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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS November 21, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Clallam GOP to begin prosecutor interviews Party committee plans to present commissioners list of candidates BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Republican Party will conduct interviews in a county process to appoint a new prosecuting attorney, party Chairman Dick Pilling said Wednesday. Longtime Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly announced Friday that she will depart for personal reasons Dec. 31

Pilling said the party will interview Republican lawyers who live in the county and select three names for commissioners to consider. Commissioners will have 60 days after Kelly’s resignation to appoint a successor from the names provided by the party’s central committee, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Brian Wendt said in a memo. If two of the three commissioners cannot agree on an appointee within 60 days, Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, will appoint a county prosecuting attorney from the same list of names. The person appointed to serve the remainder of Kelly’s term will face election in November 2014.

with one year left on her current term. Because Kelly was elected as a Republican, the Clallam County Republican Party Central Committee will select three candidates for the three county commissioners to consider for appointment. Under the state constitution and Clallam County charter, the Board of County Commissioners must appoint one of three candidates that the political party submits.

McEntire

Kelly

The salary currently is $125,820 annually. Pilling said the decision to interview candidates was made at the county Republican Party central committee meeting Monday. Prior to the meeting, County Commissioner Jim McEntire, who also serves as a Republican Party precinct committee officer, announced that he would not participate “in the process of deciding which three names of qualified Republican attorneys to forward to the Board of County Commissioners for their further action.” TURN

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Community pitches in with gobblers Salvation Army now has turkeys for Thanksgiving BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles Salvation Army social services director Mike Saddler, left, and Major Scott Ramsey look into a freezer filled with frozen turkeys at the corps’ Peabody Street food kitchen Wednesday.

PORT ANGELES — Two weeks after putting out the word that it didn’t have any turkeys for the annual Thanksgiving feast, the Port Angeles Salvation Army’s soup kitchen now has enough for the 200 expected at next week’s holiday meal. So many turkeys and hams poured in from generous community donors that they don’t fit in a single freezer, Salvation Army Major Scott Ramsey said. “People have responded to our pleas in the Peninsula Daily News and on KONP,” Ramsey said. “There are those people who spring into action for the holidays.” As of Wednesday, the Salvation Army had received more than 70 turkeys and hams — and a few chickens. “It does speak well to our wonderful community,” Ramsey said. A typical meal at the Salvation Army’s kitchen serves 80 to 120 people, but 200 or more are expected from noon to 4 p.m. next Wednesday at the Thanksgiving eve dinner at the dining hall at 206 S. Peabody St. TURN

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Local instructor gets White House medal today College’s Walsh recognized for work at prisons BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Peninsula College instructor in corrections education will receive a “Champion of Change” award at a White House ceremony in Wash-

ington, D.C., today. Brian Walsh, director of corrections education at Peninsula College, was named by the White House as one of 10 “local heroes” to receive the award. The award ceremony will be streamed live online at 11 a.m. on the White House website at www. whitehouse.gov/live. Walsh was traveling to Washington, D.C., on Wednesday and was unavailable for comment. The award celebrates educators who are taking creative

approaches in using technology to enhance learning for students in communities across the U.S., the White House said. It is given by the Con- Walsh nectEd Initiative, a White House program that President Barack Obama launched in June.

The White House said that Walsh “believes that by providing quality college education, offenders will be less likely to return to prison and be better prepared to care for themselves and their families.”

Started programs “As education director for Clallam Bay and Olympic corrections centers, Walsh started the first prison-based Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training program, a nationally recognized

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curriculum for adult education in Washington state,” it continued. Walsh founded five vocational programs at the prisons located in Clallam Bay and 25 miles south of Forks: Sustainable Horticulture, Artisan Baking, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Green Building and Computer Programming and Game Development. He has led the effort to expand the use of technology in the prison classroom, the White House said.

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

‘Once Upon a Time’ stars are expecting THE FAIRY TALE continues for Ginnifer Goodwin and Josh Dallas of ABC’s “Once Upon a Time.” The actors, who play Snow White and Prince Charming on the TV drama, are expecting Dallas their first child together. Goodwin’s representative confirmed the news, first reported by Goodwin People magazine Wednesday. No other

details were available. The couple became engaged last month. Goodwin, 35, stars in the National Geographic Channel movie “Killing Kennedy.”

Act-violation plea The former host of Animal Planet’s “Wild Recon” show admitted Tuesday that he sold two endangered Iranian desert monitor lizards without a permit. Donald Schultz pleaded guilty in federal court in Los Angeles to violating the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. As part of a plea deal, Schultz, 36, agreed to pay a $6,000 fine and $3,000 restitution, as recommended by prosecutors, and to perform 200 hours of community service. Schultz sold the rare lizards for $2,500 to an undercover federal wildlife agent who answered his

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEXY

Recording artist Adam Levine has been named Sexiest Man Alive 2013 by People, the magazine announced Tuesday. He is a coach on the NBC hit series “The Voice.”

Passings By The Associated Press

FREDERICK SANGER, 95, a British biochemist who twice won the Nobel Prize in chemistry and was a pioneer of genome sequencing, has died. His death was confirmed Wednesday by the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, which Dr. Dr. Sanger Sanger in 1958 helped found in 1962. The laboratory praised Dr. Sanger, who died in his sleep Tuesday at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, England, as an “extremely modest and selfeffacing man whose contributions have made an extraordinary impact on molecular biology.” Dr. Sanger was one of just four individuals to have been awarded two Nobel Prizes, the others being Marie Curie, Linus Pauling and John Bardeen. Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, called Dr. Sanger “the father of the genomic era.” Dr. Sanger first won the Nobel Prize in 1958 at the age of 40 for his work on the structure of proteins. He had determined the sequence of the amino acids in insulin and showed how they are linked together. He later turned his attention to the sequencing of nucleic acids and developing techniques to determine the exact sequence of the building blocks in DNA. That work led to Dr. Sanger’s second Nobel Prize, awarded jointly in 1980 with Stanford University’s Paul Berg and Harvard University’s Walter Gilbert, for their work

HONOR

determining base sequences in nucleic acids.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think that opening a business involving newly legalized recreational marijuana is a good or bad business idea? Good idea

39.3%

Walt Disney Family Bad idea 45.1% Museum, which opened in 2009 in San Francisco’s _________ Undecided 9.7% Presidio, as a tribute to her DIANE DISNEY Pass the munchies 5.9% MILLER, 79, Walt Disney’s family’s legacy. One of her major condaughter and one of his Total votes cast: 1,137 inspirations for building the cerns was that her father’s Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com Disneyland theme park, has name had become associNOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those ated more with a corporate died at her Northern Calipeninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be identity than with the man fornia home. assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole. Her himself. death Tuesday in Napa Peninsula Lookback Setting it Straight was conFrom the pages of the P ENINSULA D AILY N EWS Corrections and clarifications firmed by The Walt government boat came ■ The Port Angeles 1938 (75 years ago) Disney Co. into the bay, dragging a Regional Transfer Station is Advertisement: The cause located at 3501 W. 18th St., deep cable with surface Comfort is the keynote was compli- Mrs. Miller Port Angeles. floats attached to each on the electrified Olymcations from in 2005 A Page A1 story Wednesside. pian! a fall, said day in the Clallam County The boat made one wide There’s no getting Andi Wang, spokeswoman edition listed the wrong circle, then headed out around it — you can’t for the Walt Disney Family address. toward the Strait of Juan beat the air-conditioned, Museum. de Fuca. _________ roller-bearing Olympian “As the beloved daughter We assumed that they for solid comfort. of Walt Disney and one of The Peninsula Daily News It’s clean, quiet, smooth- were measuring depths. strives at all times for accuracy and his inspirations for creating fairness in articles, headlines and riding, and the crew offers Disneyland, she holds a photographs. To correct an error or 1988 (25 years ago) the kind of courteous serspecial place in the history to clarify a news story, phone Execvice that makes you feel at One man was killed of The Walt Disney Co. and utive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417home. and another wounded in the hearts of fans every3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuRemember, The Milwau- in Hadlock when a domes- ladailynews.com. where,” Robert A. Iger, the kee Road is the only railtic dispute erupted in company’s president and road over its own rails all gunfire. CEO, said in a statement. Seen Around Sheriff’s deputies were “She will be remembered the way to Chicago. And it Peninsula snapshots offers the world’s longest summoned to a Rhody for her grace and generosity continuous electrified ride Drive residence by the and tireless work to preSOUTHBOUND ON — 656 thrilling miles over girlfriend of a man who serve her father’s legacy.” BROWN Road in Sequim: a four great mountain today is in stable condition large dog with its head out Mrs. Miller, the eldest ranges. at Jefferson General daughter of Walt and Lilthe open moon roof of a — Frank G. Lindsay, Hospital. lian Disney, remembered small car, enjoying the passenger agent, Chicago, Dead is the man who her father as a man who breeze of a cold Saturday Milwaukee, St. Paul and lived with the injured was caring and patient with morning . . . Pacific Railroad, 105 N. man’s former wife. his children. Laurel Street, Port Angeles. Jefferson County Sheriff “He’d take me and my WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, Mel Mefford said there sister Sharon to the merryP.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 1963 (50 years ago) apparently was “an ongogo-round at Griffith Park 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email ing domestic problem for and stand there all day Discovery Bay apparnews@peninsuladailynews.com. days” over custody of a waiting until we were ready ently is a place for oceanic child. to go,” Mrs. Miller told the experiments. The shooting fatality San Francisco Chronicle in For several evenings, Laugh Lines was the second in East Jef1998. electric flashes have been ferson County in the past “As he stood there, he seen at intervals over the A DOG NAMED Rupee 1½ months. kept thinking there should bay. has become the first dog to On Oct. 1, a man was be more for parents and Sometimes they appear climb Mount Everest. killed and another children to do together, and to be very red, and on the His owner really threw wounded when they were the idea for Disneyland was next occasion they are ice the heck out of a Frisbee, gunned down on Water born.” blue in color. and up he went. Street in Port Townsend. Mrs. Miller founded the Jimmy Kimmel On Saturday, a small

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Nov. 21, the 325th day of 2013. There are 40 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Nov. 21, 1973, President Richard Nixon’s attorney, J. Fred Buzhardt, revealed the existence of an 18½-minute gap in one of the White House tape recordings related to Watergate. On this date: ■ In 1789, North Carolina became the 12th state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. ■ In 1861, Judah Benjamin, who had been acting Confederate secretary of war, was formally named to the post. ■ In 1920, the Irish Republican Army killed 12 British intelli-

gence officers and two auxiliary policemen in the Dublin area; British forces responded by raiding a soccer match, killing 14 civilians. ■ In 1922, Rebecca L. Felton of Georgia was sworn in as the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate. ■ In 1931, the Universal horror film “Frankenstein,” starring Boris Karloff as the monster and Colin Clive as his creator, was first released. ■ In 1934, the Cole Porter musical “Anything Goes,” starring Ethel Merman as Reno Sweeney, opened on Broadway. ■ In 1942, the Alaska Highway was formally opened. ■ In 1969, the Senate voted down the Supreme Court nomina-

tion of Clement F. Haynsworth, 55-45, the first such rejection since 1930. ■ In 1974, bombs exploded at a pair of pubs in Birmingham, England, killing 21 people. Six suspects were convicted of the attack, but the convictions of the so-called “Birmingham Six” were overturned in 1991. ■ In 1980, 87 people died in a fire at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. ■ In 1995, the Dow Jones industrial average closed above the 5,000 mark for the first time, rising 40.46 points to end the day at 5,023.55. ■ Ten years ago: Health officials said a deadly outbreak of hepatitis A at a Chi-Chi’s Mexican

restaurant in suburban Pittsburgh was probably caused by green onions from Mexico. ■ Five years ago: Somali pirates released a hijacked Greekowned tanker, MV Genius, with all 19 crew members safe and the oil cargo intact after payment of a ransom. The ship had been seized almost two months earlier. ■ One year ago: Two weeks after he was re-elected to a ninth full term in Congress, Democratic Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. quietly resigned in a letter in which he acknowledged an ongoing federal investigation. Jackson would eventually be sentenced to 2½ years in prison for illegally spending campaign money.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, November 21, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Supremacist serial killer is executed BONNE TERRE, Mo. — Joseph Paul Franklin, a white supremacist who targeted blacks and Jews in a cross-country killing spree from 1977 to 1980, was put to death Wednesday in Missouri, the state’s first execution in nearly three years. Franklin, 63, was executed at the state prison in Bonne Terre for killing Gerald Gordon in a sniper shooting at a suburban St. Franklin Louis synagogue in 1977. He was convicted of seven other murders, but the Missouri case was the only one resulting in a death sentence. Franklin has also admitted to shooting and wounding civil rights leader Vernon Jordan and Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, who has been paralyzed from the waist down since the attack in 1978. Mike O’Connell, a spokesman for the Missouri Department of Corrections, said Franklin was pronounced dead at 6:17 a.m. The execution began more than six hours later than intended, and it took just 10 minutes. Franklin declined to make a final statement before being administered 5 grams of pentobarbital.

Rep pleads guilty WASHINGTON — Florida Republican Rep. Henry “Trey” Radel pleaded guilty Wednesday

to a misdemeanor charge of cocaine possession and was sentenced to a year’s probation. “I’ve hit a bottom where I realize I need help,” Radel told a judge in acknowledging that he purchased 3.5 grams of cocaine from an undercover police officer. As part of a plea agreement, Radel acknowledged he agreed to buy the cocaine for $250 in a Washington, D.C., neighborhood Oct. 29. After the undercover officer gave Radel the drugs, federal agents confronted him, court documents show. Radel agreed to talk with the agents and invited them to his apartment, where he also retrieved a vial of cocaine he had in the home, the documents said.

Macy’s float flap NEW YORK — Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is awash in animal-related protests over its floats, with controversies involving the unlikely pairing of rocker Joan Jett and Shamu the killer whale. Activists plan to line the route of next week’s parade to protest a SeaWorld float over accusations in a new documentary that the theme parks treat whales badly. And ranchers succeeded in getting Jett pulled off the South Dakota tourism float after they questioned why the vegetarian and animal-rights ally was representing their beef-loving state. The float flaps threaten to shake Macy’s traditional position of staying out of politics. “The parade has never taken on, promoted or otherwise engaged in social commentary, political debate or other forms of advocacy,” Cincinnati-based Macy’s Inc. said in a statement this week. The Associated Press

Briefly: World poison gas and nerve agents at sea is a possible alternative to finding a country willing to host the destruction, a spokesman for the global chemical weapons watchdog said Wednesday. The Organization for the ProGENEVA — A new round of hibition of Chemical Weapons Iran nuclear talks began in fits aims to destroy some 1,300 metand starts Wednesday, with the ric tons of Syrian toxic agents two sides ending a first session just minutes after it began amid by mid-2014, but the plan was dealt a blow last week when warnings from Iran’s supreme leader of “red lines” beyond which Albania rejected a U.S. request his country will not compromise. to host destruction. A senior 11 soldiers killed U.S. official said the brief CAIRO — A suicide car bomb general meethit a bus convoy of off-duty ing was only a Egyptian soldiers in the Sinai formality and Peninsula on Wednesday, killing that bilateral 11 and wounding 37, in the latmeetings est of a wave of attacks blamed would continue on Islamic militants sympathrough the thetic to ousted President Khamenei evening to Mohammed Morsi. work on a deal The mounting insurgency in that would start a rollback of Teh- the Sinai has sent security and ran’s nuclear program in intelligence agencies scrambling exchange for limited sanctions for new tactics to thwart future relief. attacks and protect themselves While voicing support for the amid signs of the violence creeptalks, Iran’s supreme leader, ing into other parts of Egypt, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, particularly the capital, Cairo. insisted there are limits to the Among the attacks that have concessions Tehran will make. raised alarm was the killing of a senior security officer, gunned Destruction at sea down in his Cairo neighborhood THE HAGUE, Netherlands Sunday. — Destroying Syria’s stockpile of The Associated Press

Opening of nuclear talks ends quickly

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama smiles after awarding Oprah Winfrey the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House on Wednesday.

Presidential medals awarded to select few BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama opened a day of tributes to former President John F. Kennedy on Wednesday by bestowing the Presidential Medal of Freedom on prominent Americans, 50 years after Kennedy was assassinated weeks short of the medal’s first award ceremony. Obama presented the medal — the highest award the U.S. gives a civilian — to Oprah Winfrey, former President Bill Clinton, and leaders from the worlds of sports, entertainment, science and public service. The award was given to 16 living and deceased Americans. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Steven Spielberg were among those gathered in the East Room of the White House to watch the ceremony. “Today, we salute fierce competitors who became true champi-

ons,” Obama said, pausing to speak in personal terms about each of the recipients and their contributions to society. The ceremony marked the start of a day honoring Kennedy’s legacy two days before the nation pauses to remember the 50th anniversary of his assassination.

“I’m grateful, Bill, as well, for the advice and counsel that you’ve offered me, on and off the golf course,” Obama said to chuckles. “And most importantly, for your lifesaving work around the world, which represents what’s the very best in America.”

‘Blasted’ through ceiling Remembering Kennedy Later, Obama made a visit to the eternal flame that marks John F. Kennedy’s gravesite. He was joined by first lady Michelle Obama and the Clintons at the ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. Turning to the former White House inhabitant, Obama said that Bill Clinton’s presidency had been only the start of his work to improve the world, crediting his post-presidency humanitarian works as helping to save or improve the lives of hundreds of millions around the world.

Obama said the late Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, didn’t just break the stratospheric glass ceiling, “she blasted right through it.” “Young girls need to see role models, she said. You can’t be what you can’t see,” Obama said. “Today, our daughters, including Malia and Sasha, can set their sights a little bit higher because Sally Ride showed them the way.” Receiving the award for Ride, who died last year, was Tam O’Shaughnessy, who was introduced as Ride’s life partner.

Too fat to fly? Stranded Frenchman’s ordeal ends BY DANICA KIRKA ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — He’s been turned down by planes, trains and a cruise ship in his quest home — and his family said it’s because he has been deemed too fat to travel. Now Frenchman Kevin Chenais’ long and fitful journey is coming to an end. Chenais, who weighs 500 pounds, said he has been repeatedly refused transport over the past two weeks as he sought to get home to France from the United States. P&O Ferries offered to take him in his ambulance aboard the Spirit of Britain on Wednesday, the final hurdle keeping him from his home near the Swiss border. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS “I am absolutely tired,” the 22-year-old said as he slumped over in his mobility Kevin Chenais sits in his mobility scooter in scooter just before being loaded into the front of an ambulance at St. Pancras in ambulance. London on Wednesday.

Quick Read

. . . more news to start your day

West: ‘Batkid’ events, rentals cost city $105,000

Nation: Congresswoman attacked near Capitol Hill

World: Paris shootings suspect taken into custody

World: Stockpile of gold found in airplane lavatory

A SPOKESWOMAN FOR San Francisco’s mayor says it cost the city $105,000 to honor the 5-year-old boy with leukemia who captivated the nation with his larger-than-life portrayal of a caped crusader. Mayor Ed Lee’s communications director, Christine Falvey, said Wednesday that most of the money went toward renting sound and video equipment for the crowds gathered to watch Miles Scott, aka “Batkid,” receive a chocolate key to the city. Falvey said the San Francisco chapter of Make-A-Wish hopes to reimburse the city through private donations.

FRESHMAN NEW YORK Congresswoman Grace Meng said she was hit on the head and robbed in Washington., D.C., but was not seriously injured. Meng is a Democrat representing the New York City borough of Queens. She said in a statement Wednesday she suffered a bruise on her chin and underwent a CT scan after the attack Tuesday night near Capitol Hill. Meng said she had dinner at a restaurant and was walking to her apartment when she was hit in the back of the head. She said the robber took her purse and fled on foot. U.S. Capitol Police are investigating.

THE SUSPECT IN a Paris newspaper office shooting that left a photographer gravely wounded and other attacks that triggered a two-day nationwide manhunt was arrested Wednesday evening, French authorities said. Agnes Thibault Lecuivre, a spokeswoman for the French prosecutor’s office, said that “a suspect with a strong resemblance to the shooter” was arrested Wednesday evening in an underground parking lot in Bois-Colombes, 6 miles north of Paris. She could not confirm French media reports that he is being treated in a hospital.

CLEANERS FOUND A stash of 24 gold bars worth more than $1.1 million hidden in an airplane lavatory after a flight from Bangkok arrived in New Delhi, officials said Wednesday. The Jet Airways plane had landed in Kolkata and was being cleaned before a scheduled flight to Patna when the cleaners found two bags with the gold stashed inside, Customs official Mona Priyadarshini said. Priyadarshini said the gold bars weighed around 2.2 pounds each. Customs officials confiscated the stash and are investigating. India is one of the world’s biggest consumers of gold.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PA panel approves funds for landfill bluff design Council looks to consultant to find way to move more ex-dump waste BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The city will pay a consultant up to $145,180 to design a way to remove more waste from the city’s buried landfill using state Department of Ecology funds. The work is part of an effort to shore up a failing bluff buttressing the landfill. The amount paid to Seattle-based Herrera Environmental Consultants could fund design for work that may not be done, however, if the state Legislature does not approve Ecology’s 2014 supplemental budget request for $2.5 million, which Port Angeles would not have to match or pay back. “There is no guarantee that this additional financial assistance will come,” City Engineer Mike Puntenney said, adding that Ecology officials do consider the city’s project a high priority.

‘Expensive’ “[The request was added] after our pleas that this project is very expensive to the taxpayers of Port Angeles,” Puntenney said. The $145,180 is part of a total $282,555 amendment to the city’s contract with Herrera approved by a unanimous City Council vote Tuesday night. The amendment increases the Herrera design contract amount to

$2.8 million. If the Legislature doesn’t approve the Ecology funding, Puntenney said, the design work still will be beneficial because it will provide more information on how more waste can be removed in the future. Ecology’s $2.5 million would allow removal of about 100,000 more cubic feet of waste than originally planned from the city’s defunct and buried landfill at the end of 18th Street, Puntenney said. “It’s a very cost-efficient way to get additional garbage relocated,” Puntenney said.

Expect word in spring Ecology and the city likely won’t know whether the Legislature has approved the request at least until March, Puntenney added. Under the city’s current plan, about 250,000 cubic yards will be removed from a section of landfill near a failing bluff over the Strait of Juan de Fuca and moved within the landfill farther from the bluff, city officials have said. The city hopes to start moving the garbage and buttressing a seawall supporting one portion of the bluff next summer as part of the total $19.6 million effort. The city already has secured about $3.9 million in financial assistance from Ecology. The expected cost

to the city is about $15.7 million. No more than 11 feet of dirt in some places separate decades of buried garbage from the edge of the bluff, which is eroding at a rate of between 3 feet and 5 feet per year — threatening to release garbage into the Strait. City Engineering Manager Kathryn Neal told council members the remaining $137,375 going to Herrera is to prepare additional permitting to deal with stormwater runoff during construction and for planned habitat restoration for the mouth of nearby Dry Creek. It also would allow the design of a road to access the seawall without touching the beach and to address water found to be pooling at the bottom of the main landfill portion, Neal explained.

