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Peninsula Daily News March 31, 2011

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

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Bill recognizing out-of-state gay marriage passes Sen. Hargrove votes against measure Peninsula Daily News news sources

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Vietnam War veteran Richard Hammer of Sequim salutes as a flag is folded during a Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day program at the Clallam County Veterans Center in Port Angeles on Wednesday.

Veterans of Clallam honored at PA event By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County veterans from every generation gathered in Port Angeles on Wednesday to pay their respects during the second Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day. More than 100 veterans and their fami-

lies packed the Clallam County Veterans Center on Francis Street for a one-hour ceremony that featured a rifle salute, a symbolic Prisoners of War-Missing in Action table and the folding of a U.S. flag as the names of 11 local veterans who died in combat were read with every fold. Turn

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OLYMPIA — Same-sex couples married elsewhere would be granted the same legal rights and protections in Washington state as domestic partners under a bill headed to the governor’s desk after clearing its last legislative hurdle Wednesday. The measure passed the state Senate, but the only two Democrats to oppose it hail from the Olympic Peninsula. Gay marriage remains illegal in Washington state. But under this bill, same-sex marriages and domestic partnerships performed and recognized elsewhere — including British Columbia and other Canadian provinces — would be eligible for the rights granted to domestic partnerships in Washington. In the past half-decade, lawmakers here have approved hundreds of rights and responsibilities for domestic partnerships, putting them on almost equal footing with marriage. Currently, five states, the District of Columbia and Canada allow same-sex marriages.

Washington becomes the fourth state to approve this type of bill, following Rhode Island, New York and Maryland, according to Senate staff. “I’m ecstatic,” said Rep. Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, the bill’s prime sponsor. “It extends what the voters of this state have already said they want to do for people.” The measure enjoyed wide support among Democrats.

Local legislators It cleared the state House on a 58-39 vote, with most members voting along party lines — including yes votes from both North Olympic Peninsula representatives: Kevin Van De Wege and Steve Tharinger, Democrats from Sequim. In the state Senate, where it passed 28-19, the only Democrats voting against the measure both hail from the Olympic Peninsula: Sens. Jim Hargrove of Hoquiam, and Tim Sheldon of Potlatch. Hargrove’s 24th District includes Clallam and Jefferson counties. Turn

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‘It was like I was suffocating’ PT man tells of experience climbing Everest By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Leif Whittaker was completely out of breath and on the verge of passing out. The 26-year-old Port Townsend man was two hours into a grueling push from high camp to the 29,029-foot summit of Mount Everest. “I was breathing with intense depth and frequency, basically hyperventilating, but still nothing was getting in,” Whittaker told a crowd of more than 100 at the Peninsula College Little Theater on Tuesday. “It was like I was suffocating.” Whittaker realized the air valve in his oxygen mask was clogged with frozen spit.

Top of the world He fixed his mask and pushed onward and upward, reaching the top of world

May 25. “Being there, feeling like I’m going to suffocate and being able to kind of overcome that and continue up the mountain was one of the hardest moments of the climb,” he recalled. “And absolutely, it was the hardest thing I have ever done.” Whittaker has made several speaking appearances about his Everest climb in Western Washington and Alaska since returning to Port Townsend. Tuesday’s presentation, sponsored by the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club, was his first in Port Angeles. Attendees paid $20 in advance or $25 at the door. Proceeds went to the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Education Fund.

Slides, videos Whittaker showed dramatic slides and videos of his Everest ascent and earlier climbs on Mounts Vinson and Aconcagua,

“I was breathing with intense depth and frequency, basically hyperventilating, but still nothing was getting in.”

Leif Whittaker on his ascent of Mount Everest

the highest points in Antarctica and South America, respectively, during the 90-minute event. Whittaker is the son of legendary climber Jim Whittaker, who became the first American to summit Everest in 1963. As Leif Whittaker was nearing the summit, he envisioned his father navigating the summit ridge with old-school equipment and a single Sherpa, the expert Nepalese climbers who help carry supplies and set up camps. “I remember looking at it [Everest] and thinking he was crazy,” Leif Whittaker said.

Rob Ollikainen/Peninsula Daily News

Leif Whittaker talks about his climb to the top of Mount Everest during a presentation at Peninsula Turn to Everest/A4 College in Port Angeles on Tuesday.

Walmart, apartments added to new Sequim shuttle route Saturday service cut By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois, who frequently takes the Clallam Transit bus to City Hall, said that despite the cut of Saturday service, the new Sequim shuttle is an improvement in both efficiency and conveKeith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News nience. The new, reduced shuttle No. The new Sequim shuttle route, which starts service Monday, is an improvement in efficiency and convenience, 40 route starts service Monday in said Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois. “The Sequim shuttle is Sequim. the most expensive and has the lowest ridership,” she said. “Basically, it runs east-west

rather than in a loop,” said Dubois, who has served for three years as a transit board member for the city of Sequim. The new shuttle route now allows riders to stay on the shuttle to go to Walmart, for example, eliminating a transfer from the No. 40 shuttle to the No. 30 commuter bus to Port Angeles. “The Sequim shuttle is the most expensive and has the lowest ridership,” Dubois said.

sit board cut about 55 hours a week of total Sequim service, eliminating Saturday shuttle service, for a savings of about $185,000, said Transit Operations Manager Clint Wetzel. About 26 hours of shuttle service was cut by redoing the route, he said. The cuts were warranted by low ridership, he said. Wetzel said the monthly average ridership Saturdays was 2.9 people per trip for the 1 p.m. Cuts in service route, with weekday service runTo save the underused and ning at about 2.3 people per trip. expensive shuttle route, the tranTurn to Shuttle/A4

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UpFront

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

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Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

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www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people.

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Adams lives out dream as Lois Lane AMY ADAMS HAS played fairy-tale royalty in “Enchanted” and co-stars with the Muppets this fall. Now she’s satisfying another girlhood fantasy: playing Lois Lane. Adams was cast last weekend as the tough reporter in the next Warner Bros. incar- Adams nation of “Superman,” directed by Zack Snyder (“300”) and starring British actor Henry Cavill (“The Tudors”) in the title role. “She’s such a fantastic character,” Adams said Tuesday at CinemaCon, a Las Vegas convention for theater owners, where she appeared with co-star Jason Segel to promote their family comedy “The Muppets,” due out in November. “She’s feminine, she’s intelligent, she’s a go-getter. She’s somebody I have identified with since whenever. “I’m like the luckiest girl in the world. I’ve gotten to be a princess, I’ve gotten to work with the

Muppets. A lot of my childhood dreams about who I wanted to be when I was a grown-up, I at least get to play them in movies. And Lois Lane is one of them. So I’m just excited. I hope I bring something that people enjoy.” The studio aims to have the new “Superman” adventure in theaters late next year.

French, piano, chess Kevin Kline likes roles that teach him something. The Oscar winner brushed up on his French to play a Frenchspeaking American Kline in “Queen to Play,” an offbeat drama set for release Friday in the U.S. Kline also “upped” his chess game for the film, in which his character employs a Corsican cleaning woman who picks up the game. Kline learned to play the piano for his role in the 2004 film “De-Lovely.” The actor has another film, “The Conspirator,” due out April 15. He said the post-Civil War drama was educating, too: He learned a chapter of American history he didn’t know and

The Associated Press

So

vogue

A model presents a creation from the Style Garden collection of Macedonian fashion house Astibo during a fashion show in Skopje, Macedonia, on Wednesday. discovered what it’s like to work with director Robert Redford. Kline said he’s always searching for “different” kinds of roles to avoid boring him and his audience.

DAVID E. DAVIS JR., 80, considered a pioneer in automotive journalism and the founder of Automobile magazine, died Sunday in an Ann Arbor, Mich., hospital of complications from bladder cancer surgery. Called the dean of automotive journalism by Time magazine, Mr. Davis split from rival Car and Driver to start Automobile in 1985 with financial backing from media mogul Rupert Murdoch. Mr. Davis changed the auto magazine business when he started Automobile

Any amount 

$0-$3 million  4.0%

$4 million-$50 million  $51 million-$99 million 

16.8% 9.2% 6.0%

$100 million 

12.2%

I never play  Total votes cast: 997

51.8%

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

By The Associated Press

_________

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: How big does the lotto jackpot have to get before you play?

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

Passings LYUDMILA GURCHENKO, 75, a popular Russian movie actress since the mid-1950s, has died. Ms. Gurchenko died at her home in Moscow on Wednesday, Russian news agencies reported. Ms. Gurchenko The cause of in 2004 death was not immediately reported, though a Kremlin statement said she died of a serious illness. She became a star at age 21 when she played the lead in the 1956 comedy “Carnival Night,” which also was the debut of the noted director Eldar Ryazanov. He again directed her a quartercentury later in another of her most noted roles, as the waitress in “Station for Two.”

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

with thick paper stock and full-color photography, according to the magazine. “He was very opinionated and did not hesitate to ruffle feathers, even if they were those of his own bosses. He had a keen sense of self, but ultimately, he was a serious car enthusiast and brought his passion for cars to enormous audiences,” said Joe DeMatio, deputy editor of Automobile.

Tear’s voice as “serviceable rather than sensuous,” adding that a “keen intelligence and sophistication in matters of style and stage deportment have made him an invaluable artist in a wide range of settings.”

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

A crowd estimated at _________ 2,000 attended the reopenROBERT TEAR, 72, a ing of the V.A. Samuelson Welsh tenor who also made and Co. Super Service heada mark as a conductor and a quarters in downtown Port poet, has died. Angeles. Mr. Tear, who had cancer, The crowds inspected the died Tuesday in a London rebuilt structure from top to hospice, said Melanie Moult bottom — through the serof the Askonas Holt agency. vice station, offices, sales He was born in the Welsh rooms and shop. town of Barry on March 8, Talking motion pictures 1939, and performed in a took the audience on Welsh National Opera perinstructive and informative formance of “Cavalleria Rus- travelogues through Ford ticana” just seven years factories making the Ford later. V-8 and Lincoln Zephyr Mr. Tear performed on automobiles. more than 250 recordings, including operas, Bach can1961 (50 years ago) tatas, recitals, Schubert’s State gasoline taxes will song cycle “Die Winterreise” with Philip Ledger and Vic- be boosted one cent a gallon next Saturday under provitorian ballads with Benjasions of a bill that cleared min Luxon and Andre the Legislature. Previn. The measure, the first Erik Eriksson, in the All tax bill to pass the 37th LegMusic Guide, described Mr. islature, will increase the gas tax from 6.5 cents to 7.5 cents — highest in the Laugh Lines nation. The federal tax of 4 cents PRESIDENT OBAMA a gallon will bring the total GAVE a nationally teletax in Washington to vised speech about Libya. 11.5 cents a gallon. The speech was titled, The additional money “No, I wasn’t born there.” Conan O’Brien will be used in part to bail

out the storm-damaged Hood Canal Bridge so it can open later this year. However, a Seattle citizens group Overtaxed Inc. said it plans to file a referendum against the tax increase because the penny a gallon increase threatens to push the pump price past 30 cents a gallon.

1986 (25 years ago) North Olympic Library System trustees have approved a draft building program for a new Port Angeles Library as presented by director Jo Davies. The draft proposal calls

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots YOUNG WOMAN WALKING on Port Townsend’s Larry Scott Trail. She strides forward several yards, turns and walks backward several more, reverses and repeats toward her destination. Is she coming or going? . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

for a lot more elbow room, more parking space and a more visually appealing building than the current one at 207 S. Lincoln St. Trustees have yet to pick a location, but choices under consideration including the current City Light building at Front and Oak streets; next to the Clallam County Courthouse at Fourth and Peabody streets; the library’s current service center at 2210 S. Peabody St.; and the current City Hall on Front Street.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Wednesday’s Daily Game: 6-7-9 Wednesday’s Hit 5: 03-12-21-22-26 Wednesday’s Keno: 03-04-05-10-11-12-19-2728-32-39-44-54-56-58-6366-69-77-80 Wednesday’s Lotto: 04-05-13-19-34-43 Wednesday’s Match 4: 01-07-20-22 Wednesday’s Powerball: 19-20-42-56-58, Powerball: 37, Power Play: 4

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, March 31, the 90th day of 2011. There are 275 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On March 31, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson shocked the country by announcing at the conclusion of a broadcast address on Vietnam that he would not seek re-election. On this date: ■  In 1811, German scientist Robert Bunsen, who helped develop the Bunsen burner, was born. ■  In 1889, French engineer Gustave Eiffel unfurled the French tricolor from atop the Eiffel Tower, officially marking its completion. ■  In 1917, the United States took possession of the Virgin

Islands from Denmark. ■  In 1933, Congress approved, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed, the Emergency Conservation Work Act, which created the Civilian Conservation Corps. ■  In 1943, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “Oklahoma!” opened on Broadway. ■  In 1949, Newfoundland (now called Newfoundland and Labrador) entered confederation as Canada’s 10th province. ■  In 1976, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that Karen Ann Quinlan, who was in a persistent vegetative state, could be disconnected from her respirator. Quinlan, who remained unconscious, died in 1985. ■  In 1991, the Warsaw Pact spent the last day of its existence

as a military alliance. ■  In 1995, Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez, 23, was shot to death in Corpus Christi, Texas, by the founder of her fan club, Yolanda Saldivar, who was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. ■  In 2005, Terri Schiavo, 41, died at a hospice in Pinellas Park, Fla., 13 days after her feeding tube was removed in a wrenching rightto-die dispute. ■  Ten years ago: Riot police laid siege to Slobodan Milosevic’s villa in an attempt to bring the former Yugoslav president to justice. But a defiant Milosevic rejected a warrant, reportedly telling police he wouldn’t “go to jail alive.” He was taken into custody the next day.

■  Five years ago: Auto parts supplier Delphi Corp. unveiled a broad restructuring plan that would cut 8,500 salaried jobs and shut or sell a third of its plants worldwide. A Brazilian airliner crashed, killing all 19 people onboard. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama threw open a huge swath of East Coast waters and other protected areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Alaska to oil drilling. A Chechen militant claimed responsibility for deadly attacks on the Moscow subway two days earlier that claimed 40 lives; the claim came hours after two more suicide bombers struck in the southern Russian province of Dagestan, killing a dozen people.


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Briefly: Nation ‘Good progress’ on budget talks, Biden claims

approved an earlier version of the legislation, could soon follow. The measure affects safety workers, teachers, nurses and a host of other government personnel. It allows unions to negotiate WASHINGTON — Vice Pres- wages but not health care, sick ident Joe Biden said there’s time or pension benefits. “good progress” being made in It gets rid of automatic pay talks with Congress on a govincreases and replaces them ernment funding bill to avoid a with merit raises or perforgovernment shutdown next mance pay. week. Workers would also be Biden said banned from striking. the White House and Wis. may ignore judge Republicans MADISON, Wis. — Wisconcontrolling the sin’s Republican leaders appear House were to be taking the same confident working on a and bullish approach to impleplan that menting their divisive collective would cut bargaining law that they took to $73 billion Biden passing it, suggesting they may from Presiignore a judge’s warning that dent Barack Obama’s budget there would be consequences to request for the current budget moving ahead while challenges year. to the law are pending. The vice president said Gov. Scott Walker and his there’s no reason why the administration and Republicans allies in the Republican-controlled Legislature believe they can’t avoid a government shutare on solid legal ground as down next Friday at midnight. they push forth on a course that Biden stressed that there’s no official deal yet and that the could deepen an already toxic crisis in the state’s government. outcome depends on the makeup of the spending cuts as Sidestepping Democratic well as GOP policy provisions state senators playing hooky to disliked by the administration. block the law’s passage may have angered their political opponents, but defying a judge’s Ohio bargaining bill orders — however imprecise — COLUMBUS, Ohio — The could put GOP lawmakers and Republican-led Ohio House state officials at risk of being voted Wednesday to severely found in contempt and could limit the collective bargaining rights of 350,000 public workers lend weight to accusations that the Republicans consider themacross the state, sending a bill that’s sparked pro-labor protests selves above the law. “It’s dangerous. Arguably for weeks back to the state Senthey’re in contempt of court ate. The full House approved the already,” University of Wisconsin law professor Howard measure on a 53-44 vote. A vote in the GOP-controlled Schweber said Wednesday. The Associated Press Senate, which narrowly

Briefly: World Fears about contaminated food spreading TOKYO — Fears about contaminated seafood spread Wednesday despite reassurances that radiation in the waters off Japan’s troubled atomic plant pose no health risk, as the country’s respected emperor consoled evacuees from the tsunami and nuclear emergency zone. While experts said radioactive particles are unlikely to build up significantly in fish, the seafood concerns in the country that gave the world sushi are yet another blemish for Brand Japan. It has already been hit by a contamination of milk, vegetables and water, plus shortages of auto and tech parts after a massive quake and tsunami disabled a coastal nuclear power plant. Setbacks at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex mounted Wednesday, as the plant’s operator, Tokyo Power Electric Co., announced that its president was hospitalized. Spokesman Naoki Tsunoda said Masataka Shimizu, 66, was admitted to a Tokyo hospital Tuesday after suffering dizziness and high blood pressure.

Record-setting purr? LONDON — No need to bell this cat: A gray-and-white tabby by the name of Smokey has catapulted to fame with purring so loud it has been recorded at a potentially record-setting 73 decibels.

The British community college that measured the sound said it peaked at 16 times louder than that of the average cat. By some estimates, that is about as noisy as busy traffic, a hair dryer or a vacuum cleaner. The 12-year-old, ordinarysize feline first came to national attention last month when her owner, Ruth Adams, decided to run a local competition for the most powerful purr.

Message in a bottle MOSCOW — Nearly a quarter-century after a German boy tossed a message in a bottle off a ship in the Baltic Sea, he’s received an answer. A 13-year-old Russian, Daniil Korotkikh, was walking with his parents on a beach when he saw something glittering lying in the sand. “I saw that bottle and it looked interesting,” Korotkikh told The Associated Press on Tuesday. “It looked like a German beer bottle with a ceramic plug, and there was a message inside.” His father, who knows schoolboy German, translated the letter, carefully wrapped in cellophane and sealed by a medical bandage. It said: “My name is Frank, and I’m five years old. My dad and I are traveling on a ship to Denmark. If you find this letter, please write back to me, and I will write back to you.” The letter, dated 1987, included an address in the town of Coesfeld, Germany. The boy in the letter, Frank Uesbeck, is now 29. His parents still live at the letter’s address. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

A Libyan family carry suitcases while fleeing the eastern town of Ajdabiya, Libya, on Wednesday.

Gadhafi forces nearly reverse rebels’ gains Key oil town is recaptured By Ryan Lucas

The Associated Press

AJDABIYA, Libya — Moammar Gadhafi’s ground forces recaptured a strategic oil town Wednesday and moved within striking distance of another major eastern city, nearly reversing the gains rebels made since international airstrikes began. Rebels pleaded for more help, while a U.S. official said government forces are making themselves harder to target by using civilian “battle wagons” with makeshift armaments instead of tanks. Western powers kept up the pressure to force Gadhafi out with new airstrikes in other parts of Libya, hints that they may arm the opposition and intense negotiations behind the scenes to find a country to give haven to Libya’s leader of more than 40 years. Even as it advanced militarily, Gadhafi’s regime suffered a blow to its inner circle with the apparent defection of Foreign Minister Moussa Koussa.

U.S. considers ‘all types of assistance’ for Libya The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The White House said Wednesday it is assessing options for “all types of assistance” to Libyan rebels battling Moammar Gadhafi’s troops, while frustrated lawmakers quoted senior Obama administration Koussa flew from Tunisia to an airport outside London and announced he was resigning from his post, according to a statement from the British government.

