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Scatter the doldrums

Thursday Showers, diminishing by mid-Friday A12

Lots of Peninsula live music opportunities A6

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

January 5, 2012

Council picks King as mayor Selection is unanimous; Nelson deputy BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

City Attorney John Watts, right, administers the oath of office to City Council members Kris Nelson, David King, Deborah Stinson and Bob Gray, from left. The council then elected King to be the new mayor.

PORT TOWNSEND — David King, who ran unopposed for a second term on the Port Townsend City Council in 2011 has been elected the town’s 48th mayor. “I haven’t been as nervous as I am now since my eighth-grade piano recital,� King said after seating himself in the mayor’s chair on Tuesday night. “I hope this turns out better.� King was nominated by Mayor Michelle Sandoval and received

unanimous support from the other five council members. Councilwoman Kris Nelson, who also ran unopposed in the most recent election, was unanimously elected deputy mayor after a nomination by Councilman Mark Welch. Along with King and Nelson, new council members Bob Gray and Deborah Stinson were also sworn in on Tuesday night. In the Nov. 8 general election, Stinson defeated Jack Range by 20 votes for the Port Townsend City Council seat vacated by Laurie Medlicott, and Gray defeated Deputy Mayor George Randels. Port Townsend has a “weak mayor� system that elects mayors from the council to serve in a largely ceremonial role. TURN

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Gregoire supports same-sex marriage Governor says she wrestled with own religion before taking stand BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire publicly supported legalizing same-sex marriage in Washington state, saying Wednesday that she came to the decision after several years of battling her own uncertainty on the issue. “I have been on my own journey, I’ll admit that,� Gregoire said at a news conference announcing her support of a legalization bill that will Gregoire be introduced in the Legislature next week. “It has been a battle for me with my religion.� The Democrat, a Roman Catholic, previously had supported efforts to expand the state’s current law on domestic partner rights for gay couples, but had not come out in favor of full marriage rights.

“I’ve always been uncomfortable with the position I took publicly,� she said. “Then I came to realize, the religions can decide what they want to do, but it’s not OK for the state to discriminate.�

Gay-rights supporters Gregoire’s announcement was met with loud applause from gayrights groups who crowded her conference room. “It’s about damn time,� said 75-year-old John McCluskey of Tacoma, who attended the news conference with his partner of 53 years, Rudy Henry. The couple registered as domestic partners the first year that they could, in 2007. “At our age, we don’t know how long we’ll be around,� he said. “We’d really like to get married.� The state’s underlying domestic partnership law, which the Legislature passed in 2007, provided hospital visitation rights, the ability to authorize autopsies ELAINE THOMPSON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS and organ donations, and inheri- Gov. Chris Gregoire speaks to gay-rights supporters and journalists at a news tance rights when there is no will. conference in Olympia where she said that she wants Washington to become the TURN

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ONP rangers stand by colleague Four taking turns in honor guard for Mount Rainier victim BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Four Olympic National Park rangers assigned to help in the effort to track down a killer at Mount Rainier National Park have returned to their posts, while others are standing guard over a fellow ranger’s body.

Olympic rangers are taking turns standing in the honor guard of the body of Margaret K. Anderson, a 3 4 - y e a r- o l d Mount Rainier Lustig National Park ranger and mother of two who was shot and killed Sunday. They joined the guard at the Pierce County medical examiners

Tribe will rebury skull found near Elwha River

ALSO . . . â– Autopsy reveals how Mount Rainier gunman died/A10

office and will also do so after Anderson’s body is transferred to a funeral home, said Olympic National Park spokeswoman Barb Maynes on Wednesday. Of the four rangers, one, Sanny Lustig, was selected by park staff to share her experiences on behalf of the other three who the park declined to name. TURN

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BY TOM CALLIS PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Lower Elwha Klallam tribe plans to rebury a skull found on a beach near the mouth of the Elwha River. Tribal Chairwoman Frances Charles said the skull was found Monday afternoon by tribal members. It has been placed in a

cedar box pending reburial. Bill White, tribal archeologist, said the skull belonged to a set of remains repatriated from the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in Seattle in 1980 and buried near the river mouth. It was apparently unearthed through erosion, he said. TURN

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RANGERS/A4

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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96th year, fifth issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD

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UpFront

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■ See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Cannon in hospital with kidney failure NICK CANNON IS spending the first week of the new year in the hospital, with wife Mariah Carey by his side. Carey tweeted that Cannon is suffering from “mild kidney failure.” His representative Cannon confirmed Cannon’s hospitalization. He is in Aspen, Colo., where he and Carey were vacationing. Carey posted a picture on her website of a miserable-looking Cannon in a hospital bed as she lay beside him. She asked for prayers and said Cannon’s situation was “very painful.” She later called it a “serious moment that’s very tough on all of us.” The pair became the parents of twins — a boy and a girl — last year. Cannon is 31. His representative had no further information Wednesday about his condition but said he is still hospitalized.

Baldwin yanked Alec Baldwin’s antics

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPANISH ‘DRAGON’

PREMIERE

Actress Rooney Mara, left, and actor Daniel Craig pause during a photo call to promote the Spanish release of the movie “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” in Madrid on Wednesday. aboard an American Airlines flight have gotten him grounded as a spokesman for a Baldwin New Yorkbased supermarket chain. A spokeswoman for Wegmans Food Markets told Rochester, N.Y., media outlets the company pulled television ads featuring Baldwin after some customers complained about his behavior that resulted in his being booted from a

Dec. 6 flight at Los Angeles International Airport. Baldwin was removed from the New York-bound plane for refusing to turn off his cellphone. The TV spots were filmed for the 2010 holiday season, and the commercials were supposed to run again for three weeks during the 2011 season but were pulled a week early after Baldwin’s airline dustup. Baldwin was hired for the ads after he mentioned that his mother, who lives in the Syracuse area, is a loyal Wegmans customer.

Peninsula snapshots

A CAR DRIVING west on Front Street in Port Angeles with a big sign in the rear window reading, “Throw the Bums Out” . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

A lot A little

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Total votes cast: 1,246 NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

Seen Around

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How much do the Iowa caucuses matter to you in the selection of the presidential nominee?

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

Passings ANTHONY “TONY” SAVAGE, 81, Seattle criminal defense lawyer who was an attorney for Gary Ridgway who was convicted in the Green River serial killings, died Tuesday. His family and a law partner told The Seattle Times he had terminal cancer, but he could be found at his office every day until last week. Early in his career, Mr. Savage worked as a King County deputy prosecutor. He went into private practice after six years and became known as a death penalty opponent. In addition to Ridgway, Mr. Savage also represented David Lewis Rice who was convicted of killing attorney Charles Goldmark and three members of his family. He also represented Charles Campbell who was

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

executed for killing two women and a girl.

________ GORDON HIRABAYASHI, 93, a U.S.-born sociologist who refused to be sent to internment camps that kept more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans captive during World War II, has died in the Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Mr. Hirabayashi was vindicated four decades after taking his stand when a U.S. court in 1987 conMr. cluded the Hirabayashi nation’s internment policies had been based on political

expediency, not any security risk. Mr. Hirabayashi had by then left the U.S., eventually settling in Canada. Mr. Hirabayashi was born in Seattle and attended the University of Washington where he was a student when he refused to get on a bus taking Japanese-Americans to internment camps on the West Coast, saying he and his generation “were U.S. citizens. We had constitutional rights.”

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ To clarify, the new Washington State Ferry, MV Kennewick, will be dedicated Friday, but it won’t begin service on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route until later this month. A headline on Page A1 of Wednesday’s edition was unclear.

_______ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Columbus, Ohio. The rating indicates That newfangled idea how many times their body that “life begins at 40” is weight in milk was projust old stuff to Steven duced during their recent Rawdon and Elizabeth lactation. Borst of Sappho. Top cow was Challenger Optimistic about the Lad’s Colleen, which profuture and obviously happy, Laugh Lines duced 9,850 pounds of milk they were married last month in Vancouver, Wash. and 554 pounds of fat in I WORK UNTIL beer The groom gave his age 299 days with a power o’clock. index rating of 10.2. Stephen King as 88; the bride said her’s The production from is 77. this cow would provide a Lottery family of four with the 1962 (50 years ago) milk necessary for more Cows owned by Vernon LAST NIGHT’S LOTthan three years, according V. Mantle of Sequim TERY results are available to the cattle club. recently have completed on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 official production records 1987 (25 years ago) or on the Internet at www. giving them cow power index ratings by the AmeriJefferson County comwalottery.com/Winning can Jersey Cattle Club of missioners are considering Numbers.

1937 (75 years ago)

removing a Quilcene bridge that remains closed a year after debris from floodwaters struck its support structures. The wooden Rodgers Street bridge stands at a bend in the Big Quilcene River. Traffic has been detoured to a more recent structure a few blocks east on Linger Longer Road. One concern is what will happen to the debris caught on the Rodgers Street bridge if it is removed. Some say the debris will continue downriver and pile up on the Linger Longer bridge, causing similar problems.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Jan. 5, the fifth day of 2012. There are 361 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 5, 1972, President Richard Nixon announced he had ordered development of “an entirely new type of space transportation system,” the reusable space shuttle. The first operational shuttle, Columbia, was launched in 1981. On this date: ■ In 1589, Catherine de Medici of France died at age 69. ■ In 1781, a British naval expedition led by Benedict Arnold burned Richmond, Va. ■ In 1896, an Austrian newspaper, Wiener Presse, reported the

discovery by German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen of a type of radiation that came to be known as X-rays. ■ In 1925, Nellie T. Ross of Wyoming became America’s first female governor. ■ In 1933, the 30th president of the United States, Calvin Coolidge, died in Northampton, Mass., at age 60. ■ In 1949, in his State of the Union address, President Harry S. Truman labeled his administration the Fair Deal. ■ In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposed assistance to countries to help them resist Communist aggression; this became known as the Eisenhower Doctrine.

■ In 1970, Joseph A. Yablonski, an unsuccessful candidate for the presidency of the United Mine Workers of America, was found murdered with his wife and daughter at their Clarksville, Pa., home. UMWA President Tony Boyle and seven others were convicted of or pleaded guilty to the killings. ■ In 1994, Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill, former speaker of the House of Representatives, died in Boston at age 81. ■ In 1998, Sonny Bono, the 1960s pop star-turned-politician, was killed when he struck a tree while skiing at the Heavenly Ski Resort on the Nevada-California state line; he was 62.

■ Ten years ago: Charles Bishop, a 15-year-old student pilot, deliberately crashed a small plane into a skyscraper in Tampa, Fla., killing himself. ■ Five years ago: The White House announced a shuffling of U.S. military leaders in the Iraq war. Adm. William Fallon ended up replacing Gen. John Abizaid as top U.S. commander in the Middle East; Army Lt. Gen. David Petraeus succeeded Gen. George Casey as top American general in Iraq; Casey replaced retiring Gen. Peter Schoomaker as Army chief of staff. ■ One year ago: Roberto Alomar and Bert Blyleven were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 5, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Arson suspect in Los Angeles on suicide watch LOS ANGELES — A law enforcement official said the suspect in a string of arson fires in Los Angeles has been put on a suicide watch. Harry Burkhart has been in custody since Monday when he was arrested driving a van through Hollywood. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because of privacy issues. Burkhart’s mother Dorothee Burkhart said in court Tuesday that her 24-year-old son is mentally ill. He has refused to cooperate with investigators since his arrest on suspicion of starting dozens of car fires in and around the city over several days. Authorities said he is also under investigation in his home country of Germany for a house fire days before he traveled to the United States in October.

mer board member and a construction contractor, the district attorney’s office said. The officials accepted costly dinners and theater and concert tickets to influence their votes on the projects, authorities said. They could face up to seven years in prison if convicted along with fines. The San Diego Union-Tribune said the documents laid out time lines showing expensive dinners followed by key votes on how to spend hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayer-approved bond measures.

Audubon auction

NEW YORK — A rare first edition set of John James Audubon’s sumptuously illustrated The Birds of America will be sold at auction in New York. Christie’s said Wednesday the four-volume set has a pre-sale estimate of $7 million to $10 million. The auction is Jan. 20. The set contains more than 400 hand-colored plates of all the North American species known to Audubon in the early 19th century. School corruption It is considered a masterpiece of ornithology art. SAN DIEGO — San Diego The volumes stand 3½ feet County prosecutors said Wednestall because Audubon wanted to day they have charged current depict the birds in their actual and former officials of a local school district with taking bribes size and habitat. It will be on view at Christie’s to award hundreds of millions of Rockefeller Center galleries Satdollars worth of construction urday through Jan. 19. contracts. The books will be sold Bribery, perjury and other together with a complete first charges were filed against the edition set of Audubon’s five-volSweetwater Union High School District’s former superintendent, ume Ornithological Biography. two current board trustees, a forThe Associated Press

Briefly: World will not travel to the U.S. for medical treatment and will instead remain in his country, a senior official from the ruling party said Wednesday. Sheik Mohammed al-Shaif, a powerful tribal chief and leading LONDON — A young black member in the ruling General man lay dying in a south London People’s Congress party, said bus stop. His friend called franti- Saleh’s decision to remain in cally for help while a gang of Yemen came after his party white teenagers who had urged him not to leave. stabbed him ran off. Earlier, Saleh said he would Two members of that gang travel to the U.S., but he did not were sentenced Wednesday for say when. the 1993 murder of Stephen Al-Shaif told The Associated Lawrence, but three more Press on Wednesday that Saleh remain at large. is needed in Yemen to implement Judge Colman Treacy a power transfer deal he signed Wednesday sentenced Gary Dob- last year. son to at least 15 years and two months in jail and David Norris Misleading in Syria to at least 14 years and three BEIRUT — Activists accused months for the murder of the President Bashar Assad’s regime teenager, and urged police to continue looking for new leads in Wednesday of misleading Arab League observers by taking the case. them only to areas loyal to the “A totally innocent 18-yeargovernment and changing street old youth on the threshold of a signs to confuse them. promising life was brutally cut According to the activists, down in the street in front of eye regime loyalists also are painting witnesses by a racist thuggish military vehicles still inside of gang,” Treacy said. “You were cities blue to make them look both members of that gang.” Police, who have been accused like police vehicles — a ploy that in the last two decades of incom- allows the government to claim it has pulled the army out of heavpetence and racism in the way they handled the murder inquiry, ily populated areas in accordance vowed Wednesday to continue to with the Arab League plan to end the crackdown on dissent. hunt for the remaining killers. About 100 Arab League The saga of Lawrence’s murobservers now in Syria for a der has for many come to symweek are supposed to be assessbolize Britain’s lingering racial ing whether the government is trauma. complying with the plan. Foreign Ministry spokesman No trip to U.S. Jihad Makdissi denied the SANAA, Yemen — Yemen charges. President Ali Abdullah Saleh The Associated Press

UK sentences 2 for killing black teen in 1993

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney listens as Sen. John McCain speaks during a gathering in Manchester, N.H., on Wednesday.

Romney takes Iowa, gets McCain support Bachmann quits after poor showing in state of her birth THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Mitt Romney eagerly pocketed an endorsement from two-time New Hampshire primary winner John McCain on Wednesday and bid to convert a single-digit victory in Iowa into a Republican presidential campaign juggernaut. Unimpressed, Newt Gingrich ridiculed the former Massachusetts governor as a liberal turned moderate now masquerading as a conservative. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum sought to rally conservatives to his side after coming achingly close to victory in the Iowa caucuses. “This is a wide-open race still,” added former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, who skipped the Iowa caucuses in hopes of making his mark in next Tuesday’s first-inthe-nation primary. Romney is the odds-on favorite to win the New Hampshire pri-

mary, and the endorsement of McCain, an Arizona senator, made his welcome in the state a warm one. “The time has arrived for Republicans to choose a presidential nominee, a new standard bearer who has the ability and determination to defeat President Obama,” said the 2008 Republican presidential nominee, a man with a demonstrated appeal to the state’s independent voters. Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann ended her campaign after a dreary 5 percent showing in Iowa, the state where she was born. After suggesting he, too, might withdraw, Texas Gov. Rick Perry decided otherwise. “Here we come South Carolina!!!” he tweeted. That primary is Jan. 21 and will mark the first balloting in the South as well as in a state that is part of the Republican Party’s conservative, political base nationally. Iowa, for months ground zero in

the Republican race, yielded an almost impossibly close finish. Romney emerged with an eightvote victory over Santorum, whose grass-roots campaigning produced a late surge that fell just shy of victory. Texas Rep. Ron Paul finished third, followed by Gingrich, Perry and Bachmann. A survey of Iowa caucus-goers highlighted the internal divisions in the GOP as it sets out to find a challenger to President Barack Obama. Romney, who campaigned as the man best positioned to defeat Obama, was the favorite by far among caucus-goers who said that goal was their priority. Paul was preferred by those who said what mattered most was backing a true conservative. Santorum ran particularly well among those who said they were looking for a candidate with strong moral character. Paul outpolled his rivals among younger voters and gained an estimated 48 percent share of selfidentified independents, a group that traditionally plays a major role in determining the outcome of New Hampshire’s primary.

Off-duty agent friendly-fire victim? THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

GARDEN CITY, N.Y. — Street smarts, judgment, discretion. Other than relying on those skills taught at the police academy and honed through experience, offduty and retired law enforcement officers appear to have few protocols to follow when confronting a crime out of uniform, like the apparent friendly fire that left a federal agent dead on New Year’s Eve. And when different police agencies are involved, with unfamiliar officers coming face to face and making snap decisions about life and death, the peril is greater, according to a 2010 New York state study of police-on-police shootings that called for uniform protocols across agencies.

Quick Read

The task force created in 2010 by then-Gov. David Paterson found “enormous variation” in how thoroughly departments across the country train for encounters between police officers in and out of uniform — “if they train at all.” “The multiplicity of agencies is a source of many problems in policing, but it raises particular problems when officers from one agency confront an officer out of uniform from another agency, mistaking the confronted officer for a criminal,” the report said. John Capano, a 51-year-old offduty agent for the federal bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, was shot Saturday in Seaford while struggling with 43-year-old suspect James McGoey during a robbery for prescription painkillers and cash at a small

family pharmacy. Capano, an explosives expert who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, was a customer and followed the suspect outside. Police said someone ran into a nearby deli and shouted that the drugstore was being robbed. A retired Nassau County police lieutenant and an off-duty NYPD officer who were in the deli ran to the pharmacy. Shots were fired, and Capano and McGoey were killed. On Tuesday, a law enforcement official speaking on the condition of anonymity told The Associated Press the retired county officer likely shot Capano. Nassau County police have not commented on details, citing the ongoing investigation.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Secret Santa ends decades of pie gifts

Nation: Jan. 4 birthdate runs through generations

Nation: Times Square ball back on perch, ready for ’13

World: Art student skips wait, puts work in museum

A SECRET SANTA has told an Ohio man not to expect any more pecan pies, which arrived mysteriously for 35 years. Willis Welch, 87, said the pie that showed up at his Columbus home during the recent holiday season was accompanied by a note that said, “It has been a great ride.” The person who signed it “Pie Fairy” also wrote: “My wings are shorter now and I am a little too fat to fly anymore. But I still love you!!” Welch still doesn’t know who was sending his perennial pastries, though whoever did it knew him well enough to know of his fondness for pecan pies.

JAN. 4 BIRTHDAYS have been running in one Ohio family for four generations. Richard Stiff of the Toledo area turned 65 on Wednesday. The day is also the 34th birthday of his daughter, Julia Gonyer, and it’s the first birthday of Gonyer’s daughter, Kourtney. The string began with Stiff’s late father, Marshall Stiff, who was born on Jan. 4, 1924. All four family members arrived on Jan. 4 through unscheduled, natural births. The birthdays have traditionally been celebrated with one cake and one singing of “Happy Birthday.”

A TELEVISION AUDIENCE of millions joined the crowds in the street

ART STUDENT ANDRZEJ Sobiepan didn’t want to wait decades for his work to appear in museums. So he took matters in his own hands, covertly hanging one of his paintings in a major museum in Poland. The director of the National Museum in the southwestern city of Wroclaw, Mariusz Hermansdorfer, said Wednesday that the action revealed some security breaches, but he also considered it a “witty artistic happening.” The museum has kept the painting on display — in its cafe. It will be offered for sale at Poland’s biggest charity auction Sunday.

to watch as the glittering crystal ball dropped at Times Square just days ago, ushering in 2012. Fewer watched Wednesday when it went back up the pole. But officials with the Times Square Alliance organized a ceremony to relight the ball and return it to its 130-foot-high perch above One Times Square. The ball will stay there until is lowered to replace some of its panels. Then it’ll be time for the countdown to 2013.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PA city finance chief put on leave State Patrol to probe self-payout BY TOM CALLIS PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The State Patrol will investigate whether the head of the city’s finances broke state law by authorizing $28,862 in payments to herself through a program that allows employees to “cash out� unused leave, according to Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers. Myers announced in a statement Wednesday that the investigation — which comes two months after a state Auditor’s report highlighted limited oversight of the program — will start this week. Finance Director Yvonne

Ziomkowski has denied any intentional wrongdoing. She was placed on paid administrative leave Tuesday pending the completion of the investigation. Ziomkowski has pledged to repay the funds, which went toward her retirement. Myers, who last month placed additional oversight and controls over the cashout program, said no determination has been made on whether any laws were broken. “As city manager, I have a legal and ethical obligation to ensure that this incident is fully investigated and that, if a crime has been committed, proper action is taken,� he said. Myers said he had consulted with Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly, who recommended the State Patrol conduct its own investigation. Kelly was out of town

Wednesday attending to a family emergency and couldn’t be reached for comment. Clallam Ziomkowski C o u n t y Chief Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Mark Nichols said the office sometimes recommends the State Patrol conduct an investigation involving local governments to avoid any conflict of interest. The State Patrol referred all comment to Myers. Ziomkowski received the payments by cashing out 896 hours of unused leave since January 2009, far in excess of city policy that allows employees to turn between 80 and 120 hours of leave each year into cash or be contributed toward retirement.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Flags fly at half-staff in honor of Mount Rainier National Park Ranger Margaret Anderson at a fire station in Ashford.

