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Port Angeles-Sequim-West End SPRING FLING

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REPORTER

TO THE

COAST|MARCH

2013

1

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ays on to spring getaw and Your guide ic Peninsula the North Olymp Oregon coasts and Washington A publication

of the Peninsula

Daily News

| March 2013

Today’s ‘fling’

Spring Fling to the Coast is your guide to yo coastal getaways on the North Olympic Peninsula and Washington and Oregon coasts. Find this special section, along with Peninsula Spotlight entertainment magazine, in today’s Peninsula Daily News.

Tsunami dock removed ‘Challenging’ operation ends on debris from Japan tragedy BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAPUSH — The dock is gone. A Port Townsend contractor has finished removing a 185ton Japanese dock that broke off in a massive tsunami in March 2011, floated across the Pacific Ocean and washed ashore on a remote beach divid-

ing Olympic National Park and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary last December. State and federal officials officially announced Thursday that the Undersea Co. had removed what was left of the 65-foot-long, 7½-foot-tall structure after winds and ocean currents had driven it to a wilderness beach near the mouth of

Mosquito Creek between the Hoh River and LaPush. “Thanks to the extraordinary teamwork of all involved, the dock has been removed,” said Carol Bernthal, sanctuary superintendent. “No one was injured, and the potential for environmental impacts has been reduced significantly. But this cannot erase the tragedy experienced by the people of Japan.” Crews began dismantling the dock — a concrete hull filled with plastic foam — with wire saws March 17.

Chunks of the structure were lifted out by helicopter and taken to a landing site on privately owned Rayonier Inc. land nearby, Olympic National Park spokeswoman Barb Maynes has said. From there, it was trucked to a Forks recycling station. John Nesset, president and chief executive officer of Undersea Co., said the last of the equipment was removed from the dock site Wednesday. “This operation was challenging,” Nesset said. TURN

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Farm store moving to ex-car dealer site

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Ed Leitz, owner of Leitz Farms Inc. in Mount Pleasant, is moving his business closer to Port Angeles — at the former Price Ford Lincoln Mercury location on East Front Street.

Growing business going west CRYSTAL CRAIG

A rescue worker from Naval Magazine Indian Island rappels about 125 feet down to rescue Jake, a 90-pound black Labrador retriever that slipped and fell down the Fort Worden State Park bluff.

Dog tumbles down bluff, rescued OK BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND –– A 90-pound black Lab named Jake is unhurt after stumbling halfway down a 200-foot cliff at the north end of Fort Worden State Park. Rescue crews from East Jefferson FireRescue, Port Ludlow Fire and Rescue and Naval Magazine Indian Island spent two hours Wednesday evening bringing the Labrador retreiver to safety on the beach below. Jeff Passerotti, father of Jake’s owner, Sara Passerotti, reported Thursday that Jake was shaken but not seriously injured from the ordeal. “She told me he’s tired and a little bit shaken up, but he’s fine,” Jeff Passerotti said in a phone interview from his Eugene, Ore., restaurant. TURN

TO

Feed, farm supplier set for former Ford locale BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — One of the area’s largest farm stores will be moving to bigger digs in April because the store’s

owner said the business has grown beyond his expectations over the past four years. Ed Leitz, owner and operator of Leitz Farms Inc. at 173 Mount Pleasant Road, said he expects to have moved into the former space of Price Ford Lincoln Mercury at 1527 E. Front St. by April 8. “So it’s coming up quick,” Leitz said Thursday. Leitz, 29, said he decided on the move

from the Mount Pleasant location, the farm store’s home since 2009, to take advantage of nearly twice the square footage the Front Street space offers and three times the parking space. “We actually outgrew [the Mount Pleasant location] a couple of years ago, so it was time to expand a little bit,” he said. TURN

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Border agent guilty of assault PA-stationed supervisor admits choking another during meeting BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TACOMA — A Border Patrol supervisor stationed in Port Angeles has pleaded guilty in federal District Court to misdemeanor assault on a federal officer. Mauricio G. Benitez, 42, of Port Angeles admitted Wednesday in his plea agreement that he choked his acting field operations supervisor, identified in court records only as “J.W.,” and DOG/A7 pinned him against a chair dur-

ing a work meeting with other supervisors Sept. 29, 2011. The U.S. Attorney’s Office and Benitez agreed to a sentence of three years’ probation and the possible condition that Benitez complete an angermanagement program. Misdemeanor assault of a federal officer is a federal crime punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000. Benitez will be sentenced at 10 a.m. June 5 in U.S. District Court in Tacoma.

He remains a supervisory Border Patrol agent in Port Angeles and “remains on administrative leave while this matter is pending,” said his lawyer, Ronald Friedman of Lane Powell in Seattle. Agents based in Port Angeles patrol both Clallam and Jefferson counties.

Personnel matter Friedman said the altercation was over “policies and personnel matters” but would not elaborate on what prompted the fracas, which occurred at a midmorning meeting. The Border Patrol does not comment on personnel matters

NEW 2013

regarding specific employees, agency spokesman Jeffrey Jones said in an email. “We do not tolerate unlawful misconduct or abuse within our ranks,” Jones said. He did not respond by midday Thursday to a request to describe the agency’s disciplinary process for agents who plead guilty to misdemeanor assault of a federal officer. The incident involving Benitez was investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the investigative arm of the federal Department of Homeland Security, which oversees the Border Patrol. TURN

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A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Comedian still hurting from diving mishap COMEDIAN LOUIE ANDERSON said he’s been in pain all week from a recent diving mishap during a taping of the ABC celebrity diving show “Splash.” Anderson, who weighs more than 400 pounds, was trying to do a flip from the 5-meter Anderson board when he slammed into the water, landing on his face and chest. “If I were lying down right now, you would have to help me up,” the 60-yearold Anderson said Wednesday. “It’s been almost a week, and it still hurts almost as much.” Anderson, who skipped diving practice Tuesday night to take the stage in Sioux Falls, S.D., for a show benefiting the Brennan

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COUNTRY

SINGER RECOVERING

Charlie Daniels, 76, shown in 2005, reportedly is recovering after having had a pacemaker implanted Thursday at a Nashville, Tenn.-area hospital. Rock & Roll Academy, said he asked the “Splash” staff after the accident if he was suffering internal bleeding or damage but was told no. “They said, ‘That’s your abs. You’ve never worked

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

them,’” Anderson joked. “The last time I worked them was when I was struggling to get out of my mother. That was it, and I haven’t worked them since.”

WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: North Korea’s People’s Army Supreme Command was placed on “highest alert,” threatening to attack South Korea and the U.S.’s Guam and Hawaii with missiles. Are you worried?

Passings

Yes

28.1%

Only a little

27.7%

By The Associated Press

GORDON STOKER, 88, a member of The Jordanaires vocal group that backed Elvis Presley, died Wednesday. His son, Alan, told The Associated Press that Mr. Stoker died at his home in Brentwood, Tenn., Mr. Stoker after a lengthy illness. Mr. Stoker got his start playing the piano on WSM radio and its signature show, the Grand Ole Opry. He joined the Jordanaires as a piano player but then became tenor vocalist. The group was already well-known for their gospel singing when Presley recruited them to perform on his recording of “Hound Dog” in 1956. The Jordanaires originated in Missouri and came to Nashville, where they backed Red Foley on a segment of the Opry called the “Prince Albert Show,” according to John Rumble, senior historian at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. The quartet recorded and performed for years with Presley, Rumble said. The Jordanaires also per-

1979 to 1983. Ms. Kanin was nominated for an Acad_________ emy Award for 1958’s DON PAYNE, 48, an Ms. Kanin “Teacher’s Emmy-winning writer and in 2006 producer for “The Simpsons” Pet” alongwho also wrote the hit movie side her husband and writ“Thor,” has died. ing partner, Michael Kanin. His friend and former The film starred Clark writing partner, John Frink, Gable and Doris Day. told the Los Angeles Times Ms. Kanin also was recthat Mr. Payne had bone ognized for her television cancer and died Tuesday at contributions, winning two his Los Angeles home. screenwriting Emmys in Mr. Payne shared four 1974 and another for proEmmys won by “The Simpducing the TV special sons.” “Friendly Fire” in 1979. He also wrote the 2006 Details on Ms. Kanin’s Uma Thurman comedy “My cause of death were not Super Ex-Girlfriend” and 2007’s “Fantastic Four: Rise immediately available. of the Silver Surfer.” formed with Patsy Cline on “Crazy,” with Jim Reeves on “Four Walls,” on George Jones’ 1980 hit “He Stopped Loving Her Today” and on Kenny Rogers’ “Lucille.”

_________ FAY KANIN, 95, an Emmy-winning and Oscarnominated screenwriter, has died. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences confirmed Ms. Kanin’s death Wednesday. She served as president of the film academy from

41.2%

No

Undecided 3.0% Total votes cast: 1,156 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ Sequim High School’s colors officially are purple and gold. An article on the city’s makeover of downtown appearing Thursday on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition and Page A4 of the Jefferson County edition erroneously reported the colors as purple and yellow.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago)

The Charles Nelson Co. lumber mill, for 25 years a prominent landmark on the Port Angeles waterfront, is well on the way toward becoming only a memory. Machinery in the big plant east of the base of Ediz Hook is being sold off Seen Around piece by piece under fedPeninsula snapshots eral court jurisdiction. A SEAPLANE TAKMechanics and laborers ING off from William R. are removing items of Fairchild International Air- equipment gradually for Laugh Lines port in Port Angeles. Yes, it various buyers up and had wheels with the ponTHERE’S A GROWdown the Pacific Coast. toons . . . ING trend of older AmeriThe mill, which the San cans who are using mariFrancisco-based Charles WANTED! “Seen Around” juana in their retirement. Nelson Co. acquired in Send them to PDN News That makes sense because items. Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles 1916, was the prime factor old people are always talk- WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or in developing Port Angeles ing about their joints. from a village to a thriving email news@peninsuladailynews. Jimmy Fallon com. small city.

Sidney M. Hauptmann of San Francisco is the federal trustee for the bankruptcy proceedings.

3,922 mbf, but log rafting in the harbor increased by 1,314 mbf.

1988 (25 years ago) 1963 (50 years ago) Lumber shipments by ship and barge from the Port of Port Angeles showed a sharp increase in 1962 over the previous year, port Manager Jack P. Hogan reported to commissioners. The 1962 volume of outbound lumber was 35,818 million board feet, or mbf, an increase of 8,578 mbf over 1961 shipments. Hogan said log shipments to Japan decreased by 2,704 mbf. Logs dumped at the port dock in 1962 decreased

Plans are under way to double the floor space and holdings of the Clallam Bay Library by moving it to a house recently bought by the North Olympic Library System. The library board agreed to pay $39,000 for a 640-square-foot house and three lots across the street from Clallam Bay School. Plans call for expanding the house to about 1,200 square feet and moving the library’s collection to the new site by 1989, said Hal Enerson, library community relations coordinator.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS GOOD FRIDAY, March 29, the 88th day of 2013. There are 277 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On March 29, 1973, the last United States combat troops left South Vietnam, ending America’s direct military involvement in the Vietnam War. In an address to the nation, President Richard Nixon declared, “For the first time in 12 years, no American military forces are in Vietnam.” On this date: ■ In 1638, Swedish colonists settled in present-day Delaware. ■ In 1812, the first White House wedding took place as Lucy Payne Washington, the sister of

first lady Dolley Madison, married Supreme Court Justice Thomas Todd. ■ In 1912, British explorer Robert Falcon Scott, his doomed expedition stranded in an Antarctic blizzard after failing to be the first to reach the South Pole, wrote the last words of his journal: “For Gods sake look after our people.” ■ In 1943, World War II rationing of meat, fats and cheese began in the U.S. ■ In 1951, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage. They were executed in June 1953. The Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “The King and I” opened on Broadway.

■ In 1962, Jack Paar hosted NBC’s “Tonight” show for the final time, though the network aired a repeat the following night. Johnny Carson debuted as host the following October. ■ In 1971, Army Lt. William L. Calley Jr. was convicted of murdering 22 Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai massacre. Calley ended up serving three years under house arrest. A jury in Los Angeles recommended the death penalty for cult leader Charles Manson and three female followers for the 1969 TateLa Bianca murders. The sentences later were commuted. ■ In 1993, “Unforgiven” won the Academy Award for best pic-

ture as well as best director for Clint Eastwood. Emma Thompson won best actress for “Howards End,” and Al Pacino won best actor for “Scent of a Woman.” ■ Ten years ago: Michelle Kwan became only the third American to win five World Figure Skating Championships, after Dick Button and Carol Heiss, at the competition in Washington, D.C. ■ Five years ago: Anti-American Shiite militia leader Muqtada al-Sadr ordered his followers to defy orders from the Iraqi government to surrender their weapons. ■ One year ago: Stanford routed Minnesota 75-51 to win the NIT title.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, March 29-30, 2013 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Woman arrested on Colorado gun transfer charge HOUSTON — Colorado authorities have arrested a woman accused of illegally transferring the gun allegedly used to kill the state prisons chief, according to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Police believe Stevie Marie Vigil, 22, of Commerce City, Colo., legally bought the gun from a licensed dealer in Vigil the Denver suburb of Englewood before transferring it to Evan Ebel, 28, a felon barred from possessing a firearm, the CBI said. Ebel, who died last week after allegedly using the same gun in a shootout with officers in Wise County, Texas, is suspected in the shooting deaths of Colorado Department of Corrections head Tom Clements, 58, on March 19 and Nathan Leon, 27, who was shot March 17 while working as a pizza delivery driver around Denver. Vigil was arrested Wednesday on one felony count of unlawful purchase of a firearm, her bail set at $25,000.

NATO job nomination WASHINGTON — A senior

Air Force general is being nominated to take over as commander of all U.S. and NATO forces in Europe. Gen. Philip M. Breedlove is the top Air Force commander in Europe. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Breedlove is particularly well-qualified. Hagel announced the nomination Thursday. If confirmed, Breedlove would be the first Air Force general to hold the top NATO job since Joseph Ralston served in the post from 2000-2003. Breedlove would succeed Navy Adm. James Stavridis, who has held the job since 2009. President Barack Obama chose Breedlove after his first choice for the job, Marine Gen. John Allen, said he would retire.

New anti-smoking ads NEW YORK — Government health officials launched the second round of a graphic ad campaign Thursday that is designed to get smokers off tobacco, saying they believe the last effort convinced tens of thousands to quit. The ads feature sad, real-life stories: There is Terrie, a North Carolina woman who lost her voice box; Bill, a diabetic smoker from Michigan who lost his leg; and Aden, a 7-year-old boy from New York, who has asthma attacks from secondhand smoke. “Most smokers want to quit. These ads encourage them to try,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Associated Press

Briefly: World apartheid leader was responding well to treatment and the medical team was acting SEOUL, South Korea — In a with extreme show of force following weeks of caution North Korean bluster, the U.S. because of Mandela on Thursday took the unpreceMandela’s dented step of announcing that advanced age. two of its nuclear-capable B-2 The Nobel laureate was stealth bombers joined joint miladmitted Wednesday to a hospiitary drills with South Korea, tal in Pretoria, the South Afridropping dummy munitions on can capital, in the latest in a an island range. series of such trips in a year. The announcement is likely to further enrage Pyongyang, which has already issued a flood Pope washes feet of ominous statements over the ROME — Pope Francis drills and U.N. sanctions over washed and kissed the feet of a its nuclear test last month. dozen inmates at a juvenile But there were signs Thursdetention center in a Holy day that it is willing to go only Thursday ritual that he celeso far. A North Korean indusbrated for years as archbishop trial plant operated with South and is continuing now that he is Korean know-how was running pope. Two of the 12 were young normally, despite the North’s women, a remarkable choice shutdown a day earlier of comgiven that the church’s current munication lines used to move liturgical law says only men workers across the border. should participate. U.S. Forces Korea said that The Mass was held in the the B-2 stealth bombers flew Casal del Marmo facility in from a U.S. air base in Missouri Rome, where 46 young men and and dropped dummy munitions women are detained. on the South Korean island Many are gypsies or North range before returning home. African migrants, and the 12 selected for the foot-washing Mandela hospitalized rite included Orthodox and JOHANNESBURG — A lung Muslim detainees, reports said. Vatican Radio carried the infection that has plagued NelMass live, and Francis told the son Mandela has struck again, detainees that Jesus washed the prompting doctors to admit the feet of his disciples on the eve of 94-year-old former president to his crucifixion in a gesture of a hospital late at night. love and service. South Africa’s presidency said Thursday that the antiThe Associated Press

U.S. sends B-2s to South Korea for exercises

Obama to Congress: Remember Newtown Don’t let NRA control laws, president says THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama urged lawmakers Thursday to remember the children gunned down in America and not “get squishy” in the face of powerful forces against gun control legislation, as supporters struggle to win over moderate Democrats before a Senate vote expected next month. Obama, flanked by grim-faced mothers who lost their children to guns, said Washington must do something after the tragic mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., three months ago. He called out to the families of four children killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School sitting in his audience. “Shame on us if we’ve forgotten,” Obama said. “I haven’t forgotten those kids.” Obama’s event came as gun control legislation faces an uncertain future, even though more than 80 percent of people say in polling they support expanded background checks. Backed by a $12 million TV advertising campaign financed by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, gun control groups scheduled rallies around the country Thursday aimed at pressuring senators to back the effort. Obama said the upcoming vote is the best chance in more than a

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama, flanked by Vice President Joe Biden and mothers of children killed by guns, speaks Thursday in the East Room of the White House. decade to reduce gun violence. He encouraged Americans, especially gun owners, to press lawmakers to “turn that heartbreak into something real.” “Don’t get squishy because time has passed and it’s not on the news every single day,” he said.

Shunning Bloomberg Moderate Senate Democrats like Mark Pryor of Arkansas and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota are shunning Bloomberg as a meddling outsider while stressing their allegiance to their own voters’ views and to gun rights. While saying they are keeping an open mind and that they support keeping guns from criminals and people with mental disorders, some moderates are avoiding specific commitments they might regret later.

“I do not need someone from New York City to tell me how to handle crime in our state,” Heitkamp said this week. “I know that we can go after and prosecute criminals without the need to infringe upon the Second Amendment rights of lawabiding North Dakotans.” Heitkamp does not face reelection next year, but Pryor and five other Senate Democrats in closely divided states do. All six, from Southern and Western states, will face voters whose attachment to guns is unshakeable — not to mention opposition from the National Rifle Association, should they vote for restrictions the NRA opposes. “We have a politically savvy and a loyal voting bloc, and the politicians know that,” said Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the NRA.

Adam Lanza’s secret arsenal detailed INVESTIGATORS FOUND A trove of evidence in Newtown, Conn., shooter Adam Lanza’s house — three photos of dead people covered in plastic and possibly blood, and a cache of 1,400 rounds of ammunition in his room, search warrants unsealed Thursday showed. Also in the Rocky Hill, Conn., home: three samurai swords with blades ranging from 13 to 28 inches, 10 other knives, both Xbox 360 and Sony PlayStation game consoles, and handwrit-

ten notes with locations of gun shops. A military-style uniform was in his bedroom. The 85 pages of unsealed search warrants also offer new details about the shooting spree that claimed the lives of 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown the morning of Dec. 14. Lanza already had killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, and then turned a gun on himself. The Associated Press

State-by-state gay marriage push may hold back ruling THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Late in the argument over same-sex marriage in California, Justice Anthony Kennedy made this comment: “You might address why you think we should take and decide this case,” he said to lawyer Charles Cooper, representing opponents of same-sex marriage. One might have thought the court already crossed that bridge. But now the justices were openly discussing essentially walking away from the case over California’s Proposition 8, a voterapproved ban on gay marriage, without deciding anything.

Quick Read

Indeed, this case offers a rare glimpse at the court’s opaque internal workings, in which justices make political calculations about what to do, and Kennedy’s often-decisive vote can never be far from his colleagues’ minds.

Two days of arguments The court Wednesday concluded two days of arguments involving gay marriage. In the second case, a constitutional challenge to a portion of the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a majority of the court appeared likely to rule that legally married gay couples should receive bene-

fits that the law currently reserves for straight married couples. From their comments and questions Tuesday, Justices Samuel Alito and Antonin Scalia indicated they preferred what they called the cautious approach: allowing the debate over gay marriage to play out in the states and not overturning by judicial fiat the will of California voters who approved Proposition 8 in 2008. Justice Clarence Thomas, as is his custom, said nothing during the argument, but Chief Justice John Roberts had tough questions for lawyers for same-sex couples who sued for the right to marry, and the Obama administration.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Arizona program would issue free shotguns

Nation: Justice to probe Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling

Nation: Adults allegedly home when dogs killed tot

World: Appellate judge stands by Knox’s acquittal

A FORMER MAYORAL candidate in Tucson, Ariz., is launching a privately funded program to provide residents of crime-prone areas with free shotguns so they can defend themselves against criminals. Shaun McClusky said the program, modeled after one recently started in Houston, would provide training and enough money to buy a basic shotgun to residents who pass background checks, the Arizona Daily Star reported. Donors have committed about $12,000 to the program that McClusky said could start handing out guns within 60 days, the newspaper said.

THE COAST GUARD has asked the Justice Department to investigate possible pollution violations by both the drilling rigs Shell used in its botched efforts to explore for oil last year in the Arctic Ocean waters off the northern coast of Alaska. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Thomas Ostebo said he’d turned over to the Justice Department for review and possible prosecution an investigation into the troubled Shell drilling rig Kulluk Kulluk.. The Coast Guard earlier had sent the Justice Department a list of 16 safety and environmental violations by the other rig used in Shell’s Arctic efforts, the Noble Discoverer. Discoverer.

A GEORGIA SHERIFF said seven dogs fatally mauled a toddler in her backyard as the attack went unnoticed by the girl’s mother and other adults. Bryan County Sheriff Clyde Smith said Thursday that Monica Renee Laminack, who would have turned 2 years old in June, slipped out a dog door and into the fenced-in yard where she was attacked. By the time the child’s grandmother looked outside, the girl was dead, and her clothes were in shreds, he said. Authorities said the dogs were pit bulls and pit bull mixes. Animal Control officers euthanized them after the attack Wednesday night.

THE ITALIAN PRESIDING appellate judge who acquitted student Amanda Knox in the murder of her British roommate said he remains certain there is no evidence of her guilt. Now retired, Judge Pratillo Hellmann was quoted in Italian newspapers as saying the only evidence tying Knox of Seattle and Italian co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito to the crime was refuted by expert testimony. Italy’s highest criminal court this week overturned the acquittals and ordered a new appeals trial for the two. Hellmann said he would draw the same conclusion again “without a doubt.”


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FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Kayak symposium scratched this year BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The 2013 Port Angeles Kayak Symposium has been called off. Olympic Raft and Kayak, which has hosted the popular spring paddle convention for a dozen years, announced that this year’s symposium has been canceled. Morgan Colonel, secondyear owner of the store at 123 Lake Aldwell Road, said he made a difficult “business decision” to scratch the event, which had been planned for April 12-14. “I know this decision will not be a popular one, and I do understand what PAKS means to everyone,” Colonel

wrote in an email to paddlers that he posted at www. raftandkayak.com. “Please believe me, this has been a heavy weight on my shoulders, but ultimately I have to put the business before anything, even my own heart sometimes. I believe that this was such a difficult decision for me because I do understand what an event like this means to the local and regional community.”

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clinics, speakers

Kayaks line Hollywood Beach in Port Angeles during the 2012 Kayak Symposium.

The Port Angeles Kayak Symposium typically is held at Hollywood Beach and the Port Angeles Red Lion Hotel. It offers clinics for beginners and seasoned paddlers, attracts guest speakers and

provides “test-drives” of new and used kayaks. The symposium was organized by former Olympic Raft and Kayak owner Dave King, who retired

more than a year ago. In 2011, King delegated some of the responsibilities of the symposium to a business partner in Oak Harbor. The symposium hosted

hundreds of attendees in its later years. Colonel, who could not be reached for comment Thursday, apologized in his letter for not announcing the cancellation sooner. “We would also like everyone to know that our enthusiasm for the event has not faded,” Colonel wrote. “As we mentioned, this is a business decision but a symposium type of event is still something that has a big place in our hearts. “Our future plans are to involve the other local kayak shops, local vendors, etc . . . and re-create the event but as of right now, we cannot do that. “However, rest assured,

we will be busy figuring out how we can.” Olympic Raft and Kayak offer river trips, sea tours, whitewater and sea kayak instruction and rentals at its shop west of Port Angeles. It also puts on the Hobuck Hoedown, a surf kayak festival-competition at Hobuck Beach near Neah Bay. This year’s hoedown is scheduled for Oct. 6-7. “As of right now, we will be focusing our energy and resources into the core of the business and our event planning for the Hobuck Hoedown,” Colonel said.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com.

PA schools expect to cover Man charged future shortfall with reserves in ‘road rage’

incident near PA

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles School District is expected to end the 20122013 school year more than $276,000 in the hole, with the difference paid with reserves, the School Board was told this week. Kelly Pearson, director of finance and operations, presented midyear budget projections to the board Monday that show that the district’s total revenues will be $36,616,917, while expenses are expected to reach $36,893,040, a difference of $276,123. The 0.7 percent shortfall includes both lower-thanexpected revenues and h i g h e r- t h a n - e x p e c t e d expenses, and was anticipated by the School Board, staff members said. The district is currently even more over budget, by more than $600,000, but Pearson said the higher deficit amount is not expected to continue to the end of the school year. “March is the lowest point of the year. Then, the taxes come in,” she said. Pearson said the district currently has a “committed fund balance” of $1.4 million, about 4 percent of the district’s annual budget, which cannot be spent. She said an additional $1.8 million of the general

New board meeting schedule?

BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles School Board has tabled the idea of changing the day of regularly scheduled board meetings in the 2013-2014 school year to Thursdays instead of Mondays. The first suggestion, to meet the first and third Thursdays of each month, was rejected because of scheduling conflicts for board member Steve Baxter. A schedule of second and fourth Thursdays was suggested, and the revised board calendar is expected to be brought back for a vote at the April 8 board meeting at 7 p.m. at the Central Services Building, 216 E. Fourth St. The new schedule would begin in July. Meetings that conflict with latemonth holidays, such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, could be rescheduled to a week earlier, board members suggested. Moving the board meeting to Thursfund balance is considered “undesignated, unreserved” funds, which will be used to pay for the shortfall. “The balance was built up a few years ago in thoughtful anticipation of such a possibility,” Pearson said. The district is expecting a 5 percent to 7 percent cut in federal funds as a result of sequestration. Existing district levies help make up for some of these funding losses,

days would allow the district to make changes to meeting agendas more easily than the current schedule, in which agendas are finalized by Friday and changes cannot be considered until just before Monday meetings, said Superintendent Jane Pryne. The board’s first meeting of the month for the current second-and-fourthMonday schedule is held at the Central Services Building, and the second meeting location rotates between the district’s school buildings, with a presentation from that school’s principal on its current achievements, challenges and activities. The board also approved the 20132014 school calendar, with a beginning date of Sept. 3; winter break Dec. 23 to Jan. 3; spring break March 31, 2014, to May 4, 2014; and the final school day June 13, 2014. Two snow day makeup days are scheduled for June 16 and 17, 2014, if needed.

Pearson said. “Without local support in the form of levy dollars, we would have to make some difficult cuts that would certainly impact our ability to provide the quality of education that our community has come to expect,” she said. Enrollment is slightly higher than anticipated. On March 1, the district counted an average of 3,423.26 full-time-equivalent enrolled students, 21.45

more than estimated. According to the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction records, the district averages $9,473 in annual spending per student, with 70 percent of funds being spent in the classroom, 12 percent for district and building administration, 8 percent in maintenance and operations, and 4 percent each for food services and transportation expenses.

PORT ANGELES — A 64-year-old Oregon man has been charged with second-degree assault with a deadly weapon in what the Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office is calling a probable incident of road rage. James E. Jones of La Pine, Ore., was arrested March 22 after allegedly pointing a gun for an extended period of time at a car containing two adults and their two children while Jones drove behind them in the vicinity of Spath Road, McCawley Road and Kitchen-Dick Road between Port Angeles and Sequim. Jones, who was charged Wednesday, is on his own recognizance as he awaits his arraignment at 9 a.m. April 5 in Clallam County Superior Court. “It appears that Mr. Jones was unhappy with an unsuccessful attempt to pass the other vehicle,” Deputy Prosecuting Attorney John Troberg said Thursday. “Mr. Jones was upset at the other driver. “That’s typically what you would call road rage, I guess.” The arrest report from county Sheriff’s Deputy Andrew Wagner gave this account of the couple’s allegations: At about 6:30 p.m. March 22, the couple and their two children were traveling on Spath Road when Jones attempted to

pass them. When Jones almost ran them off the road, they sped up. The driver looked in his rear-view mirror and saw Jones pointing a silver pistol at the family’s car. The woman said Jones was driving his vehicle with his left hand and pointing the pistol out the window with his right hand. Jones turned off at McCawley Road but then apparently returned to Spath because the couple said they saw him behind them again still pointing the gun. He followed them to Kitchen-Dick Road. They sped north on KitchenDick, and Jones turned around on Spath and headed east on that road, they said. The couple “feared for their safety and the safety of their children,” Wagner said in his report. Authorities obtained a search warrant and retrieved a loaded Taurus .45-caliber pistol from a West Buena Vista Drive home, arrested Jones and booked him into Clallam County jail. A friend of Jones’ lives at the house, Troberg said. Jones was released Monday on his own recognizance after the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office unsuccessfully requested $10,000 bail. Jones was ordered to surrender any firearms in his possession and maintain a physical residence at an address in Port Angeles.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

A5

Pole fixed after wreck Driver uninjured in crash BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BICYCLIST

CRASHES INTO VAN

Emergency workers treat a bicyclist who was involved in a collision with a passenger van Thursday at Eighth and C streets in Port Angeles. Police said Jeremy May, 35, of West Virginia was riding the bicycle eastbound on Eighth Street and reportedly ran the stop sign, striking the side of a Dodge Grand Caravan that was southbound on C Street. May was taken to Olympic Medical Center, where he was listed in satisfactory condition.

The repair forced the temporary shutoff of electricity for two homes in the area, Howe added. Paramedic units from the fire district received a 9-1-1 emergency call about the single-car wreck at 3:43 p.m., Young said. The fire department did not identify the driver, citing privacy concerns.

SEQUIM — Clallam County Public Utility District crews repaired a power pole on the eastbound side of Woodcock Road after it was severed in a single-car wreck Wednesday. The 69-year-old driver was not hurt when his sport utility vehicle ran into the power pole north of Sequim and sheared it off its base, Recoup costs said Patrick Young, spokesHowe could not estimate man for Clallam Fire Disthe cost of repairs Thurstrict 3. day, though the utility disInvestigation continues trict will charge the driver for expenses incurred by The Clallam County the work. Sheriff’s Office continued to “We do try to recoup the investigate the cause of the cost,� Howe said. wreck Thursday. ________ Crews repaired the pole in about five hours WednesReporter Jeremy Schwartz can day, Michael Howe, utility be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. district spokesman, said 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula Thursday. dailynews.com.

Briefly . . . Hoquiam standoff ends in death, fire

Libraries closed PORT ANGELES — All libraries in the North Olympic Library System will be closed Friday, April 12, to allow staff to attend an in-service training day. The libraries in Port Angeles, Sequim, Forks and Clallam Bay will reopen at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 13. The library’s website is always available at www. nols.org. For more information, phone library Director Paula Barnes at 360-4178500, ext. 7715, or email director@nols.org.

Autism benefit set BLYN — An Autism Awareness benefit, complete with live country music and mechanical bull riding, will be held in Club Seven lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 U.S. Highway 101, from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday, April 6. Haywire will perform from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., mechanical bull rides will be available from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m., and Country Rock Association will play from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Attendees must be 21 and older. Admission is by donation.

Famed railway talk SEQUIM — Hank and Barbara Offerman will discuss their adventures on the Trans-Siberian Railroad at the next meeting of the Computer Genealogy Users Group on Friday, April 5. The talk will be held at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Port Townsend Weavers Guild is set for Saturday, April 6. The event will be held at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. Show-and-tell and the potluck are set for 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., and Alison Irwin will discuss her history with inkle looms, the types of bands she weaves and her inspiration from 11 a.m. to noon. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.nossg.org. Peninsula Daily News

PATRICK YOUNG/CLALLAM COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT NO. 3

Clallam County Fire District No. 3 was dispatched at 3:43 p.m. Wednesday to Woodcock Road after a vehicle collided with a power pole.