Foreign minister resigns Moussa Ibrahim, a Libyan government spokesman in Tripoli, denied that the foreign minister has defected, saying he was in London on a “diplomatic mission.” It was not immediately possible to confirm either statement with Moussa or people close to him. Gadhafi’s justice and interior ministers resigned shortly after

officials as saying the U.S. military’s role will be limited. “No decision has been made about providing arms to the opposition or to any groups in Libya,” said White House press secretary Jay Carney. “We’re not ruling it out or ruling it in.” the uprising began last month, but Koussa would be the first high-profile resignation since the international air campaign began. Airstrikes have neutralized Gadhafi’s air force and pounded his army, but his ground forces remain far better armed, trained and organized than the opposition. The shift in momentum back to the government’s side is hardening a U.S. view that the poorly equipped opposition is probably incapable of prevailing without decisive Western intervention — either an all-out U.S.-led military assault on regime forces or a decision to arm the rebels.

Life-extending prostate cancer drug to be covered by Medicare By Matthew Perrone The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Medicare officials said Wednesday that the program will pay the $93,000 cost of prostate cancer drug Provenge, an innovative therapy that typically gives men suffering from an incurable stage of the disease an extra four months to live. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid said the biotech drug made by Dendreon Corp. is a “reasonable and necessary” medicine. The decision ensures that millions of men would be able to afford the drug through the government-backed health care coverage. With government reimbursement, analysts estimate Provenge could rack up $1 billion in sales next year. The decision, which will be

Quick Read

finalized by June 30, is important for Dendreon because most prostate cancer patients are 65 or older. Medicare is legally prohibited from considering price when deciding whether to pay for a new treatment.

FDA approval The Food and Drug Administration approved Provenge last April, and in most cases, Medicare automatically covers drugs cleared by the agency. But Medicare’s decision to review Provenge last year prompted outrage from some patients and doctors who said the government was looking for a reason to avoid reimbursing for the pricey drug. The infused drug is a first-of-akind treatment in that each dose

is customized to work with a patient’s immune system. Seattle-based Dendreon said Provenge’s price reflects the more than $1 billion spent researching and developing the drug. And prostate cancer patients point out that the median survival time with Provenge is double that of chemotherapy, which is about two months and is marked by significant side effects. “It’s impossible to put a dollar figure on a human life, especially when you’re talking about a drug that has such mild side effects,” said Jim Kiefert, a prostate cancer patient and advocate who was part of the Provenge study. “Of all the treatments I’ve had — with surgery, radiation and hormone treatment — Provenge had fewer side effects than any of them.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: Calif. drought ends officially after snowy winter

Nation: Trucker saved from choking by car crash

Nation: Orca that drowned trainer is back at SeaWorld

Nation: 10 injured in fire aboard aircraft carrier

A DROUGHT THAT loomed over some of California’s most fertile farmland officially ended Wednesday after a winter of relentless mountain storms that piled snow up to three stories high and could keep some ski resorts open until the Fourth of July. More than 61 feet of snow has fallen in the Sierra Nevada high country so far this season, second only to 1950-1951, when 65 feet fell. And more snow is possible in April, raising the prospect of an all-time record. When it melts, the snow will bring relief to hundreds of communities and many farms that provide fruits and vegetables to the nation.

A PENNSYLVANIA TRUCKER may have saved his own life with an unintentional and very elaborate Heimlich maneuver. Police said 55-year-old Richard Paylor of Fairless Hills, Bucks County, was eating an apple as he drove on a busy highway in Reading when he began choking Tuesday morning. Authorities said Paylor then lost consciousness and crashed through a concrete median. The Reading Eagle reported investigators believe the apple was dislodged when Paylor smacked his chest against the steering wheel. Police recovered a chunk of apple from the dashboard.

THE KILLER WHALE that drowned a trainer last year at SeaWorld in Orlando resumed performing Wednesday for the first time since the woman’s death. Tilikum participated in the marine park’s signature “Believe” show before a crowd of thousands, more than a year since drowning 40-year-old Dawn Brancheau during a performance Feb. 24, 2010. No trainer has been allowed in the water during the shows since Brancheau’s death, and they remained out of the pool Wednesday for the performance before the audience filled the 5,000-seat Shamu Stadium to capacity.

A JET FIGHTER’S engine exploded and caught fire Wednesday as it prepared to take off from the aircraft carrier John C. Stennis off San Diego, Calif., injuring 10 sailors, the Navy said. The F/A-18C Hornet was starting a training exercise when the accident occurred about 2:50 p.m. on the flight deck. Four sailors were flown to Naval Medical Center San Diego where they were in stable condition. The six others were treated for burn injuries on board the carrier. None of the injuries was life threatening. The pilot was not hurt. There was no significant damage to the carrier, which is based in Bremerton.


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Thursday, March 31, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Everest: Whittaker will keep seeking adventure Continued from A1 mit,” Whittaker said. “I started getting really “I gained so much discouraged, and I started respect for what he accom- thinking about all the peoplished. I’m still in awe of ple who were following this what he did up there.” climb: my community, all of Leif Whittaker described you, the people I would be the complex emotions he letting down if I didn’t get felt during the half-hour he to the summit.” spent on the summit. Whittaker said a prayer, Most of all, he said, he asking the mountain for felt gratitude to his team- one chance to go for the top. mates, their Sherpas, climbAfter 20 minutes of rest, ers of the past, his friends, he opened his tent to clear family and, most of all, the skies, calm winds, reasonmountain itself. able temperatures and no Waiting on the weather crowds. Bottlenecks have killed dozens of climbers on Whittaker had spent two Everest. days huddled in his tent at “I was so thankful that the 26,000-foot high camp the mountain had given me waiting for the weather to that one chance that I asked improve. His climbing team was for,” Whittaker said. A native of the North running out of supplies, and Olympic Peninsula, Leif the window for a summit Whittaker first climbed push was closing fast. “If the weather didn’t 7,980-foot Mount Olympus change in a matter of hours, at age 15. One year later, he stood we’d be forced to descend without even getting a sin- on top of 14,411-foot Mount gle chance to go to the sum- Rainier, where his uncle,

Lou Whittaker, and cousin, Peter Whittaker, are legendary climbers who run the main guide service. Leif Whittaker opened his presentation by showing a helmet-cam video of himself backcountry-skiing with his friends at Hurricane Ridge. “I grew up on the Olympic Peninsula, and I really learned to climb in the Olympic Mountains,” he said. “But I didn’t discover Hurricane Ridge until this season, to be honest, and it’s totally changed my perspective on winters on the Olympic Peninsula.” “It’s completely different. I don’t want the spring to come, honestly. I hope it keeps dumping snow for weeks,” he said. Whittaker thanked the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club for sponsoring the event. He also thanked Eddie Bauer and First Ascent, the main sponsors

of his Everest climb. “Without their sponsorship, there’s no way I would have made it up there in 2010,” he said. Whittaker detailed the team’s 10-day trek to base camp at Everest. They landed at a treacherous high-mountain airport, received blessings from a Buddhist lama and played poker and horseshoes for rupees with other climbers at the 17,000-foot base camp. Whittaker’s team employed 10 Sherpas. One of the scariest parts of the expedition for Whittaker was the infamous Khumbu icefall, a glacier that spills down a narrow valley at a rate of 4 feet per day. Blocks of ice the size of trucks can break loose at any moment. Climbers move as fast as possible through the shifting ice, crossing over deep crevasses with ropes

“I grew up on the Olympic Peninsula, and I really learned to climb in the Olympic Mountains. But I didn’t discover Hurricane Ridge until this season, to be honest, and it’s totally changed my perspective on winters on the Olympic Peninsula. It’s completely different. I don’t want the spring to come, honestly. I hope it keeps dumping snow for weeks.”

Leif Whittaker Port Townsend outdoorsman

and ladders. “If this feature were on any other mountain in the world, on Rainier or on Baker or Mount Olympus, you wouldn’t imagine going through it,” Whittaker said. “It’s that dangerous.” Since it takes several weeks for the body to acclimate to the low oxygen on Everest, climbers make several “rotations” up and down the mountain to progressively higher camps. Whittaker’s team

crossed the Khumbu icefall about a dozen times during its expedition. As for his future, Whittaker said he will continue to seek out new adventures. “There are still countless mountains to climb and countless corners of the world to explore,” Whittaker said.

________

Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Bill: Pilot program for booze sampling passed Continued from A1 ship law, which was created in 2007 after years of lobbySen. Don Benton, R-Van- ing by gay activists. “What we have witcouver, was the lone senator to speak on the floor against nessed is progress,” said the bill, arguing there was Josh Friedes, advocacy no need for it because same- director for Equal Rights sex couples already qualify Washington. However, he said because for domestic partnerships. But Sen. Craig Pride- the federal government still more, D-Vancouver, said does not recognize same-sex that because the federal couples, the public “should government does not recog- not think that gay and lesnize same-sex marriages, bian families are adestates have to step in to quately protected in Washington.” clarify their laws. “They remain very vulSupporters say the bill approved Wednesday is nerable,” Friedes said. “Most states don’t proanother victory for Washington’s domestic partner- vide reciprocity. When

Washington couples travel state would offer samples of outside, they remain espe- local and out-of-state liquor. cially vulnerable.” The samples would not be larger than one-quarter Liquor samples of an ounce, and total samples would not exceed an Also Wednesday, the ounce of liquor, or less than Senate passed a bill that a regular shot glass. would establish a pilot proThe bill now heads to the gram for booze sampling in House after an amendment the state’s liquor stores. was added in the Senate. Senators approved the Supporters say the promeasure sponsored by gram will help produce revDemocratic Rep. Sam Hunt enue for the state. of Olympia on a 31-17 vote. The measure directs the Continuing taxes state to create a yearlong pilot program starting in Senators on Wednesday September. also heard testimony on a Under the program, 30 House bill that would liquor stores across the extend taxes that were

meant to be temporary to fund arts and other economic development in King County. The measure directs revenue from taxes on hotel stays, restaurants and car rentals to fund local arts and a convention center. The taxes outlined in the House bill are currently going toward paying off the Kingdome, Safeco Field and Qwest Field. The Safeco Field debt is expected to be paid within the year. The House bill extends the 0.5 percent restaurant tax until 2015, even if the

Safeco debt is paid off. It extends indefinitely a 2 percent car rental to raise revenue. Supporters said expanding the convention center will create several thousand new jobs — muchneeded employment growth as the state struggles to come out of the recession. Opponents said lawmakers should keep their promise of ending the taxes when the stadiums are paid off.

________ Manuel Valdes of The Associated Press’ Olympia bureau contributed to this report.

Veterans: 36th anniversary of Vietnam War’s end Continued from A1 The statewide observance was initiated by Norman Goodin of Port Angeles. Gov. Chris Gregoire signed a proclamation last month declaring March 30 as Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day, saying it marks the 36th anniversary of the end of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam war. Martin Arnold, president of the Clallam County Veterans Association and a Navy commander during Vietnam, served as the master of ceremonies.

1968, mounted a one-year effort to dedicate a ceremonial day for Vietnam veterans in 2009. “Since then, almost all of the states have adopted Vietnam welcome-home days,” Arnold said. On March 17, the U.S. Senate recognized March 30 as Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day, Arnold said. Goodin thanked his fellow veterans and the people who helped organize the event. He quoted a Latin verse that translates as: “If you wish for peace, be prepared for war.” Before and after the ceremony, the Clallam County

veterans shared stories over lunch and coffee. It gave Bill Larson, an Army veteran who fought in Korea, and Richard Hammer, a Navy veteran who fought in Vietnam, a chance to catch up.

‘Most appropriate’ “I think it’s most appropriate to do this,” Larson said. After he was drafted, Larson said, he “hated it for two weeks.” “Then, I got into it and stayed for 38 years,” he said. Tammy Sullenger, Clallam County veterans coor-

dinator, said Wednesday’s turnout exceeded last year’s for Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day. “It worked out really well,” Sullenger said. Port Angeles High School student Jessalyn Rogers played taps during the ceremony. A group of students from Stevens Middle School were among the attendees. Commissioner Mike Doherty and Administrator Jim Jones represented Clallam County government at the event. Sullenger said all are invited to gather at Veterans Memorial Park on Lincoln Street the last Friday

of every month for the 1 p.m. bell ringing ceremony. The names of Clallam County veterans who died that month are read one by one with each ringing of the bell. According to the governor’s proclamation, more than 58,000 service members made the ultimate sacrifice in Vietnam. As of last month, 1,702 Americans were still missing and unaccounted for.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Shuttle: Route will run hourly Continued from A1 plexes around Sequim and now extends service to Clallam Transit officials North Rhodefer Road on and Dubois hope ridership the east side of town. Dubois said the route will climb with the route that stops at most of the will run hourly to most largest apartment com- major stops, including the

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Sequim Public Library and the North Fifth Avenue medical offices. “If I want to go to City Hall and back, this is an improvement,” Dubois said, adding she lives about a mile from city offices. Bruce Monroe, shuttle bus driver, has more than 20 years of driving experience. Youth and senior rider fares are $1, adults at $1.50 and day passes $3. Clallam Transit General Manager Terry Weed said the cuts to Sequim transit service amount to about

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5 percent overall. The Sequim to Diamond Point route was the other lower ridership run to be cut from Saturdays and reduced in hours during the week. The Saturday dial-a-ride service will be expanded to include areas affected by the elimination of the No. 40. “We have to cut it back, but we did improve it because we took it out to Walmart,” Dubois said, adding that residents at the 118-unit Vintage at Sequim Apartments on Brackett Road can take the shuttle to Walmart instead of walking on narrow Brackett Road and crossing Priest Road to get to the Walmart shopping center.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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“On behalf of the 13 veterans organizations and their auxiliaries here in the county, I’d like to welcome you guys home,” Arnold said. “If you look around, you’ll see a lot of Korean War veterans here today, you’ll see a lot of WWIIs and, of course, the Vietnamese veterans. “That says something about the veterans in the county. We can have a gettogether, and veterans from all eras show up to honor one another. I think it’s great.” Goodin, who returned from the Vietnam War in

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Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 31, 2011

A5

Council bones up on PA actress returns to stage to ‘kill it’ business licenses By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

It covers about 150 businesses that fall under 18 categories, such as ambulances, dance halls that serve liquor, taxis and pawn shops. A proposal to consider licenses for all businesses was dropped in November after a petition with signatures from 72 business owners was presented at a council meeting.

PORT ANGELES — City Council members heard a pitch from the state Department of Licensing on how the organization could handle the processing of business licenses if the city decides to implement them for all businesses. No decisions were made at the Wednesday meeting, held for informational purposes. Business directory Councilmen Brad ColThe council was considlins and Max Mania were ering requiring the license absent from the meeting. in order to create a comHandling with cities plete directory of businesses in town. John Jacob, outreach The idea was that the and partnership manager directory could then be used with the state Department by the city and entrepreof Licensing, spoke on how neurs to understand what the state handles partner- services are already proships with cities on busi- vided by businesses in Port ness licensing. Angeles. Under the state’s program, businesses would pay State fee for all their licenses under All businesses already one “master license,” Jacob pay a one-time $15 applicasaid. tion fee to register with the The other licenses could state. include liquor licenses as The state’s renewal fee is well as licenses for other $9 per year. cities if a business operates The amount of city fees in more than one city, he would be up to the council said. to determine if it decided to The city now has only a move forward with the idea. limited business license Most cities charge about ordinance that comes with $30 for a business license, a $25 fee, mostly for public Jacob said. Deputy Mayor Don safety purposes.

Perry asked if the city could require licenses but charge no fee or if the information for a business directory could be gathered from other sources. Nathan West, city economic and community development director, said that though the city has limited information from its occupancy certificates, it doesn’t currently have anything that can render that information.

Staff time, supplies City Manager Kent Myers said staff time and supplies to keep up with the licenses — even with the state doing much of the paperwork — could not be absorbed into the budget. Jacob said he encouraged cities that were considering joining the state program to think about the purpose of the licenses. “Are you doing it to have an inventory of what is in town? Are you doing it to generate revenue?” he said. “It is important to think about the reasons, especially since this is a city that doesn’t already have licenses.”

_________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Council mulls possible local retail-needs study By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Why don’t more shoppers buy locally? And if they don’t shop in Port Angeles, where do they go? What kinds of businesses are more likely to succeed in Port Angeles? How could current businesses expand? These are question that a proposed retail-needs study would be expected to answer. The City Council at a Tuesday work session discussed the possibility of conducting a retail analysis of the city and a 15-mile driving radius outside the city limit.

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come out of economic development reserves from the $7 million settlement for the Tse-whit-zen site. About $300,000 would come out of general fund reserves, $150,000 out of electric utility rural economic development fund reserves and $300,000 out of the streets project reserves. Because both projects were approved after the 2011 budget, neither was included in the budget, so funding had to be found for them, Myers said. The council did not make a decision but heard the sug$4.7 million bridge gestions and will make forThe Lauridsen Boulevard mal decisions at later meetBridge is projected to cost ings. about $4.7 million. ________ Myers suggested that $3.7 million be paid with Reporter Paige Dickerson can grant funding while $1 mil- be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily lion come from city funds. About $250,000 would news.com. come from general fund reserves, and $750,000 would come out of the reserves of the real estate excise tax fund reserves. If broken down that way, the reserves for the real estate excise tax fund would be depleted through 2013, he said. The Waterfront and Transportation Improvement Plan is projected to cost about $1.25 million. About $500,000 would City Council members asked that Myers find out what kind of usable information other cities have gained and how easily implemented the ideas were. Also at the meeting, Finance Director Yvonne Zimkowski told the council that the city ended 2010 with a surplus of $640,000 over what was budgeted. Myers also presented ways to fund the Lauridsen Boulevard bridge widening and the Waterfront Transportation Improvement Plan.

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‘Came here to kill it’ “I said, ‘No. I came here to kill it,’” Trowbridge recalled this week. The Port Angeles actress and dancer did kill it. She completed her chemo Oct. 31, and a test just last month confirmed she is cancer-free. And now Trowbridge, who celebrated her 87th birthday Jan. 30, is about

Performance Friday “Four Women” will arrive on the stage of the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 8 p.m. Friday as part of the center’s springtime “Enter Stage Left” series. Admission is $5. Those who attend will see Trowbridge in her element. Since 2007, she’s performed “Four Women,” by local playwright Rebecca Redshaw, at venues from Port Angeles to LaPush. She’s shaped Bootsie’s drawl and Elizabeth’s New England vowels, perfected Vera’s accent and, as Sheri, been swept back in time by the music of her youth in the 1940s. Trowbridge herself continues to revel in the present and in music and dance.

A pure pleasure Preparing for Friday’s performance of “Four Women” has been pure pleasure. “I love Rebecca’s writing. It’s so easy to play those parts,” Trowbridge said. As for Redshaw, well, she’s in awe of her actress. “I called her and asked if she was interested” in doing the 80-minute show again, “and she said, ‘Absolutely.’” And as Trowbridge has done each time before, “she nails it,” Redshaw added. “We make a good team,” Trowbridge said. “I feel pretty lucky . . . and I love doing this.”

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

The Associated Press

SPOKANE — Spokane police used GPS tracking to arrest a burglary suspect. KXLY reported that police got permission from a judge to secretly attach a GPS device to the car

driven by convicted burglary Robert Frates, who is suspected in a string of beauty parlor burglaries in the city. Detectives were following his GPS signal early Saturday when he pulled

up in front of a salon. Spokeswoman Jennifer DeRuwe said they had probable cause to make the arrest. Frates appeared in court Tuesday and had bail set at $150,000.

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PORT ANGELES — In February 2010, Marianne Trowbridge knew she had ovarian cancer. S h e didn’t stop for it, though, not then. At age 86, she was busy choreographing “Caba- Trowbridge ret,” a musical about to go on stage in Olympic Theatre Arts’ new playhouse in Sequim. Once the show was open — and drawing crowds — Trowbridge began chemotherapy. From March 1 on, she went every week to Olympic Medical Cancer Center in Sequim for treatments that made her so ill her doctor asked if she wanted to quit.

