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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

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October 15-16, 2010

Are you ready to

A square hit at the roundabout

VOTE? INSIDE THIS EDITION Your Jefferson County Election Guide

Foot ferry to Seattle to begin Monday start for weekday passenger shuttle from Kingston Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

A truck driven by Daniel Young of Port Townsend is impaled on the wall surrounding the new Thomas Street roundabout on Thursday morning.

Airborne truck ends up on wall By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The first major traffic mishap to occur in the new roundabouts had nothing to do with their construction or design. At 9:40 a.m. Thursday, Daniel Young of Port Townsend was heading east on McPherson Street when his brakes failed and he could not stop. Rather than shoot out onto Sims Way, he made a sharp left turn into Fifth Street, which provides access to Vintage Hardware, but was still unable to stop. The truck jumped the curb and became airborne before landing on the retaining wall that borders the south

side, where Thomas Street enters the roundabout. Young, 53, was able to maneuver the truck between a panel truck that is being used to display a campaign sign and the ornate fountain outside Vintage’s front door. “I think he made the right choice,” said Vintage Hardware owner Ken Kelly. “If he went out onto Sims Way, he could have gotten T-boned or T-boned someone else. “This could have happened to anybody.” Young, who was not injured, did “a really good job” handling the out-of-control car, said Port Townsend Police Officer Bill Corrigan, who nevertheless cited

Young for inadequate equipment. Young told police that he was driving the 1969 Chevrolet truck because his other vehicles were out of commission. Emergency personnel used a tow truck to lift the truck off the wall and set it on the ground with the intention to drive it onto the road. It became stuck in the dirt, so three people pushed it out of the dirt and onto the road, after which it was towed to a garage for repair. Young said he was upset about his truck, “but I am glad no one got hurt.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

KINGSTON — The Port of Kingston will launch passenger ferry service between Kingston and downtown Seattle on Monday. It will provide two morning and two afternoon commuter runs Monday through Friday, offering North Olympic Peninsula commuters a foot-ferry option from Kingston, which is on state Highway 104 across the Hood Canal Bridge, Osnes about one hour’s driving time from Port Townsend. “We are doing trial runs today and tomorrow,” Eric Osnes, Port of Kingston ferry program manager, said Thursday. “We’ve been working almost non-stop,” he added. Osnes said that free trial runs will be offered Monday, with Tuesday being the first day fares are collected. Turn

Border Patrol building sale nears finish

Ferry to be featured in Halloween portrait

Peninsula Daily News

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Town photo to focus on newest ‘resident’

By Paul Gottlieb

PORT ANGELES — Eagles club members are expected to meet by Wednesday to consider the Border Patrol’s second offer to buy the club’s lodge building for a new North Olympic Peninsula headquarters. Realtor Pili Meyer, representing Eagles Aerie 483 at 110 S. Penn St., which is two miles west of downtown Port Angeles, said Thursday she expects to meet with the club’s real estate committee by Wednesday “at the latest.” The club voted Sept. 24 to sell the building to the Border Patrol after the agency made an offer of $1.7 million for the lodge and the 4 acres it sits on. The Eagles made a counter offer, and the Border Patrol came back with another offer that Meyer received Tuesday night, she said. She declined to state the amount of the offers.

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By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

David Conklin

Main Street Executive Director Mari Mullen stands for a test shot for the Port Townsend Family Portrait at the ferry landing.

PORT TOWNSEND — This year’s Port Townsend Family Portrait will have some extra color, as many of the participants will be in costume, and the new ferry will fill the background. The portrait will be taken on Oct. 31, Halloween, and is timed to take place immediately prior to the Main Street Downtown Trick or Treat and Costume Parade. “This is going to be exciting, and very Port Townsend,” Main Street Director Mari Mullen said. It will take place on the Washington State Ferries holding area on Water Street, with the new M/V Chetzemoka docked in the background. The ferry is not scheduled to go

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into service on the route between Port Townsend and Coupeville on Whidbey Island until Nov. 14, but the city and the state ferry system have coincided sea trials to allow the boat to be in the community photograph.

About 4 p.m. Port Townsend photographer David Conklin will snap the photo at about 4 p.m., between sailings of the Steilacoom II, which leaves at 3:45 p.m. Mullen said that participants should arrive at about 3:50 p.m. They will stand on the empty holding area. “We can do this pretty quickly and expect that it will be finished a little after 4,” she said. Immediately after the photograph, the parade will move from the ferry dock down Water Street. Turn

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 94th year, 241st issue — 6 sections, 60 pages

Business C9 Classified D1 Comics C11 Commentary/Letters A8 Dear Abby C11 Deaths C10 Faith C8 Movies *PS Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Spotlight

Puzzles/Games Sports Things To Do Weather

D3 B1 C6 C12


A2

UpFront

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Nirvana exhibit will open in April EXPERIENCE MUSIC PROJECT, the rock museum at Seattle Center, is preparing the world’s largest exhibit on one of the Northwest’s most legendary rock ’n’ roll bands, Nirvana. Led by enigmatic frontman Kurt Cobain, who committed suicide in Seattle in Cobain 1994, Nirvana sold more than 50 million albums worldwide between 1990 and 1994. Curated by EMP’s Jacob McMurray, “Nirvana: Taking Punk to the Massess,” is scheduled to run April 16-22, 2011. The exhibit will feature rare and previously unseen items from the band and their crews and families. Cobain “was a visionary artist who touched people all over the world,” said Krist Novoselic, the band’s bassist who cofounded Nirvana with him in Aberdeen, Grays Harbor

County. “There’s a story with Nirvana at its center, but it’s a story that also includes the many people, bands and institutions that make up a music community. The show is a celebration of Northwest music.” Among the more than 200 artifacts associated with the band will be Cobain’s high school painting of two aging, Reaganera punks in the post-apocalypse; the Teac reel-to-reel tape recorder owned by Mari Earl, Cobain’s aunt, on which a young Kurt recorded material for his early bands; the yellow cardigan Cobain wore from 1991 to 1994; and the winged angel prop featured on Nirvana’s “In Utero” tour. Included are various instruments, among them pieces of the first guitar Cobain destroyed onstage (a Univox Hi-Flyer), Dave Grohl’s Tama Rockstar-Pro drum kit, and Novoselic’s Guild acoustic bass guitar and Buck Owens’ American acoustic guitar used during “MTV Unplugged.” Novoselic, who dabbles in politics, now lives in Southern Washington. Grohl, who joined Nirvana in 1990, is the frontman for the highly successful band, Foo Fighters.

Oprah interview Michael Jackson’s brother Randy Jackson has confirmed that Oprah Winfrey did an interview at the Jackson family home — and he’s sick about it. Although Randy Jackson didn’t say who Winfrey interviewed — and Winfrey’s show has not con- Jackson firmed who either — Randy Jackson said Winfrey is the last person Michael Jackson would have wanted around his kids. He vented in a series of posts on Twitter on Wednesday. He said: “I know how Oprah feels about my brother and family.” He noted that when the jury was deliberating Michael Jackson’s fate on child molestation charges in 2005, Winfrey did a show on pedophilia. Randy Jackson said it wasn’t a coincidence. Randy Jackson added he disagreed with his parents allowing the interview but still loves them. Michael Jackson gave a famous interview to Winfrey in 1993 in which he first disclosed suffering from the skin condition vitiligo.

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: How often do you do your personal banking online (not counting ATM use)?

All the time 

Occasionally 

52.4% 11.3%

Seldom  4.6% Never 

31.8%

Total votes cast: 613 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

Passings

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

DR. DAVID F. MUSTO, 74, an expert on drug-control policy who wrote an important history of drug use in the United States and government efforts to control it and who served as a government adviser on drug policy during the Carter administration, died Friday in Shanghai. He lived in New Haven, Conn. Dr. Musto was in China to attend a ceremony marking the donation of his books and papers Dr. Musto to Shanghai in 1988 University and the creation there of the Center for International Drug Control Policy Studies. The apparent cause of death was a heart attack, his son Christopher said.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Dr. Musto, who was a professor of child psychiatry in the Child Study Center at the Yale School of Medicine and a professor of the history of medicine, broke new ground in 1973 with The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control. I n offering a comprehensive account of drug use and government drug policy from the 1860s to the present, the book struck a nonpolemical tone rare in a field dominated by partisan zealots. Among its findings was the close correlation, historically, between public outrage over certain drugs and their use by feared or hated minorities. It was an unusually timely book. Two years before its publication, President Richard M. Nixon had officially declared a war on drugs, calling them “Public Enemy No. 1,” and in June

1973 he created the Drug Enforcement Administration — strong evidence that the growing problem of drug abuse and alcoholism was gripping the national imagination. Dr. Musto was named a consultant to the president on drug control policy in 1973, and in 1978, President Jimmy Carter appointed him to the White House Strategy Council on Drug Abuse. “Societies tend to react against drugs slowly, and the reaction usually comes just after the popularity of drugs has peaked,” he told The New York Times in 1986. “Learning to hate drugs comes not so much from a government brochure as from repeated observation of the damage to acquaintances and society.”

Peninsula Lookback

Corrections and clarifications

■  Tickets to the Moonlight Memories, a dinner dance and fundraiser for KSQM-FM, Sequim’s nonprofit radio station, are $75 per person. Reservations, made by phoning 360-6810000, are requested by today. The ticket price was omitted from a story on Page A6 Thursday. ■  Rhonda Goudie, the former assisted living center provider who was convicted Wednesday of two counts of first-degree theft and one count of money laundering, while being acquitted of four counts of first-degree theft, may be sentenced beyond her “standard range” of three to six months.

Seen Around

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

Setting it Straight

lard-Ludlow said would put 1985 (25 years ago) it out of business on its A state Department of Students who commit routes to Port Townsend Public Service order susacts of “exceptional misconand Port Ludlow. pending reductions in car duct” in Port Angeles puband truck rates on Puget lic schools will be subject to 1960 (50 years ago) Sound Navigation Co. ferimmediate suspension ries between Edmonds and Gov. Albert Rosellini has under new policy amendthe Olympic Peninsula was tapped his emergency fund ments adopted by the upheld in Thurston County. to prevent an increase in School Board. In a memo opinion by state Puget Sound ferry Such misconduct Superior Court Judge D.F. rates to meet bond retireincludes assault, battery, Wright, the court denied ment requirements. possession of a weapon, Puget Sound Navigation’s Rosellini, in announcing application for a writ of assault with a deadly his allocation of $32,000, review to keep the state weapon, fighting, interfersaid he is “vigorously from enforcing its order on ing with a staff member, opposed” to higher rates. a complaint brought by verbal abuse, possession Net earnings for state competitor Ballard-Ludlow and use of explosives, ferries for the 12 months Ferry Co. over alleged “low ending Aug. 31 fell $32,000 extortion, theft, willful ball” rates. damage to property of a Puget Sound Navigation short of meeting the staff member, possession or annual debt service has sought to reduce its rates an average of 50 per- required to retire the ferry- use of drugs or alcohol, and repeated refusal to follow Hood Canal Bridge bond cent on ferries to Port school rules. Townsend — an action Bal- issue.

Peninsula snapshots

A girl in Port Townsend wearing skates while being pulled by a dog ... WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Thursday’s Daily Game: 3-9-0 Thursday’s Keno: 01-06-09-25-27-31-32-3739-42-44-46-49-53-54-5961-65-70-71 Thursday’s Match 4: 07-17-21-24

A Thursday story on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition and Page A4 of the Jefferson County edition erroneously said that Goudie can be sentenced beyond the maximum 10 years imprisonment. ■  Female corrections officers can supervise male inmates, and male jail staffers can supervise female prisoners at the Clallam County jail. A report Wednesday on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition misstated the policy. The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Laugh Lines Vacationing in Alaska, I couldn’t help but notice all the warnings about bears posted in campgrounds, visitors’ centers and rest areas advising people not to feed the bears, how to avoid bears, what to do if a bear sees you, what to do if a bear attacks, and so on. My favorite, however, was a hand-lettered sign on the door of a small gas station in a remote area. It said: “Warning! If you are being chased by a bear, don’t come in here!” Your Monologue

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Oct. 15, the 288th day of 2010. There are 77 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 15, 1860, 11-yearold Grace Bedell of Westfield, N.Y., wrote a letter to presidential candidate Abraham Lincoln, suggesting he could improve his appearance by growing a beard. The rest, as they say, is history. On this date: ■  In 1858, the seventh and final debate between senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Alton, Ill.

■  In 1917, Dutch dancer Mata Hari, convicted of spying for the Germans, was executed by a French firing squad outside Paris. ■  In 1928, the German dirigible Graf Zeppelin landed in Lakehurst, N.J., completing its first commercial flight across the Atlantic. ■  In 1940, Charles Chaplin’s first all-talking comedy, “The Great Dictator,” a lampoon of Adolf Hitler, opened in New York. ■  In 1945, the former premier of Vichy France, Pierre Laval, was executed for treason. ■  In 1946, Nazi war criminal Hermann Goering fatally poisoned

himself hours before he was to have been executed. ■  In 1964, it was announced that Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev had been removed from office. ■  In 1969, peace demonstrators staged activities across the country as part of a “moratorium” against the Vietnam War. ■  In 1976, in the first debate of its kind between vice presidential nominees, Democrat Walter F. Mondale and Republican Bob Dole faced off in Houston. ■  In 1990, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was named recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

■  Ten years ago: President Bill Clinton left Washington for emergency talks in Egypt with Israeli and Arab leaders. New York Times movie and drama critic Vincent Canby died at age 76. ■  Five years ago: Iraqis voted to approve a constitution. ■  One year ago: A report of a 6-year-old Colorado boy trapped inside a runaway helium balloon captivated the nation before the boy, Falcon Heene, was found safe at home in what turned out to be a hoax. Falcon’s parents served up to a month in jail.


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 15-16, 2010

Second Front Page

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Briefly: Nation Senator seeks to discuss issue of fetal pain OMAHA, Neb. — Bolstered by the passage of unique abortion restrictions in his home state of Nebraska, U.S. Sen. Mike Johanns is pushing for a new federal discussion on the notion of fetal pain. Although doctors are at odds about when during development a fetus can feel pain, it’s an issue that could change the way abortions are regulated in the United States. The Nebraska law that takes effect today bans abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy based on the idea of fetal pain, a departure from the standard of viability — when the fetus could survive outside the womb, generally considered to be between 22 and 24 weeks — established by the 1973 landmark ruling in Roe v. Wade. Legislation recently reintroduced by Johanns doesn’t go that far. It would require women seeking abortions after 20 weeks to be told the fetus could feel pain and allow them to request anesthesia for the fetus.

Officer indicted PHOENIX — A defense lawyer said a Phoenix police officer has been indicted on a seconddegree murder charge for the on-duty shooting of a suspect. Attorney Craig Mehrens said Officer Richard Chrisman was served a summons Thursday on the indictment. He was also charged with aggravated assault and misdemeanor cruelty to animals.

Chrisman allegedly pulled his pistol, put it against 29-year-old Danny Frank Rodriguez’s head and told him he didn’t Chrisman need a warrant when Rodriguez ordered him out of his house Oct. 5. Over the next few minutes, authorities said, Chrisman shocked Rodriguez with a stun gun, shot his pit bull, then finally fatally shot Rodriguez. Court records showed another officer told investigators he saw no reason for Chrisman to shoot. Maricopa County Attorney Rick Romley has called a press conference to discuss the case.

Animal registry FARMINGVILLE, N.Y. — You’ve heard of Megan’s Law, designed to keep sex offenders from striking again. Now there’s a law created in the hope of preventing animal abusers from inflicting more cruelty — or moving on to human victims. Suffolk County, on the eastern half of Long Island, moved to create the nation’s first animal abuse registry this week, requiring people convicted of cruelty to animals to register or face jail time and fines. “We know there is a very strong correlation between animal abuse and domestic violence,” said Suffolk County legislator Jon Cooper, the bill’s sponsor. “Almost every serial killer starts out by torturing animals, so in a strange sense we could end up protecting the lives of people.” The Associated Press

Briefly: World Police foil plot to kill Pakistani prime minister

rejected the idea of negotiating a nonmilitary resolution of the war. “They have some conditions to start the negotiations process. “It gives us hope that they want to talk and negotiate,” MULTAN, Pakistan — Paki- Rabbani said. “We are taking stani police arrested a group of our first steps,” he said. Islamist militants who were “I believe there are people plotting to kill the prime minis- among the Taliban that have a ter and other top government message that they want to talk. officials, a top officer said Thurs- They are ready.” day. The Afghan government has The conacknowledged that it has been spiracy involved in reconciliation talks against Prime with the Taliban, but discusMinister sions between the two sides Yousaf Raza have been described as mostly Gilani was informal and indirect message “almost comexchanges relying on mediators. plete,” said U.S. Secretary of State HilAbid Qadri, a lary Clinton said Thursday that regional it’s “highly unlikely” that TaliGilani police chief. ban leaders will ever reconcile. He said the militants were planning to Travel advisory stays attack Gilani when he traveled LONDON — A European to his hometown of Multan but terrorist plot is still enough of a gave no more details. threat for the United States to Militants in Pakistan have frequently attacked government keep its current travel advisory, the U.S. State Department’s officials, security officers and counterterrorism coordinator political leaders as part of a said Thursday. campaign to destabilize the U.S.-allied government and take Earlier this month, the State over the state. Department advised U.S. citiOpposition leader Benazir zens living or traveling in Bhutto was killed in a gun-and- Europe to take more precaubomb attack near Islamabad in tions, following reports that ter2007. rorists may be plotting attacks in Europe. Concerns have centered Ready for peace? around a plot using assault KABUL, Afghanistan — A weapons on public places, simiformer Afghan president who lar to the deadly 2008 shooting heads a new peace council said spree in Mumbai, India. Thursday that he’s convinced The U.S. travel advisory is the Taliban are ready to negotione step below a formal travel ate peace. warning advising Americans not Burhanuddin Rabbani told reporters in Kabul that the Tali- to visit Europe. ban have not completely The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Chile’s president, Sebastian Pinera, center, greets rescued miner Omar Reygadas while visiting the 33 miners freed from the San Jose mine at the hospital in Copiapo, Chile, on Thursday.

World fame awaits 33 rescued miners TV producers, writers want whole story By Michael Warren The Associated Press

COPIAPO, Chile — The Chilean miners began their unfamiliar new lives as national heroes Thursday and got a taste of what awaits them outside the hospital doors — a deluge of TV producers, writers and even soccer teams all desperate for a piece of their story. A day after their epic rescue, still wearing the oddly fashionable sunglasses that protected them from the bright light when they were hoisted from 2,000 feet underground, the men posed in hospital bathrobes for a group photo with President Sebastian Pinera. Unity helped the men, known as “los 33,” survive for 69 days underground, including more than two weeks when no one knew whether they were alive. But the moment they walk out the hospital doors, they’ll go beyond the reach of a government operation that has cared for, fed

and protected them in a carefully coordinated campaign to ensure each of them would be in top condition. “Now they’re going to have to find their equilibrium and take care of themselves,” the hospital chaplain, the Rev. Luis Lopez, told The Associated Press. They got quite the preview Thursday of what lies ahead. On their first full day of fresh air, the miners were probably the 33 most in-demand people on the planet. A Greek mining company wants to bring them to the sunny Aegean islands, competing with rainy Chiloe in Chile’s southern archipelago, whose tourism bureau wants them to stay for a week.

Celebrity status Soccer teams in Madrid, Manchester and Buenos Aires want them in their stadiums. Bolivia’s president wants them at his palace. TV host Don Francisco wants them all on his popular “Sabado Gigante” show in Miami. Hearing that miner Edison Pena jogged regularly in the tunnels below the collapsed rock, the New York City marathon invited

him to participate in next month’s race. What about a reality show? Some other kind of TV work? Why not, said television writerproducer and Oscar nominee Lionel Chetwynd, who said he expected projects were being pitched around Hollywood within hours of the rescue. “Television is a quick-response medium,” he said, joking: “In fact, I think I’ll call my agent when we get off the phone.” Doctors said three of the men could be discharged from the hospital as early as Thursday evening, with others following today and over the weekend.

Welcome home Meanwhile, the families and friends of the men of the San Jose mine were organizing welcomehome parties, street celebrations, big dinners and even a few weddings, while trying at the same time to hold off the onslaught of demands from the media to learn more about how they survived. The government promised six months of psychological treatment and help with medical needs. It made sure each has a bank account only he can operate and coached them on dealing with the media.

Obama: ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy should stand By Pete Yost and Anne Flaherty The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — After two days of silence, the Obama administration urged a federal judge Thursday to let the military press on with its “don’t ask, don’t tell” ban on gays serving openly in the military. Still, President Barack Obama insisted the policy that has divided the nation for two decades “will end on my watch.” The Pentagon said the military “will, of course, obey the law” and halt enforcement while the case is still in question. But gay rights advocates cautioned gay service members to avoid revealing their sexuality in

Quick Read

the meantime. A federal judge threw out the ban Tuesday, setting in motion a legal, political and human-rights back-and-forth that put the administration on the spot just two weeks before midterm elections. Obama has consistently argued against the ban, approved by Congress in 1993. But he said it is up to Congress to repeal it. Their superiors are forbidden to ask about sexual orientation, but service members can be thrown out or denied enlistment if they talk about being gay or let it be known that they engage in homosexual acts. Obama’s Justice Department asked U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips to stay her ruling that

overturned the ban while the government prepares a formal appeal. Asking the judge for a response by Monday — “given the urgency and gravity of the issues” — the government said that suddenly ending the ban would be disruptive and “irreparably harm the public interest in a strong and effective military.” Obama, challenged Thursday at a town hall meeting by a Howard University faculty member who questioned his “alleged commitment to equality for all Americans, gay and straight,” said his stance has not wavered. He can’t end the ban with the stroke of a pen, he said, but “we’re going to end this policy.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: New Hoover Dam bridge finally completed

Nation: New Jersey field toilet papered from the sky

Nation: New York police pay most claims in nation

World: Police suspend search for missing tourist

A soaring bypass bridge high above the Colorado River near Hoover Dam is set to open after nearly eight years and $240 million worth of work. The 1,900-foot engineering wonder perched 890 feet above the water is expected to drastically cut travel time along the main route between Las Vegas and Phoenix, as motorists will no longer have to make their way across the dam and its security checkpoints at a snail’s pace. The bridge is named for former Nevada Gov. Mike O’Callaghan and Pat Tillman, the former NFL player who joined the Army Rangers and died in Afghanistan under friendly fire.

Authorities said a man tossed wet toilet paper from a small plane onto a New Jersey athletic field, but his intent wasn’t nefarious: He was making a test run for a streamer drop at an upcoming high school football game. Westwood Police Chief Frank Regino told The Record of Woodland Park that Wednesday’s flyover stirred anxieties about low-flying aircraft. The pilot, Warren Saunders, has been charged with violating a state law that prohibits aerial stunts over densely inhabited areas or public gatherings. He’s been released on his own recognizance.

The fiancee and friends of an unarmed man killed in a 50-bullet police shooting on his wedding day said they wanted justice. The legal system gave them money — more than $7 million. New York City did what it has done time and time again: pay. Nearly $1 billion has been paid over the past decade to resolve claims against the nation’s largest police department, according to an investigation by The Associated Press. The total spending outstrips that of other U.S. cities, though some smaller cities and departments also shell out tens of millions of dollars a year in payouts.

A Mexican official said the search for an American tourist believed to have been shot while crossing a Texas border lake has been temporarily called off. Tamaulipas state attorney general’s office spokesman Ruben Dario Rios Lopez told the McAllen newspaper, The Monitor, that the search for David Michael Hartley was suspended Thursday so that authorities can look into new strategies to find him. He said authorities hope to be able to resume the search for Hartley “in a few days.” Hartley’s wife, Tiffany, said they were on their way back to the U.S. from Mexico when pirates in boats opened fire on them, shooting her husband.


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Friday, October 15, 2010 — (J)

Police find pipe bombs in vehicle By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A bomb squad was called to west Port Angeles early Thursday after police discovered metal pipe bombs in a vehicle in the 2000 block of West 15th Street. The bombs were found inside a vehicle that belonged to a man who had just been arrested after he allegedly threatened another man with a loaded handgun, Port Angeles police said. Eric L. Possinger, 38, of Port Angeles, was booked into the Clallam County jail at 3:59 a.m. on investigation of first-degree assault and possession of amphetamines. Police found one apparent pipe bomb in Possinger’s vehicle and called the State Patrol Interagency Bomb Squad, which confirmed that it, and others, were explosive devices. “We found six confirmed incendiary devices,” said Brian Smith, Port Angeles deputy chief of police.

Detonated outside city

ing on this, and it’s a slow, meticulous process to rendering these things safe,” said Smith, who would not say where the bombs were being detonated. “They are detonated in a way that they preserve all the evidence. We have a bunch more work to do today and tonight.” Smith said there was no evidence to suggest any threat to public safety. Police responded to a report of a man threatening another person with a handgun at about 3:30 a.m. A loaded handgun and a magazine were found at the scene. Possinger was arrested without incident, police said. He remained in custody Thursday on $2,500 bail. Possinger had no case file in Clallam County Superior Court records on Thursday night. Smith said it’s too soon to tell whether the U.S. Attorney’s Office or the Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office will file formal charges. “We may file additional charges,” Smith said late Thursday. “It took a lot longer than we thought today. … It’s been a long day.”

Bomb squad detectives and agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives took ________ the bombs to a location outside the city limit to detoReporter Rob Ollikainen can be nate them without destroy- reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ing the evidence. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. “We have six guys work- com.

Briefly: State Canada will waive Amtrak border fee OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire is celebrating a decision by Canadian border officials to waive a border clearance fee on Amtrak’s second train from Seattle to British Columbia. The decision to waive the $550,000 a year fee is great news for businesses on both sides of the border, she said. Gregoire said she worked closely with British Columbia Premier Gordon Campbell, local mayors, the state’s congressional dele-

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Pilot OK BURLINGTON — The pilot of a small experimental plane was able to walk away after an accident that left debris on the runway of Skagit Regional Airport at Burlington. The craft broke apart about 11:30 a.m. Thursday as it swerved across the runway and a taxiway, said Port of Skagit spokesman Carl Molesworth. He didn’t know if the plane was landing or taking off. Molesworth said the pilot was walking and talking after the accident. The Associated Press

Pieces of lumber lay strewn about the Dry Hill mountain bike area on Thursday after vandals attacked the site.

Bike course trashed Trails to open this weekend despite damage By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A couple of broken signs and few busted pieces of lumber are mostly all that’s left of a mountain bike staging area in the hills west of Port Angeles after vandals sacked the course last week. Scott Tucker, a founder of the club that maintains the Dry Hill mountain bike trails, discovered the damage Oct. 8. He found that a loading ramp for the bikes and the backdrop to the awards podium had been taken. The following Saturday, Tucker returned to find more damage. Vandals had broken the finish sign at the end of the trails in half, knocked over another sign at the entrance of the staging area and destroyed a jump near the top of the course. He said that tire tracks indicate that vandals were riding two

By Matthew Barakat The Associated Press

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — If you want to understand why the richest man in America is giving away the bulk of his fortune, it helps to understand that Bill Gates’ mother was a long-

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Gates Foundation provided a $10 million grant toward establishing the learning center. Bill Gates’ father, Bill Sr., who also spoke at Wednesday’s dedication, said his son often asked pointed questions of his mother during dinner table conversation, honing in on where funds should be allocated to be used most efficiently. Bill Sr. joked that he would step back from the conversations and lament his son’s penchant for orderly analysis. The younger Gates said he recalled “those dinner conversations were part getting myself and my sisters to think about service.”

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Tucker said the vandalism won’t stop the club from opening the trails this weekend to riders for $35 each. But there will be some more cleaning up to do. “We’re going to clean it up as much as we can,” he said, while viewing the damage. Money raised this weekend will be used to repair the damage and install security cameras, Tucker said. Anyone who has information on the vandalism should contact the Sheriff’s Office at 360-417-2459.

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and other off-road vehicles. Tucker suspects the vandalism was carried out by users of the other trails who may not like sharing the hill with mountain bikers. He cites the extensive damage as the basis for that assumption. “They were definitely targeting us,” he said. “They’ve done everything they can to tear everything down.”

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time volunteer and board member with the United Way, and that her charitable work was a favorite topic of family conversation. “She got us thinking from a young age what was volunteerism all about,” Gates said Wednesday as he helped dedicate a new $17 million learning center at United Way Worldwide headquarters in Alexandria that will bear his mother Mary’s name. The Bill and Melinda

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off-road vehicles. “They basically tore apart everything we had built,” said Tucker, who co-founded the Olympic Dirt Society, the club responsible for maintaining the trails. He estimated the damage at the course — which is on Walkabout Way, just off U.S. Highway 101 west of Port Angeles — at $1,500. The Clallam County Sheriff ’s Office is investigating, said Chief Criminal Deputy Ron Cameron, who had no additional information. The vandals left behind empty beer cans and plenty of tire marks, Tucker said. He said the tracks seemed to be from a four-wheeler and multipassenger off-road vehicle known as a Rhino. Both of those vehicles were seen leaving the area on Oct. 7, he said, when some of the vandalism is believed to have occurred. Deep tread marks in the mud at the base of the wooden frame that held the finish sign point to a failed attempt at pulling down the structure. A gate blocks the entrance to the base of the course, but Tucker said it could have been accessed by the nearby trails for dirt bikes, quads

Gates dedicates $17 million United Way learning center

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gation and business leaders to make sure the second train continues to run. The governor said she is looking forward to working with Canadian authorities to figure out more ways to grow the economies of both Washington state and British Columbia.

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Gates, who frequently talks about the desire to ensure his donations have “a catalytic effect” and have been spent efficiently, said he supports the United Way not just because of his mother’s involvement, but because he sees it as an agency that brings charities together to work and learn from each other. The learning center is designed to do just that. It features high-level, high-definition video conferencing and webcasting technologies that allow United Way chapters from around the world to talk to each other and share ideas. United Way demonstrated the technology at Wednesday’s dedication, with chapters in India, South Africa and San Francisco linked up by video to discuss some of their projects and the unique issues they face. Those who have occasionally been frustrated by the technology upon which the Microsoft founder has built his fortune may have found it appropriate that the demonstration ground to a halt for several minutes when the video hookups went dead. But Veronica Cronje, executive director of the Lusa Community Chest — a United Way member organization — in Sasolburg, South Africa, said the technology will be a valuable asset. On an international level, cross-cultural communication is better when the parties can see each other, as opposed to e-mail or a telephone conference call. “Not being able to see each other, each other’s body language, we often misunderstood each other,” Cronje said.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Dick’s Drive-In to announce new location

Continued from A1

return to a Kingston-Seattle run. “It opens the doors of opportunity,” said Caldwell, who plans to be aboard the second Kingston-Seattle run of the day Monday. He said he would support the Port of Kingston’s offer of weekend service between Port Townsend and Seattle but “until we find what’s going on with the [Port of Port Townsend], we won’t know.”

Financing

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

The Port of Kingston’s newly purchased 149-passenger ferry, Spirit of Kingston, prepares to dock in the Port of Port Townsend Boat Haven marina recently. in Kingston at 7:35 a.m. The next run will leave Kingston at 7:40 a.m., arrive in Seattle at 8:25 a.m., leave Seattle at 8:35 a.m. and dock in Kingston at 9:20 a.m. The afternoon run will leave Kingston at 4:20 p.m., arrive in Seattle at 5:05 p.m., leave Seattle at 5:15 p.m. and dock in Kingston at 6 p.m The evening run will leave Kingston at 6:05 p.m., land in Seattle at 6:50 p.m., depart Seattle at 7 p.m. and dock in Kingston at 7:45 p.m. “Unfortunately, the schedule doesn’t work for some people, but on the other hand, it works for others,” Osnes said. “Coming up with the schedule was a challenge.

Sale: Real estate deal

Fine-tuning

ICE looking for space

facility would be an allowed use at the Eagles site as now proposed, Stop the Checkpoints coordinator Lois Danks said she will continue to protest the move. “It doesn’t seem like a wise use of taxpayer money,” she said Tuesday. “If they only need a building for 24 or 25 officers, they should be able to do that size building and save the money.” Eagles club members have said their membership numbers are too low to support maintenance of such a large building. “I’ve always felt that if we didn’t sell that, the Eagles may have just ended up not existing in Port Angeles anymore,” Wheeler said. “It’s a great big building and it has lots of potential, and we weren’t taking advantage of it. The group agreed to proceed ahead, so that’s what we are doing.”

The Border Patrol is looking for a facility large enough to house a staff of 50. The Border Patrol expanded from a staff of four in 2006 to 25 by August. Border Patrol officials have said they are required to seek a 50-person capacity for the project. Border Patrol critics have protested the expansion of agency activities on the North Olympic Peninsula, such as boarding buses ________ to check passengers for documentation of citizenship. Senior Writer Paul Gottlieb can Though city Planning be reached at 360-417-3536 or at Director Nathan West said paul.gottlieb@peninsuladailynews. in August that the new com.

We have to work within boundaries of Vashon Island boat’s schedule so as not to hinder their operation.” Food and drinks, including beer and wine, will be served to passengers, and free Wi-Fi and HDTV also will be available.

Offer for PT route open

with PT to establish a weekend run for them,” he said, but the Kingston port has not been approached by Port Townsend leaders. “I know they are pursuing their own boat, but we would be willing to work with them.” Jim Pivarnik, Port of Port Townsend deputy director, said the port is on the “short list” for receiving a $1 million appropriation through Bothell Democratic Sen. Patty Murray’s office and has applied for another $1 million state Department of Transportation mobility grant. That money could be used by the port to build its own boat, Pivarnik said. “We could build a small, energy-efficient one,” he said, and the port has talked to three designers “who think it can be done for a little more than $1 million.” Tim Caldwell, chairman ________ of the Jefferson County Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiFerry Advisory Committee, tor Jeff Chew can be reached at said he was excited to see 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ passenger ferry service peninsuladailynews.com.

Photo: Fire-Rescue

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Continued from A1 in town is invited to participate, Mullen said. Public safety officials will be involved. The Port All welcome Townsend Police Depart“This is a community ment officers will manage traffic while East Jef- event, and anyone who ferson Fire-Rescue fire wants to come is welcome,” fighters will loan a ladder she said. She estimated that about truck, allowing Conklin 500 people would attend. to shoot down onto the The family portraits crowd. While the portrait is have been taken about intended to reflect the every three years since 1985 population of Port and are often planned in Townsend, anyone who is conjunction with a civic

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ICE is looking for leased space, though still in downtown Port Angeles, General Services Administration spokesman Ross Buffington said. The GSA is coordinating ICE’s move, while the Army Corps of Engineers is coordinating the Border Patrol project. “Our schedule has us moving ICE into new space in fall of 2011,” Buffington said Wednesday after GSA officials met for an update on relocation. GSA will release information on the website, www.fbo.gov, by today to seek “expressions of interest” from land owners interested in providing leased space, Buffington said. Potential landlords can get “solicitations for offers” packages by going to the website once the information is posted. GSA wants 4,000 square feet of office space, Buffington said.”

Room for 50

Eric Osnes ferry program manager Port of Kingston

The Port of Kingston vessel purchases were financed with a $3.5 million Federal Transportation Administration grant received about two years ago to establish regular runs from that port’s passenger dock on the waterfront in downtown Seattle. The Port of Kingston also received $150,000 in support from the state Legislature and has about $4 million saved for the venture. The Port of Kingston commissioners learned from the failed 2005 attempt by private operator Aqua Express to provide Kingston-Seattle service, which shut down because expenses were too high. The ferry service has a Facebook page at www.face book.com/Soundrunner, where comments can be made. Fares are $15 round trip for adults and $10 one way. Seniors, who are 65 and older, and the disabled ride for $7.50 round trip and $5 one way. Youths and students ages 6 to 18 ride for $10 round trip and $7.50 one way. Children 5 and younger ride free. For information, visit www.portofkingston.org/ home.html or phone 360297-3545.

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“There is a lot of finetuning that has to go on,” Meyer said. “Nothing is happening quickly in real estate today. This is like watching the earth’s crust form.” Kevin Wheeler, a member of the Eagles club real estate committee, said Tuesday that “the whole thing is still in process.” Realtor Karen Kilgore of Windermere Sequim-East, representing the Border Patrol, did not return calls for comment. The Border Patrol and its companion Homeland Security agency, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, are moving from the Richard B. Anderson Federal Building in downtown Port Angeles to larger quarters, but the two staffs will not be housed side-by-side as they are now.

“The idea is to find out what’s on the market in terms of space,” he said. “Four-thousand square feet is not a very big requirement. I would think the market exists to be able to accommodate that in an existing building.” A lease won’t be awarded until “after the first of the year,” Buffington said. ICE is looking for space with five parking slots.

“Coming up with the schedule was a challenge. We have to work within boundaries of Vashon Island boat’s schedule so as not to hinder their operation.”

Osnes said the Port of Kingston’s offer to provide weekend service between Port Townsend and Kingston is still open. “We would like to work

still being negotiated The building and property are valued at $1.8 million, according to the Clallam County Assessor’s Office. “This is a standard negotiation going back and forth,” said Meyer, with Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty in Port Angeles.

A5

Ferry: Kingston purchased two vessels

The trip to Seattle on the Port of Kingston Soundrunner service will take about 45 minutes. SEATTLE — Dick’s The Port of Kingston has Drive-In will announce the location of its first new res- purchased two vessels for the ferry service: the Spirit taurant since 1974 today. of Kingston for $2.5 million The Seattle fast-food from Four Seasons Marine institution also will be marking the 87th birthday Services of Silverdale, and the Victoria Express for of its namesake and co$650,000 from the Port founder, Dick Spady, Angeles company of the Seattlepi.com reported. same name that offers pasOn Sept. 20, company senger-only ferry service officials announced plans from Port Angeles to Victoto add a location someria and San Juan Island. where within a 20-mile Both vessels have a area north of the original capacity of up to 150 pasDick’s in Wallingford. That region got the most sengers and crew members. The Spirit of Kingston, votes in an online poll. The north region includes which will serve as the primary boat, is a 65-foot cataShoreline, Mountlake Termaran built in 2005 at All race, Lynnwood, Edmonds American Marine in Belland South Everett. ingham. It has a cruising speed of Skull found 25 knots and a maximum JOINT BASE LEWISspeed of more than 30 MCCHORD — Army inves- knots. tigators and police officers The Victoria Express, the searching a heavily wooded backup boat, is a 93-foot area of Joint Base Lewismono-hull vessel built in McChord have found other 1981 by Neuville Boat items near where a human Works in New Iberia, La. skull was found WednesIt has a cruising speed of day. 18 knots and a maximum Investigators cannot be speed of nearly 25 knots. more specific about the The Port of Kingston ferother items found Thursries will dock at Colman day, Lewis-McChord Dock in downtown Seattle, spokesman Joe Piek said. making connections with The area is at the outer Metro Transit and shuttle edge of the base’s training buses. center along state Highway The dock is within walk507. ing distance of the stadiA forensic anthropoloums, downtown offices and gist is scheduled to be at Pike Place Market. the scene today to examine the items to determine the Schedule gender, age and possible The first run will leave identity of the person. The anthropologist also Kingston at 5:55 a.m. and arrive in Seattle at 6:40 will try to figure out how a.m., departing Seattle at long ago the person died. The Associated Press 6:50 a.m. and arriving back

Continued from A1

(J) — Friday, October 15, 2010


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

High court rules on tribal authority By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The state Supreme Court said Thursday that tribal police can pursue non-Native American drivers suspected of traffic infractions beyond a reservation’s boundaries and detain them until other authorities arrive. The court’s ruling was a reconsideration of an opinion it issued last year, in which it unanimously reached the same conclusion. The court withdrew the earlier opinion because of an error, and this time, the judges split 6-3. The majority said that under the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliot between the U.S. and area tribes, it was OK for a Lummi nation officer to continue pursuing a suspected drunken driver, Loretta Eriksen, beyond the reservation’s boundaries in 2005 and detain her until Whatcom County deputies arrived. The treaty required tribes to turn over lawbreakers to U.S. or state authorities, the justices said.

Clallam, Jefferson sheriffs support ruling By Paul Gottlieb

sheriff’s jurisdictions extend to each other through the Mutual Sheriffs of Clallam and Peace Powers Act.” Jefferson counties said a ruling Thursday by the Little impact state Supreme Court Jefferson County Sheraffirms existing law enforcement relationships iff Tony Hernandez said the ruling would have litwith Native American tribes on the North Olym- tle impact on the agency relationship with the Hoh pic Peninsula. Indian tribe, which con“I support the decitracts with the Sheriff’s sion,” Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict said. Office for police services but has a fish and game “It essentially is just officer. giving the tribal officer Hernandez said the the authority to pursue ruling has no bearing on someone for a crime off an incident involving two the reservation and not Port Gamble S’Klallam giving them general tribal officers who authority such that they detained three nontribal can set up shop off the elk hunters on nontribal reservation,” he said. land in Brinnon Oct. 3, “It extends to the tribes the same authority 2009. The tribal council said that municipalities and Peninsula Daily News

They also said the stop was justified under the doctrine of “fresh pursuit,” which allows officers to cross jurisdictional lines when there’s a threat to life or property.

Fresh pursuit “To allow drunk drivers to escape the law by crossing a reservation boundary would unnecessarily endanger lives by incentivizing high-speed dashes for the border,” Justice Richard

Sanders wrote for the majority. Some lawyers said that although the ruling referenced the ability of tribal police to make traffic stops beyond a reservation’s boundaries, it seemed likely that the same logic would apply for officers pursuing suspects in other crimes. Justices on both sides agreed that letting drunk drivers get back behind the wheel simply because they’re not tribal members

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was a terrible idea. But the minority argued that the treaty provided tribes no authority to detain non-Native Americans beyond their borders. It simply required tribes to turn over suspected lawbreakers who sought haven on a reservation, they said. They also said the doctrine of “fresh pursuit” applies only to felonies. DUI is a gross misdemeanor. In her dissent, Justice Mary Fairhurst said she

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the officers erred in detaining the hunters. The Makah, Lower Elwha Klallam and Quileute tribes in Clallam County have their own police departments. This year, the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe signed a contract with Clallam County for the latter to provide law enforcement services. Clallam County is cross-commissioning law enforcement services with the Quileute tribe. That will allow tribal police officers to enforce laws outside tribal boundaries in places, for example, where traffic laws are being broken and no sheriff’s deputies are patrolling. “That’s a huge benefit to us,” Benedict said.

Benedict wants to cross-commission with the Makah and Lower Elwha Klallam tribes to better enforce traffic laws near those reservations, too, he said. For cross-commissioning, tribal officers must attain peace officer certifications for Washington state. Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Chairwoman Frances Charles and the Quileute tribe’s executive director, Bill Peach, did not return calls requesting comment late Thursday.

