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Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

October 24, 2011

Fire leaves 3 homeless By Arwyn Rice

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A blaze left three people homeless and a neighborhood shaken when a house in the Cherry Hills area caught fire Sunday morning. Three occupants of a singlefamily home at 815 W. Ninth St. woke to find smoke in the house at about 10:40 a.m., said Ken Dubuc, Port Angeles assistant fire chief and city fire marshal.

The

Firefighters work at a house fire in the Cherry Hill area of Port Angeles on Sunday morning. The home was fully involved in flames when firefighters arrived, and the blaze threatened surrounding homes and buildings.

“They got out of the house and called 9-1-1,” Dubuc said. The three were able to escape the house without injury, he said. Port Angeles Fire Department responded with 12 firefighters, with mutual-aid assistance from Clallam County Fire District 2. When the Fire Department arrived, the house was fully involved and flames were threatening neighboring residences. Turn

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Arwyn Rice/Peninsula Daily News

reward and the risk

Northwest deportation numbers fall Focus is on criminals, recent and frequent border crossers By Manuel Valdez The Associated Press

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Lynne McElroy, from second from left, Sue Garlinghouse and Vlad Naft look at mushrooms on display at the Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society Wild Mushroom Show in Sequim on Sunday. McElroy and Garlinghouse are from Port Townsend, and Naft is from Sequim. In the foreground are pholiota mutablish mushrooms.

Show teaches difference between dinner, danger Mushroom experts, lovers gather in Sequim

Hans and Judy Stevenfeldt of Sequim stand near lycoperdon perlatum “gemmed puffball” mushrooms.

By Arwyn Rice

will put you in the hospital, said Larry Bauer, an OPMS member and mushroom guide at Sunday’s event. Some can cause stomach cramps, nausea, diarrhea and other symptoms, which can go away in a day — leaving the unfortunate mushroom gourmet feeling lucky. “But the damage has been done,” Bauer said.

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Gathering mushrooms for food and fabric dyes is a Pacific Northwest tradition going back thousands of years, but it’s also a risky venture if gatherers aren’t educated in mushroom identification. The Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society Wild Mushroom Show provided an opportunity for mushroom lovers to learn about their flavorful options, and they got a lesson on the dangers. Hundreds of guests showed up at the Sequim Elks Lodge, and many walked away with mushroom-growing kits and a new appreciation for the variety of mushrooms. The show featured three main

table displays of mushrooms found in the Pacific Northwest — a table for edible, highly desired mushrooms, one for those that may be good for dyes or are not harmful but aren’t good eating, and a table of poisonous mushrooms. Not all poisonous mushrooms

‘Have to know’ Some mushrooms that cause temporary symptoms may cause damage to internal organs that could be fatal if the experience is repeated, he said. “You have to know what’s edible and what is not,” he said. Turn

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SEATTLE — If deportations have declined in the Pacific Northwest, immigration attorney Betsy Tao hasn’t noticed. Tao works at the only legal aid office that provides free advice to immigrants being detained at the detention center in Tacoma. She’s seen the center expand from 1,000 beds to 1,575, and ever more people channeling through the legal orientation sessions she puts on for the detainees. “To be honest, we see more and more people every year,” Tao said from the Tacoma office of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. “The workload is continuously increasing for us,” she added. “Years ago, we were able to help fewer people. In part, existing staff has gotten a lot better and quicker at what they do. “In spite of that . . . there’s the knowledge we’re only reaching a fraction of the people.” Even so, and despite recordsetting deportations nationally, the number of immigrants removed from the Pacific Northwest has dropped to its lowest levels in five years,according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE. ICE is the main investigative arm for Homeland Security and the federal government’s second largest investigative agency. It is a different agency from the Border Patrol, which focuses on federal law enforcement.

ICE figures New figures from the past fiscal year released by ICE show that 7,607 people were deported from Washington, Oregon and Alaska in fiscal 2011 — a slide of 22 percent from 2010. Moreover, those figures are

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a 30 percent drop from 2008 when more than 10,900 people were removed from the area. The Northwest figures buck the national trend: Nearly 400,000 people were deported last fiscal year around the country, a record for the agency, said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director John Morton this past week in Washington, D.C. Local ICE officials declined to be interviewed for this story.

Reason for drop But the office said in a statement the drop in Northwest deportations is because of fewer transfers to the detention center in Tacoma and because the office has seen an increase in nondetained immigration cases, in which those facing deportation are not incarcerated. “Generally, it takes considerably longer for the immigration courts to adjudicate non-detained cases, since, for a variety of reasons, detained aliens’ cases receive scheduling priority,” the statement said. “Depending on the extent to which a case is appealed, it can take several years before a nondetained alien is actually removed,” it continued. Nationally, ICE leaders have said the agency is focusing its resources on criminals, recent border crossers, those who repeatedly cross the border and those people the department considers fugitives. Turn

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News

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“I don’t think we should read the decline came out of the goodwill of ICE or because they ran out of people to deport, but because of the political pressure on them.”

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UpFront

Monday, October 24, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Lopez tears up during performance JENNIFER LOPEZ WAS spreading the love Saturday night, but deep inside she was feeling mixed emotions. At her jam-packed Mohegan Sun concert in Montville, Conn., the 42-year-old put together a bit focused around her love songs. “You want to talk about love? I can talk about love. Oh, the stories!” she said during a heartfelt speech to the audience before breaking out with her hit “If You Had My Love.” Afterward she said, “That’s the first song I wrote about love. And this is the last song I wrote about love. A lot has happened since then!” As she belted out one of her newer songs, a montage of male and female dance pairs whirled behind her. They paid homage to her past romances: her with a Diddy-esque person, her and a Ben Affleck type and lastly a Marc Anthony lookalike. “A little trip down memory lane,” the star, who separated from Anthony, her husband of seven years in July, said, as she paused

The Associated Press

Jennifer Lopez performs at Mohegan Sun during its 15th anniversary celebration in Montville, Conn., on Saturday. and looked down. When the camera zoomed in and showed her starting to tear up, the crowd gave her a standing ovation.

Carey’s twins Mariah Carey and Nick Cannon unveiled their 6-month-old twins, Moroccan and Monroe, during an interview with Barbara Walters on ABC’s “20/20” on

Friday night. “My family gives me everything,” Cannon beamed to Walters. “Unconditional love means . . . the world to me. I mean, it’s completion.” “It’s just love,” a proud Carey added. “It’s a beautiful place to be.” Carey and Cannon welcomed their twins — who they affectionately refer to as “Dem Babies” — in April on the couple’s third anniversary.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: How often do you use a credit (not debit) card?

More than ever 

As much as ever 

Less frequently 

Almost never 

Don’t have one 

8.6% 29.1% 17.2% 25.3% 19.8%

Total votes cast: 1,522 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings By The Associated Press

PAUL LEKA, 68, a songwriter and producer who worked with many recording stars but who was best known for writing the chanting chorus of “Na Na Hey Hey (Kiss Him Goodbye),” a No. 1 hit in 1969 that was reborn in the 1970s as a sports arena anthem, died Oct. 12 in a hospice near his home in Sharon, Conn. The cause was lung cancer, said his brother, George. Mr. Leka made his name in the Mr. Leka Tin Pan Alley tradition, writing or arranging songs for other people. He wrote and produced “Green Tambourine,” a No. 1 hit in 1967 for the psychedelic soft-rock band the Lemon Pipers, signed REO Speedwagon to its first record contract and produced four of Harry Chapin’s albums, including 1974’s “Verities & Balderdash,” containing the song that was Chapin’s lone No. 1 hit, “Cat’s in the Cradle.” In 1969, Mr. Leka was helping a longtime friend from Bridgeport, Conn., Gary DeCarlo, fill the B-side of a single he was recording for Buddah. With Mr. Leka on keyboards, they started with a song they had written years before, a bluesy shuffle called “Kiss Him Goodbye,” but it filled only two minutes of playing time, and to make sure disc jock-

eys would not play it — instead of Mr. DeCarlo’s A-side — they decided to add a chorus to stretch it to four minutes, beyond the time limit of most radio formats.

________

CHARLES HAMM, 86, who helped establish the field of American popular music history with two books that have become standard texts, died Oct. 16 in Lebanon, N. H. The cause was pneumonia, his son, Stuart, said. After beginning his career as a special- Mr. Hamm ist in Renaissance music, Mr. Hamm became frustrated with the condescension of his fellow musicologists toward the popular music of their own time. He began to write and lecture on the subject. In Yesterdays: Popular Song in America (1979) and Music in the New World (1983), Mr. Hamm was one of the first scholars to study the history of

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American popular music with musicological rigor and sensitivity to complex racial and ethnic dynamics, and both oral and written traditions. He traced pop’s history not just to its full recent flowering in the 1950s or to the 19th century and Stephen Foster, but also to the colonial-era compositions that created the context for all that followed. His books “convinced other scholars to study and take seriously the music loved by ordinary people,” Dale Cockrell, the director of the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University, said in an email.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

The only chance for the public to view the handsome new barracks building built at the Coast Guard air station on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles will be at an open house Sunday afternoon. The structure was finished this week by A.F. Mowat Co. of Seattle and will be occupied by air staLaugh Lines tion personnel starting with breakfast in the galCHINA IS NOW ley Monday. expected to surpass Japan After Sunday, the baras the second richest country in the world. They could racks will be closed to the public. become the richest, but Meanwhile, the Works that’s only if we pay them Progress Administration the money we owe them, and that’s not going to hap- has started construction of a bulkhead along the inner pen. Jay Leno beach to protect the shoreline of the air station property.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

IN A SEQUIM store, Christmas music played over the store’s loudspeaker system . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

The daily patient census of 39.2 was recorded last month. The hospital needs an average census of about 45 to operate in the black.

1986 (25 years ago)

Sequim senior citizens surveyed by a group seeking community development block grant funds to build a new senior center and nutrition site determined that seniors overwhelmingly want a new and combined center. Currently, the nutrition site is on Cedar Street, and senior center is on Fifth Avenue. Transportation between the two can be difficult and cost up to 35 cents a ride, many of the 1,393 surveyed said. A task force is now look1961 (50 years ago) ing at possible sites on Olympic Memorial Hos- which a combined senior pital commissioners attriand nutrition center can be bute a September monthly loss of $1,571 to a seasonal built. Top possibilities are slump that happens at this lands near Carrie Blake time every year. Hospital finances dipped Park, near Sequim High School or next to the new into the red for the first time in 1961 when August Sequim Aquatic Recreation losses totaled $64. Center swimming pool.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Oct. 24, the 297th day of 2011. There are 68 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 24, 1861, the first transcontinental telegraph message was sent by Chief Justice Stephen J. Field of California from San Francisco to President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C., over a line built by the Western Union Telegraph Co. In his message, Field expressed hope the telegraph would be “the means of strengthening the attachment which binds both the East and the West to the Union.” On this date: ■  In 1537, Jane Seymour, the third wife of England’s King Henry VIII, died 12 days after giving birth to Prince Edward, later

King Edward VI. ■  In 1648, the Peace of Westphalia ended the Thirty Years War and effectively destroyed the Holy Roman Empire. ■  In 1901, widow Anna Edson Taylor became the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel. ■  In 1931, the George Washington Bridge, connecting New York and New Jersey, was officially dedicated. It opened to traffic the next day. ■  In 1940, the 40-hour work week went into effect under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. ■  In 1945, the United Nations officially came into existence as its charter took effect. ■  In 1949, construction began on U.N. headquarters in New York. ■  In 1952, Republican presi-

dential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower declared in Detroit, “I shall go to Korea,” as he promised to end the conflict. He made the visit more than a month later. ■  In 1987, 30 years after it was expelled, the Teamsters union was welcomed back into the AFLCIO. However, the Teamsters disafilliated themselves from the AFL-CIO in 2005. ■  In 1991, “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry died in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 70. ■  Ten years ago: Two trucks crashed head-on in a main tunnel through the Swiss Alps, igniting a fire and killing 11 people. O.J. Simpson was acquitted in Miami of grabbing another driver’s glasses and scratching the man’s face in a road-rage argument.

■  Five years ago: American officials unveiled a timeline for Iraq’s Shiite-led government to take specific steps to calm Baghdad and said more U.S. troops might be needed to quell the bloodshed. The St. Louis Cardinals gained a 2-1 World Series edge as they defeated the Detroit Tigers 5-0. Before Game 3 began, baseball players and owners finalized a five-year collective bargaining agreement. ■  One year ago: Following the latest release of secret U.S. military documents by WikiLeaks, British Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg told BBC television that allegations of prisoner abuse and civilian killings in Iraq were extremely serious and needed to be investigated.


Peninsula Daily News for Monday, October 24, 2011

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation

The Statue of Liberty is seen through a fisheye lens mounted in its torch in this photo provided by EarthCam.

High-tech gifts turn on for Lady Liberty’s 125th NEW YORK — Lady Liberty is getting high-tech gifts for her 125th birthday: webcams on her torch that will let viewers gaze out at New York Harbor and read the tablet in her hands or see visitors on the grounds of the island below in real time. The five torch cams are to be switched on Friday during a ceremony to commemorate the dedication of the Statue of Liberty on Oct. 28, 1886. The ceremony caps a week of events centered around the historic date.

Soldier kills deputy ATLANTA — A National Guardsman who appeared to be drunk and firing gunshots at passing cars shot and killed a sheriff’s deputy, then committed suicide on a Georgia road, authorities said Sunday.

Evidence shows Spc. Christopher Michael Hodges, 26, fired 35 rounds from his M4 semiautomatic rifle, Richmond County Sheriff’s Capt. Scott Gay said. Hodges and Deputy James D. Paugh, 47, were found dead on the side of Bobby Jones Expressway after 1 a.m. Sunday. Hodges served in the Tennessee National Guard but was on temporary duty at Fort Gordon in eastern Georgia for training, said Buz Yarnell, a spokesman for the military post. Yarnell said he was not aware of any problems with Hodges before the shooting, and he would not say if Hodges had previously been deployed in combat. Sheriff Ronnie Strength told The Augusta Chronicle that Paugh was off duty and on his way home when he saw a suspicious car on the side of the road. He was shot several times when he stopped to check on the car and apparently fired two shots from his service weapon before he was killed. The Associated Press

Briefly: World

The Associated Press

Supporters of Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez celebrate her re-election in Buenos Aires on Sunday.

Argentinians re-elect leader in a landslide

3 new saints

VATICAN CITY — Three 19th-century founders of religious orders were named saints by Pope Benedict XVI during Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s BUENOS AIRES, Argentina Square. — Argentine President Cristina They are Italian bishop and Fernandez was re-elected in a missionary Monsignor Guido landslide Sunday, winning with Maria Conforti, Spanish nun the widest victory margin in the Sister Bonifacia Rodriguez de country’s history as voters were Castro and an Italian priest who mobilized by popular programs worked with the poor, the Rev. that spread the wealth of a Luigi Guanella. booming economy. On hand in the crowd was Fernandez is Latin America’s William Glisson Jr., from the first woman to be re-elected as Philadelphia area, whose cure president, but the victory was from a 2002 head injury was personally bittersweet — the declared the miracle needed to first without her husband and canonize Guanella. predecessor, Nestor Kirchner, Also there was a man who who died of a heart attack last disrupted the Mass when he Oct. 27. climbed out onto the upper colFernandez appeared to have onnade and burned a Bible. won a larger share of votes, 53 Vatican personnel talked the percent, than any president man back from the edge of the since Argentina’s democracy was colonnade. restored in 1983. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Deadly

earthquake hits eastern

Turkey

Two women are rescued in Van in eastern Turkey, where a 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck at 1:41 p.m. Sunday. At least 138 people were killed as buildings pancaked and crumpled into rubble. The death toll was expected to rise as rescuers sifted through the rubble and reached outlying villages. The hardest-hit area was Ercis, a city of 75,000 close to the Iranian border and on one of Turkey’s most earthquake-prone zones. Van is a bustling city about 55 miles south of Ercis.

amid the unease,

a peaceful feeling

Statistics show less-violent world, authors say By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — It seems as if violence is everywhere, but it’s really on the run. Yes, thousands of people have died in bloody unrest from Africa to Pakistan, while terrorists plot bombings and kidnappings. Wars drag on in Iraq and Afghanistan. In peaceful Norway, a man massacred 69 youths in July. In Mexico, headless bodies turn up, victims of drug cartels. This month eight people died in a shooting in a California hair salon. Yet, historically, we’ve never had it this peaceful. That’s the thesis of three new books, including one by prominent Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker. Statistics reveal dramatic reductions in war deaths, family violence, racism, rape, murder and all sorts of mayhem. In his book, Pinker writes: “The decline of violence may be the most significant and least appreciated development in the history of our species.” And it runs counter to what the mass media is reporting and essentially what we feel in our guts.

Documentation Pinker and other experts say the reality is not painted in bloody anecdotes, but demonstrated in the black and white of spreadsheets and historical documents. They tell a story of a world moving away from violence. In his new book, The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, Pinker makes the case that a smarter, more educated world is becoming more peaceful in several statistically significant ways. His findings are based on peerreviewed studies published by other academics using examinations of graveyards, surveys and historical records: ■  The number of people killed in battle — calculated per 100,000 population — has dropped by a thousandfold over the centuries as

Quick Read

civilizations evolved. Before there were organized countries, battles killed on average more than 500 out of every 100,000 people. In 19th century France, it was 70. In the 20th century with two world wars and a few genocides, it was 60. Now battlefield deaths are down to three-tenths of a person per 100,000. ■  The rate of genocide deaths per world population was 1,400 times higher in 1942 than in 2008.

We’re getting smarter Pinker says one of the main reasons for the drop in violence is that we are smarter. IQ tests show that the average teenager is smarter with each generation. The tests are constantly adjusted to keep average at 100, and a teenager who now would score a 100 would have scored a 118 in 1950 and a 130 in 1910. So this year’s average kid would have been a near-genius a century ago. “As we get smarter, we try to think up better ways of getting everyone to turn their swords into plowshares at the same time,” Pinker said in an interview. “Human life has become more precious than it used to be.” Pinker argued his case in a commentary this past week in the scientific journal Nature. He has plenty of charts and graphs to back up his claims, including evidence beyond wartime deaths — evidence that our everyday lives are also less violent: ■  Murder in European countries has steadily fallen from near 100 per 100,000 people in the 14th and 15th centuries to about one per 100,000 people now. ■  Murder within families. The U.S. rate of husbands being killed by their wives has dropped from 1.2 per 100,000 in 1976 to 0.2. For wives killed by their husbands, the rate has slipped from 1.4 to 0.8 over the same time period. ■  Rape in the United States is down 80 percent since 1973. ■  Discrimination against blacks and gays is down, as is capital punishment, the spanking of children and child abuse.

“It is easy to forget how dangerous life used to be, how deeply brutality was once woven into the fabric of daily existence,” Pinker writes in his book. He examines body counts, rapes, sacrifice and slavery in the Bible, using an estimate of 1.2 million deaths detailed in the Old Testament. He describes forms of torture used in the Middle Ages and even notes the nastiness behind early day fairy tales, such as the evil queen’s four gruesome methods for killing Snow White along with a desire to eat her lungs and liver. Even when you add in terrorism, the world is still far less violent, Pinker says. “Terrorism doesn’t account for many deaths. Sept. 11 was just off the scale. There was never a terrorist attack before or after that had as many deaths. What it does is generate fear,” he said. Also publishing recently were: ■  Andrew Mack, who was head of strategic planning for U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan and is now with Simon Fraser University in Canada. The “Human Security Report 2009/2010,” a project led by Mack and funded by several governments, is a worldwide examination of war and violence and has been published as a book. ■  Joshua Goldstein, a professor of international relations at American University and author of Winning the War on War. Mack and Goldstein emphasize how hard society and peacekeepers have worked to reduce wars, focusing on action taken to tamp down violence, while Pinker focuses on cultural and thought changes that make violence less likely. All three say those elements are interconnected. Pinker and Goldstein believe it’s possible that an even greater drop in violence could occur in the future. Goldstein says there’s a turn on a cliche that is apt: “We’re actually going from the fire to the frying pan. And that’s progress. It’s not as bad as the fire.”

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: ‘Paranormal’ sets records on debut weekend

Nation: Dentist tells kids he’ll buy Halloween candy

Nation: Occupy movement makes room for religion

World: Satellite might have crashed in SE Asia

“PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3” didn’t just go bump in the night. It made a ton of noise at the box office with a record-setting, $54 million opening. The third film in Paramount Pictures’ low-budget fright franchise, which was No. 1 at the box office, had the biggest debut ever for a horror movie, according to Sunday studio estimates. It broke the previous record part two set a year ago with $40.7 million. It’s also the biggest opening ever for an October release, topping the $50.35 million Paramount’s “Jackass 3D” made last year. Last week’s No. 1 release, “Real Steel,” fell to second place.