She teaches tap dancing to a group of seniors every Tuesday at the Sequim Elks Lodge, and this past winter, she choreographed “Nunsense,” Olympic Theatre Arts’ musical comedy hit. She acknowledged that 2010 “was a tough year.” But Trowbridge kept her mind on the future; she was determined to finish chemotherapy well before it was time to start teaching the “Nunsense” sisters to dance.

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to return to the stage — and “kill it,” as they say, in another way. On Friday night, she’s starring in “Four Women,” a story about a mother’s secrets and a daughter’s search for the truth. As she has done five times before, Trowbridge will portray four characters: 101-year-old Elizabeth, the Southern belle Bootsie, the elderly Sheri who struggles with Alzheimer’s and Vera, a young widow who wants to get on with her life.

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City Manager Kent Myers said he would return to a future City Council meeting with more information on a consultant firm, Buxton, which has had preliminary conversations with city personnel. Myers discussed the scope of the possible study. “There is a lot of leakage outside the city and outside of Clallam County,” Myers said. “Also, the number of closures in the last year or two have created more opportunities to shop outside of the community.” Myers said that once contracted, Buxton could have an analysis ready in a matter of months. Preliminary discussions with Buxton estimated the price at around $35,000, Myers said. The final price would have to be negotiated if the council decides to move forward with the project. He said the council had the choice of putting the project out to bid but that he had consulted with City Attorney Bill Bloor, who said it didn’t have to go through the bid process if the council was satisfied with Buxton.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 31, 2011

A7

Move over, slow down or get ticketed Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIA — Move over or slow down as you pass emergency personnel at work, or you may get a ticket. Beginning Friday, State Patrol troopers will begin enforcement of the emergency zone law that went into effect Jan. 1.

The law requires motorists to slow down or move over when passing stationary emergency vehicles on the side of the highway. The fine is $124. That will be doubled if the motorist also is guilty of breaking another law, such as speeding, said Dan Coon, State Patrol spokesman. The first 90 days the law

went into effect, troopers only told motorists about the law. The legislation had directed the State Patrol to conduct this education period. As of Friday, troopers will begin writing tickets. They will not conduct “sting” or emergency zone emphases, the State Patrol said, but instead will ticket

motorists on a case-by-case basis or as incidents occur. The law was built on an earlier “move over” law and creates a 200-foot zone around stationary emergency vehicles that have their lights activated. Emergency vehicles include police cars, fire and emergency medical service vehicles, tow trucks and

state Department of Transportation vehicles. The Washington state Legislature passed the original “move over” law in 2007. However, despite this change, the problem continued to get worse, the State Patrol said. Between 2006 and 2009 alone, the State Patrol had

80 collisions involving passing vehicles striking trooper vehicles parked alongside the highway. The major contributing factor in these collisions was speeding or driving too fast for conditions, followed by driving while intoxicated, the State Patrol said.

Lawmakers tell budget writers: No gimmicks By Robin Hindery

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — The state’s chief financial officer is urging lawmakers to reject what he calls “felony gimmicks” as they work to finalize their proposals for the next two-year budget. State Treasurer Jim McIntire said he’s concerned lawmakers will dust off shortsighted deficitreduction ideas from the past to close the state’s estimated $5 billion budget gap for 2011-2013, at the expense of long-term fiscal stability. Such strategies include adding a 25th month to the 24-month budget period to

help cover expenses — a tactic last seen in 1971 — and borrowing against expected future revenues, or securitization. “The gimmicks we have to watch out for are the ones that create a long-term liability for the state,” McIntire said in a phone interview Tuesday, noting that the 25-month plan took nearly 16 years to pay off. The state adopted a securitization strategy in 2002, borrowing $450 million by selling a portion of its future payments from the 1998 national settlement with tobacco companies. That decision has since stripped vital money from

education and health services, McIntire said, estimating that the state will spend $100 million in the next biennium to repay interest and principal on the debt. “That’s expensive money. Those are junk bond rates,” he said. “Those are long-term revenue streams that we’re locking up for short-term purposes.”

Governor agrees McIntire’s concerns have been echoed by Democratic Gov. Chris Gregoire, who as state attorney general served as a lead negotiator in the tobacco settlement.

Register for classes for April’s kayak symposium Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Registration is being accepted now for classes at the 11th annual Port Angeles Kayak Symposium in mid-April. More than 300 sea kayakers, standup paddleboarders and those who want to try out the sports are expected at the symposium on Hollywood Beach and the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., from April 15-17. Kayaking enthusiasts will be able to try out the newest in kayaks and paddleboards. “Some people come for the sale prices,” said Dave King of Olympic Raft and Kayak of Port Angeles — which is hosting the event — “but most come for the chance to try all the coolest gear on the water.” For $5 or a food bank donation, guests can spend the day chatting with the sport’s experts and learning which boats might be the right one for them. The symposium will be from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, April 15; from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, April 16; and from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 17.

Free for browsers The event is free to those who want to browse and talk to exhibitors, $5 to try out kayaks and paddleboards, and between $5 and $35 per session for classes.

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egistration is being accepted for classes at the 11th annual Port Angeles Kayak Symposium in mid-April. More than 300 are expected at the symposium on Hollywood Beach and the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., from April 15-17. Beginner-friendly paddling clinics and intense advanced-level courses will go on all weekend, both on the water and on land. The Red Lion Hotel’s Peninsula Room will host 17 sessions of classroom instruction and entertainment. Keynote speakers will talk from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. both April 15 and 16 in the Peninsula Room at the Red Lion Hotel. Admission is $5. On April 15, Shane Robinson of the Kamchatka Project will talk about an expedition to explore Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula last summer. The next night, Don Keisling of the Tsunami Rangers will speak.

Instructors King estimated that a third or more of the attendees will be from outside the Clallam County area, including paddlers looking for a scenic weekend of instruction, as well as such instructors as Wayne Horodowich of the University of Sea Kayaking and Chris Mitchell of Secondwind Sports.

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But several instructors will be from here. “We have more than our share of top paddling teachers right here on the North Olympic Peninsula, like Deb Volturno, Rob Casey and Gary Korb,” King said. Volturno will lead a clinic on “Debacle Deterrence,” her title for a twohour risk-management clinic, and host a show featuring the exploits of the Tsunami Rangers, of which she is a long-standing member. Volturno and Korb will teach experienced paddlers how to build their skills in the surf. Standup Paddleboard instructor Casey will lead three clinics for beginner paddlers and one for more experienced sport practitioners in the surf. New this year will be a rescue skills contest, a kayak polo tourney, clinics on racing skills for those who want to join the growing paddlesports competition circuit and, on both weekend mornings, an hour of movement with the Feldenkrais method titled “Whole Body Kayaking” and led by Peninsula local Jory Kahn. To register for classes, visit http://tinyurl.com/ y3phqu9. For more information, phone Bill Walker at 206940-6269 or email rubycreekboathouse@gmail. com.

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsula dailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

She told reporters last week that if recent rumors of securitization are true, “somebody needs to tell me so I can say no.” Jeff Reading, a spokesman for the Senate’s majority Democrats, said the Senate was not considering either securitization or a 25th month as part of its budget plan. House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, D-Covington, called both strategies “very, very unlikely” but said at this stage, “everything is on the table, and it always has been.” “There’s this spectrum of things that you can do, things that are very difficult to do and things that

are so bad you don’t want to talk about it,” he said Wednesday, adding that securitization and a 25th month fall under the third category.

‘No gimmicks’ Rep. Gary Alexander, the GOP’s budget negotiator in the House, said Republicans have crafted a list of a dozen principles to serve as guidelines for ongoing negotiations, and one of them is “no gimmicks.” “Certainly, to us, that includes the 25th month and issues such as securitization, so we attempt to try to avoid them,” the Olympia lawmaker said.

Leaders from the House and Senate have given no clear indication of when they will unveil their plans to counter Gregoire’s budget proposal, released in December. This year, the House is proposing its budget first. Sullivan said his colleagues were “getting close” to an agreement and he hoped the plan would be ready by early next week. Earlier this month, the state’s chief economist said tax collections will drop by an estimated $780 million in the next two years, bringing the deficit to about $5.3 billion.

Briefly . . . State traffic fatalities drop in 2010 OLYMPIA — Traffic fatalities in Washington state continued their downward trend in 2010, reaching the lowest level in at least 35 years, the state Traffic Safety Commission said Wednesday. There were 448 known traffic-related deaths last year — down 44 from 2009. That represents a drop of more than 200 fatalities over a five-year period and is the lowest figure since the Fatality Analysis Reporting System launched in 1975, said commission spokesman MJ Haught. Transportation officials said the steady decline is a product of tpublic education campaigns, highway safety projects and strong enforcement of traffic laws. The state has set a goal of eliminating traffic fatalities by 2030 as part of its Target Zero plan established in 2000. Washington State Patrol Chief John Batiste said most traffic deaths are caused by speeding, driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and not wearing a seat belt. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, speeding was blamed for 40 percent of the 2,866 traffic fatalities in Washington between 2005 and 2009, while alcohol impairment played a role in 36 percent of the accidents. More crashes occurred in

rural areas than in urban settings.

Rally set Saturday SEQUIM — Clallam County MoveOn will host a rally Saturday. Defend the Dream will be from noon to 1 p.m. on the corner of Sequim Avenue and Washington Street. “It’s time to stop the negative assault on American workers, pitting the middle class and unions against the wealthy through the unfairness of tax laws,” the group said in a prepared statement. This is the first of a spring series of rallies, said Richard Gray of Clallam County MoveOn. An April 8 rally sponsored by the Washington Labor Council will be held in Olympia. For more information, phone Gray at 360-4774533.

City Council table PORT ANGELES — Two Port Angeles City Council members will have a table at the Farmers Market at The Gateway on Saturday. Council members Cherie Kidd and Max Mania will be available to answer questions and hear from the public from 10 a.m. to noon at the market at Front and Lincoln streets Council members host a table at the market the first Saturday of each month. The tentative schedule for upcoming Saturdays is: ■  May 7: Mayor Dan Di Guilio and council members Patrick Downie and Mania. ■  June 4: Di Guilio and Councilman Brad Collins. ■  July 2: Di Guilio and Deputy Mayor Don Perry. ■  Aug. 6: Council members Brooke Nelson and Downie. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Death Notices Marguerite Ilene Johnson

Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Jan. 27, 1923 — March 20, 2011

Clifford H. Robinson

Marguerite Ilene Johnson of Sequim died of agerelated causes. She was 88. Services: Today, March 31, 11 a.m., memorial Mass in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 121 E. Maple St., Sequim. The Rev. Victor Olvida will celebrate. Inurnment will be in Mount Angeles Memorial Park, U.S. Highway 101 and Monroe Road, Port Angeles. Sequim Valley Funeral

Jan. 11, 1946 — March 28, 2011

Sequim resident Clifford H. Robinson died at 65. His obituary will be published later. Services: Saturday, April 2, at 1 p.m., memorial at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles. Pastor Edward McKay will officiate. www.drennanford.com

Death and Memorial Notice ALANNA LEE JACOBSON November 19, 1989 March 27, 2011 On March 27, 2011, Alanna passed away from respiratory failure due to illness at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles with her daddy by her side. Alanna began her journey at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, to Jerry Dean Jacobson and Donna Marie Refroe. She was raised in Port Angeles, where she enjoyed attending both Sequim schools and Port Angeles High School. Alanna spent her time smiling and laughing with her family around campfires, baseball games, basketball games, listening to music, and looked forward to her daddy and family lighting off fireworks on the Fourth of July. She was a very special girl who brought happiness and joy to anyone

Alanna Jacobson and everybody in her presence. Alanna lived at home with her dad and Aunt Corrie who took care of her, along with wonderful caregivers, nurses, family and friends. She was a fighter who overcame obstacles no one would ever think possible to bring joy and happiness to so many who loved and adored her. Her smile will be deeply missed but never forgotten. Surviving family include her father, Jerry Jacobson; mother, Donna Renfroe; paternal grandmother, Verda Lee Jacobson; maternal grandpar-

ents, Don and Karen Renfroe; brother, Kohry Chaney; sister and brother-in-law, Tina and Jacob Lee; nieces, Anna Menkal, Chloe Chaney and Jaelynne Lee; nephews, Rylen Lee and Kayson Chaney; as well as many aunts, uncles and cousins. Alanna was preceded in death by her paternal grandparents, Rodney and Dea Jacobson; twin sister, Brenna Rose Jacobson; brother, Wade Chaney; and cousin, Stephenie Garner; whom all are buried at Port Crescent Cemetery, where Alanna will be laid to rest. Graveside service open to all who loved and knew Alanna will be held at Port Crescent Cemetery, Agate Beach Road, Port Angeles, on April 2, 2011, at 1 p.m. Uncle Stanley Jacobson will officiate the ceremony, with burial to follow. After burial, there will be a potluck reception with bonfire to follow at 69 Hidden View Drive in Port Angeles.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 31, 2011

Commentary

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If Libya, why not intervene elsewhere? IF THERE WERE an award for stating the obvious when it comes to the Middle East it would go to The New York Times. On its front page last FriCal day, the newspaper ran a Thomas story headlined, “Muslim Group Is Rising Force In New Egypt.” What group would that be? Why, the Muslim Brotherhood, of course. We have been repeatedly assured by certain pundits and members of the Obama administration that the Brotherhood are a small minority with no major influence in Egypt and that those Cairo protesters clamoring for “democracy” that led to the downfall of President Hosni Mubarak would be the ones to chart the country’s future. Each time another myth is busted, the deniers of what is happening throughout the region simply create a new myth, one

they desperately cling to against all evidence to the contrary. It would be well for the willfully blind to memorize the motto of the Muslim Brotherhood: “Allah is our objective, the Prophet is our leader; the Quran is our law; dying in the way of Allah is our highest hope.” Got that? The London Daily Telegraph interviewed Abdel-Hakim alHasidi, leader of the rebellion in Libya. He admitted some of the rebels have ties to al-Qaida — but not to worry. Hasidi claimed that even members of al-Qaida “are patriots and good Muslims, not terrorists.” Sure they are. We should take them at their word, even though they have been known to lie. At what point do we begin to wake up to this nonsense? Is anyone at the State Department paying attention? How about the White House? President Obama has been forced by growing criticism to better explain his non-policy in Libya and his reasoning behind bombing the country without

deposing Moammar Gadhafi. The president went to the United Nations Security Council for a resolution, not Congress, for constitutional approval to launch air strikes on Libya. Perhaps this is an extension of his stated belief that America is no more exceptional than any other country. “While regime change in Libya is the U.S. policy,” reports ABC News, “Gadhafi’s removal is not the goal of the operation.” No, President Obama tells us the United States is in Libya “to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe.” Huh? What about Syria, where security forces are shooting civilians in the streets on the apparent orders of President Bashar al-Assad? Under the new “humanitarian” rules of engagement, shouldn’t president Obama send bombers to Syria? Will the United States seek authorization from the U.N. for military air strikes there? And then there is Bahrain, where thousands of protesters spilled into the streets last week

Peninsula Voices

after Friday prayers and were confronted by security forces firing tear gas and pellets. Can live ammunition be far behind? If humanitarianism is the new standard for U.S. military intervention, what about bombing North Korea, liberating Tibet, strafing The Congo, Darfur and scores of other countries where authoritarian regimes deny basic human rights to their people? In last Saturday’s Wall Street Journal, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry wrote that what is taking place in the Middle East “could be the most important geostrategic shift since the fall of the Berlin Wall.” That’s the wrong analogy. When the Berlin Wall fell, people were liberated. What is happening in the Middle East could be the most important geostrategic shift since communists came to power in Russia and China, oppressing and killing millions. This is just the beginning. Saudi Arabia is next, and already the fault lines in that

Our readers’ letters, faxes

creaking monarchy are visible. The hand of Iran is behind much of this turmoil, and behind Iran is al-Qaida and Osama bin Laden’s vision for the toppling of every regime in the region, each to be replaced by the most religiously fundamentalist and politically repressive of leaders. While President Obama fiddles, the Middle East burns. At a private dinner last week in Washington, attended by a group of conservative journalists, someone said if a Democrat must be president, he would rather it be Hillary Clinton than Barack Obama. There was general head nodding. Mine was among them. ________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and e-mail

History Day

Of the 35 Sequim Middle School students I enjoyed reading about who went to Bremerton, the 53 Stevens Middle 15 qualified to go on to the School students who comstate competition in peted at the Olympic Bellevue on May 7. Regional History Day Billes and Sequim Midcompetition in Bremerton dle School teacher Todd [“History Day Competition Beuke were the Olympic Draws Students,” March 27 Regional History Day coorPDN]. dinators. Five of these students Without teachers like qualified to move on to the them, this regional compestate competition in tition could not happen. Bellevue. Karen Holtrop, Sequim History Day competitors work hard by conducting extensive historical Dangers of pot research and producing a First, let us separate the culminating project. arguments for medical Thirty-five Sequim Mid- usage and recreational dle School students also usage of marijuana. went to the regional HisThere is a limited numtory Day competition. ber of people who cannot Their projects included find pain relief from legal dramatic performances, prescription drugs. exhibits and research Identify them, register papers. them and address their The group’s teacher and needs. Now we can talk about adviser was Tricia Billes.

the supposed recreational need for an additional, legal, mind-altering drug. Skip the debate about tax income. We already have an unmanageable

cost with the misuse of alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs. Safety concerns alone would limit acceptable use of any mind-altering drug

in the workplace or while operating machinery, driving, flying airplanes or providing services such as firefighting, law enforcement or health care.

The use of mind-altering drugs (including marijuana) limits logical thought, impairs motor skills and leads to potentially high-risk activity. Can we accept more death and crippling accidents on our highways? There is a strong argument that all the mindaltering drugs lower productivity, reduce the ability to learn and potentially create a psychological dependence. Legalized marijuana adds one more unwanted cost to society. How our legal system implements penalties for irresponsible behavior can be debated, but the end goal should be a citizenry of logical, responsible, learning, productive people. Legalized use of more mind-altering drugs does not help us reach that goal. Sheldon McGuire, Sequim

Troy Davis and ‘the machinery of death’ ON MARCH 28, the Supreme Court refused to hear the death penalty case of Troy Anthony Davis. It was his Amy last appeal. Goodman Davis has been on Georgia’s death row for close to 20 years after being convicted of shooting to death off-duty police officer Mark MacPhail in Savannah. Since his conviction, seven of the nine nonpolice witnesses have recanted their testimony, alleging police coercion and intimidation in obtaining the testimony. Despite the doubt surrounding his case, Troy Anthony Davis could be put to death within weeks. Davis is now at the mercy of the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Parole, which could commute his sentence to life without parole. It will be a tough fight, despite widespread national and international support for clemency from figures such as Pope Benedict XVI, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former President Jimmy Carter.

Davis’ sister, Martina Correia, has tirelessly campaigned for justice for her brother. In response to the Supreme Court decision, she told me: “We were really shocked and appalled yesterday when we received the news . . . no one wants to look at the actual innocence, and no one wants to look at the witness recantation as a real strong and viable part of this case, even though new witnesses have come forward. “There needs to be a global mobilization about Troy’s case, and the fact that in the United States it’s not unconstitutional to execute an innocent person needs to be addressed once and for all by the U.S. Supreme Court.” Correia brings up a significant but little-known fact about death penalty law in the U.S. — namely, that current court precedent allows the execution of innocent people. Remarkably, the Supreme Court, in a 1993 opinion, suggested that “actual innocence” is not a sufficient cause to be let free. The court only cares if the legal rules are followed, while acknowledging that innocent people could still be convicted and put to death. In such cases, a prisoner could appeal for executive clemency.