Inherent authority

________ Senior Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsula dailynews.com.

agreed that a tribal officer could pursue Eriksen beyond the reservation’s boundaries. But once the officer determined Eriksen wasn’t enrolled in the tribe, he should have let her go, she said — a conclusion that troubled her. “It is ludicrous that a suspected drunk driver who has been stopped outside a reservation’s boundaries by a tribal police officer must be allowed to get back on

peninsuladailynews.com

The second half of the year’s property taxes are due by Monday, Nov. 1, said Clallam and Jefferson county treasurers. “Second-half property taxes are due Oct. 31,” but “because the 31st falls on a

Sunday, taxes may be paid or postmarked by Monday, Nov. 1,” Jefferson County Treasurer Judi Morris explained. Clallam County Treasurer Judy Scott said that the county asks taxpayers to avoid writing post-dated

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Our current Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly and her supporters tout her record on conviction rates and keeping criminals off the streets. Well, let me tell you from a personal experience that this could not be farther from the truth. In June of 2007, my wife and I discovered that our bookkeeper was embezzling funds from our business. We contacted the Clallam County Sheriff immediately.

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We heard nothing for months. Finally in January of 2008 I contacted the prosecutor’s office and inquired as to the status of the case. I was told that the case was being reviewed.

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Detective Reyes took the lead and investigated our claims. His investigation uncovered that $50,000.00 had been stolen over the previous nine months since my wife’s retirement due to illness. Detective Reyes then went to the prosecutor for an arrest warrant in late September. The warrant was issued and, upon serving the warrant, he was told by a housesitter that the perpetrator was “on vacation” and would return in two weeks. That was September 28th of 2007. The case was turned back to the prosecutor’s office to be pursued at a later date.

Over the next few months, Kelly and her deputy staff made a plea deal with the accused. The offer was 30 days of home monitoring, 30 days of community service and restitution. The restitution would start with an initial payment of $10,000.00 (offered by the accused) and monthly payments to follow. When I asked what the monthly payments would be, Kelly told me that they had asked for $100.00 a month, but the Judge could drop that to as little as $25.00 if the accused claimed she could not afford the higher payment. Even at $100.00 per month, that would not even cover the interest of 12% per year as mandated by the State of Washington. This is Kelly’s idea of a “conviction”. Plead the case to a lower charge, give the criminal a slap on the wrist and go on to the next case. We refused to accept a slap on the wrist as offered by our “tough on crime” prosecutor. Over the next 22 months we were subjected to so many “status hearings” we lost count. Ms. Kelly allowed the defense to postpone the trial 11 times. We had the oldest felony case in Clallam County when the final plea agreement was made. It took 33 months to close a case that was so cut and dried it could have been settled in no time, had the Prosecutor done her job. Due to turnover in the Prosecutor’s office we ended up with four different deputy prosecutors, never having the chance to even meet with the last one. If not for my continued insistence that the accused be made to “pay” for her crimes, both monetarily and criminally, all we would have had was another notch on Ms. Kelly’s “Conviction Belt”. As it is, Michele Kraft is currently making license plates (or whatever they do) at the Women’s State Prison in Purdy, thanks to Judge Brooke Taylor’s sentence of a year and a day in jail (if under 365 days the time could be spent in county jail). Restitution was set at $500.00 a month. While we really don’t expect to see the restitution in our lifetime, we do have the satisfaction that Ms. Kraft is paying for her crimes. The bottom line is this. While Ms. Kelly may have a law degree, she is a lousy Prosecutor and an even worse administrator. Our third Deputy Prosecutor, Kristy Kollmar, had over 100 cases she was dealing with at the same time. Ms. Kollmar has left Clallam County for a career with the FBI. I can’t say I blame her. It is high time that the citizens of Clallam County be represented by a prosecutor who is tough on crime. My hope is that Larry Freedman can fulfill those needs. Ward S. Dunscomb Port Angeles 0A5100395

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Eriksen’s lawyer, William Johnston of Bellingham, said Thursday’s ruling was problematic because if tribes have inherent authority to detain non-Native Americans, there was no reason for them to comply with the state law, which took effect in 2008. He questioned whether a tribe would allow itself to be sued in state court if an officer conducting a pursuit off reservation caused an accident. “Sooner or later, there is going to be a hot pursuit, and in that hot pursuit, somebody’s going to be hurt who is not a criminal,” he said. Mary Neil, a lawyer for the Lummis, said the tribe has insurance for such cases.

Second-half property taxes due by Nov. 1

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Over

the road if she is not a tribal member,” Fairhurst wrote. “However, I cannot avoid my duty to faithfully interpret the law.” The Legislature recently passed a law that said tribal police could be designated general authority peace officers — meaning they’d have power to enforce state laws — if they sent their officers to the State Patrol academy, provided the state with proof of public liability insurance and agreed to waive sovereign immunity if officers were sued in state or federal court. Lummi police officers have not been so designated.

checks, adding that such checks will be deposited within 24 hours. Payments may be made in person at treasurer offices at county courthouses — 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles or 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend — or at other designated places, or placed in drop boxes, mailed or made by credit card. A drop box is in front of the Clallam County Courthouse. It is cleared daily. Sequim residents can drop off payments at the Department of Motor Vehicles, 1001 E. Washington St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. West End residents can pay at the District Court office at Forks City Hall, 500 E. Division St., during office hours or in the drop box. In both Sequim and Forks, payments must be made by check or money order. Cash will not be accepted, and receipts will not be provided. In Jefferson County, taxes may be paid in person at the courthouse between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Payments also can be placed in drop boxes at the courthouse; the Bank of America, 734 Water St., Port Townsend; the Bank of America, 10 Oak Bay Road, Port Hadlock; American Marine Bank, 9500 Oak Bay Road, Port Ludlow; or the US Bank, 14890 Center Road, Quilcene. Payments can be mailed to the Clallam County Treasurer, P.O. Box 2129, Port Angeles, WA 98362; or to the Jefferson County Treasurer, P.O. Box 571, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Other payment options include paying by credit card or electronic check through Official Payment Corp. at 888-272-9829 or at www.officialpayment.com. Instructions for both are on the back of tax statements. Instructions also are available at www. co.jefferson.wa.us/treasurer and www.clallam.net/ Taxes/payment.html. A fee is charged by the service provider for all credit card payments. Payments received after the due date are subject to additional interest and penalties. For more information in Clallam County, phone 360417-2344. For more information in Jefferson County, phone 360-385-9150.


Peninsula Daily News

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

A7

Senate candidates wrangle over taxes Murray, Rossi meet for 1st of 2 debates By Nicholas K. Geranios The Associated Press

SPOKANE — Democratic U.S. Sen. Patty Murray and Republican challenger Dino Rossi argued over tax cuts and the role of government during their first debate of the campaign Thursday evening. The debate produced few fireworks as the candidates stuck to well-worn themes that have been featured in a barrage of television ads. Murray, who is seeking a fourth term, continually hammered Rossi for supporting extension of the Bush-era tax cuts that benefit the wealthy. She said those tax breaks take away revenue that could be used for Social Security, Medicare and health programs. “If Mr. Rossi gets his way and extends the Bush tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans to the tune of almost $1 trillion, there is no way to sustain the programs so important to us,” Murray said. “You can count on me to make sure our parents are taken care of.”

Bigger government

Peninsula Daily News

parade prep

Sequim High School junior Mac Grinnell, left, pushes sophomore Jon Donahue in a shopping cart around a circle drive at the school at the start of the high school’s homecoming parade Thursday. The parade took a cadre of students, marching band members and football team players from the school’s north parking lot, around the school on Sequim Avenue and then to the high school stadium. The Wolves face off against Olympic High School of the Silverdale-Bremerton area at 7 for tonight’s homecoming game.

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PORT ANGELES — Dance instructor Carol Hathaway will teach Mad Hot Ballroom, a beginning swing class for young adults, at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., at 7 p.m. Thursday. This program is for youths in grades 7-12 only. No partners are required, but sign-ups are recommended. This event is one of a series offered by the North Olympic Library System to create a community and introduce new people to the library. This particular program was suggested by the library’s Teen Advisory Council, which requested a dance class to help promote the library’s large collection of CDs and introduce more young people to the library. Mad Hot Ballroom coincides with Teen Read Week, a national campaign sponsored by the American Library Association. “Books With Beat” is the theme of this year’s program. During Teen Read Week, young adults throughout the U.S. are encouraged to read and are introduced to new titles. For the observance, the system’s youth services librarian, Jennifer Knight, will visit middle and high schools in Port Angeles to get kids jazzed about reading. For information on Mad Hot Ballroom and other programs for youths, visit www.nols.org, phone 360417-8502 or e-mail youth@ nols.org.

Homecoming

07700687

Ballroom dance class scheduled

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

782 Kitchen-Dick Rd., Sequim

095095757

Rossi criticized Murray as a three-term incumbent who constantly voted for bigger government programs and more government control of business. “You have an 18-year incumbent killing jobs in the state of Washington in vote after vote after vote,” Rossi said. “I want to allow entrepreneurs to be successful.” Although polls have been inconclusive, the race is thought to be close as Democrats try to hold control of the Senate. The hourlong debate was held in the studios of public television station KSPS. The candidates’ second and last scheduled debate is Sunday in Seattle, hosted by KOMO-TV. Before the debate, a man drove past the studio building several times brandishing a meat cleaver out the

create jobs. “We are going to have the biggest tax increase in American history” if the Bush tax cuts are not extended, Rossi said. Both candidates supported continued cleanup of nuclear waste at Hanford, Murray Rossi but Murray said the government needs the money window of his vehicle at to do that. Murray supporters. He was arrested by Spokane police. As she has done through- Health bill out the campaign, Murray Rossi attacked the health painted Rossi as a friend to care reform bill, saying it Wall Street and big banks. would dramatically increase Rossi, a real estate devel- costs for key employers like oper who has twice lost Boeing. races for governor, branded “This eventually could Murray as a big-spending bankrupt America,” Rossi liberal. said. “The only people that Constant theme health care was working for They referred constantly was health insurance comto the fight over extending panies,” Murray responded. Murray said she supthe 2001 and 2003 tax cuts to individuals making more ported getting banks out of than $200,000, bringing it the business of giving stuup in the context of numer- dent loans so that money was funneled to students ous issues. Rossi said the country and not into profits for the was heading in the wrong banks. “Part of the takeover by direction because of uncontrolled spending such as the government is student loans,” Rossi responded, health care reform bill. Murray said families are saying having banks adminstruggling because of the ister loans provided students more options. greed of Wall Street. Asked to say something Murray said the country needed targeted invest- they admired about their ments in places like educa- opponent, Murray said she admired Rossi for making tion to create more jobs. Rossi contended lower the sacrifices to get into the taxes and predictable costs race. Rossi said he believed for items like health care Murray had done good work will allow businesses to for veterans.

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 15-16, 2010

Commentary

Page

A8

Debt makes deficits harder to defeat DEBT AND DEFICITS aren’t synonyms. Debt is money owed. Deficit is insufficient funds to pay for expenses. Debt is huge in some counMartha M. ties. In 1996, a Ireland first-term Kitsap County commissioner told me he was dismayed to find every penny his county collected in property taxes went toward debt. Such is not the case in Clallam and Jefferson counties. The last debt Clallam incurred paid for the new courthouse and Camp David on Lake Crescent, during Mike Doherty’s first stint as a county commissioner, 1976 to 1980. Clallam saved timber revenue and paid cash for capital projects, notably because of the leadership of Lawrence Gaydeski, who represented the West End from 1982 through 1994.

When paying off those bonds showed up in the proposed 1998 budget, Doherty told the thencommissioners, myself included, that debt keeps current taxpayers from fully paying for public facilities that future generations will use. Elected in 1998, Doherty, who now seeks a fourth four-year term, challenged by Robin Poole, inherited a debt-free county with healthy reserves. So did Steve Tharinger, elected in 1999, who’s now vying for state representative against Jim McEntire. To their credit, Clallam remains debt-free, with a shrinking cushion of banked reserves. It may draw $1.6 million from reserves to help fill a $2.6 million deficit, according to the preliminary budget message. Balancing the budget would also entail $1 million of spending cuts, and a 1 percent increase in revenue from property taxes. No new taxes are proposed. Read the summary at http:// tinyurl.com/23aubgy (you need to be able to read PDF files). Jefferson County’s debt totals a bit over $8 million, which is

supposed to be paid by real estate excise taxes. Last year, for the first time, the real estate revenues didn’t cover the full debt payment, and likely won’t this year or next, County Administrator Philip Morley told me. “This year, we’re anticipating having to make up about $256,000, but not out of the general fund,” Morley said. By 2012, a “modest recovery of the real estate industry” should cover bond payments, he said. “Refunding” — the equivalent of refinancing a mortgage — could lower the interest rate, which would reduce payments and total costs. On the other side of the ledger, Clallam and Jefferson counties both have interest-earning economic development accounts, funded by a small portion of state sales tax revenue, under legislation sponsored in 1998, by state Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. Hargrove envisioned that Clallam would issue bonds to buy the Rayonier mill that had closed in 1997, and use the sales tax money to repay the bonds.

Peninsula Voices

Instead, Clallam created the Opportunity Fund and Jefferson County created its Public Infrastructure Fund. These funds collect interest, rather than paying it, while helping to fund local governments’ projects, such as designing the Port Hadlock and Carlsborg urban growth area sewer systems. However, counties’ overall interest income took a huge hit from federal and state banking reforms. Clallam anticipates interest revenue will plunge from $2.6 million per year to $400,000 per year, a loss of $2.2 million, which equals 7.2 percent of total general fund revenue. Jefferson County’s Public Infrastructure Fund is “not huge dollars, but it makes a difference,” said Morley, who is wrestling with a growing shortfall. Since Morley was hired two years ago, Jefferson County’s budget has been cut $2.3 million, but revenue cannot sustain existing services in 2011 and beyond. Since September, a projected $900,000 gap in the $15.6 million general fund budget for 2011 as

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Against biomass

Lynn Kessler, has endorsed Mr. Tharinger because she Regarding the PDN’s Oct. 7 article [“Appeal Tar- fully understands the challenges that our state faces gets Biomass Plan/Environmental, Shoreline Chal- in this economy and has chosen him to follow in her lenges by 7 Groups”] footsteps. nowhere in the pros and Steve has worked on cons regarding the pronumerous multicounty posed biomass project at boards, often taking leaderthe Nippon mill is there any reference to a potenship positions, which allotially very significant envi- cate funds in a transparronmental impact. ent, well-reasoned way. Imagine all the air-polWith his broad range of luting exhaust that spews experience, I have no probfrom the tractors and lem with him having two trucks collecting and deliv- jobs. ering the “biomass” from We have a citizen Legisever farther locations, not lature, and most of the to mention their consump- other legislators have a diftion of our ever decreasing ferent job — his job hapsupply of fossil fuel. pens to be in county govCurrent practice of ernment. burning forest “waste” in This is actually to our place leaves nutrients for advantage. replenishing the soil as He understands the govwell as stuff in the air that ernment processes, and the growing trees really like. RCWs and WACs. Time for a rethink of He is so capable, intelliwhat is really only a feelgent and responsible. good project. He always does his best. Larry Werner, Please join me in electSequim ing Steve Tharinger as our next state representative. For Tharinger Teri Nomura, I have been a Jefferson Port Hadlock County resident for 27 years and am voting for Against Tharinger Steve Tharinger to be my I cannot vote for state representative for the 24th representative candidate Legislative District, PosiSteve Tharinger because of tion 2. Our current representa- his stated intention to “double dip” by serving contive for the last 18 years,

grown to $1.1 million, as revenues come in below dismal projections. Proposition 1, now on Jefferson County ballots, would fill part of that deficit by adding a three-tenths of 1 percent public safety sales and use tax, equal to 3 cents per $10 purchase. Pre-election, the budget must be balanced as if Prop. 1 won’t pass. Explaining proposed cuts to core services, Morley said: “Essential, yes. Immune, no.” Tax structure that has the property tax base steadily falling behind inflation, regulations that have every other category of revenue in decline and the continuing recession, spell one certainty, Morley said: “County government’s going to be getting smaller.”

________ Martha Ireland was a Clallam County commissioner from 1996 through 1999 and is the secretary of the Republican Women of Clallam County, among other community endeavors. Martha and her husband, Dale, live on a Carlsborg-area farm. Her column appears every Friday. E-mail: irelands@olypen.com.

and e-mail

Death choice Just amazing. They don’t have the correct chemicals to put a murderer to sleep. [“Drug Shortage Holds Up Some Executions,” Sept. 28 PDN]. Why not try a massive amount of morphine — it’s cheap, available and effective? He will go to sleep and wake up in hell. Peter Harringer, Sequim

Columnist kudos

currently as both a state representative and a county commissioner. Apparently, Mr. Tharinger cannot see the inherent conflicts of interest that may arise in trying to represent his constituents in Clallam County and, simultaneously, those of the 24th District. Moreover, he appears insensitive to the fact that simultaneously serving in the two positions may be seen as greedy and selfserving. Unlike Mr. Tharinger, many people understand that when referring to ice cream, double dip, covered with chocolate sauce and nuts, is a good thing. But when it comes to

double-dipping politicians — well, it’s just plain nuts. Paul Sprinkle, Port Angeles

D.C. rally I’ll bet that if the Democrats had it to do over again, they would not have left such a mess at our nation’s capital after their “One Nation Working Together” rally on Oct. 2. It did make for some bad press. Then again, they probably wanted to create jobs for the government workers who had to clean up after them. Marc Reinertson, Port Angeles

I grew up in Port Angeles — my folks ran the old Audett Hotel on Lincoln Street across from what was then the library. The Daily News was in the building just a few doors down, and I was mesmerized by the ticker tape of the news being printed by the front window. I guess I am still a news fan — just an older one. I want to express my deep appreciation for three PDN contributors, with no ranking as they are all great but in extremely differing ways. I want to go fishing with Wednesday columnist Pat Neal. I want to ride with columnist Karen Griffiths [“Peninsula Horseplay,” every other Wednesday]. I don’t like to really think about all the good

Ready to vote? Look for two pages of election letters to the editor in Sunday’s PDN. And don’t overlook the revealing Q&As with all the candidates that are in our Election Guide, part of today’s PDN. If you misplace it, copies of the Election Guide are also available at PDN offices (addresses on Page A2) and at local libraries and other public places. It is also online at www.peninsuladaily news.com. Rex Wilson, executive editor information provided by columnist Mark Harvey [“Help Line,” every Thursday] but I am truly glad he makes me. In conclusion, and not on topic, thank you, Mike Chapman, for being a [Clallam County] commissioner who is responsive and caring about the people he represents. Beth (Trosper) Blay, Sequim

Biomass plan also means Clallam jobs By Mike McAleer

Biomass is a proven alternative fuel for energy generation. It is environmentally safe when used under the properly approved conditions. Nippon Paper Industries USA’s paper-making plant in Port McAleer Angeles has designed a biomass system to upgrade its current facility and received the appropriate approvals. Recently, a coalition filed an

point of view appeal of the city of Port Angeles’ environmental impact statement and shoreline management permit. The coalition clearly does not understand the need for business retention and enhancement here in Clallam County. The biomass project is an effort by Nippon to pursue not only new jobs, but diversify their current operations and provide a level of energy redundancy that will to make that operation economically viable. It will ensure that the 242 jobs that are at the mill — and probably another 500 jobs indi-

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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Rex Wilson

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rectly associated with the mill’s operations, remain within this county. The belief that somehow the city of Port Angeles, the state Department of Ecology and Olympic Region Clean Air Agency would somehow “let something slip by” in this entire process is bewildering. Further, the Nippon project was endorsed by Peter Goldmark, state commissioner of public lands, who is not only a scientist, but a man with a very strong, conservation-based ethic. Woody biomass cogeneration is a viable, renewable energy option that we on the North Olympic Peninsula have an opportunity to utilize to offset

expensive fossil fuel use. It allows us to use materials that are waste residuals, or potentially materials that would be pre-commercial thin materials in a way that provides not only a source for energy production but enhances forest health and growth. Nippon is looking at replacing a 1950s system with a modern system that would increase efficiencies in production, output — and meet current Olympic Regional Clean Air Agency standards for air quality, if not surpass them. There is much opportunity to develop new industries, or new opportunities within existing industries, without having

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

adverse impacts on the environment. The approach Nippon is taking is one of the ways. The Clallam Economic Development Council fully supports the efforts of Nippon to upgrade its facility in an environmentally friendly way to save and create jobs.

________ Michael E. McAleer is president of the Clallam Economic Development Council and managing broker of Team McAleer RE/MAX Fifth Avenue realty in Sequim. Contact McAleer at 360-6831500 or mike@teammcaleer.com.

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Looking back at The Unfair Game As Barack Obama struggles to rekindle the magic, one of the most pathetic headlines was the one on a CNN poll last week: “Was Bush Better President Than Obama?” “Americans are divided Maureen over whether President Dowd Barack Obama or his predecessor has performed better in the White House,” the CNN article said. So now the Republican president who bungled wars and the economy and the Democratic president trying to dig us out are in a dead heat? America’s long-term economic woe has led to short-term memory loss. Republicans are still popular, and the candidates are crazier than ever. And crazy is paying dividends: Sharron Angle, the extreme Republican candidate for the Senate in Nevada, vacuumed up $14 million in the last quarter in her crusade to knock out Harry Reid — the kind of money that presidential candidates dream of collecting. Karl Rove has put together a potent operation to use anonymous donors to flood the airwaves with attack ads against Democrats. And a gaunt-looking Dick Cheney is out of the hospital and back to raking in money defending torture and pre-emptive war. He, Lynne Cheney, Rove, Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich and Laura Bush drew more than 10,000 people at $495 a pop to a conference in Bakersfield, Calif., last weekend. Republicans are also gearing up to start re-sliming Valerie Plame Wilson and Joe Wilson when “Fair Game,” the movie based on their memoirs, opens next month. Robert Luskin, a lawyer for Rove who considered Plame col-

lateral damage and labeled her “fair game,” dismissively told Sheryl Gay Stolberg of The New York Times that the Wilsons are “a little past their ‘sell-by’ date.” It’s hard to believe that it was seven years ago when the scandal of the Glamorous Spy and Showboating Ambassador exploded. Joe Wilson first accused the Boy Emperor of not wearing any clothes on the Iraq WMDs, and then charged the Bush White House with running a “smear campaign” against him and outing his wife as a CIA spy. He was right on all counts and brave to take on a White House that broke creative new ground in thuggery and skulduggery. But it was child’s play for the Republicans to undermine the former diplomat and the spy who loved him. Wilson was “pretty widely known as a loudmouth,” as the movie’s director Doug Liman put it, and overstepped at times, posing for Vanity Fair in his Jaguar convertible with his wife coyly cloaked in scarf and sunglasses. While her husband was in his promotional whirlwind, Plame was in her reticent cloud, her air of blonde placidity belying her anguish at being betrayed and her disgust that Cheney Inc. bullied the CIA, overriding skepticism about Saddam’s weapons system and warping intelligence. “It’s called counterproliferation, Jack,” Naomi Watts’ Plame says to her superior. “Counter.” The movie makes clear that Plame was not merely “a secretary” or “mediocre agent” at the agency, as partisan critics charged at the time, but a respected undercover spy tracking Iraqi WMD efforts. And it reiterates that Plame did not send her husband, who had worked in embassies in Iraq while Saddam and Bush Sr. were in charge and was the ambassador in two African countries, on the fact-finding trip to Niger about a possible Iraqi purchase of 500 tons of

yellowcake uranium. She merely acted as an intermediary when a colleague threw his name into the hat for the unpaid gig. The film creates composites to heighten the tension and suggests that Plame’s Iraqi contacts and their families were murdered once she was outed — a subplot Variety called “apocryphal and manipulative.” But the movie is a vivid reminder of one of the most egregious abuses of power in history, and there are deliciously diabolical turns by actors playing Scooter Libby, David Addington and Rove. Plame’s CIA bosses are portraits in cravenness, cutting her loose at the moment she starts receiving death threats and her Iraqi sources become endangered. Liman, who grew up watching his father Arthur’s Buddha-like interrogations during the IranContra hearings, does not use an Oliver Stone sledgehammer on history. He views the scandal through the lens of the Wilsons’ marriage, which snaps for a time under the strain of being hounded by the most powerful men on Earth. (As Valerie writes in her book about Joe’s demand to see Rove “frog-marched out of the White House in handcuffs”: “Husbands. What can you do?”) Costumed with lush mane and round paunch, Sean Penn is well suited to capture Wilson’s arrogance and mouthiness, while also showing his honesty, brazenness, sly charm and fierce love of wife and country. They were the Girl and Boy Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, and we should all remember what flew out.

_________

Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. Contact Dowd via http:// tinyurl.com/dowdmail.

Leftist vigilantes dog GOP donors The White House attack on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce isn’t about “disclosure.” It’s about disarmament. While posing as campaign finance Michelle champions, the Malkin ultimate goal of the Democratic offensive is to intimidate conservative donors, chill political free speech and drain Republican coffers. Chamber of Commerce official Bruce Josten tried to educate the public. “We know what the purpose here is,” he told ABC News. “It’s to harass and intimidate.” Josten cited protests and threats against chamber members as retribution for ads the organization ran opposing the federal health care takeover. But this isn’t the first time liberal bullyboys have targeted right-leaning contributors. Far from it. In August 2008, a former Washington director of MoveOn. org — the smear merchant group that branded Gen. David Petraeus a traitor for overseeing the successful troop surge in Iraq — announced a brazen witch hunt against Republican donors. Left-wing political operative Tom Matzzie told The New York Times he would send “warning” letters to 10,000 top GOP givers “hoping to create a chilling effect that will dry up contributions.” Matzzie bragged of “going for the jugular” and said the warning letter would be just the first step, “alerting donors who might be considering giving to rightwing groups to a variety of potential dangers, including legal trouble, public exposure and watchdog groups digging through their lives.” Defenders of this brown-shirt initiative played the disclosure card — hey, they were just pro-

viding “information” — to rationalize the public humiliation of GOP donors. Matzzie also put up a $100,000 bounty for dirt on conservative political groups “to create a sense of scandal around the groups” and dissuade donors from giving money. The effort was cheered by Accountable America adviser Judd Legum, founder of Think Progress — the same group leading the attack today on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Yet, Matzzie’s group, Accountable America, is itself a 501(c)(4) nonprofit entity that shields the identity of its donors. (The group is required by law to remain nonpartisan, but has described itself as “dedicated to electing Democrats to the state legislature across America.”) By targeting direct, hardmoney contributors who are required to disclose their occupations, addresses and employers, Matzzie’s assault simply created a sunshine-evading incentive to steer campaign donations to softmoney groups that protect donor identities. You know, like Accountable America does. Piggybacking on the Accountable America foray, Obama’s presidential campaign lawyers demanded that the Justice Department block TV stations from airing a documented, factual independent ad spotlighting Obama’s longtime working relationship with unrepentant Weather Underground terrorist Bill Ayers. Obama summoned his followers to bombard stations, many of them owned by conservativeleaning Sinclair Communications, with 93,000 e-mails to squelch the commercial. Team Obama then tried — and failed — to convince the Justice Department to investigate and prosecute the American Issues Project, the group that produced the Ayers ad, as well as Dallas billionaire and GOP donor Harold Simmons, who funded it. Two Obama supporters —

Democratic St. Louis County (Mo.) Circuit Attorney Bob McCulloch and St. Louis City Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce — took the next step and threatened to bring criminal libel charges against anyone who sponsored objectionable criticisms of Obama. In California, gay rights maumau-ers compiled black lists and harassment lists of citizens who contributed to the Proposition 8 initiative in defense of traditional marriage. A Los Angeles restaurant whose manager made a small donation to the Prop. 8 campaign was besieged nightly by hordes of protesters who disrupted the business, intimidated patrons and brought employees to tears. Terrified workers at El Coyote Mexican Cafe pooled together $500 to pay off the protesters. A theater director who donated $1,000 to Prop. 8 was forced to resign over the donation. Anonymous mischief-makers created “Eight Maps,” a detailed directory of Prop. 8 donors using Google Maps to pinpoint their residences and businesses. Death threats, enveloped with powdery substances and boycotts ensued. “When I see those maps,” admitted California Voter Foundation President Kim Alexander, “it does leave me with a bit of a sick feeling in my stomach.” It’s the same feeling every American should be left with after witnessing the liberal thugtested, White House-approved donor suppression campaign against fiscal and social conservatives. In the hands of leftist vigilantes, “disclosure” is a deadly bludgeon; political free speech is the casualty.

________ Michelle Malkin is author of Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. E-mail: malkinblog@gmail.

Friday, October 15, 2010

A9

In recognition of today’s debut of the PDN’s Election Guide special section . . .

Let voting begin!


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Woman welcomes fall with craft class Sequim resident to teach how to make wreaths with dried hydrangea blooms By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Ropes of drying hydrangeas accompany the turning leaves and chilling weather as sure signs of fall for Su Howat. Howat, a longtime resident of Sequim, has 65 bushes of hydrangeas, having recently given 15 of her original 80 bushes to her niece. Every summer, they blossom into a multitude of tiny tight bouquets of pale florets. Howat will use dozens of drying blossoms in a class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in Howat’s barn at 302 Ward Lane in Sequim, where she will teach stu-

The class is $25. Attendees need bring only a glue gun. Howat will supply all other materials. Howat said she waits for the perfect time to pick the blossoms so they will maintain both their color and shape. For the perfect result, Howat said, those with mophead hydrangeas should wait until the tiny Su Howat flowers in the center of each craft instructor of the individual blossoms open and fall off.

“The Martha Stewart way is to put them in a vase with a little bit of water and let the water evaporate and let them dry like that. But I have so many that I hang them to dry.”

dents how to make wreaths from the blossoms. “The wreaths will be 15 to 16 inches across, and to make them, you don’t have to be skilled at all. Anyone can do this,” she said.

Perfect time “When that little flower falls off, that is when you should pick them,” she said. Hydrangeas hold their

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Su Howat of Sequim stands among strings of drying hydrangeas Tuesday, a flower that she weaves into wreath-like arrangements. color for about a year after drying, she said. “Some people keep them longer, but they really don’t look that good,” she said. “This [the time to dry hydrangeas] is just something that is a sign that fall is here at last.” Howat hangs the blos-

soms upside-down to ensure that they hold their shape. “The Martha Stewart way is to put them in a vase with a little bit of water and let the water evaporate and let them dry like that,” Howat said. “But I have so many that I hang them to dry.”

To reserve a spot in the class, phone 360-683-9446 or e-mail jshowat@olypen. com.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Field to visit PT for PA man sentenced in screening of ‘Sybil’ shooting plans appeal Rose Theatre event sold out since August Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Actress Sally Field will visit Port Townsend on Sunday for a screening of the “Sybil,” a television movie in which she played a woman with multiple personalities. The event, which will be from noon to 5 p.m. at the Rose Theatre, has been sold out since it was announced in August. Field will appear along with screenwriter Stewart Stern, who wrote

the movie. The two will speak both before and after a screening of the movie, which is more than Field three hours long. It was originally shown over two nights in 1976 and was one of the first successful television miniseries.

Emmy-winning role Field won an Emmy Award for the role, which helped to establish her as a serious actress. Up to that point she was best known for her televi-

sion roles in “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun.” She subsequently won two Oscars for “Norma Rae” and “Places in the Heart.” Stern, who wrote “Rebel Without a Cause” starring James Dean, has worked with a variety of Hollywood stars including Joanne Woodward, Paul Newman, Marlon Brando and Natalie Wood. He now lives in Seattle and has taught screenwriting at the University of Washington. The event has been billed as “a rare opportunity to understand and appreciate the collaborative creative process between author and actor.”

Court costs will be paid by public By Tom Callis Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A 54-year-old man who was sentenced Thursday to nearly 13 years in prison for shooting and wounding his roommate plans to appeal his conviction. Clallam County Superior Court Judge George Wood, after sentencing Keith R. Berlin to 153 months in prison, granted a motion authorizing Berlin to pursue an appeal at public expense.

Berlin doesn’t have enough money to cover the cost, according to the motion filed by Berlin’s attorney, Loren Oakley of the Clallam Public Defender’s Office.

Guilty in September

about a day at Olympic Medical Center. The appeal, according to court documents, would say the defense was not allowed to cross-examine Griffith on an alleged offer he made to change his testimony in exchange for money, and would ask for review of the denial of the defense’s request for a jury instruction addressing the lesser offense of fourthdegree assault, as well as the court allowing a Port Angeles police detective to testify as an expert on the shooting wound.

A jury in September found Berlin guilty of firstdegree assault in the shooting of his roommate, Jacob Griffith, in the face with a .22-caliber rifle at their home on Alder Lane east of Port Angeles. The shooting occurred in February after Griffith ________ said he was moving out. Reporter Tom Callis can be Griffith, who was reached at 360-417-3532 or at 33 years old at the time, tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. recovered after spending com.

Kevin VanDeWege worked to: Create New Jobs “We are working through the toughest economic recession of our generation. Even though these are tough times, it was great to work with our business community on the Peninsula to create new family wage jobs.” • •

Opened Peninsula Plywood in Port Angeles creating more than 100 good paying jobs with benefits. Helped our pulp mills and other local businesses receive new alternative energy projects.

Help Small Business “Our small businesses are the backbone of our economy. State government needs to do all it can to make it easier for our local businesses to thrive and be successful.” • • •

Doubled the state small business tax credit so our local businesses pay less. Cut red tape for small businesses passing a Permitting Bill of Rights to streamline the permitting process.

Representative Kevin VanDe Wege lives in Sequim with his wife, Jen, and their two children...

Honor Our Veterans “Our veterans made the greatest sacrifice possible in service of our country. They deserve to be honored and respected here at home.” • Named a portion of State Route 110, in the far western part of Clallam County the Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm Memorial Highway. • Saved funding at the state level so our veterans have options available when returning home.

Keep State Government Efficient “State government needs to balance it’s budget in tough economic times, just like families do.Taxpayers should expect accountability and state projects that are on-time and on-budget.” • • •

Restructured three Growth Management Hearings Boards into one. Supported bills to create a government efficiency hotline and expanded performance audits.

Elect Kevin VanDeWege For State Representative 0A5099175

Paid For By The Committee To Elect Kevin VanDeWege www.kevinvandewege.com 10 Sable Court Sequim, WA 98382 • Phone: (360) 477-0548 • www.kevinv


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 15-16, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Outdoors

Duck hunting just got better DUCK HUNTING HAS finally come to the people of the North Olympic Peninsula. For the first time in more Matt than 100 years, Schubert an area west of the Dungeness River mouth will open for waterfowl hunting when the statewide season begins Saturday. Long considered one of the premiere places to target fowl on the Peninsula, Dungeness Valley hunting grounds have been almost exclusively private since the Voice of America (aka Dungeness Recreation Area) closed years ago. That all changes this fall with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife opening a 140-acre portion to public hunting under a three-year agreement with Dungeness Farms Inc. The unit — located west of the Dungeness River off Rivers End Road — will open Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays throughout the season. “It really is right there at the mouth,” state biologist Greg Schirato said. “It’s been a private hunting club for many years, so it’s a good opportunity for the public. “We’re pretty excited about it, because there’s so little hunting opportunity for Clallam County residents.” Signs will be posted outlining the rules for hunting in the area. As part of the agreement, Fish and Wildlife granted exclusive access to Dungeness Farms to a parcel off Three Crabs Road. That site will no longer be open to public access and will be posted accordingly. “If it works out for both parties, we’ll look at doing a property exchange,” Schirato said. “This parcel gets [hunters] to the good duck hunting area. [The ducks] will probably go into the bay itself. “They move back and forth to feed, so it’s kind of in the flight path.” Hunters once enjoyed good public hunting at the Voice back in the 1980s, Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-452-2357) in Port Angeles said. “We’d come pulling into the parking area early in the morning . . . and you could hear the ducks all the way from the road,” he said. “There were 2,000 ducks sitting on that thing.” Ideally, this would provide the same sort of opportunity. Most of the Peninsula’s other public hunting areas can be found near the Hoh, Quillayute Prairie and beaver ponds of the Pysht. The beach near Graysmarsh Farm in Jamestown typically is open to the public on Wednesdays and Sundays, too. There are also areas on the Coyle Peninsula worth giving a look. Clallam County hunters harvested an average of 7,829 ducks and 687 Canada geese during each of the past four years. Jefferson County hunters bagged an average of 2,997 ducks and 233 Canada geese. The goose numbers have risen steadily each year on the Peninsula, with the 2009 harvest — 1,651 for Clallam and 550 for Jefferson — the largest for both counties. “Windy, blustery days are probably your key days to hunting [waterfowl],” Aunspach said. “It’s shoving them off the salt water into those protected lakes and fields. Blustery days keep those ducks moving more.” Duck season opens for five days beginning on Saturday. After a brief closure it reopens Oct. 23 through Jan. 30. Canada Geese are fair game Saturday through Oct. 28 and Nov. 6 through Jan. 30.

More hunting Hunters need not focus on feathers this weekend. With modern rifle deer season opening in each of the Peninsula’s Game Management Units (GMUs), they can fetch a little fur instead. Turn

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SCOREBOARD Page B2

Redskins beat Wolves PT earns 1-0 victory Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Port Townsend girls soccer team continued its ascension up the Olympic League standings with a scrappy 1-0 win over rival Sequim on Thursday night. The Redskins managed just one goal, an Irina Lyons score in the 16th minute off an Audrey McHugh assist, despite having several chances on net. Nevertheless, it was the second straight win for Port Townsend (4-2-0 in league, 9-4-0 overall) as it makes its bid for a top two seed in the Class 1A TriDistrict. Port Townsend currently is tied for second place in the Olympic League and must finish atop the 2A standings to get the No. 2 seed. A second- or third-place finish among the 2As results in a No. 4 seed. “For 20 minutes PT played immaculate soccer,” Redskins coach Colin Foden said. “In that time they scored one goal and missed several more. “The passing was brilliant and the goal from Irina Lyons concluded a passing move involving Lydia Young, Chelsey Hoglund and Audrey McHugh that leaves me searching for superlatives.” Sequim (0-5, 1-10) managed to keep the Redskins out of the net after that as things got more physical as the game went on. The one goal was actually the second fewest allowed by the Wolves in a game this season. They also had a 7-0 shutout victory over Chimacum earlier in the year. Sequim’s offense, however, could not come up with quality chances against the Port Townsend defense. “Elena Akins and Jennifer Grauberger were well in control in the defense and Chelsey Hoglund had a fine game too,” Fodin said. “We learned a lot from the

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend’s Lydia Young, front, slips past Sequim’s Leslie Cisneros in the first half on Thursday at Sequim High School.

Port Angeles 2, North Mason 0

Preps

BELFAIR — The Roughridgame and came away with three ers put themselves in the drivpoints.” er’s seat for the Olympic League’s fifth and final 2A playoff spot Port Townsend 1, Sequim 0 with their fifth shutout win of Port Townsend 1 0 — 1 the season Thursday. Sequim 0 0 — 0 Scoring Summary Forward Kathryn Moseley First half: 1, Port Townsend, Lyons (McHugh), 16th minscored a goal and dished out an ute. assist in the first half to help Second Half: No scoring.

Port Angeles move to 2-3-0 in league and 6-5-0 overall. Port Angeles has held opponents to just 10 goals, putting it on pace to challenge the 2000 team’s record for goals allowed in a season (13). Port Angeles hosts Sequim in another Olympic League game on Tuesday. Turn

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Preps/B3

Playoffs beckon PA, Sequim Area teams jockey for postseason berths

Football Previews Port Angeles at North Kitsap

Peninsula Daily News

The prep football season hits the home stretch this weekend with several teams still holding on to playoff hopes. While some still have a lot of work to do, others are just a win away from clinching a postseason bid. The latter group includes the Olympic League’s top two teams: Port Angeles (4-0 in league, 6-0 overall) and Sequim (4-0, 5-1). Each can lock up a spot in the playoffs with a win tonight while moving one step closer to a dramatic showdown for the Olympic League title Oct. 29 at Civic Field in Port Angeles. On the other side of the spectrum, homecoming hosts Forks and Port Townsend are both one loss away from being knocked out of postseason contention. Here is a quick rundown of the area high school football slate for this weekend:

1-5) coming to town tonight at 7. Olympic hasn’t been the same team without bruising running back Larry Dixon, who graduated last spring and now plays on scholarship for Army. The Trojans earned their lone win of the season last Friday after beating North Kitsap 19-3. In the Wolves, winners of four straight by a combined score of 206-62, they obviously face much stiffer competition. Sequim is looking to clinch its seventh straight postseason berth while moving to 30-0 in October games under head coach Erik Wiker. The seventh-year coach will be honored during the game by the Seattle Seahawks and Sterling Bank “for a job well done.”

POULSBO — The Roughriders’ dramatic turnaround can come full circle tonight with a win against the Vikings (1-3, 1-5) in Olympic League action. Port Angeles not only has a chance to exorcise some demons against North Kitsap — a team it has continually lost to — but also earn its first playoff bid in four years. The Riders can clinch a No. 2 seed and a home Class 2A preliminary playoff game with a victory. By starting the year 7-0, they can also achieve something no Port Angeles team has since the Lyndon Johnson administraCascade Christian tion. at Port Townsend The last time a Port Angeles football PORT TOWNSEND — Talk about a team won its first seven games was 1967. Those Riders finished the year 9-0 as scheduling gaffe. The Redskins (0-4, 0-6) get no gimme for Olympic League champions. tonight’s homecoming game. Instead, the top-ranked Cougars (4-0, 6-0) pay a visit to Olympic at Sequim Memorial Field at 7 p.m. SEQUIM — The Wolves face the perfect homecoming patsies with the Trojans (1-3, Turn to Football/B3

Lynch gets ready for Hawks debut The Associated Press

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks are ready to unleash “Beast Mode.” Marshawn Lynch and his self-given moniker will take to the field for the first time with his new team when the Seahawks travel to take on the Chicago Bears on Sunday. “It’s a real exciting time for me — almost feel like a rookie all over again,” Lynch said. “Everybody’s excited to see what I’m going to do and I’m also excited to see what I’m going to do myself.” Lynch developed the nickname while he blossomed at

California into an eventual firstround pick by the Buffalo Bills. His hard-nosed running style became his trademark as he posted back-to-back 1,000 yard seasons with the Bills in his first two years in the league. “It came about back in Pop Warner but it was called, ‘ManChild,”’ Lynch said in describing his alias. “As I got to college, it kind of transformed as I kind of took it to another level. “It’s just a state of mind that I follow, that basically I won’t be denied and I’m just relentless at what I do and that’s running that ball,” he said. Turn

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The Associated Press

Marshawn Lynch (23), breaking a tackle against New England on Sept. 26, is ready for his Seattle debut this Sunday.


B2

SportsRecreation

Friday, October 15, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Calendar

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Football: Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 7 p.m.; Cascade Christian at Port Townsend (Homecoming), 7 p.m.; Olympic at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Chimacum at Charles Wright Academy in Tacoma, 7 p.m.; Neah Bay at Highland Christian, 7 p.m.; Rainier at Forks, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Lummi, 7 p.m. Boys Tennis: Port Angeles and Sequim in Olympic/SPSL sub-district tournament at Clover Park High School (Lakewood), 10 a.m.