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HOQUIAM — A 20-hour standoff between police in a Washington coastal town and a man who wounded an officer trying to arrest him on a warrant ended Thursday when the suspect died in a gunbattle with a SWAT team as his house went up in flames. The armed man had a gas mask and a ballistic helmet, indicating he had prepared for a confrontation, Hoquiam Sgt. Brian Dayton said. “We have no idea what made the guy take it to such an extreme level,� Dayton said. The 49-year-old man and his 53-year-old wife, whose names were not released, were wanted on arrest warrants out of Sacramento, Calif., for fraud, Dayton said. The man “engaged in a firefight with the officers on the scene,� Dayton said. Sgt. Jeff Salstrom was hit in the hip, but the bullet was slowed by his duty belt; he was treated at a hospital for a minor wound and discharged. Salstrom and another officer returned fire, and the man holed up on the top floor of the two-story house, Dayton said. At 6 a.m., after a nightlong standoff, flames were reported at the back of the house, and the man came out the front. He didn’t obey commands from the officers, Dayton said, and during a gunfire exchange, he

The couple traveled across Russia from Vladivostok all the way to Moscow last fall on the famed railway. It took 30 days, and stops were made at seven Russian cities. This meeting is free and open to all who are interested in computer genealogy.

“went down.� More than 100 officers from surrounding agencies helped Hoquiam police through the standoff.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 — (C)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PT mercantile to lose money at first Not unusual, stockholders told at inaugural meeting BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Quimper Mercantile Co. will lose money during its first year of operation, which is exactly what the managers of the community-owned retail outlet said they predicted. “We are planning to lose money in 2013,� said CEO Peter Quinn during the publicly traded company’s first stockholder meeting Wednesday night. “That is not unusual in a new business, especially in retail, where the first quarter is always challenging, and this past quarter has been especially difficult for retailers in Port Townsend,� Quinn continued. Quinn said the store will follow a common retail pattern, where sales during the final five months of the year sustain the operation for the less-busy times. Quimper Mercantile Co., or QMC, opened its doors in October and celebrated its grand opening in November. Wednesday’s meeting represented the first formal report to stockholders and took place in a vacant part of the store, located at 1121 Water St. QMC was formed after

Swain’s Outdoor, which was in the same location, closed in early 2011 after having operated in Port Townsend since 1996. The store showed a $220,103 net loss for the year, but the profit outlook will be more optimistic in future years since $250,000 in startup costs is not an expense that will be repeated, Quinn said. A new board of directors was elected Wednesday, with 3,398 shares voting and providing 99.79 percent approval of the unopposed slate of candidates. Elected were incumbent board members Quinn, Marty Gay, Deborah Stinson, Ian Keith, Tim White and Steve Moore, along with new members Ron McElroy and Xoe Huffman. Stockholders had the option of approving or rejecting the new list of board members but not of voting on individual members. Gay, the chief financial officer, said there is room for one more person on the eight-member board but attempts to solicit someone for that position were unsuccessful. About 120 stockholders attended the meeting. Most stood during proceedings.

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Quimper Mercantile CEO Peter Quinn, right, addresses the store’s first stockholder meeting Wednesday in the unused space of the store in Port Townsend. About 120 people attended. About 40 chairs were set up. The unused retail space where the meeting was held is where store officials eventually hope to expand the inventory.

Money raised Through its stock offerings, QMC has raised $576,000, which is short of the $750,000 goal and the $950,000 limit. Initially, the offering was to end Jan. 1, but the store was granted an extension until Feb. 1, 2014, and stock sales have continued at

what Gay characterized as “a trickle.� The store was able to operate when it raised $425,000, with all additional funds to be allocated toward inventory development. The store now has about $245,000 worth of inventory, an amount that Quinn said he would like to double. “We had a minimum amount of money that we needed to open the store,� Quinn said. “If there is anything that we’ve heard most frequently from people, it’s that the

inventory is a little sparse and there isn’t a lot of depth,� said Steve Moore, board member. “We have a store open, and we are in business, although we feel that if we had around $750,000 or $800,000, we’d have a level of inventory that we’d really like,� Moore said. “We’d love to be able to respond by offering more product and what people are asking for.� Moore said the best way to build inventory is to sell stock, which should be a less difficult process now

that the store is open. “The nice thing is that unlike when many of you stepped up and bought shares, we exist now,� Moore said. “I remember people asking, ‘Are you going to carry this or do that,’ and we couldn’t answer because those were forward-looking statements. There is no more forward looking because there is a pretty good indication of what we will have.� Moore said the sale of another $175,000 in stock would bring inventory to an adequate level. “We hope you can help us to reach more people,� Moore said. “We are all in this together,� he said. During a question-andanswer session, stockholder Deborah Hammond said she found the numbers encouraging, even if they were in the red. “You already made so much money in a limited time, you are covering your losses,� she said. “It would look a lot worse if you weren’t doing so well, but this doesn’t look so terrifying to me. “It could be a lot more terrifying, but it’s not.�

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant, who owns two shares of QMC stock at $100 each, can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@peninsuladaily news.com.

Editor of Forks Forum retires Jefferson PUD Newsman, prepares to flip wife to head for California power switch BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Forks Forum Editor and Publisher Chris Cook will hang up his press badge today after 25 years in the industry, the past six years covering the West End for the weekly community newspaper. The Forks Chamber of Commerce honored Cook on Wednesday with a cake and send-off at its regular weekly meeting. “Chris is the best editor we ever had,� said Marcia Bingham, chamber director of customer service. Cook arrived in Forks in March 2007 with a diversity of experience and willingness to learn more that made him an integral part of the Forks community, Bingham said. “He’s always connected LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS with everything. He didn’t Chris Cook, editor and publisher of the Forks mind being included in Forum, stands outside the newspaper office in things,� she said.

‘Understand my roots’ After spending most of his life in New York City and Hawaii, Cook said he found that Forks is a lot like life in rural Idaho, the home of his pioneer family. “I understand my roots better now,� he said.

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Forks on Wednesday. Cook retires from his position today. He and his wife will move to Crescent City, Calif.

At 63, Cook said it was time to hang up his journalistic hat and concentrate on other parts of his life, including writing more books and spending more time with his wife, Evelyn Cook, who has health concerns. His current project is a nonfiction version of the first chapters of James A. Michener’s novel Hawaii, he said. The Cooks are moving to Crescent City, Calif., a fishing and logging community near the Oregon border,

where they already own a home, he said.

Delivered papers

Island newspaper on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, as an Associated Press and United Press International stringer in Hawaii, and as editor of the Coeur d’Alene Press in Idaho. Cook, who also has spent time traveling to the best surf spots in the world, has published more than 15 books, he said. Among them are Twilight Territory: A Fan’s Guide to Forks & LaPush and Forks (Images of America), with Larry Burtness.

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — There will be no ceremonial throwing of a switch when electrical power service in East Jefferson County transfers from Puget Sound Energy to the Jefferson County Public Utility District at 12:01 a.m. Monday. If all goes according to plan, the 19,000 customers won’t notice the difference. “We’re ready to go,� said PUD board President Barney Burke earlier this week. “I’m feeling good about this. “We’ve done a lot of work in the last four years.� In 2008, voters granted the public agency — which already provided water and sewer service — the authority to offer electrical service to East Jefferson County residents, severing a relationship with PSE that spanned about 100 years.

In tourism He worked as a tourism industry spokesman, was part of the effort to bring “Jurassic Park� filming to the island of Kauai and was a state spokesman during Hawaii’s recovery from Hurricane Iniki in 1992, he said. The Forks Forum is delivered each Thursday to every postal address in the West End of Clallam and Jefferson counties and counts a circulation of 5,000. Sound Publishing Inc., owner of the Forks Forum, is working toward finding a new editor but has not yet found one, Cook said. Until a permanent replacement writer and editor can be found, a reporter from the Sequim Gazette, also owned by Sound Publishing, will cover local news for the Forum, Cook said. The Peninsula Daily News also is owned by Sound Publishing.

Unnoticeable Burke expects that the changeover won’t be discernible to the average user, nor will the customer experience appreciably change, he said. He hopes the service will improve because of the smaller customer base — compared with the 1.1 million electrical customers in 11 counties that the Bellevue-based PSE has served — and that the local point of contact will offer more thorough information than is currently available during a disaster. “When there is an outage, people can call 360385-5800 anytime for information,� he said. “And anyone who has a question or a problem can call me directly — I’m in the

Cook’s involvement in journalism included delivering newspapers in New York in 1963. “I was in journalism before the Beatles were on ‘The Ed Sullivan Show’� in ________ 1964, Cook said. He studied journalism at Reporter Arwyn Rice can be the University of Hawaii reached at 360-452-2345, ext. and, beginning in the 1980s, 5070, or at arice@peninsula worked for The Garden dailynews.com.

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There will be differences as to where bills are mailed or paid online, if that is the preferred customer option. Another change will be the handling of discounts for senior citizens and the disabled. Burke said PSE was able to charge different rates for different customers and make direct contributions to Olympic Community Action Programs for seniors’ benefit, while the PUD will eliminate the $7.49 base charge for qualified customers and charge them only for what they use. PSE’s office at 181 Quincy St. will close. The PUD hopes to install several drop boxes for bills throughout its service area, Burke said. He said everything is in place for the transition.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

A7

Change of command made at Indian Island BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NAVAL MAGAZINE INDIAN ISLAND — Cmdr. Michael Yesunas assumed command of Naval Magazine Indian Island from Cmdr. Gary Martin on Thursday morning in a ceremony aboard the USNS Richard E. Byrd. More than 100 family members, friends, military personnel and local dignitaries attended the 90-minute ceremony, which took place in a cargo bay on the Richard E. Byrd, a drycargo ammunition ship that is now docked at the ammunition facility. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE “It seems like it was just Workers are shown cutting up the dock on an Olympic Peninsula beach yesterday when I rolled up earlier this month. here, and now I’m rolling out,” said Martin, who assumed command in October 2010. “I can’t say enough about this beautiful area,” he added. CONTINUED FROM A1 National Marine Sanctuar- generous gift is yet another “Everywhere you look, ies and the National Park demonstration of Japan’s you see creations from God. “Imagine opening up a Service each contributed continued contributions to toward the the international commu185-ton concrete package $75,000 filled with foam-packing $628,000 cost of dock nity.” During dock removal, peanuts while standing removal. The other $478,000 came Olympic National Park near a helicopter on an extremely remote coast- from the Japanese govern- closed the stretch of coastline,” Nesset said in a pre- ment — part of a $5 million line between Jefferson Cove CONTINUED FROM A1 provision to the U.S. for the and Goodman Creek. pared statement. “We wouldn’t have been removal of tsunami debris. “ICE’s Office of Profes“Our state deeply appre- Popular destination successful in removing the sional Responsibility is dock without the hard work ciates Japan’s friendship That area has reopened. charged with investigating and dedication of everyone and the generous gift of “The coastline of Olym- misconduct on the part of $5 million in goodwill to the involved.” pic National Park is one of both ICE and [Customs and The National Oceanic United States to support the most popular wilder- Border Protection] employand Atmospheric Adminis- response efforts related to ness destinations in North ees,” ICE spokesman tration, which oversees the tsunami debris, such as the America,” Olympic National Andrew Munoz said this sanctuary, hired the east dock that washed ashore Park Superintendent Sarah week. Jefferson County diving and was recently removed Creachbaum said. “It is an important misand salvage service to from the Olympic National “Thanks to the excellent sion because not only are Park and Olympic Coast remove the dock. work by the Undersea Co., we charged with protecting The state Department of National Marine Sanctu- the support of our state and our nation’s borders, our Ecology said that between ary,” Gov. Jay Inslee said. federal partners, and the agencies are charged with “We continue to offer our 30 to 50 species of marine generous gift from the gov- homeland security, which for the ernment of Japan, we are plants and animals not condolences as law enforcement agenfound in the United States March 11, 2011, tragedy able to reopen this wild cies demands that we hold but native to Japan had that claimed so many lives stretch of coast to the pub- ourselves to higher stanattached themselves to the in Japan and admire the lic.” dards. strength and resilience of structure. “Our internal investiga________ In January, workers the Japanese people as well tions are primarily focused removed more than 400 as the nation’s ongoing Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be on ensuring the accountpounds of plant and animal efforts to recover and reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula ability and integrity of our life and washed the dock rebuild.” employees.” Inslee added: “Japan is dailynews.com. with a diluted bleach solution to prevent the spread under absolutely no obligaReporter Arwyn Rice and Mantion to provide this type of aging Editor/News Leah Leach Stationed in PA of invasive species. NOAA’s Office of assistance, and the nation’s contributed to this report. Friedman said Benitez has been stationed in Port Angeles for three years. “During the meeting, tempers became aggravated; voices were raised,” “I didn’t know [Faith found in national retail he said. CONTINUED FROM A1 “There may be further Baptist Fellowship] was chains. discipline by the Border “We want to be that “This is a step up all inquiring about the buildPatrol, but we certainly ing.” place where people come to hope he retains his job.” around.” Leitz said the new locaLeitz is leasing the ask a question and feel like A disciplinary board will space, which is owned by tion also will offer better they walked away with examine the case, Friedvisibility for the store and Ray Birdwell of Lacey and something that they didn’t man added. valued at $1.3 million, more space for semi trucks have before,” Leitz said. “It will be reviewed by according to the Clallam that make daily deliveries Leitz also said he thanks the Border Patrol, and they of hay, feed, fertilizer and God for blessing him, wife County Assessor’s Office. decide what, if any, further Price Ford Lincoln Mer- other farm supplies the Stephanie and their six action is appropriate.” cury moved in January store sells. children with all they have. According to the plea Leitz Farms will con2011 from the Front Street Leitz, who now lives in agreement, Benitez space to a larger property at tinue to offer all the farm Port Angeles, said he incoraccepted responsibility for supplies and equipment 3311 U.S. Highway 101 just porated Leitz Farms in his actions. west of the Walmart Super- currently offered at the “He apologized at the Mount Pleasant location, 2003 after selling hay out of center. time. He apologized a family barn in Carlsborg. just more of them, Leitz [Wednesday],” Friedman Leitz said the loyal cussaid. Share location tomers he amassed during said. “He knows what hapLeitz Farms will share Reason for expansion this time encouraged him to pened, and he apologized.” Here are excerpts from the new location with Port expand to selling other The farm store has been farm supplies. the “statement of facts” conAngeles Faith Baptist Fellowship, with the church able to expand during the “We were pushed by doz- tained in the plea agreetaking up the building’s economic downturn, Leitz ens and dozens of people to ment that outline what happened during the incishow room and Leitz taking said, because more people expand,” Leitz said. seem to be learning about dent: over the rest of the space. “There was a need there, “On Sept. 20, 2011, Coincidentally, the fel- self-sufficiency and are buy- and we did what we could to [Benitez] threatened to lowship is a sister church to ing farm supplies to grow fill it.” choke J.W. during a work Sequim Faith Baptist their own food. ________ Leitz said his store has meeting . . . Moments later, Church, at which Leitz is a remained successful deacon. Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can during the same meeting, “It was a complete sur- through a combination of be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. defendant intentionally and prise to both of us,” Leitz competitive prices and cus- 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula voluntarily assaulted J.W. tomer service not typically dailynews.com. by forcibly putting his said.

Dock: Coastline reopens

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Cmdr. Michael Yesunas, left, assumes command of Naval Magazine Indian Island on Thursday from Cmdr. Gary Martin, who is taking another post. The people here are wonderful, and we will miss them.” Martin’s voice broke as he addressed Yesunas and his wife. “Mike and Susan, you just won the lottery.” Martin will take a post in Millington, Tenn., at the

Assault: Case

Store: ‘This is a step up’

Dog CONTINUED FROM A1 A crew member from Naval Magazine Indian Island rappelled some 125 feet to Jake, strapped him into a harness and continued rappelling 75 feet down to the beach, said Bill Beezley, spokesman for East Jefferson Fire-Rescue. Jake was dehydrated when he was finally recovered and lapped up a steady stream of water when he was reunited with his owner, Beezley said. Sara Passerotti told rescue crews Jake misstepped while on a walk with her and two friends near the fort’s Battery Tolles. The dog slipped about 10 feet down, then tumbled and slid another 125 feet down the bluff, stopping at a grassy outcropping. Beezley said one of Sara Passerotti’s friends tried to descend the bluff to rescue Jake but quickly realized it was too steep.

Hiked back up The three then walked west down to North Beach County Park and hiked back up the beach until they could see the dog from below. Beezley said the three spent about an hour trying to rescue Jake before calling emergency crews at 5:22 p.m. East Jefferson Fire-Rescue firefighters were the first to respond to the call for help but realized they would need specially trained assistance, Beezley said. They then called in rescue units from Port Ludlow and Naval Magazine Indian Island, crews that Beezley said regularly train for rescue rappel work. “They drill in that technical rescue all the time,” Beezley said. “They have lots of experience.”

________

________

Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Happy Birthday, Marless (Doss) Boston!

u o Y u k o n Y ! a u k h o n T Y a Th Thank

From your brothers, Ed, Ted and Fred, and all their families. 33759266

33759278

Wow, I have truly been blessed with a wonderful Family and so many Treasured Friends! All of you made my 75th Birthday a memorable day that I will never forget. Again, Thanks to all! Marless (Doss) Boston

hands around J.W.’s neck and pinning J.W. against the chair in which J.W. was sitting. “No punches were thrown or other blows exchanged, and the altercation ended seconds later when other individuals at the meeting separated defendant from J.W.” Two months before the incident, on July 29, 2011, a national spotlight was trained on the North Olympic Peninsula over a whistleblower claim by thenPort Angeles Border Patrol Agent Christian Sanchez that agents had little to do. Sanchez, who reached a settlement with the federal government and has since transferred from Port Angeles, asserted before the Congressional Transparency Caucus in Washington, D.C., that the Port Angeles station was akin to a “black hole” in which agents had nothing to do. “During our work shifts, other agents and I always talked about how coming to work was like the ‘black hole,’ swallowing us up slowly, with no purpose, no mission,” Sanchez said then in a lengthy prepared statement. Sanchez also said he was retaliated against after he refused to accept overtime pay. The number of agents at the Port Angeles station has grown more than tenfold over seven years, from four in 2006 to 42 as of midMarch. The incident involving Benitez occurred at the agency’s former headquarters at the Richard B. Anderson Federal Building in downtown Port Angeles, which became too small for the Border Patrol contingent. In September, the Border Patrol station moved to its sprawling new $11.9 million headquarters about 2 miles east of downtown.

headquarters of Naval Personnel Command, where he will be involved in manpower management. Yesunas most recently was stationed in Afghanistan, where he served as a liaison between provisional governments and the capitol of Kabul.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, March 29-30, 2013 PAGE

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Peninsula self-made jobs abound ABOUT ONE IN nine workers is self-employed in the United States, according to a recent report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the North Olympic Martha M. Peninsula, it is Ireland closer to one in three. Nationwide and statewide, just 6.4 percent of workers are self-employed in non-incorporated businesses they own. The labor statistics bureau says that since the early 1960s, self-employment has been declining. But rural areas historically have had higher self-employment, primarily in agriculture. Locally, timber harvesting and fishing — both commercial and guided sportfishing — boosted the ranks of the self-employed and their earnings. Despite prolonged downturns in those industries, self-employment is soaring in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Earnings are not. With the highest percentage of retirement-age residents in the state, Jefferson County is home to many semiretired people who add a cushion of comfort to their budgets by engaging is some enjoyable sideline. Other residents desperately need a paycheck, but find their only alternative to unemployment is self-employment, which may produce earnings far below minimum wage rates. After trips abroad, Port Angeles native Cody Coughenour, 34, returned to his hometown unsure of what he wanted to do. But “I knew I wanted to do it here,” he said. When the Peninsula Plywood mill reopened in March 2010, Coughenour hired on. It seemed like a giant step-up from restaurant work, but the mill struggled throughout its brief resurrection, permanently

closed in November 2011 and is now being dismantled. While working at PenPly, Coughenour married Alethia Lane, the mother of a young son. Shortly thereafter, mill management dropped all salaries 10 percent. “I realized I had to start my own thing,” he said. With an environmental-policy degree from Huxley College, he was positioned for what is said to be the careers of the future, but the only work available in the environmental field was “out of area and mostly internships with little pay,” Coughenour said. “The [Elwha] Dam removal looked like an opportunity, but it was a closed circuit for job opportunities,” he said. “It was discouraging. A lot of young people here wanted to work, but there was no pay.” The Coughenours began exploring possible businesses. Having stayed in hostels around the world, “I had been interested in starting a hostel for quite a while,” he said. ToadLily International Hostel opened in May 2012 across from the Port Angeles Fire Station, not long after the couple’s daughter was born. “Fortunately, we are able to live next door and rent this from my father,” said Coughenour. He is the son of Port Angeles attorney Brian Coughenour. As its name suggests, ToadLily is not an ordinary hostel. It also serves as a platform for supporting the performing arts and a venue for environmental gatherings. Now and then, the hostel also serves as a stepping stone out of homelessness for guests who pitch in to help with Coughenour’s unending projects, in return for reduced room charges, “I can’t afford to hire help,” Coughenour said. “I go to the library and read how-to books.” He is now setting cedar rounds in black gravel to make a patio around “Cupzilla,” the

Cody Coughenour places cedar rounds in black gravel to make a patio around “Cupzilla,” the unusually shaped juice bar he hopes to have open before summer at his Port Angeles small business, ToadLily International Hostel. “unique, off common” juice bar he hopes to have open before summer. Despite the tiny square footage, a building permit was required for the juice-cup-shaped structure. While Coughenour does not want to complain, he has found the city’s permitting process to be “quite difficult.” “Hopefully, the city will give some allowances to let young people start businesses,” he said. Would he take a job if offered one? “I don’t want to be doing anything else, but I would have to consider it for my family’s sake,”

Peninsula Voices Majority rules The letter “Two-thirds Vote” [Peninsula Voices, March 20] urged us to endorse a proposal to require a two-thirds vote to pass any legislation dealing with money. Where did the writer get 66.6 percent? Why not 55 percent, 75 percent or even 90 percent? The state Supreme Court has declared, with good judicial reasoning, that this arbitrary requirement, which limits the authority of the state Legislature to raise revenue in order to fulfill its constitutional responsibilities, is unconstitutional. In all aspects of our lives, we rely on the age-old concept that “the majority rules.” Sports teams win by gaining one more point than their opponent. We elect our officials by a majority vote of the electorate. Why should their governing be any different? The statement that everyone pays too much in taxes is not true. Taxes are unequally distributed in our state because Washington has the most regressive taxing system in the nation. The bottom 20 percent — earning less than $20,000 annually — pay 16.9 percent of their income

Correction BECAUSE OF A PDN editing error, the name of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service was misspelled in the letter by Allan J. Harrison of Port Angeles that appeared in Thursday’s Peninsula Voices.

in state and local taxes, whereas the top 1 percent — earning more than $430,000 — pay only 2.8 percent. What helped me put the letter writer’s theory into perspective was reading about “tapeworm economics.” It is defined as “how private investors arrange for new laws that are contrary to society’s best interest.” Learn more about “tapeworm economics” at www. dunwalke.com. Norma Turner, Port Angeles

No supermajority Bravo for the crocodile tears shed in a recent letter [“Two-thirds Vote,” cited above] to get your sympathy. Libertarians and Mitt Romney wannabes talk about us picking their pockets to hide the fact that

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taxes are the way we apportion the obligation to pay for the investments in infrastructure and programs to help people that we have agreed we want. To ask for a supermajority to levy a tax is like having a majority vote to decide if we will buy new shoes for the kids and then having a supermajority requirement to decide if we pay the bill that comes at the end of the month. If there is a need for a supermajority, it is when we decide to spend the money, not when the bill comes in. Yet I don’t hear those same people asking for a supermajority to decide if we need another fighter plane or to continue a tax incentive to the oil industry. I’m pretty sure there are people who object to those expenditures who would like to require a supermajority vote to make it harder to make those purchases. Preventing the majority from deciding most things in a representative form of government is a tyranny over the will of the people by a minority. The founding fathers wisely designed checks and balances, and only a few exceptions where a supermajority is required. We should honor their wisdom. Roger Fight, Sequim

Coughenour said. It would have to be local, wellpaid and allow him and Alethia to continue operating ToadLily. “There are a lot of opportunities if people try,” he said, but self-employment alone cannot support the community. Coughenour is an environmentalist in the tourist industry, but his response to Congressman Derek Kilmer’s recent proposalto restore timber harvests in Olympic National Forest is “definitely positive,” he said. “Keep doing it responsibly,” he said. “Trees are renewable resources. “We need jobs.”

OUR READERS’

Martha M. Ireland was a Clallam County commissioner from 1996 through 1999 and is the secretary of the Republican Women of Clallam County, among other community endeavors. Martha and her husband, Dale, live on a Carlsborg-area farm. She works at Serenity House in Port Angeles, the nonprofit agency that provides emergency shelter, transitional housing and supportive services to homeless individuals and families. Her column appears every other Friday. Her next one will be published April 12. Email: irelands@olypen.com.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

be local talent to do this work and create jobs? ■ There are 51 empty retail or professional business spaces on Washington Street. ■ With Battelle, the loss THE PENINSULA PLYWOOD mill and subsequent of the $14 million expansion ownership incarnations stood on the Port Angeles waterof a local company, providfront for 71 years. ing an additional 300 to 400 The scheduled April 8 demolition of its 175-foot smokestack truly marks the end of an industrial icon in Port family-wage jobs, killed by Angeles. the City Council. To commemorate the mill, the PDN on April 7 will pubOn Nov. 10, 2009, local lish short memory vignettes on the mill that carried the businessman Richard Parks’ PenPly, ITT Rayonier and KPly names over the decades. letter to the editor related a We’re especially hoping that former mill employees, conversation with nowtheir families and others who depended on the mill for council member Ted Miller many years will jot down their feelings at this significant about roadblocks to busitime. ness growth. Please keep your vignette short — no more than 100 Mr. Parks wrote: “He words, please — and feel free to include a photo of yourfrankly told me that I’m free self. If you don’t have one, we’ll be happy to arrange to to move my business out of take a photo. Sequim.” Send your thoughts and photos by 5 p.m. today to This attitude sound familletters@peninsuladailynews.com (put “mill” in the subject iar? All of these things effect line), or to PDN Mill Memories, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angelocal businesses negatively. les, WA 98362. They can have a voice. I would be willing to help them along that road, but ■ Outrageous fees and Sequim business they must take the initiative. barriers to obtain building Small-business concerns permits, requiring an attorIf they don’t, then preare not considered in pare to live with the conseney to navigate. Sequim City Council deci■ The public works/com- quences. sions. And Sequim City Counmunity development build[Sequim Businesses cil, watch it. ing has 12 city officials to Fume Over City Rules,” Beware biting the hand deal with development that PDN, March 24.] that feeds you. isn’t occurring. My background is Walt Schubert, ■ The City Council hired 50-plus years of small busi- a consultant for $180,000 Sequim ness entrepreneurship. from Bellevue to manage Consider: Schubert is a former the design and construction ■ Experiences of Crumb of a new City Hall we don’t Sequim mayor and former Grabbers Bakery and Tarci- need. member of the Sequim City sio’s Italian Restaurant. Do you think there might Council.

PenPly mill memories deadline today

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CommentaryViewpoints

Justices squirm over same-sex marriage AS THE ARGUMENTS unfurled in Tuesday’s case on same-sex marriage, the Supreme Court justices sounded more and more cranky. Things were moving too fast for them. How could the nine, cloisMaureen tered behind Dowd velvety rose curtains, marble pillars and archaic customs, possibly assess the potential effects of gay marriage? They’re not psychics, after all. “Same-sex marriage is very new,” Justice Samuel Alito whinged, noting that “it may turn out to be a good thing; it may turn out not to be a good thing.” If the standard is that marriage always has to be “a good thing,” would heterosexuals pass? “But you want us to step in and render a decision,” Alito continued, “based on an assessment of the effects of this institution which is newer than cellphones or the Internet? I mean, we do not have the ability to see the future.” Swing Justice Anthony Kennedy grumbled about “uncharted waters,” and the fuddy-duddies seemed to be looking for excuses not to make a sweeping ruling. Their questions reflected a unanimous craven impulse: How do we get out of this? This court is plenty bold imposing bad decisions on the country, like anointing W. president or allowing unlimited money to flow covertly into campaigns. But given a chance to make a bold decision putting them on the right, and popular, side of history, they squirm. “Same-sex couples have every other right,” Chief Justice John Roberts said, sounding inane for

a big brain. His argument, that “It’s just marriage about the label should be in this case.” reserved for He continthose who proued, “If you tell create, is ludia child that crous. somebody has Sonia Sototo be their mayor was friend, I suppose you can married and force the child didn’t have to say, ‘This is kids. Clarence my friend,’ but and Ginny it changes the Thomas did definition of not have kids. what it means Roberts’ two to be a friend.” kids are Donald VerCHRISTO KOMARNITSKI/CAGLE CARTOONS adopted. rilli Jr., the Should U.S. solicitor Chief Justice John Roberts their margeneral arguing on the side riages have of same-sex been banned? marriage, told the justices, What about George and Mar“There is a cost to waiting.” tha Washington? They only proHe recalled that the argument created a country. by opponents of interracial marCooper said that California riage in Loving v. Virginia was to should “hit the pause button” delay because “the social science while “the experiment” of gay is still uncertain about how bira- marriage matures. cial children will fare in this And he urged that we not world.” refocus “the definition of marThe wisdom of the Warren riage away from the raising of court is reflected two miles away, children and to the emotional where a biracial child is faring needs and desires of adults.” pretty well in his second term in Did he miss the last few Me the Oval Office. Decades? It may take another case, even The fusty legal discussion another court, to legitimize same- inside was a vivid contrast with the lusty rally outside. sex marriage nationally, but the There were some offensive country has moved on. An ABC/Washington Post poll signs directed at gays, but the showed that 81 percent of Ameri- vibrant crowd was overwhelmcans younger than 30 approve of ingly pro same-sex marriage. One woman summed it up gay marriage. nicely in a placard reading: “Gays Every time you blink, another have the right to be as miserable lawmaker comes out of the closet as I make my husband.” on supporting the issue. While Alito can’t see into the Charles Cooper, the lawyer for future, most Americans can. If the proponents of Proposition 8, this court doesn’t reject bigotry, which banned same-sex marriage history will reject this court. in California, was tied in knots, ________ failing to articulate any harm Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer that could come from gay marPrize-winning columnist for The riage and admitting that no New York Times. Email her via other form of discrimination against gay people was justified. http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail.

Mexico immigration laws are tough AMERICAN POLITICIANS IN both parties are stampeding all over themselves to pander to Mexico and adopt mass illegal alien amnesty schemes. But while the Mexican Michelle government lobbies for Malkin more “humane” treatment of illegal bordercrossers from their country into ours, Mexico remains notoriously restrictionist toward “undesirable” foreigners who break their laws or threaten their security. Despite widely touted immigration “reforms” adopted in 2011, Mexico still puts Mexico first — as any country that is serious about protecting its sovereignty should and would. Article 33 of Mexico’s constitution establishes the right of the president to detain and deport “any foreigner” and prohibits foreigners from participating “in any way” in the political affairs of the country. While you read this passage [translated from Spanish], dwell on the demagogic rhetoric of meddling Mexican consular officials and lobbyists who assail America for its (poorly enforced) detention and deportation policies: “The president of the republic shall have the power to expel from national territory any foreigner, according to the law and after a hearing. “The law shall establish the administrative procedure for this purpose, as well as the place where the foreigner should be detained and the time for that. “Foreigners may not in any way participate in the political affairs of the country.”

Article 32 of Mexico’s constitution unapologetically bans nonnative-born residents from holding sensitive jobs and joining the country’s military. Preference is given unabashedly to Mexicans over foreigners. While you read this passage, contemplate the inexorable push by open-borders groups to secure illegal alien “rights” to American jobs, American military assignments, American driver’s licenses, discounted U.S. college tuition and Obamacare: “Only Mexicans by birth can perform all government employments, positions, or commissions in which the status of citizenship is indispensable. “During peacetime, foreigners shall neither serve in the army nor in the police bodies. During peacetime, only Mexicans by birth can serve in the army, in the navy or in the air force as well can perform any employment or commission within such corporations. “The same condition applies to captains, pilots, skippers, ship engineers, flight engineers and, in general, to every crew member in a ship or an airplane carrying the Mexican flag. “In the same way, only Mexicans by birth can be port harbormasters, steersmen and airport superintendents. “Mexicans shall have priority over foreigners, under equal circumstances, for all kind of concessions, employments, positions or commissions of the government in which the status of citizenship is not indispensable.” While amnesty advocates and civil liberties zealots in the U.S. decry “police state” tactics against illegal aliens, Mexico fiercely maintains laws against illegal border crossings; “verification visits” to enforce visa conditions; requirements that foreigners produce proof of legal status

on demand; and enforcement and cooperation between and among immigration officials and law enforcement authorities at all levels in Mexico. Native-born Mexicans are also empowered to make citizens arrests of illegal aliens and turn them in to authorities. Mexico’s National Catalog of Foreigners tracks all outside tourists and foreign nationals. A National Population Registry tracks and verifies the identity of every member of the population, who must carry a citizen’s identity card. Visitors who do not possess proper documents and identification are subject to arrest at any time. And for those seeking permanent residency or naturalization, Mexico requires that they must not be economic burdens on society and must have clean criminal histories. Those seeking to obtain Mexican citizenship must show a birth certificate, provide a bank statement proving economic independence, pass an exam and prove they can provide their own health care. Applicants are assessed based on a point system using factors such as level of education, employment experience and scientific and technological knowledge. Property acquisition and ownership by foreigners is still severely restricted. Mexican corporations are banned from hiring illegal aliens. Exit question: If such selfinterested “nativism” is right and good for the protection and survival of Mexico, why not for the United States?