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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It seems the court has not yet learned what many states have, that the death penalty system is broken beyond repair. Illinois Troy Davis recently became the 16th state in the United Sates to outlaw the death penalty. Gov. Pat Quinn, after signing the bill into law, said: “I have concluded that our system of imposing the death penalty is inherently flawed . . . it is impossible to devise a system that is consistent, that is free of discrimination on the basis of race, geography or economic circumstance, and that always gets it right.” He follows an earlier Illinois governor, Republican George Ryan, who commuted the death sentences of 120 death row prisoners in that state. Both Illinois governors bring to mind former Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun. In a dissenting opinion in 1994, after the court denied yet another death row inmate’s last appeal, Blackmun wrote: “From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the

machinery of death.” Tinkering with the machinery of death is just what some states seem to be doing. Thiopental is one of the three drugs used in the lethal “cocktail” administered in most executions in this country. Hospira, the last U.S.-based company to make sodium thiopental, quit making the controlled drug, creating a national shortage. States began scrambling to keep their death chambers wellstocked. When California borrowed a similar drug from Arizona, California Undersecretary of Corrections and Rehabilitation Scott Kernan wrote in an email, “You guys in AZ are life savers . . . ” Georgia, it turns out, seems to have illegally imported its supply from a dubious, London-based company called Dream Pharma Ltd., run by a husband and wife out of a rented space in the back of a driving school. Georgia is not currently licensed by the Drug Enforcement Administration to import controlled substances, so the DEA recently confiscated the state’s thiopental supply. Pending an investigation, Georgia will not have this key ingredient and will not be able to execute Davis or any other death row inmate.

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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On the same day that the Supreme Court denied Davis’ appeal, Amnesty International issued its annual report on the death penalty. The United States remains among the world’s leading executioners, along with China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and North Korea. In addition to leading the fight for her brother, Martina Correia has been fighting for her own life. The day of the court decision was the 10th anniversary of her ongoing battle against breast cancer. Her face adorns the mobile mammography van that helps save the lives of poor women in Savannah. The National Breast Cancer Coalition named her and former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi “Women Who Get It Right.” Correia, with customary humility, feels she won’t have earned the title until her brother’s life is saved as well. ________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email her at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

Fun ’n’ Advice

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Daughter despises dad’s girlfriend DEAR ABBY: I am in my late 30s and have been dating “Rick” for six years. The problem is his daughter, “Janet.” We used to get along, but now she hates me. She calls me awful names and says she wishes I would go away. I recently asked Rick to marry me. Now Janet says I am “desperate,” and she refuses to talk to either of us. I don’t know what to say to her. I’m appalled at her attitude toward me, the language she uses and the things she’s saying about me to her friends on the Internet. She won’t listen to her dad. Her mother is encouraging her behavior and has been threatening me. I can’t get Janet to understand that her dad and I love each other, that it’s all right for a woman to ask a man to marry her and it’s not out of “desperation.” Please help. Not Desperate in Louisiana

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Not Desperate: Toughen up. Recognize that for all of the joy Rick brings you, Janet is his extremely immature daughter, and she’s part of the package. How old is the girl? She appears to have years of growing up to do. You can’t change her behavior, so go on with your life without seeking her approval. Unfortunately, nasty ex-wives are nothing new. If the ex does anything beyond “threaten” you, file a police report and let them deal with her.

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Dear Abby: Can common sense be learned or taught? Some people seem to be born with it. Others have “book smarts” but struggle with everyday common sense. I fail to grasp simple connections, and I sometimes ask questions that have obvious answers — for someone else. I know other people who share the same problem, and I admire

Momma

DEAR ABBY Abigail

Van Buren

those who simply seem to “get” what’s happening around them. Is there any way to improve? I’m 38 and married to a man who has strengths in both areas. Bookworm in Montana

Dear Bookworm: Nobody has everything. Your strength is your intellect. Not everyone is a good student, and it can affect their self-esteem as much or more than your worry about not having common sense. If it’s any comfort, people usually acquire common sense in the school of life. In other words, they learn from the mistakes they make. I’m sure you have done that and will continue to do so. Dear Abby: My 34-year-old daughter blames me for her poor penmanship. When she was a baby, she started grabbing things with her left hand. Her pediatrician advised me to force her to use her right hand. Could she have had better penmanship if she had not been forced to use her right hand? Guilty Mom in Madison, Ala. Dear Guilty Mom: Probably. Your pediatrician must have been very old or very “old school.” I am also left-handed, and when I was a child, educators had stopped forcing children to write in a way that was unnatural for them. I was taught to properly hold a pencil, we practiced printing and cursive penmanship, and I am told my handwriting is beautiful.

–––––––– Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your quick response to whatever comes your way will show others you are on top of your game and aren’t easily fooled. With discipline and a responsible attitude, you can turn any disappointment into something that can work for you. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put more time and effort into helping others and you will receive recognition. Your hands on approach in both your personal and professional dealings will lead to a position you cannot turn down. Take care of personal paperwork. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You have to separate your emotions from the equation when dealing with difficult individuals trying to get something for nothing. It’s nice to receive compliments but don’t make a promise to do something because of it. Use your time to your own advantage. 2 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t let last-minute changes throw you off. Be ready to adapt to whatever develops, especially if it has to do with work. Love is on the rise and the chance to meet someone new or to enhance the relationship you are already in looks good. 5 stars

Dennis the Menace

A9

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Jump in with both feet. Change will stimulate you and help you turn one of your ideas into a workable endeavor. Getting involved in a group or attending a conference will lead to an important connection. A lifestyle change will open up opportunities. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your emotions will be difficult to control. Deal with pending problems in order to ease your stress so you can address any personal issues that arise. Someone you love is likely to disappoint you. Patience and understanding will be the keys to making things better. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t overreact. Use whatever comes your way to your advantage. Let your imagination flow and your creative talent move you in a positive direction. Opportunities are present but you have to take action. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can achieve a lot both personally and professionally if you mingle with people who can help you get ahead and people who love and support you. Mixing business with pleasure will pay high dividends. Love is in the stars. 5 stars

The Family Circus

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Look at each situation you face, separating the good from the bad. Only after you differentiate between who is willing to help you and who isn’t, will you be in a position to move forward. Changes made at home can increase efficiency. 2 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t show surprise if someone broadsides you with unexpected information or choices. Make whatever you are handed work for you. Don’t bother arguing when taking action is so much more effective. 4 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An old idea will help you turn something you are working toward now into a positive endeavor. A love interest will not turn out the way you expect. Be careful not to disrupt a relationship that means a lot to you by making a stupid choice. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Love is at an all-time high. Putting pressure on someone you want to be with will have its advantages, but keep in mind that if you ask for too much, your plan will backfire. Consider everyone involved in your circle before you proceed. 3 stars


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Northwest ready for a tsunami? Threat may catch region off guard By Alicia Chang

The Associated Press

CANNON BEACH, Ore. — When the big one hits the Pacific Northwest, the best place to escape the wall of water moving at jetliner speed from 50 miles off the coast may be a City Hall on stilts. Once the ground finishes two to four minutes of lurching and shaking, residents and tourists in Cannon Beach would flock to the refuge on concrete columns 14 feet above the waves racing beneath. They would . . . if the refuge gets built. There’s nothing like it from Northern California to British Columbia and, so far, no money for anything like it. It’s an example of how underprepared the West Coast is for an earthquake and tsunami on the scale of what happened in Japan. Scientists say it’s inevitable that an offshore seismic menace called the Cascadia Subduction Zone will one day unleash a megaquake. The last time it happened was 300 years ago when a magnitude 9 shaker spawned enormous ocean waves that slammed into the West Coast and damaged Japanese fishing villages. Mindful of the risks of waves as high as 60 feet, communities in the Pacific Northwest have worked on their defenses, installing sirens to warn of dangerous waves, posting hazard signs to mark inundation zones, designating evacuation routes and holding evacuation drills.

Recent discovery

Washington state In Washington state, emergency managers are working with coastal communities to develop local plans for elevated evacuation structures that could do double duty, such as steel-reinforced earthen berms 20 feet high that could support bleachers at a stadium. “Right now, there’s no funding for anything like this, through state and federal funding,” said John Schelling of the state Emergency Management. He argues, though, that it’s important to develop the plans for the day when money is available. That’s particularly the case, he said, for places on the Pacific Northwest coast that don’t have high ground close to the beach, such as the flats of southwest Washington’s Long Beach peninsula.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The

beauty of rain

Raindrops fall on a decorative planter in downtown Port Angeles on Wednesday as steady showers fall on the North Olympic Peninsula. Rain, heavy at times, is expected to fall across the region through Friday, prompting flood watches and warnings on many flood-prone rivers. AccuWeather five-day forecast, Page C10.

Man charged with assaulting two deputies pleads not guilty By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — A Sequim man charged with assaulting two Clallam County deputies has pleaded not guilty to second-degree assault, third-degree assault and harassment. Ha-Qwenith Zachary Grinnell, 21, was no longer in custody in Clallam County jail Wednesday. At an arraignment last Friday, one of the original two counts of third-degree assault was increased to second-degree. Grinnell, a former Sequim High School foot-

T

he deputies used electrical control devices and pepper spray to gain control of him ball player, will have a status hearing at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 15, at 1:30 p.m. A three-day trial is scheduled for May 16. Deputies Michael Dick and Todd Yarnes were treated at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles and discharged that night after Grinnell struck and kicked

SPRING SPECTACULAR

them March 14, according to court documents. The deputies used electrical control devices and pepper spray to gain control of him, court documents said. Dick sustained a head laceration and extremity abrasions. Yarnes suffered a slight concussion, facial scratches and abrasions to the arms and leg regions. Because he suffered a loss of consciousness, loss of memory and could not return to work for at least two weeks, the injuries were deemed more serious

than originally thought, court documents said. Grinnell also was charged with felony harassment against a family member. Court documents said he allegedly threatened to kill a family member, court documents said. A court order not to contact the family member he allegedly threatened also was removed at the family member’s request at the Friday hearing.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

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Scientists in the Pacific Northwest hadn’t understood the geology and the threat it poses until recent decades, when they discovered evidence of big quakes near the coast over the past 10,000 years — about 20 the size of the March 11 quake in Japan. By contrast, the Japanese have long paid close attention to quakes and tsunamis. Their written records from 1700 allowed North American scientists a few years ago to fix the timing of the last Pacific Northwest megaquake, right down to the hour it occurred. So the death and damage caused by this month’s earthquake and tsunami in Japan were worrisome on the other side of the Pacific. “We’re not nearly as well-prepared as the Japanese, and clearly, they were overwhelmed,” said Bill Steele, coordinator of the University of Washington’s Seismology Laboratory. “It is a problem.” Elevated refuges are among the Japan-style responses to the tsunami threat that experts say helped to mitigate the destruction and death. And these are just pieces in a giant puzzle for the Northwest in dealing with the aftermath of a disaster that could bring Katrinastyle devastation to a region of 13 million people west of the Cascade Range. In Cannon Beach, Jay Raskin is terrified at the prospect — “terrified” is a word he uses three times in the first few minutes of an interview. The former City Council member and mayor has proposed replacing the current City Hall, seismically unsound, with a two-story building on stilts to provide refuge to as many as 1,500 people. The second floor would house city offices. Atop that would be a terrace. The idea is still conceptual, awaiting vetting by

structural and geophysical engineers. That could add to the tentative $4 million price tag Raskin puts on it. There are no current plans in California to build special tsunami-resistant structures, but some communities are looking at ways to herd residents to existing buildings perched on higher ground in the event of dangerous waves, said Rick Wilson, senior engineering geologist with the California Geological Survey.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 31, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

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BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Outdoors

Derbies coming to dock near you BLESSED ARE THE litigious. They are given two salmon derbies where there was once one. Six weeks after the OlymMatt pic Peninsula Salmon Derby Schubert had its first run, the inaugural Discovery Bay Volunteer Fire Fighters Salmon Derby comes to the North Olympic Peninsula. Smaller than its fellow Discovery Bay Salmon Derby offshoot, the event harkens back to derbies of years past. “It’s a community derby,” event organizer Barbara Knoepfle said. “It’s the one we’ve always had.” As has been well-documented in this column space, the original event — the Discovery Bay Salmon Derby — went away for a year after groups from Discovery Bay and Gardiner clashed over where its proceeds should go. The Gardiner residents held their event Presidents Day weekend, a mega-derby that stretched all the way from Tongue Point near Joyce to Foulweather Bluff in Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet). Now the Discovery Bay Volunteer Fire Fighters get their turn with this weekend’s fishing engagement. And much like in the years before the Disco Derby was canceled in 2010, western boundaries will not go past Dungeness Spit. Fishing will instead be limited to waters east of the spit and Hein Bank, including most of Area 9 toward Double Bluff and Foulweather Bluff. “We like to keep it like it was,” Knoepfle said. “And the fish from the other derby, the bigger ones, all came from the Port Townsend area anyway.” Indeed, those waters produced nearly all of the largest blackmouth during the Olympic Peninsula derby, despite the fact most of the fish came from the Port Angeles area. Fittingly, the winner — an 18.90-pounder caught by Rob Schmidt of Sequim — was caught in Discovery Bay itself. The next three largest fish were all brought back to the docks in Port Townsend, ranging from 18.05 to 17.5 pounds in size. Those were all fin-clipped hatchery fish, per derby rules. Only fin-clipped fish can be entered into this weekend’s ladder as well. The top fish will net $3,000, second-place gets $1,200, third $750 and fourth $500. There will also be other goodies up for grabs thanks to donations from area businesses. The prize ceremony will be held at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday at the Discovery Bay Store, 282322 U.S. Highway 101. Tickets cost $30 to fish for one day or both and are available at several area merchants. Proceeds benefit the Discovery Bay Volunteer Fire Department. For more information on the derby, visit www.dbvfd.org.

The Associated Press (2)

Ichiro begins his 11th season with the Seattle Mariners this Friday looking to extend his streak of 200-hit seasons to 11 while also ending a 10-year playoff drought.

Few expectations M’s have foundation, may need more pop By Tim Booth

“It was a straight rebuild in Cleveland. They tore it all down SEATTLE — When Eric and it was the right thing to do,” Wedge walked into a rebuilding Wedge said. “Here you have to start with situation in Cleveland, he inherited a team that was going to Felix and Ichiro, two pillars, one take its lumps with youth in the on the pitching side, one on the position player side. hopes of a payoff in the future. That, in and of itself, So when Wedge tells you you’re not looks around the Seatrebuilding because tle Mariners clubhouse you have those guys.” and sees the reigning The Mariners begin AL Cy Young winner in finding out who they Felix Hernandez in one are on Friday night corner, the hit-machine Next Game when they open the that is Ichiro in Friday season at Oakland another and a starting with Hernandez on vs. Athletics lineup that doesn’t feathe hill, and expectature a single rookie, at Oakland tions nowhere near Time: 7:05 p.m. Wedge doesn’t see the the hype that surproject that he’s taking On TV: FSN rounded the club at on in Seattle as a true this time a year ago. rebuilding job. Seattle was a popular pick to Instead, Wedge believes his emerge from the AL West, led by first season in trying to bring a pitching staff anchored by HerSeattle back to even being in con- nandez and Cliff Lee that prosideration for a postseason berth vided enough potential to overis a “bridge” between Seattle’s look the Mariners’ questionable troubled last five years, and the offense. promise of what they could be in the future. Turn to Mariners/B3 The Associated Press

Seattle Mariners pitcher Felix Hernandez is coming off a Cy Young Award-winning season in which he posted a 2.27 earned run average with 232 strikeouts.

College Football

Locker shines in workout The Associated Press

More derby Speaking of derbies, a more exclusive event is scheduled for the Port Townsend area next week. The All PSA Salmon Derby, open to Puget Sound Anglers members and special guests, will be based out of Point Hudson Marina on Saturday, April 9. The derby will include waters in Marine Area 6 (eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca) and Area 9, with fishing open until 4 p.m. for fin-clipped chinook. Tickets cost $20, with all funds paid out as prizes. First place gets 40 percent of the pot, second 25 percent, third 15 percent, fourth 10 percent and the mystery fish 10 percent. Tickets can be purchased by PSA members and guests only. Money must be mailed in by Monday. To get tickets, North Olympic Peninsula Chapter members should contact Mike Schmidt at 360-460-0331. East Jefferson Chapter members can contact Jerry Johnson at 360-3792855.

________

Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.

Steve Mullensky/Peninsula Daily News

Chimacum’s Eric Estrada, right, holds on to Redskin midfielder Ian Hadden to keep him from getting control of the ball during Wednesday’s game in Port Townsend.

Cowboys shock PT Chimacum beats archrivals for first win of the season Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Chimacum boys soccer team finally got its shot at its archrivals. After more than four years without a match against Port Townsend, and eight total with-

out a win, it was well worth the wait. The Cowboys scored two goals in the first 41 minutes then held off the Redskins’ desperate attempts at a rally to earn a 2-0 nonleague win at Memorial Field on Wednesday night.

Prep Soccer “Everybody on that pitch worked hard,” Chimacum coach Kevin Coate said. “We earned the victory.” Kobi Albright and Chris Pieper each scored unassisted goals to help Chimacum (0-1-1 in league, 1-3-1 overall) to its first win of the season. Turn

to

Preps/B3

SEATTLE — Jake Locker dropped back seven steps and flicked the pass 60 yards downfield, barely missing the fingertips of receiver D’Andre Goodwin. After 35 straight completions, all well choreographed, it seemed about time for a pass to hit the ground. If scouts ALSO . . . and NFL exec■ Fiesta utives still had Bowl in concerns about danger amid Locker’s accuscandal/B3 racy after his performances at the Senior Bowl and NFL combine, some of those could have been put to rest on Wednesday. “It was better. It was more consistent. There were a few throws in the combine that I didn’t like and would have liked to do over again and today I felt like every ball came off my hand good,” Locker said. Locker completed 38 of his 40 pass attempts during Washington’s pro day. While some of his former UW teammates went through the whole regimen of bench press, broad jump, 40-yard dash and individual drills, Locker’s day lasted about 20 minutes at the very end. Turn

to

Locker/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Baseball: Forks at Chimacum, 3:30 p.m. Softball: Forks at Chimacum, DH, 3 p.m. Girls Tennis: North Mason at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Chimacum at Sequim, 4 p.m. Track: Onalaska, Elma, Clallam Bay, Neah Bay and Crescent at Forks, 3:30 p.m.; Chimacum at Life Christian, 3:30 p.m.