AN OHIO DENTIST is offering to buy kids’ trick-or-treating booty this Halloween, and he’s even throwing in a toothbrush to sweeten the deal. The Mansfield News Journal reported that dentist Craig Callen and his associates are offering kids $1 per pound of candy they bring in, with a 5-pound limit per child. The dentists are also holding a drawing for two children’s bikes. Callen said doing away with excess sweets would give teeth a healthy boost. He said candy can lead to hyperactivity and weight gain and can be especially damaging to children’s braces.

OCCUPY BOSTON ORGANIZERS made sure from the start of their weeks-old encampment that there was room for the holy. At the “Sacred Space” tent, a day’s schedule finds people balancing their chakras, a “compassion meditation” and a discussion of a biblical passage in Luke. Inside, a Buddha statue sits near a picture of Jesus, while a hand-lettered sign in the corner points toward Mecca. Religion might not fit into the movement seamlessly, but activist Dan Sieradski, who’s helped organize Jewish services and events at Occupy Wall Street, said it must fit somewhere.

THE DEFUNCT GERMAN research satellite ROSAT crashed into the Earth somewhere in Southeast Asia on Sunday, a U.S. scientist said — but no one is quite sure where. Calculations based on U.S. military data indicate that satellite debris must have crashed somewhere east of Sri Lanka over the Indian Ocean, over the Andaman Sea off the coast of Myanmar or inland in Myanmar or as far inland as China, said Jonathan McDowell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. There were no immediate reports from Asian governments or space agencies about the fallen satellite.


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Monday, October 24, 2011

PeninsulaNorthwest

Waterfront effort recognized Planning associations say PA deserves achievement award Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The city of Port Angeles Waterfront & Transportation Improvement Plan received an award for outstanding achievement from the American Planning Association and the Planning Association of Washington last week. The award, one of a handful issued annually, was presented to city representatives at the 2011 Joint APA Washington-Oregon planning conference in Portland, Ore., on Friday, said Teresa Pierce, city spokeswoman. Representatives from the APA are expected to visit Port Angeles to present the award formally at an

upcoming City Council meeting, she said. Since the waterfront plan was adopted by the City Council in February, designs have been produced in phases, from the westernmost section of the plan area at the Valley Creek Estuary to the easternmost portion at Hollywood Beach. Consultants and staff plan to have completed drawings for an esplanade and street improvements along Railroad Avenue from the Coho ferry terminal west before the end of the year. Another portion of the plan involving directional “wayfinding” signs is under way, with a set of prototype signs now installed in various locations downtown.

The plan is expected to cost the city $1.7 million to develop. It is funded through the economic development and lodging tax funds. Nathan West, city economic and community development director, said he is requesting $500,000 from the $3.5 million economic development fund to begin construction of an esplanade, a portion of the waterfront plan. The esplanade is budgeted at $1.9 million, and West said the city would need to receive grant funding to cover the additional cost and break ground. The total plan would cost about $17 million to implement. “This award would not

have been possible without the strong engagement that we had from the community and the strong commitment from the consulting team led by Studio Cascade,” said City Manager Kent Myers. Residents took part in workshops and community meetings on the plan in 2010, with the involvement of the PA Forward advisory committee. A consultant team led by Spokane-based Studio Cascade, with LMN Architects and HBB Landscape Architecture of Seattle, as well as the local engineering firm Zenovic & Associates, developed the plans. More information about the plan is available at www.cityofpa.us or at www. pa-waterfront.org.

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Arts to Elders show to have actor, guitarist PORT TOWNSEND — Arts to Elders will present a concert featuring musician and actor Raven and the guitar playing of Bill Wolfe, known as the “Pickin’ Pastor of Port Townsend.” The show will be held at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1. The event is free and open to the public.

Holiday fair set PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County Fairgrounds’ eighth annual Holiday Fair will be held

from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6. The Jefferson County Fairgrounds is located at 4907 Landes St. The fair will include arts, crafts and gifts. Pictures with Santa will be available from noon to 4 p.m. each day. The fair is free and open to the public.

Flamenco dancing NEAH BAY — Flamenco Algarabia featuring Jose Barrios and Ana Maria Gonzales will perform at the Makah Community Gymnasium at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6. The performance is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the Honorary Consulate of Spain and the Makah tribe. Peninsula Daily News

House addresses state-run insurance exchanges Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — This week, the Senate will be in recess, and the House will take up a bill tightening rules for the 2010 health law’s state-run insurance exchanges.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Belfair). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Dicks, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-228-

0514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Dicks, 800-947-6676 (fax, 202-226-1176). Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; house.gov/dicks. Dicks’ North Olympic Peninsula office is at 332 E. Fifth St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. It is open from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays and by appointment. It is staffed by Judith Morris, 360-452-3370 (fax: 360-452-3502).

State legislators Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger.

Eye on Congress steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. aspx.

Learn more Websites following our state and national legislators: ■  Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■  Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues. JOBS ■  OBAMA PLAN: By a vote of 50 for

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The Senate, now in recess, will complete action on the bill in the week of Oct. 31. No senator spoke against the amendment. A yes vote backed the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

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■  PRESCRIPTION DRUGS FROM CANADA: Voting 45 for and 55 against, the Senate on Thursday refused to allow American consumers to buy U.S.-made pharmaceuticals from Canadian vendors over the Internet, by mail order or in person. The amendment to HR 2112 (above) applied to only individuals — not wholesalers — who are obtaining Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for their personal use. A yes vote backed the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted no.

and 50 against, the Senate on Thursday failed to reach 60 votes for ending GOP blockage of a bill (S 1723) providing $35 billion to avert state and local layoffs of teachers, police and firefighters. This effectively killed the bill. The bill’s spending consists of $30 billion for teacher employment and $5 billion to protect law-enforcement and first-responder jobs. To offset the $35 billion, the bill would levy a 0.05 percent surtax on incomes more than $1 million. The bill is one part of a $447 billion jobs plan offered by President Obama. After Senate Republicans used a filibuster to block the overall plan, he broke it into pieces such as this one. Among bills still to be debated are ones to expand payroll-tax cuts, provide extended jobless benefits and fund highway, transit and school repairs. The House has not yet addressed the president’s jobs package. A yes vote supported the bill. ■  MILLIONAIRES’ Cantwell and Murray FARM PAYMENTS: Votvoted yes. ing 84 for and 15 against, REPEAL the Senate on Friday ■  GOP MEASURE: Voting 57 for reduced from $2.5 million to and 43 against, the Senate $1 million the income limit above which active and absentee farmers are ineligible for crop subsidies, cash payments, loans and other types of federal farm aid. The amendment was attached to a $182 billion fiscal 2012 appropriations bill (HR 2112) for the departments of Agriculture, State, Justice, Commerce, APARTMENT Transportation and HousFEATURES INCLUDE ing and Urban Develop• Wall to Wall Carpeting ment. • Kitchens in all Apartments • Window Treatments • Cable TV Available • Extra Storage in Each Apt.

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on Thursday failed to reach 60 votes needed to advance a Republican bill (S 1726) repealing a law affecting some companies that receive government contracts. Scheduled to take effect in 2013, the law is seen by Republicans and other foes as a paperwork burden that will impede job-creation. Defenders said it will help catch tax cheats. This bill would reduce federal revenue by $11 billion over 10 years and use unspecified cuts in federal programs to offset the loss. The law targeted by this bill is aimed at vendors who owe back taxes to the federal government at the same time they receive government contracts. It requires 3 percent of the contract to be withheld and deposited with the IRS as a credit against the company’s federal income-tax obligation. The law applies to contracts awarded by federal or non-federal units of government that award at least $100 million annually to vendors. A yes vote was to advance the bill. Cantwell and Murray voted no.

■  TERRORISM PROSECUTIONS: Voting 47 for and 52 against, the Senate on Friday refused to require terrorism suspects affiliated with al-Qaida and similar groups to be tried in U.S. military tribunals rather than in the federal judiciary. More than 200 terrorism defendants have been successfully prosecuted in federal courts by the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations. But backers of this amendment to HR 2112 (above) argued U.S. security and intelligence-gathering are better served if these suspects are subjected to military justice, in which due process is more limited than in federal courts. A yes vote backed the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted no. ■  COMMISSION ON U.S. PRISONS: The Senate on Thursday failed, 57 for and 43 against, to reach 60 votes for establishing a national commission to conduct an 18-month review of the U.S. network of federal, state and local prisons, which now hold 2.3 million inmates with 5 million individuals on probation or parole. The vote occurred during debate on HR 2112 (above). The commission would examine policies ranging from crime prevention to incarceration to sentencing, with goals such as reducing costs and recidivism and improving rehabilitation. A yes vote backed the amendment. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.

■  COMMERCE SECRETARY BRYSON: The Senate on Thursday confirmed, 74 for and 26 against, John E. Bryson as secretary of Commerce. Bryson, 69, has been chief executive of the energy firm Edison International and was a founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental organization. He replaces Gary Locke, who left the Department of Commerce in July to become U.S. ambassador to China. A yes vote was to confirm Bryson. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Monday, October 24, 2011

A5

Suzie Bennett, left, and Christopher Thomas and are among the Native American writers who will read poetry and short stories Tuesday during an open-mic night at the Elwha Heritage Training Center in Port Angeles. Diane Urbani

By Diane Urbani

Rising out of pain with hope and humor

Indian Voices Stories, poems at open-mic for Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Paz

among tribal people, Parker said. And the suffering goes on. But for her and the others in Indian Voices, writing ­— PORT ANGELES — It sounds like and sharing their words together one one heavy night. But with these voices night a month — has become a healing and these survivors, Tuesday stands to agent. be about rising, rising out of pain and “There is always some kind of hope at into a new life. the end of every one of my pieces that I The Indian Voices writing group, a write,” Parker said. “I’m still standing . . . circle of tribal women and men, will host I’m going forward.” an open-mic night at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Indian Voices writer Brandan the Elwha Heritage Training Center, 401 McCarty, who like Parker is a member of E. First St. at Peabody Street. the Makah tribe, wrote a poem about the This is a free, public event held in suffering in his family — and to Parker, conjunction with Domestic Violence it is also about his transcendence. Awareness Month and the Silent Wit“That poem makes me cry. But his ness Display, a memorial to Washingtostrength as a healthy Indian man,” she nians who have died at the hands of said, “makes me happy for him.” their abusers. The display will be open at the Elwha Beyond poetry center all day Tuesday, from 8 a.m. The Indian Voices circle began at Penthrough the start of the open-mic night. insula College, with Parker and instruc“We’re asking the readers to wear tors Alice Derry and Kate Reavey purple,” the color symbolizing hope for encouraging the men and women to survivors of domestic abuse, said Tor explore poetry. But one of them, Lower Parker, a member of the Indian Voices group. She’ll be among the writers offer- Elwha Klallam tribal member Suzie Bennett, knew poems were not her ing poems about her own path out of a thing. violent household. She is a short-story writer, and a highly irreverent one. Stories and statistics “I’m writing cynical short stories,” she Along with a poem or short story, said with a smile. And while several in each reader will give a statistic related the group write about their tribal culto domestic violence across Indian Coun- ture and ancestors, “I branched away try, Parker added. from that.” In sharing their work, the writers will One of her signature tales, for examstir in two ingredients for survival: hope ple, is about a woman trying to quit and humor. smoking. “She writes the funniest short stoThere has been much suffering de la

Peninsula Daily News

de la

Paz (2)/Peninsula Daily News

ries,” said Parker. To which Bennett shot back: “Tor [Parker] is a fabulous writer,” and “extremely humorous.” Others planning to read Tuesday night are Christopher Thomas, a member of the Coeur d’Alene tribe, and Makahs Zack Greene, John Pritchard III and Meri Parker. Some of their pieces are about surviving domestic violence; some are about other scourges, such as alcoholism.

Not a pitch-dark night But this will not be a pitch-dark night, Tor Parker promised. Far from it. “One of our greatest survival skills,” as tribal people, “is keeping our sense of humor,” she said. In the writing group, “we support each other,” Parker added. “We always end up laughing.” The Indian Voices group has published a paperback book, Where Thunderbird Rests His Head and Waits for the Songs of Return, with cover art by Lower Elwha Klallam artist Roger Fernandes. The book is available for $10 at the Elwha center, and proceeds from its sales support the Indian Voices circle, which now holds its monthly meetings at the center. For details, phone the center at 360417-8545.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

No plans to use new option at Peninsula College for now Peninsula Daily News news sources

The Peninsula College administration is not planning to use a new state rule that would make it easier for community and technical colleges to lay off faculty. Last month’s action by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges would allow individual colleges to declare their own financial emergencies and then have an easier time laying off faculty without having to adhere to some contracted job protections. “At this point, we don’t have any plans to eliminate any tenured or tenure-track instructor positions,” Peninsula College President Tom Keegan said. The decision gives the state’s 34 community colleges an option to take if they need it, he said. “Every college is different,” Keegan said.

their financial problems before invoking the emergency rule. Schroeder said colleges and their faculty have done a good job finding solutions together, including furlough days, salary cuts, early retirement and not filling job openings. But, she said, the board doesn’t understand the emotional impact of invoking this rule. “They can get the same end through bargaining.”

A bargaining threat?

to Schroeder. The board approved the financial emergency after tabling the idea to give the members more time to monitor the economy to see if conditions would be improving. “These are extraordinarily challenging times, requiring us to make many difficult decisions, including this one,” Fairchild said in a statement.

State funding cuts The 2011 Legislature cut state dollars going to community colleges by $76.8 million for the current fiscal year and by 12.6 percent, or $84.3 million, for fiscal 2013. State funding has dropped from $669 million last year to $592 million in fiscal 2012 and to $585 million in fiscal 2013. Faculty salaries make up about 8 percent of those totals. Most, but not all, of the cuts will be made up with legislative-approved tuition increases. Schroeder said state law is harder on community college instructors than it is on instructors and professors at Washington’s four-year colleges.

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To date, no colleges have exercised the authority or announced an intention to do so, Deb Merle, deputy executive director, government relations, for the college board, said earlier this month. During their September meeting, board chair Sharon Fairchild encouraged the colleges to continue their collaborative process, working with faculty, staff and students to resolve

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The union has not heard of anyone planning to use the rule, but Schroeder predicted it could use it as a bargaining threat. “It really un-levels the playing field,” she said. The last time the board declared a financial emergency was in June 2009 for the 2009-2011 biennium. Only one of the state’s more than 30 community Union is concerned and technical colleges — The state’s decision drew Bates Technical College — concern from the union that took advantage of the rule represents faculty at the during that time, according schools. “Individual colleges can Welcome All Ages • New & Medicare Patients invoke the law,” said Sandra Schroeder, president of the Washington chapter of the American Federation of Teachers. “Then there’s no longer any reasonable protections we can give to the people who have been targeted. Seniority becomes fairly meaningless in this proRachel Swett Katherine Ottaway, MD Office Manager cess.” We help you clarify your personal health care priorities. Under the rule, full-time Wellness & screening through all of life's stages. tenured instructors and those on the tenure track Quimper Family Medicine could be laid off as easily as 2120 Lawrence St., Por t Townsend • 360-385-3826 part-time, non-tenured teachers. But Schroeder’s worries may be just an exercise if no one decides to invoke the rule.

No similar law allowing such a financial emergency exists for Washington’s four year colleges, and she said other laws could create similar “problems” for col-

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Monday, October 24, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Theater troupe seeking actors with fire for justice and whether you want us.” The Poetic Justice Theatre Ensemble is a component of the Mandala Center for Change, which Weinblatt founded in 1999. Weinblatt, 52, calls Mandala a way for “people to be more awake and alive as well as empowered to take action toward a more just and joyous world for all people.” Poetic Justice generally doesn’t perform in a standard theater format. It visits small and large groups in order to stimulate interest in such issues as poverty and racism. These can be civic groups or senior centers,

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A theater group that strives to promote social change and raise awareness about important issues is recruiting actors to perform this year’s season. The Poetic Justice Theater Ensemble will begin a six-week workshop session Tuesday that includes theater games and interactive exercises that will serve as a lengthy audition period for the troupe. “This goes two ways,” said Marc Weinblatt, who founded Poetic Justice 10 years ago. “After six weeks, we decide if we want you

where the troupe creates an interactive learning environment. “We put on a short play that portrays a social problem and then perform it a second time, stop the action and then allow people to come up, portray a character and improvise a solution,” Weinblatt said. Participation in the workshop is open, but Weinblatt “doesn’t want people to just show up.” Those interested in participating the workshop and performances can phone 360-344-3435 or write info@ mandalaforchange.com. For more information, visit www.mandalafor change.com/poeticjust.htm.

Fire: Hoses had to be

daisy-chained to house Continued from A1 The home’s yard was filled with children’s toys and play structures and decorated for Halloween.

Hydrant logistics

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Bill and Diana Baum of Diamond Point take a look at mushrooms on display at the Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society Wild Mushroom Show in Sequim on Sunday.

Shrooms: Some fungi

have poisonous twins

Getting water to the house was a challenge — it is between two fire hydrants, each a block away. Firefighters laid long daisy-chained hoses from each hydrant to the house, and closed-off all of Ninth Street between A and B streets, and portions of A and B streets, to protect the hoses.

The fire created a dramatic, billowing column of smoke, drawing neighbors’ attention as the flames burst through the roof of the one-story home. At that point, the primary objective of the firefighters was to keep the fire from spreading to adjacent homes, said Lt. Kelly Ziegler. “The fire was contained to the structure, but it was heavily damaged,” Ziegler said. Much of the roof is gone or buckled, and the interior burned from the front room to the back, where the fire burned through the

Seattle detectives shoot homicide suspect The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Seattle homicide detectives on Sunday shot a man they suspected was involved in the Saturday death of an elderly storage-facility worker. Police spokesman Mark Jamieson said the man attacked detectives after they confronted him Sunday, and police were forced

to shoot him. The man was taken to Harborview Medical Center with life-threatening injuries. His condition was not immediately known. Jamieson said detectives were investigating the brutal attack on the public storage facility worker when they encountered the suspect in Belltown on

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsula dailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com.

The office covers Alaska, Oregon and the The arrests of six forwestern half of Washingeign nationals Oct. 2-8 ton with 322 agents, were listed on the U.S. including 36 that patrol Border Patrol’s latest segregated weekly blotter Clallam and Jefferson counties and are based at of agency arrests in the Border Patrol’s Port Whatcom, Clall­am and Angeles station. Jefferson counties. The list “is a represenAll of those arrested tation of the arrests in were transported to fedthe sector, and those eral Immigration and were the ones we chose Customs Enforcement’s to put into the blotter,” Tacoma Northwest Border Patrol spokesman Detention Facility to be Jeffrey Jones said. processed for removal The blotter contains from the United States. The report, issued last the following arrests: ■  A citizen of India week, is produced by the was arrested Oct. 7 after agency’s Blaine Sector he illegally tried to enter office.

Canada near Lynden. He said he had illegally entered the United States near Laredo, Texas, agents said. ■  A citizen of Pakistan was arrested Oct. 7 while walking away from the international boundary north of Lynden. ■  Agents responding to a request for assistance from the Ferndale Police Department arrested four citizens of Mexico on Oct. 8 after their vehicle was stopped on Interstate 5. The driver was intoxicated, according to the report.

Numbers: Nationwide

55% had convictions

Continued from A1 ber of deportees convicted of crimes was up 89 percent That goal shows in the from 2008. Among the individuals Pacific Northwest numbers. 396,906 Nearly 70 percent of peo- deported were more than ple removed from the three- 1,000 convicted of homicide. state jurisdiction in fiscal Another 5,800 were sexual 2011 were considered con- offenders, and about 80,000 victed criminals by ICE, people were convicted of something the local office drug-related crimes or drivsaid has been consistent ing under the influence. Last year, the total was with the agency’s stated roughly 393,000. enforcement strategy. The new deportation figNationwide, Morton said about 55 percent of those ures come at a time when deported had felony or mis- the Obama administration has sought to address critdemeanor convictions. Officials said the num- ics on both sides of the immigration debate.

Death Notices Leonard W. Beil Dec. 22, 1922 — Oct. 21, 2011

Leonard W. Beil died of age-related causes at his Port Angeles home. He was 88. His obituary will be published later. Services: Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements.