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

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FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Probe continues into island landslide BY MANUEL VALDES THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COUPEVILLE — Authorities Thursday assessed the damage and danger from a massive landslide Whidbey Island as nervous residents waited for more detailed information about how safe the area is. One home was heavily damaged and 33 others were ordered evacuated after the landslide early Wednesday overlooking Admiralty Inlet directly across from Marrowstone Island. No one was injured.

‘Road closed’ On Thursday, “road closed” signs were being posted to prevent access to some areas as geologists continued to examine the site where 400 to 500 yards of a hillside plunged toward the waterway. Pete Kenny was on a vacation to help move his grandmother to Illinois and heard the landslide as he watched power line transformers explode. “The landslide started right at the property line and went south of us,” he said Thursday. Kenny said crews were going house to house to tag structures with different colors, with red meaning mandatory evacuation. Details on exactly how many homes were still offlimits were not available Thursday afternoon. Kenny said his grandmother’s home and neigh-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

An aerial photo shows the landslide into Admiralty Inlet on Whidbey Island on Wednesday afternoon. bor to the south had not been evacuated. That neighbor lost part of their yard. “It’s a real sad situation. I just hope everything works out,” he said. Many of the homes are summer cabins or weekend getaways and were unoccupied. Some are larger, upscale properties, and oth-

fuller assessment Thursday. Terry Swanson, a geologist at the University of Washington and a Whidbey Island resident, said more detailed studies are needed. “Not all bluffs act the same. We have landslides here every year,” Swanson said of the island, which is about 35 miles long, north

ers are more modest dwellings. The slide area remains unstable. A geotechnical engineer working for Island County and state Department of Natural Resources geologists took a preliminary look at the area Wednesday and hoped to complete a

to south, and just a mile or two wide in places. “People understand that yes, these are clearly hazards, but there are different types of hazards for different types of slopes.” Residents of about 15 homes higher up the hillside were told by authorities Wednesday evening

that they could return. Eleven people from 16 homes along a road close to the water were evacuated by boat because the road was blocked by the landslide. Swanson said access to those houses would remain a challenge. “That part of the road is gone,” he said.

Stennis leader censured over his conduct Allegations of crude language, derision toward Navy leaders PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

BREMERTON — The former commander of the Navy’s Bremerton-based John C. Stennis aircraft carrier group will get a careerending letter in his file after complaints about his leadership style — including vulgar language and derisive comments about senior Navy leaders — apparently were confirmed by an investigation. Rear Adm. Charles M.

Gaouette was reassigned from his job atop the Stennis group in October pending a Navy inspector general investigation. The Stennis was on deployment in the Arabian Sea at the time. The reason given then for the investigation was allegations of “inappropriate leadership and judgment.” The Stennis group deployed from Bremerton in late August and had entered the Navy 5th Fleet’s

area of operations in the Middle East on Oct. 17 after sailing across the Pacific. In October, during Gaouette the presidential election campaign, Internet rumors claimed that Gaouette wanted to send help during the deadly Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and disobeyed orders to stand down. The Navy has flatly denied that claim. The Stennis was still in the AsiaPacific region at the time,

MARCH MADNESS

“But being cleared of charges doesn’t mean he’s exonerated and doesn’t mean his conduct and leadership was found in keeping with what we expect of a flag officer in general and a

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out of aircraft range for Libya. Gaouette faced an administrative hearing Monday. The hearing, presided over by Adm. John M. Richardson, cleared him of any violations of military justice, according to a Navy official with knowledge of the case.

strike group commander specifically,” the official said Wednesday. The official said the complaints against Gaouette were related to the way he treated people aboard ship. “The allegations did include use of vulgar and profane language and derisive comments about some leaders in the Navy,” he said. The New York Times on Wednesday quoted unnamed sources saying Gaouette also made racially insensitive remarks on two occasions. The Times story quoted unnamed officials who said the commanding officer of the Stennis, Capt. Ronald Reis, was the source of the complaints against Gaouette after the admiral challenged him on his handling of the carrier in crowded waters. A letter and the inspector general report will be placed in Gaouette’s file, which would likely block any future advancement, said the Navy official familiar with the situation. The report is still not

TRUSTand COMFORT

publicly available because the administrative side of Gaouette’s case continues. More senior Navy leaders, including the chief of naval operations and secretary of the Navy, will have an opportunity to review the findings.

Apology from Gaouette The Times quoted Gaouette on Wednesday as saying, “I fully accept responsibility and accountability for my actions while in command . . . and deeply regret that my missteps have placed the Navy in this position.” Is profane language and rough handling of subordinates enough to pull a carrier group leader in the middle of a deployment? The Navy official says yes. “While some people might laugh off vulgar and profane language as saltiness, we expect a higher standard to be applied to flag officers and particularly to flag officers in command,” the official said. “It wasn’t just about bad language. “These allegations were about poor judgment and about leadership practices that did not rise to the level that we expect for senior officers.”

Gaouette’s service Gaouette served as deputy commander of U.S. Naval Forces at Central Command before assuming command of Carrier Strike Group Three in April 2012. In 2003, he was awarded the Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale Award for inspirational leadership, according to his official biography. Gaouette was one of at least 25 Navy commanders removed or replaced in 2012.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, March 29-30, 2013 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

B

On your mark,

get set,

HUNT!

Children can delight in Easter tradition PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The hunts are over in a flash, but the delight lingers as children all over the North Olympic Peninsula discover brightly colored Easter eggs hidden in fields and parks and inside businesses. Easter egg hunts and other special events will be offered Saturday and Sunday.

Sequim KONP Easter egg hunt SEQUIM — Just west of Sequim, The Pumpkin Patch and farm at the corner of Kitchen-Dick Road and U.S. Highway 101 will host the 35th annual KONP Easter egg hunt, a free public event, on Saturday. The hunt is for children 8 and younger and will have eggs, toys, candy, prizes and the Easter Bunny on hand. Sign-ups start at 8:30 a.m. Sagturday, and the hunt begins at 9 a.m. Children will be grouped into

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Youngsters take off from the starting line in search of prize-filled eggs during the 2012 KONP Easter egg hunt at The Pumpkin Patch west of Sequim. Hundreds of children went in search of more than 4,500 eggs during the event. age-appropriate categories. Pumpkin Patch organizers suggest arriving early to leave plenty of time for parking. To be eligible for toy giveaways,

each child will need to bring a registration form. Registration forms are available in Port Angeles at Grand View Grocery, Jim’s Pharmacy,

Fairmount Shell, The Baby Store, Olympic Party & Custodial Supply, Baskin Robbins, Mount Pleasant IGS, Viking Sew & Vac, Expeditions NW, Klahhane Gymnas-

Entrance to all state parks will be waived Saturday. The Discover Pass requirement for state parks will be waived in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the state park system. A Discover Pass still will be required to access lands managed by the

state departments of Natural Resources and Fish and Wildlife. The fee is $30 for an annual Discover Pass and $10 for a one-day pass.

Other free days Other state parks “free days� are set for April 27-28 in honor of National Parks Week,

TURN

TO

EGG/B2

GET A

State Discover Pass waived for Saturday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

tics, Franni’s Gift Expressions and Beauty & the Beach; in Sequim at Olympic Game Farm, the Dungeness Kids Co. and Kettle’s.

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OF RUNNING ADVICE

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Events to welcome spring over weekend PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Along with the Easter egg hunts highlighted on this page, the North Olympic Peninsula offers a variety of activities ranging from a shellfish farm tour to a gun show to a ceremony for veterans. For more entertainment news, check out Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide that is part of today’s PDN.

Quilcene Shellfish farm tours

Water St., will hold Magic the Gathering game night as part of its Friday Night Port Townsend Magic program. Tonight’s games begin Working Man’s Poetry at 6 p.m., and a $5 donation is collected from each PORT TOWNSEND — player and used as prizes Charles Goodrich and Clefor that evening’s games. mens Starck will deliver a Whistle Stop Toys is an free “Working Man’s Poetry Reading� at Quim- advanced-level store in the per Unitarian Universalist Wizards Play Network. Game format varies, so Fellowship, 2333 San Juan phone the shop at 360-385Ave., from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 9616 or visit the www. tonight. Wizards.com store locator Goodrich started as a for more information. professional gardener and Starck as a carpenter/construction foreman. Chimacum They both now live in the Willamette Valley in Oregon and have written Celebrate spring, cider several books of poetry CHIMACUM — associated with their Finnriver Farm & Cidery trades, the land and peowill hold a “Get It While It’s ple’s interaction with it. The event is part of the Hot� Spring Celebration and fellowship’s Adult Learning Cider Release for its new Habanero Cider from 1 p.m. Program Visiting Scholars to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. series. The event will include For more information, music from Porto Alegre and visit www.quuf.org. wood fire pizza from Dented Buoy from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Magic card games Suggested donation is $5. PORT TOWNSEND — Whistle Stop Toys, 1005 TURN TO EVENTS/B2

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QUILCENE — Public tours of Taylor Shellfish Farms’ hatchery, 701 Broad Spit Road, will be offered from noon to 1 p.m. today, with a beach tour from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Attendees should arrive between 10 to 15 minutes early. Taylor Shellfish Farm spawn clams, mussels, oysters and geoduck, with larvae planted at beaches around Hood Canal and

Puget Sound.


B2

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Ogre CONTINUED FROM B1 involved in developing a small-farm enterprise. Finnriver Farm & Cidery is located at 62 Barn SwalPort Angeles low Road off Center Road in the Chimacum Valley.

Cage fighting

Spring Hoedown set CHIMACUM — A Spring Hoedown square dance is set for the Chimacum Grange, 9572 Rhody Drive, from 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. Wild Phil and the Buffalo Gals will perform, with dances called by Seattle’s Gabe Strand. Admission is $5 to $10. Children 16 and younger are admitted free. For more information, phone 360-385-4288.

Sequim Maple landscaping KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Austin Thompson takes a piece of candy from the Easter Bunny, portrayed by Travis Hedin, as Austin’s mother, Samantha Thompson, looks on during 2012 Easter festivities in downtown Port Angeles.

Egg: Hunt to help cheer group CONTINUED FROM B1 until the eggs run out. “If we need to, we can go and buy more eggs because Port Angeles I’d hate to turn a child away,� White Crane owner ‘Spring Fever’ events Robert Nicholls said. Parents can sign their PORT ANGELES — A Spring Fever celebration children up for an Enhanced with festivities and special Kids ID at Necessities & offers throughout down- Temptations gift shop at town will be hosted by the 217 N. Laurel St. Black Ball Ferry Line Port Angeles Downtown Association from 10 a.m. to sponsors reimbursement for this safety program, 4 p.m. Saturday. Many events will be at which is administered by the Conrad Dyar Memorial the Boys & Girls Clubs of Fountain at First and Lau- the Olympic Peninsula. rel streets. They include: Horticulturist and Pen■ Meeting and taking insula Daily News gardenphotos with the Easter ing columnist Andrew May Bunny all day. People are will offer garden tips at asked to bring their own Necessities & Temptations. cameras. Rissa’s Consignment, ■ Games and crafts for 117 W. First St., will have young people, with projects kids’ face-painting and an led by youth volunteers in-store special, and Cotwith the Port Angeles tage Queen, 119 W. First Downtown Association. St., will offer May baskets ■ A presentation by and craft for kids. Klahhane Cougar Cheer. Businesses offering spe■ A love-letter creation cials include Browns Outstation with Amita Life door, 112 W. Front St.; CockCoaching/Thriving on the a-Doodle Doughnuts, 105 E. Olympic Peninsula. ■ Information on par- Front St.; InSpired!, 124-B ticipating in the Port Ange- W. First St.; Iron Apparel, les Relay For Life, set June 123 E. First St.; PA Antique 7-8 at the Clallam County Mall, 109 W. First St.; Cafe New Day, 102 W. Front St.; Fairgrounds. White Crane Martial Port Angeles Baby Store, Arts, 129 W. First St., will 313 W. First St.; Odyssey hold an egg hunt beginning Bookshop, 114 W. Front St.; at noon Saturday. It typi- and Northwest Fudge and cally runs until 2 p.m. or Confections, 108 W. First St.

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PORT ANGELES — An Easter egg hunt sponsored by the Future Rider Cheer program will be held Saturday. The hunt will be held at the Camp Fire Clubhouse at Webster Park, 619 E. Fourth St., at 2 p.m. Two separate egg hunts will be held, one for youths from walking age to 6 and the other for ages 7 and older. Cost is $5 for the younger group and $7 for the older group. A silent auction for a host of items and gift cer- PT Elks Club hunt tificates also is planned. PORT TOWNSEND — For more information, The Port Townsend Elks phone 360-477-5198. Club’s 83rd annual Easter egg hunt will be held at Hurricane Ridge hunt Chetzemoka Park at 8 a.m. PORT ANGELES — The Sunday. Hurricane Ridge Ski Area This public hunt is free will host an Easter Egg and is geared toward chilOlympics Hunt on Sunday. dren 12 and younger. Egg A hunt for younger chil- hunters will be divided into dren will be held on the three age groups. bunny slopes at 12:30 p.m. At least 100 dozen eggs Older children will hunt (1,200) will be hidden in the for eggs on the pommel-lift park by Port Townsend Boy side of the ski slope at 1 p.m. Scouts. Elks volunteers begin Organizers promise “lots of treats, prizes, fun and a dyeing the eggs today at golden egg with a season 9 a.m. to make up more pass to Hurricane Ridge Ski than 150 Easter baskets Area for the 2013-2014 win- with candy and plastic eggs. Prize eggs made of wood, ter season for one lucky gold and silver will win winner.� small cash prizes. For more information, Joyce phone the Elks Lodge at 360-385-0317.

Salt Creek egg hunt JOYCE — In Joyce, the Kitchens family invites children and their parents to the 12th annual Joyce community Easter egg hunt at the Tongue Point area of Salt Creek Recreation Area County Park at 10 a.m. Saturday. The egg hunt is open to children 10 and younger. Organizers promise “prizes and lots of fun.� Age groups include ages 3 and younger, 4-6 and 7-10. A visit by the Easter Bunny also is expected.

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No. 26 Ladies Auxiliary will hold its annual free Easter egg hunt at the Fred Lewis Scout Cabin Park (formerly Legion Park) at 1 p.m. on Sunday. The park is located on Discovery Road near the city limits. The auxiliary has a lot of prizes across three age groups — birth to age 4, 5 to 7 and 8 to 12. Parents may accompany children only in the birthto-age-4 group. The egg hunt is sponsored by Elevated Ice Cream Co.

Forks Forks egg hunt slated Elks Lodge is hosting the annual free community Easter egg hunt at the Tillicum Park baseball fields at 1 p.m. Saturday. Children will be separated into three age groups: 3 and younger, 4-8 and 9-12. There also will be drawings for two bikes, chocolate rabbits and stuffed animals.

Easter Fun Day FORKS — First Baptist Church of Forks will host its second annual Kids Easter Fun Day at 3 p.m. Saturday. TURN

TO

EGG/B3

RELINES

Gun show slated SEQUIM — The Pacific Northwest Shooting Park Association will host a gun show at the Sequim Prairie Grange’s Macleay Hall, 290 Macleay Road, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. General admission will be $5 for adults and $7 for families. Children 17 and younger are admitted free when accompanied by adults. For more information, phone Don Roberts at 360457-1846 or email donr@ olypen.com.

SEQUIM — Fairaview Farm owner and garden coach Paris Lujan will present “What Can I Do with My Small Farm?� at Nash’s Farm Store, 4681 SequimDungeness Way, at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. The presentation is free and open to the public. On their farm in the foothills above Sequim, Lujan, with her husband, Fred, have developed a Grade-A dairy, an artisan cheese-making facility, a certified organic farm and commercial greenhouses. She will discuss some of the major components

PORT ANGELES — “The Great Kapok Tree,� a story set in the Amazon Rainforest, and the classic comedy “Shrek� make up this spring’s Five Acre School production tonight. Admission is by donation to the 90-minute show, which will start at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. More than 50 children, age 5 to 12, create the “Kapok� forest and “Shrek’s� world for the productions by the private elementary school in Dungeness. Rosie Sharpe, Five Acre’s music teacher, is directing the productions, which feature music by Dan Lieberman, a Port Angeles schoolteacher and musician, plus capoeira dance music from Brazil. Donations will go into Five Acre School’s Lisa Inman Scholarship Fund and equipment account. For more information, phone 360-681-7255 or visit www.FiveAcreSchool.org.

Learn about Habitat PORT ANGELES — Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County will host a volunteer orientation session at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The hourlong session for those interested in volunteering with the organization will be at the Habitat Store, 728 E. Front St. Habitat has built 22 homes in Clallam County and will begin work on the 23rd project in May. More volunteers are needed to complete this project and do behind-the-scenes jobs that allow Habitat to help local families in need of decent, affordable housing. RSVPs to the orientation sessions are appreciated but not required. For more information or to request a volunteer application, phone 360-6816780 or email volunteer@ habitatclallam.org.

Veterans events PORT ANGELES — A “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day,� sponsored by the Clallam County Veterans Association, is planned Saturday. All military veterans are invited to a coffee social from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. A ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. at the Clallam County Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St. It will be followed by a luncheon hosted by the VFW Post 1024 Auxiliary. For more information, phone Tammy Sullenger at 360-417-2383.

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SEQUIM — Cobalt Mortgage will hold a grand opening of its new Sequim branch, 175 W. Washington St., from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. today. Appetizers, cupcakes and beverages will be served. The Sequim branch joins the Port Townsend office of Cobalt Mortgage as two of the company’s newest locations on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Port Townsend branch, 112 Kala Square Place, No. 1, will celebrate its grand reopening April 5.

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SEQUIM — Fran Sharp will discuss “Japanese Maples in Your Landscape� at a McComb Gardens seminar at 1 p.m. Saturday. The free seminar will be at McComb Gardens, 7 5 1 McComb Road. She is active in Sharp many horticulture associations and is a charter member of the Great Plant Picks Selection Committee.

PORT ANGELES — “Olympic Combat Challenge II,� live amateur cage fighting, will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday. The event includes a beer garden and takes place in the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 W. Fourth St. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $30 and $50 and are available at Cageworx Gym, 103 Elwha Road in Port Angeles, and online at www.cageworx.com and www.brownpaperticket.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

B3

PAHS choir performs as invited guests PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School choral director Jolene Dalton Gailey and the PAHS Symphonic Choir recently traveled to Portland, Ore., as invited clinician and musicians to perform at the Northwest Division Conference of the National Association of Music Educators.

Director presents clinic Gailey presented a clinic on “Sight Reading Like a Musician,� and the Symphonic Choir demonstrated the techniques she uses in the classroom. The Symphonic Choir also performed concert literature, including “Missa Kenya,� by Paul Basler, and James Taylor’s “Lonesome Road.� PAHS band director Doug Gailey was a featured French horn soloist with the choir. The clinic was attended PORT ANGELES SCHOOL DISTRICT by music educators from Wyoming, Alaska, Oregon, The Port Angeles Symphonic Choir performed recently at the Northwest Division Conference of the National Association of Montana, Idaho and Wash- Music Educators in Portland, Ore. Port Angeles High School choral director Jolene Dalton Gailey served as the invited clinician, and PAHS band director Doug Gailey served as a featured French horn soloist. ington.

Egg: Breakfast in Forks CONTINUED FROM B2 dren ages 12 and younger, and is located on the lawn Activities at the church of the Quileute Oceanside at 651 S. Forks Ave. will Resort, 330 Ocean Drive. Prizes are presented to the include storytime, snacks and an Easter egg hunt finder of the secret egg and with more than 1,000 eggs the coloring contest winner. Look for an appearance stuffed with prizes. by the Easter Bunny.

Easter Breakfast FORKS — The annual Easter Breakfast will be held at the Forks Elks Lodge, 941 Merchants Road, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sunday. The meal includes ham, sausage, scrambled eggs, biscuits and gravy, french toast, hash browns, orange juice and coffee. Cost is $7 for adults, $5 for seniors and kids ages 4-11, and free for ages 3 and younger. The breakfast is sponsored by Concerned Citizens and the Forks Emblem Club.

Boys & Girls Clubs Mount Angeles unit member Hannah Anderson, right, gives a tour of the Port Angeles facility to guests attorney Rob Tulloch and real estate agent Jean Irvine, both of Port Angeles.

Boys & Girls Clubs show facility to community PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula board members, staff and several participants in the after-school program opened the clubs’ Mount Angeles Unit facilities in Port Angeles, 2620 S. Francis St., to showcase its facility and pro-

Flea market, plant sale set in Joyce

grams to community members. About 30 participants enjoyed breakfast and a tour of the facilities March 14. The Mount Angeles unit is one of two units, the other located in Sequim at 400 W. Fir St. For more information on the Port Angeles unit, phone 360-417-2831.

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CLALLAM BAY — A community Easter egg hunt will begin at Clallam Bay School on state Highway 112 at 11 a.m. Saturday.

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BEAVER — The Bear Creek/Hungry Bear Cafe’s 13th annual Easter egg hunt will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday. There will be a separate section for toddlers to age 3. Ages 4-7 will have a oneminute head start on their older (8-12) counterparts. The Easter Bunny is expected to make a guest appearance. Hungry Bear Cafe is located at 205860 U.S. Highway 101.

Sequim Doce Pares/ Sequim Martial Arts 452 Riverview Dr., Sequim (off of McComb Rd.) Mon. & Thurs. 5 p.m. – 6 p.m. Traditional Filipino martial art of Eskrima stickďŹ ghting. Students learn single stick, double stick, stick and blade techniques, forms, disarms, joint locks and control methods. Rank promotion encouraged but not required. Smart, safe training in a really nice studio. $60 per month. Contact Kathrin Sumpter at 360-6834799. Visit us at www. sequimmartialarts.com.

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The semiannual flea markets are part of the grange’s fundraising efforts to help maintain facilities, provide scholarships to Crescent graduates and support other community activities. To rent a tailgate spot, phone Paul Robertson at 360-928-9556. To donate baked goods, phone Lelah Singhose at 360-457-5944.

LAPUSH — The Quileute Housing Authority is holding its 16th annual Easter egg hunt at 11 a.m. Saturday. The free hunt is for chil-

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JOYCE — Crescent Grange, 50870 state Highway 112, will host its Spring Flea Market and Plant Sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 5-6. More than 25 inside tables plus several outside booths will offer items for sale. Lunch will be available for purchase with a spaghetti entree, sandwiches, clam chowder, chili, hot dogs, potato salad, pies a la mode or a la carte, coffee, tea, juice and a baked-goods table.

LaPush

Beaver

The free hunt is sponsored by the West End Youth and Community Club for children up to age 12. Prizes will be awarded in four age groups: preschoolers and younger; kindergarten to second grade; third and fourth grades; and fifth and sixth grades. Eggs are dyed by senior citizens and special-education youths at the school. Honor students will help set up the hunt. For details, phone the Clallam Bay-Sekiu Chamber of Commerce at 360963-2339.


B4

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Briefly . . . 9th annual Scandia meal scheduled PORT TOWNSEND — Nordic culture will be on display at the ninth annual Scandia Dinner on Friday, April 19. The event will be held in the Parish Hall of St. Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church, 1335 Blaine St., at 6 p.m. It will be hosted by members of Thea Foss Lodge No. 45 of the Daughters of Norway. The homemade dinner includes Scandinavian meatballs and gravy, red potatoes, carrots, coleslaw, lefse, pickled herring, lingonberries, cucumber salad, hot coffee and cookies. Baked goods include sandbakkels, fattigmand, krumkake, rosettes and spritz. Jack Anderson’s fiddle and Jane Johnson’s button accordion will provide musical accompaniment. Tickets are $20 and are available at Maricee Fashion, 913 Water St., or by phone at 360-379-1802.

may be used. “Garden Glory” is a mixture of yard waste and biosolids. Yard waste includes grass, leaves, branches, and other yard debris from residences and commercial activities in Clallam County. The city is a participant in the U.S. Composting Council Seal of Testing Assurance Program, and test results are given with each purchase. Compost can be purchased Mondays through Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Phone the Transfer Station Informational Line at 360-417-4875 and press “5” for more information. Learn more about Garden Glory and composting at http://tinyurl.com/ cjk7pr9.

WSU names grads

PULLMAN — North Olympic Peninsula students have earned undergraduate degrees from Washington State University for the fall 2012 semester. Graduates are Sarah Sanders, Forks, with a Bachelor of Arts in social sciences; Cody Othoudt, City compost sale Port Hadlock, with a B.A. in history, cum laude; LauPORT ANGELES — ren Anderson, Port “Garden Glory,” locally made Class A compost, will Townsend, with a B.A. in be offered at 20 percent off human development, cum regular price from Monday laude; Michael Grace, Port through Saturday, April 13, Townsend, with a B.A. in social sciences; Sheridan at the compost facility at the Regional Transfer Sta- Allen, Sequim, with a Bachelor of Science in tion, 3501 W. 18th St. mechanical engineering, Sale prices will be: $16 per cubic yard for 1-3 cubic magna cum laude; and Kali Curtis, Sequim, with a B.A. yards; $13.60 per cubic in anthropology. yard for 4-49 cubic yards; Allen’s magna cum $12.80 per cubic yard for laude distinction recognizes 50-99 yards; $12 per cubic yard for 100-299 yards; and a minimum cumulative grade-point average from $11.20 per cubic yard for 3.7 to 3.9 and Othoudt’s 300 or more yards. and Anderson’s cum laude No half-yard sales or a minimum cumulative rain checks will be GPA of 3.5 to 3.7. accepted. Visa, Master Peninsula Daily News Card, Discover and checks

Classified employees in the Crescent School District were honored with a week’s worth of treats from students and teaching staff during Classified Public School Employee Week. Classified employees are, back row from left, Lynnette Crouse, Nora Williams, Bonnie Hansen, Tracy Hoffman, Carol Kitchens (partially obscured), Cara Ottele, Shelby White and Jennifer Gross; and front row from left, Louisa Monger, Terry Nunn, Katy Middlestead, Jennifer Gross and Linda Sage.

Crescent School District honors staff members PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOYCE — Crescent School District recently honored its classified staff during Classified Public School Employee Week by recognizing them throughout the week with a number of activities. The 22 classified staff members at Crescent were treated to break-

fast and/or lunch every day; given letters written by the elementary students and personal reflections written by the teachers; had a large banner made by the high school art class; were serenaded by the student body; were given small gifts and cards during the week from teachers and administrators;

and had a large recognition reception after school in which they each received certificates of appreciation from the teachers and a large lunch provided by the administration. The classified staff members also were recognized individually throughout the week.

Foundation lauds volunteer PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Patsene Dashiell recently was awarded the Sequim Education Foundation’s Crystal Apple award in recognition of her 10 years of service to

BUILDINGS FOR SALE The General Services Administration

invites you to bid on one or both of these unique buildings! GOVERNMENT PROPERTY 2 SEALED BID SALES OFF-SITE REMOVAL Bid opening 2:00 pm April 25, 2013

the organization. The prize was given at an SEF board of directors dinner. Dashiell became a member of the volunteer board of directors in the 20022003 school year. She was elected secretary in 2003 and served in that capacity until 2012. “Patsene has been an important part of every board meeting and every SEF program to benefit Sequim public school students and teachers for more than 10 years,” said SEF President Dick Hughes.

For the past seven years, Dashiell has helped stage the Student Film Festival and Family Spaghetti Dinner, and she has been an official recorder at the Engineering Challenge since its inception.

Run organizer Last year, she worked on organizing and implementing both the SEF Family Fun Run and the Shoes 4Kids Program. “Over the past decade, Patsene has touched the lives of thousands of Sequim

schoolchildren for good,” SEF Vice President Elna Kawal said. The SEF Crystal Apple award is reserved to recognize those individuals making outstanding contributions to its mission. Previous recipients include Jeanne Martin, founder and 12-year benefactor; Katie Gilles, second president and 10-year board member; and former school Superintendent Bill Bentley, benefactor and five-year board member. For more information, visit www.sequimed.org.

Woman recognized for work with fundraisers PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Patsy Mattingley was named a “Very Special Friend of Sequim Education Foundation” by resolution of the board of directors for her role in staging the foundation’s first two variety show fundraisers. Money raised by the annual variety show funds scholarship prizes for SEF events as well as a performing arts scholarship presented in honor of the current year’s show performers.

Log Cabin Inn, 3,385 sf, 2 story Historic Lodge/Restaurant

PATSENE DASHIELL

‘Grateful to artists’ “We are very grateful to the artists donating their performances each year because it’s so much fun to watch our schoolkids’ faces when they win a college scholarship,” Hughes said. SEF allocates $13,500 in scholarship awards each year for winners of its Engineering Challenge and Film Festival contests.

Sequim Education Foundation President Dick Hughes presents Patsy Mattingley with a plaque celebrating her status as a “Very Special Friend” to the foundation. Programs are intended to encourage students to pursue studies in mathematics, science and the creative arts. Scholarship funds are paid when a student is accepted into a college or

trade school after graduating from high school. More than a 100 Sequim public school students have won SEF scholarship prizes over the past several years. For more information, visit www.sequimed.org.

Vendors sought for art market PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 33757901

Quarters No. 3, 2,252 sq ft, 3 bdrm home with attached garage

Quilcene National Fish Hatchery 281 Fish Hatchery Road, Quilcene, WA 98376 http://rc.gsa.gov andrew.schwartz@gsa.gov 253-931-7556

SEQUIM — Vendors are sought for the Helen Haller Elementary Art Spring Market and Shopping Bazaar, set for Saturday, May 4. The event will be held at

the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. HHEART is a division of Helen Haller Elementary’s Parent-Teacher Organization and raises money exclusively for arts educapeninsuladailynews.com

tion and enrichment programs at the school. Vendors are requested to provide an item for a raffle at the event. For more information, phone Jodie Coulson at 360797-4587.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, March 29-30, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Holiday bird honored

Salmon in Sekiu The way blackmouth fishing has gone this season, I’m hesitant to give anything resembling a good report. “That’s how the blackmouth season has been,” Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-4522357) in Port Angeles said. “There will be one good day, then decent for half a day, and then completely die.” All that being said, anglers seemingly had a nice weekend in Sekiu. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s sport fishing reports had double-digit catch numbers at the Olson’s Resort ramp last Saturday and Sunday. There have also been some good reports out of Freshwater Bay. Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360-683-1950) in Sequim said an angler caught three there in two days. But, as Aunspach found out firsthand, that doesn’t mean Freshwater Bay is a hot spot. He fished the bay earlier this week and his boat didn’t bring home any fish.

Trout plants The state recently planted trout in a few of the North Olympic Peninsula’s year-round lakes in time for spring break. Lake Leland received 300 cutthroat earlier this month, and Teal Lake received 40 cutthroat a few weeks ago and 40 rainbow last Friday. TURN

TO

HORTON/B7

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles’ Larsson Chapman is caught off the bag between second and third by Port Townsend’s Sean Dwyer in the first inning at Port Angeles Civic Field.

Riders romp past PT Strong pitching, hitting propels Port Angeles BY LEE HORTON PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Michael Konopaski shut down Port Townsend and the Port Angeles bats lit up the Redskins as the Roughriders picked up a 9-1 Olympic League baseball win Wednesday at Civic Field. Port Angeles has recovered from losing its first three games on the last at-bat to earn two consecutive victories.

Baseball “We’re finally playing some home games. It helps out a lot,” Riders coach Chad Wagner said. “And guys started to hit, and we minimized errors.” Konopaski allowed just two hits and one run over six innings, while striking out five. “I felt like I had good com-

mand today, good velocity,” Konopaski said. “I was just out there getting some ground balls. I wasn’t really worried about anything else, just getting ground balls so we could get out of the inning.”

New role Making a rare start, Konopaski, normally the Riders’ second baseman and closer, won the match-up against Redskins ace Cody Russell. “He threw well,” Port Townsend coach Tom Webster said of Konopaski. “He’s a baseball player. He handcuffed us a little bit.”

After Konopaski’s solid six innings, freshman Curan Bradley pitched a three-up, threedown seventh in his first appearance of the season. “That was his first time out . . . and he showed that he wasn’t nervous or anything like that,” Wagner said. “Went out there and just pounded the strike zone, just like we asked him to do, so that proved something to me.” Perhaps more important for the near future, the Riders’ bats came alive, with 13 hits and nine runs. TURN

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BASEBALL/B7

PA shuts out PT in softball Riders stay at top of league PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Cara Cristion and Sarah Steinman of Port Angeles combined for a two-hit shutout against Port Townsend to help keep the Roughriders undefeated and on top of the Olympic League softball standings. Port Angeles beat the Redskins 10-0 in six innings Wednesday at the Dry Creek athletic fields to improve to 5-0 for the season and in league. Sequim defeated Bremerton 15-0 on Wednesday to remain a half-game behind the Riders at 4-0 in league. The Wolves are 5-0 overall.

