Page 1

Cure for cabin fever

Thursday Cloudy; lighter rain, possible dry periods B8

Live music prescribed if you’ve been shut in A6

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

50 cents

January 19, 2012

Streets covered, emptied by snow Problems are few as most stay home BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The streets of Port Townsend were deserted Wednesday morning as a CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS winter storm dumped 4 inches of new snow on the Lawrence Street is deserted Wednesday morning as most drivers opted to stay home. downtown area and brought the city to a crawl. Spokespeople for several East Jefferson County government agencies said the weather didn’t cause many problems because a majority of people just stayed home. “A lot of people made the decision to stay home today, which is a good thing for us because we didn’t have a lot of cars piling up,� said Port Townsend Operations Manager John Merchant. “We just wanted to keep things moving for the people who are out there.� Wednesday’s storm was the second — and strongest — to sweep across the North Olympic Peninsula this week. A weaker system will move onshore today with a chance of more lowland snow, said Brent Bower, a hydrologist with the National Weather Service in Seattle. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Rain is expected to develop on the Peninsula on Friday as high temperatures climb into the mid-40s. Public schools and local and state offices across the North Brinnon, Chimacum Olympic Peninsula were closed During Wednesday’s storm, Brinnon and ChimaWednesday, and most meetings cum received the largest amount of new overnight and events were canceled because snow in East Jefferson County, both reporting 5 of severe weather. L ONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS inches to the Community Collaborative Rain, Snow The Clallam County CourtDarrell Gaydeski, right, owner of D&H Enterprises of Forks, goes over and Hail Network. house at 223 E. Fourth St., Port Weather spotters reported 3 to 5 inches of new tree-removal procedures with Marcia Bingham’s neighbors Jack Tuttle, in Angeles, is expected to reopen snow in Port Townsend and about 2 to 4 inches in the checkered shirt, and Lowell McQuoid. today after being closed WednesHood Canal area, said Bower. day. Reports of 3 inches of new snow for Port Ludlow The Jefferson County Courtand 4.2 inches in Port Hadlock were made to the house opened at 10 a.m. WednesWeather Service. day, though both District Court Total accumulations after the week’s storms on ting at her home computer Wednesday and Superior Court were closed. the North Olympic Peninsula varied widely from BY TOM CALLIS morning when a 150-foot spruce tree fell For updates, visit www.co.jefferson. place to place with melting, evaporation and wind PENINSULA DAILY NEWS wa.us. onto her roof about 15 feet away. drifts. FORKS — The winter wonderland proAll Peninsula College campuses The trunk rested on top of the house, Port Townsend, Brinnon, Port Ludlow, Chimacum vided by this week’s snowstorm proved about six miles north of Forks, with were closed Wednesday. For inforand Port Hadlock had between 3 to 6 inches of total dangerous for one Forks-area resident. branches puncturing the ceiling and walls. mation today, visit www.pc.ctc.edu. accumulation. Marcia Bingham, executive director of TURN TO SNOW/A4 the Forks Chamber of Commerce, was sitTURN TO TREE/A4 TURN TO CANCEL/A4

Storm whites out most agendas

Tree crashes onto Forks house

Port Townsend slips to fifth place in cool town contest BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Snowstorms may have cooled Port Townsend considerably this week, but local boosters say that the town’s “cool� is not a matter of its temperature. They hope the town can earn the distinction of being the coolest small town in America in the Budget Travel magazine’s online contest going on now. For the second consecutive year, Port Townsend is a finalist in the contest, in which towns

with a populations of fewer than 10,000 compete for a bragging rights distinction that touts their overall hip demeanor. And for the second consecutive year, online votes — which will be accepted until the end of the month — are lagging after a strong beginning. Port Townsend — which posted a lackluster 13th place finish in 2011 — had quickly risen to fourth place after the contest began. By Wednesday afternoon, Port Townsend had fallen to fifth place with just 6.4 percent of the vote.

Port Townsend is the only Pacific Northwest town in the running. With a population of 9,136, it is also the largest in the top 10 chosen by a panel of judges from 647 online nominations of towns. Two of the traits that pushed Port Townsend to the top of the pack were its Victorian architecture and its proximity to wilderCHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS ness areas, according to magazine Unique small businesses like the Undertown make Port spokesman Ryan Murphy. Townsend one of the coolest small towns. Taking Those leading the contest now advantage of the atmosphere for a job-sharing exercise are from opposite coasts.

are Khu Larb Thai owner Rosie Itti, left, and Port

TURN

TO

COOL/A4 Townsend High School sophomore Pearl McRae.

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

6JCPM[QWHQTXQVKPIWU$GUV2NCEGVQ$CPMHQT[GCTU

)LUVW)HGHUDOZDVYRWHG%HVW3ODFHWR%DQNDQG%HVW&XVWRPHU6 R %DQN DQ HUYLFHLQ3HQQLQVXOD 'DLO\1HZVc%HVWRIWKH3HQLQVXODdSROO

/GODGT(&+%

QWTHKTUVHGF QWTHKTUVHGFEQO

195131520

Your Business Busine B Bank...

96th year, 17th issue — 2 sections, 18 pages

BUSINESS A10 CLASSIFIED B4 COMICS B3 COMMENTARY/LETTERS A9 B3 DEAR ABBY DEATHS A8 MOVIES B8 NATION/WORLD A3 PENINSULA POLL A2

PUZZLES/GAMES A7, B5 SPORTS B1 3RD AGE A7 WEATHER B8


A2

UpFront

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Judge: Lohan doing well on probation LINDSAY LOHAN RECEIVED her second favorable probation report in a row and a judge told the actress that she appears to be on track to complete a strict program by the end of March. Lohan appeared in court for less than five minutes Tuesday to update the judge on Lohan her progress in completing strict probation terms that were imposed in November after a series of missteps by the actress. By all accounts, the rigid program has benefited Lohan, with Superior Court Judge Stephanie Sautner telling Lohan that she received favorable reports from probation officials and her community service program. Lohan is doing mandatory cleanup duty at the county morgue and attend-

ing frequent psychotherapy sessions, with Sautner requiring Lohan to appear in court monthly for updates. “Just keep doing what you’re doing, you appear to be doing it well,” Sautner told Lohan. The “Mean Girls” star will have to work at the morgue 15 times before she returns to court Feb. 22. Sautner said Lohan appears to be on track to complete morgue duty and court-mandated therapy by March 29, just shy of five years after the actress’ problems began with a drunken driving arrest Memorial Day weekend in 2007. After that, she will probably be placed on informal probation that won’t require court appearances.

Diabetes team-up Celebrity chef and Food Network star Paula Deen is teaming with drug maker Novo Nordisk to launch a program that aims to help people live with Type 2 diabetes and promote a Novo diabetes drug. The program is called “Diabetes in a New Light”

and offers tips on food preparation, stress management and working with doctors on a Deen treatment plan. Recipes and tips can be found at www.Diabetesinanew light.com. Deen, a paid spokeswoman for Novo Nordisk, said she was diagnosed three years ago but kept quiet about her condition until she had advice to offer the public. “I wanted to bring something to the table when I came forward,” she said Tuesday during an appearance on NBC’s “Today” show. “I’ve always been one to think that I bring hope.” When asked if the highfat, high-caloric recipes she champions can lead to diabetes, she hedged. “That is part of the puzzle,” she said but mentioned other factors: genetics, lifestyle, stress and age. “On my show I share with you all these yummy, fattening recipes, but I tell people, ‘in moderation,’” she added. “I’ve always eaten in moderation.”

Passings Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■ See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you have a valid passport? Yes

56.5%

No

43.5%

Total votes cast: 1,329 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

JIMMY CASTOR, 71, a New York funk and soul saxophonist, singer and songwriter whose tune “It’s Just Begun” morphed over 40 years into an anthem for generations of hip-hoppers and mainstream musical acts, died of apparent heart failure in a Las Vegas hospital, family members said Tuesday. Mr. Castor was hospitalized in November after suffering a heart attack, and underwent quadruple bypass surgery. He died Monday at Saint Rose Dominican Hospital, said his son, Jimmy Castor Jr. Mr. Castor’s music, including another 1972 hit, “Troglodyte,” spoke for itself thousands of times in riffs and samples by groups like N.W.A., the 2 Live Crew, Kanye West, Ice Cube and Mos Def, as well as acts such as the Spice Girls, Christina Aguilera and Madonna. His son told The Associated Press he’s seen instant recognition hundreds of times at the first sax chords of “It’s Just Begun” — even before the lyrics begin. (“Watch me now. Feel the groove. Into something.

Gonna make you move.”) “No matter what country you’re in, no matter what language you speak, everyone knows it,” Castor said in Las Vegas.

_________

U.S. House seat until losing a primary race in 1982 after the boundaries of his district were redrawn. He then spent six years at the State Department, rising to the post of undersecretary for national security affairs, before President George H. W. Bush picked him in 1989 to head of the Department of Veterans Affairs, which had just been elevated to Cabinet status. His three-year tenure proved rocky. The Veterans of Foreign Wars, for instance, passed a resolution calling for his resignation. The group’s commander accused Mr. Derwinski of displaying “contempt” for veterans. He was also booed by members of the American Legion at an event. The issues that triggered their anger included proposals to admit poor nonveterans to two underused VA hospitals and to eliminate smoking at the hospitals.

EDWARD DERWINSKI, 85, who represented Chicago’s south side and adjoining suburbs in Congress for nearly a quartercentury before becoming the nation’s first secretary of veterans affairs, has died. Mr. Derwinski died Sunday of cancer, his family said. He will be buried this weekend at Arlington National Cemetery. Mr. Derwinski’s congressional career began in 1959 after he had served a single term in the Illinois House, and those who knew him said he knew his district inside and out and was liked by his fellow Republicans and Democrats alike. “He was somebody that was well-grounded in his principles and his patriotism but brought a gritty, Chicagoland get-it-done feel Seen Around to his work,” Illinois Sen. Peninsula snapshots Mark Kirk, a Republican, A WILD-EYED told the Chicago Tribune. WOMAN running amok on Mr. Derwinski held his the streets of Port Townsend, grasping her Lottery copy of the Peninsula Daily Laugh Lines News, crying, “Not another LAST NIGHT’S LOTtypo! Not another typo! YOU KNOW THE difTERY results are available ference between Michele WANTED! “Seen Around” on a timely basis by phonBachmann, Rick Perry and items. Send them to PDN News ing, toll-free, 800-545-7510 Tim Tebow? Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles or on the Internet at www. When God tells Tim WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or walottery.com/Winning Tebow to run, he wins. email news@peninsuladailynews. Numbers. Jay Leno com.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ David Timmons is the Port Townsend city manager. An article that appeared on Page A1 of both editions Sunday erroneously said he was the mayor.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1937 (75 years ago) A final Mount Olympus National Park report of the State Planning Council in Olympia will be given to Gov. Clarence D. Martin soon, said council Executive Officer R.K. Tiffany. The report is much the same as the council’s preliminary report, providing that 30,000 acres be taken off the southeast corner of the current Mount Olympus National Monument and 90,000 acres be added in the Hoh, Bogachiel and Lake Crescent areas. U.S. Rep. Mon Wallgren, D-Everett, whose congressional district includes the North Olympic Peninsula, plans to reintroduce his national park bill in Washington, D.C., this month.

1962 (50 years ago) Clallam County Sheriff Bob Polhamus announced that Austin V. Glidden has been promoted from night jailer to resident deputy in Clallam Bay-Sekiu. The county had only one

resident deputy on the West End after the budget was curtailed at the beginning of 1961. Now there will be Deputy Bob Ellis in Forks and Glidden in Clallam Bay. John E. Lacy was appointed jailer to replace Glidden.

1987 (25 years ago) Today’s holiday to honor the memory of Martin Luther King Jr. will be observed by Jefferson County employees as well as state and federal workers. Clallam County offices and city halls in Port Angeles, Port Townsend, Sequim and Forks will all be open. Public schools across the North Olympic Peninsula are closed for the King holiday today, but Peninsula College remains in session. Today marks the second official recognition of the holiday, which began observance Jan. 20, 1986, from legislation signed by President Ronald Reagan in 1983.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Jan. 19, the 19th day of 2012. There are 347 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 19, 1862, Union forces won a victory over the Confederates in the Civil War Battle of Mill Springs in southeastern Kentucky. On this date: ■ In 1807, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was born in Westmoreland County, Va. ■ In 1861, Georgia became the fifth state to secede from the Union. ■ In 1937, millionaire Howard Hughes set a transcontinental air record by flying his monoplane from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J., in seven hours, 28 minutes and

25 seconds. ■ In 1955, a presidential news conference was filmed for television for the first time, with the permission of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ■ In 1960, the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security between Japan and the United States of America was signed by both countries in Washington, D.C. ■ In 1966, Indira Gandhi was elected prime minister of India. ■ In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon nominated G. Harrold Carswell to the Supreme Court; however, the nomination was defeated because of controversy over Carswell’s past racial views. ■ In 1977, in one of his last

acts of office, President Gerald R. Ford pardoned Iva Toguri D’Aquino, an American convicted of treason for making wartime broadcasts for Japan. ■ In 1981, the United States and Iran signed an accord paving the way for the release of 52 Americans held hostage for more than 14 months. ■ In 1992, German government and Jewish officials dedicated a Holocaust memorial at the suburban Berlin villa where the notorious Wannsee Conference had taken place. ■ Ten years ago: Israeli troops set off a powerful explosion that gutted the official Palestinian broadcasting building, dealing

another retaliatory blow two days after a Palestinian gunman killed six Israelis at a bat mitzvah celebration. ■ Five years ago: Denny Doherty, a member of the 1960s folk-rock group The Mamas & the Papas, died near Toronto at age 66. ■ One year ago: Chinese President Hu Jintao, visiting the White House, declared “a lot still needs to be done” to improve his country’s record on human rights; the exchange with President Barack Obama over human rights was balanced by U.S. delight over newly announced Chinese business deals expected to generate about $45 billion in new export sales for the U.S.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 19, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Deadly attack on Americans premeditated WASHINGTON — U.S. military investigators found no conclusive evidence that an Afghan officer who killed eight U.S. airmen and one U.S. civilian during a meeting in Kabul in April had ties to the Taliban, according to a report released this week. The gunman, who shot each of the Americans multiple times after arriving for a routine meeting at an Afghan air force headquarters compound, previously had vowed to “kill Americans,” the report said. Gen. Norton Schwartz, the Air Force chief of staff, praised the victims’ bravery and said they have left behind “an honorable legacy that we continue to see in the commitment of airmen who serve as air advisers today.” The 436-page report by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations determined that Col. Ahmed Gul acted alone, but it found no conclusive motive for the deadly shooting spree at Kabul International Airport. The report was dated Sept. 4 but not released until Tuesday.

Infection threat SHARON, Pa. — A man tried to rob a western Pennsylvania gambling parlor by threatening to spread a staph infection. Police said Fred Parker, 41, of Coolspring Township walked

into Lucky’s Internet Cafe in Sharon on Monday night and began touching the walls and gambling machines, claiming he has MRSA — a serious staph infection that resists antibiotics. Parker then threatened to infect the cashier if he didn’t give Parker money, said Sharon Police Chief Mike Menster. “It’s our first case of robbery by threat of an infectious disease,” Menster said. Parker left when the cashier refused, police said, but was arrested a short time later based on his description.

South Pole feat RENO, Nev. — A Nevada man paralyzed in a 2010 snowmobiling accident has reached the South Pole. Grant Korgan, 33, of Incline Village used a device called a Sitski to reach the pole on the 100-year anniversary of the Terra Nova Expedition that arrived there Jan. 17, 1912. Korgan traveled about 75 miles in sub-zero temperatures during the two-week expedition. His crew said he’s the first adaptive athlete to accomplish the feat. Korgan’s expedition party included paralympian John Davis, two guides and cinematographers who are shooting for a documentary called “The Push: A South Pole Adventure.” The film is expected to be released later this year. The challenge supports California-based nonprofit High Fives Foundation. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Peace Corps withdraws from Honduras TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — The U.S. government’s decision to pull out all its Peace Corps volunteers from Honduras for safety reasons is the latest blow to a nation still battered by a coup and recently labeled the world’s most deadly country. Neither U.S. nor Honduran officials have said what specifically prompted them to withdraw the 158 Peace Corps volunteers, which the U.S. State Department in 2011 called one of the largest missions in the world. But the wave of violence and drug cartel-related crime hitting the Central American country had affected volunteers working on HIV prevention, water sanitation and youth projects, President Porfirio Lobo acknowledged. The pullout was Monday.

and Save the Children. A food shortage had been predicted as early as August 2010, but most donors did not respond until famine was declared in parts of Somalia in July 2011. The report even blamed aid agencies, saying they were too slow to scale up their response. “We all bear responsibility for this dangerous delay that cost lives in East Africa and need to learn the lessons of the late response,” said Oxfam head Barbara Stocking.

Tourists attacked

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Gunmen in Ethiopia’s arid north attacked a group of European tourists traveling in one of the world’s lowest and hottest regions, killing five, wounding two and kidnapping two, an Ethiopian official said Wednesday. Three Ethiopians were also taken hostage. Ethiopia called the attack “an act of open terrorism” and said the gunmen came from neighFamine criticism boring Eritrea and attacked the tourist group before dawn TuesNAIROBI, Kenya — Thouday. sands of people died needlessly Eritrea denied it was and millions of dollars were wasted because the international involved. Two Germans, two Hungaricommunity did not respond fast ans and an Austrian were killed, enough to early signs of famine in East Africa, aid agencies said and two Belgians were seriously hurt. Two Italians escaped Wednesday, while warning of a new hunger crisis in West Africa. unharmed. Two Germans were kidnapped. Most rich donor nations Ethiopia said it suspects the waited until the crisis in the attack was linked to an upcomHorn of Africa was in full swing ing African Union summit in before donating a substantial Addis Ababa later this month. amount of money, according to The Associated Press the report by aid groups Oxfam

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TWINS

TANGLE IN THE SNOW

Mikhail, left, and his twin sister, Nicole, 13-year-old Amur tigers, do a little fighting shortly after going on display at the Oregon Zoo in Portland on Tuesday.

Pipeline from Canada denied by president Obama says GOP deadline doesn’t allow time for review THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Obama said he is denying an application for a Canada-to-Texas oil pipeline because a GOP-mandated deadline didn’t allow time for a full review. Obama said Wednesday his decision isn’t a judgment on the merits of the proposed $7 billion pipeline. Rather, he’s citing the “arbitrary nature” of the Feb. 21 deadline that was set by a GOP-written provision in a recent tax bill that Obama signed.

The president said in a statement that he’s disappointed that Republicans in Congress forced the decision. Obama had until late next month to decide whether the pipeline was in the national interest. Administration officials said the looming deadline cut short the time needed to conduct environmental reviews after the State Department ordered the project developer to find an alternate route to avoid environmentally sensitive areas of Nebraska. The 1,700-mile pipeline would carry oil from tar sands in west-

ern Canada to refineries in Texas. It would pass through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma. The Canadian company seeking to build the pipeline said it would reapply for a permit. TransCanada’s CEO and President Russ Girling said Obama’s announcement was not entirely surprising. He said the company plans to reapply for a presidential permit for the proposed 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline. In his statement, Obama made clear the company was free to reapply for the permit. TransCanada said it is working with officials in Nebraska to find a route through the state that avoids environmentally sensitive areas.

TSA admits screeners didn’t follow rules with strip-search THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Security screeners at Kennedy Airport violated procedures this fall when they asked two elderly women to show them medical devices concealed beneath their clothing, senior Homeland Security officials acknowledged in correspondence made public this week. In a pair of letters to U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer and state Sen. Michael Gianaris, Transportation Security Administration Administrator John Pistole and Department of Homeland Security Assistant Secretary Betsy Markey said screeners at the airport will get refresher training on how to handle passengers with medical conditions. The action followed complaints by Lenore Zimmerman, 85, of Long Beach, N.Y., and Ruth Sherman, 88, of Sunrise, Fla., that

Quick Read

they were effectively stripsearched while traveling separately through the airport in November. Zimmerman, who weighs less than 110 pounds and is in a wheelchair, said that after being escorted into a private room, she had to raise her shirt and lower her pants for a female TSA agent and remove her back brace, which was put through an X-ray machine. Sherman said she was humiliated when two female screeners made her lower her sweatpants so they could examine her colostomy bag. In their letters to the New York politicians, Pistole and Markey disputed some of the details of the women’s accounts. They said Zimmerman had raised her shirt voluntarily. “At no point was the passenger

asked to remove any items of clothing,” the letters said. But in her letter, Markey acknowledged that Zimmerman should have been allowed to leave the brace on. “It is not standard procedure for TSOs to screen back braces through the X-ray, and TSA apologizes for this employee’s action,” she wrote. Likewise, she said Sherman had also initially lowered her pants voluntarily and was never asked to remove any items of clothing but added that “it is not standard operating procedure for colostomy devices to be visually inspected, and TSA also apologizes for this employee’s action.” Zimmerman told the Daily News of New York that she was upset that federal officials were still insisting that she hadn’t been asked to remove clothing.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Condom crackdown could trigger porn exodus

Nation: Opossum boards subway; commuters leave

Nation: NASA breaks ground for shuttle display

World: First identification made of cruise ship victim

SOME OF THE most prominent purveyors of porn say they’ll start packing up their sex toys and abandoning Los Angeles, the nation’s porn capital, if authorities carry through with a nascent effort to police adult film sets and order that every actor be outfitted with a condom. The City Council voted 9-1 Tuesday to grant final approval to an ordinance that would deny film permits to producers who do not comply with the condom requirement. Approximately 90 percent of U.S. porn films are made in Los Angeles, said Mark Kernes, senior editor of Adult Video News.

A SUSPICIOUS PASSENGER of the four-legged variety led to the evacuation of a New York City subway car. Startled riders aboard a Manhattanbound train spotted an opossum curled up underneath a seat near the train’s heating duct around 4:30 a.m. Friday. The New York Times reported that the animal apparently boarded the train at Coney Island in Brooklyn, where the platform is above ground. The subway car was evacuated several stops later in Manhattan as officers wearing heavy gloves tried to remove it. When the marsupial bared its teeth at them, animal control experts were called in.

NASA’S RETIRED SPACE shuttle Atlantis is a step closer to completing its final journey. The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex broke ground Wednesday in Florida for the permanent home of Atlantis. The $100 million exhibit will open in summer 2013. NASA’s 30-year shuttle program ended last July with the voyage of Atlantis. Shuttle Discovery will be the first to ship out to museums. In April, it will head to the National Air and Space Museum’s display hangar outside Washington.

