapin the U.S. The affected nel into the passenger cars include the Mazda6 cabin is responsible for and RX-8. the global recall of more Ford Motor Co. said than 3 million cars manu- it was looking into the factured by Honda, Nisissue to see if it would san, Toyota and General have to recall any vehicles. Motors and will likely Chrysler Group said lead to more recalls. it was not affected by the The front passenger air Takata airbag issue. bags all were made by the Toyota has recalled same parts supplier, more than 10 million cars Japan’s Takata Corp. in recent years to fix a They have faulty infla- variety of problems and tor mechanisms that don’t was fined by U.S. regularoute gas into the air tors for not making the bags. Instead, the highmoves rapidly enough. pressure gas can launch Since then, automakers plastic and metal parts have been very quick from the air bags into the about recalling cars. cars’ passenger areas. “They don’t want to be Takata says no one has caught dragging their feet been hurt, but there have like Toyota,� said Michelle been six incidents of the Krebs, an analyst with air bags deploying auto information company improperly on roadways. Edmunds.com. All of the recalled cars “This is an important announced so far were issue, consumers should produced from 2000 to get the repair made.� 2004. Toyota Motor Corp. Gold and silver recalled 1.7 million vehiGold futures for cles, including about June delivery rose $6.10, 510,000 in the U.S., including Corolla, Matrix, or 0.4 percent, to settle at $1,564.90 an ounce on Sequoia, Tundra and Thursday. Lexus SC 430 models. Silver for May delivHonda will recall 1.1 million vehicles, including ery tacked on 4 cents, or 0.2 percent, to end at 426,000 Civic vehicles $27.70 an ounce. from the 2001-03 model Peninsula Daily News years, approximately 43,000 CR-V vehicles and The Associated Press

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Sequim Doce Pares/ Sequim Martial Arts 452 Riverview Dr., Sequim (off of McComb Rd.) Mon. & Thurs. 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. Traditional Filipino martial art of Eskrima stickďŹ ghting. Students learn single stick, double stick, stick and blade techniques, forms, disarms, joint locks and control methods. Rank promotion encouraged but not required. Smart, safe training in a really nice studio. $60 per month. Contact Kathrin Sumpter at 360-6834799. Visit us at www. sequimmartialarts.com.

Advertise in Classes & Lessons Only $20 per week for up to 75 words. 25¢ each additional word. Also listed online at peninsuladailynews. com. Submit by calling Margot at 360-4528435 or 1-800826-7714 or email her at mconway@ peninsuladailynews. com. You may also come to our ofďŹ ce at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday publication.

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Cabled Fiber Studio Come to Cabled Fiber Studio for a 2 hour class on adding color to a skein of ďŹ ngering weight yarn suitable for a small shawl or scarf. Cost: $15.00, which includes yarn and the cost of dye. Cabled will provide protective aprons and inspiration. Visit Cabled Fiber Studio at www.cabledďŹ berstudio.com or stop the store at 106 N. Laurel St. in Port Angles. The store can be reached at 360-504-2233 or info@ cabledďŹ berstudio.com.

STICKFIGHTING CLASSES


FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

B9

Briefly . . . Discussion on Islam set for April 20 PORT HADLOCK — Guest speaker the Rev. Darryn Hewson will discuss Islam at Community United Methodist Church, 130 Church Lane, at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 20. Hewson’s talk will focus on understanding the traditions and culture of Islam while exploring the Palestinian side of the the Middle East conflict. He has a doctorate in ecumenical and interfaith dialog and a post-doctoral certificate in Muslim Christian studies. Hewson describes his calling in life as “to build bridges across the things that divide us, doorways through the barriers that separate us and windows into the knowledge that can erase the ignorance of hate and fear between us.� The setting will be informal, and a question-andanswer session will follow the talk.

Struggle for the Land Called Holy.� For information, phone the church at 360-6835367.

Unity service PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will present “Moon Dance� at Unity in the Olympics’ 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship service. A membership ceremony will be held during worship. Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. A Course in Miracles group will meet at the church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., at noon Wednesday. On Sunday, April 21, the 10:30 a.m. service will be an Earth Day celebration. A nonviolent communication workshop will be held following fellowship time. Events are open to the public. For more information, phone 360-457-3981.

Special guest set

PORT ANGELES — Speaker, author and radio host Eric Barger will speak Trinity hosts film at two Sunday services at SEQUIM — “Five BroFirst Church of God, 505 S. ken Cameras,� an OscarRace St. nominated documentary At 11 a.m., Barger will about Israeli-Palestinian discuss whether the Bible strife in one community, and Quran harmonize, will be shown at 7 p.m. whether Allah is actually Wednesday at Trinity Jehovah and the differUnited Methodist Church, ences that separate Chris100 S. Blake Ave. tianity from Islam. The film shows the During the evening serresults of a Palestinian vice at 6 p.m., Barger will farmer’s purchase in 2005 present “The Errors of the of a camcorder to record Emergent Church.� the life of his infant son. This presentation conAt about the same time, cerns the redefinition of the Israeli army began Christianity and how it is claiming land for a new designed to reach the “postsettlement, and local resimodern� generation. dents began nonviolent Barger will question protests. whether the redefinition The movie’s title alludes passes the “Biblical Test.� to cameras broken during Barger has presented the filming of the documen- his “Take a Stand! Ministary. tries from Coast to Coast Trinity’s Ken Burres is Since 1984.� presenting the movie as a For more information, supplement to a class he phone 360-797-4868. taught recently, “The Peninsula Daily News

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANOTHER

PLACE TO RECYCLE

Jake Allen, James Kauffman, Tyler Larrabee and First Baptist Church Youth Pastor Chris Cummings, from left, unload recycled paper from the new paper bin in the Swain’s General Store parking lot, Second and Eunice streets, Port Angeles. The bin will serve the east side of Port Angeles, along with bins at Safeway, 110 E. Third St., and First Baptist, 105 W. Sixth St. The church’s Barefoot Student Ministries youths will be maintaining the bins under the leadership of Cummings, who uses his truck to deliver recycled paper to the Port Angeles Nippon Paper Industries USA mill about every two weeks.

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

360.452.2351 www.queenofangelsparish.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076 www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m.

“Getting to work�

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John WingďŹ eld

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The GSN television network is looking to build on the success of “The American Bible Challenge,� hosted by comedian Jeff Foxworthy, with “It Takes a Church.�

Church-based dating show in network’s plans THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The GSN television network is looking to build on the success of “The American Bible Challenge� with a churchbased dating show. “The American Bible Challenge,� which just began its second season, is a runaway hit for the game show-focused cable network. Jeff Foxworthy is host of the show, which quizzes contestants on their biblical knowledge. The show gets more than

twice the viewers than anything else on the network. GSN is developing “It Takes a Church,� where church parishioners compete to find a love interest for a single member of the congregation. GSN programming chief Amy Introcase-Davis said Tuesday that no air date has been set for the new show. Gospel superstar Kirk Franklin recently joined “The American Bible Challenge� as its musical director.

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST & Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church ofďŹ ce@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

FAITH BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 74(34s0ORT!NGELES 360-452-4551 A ministry of Faith Baptist Church of Sequim (GARBC) SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race 0/"OXs  Pastor Neil Castle

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline�

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 Pastor Neil Allen

301 E. Lopez Ave., PA 452-2323 Pastor Richard Grinstad Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. SUNDAY Nursery Provided Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. most Sundays www.htlcpa.com

.3EQUIM!VEs  www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

"IBLECENTEREDs&AMILYFRIENDLY

34569893

peninsuladailynews.com

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH

Joseph Bednarik Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. April 14, 10:30 a.m.


B10

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Navy, Jefferson fire districts Events: Hike hold live training exercises CONTINUED FROM B4

Port Ludlow

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT HADLOCK — Navy Region Northwest Fire and Emergency Services recently hosted a joint live fire training on Naval Magazine Indian Island with firefighters from Port Ludlow Fire and Rescue, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue and Jefferson County Fire District No. 2’s Quilcene Volunteer Fire Department. The Fireblast live fire simulator allows firefighters to experience real-life scenarios in a controlled environment and has multiple room setups.

Live fire simulator East Jefferson Fire-Rescue Deputy Chief of Training and Operations Ted Krysinski said joint training held using the Navy’s mobile live fire simulator allows Jefferson County to have access to live fire training on a regular basis. “It is literally in our backyard,” he said. “For Jefferson County, to gain the same live fire experience, we have to travel to either Bremerton or North Bend [Ore.].”

During the training, firefighters from different units worked to foster good working relationships. “We work together in this operations capacity so we become familiar with each other’s strengths and weaknesses,” said Eric Wentworth, assistant chief of operations, Battalion 2.

A new Ludlow art party

‘Critical relations’ “We are able to build these critical relations, which will help us aid each other should a situation arise where we need to work jointly together.” Krysinski said various fire departments within Jefferson County train together at least once a quarter. According to Krysinski, this continuous training improves basic muscle memory skills, strengthens teamwork and reduces the potential for injuries on the job. “The better we know each other, the better we function as a focused and organized work group,” he said.

CHRIS BROWN/U.S. NAVY

Justin Fletcher, an East Jefferson Fire-Rescue firefighter, exits a training room in which he worked with firefighters from Navy Region Northwest Fire and Emergency Services in a joint training exercise at Naval Magazine Indian Island.

Briefly . . . driven vessel, power or sail. Topics range from safety issues for sail and power boats, navigational rules and seamanship. This is a nonprofit class, with students paying only the cost of the text. A discount will be available for additional family members. To register or for more information, phone Bob Monica at 360-385-2634.

The workshop at Dungeness Recreation Area involves a 2-mile hike through the county park. More than 25 native trees and shrubs will be described, along with their PORT TOWNSEND — cultural requirements, aesAn eight-hour boating seathetic attributes and envimanship and safety course ronmental and wildlife will be offered by the Point habitat benefits. Wilson Sail & Power Tips on how to incorpoSquadron on Friday and rate native plants into a Saturday, April 19-20. landscape also will be preA four-hour session will Native plant events sented. run from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The workshop at Robin SEQUIM — Clallam April 19, with the second Hill Farm Park will be much Conservation District is half following from 9 a.m. shorter and focus on coniferoffering two free field to 1:30 p.m. April 20. ous forest communities. workshops on landscaping Each session will be Conservation district held at the Northwest Mar- with native plants. manager Joe Holtrop will The workshops will be itime Center, 431 Water St. lead the workshops. Friday, April 19, at the This is an approved Holtrop, who holds Dungeness Recreation course for qualifying for bachelor’s and master’s the Washington State Boat- Area and Friday, April 26, degrees in landscape archiat Robin Hill Farm Park. er’s Education Card, mantecture, has conducted Both workshops begin datory effective this past these popular workshops Jan. 1 for boaters 50 years at 1 p.m. since 1990. of age and younger who Due to space limitations, To register or for more operate a 15-horsepowerpreregistration is required. information, phone the

Seamanship, boat safety class slated

Clallam Conservation District at 360-452-1912, ext. 5.

Volunteer training PORT ANGELES — Olympic Coast Discovery Center volunteer training will begin Wednesday, April 24, at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary office, Suite 206, at The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave. Trainings will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Wednesday through May 29. These volunteer positions are available to those who love the ocean, meeting new people and learning new things. For more information or to register, phone Hannah Robbins at 360-457-6622, ext. 34, or email hannah. robbins@noaa.gov. Peninsula Daily News

July 19, 1926 April 3, 2013 Jack Hendrickson was born in Oak Park, Illinois, on July 19, 1926. He was the second son and fourth child of Charles Hendrickson and Mary Anna (Williams) Hendrickson. He was the youngest of four children, with sisters Eleanor and Margaret, and brother Robert. After graduating from Hinsdale High School in 1944, he joined the U.S. Navy, serving aboard the light cruiser Vicksburg till 1946. Waiting to enter Lawrence College, Jack worked as a logger (chokerman) in Pacific County, Washington. During the 1947-1948 school year at Lawrence in Appleton, Wisconsin, Jack was continually reminded of the Western Washington forest. He entered the University of Washington College of Forestry in the fall of 1948. Following graduation in 1952, he served as a logging engineer and forester for Weyerhaeuser, West Tacoma Newsprint and Rayonier as Northwest timber chief forester before becoming a consultant in 1978. As a con-

Mr. Hendrickson sultant, his clients included Olympic National Park, Crown Zellerbach, Rayonier, and Merrill & Ring, Japanese log exporters, private loggers and timber land owners. He participated in the founding of Green Crow Timber Company. Jack was an active member of forest management organizations, including the Society of American Foresters, Washington Forest Protection Association, Western Forestry Association and North Olympic Timber Action Council. Jack enjoyed fishing, boating and watching the UW Huskies play! Jack and Carla Cummins were married in 1950. They had two children, Eric Hendrickson of

Seattle and Lynn Hendrickson (Florence) of Washington, New Hampshire. They divorced in 1971. Jack and Loris Watson Roberts were married in November of 1972. When Jack became a consultant, Loris became a fulltime partner in the business. She took care of the office, including business contacts and records, and at times participated in field work. They also traveled extensively in the U.S. and in the world, going to Africa four times. They hiked extensively in the Olympics — just for fun. Jack was a member of First Presbyterian Church, Kiwanis-Juan de Fuca and Veterans of Foreign Wars. He is survived by his three stepsons, eight stepgrandchildren and one stepgreat-grandchild. Jack always did the right thing — even when no one was looking! In lieu of flowers, plant a tree for Jack. A graveside inurnment will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, April 15, at Mount Angeles Memorial Park, 45 South Monroe Road, Port Angeles. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 20, at First Presbyterian Church, 139 West Eighth Street, Port Angeles.

Visit rhody garden PORT LUDLOW — Chimacum Woods’ rhododendron nursery will hold open garden days from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The public is invited to wander the 6-acre woodland rhody garden or take a tour, enjoy light refreshments with like-minded gardeners and ask owners rhody questions. The garden is located at 2722 Thorndyke Road. For more information, including directions, visit www.chimacumwoods.com or phone 206-383-2713 or 360-437-2713.

Duckabush hike slated

QUILCENE — The Olympic chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society will host the Duckabush River Trail hike today. The walk is free and open to the public. Participants will meet at 9 a.m. at the Hood Canal Ranger Station, 295142 U.S. Highway 101. The group will walk about 3 miles along the trail, which gradually climbs over Little Hump with a gain of about 700 feet, then on to Big Hump in another mile. The Duckabush River Trail is one of the best early season botany walks in the Olympic Mountain foothills, the group said in a statement. Participants can see fawn lilies and chocolate lilies, among other flowers, the group said. Attendees should bring lunch, a hand lens and field guides, and be prepared for any type of weather. For more information, phone Fred Weinmann at 360-379-0986 or email fweinmann@cablespeed. com.

Chimacum Viking site lecture CHIMACUM — The public is invited to hear Randy Washburne tell of his trip to L’Anse aux Meadows, a Viking archaeological site in Newfoundland, Canada, during a lecture at 1 p.m. Sunday. The free lecture, sponsored by Thea Foss No. 45 Daughters of Norway, will be at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road. Refreshments will be offered. L’Anse aux Meadows on the northernmost tip of Newfoundland consists of three Norse buildings that are the earliest known European settlement in the New World. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1978. For more information about the talk, phone 360379-1802.

Death Notices

Death and Memorial Notice JOHN PAUL ‘JACK’ HENDRICKSON

PORT LUDLOW — The Port Ludlow Artists’ League will host its annual Art Gala, formerly known as the Scholarship Auction, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. The gala will be at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place. Admission will be $5 per person. It includes appetizers and a glass of wine. At the party, guests can bid on art by members of the league and support local students pursuing college majors or minors in the arts, be they visual, musical or theatrical. Over the past seven years, the Port Ludlow Artists’ League event has raised more than $15,000 for scholarships. New this year will be a silent auction to end at 6:45 p.m.; a “Buy it Now” sale of small items such as cards, bookmarks and jewelry at a stated price; a “Price as Marked” section with larger pieces at fixed prices; and the “Quick Draw,” in which artists Kathy Constantine, Gary Griswold and Bob Jamison will create art on the spot, with their paintings immediately going up for bid. Tickets are on sale at the League’s Gallery next door to the Columbia Bank, 9500 Oak Bay Road. On the night of the gala, they will be available at the door. For more information and pictures of some of the art to be in the auction, visit www.PortLudlowArt.org.

Quilcene

2358 W. U.S. Highway 101, at 6 p.m. Friday, April 19. Drennan-Ford Funeral Dec. 28, 1943 — April 9, 2013 Home, Port Angeles, is in Joseph Edward Chais- charge of arrangements. son Jr. died at his Port www.drennanford.com Angeles home. He was 69. His obituary will be pub- LoRayne Ann Cole lished later. Services: A gathering of March 24, 1932 — April 7, 2013 family and friends will be Sequim resident held at Harbinger Winery, LoRayne Ann Cole died of

Joseph Edward Chaisson Jr.

respiratory failure at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. She was 81. Services: Memorial service at 2 p.m. Friday, April 19, at Faith Lutheran Church, 382 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is avail-

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able at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further details, call 360-417-3527.