Stormwater pipe

help increase stormwater capacity downtown, Puntenney said. “It’s just more cost-efficient,” he said. “We’ll only be paying for trenching and resurfacing of the road the one time.” The city will wait to install the separate stormwater line, likely a $500,000 project, until low-interest state loans can be obtained for the larger CSO phasetwo work, Puntenney added. Council members also unanimously agreed Tuesday to use up to $119,844 in Ecology stormwater capacity grant funds for Herrera to begin the designs of three city stormwater projects. The projects are: ■ Replacing certain city residential alleys with permeable pavement to reduce stormwater runoff. ■ Installing water filtration systems on stormwater outfalls releasing water into Peabody Creek. ■ Building a facility at the city’s transfer station to separate water from sediment and other debris collected by the city’s vacuum truck, which cleans stormwater drains. The water would then be piped to the city’s wastewater treatment plant. Puntenney said the costs of each project would be determined as part of Herrera’s design work. The designs would be used to seek additional Ecology grants to fund the projects, he added.

In other council action, council members unanimously approved a $67,234 amendment to the professional services contract with environmental engineering firm Brown and Caldwell to add a new stormwater pipe under a stretch of First Street. The pipe will separate stormwater from a combined sewer and stormwater line already running beneath the street, Puntenney explained. The work will be part of the second phase of the ________ city’s combined sewer overReporter Jeremy Schwartz can flow, or CSO, project, which be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. will require First Street to 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula be dug up to install pipes to dailynews.com.

PA nonprofits praise services funding plan Council members took no action on the budget Tuesday. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS The funding is part of a proposed PORT ANGELES — Nonprofit $129 million total city budget, which workers earlier this week praised a includes a $19.2 million general city staff proposal to include $46,350 fund. for health and human services in the The staff proposal added the city’s proposed 2014 budget. health and human services funding, “I just want to thank you for actu- which is steered toward local nonally restoring last year’s budget for profits that provide a variety of serhealth and human services and add- vices to the city’s low-income, elderly ing some funds to it,” said Jody Moss, and disabled populations, after City executive director of the United Way Manager Dan McKeen initially recof Clallam County, which manages ommended no such city money for the funds, at Tuesday night’s City 2014. Council meeting. The city’s budget funded health Utility rate increases and human services at $30,000 in At the request of council mem2013. Funding in 2012 was $56,250. Moss said the city’s 2013 funding bers, McKeen worked with staff to increase the proposed amount first helped local nonprofits serve just more than 11,000 people in the Port to $35,000, then to $46,350 using additional utility tax revenue Angeles area in the first six months expected to be generated next year of this year. Moss spoke during a public hear- due to utility rate increases set to go into effect Jan. 1. ing on the city’s proposed 2014 budPriscilla Schaefer, fiscal manager get, which will be the subject of for Port Angeles’ First Step Family another public hearing and possible Support Center, one of the historical council vote Dec. 3. The council will recipients of the health and human meet at 6 p.m. in council chambers services money, told council members at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

Updated state revenue forecast stays steady THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lerch, executive director of the Economic and Revenue Forecast Council. Democratic Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam — who represents the 24th District, which includes the North Olympic Peninsula — asked about the impact of Boeing potentially deciding to build its new 777X airplane in another state.

OLYMPIA — Washington state’s revenue outlook is holding steady as economists expect a continued trend of slow economic growth. An updated forecast released Wednesday shows lawmakers may have $25 million more available to them. It’s a small amount for a state in which the two-year budget cycle is expected to collect some New jet production $33 billion for the general fund. Lerch said his forecasts don’t account for that as the projecVariety of risks tions only go out through 2017. Steve Lerch, executive direc- Boeing’s production on the new tor of the Economic and Revenue jet is expected to begin later. However, state Treasurer Jim Forecast Council, said there are a variety of risks in the projec- McIntire said it will raise bortions, including a slowing Chi- rowing costs for the state. “It could be several hundred nese economy, European economic problems and the poten- million dollars,” McIntire said. Gov. Jay Inslee is preparing a tial for a slowing U.S. housing supplemental budget proposal to recovery. “Slow economic growth con- be released next month. Lawtinues to be the primary trend in makers will return to Olympia this forecast update,” said Steve in January.

the city funds help the support center receive grants from other agencies. Such grants are more likely to be awarded if it’s shown the city has enough faith in the center to fund it, Schaefer explained. “Thank you very much for caring about health and human services here,” she said. The family support center has received $1,867 from the city this year, according to United Way figures, and served 539 individuals in the first six months of 2013. Becca Korby, executive director of Health Families of Clallam County, another funding recipient, praised the council for urging for more nonprofit money. “I would like to thank you for being a public example for doing what civilized leaders do,” Korby said. Healthy Families of Clallam County, which helps victims of domestic violence, got $4,533 from the city in 2013, according to United Way figures, and served 4,531 people in the first six months of this year.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LUSTER

OF LIGHTS

June Erickson straightens out a line of decorative holiday lights for placement in the front window of Moxie Boutique on Laurel Street in downtown Port Angeles on Tuesday. With the holiday season about to go into full swing, many businesses are putting up decorations to foster the holiday spirit.

Clallam marks draft of solid waste plan Comments to be accepted from Dec. 2 to Jan. 3 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Solid Waste Advisory Committee has announced the release of the preliminary draft of the Clallam County Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan for public comment. The draft can be viewed at www.clallam.net/boards/ SWAC. Public comments will be taken between Dec. 2 and Jan. 3. Public input also will be taken at public meetings Dec. 2 and 3. The Dec. 2 meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the commissioners’ meeting room (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St. The Dec. 3 meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in City Council chambers at Forks City Hall, 500 E. Division St. After the public comment period, the draft will be reviewed by the state

Department of Ecology and finalized for adoption in 2014. The 153-page draft contains minimum contents as specified by state law, including an assessment of solid waste handling needs and operations, a program for surveillance and control, a cost assessment and projections for capital acquisition and operations, and waste reduction and recycling strategies. It also includes background elements of solid waste planning, legal authority and recommendations for solid waste over a five-year planning cycle. Members of the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, who represent public and private interests, provided input to a local independent contractor to update the 2006 Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan. Public comments can be emailed to Clallam County Public Works Administrative Director Bob Martin at bmartin@co.clallam.wa.us. Comments can be mailed to Martin at 223 E. Fourth St., Suite 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362. For more information, phone Martin at 360-4172389.

Washington state sees loss of 9,500 jobs over 2 months BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — Washington state’s unemployment rate was relatively constant over the past two months, but the state saw an estimated loss of 9,500 jobs over the same period, according to numbers released Wednesday by the state Employment Security Department. The state’s unemployment rate was 6.9 percent in September, a slight decrease from August’s 7 percent. In October, it crept back up to 7 percent. The agency was releasing data for both months because the September numbers were delayed due to the federal government shutdown last month. Jobless rates for Clallam and Jefferson counties will be released Tuesday. Statewide, jobs fell an estimated 1,400 in September and 8,100 in October.

Two different surveys are used to calculate unemployment figures and job losses and gains. The unemployment rate represents the percentage of the labor force that is unemployed and actively looking for work. People who have stopped looking for work are not counted. The job gains and losses estimates are based on a U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of businesses.

Overall unemployment Paul Turek, a labor economist with Employment Security, said that while the federal furloughs did not affect October job numbers, it could have affected the overall unemployment rate for that month. Turek said that while Washington did gain some jobs in both months, the overall drop is due in part to seasonal adjustments compared with normal patterns

this time of year, as well as the result of the overall economy. “We enjoyed a very long growth streak, but we should expect there will be ups and downs over time as the recovery gradually strengthens,” Turek said in a written statement. Industries that saw the biggest losses were education and health services, construction, leisure and hospitality and manufacturing. Sectors that saw some gains were wholesale trade, retail trade, other services and government. Since October 2012, when Washington state’s unemployment rate was 7.8 percent, the state has gained more than 48,000 jobs. The national unemployment rate for October was 7.3 percent. More than 241,000 people were unemployed and looking for work in Washington state last month, including 94,951 who claimed unemployment benefits during that same period.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Briefly . . . Hospice plans survivors workshop

A5

Schooner theme of ornament PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend Main Street is celebrating the 100th anniversary of the schooner SEQUIM — Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County Adventuress with a limitededition Christmas ornais offering a new educational series for people fac- ment. Since the 1990s, Port ing the challenge of living Townsend Main Street has alone after losing a loved offered collectible Christmas one. ornaments. The Survivors’ 4-Week The choice this year repWorkshop offers answers to resents a theme the agency everyday problems and has focused on all year, said provides resources for Executive Director Mari adapting to the changes Mullen. that come with loss, the “We are helping the organization said. Space is limited, so reg- Adventuress celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ister by phoning the hospice office at 360-452-1511. boat,� she said. Mullen said the AdvenThe free series will be from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on turess, launched in 1913, was included in the commuFridays beginning Dec. 6 nity portrait in March as it and continuing Dec. 13, sailed by behind the assemDec. 20 and Jan. 3. bled crowd. It will be at Trinity The theme, “Sailing on United Methodist Church, Silver Seas,� is appropriate 100 S. Blake Ave. in for a maritime community, Sequim. Mullen said. The first class will deal The Adventuress is the with financial management with Susan Burkhardt and a guest speaker. The next will focus on home maintenance, with a presentation by Kay Rudiger and Jan Yates. The third in the series will concern self-care, with registered nurse Debby Smith and the Rev. Maggie-Bourne-Raiswell. The last class will be “Cooking for One,� presented by Dr. Janelle Doolittle. It also will have a holiday potluck. The nonprofit Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County provides care for the terminally ill and their families free of charge. For more information, visit www.vhocc.org.

flagship of Sound Experience, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection of Puget Sound. “It’s an honor to be associated with Port Townsend Main Street and the great work they do building our local economy and preserving our past,� said Catherine Collins, executive director of Sound Experience, based in Port Townsend.

Adventuress photo The ornament features a photo of the Adventuress by Elizabeth Becker of Seaport Photography. At the top of the ornament are the words “Victorian Holidays in Port Townsend 2013.� At the bottom is written “Schooner Adventuress 1913-2013.� “It’s a centennial of the boat so it’s kind of special,� Mullen said. Only 250 ornaments are available. The Adventuress, a two-

Winter schedule PORT ANGELES — Public restrooms in Port Angeles are now on a winter schedule. The restrooms at Ediz Hook, Shane Park, Elks Playfield, downtown, City Pier, Erickson Park, The Gateway transit center and Lincoln Park are open from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. All city public restrooms will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. The schedule is subject to change, the city said.

(C) — THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

ELIZABETH BECKER/SEAPORT PHOTOGRAPHY

The 2013 Port Townsend Main Street Collectible Christmas ornament celebrates the “Centennial of the Schooner Adventuress 1913-2013.�

PORT TOWNSEND MAIN STREET

Elizabeth Becker of Seaport Photography of Port Townsend holds the Port Townsend Main Street’s limited-edition ornament that bears a photograph she took of the Adventuress. masted, gaff-rigged schooner, was designed by B.B. Crowninshield and built at the Rice Brothers Yard in East Boothbay, Maine, Mullen said. The owner, John Borden II of Chicago, commissioned the vessel for his personal use to embark on an Arctic expedition to collect specimens for the American Museum of Natural History in New York, with the particular goal of adding a bowhead whale skeleton to the museum’s exhibits. He did not carry through with his plans, and the Adventuress moved on to other owners and other endeavors, including several decades of service to the San Francisco Bar Pilots. Adventuress came north to Seattle in 1952. The vessel carries more than 3,500 passengers each year on educational expeditions and has become “an icon for environmental awareness and stewardship,� according to Sound Experience’s website.

Ornaments are on sale for $12 at Quimper Mercantile, 1121 Water St.; Maricee, 913 Water St.; Sport Townsend, 1044 Water St.; Elevated Ice Cream & Candy Co., 631 Water St.; Jefferson Museum of Art and History, 540 Water St.; Maestrale, 821 Water St.; Sea Salt Cottage, 1007 Water St.; the

Wooden Boat Chandlery at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St.; Perfect Dreams Cupcakes, 909 Water St.; Closet Space — Pop Up Shop, 1038 Water St.; Port Townsend Safeway, 442 W. Sims Way; and the Port Townsend Visitor Information Center at the Haines Place Park and Ride.

This photograph by Elizabeth Becker adorns Main Street’s collectible ornament.

Award: Sequim Turkeys: Food staples

CONTINUED FROM A1 grade students. He received a bachelor’s He also worked to degree from Ripon College develop secure ways for fac- and, while serving as a ulty within prisons to Rotary Ambassadorial deliver offenders the same Scholar, a master’s degree technologically enhanced from the University of education courses available Wales in Britain. to the public. To learn more about the program, visit www.white Own private school house.gov/champions. ‘Frybread’ film ________ Walsh and his wife also PORT ANGELES — own and operate Five Acre The comedy film “More Reporter Arwyn Rice can be than Frybread,� about a fic- School, an independent pri- reached at 360-452-2345, ext. tional fry-bread competivate school in Sequim for 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula tion among Native Ameripreschool-through-eighth- dailynews.com. can tribes, will screen at the Elwha Heritage Center, 401 E. First St., on Friday night, and the public is invited. Admission is free to the 6:30 p.m. screening, which CONTINUED FROM A1 Three days before she is in honor of Native Heriannounced her resignation, tage Month. “So doing will preserve Kelly won a landmark douThe center has more my ability to vote on that ble-murder case against information at 360-417appointment [as a county Darold Stenson, a former 8545. commissioner], free from Sequim man who was found In the 93-minute, PGany appearance of conflict guilty of killing his wife and rated movie, Tatanka of interest,� McEntire wrote business partner in 1993. Means portrays Buddy in a letter to the party. Begay, a Navajo fry-bread State law allows com- High-profile case star who draws crowds to missioners to pick a deputy The high-profile case his food truck. prosecutor to serve as “act- was tried over seven weeks At the World Wide Frying� prosecuting attorney to in Kitsap County Superior bread Association contest, maintain normal operahe meets Sunshine Smith tions until an appointment (Dey Gomez) and her jealis made. ous twin sister Stormy Kelly has recommended (Gomez’s real-life twin, Nite), among other charac- that her chief deputy, Mark Nichols, be the acting prosters. Peninsula Daily News ecuting attorney.

CONTINUED FROM A1 turkeys and hams for the hot meal, but there is also a The Salvation Army din- start for Tuesday’s food disner is held a day before tributions. Thanksgiving to serve a feast to those who other- Thanksgiving baskets wise might not get one, to Each week, the food panallow the diners to have try provides food staples to another hot meal on Thanksgiving day at those in need. Thanksgiving another lunch kitchen, and week those clients are given “Thanksgiving to give those who also have special family or friends in the area themed� food baskets, to spend Thanksgiving Day Ramsey said. The food pantry is open with those loved ones. Not only did the commu- from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesnity respond with enough days and Thursdays, but

will be closed for Thanksgiving. The Salvation Army serves free meals Monday through Friday: breakfast from 8:45 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. and lunch from noon to 1 p.m. The organization also operates a food bank and has church services at 11 a.m. Sunday.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

GOP: Resumes to be sent to GOP party Court in Port Orchard. Kelly, 60, was elected in 2002. She ran unopposed in 2006 and was re-elected in 2010. “On a personal note, I add my congratulations and best wishes to my friend Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly’s announcement of her impending resignation, and wish her and her family the

Clallam County Republican Headquarters, P.O. Box 808, Port Angeles, WA 98362, and be marked to Pilling’s attention. To contact Pilling, phone 360-460-7652 or rightguy@ olypen.com.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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13th Annual Reindeer 5-10K Fun Run or Walk December 14, 2013 1:00pm Start at City Pier

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THE COURSE: The run/walk will start at the City Pier promptly at 1:00pm Saturday, December 14th. (Participants should check in by 12:45pm) Runners and Walkers will travel out along the water front trail and finish at the City Pier. THE FUN: Antlers for first 50 registered. Costumes encouraged! THE FUND: Proceeds from the Run/Walk go to the Recreation General Fund, which helps cover costs for the various Recreation programs/special events that are put on throughout the year. Medals awarded for 1st, 2nd & 3rd Place finishers in each age division. Raffle drawing for participants. We cannot guarantee t-shirts to persons registering the day of the race. Pre-registration guarantees a t-shirt! AWARDS CEREMONY WILL START AT ABOUT 2:30PM Sponsored by the City of Port Angeles Parks & Recreation • Call 360-417-4557 for info.

 &Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2014;Ĺ˝Ä&#x161;Ç&#x2021;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?ĹśĆ?Í&#x2022;:ŽŜÄ&#x201A;Ć?Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ç ĹśÍ&#x2022;DÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;Ĺś'ĆľĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ç Ć?ĹŹĹ?Í&#x2022;DÄ&#x201A;ĹŹÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;,Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022; ZĹ˝Ć?Ć?<Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;ĆľĹ?Ĺ&#x161;Í&#x2022;:Ĺ˝Ć?Ĺ&#x161;DÄ?>Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÍ&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹŹDŽŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;ĹśÍ&#x2022;ŜŜÄ&#x17E;ĹŻĹ?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x17E;ZĆľĆ?Ć?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÍ&#x2022; ĹŻĹ?Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;^ĹľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Î&#x2DC;WĹ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ć&#x2030;zŽƾŜĹ?

1RYHPEHU'HFDWSP 'HFDWSP $12 Adults / $6 Children & Students Tuesday $12 reserved $6 at door Tickets at Odyssey Bookshop 114 W. Front St or www.pacommunityplayers.com Season Sponsor Hearing Devices Available 3B926578

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

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Fall Concert of the 25 Years of Musical Remembrances Saturday, Nov. 23, 7:30 pm • Sunday, Nov. 24, 2:00 pm

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Adults $15 • Srs./Students $12 • Children 12 & under free N O R E S E RV E D S E AT I N G Ticket Outlets: Elliott Antique Emporium, 135 E. 1st St., Port Angeles Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St. Sequim or from Peninsula Singers members at the door.

Run Dates: Fridays, Nov. 22 & 29 and Saturdays, Nov. 23 & 30 • 7:30 pm Curtain Sunday Matinées: Nov. 24 & Dec. 1 • 2 pm Curtain Special Cast/Crew/Audience Celebration after the show Friday Nov. 22!

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A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

There’s really no place like home for melodies AS YOU READ this, I LIVE MUSIC am winding up the birthday celebration in Illinois with Fairmy namesake uncle, and it John mount was a great time. Nelson RestauOther members of our rant, family joined us for a mini 1127 W. family reunion, and it was a U.S. tremendous event. Highway I got several phone calls 101, Old because there were tornaTyme does near the area where Country we are. plays oldThanks to all who time expressed concerned for our country well-being, but the storm tunes missed us by 30 miles. from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. We are looking forward On Sunday, join the to getting back home to our country jam from 5 p.m. beautiful Olympic Peninto 7:30 p.m. sula.

Sequim and Blyn

Port Angeles ■ On Friday at the Junction Roadhouse, 242701 U.S. Highway 101, Bakin’ Phat delivers sizzling R&B from 9 p.m. to midnight. $5 cover. On Wednesday, Joy in Mudville (Jason Mogi, Paul Stehr-Green and Colin Leahy) performs a unique mix of old-time/jamband/rock/Celtic-funk-influenced original and cover tunes at 7:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Barhop Brewing, 124 W. Railroad Ave., the Soulshakers, a blues band, will perform from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■ Today at Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, it’s Jerry’s Country Jam with Jerry Robison, Rusty Moroz and Jim Huffman from 5 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. On Saturday, the Turner Brothers Band of Sequim brings you classic rock ’n’ roll from 8 p.m. to midnight. ■ On Friday at Next Door Gastropub, 113 W. First St., Dan and the Juan de Fuca Band will play original rock starting at 10 p.m. On Sunday, you can enjoy Dan Maguire with Clark Driese, an acoustic duo, starting at 4 p.m. ■ On Friday, Joy in Mudville will perform at Wine on the Waterfront, 115 E. Railroad Ave., at 8 p.m. No cover. ■ On Tuesday at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally’s Boys playing ballroom dance favorites from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover; first-timers free. ■ On Friday at the

■ On Friday at The Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., the Old Sidekicks bring you country dance music from 5:30 p.m. m. to 8:30 p.m. m. On Saturaturday, the Stardust st Dance Band plays ballroom m dance music from 5:30 30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. m. On Wednesday, day, dance too more country with Buck Ellard from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ Today at Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., Cort Armstrong plays from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. On Friday, Sarah Shea and Chez Jazz play jazz tunes from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. On Saturday, Trevor Hanson plays classical guitar from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Wednesday at Nourish restaurant, 1345 S. Sequim Ave., Victor Reventlow hosts the open mic from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., with sign-ups at 6 p.m. ■ On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, R&B (Rachael & Barry) play acoustic classic rock and Motown guitar from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ On Friday in Club Seven lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, dance the night away with the Michael Pratt Band playing high-energy country

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Captain Phillips” (PG-13) “Ender’s Game” (PG-13) “Gravity” (PG-13) “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (PG-13) “Last Vegas” (PG-13) “Thor: The Dark World” (PG-13)

music from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Friday in the Rainforest Bar, Julie Dukes and Van Bergan are accompanied by piano from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday, listen to Joey James Dean sing contemporary blues and country from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Port Hadlock ■ On Friday at the Ajax Cafe, 21 N. Water St., Trevor Hanson plays classical guitar from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Ludlow ■ Today in the Fireside Room at the Resort at Port Ludlow, 1 Heron Road, Trevor Hanson plays from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Townsend ■ Today at the Uptown U Pub, 1016 Lawrence St., the Juli and twins Julie Meg g pl play and sing so soulful me melodies fro from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. B Blue H Holiday Ban folBand low playlows, ing bl blues, R&B and jazz from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. No either cover for either. ■ On Friday at Sirens, 823 Water St., Hillary Susz, a cross-genre chanteuse, entertains from 9 p.m. until close. $5 cover. On Saturday, the Blue Holiday Band plays blues, R&B and jazz, and dancing starts at 9 p.m. $5 cover. ■ On Tuesday at the Cellar Door, 940 Water St., Carla Main sings jazz, blues and pop vocals from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ Today, Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays guitar at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

High notes ■ Today, the young and highly charged band Kithkin plays a concert at Peninsula College’s Maier Performance Hall at 7 p.m. Featuring percussion and upbeat songs with unconventional vocals, this band is recently back in Washington state after a

Death Notices

“Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” (R)

Harbhajan Singh Bains

■ The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

April 1, 1929 — Nov. 17, 2013

Sequim resident Harbhajan Singh Bains died of age-related causes in Seat“12 Years a Slave” (R) tle. He was 84. “All Is Lost” (PG-13) Services: Visitation from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Satur■ Uptown Theatre, Port day at Sequim Valley Townsend (360-385-3883) Funeral Chapel, 108 W. ■ Lincoln Theater, Port Alder St. Funeral at 1 p.m. Closed for phase two of its Angeles (360-457-7997) renovation project. A grand Sunday at Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, 925 reopening is planned for “About Time” (R) N. Sequim Ave. in Sequim. “Free Birds” (PG; animated) Thanksgiving. Pastor Jack Anderson will officiate. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. www.sequimvalleychapel. M O C H A C R O W E C A R B H A I L com A A R O N O K R A S A B A A A G R A

Solution to Puzzle on B4

C H A T E S U N L A E R E L B A G O A D S O O H U S P A R R I S E S O V S S T E P T L A U D A T V M V E R S A S N E A K G E A D I E U D O N T P A N N E M E S A

A U O M P A T B O U N N D E E D E M F I U R N S A N A U I D E S T R E O A R A N I T A C S T A

I L R H U A S I R S P O I L N D D B O E L C A A L S M C O T

S O U N T S H E E A S T O P E R U A R N O O S G E A N P R S E E S

M E D I E A I R O T I N S N N A O U I J G A M E N E W A C E D E T S D I P H I L E E E A R D K E S C H A G U E W O N S A Y

A L I C I A S T A R E D H E A T H

B I T A T B R A C E E R U D I T E

I A S N E S L E I A O U T C O M E

I R O B O T

A S S A M

T W O S

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Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday. A form is at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased appears once at no charge. For further information, call 360-417-3527.

presentation in Iceland. Admission is free; however, participants are encouraged to bring canned food to support the college’s food drive. ■ On Saturday, the Crescent Blue Bluegrass Band will perform a free show at the Peninsula College Forks Extension site, 71 S. Forks Ave., at 7 p.m. ■ On Saturday, Jim Nyby and the F Street Band performs New Orleans blues and rock ’n’ roll with a touch of zydeco dance at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St. in Port Townsend. A dance lesson kicks things off at 7 p.m., followed by live music and dancing from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Cover is $12 for adults, with a discount for children. ■ On Sunday, the Bottom Line Duo, composed of Port Angeles natives and high school sweethearts Spencer and Traci Hoveskeland, return for performances at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Peninsula College’s Maier Hall. Their repertoire has its roots in chamber music, which they combine with a mix of modern and popular sounds, resulting in what they call “social chamber or 21st-century parlor music.” Tickets for the concert are $15 for adults and $5 for students. They may be purchased online at www.pencol.edu/ cultural-events. ■ On Wednesday, solo vocalist Charlie Ferris covers music of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Nat King Cole, Dean Martin and many more with his smooth crooning. He’ll be performing at Park View Villas, 1430 Park View Lane, Port Angeles, at 2 p.m. Phone 360-452-7222 for more information.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PEANUT

BUTTER DRIVE WRAPS

Mike Daniels, Hamilton Elementary School custodian, helps carry out more than 100 pounds of peanut butter that students collected during the Peanut Butter Challenge in Port Angeles elementary schools and some private schools to benefit the food bank. Classes that brought in the most peanut butter at their schools will receive a free catered lunch in December.