THE FIRST VICTIM from the Costa Concordia disaster was identified Wednesday — a 38-year-old violinist from Hungary who had been working as an entertainer on the stricken cruise ship. Sandor Feher’s body was found inside the wreck and identified by his mother, who had traveled to the Italian city of Grosseto. The cruise ship slammed into a reef and flopped on its side Friday off the Italian island of Giglio after the captain made an unauthorized detour on his route. Eleven people have been confirmed dead so far.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Snow: Forks hardest-hit Tuesday with foot total CONTINUED FROM A1 available on the city’s website at www.cityofpt.us. Port Townsend Police Sgt. Forks, the hardest-hit Tuesday, received anywhere Ed Green said the sparse from a trace to 4 inches traffic meant there were few Wednesday for a total accu- problems, aside from one car mulation of about a foot of being stuck on the curve snow on the ground, and Port between Safeway and QFC, Angeles and Sequim — which is usually a trouble which received 4 to 6 inches spot in bad weather. Two semi-trucks caused a of new snow Wednesday morning, according to the similar blockage Tuesday. No injury vehicle wrecks National Weather Service — had about half that amount. were reported in Clallam Wednesday’s storm was County, according to PeninCommunications, created by a combination of sula moisture from the south and though there have been 90 cold air from the north, minor vehicle mishaps — mostly cars in ditches — Bower said. The low-pressure system since Sunday, PenCom Comthat carried the moisture munications Supervisor Karl came onshore near the Hatton said Wednesday mouth of the Columbia River, morning. The State Patrol reported while cold air from the Canadian interior funneled no injury wrecks on U.S. through the Fraser River Highway 101 in Clallam and valley and pushed up against Jefferson counties or along the Olympic Mountains to the Hood Canal since Sunday. the southwest, he said. But a semi-truck and Merchant said Port Townsend’s five plows were trailer jackknifed Tuesday all out early plowing and night on state Highway 104 three miles south of Discovsanding the main arteries. A list of all the priority ery Bay in Jefferson County, streets that were being State Patrol spokesman plowed Wednesday was Russ Winger said.

The driver “just lost it” on the icy road, he said. The semi ended up in the ditch and blocked one lane of the road from about 7:15 p.m. to about 9:30 p.m. Tuesday and both lanes from 9:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. while three large tow trucks extricated it from the ditch. Drivers were warned by state Department of Transportation signage to seek alternate routes, Winger said. There were also several non-injury collisions in the Brinnon area, Winger added. “Today, cars are getting around fairly well,” he said late Wednesday morning.

stay open its regular hours, and City Manager David Timmons said he did not recall any instance that the building closed during his 12 years with the city. Timmons, who previously worked in Northern Michigan and Vermont, called the recent storms “just a skiff of snow.” County offices opened for business at 10 a.m., though both District Court and Superior Court were closed. The city canceled garbage service for Wednesday and may do so again today, and announced it would provide double service once the weather improved. The pool and the Port City Hall open Townsend and Jefferson County libraries also were Port Townsend City Hall closed. opened at 8 a.m. as usual, with the Fort Worden Life- Snowplows keeping up long Learning Center holding a previously scheduled County Engineer Monty meeting that began at Reinders said snowplows 8:30 a.m. were able to keep up with the Six members of the com- snow, especially since it had mittee met in the third-floor tapered off by early afterconference room, while oth- noon. ers teleconferenced through “It has been pretty speaker phones. smooth,” he said. City Hall was expected to “Right now, we have tran-

sitioned to more of a cleanup effort and are working our way to the secondary roads,” Reinders said. “Later on, we will see if we need to deal with any flooding issues when the snow starts to melt.” Puget Sound Energy spokeswoman Dorothy Bracken said there were few power outages caused by the snow, and she was not aware of any blackouts in Jefferson County. “We are fully staffed and will send out a crew as soon as we hear about any problems,” she said. This was countered by East Jefferson Fire-Rescue spokesman Bill Beezley, who said PSE and his department answered a call at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday on Anderson Lake Road, where a tree knocked down power lines. Beezley said there were no major incidents. “People are being good and staying inside,” Beezley said. Brinnon Fire Chief Bob Herbst saw the same thing in his area. “There hasn’t been a lot of

vehicle traffic, although I’ve seen a lot of people out walking around,” Herbst said. Willy Stark at the weather shelter in the American Legion Hall’s basement in Port Townsend said 39 people stayed in the shelter Tuesday night and that guests would be allowed to stay through the day rather than being asked to leave during the daytime hours. “We are staying open while the weather is this bad,” he said. “This is the first time we’ve done this.” Local markets were pretty quiet Wednesday, with a dearth of customers. Jessica Roberts, a supervisor at the Port Hadlock QFC, said few people came into the store Wednesday. Milk was the most popular item.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com. Reporters Rob Ollikainen and Paul Gottlieb contributed to this report.

Cancel: Transit operating on revised schedule CONTINUED FROM A1 KONP 1450 AM radio. Public information regarding transit or paraJefferson Transit said all transit service also is availPort Townsend and Tri- able at 360-452-4511 or tollArea Loop buses continued free at 800-858-3747. on snow routing WednesThe Jamestown day, with no buses running S’Klallam tribe announced on 12th and 14th streets in that 7 Cedars Casino was Port Townsend. closed Wednesday but For updates, visit www. would reopen today. jeffersontransit.comor The Cedars at Dungephone 360-385-4777, ext. 1. ness Golf Course and the Clallam Transit contin- Double Eagle Steak & Seaued to operate all buses, food Restaurant also were with many routes and closed Wednesday, while schedules revised Wednes- Stymie’s Bar & Grill was day and plans to stay with open until 1 p.m. the revised scheduled today. The Longhouse Market For more information, was open Wednesday visit the Clallam Transit though the deli was closed. website at www.clallamThe Forks Chamber of transit.com or listen to Commerce meeting sched-

uled for Wednesday was canceled, as was the Shelter Providers Network meeting set in Port Angeles the same day. A Puget Sound Partnership stormwater program, “All Things Low-Impact Development: What Is It? Why Use It? What Does It Save?,” planned at the Port Angeles Library tonight, was canceled. The Puget Sound Anglers Auction and Dinner scheduled today at the Sequim Guy Cole Convention Center has been cancelled. A new date will be announced later. The Olympic National Park Visitor’s Center on

Mount Angeles Road and Hurricane Ridge Road were closed Wednesday. Public school officials make closure decisions early each morning. Information is broadcast on local radio stations and on many Seattle-area television channels. Here’s how to get information: ■ Port Angeles — Decisions to close or start late are usually made by 5 a.m. and are posted at www.portangelesschools. org. The phone number for the transportation center is 360-452-9714. The district office’s number is 360-4578575.

Tree: ‘Startled’ is an understatement “I jumped up quite snow caused the tree to fall. Her neighbor, Lonnie quickly,” she said. Archibald, said winds were “I am very lucky.” Bingham said calling her Bingham said she gusting at about 20 to 30 “startled” would be an understatement. believes the weight of the mph when the tree fell at about 7:30 a.m. Archibald, a freelance Kevin Tracy photographer who often Financial Planner - FSC Securities Corporation publishes in the Peninsula 1051⁄2 East First Street, Suite A Daily News, said some of Port Angeles, WA 98362 the tree’s limbs hit the bank (360) 452-9080 of the Sol Duc River, which absorbed some of the impact. “She’s fortunate she wasn’t hurt,” he said. CONTINUED FROM A1

Bingham had hired D&H Enterprises of Forks to remove the tree Wednesday.

No estimate She didn’t have an estimate for how much the damage cost but said she can still live in the home until repairs are made.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

21565199

• For New Computer Set-up or Tune-up • Home or Business Location

CONGRATULATIONS

• I Come to You No Hauling

ON YOUR YEARS OF SERVICE

• Reasonable Rates • Fast, Competent Service

30 Years Experience

1C560149

Mary E. Bower

Dave Grainger, CNE 360-379-4881 • 360-774-2467(cell)

,CMC

OFFICE MANAGER, CLERK TO THE BOARD

30 Year Service Anniversary

We Salute You!

TheWashBoard.org is a free clearinghouse of scholarships. Apply now for 2012-2013. 21574381

…For Wherever Life Takes You! 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. • Port Angeles 452-4511 or 1-800-858-3747

Hammondsport, N.Y., which had 23.9 percent, maintained a slim lead over Weaverville, Calif., which had 23.1 percent. Port Townsend also lagged behind Beaufort, N.C., with 21.1 percent and Damascus, Va., with 7.1 percent.

Leading charge

“But the question is, can we afford to ignore this opportunity to let people know about us, especially in this economy? “It will give us a little leverage. It’s not going to raise our taxes or make it harder to find parking downtown.” Verraes said the chamber is using social media, predominantly Facebook, to encourage people to vote. This includes a series of videos filmed by local media blogger Jack Olmsted that feature local citizens stating why the town is cool, viewable on several local sites. “People are on Facebook all the time, so they should just vote every day,” Verraes she said. The contest rules allow one vote each day from each computer or smartphone.

The Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce is leading the charge in motivating people to vote, using social networking tools to encourage people to participate. “I don’t know why you wouldn’t do this,” said Teresa Verraes, chamber executive director. “It could have a huge benefit on the local economy, bringing people into town who will support ________ small businesses.” Verraes acknowledged Jefferson County Reporter that many people aren’t Charlie Bermant can be reached at supporting the contest 360-385-2335 or at charlie. because they don’t want bermant@peninsuladailynews.com. new people coming into town, an attitude she feels is shortsighted and selfish. “I have heard that kind of thing since my family moved here in the early 1980s,” she said.

Man found shot dead on sidewalk THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

21572638

Find yours now!

January 18, 2012

Clallam Transit System

CONTINUED FROM A1

30 Million Dollars in Washington scholarships are available...

Mary is recognized and commended on the occasion of her

School Information line at 360-645-2221, according to the district website at www. capeflattery.wednet.edu. ■ Port Townsend — Closure and late start information are online at www. psecs.wednet.edu after 6 a.m. Information is also on television and radio stations. ■ Chimacum — For information, visit http:// csd49.org or phone 360-3853922. ■ Quilcene — For information, visit www. quilcene.wednet.edu or phone 360-765-3363. ■ Brinnon schools — For information, visit www. bsd46.org or phone 360796-4646.

Cool: Facebook

www.tracywealthmanagement.com Securities and investment advisory services offered through FSC Securities Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC and a registered investment advisor. Tracy Wealth Management is not affiliated with FSC Securities Corporation or registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor.

■ Sequim — Decisions are made by 6:15 a.m. and are posted at www.sequim. k12.wa.us. The district number is 360-582-3260. The Sequim School District will not have classes today. ■ Crescent School District — For information about this Joyce school district, visit www. crescentschooldistrict.org or phone 360-928-3311. ■ Quillayute Valley — For information about the Forks school district, visit www.forks.wednet.edu or phone 360-374-6262. ■ Cape Flattery — Decisions are made soon after 4:30 a.m. and are available on the Neah Bay

SEATTLE — A man was found shot to death late Tuesday night on a sidewalk in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. Police said officers responding to a report of shots fired found the man with a wound to his chest. Fire Department medics declared him dead at the scene. Homicide detectives processed the scene and canvassed the area for possible witnesses. Police said they have no information at this time about a suspect.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

A5

Snowstorm wallops Pacific Northwest BY DOUG ESSER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — A winter storm that blasted the Pacific Northwest on Wednesday dumped near-record snow in Olympia, hammered parts of Oregon with winds as high as 110 mph and brought much of the region to a standstill. From the Washington state capital in Olympia to the Oregon coast, schools were closed, roads were clogged with snow and hundreds of accidents, and dozens of flights were canceled. In an eight-hour period near the capital, there were 95 accidents, mostly spinouts, State Trooper Guy Gill said. “If you get off the beaten path, you’re in deep trouble,” Gill said. “I saw a guy in my rear mirror. I saw headlights and taillights and headlights and taillights again as he spun

around off the road.” “For the first time in my career, I had to put chains on,” he said. “You stay in the path laid down on the freeway.” Olympia had about a foot of new snow on the ground by 7:30 a.m.

Could break record The city could break its record of 14 inches of snow in a 24-hour period, Colman said. Areas south of Olympia could get 20 inches. “They’re getting hammered,” Colman said. It was business as usual at the Capitol, where committee hearings were still being held, if not fully attended. Some state employees drove into work, but others walked in, and at least one employee was seen crosscountry skiing to the Capitol campus. The 60-day legislative

session began Jan. 9. Tacoma had about 7 inches of snow for the morning rush hour. Seattle had compact snow and ice on roads for commuters. Lesser amounts were reported north of Seattle. Southeast Washington also is getting a good shot of snow, with 6 to 10 inches expected in the Palouse, meteorologist Colby Neuman said. High winds have begun hammering parts of the Oregon coast and causing power outages, with reports of gusts of 100 mph and more. There were no immediate reports of serious damage. Heavy snow has been falling in Washington’s mountains, with up to 2 feet of fresh snow expected by today. Interstate 90 across Snoqualmie Pass was shut down for much of Tuesday for avalanche control work. Snow blankets cars and homes in Tacoma on Wednesday.

Kenmore Air, Alaska Airlines cancel flights PENINSULA DAILY NEWS AND NEWS SOURCES

Kenmore Air and Alaska Airlines canceled flights Wednesday because of the weather. Kenmore flights between Port Angeles and Seattle are scheduled to resume today, Marketing and Sales Director Craig O’Neill said. The conditions both in the sky and on the ground prompted Kenmore Air to cancel all flights Wednesday, O’Neill said. “It just seemed like the prudent thing to do,” he said, adding that the company would have had difficulty offering its shuttle service from Boeing Field, where its planes land, to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport because of icy road conditions. Customers are entitled to a full refund, O’Neill said. Kenmore’s reservation line is 866-435-9524. For

more information, visit www.kenmoreair.com. The airline makes the only scheduled flights from Port Angeles to Seattle. Alaska Airlines on Wednesday canceled 38 flights into and out of Seattle and Portland, Ore. The airline urged customers to check the airline website before leaving for the airport. The airline is also waiv-

2 campers, 2 climbers still overdue on Mount Rainier Rangers to continue search with break in snow THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

and other gear needed to survive. Rangers hope they’re waiting out the storm. ASHFORD — Heavy snow has preThe campers are 37-year-old Mark vented Mount Rainier National Park Vucich of San Diego and 30-year-old rangers from searching for two climbers Michelle Trojanowski of Atlanta. and two campers overdue from winter They were due back Sunday from the outings. Muir snowfield at the 10,000-foot level. Spokeswoman Patti Wold said The climbers are a Springfield, Ore., Wednesday the park will send rangers as couple who have not been named. soon as there’s a break in the storm, They were due back Monday from an which is dropping 2 to 3 feet of snow. attempt to reach the summit of the The two parties are believed to be well-equipped with tents, sleeping bags 14,410-foot mountain.

CASTING CALL: READY TO MAKE YOUR DREAMS A REALITY? Macy’s is teaming up with Clinton Kelly and TLC to help you bring your dreams to life. To submit your application now through January 31, 2012, go to facebook.com/macys No purchase necessary; complete details online. Employees of Macy’s, Inc. not eligible.

NOW THROUGH SUNDAY!

storewide

clearance

5O - 85 %

State Patrol seeks law for ferry behavior

% OFF

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

orig.* prices

thousands of items when you

TAKE AN EXTRA 2O% OR 5O% OFF already reduced prices

FREE SHIPPING AT MACYS.COM WITH $99 ONLINE PURCHASE No promo code needed; exclusions apply.

75% OFF

75%-85% OFF

60%-65% OFF

Orig.* 34.50-$75, final cost 8.63-18.75. Clearance sportshirts from our Club Room, Alfani & more.

Orig.* $29-$299, final cost 3.63-74.75. Select clearance sweaters, knit tops, blouses, outerwear & more from our Style & Co., Alfani, Charter Club and JM Collection. Misses & petites. Women’s prices slightly higher.

Orig.* $195-$400, final cost 62.40-$160. Clearance coats: down, wool-blend and faux shearling styles. Misses.

60% OFF

75%-85% OFF

Orig.* 39.50-119.50, final cost 15.80-47.80. Clearance sweaters, fleece tops, outerwear & sportshirts from Sean John & our American Rag.

Orig.* 9.99-69.50, final cost 2.49-9.99. Kids’ clearance dresses, tops, sweaters, pants & sets. Girls’ 2-16; boys’ 2-20; infants’ 3-24 mos.

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF

60% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF Orig.* $400-$9000, final cost $160-$3600. Clearance fine jewelry: diamonds, cultured pearls and more. Extra savings end 1/28/12.

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 50% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 50% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF

65%-70% OFF WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF Orig.*

24.50-39.50, final cost 7.99-11.99. Juniors’ clearance selections: tops, sweaters, jeans, dresses, more.

50%-65% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 20% OFF Orig.* $18-$248, final cost 6.30-$124. Clearance handbag selections: satchels, totes, more.

21572963

BREMERTON — The State Patrol is requesting a law to help troopers control inappropriate behavior on state ferries. The bill introduced Monday by Sen. Kevin Ranker of San Juan Island lists smoking, spitting, littering, playing radios, urinating or defecating in places other than approved plumbing fixtures, carrying firearms or flammable liquids, roller-skating, skateboarding, gambling, trying to pass oneself off as a ferry worker and letting a pet off its leash as misdemeanors. That behavior on a state vessel or ferry terminal would bring a penalty of up to 90 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. “When it does happen, we’d like to have something very specific in law that allows us to address it,” said Capt. Jason Berry, legislative liaison. Berry told the Kitsap Sun that ferries were left out of a law that covers behavior on other forms of transit. Troopers can’t arrest ferry riders now unless the behavior rises to disorderly conduct. For example, troopers have been frustrated that people must keep dogs on leashes in Seattle, but when they enter the Colman Dock, they don’t have to, Berry said. Dogs running loose around the State Patrol’s bomb-sniffing dogs could endanger the animals and humans. The proposed law would allow troopers to remove somebody before danger escalates, Berry said.

ing change fees for customers traveling Tuesday through Thursday in those cities. Spokeswoman Bobbie Egan said tickets must be exchanged and travel completed by Sunday. Kenmore and Alaska Airlines have a partnership. Interline booking is available through www.Alaska Air.com or by phone at 800252-7522.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES & SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. EXTRA SAVINGS IN EFFECT 1/19-1/22/2012, EXCEPT AS NOTED. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. Orig/Now & clearance items are available while supplies last & are not available by phone. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Extra savings taken off already reduced prices; “final cost” prices reflect extra savings. Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s & selection may vary by store. Prices & merchandise may differ at macys.com. N1120030. OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 15% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy’s credit card is available subject to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food & wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Violinist fiddles — from Moldova to Port Ludlow BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

Venetian Hotel. The violinist’s music is available online at www. ValeriGlava.net. Tomboulian, a New York-born composer, plays jazz piano, accordion and keyboards — and sings, having studied AfricanAmerican gospel music in Texas. Today, he teaches jazz improvisation and jazz piano at the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music in Appleton, Wis.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT LUDLOW — This has to be one of the most musically diverse performances ever to happen here. Brahms’ Hungarian Dance No. 5, tunes from “Schindler’s List� and “Fiddler on the Roof,� and even the fiddle classic “Orange Blossom Special� are all together Friday as Moldovan violinist Valeri Glava and American pianist Lee Tomboulian arrive at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place. Doors will open at 7 p.m. for the 8 p.m. concert, presented by the Port Ludlow Arts Council with help from a Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) grant. Tickets are $24 at the Bay Club, which can be reached at 360-437-2208. To order with a credit card, visit www.PortLudlow ArtsCouncil.com. In his native Moldova, Glava is considered a national treasure. He started playing violin when he was 8 years old at a school in Chisinau, Moldova, back when that country was part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Glava’s longtime dream was to come to the United States and share his music. When Ukrainian-born comedian Yakov Smirnov invited Glava to join his show in Branson, that came

Student concert earlier Earlier Friday, Tomboulian and Glava will play for some 325 elementary school students in the Chimacum School District in a program promoting music appreciation and cultural diversity. During the hour before the evening concert at the Bay Club, patrons are invited to gather in the great room for a showing of artist Virginia Moyer’s photography from around the Moldovan classical violinist Valeri Glava will world. host “A Musical Journey,� a concert featuring The venue also offers a music from “Fiddler on the Roof� as well as Russian-themed preconcert tunes like “Orange Blossom Special,� at Port supper of beet salad, lamb Ludlow’s Bay Club on Friday. stew with roasted fingerling potatoes and apple tart true — in the Missouri New Show. music city where entertainIn 2001, Branson audi- a la Russe beginning at ers have ranged from ences voted him Instrumen- 5 p.m. To make dinner reservaJohnny Cash to Dick Clark talist of the Year and Headtions, phone 360-437-7412. to Phyllis Diller. liner of the Year. ________ Glava became a big Glava also performed hit in Branson and between at the Liberace Museum Features Editor Diane Urbani 1998 and 2001 received in Las Vegas until it de la Paz can be reached at 360nominations for Violinist closed in October 2010. He 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ of the Year and Best next played at Vegas’ peninsuladailynews.com.

Yvonne Wakefield reads her memoir Friday.

PT artist publishes memoir of Kuwait PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Yvonne Wakefield will present readings from her recently published memoir, Suitcase Filled with Nails, about teaching art to young Muslim women in Kuwait on Friday. She will read from and discuss the book at 7 p.m. at the Port Townsend Gallery, 715 Water St. Admission is free, while signed copies of Suitcase will be available for purchase. The author will give two more readings over the coming week: at 10 a.m. Saturday at Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave. in Port Townsend; and finally at 4:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27, at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St. in Sequim. Wakefield, an artist and former art instructor in Sequim’s elementary schools, spent six years teaching at Kuwait University’s Women’s College. For more information about Wakefield’s life and art, visit www.YvonnePepinWakefield.com. Her book is available through AuthorCloud Publishers at www.AuthorCloud.com.

Cure cabin fever by getting out, dancing HEY, SONGWRITERS! THE events of the past few days may provide inspiration for a new song called “Cabin Fever.� I know if I were one, I would be so inspired. However, if you’re like me, you can cure that cabin fever by getting out and taking in some live music.

Port Angeles â–  Tonight at Castaways Restaurant and

Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, come on down for Jerry’s Country Jam from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. If country’s your style, come and dance or play plugged or unplugged. ■ On Saturday at the Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 five miles west of Port Angeles, shake the winter blues with the rocking blues of BluMeadows

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat!