Preps Port Angeles and Sequim won’t play for the first time until April 10 at Sequim. According to the league’s master schedule, they were set to play today but both schools moved the game to April 10 before the season even started. They are scheduled to play their second game at Port Angeles on April 24. On Wednesday, Cristion and Steinman kept the Redskins offbalanced with strong pitching. Cristion started and threw the first four innings, giving up just two hits while striking out four and walking two. Steinman pitched the final two innings, allowing no hits while fanning three batters and walking none.

“This was a good game played by both teams,” Port Angeles coach Randy Steinman said. “Port Townsend made some great plays in the outfield. Our pitchers allowed only four base runners, and our defense got back on track with zero errors.” The Riders led 5-0 after two innings and 7-0 after three. They put the game away with three runs in the bottom of the sixth. Alyssa Wetzler led the Rider offense by going 2 for 2 with two RBI. Haley Gray also had two RBI while Ashlee Reid hit a double. Sarah Steinman had an RBI. Gen Polizzi and Rilke Rutenbeck had a hit each for Port Townsend. Megan Lee pitched a complete-game six innings for the Redskins, striking out two and walking four.

Port Townsend coach Heather Polizzi picked Crystal Crump as the defensive player of the game. Crump had four catches playing center field. The Riders have next week off for spring break and won’t play again until April 9 against Kingston (3-0). The Redskins (0-5), meanwhile, next host Olympic (2-2) today. Port Angeles 10, Port Townsend 0 Port Townsend 0 0 0 0 0 0 —0 2 3 Port Angeles 1 4 2 0 0 3 — 10 7 0 WP- Cristion; LP- Lee Pitching Statistics Port Townsend: Lee 6IP, 2K, 4BB, 7H, 10R. Port Angeles: Cristion 4IP, 0R, 2H, 4K, 2BB; Steinman 2IP, 0R, 0H, 3K, 0BB. Hitting Statistics Port Townsend: G. Polizzi 1-2; Rutenbeck 1-3. Port Angeles: Wetzler 2-2, 2RBI; Steinman 1-2, RBI; Johnson 1-1; Gray 1-3, 2RBI; Reid 1-3, 2B.

TURN

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PREPS/B7

Morse sets M’s spring HR record Seattle nips Cubs 6-4 on Thursday THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MESA, Ariz. — One last time at HoHoKam Stadium, “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” during the seventh inning was changed to include the lyric, “If the Cubs don’t win, it’s a shame.” Thursday’s game marked the end of a 17-year stay by the Chicago Cubs at HoHoKam as their spring training home. The club moves into a new facility about four miles away next year. The fans turned out to say goodbye, 11,635 were in attendance as the Cubs lost 6-4 to the Seattle Mariners. Seattle’s Michael Morse set the Mariners’ record for spring training home runs with his

ninth, coming off Villanueva to lead off the second inning. “He’s a big strong guy, but he is more than that,” Mariners manager Eric Wedge said. “He works at this craft.” The previous record was eight by Mike Wilson in 2009. Mariners No. 2 starter Hisashi Iwakuma was scheduled to throw 80 pitches but came out after four innings because a dry skin on his fingertips. He said through an interpreter that it happens every spring and it was nothing to be worried about. Iwakuma had a solid outing other than a ball he left up to Cubs left fielder Alfonso Soriano, who connected for a tworun shot in the third inning. In his four innings, the righthander allowed five hits, three

earned with no walks and four strikeouts. “I felt good, generally, but I threw a couple of pitches too high,” he said through an interpreter. “I am ready for the season to start.” The Mariner’s Kelly Shoppach had a two-out, two-run double off Hisanori Takahashi in the eighth inning to break open a 4-all game. The Cubs had a 132-119-13 all-time record at HoHoKam, which becomes the home of the Oakland Athletics starting in 2015. “It’ll be interesting to see how the new one compares to some of the other nice parks in Arizona,” said 74-year-old Wes Odean, an THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Elmhurst, Ill., resident down for Seattle’s Michael Morse spring training.

hit his ninth homer of

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M’S/B7 spring Thursday.

SPORTS/BUSINESS

FOR MY MONEY, Easter is the best candy holiday. Christmas has some nice sweets, but most Lee of them are just Horton festive versions of year-round candies, merely coming in special holiday colors or packaging. Valentine’s Day does have those heartshape boxes filled with chocolates, but that’s about it. And don’t get me started on Halloween, which is more about quantity than quality, with plastic bags being loaded with what I swear are sub-par forms of everyday candy bars. Nope, it’s Easter. There are all manner of eggshaped goodies, some are chocolate filled with another type of sugar, and others have a candy shell filled with chocolate. There are various jelly beans to choose from, including those made by Starburst. Finally, marshmallow treats, highlighted by the iconic birdshaped Peeps. Personally, I’m not a fan, but I can’t deny their popularity. And now, Peeps are birds of distinction, according to a press release sent out this week by the American Bird Conservancy. “American Bird Conservancy, bowing to a tidal wave of public opinion,” the release said, “has declared the Peep (Marshmallicious delicious) to be this year’s Easter bird of the week.” The Peep becomes the first bird to be named bird of the week more than once. Even more, each of the different colors of Peeps will receive its own species status. Until this week, only yellow Peeps were recognized as a full species; but now the blue, teal, pink and purple forms, called color morphs, will receive that same consideration. “There simply isn’t any evidence that these forms interbreed,” senior scientist Dr. David Wiedenfeld said. “While they can often be found roosting in the same box, the fact is that nobody has ever seen an intermediate bird between the color morphs.” Needless to say, this is big news for the ornithological community.


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

Today’s

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Trophée Hassan II Agadir, Morocco (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Sony Ericsson Open, Semifinal - Key Biscayne, Fla. (Live) 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Houston Open (Live) 4 p.m. (7) KIRO Basketball NCAA, Oregon vs. Louisville, NCAA Tournament, Midwest Sweet 16, Site: Lucas Oil Stadium - Indianapolis (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ATP, Sony Ericsson Open (Live) 4:30 p.m. (28) TBS Basketball NCAA, Kansas vs. Michigan, NCAA Tournament, South Region Sweet 16, Site: Cowboys Stadium Arlington, Texas (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Boxing, Vera vs. Bondoravas (Live) 6:30 p.m. (7) KIRO Basketball NCAA, Michigan State vs. Duke, NCAA Tournament, Midwest Region Sweet 16, Site: Lucas Oil Stadium - Indianapolis (Live) 7 p.m. (28) TBS Basketball NCAA, Florida vs. Florida Gulf Coast, NCAA Tournament, South Region Sweet 16, Site: Cowboys Stadium - Arlington, Texas (Live)

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Baseball: Vashon Island at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Olympic at Port Townsend, 4:15 p.m. Softball: Vashon Island at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Olympic at Port Townsend, 4:15 p.m.; Port Angeles JV at Forks, DH, 3 p.m. Boys Soccer: Vashon Island at Chimacum, 4 p.m.

Saturday No events scheduled

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Women’s League Wednesday 7 Cedars Casino 57, Halberg Chiropractic and Massage 36 Top Scorers: Halberg Chiropractic: Shayla Nothern 11, Beth Krause 10; 7 Cedars: Ashley Payne 20, Ali Crumb 19 Windermere Lady Riders 69, Sequim Lady Wolves 34 Top Scorers: Windermere: Krista Johnson 19, Hayley Baxley 14; Sequim: Emma Anderson 12, Hailey Lester 7

Baseball American League West Division W L Houston 0 0 Los Angeles 0 0 Oakland 0 0 Seattle 0 0 Texas 0 0 East Division W L Baltimore 0 0 Boston 0 0 New York 0 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 Toronto 0 0 Central Division W L Chicago 0 0 Cleveland 0 0 Detroit 0 0 Kansas City 0 0 Minnesota 0 0

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Start of Season Sunday’s Game Texas at Houston, 5:05 p.m.

BEST

Saturday OF THE BEST

Ten-year-old Nadia Cole, above, and two of her Port Angeles Swim Club teammates placed in the top 16 at the 2013 Northwest Regional Championships at King County Aquatic Center this past weekend. The event included the top swimmers from the seven-state region of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Alaska and Hawaii. Cole broke both of her Port Angeles pool records in the 50- and 100-yard breaststroke, placing second in the 50 breast with a time of 34.76 and sixth in the 100 breast with a time of 1:20.35. She also placed sixth in the 100 freestyle in 1:03.82 and 12th in 200 free in 2:20.84. Teammates Kenzie Johnson, 11, placed 16th in 200 individual medley in 2:32.84, while Tracie Macias, 17, placed 15th in 100 backstroke with a time of 1:02.61.

National League West Division W L Arizona 0 0 Colorado 0 0 Los Angeles 0 0 San Diego 0 0 San Francisco 0 0 East Division W L Atlanta 0 0 Miami 0 0 New York 0 0 Philadelphia 0 0 Washington 0 0 Central Division W L Chicago 0 0 Cincinnati 0 0 Milwaukee 0 0 Pittsburgh 0 0 St. Louis 0 0

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Season starts Monday

College Basketball Men’s NCAA Tournament FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 19 N.C. A&T 73, Liberty 72 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 67, Middle Tennessee 54 Wednesday, March 20 James Madison 68, LIU Brooklyn 55 La Salle 80, Boise State 71 EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 21 At Rupp Arena Lexington, Ky. Butler 68, Bucknell 56 Marquette 59, Davidson 58 At HP Pavilion San Jose, Calif. California 64, UNLV 61 Syracuse 81, Montana 34 Friday, March 22 At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Temple 76, N.C. State 72 Indiana 83, James Madison 62 At The Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Miami 78, Pacific 49 Illinois 57, Colorado 49 Third Round Saturday, March 23 At Rupp Arena Lexington, Ky. Marquette 74, Butler 72 At HP Pavilion San Jose, Calif. Syracuse 66, California 60 Sunday, March 24 At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Indiana 58, Temple 52 At The Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Miami 63, Illinois 59 Regional Semifinals Thursday At The Verizon Center Washington Miami (29-6) vs. Marquette (25-8), late Indiana (29-6) vs. Syracuse (28-9), late Regional Championship Saturday Semifinal winners, TBA

SOUTH REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 21 At The Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills, Mich. Michigan 71, South Dakota State 56 VCU 88, Akron 42 Friday, March 22 At Wells Fargo Center Philadelphia Florida Gulf Coast 78, Georgetown 68 San Diego State 70, Oklahoma 55 At The Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. North Carolina 78, Villanova 71 Kansas 64, Western Kentucky 57 At The Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Florida 79, Northwestern State 47 Minnesota 83, UCLA 63 Third Round Saturday, March 23 At The Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills, Mich. Michigan 78, VCU 53 Sunday, March 24 At Wells Fargo Center Philadelphia Florida Gulf Coast 81, San Diego State 71 At The Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. Kansas 70, North Carolina 58 At The Frank Erwin Center Austin, Texas Florida 78, Minnesota 64 Regional Semifinals Today At Cowboys Stadium Arlington, Texas Kansas (31-5) vs. Michigan (28-7), 4:37 p.m. Florida Gulf Coast (26-10) vs. Florida (28-7), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Sunday Semifinal winners, TBA MIDWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 21 At Rupp Arena Lexington, Ky. Louisville 79, N.C. A&T 48 Colorado State 84, Missouri 72 At The Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills, Mich. Michigan State 65, Valparaiso 54 Memphis 54, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 52 At HP Pavilion San Jose, Calif. Saint Louis 64, New Mexico State 44 Oregon 68, Oklahoma State 55 Friday, March 22 At Wells Fargo Center Philadelphia Duke 73, Albany (N.Y.) 61 Creighton 67, Cincinnati 63 Third Round Saturday, March 23 At Rupp Arena Lexington, Ky. Louisville 82, Colorado State 56 At The Palace of Auburn Hills Auburn Hills, Mich. Michigan State 70, Memphis 48 At HP Pavilion San Jose, Calif. Oregon 74, Saint Louis 57 Sunday, March 24 At Wells Fargo Center Philadelphia Duke 66, Creighton 50

Regional Semifinals Today At Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis Louisville (31-5) vs. Oregon (28-8), 4:15 p.m. Duke (29-5) vs. Michigan State (27-8), 30 minutes following Regional Championship Sunday Semifinal winners, TBA WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 21 At EnergySolutions Arena Salt Lake City Wichita State 73, Pittsburgh 55 Gonzaga 64, Southern 58 Arizona 81, Belmont 64 Harvard 68, New Mexico 62 Friday, March 22 At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Ohio State 95, Iona 70 Iowa State 76, Notre Dame 58 At The Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. Mississippi 57, Wisconsin 46 La Salle 63, Kansas State 61 Third Round Saturday, March 23 At EnergySolutions Arena Salt Lake City Arizona 74, Harvard 51 Wichita State 76, Gonzaga 70 Sunday, March 24 At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Ohio State 78, Iowa State 75 At The Sprint Center Kansas City, Mo. La Salle 76, Mississippi 74 Regional Semifinals Thursday At The Staples Center Los Angeles Arizona (27-7) vs. Ohio State (28-7), late Wichita State (28-8) vs. La Salle (24-9), late Regional Championship Saturday Semifinal winners, TBA FINAL FOUR At The Georgia Dome Atlanta National Semifinals Saturday, April 6 Midwest champion vs. West champion, 3 or 5:30 p.m. South champion vs. East champion, 3 or 5:30 p.m. National Championship Monday, April 8 Semifinal winners, 6 p.m.

Basketball

x-Denver Utah Portland Minnesota

49 24 .671 36 36 .500 33 38 .465 25 45 .357 Pacific Division W L Pct x-L.A. Clippers 49 23 .681 Golden State 41 32 .562 L.A. Lakers 37 35 .514 Sacramento 26 46 .361 Phoenix 23 49 .319 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct x-New York 44 26 .629 x-Brooklyn 42 29 .592 Boston 37 34 .521 Philadelphia 28 43 .394 Toronto 26 45 .366 Southeast Division W L Pct y-Miami 56 15 .789 x-Atlanta 40 32 .556 Washington 26 45 .366 Orlando 18 54 .250 Charlotte 17 54 .239 Central Division W L Pct x-Indiana 45 27 .625 x-Chicago 39 31 .557 Milwaukee 34 36 .486 Detroit 24 48 .333 Cleveland 22 48 .314 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

4½ 17 19½ 27 GB — 8½ 12 23 26 GB — 2½ 7½ 16½ 18½ GB — 16½ 30 38½ 39

Wednesday’s Games Boston 93, Cleveland 92 Charlotte 114, Orlando 108 Philadelphia 100, Milwaukee 92 Atlanta 107, Toronto 88 New York 108, Memphis 101 Chicago 101, Miami 97 Indiana 100, Houston 91 L.A. Lakers 120, Minnesota 117 L.A. Clippers 105, New Orleans 91 Oklahoma City 103, Washington 80 San Antonio 100, Denver 99 Utah 103, Phoenix 88 Sacramento 105, Golden State 98 Brooklyn 111, Portland 93 Thursday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, late Indiana at Dallas, late Sacramento at Phoenix, late Today’s Games Washington at Orlando, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Charlotte at New York, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Denver, 6 p.m. Utah at Portland, 7 p.m.

National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 54 17 .761 — x-Memphis 47 24 .662 7 Houston 39 32 .549 15 Dallas 35 36 .493 19 New Orleans 25 47 .347 29½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 53 19 .736 —

Saturday’s Games Chicago at Dallas, 11 a.m. Orlando at Atlanta, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 5 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Utah, 6 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

GB — 5 10 21 22

5:30 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer EPL, Manchester United vs. Sunderland (Live) 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Trophée Hassan II (Live) 9 a.m. (7) KIRO Tennis WTA, Sony Open, Women’s Final (Live) 9 a.m. (26) ESPN Women’s Basketball NCAA, Division I Tournament (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Houston Open (Live) 11:30 a.m. (26) ESPN Women’s Basketball NCAA, Division I Tournament (Live) Noon (5) KING Golf PGA, Houston Open (Live) Noon (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Seattle Mariners vs. Colorado Rockies, spring training, Site: Coors Field Denver (Live) 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC Golf PGA, Houston Open (Live) 1 p.m. (2) CBUT Figure Skating ISU, World Cup Encore (Live) 1:20 p.m. (7) KIRO Basketball NCAA, NCAA Tournament, Elite Eight, Site: Verizon Center - Washington, D.C. (Live) 3 p.m. (7) KIRO Basketball NCAA, NCAA Tournament, Elite Eight, Site: Staples Center - Los Angeles (Live) 3 p.m. (25) ROOT Soccer MLS, Portland Timbers vs. Colorado Rapids, Site: Dick’s Sporting Goods Park - Commerce City, Colo. (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Toronto Maple Leafs vs. Ottawa Senators, Site: Scotiabank Place - Ottawa, Ont. (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MFL, Atlas vs. Cruz Azul Site: Estadio Azul - Mexico (Live) 6 p.m. (6) KONG Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC vs. Real Salt Lake, Site: Rio Tinto Stadium - Sandy, Utah (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Women’s Basketball, NCAA Division I Tournament (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Vancouver Canucks vs. Edmonton Oilers, Site: Rexall Place - Edmonton (Live) 7:30 p.m. (10) CITY Soccer MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps vs. Chivas U.S.A., Site: Home Depot Center - Carson, Calif. (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Division I Tournament, Sweet 16, Site: Spokane Arena - Spokane (Live)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

B7

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

Preps: Sequim routs CONTINUED FROM B5 League action Wednesday. Mallori Cossell kept the Cowboys in the game with a Sequim 15, three-run homer deep in Bremerton 0 center field. She went 2 for BREMERTON — The 4 in the game. Wolves improved to 4-0 in Chimacum smacked the Olympic League and eight hits in the game with 5-0 overall as Makayla Ashley Kelly also going 2 Bentz and Melissa Lewis for 4 and Megan Dukek hitcombined for a three-hit, ting a double. five-inning shutout WednesCydney Nelson went the day. distance on the mound, Sequim has yet to allow allowing just five hits while a run in league play. striking out four and walkBailey Rhodefer and ing only one. MaryLu Clift had monster Nelson helped herself days at the plate for Sequim out by playing tough as Rhodefer went 5 for 5 defense on the mound with with a home run, five RBI three defensive plays while and three runs scored while Erin Bainbridge and KierClift was 3 for 4 with a sten Snyder also had three home run and a triple, six defensive plays each. RBI and three runs scored. Cossell caught a hard Lewis, meanwhile, went line drive to short center a perfect 3 for 3 at bat and field while Kristen Castillo scored four runs. and Kyah McKinlay each Bentz was 2 for 2 and caught a fly ball in the outscored a run. field. The Wolves displayed But the Cowboys also speed as well as power with had four defensive errors in three players earning which two runners came steals. Columbia Haupt led around to score on them. the way with two while Rhodefer and Shelby Lott Baseball had one each. Sequim 15, Bremerton 0

Bremerton 7, Sequim 1

Sequim 1 3 6 4 1 — 15 19 0 Bremerton 0 0 0 0 0 — 0 3 2 WP- Bentz; LP- Muhlman Pitching Statistics Sequim: Bentz 3IP, 0R, 1H, 2K, 2BB; Lewis 2IP, 0R, 2H, 4K, 0BB. Bremerton: Muhlman 5IP, 15R, 19H, 6K, 5BB. Hitting Statistics Sequim: Rhodefer 5-5, HR, 5RBI, 3R; Clift 3-4, HR, 3B, 6RBI, 3R; Lewis 3-3, 4R; Bentz 2-2, R; Lott 2-3, R; Kirsch RBI, R. Bremerton: Reed 1-1; Richer 1-1.

BREMERTON — The Knights’ Eli Fultz was a little too much for the Wolves in Olympic League action Wednesday. Fultz struck out a season-high 12 batters while limiting the Wolves to just two hits in seven innings. Bremerton remained Cedar Park 5, tied for first place in league Chimacum 3 with North Kitsap at 5-0 BOTHELL — Cedar each while Sequim fell to Park Christian held off the 2-3, tied for fourth place Cowboys in Nisqually with Port Angeles and

North Mason. Austin Clement had a hit and a run for Sequim in the game while Chris Whitaker had the other hit. Nick Johnston had an RBI. The Wolves next play at Olympic on Monday and at Port Townsend on Tuesday. Bremerton 7, Sequim 1 Sequim 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 —1 2 4 Bremerton 4 1 0 0 1 1 x — 7 7 0 WP- Fultz; LP- Rigg Pitching Statistics Bremerton: Fultz 7IP, 1R, 2H, 12K. Hitting Statistics Sequim: Clement 1-2, R; Johnston RBI. Bremerton: Amicangelo 2-3, 2RBI, 2R, 2B; Merrill 2-2, 2RBI, R; Noll 2B, 2R.

Girls Tennis Sequim 7, Klahowya 0 SEQUIM — The Wolves had only one three-set match to improve to a perfect 2-0 record in the Olympic League, 4-0 overall. In singles action, Hillary Smith defeated Katie Gallegos 7-5, 6-2 at No. 1; Anna Prorok beat Danielle Frederick 6-4, 2-6, 6-3 at No. 2; and Hannah Gauthun defeated Shania Rose 6-1, 6-1 at No. 3. In doubles competition, Melanie Guan and Karen Chan beat Kelsey Dammeyer and Sidney Winters 6-1, 6-1 at No. 1; Maggie Christie and Heidi Stallman defeated Caroline Powell and Natalie Royle 6-0, 6-2 at No. 2; Kortney Oen and Anna Mittman defeated Emily Schurman and Miranda Eberhard 6-0, 6-0 at No. 3; and Tenisha Powless and Courntey Cassal beat Chloe Stilts and Tyana Cara 6-0, 6-0 at No. 4.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

GOING

AIRBORNE

Beau Pilon, right, playing for Olympic Sporting Goods of Forks, attempts to block a shot put up by Black Diamond Electrical’s Drew Ready (24) on Sunday during the championship game of the Nate Crippen Memorial Basketball Tournament in Forks. Black Diamond Electrical defeated Olympic Sporting Goods 68-53 to win the tournament.

Baseball: Riders win second game in a row CONTINUED FROM B5 And unlike Tuesday’s win over Olympic when it scored four quick runs and then outlasted the Trojans, Port Angeles continued swatting hits throughout the game and plated runs in all but one inning. All but one of those runs came with two outs. “It’s timely hitting,� Wagner said. “Actually, it makes me nervous, I hate when they do that.� Senior Kevin Herzog was right in the middle of most of the Riders’ offense, accounting for seven of Port Angeles’ nine runs (three RBI, four runs).

“He’s been struggling lately, so it was good for him to finally break out,� Wagner said. “He’s been hitting balls hard, but just right at people. “So, I put him down in that nine-hole — kind of that second leadoff — see if he could get some more fastballs. “He did his job today and drove in some runs.� Herzog began the season hitting leadoff for the Riders. He said a pep talk from Wagner helped him overcome his early season slump. “He said ‘You just need to stop thinking about it,’ � Herzog said. “So, I went up there with

a clear mind and said, ‘I’m just going to hit the ball.’ “That’s what happened. I was just being patient, waiting for my pitch. When I saw my pitch, I tried capitalizing on it.� Zach Lovik, who started at second base in place of Konopaski, drove in two runs for Port Angeles, and Richard Crawford went 2 for 2 at the plate with an RBI. “It’s nice that we’re actually starting to come together and start hitting,� Konopaski, who contributed a hit and a run, said. “It gives the pitchers a lot to work with.� The Redskins weren’t nearly has helpful to Rus-

sell and Dillon Ralls, who pitched the final four innings in relief. Port Townsend managed only two hits and five base runners in the game. The lone run came in the fourth inning when the recently surging Emmett Davis doubled home Sean Dwyer from second base. It was Davis’ third consecutive game with an RBI. Port Townsend’s other hit was a single by Russell in the sixth. “We’ve got to get our bats rolling,� Webster said. The Redskins (0-5, 0-6) were playing their third game in three days, and are in the midst of a brutal stretch in which they play

seven games in 11 days, so they won’t have much practice time in the batting cages until next week. In the field, Port Townsend prolonged innings by committing four errors. “We had Cody out on the mound, he’s our ace, but we ended up making too many errors,� Webster said. “We’ve been playing pretty clean baseball, but today wasn’t one of those days. So, we’ve got some stuff we’ve got to fix.� The Redskins will again try for their first win of the season today when they host Olympic (1-3, 1-5). The Trojans’ only win of the season came against

the Olympic League’s other winless team, Kingston. Port Angeles (2-3) has the weekend off before facing two big tests early next week. The Riders host league powerhouse North Kitsap (5-0, 7-0) on Monday and 5-1 Klahowya (5-3 overall) on Tuesday. Port Angeles 9, Port Townsend 1 Port Townsend 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 — 1 2 4 Port Angeles 2 1 2 0 1 3 x — 9 13 0 WP- Mi. Konopaski; LP- Russell Pitching Statistics Port Townsend: Russell 3 IP, K, 3 BB, 5 R; D. Ralls 3 IP, 2 BB, 4 R. Port Angeles: Mi. Konopaski 6 IP, 2 H, 5 K, 2 BB, ER; Bradley IP, 2K. Hitting Statistics Port Townsend: Davis 1-3, 2B, RBI; Russell 1-3. Port Angeles: Herzog 2-3, 3 RBI, 4 R, 2 SB; Lovik 2-3, 2 RBI; Crawford 2-2, RBI.

Horton: College fishing classes M’s: Notebook from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ■ River Fishing: Friday, May 10, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, May 11, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ■ Fishing the Peninsula: Friday, June 7, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, June 8, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for these classes, phone Peninsula College at 360-417-6340.

Halibut clarification The second weekend of the Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) halibut fishery is open Thursday, May 30, through Saturday, June 1. I wrote the wrong day of the week in Thursday’s column.

Send photos, stories Have a photograph, a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique? Send it to sports@

peninsuladailynews.com or P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.

CONTINUED FROM B5 NOTES: Wedge said the team won’t make its final roster decision between outfielders Jason Bay and Casper Wells until Sunday. Villanueva has worn No. 57 all spring but will switch to No. 33 in regular season.

The Cubs will play games today and Saturday in Houston before opening the season in Pittsburgh on Monday The Mariners, meanwhile, play Colorado once in Salt Lake City on Saturday before heading to Oakland for opening day.

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CONTINUED FROM B5 chased online at https:// fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov, and from license dealers The Leland plants throughout the state. might not be noticeable, according to Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler College courses and former fishery bioloThe next round of Pengist. insula College fishing “That plant is so minusclasses, taught by Ron cule for a lake that size — Link, have been over 100 acres — that it announced. should not have much The first of these four impact,� Norden said. Menkal reports the fish- classes doesn’t start until the end of April, so there is ing at Lake Leland has plenty of time to register. been inconsistent. These classes consist of “Some guys are doing well, some aren’t,� he said. class time and a Saturday Norden said better fish- field trip. More information on ing is nigh. these course will come “Water temp at Lake later, but here are the Leland is now up to 47 dates and times: degrees, and fishing ■ Fishing for Steelhead: remains fair for the patient Friday, April 26, from 6 angler,� he said. p.m. to 9 p.m.; and Satur“I still see no insect day, April 27, 9 a.m. to 4 hatches on the lake in the p.m. evenings, but that should begin soon. ■ Fly Fishing: Thurs“By the end of next days from May 2 to May week, I hope to have 16, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; caught my first few largeand Saturday, May 18, mouth bass of the season in Lake Leland — if we don’t have another cold snap.�

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, March 29-30, 2013 PAGE

B8

Jefferson County Career Days given in schools by AAUW PT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Annual Career Days events sponsored by AAUW Port Townsend’s University Women’s Foundation of Jefferson County were held recently at schools across Jefferson County. The events are held to give middle school students the chance to interact with local professionals and learn about careers that may interest them.

Inspirational to students Such contacts help give students a direction and may inspire them to continue their education, AAUW said. Eighth-graders at Port Townsend’s Blue Heron Middle School and in Brinnon, Quilcene and Chimacum all attended career presentations provided by community members. The presentations were offered by: ■ Bill Beezley and East Jefferson Fire-Rescue staff. ■ Abbie Doll, Jeff Highbarger,

Sara Penhallegon (veterinary medicine). ■ Alicia Birr (naturopathic medicine). ■ Tristan Stoch (video production). ■ Nate Malmgren (Web design, online retail). ■ Michael Haberpointner, Amy Irene Lynch, Jessica Monroe (physical therapy). ■ Teresa Hoffman (physical fitness. ■ Garin Williams (law enforcement). ■ Mike Blair (juvenile justice). ■ Arran Stark (culinary arts). ■ Jed Bothell, Austin Henry, Rich Pindell (engineering). For more information about AAUW Port Townsend’s University Women’s Foundation of Jefferson County, email porttownsend@aauw wa.org.

POLLY LYLE/AAUW PORT TOWNSEND

Chimacum student Morgan Headley is flanked by East Jefferson Fire-Rescue’s Bill Beezley, left, and Ben Carver.

Scooter ads face wide scrutiny Lawmakers say TV spots may be misleading THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — TV ads show smiling seniors enjoying an “active” lifestyle on a motorized scooter, taking in the Grand Canyon, fishing on a pier and highfiving their grandchildren at a baseball game. The commercials, which promise freedom and independence to people with limited mobility, have driven the nearly $1 billion U.S. market for power wheelchairs and scooters.

Create false impression But the spots by the industry’s two leading companies, The Scooter Store and Hoveround, also have drawn scrutiny from doctors and lawmakers, who say they create the false impression that scooters are a convenient means of transportation rather than a medical necessity.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A frame grab from a Hoveround TV commercial shows seniors at the Grand Canyon. Members of Congress said the ads lead to hundreds of millions in unnecessary Medicare spending. Government inspectors said up to 80 percent of the scooters and power wheelchairs Medicare buys go to people who don’t meet the requirements. And doctors said more than money is at stake: Seniors who use scooters can become sedentary, which can exacerbate obesity and other disorders. “Patients have been

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brainwashed by The Scooter Store,” said Dr. Barbara Messinger-Rapport, director of geriatric medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. The scooter controversy, which escalated with a government raid on The Scooter’s Store’s New Braunfels, Texas, headquarters last month, underscores the influence TV ads can have. The Scooter Store and Hoveround spent more than $180 million on TV, radio and print advertising in 2011, up 20 percent since

2008, according to advertising tracker Kantar Media. The Scooter Store has been operating with a streamlined staff following massive layoffs in the wake of the raid by federal agents. Scooters — which are larger than power wheelchairs and often include a handlebar for steering — are covered by Medicare if they are prescribed by a doctor who has completed an evaluation showing the patient can’t function at home without a device. Medicare pays about 80 percent of the cost, which can range from $1,500 to $3,500. The rest is often picked up by supplemental insurance. Dr. Jerome Epplin of Litchfield, Ill., who testified before the Senate, said only about 1 out of every 10 patients who ask him for a scooter actually need one. But he said that sales representatives put pressure on him by accompanying patients to his office. The effect is coercive, he said. “It can be intimidating,” Epplin said.

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$ Briefly . . . US Airways, American merger OK’d NEW YORK — American Airlines parent AMR Corp. won approval for its merger with US Airways Group Inc. from a judge who also rejected a $20 million severance deal for Chief Executive Officer Tom Horton. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Sean Lane in Manhattan approved Horton the merger at a hearing while denying approval for Horton’s severance following opposition from the U.S. government, which called the pay a “golden parachute.” “The merger is a terrific result,” said Lane, who will issue a written decision explaining his reasoning. Approving Horton’s severance now “is just not appropriate.” Approval of the agreement moves Fort Worth, Texas-based American a step closer to finishing its reorganization and exiting bankruptcy protection. The carrier filed for bankruptcy in November 2011 and announced its merger with US Airways in February. The tie-up with US Airways will create the world’s largest carrier and will be completed through a bankruptcy reorganization plan for American. That plan requires creditor support and separate approval from Lane. The court hearing to approve the bankruptcy plan should occur in about six months, said Stephen Karotkin, an attorney for American. The combined company will operate under the American Airlines name. US Airways Chief Executive Officer Doug Parker will be CEO of the merged company, while AMR’s

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CEO, Horton, will become chairman. Horton’s $19.9 million severance, which was to be paid half in stock and half in cash after the merger is completed, was opposed by the U.S. government’s bankruptcy watchdog, the U.S. Trustee, which said the payment violates bankruptcy laws.

787 is ‘close’ WASHINGTON — Boeing CEO Jim McNerney said his company is “very close” to getting its troubled 787 Dreamliner jet back flying again. Two incidents involving batteries on 787s led the Federal Aviation Administration to ground the planes in January. Boeing is testing a redesign of the battery system. “We have a high degree of confidence in the technical solution we are testing right now with the FAA,” McNerney said at an aviation conference Thursday. “I think it will be sooner than later.” The Chicago-based conducted a test flight with the redesigned battery Monday.