Briefly . . . Percussion band to take stage today PORT ANGELES — Kithkin, a band specializing in percussion and featuring upbeat songs with unconventional vocals, will take the stage of Maier Performance Hall at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 7 p.m. today. “Kithkin is like no other band that has ever played here,” Director of Student Programs Rick Ross said. “If you like drums and if you like a highly charged, exciting and unique show, this is your show.” Sponsored by the Associated Student Council, the show is free for students. However, attendees are encouraged to bring canned food to support the college’s food drive. Those who do bring canned food will receive tickets to participate in a drawing for prizes to be handed out following the show. Kithkin describes itself as “a band that loves drums, lots of drums,” on its website. “From the funky, tribal-

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

inspired clothes they wear onstage, to their highly charged, participatory tuneage, the men of Kithkin are set to be one of the most excitable and entertaining bands,” wrote Keegan Prosser of Seattle Weekly. Kithkin recently released an LP titled “Takers & Leavers,” recorded by Shawn Simmons. For information, visit the www.pencol.edu or www.facebook.com/ PeninsulaCollege.

Workout benefit PORT ANGELES — CrossFit ThunderRidge, 325½ W. Second St., will hold a food bank fundraiser from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday. A free CrossFit workout is planned to move donated food from CrossFit ThunderRidge to the Port Angeles Food Bank, located nearby on Valley Street. No previous CrossFit experience is required. Food donations are requested for participation. Heats will be held at 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. For more information, phone 360-477-8455 or visit crossfitthunderridge. com. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice HELEN LEONTINE DOTY March 5, 1932 November 3, 2013 Mrs. Helen Leontine Doty of Sequim passed away at the age of 81 from congestive heart failure at Sequim Health and Rehabilitation on November 3, 2013. She was born on her family’s farm in Bellevue, Ohio, to Wilbert Marcus Heyman and Helen Leona Ingold Heyman on March 5, 1932. She was a high school graduate when she met and married Richard Doty. They were married on October 2, 1950, in Auburn, Indiana. Together, the pair traveled to more than 20 different countries, including the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Thailand. A talented artist, Helen was always creating something beautiful. Over her life, she painted, made jewelry, sewed, used clay and made many wonderful stained-glass pieces, including an entire

Mrs. Doty village out of glass. With her artist’s eye, she designed beautiful landscapes and loved to garden. As a homemaker, Helen excelled at creating a warm and loving environment in which to raise her three daughters. She was married to Dick for 63 years, and they were true partners in all aspects of life. A lifelong animal lover, Helen always had either a cat or dog in the house. When Dick would mention

that his company wanted him to move to yet another country, Helen’s first question would always be, “Can the dog come?” She passed this love of animals and her artistic talents to all three of her children. Helen was Methodist and spent quite a bit of time at the Sequim Elks Lodge with Dick, who is a member. She is survived by her husband, Richard “Dick” L. Doty; and daughters Nadine Kay Doty Dexter and her husband, Joe, Julie Anne Doty Felty and her husband, Brian, and Trina Lee Doty. She is also survived by her sister, Greta Yvonne Heyman Scheid, and grandsons, Owen Edward Felty, Dane Marcus Felty and James Clark Dexter. She was preceded in death by her father, Wilbert Heyman; mother Helen Heyman; and brother Robert Allen Heyman. A private celebration of life will take place at a later date.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at

www.peninsuladailynews.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, November 21, 2013 PAGE

A9

‘Flash. Stop. Kennedy wounded.’ MY PARENTS VOTED for Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election. I had not yet developed a Cal political worldThomas view, but as a freshman at American University in Washington, D.C., I stayed up late to watch the election returns slowly trickle in before going to bed at 2 a.m. with the outcome still undecided. The following year, I was hired as a copyboy at NBC News, delivering wire service copy to news reporters in the network’s Washington bureau. White House correspondent Sander Vanocur invited me to accompany him to observe the swearing-in of Adlai Stevenson as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. President Kennedy was there. It was the first time I had seen a president in person. My mother had told me about visits she and her parents had made to the White House when Calvin Coolidge was president, but this was something new for me. After the Eisenhower years, my impression of the man was similar to that of many others: Kennedy looked so young. Two years later on the way to work, Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, I stopped at a traffic light on River Road in Bethesda, Md.

It was 1:30 p.m. Eastern Time. A bulletin interrupted the music I was listening to on the car radio. President Kennedy had been shot in Dallas. My first reaction was to roll down my car windows and shout to other motorists, “The president has been shot!” I then raced to the bureau, where it was controlled chaos for the next four days. The 1960s are often called the “Golden Age” of broadcast journalism. One reason is that the networks were composed mainly of men who were writers with experience at newspapers or wire services. Some had reported on World War II. They became my mentors. Working alongside them was my master class. On that unforgettable day, as I was reviewing the Associated Press wire coverage, I saw something I had never seen before. “Flash,” the bulletin read, “Kennedy seriously wounded, perhaps fatally, by assassin’s bullet.” Flash was a designation reserved for only the most catastrophic events. The time on the wire copy was 12:39 p.m. Central Time. Less than an hour later, there was another “Flash.” “President Kennedy Dead.” I saved copies of the wire bulletins and tucked them neatly inside the book Four Days, a historical record of President Kennedy’s death.

Re-reading UPI White House Correspondent Merriman Smith’s reporting from Dallas with the limited technology of the time is a testament to what great journalism once looked like. His stories are in the book. Also included in Four Days is an essay by the late historian Bruce Catton, whose words written just weeks after the assassination cut through a lot of the analysis and gets to the true legacy of this personally flawed, but fascinating man: “What John F. Kennedy left us was most of all attitude,” he wrote. “To put it in the simplest terms, he looked ahead. He knew no more than anyone else what the future was going to be like, but he did know that that was where we ought to be looking. “Only to a certain extent are we prisoners of the past. “The future sets us free. It is

our escape hatch. “We can shape it to our liking, and we had better start thinking about how we would like it.” Ronald Reagan would embrace a similar futuristic outlook. What followed Kennedy’s assassination was an era of growing and more expensive government, race riots, the divisive Vietnam War and social disintegration. It was not the hopeful future Kennedy envisioned, but Bruce

Catton’s words remind us we can always start over by using the future as an “escape hatch.”

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune. com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

Climate change confab welcomed THE UNITED NATIONS is holding this year’s climate conference in Warsaw, a city steeped in history. Nicolaus Copernicus, the Amy famous Polish Goodman astronomer who first posited that the Earth revolves around the sun and not vice versa, is celebrated here. The Frederic Chopin Airport is named for the brilliant composer who lived here. The pioneer in the science of radiation, Marie Curie, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize (she won two of them), was born here. Here also was the Warsaw Ghetto, one of the many awful hallmarks of the Holocaust, where hundreds of thousands of Jews were imprisoned before being shipped off to their deaths at Treblinka and other Nazi concentration camps. It was under the oppression of the German occupiers that the Jews of the Ghetto rose up, in a courageous act of self-defense. Later, inspired by the Ghetto uprising, the non-Jewish residents of Warsaw rose up as well and fought for two months before being crushed. By the end of World War II, 6 million Poles, half of them Jews, had been killed. Eighty-five percent of Warsaw was demolished. This is where the so-called COP 19 is being held, the 19th conference of parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the UNFCCC. Sequestered in the new National Stadium, thousands of negotiators from the body’s 198

member countries hurry through the temporary, canvas-walled corridors erected on the stadium’s field, along with representatives of countless nongovernmental organizations and members of the press. This year’s meeting has a new feature: corporate sponsorship. “This is perhaps the most corporate climate talks we have ever experienced . . . not to say that previous ones haven’t had a large corporate influence,” Pascoe Sabido told me. “But what’s different this time is the level of institutionalization, the degree to which the Polish government and the U.N., the UNFCCC, have welcomed this with open arms and have actively encouraged it.” Sabido works with Corporate Europe Observatory, which published the pamphlet “The COP 19 Guide to Corporate Lobbying: Climate Crooks and the Polish Government’s Partners in Crime.” Among them, Pascoe says, are “General Motors, known for funding climate skeptic think tanks like the Heartland Institute in the U.S.; you have BMW, which is doing equal things in Europe, trying to weaken emission standards.” LOTOS Group, the secondlargest Polish petroleum corporation, has its logo emblazoned on the 11,000 tote bags handed out to delegates here. Poland, which gets 80 percent to 90 percent of its power from coal, hosted a parallel conference with the World Coal Association, called the International Coal and Climate Summit. UNFCCC chief Christiana Figueres enraged many climate activists by dignifying the coal conference with a keynote address. Outside the summit, Greenpeace activists in climbing gear hung from the Ministry of Econ-

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omy with a huge banner, in the red and white of the Polish flag, stating “Who Rules Poland: Coal Industry or the People?” On the roof, others unfurled “Who Rules the World? Fossil Fuel Industry or the People?” On the plaza below, hundreds rallied against coal, arriving in a procession called “Cough 4 Coal” with two huge inflated lungs, signifying the destructive impact of coal on the atmosphere and human health. Back in the National Stadium, the negotiations were breaking down. “WTF?” activists shouted in unison. “Where’s the finance?” Wealthy countries had pledged financial support for poorer, developing countries to move to renewable energies (“mitigation”) and to prepare for the onslaught of climate change (“adaptation”). Oxfam estimates that to date this fund has raised only $7.6 billion, far short of the promised $30 billion to $100 billion. This is not charity; polluters should pay. The Philippines’ chief climatechange negotiator, Yeb Sano, spoke with me on the ninth day of his fast, which he started on

the day COP 19 opened. “The U.S., accounting for at least one-fourth of cumulative emissions, has a huge responsibility, a moral responsibility, to tackle climate change, not just to address it domestically, but also to be able to provide support for developing countries.” Typhoon Haiyan’s destruction provides a grim backdrop to the negotiations in Warsaw. Yeb Sano learned that his brother survived only by seeing him on a news report, helping to collect the dead. The science is clear: With increasing temperatures, extreme weather events will become more frequent and more deadly. After Sano announced his fast in an emotional address to the plenary, several students silently

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525 lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052 jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way, 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550 cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

walked with him as he exited, holding a banner commemorating the dead in the Philippines. For this spontaneous act of solidarity, they were banned from the climate proceedings, for a year. One of the banned, Clemence Hutin from Paris, told me, “I don’t understand why civil society isn’t welcome here and corporations are.”

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ PAUL GOTTLIEB, Commentary editor, 360-452-2345, ext. 5060 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, November 21, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Event helps kids ski HURRICANE RIDGE IS mostly covered by a small blanket of snow these days. That blanket will remain Lee untouched for the near future, Horton and will only grow in the coming days and weeks. But it won’t be long before skiers and snowboarders are gliding at the Ridge — except for the five days a week it is closed, that is. To herald in the upcoming snow sports season, and to raise money for the kids, will be Winterfest on Saturday at the Vern Burton Community Center in Port Angeles. This annual fundraiser supports winter sports education at Hurricane Ridge. The event will feature a prime rib dinner prepared by Next Door Gastro Pub, live and silent auctions and live music by Bill and Rudy. Following the auctions, a series of short films featuring local skiers and snowboarders ripping it up at the Ridge will be shown. These are the top films from the VideOlympics, a film festival and contest that was held in the spring. This year’s films include “Hurricane Ridge — Party Like It’s 1999” and “2013 Hurricane Ridge Baked Slalom” by Tim Stanford, “1 Day at Salt Creek” by Bill Roberd, “Hurricane Ridge Film Fest” by the McColl Brothers, “Dedicated” by David Herberg, “Olympic Decathalon” by Sean Halberg,” “Just for the Huck of It” by Stephan Canale and “Paradise” by the Z Boys. All proceeds from Winterfest will go to snow school and ski team operations, as well as scholarships to underprivileged youth in the community who would like to learn how to ski, snowboard or participate on ski team. Tickets are $45 in advance and $50 at the door. Children 12 and younger are $25. Individual tickets can be purchased at Swain’s General Store, Necessities and Temptations, Brown’s Outdoor, which are all in Port Angeles, and at Brian’s Sporting Goods in Sequim. Community tables are $320, a $5 per person savings. For further information regarding community tables, phone Eric Flodstrom at 360452-2327 ext. 30. The doors open at 5 p.m. and the event begins at 6 p.m. For more information, visit www.hurricaneridge.com.

PT’s King named MVP 4 Redskins chosen for first team PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend quarterback Jacob King was selected as Nisqually League Division 1 MVP by the division coaches. King ran for 1,440 yards and 17 touchdowns on 140 carries as a senior this season. He averaged 10.3 yards per carry. King also threw for 476 yards and five touchdowns. Including kick and punt returns, King amassed 1,946 all-purpose yards for the Redskins, who finished 7-3 and came within one game of making the state playoffs for the first time since 2004. On defense, he intercepted six passes, recovered two fumbles and scored two defensive touchdowns. King’s teammate Tim Russell earned first-team honors on offense and defense as a running back and defensive back. Matt Cain (running back/ linebacker) and Skyler Coppenrath (tight end/defensive line) were both named to the division’s first-team defense and second-team offense.

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend senior quarterback Jacob King was chosen as division MVP by the TURN TO PREPS/B3 Nisqually League coaches.

UW must slow Beavers’ air game Pass rush will be key to controlling OSU QB Mannion MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Oregon State’s Sean Mannion (4) is one of the top quarterbacks in the Pac-12

ANOTHER

SEATTLE — Sean Mannion is going to throw the ball many times when the Washington Huskies visit Oregon State on Saturday. This is a given. What the Huskies can’t allow Mannion to do, however, is pat the ball many times. “The challenge is, if he’s standing back there patting the ball and staring at our secondary with time, he’s going to throw it accurately,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. “He’s a really accurate passer down the field, so we have to find a way to generate some pressure on him.”

TROPHY FOR

They do, but it’s not as simple as sending four or five passrushers toward the Next Game quarterback on every Saturday play at full vs. Oregon St. speed. at Corvallis Oregon Time: 7:30 p.m. State might On TV: ESPN2 not run the ball a lot — the Beavers’ 261 rushing attempts this season are fewer than every FBS team in the nation except SMU (239) and Washington State (183) — but their creative, welltimed screen passes keep opposing defenses from teeing off on Mannion. TURN

TO

DAWGS/B3

PIRATES

Puget Sound Anglers meeting The next gathering of the Puget Sound Anglers’ North Olympic Peninsula Chapter is today at 6:45 p.m. at the Trinity United Methodist Church located at 100 S. Blake Ave. in Sequim. Troy Hatler from Aqua Tech Marine in Bremerton (learn more at www.aquatechmarineservices.com). He will discuss boat and motor winterizing and storing procedures for optimizing engine life and performance.

Salmon advisory group The state Department of Fish and Wildlife is seeking nominations through Friday, Dec. 6, for membership on its Puget Sound Salmon Sportfishing Advisory Group. Up to 15 qualified individuals will be chosen for the advisory group for 2014 and 2015. Those selected will provide guidance to state on issues affecting recreational salmon fisheries in Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Members of the group will be expected to meet three or four times each year and participate in the annual salmon season-setting process known as North of Falcon. They also are expected to communicate policy decisions to sportfishing groups in their areas. TURN

TO

HORTON/B3

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula College men’s soccer head coach Andrew Chapman points to a sculpture made by students in the college’s welding program during a victory celebration Wednesday for the men’s and women’s back-to-back NWAACC-champion soccer teams. Women’s head coach Kanyon Anderson looks on in the Pirate Union Building on the school’s Port Angeles campus.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today No events scheduled.

Friday Football: Neah Bay vs. Cusick, 1B State Quarterfinal, at Silverdale, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Spokane vs. Peninsula College, at Everett Classic, 6 p.m.

Saturday Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College Alumni Game, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula-Spokane loser vs. Northwest Indian College-Everett loser, at Everett Classic, 4 p.m.; PeninsulaSpokane winner vs. Northwest Indian CollegeEverett winner, at Everett Classic, 8 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Adult City League Tuesday Servicemen 62, Skyridge Ridge Runners 54 Leading scorers: Ridge Runners: Lance Scott 20, Sean O’mera 14. Servicemen: Jordan Justice 27, Corbin Webb 13.

Volleyball Adult City League Tuesday Higher Grounds/Law Office of Alan Millet vs. High Energy Birds Game 1: HEB 25, HG 6 Game 2: HEB 25, HG 13 Game 3: HG 25, HEB 11 Game 4: HEB 25, HG 20 Serena’s Spikers vs. California Horizon Game 1: CH 25, SS 18 Game 2: CH 25, SS 13 Game 3: CH 25, SS 17 High Energy Birds vs California Horizon Game 1: CH 25, HEB 17 Game 2: HEB 25, CH 15 Game 3: HEB 25, CH 18

Football National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 San Francisco 6 4 0 .600 247 Arizona 6 4 0 .600 214 St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 Dallas 5 5 0 .500 274 N.Y. Giants 4 6 0 .400 192 Washington 3 7 0 .300 246 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 8 2 0 .800 288 Carolina 7 3 0 .700 238 Tampa Bay 2 8 0 .200 187 Atlanta 2 8 0 .200 214 North W L T Pct PF Detroit 6 4 0 .600 265 Chicago 6 4 0 .600 282 Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 258 Minnesota 2 8 0 .200 240 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Denver 9 1 0 .900 398 Kansas City 9 1 0 .900 232 Oakland 4 6 0 .400 194 San Diego 4 6 0 .400 228 East W L T Pct PF New England 7 3 0 .700 254 N.Y. Jets 5 5 0 .500 183 Miami 5 5 0 .500 213 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 Houston 2 8 0 .200 193 Jacksonville 1 9 0 .100 129 North W L T Pct PF Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 Pittsburgh 4 6 0 .400 216

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

RETURN

Port Townsend High School wrestlers Charity Jesionowski and Henry Veitenhans work on holds during practice. Wrestling, basketball and boys swimming began practices this week. Jesionowski, the only female on the team when practice opened, wrestles in the 120-pound classification. Baltimore Cleveland

PA 179 178 212 234 PA 260 258 256 311 PA 183 135 237 292 PA 253 267 239 320 PA 255 138 246 222 PA 199 268 225 273 PA 220 226 276 318 PA 206 245

TO THE MAT

4 6 0 .400 208 4 6 0 .400 192

212 238

Today New Orleans at Atlanta, 5:25 p.m. Sunday Minnesota at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 10 a.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Carolina at Miami, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 1:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 5:30 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Monday San Francisco at Washington, 5:40 p.m.

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Anaheim 23 15 6 2 32 72 San Jose 21 13 3 5 31 72 Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 Los Angeles 22 15 6 1 31 63 Vancouver 23 11 8 4 26 58 Calgary 21 7 11 3 17 59 Edmonton 23 6 15 2 14 60 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Chicago 22 14 4 4 32 79 St. Louis 20 14 3 3 31 70 Colorado 20 15 5 0 30 64 Minnesota 22 13 5 4 30 57 Dallas 20 11 7 2 24 58 Winnipeg 23 10 10 3 23 61 Nashville 21 10 9 2 22 48 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 21 14 6 1 29 59

GA 59 50 66 48 61 79 83 GA 66 47 42 50 56 66 63 GA 38

Tampa Bay Toronto Detroit Montreal Ottawa Florida Buffalo

21 14 7 0 28 66 55 21 13 7 1 27 62 49 22 9 6 7 25 54 62 22 11 9 2 24 58 47 21 8 9 4 20 60 67 22 6 12 4 16 49 72 23 5 17 1 11 42 72 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 21 13 8 0 26 59 48 Washington 21 12 8 1 25 69 59 N.Y. Rangers 21 10 11 0 20 43 52 Carolina 21 8 9 4 20 40 59 New Jersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49 N.Y. Islanders 22 8 11 3 19 63 73 Philadelphia 20 8 10 2 18 40 50 Columbus 21 7 11 3 17 52 64 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Florida 3, Vancouver 2, SO St. Louis 4, Buffalo 1 Toronto 5, N.Y. Islanders 2 Philadelphia 5, Ottawa 2 Montreal 6, Minnesota 2 Nashville 2, Detroit 0 Boston 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Colorado 5, Chicago 1 Edmonton 7, Columbus 0 Los Angeles 5, Tampa Bay 2 Wednesday’s Games Minnesota at Ottawa, late. Pittsburgh at Washington, late. Columbus at Calgary, late. New Jersey at Anaheim, late. Today’s Games St. Louis at Boston, 4 p.m. Nashville at Toronto, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Winnipeg, 5 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Florida at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. New Jersey at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.