!"  "  EVERY SUNDAY The ALL DAY Sunday Dinner Special

ROAST TURKEY OR SMOKED VIRGINIA HAM Homemade stuffing, mashed potatoes, Gravy, Veggies, Cranberry Sauce, Salad, Bread, Beverage & Dessert

$

1495

MONDAY NIGHTS

Buy 1 & Get 2nd At Half Price 95 All you can eat $

10

SENIOR DINNERS STARTING AT $898  

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS

$

5-$7-$9 Appetizers

THURSDAY NIGHTS Never Ending

PASTA BOWL 95

10

Served with $ Salad & Bread

1506 E. First Port Angeles

457-4611

www.cafegardenpa.com

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL

6IHSV;LMXI ,SYWI;MRI $3 per glass

Tues. - Sat. 2:30 - 5:30 7SYTSV7EPEHTPYW)RXVŠIĹœ'LSMGISJMXIQW 4097;IIOP]7TIGMEPWWIVZIHEJXIVTQ Coupon

BUY an EntrĂŠe KIXWIGSRH 1/2 OFF* 1YWXFISJIUYEPSVPIWWIVZEPYI2SXKSSH[MXLER]SXLIVSĹ´IVWTIGMEPW +SSHXMPP%TVMP2SXKSSH7YRHE]WSV:EPIRXMRIĹ•W(E]

21572055

9

$ 95

21571934

95 Burger & Brew 9 – or – Salad, Chowder & Bread

$

TUESDAY NIGHTS

from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Tuesday, Ches Ferguson stops by for some picking and grinning at 7 p.m. ■ On Friday at Wine on the Waterfront, 115 Railroad Ave., Kim Trenerry goes solo with tunes from the Deadwood Revival songbook and her own originals at 8 p.m. $3 cover. On Saturday, Fret Noir (Gil Yslas and Mary Tulin) perform at 8 p.m. $3 cover. This Sunday’s Music in the Bar features Otter at 3 p.m. ■ Today at Bella Italia, 118 E. First St., Locozonly, the acoustic trio of Kevin Lee Magner and the father/daughter team of Scott and Elora Bradley performs at 8 p.m. ■ On Friday, Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Country perform at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Stop in Sunday for a great jam from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dave and Rosalie Secord and the Luck of the Draw Band play old-time music with guest Bill Camuso of the Old Sidekicks, singing the songs of country’s Golden Age, for an old-fashioned good old time from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ Every Tuesday evening at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets, the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally and the Boys playing ballroom dance favorites for the dancing pleasure of all adults 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free. ■ On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn â–  On Friday at the Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., Denny Secord Jr. goes solo acoustically at 5:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Final Approach plays your favorite 1950s-1970s music for your listening and din-

LIVE MUSIC ing pleasure at Nelson 5:30 p.m. ■ At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, have a swashbuckling good time with the Discovery Bay Pirates from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ On Friday at Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, Sequim’s Turner Brothers Band rocks from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, dance to the blues, classic rock and contemporary music of Author Unknown from 9 p.m. to 1 p.m. On Sunday, 3 Miles High with Dana Osborn plays your favorite dance tunes by request from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Monday, We Be Jammin’ with hosts Barry Burnett and Tom Svornich returns for more jamming fun from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

John

Port Townsend ■ Today at The Upstage, 923 Washington St., local group Shady Grove plays classic country, folk, blues, roots and more at 7 p.m., celebrating the release of its new CD, “One More Song.� $5 voluntary cover. On Friday, the Port Angeles-/Sequim-based band Bound to Happen plays its mix of roots, rock, blues, rockabilly and country for dancing at 7:30 p.m. Youths $3, adults $4 to $7. On Saturday, the Washington Blues Society award-winning Stacy Jones Band continues to amaze with superb vocals,

outstanding musicianship and more at 8 p.m. $12 cover. On Sunday, join Rex Rice for the Penultimate Sunday Jazz Jam at 6 p.m. $5 cover. On Wednesday, acclaimed Rosie Ledet & the Zydeco Playboys perform original Bayou tunes at 8 p.m. $18 cover. Phone 360-385-2216 for info and reservations. ■ On Saturday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., the Corespondents play “sentimental cowboy music for dreaming circus workers just before dawn out in the field next to the tiger cages and cotton candy machines� at 10 p.m. $5 cover. ■ Today at the Undertown, 211 Taylor St., Port Townsend’s own traveling musician Simon Lynge performs at home between tours. $8 cover. On Friday, The Solvents open for Peter Stampfel, Jeffrey Lewis and The Dust Busters at 8 p.m. $5 cover. ■ Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., today and Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Today, classical guitarist Trevor Hanson plays at Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine, 1208 Water St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays guitar at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ Steve Grandinetti plays and sings at the Northwest Maritime Center Cafe, Port Townsend, on Thursdays and Fridays from noon till 2 p.m.

High notes â–  Caller and fiddler T-Claw comes from Tennessee to the Port Townsend Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., to call the dance by the Skookum Band from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. $5 to $15 sliding scale cover (younger than 18 admitted free). â–  Down in Quilcene will be an old-fashioned barn dance at the Quilcene Village Store,

294235 U.S. Highway 101, before it’s filled with wares. The Saturday dance social features the music of Home-Aid featuring members of the Washington Old Time Fiddlers at 7 p.m. Donations for musicians are appreciated. ■ The Juan de Fuca Festival now offers financial aid to low-income individuals and families. For more info, phone the festival office at 360-457-5411. ■ The second annual Juan de Fuca Festival Talent Show takes the stage Saturday, Feb. 25, at 1 p.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 Seventh St. All you need is to get an entry form at 360457-5411 or www.JFFA.org and turn it in by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17. Good luck to all. ■ Here’s a heads-up on the 10th annual Snowgrass Bluegrass Concert for the First Step Family Support Center. The concert is at the Port Angeles High School Auditorium, 304 E. Park Ave., on Saturday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m. The lineup includes Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys, Crescent Blue, the Old Sidekicks and Rocky Island Bluegrass. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and $7 for seniors, with 10 and younger admitted free. Tickets can be purchased at First Step, KONP, Strait Music, Odyssey Books, Port Book and News, Renaissance and Necessities and Temptations in Port Angeles; in Sequim at Pacific Mist Books; and in Forks at the Forks Outfitters.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive� on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s new deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,� a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Home not sweet if not ergonomic

Birthday CORNER ica when he was 5 years old and the trumpet at Sequim resident Dennis Sch12. leve will celebrate his 80th birthHe played his day with family and friends Saturday at 4 p.m. at Pioneer Memorial trumpet in the Garfield High Park in Sequim. School Band and He was born for evening/ in Alliance, night gigs while Mr. Neb., on Jan. 21, in high school. 1932, the third Snyder In the spring child of four. of 1945, his parHe moved to ents agreed to let him drop out of Rapid City, S.D., high school to travel with the Ted when he was in Firo Rito Band, a 16-piece dance high school to band. live with his Mr. It traveled down the Pacific Aunt Lillian. Schleve Coast, playing gigs at locations Soon, he along the way to Los Angeles. enlisted in the Mr. Snyder was drafted June Navy, where he 11, 1945, and accepted into the met a relative of his future wife, Army Air Force Band. Donna Miller, whom he married Back in Seattle after being disJan. 24, 1952. charged in 1946, he went to Old They celebrated their 50th Broadway High School and graduwedding anniversary in 2002. ated. The couple lived in Port AngeHe then attended San Franles, where Mr. Schleve made cisco State College for three years leather goods, worked as a logger with his GI benefits. and then became the first deputy He played at New China Town sheriff in Sequim, where he moved Cafe in Seattle and then traveled in 1967, with his wife and their five children, Denise, Debbie, Den- in a trio. While playing at a race track in nis Jr., Danny and Laura. Many grandchildren and great- Montana, he was heckled, joined their table and in two weeks margrandchildren were born thereafried the “very nice heckler” named ter. Jean. After retirement, he restored He then went to the University old classic cars, chartered the of Washington and graduated with Sequim Veterans Car Club of a music teaching degree. America and traveled with it. His first teaching job was in Then he began restoring old 1956 in Clallam Bay, teaching hisFarmall tractors, showing them at tory, typing, band, choir and elefairs and museum benefits and mentary music. earning ribbons and praise. The next year, he also taught These days, he enjoys retiredriver’s education. ment, doing what he wants when The Snyders took two boys into he wants. their family, Tom and Gary Rhinevault, and had one daughter, George Oliver Snyder Robin Laureane. They also have one grandPort Angeles resident George daughter, Andrea Alicia. Snyder will celebrate his 85th Mr. Snyder then taught in Oregon and later took time out to sell birthday Jan. 27. He was born in Seattle on Jan. smoke alarms, living in Houston, Texas, and Louisiana. 27, 1927, the first child, followed Returning to teach in Neah by two younger sisters, Dorothy Bay for eight years, the couple ran Jean and Joanne Gladys. He began playing the harmon- chartered fishing boats.

Dennis Schleve

A7

Mr. Snyder then taught in Puerto Rico for eight years, teaching drama. While in Puerto Rico, he played in a band at the Hilton Hotel, where it increased its revenue by 200 percent. As a result, Hilton Hotels included jazz venues in all their hotels. Moving back to Clallam Bay, he taught for eight years, retired in 1989 and moved to Port Angeles. Mr. Snyder played in Port Angeles with the Bill Rowland Band, Opus One and the Stardust Big Band. He started his own eight-piece dance band, the Oly Jazz Band. He also substituted in Port Angeles schools in classroom, band, choir and orchestra. The Snyders were active with the Port Angeles Light Opera Association, Mrs. Snyder doing makeup and Mr. Snyder either playing or directing music and also acting as Mordcha the innkeeper in “Fiddler on the Roof.” After 53 years of marriage, Mr. Snyder’s wife died Dec. 10, 2007. Mr. Snyder continues to play his flugal horn, has been in the Jazz Ensemble at Peninsula College and enjoys various music and dance events.

OK, THAT’S IT. Enough of this post-holiday giddiness. And if you haven’t finished the leftovers by now . . . well, they aren’t “leftovers,” anymore. It’s time to get back to work. And “work” is this “Boomer Primer,” designed to give boomers (and anyone else who might care to come along for the ride) a list of “Things to Think About” regarding this whole “aging thing.” We’re assuming that you (whoever “you” are) are in your early to mid-60s, or rapidly closing in on same, and have been shocked to discover that your immortality is in question. Ready? Most of us steadfastly declare that we want to “stay in our homes.” What most of us mean when most of us say that is that we don’t want to end up in an institution, spelled “nursing home.”

HELP LINE Now, what do Harvey you see? Do you see slippery stairways? Narrow doorways? Stuff stashed where you have to be your height or better to reach it? A “normal” kitchen? A “normal” bathroom? Three steps up to the front porch? A dark hallway with throw rugs? All the bedrooms (or the only bathroom!) on the second floor? You’re beginning to get this, aren’t you? Right. If you’re going to stay home, “home” has to like you.

Mark

Not young anymore

And it has to like who you are now, not who you Now, if “home” happens were some other time, so if to be a camping trailer in this is really where you your ex-father-in-law’s back- mean to plant yourself, you yard or an apartment might want to consider immediately next door to whether or not you’ll be able several thousand 20-someto live there if you don’t things, the above may not have the physical acumen of be universally true, but if a high school football player, you’re in your own place which, by the way, you and you pretty much like it haven’t had for some time. most of the time, it’s probaI know what you’re bly pretty close. thinking. You’re thinking Now, look around you (go that you don’t particularly ahead, we’ll wait). want to make “home” look What do you see? like a nursing home. Well, I know, but you can I get it. I don’t, either. clean that up later. But things have gone a What do you see? Nothlong way since the last time ing in particular? you saw or thought about Don’t feel stupid, because this stuff, which might that’s what most of us see. include “never.” Next, picture yourself 15, TURN TO HARVEY/A8 20 or 30 years from now.

________

Where heart is

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

WEATHER REPORT

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

19

BY FINN VIGELAND / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 55 Part of a pinochle round 56 Former U.N. secretary general Kofi ___ 58 Get ready to drive 59 x, y and z 60 Scot’s “not” 61 Ousted from the ring, for short 62 TV station, e.g. 64 Cicely or tarragon 66 Weather comment represented visually by this puzzle’s circled letters 72 Major artery through San Antonio 73 Plant tissue 74 Hunted 75 TV tavern keeper 76 Bud 78 Feel (for) 80 The Mediterranean has a warm one 82 Shade of a swan’s bill in a Keats poem 83 Kindergarten stuff 84 Gravitate 85 Not cheating 86 Many wonks 88 Scat syllable 89 One of the Everly Brothers 90 Fate 91 Fictional Simon 92 Esteem 94 Rolling ___ (rich) 96 Kaput 98 Overseas Mr.

13 It’s lowered to hear music 14 Taft’s partner in a 1947 act 15 Light reflection ratio 16 R.S.V.P. facilitator: Abbr. 17 Tolkien creature 18 Pharmacies fill them, in brief 21 Fourth letter after 49-Down 23 Leaf pores 29 You probably raise your arm for this 31 It’s north of the South 32 Stock page listings: Abbr. 34 Big Apple team 35 Side (with) 36 Heroic deeds 37 ___ Hall (site on many a campus) DOWN 38 Attacked 1 Chewed stimulant 39 Shows that can 2 Precious girl’s name? be racier than 3 In the event that their network counterparts 4 2000 title role for Richard Gere 40 Nest maker 5 LL Cool J’s “Going 41 Cheating Back to ___” 45 Angry Birds, e.g. 6 “Lemme ___!” 47 Manipulate to one’s 7 “That is quite clear” advantage 8 Directional suffix 49 Fourth letter before 21-Down 9 “Shut your trap!” 53 Track ___ 10 Nudists 11 Nascar Hall of Fame 54 Prison unit architect 57 Security Council veto 12 Part of a security system 58 Mine transport 99 Austrian physician who lent his name to an English word ending in “-ize” 100 Propose 102 “True Colors” singer, 1986 104 Roam 105 Letters on some N.Y.C. luggage 108 Actress Tyler 111 Subject of a Vatican investigation 114 Artificial plot device 118 “The Conqueror,” e.g. 119 “___ it” (“Understood”) 120 Some bills have them 121 Dolls 122 Brit’s teapot cover 123 Like some boards

26

38

39

44

40

13

28

31

32

46

56

60 66

48

83

63

64

79

80

99

112

113

95

96

97

110

98

101

103

104 114

115

105

120

121

122

123

77 Villa, e.g. 79 Portuguese king 81 Tart drink 82 Doc’s reading 85 Battle wear 87 Bond 89 Tediously didactic 90 North Korean leader or his father 93 White Rabbit’s cry

106

116

119

SOLUTION ON PAGE A8

109

87

91

118

61 ___ kwon do 63 Put away 65 Big name in frozen desserts 67 72-Across and others: Abbr. 68 “Cagney & Lacey” org. 69 Bazooka, e.g. 70 Yokel 71 Martial-arts master 76 Lady

71

82 86

100 102

81

90 94

70 75

85

93

36

65

74

89

35

69

84

88

34

59

73 78

18

54

68

77

17

50

58 62

72

49

53

57

67

92

33

47

61

16

43

52

55

15

29

42

45

14

24

41

51

111

12 21

27 30

76

11

23

25

37

10

20

22

ACROSS 1 DNA testing might reopen one 9 Uses a 13-Across on 13 “Star Trek” weapon 19 Person who’s a zero? 20 What will the French think of next? 21 Troop group 22 Dream setting 24 After-dinner choices 25 PC key 26 Some online communications, for short 27 QB Tebow 28 Thérèse de Lisieux, for one 30 :D, e.g. 33 Battle-ax 37 Grp. that coordinates E.T.A. and E.T.D. 40 Letter-shaped girder 42 Basis of a lawsuit 43 “By ___!” 44 Slip-on 46 Places for rings, maybe 48 Humble response to praise 50 Organ repair sites, briefly 51 Polished 52 ___ B. Driftwood (“A Night at the Opera” role) 53 Org. that may assess violence levels 54 PBS flagship station

9

95 Certain skiing competition 97 California beach town with a racetrack 101 Vicious 103 Doll 106 Player of golf 107 Climax 108 The euro replaced it 109 Signs

107

108 117

110 One with a neck and a lip 111 “I can’t get excited about it” 112 Bit of investors’ news, for short 113 ___ Tin Tin 115 I, to Tiberius 116 Struck 117 Laugh syllable


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Harvey: Home

Lawmakers seek new route for medical pot

CONTINUED FROM A7 “high points.� Try this: Most of us You could see some of have friends and/or family this stuff on the covers of who are elders or folks fancy home-improvement with disabilities, so if you magazines and think, want to hear from the real “pros,� go ask them what “Wow!� The concept is “univer- they did (or what they sal design,� which means wish they’d done). If they think you’re that these modifications make life easier for every- honestly interested and body, not just folks who you’re not “pitying� people who didn’t ask for any, “need� them. Or you may have heard they’ll probably tell you the phrase “aging in place,� the truth. Here’s what most of us which can mean several different things in several do: nothing. Then something bad different contexts, but just take it literally: age in this happens (usually a medical something), and here place.� Now, what do you see? we are, trying to live in a Consider doorknobs or home that is waiting for even just reaching into the who we used to be to show up, but we have to live mailbox. Turning lights off and here now. And off we go on a deson, or water off and, on or perate, fearful, emotionjust using the electrical driven foray into the wonoutlets. derful world of “home Opening or closing winimprovement,� which is dows, or even just changnot (usually) when we’re ing which way the doors likely to find the best deals open and close (and, yes: or the most competent proWider is smarter). fessionals. Reaching cabinets? Reaching counters? Reaching the freezer? Go look at We compromise the tub/shower. Here’s the truth: Most And if the only bath- of us aren’t willing to do room is upstairs, well . . . everything we “should� do, Look: There’s a lot of right? info on this stuff online So, we make compronow. mises, right? Choices. I’m willing to do “this,� but not “that.� Specialists Kinda like diet and Further (better!) there exercise. We make choices. are folks who specialize in And we’ve been making assessing your home for choices since we were old its ability to remain your enough to have any, so the home, then giving you a fact is, nothing has laundry list from which changed, but you might you can pick and choose or, want to take another look better yet, prioritize, so around because it could be you could chip away at it time to have a heart to one piece at a time. heart with “home sweet Expensive? Well, it home.� depends on what you _________ might need and what you Mark Harvey is director of might want, but I’ll bet you the price of a brighter Clallam/Jefferson Information & which operates light bulb that it’s not as Assistance, through the Olympic Area Agency bad as you imagine. on Aging. He can be reached at And do you have to do 360-452-3221 (Port Angeleseverything that shows up Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferon the aforementioned son County) or 360-374-9496 list? No. You don’t have to (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The do anything. agency can be found on FaceBut you might want to book at Olympic Area Agency on at least consider the Aging-Information & Assistance.

BY MIKE BAKER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — State lawmakers pursued a new plan Wednesday to provide medical marijuana patients with easier access to the drug, and the Governor’s Office said staff members were contributing to the bill just months after she vetoed a different proposal. Democratic Sen. Jeanne

O P A L

A L U M N I

T O R E A T

M A D A M

A B O D E

M I E P H O

L D C A S E R A T O S T L E I T I M S E C H B E A F E R B A N E L D A N E T K O S R A I N I T E N T E G R C S T E O P H I M I R E S M E R L A U P R A C L E I T H E T N E Y S

E R N S T M O A M S A O T N A D I N X Y O P N D L I N N O E R D I C

Z I P I T

A D A M I T F E I S N A I G C L E E F K A I T M I G E U G E O S

P S E E I N S C O O R S M T E R E A T M C L A I R M E N A A D S E T Y

P H A P H A L S O R B A I N T E N O L D T G E O I T R Y P A A W E U P A R H E R S A N D D P R E Y I M E E R D W E A L E G N D E D T E L G A X M A C H E A R M A D R Y E R

Kohl-Welles said she is optimistic that the Legislature can make some improvements to the system. The new proposal would allow local governments to regulate nonprofit patient cooperatives, which could grow up to 99 plants. She acknowledged that the bill could undergo changes as it has some support and some opposition from both sides.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County MoveOn Council will host a rally Saturday indoors at the Pope Marine Plaza. The rally, which will be from noon to 1:30 p.m., will commemorate the second anniversary of the Citizens United Supreme Court decision, a January 2010 ruling by a divided U.S. Supreme Court that the government may not ban

because she was concerned that federal authorities could prosecute state workers. Gregoire’s policy staff members have been helping work on the Kohl-Welles’ bill, though she hasn’t officially endorsed it, said Gregoire spokesman Cory Curtis. She is separately advocating that the federal government reclassify medical marijuana.

political spending by corporations in candidate elections. “Citizens United — No Way!� will focus on the impact of the decision. Groups such as MoveOn, Move to Amend and Progressive Democrats of America are attempting to overturn what they consider an assault on democracy that allows unlimited campaign contributions to influence elections from federal to local races, said

Dianne Joy Diamond of the Jefferson County MoveOn Council. A skit re-enacting the Supreme Court decision made two years ago is planned. “Come prepared to cheer or boo the judges as they let us know what they were thinking when they decided money equals speech and corporations have personhood,� Diamond said. Also available will be information and petitions

encouraging support of a proposed constitutional amendment nullifying the Citizens United decision from county commissioners, state legislators and members of Congress. Several speakers are planned. For more information, phone Diamond at 360-3852341. To sign up for the event, visit http://tinyurl. com/89ddmro.

Clallam Democrats to host town hall meeting with commissioner PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

S E R A N X E T S B R O N X B O M B E R S

A G R E E

G E S T S

G O O B E R

S E N S E I

L I R A

I N K S

V A S E

Who Will BeneďŹ t From Your Life’s Work? Estate Planning Package for Couples

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Democratic Party will host a town hall meeting with County Commissioner Mike Chapman on Jan. 26. T h e meeting also will include an a n n u a l State of the P a r t y update from c o u n t y Chapman party Chairman Matthew Randazzo. The event, which will be free and open to the public,

will be at 6 p.m. at the Port Angeles City Council chambers, 321 E. Fifth St., Port Angeles. Chapman has represented Clallam County District 2 since 2000. He ran as a Republican to win his first two terms but lost the county GOP organization’s support for endorsing Democrat Steve Tharinger, who was then his colleague on the county commission in 2007. Chapman ran as an independent in the 2008 election. “The Democratic Party invites the public to join us for our first general party meeting of the year at the

Death and Memorial Notice ROBERT EARL STARKEY July 1, 1919 January 11, 2012 Mr. Robert Earl Starkey, 92, of Port Townsend passed away January 11, 2012, of age-related causes. He was born July 1, 1919, in Canton, Ohio, to Edward Thomas and Laura Nettie (Hartzell) Starkey. Robert graduated from high school and attended some college and military classes. He entered the Air Force in 1940 but missed active duty in World War II because of a serious car accident. He participated as a pilot in the Berlin

Airlift and the Korean War. He also piloted B-52 bombers. Mr. Starkey retired from the Air Force in 1966 as a lieutenant colonel. As well as being an Air Force pilot in Louisiana and various places, he was also a safety manager at Boeing in Seattle. Robert married Elizabeth Jane Starkey in Greensboro, North Carolina, on June 27, 1946. Elizabeth preceded him in death on February 21, 2006. Mr. Starkey is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, Robert Nils and Yvonne Starkey, and grandson Evan Starkey of Port Townsend.

$800 Flat Fee 2 Wills, 2 Healthcare Directives & 2 Power of Attorneys

1C5141594

Olympic Peninsula Law Offices, LLC in Port Ludlow Free initial consultation by phone. Call today (360)437-4172 Amanda Wilson, Esq. Estate Planning Attorney Home Visits

WANTED GOLD • SILVER COINS • DIAMONDS

Washington’s Largest 0LOLWDU\DQG6HQLRU%RQXV Gold & Coin Buyer SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY

ARE YOU GETTING THEHighest MOST FOR YOUR COINS &Paid GOLD? Guaranteed Prices 21565624

6HTXLP‡   (DVW:DVKLQJWRQ$YH6XLWH

“I am very frustrated,� Kohl-Welles said. “This is like a big puzzle, trying to put together the pieces into a coherent whole that will make sense for all the different groups. It is an extremely daunting challenge.� Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed last year’s plan, which would have provided statewide regulation,

MoveOn plans rally Saturday

Solution to Puzzle on A7 C O C A

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

+RXUV0RQGD\)ULGD\DPSP6DWXUGD\DPSP

Death Notices Edward R. Holding Nov. 13, 1925 — Jan. 13, 2012

Port Angeles resident Edward R. Holding died of age-related causes. He was 86. His obituary will be published later.