Rangers: ‘Everyone

was very, very focused’ CONTINUED FROM A1 son’s remains, as they were taken from the park to the Lustig was on duty at medical examiner’s office. Hurricane Ridge early The procession began Sunday afternoon when with the park service she was called by the park escort and quickly grew, dispatcher to report for with officers from agencies special duty to join three who responded to the park other ONP rangers to and from agencies along assist in park control and the way joining the line of the manhunt at Mount police vehicles until Lustig Rainier. could no longer see the “It was very intense. end. Everyone was very, very focused,� Lustig said. Salutes along the way The Park Service is a Lustig said that law very small agency, and the members of the agency are enforcement and fire very close-knit, Maynes department vehicles lined the way, and officers and said. Anderson never served firefighters saluted as the at ONP, but because of vehicle carrying Andertheir proximity, staff at the son’s body passed by. “One fire department two parks work together a had their ladder trucks up, lot, Maynes said. The four rangers who with flags raised,� Lustig were selected to assist at said. “It was an amazing their sister park were chosen for their training in show of spontaneous emergency response and respect from firefighters skill in winter operations, and law enforcement,� she added. Maynes said. “It was amazing to see that come together that Escort duty fast on that scale.� When she arrived at On Monday, Lustig Mount Rainier, Lustig, returned to the park, this who is a fully accredited time as an escort for offilaw enforcement officer, cers who responded to the was put on escort duty, an fatal shooting and manarmed guard for unarmed hunt for a cop killer. officials traveling into and “Barnes had already out of the park, she said. shot at law enforcement. Meanwhile, law They were a target,� she enforcement teams from said. the Park Service, State Then word came down Police, FBI, and local that Barnes’ body had county and city agencies been found. hunted for shooting sus“There was a lot of relief pect Benjamin Colton that no one else was going Barnes, 24. to be hurt by him,� Lustig “It was already func- said. tioning very well,� Lustig Lustig returned to her said. own station at Hurricane Then, late Sunday, Ridge on Tuesday, again a Lustig was selected as a lone law enforcement offimember of the U.S. Park cer on a high, remote Service escort for Ander- mountain.

“We are law enforcement officers, we are always very aware of the potential that situations may not be what they seem at first,� Lustig said of the job. Rangers are expected to be helpful and friendly, and people often forget that they are also law enforcement and are always prepared for bad situations. “In the parks it happens less frequently, but it can happen anywhere,� Lustig said. “We have the same level of awareness as any law enforcement, in some ways even more aware� she said. Rangers don’t have the same level of backup, and Lustig said response times for backup to arrive is often slow

Memories of 2008– The killing brought back memories of the killing of U.S. Forest Service Officer Kristine Fairbanks in a campground south of Sequim in September 2008. The 51-year-old wife and mother from Forks was fatally shot after she stopped a suspicious van in the Dungeness Forks campground about six miles south of Sequim. Shawn Roe, 36, of Everett, who authorities believed to be the shooter was killed in a shootout with Clallam County deputies later that night.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com. Managing Editor/News Leah Leach contributed to this report.

Council: Sandoval lauded CONTINUED FROM A1 him while he was on the council. “It has been a tough four The mayor receives $750 monthly while council years, with the ferries leavmembers received $500 ing and the bridge closing and the bad economy,� Saneach month. Sandoval, who is the doval added. “It’s been a lot of work in only Port Townsend mayor what is essentially a volunto serve consecutive terms, said she approached King, a teer job.� Sandoval received accomanaging partner and the lades from King, other chief financial officer of Townsend Bay Marine, two council members and City years ago about taking over Manager David Timmons. “The staff, to a person, as mayor but he declined. King accepted this time, admires you for the passion he said, “because work has and the commitment that slowed down and I have the you have brought to the office,� Timmons said. skills.� “We have accomplished a “David is a crackerjack. He’s smart, funny and suc- lot as a city but we would cinct in his comments,� San- not have been able to doval said during a break in achieve this without your the meeting. leadership and encourage“I have truly appreciated ment and the standards

that you set for us to meet. “I had something clever to say about filling Michelle’s shoes, especially the little pointy ones, but I don’t think that is adequate to the task,� King said. “The word I would use for her is ‘selfless.’ “She has accomplished a lot for the community and I will be twice as happy if I can do half as much.� King said that he will rely on Sandoval for advice and continued mentorship. “When she asked me to do serve as mayor, I said that I would rather do it now while she is on the council as a resource.�

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews.

Marriage: Bill expected CONTINUED FROM A1 domestic partnership law has helped lay the groundUnder state law, senior work for full marriage. couples can register as Murray and Rep. Jamie domestic partnerships as Pederson, D-Seattle, confirmed a bill would be introwell. In 2009, the Legislature duced next week. They said that they passed — and voters later upheld — a bill that greatly would not attach a referenexpanded those rights and dum clause to the bill, was known as the “every- which would require the public to ultimately approve thing-but-marriage� bill. Nearly 19,000 people in the measure if passed by Washington are registered the Legislature. “We need to take this as domestic partners. In November, a coalition vote, we need to take it this called Washington United year, and we need to take it for Marriage announced it in the Legislature,� Murray would lobby the Legislature said. to approve a gay-marriage bill this year. Lawmakers return to the Capitol on Monday for the start of a 60-day legislative session. CONTINUED FROM A1

“It’s time for the Legislature to catch up with the public.� Murray acknowledged that it would be a tough battle in the Senate, where Democrats hold a 27-22 majority, but where some conservative Democrats have voted with Republicans in opposition to the state’s domestic partnership law. “We’re not there yet,� Murray said. “We’re a few votes short, but I think we can get there.� Democrats hold a 56-42 majority in the House.

Skull: Aged

Legislation due Democratic Sen. Ed Murray of Seattle, who is gay and has spearheaded past gay rights and domestic partnership laws in the state, said the underlying

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tion considering that it actually has been buried twice,� White said. He said the box it was last buried in was found partially exposed a few yards away.

The four partial skeletons reclaimed from the museum were removed in 1920 by University of Washington archaeologists working at the river’s mouth. ________ White said the skull is in good shape, though it is Reporter Tom Callis can be missing its lower jaw. reached at 360-417-3532 or at It’s unclear how old it is. tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. “It’s in pretty good condi- com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

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Kidd PA mayor in unanimous vote Deputy also elected by council PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The City Council came under new leadership Tuesday evening with Councilwoman Cherie Kidd taking over as mayor. Councilman Brad Collins became the new deputy mayor. Kidd, who is serving her second term on the council, was elected unanimously by her colleagues. She replaced Councilman Dan Di Guilio, who had served as mayor for the past two years. The mayor acts as the chair of the council and helps direct discussion at meetings. The mayor is also the public “face” of the community. Council members receive $550 a month. The mayor earns $650; deputy mayor, $600.

CHRIS TUCKER/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bonnie Stehr of Port Angeles stands on an elliptical fitness cross-trainer machine at Therapeutic Associates on Monday.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532; tom. callis@peninsuladailynews.com.

drug at the federal level. The federal government lists marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, which means it is considered to have no medical value. Heroin is also in that category. Councilman Max Mania called it a “sensible move.” “I think it’s something that is going to happen sooner or later,” he said. “I would love it if we were part of the sooner rather

than the later.” Di Guilio said he sympathizes with cancer patients who use marijuana as a pain reliever but voted no because he considers the move to be a “slippery slope.” “To take a drastic step at this moment is not appropriate,” he said.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

State poll finds pot legalization split THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Washington voters appear split on whether to legalize marijuana. The Seattle Times reported that a new Elway Poll of 411 voters found 48 percent in favor and 45 percent opposed, within the margin of error of 5 percentage points.

Initiative 502, which would legalize and tax sales of marijuana to adults 21 and over, is headed to the Legislature next week. Unless lawmakers approve it outright, it will be sent to voters on the November ballot. The support was down from an Elway poll in July, when 54 percent of respondents favored legalization in

response to a more general question. Alison Holcomb, the initiative’s campaign director, noted the Elway poll question was broadly worded, without mentioning the $215 million in estimated annual marijuana tax revenue or other specific I-502 provisions that are popular with voters.

Driver flees, flips vehicle in hospital parking lot THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ish-Edmonds hospital. wreckage. He was taken to Firefighters had to Harborview Medical Center EDMONDS — The driver of a stolen SUV fled remove the driver from the in Seattle. from an officer who tried to pull him over early Wednes________ day in Lynnwood. KIRO-TV reported the Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at chase ended when the fleearwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. ing car flipped on its side in Estate Planning Package for Couples com. the parking lot of the Swed-

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back and knew Kidd was interested in the job. “It was an honor,” he said. “I feel very privileged by that.” Collins replaces Don Perry as deputy mayor, who lost his seat to Sissi Bruch in the Nov. 8 general election. Councilman Pat Downie was nominated for deputy mayor but didn’t receive enough votes.

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Di Guilio, who remains on the council, did not seek another term as mayor. Kidd was the only council member to be nominated by her colleagues. Kidd thanked Di Guilio for his two years as mayor and led the council, staff and the audience in giving him a round of applause. “He’s been exemplary and we owe him a debt of gratitude,” she said. Di Guilio said he didn’t seek another term as mayor because he was ready to step

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Contestants who lose 2 percent of their total body weight will get “finishers’ T-shirts.” Stehr said she doesn’t expect to reach her 50-pound weight-loss goal during the challenge. It’s just going to fuel her motivation. “It will be a start,” she said. Plans are already being made for a 2013 challenge that may involve teams and other fun activities, she said. For more information about VIMO and its clinic at 909 E. Georgiana St., in Port Angeles, visit the website at www.vimoclinic.org or phone the clinic at 360457-4431.

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles City Council is backing Gov. Chris Gregoire’s request to have marijuana reclassified as a Schedule 2 drug. The council voted 6-1, with Councilman Dan Di Guilio opposed, Tuesday evening to support the position, intended to recognize the medical benefits of the

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six categories. The categories, three for men and three for woman, PORT ANGELES — are for ages 18-34, 35-50 One woman’s Christmas wish to lose 50 pounds has and 50-plus. The person who loses evolved into a chance for the highest percentage of her neighbors to lose some extra padding of their own weight in each category while contributing to char- will win the grand prize. Half of the remaining ity and having a shot at proceeds will be donated to winning a $500 cash prize. VIMO — which provides “When my husband asked me what I would like medical care to uninsured adults — and half will be for Christmas, I said I divided among competitors wanted to be 50 pounds lighter,” said Bonnie Stehr, who lose at least 5 percent of their body weight. a Port Angeles resident. “That’s 10 pounds for a “He asked, ‘How do you 200-pound person,” Stehr want to do that?’” Stehr said. said. Initially, she thought of The official registration getting a few friends and weigh-in will take together for a friendly chal- place from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. lenge. Friday or from 10 a.m. to 2 Challenging herself has p.m. Saturday at Therahelped her maintain her peutic Associates Physical health after she was diagTherapy, 1114 Georgiana nosed with multiple sclero- St., in Port Angeles. sis 15 years ago, she said. The weigh-out will take Losing 50 pounds could place on March 30 at Thermake a great difference to apeutic Associates. her health, she added — The entry fee could easand some of her friends ily pay for itself in those could benefit from losing a three months in savings few extra pounds and gainfrom avoiding fast food and ing a few dollars as well. theater popcorn — which “Then I asked, ‘Wouldn’t also would encourage it be great to give part to weight loss, Stehr said. charity?’” she said. During the first three Stehr, who works at weeks, there will be Therapeutic Associates and volunteers with Volunteers weight-loss and fitness seminars for participants, in Medicine of the Olympics — or VIMO — worked and all participants will be with the two health groups offered injury screenings and discounts on gym and came up with the Olympic Weight Loss Chal- memberships and personal training. lenge. Before and after photos The cost to enter the challenge is $100, and con- will be available to those testants have the chance to participants who want them, Stehr said. win $500 grand prizes in BY ARWYN RICE

Brad Collins Deputy mayor

City Council supports reclassifying marijuana BY TOM CALLIS

Losing

Cherie Kidd PA’s new mayor


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

New year, live music full of bright promise He’ll be heading south after this, returning with one band. the robins, so all you CharJohn No cover. lie’s Angels better be there from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Nelson ■ All ■ On Friday, Les Wamyou boldt and Olde Tyme Charlie Country perform at the Ferris Fairmount Restaurant, fans, heads up! 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (And, if On Tuesday, Dave and you’re not Rosalie Secord and the a Charlie Luck of the Draw Band Ferris play old-time music with fan, you guest Denny Secord Sr., should singing the songs of counPort Angeles be.) Wednesday at the try’s Golden Age for an old ■ On Saturday at Wine Bushwhacker, 1527 E. fashion good ol’ time from on the Waterfront First St., Charlie will be cel6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (WOW), 115 Railroad Ave., ebrating a 16x4=64 Show. ■ On Sunday at the Witherow and Gibson He’s going to try to turn Next Door Gastropub, perform at 7 p.m. This past 16 again (when he started 113 W. First St., Fret Noir summer, childhood friends his first band) with his (Gil Yslas and Mary Dillan Witherow and fourth “Best of the Best Tulin) perform from 4 p.m. Cole Gibson joined their Birthday Celebration” and to 6 p.m. their sweet dark vocal, instrumental and will be pulling out all his blends of Celtic and English songwriting abilities into best stuff. folk and originals, flavored with rock, blues, jazz and New Age. ■ Every Tuesday evening at the Port Angeles P H D S S A R A N P B J A B E A M Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets, the S E E I F I C A R O M O U I G O L D A Port Angeles Senior SwingH Y P N O T I C T R A N S O M A G A I N ers present Wally and the A J A R O D E V E I N S T A Y E D Boys, playing ballroom W O R S E N S T E M T O S T E R N U M dance favorites for the E T A L S T E R N O H O S T E S S dancing pleasure of all G E T A W A Y V O W seniors 45 years plus, from C A P G A L E S O F F I C E M A X I M 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 B L O B L O L B R E A K O L I V E cover, first-timers free! S I L I C O N V A L I U M S T O N E D ■ Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, E A R N E R A I M O K O N G 256861 Highway 101, Bob R I N S E S B R U T E F O U R S O M E and Dave play blues with A C T E D S E O U L Y S L O U R S a brew and barbecue from H E A D O F H A R E M M O C K S T I P 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. L O U E U R A S I A FINALLY, THE HOLIDAYS are behind us and the bright promise of a new year is ahead of us, doomsday’ers notwithstanding. Get out and let live music soothe your soul, energize your resolutions, help nail down that new dance step or meet new friends. All is good when you let live music into your life. Now, here is a list of places you can follow your muse.

LIVE MUSIC

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H E A T E D

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B E A T

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Sequim and Blyn ■ On Friday at Rainshadow Coffee Roasting, 157 W. Cedar St., Fret Noir performs during the First Friday Art Walk from

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. ■ At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday, at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, Keli and Barry perform from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ At the Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., Discovery Bay Pirates performs Irish songs and sea shanties Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Final Approach lands with a boom (boomer music, that is), Wednesday from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Friday, Damiana’s Wine Bar and Bistro, 143 W. Washington St., otherwise closed for inventory in January, will be open from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. to participate in the Art Walk with Locozonly, (Kevin Magner, Scott Bradley and Elora Bradley) performing from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Friday, at the Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, rock to Port Angeles’ popular Mister Sister (formerly Big Fine Daddies until Rachael came along) and the latest top-40 hits from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, Chris Ward, a veteran of the Nashville country scene, performs covers (Eagles are favorites) and originals from 9 p.m. to 1 p.m. On Sunday, country reigns with Denny Secord Jr. and Haywire, from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

West End ■ Therapy Session will be performing mostly new tunes at Peninsula College, Forks Campus, Saturday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Roots, country, blues, gospel, you name it will be part of your therapy.

Port Townsend ■ On Friday, the Upstage, 923 Washington St., and the Jenny Davis Jazz Trio host a jazz-singers showcase from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Featured are Cole Gibson, Port Angeles; Jeff Leinweaver, Bainbridge Island; Irene Zhang, 15-year-old student at Port Townsend’s Jefferson Community School; and Timothy Stone, professional jazz saxophonist who takes the stage with his voice only. Accompanying the singers will be pianist Linda Dowdell, bassist Chuck Easton and drummer Tim Sheffel. $8 cover. On Saturday, get your blues fix with an attitude — The Blues Attitude, that is — performing a raucous style of traditional blues, classic rock and new country in an entertaining and danceable style starting at 8 p.m. $8 cover. Phone 360-385-2216 for info and reservations. ■ On Friday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., New Forge returns for another great night of original songs on a mix of instruments that’s great for listenin’ and dancin’ at 9 p.m. Cover. On Saturday, Chris Chandler and Paul Benoit perform songs from their new CD in a CD

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■ On Saturday at the Black Diamond Community Hall, 1942 Black Diamond Road, Port Angeles, Ethan Jodziewiz, Scotty Leach and Marlin Prowell perform from 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Adults $6, under 18 $2. Thanks for having a designated driver — whether a friend, family member, cab or All Points Charters and Tours (owned by my brother and I) — on New Year’s Eve, keeping our Peninsula’s roads free of serious accidents.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s new deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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³JEWELRY SPECIALS ARE ONLY AVAILABLE AT STORES THAT CARRY FINE JEWELRY. REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. ONE DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT 1/6/ & 1/7/2012. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. ‡All carat weights (ct. t.w.) are approximate; variance may be .05 carat. **May contain rose-cut diamonds. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance their beauty and require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced sale prices; “special” prices reflect extra savings. Specials & clearance items are available while supplies last & are not available by phone. Clearance items will remain at advertised prices after event. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s and selection may vary by store. Prices and merchandise may differ at macys.com. Some coats will remain on sale after event. Luggage & electrc items shown carry warranties; to see a mfr’s warranty at no charge before purchasing, visit a store or write to: Macy’s Warranty Dept., PO Box 1026 Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties. N1120024. + Enter the WebID in the search box at MACYS.COM to order. OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 20% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy’s credit card is available subject to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food & wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., will begin its winter story time series Friday. Story times feature stories, music, dance, storytelling and fingerplays, and they create critical early-literacy opportunities for young children and their parents or caregivers. Different types of story time experiences are offered, each specifically designed for children of different ages. “Story times are fun and help teach language skills and promote a love of reading,” said librarian Jennifer Knight. “Library story times support parents and caregivers by giving them tips on how to read, talk, sing, and play with their children, and can ultimately play an important role in preparing children for a successful school experience.” Toddler story times for children ages 18 months to 3 years include rhymes, songs, dancing and books. They will be at 10:15 a.m. Fridays until March 30. Preschool story times for children ages 3 to 5 will be held at 11 a.m. Fridays until March 30. All-ages pajama story times will be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays until March 27. Four themed series of three to four Baby & Me Storytimes for newborns to 1-year-olds also will be offered. Themes include Baby Books, Baby Brains, Rhyming Time and Music and Me. For Baby & Me schedules, information on story times or other programs for youths, visit the North Olympic Library’s website at www.nols.org, phone 360417-8502 or email youth@ nols.org.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PeninsulaNorthwest

A7

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

PA port selects 4 finalists for vacancy BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Four finalists for Jim McEntire’s vacant Port of Port Angeles commission position were selected Wednesday from 12 applicants. Port of Port Angeles Commissioners John Calhoun and Jim Hallett, who narrowed the field at a special meeting, will interview Sequim-area District 1 applicants Paul McHugh, Gerald Stiles, Sterling Epps and Shawn Hankins at the regular port meeting at

9:30 a.m. Monday at 338 W. First St. in the port meeting room. The public can make statements about the finalists during the public comment period at the beginning of the meeting, Calhoun said.

Presentations The candidates will make brief presentations followed by an opportunity for Calhoun and Hallett to question the applicants. The appointee, who must be selected by March 31, will be expected to fill out

McEntire’s six-year term, which expires in 2013. McHugh is a retired real estate broker and former Sequim City Council member. Stiles is a retired aeronautical engineer and serves on the executive committee of the Clallam County Republican Party. Hankins is a Port Angeles chiropractor and a Port Angeles High School graduate. Epps is a cold-case investigator for the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and Port Angeles Police Department.