Saturday Football: Clallam Bay at Evergreen Lutheran, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Forks at Hoquiam, 5:30 p.m., Crescent Invitational Tournament, 9 a.m. Girls Soccer: Forks at Hoquiam, 6 p.m. Cross Country: Port Angeles at Tigar Classic, 9 a.m. Men’s Soccer: Bellevue at Peninsula College, 2 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Bellevue at Peninsula College, noon.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Lakeside Big Four Men’s High Game: Evan Smith, 262 Men’s High Series: Jim Ault, 692 League Leaders: The Whackers

Golf SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Lady Niners Oct. 14 Hidden Holes 1st Place: Janice Orth, 17.5 2nd Place: Gwyen Boger, 19 3rd Place: Kathy Tiedeman, 20

Preps Football Stat Leaders As of Oct. 14 PASSING LEADERS Player (School) Comp.-Att Yds TD D. Rickerson (Sequim) 82-129 1050 12 K. Walker (Port Angeles) 40-84 615 6 M. Moug (Chimacum) 35-81 517 8 J. Greene (Neah Bay) 36-60 428 3 D. Findley (Crescent) 13-19 264 3 RUSHING LEADERS Player (School) Att-Yds TD I. Yamamoto (Sequim) 68-558 8 J. Greene (Neah Bay) 27-502 7 K. Walker (Port Angeles) 72-388 5 C. Sullivan (Port Angeles) 26-326 6 T. Pascua (Neah Bay) 37-288 5 E. Larson (Crescent) 38-284 6 D. Manix (Chimacum) 82-267 4 K. Sewell (Port Angeles) 23-247 4 F. Catelli (Sequim) 30-236 4 J. Barnes (Crescent) 37-247 6 RECEIVING LEADERS Player (School) Rec-Yds TD J. Hall (Sequim) 20-411 6 D. Doherty (Neah Bay) 23-251 5 I. Ward (Port Angeles) 15-227 1 J. Barnes (Crescent) 9-213 2 T. Forshaw (Sequim) 17-212 2 D. Manix (Chimacum) 11-186 2 D. Settlemire (Chimacum) 7-122 3 F. Catelli (Sequim) 13-153 0 I. Yamamoto (Sequim) 15-135 1 D. Toepper (Chimacum) 6-111 3 Note: Schools reporting were Port Angeles, Sequim, Neah Bay, Crescent and Chimacum.

Football Standings As of Oct. 9 Olympic League Conf. Overall Port Angeles 4-0 6-0 Sequim 4-0 5-1 Bremerton(3A) 2-2 3-3 Kingston 2-2 3-3 North Mason 2-2 3-3 North Kitsap 1-3 1-5 Olympic 1-3 1-5 Klahowya 0-4 0-6 Tonight’s Games Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 7 p.m. Olympic at Sequim, 7 p.m. North Mason at Klahowya, 7 p.m. Bremerton at Kingston, 7 p.m. 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall Cascade Christ. 4-0 6-0 Orting 4-0 4-2 Cedar Park Christ. 2-2 4-2 Charles Wright 2-2 3-2 Life Christian 2-2 3-3 Chimacum 1-3 2-4 Vashon Island 1-3 2-4 Port Townsend 0-4 0-6 Tonight’s Games Cascade Christian at Port Townsend, 7 p.m. Chimacum at Charles Wright, 7 p.m. Cedar Park Christian at Orting, 7 p.m. Life Christian at Vashon Island, 7 p.m. Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division Conf. Overall Montesano 4-0 6-0 Onalaska 3-1 5-1 Elma 3-1 4-2 Hoquiam 3-1 4-2 Rainier 2-2 3-3 Rochester 1-3 1-5 Tenino 0-4 1-5 Forks 0-4 0-6 Tonight’s Games Montesano at Elma, 7 p.m. Rainier at Forks, 7 p.m. Tenino at Rochester, 7 p.m. Onalaska at Hoquiam, 7 p.m. Northwest Football League 8-man Conf. Overall Neah Bay 3-0 4-1 Quilcene 2-0 3-1 Lummi 1-0 3-1 Crescent 2-1 2-1 Evergreen Lutheran 2-2 2-2 Muckleshoot 1-2 1-2 Clallam Bay 1-3 1-3 Highland Christian 0-4 0-4 Tonight’s Games Quilcene at Lummi, 7 p.m. Neah Bay at Highland Christian, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Game Evergreen Lutheran at Clallam Bay, 1 p.m. Tuesday’s Game Lummi vs. Crescent at Sequim, 5 p.m.

The Associated Press

One

step away from

World Series

New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada leaves the field after practice for Game 1 of the AL championship series against the Texas Rangers on Thursday in Arlington, Texas. The Yankees and Rangers open the series today.

Baseball MLB Playoffs Today’s Games NY Yankees at Texas, 5 p.m. Sabathia vs Wilson Saturday’s Games NY Yankees at Texas, 1 p.m. Hughes vs Lewis San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Lincecum vs Halladay Sunday’s Games San Francisco at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sanchez vs Hamels

Basketball NBA Preaseason Western Conference NORTHWEST W L PCT GB PF PA Utah 4 0 1.000 - 105.5 98.3 Minnesota 3 1 .750 1 106.3 99.5 Oklahoma City 2 2 .500 2 96.5 100.3 Denver 1 1 .500 2 108.5 110.5 Portland 1 3 .250 3 102.5 101.0 PACIFIC W L PCT GB PF PA Golden State 2 1 .667 - 106.3 96.3 Sacramento 2 3 .400 1 98.8 101.0 LA Lakers 1 2 .333 1 92.7 99.3 LA Clippers 1 3 .250 1 ½ 98.0 107.5 Phoenix 1 4 .200 2 93.6 108.2 SOUTHWEST W L PCT GB PF PA Memphis 5 0 1.000 - 105.0 97.4 Houston 3 2 .600 2 97.6 91.2 San Antonio 2 2 .500 2 ½ 89.3 92.0 Dallas 2 3 .400 3 90.4 91.8 New Orleans 1 2 .333 3 87.0 102.7 Eastern Conference ATLANTIC W L PCT GB PF PA Boston 4 1 .800 - 95.2 89.6 New Jersey 3 2 .600 1 94.8 88.4 Toronto 2 2 .500 1 ½ 106.3 98.5 New York 1 2 .333 2 108.7 107.7 Philadelphia 1 4 .200 3 93.8 99.4 CENTRAL W L PCT GB PF PA Cleveland 4 1 .800 - 92.0 84.2 Milwaukee 3 1 .750 ½ 96.0 91.0 Chicago 2 2 .500 1 ½ 95.5 91.5 Detroit 2 2 .500 1 ½ 98.5 100.3 Indiana 1 3 .250 2 ½ 90.3 98.0 SOUTHEAST W L PCT GB PF PA Orlando 4 0 1.000 - 102.8 82.0 Washington 3 2 .600 1 ½ 97.0 94.4 Miami 3 2 .600 1 ½ 90.6 90.0 Atlanta 0 3 .000 3 ½ 96.0 105.3 Charlotte 0 4 .000 4 79.0 89.0 Thursday’s Games Orlando 86, Charlotte 73 Milwaukee 96, Washington 88 Cleveland 106, San Antonio 80 Oklahoma City 97, CSKA Moscow 89 Memphis 110, Caja 105 Utah 108, Phoenix 97 Denver at LA Clippers, LATE Today’s Games New Orleans at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston vs. New Jersey in China, 4:30 a.m. Detroit at Charlotte, 3:30 p.m. Chicago at Orlando, 4 p.m. New York at Boston, 4:30 p.m. CSKA Moscow at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Utah at LA Clippers, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Memphis, 5 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 5:30 p.m. Caja at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Golden State at Portland, 7 p.m. Denver at LA Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Football NFL Week 6 Sunday’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. Miami at Green Bay, 10 a.m. San Diego at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at New England, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Detroit at NY Giants, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.

Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Houston, 10 a.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. NY Jets at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Washington, 5:20 p.m. Monday Night Football Tennessee at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m. ***Byes: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona and Carolina

College AP TOP 25 RANKINGS RK TEAM RECORD PTS 1 *Ohio State (34) 6-0 1453 2 *Oregon (15) 6-0 1427 3 Boise State (8) 5-0 1395 4 *TCU (1) 6-0 1304 5 Nebraska 5-0 1236 6 Oklahoma (2) 5-0 1225 7 *Auburn 6-0 1104 8 Alabama 5-1 1021 9 *LSU 6-0 999 10 South Carolina 4-1 978 11 Utah 5-0 926 12 Arkansas 4-1 813 13 *Michigan State 6-0 806 14 Stanford 5-1 732 15 Iowa 4-1 648 16 Florida State 5-1 547 17 Arizona 4-1 472 18 Wisconsin 5-1 410 19 Nevada 6-0 376 20 Oklahoma State 5-0 348 21 Missouri 5-0 298 22 Florida 4-2 209 23 Air Force 5-1 187 24 Oregon State 3-2 186 25 West Virginia 5-1 141 * BOWL ELIGIBLE Others receiving votes: Michigan 137, Miami (FL) 63, North Carolina State 31, Virginia Tech 17, Northwestern 5, Texas 5, Kansas State 1 NCAA SCHEDULE Thursday’s Games West Virginia 20, S. Florida 6 Kansas State 59, Kansas 7 Today’s Games Cincinnati at Louisville, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Illinois at 13 Michigan State, 9 a.m. Boston College at No. 16 Florida St., 9 a.m. 21 Missouri at Texas A&M, 9 a.m. Vanderbilt at Georgia, 9 a.m. Arkansas State at Indiana, 9 a.m. North Carolina St. at East Carolina, 9 a.m. Pittsburgh at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Maryland at Clemson, 9 a.m. Southern Miss at Memphis, 9 a.m. Miami (OH) at Central Michigan, 9 a.m. Minnesota at Purdue, 9 a.m. Miami (FL) at Duke, 10 a.m. Bowling Green at Temple, 10 a.m. Eastern Michigan at Ball State, 10 a.m. UNLV at Colorado State, 11 a.m. Army at Rutgers, 11 a.m. Akron at Ohio, 11 a.m. Western Michigan at Notre Dame, 11:30 a.m. Texas at 5 Nebraska, 12:30 p.m. 12 Arkansas at 7 Auburn, 12:30 p.m. 15 Iowa at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. 20 Oklahoma St. at Texas Tech, 12:30 p.m. California at USC, 12:30 p.m. Mid. Tennessee at Georgia Tech, 12:30 p.m. Houston at Rice, 12:30 p.m. Wake Forest at Virginia Tech, 12:30 p.m. Southern Methodist at Navy, 12:30 p.m. Buffalo at Northern Illinois, 12:30 p.m. Brigham Young at 4 TCU, 1 p.m. UTEP at UAB, 1 p.m. Idaho at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. 10 South Carolina at Kentucky, 3 p.m. 11 Utah at Wyoming, 3 p.m. North Carolina at Virginia, 3 p.m. 1 Ohio State at 18 Wisconsin, 4 p.m. Iowa State at 6 Oklahoma, 4 p.m. McNeese State at 9 LSU, 4 p.m. Mississippi State at 22 Florida, 4 p.m. Baylor at Colorado, 4 p.m. Louisiana-Mon. at Western Kentucky, 4 p.m. Tulane at Tulsa, 4 p.m. Kent State at Toledo, 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Troy, 4 p.m. 17 Arizona at Washington St., 4:30 p.m. Florida Intern. at North Texas, 4:30 p.m. 3 Boise State at San Jose State, 5 p.m. 23 Air Force at San Diego State, 5 p.m. Mississippi at 8 Alabama, 6 p.m. 24 Oregon St. at Washington, 7:15 p.m. New Mexico St. at Fresno St., 7:30 p.m. 19 Nevada at Hawaii, 8:30 p.m.

Hockey National Hockey League Thursday’s Games Carolina at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Nashville, 5 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Edmonton at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Today’s Games Colorado at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Toronto at NY Rangers, 4 p.m. NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 4 p.m. Montreal at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 4 p.m. Boston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Colorado at NY Islanders, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 5 p.m. Washington at Nashville, 5 p.m. Columbus at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Buffalo at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 7 p.m. Atlanta at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

Soccer Major League Soccer Today’s Game Chivas USA at Seattle Sounders FC, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games DC United at Chicago, 1 p.m. Columbus at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. New York Red Bulls at Philadelphia Union, 3 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 5 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Houston at San Jose, 7 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Boston Red Sox: Agreed to terms with C Jarrod Saltalamacchia on a one-year contract. National League Houston Astros: Sent C Brian Esposito, INF Anderson Hernandez and INF Wladimir Sutil outright to Oklahoma City (PCL).

Football National Football League NFL: Fined Detroit WR Nate Burleson $15,000 for two rule violations, for kicking the football into the stands and displaying an unauthorized shirt with a personal message written on it in an Oct. 10 game against St. Louis. Dallas Cowboys: Signed OT Jermey Parnell off the New Orleans practice squad. Detroit Lions: Signed LB Vinny Ciurciu. Waived-injured LB Spencer Havner.

Basketball National Basketball Association NBA: Suspended Toronto Joey Dorsey one game for swinging his arm at the head of the Chicago Brian Scalabrine in an Oct. 12 game. Denver Nuggets: Named Pete D’Alessandro advisor to the executive vice president of basketball operations.

Hockey National Hockey League Anaheim Ducks: Reassigned D Brett Festerling to Syracuse (AHL). New Jersey Devils: Recalled D Matt Corrente, C Tim Sestito and C Jacob Josefson from Albany (AHL). Placed F Brian Rolston on longterm injured reserve.

Lacrosse National Lacrosse League Colorado Mammoth: Signed D Ken Clausen, D Jon Rae, D Ben Davies, D Matt Davenport and MF Jarett Park.

College Bradley: Named Andy Reilly coordinator of event management and facilities.

SPORTS ON TV Today 7 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Portugal Masters, Site: Victoria Club de Golfe - Vilamoura, Portugal (Live) 10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF NWT, Miccosukee Championship, Site: Miccosukee Golf and Country Club Miami (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Dollar General 300 Nationwide Series Qualifying, Site: Charlotte Motor Speedway Charlotte, N.C. (Live) 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Frys.com Open, Site: CordeValley Golf Club - San Martin, Calif. (Live) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Bank of America 500 Sprint Cup Series Practice, Site: Charlotte Motor Speedway Charlotte, N.C. (Live) 3:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Bank of America 500 Sprint Cup Series Happy Hour (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Cincinnati vs. Louisville - Louisville, Ky. (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, Dollar General 300 Nationwide Series (Live) 5 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, New York Yankees vs. Texas Rangers, American League Championship Series, Site: Rangers Ballpark - Arlington, Texas (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MLS, Chivas U.S.A. vs. Seattle Sounders FC, Site: Qwest Field - Seattle (Live)

Saturday 6:55 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer EPL, West Brom vs. Manchester United, Barclays Premier League (Live) 7 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Portugal Masters (Live) 9 a.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Boston College vs. Florida State (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Minnesota vs. Purdue (Live) 9 a.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Mississippi vs. Texas A&M (Live) 10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF NWT, Miccosukee Championship (Live) 11 a.m. (2) CBUT Show Jumping, World Equestrian Games - Lexington, Ky. (Live) 11:30 a.m. (5) KING Football NCAA, Western Michigan vs. Notre Dame (Live) 12:30 p.m. (2) CBUT Soccer MLS, Columbus Crew vs. Toronto FC (Live) 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Iowa vs. Michigan or Texas vs. Nebraska (Live) 12:30 p.m. (7) KIRO Football NCAA, Arkansas vs. Auburn (Live) 12:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, California vs. USC (Live) 1 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Horse Racing, Breeder’s Cup Challenge (Live) 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Frys.com Open, Round 3 Site: CordeValley Golf Club San Martin, Calif. (Live) 1 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, New York Yankees vs. Texas Rangers, American League Championship Series, Game 2 (Live) 3 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, South Carolina vs. Kentucky(Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Ottawa Senators vs. Montréal Canadiens (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Ohio State vs. Wisconsin (Live) 4 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Iowa State vs. Oklahoma (Live) 4:30 p.m. (4) KOMO Auto Racing NASCAR, Bank of America 500 Sprint Cup Series (Live) 4:30 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, San Francisco Giants vs. Philadelphia Phillies (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Mississippi vs. Alabama (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Edmonton Oilers vs. Calgary Flames (Live) 7:15 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Oregon State vs. Washington (Live)


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

This weekend’s games (Day) High School Port Angeles at North Kitsap, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Cas. Christian at Port Townsend, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Olympic at Sequim, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Chimacum at Charles Wright, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Neah Bay at Highland Christian, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Rainier at Forks, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Quilcene at Lummi, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Clallam Bay at Ev. Lutheran, 1 p.m. (Sat.) College Arkansas at Auburn, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Ohio State at Wisconsin, 4 p.m. (Sat.) Texas at Nebraska, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Arizona at Washington St., 4:30 p.m. (Sat.) Oregon St. at Washington, 7:15 p.m. (Sat.) NFL Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Baltimore at New England, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Indianapolis at Washington, 5:20 p.m. (Sun.) Tennessee at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m. (Mon.)

Matt Schubert Sports Reporter

Mike Carman Golf Columnist

Paul Gottlieb Guest Picker (PDN reporter)

Port Angeles Cascade Christian Sequim Chimacum Neah Bay Rainier Lummi Clallam Bay

Port Angeles Cascade Christian Sequim Chimacum Neah Bay Rainier Lummi Evergreen Lutheran

Port Angeles Cascade Christian Sequim Chimacum Neah Bay Rainier Lummi Evergreen Lutheran

Port Angeles Cascade Christian Sequim Charles Wright Neah Bay Rainier Lummi Evergreen Lutheran

Auburn Ohio State Nebraska Arizona Oregon State

Arkansas Ohio State Nebraska Arizona Oregon State

Auburn Ohio State Nebraska Arizona Oregon State

Arkansas Ohio State Nebraska Arizona Washington

Chicago New England Atlanta Indianapolis Tennessee

Chicago Baltimore Atlanta Indianapolis Tennessee

Chicago Baltimore Philadelphia Indianapolis Tennessee

Chicago Baltimore Atlanta Indianapolis Tennessee

Record: 61-32

Record: 62-31

Record: 67-26

Record: 53-40

Preps: Sequim beats PT 3-0 Continued from B1 “I don’t know how the girls keep piecemealing it together, but we’ve got a tough defense,” Rider coach Scott Moseley said. Port Angeles 2, North Mason 0 2 0 — 2 0 0 — 0 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Port Angeles, Moseley, 27th minute; 2, Kaitlin Boston (Moseley) 38th minute. Second Half: No scoring.

Rochester 6, Forks 0

Continued from B1

Vashon Island 11, Chimacum 0 VASHON ISLAND — The Cowboys were blanked in a Nisqually League loss to the Pirates on Thursday.

Volleyball Vashon Island 3, Chimacum 0

JOYCE — The Loggers came out strong and never eased up against the Bruins in the North Olympic League match Thursday. “We came out on fire,” Crescent coach Alex Baker said. “We had a really solid match.” The Loggers improved to 3-1 in league and 8-2 overall with scores of 25-14, 25-20, 25-14. Catherine Youngman was a perfect 12-for-12 in serving with four aces and three kills for Crescent while Jandi Frantz earned five kills, four blocks and had a tip. Jessica Criss was 7-of-7 from the serving line with three blocks and two kills for the Loggers while Rashaya Donnell had four kills and three aces. Crescent next hosts a six-team tournament Saturday at 9 a.m. and then will play Neah Bay, possibly for the league championship, Thursday at Crescent.

Forks 3, Rochester 1 FORKS — The Spartans took a step closer to the Southwest Washington League playoffs with the

A loss would virtually eliminate Chimacum from playoff contention, while a win would give them a critical victory against another middle-of-the-pack Nisqually team in Charles Wright. Chimacum saved its season with a come-frombehind 32-24 win over Vashon Island (1-3, 2-4) at home last Friday. Charles Wright (2-2, 3-2) comes into the game on a two-game losing streak after dropping games to league powers Orting and Cascade Christian.

Quilcene at Lummi BELLINGHAM — The Rangers hope to take a big step toward a Northwest Football League crown with an upset win over 1B’s second-ranked Blackhawks (1-0, 3-1) tonight at 7. Quilcene rebounded from a blowout loss to Peninsula rival Neah Bay with a 36-32 victory over Muckleshoot last Friday.

Clallam Bay at Ever. Lutheran

Hawks: Play

FORKS — The Warriors kept the Spartans off the scoreboard in 1A SWLEvergreen League play on Thursday. Abigail McIrvin had 17 saves as Rochester outshot Forks 26-1 in the game. The Spartans (0-10, 0-12) travel to Hoquiam for their next game on Saturday at 6 p.m.

Crescent 3, Clallam Bay 0

Continued from B1 they host the Mountaineers in their homecoming game Port Townsend hasn’t tonight at 7. Forks (0-4, 0-6) will have knocked off the Cougars — 1A state runners up the to do so without its lead past two seasons — since runner in Luke Brown, who joining the 1A Nisqually is out after breaking his League in 2008. arm in last week’s loss to It figures to get no easier Montesano. this time around either. A loss to Rainier (2-2, Cascade Christian has 3-3) would eliminate the outscored opponents 261-79 Spartans from postseason this season. contention. And quarterback Kyle Stennes (1,117 yards passNeah Bay at ing, 16 TDs, two interceptions) is the front runner Highland Christian for league MVP. ARLINGTON — The Red Devils take on the Chimacum at Northwest Football League’s bottom feeders when they Charles Wright visit the winless Knights TACOMA — The Cow(0-4) tonight at 7. boys (1-3, 2-4) have another Neah Bay (3-0, 4-1) can do-or-die Nisqually League stay on top of the league game tonight at 7 p.m. standings with a win against the Tarriers.

DES MOINES — The Bruins look to build on their Rainier at Forks first win in 18 games when FORKS — The Spartans they take on the Eagles in a will be shooting for their Northwest Football League first win of the season when game Saturday afternoon.

Port Angeles North Mason

VASHON — The Cowboys went against the best setter in the Nisqually League and an unforgiving defense to remain winless in league Thursday. “Vashon has the best setter in league and they have a really good defense,” Chimacum coach Sally Dankert said. The Pirates won 25-12, 25-15, 25-12 as the Cowboys fell to 0-9 in league and 4-9 overall. Dani Kaminski led Chimacum with 100 percent serving and two aces while Lauren Thacker had five kills. The Cowboys next host Seattle Christian on Monday.

B3

Football: Prep

PDN Weekly Football Picks

Brad LaBrie Sports Editor

Friday, October 15, 2010

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend’s Trish Reeves, left, and Gen Polizzi, center, try in vain to block a spike by Sequim’s Rylleigh Zbaraschuk in the first game of their volleyball match Thursday in Sequim. victory Thursday. Forks improved to 4-5 in league and 6-6 overall with the 25-18, 25-15, 20-25, 25-23 win. Casey Williams led the Spartans with seven serving aces and six kills while Whitney Fairbanks had four kills and Raven McCann earned four aces and put down two kills. Jillian Raben had 18 assists and five aces. Forks next plays at Montesano on Tuesday.

Port Angeles 3, North Mason 0 BELFAIR — The Riders warmed up for next week’s showdown with rival Sequim with a 25-14, 25-19, 25-13 Olympic League victory over the Bulldogs on Thursday night. Port Angeles stayed unbeaten in league with the win, moving to 5-0 in league and 7-3 overall. “The first time we played [the Bulldogs] we barely beat them,” Port Angeles coach Christine Halberg said. “We played much better tonight and beat them with an exclamation point.” Kiah Jones led the Riders with 10 kills and four digs in the win while Emily Drake added two digs, 15 assists and six aces on 15-for-15 serving. Taylyn Jeffers had four kills, five blocks and three assists, and Lauren Norton collected two kills and four aces on 13-for-13 serving. Chloe Johnston had 12 digs and one ace. “The girls played very well,” Halberg said. “Lots of energy. They worked together very well.” Port Angeles hosts

Sequim next Tuesday in a match that will go a long way toward determining the pecking order at the top of the Olympic League.

Sequim 3, Port Townsend 0 SEQUIM — The Wolves made quick work of the young and inexperienced Redskins in Thursday night’s Olympic League tilt, winning 25-13, 25-4, 25-4. “It went really fast, that’s what the girls are happy about,” Sequim coach Jennie Webber-Heilman said. “It’s homecoming week. They wanted out of there.” Taylor Balkan went a long way toward making that happen, connecting on 28-of-28 serves for six aces while also dishing out 30 assists and seven digs. Haleigh Harrison added 13 kills, two aces and two blocks and Kyla Martin four kills and 10 digs. Ryleigh Zbaraschuk had five kills and eight digs, Jessica Lauritzen seven kills and Marissa Haner five kills and five digs. The Wolves (4-1, 8-3) travel to Port Angeles on Tuesday night for a critical Olympic League showdown.

Girls Swimming Port Angeles 133, Kingston 50 KINGSTON — The Roughriders remained perfect in the Olympic League with one meet left by swamping the Buccaneers on Thursday. Port Angeles won all but one event to improve to 6-0 in league and 6-1 overall, losing only to 3A power-

house Bainbridge. The Riders will finish the regular season on senior recognition night Thursday at William Shore Memorial Pool against North Kitsap. Ashlee Reid earned a district qualifying time for Port Angeles in the 200yard freestyle for first place in a time of 2 minutes, 15.42 seconds. The Riders had two double winners as Tarah Erickson claimed first in the 50 free in 26.78 and the 100 free in 1:00.60 while Tracie Macias was first in the 200 individual medley in 2:25.24 and the 100 butterfly in 1:06.78. Port Angeles had 18 season bests in the meet. “We’re swimming very strong right now,” coach Rich Butler said.

Seattle acquired Lynch a week ago in a trade with the Bills that sent a pair of future picks to Buffalo for the former 12th-overall pick in the 2007 draft. The Seahawks haven’t had a running back with Lynch’s combination of size and speed since Chris Warren in the mid-1990s. They have struggled to find consistency in the running game since the end of the Shaun Alexander era. This season, Seattle ranks 29th in the league in yards per game and 31st in yards per carry. Through four games, the Seahawks have just two rushing touchdowns, both coming from quarterback Matt Hasselbeck. Pete Carroll is hoping Lynch can be the spark that helps the offense begin to find its rhythm. “I think he really has the full range of ability to do whatever we want to do,” Carroll said. “Now we’re anxious to see how it fits together. And he’s going to get a lot of work in this game; he’s doing really well picking things up.” It helps having former college teammate Justin Forsett in the backfield with him.

The two have been close friends since their days at California, and Lynch served as a groomsman in Forsett’s wedding in June. “They’re great friends,” Carroll said. “He [Lynch] is looking over his shoulder now and then for assignments or reminders and Justin is quick to help him. Those guys have been close friends for a long time.” Lynch is familiar with the zone blocking scheme the Seahawks employ, but is still learning the terminology and blocking assignments in pass protection. “Justin has been a real big help,” Lynch said. “Him along with Leon [Washington] and Mike [Robinson]. They kind of catch me up on the fly as I go. I am feeling pretty comfortable of what they’re going to ask of me.” Carroll wouldn’t commit to Lynch starting on Sunday against the Bears, but there won’t be any shortage of “Beast Mode” sightings. “Right now Marshawn is going to play a lot in this game,” Carroll said. “Justin will get a lot of work as well, but we’ll see how the thing blends.” Notes: G Chester Pitts (knee) did not practice Thursday. DT Brandon Mebane was limited with a calf injury.

Pirates have crucial home match Saturday Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team continues to remain on top in the NWAACC rankings. The Pirates have been North Kitsap beats ranked at No. 1 for the second straight poll but BelleSequim Wolves vue Community College SEQUIM — The Wolves will be quite the test for the took on a team more than double their size in Olympic League action Thursday. The score was not available. The Associated Press Sequim, however, still EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. came away with four first place finishes with close — Over 20 seasons as an second-place finishes in NFL quarterback, Brett Favre has taken plenty of three other events. hits on the field. Rachel Hardy continues Now his reputation is to drop her 50-yard free- taking a hit, too. style time by .2 seconds and The NFL is investigating in such a short, fast race, the Deadspin website report every one-tenth of a second that he allegedly sent belowis a huge drop. the-waist naked photos of Gianna Venetti took .56 himself to a woman who seconds off her 100 butter- worked for the New York fly time, and is now just 4 Jets when he played for the seconds from a state quali- team two years ago. Favre has become one of fying time. Sequim’s next meet is on America’s most popular aththe road at Olympic on letes by winning a Super Bowl, setting all kinds of Thursday.

Pirates on Saturday at 7 p.m. at Civic Field. The Peninsula women’s soccer team plays Bellevue at 5 p.m. at Civic Field on Saturday in the doubleheader. Bellevue is second in league right behind Peninsula and ranked fifth in the NWAACC right now.

Favre’s image takes hit passing and durability records and building an image as an everyday downto-earth guy. Just watch one of those Wrangler commercials, where he plays backyard pickup ball with a bunch of smiling and laughing guys while wearing a T-shirt, blue jeans and stubble. Wrangler, arguably his highest-profile promotion, issued a statement Thursday saying “we are following the story like everyone else. “We are not making any major decisions on our marketing program until more information is available,” said Rick French.


B4

SportsRecreation

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Fish Counts Saltwater Salmon Ediz Hook Monday, Oct. 4 — 8 boats (14 anglers): 4 coho; Tuesday, Oct. 5 — 18 boats (27 anglers): 11 coho, 1 chum; Wednesday, Oct. 6 — 19 boats (35 anglers): 3 chinook, 8 coho, 1 chum; Friday, Oct. 8 — 4 boats (8 anglers): 2 chinook; Saturday, Oct. 9 — 10 boats (27 anglers): 1 chinook, 2 coho; Port Angeles West Ramp Friday, Oct. 8 — 4 boats (8 anglers): 2 chinook; Freshwater Bay Ramp Thursday, Oct. 7 — 10 boats (15 anglers): 4 chinook; Saturday, Oct. 9 — 5 boats (9 anglers): 2 chinook, 3 coho; Sunday, Oct. 10 — 1 boat (2 anglers): No fish; Hoodsport Shore Saturday, Oct. 9 — 3 anglers: No fish; Reports are provided by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reports are taken randomly and do not reflect all fish caught.

Marcia Bingham/Forks Chamber

of

Commerce

Winners of the Last Chance Salmon Derby were, from left, largest chinook: Mike Morgan, Indianola, 34.34 pounds; Leif Larsen, Port Angeles, 31.2 pounds; Bert Phillips, Kirkland, 29.42 pounds; largest coho: Hank Surbeck, Tacoma 16.36 pounds; Jennifer Hagen, Forks, 14.57 pounds; George Delgado, Puyallup, 14.10 pounds; and largest bottom fish: Stan Dopps, Issaquah, 21.70 pounds.

Schubert: Fish crowd rivers Continued from B1 in and a few adults. And talking to the guys drifting the river, they say it’s just There are rumors of a full of fish. pre-rut period already “We’ve pretty much got beginning with Peninsula bucks, Brian Menkal of Bri- fish from the mouth all the way up to the hatchery.” an’s Sporting Goods and Such glowing reports More (360-683-1950) in aren’t unique to the QuillSequim said. “A source told me he was ayute system tributaries watching the bucks sniffing either. With so many coho some does,” he said. “It’s a little early, but it’s starting swimming around — a few kings are present, too — to happen.” anglers are cleaning up. Added Aunspach, “All “The Sol Duc has been the guys I’ve talked to feel that it will start a little ear- smoking hot and the Hoh lier. Is there a pre-rut going has been really smoking hot, too,” Bob Gooding of on already? Maybe a little Olympic Sporting Goods bit. (360-374-6330) in Forks “The true rut doesn’t said. start until mid-November, “I called up one of the but” that doesn’t mean it guys this morning who was can’t come earlier. fishing the lower end [of Sol Duc] . . and he said it Rivers ramp up was ridiculous. He’d been I know what the calenfishing an hour and a half dar says. and they were already in Yes, Oct. 16 is almost the teens for a count. here. Yes, that means Dun“[These fish] just seem geness River opens for busi- to keep coming. They’ve ness Saturday. been pretty nice fish; nice But as tantalizing as an silvers, 10, 12, 15 [pounds]. opening day dalliance with I’ve seen half a dozen that the Dungeness sounds — were at least 20s or better.” Who doesn’t enjoy rubbing Those who can’t resist elbows with dozens of foul- the magnetic pull of the breathed combat fisherDungeness shouldn’t be too men? — a weekend out disappointed, either. west might be a better bet. The Dungeness River The salmon fishing has Hatchery has already simply been that good on received 250 coho this fall, West End streams during with 150 of those coming the past week. during the last week. “The guys who have “They are kind of combeen coming in here ing in spurts,” hatchery recently showing pictures technician Orie Cooksey of what they are catching said. in the rivers [out west] “I talked to a gentleman have just been insane,” Bob [Wednesday], and he said Aunspach of Swain’s Genthey are just now starting eral Store (360-452-2357) in to catch some out in the Port Angeles said. salt. Hopefully, this rain “I’ve never seen anywill push them up.” thing like it . . . just tons of fish.” Saltwater stuff Indeed, reports of four-, Hood Canal could soon five- and six-fish days turn into a saltwater aren’t all that uncommon salmon hot spot. on the Sol Duc and Hoh With most of Marine rivers these days. Area 12 (Hood Canal outSol Duc Hatchery Speside of Quilcene Bay) opencialist Brian Russell said ing to full salmon retention the last few shots of rain got things moving this past Saturday — with the exception of wild chinook — week. things should pick up. The hatchery reported Clipped chum tend to its first 100 fall coho of the season, and many more are start showing up in good numbers at the Hoodsport expected to arrive at its traps in the coming days. Hatchery in the fall. While “There’s an awful lot there have been none below the hatchery here,” reported so far by the Russell said. “We just had a hatchery, that should whole bunch of jacks come change in the next couple

of weeks. Whatever is left of the Strait of Juan de Fuca coho parade may have passed by. Aunspach in Port Angeles said anglers have been doing so-so in the Area 6 (eastern Strait) salt. “[It] sounds like it’s really slowed down,” he said. “We did weigh a 17-pound, 9-ouncer [coho on Wednesday].” Anglers are picking off a few blackmouth in the area as well, but “I don’t know if too many guys have actually tried to target them or not,” Aunspach said. Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) remains open to salmon fishing as well, although all chinook must be released.

Clam success Kalaloch razor clam diggers cleaned up during the first two openers of the season last weekend. The crowd was small (324 digger trips) but the bounty (3,959 clams) large during two days of digging at the Olympic National Park beach. Harvesters averaged 12.2 clams per digger trip, second only to Twin Harbors (12.3) in terms of harvest rate for the state’s five coastal beaches. State coastal ecologist Dan Ayres attributed that success to Kalaloch’s relatively concentrated populations, located next to the campgrounds. “It would have been better except Saturday’s weather was just short of terrible,” Ayres said. The next set of razor clam digs are tentatively scheduled Nov. 5-8. Kalaloch, pending marine toxin testing, is scheduled to open for afternoon digs Nov. 5-6.

Also . . . ■ Dave Jackson of Dungeness River Audubon Center will lead a trip to Carrie Blake Park and John Wayne Marina for beginning birders on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to noon. The trip will allow participants to learn birding techniques and get to know birds in the area. It will also benefit Peninsula residents who are new to the area. Pre-registration is

required. To do so, contact Jackson at 360-683-1355 or djackson@wavecable.com. ■ Washington Trails Association will gather a volunteer work party at Dosewallips State Park on Sunday, Oct. 24. Volunteers must preregister 48 hours in advance. To pre-register, contact Washington Trails at 206-625-1367 or visit www.wta.org. ■ The Gardiner Salmon Derby Association will host a “Taste of Italy” fundraiser at the Gardiner Community Center on Nov. 6. The event will feature live and silent auctions that will include fishing trips, vacations, sporting event tickets and various other items. Proceeds will support the nonprofit Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby (formerly Discovery Bay Salmon Derby) on Presidents Day weekend. Dinner tickets cost $15 and must be purchased in advance. To do so, contact Marylou Tatum (360-797-7710) or Linda Hanel (360-7970050). ■ The state Department of Fish and Wildlife is seeking nominations through Dec. 1 for membership on the Steelhead/Cutthroat Policy Advisory Group. Nominations must include the nominee’s name, address, telephone number, affiliations and expertise. The name, address and telephone number of any organization submitting the nomination must also be given. Nominations may be submitted to state steelhead program manager Bob Leland by mail at 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501; or e-mail at robert.leland@dfw.wa.gov. For more information, contact Leland at 360-9022817. ■ Port Townsend’s Leif Whittaker will discuss his summit of Mount Everest at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St., in Port Townsend on Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. Whittaker has summitted the highest mountains in Antarctica and South America and is the son of Jim Whittaker, the first American to successfully

Five best bets for this week ■ Sol Duc salmon — Listen, I can’t say this anymore than I already did in today’s column, so I’ll do it in all caps: THE SOL DUC IS HOT. ■ Hoh hike — Washington Trails Association recently listed the Hoh River Trail as one of the state’s “eight haunted hikes.” Now I’m not sure about that noise, but I do know the Hoh is always best once the rains start falling and the rainforest comes alive with its classic soggy fairy-tale feel. Given that it’s midOctober, that would be about right now. ■ CCA fundraiser — The Coastal Conservation Association-North Olympic Peninsula Chapter will hold its first fundraising banquet in John Wayne Marina on Saturday at 4 p.m. There will be live and silent auctions of fishing gear, trips, art and more. Tickets are $65 per person or $120 for couples. That includes a one-year membership in the CCA. For information on ordering tickets, contact banquet chair Bill Batson at 877-875-2381 (ext. 20) or bill@batsonenterprises.com. ■ Quilcene Bay climb Mount Everest. Tickets for the event are $12 for Northwest Maritime Center members, $15 in advance and $20 at the door if space permits. Tickets can be purchased at Wildernest Outdoor Store, 929 Water St., or the Wooden Boat Chandlery in the Northwest Maritime Center. ■ The Wapiti Bowmen Archery Club will host a late season 3-D archery shoot on Saturday, Nov. 6. The shoot will feature 20 full-size 3-D animals at unmarked distances at the club’s 20-acre wooded range at 374 E. Arnette Road in Port Angeles. The cost is $5. For more information about the club, send an e-mail to wapitibowclub@ gmail.com. ■ Winterfest is set for Nov. 19-20 at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St., in Port Angeles. The annual fundraiser for the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club usually includes a dinner and

kayaking — Admiralty Audubon’s Ron Sikes will lead a birding trip by kayak through the Quilcene Bay estuary Saturday. A group will depart Haines Place Park-nRide near Safeway in Port Townsend at 11 a.m. Participants must bring their own kayak, gear, lunch and water. To register for the trip, contact Sikes at 360-385-0307 or sikes@ olympus.net. ■ Mushroom Madness — The fungal photos continue to pile up in my inbox for the PDN’s annual mushroom photo contest. Now that the season is in full bloom — if “bloom” is the right word — now is the time to find the perfect shroom shot of the biggest or prettiest mushroom on the Peninsula. Or you can go for the true brass ring and find the mushroom most resembling a notable figure. Whatever it might be, just make sure to send it to yours truly (matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com) by the Nov. 8 deadline. Instant fungal fame can be yours. Matt Schubert movie gala event that Friday night with live and silent auctions. A second movie showing is normally scheduled the next night as well, with a ski swap that Saturday afternoon.

Send photos, stories Want your event listed in the outdoors column? Have a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique, why not share it with our readers? Send it to me, Matt Schubert, Sports Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; phone, 360-417-3526; fax, 360-4173521; e-mail matt.schubert @peninsuladailynews.com.

__________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column appears on Thursdays and Fridays.

Williams moving to left guard for Bears The Associated Press

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Poised to return from a hamstring injury, Chris Williams might not have his old job waiting for him. There’s a good chance he will be at left guard rather than left tackle when the

Chicago Bears play the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday. It would be another switch for a line plagued by injuries and poor play so far this season. The Bears have already gone with three different

starting lineups, and they’ll have a fourth this week with Williams back and Roberto Garza sidelined. Offensive coordinator Mike Martz said the Bears were “still trying” to figure out what to do with Williams now that he’s back

after missing three games. But with Garza nursing a knee injury that will require surgery, there’s an opening at left guard. Putting Williams there would allow the Bears to keep Frank Omiyale at left tackle.

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 15-16, 2010 SECTION

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Our Peninsula

COMICS, DEAR ABBY, BUSINESS, OBITUARIES In this section

Art of Fabulous Peninsula fall for fungi telling Mushroom show to teach difference between the edible, deadly stories Peninsula Weekend

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — It’s a fabulous fall for fungi, thanks to rainy days, and the Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society’s president said Sunday’s mushroom show will be wild and a little woolly. The Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society Wild Mushroom show opens at noon Sunday at the Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, said Sequim mushroom farmer Lowell Dietz. The fungus fest, which will continue until 4 p.m., is free and open to the public. “We expect a huge amount of mushrooms this year just because the weather has been so wet,” Dietz said, adding that this year, up to 300 species are expected to be displayed. “Chantrelles are big and beautiful,” said the impassioned Dietz. “And this is going to be a major matsutake year here.” The North Olympic Peninsula is a fungus paradise that has more than 5,000 species growing in its lowland and mountain forests. “I know of 3,000 edible varieties. Six taste good,” Dietz said with the laugh. “You’re risking your life, but it’s a thrill. It’s the culinary equivalent of sky diving.”

The 16th annual Forest Storytelling Festival opens at Peninsula College in Port Angeles with five featured storytellers at 7:30 p.m. tonight. Tickets at the door are $12, and there’s a free storytelling session at 10 a.m. Sunday. For more about this weekend festival — and other music and arts events on the North Olympic Peninsula — see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide in today’s PDN. Other major weekend events for you to enjoy are spotlighted on this page and inside, on “Things To Do” on Page C6 and — by area — below:

Port Angeles VFW bazaar PORT ANGELES — Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1024 Ladies Auxiliary 1024 will hold a craft bazaar at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today. Information on VFW scholarships and other programs for youth also will be available. For more information, phone 360-681-7085.

Fresh fungi The show will exhibit many mushrooms that will be picked today and Saturday before the show, and attendees are encouraged to bring samples of fungi they’ve found to be identified. The society — which has members in both Clallam and Jefferson counties and often conducts mushroom shows in Chimacum at the Tri-Area Community Center — emphasizes learning what the edible mushrooms look like compared with their “poisonous look-alikes.”