Economy expands WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy grew at a slightly faster but still anemic rate at the end of last year. But there is hope that growth accelerated in early 2013 despite higher taxes and cuts in government spending. The economy grew at an annual rate of 0.4 percent in the OctoberDecember quarter, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That was slightly better than the previous estimate of 0.1 percent.

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Gold and silver Gold futures for June delivery fell $11.50, or 0.7 percent, to settle at $1,595.70 an ounce on Thursday. Silver for May delivery fell 29 cents, or 1 percent, to end at $28.32 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press


FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will present “I Am Alive� at Unity in the Olympics’ 10:30 a.m. Easter Sunday worship service. Unity’s annual meeting will follow the service. Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. A Course in Miracles group will meet at the church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., at noon Wednesday. A Cinema Night screening of “Freedom Writers� (PG-13) will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 6. Starring Hilary Swank, the movie is set in Los Angeles following the Rodney King riots. Through her belief in the potential of others, a new teacher brings peace to a class of mixed-race students, some of whom are gang members. The movie is based on a true story. Events are open to the public. Phone 360-457-3981.

Passion depicted SEQUIM — Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., will host “Experiencing the Passion� from noon to 7 p.m. today. “Experiencing the Passion� is a free self-guided tour of 11 events depicting the Last Supper through to the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus and ending with the empty tomb. Visit passion-sequim. com.

B9

Look within for divine

Briefly . . . Unity Easter services, meeting set

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

Unity Easter event PORT TOWNSEND — Unity of Port Townsend will host a CommUnity Easter Celebration at the Port Townsend Masonic Hall, 1338 Jefferson St., at 11 a.m. Sunday. The event will include music and a message. The service is open to all ages. Visit www.unitypt.org.

of all ages. All are welcome to attend.

Oneness blessings

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula Oneness Blessings group will host its monthly blessings circle at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday. Attendees can receive blessings of divine grace 12th Resurrection from certified Oneness PORT TOWNSEND — The 12th annual Resurrec- Blessing givers. The Oneness Blessings, tion Celebration Service is set for the Northwest Mari- or Deeksha, are not affilitime Center, 431 Water St., ated with any religion or spiritual belief. at 10 a.m. Easter Sunday. Donations are accepted The service will include to cover space rental. a variety of traditional and No child care is pronew music, and activities. Coffee and pastries will vided. For more, phone 360be served. 640-1254 or email saint The event will be held julianna@yahoo.com. upstairs, and the center’s elevator will be available. Evensong prayer The event is hosted by First Baptist Church of PORT TOWNSEND — Port Townsend. An Evensong Evening Phone 360-385-2752 or Prayer event will be held visit www.ptfbc.org. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1020 Jefferson St., First Presbyterian at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 7. The experience includes PORT TOWNSEND — First Presbyterian Church meditative singing drawn largely from Iona Abbey of of Port Townsend, 1111 Scotland and the Taize Franklin St., has set its final services of the Lenten community of France. The service, held the season and its Easter celefirst Sunday of each month, bration. is free and open to the “When Life Begins� public. (Matthew 28:1-8) is the For more information, sermon for the Easter Sunphone 360-385-3075. day services at 8:15 a.m. Peninsula Daily News and 11 a.m. Sunday.

HUMANS HAVE ALWAYS tried to describe God and define characteristics that make up the divine. Ancient people created images to help visualize what they felt in their souls. Judaism was unique with an invisible God, and Jews were explicitly directed not to make any image of God. It’s not easy worshipping something one cannot see; hence, ways developed to describe God so humans could better relate. But human characteristics are metaphors, not literal descriptions of God. Being created in the divine image refers to the spark of divine in our souls, not that God resembles a human. “Judaism believes there is a God — and only One God — but leaves what God is completely in the air� (Falcon/Glatner, Judaism for Dummies). The Kabbalists speak of God as Ein Sof, the endless, the limitless, the unknowable.

ISSUES OF FAITH Suzanne DeBey

with respect to time and place, and there is no gender implied. . . . God is the Ultimate and Universal First-Person Singular�

(Falcon/Glatner). So what does this mean in our lives? In Judaism, ultimately, we understand that God is expressed through our actions. Rabbi David Cooper eloquently illustrates this through the title of his book on Jewish mysticism, God is a Verb. The divine spark is not “out there� but within all creation and is manifested through our interaction with the world. Gandhi expressed this when he said, “God never appears to you in person but ‘I am that I am’ in action.� When Moses asked God The absurdity in reliat the burning bush how he gious comparisons can be should explain the presence seen when people try to disto the Israelites, the tinguish between the response was “Eh’yeh Asher “vengeful� God of the Jews, the “loving� God of ChrisEh’yeh� (“I am that I am�). tians, the “selective� God of To dig into the Hebrew Islam, the “multiple manigrammar and meaning of festations� of the Hindu God this phrase is complicated, and the “enlightened state� but essentially, it means that this “I am� is “unlimited in Buddhism God.

God is God, unchanging and limitless. Our methods of worship may differ, but there is only One. In Judaism, the multiple approaches to understanding God can be seen in our prayer to the God of our ancestors. It says, “God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob, God of Sarah, God of Rebecca, God of Rachel and God of Leah.� Rather than the “God of,� then listing the names, each name is preceded by the words “God of� to emphasize that everyone experiences God in their own unique way. There is no “right way.� By releasing the divine sparks hidden in all creation through our loving actions for others, we will become partners with the holy within us to repair this world. Rabbi Chaim Stern confronts the puzzling reality that is God in his prayer: “There is a mystery within me, and try as I may, I cannot come to the end of it. “It teaches me reverence for the unfathomable wonder at my core. “Hidden One, You alone know the secret within the secret within me, for are You not that secret?� Shalom.

_________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. Suzanne DeBey is a lay leader of the Port Angeles Jewish community.

Trinity Easter

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QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH 209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

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Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076 www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m.

“Seeing the Lord�

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

& Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor FRIDAY- MARCH 29 7:00 p.m. Good Friday Service EASTER SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship Continental Breakfast CHURCH OF CHRIST 9:45 a.m.office@pafumc.org 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles www.pafumc.org 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

FAITH BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 74(34s0ORT!NGELES 360-452-4551 A ministry of Faith Baptist Church of Sequim (GARBC) SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching

Carol Cissel Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. March 31, 10:30 a.m.

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race 0/"OXs  Pastor Neil Castle

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline�

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 Pastor Neil Allen

301 E. Lopez Ave., PA 452-2323 Pastor Richard Grinstad Sunday Worship at 9:30 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. SUNDAY Nursery Provided Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. most Sundays www.htlcpa.com

.3EQUIM!VEs  www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

"IBLECENTEREDs&AMILYFRIENDLY

31569893

SEQUIM — A wiremesh cross will be decorated with bouquets to begin the 10 a.m. Easter Sunday service at Trinity United Methodist Church, Lutheran services 100 S. Blake Ave. PORT TOWNSEND — Those attending are Grace Lutheran Church invited to bring flowers to has set its Easter weekend the cross immediately services. All services will be before the service. held at 1120 Walker St. In addition to the serToday’s Good Friday mon by the Rev. Bill Green, events will include two the Trinity Singers and worship services rememHandbell Choir will perbering Jesus’ crucifixion. form. The first service at noon A light brunch will will be the Stations of the precede the service from Cross, where specific 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. events in the final 24 hours of Jesus’ earthly life and Art and the Passion the meaning of those PORT TOWNSEND — events today will be dis“Crossroads 2013: Where cussed. Art and the Passion Meet� The second service at will be presented today and 7 p.m. is called Tenebrae, Saturday at First Baptist or Service of Darkness. Church, 1202 Lawrence St. This service recalls It will be open from God’s great love for human4 p.m. to 8 p.m. both days. ity, culminating in the Local artists portray the cross, and the service ends events between the Last in silence waiting for the Supper and the burial of resurrection. Jesus of Nazareth in a conThe Great Vigil of Easter will begin at 7 p.m. Sat- templative setting. Admission is one nonurday to transition from perishable food item to be the season of Lent into donated to Jefferson Easter. Easter Sunday, the cele- County food banks. For more information, bration begins with a potphone 360-385-2752 or luck breakfast at 9:15 a.m. and celebration worship at visit www.ptfbc.org. 10:30 a.m. New worship times All are welcome. For more information, PORT ANGELES — phone the church office at Holy Trinity Lutheran 360-385-1595. Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., will have a new Sunday Episcopal services morning worship opportunity beginning April 7. PORT ANGELES — St. Holy Trinity will now Andrew’s Episcopal Church offer two worship services will offer a Taize-style woreach Sunday: an early sership service of Stations of vice at 8:30 a.m. and a secthe Cross at 7 p.m. today. ond service at 11 a.m. The church, 510 E. Park Sunday school runs Ave., will use Stations crefrom 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. ated by members of the Children are welcome at congregation in 2010. either worship service, and Taize music, prayer, cana nursery is available at dlelight and silence are both times. added to create opportunity The 8:30 a.m. service for meditation on Christ’s will be the more traditional gift of his life. liturgical service, while Opportunity is provided the second service at for individual prayers and 11 a.m. will be less formal lighting of candles. This is and geared toward people a nondenominational service, and all are welcome. Earlier in the day, the Achievement traditional Good Friday and success service is offered at noon, with communion served on the North from the Reserved SacraOlympic ment. Peninsula. St. Andrew’s will host the Great Vigil of Easter at ENINSULA 8 p.m. Saturday, March 30. Easter Sunday services ROFILE are planned for 10 a.m., followed by brunch and an Every Sunday in Easter egg hunt for chilPENINSULA dren. DAILY NEWS All services are open to the public.


B10

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice JONATHAN BALCH October 1, 1987 March 22, 2013 Lifelong Cathlamet, Washington, resident Jonathan Lewis Balch, 25, passed away on March 22, 2013, at a Vancouver hospital. Jonathan was born on October 1, 1987, in Longview, Washington, to Michael and Darlene (Hagedorn) Balch. He graduated from Wahkiakum High School in 2006. In 2012, he received a degree as a medical assistant from Concord Career College in Portland, Oregon. He was a loving, caring young man who had a passion for sports and the medical field. He enjoyed helping

Mr. Balch people and loving his family and friends. Coaching youth sports brought him great joy. On July 13, 2011, he married Brittney Burke of Longview. He was a recent member of the Cathlamet

Emergency Medical Services and a lifelong member of River of Life Assembly of God Church, and had received the Gold Medal of Achievement in the church’s Royal Ranger Program. Jonathan is survived by his wife, Brittney Balch; daughter Kamryn Balch; son Austin Goodnight Balch; his parents, Mike and Darlene Balch; brother Christopher Balch; mother- and father-in-law Cindy and Jim Burke; and grandparents Donna Stansberry and Herbert and Sande Balch. Jonathan also leaves behind a large extended family and many friends. He was preceded in death by his grandma, Nymah Balch; grandpa Lewis Hagedorn; and a cousin, Autumn Balch. A viewing will take

SHARON YVONNE KENNEDY

place at Steele Chapel at Longview Memorial Park, 5050 Mount Solo Road, Longview, today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A celebration of Jonathan’s life will be held in JA Wendt Elementary School’s multipurpose room, 265 South Third Street in Cathlamet, on Saturday at 2 p.m. Casual dress is appreciated. There will be a private inurnment at Greenwood Cemetery in Cathlamet. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Jonathan’s name to Cathlamet First Aid Division, P.O. Box 142, Cathlamet, WA 98612. Steele Chapel at Longview Memorial Park and Crematory is in charge of arrangements.

April 9, 1945 March 21, 2013 Mrs. Sharon Yvonne Kennedy of Sequim passed away suddenly at the age of 67. She was born on April 9, 1945, in Cottonwood, Idaho, to Charles James Strong and Geraldine Louise Stearns. Sharon married Gordon Payton in Lewiston, Idaho, in 1960. They divorced in 1966. Sharon then married Mike Kennedy in 1973 in Hoquiam. They divorced in 1977, and she never married again. She earned a certificate in bookkeeping and took up employment as a bookkeeper in both Clarkston, Washington, and Sequim. She also worked as a care provider. Sharon loved spending time with family, reading, her pets and hunting for a good find at a garage sale. She is survived by her son, Michael Payton of Port Angeles; daughters

Death and Memorial Notice GEORGE JANDERS June 29, 1926 March 20, 2013 Mr. George Janders of Port Angeles passed away from natural causes. He was 86 years old. Born to Nick and Mary (Kauzlaric) Janders on June 29, 1926, he spent most of his youth in his hometown of Renton, Washington. He graduated from Renton High School before joining the U.S. Navy and served during World War II. After the war, he achieved a Bachelor of Science from the University of Washington. George then worked for many years as a systems

Mr. Janders analyst for Pacific Northwest Bell. He married Shirley Moffit of Port Angeles on July 1, 1950, in Renton.

George spent many winters snowbirding in the American Southwest and had a home at Lake Havasu City, Arizona. He and Shirley loved to spend their summers at their home on Lake Crescent that George had built. On Lake Crescent, they enjoyed boating and watching the local wildlife. George and Shirley also built and lived in a home on Marrowstone Island, where he enjoyed clamming, crabbing and beautiful sunsets. George was a member of both the Elks Naval Lodge and Friends of Lake Crescent. He leaves behind his wife of nearly 63 years,

Shirley Janders; his son, Paul Janders; daughters Leiann (Sergio) Niccoli and Patty (Jim) Rosand; brother John Janders; and sister Marion (Henry) Benson. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his sister Katherine Morris and brother-inlaw Russell Morris. At his request, there are no services immediately planned. A celebration of his life, however, will be announced at a later date. Memorial contributions can be made to the Friends of Lake Crescent, 546 Benson Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363.

Ms. Kennedy Lauri Schleve, of Clarkston, Tammy Graves of Sequim, Shelley Anstett of Sequim and Kerrie Phillips of Yelm, Washington; and her brothers, Bill Strong of Lewiston and Charles Strong of Sequim. She is also survived by 14 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Sharon will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her. A memorial service will take place Saturday, March 30, at 2 p.m. at Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel, 108 West Alder Street, Sequim.

Death and Memorial Notice LEO KENNETH TRACY Leo was born July 29, 1939, in Tonasket, Washington, to Omer and Winifred Tracy and passed away on March 20, 2013, in Everett, Washington. He was predeceased by his parents and brother, Omer. A beloved husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, he is survived by his wife of 51 years, Anita; four chil-

Death and Memorial Notice

dren, Rick (Ethel) Tracy, Ronda (Mike) Swartz, Leo Kenneth (Lauren) Tracy Jr. and Teresa (Rob) Williamson; nine grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren; sisters Ruby Brewer Brumback and Colleen (Ervin) Brown; and numerous nieces and nephews. His memorial will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 30, 2013, at the Arlington Seventh Day Adventist Church, 713 North Talcott Street, Arlington, WA 98223.

LAWRENCE J. MURRAY October 12, 1932 March 24, 2013

Remembering a Lifetime

Lifelong Port Angeles resident Lawrence J. Murray passed away March 24, 2013, at San Juan Villa in Port Townsend. Larry was born on October 12, 1932, in Port Angeles, the only son of Russ Murray and Mildred Jewett Murray. He attended Queen of Angels School and Port Angeles (Roosevelt) High School. Larry enlisted in the Air Force shortly after completing high school in 1952. He served as a member of the B-29 Flight Crew with the 582nd Air Squadron, primarily in Europe and North Africa. He was honorably discharged from the Air Force in 1955. He returned to Port Angeles, where he pursued a career as a heavyequipment operator with the state Department of Transportation. Larry married Jacqueline Dockter of Walla Walla, Washington, at

■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3527.

Larry and Jackie

Mr. Murray Queen of Angels on February 19, 1957. They were married for 41 years. Jackie passed away on December 23, 1998. Larry and Jackie have two children, Kelley (Steve) Oliver of Port Hadlock and Tim (Gina) Murray of Olney, Maryland; four grandchildren, Dylan (Kim) Oliver of Seattle, Washington, Kaitlan Gort of Port Hadlock and Kalen and Griffin Murray of Olney; and great-grandchildren Skylar Jaramillo and Mason Oliver. Larry led an active life, pursuing many hobbies.

He enjoyed motorcycle touring, cycling with friends Bill Rowland and Mark Hilt, backpacking and hiking with friends, including Jack Jester, and, in later years, riding his Segway. He spent idyllic days hiking the Elwha trail and Low Divide and fishing the Elwha River. He enjoyed the companionship of many friends in retirement: his 5:30 a.m. coffee group at Haguewood’s, happy hour at his local pub or time shared with special friend Joan Isenberger. He was an exuberant

In Loving Memory

Karen

Cleland-Nielsen 1/24/56 - 3/29/11 Every single day we miss you. You are my baby and you will always be my baby.

Peninsula obituaries appear at peninsula

Love, Boone

dailynews.com

Les Hove July 14, 1960 — March 17, 2013

A full obituary will follow. Services: To be announced. Johnston willed her body to the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle.

Former Port Angeles resident Les Hove died in Apache Junction, Ariz. He was 52. Services: Celebration of life from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Port Angeles Moose Lodge, 809 S. Carolyn Jean McMahon Pine St. Season’s End Mortuary, May 29, 1949 — March 25, 2013 Apache Junction, is in Sequim resident Carolyn charge of arrangements. Jean McMahon died of natural causes. She was 63.

Beverly M. Johnston

Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Kenneth A. Clark April 26, 1938 — March 25, 2013

Kenneth A. Clark died at his Sequim home. He was 74. A full obituary will follow. Services: Visitation at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 815 W. Washington St. in Sequim. A memorial service will follow at 11 a.m., with a graveside service at 1:30 p.m. at Sequim View Cemetery, 1505 Sequim-Dungeness Way. Linde-Price Funeral Service, Sequim, is in charge of arrangements.

st ce Voted 1 Pla 2008 - 2012 e Hom Best Funeral nty Cou in Clallam

The ONLY Locally Owned Funeral Home and Crematory Serving the people of Clallam County Scott Hunter

Immediate, Dependable and Affordable services 24 hours a day • Our staff has over 100 years experience

Douglas Ticknor Jim Drennan

2C706936

Services: Memorial serJuly 15, 1923 — March 26, 2013 vice at 11 a.m. Saturday at Port Angeles resident King’s Way Foursquare Beverly M. Johnston died of Church, 1023 Kitchen-Dick age-related causes at Ava- Road, Sequim. Pastor Michael mere Olympic Rehabilita- Van Proyen will officiate. Sequim Valley Funeral tion in Sequim. She was 89.

33756758

Death Notices

and boisterous Irishman whose special brand of humor touched all he knew. A lifelong devoted Catholic, Larry has now gone to his reward. He will always live in “Larryland,” and we will miss him very much. A private family memorial service is planned. In lieu of flowers, remembrances in the form of donations to the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, 2105 U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles, WA 98363, are encouraged.

Leah & Steve Ford

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I am a single mom raising a 15-year-old son. For most of his life, it has just been the two of us. I now regret that I put him in bed with me when he was a baby. As he grew older, I encouraged him to sleep in his own bed, but it would last only a few nights, and then he would sneak back into my room. I was married for three years when he was around 11, and he’d sneak into my husband’s and my bedroom after we were asleep and sleep on a couch in there. His problem is he is terrified of the dark and believes in ghosts, monsters, etc. He says he has a phobia, and I believe him. I tried getting a dog for him to sleep with and night-lights, but nothing worked. If I lock him out, he lies awake all night, scared to death. I kept thinking he would grow out of this, but he hasn’t. Please help. I can’t really afford therapy, but if you think he needs it, I will try. Troubled in Arizona

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Get together with someone you respect or who has the expertise you need in order to pursue a new venture. Events that are geared toward learning as well as having fun will enable you to make new friends and hone your skills. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Dennis the Menace

Dear Unsure: Yes, it would be wrong. The first time you have sex, it should be because you are 100 percent sure you are ready and he is the right person. If that’s not the case, you will be cheating yourself. And as for feeling guilty because you are leaving him frustrated, I have a solution: Socialize with him in group settings and spend less time alone together. That way, there will be less frustration for him and less temptation for both of you. Dear Abby: I’m different from other girls. I don’t wear girly clothes. I prefer dark clothes and makeup. My mom thinks I’m strange because I dress differently. Do you think I look like a freak for not conforming, or is there nothing wrong with being different? Different in Washington

by Hank Ketcham

Dear Different: I would never call you a “freak” because of your attire. It is common for young people to express their individuality by their dress, hairstyle and makeup. There is, however, a point when a person’s style choices can be limiting. My question for you would be, “Are you getting the kind of attention you want from presenting yourself this way?” The answer should determine how you choose to dress.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Rely on your intelligence and your insight to lead you in the right direction. Refrain from making an impulsive move because someone is pressuring you. Make plans to get together with friends, relatives or someone you haven’t seen in a long time. 3 stars

it to be about our hormones in the Van Buren heat of the moment. I know he won’t leave me, but I feel bad for leaving him frustrated. Would it be wrong to agree to have sex with him — something we both want — even if I don’t know if we’re ready for the next step? Unsure in Canada

Abigail

Dear Abby: My boyfriend and I have been dating for several months. He’s fun and caring, and we spend a lot of time together. He’s different from other boys I have dated. We can talk to each other about anything. My only concern is our relationship physically. He makes it very clear that he wants to go all the way with me. He isn’t rude or pushy about it. I don’t want to rush into anything. We are both virgins (he does have more experience), and while I have known him for a long time, I don’t know him as well as I’d like. I want to wait until we have dated for at least six months. He says he respects my decision and doesn’t want to pressure me. I still feel a little rushed. All of our friends have had sex, but I don’t want

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Troubled: Some sessions with a psychologist who specializes in phobias would be the quickest way to help your son overcome his problem. And when you consult with one, I am sure the therapist will recommend that your son stay away from violent video games and movies or TV shows that feature ghosts, monsters or anything else that goes “bump” in the dark because they could only increase his fears.

by Jim Davis

B11

Mom concerned for teen afraid of dark

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t let responsibilities drag you down. Work hard and fast to put the work behind you. Traveling or getting together with someone special will encourage you to strive for a more fulfilling lifestyle. Love is on the rise. 2 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Put your plans into motion. Fixing up your home or making a move that will improve your lifestyle is possible. Love is in the stars, and altering the way you do things will lead to an adventure that will bring you greater happiness. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Double-check your personal financial investments and papers. Making a couple of adjustments can save you from a loss. An experienced individual can offer you good advice regarding a partnership. Don’t let pressure push you in the wrong direction. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Not everyone will agree with what you say or do. Be careful while traveling or doing anything physical. Minor mishaps will set you back. Taking an unusual approach to a job you are required to do will bring you recognition. 4 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Get down to business and finish what you start. You’ll have a much better time once the work is complete and you can do as you please. Offering your services or help will boost your reputation. Love and romance are highlighted. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do something creative, get together with friends or do something with youngsters. Keeping busy or expanding your interests will leave you with some interesting thoughts about how you can raise your income and your standard of living. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Treat colleagues diplomatically to avoid being talked about behind your back. Take a critical look at your current situation as well as what you have to offer. Updating your skills or the way you do things will help you advance. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your vision will be clear and a decision you make regarding your personal life, home and family will help you gain respect and the support you need to move forward with your plans. Invest in you and your talent. 3 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rely on past experience to help you deal with anyone questioning what you are doing now. Take care of any domestic changes that need to be implemented in order to make your life better. Someone you love will support and encourage you. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look over any pending contracts, settlements or financial papers. You will have greater insight into ways you can increase your assets or raise your earning potential. Consider what you have to offer and invest in your future. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 Neah Bay 50/37

Bellingham B elli el e lin n 57/41

Olympic Peninsula TODAY

Olympics Snow level: 5,500 ft.

Port Townsend 54/44

Port Angeles 53/42

Forks 59/41

Yesterday

Sequim 54/44

Port Ludlow 55/46

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 57 43 Trace 4.00 Forks 57 45 0.10 36.94 Seattle 57 45 0.09 8.34 Sequim 56 40 0.03 2.47 Hoquiam 57 48 0.08 21.64 Victoria 58 40 0.00 9.27 Port Townsend 52 43 0.01* 5.76

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National forecast Nation TODAY

Forecast highs for Friday, March 29

Sunny

Aberdeen 59/46

Billings 63° | 32°

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Minneapolis 59° | 34°

San Francisco 68° | 48°

Denver 64° | 39°

Chicago 45° | 34°

New

First

Miami 75° | 57°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

Fronts Cold

TONIGHT ★

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Low 42 56/43 Moon, stars Sunshine out to shine bright in blaze of glory

Marine Weather

61/45 Sunshine rules for Easter

54/44 Sun, grey share the day

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Tonight, W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Ocean: Light wind... becoming W to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 3 ft at 14 seconds. Tonight, N wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 3 ft at 13 seconds.

CANADA

Seattle 63° | 48° Olympia 68° | 37°

Spokane 59° | 41°

Tacoma 64° | 48° Yakima 70° | 41°

Astoria 63° | 43° © 2013 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:10 a.m. 9.4’ 8:49 a.m. -0.7’ 3:00 p.m. 8.1’ 8:50 p.m. 1.6’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:47 a.m. 9.5’ 9:35 a.m. -0.8’ 3:50 p.m. 7.7’ 9:33 p.m. 2.1’

Port Angeles

4:18 a.m. 7.0’ 10:56 a.m. -0.3’ 5:50 p.m. 6.6’ 11:10 p.m. 4.0’

4:52 a.m. 6.9’ 11:42 a.m. -0.7’ 6:50 p.m. 6.6’ 11:59 p.m. 4.6’

Port Townsend

5:55 a.m. 8.6’ 12:09 p.m. -0.3’ 7:27 p.m. 8.1’

6:29 a.m. 8.5’ 12:23 a.m. 4.4’ 8:27 p.m. 8.1’ 12:55 p.m. -0.8’

Dungeness Bay*

5:01 a.m. 7.7’ 11:31 a.m. -0.3’ 6:33 p.m. 7.3’ 11:45 p.m. 4.0’

5:35 a.m. 7.7’ 12:17 p.m. -0.7’ 7:33 p.m. 7.3’

LaPush

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

NEW 2013

CHEVROLET

Apr 10

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Apr 18 Apr 25

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

7:40 p.m. 6:55 a.m. 11:03 p.m. 7:56 a.m.

-10s

-0s

Burlington, Vt. 50 35 Casper 57 30 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 61 38 Albany, N.Y. 36 Cldy Charleston, W.Va. 43 32 Albuquerque 53 Cldy Charlotte, N.C. 54 31 Amarillo 40 Cldy Cheyenne 50 31 Anchorage 14 Cldy Chicago 42 29 Asheville 27 Clr Cincinnati 45 24 Atlanta 36 PCldy Cleveland 43 34 Atlantic City 34 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 59 29 Austin 51 Cldy Columbus, Ohio 44 31 Baltimore 35 Cldy Concord, N.H. 53 34 Billings 34 PCldy Dallas-Ft Worth 71 52 Birmingham 33 Clr Dayton 44 29 Bismarck 19 Cldy Denver 51 34 Boise 48 Cldy Des Moines 47 31 Boston 38 Cldy Detroit 49 32 Brownsville 65 Cldy Duluth 44 18 Buffalo 33 .29 Cldy El Paso 79 55 Evansville 48 30 Fairbanks 10 -12 SUNDAY Fargo 36 26 59 31 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 45 29 3:29 a.m. 9.4’ 10:25 a.m. -0.6’ Great Falls 60 35 4:44 p.m. 7.3’ 10:21 p.m. 2.7’ Greensboro, N.C. 49 29 Hartford Spgfld 55 36 59 36 5:30 a.m. 6.8’ 12:32 p.m. -0.8’ Helena Honolulu 78 71 7:55 p.m. 6.5’ Houston 69 54 Indianapolis 42 27 7:07 a.m. 8.4’ 1:12 a.m. 5.1’ Jackson, Miss. 60 34 Jacksonville 60 35 9:32 p.m. 8.0’ 1:45 p.m. -0.9’ Juneau 39 28 Kansas City 50 37 6:13 a.m. 7.6’ 12:34 a.m. 4.6’ Key West 64 59 8:38 p.m. 7.2’ 1:07 p.m. -0.8’ Las Vegas 78 63 Little Rock 61 41

Nation/World

Victoria 59° | 39°

ORE.

Tides

56/41 Cloudy; glimpses of sun

Apr 2

Hi 52 70 76 20 44 55 52 71 50 61 57 42 65 55 71 40

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

.04

.02 .01 .01

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Cldy PCldy Clr PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy PCldy PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy Cldy

■ 91 at Ocotillo Wells, Calif. ■ 0 at Crosby, N.D.

Atlanta 63° | 34°

El Paso 82° | 50° Houston 75° | 57°

Full

New York 54° | 37°

Detroit 48° | 32°

Washington D.C. 57° | 34°

Los Angeles 70° | 54°

Almanac Last

Cloudy

Seattle 63° | 48°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 59/45

Pt. Cloudy

The Lower 48:

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

71 48 79 57 70 78 44 43 53 60 53 54 60 70 53 64 64 52 87 44 50 65 56 52 54 66 53 69 45 59 65 69 65 64 90 68 37 67

55 30 48 37 54 50 31 26 33 43 38 39 28 47 31 42 43 35 64 35 36 47 38 28 30 49 35 53 37 51 45 59 58 55 75 36 29 46

Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Clr .07 Cldy Cldy PCldy .04 Cldy .08 Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

49 47 59 53 86 67 52 62 47 53

26 33 45 33 59 47 40 38 34 34

Cldy Cldy Clr PCldy PCldy Cldy .01 Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo 73 61 81 58 55 36 34 29 41 30 85 61 46 26 89 48 75 71 73 51 77 57 67 45 42 28 82 54 44 30 35 14 89 67 47 35 82 70 61 53 74 63 54 50 49 30 59 43

Otlk PCldy PCldy Clr Snow PCldy Clr Clr PCldy Ts/Wind Clr Clr Clr PCldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy Ts PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Clr

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 C1

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A DEon’t Miss It! D

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

5TH WHEEL: $13,750 /obo cash only, must sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ Lots of extras, lamin a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 slideouts, clean, comfor table, queen bed, central vac & more! Come see in Sekiu. Text/call 582-7130. Affordable Lawn Care Mowing and weedeating, Call Dee at 477-8611

BIZY BOYS LAWN & YA R D C A R E : Yo u r work is our play! We enjoy mowing, weeding, edging, hedge trimming, landscape maintenance and gene r a l ya r d c l e a n - u p ! Free job quotes! Call Tom at 460-7766 C H E V : ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n . 4x4, 3.4 ton, 6.2L diesel. $1,200/obo. 460-5736. C H E V : ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n . 4x4, 3.4 ton, 6.2L diesel. $1,200/obo. 460-5736. FORD: ‘88 Ranger 4x4. V6, 5 speed, rebuilt tranny, runs great, low miles. $2,200/obo. 461-6970.

3010 Announcements 3010 Announcements ADOPTION: Active Executive & Future StayHome mom, Unconditional LOVE awaits miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid. 1-888-919-1604. Steve & Norma

RECEPTIONIST: Par ttime, basic QuickBooks knowledge. Call for info. FORD: ‘95 Contour. 4 (360)681-0480 door, 4 cyl, auto. $2,050. (360)379-4100 SEA RAY: ‘74 24’ HT HOME Health Aide: Im- Cruiser. Reconditioned/ m e d i a t e o p e n i n g fo r e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / nursing assistant with rough weather fishing/ appropriate training to cruising with ALL NEW work in the field of home equipment and features: health. Call Rainshadow repowered w/ Merc HoriHS. (360)681-6206. zon Engine/Bravo-3 (dual prop), stern drive (117 KING Sized bedroom hrs.), complete Garmin set: Includes king sized electronics, reinforced b e d w i t h m a t t r e s s , stern, full canvas, downmatching night stands riggers, circ water heatand high-boy dresser. ing, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, Must be sold as set, will EZ Load trailer, w/disk not split up. brakes (1,200 mi.), elec(360)457-1213 tric winch. Other extras, $52,000 invested. SacriP.A.: Remodeled 1 br., fice for $18,500. no stairs, some utilities. (360)681-5070 $550. (425)881-7267.