Friday Baseball: Lummi at Quilcene, 3:45 p.m.; Chimacum at Castle Rock, noon. Softball: Lummi at Quilcene, 3:45 p.m.; Port Townsend at Chimacum, 4 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Women’s League Results March 29 Avalanche Varsity 54, Pirates 41 Leading Scorers: Jessica Madison, 24; Paxton Rodocker, 11; Shayla Northern, 10 Bowling LAUREL LANES March 29 Mixed Up Mixed Men’s High Game: Calen Walz, 226 Men’s High Series: Dan Fereira, Sr. 594 Woman’s High Game: Rochelle Hoffman, 181 Woman’s High Series: Rochelle Hoffman, 494 March 29 Laurel Lanes Seniors Men’s High Game: Rod Melville, 175 Men’s High Series: Paul Schoville, 494 Woman’s High Game: Barbara Ross: 179 Woman’s High Series: Hazel Vail, 482 March 29 Tuesday Brunch League High Score: Deb Campion/Cheri Pysson, 189 High Series: Deb Campion, 493

College Basketball Men’s NCAA Tournament At The Honda Center Anaheim, Calif. Regional Semifinals Thursday, March 24 Connecticut 74, San Diego State 67 Arizona 93, Duke 77 Regional Championship Saturday, March 26 Connecticut 65, Arizona 63 FINAL FOUR At Reliant Stadium Houston National Semifinals Saturday, April 2 Butler (27-9) vs. Virginia Commonwealth (2811), 3:09 p.m. Kentucky (29-8) vs. Connecticut (30-9), 40 minutes after first game National Championship Monday, April 4 Semifinal winners

NCAA Women’s Tournament Glance Sunday, March 27 Texas A&M 79, Georgia 38 Baylor 86, Wisconsin-Green Bay 76 Regional Championship Tuesday, March 29 Texas A&M 58, Baylor 46 FINAL FOUR at Conseco Fieldhouse Indianapolis National Semifinals Sunday, April 3 Stanford (33-2) vs. Texas A&M (31-5), 4 p.m. Connecticut (36-1) vs. Notre Dame (30-7), 6 p.m. National Championship Tuesday, April 5 Semifinal winners, TBA

Basketball NBA Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division W L Pct GB x-Oklahoma City 49 24 .671 — Denver 44 29 .603 5 Portland 43 32 .573 7 Utah 36 39 .480 14 Minnesota 17 58 .227 33 Pacific Division W L Pct GB y-L.A. Lakers 53 20 .726 — Phoenix 36 37 .493 17 Golden State 32 44 .421 22½ L.A. Clippers 29 45 .392 24½ Sacramento 21 52 .288 32 Southwest Division W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 57 17 .770 — x-Dallas 52 21 .712 4½ New Orleans 43 32 .573 14½ Memphis 42 33 .560 15½ Houston 39 36 .520 18½

The Associated Press

Bowled

over

Pakistan’s Asad Shafiq, left, is bowled out during the Cricket World Cup semifinal match between Pakistan and India in Mohali, India, on Wednesday. India topped archrival Pakistan by 29 runs in the so-called “mother of all World Cup matches” to progress to the final against Sri Lanka. EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB y-Boston 51 22 .699 — Philadelphia 39 36 .520 13 New York 37 38 .493 15 New Jersey 23 51 .311 28½ Toronto 20 54 .270 31½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB x-Miami 52 23 .693 — x-Orlando 47 28 .627 5 x-Atlanta 43 32 .573 9 Charlotte 32 42 .432 19½ Washington 18 56 .243 33½ Central Division W L Pct GB y-Chicago 54 20 .730 — Indiana 34 42 .447 21 Milwaukee 30 44 .405 24 Detroit 26 48 .351 28 Cleveland 15 59 .203 39 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 85, Orlando 82 Charlotte 98, Cleveland 97 Indiana 111, Detroit 101 Milwaukee 104, Toronto 98 Philadelphia 108, Houston 97 Miami 123, Washington 107 New York 120, New Jersey 116 Memphis 110, Golden State 91 Chicago 108, Minnesota 91 New Orleans 95, Portland 91 Sacramento at Denver, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Phoenix, LATE Dallas at L.A. Clippers, LATE Today’s Games Boston at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Milwaukee at Indiana, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 4 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Portland, 7 p.m. Denver at Sacramento, 7 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey NHL Standings WESTERN CONFERENCE Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Van 77 51 17 9 111 250 176 Calgary 77 38 28 11 87 235 226 Minnesota 76 36 32 8 80 191 215 Colorado 75 28 39 8 64 211 267 Edmonton 76 23 42 11 57 180 251 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 76 44 23 9 97 224 199 Phoenix 78 42 25 11 95 221 213 LA 76 44 26 6 94 209 181 Anaheim 76 43 28 5 91 219 221 Dallas 75 38 26 11 87 209 212

Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 77 44 23 10 98 247 226 Nashville 77 41 26 10 92 203 182 Chicago 76 41 27 8 90 242 209 St. Louis 77 35 32 10 80 224 225 Columbus 76 34 31 11 79 203 232 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Philly 76 46 20 10 102 243 202 x-Pitts 77 45 24 8 98 220 188 Rangers 77 41 31 5 87 218 182 NJ 76 35 36 5 75 158 191 Islanders 77 29 36 12 70 212 244 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Boston 76 43 23 10 96 229 178 Montreal 78 41 30 7 89 205 203 Buffalo 77 39 29 9 87 226 214 Toronto 77 35 32 10 80 205 235 Ottawa 77 29 38 10 68 177 238 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Wash 77 44 22 11 99 207 185 Tampa 76 41 24 11 93 228 230 Carolina 77 37 30 10 84 220 228 Atlanta 76 32 32 12 76 211 249 Florida 77 29 36 12 70 187 212 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot z-clinched conference Wednesday’s Games Buffalo 1, N.Y. Rangers 0 New Jersey 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 Carolina 6, Montreal 2 St. Louis 10, Detroit 3 Anaheim at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Today’s Games Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Columbus at Washington, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Nashville at Colorado, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 4 p.m. Calgary at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Colorado at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League Baltimore Orioles: Announced RHP Rick VandenHurk cleared waivers and was sent outright to Norfolk (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Josh Rupe from Norfolk (IL). Cleveland Indians: Selected the contracts of RHP Justin Germano, INF Adam Everett, INF Jack Hannahan and OF Travis Buck from Columbus (IL). Placed INF Jason Donald and RHP Joe Smith on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22; and OF Grady Sizemore on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 29. Placed OF Trevor Crowe on the 60-day DL. Recalled INF Jared Goedert from Columbus and placed him

on the 60-day DL. Reassigned INF Jordan Brown, 1B Nick Johnson and OF Chad Huffman to Columbus (IL). Detroit Tigers: Selected the contract of RHP Enrique Gonzalez from Toledo (IL). Sent INF Audy Ciriaco outright to Erie (EL). Placed INF Carlos Guillen and RHP Joel Zumaya on 15-day DL. Kansas City Royals: Placed C Jason Kendall on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Selected the contract of LHP Tim Collins from Omaha (PCL). Designated C Lucas May for assignment. Sent OF Gregor Blanco outright to Omaha. New York Yankees: Selected the contracts of RHP Luis Ayala, RHP Bartolo Colon, RHP Freddy Garcia and C Gustavo Molina from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned OF Chris Dickerson to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Placed LHP Pedro Feliciano and C Francisco Cervelli on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Placed LHP Damaso Marte, INF Reegie Corona and OF Colin Curtis on the 60-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Designated RHP Romulo Sanchez for assignment. Oakland Athletics: Optioned RHP Tyson Ross, C Josh Donaldson and INF Eric Sogard to Sacramento (PCL). Selected the contract of INF Andy LaRoche from Sacramento. Placed INF Adam Rosales on the 60-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Placed RHP Andrew Bailey and RHP Rich Harden on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Reassigned INF Wes Timmons and OF Matt Carson to minor league camp. Toronto Blue Jays: Placed RHP Octavio Dotel, RHP Frank Francisco and RHP Brandon Morrow on the 15-day DL. National League Arizona Diamondbacks: Assigned INF Tony Abreu outright to Reno (PCL). Optioned INF Brandon Allen and RHP Esmerling Vasquez to Reno. Released RHP Carlos Rosa for the purpose of selling him to Japan. Placed LHP Zach Duke and INF Geoff Blum on the 15-day DL. Atlanta Braves: Released LHP Billy Wagner. Assigned OF Joe Mather outright to Gwinnett (IL). Chicago Cubs: Sent C Max Ramirez outright to Iowa (PCL). Cincinnati Reds: Placed RHP Jared Burton on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 29; OF Fred Lewis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 27; RHP Jose Arredondo on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 25; RHP Homer Bailey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 24; and RHP Johnny Cueto on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 20. Recalled RHP Jordan Smith from Louisville (IL). Florida Marlins: Placed C John Baker on the 60-day DL. Selected the contracts of INF Donnie Murphy and INF Greg Dobbs from New Orleans (PCL). Houston Astros: Reassigned INF Tommy Manzella to Oklahoma City (PCL). Designated LHP Ryan Rowland-Smith for assignment. Milwaukee Brewers: Placed OF Corey Hart and C Jonathan Lucroy on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22. Selected the contracts of INF/OF Erick Almonte and OF Jeremy Reed from Nashville (PCL). Assigned C Mike Rivera and RHP Mark DiFelice to their minor league camp.

SPORTS ON TV Today 8 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA Golf, Trophée Hassan II at Agadir, Morocco. 9 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA Golf, Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, Calif. 10 a.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, Detroit Tigers at New York Yankees. 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis, Sony Ericsson Open at Crandon Park Tennis Center in Key Biscayne, Fla. Noon (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Houston Open at Redstone Golf Club in Houston, Texas. 1 p.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, San Diego Padres at St. Louis Cardinals. 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA Golf, Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage, Calif. 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Alabama vs. Wichita State in NIT Championship at Madison Square Garden in New York City, N.Y. 5 p.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, San Francisco Giants at Los Angeles Dodgers. 5 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Boston Celtics at San Antonio Spurs. 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT NBA Basketball, Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers. New York Mets: Announced INF Nick Evans cleared waivers and was sent outright to Buffalo (IL). Announced INF Luis Hernandez cleared waivers. Pittsburgh Pirates: Optioned RHP Chris Leroux to Indianapolis (IL). Acquired C Carlos Paulino from Florida for INF Jim Negrych. Philadelphia Phillies: Released 2B Luis Castillo. Selected the contract of INF Pete Orr from Lehigh Valley (IL). Assigned INF Delwyn Young and C Erik Kratz to their minor league camp. Placed INF Chase Utley, INF Brian Bocock, OF Domonic Brown and RHP Brian Schlitter on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 22 and RHP Brad Lidge on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 25. St. Louis Cardinals: Placed INF Nick Punto on the 15-day DL. Put RHP Adam Wainwright on the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Miguel Batista from Memphis (PCL). San Francisco Giants: Placed RHP Brian Wilson on the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Travis Ishikawa for assignment. American Association Amarillo Sox: Signed 1B Chris Nash. Gary Southshore Railcats: Traded RHP Andy Shipman to Kansas City for cash and a player to be named. Lincoln Saltdogs: Signed C Pat Trettel, INF Brandon Jones and INF Phil Hawke. Sioux City Explorers: Signed INF Ryan Priddy and OF Joe Wendte. Wichita Wingnuts: Signed RHP Jared Simon. Acquired INF Juan M. Richardson from Chico Outlaws (North American) for cash.

Hockey NHL Chicago Blackhawks: Signed F Jimmy Hayes to a three-year contract. Edmonton Oilers: Signed G Olivier Roy to a three-year entry level contract. Nashville Predators: Signed LW Austin Watson to a three-year contract. New York Islanders: Agreed to terms with D Matt Donovan and assigned him to Bridgeport (AHL). Tampa Bay Lightning: Reassigned F Mattias Ritola to Norfolk (AHL).

College Boston College: Announced junior G Reggie Jackson has declared for the NBA draft. Flagler: Announced the resignation men’s and women’s cross country coach of Dave Williams. Illinois State: Named Jim Schneiderhahn women’s assistant soccer coach. Louisiana Tech: Named Michael White men’s basketball coach. Marquette: Signed men’s basketball coach Buzz Williams to a new contract. Michigan: Signed football coach Brady Hoke to a six-year contract. Purdue: Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Matt Painter on an eight-year contract through the 2018-19 season. Rhode Island College: Announced the addition of women’s swimming and golf for the 2011-12 season and the elimination of women‘s gymnastics. Tennessee: Named Jon Harris to the men’s basketball coaching staff.

Cougs’ future uncertain Fortunes rest on whether Thompson bolts for NBA The Associated Press

PULLMAN — Klay Thompson held up his index finger as Washington State students chanted “one more year” following the team’s overtime victory over Northwestern in the quarterfinals of the NIT last week. But the leading scorer in the Pac-10 was just indicating the Cougars had one more game, which they lost to Wichita State on Tuesday. Whether Thompson returns for his senior year is an open question. Thompson had one of his worst games in the 75-44

loss to the Shockers, going 1-for-10 and tying his season low with six points. “I think it’s just too early to tell,” said Thompson, a junior who led the Pac-10 with 22 points per game. “Just trying to enjoy the time that I have with my teammates.” Thompson, the son of former No. 1 draft pick Mychal Thompson, has indicated repeatedly that he will decide after the season if he will enter this summer’s NBA draft. The 6-foot-6 guard set a WSU season scoring record with 733 points, and a

3-point field goal record with 98. He shot 44 percent from the field and 83 percent from the free throw line, and averaged more than five rebounds and nearly four assists per game. Coach Ken Bone, who has indicated that he believes there is a 50-50 chance Thompson will return, said nothing has changed. Bone has said WSU may also lose junior post DeAngelo Casto to a pro team in Europe because Casto has a child and is struggling to make ends meet. “It’s just a matter of time and see what type of information they are able to gather,” Bone said Tuesday. Washington State (2213) finished on a downer.

The 31-point loss was their worst of the season and their 44 points were second-lowest of the season. They did not make a 3-pointer for the first time since 2009. But the 22 wins were tied for 10th most in team history, and they reached the semifinals of the NIT for the first time. With no seniors on this team, Washington State figures to be even better next year if Thompson and Casto return. If they leave, the Cougars will return Faisal Aden (12.9 ppg), point guard Reggie Moore (9 ppg) and forwards Brock Motum (7.7 ppg), Marcus Capers (5.9 ppg) and Abe Lodwick (3.6 ppg) among players who saw significant minutes.

The Associated Press

Washington State coach Ken Bone watches during second half of a semifinal in the NIT tournament against Wichita State on Tuesday in New York. Wichita State won 75-44, ending WSU’s season.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Party may be over Fiesta Bowl on notice after scandal revealed The Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — The head of the BCS put the Fiesta Bowl on notice Wednesday: “Follow the letter of the law” or lose its place in college football’s lucrative championship system. BCS officials challenged the Fiesta Bowl to persuade them that extravagant and improper spending behind the firing of longtime CEO and President John Junker will never happen again. Otherwise, the BCS said it can kick out the Fiesta Bowl altogether. There are plenty of others eager to jump in. “They know that if they want to do business with us, they need to follow the letter of the law,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock told The Associated Press. “If they fail to do so, they do it at their own peril.” The Fiesta Bowl released an internal report on Tuesday that uncovered hundreds of thousands, perhaps even millions of dollars, in “excessive compensation, nonbusiness and inappropriate expenditures and inappropriate gifts.” Arizona prosecutors are looking into possible criminal charges, focusing on accusations that top officials pressured employees into donating money to favored political candidates and then reimbursed them with bowl funds. Fiesta Bowl officials placed the blame squarely on Junker, who made $600,000 a year as the affable face of the organization. Over the past two decades, he led the upstart bowl from just another postseason game to one of the largest and most prestigious. “I must say that the actions undertaken and orchestrated by John Junker and others are shocking and completely unacceptable,” said Duane Woods, the Fiesta Bowl chairman. “Their actions, unfortunately, have tainted the stellar reputation that the Fiesta Bowl has worked so hard to maintain for more than 40 years.”

The Bowl Championship Series also includes the Rose, Orange and Sugar bowls, and draws tens of millions of dollars a year in television revenue, ticket sales and merchandise. Frito-Lay, whose product “Tostitos” is the Fiesta Bowl’s title sponsor, said it was “disappointed” and was monitoring the situation.

Critics come out The scandal rekindled long-standing criticism of the BCS, one of three organizations whose polls crown national champions. The others are the AP and ESPN/ USA Today. Matthew Sanderson, cofounder of Playoff PAC, a group advocating a playoff system to determine a national college football champion, accused the BCS of making the Fiesta Bowl a scapegoat. “Any BCS effort to expel the Fiesta Bowl would be a hypocritical act, given the documented irregularities at these other BCS bowls,” he said. “And who’s to say we won’t find the same type of shockingly questionable behavior when the curtain is peeled back at the BCS’s Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl?” Hancock said he had “absolutely no indication” of similar behavior by the BCS’ other three bowls. The BCS set up a task force to help determine if the leaders of major college football want to continue doing business in Arizona. “We want to send a clear and very strong signal to the public,” Pac-10 Commissioner Larry Scott told the AP, “about the standards and values the conferences that make up the BCS stand for.” The Fiesta Bowl, played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz., is in the second season of a fouryear deal to be one of the four bowls that rotate hosting the national championship game. Asked if he was confident there is nothing in the contract to stop the BCS from ending the relationship immediately, Hancock replied: “Yes, I am confident.”

Even the marketing arm of the organization thought 2010 was going to mark Seattle’s return to the postseason with the tag “Believe Big.” Instead, 2010 became an embarrassing thud of mistakes and missteps, from the Mariners’ punchless offense, to the story about Ken Griffey Jr. sleeping in the clubhouse and his abrupt retirement, to the firing of manger Don Wakamatsu — the first Japanese-American manager in baseball — on Japanese heritage day at the ballpark. “I would never want to try and oversell a ball club which I tried not to do a year ago,” Seattle general manager Jack Zduriencik said. “Everybody was selling it and I was like ‘Guys let’s back off a little bit here. We still need another big bat, I’d like to have another starter.’ “I said it many, many times, but I didn’t expect us to underachieve the way we did.” But coming off a second 101-loss season in the last three years, the Mariners were hamstrung by costly contracts that limited what Zduriencik could do in the offseason to bring immediate changes while trying to keep payroll around the level of a year ago. Hence, the bridge notion for the 2011 season. Milton Bradley will start in left field and will likely be the Mariners’ No. 3 hitter as long as his spring training performance carries into the regular season. But his $12 million contract comes off the books after the 2011 season.

Same goes for Jack Wilson and his $5 million deal. Seattle moved Wilson from shortstop to second base, providing a strong defensive infield, but also making clear that Brendan Ryan is likely the Mariners’ shortstop of the future and Wilson’s time in Seattle could be running out with top prospect Dustin Ackley sitting at Triple-A. Others, like left-handed pitcher Erik Bedard and designated hitter Jack Cust, are playing on oneyear contracts as well.

Locked in The Mariners also hope those they have locked up for a number of years can either continue their growth or rebound from disappointing 2010 seasons. Young first baseman Justin Smoak closed 2010 strong after a demotion to the minors. New catcher Miguel Olivo should bring leadership behind the dish, but will need to add a little offensive pop. Center fielder Franklin Gutierrez continues to be bothered by stomach problems that have affected his game, while Seattle believes Chone Figgins’ move back to third base will lead to a more productive season at the plate. Still, there are major offensive questions that may again overshadow what could be a strong pitching staff. “You’d love to have two more big power bats, but we don’t,” Zduriencik said. “We have what we have and we’re relying on guys to have bounce back years or some guys to grow into big league players and play the game the right way.”