James Deckman, a Sequim dentist and Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society mushroom show chairman, holds a cluster of Lemon Cap Oyster Mushrooms, cultivated by the group’s president Lowell Dietz.

displays — and purchase mushroom books. Dietz grows blue cap oyster mushrooms in Sequim and said the show will include a cultivation display. Mushroom-growing kits will be on sale for $20. Experts will be on hand to answer questions. Mushroom education Sequim dentist James Deckman is the show’s chairman for Attendees at Sunday’s show 2010. can view displays of wild mushThe society, founded in 1977 rooms that grow on the Peninas the Jefferson County Mycologsula, learn the similarities ical Society, is a nonprofit volunbetween edible and poisonous mushrooms, learn about propaga- teer organization dedicated to tion projects and how to preserve learning about and

enjoying mushrooms and their environment. Today, members hail from Joyce to Brinnon, and most live in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. The society is open to anyone and schedules six meetings a year to promote the safe enjoyment of wild mushrooms.

Two annual outings A guest speaker usually addresses the gatherings, and at least two outings a year are scheduled. Mushroom hunters comb the Cascade Mountains in the spring

for black morels, snow mushrooms, pink-tipped coral and boletes, and then in the fall search the eastern Olympic Mountains for golden chantrelles, russulas, boletes, hedgehogs and matsutakes. Annual society dues are $15 per family or $10 per individual. Check out the society’s website at www.olymushrooms.org or phone Dietz at 360-477-4228.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com.

Couple showcase area talents By Jeff Chew

“The purpose of this event is to offer our services in marketing and create maximum exposure to SEQUIM — A Marrowstone Northwest artists for tour packIsland show business couple see aging, worldwide theme parks a wealth of talent and a beautiful and venues, domestic, regional setting for moviemaking on the and local touring for the artists North Olympic Peninsula. we showcase,” Rickey said of the That’s why Jan Rickey and Sunday program. Dan Stenado, who founded Int’l Featured will be two bands Entertainment and Productions from Port Angeles, Thomas — a corporation specializing in Sparks and Haunebu II, and a the production and promotion of classic rocker, the Big Fine film, music and live events — will Daddies. feature bands, musicians and performers, including Sequim’s Craig Filming events Buhler, at 7 Cedars Casino in “We are filming both events Blyn at 4 p.m. Sunday. for promoting the groups and to “This is not a competition. There are no judges. This is sim- build their tour promotional package,” Rickey said. ply an entertainers’ showcase of Rickey and Stenado have had talent who will be booked dreams of launching a film and through Int’l Entertainment,” stunt school in the Sequim-DunRickey said. The event is billed as the 2010 geness Valley of Diamond Point areas since the mid-1980s. Talent Search USA and will be followed by a 1:30 p.m. Tuesday Their business plans include stunt seminar put on by Stenado opening a stunt and film acadat the casino. emy that also would work with That event, which includes Native Americans, such as those lunch and costs $45, also will fea- with the Jamestown S’Klallam ture Bob Stacy of Carlsborg. tribe, which owns and manages Peninsula Daily News

7 Cedars Casino. “It’s just so beautiful out here, but it’s off in the distance where it gets cut off from things,” said Stenado, who worked as actor Kris Kristofferson’s stunt double in the movie “A Star is Born” and with actor Sylvester Stallone as a boxing trainer-technician in “Rocky” and “Rocky III.” He also met actor Robert Conrad, which led to work in the 1960s TV series “The Wild Wild West.” Stenado, a former lightweight boxer turned coach, is president of Int’l Pro Sports and Pacific Northwest Stuntmen’s and Women’s Association. He said he was once in the same “stable” as boxer Jerry Quarry and is still a friend with Kenny Norton. Rickey and Stenado both have entertainment careers dating back more than 30 years. “Producers, directors, guides and people from the motion picture film industry asked us to do something,” Stenado said. Rickey and Stenado intend to build a film production company

for all those who graduate and accomplish the courses offered. “We will then produce two to three films a year here on the Peninsula,” Rickey said. “We have been giving actors workshop classes and stunt apprentice programs since the 1990s on the Olympic Peninsula, Kitsap and at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend.” Certified stunt instructor Red Horton is also a partner with Stenado, and together they have established the state’s stunt safety guidelines. Those interested in attending the Sunday or Tuesday events can make seating reservations at 888-290-9779. See www.talensearchusa.biz, www.intl-entertainment.com or www.intl-entertainment.net, or phone 360-379-3068. Performers can sign up for future talent search events at www.talentsearchusa.biz.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com.

Scaled-down choo-choos on display By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

The North Olympic Peninsula Railroaders will host the 11th annual Train Show and Swap Meet at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. The event is free and open to the public. “Those of us who started it wanted to get more people interested in model railroading as an avenue for a hobby,” said Lauren Scrafford, who has helped organize the event since the first in 1999.

“When we first started out, we had a couple hundred people on both days, but at this point, we probably have 250 or 300 people on Saturday and on Sunday we still get 100-plus people. “It is something really fun to do for the whole family or maybe the grandparents and the grandkids.”

Hands-on display The model train will have a special display for children to play with. “So many places, it is ‘look but don’t touch’ — and we do have that element with some of the

displays — but we have a model set up that kids can play with and run themselves, so it is a really great hands-on activity,” Scrafford said. Club members and vendors will sell model railroad items and memorabilia. The Railroaders will have their H0 model train modular layout on display and operating during the show. H0 scale is defined as a scale of 3.5 mm to 1 foot. A larger G-gauge layout also will be on display. “There are all sorts of different sizes of models, and we’ll have a lot of them set up at the

show,” Scrafford said. Door prizes, including four gift certificates, will be awarded, as well as a starter set for youths 12 and younger. “This event is something that it is our goal to try and pass on our knowledge of model railroading,” Scrafford said. “It is an excellent activity for people of all ages, girls and boys alike, and for the whole family.” For more information, phone Scrafford at 360-379-3280.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige. dickerson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Harvest Carnival set PORT ANGELES — A Harvest Carnival, sponsored by the Port Angeles Pre-3 Cooperative, is planned at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St., from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Activities will be geared for children younger than 10. The event will include games, a cakewalk, balloon animals, crafts, a photo booth and food. A silent auction will be held, and there will be raffle baskets. Admission is $3 for kids, $4 for adults and $14 for a family of four. For more information, phone Rachael Purdue at 360504-2187.

Head in the clouds PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., will host the Starlab Planetarium from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The Starlab is Port Angeles High School’s inflatable portable planetarium. Visitors will learn how to find the constellations and listen to star stories. Shows will occur on the hour and half-hour. Children younger than 12 must be accompanied by adults. This program is part of a series offered by the North Olympic Library System and Port Angeles High School to coincide with the Visions of the Universe exhibition now showing at the Port Angeles Library. It will be on display at the library until Dec. 2. For more information about Visions of the Universe or other library programs and events, visit www.nols.org or phone the library at 360417.8500 or e-mail Port Angeles@nols.org.

Community shred PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Eastside branch of First Federal, 1603 E. First St., will host a free community shredding event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The event will allow the public to dispose of sensitive documents in a secure way. Shredding will be done on site by LeMay Mobile Shredding. Shredding documents helps ensure privacy and prevent identity theft. Types of documents to bring include old tax returns, financial statements or any paperwork with account or Social Security numbers, or other personal information. First Federal security personnel will be on hand to answer questions and provide information on identity theft. Turn

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Peninsula Daily News

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C3

Oktoberfest to help meal program

Moonlight Memories reservations Traditional Bavarian buffet, hand-painted plates available at fundraiser due today challenged by Port Angeles Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Reservations are requested by today for Moonlight Memories, a dinner dance and benefit for KSQM-FM, Sequim’s nonprofit nostalgic-music station, planned for Saturday, Oct. 23. Tickets are $75. Reservations can be made by phoning KSQM at 360-6810000. Festivities will start at 5:30 p.m. at the Sequim Elks Club, 143 Port Williams Road, and will culminate with dancing to Stardust, a 16-piece band featuring singer Jenny Davis. Other highlights of the evening will be auctions featuring a vintage sewing machine that reportedly belonged to Howard Hughes’ maid, Kenmore Air tickets to Seattle and bed-andbreakfast getaways, and a performance by Sequim High School senior Rachel Chumley of Robin Hall’s original song “You Belong in Sequim.” For more information, visit www.KSQMfm.com.

SEQUIM — Handpainted plates and good food will raise money for the Olympic Community Action Programs Senior Nutrition Program on Saturday. Suncrest Retirement Village, 251 S. Fifth Ave., will host the Oktoberfest benefit from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. All proceeds will go to OlyCAP, said Jerry Brummel, director. One-of-a-kind dinner plates, hand-painted by the 36 residents of the retirement village, will be sold for $20 each. Created with the assistance of Aglazing Art Studio, these plates are functional and dishwasher-safe. The traditional Bavarian buffet menu will include brats and sauerkraut, sauer klopse — which is a Germanstyle meatball appetizer — hot German potato salad, braised apples and red cabbage, a choice of Black Forest or German chocolate cupcakes, and free hot dogs and chips for kids. The buffet will be

Republican Dan Gaze, a real estate managing broker and consultant. Tharinger, a Clallam County commissioner from Sequim, and Sequim Republican Jim McEntire, a Port of Port Angeles commissioner and retired Coast Guard captain, are vying for the seat vacated by Democrat Lynn Kessler, who is retiring. A beer garden will be set up with Port Townsend Brewery beer, wine by the glass and hot cider — all sold separately from the buffet. The Washington Old Time Fiddlers will play traditional tunes. Children can search for prizes in a hay scramble Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News and be transformed into Residents at Suncrest Village Retirement Community in Sequim hold the superheroes at a facehand-painted plates they had decorated on Thursday. From left are painting booth. Shirley Bailey, Doris Watters, Ensley Rofinot, Helen Funston, Bob Whiting, The OlyCAP Senior Jean Whiting, Alice Queen, Maxine Uhlig, Bernice Craig, Gloria Daly, Nutrition Program proDottie Vanchura and Pattie Whisner. vides senior dining at several locations throughout ning for 24th District seats Jefferson and Clallam taken on a guided tour of prepared by Chef Art of Counties, and home-delivin the state Legislature, the Suncrest Retirement Suncrest Retirement Vilered meals, commonly Kevin Van De Wege and Village, which has been lage and OlyCAP Senior known as Meal on Wheels. Steve Tharinger. operating for 16 years. Dining. For more information, Van De Wege, a firefighter The Oktoberfest celebraA donation of $5 for the and paramedic from Sequim, phone Brummel at 360tion will feature a visit buffet is suggested. 681-3800. is seeking re-election and is from two Democrats runVisitors can also be

Events: Public Safety Fair slated in Sequim and video from the hospital. The program will include 10-year-old Colton Matter; his mother, Suzy Schultz Matter; and grandmother, Sandy Schultz. Colton Matter is a happy, active boy who loves sports and has spent many months in Seattle Children’s battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For more information, phone Jan Hanson at 360361-3133 or Nan Burris at 360-582-0629.

Finishing workshop SEQUIM — SherwinWilliams paint store, 1400 W. Washington St., Suite 109, will hold a free faux finishing workshop from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Store employees will demonstrate the process and will help customers create sample boards of the latest techniques using Sherwin-Williams new line of Faux Impressions products. To reserve a spot at the workshop or for more information, phone 360-6818675.

formance of “Warriors (The Battle of Age!)” on Saturday. The performance will be at 7:30 p.m. at the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road. “Warriors” is a story about several senior citizens in group therapy dealing humorously with the real situations brought about by aging and the coping skills they have discovered and discarded. Professional actors Jarion Monroe and Anni Long from San Francisco will be involved in the reading. Other actors involved in the one-night-only presentation will be Pat Owens, Ric Munhall, Barbara Wilson, Paul Martin, Barbara Hughes, Jim Dries and Carol Swarbrick Dries. Tickets are $15 each or two for $25 and are available at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., in Sequim; at Odyssey Bookstore, 114 W. Front St., in Port Angeles; or at the door. Proceeds will go toward scholarships for graduating seniors at Port Angeles and Sequim high schools. For more information, e-mail rtplus@olypen.com.

tal Guild Thrift Shop, 204 W. Bell St., will be open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Holiday items and dishware will be featured. All white-tag items will be at half-price during this sale. Proceeds from this shop are returned to the community. The shop is always in need of volunteers. For more information, phone 360-683-7044.

West End Men in Pink

JOYCE — The Salt Creek Restaurant and Lounge, corner of state Highway 112 and Camp Hayden Road, will host “Men in Pink,” a breast cancer fundraiser, at 7 p.m. Saturday. Men are encouraged to wear pink — and be rewarded for it — to help support the fight against breast cancer. The event will include music and karaoke with DJ Eddy Rosa, as well as a raffle and drawings for pink prizes. Theatre fundraiser There will be three Thrift shop open prizes for the best “Men in SEQUIM — Readers Theatre Plus will hold a SEQUIM — The Pink” as voted by the fundscholarship fundraiser per- Sequim-Dungeness Hospi- raiser guests. To vote, a

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Harvest Dinner FORKS — The 76th annual Forks Harvest Dinner will be held in the fellowship hall of First Congregational Church, 280 S. Spartan Ave., from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. today. The dinner will precede the Forks High School football team’s homecoming game against Rainier High School. Roasted turkey, savory stuffing, baked salmon, sweet potatoes, salads, cranberries and green beans, and apple and pumpkin pie will be served. The cost of the dinner is $10 for adults, $6 for children ages 4-12 and senior citizens 60 years and older. Family passes are available for $35. Turn

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person must buy a $1 raffle ticket. Also sold will be $2 “message bags,” pink bags with a candle — like a luminaria — on which people write messages to people they love. Proceeds will go to the Cindy Hoffman Fund to provide free mammograms to women who can’t afford them. For more information, phone 360-928-9942.

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Continued from C1 Washington’s Most Wanted vehicle. The Sequim Masonic Soiree by the Sea Lodge will offer a chip idenPORT ANGELES — tification system for chilHabitat for Humanity of dren. Clallam County will host its A clinic will be set up to second annual “Soiree by inspect and install car seats, the Sea” at the Port Angeles and CarFit will help “the Yacht Club, 1305 Marine mature driver find the best Drive, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. fit” at the Sequim Skate Park. Saturday. Sequim Police DepartThe event will include wines and hors d’oeuvres ment dog Chase and K-9 provided by several local Officer Mike Hill will prorestaurants and caterers, as vide a demonstration in the well as barbecued oysters afternoon. hot off the grill. A silent auction will offer Marketing talk an assortment of gifts and SEQUIM — “Cooperaentertainments, and musi- tive Marketing: Making the cal entertainment will be Olympic Peninsula an Arts provided by a Port Angeles Destination” is the topic of High School Chamber the free “Cultural ConnecOrchestra string quartet. tions” talk set for Saturday. Tickets are $20 each and The Sequim Humanities can be purchased in person and Arts Alliance is hosting at the Habitat Store, 728 E. the discussion from 6 p.m. Front St.; by phone at 360- to 8 p.m. at The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 W. 681-6780; or at the door. Proceeds from the event Evergreen Farm Way, just will help the organization off North Fifth Avenue. “We are all in this build affordable housing in Clallam County for families together” is the theme, and the alliance invites anyone in need. interested in art and community to attend. Sequim To find out more about the alliance and its monthly Public Safety Fair Cultural Connections provisit www. SEQUIM — About 30 grams, SequimArtsAlliance.org. booths with information about crime prevention, Guild luncheon set disaster preparedness, personal safety and senior SEQUIM — The Sequim resources will be featured Guild of Seattle Children’s at the Sequim Police Depart- Hospital will host its annual ment’s fifth annual Public outreach luncheon at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Safety Fair on Saturday. The fair will be from 525 N. Fifth St., at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Guy 11:30 a.m. today. The luncheon is an Cole Convention Center at opportunity for Seattle Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Children’s Hospital repreBlake Ave. sentatives to visit North Local, state and federal Olympic Peninsula guilds agencies will provide infor- and provide information mation from booths inside about events, services and the center, while emergency news about the hospital, its vehicles will be parked out- foundation and its side for children to explore. research. Police vehicles and fire Tickets are $16 per pertrucks will be displayed. A son. Coast Guard helicopter will Guild Association trustland. New this year will be ees will bring a message

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Japanese students visit Port Angeles

both the 9:15 a.m. and the 11:15 a.m. services at Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. Send checks to The Jung Society, 711 27th St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. For more information, visit www.junginpt.com or phone 360-385-3622.

PORT ANGELES — Tanabu Senior High School students from the Japanese city of Mutsu visited Port Angeles for a “long weekend” Oct. 7-11. The Port Angeles School District said Tanabu is one of the “sister schools” it has in Mutsu. The 38 students are part of the intensive English program at Tanabu. They were accompanied by their vice principal and three teachers. After spending a few days with host families and enjoying a trip to Victoria, they attended class at Port Angeles High School with their student hosts and also visited pen pals at Jefferson Elementary. Several students also visited Lincoln High School and the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center.

Winemakers gala

SEQUIM — Olympic Medical Center Foundation is teaming with Seattle Cancer Care Alliance to present “An Evening in the Pacific Northwest” for the 2010 Harvest of Hope Winemakers Gala at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23. The event will be held at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive. The eighth annual event Port Angeles School District will raise funds for patients Tanabu Senior High School student Souya Kinoshita translates an being treated at Olympic English word into Japanese for Jefferson Elementary students Adam Medical Center’s Thomas Moore, center, and Justice Davis. Adam and Justice are in Evan Murphy’s Family Cancer Center. third-grade class in Port Angeles. Michael’s Seafood and Clothing donations that sented by The Jung Society Steakhouse chef Doug notices, phone the library, Seaver will oversee dinner of Port Townsend and e-mail director@nols.org, or are clean and in good conservice. Quimper Unitarian Unidition are being accepted. visit a library and ask any Willamette Valley wines To schedule a pickup or versalist Fellowship. staff member for assiswill be featured. Sparks is a graduate of for more information, tance. Switch to e-mail Todd Ortloff of KONP Bucknell University, Pacific The branch phone num- phone 360-460-4291. PORT ANGELES — radio station will host the School of Religion and the bers are: Port Angeles, 360The North Olympic Library C.G. Jung Institute of Zur- fundraiser. 417-8500; Sequim, 360-683- Jungian events System is kicking off a “Go Cocktails will begin at ich. 1161; Clallam Bay, 360PORT TOWNSEND — green! — Switch to E-mail 6 p.m. with dinner at He is the author of At 963-2414; and Forks 360Jungian analyst J. Gary Notices” campaign. 6:45 p.m. the Heart of Matter: Syn374-6402. Sparks will soon hold a Library customers who Tickets are $125 and chronicity and Jung’s Spirpair of events at the are receiving notices itual Testament and Valley can be purchased from New clothing bank Quimper Unitarian Unithrough traditional mail of Diamonds: Adventures in Olympic Medical Center SEQUIM — A clothing versalist Fellowship, 2333 are being asked to switch Number and Time, written Foundation until Friday, bank at Redeeming Life San Juan Ave. to e-mail. with Marie-Louise von Oct. 22. Fellowship, 425 E. WashA lecture titled “The E-mail is the fastest Franz. To purchase tickets or ington St., will open Heart of a Scientist: An way to receive notice of The cost of the lecture is for more information, Wednesday. Atomic Physicist’s Ordeal held and overdue materi$10 at the door, and the phone the Olympic Medical The clothing bank will of Matter and Meaning” als. workshop is $50 at the Center Foundation at 360will be held at 7 p.m. FriThe notices are environ- be open from 1 p.m. to door. 417-7144 or visit www. mentally friendly, and they 4 p.m. the third Wednesday day, Oct. 22. Advance registration omhf.org. A workshop, “Synchron- knocks the price down to reduce the library system’s of each month. Adult and children’s icity in Thought and Deed,” $45 for both events. postage, copying and paper clothing and various other will be offered from 10 a.m. costs, allowing for a more Sparks will also deliver Harvest dinner PORT ANGELES — donated items will be avail- to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23. a sermon titled “The efficient use of tax dollars. able. The events are preThe Esther Chapter of the Shadow Side of God” at To switch to e-mail

Order of the Eastern Star will hold a harvest dinner at the Masonic Lodge, Seventh and Lincoln streets, from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24. The meal will include turkey and all the trimmings. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 2 to 5. Attendees will have the chance to win a Thanksgiving dinner for six to eight people with each ticket. To purchase tickets, phone Mary Miller at 360417-9236 or Vickie Larson at 360-457-9444, or mail check and contact information to Esther OES, P.O. Box 1394, Port Angeles, WA 98362 by Monday.

PT McTakeover set PORT TOWNSEND — The Blue Heron Middle School Parent Teacher Association will hold a McTakeover of the Port Townsend McDonald’s, 310 W. Sims Way, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday. Entertainment will be provided by Principal Mark Decker, school staff and volunteers as they take over service and cleanup duties. McDonald’s donates 40 percent of proceeds for the event to the PTA and 10 percent to Ronald McDonald House. McDonald’s coupon books for use at locations on the North Olympic Peninsula and in Kitsap County can be purchased for $5 during the event. These books normally cost $27. The PTA will use funds to help teachers buy curriculum materials. Peninsula Daily News

Events: English country dance, potluck set Continued from C3 0417 or e-mail dan.post@ frandango.org. Proceeds help cover the costs of nonprofit groups Education discussion that meet at the church and PORT TOWNSEND — the church’s building fund. Carolyn Landel, an expert To volunteer, donate a on science, technology, engimeal item, make a cash neering and mathematics, donation or for more infor- will speak at the monthly mation, phone Warren or meeting of AAUW Port Cathy Johnson at 360-374- Townsend on Saturday. 9382. The meeting, which is free and open to the public, Port Townsend/ will be at 10 a.m. at Quimper Unitarian Universalist FelJefferson County lowship, 2333 San Juan English dance, potluck Ave. Refreshments will be PORT TOWNSEND — served at 9:30 a.m., and the A free English country business meeting for the dance and potluck is American Association of planned at the RoseWind University Women will Common House, 3131 begin at 11 a.m. Landel, who says that a Haines St., from 4 p.m. to lack of qualified applicants 6 p.m. Sunday. The dancing will be is keeping thousands of jobs taught by Nan Evans of unfilled in Washington state, will discuss work Portland, Ore. Fred Nussbaum and force trends, gaps in the Friends will provide music. school-to-work transition RoseWind Common and actions citizens can House is a fragrance-free take to ensure that students facility, and no street shoes are well-prepared for jobs are allowed. and productive citizenship. For more information, Landel, who received her phone Dan Post at 360-554- doctoral degree in biochem-

istry and molecular biology from the University of Chicago, has led the setup of Washington STEM, a nonprofit that will launch this fall. The Washington STEM initiative aims to speed innovation in the state’s K-12 education system, increase teacher effectiveness and student learning, and raise the number of students graduating ready for college and work. For more information, visit www.aauwpt.org or porttownsend@aauw-wa. org.

Rock, blues and swing PORT TOWNSEND — Maia Santell and House Blend, a rock, blues and swing band from Tacoma, is arriving tonight for the Olympic Peninsula Dance event at the Port Townsend Elks Club, 555 Otto St. If you come at 7 p.m., you can take part in an “American Bandstand”style swing lesson with local dance teachers Walter Dill and Janice Eklund. Then, Santell and her

is Here! Bringing the

band will play from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. Admission is $15, or $10 for disabled patrons and students with identification. Children 12 and younger get in for $7. Santell, who’s been performing on the Pacific Northwest scene for 40 years, is backed by House Blend tenor saxophonist Ted Dortch, guitarist Al Alto, bassist Bob Mathews and drummer Bruce Simpson. This is the second dance of the 2010-2011 season for the Olympic Peninsula Dance group, which presents plenty of other dancing opportunities, from tango lessons to zydeco parties in Port Townsend. Visit www.Olympic PeninsulaDance.com for details.

the shifting memories of Hardy; his wife, Grace; and stage manager, Teddy. Tickets are $18 and are available at www.brown papertickets.com/ event/132485, by phone at 800-838-3006, the Food Co-op at 414 Kearney St. or at the door. Discovery Bay Players is a new group “producing literate transformative plays, especially by American and Irish playwrights,” according to the performance announcement. The group rehearses in Port Townsend and stages full productions in Puget Sound-area theaters. “Faith Healer” opened recently at Seattle’s Odd Duck Studio. For more information, visit w w w. discoverybayplayers.com.

‘Faith Healer’ play

Diabetes program

PORT TOWNSEND — The Discovery Bay Players will perform the play “Faith Healer” at the Chameleon Theater, 800 W. Park Ave., beginning tonight. Performances will be held at 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays until Oct. 24. Irish playwright Brian Friel’s “Faith Healer” is about the life of faith healer Francis Hardy told through

PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson Healthcare hospital will hold “Change Your Mind, Change Your Life — Positive Approaches to Preventing and Managing Diabetes” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The free event at the hospital at 834 Sheridan Ave., Port Townsend, is for those who want to prevent diabetes as well as for those who have it, and for the latter

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group, the symposium will feature seminars by three guest lecturers from Virginia Mason Medical Center. Dr. Cyrus Cryst will present “Chronic Kidney Disease — a growing problem.” Jacqueline Siegel, a clinical nurse specialist in diabetes, will present “From Continuous Glucose Sensors to the Worldwide Web, New Products and Services Are Appearing to Change the Lives of People with Diabetes.” Dr. Monica Rodriguez, an endocrinologist, will present “Diabetes: Know Your Medications.” Other lectures will include “Lose Weight for Life,” “Diabetes and Your Feet” and “Diabetes and Exercise.” There also will be presentations by diabetics who successfully manage the disease, as well as impaired glucose tolerance risk assessments, free blood tests for diabetes screening and weight loss information. Vendors will be in the cafe, where food samples will be offered, and the cafeteria will feature a diabetic-friendly lunch menu. For more information, phone the Diabetes Education Department at 360385-2200, ext. 1240.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

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Celebrity baggers work for United Way aged to support United Way through donations at their Local celebrities will bag workplace or through the groceries for the United mail campaign. Way of Clallam County in Port Angeles and Sequim Port Angeles from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. In Port Angeles, celebrity Baggers will wear United baggers will be stationed at Way aprons or Live United both Safeway stores, AlbertT-shirts and will distribute sons, Swain’s General Store fliers calling attention to and Saar’s Market Place the annual United Way Food. fund drive, which has a goal Baggers include Port of $1 million. Angeles Police Chief Terry Shoppers will be encour- Gallagher, Port Angeles Peninsula Daily News

schools Superintendent Jane Pryne, Port Angeles Fire Chief Dan McKeen, District 2 Fire Chief Jon Burgher and Peninsula Daily News Publisher John Brewer. Port Angeles City Council members Brad Collins, Patrick Downie and Cherie Kidd also are volunteering, as well as Kathy Charlton of Olympic Cellars; county Assessor Pam Rushton; Penny Linterman of Clal-

lam County Emergency Management; Nita Lynn, director of First Step Family Planning; Dan Montana of Firefighters Local 658; Jack Slowriver, the director of Family Planning; and Chuck Hatten, Port Angeles Rotary president. Some celebrities also are candidates. Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly, who seeks re-election against challenger Larry Freedman; Dan Gase, Republican chal-

lenging Democrat Kevin Van Wege’s re-election bid to a 24th District seat; and Judy Scott, seeking re-election to the county Treasurer’s Office against Selinda Barkhuis, also are bagging.

Sequim baggers In Sequim, participating stores are Safeway, QFC and Sunny Farms. Lt. Sheri Crain of the Sequim Police Department, City Manager Steve Bur-

kett and City Councilman Don Hall are among the celebrity baggers. In the West End, Forks Outfitters participated earlier on Oct. 2. The United Way provides funds to 27 nonprofits and also funds community initiatives. For more information, phone 360-457-3011, e-mail info@unitedwayclallam.org, or visit www.unitedway clallam.org.

Scandia Fall Fest slated Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Thea Foss No. 45 Daughters of Norway Scandia Fall Fest will be held at the Blue Heron Middle School, 3939 San Juan Ave., from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23. Vendors will be in the gymnasium selling homemade arts and crafts. An informal learning center will feature demonstrations of spinning, weaving and band weaving. Events will occur every hour at the free festival. Homemade pea soup will be available from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Desserts, coffee and punch will be available all day. A bake sale of Scandinavian pastries, breads, cookies and kaker will be held. There also will be baking demonstrations of waffler, Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News which is a Norwegian dessert waffle, as well as krumoad work requires closure of irst treet lane kake and lefse. The entertainment Trent Adams with Northwest Territories Inc., left, and Mike Baker with Boart Longyear drilling services shovel schedule: dirt taken from beneath First Street in downtown Port Angeles into a metal drum Thursday. The crew was taking ■  Children’s story soil samples in preparation for the installation of a stormwater collection system. The road work closed one lane time with Karen Lopez, of First Street from 7:30 a.m. to about 4:15 p.m. Traffic was backed up most of the day. Glenn Cutler, city public 11 a.m. works and utilities director, said the stormwater collection system will be installed early next year and that no ■  Gladan Band performs fancy fiddling at more lane closures related to the project have been scheduled. noon. ■  Bunad style show and parade featuring traditional Norwegian garments, with narrator Ellen Ostern, at 2 p.m. Later, the Gladan band 15 pounds of aluminum Patricia Byrd, Diana Entri- cal Society at 360-452-2662. real difference in the lives will lead a parade — as can, Elizabeth Sump, Sylof these students,” said from 10.5 miles of Fish with country church wedHatchery, O’Brien and Blue via Hancock, Judy Paine, Yacht club donates Quilcene School District Bettee Miller, Loren Noble counselor Shea Harrington. dings of old — amid the Mountain roads. QUILCENE — The vendors’ booths. and Gerda van Dijk have The Port Ludlow Yacht Illegal dumpsites were Quilcene School District’s A Scandinavian dancing Club Women’s Group contributed pieces for the cleared on Fish Hatchery Saul Haas Fund recently demonstration with Dick raised the funds at a exhibit. and Blue Mountain roads, received its largest donaSEQUIM — A past and Roxanne Grinstad will “Bingo Bucks for Kids” Cathy Grissom and Jea- tion in its history: $2,500 with notable items includpresident of Seattle Audube held in the gymnasium fundraiser in September. nette Gault have provided from the Port Ludlow Yacht bon, Idie Ulsh, will present ing modified brass knuck“The ladies had a goal of at 2 p.m. scenes. les, a car hood, tires, car Club Women’s Group. “Feathered Architects: The For more information, $1,500, but through their Included in the display parts, a kid’s bike and The fund is used as a Fascinating World of Bird phone Bonnie Svardal at efforts and generosity, we are a log cabin, scenes from paint cans. contingency for economiNests” during a meeting of 360-683-2555 or e-mail received $2,500,” Harthe county fair, house and Crews also weeded and cally disadvantaged stuthe Olympic Peninsula bsvardal@wavecable.com. rington said. shop interiors, and the sprayed the Port Angeles dents. Audubon Society at 7 p.m. For more information or Police Department parking inside of an Egyptian tomb. It has covered things Wednesday. to donate to the fund, There also is a “treasure like student body fees for lot. The free talk will be phone Harrington at 360peninsuladailynews.com hunt” for children — and They also found nine sports participation, yearheld at the Dungeness 765-3363, ext. 252. adults. illegal dumpsites on U.S. books, clothing, caps and River Audubon Center at Peninsula Daily News Visitors can test their gowns for graduating Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 Forest Service land. observation skills by findFrom Oct. 2 to 7, crews seniors, school lunches, W. Hendrickson Road. removed 340 pounds of litter ing objects such as playing field trips and other things Ulsh will discuss how and 25 pounds of aluminum cards, an Egyptian throne, students and their families and where birds from for recycling from 23.5 miles a milk bottle for bunnies struggle to afford. eagles to hummingbirds of Clallam County roadways. and a thermos bottle. “The fund covers stuff make nests. For more information, Crews also added 1,490 that many people take for She has photographed phone the Clallam Histori- granted but can make a nests of more than 30 spe- feet of trail to the Olympic Discovery Trail during the cies and has researched two time periods. bird nests for many years. In addition to her own images, she will show pho- Miniatures display 755 W. Washington Ste. A tos from local photograPORT ANGELES — Sequim • 582-9275 phers, University of Puget FRAME CENTER Creations by members of 625 E. Front St. Sound Slater Museum and the Mini-Marvels MiniaMon.- Fri. 9:30 to 5:30 • Sat. 10 to 4 Port Angeles • 565-0308 Cornell Lab of Ornithology. ture Club are featured in a www.karonsframecenter.com For more information, new exhibit at the Clallam phone Sara Ellen Case at County Historical Society’s 360-681-63425 or e-mail Fares as low as Museum at the Carnegie, saraellen.mn@gmail.com. * 207 S. Lincoln St. The exhibit can be 426 E. Washington St., Sequim • (360) 683-9284 Chain gang at work viewed until Dec. 31. www.castellinsurance.com • info@castellinsurance.com The museum is open PORT ANGELES — Wednesday through SaturClallam County Sheriff’s Office Chain Gang members day from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Mini-Marvels Club cleared roadways in recent Oct 1–Dec 31 started in 2001 for those weeks. who want to create intriFrom Sept. 27 to Oct. 1, • Port Angeles to Sea-Tac cate scenes in miniature. crews removed 500 pounds of litter and recycled Members Violet Ryan, in only 55 minutes

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Things to Do Today, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 15-17, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532.

Insurance assistance — Statewide benefits advisers help with health insurance and Medicare. Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. 3425.

Saturday Intro rowing classes — For beginners and intermediates ages 16 and older. Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association Boathouse, 1431 Ediz Hook, 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. Membership fees apply. E-mail Tim Tucker at tim@ccfymca.org.

Market — The Gateway, Front and Lincoln streets, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts and music.

Joyce Depot Museum — 15 miles west of Port Angeles on state Highway 112, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 1915-era log depot houses, photographs and historical information regarding Zazen — NO Sangha, a Joyce, Port Crescent, Twin, Zen community, offers zazen Lake Crescent, Camp Hayden, alternated with kinhin. 420 W. the Spruce Railroad and early Third St., 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. logging. Phone 360-928-3568. Also opportunities for private teaching interviews with SenGuided walking tour — sei Kristen Larson. For direc- Historic downtown buildings, tions, phone 360-452-5534 or an old brothel and “Undere-mail nosangha@aol.com. ground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. RailForest Storytelling Festi- road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 val — Little Theater, Peninsula p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 College, 1502 E. Lauridsen senior citizens and students, Blvd. Individual events range $6 ages 6 to 12. Children from $12 to $20. For informa- younger than 6, free. Reservation, visit www.dancingleaves. tions, phone 360-452-2363, com/storypeople/index.html. ext. 0.

Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recomTatting class — Golden mended. Phone 360-457Craft Shop, 112-C S. Lincoln 8921. St., 10 a.m. to noon. Phone Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 360-457-0509. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Olympic Coast Discovery Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Center — Second floor, The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Phone 360-457-7377. Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free.

Scrapbook and papercrafts class — Clallam County Family YMCA Art School, 723 E. Fourth St., 10 a.m. to noon. Cost: $8, $5 for YMCA members. For children 8 to 14. To Port Angeles Chamber register, phone 360-452-9244, Orchestra concert — Holy ext. 309, or e-mail cheryl@ Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 W. ccfymca.org. Lopez Ave., 7:30 p.m. For tickGuided walking tour — ets, phone 360-457-5579.Visit Historic downtown buildings, www.portangelessymphony. an old brothel and “Under- org or e-mail pasymphony@ ground Port Angeles.” Cham- olypen.com. ber of Commerce, 121 E. RailForest Storytelling Festiroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 val — Little Theater, Peninsula senior citizens and students, College, 1502 E. Lauridsen $6 ages 6 to 12. Children Blvd. Individual events range younger than 6, free. Reserva- from $12 to $20. For informations, phone 360-452-2363, tion, visit www.dancingleaves. ext. 0. com/storypeople/index.html.

$12 to $20. For information, Sequim and Second avenues, visit www.dancingleaves.com/ 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit www. storypeople/index.html. sequimmarket.com.

The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Port Angeles

Olympic Coast Discovery Mental health drop-in cenCenter — Second floor, The ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to Nicotine Anonymous — socialize, something to do or a Klallam Counseling,1026 E. hot meal. For more information, First St., 10:30 a.m. Phone phone Rebecca Brown at 360360-452-1060. 457-0431.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do

Bingo — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 360-457-7004.

Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam Today County.” Miniatures exhibit till Play and Learn Port Ange- Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln les — For children up to 5 streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Chilyears to attend with parent, dren welcome. Elevator, ADA grandparent or caregiver with access and parking at rear of individual and group play, building. 360-452-6779. songs and story time. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. For location and inforIntroduction to line dance mation, phone 360-452-5437. for beginners — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Walk-in vision clinic — St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 Information for visually impaired members, $3 nonmembers. and blind people, including Phone 360-457-7004. accessible technology display, library, Braille training and variThe Answer for Youth — ous magnification aids. Vision Drop-in outreach center for Loss Center, 228 W. First St., youth and young adults, providSuite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ing essentials like clothes, food, Phone 360-457-1383 or visit Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonwww.visionlossservices.org/ ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. vision. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Peninsula Daily News

Olympic Gentle Paws reading event — Children invited to read to group’s dogs. Can bring own book or choose one off library shelves. Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 11 a.m. to noon. Phone 360-681-4440 or e-mail cornellc@olypen.com.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. Peace rally — Veterans Park, 217 S. Lincoln St., noon to 2 p.m. Sponsored by Green Party of Clallam County. Phone 360-683-0867. Cribbage — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For all ages.

Embroidery class — Golden Craft Shop, 112-C S. Lincoln St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Bring an embroidery needle, Feiro Marine Life Center hoop, scissors and a 12-inch — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. square of plain cotton fabric. Admission by donation. Phone Phone 360-457-0509. 360-417-6254. Museum at the Carnegie Port Angeles Farmers — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam County.” Miniature exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA access and parking at rear of building. 360-452-6779.

A HUGE “THANK YOU” from the 2010 DUNGENESS CRAB & SEAFOOD FESTIVAL

Help for veterans — For veterans, their families and surviving spouses. Veterans Administration representative discusses funds that may help with assisted living expenses. Park View Villas, 1430 Park View Lane, 2 p.m. Free. For reservations, phone 360-4527222

to our community, sponsors & volunteers is doubled in light of the extra effort and hard work in putting the festival together after the damaging storm that hit us early Sunday morning. It reaffirms for all of us what we can do together to produce an event that inspires and connects us. We deeply thank all of you.

Presenting Sponsors

The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Major Sponsors

Sunday

Olympic Outdoor Club hike — Hurricane Hill Trail, a moderately easy hike of 3 miles round trip; elevation gain of 650 feet; high point at 5,757 feet. Quimper Peninsula hikers meet 8 a.m. at Quimper Credit Union, Port Hadlock. Sequim and Quimper hikers meet 8:45 a.m. at southeast corner of Sequim Walmart parking lot. Those and Port Angeles hikers meet 9:30 a.m. at Clallam County Courthouse. E-mail olympic. outdoors@yahoo.com.

Clean-up work party — Volunteers clean Dungeness River Audubon Center, Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, 9 a.m. to noon. Phone the Audubon at 360-681-4076 or e-mail rivercenter@olympus.net.

Dance — Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 minutes of instruction, followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments, 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081.

Hydrangea wreath class — 302 Ward Lane, 10 a.m., $25. Bring a glue gun, everything else is supplied. Phone Su Howat at 360-461-2665 or e-mail jshowat@olypen.com.

Olympic Outdoor Club hike — The Baldy Trail, a difficult hike of 9 miles round trip; elevation gain of 3,700 feet; high point at 6,550 feet. Port Angeles hikers meet 8:30 a.m. at Clallam County Courthouse. Olympic Coast Discovery Quimper Peninsula hikers meet Center — Second floor, The 8:30 a.m. at Quimper Credit Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Union, Port Hadlock. Those Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sequim hikers meet 9:15 a.m. at entrance to Sequim Bay Feiro Marine Life Center State Park. E-mail olympic. — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. outdoors@yahoo.com. Admission by donation. Phone 360-417-6254. Overeaters Anonymous — Literature meeting at St. Luke’s Port Angeles Fine Arts Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Center — “Future Relics of the St., 10 a.m. Phone 360-452Elwha Dam.” 1203 E. Laurid- 0227. sen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Clallam-WSU Master GarFree. Phone 360-457-3532. deners plant clinic — Co-Op Port Angeles Community Farm & Garden/True Value, Market — The Gateway, First 216 E. Washington St., 10 a.m. and Lincoln streets, 11 a.m. to to 2 p.m. Free and open to the 3 p.m. Through mid-October. public. Bring samples of plants Phone 360-417-0486 or e-mail for identification. Phone Muriel mimi@por tangelesmarket. Nesbitt, program coordinator, com. at 360-565-2679.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Your Daily Fiber: Conspicuous Consumption, Community and Ceremony” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360-6838110.

Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Light lunch — Free hot Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit meals for people in need, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 www.sequimyoga.com. N. Fifth Ave., 11:30 a.m. to 1 Walk aerobics — First Bap- p.m. Phone 360-683-4862. tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Cultural Connections — Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-683- “Cooperative Marketing: How to Make the Olympic Peninsula 2114. an Arts Destination.” The Lodge Circuit training exercise at Sherwood Village, 660 W. class — Sequim Community Evergreen Farm Way, 6 p.m. to Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 8 p.m. Free. Visit www. or a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. sequimartsalliance.org Phone Shelley Haupt at 360- phone 360-460-3023. 477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ Port Angeles Chamber wavecable.com. Orchestra concert — Sequim Line dancing lessons — Worship Center, 640 N. Sequim Beginning dancers. Sequim Ave., 7:30 p.m. For tickets Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams phone 360-457-5579.Visit Road, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. $3 per www.portangelessymphony. class. Phone 360-681-2826. org or e-mail pasymphony@ olypen.com. Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group — Sequim Readers Theatre Plus Public Library, 630 N. Sequim scholarship fundraiser — Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. “Enhanc- “Warriors (The Battle of Age!)” ing Security Through Peace Building.” Topics from Foreign Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, Policy Association’s Great 2781 Towne Road, 7:30 p.m. Decisions 2009 publication and Tickets $15 each or two for $25 articles in Foreign Affairs mag- and available at Pacific Mist azine. Phone 360-683-9622, Books, 121 W. Washington St., e-mail jcpollock@olypen.com Sequim; Odyssey Bookstore, or visit www.fpa.org/info-url_ 114 W. Front St., Port Angeles; or at the door. For more infornocat4728/. mation, e-mail rtplus@olypen. Sequim Museum & Arts com. Center — “Your Daily Fiber: Conspicuous Consumption, Sunday Community and Ceremony.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 VFW breakfast — 169 E. p.m. Free. Phone 360-683- Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 8110. p.m. Cost: $5 a person. Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., 12:30 p.m. Phone 360681-4308, or partnership 360683-5635.

PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-452French class — 2 p.m. For 5973 or Ken Foster at 360-683- more information, phone 3600141 for information including 681-0226. time of day and location.