Among 10 references on his application, Stiles listed McEntire, Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict and Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers. Among five references, Epps listed Port Angeles Police Chief Terry Gallagher. McHugh and Hankins did not list references. “I was looking for life experiences that would indicate they could maturely perform the duties of commissioner,� said Calhoun, commission president. “I was looking for candidates who had a

strong orientation toward economic development of the port and creating jobs.� The port did not release the names of other candidates on advice from port lawyer Dave Neupert that the names did not have to be disclosed, Calhoun said.

didate assigned a letter of the alphabet, Calhoun said. At Wednesday’s public meeting Calhoun and Hallett chose four lettered candidates, three of whom were chosen by both commissioners. “I had four candidates who clearly stood out,� Calhoun said. “I withdrew one From 12 [Hallett] didn’t have on his Calhoun and Hallett on list.� So Calhoun decided on Wednesday chose the finalists from a list of 12 candi- candidates D, F, J and K. ________ dates who had met with Calhoun. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb Neupert mailed Hallett can be reached at 360-417-3536 the candidates’ applications or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily in December with each can- news.com.

Two charged in burglaries Men arrested in separate incidences PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Two Sequim men have been charged with residential burglary in separate incidences. Dominic Anthony Megrant, 20, is charged with one count of residential burglary, a Class B felony, punishable by a prison term of up to 10 years, or a fine of $20,000. Megrant is alleged to have broken into a Sequim home on Sunset Place and stolen more than $600 in cash, bank checks and $700 worth of prescription medications, court documents state. Megrant is scheduled for arraignment at 1:30 p.m. Friday in Callam County Superior Judge George L. Wood’s court.

William Alan Duncan, 19, of Sequim, is charged in a separate incident with residential burglary of a Mountain View Drive home, trafficking in stolen property and third-degree theft, a gross misdemeanor. Duncan is scheduled to go to trial Feb. 27 after he pleaded not guilty Dec. 21, court records show. Clallam County Sheriff’s investigators said in court records they found fingerprints on the outer pane of a kitchen window in the home on Sunset Place, and the State Patrol Crime Lab confirmed they belonged to Megrant, deputies said. Megrant was arrested Oct. 17 on suspicion of residential burglary and thirddegree theft. He was charged with residential burglary Nov. 28 and appeared in court Dec. 30, when he was released on personal recognizance. Duncan remained in the Clallam County jail as of Wednesday.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

UNDER-COVER

WALKERS

Ralyn Asher, 4, and her mother, Jamie Asher of Port Angeles, make their way down steps from the main courtyard at Peninsula College on a rainy Wednesday in Port Angeles. Showery conditions are expected to prevail across the North Olympic Peninsula for the remainder of the week.

USS Ronald Reagan to make way for Bremerton PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan will leave San Diego for Naval Base Kitsap on Friday. The Reagan will under go maintenance during a year at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility at Bremerton. Reagan, which has been based in San Diego since

2004, is scheduled to return in January 2013. “Maintaining the ship’s material condition is an important part of ensuring that Ronald Reagan reaches its 50-year life cycle,� said Capt. Thom Burke, Reagan’s commanding officer. “The next year will help us remain a fully-capable war fighting vessel.� The Ronald Reagan was the first U.S. ship to assist

the Japanese after the March 11, 2011, magnitude-9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that devastated the coast of that country.

Carrier Air Wing 14 From the Reagan, Carrier Air Wing 14 flew more than 300 sorties and delivered more than 350,000 pounds of supplies to isolated areas of the

the last six years. It returned to San Diego on Sept. 9 after spending more than seven months at sea. It participated in Operations Tomodachi, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. Puget Sound Naval CAPT. THOM BURKE Reagan’s commanding officer Shipyard is the only government dry dock capable of accommodating a Nimitzdamaged coast. The Reagan has com- class aircraft carrier on the pleted five deployments in West Coast.

“Maintaining the ship’s material condition is an important part of ensuring that Ronald Reagan reaches its 50-year life cycle.�

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A8

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

rdAge Mastodon find topic of talk

Medicare open enrollment coming YOU GUYS ARE hardcore! It’s Jan. 5 of a new year. We’re surrounded by opportunity and the prospect of Valentine’s Day. You ought to be recovering from the frenzy of the holiday spirit and the vagaries of airline schedules. But, oh no! Not you guys. You want to talk about . . . Medicare? OK, while I think your time would be better spent burying last year’s fruitcake in the neighbor’s backyard, I live to serve, so (since you’re asking) Medicare it is. Yes, there is another “open enrollment” coming up. Some people, professionals and bureaucracies like to argue about whether or not it should be called an “open enrollment” because there are two or three other equally obtuse monikers that can be applied, but for most of us who are just trying to navigate this sucker, it’s an “open enrollment.” Beginning Jan. 1 and running through Feb. 14 (I know — no, I don’t know. Maybe because it’s a day we can remember? Who cares?), we can leave a Medicare Advantage Plan

Medicare Supplement plan to your “back-to-originalMedicare” New Year’s and jaunt, you might want to Mark switch to investigate whether your Harvey “original” supplement plan-of-choice Medicare. will even take you, given If we your health status, because do that, they don’t have to. we will And what, you’ve asked, have are these “5-star” plans? through Well, beginning this Valenmonth, you can switch to a tine’s “5-star” Advantage Plan Day to any time during the year if join a there’s one in your area, Part D and you can only do that plan. Coverages will begin once in a calendar year. the first day of the month An Advantage Plan gets after the plan(s) gets your a “5-star” rating based on form. feedback from members, Here’s what you can’t do health care providers, etc. between now and Feb. 14: There are, for now, only ■ You can’t switch from two in Washington: Group Original Medicare to an Health Cooperative and Advantage Plan. Kaiser Permanente Senior ■ You can’t switch from Advantage, so unless you one Advantage Plan to live around one, no help. another Advantage Plan. And speaking of “no ■ You can’t switch from help,” have you wondered one Part D plan to another what we’d do if our local Part D plan. hospital went away? ■ You can’t switch or Probably not, because drop a Medicare Medical most of us think of our hosSavings Account Plan. pitals like we think about Another thing you prob- firefighters or law enforceably can’t do between now ment or 24-hour plumbers and Feb. 14 is go outside — of course they’re there. and get a tan, but MediThey’re always there. We care doesn’t care. count on them. Yeah, we do. So if, in our If you decide to do this, frenzy to cut every proand if you’d be adding a

HELP LINE

gram that doesn’t cut us first, we keep whacking folks off things like Basic Health, Maternity Support, Disability Lifeline, Medicaid, etc., what do we suppose happens? Do we suppose that all those folks stop needing hospitals or health care? Probably not. So, what do we suppose that they do? Right, same thing you and I would do: Go to the ER and end up becoming “charity care.” And do we suppose that our hospitals have an infinite capacity to absorb more and more and more charity care? Probably not. Could a hospital actually have to . . . close? Yes, or dramatically reduce services or something because this is America, and everything runs on money. Nothing runs on nothing. So this whole economic “thing” may not be just about the folks who are actually on those programs; it may also be about you and me and Grandma. Oh, well, as long as I’m on a soapbox, consider this: Hospitals are businesses, right? Patients (customers) come in, services get rendered, hospital gets paid.

Birthday Wilma Beck Murray Wilma Murray will celebrate her 85th birthday Friday, Jan. 6, with family. There will be an open-house birthday celebration Sunday, Jan. 15, at 1 p.m. at the home of her Mrs. Murray daughter Roxanne Brickey, 31 Brueckner Road, Sequim.

Friends are invited to phone 360-683-4764 for directions, and she requests no gifts. She was born Jan. 6, 1927, in Mandan, N.D., the youngest of four children. When she was a year and a half, the family moved to Lynden, where she grew up and graduated from Lynden High School in 1946. After marrying Gene Beck of Ferndale, the couple moved to Forks, where Mr. Beck began working for the Clallam County Public Utility District and Mrs. Beck worked part time as a nurse’s aide at the old Forks Maternity Hospital.

Rather like a beauty salon. So, if a business (hospital) doesn’t have enough customers, what happens? Right. Same thing that happens to the beauty salon. Sound fun? No. So, when you hear about shopping and buying “locally” to support our local economies, consider applying that same principle to our local hospitals. Now, certainly, if you need to go somewhere else to get the care you need, then go. I would. But if you can get what you need here . . . well, “here” is where you live. But I digress. What this whole column should have been about is what to get 98-year-old Aunt Tillie for next Christmas. Do hospitals sell gift cards?

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Sequim resident Claire Manis Hatler will present “What If You Found a Mastodon in Your Front Yard” at the Sons of Norway Lodge, 131 W. Fifth St., at 7 p.m. Monday. Hatler will present a slide show of the find on her family’s property in August 1977. That discovery, combined with other evidence found at sites in Wisconsin, demonstrates that people about 13,000 years ago were hunting mastodons, an elephant-like woolly animal standing 8 to 9 feet tall at the shoulder . The event is free and open to the public.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port AngelesSequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360-374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@ dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Duplicate Bridge Results Port Townsend Winners for Wednesday, Dec 21, were: Betty Abersold-Mike Edwards, first; Pat Karls-Sonja Schoenleber, second; Jean GillilandDeborah Lewis, third.

CORNER

After living in Forks for eight years, the couple moved to Clallam Bay, where they raised their six children, remaining there for 46 years. Mr. Beck died in 1976. Three years after the death of her second husband, in 2000, Mrs. Murray moved to Port Angeles. Her children are Barry Beck of Plymouth, Bonnie Bell and Paul Beck of Port Angeles, Roxanne Brickey of Carlsborg and Gerry Beck of Roundup, Mont. The youngest son, Kevin, died at age 21. Mrs. Murray has eight grandchildren, nine stepgrand-

children, five great-grandchildren and two stepgreat-greatgrandchildren. She has never missed any of her children’s or grandchildren’s activities and is trying to keep up with the great-grandchildren. She enjoys walking. Mrs. Murray also enjoys singing with the Port Angeles Senior Singers and dances at least twice a week, usually at the senior center.

________ Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents

70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

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115 Savings plan, briefly 116 Dessert delivered over the Internet? 117 Brouhahas 118 Cowlick fixer 119 Monster of Jewish folklore 120 The Big Board, for short DOWN 1 “What a load of hogwash!” 2 Jimi Hendrix’s debut single 3 Set out 4 Stray from righteousness 5 Refuse to release 6 Low-pH compound 7 Go to the tape? 8 “___ hath an enemy called Ignorance”: Ben Jonson 9 Negative conjunction 10 Conjecture 11 It’s good in Italy 12 Pal of Huck Finn 13 Swirly marbles 14 “The Big Sleep” co-star, 1946 15 Funny Boosler 16 They’re exchanged in France 17 Candy eaten in handfuls 19 “Praying” part of a praying mantis 20 Master 24 Pixar title character

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 5, 2012 PAGE

A9 $ Briefly . . . Yahoo names PayPal exec as its CEO

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boeing employees in Wichita, Kan., leave a company meeting where it was announced Wednesday that opertations would be relocated.

Boeing leaving Wichita Defense budget cuts take toll on 2,160 workers BY ROXANA HEGEMAN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WICHITA, Kan. — Faced with defense budget reductions, the Boeing Co. announced Wednesday it will close its defense plant in Wichita by the end of 2013. The closure will cost more than 2,160 workers their jobs and end the firm’s presence in a city where it has been a major employer for generations. The decision was not entirely unexpected. The company said in November it was studying whether to close the Wichita facility, which specializes in modifying commercial aircraft for military or government operations, to address Defense Department budget cuts. The first layoffs are expected to begin in the third quarter of 2012.

The company said it was moving future aircraft maintenance, modification and support to its plant in San Antonio, Texas, and engineering work to Oklahoma City. Work on the Air Force refueling tanker will be performed in Puget Sound. The company said the 24 Kansas suppliers on that program will continue to provide parts as originally planned. “In this time of defense budget reductions, as well as shifting customer priorities, Boeing has decided to close its operations in Wichita to reduce costs, increase efficiencies and drive competitiveness,” said Mark Bass, vice president and general manager for the Boeing Defense, Space & Security facility in Wichita. The study came even as the Pentagon had been

working to prevent $500 billion in automatic, acrossthe-board defense budget cuts over 10 years in the wake of the failure by a bipartisan congressional supercommittee to agree on $1.2 trillion or more in deficit reductions. Wichita had hoped the number of jobs at the facility would grow after Boeing won a contract worth at least $35 billion to build 179 Air Force refueling tankers. The modification work on the planes had been expected to be done at Boeing’s Wichita plant — bringing with it 7,500 direct and indirect jobs with an overall economic impact of nearly $390 million. Wichita Mayor Carl Brewer said the city, which prides itself as being the air capital of the world, has a long history with Boeing in the community.

Brewer noted he worked there for 20 years before the company sold off its commercial operations. “Many people — generations upon generations — have had an opportunity to be employed there and that could very easily be the end of that . . . They are a very important part of us here,” Brewer said. But the mayor said the city would move on and take care of those families and continue working to be the “air capital of the world.” “This is not the first time we have had something of this magnitude. We have had other challenges and we have always managed to work through it and been able to survive,” Brewer said. Boeing has had a facility in Wichita since it bought the Stearman Aircraft Co. in 1929.

Obama installs consumer chief Republicans in Senate bypassed; they’re outraged THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio — A defiant President Barack Obama, tired of Senate Republicans stalling his nominee to lead a new consumer protection agency, put him in charge Wednesday over their opposition. Outraged GOP leaders in Congress immediately suggested that courts would determine whether Richard Cordray’s appointment was illegal. With a director in place, Obama said the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

can start overseeing the mortgage companies, payday lenders, debt collectors and other financial operations often blamed for practices that helped undermine the economy. Obama announced the move with Cordray by his side before a cheering crowd in Ohio, a politically vital state where Cordray once was attorney general. “Every day that we waited was another day when millions of Americans are left unprotected,” Obama. Until Cordray took over, the office didn’t have all the tools needed “to protect consumers against dishonest mortgage brokers or payday lenders, and debt collectors who are taking advantage of

consumers,” Obama said. “And that’s inexcusable. It’s wrong.” In political terms, the recess appointment during the congressional break raised the level of confrontation for a president seeking re-election by championing the middle class and challenging an unpopular Congress. Acting right after Tuesday’s GOP presidential caucuses in Iowa, Obama sought to grab attention and show he would not be slowed, making his most brazen leap-frog over Congress. Senate Republicans had halted Cordray’s nomination because they think the consumer agency is too powerful and unaccountable. The Senate’s top Republi-

can, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, accused Obama of an unprecedented power grab that “arrogantly circumvented the American people.” Added House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio: “It’s clear the president would rather trample our system of separation of powers than work with Republicans to move the country forward. “This action goes beyond the president’s authority, and I expect the courts will find the appointment to be illegitimate.” It was unclear who might undertake a legal fight. But people familiar with the matter said an outside private group regulated by the consumer agency might be in the best legal position.

NEW YORK — Yahoo Inc. has named Scott Thompson, president of eBay Inc.’s PayPal division, as its CEO, the fourth one in less than five years for the struggling Internet company. Yahoo, which announced its choice Wednesday, has been without a permanent CEO since early September. It fired Carol Bartz after losing patience with her attempts to turn around the company during her 2½ years on the job. Tim Morse, Yahoo’s chief financial officer, has been interim CEO since Bartz’s ouster. Thompson has served as president of PayPal, eBay’s online payment service, since January 2008. He previously served as PayPal’s senior vice president and chief technology officer. Yahoo said Thompson’s new job starts on Jan. 9. Morse will return to his CFO post.

Pooling points NEW YORK — Citibank customers can now use Facebook to pool their rewards points online. The bank on Tuesday launched a Facebook application that lets users team up to use their points, whether it’s for charity, a group gift or a personal goal. Citi said it’s the first bank to offer such a feature. The app builds on a service Citi introduced last year that lets customers transfer points to one another on the bank’s home page. After getting feedback, executives decided to expand the rewards sharing capability and offer it through social media. The company is giving away 2,500 free rewards

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

points to each of the first 4,000 customers to sign up. To get started, customers download the ThankYou Point Sharing App, which is linked on Citi’s Facebook page at www. facebook.com/citibank. Customers can then start a rewards pool by naming a recipient and explaining its purpose. The recipient of the points maintains control of any contributions, so it’s best if you know and trust that person.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $0.9098 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.4748 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.4295 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $1994.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8286 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1613.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1611.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $29.350 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $29.063 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1420.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1423.10 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “The Adventures of Tintin” (PG) “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (G) “Hugo” (PG) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (PG-13) “War Horse” (PG-13) “We Bought a Zoo” (PG)

Tattoo” (R) “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol” (PG-13)

■ The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089) “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” (R) “Hugo” (PG)

Angeles (360-457-7997)

■ Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

“The Darkest Hour” (PG-13) “The Girl with the Dragon

“Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (PG-13)

■ Lincoln Theater, Port

Honda hybrid mpg in small claims court BY LINDA DEUTSCH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORRANCE, Calif. — A Los Angeles woman who expected her hybrid Honda Civic to be a high-mileage machine wants the automaker to pay for not delivering the 50 mpg it promised. But rather than being one of thousands in a classaction lawsuit, she took her case Tuesday to small claims court. Experts said Heather Peters has a better chance of winning her case in a court with more relaxed standards and could get a payout many times higher than the few hundred dollars offered to class-action plaintiffs. Peters said she’s been contacted by hundreds of owners who also want to take their chances with small-claims, where there

are no attorneys’ fees and cases are decided quickly. “If I prevail and get $10,000, they have 200,000 of these cars out there,” said Peters. Peters, a state employee and ex-lawyer, argued that Honda knew her car wouldn’t get the 50 mpg as advertised before a judge in Torrance, where American Honda Motor Co. has its West Coast headquarters. As her 2006 vehicle’s battery deteriorated over time, it barely got 30 mpg, she said. Neil Schmidt, a technical expert for Honda, called Peters’ $10,000 claim excessive for her 2006 Civic Hybrid. He said the federal government had required Honda to post the highest mileage the car could get,

but said the mileage varies depending on how the car is driven — for instance, if it gets stuck often in stop-andgo traffic. Peters said she would have never purchased the car if she had known that.

Reason for purchase “The sales force said 50 miles per gallon, but they didn’t say if you run your air conditioning and you remain in stop-and-go traffic, you’re going to get 29 to 30 miles per gallon,” she said. “If they did, I would have gotten the regular Civic.” Peters never contacted Honda to complain or express any concern about her vehicle’s fuel economy until she sent a letter in late November and then filed her suit shortly thereafter, Honda said in a state-

ment Tuesday. In response, Peters said she did not write to Honda’s corporate offices sooner because she was repeatedly told by Honda dealers that the company had a strict policy not to replace batteries until the dashboard warning light was lit. In a statement, the company also said that it offered to inspect her vehicle and work with her on the findings, but those offers were rejected. Peters called that claim “absolutely false.” The company also said it did not believe Peters was deceived. “The window sticker that was attached to her vehicle (as required by federal law) clearly indicated that her mileage would vary depending on driving conditions,

options, vehicle condition and other factors,” the statement said. But if Peters wins, and other Civic owners follow her lead, she estimates Honda could be forced to pay as much as $2 billion in damages. Experts say there are many upsides to Peters’ unusual move. “I would not be surprised if she won,” said Richard Cupp Jr., who teaches product-liability law at Pepperdine University. “The judge will have a lot of discretion, and the evidentiary standards are relaxed in small-claims court.” A judge in San Diego County is due to rule in March on whether to approve Honda’s classaction settlement offer for

Heather Peters Makes small-claims case hybrid owners. Members of the class have until Feb. 11 to accept or decline the deal. Peters has launched a website, DontSettleWith Honda.org, urging others to take their complaints to small-claims court.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Mount Rainier shooter died of drowning Park to reopen Saturday THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — A man who shot a Mount Rainier National Park ranger on New Year’s Day died of drowning, with hypothermia another significant condition, an autopsy found. Ranger Margaret Anderson, a 34-year-old mother of two who was married to another park ranger, was shot and killed Sunday by Benjamin Colton Barnes, a 24-year-old Iraq war veteran. After searching by plane and snowshoe, investigators found Barnes’ body face-down in a snowy creek Monday, with a handgun and a rifle nearby. The Pierce County medical examiner’s office completed an autopsy Tuesday.

Reopen on Saturday The park will reopen to the public Saturday, and all services with the exception of snow play will be available this weekend. The park has been closed since Anderson was shot to

death as she tried to stop a car that failed to pull over at a checkpoint requiring drivers to put chains on their vehicles. A memorial service is being planned. Staff at Mount Rainier National Park gathered Tuesday to grieve her loss — and to wonder what led the gunman, heavily armed and carrying a bulletproof vest, to that rugged, remote spot as he fled another shooting 100 miles away.

Earlier shooting The King County Sheriff’s Office was trying to pin down details about a shooting Barnes was involved in at a party in Skyway, south of Seattle. Witnesses told investigators that about nine people attended the party, many of them armed, and some had a “show and tell” with their guns. Some fired shots in the air to celebrate the new year. At 3 a.m. Sunday, one

knocked on the door of an acquaintance named Rachel Austin, in the Tacoma suburb of Fife. Austin told a Seattle television station that when her husband answered the door, Barnes said he wanted to wish her a happy new year, then left. About two hours later, Barnes blew through a checkpoint that Mount Rainier rangers use to determine whether vehicles are equipped with tire chains for winter driving. One ranger pursued him, while Anderson set up Benjamin Colton Barnes a roadblock up the road.