Services: Friday at 11 a.m. at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday. A convenient form is at www.peninsuladailynews. com under “Obituary Forms.� ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Port Angeles City Council chambers,� Randazzo said. “After I give a quick update on what the party is up to, I’ll introduce my good friend Commissioner Mike Chapman and moderate a town hall with questions and answers from the audience.� Randazzo said Chapman “has been an integral member of a superb team of county commissioners over the past 11 years, and with the election of Republican Jim McEntire, he is generally considered to be the swing vote on the board going forward.� The third county commissioner, Mike Doherty, is

a Democrat. “I’m sure local Democrats will have plenty of very good questions for the commissioner about how the county government can best overcome the challenges it faces,� Randazzo said. McEntire was elected in November to fill the seat vacated by Tharinger, who did not seek re-election, saying he wanted to focus on his duties as a representative of the 24th District in the state Legislature. The 24th District covers Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor County.

Death and Memorial Notice MELVIN DORMAIER April 8, 1930 December 17, 2011 Mel passed away on December 17, 2011, in Bremerton, Washington. He was born on April 8, 1930, in Moscow, Idaho, to Albert and Barbara Dormaier. He lived in the Quincy/Wenatchee area until his family moved to Bremerton, Washington, in 1936. Mel served as a “Tin Can Sailor� aboard the USS Henry M. Tucker during the Korean War. He went from the Navy to an apprenticeship program at the Keyport Torpedo Station, where he remained until he retired in 1985. He enjoyed his retirement by keeping busy creating and fixing things. He proudly said,� I can fix anything but a half moon and a broken heart.� He especially enjoyed “helping� and “supervising� the work of his many friends. His latest pride and joy was the 1948 Earthmaster tractor he restored, used and displayed to equipment lovers. He enjoyed many wonderful years filled with great friends, tall tales over coffee, smoke or drink, and his many wild adventures. It was common for him to say, “If I die tomorrow, I sure

Mr. Dormaier had fun.� He is survived by his three children, daughters Janine Carlson and Melanie Long (John) and his son, Derrill; four beautiful granddaughters; three great-grandsons; a great granddaughter; and three sisters, Lila of Port Orchard and Julia and Dottie, both of Alabama. He was preceded in death by 12 brothers and sisters and his lifelong friend Wayne Martin. We sure had fun, didn’t we, Dad? We love you. His family would like to thank Dr. Larri Anne Mishko, the West Adult Family Home and Hospice of Kitsap County. A celebration of life will be held at the Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, on Sunday, January 22, 2012, at 1 p.m.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at www.peninsuladailynews.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 19, 2012 PAGE

A9

Are openly religious out of bounds? A GROUP OF conservative evangelical leaders met in Texas last weekend and endorsed a Roman Catholic for president. Given the history of evanCal gelical antipathy toward the Thomas theological underpinnings of the Roman Catholic Church, that in itself signals a remarkable evolution (pardon the word), along with a considerable amount of political pragmatism. The blessing of what was once called the “Religious Right” fell on the once-married Rick Santorum and not the thrice married and more recent convert to Catholicism, Newt Gingrich. The endorsement came on the same weekend when Tebowmania was at its height, as were the ratings for CBS, which carried the Denver Broncos-New England Patriots football game. Tebow’s Broncos were crushed by the superior and less openly religious Patriots. Despite evidence that politics (and sports) cannot deliver America from its collective sins, evangelicals repeatedly search for an earthly savior. So desperate are they to find this deliverer that they have glommed onto the Catholic Santorum, a man whose religion

many of them vilify and hold in utter contempt, in hopes of trumpeting their conservative values and faith-based initiatives in the coming election. In so doing, they make a mistake their Scriptures warn against. The Kingdom of God functions best, said the One who ought to know, when it is invisible, or hidden. In his numerous parables, Jesus spoke of it being like a treasure hidden in a field (Matthew 13:44), or as tiny as a mustard seed (Mark 4:30-32). As for prayer, He said to do that privately, not in public “ . . . like the hypocrites . . . ” (Matthew 6:5-6) Those who spend a lot of time arguing for the inerrancy of Scripture seem to gloss over these instructions when it comes to politics and football. Why do many evangelicals feel the need to see their faith on public display? Are they that insecure about the One in whom they claim to believe? His Apostle, Paul, said, “We walk by faith, not by sight.” (2 Corinthians 5:7) Was he kidding? I’m sure Tim Tebow is as fine a man as everyone says he is; everyone except Bill Maher and other “apatheist” detractors. But the Jesus about whom Tebow frequently speaks and to whom he drops to one knee to publicly praise, said to go into your closet and pray in secret and then your prayers will be heard.

The point has been made by several commentators that God also loves players on the losing side of games (and elections), so why don’t losers praise Him and we them? Just asking. Something else evangelicals gloss over: Scripture says all authority comes from God and He puts people in power who serve His purposes, not ours. There are too many verses to cite here. Look it up. For those who claim to believe the Bible is “the Word of God,” it means God has a purpose for President Obama being in office. Evangelicals may not like it and many may not vote for him, but they can’t credibly deny this truth. In the ultimate church-state moment, Pontius Pilate asked Jesus, “Don’t you realize I have power either to free you or to crucify you?” Jesus responded that Pilate would not have that power had God not given it to him. (John 19:11) Case closed. American Christianity is unique and the antithesis of what the faith looks like in much of the world. Elsewhere, Christians pay a high price for their faith. Some are denied their freedom, some are denied jobs and still others are denied their lives. Christian missionaries labor for low pay, receive little recognition and are often persecuted.

Peninsula Voices Ziomkowski praise My husband and I have known Yvonne Ziomkowski, the city of Port Angeles’ finance director, for more than 20 years. Our children played together, and my husband taught her children in school. I have also been in an investment club with Yvonne since 1997, for which she served as treasurer for many years. Yvonne is one of the most hardworking, disciplined and trustworthy

people that I know. While the county has struggled with its budget and has furloughed employees, the city of Port Angeles appears to have been much better prepared for the recession. I am so sorry that the city has decided to make a public display of the matter surrounding her unused vacation-time reimbursement. I also work for a public agency, and the laws that govern vacation and

sick-leave buy-outs are very complicated and confusing. It is not at all uncommon for different interpretations of these laws to result in changes after audits are made. This is usually an internal issue, and blame is not slung around. Sometimes after audits, employees receive more money, and sometimes they pay back money. Public employee retirement funds are not something that we have access to until we retire, and the

OUR

Jesus said those who are greatest on Earth will be least in Heaven and vice versa. (Matthew 19:30) Righteousness doesn’t come from the top, but from the bottom. A nation that focuses on money and pleasure will get political leadership that reflects that idolatry. The list of great nations that have collapsed throughout history is a long one. Self-indulgence toppled most of them. Invading armies merely finished the process. Instead of intensely focusing

on football and the next election, perhaps evangelicals ought to pray more; in private, of course, and with the right motives. ________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune. com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

money is far from being a hidden asset. Yvonne has worked tirelessly and prudently to keep the city above water through a very challenging time. The city needs her to be at her job right now continuing to provide the organizational and leadership skills that she is so adept at. Freda Tallmadge, Port Angeles

Navy’s wharf plans Interestingly, soon after

reading the article on Page D4 in the Jan. 15 Peninsula Daily News, “Plan For New Navy Wharf Fires Up Debate On Nukes,” I read in John Steinbeck’s 1941 classic, The Log From The Sea of Cortez (Penguin Books, 1986): From Page 103: “Some time ago a Congress of honest men refused an appropriation of several hundreds of millions of dollars to feed our people. “They said, and meant it, that the economic struc-

ture of the country would collapse under the pressure of such expenditure. “And now the same men, just as honestly, are devoting many billions to manufacture, transportation, and detonation of explosives to protect the people they would not feed.” And by the way, at 60, I can say with some fair certainty that I, along with many others, am already against the next war. Craig Chambers, Port Angeles

The day Wikipedia went dark — and why WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18, marked the largest online protest in the history of the Internet. Websites from large to small “went dark” in protest of proposed legislation before the U.S. House and Senate that could profoundly change the Internet. Amy The two bills, SOPA Goodman (the Stop Online Piracy Act) in the House and PIPA (the Protect Intellectual Property Act) in the Senate, ostensibly aim to stop the piracy of copyrighted material over the Internet on websites based outside the U.S. (See related story today, Page A10.) Critics, among them the founders of Google, Wikipedia, the Internet Archive, Tumblr and Twitter, counter that the laws will stifle innovation and investment, hallmarks of the free, open Internet. The Obama administration has offered muted criticism of the legislation, but, as many of his supporters have painfully learned, what President Barack

Obama questions one day he signs into law the next. First, the basics. The two bills are very similar. SOPA would allow copyright holders to complain to the U.S. attorney general about a foreign website they allege is “committing or facilitating the commission of criminal violations” of copyright law. This relates mostly to pirated movies and music. SOPA would allow the movie industry, through the courts and the U.S. attorney general, to send a slew of demands that Internet service providers (ISPs) and search-engine companies shut down access to those alleged violators, and even to prevent linking to those sites, thus making them “unfindable.” It would also bar Internet advertising providers from making payments to websites accused of copyright violations. SOPA could, then, shut down a community-based site like YouTube if just one of its millions of users was accused of violating one U.S. copyright. As David Drummond, Google’s chief legal officer and an opponent of the legislation, blogged: “Last year alone we acted on copyright takedown notices for more than 5 million web pages.” “PIPA & SOPA will censor the

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

web, will risk our industry’s track record of innovation and job creation, and will not stop piracy.” Corynne McSherry, intellectual property director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (www.EFF.org), told me: “These bills propose new powers for the government and for private actors to create, effectively, blacklists of sites . . . then force service providers to block access to those sites. “That’s why we call these the censorship bills.” The bills, she says, are the creation of the entertainment, or “content,” industries: “SOPA, in particular, was negotiated without any consultation with the technology sector. They were specifically excluded.” The exclusion of the tech sector has alarmed not only Silicon Valley executives, but also conservatives like Utah Republican Congressman Jason Chaffetz, a tea party favorite. He said in a December House Judiciary Committee hearing, “We’re basically going to reconfigure the Internet and how it’s going to work, without bringing in the nerds.” PIPA sponsor Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said in a press release: “Much of what has been claimed about [PIPA] is flatly

wrong and seems intended more to stoke fear and concern than to shed light or foster workable solutions.” Sadly, Leahy’s ire sounds remarkably similar to that of his former Senate colleague Christopher Dodd, who, after retiring, took the job of chairman and CEO of the powerful lobbying group Motion Picture Association of America (at a reported salary of $1.2 million annually), one of the chief backers of SOPA/PIPA. Said Dodd of the broad-based, grass-roots Internet protest: “It’s a dangerous and troubling development when the platforms that serve as gateways to information intentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests.” EFF’s McSherry said: “No one asked the Internet — well, the Internet is speaking now. People are really rising up and saying: ‘Don’t interfere with basic Internet infrastructure. We won’t stand for it.’” As the Internet blackout protest progressed Wednesday, and despite Dodd’s lobbying, legislators began retreating from support for the bills. The Internet roared, and the politicians listened, reminiscent of the popular uprising against media consolidation in 2003

proposed by then-Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael Powell, the son of Gen. Colin Powell. Information is the currency of democracy, and people will not sit still as moneyed interests try to deny them access. When Internet users visited the sixth-most popular website on the planet during the protest blackout, the English-language section of www.Wikipedia.org, they found this message: “Imagine a World Without Free Knowledge. “For over a decade, we have spent millions of hours building the largest encyclopedia in human history. “Right now, the U.S. Congress is considering legislation that could fatally damage the free and open Internet.” In a world with fresh, Internet-fueled revolutions, it seems that U.S. politicians are getting the message. ________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

NEWS DEPARTMENT

HAVE YOUR SAY

Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ ROY TANAKA, news editor; 360-417-3539, roy.tanaka@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hot line: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 19, 2012 SECTION

A10

Wikipedia blackout not sitting well with editors BY PETER SVENSSON

The Wikipedia home page shows a stark blackand-white page with the message “Imagine a world without free knowledge” at an office in Brussels on Wednesday.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Can the world live without Wikipedia for a day? The shutdown of one of the Internet’s mostvisited sites is not sitting well with some of its volunteer editors, who say the protest of anti-piracy legislation could threaten the credibility of their work. “My main concern is that it puts the organization in the role of advocacy, and that’s a slippery slope,” said editor Robert Lawton, a Michigan computer consultant who would prefer that the encyclopedia stick to being a neutral repository of knowledge. “Before we know it, we’re blacked out because we want to save the whales.” Wikipedia’s English-language site shut down at midnight Eastern Standard Time Tuesday and the organization said it would stay down for 24 hours. Instead of encyclopedia articles, visitors to the site saw a stark black-and-white page with the message: “Imagine a world without free knowledge.” It carried a link to information about the two congressional bills and details about how to reach lawmakers.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

It is the first time the English site has been blacked out. Wikipedia’s Italian site came down once briefly in protest to an Internet censorship bill put forward by the Berlusconi government. The bill did not advance. The shutdown adds to a growing body of critics who are speaking out against the legislation. But some editors are so uneasy with the move that they have blacked out their own user profile pages or resigned their administrative rights on the site to protest. Some likened the site’s decision to fighting censor-

ship with censorship. One of the site’s own “five pillars” of conduct says that Wikipedia “is written from a neutral point of view.” The site strives to “avoid advocacy, and we characterize information and issues rather than debate them.” Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales argues that the site can maintain neutrality in content even as it takes public positions on issues. “The encyclopedia will always be neutral. The community need not be, not when the encyclopedia is threatened,” he tweeted. The Wikimedia Foundation, which administers the site, announced the blackout

$ Briefly . . . Yahoo co-founder leaving

late Monday, after polling its community of volunteer contributors and editors and getting responses from 1,800 of them. The protest is aimed at the Stop Online Piracy Act in the House and the Protect Intellectual Property Act under consideration in the Senate. “If passed, this legislation will harm the free and open Internet and bring about new tools for censorship of international websites inside the United States,” the foundation said.

Crackdown on piracy Both bills are designed to crack down on sales of pirated American products overseas, and they have the support of the film and music industry. Among the opponents are many Internet companies such as Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Twitter, eBay and AOL. They say the bills would hurt the industry and infringe on free-speech rights. Dick Costollo, CEO of Twitter, said he opposes the legislation as well, but shutting down the service was out of the question. “Closing a global business in reaction to single-issue national politics is foolish,” Costollo tweeted.

Cozy insider trading scheme outlined in court complaint

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang is leaving the struggling Internet company, as it tries to revive its revenue growth and win over disgruntled shareholders under a new leader. The departure, announced Tuesday, punctuates the end of an era at Yahoo, a tarnished Internet icon that has spent much of the last decade scrambling to catch up to Internet search leader Google Inc. — a company that got early encouragement and advice from Yang. It comes just two weeks after Yahoo Inc. hired former PayPal executive Scott Thompson as its CEO. Thompson is the fourth look to minus 0.3 percent from 1.8 percent. CEO in less than five years to try to turn around Nonferrous metals Yahoo.

Bank warning BEIJING — The World Bank warned Wednesday of a possible slump in global economic growth and urged developing countries to prepare for shocks that could be more severe than the 2008 crisis. The bank cut its growth forecast for developing countries this year to 5.4 percent from 6.2 percent and for developed countries to 1.4 percent from 2.7 percent. For the 17 countries that use the euro currency, it forecast a contraction, cutting their growth out-

NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $0.9849 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.7125 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.7260 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2046.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9071 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1647.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1655.20 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $30.440 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $30.106 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1509.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1526.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HEALTHY FAMILIES

www.trisa.us

21565198

fund to make approxiThe illegal profits in the earnings announcements mately $57 million in illegal case were made after tips regarding Dell and Nvidia NEW YORK — A hedge were shared among co-con- Corp., according to court fund co-founder, a hedge profits through trades. spirators about upcoming papers. fund portfolio manager, four Illegal profits financial analysts and a 2 4 - H O U R C R I S I S L I N E Dell Inc. employee teamed Inside information about up in a record-setting of Clallam County insider trading scheme that Dell earnings resulted in www.healthyfam.org netted more than $61.8 mil- $3.8 million in illegal lion in illegal profits based profits at another hedge 3 6 0 . 4 5 2 . H E L P ( 4 3 5 7 ) on trades of a single stock, fund and $1 million in authorities said Wednesday illegal profits at a third • Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, & Child Abuse as they described a cozy hedge fund, the complaint • Parenting Classes & Support Groups, Safe Shelter said. network of friends in The Dell inside informa- • Supervised Visitation finance who made the most & Third Party Transfer of Children of their connections with tion also allowed an investcorrupt employees of tech- ment firm to avoid losses of • Speakers Bureau approximately $78,000, nology companies. 1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811 The scheme was out- authorities said. lined in a criminal complaint in U.S. District Court in Manhattan that charged four of the men with conspiracy to commit securities fraud and securities fraud, among other charges. Three analysts have already pleaded guilty and are cooperating with the government, according to the court papers.

360 457 6759 ■

“Working with people to create beautiful homes and environments.”

0A5100780

PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD AND INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE FACILITY

CAREER FAIR

Size of scheme Prosecutors are highlighting the size of the scheme, saying the co-conspirators netted more than $61.8 million in illegal profits based on trades of a single stock from 2008 through 2009. Anthony Chiasson, a cofounder at former hedge fund group Level Global Investors LP, was among three men arrested early Wednesday. He surrendered to the FBI. In court papers, he was credited with a starring role in the securities fraud. Authorities said a hedge fund analyst fed Chiasson inside information about an upcoming announcement of Dell’s earnings for the first and second quarters of 2008, allowing Chiasson and others at his hedge

Follow the PDN on

January 27th and 28th, 2012 9 am to 5 pm

Kitsap SUN Pavilion Kitsap County Fairgrounds 1200 NW Fairgrounds Road Bremerton, WA Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) and other Career Fair participants expect to hire in the folllowing areas over the next year:

Student Trainee (Various Trades); Helper (Various Trades); Journey or Worker level positions in a variety of trades and Physical Science Technicians. This is an opportunity to explore career opportunities and meet with managers from PSNS & IMF, other local Department of the Navy Commands, and local businesses involved with ship maintenance and repair. BACKPACKS, BRIEFCASES, etc. will not be allowed into the Pavilion. All hand carried items are subject to search.

For additional information on positions and job announcements, and how to apply, go to www.navsea.navy.mil/shipyards/puget. For questions not addressed at the websites, e-mail psnsproductionjobs@navy.mil . The US Government is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

21571195

TWITTER pendailynews

21570563

FACEBOOK Peninsula Daily


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 19, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Having some fun with powder THERE WILL BE no more cries for more snow. Thanks to Snowpocalypse Matt 2012, I think we’re all set on Schubert the white stuff here on the North Olympic Peninsula. The question is, what are we to do with it? Well, as a man of Midwestern descent, I can think of at least one thing I’ve always been a big fan of: Getting it off the roads. Save for that, there are a few other fun activities available to those looking to savor the snow before it all melts away. I’d suggest snow skitching, but I’m pretty sure the PDN legal team would object. So here are a few safer alternatives unlikely to result in permanent scars (and, yes, I have one on my left arm): ■ Snowball fight — The snowball fight always sounds innocent enough in practice. Of course, once one actually begins getting pelted with little bits of packed snow — especially in the face — things quickly turn ugly. Soon, snowballs are armed with bits of rock, the neighbor’s car is tattered with tiny dents and mom is treating various eye injuries. Be warned. ■ Demolition sledding — Why go sledding, when you can go demolition sledding? Few things combine the thrill of sliding down a snow-covered slope with the rush of pummeling everything in your path like demolition sledding. All you need are four sleds, a sizable slope and four people who don’t mind manhandling their buddies while hurtling to their eventual deaths. Much like snowball fighting, things can get a little touchy. That being said, the best demolition sledders are often parents. ■ Igloo building — Tree houses are all well and good, but they take substantial time, effort and materials to construct. An igloo can be put together in a matter of hours if enough snow is available as well as a few shovels and something to hold the roof together (e.g. some folding chairs). One note to the parents involved: You might want to keep tabs on what goes in those little snow homes. Just sayin’. ■ Snowman making — Obviously, this time-honored tradition goes back generations. Snowman builders get to develop their artistic side through sculpture while also creating the friend they likely never had. Best of all, the whole activity ends with a valuable life lesson after Frosty dies his inevitable slow and disfiguring death on the front lawn. “Yes, everything eventually dies, little Timmy. EVEN YOU!” ■ Ridge return — Let’s face it, all these fun activities are simply a substitute for the real thing up on Hurricane Ridge. Ranger-led snowshoes hikes, skiing and snowboarding are much more fun things to do than getting a snowball to the face (although, hitting someone with a snowball in the face can be nearly as enjoyable.) Now that the Ridge’s ski and snowboard school is set to open this weekend — look for more on this in Friday’s PDN — you don’t have any excuses. Don’t know how? Learn. Trust me, it’s much easier than having to deal with little Timmy’s existential tears.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Sark adds another coach ers coach duties and running backs coach and former Roughrider added new titles for some of its Joel Thomas coaches from last season. has the added Johnny Nansen is now title of associThomas assistant head coach, recruiting ate head coordinator and special teams coach/offense. coordinator. Thomas is a Port Angeles Jimmie Dougherty has High School graduate and one added the title of passing game of the first additions to Sarkicoordinator to his wide receivsian’s original staff.

Kiesau named off. coordinator; Thomas receives new job title THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Washington plucked another coach from the staff at California, making Eric Kiesau the Huskies’ new offensive coordinator on Wednesday to complete the makeover of Washington’s coaching staff. The football program also

Running back Chris Polk thrived under Thomas’ guidance the past three years. He will now work with Kiesau, who is the second coach to depart from Berkeley for Seattle in the past few days, joining new Washington defensive line coach Tosh Lupoi. “Eric is a great fit for our football program,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said in a statement. TURN

TO

FOOTBALL/B2

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s Terrence Ross (31) and Tony Wroten react after Ross made a dunk against Washington State during Sunday’s game in Seattle. The Huskies have an important homestand this weekend against the Bay Area schools.

Time for home stand Bay Area teams visit for critical weekend BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — For this year at least, Lorenzo Romar is a big fan of an odd scheduling quirk in the Pac-12. The idea of getting to host California and Stanford, the two teams at the top of the Pac-12 standings with Washington, and not having to make a trip to the Bay Area later in the year is quite appealing. “I think this year I really like it given that they’re playing the best basketball, two of the best teams in the league,” Romar said. “Yeah, I kind of like that idea this year.” Yes, it’s still extremely early in a conference season that doesn’t end until the first weekend in March.