Pittsburgh Steelers Fan Club — Stymie’s Bar & Grill, Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, 1965 Woodcock Road, 10 a.m. Phone 360-775-8663.

Olympic Peninsula Mycological Society’s wild mushroom show — Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, noon Saturday to 4 p.m. Free. For more inforForest Storytelling Festivisit www.oly val — Little Theater, Peninsula Sequim Open Aire Market mation, College, 1502 E. Lauridsen — Farm, food and art and craft mushrooms.org. Blvd. Individual events from vendors. Cedar Street between Adult Scrabble — The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. Avalon Wood & Gas Stoves Trivia night — Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360582-3143.

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C8

FaithReligion

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Make time to show up at services

The Associated Press

Durga Puja

festival in India

Hindu devotees carry holy water from the Ganges River after performing rituals during the Durga Puja festival in Calcutta, India, on Thursday. Each year at the festival, different neighborhoods compete for visitors at their temporary Durga shrines, known as pandals, using images from films or of top-ranking cricket stars to attract attention. Each night, families travel around the city visiting the pandals and eating at the food stalls around the shrine.

N.Y. town won’t disturb graves The Associated Press

SIDNEY, N.Y. — A small town in rural upstate New York is dropping plans to take legal action forcing a Muslim community to shut down its tiny graveyard, according to a letter sent by the town attorney Wednesday. Tom Schimmerling, lawyer for the 30-member Sufi community 130 miles

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC CHURCH 209 West 11th Port Angeles

360.452.2351 www.queenofangelsparish.org

Parish School

457-6903

www.queenofangelsschool.edu

Rev. Thomas Nathe, Pastor Mass: Saturday Vigil 5 p.m. Sunday 8:30 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Confession: Half hour before all Masses & 4-5 p.m. Saturdays Youth Religious Ed Classes: Sundays 9:35-10:35 a.m. at Parish School Life Teen Night: Sunday 6-7:30 p.m. at Parish Hall Eucharistic Adoration: Fri. 9:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. Sat.

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

northwest of New York City, said he received a letter from Sidney town attorney Joseph Ermeti saying the town had decided not to take action. In the letter, which Schimmerling showed to The Associated Press, Ermeti said he had researched state and local laws regarding the two burials on the Muslim community’s 50-acre farm.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

“This letter is to inform you that no action will be taken by the Town of Sidney in this matter,” Ermeti wrote. He stopped short of saying the graveyard was legal. Hans Hass, a spokesman for the Sufi Muslim community, said they want an apology and a statement that the cemetery is legal. Hass has said anti-

Islamic bigotry motivated a town board vote in August to try to shut down the cemetery. He said he has a zoning board document saying the cemetery is legal. Town Supervisor Bob McCarthy didn’t immediately return a call Wednesday. He has previously said that the graveyard was illegal and bigotry had nothing to do with it.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers

THE OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP A Welcoming Congregation 73 Howe Rd., Agnew 417-2665 www.olympicuu.org

Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m. Nursery Provided: Both services

“Listening”

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m.

Sunday 9:30 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936 www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

SEQUIM CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING

PIONEER MEMORIAL PARK, SEQUIM REV. LYNN OSBORNE 681-0177

Teaching the principles of Science of Mind SUNDAY 10 a.m. Services

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship

REDEEMING GRACE ORTHODOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH REFORMED Scandia Hall, 131 W. 5th St., P. A. Andy Elam, Pastor SUNDAY 9:15 a.m. Study Hour 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 360-504-1950

FIRST UNITED METHODIST and Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Jo Ann Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship 4:00 p.m. Youth Group portangelesumc@tfon.com www.gbgm-umc.org/portangelesfumc

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know C hrist and to m ake H im know n www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 David R. Moffitt, Pastor SUNDAY

9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

St. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim Father Victor Olvida Mass Schedule

Saturday, 5:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Confessions: 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. Saturday

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Fam ily friendly

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FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH GARBC 683-7303 7652 Old Olympic Highway Sequim Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Worship: 11 a.m. Praise and Fellowship Service 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6 p.m. Nursery Available

Sunday Service begins at 10:30 a.m. Handicap accessible; Childcare available; Religious exploration classes for children, refreshments, and conversation following the service.

WOODY ALLEN ONCE said, “Seventy percent of success in life is showing up.” In my 51 years on Earth, that would seem about right. There is a huge importance on just “being there,” whether it is home, job and, of course, church. Cal Ripken, baseball player, showed up to 2,632 straight baseball games, playing in all of them, eclipsing “Iron Man” Lou Gehrig by 502 games. Ripken didn’t just show up, but performed, taking that remaining 30 percent and doing something magnificent with it. In every week, there are exactly 168 hours, though some weeks can seem much longer, or much shorter, depending on what’s going on, and yet a decreasing number of people in our community and country can’t seem to find one hour in that week to humble themselves before God at Mass and at church. A friend of mine from California, a lukewarm Catholic, told me that he always feels better when he goes to Mass. He knew what I was thinking, so I didn’t even have to say it: “Then why don’t you go more often?” Many folks say that they believe in God but not in “organized” religion. Would they prefer “disorganized” religion? I admit that if I turn on the TV and see this or that minister pacing the stage and sweating profusely, it doesn’t do a lot for me, though the message is not lacking in importance. I had an evangelical woman say to me once that the Catholic Church was basically just rules that you had to follow. This opened up quite a dialogue. Did not Jesus have some strong beliefs regarding baptism, Holy Communion, marriage and holy orders, and did he not trust this in his passing to Peter the “keys of the kingdom,” which is continuity in prayer and in teaching? So much of Paul’s teachings are an attempt to get communities to adhere to the teachings of Christ and his Apostles, as heresies abounded. Heresies abound today as we see the thousands of churches that exist, most of which claim guidance by the Holy Spirit. My nephew was just rebaptized because the church he attends told him he needed to be, which is the fruit of disorganized religion. Jesus aches that families are denying their children the faith. In Matthew 19:14, he states and almost

Issues of faith pleads, “Let the Acheson little children come to me.” One of the popular philosophies today is to allow children to address their own faith needs without guidance from Mom and Dad. Do we allow our children to address their own alcohol and drug needs without a little input from the folks? I would hope not. Nor should we lie back and let Johnny and Jill hit their late teens before a little word about the afterlife. There are a lot of answers coming from Jesus, not to mention peace. Kids can learn a lot from watching Mom and Dad in prayer. Having trouble sleeping, filled with anxiety, or do deep sighs punctuate your day? Hey, lady, hey, fella, how about saying a prayer, lifting your heart and mind to God for a moment? It will be the best moment you spend throughout your day. Pope Benedict had this to say on Palm Sunday of this year: “Faith in Jesus Christ is not a legendary invention. It is based on a true story. This history we can, so to speak, contemplate and touch.” How can you go wrong with the man and Messiah who walked the Earth 2,000 years ago, saying things such as, “Come to me, all you who labor and are heavily burdened, and I will give you rest”? He knew our lives would be no cakewalk, but he is the fuel for our engines, and we ignore Jesus at our own peril. There is nothing not to like about this divine man. He asks for our time and in return gives us strength. He established a church — the Catholic Church — with some hard positions on things. He expects us to do more than just show up, but that would be a start. He predicted sin and heresy in our world but preached love. A role model, this one and only Messiah; a friend as well. Do not expect an easy life with Jesus, but a peaceful one, most certainly.

Mike

_________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. Mike Acheson is a lay minister at Queen of Angels Roman Catholic Church in Port Angeles.

Briefly . . . Chris Clark cancels visit to church PORT ANGELES — Chris Clark, founder and international president of Children of the Nations, has canceled his Sunday appearance at the Independent Bible Church, 116 Ahlvers Road, because of a family emergency. It will be rescheduled later. He is the son of Pat Clark and the late Bill Clark, who was a businessman in Port Angeles for many Clark years. Children of the Nations, with its administrative offices in Silverdale, is a Christian nonprofit organization dedicated to raising children who transform nations. The organization currently serves in Sierra

Leone, Malawi, Uganda and the Dominican Republic, providing holistic care to orphaned and destitute children. Additional information about COTN can be found at www.cotni.org.

Sequim fellowship SEQUIM — Sequim Presbyterian Fellowship will meet Sunday at 6 p.m. at Holiday Inn Express, 1441 E. Washington St. All are welcome.

Sunday sermon PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield Sun will lead the worship service at Unity in the Olympics on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. The title of his lesson will be “So, Sew, Sow.” Sunday school is held at the same time. Meditation in the sanctuary, prior to the service, will be from 10:15 a.m. to 10:25 a.m. The church is located at 2917 E. Myrtle St. Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Friday, October 15, 2010

C9

Business

Politics & Environment

Judge: Suit over health overhaul can go to trial By Melissa Nelson The Associated Press

PENSACOLA, Fla. — Crucial pieces of a lawsuit challenging the Obama administration’s health care overhaul can go to trial, with a judge ruling Thursday he wants to hear more arguments over whether it is constitutional to force citizens to buy health insurance. In a written ruling, U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson said it also needs to be decided whether it is constitutional to penalize people who do not buy insurance with taxes and to require states to expand their Medicaid programs. Another federal judge in Michigan threw out a similar lawsuit last week. Vinson set a hearing for Dec. 16.

Overstepping authority The lawsuits will likely wind up before the U.S. Supreme Court. In his 65-page ruling, Vinson largely agreed with the 20 states — including Washington state — and the National Federation of Independent Business, saying Congress was intentionally unclear when it created penalties in the legislation. The states have argued that Congress is overstepping its constitutional authority by penalizing people for not doing something — not buying health insurance. The penalties for those who do not buy insurance are never referred to as taxes in the 2,700-page act,

Bill McCollum Florida attorney general Vinson wrote. Attorneys for the Obama administration argued at a September hearing that the penalties should be considered a tax levied by Congress — as allowed by its constitutional power to regulate interstate commerce. “One could reasonably infer that Congress proceeded as it did specifically because it did not want the penalty to be ‘scrutinized’ as a $4 billion annual tax increase,” Vinson wrote. “It seems likely that the members of congress merely called it a penalty and did not describe it as revenuegenerating to try and insulate themselves from the potential electoral ramifications of their votes.” The administration’s attorneys had told Vinson last month that without the regulatory power to ensure that young and healthy people buy health insurance, the health care plan

will not survive. Vinson also took issue with the administration’s argument that the states and individual taxpayers must wait until 2014, when some of the changes take effect, to file any lawsuits. Vinson said businesses and states are feeling the ramifications of the law now. The health care act leaves states with the difficult choice of expanding their Medicaid programs and taking on major expenses or entirely withdrawing from the insurance program for the poor, Vinson wrote. In states like Florida — where 26 percent of the state budget is devoted to Medicaid, according to the lawsuit — the law amounts to coercion, Vinson wrote. Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum praised the ruling. “It is the first step to having the individual mandate declared unconstitutional and upholding state sovereignty in our federal system,” McCollum said in a statement. He filed the lawsuit just minutes after President Barack Obama signed the 10-year, $938 billion health care bill into law in March. Stephanie Cutter, a political operative tapped by Obama to guide efforts to explain the law’s benefits, wrote in a White House blog late Thursday that the government expected to prevail. Cutter highlighted a favorable ruling by a Michi-

gan federal judge and described Vinson’s ruling as procedural: “Having failed in the legislative arena, opponents of reform are now turning to the courts in an attempt to overturn the work of the democratically elected branches of government.,” he wrote.

Nothing new “This is nothing new. We saw this with the Social Security Act, the Civil Rights Act, and the Voting Right Act — constitutional challenges were brought to all three of these monumental pieces of legislation, and all those challenges failed.” Vinson’s ruling comes a week after District Judge George Caram Steeh in Detroit ruled that the mandate to get insurance by 2014 and the financial penalty for skipping coverage are legal. He said Congress was trying to lower the overall cost of insurance by requiring participation. There is also a lawsuit pending in Virginia. A federal judge there has allowed the lawsuit to continue, ruling the overhaul raises complex constitutional issues. In addition to Washington and Florida, the states involved in the lawsuit Vinson is hearing are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas and Utah.

Yahoo shares climb after buyout talk by AOL, others By Andrew Vanacore The Associated Press

sports@peninsula dailynews.com

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PORT ANGELES — Michael’s Northwest Seafood & Steakhouse, 117 B East First St.. will host its second annual Mushroom Festival 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. today and Saturday. Guest lecturers and foragers will answer questions about locally grown mushrooms and a special menu showcasing North Olympic Peninsula mushrooms in specialty dishes, including, lobster mushroom bisque, chanterelle mushroom strudel, porcine mushroom risotto, oyster mushrooms and smoked white king salmon, all paired with suggested local wines. Dinner reservations are encouraged. For a reservation or more information, phone 360-417-6929.

her and her family. The suspect was escorted away by the teacher and arrested. Prison job cuts King County prosecuSEATTLE — The union tors charged Faribah F. representing 6,000 WashMaradiaga on Tuesday ington Department of Cor- with assault. She was held rections workers has sued on $50,000 bail with to block the department’s arraignment set for Oct. 25. recent job cuts. Teamsters Local 117 Nonferrous metals Secretary-Treasurer Tracey NEW YORK — Spot nonferThompson said it filed the rous metal prices Thursday. lawsuit Wednesday in King Aluminum - $1.0831 per lb., London Metal Exch. County Superior Court Copper - $3.8091 Cathode because the state is changfull plate, LME. ing the workers’ wages, Copper - $3.8090 N.Y. Merc hours and working condispot Thu. tions without bargaining Lead - $2407.50 metric ton, over the issues. London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0797 per lb., LonThe state recently cut 299 jobs in the department don Metal Exch. Gold - $1373.25 Handy & and closed the Larch CorHarman (only daily quote). rections Center in Yacolt. Gold - $1376.70 troy oz., NY

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SEATTLE — A 19-yearold woman is accused of stabbing another woman at an anger management class at Bellevue College. The victim told police Peninsula Daily News the 19-year-old complained and The Associated Press about a video they were watching Saturday. When the victim said it was good and to give it a chance, the other woman swore at her. The two started “trash talking,” police said, and the 19-year-old came from two rows behind the victim to stab her. She suffered two puncture wounds to the right shoulder and one to the left arm. Police said the attacker threatened to kill

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He said a deal could help them cut costs by eliminating redundant operations, but putting together two companies that both run search sites and other Web properties won’t necessarily generate more revenue. Nevertheless, if a deal does happen, Yahoo is likely to ask for a big premium given that management feels the company’s stock is underpriced, said UBS analyst Brian Pitz. He pegged the lowest per-share offer

been able to get revenue growing again. Yahoo will report quarterly results on Tuesday, after the market closes. Shares of AOL fell 39 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $24.73 in afternoon trading Thursday.

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that Yahoo would accept at $22, which would be a 44 percent premium over Yahoo’s closing price of $15.25 on Wednesday. That would value the company at just under $30 billion, compared with its current market value of about $22 billion. Jordan Rohan, an analyst at Stifel Nicolaus, doesn’t think AOL or its partners can come up with the cash. In a report Thursday on the potential deal, he said credit markets are probably too tight for a group of private equity firms to raise the money. Yahoo resisted a takeover attempt in 2008, when Microsoft Corp. offered to pay as much as $47.5 billion. But shareholders were so upset at the company for balking that then-CEO Jerry Yang decided to step down. He was replaced by Carol Bartz at the beginning of 2009, but she hasn’t

‘Mushroom Festival’ set for weekend

095097294

NEW YORK — Investors are running up the price of Yahoo Inc. shares after a report saying AOL Inc. and a group of private equity firms may bid for the Web company. The stock climbed 68 cents, or 4.5 percent, to $15.93 at the end of Thursday trading after rising as high as $16.76 earlier in the day. The stock has ranged from $12.94 to $19.12 over the past 52 weeks. The Wall Street Journal reported on its website after the close of trading Wednesday that AOL, Silver Lake Partners and Blackstone Group LP were exploring a bid. The report said two or three other firms could also be interested in the deal but that Yahoo hasn’t been involved in the talks yet. Both AOL and Yahoo have declined to comment. Representatives for Silver Lake and Blackstone did not respond to calls seeking comment Thursday.

A deal would marry two companies that haven’t been able to gain much traction in relentless competition with other online destinations like Google, Facebook and Twitter. And even if they teamed up “it would still be a struggle to turn around both Yahoo and AOL,” said ThinkEquity LLC analyst Aaron Kessler.

 $ Briefly . . .

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Catchy names, more receipts Apple growers marketing tasty new varieties By David Lester

Prescott-based Broetje Orchards, which is handling Sweetie and Opal. Along with the new apples come new marketing strategies.

Trademarked names

Yakima Herald-Republic

YAKIMA — The names can be quirky, sublime or romantic. SweeTango, Pinata, Jazz, Aurora, Honeycrisp, Opal, Sweetie, Pacific Rose and Ambrosia. They’re among the most recent apple varieties vying for the attention of consumers and retailers with the hope of bringing growers more money. Ever since the introduction to Washington state of Granny Smith in the 1960s, followed more recently by Fuji, Gala, Braeburn, Jonagold and others to expand the apple market beyond Red and Golden Delicious, the search has been on for new apples that emphasize taste. “We have to stay current and we have to be consumerdriven,” said Jim Hazen, business manager for

without restriction — now appear to be numbered. The Honeycrisp, which was trademarked following its development by the University of Minnesota breeding program, shows what a new variety can mean. Since its patent expired two years ago, more acres of Honeycrisp have been planted and the variety’s popularity and return to growers are touted as a success story. This marketing season, average price for a 40-pound box of Honeycrisp exceeds $47. By comparison, Red Delicious, the industry mainstay for years, is averaging less than $18 per box in limited shipments of fruit from the 2010 crop. While the price is high, the Honeycrisp variety is difficult to grow and is more susceptible to problems that limit how many are ultimately shipped to market.

Establishing trademarked names and licensing agreements for the new varieties can limit production and target distribution, which can mean higher prices and better quality control. In theory, the more exclusive the availability, the greater the cachet and the higher the price. Some newer varieties, for example, are selling at more than twice the price of the old standards, such as Red Delicious. The trend, which began several years ago when the Pink Lady variety was trademarked, represents a significant change in the industry. The days of so-called new SweeTango variety open varieties — such as Red and Golden Delicious, Other new varieties are which could be purchased in such limited quantities and grown by orchardists and are being marketed by

Things to Do Port Townsend and Jefferson County

Prostate support group — Fiesta Jalisco Restaurant, 10893 Rhody Drive, Port Had“Windows on the World” lock, noon to 1 p.m. watercolors exhibit — Sandra Smith-Poling. Art Mine Gallery Northwest Maritime Cenin the Inn at Port Hadlock, 310 ter tour — Hourlong tour of the Hadlock Bay Road. new headquarters and telling of property’s story. Meet docent Port Townsend Aero in chandlery, 431 Water St., Museum — Jefferson County 2 p.m. Free. Elevators availInternational Airport, 195 Air- able, children welcome and port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. pets not allowed inside buildAdmission: $10 for adults, $9 ing. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. for seniors, $6 for children ages 102 or e-mail sue@nw 7-12. Free for children younger maritime.org. than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Puget Sound Coast Artil- 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. lery Museum — Fort Worden Phone 360-385-6854. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Whole Person Drumming children 6 to 12; free for chil- — Beginners Mind with Zorina dren 5 and younger. Exhibits Wolf. Madrona Mind Body Instiinterpret the Harbor Defenses tute, Fort Worden State Park, 6 of Puget Sound and the Strait p.m. to 8 p.m. Visit www.village of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- heartbeat.com. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ 681-5407 or e-mail vhb@ olypen.com. villageheartbeat.com.

Today

Rothschild House — Franklin and Taylor streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to Jefferson County Historical Society members. Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., Port Townsend, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-3851003 or visit www.jchsmuseum. org. Commanding Officer’s Quarters museum tour — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for children. Phone 360-385-1003. Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for youth (6-17); free for science center members. “Whales in Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. org. Conversation Cafe — Victorian Square Deli, 940 Water St., No. 1, noon. Phone 360-3856959 or visit www.conversation cafe.org. Topic: Medici. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360-

2010 Global Lens film series — “Ordinary People,” a 2009 film from Serbia. Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St. 10 a.m. Admission $5. Phone 360-3791333. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous — First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Visit www. foodaddicts.org. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Rothschild House — Franklin and Taylor streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to Jefferson County Historical Society members. Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org.

Northwest Maritime CenRhody O’s Square Dances — Gardiner Community Cen- ter tour — Hourlong tour of ter, 980 Old Gardiner Road, new headquarters and telling of property’s story. Meet docent 6:30 p.m. in the center’s chandlery, 431 Olympic Peninsula Dance Water St., 2 p.m. Free. Eleva— Music by Maia Santell and tors available, children welHouse Blend. Port Townsend come and pets not allowed Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., 8 inside building. Phone 360p.m. to 11 p.m. Free (with 385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail admission) dance lesson in sue@nwmaritime.org. “American Bandstand” swing Jefferson County Historiwith Walter Dill and Janice Eklund, 7 p.m. Adults $15; stu- cal Museum and shop — 540 dent with school ID & people Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with disabilities $10; ages12 Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for and younger $7. No partner or children 3 to 12; free to historiregistration necessary. Experi- cal society members. Exhibits enced dancers encouraged to include “Jefferson County’s help beginners. Smoke-free. Maritime Heritage,” “James For more information, phone Swan and the Native Ameri360-385-6919 or 360-385- cans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 5237. 360-385-1003 or visit www. “Here’s to the Ladies! The jchsmuseum.org. Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Commanding Officer’s Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, 419 Washing- Quarters museum tour — ton St., 8 p.m.; General admis- Fort Worden State Park, 11 sion $18 and students $10. a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for Advance tickets online or at children. Phone 360-385-1003. Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. Jazz brunch — Celebrating For more info, phone 360-3857396 or visit www.keycity music of Hoagy Carmichael with his son Hoagy B. Carmipublictheatre.org. chael, the cast and creators of Key City Public Theater’s curSaturday rent production and The Blue “Windows on the World” Crows. Castle Key Restaurant, watercolor exhibit — Sandra 651 Cleveland St., 11 a.m. Smith-Poling. Art Mine Gallery Tickets $40 available online at in the Inn at Port Hadlock, 310 www.keycitypublictheatre.org Hadlock Bay Road or by phone at 360-379-0195. . Port Townsend Aero Port Townsend Marine SciMuseum — Jefferson County ence Center — Fort Worden International Airport, 195 Air- State Park. Natural history and port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for for seniors, $6 for children ages youth (6-17); free for science 7-12. Free for children younger center members. “Whales in than 6. Features vintage air- Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone craft and aviation art. 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. Boatbuilding — The Boat org. School, 42 N. Water St., at 10 a.m. Phone Wayne Chimenti Peace vigil — Ferry inter360-379-9220 or e-mail force section, downtown Port

Remembering a Lifetime

Sweetie variety But some disgruntled Minnesota growers, not included in the licensing deal, are suing. Broetje Orchards and its marketing arm, FirstFruits Marketing, are providing the Sweetie variety exclusively to Top Food & Drug and Haggen Food and Pharmacy in Washington and Oregon. The apples, which went on sale late last month, are promoted as having a beautiful red color accented by golden cheeks. An initial retail price was $1.99 per pound.

Other warehouse and marketing firms have their own varieties. One, Stemilt Growers of Wenatchee, trademarked the name Pinata and has exclusive rights to grow and market the variety in the United States. The variety was developed in Germany and released throughout Europe in 1986, according to information from Stemilt. Fewer than 100,000 boxes of Pinata made their way to market through June.

Washington state has its own new variety. Technically, the variety, now known only as WA 2, was developed by Washington State University breeder Bruce Barritt in conjunction with the Washington State Tree Fruit Research Commission. WA 2, a blush red apple, is undergoing evaluation in commercial orchard settings and is expected to be released in January. Another variety, WA 5, also is in the pipeline.

at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Townsend, 12:30 p.m. Bring www.jchsmuseum.org. flags, banners or posters. Jefferson County HistoriQuilcene Historical cal Museum and shop — 540 Museum — 151 E. Columbia Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. St., by appointment. Artifacts, Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for documents, family histories children 3 to 12; free to historiand photos of Quilcene and cal society members. Exhibits surrounding communities. New include “Jefferson County’s exhibits on Brinnon, military, Maritime Heritage,” “James millinery and Quilcene High Swan and the Native AmeriSchool’s 100th anniversary. cans” and “The Chinese in Phone 360-765-0688, 360- Early Port Townsend.” Phone 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or 360-385-1003 or visit www. e-mail quilcenemuseum@ jchsmuseum.org. olypen.com or quilcene Commanding Officer’s museum@embarqmail.com. Quarters museum tour — Jefferson County Histori- Fort Worden State Park, 11 cal Society downtown walk- a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 adults, free for ing tour — Begins at Historical children. Phone 360-385-1003. Society Museum, 540 Water Port Townsend Marine SciSt., 2 p.m. Cost: $10 and free for historical society members. ence Center — Fort Worden Museum admission included. State Park. Natural history and Visit www.jchsmuseum.org. marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for Through September. youth (6-17); free for science Bingo — Booster Club, center members. “Whales in Corey Lane, Brinnon, 6:45 Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ p.m. ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. “Here’s to the Ladies! The org. Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Quilcene Historical Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, 419 Washing- Museum — 151 E. Columbia ton St., 8 p.m. General admis- St., by appointment. Artifacts, sion $18 and students $10. documents, family histories Advance tickets online or at and photos of Quilcene and Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. surrounding communities. New For more information, phone exhibits on Brinnon, military, 360-385-7396 or visit www. millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. keycitypublictheatre.org. Phone 360-765-0688, 360Comedy show — Castle 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or quilcenemuseum@ Key Restaurant, 651 Cleveland e-mail olypen.com or quilcene St. 9 p.m. $12. museum@embarqmail.com.

Free bike clinic — Chauncey Tudhope-Locklear offers “Port Townsend ReCyclery,” Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-643-1755. “Here’s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. General admission $15 and students $10. Advance tickets online or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more info, call 360-385-7396 or visit www. keycitypublictheatre.org. English country dance and potluck — RoseWind Common House, 3131 Haines St., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Free. Facility is fragrance-free. No street shoes are allowed. For more information, phone Dan Post at 360-554-0417 or e-mail dan. post@frandango.org.

Forks and the West End Today Forks Timber Museum — Next door to Forks Visitors Center, 1421 S. Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $3 admission. Phone 360-374-9663.

Saturday Forks Timber Museum — Next door to Forks Visitors Center, 1421 S. Forks Ave., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $3 admission. Phone 360-374-9663.

Sunday “Windows on the World” watercolor exhibit — Sandra Smith-Poling. Art Mine Gallery in the Inn at Port Hadlock, 310 Hadlock Bay Road.

Death and Memorial Notice Christopher Nourse Heggenes

Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art.

November 30, 1966 October 7, 2010 Christopher Nourse Heggenes, 43, of Langley, Washington, died on October 7, 2010, at his home of a stroke. Chris was born November 30,1966, in Ballard, Washington, to Norm and Kathy Heggenes. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, golfing with friends and spending time with his family and dog, Shelby. He is survived by his father and mother, Norm and Kathy Heggenes of Langley, Washington; wife, Ronda Heggenes; brother’s family, Garth, Molly and Kolby Heggenes; and sister’s

Chimacum Grange Farmers Market — 9572 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for children 6 to 12, free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Rothschild House — Franklin and Taylor streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to Jefferson County Historical Society members. Phone 360-385-1003 or visit

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading

The Associated Press

Bob Clymer of Yakima picks out Sweetie apples at Top Foods in Yakima after trying a sample in the store’s produce section.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Continued from C6 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or 10sails@hotmail.com. e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcenemuseum@embarqmail.com.

individual shippers that price information is not available. Another University of Minnesota apple variety, SweeTango, is being handled as a managed variety, meaning production is limited. The name is trademarked and the university has licensed the variety to a select group of growers, including some in Washington state.

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Leah & Steve Ford

email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Luann • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Friday, October 15, 2010

Godmother steps in for the last time DEAR ABBY: I’m a 23-year-old woman who has been helping to raise my three adorable godchildren over the last few years. Their mother is also 23. She became pregnant with her oldest when she was 15. She’s a young single mother, unprepared for the full responsibility, so I have stepped in. When they were babies, we would take turns rocking them all night. I take them to the doctor when they are sick — with or without their mom. I helped select which schools they attend. Through the years, I have been there every day, waking them in the morning, taking them to school, putting them to bed, etc. I am now getting married and have slightly reduced my day-to-day role although I am still in many ways the “other parent.” I get criticized for this all the time. I am constantly being told: “They are not your children. You shouldn’t be doing this.” Even my future in-laws have said it. I don’t know how to respond. I love the children very much, as if they were my own. I can’t let them suffer for their mother’s numerous mistakes. I’d appreciate any advice you can give me. Godmother of Three in New England

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Dear Godmother: May I begin by asking, “Where is their mother?” Where are the grandparents? Three children, no father(s) — who is supporting them? You are a caring angel to have stepped in to the extent that you have, but why isn’t their mother around to put them to bed at night, wake them in the morning and see that they get to the doctor when they are so sick they need one? Something is seriously out of kilter. In the not-too-distant future, you will have children of your own to care for. Husbands need a certain amount of care and nurturing, too. It will be impossible for you to continue to be as involved as you have been in your godchildren’s lives.

Garfield

Momma

dear abby Abigail

Van Buren

asked) to do.

You are doing the right thing by transitioning away, and you must continue to do so. As much as you love them, your godchildren are their mother’s responsibility, and you have already done more than you should have been expected (or

Dear Abby: My husband and I had a troubled marriage. He was a good father and provider, and I respected him for that. But he did not respect me. He constantly blamed and criticized me for his many emotional problems. After I told him I was leaving him, he committed suicide. My problem is, our adult children blame me for his death. I don’t want to bad-mouth their father or tell them the unpleasant details of our marriage, but they don’t know the whole story. I have had a lot of professional counseling and my kids have had some, but they refuse to attend any more sessions. Should I just continue to do the best I can and hope they can be more forgiving as they mature, or should I tell them my side of the story? Doing the Best I Can Dear Doing: Your children should have been told the whole story while you were together in counseling. If you allow them to continue in their belief that you caused their father’s death, their anger will only continue to grow. If possible, that important conversation should be held with the help of a mediator. Because they refuse to see a therapist, I’m recommending your religious adviser.

________

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Lend a helping hand. The impression you make will lead to a proposal you will want to consider. Someone with more experience or something you learned in the past will help you make the right choice now. 4 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have more options but won’t realize it if you are too absorbed in a personal problem. Move toward a brighter future by branching out in a direction that allows you to put your skills, talents and attributes to better use. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Take on a challenge. A job prospect looks good and can help you solve some of your personal problems if you make a move. A short trip will enable you to connect with someone helpful. 5 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): There will be changes made based on what you do that will influence your future. Love and romance are apparent. A promise made will enable you to improve your current living situation. 3 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You may be undecided about someone or something going on in your personal life. Sort

Dennis the Menace

C11

Doonesbury

out what needs to be done and move forward before you don’t have a choice. Change will be required and, although distasteful initially, you will benefit in the end. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Change is required but you cannot do it alone. Ask the people you feel most akin to for help. Join forces so you can all pitch in to make life easier for you as a group. Reverting back to an old lifestyle will help cut costs. 5 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Ease your stress by moving forward. Deal with the people who influence your life and your emotional well-being. The changes you make at home will bring marked improvement for you and anyone you reside with. Don’t look back. 2 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t allow innuendos or someone’s negativity to take you in the wrong direction. You know what changes need to be made, so get moving. Opportunity knocks but, if you aren’t ready because you are too busy satisfying everyone around you, you will get left behind. 4 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You can focus on getting ahead and advance or you can focus on what’s going on in your per-

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

sonal life and take a step backward. There is nothing you can do to change the past, so own up to any wrongdoing and move forward. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Lift any burden that has been put on you. It’s OK to say no if you don’t have time or if someone is taking advantage of your generosity and good nature. Think of what’s best for you and your family and act accordingly. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There are plenty of possibilities but you have to make a choice. You can remain in the same position, doing the same thing over and over again, or you can make the changes required to bring greater satisfaction to your life. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You can win favors as well as someone’s approval if you are willing to go the distance and follow through with your promises. Don’t become a chameleon or let someone’s negativity or refusal to take part in your plans stop you from reaching your set goals. 3 stars


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WeatherNorthwest

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

SaTurday

Sunday

Yesterday

Monday

TueSday

High 54

Low 35

53/35

53/37

54/39

54/40

Mostly cloudy.

Partly cloudy.

Mostly sunny.

Sunshine and patchy clouds.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

The Peninsula Today will be a tranquil day across the Peninsula. It will be cloudy most of the day, but expect a few peeks of sunshine. High temperatures will be in the lower to middle 50s. Skies will turn clear tonight, allowing temperatures to become cold. Patchy frost Neah Bay Port is possible late. Mostly sunny skies are expected Saturday 54/42 Townsend with high pressure overhead. Sunday should be a mostly Port Angeles 55/42 sunny day as well. High pressure will actually strengthen 54/35 Sunday through early next week. This means an Sequim extended dry spell can be expected.

Victoria 55/37

57/41

Forks 58/38

Olympia 58/32

Seattle 56/39

Everett 56/39

Spokane 56/31

Yakima Kennewick 62/28 67/29

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Mainly cloudy today. Wind from the west at 7-14 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Partly cloudy tonight. Wind light and variable. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Mostly sunny tomorrow. Wind from the west-southwest at 4-8 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Sunday: Partial sunshine. Wind from the west at 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear.

LaPush

7:28 a.m. 6:56 p.m. Port Angeles 11:18 a.m. 8:37 p.m. Port Townsend 1:03 p.m. 10:22 p.m. Sequim Bay* 12:24 p.m. 9:43 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

6.2’ 6.4’ 6.9’ 4.8’ 8.3’ 5.8’ 7.8’ 5.5’

12:43 a.m. 1:05 p.m. 3:02 a.m. 6:09 p.m. 4:16 a.m. 7:23 p.m. 4:09 a.m. 7:16 p.m.

1.1’ 3.6’ 0.6’ 4.2’ 0.8’ 5.4’ 0.8’ 5.1’

8:29 a.m. 8:07 p.m. 12:03 p.m. 10:19 p.m. 1:48 p.m. ----1:09 p.m. 11:25 p.m.

6.2’ 6.2’ 6.8’ 4.6’ 8.2’ --7.7’ 5.3’

2005 HONDA CBR 600F41

3,900 MILES!

STK#9012B

$

Moon Phases Last

New

First

Seattle 56/39 Billings 72/36

1:44 a.m. 2:16 p.m. 4:09 a.m. 6:51 p.m. 5:23 a.m. 8:05 p.m. 5:16 a.m. 7:58 p.m.

1.4’ 3.3’ 1.1’ 3.6’ 1.4’ 4.7’ 1.3’ 4.4’

High Tide Ht 9:21 a.m. 9:13 p.m. 12:37 p.m. ----12:04 a.m. 2:22 p.m. 1:43 p.m. -----

6.6’ 6.3’ 6.7’ 4.8’ 5.6’ 8.1’ 7.6’ ---

Low Tide Ht 2:42 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 5:13 a.m. 7:21 p.m. 6:27 a.m. 8:35 p.m. 6:20 a.m. 8:28 p.m.

1.5’ 2.7’ 1.5’ 3.0’ 2.0’ 3.9’ 1.9’ 3.7’

Oct 30

Nov 5

Nov 13

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 79 67 s Baghdad 95 65 s Beijing 70 43 s Brussels 57 43 sh Cairo 98 75 s Calgary 50 22 sh Edmonton 49 26 c Hong Kong 84 74 pc Jerusalem 90 67 s Johannesburg 72 45 s Kabul 87 43 s London 57 42 c Mexico City 73 46 pc Montreal 48 43 r Moscow 41 30 sn New Delhi 99 65 s Paris 60 49 pc Rio de Janeiro 89 77 pc Rome 67 53 s Stockholm 43 30 s Sydney 75 50 r Tokyo 75 61 c Toronto 58 38 c Vancouver 58 40 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Minneapolis 60/46 Chicago 62/44 Kansas City 70/48

San Francisco 74/51 Denver 78/44 Los Angeles 80/62

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Detroit 60/41

El Paso 80/50

New York 59/48

Washington 68/45

Atlanta 74/46 Houston 85/54 Miami 86/71

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 76 39 58 74 62 65 64 72 70 72 58 56 78 72 62 63 55 68 85 78 66 60 63 26 68 85 85 43

Lo W 47 s 33 s 38 c 46 s 46 c 42 pc 29 pc 36 s 38 s 45 s 44 c 41 c 51 s 43 s 44 s 44 s 27 pc 34 pc 54 s 44 s 49 s 41 pc 33 pc 10 s 30 pc 72 pc 54 s 37 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 70 88 80 80 86 60 60 72 78 59 84 72 82 96 61 94 63 71 78 84 68 72 84 71 74 70 64 68

Lo W 48 s 65 s 48 s 62 pc 71 pc 43 pc 46 s 44 s 57 s 48 c 53 s 47 s 58 s 67 pc 46 c 69 pc 41 pc 43 s 44 s 51 s 46 s 47 s 52 s 62 c 51 s 43 s 40 s 45 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 102 at Thermal, CA

Low: 16 at West Yellowstone, MT

2008 SUBARU LEGACY LIMITED 3.0 AWD 2007 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER 4WD 2008 HARLEY-DAVIDSON ROAD KING CLASSIC 2007 CHEVROLET COLORADO LS AUTO, PWR MULTI-ADJ SEATS, NAVIGATION, FOG LIGHTS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & HTD MIRRORS, ABS, LEATHER, TILT/TELE, CRUISE & MORE! STK#P2165A

$

UNDER

1,000 MILES!

2 6, 9 8 3

V8, AUTO, FRT AIR DAM, STAB CTRL, CLIM CTRLS, TACH, TILT, TOW PKG, VOICE-ACTIVATED PHONE, LUGGAGE RACK, ALLOYS, ONSTAR, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AC, CRUISE & MORE! STK#9533A

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96 CID, 6 SPD MAN, SADDLE BAGS, WINDSHIELD, LOW MILES, LEATHER SEATS, CRUISE & MORE! STK#9550A

1 7, 4 9 9

$

1 4, 9 9 9

TACH, TILT, TIRE PRESSURE MONITOR, CARGO TIEDOWNS, FRT AIR DAM, SKID PLATE, TOW HITCH RECEIVER, FOG LAMPS, ALLOYS, SAT RADIO, AM/FM/CD, AC, CRUISE & MORE! STK#9364B

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1 1, 9 8 7

Prices do not include tax, license & documentation fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typographical errors. VINs posted at dealership. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 10/22/10.

0A5099009

4, 2 8 7

Sunday

Low Tide Ht

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

ONLY

Sunset today ................... 6:26 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:35 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 3:19 p.m. Moonset today ....................... none

Oct 22

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sun & Moon

Friday, October 15, 2010

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 56 40 0.00 7.84 Forks 65 41 0.20 88.04 Seattle 60 47 0.04 30.12 Sequim 59 44 0.00 8.36 Hoquiam 57 42 0.00 46.35 Victoria 58 39 trace 23.52 P. Townsend* 61 48 0.00 11.02 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 56/41 Bellingham 54/32

Aberdeen 59/39

Peninsula Daily News

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

D1

Thank You!

to our carriers.

INTERNATIONAL NEWSPAPER CARRIER DAY OCTOBER 16

Port Angeles Carriers: Michael Erwick Lila Bowchop Rachel Stoddard Terry Stoddard Jerry Steed Tony Bradley Janessa Scott Colleen Rickel Vanessa Bentley Jamie Robinson Amy Filion Trent Blore Jim Bailey Joan Morrish Rick Preston Jan Bock Gary Johnson Charles Owens Pat Johnson Sequim Carriers: Dee Young Bill Huizinga Robert Young Melanie Morris Dan Pfleger Jr. Mathew Stone Justin Houseman Bill Mercer Steve Yale Alan Parenti Ken Daugaard Forks & West End Carriers: Maggie White Mike Andrews William Christian Amber Bellamy

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Port Townsend Carriers: Christy Bromley Heidi Pflueger Earlyne Lathim Anna Vaughan Jessica Houck Paul Mascho Judy Hart Zachary Mitton


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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

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Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

23

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

ESTATE Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 9-2 p.m. (Oct. 16-17) 1110 W. Spruce Ct., Sequim. Furniture, lamps, kitchen garden, patio. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com GENERATOR: 8000 watts, diesel. $1,000. 452-5154.

FOUND: Cash. Clallam County Courthouse, call with exact details to claim. 360-417-2268 FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST FT, plus benefits, experience required. No calls. Bring resume and fill out application at Peninsula Children’s Clinic, 902 Caroline Street, P.A. GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 1000 Eagle Heights Rd. Follow Hwy 112 West to Gerber Rd. (1/4 mile past Freshwater Bay Rd on left) Follow signs!!! Hydraulic wood splitting, big or small, we’ll split them all. 457-9037 JEEP: ‘88 Cherokee. 89K miles, body and interior rough, good powertrain, driveable or parts. $650. 452-1162 LAKE SUTHERLAND Small trailer. 1 Br., $350 mo. References. No smoking. 360-461-4280 MISC: 2 sofas with recliners, beige, with blue and brown, great condition, $200 each. Overstuffed chair with ottoman, soft gold, great condition. $125. 457-5656 MOTOR HOME: ‘82 24’ Travelcraft. Must see. $3,400/obo. 452-2609

MOVING Sale: Fri., 93 p.m., 82 Starry Rd off March Banks. 30 gallon lawn sprayer. Welding table. CB radios, etc. MOVING: Diamond Point. 3921 Diamond Pt. Rd. Sat., 8-3 p.m. Furniture. 681-0550. MULTI-FAMILY Sale Fri.-Sat., 10-6 p.m., Sun Meadows, 120 Patriot. PAMPERED CHEF, appliances, clothes, computers, drums, TVs, generator, & check online for more!

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com P.A.: 636 Georgiana, large shop/garage, 4 Br., 2 ba, great location. $1,100, deposit. 460-7516 P.A.: 2 Br. duplex, ground floor, carport, lg. extra parking, quiet, clean, near bus. $750. 417-5589 or 460-5358. Purple Cow Cleaning Services. Fast and reliable. Mon.-Fri., Sequim/P.A. References. 797-4906. RECLINERS: Leather, swivel rocker, black, $185 ea. or $300 pair. Can deliver for gas. Port Angeles. 808-5636 SEAHAWK TICKETS (2) Section 337, seat 21 and 22, row T. Oct. 24, vs. Arizona Cardinals. $78 ea. 461-3661

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1 bath rambler, large yard above the QFC parking lot. Wood stove, attached garage, nice neighborhood Properties by Landmark, 452-1326. SEQUIM: 5 acres, flat land on Dungeness River, with damaged 2 story home on property 100’ from river, perfect view, approved septic plans 1-5 Br., above flood plane, fenced, with pond. $137,500. 582-1292 SUBARU: ‘96 Legacy wagon. Auto, loaded, well maintained, $3,200. 417-0468 TRAILER: ‘78 22’ Layton. Nice shape, good rubber. $800/ obo. 457-3627. Waterfront Homes Troll Haven Farm, amenity laden properties, secluded luxurious homes, water/mtn. views, lease options, owner financing possible. 360-775-6633 Welding Services. 25 years experience, local references. Large and small jobs welcome. Call Bob at 457-5749 YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 1322 S. Cedar. Double box springs and mattress, chairs, end tables and lots of misc. YARD Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., at Salvation Army, 206 S. Peabody.