Hypothermia contributed

partygoer asked to see another’s gun and then refused to give it back. At least two people drew their weapons — Barnes was one of them — and four people were injured in the shootout, two of them critically, the Sheriff’s Office said Tuesday. It wasn’t clear who fired first. Barnes fled, along with two other people, investigators said. About five hours later, he

Shot in her car She didn’t have a chance to get out of her car before she was shot. An autopsy showed Anderson died of gunshot wounds to the head and torso, according to the medical examiner’s office. The ranger who had pursued him was not injured, but a photo of his vehicle released by authorities showed four bullet holes in the windshield. Barnes headed into the woods, where he waded

through chest-deep snow, though ill-equipped for the cold. Investigators in planes, equipped with thermal imaging technology, and on snowshoes pursued him. Barnes’ body was found Monday morning, clothed in a T-shirt, a pair of jeans and one tennis shoe; it wasn’t clear if he had removed some clothing, as hypothermia victims sometimes do. Investigators found several other weapons and body armor in his car. The family of Barnes extended condolences and asked for privacy in a statement published Wednesday by The Seattle Times. “Please know that our thoughts and prayers are with you and your families as well during this difficult time,” the statement said. “We are as shocked as anyone concerning the events of the last few days and while we in no way condone or excuse Ben’s behavior, he was a beloved member of our family and we are saddened by his loss.” According to police and

court documents, Barnes had a troubled transition to civilian life, with his former girlfriend, Nicole Santos, saying in a custody dispute over their baby daughter that he suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder and was suicidal. Santos did not return an email from The Associated Press on Tuesday. Santos alleged that Barnes was easily irritated, angry and depressed, and that he had an arsenal of weapons. She wrote that she feared for their daughter’s safety. Undated photos provided by police showed a shirtless, tattooed Barnes brandishing two guns. The Army said he joined in 2007, listing Temecula, Calif., as his hometown. He served in Iraq from November 2007 to June 2008 and received a lessthan-honorable discharge in 2009 for a drunken-driving arrest and for improperly transporting a privately owned weapon.

murder in the shooting of another rapper at a hotel after a Spokane concert. John “Lil Danger” Castro pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder and assault charges in the Nov. 27 shooting that killed 21-year-old Jose A. “Junior” Solis, 21, of Moses Lake.

Police said Solis was hosting an after-concert party when a friend got into an argument with another group. The Spokesman-Review reported the 27-year-old Castro remains in jail on $1 million bond. The Associated Press

Briefly: State Water main break cuts service SEATTLE — Seattle Public Utilities crews are repairing a 20-inch water line that broke early Wednesday, cutting service to a 200-square block area of south Seattle.

Spokesman Andy Ryan said the break flooded a block of South Juneau Street, and water was running down Martin Luther King Jr. Way. The utility said homes and businesses will likely notice discolored water when service resumes.

Tuesday shooting SEATTLE — A Seattle

Fire Department spokesman said two people have been seriously hurt in a shooting at a sandwich shop in Seattle’s Rainier Beach neighborhood. Spokesman Kyle Moore said a woman in her early 20s was shot in the chest late Tuesday night. A 26-year-old man was shot in the lower body. Both were taken to Harborview Medical Center.

Death Notices Sheri Ann Craker Jan. 25, 1949 — Dec. 30, 2011

Denise Devnich Graham

Sheri Ann Craker died May 26, 1967 — Dec. 28, 2011 in her Port Angeles home of cancer. She was 62. Services: Pending. Linde-Price Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge of arrangements. PDN obituaries and death notices at peninsuladailynews.com

Denise Devnich Graham, 44, died of breast cancer in Port Angeles. Services: Private services were held in a friend’s home on Dec. 31. HarperRidgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, was in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Harold E. Oleson Jr. Jan. 22, 1923 — Dec. 29, 2011

Sequim resident Harold E. Oleson Jr., died of agerelated causes. He was 88. Services: Jan. 15 at 1 p.m., celebration of life in the Monterra clubhouse, 22 Circle Drive, Port Angeles. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Death and Memorial Notice TERESA RENELL ‘TESSY LOU’ ACOSTA August 25, 1971 December 22, 2011 Teresa was born to parents Stephen L. and Marcie C. (Fendler) Minker on August 25, 1971, in Port Angeles. She passed on into her new life on December 22, 2011. She grew up in Port Angeles, Seattle and Idaho, but always returned to where her heart belonged — Port Angeles, where she had many friends and family. Most of her friends called her Tessy Lou. Her grandmother named her Greaser, which also stuck with her. Teresa married several times. She married Breck Curren — they had a daughter. She had two more daughters with her second husband, Brian Mackey. All three girls look just like their beautiful mother. She then married her third husband, John Acosta, and adopted his daughter. The marriage ended in divorce. She lived her life with humor, always making people smile. Teresa worked at Mickey’s Card Casino for approximately seven years, and her dream was to open her own casino. You could always find her at the beach combing

Ms. Acosta for rocks, sea glass and driftwood — anything she could turn into art. Her art will be cherished forever. She started drawing at an early age and became a skilled artist. Teresa always found it in her heart to help others. She took care of the sick, even when she was sick. She loved to dance and sing, and loved Halloween. Teresa is survived by her three daughters, Stephanie and spouse Aaron McMahan and their children Jermaine, Xylis and Azaisha; daughter Rhiannon and fiancee Chris and her daughter Sweet Pea Sara; and daughter Samantha and her children Valerie and Kolby Charles; father Steven L. Minker and wife Denise of Meza, Arizona; mother Marcie C. Fendler of Port Angeles; brothers Michael Minker and wife Regina of Lynnwood,

Washington, Otis Milam and wife Rhoda of Kent, Washington, Josh Milam and wife Melquana of Mesa, Arizona; grandmothers Ramona Amundson of Port Angeles and Vera Butcher of Renton, Washington; and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. Preceding her in death are her grandparents, Carl Amundson, Mary and Wayne Brown; and stepfather John Fendler, whom she loved all of very much. Teresa will always be remembered for her beauty and compassionate heart, for her laughter and beautiful smile, and the love she gave to all. May the path you are on now never cause you any heartache and pain. May you rest in peace, dear daughter, granddaughter, niece, sister, mother, grandmother and friend. For no one or no thing can cause you pain ever again. From your surviving family — we love you and you are missed. A private family memorial has already been held. A celebration of her life will be held at the Moose Lodge, 809 South Pine Street, Port Angeles, on January 15, 2011, at 1 p.m. Donations are welcome to any organization of your choice in her name.

Police are investigating.

Rapper shooting SPOKANE — Extra officers helped maintain security Tuesday in Spokane County Superior Court at the arraignment for a rapper charged with

Death and Memorial Notice GONE FISHING

G.K. ‘SANDY’ SANDQUIST April 3, 1920 December 29, 2011 Sandy was born to parents John and Edith Sandquist in St. Paul, Minnesota. Sandy served in World War II as a medic and survived the Battle of the Bulge. He returned from the war and was the first male nurse to graduate from the Mayo Clinic Nurse Anesthetist Program in Rochester, Minnesota. Sandy married Lida Johnson in 1947. They raised five children in

Pasco before moving to Port Townsend so that Sandy could practice anesthesia in the winter and commercial fish in the summer. Luckily, he had a very understanding partner! Sandy loved fishing, shrimping, crabbing and growing lilies. His many colleagues at Jefferson General Hospital speak of the sense of relief and security they felt whenever Sandy showed up at the scene in tense or emergency situations. He introduced himself as “Sandy the Sandman” to young patients and allayed the fear and anxiety of all facing surgery with his calm demeanor and wide smile.

Sandy left this life due to complications from pneumonia and was surrounded by his family and many of his friends who remember him with love, laughter and respect. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Lida; daughter Linda Lamb (Fritz); sons Rick, Keven (Tammy) and Dale; five grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; and many in his family of friends. A memorial service is scheduled for April 14, 2012, in Port Townsend. Sandy said 2011 was the best crabbing he’d ever seen in Port Townsend Bay. It was time to pull his pots for the last time.

Death and Memorial Notice WAYNE PAUL MURPHY June 27, 1945 December 15, 2011 Wayne Paul Murphy, 66, of Port Angeles, passed away December 15, 2011, at his home. Wayne was born June 27, 1945, in Culver City, California, to Harold Robert and Verda Lucille (Christenson) Murphy. Mr. Murphy attended Edgewood High School. He retired in 1998 after a successful career as the General Manager of Wilder Toyota in Port Angeles.

Mr. Murphy Wayne married Vicky in Port Angeles in 1984. Mr. Murphy enjoyed fishing, jet skiing, camp-

ing, writing, photography and music. He is survived by his wife, Vicky Thomsen Murphy of Port Angeles; stepsons Dustin and Michael Moyle of Port Angeles; brothers, David Murphy and wife Carol of Florida, George and Marie Murphy of South Carolina, Tom and wife Marie Murphy of Idaho, and Ray Murphy of California; sister Vickie Mills of Yakima, Washington; and three step-grandchildren, Ashley, Kamielle and Carson Moyle, all of Port Angeles. Wayne was preceded in death by his brother Keith Murphy and his parents.

Remembering a Lifetime ■ North Olympic Peninsula Obituaries chronicle a person’s life as written by the PDN news staff. These appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary; photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death and Memorial Notice, in which the deceased’s obituary appears as a separately boxed item as a paid advertisement, is written in the family’s own words. It might

even include a prayer, poem or special message. Photos are welcome. Call 360-417-5556 Monday through Friday for further information. ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 5, 2012 PAGE

A11

You don’t get smart with video games A FRIEND OF mine hands me what looks like a business card. It says: “Don’t Die Stupid.” As America begins another Cal round of voting Thomas to select the next president, or retain the current one, what we need is a stupid test. Flunk it, and you shouldn’t vote. Evidence of the dumbingdown of America is everywhere. Some of it is chronicled in a new book, Blue Collar Intellectuals: When the Enlightened and the Everyman Elevated America by Daniel J. Flynn. Flynn contends popular culture has divorced itself from the life of the mind. He has plenty of examples . . . in case television, texting, video games and improper use of English (“she was like and then I

was like”) are not enough. Flynn calls the digital age that has sped up the process by which we receive information “Idiotville,” because it has made us less intelligent. “Stupid is the new smart,” writes Flynn. He says we arrived at this lower level of brain activity because as recently as the last century “the everyman aspired to high culture and . . . intellectuals descended from the ivory tower to speak to the everyman.” Today, he says, “those who pursue the life of the mind have insulated themselves from popular culture. Speaking in insider jargon and writing unread books, intellectuals have locked themselves away in a ghetto of their own creation.” That has left the nonintellectual class to fend for itself. One library in Portland, Me., rather than leading, is being led by the unformed teenage mind. “Video gaming is just a new form of literacy,” says the “teen librarian.” If so, what’s the new form of

illiteracy, ignorance about how to use a joystick? Flynn quotes from Steven Johnson’s book, Everything Bad is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture is Actually Making Us Smarter. Sure, and sugar makes us slimmer. Johnson says, “Reality shows . . . challenge our emotional intelligence.” Emotional intelligence? In an age when feelings trump everything and too many reality TV programs feature wellheeled housewives and lovestarved bachelors, “emotional intelligence” is a contradiction. “A mind is a terrible thing to waste” is the slogan of the United Negro College Fund. It certainly is. Here’s a potent example of what Flynn means when he writes about the destruction of our minds: “At the tony Cushing Academy in western Massachusetts, $40,000 in tuition doesn’t even get you a library anymore. “‘When I look at books, I see

Peninsula Voices Questions What happens in a community when the drug dealers live next door? What happens to our daughters when they get hooked on a supply? Do we turn our backs and say they have got to want to clean up? Do we say they have made their own decisions and must get clear-headed enough to want change? Do we question the perpetrators who hold them as trophies, justifying their gratifications for another’s enslavement? Do we allow those in our community to exchange sex for money, buying our daughters’ virtue, holding them captive? Does a man on the hill get off the hook by saying,

“any man would,” while our daughters are held in the chains of addiction and shame? Who will blow the whistle? Who will say it is not acceptable to sacrifice a beautiful life for a life defiled, traded and trampled? Who is the nice guy down the street? A round of drinks on the house, be mute! Harriette Brooke, Sequim

Weapons in parks The murder of a park ranger and mother of two children is a tragedy. For Bill Wade of the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees to say that this could have been

OUR

an outdated technology, like scrolls before books,’ the prep school’s headmaster notes, adding, ‘This isn’t Fahrenheit 451.’ “It is, and 1984, too,” comments Flynn. “In place of the 20,000 discarded books, the school spent $500,000 on an Orwellian ‘learning center’ complete with three giant flat-screen televisions and a cappuccino machine. “School officials guessed that only a few dozen books had been checked out at any one time.” The solution? Get rid of the books. Don’t get kids interested in books when they’d rather play “World of Warcraft,” or if younger, watch cartoons, which can’t be that different from The Canterbury Tales, right? Our intellectual depth increasingly resembles floor wax: shiny on top but lacking depth. A muscle atrophies if it is not used. Similarly, a mind becomes lazy if it is not well-fed. And a weak mind dumbsdown our politics. We elect people we come to dislike because too many of us

require no more of them than we require of ourselves. We then wonder why little seems to work and the country soon suffers. In Iowa this week, followed by New Hampshire, South Carolina and Florida, Republican voters began the process of selecting a presidential nominee. It’s not that sufficient information about the problems confronting us — along with solutions that actually work — are not available. It’s just that we’re not reading much about them. Like, ya know, man, that’s just the way it is. Like, ya know what I’m sayin’?

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

prevented if Congress had not made it legal to take firearms into national parks is ludicrous [PDN, Jan. 3]. I am pretty sure that the murderer, who had already shot four people and was escaping into the park, would not have been deterred from entering if there was a law preventing firearms. I guess Mr. Wade thinks that he would have seen a sign at the entrance and either gotten rid of his weapons or would have turned around and not entered. There are plenty of things that we can hold Congress accountable for, but this is not one of them. Steven Miller, Sequim

Secret money behind 2012 campaigns THE REPUBLICAN CAUCUSES in Iowa, with its cliffhanger ending, confirmed two key political points and left a third virtually ignored. First, the Republicans Amy are not enthuGoodman siastic about any of their candidates. Second, we have entered a new era in political campaigning in the United States post-Citizens United, the U.S. Supreme Court decision that unleashed a torrent of unreported corporate money into our electoral process. And third, because President Barack Obama is running in this primary season unchallenged, scant attention has been paid to the growing discontent among the very people who put him in office in 2008. As a result, the 2012 presidential election promises to be long, contentious, extremely expensive and perhaps more negative than any in history. Mitt Romney technically prevailed in the Iowa caucuses, squeaking out an 8-vote margin

over late-surging Rick Santorum. Libertarian Ron Paul garnered an impressive 21 percent of the vote in the crowded field. Note that the Republican Party does not allow a recount of the handwritten, hand-counted ballots, and that the final Romney edge was first reported on right-wing Fox News Channel by none other than paid commentator Karl Rove, the architect of George W. Bush’s two controversial presidential election wins. So, the prevailing wisdom is that while Willard Mitt Romney retains the veneer of “electability,” he cannot persuade more than 25 percent of Republicans to vote for him. Santorum’s surge was a latebreaking coalescence of the antiRomney vote, boosted by massive voter flight from Newt Gingrich that was inspired by a withering campaign of anti-Gingrich attack ads attributed to Romney. While Romney’s Iowa operation maintained a positive campaign strategy, a super PAC that supported him went on the offensive. Restore Our Future, according to NBC’s Michael Isikoff, spent $2.8 million in ads in Iowa, more than twice the amount spent by

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the Romney campaign itself, all attacking Gingrich. The super PAC is not limited in how much corporate or individual money it can take in, and does not have to disclose the identity of its donors. While super PACs are prevented by law from coordinating with campaigns, three of the founders of the pro-Romney Restore Our Future were campaign staffers on Romney’s failed 2008 presidential bid — Carl Forti, Charlie Spies and Larry McCarthy. The Iowa caucuses can be seen as the first instance in a presidential electoral race waged after the January 2010 U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission ruling. As summarized by the SCOTUSblog, the split court decided that “political spending is a form of protected speech under the First Amendment, and the government may not keep corporations or unions from spending money to support or denounce individual candidates in elections.” Election seasons are usually a boon for local TV stations, which sell airtime over the public airwaves. Iowa broadcasters were

reporting a less-than-projected windfall, however, due to the record number of candidate debates in which the candidates got to present themselves to the public, in essence, “for free.” The last-minute onslaught of negative ads brought station revenues back up. Dale Woods, general manager of WHO-TV in Des Moines, told Broadcasting & Cable magazine: “It’s normally never negative here, but that’s one dynamic I’ve seen change with the PAC money involved. The candidate buys are positive, but the PAC money is negative. “I think that’s a dynamic you’ll see all over the country.” The advertising industry is watching campaign spending closely, predicting up to $4 billion in spending across all the campaigns, including those for president, Senate, House and governorships. But there’s hope. People are fighting back against this flood of secret money infecting U.S. elections. State legislators in California are calling for a constitutional amendment overturning Citizens United. The New York City Council is voting on a similar measure, following Los Angeles, Oakland,

Calif., Albany, N.Y., and Boulder, Colo. Last week, Montana’s Supreme Court restored a 100-year-old ban on corporate spending directed at political campaigns or candidates. Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig is calling for a constitutional convention. As defined in the U.S. Constitution, 34 state legislatures would need to call for a convention, which could allow an amendment banning corporate money from elections. Lessig, a favorite of progressives, is recruiting the right-wing tea party to help. He told me: “People can call for a convention for any purpose . . . the only option we have for intervening to fix this corrupted system is the only option the framers gave us, which is outsiders organizing to fix the problem in Washington.”

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

NEWS DEPARTMENT

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Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ ROY TANAKA, news editor; 360-417-3539, roy.tanaka@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hot line: 360-417-3506


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WeatherNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

High 48

Low 32

43/31

44/35

46/36

46/32

Cloudy with showers, mainly early.

Plenty of clouds.

Remaining cloudy.

Mostly cloudy.

Times of clouds and sun.

Cloudy, chance of a little rain.

The Peninsula Victoria 47/37 Neah Bay 47/36

Port Townsend 45/36

Port Angeles 48/32

Sequim 47/34

Forks 47/31

Port Ludlow 46/35

A storm system that brought plenty of clouds and rain to the Peninsula over the past few days will move off to the east today, with showers tapering off in the afternoon. Snow levels will continue to drop, reaching 2,500 feet late in the afternoon. A weak area of high pressure will then build in tonight, but a steady onshore flow will keep clouds in place. Snow levels will continue to fall, dropping to around 2,000 feet. There will be a few breaks in the clouds Friday with high pressure remaining in control.

Olympia 45/29

Everett 44/34

Seattle 48/34

Spokane 42/23

Yakima Kennewick 46/19 53/25

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š 2012

Marine Forecast Cloudy today with showers, mainly early in the day. Wind southwest 10-20 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 2 miles. Considerable cloudiness tonight. Wind light and variable. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Remaining cloudy tomorrow. Wind light and variable. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Wind southeast 3-6 knots. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. TABLE Location High Tide LaPush

8:53 a.m. 10:21 p.m. Port Angeles 2:03 a.m. 10:08 a.m. Port Townsend 3:48 a.m. 11:53 a.m. Sequim Bay* 3:09 a.m. 11:14 a.m.

TODAY Ht 8.2’ 6.6’ 6.6’ 6.9’ 8.0’ 8.3’ 7.5’ 7.8’

TOMORROW

Low Tide 2:51 a.m. 3:55 p.m. 5:54 a.m. 6:26 p.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:40 p.m. 7:01 a.m. 7:33 p.m.

National Forecast Thursday, January 5, 2012 Seattle 48/34 Billings 52/32

San Francisco 58/45

Moon Phases Last

Ht

High Tide

Ht

3.5’ 0.6’ 5.5’ -0.2’ 7.2’ -0.2’ 6.8’ -0.2’

9:43 a.m. 11:13 p.m. 2:36 a.m. 10:52 a.m. 4:21 a.m. 12:37 p.m. 3:42 a.m. 11:58 a.m.

8.5’ 7.0’ 7.1’ 6.9’ 8.5’ 8.3’ 8.0’ 7.8’

SATURDAY

Low Tide 3:46 a.m. 4:41 p.m. 6:51 a.m. 7:00 p.m. 8:05 a.m. 8:14 p.m. 7:58 a.m. 8:07 p.m.

Ht

High Tide Ht

3.4’ 0.2’ 5.6’ -0.5’ 7.3’ -0.7’ 6.9’ -0.7’

10:30 a.m. ----3:05 a.m. 11:37 a.m. 4:50 a.m. 1:22 p.m. 4:11 a.m. 12:43 p.m.

8.7’ --7.3’ 6.9’ 8.8’ 8.3’ 8.3’ 7.8’

Low Tide Ht 4:36 a.m. 5:24 p.m. 7:35 a.m. 7:35 p.m. 8:49 a.m. 8:49 p.m. 8:42 a.m. 8:42 p.m.