B3

Briefly . . . April Fools’ basketball comes to PA

ational League will be kicking off its 2011 season next Thursday, April 7. Men ages 50 and older and women 45 and older are welcome to join. Games start at 9 a.m. PORT ANGELES — The every Tuesday and ThursCity of Port Angeles Recre- day at Carrie Blake Park, ation Division and Boys 202 N. Blake Ave. AAU will be hosting the All skill levels are welApril Fools’ Extravaganza come. basketball tournament this For more information, weekend. contact John Zervos at 360Games get under way at 681-2587. 11 a.m. Saturday at Port Angeles High School and Olympic wrestlers Vern Burton Community BATTLEGROUND — Center. Twenty-four boys teams Five of seven wrestlers brought home medals at a and three girls teams will Northwest Cadet and be playing in divisions Junior Regionals tournaranging from fifth grade to ment last weekend. high school. Brian Cristion was a Other cities represented double winner at 171 include Bellingham, Blaine, pounds, placing fourth in Bellevue, Bremerton, Fedfreestyle and second in his eral Way, Lake Stevens, Maple Valley, Poulsbo, Rain- first Greco-Roman tourney. Also competing for the ier, Silverdale, Tacoma, first time in Greco, Nathan Toledo, Yelm and Sequim. Cristion finished third at Games are open to the 189 pounds in the junior public. There is an admisdivision. sion fee. Cody Anderson (novice The Associated Press For more information, 75) and Andrew Symonds The Fiesta Bowl has fired its longtime CEO John contact Dan Estes at 360(junior 152) wrestled well Junker after a scathing internal report found 417-4557 or destes@cityofpa. to win gold medals. “an apparent scheme” to reimburse employees us. Brady Anderson brought for political contributions. home the silver in the Sequim softball schoolboy 98-pound compeOf the $4.8 million An investigation by forSEQUIM — The Sequim tition. charged to Junker’s Ameri- mer Arizona Attorney GenPeninsula Daily News Senior Softball Coed Recrecan Express card over the 10 eral Grant Woods, no relation years he was president and to the board chairman, led to CEO, investigators deemed the conclusion that there was less than half the expenses no credible evidence to sup“appropriate.” port the allegations. Now the board says that His place in the draft has Continued from B1 Excessive expenditures report was “flawed.” been debated since he Duane Woods said that Tuesday’s report said the last September, an employee Personnel from about a decided in December 2009 to bowl spent $33,188 for a — identified in the report as dozen NFL teams were look- return to school for his senior birthday bash for Junker in Junker’s executive assistant, ing on, including Seattle year, then struggled with Pebble Beach., Calif., and Kelly Keough — went to his coach Pete Carroll and gen- injuries and inconsistency $13,000 for the wedding and office and told him that eral manager John Sch- through a final year where honeymoon of Junker’s indeed the reimbursements neider, and Tennessee offen- Washington won its final assistant. sive coordinator Chris three games to become bowl had been made. Junker picked up a eligible and then upset The bowl began another Palmer. $1,200 tab at a Phoenix investigation led by a threeWhat they saw was a Nebraska in the Holiday strip club for himself and person panel headed by a well-structured series of Bowl. two others, including a sher- retired Locker was believed to be Arizona state throws on which Locker was iff’s lieutenant who worked Supreme Court justice. a possible No. 1 pick had he nearly perfect. for the Fiesta Bowl on the Most important, his foot- left Washington after his Most of their report censide. ters on the contribution work appeared sound and of junior season. Now, many Junker wrote on his scheme, in existence since at his 38 completions, only a wonder if he’ll even be picked American Express bill that least 2002, where top offi- few were off target to where in the first round. the meeting was for “secu- cials would strongly urge Locker’s receivers were Washington coach Steve rity site planning.” employees to make contribu- asked to make a difficult Sarkisian said he’d be surJunker took some or all tions to favored candidates, catch. And when the pass prised if Locker fell out of the of his family on 27 trips, the including Republican Sens. was slightly off, Goodwin first round because “he is report said. and tight end Dorson Boyce better than that.” John McCain and Jon Kyl. The Fiesta Bowl also Locker said he was Reimbursements were helped Locker look good in paid for his membership in listed as at least $46,539. front of the scouts by keep- invited by the league to four elite private golf clubs. Duane Woods has said ing the throw from hitting attend the draft in New The scandal began to the system violated state the ground. York, but instead will be at unravel when The Arizona campaign finance laws and It’s what scouts wanted to his home in Ferndale. Republic reported in Decem- endangers the bowl’s non- see after a shaky effort at It’s not out of concern ber 2009 that five former or profit status. the combine and backed the about possibly falling into current Fiesta Bowl employ“The lesson here really is work Locker has done with the second round, but more ees had been reimbursed for that we placed too much former NFL quarterback about Locker’s desire to be political donations they trust in a single individual,” Ken O’Brien to be quicker in around his family. “I appreciate the invite his release and not “drag” his were encouraged to make. Woods said. hand so much through his but for me I want to be with throw. The result was a the people that have been tighter spiral and more accu- with me my whole life and helped me get to this point rate pass. “I was able to improve on and I want to share that my combine performance experience for them,” Locker Hernandez is clearly the and be a little more consis- said. starring attraction for the Foster was hoping to FIRST-YEAR SKIPtent and fluid,” Locker said. Mariners, making it worth PER Eric Wedge may This wasn’t entirely a lower his 40-yard dash time showing up every five days not believe there’s a void showcase for Locker. Scouts after running a 4.75 at the to see what the righty can in the Seattle Mariners were also interested in line- NFL combine. do a year after winning his Foster ran a 4.67 on locker room, but we backer Mason Foster and first Cy Young award know better. safety Nate Williams. But Wednesday and showed well despite just a 13-12 record. The same gaping clearly Locker was the focus. in individual drills. The rest of Seattle’s rotaFoster has been considhole that brought down All eyes were on the quartion will be filled out by Seattle a year ago — terback when he took the ered a possible pick in the lefty Jason Vargas and namely, zero power bats field about 2½ hours after middle rounds of the draft. righty Doug Fister, a pair of “It was a little nerve— still remains. the event began. pitchers for whom 2011 will Signing Jack Cust be an opportunity to prove and bringing the ticking the promise they showed a time bomb that is Milyear ago wasn’t a one-year ton Bradley back into fluke. the fold will not solve Bedard’s comeback from that problem. Continued from B1 Port Angeles 5, shoulder surgery will be It’s also hard to Olympic 1 closely watched, but his believe Justin Smoak is Albright’s came on a free strong spring is giving SeatPORT ANGELES — The the answer either. kick in the 17th minute, tle hope he can finally be Roughriders might want to The sad thing: The while Pieper scored off a the pitcher they traded for Mariners are set in so show-stopping effort sec- start calling Wally Sigmar three years ago. Athletic Complex home. many other areas that onds into the second half. The fifth starter spot Port Angeles (0-0-1, 5-2-1) even a decent amount of “He beat two defenders will go to rookie Michael continued its torrid start to pop in middle of the and took a shot and put it Pineda, who is an intimiorder would at least over the keeper’s hands to the season with its fifth win dating presence on the allow them to contend in the far post,” Coate said. “It in six games, including the mound at 6-foot-7 and 260 the AL West. was a great individual effort.” second in three at the colpounds, and at 22 years old Felix Hernandez may Port Townsend, which lege’s new artificial turf field. gives Seattle dreams of a “This is definitely my best very well be the best in spent most of the first half Hernandez-Pineda top of starting record by far,” sevthe business, and on its heels, frantically tried the rotation in the near Michael Pineda has to find the back of the net in enth-year Port Angeles coach future. Chris Saari said. “We don’t potential. If Erik Bedard the final 20 minutes. Seattle’s bullpen will can stay healthy — yes, But sweeper Renns want to get too carried away need someone to fill in for that’s a big “if” — there Bresser and company kept because we’ve only played closer David Aardsma until will be few holes in Seatthe winless Redskins (0-5-1 one game that counts.” he returns from surgery. Kyle Bingham scored a tle’s rotation. overall) from getting many Seattle’s relief is much pair of goals and exchange Obviously, Ichiro is good opportunities in the like the rest of its team with student Kurbanjan Mamat pretty darn good at the final third of the field. a mix of vets like Jamey top of the order. It’s also The Cowboys’ goal- added two of his own and an Wright and Brandon hard to imagine Chone keeper only had to make assist as the offensive playLeague and newcomers like ers of the match, Figgins submitting the two saves all game. Tom Wilhelmsen and Josh Sam Beasley was given same stink bomb he did The match marked the Lueke. defensive player of the a year ago. first time the two teams It’s all part of a mix that match honors in the nonBut until managehad met in more than four Wedge believes is the first league victory. ment adds a couple of years on the pitch. step in. Port Angeles’ next match big bats to complement “I’m glad we got the “I think that mix is good isn’t until April 12 when it them, Seattle’s ceiling game because these kids all because what we’re trying travels to Bremerton. will stay where it has know each other and they to do here, what we’re trybeen since 2003. play together [during club Port Angeles 5, Olympic 1 ing to stand for, what to Translation: The best season],” Coate said. Olympic 1 0 — 1 expect of themselves, what I fans can hope for is Port Angeles 4 1 — 5 “It was a good rivalry.” expect every day for everyslightly above mediocre Scoring Summary First half: 1, Port Angeles, Mamat (Brandon), 1st body to get that we’re not (85 wins). The worst? I Chimacum 2, Port Townsend 0 minute; 2, Port Angeles, Brandon (Kurbanjan), 17th missing anything,” he said. think we all know what minute; 3, Port Angeles, Kurbanjan, 24th minute; 4, Chimacum 1 1 — 2 “We’re covering every Port Angeles, Bingham, 29th minute; 1, Olympic, Port Townsend 0 0 — 0 that looks like. Dreany (PK), 35th minute. Scoring Summary genre. There isn’t a void in Matt Schubert Second Half: 5, Port Angeles, Bingham (ElFirst half: 1, Chimacum, Albright, 17th minute. that locker room.” Second Half: 2, Chimacum, Pieper, 41st minutes. Maallam), 50th minute.

Mariners: Wedge all in Continued from B1

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Locker: Show

No power, no pennant

Preps: PA win


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 31, 2011

PAGE

B4

Business

Politics & Environment

Google introduces social tool, settles privacy charge By Claire Miller The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Google is trying social networking again, even as it pays a price for earlier privacy blunders. Google introduced its latest social tool on Wednesday, the same day it settled with the Federal Trade Commission over charges of deceptive privacy practices last year for Buzz, the social networking tool in Gmail. Under the settlement, Google agreed to start a privacy program, permit audits for 20 years and face $16,000 fines for any future privacy misrepresentations. This is the first time the FTC has charged a company with such violations and ordered it to start a privacy program, the commission said. The new social networking tool, called +1, lets people annotate Google search results and ads so they can recommend Web pages to friends and acquaintances. It is the biggest feature yet in Google’s long-awaited social networking toolkit. The introduction of +1 and the FTC charges highlight two of Google’s biggest challenges — heightened

T

competition from Facebook, he new social networking tool, called +1, and near-constant criticism from privacy advocates and lets people annotate Google search results policy makers over its pracand ads so they can recommend Web tices. pages to friends and acquaintances. The As it tries to make its services more social, the introduction of +1 and the FTC charges company has come under intense scrutiny from peo- highlight two of Google’s biggest challenges — ple concerned about its heightened competition from Facebook, and broad access to personal near-constant criticism from privacy advocates information. But at the same time, it and policy makers over its practices. is in the unusual position of racing to catch up with a duced Buzz, which let search results to publicly rival, as Facebook captures Gmail users share status recommend the pages. more of the time, informaPeople perusing results updates, photos and videos. tion and ad views of InterThe debut of Buzz in will see how many Google net users. February 2010 unleashed a users recommended a page barrage of criticism from and see names and photoFacebook searches users and privacy advocates graphs of people they know. Google is considering Of particular concern to because it automatically Google is the fact that many included users’ e-mail con- whether to use the recompeople now turn to Face- tacts in their social net- mendations to influence the order of search results. book with search queries, work. In the FTC charges like seeking the best place to go on vacation, because Web recommendations against Google, the commission said the company viothey trust the advice of Cutts repeatedly lated its own privacy policy friends more than that of an anonymous search engine. stressed that anything peo- when it used the informaWith +1, which began ple shared with +1 was pub- tion from users’ Gmail accounts for Buzz without rolling out to users Wednes- lic. “If you wouldn’t feel obtaining their permission. day, Google wants to percomfortable telling your The settlement prohibits sonalize search results. In an interview about friends and broadcasting Google from making any the new tool, Matt Cutts, a this to the world, then of similar privacy misrepreprincipal search engineer at course you don’t have to sentations, and requires Google, took great pains to click the +1 button,” he said. Google to ask for users’ conPeople logged into their sent before changing the emphasize that the company had learned from the Google accounts will be able way any Google products privacy outcry after it intro- to click a +1 button next to share personal information.

Obama calls for one-third cut in oil imports by 2025 By Julie Pace

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Wednesday called for a onethird reduction in U.S. oil imports by 2025, reviving a long-elusive goal of reducing America’s dependence on foreign supplies as political unrest rocks the Middle East and gasoline prices rise at home. Tackling an issue that has vexed nearly every U.S. president since Richard Nixon, Obama said the country can’t solve the problem with quick fixes and political gimmicks.

Little new But he offered little in the way of new initiatives, relying instead on a litany of energy proposals he has already called for, including boosting domestic oil production, increasing the use of biofuels and natural gas,

and making vehicles more energy efficient. Obama also embraced nuclear power as a critical part of America’s energy future, despite increased safety concerns following the earthquake and tsunami in Japan that severely damaged a nuclear power plant there.

Thorough safety review He vowed a thorough safety review of all U.S. plants, incorporating lessons learned from Japan, but said nuclear power still holds enormous potential for the U.S. “We can’t simply take it off the table,” Obama said during a nearly hour-long speech at Georgetown University. Moving the U.S. away from its dependence on foreign oil and toward clean energy technologies was a key part of the domestic

agenda Obama outlined in his January State of the Union address. That agenda has since been overshadowed by events around the world, from the uprisings in the Middle East and subsequent U.S. military intervention in Libya to the humanitarian and nuclear crisis in Japan. But with gas prices on the rise as the president readies his reelection bid, the White House wants to regain its footing on domestic issues before public anger over the spike in energy costs take hold.

Domestic drilling Gas prices have jumped more than 50 cents a gallon this year, reaching a national average of $3.58 a gallon last week, according to AAA’s daily survey. Republicans have placed the blame for the spike in

prices on Obama’s policies, arguing that the administration has been too slow in approving new permits for oil drilling and calling on the president to open up areas along the Atlantic Coast and near Alaska, where drilling its currently banned.

Striking back The president struck back at that criticism during his speech, noting that his administration has approved 39 shallow-water drilling permits since new standards were put in place last year following the Gulf oil spill, and seven new deep-water drilling permits in recent weeks. “So any claim that my administration is responsible for gas prices because we’ve shut down oil production might make for a useful political sound bite but doesn’t track with reality,” Obama said.

Very low radiation levels detected in sample of milk from Spokane FDA says findings to be expected The Associated Press

Iodine-131

OLYMPIA — A bill to set up a foreclosure mediation process for troubled Washington homeowners has cleared another hurdle in the state Legislature. The proposal, House Bill 1362, passed the state Senate in a 36-11 vote, and, if it becomes law, supporters said it would go a long way toward keeping state residents from losing their homes. Among those voting yes was Jim Hargrove, D-Holquiam, who represents the North Olympic Peninsula. The bill still needs to be reconciled with the version that passed the House and be signed by the governor to become law. If that happens, it would increase the number of housing counselors in Washington, set up third-party mediation and extend a requirement that lenders “meet and confer” with borrowers facing foreclosure. The measure would be funded through a $250 fee banks would have to pay every time they foreclose on someone.

Boutique opens PORT ANGELES — Jewell’s Boutique will open at 1607 E. Front St., Suite B, on Friday. The women’s clothing shop will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week. The business is owned by Joe Jewell and managed by Deanna Bower. For more information, phone Jewell’s at 360-4577000.

Base grows JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — The Army is moving the headquarters of the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade from Fort Wainwright, Alaska, to Joint Base LewisMcChord. The Army also said Wednesday that some units currently stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, will move to Lewis-McChord. The changes will add about 1,400 soldiers and 44 helicopters to the base near Tacoma, which currently is without a combat aviation brigade. The additions will raise the total number of JBLM service members to nearly 45,000 and the total number of copters to 143. Eight years ago, Fort Lewis had 19,000 activeduty soldiers.

Financing program

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

result of a change that will be published in the Federal Register by April 6. The change lifts an earlier expiration date for the refinancing. To be eligible, a business must have been in operation for at least two years, the debt to be refinanced must be for owneroccupied real estate and have been incurred no less than two years prior to the application date. The loan would have been used for business expenses, and payments would have to have been current for the past 12 months. The SBA will accept applications for the loans after April 6.

Candy prices up HERSHEY, Pa. — The Hershey Co. on Wednesday said it raised wholesale prices by 9.7 percent. The candy maker cited higher costs for raw materials, packaging, fuel, utilities and transportation as driving the price hike. Consumers may not see the impact on store shelves right away, A Hershey spokesman said many retailers will be able to buy products at the old prices for about eight weeks. The announcement comes weeks before one of the most popular candy consumption holidays — Easter — when Americans spend about $2 billion on candy.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.1752 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.2858 Cathode full plate, LME; $4.2660 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2665.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0507 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1425.50 Handy & Harman; $1423.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $37.345 Handy & Harman; $37.501 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1762.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract); $1771.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

WASHINGTON — Small business owners with eligible commercial real estate mortgages maturing after Dec. 31, 2012, can secure long-term financing through the U.S. Small Business Administration’s temporary 504 Peninsula Daily News refinancing program as a and The Associated Press

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Results from a March 25 milk sample showed levels of radioactive Iodine-131 that were still 5,000 times below levels of concern set by the FDA, including levels set for infants and children. “Radiation is all around us in our daily lives, and these findings are a miniscule amount compared to what people experience every day,” said Patricia

Foreclosure bill advances in Legislature

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SPOKANE — Very low levels of radiation turned up in a sample of milk from Spokane, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday, but federal officials assured consumers not to worry. The FDA said such findings were to be expected in the coming days because of the nuclear reactor crisis in Japan, and that the levels were expected to drop relatively quickly.

Hansen, senior scientist.at Japanese foods make up said it expected no risk to less than 4 percent of all the U.S. food supply from the FDA. “A person would be U.S. imports. The FDA has radiation. exposed to low levels of radiation on a round-trip cross-country flight, watching television, and even from construction materials.” EPA said it was increasing the level of nationwide monitoring of milk, precipiFriendly, talkative female, aged 22-24, willing to talk once or tation and drinking water.

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Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, March 31, 2011

Our Peninsula

SECTION

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CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

All music genres all across Peninsula ONCE AGAIN, WE’VE got some jazz, blues, rock ’n’ roll, punk, pop and country performed by solo acts, duos, trios and bands, including an 18-piece big band. So, put on your dancing shoes, and you’ll have a good time. And that’s no April Fools’ Day joke!

ness, 1965 Woodcock Road, the lovely Lili Crabbe will sing her way into your heart from 6 p.m. ■  On SatJohn to 9 p.m. urday at ■  On Friday at Club Seven Nelson Coogs BudLounge at 7 Cedars Casino, get CDs, 111 Blyn, local rock band MLR W. Front St., knows how to start a party, and legendary that’s no foolin’, from 9 p.m. to punk band 1 a.m. Sequim and Blyn D.O.A. returns On Saturday, 4 More plays all Port Angeles ■  No foolin’, Denny Secord at 7 p.m. with your favorite Top 40 dance tunes Jr. is a-pickin’ and a-grinnin’ Fri■  On Friday at the Junction Artimus day at the Oasis Bar and Grill, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Maximus, Sunday is the day to swing to 301 E. Washington St., with some Highway 101 and state Highway Koosbane the Stardust Big Band from classic rock and country from 112 five miles west of Port Angeand the final 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. les, Mister Sister (formerly Big performance of On Monday, we be jammin’ ■  Tuesday’s Irish Session is Fine Daddies) rock the Roadthe Fixt. $6 cover. with host Barry Burnett and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. house from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. These ■  On Friday, Chuck Grall, On Wednesday, the Blue Hole friends, so bring your ax and/or guys and a gal are always adding Les Wamboldt and Olde Tyme Quintet jazzes it up at 5:30 p.m. vocal talents for the fun from new tunes to their broad reperCountry perform at the Fair7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■  On Saturday at the toire. $5 cover. mount Restaurant, 1127 W. 3 Crabs Restaurant, 11 Three On Sunday, the Goodfellas U.S. Highway 101, from 6 p.m. to Port Hadlock Crabs Road, in Randy’s Place, have taken over the Junction 8:30 p.m. Denny Secord Jr., still Jam from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. ■  Ajax Cafe, 271 Water St., Victor Reventlow hosts the unplugged, performs from On Wednesday, banjo craftshas Buzz Rogowski playing acoustic jam, from 6 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. man Jason Mogi and bassist original jazz and a few old favor9 p.m. every Tuesday. Don’t be Paul Stehr-Green play from ■  Damiana’s Best Cellars, ites on the piano Friday at 6 p.m. left out! 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. 143 Washington St., features the On Saturday, Peter Evasick ■  Tonight and every Thursdynamic brother-sister act of ■  Tonight at Castaways and George Radebaugh will day, Larry and Rene Bauer Kevin Lee Magner and Mary Restaurant and Night Club, play Gypsy swing on the fiddle direct the goings-on at the open Magner from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 1213 Marine Drive, the Sunand accordion at 6 p.m. mic hosted by the Cracked ■  Every Wednesday at Mugs downers host a jam from 5 p.m. Bean, 108 DelGuzzi Drive, from ’n’ Jugs Bar and Grill, 735 W. to 8 p.m. You can’t help but have 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Port Townsend Washington St., Jimmy Hoffa fun time with these guys. ■  On Monday, Dave and ■  On Friday at the Upstage, man and friends perform On Friday, MLR (moderately Rosalie Secord perform at 923 Washington St., there’s no unplugged from 7 p.m. to midloud rock) will get you groovin’ Smuggler’s Landing, 115 Rail- night. Donations welcome. better way to greet April Fools’ from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. road Ave., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Day than with Quasimodo and ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. ■  On Saturday at Wine on ■  Every Tuesday evening at Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and the Bellringers at 8 p.m. They the Waterfront, 115 Railroad the Port Angeles Senior CenVictor Reventlow host the very have their own brand of musical Ave., award-winning Seattle ter, Seventh and Peabody foolishness. $10. popular and rousing open mic singer/songwriter Larry streets, the Port Angeles Senior On Saturday, blues and barWednesday from 6:30 p.m. to Murante teams up with local relhouse piano legend Ann Rabsinger/songwriter Michael RivSwingers present Wally and the 9:30 p.m. ers to perform on multiple ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar son performs at 8 p.m. $15 Boys playing ballroom dance instruments at 7 p.m. $5 cover. advance, $18 at the door. favorites for the dancing pleasure & Grill at Cedars at Dunge-

LIVE MUSIC

Things to Do Today and Friday, March 31 and April 1, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Women 45 and older and men 50 and older. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360683-0141 for information, time of day and location.

Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-417-7652. Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-457-8921.

Knit, crochet and spin — All ages and skill levels, Veela Cafe, Port Angeles Pre-3 Coop- 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. to 6 erative — For ages 10 months p.m. to 18 months. First Baptist Church, 105 W. Sixth St., 9 a.m. Volunteers in Medicine of to 11 a.m. Phone Amy Brilhart at the Olympics health clinic — 360-681-7883 or email 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 prethree@yahoo.com. p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health Guided walking tour — His- care. For appointment, phone toric downtown buildings, an old 360-457-4431. brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of ComTai chi class — Ginger and merce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., 6:30 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: p.m. $12 per class or $10 for $12 adults, $10 senior citizens three or more classes. No expeand students, $6 ages 6 to 12. rience necessary, wear loose Children younger than 6, free. comfortable clothing. Phone Reservations, phone 360-452- 360-808-5605. 2363, ext. 0. Bariatric surgery support Serenity House Dream group — Terrace Apartments, Center — For youth ages 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. 13-24, homeless or at risk for Phone 360-457-1456. homelessness. 535 E. First St. Drop in 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Get Celebrate Recovery — housing and planning help, plus Christ-based recovery group. basic needs: showers, laundry, Lighthouse Christian Center, hygiene products, etc. Meals 304 Viewcrest Ave., 7 p.m. to served daily. Volunteers and 8:30 p.m. Phone 360-452-8909. donors phone 360-477-8939 or 360-565-5048. “Lilly” — Readers Theatre Plus presents one-woman play Port Angeles Fine Arts about Lillian Carter by Richard Center — “Strait Art 2011” 1203 Broadhurst, starring Carol E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 Swarbrick Dries. Port Angeles p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m. Advance Mental illness family sup- tickets $15 or two for $25 availport group — For families and able at Odyssey Book Store, friends of people with mental 114 W. Front St., in Port Angedisorders. Peninsula Commu- les, and Pacific Mist Books, 121 nity Mental Health Center, 118 W. Washington St., in Sequim. E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. $15 at the door. Phone 360-681Phone Rebecca Brown, 360- 3862. Scholarship fundraiser for 457-0431. Sequim and Port Angeles high school students. First Step drop-in center — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 Bhutan presentation — p.m. Free clothing and equip- Dale Holiday gives PowerPoint ment closet, information and presentation of her work in referrals, play area, emergency Thimphu, Bhutan, titled, “Monks, supplies, access to phones, Trees and SUVs.” Port Angeles computers, fax and copier. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh Phone 360-457-8355. St., 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-7004. Museum at the Carnegie — Second and Lincoln streets, Friday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by donation $2 per person; $5 per Play and Learn Port Angefamily. Main exhibit, “Strong les — For children for ages 0-5 People: The Faces of Clallam to attend with parent, grandparCounty.” Lower level, changing ent or caregiver with individual exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. and group play, songs and story Elevator, ADA access parking in time. 9 a.m. to 11a.m. Phone rear. Tours available. Phone 360-452-5437 for location and 360-452-6779. information. Gastric bypass surgery support group — 114 E. Sixth St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Open to the public. Phone 360457-1456.

Serenity House Dream Center — For youth ages 13-24, homeless or at risk for homelessness. 535 E. First St., Drop in 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Get housing and planning help, plus Newborn parenting class basic needs: showers, laundry, — “You and Your New Baby,” hygiene products, etc. Meals third-floor sunroom, Olympic served daily. Volunteers and

of all adults 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free. ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Phone 360-385-2216 for reservations. ■  Tonight at the Castle Key, Seventh and Sheridan streets, Johnny Z and Sylvia Heins play jazz from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturday, the Johnny Z Trio performs from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. with more jazz. $8 cover. ■  Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., hosts Rose’s Pawn Shop with bluegrass, roots and alt-country, Friday at 9 p.m. $5. On Saturday, Tilted Stilts brings on the blues, country and psychedelic music at 9 p.m. $5. ■  Undertown, 211 Taylor St., entertains Friday with Brother Townsend at 8 p.m. On Saturday, take a little Jazz off the Beaten Path at 6 p.m., followed by a “throw down” with Better Half at 9 p.m. $5. ■  It’s no April Fools’ joke that ol’ Howly Slim is at the Banana Leaf Bistro, 609 Washington St., Friday from 6 p.m. ■  On Saturday, you’ll find Howly Slim at the Owl Spirit Cafe, 218 Polk St., at 6 p.m.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-5651139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula sequimyoga.com.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Strength and toning exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per class. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360477-2409 or email jhaupt6@ wavecable.com. Line dancing lessons — High-beginner, intermediate and advanced dancers. Sequim Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Drop-ins welcome. $3 per class. Phone 360681-2826.

ing reception, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Free. Phone 360-683-8110. Group Discussion — “The Political Power of Social Media.” Sequim Great Decisions Discussion Group, Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. Topics taken from Foreign Policy Association’s Great Decisions and articles in Foreign Affairs magazine. For more information, visit the Sequim Great Discussion Group at w w w. f p a . o r g / i n fo - u r l _ nocat4728/. Phone 360-6839622, email jcpollock@olypen. com. New members are welcome.

Sequim Senior Softball — Co-ed recreational league. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for Sequim Duplicate Bridge practice and pick-up games. — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Phone John Zervos at 360-681- Ave., noon Phone 360-6812587. 4308, or partnership 360-6835635. donors phone 360-477-8939 or ing essentials like clothes, food, Sequim Museum & Arts Narcotics and Alcoholics Anon- Center — 175 W. Cedar St., 10 360-565-5048. French class — 2 p.m. For ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. Phone 360- more information, phone 360Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. First Friday Coffee — Lin683-8110. 681-0226. coln Center, 905 W. Ninth St., 10 Mental health drop-in cenParent connections — First a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360-417NOLS Art in the Library ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10 After-hours Reception — 6344. E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Walk-in vision clinic — For those with mental disorders 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Reception Spanish class — Prairie Ave., Information for visually impaired and looking for a place to socialfor photographer Robert Reed. and blind people, including ize, something to do or a hot Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Live music by Chez Jazz. Free. accessible technology display, meal. For more information, Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681-0226. Phone 360-683-1161 or visit library, Braille training and vari- phone Rebecca Brown at 360Chess Club — Dungeness www.nols.org. ous magnification aids. Vision 457-0431. Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Loss Center, Armory Square First Friday Art Walk — Senior meal — Nutrition pro- Sequim Ave., 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 Self-guided tour of downtown Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. Phone for an appointment 360- gram, Port Angeles Senior Cen- p.m. Bring clocks, sets and art galleries and additional venAll are welcome. Phone 457-1383 or visit www.vision ter, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 boards. ues. Performances and events p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per 360-681-8481. lossservices.org/vision. as scheduled. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. meal. Reservations recomVisit www.sequimartwalk.com Health clinic — Free mediInsurance assistance — mended. Phone 360-457-8921. cal services for uninsured or for a tour map. Phone Renee Brock-Richmond 360-460-3023. Statewide benefits advisers help Peggers Cribbage Club under-insured, Dungeness Valwith health insurance and Medi- — PA Eagles Club, 110 S. Penn St. ley Health & Wellness Clinic, care. Port Angeles Senior Cen- Check-in, 5:30 p.m. Games, 6 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 Port Townsend and ter, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to p.m. New members welcome. p.m.. Phone 360-582-0218. 11 a.m. Phone Marge Stewart at For more information, email Jefferson County 360-452-3221, ext. 3425. Meditation class — 92 Plain papeggers@hughes.net, phone 360-808-7129 or visit www. Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admission by Today Port Angeles Fine Arts papeggers.com. donation. Yoga classes — Room to Center — “Strait Art 2011” 1203 Move Yoga, Second floor, 1008 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 Gamblers Anonymous — Lawrence St. For more details or Friendship Dinner — First p.m. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. United Methodist Church, Sev- Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce questions, visit www.roomto enth and Laurel streets. Doors Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360- moveyoga.com or phone 360Guided walking tour — His- open, 3 p.m. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. 460-9662. 385-2864. toric downtown buildings, an old Free. Phone 360-457-8971. Food Addicts in Recovery brothel and “Underground Port Port Townsend Aero Angeles.” Chamber of ComBingo — Masonic Lodge, Anonymous — Calvary Cha- Museum — Jefferson County merce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Doors pel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. International Airport, 195 Air10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: open at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and Phone 360-452-1050 or visit port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $12 adults, $10 senior citizens pull tabs available. Phone 360- www.foodaddicts.org. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. 457-7377. for seniors, $6 for children ages Friday Children younger than 6, free. 7-12. Free for children younger Enter Stage Left series — Reservations, phone 360-452than 6. Features vintage airVinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain “Four Women” by Rebecca Red2363, ext. 0. craft and aviation art. shaw. Actress Marianne Trow- Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www.sequim bridge recreates stories of four Bingo — Port Angeles Chimacum TOPS 1393 — yoga.com. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh women, each of whom holds a Evergreen Coho Resort Club St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone piece of the puzzle to a woman’s Walk aerobics — First Bap- House, 2481 Anderson Lake struggle for truth in life. Port 360-457-7004. Chimacum, 9 a.m. VisiAngeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 tist Church of Sequim, 1323 Road, Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 a.m. tors welcome. Phone: 360-765E. Lauridsen Blvd., 8 p.m. $5 Museum at the Carnegie suggested donation. 3164. Free. Phone 360-683-2114. — Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission by East Jefferson County Circuit training exercise donation $2 per person; $5 per Sequim and the class — Sequim Community Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. family. Main exhibit, “Strong 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Dungeness Valley Church, People: The Faces of Clallam a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to County.” Lower level, changing Today Phone Shelley Haupt at 360- noon. Open to men 50 and exhibits, Books-Plus Shopping. 477-2409 or email jhaupt6@ older and women 45 and older. Elevator, ADA access parking in Phone 360-437-5053 or 360Soroptimist International wavecable.com. rear. Tours available. Phone of Sequim call for artists — 437-2672 or 360-379-5443. 360-452-6779. For artwork to display during Line dancing lessons — 14th annual Gala Garden Show Beginning dancers. Sequim Tax-Aide — Free assisIntroduction to line dance on March 18 and 19, 2012. Sub- Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams tance with tax preparation profor beginners — Port Angeles mit flower and/or garden themed Road, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. $3 per vided by trained volunteers. Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh works by March 31. Visit www. class. Phone 360-681-2826. Bring any and all necessary St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 mem- sequimgardenshow.com for an documentation. Tri-Area Combers, $3 nonmembers. Phone artist agreement and contract Sequim Museum & Arts munity Center, 10 West Valley 360-457-7004. information. Center — “The Art of Sustain- Road, Chimacum. By appointability: Considerate Creativity ment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone The Answer for Youth — Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Taking Personal Responsibility 360-732-4822. Drop-in outreach center for Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone for the Future,” 175 W. Cedar St. youth and young adults, provid- 206-321-1718 or visit www. Exhibit 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. OpenTurn to Things/C10


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Pine Hill’s pioneering gas station Business area boomed in PA neighborhood SEVERAL READERS RECOGNIZED the Feb. 24 “Picture from the Past” as Pine Hill Service Station, which was on the corner of Eighth and Pine streets in Port Angeles. The additional photo is a view taken farther north. It shows the name of the service station along with the gas pumps and office. Both photos were taken between 1926 and 1929. [Rex Gerberding shared these photos from his collection for the column. Rex was able to locate the Pine Hill Station in a 1936 phone book he possesses.] Pine Hill Service station was built in the early 1920s on the south side of Eighth Street. The sign in the one photo indicates 336 as the business’ telephone number. The 1925 Port Angeles phone directory lists George and Albert Lamoureux as owners. In 1932, the service station’s name was changed to Lamoureux Service No. 1. By 1935, it had returned to the Pine Hill Service name, but was listed under a different phone number. Bertha Norris says her brother-in-law, Basil Decker, is the man on the right of the larger photo. He worked as a mechanic for the Lamoureuxs. From the Port Angeles city/ county directory, it appears that the Lamoureuxs had the service station until 1952. M.A. Hunley then owned it until 1956, when Dick’s Auto became the listed owner. By 1959, Paul Markley had established a repair shop, M&M Auto, in addition to Pine Hill Service. In 1962, Pine Hill Service was closed and M&M Auto became the sole business at the location. In 1963, George Mangano built a new building for Markley, who then opened a motorcycle shop called Markley’s HarleyDavidson. By 1965, Mangano had purchased Markley’s shop, and opened his own business, and named it, PA Cycle Hub”.

Rex Gerberdine

collection

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Pine Hill Service was a landmark back when Eighth Street in Port Angeles was part of Secondary State Highway 9A in the 1920s. Basil Decker, a mechanic, is at right in the photo above and left in the below photo, which was last month’s “Picture from the Past.”

BACK WHEN Street. Irene’s Alexander brother, Jack Estes, said Bailey’s grocery was a big competitor for his dad. He also said his grandfather was the butcher for the store. According to Doug Bailey, his dad, Roland, built another store as well as a gas station in 1935, farther down the block to the west. The address of the gas station was 514 W. Eighth St. Later on it was sold and had several different owners. The store, Doug said, was named Bailey’s Grocery Store and Meat Market and was located at 518 W. Eighth St. They did not actually have a meat market, Doug said, but rather a cold chest to keep meat for their customers.

Alice

Small business district

Stan Fouts recalls the Pine Hill Service station and the two grocery stores down the block. Next door to the service staHe had a newspaper route in tion was a grocery store at 508 W. the mid-1950s and picked up his Eighth Street, which land newspapers at Estes Red and records show was built in 1923. It was one of the first businesses White Grocery. There was a church at Eighth built on the south side of Eighth and Pine streets, across Pine Street between Pine and Cedar. Street from Pine Hill Service staThat grocery store was Pine tion. By 1956, Bailey’s old service Hill Cash Market and owned by station had been re-named Bill & R. D. Bailey. Later, he changed Ben’s Auto Repair. the name to Bailey’s Red and There were apartments White Grocery. located along the north side of Beverly Wayne Estes bought Eighth Street, Stan recalled. the in 1935 and changed the He also remembered coming name to Estes Red and White’ down Pine Hill during winter Grocery. months when it was slick, and Daughter Irene Estes Bourm said that when she was born, her sliding down the alley to Eighth. During the 1950s, Stan said, family lived in the back of the there was a small garage in back store, but by 1942 they had of the Pine Hill Service station moved into a house on 10th

Grocery store

where the owner refurbished old cars. “He took old rusty autos and turned them into gold,” Stan said. Mike Owens, a Port Angeles resident who grew up in the Hoko-Ozette area, remembers his family going past the Pine Hill Station in the 1960s, on their way into town. The route they traveled was on state Highway 9A (now state Highway 112), then down C Street and on into town via Eighth Street. Dan Mangano said he has fond memories of the Pine Hill corner, but does not remember the service station. By the time he was a child, his dad, George’s, ‘\PA Cycle Hub was an active business at the corner of Pine and Eighth. David Hassell remembers going past the motorcycle shop on his way to Elks Memorial Playfield for Little League practice.

In later years Since the demise of Pine Hill Service, there have been several businesses at that location. DJ Cycle was at 502½ W.

Eighth St. (the part of the building across the back of the lot) in 1969-1970. The site sat vacant for a year until Gary’s Plumbing moved there. In 1978, Gary moved to “The Barn” on U.S. Highway 101. M&P Doors now occupies that space. Over the years, M&P Doors shared the address with at least two barbershops — Wayne’s was there until Paul’s Barber Shop came in 1995. The front section of that building housed several businesses after P.A. Cycle Hub left — including Tevco Electronics, Oroweat, PA Sign Shop, Hi Tech Electronics, Pacific Television and the present tenant, Olympic Community Action Programs.

Setting It Straight CLARIFICATION FROM LAST month’s column about Art Anderson’s Flying A Service Station in Forks: Mary and Jim Springer bought Hungry Harry’s Restaurant from Harry Leffler in the 1990s. They had the Raindrop Café for several years until the Golden Gate opened. Harry Leffler purchased Anderson’s original property from Warren Paul. Alice Alexander

Down the block By 1964, the block had gone through many changes. Olson bought Estes Red and White Grocery and relocated to a new grocery store farther east down Eighth Street. After their new grocery opened, Olson sold the old building to Daugaard’s Plumbing, which stayed until the late 1990s.

The building is presently empty. Over the years, Bailey’s old service station at 514 W. Eighth eventually became Watts’ Chevron, Hutch’s Chevron, Bob’s Beetle Service, D&S Transmissions and a car stereo business. Then it was vacant for a year or so, and is presently a beauty salon, Family Hair Care, operated by Sandy Howe. When Roland Bailey died of a stroke in 1953, his son, Doug, continued to operate the grocery until 1960, when his brother took over. The Baileys sold to Frank’s Shoe Repair in 1967-1968. Frank’s Shoe Repair was originally at 507 W. Eighth, across from the Moose Hall. Frank died in 1980, but the shoe repair continued to operate for several years. When it closed, there were several small businesses at that location, and an espresso stand, High Voltage, now occupies the site.

__________

Picture

from the

Past

This building was a school when this photo was taken, and it’s still a prominent building today. What is it, where is it and what memories do you have of both its incarnations? Back When columnist Alice Alexander will build her April 28 column around your recollections. Email them by April 8 to Alice at cdalex@olypen.com or mail them to Alice Alexander, c/o PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

Alice Alexander is a Clallam County historian, author, descendent of an Elwha Valley pioneer family and member of the Clallam County Heritage Advisory Board. She can be reached at cdalex@olypen.com. Her latest book, Memories of Elwha Resort, was released last fall. Alice’s history column, Back When, appears on the final Thursday of every month. The next installment, based on today’s “Picture from the Past” on this page, will appear April 28. Alice acknowledges: “Much of the research material for this column came from the Clallam County Geneology’s collection of Port Angeles directories and phone books.”