The missing piece to your home selling success.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

ARTISANS CREATIVE CONSIGNMENT OPENING SOON IN CARLSBORG. PROUD SPONSORS OF BRIGHTER SMILES! We are looking for talented people who make Jewelry, paint, pottery, quilting, knitting. Any unique artistic talent qualifies!!! Also great consignable items. Clothes, household etc. We are located at 803 Carlsborg Rd. Ste D. Across from the post office. Our consignment days will be on Tues. Oct. 12th 10 am until 5:30 pm. Thurs. Oct. 14th 10 am to 3 pm and Sat. 16th 10am to 2 pm. Call for future dates. We are aiming to be open by November 1st. Our goal is to donate a portion of the proceeds to help children receive dental care. This is such a great need and something I feel passionate about! Your consignment or donation will be greatly appreciated and help create a brighter smile! Please contact Michele at 360461-4799 or Heather 360-7756554. The Business line is activated on Tues the 12th. 360-681-7655

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard Pick your ad package and rate that works for you. Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday

sula P enin if ied C la ss8 4 3 5 4 52 -

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FOUND: Cash. Clallam County Courthouse, call with exact details to claim. 360-417-2268 FOUND: Cat. Orange, young, male, Hwy. 112, mile 49, P.A. 928-3447 FOUND: Cell phone. Sherborne Rd., Sequim. Call to identify. 683-0858. FOUND: Key. Saturn with fob, and another key. Old Mill area, P.A. 417-8000. FOUND: Keys. Leather monkey, 1st and Francis parking lot, P.A. 452-5034. LOST: Cat. 5 yrs old, peach short hair tom, missing 4 days, end of Craig st., college area, P.A. 417-9170. LOST: Cat. Gray longhaired male tabby, 6 mo. old, no collar, Hooker and Atterberry Rd., Sequim. 360-775-4231 LOST: Dog. Chihuahua, male, tan with black markings and muzzle, wearing collar, Carlsborg gas station. 582-1160. LOST: Dog. Chihuahua. Gales Addition, P.A. 457-3730 or 461-0478. LOST: Keys. Sequim/PA: Remote key fob for Ford. 3 keys, one w/ red rubber ring around it. Large charm w/ ‘L’ in circle. 461-0348.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CLALLAM CONSERVATION DISTRICT is accepting applications for a half-time Administrative Assistant to perform fullcharge bookkeeping and general office administration. Proficiency in QuickBooks and Excel required. Starting pay DOQ. Excellent benefits. Full description and application materials available at Clallam Conservation District, 1601 E. Front St., Bldg/Ste A, Port Angeles, WA 98362, 360-452-1912 ext. 5 or http://clallam.scc. wa.gov/ Applications due by 10/18/10.

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TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

31

Help Wanted

ASSURED HOSPICE LHC Group RN Forks and West End Seeking motivated individuals to enhance our expanding program. For application call 360-582-3796 CLERICAL: Excel and Word experience helpful. Fax resume to 360-681-5436 CLINIC ADMINISTRATOR Family Medicine of Port Angeles is seeking an experienced full-time clinic administrator. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Required Qualifications: 5 yrs. healthcare mgmt. BA degree in a relevant field. Leadership, supervisory, human resources, risk mgmt., accounting, QuickBooks, Excel. CQI or Lean Thinking. Send a cover letter and resume to: Katrina Weller MD, Family Medicine of Port Angeles PLLC, 240 W. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. See our website at FMPA.net, or email katrinaweller@ gmail.com. COUNTER HELP Cock-A-Doodle Doughnuts is looking for a reliable and friendly person, Tues.-Fri., approx. 30 hrs. wk. Apply at 105 E. Front St., P.A. with resume or fill out application. DENTAL HYGIENIST Part-time position available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Dr. Clark Sturdivant at 608 Polk St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. FRONT DESK ASSISTANT For digital/dental office, experienced, self-motivated, friendly and customer service oriented person. Must be a team player, helping when needed in other areas. Cross-trained as well as competency in dental software. Send resumes to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#176/Assistant Pt Angeles, WA 98362 FRONT DESK RECEPTIONIST FT, plus benefits, experience required. No calls. Bring resume and fill out application at Peninsula Children’s Clinic, 902 Caroline Street, P.A.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. MENTAL HEALTH Crisis Intervention Specialist for mobile crisis interventions/ assessments/stabilization svcs. Req. Master’s degr. or RN plus 2 yrs mental health exp. Case Manager/Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Pref. Master’s w/2 yrs exp. Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE BUSINESS MANAGER For Crescent School District, full-time. Complete job description and application at www.crescent.wednet.edu or contact 360-9283311, ext. 100. Closing date for applications October 27, 2010. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 UTILITY BILLING LEAD The City of Sequim has an immediate opening for a Utility Billing Lead. Minimum 4 years experience in utilities, billing, collections, and customer service - including serving in a lead or supervisory capacity. This position is also responsible for general accounting work as assigned. Undergraduate degree in Accounting, Business Administration or related field preferred. Excellent communication, people, and organizational skills needed. Must have demonstrated experience working with customers with advanced and complex issues. Union position with benefits. $19.81-$23.55 hr. For application and job description visit http://www.ci. sequim.wa.us/jobs/ Open until filled. EOE

34

Work Wanted

Aaron’s Garden. Hand weeding, weedeater, pruning, clean-up, hauling. Whatever your garden needs. 360-808-7276 ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 Hannah’s helping hands. My name is Hannah and I clean houses. I am reliable, no hassles, and very detailed. I will go to Joyce, Port Angeles, or Sequim. Please call me at 775-1258, I would love to clean your home.

34

5000900

AGNEW: 1 Br., 1 ba, all utilities paid. $600 mo. Small pet neg. 477-2000 BED: King Sealy Posturpedic Plush Pillowtop, mattress and box spring, pillow top on both sides, great shape, will deliver. $400/obo. 681-3299 CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990 COSTUME Sale: Fri.Sat., 12-6 p.m., 214 E. Lauridsen Blvd., All View Motel. 457-1311 COUNTER HELP Cock-A-Doodle Doughnuts is looking for a reliable and friendly person, Tues.-Fri., approx. 30 hrs. wk. Apply at 105 E. Front St., P.A. with resume or fill out application. CRAB POT PULLER: Honda, aluminum tower, $450. 460-3774

Lost and Found

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Work Wanted

Best Choice Lawn Care. Maintenance and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/ P.A. 248-230-0450. HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, offices, RV’s, and event/party clean up. No job too small or too big. Move out’s, rentals, foreclosures, or for sale. Call for your free estimate. 360-808-3017 Hedge trim, prune, mow, haul, odd jobs. 452-7249 HOME CLEANING Meticulous and honest. Amie 452-4184. Honest, reliable, housekeeping. $20 hr. Quality service counts. For details, 360-434-2308 Hydraulic wood splitting, big or small, we’ll split them all. 457-9037 Janitorial Services. Honest, reliable and hardworking. Looking for business’s that need cleaning in the evenings and on weekends. Licensed and Bonded. Ready to keep your office clean. Call Bailey. 477-9256 MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142. O’Leary General LLC. Local college grad seeks your fall projects. Carports, decks, debris hauling, & much more! No job too big or too small. Highly conscientious & efficient. Over 10 yrs exp! Excellent references. Res. & comm. accts. accepted. Lisc., bonded, insured. Call Bryan today. 360-460-1557 OLEARGL929MH PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek.c om Purple Cow Cleaning Services. Fast and reliable. Mon.-Fri., Sequim/P.A. References. 797-4906. RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. No job too small! Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586.

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations and new projects... Call me today! Appointments in my central Port Angeles home. Patti Kuth, 417-5576. isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy! TUTORING: Certified teacher, all subjects except higher math. 360-609-2927


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Mr. Olympia contestants’ obsessions 2 Risqué 3 Thin ornamental layer 4 Black light, briefly

34

Work Wanted

VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971 Welding Services. 25 years experience, local references. Large and small jobs welcome. Call Bob at 457-5749

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. HARBORS AND PORTS

R O P E G N I H S I F R A H W By Kelsey Blakley

5 Marshal under Napoleon 6 Good, except on the links 7 Eggbeater feature 8 Tip of Massachusetts 9 Beatnik’s address 10 Gilligan’s shipwrecked ship 11 Savanna grazer 12 River through Tours 13 Fly-by-night co.? 18 “It’ll never wash!” 24 Little cut-up 25 Bug like a 24Down 26 Went off the deep end 27 God wounded by Diomedes in the “Iliad” 28 Wheels of Fortune? 32 Knock over 34 “Sands of Iwo __”: 1949 film 35 Med school subj. 36 “Mayor” author 38 Doctor’s orders, often 40 Stump Homes

$50,000 LESS THAN ASSESSED VALUE! You’ll love this spacious 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,620 sf home featuring both a living room and family room, formal dining area and breakfast nook and a large master suite with sitting area and walk-in closet. Detached 864 sf shop/garage. The southern exposure back yard is fully fenced and has a raised garden beds, fruit trees, a deck and beautiful mountain view. Located just minutes from town on a quiet cul-de-sac. $224,000 ML251863/123213 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. A REAL WINNER Curb appeal with gorgeous grounds and mountain view, huge 1,560 sf finished heated and insulated workshop/studio with a 3/4 bath, 5 skylights, storage galore, and a one car garage! This is in addition to the 1,476 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath, one story home with a two car garage. 1.03 acre property. $299,000 ML#251778/118985 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY Beautiful custom home (2005) on 2 private fenced acres, 2 Br. plus den, 2 bath, hardwood, tile, granite, large windows to enjoy nature and wildlife from indoors, organic gardens, orchard, mtn views. Located between Sequim and Port Angeles in a prestigious neighborhood. $399,000. ML251453. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

10/15/10

L O V E D I T S H I P S E O N

S A H L O A D T O C N L T I V

W H N C I H G W R A H R A E P

© 2010 Universal Uclick

P S E G N C E U E A E T S N Q

N A T L I A I C E D P S S U K

Solution: 10 letters

K O T E T S O N N A E E A E M

C C I H E E I U C L M Y D V R

www.wonderword.com

S L E T G R R T T R O U O I O

T R I D A I H L O N T S C R F

A L I M V T A T T P E O K R T

O R O E A H S S A E S R L A A

B O R E N T R Y L A K E R I L

R S P A S S E N G E R S E U P

R E T A W K A E R B O G R A C

10/15

Join us on Facebook

Anchor, Arrive, Boats, Breakwater, Bridge, Captain, Cargo, Chain, Climate, Cruise, Current, Deck, Depart, Dock, Entry, Fishing, Halt, Lake, Load, Marine, Moor, Ocean, Passengers, Path, Pier, Pilot, Plank, Platform, Quay, Rest, Rivers, Rope, Seas, Shelter, Ships, Shore, Signal, Spot, Station, Steer, Storm, Tide, Undertow, Vessel, Wave, Weather, Wharf Yesterday’s Answer: Bargain

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

CUHDY ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SONEO (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Plaque holder? 44 James’s “Westworld” costar 46 Time slice 49 Aristotle’s first element of tragedy 50 Home to many Berbers 52 Annapolis newbies 53 Two-time

Homes

Charming, Vintage 2 Br., 1 bath remodeled Port Angeles home. $137,000 Improvements include: newly painted exterior and interior, new carpet. Bath includes maple vanity, ceramic tile and new fixtures. Updated kitchen with new countertops, flooring and appliances. Slider off master opens to large backyard. 12x12 deck and backyard fence in progress. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. 628 W. 9th Contact: Susan 206-948-6653. CITY CHIC IN THE COUNTRY Best entertaining floor plan around with a well planned kitchen and fantastic entertainment center in the living room. You’ll love it and so will your friends. Lots of storage for your toys in the oversized garage plus detached double garage/workshop. $409,000. ML252115. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CUSTOM HOME ON 1.25 ACRES OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE OFFERED AT ONLY 289k. Owner terms are only 10% down, balance at 6% for 30 years, easy qualifying. Possible Lease Option with only 5% down. NO AGENTS. Serious calls only. SEE photos, PDN ONLINE. PLEASE CALL REX @ 360-460-1855

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

ENCHANTING MEDITERRANEAN 3 Br., 2.5 bath located close to desirable Cline Spit and 2 public golf courses. Gourmet kitchen, spacious living and family rooms. Spectacular sunroom, portico and courtyard. Huge 2,000 sf shop with bonus room, 1/2 bath, boat and RV parking. Lavender farm potential! $595,000. ML251088 Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GREAT HOME IN CUL-DE-SAC! You will enjoy this roomy like new home with 9’ ceilings and great floor plan. The spacious master suite is on the main floor. The living area includes a separate living/dining room in addition to a family room. Upstairs there is a bonus room with deck to enjoy the partial saltwater view. $289,000. ML252042/134623 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Great Home, Great Location, Great Price. 622 W 11th, PA. FSBO 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, 840 sq feet. Private setting between the bridges on a deadend. Wood stove, private deck. New flooring, windows, paint inside and out. Close to Elks Playfield. Can't beat the price. $134,900. Call Katie at 457-6788.

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

10/15/10

ARIDAL

Venezuelan president Carlos 54 Turn on __ 55 Intolerant 56 “__ Rae” 60 Early animal handler 61 Bit of force 62 Ret. fliers 65 Sumac from Peru

51

Homes

GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Main house has 2,332 sf of living space and custom features. Custom landscaping, koi pond with waterfall. Large greenhouse and garden area. Laminate wood floors, builtins, great sunroom, too. Includes two outbuildings for extra investment opportunities. $499,950. ML241656 Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GREAT LOCATION! Located near the high school, this beautiful 3 Br., 3 bath home has over 2,500 sf which includes a large bonus room over the 3 car garage. Nice cul-desac location! $279,000. ML251797. Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT OPPORTUNITY Generous corner lot, easy care landscaping, approximately 1,566 sf of friendly floor plan, all appliances included. Newer roof and water heater. $195,000 ML131039/251993 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT STARTER HOME You’ll love this 3 Br., 2 bath, one level home. Updated kitchen with newer countertops, pull outs, breakfast bar and a new stove. Skylights and newer countertops in both bathrooms. The roof is approximately 2 years old. Fenced in area for your pets. 2 car attached garage and plenty of parking in the back. $185,000 ML252096/138720 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. We will PRINT and DISTRIBUTE over 17,500 copies of your ad every day! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

GIZHAN Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: A Yesterday’s

51

Homes

HIGH BANK WATERFRONT Featuring views of the Strait, Mount Baker, and Victoria. Private, end of the road location. 3 Br., 3 bath home. 1.05 acre mountain view lot is added as a bonus. Two separate living areas to explore. Partially remodeled, fireplace, greatroom, master suite, all situated to take advantage of the incredible views. $499,000 ML#251408/96303 Dan Tash 461-2872 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY HOME WITH SHOP Like new 3 Br., 2 bath manufactured home on 1.4 acres with a great mountain view and a large RV garage/shop. Features include large kitchen with eating area, formal dining room, large living room, master suite with 2 closets, heat pump, Agnew irrigation with underground piping, large drive through RV garage/shop rough plumbed for a bath. Inside and outside RV hookups. A great package. $235,000. ML251556 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $89,000. 460-2667.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

(Answers tomorrow) VOUCH BANNER SUBDUE Jumbles: AGLOW Answer: What the executioner did when he wasn’t working — “HUNG” AROUND

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Homes

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Homes

JUNIPER ESTATES 1,440 sf of great living space: 2 living rooms, 2 Br., 2 baths! Energy efficient heat pump. Back yard backs to the greenbelt, raised garden beds, southern exposure. Needs a little TLC but price reflects it. $32,000. ML252098 Cathy Reed or Sheryl Payseno-Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

LET’S GO HOT TUBBIN’! The weather outside may be frightful but in the hot tub it will be delightful cause this spa is in its own cedar wood lined room. 3 Br., 2.5 bath with a 3 car garage. Outside yards are landscaped with plenty of room for outdoor activities. $260,000. ML251989. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

LIKE TO HUNT AND FISH? Nature lovers getaway to 10 acres across from the Sekiu River. Great for picnics and outdoor games. Baseboard heat, wall heater and free standing wood stove. Just north of approx. 300 square miles of state trust/timber lands. Bear, deer, elk and cougar habitat. $159,000. ML252065. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

NEARLY SOLD OUT Only one ground floor condo remaining in this 8 unit building on the 1st fairway at the Dungeness Golf Course. 1 Br., 1 bath with patio; all furnishings included, laundry room. Great rental or getaway home. $74,950. ML240846 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

MT PLEASANT BEAUTY Immaculate throughout, this 3 Br., 2 bath custom home boasts state-of-the-art stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops, custom lighting, skylights and solar tubes, etc, etc. The spaciousness of the great room concept is enhanced by the 18’ ceilings, wide expanse windows, custom window treatments and inside-the-glass mini blinds. A 3 plus car garage houses toys for the boys. A must see. $423,500. ML251517 Dick Pilling Carroll Realty 457-1111

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

NORTHBAY RAMBLER Situated on a private lot. 3 Br., two 3/4 baths, living room with propane fireplace, family room with woodstove. Kitchen plus dining room, carport, workshop, Landscaped with peek-a-boo view. $219,000. ML138558 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow OLYMPIC MTN VIEW Contemporary home built in 2006, 3 Br., 2 baths, vaulted ceilings, solid wood doors, heat pump, northern and southern exposure. $235,000 ML250840/56797 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND OWNER WILL CARRY Wonderful community, close to town, quiet peaceful, enclosed patio off master, amenities include pool, clubhouse, golf course. $219,000. ML116759/251727 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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Homes

GREAT BUY 3 Br., 1 bath home on large fenced corner lot. Detached oversized 2 car garage. Small basement. $177,500 ML232733/28170697 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SEQUIM: 5 acres, flat land on Dungeness River, with damaged 2 story home on property 100’ from river, perfect view, approved septic plans 1-5 Br., above flood plane, fenced, with pond. $137,500. 582-1292 Solid and clean 1951 Del Guzzi with 4 Br. and 1.5 baths. Large fenced lot, hardwood floors, new roof and a detached single garage. Would make a great starter home. Upstairs bath has plenty of space to make into a 3/4 bath. $199,900 ML251307/89079 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SPACIOUS ELEGANCE 2 master suites, 3 car garage, open floor plan, large kitchen and formal dining room, overlooking 8th green, 2 Br., 2.5 baths. $339,000. ML136212/252066 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPECTACULAR VIEWS! Wake up to a sunrise over Mt. Baker, the ships passing through the straits and the scenic Dungeness Valley. This energy efficient custom built home on 4+ acres has a long list of features and views that stretch for miles. $775,000. ML251141. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

4 SEASONS RANCH Very nice 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,180 sf home located on the 9th fairway in Four Seasons Ranch. Nearly everything in this home has been updated from the siding down to the floor coverings. Circular driveway, 2 car attached garage, covered R.V. parking, great fenced in backyard with lots of gardening space, small outbuildings/ shops, private deck and more. $299,000. ML252074/137506 Nason Beckett 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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By DAVID OUELLET

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

ACROSS 1 A popular one is modeled after the Winchester rifle 6 Three-time A.L. MVP 10 Narcissist’s obsession 14 Oil source 15 __ fide 16 Gin flavoring 17 Mentioned with a yawn? 19 Inn group member 20 __ trap 21 Like jellybeans 22 Memo header 23 Tightfistedness scale? 26 Swiffer WetJet, e.g. 29 Bereft 30 Jupiter, for one 31 Allen contemporary 33 Lollipop-licking cop 37 Ristorante staple 39 Explore deeply 42 Derelict, perhaps 43 Contest entry 45 Factor opening 47 Bucko 48 Goofs (around) 51 Battle preparation place, in metaphor 53 Like a centaur? 57 Actress Falco 58 Oarlock pin 59 Vanishing points 63 Outfits 64 Old enough to know better? 66 Send out 67 End of a lover’s ultimatum 68 Designated 69 Aussie sleep sounds? 70 European coal region 71 Fire proof?

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


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Homes

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This spacious 4 Br., 1.75 bath rambler is a short distance from the beach! Some of the recent Updates include the Corian countertops, laminate flooring and vinyl windows. Open floor plan in living/ dining/kitchen area. Southern exposure brings in lots of warm, bright light to home. Great backyard. $269,000. ML250960/65549 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. VIEWS, VIEWS AND MORE VIEWS! Located on 2.67 acres atop Bell Hill. Saltwater and mountain views from every room. 2 Br., 2.5 baths and 3 car garage, gourmet kitchen and formal dining, office with built-ins and murphy bed. Large bath with shower and soaking tub in master. $695,000 M102058/251500 Irene Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WANT OPEN SPACE? 1.96 cleared acres with small barn/ workshop, 2 garden sheds. House has had some recent updates. There is 111’ of Dungeness River frontage. This property would be a wonderful investment or starter home. $219,900. ML250991 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East WATER VIEW CHARMER! Beautiful, century old home, with an amazing view of the P.A. harbor. Also enjoy an unstoppable view of the Olympics from your backyard. Hardwood throughout the home, although most of the home is currently carpeted. Many updates still needed, but allows the opportunity to make this your home. $325,000. ML252095/138514 Shawnee Hathaway-Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

Classified 52

54

Manufactured Homes

WATER VIEW LARGE GARAGE/SHOP Fantastic 2 Br. and office/den home. Spacious 30x30 garage/shop with 2nd office and half bath. $269,900. ML250515 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $23,500. 683-5120. USED 1979 24x64 2 Br. 1979 28x66 3 Br. Buy Rite Homes 681-0777

WELL MAINTAINED... 3 Br., 2 bath, rambler with family room, on a beautifully landscaped lot. Remodeled kitchen/family room with oak cabinets and sky lights. Entertainment size deck and much more. $219,000. ML250216 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

BEAUTIFUL ACREAGE This rare property is located right in town, in a unique location that offers both convenience and privacy. Bordered on one side by state-owned preserve, this is the last lot on a dead end street of acre+ properties, it feels like civilization is miles away. The 1.42 acres are wide-open and ready for your home and features beautiful mountain views and southern exposure. Close distance from QFC, Carrie Blake Park and The Discovery Trail. $89,950. ML252113 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

WEST: Lindal cedar home, 10 ac, pond. $450,000 cash. 928-9528 WONDERFUL LOCATION Step inside and fall in love. Terrific tiled front porch. Gorgeous oak flooring with inlaid design. Huge living room with brick fireplace. Formal dining, builtin buffet and cabinets. Newer kitchen with cozy breakfast room. Master Br. has sitting room with beautiful mtn view. Heat pump, 2 storage sheds. Very well maintained home in Cherry Hill neighborhood. $259,500. ML250905 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WONDERFUL ONE LEVEL Meticulously maintained in and out, this 3 Br., 2 bath home with partial mountain and saltwater views has it all! Fruit trees, irrigation, outbuilding with workshop and extra garage, room for lots more on 3.17 acres. $279,900. ML241626. Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

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Manufactured Homes

MOBILE HOME: 2 Br., 1 bath, copper wire, newly remodeled. Must be moved. Very clean. $8,000. 360-301-9109

54

Lots/ Acreage

LAKE PLEASANT LAKEFRONT PROPERTY fully loaded 2006 5TH WHEEL w/slideout. carport, deck. DOCK, well maintained SKI BOAT 2 KAWASAKI JET SKIES. fishing. great family vacation spot or use as a nightly rental investment. seller owns local resort and will give overflow of renters. $199,000. 360-374-3118 Lake Sutherland, 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589. RARE FIND Beautiful acreage in Agnew, breath taking views, bring your house plans, Sequim school district, wonderful community. $199,000 ML56475/250847 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

Lots/ Acreage

WEST P.A.: 30 acres, utilities. $100,000 discount. $150,000 cash. 928-9528. WHALES, EAGLES, AND SHIPS, OH MY! Calling all mermaid and whale watchers, have we got a home site for you! Super close to the Discovery Trail for outdoor recreation, driveway already punched in for easy access. Views of the islands, ships, eagles and whales. Power to the property and community water available at a great price. No manufactured or mobile homes but bring all your other home dreams with you! Going once, going twice: bargain prices will not last! $199,500. ML252084. Jace Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

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Commercial

SEQUIM PRIME COMMERCIAL Prime commercial parcel with outstanding Highway 101 frontage in Sequim located near Sears and next to Big 5 Sporting Goods. $159,000. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

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Apartments Unfurnished

BIG, nice apts. $650. Great P.A. location. 417-6638 CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br., ground floor, excellent refs. req. $700. 360-460-3124

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br. $695, 2 Br. $495, Studio $390 + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoking. $665. 360-670-9418 P.A.: Lg 1 Br., storage, no smoke/pets. $650. 457-8438. SEQUIM: On Cedars Golf Course, fully furnished and equipped, by day, week or month, 2nd floor, balcony. Call Bill 360-683-5963 STUDIO: Newer, nice, cozy, fenced, west side, W/D, close to town $650, util. paid. 460-7454 or 670-9329

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Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. duplex, ground floor, carport, lg. extra parking, quiet, clean, near bus. $750. 417-5589 or 460-5358.

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Apartments Unfurnished

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

Houses

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath, skylights. $850. 681-0140.

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. $600. 813 E. 2nd St. 460-7235.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. No smoke/pets. $750, $700 dep. 457-5206. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, garage. $685. Mark McHugh 683-0660.

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Houses

EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. P.A. APTS & HOUSES A Studio 1 ba..$475 A 2 br 1 ba......$550 H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1150 SEQ APTS/HOUSES A 2 br 1.5 ba....$875 H 2+ br 2 ba.....$950

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

Lake Front Condo 2 Br., 1.5 bath. $950 mth water/garb included, 6 mth lease. Available now. 360-461-4890 LAKE SUTHERLAND Small trailer. 1 Br., $350 mo. References. No smoking. 360-461-4280 MAINS FARM: 2 Br., 2 bath, gar. $875. 928-9528

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com P.A. Near hospital, 3 Br. with study, 1 ba, nice yard, no smoking/pets. $875, 1st, dep. 775-8047. P.A.: 1131 Columbia. 3 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $825. 477-3051.

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Houses

P.A.: 218 W. 8th. 2 Br., W/D, no smoking/ pets. $600. Credit check. 460-5639. P.A.: 3 Br., 1.5 ba, office, beautiful mtn/water views, all new carpet/paint. Fire-place, garage. $995. 775-7129. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, lg. covered deck, cathedral ceilings, gas fireplace/heat, no pets/ smoke, credit check. $900. 808-0009. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $990. 452-1395. P.A.: 5 Br., 2 ba. Cherry Hill, no smoke. $1,250. 457-3137. P.A.: 6 Br., 2 bath. $1,000 mo. Call for details. 457-7216. P.A.: 636 Georgiana, large shop/garage, 4 Br., 2 ba, great location. $1,100, deposit. 460-7516 P.A.: Lg. house, 3 Br., 2 bath, 814 W. 5th St. $1,075 or $1,025 lease. 452-5050. P.A.: Residential or comm’l, 834 W. 8th, 5 Br., 3 ba, garage. $2,000. 683-9626. SEQUIM: 2 Br. 1 bath. Living room, kitchen. $500. $200 dep. Half utilities. 683-2017. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoke. $800, 1st, last, dep. req. 360-683-4336. SEQUIM: 3 bdrm, 2 ba, livng rm, lrg den, cul-de-sac, pets OK. $1,000 mo. 360-460-9917 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 1 bath rambler, large yard above the QFC parking lot. Wood stove, attached garage, nice neighborhood Properties by Landmark, 452-1326.

AGNEW: 1 Br., 1 ba, all utilities paid. $600 mo. Small pet neg. 477-2000

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, newly remodeled, no pets/smoking. $690 mo., $700 deposit. 460-5290 P.A.: 2 story, 3 Br. plus den, 2 ba, garage plus carport, all appliances, built in ‘04, no pets. Dep. and refs. $1,150 mo. 360-808-4476

Houses

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Vintage, completely remodeled 2 Br., 1 bath Port Angeles home. $900. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. First, last and deposit, credit check. Sorry no smoking or pets. Contact Susan at 206-948-6653 Waterfront Homes Troll Haven Farm, amenity laden properties, secluded luxurious homes, water/mtn. views, lease options, owner financing possible. 360-775-6633 WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

ROOM FOR RENT $400-$500 mo., Sherwood Village in Sequim. For details, call Betty 504-2685. SEQUIM: Master bedroom, private bath, private entry. $575. Charlie at 681-2860.

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Commercial Space

P.A.: Rent or sale, 1409 E. 1st. 2 lots. 4,400 sf. 457-5678. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 SEQUIM: 720 E. Washington, 600-1200 sf. Mark McHugh 683-0660

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $1,095 mo, last, dep. 683-0123. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, 1800 sf, 5 quiet acres, mtn view. $1,200. 477-0747.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $600. 457-4740, eves. 2 bedrm 2 bath house For Rent East End Port Angeles. $725 rent, $700 deposit. 360-718-6101 day4@q.com

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SEQUIM: Energy efficient 1 Br. Water view. $870 mo. 1st/last/SD, ref rqd. No pets/smoke. 582-0637 SEQUIM: Nice, clean 2 Br. mobile in town. W/D, no pets. Refs., $675. 582-1862.

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Furniture

ANTIQUES: Brass bed, settee, lg. oak rocker. $900 all or $350 each. 670-9264

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Furniture

BED: King Sealy Posturpedic Plush Pillowtop, mattress and box spring, pillow top on both sides, great shape, will deliver. $400/obo. 681-3299 DESK Medium sized, black, shabbychic. Very cute, vintage piece. $75/obo. 360-775-8746 DINING ROOM TABLE With 4 chairs. Very nice set. $175/obo. Call 681-4429. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

Leather sofa and chair. Beautiful set. Unemployed and must sacrifice. Call Chris 404-423-9629. Pics avail. for email. LIFT CHAIRS: (2) perfect condition, moss green, new $1,600 ea. Will sell for $400 each. 683-5307. LOVE SEAT Blue. $60. 477-7834 or 452-9693 MISC: 2 sofas with recliners, beige, with blue and brown, great condition, $200 each. Overstuffed chair with ottoman, soft gold, great condition. $125. 457-5656 MISC: Bedroom set, hunter green, full bed, 5 drawer chest, bedside stand, $500. Love seat, southwest print, $150. 4 drawer chest, $50. small table and two chairs, $50. Wing arm chairs, rose, $100. brown recliner, $75. 582-0185 MISC: Dining set, very large heirloom quality 4-piece, 6 high back chairs. $1,099/ obo. Sofa, large plush velour fabric living room, very comfortable, light color green-blue, tan & brown, $249/obo. 452-9562

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M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875 YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

D5

GARAGE GARAGE YARD SALES YARD SALES

For Better or For Worse

On he e ni iin ns s ul lla a On tth h he e Pe Pen n ni n ns su u ul a

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Furniture

MISC: Dinette set, oak table with tile inlay, 4 swivel chairs, $350. 2 matching bar high chairs, $60 ea. 452-4760 MISC: Hutch, $100. Sewing machine in cabinet, $100. 7 drawer dresser, with mirrored top, $100. All obo. 460-8675. RECLINERS: Leather, swivel rocker, black, $185 ea. or $300 pair. Can deliver for gas. Port Angeles. 808-5636

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General Merchandise

BRICKS: Round tree. $1 ea. 452-2287. Campground memberships TT/NACO Alliance. $600 plus tfr fee. Coast to Coast Hart Ranch B $900 plus tfr fee. Dues paid both $1,400. 452-6974. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. CRAB POT PULLER: Honda, aluminum tower, $450. 460-3774 DRESSES: 5 nice prom dresses 4 size small, 1 size med, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 417-3504.

General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: Fir, $175 a cord or $185 delivered. 808-5891. Gas lawn mower. $45. 457-8656. GENERATOR: 8000 watts, diesel. $1,000. 452-5154. Leaf/Lawn Vacuum Craftsman, professional, 5.5 hp B&W engine, barely used, paid $1,100. Now $725. 681-3522. MISC: Husqvarna chainsaws: #395, $650. #385, $450. #575, $300. Leister plastic air welder, $200. Antique partridge bamboo fly rod, #8, $200. Commercial canopy, side and full backdoors, short bed, white, $800. Willies Jeep tranny, 3 speed with overdrive, $800. 461-8060 PELLET STOVE Enviro EF. Free standing, good condition. $600. 460-2502. SEAHAWK TICKETS (2) Section 337, seat 21 and 22, row T. Oct. 24, vs. Arizona Cardinals. $78 ea. 461-3661 TIMESHARE WEEK Hot August Nights! RENO August 6th-13th Tons of old cars and old time music. LOCAL SELLER. Great Christmas Gift! $500. 460-6814. TRAILER: Snowmobile, quad, utility trailer, 7x12, always garaged, excellent condition, 3,500 lb. axle. $1,495. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

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General Merchandise

TOOLS: Wood planer, Delta model DC-380, $750/obo. Bosch router table, compete, $450/obo. 460-5762 VENDORS WANTED Eagles Crafts Fair and Flea Market. Nov. 6th. Table rental, $25. 360-683-6450 WANTED LOGS FOR FIREWOOD 477-8832 WANTED TO BORROW Peninsula College drama department seeking a motorized wheelchair to use for first two weeks in November. Please contact director Dr. Starcevich 477-5368 or at larastarcevich@yahoo.com

XBOX 360 ELITE 1 wireless controller, 5 games - Rainbow 6 Vegas, Saints Row 2, Skate 2, Lego Batman, and Pure. $300/obo. 360-477-8505 XBOX 360 ELITE With Grand Theft Auto 4, wireless controller, like new condition, with high definition cables. $350/obo. 775-5767 or 681-7771

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Musical

GUITAR: Acoustic left handed Carlos brand adult size, like new condition with semi soft case and two beginning books. $350 firm. 452-9401.

75

Musical

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUN: S&W model 57, 41 mag, 6” barrel, clam shell shoulder holster, $650. 360-912-1277 GUNS: 45-70 plus ammo, $400. German sporting rifle, $700. 461-6339 after 4 p.m. GUNS: Glock 23 40 cal., plus accessories, $500. Interarms 44 mag. single action, $300. Thompson 54 cal. black powder, plus accessories, $200. 360-385-7728 PISTOL: Smith & Wesson, model 686, 4” barrel, stainless steel finish, wood grip, great condition. $500/obo. 461-9585. PISTOLS: EAA Witness 40 cal., $450. Llama 45 ACP, $450. Marty 670-8918 RIFLE: 1941 Winchester model 94, very good condition, with ammo. $650 firm. 460-7566. RIFLE: Savage model 93 R17, 17HMR caliber, thumb hole stock, Accutrigger, Bushnell 3 to 9 scope, bi-pod. $550. 457-9608 SKATES: Bauer aggressive skates, black, size 11 good shape $20. 460-0845 SKS: 7.62x39, new black stock, tactical scope. $450. 457-0943

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COSTUME Sale: Fri.Sat., 12-6 p.m., 214 E. Lauridsen Blvd., All View Motel. 457-1311

Bargain Box

PINE ARMOIRE ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Beautiful. $125/obo. 808-1767

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 LOOKING FOR HAND CARVED HITTY DOLL Please call 417-7691 WANTED: Stock trailer, good condition. 683-1179

FLIP THAT RUMMAGE AT THE SOROPTIMIST JET SET RUMMAGE SALE! See you at the campfire house behind Swain’s on 4th St., Saturday, October 16, 9-2:00 p.m. Furniture and collectibles. Baked goods, raffle basket and lots more to chose from. Come see us and support Relay For Life! YARD Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., at Salvation Army, 206 S. Peabody. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 1322 S. Cedar. Double box springs and mattress, chairs, end tables and lots of misc.

78B 81 82 83 84 85

DRY CREEK GRANGE COMMUNITY SALE Sat., Oct. 16, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 3520 W. Edgewood Dr. Come see our vendors, bargains and foods. Come get our famous fair scones! Much, much more!

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Food Produce

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 8-2 p.m., 1000 Eagle Heights Rd. Follow Hwy 112 West to Gerber Rd. (1/4 mile past Freshwater Bay Rd on left) Follow signs!!!

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

10 Family Super Sale Sat., 8-2 p.m. Fairview Grange 161 Lake Farm Road off Hwy. 101. Furniture, dishes, adult clothes, craft supplies, antiques, bicycle, vase/glassware, children’s toys, costume jewelry and much more. BIG GARAGE Sale: No baby clothes, no broken strollers! Fri. 10-5, Sat. 8-5 p.m. no early birds, 385 Brown Rd., 1/2 mi. up Monroe Rd. on right. 85 gal. air compressor, hand tools, furniture, new and used 4x4 and truck parts, and much more. Delivery availabe on some items for a small fee. ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 742 Gehrke Road. YARD Sale: Fri. 12-4, Sat. 9-4, 250 Stuart Dr., off Gasman Rd. Riding mower, generator, clothes, household items, etc

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

PORT ANGELES GARDEN CLUB Fall Plant Sale (Dig in and Dig up for Scholarship) Sat., Oct. 16, 9-1 31 Stephanie Lee Pl. Between P.A. and Sequim at Lewis Rd. Follow the signs on 101 & Old Oly Hwy. 582-0803 for inquiries Club members are gathering their trees, shrubs, bulbs, tubers and perennials for this sale. Master gardeners advice on hand with pictures and planting instructions. Gertie's winter vegetables & herbs will be available. GREAT PRICES GREAT SELECTION Support our club.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

ESTATE Sale: Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 9-2 p.m. (Oct. 16-17) 1110 W. Spruce Ct., Sequim. Furniture, lamps, kitchen garden, patio. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., Oct. 15 and 16, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 31 Windsor Ct., off Crown View, off Old Olympic. HUGE MOVING Sale: Sat., 7-2 p.m., 73 Quiet Place, off E. Silberhorn. Everything must go. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

MOVING Sale: Fri., 93 p.m., 82 Starry Rd off March Banks. 30 gallon lawn sprayer. Welding table. CB radios, etc. MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m. 111 Mclaughlin Rd., off Andersen and Thornton. Everything goes! Must be gone by Saturday! Patio set, building tools, ocean kayak, camping and fishing gear, portable heaters, golf clubs, nail gun, lawn mower, weedwacker, household items, and tons more! MOVING: Diamond Point. 3921 Diamond Pt. Rd. Sat., 8-3 p.m. Furniture. 681-0550. MULTI-FAMILY Sale Fri.-Sat., 10-6 p.m., Sun Meadows, 120 Patriot. PAMPERED CHEF, appliances, clothes, computers, drums, TVs, generator, & check online for more! YARD Sale: Sat. only, 9-4 p.m., 843 Sherbourne Road.

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m., 1207 Van Ness, P.T. Antiques, retro, household, tools.

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

CYPRESS: 6’-7’, $13 ea. G&G Farms, 95 Clover Lane, off Taylor-Cutoff. 683-8809.

82

Pets

30 gallon aquarium with stand for sale. $45. 457-1560.

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell.

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

www.peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

For details on how your ad can be on the internet call: 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7724

61246807

FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com

73

Garage Sales Central P.A.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

REMODELING

HOME/YARD SERVICES

MOLE CONTROL/PRUNING

RENOVATION/REPAIR

TREE SERVICE

PAINTING

RESTORATION

DIRT WORK

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

LANDSCAPING

ASBESTOS

ELECTRICAL

COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT

CARPET CLEANING

Call NOW To Advertise Here 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

0A5099525

SERVICE DIRECTORY


D6

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

82

Pets

84

Horses/ Tack

AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male, 3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/silver and salt/pepper coloring. First shots. $500 each. 360-460-7119

FILLY: 2 yr old registered AQHA. Ready to be started, friendly. $475. 640-2325.

AQUARIUM: 30 gallon aquarium. $45. 360-457-1560

85

BEAGLE: Female, spayed. Pr Br Beagle F. 5yrs loves the indoors as well as out.. should have fenced yrd-leash when walking. great companionship, for kids or elders. kind loving, my name is Dolli. $100. 360-461-4622

TRACTOR: John Deere Model H. Resotred. $3,200. 457-3120

BLACK LABS: AKC/ UKC Black Lab pups excellent hunting lines. $650. 461-7583 CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 2 females, 2 males, ready to go. $350 ea. 452-7746 FISH TANK: 80 gal., with 5 saltwater fish, pump, lights everything included. $100. 460-0965 FREE: Cat. 3 yr. old, needs lots of attention and love, great for older person. Neutered and has all shots. 417-2130. FREE: Downsizing. Cats to kittens, to good homes only. Call for info. 360452-1120, leave message if no answer. FREE: To good home Tabby cat, adult male, neutered, best for adult home only. 683-9899 HALLOWEEN PUPPIES AKC Golden Retriever pups, 5 male $400 ea., 1 female $500, 20 yr. breeder, father on site, 1st shots, wormed, quality, guarantee health. 582-3181 LABRADOODLE PUPPIES CHOCOLATE. Mom is AKC Chocolate Lab and Dad is AKC Chocolate Standard Poodle. 5 girls and 2 boys. First set of shots, wormed and vet checked. Happy, healthy and ready for their new homes. $900. Call 360-460-6605 PUPPIES: (5) purebred Havenese, 8 weeks old, $400 ea. 360-477-8349

HORSE TRAILER: 2 horse, straight load, Safari 1969, good condition. $950/obo. 683-1179

Farm Equipment

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

91

Aircraft

ULTRALITE: Avenger/Hurricane. 503 Rotax engine, 10 gal tank, new tires, 4 year old sails, always hangered, full instruments including CHT, EGT, RPM, airspeed, recording G meter, hr meter, hydraulic disc brakes, ballistic chute. $7,500. 360-640-1498 360-374-2668

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirror and windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, excellent inside and out, all new brakes. $42,000. 460-8325.