Debate Immigration advocates complain law enforcement officials are spending too many scarce resources rounding up families living illegally in the country who otherwise are law-abiding. Others say the administration isn’t doing enough to stop the flow of illegal immigration and protect Americans from potential foreign terrorists and other criminals. Immigration has become

a contentious topic among Republican presidential hopefuls, with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry trading verbal barbs in the most recent debate. Perry resurrected an old attack on Romney, who had hired a lawn care company that employed illegal immigrants. Romney’s camp was quick to point out that Perry signed a bill giving in-state tuition to students who are in the country illegally. In Oregon, one advocate said immigrant groups have enjoyed success in defeating stricter immigration laws at the state level, communicating know-your-rights campaigns and maintaining open channels with federal immigration authorities. “I don’t think we should read the decline came out of the goodwill of ICE or because they ran out of people to deport, but because of the political pressure on them,” said Francisco Lopez, executive director of Causa Oregon.

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Sunday afternoon. The suspect had been using the worker’s credit cards at stores around Seattle, and detectives had video footage and photographs of him, police said. Jamieson said he did not know how many times the man was shot or whether he was armed. He did not have the man’s age or identity. The King County Sheriff’s Office will be investigating the police-involved shooting.

________

Border Patrol tells of some arrests Peninsula Daily News

“You’ve got to be careful said Anne Swenski, an about mushroom differenti- Olympic Peninsula mushOne display included ation,” she said. “Watch room hunter. National parks do not several popular edible what you pick.” allow any mushroom gathmushrooms and their poiGetting it right ering, while state and sonous look-alikes. Chantrelles, a graceful national forests and state The flip side of the danyellowish mushroom gers of mushrooms is the parks allow limited gathershaped like an umbrella ing. that has been turned inside reward of getting the right People who want to one. out by the wind, is a tasty, gather mushrooms should Boletes are the king of desirous mushroom much check with the appropriate sought after by mushroom mushrooms, Bauer said. ranger station to get a copy A single thumb-size hunters. of the current written reguBut it has two near- bolete, known as a porcini, lations before gathering can go for as much as $150 twins that also grow in the anything, Swenski said. area, the false chantrelle on a steak dinner at some Before gathering on prirestaurants, he said. and the fuzzy chantrelle. vate lands, check with the The key to gathering Melissa Kanas, 37, of property owner. Sequim, has been gathering boletes is to get to them “Most people will say early, before the bugs get mushrooms since she was yes,” she said. 22, but Sunday was the first them, he said. ________ The types and amounts time she attended a mushof mushrooms that can be room show. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be “I didn’t realize how picked frequently changes, reached at 360-417-3535 or at many look-alikes there are and there are difference arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. for chantrelles,” Kanas said. among various locations, com. Continued from A1

exterior walls. At 12:30 p.m., firefighters were still putting out hot spots. As of 7 p.m. Sunday, Dubuc was still on scene investigating the fire, Ziegler said. There was no known cause of the fire or estimate of damages at that time, he said. Red Cross volunteers and family members were on scene to assist as needed.


Peninsula Daily News for Monday, October 24, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

One country, two revolutions I TAKE NO pleasure in seeing anyone lose a job. But I can’t say that the recent headlines showing that America’s biggest banks have been losing money on their trading operations, and are Thomas having to radiFriedman cally shrink as a result, are entirely bad news for the country. Over the last decade, America’s banking sector got pumped up by steroids — in the form of cheap credit and leverage — every bit as much as Major League Baseball’s home run hitters. And if one result of the downsizing of Wall Street is that more of America’s best and brightest math and physics students decide to go into science and real engineering rather than financial engineering, the country will be a whole lot better off. Why? Because, to paraphrase the Columbia University economist Jagdish Bhagwati, Wall Street, which was originally designed to finance “creative destruction” (the creation of new industries and products to replace old ones), fell into the habit in the last decade of financing too much “destructive creation” (inventing leveraged

financial products with no more societal value than betting on whether Lindy’s sold more cheesecake than strudel). When those products blew up, they almost took the whole economy with them. I was on Wall Street two weeks ago, and I’ve been in Silicon Valley this past week. What a contrast! While Wall Street is being rattled by a social revolution, Silicon Valley is being by transformed by another technology revolution — one that is taking the world from connected to hyperconnected and individuals from empowered to superempowered. It is the biggest leap forward in the IT revolution since the mainframe computer was replaced by desktops and the Web. It is going to change everything about how companies and societies operate. The latest phase in the IT revolution is being driven by the convergence of social media — Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Groupon, Zynga — with the proliferation of cheap wireless connectivity and Web-enabled smartphones and “the cloud” — those enormous server farms that hold and constantly update thousands of software applications, which are then downloaded (as if from a cloud) by users on their smartphones, making them into incredibly powerful devices that can perform myriad tasks. The emergence of the cloud,

iPod Nano as a watch explained Alan Cohen, a vice president of Nicira, a new networking company, “means than anyone can have the computing resources of Google and rent it by the hour.” This is speeding up everything — innovation, product cycles and competition. The October issue of Fast Company magazine has an article about the designer Scott Wilson, who thought of grafting the body of an iPod Nano onto colorful wristbands, turning them into watchlike devices that could wake you up and play your music. He had no money, though, to bring his concept to market, so he turned to Kickstarter, the Webbased funding platform for independent creative projects. He posted his idea on Nov. 16, 2010, reported Fast Company, and “within a month, 13,500 people

Peninsula Voices Global warming?

fresh air. Moreover, in her column, I note that a half-page on Ms. Rosenthal poses the the Oct. 18 PDN Commenquestion of why interest in tary Page was devoted to a global warming (anthropohand-wringing column by morphic and otherwise) has Elizabeth Rosenthal, a jourwaned. nalist/blogger (not a scienDr. Deming provides a tist) working for The New rational answer to that York Times, decrying the question. lack of public interest in Bill Dettmer, global warming these days Port Angeles [“Where Did Global Warming Go? Even As Other Liquor initiative Nations Take Action, The Issue Is Fading From The Most proposed legislation American Agenda”]. defies logic. In the interest of fairness Sadly, nearly all legislaand balance, here’s a link to tive proposals are overan opposing view from whelmingly emotional. David Deming, a geophysiThis new liquor control cist at the University of proposal [Initiative 1183], Oklahoma, an actual scien- however, can be evaluated tist — http://tinyurl.com/ in a different way from demingarticle. many others despite the So much misinformation huge number of sappy TV and outright falsehood has ads. been disseminated throughLuckily, the Internet can supply actual information. out the media. Googling both governThis is a breath of

ment and private data, a voter can compare what is currently going on with American youth by state (“under 18” on most charts), liquor consumption rates,

from 50 countries had ponied up nearly $1 million.” Apple soon picked up the product for its stores. Said Alexis Ringwald, 28, who recently founded an education startup, her second Silicon Valley venture: “I have many friends — they introduce themselves as ‘reformed’ Wall Street bankers and lawyers — who have abandoned conventional careers and are now launching startups.” Marc Benioff, the founder of Salesforce.com, a cloud-based software provider, describes this phase of the IT revolution with the acronym SOCIAL. n S, he says, is for speed — everything is now happening faster. n O, he says, stands for open. If you don’t have an open environment inside your company or country, these new tools will blow you wide open. n C is for collaboration because this revolution enables people to organize themselves within companies and societies into loosely coupled teams to take on any kind of challenges — from designing a new product to taking down a government. n I is for individuals, who are able to reach around the globe to start something or collaborate on something farther, faster, deeper, cheaper than ever before — as individuals. n A is for alignment. “There has never been a more

Our readers’ letters, faxes

important time to have all your ships sailing in the same direction,” said Benioff. “The power of social media is that it is easier than ever to both articulate, and reinforce, the vision and values that create and inspire alignment.” n And L is for the leadership that does that. Leadership in a SOCIAL world has to be a mix of bottom-up and top-down. Leaders need to inspire, enable and empower everything coming up from below in a company or a social movement and then edit and sculpt it with a vision from above into a final product. The great thing about the new IT revolution, says Jeff Weiner, the CEO of LinkedIn, is that “it makes it easier and cheaper than ever for anyone anywhere to be an entrepreneur” and to have access to all the best infrastructure of innovation. “And despite all of our challenges,” he adds, “it is happening here in America.” Like I said, the news isn’t all bad.

________

Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears in the Peninsula Daily News on Mondays. E-mail Friedman via nyti. ms/friedmanmail.

and email

surprised with what you find. And I am not going to tell you what it is. That’s the idea here: Unlike the TV ads, you’ll have to look for yourself, see what is happening in other states and how successfully they have dealt with the issue. Note particularly any large differences between them and Washington. See if there is any likelihood that changing the law will improve matters or make them worse. See also how Washington already compares with other states. Don’t be surprised to find that both sides of the political-ad campaigns have cleverly cluttered the issue just to keep you from making an informed choice. arrests made, impaired drivCompare and contrast Don’t let the advertising ing numbers, etc. the outcomes of maintaining In those listings, you can the present system or mov- industry make your decision find states similar to our ing to one more like the rest for you. own in population, whether of the country. John Ravage, “liquor-controlled” or not. You may well be Sequim

Failure can drive terrorism, too WHEN TRYING TO make sense of terrorists, we examine their “causes.” In the cases Froma of Muslim terrorists, we Harrop search their religious views and political indoctrination. But when looking at other Americans who commit outrages not overtly tied to some creed, we tend to focus on their inner turmoil rather than their bigpicture resentments. And so we pinpoint lost jobs, failed marriages, rejecting lovers and child-custody battles as reasons why someone might shoot up a workplace or shopping mall — or, to be more accurate, as stresses that might push an unbalanced individual over the edge. A recent tragedy in the

normally tranquil town of Seal Beach, Calif., follows this pattern: Bitter over his divorce, a man killed eight and wounded others in the hair salon where his former wife worked. We shudder at these rampages but regard the slayers as people who cracked. But could personal and mental problems be a main factor in what we usually call “a religious or politically inspired terrorist attack”? Suppose Muslim terrorists are using radical Islam as a cover for mental imbalance and perceived failures — just as Timothy McVeigh blamed an allegedly abusive government for his decision to blow up a building in Oklahoma City. Most immigrants must cope with the tensions of cultural dislocation. A man raised in a very maledominated country whose wife walks out on him — and after he failed as a provider — experiences deep humiliation.

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But are his frustrations all that different from those of the native-born bankrupt, enraged over losing the kids, who opens fire at a hamburger joint? Consider Mansour Arbabsiar, the suspect in an alleged Iranian plot to assassinate a Saudi diplomat in Washington. His personal life was in shambles. Born in Iran, he had spent more than 30 years in Texas trying to make it big in business after business and not succeeding. He lost his house through foreclosure. His marriage failed, and creditors were on his tail. His wife had sought a protective order against him. Neighbors and friends expressed surprise that Iran would pick the likes of Arbabsiar to pull off an assassination. They saw him as a bumbler always searching for his keys. Involved in ordinary American go-getter activities, Arbabsiar never roused suspicions of radical beliefs. And he may not

have had them. He might have been in it for the money, but he gets lumped in with Muslim terrorists. A similar story emerges from Faisal Shahzad, the Pakistani immigrant accused of trying to set off a car bomb last year in Times Square. A son of privilege, Shahzad came to America and studied at the University of Bridgeport. In those days, he went to clubs, worked out at the gym, drank and womanized. He obtained a green card and a job as a financial analyst in Connecticut. He married and had two children. According to published reports, Shahzad had long harbored militant thoughts, but other things were going on. His real estate investments didn’t pan out. Like Arbabsiar, he lost a suburban home to foreclosure, fell behind on his bills and saw his marriage founder. (He started hassling his wife

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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to wear a hijab, a modest Muslim head covering.) And he was estranged from his liberal-minded father, a retired high official in the Pakistani air force. Some may argue that radical Islam provides would-be terrorists a seven-layer cake of grievances, cultural alienation and frozen ideologies to ease their transition from just another stressed member of society to would-be terrorist. There may be something to that, but you have to wonder: Had Arbabsiar and Shahzad conquered America’s fabled streets of gold, would we ever have heard about them?

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears here every Monday. Contact her at info@creators. com or at 40 Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Monday, October 24, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Volunteers get food to students

Lewis-McChord soldiers killed

Peninsula Daily News

The Associated Press

PORT ANGELES — Volunteers are keeping a growing Friday Food Bag distribution going. On Friday morning, volunteers — mostly from faith-based organizations — packed about 400 food bags. Their work is part of the Friday Food Bag program continuing in Port Angeles School District schools this year. Jerry Dean, one of the original organizers, and other volunteers have worked closely with food bank Director Josie Gilbeck and school district principals to distribute food to students who may need extra help over the weekend. The program has grown from last year’s highest count of 175 and is still increasing in numbers. Participants can apply to the Port Angeles Food Bank program through their school. Community members wishing to donate to the program can Port Angeles School District Volunteers, from left, Johnny Westerholm, Lynn Gosser and phone Gilbeck at the Port Angeles Jerry Dean, help pack about 400 food bags Friday morning as part of the Friday Food Food Bank at 360-452-8568. Bag program continuing in the Port Angeles School District schools this year.

JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — Three U.S. soldiers were killed Saturday in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province, including two based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. The Department of Defense said the soldiers based in Washington state were 29-year-old Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij of San Diego and 20-year-old Pfc. Christopher A. Horns of Colorado Springs, Colo. Both were assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. Also killed was 24-year-old 1st Lt. Ashley White of Alliance, Ohio. She was assigned to 230th Brigade Support Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team of the North Carolina National Guard in Goldsboro, N.C. Enemy forces attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device.

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Sports

S E CT I O N

B

COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

The Associated Press

Mike Napoli of Texas reacts after umpire Ron Kulpa called Matt Holliday of St. Louis safe during the fourth inning of Saturday’s World Series game in Arlington, Texas. The replay showed that the call was wrong and Holliday should have been called out.

World Series needs replay By Ben Walker

The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Don Denkinger was watching at home, saw the blown call at first base and winced. As did baseball fans everywhere. “That’s a nightmare for an umpire,” he said Sunday. “You hate to see that happen to anyone.” He would know. All these years later, he still gets an earful from St. Louis fans angry about his miss at first base in the 1985 World Series. Back then, the technology wasn’t too refined, there weren’t too many remedies to correct mistakes. So how about now? What about more instant replay? “It’s time, especially for the World Series,” he said. “You can’t get an argument out of me.” Hard to imagine anyone would dispute that these days. No further review needed: Enough is enough. Ron Kulpa’s admitted missed call at first base Saturday night wasn’t the reason the Texas Rangers got routed by the Cardinals in Game 3. Albert Pujols was the story, clearly. But after another glaring call went wrong, and millions of fans saw right away that it indeed was wrong, the reasons Major League Baseball keeps offering against replay are harder and harder to understand. Mostly, the pace of the game is the issue. An overblown issue, really, in an era where every hitter seems to step out of the batter’s box, catchers wear out the grass with trips to the mound, and TV commercials add about 10 minutes to postseason games. Besides, look around. The NFL reviews all scoring plays. The NBA, NHL and Grand Slam tennis use replay. A sensational ending in the Wisconsin-Michigan State game Saturday night was decided by a replay that overturned a call at the goal line. No one argued; the call was right. As it stands, MLB only uses replay to check on potential home runs. Next season, it’s expected replay will be extended to fair-or-foul calls and trapped balls. That’s good, but not far enough. Particularly in October, when a game can tilt in the blink of an eye. Texas manager Ron Washington never blamed his team’s 16-7 drubbing on Kulpa failing to see Rangers first baseman Mike Napoli slather a tag on Matt Holliday a full step short of the bag. Before Game 4, Washington still supported umps making the calls, and made a suggestion. “I always believed in this game being the human type of game, you know, umpires are human. They can’t always be right, and they make mistakes and you have to play around them,” he said. “We brought in instant replay for the home run. I think in the World Series for plays like last night, maybe we can find a way to get the play right,” he said. “All I want is to get the play right, that’s all.”

The Associated Press (2)

Cleveland wide receiver Greg Little (15) is gang-tackled by Seattle’s Walter Thurmond, right, Kam Chanceller (31) and an unidentified player below after Little made a catch in the second quarter Sunday in Cleveland.

Punchless in Cleveland Whitehurst, Seahawks misfire in ugly 6-3 loss By Tom Withers

The Associated Press

CLEVELAND — The Seattle Seahawks found the end zone once. They weren’t allowed to stay. An illegal block — on a questionable call — wiped out Leon Washington’s 81-yard punt return for a touchdown Sunday, and the Seahawks couldn’t muster much offense in a sloppy 6-3 loss to the Cleveland Browns, whose only points came on a pair of long field goals by Phil Dawson. Desperate for a big play with backup quarterback Charlie Whitehurst unable to move their offense and running back Marshawn Lynch injured, the Seahawks (2-4) finally got one in the third quarter from Washington only to have his TD nullified by a blocking-in-the-back penalty against cornerback Kennard Cox. Cox’s bump of Browns cornerback James Dockery near midfield was deemed illegal, although Seattle coach Pete Carroll wasn’t so sure about the call. “That’s a touchdown play and way after the fact here it [the penalty flag] comes,” Carroll said. “They [officials] saw something and whether it was legit, I don’t know. “In this game, those calls are

magnified and they play a big role. I kind of hope they were right. I Next Game hope they made the Sunday right choices vs. Bengals on those at Seattle t h i n g s Time: 1 p.m. because it’s On TV: Ch. 13 pretty hard to live with otherwise.” Watching the Seahawks offense was hard enough. With Whitehurst filling in for injured starter Tarvaris Jackson, the Seahawks couldn’t do much with the ball. They managed just 137 yards of offense and only had the ball for 17:04 to Cleveland’s 42:56. Whitehurst completed 12 of 30 passes for 97 yards and was sacked three times. “It’s disappointing for sure,” Whitehurst said. “We definitely had a chance to win the game and we didn’t do it. “We couldn’t convert and I couldn’t hit some guys when they were open. It was a tough day on offense.” Even Whitehurst’s longest completion was, well, incomplete. Seattle’s Leon Washington looks back during his Turn

to

81-yard punt return for a touchdown that later was

Hawks/B2 called back because of an illegal block.

Rangers even Series at 2-2 Game 5 is slated tonight in Texas The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Holland kept Albert Pujols in the ballpark and the Texas Rangers in this World Series. In a title matchup that’s getting more interesting with every game, Holland put the emphasis back on pitching. Given a pep talk by manager Ron Washington minutes before the game, Holland allowed two hits over 8 1/3 innings to beat the St. Louis Cardinals 4-0 on Sunday night and even things at 2-all. Holland struck out seven, walked two and never was in trouble against a team that erupted for 16 runs the previous night. Game 5 is tonight. Holland came within two outs of pitching the first complete-game shutout in the World The Associated Press Series since Josh Beckett’s gem Mike Napoli of Texas celebrates with Yorvit Torrealba for Florida to clinch the 2003 (8) and Elvis Andrus (1) after hitting a three-run homer title at Yankee Stadium.

in the sixth inning during Game 4 of the World Series

Turn

to

Series/B2 on Sunday in Arlington, Texas.

College Hoops

Pirate Madness impresses Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — On Saturday night students and basketball fans were treated to a great evening of exciting basketball at Peninsula College’s second annual Pirate Madness. The official tipoff to the basketball season featured coach Lance Von Vogt’s defending NWAACC champion men’s basketball team and coach Alison Crumb’s much-improved women’s team. Both squads dazzled the crowd during the 3-point competition and intra squad scrimmages. The men’s squad looks more athletic and talented than its championship predecessor as the gold team upended the black team 37–33 in their 10-minute scrimmage. Turn

to

Pirates/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

Monday, October 24, 2011

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Volleyball: Chimacum at Cascade Christian, 5:45 p.m.

Tuesday Volleyball: Clallam Bay at Neah Bay, 5 p.m.; Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 6:15 p.m.; Klahowya at Sequim, 6:15 p.m.; Hoquiam at Forks, 7 p.m. Girls Soccer: Chimacum at Cascade Christian, 4 p.m.; Hoquiam at Forks, 6 p.m.; Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 6:45 p.m.; Klahowya at Sequim, 6:45 p.m. Girls Swimming: Olympic League Divisional meet at William Shore Memorial Pool in Port Angeles, 3 p.m.

Wednesday Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Highline, 2 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Highline, 2 p.m.