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Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I’m a 50-year-old man who is serving time for robbery in West Virginia. Every day, I wake up acting as if I am in control and don’t have a care in the world. The truth is, I’m scared, lonely and feel totally helpless. All my life, I have lived on the dark side of the street, taking for granted the values in life and the love so many people tried to give me. Two failed marriages and several relationships with good women are over because of my determination to follow an unhealthy dream, not to mention all the friends I have lost. Now, as I look around me, there’s no one there. No one to love and no one to love me. I never knew until now that chasing that dream would cost me everyone I ever loved. I know I have made bad choices in life. I deserve the time for the crime I committed. But am I also sentenced to a world of loneliness? Can I ever be loved again and be happy after all the wrong I have done? Is there someone out there who would be willing to give me a chance? Is it too late to start over? Abby, you have so many answers for so many people, I am just hoping you have an answer for me. Serving Time

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

Abigail Van Buren

throughout his entire 22-year military career. When my daughter mentioned it to his wife, she got angry. C. in Texas Dear C.: Your former husband’s wife was entitled to whatever property was left after

his demise. The flag is hers to bestow — or not. I don’t know how your daughter’s request was phrased, but the woman may have been offended by the way the question was asked. I can’t think of any other reason she would become angry. Dear Abby: I am writing regarding a letter you printed from “Wants to Be Polite.” I appreciate the person’s sentiments because I, too, want to use good manners, and a “You’re welcome” or “Have a nice day” is a pleasing reply to hear. What I do not like is a “No problem” reply to a “Thank you.” It does not seem like a sincere response to me. In fact, it sounds like I was expected to be a problem and just happened not to be one. Any thoughts on this? Arkansas Lady

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll be impulsive disclosing how you feel. Once you head down that path, ride out the storm until you reach a place that permits you to reorganize and start over. Letting go of something that isn’t working will liberate you. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t let the little things get you down. Strive for personal perfection and being pleased with your accomplishments instead of trying to be or do what someone else wants. Love who you are; hone your skills and talents to serve your needs. 2 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Stick to the truth. As soon as you exaggerate or color your story, you will be criticized. Socializing with friends or doing something special with someone you love will lead to happiness and a positive attitude. Embrace a challenge. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Refrain from sharing your secrets or giving in to peer pressure. Put your time and effort into learning something that will help you advance. Delays due to poor organization or last-minute changes can be expected. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Spend time clearing up your personal papers and accounts. Letting someone else handle your affairs is questionable. Research alternatives that will help bring you more cash. Investing in you and your talents will pay off. 5 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Risks will not pay off. Stick close to home and engage in family fun or fixing up your place. Put comfort and relaxation at the top of your list. Being responsible is fine, but you also have to know when to take a break. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Expand your interests but don’t overpay to do so. If you research what you want to accomplish, you will find ways to cut corners and stay within your budget. A personal relationship will flourish if you are receptive and willing. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Relationships must be nurtured. Hear what others have to say before you make a judgment call that will leave you in a vulnerable position. It’s best not to voice your opinion before having all the facts. Don’t let love cloud your vision. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t confuse love with friendship. You have to be clear about what someone wants or expects from you before you make a promise. Do whatever it takes to resolve some uncertainty at home. Redistribution of chores and responsibilities will help. 4 stars

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Dear Serving Time: It is never too late to start over. With penitence comes redemption. If you are willing to journey down a different path, the relationships you form along the way will be rewarding, long-lasting and mutual. Because of your criminal record, Dear Arkansas Lady: You may you may have to work harder to gain trust, but I promise you that if you’re not like hearing it, but you had better get used to it. willing to work at it, it can be done. While “You’re welcome” may be Dear Abby: My ex-husband, the more gracious, saying “No problem” father of our two children, was reflects a generational shift in the retired from the Air Force. He passed vernacular. away 18 years ago. And while it may seem jarring, it He had a full military funeral, is intended to be a polite response, so with draped flag and all. His wife at accept it graciously. the time was presented with the flag, _________ which was proper. They had no chilDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, dren. also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was When she passes on, would it be founded by her mother, the late Pauline Philproper for her family to give the flag lips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. to his biological children? After all, Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via they were with him — as was I — email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Jim Davis

B11

Lonely inmate muses on future

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put more time into your home and use your imagination to utilize your space to better suit your needs. Don’t worry about a last-minute change someone makes. As long as you don’t fold under pressure, you will win in the end. 3 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rethink your strategy. You can pick up valuable information if you attend a class or seminar that helps you advance. A change in the friends you hang out with or the interests you engage in will bring about positive results. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Avoid anyone putting pressure on you or asking for cash. You must be intent on following through with plans that will help you expand your interests and services. Charity begins at home. Take care of your needs first. 4 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 Neah Bay 46/38

ellingham elli e llin n 53/42

Olympic Peninsula TODAY Y RAIN

RA

Forks 49/38

N Port R A I To Townsend T o 50/42

Port Angeles 49/39

Olympics Snow level: 2,500 ft.

➥

Sequim 50/40

Port Ludlow 51/41

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

IN

Yesterday

National forecast Nation TODAY

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 57 42 0.02 5.49 Forks 54 43 0.07 42.23 Seattle 59 46 0.06 11.54 Sequim 54 41 0.00 3.36 Hoquiam 51 44 0.06 25.87 Victoria 60 46 0.39 10.71 Port Townsend 56 39 0.01* 7.10

Forecast highs for Friday, April 12

Sunny

Billings 52° | 32°

San Francisco 68° | 50°

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Minneapolis 43° | 25°

Denver 52° | 30°

Chicago 45° | 37°

➥

Aberdeen 51/40

Last

New

First

Atlanta 72° | 52°

El Paso 81° | 48° Houston 77° | 48°

Full

Miami 86° | 73°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

Fronts Cold

TONIGHT

Low 39 Rainy night ahead

SATURDAY

51/37 Showers likely

Marine Weather

MONDAY

50/38 Mostly cloudy; shower chances

51/38 Partly sunny; chance of showers

SUNDAY

52/39 Mostly cloudy

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Chance of rain. Tonight, W wind 5 to 15 kt...becoming variable. Wind waves 2 ft or less.

CANADA

Seattle 52° | 43°

Spokane 54° | 32°

Tacoma 54° | 39°

Olympia 54° | 34°

Yakima 57° | 30° Astoria 52° | 37°

ORE.

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:01 a.m. 8.8’ 8:43 a.m. -0.4’ 2:58 p.m. 7.5’ 8:40 p.m. 2.3’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:34 a.m. 8.6’ 9:20 a.m. -0.2’ 3:38 p.m. 7.2’ 9:16 p.m. 2.8’

Port Angeles

3:54 a.m. 6.5’ 10:46 a.m. -0.1’ 6:06 p.m. 6.6’ 11:16 p.m. 4.7’

4:23 a.m. 6.3’ 11:23 a.m. -0.2’ 6:53 p.m. 6.6’

Port Townsend

5:31 a.m. 8.0’ 11:59 a.m. -0.1’ 7:43 p.m. 8.2’

6:00 a.m. 7.8’ 12:29 a.m. 5.2’ 8:30 p.m. 8.1’ 12:36 a.m. -0.2’

Dungeness Bay*

4:37 a.m. 7.2’ 11:21 a.m. -0.1’ 6:49 p.m. 7.4’ 11:51 p.m. 4.7’

5:06 a.m. 7.0’ 11:58 a.m. -0.2’ 7:36 p.m. 7.3’

LaPush

May 2

May 9

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Apr 18 Apr 25

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

8:00 p.m. 6:27 a.m. 7:33 a.m. 10:48 p.m.

-10s

-0s

Burlington, Vt. 52 Casper 26 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 82 Albany, N.Y. 39 .37 Rain Charleston, W.Va. 88 Albuquerque 31 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 84 23 Amarillo 21 PCldy Cheyenne 41 Anchorage 8 .01 Cldy Chicago 83 Asheville 57 Rain Cincinnati 67 Atlanta 60 Rain Cleveland Atlantic City 54 .03 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 87 Austin 46 .15 PCldy Columbus, Ohio 82 60 Baltimore 59 Cldy Concord, N.H. Billings 34 Clr Dallas-Ft Worth 48 82 Birmingham 65 Rain Dayton 23 Bismarck 26 Cldy Denver 43 Boise 38 Clr Des Moines 46 Boston 44 .17 Cldy Detroit 36 Brownsville 54 .01 Cldy Duluth El Paso 67 Buffalo 34 .75 Rain Evansville 84 Fairbanks 14 SUNDAY Fargo 35 Flagstaff 49 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Grand Rapids 42 60 3:07 a.m. 8.4’ 9:58 a.m. 0.1’ Great Falls 4:21 p.m. 7.0’ 9:53 p.m. 3.2’ Greensboro, N.C. 85 Hartford Spgfld 67 Helena 57 4:56 a.m. 6.1’ 12:06 a.m. 5.0’ Honolulu 85 7:42 p.m. 6.5’ 12:03 p.m. 0.0’ Houston 83 Indianapolis 82 Jackson, Miss. 84 6:33 a.m. 7.5’ 1:19 a.m. 5.6’ Jacksonville 76 9:19 p.m. 8.0’ 1:16 p.m. 0.0’ Juneau 40 Kansas City 43 5:39 a.m. 6.8’ 12:41 a.m. 5.0’ Key West 84 8:25 a.m. 7.2’ 12:38 p.m. 0.0’ Las Vegas 74 Little Rock 81

Nation/World

Victoria 52° | 39°

Ocean: Light wind... becoming S 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Rain developing. Tonight, S wind rising to 15 to 25 kt...then becoming W.

Tides

SUNDAY

New York 63° | 43°

Detroit 48° | 34°

Washington D.C. 79° | 57°

Los Angeles 70° | 54°

Almanac

Brinnon 50/41

Cloudy

Seattle 52° | 43°

*Reading taken in Nordland

âœźâœź âœź

Pt. Cloudy

Hi 59 48 47 23 83 83 89 59 91 48 87 38 65 54 93 46

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

The Lower 48:

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

32 .03 Cldy Los Angeles 18 .01 Cldy Louisville 62 Cldy Lubbock 59 Rain Memphis 58 Cldy Miami Beach 8 Clr Midland-Odessa 38 .98 Rain Milwaukee 61 .15 Rain Mpls-St Paul 40 1.49 Rain Nashville 63 Cldy New Orleans 59 .22 Rain New York City 43 .39 Cldy Norfolk, Va. 40 .13 PCldy North Platte 54 .30 Rain Oklahoma City 15 Cldy Omaha 39 .48 Cldy Orlando 39 1.24 Rain Pendleton 29 Snow Philadelphia 42 Clr Phoenix 64 .74 Rain Pittsburgh -20 Cldy Portland, Maine 33 Snow Portland, Ore. 28 PCldy Providence 36 .94 Rain Raleigh-Durham 37 Cldy Rapid City 60 Cldy Reno 47 .09 Cldy Richmond 40 Cldy Sacramento 72 PCldy St Louis 45 .70 Rain St Petersburg 58 .67 Rain Salt Lake City 70 .01 Rain San Antonio 66 Rain San Diego 30 .11 Snow San Francisco 34 .53 Cldy San Juan, P.R. 78 PCldy Santa Fe 54 Cldy St Ste Marie 44 .79 Cldy Shreveport

80 86 52 84 84 59 37 40 86 83 74 89 26 39 38 88 68 89 76 81 55 59 67 85 25 77 91 86 82 88 54 71 72 80 87 48 42 78

■ 96 at Port Isabel, Texas, and Baltimore Inner Harbor, Md. ■ -3 at Lusk, Wyo. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

57 PCldy Sioux Falls 30 29 .55 Snow 64 .51 Rain Syracuse 52 39 .53 Rain 29 .04 Clr Tampa 87 73 Cldy 54 2.20 Rain Topeka 40 34 .19 Cldy 76 Cldy Tucson 69 48 Clr 39 Clr Tulsa 40 34 .47 PCldy 35 .87 Rain Washington, D.C. 91 63 Cldy 31 .39 Snow Wichita 33 28 .20 Clr 70 Rain Wilkes-Barre 76 46 .51 Cldy 74 Rain Wilmington, Del. 90 57 .06 Cldy 53 .49 Rain ________ 63 PCldy 19 .02 Cldy Hi Lo Otlk 29 .54 PCldy 73 56 PCldy 32 .18 Rain Auckland 87 65 PCldy 70 Cldy Baghdad 72 40 PCldy/Wind 39 .02 Cldy Beijing Berlin 54 43 Rain 60 .14 Cldy 54 45 Ts 56 Clr Brussels 80 58 Clr 56 .87 Rain Cairo 43 29 Cldy 44 .27 Cldy Calgary 88 47 Clr 41 .14 Cldy Guadalajara Hong Kong 75 67 Clr 45 .32 Cldy 69 48 Clr 62 PCldy Jerusalem 68 51 Clr 11 .10 Cldy Johannesburg 70 52 PCldy 46 .19 PCldy Kabul 52 38 Ts 63 PCldy London 85 53 PCldy 52 Clr Mexico City 34 35 Snow 49 .95 Cldy Montreal 44 27 PCldy 73 Cldy Moscow 99 73 Clr 42 .14 Rain New Delhi 57 43 Sh 48 .13 Clr Paris PCldy 57 PCldy Rio de Janeiro 89 73 66 53 PCldy 49 Cldy Rome 75 60 Clr 76 .05 PCldy Sydney Tokyo 63 51 Clr 21 PCldy 41 36 Rain 25 Cldy Toronto 42 2.20 Cldy Vancouver 47 41 Sh

Lease a

2013 Subaru 2.0i Premium MODEL CODE: DJD OPTION PACKAGE: 02

KOENIG Subaru Since 1975

3501 HWY 101, E., PORT ANGELES

s

171

$

82 per mo.*

UP TO

27/36 MPG (city/hwy)^

34754982

IMPREZA

For only

www.koenigsubaru.com 36 month lease, cap cost (Selling price) $19,670 less $350.00 lease rebate. Amount due at lease signing: $1 $1,999.00 999 99 00 cashh or trade t d equity it ddown plus l fifirstt payment and license. $0 Security Deposit required. Includes 10,000 miles per year. 15¢ per mile over. Lease end value $12,723.35. *Payment of $171.82 is plus tax. A documentary service fee in an amount up to $150 may be added to sale price or the capitalized cost of a vehicle. ^EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. Ad expires 4/30/13.

34754840


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 C1

REDESIGNED INSIDE AND OUT NEW

2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER

0%

You Can Count On Us!

SL

2013 NISSAN ALTIMA

NEW

0%*

*

97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles t

WILDER

Check us out online at:

NISSAN

www.wildernissan.com

NEW 2013

PRIUS

"136QUP.POUITGPSR "136QUP.POUITGPSRVBMJĂŞFECVZFST0O"QQSPWBMPG$SFEJU/FHPUJBCMFEFBMFSEPDVNFOUBSZGFFPGVQUP4FF%FBMFSGPSEFUBJMT1IPUPTGPSJMMVTUSBUJPOQVSQPTFTPOMZ0GGFSFYQJSFT

36 MONTH LEASE

Two

279

GO GOOD OOD AV AVAILABILITY VAILA IILABILI LABIL ILITY TO CHOOSE FROM!

$

MO.*

TOYOTA You Can Count On Us!

95 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles t Check us out online at

*36 month lease for $279.00 per month. $3,000.00 cash and/or trade due at lease signing, plus tax, license and $150.00 negotiable documentary fee. Security deposit waived. Tfs tier 1+ customers on approval of credit. Residual value is $15,488.00. Photo for illustration purposes only. Offer expires 4/30/13.

COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR COMPLETE PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA.

WILDER

www.wildertoyota.com

Value only comes in one size at Honda, BIG.

CIVIC SEDAN DA DAN AN WILDER Honda You Can Count On Us!

97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles t Check us out online at

www.wilderhonda.com

$

FIT $

169

PER MONTH*

169

PER MONTH**

*$169.00 per month for 36 months. $2,499.00 total due at signing. Includes down payments with no security deposit. Excludes taxes, titles and dealer fees. For well qualified lessees. Closed end lease for 2013 Civic Sedan 5 Speed Automatic LX (FB2F5DEW) available from March 5, 2013 through April 30, 2013, to well-qualified lessees approved by Honda Financial Services. Not all lessees will qualify. Higher lease rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings. MSRP $19,755.00 (includes destination, excludes tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Actual net capitalized cost $17,339.50. Net capitalized cost includes $595 acquisition fee. Dealer contribution may vary and could affect actual lease payment. Total monthly payments $6,084.00. Option to purchase at lease end $12,445.65. Must take new retail delivery on vehicle from dealer stock by April 30, 2013. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15¢/mile over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP less than $30,000, and 20¢/mile over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more. Offer expires 4/30/13.

2013 PASSAT

**$169.00 per month for 36 months. $2,199.00 total due at signing. Includes down payments with no security deposit. Excludes taxes, titles and dealer fees. For well qualified lessees. Closed end lease for 2013 Fit 5 Speed Automatic (GE8H3DEXW) available from March 5, 2013 through April 30, 2013, to well-qualified lessees approved by Honda Financial Services. Not all lessees will qualify. Higher lease rates apply for lessees with lower credit ratings. MSRP $17,015.00 (includes destination, excludes tax, license, title, registration, documentation fees, options, insurance and the like). Actual net capitalized cost $15,417.99. Net capitalized cost includes $595 acquisition fee. Dealer contribution may vary and could affect actual lease payment. Total monthly payments $6,084.00. Option to purchase at lease end $10,549.30. Must take new retail delivery on vehicle from dealer stock by April 30, 2013. Lessee responsible for maintenance, excessive wear/tear and 15¢/mile over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP less than $30,000, and 20¢/mile over 12,000 miles/year for vehicles with MSRP of $30,000 or more. See your Honda dealer for complete details. Offer expires 4/30/13.

2013 JETTA

0%*

0.9%* WILDER VOLKSWAGEN You Can Count On Us!

:FBSTPS .JMFTPG/P$IBSHF4DIFEVMFE .BJOUFOBODF "136QUP.POUITGPSRVBMJĂŞFECVZFST0O"QQSPWBMPG$SFEJU/FHPUJBCMFEFBMFSEPDVNFOUBSZ GFFPGVQUP4FF%FBMFSGPSEFUBJMT1IPUPTGPSJMMVTUSBUJPOQVSQPTFTPOMZ0GGFSFYQJSFT

Whichever occurs first. Some restrictions. See dealer or program for details.