93

Farm Animals

GRASS HAY No rain, $5 bale. 457-8704, 460-6847 HAY: Alf/grass. $5.50 bale. Grass, $4.50. In barn. 683-5817. WANTED Free spoiled hay. 360-461-5026

84

Horses/ Tack

AQHA: Gelding, 15 yrs., reining/cow horse, $25,000 in training. $2,500. 461-7583

ARIMA: ‘89 17’, 70 hp Yamaha, canvas top, galv. trailer, with extras. $8,000. 928-3900 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 CRESTLINER: Sturdy ‘96 16’ aluminum boat. With newer 20 hp merc, E-Z Loader trailer, good cond. Light use, freshwater only. $2,250. 360-681-7989 GLASPLY: ‘79 19’. Cuddy cabin, 170 hp I/O, newer 15 hp Honda tolling motor and pot puller, galvanized trailer, electric winch. $8,000. 360-417-2606 GLASPLY: They don’t make ‘em like they used to! ‘77 24’. Lots of extras. $12,000/obo 360-374-2234 HEWESCRAFT: ‘06 18’ Sea Runner. 115 hp and 8 hp 4 stroke Yamahas, all elelctric tilt, much more. $21,900. Just completely serviced. Bob 360-732-0067 JET SKI: ‘96 ZXI750. Low hours. $2,600/ obo. 928-3450. MALIBU: ‘01 Sportster LX. Fuel injected 350, great shape, only 240 hours. $17,000. 808-6402. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $16,000/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 OUTBOARD: 2010 Yamaha 4 hp, 3 hrs., no salt ever, as new. $875. 681-0151.

REINELL: ‘95 19.5’ V6 I/O. EZ-Load galvanized trailer, half cutty. $4,800/obo. 452-2459

TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843

83

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779

GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383.

PUPPIES: Boston Terrier pups. $250$350. Call 797-3189 after 4 p.m.

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, Powder Puff China-Jacks, registered, vet checked, shots, wormed. $800 each. 582-9006

93

Marine

FLAT BED: ‘73 Ford F600 with liftgate, needs work. $1,000. 457-3120

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

PUPPIES: Golden Retrievers, beautiful AKC, dark golden, championship lines on sires side, ready 10/15. 4 males, $450 ea. 2 females, $500 ea. 1st shots, wormed. 681-3160, after 4 p.m.

93

RAIDER: ‘07 24’ aluminum, well equipped. $53,500. 683-5120

PUPPIES: AKC registered Golden Retrievers, ready now, 2 female $450. 1 male $400. 808-2959.

PUPPIES: Chihuahuas. Very cute, 3 females, 1 male. Ready to go October 18th. $175 each. 452-5049 or 670-5118

Classified

Marine

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411 BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887 COOKIE MONSTER ‘78 Sloop, 30’. 4 head sails, main, 3/4 and 1/2 oz. spinnakers. Head foil and hydraulic backstay. All new halyards, knot, depth, and wind meters in ‘08. Best of all, new 14 hp FWC Yanmar diesel in ‘09. Propane 2 burner stove and cabin heater. Marine UHF radio and Sony AM/FM CD radio. Sleeps 5. See at slip Q-5 in P.A. Boat Haven. $18,500. 457-8382.

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 30’ sloop. Yanmar diesel, low hrs., VHF radio, depth and knot meter, working galley and head, color TV, CD player, wheel steering, sleeps 5. $10,500. 457-0684. SAILBOAT: 12’ wooden, extra sail, trailer. $990. 683-6889. SAILBOAT: 16’ classic daysailer. Very stable, very good condition, a beauty, trailer and more incl. $10,000/obo. 360-582-1683 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

Sea going sailing canoe. Project wood boat partially restored, all parts including good sail, mast, tiller,dagger board, lines, mast and rudder with all fittings except for oars. 17 feet long with a wide beam. $500. 360-683-6575 or 360-808-5200

94

Marine

YAMAHA: 8 hp long shaft, 2 cycle, excellent condition. $750/obo. Call Terry 461-6462

94

Motorcycles

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 CAN-AM ‘08 OUTLANDER XTMAX QUAD 4x4, 2 seater, 400cc EFI, winch. VIN#000298 $5,700 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 1200C. 450 miles. $8,495/obo. 452-6448 Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670 HARLEY: ‘02 1200 Sportser. Black, lots of chrome. Saddle bags, detachable windshield, beautiful bike! $5,995. 360-461-0961 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895.

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677 HONDA: ‘04 CFR 100F. Less than 60 hrs., original owner. $1,500. 417-1151. HONDA: ‘04 XR650L. Only 3,000 mi., excellent condition, includes hitch carrier. $3,500. 460-4420. HONDA: ’06 Shadow VLX 600. Saddle bags, windshield, custom paint, lots of chrome, 1,800 mi., super clean, must see. $4,000/obo. 452-5813

Motorcycles

KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘00 Polaris. 250cc, plus extras. $1,500. 417-9170. QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107. QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki 250. Like brand new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIKE: ‘08 Suzuki Burgman 400 CC. Looks and runs like new. Very stable. $6,500/obo. 683-6079 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895 YAMAHA ‘07 GRIZZLY 350 4X4 QUAD Auto, reverse, warn winch. VIN#OU1599 $4,300 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184. YAMAHA: ‘05 FJR 1300. 8,400 miles, lots of extras. $8,750. 460-3162. YAMAHA: ‘09 250 Star. Under 500 mi., mint cond. $3,500. 765-4775, leave msg

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,950. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290.

KAWASAKI: ‘09 KLX 250s Dual-Sport Excel. cond., 1,600 mi., street legal, 65 mpg, elec start, 6 speed, liquid cooled, new tires, Comes w/ riding gear and helmet, perfect for commute and trail! $3,850. 360-477-7589 POLARIS ‘08 TRAILBOSS 330 QUAD Auto, racks. VIN#316882 $3,200 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘05 34’ Montana Mountaineer 348RLS. 3 slides. Great condition. Extended warranty. 50 amp, central heat/air. Kelley Blue Book is $32,000. Asking $24,900/obo. Call Steve at 360-477-3949

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914

95

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘00 24’ SandPiper By Forest River. Built in the Northwest, for the Northwest, w/queen bed up front, sofa & dining areas convert to bed, awning. In Sequim. $8,000. 602-615-6887 TRAILER: ‘05 22’ Arctic Fox. 1 slide, most options on board. $14,000. 417-5082. TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695. TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504

5TH WHEEL: 2007 Mckenzie Lakota 33SKT 4 SEASON. 3 slides, no smoke/ pets, dual Euro recliners, king bed, large corner shower, washer/dryer closet, large wardrobe closets, central vac, more than adequate storage, very nice little one bedroom on wheels. Over 11,000 under dealer value at $37,900. elgreengos@hotmail.com for more pictures or come see. 683-7411 or 477-5621. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 25’ Alpenlite DL. Gas stove/oven, electric/gas freezer, fridge, air, microwave, antenna, AM/FM cassette stereo, roof ladder, storage, new tires, Hijacker Ultraslide hitch with mounting brackets, Super Shade awning, ONAN gen. set, low hours, very good condition. $5,000. 360-452-3402 5TH WHEEL: ‘95 25’ Terry. Slide hitch and air tailgate, bought last spring, never used, one previous owner, excellent condition. $5,000 all. 683-7877 Affordable Home 32’ Royal Coachman, park model, very clean, good shape. $5,500. 457-6540. BRAND NEW STORAGE 18’x44’ with 12’x14’ door. $225 mo. 2 units available. 452-1254, 460-9466 CAMPER: ‘72. Fits 8’ bed, no leaks. $350. 797-4518 CAMPER: ‘94 11.5’ Northland. Always under cover, needs some work. $3,500. 360-374-8761 MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Bounder diesel pusher. Loaded. $95,000/obo. 360-460-0432 MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’. Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tip-out. $55,000/ obo. 360-808-6392. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘82 24’ Travelcraft. Must see. $3,400/obo. 452-2609

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MOTOR HOME: ‘89 21’ Winnebago Warrior. New tires and refrigerator. $8,000. 360-681-7614 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 38’ Country Coach Affinity, their best model. Mint condition, loaded, 325 Turbo Cat, 7,500W diesel generator, solid oak and leather throughout, air ride and leveling, was $400,000 new, very livable. Reduced again! $52,000/ obo. 360-460-1071. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 25’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10, 97K. $16,500. 457-7097.

TRAILER: ‘94 40x10 Woodland Park. 2 slide outs, micro, W/D, air, full length porch with metal awning, refrigerator ice maker. $10,500. 425-776-5816 or 206-853-5546

TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002 TRAILER: ‘78 22’ Layton. Nice shape, good rubber. $800/ obo. 457-3627. TRAILER: ‘88 32’ Aljo Alliance. Everything works, good condition. $3,500/obo. 457-7600

96

Parts/ Accessories

Dee Zee Running Boards. ‘99-’10 F250/F-350 long beds. Includes cab running boards and side box boards, drivers side and passenger side. Comes with brackets, bolt/ nuts, and instructions. $250. 360-460-5420 GAS PUMP: Old gas pump and oil dispenser. $700 firm. 452-5803 SNOW/WINTER TIRES Nokian Hakkapelitta 4 Set of 4. Tires are studded with sipping. Size is 225/50R-17. Approx. 75%-80% tread left. $350. 360-460-5420

97

4 Wheel Drive

BE APPROVED IN MINUTES! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! Buy here! Pay here! Kia ‘03 Sorrento LX. Blue, tan cloth interior, power locks, windows, air, cruise, auto, 4x4, clean, nice! 123K. $7,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037 CHEV ‘06 SILVERADO LT CREWCAB LB 4X4 6.o liter Vortec V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in excellent shape! Gray leather interior in excellent condition! Dual power heated seats, moon roof, OnStar, CD with Bose sound dual climate, power folding mirrors, premium alloys, spotless 2 owner Carfax, and more! Very nice well optioned Chevy at our no haggle price of only $18,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362

97

4 Wheel Drive

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713.

FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

FORD: ‘79 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ Cleveland, good body. $2,000. 797-3436.

CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292 CHEV: ‘98 S10 Blazer. 4 dr, passenger door damage, runs/drives great, must see. $1,295. 452-5803. DODGE ‘05 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4 5.7 liter HEMI V8, auto, 20” alloy wheels, spray-in bedliner, tow package, power windows, locks, mirrors, keyless entry, cruise, tilt, air, Sony MP3, CD player, information center. Kelley Blue Book value of $22,900! Only 48,430 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today and save some bucks on your next truck! $18,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘88 3/4 ton long bed. $850/obo. 452-2459 DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD ‘00 F250 XLT EXTRA CAB LB 7.3 liter Powerstroke diesel V8, 6 speed manual trans! White exterior in great shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Power windows, power locks, cruise, tilt, CD/cassette, air, privacy glass, tow, running boards, bedliner, alloys, full 4” exhaust, predator chip, spotless 2 owner Carfax! A great diesel truck at our no haggle price of only $9,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘04 EXCURSION XLT 4X4 82K, original miles, 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, loaded! 2 tone silver/gray exterior in excellent shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Dual power seats, CD/cassette, 3rd seat, rear air, privacy glass, roof rack, running boards, tow package, alloys with 70% BFG’s, spotless 2 owner Carfax! Very nice, very clean Excursion at our no haggle price of only $15,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘08 F150 LARIAT SUPERCREW 4X4 5.4 Triton V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Tan leather interior in great condition! Dual power heated seats, 6 disk CD with auxiliary, park sensors, power slider, heated mirrors, privacy glass, wood trim, 18” alloys, spotless 1 owner Carfax, and much more! We are a ridiculous $7,500 less than Kelley Blue Book at our no haggle price of only $19,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 GMC ‘03 YUKON 4X4 5.3 liter V8, auto, SLT package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, leather interior, power sunroof, 3rd row seating, AM/FM CD with 6 disc stacker, memory seat and adjustable pedals, roof rack, privacy glass, running boards, alloy wheels, tow package, remote entry, and more! One owner. Expires 1023-10. $9,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33” tires. $1,300. 640-8996. FORD: ‘94 Explorer. All power, auto, air, runs/drives great. $1,500. 457-8193 or 460-7534 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC: ‘96 Sonoma. Two color, extra cab. $3,800/obo or trade for equal value SUV/ car. 360-460-3756.

HONDA: ‘06 Element EX AWD. $18,000. 43K mi. Excellent cond, Automatic, Air cond, Roof rack, 2" tow receiver, Hood and window wind deflectors, Warranty to 2014. Call 360-477-2196 between 10 AM and 10PM ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041 JEEP: ‘76 CJ7. Stock 304 engine with headers, auto, TH400 tranny, good tires, straight body, full cage, hard top, aluminum tow bar attached and ready to go, 1st year of Jeep CJ7’s, many new parts, can see at P.T. Golf Club. $5,750/obo. 360-531-2272 JEEP: ‘88 Cherokee. 89K miles, body and interior rough, good powertrain, driveable or parts. $650. 452-1162 MAZDA: ‘03 Tribute ES. Loaded, leather, great shape, 62K, towing pkg. $10,510. 928-9527 NISSAN ‘99 FRONTIER XE KING CAB 4X4 3.3 liter V6, 5 speed, alloy wheels, good rubber, spray-in bedliner, rear sliding window, Sony MP3 CD stereo, air, cruise, tilt, dual front airbags. This truck is sparkling clean inside and out! Service records include timing belt replacement at 100K! Always popular V6 and 5 speed combination! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA ‘06 TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4 4.7 V8, auto, SR5 package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD and cassette, TRD, off road package, power sliding rear window, alloy wheels, tube running boards, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-23-10. $17,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

TOYOTA: ‘94 4Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. Needs tranny work. $2,800. 452-9693 TOYOTA: ‘01 Tacoma SR5. 4x4 extra cab, brand new 3.4 V6 engine installed by Toyota dealer, auto, PW, PDL, CD, tow pkg. with air bags and electric trailer brakes, canopy. $13,000. Call Bill at 460-3429

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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4 Wheel Drive

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Pickups/Vans

GMC: ‘73 3/4 ton. Runs good, ugly. $1,495. 582-1381.

FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940.

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GMC: ‘95 Short bed. V6, 1500 Sierra, 5 speed, 130K. $3,500. 452-5427.

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV: ‘00 Silverado. $10,000. 808-1731 or 360-477-7864. CHEV: ‘05 Suburban. Excellent, 1/2 ton. $16,800. 681-5403 CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990 CHEV: ‘95 G-20 cargo van. Ladder rack, new radiator, tires and trans, tow package, clean. $1,900. 460-9178 DODGE ‘06 CARAVAN SXT 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette and CD, power windows, locks, and seat, keyless entry, 7 passenger, quad seating, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, 62,000 miles, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, detailed service history, spotless Carfax report. $10,695 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE ‘07 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, power windows, door locks, and drivers seat, keyless entry, CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, information center, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 44,000 miles! Extra nice and clean! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘05 Grand Caravan SE. 86K, good condition. Trailer hitch. $7,725. 460-0351 DODGE: ‘69 Flat bed. Strait 6, needs tune up. $285. 683-6597. DODGE: ‘95 Grand Caravan SE. 43K with lift and scooter. $5,000. 457-4837 leave message. DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Great condition, gold color. $2,100. 683-3851 DODGE: ‘91 Cargo Van. Runs excellent, dependable. $850/ obo. 253-310-2799. FORD ‘02 E350 SUPERDUTY EXTENDED CARGO VAN 5.4 liter V8, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, power windows and locks, safety bulkhead, nice BIN package, heavy, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, nearly new tires, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, very nice cargo van. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD ‘03 F450 SUPERDUTY EXTRA CAB LB DUALLY 2WD 70K original miles, 6.0 liter powerstroke diesel, auto, loaded! Gray metallic exterior in great condition! Gray cloth interior in excellent shape! CD/cassette, power heated mirrors, Fontaine Classic Traveler 5th wheel bed, auto leveling air suspension, aux fuel tanks, diamond plate tool boxes, spray-in bed liner, on board air, spotless 1 owner Carfax! This is a whole lot of tow pig at our no haggle price of only $18,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD ‘04 E350 SUPERDUTY 11 PASSENGER VAN 55K original miles! 5.4 liter Triton V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Gray cloth interior in excellent shape! Power drivers seat, CD, cruise, tilt, rear air, air, dual airbags, running boards, tow, privacy glass, spotless Carfax! Very nice, very well kept 11 passenger at our no haggle price of only $10,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

HONDA: ‘05 Odyessy EX-L. 36.300 miles, excellent condition. $24,000. 504-2404.

KIA ‘08 RONDO LX V6 MINIVAN 2.7 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, 7-passenger seating, alloy wheels, 38,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, very clean 1 owner, non-smoker. $12,695 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN: ‘86 EX cab. 2.4L eng., good mpg, auto w/over drive, power steer., Pioneer stereo, rear jump seats, dark tint, 95,354 orig. mi., good tires/shocks, well taken care of, senior owned, bought locally. Must see to appreciate. $3,800 firm. 461-2709

NISSAN: ‘86 Kingcab. 4 cyl, 5 sp, new batt, alt, tires. 27 mpg. $1,600. 452-7439. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Voyager. Auto, seats 7, 128K. $800. 460-4693 WANTED: Looking for a VW Eurovan Weekender edition. 360-379-3341

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Cars

Abandoned Vehicle Auction In accordance with RCW 46.55.130, the following vehicles will be auctioned at 4th & Pine St. Sequim, WA 98382. Viewing at 10 a.m. 10/15/10. All bidders must sign in at 703 E. Wash. St. between 8 a.m. & 10 a.m. to be able to bid. No late sign ups. ‘80 Dodge PU WA license#B35120B ‘80 Ford MUS2D WA license#387YYM ‘83 VOLV 2402D WA license#745ULN ‘85 BUICK SKHCP WA license#149NKU ‘85 VOLKSWAGON VANAGON WA license#613PMG ‘86 ISU TROOP WA license#361XAP ‘86 MERBZ 1904D WA license#996RCK ‘86 CHEV BLAZR WA license#691TDK ‘86 MERZ 5604D WA license#111YJY ‘86 MAZDA PICKUP WA license#B53275D ‘90 Toyota 4 RUNNER WA license#963ZEI ‘91 MERC SABSW WA license#437LTC ‘92 MERC SABSW WA license#&233403 ‘95 CHEV BLAZR WA license#958SBQ ‘97 TOYO PU WA license#A71049R ‘97 KIA SPORT WA license#334XND ‘98 DODGE DAKOTA WA license#A35268Y BE APPROVED IN MINUTES! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! Buy here! Pay here! Jeep ‘99 Grand Cherokee Laredo Limited, green, stock#3813, black leather, heated seats, sunroof, info center, auto, 4x4, too much to list! 126K. $7,995. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 BUICK ‘03 LESABRE CUSTOM 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, power windows, door locks, and drivers seat, keyless entry, CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, information center, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Only 44,000 miles! Extra nice and clean! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Nice old man must part with his 2nd love! Beautiful blue, exc. condition, spoke wheels, loaded. 30K miles on new motor; 112k total miles. $3,400. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: 1951 Coupe DeVille. 46,600 original miles, powerful, great driving car. Nice chrome, paint & upholstery, WW tires, Auto, V8, Sequim, $27,900. 360-683-3385 Rrobert169@Qwest. net

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Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: ‘38 LaSalle 91K miles. Calif V8 “Harley Earl” design, needs new restore. $9,500/obo. James 360-460-3467

CADILLAC: ‘95 Seville. Gray w/67K miles. Loaded. All serviced, must see! $5,500/obo. James at 360-460-3467. CHEV: ‘68 Camaro Z28. 302, 4 speed, stock. $29,999/obo or trade. 683-7965.

99

Cars

GEO: ‘93 Storm. Runs great. $2,500/obo. 775-9612 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. Maroon, 4x4, studded tires and rims. Good condition. $2,800. 681-7032. HONDA: ‘06 Civic. Top 5 best mpg car, red/tan int., auto, CD, sunroof, exc. cond., 38K mi. $15,750. 461-1202. HONDA: ‘05 S2000. Fabulous 2 seater convert., wonderful handling, great mpg, exc cond., 27K mi. $17,500. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845 HONDA: ‘08 Civic EX. Silver, sedan, sunroof, 5 spd manual, CD, 43K, exc. cond. $13,400. 643-1410.

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246 CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649. CHEV: ‘02 Monte Carlo SS. White with leather interior, sunroof, and all the extras. 27K orig. miles. $14,500. 360-301-1854 or magiejt@yahoo.com CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHRYSLER ‘01 PT CRUISER LIMITED EDITION 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, power sunroof, leather interior with heated seats, trip computer, front and side airbags, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, roof rack, privacy glass, chrome wheels, remote entry and low, low, miles. Expires 10-23-10. $6,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHRYSLER ‘02 300M Only 34,000 miles and loaded, including 3.5 V8, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, leather interior, power sunroof, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction control, AM/FM CD stacker, trip computer, premium alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-23-10. $7,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHRYSLER: ‘04 Sebring LXI Convertible. Gold, leather, beautiful condition. 74K mi. $6,000 firm. 360-457-4020 CHRYSLER: ‘06 300C Hemi, 63K, super clean, every option, silver, leather, must see and drive, sold new for $39,000. $14,900. 582-0696. CHRYSLER: ‘86 LeBaron. 4 cyl eng., auto, new head gasket, front and rear brakes, rear brake cylinders, right front caliper, outer boot. $450. 385-2304. CLASSIC: ‘59 Cadillac model 62, 4 door hard top, red, good shape. $14,000. 360-683-7640 DAEWOO: ‘01 Lanos S . 60,780 orig. mi., 2 door hatchback, burgundy/gray, 4 cylinder, auto, 32+mpg, tabs July ‘11, newer tires plus windshield, A/C, heat, radio cassette. $2,700. 681-5326. DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 FORD ‘07 TAURUS SEL 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, full leather, power moon roof, keyless entry, alloy wheel, 45,000 miles, very clean trade in, non-smoker. $9,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘05 Focus ZX4. Auto, 73K, new tires, all power. $8,000/obo. 460-4693 FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597 FORD: ‘98 Mustang convertible. 3.8 V6, 73,000 mi., power locks-trunk-left front seat, power top, leather seats, sharp car! $8,500/ obo. 457-6156. FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

HONDA: ‘08 Fit-Sport. Auto, low miles, 35 mpg, A/C, cruise, CD/MP3, side airbags, alloy wheels. $14,495. 683-1044.

99

Cars

LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCURY: ‘89 Cougar. Hobby stock race car, fully loaded, seat belts, window net, ready to race. $1,000/obo. 477-9602

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802 P LY M O U T H : ‘ 9 9 Breeze. Front WD, 4 cylinder, power windows, locks, mirrors, 107,000 mi., great condition and mpg. AM/FM/CD, air cond. $2,400. 457-3891

HONDA: ‘90 Accord LX. 1 owner, needs work $800. 460-7442 LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,950. 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $12,000/obo 206-375-5204

SUBARU: ‘05 STI Black STI with tinted windows and silver BBS wheels. Stock except for headers, down pipe and complete stainless steel exhaust and muffler. Manual boost controller and front and rear alum skid plates. Tuned on a 4 wheel dyno and produced 300 hp and 364 ft/lb torque at the wheels. A fantastic daily driver with 65,000 miles. Adult owned and maintained. $14,900/ obo. Call Tim at 360-912-1467

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Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

If you filed bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an attempt to collect this debt from you personally

PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 477-4865 SUBARU: ‘05 Forester. Mint condition, 30K mi. $16,000. 457-9183 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 24,500 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $17,750. 452-6014 SUBARU: ‘96 Legacy wagon. Auto, loaded, well maintained, $3,200. 417-0468 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183. TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. VW: ‘07 Bug convertible. Leather, exc. cond., 16K, all options. $19,500. 460-0462 after 6 p.m. VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $3,295/obo. 775-9648

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332

101

Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE

To: All Interested Parties From: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission SUBJ: Dosewallips State Park Sewer System Improvements Informational meeting Monday, October 18, 2010, at 6:00 pm, in Brinnon School Gym, 46 School House Road, Brinnon, WA 98320. Questions, please contact Brian Yearout at brian. yearout@parks.wa.go v or (360) 725-9763. Pub: Oct. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 2010

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101

D7

OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183.

NO. 10-4-00268-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In Re the Estate of BETTY JEAN RIGGS LOWTHIAN, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statue of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) Four months after the date of the first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: October 1, 2010 Personal Representative: James C. Lowthian Address for Mailing or Service: 753 W. Anderson Road, Sequim, WA 98382 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court 223 East 4th Street, Suite #8, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Cause Number 10-4-00268-5 Pub: Oct 1, 8, 15, 2010

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

101

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO:

Occupants of the Premises Deer Park Self Storage, LLC All Other Interested Parties

James W. Ciaciuch Kimberly A. Ciaciuch

I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on November 12, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th ST, in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: Lots 3 and 4 of short plat recorded October 12, 1989 in Volume 19 of short plats, page 71, under auditor’s file no. 623280, records of Clallam County, Washington, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter in Section 8, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. (Tax Parcel No. 053008-439090/439100) (commonly known as 132 Deer Park RD, Port Angeles WA 98362), which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust, dated October 31, 2007, recorded November 1, 2007, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1211612, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Deer Park Self Storage, LLC, as Grantor, to secure an obligation in favor of First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Port Angeles, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PROMISSORY NOTE DUE IN FULL: Principal Balance: Unpaid Accrued Interest at 4.25% per annum to July 28, 2010: Plus interest thereafter at 4.25% per annum: Accrued Late Charges: Less Suspense or rents received: TOTAL AMOUNT DUE:

$149,947.60 $ 1,588.85 $xxxxxx $0000 $.00 $151,536.45

*plus all attorney’s fees and costs and foreclosure fees and costs incurred Default other than failure to make monthly payments: N/A IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $149,947.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from May 17, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 12th day November, 2010. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 12th day of November, 2010 (the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the 12th day of November, 2010 (the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the 12th day of November, 2010, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: Occupants of the Premises 132 Deer Park RD, Port Angeles WA 98362 Deer Park Self Storage, LLC 132 Deer Park RD, Port Angeles WA 98362 Deer Park Self Storage, LLC 132 Deer Park RD, Port Angeles WA 98362 ATTN: James W. Ciaciuch, registered agent James W. Ciaciuch 387 Little Loop DR, Port Angeles WA 98362 Kimberly A. Ciaciuch 387 Little Loop DR, Port Angeles WA 98362 Deer Park Self Storage, LLC PO Box 758, Port Angeles WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on June 18, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on June 22, 2010, with said written Notice of Default and/or the Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS

Legals Clallam Co. The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the

LOAN NO. xxxxxx5865 T.S. NO. 1278298-12 PARCEL NO. 0430044390100000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation of Washington, will on November 19, 2010, at the hour of 10:00am, At the county courthouse, 223 east 4th in the city of Port Angeles, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington to-wit: Lot 2 of short plat recorded august 12, 1991 in volume 22 of short plats, page 17, under auditor's no. 655648, being a short plat of parcel 3 of survey recorded in volume 6 of surveys, page 24, under auditor's no. 515703, being a portion of the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of section 4, township 30 north, range 4 west, w.m., Clallam county, Washington. situate in the county of clallam, state of washington.. Commonly known as: 2306 Kitchen Dick Rd Sequim Wa 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 06, 2004, recorded December 14, 2004, under Auditor’s File No. 2004-1147163, Book xx, Page xx, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Judi Railey Funaro, A Married Woman, As Her Separate Estate as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by to Aurora Loan Services, Llc. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $29,113.84 (together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due). IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $275,867.11, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from March 01, 2009, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession or encumbrances on November 19, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, must be cured by November 08, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before November 08, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after November 08, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: JUDI RAILEY FUNARO 2306 KITCHEN DICK RD SEQUIM WA 98382 JUDI RAILEY FUNARO PO BOX 4087 SEQUIM WA 98382 JUDI FUNARO PO BOX 4087 SEQUIM WA 98382 JAMES FUNARO PO BOX 4087 SEQUIM WA 98382 JUDI RAILEY FUNARO 2306 KITCHEN-DICK RD SEQUIM WA 98382 JUDI R FUNARO 2306 KITCHEN DICK RD SEQUIM WA 98382 JUDI RAILEY FUNARO 2306 KITCHEN DICK RD SEQUIM WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on April 29, 2010 proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on April 29, 2010 the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in the paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 60th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 60th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants say summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Date August 02, 2010 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation of Washington P.O. Box 22004 525 East Main Street El Cajon CA 92022-9004 (800) 546-1531 Signature/By. R-334336 10/15/2010, 11/05/2010 Pub:Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2010

property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the unlawful detainer act, chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: July 28, 2010. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By:/s/ Paul V. Rieke PAUL V. RIEKE, Vice President Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S Michigan ST Seattle WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 STATE OF WASHINGTON

) ) ss. COUNTY OF KING ) On this day before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared PAUL V. RIEKE, to me known to be the Vice President of the corporation that executed the foregoing NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE, and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned and on oath stated that he is authorized to execute the said instrument. Given under my hand and official seal on July 28, 2010. /s/ Maureen A. Fitzgerald Maureen A. Fitzgerald Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, residing at: Issaquah My commission expires: 9/27/12 NOTICE GUARANTORS, BORROWERS, AND/OR GRANTORS OF THE COMMERCIAL OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST: 1. IF YOU ARE A GUARANTOR, YOU MAY BE LIABLE FOR A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT TO THE EXTENT THE SALE PRICE OBTAINED AT TRUSTEE’S SALE IS LESS THAN THE DEBT SECURED BY THE DEED OF TRUST. YOU HAVE THE SAME RIGHT TO REINSTATE THE DEBT, CURE THE DEFAULT, OR REPAY THE DEBT AS IS GIVEN TO THE GRANTOR IN ORDER TO AVOID THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. YOU WILL HAVE NO RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE. SUBJECT TO SUCH LONGER PERIODS AS ARE PROVIDED IN THE WASHINGTON DEED OF TRUST ACT, CHAPTER 61.24 RCW, ANY ACTION BROUGHT TO SEEK A DEFICIENCY JUDGMENT MUST BE COMMENCED WITHIN ONE YEAR AFTER THE TRUSTEE’S SALE, OR THE LAST TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER ANY DEED OF TRUST GRANTED TO SECURE THE SAME DEBT. IN ANY ACTION FOR A DEFICIENCY, YOU WILL HAVE THE RIGHT TO ESTABLISH THE FAIR VALUE OF THE PROPERTY AS OF THE DATE OF THE TRUSTEE’S SALE LESS PRIOR LIENS AND ENCUMBRANCES, AND TO LIMIT YOUR LIABILITY FOR A DEFICIENCY TO THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE DEBT AND THE GREATER OF SUCH FAIR VALUE OR THE SALE PRICE PAID AT TRUSTEE’S SALE, PLUS INTEREST AND COSTS. 2. If you are a borrower or a grantor, then to the extent that the fair value of the property sold at trustee’s sale to the beneficiary is less than the unpaid obligation secured by the deed of trust immediately prior to the trustee’s sale, an action for a deficiency judgment may be brought against you for: -any decrease in the fair value of the property caused by waste to the property committed by the borrower or grantor after the deed of trust was granted; and -any decrease in the fair value of the property caused by the wrongful retention of any rents, insurance proceeds, or condemnation awards by the borrower or grantor that are otherwise owed to the beneficiary. The deficiency judgment may also include interest, costs and attorneys fees. Pub: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2010

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714


D8

Classified

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0602394042 APN: 06-30-15770080 TS No: WA-251336-F PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 11/12/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 8, MILL CREEK COURT SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 14 OF PLATS, PAGE 9, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTH OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 3425 MILL CREEK COURT PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/8/2009, recorded 6/12/2009, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1238330, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from MICHAEL J. DAFOE AND DELAINA J. DAFOE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 2/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO.PMT 5 AMOUNT $1,441.74 TOTAL $7,208.70 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 8/9/2010 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $1,471.03 TOTAL $2,942.06 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 2/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 5 TOTAL $288.30 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 8/9/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 1 TOTAL $58.84 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 6/8/2009 Note Amount: $217,929.00 Interest Paid To: 1/1/2010 Next Due Date: 2/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $14,603.28. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $227,284.21 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $216,341.44, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 2/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 11/12/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/1/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/1/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/1/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): MICHAEL J. DAFOE AND DELAINA J. DAFOE, HUSBAND AND WIFE 3425 MILL CREEK COURT PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 MICHAEL J DAFOE and DELAINA J DAFOE 3425 MILL CREEDK COURT PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 7/7/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 8/9/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3688084 10/15/2010, 11/05/2010 Pub.: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Loan No: 0307710320 APN: 06-30-10502044 TS No: WA-173285-C PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc fdba Chicago Title Insurance Company (LSI Division), the undersigned Trustee will on 10/22/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 15 BLOCK 20 OF PUGET SOUND COOPERATIVE'S COLONY'S SECOND ADDITION TO PORT ANGELES, AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS PAGE 12, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 113 E LOPEZ AVENUE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/26/2006, recorded 6/30/2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1183252, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from ADAM CAMPBELL and SHANNON CAMPBELL, husband and wife, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY OF CL, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Loan No: 0307710320 T.S. No.: WA-173285-C III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 9/1/2008 THRU 6/30/2009 NO.PMT 10 AMOUNT $1,172.16 TOTAL $11,721.60 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 7/31/2009 NO.PMT 1 AMOUNT $1,203.81 TOTAL $1,203.81 FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 7/19/2010 NO.PMT 12 AMOUNT $978.24 TOTAL $11,738.88 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 9/1/2008 THRU 6/30/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 10 TOTAL $491.20 FROM 7/1/2009 THRU 7/31/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 1 TOTAL $49.12 FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 7/19/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 12 TOTAL $454.08 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 6/26/2006 Note Amount: $148,800.00 Interest Paid To: 8/1/2008 Next Due Date: 9/1/2008 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $30,352.41. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $189,930.29 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $163,432.51, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 9/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 10/22/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 10/11/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/11/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 10/11/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADAM CAMPBELL and SHANNON CAMPBELL, husband and wife 113 E LOPEZ AVENUE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 ADAMCAMPBELL and SHANNONCAMPBELL HUSBAND AND WIFE PO BOX 82 PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 12/19/2008, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 7/19/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc fdba Chicago Title Insurance Company (LSI Division) 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3657410 09/24/2010, 10/15/2010 Pub.: Sept. 24, Oct. 15, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7301.25977 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. CitiMortgage, Inc. Grantee: Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 032902310430 Abbreviated Legal: Pcl J, BLA 45/25 NESW 2-29-3 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 12, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel "J", as delineated on Boundary Line Adjustment Survey, recorded in Volume 45 of Surveys, page 25, under recording no. 2000 1051862, being a portion of Parcels 10, 11, and 14 of Sequim Bay Estates #3 Survey recorded in Volume 8 of Surveys, page 148, being a portion of the northeast quarter of the southwest quarter of Section 2, Township 29 north, Range 3 west, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/16/08, recorded on 04/22/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1219817, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Keith L. Burfitt and Carol A. Burfitt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Legacy Group Lending, Inc., and its successors and assigns to CitiMortgage, Inc., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254837. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/06/2010 Monthly Payments $45,730.80 Late Charges $1,946.16 Lender's Fees & Costs $306.50 Total Arrearage $47,983.46 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $992.94 Statutory Mailings $23.90 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,723.34 Total Amount Due: $49,706.80 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $363,874.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 12, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/01/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Keith L. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Keith L. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 Carol A. Burfitt 363 Weston Parkway Sequim, WA 98382 Carol A. Burfitt P.O. Box 773 Carlsborg, WA 98324 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/30/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/30/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/06/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7301.25977) 1002.161890-FEI Pub: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 0359509968 APN: 03-30-30-319060 TS No: WA-251247-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 11/12/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 6 OF SEA, SUN AND SIERRA VISTAS SHORT PLAT, RECORDED MARCH 25, 2005 IN VOLUME 31 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 17, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 2005 1153117, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY WASHINGTON Commonly known as: 1970 S 7TH AVE SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/28/2007, recorded 4/2/2007, under Auditor's File No. 20071198935, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from JACK S TAMBLYN, AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY OF CL, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2010 NO.PMT 9 AMOUNT $2,229.68 TOTAL $20,067.12 FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 8/10/2010 NO.PMT 4 AMOUNT $2,359.41 TOTAL $9,437.64 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 8/1/2009 THRU 4/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 9 TOTAL $778.41 FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 8/10/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 3 TOTAL $278.91 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 3/28/2007 Note Amount: $592,000.00 Interest Paid To: 7/1/2009 Next Due Date: 8/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $33,238.99. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $669,808.30 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $636,148.92, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 8/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 11/12/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/1/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/1/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/1/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JACK S TAMBLYN, AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE 1970 S 7TH AVE SEQUIM, WA 98382 JACK S. TAMBLYN 1970 SO 7TH SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 7/6/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 8/10/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3689680 10/15/2010, 11/05/2010 Pub.: Oct. 15, Nov. 5, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Legals Clallam Co.

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the Members of First Federal will be held in the Home Office of the Association located at 105 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles, Washington, in accordance with its Bylaws at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, October 20, 2010, for the purpose of the Managing Officer’s Annual report, the election of directors, and such other business as may properly come before the meeting. First Federal Joyce Ruiz, Senior Vice President Corporate Board Secretary Pub: Oct. 8, 15, 2010

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Bruce A. Phillips, Deceased. NO. 10-4-00277-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Administrator named below has been appointed as Administrator of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Administrator or the Administrator’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Administrator served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: October 1, 2010 Administrator: Steven Phillips Attorney for Administrator: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 10-4-00277-4 Pub: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 2010

NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, October 19, 2010, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for: The improvement of Old Olympic Highway from milepost 2.80 to milepost 3.58 by realigning, regrading and widening the road, installation of hot mix asphalt, guardrails, and other related work.. Complete plans and specifications may be obtained from the office of the Public Works Department, Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Rich Fox (360) 417-2316 or Joe Donisi at (360) 4172404. The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, "BID PROPOSAL – OLD OLYMPIC HIGHWAY- MATSON TO GUNN ROADS CONTRACT CRP C1201". Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners' Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail. Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12.080 and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County. Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award. The attached contract plans, these contract provisions and the Standard Specifications for the above-described project are hereby APPROVED THIS fifth DAY OF October, 2010. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Oct. 8, 11, 15, 2010

Notice of Trustee s Sale Pursuant To the Revised Code of Washington 61 24 et seq File No 2009 9187 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee RECONTRUST COMPANY NA on October 22, 2010 at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse 223 East 4th St Port Angeles WA 98362 State of Washington (subject to any conditions imposed by the trustee to protect the lender and borrower) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder payable at time of sale the following described real property situated in the county(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington Tax Parcel ID no 0330195007240000 LOTS 20 AND 21 IN BLOCK 7 OF THE FIRST PLAT OF THE TOWNSITE OF SEQUIM AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 3 OF PLATS PAGE 90 RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY WASHINGTON SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY STATE OF WASHINGTON Commonly Known as 234 WEST HAMMOND STREET SEQUIM WA 98382 which ts subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/10/2004 recorded on 06/24/2004 under Auditors File No 2004 1136097 and Deed of Trust re recorded on_ under Auditors File No _ records of Clallam County Washington from JOHNATHAN DA ALDRICH AND LUCY ANN ALDRICH HUSBAND AND WIFE as grantor to LS TITLE OF WASHINGTON as Trustee to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC as beneficiary the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT 2004 17CB under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditors File No 2010 1252483 II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Grantor s or Borrower s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust III The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults A Monthly Payments $18,672.22 B Late Charges $144.66 C Beneficiary Advances $1,391.75 0 Suspense Balance ($.00) E Other Fees $0.00 Total Arrears $20,208.63 F Trustee s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee s Fee $540.00 Title Report $536.58 Statutory Mailings $211.80 Recording Fees $112.00 Publication $974.14 Posting $200.00 Total Costs $2,574.52 Total Amount Due $22,783.15 Other potential defaults do not involve payment of the Beneficiary If applicable each of these defaults must also be cured Listed below are categories of common defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action/documentation necessary to cure the default The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults any defaults identified by Beneficiary or Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured OTHER DEFAULT ACTION NECESSARY TO CURE Nonpayment of Taxes/Assessments Deliver to Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the property are paid current Default under any senior lien Deliver to Trustee written proof that all senior liens are paid current and that no other defaults exist Failure to insure property against hazard Deliver to Trustee written proof that the property is insured against hazard as required by the Deed of Trust waste Cease and desist from committing waste repair all damage to property and maintain property as required in Deed of Trust Unauthorized sale of property (Due on Sale)Revert title to permitted vestee IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is Principal Balance of $121,801.98 together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/2008 and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured and as are provided by statute V The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of the sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute The sale will be made without warranty express or implied regarding title possession or encumbrances on 10/22/2010 The default(s) referred to in paragraph III together with any subsequent payments late charges advances costs and fees thereafter due must be cured by 10/11/2010 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee s business on 10/11/2010 (11 days before the sale date) the defaults(s) as set forth in paragraph III together with any subsequent payments late charges advances costs and fees thereafter due Is/are cured and the Trustees fees and costs are paid The sale may be terminated any time after 10/11/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by the Borrower Grantor and Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust plus costs fees and advances if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the address(es) enclosed JOHNATHAN DA ALDRICH 31 Lund Ln Sequim WA 98382 LUCY ANN ALDRICH 31 Lund Ln Sequim WA 98382 JOHNATHAN DA ALDRICH 234 WEST HAMMOND STREET SEQUIM WA 98382 LUCY ANN ALDRICH 234 WEST HAMMOND STREET SEQUIM WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail return receipt requested or registered mail on 02/03/2009 proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee and on 02/04/2009 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above and the Trustee has possession of such service or posting VII The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee s fees due at any time prior to the sale VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by through or under the Grantor of all their right title and interest in the above described property IX Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61 24 1 30 Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee s sale X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust including occupants who are not tenants After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59 12 RCW For tenant-occupied property the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61 24 060 and/or any applicable Federal Law DATED March 07 2009 RECONTRUST COMPANY N A CHERYL LEE Its Assistant Secretary ASAP# 3660209 09/24/2010, 10/15/2010 Pub.: Sept. 24, Oct. 15, 2010


Sprout Film Festival | This week’s new movies

Peninsula

Forest Storytelling Festival

Page 7 Storyteller Laura Sims of New York City comes to Port Angeles this weekend.

Peninsula Daily News

The week of October 15-21, 2010


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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Winery hosts benefit Jazz brunch honors for Humane Society work of Carmichael By Diane Urbani Paz

de la

Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — Some events must be seen to be believed. Here’s one: Yappy Hour, a happy hour that doesn’t discriminate against dogs. It’s happening for two hours, in fact, at Olympic Cellars, 255410 U.S. Highway 101, east of Port Angeles. Yappy Hour, a wine-tasting and fundraising party for the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, runs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. Admission is a $10 donation to benefit the Humane Society — and small,

friendly canines are encouraged to escort their people, said Kathy Charlton, Olympic Cellars’ owner. You do not, mind you, have to have a pet “date” to attend, she added. You can talk with staffers from the Humane Society’s shelter about the dogs and cats that are looking for adoptive parents and meet Dr. Suzy Zustiak, the new shelter manager and veterinarian. Disc jockeys Howard and Leslie, aka Double Exposure, will play animalthemed music, Best Friend Nutrition of Sequim will serve healthful dog kibble and Viaggio will provide pizza treats for the humans, Charlton promised.