3023 Lost

SEEKING Non-medical Caregivers in PA, PT, PL and Sequim n ow ! H o m e H e l p e r, Personal Care, Companionship. Visit HISC650.digbro.com call (360) 681-2511 Home Instead Senior Care in Jefferson and Clallam Counties. WASHER: Kenmore 3.5, 2006 Super Capacity f r o n t l o a d i n g wa s h e r. Runs great! $250/obo. (360)640-1559

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

AIDES/RNA OR CNA MMA Fight Show 3/30 LOST: Dog. Black Lab with white on chest in Best wages, bonuses. www.Cageworx.com Bagley Creek area, P.A. Wright’s. 457-9236. (360)504-2751 REWARD. 457-9346 or DENTAL ASSISTANT 461-9666. Full-time for busy prac3020 Found LOST: Dog. White poo- tice, experience a plus, dle, doesn’t see or hear b e n e f i t s a n d s a l a r y well, Second/Third Ave. DOE. Resumes to: PO F O U N D : K - N e x c a r of Gales Addition. Box 268, Port Hadlock, par ts. W. 18th St. gar457-0648 or 461-7054 WA 98339. age sale in P.A. LOST: Ring. Platinum COOK: Exp. pref., First (360)457-3979 with a moissanite stone, Street Haven, 107 E. First St., PA. Apply in Peninsula Classified Sequim. REWARD. (360)460-3038 person. 360-452-8435

You can help us protect America! Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

Cardiology Services RN Day shift! Provide cardiac rehabilitation, arrhythmia monitoring, pacemaker checks, 12 l e a d a n d exe r c i s e ECG’s, etc. Must have ACLS with prior experience in clinic/office or hospital setting. Tw o p o s i t i o n s n o w available, full time and 24 hours a week. Apply: nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org or apply online at www.olympic medical.org EOE

DAYS INN SEQUIM Fr o n t D e s k R e p a n d Night Auditor. Apply in person at 1095 Washington, Sequim. Estimator/Drafter for ornamental & structura l s t e e l fa b r i c a t o r. Must have math skills & creative ability to create shop-ready d raw i n g s fo r g a t e s, railings, & structural jobs. Ability to develop accurate estimates and create material cut lists for welders. Experience using AutoCAD 2010 a must. Ability to work with the public, required. Must be detail oriented. FT. Wages DOE. Email resume to Kate@Allform Welding.com or fax to (360)681-4465. No phone calls. Experienced Biller/Coder and/or MA or LPN. Please submit resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#652/Biller Port Angeles, WA 98362 FIRST STEP FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER Development Manager Maternity Support Services RN For requirements go to firststepfamily.org HOME Health Aide: Imm e d i a t e o p e n i n g fo r nursing assistant with appropriate training to work in the field of home health. Call Rainshadow HS. (360)681-6206.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General

PORT TOWNSEND RECEPTIONIST: Par tL i g h t h o u s ewo r k a n d time, basic QuickBooks yardwork. knowledge. Call for info. (360)379-0469 (360)681-0480

SEEKING Non-medical Caregivers in PA, PT, PL and Sequim n ow ! H o m e H e l p e r, Personal Care, Companionship. Visit HISC650.digbro.com call (360) 681-2511 Home Instead Senior Care in Jefferson and Clallam Counties.

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

HomeCare Supervisor Position

This is a highly responsible supervisory job in Sequim directing homecare workers by scheduling, training, and running day-to-day operations. Qualifications include strong communications, computer, and marketing skills as well as enthusiasm for serving our seniors. Skills test required. Please download application at www.kwacares.org and email to ILee@kwacares.org

Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

WILDER AUTO

YO U C A N CO U N T O N U S ! /*44"/r78r+&&1r)0/%"r50:05"r4$*0/

www.peninsula dailynews.com 33755196

1-866-247-2878 Full-time RN/LPN/Volunteer Coordinator and Part-time Social Worker Hospice experience preferred. Serving Clallam and Jefferson counties.

Contact: Jacquelyn Jones P: 360.582.3796 F: 360.582.0592 24 Lee Chatfield Way Sequim, WA 98382 Excellent Benefit Package | Flexibility | 401(k) Opportunity for Advancement Apply online at our Career Center at LHCgroup.com, or email Jacquelyn.Jones@LHCgroup.com. 135114275

®

It’s All About Helping People. Proud Member of LHC Group LHC Group is one of the nation’s largest home care providers with more than 300 locations in 23 states. | EOE

Career Opportunity

Wilder Auto has the largest selection of new and used vehicles on the Olympic Peninsula. Come join our team of friendly sales professionals. No experience necessary, extensive training program and a great working environment await you. Benefits include a 401K program, medical and dental insurance, paid vacation and a great college tuition package for your children. Please call Jason or Rick at 452-3888 – or send your resume to: hr@wilderauto.com for more information and the opportunity to experience the Wilder difference.

$EER0ARK2OADs0ORT!NGELES

   s   2A686905

The mission of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Air and Marine (OAM), the world’s largest aviation and maritime law enforcement organization, is to protect the American people and the nation’s critical infrastructure through the coordinated use of integrated air and marine forces to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband toward or across U.S. borders.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

33759363

D E N I S E , s aw yo u o n AY I , y o u f r e q u e n t S w a i n s , S h i r l y ’s a n d Harold’s. Looking to connect. (360)748-0081. kingkivi@hotmail.com

MISC: Bin table, $250. Antique storage cabinet, $200. 2 Eastlake cane c h a i r s a n d 1 r o cke r, original caning, $350. (360)301-4122

Certified Diesel Mechanic for logging co. and Buncher Operator, experienced only. Call (360)417-8022

5000900

OlyPets In-Home Pet Care offers a convenient alternative to kenneling your pets and leaving your home unattended. Call (360)565-5251 for yo u r c o m p l i m e n t a r y “Meet ‘n Greet”. Or visit www.OlyPets.com

CHEVY: ‘99 Suburban LS package. 4X4 5.7 liter 3.72 rear end. Tow package with transmission cooler. Third seat. Front and rear hitches. Ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . 136,000 miles. $4500. (360)417-1027

4026 Employment General


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF JR. (1934-2012) Solution: 13 letters

T S Y L A N A O F F I C E R E By Jack McInturff

DOWN 1 “Shark Tank” airer 2 Corp. leader 3 __4: Toyota SUV 4 Like some imaginations 5 MP’s concern 6 Pickup opener 7 Ho’s instrument 8 Cause of a big slice 9 Mardi Gras torch 10 Focal points 11 Cartoonists, at times 12 Offer to one who’s been recently blessed? 17 “Goodbye, Columbus” author 18 Fireside shelf 21 Common base 22 Points a finger at 23 Sounds of disdain 24 Difficult spot 25 Potbellied 28 Clothes lines 29 Brit. recording heavyweight 31 Peace rally slogan

3/29/13 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

E Z N O R B R E N D A Y O V F

R E D N A M M O C D D N I E N

T A C T I C Y T U E O T I A A

© 2013 Universal Uclick

R R E H E A R T S H C H C P I

S U A B O E Y E N A C I M U T

T M T R O R R N O O O L M T O D N S P I R T S T R E E T R G H J N A E R S S T N S T L I A A R A W A ‫ګ‬ R O ‫ګګ‬ R P L E S I R H

www.wonderword.com

A D E L R A N K I O E L D N C

I A V O M F U S A R M R I E G

N E E G I F L A F L A G A M M

R L L H G U O T N O O T A L P

M A N T E I V A L O R A T S N

3/29

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Active, Analyst, Army, Bear, Brenda, Bronze, Chief, Christian, Commander, Cynthia, Desert, Duty, Fair, Flag, General, Gold, Heart, Hero, Honor, Jessica, Lead, Level, Medals, Military, Officer, Platoon, Purple, Silver, Smart, Staff, Star, Storm, Strong, Tactic, Tampa, Task, Tough, Tour, Train, Trenton, Troops, Valor, Vietnam, Volunteer, War Yesterday’s Answer: Chili THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

OFCER ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

RUNPS (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Hairy “pet” 36 Clicking site 37 Ph.D. seeker’s exam 38 Brooklyn Nets forward Humphries 39 Dissenting group 43 Barely earn, with “out” 44 Oklahoma city 45 Duke’s home

3/29/13

46 Chant 47 Seals’s partner 48 In need 51 Mac alternatives 54 Spanish address 55 Creamy spread 56 Early Nebraskans 58 Pay dirt 59 Word of sharing 60 Class-conscious org.? 61 Prepared

AMOOTT

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Beginning to bat? 5 Styptic stuff 9 Leapfrog 13 Cleaver kid 14 Collaborative website 15 Actress Anderson 16 Hide cyberspace crimes? 19 Macbeth or Hamlet 20 Most cozy 22 “Where __”: 1996 Beck hit 25 Mr. __: Dr Pepper rival 26 Bemoan 27 Amsterdam cops? 30 “Barnaby Jones” star 32 Editor’s mark 33 Strong-legged bird 34 Pendleton Act pres. 35 Objects of poolside ogling? 40 Writer Marilyn __ Savant 41 Chambéry shout 42 Olive, for one 44 Parting word 47 Hayseed that doesn’t tip? 49 Push for payment 50 Peppy 52 Málaga-to-Cádiz dirección 53 Like the L.A. Times Building 55 Nitwit 57 NBA military appreciation initiative, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 62 Broadway governess 63 The Supremes or Cream 64 Remote button 65 Honey drink 66 Realizes 67 Victim of spoilage?

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NILMEG Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ONION STASH COUPLE COUGAR Answer: When they counted the prisoners, the result was a — “CON-CENSUS”

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General General General General General Wanted Wanted Clallam County Clallam County FORKLIFT OPERATOR Min 2 yrs verifiable forklift operator experience • Experience operating 15,000 lb or larger forklifts • Prior lumber handling and truck loading exp preferred • Ability to understand and follow directions • Strong attention to detail • P r i o r s aw m i l l a n d kiln loading experience a plus!

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

Excellent wage and benefits package. Shift work required.

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

Complete application in person at Interfor; 243701 Hwy 101 W; Port Angeles, WA 98363

RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents. Reg. PT, Req. H.S./GED & cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $10.41-$12.25 hr., DOE. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at http:// peninsulabehavioral.org EOE

KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

OFFICE NURSE Part time position with private physician practice. EHR experience preferred. Flexibility a must. Resume to POB 2391 Port Angeles WA 98362 or cathyv@olypen.com

6A113352

PURCHASING/ OFFICE HELP Part-time. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#651/Office Port Angeles, WA 98362

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

VP of Sales: Sales VP S a l e s, h i g h - e n e r g y, positive attitude, lead company sales inHospitality; selling ID card systems to major hotel and restaurant chains. Proven track record selling software solut i o n s. M u s t b e we l l spoken with hospitality background. Computer and IT knowledge, Associate’s Degree or equivalent. Some travel is required. Salary plus commissions, strong benefit package. Office located in Port Townsend. Email resume-jobs@ icmobil.com

The Quileute Tribe has two jobs opened in our Child Care department, Administrative Supervisor and a Lead Teacher. Please visit our website a t w w w. q u i l e u t e n a tion.org for a complete job description and job application. Or you may call (360)374-4366. Both positions close April 5, 2013.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

ENVIOUS GREENS C o m p l e t e Ya r d C a r e Proper ty Mntnce. Specialty Pruning Gutters Weed Pulling/Whacking Deliver y & Spread Bark/Rock Brush Clearing Debris Hauling Seq u i m / P. A . a r e a 6 8 1 3521 cell: 808-9638 F RU I T Tr e e s, L aw n s : Don’t allow just anyone to hack your trees. I also provide complete yard ser vice at competitive rates, semi-retired. Many long standing customers. P A only Local (360)808-2146

Affordable Lawn Care Mowing and weedeating, Call Dee at 477-8611

OlyPets In-Home Pet Care offers a convenient alternative to kenneling your pets and leaving your home unattended. Call (360)565-5251 for yo u r c o m p l i m e n t a r y “Meet ‘n Greet”. Or visit www.OlyPets.com RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE Call 681-4429

2040 General Financial

4080 Employment Wanted 5 STAR House Cleaning. Professional, efficient, high quality, eco safe cleaning. Call Frank and Steph 360-460-0316 or visit us on the web at fivestarcleaning co.com Free Estimates & Excellent References.

EOE/Drug-Free Workplace

NOW HIRING At Red Lion Hiring for summer positions. Please apply online at www.Redlion.com EOE/AA/M/F/VD

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

QUILCENE SCHOOL DISTRICT Is looking for outstanding applicants for a K-12 Pr incipal vacancy. All details and application infor mation can be viewed/downloaded at: www.quilcene.wednet. edu/District & Admin Info/Employment.

IN HOME Caregiver ava i l a bl e. I f yo u o r your loved one need care in your home, call Deanna, (360)565-6271. New hours available. 5 years exper ience in the Sequim and Port Angeles community. Rate at $15/Hr.

Discover the “Success and Money Making Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know a b o u t . To g e t yo u r FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD please call 206-745-2135 gin

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

1216 S. H ST., P.A. 3 Br., 1 ba, 1,082 sf rambler in a quiet neighborhood, 2 carpor ts, heat Affordable Lawn pump, remodeled kitchMaintenance en both installed in JUAREZ & SON’S HAN- 2012. $139,900. (360)477-1805 DY M A N S E R V I C E S . (360)775-0578 for appt. Quality work at a reasonable price. Can han234 E. AHLVERS dle a wide array of prob- H a s b e e n r e d u c e d lems projects. Like home $15,000 don’t miss this maintenance, cleaning, great 3 bedroom home clean up, yard mainte- on a large cor ner lot. nance, and etc. Give us Master Bath includes a a call office 452-4939 or walk-in tub. Other feacell 460-8248. t u r e s i n c l u d e fe n c e d back yard, big deck with BIZY BOYS LAWN & Kelly’s House Cleaning awning, 2 car garage YA R D C A R E : Yo u r N e e d h e l p w i t h yo u r and a fireplace with inwork is our play! We house cleaning? Call me sert. Was $165,000. enjoy mowing, weed- or send an email, I can $150,000. ML#270366. i n g , e d g i n g , h e d g e do weekly, bi-weekly, or Dave Ramey trimming, landscape monthly maintenance of (360)417-2800 maintenance and gen- your house. My name is COLDWELL BANKER e r a l ya r d c l e a n - u p ! Kelly, I am licensed and UPTOWN REALTY have been cleaning Free job quotes! h o u s e s fo r 3 + ye a r s. Visit our website at Call Tom at 460-7766 360-440-3118 or email www.peninsula kellydakota1 CALL Ground Control dailynews.com @gmail.com Lawn Care for honest, Or email us at dependable lawn care at classified@ your home or business. LAWN MOWING: Free peninsula Ground Control Lawn estimates. dailynews.com (360)452-7743 Care: (360)797-5782.

4 Br. home on 10.23 ac, in ground pool. 2 Br. AFrame on 4.39 acres. Timber on both. Secluded, seasonal creek, near Lake Ozette. Both for $320,000. Can sell apar t. Ser ious buyers only. (360)963-2156. BEAUTIFUL VIEW HOME War m and welcoming describes this custom built home with panoramic views of the Strait, Vancouver Island and Mt. Baker. Features 10’ c e i l i n g s , ve r t i c a l c u t bamboo floors, high end light fixtures and lots of windows to enjoy the views. Granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances and 42” Alder Wood cabinets with pull outs. 2 Propane fireplaces with granite surround a n d f l a t s c r e e n T V ’s. Spa like master bathroom with jetted tub & sauna. $349,900 MLS#264691 Kelly Johnson (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES CUTE SWEET AND SIMPLE 1 Br., 1 bath, 576 sf, 0.16 acre lot, fenced back yard, central city loc a t i o n , bu f fe r e d , s i t s away from the street. Manageable utility bills. $67,500. ML#270409. Team Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NEW PRICE Single level townhome close to the Discovery Trail and downtown Sequim. Built in 2007, this 2 Br., 2 bath 1,331 sf., home backs to a greenbelt, with a southern exposure. Attached, direct acess 2 car garage enters to roomy kitchen that has lots of storage. Skylights add to the light and bright feel of this home. $199,000 Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9361

ENTERTAINERS DELIGHT! Walk into soaring ceilings and a beautiful view of the first fairway looking out from a 160 sf t i l e d s u n r o o m . O ve r sized living room with fireplace & balcony a b o v e . Tw o m a s t e r suites. Main master has a creatively tiled walk-in shower, large walk-in closet, double sinks and a propane fireplace. Adjacent to the MB is a den/sitting room with a wall of built-in cabinets and a deck. Second master has a full bath. $310,000 OLS#270312 NWMLS#448375 CAROL (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Compose your Classified Ad on

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TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 C3

33688614

FENCING

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Classified

C4 FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013 For Better or For Worse

by Lynn Johnston

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County

GOLOF COURSE VIEW LOT! Great eastside location with all city ser vices. Pe r fe c t s p o t fo r yo u r custom home. Dr ive your cart to the club! ML#270146. $79,000. Charles R. Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY Incredible setting with gr e a t s o u t h e r n ex p o sure, mature landscaping and mountain view. Very cozy and well kept home with a master suite with fireplace for ambiance. Detached shop and many additional outbuildings. $279,000 MLS#264082 Quint Boe (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES ON THE DUNGENESS RIVER 5 acres with two homes. The main home has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and the second home has 2 Br., 2 baths. The property also offers plenty of parking areas and a large detached garage/shop. $265,900 ML#270228/442817 Robert Sexton (360)460-8769 TOWN & COUNTRY PRISTINE manufactured home in 55+ community. Located minutes to downtown sequim. 955 Sf., 2 Br., 2 bath, open floor plan. Carport parking and shop/storage building. Large private deck. Exterior paint and windows updated in 2012, new roof in 2005. Some appliances/furniture may be included. $27,500. (360)460-5471. READY FOR YOUR PLANS Close to town, PUD water, established neighborhood,over an acre of level land, distant mountain views. $69,900 ML#443533/270238 Deb Kahle (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

P.A.: 1926 Craftsman Bungalow. Old school charm with modern details. Historic Cherry Hill neighborhood. 2 Br., 1 bath, detached garage, large covered front porch with swing, hard wood floors, propane fireplace and stove, all s t a i n l e s s a p p l i a n c e s, h e a t p u m p, l a u n d r y room with front load w a s h e r / d r y e r, s m a l l basement used as wine storage, ADT security/fire system with 16 c a m e ra DV D s y s t e m , private 2-person hot tub, raised garden beds with self water ing system, small greenhouse, immaculate yard, propane fire place with pub seating under large alumin u m g a z e b o, fe n c e d backyard for kids and pets, alley access, partial mountain view, convenient location within walking distance to d o w n t o w n , S a f e w a y, Countr y Aire, cour thouse, and city hall. Call for appointment (360)417-6613. SOL DUC RIVER CABINS Own three small cabins on 4.5 acres with 200 feet of r iver frontage. Water, septic and power included on 2 of the cabins. $160,000. Jeanine Cardiff (360)565-2033 JACE The Real Estate Company

120 Homes for Sale Jefferson County BRINNON: 3 Br. mobile on 3.3 acres. 2 mobile rentals, orc h a r d , bl u e b e r r i e s , and large truck garden area, all pipes for irrig a t i o n , e l k fe n c e d , large workshop, 2 garages. Diesel tractor and farm equip if wanted. $150,000. (360)796-4270

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

Logos Bold Lines 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com or: marketplace. peninsuladaily news.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

408 For Sale Commercial 5.3 ACRE MOSTLY WOODED HOME SITE This would make a great p a r c e l fo r t h o s e w h o would like a home in a wooded setting but still have a sunny southern exposure. The parcel is mostly flat, has a drilled well, cleared building area, established driveway, and storage building. Located in the foothills just a few miles east of Sequim. $150,000. ML#251358. PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE 683-4116

505 Rental Houses Clallam County CARLSBORG: 3 Br., 2 bath country home, W/S inc. $950. 460-1800. JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A Studio util incl......$500 H 1 br 1 ba..............$500 A 2 br 1 ba. ..............$550 A 2 br 1 ba..............$600 A 2 br 1.5 ba...........$695 H 2 br 1 ba .............$700 H 3 br 1 ba .............$825 H 3 br 2 ba..............$890 H 2 br 1.5 ba bluff ....$990 H 2 br 2.5 ba close up oceanfront.............$1,500 More Properties at www.jarentals.com P. A . : 2 B r. , 1 b a t h , $850/mo, 521 E. 7th St., W/D, 1st/Last/$400 deposit. Pets extra monthly chg. Dave: (360)809-3754 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, appl., wd. stove., no pets. $890. (360)452-1395.

SEQUIM: 2,500 Sf. home for rent, $ 1 , 2 5 0 / m o, o n g o l f course. 4 Br., 3 bath, new car pet and wood floors throughout, double g a ra g e, 2 f i r e p l a c e s, huge family room, deck with view, new septic, community well $36/mo. One year lease required. No smoking. Pets negotiable. Scott at 360-388-8474 Immediate occupancy.

Add:

Borders

2 FOR 1 Two 2.5 acre leveled, treed adjacent private parcels. Homesites cleared, with utilities, private road, conventional perk. $96,500. 461-2145, Joel

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Grab Their ATTENTION!

Pictures

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

PORT LUDLOW! Waterfront Condo For Sale Great views of Sound, b ay, a n d m o u n t a i n s . Vaulted ceilings. 3 Br., bonus room, 4 Bath. 18mi Kingston, Poulsbo 20, Sequim 33, Bainbridge 31. With Beachclub activities, pools, fitness, trails. By Owners Now $305,000 (listing mid-Apr) Call (360)437- WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 2 car carport. 7357 OR $740. (360)808-0022. portludlowcondo@hot mail.com, www.Water frontCondo-PtLud.com. 605 Apartments

Clallam County

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540. P.A.: 1 Br. lg. apt., water view, quiet, clean. $615 mo. (206)200-7244

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

6025 Building Materials

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MISC: Milgard windows, $200-$400 each. Empire Pacific windows, $50$150 each. Sherwin Williams Contractor 3000 pressure washer, $300. (360)452-3012

M I S C : 8 ’ s o fa , $ 2 0 0 . Solid oak table, $250. 6 oak chairs, $200. (360)452-5412

MOVING: Bedroom set, king size, bed, nightstand, all bedding, d r e s s e r s, $ 5 0 0 / o b o. Twin beds, all bedding, $50. (17) fence posts, round, $5 ea. Generator, gently used, $450/obo. 2 lg. white storage units, $60 ea. (360)775-4301.

MISC: Antique 2 door cabinet, $75. Oak entertainment center, leaded glass doors, $75. White 6045 Farm Fencing u p h o l s t e r e d c o u c h , $125. Weslo collapsible & Equipment treadmill, $75. Small oak ROTOTILLER: Rankin r o l l - t o p d e s k , $ 1 2 5 . (110cm) 3.0 hitch, used Small bookcase, $25. Oak rocker, ornate, $75. once. $1,800/obo. (360)670-5336 (360)928-9450 or 605 Apartments (360)670-3651 Clallam County MISC: Bin table, $250. Antique storage cabinet, DOWNTOWN SEQUIM TRACTOR: ‘52 Fergu- $200. 2 Eastlake cane 2 l a r g e B r. , 1 . 5 b a , son. 6-way back blade, c h a i r s a n d 1 r o cke r, Sherwood Village condo, scraper box, and ripper original caning, $350. t o o t h , g o o d r u n n e r. with new appliances! (360)301-4122 $2,500. (360)710-4966. (360)681-0253 MISC: Blue gray sofa 6050 Firearms & a n d l ove s e a t , $ 3 0 0 . DUNGENESS: BeautiSwivel rockers, $50 ea. ful view 2nd floor open Ammunition Dining sets, $60 ea. Ana p t . , 8 0 0 s f , W / D. $650 mo. 681-2303 7 7 R U G E R : 2 2 - 2 5 0 . tique full bed with bedH e a v y B a r r e l N i k o n ding, $150. Long twin P.A.: 1 Br. Storage, no Monarch Scope. 5.5 x and standard twin bed, pets/smoking. $485 mo., 16.5 x 44, new in box, $ 2 0 e a . S e e a t P D N $450 dep (360)809-9979 perfect for Beuch Rest Classified online. (360)452-7418 or varment hunting. P.A.: Remodeled 1 br., (360)683-8025 MISC: Sofa, $65. Douno stairs, some utilities. ble bed with frame, matGUN SHOW $550. (425)881-7267. tress and box spr ing, Sequim Prairie Grange Properties by March 30-31, Sat. 9-5, $95. (360)683-1006. Landmark. portangeles- Sun. 9-3. Admission $5, landmark.com Family $7. Tables both MURPHY BED: (Hide-abed). Maple cabinet (84” days $35. Don Roberts H x 18” D) with custom SEQUIM: 1 Br., close to (360)457-1846 Englander memory foam town, on site laundr y. Donr@olypen.com mattress. Includes cus$540. (360)681-8679. NEW: Smith & Wesson tom bedding. Cost new $1600. (Cabinet) + $900 AR15, 2 clips. $1,800. 665 Rental (mattress), $600. Call (360)582-7142 360-452-7914 (10 a.m.-7 Duplex/Multiplexes PARTS GUN: 303 Brit- p.m.) ish Enfi eld, SMLE III. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 PLANTS: Beautiful overbath. Fireplace, garage. $90. (360)379-3894. s i ze d j a d e p l a n t a n d W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r philodendron, perfect for pets. $800. 460-8797. 6055 Firewood, a foyer or business entry. $400/obo. 457-1695. Fuel & Stoves

671 Mobile Home Spaces for Rent

RECLINERS: 2 matchFIRE LOGS Dump truck load. $300 ing leather recliners, like new. $250 ea, or $400 plus gas. (360)732-4328 for both. (360)681-7532. MOBILE for sale. 2 Br., 1 bath, lots of storFIREWOOD: $179 delivS O FA : C u s t o m 9 . 5 ’ age, quiet park, ered Sequim-P.A. True taupe, curved, very com$5000/obo. Call cord. 3 cord special for fy, good condition, sel(360)477-4567, 8 a.m. $499. Credit card acdom used, Diamond to 8 p.m. cepted. 360-582-7910. Point. $950. www.portangeles (425)766-1876 firewood.com 683 Rooms to Rent SOFA/LOVE SEAT Roomshares R e d m i c r o f i b e r, g o o d 6065 Food & condition. $125. Farmer’s Market P.A.: Suite for rent, love(360)477-4683 ly private home. G&G FARMS (360)808-2568 FRUIT TREES: Pears 6100 Misc. WEST of P.A.: Beautiful and Asian pears, apples, Merchandise home on 10 + ac, quad c h e r r i e s , p e a c h e s , trails, incl all utilities and plum, walnuts, filberts, BOB SEGER 2 Tickets. Direct TV. $515 mo. Call thunder clouds, maples, Tacoma Dome 3/29/13 after 5 p.m., ask for Lon- quaking aspen, cypress, FLOOR 3 next to stage. blueberries, strawberries $250. 360-670-6613. nie (360)477-9066. and many more. 95 Clover Ln. off Taylor 1163 Commercial Cutoff, Seq. 683-8809. CHAINSAW BEAR B e a u t i f u l 7 ’ c a r ve d Rentals grizzy bear has so 6075 Heavy much detail that you PROPERTIES BY really need to see in Equipment LANDMARK person to appreciate it. 452-1326 We need to sell it and SEMI END-DUMP SEQUIM: 1,000/2,000 TRAILER: 30’. Electric are asking $1,100.00 sf, across from the Post tar p system, excellent for it. Any questions please call Dave Office, 151/153 Sunny- condition. $7,500. Barnes at side, $1,250/$2,500 neg. (360)417-0153 (360)683-5796 with lease, avail. May 1. Currant occupant Wave 6080 Home Broadband. 683-6789. DOWNSIZING: All pricFurnishings es obo. $1,800 power S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h reclining chair with conAve., Boardwalk Square. BED: Fold away, sheets trols, $400. Two Toshiba (360)683-3256 included, not quite full televisions with remotes - 32” HDTV super picsize. $90. ture, $100, 20” TV, $40. (360)379-3894 SPACE NEEDED Cabinetmaker wood Non-profit sports league seeking 10,000 BED: Queen sleigh bed, vise, $60, 9/11 criticism sf space for practice dark wood, Temperpedic collection, books, docuand spor ting events, mattress and box spring, ments, $300, Yamaha etc. Warehouse, shop, no stains, like new. $600 full keyboard (8 voices +midi) with HD folding garage, hangar, empty all/obo. (360)452-4327. storage area, etc. Any FURNITURE SALE: (2) s t a n d , $ 2 0 0 , M e d i u m flat space sitting emp- Rolltop desks, beautiful H a v a h a r t t r a p , $ 3 0 , Small folding pet crate, ty, give us a call! redwood table, shabby $30. All obo. Call (206)890-8240 chic loveseat, 3 pc. cher(360)452-5003 ry wood chair/settee set, 2 5 v i n t a g e s t a c k i n g HALIBUT: Fresh, whole 6010 Appliances chairs, 30 NEW white fish only. (360)963-2021. o u t d o o r c h a i r s, N E W 2 0 X 3 0 o u t d o o r eve n t MISC: Electronic dog WASHER: Kenmore 3.5, tent, too much to list! NO door, new in box, $130. 2 0 0 6 S u p e r C a p a c i t y REASONABLE offer will W h e e l C h a i r , $ 2 5 . f r o n t l o a d i n g wa s h e r. be refused! Queen Mattress, comfort Runs great! $250/obo. foam, $125. Electric mo(360)808-6160 (360)640-1559 bility scooter, $650. UpKING Sized bedroom right Kenmore freezer, Visit our website at set: Includes king sized $150. Best offer on all b e d w i t h m a t t r e s s , items! (253)678-0986. www.peninsula matching night stands dailynews.com Roofing Tar Kettle and high-boy dresser. Or email us at Must be sold as set, will 1984 Speed King, pumpclassified@ er, extras. $600/obo. not split up. peninsula (360)452-3213 (360)457-1213 dailynews.com

MUST DOWNSIZE Old bottles, $2-$5. Shop lights, $10 ea. Pressure cooker, $20. Stainless steel double sinks with faucets, $30. 6x9 vinyl flooring, new, $30. (360)457-5218

8142 Garage Sales 9820 Motorhomes Sequim ESTATE/Moving sale: 334 Grant Rd., Sequim, Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. Leather sofas, computer, unique teak pub table and stools, natural teak chest, vanity, bamboo t a bl e a n d ( 2 ) c h a i r s, misc furniture, cal-king bed, washer/dryer, clothing, surf boards, wetsuits and gear, snowboards and gear, carved Sasquatch and surfer dude, flat-bed trailer, r iding l a w n m o w e r, H o n d a mower, chainsaw, blower, bibs, garden tools, p i c n i c t a bl e , p i l i n g s , chains, lots more.

PRINTER: HP Officejet E-Print 6600, like new. HUGE SALE $50/obo. (360)452-4339. Thurs.-Fri.-Sat., 9-?, 387 E. Washington. Yard art, SPRAY PAINTER: Cap furniture, jewelry, wicker Spray 9100 HVLP paint- bassinet and end tables, er 4-stage turbine. $400. books and lamps. (360)683-9320 TRAILER: Car hauler. A l l a l u m i n u m , 4 n ew tires. $1,200. (360)928-3419

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central

GIANT MOVING Sale: Thurs.-Fri. 9-4, Sat. 8noon, 320 W. 12th St. Garden tools, hardware, plants, pots, queen size sofa bed, small freezer, BUYING FIREARMS washer, dryer, table/bufAny & All - Top $ Paid fet, table with 4 chairs, One or Entire Collec- desk, 3 small Hitchcock tion Including Estates chairs, old stove, clothCall (360)477-9659. ing, china cabinet, dishes, cushions, pillows CATARAFT: 9’ pontoon and more. boat, Skookum, Carlisle (360)477-5207 oars. $500. (425)422-6678

6115 Sporting Goods

YAMAHA: ‘07 Dr ive 48v Golf Car t. Upgrades include headlights, taillights, Trojan batteries, digital voltage gauge, and a fold down front windshield. Battery charger included. $2500. (360)4605420 before 9 p.m.

6125 Tools

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

ESTATE Sale: Thurs.Sat., 10-3 p.m., 1130 W. 12th Street. Furniture, kitchen stuff, freezer, medical supplies, bed, brand-new scrubs, baby clothes, womens clothes, brand-new hunting knives, fishing poles. Big item silent auction ends Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Everything must go!

COMPRESSOR: Crafts- 8183 Garage Sales man 5 hp, 20 gal. gasoPA - East line compressor with pressure paint tank, spray gun with pot, and ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9 - 3 p. m . , 1 3 5 Ve r n s much hose. $400. Lane, up Mt. Pleasant, (360)683-0033 r ight on Marsden Rd. Antique gaming table, ar twork, books, china, 6140 Wanted cr ystal, collectibles, & Trades d o l l s, t oy s, t a ck . To o BOOKS WANTED! We much to list. love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789. 8435 Garage WANTED: Clear Douglas Fir blocks, straight grain hand split blocks, 36” long, no more than 1 / 8 ” gra i n d e f l e c t i o n . $1,000 cord. Call Robert at (360)808-6823 for more info.

Sales - Other Areas

ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9 - 4 p. m . , 2 3 6 7 M o r a Rd., For ks/La Push area. Fishing, tools, furniture, other misc. Bring your own box and lots of cash! Please, no early WANTED: Electric stair birds! lift. (360)683-4467.