Montreal at Washington, 4 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 6 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Anaheim, 7 p.m.

Basketball

10:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, CME Group Titleholders, Round 1, Site: Tiburon Golf Club - Naples, Fla. (Live) 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Long Beach State vs. Michigan, Puerto Rico Tip-Off, Quarterfinal, Site: Coliseo Roberto Clemente - San Juan, Puerto Rico (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Connecticut vs. Boston College, 2K Sports Classic, Semifinal, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Rutgers vs. Central Florida (Live) 4:30 p.m. FS1 Football NCAA, Rice vs. AlabamaBirmingham (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Los Angeles Clippers vs. Oklahoma City Thunder, Site: Chesapeake Energy Arena - Oklahoma City (Live) 5 p.m. PAC-12 NET Men’s Basketball NCAA, UC Santa Barbara vs. Colorado (Live) 5:25 p.m. NFL NET Football NFL, New Orleans Saints vs. Atlanta Falcons (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Indiana vs. Washington, 2K Sports Classic, Semifinal, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 6 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, ISPS Handa World Cup, Round 2, Site: Royal Melbourne Golf Club - Melbourne, Australia (Live) 6 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. Gonzaga (Live) 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Men’s Basketball NCAA, Texas Southern vs. Stanford (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Chicago Bulls vs. Denver Nuggets, Site: Pepsi Center - Denver (Live)

National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct Portland 9 2 .818 Oklahoma City 7 3 .700 Minnesota 7 5 .583 Denver 4 6 .400 Utah 1 11 .083 Pacific Division W L Pct Golden State 8 3 .727 L.A. Clippers 7 4 .636 Phoenix 5 5 .500 L.A. Lakers 5 7 .417 Sacramento 3 7 .300 Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 9 1 .900 Houston 8 4 .667 Dallas 7 4 .636 Memphis 6 5 .545 New Orleans 4 6 .400 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Philadelphia 5 7 .417 Toronto 4 7 .364 Boston 4 8 .333 Brooklyn 3 7 .300 New York 3 7 .300 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 8 3 .727 Atlanta 6 5 .545 Charlotte 5 6 .455 Orlando 4 6 .400 Washington 3 7 .300 Central Division W L Pct Indiana 9 1 .900 Chicago 6 3 .667

GB — 1½ 2½ 4½ 8½ GB — 1 2½ 3½ 4½ GB — 2 2½ 3½ 5 GB — ½ 1 1 1 GB — 2 3 3½ 4½ GB — 2½

Detroit Cleveland Milwaukee

4 4 2

6 .400 5 7 .364 5½ 7 .222 6½

Tuesday’s Games Washington 104, Minnesota 100 Miami 104, Atlanta 88 Detroit 92, New York 86 Houston 109, Boston 85 Sacramento 107, Phoenix 104 Wednesday’s Games Miami at Orlando, late. Toronto at Philadelphia, late. Washington at Cleveland, late. Indiana at New York, late. Brooklyn at Charlotte, late. Detroit at Atlanta, late. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, late. Portland at Milwaukee, late. Utah at New Orleans, late. Boston at San Antonio, late. Sacramento at Phoenix, late. Houston at Dallas, late. Memphis at Golden State, late. Today’s Games L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Washington at Toronto, 4 p.m. Indiana at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Minnesota, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 5 p.m. Cleveland at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Utah at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

Pac-12’s list of bowl-eligible teams has grown to eight BY JOHN MARSHALL THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — No. 5 Oregon is a longshot to play in the BCS title game, thanks to its loss to Stanford earlier this month. Entering Saturday’s game against Arizona, the Ducks are 9-1 and will need some help from the four undefeated teams in front of them in the BCS standings: Alabama, Florida State, Ohio State and Baylor. Oregon coach Mark Helfrich understands the position his team is in and the way the current system works. What he doesn’t particularly like is the hyperbole that goes with it, particularly with as difficult as the Pac-12 has become this season. “You look from a scheduling standpoint this week around the country, there’s a lot of conferences that play a lot different schedule than the Pac-12 does,” Helfrich said. “Some of those teams, their

score is going to look a lot different than our score. Or a team that wins a conference game 21-17 and they’re a workmanlike effort. And if we win a game 21-17, [the media] would try to fire me. That’s part of the deal.” The Pac-12 is as deep as it’s been in years, with eight teams already bowl eligible despite beating up on each other every week. The conference could conceivably have 10 bowl-eligible teams, with Washington State (5-5) and Utah (4-6) still within reach. That’s a nice change for a conference that wasn’t able to fulfill its bowl obligations five times the past decade, including three times when it fell two teams short. Problem is, some of the Pac12’s bowl-eligible teams may not have a place to play when the season is over. The conference has affiliations with seven bowls, so there could be a scramble to find postseason homes at the end of the regular season, particularly with poten-

College Football tially 75 or more teams becoming eligible for 70 overall bowl slots. The Pac-12 also could be limited to one BCS bowl berth this season after three straight years of landing two. The conference has a tie-in for its champion to play in the Rose Bowl, so that’s one guaranteed spot. Oregon, in control of the North, will be the likely host for the Dec. 8 Pac-12 Championship game and should face either No. 19 Arizona State or no. 14 UCLA, which play on Saturday. No. 10 Stanford had its national championship chances end and put its BCS hopes in doubt with the 20-17 loss to the Trojans. The Cardinal (8-2) are still No. 9 in the BCS standings, but have fallen down in the BCS bowl pecking order, with most bowl projections putting them in the Alamo Bowl.

To have any shot of playing in a third consecutive BCS bowl, Stanford must beat rival California and Notre Dame to close out the regular season. The Bears are 1-10, but Saturday’s game is the Big Game, where anything can happen. “We’ve shown that we have weaknesses,” Stanford coach David Shaw said. “Don’t think for one second that we cannot give this game everything we have.” Stanford’s loss to USC muddled things a bit in the Pac-12 division races. The Cardinal appeared to be in control after beating Oregon, but are now a half game behind the Ducks at 6-2 in conference. Stanford holds the tiebreaker over Oregon, but needs to win its final conference game and have the Ducks lose to Arizona this weekend or to rival Oregon State in the regular-season finale. The South will likely come down to Saturday’s game between

the Sun Devils and Bruins at the Rose Bowl. Arizona State is a game ahead of UCLA, but a loss would create a tie and give the Bruins the tiebreaker. USC still has a chance at winning the South, but the Sun Devils and Bruins can go a long way to deciding what happens in the division, a fact neither coach is hiding from his team. “We talk about it all the time. It’s something we’ve been talking about all year long,” Arizona State coach Todd Graham said. “From the time we walked in the door year one, we talked about having one goal, winning a championship. Winning every day.” UCLA’s Jim Mora and his team are taking a similar approach. “I address it, but they also understand the significance of this,” he said. So do a lot of other teams still jockeying for position in the conference.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

B3

Dawgs: Rush Bucannon at best when teeth rattle CONTINUED FROM B1 a lot of different ways. He gets it on flies; they give it “We’ve always got to to him, obviously, when he’s react, but that’s part of it,” split out. They’ll motion him said Washington defensive so you can’t jam him. “Coach [Mike] Riley and end Hau’oli Kikaha. coordinator] “Any team that will pass [offensive a lot will hit you with Danny Langsdorf know screens to keep you kind of what they’re doing.” at bay.” And despite some inju- Running interference ries to their offensive line In the aftermath of earlier this season, the Beavers have protected Man- Washington’s 41-31 loss to UCLA last Friday, Wilcox nion relatively well. He’s been sacked only 20 lamented the Huskies’ four times in 10 games, a figure pass-interference penalties, that ranks 65th nationally three of which came on but is made more impres- third downs and extended sive by the fact that Oregon the Bruins’ drives. Those penalties ultiState has attempted 495 mately led UCLA to 21 passes. That’s partially due to a points. One of them — a balanced passing attack pass-interference penalty that includes multiple play- by safety Sean Parker in ers catching different kinds the first half — nullified an interception. of throws. “We want to play very “That’s why they do it,” said Washington defensive aggressive in our coverage and be physical, but there’s coordinator Justin Wilcox. “They’ve obviously got a a point where you can’t ton of motions and flies, and hold,” Wilcox said. “Whether it’s just a little you have to defend all that stuff. They throw the screen tug, something here or game not only to the run- there, they’ll call it. But ning backs, they use the again, those are tough to tight ends and the receiv- overcome because three of them are third-down plays ers. “They’re a different style and we were going to be off of offense than we’ve seen the field.” Fumbles forced by the this year, and they’re very Huskies, but recovered by good at it.” Of course, receiver Bran- UCLA — two of them, din Cooks is a big reason including one that bounced why. He leads the nation in directly toward two Hustotal receiving yards (1,443) kies players — also proand yards per game (144.3), vided moments of disapand ranks second in recep- pointment. “We made a huge effort tions per game (10.0). What makes Cooks par- to get it out all around on ticularly dangerous is the our defense, so [we] purway the Beavers use him. posely got it to come out He’s not just a vertical more than a few times,” Kikaha said. threat. “So just being able to Wilcox called him “elite,” and that has to do with his pick it up is effort, everybody flying to the ball and versatility. “It’s not like he just lines getting around it so when it up in one spot,” Wilcox said. comes out, we recover it and “They get him the ball in not the opposing team.”

Horton: Group CONTINUED FROM B1 and reasons for wanting to serve as a member of the “We’re looking for people advisory group. ■ Nominee’s effectivewith first-hand knowledge ness in communication. of marine and freshwater ■ Name and contact sport salmon fisheries in Puget Sound, and have the information for any individual or organization subability to communicate their ideas to fishery man- mitting a nomination. Nominations may be agers and with fellow anglers,” Ryan Lothrop, the submitted to Lothrop by mail to Washington state’s Puget Sound recreDepartment of Fish and ational salmon manager, Wildlife, 600 Capitol Way said in a news release. Nominees do not have to N., Olympia, WA, 98501; or email Ryan.Lothrop@dfw. be affiliated with an orgawa.gov. nized group, and current For more information, members of the advisory group may be reappointed. phone Lothrop at 360-9022808. Nominations must be submitted in writing with ________ the following information: Sports Editor Lee Horton ■ Nominee’s name, appears here Thursdays and address, telephone number Fridays. He can be reached at and email address. 360-417-3525 or at lhorton@ ■ Relevant experience peninsuladailynews.com.

NFL Briefing RG3 clears air with WR, coaches

SF’s Brooks fined

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Baltimore Ravens tight end Dennis Pitta returned to the practice field Wednesday, nearly four months after undergoing surgery to repair a fractured and dislocated hip. The injury occurred on the second day of training camp, when Pitta and safety James Ihedigbo collided in the end zone in pursuit of a high pass. Pitta landed awkwardly on his side and had to be carted off the field. Pitta underwent surgery that night and was subsequently placed on injured reserve with a designatedto-return tag. The Associated Press

ference. But what sets Bucannon apart are his conference-leading 96 tackles — he is the only defensive back in the Pac-12’s top five tacklers. “You want to have both, as long as they stay within themselves, just do what they do best,” said coach Mike Leach, whose team hosts Utah on Saturday at Martin Stadium (12:30 p.m., Pac-12 Networks). “And he’s good at the physical part of it.” Breske added that Bucannon’s gaudy tackle numbers are a result of his ability to finish plays and keep opposing offenses from big gains. With Bucannon acting as a safety net, the rest of the defense is able to take more chances, which has translated into 23 turnovers, fourth in the Pac-12. The Cougars recovered a pair of fumbles in their stunning 24-17 road victory over Arizona on Saturday. Although the Wildcats’ Ka’Deem Carey, the nation’s second-leading ball carrier, rushed for 132 yards, he was never able to break the big one. Bucannon’s seven tackles from the secondary helped limit Carey to a single touchdown.

Preps: 3 make soccer 1st team CONTINUED FROM B1 goals with six and points with 16. Johnson, a senior forMax Ghai made the first ward, tied for second with team as a center. Redskins chosen for the five goals. second team were Alex ReiCadenas, also a senior, erson as an offensive guard tallied nine total points and a defensive lineman (three goals and three and offensive tackle Colby assists) as a defender. Martin. Each North Olympic Chimacum had two play- Peninsula school had five ers honored by the players honored by Olympic Nisqually League Division League coaches. 2 coaches. Other Roughriders Sophomore Trevon Noel receiving all-league recogwas picked for the first- nition were senior midteam offense as a lineman fielder Kylee Jeffers, who and the second-team was named to the second defense as a linebacker. team, and honorable menDefensive back Drew tion recipients Brittany Yackulic made the second- McBride, Karina Bohman team defense. and Emma Moseley. Life Christian’s Taylor Wolves senior forward Roelofs was name the Divi- Makayla Bentz, who made sion 2 MVP. the second team, while Mattie Clark, Maeve Harris Olympic League and Shelby Lott received Girls Soccer honorable mentions. Senior defender Rebecca Port Angeles’ Maddie Boe, Sequim’s Vianey Cade- Stewart earned secondnas and Port Townsend’s team honors and Redskins Jewel Johnson were all teammates Anne Meek, selected to the All-Olympic Malia Henderson and Lily Murock claimed honorable League girls soccer team. McKenzie Cook of Kla- mention. Port Townsend, coached howya was chosen as the by Colin Foden, also picked league’s MVP. Boe, a sophomore for- up team sportsmanship ward, led the Peninsula in honors.

1B Sea-Tac Volleyball Quilcene senior Kiani Clissold was named to the all-league first team for helping the Rangers to an eighth-place finish at the 1B state tournament. Junior Sammy Rae earned second-team honors and Katie Bailey received honorable mention. Katrice Pond of Christian Faith School was named league MVP.

PT swim team honored The Port Townsend girls swim and dive team was named the 1A academic state champions over the weekend. The honor capped off a banner year for the Redskins, who placed 16 at the 2A state tournament. That included a 16thplace finish for Rachel Ramsey in the 1-meter dive in the school’s first year having a diving program. Under the guidance of dive coach Andy Ridder, the Port Townsend divers traveled to Sequim twice a week for 75-minute sessions. “Rachel was competing

against girls who practice 5-6 times a week for two hours at a time,” Port Townsend head swimming coach Peter Braden said. “What Andy and the dive team accomplished this year is amazing.” Four team records were broken during the year: Rose Ridder in the 50 freestyle, 100 butterfly and diving; and the 400 freestyle relay of Jayde Richardson, Keira Matkins, Chloe Rogers and Ridder. Ridder, a junior placed fifth at the state meet in the 50-yard freestyle, which Braden said is the highest placing of a Port Townsend swimmer in recent memory, and perhaps the highest ever. Ridder also placed 14th in the 100 freestyle. “This is a very special group, and while I am pleased with their swimming performances, most of all I am impressed with their sense of team unity, support of one another, and ability to have fun,” Braden said. “I wouldn’t trade them for a team filled with recordbreaking first place finishers.”

A-Rod bolts grievance hearing; lawsuit looms THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez benched himself at his own grievance hearing. The New York Yankees star walked out in the middle of a session Wednesday, furious arbitrator Fredric Horowitz refused to order baseball Commissioner Bud Selig to testify. The move, followed by angry statements accusing Selig of bias and the entire arbitration process of flaws, appeared to be a prelude to a lawsuit challenging whatever ruling Horowitz makes on A-Rod’s 211-game suspension. Horowitz was in the midst of the third week of hearings on the grievance filed by the players’ association to overturn the penalty given to the three-time AL MVP by Major League Baseball in August for alleged violations of the sport’s drug agreement and

refused, Rodriguez uttered room at MLB’s office, two labor contract. “I lost my mind. I banged a profanity at Manfred just people familiar with the a table and kicked a briefcase and slammed out of before leaving the hearing proceedings said. the room,” Rodriguez said during a 40-minute interview on WFAN radio. “I probably overreacted, but it came from the heart.” Rodriguez has not testified in the grievance and said he had been warned that repeating his denials of wrongdoing on the stand could result in attempts at additional discipline by MLB. MLB argued that it could decide what witnesses it wanted to present to justify the discipline, since the penalty must meet a “just cause” standard. The league said Chief Operating Officer Rob Manfred spoke to reasoning behind the discipline during his six hours of testimony. Rodriguez and the union asked Horowitz to compel Selig to testify. After the arbitrator

Linty Hopie Bill Hopie

FOUND:

Photo by Ernst Fine Art Photography

Flash Drive, 2 Gig, found in Port Angeles Walmart. Call to I.D.

Want to make a difference? Find out how at 360-457-3011 United Way of Clallam County, PO Box 937, Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-452-2951 722303

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — San Francisco 49ers linebacker Ahmad Brooks was fined $15,570 by the NFL on Wednesday for his hit on Saints quarterback

Pitta returns

PULLMAN — It was apparent even in 2010 the Cougars had unearthed a future impact player in safety Deone Bucannon. Starting in place of injured Chima Nwachukwu, Bucannon racked up 16 tackles against Arizona, the most ever by a Washington State Next Game freshman. He has been Saturday one of the Cou- vs. Utah gars’ best players at Pullman Time: 12:30 p.m. ever since. Bucannon is a On TV: Pac-12 defensive back of the big-hitter variety, whose greatest weakness has been a penchant for picking up flags while making mouthpiece-rattling hits. But as unkind as the safety is on the field, he is polite and soft-spoken when his pads come off, and he is deferential when talking about his breakout game.

“We had good linebackers on that team that, fortunately for me, had faith in me as a freshman,” said Bucannon, recently named a Jim Thorpe Award semifinalist, given to the top defensive back in college football. “So that made it a lot easier for me, even though I didn’t know what I was doing out there. I was a freshman — I barely knew the plays — but they led me along the way.” Now a senior and a leader of the Washington State defense, Bucannon is no longer a precocious 18-year-old. He is now one of the top safety prospects in the upcoming NFL draft. “Statistically what’s he done, he’s had a tremendous year, and [is] one of our leaders on defense and has to be,” defensive coordinator Mike Breske said. “A lot of his leadership is through his play, especially for the young guys to see. And we ask more of him, more of him, more of him.” Based on his numbers, Bucannon is one of the most versatile defenders in the conference. Like any good safety, he excels in pass coverage, as evidenced by his five interceptions, which rank second in the Pac-12 Con-

3B909573

ASHBURN, Va. — Robert Griffin III parsed the appropriate uses of “me” and “I’’ when it comes to owning up to a mistake and privately explained his words to teammates Santana Moss and coaches Wednesday. It was the latest bit of damage control in a disappointing season for the under-the-microscope quarterback. Griffin was dealing with the backlash from the comments he made after the Washington Redskins’ 24-16 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday, when his unwise thirdand-1 heave was intercepted in the end zone in the final minute.

Drew Brees last Sunday. Brooks’ agent, Greg Williams, said his client would appeal the penalty — the standard fine for such hits to the head and neck area. Brooks leveled Brees, forcing a lost fumble. But the personal foul penalty kept the ball in the Saints’ possession, and they soon kicked two late field goals to win 23-20.

MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

www.unitedwayclallam.org/give


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

B4

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Be bold after some careful planning “death” insurance): We pay money to a company that will, in theory, pay that money back if something bad happens to us, like a car accident or a house fire or whatever. Then we hope we will never need to have the insurance company pay out some or all of the money we sent it because something bad happens to us. If we can afford to pay for whatever the “bad thing” is — out of our own pockets — then there’s really no reason to pay for insurance at all. But if we can’t . . . So, what do we do?

I know others who paid out thousands and thousands, but life unfolded such that they never trip to visit Mark qualified for any benefit — at all. family. The “conventional wisdom” in Harvey my business for some time has Just received notice in the past The fact is been that if you have “substantial two weeks that my long-term-care that this has assets” to protect, LTC insurance premium through [an insurance been going on can be a good investment. company] is going up 58 percent. for a while: And how do I plan for a future I I thought it was a good deal at In the name can’t see? the time. But why would I throw of good planI spent quite awhile on the good money after bad? ning, protecting phone with the gal who sent the If I stop now, the premiums I the kids and email. She has no kids and no local have paid — more than $15,000 — personal family. are lost forever. responsibility, a We talked about Medicaid (not But if I keep going, who is to say lot of folks bought long-term-care Medicare, Medicaid). the company won’t raise it again insurance back when it was affordShe’s reasonably healthy; next year, etc.? Foretelling the future makes reasonably smart choices And [the company] has stopped able. But over time and as insurance about diet, exercise, lifestyle, etc.; selling long-term-care insurance at Well, what most of us do is try companies realized that their she’s made her home as “userall. to foretell our futures: Will I need actual experience wasn’t matching long-term care? Will I just drop friendly” and accessible as possible; Who is to say it won’t keep taktheir actuarial data, premiums she understands her health care ing my premiums and go out of conveniently dead on the 10th have gone up, up and up, until . . . green? What about the kids? Fam- as well as she understands her business before I need it? (I am well, until a lot of folks find them- ily? Friends? How long will my health insurance; and she’s reasononly 62.) The policy was already for only selves in this same situation: savings/assets hold out? Will I end ably active with a reasonable “I’ve paid out all this money, three years, so maybe I will just be social life, so what can she do? up in a . . . ? gotten nothing back, and now I forced to trust the universe when I Her answer turned out to be: Or should I stop paying for heat can’t afford the ever-increasing get old. and prescriptions, eat rice-n-beans affirm life. It is too bad that situations like premiums! So do I just terminate She decided she had never lived and keep paying the LTC premithe policy and kick myself in the this make some of us hope we will her life in fear and that she wasn’t ums? head for having wasted all that not live to be old. going to start now. Or, as one gentleman said to money?” We treat our elders so poorly in She was doing the best she me, “I don’t think I can afford to It’s pretty much true with this country. could to take of herself and plan grow old.” all kinds of insurance (with the So I will get out there and for the worst, so she was going to I know people who will say possible exception of “life” insurspend the premium money on enjoy her life and accept that her (and have said): “Our LTC insurance, which is, of course, really something that affirms life, like a crystal ball had never really ance saved our lives.” HERE’S AN EDITED email I received from a gal awhile back. The subject line was “Long-Term Care”:

HELP LINE

Birthday Gerald (Gary) Moe Gerald (Gary) Moe celebrated his 90th birthday Wednesday. He was born Nov. 20, 1923, in Burtram, Minn. A veteran of World War II, Moe served in the Navy for 42 months aboard the USS Dixie. He married Ruth Ann Tufts in 1946. The couple had two sons but later divorced. Moe married Marjorie Munkberg in 1952. They had two daughters. He moved to Port Angeles in 1952 and worked at Rayonier mill, then as a pressman at the Peninsula Daily News for 33 years, retiring in 1989.