3.3’ -0.2’ 5.6’ -0.8’ 7.3’ -1.1’ 6.9’ -1.0’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Jan 16

New

Jan 22

First

Jan 30

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 59 50 s Baghdad 63 40 s Beijing 39 18 s Brussels 48 39 r Cairo 61 46 s Calgary 44 26 pc Edmonton 38 23 sf Hong Kong 57 54 c Jerusalem 59 42 s Johannesburg 86 58 t Kabul 41 11 s London 50 37 pc Mexico City 66 41 pc Montreal 25 10 sn Moscow 34 29 c New Delhi 68 45 s Paris 52 39 r Rio de Janeiro 81 72 sh Rome 55 43 pc Stockholm 36 27 sn Sydney 78 68 pc Tokyo 48 36 s Toronto 34 29 c Vancouver 45 39 sh Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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Chicago 46/33

Denver 66/36

New York 42/32

Washington 44/31

Kansas City 60/36

El Paso 58/35 Houston 68/53

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Miami 70/53

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 54 13 48 54 41 44 44 52 56 50 38 34 56 58 46 42 43 51 66 66 58 36 50 -13 48 80 68 35

Lo 33 6 31 37 28 25 22 32 26 29 26 30 35 33 33 32 24 30 39 36 36 30 34 -19 21 65 53 25

W s sn sh s s pc c pc pc c pc sf s s pc s sn sh s s s c sh c pc s pc sf

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 60 68 62 82 70 38 45 53 68 42 66 62 66 80 42 78 50 52 60 64 56 54 64 73 58 56 42 44

Lo 36 45 37 54 53 31 31 36 54 32 34 31 44 50 30 47 33 34 26 38 39 30 45 50 45 30 23 31

W s s s s pc pc pc s pc pc s s s s pc s sh s pc pc s pc pc s pc pc pc s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 92 at Paso Robles, CA

Low: -17 at Saranac Lake, NY

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Detroit 36/30

Atlanta 54/37

Sunset today ................... 4:35 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:04 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:42 p.m. Moonset today ................. 4:54 a.m.

Full

Minneapolis 45/31

Los Angeles 82/54

Sun & Moon

Jan 8

Shown is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather.

TIDE

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 52 40 0.24 0.28 Forks* 48 44 0.92 1.53 Seattle 54 42 0.53 0.96 Sequim 55 41 0.05 0.08 Hoquiam 54 46 1.02 1.83 Victoria 50 44 0.60 0.79 P. Townsend 56 48 0.06 0.22 *Data from Tuesday

-10s -0s

Bellingham 44/29 Aberdeen 49/35

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

 

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Briefly . . . Tribal center to reopen after break-in PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Lower Elwha Klallam tribal center is expected to reopen today after being closed Wednesday while tribal police investigated a break-in. Tribal Chairwoman Frances Charles said the break-in occurred the night before. She declined to comment on whether anything was damaged or taken from the center due to the ongoing investigation.

Suspect released PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A 53-year-old Port Angeles man was released on personal recognizance from Clallam County jail Wednesday after allegedly threatening to set fire to a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home with his wife inside. Charges will be filed against Scott T. Collins at his next court appearance Jan. 6. Collins allegedly made the threat after exchanging heated words with the man over his driving. Police arrested Collins on Tuesday after spending two hours outside his home at 1901 W. Fifth St. trying to persuade him to come out.

Garden club meets

Diabetes support PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The first meeting of the Type I Diabetes Family

Support Group will be held at 6 p.m. Friday. The event will be part of the Clallam County Family YMCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Friday Family Night at the Y. The YMCA is located at 302 S. Francis St. First Friday Family Nights begin at 5:30 p.m. The public is welcome to attend.

Rocks in landscape NORDLAND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Nordland Garden Club will meet at the Garden Clubhouse, 320 Garden Club

Road, at 10 a.m. Wednesday. Karen Page of Landshapes Gardens will discuss how to use rocks in landscaping projects. To RSVP, phone 360379-3777. For more information visit nordlandgardenclub. com.

Call for artists SEQUIM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sequim Arts is seeking artists and artisans to give presentations about their mediums and talents at the organi-

zationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly meetings. Presenters are given the opportunity to share, demonstrate and discuss their art and artistic experiences with fellow artists in a friendly and inspirational atmosphere. An honorarium is provided to presenters. Interested people may phone Sequim Arts program chair person Robert Lee at 360-683-6894.

Organic gardening PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wanda Horst of Earth CPR

Supplies will present an organic-gardening lecture to the Olympic Orchard Society on Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organic Gardening Made Simple â&#x20AC;&#x201D; How to Improve Our Soil By Organic Methods and Suppliesâ&#x20AC;? will be held in the commissionersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boardroom at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., at 7 p.m. Tuesday. For more information, phone Erik Simpson at 360-683-6684 or Marilyn Couture at 360-681-3036. Peninsula Daily News

Transform any room with paint and molding Tired of plain white walls? Transform your room instantly with a fresh coat of colorful paint. Add some versatile trim, gorgeous crown molding or stylish wainscoting to create character and charm. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to achieve a stylish, new look. Come check out our selection of molding and grab some paint to get started today. Need a carpenter or professional painter? Ask us. We supply building materials to reputable contractors every day! SAVE THE DATE: Come meet painting pros at Hartnagelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Painting Open House on January 24 from 10 am - 2 pm. Authorized dealers of:

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PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Master silk painter Karen Sistek will speak to the Port Angeles Garden Club on Monday. The talk will be held at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 Lopez Ave., at 10 a.m. Sistek has been painting on silk for more than 16 years. She specializes in flowers done, as she puts it, from an insectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point of view.

Sistek will give a PowerPoint presentation on her works of art along with a demonstration of painting on silk. She recently received the prestigious designation as a Signature Member by Silk Painters International. For more information or to join the club, phone 360457-8964.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 5, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Out of the sun, into the drizzle EXCUSE ME IF I sound a little less grumpy than normal. I’m still trying to shed all of Matt those 70 degree days I was forced Schubert to endure down in Phoenix, Ariz., during the holidays. Mountain hikes and day long bike rides through the Valley of the Sun left me a little on the dry side. Now awash in the familiar liquid sunshine of the Pacific Northwest, it’s only a matter of time before I’m back to my more typically truculent temperament. North Olympic Peninsula winters are about shared misery, after all. Who am I to not partake? On that note, here’s a couple of outdoor items:

Ridge news Don’t expect any operational rope tows atop Hurricane Ridge this weekend. Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club President Lori Lynn Gray said she doesn’t expect organized ski activities to start up this week, and it remains to be seen if things will be up and running next week either. It’s also beginning to look like the scheduled ski school opener, set for Jan. 14-15, will have to be postponed a week as well. Mountain manager Craig Hofer and his crew have been unable to get on the Ridge to throw together the intermediate rope tow because of a lack of snow. Fresh powder has fallen on the mountain in recent days. It just hasn’t gathered enough in certain spots for Olympic National Park to allow Hofer on the intermediate hill. “It’s definitely not happening this week,” Gray said. “We’re going to shoot for an opening next weekend. “We’re ready to go except for the intermediate rope.” For more information on ski activities on the Ridge, visit hurricaneridge.com.

PSA fundraiser The kids demand their fish, and the Puget Sound Anglers-North Olympic Peninsula Chapter delivers each year with its Olympic Peninsula Kids Fishing Program. In order to make that happen, the group will hold its annual fundraising auction and dinner Thursday, Jan. 19, in Sequim. The proceeds from the auction provide most of the funding for the kids fishing program at the Sequim water reclamation pond. The auction/dinner is set to begin at 5 p.m. inside the Guy Cole Convention Center at Carrie Blake Park. A spaghetti dinner will be served starting at 5:30 p.m. There is no fee for the dinner, although donations will be accepted. (Those who choose not to donate must accept the title of cheapskate.) There will be live and silent auctions, with the former being held following dinner. Live auction items include fishing trips with Peninsula river guides for salmon and steelhead, and charter boat trips for salmon, halibut and bottomfish out on the ocean and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Club members will also be offering saltwater trips departing out of Port Angeles, Sequim or Sekiu for salmon or halibut. The 11th annual Kids Fishing Day will be held Saturday, May 19, at the reclamation pond. The pond is stocked with 1,500 trout, some of which weigh as much as five pounds. For more information on the events, contact Herb Prins at 360582-0836.

________

Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com.

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chimacum’s Derek Ajax (22) sets a pick as teammate Quinn Eldridge (3) dribbles around a Seattle Christian defender during a Class 1A Nisqually League game played in Chimacum on Tuesday.

Too little, too late Chimacum falls short in Nisqually matchup BY MATT SCHUBERT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHIMACUM — The secret is out on the Chimacum boys basketball team. The undersized, athletic Cowboys like to run, and they like to fire away from deep. In Tuesday night’s Nisqually League showdown with Seattle Christian, they couldn’t do enough of either. Seattle Christian handed Chimacum its first league loss of the season, withstanding a torrid second-half shooting display from Quinn Eldridge for a 57-49 victory. The Chimacum senior scored 17 of his team-high 22 points in the final two frames, but it wasn’t enough to rally the Cowboys

back from a 16-point halftime hole. “Our goal was to play a little higher than we normally do [on defense] and defend the 3, defend their shooters,” Seattle Christian coach Shaun DeYager said. “We were really asking them to try to take it inside.” Chimacum (3-1 in league, 8-2 overall) had vaulted to the top of the Nisqually League standings due to the strength of its outside shooting. On Tuesday night, Seattle Christian (3-0, 8-2) countered that by using its size and length to aggressively defend the perimeter and slow down the Cowboys’ athletic guards. Extending their zone defense out past the 3-point line, the

Warriors stayed close to the Cowboys’ shooters. They also forced the Cowboys to walk the ball up the court against a full-court press. The result was a tepid first half that saw Chimacum score just 20 points while shooting 6 of 20 from the field. “That’s what [teams] are going to do,” Chimacum coach Jim Eldridge said. “It’s something that we are going to have to figure out. We need some points out of the paint.” Six-foot-4 Seattle Christian post Chaise DeVries controlled the paint while guards Cody Miller (6-3) and Richard Jensen (6-1) attacked from the wings. DeVries nearly had a doubledouble by halftime and finished with 13 points, 13 rebounds (seven offensive), three assists and one block. Miller scored 15 points and Jensen netted a game-high 25 points, including a pull-up 3 at the halftime buzzer that put the Warriors ahead 36-20.

Forks still on top Defense keys league win for Spartans

“They set the tempo of the whole game with their press,” said coach Eldridge, whose team’s next league game is Jan. 10 at Life Christian. “We’ve got to be able to break that press better and set our tempo. We want to push the ball up a little better, break that press and get some baskets off the press.” “That’s the bottom line, we got to play our tempo.” The Cowboys were finally able to get out and run early in the third quarter thanks to their own aggressive defense. Guard Landon Cray scored back-to-back buckets off fastbreaks two minutes into the half, then Rafael Pagasian came up with a steal and dished to Eldridge for a transition 3 that put the score at 38-31. TURN

TO

COWBOYS/B2

Seahawks

Free agent questions on horizon BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — The Forks boys basketball team maintained its grip on first place in the SWLEvergreen Division with another strong defensive performance Tuesday night. Brady Castellano scored 16 points and pulled down 12 rebounds to spark the Spartans to a 45-33 victory over Montesano. Forks improved to 4-0 in league and 8-2 overall while Montesano fell to 1-3 and 7-3. Braden Decker added 12 points to go with Castellano’s double-double, but it was defense that won this one for Forks. “Defense is keeping us in the games,” Forks coach Scott Justus said. The Spartans shot only 36 percent from the floor but it’s much better than the last two games where they shot 31 and 28 percent. “We put up 52 shots,” Justus said. “Our goal is 60 shots, but I will take 52.” The Spartans had scoring problems early because Montesano plays physical, Justus said.

ALSO . . . ■ Chimacum girls dropped by Seattle Christian/B2

Preps

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forks’ Shaquille Cress makes a pass into the lane around Montesano’s Matthew Jensen (44) during Tuesday night’s SWL-Evergreen Division game in Forks. Forks held Montesano’s leading scorer, Joe Benedict, to two points in the game. Benedict averages almost 18 points a game but was held to two points by the trio of Decker, Castellano and Cameron Leons in Forks’ matchup zone defense, Justus said.

All-State football star Evan Truax led Montesano with 11 points. First place in the SWL-Evergreen will be on the line when Forks travels to Elma (4-0, 5-5) on Friday night. TURN

TO

PREPS/B2

RENTON — Just as Marshawn Lynch became the Skittles-loving face of the Seattle Seahawks, he could just as quickly be leaving town. Or he could remain part of the foundation that led to the Seahawks’ turnaround in the second half of the season. Lynch tops the list of 18 unrestricted free agents that the Seahawks must make decisions on this offseason. The list features seven starters from Seattle’s season finale last Sunday in Arizona, plus a few former starters who missed all or parts of the season with injuries. “Our first concern is to take care of our team and take care of the guys that are unrestricted on our football team and fit that back together,” coach Pete Carroll said. It starts with Lynch. Coming off the finest season of his career, Lynch is at the peak of his NFL financial prospects. He’s 25, has just rushed for 1,204 yards and 12 touchdowns and embodies the attitude Carroll wants the rest of his roster to emulate. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

Today’s Today Girls Basketball: Sequim at Chimacum, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Forks at Hoquiam, 6 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Monday Night Mixed Men’s High Game: Travis Peterson, 254. Men’s High Series: Calen Walz, 617. Women’s High Game: Nancy VanWinkle, 227. Women’s High Series: Nancy VanWinkle, 641 League-leading Team: Undiscovered. Les Schwab Mixed Majors Monday Men’s High Game: John Glass, 277. Men’s High Series: Tony Chapman Jr, 747. Women’s High Game: Karen Paulsen, 203. Women’s High Series: Louise Demetriff, 570. League-leading Team: Red Carpet/Sunrise Car Wash. Baxter Auto Parts Old Timers Monday Men’s High Game: Bob Thompson, 206. Men’s High Series: Jay Cameron, 556. Women’s High Game: Joan Wright, 177. Women’s High Series: Joan Wright, 480. Pee Wee Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Jonathan Roland, 94. Girls High Game: Jayde Wold, 92. Bantam Kids League Saturday Girls High Game: Sierra Burkett, 122. Girls High Series: Sierra Burkett, 277. Junior Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Casey Sisneros,177. Boys High Series: Nathan Dewey, 431. Girls High Game: Malyssa Gannon, 124. Girls High Series: Malyssa Gannon, 298. 7 Cedars Mixed Friday Men’s High Game: Bill VanGordon, 247.

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calender

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Men’s High Series: Bill VanGordon, 720. Women’s High Game: Rita Berson, 202. Women’s High Series: Rita Berson, 544. League-leading Team: We Deliver Wall Street Journal Dec. 27 Men’s High Game: Cliff Siliman, 168. Men’s High Series: Cliff Siliman, 489. Women’s High Game: Lynda Everett, 145. Women’s High Series: Kelly Meyer, 388. League-leading Team: Funnies.

Preps Basketball BOYS Olympic League Standings League Overall Kingston 7-0 9-2 Port Angeles 6-1 9-1 Sequim 5-2 8-3 Bremerton (3A) 4-3 5-6 Klahowya 4-3 4-7 Olympic 3-4 5-5 North Kitsap 2-5 2-8 Port Town. (1A) 1-7 2-8 North Mason 0-7 1-10 Tuesday’s Games Kingston 53, Sequim 45 Bremerton 53, Port Townsend 35 Olympic 63, North Kitsap 25 Klahowya 73, North Mason 69 Friday’s games Port Angeles at Kingston Sequim at Olympic Klahowya at Port Townsend North Kitsap at North Mason 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 3-0 8-2 Life Christian 2-0 6-3 Chimacum 3-1 8-2 Cas. Christian 2-1 5-3 Charles Wright 1-2 6-5 Vashon Island 0-3 2-6 Orting 0-4 0-10

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Tuesday’s Games Seattle Christian 57, Chimacum 49 Cascade Christian 52, Vashon Island 29 Charles Wright 78, Orting 46 Friday’s Games Cascade Christian at Charles Wright Vashon Island at Orting Life Christian at Seattle Christian Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Forks 4-0 8-2 Onalaska 4-0 6-4 Elma 4-0 5-5 Hoquiam 2-2 5-4 Montesano 1-3 6-3 Tenino 1-3 3-7 Rainier 0-4 3-7 Rochester 0-4 1-9 Tuesday’s Games Forks 46, Montesano 32 Hoquiam 56, Rainier 45 Elma 67, Tenino 46 Today’s Game Rochester at Montesano Friday’s Games Forks at Elma Onalaska at Hoquiam Rainier at Montesano Tenino at Rochester North Olympic League League Overall Crescent 0-0 6-4 Neah Bay 0-0 5-2 Clallam Bay 0-0 4-6 Tuesday’s Game Crescent 62, Lake Quinault 49 Wednesday’s Game Port Angeles C/JV at Neah Bay Friday’s Games Crescent at Clallam Bay Neah Bay Alumni Game GIRLS Olympic League Standings League Overall Kingston 6-1 8-3

4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Pittsburgh at DePaul. 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN High School Football, All American Game Highlight vs. Blur in St. Petersburg, Fla. 5 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Miami Heat at Atlanta Hawks. 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Michigan at Indiana. 6 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Washington at Colorado. 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Los Angeles Lakers at Portland Trail Blazers. 8 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Arizona at UCLA.

Bremerton(3A) 6-1 7-4 North Kitsap 5-2 6-3 Port Angeles 5-2 5-4 Olympic 4-3 5-5 Klahowya 3-4 5-6 Port Town. (1A) 2-6 5-6 Sequim 1-6 2-8 North Mason 0-7 2-9 Tuesday’s Games Kingston 60, Sequim 42 Bremerton 81, Port Townsend 34 Klahowya 44, North Mason 22 Olympic 54, North Kitsap 48 Today’s Game Sequim at Chimacum Friday’s Games Kingston at Port Angeles Olympic at Sequim Port Townsend at Klahowya North Mason at North Kitsap 1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Cas. Christian 3-0 7-1 Seattle Christian 3-0 5-6 Chimacum 2-2 3-7 Life Christian 1-1 4-5 Vashon Island 1-2 5-5 Charles Wright 1-2 4-4 Orting 0-4 0-9 Tuesday’s Games Seattle Christian 50, Chimacum 36 Cascade Christian 56, Vashon Island 23 Charles Wright 58, Orting 10 Today’s Game Sequim at Chimacum Friday’s Games Life Christian at Seattle Christian Cascade Christian at Charles Wright Vashon Island at Orting Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Tenino 3-1 8-2 Elma 3-1 7-2 Onalaska 3-1 7-3 Rainier 2-2 5-4 Montesano 2-2 5-5

Hoquiam Rochester Forks

2-2 3-6 1-3 3-9 0-4 2-8 Tuesday’s Games Montesano 40, Forks 37 Elma 70, Tenino 46 Hoquiam 54, Rainier 33 Onalaska 43, Rochester 26 Friday’s Games Forks at Elma Tenino at Rochester Rainier at Montesano Onalaska at Hoquiam North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 0-0 6-0 Clallam Bay 0-0 3-5 Crescent 0-0 1-4 Wednesday’s Game Port Angeles C/JV at Neah Bay Friday’s Games Crescent at Clallam Bay Neah Bay Alumni Game

Cowboys: Girls fall to Warriors Hawks: Deals CONTINUED FROM B1 After a Seattle Christian basket, Eldridge drained another 3 to bring the Cowboys within 40-34. The 6-foot guard went on to hit 4 of 5 3-point attempts in the second half. His last bomb brought the Cowboys within four points at 48-44 with 4:40 left in the fourth quarter. Eldridge sank two free throws a minute later to close the gap at 48-46. Miller immediately responded with his third 3 of the game on the other end, however. Jensen sank a reverse layup on the Warriors’ next possession, and the Cowboys got no closer the rest of the way. “We weren’t playing our game [in the first half]. We were kind of letting them dictate the pace,” Quinn Eldridge said. “We played good in the second half, we just started off slow. If we started off like we did in the second half, it would have been a different game.” Eldridge finished 5 of 9 from 3-point range on the game and a perfect 7 of 7 from the free throw line. The rest of the Cowboys struggled, however, with the team finishing 6 of 27 from distance and 16 of 50 from the field overall.

The normally explosive Cray was limited to just eight points and two assists while failing to sink any of his 10 3-point attempts. Pagasian, who has also been a consistent force in the Cowboys’ three-guard lineup, had trouble penetrating against the Warrior zone as well. He had nine points and one assist. Despite the size disadvantage, the Cowboys were even on the boards with both teams grabbing 30 rebounds. Riley Downs led Chimacum with six rebounds, and Lucas Dukek had five. The Warriors came up with two big blocks. That included an above-the-rim swat from Miller on a Cray fastbreak layup attempt late in the fourth quarter. The athletic play quelled whatever hope was left of a late Cowboys comeback. “In the third quarter, Chimacum definitely won the effort war there, diving on the floor and out-hustling us on rebounds,” DeYager said. “About that time where we needed to step it up, we changed it back.” Seattle Christian 57, Chimacum 49 Seattle Christian 18 18 8 13— 57 Chimacum 8 12 16 13— 49 Individual scoring Seattle Christian (57) Jensen 25, Miller 15, Pierotti 2, Abe 2, DeVries 13. Chimacum (57) Cray 8, Eldridge 22, Pagasian 9, Madayag 2, Ajax 4, Downs 2, Glessing 2.