Area Sports

Preps Girls Swimming Port Townsend 115, Bremerton 55 Port Townsend (7-0) Results NOTE: All times are converted for 20-yard pool 200 medley relay 1. Port Townsend A - Braden, Vilage, Cremeans, Elias 2:03.86 200 freestyle 1. Rose Ridder 2:17.90 50 freestyle 1. Sarah Allen 0:31.19 100 freestyle 1. Olivia Cremeans 1:03.31 500 freestyle 1. Darby Flanagan 6:15.16 200 freestyle relay 1. Port Townsend A - Ridder, Matthew, Walcome, Vilage 1:50.94 100 backstroke 1. Serena Vilage 1:09.70 100 breaststroke 1. Olivia Cremeans 1:22.92 400 freestyle relay 1. Port Townsend B - McAdam, Braden,

8 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Children’s Miracle Network Classic, Final Round, Site: Magnolia Golf Course - Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Noon (25) ROOT Soccer EPL, Manchester City vs. Manchester United, Site: Old Trafford Stadium - Manchester, England 4:30 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, St. Louis Cardinals vs. Texas Rangers, World Series, Game 5, Site: Rangers Ballpark - Arlington, Texas (Live) 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, Baltimore Ravens vs. Jacksonville Jaguars, Site: EverBank Field Jacksonville, Fla. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Pan American Games - Guadalajara, Mexico (Live)

0 0 3 0—3 0 3 0 3 —6 Second Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 52, 7:26. Third Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 20, 2:33. Fourth Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 53, 11:18. A—66,350.

8 Intermediate 1. Moose Johnson 2. Taylor Tolliver 3. Jaron Tolliver

12 Intermediate 1. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 2. Jaiden Albin 3. Trey Mannor 4. Austin Loomis

Today

Seattle Cleveland

Port Angeles BMX Track Saturday 26-30 Cruiser 1. Zach Slota 2. Scott Gulisao 3. “Curious George” Williams

8 Intermediate 1. “American Idol” Tolliver 2. Moose Johnson 3. Matthew Rolley Jr. 4. Taylor Slota 5. Jaron Tolliver

SPORTS ON TV

Browns 6, Seahawks 3

BMX Racing

Sunday 41-45 Cruiser 1. Larry Moroles 2. Zach Slota 3. Scott Gulisao 4. “Curious George” Williams

Peninsula Daily News

Grade-school

education

Peninsula College star men’s soccer player Miguel Gonzalez gives instruction and pointers to Jefferson Elementary School fifth-graders Erick Edwards, center, and Hannah Heustis recently. Gonzalez and fellow player Michael Carbon visited the Port Angeles school to tell the students how hard work, focus and team work are essential to success. Vilage, Matthew 4:18.03

Football NFL Standings NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF San Francisco 5 1 0 .833 167 Seattle 2 4 0 .333 97 Arizona 1 5 0 .167 116 St. Louis 0 6 0 .000 56 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 154 Dallas 3 3 0 .500 149 Washington 3 3 0 .500 116 Philadelphia 2 4 0 .333 145 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 4 2 0 .667 177 Tampa Bay 4 3 0 .571 131 Atlanta 4 3 0 .571 158 Carolina 2 5 0 .286 166 North W L T Pct PF Green Bay 7 0 0 1.000 230 Detroit 5 2 0 .714 194 Chicago 4 3 0 .571 170 Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 148

PA 97 128 153 171 PA 147 128 116 145 PA 151 169 163 183 PA 141 137 150 178

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 5 1 0 .833 185 Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 188 N.Y. Jets 4 3 0 .571 172 Miami 0 6 0 .000 90 South W L T Pct PF Houston 4 3 0 .571 182 Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 112 Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 72 Indianapolis 0 6 0 .000 104 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 148 Pittsburgh 5 2 0 .714 151 Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 137 Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 97 West W L T Pct PF San Diego 4 2 0 .667 141 Oakland 4 3 0 .571 160 Kansas City 3 3 0 .500 105 Denver 2 4 0 .333 123

PA 135 147 152 146 PA 131 135 132 163 PA 71 122 111 120 PA 136 178 150 155

Sunday’s Games Houston 41, Tennessee 7 Carolina 33, Washington 20 N.Y. Jets 27, San Diego 21 Cleveland 6, Seattle 3

Denver 18, Miami 15, OT Atlanta 23, Detroit 16 Chicago 24, Tampa Bay 18 Kansas City 28, Oakland 0 Pittsburgh 32, Arizona 20 Dallas 34, St. Louis 7 Green Bay 33, Minnesota 27 Indianapolis at New Orleans, late Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants, New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco Today’s Game Baltimore at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30 Indianapolis at Tennessee, 10 a.m. New Orleans at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 10 a.m. Miami at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 10 a.m. Arizona at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Detroit at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 1:05 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay, N.Y. Jets, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 31 San Diego at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.

First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Sea 9 137 17-65 72 2-39 3-60 1-0 12-30-1 3-25 7-50.1 2-1 8-68 17:04

Cle 20 298 44-141 157 4-14 1-23 1-0 20-35-1 5-21 5-38.6 1-0 7-48 42:56

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle, Washington 7-39, Forsett 8-23, Whitehurst 2-3. Cleveland, Hardesty 33-95, McCoy 8-31, Ogbonnaya 3-15. PASSING—Seattle, Whitehurst 12-30-1-97. Cleveland, McCoy 20-35-1-178. RECEIVING—Seattle, Washington 4-10, Rice 2-38, Morrah 2-18, A.McCoy 2-10, Tate 1-11, Williams 1-10. Cleveland, Ogbonnaya 5-43, Little 5-31, Moore 4-35, Hardesty 2-27, Massaquoi 1-15, Smith 1-13, Cribbs 1-9, Watson 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Cleveland, Dawson 48 (BK), 24 (BK).

Baseball MLB Playoffs WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox St. Louis 2, Texas 2 Wednesday, Oct. 19: St. Louis 3, Texas 2 Thursday, Oct. 20: Texas 2, St. Louis 1 Saturday, Oct. 22: St. Louis 16, Texas 7 Sunday, Oct. 23: Texas 4, St. Louis 0 Today: St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9) at Texas (Wilson 16-7), 5:05 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26: Texas (Lewis 14-10) at St. Louis (Garcia 13-7), 5:05 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 27: Texas at St. Louis, 5:05 p.m.

Hawks: Can’t generate any offense in contest Continued from B1 20-yard field goal that tied it 3-3. Dawson’s 53-yard field goal Rolling to his right in the third with 11:18 left gave the Browns a quarter, Whitehurst looked down 6-3 lead, and the 36-year-old was field and saw wide receiver Sid- set to give Cleveland a six-point ney Rice wide open near the side- lead but his 24-yard attempt with 3:05 left was swatted away by line. All Rice had to do was catch Seahawks defensive end Red Brythe ball and waltz into the end ant, who earlier blocked a zone, but he stumbled after mak- 48-yarder in the first quarter. However, Seattle couldn’t move ing the grab and went out of bounds at Cleveland’s 9-yard line. the ball as Whitehurst had four “On my turn, I didn’t realize incompletions and had a pass how close I was to the sideline,” dropped on the Seahawks’ final possession. Rice said. In the final minute, a frus“I was trying to get some extra yards and I went out of bounds.” trated Bryant was ejected for The Seahawks then failed to head-butting Cleveland tight end score a TD despite running five Alex Smith. plays inside Cleveland’s 10 before “Dumb move on my part,” Brysettling for Steven Hauschka’s ant said. “I take full responsibility

for it. “I’m supposed to be a leader. I lost my composure. You never know what could have happened if we got the ball back on offense. “He [Smith] was talking the whole game. He was taking cheap shots at me. That’s what guys do when they can’t block you.” The Seahawks were penalized eight times, and a few of the calls were sketchy. In the first quarter, safety Kam Chancellor sacked Browns QB Colt McCoy on third down but was whistled for unnecessary roughness, a call that sent Carroll onto the field screaming at referee Mike Carey. “They said he led with his head, you can’t do that,” said Car-

roll, careful not to blame the officials. “It looked like Kam tried not to do that and get his head to the side and then actually wrapped him up and threw him down. “You guys had a better look than I had, so I don’t know what to tell you about that.” Seattle’s chances took a big hit before kickoff, when Lynch, the team’s leading rusher and top offensive weapon, had back spasms. Lynch remained on the sideline and at one point appeared ready to enter the game. “He’s had an ongoing thing with his back since he arrived with us,” Carroll said. “It came up right before game

time and he couldn’t get loose. We tried to work with him the whole game and keep him going. “He was about ready to take a shot at going after it, but he had sat too long.” Notes: Seahawks starting CB Walter Thurmond broke his leg and is done for the season. Carroll said Chancellor injured his knee. Washington started in place of Lynch and finished with 39 rushing yards and caught four passes. DE Chris Clemons got two of Seattle’s five sacks. LB David Hawthorne was credited with 11 tackles and intercepted McCoy.

Series: Texas Rangers shut out Cardinals 4-0 Continued from B1 in the first inning. Then Mike Napoli broke it open with a three-run homer in “I was very focused. I knew this was a big game for us,” Hol- the sixth that set off a hearty land said. “I had to step up and high-five in the front row between team president Nolan Ryan and make sure I was prepared.” Hobbled Josh Hamilton put former President George W. Bush. Texas ahead with an RBI double And just like that, for the first

time since 2003, the World Series stood at two games apiece. Now the whole season is down to a best of three, with the outcome to be decided back at Busch Stadium. Game 5 is tonight at Rangers Ballpark. It’s a rematch of the

opener, when Cardinals ace Chris Carpenter topped C.J. Wilson. A day after Pujols produced arguably the greatest hitting show in postseason history, tying Series records with three home runs, six RBIs and five hits during the Cardinals’ romp, Holland

emerged as the unlikely star. Holland got a big cheer when he took the mound in the ninth and was still throwing 96 mph. With the crowd chanting his name, he walked Rafael Furcal and left in the ninth inning. He tipped his cap and waved.

Pirates: Celebrating men’s, women’s hoops Continued from B1 make that happen and our gymnasium will be an exciting place to be The women’s team showcased as we contend for another champinewfound depth, quickness and onship.” guard play in an intense defensive The women’s team performed a 15–11 black team victory. dance number whose execution “We have the pieces in place to can only spell future success for the be the top junior college basketball women’s ability to execute plays. program in the country,” Von Vogt “I’m excited about my team this said. year,” Crumb said. “The guys are working hard to “They work very hard and are a

very dedicated group. They are competitive and have natural team chemistry that will allow us to improve throughout the season.” On the men’s side, the dunk contest was a high-flying affair that left many wondering if they were at the annual NBA Dunk Contest rather than the area community college. Defending dunk champion

DeShaun Freeman wowed the crowd early with his patented 180-degree tomahawk slam as did Las Vegas freshman Curtis Stewart by flying over two teammates on the way to an electrifying lefthand windmill jam. The dunks of the night belonged to Wake Forest University transfer JT Terrell, who recorded perfect scores in both rounds by bouncing

the ball off the ground and backboard before catching it mid-air and then going through the legs while spinning in an 180-degree turn and slamming the ball home. Sophomore Megan Smith captured the 3-point completion crown for the women while sophomore Jordan Rawls won the title for the men.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Monday, October 24, 2011

B3

Tebow works magic for Broncos Unlikely comeback for Denver

Week 7 highlights Passing

The Associated Press

MIAMI — Fans chanted Tim Tebow’s name in derision. They hooted as he missed open receivers, got buried under blitzes and kept falling short on third down. Then he led an improbable comeback that became the latest chapter in the legend of Tebow. In his first start this year, Tebow rallied the Denver Broncos with two touchdown passes in the final 2:44 of the fourth quarter to force overtime, and Matt Prater’s 52-yard field goal gave them an 18-15 win Sunday over the stunned Miami Dolphins. “It’s tough to say, but man, Timmy did a great job,” said Dolphins center Mike Pouncey, who played with Tebow at Florida. “Hopefully the critics will get off him about what he can’t do and talk about the things that he can do, and that’s figure out a way to win the game, no matter what.” The Broncos appeared beaten when they trailed 15-0 with 5:23 left and took over at their 20. At that point Tebow was 4 for 14 for 40 yards. “It was my fault we were in that position,” he said. “Silly things kept happening. On the sidelines, we were still believing. “We wanted it, and they believed in me for more than 60 minutes.” In the frantic final minutes of the fourth quarter, Tebow led TD drives of 80 and 56 yards sandwiched around a successful onside kick. He scored a 2-point conversion standing up with 17 seconds left to tie the game. In overtime, Denver’s D.J. Williams sacked Matt Moore to force a fumble and recovered it at the Miami 36. Three plays later Prater hit the game-winner. “It was never in doubt,” said Denver’s relieved coach, John Fox. The Broncos (2-4) won for the first time in the eight games they’ve played on the Dolphins’ field. Miami (0-6) extended the NFL’s longest losing streak to nine games, leaving the status of embattled coach Tony Sparano even more tenuous.

Bears 24, Buccaneers 18 WEMBLEY, England — Matt Forte ran for 145 yards and a touchdown and Chicago held on at Wembley Stadium. Jay Cutler threw for 226 yards and a touchdown and the Bears (4-3) intercepted Josh Freeman four times to win their second game in a

Aaron Rodgers, Packers, 24-30-0, 335 yds, 3 TDs, 146.5 PR Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers, 26-39-0, 361 yds, 3 TDs, 121.8 PR Matt Schaub, Texans, 18-23-0, 296 yds, 2 TDs, 147.7 PR

Receiving

Greg Jennings, Packers, 7-147, 1 TD Steve Smith, Panthers, 7-143, 0 TDs Arian Foster, Texans, 5-119, 1 TD

Rushing

The Associated Press

Denver’s Tim Tebow (15) passes to wide receiver Demaryius Thomas for a touchdown against the Miami Dolphins late in the fourth quarter Sunday in Miami.

NFL Sunday row. The Buccaneers (4-3) lost for the second time in three years in London. Tampa Bay scored two touchdowns in the fourth quarter to pull within three points. But after a 25-yard field goal by Chicago’s Robbie Gould, Freeman was picked off with 37 seconds left by D.J. Moore.

Panthers 33, Redskins 20 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Cam Newton ran for a touchdown and threw for another in the second half to help Carolina. Jonathan Stewart also ran for a third-quarter touchdown for the Panthers (2-5), who for the first time all year found themselves playing with the lead almost the entire way. Newton threw for 256 yards and ran for 59 more. He ran for his seventh touchdown on a 16-yard keeper in the third quarter, tying a record for most TDs rushing by a rookie quarterback since the 1970 NFL-AFL merger. In the fourth, he had an easy touchdown toss to Brandon LaFell that blew the game open. Washington’s John Beck threw for 279 yards and scored on a short keeper in his first start in four years. But he didn’t get the Redskins (3-3) back to the end zone again until they were down 30-13.

Chiefs 28, Raiders 0 OAKLAND, Calif. — Kendrick Lewis and Brandon Flowers returned interceptions for touchdowns and Kansas City took advantage of rusty quarterback play from Kyle Boller and Carson Palmer.

three games, but he missed several open receivers and, with a blitzing LaMarr Woodley in his face, drew an intentional grounding call in the Cardinals’ end zone Mike Pouncey for a safety. Pittsburgh (5-2) won its Miami center third straight and improved to 2-2 on the road.

“Hopefully the critics will get off [Tim Tebow] about what he can’t do and talk about the things that he can do, and that’s figure out a way to win the game, no matter what.”

Boller became the first Raiders quarterback in 13 years to throw three interceptions in the first half, including Lewis’ 59-yard score on the first drive of the game for Oakland (4-3). Palmer relieved in the second half and threw three more interceptions, including one that Flowers returned 58 yards to give the Chiefs a 28-0 lead early in the fourth quarter. Javier Arenas and Le’Ron McClain each added touchdown runs for the Chiefs (3-3) on a day the Kansas City offense didn’t have to do much at all.

Packers 33, Vikings 27 MINNEAPOLIS — Aaron Rodgers kept Green Bay unbeaten with three touchdowns and 335 yards passing, holding off plucky Christian Ponder in the rookie’s first start. Rodgers finished 24 for 30, another near-unstoppable afternoon for him. Ponder was picked off twice in the third quarter by Charles Woodson, who almost grabbed a couple more, but he kept the Vikings in it the whole game after a 71-yard completion on his first play. Adrian Peterson rushed 24 times for 175 yards and a touchdown for the Vikings (1-6), but James Starks put the game away with two big gains for first downs before the 2-minute warning and finished with 75 yards on 13 carries. Mason Crosby had four field goals for the Packers (7-0), including a franchise record 58-yarder.

Cowboys 34, Rams 7

ARLINGTON, Texas — DeMarco Murray ran for a franchise-record 253 yards, including a 91-yard touchdown that’s the second-longest in club history, to lead Dallas. In the start of a footballbaseball doubleheader between teams from DallasFort Worth and St. Louis, the Cowboys (3-3) emphatically ended their stretch of 11 straight games decided by four points or less. The Rams (0-6) were without quarterback Sam Bradford and were averaging the fewest points in the league even with him. They also had by far the worst run defense in the NFL, allowing 163 yards per game. Quarterback A.J. Feeley was mediocre in his first start since 2007 and Steven Jackson ran for 70 yards and a TD.

Steelers 32, Cardinals 20 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Ben Roethlisberger threw 95 yards to Mike Wallace for the longest pass play in Steelers history and Pittsburgh handed Arizona its fifth consecutive loss. Roethlisberger, 26 of 39 for 361 yards, also had TD passes of 12 yards to Heath Miller and 4 yards to Emmanuel Sanders in the first game between the teams since Pittsburgh’s 27-23 thriller over the Cardinals in the 2009 Super Bowl. Kevin Kolb threw a pair of touchdown passes for the Cardinals (1-5), his first in

Jets 27, Chargers 21 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Plaxico Burress caught three touchdown passes, including the goahead score that was set up by an interception by Darrelle Revis, and the Jets stormed back for the win. Leading 21-17, the Chargers (4-2) appeared to be driving for a possible gamesealing score when Philip Rivers threw toward Vincent Jackson. The ball tipped off the receiver’s hands and right to Revis, who returned the interception 64 yards to the Chargers’ 19. After a few runs by Shonn Greene and a defensive holding call — the Chargers’ 11th penalty in the game — Mark Sanchez found Burress on a slant for a 3-yard touchdown to give the Jets (4-3) their first lead midway through the fourth quarter. It was the second time in his career Burress caught three touchdowns, and first since 2007 while with the Giants.

Texans 41, Titans 7 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Arian Foster ran for 115 yards and two touchdowns and added 119 more receiving with a 78-yard TD as Houston moved back into first place in the AFC South. The Texans (4-3) snapped a two-game skid even with Pro Bowl receiver Andre Johnson missing his third straight game and

DeMarco Murray, Cowboys, 25-253, 1 TD Adrian Peterson, Vikings, 24-175, 1 TD Matt Forte, Bears, 25-145, 1 TD Arian Foster, Texans, 25-115, 2 TDs

Wished I Stayed Home

Tie, Carson Palmer, Raiders, 8-213, 116 yds, 0 TDs, 17.3 PR Kyle Boller, Raiders, 7-14-3, 61 yds, 0 TDs, 22.3 PR fullback James Casey his second due to injuries. Matt Schaub threw for 296 yards and two TDs. Tennessee (3-3) has lost two straight. Chris Johnson had 18 yards on 10 carries and was booed by the hometown crowd, of whom began leaving early in the fourth quarter.

Falcons 23, Lions 16 DETROIT — Matt Ryan ran and threw for touchdowns to give Atlanta a double-digit lead in the first half, and the Falcons held on for the win. On Detroit’s final drive, a pass-interference penalty against Atlanta was overturned because instant replay showed defensive tackle Corey Peters had tipped the ball. Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford appeared to injure his right ankle on the play. He then threw incomplete on fourth down from the Atlanta 41 and limped off the field. The Falcons (4-3) ran out the clock with a first down to win consecutive games for the first time this year. The Lions (5-2) have lost two straight after their perfect start. Ryan’s 17-yard pass to Roddy White put Atlanta ahead 17-6 at halftime. Calvin Johnson caught his 10th TD pass late in the third quarter to pull Detroit within four points.