"136QUP.POUITGPSRVBMJĂŞFECVZFST0O"QQSPWBMPG$SFEJU/FHPUJBCMFEFBMFSEPDVNFOUBSZ GFFPGVQUP4FF%FBMFSGPSEFUBJMT1IPUPTGPSJMMVTUSBUJPOQVSQPTFTPOMZ0GGFSFYQJSFT

97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles t Check us out online at

www.wildervw.com

SPRING FORWARD WITH PRE-OWNED SAVINGS

2003 HONDA ACCORD EX-L V6

SALE PRICE STK#10226A

$10,980

2007 PONTIAC G6 GT SPORT

SALE PRICE STK#V5576A

$14,950

2010 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3412A

$15,995

2007 HONDA ACCORD EX-L V6

SALE PRICE STK#P3372

$17,995

2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HB

SALE PRICE STK#10167A

$12,880

2008 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN LX

SALE PRICE STK#H5708A

$14,951

2010 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD

SALE PRICE STK#P4604

$16,950

2012 KIA SEDONA LX

SALE PRICE STK#P4603

$18,511

2008 MAZDA 5 GRAND TOURING

SALE PRICE STK#H5868E

$12,980

2011 FORD FOCUS SES

SALE PRICE STK#P3259

$14,986

2010 DODGE CHARGER SXT

SALE PRICE STK#N7100A

$16,980

2006 ACURA TSX NAVIGATION

SALE PRICE STK#V5607B

$18,810

2009 NISSAN CUBE S

2007 TOYOTA PRIUS HB

SALE PRICE STK#P3419

SALE PRICE

$12,995

2008 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID NAVIGATION

SALE PRICE STK#V5530B

2008 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 4WD LT3

STK#C7871A

$15,514

2008 GMC CANYON EXT CAB 4WD SLE1

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$16,995

2010 HONDA ACCORD LX-P

STK#J7846C

$17,919

2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID

SALE PRICE STK#H6111A

$14,811

SALE PRICE

$14,995

2007 HONDA PILOT 4WD EX-L

STK#H5983A

STK#10278A

SALE PRICE

$19,995

STK#10556A

$21,950

2011 FORD FIESTA SES

SALE PRICE STK#P3260

$14,888

2007 MERCEDES-BENZ C-230 SPORT

SALE PRICE STK#P3320A

$15,981

2009 NISSAN ALTIMA S

SALE PRICE STK#H5938A

$17,995

2008 DODGE NITRO R/T 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3443

$22,995

Vehicles are one only and subject to prior sale. VINs posted at dealership. Sale price doesn’t include tax, license and documentation fees. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 4/19/13.

Check us out online at

You Can Count On Us!

www.wilderauto.com 24-hours a day!

95 & 97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles

1-888-813-8545

34767086


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It!

PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

D

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S ! GARAGE Sale: Saturday, 9-5 p.m., 205 W Spruce Street. Furniture, books, clothing, bedframe headboards, misc.

2006 Wells Cargo Trailer : Wells Cargo Utility Trailer, Inside dimensions 6’x12’. With fold down ramp rear door and side access door. Lightly used and in excellent condition. Please call ACTI @ 452-6776.

BERSA: 380 auto. Nickle-plated, 8 shot clip, like CHILDREN’S MARKET new. $450. Reserve your table for (360)452-3213 $10, keep your profits! G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . - Sequim Prairie Grange, Sun., 8-4 p.m. Fri. and April 27, 12:30-3:30. Sell Sat., Sunday 9-3 p.m, your gently used kid’s 2241 Atterberr y Rd. 2 clothing and gear! Call quads, old fishing gear, 6 8 1 - 7 2 5 5 , F i ve A c r e viola, clothes, golf clubs, School PSO. tools, much more.

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m. Carlsborg Rd. to Spath, turn on Davidson, all the way to the end, t o 1 9 3 D a v i d s o n D r. Dressers, tables, misc. items. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . S u n . , 1 0 - 3 p. m . , 1 3 2 Herrick Rd. Too much to list!

3020 Found

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

FOUND: Dog. Male, small, tan/black color, Barr Rd., Port Angeles. (360)683-3945

AIRPORT Garden Center. Seasonal Garden Attendant. Par t-time, weekdays. Plant knowledge preferred. Apply by F O U N D : H o n d a Ke y. 4/19. Light attached. Oak Table, Sequim. (360)683-2179 F O U N D : To o l b ox . O n Hwy 101 near Lake Sutherland. Call to identify. (360)452-6621

3023 Lost

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

L O S T: D o g . E n g l i s h Bulldog, brindle, lower Deer Park area, P.A. (360)477-6314 L O S T : D o g . Ta n w i t h black markings, Agnew area. (360)582-1160.

APPLY NOW! HEALTHCARE JOBS Due to growth new positions available for NAC/NAR/HCA’s Additional opening for LN 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 reception@ discovery-mc.com

L O S T: Pe p p e r s p ray. AUTO PARTS C a n n i s t e r, bl a ck t o p, COUNTER PERSON small version, lost near Here we grow again. AuRailroad Bridge Park, on tomotive parts or service 4/1/13. (360)681-4841. experience requred. Apply in person, Baxter 4070 Business Auto Parts, 221 W. 1st, P.A. No phone calls.

Opportunities

BARTENDER/WAITER FOR THE CANTINA Apply in person at 205 E. 8th St., P.A. daily before 2:00 p.m. BLONDIE’S Plate in Sequim hiring all postions. Mail resume to: 216 Center Park Way, Sequim, WA 98382.

6A113352

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

ON-CALL MEDICAL ASSISTANT Join multi-disciplinar y team supporting consumers with chronic mental illnesses in an outpatient setting. Must be program grad & license-eligible. Mental health exper pref ’d. Base Pay: 4026 Employment $ 1 3 - $ 1 5 . 2 9 h r. D O E . General Resume to PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Por t Angeles, AIDES/RNA OR CNA WA 98362. http:// Best wages, bonuses. peninsulabehavioral.org Wright’s. 457-9236. EOE

THE BLACKBIRD COFFEEHOUSE For sale. Great price, thriving and profitable. Contact Adam for details: (360)224-9436, blackbirdcoffee @gmail.com

CCU RN Med/Surg RN House Supervisor, RN CNA Medical Assistant EKG Tech (CWT) Respiratory Therapist Registered Dietitian Administrative Assistant For details on these and other positions, visit www.olympic medical.org Apply online or nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org CERTIFIED FORD TECHNICIAN Price Ford/Lincoln is currently seeking a certified factor y trained technician. We offer competitive wages and benefits. New facility, state of the art equipment and friendly work environment right in the heart of the Olympics. Great place to relocate to. A family friendly community. Ford Motor Co. is making all the right choices and our growth i s t h e r e s u l t . We a r e looking for a dedicated team player who has the right attitude toward growing our business. If this is you and you need a place to call home contact us immediately. Send resume to newcareer@ priceford.com or contact Robert Palmer Service Manager (360)457-3333 LEGAL ASSISTANT Family law. Peninsula Daily News PDN#654/Legal Port Angeles, WA 98362

EXPERIENCED DINNER COOK AND EXPERENCED BAKER Apply within, Cafe Garden, 1506 E. 1st street. HOME CARE ASSISTANTS To p r o v i d e i n - h o m e , non-medical care to our elderly and disabled clients in Jefferson County, Sequim, Por t Angeles, and Neah Bay. $10.31 hr. Flexible Shifts: FT/ PT Hourly, Over night, Live-In. Medical/Dental/Vacation Certification fees paid. For application call Catholic Community Services at (360) 417-5420 or 1-855-582-2700 EOE HOOK TENDER Well-established logging company looking for a qualified hook tender. Call (360)477-5791

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

BARTENDER/WAITER FOR THE CANTINA Apply in person at 205 E. 8th St., P.A. daily before 2:00 p.m.

BRAND NEW WHEELS S t i l l i n b ox ! M i ckey Thomson Classic II, black, 16x8 with bolt pattern 8x6.5. Didn’t fit our Toyota 4-Runner and don’t want to pay the restock fee. $550/obo (360)460-1301

FORD: ‘99 F-350 V10 XLT Super Duty Crew Cab. 1999 F-350 V10 Super Duty Crew Cab, seats 6 comfortably, 8 ft. bed, one-ton chassis, 4x4, with spray in bedliner, tow package and cd disc changer. 145,900 miles. Great condition and regularly maintained. Please call ACTI @ 360-4526776 for information.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1405 Monroe Rd. 2nd of 3 sales. This is the big one. Farm supplies, spor ting goods, h u n t i n g h e a r, h o u s e HAY: 1st crop, $7 bale. wares, camping stuff, 2nd crop, $10 bale. misc. galore. 477-0274 or 460-1456 POWER CHAIR: Used, HEWESCRAFT: 2005 Invacare Pronto. $1,500/ 20’ Searunner, Yamaha obo. (360)504-2710. 115/165 hrs., Yamaha 15/low hours, GPS, VHF S O U T H W I N D : 2 0 0 1 radio, fishfinder, great Motorhome. 36’ Limited extras. One owner, EZ Edition. Very good conL o a d e r / r o l l e r b u n k , dition. 16k mi., 2 slides, stored under cover. new levelers, rear came$27,900. 681-8835. ra, drivers side door, lots Cell: 808-4381 of storage inside and out. Many extras. Nonsmokers. $40,000. HOOK TENDER (360)683-5359 Well-established logging company looking THREE GALS for a qualified hook ESTATE SALE tender. Call 2112 Driftwood Pl (360)477-5791 Sat.-Sun., 9-3 MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat.- “Spring” up to this one! Sun., 9-7 p.m., 145 John Beautiful oak table with 6 chairs and hutch, twin Jacobs Rd., off O’Brien. bed, vintage items, TV YAKS: 2 bulls, 4 yrs. stands, mirrors, freezer, and 1.5 yrs. old. 2 cows, washer/dryer, garden art 4 yrs. and 3 yrs. $500- bird houses and Neutron $800. (360)582-3104, lawn mower. Too much to list. (13th & N). Sequim.

4026 Employment General

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment General General Wanted HOUSEKEEPING POSITIONS IMMEDIATELY AVAIL. Wage DOE. Apply in person at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles. No calls please. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 LEGAL Assistant: Jefferson County has an opening for a Legal Assistant. Knowledge of legal procedures, MS Word, Excel and Access. Union position, $16.52/hr +benef i t s. A p p l y b e fo r e 5 p.m. 4/19/13, to County Commissioners’ Office, PO Box 1220, Port Townsend, WA 98368, www.co.jeffeson.wa.us LICENSED NURSE Looking for versitle, caring individual, come join our great team! Contact Cherrie (360)683-3348

NANNY and housekeeping help needed: full time. And part-time help and housekeeping/errands, 2-4 hours a day. Apply at SunnySequim92 @gmail.com WE ARE GROWING!

Looking for someone experienced in: Remodeling Interior Finish Cabinets Countertops Shower Replacement Flooring Tile Trimwork Send Resume by fax: (360)582-1943 by E-mail: showroom@ bydesigngroupinc.net

Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center Correctional Officer 1 Pay starts at $16.48 hr., plus full benefits. Closes 04/17/13. Cook Adult Correctional Pay starts at $14.67 hr., plus full benefits. Closes 04/17/13. Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov For further information please call Roxann at (360)963-3207. EOE. SHOWROOM Assistant for home improvement showroom. Fulltime position. Apply in person. Curtis Interiors 845 W. Washington; Sequim. Support/Care Staff To work with developmentally disabled adults, no exper ience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. CNA’s encouraged to apply. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m. SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ GENERAL CLERICAL Versatile & responsible t e a m p l aye r fo r bu s y front office. Must have excellent interpersonal, customer svc, & keyboarding skills. Recent exper in health care office pref’d. F.T., w/benefits. Some eves. hrs. Base pay $12 hr. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Por t Angeles, WA 98362. http:// peninsulabehavioral.org EOE

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

WEEKEND CHEF NEEDED M u s t l o ve t o c o o k , have catering experience, understand menu planning, portion control, and food presentation. Also required are leadership skills and good time management. Please send resume to 131 E. 1st Street, Port Angeles, WA, 98362.

4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 Affordable Lawn Care Mowing and weedeating, Call Dee at 477-8611 Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805

ENVIOUS GREENS C o m p l e t e Ya r d C a r e Proper ty Mntnce. Specialty Pruning Gutters Weed Pulling/Whacking D e l i ve r y a n d S p r e a d Bark/Rock Brush Clearing Debris Hauling Sequim/P.A. area 681-3521 cell: 808-9638

F RU I T Tr e e s, L aw n s : Don’t allow just anyone to hack your trees. I also provide complete yard ser vice at competitive rates, semi-retired. Many long standing customers. P A only Local (360)808-2146

JUAREZ & SON’S HANDY M A N S E R V I C E S . Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problems projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248. LAWN MOWING: Free estimates. (360)452-7743

BIZY BOYS LAWN & YA R D C A R E : Yo u r work is our play! We enjoy mowing, weeding, edging, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance and gene r a l ya r d c l e a n - u p ! Free job quotes! Call Tom at 460-7766

M OW I N G , t r i m m i n g , mulch and more! Call Ground Control Lawn C a r e fo r h o n e s t , d e pendable lawn care at your home or business. Ground Control Lawn Care (360)797-5782.

RENT-A-MAN Labor for hire. Inside or out. Call and we’ll talk. John (360)775-5586 RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE Call 681-4429

COMPUTER Care-Assistance. In home assistance or instruction with your computer. 25 years experience working with windows based computers. No service call fee within Sequim city limits. Chet 681-0522 or cell, 808-9596.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

SEWING. I Sew 4U *Hemming *Alterations *Zippers replaced *Any project Don’t wait! Call today for an appointment Patti Kuth, 417-5576. I’m Sew Happy!


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. WHAT’S FOR DESSERT? Solution: 9 letters

R P P U D D I N G G E C I P S By Julian Lim

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

D S N A B A K E L B I D E S I

N S E I R O L A C E B P E W R

© 2013 Universal Uclick

E C L I H O N E Y L I E T E R

L H F I P S M R A C H I E E E

B O F C C I E N E C U N W T B

A C U E L E D R A R T A E A S

www.wonderword.com

T O O N E Z O R F I F M M L U

C E L E D L A T E E S ‫ګګګ‬ O U R L ‫ګ‬ T C T L I R S E E C A J G G I T D N E O U I T G U C R O S S E U H E A R R K Y Y P A S T R C S V S A L I N A V G A R T B

YARD MAINTINENCE: Free estimates. (360)912-2990 YO U N G c o u p l e e a r l y s i x t i e s . a va i l a b l e fo r spring cleanup, weeding, trimming, mulching, moss removal, complete garden restoration and misc. yard care. Excellent references. (360)457-1213

2040 General Financial Discover the “Success and Money Making Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know a b o u t . To g e t yo u r FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD please call 206-745-2135 gin

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

4-PLEX Pr iced for quick sale! R a r e Po r t A n g e l e s 4-plex with excellent rental history at $650 per month per unit, and centrally located. Coin operated laundry on site for additional income. Each unit has assigned covered parking space and on street parking, and assigned indoor storage area. Unit A features a fire place. $289,000. MLS#270376. Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

AFFORDABLE UPDATED HOME Nice 3 Br., 1 bath home c o nve n i e n t t o m i d d l e school and parks. Updated kitchen with new appliances, cabinets and countertops, new carpet, new vinyl windows and recnently painted. This home is move in ready! Two carports and partly fenced yard. $139,999 MLS#270604 Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189 DOMINION TERRACE 55+ in Sequim, 1 Br. condo, stove, washer and dryer, fridge, water view! A great place to live! $76,000. (360)683-5917

AMAZING Currently operating as a Bed and Breakfast. 8.11 acre parcel is populated with a variety of buildings includes the main house, guest cottage, bath house, chapel, covered dance floor, barn with 3 guest rooms, tack room with guest quarters upstairs, fire pit, an outdoor breakfast area. $900,000 ML#263927/391479 Patty Brueckner (360)460-6152 TOWN & COUNTRY

4/12

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Bake, Bavarian, Berries, Bland, Blender, Cakes, Calories, Cheese, Chocolate, Delectable, Delicious, Diet, Edible, Egg, Enticing, Frozen, Fruit, Fudge, Gourmet, Honey, Jelly, Lime, Made, Mush, Pastry, Pear, Pies, Pudding, Recipes, Refreshing, Refrigerate, Roast, Slice, Souffle, Sour, Spice, Steamed, Sugar, Sweet, Syrup, Tarts, Tasty, Vanilla, Vary, Wafer Yesterday’s Answer: Necktie THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

XENAN ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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37 View from Tokyo 38 Wished 39 Valhalla chief 41 Reuters competitor 42 “I wonder ...” 47 Breakfast cereal magnate 49 With 50-Down, when modern mammals emerged

4/12/13

50 See 49-Down 51 “Brave” studio 52 “Fingers crossed” 54 Bad sentence 55 Round no. 58 Parts of la cara 59 1978 Booker Prize recipient Murdoch 61 Kind of exam 62 “I got it” 65 Darken in a salon

TAHPAY

LIBGOE Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here:

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: JOKER TOKEN BITTEN AVENUE Yesterday’s Answer: When they discussed creating a company to make artificial knees, they planned a — JOINT VENTURE

4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 120 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 1163 Commercial 6045 Farm Fencing Clallam County & Equipment Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Jefferson County Rentals TAY L O R ’ S L a w n Maintenance Available all year around for any lawn care needed, moss removal and odd jobs. Just Call (360)565-6660 or (360)565-6298. Always done to your satisfaction!