Girls Basketball Seattle Chr. 50, Chimacum 36 CHIMACUM — The Cowboys controlled the first quarter of Tuesday night’s Nisqually League tilt. The rest belonged to the Warriors. Chimacum hit 4 of its first 5 field goal attempts and took a 10-5 lead after one frame before going ice cold against the first-place Warriors. “We’re a feast or famine team,” Chimacum coach Brad Burlingame said. Unfortunately for the Cowboys (2-2, 3-7), it was nearly all famine following the strong first-quarter start. That included a scoreless seven-minute stretch to begin the second quarter that saw the Cowboys turn the ball over eight times against the Warriors pressure defense. Cydney Nelson scored a team-high 13 points and grabbed six rebounds to lead the Cowboys, and Lauren Thacker added 12 points, four rebounds and two assists. But there was little additional offense from a Chimacum team that shot 15 of 43 from the field, 5 of 14 from the free throw line and gave the ball away 24 times. “If they can just push

your guards out to half court it doesn’t really matter what your offense is,” Burlingame said. “It’s going to fall short.” Seattle Christian (3-0, 5-6) has been forced to play its season without 6-foot-3 UW recruit Katie Collier, who is undergoing treatment for leukemia. The Warriors still looked plenty strong Tuesday, with the team dishing out 19 assists while out-rebounding Chimacum 34-26. Sophomore guard Alyssa Kaler scored 14 points and had three assists, while Catie Shelton had 12 points, seven rebounds and five assists. The Warriors outscored Chimacum 31-14 between the second and third quarters as they turned a fivepoint deficit into a 36-24 lead going into the fourth. The Cowboys didn’t get closer than 13 points the remainder of the game. “We’re still on track, everything is good,” Burlingame said. “It’s just against these really good teams . . . it’s just a big practice.” Seattle Christian 50, Chimacum 36 Seattle Christian 5 14 17 14— 50 Chimacum 10 6 8 12— 36 Individual scoring Seattle Christian (50) Johnson 13, Kaler 14, Shelton 12, Gleason 7, Terhune 2, Weber 2. Chimacum (36) Nelson 13, Thacker 12, Johnson 6, King 3, Hathaway 2.

CONTINUED FROM B1 Lynch also showed a maturity this season that might have been absent in the past. When Seattle was struggling at midseason and Lynch had rushed for more than 80 yards just once, Lynch sat down with assistant head coach Tom Cable to ask how he could become more productive. The result was six 100yard games over the final nine weeks. “He was more than willing to say, ‘Teach me, I’ll do it the way you need it and don’t let me off the hook if I don’t do it right,’” Cable said. Not far behind on Seattle’s priority list is locking up Bryant. Before Carroll took over in 2009, Bryant appeared to be on his way out of the NFL, unable to find his way as a defensive tackle. But Carroll and defensive coordinator Gus Bradley shifted Bryant to defensive end and he’s become the anchor of a Seattle defensive line that’s been successful each of the past two seasons at stopping the run with Bryant starting. Bryant said earlier this week that he doesn’t have the desire to see what he could get in free agency.

His loyalty to the Seahawks goes beyond finding a role where he could thrive; he’s the sonin-law of former Seahawks defensive end great Jacob Green. “I’d be lying to say that the Seahawks haven’t been extremely good to me. They gave me the opportunity to play a position that at first I thought they were trying to cut me when they first talked about moving me to defensive end,” Bryant said. There are other players on the next tier who are just as important for the Seahawks. Fullback Michael Robinson was a first alternate to the Pro Bowl and the one Lynch gave plenty of credit to for his breakout season. Along the offensive line, Seattle learned the value of backups Breno Giacomini and Paul McQuistan this season as each filled in admirably after starters James Carpenter, John Moffitt and Russell Okung were lost for the season because of injuries. Giacomini made $600,000 this season, and McQuistan $685,000. Defensively, Seattle’s biggest issue aside from Bryant is at linebacker, where starters David Hawthorne and Leroy Hill are both free agents.

Preps: Sequim boys fall to first-place Kingston CONTINUED FROM B1 Forks 45, Montesano 33 Montesano Forks

6 4 9 14 — 33 7 13 10 15 — 45 Individual Scoring Montesano (33) Truax 11, Baker 9, Ohashi 3, Dodger 2, Bruner 2, Benedict 2, Johnson 4. Forks (45) J. Penn 5, T. Penn 8, Castellano 16, Decker 12, Leons 3.

Crescent 62, Lake Quinault 49 JOYCE — Joel Williams earned a double-double with 18 points and 12 rebounds as the Loggers tuned up for league play with a nonleague win Tuesday night. Derrick Findley added 17 points and eight boards as Crescent improved to 6-4 overall on the year. Kai Story added nine points and nine rebounds for the Loggers while Travis Walker sank nine points and had four boards and three assists.

The Loggers open North in the third quarter sealed Olympic League play at Sequim’s fate. Clallam Bay (4-6) on Friday. “Kingston came out and shot the ball real well,” Crescent 62, Lake Quinault 49 Sequim coach Greg Glasser Lake Quinault 9 14 10 16 — 49 said. Crescent 12 19 11 20 — 62 Still, the Wolves trailed Individual Scoring Lake Quinault (49) just 31-27 at the break Garcia 4, Molina 3, Lyons 15, Kalama 8, Dorhoffer 2, thanks to Carter’s scoring. Bregas 4, Potter 12. He finished with 17 Crescent (62) Walker 9, Fadness 7, Findley 17, Story 9, Williams points while Jayson Brock18, Souders 2. lesby added 11. The Wolves travel to Kingston 53, Olympic (3-4, 5-5) for league Sequim 45 play Friday in the second of KINGSTON — The Buc- four straight road games caneers had four players Kingston 53, Sequim 45 score in double figures to Sequim 14 13 6 12 — 45 hold off the Wolves in a cru- Kingston 15 16 17 5 — 53 Individual Scoring cial Olympic League game Sequim (45) Tuesday night. Hill 5, Brocklesby 11, Catelli 6, Carter 17, Webb 6. Kingston stayed unde- Kingston (53) feated in league at 7-0 while 10.Combs 10, Sander 15, Dean 11, Byers 7, Sundquist Sequim fell to 5-2 in league and 8-3 overall. Bremerton 53, The Wolves stayed close Port Townsend 35 in the first half thanks to Gabe Carter’s 11 points, but PORT TOWNSEND — a 17-6 Kingston advantage The Redskins had a tough

night Tuesday in Olympic League play against the Knights. Bremerton led by 13 points at the half and never looked back. The high points for the Redskins included Daniel Charlton scoring 10 points and Kyle Kelly sinking nine. “We had a really tough time on the boards tonight,” coach Tom Webster said. “We look forward to Friday night for a chance to get better.” The Redskins (1-7, 2-8) play Klahowya at home Friday. Bremerton 53, Port Townsend 35 Bremerton 17 13 13 10— 53 Port Townsend 7 10 4 14— 35 Individual scoring Bremerton (53) Wales 6, Shadle 2, Broussard 4, Petroski 2, Fultz 3, Lawrence 7, Stevens 19, Dixion 2, Robinson 2, Pounds 6. Port Townsend (35) O’Brien 2, Kelly 9, King 4, Charlton 10, Spaltenstein 7, LeMaster 3.

Girls Basketball Bremerton 81, Port Townsend 34 BREMERTON — The Redskins ran into the Jalen Carpenter-Sawyer Kluge buzzsaw Tuesday night in Olympic League action. Carpenter ripped the nets for 28 points while Kluge added 26 as the Knights (4-3, 5-6) overwhelmed Port Townsend. Kiley Maag scored almost half of the Redskins’ points with 15 on the night. Port Townsend (2-6, 5-6) next will play at Klahowya (3-4, 5-6) in league play Friday night in Silverdale. Bremerton 81, Port Townsend 34 Port Townsend 7 13 7 7 — 34 Bremerton 17 18 22 24 — 81 Individual Scoring Port Townsend (34) Johnson 3, Maag 15, Lyons 2, Hossack 2, Hallinan 8, Phillips 5. Bremerton (81) Strylund 2, DeWalt 9, Kluge 26, Grettenberger 2, Chambers 6, K. Carpenter 8, J. Carpenter 28.

Kingston 60, Sequim 42 SEQUIM — The Wolves (1-6, 2-8) couldn’t keep up with the Olympic League leading Buccaneers (6-1, 8-3) in Tuesday night’s contest. Kingston 60, Sequim 42 Kingston Sequim

18 16 19 4 — 60 10 12 10 10 — 42 Individual Scoring

Kingston (60) N. Sontes 2, Carper 13, Gaines 3, I. Sontes 9, Salas 12, Wicklein 9, Snaza 9. Sequim (42) Balkan 7, Hudson 2, Haupt 11, Harrison 2, Guan 8, Walner 2, Briones 2, Besand 8.

Montesano 40, Forks 37 FORKS — The Spartans’ shot at their first SWL-Evergreen Division win this winter fell short Tuesday night. Forks (0-4, 2-8) led for most of the game before falling behind in the fourth quarter. Details of the game were not reported.


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I was sure “Emotionally Abused in California’s” letter was inspirational but fictional. The 15-year-old writer felt her mother was unreasonable because of the rules Mom enforced and the chores the teen was required to do. Then I started rereading my high school diary. There were many parallels between this girl’s complaints and my own as a teen. My mom also didn’t let me go to parties if she didn’t know the parents and confirm they’d be home; my curfew was 11:30 p.m. on weekends because Mom couldn’t sleep until I was in for the night. She always offered to host Friday pizza-and-movie night at our home to ensure my friends and I had a safe place to hang out. Like “Emotionally Abused,” I also resented my lack of freedom, but because of her efforts, I never had run-ins with the law, never got an STD or became pregnant, and I didn’t try drugs or alcohol. When I expressed my frustration, Mom would say, “When you’re a parent, you’ll understand.” Now that I have two small children, I do understand. I hit the Mom jackpot! I’m grateful for her guidance, love and the boundaries she set for me. I’ll be sending her that column and a copy of this letter to you as a thank-you for making decisions that kept me grounded and safe. Won the Jackpot in Michigan

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

DEAR ABBY Abigail Van Buren

Dear Abby: It’s about time parents raise their children appropriately. I grew up with much less than “Emotionally Abused” but with more rules and restrictions. My mom divorced my physically abusive father when I was 3. There was no alimony or child support. Mom did it all on her own. She even went back to school to get a college degree. Parents are not meant to be their children’s BFF. They are responsible for raising their children with morals and social values. Welcome to the real world. Jackson, Wis., Reader Dear Readers: To read a longer version of this column, visit DearAbby.com.

Dear Abby: It’s refreshing to know there are still parents who actually care about how they raise their children. Bringing a child into this world is a tremendous responsibility. It requires years of 24/7 vigilance, teaching and love to produce a moral, by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

by Corey Pandolph

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Consider ways to bring in extra cash. A sudden change of plans will help you realize a service you have to offer. Take the initiative with regard to a partnership you want to pursue. Love and romance are highlighted. 4 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Getting along with others will be essential if you want to advance. Mix and mingle with people who share your interests and goals. Love is in the stars, and your charm will make you hard to resist. Spontaneity will enhance your popularity. 4 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A false impression may cause you to overreact. Step back and view your situation before you say or do anything that may work against you. A misunderstanding is apparent if you aren’t clear about what you want or what you are willing to do. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Emotions will lead to unpredictable behavior. Whether it’s you or someone else who is upset, you are best to stick to the truth and clear matters up quickly. Letting a situation fester will only make matters worse. You need a break. 2 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Emotional issues will be brought to the surface. You are best to keep an open mind and listen to what’s being said and offered. A quick change on your part can actually help things turn out to your benefit. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Socializing will bring out the best in you. Take on a challenge and show everyone how capable you are when it comes to creative thinking and versatility. Changes to your residence will increase its value. Focus on financial gain. 5 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You may be left in the dark regarding what everyone else is doing. Make adjustments to suit your needs, but be prepared to adapt to whatever comes your way. You need to be versatile if you want to keep up and make an impression. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Discipline will be required, especially when working with a partner. Keep an open mind, but don’t let anyone railroad you into something you don’t want using emotional blackmail. Set your priorities and stick to them. Strive for equality. 3 stars

The Family Circus

loving and productive pillar of our society. Some parents today do not take their responsibility seriously. How we raise our children will directly affect how we function as a society in the future. Concerned Dad in Las Vegas

Dear Abby: I am a teacher of many spoiled, lazy, irresponsible and incompetent students. If all parents were as dedicated in rearing their children as this teen’s mother, my job would be wonderful. She has the necessary parenting skills to mold her child into a responsible, productive and mature adult. She’s an awesome woman! Teacher in Nashville, Ga.

Dear Won the Jackpot: When that letter hit print, I was overwhelmed with mail from readers supporting my response and sharing experiences that validated “Emotionally Abused’s” mom’s parenting techniques. I took special note of the responses from teens, which I’ll share Friday. Today, some comments from adults:

by Jim Davis

B3

Mom’s limits will serve child well

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tie up loose ends and stand behind your work. It’s important to send the right signal, especially when dealing with those who can affect your future. Diplomacy and charm will work wonders. Love, romance and travel are highlighted. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t let added responsibilities get you down. Stellar work will increase your chance to get ahead. Mixing business with pleasure will open doors. Your ability to schmooze will give you a competitive edge. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Prepare to make changes that will alter your lifestyle. Adjusting your living arrangements will open up opportunities that will help stabilize your finances. More responsibility will enhance your reputation. Love is in the stars. 5 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Question anyone who is procrastinating. You need firm answers from the people you are trying to do business with. Don’t settle for something you don’t really want. You’re better off starting from scratch than making do. 2 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B4

Classified

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK • •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

AIRPORT CAFE CLOSE-OUT SALE Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m. Kitchen equipment & supplies, catering and gift shop items at move-out prices. Fairchild Aiport, P.A. 360-477-1650 Almost new 3 Br., 3 bath numerous upgrades close to Discovery Trail, Carrie Blake Park, the marina and more. Call Marie. 253-394-3903 JACE REAL ESTATE PALO ALTO, SEQ: 1 Br. cabin, wdstve, W/D $550. 683-4307

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 7 am- 2 p.m. 212 Secor Road off River Road. Lots of hand tools, fishing equipment, furniture, housewares, medium size chest freezer and lots of misc. FORD: ‘92 Escort station wagon. Looks new, 102K miles and carefully maintained. $1,800. 683-4467. FORD: ‘68 1/2 ton. Rebuilt 300 ci, 6 cyl, 4 sp man., clear title with parts truck. $1,500. 808-2563.

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

HONDA: ‘91 Station Wagon. 92K miles, I4 DOHC, auto, A/C, exc. cond., white ext., tow bar. $3,200. 681-0144 INDOOR Sale: Fri., 93 p.m., 105 N. Francis. Salon furniture, multi-purpose chairs, driers with chairs, misc. knickknacks, crafts and other items. LABRADOODLES Black, 1st generation, 4 males, born Oct. 1st shots, wormed, very sweet. $400. 360-259-6347

31

Help Wanted

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

Best gift ever, Wild Rose Care Home gives love year round. We have a vacancy. 683-9194. ROUGH HOLIDAYS? Learn to control your drinking in 8 week class using evidence-based materials. Wed., from 5:307:30 p.m. For more info call 452-5005.

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Black male, in Sequim. Call to identify. 681-5370 FOUND: Cat. Gray and white long hair, no tail, female, very skinny, Olympic Medical Center, P.A. 460-6019 FOUND: Keys in Shane Park, P.A. Call to identify. 457-6125. LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268 LOST: Cat. Longhaired silver female, spayed, 12 yrs old, no collar. Last seen Fri., Dec. 30, East Myrtle St., near Safeway/Hartnagels area in P.A. 460-2859. LOST: Leash. Blue retractable dog leash, large side, Flexi brand, west side P.A. 417-5342. LOST: Silver bracelet, with intricate link pattern, between hospital and downtown P.A. on 12/31. 206-419-9417 The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

Facilities Manager The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Facilities Manager. The Facilities Manager is responsible for the daily operations of the Facilities Maintenance department & personnel. The Facilities Manager also manages maintenance at the following facilities: marinas, industrial properties/buildings, airports, waterfront properties, marine terminal docks, piers, log yard facilities, boat launch facilities, boat yards & rental properties. Qualified candidates must have 5-10 yrs of experience in facilities management preferably in the public sector & sufficient knowledge of the methods, materials, tools, & equipment used in all phases of facilities maintenance, including a basic general knowledge of electricity, plumbing, carpentry, HVAC systems, etc. Experience with marinas, docks, piers & marine work preferred. Salary is DOE with an anticipated hiring range of $60,000 to $75,000. Applications & job descriptions may be obtained at the Port Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Port Angeles between 8am & 5pm M-F or online at www.portofpa.com. Applications will be accepted until 5pm January 6, 2012. Letters & resumes without an application will not be accepted. Drug testing is required.

CLERICAL: Part-time, must be highly organized, detail oriented, energetic, sales oriented with good communication skills. Flexible schedule and basic computer knowledge a must. Drop resume off at Angeles Mini Storage, 919 W. Lauridsen Blvd., P.A. ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE RESIDENT ADVISOR To work with developmentally disabled adults, no experience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m. For more info: 452-9548. SEQUIM PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER Seeks experienced licensed physical therapist for private practice outpatient therapy clinic. Manual therapy skills preferred, will consider part or full-time. Contact Jason Wilwert at 360-683-0632.

34

Work Wanted

FOR HIRE mature Christian man Sequim/P.A. area. $80 per day, 6 hours. 360-683-9499

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

MISC: Solid oak dining table with 2 leaves and 8 chairs, $450. Vintage Victorian vanity, $125. Oriental cabinet, $200. All in excellent condition. 808-0471 WANTED: Mother-inlaw apt. for older adult with disabilities. Sequim area pref. 683-5460.

34

Work Wanted

LAND MINE Lawn Care. We will pickup and dispose of dog feces. Small dog, $10 week. Large, $15 week. 360-504-2443

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

Centrally located in Port Angeles. 1,296 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath in a quiet neighborhood. Open living area, kitchen with lots of counter space. Bright windows with views of mountains and the Strait. Private fenced in yard, large detached 2 car garage. $189,000 Call 360477-9597 for more info. Offers with a Buyer's agent considered.

Homes

BEACH FRONT HOME Built in 1997. 2 Br., 2.5 bath, 2,134 sf. Hobby room. Propane heat. Protected glass screened patio with view. .33 acres. Water front and tidelands. Small boat launch. $529,000. ML262243/293936 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY CHARMING RAMBLER With 3 Br., hardwoods, and a knotty pine kitchen with new tile floors. Single attached garage plus double detached garage makes this extra special! Private fenced backyard with raised garden beds. $159,000. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY CLOSE TO SHOPPING Beautiful 3 Br., 2 bath, manufactured home with attached 2 car garage on its own city lot. Located in a quiet neighborhood with easy access to downtown and shopping. Features include oak flooring in the entry, living and dining rooms, Propane fireplace with Cherry wood mantle, completely fenced in yard, and plenty of room to park an RV. $200,000. ML261491. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 COMMERCIAL ZONING This home on 8th Street has a new roof, gutters and the exterior has been freshly painted. There is a foyer that has a door into one bedroom/office and a separate door into the living room. The kitchen has lots of built-ins plus a large walk in pantry. You can live and work from this charming home located at 212 W. 8th Street. $99,950. ML261731. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

51

Homes

NEAT, CLEAN, & MOVE-IN READY Newer manufactured home with vaulted ceilings and many windows. Fenced back yard with patio. Many upgrades. Clasen Cove is a coop, not a mobile home park. Landscaping with sprinkler system installed. Oversized garage w/lots of cabinet storage and shop area. $167,000. ML261896 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PRICE REDUCTION Manufactured home on 4.90 acres of partially-cleared land. Beautiful sweeping view of the Strait and mountains. Efficient floor plan with 2 Br., 2 baths. Nice shop/ barn with enclosed garage with storage and bath. Seasonal pond with lovely landscaping. $219,900. ML261838. Patti Morris 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company Quaint home with 4 Br., 1 and 3/4 bath. Well maintained, centrally located, beautiful partial mountain view from back deck. Entire yard is fully fenced. Bright cheery kitchen with off-kitchen dining. Electrical outlet on deck ready for hot tub. $186,000. ML262108 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY REDUCED $61, 000! 3.45 fenced acres, 2 beautiful large barns (2,400 sf and 1,600 sf) for animals/equipment/RV storage. Manufactured home built in 1996, 2,268 sf, nicely designed. This property is located behind other properties bordering Edgewood Dr. Cannot be seen from the road! Very private! $289,000. ML260136. Marc Thomsen 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CONDOMINIUM CONVENIENTLY LOCATED Great access to nearby stores, services, public transportation. End unit, two Br. suites. Laminate floors, built-ins, fireplace, extra storage, park like setting. $199,900. ML29023197 Patrick French 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

REDUCED PRICE IS NICE This 3 Br., 2 bath home is located just East of the 7 Cedars Casino. Features a newer 3 car garage, historic restored cabin and situated above year-round creek. Take a nature walk or just enjoy your natural surroundings. $259,900. ML261050 Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

LOVELY SINGLE LEVEL HOME 2 private acres with mountain views, 2,590 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath + family room. Estates water system and private well. Southern exposure, fruit trees, garden space. 2 car garage, shop, covered RV parking. $399,000. ML252372/261535 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT Magnificent describes the inspiring design of this 4 Br., 3.5 bath home nestled on 10 lovely acres in a quiet valley setting, with stunning views of the Straits, Mt. Baker, and the Olympics. $675,000. ML262185 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

51

Homes

SUNLAND CHARMER! Remodeled with updated kitchen and laminate floors throughout. Spacious bedrooms, large family room and open kitchen/ dining area. Attached 2-car garage. $229,000. ML262232 Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND CRAFTSMAN HOME. quality built in 2010 1736 sf 3 br 2 full baths open floor plan granite counter top view of 3rd fairway hardwood floors 40’deck lowe windows heat pump agent offers considered. $339,000 360-797-1629 UNOBSTRUCTABLE SALTWATER VIEWS Of the Strait and shipping lanes. Views from most every room in this wellmaintained home: great room, kitchen, dining, master Br. and guest Br. Wonderful covered deck for your enjoyment nearly year round. Beautifully landscaped grounds with easy care upkeep. Home is move-in ready and has a lot of built-in storage. $298,500 ML260883/216492 Heidi Hansen and Dave Stofferahn 477-5322 or477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

Tri-level in the beautiful Deer Park area with a water view. 3 Br. and 2 bath. Hardwood floors and rec-room. Attached 2 car garage. Over a acre with room for a garden. 2 out buildings. $172,270. ML262369/301727 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. YOUR NEW YEARS RESOLUTION Make a fresh start in 2012 with this 1.70 acre gated beauty. 3 bed, 2.5 bath, double garage and outside wood storage. Kitchen, dining room and great room have hardwood floors. Sit on the deck on a quiet evening and enjoy the landscape and unobstructed mountain view. ML262042 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

52

Manufactured Homes

MFG HOME: Barrington 14’x66’, must be moved. Offer incl. carport plus shed. $6,995. 457-0950.