But considering Washington and the Bay Area schools match up only once this season, this week’s meetings between the Huskies (11-6, 4-1 Pac-12) and Golden Bears (15-4, 5-1) tonight and Washington and Stanford (15-3, 5-1) on Saturday could be significant down the road. Washington doesn’t have many impressive notches on its season resume thus far. They aren’t alone in a Pac-12 that has scored no victories over teams in the AP Top 25 this season and has no program ranked higher than Cal’s 40th place spot in the RPI. Because of the general lack of impressive victories throughout the conference, pundits have wondered whether the Pac-12 will be limited to just a couple of

Next Game Today vs. Cal at Hec Ed Time: 5:30 p.m. On TV: ROOT

bids when the NCAA tournament rolls around in March. That means any win with some significance that can be added to the resume is amplified because the perception is that the conference is down this year. So no matter how each game goes this week, it could be a boost for any of the three schools. “We’re going to need to be focused and really dialed in for this one,” Washington guard Abdul Gaddy said about Cal. “They’re just solid all around. They don’t really have any weaknesses.” All three schools are on remarkably similar runs of late. Each is currently on a threegame winning streak. TURN

TO

DAWGS/B2

Wilcox likely to not suit up THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Washington’s C.J. Wilcox said he was essentially playing on one leg last week against rival Seattle, the discomfort in his left hip so severe he was doing all he could to mask how much it hurt. Pretty impressive then that he scored a career-high 25 points in the victory. “I have no idea [how],” Wilcox said on Tuesday. Wilcox, the Huskies’ second-leading scoring, is highly doubtful to play in this week’s key home games against California and Stanford with first-place in the Pac-12 Conference on the line. Wilcox has a stress fracture in his left femur near his hip. TURN

TO

WILCOX/B2

Sports grind to halt on Peninsula Postponements abound for area teams due to inclement weather PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The casualties of Snowpocalypse 2012 continue to pile up. Nary a North Olympic Peninsula team has been able to play a game so far this week, with several high school sporting events postponed or cancelled due to inclement weather. A slate of games scheduled for Tuesday was postponed.

Among the boys games that were put off were Orting at Chimacum, Port Townsend at North Kitsap, Olympic at Port Angeles, North Mason at Sequim and Forks at Rainier. Girls games canceled included Forks at Rainier, North Kitsap at Port Townsend, Orting at Chimacum, Port Angeles at Olympic and Sequim at North Mason.

Wednesday saw the postponement of several games as well, including girls and boys basketball games between Clallam Bay and Crescent in Joyce. Port Townsend, Port Angeles, Sequim and Forks each had to put off wrestling duals set for that night as well. The two Port Townsend basketball games from Tuesday night have been rescheduled for Jan. 23 at the same locations. The Port Angeles boys are reset to host Olympic on Jan. 26, while the girls will visit their

Preps Olympic counterparts the same night. Port Angeles’ girls were also forced to cancel a special Martin Luther King Jr. Day game on Monday against Foster. A few area teams were spared any winter carnage, including the Peninsula College men’s and women’s basketball teams. The Pirates were already scheduled to be idle Wednesday.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Noon (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Humana Challenge at La Quinta Golf & Country Club in La Quinta, Calif. 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Men’s College Basketball, Wake Forest at Duke. 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Vanderbilt at Alabama. 5 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Los Angeles Lakers at Miami Heat. 5:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, California at Washington. 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Men’s College Basketball, North Carolina at Virginia Tech. 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Illinois at Penn State. 7:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, UCLA at Oregon State. 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Dallas Mavericks at Utah Jazz. 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis, Australian Open Third Round at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia. Midnight (27) ESPN2 Tennis, Australian Open Third Round at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia.

SPORTS SHOT

Today No events scheduled

Preps Basketball AP BOYS Poll The Associated Press Class 4A School Record Points Last 1. Bellarmine Prep (9) 12-1 90 1 2. Davis 11-2 81 2 3. Skyline 12-3 72 3 4. Union 10-3 58 5 5. Snohomish 12-2 49 8 T6. Redmond 11-3 35 10 T6. Garfield 9-4 35 7 8. Central Valley 9-3 31 NR 9. Gonzaga Prep 8-4 10 NR 10. Kent Meridian 10-5 8 NR Others receiving votes: Lewis and Clark 6. Curtis 6. Edmonds-Woodway 4. Olympia 3. Ferris 2. Issaquah 2. Bothell 2. Mt. Rainier 1. Class 3A School Record Points Last 1. Rainier Beach (9) 13-1 90 1 2. Kamiakin 13-0 81 3 3. Mountlake Terrace 14-0 70 4 4. Seattle Prep 12-2 65 5 5. University 9-3 41 6 6. Lincoln 11-3 39 2 7. Columbia River 12-3 24 T9 8. Foss 13-3 14 8 9. Wilson, Woodrow 11-2 13 NR 10. Franklin 12-3 11 NR Others receiving votes: Lakes 11. Kennewick 8. Kennedy 6. Bellevue 6. Shadle Park 4. Lake Washington 4. Ferndale 3. Sammamish 3. Mountain View 2. Class 2A School Record Points Last 1. Lynden (5) 12-2 85 3 2. Pullman (3) 13-2 82 4 3. Clover Park (1) 11-3 68 1 4. Squalicum 11-2 61 2 5. Sehome 11-2 50 7 6. Sumner 13-2 49 6 7. W. Valley (Spokane) 12-1 32 9 8. Toppenish 10-2 17 NR 9. White River 11-4 14 NR 10. Ellensburg 9-3 11 5 Others receiving votes: North Thurston 9. Mark Morris 6. Kingston 5. Sequim 2. Tumwater 2. Clarkston 1. River Ridge 1. Class 1A School Points Last 1. Cashmere (2) 76 5 2. Naches Valley (5) 68 3 3. Bellevue Christian 65 2 T4. Lynden Christian (2) 62 4 T4. Granger 62 1 6. King’s 45 6 7. Zillah 34 10 8. Okanogan 31 T7 9. Toledo 29 T7 10. Freeman 6 NR Others receiving votes: Kiona Benton 4. Newport 4. Seattle Christian 3. Seattle Academy 2. Life Christian Academy 2. Meridian 1. Chewelah (Jenkins) 1.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BLAME

THE TOOL

Donald Young of the U.S. smashes his racket in frustration during his secondround match against Slovakia’s Lukas Lacko at the Australian Open in Melbourne on Wednesday. Young lost the match 6-3, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3. Class 2B School Points Last 1. NW Christian (Colbert) (8) 80 1 2. Bear Creek School 67 3 T3. Adna 56 2 T3. White Swan 56 4 5. Dayton 43 5 6. LaConner 42 6 7. Toutle Lake 33 7 8. Colfax 16 9 9. Davenport 15 8 10. Wahkiakum 12 10 Others receiving votes: Napavine 9. Lake Roosevelt 5. Raymond 4. Riverside Christian 2. Class 1B School Points Last 1. Colton (7) 79 1 2. Valley Christian 68 3 3. Moses Lake Christian 62 4 4. Almira Coulee-Hartline (1) 55 2 5. Sunnyside Christian 50 5 Others receiving votes: Lummi 6.

AP GIRLS Poll The Associated Press Class 4A Class 4A School Record Points 1. Central Valley (8) 12-0 80 2. Mt. Rainier 14-0 71 3. Lake Stevens 14-0 65 4. Woodinville 13-1 56 5. Stanwood 13-1 46 6. Skyview 11-2 35 6. Jackson 13-2 35 8. Emerald Ridge 12-1 21 9. Gonzaga Prep 10-2 16 10. Auburn Riverside 12-1 14 Class 3A School Record Points 1. Prairie (6) 13-1 78 2. Kamiakin (2) 13-0 74 3. Cleveland 12-2 61 4. Auburn Mount. 12-3 55 5. Holy Names 10-1 46 6. Wilson, Woodrow 10-2 39

7. Seattle Prep 8. University 9. Juanita 10. Shorecrest Last 2 1 3 4 5 7 6 8 NR 9 Last 1 2 T3 T3 5 6

11-3 31 8 9-3 29 7 12-2 18 9 11-2 7 10 Class 2A School Record Points Last 1. White River 14-1 72 2 2. E. Valley (Yakima) (7)13-0 70 1 3. Clarkston 12-1 58 3 4. W. F. West 13-1 57 4 5. Burlington-Edison 12-2 49 5 6. Lynden 11-3 43 6 7. Wapato 11-1 27 7 8. Sehome 11-3 18 9 9. North Thurston 11-2 17 NR 10. E. Valley (Spo.) (1) 8-5 10 NR Others receiving votes: River Ridge 5. Mark Morris 5. Black Hills 4. Blaine 2. Archbishop Murphy 2. Deer Park 1. Class 1A School Points Last 1. Freeman (8) 80 1 2. Cashmere 71 2

Dawgs: Host Bay Area schools CONTINUED FROM B1 Washington has won seven of nine after dropping three straight in December. California has wins in nine of its last 11 following a loss at San Diego State. Since losing to No. 1 Syracuse at Madison Square Garden, Stanford’s only losses have come against Butler and Oregon. But the three are finding success in completely different ways. Washington is the second-highest scoring team in the league that can play defense when it wants, evident when it outscored Washington State 38-18 over the final 12 minutes in last Sunday’s 75-65 win against the Cougars.

Terrence Ross scored 26 of his career-high 30 points in the second half of Washington’s rally. “They’re a great offensive rebound team, as usual. They get to the glass really well. They’ve got a bunch of guys that can score the ball,” California coach Mike Montgomery said. “Obviously, [Tony] Wroten can get to the glass anytime he wants. You’ve got a guy in Ross that can really, really score the ball.” Stanford is the best team in the league in rebounding margin and is second to California in scoring margin. Even though the Cardinal had just two 20-point scorers all season, they are third in the league in scoring

behind Oregon State and Washington. Romar called California the most complete team in the league, noting the scoring punch of Allen Crabbe, the all-around skills of Jorge Gutierrez and the Golden Bears’ impressive defense, which is holding teams to fewer than 60 points a game. Since the start of conference play, California has allowed 70 points or more only once. “Defensively they don’t give you anything, they play really good man-to-man defense and they will change their defense at times,” Romar said. “But offensively, their starting five, there is not a player out there that can’t

Pac-12 Standings Conf. Overall Stanford 5-1 15-3 California 5-1 15-4 Washington 4-1 11-6 Oregon 4-2 13-5 Arizona 3-2 12-6 Colorado 3-2 11-6 UCLA 3-2 10-7 Arizona State 2-3 6-11 Washington State 1-4 9-8 Utah 1-4 4-13 Oregon State 1-5 11-7 USC 0-5 5-13 Tonight’s Games Arizona State at Colorado, 5:30 p.m. Arizona at Utah, 5:30 p.m. California at Washington, 5:30 p.m. USC at Oregon, 5:30 p.m. Stanford at Washington St., 7:05 p.m. UCLA at Oregon State, 7:30 p.m.

make a play. “They’re a really good team right now in my opinion.”

Wilcox: Not expected to suit up CONTINUED FROM B1 An MRI done after the win over Seattle revealed the extent of the injury that’s been bothering the sharpshooting guard since around Christmas. There is a concern that the stress fracture could develop into a full-fledged break of the bone and rest is the only cure. So for now, Wilcox is a spectator with his 15.5 points per game stuck on the bench.

“It’s really just day by day. Right now I feel fine, but it’s really just the worry about breaking it and not being able to play again,” Wilcox said. “It’s really just a safety thing. I feel like I can play right now but just being on the safe side.” Wilcox was a late scratch for last Sunday’s 75-65 win over Washington State. While he was stuck on the bench, Terrence Ross scored 26 of his career-high 30 points in the second half as Washington rallied.

With Wilcox out, Washington used a four-guard rotation that included Tony Wroten, Abdul Gaddy, Ross and freshman Hikeem Stewart. Although Stewart didn’t score, Washington coach Lorenzo Romar was complementary of Stewart’s 10 minutes. In the victory over Seattle, Wilcox made 6 of 15 shots, including four 3-pointers and was 9 of 11 at the free throw line in 34 minutes.

Despite the injury, he had played at least 27 minutes in his previous seven games before sitting out Sunday. The Huskies remain hopeful that Wilcox will be able to play next week at the Arizona schools, even though he is mostly limited to shooting free throws in practice. Before he can play, Wilcox will have to be cleared by doctors who plan on giving him weekly X-rays and he will be put through “jump tests” to make sure the bone can handle the impact.

Football: UW completes football staff at Colorado under thencoach Dan Hawkins. Kiesau spent five seasons in Boulder, the first three as receivers coach. He returned last season to California as receivers coach and passing game coordinator for the Golden

Bears. Kiesau worked four seasons at Cal before leaving for Colorado. Kiesau replaces Doug Nussmeier, who took the same job at Alabama after serving as UW offensive coordinator for the three years.

Briefly . . . Klahhane excels in big competition VANCOUVER, Wash. — The Klahhane Gymnastics Excel Team saw all seven of its members reach the awards podium at the Shooting for the Stars Recreational Optional Meet last Sunday. Adare McMinn, Sydney Miner and Emily VanDyken each had first-place showings to lead Klahhane at the meet at Naydenov Gymnastics. McMinn took first allaround in the 12-year-old age group, putting up firstand third-place marks on the uneven bars and balance beam, respectively. Lillian Oden was fourth in the same age group, with fifth-place marks on the balance beam and floor exercise. Minder was first on the balance beam in the Child C Intermediate Division. VanDyken placed third in the all-around in the

14-year-old Advanced Division. She was first on the balance beam, third on the uneven bars and fifth in vault and floor exercise. Hannah Middlestead took fifth all-around in the 15-and-over group and had event places of second (balance beam) and third (uneven bars). Lexi Hefton took fourth on the uneven bars in the 14-year-old age group, and Nikki Price was fourth on the vault and uneven bars in the 12-year-old group.

Sequim athletes SEQUIM — Jayson Brocklesby and Karli Furgurson were recognized as the Sequim High School athletes of the week. Brocklesby earned the honor after scoring 22 points in the Sequim boys basketball team’s win over Port Townsend. Furgurson was awarded for her play on the bowling team. She continues to improve and scored a high of 129 to bring her season average to 107 for the week. Peninsula Daily News

ESTATE SALE: 8 of 10. Rain or snow, we are in the basement. Huge record collection, paper shredders, VCR movies and players, coffee makers, blenders, craft stuff, tools, and other stuff men like. Free stuff too.

Sat., 9-2 p.m. 2521 S. Laurel St. 557315

CONTINUED FROM B1 ington and brings a wealth of knowledge in it.” By coming to WashingAdded Sarkisian, “I’ve been following his career for ton, Kiesau will get a second opportunity at being an a number of years. “He comes from a similar offensive coordinator. He offensive system as what we previously was offensive already run here at Wash- coordinator for two seasons

3. Cascade Christian 64 3 4. La Salle 55 4 5. King’s 48 5 6. Elma 39 6 7. Castle Rock 31 7 8. Granger 25 8 9. Okanogan 15 9 10. Connell 6 NR Others receiving votes: Stevenson 3. Tenino 1. Onalaska 1. Newport 1. Class 2B School Points Last 1. Reardan (7) 70 1 2. Napavine 60 2 3. Brewster 58 3 4. White Swan 41 T6 5. Northwest Christian (Colbert) 36 5 6. Lake Roosevelt 33 T6 7. North Beach 29 8 8. Adna 28 4 9. Pe Ell 13 10 10. Colfax 12 9 Others receiving votes: Riverside Christian 4. Darrington 1. Class 1B School Points Last 1. Colton (7) 70 1 2. Sunnyside Christian 62 2 3. Columbia (Hunters) 57 3 4. Rosalia 44 5 5. A. Coulee-Hartline 34 4 Others receiving votes: Neah Bay 7. TekoaOakesdale 6.


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: May I respond to “Iowa Reader,” the older woman who asked you where to turn when she needed to be hugged and listened to? I’m guessing she was married a long time and doesn’t have any real friends — just people from her married days. I suggest she get a dog. While dogs can’t hug or hold, they do love unconditionally. A dog is always happy to be with you, and will listen even though it can’t talk back. I would have died of loneliness had it not been for mine. Through her, I have met other older single people on walks and at the dog park. She has given me a way to make new friends and find some company. Marcy in Oakland, Calif.

by Lynn Johnston

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

by Mell Lazarus

Elderberries

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Invest in you and your goals, not in someone else or in something that will not benefit you personally. Be careful not to let anyone take advantage of you emotionally or financially. Put your energy into advancement and recognition. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Look over your personal papers and take care of important correspondence. Learning a new skill or expanding your knowledge will help you get ahead. Discipline will enable you to complete an unfinished project. Relationship problems will surface. 3 stars

by Corey Pandolph

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t mix business with pleasure. Someone you like will try to use you to get ahead. Offer suggestions, but don’t promote someone or something unless you truly believe in the outcome. Conversations can lead to good fortune. Focus on home and family. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

bies to reach out to people. Buren We go on outings, and I have made many “huggable” friends. I urge “Iowa Reader” to visit places of worship and find one that has an active senior adult ministry. Jo Ann in Arlington, Texas

Abigail Van

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Pick your battles. Stay active and pursue your goals. A challenge will help you redirect your energy and focus on something worthwhile. Arguing will be a waste of time. Offer your experience and know-how to those in need. 5 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: I have been a licensed massage therapist for 20 years. I suggest “Iowa Reader” seek Dear Marcy: Thanks for your suggestion. I promised “Iowa Reader” out one. During her hour on the massage that if other readers shared ideas, I table, she will be touched, nurtured would pass them along. Because of you and other compas- and encouraged to speak about anything on her mind. It’s my job to not sionate readers, I received a wide only make her feel safe and healthy range of heartfelt, helpful advice. My newspaper readers comment: physically, but emotionally as well. For many clients, I am their only source of touch. It gives me great joy Dear Abby: I discovered a wonto know that in some small way, I derful way to receive much-needed can make an important difference in human contact: partner dancing. their overall well-being. I started with the Argentine Hugs from Maine tango, which might be a bit too much for some folks, but I have learned to Dear Abby: Volunteering to rock absolutely love it. and cuddle low-birth-weight babies It’s a safe way to enjoy an intiputs one in an environment where mate connection with a member of the opposite sex, no strings attached. personal problems matter less. Brushing and petting dogs and It takes time to master the skills, cats at the SPCA can provide meanbut if you stick with it, you’ll find a community that shares a passion for a ingful interaction because socialized skill that’s challenging and rewarding. animals are more likely to be adopted. Less-intimate forms of partner There are poetry and writing dance include swing, salsa and coungroups, peer-to-peer counseling at try dancing. her Area Agency on Aging and “conIf you love music and movement and could use some exercise, I highly tact” sports like pingpong. recommend it. Abby, I once read in your column, Catherine in Hawaii “The best way to have a friend is to be one.” To not overburden any one Dear Abby: I was faced with the friend, some conversations are best same situation when my husband done with God. passed away. I joined a Sunday Rachel L. school and found what I needed. _________ Often, the only hugs I get are from Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, people in our group. also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was I volunteer in the kitchen, and founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letsince I like taking pictures, I’ve been ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box appointed the class photographer. 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by Others have also utilized their hoblogging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

B3

Readers respond on needing hugs

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You will aspire to great heights if you change your environment. A short trip or visiting someone who has something to offer you will give you a different perspective regarding the possibilities that exist. Think big, but don’t overstep your financial limits. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get out and try something new. Surround yourself with people who share your curiosity. Avoid emotional situations at home or with a partner who doesn’t see things your way. You might want to re-evaluate your life and relationships. 2 stars

by Eugenia Last

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Emotional matters will escalate. Avoid any sort of situation that might lead to verbal or physical abuse. Know when to step back and move on. A change at home will do you good and help you consider better options. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Someone from your past may cause a problem for you now. Don’t give in to threats or blackmail. Back away from anyone trying to get something from you. Take control and you will avoid a situation that could turn ugly. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Enjoy the company of friends who like to try new things. A little adventure or a trip will keep you away from the responsibilities at home that are getting you down. Take a break from your everyday routine. 4 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A change of plans will work in your favor. Look at job opportunities and how you can tie in what you know and the experience you have in other fields that interest you. Raising your income should be the deciding factor. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The time and effort you put into helping someone will lead to knowledge that will allow advancement in other ways. Working electronically to reach a wider variety of clients is apparent. Expand your business interests. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Stick to what you can do, not what you cannot. Worry will only lead to emotional turmoil and poor judgment. Offer assistance to someone who can contribute to your future goals. What you put in, you will get back. 2 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

B4 Thursday, January 19, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK T O DAY ’ S

HOTTEST

NEW

CLASSIFIEDS!

6108 Sneak-apeek

6108 Sneak-apeek

Contract Site Security Manager. Contract Site Security Manager is needed for well established firm in the Por t Townsend area. Must have 5 years contract security experience. Military or police experience a plus. Must have excellent written and verbal skills, and knowledge of computers. Full or part time. Send resume with wage requirements in confidence to ewesthrdept@Comcast.net

ESTATE Sale: 8 of 10. Rain or snow, we are in the basement. Huge record collection, paper shredders, VCR movies and players, coffee makers, blenders, craft stuff, tools, and other stuff men like. Free stuff too. Sat., 9-2 p.m., 2521 S. Laurel St.

TIRES/WHEELS: 215/ 65 R16 wheels fit Honda Odyssey, Chrysler vans, and many others, orig cost of tires and wheels $750, less than 2,000 mi., mounted snowtires make it easy to switch to snowtires and back to summer tires quickly. Winter is finally here! $349. Bill K. at (360)808-3680

RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570

TOYOTA : ‘ 0 2 Ava l o n XLS. Very good condiSEWING MACHINE tion, 133K miles. $6,000. Pfaff model Special 360-460-1071 FREE: Lab/Rottweiler 1 5 3 0 , u s e d t o s ew 1 mix, female, 5 mo. old. quilt. $350. www.peninsula (360)460-5248 360-385-2475 dailynews.com

3020 Found F O U N D : S m a l l bl a ck poodle, west of Hood Canal Bridge, running down highway. Call to identify. 360-582-0869.

3023 Lost LOST: Dog. Black and white Cocker Spaniel, named Sadie, missing form E. Fir St., Sequim. 360-477-1313 LOST PROPERTY? Always check with Clallam County Sheriff’s Office for lost property. 360-417-2268

4026 Employment General

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

Contract Site Security Manager. Contract Site Security Manager is needed for well established firm in the Por t Townsend area. Must have 5 years contract security experience. Military or police experience a plus. Must have excellent written and verbal skills, and knowledge of computers. Full or part time. Send resume with wage requirements in confidence to ewesthrdept@Comcast.net Correctional Officer At Clallam Bay and Olympic Corrections Centers. Non-Permanent On-Call. Pay starts at $16.11 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 1/23/12. Also at Clallam Bay Administrative Assistant 2 and Office Assistant 3 positions. Permanent, plus benefits, for more details go to www.careers.wa.gov. Closes 1/29/12. There is a 3% temporary salary reduction in effect through 06/29/13 for most state positions. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.gov. For further information, please call Roxann at (360) 963-3207. EOE.