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DOWN 1 Murphy’s and Godwin’s, for two 2 Shakespeare’s flower? 3 Carving area 4 It’s bigger than the neg. 5 Unwavering 6 Buster Brown’s dog 7 Causes a stink 8 Collide with 9 Where the slain roll? 10 “I __ beautiful city ...”: Dickens 11 Dad 12 Preserves, in a way 13 Editor’s request 18 Genetic letters 22 Prone to snits 24 Grab a sandwich, perhaps 27 65-Down shade 28 Women 29 __ Miguel: Azores island 31 Suffix with ox34 Like many a brisk 45-minute walk 35 General on a menu

4/12/13

E G E T A R E G I R F E R S E

-

ACROSS 1 Least ancient 7 Some TVs 11 This second, briefly 14 Forward, to Fiorello 15 City SW of Buffalo 16 Christian sch. since 1963 17 Extra effort 19 Shoofly __ 20 Skittish NBC show? 21 “That’s rich!” evoker 23 Jellied item in British cuisine 25 “Days of Grace” memoirist 26 Relaxed 27 GRE components 30 Doubter’s question 32 Note promising notes 33 Letter-routing letters 36 Big-eared flier of film 40 Take on responsibility 43 Finish 44 It may be spare 45 “Progress through Technology” automaker 46 “Awesome!” 48 Original Speed Stick maker 50 Awesome, in a way 53 Used to be 56 Giant of note 57 It usually involves rapping 60 Rock’s __ Fighters 63 Maker of SteeL kitchen products 64 Filing option, or what can be found in four long answers? 66 Beret, e.g. 67 __ Accords: 1993 agreement 68 Having trouble 69 Charles V’s domain: Abbr. 70 Light submachine gun 71 Forgetful, maybe

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 C3

NEW LISTING Custom home on 6 acres including McDonnell Creek. 3 Br., 2 bath, custom kitchen plus a Mother in law apt. Spectacular land and river front $434,000. MLS#270594. Amy Powell (360)417-9871 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEW LISTING Pine Hill Charmer has tons of character! Hardwo o d f l o o r s, u p d a t e d kitchen, large basement/workshop and carp o r t . O ve r s i z e d l o t , ra i s e d b e d s a n d m t n views make the backyard truly special. $140,000. Kimi Robertson (360)461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company

JUST REDUCED! Beautiful home on two waterfront lots, with 2 B r. , 2 b a t h p l u s l o f t . Paved road to the door, plus lots of parking! And a very nice large dock. Summer is almost here! $469,000. ML#261199. PAM CHURCH 452-3333 PORT ANGELES NEW PRICE! REALTY Enjoy watching eagles perched or nesting atop LAST CHANCE Located in Cresthaven one of the trees across development, below col- the street while sipping lege. Harbor view and your morning coffee in perfect for that rambler the breakfast nook with with daylight basement. a d i s t a n t v i ew o f t h e Take a look and visual- Strait of Juan de Fuca. This craftsman style ize the possibilities. home boasts solid teak $59,000. ML#263288. floors throughout, 9-foot Becky Jackson ceilings, custom blinds, (360)417-2781 taller counters in kitchen COLDWELL BANKER and baths and solid core UPTOWN REALTY doors. The Olympic DisMAGNIFICENT HOME, c ove r y Tr a i l i s a t i t s doorsteps. This lovely, YARD AND VIEWS! Set on 5 private acres comfortable, meticulouswith exceptional land- ly maintained one-owner s c a p i n g f e a t u r i n g a home with low-maintepond, waterfalls, path- nance landscaping is w ay s , r o c k e r i e s a n d move-in ready. $250,000 stone patios. The home MLS#264612 enjoys a great room with Helga Filler oak floors, custom kitch(360)461-0538 en, floor to ceiling winWINDERMERE dows and a wrap around PORT ANGELES deck to capture the stunning views of the Strait SHADOW MTN RV and beyond! PARK & GENERAL $400,000. ML#270395. STORE Kathy Brown 8.09 acres bordering (360)417-2785 Highway 101 across the COLDWELL BANKER road from Lake SutherUPTOWN REALTY land. 40 full hookup RV Mt. Pleasant area ram- sites, 13 tent sites, hot bler on 1.39 acres. 3 showers, laundry. Genbr., 1.5 baths, 1,652 sf. eral Store – gifts, grocerC o u n t r y k i t c h e n w i t h ies, necessities, deli, breakfast bar, extensive gas, diesel, propane. orchard, berries, fenced Fire Station bldg. All this garden area and dog AND a profitable busirun. Pond with waterfall ness!! and lots of flowers. $1,000,000 28x28 atrium for fun and MLS#264507 h o bb i e s. S m a l l wo r k Team Thomsen shop off garage. All pri(360)417-2782 vate yet close in. COLDWELL BANKER $229,900 UPTOWN REALTY MLS#270626 Paul Beck PLACE YOUR (360)461-0456 AD ONLINE WINDERMERE With our new PORT ANGELES Classified Wizard you can see your Place your ad at ad before it prints! www.peninsula peninsula dailynews.com dailynews.com

P.A. or BRINNON: Trailer rental in exchange for maintenance work. 457-9844 or 460-4968 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com P.A.: 1926 Craftsman Bungalow. Old school charm with modern details. Historic Cherry Hill neighborhood. 2 Br., 1 bath, detached garage, large covered front porch with swing, hard wood floors, propane fireplace and stove, all s t a i n l e s s a p p l i a n c e s, h e a t p u m p, l a u n d r y room with front load w a s h e r / d r y e r, s m a l l basement used as wine storage, ADT security/fire system with 16 c a m e ra DV D s y s t e m , private 2-person hot tub, raised garden beds with self water ing system, small greenhouse, immaculate yard, propane fire place with pub seating under large alumin u m g a z e b o, fe n c e d backyard for kids and pets, alley access, partial mountain view, convenient location within walking distance to d o w n t o w n , S a f e w a y, Countr y Aire, cour thouse, and city hall. Call for appointment (360)417-6613. UNIQUE PROPERTY Custom built quality log home, 20 acres offers privacy and seclusion, Strait, San Juan’s and Mt. Baker Views, dramatic kitchen and living area, large deck and daylight basement, 30’x30’ outbuilding $399,900 ML#419960/264485 Team Schmidt (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

PORT LUDLOW! Waterfront Condo For Sale Great views of Sound, b ay, a n d m o u n t a i n s . Vaulted ceilings. 3 Br., bonus room, 4 Bath. 18mi Kingston, Poulsbo 20, Sequim 33, Bainbridge 31. With Beachclub activities, pools, fitness, trails. By Owners Now $305,000 (listing mid-Apr) Call (360)4377357 OR portludlowcondo@hot mail.com, www.Water frontCondo-PtLud.com.

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

SEQUIM: 2,500 Sf. home for rent, $ 1 , 2 5 0 / m o, o n g o l f course. 4 Br., 3 bath, new car pet and wood floors throughout, double g a ra g e, 2 f i r e p l a c e s, huge family room, deck with view, new septic, community well $36/mo. One year lease required. No smoking. Pets negotiable. Scott at 360-388-8474 Immediate occupancy. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, close to town. $1,200. (405)640-7314

SEQUIM: Water view, 3 Br., 2 ba. No smoking or CARLSBORG Mobile p e t s, r e f. r e q u i r e d . Home: 2 br., 1 bath mo- $1,100 mo. 477-4192. bile home in quiet park WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br., i n d e s i r e a b l e a r e a . 1 ba, 2 car carport. Vaulted celings, compo$740. (360)808-0022. sition roof, eat in kitchen, great yard, storage s h e d , e n c l o s e d f r o n t 539 Rental Houses Port Angeles porch, small deck. $34,000. 425-213-7262. WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $850. M a n u f a c t u r e d H o m e No smoking/pets. For Sale: 3 br., 2 bath (360)452-6750. d o u bl ew i d e m a nu fa c tured home. Newly reno605 Apartments vated and move in Clallam County ready. Owner financing available OAC. $39,500. L o c a t e d a t t h e L a k e CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 Pleasant Mobile Park in ba, close to Safeway, no Beaver. Also have a sin- smoking/pets. $550 mo. (360)460-5892 glewide manufactured home available as well. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, Homes will not be moved from park. Call quiet, 2 Br., excellent (360)808-7120 for more r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540. information.

SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide mobile home, 55+ park, 2 Br., 2 bath, garage with spare room, large covered deck. $31,500. WATER VIEW (360)385-4882 P r i va c y a n d r o o m t o roam, beautiful parcel off beaten path, minutes 505 Rental Houses from town, house plans Clallam County available for review, directions: east on 101, 919 W. 15th, P.A.: 4 Br., r ight on Happy Valley 1.5 ba, garage, fenced. Rd., right on Huffman $1,100. (360)452-6144. Heights, left on Chels a m i s h t o p r o p e r t y. JAMES & WRE sign at entry road. ASSOCIATES INC. E. of 583. Property Mgmt. $160,000 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. ML#26129670/223083 A 1 br 1 ba..............$500 Deb Kahle A Studio........... ........$550 (360)683-6880 A 2 br 1.5 ba...........$695 WINDERMERE H 2 br 1 ba..............$700 SUNLAND H 2 br 2 ba..............$800 Visit our website at H 3 br 2 ba. .............$850 A 3 br 2 ba ..............$875 www.peninsula H 3 br 2 ba 1.5 ac. .$1200 dailynews.com H 3+ br 1 ba lake ...$1300 Or email us at HOUSE IN JOYCE classified@ H 4 br 2 ba 5 ac .....$1200 peninsula More Properties at dailynews.com www.jarentals.com

6080 Home Furnishings

TRACTOR: ‘52 Fergu- BED: Fold away, sheets son. 6-way back blade, included, not quite full scraper box, and ripper size. $90. t o o t h , g o o d r u n n e r. (360)379-3894 S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h $2,500. (360)710-4966. FURNITURE SALE: (2) Ave., Boardwalk Square. Rolltop desks, beautiful (360)683-3256 6050 Firearms & redwood table, shabby Ammunition chic loveseat, 3 pc. cherSEQUIM: Office/retail ry wood chair/settee set, space 850 sf. $800 mo. AR-15: Bushmaster rifle. 2 5 v i n t a g e s t a c k i n g (360)460-5467 Brand new in box, with chairs, 30 NEW white a c c e s s o r i e s . o u t d o o r c h a i r s, N E W SPACE NEEDED $1,300/obo. 2 0 X 3 0 o u t d o o r eve n t Non-profit sports (360)640-1171 tent, too much to list! NO league seeking 10,000 REASONABLE offer will sf space for practice BERSA: 380 auto. Nick- be refused! and spor ting events, le-plated, 8 shot clip, like (360)808-6160 etc. Warehouse, shop, new. $450. garage, hangar, empty (360)452-3213 KING Sized bedroom storage area, etc. Any set: Includes king sized flat space sitting emp- PARTS GUN: 303 Brit- b e d w i t h m a t t r e s s , ish Enfield, SMLE III. ty, give us a call! matching night stands $90. (360)379-3894. (206)890-8240 and high-boy dresser. Must be sold as set, will RELOADING EQUIP. not split up. 6005 Antiques & Dies, powder, etc., varie(360)457-1213 ty of ammo. $500/obo. Collectibles Jim at (360)457-0943 RECLINERS: 2 matchMISC: Antique bin table, RIFLES: Mini 14, black, ing leather recliners, like $250. Matching antique like new, $1,275. Stain- new. $250 ea, or $400 for both. (360)461-7532. storage cabinet, $200. 2 less Mini 14, $1,400. (360)477-5566 E a s t l a ke c a n e c h a i r s SET: Decorative glass and 1 rocker, original WANTED: Private party, dining table, 4 chairs, caning, $350. 22 cal DA pistol, Colt or glass hutch to match, (360)301-4122 S&W, nice cond. Leave beautiful. $150 both. (360)681-8034 msg. (360)681-0309. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

6010 Appliances

WASHER: Kenmore 3.5, 2006 Super Capacity f r o n t l o a d i n g wa s h e r. Runs great! $250/obo. (360)640-1559

6035 Cemetery Plots

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6100 Misc. Merchandise

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

BOAT TRAILER: 1994 Caulkins galvanized boat trailer. 17’-20’ boat length. (360)461-2811. CAR TRAILER $1,200. (360)457-3645.

HALIBUT: Fresh, whole F I R E W O O D : 6 c o r d fish only. (360)963-2021. COMPANION NICHE special, $895. Limited At Sequim Valley Ceme- time only! 360-582-7910. Compose your tery. $1,850. www.portangeles Classified Ad (360)461-2810 firewood.com on

6042 Exercise Equipment

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market

P.A.: 1 Br. lg. apt., water view, quiet, clean. $615 mo. (206)200-7244 B OW F L E X : U l t i m a t e G&G FARMS P.A.: Upstairs 2 Br., 1 H o m e G y m . H a r d l y FRUIT TREES: Pears and Asian pears, apples, used. $700/obo. bath, remodeled. $650. cherries, peaches, (360)461-2811 (360)670-9418 plum, walnuts, filberts, thunder clouds, maples, Properties by 6045 Farm Fencing quaking aspen, cypress, Landmark. portangeles& Equipment blueberries, strawberries landmark.com and many more. 1989 John Deere model 95 Clover Ln. off Taylor 665 Rental 970 Tractor with model Cutoff, Seq. 683-8809. Duplex/Multiplexes 8 0 L o a d e r. E x c e l l e n t Condition, professionally Thornless Raspberry P.A.: 1 Br., office, car- maintained. 30 horse Plants: Huge, Sweet por t, view, clean and power diesel engine with Berries. $10 dozen. quiet, W/S inc. $675. 3700 hours, 4-wheel 360-681-8015 (360)452-6611 drive. Located in Por t SEQUIM: Duplex, 2 Br., To w n s e n d . D e l i v e r y 6075 Heavy available for additional $700+dep. 460-4089. Equipment www.mchughrents.com cost. $10,000/obo. Call Larry at (360) 301-0347. SEMI END-DUMP 671 Mobile Home ROTOTILLER: Rankin TRAILER: 30’. Electric (110cm) 3.0 hitch, used tar p system, excellent Spaces for Rent once. $1,800/obo. condition. $7,500. (360)928-9450 or S E QU I M : L a z y A c r e s (360)417-0153 (360)670-3651 M H P, 5 5 + , n o R V s . GARAGE SALE ADS $325 mo. (360)683-6294 TIRES: (2) 11.2x28 rear Call for details. 360-452-8435 Peninsula Classified tractor tires. $575. (360)683-6464 1-800-826-7714 1-800-826-7714

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


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C4 FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

33688614

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

For Better or For Worse

by Lynn Johnston

7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes SIAMESE CATS: Two beautiful Siamese cats. 1 male, 1 female. Indoor only. Spayed and neutered. We are sorry to h ave t o l e t t h e m g o. Ve r y p e o p l e f r i e n d l y. $100/obo for the pair. (360)582-1018

7045 Tack, Feed & Supplies 6100 Misc. Merchandise LOG SPLITTER: Electric, 5 ton. $300. (360)452-4801 PIANO: Ivers and Pond piano. $200. (360)683-9146 PICTURE: Elton Bennett Seascape, sea stacks and canoe group having shelter. $1,200. (360)457-3169 POWER CHAIR: Used, Invacare Pronto. $1,500/ obo. (360)504-2710.

6115 Sporting Goods

BUYING FIREARMS Any and all - top $ paid one or entire collection including estates. Call (360)477-9659

8142 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales 7025 Farm Animals Sequim PA - East & Livestock

HAY: 1st crop, $7 bale. 2nd crop, $10 bale. 477-0274 or 460-1456

YAKS: 2 bulls, 4 yrs. and 1.5 yrs. old. 2 cows, 4 yrs. and 3 yrs. $500$800. (360)582-3104, Sequim.

9820 Motorhomes

ESTATE SALE Please join us on Saturday, April 13th, from 9 am - 3 pm, at 755 W. Wa s h i n g t o n ( H o l l y wood Video). We will feature antiques/coll e c t i bl e s e s p e c i a l l y nice items for online sellers, large selection of Asian furniture/art/ collectibles, JEWELRY, designer clothes, shoes, purses, furniture, Sleep Comfor t Queen Size Bed, lawn/garden, yard art, s i l ve r p l a t e , c h i n a , glassware, books, A R T, r u g s , a n d s o much more! Please bring non-perishable food items for t h e S a l va t i o n A r my Soup Kitchen. Swallow’s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

used 5 times. $280. (360)457-6845

7035 General Pets MOVING and studio sale: One day only, Saturday April 13, 8-5 p. m . , 9 1 C h a m p i o n Rd., Port Angeles. Furniture, sofas, coffee table, end tables, lamps, contemporar y entertainment center with l i g h t e d d i s p l ay, b ox f r e e z e r, t r e a d m i l l , lamps. Bead making and Jewelr y making supplies - soft glass rods and stringer, silv e r f o i l , A r t c l a y, stamps. Findings-Hilltribe Silver, Bali Silver and more.

MOVING Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1405 Monroe Rd. 2nd of 3 sales. This is the big one. Farm supplies, spor ting goods, h u n t i n g h e a r, h o u s e wares, camping stuff, G A R A G E / M O V I N G misc. galore. Sale: Sat., 8:30-1 p.m., 1011 New Meadows Loop. Furniture, house- 7025 Farm Animals hold items, clothes, yard & Livestock tools, etc. GARAGE/Estate Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 105 Southwester n Place. Something for everyone! All must go!

K AYA K : Fe a t h e r c r a f t Java Inflatable, like new, top of the line, single or double use, 33 lbs. Portable, packable, shippable. Comes with all accessories. Was $3,000 new, offering for GARAGE Sale: Fri and $1,700. Sat, 9-2. Household (360)301-2082 stuff, collectibles, knick MOUNTAIN BIKE: 2010 knacks, books, lots of Specialized Stumpjump- jewelry, much misc. 74 e r C o m p 2 9 . D i s c Grant Rd Storage, beb r a k e s . 1 7 . 5 ” f r a m e . hind Napa, Unit #14. $775. (360)457-2821. G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . Sun., 8-4 p.m. Fri. and Sat., Sunday 9-3 p.m, 6125 Tools 2241 Atterberr y Rd. 2 quads, old fishing gear, EDGER: Husqvarna 323 viola, clothes, golf clubs, E X-Ser ies, like new, tools, much more.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 C5

HORSESHOEING Port Angeles, Sequim, and Joyce. Call Logan at (360)808-0423.