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“Georgia on My Peninsula Spotlight Mind,” “Heart and PORT TOWNSEND — Soul,” Hoagy Bix Carmichael, “Skylark,” son of the late songwriter “In the Hoagy Carmichael, is com- Still of the ing to the Castle Key for a Night.” The elder jazz brunch at 11 a.m. this Brunch, Carmichael Saturday — and he’ll be which surrounded by women starts with cinnamon rolls throughout the event. and continues to crab In conjunction with cakes, Grecian omelettes or “Here’s to the Ladies! The steak and eggs, features Women of Tin Pan Alley,” jazz by the Blue Crows, the musical revue now who are guitarist George playing at Port Townsend’s Rezendes, clarinetist John Key City Playhouse, Morton and cellist Fred Hoagy Bix Carmichael Nussbaum. will fill the Castle Key After the meal, Hoagy with music and memories Bix Carmichael will share of his father. personal stories about his And it’s hard to know dad, who was born in 1899 which songs to list, since and lived to be 82. His recolthe late Carmichael wrote lections will be interspersed armloads of classics: “The with songs like “Two Sleepy Nearness of You,” “In the People” and “I Get Along Cool, Cool, Cool of the Without You Very Well Evening,” “Stardust,” (Except Sometimes).”

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“Well-behaved, peoplefriendly, dog-friendly pooches that are spayed or neutered — just in case there’s a love connection — are welcome,” she noted. And it’s better if the dogs are on the small side and up to date on their immunizations. “The cellar is a confined space, and big/small dogs might not mix well until we get a better handle on the whole human/dog social hour. This is our trial run. In summer when we can be outside, then we can really get creative.” Charlton is co-hosting Yappy Hour with her “winery dog in training,” Harley. For more information, phone Olympic Cellars at 360-452-0160 or visit www. olympiccellars.com. To learn more about the pets available at the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, see www.cchumane.com.

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-417-3550 weekdays.

A Taste of Mexico

The “Here’s to the Ladies!” cast, including Heather Dudley Nollette, Marlette Buchanan and Lee Harwell and musical director and pianist Linda Dowdell, will give a performance during the brunch. They’re enjoying a popular run of their show, created by Dowdell and Joanne Schmoll, at Key City; several performances are sold out and an extra one has been added at 7 p.m. on the final day, Oct. 24. Seats for Saturday’s Hoagy Carmichael jazz brunch are $40 and available by phoning 360-3790195 or by visiting www. keycitypublictheatre.org. Tickets, if any remain, will also be sold at the door of the Castle Key, which is inside Manresa Castle at 651 Cleveland St. in Port Townsend. To reach the restaurant, phone 360-379-1990.


Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

Films open eyes, lift up audiences Aims to raise awareness

Wideline and her brother, Widmark, who has autism, appear in “The Other Child,” one of the 16 short movies screening Saturday during the Sprout Film Festival.

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

films that are heartwarming, funny and even outrageous,” Barton said, adding Peninsula Spotlight that admission is free for PORT ANGELES — music, movies and the “Up Syndrome,” one of the question-and-answer sesshort movies screening in sions after each segment. Saturday’s free Sprout To be as viewer-friendly Film Festival, is about two as possible, she and guys who grow up together. DeMatteo assembled three Their friendship lasts sessions, each about an into adulthood, and one of hour and a half long, and the men teaches the other brought in a local band for how to drive. At one point, the 3 o’clock break. someone tells him that his “It’s an all-day event,” friend has Down syndrome. Barton said, “with “He just doesn’t see it,” Sequimarimba offering said Aimee Barton, a coortheir joyous music to get us dinator of the Sprout Film moving after sitting.” Festival’s stop in Port Along with “Up SynAngeles. “He says his drome,” she touted another friend is ‘always so up.’” favorite. “Street Anthem,” The 16 films in the trav- about the Portland, Ore., eling festival are that way, rapper known as Laz D, “is added Barton, who works really fun . . . he raps all in Clallam County’s the way through it.” Department of Health and The schedule of Sprout Human Services. films is as follows: She and Jenell DeMatteo, ■  10 a.m. — “Hands executive director of Special Away,” a three-minute Needs Advocacy Parents in music video from Germany, Clallam County, worked is about expressing joy with festival founder through movement; “Body Anthony Di Salvo to present & Soul,” a 40-minute U.S. the event in the Port Angedocumentary, is a look at les High School auditorium, an unusual relationship 304 E. Park Ave. between two people with disabilities; “These are world-class

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world and declare his love to Linda. ■  6 p.m. — “My Classic Life as an Artist” is a 21-minute U.S. documentary about autistic artist Larry Bissonnette and how he moves between speech, “Look, I’m In College,” a unusual indie-rock acts; typing and painting; “Acting Normal” is a 31-minute U.S. documen“Fathers’ Voices,” a 35-minute U.S. documentary, is about four young 14-minute U.S. documenmen with autism who pilot tary about how a performtary, is about four men a college inclusion program ing-arts studio changes raising children with develperceptions; in New York City; opmental disabilities; “Cocktails with Ben” is “The Other Child,” a “Up Syndrome,” a an 11-minute U.S. docu13-minute U.S. documen24-minute U.S. documentary, shows the unique win- mentary about a man’s tary, is a close friend’s playlove for life and music; dow brothers and sisters ful portrait of Rene, a man “Be My Brother” is a have into each other’s world. with Down syndrome; seven-minute Australian ■  1 p.m. — “Street “Beyond Borders,” a Anthem” is a three-minute feature about how a young 20-minute Belgian documan’s charm and charisma mentary, spotlights three U.S. music video showing challenges the prejudices of lives and one universal rapper Laz D performing a stranger at a bus stop; in the streets of Portland; story; “Dream Lover” is a “Rudely Interrupted” is “Sheri and Paul,” an 25-minute U.S. feature a nine-minute Australian 11-minute U.S. documentary, about Seth and whether he is a candid portrait of a coudocumentary about one of will come out of his dream ple sharing their thoughts that country’s most

on love and marriage; “Dreams” is a four-minute U.S. documentary of children and adults with Down syndrome, talking about their dreams and triumphs. The Sprout Film Festival, which originated in New York City, is so named for its goal of sprouting innovative programs for people with developmental disabilities, said DeMatteo. These movies “make the invisible visible,” she added. DeMatteo hopes the movies will give viewers fresh insights, to help them connect with and appreciate their neighbors who have disabilities. “This is a wonderful way to break down fear and barriers,” she said. “People with developmental disabilities are often isolated from our communities due to that fear. “People are just people, and these films are a wonderful reminder.” To learn more, visit www.gosprout.org.

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Friday, October 15, 2010

Professor shares Italian trip during Studium Generale Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — “Pigeons, Pick-pockets, Gelato and Da Vinci: The Everyday Moments of Florence in Springtime,” is the title of professor Kate Reavey’s talk this Thursday in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Reavey, who taught literature and creative writ-

ing in Florence, Italy, during the 2010 spring quarter, will start her free lecture at 12:35 p.m., and students as well as the rest of the public are welcome. She’ll share work by her students and talk about her Italian experience in the 50-minute program, which is part of the weekly Studium Generale series at Peninsula College.

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NFL Specials in the lounge with 3 large screens to watch the games on. Live Music on Wednesday Nights!

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Spotlight

Double feature will light up screen at Peninsula College By Diane Urbani de la Paz

sister who live in the countryside. Mounir worries that his Peninsula Spotlight sister, a narcoleptic, will PORT ANGELES — It’s never find a husband. He a double feature on Friday, does find a rich suitor for Oct. 22, as “Gods” from her — but then his friend Peru and “Masquerades” Khliffa proposes to Rym. from Algeria arrive inside Rym wants to marry the Little Theater at PeninKhliffa, but Mounir objects, sula College, 1502 E. Lauso Rym presses Khliffa into ridsen Blvd. action. The two are the next “Masquerades” shows installment of the Global how men dominate public Lens film series, and life in Algeria, but women admission for both is $5, or are the real leaders at free for high school and home, said the movie’s Peninsula College students. director, Lyes Salem. “Gods,” a movie from Peru, screens Friday, Oct. “I wanted her to symbol22, in the Little Theater at Peninsula College as ize Algeria,” Salem said of Peruvian film part of a Global Lens Series double feature. Rym in a recent interview. “Gods,” which will “I think that the Algerian screen at 4 p.m. Friday, “Gods” won the El enter the family business, woman deserves the image Oct. 22, is the story of and Andrea, a bit of a party Abrazo Award for Best we saw in the movie. She Elisa, a working-class girl. Film from the Biarritz was at the first ranks in woman eager to shed her As Elisa embraces her International Film Festival fighting extremism during background. She’s about to new life of lavish parties as well as the Audience the years of violence in marry a wealthy industriand beachfront estates, Award and Best Peruvian Algeria in the past years. The Algerian woman was alist who will give her step- Diego and Andrea rebel Feature prize at the Lima our last resort when children: Diego, who is against their upper-class Film Festival. despair crept in.” upbringing. reluctantly preparing to For more information on Algerian tradition the Global Lens series, con“Masquerades,” screentact Peninsula College film ing at 7 p.m., takes movie- studies professor Bruce goers inside Algerian famHattendorf at bhattendorf@ ily tradition, with Mounir pencol.edu or visit www. pencol.edu. and Rym, a brother and

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Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

Chamber orchestra opens season Free concert with pair of concerts in PA, Sequim set at college By Diane Urbani de

la

Paz

Peninsula Spotlight

The Port Angeles Chamber Orchestra is starting the season with a pair of concerts titled “Gems for Small Ensembles,” tonight in Port Angeles and Saturday night in Sequim. “These are very intimate,” flutist Sharon Snel said of the performances, “and the music is quite diverse, from Gabrieli’s Canzonas, which are Baroque, to Beethoven, who’s Romantic and Piston, who is modern.” The two concerts’ gems also include Haydn’s Notturno No. 3 in C, alongside Beethoven’s Quintet for Piano and Winds and Wal-

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ter Piston’s Divertimento for Nine Players. “The middle movement [of Piston’s piece] is just to die for,” Snel added. “This is such a well-balanced program. There really is something for everyone.” Snel, enthused as she is, won’t be performing with the chamber ensemble. She’s principal flutist in the Port Angeles Sym-

phony, and a fan of the players who will appear tonight and Saturday. They are cellist Fred Thompson, clarinetist Lylburn Layer, oboist Anne Krabill, bassoonist Beatrice Kaufman Monohon and French horn player Kristin Quigley-Brye, plus pianist Adam Stern, who’s usually seen conducting the symphony orchestra.

From the piano In these chamber concerts, “he’ll conduct from the piano,” said Mark Wendeborn, executive director of the Port Angeles Symphony. “These are seasoned performers,” Snel added, “who really know how

to play.” The music will begin at 7 p.m. today inside Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., Port Angeles, and at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Sequim Worship Center, 640 N. Sequim Ave. All seats are $12, and tickets will be available at the door. Patrons wanting to purchase in advance should visit Port Book and News at 104 E. First St., Port Angeles, or BeeDazzled at The Buzz, 130 N. Sequim Ave. Information and tickets are also available during business hours at the Port Angeles Symphony office, 216-C N. Laurel St. in downtown Port Angeles. For more details, phone 360-457-5579.

5

and the USA Songwriting Competition’s folk category PORT ANGELES — as well as other prizes, Jonathan Kingham, a SeatKingham mixes vocals, tle singer-songwriter noted for bringing buckets of Red guitar and freestyle rap. He’s shared stages with Vines licorice to his perforShawn Colvin, Michael mances, is headed for PenMcDonald, Vanessa Carlinsula College at noon this ton and David Wilcox, and Wednesday. toured with Julio Iglesias He’ll Jr. and Glen Phillips of give a free Toad the Wet Sprocket. concert in The release of his third the Pirate album, “That Changes Union Everything,” marks his Building, entry into jazz, though or PUB, he’s kept a foot firmly cafeteria, planted in the folk and Kingham and both pop world. students And in when he and the general public are appears in coffeehouses welcome. and theaters or on lawns The winner of the at lunch time, Kingham National Telluride Trouba- typically hands out Red dour Songwriting Contest Vines from a big tub. Peninsula Spotlight

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

“The Last Turbine” is among the images photographer Harry von Stark has infused onto aluminum in “Elwha Power,” the new show at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center.

End

of an

era

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Harry

and balladeer Noel Price will provide music. Admission is free. Von Stark embarked on this project eight months ago, as a documentarian given full access to the concrete bunkers around the two dams. He took an inyour-face approach, the

opposite of the wide, aerial shots that typically illustrate news coverage of the forthcoming dam removal. “This is my thing,” von Stark said, “this” being capturing structures that will soon be gone from the landscape, while blending art and history.

‘A different light’

“Main Line” is one of 30 images in “Elwha Power,” Harry von Stark’s show opening this weekend at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center.

Stark (2)

Photography exhibit captures power of soon-to-be-extinct Elwha River dams

“Elwha Power,” his exhibition of photographs infused onto aluminum panPORT ANGELES — els, opens this weekend at This being the last dam fall the Port Angeles Fine Arts — the final autumn before Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen the Elwha and Glines Can- Blvd., with a reception from yon dams are removed next 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Von Stark will be on year — Harry von Stark is unveiling a historic tribute. hand, and Sequim guitarist Peninsula Spotlight

von

“I want to be able to have more people see history in a different light,” he added. “I want images that make you stop, that pull you in,” like a wild river. “There is a sense of heightened reality in von Stark’s images,” said Jake Seniuk, director of the fine arts center. “[It’s] as if we’re exploring the circulatory system of a great robotic body. “These big analog dials, radiating spokes and honker nuts and bolts are a far cry from the current high-tech nano-environment of computer chips

and LED lights.” The photographs seem futuristic, Seniuk added, in their celebration of an era of monumental achievement in harnessing nature. “At the same time, they are monuments of a future that has come and gone.” Von Stark, 64 and a resident of Quilcene, was born in the 1,000-year-old city of Ulm, West Germany. When he was just 5, his family left the heavily bombed burg and made for the American frontier, landing in Lodi, Calif., at the heart of the agrarian San Joaquin Valley. Von Stark discovered art and design on family trips to San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum. There, he admired the hyper-realistic still-lifes of the American illusionist painter William Harnett, and the paintings of Rembrandt and other Dutch Masters, with their unadorned naturalism. Von Stark grew up to be a salesman and car dealer-

ship owner in the San Francisco Bay area, but he never gave up his love for art. He started Vanishing Era Publications in 1971 and has since traveled the world, photographing structures in various stages of life and death. “I’m going to have a tease of my Egyptian series,” in the show at the fine arts center, he said. A few images from his visits — in 1990 — to the temple ruins of Karnak and Luxor will come to light. Von Stark is also a promoter of other artists. For the past three years, he’s assembled monthly shows of Peninsula photographers at his Long Gallery, upstairs in The Landing mall in Port Angeles. His “Elwha Power” will stay through Nov. 28 at the fine arts center, which is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. For more information, visit www.PAFAC.org or phone 360-457-3532.


Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

nce upon a time

7

Festival shares magic of well-told tale By Diane Urbani de

tional concert Sunday morning. Peninsula Spotlight “My stories are about transformation, love, rejoicPORT ANGELES — ing and the relationship This weekend-long party is between humans and the not what you think. natural world,” adds The Forest Storytelling Simms. She plans on perFestival, aka the 16th forming an excerpt from annual gathering of enter“Rejoice Regardless,” her tainers from across the one-woman show about nation, is no mere kid stuff. finding the way back to joy. And if you talk to the So yes, this is adult tellers, you could call it a entertainment, though tellpassionfest. ers worth their salt will “I like to spread the pas- acknowledge that it sion,” says Laura Simms, appeals mightily to kids, the New York City entertoo. tainer who’s in Port Angeles today. Disconnected? Along with four other professional storytellers But what about all from the east and west those gadgets people are coasts, she’s opening the carrying around? As the Forest Storytelling Festival young, the middle-aged and in Peninsula College’s Litthe mature become glued tle Theater. to their phones and iPods The local group the and Kindles, do storytellers Story People of Clallam like Simms notice any County is presenting the change in audiences’ atten16th annual event, which tion spans? includes workshops and an In a word, “no,” says open-mic story swap Satur- Kirk Waller, the Oakland, day and a free Calif., performer and storytelling teacher who’s inspiraanother featured artist this weekend. “Once the storytelling begins, that magic that happens is the same it’s always been,” he says. “It’s an antidote,” adds Simms, “to the disassociation that can occur,” when la

Paz

Weitkamp

Waller

you’ve spent a little too much time fixated on one small screen or another. To Waller’s mind, storytelling is what we all do, throughout our lives. “Adults tell stories every day . . . we live in story,” he said. “Adults are my best audiences. They understand the nuances, the subtleties of a story,” beyond the entertainment factor.

State University. And when he stands up to unleash a tale, he uses everything he’s gathered along the way. That includes music, mime and other moves, all in the name of picking up his audience and perching them on another plane.

Joy of storytelling

The joy of being a storyteller, Waller said, is “being able to share a gift with other people . . . They start out worried about their troubles, and their hearts are lightened,” by a tale that mixes sweet moments with sudden insights. Weitkamp comes from the other side of the country, from Christiansburg, Weekend theme Va., where she works with The weekend’s theme is youth, seniors and everyone in between. “Now there is this to tell,” “I like to think my disand gatherings start with a tinguishing style is that concert tonight at 7:30, continue with the open-mic people feel cared for in my shows, and that they forgot gathering at 12:15 Saturday afternoon, another con- their troubles while they cert Saturday night and were with me,” she said, the free inspirational consounding much like Waller. cert at 10 a.m. Sunday. “I hope that they are so The crop of spinners has moved that they share artistic director Rebecca their own stories,” with Hom proud. In addition to family and others they love. Waller, there’s Laura Simms from New York, Story is the essence Michael Parent from Maine, Kim Weitkamp “No matter how technolfrom Virginia and ogy changes, story is the Heather essence of human commuMcNeil from nication,” Weitkamp added. Oregon. She calls herself a “gearFor head,” since she has a complete smart phone and a deluxe details, Bluetooth device, among visit www. other gizmos. DancingLeaves.com/ Kids want to take picstorypeople. tures of her with their cell Waller, 46, holds — phones, and she’s seen peoamong other experiences ple texting at storytelling — a master’s in creative writing from San Francisco festivals.

“I’m not concerned,” she said, because “it’s in every human to have that eye-toeye communication,” and people will always search it out. She tells stories from her childhood; stories about nursing homes; stories for guys and for women and for seniors. “I’m considered a humorist and a storyteller. You’re laughing, and then suddenly you’re crying. I can’t help it,” Weitkamp added. “That’s who I am.”

Public encouraged Hom, who orchestrates the festival along with director Cherie Trebon, encourages community members to partake in the workshops and in Saturday’s open mic hour, held in the Pirate Union Building, or PUB, beside the Little Theater. “We’re all gathered in the commons having lunch,” listening to whomever signs up by 12:15. Each person has seven minutes to spin a tale —

and Hom knows how much courage that takes. “It’s an appreciative audience,” she promised. The Forest Storytelling Festival culminates in the Sunday concert in which the featured tellers share personal stories, ones with “some heart to them,” Hom added. This free gathering is a mix of tales, “some with worldly wisdom, and some folk tales, about the strength and courage that get us through.” Though the Forest Storytelling Festival draws nationally known performers, Hom believes it’s kept its down-to-Earth feeling. “We look for the people we know. But it does not have a cliqueish atmosphere at all,” she said. “You get so close to the national tellers; you can sit and chat with them.” Never tried a storytelling festival before? “You will be warmed and welcomed,” Hom said. “You will be recharged.”

Opening narrative THE 16TH ANNUAL Forest Storytelling Festival opens today with five featured storytellers in concert at 7:30 p.m., and continues Saturday with two 75-minute workshops for storytellers of all levels at 10:30 a.m., an open mic story swap at 12:15 p.m., a performance by Kirk Waller and Renee Diaz de Leon Harvey at 2:45 and by Laura Simms and Mary Dessein at 3:45 p.m., and an allteller concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday begins with a free inspirational concert by the five featured storytellers at 10 a.m., and continues with storyteller Heather McNeil’s performance at noon and Kim Weitkamp’s at 12:30 p.m. Events take place in and adjacent to the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., and range in price from $12 to $20. To make reservations or find out more, visit www. DancingLeaves.com/storypeople.


8

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

PS Calendar: Port Angeles

Peninsula Spotlight

PS Calendar: Sequim

Friday

Sunday

Friday

Port Angeles Chamber Orchestra concert — Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., 7:30 p.m. For tickets, phone 360457-5579. Visit www.portangelessymphony. org or e-mail pasymphony@olypen.com.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Elwha Power,” Harry von Stark’s photos of Elwha River dams as icons of the vanishing Industrial Age. 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Opening reception, today, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Sequim guitarist and balladeer Noel Price to perform. Center’s regular hours, Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-457-3532.

Sequim Museum & Arts Center — “Your Daily Fiber: Conspicuous Consumption, Community and Ceremony.” 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Free. Phone 360-683-8110.

Forest Storytelling Festival — Little Theater, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., today through Sunday Individual events range from $12 to $20. For complete information, visit www.dancingleaves.com/ storypeople.

Comedian Susan Rice — Kelbi’s Comedy Stop, 10115 Old Olympic Highway, 8 p.m. Tickets $15.

Monday

Saturday

Monday Musicale — Live music at Queen of Angels Church, 109 W. 11th St., noon. 360457-4585.

Cultural Connections — “Cooperative Marketing: Making the Olympic Peninsula an Arts Destination.” The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 W. Evergreen Farm Way, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Free. Visit www.sequimartsalliance.org or phone 360-460-3023. Port Angeles Chamber Orchestra concert — Sequim Worship Center, 640 N. Sequim Ave., 7:30 p.m. For tickets, phone 360-4575579. Visit www.portangelessymphony.org or e-mail pasymphony@olypen.com. Readers Theatre Plus scholarship fundraiser — “Warriors (The Battle of Age!)” Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $15 each or two for $25 available at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim; Odyssey Bookstore, 114 W. Front St., Port Angeles; or at the door. For more information, e-mail rtplus@olypen.com.

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PS Calendar: PT Jazz Brunch — Celebrates music of Hoagy Carmichael with his son Hoagy Bix Carmichael, the cast and creators of Key City Public Theatre’s current production and The Blue Crows. Castle Key Restaurant, 651 Cleveland St., 11 a.m. Tickets $40 available online at www.keycity publictheatre.org or at 360-379-0195.

Olympic Peninsula Dance — Maia Santell and House Blend of Tacoma play jazz, blues, swing, big band, jump blues and rhythm and blues. Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Free (with admission) dance lesson in “American Bandstand” swing with Walter Comedy show — Castle Key RestauDill and Janice Eklund at 7 p.m. Adults rant, 651 Cleveland St., 9 p.m. $12. $15, students with school ID and people with disabilities $10; ages 12 and younger $7. No partner or registration is necessary. Sunday Phone 360-385-6919 or 360-385-5237. English country dance and potluck — RoseWind Common House, 3131 “Heres to the Ladies! The Women of Haines St., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Free. Location Tin Pin Alley” — Key City Public Theatre is fragrance-free facility. No street shoes at Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington are allowed. For more information, phone St., 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, $18; Sun- Dan Post at 360-554-0417 or e-mail dan. day 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m., $15. Students post@frandango.org. $10 at all shows. Advance tickets online or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For Thursday more information, phone 360-385-7396 or Comedy night benefit — Comedian visit keycitypublictheatre.org. Dwight Slade performs. Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, 419 WashSaturday ington St., 8 p.m. General admission, $15; 2010 Global Lens film series — “Ordi- VIP tickets with two free drinks and priornary People,” 2009 from Serbia. Rose ity seating, $25. Tickets at www.keycity Theatre, 235 Taylor St., 10 a.m. Admission publictheatre.org or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. $5. Phone 360-379-1333.

9

Bedewed beauty “Bishop’s Garden,” a photograph taken in Washington, D.C., is among the works by Marilyn Santiago. Santiago’s artistry is on display at the Itty Bitty Buzz, 110 E. First St., in downtown Port Angeles through the end of October. Marilyn Santiago

Friday

Friday, October 15, 2010

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10

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Spotlight

PS    Nightlife

Clallam County

Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. Highway 101) — Acoustic jam hosted by Victor Reventlow, Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Angeles and Joyce Bar N9NE (229 W. First St.) — Open mic Thursday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Big Fine Daddies, Saturday, 9 p.m. $3. Sundowners, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Coo Coo Nest (1017 E. First St.) — Craig Logue hosts the open mic and plays tunes, Wednesdays, from 8 p.m.

The Junction Roadhouse (US Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Chantilly Lace, tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., $5; jam session hosted by Barry Burnett, Sunday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Jason Mogi, Wednesday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

8:30 p.m. $5.

Sequim and Blyn Alder Wood Bistro (139 W. Alder St.) — Howly Slim, Tuesday, 5 p.m. The Buzz (128 N. Sequim Ave. ) — Open mic hosted by Kelly Thomas, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Cedars at Dungeness (1965 Woodcock Road) — Lori and Clipper, tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Kokopelli (203 E. Front St.) — Howly Slim, Thursday, 6 p.m. Kelbi’s World (10115 Old (with George Radebaugh on Olympic Highway) — Standup accordion), Sunday, 5:30 p.m. comedy with Susan Rice, Cracked Bean (108 Del tonight 8 p.m. $15. Port Angeles Senior CenGuzzi Dr.) — Open mic with ter (Seventh and Peabody hosts Larry and Rene Bauer, Las Palomas (1085 E. Thursday, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. streets) — Wally and the Boys, Washington St.) — Howly Tuesday 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Slim, Saturday, 5 p.m. $5, first-timers free. Oasis Sports Bar and Salt Creek Inn (state Route Grill (301 E. Washington St.) 112 and Camp Hayden Road, — Chantilly Lace (open mic Joyce) — Dirty Joe hosts jam), Thursday 7 p.m. to 11 open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. p.m.; Skidder Hill, tonight, 5 p.m.; Cats Meow Monday, 5:30 Smuggler’s Landing Res- p.m.; Jubilee, Wednesday, ���������� taurant and Lounge (115 5:30 p.m. Railroad Ave.) — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the 7 Cedars Casino (270756 Draw Band, Wednesday, Highway 101) — Sway, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; OB1, ����������������� � DJ, Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; @ Long.... International Entertainment Inc The Veela Cafe (133 E. All Month First St.) — Jim Lind (rock and and Club 7 present star Get���������� 20% off when you search with six bands and country), tonight, 7:30 p.m. buy any local cheese eight acts, Sunday, 4 p.m. to Featuring Fresh, 10 p.m.; Comedy Night with AND any local Wine on the Waterfront Louie Foxx and Marc Yaffee, Local craft Fare from (115 E. Railroad Ave.) — beer.the Wednesday, 8:30 p.m. Charlie Ferris, tonight, 7 p.m. Peninsula and Beyond: $3. May Palmer, Saturday, It’s Better Together!

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Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

PS At the Movies: Week of October 15-21 Port Angeles

Where to find the cinemas

“Easy A” (PG-13) — A high school student (Emma Stone) relies on the school’s rumor mill to advance. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5 p.m. daily, plus 7 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:05 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Jackass 3-D” (R) — Outrageous stunts. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 12:50 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole” (PG) — In this animated adventure-fantasy, an owlet must find a mythic band of winged warriors. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. daily, plus 1:10 p.m. and 3:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Life as We Know It” (PG13) — Two single adults (Kath-

■  Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■  Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■  The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■  Uptown Theater: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

erine Heigl, Josh Duhamel) become caregivers to an orphaned girl when their mutual best friends die in an accident. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 12:50 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Red” (PG-13) — The CIA targets a team of former agents for assassination. Starring Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Helen Mirren. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m.

and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 9:25 today and Saturday, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “My Soul To Take” (R) — A serial killer stalks seven children. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:05 p.m. daily, plus 9:05 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:05 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Secretariat” (PG) — The story of the 1973 Triple Crown winner. Stars Diane Lane and John Malkovich. At Deer Park

Friday, October 15, 2010

Cinema. Showtimes 4:50 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

his 1987 Oscar-winning role). At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 7:20 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. today, 7:10 p.m. and 9:35 p.m. Saturday through Thursday.

“The Social Network” (PG-13) — The story of Facebook’s founder and his personal and legal complications. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:55 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 9:35 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Paranormal Activity 2” (R) — After experiencing what they think are a series of “break-ins,” a family sets up security cameras around their home — to see sinister events unfolding around them. Deer Park Cinemas. Midnight screening Thursday. (Friday morning, Oct. 22.)

“The Town” (R) — An unrepentant criminal (Ben Port Townsend Affleck) and his bank manager hostage (Rebecca Hall). At “Secretariat” (PG) — See Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 9 synopsis under Port Angeles p.m. today and Saturday, 7 listings. At the Rose Theatre. p.m. Sunday through Thursday. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily. “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (PG-13) — As the “The Social Network” (PGglobal economy teeters on the 13) — See synopsis under Port brink of disaster, a young Wall Angeles listings. At the Rose Street trader (Shia LaBeouf) Theatre. Showtimes 4:30 p.m. partners with disgraced former and 7:20 p.m. daily. Wall Street corporate raider (Michael Douglas, reprising “Legend of the Guardians:

PS  Nightlife Continued from 10 and Lounge (Seventh and

Jefferson County Port Hadlock

Sheridan streets) — Jazz Brunch celebrating Hoagy Carmichael, 11 a.m., $40; Standup comedy, Saturday 9 p.m. $12.

$15, students/disabled $10, children younger than 12 $7. Upstage (923 Washington St.) — The Bruce Katz Band, tonight, 8 p.m. $15; Brian “Buck” Ellard, Saturday, 9 p.m. $3; Meklit Hadero Band, Sunday, 7:30 p.m. $10; open mic hosted by Greg Vinson, Tues-

DEER PARK CINEMAS ALL FILMS PRESENTED IN D.L.P. DIGITAL CINEMA 100% DIGITAL PICTURE AND SOUND

RED JACKASS 3-D

DOLBY DIGITAL

3D

SECRETARIAT THE SOCIAL NETWORK

day, 8 p.m.; Sylvia Heins Band, Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. Cover. This listing, which appears every Friday, announces live

entertainment at Clallam and Jefferson counties’ night spots. Call in your information by Tuesday to 360-417-3527, fax it to 360-4173521, or e-mail news@peninsula dailynews.com.

It’s Astounding! Time is Fleeting! Madness takes its toll! Tickets for Richard O’Brien’s

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS

LINCOLN THEATRE LIFE AS WE KNOW IT MY SOUL TO TAKE

Inn at Port Hadlock (310 Hadlock Bay Road) — Open mic hosted by Dave Sheehan, Thursday, 7 p.m.

Presented by PALOA Musical Theater and Peninsula College are now on sale! November 11 and 12 at 7:30pm November 13 and 2:00pm and 11:00pm

Port Townsend

EASY A THE TOWN

in the Little Theater at Peninsula College

Banana Leaf (609 Washington St.) — Howly Slim, tonight, 5 p.m.

All tickets $15.00 Tickets on sale at www.paloa.org NW Fudge and Confections 108 W. First St., Downtown P.A. The Sequim Gym in Sequim and The Boookaneer Store at Peninsula College

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 0A5100438

0A5099375

Castle Key Restaurant

www.pen-movies.com

WALL STREET:MONEY NEVER SLEEPS

Hadlock House (141 Chimacum Road) — Mastermind Productions Karaoke with DJ B-Man, tonight and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — Open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue.

The Owls of Ga’Hoole” (PG) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theater. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today, 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

0A5099643

Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) Elks Lodge (555 Otto St.) — Jim Nyby, Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; — Olympic Peninsula Dance Jess, Tuesday, 6 p.m.; Buzz presents Maia Santell and Rogowski, Thursday, 6 p.m. House Blend. 8 p.m. Adults

11

DISCOUNT PRICES

ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6 P.M.


12

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 15, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

TIRE SALE

tourevo SALE PRICE

205/70TR-15 215/70TR-15 195/65HR-15 205/65HR-15 205/65TR-15 215/65TR-15 205/65TR-16 205/65HR-16 215/65TR-16 225/65HR-16 235/65TR-16 215/65TR-17 195/60VR-15 195/60HR-15 205/60HR-15

118.92 122.44 111.67 122.53 125.18 130.67 83.23 141.71 145.45 166.67 144.55 149.78 121.63 109.46 114.96

SIZE

215/60TR-15 215/60HR-15 205/60HR-16 205/60VR-16 215/60VR-16 215/60TR-16 225/60TR-16 225/60HR-16 235/60HR-16 215/60HR-17 225/60HR-17 225/60HR-18 205/55HR-16 205/55VR-16 215/55HR-16

SALE PRICE

127.11 119.97 146.60 150.90 158.21 142.36 146.21 155.74 163.92 156.63 182.67 183.10 145.10 115.62 154.10

SALE PRICE

SIZE

225/55VR-16 186.02 215/55VR-17 197.80 225/55HR-17 201.47 225/55VR-17 201.64 235/55HR-17 184.08 235/55TR-17 183.56 215/55TR-18 187.66 225/55TR-18 193.99 235/55VR-18 216.76 215/50VR-16 160.87 225/50VR-16 182.55 205/50VR-17XL193.82 215/50VR-17XL 182.49 225/50VR-17 210.35 225/50ZR-17 223.35

money back guarantee

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT215/85R-16/10 E 197.96 LT235/85R-16/10 E 199.42 LT235/80R-17/10 E 231.20 235/75SR-15 166.44 265/75SR-15 167.79 225/75SR-16 134.31 235/75SR-16 165.64 245/75SR-16 167.12 265/75SR-16 175.37 LT235/75R-15/6 C 174.06

SALE PRICE

SIZE

235/50VR-17 222.67 245/50VR-17 255.62 225/50TR-18 240.01 235/50VR-18 270.55 245/50VR-18 184.08 225/45VR-17 202.43 235/45ZR-17 207.63 245/45VR-17 227.29 255/45VR-17 147.07 235/45VR-18 249.47 245/45VR-18 252.08 255/45VR-18 250.77 235/40ZR-18XL 207.63 245/40VR-18 256.27 275/35VR-18 294.54

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SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT245/75R-16/6 C 210.36 LT245/75R-16/10 E 216.70 LT265/75R-16/6 C 205.66 LT265/75R-16/10 E 247.42 LT285/75R-16/8 D 256.55 LT315/75R-16/8 D 296.48 LT225/75R-16/10 E 200.69 235/70SR-15 157.90 225/70SR-16 164.61 235/70TR-16 167.57

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

the west’s largest selection!

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Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

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MIlaNNI 461

MIlaNNI 452

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$123.32

16x7 Black/Machined Starting at

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT235/75R-15/6 C 174.06 LT245/75R-16/6 C 210.36 LT245/75R-16/10 E 216.70 LT265/75R-16/6 C 205.66 LT265/75R-16/10 E 247.42 LT285/75R-16/8 D 256.55 LT315/75R-16/8 D 296.48 LT225/75R-16/10 E 200.69 235/70SR-15 157.90 164.61 175.37 225/70SR-16

PRICE 197.96 199.42 231.20 166.44 167.79 134.31 165.64

56.14 75.23 78.82 80.72 86.82 99.89 222.02 202.05

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT285/70R-17/8 D 248.61 LT275/70R-18/10 E 278.82 P235/65TR-17 205.70 245/65SR-17 207.89 265/65TR-17 219.71 P275/55SR-20 294.18 30/950R-15/6 C 183.95 31/1050R-15/6 C 193.26 32/1150R-15/6 C 227.13

WE REPLACE Bleeder Screw Caliper p Housing

We reSurface braKe rotorS

8 A.m.-6 P.m. mon.-FrI. 8 A.m. - 5 P.m. sAt.

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE P245/70SR-16 163.20 P255/70SR-16 178.94 P265/70SR-16 181.31 P265/70SR-17 192.91 30/950R-15/6 C 147.04 31/1050R-15/6 C 166.01 35/1250R-15/6 C 199.99

Does your vehicle pull when you apply the brakes? Do you hear a grinding noise when you step on the brakes? Is your brake pedal spongy or maybe too hard?

WE REPLACE Primary y Shoe Return Spring

BRAKE ASSEMBLY

Free

WE REPLACE Primary Shoe WE REPLACE Shoe Hold-Down Parts WE REPLACE Adjuster j Lever Spring

WE REPLACE Secondary Shoe Return Spring WE REPLACE Wheel Cylinder y Assembly

WE REPLACE Secondary y Shoe

We reSurface braKe druMS

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

open country h/t highway tread design

SIZE & LOAD RANGE

LT215/85R-16/10 LT235/85R-16/10 LT235/80R-17/10 P225/75SR-15 P235/75SR-15 P225/75SR-16 P235/75SR-16 P245/75SR-16 P265/75TR-16 P235/75SR-17 P245/75SR-17 LT235/75SR-15/6 LT265/75R-16/10 LT285/75R-16/10 LT225/75R-17/10 LT245/75R-17/10 205/70HR-15 P225/70TR-15 P235/70SR-15 P265/70SR-15 P215/70HR-16

sequIm 360-683-7261 802 e. WAsHIngton

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E E E

C C E E E

PRICE 198.48 222.73 262.98 154.24 148.03 168.69 174.59 174.14 206.01 219.03 185.66 173.28 262.79 272.43 225.92 265.88 144.45 157.53 168.06 184.01 166.99

Offers a highway tread pattern designed to reduce road noise.

SUPERMARKET

PRICE P225/70TR-16 176.63 P235/70TR-16 176.57 P245/70SR-16 178.92 P255/70SR-16 189.77 P265/70SR-16 193.28 P275/70HR-16 215.81 P235/70SR-17 215.50 P245/70SR-17 221.60 P255/70SR-17 225.24 P265/70TR-17 220.19 P285/70TR-17 225.40 255/70SR-18 227.58 P265/70SR-18 210.14 LT245/70R-17/10 E 260.23 LT265/70R-17/10 E 269.14 215/65HR-16 175.82 255/65HR-16 192.69 P235/65SR-16 173.08 225/65HR-17 189.75 235/65HR-17 216.24 275/65TR-17 169.99

SIZE & LOAD RANGE

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE

P245/65HR-17 211.37 P255/65SR-17 223.41 P265/65SR-17 225.98 P275/65TR-18 265.64 LT275/65R-18/10 E 259.55 215/60HR-16 169.87 235/60HR-16 187.95 255/60HR-17 201.76 P235/60SR-17 193.54 235/60VR-18 220.59 255/60HR-18 241.81 P245/60HR-18 223.28 P265/60TR-18 245.37 P275/60HR-18 287.97 P275/60SR-20 278.06 235/55HR-17 200.92 235/55VR-18 273.66 255/55VR-18 232.27 P245/55SR-19 252.57 255/55VR-19 284.48

Port toWnsend 360-385-0124 2355 sIms WAY

095095281

Hours

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT305/70R-16/8 D 199.99 LT265/70R-17/6 C 211.42 P225/70SR-14 145.65 P225/70SR-15 129.72 P235/70SR-15 152.69 P265/70SR-15 175.25 P225/70SR-16 156.11 P235/70SR-16 160.38

quiet ride

Do your brakes grab? Do your brakes squeal when you step on the pedal?

DRUM BRAKE SERVICE

CALIPER ASSEMBLY

Boot Piston Seal ea WE REPLACE WE REPLACE WE REPLACE Outer/Inner Sleeve & Pad & Plates Bushings

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT315/75R-16/8 D 199.99 P205/75SR-15 129.91 P215/75SR-15 134.66 P225/75SR-15 139.89 P235/75SR-15 141.42 P265/75SR-15 143.25 P245/75SR-16 166.36 P265/75SR-16 167.95

long tread life

TO WATCH FOR:

les schwab brake service includes: DISC BRAKE SERVICE

smooth ride SUPERMARKET

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SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE 235/70TR-16 167.57 245/70SR-16 172.34 255/70SR-16 185.00 265/70TR-16 191.28 245/70SR-17 203.49 265/70SR-17 201.49 P265/70SR-18 228.89 LT255/70R-16/6 C 217.31 LT265/70R-17/6 C 247.31 LT265/70R-17/10 E 223.75

(Free Replacement 25,000 Miles – Parts & Labor)

SUPERMARKET PRICE

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

wild country XtX sport

There are many important parts that wear out in your brake system. This PROfESSIONALLY TRAINED TECHNICIANS is why we don’t just replace your brake pads and shoes. BEST BRAKE It’s also why we WARRANTY can stand behind our brake service with the best brake PREMIUM warranty. QUALITY PARTS

SIZE & LOAD RANGE ST175/80R-13/6 C ST205/75R-14/6 C ST215/75R-14/6 C ST205/75R-15/6 C ST205/75R-15/8 D ST225/75R-15/8 D 225/70R-19.5/12f 245/70R-19.5/16H

452-7691

SUPERMARKET

OVER 25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

TREAD DESIGN MAY VARY

2527 e. HIgHWAY 101

Attractive outlined white letters. Features a deep tread design for longer mileage. M & S rated with a smooth, quiet ride.

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT235/85R-16/10 E 182.42 LT225/75R-16/10 E 180.04 LT245/75R-16/10 E 190.85 LT235/75R-15/6 C 159.15 LT245/75R-16/10 E 200.84 LT265/75R-16/6 C 191.38 LT265/75R-16/10 E 216.30 LT285/75R-16/8 D 221.95

why les schwab brakes?

17x8 Machined Starting at

trailer tires

Port Angeles

SUPERMARKET

Free

quiet ride

50,000 mile warranty

The XTX Sport features an aggressive tread design that provides superior all terrain performance. SIZE & LOAD RANGE LT215/85R-16/10 E LT235/85R-16/10 E LT235/80R-17/10 E 235/75SR-15 265/75SR-15 225/75SR-16 235/75SR-16 245/75SR-16 167.12 265/75SR-16

16x7 Silver Starting at

long tread life

SUPERMARKET

SUPERMARKET

raCElINE 197

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT275/70R-18/10 E 278.82 P235/65TR-17 205.70 245/65SR-17 207.89 265/65TR-17 219.71 P275/55SR-20 294.18 30/950R-15/6 C 183.95 31/1050R-15/6 C 193.26 32/1150R-15/6 C 227.13

mud & snow rated

“Silent Wall” technology diSturbS air floW for a quieter ride!

custom wheels

15x8 Polished Starting at

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE 245/70SR-16 172.34 255/70SR-16 185.00 265/70TR-16 191.28 245/70SR-17 203.49 265/70SR-17 201.49 P265/70SR-18 228.89 LT255/70R-16/6 C 217.31 LT265/70R-17/6 C 247.31 LT265/70R-17/10 E 223.75 LT285/70R-17/8 D 248.61

longer tread life

smooth quiet ride

Ultra 175

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wildcat a/t

all season traction

Free

wild country XtX sport

The XTX Sport features an aggressive tread design that provides superior all terrain performance. SUPERMARKET

SIZE

LesSchwab.com

PDN10152010j  

PDN10152010j