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Briefly . . .

CORNER

Moe has lived on Blue Mountain Road since 1954. His children, Ronald and Dorothy Moe of Roy, Larry Moe of Mr. Moe Arizona, Anita Moe of Port Angeles and Laurie Moe of Port Townsend, wish him a happy birthday.

worked very well. She let the LTC policy run out its term, then spent the premium money on a trip to see family, and she had a ball. And what’s the “takeaway” here? We should all cancel our LTC policies? Hardly. The takeaway is that nothing has changed. Most of us have lived our whole lives doing the best we could, being as responsible as we could be and trying to plan and prepare for the “worst” as best we could. Then, we proceeded with our lives. Nothing has changed. On a more personal note, given all of the above, I’m not willing to hate my life in the name of planning ahead, so I won’t hate my life. I love my life! And fear is not my friend. So ...? Plan carefully. Go boldly. Affirm life.

People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com with the subject line “Birthday Corner,” or mail to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

Holiday market set with displays of local artistry

artists and vendors will be donated to Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics, or VIMO. Phone the church office at 360457-4862 or sapa@olypen.com.

PORT ANGELES — Works by local artists will be on exhibit and for sale at the Holiday World Marketplace at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Susan Kroll, Melissa Spaulding and Janice Dotson will have works of weaving, felting and other fiber arts. Donna Standerwick will show pottery, and Jeff Becker and Linda Parcell are jewelers who will attend with their work. In addition, Cabled Fiber Studio will have yarn from around the world, and Leilani Wood will sell fresh, handmade wreaths. A portion of the proceeds from

Vets dinner RSVP PORT ANGELES — Reservations are requested by Nov. 30 for the second annual veterans appreciation Christmas dinner, set for Smugglers Landing, 115 E. Railroad Ave., from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 22. All veterans and their spouses are invited to attend the buffetstyle traditional dinner free. RSVP to Tammy Sullenger at tsullenger@co.clallam.wa.us or 360-417-2383 with how many will be attending and arrival time. All veterans will receive a gift from Santa Claus at the meal. Peninsula Daily News

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

VOWEL PLAY 52 Aid for a submarine séance? 56 Google : Android :: Apple : ___ 57 Quarreled 59 When scores are settled? 60 Cake with a kick 61 “That’s clear” 62 Venus de ___ 63 Post production locale? 65 Kings and queens: Abbr. 66 Achieve nirvana 69 Having little give 70 Skiing maneuver at a bend in the course 72 Like cutting in line 73 Savoir-faire 74 Glorify 75 Navigation hazards 78 Dish Network competitor 81 4x4, e.g. 82 Hawaiian wine lover? 84 Get behind 85 Vice ___ 87 Big name in batteries 88 Substantial shoe spec 89 Figure with horns 91 Untrustworthy sorts 93 Odin’s home 95 Time off 96 “That’ll never happen!” 100 Scrape (out) 101 Moo ___ pork

14 Wee ones 15 Living room? 16 Not supportin’ 17 “Dies ___” 18 Girl in tartan 24 Docs united 26 Keys with tunes 29 Turn out 31 Muscle ___ 32 Extremely sharp 34 Self centers 35 Lariat part 36 All the writings of a Persian faith? 37 Fictional Billy 38 Hit show with many hits 40 “Happily ever after” with Han Solo? 41 2004 movie set DOWN in 2035 1 One side in a 42 Indian state known computer rivalry for its tea 2 Home of the Waianae 44 Most reliable Range 3 Start of some blended 47 Seasonal beverage 48 Small difference juice names 49 Girl’s name 4 Gunfire, in slang meaning “loved” 5 Not far from, 53 Word between last in poetry names 6 Putsch 54 Convinced 7 Studio behind 55 Wailing Wall “Suspicion” and pilgrim “Notorious” 58 Got back to, in 8 “… ___ quit!” a way 9 Whiskered creature 60 Support 10 International gas 62 Toon with a polkabrand dot hair bow 11 Stan Lee’s role in 64 Goggled many a Marvel film 65 New York’s ___ Island 12 Skip ___ 66 Charlatan 13 They come from the center 67 100 cents

103 Last words from a coxswain? 107 American alternative 111 “Stay cool!” 112 Garlicky sauce in central Europe? 115 English princess 116 Food item often seasoned with cilantro 117 Like some patches 118 Sporty car roofs 119 High land 120 6’9” or 72% freethrow avg. 121 Swift composition 122 “Narcissus and Goldmund” author

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BY JULIAN LIM / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Shade of brown 6 Javert’s portrayer in 2012’s “Les Misérables” 11 Rice, e.g., informally 15 Come (from) 19 All-time leader in R.B.I.’s 20 Vegetables also known as lady’s-fingers 21 Common quatrain form 22 Indian tourist destination 23 Paintings of French estates? 25 Spin, of a sort 27 Tanning aid 28 Carrier for Casanovas? 30 Time of one’s life? 31 Thanksgiving, e.g.: Abbr. 33 Having failed to ante up, say 34 Italian tourist destination in the Mediterranean 37 “Anything you can do I can do better” and others 39 Supreme Court justice known for his trenchant dissents 43 Spurs 45 Relative of mono46 Medium for body art 50 Roman roads 51 “So pret-t-ty!”

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SOLUTION ON PAGE A8

79 What chopsticks come in 80 Hole in the wall 82 Kind of exam or kit 83 “Is this the spot?” 86 Hot herbal beverage 90 Learned 92 Brown weasels 94 History and biography 97 Pressed charges against?

90 95

115

68 “Operators are standing by” and “Call now!,” e.g. 70 Many Eastern Europeans 71 “WWE Raw” airer 73 Up to, informally 76 “Almighty” item: Abbr. 77 Quiet 78 Was mortified, hyperbolically

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98 Actress Durance who played Lois Lane on “Smallville” 99 Fancy neckwear 101 “And ___ Was” (1985 Talking Heads single) 102 ___ bar 103 Singer Lambert 104 Cry made while wiping the hands

105 Some stopovers 106 Recess 107 Big Apple sch. 108 Ski-___ (snowmobiles) 109 Challenge for Hannibal 110 Quit lying 113 Sounds by a crib, perhaps 114 Indian tourist destination


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Doonesbury

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Garry Trudeau

[“Red and Rover” comments should be sent to pdncomics@gmail.com before Friday, Nov. 22]

by Bob and Tom Thaves

If she helped, it would not change Van Buren her lifestyle at all. My wife’s family is the opposite. Her parents aren’t wealthy, but they have done everything within their power to help their children. I know how I will treat my kids. Am I wrong to feel resentment because my mother has decided differently? Or should I just “grow up”? Frustrated in North Carolina

Abigail

Dear Frustrated: If you have discussed with your mother that you are under extreme financial pressure and she has refused to help, then I can see why you might feel some resentment. My question is, have you talked to her about it? That would be the “grown-up” thing to do. The worst she can say is no. If she does, what you will need to do is take a part-time job to help with the bills — even if it means you mow your mother’s lawn less often. Dear Abby: Next month will be our 25th anniversary. My wife and I are permanently separated but will not divorce because she would lose health coverage under my employer’s plan. How do I acknowledge this “landmark” — or should I just ignore it, since it isn’t really a celebratory event? Not Quite an Ex in the South

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

by Hank Ketcham

Dear Not Quite an Ex: If you and your wife are on speaking terms, call her and say something nice. Or send her a card. If you’re not on friendly terms, then diplomatically ignore the landmark.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: I’m a married father of two very young children (2 and 6 months old). I have excessive student loan debt that is making my life extremely tough, and between that, day care and my mortgage, I’m on the brink of bankruptcy. My mother is extremely wealthy. She is very involved with my family, and we both do things to help each other out. I mow the grass in her large yard every week. She sees me struggling, yet she makes no offer to help financially. I am becoming resentful about it.

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY: I love my husband very much. Until the past few years, there have never been any problems in our 20-year marriage. I have depression and epilepsy, and I am on five different medications for them. Sometimes when I have come out of a seizure, I have found that my clothes have been removed and my husband is “touching” me. Also, because the medication puts me into a deep sleep at night, I have half-awakened to him having sex with me. I am so groggy I can’t respond. Is this right? I feel like I have been violated, but I haven’t said anything to him. This causes me to cringe most of the time when he touches me now. I’d like to get back to a normal love life, but I can’t get over what he does to me when I’m not fully aware. How do I tell him I know what he has been doing without ruining my marriage? Feeling Violated in Rio Rancho, N.M. Dear Feeling Violated: You feel violated because what your husband is doing is called spousal rape, and it’s a criminal offense. Having sex with someone who is so doped up she (or he) can’t give consent is a sexual assault. Tell your husband you know what he has been doing, how you feel about it and that you would prefer that the two of you make love while you are wide awake and able to fully enjoy it. This should be discussed with a marriage counselor and, if necessary, the police.

by Jim Davis

B5

Violated wife should mull options

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): A change in your living arrangements must be made with caution. Protect your possessions from theft, loss or damage. A problem with someone you work with must be averted before it escalates into a problem that cannot be fixed. 2 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Wait and watch. It’s not up to you to interfere with what others want to do. Go about your business and make personal changes that will help you excel in an area that suits your needs and future prospects. Put yourself first. 3 stars

exaggerate. Work on personal progress, not on trying to improve others. Change is good, but only if it benefits everyone involved. Proceed with caution and do your best to control your temper. Treat loved ones with respect. You cannot buy love. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Get together with friends or colleagues who share your concerns and interests. Forming a partnership for either personal or professional reasons will complement what you are trying to accomplish. A romantic evening will leave you feeling optimistic. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Strive for satisfaction and reaching your personal goals. Set your destination and include the people you enjoy spending time with most. Personal achievements will be reached, and self-improvement projects will make you feel good. A romantic encounter is in the stars. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hone your skills and show everyone what you’ve got to offer. Your intense drive and desire to get things done will raise your profile, giving you a better chance to advance. Romance is heightened. Enjoy the one you love. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be willing to take a chance, but before you jump in, question your motives as well as the reason why others are taking part. Uncertainty coupled with misinformation is apparent, and caution must be taken to avoid loss. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t feel forced to make a decision if you are uncertain. Problems in your personal life due to overindulgence will lead to worry. Setting a budget or rules to live by will help you feel confident enough to make a choice. 2 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let your feelings be known. The more you share, the greater a response you will receive. Love is on the rise, along with closing deals, making promises and getting what you want. Enjoy the moment and reach for the stars. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are in control and can advance personally, professionally and financially if you trust your intuition. Contracts are favored, along with partnering with someone who has benefited you in the past. Romance is in the stars. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t meddle or 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Make your way to the winner’s circle. Trust in your ability and go full-tilt toward your goals. Ask and you will receive. Set plans for a special outing with someone you love and it will bring you closer together. 5 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Put your money into something that shows growth potential. Avoid joint ventures or relying on hearsay for guidance in the right direction. Fact-finding, coupled with the wherewithal to adapt to change, will lead to victory. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

B6 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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WANTED: Small Older Crawler (Bulldozer), any model/condition, running or not. Related equipment: skidsteer, far m tractor, old gas pumps, advertising signs. Also wanted: old arcade coin operated games, pinball, kiddie ride, old slot machines. Pr ivate par ty, cash. (360)204-1017.

NEWS ASSISTANT (Part-time) Join the exciting newsroom atmosphere of the Peninsula Daily News in Port Angeles! We have an immediate opening for a pleasant, detail-oriented person to perform a variety of tasks essential to the PDN’s news presentation. The Monday-throughThursday position, 7 hours each day, in our d ow n t ow n Po r t A n g e l e s n ew s r o o m i s ideal for someone who seeks a part-time job that is one of the most interesting on the North Olympic Peninsula. The successful applicant will be an accura t e a n d fa s t t y p i s t with professional journalism knowledge that include excellent writing, spelling, grammar, clerical and phone skills, computer abilities and a pleasing personality. Only applicants who possess these experience factors will be considered. A timed newswriting test will be administered to finalists as part of the interview process. For additional details and to request an online application, please email Executive Editor Rex Wilson at rex.wilson@peninsula dailynews.com

PRIVATE, Affordable Caregiver/Choreperson. Experienced and certified, NAR licensed. Excellent references. $15-$20 per hour. Available 3-10 hours per week in Sequim-P.A. area. (360)531-2331 or (205)304-2867 RUSSELL ANYTHING 775-4570 or 681-8582 UNIT Sale: Fr i.-Sun., 10-4 p.m., Monte Engl i s h S t o ra g e, 2 5 5 4 3 2 Hwy 101, next to Olympic Cellars Winery, Unit D13. Clearing out our u n i t ! W i d e va r i e t y o f stuff! WEST P.A.: Quaint and secluded, small, 1 Br., extras. No dogs/smoke. $515. (360)504-2169.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 107 E. 13th, in P.A.: 1 Br., incredible alley. Furniture, books, wa t e r v i ew, o n bl u f f, WOOD STOVE: Front i e r, t a ke s 2 4 ” wo o d . collectibles, clothes and downtown. No pets. Call Pat (360)582-7241. $325. (360)732-4328. misc.

Employment 3010 Announcements 3010 Announcements 4026 General

CHERYL V.: Please c a l l c o l l e c t E ve C. (Mom) at (541)863-4274 or Traci Carpenter at (541)874-3139. VERY IMPORTANT!

LINDA D. Swartz M.D., Neurology Office Closure. As of December 31st, the office will close permanently. To request records send a signed release to PO BOX 1157 Silverdale, WA 983831157.

3020 Found F O U N D : D o g . Ye l l ow Lab, female, collar tags, D r y ke a n d H w y. 1 0 1 , Sequim. Is now at the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, P.A

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

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FOUND: Dog. Young female, black/white, Cl. Co. Fairgounds and W. 18th, P.A. on Nov. 8. (360)457-4399 FOUND: Flashdrive. 2 gig, found in P.A. Walmart, call to ID. (360)452-2951

3023 Lost

C A R E G I V E R : P r i va t e home, will train, health insurance and vacation pay, no exp. necessary. (360)582-6614 CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659 CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Townsend area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Call Jasmine at (360)207-5577.

Case Manager-Medical FT, w/benes. Req. BA & LOST: Mitten. Child size 2yrs exp. providing case bright blue, upper Cherry management or clinical Hill, P.A. (360)452-0286. treatment. Resume/cvr ltr: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., LOST: Phone. Verizon P.A., WA 98362. EOE. Touch, black, drywall on peninsulabehavioral.org it, west Safeway, Cash Reward! Need for work. DENTAL ASSISTANT (360)452-6614 Part-time, for busy practice, experience a plus, train right person, 4026 Employment will Benefits and salary General DOE. Resume to PO Box 268, Port Hadlock, BOOKKEEPER wanted WA 98339. wanted nonprofit experience. Mail to Dove PAINTERS WANTED House 1045 10th St., Experience requried. Port Townsend, 98368. In P.T. (360)379-4176.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General Experienced Biller/Coder and/or MA or LPN. Please submit resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#719/Biller Port Angeles, WA 98362 HOME HEALTH CUSTOMER SERVICE Full-time, rotating weekends. Experience with home health equipment p r e fe r r e d bu t n o t r e quired. People person a must. Competitive salary and benefits. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 LEGAL Assistant: Wanted in Jefferson County. Knowledge of legal procedures preferred, Computer skills essential, MS Word desired. Union, $16.52/hr +benefits. Apply to BOCC before 5 p.m. 12/5/13, P.O. Box 1220, Port Townsend, WA 98368. www.co.jeffer son.wa.us LICENSED VET TECH team member, must be graduate of an AVMA accredited training program. If you share a belief in the quality of care we provide apply in person at Angeles Clinic for Animals, 160 Del Guzzi Drive. No phone calls! Machine Operator The Port of Port Angeles is seeking a qualified individual for the position of Machine Operator at the Port’s log yard. Applicants must have 5 yrs of progressively responsible exper ience in heavy equipment and log yard operations. Must be a team player, have excellent verbal/written communication skills and have knowledge of different log species. CDL is a plus. The starting hourly rate is $22.37. Applications and job descriptions may be obtained at the Por t Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., PA between 8am-5pm M-F and also online at www.portofpa.com . Applications will be accepted until 5pm Monday, Dec. 2nd. Drug testing is required. Other testing may be required. Make a Difference! F/T position, benefits. Licensed Mental Health Clinician. Pref. Licensed Social Worker. 2 years older adult exp. required. EOE. Resume, cover letter to: PBH 118 E. 8th St., Po r t A n g e l e s , WA , 98362. http://peninsula behavioral.org. NEWS ASSISTANT (Part-time) Join the exciting newsroom atmosphere of the Peninsula Daily News in Port Angeles! We have an immediate opening for a pleasant, detail-oriented person to perform a variety of tasks essential to the PDN’s news presentation. The Monday-throughThursday position, 7 hours each day, in our d ow n t ow n Po r t A n geles newsroom is ideal for someone who seeks a part-time job that is one of the most interesting on the North Olympic Peninsula. The successful applicant will be an accura t e a n d fa s t t y p i s t with professional journalism knowledge that include excellent writing, spelling, grammar, clerical and phone skills, computer abilities and a pleasing personality. Only applicants who possess these experience factors will be considered. A timed newswriting test will be administered to finalists as part of the interview process. For additional details and to request an online application, please email Executive Editor Rex Wilson at rex.wilson@peninsula dailynews.com