MISC: (2) 13 hand pon i e s, $ 5 0 0 e a . / o b o. Miniature Stallion, $400/ obo. Exotic chickens, $25-$75. Laying hens, $20 ea. Miniature Sonnen goats and babies, $75-$150. 2 donkeys, $100 ea. Misc. tropical birds, $10-$100. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 (360)683-8328 p.m. Carlsborg Rd., to Spath, turn on Davidson, all the way to the end, t o 1 9 3 D a v i d s o n D r. Dressers, tables, misc. items.

FREE: Basset Hound, purebred, 6 yr. old female, up to date with shots, spayed, wonderful dog, moving to senior living, cannot take with us. (360)797-1014.

M OTO R H O M E : 1 9 8 9 Fleetwood Limited 37J. new 460 Ford Banks exhaust system, HYD leveling jacks, 2 tvs, nonsmoker, 5.5 Onan generator, driver and passenger side doors, oak cabinets, corian countertops, hardwood floors. $20,000. (360)417-0619

MISC: Staffordshire Terrier puppies, 5 wks. old, born March 7, $650. Fish tank, 55 gal. with stand, lid, lights, filter, all accessories, $175. (360)628-6672 or M OTO R H O M E : 2 3 ’ (360)628-7944 Class C Winnebago. 50k mi., no smoking, no pets N O R T H W E S T FA R M $9,000. (360)457-9259. TERRIER PUPPIES F O R S A L E B o r n RV: 3 8 ’ RV a n d To w 2/16/13. Papers, worm- C a r . 2 0 0 1 N e w m a r ing, vaccinations, and Mountainaire and a 2009 flea and tick treatment Honda CRV tow car ofincluded. Medium-size, fered together or separinteligent, loving, versa- a t e l y. T h e R V h a s tile, and healthy. Great 61,400 miles on a gas dogs! $400. Call driven Trident V10 with a (360)928-0273. Banks system added. The interior is dark cherPUPPIES: Golden Re- r y w o o d w i t h c o r i a n triever, AKC purebred counter tops. The RV is registered, papered. in very good condition. $450. (360)797-8180. We just returned from a trip to Arizona which was PUPPIES: Golden Re- trouble free. The CRV trievers, male $700, fe- tow car is in excellent male $750. condition with 47,000 (360)912-2227 miles. Asking $40,000 for the RV and $20,000 SCOTTISH Terrier pupfor the CRV or $58,000 p i e s , p u r e b r e d . Tw o together. Please call Bill male, two female, all or Kathy at bl a ck . 1 1 w e e k s o l d . (360)582-0452 Both parents on site. to see the vehicles. First shots and deworming. They are being LONG DISTANCE raised around other aniNo Problem! mals and children. They are very sweet and don’t Peninsula Classified shed! $650. 1-800-826-7714 (360)452-5251

SOUTHWIND: 2001 Motorhome. 36’ Limited Edition. Very good condition. 16k mi., 2 slides, new levelers, rear camera, drivers side door, lots of storage inside and out. Many extras. Nonsmokers. $40,000. (360)683-5359

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: $13,750 /obo cash only, must sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ Lots of extras, lamin a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 slideouts, clean, comfor table, queen bed, central vac & more! Come see in Sekiu. Text/call 582-7130. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 Prowler Lynx 215. New raised a x l e s, 1 2 0 vo l t r e fe r, great shape, fully equipped, comes with hitch. $3,250. (360)460-6248, eves.

2006 Wells Cargo Trailer : Wells Cargo Utility Trailer, Inside dimensions 6’x12’. With fold down ramp rear door and side access door. Lightly used and in excellent condition. Please call ACTI @ 452-6776.

9808 Campers & Canopies CAMPER: ‘11 10’ Alaskan cab-over. Original owner, excellent cond. $9,000. (360)452-8968.

7x16 Interstate Cargo / Utility Trailer 2008 Black $3800 Excellent condition, less than 300 miles on it! Call 360-928-0214 TERRY ‘98: 30’ long, 1 large slideout. $6,500/ obo. (360)460-4408. TRAILER: ‘00 25’ Komfor t. Slide, air, bunks, queen bed, rear bath and shower, microwave, skylight, deluxe cabinets, AM/FM CD stereo. $8,000. (360)457-6066 or 460-6178, call or text. TRAILER: ‘04 27’Q Forrest River Cherokee. Excellent condition, new flooring, slide out with large window/skylights. $8,700. (360)379-5136. TRAVEL Trailer: ‘96 29’ H o l i d ay R a m bl e r, 1 slide. $5,500. (360)460-3708

9802 5th Wheels KOMFORT: 1997 23F 5th Wheel. Great condit i o n N ew t i r e s w a t e r pump (2012) 2 skylights 2 twin beds Awning Purchase option of deluxe hitch, Chev PU tailgate, 1000 Trails Membership Po r t a b l e g r e y w a t e r tank. $7,000. (360)683-4552

B E L L B OY : ‘ 6 4 1 8 ’ Classic. Very good condition, Volvo I/O, 7.5 hp Johnson kicker, fullc anvas, new EZ Load trailer, new tires, 2 downr igg e r s , l o t s o f ex t r a s . $2,600. (360)417-1001.

PA - Central

FRONT SCOOP: Tractor attachment, Craftsman, new $560. Asking $300. (360)477-4573. LARGE blooming rhododendrons and deciduous azaleas. Bigger than ever! $26! OP Plants and Berrys 151 D Street, Por t Hadlock, Monday thru Saturday, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. (360)379-6456. MISC: Craftsman weed trimmer, 6.0 hp, 22” high wheel, $200. Rototiller, Craftsman, 5.0 hp, 17” heavy duty counter-rotating rear tine, $200. R o u n d b a l e fe e d e r, $ 1 0 0 . M o w e r, S e a r s L 2 0 0 0 r i d i n g m o w e r, 4 2 ” , r u n s a n d m ow s, $250. (360)928-0254, (360)460-4773

8120 Garage Sales Jefferson County

UNDERTOWN COFFEEHOUSE/BAR BLOWOUT SALE Everything must go! Saturday, 8-1 p.m., 211 Tyler St., Por t Townsend. Loads of commercial restaurant equipment, supplies, furniture, fixtures. Sushi case, electric convection oven, ref r i g e r a t o r, u t e n s i l s , dishware, and other unique items. Use backdoor entrance.

8142 Garage Sales Sequim 2 H O U S E Ya r d s a l e : Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., Cedar Hill Ln., off Towne Rd, look for balloons. Fishing, collectibles, books, jewelry, quality women’s c l o t h i n g i n a l l s i ze s, bags, shoes, European decor items, antiques, tapestries.

HUGE Sale: Fr i.-Sat., 8-5 p.m., 619 E. 4th St. Oak file cabinet, oak night stand, beautiful baby crib, yard items, lots of really nice things. Collectibles, antiques and lots of everything. Don’t miss it.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

SEA RAY: ‘74 24’ HT Cruiser. Reconditioned/ e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / rough weather fishing/ cruising with ALL NEW equipment and features: repowered w/ Merc Horizon Engine/Bravo-3 (dual prop), stern drive (117 hrs.), complete Garmin electronics, reinforced stern, full canvas, downriggers, circ water heating, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, EZ Load trailer, w/disk brakes (1,200 mi.), electric winch. Other extras, C H R I S C R A F T : 2 6 ’ $52,000 invested. SacriCavalier with trailer, 350 fice for $18,500. MerCruiser inboard, Bow (360)681-5070 Thr uster, radar, GPS, sounder, toilet with Electro Scan. $14,995. 9817 Motorcycles (360)775-0054

DEATH TAKES OWNER OF FISHING BOAT 20 ft. Robolo Boat,Center Counsel, with 4 stroke 115 Yamaha Motor, has 400 hrs. on it. Electronics, trailer, (gal i va n i z e d ) d u a l a xe l , many extras. By appointment. $22,000. (360)417-0277

APRILIA: Scarabeo motorcycle/scooter 2009. This is a pristine motorcycle with less then 1000 miles on it! Hardly used! NOT A SR. S C O OT E R ! 5 0 0 C C s Needs a battery charge. $3600/obo. (360)808-6160

HONDA: 2003 VT750 A c e D e l u xe C r u i s e r. Showroom Condition Must see. Lots of Chrome, Many Extras. Will not find another bike like this. Never left out,never dropped. 10,387 Low Miles $4,500. (360)477-6968.

HONDA: ‘80 CB-900C. S i l ve r. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / o b o o r t r a d e fo r g u n s / s m a l l truck. (360)460-3756.

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153.

MOPED electric scooter E600. Like new, classified as an electric bicycle. No motorcycle certification is required. Range 25 miles. Speed up to 25 mph. Red. (360)460-0060

SLICKCRAFT: 1976 23’ inboard/outboard. 302 S C O OT E R : V K - E 5 0 0 engine, boat and trailer. electric, 48V/15AM, lithi$5,200. (360)457-8190. um battery, almost new, less than 20 mi., top EMAIL US AT speed 35 mpg, 30 mi. on classified@peninsula 1 charge, paid $1,450. dailynews.com $600/obo. 504-2113.

10008 for 4 weeks!

$

& Trades

WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . lures, P.A. Derby me- Sun., 9-2 p.m., 436 E. morabilia (360)683-4791 6th St, in the alley of 6th and Vine. Fur niture, electronics, Xbox 6135 Yard & games. Garden

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

BELLBOY: ‘78 24’ 20 KT Cruiser, 80 gal. fuel, 30 gal. water, 1,750 watt i nve r t e r, 1 2 0 V s h o r e power, 4 batteries, microwave, refr igerator, new depth finder, compass, GPS, VHF, dinette, new galley, new Wallas ceramic diesel stove/heater, auto leveling trim tabs, enclosed head, trailer with new disc brakes, wheels and tires. $8,000/obo. (360)683-9645

PACKAGE: ‘85 Dodge 350 and 11.5’ self con- EASTERN: ‘11 18’ centained camper. ter console, premium $1,900. (360)457-1153. boat, like new, completely equipped, 50 hp Yamaha, under 50 hrs. 9050 Marine in warranty, Load-r ite Miscellaneous galv. trailer, many ext ra s, D ow n e a s t s t y l e. BAYLINER: 17’, 70 hp See easternboats.com Yamaha, needs some $26,500. (360)477-6059 engine work but runs. GLASTROM: 16’ open $1,850. (360)460-9365. bow boat, 25 hp JohnBAYLINER: 1987 Capri son, Calkin trailer. $750/ 1750. GM 4 Cyl 3.0L en- obo. (360)385-3686. gine with OMC stern drive. Runs great! Elec- PONTOON BOAT: 10’ tronic ignition, Dual bat- ODC 1018, white water t e r i e s , H u m m i n g b i r d and still water, oars and 5 8 7 c i F i s h f i n d e r w i t h wheel mount. $295/obo. (360)912-1759 GPS. More info on PDN online. $3,800/obo. S E A R AY: 1 9 7 9 S RV (360)460-0460 1 9 5 . O r i g . o w n e r, 8 ’ beam, 305 Chev V8, 228 BAYLINER: 27’ Bucca- hp, Mercrusier, equip. neer 3500 obo or trade for salmon fishing, water for ‘land yacht’ +6’ head- s k i i n g , ve r y l ow h r s, r o o m ; 8 H P M e r c u r y used mostly in fresh walongshaft recently ser- ter, many extras, incl. all v i c e d : r u n s g r e a t ! ’ electronics and fishing Main+jib sail; small row- gear, EZ Load trailer, in ing skiff. Many extras storage 24 yrs., health Call Rob to see forces sale. $4,575/obo. (360)390-8497 (360)928-2518

MISC: Roll-around tool cabinet, top cabinet 10 drawers, bottom cabinet 5 drawers, 50 yr. collection of tools included. $300. AC arc and gas GARAGE Sale: Saturwelders, owner tanks, day, 9-5 p.m., 205 W $150. (360)681-2016. Spruce Street. Furniture, POOL TABLE: Full size, books, clothing, bedwith accessories, good frame headboards, misc. condition, could use new IN-HOUSE Sale: Fr i.rails. Buyer disassem- Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 961 bles and moves the ta- E. Fir. Lots to choose ble. $300 firm. from. (360)681-2478 MOVING Sale: Sat. 8-3, Sun. 8-1, 119 Clallam 6140 Wanted Bay in SunLand.

YARD Sale: Saturday, BOOKS WANTED! We 10-4 p.m., 110 Green love books, we’ll buy B r i a r L n . H o u s e h o l d yours. 457-9789. i t e m s, a m a t e u r ra d i o equipment and tools. WANTED: Moving boxes. Will pick up. 8180 Garage Sales (360)683-9146

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

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ESTATE Sale: Thurs.Fri.-Sat., 9-4 p.m., 905 W. 11th St. Kitchen stuff, office supplies, brand new exercise items, Christmas, books, and much more! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 11 Mapleton Way, 1/2 mi. down Lower Elwha Rd. Lots of tools, m a r i n e s t u f f, m o t o r s, lawn care items, lathe, and much more. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-2 p.m., 1921 W. Hwy. 101 #7. Furniture, toys, tools, small appliances, old hardware. G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . S u n . , 1 0 - 3 p. m . , 1 3 2 Herrick Rd. Too much to list! MOVING Sale: Ever ything goes. Sat. only, 9-3 p.m., 1317 W. 9th St., across from Shane Park. Computer par ts, furniture, kitchen items, exercise equipment, vanity and cabinet, antique trunk, women’s clothes and shoes, other odds and ends.

$100

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(4 Weeks)

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call Holly at 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

04915

THREE GALS ESTATE SALE 2112 Driftwood Pl Sat.-Sun., 9-3 “Spring” up to this one! Beautiful oak table with 6 chairs and hutch, twin bed, vintage items, TV stands, mirrors, freezer, washer/dryer, garden art CHILDREN’S MARKET bird houses and Neutron Reserve your table for lawn mower. Too much $10, keep your profits! to list. (13th & N). Sequim Prairie Grange, April 27, 12:30-3:30. Sell your gently used kid’s 8183 Garage Sales PA - East clothing and gear! Call 6 8 1 - 7 2 5 5 , F i ve A c r e HE-MAN AND School PSO. GIRLY FU-FU SALE H U G E G a r a g e S a l e : Sat., April 13, 8-3 p.m., Great deals on furniture, 81 New Haven Lane, off household, electronics Lake Farm Rd., east of you name it! 89 Ply Voy Por t Angeles. Lots of $600, 97 Chevy Silvera- construction materials, do PU $1,800. Moving, housewares and stuff. everything must go. Fri, Sat, Sun 8-4. 45 Frog MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat.Lane, Sequim. See you Sun., 9-7 p.m., 145 John Jacobs Rd., off O’Brien. there!

only


Classified

C6 FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9817 Motorcycles 9292 Others Others Others Others Others YAMAHA: ‘72 Enduro BUICK ‘04 CENTURY 100LT2. Ready to ride, SEDAN 3k original miles. $750/ 3.1L V6, automatic, new obo.(360)683-0146. tires, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, YAMAHA: ‘74 DT360. mirrors, and drivers seat, 4k original miles, runs cruise control, tilt, air g o o d , a m a z i n g c o n d . conditioning, dual zone $2,500/obo. 452-7253. climate control, CD/casYAMAHA: ‘79 XS 1100. sette stereo, dual front 35K, fairing, saddle bags a i r b a g s. O n l y 3 1 , 0 0 0 excellent cond. $2,750/ ORIGINAL Miles! One obo. (360)808-1922 or owner! No accidents! This car is in like new (360)681-3023 after 6. condition! 27 MPG highway! This is one great d r i v i n g c a r ! W hy bu y 9805 ATVs new when you can get one with this low of miles ETON: 90 cc Quad, 2 for much less? Stop by stroke, like new. $1,500 Gray Motors today! $9,995 firm. (360)452-3213. GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 9740 Auto Service graymotors.com

& Parts

ATTENTION BIG BOAT AND RV OWNERS Low miles, Diesel Cummings V8 engine, model #504, with Allison 4-speed trans with complete power train and radiator. $30,000 value for $7,500 firm. Don at (360)670-2204 PARTS: Model-A Ford. $25-$150. (360)683-5649

9742 Tires & Wheels

BRAND NEW WHEELS S t i l l i n b ox ! M i ckey Thomson Classic II, black, 16x8 with bolt pattern 8x6.5. Didn’t fit our Toyota 4-Runner and don’t want to pay the restock fee. $550/obo (360)460-1301

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

AMC: Rare 1970 AMX 2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd, 95% original. $19,950. (360)928-9477 BUICK: 1976 Skylark. Rare, 2 door, V-6, stick. $1,600/obo. 460-8610. CHEV: ‘63 Nova SS. 2 door hard top, V8, 2 sp power glide. $5,200. (360)461-2056 C H E V: ‘ 7 9 C o r ve t t e . L82, runs great, lots of new parts! $6,800/obo. (360)457-6540 HEWESCRAFT: 2005 20’ Searunner, Yamaha 115/165 hrs., Yamaha 15/low hours, GPS, VHF radio, fishfinder, great extras. One owner, EZ Loader/roller bunk, stored under cover. $27,900. 681-8835. Cell: 808-4381 MERCEDES: ‘85 SL380. Both tops, excellent condition. $10,000/obo. (360)460-6764 P O N T I AC : ‘ 7 0 G ra n d Prix. Good interior, runs good, drives good. $3,500/obo (360)683-3290 S T U D E BA K E R : 1 9 5 0 S t a r l i g h t C o u p. C o m plete restoration, black cherry color, runs good, looks excellent. $11,000. (360)683-8810