7025 Farm Animals WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and & Livestock lures, P.A. Derby memorabilia (360)683-4791 FREE: Beautiful roosters to good home. (360)452-1853 6135 Yard & Garden

MISC: Red Lion cement mixer, electric, 1/3 hp, l i k e n e w, $ 1 0 0 / o b o . Tr o y - B i l t s i c k l e b a r brush/mower cutter, 4 hp, 40” cut, $500/obo. Scotts push Speedy Green 1000 rotary fertilizer spreader, $20/obo. R e p u bl i c p u l l b e h i n d easy broadcast spreader, $35/obo. Craftsman 15.5 hp 42” cut, hydrostatic with twin grass bagger, $550/obo. DR trimmer/mower, 6.75 hp, $175/obo. Sequim area. (206)940-1849

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

LAMBS for sale. 100% Grass fed. (360)477-5996

M OTO R H O M E : 1 9 8 9 Fleetwood Limited 37J. new 460 Ford Banks exhaust system, HYD leveling jacks, 2 tvs, nonsmoker, 5.5 Onan generator, driver and passenger side doors, oak cabinets, corian countertops, hardwood floors. $20,000. (360)417-0619

M OTO R H O M E : 2 3 ’ Class C Winnebago. 50k mi., no smoking, no pets $10,000. (360)457-9259.

RV: 3 8 ’ RV a n d To w C a r. 2 0 0 1 N ew m a r Mountainaire and a 2009 Honda CRV tow car offered together or separa t e l y. T h e R V h a s 61,400 miles on a gas driven Trident V10 with a Banks system added. The interior is dark cherr y wood with corian counter tops. The RV is in very good condition. We just returned from a trip to Arizona which was trouble free. The CRV tow car is in excellent condition with 47,000 miles. Asking $40,000 for the RV and $20,000 for the CRV or $58,000 together. Please call Bill or Kathy at (360)582-0452 to see the vehicles.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers 75 KIT Companion 20 ft, great shape. New paint, cur tains and cushion covers! Bath, full kitchen, NEW deep c y c l e b a t t e r y. P. A . (206)310-2236.

7x16 Interstate Cargo / Utility Trailer 2008 Black $3800 Excellent condition, less than 300 miles on it! Call 360-928-0214

TRAILER: ‘00 25’ Komfor t. Slide, air, bunks, queen bed, rear bath and shower, microwave, skylight, deluxe cabinets, AM/FM CD stereo. $8,000. (360)457-6066 or 460-6178, call or text.

TRAVEL Trailer: ‘96 29’ H o l i d ay R a m bl e r, 1 slide. $5,500. (360)460-3708

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: $13,750 /obo cash only, must sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ Lots of extras, lamin a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 slideouts, clean, comfor table, queen bed, central vac & more! Come see in Sekiu. Text/call 582-7130.

7035 General Pets

5TH WHEEL: ‘89 Prowler Lynx 215. New raised a x l e s, 1 2 0 vo l t r e fe r, FREE: Adult male rat, g r e a t s h a p e , f u l l y cage, food, and acces- equipped, comes with sories, very friendly. hitch. $3,250. (360)704-9407 (360)460-6248, eves. FREE: Dog. Active, large, mixed-breed dog, n e e d s g o o d h o m e. 4 year old female, spayed, microchipped, and curr e n t o n a l l va c c i n e s. Please call for details: (360)460-1729

WHEELS: (4) steel c h r o m e n ew t a ke - o f f wheels, 16”, 8 lug. $260/obo. (360)928-3692

9808 Campers & Canopies

PUPPIES: Golden Retrievers, 6 weeks, shots, TENT Trailer: 88 Colepaper trained, registered m a n , k i n g , f u l l , t w i n GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., litter, male $700, female beds. $600. 7 - 1 p. m . , 1 1 1 M i s t y $750. (360)912-2227. 808-0496 After 4 p.m. Glen, off of Old Olympic TRAINING CLASSES Highway, behind SolEMAIL US AT April 11. Greywolf Vet. mar. Tools, Honda genclassified@peninsula (360)683-2106. erator, welder, and guns. dailynews.com

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www.Peninsuladailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9808 Campers & Canopies

CAMPER: 2002 Lance Camper Model 845 for short bed. Exclnt cond-used twice. Extended cabover w/queen-size bed. D i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o b e d . S h ow e r i s f u l l hght. Fresh water flush toilet. Blue int. $8795. (360)477-4778

9050 Marine Miscellaneous BAYLINER: 1987 Capri 1750. GM 4 Cyl 3.0L engine with OMC stern drive. Runs great! Electronic ignition, Dual batteries, Hummingbird 587ci Fishfinder with GPS. More info on PDN online. $3,800/obo. (360)460-0460 BAYLINER: 27â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Buccaneer 3500 obo or trade for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;land yachtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; +6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; headroom; 8HP Mercury longshaft recently serviced: runs great!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Main+jib sail; small rowing skiff. Many extras Call Rob to see (360)390-8497 B E L L B OY : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 6 4 1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Classic. Very good condition, Volvo I/O, 7.5 hp Johnson kicker, fullc anvas, new EZ Load trailer, new tires, 2 downr igg e r s , l o t s o f ex t r a s . $2,600. (360)417-1001.

BELLBOY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;78 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20 KT Cruiser, 80 gal. fuel, 30 gal. water, 1,750 watt i nve r t e r, 1 2 0 V s h o r e power, 4 batteries, microwave, refr igerator, new depth finder, compass, GPS, VHF, dinette, new galley, new Wallas ceramic diesel stove/heater, auto leveling trim tabs, enclosed head, trailer with new disc brakes, wheels and tires. $9,975/obo. (360)683-9645 CHRIS CRAFT: 26â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cavalier with trailer, 350 MerCruiser inboard, Bow Thr uster, radar, GPS, sounder, toilet with Electro Scan. $14,995. (360)775-0054

9050 Marine Miscellaneous DEATH TAKES OWNER OF FISHING BOAT 20 ft. Robolo Boat,Center Counsel, with 4 stroke 115 Yamaha Motor, has 400 hrs. on it. Electronics, trailer, (gal i va n i z e d ) d u a l a xe l , many extras. By appointment. $22,000. (360)417-0277 EASTERN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122; center console, premium boat, like new, completely equipped, 50 hp Yamaha, under 50 hrs. in warranty, Load-r ite galv. trailer, many ext ra s, D ow n e a s t s t y l e. See easternboats.com $26,500. (360)477-6059

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others Others APRILIA: Scarabeo motorcycle/scooter 2009. This is a pristine motorcycle with less then 1000 miles on it! Hardly used! NOT A SR. S C O OT E R ! 5 0 0 C C s Needs a battery charge. $3600/obo. (360)808-6160 HONDA: 2003 VT750 A c e D e l u xe C r u i s e r. Showroom Condition Must see. Lots of Chrome, Many Extras. Will not find another bike like this. Never left out,never dropped. 10,387 Low Miles $4,500. (360)477-6968.

CHRYSLER: 2002 LTD PT Cruiser. 78k miles New battery. Black with c h r o m e t r i m , ex t r a s . Moonroof, great stereo C H E V: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 7 9 C o r ve t t e . and a gas to drive. too L82, runs great, lots of much fun in the sun! new parts! $6,800/obo. One owner who loved it! (360)457-6540 $5500/obo. (360)808-6160 CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;63 Nova SS. 2 door hard top, V8, 2 sp power glide. $5,200. (360)461-2056

DUDGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 NEON ES 4 cyl., auto, pw pl. $5,495. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;27 T-Bucket, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;350â&#x20AC;&#x2122; blower, rag top, f a s t a n d n i c e , C D. Asking $17,500. Before 7 p.m. 457-8388.

H O N DA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 7 3 Tr a i l 9 0 : 1250 miles, ran when parked 6 years ago, one MERCEDES: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;85 SL380. owner. $900. 271-0867. Both tops, excellent condition. $10,000/obo. HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80 CB-900C. (360)460-6764 S i l ve r. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / o b o o r t r a d e fo r g u n s / s m a l l S T U D E BA K E R : 1 9 5 0 truck. (360)460-3756. S t a r l i g h t C o u p. C o m plete restoration, black HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;85 Goldwing cherry color, runs good, A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , looks excellent. $11,000. black/chrome, exc. cond. (360)683-8810 GLASTROM: 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; open $3,500/obo. 417-0153. bow boat, 25 hp Johnson, Calkin trailer. $750/ YAMAHA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 Enduro 9292 Automobiles obo. (360)385-3686. 100LT2. Ready to ride, Others 3k original miles. $750/ PONTOON BOAT: 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; obo.(360)683-0146. ODC 1018, white water AUDI â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 A4 QUATTRO and still water, oars and YAMAHA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 DT360. (AWD) SEDAN wheel mount. $295/obo. 4k original miles, runs 77k orig mi!! 1.8L turbo (360)912-1759 g o o d , a m a z i n g c o n d . 4cyl, 5sp manual trans!! L o a d e d ! S i l ve r ex t i n $2,500/obo. 452-7253. SEA RAY: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; HT great shape! Gray leathCruiser. Reconditioned/ YAMAHA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;79 XS 1100. e r i n t i n g r e a t c o n d ! e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / 35K, fairing, saddle bags CD/Cass with Bose aurough weather fishing/ excellent cond. $2,750/ dio, moon roof, cruise, cruising with ALL NEW obo. (360)808-1922 or tilt/telescoping wheel, equipment and features: (360)681-3023 after 6. htd seat, climate cont, repowered w/ Merc HoriF&R side airbags, alloy zon Engine/Bravo-3 (duwheels, clean 2 owner al prop), stern drive (117 9740 Auto Service Carfax! Very nice little hrs.), complete Garmin & Parts Audi @ our No Haggle electronics, reinforced price of only stern, full canvas, down- B U M P E R : N ew 2 0 1 2 $7,995! riggers, circ water heat- chrome rear bumper, fits Carpenter Auto Center ing, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, Dodge Ram. $450. 681-5090 EZ Load trailer, w/disk (360)327-3689 brakes (1,200 mi.), elecAUDI â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 90 SERIES tric winch. Other extras, E N G I N E : C h ev â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 3 5 0 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; With sunroof, sport tires, $52,000 invested. Sacri- 1973, completely rebuilt. leather int., runs great. $675. (360)457-6540. fice for $18,500. $4397/obo. 477-3834. (360)681-5070 BUICK: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;96 Century. 75k 9742 Tires & SMOKER CRAFT: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 m i l e s. $ 3 , 8 7 0 . L e ave 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tracer. 40 HP MerWheels name/number: 457-1770 cury. $3,500. (360)796-0078 GOODYEAR: (4) Good- C A R S : V W â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 6 4 B u g , YAMAHA: 9.9 HP out- year Wranglers, P275/65 $3,950. Eagle â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Talon board, 4 stroke, long- R 1 8 , M + S , 2 1 , 0 0 0 TSI, $1,000. 477-3495. s h a f t , e l e c t r i c s t a r t . miles. $160. CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70 Nova. High (360)417-3936 $1000. performance 350. (360)582-0158 $5,000. (360)645-2275. 9180 Automobiles LONG DISTANCE Classics & Collect. C H RY S L E R : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 3 P T No Problem! C r u i s e r. 1 1 5 k m i l e s , BUICK: 1976 Skylark. Shar p and well mainPeninsula Classified tained. $4,250. Rare, 2 door, V-6, stick. 1-800-826-7714 (360)796-4270 $1,600/obo. 460-8610. FOR SALE By Owner Boat Show & Marine Swap April 13th 10 - 4 R e g i s t e r yo u r b o a t , k aya k o r d i n g hy t o sale 10X10 booth only $15. Admission into the event is free! Call Port Ludlow Marina for details (360)437-0513.

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FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE 5.0L V8, auto, air, premium wheels and tires, b r a n d n e w t o p, f u l l y loaded, nice car! And by the way, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipped with nitrous oxide that can get 100 more horsepower, like it needs it? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rocket! $5,990 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 FOCUS ZX5 5 door hatchback, 5 speed, CD, good economical commuter. $5,950 Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;95 Contour. 4 door, 4 cyl, auto. $2,050. (360)379-4100 G M C : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 8 S U V. 4 W D, low miles on new motor. $3,695. (360)452-6611. HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 ACCORD LX Economical 2.4 liter 4cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, privacy glass, only 28,000 miles, beautiful 1-owner fa c t o r y l e a s e r e t u r n , non-smoker, balance of factor y 3/36 and 5/60 warranty. Spotless â&#x20AC;&#x153;AUTOCHECKâ&#x20AC;? vehicle histor y repor t. Near new conditioan! $17,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com I S U Z U : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 8 A m i g o. 5 speed, 4 cyl., new studded snow tires. $1,050/obo. (360)928-2142 or (325)450-7046

HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 CIVIC Si 4 door, 16K mi., 197 hp, 2 liter VTEC 4 cyl, 6 sp manual trans, limited slip differential, aluminum pedal plates, moon roof, 17â&#x20AC;? alloy wheels, rear spoiler, balance of factory warranty. Price reduced to $20,000 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 SENTRA 1.8S SPECIAL EDITION 65k orig mi!! 1.8L DOHC 4cyl, auto. Silver ext in great shape! Black cloth int in great cond! Pw, Pdl, Pm, CD with factory Rockford Fosgate prem sound with factory SubWoofer in trunk, cruise, tilt, rear spoiler, factory prem 16â&#x20AC;? wheels! 30+ MPG! VERY clean little Nissan @ our No Haggle price of only $8,995! HYUNDAI: 2009 Accent. Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 AT, AC. Very clean, excellent shape $8,400. NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 (360)452-7630 SENTRA SL KIA: 2003 Rio. 5 spd, 4 Auto, leather, moonroof, cylinder, less then 40K this one has it all! Only miles. $5,500/obo. 28K miles. (360)808-1303 $15,450 Preview at: LINCOLN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 TOWN heckmanmotors.com CAR CONGRESSIONHeckman Motors AL TOWN SEDAN 111 E. Front, P.A. 4.6L V8, automatic, 17 (360)912-3583 inch alloy wheels, new Vo g u e t i r e s , t r a c t i o n control, carr iage top, N I S S A N : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 7 A l t i m a . p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r Low mi., 78K, auto, air. locks, and mirrors, pow- $5,000/obo. 681-7632. er heated leather seats, w a l n u t a c c e n t s , a d - P O N T I AC : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 1 G ra n d justable pedals cruise A M S E 2 d o o r. 2 0 0 1 control, tilt, air condition- gold color Pontiac Grand ing, information center, AM SE. Looks in good CD stereo, rear parking condition, but is not runassist, dual front and ning. $2000/obo. Cash side airbags. Kelley Blue only. Call (360)440-1748 Book Value of $15,124! to make appointment. Only 57,000 Original Miles! Loaded with op- SCION: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 XB. 40k, extions! Sparkling clean in- cellent. $13,500. (360)928-3669 side and out! This is one of the most comfortable luxur y cars available! Write ads that get Come on in to Gray MoRESULTS tors today and take it for a drive! Description $11,995 Description GRAY MOTORS Description 457-4901 Let your potential graymotors.com buyer get a MERCEDES: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 SL320. mental picture Both tops, gold/tan. of your item $10,500. (360)683-7420. OR add a picture TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 PRIUS to your ad! ver y, ver y economical 1.5 liter 4-cyl, gas/elecClassified tric, auto, A/C, cruise, customers are tilt, AM/FM/CD, power smart consumers. windows and locks, keyThe ones with less entry, side airbags, money call the a l l oy w h e e l s, 7 3 , 0 0 0 good ads first! miles, very very clean local car, senior owned, 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 garage kept. Non-smoker, e.p.a. rated 60 city / www.peninsula 50 hwy. dailynews.com $13,995 REID & JOHNSON PENINSULA MOTORS 457-9663 CLASSIFIED reidandjohnson.com

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-515903-SH APN No.: 04-30-26-530590 Title Order No.: 120210489-WA-GSO Grantor(s): NICOLE GARCIA Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1231653 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/5/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 15 IN BLOCK D OF DUNGENESS MEADOWS TWO, AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 6 OF PLATS, PAGE 36, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 280 DUNGENESS MEADOWS, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 1/23/2009, recorded 1/28/2009, under 2009-1231653 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from NICOLE GARCIA , A SINGLE WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $2,384.50 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $177,231.51, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/5/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME NICOLE GARCIA, A SINGLE WOMAN ADDRESS 280 DUNGENESS MEADOWS, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 7/20/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_ counselors_ foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Loc a l c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n Wa s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g ov / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agent, or the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders rightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/03/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-515903-SH A-4335967 03/08/2013, 03/29/2013 Pub: March. 8, 29, 2013 Legal No. 461985

VW â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 PASSAT GLS SUBARU: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;97 Legacy WAGON O u t b a ck . Pow e r w i n 104k orig mi! 1.8L Turbo dows/locks, AWD. 4cyl, Tip-Tronic auto, $3,600. (360)775-9267. loaded! Green ext in excel cond! Black leather TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 CAMRY int in great shape! Moon LE roof, CD, htd seats, trac Very economcial 2.5 liter cont, cruise, tilt, side air4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, bags, roof rack, alloy tilt, AM/FM/cassette/CD, wheels! Excellent little power windows, locks VW @ our No Haggle a n d s e a t , v e r y v e r y price of only clean local trade in, non$5,995! smoker, senior owned. Carpenter Auto Center very nice condition. 681-5090 $7,995 REID & JOHNSON VW â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 JETTA GLS MOTORS 457-9663 SEDAN reidandjohnson.com 2.0L 4 cylinder, automatic transmission, new battery, alloy wheels, tinted TOYOTA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;12 CAMRY Economical 2.5 liter 4- windows, sunroof, keycyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, less entr y, power winAM/FM/CD, power win- dows, door locks, and dows and locks, side air- mirrors, cruise control, bags, only 15,000 miles, t i l t , a i r c o n d i t i o n i n g , very very clean 1-owner CD/cassette Monsoon toyota motor credit, bal- Stereo, dual front and ance of factory 3/36 and side impact airbags. only 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y. N o n - 103k miles! Immaculate smoker, spotless â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auto- condition inside and out! checkâ&#x20AC;? vehicle histor y Shows the very best of care! All the right opreport. tions! Stop by Gray Mo$18,995 tors today! REID & JOHNSON $7,495 MOTORS 457-9663 GRAY MOTORS reidandjohnson.com 457-4901 graymotors.com TOYOTA : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 9 9 C a m r y XLE. Great shape, all VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66 Bug. Excellent options, 4 cyl. auto OD. shape. $5,000. $4,250. (360)460-1207. (360)457-7022 VOLVO â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 S-40 Leather, sunroof. $7,955. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 VW â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 PASSAT GLS SEDAN 113k orig mi! 1.8L turbo 4cyl, 5sp manual trans! Silver ext in great shape! Black cloth int in great cond! Moon roof, Cass. with Monsoon audio, htd seats, side airbags, trac cont, cruise, tilt, alloys with 70% rubber! Clean Carfax with 27 service records! Real clean little VW @ our No Haggle price of only $5,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 Super Beetle. Great shape. $3,200. (360)809-3656

VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 Classic conver tible Super Beetle. $9,500/obo. Call after 6 p.m. (360)460-2644. VW â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;87 JETTA 4 cyl, 5 sp, low mi., 88K, excellent condition inside and out, runs great. Price reduced to $3,950 Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Ranger XLT. 4WD, xtra cab, 4 liter, clean. $5,900. 460-1168.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County

S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of David C. Schulz, Deceased. NO. 13 4 00090 3 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 15, 2013 Personal Representative: Debra Collins Attorney for Personal Representative: Patrick M. Irwin, WSBA #30397 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number:13 4 00090 3 Pub: March 15, 22, 29, 2013 Legal No. 465128

NO: 13 4 00089 0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: MARIAN JOHNSON Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 22, 2013 KARIN P. ANDERSON Personal Representative Attorney for Personal Representative and address for mailing or service: Greg Richardson WSBA # 8680 1407 East 3rd St. PO Box 2029 Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457- 1669 Clallam County Superior Cour t Probate Cause Number: 13 4 00089 0 Pub: March 22, 29, April 5, 2013 Legal No. 466494

S U P E R I O R C O U RT O F WA S H I N G TO N F O R CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Guardianship of VIRGINIA SKVAREK, An Incapacitated Person. In re the Estate of VIRGINIA SKVAREK, Deceased. NO. 12-4-00203-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The below-named Guardian of the estate of Virginia Skvarek, a deceased incapacitated person, has been authorized to administer the estate as the probate estate of the deceased incapacitated person, pursuant to the Guardianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Letters of Guardianship and without further letters of qualification. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Guardian or the Guardianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which this proceeding was commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Guardian served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 22, 2013 Guardian: Mindi Blanchard of Bridge Builders, Ltd. Attorney for Guardian: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Guardianship/ Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Guardianship/Probate Cause Number: 12-4-00203-7 Pub: March 22, 29, April 5, 2013 Legal No. 466496


Classified

C6 FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others BRUSHFIRE TRUCK 1981 4X4 1 ton dually, 4 speed manual with granny low, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O tank, 4 yr old Honda GX690 generator, dual side diamond plate tool boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! $12,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 CHEV: ‘86 half ton pickup. Half Ton pickup with 2 wheel drive, 4 speed manual, 305 engine with after market performance parts, good reliable tr uck, needs some brake wor k and has some rust on body. $750. Contact Bruce at (360)461-5168 CHEV ‘90 1 TON DUALLY 4X4 8’ dump box, V8, 4 speed with granny low, A/C, original 16k miles! The truck is like new! $14,490 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 C H E V: 9 4 S i l ve r a d o. 1500 Ext Cab - Excellent Condition! Runs and drives great, very clean! $1,000 new tires, 158,000 miles, tow package, power windows and locks, Nice interior. Call 928-0214, $5,000/obo.

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C H E V: ‘ 9 5 3 5 0 0 H D. 8’x15’ wood deck, 84,760 mi., GTX 10-30 every 3,000 mi., original owner. $8,500. (360)301-0050 DODGE ‘05 RAM 1500 4X4 Big Horn Quad Cab SLT pkg. 5.7 liter Hemi V8, 5 speed auto, leather, loaded. 20” custom wheels, tow pkg., 1 owner, very nice truck. Sale priced at $14,700 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD ‘85 F-250 Super- FORD: ‘99 Ranger. XLT c a b : 4 x 4 , a u t o, 4 6 0 , Super Cab, 72K, 4L, V6, loaded, tire chains, Ulti$1,900/obo. 417-8250. ma bed box, garaged, no off road. $8,500/obo. FORD: ‘88 Ranger 4x4. (360)379-8755 V6, 5 speed, rebuilt tranny, runs great, low miles. GMC: ‘92 Sonoma S10. $2,200/obo. 461-6970. E x t e n d e d c a b, 1 1 2 k miles, hydraulic lift bed, FORD: ‘94 F150 XLT. new tires and radiator, 4 Low mi., 4x4, runs good, cyl. Needs body work. looks good. $4,500. $2,000/obo. (360)452-6758 (360)477-4838

FORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. Runs GREAT, 4.0 V6, automatic with overdrive, custom wheels, AM/FM, cruise control, tilt wheel. ext cab with two rear side seats, slider window D O D G E : ‘ 9 8 D a ko t a . in rear, 226,000 miles 1 6 0 K , 5 . 2 L V 8 , gr e a t $2,700 or trade for travrunning truck. $4,500/ el trailer 18-25’ in good obo. (360)461-7210. wo r k i n g o r d e r. L e ave message (360)452-2970 FORD ‘03 RANGER XLT SUPER CAB FX4 FORD ‘96 F150 4X4 SUPER CAB 4.0L V6, automatic, alloy E x t r a c a b, a u t o, V 8 , nice, runs great, straight wheels, new tires, bedliner, rear sliding win- truck. Price reduced to d ow, r u n n i n g b o a r d s, $4,500 tow ball, keyless entry, 4 Preview at: opening doors, power heckmanmotors.com w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, Heckman Motors and mirrors, cruise con111 E. Front, P.A. trol, tilt, air conditioning, (360)912-3583 Mach MP3 CD Stereo, dual front airbags. Only 52,000 original miles! FORD ‘96 F150 REGUClean Carfax! ImmacuLAR CAB LONGBED late condition inside and 4X4 out! Just like it’s still in 5 . 0 L ( 3 0 2 ) E F I V 8 , 5 the wrapper! FX4 Series speed manual, chrome One Offroad Package! wheels, dual fuel tanks, This Ranger is a real bedliner, tow package, Must-See! Stop by Gray cruise control, tilt, air Motors today! conditioning, cassette $13,995 stereo, drivers airbag. GRAY MOTORS Only 75,000 original 457-4901 miles! Great running and graymotors.com driving truck! Set up to get some serious work FORD: ‘05 F150. 4x4 done! Adult owned local quad cab, automatic 5.4 trade-in! Stop by Gray L t , w i t h c h i p fo r i m - Motors today to save big proved milage, 121,000 b u c k s o n y o u r n e x t miles, leather interior, truck! power locks windows, $4,995 and mirrors, heated and GRAY MOTORS power seats, with 457-4901 memory, center console graymotors.com and overhead console. 20” wheels, 10 ply tires, tunnel cover with spray- FORD: ‘96 Ranger. Subed-liner, and bed ex- per cab, good cond., 4 tension, tinted windows, c y l . , 2 . 3 L , 5 s p e e d , ex c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n . matching shell, AC, $14,700. (360)941-6373. cruise. $3,499. 670-9087

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH APN No.: 063008-550570 Title Order No.: 080146772-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSH ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2005 1159435 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/5/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 19 AND 20, BLOCK 5, MALLETTE’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; TOGETHER WITH THE SOUTH HALF HALF OF VACATED ALLEY ADJOINING, PUSUANT TO CR RESOLUTION NO. 8, 1996 RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 734777; EXCEPT THE WEST 3.5 FEET OF SAID LOT 19; ALSO EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO CLALLAM COUNTY FOR RIGHT-OF-WAY PURPOSE BY DOCUMENT RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 298062. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/21/2005, recorded 6/27/2005, under 2005 1159435 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, N.A., f/k/a Norwest Bank Minnesota, N.A., solely as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., GreenPoint Mortgage Funding Trust 2005-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-AR4 . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $7,495.22 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $137,791.19, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/5/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph HI is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN ADDRESS 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 10/23/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/4/12 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH A-4336011 03/08/2013, 03/29/2013 Pub: March. 8, 29, 2013 Legal No. 461996

TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma. 90K miles, 4X4. 2005 Toyota Tacoma. Great tr uck, just over 90k miles. Small Lift. Ride and dr ives perfect. $15,500/obo. Call Ryan (425)422-6678 this truck is located in Sequim.

9556 SUVs Others C H E V : ‘ 0 1 B l a z e r. 4WD, power windows, white, good cond. $2,900. (360)460-8155 C H E V : ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n . 4x4, 3.4 ton, 6.2L diesel. $1,200/obo. 460-5736.

C H E V: ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n 4x4. ‘454’, needs some work, body great shape, m a ny ex t ra s. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / obo. (360)461-6970. JEEP: ‘04 Grand Cherokee. L6, auto, full power, privacy windows, 88K mi $8,250. (360)460-0114.

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

C H E V : ‘ 9 6 B l a z e r. 4x4, 184K, fully loaded, clean, exc. condition. $4,000/obo. (360)460-8631

MITSUBISHI ‘11 ENDEAVOR LS AWD 3.8 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, with blue tooth, power windows and locks, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, only 34,000 miles, balance of factory 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y, n o n smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y report. Near new condition. Great value! $17,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEVY: ‘99 Suburban LS package. 4X4 5.7 liter 3.72 rear end. Tow package with transmission cooler. Third seat. Front and rear hitches. Ve r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n . 136,000 miles. $4500. (360)417-1027 FORD: ‘93 Explorer XLT. 4x4 auto, dark green, tan interior, looks great, runs great, 116K orig. mi., new front suspens i o n , n ew t ra n s, n ew brakes/wheel bearings, new head gaskets/timing chain, new rocker arms/ push rods, new radiator. $4,900. (360)457-3744.

PONTIAC ‘09 VIBE AWD,auto, air, ABS, low 28K miles, super clean. Consumer Reports rates this as a best buy in its class in ‘09. This is built on a Toyota chassis with 4 cyl, 16V, Toyota VVT-i FORD: ‘97 Expedition engine. No wonder ConXLT. 4x4, 3rd row seat. sumer Reports likes it! $3,690. (360)461-2145. $14,900 Preview at: GMC: ‘90 Jimmy.Rebuilt. heckmanmotors.com Call for details. $2,500. Heckman Motors (360)452-6649 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 HONDA ‘07 ELEMENT SC Auto, premium sound, fully loaded, 18” wheels 9730 Vans & Minivans with brand new Michelin Others tires, 4 cyl, new brakes, excellent condition in- C H E V: ‘ 8 6 2 0 s e r i e s side and out. Van. Rebuilt engine, V8. $14,900 $695. (360)640-0948. Preview at: heckmanmotors.com C H E V ‘ 9 7 Va n : ( 7 ) Heckman Motors pssngr, 45k mi on Jas111 E. Front, P.A. per engi, recent R&R ra(360)912-3583 diator, trans rebuild, etc. LINCOLN: ‘04 Naviga- $3,1000/obo. 582-9179. t o r. 9 5 k , AW D, 4 X 4 , leather, seats 7 com- VW: ‘88 Westfalia. Sinfortably, good family ve- gle owner, rebuilt, 15” hicle, new compressor wheels and tires, awnand tabs, 6 disc changer ing, tent, all reciepts, etc. Excellent condition! and Bose sound syst e r m , v e r y r e l i a b l e . $14,995. (360)452-4890. $12,000/obo. ISUZU: ‘00 16’ van. Die(360)460-5421 sel engine, 179,166 mi., runs great, auto tail lift. Place your ad at $7,000. Call Cookie at peninsula (360)385-6898, lv msg. dailynews.com

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH APN No.: 0630000086200000 Title Order No.: 080154401-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007 1200533 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/5/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: ALL OF LOTS 5 AND 6 IN BLOCK 86, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, LOT 4 IN BLOCK 86, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT ANY PORTION THEREOF LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT, 40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 4 TO A POINT 40 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY IN A DIRECT LINE TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 25 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY IN A DIRECT LINE TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 A POINT 25 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 TO A POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 318 WEST 4TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/26/2007, recorded 4/30/2007, under 2007 1200533 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSUAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, N.A., f/k/a Norwest Bank Minnesota, N.A., solely as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust 2007-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-AR4. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $6,543.92 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $175,066.24, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/5/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE 318 WEST 4TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 10/25/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: DEC. 04, 2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH A-4336009 03/08/2013, 03/29/2013 Pub: March. 8, 29, 2013 Legal No. 461990

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9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

NO. 13 4 00107 1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF IRMA JEAN HANIFY, Deceased. The Co-Personal Representatives named below have been appointed and have qualified as Co-Personal Representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Co-Personal Representatives or the Co-Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and the filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Co-Personal Representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claim against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 22, 2013 DANIEL R. HANIFY Co-Personal Representative JOHN G. HOLLIS Co-Personal Representative ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: MARY F. PFAFF-PIERCE Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives 218 East Seventh Street P.O. Box 1001 Port Angeles, Washington 98362 (360) 457-5390 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Clallam County Superior Court, 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 Cause Number: See Above Pub: March 22, 29, April 5, 2013 Legal No. 465727

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH APN No.: 063022-330240 Title Order No.: 6552740 Grantor(s): JAYNA STORY LAFFERTY, ARTHUR D LAFFERTY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY - ARLINGTON BRANCH. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 20081220032 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/5/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: Parcel “A” That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the point on the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87º19’20” East 485.11 feet from the Southwest corner thereof; Thence continuing South 87º19’20” East along said South line 95 feet; Thence North 2º 40’ 40” East 450 feet; Thence North 87º 19’ 20” West 95 feet; Thence South 2º 40’ 40” West 450 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT the South 255 feet thereof. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. PARCEL “B” An easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and across that portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at a point of the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87º 19’ 20” East 286.31 feet from the Southwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 87º 19’ 20” East along said South line 403.80 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence North 2º 31’ 40” East along the East line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 20 feet; Thence North 87º 19’ 20” West parallel with the said South line 387.27 feet; Thence North 8º 19’ 20” West 178.27 feet; Thence South 87º 19’ 20” East parallel with said South line 311.33 feet; Thence North 2º 40’ 40” East 60 feet; Thence North 87º 19’ 20” West 95 feet; Thence North 2º 40’ 40” East 399.52 feet to the point on the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87º 19’ 24” East 481.66 feet from the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing North 2º 40’ 40” East 5.28 feet to the South margin of the Plat of Brunch’s Panoramic Heights, as recorded under Auditor’s File No. 373011 in Volume 6 of Plats, page 23; Thence North 87º 57’ 05” West along said South margin 60 feet; Thence South 2º 40’ 40” West 4.62 feet to the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 2º 40’ 40” West 399.52 feet; Thence North 87º 19’ 20” West 188.37 feet; Thence South 8º 19’ 20” East 259.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/23/2008, recorded 4/28/2008, under 2008-1220032 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to JOAN H. ANDERSON, EVP ON BEHALF OF FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH, (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage, LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $4,950.31 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $265,428.27, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/5/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 3/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 10/26/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n W a s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: DEC. 04, 2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH A-FN4333893 03/08/2013, 03/29/2013 Pub: March. 8, 29, 2013 Legal No. 461994


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF MARCH 29-APRIL 4, 2013


2

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Bit of dark laughter Cabaret brings â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Kreepshowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to PT stage BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Black Pearl Cabaret rides again, starting tonight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreepshow: A Gothic Comedy Cabaretâ&#x20AC;? will open for an extended run at Manresa Castle, 651 Cleveland St., bringing in its wake a cast of strange, comical characters. With curtain time at 9 p.m. every other Friday and Saturday now through May, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreepshowâ&#x20AC;? will unfold in the castleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Victo-

Where & when

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreepshow: A Gothic Comedy Cabaretâ&#x20AC;? opens tonight inside Port Townsendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Manresa Castle. The show stars, from left, Aidan McClave, R Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell, Misha CassellaBlackburn and Ares Altamirano.