Ryan finally sees team he expects The Associated Press

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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Rex Ryan never is afraid to say anything. In the last week, he pulled off a doozy, basically insulting Chargers coach Norv Turner because San Diego hasn’t won any championships. During a conference call with San Diego reporters on Wednesday, Ryan mentioned that it was a once-ina-lifetime chance to be an NFL head coach. Asked if he had reflected on what would have happened had he been hired in 2007 by San Diego for his first NFL head coaching job — Turner got the gig — he replied: “I think I would have had a couple of rings. I’m telling you, those teams were loaded. There’s no question about it.” Ryan insisted it was an unintentional slight, and it probably was. But it made headlines and led sportscasts, and Ryan called Turner to explain and apologize. On Sunday, Ryan had no reason to apologize as his

Jets made an impressive Ryan and his team. mix and Ryan is trying to The Jets have a delicate mold it into a champion. turnaround to beat the Chargers 27-21. It was San Diego that self-destructed, particularly in the second half, leaving Local Monitoring Turner to bemoan his team’s sloppiness. PROTECTED BY Ryan, meanwhile, could joke about the incident, which is exactly what everyone expects from Rex. He might be irreverent at times and he certainly is NORTHWEST, INC. remarkably confident in his coaching ability, his defensive schemes and his relationship with his players. He’s also entertaining, insightful and, well, honest. You can’t say that about $5 OFF too many coaches in the REGISTRATION NFL, or any other sport, for FEE IN that matter. OCTOBER “Before the game, I told him I thought I could get him inside,” Ryan joked of his pregame meeting with Turner. OCTOBER ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS “I was going to work the 10% October tuition discount on selected classes body. Obviously, my chin’s not so great, so I have to Located at 3318 Acorn Lane, PA worry about that one punch (West of McCrorie Carpet One) of his.” paathletics.com The jokes, bravado and 457-5187 • klahhanegymnastics@gmail.com bluster serve a purpose for

Happy Hour Specials


B4

Monday, October 24, 2011

Fun ’n’ Advice

Peninsula Daily News

Friend wants wedding gifts back

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: Two years ago, my friend of more than 30 years was being married for the first time. Three days before the ceremony, “Caryn’s” wedding planner emailed all the guests, saying the wedding was canceled. No explanation was given, and we were asked to “respect the bride’s privacy” and refrain from contacting her. I waited a week, then sent Caryn a note saying I was thinking about her. I had given her two shower gifts and a wedding present a month in advance. Caryn has not returned the gifts. I didn’t expect to get the lingerie back, but I did expect the expensive tableware would be returned to me. In subsequent phone conversations — and emails and texts — she has never mentioned the gifts. Should I tell her I’d like my gift back or let it drop? Obviously, it’s bothering me, but if you tell me I should forget about it, I will. Disgruntled Friend in California

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Friend: Either Caryn doesn’t have a clue about proper wedding etiquette — that if a wedding is canceled, all unused gifts should be returned — or her fiance skipped out and took the gifts with him. I see no reason why, after all this time, you shouldn’t ask your friend if she’s planning on returning the gifts. Then you’ll have your answer.

Frank & Ernest

Dear Abby: With Halloween fast approaching, my husband and I are again trying to figure out how to deal with a sticky situation. A few years ago, we took in the granddaughter of a dear friend who passed away. “Teresa” is mentally challenged and childlike at age 35. She gets excited on holidays just like a youngster does. We usually stay home and observe the holidays without incident, but Halloween is different because Teresa wants to go trick-or-treating and expects candy from people who may not understand. We’ve tried in the past to suggest a party at church, but Teresa expects to collect goodies throughout the entire neighborhood, where we don’t know everyone. People can be cruel

Garfield

and have made rude comments Van Buren about Teresa’s age and size. (She weighs 300 pounds.) Is there anything we can do to help strangers understand? Can you think of something else exciting we can do that might interest Teresa and lessen her desire to go trick-or-treating? Spooked for Halloween

Abigail

Dear Spooked: Teresa should not go trick-or-treating unescorted, and then, only to households where the residents know her or have been alerted to her condition, which should eliminate insensitive comments. If that doesn’t work, then perhaps Teresa might enjoy handing out candy to trick-or-treaters who come to your door and celebrating the holiday that way. Dear Abby: I loaned a friend a significant amount of money, with the understanding that he would pay me a small amount every week for a year until it was repaid. For the most part, he has been making the payments, but he has missed a few. In the past, I have always given him a gift of $50 for his birthday and on Christmas. Would it be cheesy on my part to deduct the amount from what he owes me rather than give him cash on these occasions? Doin’ the Math in San Diego Dear Doin’: While I see your point, you’re mixing apples and oranges. A loan is a loan, and a gift is a gift. Your chances of being repaid will be better if you don’t mix the two.

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology

Momma

By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let anyone take advantage of you. Do things that will benefit you, rather than someone else. Take control, refuse to give in to demands and set the rules to suit your needs. If change is required, be the instigator. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Apply pressure if someone disappoints you. You have to strengthen your position and stand up for your rights. An old friend will help you out. Don’t let your emotions hold you back. Make a decision based on facts. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Take on a challenge with fervor. Beware of interference from others. A change of heart can lead to new friendships. Don’t let work cost you personally. Take care of your domestic responsibilities, no matter what it takes. 5 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Moodiness will ruin your plans. A hobby will help take your mind off someone who is causing you grief. Don’t let anyone put you in an uncompromising position. A change due to an older or younger relative can be expected. 2 stars

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Ask questions and find out the facts before you make a personal or financial decision. An impulsive move may solve one problem, but it’s sure to cause another. You are better off getting as far away from an unsavory situation as possible. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Follow your heart and you will find a way to cut corners and get ahead. Don’t remain idle when an opportunity is within reach. You will end up in a better position if you put more thought and effort into the way you use your experience and skills. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Consider what’s important and necessary to be successful. Don’t let laziness or the obstacles in your way be your excuse. Face competition or challenges head-on. Win or lose, what counts is how you play the game. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t let anyone put you down. Your reputation must be kept intact. Ask for a favor if it will ensure that you will be able to reach your goals. Speak from the heart and avoid misconceptions that might give the wrong impression. 4 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Do your best to avoid an unsavory situa-

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

tion. Diplomacy will be required. Keep yourself busy with projects that interest you or by picking up knowledge that will help further your goals. Make sure you know what’s expected of you. 2 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Caution will be required, but so will speed, flexibility and the determination to finish what you start. The more you do and the further you travel mentally and physically, the better off you’ll be. Greater negotiating power will result in higher cash returns. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An emotional situation will make it hard to hold on to money. Talk to someone who makes wise financial decisions and you will find out how to make yours work for you. Good judgment will be required. Overindulgence will be your downfall. 5 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Communication will lead to resolutions. Contracts, agreements and getting some sort of game plan in place will add to your security and overall wellbeing. Love and romance are highlighted. Celebrate your good fortune. Opportunities are within reach. 3 stars


Peninsula Daily News for Monday, October 24, 2011

c Our Peninsula Pickin’ (and eatin’) best of season SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, PUZZLES and WEATHER In this section

Directors take bite of local agriculture By Jennifer Jackson

For Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — How much lunch can $2.95 buy? How about a bowl of chili made with organic beef, coleslaw with fresh cabbage and carrots, roasted potatoes topped with fresh broccoli and parmesan, corn and black bean salsa, and apple-berry cobbler for dessert? That’s what Chef Dave Long of Port Angeles prepared for the 30 participants in Wednesday’s Farm to School Mobile Tour at Sequim Prairie Grange. A daylong event for food service directors and farmers on the North Olympic Peninsula, it featured hands-on training in the kitchen, field trips to local growers and, of course, lunch featuring local ingredients. “That’s our menu,” Long explained after the participants had filed off the bus and into the grange kitchen. “Are you hungry?” The answer was yes.

Began with breakfast The tour, organized by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, started at 8:15 a.m. in the Port Angeles School District’s central kitchen. There, the head cook assembled a yogurt and three-berry breakfast parfait, then everyone made one and ate it. According to Anna WebsterStratton, an AmeriCorps volunteer for the Jefferson County Farm2School program, it was delicious. “The berries were from Graymarsh Farm,” she said. “Then we went to the farm.” The participants also visited

A participant helps herself to broccoli tossed with parmesan, one of the toppings for the roasted potatoes. Chef Dave Long of Oven Spoonful, a catering business in Port Angeles, prepared the lunch. A gluten-free apple-berry cobbler made with Graymarsh Farm berries rounded out the meal, designed as a model for National Farm to School Month.

Jennifer Jackson (3)/for Peninsula Daily News

Christie Johnson of Johnson Farms, left, and Kia Armstrong of Nash’s Organic Produce, second from left, local food producers, serve themselves from a wide range of dishes assembled from locally grown produce during Wednesday’s “Farm To” tour. Second from right is Sandy Diimmel, assistant supervisor of the Clallam Bay Correction Center. Nash’s Organic Farm and Produce in Sequim. Jamie Calley, food service director at the Clallam Bay Corrections Center, said the tour provided the opportunity to make a connection with Nash’s, something she had been trying to do through the summer. Calley said the center’s dietitian, Brent Carney, has been try-

Peninsula

ing to get more fruit and vegetables into meals at the correction center. She has been working with one local grower, an orchardist, Calley said, through the state’s pilot Farm to Prison program. Buying overages and grade 2 produce would make buying local organic produce from Nash’s affordable.

“We may be able to pick up on our own,” Calley said.

Cape Flattery schools Sandy Lovik and Kathy Shingleton, who work in the Cape Flattery School District food service, took the tour and were also interested in getting fresh produce out to the West End. Brendon O’Shea, produce

23

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22 Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World IN PRINT & ONLINE Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video 23

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

*Excludes Real Estate & Employment Ads.

305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles, WA

LOST: Camera. Olympus, silver, last seen at the Pumpkin Patch, Carlsborg. 477-9332

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

LOST: Dog. 9 month old male yellow Lab, Carlsborg area, near Sunny Farms. 360-640-8311 LOST: Dog. Small black/white Sheltie. Near Bluffs at Gunn Rd. 460-1967.

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Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

5000900

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1A8315

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Lost and Found

LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Lost and Found

LOST: Green Barska binoculars Oct. 15. Oil City Rd past Goodman. Left on bumper and drove off. Email: beccay@gmail.com. LOST: Keys. Large set, west side P.A. 477-8315 LOST: Men’s wallet. Small, shiny black, made for shirt pocket, had hair band around it. In Sequim. REWARD. 681-6464.

FOUND: Dog. Approx. 2 yr. old male, up by Port Angeles High School. Call to identify. 461-6357.

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

Friday 11-11-11 before 4:00 p.m.

Community Notes

When your aging mother needs more care, call the Wild Rose Adult Family Home in Sequim. We solve problems. 683-9194

PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

11 Lines of Text Ads 11 Days in Print must be placed in person 11 Dollars * or over the phone on

Turn

LOST: Dog. Small brown Siberian husky. Last seen at Peninsula College, 10/19. Wearing red halter with her name and number. 460-1628

MARKETPLACE

November 11, 2011 Classified Ad Special

buyer for the Food Co-op in Port Townsend, said he signed up for the tour because the co-op is interested in supporting the Farm to School program, possibly by coordinating, storing or processing local food. “We work with the local growers already,” O’Shea said. “This expands the conversation and broadens the relationship.” Veda Wilson, Quilcene School District food service director, said her school has made a lot of changes in the past few years, including dedicating a percentage of the levy to buying food for the cafeteria from local farmers and revising menus to include “more green, more orange, more fresh fruit.”

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. AR Administrator/ Receptionist For building supplier, part-time. Must have AR experience, proficient in MSOffice, multi-task and detail oriented. Resume to Julie, 301 W. Washington, Sequim WA 98382 by 10/31. Caregiver Needed Great pay, DOE. Light house keeping/cooking. Refs req. Send resume to 181 Green Meadows Drive, Sequim, WA 98382.

CNA/NAR Due to growth, new positions available. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com Development Mgr for First Step 25 hrs. wk. For req/full desc or to submit resume email fstep@olypen.com EOE

to

31

Season/C8 Help Wanted

HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR Full-time Mon.-Fri., with rotating weekends. Prior management and durable medical equipment/ billing exp. a MUST. Needs to be a good organizer, multi-task oriented and have excellent management skills. Pick up application at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. QA Inspection Supervisor. Job Summary: Coordinate quality inspection activities including the reporting and correction of production/system processes while supervising QA Inspectors. Duties and Responsibilities: Responsibility and authority to manage and supervise the Final and In-Process Inspection activities. Assists Inspectors in the interpretation and application of customer drawings and specifications. Develops training plans for Inspectors and Inspection Leads. Performs other quality assurance duties as assigned. Skills: Ability to read and interpret aerospace blueprints and specifications. Ability to work within tightly controlled deadlines. Must demonstrate Management/Leadership skills within the Quality Assurance Department, while establishing effective communication with other departments. Qualifications: US Citizen or lawful Permanent Resident. Eight years of QA experience. A minimum of three years of the work experience must be in a decision-making position. Education and/or current ASQ CQE certification may be used to waive part of the eight year work experience. Experience and understanding of working in a Quality Management System. Knowledge of SPC and statistical/continuous improvement tools and techniques. How to apply: Submit resume and documentation to support the above requirements to either hr@acti.aero or HR at ACTI, 2138 West 18th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98363.


ACROSS 1 Use a rotary phone 5 Common movie theater name meaning “jewel” 10 Cheat (out of) 14 Regarding 15 Accustom (to) 16 Cad 17 Armstrong who took a “giant leap for mankind” 18 1966 Tommy James and the Shondells hit 20 Release 22 Comes up, as the sun 23 Not working 24 Knock for a loop 26 1958 Connie Francis hit 30 Printer’s widths 33 Is wearing 34 First application line to fill in 35 Sheep sound 36 “My turn to bat!” 37 Untrue 39 List of choices 40 Fed. pollution monitor 41 Rani’s wrap 42 Gave a hoot 43 Mineo of “Rebel Without a Cause” 44 1956 Little Richard hit 47 Puts on 48 1982 Disney sci-fi film 49 Wedding site 52 Dinner alternative, on a 39-Across 56 1965 Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs hit 59 Cat that roars 60 Auditorium 61 Remark between actor and audience 62 Aware of 63 Nothing but 64 Do a lawn job 65 Mellows, as wine DOWN 1 Pioneer Boone, folksily 2 “Understood” 3 Working busily

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Classified

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

Help Wanted

Jefferson County Public Health seeks applications from residents of all 3 County Commissioner districts to serve on the recently created Clean Water District Advisory Board. If interested in assisting the County with protection & restoration of water quality & shellfish resources in Jefferson County, please refer to the Clean Water page found at: jeffersoncountypublic health.org LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LEGAL ASSISTANT Small practice needs half-time assistant who can organize and run things. Reply Peninsula Daily News PDN#235/Legal Pt Angeles, WA 98362 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

Lincare, leading national respiratory company seeks results driven Sales Representative. Create working relationships with MD’s, nurses, social worker and articulate our excellent patient care with attentive listening skills. Fulltime position with benefits, competitive base + un-capped commission. Drugfree workplace. EOE. Interested candidates may deliver resume to: 1905 E. Front St Port Angeles or fax to 360457-3263. RECEPTIONIST For busy office. MUST be great with people and be able to multitask. Send resume: Peninsula Daily News PDN#234/Reception Pt Angeles, WA 98362

31

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. THE MATTERHORN, SWITZERLAND Solution: 9 letters

W I L D L I F E P H N Z Y S E By Michael Wiesenberg

4 Sweet sucker 5 “Look!” 6 “Right away!” 7 Popular wedding month 8 Comedic TV alien’s planet 9 Turn you hang, in slang 10 Scarecrow’s lack 11 Electrified particles 12 Gospel writer 13 Islets 19 Bluenose 21 Thor’s father 24 Luxury hotel bathroom features 25 Clock readout 26 Acts skittish 27 Florida city on its own bay 28 Pub order, with “the” 29 Dark 30 Thumbs-up reviewer 31 “Olympia” painter Édouard 32 Riyadh resident 37 Goat-man of myth 38 Painting and sculpture, e.g. Help Wanted

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H G S T L T A R A R A T N P E

T R A T R F O L E L O C E O C

www.wonderword.com

A S E A N C L R L K G P E ҹ E W

E W S P L A I E I G P G K N P I L A O O E L U P M E A N C ҹ B K ҹ A W S E C ҹ E P R S S H P E L

A L L X D S D Y R E N E C S B

E V E K U I M O U N T A I N A

C L I M B E R S Y E L L A V C

10/24

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Alps, Base, Cable, Cars, Century, Climbers, Cold, Danger, Explorers, Faces, Falling, Famous, Flanks, Forest, Four, French, Glaciers, Gneiss, Highest, Italy, Mountain, Museum, Peace, Peak, Pennine, Points, Ridge, Rock Pile, Rocky, Ropes, Scenery, Snow, Spire, Steep, Trails, Train, Trekkers, Valley, View, Walk, Waterfall, Weather, Wildlife, Zermatt Yesterday’s Answer: Definition

OEMMD (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 Hawaiian volcano 41 Building level 42 Swamp beast 45 “That’s good enough” 46 On edge, as nerves 47 Dawdle 49 Dr. Seuss’s “Horton Hears __” 50 Bank offer 51 Bridge crossing

Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast reliable reasonable rates. Fall clean-up, gutter cleaning, weed pulling/whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Sequim/P.A. Local: 681-3521. Cell: 541-420-4795.

I DO housecleaning, pet walking, errands. II am mature, reliable. 683-4567.

Perfection Housekeeping, client openings, Seq./Carlsborg, and eve. business janitorial. 681-5349. Winter house sitter. Trade room and board for service. Mature, responsible and conscientious. 3 yrs experience. 683-3175 Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513

Work Wanted 41 Business Opportunities 42 Mortgages/Contracts 43 Money Loaned/Wanted

Business Opportunities

www.kbsilverandgold wealth.com

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. New carpet. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower and granite countertops. Peek-a-boo water view and mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. $199,000. 360-460-7503

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

10/22/11

charge 52 Father-daughter boxers 53 Workplace for the 52-Down 54 Handy bag 55 Grandson of Adam who reputedly lived to 905 57 Place for a drink 58 Consume

51

Work Wanted

HOME CLEANING Reliable, dependable, flexible. Call Meredith 360-461-6508.

41

E C N A S F T C O F S S E N N

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

BROTHER & SISTER TEAM. Looking for caretaker position-home, farm, business. Quiet, drug free, responsible and trustworthy, late 50s. Love animals, do maintenance, give you more freedom while keeping your property safe. Small salary with separate, private small quarters or larger salary if not. Personal references available. Karen Donny 360-808-0698

© 2011 Universal Uclick

R S N E R E I A R C U A I E T

RMYAR

HANDYMAN: Sequim area, references, $15 hr. 775-7364.

Veterinary receptionist wanted. Must have excellent communication & customer service skills; ability to handle clients facing difficult situations w/diplomacy; strong computer/phone skills; ability to work in a fast paced & changing environment; must be organized & able to mutli-task. Send resume to: ATTN: Tiffany Cronk, Angeles Clinic For Animals, 160 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles, WA 98362.

C K R E I E H U M O K N T R U

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

Residential Coordinator For Maloney Heights, 28-unit residence for chronically homeless. BA degr or 3-5 yrs relevant exper. M-F, FT w/benes. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. EOE. Details at www.pcmhc.org

SCHEDULER Schedule clinical appointments. Exper req’d. FT with benefits. Resume & cvr ltr to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

S O T A R S O G M R N Y A I R

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

EDDY’S REPAIR Small engine repair. Mower, trimmers, chainsaws. Pick up and delivery for a fee. 360-681-3065.

Ruddell Auto Mall seeks Lube Tech. Apply in person.

10/24/11 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

F A L S C F S A I E E I L P Y

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

MA: Per diem, medical experience required, wage DOE. Send resume to SSDS, 777 N. 5th Ave., Sequim.

34

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Homes

4 SEASONS RANCH Cute 2 Br., 1.5 bath rambler, wood stove, laminate floors throughout, newer roof, one car garage and private back yard, paved circle drive. $195,000. ML262045 Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY A welcoming front porch awaits you as you walk towards this spacious classic craftsman style home which has been lovingly restored to retain its original character. Living room and dining room have luxurious walnut floors and ceiling detail. Strait and mountain views. The lower level is a completely furnished 1 Br. + apartment! $399,000. ML261841. Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BETWEEN SEQUIM AND P.A. Great split level 4 Br., 2 full bath + 2 half bath, 2,478 sf home on 2.50 acres at the end of a cul-de-sac. Attached 3 car garage + detached 2 car garage/workshop finished, heated 220V. Property is private sunny with a park like feel. $340,000. ML262103. Liz Parks 683-1500 RE/MAX Fifth Avenue

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Peninsula Daily News Garage Sale Ad!