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

Property Manager The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Proper ty Manager. The Property Manager is responsible for negotiating new leases, lease amendments, use agreements and agency agreements. This posit i o n a l s o p r o a c t i ve l y works with tenants to ensure lease compliance. In-depth analytical skills relating to lease and property transactions are a must. The ideal candidate will have 5+ yrs exDEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. perience with progres“ON-CALL” s i ve r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i n RESIDENTIAL AIDE ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Promote daily living property, escrow or conPort Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays skills of residents at 2 t ra c t m a n a g e m e n t . A Bachelor’s degree and sites. Req h.s./GED & experience working for a ORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the C Cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experi- public agency are prenewspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the e n c e w i t h c h r o n i c ferred. Salary is DOE m e n t a l i l l n e s s / s u b - with an anticipated hiring first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully range of $71-$84K. Apstance abuse preplications and job deferred. Resume to: and report any errors promptly. PBH, 118 E. 8th St., scriptions may be obCancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. P o r t A n g e l e s , W A tained at the Port Admin Office, 338 W. 1st St., 98362. Details at Por t Angeles between Billing adjustments cannot be made without it. http://peninsula 8am-5pm M-F or online behavioral.org. EOE. a t w w w. p o r t o f p a . c o m Applications will be ac- 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale ORTHODONTIC Assist- cepted until 5pm MonClallam County Clallam County Clallam County ant: PT, in Sequim. day, Dec. 2nd. Letters Email resume or and resumes without an SUNLAND AMENITIES BEAUTIFUL ESTES GREAT HOME inquiries to application will not be B e a u t i f u l E s t e s bu i l t W i t h wa t e r v i ew a n d 2 Br., 2 bath Sunland sequimortho@gmail.com accepted. Drug testing h o m e o n a c r e a g e , r o o m f o r e v e r y o n e . home, roof replaced in is required. breath taking views of O p e n c o n c e p t l i v i n g 2002, flagstone patio in PARALEGAL: Sequim the mountains and the room, kitchen, and din- backyard, master has Support/Care Staff law office seeks legal valley. Well maintained ing with hardwood floors private patio access To work with developsecretary/paralegal, litiML#272169 home with all of the ex- along with tile counters. gation exp. pref., com- mentally disabled adults, t r a s . C r a f t m a n s h i p Back door leads out to $179,000 p u t e r a n d t y p i n g a n d no exper ience neces- throughout. Square foot- covered deck and a step Deb Kahle telephone skills required. sary, will train. $10 hr. to age does not include the down open deck. New (360)683-6880 start. CNAs encouraged wonderful finished base- roof year ago. Guest and Send resume to: WINDERMERE to apply. Apply in person ment. Lot’s of decking to m a s t e r b a t h u p d a t e d Peninsula Daily News SUNLAND at 1020 Caroline, P.A. look out over the valley, with tile counters and PDN#726/Paralegal Port Angeles, WA 98362 from 8-4 p.m. WATER and mountain privacy abounds here. newer floors. 3 Br., 2 MLS#272320. $499,000. b a t h o n u p p e r l e v e l view, 4 br., 3 bath, 2 car PERFORMANCE Kim Bower along with kitchen, living g a r a g e , u p d a t e d 4080 Employment IMPROVEMENT 360-477-0654 room, and dining. Main t h r o u g h o u t , 3 bl o ck s Wanted COORDINATOR Blue Sky Real Estate floor has the entry, large from Peninsula College, Coord PI activities proSequim - 360-477-9189 family room with bar, 4th private yard with hottub. m o t i n g c o s t - e f fe c t i ve CAREGIVER: I am a pribedroom, utility room, Potential for rental space downstairs. $219,00. svcs and compliance. vate caregiver for in- BLACK Diamond area: 3/4 bath, and a storage. home care. I have refer(360)477-9993 or FT w/benes. Required: 1.73 acres, zoned R2 lt MLS#272373. $239,000. ences, experience with i n d u s t . , 2 0 0 1 m a n u f (360)670-9673. • Master’s degr in Holly Coburn Alzheimer’s, ALS, and home 1,530 sf in excelhealth-related field (360)457-0456 MS. (360)808-2709. • 5 + yrs mental/ lent cond.; wheelchair WINDERMERE 311 For Sale medical health exp, acc, electric forced air PORT ANGELES DENNIS’ YARD WORK Manufactured Homes • Supv exper. heat, local water system; • Working knowledge of Clean-up, pruning, de- pole barn with 500 sf loft HOME SWEET HOME bris hauling. 457-5205. JCAHO, HIPAA and office, RV hookups. Cute, clean and a con- BRINNON: 2 Br., 1 bath, • Strong communication Sale may inc. hot tub. venient location for this 2 s i n g l e w i d e, i n s m a l l skills Ver y quiet and sunny. bd. home in a quiet cen- p a r k . $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 , $ 2 6 0 Resume/cvr ltr to PeninShown by appt only. No tral neighborhood. you’ll par k rent. Owner will sula Behavioral Health, contingencies, cash on- enjoy the large rooms, carry. (360)796-4813. 118 E. 8th St., Port Anl y. N o a g e n t s . C a l l fenced backyard, moungeles, WA 98362. EOE. ( 3 6 0 ) 4 6 0 - 8 4 1 2 a n d tain view and detached http://peninsula leave msg if no immedi- garage. behavioral.org/ ate answer. $234,000. $129,500. ML#271841 Kathy Brown CHERRY HILL (360)417-2785 T h i s o n e i s s p e c i a l . COLDWELL BANKER OFFERING bookkeep- Craftsman style Tudor MOUNTAIN VIEW: 3 Br, UPTOWN REALTY i n g s e r v i c e s fo r yo u r home on 4 lots that fea2 bath, laundr y room, s m a l l b u s i n e s s . S e e tures a 4 bedroom, 2.5 Lovely 2 Bedroom home handicap access, amazPDN online for more info Permanent and On-call bath with loads of old with a den/office in Mon- ing yard! 1,395 sf. positions available now or call (360)460-9326. world charm. Features terra on nearly 1/4 acre $159,500. 681-2604. at Clallam Bay include gorgeous built- o f l o w m a i n t e n a n c e Corrections Center ins, updated baths, forg r o u n d s . E x p a n s i v e PRIVATE, Affordable 408 For Sale Correctional Officer 1 Caregiver/Choreper- mal dining room, spa- kitchen with so many Pay starts at Commercial son. Experienced and cious living room, main cabinets you will have a $16.99 hourly, c e r t i f i e d , N A R l i - l eve l m a s t e r, l a u n d r y hard time filling them all Plus full benefits. NEAH BAY: Waterfront censed. Excellent ref- room, and music studio. and a separate breakfast Closes 12/30/13. erences. $15-$20 per Three car carport with nook. Large 280 sf sun 1 5 u n i t m o t e l , n ew l y Apply on-line: hour. Available 3-10 shop and RV parking. room and an adjoining r e n ova t e d , 9 k i t c h e n www.careers.wa.gov hours per week in Se- L o c a t e d o n a p r i va t e deck that are perfect for units, across from mariFor further information dead end street. This enter taining. The yard na, coffee shop on site. quim-P.A. area. please call Laura $1,100,000/obo darling home won’t dis- has good privacy , fruit (360)531-2331 or at (360)963-3208. EOE. (360)645-2223 appoint you. trees and RV or boat (205)304-2867 $268,862. MLS#271730. parking . PHARMACY Jean Irvine $154,900. RUSSELL 505 Rental Houses ASSISTANT (360) 417-2797 Jim Hardie ANYTHING Clallam County Mon.-Fri. rotating weekCOLDWELL BANKER U-$ave Real Estate 775-4570 or 681-8582 end shifts. Exceptional UPTOWN REALTY 775-7146 customer service skills, S e a s o n e d c a r e g i v e r high school diploma or available for private care CITY LOTS FOR SALE NICE AFFORDABLE GED equivalent. Apply in P.A. area. Good per- 3 vacant lots to choose HOME at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 sonal care, housekeep- from on quiet cul-de-sac This home is in the SumE. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. i n g , c o o k i n g a n d e r - in an upscale neighbor- mer Breeze subdivision, hood. Close to Olympic a quiet, well kept neighrands. $15-$20 hr. Discovery Trail, Straits borhood located in the Port Townsend Paper (360)460-0200 of Juan de Fuca the ma- hear t of Sequim. 3BR, Environmental rina and downtown Port 2BA, attached double AT T R A C T I V E s p a Process Engineer Evaluates facility emis- 105 Homes for Sale Angeles. All city utilities g a r a g e , fe n c e d b a ck c i o u s 3 B r. , 1 . 5 b a Clallam County are on the property. Pro- yard and nice landscap- home with great mtn. sions trends and pretective CC&R’s to en- ing all add to the ambi- view. 2,100 sf. Nice pares monthly, quarterly sure your investment. 25 ACRES/PASTURE/ ance of this cozy, single r e s i d e n t i a l e a s t PA and annual environmenMLS#270937. $34,000. level home. Enjoy con- neighborhood. Fenced HOME tal compliance reports. Harriet Reyenga venient city living and all yard, patio, deck, 2-car Identifies and completes 4 s e p a r a t e p a r c e l s , (360)457-0456 that it has to offer. projects to improve mill f e n c e d a n d c r o s s garage. Huge Great WINDERMERE MLS#271976. $198,000. environmental perfor- fenced, 3 br. plus den, 2 Room with gas firePORT ANGELES Dave Sharman mance. B.S. degree in bath, born 1981, 2,160 place. Large Kitchen (360)683-4844 Engineering or Pulp and sf, 1-story,floor to ceiling with newer appliances, Windermere Paper Science. Three or river rock fireplace, 2-car Laundry Room with Real Estate more years experience plus attached, garage/ washer/dr yer. UnfurSequim East in an industrial setting/ workspace, bonus - salt nished. Lots of storkraft mill extremely de- wa t e r v i ew. B e a u t i f u l age. $1100 mo. 1-yr P.A.: 2.48 acres, mobile, lease. Pets negotiable. sirable. Qualified appli- proper ty and beautiful c o v e r e d d e c k s , n e w Photos and details at cants are encouraged to home! paint in and out, front MLS# 271539 email resume to www.housepa.net field and back timbered, $475,000 debrar2@ptpc.com (360)808-3549 D r y C r e e k a r e a , l o t s Team Thomsen FSBO: $229,000. Open new! Nice! $130,000. (360)808-0979 plan triple wide 2,300 sf, Senior Employment COMFORTABLE, fully COLDWELL BANKER 3 br., 2 baths, large bo- A d j a c e n t 2 . 4 8 a c r e s f u r n i s h e d e q u i p p e d Training Vacancy UPTOWN REALTY nus room or 4th bed- a v a i l a b l e w i t h w a t e r home for rent for the C l a l l a m C o. 1 6 h r s . room. Mountain view on share, $40,000. week $9.19 hr. ($9.32 on winter. 3 br., 3 bath, 3 AFFORDABLE (360)775-9996 1.01 acres, close to Dis1/1/14). To qualify must story house on lake SuNicely remodeled single covery Trail, NOT in the b e 5 5 + , u n e m p l oye d , therland, available for a REDUCED meet low income guide- wide on .95 acres. New Carlsborg Urban Growth two month minimum stay lines. Update your skills: r o o f, n ew f l o o r i n g i n A r e a . C o v e r e d f r o n t Spacious Sunland Con- or from Nov. 1. 2013 to Call O3A for application. kitchen, new vinyl skirt- porch, large rear deck, do 3 br., 2 bath with wa- April 30. 2014. Laundry (866)720-4863 ext: 113. ing, new outside paint, ex t r a l a r g e 2 8 ’ x 3 6 ’ ter view wood deck and room with washer and and new water heater. (1,008 sf) detached gar- courtyard entry daylight Open until filled. b a s e m e n t w i t h w o o d dryer. Does not include Newer range, refrigera- age and workshop. electricity, garbage disstove. t o r a n d d i s h w a s h e r. (360)582-9782 posal. Rent is $1,500 ML#271216/495367 WAREHOUSE Posi- Large detached carport per month. first last, and $194,900 tion: Por t Townsend. with shop area. Has irriUNOBSTRUCTED cleaning damage deposTeam Schmidt G e n e ra l wa r e h o u s e gation ditch and view of SALTWATER VIEW! it. No Pets. Mike: 460-0331 helper. Must be able to Mt. Baker. Enjoy sweeping saltwa(360)460-8677 Irene: 460-4040 lift 50 lbs. Many variML#272215/554896 ter views from this 4.86 smugglerslanding WINDERMERE ous duties. experience $125,000. acre parcel located in @wavecable.com SUNLAND as a fix-it person very Roland Miller the hills above Port Anu s e f u l . Pa r t T i m e, (360)461-4116 geles. The 30 GPM well DISCO BAY: Waterfront, 35hrs/wk. Start $10/hr. TOWN & COUNTRY PLACE YOUR is drilled with no restricnewly renovated 3 Br., 2 (360)379-9030 AD ONLINE tions on use. Power and ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. With our new $900. (360)460-2330. CHECK OUT OUR phone to the property. Classified Wizard MLS#271057. $165,000. NEW CLASSIFIED SELL YOUR HOME you can see your Jeanine Cardiff P. A . : 2 B r. , g a r a g e , WIZARD AT IN PENINSULA ad before it prints! p a t i o, h u g e ya r d , n o (360)460-9221 www.peninsula CLASSIFIED www.peninsula JACE The Real Estate pets. $750, deposit, refdailynews.com 1-800-826-7714 dailynews.com Company erences. (360)808-4476. ON-CALL MEDICAL ASSISTANT Join multi-disciplinary team supporting consumers with chronic mental illnesses in an outpatient setting. Must be program grad and license-eligible. Mental health exper pref’d. Base Pay: $13 $15.29 hr. DOE. Resume to PBH,118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA. 98362. http://peninsula behavioral.org. EOE.

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GARAGE Sale: Indoor, Sat., 10-3 p.m., 908 Eckard Place, up Race. Collectibles, glassware, vintage, retro to modern. Housewares, recliner, kitchenware, Christmas, oak desk hutch, and CAMPER: Unique pop- m o r e . G o o d q u a l i t y, u p, R o a m i n ’ C h a r i o t , priced to sell. hinges on front edge to fo r m l a r g e t r i a n g u l a r HUGE Sale: Sat., Nov. s p a c e , l o t s o f h e a d 23, 8-5 p.m., 1/2 price room, 2 lg. beds and lots after 2 p.m. Hand Tools, of storage, fits full size Power Tools, Christmas decorations, wedding truck with 7 or 8’ bed. decorations, wood, elec$1,500. (360)385-1081. tronics, vintage items, CAREGIVERS NEEDED camping, kids clothes, boat, jewlery, too much $100 hire bonus. to list, priced to sell Training available. quickly. Pioneer Park, Call Caregivers. 387 E. Washington. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659 LEGAL Assistant: Wanted in Jefferson Case Manager-Medical FT, w/benes. Req. BA & County. Knowledge of 2yrs exp. providing case legal procedures premanagement or clinical ferred, Computer skills treatment. Resume/cvr essential, MS Word ltr: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., d e s i r e d . U n i o n , $16.52/hr +benefits. P.A., WA 98362. EOE. Apply to BOCC before peninsulabehavioral.org 5 p.m. 12/5/13, P.O. Box 1220, Port TownCRAFTS UNLIMITED send, WA 98368. BAZAAR www.co.jeffer Fri.-Sat., Nov. 22-23, 9-3 son.wa.us CampFire Clubhouse, 619 E. 4th St. Woven r u g s , j e w e l r y, h a n d LIN AND LIL’S painted and sewn items, ESTATE SALE pottery, Christmas de- A n t i q u e s a n d c o l cor, scrubbies, decorat- lectibles, bookshelves, ed wood items, baked b e d s , n i g h t s t a n d s , goods, candy, jams, and l a m p s , d i s h e s a n d so much more! glass, chest of drawers, sideboard, formal DENTAL ASSISTANT Part-time, for busy prac- d i n i n g s e t , s l e e p e r tice, experience a plus, sofa and sofa, mirrors, will train right person, pictures, golf clubs, file B e n e f i t s a n d s a l a r y cabinet, wheelbarrow, D O E . R e s u m e t o P O l a d d e r, o c c a s i o n a l Box 268, Port Hadlock, chairs, lawn furniture, and much more! Come WA 98339. and see and buy! 972 E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . - E. Spr uce St., Fr i.Sun., 9-?, 802 E. Willow Sat., 9-3 p.m. St. Leather sectional sofa, oak table and chairs, LINCOLN: ‘01 LS V8. hutch, air hocky table, Automatic, 73,500 miles, Harley Davidson leath- pearl white, good condiers, lots of quality wom- tion. $6,500. (360)683-2030 en’s clothing size small and medium, lg. jewelry MOTORHOME: ‘96 ‘19 c a b i n e t , o a k d i s p l ay case, dishes, lots more. C h ev y C l a s s B. 3 3 k , C a s h o n l y. N o e a r l y great shape. $6,000. (360)582-3850 birds.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. KIDNEY SPECIALISTS Solution: 13 letters

S N R S T R E P X E M Y Z N E By MaryEllen Uthlaut

7 Foreboding 8 Cupboard arrangement 9 Officers-to-be 10 Floral wreath 11 Word-of-mouth 12 Riesling product 13 Aid factor 19 Grow together 21 Rock-filled 25 It can be viewed with a scanning tunneling microscope 26 Column style 29 Paranormal ability 30 Tip for a croupier 31 Large gulp 32 Prefix with skeleton 33 Book after John 34 River through Orsk 35 Broccoli relative 37 Prefix with skeleton 38 Metronome settings 41 Prize component? 42 “The Lady & Sons Savannah Country Cookbook” author Paula

11/21/13 Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, attached garage. $900, damage. (360)461-6608

605 Apartments Clallam County CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent references required. $700. (360)452-3540.

P.A.: 2 Br. mobile, garage, W/D, no smoking. CENTRAL P.A.: Con$700. (360)452-1573. venient 1 br., second flr. P. A . : 2 B r. , W / D, n o $553, and 2 br., 1st flr. pets/smoking. $650, 1st, $589 incl. util! Clean, light, No smoke/pet maylast, dep. (360)417-5137 be. (360)504-2668. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, gar. HOLIDAY LODGE $1,100 mo. $1,100 se$220 week incl tax. Free curity. (360)417-0153. WiFi and HD programming. (360)457-9201. P.A.: 4 br., 2 bath, 2 c a r g a r a g e . N o P.A.: 1 Br., incredible pets/smoke. $1,300, wa t e r v i ew, o n bl u f f, downtown. No pets. refs. required. Call Pat (360)582-7241. (360)452-1641 P. A . : 2 B r. , n o p e t s. $675 mo., 1st, last, dep. (360)670-9418 P.A.: Nice 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $725. (360)808-4972 SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 or 2 B r. , gr e a t l o c a t i o n . $600/$700. 809-3656. P.A.: Nice, clean 2 br.,1 bath, garage $825 1st/Last/Dep. See PDN online for more info or call (360)670-3499. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, avail. now, credit app. req. Diane, 461-1500.

P.A.: 433 E. First St. 2 SEQUIM: 1 Br., 1 ba, B r. , 1 b a t h , N o p e t / W/D, no smoking/pets. smoke. $600, first, last, $675 first/dep. 460-4294 dep. 461-5329. S E QU I M : 2 B r. , 1 b a mobile, lg lot, great location, mtn view, W/D, no smoke/pets. $700 mo plus utils. Credit & background check. Owner (818)749-3765. To view: Robert (360) 461-4296.

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

SEQUIM: In town, great location, nice 3 Br., 2 ba, 1,600 sf, fenced backyard, storage shed, 1st, last, security. $995 mo., water/sewer included. (626)232-0795

EAST P.A.: Roommate wanted, nice home, private bath. $450, share utilities. (360)477-6083.

CARLSBORG: bathroom, large closet, W/D, garden space, one acre, quiet. References needed, stable, cat must apSEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 ba, prove you. $435/month W/D, no smoking/pets. + utilities. $800 first/dep. 460-4294 (360)582-3189.

SEQUIM: Fur nished 1 Br. $380, plus electric. (360)417-9478. Email SEQUIM: Newly remod- susanunpc@gmail.com eled 2 Br., 1 ba mobile, carpor t, storage shed. 1163 Commercial $800 mo. (360)477-8180 WEST P.A.: Quaint and secluded, small, 1 Br., extras. No dogs/smoke. $515. (360)504-2169.

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PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

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11/21

Acute, Adult, Anemia, Bags, Beds, Biopsies, Bones, Catheters, Cells, Chronic, Clot, CT Scan, Dialysis, Diet, Disease, Edema, Educated, Enzyme, Epidemiology, Exam, Expert, Fluid, Glomerular, Kidney, Matched, Medical Degree, Monitor, Nephrons, Pediatrics, Prevention, Protein, Regulate, Renal, Stones, Strong, Team, Test, Transplant, Work Yesterday’s Answer: Memphis THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

RUSTM ©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

VECOT (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

43 Stylebook subject 48 Stoli and SKYY 49 Tar Heel State campus 51 Egyptian amulet 53 Solution for 4-Down 54 2010 Supreme Court appointee 55 Honshu port

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 1163 Commercial Clallam County Clallam County Rentals JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 H 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 Duplex 2 br 1 ba ......$625 A 2 br 1 ba util incl ...$650 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$700 H 3 br 2 ba ...............$850 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 H 3+ br 1.5 ba ........$1200 H 4 br 2.5 ba.........$1600 STORAGE UNITS $40 mo.-$100 mo. Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

E P A E S C I R T A I D E P T

TWO OFFICES IN DOWNTOWN SEQUIM GAZETTE BUILDING FOR SUB-LEASE 448-sq-ft for $550 mo., 240-sq-ft for $350 mo. Perfect for accountant or other professional. S h a r e d c o n fe r e n c e room, restroom, wired for high-speed Internet. Contact John Brewer, publisher, (360)417-3500

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

56 Admit to the club 57 Twisty-horned antelope 58 Admitting a breeze, perhaps 59 “Frasier” actress Gilpin 60 Shangri-la 64 Press coverage 65 Make haste 66 Uno e due 6080 Home Furnishings

WOOD STOVE: Fron- MISC: Solid oak Lane t i e r, t a ke s 2 4 ” wo o d . hutch, with mirror, $200. Rattan peacock chair, $325. (360)732-4328. $ 3 5 . O l d wo o d t a bl e, $50. Glass-top patio ta6065 Food & ble set, umbrella, (4) Farmer’s Market chairs, $200. Solid pine TV armoire, $300. White S A L M O N : F r o z e n 4 piece faux-wicker patio Wild King Salmon fil- set, cushions, $200. Potting cupboard, $100. lets, $6/lb. Must sell by 12/1, all (360)460-8472 reasonable offers considered. (360)928-3483.

6075 Heavy Equipment

6100 Misc.

WAREHOUSE SPACE Merchandise East P.A., tall ceiling, 10’ H Y S T E R : ‘ 7 9 t i l t - b e d trailer. 25’ long, 20 ton. door, 970 sf. $325. MISC: Canopy, 6’, fits $8,800/obo. Tom, (360)460-1168 shor t bed, Leer, light (360)640-1770 blue, very clean, $175. Stowmaster 5000 tow 6005 Antiques & SEMI END-DUMP bar, like new, $175. TRAILER: High lift-gate, Collectibles (360)710-4966 ex. cond. $15,000/obo. (360)417-0153 FAINTING COUCH: AnS PA : C o l e m a n S p e c tique, floral pattern in SEMI Trailer: 53’ 1992 trum 200, 4-5 person, maroons and greens make: TRLMO. 53’ Semi fully functional, new filand blues, excellent conBox Van low pro 24.5 ter, good shape, no covdition. $450/obo. - 7 5 % r u b b e r s p a r e , e r, 2 r e c l i n i n g s e a t s. (360)460-8610 or wheel $7,999 inspected $500. (360)808-4029. (460)477-5588 road worthy! Moving out of state! Pack at your 6105 Musical speed sell when you get 6035 Cemetery Plots to your destination! Do Instruments the logistic-cost-it works save $$ A M P S : ( 1 ) 3 0 0 Wa t t NICHES: At Sequim (909)224-9600 Crate amp/PA system. V a l l e y C e m e t e r y. (1) 100 Watt Line 6 base Companion and sinamp combo. $200 each. 6080 Home gle. $1,550 each. (360)808-1156 Furnishings (360)461-2810 SACRIFICE: Baby BED: Queen four-poster piano, excellent 6050 Firearms & bed, cherry, headboard, grand condition. $2,850/obo. footboard, side rails, exAmmunition (360)460-8610 or cellent condition. $500. (460)477-5588 (360)460-2796 LONG RIFLE: 50 caliber black powder. $250/obo. HOSPITAL BED: Inva6115 Sporting (360)565-6130 care In Home SemiGoods MISC: Large queen bed, Electric Hospital Bed. f r a m e, m a t t r e s s, b ox Very good condition. All spring, $150/obo. Bicy- functions wor k. Head FISHING POLE LATHE c l e , M o n g o o s e R o c k lift/foot lift controlled by Dale Clemens brand, Climber, good condition, electr ic hand remote. many extras. $600.1 (360)452-2985 $50/obo. (360)565-6130. Has hand crank for bed height adjustment. InMISC: Winchester mod- cludes mattress with vi- KAYAK: Single-person e l 9 4 , 3 2 W I N . S P L , nyl cover and two guard i n f l a t a bl e k aya k w i t h paddles, manual, and $ 7 5 0 . H i g h S t a n d a r d rails. $450. Mark, carrying bag. Great conSport King 22 LR semi(360)683-5073 dition. Used only once! auto, $400. Beretta model 21A-22LR Lady, $300. MISC: Char ming iron $140/obo. trundle day bed, 2 new 417-7685 weekdays, or (360)460-8124 681-4429 weekends. twin mattresses with linPISTOL: Walther war- e n s, $ 5 0 0 / o b o. B l a ck time P-38, AC44, w/hol- lacquer Asian storage MISC: 150 duck decoys, ster and cartridge. $775. chest, cedar lined, $250/ $3 ea. 150 lead anchors, (360)809-0970 $2.50 ea. obo. (360)379-1804. (360)452-1260 MISC: Loveseat, $75. 6055 Firewood, Sewing table, $40. SewFuel & Stoves ing machine, $40. Cof6125 Tools fee table, $40. Dining taFIRE LOGS ble, round, (4) chairs Dump truck load, $300 with wheels, $100. MISC: Tig Miller Dynasty plus gas. Madrona, $400 (360)461-4529 200 welder, $1,000. Air p l u s g a s. S p l i t Wo o d compressor, 5 HP, 220 MISC: Small night stand, VAC, 60 gal., $500. Available, $400. $ 2 0 . Q u e e n s i ze b e d (360)732-4328 (360)452-4179 with headboard, $200. FIREWOOD: $179 deliv- Heavy duty Christmas ered Sequim-P.A. True tree stand, $35. Misc. 6140 Wanted cord. 3 cord special for mouldings, $.10 cents & Trades $499. Credit card acfoot. (360)477-0351. cepted. 360-582-7910. WA N T E D : 2 w e a n e d LONG DISTANCE www.portangeles steers. (360)928-0177. No Problem! firewood.com FIREWOOD: You haul. Peninsula Classified $60 per standard pickup 1-800-826-7714 load. (360)621-5194

11/21/13

AMSEES

KUREEB

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

DOWN 1 Marina structure 2 Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum city 3 Rose essence 4 Need of a 53-Down 5 Brief missions? 6 Hi and Lois’s daughter

By DAVID OUELLET

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

ACROSS 1 “Are you serious?” 5 Handicapper’s concern 9 Class __ 14 Doth possess 15 Los Angeles, for one 16 High nest 17 Opposed party 18 *Filet mignon dish named for a goddess 20 Jet sounds 22 Proactiv target 23 Was in the vanguard 24 *Emergency supplies 27 Dog in Baum stories 28 Dangerous fly 33 Puffin kin 36 Sizable music combo 39 Planted 40 Troubled youth literally hiding in each answer to a starred clue 44 Fable 45 Makes the scene 46 I trouble? 47 Slob’s napkin 50 Spheres studied by Mendel 52 *Pipe-smoking royal 58 Tailless primate 61 Explorer on Nick Jr. 62 Art support 63 *Fictional rank above Padawan 67 Pro __ 68 Where the action is 69 Former Neet rival 70 Similar 71 Face-off locales 72 Low joint 73 Wings, for instance

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 B7

Answer here: Yesterday’s

6140 Wanted & Trades WANTED: Small Older Crawler (Bulldozer), any model/condition, running or not. Related equipment: skidsteer, far m tractor, old gas pumps, advertising signs. Also wanted: old arcade coin operated games, pinball, kiddie ride, old slot machines. Pr ivate par ty, cash. (360)204-1017. WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and lures, P.A. Derby memorabilia (360)683-4791

6135 Yard & Garden

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: THINK PIVOT PARLOR EXPOSE Answer: The mountain climber who reached the peak first was in — TIP-TOP SHAPE

8142 Garage Sales 7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes Sequim LIN AND LIL’S ESTATE SALE Antiques and collectibles, bookshelves, beds, nightstands, lamps, dishes and glass, chest of drawers, sideboard, formal dining set, sleeper sofa and sofa, mirrors, pictures, golf clubs, file cabinet, wheelbarrow, l a d d e r, o c c a s i o n a l chairs, lawn furniture, and much more! Come and see and buy! 972 E . S p r u c e S t . , Fr i . Sat., 9-3 p.m.