54

5000900

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

LOST: Silver bracelet, with intricate link pattern, between hospital and downtown P.A. on 12/31. 206-419-9417

51

Lots/ Acreage

‘G’ IS FOR GREAT BEGINNINGS Begin with this beautifully forested 9+ acres with a seasonal creek and beautiful old cedars. Share a homesite with wildlife and birds. Lovely level topography. Paved road frontage. $105,000. ML261574 Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

1 BR. W/D, W/S/G pd. No smoking, pet negotiable. Covered parking. $600 mo, $300 dep. 452-4220 Leave msg.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished $478. 2 Br. $514-541. 3 Br. $695. + fixed util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258. CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $575 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 EAST P.A.: 1 Br., W/ S/G paid, W/D, no pet/smoking. $475, $450 dep. 683-1012. P.A.: 1 Br. $475-$530. Some pets ok. Dwntown. 425-881-7267.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

62

Apartments Unfurnished

64

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. AIR FORCE BASIC TRAINING Solution: 10 letters

G R E C O V E R Y D S T S D O By Victor Barocas

DOWN 1 Pouches 2 This is one 3 A sister of Demeter 4 “Star Trek” measure 5 Whomever 6 Nearing the hour 7 Farm gathering 8 Pained interjection 9 As fresh as they come 10 Chatter 11 Seriously check out 12 Inning enders 13 Largest Scottish loch by volume 21 Composer of the 2005 opera “Our Town” 23 Word with man or maid 25 Texas dance 27 Many, informally 28 “__ to Be You” 29 E’ens’ counterparts 31 “Puppy Love” singer 32 Get ready for the prom, say 33 Frost product 34 Medical battery Houses

68

1/5/12

63

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 Exceed 21, in a way 39 The Crimea, e.g. 41 Car in a shaft 42 Where Christ stopped, in a Carlo Levi title 48 La Brea goo 50 One of six in a V-6 engine 51 “Dreams From My Father” memoirist

Commercial Space

CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no smoking. $650 mo., $650 deposit. 457-5352. P.A.: East side, quiet 2 Br., deck, carport. $675. 452-6611.

64

Houses

P.A.: 4 Br., 2 ba, with water view. $1,200, 1st, last, + $1,000 dep. 452-1153.

P.A.: Efficient 1 Br., carport, storage. $550 mo. 457-3614. P.A.: Great 1 Br., lots storage, no pets. $575 mo. 452-4671. PALO ALTO, SEQ: 1 Br. cabin, wdstve, W/D $550. 683-4307 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Almost new 3 Br., 3 bath numerous upgrades close to Discovery Trail, Carrie Blake Park, the marina and more. Call Marie. 253-394-3903 JACE REAL ESTATE

SEQ: 1 Br. 1 bath cottage. Backgrnd/ credit ck. 1st/last/ dep. $550. 477-8180

Blue Mtn Area - 2 Bd 2 ba on 5+ ac + garage, n/s Pets negotiable with dep. Avail now. 360-452-2988

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba. 2,600 sf, huge shop, near Wal-Mart, nice. $1,200. 681-2500.

DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $650. 360-681-0140 HAPPY VALLEY: 3 Br., 3 ba on 2 acres, fenced horse corrall, $1,200 mo. Torres Real Estate. Bob Torres. 360-477-9458.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 2 br 1 ba......$475 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 4 br 2 ba....$1000 HOUSES/APT SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825 H 3 br 2 ba......$900 H 2+ br 2 ba....$950 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1350

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com NEWER SEQUIM WATER VIEW HOUSE. 3BR, 2BA. One story. $1,100. Eileen JACE TRE Co 360-808-0338

SEQ: Nice lg, 2 Br., + office + sunroom, 2 ba, dbl gar. By park. $1,000. 707-478-5664

SEQUIM: Solmar, 3 Br., 2 ba, gar., new floors/kitchen. W/D, D/W. Pets negot. $875. 360-775-1414.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Female, 60 and older, kitchen privilege, 12 mi. west, near Joyce. $150 mo. 928-1090. ROOMMATE wanted, Hadlock area, $400, + util w/extras. $200 dep. 360-301-9521. SEQUIM: Private room and bath, $450 mo. includes utilities. 460-6936 WANTED: Mother-inlaw apt. for older adult with disabilities. Sequim area pref. 683-5460.

68

Commercial Space

EAST P.A.: Warehouse/workshop. 22x32 $250 ea. 457-9732 or 457-9527.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

C I M A O I T E S E A R A M U

www.wonderword.com

BUDOT

P.A.: 315 Columbus, 3 Br., 2 ba, lease. $1,050. 457-4966.

P.A.: Clean 3 Br. 2 ba., 2 car gar., wtr view. $1,050. 452-1016.

I T R U D I C E L C N P T R T

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WEST P.A.: 1215 S. C St. 1,200 sf. Drive by and see! 460-4379.

Duplexes

T S G M R N T A S C O S E O Y

GAOEM

P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, no pets/smoke. $600, 1st, last, dep. Available now. 417-5137.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

© 2012 Universal Uclick

C H A U A E A I L N A U E D T

A F G N N T L Y T C A T A E D

L E I H M E D N S I I C R E W

S N C T A E I E N L Y H E A L

C E L D N A H I I B E S T U C

T B E T A E N M E C A R E E R

O R A N K G S R D N A M M O C

L L I R D M I S S I O N D I A 1/5

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Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409.

WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $575 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

A E C D A N N B S L E T R A T

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: 40’ 5th wheel, 3 slide outs, W/S/G cable and Wifi included. $550. 457-9844, 460-4968

T E I C L A S S U O I F S S S

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

P.A.: 2 Br., no pets, no smoking. $700 plus dep. 457-3781.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

S U H T A E R T E R P K E B E

Aid, Airman, Bandages, Benefits, Career, Class, Command, Course, Cuts, Cyber, Defense, Dental, Dorm, Drill, Duty, Escape, Ethics, Fitness, Guidance, Handle, Heal, Intense, Leader, Learn, Military, Mission, Obstacle, Position, Rank, Recovery, Retreat, Salute, Security, Skill, Tactical, Tasks, Teach, Team, Technical, Test, Tough, Training, Weapons Yesterday’s Answer: Blackface

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $750. 808-4972.

P.A.: Quiet apt. in town, handicapped accessible, 1 Br., 1 ba, $500 mo., plus dep. 452-1153.

B5

Furniture

BED: Full size mattress and boxspring. Euro Top plush, like new, over $500 new. Sell for $350/obo. 681-3299 DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429 or 417-7685 MISC: Solid oak dining table with 2 leaves and 8 chairs, $450. Vintage Victorian vanity, $125. Oriental cabinet, $200. All in excellent condition. 808-0471 REDECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Victorian wall sconce lamps, $25 ea. Recliner chair, $50. Camel back sofa, brown/plumb tapestry, $150. Small vintage tole painted table, $25. Sewing machine in wood cabinet, $140. Two vintage upholstered side chairs, $50 ea. Wood kitchen table with 4 chairs, $45. Camel back love seat, red pattern, $45. Elegant sofa with exquisite woodwork, $500. Victorian tapestry print and frame, $40. Small stain glass table lamp, $15. These items would make great gifts! 460-0575.

72

Furniture

SOFA: 84”, two recliners, dk blue, good condition, $450/obo 360-477-4540 SOFA: Elegant sofa with exquisite carved trim and claw arms, burgundy and cream tapestry fabric, 66” long x 45” wide, excellent condition, paid $1,500 from upscale store. Selling for $500. 460-0575

73

General Merchandise

1948 International Harvester Cub. Restore project! Asking $800. Contact number 460-1817. CANOPY: Leer Fiberglass, insulated, red, sliding front cab window, sliding windows on sides, locking rear window/door with keys, 4 clamps included. Came off a red ‘97 Dodge Dakota Long Bed. $500/obo. 360-452-4460 lv msg. ELECTRIC BIKE: By “City Bike”. With charger, new condition. $800. 683-6813 ELECTRIC FIREPLACE Cherry wood color, 47.5” wide x 18” deep x 40” high. Great condition. Great use for a classy TV stand. $300. 460-0575. Estate Items For Sale. 40’s Duncan Phyfestyle dining table,2 leafs 6 chairs $325, 60’s Broyhill China Hutch $325, 40’s Kelvinator refrigerator $500, Antique Oak Roll Top desk $1,000/obo. Call 360-460-8092. FIREWOOD: $160/ cord. Delivered. P.A. Joyce. 461-9701. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality. $190. 461-6843 MISC: Classic formal dining room set, table with 3 leaves and pads, 6 chairs, 2 arms, $800/obo. Custom formal sofa, new condition, paid $3,500, sell $700/ obo. 206-999-7139.

1/5/12

53 Surrounded by 54 Tusked mammal 55 Alexei Karenin’s wife 56 English horn, for one 57 Lie alongside 59 Caspian Sea country 60 Rosso o bianco 61 Closes 64 Tuscan time period

73

General Merchandise

KIRBY: Kirby Centria vacuum. Excellent condition, heavy duty, all attachments including carpet cleaner. $400. 681-4861 MISC: Twin beds, 2 headboards, 2 frames, 2 box springs, 1 mattress, all $250/ obo. Giant cherry execuitve L shaped desk, matching lateral file cabinet, 4 drawers, paid $1,800, like new, sell $400/ obo. 206-999-7139. Motorized wheel chair for sale. Pronto M41, used less than 1/2 hr. Perfect condition, compact, easy to drive, tight turning radius, stable, six wheels, joystick, comfortable fold down seat, adjustable & fixed height arms. $2,000. Pt Hadlock. Pick-up only. 360-732-4097 cgohn@embarqmail.c om RAINIER YERT: 30’, 2008 Eagle Model, insulated, 6 windows, platform included. $14,000. Natalia 360-774-1445 SEWING MACHINE Montgomery Ward convertible bed sewing machine. Model UHT J 1414 in wood cabinet. Both excellent condition. Includes all parts and manual. Recently serviced. Used very little. $140. Susan 460-0575 SEWING MACHINE: Singer Featherweight. Good condition. Recently serviced. $400. 681-3225 TRAILERS: ‘10 20’ Cargo Mate encl. insul. trailer, extras, $4,000. ‘05 24’ Cargo Mate, insul., 5K axles, set up as contractor’s trailer, low miles, $5,200. Both lights & outlets. 452-8092 UTILITY TRAILER ‘03 Eagle, 6.5’x13’ deck with side boards, ramps, load on all sides, hauls 3 quads, new tires. $950. 360-640-0320 VACATION: For 2. 7 days includes cruise to Grand Bahama Islands, top vacation destination and a visit to Florida’s beautiful beaches. Complete itinerary available. $450 total. Call for details. 683-3384

73

FATINN

YOOTEC Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:

General Merchandise

Home Electronics

ASUS NOTEBOOK 17”, AMD dual core 1.8ghz, 3 gigs ram, Ati radeon HD 2600. $300. 477-4219. iPAD 2: 16GB, white color, compatible WiFi and blue tooth, original pkg, unopened from Apple. Model A1395. $475. 683-7072.

75

Musical

DRUM SET: Pearl Export, 5 piece, all hardware, cymbals and throne. $500. 457-7158 GUITAR: Fender, 12 string, dreadnought acoustic. $300 cash. 460-3986 VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648 Yamaha Clavinova Piano Mint. Private estate sale! Used 4 times comes with bench, manual, music book. Never needs tuning! Perfect gift for anyone. Paid $2,500 sell quick $750. Sequim! Delivery! 360-582-7893.

76

(Answers tomorrow) CRIMP TYRANT SIMPLY Jumbles: LLAMA Answer: The dog was content to sleep through all the festivities because he wasn’t a — PARTY ANIMAL

Yesterday’s

FIREWOOD: Dry. $200. 477-8832

74

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 The “u” sound in “circus” 6 Even if, for short 9 Ladle cousin 14 “Yond Cassius has __ and hungry look” 15 Water in Côte d’Ivoire 16 Dispute 17 Spicy Indian dish 18 One side of the GW Bridge 19 Preserves, in a way 20 Rotterdam, for one 22 Party person 24 Schnozzola 26 Tell it like it isn’t 27 TV’s Dr. House, e.g. 30 Enjoy a kiddie pool 32 Many a GI 35 Plains native 36 “... from my snow-white pen the __-coloured ink”: Shak. 38 Bender 40 With “The,” classic novel, each of whose major characters is hiding in a row of this puzzle 43 Thrift, briefly 44 Crack 45 Snug retreat 46 Super Bowl highlights, for many 47 Luncheon follower? 49 Takes a position 51 Eggs, biologically 52 Biden’s 2008 counterpart 54 Boxer from California 58 Letter 62 __ a time 63 One in an unhappy chorus 65 Shroud city 66 Wind: Pref. 67 Coffee holder 68 ’30s Chan portrayer 69 Control tower tracker 70 Game for it? 71 Some iPods

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

Sporting Goods

GUNS: 1981 Colt 1911 Shooting Ace, 22 cal., like new, $1,500. 1971 Colt single action Frontier Scout revolver, like new, $500. 928-3015

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

INDOOR Sale: Fri., 93 p.m., 105 N. Francis. Salon furniture, multi-purpose chairs, driers with chairs, misc. knickknacks, crafts and other items.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

AIRPORT CAFE CLOSE-OUT SALE Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m. Kitchen equipment & supplies, catering and gift shop items at move-out prices. Fairchild Aiport, P.A. 360-477-1650

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 7 am- 2 p.m. 212 Secor Road off River Road. Lots of hand tools, fishing equipment, furniture, housewares, medium size chest freezer and lots of misc.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: LOG SPLITTER. 457-6512 Leave message. WANTED: PARAKEET MALE Wanted To Buy or Trade. Pref. courtly older gent who has a way w/the ladies. Can trade young Cobalt male 'keet or pay cash. 457-8385 leave message for Marybeth

LUGER: American Eagle Luger. Mfg. by Mauser Obendorf. 95% condition, with (2) orig. magazines and hardshell leather flap holster. $950/ obo. 452-4158 leave message. POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746. Sig Sauer P229 9mm pistol for sale. Night sights. 5 magazines (3-15rd, 2-10rd) excellent condition, 2 handles (original and finger grip) price $675 well below book. Cash, no credit cards. Call 360-809-0164 WANTED: Guns. One or whole collection. New and old, but older the better. Call 452-1016, 683-9899

82

BLUE ROTT: Rottweiler/Australian Shepherd. (1) female left, 9 weeks, 1st shot given. Loyal loving family dog. $200 or trade for cord dry wood. Jenny at 461-6851

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

AKC LABRADOR PUPPIES. 8 week old female black lab pups. Great family pets or hunters! $600 to approved homes. These pups are beautiful and have tons of personality! Pics online @ PDN. $600. 360-808-5635.

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight load. $2,000. 360-808-2295

CUTE KITTENS! $10 each. Rare orange females and one white male. 460-1222 FREE: To good home. Chihuahua, older female. 452-3633 . LABRADOODLES Black, 1st generation, 4 males, born Oct. 1st shots, wormed, very sweet. $400. 360-259-6347

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

PUPPIES: Adoarable loving Chiweenies, great mix, 4 females, all tan and white. $100. 360-775-6171.

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

PUPPIES: Blue/Red Heelers, purebred, no papers. 5 weeks old. $100 each. 360-796-4236 or 360-821-1484 PUPPIES: Male Biewer Yorkie pups, 1 teacup, 1 average size, 12 wks. old, vaccinations current, wormed, non shedding, dew claws removed, 1st vet visit, genetic health guaranteed for one year. Teacup, $2,350. average size, $1,250. 452-9650 PUPPIES: White fluff ball American Eskimos. $400/obo 461-3254 Purebred AKC Golden Retriever puppies! Best family dogs! 4 adorable boys left. Only $500. First shots and de-wormed. Serious inquiries only. Call 360-4779214 for more info.

83 81 82 83 84 85

Pets

Farm Animals

GRASS HAY: $4.50 bale. 452-8713 or 808-1842 HAY: Good quality grass hay. $5.50 bale. 461-5804. HAY: Quality grass hay, $5 bale. 808-1052

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

EXCAVATOR: Runs great! $8000. Call 360-928-0273 for details.

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 9, eves. Capt. Sanders. 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us BAYLINER: ‘87 3450 Tri-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 683-5099. BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506. CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 1973 Larson 16’ Shark, open bow. New cushion and floor board, with Calkins roller trailer. $950/obo. 1984 Johnson 25 hp short shaft, good cond., $650/obo. 461-7979. DURABOAT: ‘08 14’ aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, trailer. $1,500. 360-580-1741 GLASPLY: 21’ boat and trailer, BMW B220 Inboard, brand new Honda 15 hp 4 stroke kicker. $10,000 or make offer. 452-4338.


B6

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

93

Marine

94

Classified 94

Motorcycles

95

Motorcycles

DUROBOAT: 12’. 15 and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calkins trailer. $1,500. 683-6748. MOTOR: 25 hp Evinrude long shaft, electric start, runs good. $900. 681-5229. SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 360-504-2623 SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347.

HONDA: ‘05 CR85R. Low hours, never raced. $1,500/trade. 360-460-6148

QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096.

94

HONDA: ‘83 Ascot. $1,500. 360-963-2659

YAMAHA: ‘04 Raptor 660 limited edition, black. Brand new clutch, carrier baring in back axel, extra header and pipe. aluminum wheels and meaty tires. this a great looking quad not to mention fast. I’m asking $2,800. Great price. 360-670-6366

Motorcycles

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519. HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $10,900 452-2275 HONDA: ‘01 XR50R. Low hr, helmet $800 452-9194, 452-6160 HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. 7K miles. $4,700. 504-2599.

HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. $1,200. 360-963-2659 HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. Runs good, looks fair. $745. 683-9071

YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165.

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627.