4 Signs Prices Stickers And More! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

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51

TEELST

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

C2

SHALIV Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

Homes

AFFORDABLE 2 Br., 2 bath. Wood burning stove. Patio, fenced yard. New carpet and paint inside and out. Great room. Landscaped $45,000 ML261663/258153 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY CHARMER All brick Del Guzzi home. 2 Br., 2 baths. Hardwood floors, new roof, new windows and big oversized backyard. $159,000 ML262084/286015 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. CLOSE TO SCHOOL Neat 3 Br., 2.5 bath on low-traffic street. Kick back on front deck and check out the Strait and Mt. Baker. Or enjoy family BBQs in the big backyard. Large garage. Family rooms upstairs and down allow for separate entertainment areas. $214,000. ML262033 Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY COMFORTABLE CAREFREE LIVING Mtn views and beautiful sunsets, single level townhouse adjacent to greenbelt. Chef’s kitchen, silestone counters, breakfast bar. Generous master suite and well appointed den. Enjoy Sunland amenities. $270,000. ML254333/261570 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND COMMERCIAL POSSIBILITIES Lots of options - either with its current use as a 2 Br. home on over 1/2 acre, or develop as a commercial property with a CSD Zoning, with many allowable uses. $200,000. ML262004 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

(Answers tomorrow) YOKEL SPLINT WINNER Jumbles: SHOVE Answer: When the babies on his flight began to cry, he was afraid it would be — NONSTOP

51

Homes

Country Living Ranch Home On Acreage For Sale By Owner. Beautiful end of the road privacy on 2.5 acres with optional adjacent parcels available up to 20 acres. 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1996 custom built 1825 sf home. $295,000 Jerry 360460-2960. EASY LIVING IN HENDRICKSON PARK Open floor plan, 2 Br., 2 bath, kitchen with breakfast bar, dining room, living room. Master with large walk-in closet, master bath with 2 closets. Low maintenance yard, 10x12 storage shed in back yard with power, close to Safeway, SARC, stores, Olympic Discovery Trail. $79,000. ML261616 Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East EXCELLENT VIEWS From this older, twostory home of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, shipping lanes, San Juan Islands, Victoria and Mt. Baker. Home currently separated into two rental properties: one upstairs and one downstairs (both have views!). 2-car attached garage + parking in back off alley. $255,000. ML261246 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East FISHERMAN’S PARADISE Dream view 1.9 acre property right on the beach front of Clallam Bay. Immaculate park model home with covered deck. Bunk house with bath and extra storage. Fish processing area with everything - even a smoker! RV hookups, too. $245,000. ML261237. Barclay Jennings 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company #1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

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GATED GOLF COURSE VILLAGE HOME 2,132 sf. Fireplace, marble surround. Hardwood and tile floors. Built-ins, granite tile counters. Daylight basement partially finished with abundant storage and workshop. Includes Resort amenities. $455,000. ML85256 Lois Chase Johnson 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

NEW HOME IN SEQUIM This 2 Br. + den, 2 bath home features beautiful views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Dungeness Spit, Mt. Baker and Protection Island. All on one level with a covered wrap around porch. Located just minutes from town. Estimated to be complete at the end of November. $289,000. ML261930. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

IT’S ALL HERE + VIEWS A beautiful home and barn on 5+ acres just minutes from town— peace and quiet. Sit on the front porch and enjoy the views. Then amble from the kitchen past the breakfast nook into the great room with fireplace. Love dining in the formal dining room. Fantastic master suite plus 2 additional Br. and an office. 564 sf barn has a shop, loft studio, 12x12 tack room and even 2 stalls for the horses. Even more – 2 acres of fenced pasture. $699,900. ML261521. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

PEACEFUL AND PRIVATE SETTING This 2005 manufactured home on 1 acre with 3 Br., 2 bath, and a detached workshop is a great value! $125,000. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

LITTLE BIT COUNTRY Neat and clean 4 Br., 1.5 bath home in country neighborhood. Home features updated kitchen, tons of natural light, huge family room, and spacious fenced yard. Located on a quiet cul-de-sac off of Mt Pleasant Rd. $169,000. ML261483. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. MANY POSSIBILITIES Level .95 acre parcel of land. Partially treed. 1977 single wide mobile home. Newer range. Refrigerator and dishwasher. Older detached garage with shop area. $90,000. ML261954/277494 Patty Brueckner 460-6152 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP 2 Br., 2 bath, upgraded flooring, upgraded guest bath. Family room with fireplace, separate living room/dining. Low maintenance yard, $220,000 ML257171/261638 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND QUALITY CONSTRUCTION Energy efficient, mtn views, koi pond, waterfall and easy landscaping. 2 Br. suites + den, upscale kitchen with granite countertops, garden space and green house. $399,000. ML263139/261727 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND ‘R’ IS FOR RIVER FRONT Just reduced! One of the best fishing holes around! Gorgeous Sol Duc River front acreage in your very own yard. 7.5 acres with 120 feet of river frontage with world class steelhead and salmon fishing, regular visits from the elk herd - a perfect place to get in touch with nature. $92,500. ML250564. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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SELLER FINANCING AVAILABLE 1.5 acres, 2 separate contiguous parcels, 2 Br., 1 bath, 953 sf home. New roof in 2011, septic evaluation is done and registered with the county. Great soil for organic garden. A beautiful setting with sounds of Ennis Creek to soothe your soul. $130,000. ML261484 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SEQUIM BAY WATERFRONT This stunningly elegant waterfront home has 3 Br., 3 1/2 bath, and 2,733 sf right on Sequim Bay. Enjoy views of the water and woods from throughout the house. With custom detailing from the hardwood floors to the cathedral ceilings, this home shouts quality. $699,000. ML262111. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 STUPENDOUS OLYMPIC MTN VIEWS Horse property, chain link fenced and cross fenced with pond and irrigation rights. 50’x80’ riding arena, 24’x36’ barn. 22’x24’ foaling barn insulated with removable wall. Fruit trees. Shop with 220. Separate office (12’x16’). Excellent well. Heat pump and freestanding wood stove in home. Updated kitchen. Pond with koi. $269,900. ML261927 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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SHERWOOD VILLAGE Beautifully upgraded 3 Br., 1.75 bath condo. Great convenient location, end unit, lots of windows, private patio and mtn view, new countertops and plumbing fixtures, separate utility room and storage room. $165,000. ML197376/260570 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

The clean lines and style of the craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home to today’s standards. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $165,900. ML261473. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

STYLISH AND SOPHISTICATED NW contemporary style with water view. Architecture optimizes space and dramatic windows/ skylights infuse home with natural light. Large family room, kitchen with large bar/island and walk-in pantry. $349,900. ML260341. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

VERY CUTE BUNGALOW Close in location, zoning is office commercial. Convenient to court house, City Hall, shopping. Super well loved and maintained with mtn view. Use as your residence or it could be a great property for attorney office, beauty shop, etc. etc. Come and see this very special home. $149,500. ML261360 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SUNLAND BARGAIN Wonderful and affordable Sunland home. New carpets and freshly painted. Large backyard patio is perfect for entertaining. Large spacious rooms and even an extra room that would be perfect for a hobby or craft room. $169,900. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

WONDERFUL CAPE COD STYLE Home in the country. 10+ acres for tranquility and peace. Next to DNR land so bring you toys or horses to ride. Wrap around porch, custom pine cabinets, slate and hardwood flooring. Year round stream. 2 car detached garage. $269,000 ML260569/286010 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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This 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,380 sf home was beautifully remodeled on the inside in 2008. The kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and maple cabinets. The open living area has bamboo hardwood floors and lots of windows. It is located near Shane park. $177,500. Call at 360-477-8014 WONDERFUL COUNTRY HOME Beautiful panoramic view of Olympic Mtns. Propane brick fireplace, large master bath with separate tub/shower and walk-in closet. Large built-in pantry. Attached garage and additional garage/ workshop. Gorgeous landscaping, fruit trees, sprinkler system. $249,000. ML261180 Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 CENTRAL PA: 2 Br., 1 bath. Close to Safeway, quiet. No smoke/pets. Ref req. $575. 460-5892. COLLEGE P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba. No pets. $500. 457-1611 NO LAUNDROMATS! W/D in spacious P.A. 2 Br. $600 plus dep. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com STUDIO: Dungeness, view, util incl. $550, 6 mo. lease. No pets. Refs. Available Nov. 683-4503 WEST P.A.: 1 Br. $550 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

64 61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

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Apartments Furnished

Houses

1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no smoking/pets. $700, reference check. 928-2165 Between P.A. & Sequim. 2 Br., 1 bath with W/D/S/R on 1.5 acres. Available now. Storage Shed. No pets. Super clean. $775. 360-452-7721

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

64

Houses

68

Houses

AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $725. 460-9710.

P.A.: 933 E. 2nd. 2 Br. No smoke/pets. $780. 457-4023.

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in the city, 2 Br., 2 ba, updated with computer room. $825/$850. Drive by 415 S. Valley then call 460-7652.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: Exc. water view 2 Br. $765. tourfactory.com/397357

DISCOVERY BAY Beach front, like new, 2 Br., 2 ba, all appl. $1,000. 460-2330. FORKS: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced backyd, lg play room. $900. 374-6707, 640-0148

SEQUIM 150 Deytona St. 2 Br. single wide and outbuildings on fenced half acre. No smoking, pets negotiable. Annual lease $675 + util. Drive by, Olypenhomes.com or call 452-4258. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, on acreage. $550 mo., 1st, last cleaning dep. 683-9176.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A Studio..........$450 H 1 br 1 ba......$550 A 2 br 1 ba......$700 A 2 br 2 ba......$750 H 3 br 1 ba......$875 H 3 br 2 ba......$900 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 2.5 ba.$1300 STORAGE UNITS P.A. $40-$100 Sequim $50-$100

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. PEABODY PLAZA 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

360-417-2810

SEQUIM: Huge 1 Br., garage. $700 plus util. 681-8455.

P.A.: 1 Br., remod., carport, great location. $700. 452-6714

SEQUIM: New, 2 Br., 2 car gar., granite/ hardwoods, yard maintained. $1,150 mo. 460-0432.

P.A.: 2 Br. house, $895. 3 Br. duplex, $750. 452-1395.

65

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, carport, W/D, extra room. No smoking/ pets. 1424 W. 5th St. $900. 360-374-3259.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

Room and bath for rent. Includes utilities. Kitchen privileges. Very nice and quiet area. Must be clean and pick up after themselves must have a job, 8 minutes from Sequim. 683-8792.

Br., 1 ba, covparking with storage room. 670-6160.

P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, lg. yard. $750, 1st, last, dep. Sec. 8. Need refs. 417-0163.

66

P.A.: 3 Br., 1 bath, $800 mo. + security. 360-457-6922

Spaces RV/ Mobile

71

Appliances

Stainless Steel Appliances. 5 yrs old; Profile double convection oven, Elite refridg freezer built in w/frame, 2 drawer dishwasher, trash compactor, wine cooler. 912-2502 for info and $.

72

Furniture

BED: Full size mattress and box springs, plush eurotop, in great shape. Over $800 new. Selling for $300/obo. 681-3299 Couch/Love seat set. nice condition. matching set. Dark colors. $175. 477-8484 DINING SET: 54” pedestal dining table with leaf and 4 leather chairs. Excellent condition, $350. 565-1445

SEQUIM: 5 ac. 2 Br. office, 2.5 ba, W/D, propane heat, $1,000 mo., 1st, last, dep. 808-4082.

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

P.A.: 2 ered large $900.

Commercial Space

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

MISC: Frigidaire refrigerator, $300. Kenmore heavy duty super capacity washer dryer, 1 year old, $400. Port Angeles, 360-457-1392

FURNITURE: Wood desk, 30x66 w/20x 30 wing $250. Wood desk 30x62, $200. Steel desk, 30x60, $100. Wood oval table, 35x70, $50. Adjustable height table, 28x48 $50. Oak drafting table 28x54, $200. Ricoh color laser AP306 printer w/stand (for 8.5x11 & 11x17) $200. In Sequim. 360-460-7311 or 360-379-9117

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

SHOP LOCAL

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

peninsula dailynews.com

Sunland home by owner. 2 Br., 2 bath, sun room, hobby room, 0.23 acre lot. Views of fairway. $308,000. 681-5403.

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

WINTER SPECIAL Motel weekly, $179. Continental breakfast, microwave, refr., bathtub, Wi-Fi. Clean. 457-9494.

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean 3 Br., 2 bath, 2 car garage, no smoking/ pets. $910. Duane at 206-604-0188

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice

Window Washing

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

WEST P.A.: Full-time RV space, close to Lincoln Park, $350 plus electric. Call Bill 509-771-2123

P.A.: 634 E. 9th St. 3 Br., like new. $895 + dep. 460-7516 or 460-6172

C3

1A5137798

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Moss Prevention

360-457-6747 JIMGRP*044PQ

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

PAINTING

(360) 683-8332

REPAIR/REMODEL

SPECIALIZING IN TREES

Reg#FINIST*932D0

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

(360) 460-0518 165122885

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

WINDOW CLEANING

457-5186

ASBESTOS

360

DIRT WORK JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Small Jobs A Specialty

72289323

360/460•9824

LANDSCAPING Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com LIC

PAINTING

ACCOUNTING SERVICES Lena Washke

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

Accounting Services, Inc.

FREE Estimates

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

(360) 457-8102 165124112

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 23 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right Glen Spear, Owner

Lic#DONERRH943NA

Mole Control

Expert Pruning

683-8328

195133545

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

155121476

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

1A5136085

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

MOLE/PRUNING

Done Right Home Repair

Davis Painting

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

HOME REPAIR

#JKDIRKD942NG

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

945036615

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

025073138

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

452-9995

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

Contr#KENNER1951P8

Full 6 Month Warranty

COLUMC*955KD

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

0A5100969

D

75289698

G

ARLAN ROOFING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

& Leaky Roofs Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable 155120082

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

WANTED: Wind Damaged

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Quality Work

Inspections - Testing Surveys

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

APPLIANCES

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Asbestos

125111256

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Columbus Construction

86313195

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

78289849

TREE SERVICE

anthonystreetop@gmail.com

Call NOW To Advertise

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

115108502

JPSHAHS92BE

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

AIR DUCT CLEANING

s Handyman Services

John Pruss 360 808-6844

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

HANDYMAN

JP

FREE Estimates

195134780

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

Pressure Washing

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

9C5066307

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

93313234

#LUNDFF*962K7

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

115105618

Chad Lund

EXT./INT. RESIDENTIAL/COMM.

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Jim Green Painting 195134825

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Small jobs is what I do!


C4

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

• Page and Ad Design • Adobe Illustrator • Adobe Photoshop • Multi-Ad Creator • Adobe InDesign

Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

• Tabloids • Newspapers • Single Sheets • 11X17 Folded • Binding • Stitch & Trim

• Half Tones • Full Color • Professional Color Correction

• Negative • Paper • Velox

• Insertion into PDN • Labeling • Direct Mailing • Free Delivery Within P.A.

• Press Plates (of your favorite page or photo)

• Photo Prints

9A122696


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

79

Wanted To Buy

WANTED: Older Honda motorcycles from the ‘60s. 452-9043.

AIR COMPRESSOR 3 gall., 1/3 hp, accessories, never used. $50. 460-6979. AIR FILTER: HD, “Live to Ride” badge plate, ‘97. $35. 457-4383 ANCHOR: Danforth style 25 lb. $50. 360-437-9138 ANTIQUE: Oak dresser, with carving and mirror. $150. 360-914-0608 ANTIQUE: Oak dresser, with mirror, spindle legs. $200. 360-914-0608 ANTIQUE: Wicker baby bassinet. $25. 360-504-2282. AQUARIUMS: 30 and 40 gal. $20 and $40. 452-9685 AXLE: For boat trailer, EZ Loader, w/fenders, springs, brakes. $90. 683-1626. BATTERY: New, fits many motorcycles, 12N12A-4A-1. $25. 683-0146 BED COVER: For Ford Ranger. $45. 775-4948 BED: Queen mattress and box spring, good condition. $50. 504-2017 BEDLINER: Full size, for older Ford pickup. $20. 417-2022. BOAT: Avon Redstart 3 person, pump, OB mount, bag, oars. $200. 360-437-9138. BODY KIT: Ford Cougar, front and rear, 90 ty. $200/obo. 565-6854 BOOTS: Boggs, women’s size 10. $60. 457-0731. BOOTS: Survivors, men’s steel toe, size 8.5, new. $35. 457-0731 CB RADIO: Home base. $50. 928-9659. CELL PHONE Motorola Charm, new, Android. $100. Text 360-808-5976 CHAIN SAW: 16” Echo for parts. $25. 457-8193 CHAIN SAW: Homelite XL automatic 20” bar, runs great. $100. 460-3434 CHAIN SAW: Homelite. $40. 457-8193. CHRISTMAS LIGHTS 100 red c-9, never used. $15. 457-5720. CLARINET: Yamaha, excellent condition, incl case, just serviced. $175. 683-2323 COMFORTER SET Incl. shams, deco. pillows, etc. Blue nautical. $60. 504-2641. COMFORTER SET: 9 piece, king size, gold damask. Nice quality. $35. 452-6933. COMPUTER DESK Birch wood pull out, 31.5”x47”. $65. 683-7161 CORNER DESK Lots of storage, with white board. $100. 360-912-1758 Entertain. Center For TV. $35. 582-3069

72

Furniture

DINING SET: Dining table and 6 chairs, solid cherry, double pedestal table. 2 capt. chairs, 4 side, upholstered seats. Perfect condition. $700. 504-2017. Green fabric double reclining sofa, good shape, paid $900 new, sell $400/obo. 681-3299. MISC: Floral French provincial love seat, like new. $225. Recliner, lg., grayish green, excellent condition, $125. 477-1328, 457-4756 MISC: Oak (inlay) coffee and (2) end tables, $300. 1940s Winthrop secretary, $800. Singer sewing machine in cabinet, $300. 775-220-9611. MOVING: Coffee/end tables, $400. China cabinet, $400. Teak table/chairs, $300. 3 metal filing cabinets, $40. Roll top desk, $200. Lamp, $40 Treadmill, $200. Sofa $400. Chest freezer, $200. 681-0227. SOFA/LOVE SEAT Matching set, tan and Navy floral. $100 both/obo. 681-8694. SOFA: Natuzzi leather sofa, light tan, 75” long, 1 yr old. Excellent condition. $550. 385-4320

73

General Merchandise

(9) deck enclosure windows, new, tempered. Cost $2,000. Sell $720. 360-385-0106 ASSORTED ITEMS Large blonde pedestal dining table and 4 chairs, $150. (2) coffee tables, small $30, lg $40. (2) queen bedspreads, $5 ea. Call for info. 681-4429 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 FIREPLACE: Brand new gas/propane Majestic fireplace. Complete corner assembly with wood trim and top and a decorative rock front. VERY NICE. $1500/ obo. 360-461-2607.

COSTUME: Halloween, women’s red cape, tights, horns, fangs. $10. 797-1179 CURTAINS: (3) b/w checkered, 2 matching tab top panels. $25. 452-6933. DINING SET: Drexel Heritage, dbl pedestal, 6 chairs, 2 leaf. $200. 460-3434. DINING TABLE Round, solid oak, pedestal. $150/obo. 775-4495 DOG HOUSE Dogloo, large. $25. 681-4422 DOOR: 30”, 6 panel, solid. $30/obo. 681-3339 DOUBLE SINK: 4 hole, cast iron, white. $30. 928-1148. DRESSER: 5 drawer solid maple. $60. 775-6498 DRESSER: 6 spacious drawers, porcelain knobs. $75. 457-6431. DUFFEL: Wheeled, American Tourist, never used. $25. 360-379-1618 DUVET SET: With shams, queen, mauve, tan, green floral. $10. 683-7161. ENTRY DOOR Approx 36x72. $40. 460-3756 EXECUTIVE DESK All wood with protective glass top. $150. 360-912-1758 EXERCYCLE: Great condition, from Costco. $20. 457-3425. FISHING POLES: (8), 2 with reels, 8’-10’. $150 all. 582-3132. FREE: Craft magazines and books, 4 small boxes. Take all. 360-504-2282 FREEZER: Frigidaire white upright commercial 13 cu ft, like new. $200. 683-9333 FUTON/SOFA: never used. $90. 477-1490 FUTON: Oversize chair. Brand new, solid wood. $200. 385-6370 GRINDER: Two wheels, home made. $10. 457-4971. GUITAR: Ibanez, good condition. $100. 775-1461. GUN SAFE: Sentry 10 rifle. $200. 808-8540. HEARTH: For woodstove. Beige tile 49”x 49”. $100. 582-3132 HEATER: Fireless, infinity flame heat surge, electric. $90. 360-452-7125 HEATERS: Propane w/tank, $30. Milkhouse 1,500 watt, $7.50. 457-4971. HINGES: (39) Interior door, brass with screws, like new. $60. 683-3806. HITCH: Late model Outback or Forester. $150. 452-4827. LAPTOP: Dell WiFi. $150. Jason 460-7628 TV STAND: Black. $20. 775-4495.