â&#x2013;  Who: The Black Pearl Cabaret's "Kreepshow" â&#x2013;  When: Tonight and Saturday, April 12-13, 26027

and May 10-11, 24-25, 9 p.m. â&#x2013;  Where: Manresa Castle, 651 Cleveland St., Port Townsend â&#x2013;  Tickets: $15 in advance at Quimper Sounds, 230 Taylor St.; $20 at the door â&#x2013;  Info: 360-385-5750 or BlackPearlCabaret wordpress.com rian dining room, with dinner and a full bar available. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think Tim Burton presents â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Monty Python,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get the premise of the show,â&#x20AC;? says creator R Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell. In this cabaret, he is the spirited Capt. Brazillia R. Kreep, while the young

Misha Cassella-Blackburn is circus performer and tango dancer Parthenia Goste. Aidan McClave is the comical cellist Kreepy H. Krawler. And Ares Altamirano is Jack Frost, a man Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;devilishly charismatic.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ever-changingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;With audience participation, song and dance as well as the occasional special ghost appearance, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Kreepshowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is ever-changing,â&#x20AC;? he added. Tickets to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreepshowâ&#x20AC;?

Hi, nam eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cracke r. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from Chi macum. And you? 33734470

are $15 in advance at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., and at Manresa Castle. At the door, they will rise to $20.

ATTENTION: CRIBBAGE PLAYERS Ron Gustafson announces

2 NEW CRIBBAGE CLUBS SEQUIM VALLEY PEGGERS ÍžŽžĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x;Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Íż

Come Celebrate our 3rd Birthday on Monday, April 1st

RAINSHADOW PEGGERS

Different specials every hour!

Íž&Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;ĨƾŜĆ&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ÍŹÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ĺ?ŜŜÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?Íż

Cake & Coffee will be served.

BETWEEN#OTTAGE1UEEN%:0AWN

33759301

FOR MORE INFO CONTACT: Cribbage ibb Master, Ron Gustafson at 360.457.8356

Barely Consignment

7&IRST3Ts0ORT!NGELES

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Rissaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

380 E. Washington St., Sequim, WA Both clubs are open to all players so come by and improve your cribbage skills, math and sharpen up your trash talk by being able to win more cribbage games against your friends, ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć?Ĺ?Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ÄŽÄ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;

10 PM-ON 3ATs3UN PM 360-797-1109

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

To find out more about the production, phone 360385-5750 or visit http:// BlackPearlCabaret wordpress.com.

Why pay full price when you can get name brands for less!

Tuesday, April 2 Wednesday, April 3 at 5:30PM at 5:30PM at: ISLANDER PIZZA & PASTA

May we help?

Performances are slated for tonight and Saturday night as well as April 12-13 and 26-27 and May 10-11 and 24-25.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

3

Freedom expression of

Women tell stories of breaking bonds since the venue opened last year, will perform an interpretive dance number. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Becky Corning will offer a PORT ANGELES — Six spoken-word piece, as will women will step forward, Lisa McCoy, whose perspeak up and break free. sonal narrative will delve This is their idea of into how she faced cancer. something wild to do on a The multifaceted artist spring Saturday night: Sarah Tucker will do what Reveal how they shook off she calls a mock burlesque fear, worry and plain old dance to “My Way” as sung timidity. by the late punk rock star Performance artist Sid Vicious. Angie Huckstep of Port “This song is inspiraAngeles will host “Rebels tional to me,” Tucker says. on Stage: Breaking Free” at It’s a reminder that life is 8 p.m. Saturday. Doors will short. open at 7:30 p.m., and admission will be $8 to the Free from fears event on the Allé Stage at She wants the song to Studio Bob, the upstairs signify a breaking loose event space at 1181/2 E. from the fears that come Front St. Huckstep, also a writer, with being human. Getta Rogers, also an teacher and dancer, invited artist who works in various a variety of local people to media — from paint to the stage. Each one will bring her own story, told as music — will add to the only she can do it. But first, mix a few songs, including Huckstep will start the fes- two of her own. tivities by encouraging “For me, this particular everyone to get into the performance will be about act: to build a paper chain breaking free from musical to symbolize those things silence,” Rogers said, addthat might hold us down. ing that she has a feeling Tana Villella-Flath, who people will relate to her has been seen in several music’s content. Allé Stage experiments Huckstep herself will BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

DIANE URBANI

Performance artist Tana Villella-Flath is among the women to appear in “Breaking Free,” a night of music and spoken-word creations at Studio Bob’s Allé Stage in Port Angeles.

DE LA

PAZ (3)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

perform “Point B,” a piece that mixes spoken-word, movement and audience participation. Members of the audience will be asked to write on Huckstep with a Sharpie marker. She’ll perform a dance number too, to the song “Broken Wings,” about a woman leaving an abusive relationship. To cap the show: Huckstep’s short play based on how five people rose out of their rock-bottom moments. The piece is titled “We Are Not Broken.” “Breaking Free” totals about two hours with an intermission, and contains themes suitable for teens and adults. As for that chain put together at the beginning of the evening, Huckstep said it will be broken at the end of the night — with gusto — “a symbolic act, of us all breaking free.” To find out more about this and other events at Studio Bob, email Tucker at sarah@tuckerart.com, phone Studio Bob owner Bob Stokes at 415-9900457 or visit the Allé Stage page on Facebook.

Easter Sunday Breakfast Buffet

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8am - 12:30 $

1095

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Easter specials available for breakfast, lunch, and dinner with regular menu.

Opens at 6am

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113 DelGuzzi Dr. Port Angeles 452-6545


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Gallery owner PT Film Institute to host to offer free women’s video workshop art classes BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

of school I took a painting class, jewelry, ceramics PORT TOWNSEND — and sculpture. Max Grover of the Max “It was what really Grover Gallery is looking kept me interested in for students for a new art being there. It is now time class to begin April 22 for me to pay some of that and run for eight weeks. back,” Grover said. Grover He’ll offer his class to a will offer maximum of nine stuthe class dents from the Port free of Townsend area, and focus charge, on acrylic painting. supplies “I am looking for stuincluded, dents with commitment to youngand passion for making sters age Grover art,” said Grover. 14 to 19. “I will help students in His classroom will be his the areas of composition, gallery, which is adjacent use of color, developing a to the Sideshow Variety personal style and expandshop at 630 Water St. Ses- ing one’s creativity.” sions will go from 3 p.m. For an application or to 6 p.m. Mondays to donate painting supthrough June 10. plies, phone Grover at “In my high school, 360-774-0663 or email there were four full-time maxgrovergallery@gmail. art teachers. My last year com.

special screenings and forums year round. This filmmaking course for women, Force hopes, will be the first of many such opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Film Institute will offer its first Women’s Video Workshop, a course with screenwriter Nancy Alvarez and filmmaker Jane Champion, beginning April 24. “After years of dreaming, we have attracted the support of not one but two film professionals willing to share their expertise with women in the region,” said Janette Force, executive director of the institute. “Have you dreamed of writing a screenplay from a female perspective, shooting and editing the video, and screening it at the 2013 Port Townsend Film Festival?,” Force writes in her invitation. “That dream will come true” in this workshop.

Script first The course will start with scripting workshops from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, April 24 through May 8. It will continue with videotaping and editing sessions tentatively scheduled for two Saturdays in May and possibly Jane Champion, seen working at the Port two weekday evenings. Townsend Film Festival, will join screenwriter “We can decide as a Nancy Alvarez in teaching a women’s group the best dates and filmmaking class in April. times,” said Champion, group, and creating an out- “depending on everyone’s It’s not inexpensive, schedules and when it is line and script. Champion however: The course fee is will teach how to develop a best to videotape on loca$350 per person. tion.” storyboard, techniques for In the weekly sessions, To learn more about the videotaping on location and Alvarez will guide particiinstructors, visit www. editing the final piece. pants through the process Everyone will contribute to NancyAlvarezWrites.com of defining a concept as a and www.vimeo.com/Jane each step of the process, ChampionProductions. For Force noted. more information about the In addition to the Port workshop, phone the Port Townsend Film Festival, Townsend Film Institute at slated for Sept. 20-22, the 360-379-1333 or visit www. nonprofit Port Townsend PTfilmfest.com. Film Institute presents

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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

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Author to share ‘Pied Piper’ to visit PT this weekend tales from book PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — “The Pied Piper,” a musical adaptation of the classic, comes to Port Townsend tonight and Saturday afternoon thanks to the Missoula Children’s Theatre crew and a cast of 40 local youngsters. The Missoula Children’s Theatre of Montana stages the story of Hamelin Town today at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 1 p.m. in the Port Townsend High School auditorium, 1500 Van Ness.

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Artist Robert Amos of Victoria painted this watercolor of the clumsy but curious hero of The Adventures of J.R. Engels in the Great Pacific Northwest. graduate work. He spent the next 20 years teaching. Since his retirement, Fisher and his wife, Ann Elizabeth, have been traveling the world, while keeping homes in Sequim and at Lake Sutherland. For more information about Tuesday’s event, phone North Coast Writers spokesperson Mary-Alice Boulter at 360-457-6410 or e-mail her at critterperson@ gmail.com.

Tickets Tickets will be $5 for children and $10 for adults at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., at the Port Townsend Food

A twist

AMY RECKER

Third-graders Sam Carlson and Olivia Morningstar rehearse for “The Pied Piper,” in which Sam plays the mayor’s son and Olivia the mayor’s daughter. The show, a Missoula Children’s Theatre production, unfolds tonight and Saturday afternoon at the Port Townsend High School auditorium. Co-op, 414 Kearney St., and at the school auditorium door before the show.

“The Pied Piper” begins when ravenous rats begin to overwhelm the town.

But the town is unable to pay the Piper — and the story takes an interesting turn. This Missoula Children’s Theatre production is cosponsored by OPEPO, the Port Townsend School District’s Optional Education Program. To find out more, phone coordinator Laura Rust at 360-732-0083.

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PORT ANGELES — To celebrate April Fool’s Day — a little bit after the fact — writer and teacher Jim Fisher will host “An Evening with Jim and J.R.” this Tuesday. In an open gathering at Wine on the Waterfront, upstairs in The Landing mall at 115 E. Railroad Ave., Fisher will present a tongue-in-cheek look at the lesser-known denizens of the Olympic Peninsula in his first novel, The Adventures of J.R. Engels in the Great Pacific Northwest. This is another free event sponsored by the North Coast Writers, a Port Angeles-based writing group. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. to Wine on the Waterfront’s all-ages lounge, with Fisher’s reading to follow at 7 p.m. In this book, “J.R.” encounters grandmotherly vampires, Sasquatch, gay cows, king salmon, Roosevelt elk and other phenomena. The book, Fisher notes, is the product of 20 years of writing comical tales about the Pacific Northwest. “J.R. is a bit challenged when it comes to hunting and fishing,” Fisher writes, “but is willing to try anything, no matter how clumsily he stumbles through the experience.” Fisher himself is a retired Peninsula College English professor as well as a writer of poetry and prose. He’s a transplanted Californian who spent 25 years working at Procter & Gamble. A plant closure allowed him to return to school at the California State University campus in Long Beach, and then the University of Southern California in Los Angeles for

Sara, an orphan girl, and the other townspeople turn to the mayor of Hamelin and his council, who then call on the Pied Piper to save them. The mayor’s son and daughter, played by Sam Carlson and Olivia Morningstar, also join in the endeavor.

Sequim 683-8269

Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at either Serenity House Thrift Store

502 E. First St.

Port Angeles 452-4711


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Coming Up Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St., Sequim; Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., Port Angeles and www. brownpapertickets.com. For more information, phone 360-681-7565.

Justice and friends set to play in PT PORT TOWNSEND — The indie-folk band composed of singers Jane Justice, Laura Lee Nastri and Tamahra Martin will cook up an Easter evening concert at The Upstage this Sunday, with admission by donation. The music, from Nastri’s bass, guitar and keyboard, Martin’s drums and Justice’s guitar, will flow from 6:30 p.m. till 9 p.m. at the all-ages venue at 923 Washington St. For more details and the dinner menu, visit www. UpstageRestaurant.com or phone 360-385-2216.

Uke meeting PORT TOWNSEND — “Ukuleles Unite” is a free gathering for ukulele players and listeners alike this Tuesday at The Upstage, 923 Washington St. For those who want to

Art Blast coming PORT ANGELES — The duo called Witherow — singer Abby Mae Latson and guitarist Dillan Witherow — has grown into a quartet poised for a concert next Friday, April 5. With bassist Jason Taylor and electric guitar man Adam Bettger on board, Witherow will offer its blend of original folk and rock harmonies in another free Port Angeles Library Art Blast party. The evening also features a new exhibition of visual art by Linda Crow, Allyn Cowan, Robert Laura Lee Nastri, left, Tamahra Martin and Jane Justice will fill The Upstage with folk music this Saraduke, Michel McCarter Sunday evening. and Mark Glover, so an opening reception with the join in but don’t have an part in a conversation together, phone the venue though participants are instrument, a uke will be artists will start at 6:30 hosted by local film buff at 360-385-2216 or see encouraged to bring their provided. p.m.. Then comes the live John Hansen. www.UpstageRestaurant. own drums. For more information The Port Townsend Film music at 7 p.m. com. “We will learn easy about this 5 p.m. getAdmission is free for it Institute sponsors the world rhythms that you salon, so institute members all, and details can be can play on drums, shakShakers, blocks found at 360-417-8500 and ers, wood blocks and bells,” enjoy $1 off their tickets PORT ANGELES — at the library at 2210 S. and 50 cents off popcorn. Sharpe noted. “We will Longtime drummer and Peabody St. For details, phone the practice easy activities to dance caller Erran Sharpe film institute office at 360feel rhythm in our bodies. will start a six-week drumPato in PA ming class Wednesday eve- We will have fun improvis- 379-1333. ing — messing around — PORT ANGELES — Regning at the Greenwood Chopin and more gae artist Pato Banton and building, 113 S. Eunice St. with the rhythms. “Group drumming,” he his seven-piece band the PORT ANGELES — across from the Swain’s added, “is a thrill.” Now Generation are on their San Francisco Bay Area parking lot. To find out more, phone pianist Margret Elson will way north for a concert at This course will delve Sharpe at 360-460-6594 or bring the music of Chopin, Studio Bob, 1181/2 E. Front into basic African and email erran.sharpe@gmail. Bach and the Catalan com- St., on Sunday, April 7. Latin American rhythms, com. Father-and-son team poser Federico Mompou to Sharpe said, with sessions

33755741

geared toward beginners and advanced beginners each Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. till 8:30 p.m. The cost is $50 for the six-night series, payable at the first class. No prior musical experience is required or prohibited to take part, Sharpe said. A limited number of hand drums will be available to borrow during class,

Talk about ‘Oz’ PORT TOWNSEND — The First Tuesday Salon, a monthly discussion of new movies, returns to the Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St., this Tuesday. This time around the film for discussion is “Oz the Great and Powerful” in 3-D, so moviegoers are invited to stay after the 7 p.m. screening and take

town next Friday, April 5. Elson, a Juilliard graduate who performs, teaches and works with musicians as a psychotherapist, will give her concert at 7 p.m. in Maier Hall, the intimate performance space at Peninsula College. Tickets are $20 with proceeds to benefit the Sierra Club’s North Olympic group. Outlets include Pacific

Brian and Cody Coughenour of the Toadlily International Hostel are presenting the 7 p.m. event, which will feature food and drink from Oven Spoonful in downtown Port Angeles. Tickets are $15 in advance at the hostel, 105 E. Fifth St., and at Oven Spoonful, 110 E. First St. For more details, phone 360-452-4566. Peninsula Daily News


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

IAN BYINGTON

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

From left, Johnny Moses, Harvest Moon, Daniel Deardorff and Brian Rohr will share stories tribal and traditional this Monday night in “Trickster Tales,” held each April Fool’s Day in Port Townsend.

‘The old stories are alive’ Tale-tellers to invite Trickster into their midst BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Trickster will slip out to play this Monday night. That’s a promise from storyteller Brian Rohr: In the voices of four humans, those masters of creative chaos — Coyote, Raven, Mink and companions — will whisk listeners off to another plane. Rohr is host of the fifth annual Trickster Tales, yet he will not predict what the featured tale-spinners will do. What he does know is that the four tellers will gather at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April Fool’s Day, at the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave. Trickster Tales admission is a suggested donation of $12 to $25 to benefit the Boiler Room, Port Townsend’s nonprofit youth-run coffee house.

This year’s event has Johnny Moses of the Tulalip tribe; Harvest Moon, a Quinault tribal ambassador; Daniel Deardorff of the Mythsinger Foundation of Port Townsend and Rohr himself poised to tell stories — in English with tribal languages, sign language and drumming stirred in. The evening is open to all ages, Rohr noted, though the Trickster Tales stories of past years have contained some salty language and themes.

Coming together as community “We’ll be coming together as a whole community to really listen to these old stories,” Rohr said. To truly hear these tales, he added, is to let go of the rational and the mundane. The tellers take people into the world of the imagination, of emotion and of the ancient oral tradition. TURN

TO

TRICKSTER/9

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Find Your Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Play Fest organizers seeking actors

tt

SAINT-SAENS

Concerto No. 3 in b for or Violin and Orchestra with Monique Mead ead Evening Concert PAHS Auditorium 7:30 PM M 304 E. Park Avenue Tickets: $30, $20, $15, $12 Pre-concert Chat 6:40 PM

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The Good Book/ Joyful Noise Music Center

val, a lineup of seven short plays, will be held at 6 p.m. Monday and Tuesday inside the Little Theater in the J Building at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

hope to cast around 25 actors of all ages and both genders for the festival, which will take place in the Little Theater May 31BY DIANE URBANI June 2. DE LA PAZ The auditions are open PENINSULA DAILY NEWS to everyone in the commuPORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; nity, added Peninsula ColAll ages, genders The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Your Voiceâ&#x20AC;? New lege drama professor Lara Performers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to Starcevich. Play Festival, to unfold bring any prepared matelater this spring at Peninâ&#x20AC;&#x153;The only requirement,â&#x20AC;? rial, said production manshe said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is a willingness sula College, first needs ager John Manno, but they to put yourself out there actors and actresses from should strive to arrive by and try something new.â&#x20AC;? the campus and commuPerformers may be cast nity to come to the theater 6 p.m. or soon thereafter. in up to two of the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Your Voiceâ&#x20AC;? next week. New Play Festival directors short productions. Seven Auditions for the festiwell-known local thespians â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amy Meyer, Sean PeckCollier, Nikkole Adams, Jeremiah Paulsen, Zachary Moorman, Marissa Wilson and Chandler Wendeborn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will direct the seven Easter Brunch Menu plays.

Auditions set at Peninsula College

April 13, 2013 3

Morning Dress Rehearsal PAHS Auditorium 10 AM 304 E. Park Avenue $5 Individual, $10 Family

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Chicken Fried Steak and eggs 15 House Smoked Bourbon Peach Glazed Ham 15 Corned Beef Hash 13 Bacon and Green Chile Cheese Quesadillas with 2 eggs 11 Goat Cheese Tamales with Shrimp & Poached Eggs 15 Crab Cake Benedict 18 Cream Cheese Stuffed French Toast 9 Huevos Rancheros 12 Breakfast Burrito 10 Biscuits and Gravy 9 with two eggs 12 33759237

Omeletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3 Egg (choice of toast and southwest fries) Spinach, mushrooms and Feta Cheese 9 Bacon, Green Chile and Cheese 11 Pecan Cinnamon Rolls 4 Side of Andouille Sausage or Apple Smoked Bacon 4 Side of JalapeĂąo Tillamook Grits 3 Side of Two Eggs 3

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

All items are served with fresh fruit Drink Specials: Bloody Mary 6 Mimosas 5 House Made Sangria 6

Happy Easter from all of us at the Kokopelli Grill &'SPOU4U 1PSU"OHFMFTt

10-minute plays Each is just 10 minutes long, and chosen from 20 submissions to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Your Voiceâ&#x20AC;? festival, Manno noted. The entries came from across the North Olympic Peninsula and beyond. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Your Voice,â&#x20AC;? Manno added, is a reinvented version of the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual FOSDOAP, the Festival of StudentDirected One-Act Plays. Manno, who did a lot of fringe theater in the Midwest before moving to Port Angeles, met with Starcevich to discuss a new face for the festival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lara was open to all of the changes,â&#x20AC;? Manno said, quipping that â&#x20AC;&#x153;this is FOSDOAP reborn.â&#x20AC;? For more information about the auditions and the festival, email john manno@yahoo.com. For more on other public events on campus, visit www.Pencol.edu or see the Peninsula College page on Facebook.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

9

Trickster: Tale-tellers CONTINUED FROM 7 butions to the understanding of Northwest tribal “This is how people heritage. entertained,” Rohr said, “for hundreds of thousands Brian Rohr of years.” ■ Rohr, for his part, Trickster Tales is a full, said he’ll slip in a story two-and-a-half-hour while hosting Trickster immersion, he added. Tales. He’s the originator of “I love movies and TV. the event to benefit the Don’t get me wrong. But this is an opportunity to go Boiler Room, as well as deeper . . . [into] our indige- host of the First Friday Storynights at Better Livnous souls.” ing through Coffee. These Rohr offered some hisevenings traditionally have tory on each Trickster a featured storyteller as Tales artist: well as an open-mic section. Johnny Moses Rohr noted that the ■ Johnny Moses, whose Boiler Room, established traditional name is Whis. stem.men.knee — Walking Medicine Robe — is one of the most popular storytellers in North America, Rohr said. He has offered traditional and contemporary stories from California to New York City, where he appeared at Lincoln Center. He shares each story in English, traditional sign language and one of the eight Native American languages he speaks.

20 years ago, is believed to be the oldest continuously operating youth-run coffee house in the United States. The place at 711 Tyler St. is a venue for music, art and theater and a free soup kitchen for all ages. It is also a place for sharing stories, including the traditional ones. “The old stories are alive,” Rohr said, “ and can inform us on how to live our lives as authentic human beings.” For more on Trickster Tales and other storytelling events in Port Townsend, visit www.BrianRohr.com or phone 360-531-2535.

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Daniel Deardorff ■ Daniel Deardorff is a “singer” in the old sense of that word: a musician, storyteller, poet and maker of ritual. A longtime Port Townsender, he is the founder of the Mythsinger Foundation and the Mythsinger Consortium, an online community at www. Mythsinger.net.

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Sequim, WA 98382 open 7 days a week www.el-cazador.com

Medal of Honor Sponsor: D A Davidson and Company &ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͕ŽŶƚĂĐƚĞƚƐLJZĞĞĚ^ĐŚƵůƚnj ϯϲϬ͘ϰϲϬ͘ϳϴϰϴǁǁǁ͘ĂƉƚĂŝŶ:ŽƐĞƉŚ,ŽƵƐĞ&ŽƵŶĚĂƟŽŶ͘ŽƌŐ

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33759228

360-683-4788 531 W. Washington,

33759214

■ Harvest Moon is a Quinault ambassador, historian, basket weaver and storyteller whose name means “a light shining forth in the midst of darkness.” She has been telling stories over half her lifetime and has received the Peace and Friendship Award from the Washington State Historical Society in recognition of her contri-

Adults


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Nightlife Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Clallam County Port Angeles Bar Hop Brewery (124 W. Railroad Ave.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Scott Sullivan Duo, today, 8:30 p.m. No cover. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Eggplant (rock, funk, soul, blues) Saturday, 9 p.m. $3; Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m.

Elks (131 E. First St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Late Night Blues Band, Saturday, 9 p.m. No cover. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Country, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; country jam, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Castaways Night Club Highway 112, junction) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (1213 Marine Drive) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ChanJunkyard Jane (country blues), tilly Lace (classic rock), Satur- tonight; MRB (Mick, Rachel day, 9 p.m.; Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Country and Barry with country/folk/ Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. classic rock), Sunday, 7 p.m.; Jason Mogi and Paul StehrDupuis Restaurant Green Wednesday, 8 p.m. to (256861 U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 11 p.m.; Ches Ferguson,

Port Angeles Senior Center (Seventh and Peabody streets) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boys (ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free. R Bar (132 E. Front St) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn The Cedars at Dungeness Stymieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill (1965 Woodcock Road) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buck Ellard (country), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Old Sidekicks (country), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Olympic Express Big Band, Saturday, 5:30 p.m.; Billy Shew (top 40, blues and classic rock) and No Left Turn,

31

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Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

9 p.m. Saturday; Blue Hole Quintet, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victor hosts an open mic, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign up 6 p.m.) 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Billy Shew Band (top 40, blues and classic rock), tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight; Freddy Pink (top 40), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Stardust Big Band, Sunday, 5:30 p.m.

SUPPORT EDUCATION: When

Kids 10 & under $695

you go on vacation, donate the credit for your suspended copies to provide the PDN to schools. Phone 360-452-4507.

Dinner Special (served 3-8 p.m.)

Easter Dinner Specials Grilled Boneless Leg of Lamb $2200 Served with a garlic artichoke sauce or

Honey-Baked Ham $1700 both served with all the trimmings, plus dessert. - Regular dinner menu available too 33759566

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This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.

Send me to school!

Fresh fruit, mufďŹ ns, pastries, cheese blintzes, fruit blintzes, cinnamon swirl French toast, chicken-fried steak, biscuits & gravy, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, roasted red potatoes and more, includes coffee or hot tea. Served 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Regular breakfast menu available too -

Reservations recommended for parties of 6 or more

Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Julie & Meg (folk), today, 6 p.m. No cover; Open mic hosted by Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m.

13&4&/54 13 1 3& &4 4 & / 54 4&/54 4

Featuring Carved Honey-Baked Ham

1499

Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m.

The Upstage (923 Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Live jazz with Scenes featuring John Stowell, today, 7:30 p.m.; The Sunny Loudin Band (blues), Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Laura Lee Nastri and Jane Justice, singer/songwriters with Tamahra Martin, Sunday, 6:30 p.m.; open mic, Monday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

130.05*0/4--$

BREAKFAST BUFFET

$

Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine (1208 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. p.m. Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Tulin Sirens (823 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (Celtic folk noir), Saturday, Highlife Band (reggae), today, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. No cover. 10 p.m. $5; Kendl Winter (banjo and guitar), Saturday, Jefferson County 10 p.m.; April Fools Party with Miss Lonely Hearts, Monday, 9 Port Townsend p.m.; fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Alchemy (842 Washington St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trevor Hanson (classical Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, 9 p.m.

Enjoy our fabulous all-you-can-eat

Adults

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue.

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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

11

PS At the Movies: Week of March 29 - April 4 Port Angeles Where to find the cinemas

“Admission” (PG-13) — A Princeton admissions officer (Tina Fey), who is up for a major promotion, takes a professional risk after she meets a college-bound alternative school kid who might be the son she gave up years ago in a secret adoption. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:55 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. daily, plus 4:50 p.m. today through Sunday. “The Call” (R) — When veteran 9-1-1 operator Jordan (Halle Berry) takes a life-altering call from a teenage girl (Abigail Breslin) who has just been abducted, she realizes that she must confront a killer from her past to save the girl’s life. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m. and 9:05 p.m. daily, plus 9:05 today and Saturday and 1:05 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday through Thursday. “The Croods” (PG — Animated) — When their cave is destroyed, the Crood family must embark on a comedy adventure into strange and spectacular territory in search of a new home. As if patriarch Grug didn’t already have enough to handle, it goes from bad to worse when they encounter an imaginative nomad named Guy. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:45 p.m., 6:45 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. daily, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. Saturday through Thursday. “The Host” (PG-13) — When an unseen enemy threatens mankind by taking over their bodies and erasing their memories, Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan) will risk everything to protect the people she cares most about — Jared (Max Irons), Ian (Jake Abel), her brother Jamie (Chandler Canterbury) and her Uncle Jeb (William Hurt), proving that love can conquer all in a dangerous new world. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:10 p.m. and 9:25 p.m. daily, plus 4:45 p.m. today through Sunday.

“The Host” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theatre. 5 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Port Townsend

“Oz the Great and Powerful” (PG) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes in 2D are 4 p.m. daily. Showtimes in 3D are 7 p.m. daily plus 1:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Admission” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4:30 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. today through Tuesday and Thursday, plus daily, plus 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and 4:30 p.m. only on Wednesday.

“Persecution” (Unrated) — The solitary Daniel and Sonia share an uneasy love/hate relationship. Daniel’s life is disrupted by the appearance of a stranger that proceeds to insinuate himself in his life. The man’s persistence takes its toll on Daniel and Sonia, leaving Daniel alone with nagging questions of “Why?” At the Rose Theatre.

Mila Kunis, James Franco, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz, from left, star in “Oz the Great and Powerful.” “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (PG-13) — In this sequel, the G.I. Joes are not only fighting their mortal enemy Cobra, they are forced to contend with threats from within the government that jeopardize their very existence. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m. and 9:35 p.m. daily, plus 12:35 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. Saturday through Thursday. “Jack the Giant Slayer” (PG13) — An ancient war is reignited when a young farmhand unwittingly opens a gateway between his world and a fearsome race of giants. Unleashed on the Earth for the first time in centuries, the giants strive to reclaim the land they once lost, forcing the young man, Jack (Nicholas Hoult) into the battle of his life. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:55 p.m. daily, plus 12:30 p.m. Saturday through Thursday.

“Oz the Great and Powerful” (PG) — When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of

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CONCERTS ON WEDNESDAYS 6 PM TO 8 PM FROM JUNE 19 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 4.

Deadline for submission is 5 p.m., Friday, April 12. A Sponsor of Concert on the Pier is Peninsula Daily News

Grilled

Bread from Sequim’s Bell Street Bakery, Fresh Local Butter from Golden Glen Creamery, Frommage Blanc from Mt Townsend Creamery,

is accepting applications for bands to perform at its

Payment to the band is $400 for 2 hour show

“You Will Be My Son” (Unrated) — Instead of grooming his son to inherit his lucrative wine business, an imperious vintner looks to a California-based grower, rendering a harvest of jealousy. In French with English subtitles. At the Rose Theatre. Showtime 11 a.m. Saturday.

Featuring Fresh, Local Fare from the Peninsula and Beyond:

PORT ANGELES REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

To be considered, please submit a CD with background information (including bio and photo) on your band to the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, Attn: Lindsey, 121 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Questions? Call Lindsey Veenema at 360-452-2363, Ext. 11 or email at lindsey@portangeles.org

Showtimes 11 a.m. Saturday.

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“Olympus Has Fallen” (R) — Disgraced former presidential guard Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) finds himself trapped inside the White House in the wake of a terrorist attack. Using his inside knowledge, Banning works with National Security to rescue the president from his kidnappers. At the Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 7:20 p.m. and 9:40 p.m. daily, plus 5 p.m. today through Sunday.

Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot until he meets three witches — Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. daily, plus 2 p.m. Saturday through Thursday.

33745697

“The Incredible Burt Wonderstone” (PG-13) — Superstar magicians Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) have ruled the Las Vegas strip for years, raking in millions, but lately the duo’s greatest deception is their public friendship. They face cutthroat competition from guerilla street magician Steve Gray (Jim Carrey). At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 7:15 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. daily, plus 2:50 p.m. Saturday through Thursday.

■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

:

All the good things are right here...

www.renaissance-pa.com www.renaissance-pa.com

401E.E.Front FrontStreet Street Port Pt. Angeles 401 Angeles 360/565-1199 360/565-1199


12

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 2013

Easter Sunday Egg Grab Sunday, March 31st | 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM Win CASH from our Easter Basket

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

At The Point Casino

Party at the Indoor Beach & Tiki Bar!

Saturdays in March

Easter Brunch | only $12 95 Sunday, March 31st | 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM Sunday Brunch served 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Woody & The Longboards March 30th

A tribute to the Beach Boys 7:30 PM $10 advance | $15 day of show Tickets available now at these locations: In the gift shop | On our website For more information Call 866.547.6468 | Ages 21 and over

Continues in April Led Zepagain | April 6th Dress up for 70’s Night

Kingston, WA www.the-point-casino.com 1.866.547.6468 Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.®

Go Go Dancer Exhibition 6:30 PM | Led Zeppelin Tribute Band 8:00 PM

Heart by Heart | April 13th Jewels Lingerie Fashion Show 6:30 PM | Heart by Heart 8:00 PM

See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to enter lounge/bar areas or attend entertainment events.

33733506

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The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe.


PDN20130329C