VW ‘64 BUG Stack of service records kept from 1974 up starting with 28,000 miles. Only 24K miles on new rebuilt engine, done by local VW exper ts. Odometer ready 85,857 m i l e s, bu t i s s o l d a s m i l e s u n k n o w n . Ve r y fine condition inside and out. This car will tur n heads. Even the original AM radio works! $6,450 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

9292 Automobiles Others AUDI ‘95 90 SERIES With sunroof, sport tires, leather int., runs great. $4397/obo. 477-3834. BUICK: ‘03 Park Ave. 1 owner, 67,500 mi., excellent condition. $6,500. (360)681-2016

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add: Pictures Borders Logos Bold Lines 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com or: marketplace. peninsuladaily news.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

HONDA ‘11 CIVIC Si 4 door, 16K mi., 197 hp, 2 liter VTEC 4 cyl, 6 sp manual trans, limited slip differential, aluminum pedal plates, moon roof, 17” alloy wheels, rear spoiler, balance of factory warranty. Price reduced to $20,000 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

CHEVY ‘03 SILVERABRUSHFIRE TRUCK FORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. DO LT 1500HD CREW1981 4X4 Runs GREAT, 4.0 V6, CAB 1 ton dually, 4 speed automatic with overdrive, manual with granny low, SB 4x4, 100k orig mi! custom wheels, AM/FM, 6.0L Vor tec V8, auto, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O cruise control, tilt wheel. t a n k , 4 y r o l d H o n d a loaded! White exterior in ext cab with two rear GX690 generator, dual great cond! Black leather side seats, slider window side diamond plate tool i n t e r i o r i n ex c e l e l e n t in rear, 226,000 miles boxes, everything is in shape! Dual pwr seats, 6 $2,700 or trade for travgreat operating condition disk CD with Bose, On- el trailer 18-25’ in good and was meticulously Star, cruise, tilt, climate, wo r k i n g o r d e r. L e ave maintained by an East- privacy glass, canopy, message (360)452-2970 ern Washington fire de- ‘bed-rug’, tow, premium par tment. Try and find alloys with 33” Toyo rubb e r, l ev e l i n g k i t , i n one this nice! t a ke / ex h a u s t , S i m p l y $12,950 amazing condition! A Preview at: KIA: 2003 Rio. 5 spd, 4 great tr uck @ our No heckmanmotors.com cylinder, less then 40K Haggle price of only Heckman Motors miles. $5,500/obo. $14,995! 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)808-1303 Carpenter Auto Center (360)912-3583 681-5090 L I N C O L N : ‘ 8 8 To w n FORD: ‘99 F-350 V10 C a r. C o z y 2 0 M P G . C H E V: 9 4 S i l ve r a d o. DODGE ‘08 RAM 1500 XLT Super Duty Crew Runs great. Good body 1500 Ext Cab - Excellent QUAD CAB SLT BIG Cab. 1999 F-350 V10 and interior with some C o n d i t i o n ! R u n s a n d HORN 4X4 Super Duty Crew Cab, rust spots. Good tires. drives great, very clean! CADILLAC ‘94 Brakes redone. All ac- $ 1 , 0 0 0 n e w t i r e s , 4 . 7 L F l ex - F u e l V 8 , 5 seats 6 comfortably, 8 s p e e d a u t o m a t i c , 2 0 ft. bed, one-ton chasELDORADO TOURING cessories work, includ- 158,000 miles, tow packEDITION i n g A / C, 1 3 0 k m i l e s. age, power windows and inch alloy wheels, key- sis, 4x4, with spray in less entr y, power win- bedliner, tow package NorthStar, leather, this $1,500 or best offer. Call locks, Nice interior. Call dows, door locks, mirand cd disc changer. car has it all, it’s a dia(360)683-1683 928-0214, $5,000/obo. rors, and drivers seat, 145,900 miles. Great mond. Actual 72K miles. cruise control, tilt, air condition and regularly $6,450 MERCEDES: ‘97 SL320. C H E V: ‘ 9 5 3 5 0 0 H D. Preview at: B o t h t o p s , g o l d / t a n . 8 ’ x 1 5 ’ w o o d d e c k , conditioning, CD stereo, m a i n t a i n e d . P l e a s e heckmanmotors.com $10,500. (360)683-7420. 84,760 mi., GTX 10-30 information center, dual call ACTI @ 360-452f r o n t a i r b a g s . Ke l l e y 6776 for information. Heckman Motors every 3,000 mi., original B l u e B o o k Va l u e o f NISSAN ‘01 ALTIMA 111 E. Front, P.A. owner. $8,500. GXE $21,124! Only 51,000 (360)912-3583 (360)301-0050 GMC ‘01 SONOMA 132k orig mi! 2.4l DOHC m i l e s ! C l e a n C a r fa x ! REGULAR CAB SL One owner! Extra clean C A R S : V W ‘ 6 4 B u g , 4cyl, auto. Silver met ext 2WD PICKUP CHEVROLET ‘04 SILinside and out! All the $3,950. Eagle ‘95 Talon in great cond! Gray cloth int in great shape! Pwr VERADO 1500 LS EXT right options at a price 2.2L 4 Cylinder, 5 speed TSI, $1,000. 477-3495. CAB 4X4 NW seat, pwr windows, pwr you can afford! Stop by manual, alloy wheels, new tires, spray-in bedPACKAGE CHEV: ‘70 Nova. High locks, pwr mirrors, CD, Gray Motors today! liner, air conditioning, 5.3L Vor tec V8, autop e r f o r m a n c e 3 5 0 . cruise, tilt, dual airbags, $17,995 AM/FM stereo, dual front m a t i c , a l l oy w h e e l s , 80% Bridgestone rubber! $5,000. (360)645-2275. GRAY MOTORS a i r b a g s. O n l y 8 2 , 0 0 0 Clean 2 owner Carfax b ra n d n ew t i r e s, t ow 457-4901 original miles! Clean CHEV ‘99 CAMARO with services! Great little package, spray-in bedgraymotors.com Carfax! Sparkling clean X28 CONVERTIBLE car @ our No Haggle liner, 4 opening doors, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r D O D G E : ‘ 9 8 D a ko t a . inside and out! 4 CylinV 8 , a u t o , v e r y r a r e price of only der a 5 speed combinaw i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, 1 6 0 K , 5 . 2 L V 8 , gr e a t ground effect pkg. with $5,995! rear spoiler, this was a Carpenter Auto Center mirrors, and drivers seat, running truck. $4,500/ tion for great fuel mileage! Priced to sell! Stop cruise control, tilt, air obo. (360)461-7210. 1999 Seafair display car 681-5090 by Gray Motors today! conditioning, dual zone at the hydroplane races NISSAN ‘01 ALTIMA FORD: ‘05 F150. 4x4 $5,995 c l i m a t e c o n t r o l , C D in Seattle. Extremely low GXE GRAY MOTORS stereo, dual front air- quad cab, automatic 5.4 43K miles. 132k orig mi! 2.4l DOHC bags. Kelley Blue Book L t , w i t h c h i p fo r i m 457-4901 $12,500 4cyl, auto. Silver met ext Value of $12,300! This proved milage, 121,000 graymotors.com Preview at: in great cond! Gray cloth miles, leather interior, Chevy stands tall with heckmanmotors.com int in great shape! Pwr brand new tires! Special power locks windows, GMC: ‘92 Sonoma S10. Heckman Motors seat, pwr windows, pwr Northwest Package! Lo- and mirrors, heated and E x t e n d e d c a b, 1 1 2 k 111 E. Front, P.A. locks, pwr mirrors, CD, cal trade-in! Freshly ser- p o w e r s e a t s , w i t h miles, hydraulic lift bed, (360)912-3583 cruise, tilt, dual airbags, viced and ready to go! memory, center console new tires and radiator, 4 C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 3 P T 80% Bridgestone rubber! Priced to sell fast! Stop and overhead console. cyl. Needs body work. C r u i s e r. 1 1 5 k m i l e s , Clean 2 owner Carfax w/ by Gray Motors today to 20” wheels, 10 ply tires, $2,000/obo. Shar p and well main- services! Great little car save big bucks on your tunnel cover with spray(360)477-4838 @ our No Haggle price next truck. bed-liner, and bed extained. $4,250. of only tension, tinted windows, $9,995 (360)796-4270 $5,995! excellent condition. GRAY MOTORS $13,000. (360)941-6373. CHRYSLER: 2002 LTD Carpenter Auto Center 457-4901 681-5090 PT Cruiser. 78k miles graymotors.com FORD: ‘88 Ranger 4x4. New battery. Black with V6, 5 speed, rebuilt tranc h r o m e t r i m , ex t r a s . N I S S A N : ‘ 9 7 A l t i m a . FORD ‘03 F150 Low mi., 78K, auto, air. ny, runs great, low miles. Moonroof, great stereo SUPER CREW and a gas to drive. too $5,000/obo. 681-7632. 4x4 XLT, 5.4L V8, fully $2,200/obo. 461-6970. much fun in the sun! loaded, this is a state FORD: ‘94 F150 XLT. NISSAN ‘97 SENTRA One owner who loved it! Fish & Wildlife truck, well Low mi., 4x4, runs good, TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma. GXE SEDAN 90K miles, 4X4. 2005 $5500/obo. 151k or ig miles! 1.6L maintained, super clean looks good. $4,500. Toyota Tacoma. Great (360)808-6160 DOHC 4 cyl, auto. Lt inside and out. (360)452-6758 tr uck, just over 90k $9,500 met blue exterior in great CHRYSLER ‘96 CIRmiles. Small Lift. Ride Preview at: shape! Gray cloth interiFORD: ‘96 Ranger. SuRUS LXI SEDAN and dr ives perfect. heckmanmotors.com or in great cond! Pwr per cab, good cond., 4 122k or ig miles! 2.5L windows, pwr locks, pwr $15,500/obo. Call Ryan Heckman Motors cyl., 2.3L, 5 speed, 24v V6, auto, loaded! mirrors, cruise, tilt, Cass, (425)422-6678 this truck 111 E. Front, P.A. matching shell, AC, Black exterior in great A/C, dual airbags, 33+ is located in Sequim. (360)912-3583 cruise. $3,499. 670-9087 shape! Cream leather in- MPG! Real nice fuel sipt e r i o r i n g r e a t c o n d ! per @ our No Haggle 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Power seat, Kenwood price of only C D w i t h a u x / i Po d , Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County $2,995 cruise, tilt, dual airbags, Carpenter Auto Center NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington wood trim, prem chrome 681-5090 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-500046-SH APN No.: 063000-033275 Title Orwheels! VERY nice little Cirrus @ our No Haggle SATURN: ‘07 Aura. Low der No.: 6489166 Grantor(s): LYNDA NELSON Grantee(s): NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007-1212157 I. price of only mi. $8,000. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, $2,995 (360)796-4762 the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/19/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to Carpenter Auto Center SCION: ‘08 XB. 40k, ex- the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell 681-5090 at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit cellent. $13,500. bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally (360)928-3669 DATSUN: ‘64 Fairlady or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real propconvertable. Project car. SUBARU: ‘97 Legacy erty, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE $1,700/obo. 452-6524. O u t b a ck . Pow e r w i n - LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF CLALDODGE ‘10 AVENGER dows/locks, AWD. LAM, CITY OF PORT ANGELES, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS LOT 15, $3,600. (360)775-9267. BLOCK 332, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE SXT Economical 2.4 liter 4OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 521 EAST 11TH STREET, TOYOTA ‘12 CAMRY cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust LE AM/FM/CD, power win- Fully loaded, very nice dated 10/25/2007, recorded 11/16/2007, under 2007-1212157 records of dows, locks and seat, c a r , l i k e n e w , o n l y CLALLAM County, Washington, from LYNDA NELSON, as Grantor(s), to keyless entry, side air- 16,000 miles. FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS CO, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor bags, only 37,000 miles, of NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in $19,900 balance of factory warwhich was assigned by NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC (or by its succesPreview at: ranty, very clean local sors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC . II. No acheckmanmotors.com trade in, non-smoker, tion commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to Heckman Motors E.P.A. rated 21 city / 30 seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or 111 E. Front, P.A. hwy mpg. Just reduced Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. (360)912-3583 $1000. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to $12,995 TOYOTA : ‘ 9 9 C a m r y pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $23,542.04 IV. REID & JOHNSON XLE. Great shape, all The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal MOTORS 457-9663 options, 4 cyl. auto OD. sum of $157,551.43, together with interest as provided in the Note from the reidandjohnson.com 10/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The $4,250. (360)460-1207. above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and VW: ‘66 Bug. Excellent the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale FORD ‘02 MUSTANG shape. $5,000. CONVERTIBLE will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, posses(360)457-7022 5.0L V8, auto, air, premision or encumbrances on 4/19/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III um wheels and tires, must be cured by 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a disconb r a n d n e w t o p, f u l l y VW: ‘72 Super Beetle. tinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any loaded, nice car! And by Great shape. $3,200. time before 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Para(360)809-3656 the way, it’s equipped graph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with nitrous oxide that VW: ‘74 Classic con- in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered can get 100 more horse- ver tible Super Beetle. bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/8/2013 (11 days before power, like it needs it? $9,500/obo. Call after 6 the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of It’s a rocket! any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, p.m. (360)460-2644. $5,990 plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obliPreview at: gation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice 9434 Pickup Trucks of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors Grantor at the following address(es): LYNDA NELSON 521 EAST 11TH Others 111 E. Front, P.A. STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on (360)912-3583 FORD: ‘88 3/4 ton. Runs 4/13/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of good. $1,000. FORD: ‘95 Contour. 4 Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on (360)775-9669 door, 4 cyl, auto. $2,050. the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has posses(360)379-4100 NEED EXTRA sion of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a stateCASH! G M C : ‘ 9 8 S U V. 4 W D, ment of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of low miles on new motor. the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or $3,695. (360)452-6611. Sell your under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. AnyTreasures! one having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afLEXUS ‘03 ES300 forded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit Fully loaded, we seldom to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit 360-452-8435 see cars this age in this may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. fine condition, don’t miss 1-800-826-7714 NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s this level of quality at Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the this low price. www.peninsula sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone $12,200 an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not dailynews.com having Preview at: tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to heckmanmotors.com evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter Heckman Motors PENINSULA 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a ten111 E. Front, P.A. ant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS CLASSIFIED (360)912-3583 THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN AT9935 General 9935 General TORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and reLegals Legals fer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. No. 13-4-00537-1 See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counseNOTICE TO CREDITORS lors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your THE STATE OF WASHINGTON house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for asIN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE sistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing FiIn re the Estate of nance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: VLADIMIR M. USHAKOFF, Deceased. http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownerThe Personal Representative named below has ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Departbeen appointed as Personal Representative of this ment of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or NaEstate. Any person having a claim against the de- tional Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling cedent must, before the time the claim would be agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/inbarred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita- dex.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc tions, present the claim in the manner as provided The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housin RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the ing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: Personal Representative or the Personal Represen- http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including tative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entiof the claim and filing the original of the claim with tled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purthe Court. The claim must be presented within the chaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further relater of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Repre- course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s sentative served or mailed the notice to the creditor Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this months after the date of first publication of the no- loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s tice. If the claim is not presented within this time against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT frame, the claim is forever barred, except as other- A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT wise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit This bar is effective as to claims against both the report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: DEC. 14, Date of First Publication: April 12, 2013 2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Personal Representative: Jackie A. Beery Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Attorney for the Estate: TANYA PEMBERTON Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, Address for Mailing or Service: CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Attorney at Law Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 P.O. Box 7406 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com Tacoma, WA 98417-0406 TS No.: WA-12-500046-SH A-FN4340746 03/22/2013, 04/12/2013 Pub: April 12, 19, 26, 2013 Legal No. 472170 Pub: March. 22, April 12, 2013 Legal No. 466726

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

HONDA ‘07 CRV LX 4WD, auto, fully loaded, very nice, excellent condition inside and out, well appointed options. $12,900 C H E V : ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n . Preview at: 4x4, 3.4 ton, 6.2L diesel. heckmanmotors.com $1,200/obo. 460-5736. Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 C H E V : ‘ 0 1 B l a z e r. 4WD, power windows, white, good cond. $2,900. (360)460-8155

C H E V: ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n 4x4. ‘454’, needs some work, body great shape, m a ny ex t ra s. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / obo. (360)461-6970. C H E V : ‘ 9 6 B l a z e r. 4x4, 184K, fully loaded, clean, exc. condition. $4,000/obo. (360)460-8631 FORD: ‘93 Explorer XLT. 4x4 auto, dark green, tan interior, looks great, runs great, 116K orig. mi., new front suspens i o n , n ew t ra n s, n ew brakes/wheel bearings, new head gaskets/timing chain, new rocker arms/ push rods, new radiator. $4,900. (360)457-3744. FORD: ‘97 Expedition XLT. 4x4, 3rd row seat. $2,790. (360)461-2145. GMC: ‘90 Jimmy.Rebuilt. Call for details. $2,500. (360)452-6649

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HONDA ‘07 ELEMENT SC Auto, premium sound, fully loaded, 18” wheels with brand new Michelin tires, 4 cyl, new brakes, excellent condition inside and out. $14,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

9730 Vans & Minivans Others

C H E V ‘ 9 7 Va n : ( 7 ) pssngr, 45k mi on Jasper engi, recent R&R radiator, trans rebuild, etc. $3,1000/obo. 582-9179.

DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. Newer trans, needs front struts/module. $1,000/ obo. (206)999-6228. D O D G E : ‘ 9 8 C a rava n Spor t. 133K, excellent condition. $2,850. (360)681-2144

FORD ‘01 E-350 SUPERDUTY 15-PASSENGER CLUBWAGON XL 5.4 liter V8, auto, front and rear A/C and heat, 15-passenger seating, tow package, only 47,000 miles, very clean government owned, fleet maintained, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. Ideal JEEP: ‘04 Grand Chero- for your church, day care kee. L6, auto, full power, or large family. $8,995 privacy windows, 88K mi REID & JOHNSON $8,250. (360)460-0114. MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com JEEP ‘10 PATRIOT SPORT AWD FORD ‘05 FREESTAR Economical 2.4 liter 4SE cyl, auto, A/C, all wheel 3.9 liter V6, auto, A/C, drive, A/C, cruise, tilt, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, AM/FM/CD, keyless en- power windows, locks try, side airbags, power and seat, keyless entry, windows, locks and seat, privacy glass, luggage power moonroof, privacy rack, only 45,000 miles, glass, luggage rack, only beautiful 1-family owned 34,000 miles, balance of local car, senior driven, factor y warranty. Ver y spotless “Autocheck” veclean 1-owner corporate h i c l e h i s t o r y r e p o r t . lease return, non-smok- Great value! er, spotless “Autocheck:” $7,995 vehicle histor y repor t. REID & JOHNSON Near new condition. very MOTORS 457-9663 nice smaller SUV. reidandjohnson.com $16,495 REID & JOHNSON FORD: ‘91 Van. WheelMOTORS 457-9663 chair lift, 97k miles, enreidandjohnson.com gine purrs. $3,800. (360)681-5383 LINCOLN: ‘04 Navigat o r. 9 5 k , AW D, 4 X 4 , ISUZU: ‘00 16’ van. Dieleather, seats 7 com- sel engine, 179,166 mi., fortably, good family ve- runs great, auto tail lift. hicle, new compressor $7,000. Call Cookie at and tabs, 6 disc changer (360)385-6898, lv msg. and Bose sound syster m, ver y reliable. V W : ‘ 8 4 Va n a g o n $12,000/obo. Camper Van. (360)460-5421 $5,000. (360)460-6860.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-510216-SH APN No.: 0630135306400000 Title Order No.: 6573218 Grantor(s): BRENT ROBINSON, CHELSEA ROBINSON Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 20061176625 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Ser vice Cor p. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/19/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THAT PORTION OF VACATED BLOCK 6 AND OF VACATED PINE STREET OF TIPTON ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 103, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 24 IN BLOCK 3 OF SAID TIPTON ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID BLOCK 6 OF TIPTON ADDITION AND THE NORTHERLY EXTENSION THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 170 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID BLOCK 6 AND THE SOUTHERLY EXTENSION THEREOF TO THE SOUTH LINE OF VACATED PINE STREET OF SAID TIPTON ADDITION; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID VACATED PINE STREET, 100 FEET; THENCE NORTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID BLOCK 6 TO A POINT 170 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH LINE OF VACATED ROY STREET OF SAID TIPTON ADDITION; THENCE WEST 100 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 391 BROWN ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/14/2006, recorded 3/16/2006, under 20061176625 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from BRENT ROBINSON AND CHELSEA ROBINSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage, LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $36,169.58 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $203,023.27, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/19/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): BRENT ROBINSON AND CHELSEA ROBINSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE 391 BROWN ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 7/3/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: DEC. 17, 2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-510216-SH A-FN4340280 03/22/2013, 04/12/2013 Pub: March. 22, April 12, 2013 Legal No. 466744


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 C7

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-529422-SH APN No.: 033019511206 Title Order No.: 120324145-WA-GSO Grantor(s): MARY E SOMERO Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2006 1182435 1. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/10/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 6, IN BLOCK 2, CENTRAL PLAT OF TOWNSITE OF SEQUIM, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF PLATS, PAGE 77, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 259 W SPRUCE ST, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/13/2006, recorded 6/16/2006, under 2006 1182435 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Mary E Somero, a single person, as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $11,174.15 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $132,164.91, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/10/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph HI is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME Mary £ Somero, a single person ADDRESS 259 W SPRUCE ST, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 11/8/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 01/04/2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-529422-SH A-4344755 04/12/2013, 05/03/2013 Pub: April 12, May 3, 2013 Legal No. 471120

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-521043-SH APN No.: 0630005402200000 Title Order No.: 120260309-WA-GSO Grantor(s): LAURA R. GEBHARDT Grantee(s): JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2011-1269705 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/19/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE WEST HALF OF LOT 4 AND THE EAST HALF OF LOT 5, BLOCK 107, E.C. BAKER’S SUBDIVISION OF SUBURBAN LOT 19 ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 7 RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1022 E 3RD ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/18/2011, recorded 9/1/2011, under 2011-1269705 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from LAURA R. GEBHARDT, A SINGLE OERSIB ABD TRUSTEE OF THE LAURA R. GEBHARDT LIVING TRUST DATED MARCH 18, 2004 FOR THE BENEFIT OF LAURA R GEBHARDT, as Grantor(s), to SERVICELINK TITLE - NATL VENDOR, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $11,571.57 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $89,307.56, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/19/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/8/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME LAURA R. GEBHARDT, A SINGLE OERSIB ABD TRUSTEE OF THE LAURA R. GEBHARDT LIVING TRUST DATED MARCH 18,2004 FOR THE BENEFIT OF LAURA R GEBHARDT ADDRESS 1022 E 3RD ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 8/23/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/17/12 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-521043-SH, A-FN4339743 03/22/2013, 04/12/2013 Pub: March. 22, April 12, 2013 Legal No. 466730

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-503593-SH APN No.: 05-30-08-570220 Title Order No.: 120101388-WA-GNO Grantor(s): KEVIN W PEDREY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC, A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1244104 1. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 5/10/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 5, BLOCK B, FOUR SEASONS RANCH, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 36, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. A.P.N.: 05-30-08-570220 More commonly known as: 402 STRAIT VIEW DRIVE, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/14/2009, recorded 10/14/2009, under 2009-1244104 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from KEVIN W PEDREY , A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC, A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC, A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $27,708.55 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $252,381.36, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 12/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 5/10/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME KEVIN W PEDREY, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE ADDRESS 402 STRAIT VIEW DRIVE, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 12/7/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: Jan 07, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-503593-SH A-4344867 04/12/2013, 05/03/2013 Pub: April 12, May 3, 2013 Legal No. 471127

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Classified

C8 Friday, April 12, 2013

Peninsula Daily News

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2FAR concert, painting | This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new movies

Monique Mead

Peninsula

with PA Symphony

Monique Mead, an internationally known musician, is guest soloist at with the Port Angeles Symphony this Saturday.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF APRIL 12-18, 2013


2

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Coming Up

Pouring live jazz across Peninsula

A GOTHIC

Pianist Linda Dowdell and saxophone-clarinet man Craig Buhler are adding two more players tonight for their gig at Wine on the Waterfront, upstairs in The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles. Their new compatriots in jazz are “the brilliant Taylor Ackley on bass and drummer Terry Smith, the groove king,” Dowdell and Buhler say in their invitation. The music, from Dave Brubeck standards to originals, will flow from 7:30 p.m. till about 10 p.m. at WoW, where all ages are welcome and there’s no cover charge. Next Friday, April 19, a different wine bar will be filled with jazz piano and sax. Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., will host Buhler and Dowdell from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Admission is free, while snacks and beverages are for sale. Buhler’s CD, “Ripples,” will be available at both venues. For details, phone Wind Rose at 360-681-0690 or Wine on the Waterfront at 360-565-VINO (8466).

COMEDY

Ares Altamirano is Jack Frost in “Kreepshow: A Gothic Comedy Cabaret,” at Manresa Castle tonight and Saturday. Tickets to the 9 p.m. show are $15 in advance at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., downtown Port Townsend, or $20 at the door of Manresa Castle, 651 Cleveland St. in uptown Port Townsend. “Kreepshow” will return for more dark comedy and intrigue April 26-27, May 10-11 and May 24-25. To find out more, phone 360-385-5750 or visit BlackPearl Cabaret.wordpress.com.

May we help?

Latin lessons PORT TOWNSEND — Salsa Night returns to The Upstage this Sunday, with a rumba dance lesson at 5:30 p.m. and a beginning salsa class at 6:15 p.m. Instructors Tom Fairhall and Jean Bettanny wel-

come everybody regardless of dance background, while experienced dancers are invited to come and help novices. A $5 admission charge covers both lessons plus the open dancing afterward from 7 p.m. till 9 p.m. at The Upstage, 923 Washington St. For more information about this monthly gathering, phone 360-385-6919.

Jazz singer on tap PORT ANGELES —

Jazz songbird Sarah Shea will fill the Next Door gastropub with her music this Sunday evening, and as always with the Sunday sets at the venue at 113 W. First St., there’s no cover charge. Shea, along with her band Chez Jazz, offers her interpretations of standards such as “Summertime,” “Fever” and “Cry Me a River” from 5 p.m. till 7 p.m. For details, phone Next Door at 360-504-2613.

Last dance PORT TOWNSEND — The Olympic Peninsula Dance group wraps up its season with an event next Friday, April 19, at the Elks Club, 555 Otto St. This time around Jim Nyby and the F Street Band will provide the blues, Latin, roots and rock music for dancing from 8 p.m. on into the night. First, though, a samba dance lesson will start the evening at 7 p.m. TURN

TO

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

Jazz pianist Linda Dowdell and saxman Craig Buhler have two wine-bar gigs coming: tonight at Wine on the Waterfront in Port Angeles and next Friday, April 19, at Wind Rose Cellars in Sequim.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

3

It’s good to go

2FAR DIANE URBANI

Above, Bradford King, along with his band Urban Jellyfish, brings stinging rock ’n’ roll to Bar N9ne tonight.

At right, during tonight’s Second Friday Art Rock party at Bar N9ne in Port Angeles, artist Marjorie Newberg intends to show that face-painting isn’t just for children.

DE LA

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Music, art go beyond usual at fourth anniversary event BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Seattle band Urban Jellyfish, whose sting mixes soul, rock and blues, will take the stage at Bar N9ne tonight for a fourth-anniversary edition of Second Friday Art Rock, aka 2FAR. For a fistful of years now, 2FAR has been pairing local artists — painters, photographers, mixed-media mavens — with musicians from all over the stylistic map. And for this birthday party tonight, featured artist Marjorie Newberg will step up to prove something. Face-painting is not just for children, Newberg said. She hopes to decorate at least some of the grown men and women who visit Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., after 8 p.m. While faces are being painted, Urban Jellyfish will provide a soundtrack. The band, which sent a subset of its personnel here for a show at Studio Bob last winter, is bringing its full complement this time: Meghan Sinoff, Jonathan Seeber, Rob Reed, Jon McCormick and Bradford King. To preview their music, visit http://urbanjellyfishband.com. The cover charge, as always with 2FAR, is $3 at the door.


4

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Incredible, danceable Eggplant PA band to dish up tunes for community Saturday get-together BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Eggplant, the six-piece funk-bluessoul band, will dish out the songs for another â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just for Funâ&#x20AC;? community dance this Saturday night at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 W. Fourth St.

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Dance instructor Steve Johnson and his crew host this party from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, while those 15 and younger get in free. Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from his Wednesday night swing classes at the Port Angeles Senior Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also pay no admission.

Variety â&#x20AC;&#x153;We play Stevie Wonder, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Bob Marley,â&#x20AC;? for example, said Israel Butler, Eggplantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keyboardist. The band also features Zubrie Kamau on congas, djembe and shakers; drummer Craig Dills;

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what they tell me,â&#x20AC;? said Butler, who joined Eggplant in October. Dancers are invited to bring their own soft drinks Saturday night, along with snacks to share. More information about this Just for Fun dance and Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classes is available by phoning 360457-5950.

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Where & when â&#x2013;  Who: Eggplant at â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just for Funâ&#x20AC;? community dance â&#x2013;  When: Saturday, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. â&#x2013;  Where: Vern Burton Community Center, 308 W. Fourth St., Port Angeles â&#x2013;  Admission: $5 for adults, children 15 and younger free; Steve Johnson swing dance students, also free â&#x2013;  Information about community dances and classes: 360-457-5950.

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bassist Tom Swinford and two singer-guitarists, Stew Mueller and Kevin Briggs. The group often plays at Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., on Thursday nights, Butler added. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open-mic night, so after the rest of the performers do their sets, Eggplant takes the stage. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name comes from a convergence of apparel, according to Butler. One day, all of the band members were wearing tie-dyed T-shirts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in colors that reminded them of an eggplant.

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Eggplant, a rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soul band based in Port Angeles, plays a community dance this Saturday at the Vern Burton center. From left are Thomas Swinford, Craig Dills, Zubrie Kamau, Israel Butler, Kevin Briggs and Stew Mueller.

360-452-8434


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

5

Local artists to teach beaded jewelry class Part of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How Do I . . .â&#x20AC;&#x2122; series at Sequim Library PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Sequim Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Do I . . .â&#x20AC;? series continues with a free class on beaded jewelry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; taught by three local artists â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this Thursday, April 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Do I . . . Bead?â&#x20AC;? will start at 1 p.m. with Jamestown Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam tribal elder Janet Duncan, Snohomish elder Marlene

Hanson and Jamestown librarian Siri Hiltz teaching beading basics with all supplies provided. Participants will also be invited to choose a beading project: either a bracelet using a square stitch, a peyote-stitch keychain, a simple pair of earrings or a rosette, which is a traditional element for Native American jewelry and clothing.

Duncan and Hansonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beaded necklaces and earrings can be found at the Northwest Native Expressions Gallery, 1033 Old Blyn Highway in Blyn, and at the Dungeness River Audubon Center in Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 Hendrickson Road just northwest of Sequim.

Help in class Hiltz is the librarian at the Jamestown Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam Tribal Library, which is open to the public at the Jamestown Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam Tribal Center 7 miles east

of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101. Hiltz, who will assist Hanson and Duncan in Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class, has had training in jewelry design.

Limited space Since space and supplies are limited, potential beaders are asked to sign up in advance. The Sequim Library, at 630 N. Sequim Ave., can be reached at 360-683-1161 or Sequim@ nols.org. More details about this and other North Olympic Library System programs can be found at www.NOLS.org.

Janet Duncan, a Jamestown Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam elder, will be among three artists teaching a free class in beading at the Sequim Library next Thursday afternoon.

THE SECOND STORY TOUR

FIRST for Eve ThereCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sAaSING SECRET SURPRryIStEhing! S HOW

Come

Play

With Us as we...

TipToe Through the Tulips Saturday April 20 Visit beautiful Friday Harbor Saturday June 29 & Saturday September 21 3rd Annual Wine, Women & Water Harbor Cruise Featuring Kathy Charlton of Olympic Cellars

Meet at the Conrad Dyer Fountain (Lincoln & Laurel St.) at 9:00 am RQ6DWXUGD\$SULODQGKHDGRIIRQDIUHHIXQIDFWĂ&#x20AC;OOHGWZRKRXU WRXUXSDQGGRZQ)LUVW6WUHHWDQGGLVFRYHUZKDWLVDERYH RUEHORZ  WKHVWUHHWOHYHOVKRSVDQGEXVLQHVVHV\RXSDVVE\HYHU\GD\ 3UHVHQWHGE\WKH3RUW$QJHOHV'RZQWRZQ$VVRFLDWLRQZKRLQYLWH \RXWR([SHULHQFH([SORUHDQG(QMR\\RXU'RZQWRZQ

Friday July 12

Early reservations recommended for these popular cruises. Reservations and Information 360/452-6210 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Likeâ&#x20AC;? us on Facebook Full calendar of events www.expeditionsnw.com

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S ON


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PE ENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

Connection

in the heart Violinst to join PA Symphony in its weekend concerts

Angeles High School Performing Arts Center first PENINSULA DAILY NEWS at 10 a.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. PORT ANGELES — Mead, a violinist who Lift the bow, draw it across lives in Pittsburgh, Pa., the strings, and you say and teaches at Carnegiethings you cannot say any Mellon University, is makother way. ing her third trip here for a So believes Monique Port Angeles Symphony Mead, the guest soloist to event. And when she offer Camille Saint-Saens’ music in Port Angeles twice describes her feelings about playing, she doesn’t this weekend. hold back. Saint-Saens’ Concerto “It’s a heart-to-heart No. 3 in b for Violin and Orchestra, plus music from connection, a direct transSibelius, Sullivan, Liadov mission of emotion,” Mead and Ravel, will fill the Port said. “You can feel when BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

the audience is with you.” Mead hailed the Port Angeles Symphony and its conductor, Adam Stern, for their way with an audience, saying that Stern always has an intriguing musical combination up his sleeve. “He knows how to program,” she said, “and how to create an experience for the audience. “And nobody tells the anecdotes like he does,” added Mead, who has performed with Stern at the Orcas Island Chamber Music Festival.

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musicians,” Stern writes in his concert program notes. “He delighted in collecting children’s playthings Pre-concert talk and knickknacks; little wind-up toys were a particAs he does before each ular passion.” Port Angeles Symphony Also on Saturday’s proevening concert, Stern will gram are Sir Arthur Sulligive a short talk on the concert’s music and compos- van’s overture from “Iolanthe,” which Stern ers at 6:40 p.m. Saturday. And this time, with Rav- calls a medley of the operetta’s “superb” melodies. el’s “Mother Goose Suite” Liadov’s “Kikimora” symon the itinerary, Stern is likely to mention how that phonic poem and Sibelius’ “The Bard,” a tone poem in composer stayed in touch which the harp is the most with his “inner child” for important instrument, are the entirety of his life. Ravel “loved the unpre- here too. Mead, for her part, has tentiousness of children, both as companions and as been busy preparing the

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Internationally known violinist Monique Mead returns to the Olympic Peninsula for performances with the Port Angeles Symphony this Saturday.