8180 Garage Sales

PA - Central RIDING MOWER: Club Cadet, completely reCRAFTS UNLIMITED frubished, cleaned and BAZAAR inspected by P.A. PowFri.-Sat., Nov. 22-23, 9-3 er. $1,795. CampFire Clubhouse, (360)460-2375 or 619 E. 4th St. Woven (360)452-9084 r u g s , j e w e l r y, h a n d painted and sewn items, 8120 Garage Sales pottery, Christmas deJefferson County cor, scrubbies, decorated wood items, baked goods, candy, jams, and PORT LUDLOW so much more! HOLIDAY GIFT SALE Fri. Nov. 22nd, 5-8 p.m., GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., Port Ludlow Beach Club, 8-3 p.m., 107 E. 13th, in 121 Marina View Drive. alley. Furniture, books, Avon, Tupperware, jew- collectibles, clothes and elry, dolls, toys, hand- misc. made items, arts, crafts, food and much more. GARAGE Sale: Indoor, Call Jackie for info Sat., 10-3 p.m., 908 Eck(360)990-6112 ard Place, up Race. Collectibles, glassware, vinretro to modern. 8142 Garage Sales tage, Housewares, recliner, Sequim kitchenware, Christmas, oak desk hutch, and E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . - m o r e . G o o d q u a l i t y, Sun., 9-?, 802 E. Willow priced to sell. St. Leather sectional sofa, oak table and chairs, hutch, air hocky table, 8182 Garage Sales PA - West Harley Davidson leathers, lots of quality women’s clothing size small E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . and medium, lg. jewelry Sun., Nov. 23 and 24, 9 c a b i n e t , o a k d i s p l ay a.m. to 3 p.m., 1116 W case, dishes, lots more. 11th St., Port Angeles. C a s h o n l y. N o e a r l y Household items, China, birds. crystal, antiques, fine linens, quilts, fur niture, HUGE Sale: Sat., Nov. b o o k s , t o y s , w o o d 23, 8-5 p.m., 1/2 price c h e s t s, m e t a l t r u n k s, after 2 p.m. Hand Tools, yard items, tools, and Power Tools, Christmas more. d e c o ra t i o n s, we d d i n g decorations, wood, electronics, vintage items, 8183 Garage Sales camping, kids clothes, PA - East boat, jewlery, too much t o l i s t , p r i c e d t o s e l l UNIT Sale: Fr i.-Sun., quickly. Pioneer Park, 10-4 p.m., Monte Eng387 E. Washington. l i s h S t o ra g e, 2 5 5 4 3 2 Hwy 101, next to OlymRUMMAGE Sale: Sat., pic Cellars Winery, Unit Nov. 23, 9-3 p.m., 375 D13. Clearing out our W. Spruce St., all pro- u n i t ! W i d e va r i e t y o f ceeds benefit Faith Lu- stuff! theran Preschool. Yard tools, plants, Christmas decorations, we have a 7030 Horses lot of everything, come check it out! Don’t forget to also check out the MISC: English Saddle Faith Lutheran Christ- Kieffer Professional, exmas Bazaar held across cellent cond., $250/obo. WA N T E D : R e l o a d i n g the alley at 354 W. Ce- Breaking horse cart, 2 equip., hunting knives, dar St., Sequim, also people, matching tack, old tools. (360)457-0814 from 9-3 p.m. $250. (360)565-6130.

AKC GERMAN shepherd puppies. 8 week old black/red ready to go to there new homes just in time for the holidays. Excellent genetics with clean hips/health through the lineage. 2 males, 2 females. (360)460-6120.

MOTORHOME: ‘94 32’ F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . ‘454’ Chev engine, 67K mi., electric step, 7000 watt Oman generator, g o o d t i r e s , i n v e r t e r, queen walk-around bed, leveling jacks, 2 TVs, 2 lg. solar panels, 2 room A / C, b a ck u p c a m e ra , w i n d o w aw n i n g s , 1 8 ’ awning, outside shower, ss wheel covers, electric heated mirrors. $12,500 or best reasonable offer. (360)457-4896

A K C M i n i - S c h n a u ze r Puppies: 3 females, 2 males. Born 9/30. Tails docked, dew claws removed. Parents on site. Salt ‘n pepper and Black with silver colored. $500. MOTORHOME: ‘96 ‘19 C h ev y C l a s s B. 3 3 k , Call (360)460-7119. great shape. $6,000. (360)582-3850 CAT: Beautiful ragdoll female, 18 months, great personality, blue eyes, MOTOR HOME: ‘99 25’ spayed, up to date on all Allegro by Fleetwood. Class A, 85K mi., hyshots. $100. draulic power levelers, (360)821-8366 new fridge, rear queen bed, 2 solar panels and inverter, suited for on or 9820 Motorhomes off grid camping. $8,500. (360)460-7534

MOTOR HOME: ‘99 40’ Monaco Exec. Excellent cond., ‘450’ Cummins M11, Allison trans., lots of extras. $65,000/obo. (360)460-7200 MOTORHOME: ‘03 38’ Dutch Star. 20,230 mi., tr iple slide-out, new fridge, micro., gas oven, queen bed, sm freezer, many extras, Cat 3808, 6 sp. Allison Trans. Book $127,000. Asking $80,000. (360)457-3718 or (360)565-6408.

M OTO R H O M E : Fo u r Winds ‘98 22’. Gas and electric fridge, good cond., trailer hitch, 98,330 miles. $7,200. (360)582-9769

MOTORHOME: Newmar 2001 Mountainaire for sale, 38’ with 63,100 miles. In very good condition. Asking $31,000. MOTORHOME: ‘07 24’ Call Bill, (360)582-0452 Itasca. Class C, 30K low to find more info and/or see the unit. mi., two queen beds. $43,950. (360)683-3212. MOTORHOME: ‘86 Ford Shasta Class C. 52K, good condition, recently purchased, not being used, want to sell. $5,900. (360)457-6434. MOTOR HOME: ‘88 38’ Beaver Motorcoach. Cat 300 diesel, Allison trans, 53K mi., has everything but slide-out. $27,000. (360)477-1261

SOUTHWIND: ‘85 Class A. New brake booster, tires, and new fridge full of gas propane trip ready all lights work every system gone through over $3,000 just spent on system repairs health forces sale. Only 56,000 miles total on this vehicle. Only $6,000/obo. This is a must see and ready to go. 454 engine runs great Onan gen set has new star ter relay, MOTORHOME: ‘89 24’ w o r k s p e r fe c t l y. To w Komfort. 60K mi. Price hitch both front and rear. reduced to $3,850/obo. Driver side door for easy (251)978-1750 access. Call and leave message if we don’t anMOTORHOME: Rexhall swer: (360)683-6575. ‘ 0 2 R o s e a i r. 3 2 ’ , 2 slides, basement model, 9832 Tents & hydraulic jacks, 12 cubic foot refrigerator with ice Travel Trailers m a ke r, f i r e p l a c e, G M Motor. 47k miles, comes A I R S T R E A M : ‘ 9 3 3 4 ’ w i t h e v e r y t h i n g ! Excella 1000. 3 axles, $48,000/obo. nice. $14,500. In Por t (360)452-6318. Angeles. (206)459-6420.


Classified

B8 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9802 5th Wheels

CARGO Trailer: 7.5’ X 16’ Tandem Axle TNT C a r g o Tr a i l e r. 2 0 1 1 . Ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . 7 0 0 0 G V W. E l e c t r i c brakes. Interior lights. Inter ior r ubber tracking and tie downs. New spare tire. T R AV E L Tr a i l e r w i t h (907)232-0012 or Pick-up: Ford ‘88 F150 (360)683-2122. Pickup. $2,000 worth of $4,250/obo. new tires and rims. 1997 21’ Chateau travel trailR O A D M A S T E R To w er. Complete with A/C, Dolly. Model RM440, ex- refrigerator, queen size cellent condition, good bed, bunk beds, microt i r e s , s e l f s t e e r i n g wave, stove. Will sell wheels,electric brakes separately or as a unit. for easy secure trans$8,000. port. 620 lbs. empty with (360)681-4224 max weight of towed vehicle 4,380 lbs. $1,400/obo. 9802 5th Wheels (360)912-0030 TENT TRAILER: ‘84 Shasta. Licensed, stove, sink, new tires. $1000 obo. (360)683-4369.

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 Wildwood. 36’, good cond., ever ything works. $2,900/obo. 565-6017.

TRAILER: ‘13 23’ Visa by Gulfstream. $19,950. (360)681-7601

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

TRAILER: ‘79 31’ Nuwa. Low miles. $500. (206)949-1940.

9802 5th Wheels

9808 Campers & Canopies

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

YA M A H A : ‘ 0 3 V- S t a r Classic. Air cooled, VTwin 5 sp, many extras. $3,800/obo. 683-9357.

OLYMPIC: 17’ ‘84 88 Johnson and 8HP Mercury, both two stroke. EZ load trailer. $2,000. (360)452-3275

5TH WHEEL: 27’ Alum a s c a p e 2 0 0 2 , 3 p. slides, with Ford F250 460 V8 custom HD trans pull 15K. Interior l i ke n ew, q u e e n b e d . Truck 1992 all power, 85000M. Package ready to go anywhere $19,000/obo. (360)649-4121

FIFTH WHEEL: Forest R i ve r ‘ 0 6 W i l d c a t . 2 7 FW, nonsmoker, rig for boondocks, 4 solar panels, 4 6V golf cart deep cycle batteries, XPower inverter, 3000 plus 3600 Onan Generator, Hijacker Hitch. $18,500/obo. Call Sonny, (360)952-2038.

9808 Campers & Canopies

5TH WHEEL: ‘97 Nash, 1 slide, 27’, very g o o d c o n d . $4,000/obo. (360)928-2111

CAMPER: Unique popu p, R o a m i n ’ C h a r i o t , hinges on front edge to fo r m l a r g e t r i a n g u l a r space, lots of head room, 2 lg. beds and lots of storage, fits full size truck with 7 or 8’ bed. $1,500. (360)385-1081. S&S: ‘83 9.5’ camper. Self-contained, stable lift jack system, new fridge. $3,000. (360)452-9049.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

C A M P E R : ‘ 0 3 L a n c e. Like new, used two short trips, for short bed pick- BAYLINER: 20’ Cabin up, air, queen bed, din- Cruiser. E-Z Load trailer. ette, shower, toilet, lots $800/obo. 775-6075. of storage. $7,850. (360)681-0172 BELLBOY: ‘72 ‘19 boat, 140 HP Johnson ‘86, CANOPY fits full size Evenrude 15 HP kicker, Chev pickup standard many extras! Call for debed, (81”). Ex. Cond. tails. $1,995. $425. (808)634-3581. (360)683-7297

PORTLAND PUDGY ‘06 multi-function dinghy, unsinkable, double B OAT / M OTO R : 1 6 ’ hulled, 7’8”x4’5”, can be Starcraft fiberglass 1960 used as life raft. $1,000. runabout with 75 hp (360)437-0908 Johnson and trailer. Not a love boat, but runs like R U N A B O U T : ‘ 7 8 1 4 ’ a champ. $1,600. But boat, ‘78 EZ Load trailer, w a i t . T h e r e ’s m o r e ! 7 0 h p O / B M e r c u r y, 1991, 20 hp Merc fresh good cond Must sell! from the shop with re- $1,500. (360)928-1170. built carb, new plugs, lotza zip. $1,400. SAILBOAT: ‘69 21’Vic(360)582-0723 tory. With trailer. $1,500. (360)509-4894 D AV E S C A D D E N : 2 man pontoon boat, will SATURN: ‘12, 15’, intake Class IV rapids. flatable boat. With ‘12 Nissan 20 hp outboard $1,000 cash. 808-0422. and hand-held Garman FIBERFORM: 17’, deep GPS, Hawkeye marine V with 65 hp Merc. radio, depth finder, 5’ $2,000. (360)374-2069. harpoon, 5’ dock hook, 2 life jackets, and many GUIDE MODEL: Willie other items. $3,500. 16X54, custom trailer. (360)582-0191 $4,000. (360)460-4417. LIVINGSTON: 14’ 20 hp Honda, electr ic star t, power tilt, galvanized trailer. $5,400. Call for detials (360)681-8761.

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

9817 Motorcycles

STERLING 1995 19’ C u d d y. T h i s fa bu l o u s boat is clean and lots of fun. It is powered by a 1995 Mercruiser 3.0L inboard engine and is towed on a 1995 Calkins trailer. Contact Travis Scott (360)460-2741.

9817 Motorcycles

YAMAHA: ‘06 YZF R1 50th anniversary edition. 23k, clean title, comes with extras, ex. cond. $6,100. (360)477-0017.

9805 ATVs

QUAD: ‘06 TRX Honda 2 5 0 , l ow h r s. , h a r d l y used. $2,500. (360)417-0539

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

HARLEY: ‘04 Davids o n N i g h t Tr a i n FXSTBi. 15300 miles. Extras! Can Deliver. Awesome bike! Brad (360)683-2273. Price reduced. $6,995. brad@stinton.com Kawasaki: ‘03 KLR650. Extras. $2,600. (360)457-1314

TRIUMPH: ‘74 TR6 Classic British Spor ts Car. Excellent runner, c o nve r t i bl e w i t h h a r d top, rare over-drive, lots of extra original and new parts. $19,900. Serious inquiries. (360)460-2931 DAT S U N : ‘ 7 2 2 4 0 Z race car and trailer. Red, spare engines, trans., wheels, tires and more! $10,000. (360)385-5694

D •I •R •E •C •T •O •R •Y

FENCING

TRACTOR

TREE SERVICE

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

TREE SERVICE

Davis Painting

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

Pacific Northwest Carpet Care

PEST CONTROL

GENERAL CONST. ARNETT

“AFFORDABLE HOME IMPROVEMENTS” Remodels Interior & Exterior Kitchen, Baths, Decks, Fences, Laminate and Hardwood Flooring

360-477-1935DONARAG875DL • constructiontilepro.com

CLEANING

360-457-4341

Licensed & Bonded

14 Years Experience

References Available

(360) 808-2317

TREE SERVICE

AUTO DETAILING

Bill’s Auto Detailing

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

We go that extra mile for your tree care needs

Inc.

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3B910141

We will beat any written estimate. Senior Discounts. Gift Certificates Available

• Tree Removal • Tree Trimming • Wind Sailing of Trees

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Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

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Expert Pruning

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Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing 32736526

681-0132 www.dungenesslandscaper.com

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(360) 582-9382

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• Van Mounted Unit • True Steam Cleaning • Stain Protection • Odor Neutralizer

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PAINTING

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YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE

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ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Get code check after stalling Dear Doctor: I have a 2002 Nissan Sentra with 135,000 miles. Recently, when slowing down, the engine stalls, and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;check engineâ&#x20AC;? light comes on. Every other aspect, such as idling and acceleration, are fine. I tried additives to the gas. Can you help? Jim Dear Jim: The first step is to check that the computer communicates with the scan tool and for any codes or pending codes. Next, try an idle motor relearn. This will require a scan tool. Carbon buildup in the throttle body is also a factor. I looked on Identifix and found additional possibilities: poor ground connection under the battery and right side of the valve cover, as well as throttle position sensor failure.

Cylinder misfires Dear Doctor: I own a 2000 Honda Accord four-cylinder with 125,000 miles. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;check engineâ&#x20AC;? light came on, so I had the computer scanned, and it showed all cylinder misfires and code 1399. I had a full engine tuneup and distributor

2011 Audi A6. My wife thinks the passenger-side seat is very replaceJunior uncomfortable. but Do all European cars Damato ment, the same have very firm, stiff seats? codes still I was thinking about purcome back. chasing an aftermarket seat Do you cover or cushion. have any Would you have any recideas? Steve ommendations? Steve Dear Dear Steve: The seat Steve: I foam can be trimmed or have found replaced with a softer foam. that the This is not a major exhaust undertaking to take the seat valve seat in cushion apart. the cylinder head wears The seat position where down, allowing the valve to the seat frame mounts to sit closer to the rocker arm, the floor also can be causing the valve to not shimmed. close fully. You need to check with We also have found tight an area upholstery shop. exhaust valves, causing a As for seat covers and slight engine skip and cushions, I suspect the suprougher-than-normal idle. port would not be enough. In some rare cases, a loose timing belt also can be Pressure gauge the culprit. We see the problem you Dear Doctor: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m havdescribe often after a shop ing a problem with the autoor owner has replaced all matic tire pressure indicator related tuneup parts. in my 2008 Cadillac DTS. At my shop, we use IdenThe light indicated â&#x20AC;&#x153;low tifix and Alldata. pressure.â&#x20AC;? They advise us to adjust I checked the tires with a the engine valves on both gauge, and all had 30 pounds, the four-cylinder and V-6 but the door jamb sticker engines at 100,000 miles. calls for 28 pounds cold. I have my own compresStiff seats sor and reset the indicator Dear Doctor: I have a according to the instructions

THE AUTO DOC

Car of the Week

in the book, but the light didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go out. Is there a way to clean the sensors? Bob Dear Bob: There is no way to clean these tire monitors. Most tire pressure monitors have non-replaceable, small watch-like batteries located inside the tire. The metal valve cap cover becomes corroded and sometimes canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be removed. Most car owners usually want to replace the tire valve with a regular rubber valve stem and not spend the $75 to $125 for the correct tire pressure monitor valve assembly. There are aftermarket companies that have introduced universal monitors at a lesser price. Some companies have great tools to reset and reprogram tire pressure monitors. I use the Bartec 400 and the Pilot programmer and relearn tool.

2014 Nissan Versa Note BASE PRICE: $13,990 for S; $15,240 for S Plus; $15,990 for SV. PRICE AS TESTED: $20,370. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel drive, five-passenger, compact hatchback. ENGINE: 1.6-liter, double overhead cam, four cylinder with CVTC. MILEAGE: 31 mpg (city), 40 mpg (highway). LENGTH: 163 inches. WHEELBASE: 102.4 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 2,482 pounds. BUILT IN: Aguascalientes, Mexico. OPTIONS: SL package (includes 16-inch, aluminum alloy wheels, intelligent key, push-button start, fog lights, satellite radio, rearview monitor, rear-seat center armrest) $1,700; technology package (includes navigation system, voice recognition for audio and nav, around-view monitor, heated side mirrors, streaming audio via Bluetooth) $800; carpeted floor mats and cargo mat $175; rear cargo cover $90. DESTINATION CHARGE: $810. The Associated Press

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others Others Others Others

BUICK: Rare 1977 Buick SkyHawk. 81k original miles on this one of a kind car. Excellent mechanical with V6/Automatic. See on-line ad for details. Need the garage space. Clear title. $5K or best offer. (360)460-6162 CAMERO: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;87 Iroc Convertible. Disassembled, no motor or trans., good body, ready to restore! $500. (360)379-5243. CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66 Impala conve r t i bl e. R u n s g r e a t , beautiful, collector! $17,000. (360)681-0488.

DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 Charger. Midnight Blue 2006 Charger, 3.5 V6, 79,000 miles, automatic, K N Air Charger kit, air cond., power windows, power steering, power brakes, cruise control, fog lights, 17â&#x20AC;? mag wheels, extra set of steel wheels. $9,500. Too many vehicles, something has to go. has been a good, reliable car. Port Angeles call (720)371-0810.

HYUNDAI â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;12 ACCENT 4 c y l . , a u t o, C D a n d more. This subcompact gets up to 40 mpg hwy. Balance of factory warranty, 28K mi. Stock #12258831. Vin# posted at dealership. $11,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)460-1073 HYUNDAI â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;13 SONATA GLS 4 cyl., auto, balance fact o r y w a r r a n t y, 2 5 K . Stock #1258886. Vin# posted at dealership. Only $15,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)460-1073 LINCOLN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 LS V8. Automatic, 73,500 miles, pearl white, good condition. $6,500. (360)683-2030

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;87 El Camino. Runs good, good body and interior. $2,800/obo. (360)683-6079

HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 Prelude. N o n - V T E C, ( 4 ) ex t r a L I N C O L N : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 0 To w n tires and rims. $2,500 Car. Call for details. cash. Call or text any $3,500. (360)683-9553. time after 4 p.m., (360)461-5877 LINCOLN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50 Cosmo. MINI COOPER: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 ConGood body and interior, vertible. Price reduced! HYUNDAI: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 Elantra does not run. $3,000. Great car, no problems, SE. 97k, all extras, great (360)683-1260 fun and fast! 24K miles. mechanics and tires. PONTIAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;78 Trans Am $6,500. (360)461-1932. This is a twice reduced price, and is ďŹ rm, and if Original silver, 400 mostill in my possession tor, auto. $10,000. HYUNDAI â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 ELANwhen this ad runs out, I (360)457-6462 TRA GLS 4 cyl., auto, CD, A/C, am just going to trade it roof, 5 passenger in! This a DARN GOOD 9292 Automobiles moon compact. Excellent eco- DEAL!! $16,500. (360)477-8377 Others nomical vehicle. Balance

C O RVA I R : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 6 3 Tu r b o Spyder Coupe. Restored, loaded. $10,500. (360)683-5871

of factory warranty. Only CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;79 Corvette L82. 2 5 K m i . Stock O r a n g e , T- t o p , 6 5 K #12016012. Vin# posted miles. $6,000. Call for at dealership. details. (360)775-9996. $10,950 Preview at: KIA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Sportage 4X4. heckmanmotors.com 190k, very good cond., Heckman Motors new tires, 25-32 mpg, 111 E. Front, P.A. runs strong, nice stereo (360)460-1073 with CD. $2,750/obo. (360)460-1277 HYUNDAI: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 Elantra FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 Taurus SE. 4 Touring. 31K, sunroof, very clean. $12,500/obo. dr, sedan. Top shape. (360)681-4809 $2,800/obo. 683-5817.