LUGGAGE: 4 piece set, burgundy, like new. $20. 452-6974. MASSAGE TABLE Siamina Invision, never used. $175. 452-2080 Massage/Heat Mat Oster, works well. $20. 452-6974 MASSAGING CUSHION Homedics, like new. $65. 452-2080. MISC: Collector plates, $10/obo. Jeans, size 12/14, $2. 928-3464. MISC: Desk chairs, $10/obo. Portable TV/radio, $15/obo. 928-3464 MISC: Heavy duty tub bench, walker, port. commode, $200. 808-2949 MITER SAW: Makita, 255 mm on stand. $5. 775-4948. MIXER: Mackie CR 1604 church, cafe, band manual. $150. 775-7048 MTN BIKE: Men’s 26” Schwinn sidewinder 21 sp, like new. $85. 452-4485 MTN BIKE: Trek, 21 spd, size 16.5, new $450. $60/obo. 797-1102 OVERALLS: Welders bib, cowhide, 36 waist. $40. 460-6979 PATIO SET: Table with 4 padded chairs, umbrella. $100. 681-7579 PEDESTAL SINK New, black, never installed. $50. 928-1148 POWER WINCH: For boat, power in and out. $150. 452-2985. PRINTER: Color HP, receipt, paper, wireless, in box. $50. 912-2734 PSP: Playstation Portable, 3 games. $100. 460-3756 RACKET: Racquetball Hogan 31 oversize, cover. $25. 912-1759 RADIAL SAW: Sears 10” with legs. $60. 775-7048 RECLINER: Maroon La-Z-Boy, excellent condition. $125. 683-3681 ROLLERS: (2) for boat trailer, EZ Loader, 8 assemblies. $30. 683-1626 SHIRTS: Pendleton wool, medium, 12 patterns. $10 ea. 683-4173 SHOES: (2) Sketcher Sports, womens 9W. White, $40. Black, $35. 457-0731. SHOES: Women’s red SAS, 6.5 narrow. $50. 457-5720. SINK: 50’s style kitchen, w/faucets and metal cabinet. $75. 452-2264. SINKS: Kitchen double, faucet set, sprayer, disposal. $200/all. 683-9333. TV/VCR: Toshiba 20”. $35. 683-3887.

73

73

General Merchandise

CEMETERY PLOTS (2) Plots in Dungeness Cemetery, lot 133. Retail $1,900 each, both $2,500. 509-341-9082 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Cord $160, delivered. Proceeds to P.A. Senior Class ‘12. 417-4663. GENERATOR Coleman Powermate Pro 6750. Running watts 6,750, max watts 8,500. Low hours. $1,000 new. $700. 928-3077. LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. LUMBER: 6 doz. 4x4 old growth cedar, 8’ long, some or all. $7.50 ea. 374-5085. MISC: Trash burner, $140. Upright heavy duty Kirby vacuum, w/attachments and carpet cleaning attach., $150. 7 quart Presto canner, $50. 360-379-1099. PROM DRESS: 2 short and 1 long, like new, $25 each call for sizes and color. And prom shoes 7 ? and 8 $10 each. Call 452-9693 SEGWAY: Beautiful condition, all extras. $4,200. 385-2523. SPA: Hot Spot, like new, for 2, will deliver local, 110 or 220 volt. $2,950. 457-9037 TRAILER: ‘05 Landscape trailer, 8x14, great condition. $2,250. 683-3425.

General Merchandise

TRAILER: Covered 6x12 Hallmark Transport Deluxe. Dual axle, ramp and side door. $3,000. 683-4265 UTILITY TRAILER ‘93 trailer conversion. Built from ‘50 Ford pickup bed. Quality job. Straight body, good tailgate. New jack. Canopy. Needs paint. $600. 460-6979 ZERO CLEARANCE PROPANE FIREPLACE “HeatnGlo.” Complete, excellent cond. Handsome oak mantle. $375/obo. 457-6127.

75

Musical

GUITARS REDUCED! Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $175. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $125. Both in new condition, great sound! Make an offer! 477-0903. PIANO: Kimball, Upright, good starter, well used, tuned. $395/obo. 477-8923. TROMBONE: Yamaha trombone, with ProTec case. $200. 457-4931 VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

76

Sporting Goods

GUN SHOP at the P.A. Antique Mall, 109 W. 1st St. Taking guns on consignment, 1 low fee. Buying/trading/selling guns, rifles scopes, binoculars, spotting scopes Special order new guns, dealer plus 10%. We do scope mounting, also buying gold/silver. Call 452-1693 or 457-6699

SIRIUS: Satellite radio with boombox. $100. 683-0146

STUDDED TIRES With rims for Honda Accord (4). $40. 452-2264 SWIVEL/ROCKERS (2) beige, like new. $50/obo both. 457-7600 TABLE: Solid oak antique, drop leaf. $200. 681-7579. TACHOMETER Honda marine, ‘98’03. $45. 417-8846. TELESCOPE: Brass 36”, on wood tripod. $120. 775-6498. TELESCOPE: Bushnell North Star reflector. $30. 457-4241. TENT: plus 2 sleeping bags. $30/obo. 457-3425 TIRE: Motorcycle, back, 120x18, new. $20. 457-4383. TIRES: (4) Studded, BF Goodrich, P205/ 60R15. $50. 457-7504 TIRES: Radial studded P205/65r15, very good cond. $100. 681-0355. TRAILER: Small 4x8 flatbed, no title. $150. 670-3302. TRAVEL BAG: On wheels, with shoulder strap, pockets. $20. 360-379-1618. TRUNDLE BED Wooden. $100. 775-8040 TV. Zenith, with remote, works well. $35. 582-3069. TV: 34” Toshiba, flat screen, tube, not LCD. $50. 452-7125. TV: Zenith 24” with remote. $75. 928-9659 TYPEWRITER: $10. 797-1179 VACUUM: Eureka Boss, with all tools. $75. 385-6370. VACUUM: Panasonic Performance Plus, 12 amp. $20. 457-4241 VHS: (20) Girls Gone Wild, new. $5 each. 452-9685 VHS: (70) $15/all. 477-1490 WASHER/DRYER Whirlpool Duet. $200. 683-3887 WATERBED: Queen, drawers, padded rails, liner, heater $175. 452-3932. WHEELCHAIR: New, and portable commode. $200. 808-2949 WINDOW: Framed block, 44”Wx44”Hx5 1/2”D. 8” blocks. $200. 477-1152. WINDOW: Framed block, 44”Wx44”Hx5 1/2”D. 8” blocks. $200. 477-1152.

76

Sporting Goods

GUN: Ruger M77 and 257 Roberts with Leupold scope. $450 firm. 775-8409. MISC: XD .45 with laser, $550. Mako Shark .22, $395. Marlin .17 HMR, $450. 360-452-6363. POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746. RELOADING EQUIP. Redding Boss Press, Dillon CV-500 Vibratory tumbler, 4 bags, Corn cob media and polish, Redding #2 scale and extras. $300 all. 457-6845 RELOADING EQUIP. Redding Boss Press, Dillon CV-500 Vibratory tumbler, 4 bags, Corn cob media and polish, Redding #2 scale and extras. $260 all. 457-6845 REVOLVER: Ruger GP100, 4” barrel, caliber 327 federal mag, new in box, $450. 460-4491. SKI GEAR: Northface jacket, yellow and black, mens large, like new, $40. Soloman ski boots, mens size 8, brand new, $75. 683-8040, call after 5 p.m. WANTED: Guns, ammo, scopes. The older the better. Worn or broken ok. 683-9899

78E

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81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

FREE: 1.5 year old female Walker Hound, needs room to run or in the country. 457-1364. MINI-DACHSHUND Puppies, 2 black and tan smooth coats and 1 black and tan long coat, males, 1st shot and wormed. $400. 452-3016. Northwest Farm Terrier Puppies. Versatile, medium-sized, healthy, intelligent. Born 7/21/11, $350 for males, $400 for females, price includes papers, flea and tick treatment, vaccinated and wormed twice. Great dogs! 360-928-0273. sg1953@yahoo.com PUPPIES: 2 beautiful male Mini Schnauzer puppies. 16 weeks. Outstanding no-shed coats. Very loveable and attentive. Tails cropped, dew claws removed, 3 times wormed, first, second and third shots. Leash and potty training started, well puppy vet checked. Both parents on site. $475. 681-7480. PUPPIES: Half Blood Hound, half Pit Bull, shots, wormed. $100. Serious inquiries only. 461-0095 PUPPIES: Rottweiler Mastiff mother, Rottweiler German Shepherd father. Real nice pups, black and tan. $200 males. $150 females. 360-689-7923 RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $450. 360-643-3065 WANTED: Registered Standard Poodle (choc. pref., cream/ blk ok) for stud service. Call 681-3160, after 4 p.m. YODA PUPPIES ADORABLE Out of our Yorkie and dapple Mini-Dachshund. Tiny, first shots and dewormed. $300-$450. 452-3016

83

Farm Animals

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817. HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $5 bale, delivery available. 683-7965 HOBBY FARM LIQUIDATION Black shoulder peacock trio, $250. 2 Pea chicks, $20 ea. Laying hens, $12,50. Exotic chickens, $15. (4) Sabastipol geese, $50 ea. (2) Katahdin sheep, $50 both. Cages, feeders and misc., $5-50. 460-5980

84

Horses/ Tack

2 HORSES: Plus trailer, tack, elec. fence. All for $3,000. 681-5349, lv message

85

Farm Equipment

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325

PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071. SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618

93

Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BOAT: 12’ aluminum with trailer, 6 hp motor and accessories. $1,500/obo. 808-0156 BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: Avon Hypalon 9’ 3” hard bottom inflatable. Maximum 10 hp, storage cover, excellent condition. $940. 683-9645. DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616 DINGHY: Very sturdy, white fiberglass. Custom manufactured by Matteus Zoetem (in Los Angeles). With oars. $250. 683-2743. HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445 LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714 SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 206-397-9697 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891 SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347.

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg.

TRACTOR: 1952 JOHN DEERE MODEL B. Newly overhauled, new paint w/John Deere No. 8-7 ft. Hay Mower, hydrauliclift, 3 cycles. It ran but won't start now? $2,800. 460-8092 TRACTOR: Suzue with brush hog and front loader. $2,800. 681-6396

SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

94

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $14,000 452-2275

HARLEY: ‘49 Pan Head Chopper. Completely restored, have all receipts, beautiful bike. $17,000. 360-731-0677 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DOZER: ‘94 550 Long track Case. With brush rake. $15,000. 683-8332.

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HONDA ‘05 CR250R 2 stroke, triple clamps, RG3, pro circuit exhaust, super clean! Buy here! Pay here! Quads! Harleys! Dirt bikes! Road bikes! VIN900410 Expires 10/26/11. $2,650 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA ‘95 300 FOURTRAX 4x4, nice, older quad! No credit checks! “0” down financing available! Ask for details. VIN729277 Expires 10/26/11. $2,500 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953. HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $3,990. 452-0837. HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096.

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263 HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $750. 460-1377. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 KTM: ‘05 525 EXC Street legal enduro elec. start. $3,400. 460-3617 QUAD TRAILER: 18’ holds 5 quads *(2 stacked), electric brakes, mounted spare tire. $2,250. 683-3425 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,500/obo. 452-3051 QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213 SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $1,999/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $8900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957. 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222

Motorcycles

HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950

Garage Sales Sequim

Complete Restaurant (formerly Arby’s) Located in Sequim. Online auction Tues., October 25. Includes equipment, furniture and more. GOING TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER! Possibility to renew the lease, or remove equipment. More info at WestAuction.com or call 800-499-9378

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘76 Kenworth. Big cam400 engine. Runs well, maintained. $15,000. 327-3342

SKILL SAW: New Wormdrive in box. $150 firm. 670-3302. SPEAKERS: (2) Pioneer, matching, CSN575, three way. $50/obo. 457-7600.

92

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615. CAMPER: ‘94 8’6” Lance Squire Lite, Fully provisioned, good cond. $3,500. 360-683-4830 or 360-460-3946

4 Wheel Drive

CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779.

CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $6,500. 683-4830.

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

CHEV: ‘97 Tahoe. 4x4, leather interior, air conditioning, tow pkg., runs/drives great, must sell. $3,995. 775-9648.

MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Aerodynamic riveted aluminum body, Original, not a conversion, Cat, many features, updates. $15,000. 460-6979. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTORHOME: Southwind by Fleetwood and a Honda Accord tow car, a package deal. Will not separate. We are the original owners. $18,500 COD. Less than the cost of a new car! Call 360-681-0144 TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457. TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514

CHEV: ‘96 Suburban. CD, leather, exc. $3,650. 461-2627.

DODGE: ‘98 Durango SLT 4x4. Loaded options. $3,000/obo. 360-670-6060 FORD ‘97 F150 SUPER CAB LARIAT 4X4 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, running boards, side exit exhaust, spray-in bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, keyless entry, privacy glass, 3 opening doors, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, leather seats, cassette stereo, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Immaculate inside and out! Clean Carfax with only 2 previous owners! Plush leather interior! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘05 Expedition. 1 ownr, low mi., exc. cond. $12,000/ obo. 683-9791, 942-9208

TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $5,900. 681-7381

29’

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078 TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

96

Parts/ Accessories

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $5,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: 87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. GMC: ‘88 Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4. 5.7L V8, 198K miles. Solid engine and trans. 4x4 works great. Gutted inside. Was used for camping and hauling fire wood. Extra set of 17” tires, wheels and lug nuts included. $900. Jason, 452-3600

SNOW TIRES: (4) Michelin non-studded, used 1 season Sequim to PA. 225/60R18. $500. 683-7789

GMC: ‘89 GMC AT 350 4x4 1500. Good body, new frnt brakes, runs good, 4WD works good. $1,100. 461-3582.

STUDDED TIRES Like new Mud Terrian LT 265/75 R16 studded snow tires, mounted on set of custom wheels for F250 or F350 Ford ‘00 or newer truck. $500. 460-5974.

JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988

WHEELS: (4) Dodge Charger 18”x8” polished, caps, and lug nuts. $400. 683-7789

97

4 Wheel Drive

BEAUTIFUL ‘06 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD. Hemi, 4x4 with Quad Drive 2, fully loaded with everything. 32K miles. Like brand new. $16,500/obo. 477-7008 CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $8,500. 360-928-3440

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901. CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $6,850. 452-5803.

5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804

97

C5

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967

JEEP: ‘49 Willies. Original, unrestored, many extra parts. $4,200. 775-5078. NISSAN ‘95 PICKUP KING CAB XE 4X4 3.0 liter V6, auto, chrome wheels, good rubber, matching fiberglass canopy, bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, power mirrors, air, cassette stereo. Immaculate condition inside and out! This little pickup shows, the very best of care! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 SUBARU ‘00 FORESTER S ALL WD SPORT UTILITY 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, auto, alloy wheels, roof rack, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, heated seats, cruise, tilt, air, cassette, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $8,485! Only 85,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA: ‘88 4WD. V6, new exhaust/ tires, runs good. $2,700/obo. 681-0447 TOYOTA: ‘93 extended cab pickup. SR5 4x4. $3,500. 460-1481

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘94 S10 PU. V6, short-bed, 91K, cap, liner, LOADED. $2,750. 360-385-0122 CHEV: ‘81 Step-side. ‘350’ V8, runs good, $900. 477-1688.


C6

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

98

Pickups/Vans

CHRYSLER: ‘03 Town & Country Ltd. DVD, loaded. $6,500. 808-0825 DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756 FORD ‘03 F250 POWERSTROKE LB 2X4 6.0 liter diesel, auto, 2WD, lifted with Fox suspension, auto, power windows and locks, power leather heated seats, only 89K miles! Tons of mods! We finance everyone! Come see us first! VINC91255. Expires 10/26/11. $8,500 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘94 F150. $1,000. 452-2615. FORD: 96 Ranger XLT. Long bed, 131K mi. $2,650. 417-5460. GMC ‘03 SAFARI EXT ALL WD VAN 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, running boards, privacy glass, rear barn doors, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, rear captains seats, cruise, tilt, air, rear A/C, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $8,800! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 86,000 miles! All wheel drive for excellent year-round performance! Room for the whole family! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Runs great, nice body, forest green, captains chairs. $4,500. 385-2012. TOYOTA: ‘00 Tundra Limited access cab. 76K miles, 2WD, V8, canopy. $9,950. 460-3485

99

Cars

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154.

BEAUTIFUL: Ford ‘05 Mustang. Auto, V6, loaded, exc. cond., 45K miles. $7,500/obo. 477-7008 CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093. CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377. CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV ‘06 AVEO 5 DOOR 4 cylinder, 5 speed, CD, 1 owner, only 26K miles. Home of the 5 minute approval! Competitive finance rates! VIN556303 Expires 10/26/11. $6,500 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. 400/T400. $12,000. 707-241-5977 CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374. DODGE ‘01 STRATUS ES 4 DOOR Only 68,000 1 owner miles and loaded, incl. V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, leather interior, power sunroof, AM/FM cassette, trip computer, alloy wheels, and more! Exp. 10-29-11. VIN685867 $6,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Runs and drives super. Well maint. with records, 159K. $2,000. 457-1104. FORD: ‘65 Fairlane 500 Sport Coupe. ‘289’ 225 hp, auto, bucket seats, real nice car. $6,500. 457-6540

99

Cars

FORD: ‘70 Torino. St. Wag. 351c, good cond. $1,300. 452-3294 FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘86 Taurus. Runs great, clean. $600/obo. 681-3313. FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,000 477-1805 FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 HONDA: ’06 Civic Hybrid. 112K hwy. mi., tinted windows, nice wheels, mounted snow tires, very clean. Just retired. $9,500/obo 360-731-0677 HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191. KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040 MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863

Classified 99

Cars

MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165.

101

101

MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 NISSAN: ‘87 300ZX. 1 owner, low mi (70K), hot read with blk leather int, includes digital dash pkg., power pkg., bra, owners manual, orig. window sticker and auto tape. Excellent cond. in /out, always garaged. $4,000. 417-5496 OLDS: ‘65 98 LS 4 dr Sedan. 2 owner in great condition, int. like new, 83K. $6,000. 582-0208. PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577

101

Legals Clallam Co.

PUBLIC HEARING ON REDISTRICTING COMMISSIONER DISTRICTS OF PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF CLALLAM COUNTY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that The Commissioners of Public Utility District No. 1 of Clallam County will hold a public hearing to discuss proposed changes to the boundaries of Commissioner Districts on Monday, October 31, 2011, at 1:30 p.m., at the District’s Port Angeles office, 2431 East Highway 101, at which time any person may appear and comment. Hugh E. Simpson President, Board of Commissioners Pub: Oct. 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 2011 No. 11-2-00596-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF PHILLIP B. WHITEFEATHER; CAROL M. MYERS; SHERYL ZELIGSON; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Phillip B. Whitefeather; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after October 24, 2011, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 292 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 114 Ninth Street West, Port Angeles, WA 98362. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/ Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Pub: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011

Legals General

Cars

STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963

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MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606.

MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,850. 457-5500.

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am. Lots new, nice. $4,800/obo. 477-3180 TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669. www.peninsula dailynews.com

MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353.

TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS 4 DOOR V6, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat. AM/FM CD/cassette, power sunroof, leather interior with heated seats, front and side airbags, electronic traction control, alloy wheels, remote entry and more! One week special. Exp. 10-2911. VIN278571. $8,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966

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No: 11-7-00470-3 Notice and Summons by Publication (Termination) (SMPB) (Optional Use) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT In re the Welfare of BROOKLEIGH DODGE D.O.B.: 01/27/11 To: ASHLEIGH DODGE, Mother: A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on August 25, 2011; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: November 23, 2011, at 1:30 p.m. at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court, 3201 32nd Avenue SW, Tumwater, Washington 98501. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DSHS at 360-7256700 or 1-888-822-3541. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM.aspx. Dated: October 19, 2011, by Betty Gould, Thurston County Clerk. Pub: Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 2011

HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006.

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs well, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,295/obo. 775-9648

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7037.06615 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: James C. Hunt and Suzanne S. Hunt, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1210559 Tax Parcel ID No.: 053020-129020 Abbreviated Legal: LT 2 SP 16/87 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of revised Jewell Short Plat recorded on August 20, 1986 in Volume 16 of Short Plats, Page 87 under Auditor's File No 581275, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter in Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, Willamette Meridian, Clallam County, Washington. Situated in the County of Clallam and State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/07, recorded on 10/12/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1210559, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James C. Hunt, Suzanne S. Hunt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1251485. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/18/2011 Monthly Payments $43,235.08 Late Charges $1,846.32 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,352.25 Total Arrearage $46,433.65 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $77.00 Recording Costs $127.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $271.00 Total Costs $1,270.00 Total Amount Due: $47,703.65 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $219,337.21, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James C. Hunt 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Suzanne S. Hunt 1485 South Deer Park Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/28/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/18/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.06615) 1002.154883-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 8318.20082 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank Grantee: Dave F. Clemons, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1233736 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043023 570050 (41013) Abbreviated Legal: LOT 5, WOLFGANG ACRES, VOL. 14, PG. 53 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 5 of Wolfgang Acres, as recorded in Volume 14 of Plats, Page 53, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/04/09, recorded on 03/13/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1233736, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David F. Clemons, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Sound Community Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/22/2011 Monthly Payments $11,361.00 Late Charges $496.72 Lender's Fees & Costs $228.73 Total Arrearage $12,086.45 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $848.77 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,627.29 Total Amount Due: $13,713.74 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $250,524.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David F. Clemons 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David F. Clemons 80 Mary Jo Lane Sequim, WA 98382 David F. Clemons P.O. Box 283 Sequim, WA 98382-0283 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David F. Clemons P.O. Box 283 Sequim, WA 98382-0283 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/22/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20082) 1002.199397-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Cars

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Cars

VW: ‘61 Beetle. 60 over 350 engine. Auto trans., S10 shortened frame. $4,000 with trailer. 460-0262, 681-0940

VW: ‘74 Bug. Runs good, drive to Portland and back with no fear, trade for car with auto trans. $1,400. 452-2575.

VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,200. 681-7381.

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Legals Clallam Co.

VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.29782 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Kari M. Horton, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007 1200413 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530175501050000 Abbreviated Legal: FOUR SEASONS PARK DIV 3 VOL 6 PG 38 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: All that portion of Four Seasons Park, Division 3, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 38, Records of Clallam county, designated as "Community Area" lying between Lots 19 and 20 in said Four Seasons Park, Division 3. Situated in the County of Clallam and State of Washington. Commonly known as: 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/12/07, recorded on 04/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1200413, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kari M. Horton, an unmarried person, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/22/11 Monthly Payments $24,349.44 Late Charges $1,217.52 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $25,566.96 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $634.14 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,512.66 Total Amount Due: $27,079.62 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $142,670.58, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/11/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kari M Horton 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 Kari M Horton P.O. Box 3075 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kari M. Horton 33 Alder Lane South Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kari M. Horton P.O. Box 3075 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/22/11 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.29782) 1002.199930-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7763.27438 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Paul J. Beck and Oi Lin Beck, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20071208322 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000028670 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 14 BL 286 TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 14, Block 286, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 14 in Block 286 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/27/07, recorded on 08/31/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1208322, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Paul J. Beck and Oi Linn Beck, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/17/2011 Monthly Payments $23,254.56 Late Charges $991.68 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,157.99 Total Arrearage $27,404.23 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $472.50 Total Amount Due: $27,876.73 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $132,207.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Paul J. Beck 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Oi Linn Beck 617 East 10th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Paul J. Beck 511 Lake Farm Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Oi Linn Beck 511 Lake Farm Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/28/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/28/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/17/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27438) 1002.164526-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.29572 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Ronald A. Roblan and Christinana Devoney, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1241100 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063015239050 Abbreviated Legal: SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W.M. CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 3 of MOFFETT SHORT PLAT, recorded September 11, 1986 in Volume 16 of Short Plats, Page 98, under Auditor's File No. 582071, being a portion of the East half of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/22/09, recorded on 08/04/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1241100, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Ronald A. Roblan and Christiana Devoney, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Stewart Title of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for KeyBank National Association, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for KeyBank National Association, its successors and assigns to Bank of America, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1268620. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2011 Monthly Payments $9,493.25 Late Charges $394.80 Lender's Fees & Costs $40.00 Total Arrearage $9,928.05 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $926.82 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,709.58 Total Amount Due: $11,637.63 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $291,135.42, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Ronald A. Roblan 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Christiana Devoney 135 East Ahlvers Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.29572) 1002.200073-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7713.21710 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association Grantee: Kendrick R. Borland and Patricia M. Borland, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 200501157402 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630095216280000 Abbreviated Legal: Lts 11-12 & E15' Lt 13, Blk 16, Fogarty and Dolan's Addn 2/18 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 11, 12, and the East 15 feet of Lot 13, in Block 16 of Fogarty and Dolan's Addition of the Town of Port Angeles, as recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, page 18, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/25/05, recorded on 05/27/07, under Auditor's File No. 200501157402, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kendrick R Borland and Patricia M Borland, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Brian Lynch, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for U.S. Bank National Association, its successors and assigns to U.S. Bank National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1269366. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/24/2011 Monthly Payments $13,491.24 Late Charges $565.56 Lender's Fees & Costs $831.00 Total Arrearage $14,887.80 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.47 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $75.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,346.73 Total Amount Due: $16,234.53 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $151,594.83, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kendrick R Borland 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Patricia M Borland 124 Motor Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/27/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/27/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/24/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7713.21710) 1002.191762-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7021.29492 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Abigale A. Grace, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 525329 Tax Parcel ID No.: 985 209 605 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 7 and 8 in Block 96 of Pettygrove's Second Addition Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 7 and 8 in Block 96, Pettygrove's Second Addition to the City of Port Townsend, according to the Plat thereof filed in Volume 2 of Plats at Page 17, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Together with the Easterly 1/2 vacated Chestnut Street as vacated under Ordinance No. 1811 of the City of Port Townsend, that would attach by operation of law. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/12/07, recorded on 07/13/07, under Auditor's File No. 525329, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Abigale A. Grace, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 8/20/2011 Monthly Payments $45,520.20 Late Charges $2,276.12 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $47,796.32 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $976.64 Statutory Mailings $29.28 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,864.92 Total Amount Due: $49,661.24 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $303,865.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Abigale A. Grace 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 330 P Street Port Townsend, WA 98368-2604 Abigale A. Grace 3574 Nyland Way Lafayette, CO 80026 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 3574 Nyland Way Lafayette, CO 80026 Abigale A. Grace 25th and Sherman Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Of Abigale A. Grace 25th and Sherman Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/20/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 8/20/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.29492) 1002.199810-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7021.28206 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Carney MickHager, as her separate estate and David T. Fletcher, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 533082 Tax Parcel ID No.: 936902504 Abbreviated Legal: Lts 8,9 &10, Bk. 25, 2/99 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lots 8, 9, and 10, Block 25, California Addition to the City of Port Townsend, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 99, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/10/08, recorded on 04/15/08, under Auditor's File No. 533082, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Carney Mick-Hager, a single woman and David T. Fletcher, a single man, as Grantor, to First American Title Company of Spokane, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" as nominee of Lender, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. "MERS" as nominee of Lender, its successors and assigns to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 561186. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/19/2011 Monthly Payments $18,730.53 Late Charges $745.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $19,475.91 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $828.00 Statutory Mailings $55.12 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,708.12 Total Amount Due: $21,184.03 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $270,798.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Carney Mick-Hager 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Carney Mick-Hager 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 David T. Fletcher 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David T. Fletcher 860 53rd Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/28/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/28/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/19/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.28206) 1002.189067-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

C7

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7021.29575 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP Grantee: Brandon E. Schultz, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 551574 Tax Parcel ID No.: 935900009 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lot 9 of Bridgehaven Division 8, as per Plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 53 and 54, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. More accurately described as follows: Lot 9, Bridgehaven Division No. 8, as per plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 53 and 54, and amended in Volume 6 of Plats, Pages 236 and 237, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/26/10, recorded on 05/03/10, under Auditor's File No. 551574, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Brandon E Schultz, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to ReconTrust Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/23/2011 Monthly Payments $5,027.40 Late Charges $214.35 Lender's Fees & Costs $15.00 Total Arrearage $5,256.75 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $682.34 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,451.10 Total Amount Due: $6,707.85 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $159,969.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Brandon E Schultz 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Brandon E Schultz 70 Sparrow Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/21/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/23/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7021.29575) 1002.200190-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011 File No.: 7763.27177 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank and pursuant to its authority under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, 12 U.S.C. section 1821(d) Grantee: Scott Waltenbaugh and Terri Waltenbaugh, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 533575 Tax Parcel ID No.: 001181031 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 of SP 3/171 & 172 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Harold Harvey Short Plat, as per Plat recorded in Volume 3 of Short Plats, Pages 171 through 172, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 353 and 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/22/08, recorded on 04/30/08, under Auditor's File No. 533575, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Scott Waltenbaugh and, Terri Waltenbaugh, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/19/11 Monthly Payments $64,186.60 Late Charges $2,567.60 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,193.26 Total Arrearage $70,947.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $57.36 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $72.50 Sale Costs $162.60 Total Costs $1,017.46 Total Amount Due: $71,964.92 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $405,855.84, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 28, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/17/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 353 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 353 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 355 Loftus Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh P.O. Box 309 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Terri Waltenbaugh P.O. Box 309 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 32 Kala Square Place Port Townsend, WA 98368-9804 Terri Waltenbaugh 32 Kala Square Place Port Townsend, WA 98368-9804 Scott Leroy Waltenbaugh 371 Crutcher Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Terri Waltenbaugh 371 Crutcher Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Michael P. Klein, Ch. 7 Trustee 755 Winslow Way East #201 Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 David Carl Hill, Attorney 2472 Bethel Road Southeast, Suite A Port Orchard, WA 98366 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/07/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/08/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/19/11 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900 (TS# 7763.27177) 1002.159358-FEI Pub: Oct. 24, Nov. 14, 2011


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Monday, October 24, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Tuesday

Wednesday

Yesterday

Thursday

Friday

High 51

Low 35

51/35

49/38

52/39

54/43

Partly sunny with a passing shower.

Mainly clear.

Mostly sunny.

Mostly cloudy.

Partly sunny; rain at night.

Mostly cloudy.

The Peninsula In the wake of a cold front, a slightly chillier day is in store across the Peninsula today with intervals of clouds and sunshine as well as a passing shower. Snow levels will be down to 3,500 feet, but precipitation will not be significant. Tonight will turn out Neah Bay Port mostly clear and cold. High pressure building off the Pacific 52/41 Townsend Northwest will bring a nice day Tuesday with a mostly Port Angeles 52/41 sunny sky and seasonable temperatures. An approach51/35 ing disturbance will bring more clouds to the area on Sequim Wednesday.

Victoria 52/39

54/39

Forks 54/36

Olympia 55/33

Seattle 55/40

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Spokane 50/31

Marine Forecast

Clouds and sun today with a passing shower. Wind west at 6-12 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Mainly clear tonight. Wind southwest 4-8 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Wind east 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Wednesday: Cloudy most of the time. Wind northeast 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear.

LaPush

10:49 a.m. 11:23 p.m. Port Angeles 1:03 a.m. 12:56 p.m. Port Townsend 2:48 a.m. 2:41 p.m. Sequim Bay* 2:09 a.m. 2:02 p.m.

Billings 55/36 Minneapolis 60/44 Chicago 64/47 San Francisco 70/53

Full

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

8.6’ 7.8’ 5.6’ 7.1’ 6.8’ 8.6’ 6.4’ 8.1’

4:35 a.m. 5:15 p.m. 6:48 a.m. 7:42 p.m. 8:02 a.m. 8:56 p.m. 7:55 a.m. 8:49 p.m.

0.9’ 0.1’ 2.2’ 0.5’ 2.8’ 0.6’ 2.6’ 0.6’

11:32 a.m. ----2:13 a.m. 1:26 p.m. 3:58 a.m. 3:11 p.m. 3:19 a.m. 2:32 p.m.

wednesday

Low Tide Ht

9.1’ --6.2’ 7.3’ 7.5’ 8.8’ 7.1’ 8.3’

5:24 a.m. 6:05 p.m. 7:39 a.m. 8:21 p.m. 8:53 a.m. 9:35 p.m. 8:46 a.m. 9:28 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

0.9’ -0.8’ 2.8’ -0.5’ 3.6’ -0.7’ 3.4’ -0.7’

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

12:19 a.m. 12:14 p.m. 3:15 a.m. 1:57 p.m. 5:00 a.m. 3:42 p.m. 4:21 a.m. 3:03 p.m.

6:12 a.m. 6:54 p.m. 8:28 a.m. 9:03 p.m. 9:42 a.m. 10:17 p.m. 9:35 a.m. 10:10 p.m.

8.1’ 9.5’ 6.8’ 7.5’ 8.2’ 9.0’ 7.7’ 8.5’

Nov 2

Nov 10

1.0’ -1.4’ 3.5’ -1.4’ 4.5’ -1.8’ 4.2’ -1.7’

City Hi Lo W Athens 69 57 s Baghdad 89 58 pc Beijing 61 39 s Brussels 61 47 s Cairo 80 62 s Calgary 45 26 c Edmonton 47 26 pc Hong Kong 87 73 s Jerusalem 71 54 pc Johannesburg 93 56 s Kabul 69 36 s London 66 55 pc Mexico City 75 39 s Montreal 57 43 sh Moscow 34 22 c New Delhi 94 64 s Paris 66 53 pc Rio de Janeiro 82 71 pc Rome 66 58 sh Stockholm 50 44 c Sydney 85 65 pc Tokyo 73 63 sh Toronto 54 41 t Vancouver 52 37 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Season: Learning kitchen skills

Kansas City 76/56

Denver 80/47

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Last

Nov 18

New York 65/52 Washington 69/48

Atlanta 76/54 El Paso 84/60

Moon Phases First

Detroit 63/43

Los Angeles 76/62

Sunset today ................... 6:09 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:48 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 5:02 a.m. Moonset today ................. 4:42 p.m.

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 59/27 61/32

Today

Seattle 55/40

Sun & Moon

Oct 26

Everett 52/40

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Monday, October 24, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 57 44 0.00 12.14 Forks 56 44 0.00 91.34 Seattle 57 51 0.03 28.32 Sequim 59 47 0.00 11.94 Hoquiam 57 48 0.18 53.44 Victoria 59 40 0.01 24.11 P. Townsend* 55 50 0.00 12.91 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 53/40 Bellingham 52/31

Aberdeen 58/39

Peninsula Daily News

0s

Houston 86/65 Miami 83/71

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 76 40 57 76 66 69 54 55 54 62 62 60 75 75 64 65 49 63 88 80 71 63 57 28 54 85 86 44

Lo W 52 s 38 sh 38 pc 54 s 45 pc 48 pc 28 pc 36 r 35 pc 34 pc 48 pc 41 t 52 s 43 pc 47 s 42 t 29 pc 36 s 67 s 47 pc 49 s 43 t 32 s 15 pc 29 r 72 pc 65 pc 38 sh

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 76 82 82 76 83 61 60 75 83 65 83 74 82 92 67 88 58 74 73 78 75 74 87 72 70 64 61 69

Lo W 56 s 59 pc 55 s 62 c 71 t 45 s 44 s 48 s 60 s 52 sh 61 s 51 s 59 s 66 c 52 pc 68 pc 41 pc 47 s 39 pc 49 s 54 s 40 pc 64 pc 62 c 53 s 44 s 31 pc 48 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 99 at Imperial, CA

Low: 16 at Angel Fire, NM

Now Showing n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

“The Ides of March” (R) “The Thing” (R)

Continued from C1 is finding farmers that can n  The Rose Theatre, supply the volume we need “Dolphin Tale” (PG) Port Townsend (360at a price that fits into our But staying within bud“Footloose” (PG-13) 385-1089) budget,” Vanneste said. get is still the main draw“Moneyball” (PG-13) Chef Long, co-owner of back when it comes to buy“Real Steel” (PG-13) “50/50” (R) Oven Spoonful catering in ing local food, Wilson said. “The Three Musketeers” “The Guard” (R) Port Angeles, said he used (PG-13) Getting school board “Moneyball” (PG-13) members and local taxpayers cabbage and carrots from Nash’s for the coleslaw and “on the bus” is key, she said. n  Lincoln Theater, Port n  Uptown Theatre, Port corn from Ennis Arbor Angeles (360-457-7997) Townsend (360-385-3883) Farms for the black bean Kitchen skills training “Paranormal Activity 3” (R) “The Ides of March” (R) salsa, and substituted field Participants also partici- peas from Nash’s for lentils pated in kitchen skills in the chili, made with Where the rubber meets the road with training at the Port Angegrass-fed beef from Clark’s les School District kitchen Farm in Sequim. in the afternoon and The cost per person received resource material came out to more than the As low as a.p.r** with sample recipes, a $1.50 per meal Long guide to seasonal produce recalled from his days Purchase or refinance a new or used car or truck and tools to promote farm- teaching culinary arts at to-school programs, accord- Port Angeles High School. and drive down your interest rate. ing to tour leader Becky But consider this: None Elias, the WSDA Farm-to Call 360-385-3663 for details of it went into the garbage. School project coordinator. For more information Helping her were Can**Annual Percentage Rate – Subject to credit approval, some fees about the Farm to School and restrictions apply. Other rates and terms available and may dice Cosler, director of the and Farm to Table prochange at any time. Jefferson County Farmgrams or Farm to Prison 2School program; Shoko pilot project, visit www. Kumagai, WSDA coordinator of the Farm to Table pro- wafarmtoschool.org. ________ gram for preschoolers and Jennifer Jackson/for Peninsula Daily News seniors; and Julie Vanneste, Jennifer Jackson is a freelance coordinator of the Farm to Brendon O’Shea, left, produce buyer for the writer and photographer living in Prison pilot project. Port Townsend. To contact her, email Food Co-op in Port Townsend, ladles chili made “Our biggest challenge jjackson@olypen.com. with local organic beef and peas into a cup at

GREAT RATES 3.00%

1A5137517

MOUNTAIN VIEW HEARING

Things to Do online The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

Annual ‘Pumpkin Patch Bash’ set for evening of Halloween Peninsula Daily News

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings

Oct. 31. The event is free and open to the public and will include carnival booths and prizes, pony rides, a Ferris wheel, bouncy houses and more.

Port Angeles Senior Center Bazaar & Flea Market

125109575

Left to Right

Clallam Co

Handmade & Homemade Holiday Treasures

Flea Market MUST Haves

Breakfast & Lunch Served

Everyone Welcome!

328 E. 7th, Port Angeles, WA (SW corner of 7th & Peabody) Check us out at: www.portangelesseniorcenter.com

MOUNTAIN VIEW HEARING AID CENTERS, INC.

Port Angeles

Sequim

625 N. 5th Ave., Suite 3 Mon-Thurs 9-4

(360) 681-4481

by Joe Cammack, R.Ph.

The following may help: • Stress reduction techniques - Gentle exercise, Tai Chi, yoga, Pilates, meditation • Sleep hygiene - Regular sleep-wake cycle, avoid third shift work. The following supplements may be helpful: 5-HTP, Melatonin, Calming herbs (Valerian root, Chamomile, Hops, Passion flower) • Lifestyle modification - Delegating responsibilities to eliminate stressors, regular meals, avoid caffeine and alcohol • Vitamins and minerals - Magnesium Glycinate or Magnesium Citrate, B Vitamins, selenium, zinc, calcium, manganese, Vitamin E with mixed tocopherols, Vitamin C (Ascorbate) Please contact our compounding pharmacist for more information.

www.villageconcepts.com

Visit our website and online store

“BRING RETIREMENT

Apartments Now Available

Call Today for a Complimentary Lunch & Tour!

TO

LIFE”

A Village Concepts Retirement Community 1430 Park View Lane Port Angeles, WA 98363

360-452-7222 1-888-548-6609

www.jimsrx.com 452-4200

13701047

Thank you Clallam County for voting us the BEST!

195132193

Nancy Martineau, Dining Services Director Kelly Trudeau, Community Relations Ross Jones, Resident Council Treasurer Linda Henderson, Waitstaff Supervisor John LeClerc, Executive Director Suzanne Greenleaf, Program Manager Gladys Doty, Administrative Assistant Mary Klock, Resident Care Director Rachelle King, Lead Aide Elva Grindheim, Resident Council Food Committee Chair John Phillips, Maintenance & Housekeeping Supervisor Peggy Jaras, Resident Council Secretary Nonie Sharpe, Resident Council Vic President Sandy Louch, Resident Council President

L

TOO MUCH STRESS AND TOO LITTLE ENERGY?

RECREATION

Assisted Living programs available.

1st Place Best Assisted Living

W NE TION A OC

Health Notes

Saturday, November 5, 8am-2:30pm

360-457-7004

Shannon, Robert & Gwen

(360) 452-1188

1A5135471

Call us today to schedule your tour and inquire about our affordable housing program.

www.mtnviewhearing.com

504 E. 8th St., Suite F Mon-Thurs 9-4

peninsuladailynews.com

Retirement Perfected Active and Involved Senior Community Gracious Living

with a human touch

195130876

SEQUIM — The annual “Pumpkin Patch Bash” at Kingsway Foursquare Church, 1023 Kitchen-Dick Lane, will be held from  5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, 

. . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

1201 Hancock St, Port Townsend www.bonaventuresenior.com

BETTER HEARING

the Sequim Prairie Grange. Roasted potatoes, coleslaw and corn and black bean salsa were also part of the model lunch served to participants in the Farm to School mobile tour.

424 East 2nd • Open 8 to 7 daily 8 to 5 Sat. • 12 to 4 Sun. Where you find products you want and the attention you need


pdn10242011c