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

FUN, friendly dental office looking for full-time dental assistant to add to our family. Send resumes with references to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#238/DENTAL Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Makah Tribal Council is seeking a Business Enterprise Manager that is enthusiastic and thrives on challenges, ove r a l l c o r p o r a t e r e sponsibility for management of the enterprise and it’s divisions including planning, budgeting and evaluation, financial management, human resource management, proper ty management, public relations and marketing, business development and all other related activities. The educational requirements are a Bachelors or Masters degree with emphasis in financial management, organization planning, human resources plus min. 6 yrs. in organizational and business management positions, including production and supervision. M i n . 5 y r s. m i d l eve l m a n a g e m e n t ex p e r i ence. Mail resume, name of 3 professional references to: Makah Tribal Council Attn: Personnel Office PO Box 115 Neah Bay, WA 98357 or fax to: (360)645-3123 or email to mtcpersonnel@centurytel.net ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Po r t A n g e l e s, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

Makah Tribal Council is seeking a Forestry Program Manager that is enthusiastic and thrives on challenges. O ve ra l l c o r p o ra t e r e sponsibilities for management of the forest and it’s divisions including planning, budgeting and evaluation, financial management, human resources management, proper ty management, public relations and marketing, business development and all other related activities. Educational requirem e n t s : B a c h e l o r ’s o r M a s t e r ’s d e gr e e w i t h e m p h a s i s i n fo r e s t r y management, organization planning, human resources plus min. 6 yrs. of organizational and forestry management positions including production and supervision. Min. of 5 yrs. mid level management exp. Mail resume, name of 3 professional references to: Makah Tribal Council Attn: Personnel Office PO Box 115 Neah Bay, WA 98357 or fax to: (360)645-3123 or email to mtcpersonnel@centurytel.net

4080 Employment Wanted ALL around handyman, anything A to Z. 360-775-8234 FOR HIRE mature Christian man Sequim/ P.A. area. $80 per day, 6 hours. 360-683-9499. Mowing, Weeding, P r u n i n g / Tr i m m i n g , Hauling, Gutter cleaning, ornament decoration/hanging & many other services. Many r e fe r e n c e s. E x p e r i enced, Honest and Dependable. $20/hr or flat-rate. 360-461-7772 Put the ‘WIN’ in Winter. Prune - Weed Feed - Mulch Outstanding results! Sunshine Gardening 452-9821.

VETERINARY tech and assistant positions for busy practices in Sequim and P.A. Seeking motivated multitaskers w / gr e a t c o m m . s k i l l s. E x p. p r e f ’d . S e n d r e sume and references to: P.O. Box 339 Sequim, WA 98382

RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570

www.peninsula dailynews.com

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

CUTE RANCHETTE WO N D E R F U L h o u s e cleaning. Experienced, 3 bedroom, 2 bath with family room plus den on references. Call Esther 1.64 acres on a quiet (360)775-9513 dead end lane. Double garage, plus a detached 105 Homes for Sale shop. Great value. $279,000. ML262465. Clallam County Chuck Turner $198,000-Brand new 3 452-3333 bed, 2 bath home with PORT ANGELES heat pump and attached REALTY garage at 3921 Solar GORGEOUS OLYMPIC Lane in PA expected to MOUNTAIN VIEW be completed in March. Great family home with 5 An exceptional amount Br., 2 1/2 bath. Open of storage area is incorstairway, spacious living porated into the design r o o m , fo r m a l d i n i n g , of this home built on an Kitchen has attractive oversize lot on a cul-decabinets. Brand new carsac. Call 360-460-8891 peting, with .54 acres. for more details. Barn is being used as an electricians shop. LocatALMOST OFF THE ed just off Draper Rd. GRID This home is so private Very nice close in locaon 6+ acres you won’t tion. $279,500. ML261187 see anyone ever. SurVivian Landvik rounded by public lands, 417-2795 property is heavily treed COLDWELL BANKER with a pond and room to UPTOWN REALTY build a large pole building. Upstairs loft is a full Immaculate Home For master suite with cov- Sale By Owner. 1810 W ered deck and exterior 15th Street, Por t Anstairs. $280,000. geles. 1,631 square feet ML260877 Built: 2007, Lot: 0.16 Michaelle Barnard Acres. 3 Bed, 2 1/2 Bath 457-0456 2 car attached garage WINDERMERE P.A. All major appliances inA VIEW WITH A HOME cluded For more inforCalling wannabe harbor- mation contact Hannah masters. Supervise the Hope at 360-775-1258. h a r b o r s h i p p i n g r i g h t olympicweaver@wavefrom your own hot tub. cable.com More pictures Or, if mountains are your available upon request. thing, kick back on your MONEY MAKER! front porch and take in Affordable rents near the the Olympics. This 3 Br., college. Good occupan2 bath home, built by on cy rates and income. of P.A.’s premier build- C h a r m i n g t o u c h s ers, is ideally located for throughout. $200,000. either view. Big deck, big ML262234 lot, big view. Low price. Harriet Reyenga $228,000. ML260209. 457-0456 Dick Pilling WINDERMERE P.A. 417-2811 NORTHWEST STYLE COLDWELL BANKER Great split level home UPTOWN REALTY with 2 Br., 2 bath and CABIN IN THE WOODS 1,828 sf has been well maintained and is locatBY THE BAY 2,000 sf cabin. Spacious e d i n S u n l a n d . O n a living area and expan- large lot, spacious interizive windows. Generous or, beautiful brick firelower level with guest place and all of the Sunspace and extra storage. land amenities (tennis, Large deck with peek-a- swimming, clubhouse, b o o v i ew s o f L u d l ow beach). $359,000. ML261217 Bay. $149,900. Ed Sumpter ML250026 Blue Sky Real Estate Laura Halady Sequim - 683-3900 360-437-1011 Windermere Port PRICE REDUCED, Ludlow NOT THE VIEW Enjoy the view of the Straits all the way to Victoria. In-town convenience on a quiet, deadend street. Bright, cheer y, and spacious home with an indoor swim/spa. Master BR. and bath, another two CENTRALLY located in bedrooms and full bath Port Angeles. 1,296 sf, 3 all on the main floor. Br., 2.5 bath in a quiet Large finished daylight neighborhood. Open liv- basement with family ing area, kitchen with room, 2 more Br. and a lots of counter space. 3/4 bath. $299,000. Bright windows with ML261045 views of mountains and Pili Meyer the Strait. Private fenced 417-2799 in yard, large detached 2 COLDWELL BANKER car garage. $189,000 UPTOWN REALTY Call 360-477-9597 for STYLISH AND more info. Offers with a SOPHISTICATED Buyer’s agent considNW contemporary style ered. withwater view. ArchiVisit our website at tecture optimizes space and dramatic winwww.peninsula dows/skylights infuse dailynews.com home with natural light. Or email us at Large family room, kitchclassified@ en with large bar/island peninsula and walk-in pantry. dailynews.com $349,900. ML260341. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

ACROSS FROM BAYVIEW SHOPPING CENTER Frontage along 3 different streets - Hwy 101, Bayview Ave., and Ke m p S t . m a k e t h i s commercial 0.62 acre lot an exceptional commercial property. Perfect for fa s t fo o d r e s t a u r a n t , banks, etc. Possible owner financing available. $329,900. ML261860 Tim Riley 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CLOSE TO THE STRAIT Huge mountain views on 1/2 acre parcel in D u n g e n e s s B ay P l a t . Close to the Strait. Area of nice homes. Priced to sell. Possible owner financing. $79,000. ML260843 Jeanine Cardiff 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company VIEWS & PRIVACY TOO? Looking for a view property with privacy? This is it. Water and mountain views, 5 minutes from Port Angeles. 2.6 acres on the crest of Benson Hill. $139,500. ML262043 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

What’s New?

@ www.peninsuladailynews.com THINGS TO DO

The Peninsula’s comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds, updated daily.

CLALLAM CRIME TRACKER

Use the map to find the location of theft, assaults, sex offenders & more. Jefferson County Crime Tracker coming soon.

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE PHOTO GALLERY

View, share and purchase PDN local news and sports pictures. Put your favorite photo on a mug!

ONLINE OBITUARIES

Celebrate your loved one’s life, share memories and connect with friends and family.

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES WHO CAN HELP?

Place your classified ad online 24/7.

A powerful tool for connecting people. List services you need. Service providers will bid on them. View the hottest real estate deals on the North Olympic Peninsula, updated weekly.

DAILY DEALS

Local businesses offer 50% off on products and services.

And don’t forget:

Breaking Local News 24/7

17www-PDN

HOT PROPERTIES

FOR SALE: 14x70 mobile in 55+ park. Wood flooring throughout home, new appliances, shop, garden shed, new bathroom. Must see! Asking $12,000 - will carry contract, low down. $10,000 cash. 360-301-5652 or 360-452-4165 P.A.: Mobile home for sale in senior park, ready for move in, new carpet, roof and water pipes, illness forces sale below value. $6,500. (253)226-3470 SEQUIM: Beautiful ‘82 14x66 Skyline, in A-1 cond., 55 park, corner lot. $17,500/obo. 683-3639 or 808-0298

505 Rental Houses Clallam County ALMOST new 3 Br., 3 bath numerous upgrades close to Discovery Trail, Carrie Blake Par k, the mar ina and more. Call Marie. 253-394-3903 JACE REAL ESTATE Between Sequim/P.A. 3 Br., 2 ba, water view, a l m o s t a n a c r e, g a r age/shop. $900 mo. Leland at Schwab Realty at (360)683-4015 Downtown Sequim 2 Br., 2 ba, single gar., duplex, new car pet/ paint, close to sch-ools, fenced, clean. $900. 582-9848. JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba ...............$400 H 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$675 H 3 br 2 ba ...............$990 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1050 H 2 br 1.5 ba ..........$1100 A Penthouse ..........$1200 LAKE HOUSES TAKE A LOOK From this delightful ram- H 1/1 furnished ........$550 bler with both mountain H 2/2 furnished ........$895 and salt water views! 2 H 2/2 furnished ......$1350 360-417-2810 B r. , 2 b a t h i n m a i n More Properties at house; 1 Br., 1 bath in www.jarentals.com guest quar ters. On 5 acres, plenty of parking. P. A . : 2 B r. , ya r d . N o Close to golf courses, smoke/pets. $750 mo., hiking trails. Sit on your plus dep. 457-4023. deck and just enjoy life with space around you. P.A.: 3 Br., 1.75 bath, Irrigation water available new inside. $925 mo. 452-1395 too! $439,000. ML261147 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East WANTED: New fam 2 build dream home, looking 4 affordable 2+ Br. home w/3+ ac between P.A./Sq. Pref. owner financing/no realtor. BIG $ DOWN. Send info to: Peninsula Daily News PDN #242/Dream Home Pt. Angeles WA 98362

Subscribe and pay for your home delivery online.

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage 20 ACRES BY SALT CREEK This parcel is in a conser vancy with mature trees, a creek and one acre building site. Lots of wildlife and privacy. $100,000. ML262030. Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 2-car attached garage, fenced yard, pets okay. 1100 plus deposit. No smoking. 360-808-2987. P.A..: 3 Br., 2 bath, Section 8 ok. $950 mo. (360)460-9202 P.A.: 4 Br., 2 BA, fenced yard, pets ok. $925, 1st, last, dep. 452-7530. P.A.: 4 Br., 2 ba, with water view. $1,200, 1st, last, + $1,000 dep. 452-1153 P. A . E a s t 3 / 2 , c l e a n , 1,650+ sf, garage, stora g e, wa t e r v i ew, $1050/mo., 1st/last/ dep. 360-808-3721. P.A.: Clean 3 Br. 2 ba., 2 car gar., water view. $1,050. 452-1016.

TO PLACE

A CLASSIFIED A D: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

VISIT:

WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

P.A.: 913 W 15 ST, 4 Br., 2 ba, 2,280 sq ft, $1,100. deanman@olypen.com or 360-417-9451 PA L O A LTO, S E Q : 1 Br. cabin, wdstve, W/D $550. 683-4307. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ: Nice lg, 2 Br., plus office and sunroom, 2 ba, dbl garage. By park. $1,000. Free Feb. rent. 707-478-5664 SEQ/P.A.: 3 Br., mtn. view. $895 mo. tourfactory.com/517739

605 Apartments Clallam County CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 Condo at Dungeness Golf. 2 BR, 2 BA, no s m o ke / p e t s. A l l a p p l . Must see $650. 1st, last, dep. 775-6739 P.A.: 1 Br., util./TV paid. N o s m o ke / p e t s. $ 6 0 0 plus dep. 360-477-2207. P.A.: Great 1 Br., lots storage, no pets. $575 mo. 452-4671. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $500 mo. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

639 Apartments Port Angeles-Unfurn. P.A.: 1 Br. $475-$530. Some pets ok. Downtown. 425-881-7267.

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pet/smoke. $800, WSG incl. 360-683-2655 CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no smoking. $650 mo., $650 deposit. 457-5352. SEQUIM: 2 Br. duplex, d e n , 2 b a , W / D, n o smoke, pets neg., 1 yr. $875. 452-4701.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares WANTED: Mother-in-law apt. for older adult with disabilities. Sequim area pref. 683-5460.

1163 Commercial Rentals C A R L S B O R G : H w y. 101 frontage, 5 offices plus land. $850 mo. Leland at Schwab Realty at (360)683-4015 FOR LEASE: 1,800 sf, open space, 18’ ceilings, at 508 W. 8th., P.A. 360-452-9296 days. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

6010 Appliances D RY E R : W h i r l p o o l , 6 mo. old. $175. 504-1165

6040 Electronics ASUS NOTEBOOK 17”, AMD dual core 1.8ghz, 3 gigs ram, Ati radeon HD 2600. $300. 477-4219.

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

5000900

6108 Sneak-apeek

4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Wanted

6080 Home Furnishings

GUNS: Olympic Ar ms SOFA: Elegant sofa . 2 2 3 c a l i b e r m o d e l with exquisite carved P. C. R . 0 0 A R 1 5 , 3 0 trim and claw ar ms, round clip, ammo, flash burgundy and cream suppressor, soft case, t a p e s t r y fa b r i c, 6 6 ” o n l y 2 r o u n d s f i r e d , long x 45” wide, excel$850. Ruger Security Six l e n t c o n d i t i o n , p a i d revolver 2 3/4 barrel, $1,500 from upscale .357 mag, $450. Ruger store. Selling for $500. 94DC 40 cal semi-auto, 460-0575 3 clips, $500. Llama Super Comanche .44 mag 6100 Misc. revolver 6 inch barrel, Merchandise $450. Night Vision monocular, Famous Trails CABINETS: Commercial (Russian made) FT950 ‘Night force’ 5x magnifi- cabinets, shelving, from cation, infra red illumina- Twilight Store. $800/obo. 457-3355 tor, $80. Call 808-6399. naval@wavecable.com 6055 Firewood, ESTATE Items For Sale. 40’s Duncan Phyfe-style Fuel & Stoves dining table,2 leafs 6 F I R E W O O D : $ 1 6 0 chairs $325, 60’s Broyc o r d . D e l i ve r e d . P. A . hill China Hutch $325, 40’s Kelvinator refrigeraJoyce. 461-9701. tor $500, Antique Oak FIREWOOD: $179 deliv- R o l l T o p desk ered Sequim-P.A. True $1,000/obo. Call 360cord. 3 cord special for 460-8092. $499. Credit card acFIREWOOD: Seasoned, cepted. 360-582-7910. all types. $200 delivered. www.portangeles 360-477-8832 firewood.com H OT T U B : 4 p e r s o n . FIREWOOD: $180 cord. Works, good cond. 460-5765 $350. 360-477-7130. 6075 Heavy M i s c . I t e m s : Ko h l e r Equipment kitchen sink, $50. Craft table, $50. Garden tractor attach. 360-683-1945 SEWING MACHINE Montgomery Ward convertible bed sewing machine. Model UHT J 1414 in wood cabinet. Both excellent condition. Includes all par ts and E X C AVAT O R : R u n s manual. Recently sergreat! $8000. Call for de- viced. Used very little. tails. 360-928-0273 . $90. Susan 460-0575. SEWING MACHINE 6080 Home Pfaff model Special Furnishings 1 5 3 0 , u s e d t o s ew 1 BED: Full size mattress quilt. $350. 360-385-2475 and boxspring. Euro Top p l u s h , l i ke n ew, ove r SEWING MACHINE $ 5 0 0 n e w . S e l l f o r Singer Featherweight. $300/obo. 681-3299. Good condition. RecentD I N I N G TA B L E : 7 3 ” ly serviced. $400. 681-3225 long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very TEMPERED WINDOW n i c e s e t . $ 1 3 0 . Tw o matching blond finish 1 2 n e w, fo r g r e e n coffee tables one large h o u s e o r s u n r o o m . Cost $250 each, sell $40, one small $30. $40 each. 681-4429 or 417-7685 360-643-0356 LOVE SEAT: Stressless brand, less than 1 yr. T I C K E T S : M a r i n e r s old, double ottoman with S e a s o n T i c k e t s , 1 / 8 t a bl e, n ew c o n d i t i o n . share, 10 games, you $3500. 360-457-6887 choose, section 124, row MISC: Classic for mal 24, seats 1 and 2. $800. 360-808-0937 dining room set, table with 3 leaves and pads, TRAILER: Offroad, ar6 chairs, 2 arms, $650. ticulating hitch, 17” tires, Custom formal sofa, new p o l i s h e d w h e e l s condition, neutral color, w/spare, rear receiver, paid $3,500, will sell for fuel can rack w/2-5 gal. $550/obo. 206-999-7139 cans, jack, shovel, axe. $3,000. 360-477-9339. MISC: Plaid double recliner $150. Leather sofa VENDING MACHINES and love seat, blue $500 each. $600. Both ver y nice. 360-797-1416 379-1099 WHISTLER CONDO 2 MISC: Vintage Victorian Br., 2 ba. on Blackcomb vanity, $125. Or iental l i f t l i n e f o r 1 w e e k , cabinet, $200. Both in 2/10/12-2/17/12. $750. excellent condition. 683-1967 360-808-0471 REDECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Victorian wall sconce lamps, $25 ea. Recliner chair, $50. Camel b a c k s o f a , brown/plumb tapestry, $150. Small vintage tole painted table, $25. S ew i n g m a c h i n e i n wood cabinet, $140. Tw o v i n t a g e u p h o l stered side chairs, $50 ea. Wood kitchen table with 4 chairs, $45. Camel back love seat, red pattern, $45. Elegant sofa with exquisite woodwork, $500. Victorian tapestry print and frame, $40. Small stain glass table lamp, $15. These items would make great gifts! 460-0575.

6105 Musical Instruments

GUITARS: Gibson J-185 12 string w/Gibson hard case, custom electronics, pristine condition. $ 2 , 0 0 0 / o b o . Ta y l o r NS72CE w/Taylor hard case, $1,900 firm. 360-477-7334 GUITARS: Gibson Les Paul, Honey Burst AA top, $1850. Fender Amer ican Strat, Sunburst $850. Fender M e x i c a n Te l e c a s t e r $400. Mandolin: Epiphone MM 50/VS Sunburst, $450. Amplifiers: Marshall MG 250 DFX, $450. Peavey Express 1 1 2 , $ 1 5 0 . C r y B a by “Zakk Wylde” wah $90. Behringer V-Amp 2 effects/modeler, $85. All Vintage motel furniture excellent like new. 808a n d a c c e s s o r y s a l e . 6399 We’re renovating! Stop PIANO: Baldwin Spinby Red Ranch Inn or call net, very good condition. (360)683-4195 $550. (360)385-2702. GARAGE SALE ADS VIOLIN: 3/4, nice Call for details. shape. $125/obo. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 775-9648

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Egyptian cobra 2 Umpteen, with “a” 6115 Sporting Goods

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES Solution: 8 letters

G O U R N  I A A F G K N E  I J By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

3 Not made public 4 Came down 5 Mozart’s “__ kleine Nachtmusik” 6 6-Across container 7 Tax-sheltered savings, briefly 8 Effervesced 9 SW school whose mascot carries a pitchfork 10 Research site 11 Give off 12 Word with stock or market 15 Yarn colorer 18 Graduation flier 22 Terra firma 24 Phys., e.g. 26 Jackie’s designer 27 Actress with six Oscar nominations by age 33 28 Hard to grasp 30 Cadenza performer 35 One may not be intended 36 WWII battle site, for short 37 Fillable bread

GYNIT (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Old Sony brand 39 Give the okay 40 Unit often burned off 41 Capital nearest to Philadelphia 43 What “you always pass ... on your way to success”: Mickey Rooney 44 Vast 45 Electric alternative

DOGS: 4 yr old Mini Beagle, fixed female, $250. Pair of 7 yr old Poms, male & female, fixed, must go together, $200 both. 457-1448.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used. $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182 or 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Very nice, Porta-Potty, micro. $9,500. 360-683-5871 TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032.

TRAILER: ‘03 29’ Terry. Dbl door, front Br., large slide, great for living or pulling. $9,200. 457-9038 TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. N o s l i d e , ex c . c o n d . $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514

Lots

of local Homes

T S S M T B L S R N L N A R E

U P R A I I T D A O A O R U T

R A Y A L S A B R S A N P J E

Join us on Facebook

K L A G E N E A I D N I T A A

E A L T E L L E F D E L P H I

Y U C O B A B H I M B E T K A

1/19

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Road King FLHRI 4,950 miles! Fuel-Injection, removable windshield, foot pegs, back rest,hard saddle bags, foot boards, heel-shift, oval-tip pipes,and many other extras. $10,900. 360-808-4176

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: HIS Yesterday’s

9742 Tires & Wheels TIRES/WHEELS: 215/ 65 R16 wheels fit Honda Odyssey, Chrysler vans, and many others, orig cost of tires and wheels $750, less than 2,000 mi., mounted snowtires make it easy to switch to snowtires and back to summer tires quickly. Winter is finally here! $349. Bill K. at (360)808-3680

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

BAY L I N E R : ‘ 8 7 3 4 5 0 Tr i-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 6835099. BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506 D U R A B OAT: ‘ 0 8 1 4 ’ aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, trailer. $1,500. 360-580-1741 DURABOAT: ‘96 14’ 20 hp Merc low hrs. $3,200. 452-8092 D U R O B OAT: 1 2 ’ . 1 5 and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calkins trailer. $1,500. 6836748. GLASPLY: 21’ boat and trailer, BMW B220 Inboard, brand new Honda 15 hp 4 stroke kicker. $10,000 or make offer. 452-4338 O / B M OTO R : S u z u k i ‘86. 40 hp., long shaft with tiller. $700. 360-460-6510 SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519.