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, great storage. $20,000. 477-7957 5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/ obo. 460-9556. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Brave. Low mi., always garaged, must see/ Vortec 8.1, $35,000. 683-4912 MOTORHOME: ‘92 32’ Southwind, Chevy 454 with Banks Power Pack, 7KW gen, driver’s side door, replaced refer cooling unit, 2 A/C units. In exc. cond., garaged. $12,500. 681-0144. TRAILER: ‘03 29’ Terry. Dbl door, front Br., large slide, great for living or pulling. $9,200. 457-9038

HONDA: ‘94 XLR. 600 cc, hardly used, good cond. $1,600. 452-5412

96

Recreational Vehicles

DODGE: ‘68 cabover camper, good cond., sleeps 5. $1,900. 360-797-1508 TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Very nice, Porta-Potty, micro. $9,500. 683-5871. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $5,900. 681-7381

29’

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

Parts/ Accessories

CHEV: ‘70 Body parts. 2 door. Hood, L.F. fender, bumper, window assembly including glass. $450/obo. Excellent condition. No rust. 457-9650.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘01 SILVERADO 1500 EXT CAB Z71 4X4 PICKUP 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto, alloy wheels, tow package, bedliner, exhaust, 4 opening doors, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $11,444! Great running truck! Save a bundle with our low Gray Motors pricing! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘01 SILVERADO LT K2500 HD CREW CAB SB 4X4 8.1 liter (502 ci) Vortec V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Light tan leather interior in great shape! Dual power seats, OnStar, CD, rear air, 3rd seat, side airbags, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, roof rack, tow, running boards, premium alloys! Real nice, very well optioned Yukon at our no haggle price of only $6,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘98 TAHOE LT 4X4 SPORT UTILITY 5.7 liter (530) Vortec V8, auto, alloy wheels, BFG all-terrain tires, running boards, tow package, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seating, cruise, tilt, air with rear air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $7,510! Clean inside and out! Last of the 350 Vortec! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $7,950. 360-477-6969

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $3,900. 460-8155.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

CHEV: ‘91 K5 Blazer. 93k, Immaculate. Loaded, ALL original, 350FI, Auto, 4x4, Adult Owned, non smoker, never off roaded. Build sheet, owner's and shop manuals. Runs and Drives Like New. $10,750/obo. 360-452-7439

SHOP LOCAL

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

peninsula dailynews.com

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263

YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st $3,100 cash. Street/Trail. 670-2562

TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

PAINTING

REPAIR

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice

Window Washing

FOX PAINTING

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Pressure Washing

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

B&B Sharpening & Repair

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 WANTED: Award travel trailer. 683-8810

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

21560600

333A E. 1st St. • PA

461-4609

452-9355

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

(360) 683-8332

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

COLUMC*955KD

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Home & Bus.

360-681-7878

Lena Washke

#BAURLH*023DJ

Accounting Services, Inc.

TREE SERVICE

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

SE EMM P PER ER F I T R E EE E SE ER R VIC VIC E Licensed – Bonded – Insured

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

1C563910

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR –

1C564613

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

river1966@msn.com Lic# DELUNE*933QT

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 1C563942

EXCAVATING

360/460•9824

1C563934

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com LIC

MOLE/PRUNING

ORGAN/RADIO REPAIR Thor’s Organ Repair

At The Historic Dungeness Schoolhouse 2781 Towne Road, Sequim

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right Glen Spear, Owner

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

SPECIALIZING IN TREES FREE S ATE ESTIM

Winter! Time to Prune Fruit Trees Ornamental Trees Shrubbery

Licensed • Insured

360-460-6176 Remodels Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete

Callahans Landscape Maintenance

(360) 461-2788

Done Right Home Repair Handicap Access Painting

TREE SERVICE

Lic#DONERRH943NA

(360) 460-0518

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Call now for your appt. 17 yrs. experience

HOME REPAIR

1C564581

830-741-1677 Or Register Online www.translationmarks.com

360 417-2908

PRUNING

1C564569

Enjoy Interactive Sessions! Improve Your Conversation Skills, Vocabulary And Perfect Pronunciation In Spanish

Radios Repaired Right Since 1973. Repairs & Restorations Free Estimates F.C.C. Licensed

#JKDIRKD942NG

21565835

Ongoing Conversation Classes

683-8328 PA & PT

Thor’s Antique Radio 1C5141426

Tues & Thurs 5:00 pm To 7:00 pm & 7:00 pm To 9:00 pm

Expert Pruning 195133545

Professional Instruction For Adults & Teenagers

Mole Control

24 Years Experience ALL MAKES

1C562762

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Small Jobs A Specialty

Contr#KENNER1951P8

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 23 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

DIRT WORK

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Full 6 Month Warranty

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

1C564598

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

Classes Start Tuesday January 3, 2012

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

Paul Baur, owner

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

APPLIANCES

SPANISH CLASSES

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

24 yrs. experience

(360) 477-1805

aleach1066@gmail.com 360.612.2062 - Sequim

AA

Reg#FINIST*932D0

Baur Log Homes

21566943

CCLEACHC*892QQ

1C5141421

Custom Building • Remodeling Site Work Licensed, Bonded & Insured

1C562759

LEACH CONTRACTING

Free Estimates Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

REPAIR/REMODEL

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

1C562743

CONTRACTING

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

LOG HOMES

86313195

JPSHAHS92BE

115108502

John Pruss 360 808-6844

Call NOW To Advertise

tmccurdy@olypen.com

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

AIR DUCT CLEANING

PAINTING

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

B7

2001 PONTIAC MONTANA MINIVAN

2011 HONDA CR-Z EX HATCHBACK

1997 FORD F250 SUPERCAB HD LB

2001 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LS SPORT

3.4L V6, AUTO, DUAL SLIDING DOORS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, REAR BUCKET SEATS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, ONSTAR, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS. KBB OF $6,350! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! LOW MILES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

1.5L I-VTEC 4 CYL W/ HYBRID ASSIST, VARIABLE TRANS W/ PADDLE SHIFTERS, 3-MODE DRIVE SYS, ALLOYS, KEYLESS ENTRY/ALARM, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/MP3 W/NAVI, STEERING WHL CTRLS, FRT & SIDE AIRBAGS. KBB OF $22,900! ONLY 7,500 MILES! LIKE-NEW INSIDE & OUT! STILL UNDER FACTORY WARR! GREAT FUEL MILEAGE WITHOUT SACRIFICING FUN! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

7.5L V8, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES, SIDE STEPS, TOW PKG, MATCHING CANOPY, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, DUAL FUEL TANKS, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, BACKUP CAMERA, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CLARION CD PLAYER, IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! SENIOR OWNED! NONE NICER! BRAND NEW TIRES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

5.3L VORTEC V8, AUTO, ALLOYS, RUNNING BOARDS, ROOF RACK, TOW PKG, TRAILER BRAKE CTRL, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEATS, 3RD ROW SEATING, CRUISE, TILT, AC, REAR AIR, CD, DUAL FRONT AIRBAGS. KBB OF $10,447! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ROOM FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

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www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2004 FORD F350 XLT SUPERDUTY CREW CAB SB 2WD

1997 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCAB SB 4X4

2002 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT LARAMIE QUADCAB LB 4X4

2000 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY LTD.

$8,500 LESS THAN KBB! POWERSTROKE TURBO DIESEL V8, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN LIKE-NEW COND W/BLACK CLOTH IN LIKE-NEW COND! DUAL PWR SEATS, 6 DISC, SLIDER, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, RUNNING BOARDS, TINT, BANKS UPGRADES, 3” LIFT, 17” CHROME WHLS W/ALMOST NEW GOODYEAR MTR RUBBER! VERY NICE TRUCK @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.6L TRITON V8, 5 SPD MAN, LOADED! MAROON IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, KENWOOD CD W/AUX, CRUISE, TILT, TOW PKG, PRIV GLASS, RUNNING BOARDS, FACT. WHLS W/80% SCHWAB RUBBER! VERY WELL-KEPT FORD @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

5.9L MAGNUM V8, AUTO, LOADED! 2-TONE MAROON/SILVER IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR SEAT, CD/CASS, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, SLIDER, SPRAYIN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, ALLOYS W/80% RUBBER! REAL NICE, WELL-KEPT RAM @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

113K ORIG MILES! 3.8L V6, AUTO, LOADED! GOLD MET IN GREAT COND W/ GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEATS, CD/CASS W/INFINITY SOUND, WOOD TRIM, CRUISE, TILT, REAR AC, QUADS, 3RD SEAT, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, RUNNING BOARDS, TRAC CTRL, DUAL CLIM, PREM ALLOYS W/ 70% RUBBER! VERY NICE T&C @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

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Carpenter Auto Center

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87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

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6 SPD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, ELEC TRAC CTRL, LEATHER W/HTD SEATS, PWR SUNROOF, PREM ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#151869

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91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to cla ssify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In considerat ion of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of on e make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agenc y has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


B8

ClassifiedAutomotive

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Vibration comes and goes Dear Doctor: I own a 2005 Honda Civic. I’ve been experiencing an intermittent vibration that comes up from the gas pedal through the steering wheel that only occurs at 40 to 45 mph. When I take my foot off the gas or accelerate above 45 mph, the vibration stops. What’s causing this problem and how do I fix it? Tee Dear Tee: I get a lot of these complaints from owners of front-wheel-drive vehicles. The most common problem is a worn inner C/V joint. Unlike a faulty outer C/V joint that emits a clicking sound when turning, the inner C/V joint gives a vibration under acceleration. Have your technician remove both front axles and take apart the inner joints for inspection. A good quality aftermarket — rebuilt or new — replacement axle costs $95 to $130, plus installation at $125 per side on average.

Battery good? Dear Doctor: I own a 1995 BMW 318ic convertible. I recently had a deadstarting issue in which a

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘05 Colorado Ext Cab. 61,600 miles with Z71, Toyo A/t tires, bed liner, tool box, running boards. Interior options include Cruise, A/C, Tilt, power windows and doors, cd/mp3 player. $12,800. Call 460-3586 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $5,500. 683-4830. DODGE ‘98 RAM 1500 SHORTBED 4X4 PICKUP 5.9 liter (360) V8, auto, aftermarket dual exhaust, alloy wheels, good rubber, running boards, bedliner, tool box, tow package, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 188,000 miles! Clean inside and out! Custom 2 tone paint! Great sound! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘07 Durango. White, gray leather int., 87K, power, exc. cond., seats 8. $15,500. 460-6155. FORD ‘97 EXPLORER XLT 4X4 112K original miles! 4.o liter V6, rare 5 speed manual. Dark red metallic exterior in great shape! Gray cloth interior in great condition! Power windows, door locks, mirrors, Kenwood CD, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, roof rack, alloys. Great little 4x4 SUV at our no haggle price of only $3,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, new tires/battery. $8,000/obo. 452-2225 FORD: ‘00 Ranger XLT. 4x4 Off Road edition, 4.0 V6, 160K, extended cab, auto, tow, bedliner, clean. $5,950. 457-4363.

FORD: ‘02 Ranger Edge. 58k, 4X4, bed liner, step side, tonneau cover, 6CD player, gauges, Air conditioning, New tires. $8,000. 452-9856 FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, new Nokian tires, dark green/tan, very nice. $12,500. Curt at 460-8997.

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $3,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649

97

over 50 milliamps will be a problem. The technician will hook second Junior up an amp meter and let batthe car sit for an hour, then Damato Bosch tery remove one fuse at a time replaced a and monitor the current year-old one draw until the circuit that that would is causing the problem is not hold a located. charge. Possible problems My preinclude any circuit that has vious Exide power with the ignition key battery out of the ignition, such as lasted seven courtesy lights, power door years. locks, power seats; even the Simulta- alternator can cause excessive draw. neously, a second rebuilt alternator replaced a failed one that was installed three Paying for nothing weeks earlier. Dear Doctor: A good I do not use the car as friend’s car was not runmy daily driver, and after ning, and the fuel pump two weeks sitting the bathad recently been replaced. tery is dead, requiring a The mechanic said the recharge to get it going. code was still the fuel What can you advise? pump, so he replaced it. Mike (Didn’t help.) Dear Mike: The first He then said it was a step is to check the battery problem with the distributo make sure it is good. I tor, which was replaced. have seen a lot of brand (Again, no help.) new batteries that are borHis mechanic charged derline at best. for both repairs, saying it You want to buy the bat- would be too costly to tery that has the most remove and try to return cranking amps available for parts. this car. When the mechanic Second, you need to have makes repair decisions and a technician check for para- they don’t work, should the customer have to pay anysitic draw. A current draw

THE AUTO DOC

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘90 Bronco Eddie Bauer. EFI 5.8, OD, air, CD, clean, straight, runs excel. $2,900. 808-0153.

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘68 1/2 ton. Rebuilt 300 ci, 6 cyl, 4 sp man., clear title with parts truck. $1,500. 808-2563.

FORD: ‘96 F-350. 4x4 crew cab. White, long bed, 7.3 diesel. $4,800. 460-4986 or 460-4982 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323. GMC ‘01 YUKON XL SLT K2500 WITH AUTORIDE 8.1 liter (502 ci) Vortec V8, auto, loaded! White exterior in great condition! Light tan leather interior in great shape! Dual power seats, OnStar, CD, rear air, 3rd seat, side airbags, cruise, tilt, privacy glass, roof rack, tow, running boards, premium alloys! Real nice, very well optioned Yukon at our no haggle price of only $6,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 GMC: ‘84 Jimmy 4x4. $500. 460-9776. GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SUV. Rebuilt 4.3 Vortec engine, fully loaded, 181K, good condition. $3,000/obo. 477-4838 JEEP: ‘98 Wrangler Sport. 89K hwy. mi. $7,900. 360-580-1741 NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 TOYOTA: ‘79 Land Cruiser. Mil-spec inline 6, 67K, barn doors w/jump seats. $5,700. 670-1146. TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner 4x4. As is. $1,800. 477-0577. TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. 452-9693

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘84 F250. Turbo diesel, utility bed, rack. $4,500, won’t last. 417-1587. FORD: ‘84 pickup. Auto, 6 cyl., 96K. $1,500. 460-0262 or 681-0490. FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘91 E350 com’l vehicle. 18’ enclosed carpeted box, Tommy lift, roll up rear door, side man door, strong 7.3 diesel, new tranny and dif, low hwy. mi., newer white paint. $6,500/ obo. 460-0985 days. FORD: ‘92 E250 van. Ladder rack, interior racks, good runner. $1,800. 460-9257. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. FORD: ‘95 F350 Club Wagon Chateau. 135,000 miles, clean, sharp. $4,895. Call 457-8388 before 7 p.m. GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. JEEP: 75 DJ5 Mail Jeep. $600. 461-2021 PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero. 91K miles, well taken care of. Great Christmas gift! Collector’s item! Good mpg! $3,000. 775-9754

99

Cars

‘51 FORDS: ‘51 Ford 4 door complete, needs restoration, $3,000. ‘51 Ford 2 door complete, needs restoration, $2,000. 452-8092. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093.

CHEV ‘95 C2500 LONG BED 2WD 7.4 liter V8 engine, auto, tow package, trailer brake controller, bed mat, power door locks and windows, air, cruise, cassette, vinyl floor, cloth seat. Only 83,000 miles! Great condition inside and out! Great all-around truck! Ready to work and priced to sell! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,595 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377.

CHEV: ‘69 pickup. 6 cyl., runs great! Very dependable wood hauler. $600/obo. 683-0130, 683-7847

DODGE: ‘02 Intrepid SE. 4 door auto, 1 owner, 21,300 original mi., new tabs. $3,900. 477-6259.

CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K Onan generator, 3 air tanks, 110 outlets, etc. $3,980. 360-302-5027

DODGE: ‘07 Caravan Town & County LX. Low mi., excellent condition. $10,600 firm. 457-8129.

CHEV: ‘95 Lumina minivan. V6, 7 pass. $2,000. 457-1053. CHRYSLER: ‘05 Town and Country LTD. 1 owner, great cond. 73,200 miles. $10,500. 683-1957.

CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374. CHRYSLER: ‘04 Crossfire, 80K, $12,000. 452-8092. COLLECTORS: Olds Cutlass 442 1986, sharp lines, new int. $5,500. 683-8332.

DURABOAT: ’96 14’ 20 hp Merc low hrs. $3,200. 452-8092. FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. 360-808-1242. FORD: ‘28 2 dr sedan, restored in 1980, $15,000. 452-8092.

99

Cars

FORD: ‘54 F7, 283, restored, 2x4 spd, $3,500. 452-8092. FORD: ‘92 Escort station wagon. Looks new, 102K miles and carefully maintained. $1,800. 683-4467. FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX convertible. 5.0 auto, 71K mi., excellent condition. $3,800. 928-0213.

99

HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. $5,500. 452-9693, 461-6506 HONDA: ‘91 Station Wagon. 92K miles, I4 DOHC, auto, A/C, exc. cond., white ext., tow bar. $3,200. 681-0144 HONDA: ‘94 Del Sol. 82K orig. mi., black, auto, excellent cond. $4,000. 457-1050. HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $16,600. 477-3191. JAGUAR: ‘90 XJS Coupe. Black, tan int., only 42K mi., car is like brand new in/out, mechanically. $11,750 Call John, Euro Auto Works 683-3876. KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040 MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606. MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 PONTIAC: ‘98 Sunfire. Auto, 4 dr, clean, well maintained, red, 26-30 mpg. $2,750/ obo. 360-808-5800. VW ‘02 PASSAT GLS 1.8T SEDAN 90K original miles! 1.8 liter DOHC turbo 4 cylinder, tip-tronic auto! Loaded! Gray metallic exterior in fantastic condition! Black leather interior in excellent condition! Moon roof, CD/cassette w/premium sound, dual heated seats, cruise, tilt/telescoping, side airbags, trac, alloys, Thule roof rack! Very good deal on a very clean Passat at our no haggle price of only $7,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Cars

JAGUAR: XJS-V12. Excellent cond., $9,600. 775-5827. STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed flat head 6 cylinder engine, all original, excellent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810.

101 FORD: ‘92 Taurus GL. V6, 139,000 miles. Nearly new tires and new battery. Good cond. $1,700/obo. Call 360-808-2523. FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858

thing? Jack Dear Jack: The car owner should not pay for any repair that does not correct the problem unless there were multiple part failures. Just because there’s a fault code for a circuit or part does not mean the part is bad. The mechanic who worked on the car can send the parts in question back to the supplier; it happens often in the automotive business. The owner should take the car to a shop with an ASE-certified technician who uses information systems companies, such as Alldata and Identifix. Without either of these professional companies, we technicians cannot make the repair. We need the information and the diagnostic paths to check the faults in vehicles to make the correct repairs.

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘80 Chevette. $500. 460-7131. SATURN: ‘97 SC. Well-maintained 5 spd. 27-37 mpg. Cruise control. Auto locks. 143,740K $2,500. 360-452-6615 TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Case No.: 11-4-00333-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF CLAUDE W. CREELMAN, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita¬tions, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: December 29, 2011 ROBIN A. CREELMAN Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452 3323 No. 11-2-00778-5 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CAROL C. SMITH; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON E. SMITH; GEORGE D. SMITH; MARK SMITH; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICE; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Carol C. Smith; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Gordon E. Smith; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after January 5, 2012, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: LOT 4 OF SHORT PLAT RECORDED MARCH 21, 1985 IN VOLUME 15 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 13, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 564348, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, BEING A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 63 Majesty Way, Port Angeles, WA 98362. DATED this 5th day of January, 2012. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/ Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 10-2-01074-5 Sheriff’s No.11001193 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, VS UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED, BENEFICIAL WASHINGTON INC. DBA BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO. OF WASHINGTON; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint; TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 273 FLEMING DRIVE SEQUIM, WA 98382 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 9:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 02/03/2012 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $53,777.38 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED December 16, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION LOT 37, BLOCK “H”, SECOND PLAT OF SUNSHINE ACRES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 6 OF PLATS, PAGE 19, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM,, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 10-2-01074-5 Sheriff’s No.11001193 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, VS UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED, BENEFICIAL WASHINGTON INC. DBA BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO. OF WASHINGTON INC; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint; TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED A writ of execution has been issued in the above-captioned case, directed to the sheriff of Clallam County, commanding the sheriff as follows: FROM: THE CLALLAM COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT CLERK’S OFFICE TO: THE SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON On November 7, 2011, a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure (“Judgment”) was entered in favor of Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP (“Plaintiff”) against In Rem. The Judgment forecloses the interests of all the Defendants in and to the following described property (“Property”) commonly known as 273 Fleming Drive, Sequim, WA 98382 for the total sum of $53,777.38 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from November 7, 2011. The Property situated in Clallam County, State of Washington, is legally described as: LOT 37, BLOCK “H”, SECOND PLAT OF SUNSHINE ACRES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 6 OF PLATS, PAGE 19, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. THEREFORE, pursuant to RCW 61.12.060, and in the name of the State of Washington, you are hereby commanded to sell the Property, or so much thereof as may be necessary, in order to satisfy the Judgment, including post-judgment interest and costs. MAKE RETURN HEREOF within sixty days of the date indicated below, showing you have executed the same. Pursuant to RCW 6.21.050(2), the Sheriff may adjourn the foreclosure sale from time to time, not exceeding thirty days beyond the last date at which this Writ is made returnable, with the consent of the plaintiff endorsed upon this Writ or by a contemporaneous writing. WITNESS, the Honorable GEORGE L. WOOD Judge of the Superior Court and the seal of said Court, affixed this 6th day of December 2011, at Port Angeles, Washington. By: Barbara Christensen, Superior Court Clerk By: Bonnie Moyer, Deputy Clerk Superior Court Clerk Clallam County Court House 223 E 4th St., Suite 9 Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 Presented by: Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.S. The sale date has been set for 9:00 A.M. on Friday, 02/03/2012, in the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, inside the entrance located at 223 E. 4th Street, Port Angeles, Washington. YOU MAY HAVE A RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY from the sale under statutes of this state, including section 6.13.010, 6.13.030 and 6.13.040 of the Revised Code of Washington, in the manner described in those statutes. DATED December 16, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 Pub: Dec. 23, 29, 2011, Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012

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