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;12 CAMRY PORSCHE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 911. LE 7 2 K , b e a u t i f u l s i l ve r / 4 cyl., auto, balance of black. $23,500. factory warranty, 30K mi. (360)808-1405 Stock #12258794. Vin# SMARTCAR: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 Pas- posted at dealership. sion for 2CP. Cruise, cliA steal at $15,950 mate control, heated Preview at: leather seats, all power, heckmanmotors.com like-new cond. 18k origiHeckman Motors nal miles, 41 MPG aver111 E. Front, P.A. age. $15,000/obo. (360)460-1073 (360)821-8366

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 CAMRY LE SEDAN 2.5L VVT-I 4 cyl., automatic, traction control, alloy wheels, new tires, keyless entr y/alar m, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, 8 airbags. Kelley B l u e B o o k Va l u e o f $14,860! Like new condition inside and out! Great fuel economy! Legendar y Toyota reliability! Come see the Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value leaders for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 COROLA S This 4 cyl. sporty Corola has all the right stuff. CD, alloy wheels, rear spoiler and great economy, up to 35 mpg hwy. Stock #1154614. Vin# posted at dealership. $12,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors PONTIAC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 SUNFIRE 111 E. Front, P.A. 2 door coupe. Auto, 4 (360)460-1073 cyl, CD, custom wheels a n d t i r e s , v e r y n i c e VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 Golf TDI diesel. sporty economical vehi- 82k, charcoal color, 5 cle. Low miles. Stock speed, great r unning, # 1 1 9 . V i n # p o s t e d a t clean, 45 mpg, new timdealership. ing belt, alternator. Only $3,950 $13,000. (360)775-4667. Preview at: heckmanmotors.com GARAGE SALE ADS Heckman Motors Call for details. 111 E. Front, P.A. 360-452-8435 (360)460-1073 1-800-826-7714

9434 Pickup Trucks Others CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;87 4x4 Longbed. 2 sets of tires, 88k original miles. $2,500. (360)808-0970 CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;88 1/2 ton. 4x4, matching shell, clean, priced to sell. $2,395/obo. 775-6681.

FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 F150 SUPERCAB LARIAT 4X4 5.4L Triton V8, automatic, chrome wheels, spray-in bedliner, tow package, sunroof, privacy glass, keyless entry, 4 opening doors, power w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and drivers seat, l e a t h e r s e a t s, p ow e r sliding rear window, adjustable pedals, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, 6 CD stereo, dual f r o n t a i r b a g s . Ke l l e y Blue Book value of $9,618! Looks and d r i ve s l i ke n ew ! T h i s truck has been babied and it shows! Loaded with leather luxury! Come see the Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value leader for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90 Silverado Ex. Cab 4x4. New rear tires, ex . r u n n e r, r e a d y fo r hunting, mud, or snow. $2,500. (360)683-0763 FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;73 1 Ton Pickup. Flat bed, with side C H E V : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 8 E x t . c a b. racks, newly painted, Camper shell, 125K, 4 68k original miles. cyl., 5 speed. $2,600. $6,000. (360)640-8155. (360)683-9523, 10-8. DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Ram 1500. White, 4X4, auto, extra cab, 4 door, 109K, very nice. $8,900/obo. (360)452-5652 DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 Dakota 4X4. Quad cab, excellent cond, electric seats & windows, grill guard, side steps, bed liner and Tonneau cover, new batt e r y, t i r e s a n d f r o n t b r a ke s, l ow m i l e a g e. $15,500. (360)582-9310.

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 1/2 ton. Shor tbed, 50k miles on rebuilt 390 motor, 4 speed manual, r uns strong, new upholstry and tires, etc. Some light body rust--good project truck. $2,500 ďŹ rm. (360)477-2684. FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;78 shor t bed. Ext. cab, 70K actual mi. $1,200. (360)504-5664.

B9

NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 Pathfinder LE 4WD. 106k, automatic leather heated seats, sunroof, well maintained. $9,500. (360)683-1851.

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 Ranger. 4 door, king cab, 4WD, auto, air, CD, new trans., radiator, alternator, battery. $3,900/obo. (360)683-8145

NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 FRONTIER XE KING CAB 4X4 3.3L V6, 5 speed, alloy wheels, bedliner, keyless entr y, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD Stereo, dual front airbags. Only 84,000 Original Miles! Like new ins i d e a n d o u t ! C a r fa x CertiďŹ ed one owner with no accidents! They just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any nicer than this! Come see the Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truck exper ts for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $11,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 Tacoma. V6, super charger and exhaust, 2 sets of wheels and tires, 161K mi. $10,000/obo. (360)683-8479, after 6

TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 TACOMA XTRA CAB SR5 2WD 2.4L 4 cylinder, 5 speed, new tires, privacy glass, rear slider, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 70,000 original miles! Mint condition! This truck is like new inside and out! Legendary Toyota reliability! Where else will you find a Tacoma like this? Come see the Pe n i n s u l a â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s t r u ck ex perts for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;86 Ranger. Totally redone, excellent DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 2500 Se- cond. $3,500. r ies. Deisel, ext. cab, (360)452-7938 utility box, new trans. $9,400. (360)565-6017. FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 F150 4WD. Rhino back end, fiberFORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Ranger XLT. glass top, good driver. Green, matching cano$2,500/obo py, runs great, ex. cond., (360)797-4175 clean, cruise, power windows and heater,104k, FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 F150 4WD. s l i d i n g r e a r w i n d o w. Eddie Bauer package, TOYOTA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;93 2WD ext. cab. Canopy, runs good. $6,500/obo. All Star bed liner, 132k. (360)821-8366 $5,750. (360)681-4672. $3,450/obo. 452-5126.

9556 SUVs Others

TOYOTA : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 9 A c c e s s Cab. 48500 miles, 4X4, auto, SR5, TRD off road, 14mo/23k mi warranty, tow, new Michelins, back up alarm, bed liner, bug guard, never off road, charcoal int., located in Sequim. $24,900. (301)788-2771

NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09 Murano SL FWD. Sport Utility 4-dr, 62,000 miles, AC, AT, cruise, tilt, leather seats, backup camera, AM/FM/ CD/XM with Bose sound system, dual power/ 9556 SUVs heated front seats, powOthers er windows and locks, keyless entry, tow pkg CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Tracker 4x4. and more. Extra clean, Set for towing, ex. cond., n o n s m o ke r, ex c e l l e n t 2 owner vehicle. $5,950. condition and well main(360)683-5382 tained. $20,500. Call (360)797-1715 or C H E V : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 1 1 Tr ev e r s e . (208)891-5868 Gray, great condition. $18,500. (605)214-0437 TOYOTA : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 4 R a v - 4 . 111K mi., white, ver y C H E V: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 0 S i l va r a d o good condition. $9,150. Suburban, 8k miles on More info (360)808-0531 new engine, 4WD, captain seats in front, bench T O Y O TA : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 8 9 L a n d seats back. $4,500. Cruiser. Needs engine, (360)681-7704 running gear/body good DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 Durango. 88k, trailer tow package, a i r, p owe r s e a t s / w i n dows, 7 pass, loaded! $4,890. (360)452-2635. JEEP: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 Grand Cherokee 4.0. In-line 6, auto, reg. 4WD, leather int., ehated seats, sunroof, privacy glass, roof rack, custom wheels and tires. $5,800. (360)582-0892.

shape. $2,000/obo. (360)452-6668, eves.

9730 Vans & Minivans Others FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Windstar SEL. 144k, lots of new par ts, looks and r uns great. $3,995. (360)452-9002.

JEEP: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 Wrangler FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;93 1/2 ton Sierra. White, gray hard- Conversion Van. High top, straight 6 cyl., auto, top, 4 captainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chairs, m u d a n d s n ow t i r e s, sofa, 82k actual miles. h e av y d u t y bu m p e r s, $4,500. (360)808-2594 wired for towing, CB, fog lights, 77k. $11,995. G M C : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 1 Va n d u r a (919)616-0302 Conv. van. 187K, some J E E P : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 8 3 C J 7 . Ve r y body damage, runs exgood cond., rebuilt title. cellent. $1,500/obo. (360)681-0258 $5,200. (360)379-1277.

3B927898

2003 NISSAN FRONTIER XE CREW CAB 4X4

2003 CHEVROLET SILVERADO SHORT BED 4X4

2001 GMC JIMMY SLT 4X4

2001 GMC SONOMA SLS EXT. CAB ZR2 4X4

More photos @ graymotors.com

More photos @ graymotors.com

More photos @ graymotors.com

More photos @ graymotors.com

3.3L V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, TOYO MUD TERRAIN TIRES, BRUSH GUARD, RUNNING BOARDS, MATCHING CANOPY, BEDLINER, PRIV GLASS, 4 FULL DRS, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS! CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! PRICED TO SELL FAST!

4.8L VORTEC V8, AUTO, CHROME WHLS, BFG ALL-TERRAIN TIRES, CANOPY, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW, CRUISE, TILT, AC, JVC CD W/iPOD INPUT, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, CLEAN CARFAX! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! STANDS TALL! THIS IS A WHOLE LOT Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TRUCK FOR THE MONEY!

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, SUNROOF, ROOF RACK, TOW, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, LEATHER, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 62K MILES! CLEAN CARFAX! LIKE-NEW COND INSIDE & OUT! GET READY FOR WINTER WITH A 4X4!

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, GOOD TIRES! RUNNING BOARDS, CANOPY, BEDLINER, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS, 3RD DOOR, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 62K ORIG MILES! CLEAN CARFAX! KBB VALUE OF $11,137! SPARKLING CLEAN!

       

       

       

       

$12,495

GRAY MOTORS Since 1957

CALL 457-4901

1937 E. First, Port Angeles

1-888-457-4901

$8,995

GRAY MOTORS Since 1957

CALL 457-4901

1937 E. First, Port Angeles

1-888-457-4901

$8,995

GRAY MOTORS Since 1957

CALL 457-4901

1937 E. First, Port Angeles

1-888-457-4901

$9,995

GRAY MOTORS Since 1957

CALL 457-4901

1937 E. First, Port Angeles

1-888-457-4901

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Vivian Hansen @ 360-452-2345 ext. 3058 TODAY for more information!


B10

WeatherBusiness

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 Neah Bay 44/31

Bellingham g 40/28

Olympic Peninsula TODAY

Port Townsend 42/31

Port Angeles 43/29

Sequim Olympics 41/29 Snow level: 3,000 ft. Port Ludlow 42/33

Forks 46/27

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National TODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 48 28 0.00 19.84 Forks 49 26 0.00 80.39 Seattle 46 36 0.01 29.39 Sequim 45 32 0.00 10.35 Hoquiam 48 28 0.00 49.84 Victoria 45 30 0.17 22.71 Port Townsend 45 30 0.00* 17.68

Forecast highs for Thursday, Nov. 21

Aberdeen 45/31

Billings 27° | 9°

San Francisco 64° | 50°

New

First

Chicago 52° | 41°

Atlanta 59° | 45°

El Paso 73° | 45° Houston 81° | 66°

Full

Miami 82° | 72°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Fronts

MONDAY

Nov 25

50/38 Clouds slink back in

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

Dec 2

Dec 9

45/33 Sunshine prevails

Marine Weather

48/35 Sun continues its reign

CANADA Victoria 46° | 30° Seattle 43° | 34° Olympia 43° | 28°

Tides LaPush

Spokane 34° | 19°

Tacoma 41° | 28° Yakima 39° | 19°

Astoria 48° | 34°

ORE.

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:50 a.m. 7.4’ 8:17 a.m. 3.8’ 1:56 p.m. 8.4’ 8:55 p.m. 0.2’

4:29 p.m. 7:31 a.m. 8:14 p.m. 10:38 a.m.

Nation/World

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: Light wind. Wind waves less than 1 ft. Tonight, Light wind. Wind waves less than 1 ft. Ocean: E wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. NW swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. Tonight, Light wind becoming E to 10 kt after midnight. Wind waves 1 ft or less. NW swell 3 ft at 9 seconds.

50/35 Sunshine; brief warm-up

© 2013 Wunderground.com

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 3:31 a.m. 7.3’ 9:00 a.m. 4.0’ 2:35 p.m. 7.9’ 9:34 p.m. 0.6’

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Hi 41 61 72 07 53 61 50 73 49 61 59 40 51 44 84 38

Lo Prc Otlk 21 Clr 40 Cldy 45 Cldy 03 Clr 30 Clr 41 Cldy 27 Clr 53 Cldy 32 PCldy 19 Snow 40 Clr 21 Snow 45 .53 Rain 29 Clr 71 PCldy 23 Clr

SATURDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 4:16 a.m. 7.2’ 9:48 a.m. 3:20 p.m. 7.4’ 10:15 p.m.

Ht 4.1’ 1.0’

Port Angeles

6:09 a.m. 7.3’ 11:43 a.m. 5.8’ 3:25 p.m. 5.8’ 10:52 p.m. -0.3’

6:46 a.m. 7.2’ 12:59 p.m. 5.6’ 4:12 p.m. 5.3’ 11:33 p.m. 0.3’

7:22 a.m. 7.1’ 5:08 p.m. 4.9’

2:29 p.m.

5.1’

Port Townsend

7:46 a.m. 9.0’ 12:56 p.m. 6.5’ 5:02 p.m. 7.1’

8:23 a.m. 8.9’ 12:05 a.m. -0.3’ 5:49 p.m. 6.6’ 2:12 p.m. 6.2’

8:59 a.m. 8.8’ 12:46 a.m. 6:45 p.m. 6.0’ 3:42 p.m.

0.3’ 5.7’

Dungeness Bay*

6:52 a.m. 8.1’ 12:18 p.m. 5.8’ 4:08 p.m. 6.4’ 11:27 p.m. -0.3’

7:29 a.m. 8.0’ 4:55 p.m. 5.9’

8:05 a.m. 7.9’ 12:08 a.m. 5:51 p.m. 5.4’ 3:04 p.m.

0.3’ 5.1’

1:34 p.m. 5.6’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-10s

-0s

Burlington, Vt. 34 26 Casper 55 35 Charleston, S.C. 64 45 Charleston, W.Va. 42 30 Charlotte, N.C. 57 37 Cheyenne 56 34 Chicago 42 28 Cincinnati 42 29 Cleveland 40 27 Columbia, S.C. 62 42 Columbus, Ohio 43 30 Concord, N.H. 38 26 Dallas-Ft Worth 69 48 Dayton 43 27 Denver 60 37 Des Moines 56 41 Detroit 42 29 Duluth 37 36 El Paso 75 51 Evansville 48 27 Fairbanks 04 28B Fargo 48 31 Flagstaff 52 32 Grand Rapids 44 26 Great Falls 56 08 Greensboro, N.C. 54 35 Hartford Spgfld 44 26 Helena 58 19 Honolulu 83 71 Houston 70 49 Indianapolis 43 30 Jackson, Miss. 61 34 Jacksonville 68 57 Juneau 14 12 Kansas City 61 49 Key West 84 73 Las Vegas 67 51 Little Rock 58 38

0s

PORT ANGELES — Olympic Medical Center Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation recently welcomed physical therapists Sarah Mattson and Trina Shockey to its Port Angeles team. Both are orthopedic certified specialists, and they each specialize in the treatment of orthopedic conditions and injuries. “Sarah and Trina’s expertise allows us to expand access to our services for patients with orthopedic injuries or who need post-surgery orthope-

Mattson

Shockey

ing orthopedic conditions and specializes in shoulder rehabilitation and the treatment of sports-related injuries. She is involved in the medical center’s sports medicine clinic.

8 years’ experience dic rehabilitation,” said Gloria Andrus, operations manager at Olympic Medical Center Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation. “We are pleased to have them join our clinic.” Mattson has a doctorate in physical therapy, eight years’ experience in treat-

Shockey also has eight years’ experience in providing physical therapy in acute care, home health and outpatient settings. Both therapists said they enjoy living on the North Olympic Peninsula and providing care to the local residents.

“I have a passion for educating patients on their condition and working with them to get back to activities that are meaningful to their life,” Mattson said. “Working at Olympic Medical Center allows me to work closely with physicians in the community, providing continuity of care for our patients.” For more information on OMC Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation and its orthopedic services, phone 360-417-7728 in Port Angeles, 360-582-2601 in Sequim or visit www. OlympicMedical.org.

BY LEANNE ITALIE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Laziness, regifting “A lot of people regift,” she said. “If they didn’t like it, what makes them think that I would like it?” And gift cards? Pffft. “That’s for the truly lazy.” While gift registries, online and off, abound, along with old-fashioned list-making that you just turn over to Mom or Santa, a couple of

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Many prefer holiday gift-giving without surprise disappointment NEW YORK — Count Cynthia Gibson among gift recipients not interested in being surprised. “Most of the time it’s a disappointment, and I’m one of those people who don’t hide their emotions very well,” said Gibson, in Los Angeles. “The best gift is getting what you want.” Natalie Caine begs to differ. She has a holiday ritual with some women friends: They do a surprise giveaway of something they have at home and want to pass on. Life is busy enough, she said, without having to hunt down your own gifts. And besides, what about the magic? “We already have too many to-do lists,” said Caine, a fellow Angeleno. “Let’s enjoy bringing out our creative surprise-giver and take a chance it is wellreceived.” Welcome to gifting 3.0, when we can — and do — make our own dreams come true with a click or a list or a trip to the mall. That sounds just fine to Gibson.

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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Shoppers lug their bags as they walk in downtown Chicago during the 2011 Christmas shopping center. A couple of new websites are looking to bring back the surprise while also pleasing the picky. desired, while talking things over on a group page without the receiver seeing their activity. So, for example, if a gift recipient lists “bike,” her group can drill down together, picking each other’s brains on color and style, Jessup said.

Avoiding duplicates “A lot of other sites are focused on just pulling off of a list,” she said. “We found among our own experiences and talking to other people there’s definitely a group that wants to contribute their own ideas and personal touches to a gift. When people get back to that surprise, they realize what they’ve missed.”

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Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

67 47 71 54 87 74 37 47 52 63 48 53 56 63 62 81 59 50 79 39 41 53 46 56 63 57 54 62 49 80 54 72 67 61 84 55 29 66

58 31 55 36 72 56 32 43 33 47 32 44 33 52 46 66 36 32 62 26 27 31 27 37 34 42 36 55 33 69 45 60 62 56 74 32 25 40

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Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy Rain Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Rain PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Clr Clr PCldy Clr Rain PCldy Rain Cldy Rain Rain Cldy Cldy Rain PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy

At CheckedTwice.com, giftees can create groups and share lists in one place. It allows for “secret gifts” to be added to lists by anybody in the group, hidden from the view of the list-maker but visible to everybody else. There’s a comment area as well. “You still get the thrill of surprise when you rip into the wrapping paper,” said co-founder Andrew Swick, who recalled a particularly vexing Christmas for one loved one in 2002. Busy people benefit greatly. “Some people want to give personal gifts that are also a surprise and get down to the perfect gift without having to ask the receiver,” Jessup said.

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 88 at Miami, Fla. ■ 1 at Cut Bank, Mont., and Mount Washington, N.H. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

57 38 82 64 79 59 51 61 38 51

43 20 64 50 52 45 36 50 23 25

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________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo Otlk 74 61 Cldy 68 55 PCldy 55 28 Clr 37 36 Fog 37 32 Cldy 78 61 PCldy 22 9 PCldy 79 54 Clr 76 69 Sh 65 51 Clr 68 53 Ts 60 40 PCldy 45 38 Sh 74 49 PCldy 41 31 PCldy 36 34 Cldy 80 55 Clr 40 34 Rain/Snow 94 74 PCldy 55 48 Ts 73 64 Sh 60 42 Clr 44 39 Sh 40 30 Clr

$ Briefly . . . Restaurant introduces fall menu SEQUIM — Using ingredients derived from local sources, Alder Wood Bistro is serving up a new fall menu with more than 85 percent of the items coming from within a 25-mile radius of the Sequim-based business. Pork and lamb menu items come from Port Angeles, vegetables are grown at Nash’s Organic Farm, flour is freshly ground in Sequim and beef and chicken are harvested from cows and poultry raised in Chimacum. November and December menus will feature roasted pork and braised lamb, winter squashes, yellowfoot chanterelles and porcini mushrooms, hearth-fired apple pie, Johnston’s winter squash risotto and cedar-planked black cod, to name a few. Owned by Jessica and Gabriel Schuenemann, Alder Wood Bistro, 139 W. Alder St., has striven to be known as “the local and organic” restaurant on the North Olympic Peninsula since their 2006 opening. For more information, phone 360-683-4321.

New auto detailer

new websites are looking to bring back the surprise while also pleasing the picky, like Gibson. According to the 2009 book Scroogenomics: Why You Shouldn’t Buy Presents for the Holidays, by economist Joel Waldfogel, buying gifts is a lousy allocation of resources because of the ignorance of givers about the true preferences of the receivers. He estimated that about $12 billion a year in the U.S. and $25 billion a year worldwide is misallocated on giving at the holidays. That is one reason Jessica Jessup decided to cofound Giftovus.com in San Diego. At Giftovus, a recipient puts together a list that loved ones can pluck from, if

Pressure

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Therapists join OMC clinic PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Warm Stationary

Dec 17

Low 29 Moon and stars to shine

New York 48° | 37°

Detroit 45° | 37°

Washington D.C. 52° | 37°

Los Angeles 66° | 55°

Cold

TONIGHT

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 34° | 32°

Denver 41° | 25°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 43° | 34°

*Rainfall reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 41/29

Sunny

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch Nov. 20, 2013

-66.21

Dow Jones industrials

15,900.82

Nasdaq composite

3,921.27

Standard & Poor’s 500 Russell 2000

-10.28 -6.50 1,781.37 -1.59 1,099.79

NYSE diary Advanced:

1,030

Declined:

2,054

Unchanged:

99

Volume:

3b

Nasdaq diary Advanced:

1,168

Declined:

1,363

Unchanged: Volume:

120 1.7 b

AP

toric Places. No reservations are necessary for the lighting event, but anyone wishing to stay for dinner or overnight should phone 360928-3211.

Santa at salon PORT ANGELES — Sassy Kat Salon and Boutique, 105 E. First St., begins the holiday season with a visit from Santa Claus on Saturday, Dec. 7. “Santa’s bringing Mrs. Claus in on Dec. 7 at 1 p.m. until 4 p.m.,” said Sassy Kat owner Janee Urster. “Anyone wanting to get up with Santa should bring their own camera.” Photos are free.

PORT ANGELES — Darren Nickovich has opened D&M Auto Detail next to Mobile Music at 532 E. First St. Auto detailing services are provided at the Gold, silver Gold futures for shop. For more information, December delivery fell $15.50 to settle at $1,250 an 360-809-3576. ounce Wednesday. Silver for December Lodge to light up delivery fell 28 cents to end PORT ANGELES — at $20.06 an ounce. The Lake Crescent Peninsula Daily News Lodge begins a new traand The Associated Press dition of “Lighting the Lodge” with a free, opento-the-public holiday lighting event from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30. The historic lodge in Olympic National Park is located at 416 Lake Crescent Road, 22 miles west of Port Angeles. Built in 1916, the lodge is the centerpiece FACEBOOK TWITTER for cabins and cottages Peninsula Daily pendailynews that are all listed on the National Register of His-

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