The late Maestro Bernstein “was the one who truly inspired me,” Mead said, “to take my career in the direction of building new audiences.” Mead still goes to Germany six times a year to teach, perform and speak on classical music. She has made her primary home in the States for 10 years now, having come to Pittsburgh with her husband Andrés Cárdenes, concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony. “I moved here Saint-Saens concerto. In for love,” she said. addition to her performing Mead continues to schedule, she is director of travel for love of her music: music entrepreneurship She came to Port Angeles studies at Carnegie-Mellon, to perform with the symwhich means she teaches phony in April 2011 and to student musicians about do a symphony benefit at marketing, stagecraft, pub- Peninsula College in March lic speaking and the busi2012. ness of music. “The audiences there are incredibly friendly and Performer, teacher warm,” she said. “That rapport is the most rewarding Born in Indiana but raised in Germany, Mead is thing about performing.” Tickets to Saturday’s an internationally known 10 a.m. Port Angeles Symperformer and teacher. phony dress rehearsal conShe traveled across cert are $5 per person or Europe with conductor $10 per family. Leonard Bernstein on his final tour of the continent; TURN TO HEART/8 he was 89 and she 20.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

CAPTURING the

moments

little Revamped gallery joins Second Weekend Art Walk BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A reinvented gallery joins the lineup of Second Weekend art festivities this Saturday, courtesy of a raft of local artists. Harbor Art, at 110 E. Railroad Ave. in the former Labrie Glass shop, opens with a reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday during the Second Weekend gallery stroll.

Pamela Dicks, Ann Elizabeth Fisher and Laurie Dokken. Harbor Art is also home to two work spaces, Stokes’ RBS Sculpture Studio and Elstrom’s ceramics studio. After Saturday’s opening, the curious are invited to see the new gallery and studios during regular hours from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

N

earby, the Landing Art Gallery will likewise hold a he place is a showcase of Saturday art party from glass, ceramics, metalwork, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. in its space lighting, purses, scarves, jew- inside The Landing mall at 115 E. elry, fractal and traditional Railroad Ave. photography and mixed-media creHowly Slim will sing and play guiations, all created by members of the tar, Smuggler’s Landing will serve Harbor Art collective. These members snacks and this month, watercolor include Cindy Elstrom, Bob Stokes, portraitist Janet Beers is the painter Valerie Thomas, Jennifer Bright, Ellie in the spotlight. Polk, Richard Kohler, Eric Neurath, TURN TO ART/8 Sunny Benham, Sky Heatherton,

T

Above and left, Janet Beers’ watercolor portraits are highighted during Saturday evening’s reception at the Landing Art Gallery. The gallery, inside The Landing mall, is on the art-walk circuit in downtown Port Angeles.

J

oin rock band Urban Jellyfish and artist Marjorie Newberg at Bar N9ne for 2FAR. See Page 3 for details

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Heart:

Art: Painter

Times, tickets

captures pets, family, others

CONTINUED FROM 6 CONTINUED FROM 7 Then, for the 7:30 p.m. concert, reserved seats are $20 to $30 while general admission is $15 for adults and $12 for seniors and students. Tickets will be available at the door of the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center, 304 E. Park Ave. For those who want to buy in advance, outlets for general seating tickets include Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., Port Angeles; Sequim Village Glass, 761 Carlsborg Road; and The Good Book/Joyful Noise Music Center, 108 W. Washington St., Sequim. For reserved seats in advance, phone the Port Angeles Symphony office at 360-457-5579 or visit www. PortAngelesSymphony.org.

After attending a workshop with George Zien, another local artist, Beers realized watercolor is her medium. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s displaying the results, some of which are portraits of family members, family pets and friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But most,â&#x20AC;? Beers said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;are of strangers, caught while enjoying life and love.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WATER: THE GIFT

OF

A

few blocks away at Studio Bob, 118½ E. Front St., the Paint a Chair party will be going on from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m. Saturday. In this participatory event, individuals and teams will pay $20 for the supplies to turn a chair into a work of art. Already signed up are Stokes and Elstrom, Gay Whitman, Sarah Tucker and her daughters Celeste and Zoe Tucker, Cathy Haight, Dani LaBlond, Alex Anderson, Getta Rogers, Lauren Jeffries-Johnson, Jacob Lewis and Jennifer Bright.

LIFEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Port Angeles artist Irene Loghry will be at Karonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Frame Center, 625 E. Front St., for an opening reception for her art show titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water: The Gift of Life,â&#x20AC;? tonight. Art lovers are invited to enjoy her soft pastel and oil paintings, along with refreshments and conversation, from 6 p.m. till 8 p.m. at the Port Angeles shop.

Please join us for the 2013

Spring Concert of the b minor Mass Johann Sebastian Bach

April 21, 2013, 2:00 pm

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djacent to Studio Bob, meanwhile, the Art Up Front Gallery beckons with a show of creations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from sculpture to altered photos â&#x20AC;&#x201D; by a variety of local artists. Art Up Front, also at 118½ E. Front St., will have an opening reception from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m.; regular gallery hours are 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Other Second Weekend attractions include live music at Elliottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St., on Saturday afternoon. From 2 p.m. till 5 p.m., Roma Peters, aka Hawaii Amor, will sing and play her ukulele; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no admission charge at the shop.

FREE Consultation

Featured Soloists: Janeanne Houston, Soprano; Sharon Annette Lancaster, Soprano; Esther Morgan-Ellis, Alto; Ross Hauck, Tenor; Glenn Guhr, Bass with Orchestra and Organ

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There are still chairs up for grabs, however, and would-be painters can reserve theirs by phoning 360-775-4154 or emailing sarah@tuckerart.com. The finished chairs will continue to live at Studio Bob.

peninsuladailynews.com


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Coming Up

Admission is $15 to this, the last Olympic Peninsula Dance event till September. More details about it and other dances and classes await at www. OlympicPeninsulaDance. com.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT LUDLOW — Photojournalist Gary Settle, formerly of The New York Times, Seattle Times and Chicago Daily News, will be the speaker at next Wednesday’s Port Ludlow Artists’ League meeting. The 1 p.m. program, titled “Composition in Art and Photography,” reflects not only Settle’s work as a newspaperman but also his recent development as a camera-wielding artist.

Taiko show

9

Photographer to speak in Ludlow Lecture to focus on composition

CONTINUED FROM 2

PORT ANGELES — The On Ensemble, four men who mix Japanese taiko drumming with hiphop, electronica and rock ’n’ roll, will arrive at the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center, 304 E. Park Ave., next Saturday, April 20. Reserved seats at the 7:30 p.m. show are $15, or $9 for children age 12 and younger. For details about and tickets to this Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts presentation, visit www.JFFA.org, find the Juan de Fuca Festival page on Facebook or phone 360457-5411.

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

tographer of the Year awards in 1968 and 1970 and service as president of the National Press Photographers’ Association during the late 1970s. With his artist wife Patti, Settle came to the Puget Sound region in 1979 to accept a job as the assistant managing editor

of graphics at The Seattle Times, where he ran the photography and art departments and oversaw the newspaper’s design.

Peninsula retirement Retiring in Port Ludlow has given Settle new vistas to explore with his cameras, from local scenery to his Siamese cat, Sophie, who appears in many of

his photos. For more information about this and other Port Ludlow Artists’ League activities, phone president Carol Durbin at 360-4370204 or e-mail gramcr@aol. com.

peninsuladailynews.com

Presents

Guests welcome Singer Franc D’Ambrosio, the star of “Phantom of the Opera,” brings “Hollywood Songs of the Silver Screen” to the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, in Port Ludlow on Saturday, April 20.

Guests are welcome at the league’s meeting at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place. Admission is $5 — unless a newcomer wants to join the league for yearly dues of $30. Settle’s 45-year career in photojournalism included Newspaper Pho-

‘Phantom’ appears

34760118

G et the "dir t"sion our web te!

With taiko drums at the foundation of their world fusion mix, On Ensemble take the ancient instruments of taiko into new realms, infusing the powerful rhythms of Japanese drumming with elements of hip-hop, rock, and electronica. On Ensemble’s unique sound has been praised as “completely original and brilliantly conceived.”

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PORT LUDLOW — “Phantom of the Opera” Summer nights star Franc D’Ambrosio will PORT ANGELES — bring his “Hollywood Songs Olympic Cellars, the winof the Silver Screen” show ery at 255410 U.S. Highto the Bay Club, 120 Spinway 101 east of Port Ange- naker Place, next Saturday, les, has announced the per- April 20. formers in its summer conDoors will open at 6:30 cert series. p.m. for the 7:30 p.m. set, The lineup starts with to include musical theater the horn-driven funk band classics such as “Some the Polyrhythmics on July Enchanted Evening” from 20 and continues with “South Pacific,” “Bring Him Creme Tangerine, a Beatles Home” from “Les tribute band, on July 27; Misérables,” “The Impossithe Canadian CelticBhangra fusion band Delhi ble Dream” from “Man of 2 Dublin on Aug. 3; country La Mancha,” and “Music of the Night” from “The Phansinger Chance McKinney tom of the Opera.” on Aug. 10; bluesman Tickets are $24 at the LeRoy Bell and His Only Bay Club and at www. Friends on Aug. 17 and BrownPaperTickets.com. Polecat, a rock and blueFor more details about grass band from Bellingthis Port Ludlow Arts ham, on Aug. 31. Council event, phone 360For details, visit www. 437-2208. OlympicCellars.com or phone 360-457-0160. Peninsula Daily News

Saturday, April 20, 2013 7:30 pm Port Angeles High School Auditorium Reserved Seating: $15

Tickets on Sale at www.jffa.org Or Port Book and News in Port Angeles and Pacific Mist Books in Sequim Sponsored by


10

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Celebrate the music of the great

John Denver

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PS

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Bar Hop Brewery (124 W. Railroad Ave.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Rachael, Mick and Barry, today, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Second Friday Art Rock with Urban Jellyfish (rock, soul), today, 8 p.m.; $3.; Cody Rentas Band (blues and rock), Saturday, 9 p.m. $3; Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Bushwhacker Restaurant (1527 E. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charlie Ferris, Monday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Jimmy Hoffman Band (country and rock), Saturday, 9 p.m. Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

In Port Angeles, May 4, 2013

Ted Vigilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rocky Mountain High

02/#%%$3"%.%&)44(%0/24!.'%,%3()'(3#(//,/2#(%342!

Port Ludlow

Port Angeles Senior Center (Seventh and Peabody streets) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Community Dance with Eggplant (funk, soul), Saturday, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. $5 admission; Wallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boys (ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free. R Bar (132 E. Front St) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m. Wine on the Waterfront (115 E. Railroad Ave.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Linda Dowdell and Craig Buhler with Taylor Ackley, today, 7:30 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn The Cedars at Dungeness Stymieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill (1965 Woodcock Road) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kevin Lee Magner and Scott Bradley, tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave and Rosalie Secordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Luck of the Draw Band with special guests Twisted Roots, today from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victor hosts an open mic, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign up 6 p.m.)

Follow the PDN on 34752634

available at: Northwest Fudge in Downtown Port Angeles 0ACIlC-IST"OOKSIN$OWNTOWN3EQUIM ORONLINEATWWWNWPERFORMINGARTSCOM

Next Door Gastropub (113 W. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chez Jazz with Sarah Shea, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dukes of Dabob, today, 5:30 p.m.; Olympic Express Big Band, Saturday; Denny Secord Trio, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m.

The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shivering Denizens, today, 8 p.m.; Jason Mogi and Paul Stehr-Green, Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Ches Fergu-

Tickets $25, $15, $10

guitar) Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Elliottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Antique Emporium (135 E. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hawaii Amor (Hawaiian music and love songs solo on ukulele), Saturday, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Front Street Alibi (1605 E. Front St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jimmy Hoffman Band (country and rock), today, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

PAHS Performing Arts Center %0ARK!VENUEsPMs-AY

son, Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funnaddicts (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s dance), tonight, 8 p.m.; Pat Travers Band (rock), Saturday, 7 p.m.; The Hipsters (modern rock), Saturday, 9 p.m.; Haywire (country), Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; Joey James Dean (country), Thursday, 6 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Silver and Gold (classic country with bluegrass), Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Hadlock FACEBOOK

TWITTER

Peninsula Daily

pendailynews

Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson (classical

The Resort at Port Ludlow (One Heron Road) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson, Saturday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Port Townsend Alchemy (842 Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue. Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine (1208 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m. The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sirens (823 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carolyn Mark & Her New Best Friends, today, 10 p.m. $5; The Better Half, Saturday, 10 p.m. $5; fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, Thursday, 9 p.m. The Upstage (923 Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The BBC Jazz Band with guest vocalist Robin Bessier, today, TBA; The New Iberians (zydeco), Saturday, 7:30 p.m. $10; open mic, Monday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Barney McClure and Susan Pascal (jazz), Thursday, TBA Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Open mic hosted by Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m. This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

11

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PS At the Movies: Week of April 12-18 sis under Port Angeles listings. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 12:45 p.m. Saturday.

Port Angeles

“G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (PG13) — In this sequel, the G.I. Joes are not only fighting their mortal enemy Cobra, they are forced to contend with threats

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chadwick Boseman as Jackie Robinson, left, and Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey star in “42,” opening today at Deer Park Cinema in Port Angeles and the Rose Theatre in Port Townsend.

“Olympus Has Fallen” (R) — Disgraced former presidential guard Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) finds himself trapped inside the White House in the wake of a terrorist attack. Using his inside knowledge, Banning works with National Security to rescue the president from his kidnappers. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 5 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:40 p.m. today and Saturday. “Oz the Great and Powerful” (PG) — When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz. He thinks he’s hit the jackpot until he meets three witches — Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily, plus 2 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday. “Scary Movie 5” (R) — The latest installment of the franchise includes send ups of “Paranormal Activity,” “Mama,” “Sinister,” “The Evil Dead,” “Inception,” “Black Swan” and pop culture. At Lincoln Cinema. Showtimes 6:45 p.m. daily, plus 4:45 p.m. today through Sunday and 8:45 p.m. today and Saturday.

Port Townsend “42” (PG-13) — See synop-

“From Up on Poppy Hill” (PG — Animated) — Set in Japan of the 1960s, the film tells the story of Umi Matsuzaki, a high school girl living in a boarding house, Coquelicot Manor. When Umi meets Shun Kazama, a member of the school’s newspaper club, they decide to clean up the school’s

clubhouse, Quartier Latin. However, Tokumaru, the chairman of the local high school and a businessman, intends to demolish the building for redevelopment. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes are 4:30 p.m. and 6:50 p.m. daily, plus 1:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

YMPIC OL

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from within the government that jeopardize their very existence. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 12:35 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:35 p.m. today and Saturday.

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“Evil Dead” (R) — In the much anticipated remake of the 1981 cult-hit horror film, five 20-something friends become holed up in a remote cabin. When they discover a Book of the Dead, they unwittingly summon up demons living in the nearby woods, which possess the friends until only one is left intact to fight for survival. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 5:15 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:15 p.m. today and Saturday.

“The Croods” (PG — Animated) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theatre. 5 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

401E.E.Front FrontStreet Street Port Pt. Angeles 401 Angeles 360/565-1199 360/565-1199

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“The Croods” (PG — Animated) — When their cave is destroyed, the Crood family must embark on a comedy adventure into strange and spectacular territory in search of a new home. As if patriarch Grug didn’t already have enough to handle, it goes from bad to worse when they encounter an imaginative nomad named Guy. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:45 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. daily, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. Friday through Sunday plus 8:45 p.m. today and Saturday.

■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

TH

“Amour” (PG-13) —Georges and Anne are in their 80s. They are cultivated, retired music teachers. Their daughter, who is also a musician, lives abroad with her family. One day, Anne has an attack. The couple’s bond of love is severely tested. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:25 p.m. and 6:50 p.m. daily, plus 1:50 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:15 p.m. today and Saturday.

Where to find the cinemas

T

“42” (PG-13) — The story of two men — the great Jackie Robinson and legendary Brooklyn Dodgers GM Branch Rickey — whose brave stand against prejudice forever changed the world by changing the game of baseball. In 1946, Rickey (Harrison Ford) puts himself at the forefront of history when he signs Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) to the team, breaking Major League Baseball’s infamous color line. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:25 p.m. and 6:55 p.m.daily, plus 1:45 p.m. today through Sunday and 9:20 p.m. today and Saturday.

by Yasmina Rice Directed by Olivea Shea

God of Carnage is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service

Fri. & Sat. 7:30 April 19, 20, 26, 27 May 3 & 4 Sun. 2:00 April 21 & 28 May 5

COMING NEXT

July 5-21

Youth

Reserved seating tickets available at:

$10

Box Office - 360.683.7326

SPONSORS

Online at

Our 2012-2013 Season Presenting Sponsor

(16 & under)

OTA Member

$14

www.olympictheatrearts.org For Announcements, Coupons and Giveaways

facebook.com/olympictheatrearts


12

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Spring | Rolling in Dough '=/;.+A;'2=:;.+A;379:35B $!   $! 8=::+7.86.:+?371;/+-27312<<8:855+9:868<387+5.3/ 8:.3-/<8?37-+;2 (37 08:/>/:A.8< :855+;3@?37

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At The Point Casino

Party at the Indoor Beach & Tiki Bar!

Final Month

IRS (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Really Stressed)*+;2:+?371; &+<=:.+A9:35 <2 !87.+A9:35 <2  $!  $! (37   3>/.:+?371;/+-27312<

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Continues in April Rio | April 20th Dress up for 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Night | A tribute to the music of Duran Duran 8:00 PM

Kingston, WA www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468 Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.ÂŽ

Wanted | April 26th & 27th Karaoke 6:30 PM | A tribute to the music of Bon Jovi 8:00 PM

See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to enter lounge/bar areas or attend entertainment events.

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The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam Tribe.


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