9236 Automobiles Ford

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: VOCAL SORRY METRIC TRIPLE Answer: Getting a cardio workout by dancing to disco made them — RETRO-ACTIVE

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others

DODGE: ‘07 Durango. White, gray leather int., 87K, power, exc. cond., seats 8. $15,500. 460-6155 FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. new tires/battery. Excellent, dark blue, ex$8,000/obo. tras $18,000/ obo. 928360-452-2225 3669. FORD: ‘00 Ranger 9404 Pickup Trucks X LT. 4 x 4 O f f R o a d edition, 4.0 V6, 160K, Chevrolet extended cab, auto, CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service tow, bedliner, clean. truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K $5,950. 457-4363. Onan generator, 3 air FORD ‘02 F350 CREW tanks, 110 outlets, etc. CAB 4X4 $2,980. 360-302-5027. 7.3 liter Power stroke diesel, auto, Lariat pack9410 Pickup Trucks age, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirDodge r o r s, a n d d u a l p owe r D O D G E : ‘ 0 0 D a k o t a heated seats, adjustable q u a d c a b. 9 2 K , ex c . p e d a l s, b a ck - u p s e n cond., matching canopy, sors, leather inter ior, Rhinoguard, auto, CD, AM/FM CD, spray-on linA/C, cr uise, extra set e r, a l l oy w h e e l s, t ow s n o w t i r e s / w h e e l s . package, sliding rear $7,900/obo. 477-9755 window, remote entr y, and more! Local trade! 9412 Pickup Trucks VINC77501. Exp. 1-2112. Ford $15,995 Dave Barnier FORD: 1989 F250 4WD *We Finance in House* 460, canopy. 101K mi. Auto Sales $3,000. 808-5182 or 452-6599 452-6932 davebarnier.com FORD: ‘84 F250. Turbo diesel, utility bed, rack. FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD $4,500, won’t last. 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, 417-1587 new Nokian tires, dark gr e e n / t a n , ve r y n i c e. 9434 Pickup Trucks $12,500. Curt at 360-460-8997 Others FORD ‘05 RANGER CHEV ‘01 SILVERADO XLT SUPER CAB 4X4 1500 EXT CAB Z71 4X4 4 . 0 l i t e r V 6 , 5 s p e e d PICK-UP manual trans, alloy 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto, wheels, running boards, alloy wheels, tow pack- spray in bedliner, tow age, bedliner, exhaust, 4 package, privacy glass, opening doors, power 4 opening doors, cruise, w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual and mirrors, cruise con- f r o n t a i r b a g s . Ke l l e y trol, tilt, air, CD stereo, B l u e B o o k v a l u e o f dual front airbags. Kelley $16,011! Sparkling clean B l u e B o o k va l u e o f inside and out! Only $11,444! Great running 60,000 miles! Stop by t r u ck ! S ave a bu n d l e Gray Motors today to with our low Gray Motors s ave s o m e bu ck s o n pricing! your next truck! $7,995 $13,995 GRAY MOTORS GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 457-4901 graymotors.com graymotors.com CHEV: ‘69 pickup. 6 cyl., FORD: ‘68 1/2 ton. Rer u n s g r e a t ! Ve r y d e - built 300 ci, 6 cyl, 4 sp pendable wood hauler. m a n . , c l e a r t i t l e w i t h $ 6 0 0 / o b o. 6 8 3 - 0 1 3 0 , parts truck. $1,500. 683-7847. 360-808-2563 C H E V: ‘ 9 4 S i l ve r a d o FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 2500. Good cond. standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $5,500. 683-4830. $3,200. 360-457-5649.

HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Limited. Black beauty, all Excellent, dark blue, exthe options plus tinted tras $18,000/ obo. windows and navigation 928-3669 s y s t e m , ex t r a s e t o f wheels and tires. 9322 Automobiles $16,600. 477-3191. Toyota J AG UA R : ‘ 9 0 X J S Coupe. Black, tan int., only 42K mi., car is like brand new in/out, mechanically. $11,750 Call John, Euro Auto Works: 683-3876. JAGUAR: XJS-V12. Excellent cond., $9,600. 360-775-5827 KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs gr e a t , m a i n t . r e c o r d s avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040 MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 PONTIAC ‘06 GRAND PRIX GT 4 DOOR 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seat, only 57,000 miles, very very clean local trade in non-smoker. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Q U A D : S u z u k i 2 5 0 FORD: ‘03 Mustang conP O N T I AC : ‘ 8 6 F i e r o. Quad Sport, reverse, like vertible. $8,500/ obo. 91K miles, well taken new. $2,500 firm. 360-808-1242 care of. Great Gift! Col452-3213 lector’s item! Good mpg! YAMAHA: ‘07 TW 200. 9254 Automobiles $3,000. 775-9754. Jaguar 1,050 mi., saddle bags SATURN: ‘97 SC. Welland Versahaul carrier. maintained 5 spd. 27-37 $2,500. 360-477-9339. J AG UA R : ‘ 9 0 X J S m p g . C r u i s e c o n t r o l . Coupe. Black, tan int., Auto locks. 143,740 mi. YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino $2,500. 360-452-6615. 7 0 0 c c . G r e e n R h i n o, only 42K mi., car is w i n d s h i e l d , r o o f a n d like brand new in/out, SUZUKI ‘03 AERIO SX mechanically. $11,750 sound system. Asking 4 DOOR HATCHBACK $7900/ obo. For more Call John, Euro Auto 4 cylinder, 5 speed, air, Works: 683-3876. info call 360-477-6165. tilt wheel, cruise, power, windows, locks and mir9292 Automobiles rors, AM/FM CD stacker, alloy wheels, remote enOthers try and more! Very nice CHEV: ‘80 Chevette. 1 owner, low mileage $500. 460-7131. hatchback. Expires 1-12CHRYSLER: ‘04 Cross- 12. VIN209451. $5,995 YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. fire, 80K, $12,000. Dave Barnier 452-8092. 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago *We Finance in House* for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st FORD: ‘54 Victoria. New Auto Sales $ 3 , 1 0 0 c a s h . S t r e e t / 302/4 speed $15,000/ 452-6599 Trail. 670-2562. obo. 360-504-5664. davebarnier.com FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX : ‘ 0 2 Ava l o n 9740 Auto Service conver tible. 5.0 auto, TOYOTA XLS. Very good condi& Parts 71K mi., excellent condi- tion, 133K miles. $6,000. tion. $3,800. 928-0213. 360-460-1071 CHEV: ‘70 Body parts. 2 HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. door. Hood, L.F. fender, bumper, window assem- New swap, B18C type R b l y i n c l u d i n g g l a s s . suspension, yellow HID $450/obo. Excellent con- lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. dition. No rust. $5,500. 452-9693 or 360-457-9650. 461-6506 HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. WHY PAY SHIPPING ON New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID INTERNET lights, Apexi exhaust, inPURCHASES? t a k e , 1 1 8 K m i l e s . $5,500. 452-9693 or 461-6506 SHOP LOCAL HONDA: ‘94 Del Sol. 82K orig. mi., black, aupeninsula t o, ex c e l l e n t c o n d . dailynews.com $4,000. 457-1050.

Lots

of local Jobs

Classified

M arketplace

43220690

M arketplace

I T B A S A A D I O O L C A R

CRIBEK

HONDA: ‘94 XLR. 600 cc, hardly used, good cond. $1,600. 452-5412.

9808 Campers & Canopies

9817 Motorcycles 43220692

Classified

9817 Motorcycles

TOYNHR

9811 Campground & RV Memberships

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W / D, g r e a t s t o r a g e . $20,000. 477-7957. 5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/obo. 360-460-9556

Miscellaneous

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

47 Book of sacred poems 49 Seasoned stew 51 Hockey Hall of Fame nickname 52 Thumbs-up vote 57 Curved pieces 59 Devilish 61 Roberto’s 2012, e.g. 62 One of two complementary Asian forces 63 __ Monte Foods

CAMPER: ‘01 11’ Lance. $3,000/obo (251)978-1750 CAMPER: ‘68 Dodge cabover. Good condition, sleeps 5. $1,900. 360-797-1508

9802 5th Wheels

CAMPER: ‘92 8’ Elkhorn. Very good cond. $2,700. 360-683-0674. SUZUKI: ‘01 LTF 300 MOTORHOME: ‘02 30’ 4x4. Very good shape. Winnebago Brave. Low $1,700. 360-683-0674. m i . , a l way s g a ra g e d , must see/Vortec 8.1. 9050 Marine $35,000. 683-4912. MOTORHOME: ‘92 32’ Southwind, Chevy 454 with Banks Power Pack, 7KW gen, driver’s side d o o r, r e p l a c e d r e fe r cooling unit, 2 A/C units. In exc. cond., garaged. $12,500. 681-0144.

1/19/12

C O L L E C TO R S : O l d s Cutlass 442 1986, sharp lines, new int. $5,500. 683-8332 H O N DA : ‘ 0 1 X R 5 0 R . FORD: ‘28 2 dr sedan, Low hr, helmet $800. restored in 1980. 452-9194. 452-6160. $15,000. 360-452-8092. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. FORD: ‘54 F7, 283, re7K miles. $4,700. stored, 2x4 spd, $3,500. 504-2599 360-452-8092 H O N DA : ‘ 0 5 C R 8 5 R . PONTIAC: ‘78 Firebird Low hours, never raced. Formula. California car, $1,500/trade. no rust. $6,500. 360-460-6148 360-457-6540 HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. STUDEBAKER: ‘50 $1,200. 360-963-2659. Champion. Starlight HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed Runs good, looks fair. flat head 6 cylinder en$680. 683-9071. gine, all original, excelH O N D A : ‘ 8 3 A s c o t . lent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810. $1,500. 360-963-2659

9820 Motorhomes

WANTED: Used station- BIEWER Yorkie Puppy. ary exercise bicycle in Gorgeous Male Biewer Yo r k i e P u p py, B l a ck , good cond. 683-6942. white, and gold. Current PLACE YOUR on vaccinations, AD ONLINE wormed, dew claws reWith our new moved, 1st vet. visit, Classified Wizard non-shedding, hypoalleryou can see your genic. See pics online at ad before it prints! w w w. p e n i n s u l a d a i l y www.peninsula news.com $900. dailynews.com 360-452-9650

www.wonderword.com

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

M U LT I - FA M I LY M OVING Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 FREE: Lab/Rottweiler p.m., 50041 Hwy 112, mix, female, 5 mo. old. (360)460-5248 1/2 mi. past Crescent School on right. Furniture, collectibles, toys, L A B R A D O O D L E S WANTED: Guns. One or etc. Black, 1st generation, whole collection. New 4 males, born Oct. 1st and old, but older the 7025 Farm Animals shots, wor med, ver y better. Call 452-1016, sweet. $400. & Livestock 683-9899. 360-259-6347 BEEF: Grass fed, 2.5 yr c o w, h a n g i n g w e i g h t PUPPIES: Bull Dog mix. 6125 Tools Brindle and white. 3 $1.70 lb. 452-0837. males, 3 females. $350. HAY: Good quality grass 360-457-7013 M I S C : C r a f t s m a n 1 4 hay. $5.50 bale. drawer rolling tool chest, 360-461-5804 Rare Blue Pomeranian 26”x60”, with small re1 year old small male m o v a b l e o r g a n i z e r s , HAY: Quality grass hay, pom, raised with little $225. Devilbiss ProAir II $5 bale. 808-1052. kids and good with other compressor, 125 psi, 2 animals beautiful coat. hp, 3 gal., $125. House trained and very 7030 Horses (360)683-9229 loving boy. $200. Please call or text 360-460-3392 HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 6140 Wanted Circle J. 2 horse, straight WANTED: AKC Golden & Trades Ret. gentleman stud for load. $2,000. Viola, young Lady Gold360-808-2295 BOOKS WANTED! We en 3.5 yrs. 681-3390. love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 7035 General Pets

WANTED: PARAKEET MALE Wanted To Buy or Trade. Pref. courtly older g e n t w h o h a s a w ay w/the ladies. Can trade young Cobalt male ‘keet or pay cash. 457-8385 leave message for Marybeth.

S E L T K U E A N T J N E H C

TONJI

FREE: 10 mo. old female Plott Hound. (360)452-6111

AKC LABRADOR PUPPIES 8 week old female black lab pups. Great family pets or hunters! $600 to approved homes. These pups are beautiful and have tons of personality! Pics online at PDN. $600. 360-808-5635.

L Y U I S K R N L I A A A O I

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

MAUSER: M48, Yugoslavian mauser, 8 mm, excellent condition, incl. issue sling, Redding reloading dies, ammo and 300+ bullets and 100 brass. $250. 452-4158 leave message.

ABANDONED CAT N e e d s a g o o d h o m e. Golden orange, long haired tabby, very very friendly. For more information, call: 360-417-1346

G D T E A O A U U B K G L M E

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

DOG: 9 mo. old male tricolored Ber nises Mtn. Dog, microchip and papers. $950. (360)683-7001

WANTED: OLD BARN W O O D. O l d b a r n , fence, shed boards for u s e i n a r t p r o j e c t s. 1x8, 1x10 especially, or wider. Negotiable. Will haul away. 360-452-7308

© 2012 Universal Uclick

Y Z L K C R S R A N E O R C A

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

ESTATE Sale: 8 of 10. Rain or snow, we are in the basement. Huge record collection, paper shredders, VCR movies and players, coffee makers, blenders, craft stuff, GAME ROOM SPECIAL tools, and other stuff Foosball table and two men like. Free stuff too. p l aye r b a s ke t b a l l a r - Sat., 9-2 p.m., 2521 S. cade, good condition. Laurel St. $175. 360-460-3124.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

A G R A U N E S A D M C E O I

Baalbeck, Bhimbetka, Birka, Caesarea, Cave, Clay, Coba, Colombia, Crete, Delphi, Egypt, Ellora, Epidaurus, Fell, France, Giza, Gournia, Greece, India, Iran, Israel, Italy, Itza, Jordan, Khajuraho, Kind, Knossos, Lanka, Lasts, Lebanon, Nama, Palau, Park, Peru, Polonnaruwa, Race, Sakkara, Sanchi, Selge, Simbel, Sitagroi, Study, Tests, Tikal, Turkey Yesterday’s Answer: Declutter

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

8180 Garage Sales 7035 General Pets PA - Central

BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection. 360-477-9659

1/19/12

B E I I A Z E W V G A P C A R L I O N B R I P E ҹ A K ҹ R R ҹ K I ҹ

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Fair color? 6 Skippy rival 9 Gillette razor 13 Moses’ mount 14 Like the Gobi Desert 16 “House” actor Robert __ Leonard 17 Nuts 19 Agcy. whose seal features a shock of corn 20 First area to fill in on a form 21 Harry Potter series ender? 23 Up to, briefly 24 Street Cry, to Street Sense 25 Switching device 29 “Here Come the __”: 1945 college comedy 31 Cover 32 “Leda and the Swan” poet 33 Swing voter: Abbr. 34 Store sign 36 “Yeah, right!” 37 Keeps at it 39 Jackie Chan genre 42 Four-legged king 43 Fruit often dried 46 Novel opening 47 Row of seats 48 __ queen 50 “We want you here” 53 Targets 54 Texas Rangers manager Washington 55 Pat-down org. 56 Golfer’s feat 58 Table scraps 60 Dally, and a literal hint to 17-, 25-, 37- and 50Across 64 Stringed instrument 65 Bygone Dodge 66 One may bring eternal bad luck 67 Selection word 68 William, to Charles 69 Cold metal?

Thursday, January 19, 2012 B5


Classified

B6 Thursday, January 19, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go! We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale. Say as much as you want* for 2 days

Only $ Make easy cash – invest in Peninsula Classified.

4B235385

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 360-452-8435 • 1-800-826-7714

*15 line maximum

21560600

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

PAINTING

REPAIR

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Lund Fencing

Bob’s Tractor Service

Window Washing

FOX PAINTING

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Pressure Washing

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

B&B Sharpening & Repair

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

Lic#BOBDADT966K5

JP

s Handyman Services

‘

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684 COLUMC*955KD

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

24 yrs. experience 21566943

Home & Bus.

360-681-7878

(360) 477-1805

Lena Washke

#BAURLH*023DJ

Deluna ’s Ent erpris e T REE S ERVIC E Licensed – Bonded – Insured

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

1C563910

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

river1966@msn.com

1C564613

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR –

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

Lic# DELUNE*933QT

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

360/460•9824

1C563942

FOR

AS LITTLE AS

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS! AND SIZES: X 1� X 2� X 3� X 1� X 2� X 3�

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

21572236

advertise call PENINSULA To 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 DAILY NEWS

Mole Control

(360) 461-2788

Done Right Home Repair

Licensed • Insured

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right Glen Spear, Owner

Winter! Time to Prune Fruit Trees Ornamental Trees Shrubbery Call now for your appt. 17 yrs. experience

HOME REPAIR

Windows & Doors Concrete

#JKDIRKD942NG

Callahans Landscape Maintenance

Expert Pruning

683-8328 PA & PT

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

contact@jkdirtworks.com

PRUNING

1C564581

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON

MOLE/PRUNING

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER LIC

Lic#DONERRH943NA

1C564569

1 1 1 2 2 2

WE DO LANDSCAPING

21569329

ADVERTISE DAILY

for Delivery

Top Soil, Compost, Firbark, Sand Drain Rock, Crushed Rock, Wall Rock And More...

1C563934

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

RATES

LANDSCAPE PRODUCTS

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

21572253

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

Now Offering

EXCAVATING

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Small Jobs A Specialty

Contr#KENNER1951P8

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

DIRT WORK

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Full 6 Month Warranty

We recently moved downstairs. Stop by and see our new suite of offices.

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

1C564598

TREE SERVICE

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

SPANISH CLASSES

Quality Work

Paul Baur, owner

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

APPLIANCES

AA

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

Accounting Services, Inc. 21565835

anthonystreetop@gmail.com

Reg#FINIST*932D0

REPAIR/REMODEL

Baur Log Homes

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing Free Estimates Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

tmccurdy@olypen.com

LOG HOMES

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch�

LARRYHM016J8

(360) 460-0518

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

AIR DUCT CLEANING

21582244

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

(360) 683-8332

21572250

Larry Muckley

SPECIALIZING IN TREES FREE S ATE ESTIM

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

Larry’s Home Maintenance

21572242

TREE SERVICE

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

21569312

21569323

JPSHAHS92BE

452-9355

PAINTING

“Need something fixed?� Call Me!

John Pruss 360 808-6844

333A E. 1st St. • PA

461-4609

LAWN CARE

Tractors Gas & Diesel Small Engines & Equipment

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

21569320

360-670-1350

(360)

21569331

1C564596

1C564593

#LUNDFF*962K7

457-6582 (360) 808-0439

21572254

Chad Lund

452-0755 775-6473

Moss Prevention

Painting & Pressure Washing

1C563950

www.LundFencing.com

Small jobs is what I do!

1C562786

FENCING


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Click-off makes filling up hard Dear Doctor: I own a Hyundai XG300 with V-6 engine that I purchased new in 2002. It has 116,000 miles and runs well. Recently, when trying to put gas in at the gas pump, the hose keeps clicking off. The gas canister has been replaced, but that made no difference. The system was removed from the gas tank to gas port, cleaned, and all hoses were blown clear, but I am still unable to gas up my car. Please advise. David Dear David: At my shop, we sometimes see this problem in other vehicles, too. I have found multiple problems. Your car has a rollover valve in the fuel tank that sometimes wears and sticks. The most common problem, however, is a blocked vent valve in the system. Using a scan tool, the technician can monitor the pressure sensor in the gas tank to verify that the problem is pressure buildup in the fuel tank.

High-mileage oil Dear Doctor: I own a

But the car still lacks power. Do you have any advice? couple of Junior Steven cars Dear Steven: Before Damato older with more replacing any parts, you than need to understand how 100,000 the circuit, sensor and/or miles, and part works. both “burn” In your case, the TPS oil, but located on the gas pedal there are assembly needs to have a no leaks. 5-volt reference signal. Should I Without a comprehenswitch over sive understanding of how to highthe system works, it is mileage oil? impossible to make an Richard accurate repair. Dear Richard: Yes. I The 5-volt reference sigrecommend the use of nal also goes to other senhigh-mileage oil because it sors; if there is a “shorted” has a different additive sensor, then the TPS will package than the convennot operate. tional oil blends. You must have a wire High-mileage oil will not diagram and knowledge of leak as fast as regular oil the system. and will not burn as fast either. Impreza impressive

THE AUTO DOC

Dear Doctor: I live in the Snow Belt, and I am Dear Doctor: I own a considering purchasing a 2005 Cadillac CTS V-6 that compact all-wheel-drive is lacking power. car, such as a Subaru The code on the “check Impreza. engine” light indicated an I have never owned a issue for the throttle posiSubaru and value your tion sensor. opinion. Since I do my own work, What should I look for I purchased a new — and on this car? Mary expensive — throttle pedal Dear Mary: Subaru and throttle body. has been around for a long

Car lacks power

9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others

9556 SUVs Others

FORD: ‘97 F350 XLT. 7.3L turbo diesel, super cab, auto, dual tank, 5th wheel, dually. $8,500. 360-775-5418 GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. GMC ‘04 SONOMA SLS CREW CAB 4X4 4.3 liter Vortec V6, auto, alloy wheels, new tires, bedliner, tow package, rear sliding window, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, c r u i s e , t i l t , a i r, C D stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $12,945! V6 gas mileage in a crew cab! Clean inside and out! Loaded! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com MAZDA: ‘84 Pickup. $1,950. (360)452-5126. MAZDA ‘94 B4000 EXCAB 4X4 4 . 0 V 6 , a u t o, a i r, t i l t w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r windows and locks, AM/FM cassette, alloy wheels, and more! Expires 1-12-12. VINM50808 $3,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance in House* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

SUZUKI ‘07 XL7 LTD ALL WD Platinum Edition, V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, 3rd row seating, leather interior, power sunroof, electronic tracion and stability control, AM/FM CD with stacker navigation system, 17” premium alloy wheels, roof rack, dark glass, tow package, remote entr y and more! VIN105420. Expires 121-12. $14,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance in House* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe 4x4. Low mi., great shape. TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner $7,800/obo. Call before 4x4. As is. $1,800. 7 p.m. 360-477-6969. 477-0577 TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. CHEV: ‘91 K5 Blazer. 452-9693 93k, Immaculate. Loaded, ALL original, 350FI, 9708 Vans & Minivans Auto, 4x4, adult owned, Dodge non smoker, never off r o a d e d . B u i l d s h e e t , DODGE: ‘07 Caravan owner’s and shop manu- Town & County LX. Low als. Runs and Dr ives mi., excellent condition. Like New. $10,750/obo. $10,600 firm. 457-8129. 360-452-7439 FORD ‘08 EDGE SE 9730 Vans & Minivans 3.5 liter V6, auto, all Others wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power CHEV: ‘95 Lumina miniwindows and locks, key- van. V6, 7 pass. $2,000. less entry, side airbags, 457-1053. p r i v a c y g l a s s , a l l o y CHRYSLER: ‘05 Town wheels, back up sensor, a n d C o u n t r y LT D. 1 only 37,000 miles, bal- o w n e r , g r e a t c o n d . a n c e o f fa c t o r y, 5 / 6 0 73,200 miles. $10,500. w a r r a n t y. Ve r y v e r y 360-683-1957 clean 1 owner corporate DODGE ‘09 GRAND lease return, non-smokCARAVAN SXT er, spotless Carfax rep o r t , j u s t r e d u c e d 3.8 liter V6, auto, dual air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM $1,000. C D w i t h DV D, M P 3 , $19,995 WMA, navigation, back REID & JOHNSON up camera, power winMOTORS 457-9663 dows, locks, and seat, 7 reidandjohnson.com passenger with stow and FORD: ‘90 Bronco Eddie go seating, side airbag, Bauer. EFI 5.8, OD, po- fog lamps, luggage rack, si., CD, clean, straight, p r i v a c y g l a s s , a l l o y exc! $2,500. 808-0153. wheels, only 28,000 miles, beautiful 1 owner GMC: ‘84 Jimmy 4x4. corporate lease return, $500. 460-9776. GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SUV. non-smoker, spotless Rebuilt 4.3 Vor tec en- Carfax report. $17,995 gine, fully loaded, 181K, REID & JOHNSON good condition. MOTORS 457-9663 $3,000/obo. 477-4838. reidandjohnson.com JEEP: ‘98 Wrangler Sport. 89K hwy. mi. $7,900. 360-580-1741

peninsula dailynews.com

T O Y O TA : ‘ 7 7 L a n d Cruiser FJ40 original 2F engine, aluminum body, lift with 34’s, ARB lockers, snorkel, PTO winch. Many extras!! $9,000/ obo. 617-510-9935

FORD ‘08 E250 SUPERDUTY CARGO VAN With ‘Tommy Gate’ lift, 5.4 liter V8, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and l o ck s, p owe r m i r r o r s, s a fe t y bu l k h e a d , B I N package, heavy duty 3/4 ton chassis, 1,000 lb ‘Tommy Gate’ hydraulic cargo lift, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease r e t u r n , n o n - s m o k e r, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘92 E250 van. L a d d e r r a ck , i n t e r i o r racks, good runner. $1,800. 360-460-9257. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 360-452-9363 FORD: ‘95 E350 Club Wagon Chateau. 135,000 miles, clean, sharp. $4,100. Call 360457-8388 before 7 p.m. TOYOTA : ‘ 9 8 S i e n n a . 218K, strong, tow pkg., great running/looking. $2,750. (360)301-3223.

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Makah Environmental Division Request for Proposal (RFP) Environmental Restoration Services The Makah Environmental Division is conducting environmental restoration activities on the Makah Indian Reservation. Professional ser vices, including engineer ing and environmental consulting are needed to sample soil, sediment, s u r fa c e wa t e r, a n d groundwater; plan, coordinate and oversee rem o va l o f a b a n d o n e d buildings, other structures, and associated petroleum-contaminated soils; and to prepare technical reports.

These restoration activities are scheduled from Febr uar y 2012 through December 2012. Proposals are due February 10. 2012. To request a copy of the complete RFP, contact Steve Pendleton of the Makah Environmental Division at (360) 645-3289. Pub: Jan. 15, 16, 17, 18, FORD: ‘91 E350 delivery 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 2012 cube van. 18’ insulated box, Tommy Lift, roll up Peninsula Daily r e a r d o o r, s i d e m a n News can print d o o r, c a b p a s s - t h r u your publication at door, strong 7.3 diesel, an affordable price! new tranny and diff., low Call Dean at (hwy only) mi. Fleet 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714 maint. records, newer white paint, snow tires incl. (4), $4,000/obo. Compose your 360-460-0985 days. Classified Ad

on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Rock ‘N’ Roll.

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

Sell your skates and just about anything else starting at only $16.50. Reach more than 36,000 readers of the Peninsula Daily News every day! Some restrictions apply.

Place your ad today • 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

43220697

Where buyers and sellers meet!

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

B7

Car of the Week

2012 Scion tC BASE PRICE: $18,575 for base model with manual transmission; $19,575 with automatic. PRICE AS TESTED: $26,368. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, fivepassenger, compact hatchback. ENGINE: 2.5-liter, double overhead cam, fourcylinder engine with Dual VVT-i. MILEAGE: 23 mpg (city), 31 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 174 inches. WHEELBASE: 106.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,102 pounds. BUILT IN: Japan. OPTIONS: 19-inch tires and TRD alloy wheels $2,199; Scion navigation system (includes Bluetooth connectivity, AM/FM/CD/HD radio with eight speakers, USB port with iPod connectivity, 7-inch LCD touch screen) $1,999; performance exhaust $699; security system $469; rear spoiler $444; carpeted floor and cargo mats $184; rear bumper applique $69. DESTINATION CHARGE: $730. The Associated Press

9730 Vans & Minivans 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Others Clallam County Clallam County

FORD: ‘84 F250. Turbo NISSAN ‘03 FRONTIER XE KING CAB 4X4 diesel, utility bed, rack. PICKUP $4,500, won’t last. 3.3 liter V6 engine, 5 360-417-1587 speed manual trans, alFORD: ‘85 F150. Cher- loy wheels, new tires, r y, 61K original miles, spray-in bedliner, rear turn key and start, runs sliding window, air, tilt, CD stereo, dual front airgreat. $4,250. 928-2181. bags. Only 46,000 origiFORD: ‘95 F-350 Ford nal miles! Immaculate Moving Van. 14 ‘ Box condition inside and out! Va n ; 4 6 0 g a s V- 8 ; 4 Stop by Gray Motors tospeed auto w/OD; GVW day to save some bucks 11,000#; loading ramp, on your next truck! A/C, AM/FM radio, pow$12,995 er steering and brakes; GRAY MOTORS new front disk brakes, 457-4901 shocks and alignment; graymotors.com 171,000 mi. located Sequim. $3,900. 9556 SUVs 360-504-2098 Others FORD: ‘96 F-350. 4x4 crew cab. White, long bed, 7.3 diesel. $4,800. 460-4986 or 460-4982

time and is a very popular brand in snowy regions. Over the years, there have been many improvements. The early years of Subaru cars were not so good, as there were a lot of cylinder head and head gasket failures, not to mention the failing catalytic converters and rattling exhaust heat shields. With all this said, I spent a week in a new Impreza, and what a pleasant surprise with the updated design on both the interior and exterior. The new 2.0-liter engine is quiet and makes no more tin-can sound. The engine delivers plenty of power via an updated CVT automatic transmission. Fuel mileage is 27 city, 36 highway. Our test car had the $2,000 all-weather package that also includes alloy wheels and a moonroof.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

N O . 1 1 - 2 00778-5 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE C O U N T Y O F C L A L L A M WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN H E I R S A N D D E V I S E E S OF CAROL C. SMITH; U N K N O W N H E I R S A N D DEVISEES OF GORDON E. SMITH; GEORGE D. SMITH; MARK SMITH; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH S E R V I C E ; Occupants of the Premises; and any p e r s o n s o r parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO T H E D E F E N DA N T S U n known Heirs and Devisees of Carol C. Smith; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Gordon E. Smith; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after January 5, 2012, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (“Plaintiff ”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as fo l l o w s : L OT 4 O F S H O R T P L AT R E CORDED MARCH 21, 1985 INVOLUME 15 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 13, UNDER CLALLAM C O U N T Y R E C O R D I N G N O. 5 6 4 3 4 8 , R E C O R D S O F C L A L L A M C O U N T Y , WASHINGTON, B E I N G A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 30 N O RT H , R A N G E 4 W E S T, W. M . , C L A L L A M COUNTY, WASHINGTO N . S I T UAT E I N CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON.Commonly known as: 63 Majesty Way, Po r t A n g e l e s , WA 98362. DATED this 5th day of January, 2012. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/ Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694Valerie I.Holder, WSBA #42968 A t t o r n e y s for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Pub: Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, Feb. 2, 9, 2012

SALE OF TIMBER J&A MILLETT LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled “Proposal for the J&A MILLETT Timber Sale,” addressed to the Superintendent, T a h o l a h Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m., local time, February 7th, 2012, for the purchase of timber on the J&A Millett Timber Sale, Quin a u l t R e s e r va t i o n , Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah,Washington.This timber sale contains approximately 61 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 1,775 MBF of sawlogs including 1,663 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 24 MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs and 88 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs except western red cedar are removable at the Purchaser’s option. No western red cedar salvage operations will be allowed. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier’s check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Twelve Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($12,500.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful b i d d e r w i l l be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this sale only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Thirty-five Thousand Dollars ($35,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder’s failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering.The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Tah o l a h , Wa s h i n g t o n 98587. Dated this 11th day of January, 2012 at Taholah, Washington, Greg Masten, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: January 19, 2012

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 10-2-01074-5 Sheriff ’s No.11001193 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERG E R TO B AC H O M E L O A N S S E RV I C I N G , LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, VS UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DEC E A S E D ; U N K N OW N HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED, BENEFICIAL WASHINGTON INC. DBA BENEFICIAL M O RT G AG E C O. O F WASHINGTON; WASHI N G TO N S TAT E D E PA R T M E N T O F S O C I A L A N D H E A LT H SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint; TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNK N OW N H E I R S A N D DEVISEES OF GORD O N A . C U R RY, D E CEASED THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPE RT Y A D D R E S S I S : 273 FLEMING DRIVE S E Q U I M , WA 9 8 3 8 2 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 9:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 02/03/2012 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 2 2 3 E . 4 t h S T R E E T, PORT ANGELES, WA S H I N G T O N . T H E JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $53,777.38 TOGETHER W I T H I N T E R E S T, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DAT E . F O R T H E E X AC T A M O U N T, C O N TACT THE SHERIFF’S O F F I C E AT T H E A D D R E S S S TAT E D B E LOW. DATED Decemb e r 1 6 , 2 0 1 1 W. L . Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington K ay l e n e Z e l l a r, C i v i l Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Por t A n g e l e s , WA 9 8 3 6 2 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION L OT 3 7 , B L O C K “ H ” , S E C O N D P L AT O F SUNSHINE ACRES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 6 OF P L AT S , PA G E 1 9 , RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM,, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 10-2-01074-5 Sheriff ’s No.11001193 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERG E R TO B AC H O M E L O A N S S E RV I C I N G , LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, VS UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DEC E A S E D ; U N K N OW N HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF GORDON A. CURRY, DECEASED, BENE-

FICIAL WASHINGTON INC. DBA BENEFICIAL M O RT G AG E C O. O F WA S H I N G TO N I N C ; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOC I A L A N D H E A LT H SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint; TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF RUTH E. CURRY, DECEASED; UNK N OW N H E I R S A N D DEVISEES OF GORD O N A . C U R RY, D E CEASED A writ of execution has been issued in the above-captioned c a s e, d i r e c t e d t o t h e sheriff of Clallam C o u n t y, c o m m a n d i n g the sheriff as follows: FROM: THE CLALLAM COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT CLERK’S OFFICE TO: THE SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON On November 7, 2011, a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure (“Judgment”) was entered in favor of Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP (“Plaintiff ”) against In Rem. The Judgment forecloses the interests of all the Defendants in and to the following described property (“Property”) commonly known as 273 Fleming Drive, Sequim, WA 98382 for the total sum of $53,777.38 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from November 7, 2011. The Property situated in Clall a m C o u n t y, S t a t e o f Washington, is legally described as: LOT 37, BLOCK “H”, SECOND P L AT O F S U N S H I N E ACRES, AS PER PLAT R E C O R D E D I N VO L U M E 6 O F P L AT S , PAG E 1 9 , R E C O R D S OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE O F WA S H I N G TO N . THEREFORE, pursuant to RCW 61.12.060, and in the name of the State of Washington, you are hereby commanded to sell the Property, or so much thereof as may be necessar y, in order to satisfy the Judgment, including post-judgment interest and costs. MAKE RETURN HEREOF within sixty days of the date indicated below, showing you have executed the same. Pursuant to RCW 6.21.050(2), the Sheriff may adjourn the foreclosure sale from time to time, not exceeding thir ty days beyond the last date at which this Writ is made returnable, with the consent of the plaintiff endorsed upon this Writ or by a contemporaneous writing. WITNESS, the Honorable GEORGE L. WOOD Judge of the Superior Court and the seal of said Court, affixed this 6th day of December 2011, at Port Angeles, Washington. By: Barbara Christensen, Superior Court Clerk By: Bonnie Moyer, Deputy Clerk Superior Court Clerk Clallam County Court House 223 E 4th St., Suite 9 Po r t A n g e l e s, WA 98362-3015 Presented by: Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.S. The sale date has been set for 9:00 A . M . o n Fr i d a y, 02/03/2012, in the main l o b by o f t h e C l a l l a m County Courthouse, inside the entrance located at 223 E. 4th Street, Port Angeles, Washington. YOU MAY HAVE A R I G H T TO E X E M P T P RO P E RT Y f r o m t h e sale under statutes of this state, including section 6.13.010, 6.13.030

and 6.13.040 of the Revised Code of Washington, in the manner described in those statutes. DATED December 16, 2 0 1 1 W. L . B e n e d i c t , SHERIFF Clallam C o u n t y, W a s h i n g t o n K ay l e n e Z e l l a r, C i v i l Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Por t A n g e l e s , WA 9 8 3 6 2 TEL: 360.417.2266 Pub: Dec. 23, 29, 2011, Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012

9934 Jefferson County Legals PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE Jefferson Healthcare Small Works Roster Jefferson Healthcare is inviting contractors to par ticipate in their SMALL WORKS ROSTER program for the purpose of being invited to bid on construction projects under $ 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 P E R R C W 70.44.140 (2) provides that the public hospital district may use the small works roster process established by RCW 30.04.155 The primary project site is 834 Sheridan Street, Port Townsend, Washington but could include clinics that are located in Jefferson County. Pre-qualification is required:Prospective bidders must obtain prequalification forms from Jefferson Healthcare construction management office on-site or calling 360.385.2200 X-1402 or e-mail jskannes@jeffersonhealthcare.org. Envelopes containing the properly completed C o n t r a c t o r pre-qualification for ms shall be mar ked Jefferson H e a l t h c a r e : S m a l l Wo r k s R o s t e r f o r _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ c o n t r a c t o r ” and sent or delivered to the construction management office at 834 Sheridan Street, Port Townsend, or if mailed, Addressed to:Jefferson Healthcare, Attention: Jim Skannes, 8 3 4 S h e r i dan Street Port, Towns e n d , Wa s h i n g t o n 98368, no later than 10:00AM February 8 , 2012. J e f f e r s o n Healthcare reserves the right to reject any of the pre-qualifications, waive any informality in the pre-qualification process, and select the contractor deemed best for Jefferson Healthcare. Jefferson Healthcare does not guarantee to any contractor qualified to bid on projects under the Small Works Roster that the contractor’s bid will be accepted or any value of work will be awarded to any of those c o n t r a c t o r s p a r t i c i p a t i n g in this program. 1. General Contractor Roster 2. M e c h a n i c a l C o n t r a c tor Roster 3. ElectricalContractor Roster 4. H a z a r d o u s M a t e r i a l s Contractor Roster 5. Painting Contractor Roster 6. L a n d s c a p i n g C o n t r a c tor Roster 7. Flooring Contractor Roster Jim Skannes 360/385-2200 X1402 jskannes@ jeffersonhealthcare. org Pub: Jan. 19, 20, 22, 2012


B8

WeatherNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

High 33

Low 25

39/37

46/33

43/33

44/36

Cloudy.

Mostly cloudy.

Occasional rain; breezy in the afternoon.

Chance for a couple of showers.

Snow possible in the a.m.; mostly cloudy.

Mostly cloudy, chance of a little rain.

The Peninsula What has been a very active weather pattern will continue across Victoria the Peninsula today as another surface low pressure center makes landfall. Rain will continue to fall along the coast, but it will not 34/26 be as heavy and there could even be frequent dry periods Neah Bay Port 38/33 Townsend across the north. Mixing with snow will occur in the Olympic Mountains, but the majority of the moisture with this sysPort Angeles 37/33 tem will cross into Oregon. A short break between sys33/25 tems will occur tonight before the next system arrives Sequim on Friday. Temperatures will rise enough for all rain.

37/30

Forks 38/29

Olympia 37/32

Seattle 36/31

Spokane 25/13

Yakima Kennewick 22/12 26/20

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š 2012

Marine Forecast Cloudy today. Wind northeast 4-8 knots. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Patchy clouds tonight. Wind southeast 3-6 knots. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Periods of rain tomorrow. Wind east 7-14 knots. Waves under a foot. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Saturday: Rather cloudy; morning snow showers possible, then a couple of showers possible. Wind southwest 4-8 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. TODAY

TABLE Location High Tide

Ht

LaPush

8:17 a.m. 9:54 p.m. Port Angeles 12:57 a.m. 9:37 a.m. Port Townsend 2:42 a.m. 11:22 a.m. Sequim Bay* 2:03 a.m. 10:43 a.m.

8.8’ 6.6’ 6.5’ 7.5’ 7.8’ 9.0’ 7.3’ 8.5’

TOMORROW

Low Tide 2:08 a.m. 3:16 p.m. 4:35 a.m. 5:43 p.m. 5:49 a.m. 6:57 p.m. 5:42 a.m. 6:50 p.m.

Thursday, January 19, 2012 Seattle 36/31 Billings 12/-4

Sunset today ................... 4:53 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:56 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:44 a.m. Moonset today ................. 1:25 p.m.

Moon Phases First

Full

Last

Ht

High Tide

Ht

3.0’ -0.1’ 5.4’ -0.9’ 7.0’ -1.2’ 6.6’ -1.1’

9:20 a.m. 10:56 p.m. 1:45 a.m. 10:35 a.m. 3:30 a.m. 12:20 p.m. 2:51 a.m. 11:41 a.m.

9.0’ 7.1’ 7.1’ 7.3’ 8.5’ 8.8’ 8.0’ 8.3’

SATURDAY

Low Tide 3:14 a.m. 4:13 p.m. 5:53 a.m. 6:32 p.m. 7:07 a.m. 7:46 p.m. 7:00 a.m. 7:39 p.m.

Ht

High Tide Ht

3.0’ -0.5’ 5.5’ -1.2’ 7.1’ -1.6’ 6.7’ -1.5’

10:19 a.m. 11:49 p.m. 2:25 a.m. 11:36 a.m. 4:10 a.m. 1:21 p.m. 3:31 a.m. 12:42 p.m.

9.0’ 7.6’ 7.5’ 7.2’ 9.0’ 8.7’ 8.5’ 8.2’

Low Tide Ht 4:14 a.m. 5:05 p.m. 6:59 a.m. 7:18 p.m. 8:13 a.m. 8:32 p.m. 8:06 a.m. 8:25 p.m.

2.7’ -0.8’ 5.3’ -1.3’ 6.9’ -1.7’ 6.5’ -1.6’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Jan 30

Feb 7

Feb 14

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 47 37 s Baghdad 59 38 s Beijing 36 24 c Brussels 47 35 r Cairo 60 40 pc Calgary 3 -21 c Edmonton -13 -30 s Hong Kong 71 64 s Jerusalem 46 36 pc Johannesburg 80 54 t Kabul 37 1 s London 48 39 sh Mexico City 75 45 pc Montreal 21 10 sn Moscow 16 11 c New Delhi 64 44 pc Paris 52 42 r Rio de Janeiro 87 75 pc Rome 53 44 pc Stockholm 34 24 pc Sydney 80 70 c Tokyo 50 39 pc Toronto 27 15 sn Vancouver 33 24 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

$IIRUGDEOH'HQWXUHV$QG,PSODQWV 7R/RRN$QG(DW<RXU%HVW

Detroit 27/9

New York 36/28

Denver 59/35

Washington 45/30

Kansas City 25/13

Los Angeles 66/50

Atlanta 57/42 El Paso 66/43 Houston 70/56

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Fronts Cold

Miami 78/63

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 59 9 42 57 42 41 42 12 2 49 32 28 60 55 16 34 23 50 68 59 9 27 48 -17 22 79 70 13

Lo 34 1 34 42 31 28 31 -4 -12 36 29 13 43 35 5 15 15 39 45 35 4 9 39 -27 12 65 56 4

W s s r s pc pc sh sn c r pc sn s pc sn sf sn r s pc pc sn r s sn s pc s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 25 59 57 66 78 13 2 53 69 36 54 12 72 72 38 69 41 52 53 52 29 48 77 59 53 2 36 45

Lo 13 45 32 50 63 4 -4 26 57 28 33 6 52 48 30 47 34 34 34 44 15 38 54 51 49 -2 28 30

W pc s s s pc pc pc pc s pc s pc pc s pc s r pc sh r sf sh s s r pc sn pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 81 at Fort Lauderdale, FL

Low: -29 at Cut Bank, MT

:K\VNLSIRRGV\RXORYHRU IHHOHPEDUUDVVHGWRVPLOH" )5((HYDOXDWLRQ&DOOWRGD\

*UHJ%DUU\''6

1C564290

4XDOLW\PDNHVDELJGLIIHUHQFHLQWKHORRNVÂżWFRPIRUWDQG IXQFWLRQ\RXÂśOOH[SHULHQFH:HKHOS\RXDIIRUGWKHEHVW\RXU EXGJHWDOORZV6HHRQHSUDFWLWLRQHUSD\RQHSULFHIRU\RXU SHUVRQDOL]HGWUHDWPHQWÂąSUHSDUDWLRQÂżWWLQJDQGIROORZXSV

Minneapolis 2/-4

Chicago 16/5

San Francisco 53/49

Sun & Moon

Jan 22

Everett 33/32

Shown is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather.

TIDE

National Forecast

-10s -0s

Bellingham 30/18 Aberdeen 40/33

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 30 25 0.29 1.42 Forks* 36 29 0.65 7.82 Seattle 33 28 0.71 3.08 Sequim 29 26 0.04 0.66 Hoquiam 33 31 0.07 3.63 Victoria 29 22 0.28 1.77 P. Townsend 32 25 0.23 0.73 *Data from Tuesday

New

Port Ludlow 37/30

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

 

0DMRUFUHGLWFDUGVRUWHUPVRQDSSURYDO

Now Showing â&#x2013;  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Adventures of Tintinâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alvin and the Chipmunksâ&#x20AC;? (G) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugoâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joyful Noiseâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadowsâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;War Horseâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Bought a Zooâ&#x20AC;? (PG)

â&#x2013;  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl with the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocolâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13)

â&#x2013;  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Meet The Painting Pros

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like Crazyâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugoâ&#x20AC;? (PG)

â&#x2013;  Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-3853883)

Come to our

Tuesday, January 24 10 am to 2 pm

â&#x20AC;&#x153;War Horseâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contrabandâ&#x20AC;? (R)

Come to Hartnagel Building Supply to learn about: 9Valspar and Parker Paint, plus Superdeck and Cabot stain 9 Chalkboard & magnetic paint, Zero VOC paint 9 Creative trim and molding ideas 9 Enter our door prize drawing for Parker Paint 9 Meet our Parker Paint reps 9 Receive 15% OFF paint and stain â&#x20AC;&#x201D; single gallons and five gallons!

enjoy the SOUNDS of LIFE

We specialize in... Comprehensive hearing exams, hearing aid evaluations & repair. Our clinic also fits the latest technology, does hearing aid performance check & reprogramming.

Offering Hearing and Swim Protection.

360-452-2228 â&#x20AC;˘ 1-800-723-4106

NEED A PAINTER? Come meet these local, professional painters: 9 Northwest Inside Out Painting, Pam Boyd, 460-0392 9 Collins Painting, Stephen Collins, 461-5268 9 D&K Painting Inc., Dan Huff, 457-7823 9 Wileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Scott Wiley, 461-3277

21573173

CERTIFIED HEARING

Painting Open House

FREE Event

819 Georgiana St., Suite B â&#x20AC;˘ Port Angeles

enjoy luxurious, pillowy, softness without sacrificing support

SAVE

15%

Rust-Oleum Chalk Board Paint converts surfaces into a usable chalkboard.

SPECIAL BUY! 11 PC TRAY SET

$8.99!

Limit 1. While supplies last.

ON 1 & 5 GALLONS OF

PAINT & STAIN Applies to regular retail price, January 24-28, excludes primer. Limited to stock on hand. Coupon valid at Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. and Hartnagel Building Supply.

3111 Hwy 101 E, Port Angeles 452-8933 Â&#x2021; hartnagels.com

Clip & Save!

Thank you for shopping locally at our employee owned and operated stores!

21574246

1B5139058

1114 East First, Port Angeles

457-9412 1-800-859-0163 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 - 5:30

www.facebook.com/ AngelesMillwork.Hartnagel


PDN01192012j  

PND01192012j

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you