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, March 31, 2011

C3

Few Medicare Advantage Plans left THIS IS WEEK No. 3 of describing the Medicare Machine. It is also March 31. Today, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., a few of us will be lurking about Life Care Center of Port Townsend (formerly Kah Tai) to talk about whatever you want to talk about and eat cookies. Tomorrow is April 1, which is April Fools’ Day. (Symbolism is where you find it.) OK, the Medicare Machine: I am not going to regurgitate the past two weeks’ columns because that would place all of us squarely into the Department of Redundancy Department, so if you’re just walking into the middle of this, good luck. Remember the part about how you could delay enrolling in Part B because you were still employed? Well, if you retire, become unemployed or, for whatever reason, lose your employment-related health insurance, you will have an 8-month “Special Enrollment Period” (SEP) to get into Part B, which starts the month after your other insurance ends, and the effective date of your Part B coverage will be the first day of the month following enrollment. If you have prescription drug coverage through employment (or whoever/wherever) and it goes away, you will have a 63-day SEP to get into a Part D plan without

ous permutations of Advantage Plans, like “preferred provider organizations” and “private-feeincurring the Mark for-service” plans and others. dreaded PenHistorically, some folks have Harvey alty. really liked them because they Now, you tend to be cheap and sometimes may or may not offer benefits that “original” recall that, last Medicare doesn’t offer, like some week, I vaulted vision, hearing and/or preventive over Part C, stuff. which most of The downside has been that us refer to — not all health care providers affectionately have accepted all Advantage or ruefully — Plans, so it was always a crapas “Advantage shoot about who accepted what Plans.” Here’s this year and, sometimes, there the deal: were some other funny little Basically, there are two ways things like “facility charges” or to get Medicare: One, “original” whatnot. The litany was: Read Medicare, which means everythe contract. thing that we’ve been immersed Last year (which means this in for the last three weeks, or year, 2011), a lot of Advantage two, through a Medicare AdvanPlans went away. There are sevtage Plan. eral reasons for this, some or all Advantage Plans are Mediof which are “wonderful” or the care’s version of “managed care,” “end of the world,” depending so the classic example would be upon your socio-political views of am HMO (“health maintenance the good ole U.S. of A, and none organization”). Most HMOs in of which matter if you’re just trythe world are places you go to ing to understand the Medicare and receive virtually all of your Machine because “gone” is . . . health care — same place, same gone. folks, same billing procedures, all There are a few Advantage your records in one place, same Plans around. If you become coffee, same magazines, etc. Medicare-eligible this year and Many people who use HMOs love want to learn more, visit www. them. medicare.gov and read it slowly We do not have any HMOs on and carefully or phone any of the the Peninsula, so there are varinumbers at the end of the col-

HELP LINE

PORT ANGELES — A special “Pizza, Pop and Power Tools” event is designed to show middle school-age girls that power tools and the construction industry are no longer just the domain of men. The event will be held at the Lincoln Center Technology Building, 905 W. Ninth St., from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16. Peninsula College is hosting the event for seventh- and eighth-grade girls in order to introduce the young women to the construction trades and show them how they, too, can train for this growing career field after high school. The first 20 who register for the event will spend the day learning about the construction trades, participating in games related to the day’s theme, making a project to take home and will receive a gift bag and meet women who have been successful in the construction field. A pizza and pop lunch will be provided. All registered participants must have parental permission to attend. The event will be monitored

by college staff and volunteers from community businesses and organizations. For more information on how to register, phone Anne Grasteit at 360-681-5127 or email agrasteit@pencol.edu.

Spinal cord group PORT ANGELES — A support group is forming on the North Olympic Peninsula for those dealing with spinal cord injuries including caregivers, family and friends. The group was founded by Port Angeles resident Joseph Preti. “I find myself struggling with living life as a paraplegic and feel strongly that it would help me, as well as others, to start this support group,” Preti said. For more information, phone Preti at 360-452-9970.

Tunnel Vision run PORT TOWNSEND — The Friends of Fort Worden will hold a Tunnel Vision 5K Fun Run/ Walk at Fort Worden State Park on Saturday, April 16. The walk will begin at 10 a.m. near the park’s upper campground. Runners will follow roads and trails through historic gun batteries and a 160-foot tunnel. Registration is $10 before Monday, April 11, or $15 between

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Rotary auction’s focus homeless

Briefly . . . ‘Pizza, Pop and Power Tools’ event slated

stand that it will go best if you take your time, pay attention and think of it as your “job,” not just a quick little “something” that you’ll get done between batches of cookies . . . . . . because you won’t. I know what you’re thinking: “There has got to be a way to beat this game!” You’re right, there is: Use it as little as possible, which means use “health care” as little as possible, which means stay as healthy as possible. And you don’t need me to tell you how to do that; besides, I probably wouldn’t listen to you on that subject, either. Take the politics and the emotion out of all this and remember that, if you’re old enough to care about this stuff, then you’ve been smart enough for 60-plus years to survive in America, so you can do it. You just don’t want to. I don’t blame you; neither do I. So, I’m going to have a bumper sticker made: “Medicare happens.”

umn and ask for help, where decent people will help you for free. In as few words and as few weeks as possible, that’s what the Medicare Machine looks like, so reassure yourself about your attention span and reward yourself with a cookie (or some celery, depending upon your sociopolitical views) and breathe, but beware of lulling yourself into a false sense of security or knowledge, and here’s why: Once you enter The Machine, you’ll begin to encounter unanticipated (though, often, good) variations on themes, like the “Low Income Subsidy,” which can help pay for Part D-related stuff, or the “Medicare Savings Programs,” which help pay for Part B-related stuff, and on and on and . . . on. Medicare does not pay for long-term care long term. It will pay for up to 100 days in a “skilled nursing facility” (read, “nursing home”) if you need it and if you meet certain eligibility requirements. It doesn’t usually pay for things like hearing aids or dental care or foot care — note the use of the term “usually.” See? This isn’t easy stuff, but don’t panic: Most of us seem to be able to figure out most of this most of the time and usually with help — help is allowed — so, you can do this, but under-

Tuesday, April 12, and Saturday, April 16. Proceeds will benefit the Friends of Fort Worden. For more information, visit www.fwfriends.org, phone Roy Oesterhaus at 360-698-4724 or email royruns@gmail.com.

“Rotary Rumba,” a signature cocktail uniquely crafted for this event. “Please come and support us in our efforts to help those less fortunate in our community,” said Dave Stanko, president of Port Townsend Rotary. “Even if you can’t attend in person, your dollar or auction-item donation will go a long way toward helping us achieve our goal.”

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Helping homeless families in Jefferson County will be the focus of Port Housing forum set Townsend Rotary’s annual charitaPORT TOWNSEND — A free ble fundraising auction this year. The “Caribbean Carnival”public forum, “Raising the Roof on Affordable Housing for Work- themed event will be held at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 ing People in East Jefferson County,” will be held at Quimper Water St., on Saturday, April 30. The gala is targeted to raise at Unitarian Universalist Fellowleast $20,000 in support of the ship, 2333 San Juan Ave., from American Legion’s Emergency Auction items 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Winter Shelter and the homeless April 7. A selection of auction items families REACH program, adminAffordable housing expert includes a vintage Yamaha acoustic istered by Olympic Community Paul Purcell of Beacon Developguitar, a slumber party for five girlAction Programs. ment Group will be on hand as friends, an all-inclusive Canadian well as panelists Judy Surber of vacation, two round-trip holidays All-Caribbean menu the city of Port Townsend Planby Victoria Clipper to Victoria, a ning Department, David Rymph An all-Caribbean menu, created cooking class for eight and dozens of Homeward Bound, Al Scalf of by popular local chef Arran Stark, more. the Jefferson County Departwill feature such items as coconut A dessert auction will be held as ment of Community Developshrimp; smoked Cape Cleare well. ment, Jaime Maciejewski of Hab- salmon salad; Caribbean fruit salsa A $10-per-ticket raffle will be itat for Humanity, Pam Tietz of served with fried plantain, yucca held for any seven-day cruise for Peninsula Housing Authority and and sweet jam; jerk-spiced chicken; coconut-curried codfish; red beans two on Holland America Line to a Port Townsend City Council and rice; and lime-dressed sweet variety of destinations in the Caribmember Kris Nelson. bean, Mexico or Canada and New potato. The forum will be facilitated A reception hosted by Port England. by Port Townsend Leader pubFor ticket details or more inforTownsend Rotary with spirits, fine lisher Scott Wilson. The forum is sponsored by the wines and beer and accompanied mation, phone Carla Caldwell at by live Caribbean music will pre- 360-301-5636. fellowship’s Adult Learning ProTo donate, phone Jim Marshall cede the dinner. gram & Social Justice Council Guests may also purchase the at 360-385-3877. Peninsula Daily News

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

GET READY TO ROLL

BY KEVIN G. DER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Ornate 5 Spreads 12 Old pol. entity 15 Like some skiing 16 Dark patch on a distant sun 17 Niña accompanier 18 Roams 19 Century in Amer. politics 20 Pony 21 Yenta’s habit 23 River to the North Sea 24 Bally enthusiasts 26 Off-white pottery 28 Sharp-tongued 29 Land in a stream 31 Thin as ___ 32 Temper 34 Galumph 36 They may get people talking 38 Jazz style 42 General Assembly figure, for short 43 Mine, to Marie 45 Sun Devils’ sch. 46 Underlying 47 Dutch brews 50 Ticket presenter 51 Shred 53 Period of the Cenozoic Era 55 Meditate (on) 58 Like much of New Orleans’s French Quarter 60 Beaver’s home 61 Shankar piece 62 ___ acid 63 Hoedown seating 64 Pooh’s pal 66 What you used to be? 68 Bickering 72 “I like your thinking” 76 “Cat ___,” 1965 film 77 Red-haired film princess

79 Olds sedan 80 Shot source 82 Exchange fig. 83 Citrusy cocktail mixer 86 Focus of a class action? 88 Novelist Hoag 89 Cancún, e.g. 92 Flap 94 Drink with tempura, maybe 97 “Howards End” role 98 Centipede maker 101 Singular 102 Balancing acts? 103 Kaplan course, briefly 105 Waited longer than 107 Drillmaster’s call 108 Called 110 Rhodes of the Rhodes scholarships 114 M.P.G. watcher 115 “make.believe” sloganeer 116 ___ guisada, Tex-Mex stew 117 Kind of gun 119 Continue 123 Twin Cities sch. 124 Waikiki wear 126 Yellow pool items 128 That, in Toledo 129 Sophocles title hero 131 Station line 134 ___ del Carmen, Mexico 135 Told stories 136 Norwegian king called “the 77-Down” 139 Clear 140 Station identification 143 Tie up 144 Pixar robot with a female voice 145 London daily 146 Rot 147 Letter in 145-Across 148 Cheat 149 Cheers

DOW N 1 Luggage 2 Asian capital name starter 3 P.R. people 4 ___ no 5 Some N.F.L.’ers 6 Runaway 7 Make ready for a winter storm, as a highway 8 Ed heard in “Up” 9 Bit of free time 10 Onesie wearer 11 Enter 12 Game piece 13 “Go” square in Monopoly, e.g. 14 Cinderella’s wear, at home 16 Darling 22 Hawaiian pizza topping 25 Minstrel songs 27 Month before juin 29 Swift’s “A Tale of ___” 30 Soap opera creator Phillips 33 “___ Mio” 35 Ambulance, slangily 37 One in a maze 39 Schemed together 40 For ___ (cheaply) 41 Alexander, to Aristotle 44 Sardegna, e.g. 47 Asia’s ___ Sea 48 What writer’s block may block 49 5-4 ruling, e.g. 52 Assembly area 54 Spanish food brand 55 Old PC part 56 O.K., in Osaka 57 Ones with the Christmas spirit? 59 Mariner of note 63 Steel or bronze 65 Card catalog abbr. 67 Tracker’s aid 69 Child-sized mitt

70 Promise to pay 71 Large cask 73 The Crimson Tide, for short 74 Bass lover? 75 Irish Rose’s beau 77 See 136-Across 78 “___ had it!” 81 Nine 84 Skater Midori 85 Exsiccates 87 Campsite sight 90 Slowing, in mus. 91 French possessive 93 Highlands daggers 95 Water color 96 “Survivor” homes 98 More than pale 99 Hosiery color 100 How some shares are sold 101 Suited to a person’s strengths 104 Edible mushroom 106 Charge 109 Fork 111 Said “No fair!” 112 They have rates and ratings 113 Jay who jests 118 Tongue-lash 120 Engage in a 1920s fad 121 One way to turn 122 Cornhusker St. 125 Draws out 127 Clowns’ toys 129 Still in the game 130 Spent 132 Merry-go-round music 133 Sly type? 134 W. or Bam 137 Actress Skye 138 Nettles 141 Sound at a spa 142 Neth. neighbor

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C4

Classified

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

25

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

Wild Rose Adult Care Home has a private room available. Best care at best rate. 683-9194

23

Personals

Friendly, talkative female, aged 22-24, willing to talk once or twice a month to an incredible male currently incarcerated at Clallam Bay Correctional Center. No long term or short term relationship-just friendly talk. Must have an available vehicle, gas expenses reimbursed. Earn $40 a visit, visit times are: Fri., Sat., Sun., Mon., 10:15-5:30. Email: csantor16@gmail.com if you are interested. Yes, I am his mother!

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat, young male tabby, loveable and sweet, found at Lost Mountain Area, Sequim. 683-1508. FOUND: Cat. Young male, orange tabby, happy and friendly, not neutered, 4 white boots, Gales Addition, P.A. 808-4355. FOUND: Prescription eye glasses, on log at Ediz Hook, P.A. 477-8378 FOUND: Prescription sunglasses, Sequim Safeway parking lot. 683-3453 Lost: Cell phone. While riding my bike between Diamond Point and the bridge at the end of Gardiner Rd. 360-681-3332 LOST: Dog. Large blonde shaggy Shepherd with tall stand up ears, last seen in S. Pine area, P.A. REWARD if found. 425-876-1958 LOST: iPod Touch, blue case, locked, head phones may be attached, last had at Lincoln Park, P.A. 360-640-8289 LOST: Keys. GMC keys with remote attached, between P.A. and Sequim. $10 reward. 461-2324.

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Help Wanted

CAREER OPPORTUNITY SALES Immediate sales position is open at Wilder Toyota. If you are looking for a positive career change, like working with people and are income motivated, this could be for you. Whether you have sold cars or not, we have an extensive training program for your success. Joining the Wilder Team has great benefits: 401(k), medical and dental insurance, vacations and a great work schedule. Guaranteed income while you learn. Call Rick or Don for an appt. 457-8511.

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. ASSOCIATE DENTIST Sequim office, Mon., Wed., Fri., 8-5 p.m. Resume to: splendent@hotmail.co m AUTO DETAILER Call Arlin at Wilder Toyota 360-452-3888 Cafe-Bakery Opening Baker. Organized, dependable, FT, training avail. OBC802 E. 1st St., P.A.

LIVE UNITED United Way of Clallam County Resource Development Manager, 25 hours wk. $17.50 hour. Medical plan. Oversees annual fundraising campaign. Experience in non-profit sector and planned giving preferred. Must have driver’s license and vehicle. See www.unitedwayclallam.org for position description. Submit letter of interest and resume to PO Box 937, Port Angeles WA 98362 by 4/11/11. EOE. Medical Assistant Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest (PPGNW) seeks Medical Assistant candidates for our Port Angeles/Forks/ Sequim Health Centers. Join our medical team to provide outstanding reproductive healthcare and family planning services; assist licensed staff; phlebotomy, injections, labs, vitals, room patients; provide information about PPGNW services. Bi-lingual Spanish skills & women’s h/c exp preferred. MA certificate/ HCAe license required. EOE Please apply at: www.ppgnw.org/job s NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com Correctional Officer @ Clallam Bay and Olympic Corrections Centers. Non-Permanent On-Call. Pay starts at $16.61 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 4/17/11. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.gov For further information, please call Jennifer White at 360963-3207. EOE. Port Townsend Goodwill Hiring Retail Keyholder Must have 6 mo. supervisor exp. Apply in person at 602 Howard St. Pt. Townsend, WA 98368 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

Come be a part of the 7 Cedars Experience! Excellent Benefits HR Generalist/ Benefit Specialist Job details are posted at www.7cedarsresort .com Email questions to awilliams@7cedarsr esort.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

Native American preference for qualified candidates. Drug test required.

SALES: Part timesalary, part time commission, real estate experience required. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#205/Sales Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Tech Support Position. Must have basic computer skills, great phone skills,and data entry experience. Full time position, must be available 8:00 a.m.-7:30 p.m Monday through Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Please send resumes to support@olypen.com

31

34

Help Wanted

TECH: Min. 10 yrs. Eurocar exp., must be honest, professional, have own tools. Clean, nonsmoking shop. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#206/Tech Pt Angeles, WA 98362

34

Work Wanted

AARON’S GARDEN Pruning, planting, roses, trees, weeds, weed whacking, fence lines. 360-808-7276

DENTAL ASSISTANT Sequim office, work Mon., Wed., Fri., Sat. Resume to: splendent@hotmail.co m Head housekeepers, maintenance, housekeepers. Apply at 1807 Water St., P.T. HELP WANTED Experienced servers only. Apply in person at The Mariner Cafe. No phone calls!

MOWING. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142 YARD WORK WANTED: Spring mowing, pruning, overseed, fertilizer, lime, moss killer, weed, and barking. Reasonable rates. 360-797-3023 Your first step to a beautiful lawn! Mowing, trimming, mulch, and more. Reasonable rates, great service! Call for free estimates. Ground Control Lawn Care 360-797-5782

Cleaning, handy man, yard work, errands. 681-4502 CUSTOM CAR DETAILING Pricing varies with vehicle size and detailing options. Rates start at $125. Call for appointment 477-2010 Handyman service. JTL Handyman services. All types of home and appliance repair and installations, Landscaping and lawn care available. No job too small, affordable prices, free estimates. Licensed, bonded, & insured contractor #JTLHAHS906Q3. Phone: 360-797-1512 E-mail: jml4455@msn.com HANDYWOMAN Cleaning, Cooking, Care-giver, Yardwork, Shopping, Errands, Pet sitting, and misc. Discount for seniors, vets, disabled. Debb 360775-6775, 503-9319623.

I Sew 4U. Hemming, alterations, curtains, any sewing project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officeli ve.com I'm Sew Happy! LAWN MOWING References. 452-7743 Lawn mowing, reasonable, references. 452-3076 Mark. Lawn Mowing/Maintenance by Robinsnest Landscape. We are ready to maintain your lawn for the mowing season! Also have brush-hog for field mowing. Reasonable rates. 360-477-1282 Professional Computer Repair HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us at 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek.c om Professional Home & Office Cleaning Quality, Honest and hardworking, we provide all equipment. Flexible scheduling, references available. Free estimate. Call 360452-3202. Email: judy@minnoch.com Young Couple, early 60’s. available for misc gardening services, as well as hauling, gutter and deck cleaning, moss removal, seasonal cleanup, weeding, general maintenance and repair. Hard working and reliable with excellent references. 457-1213.

7 Cedars Resort Commercial Account Executive Excellent customer service, verbal, written & computer skills a must. Insurance license is a plus. See callisinsurance.com for details.

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst. Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11. Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim. AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare (compare at www.medicare.gov)

135114495

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Looking for a lady height/weight proportionate, nonsmoker, sense of humor, likes the outdoors, animals and home life, who’s affectionate and caring for he right man that comes into her life. This is for a white male, 60, 6’, height/ weight proportionate that is still looking for that partner, best friend and lover to share his life with. Email response to: wildcard@olypen.co m

31

Help Wanted

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

Absolutely the cutest cabin in the woods ever! 5 plus acres with Fielding Stream running through. Home is light and bright with plenty of windows. So close to fishing, hunting, hiking, beach walking and so much more. Plenty of quiet here. $189,000 ML260387/189139 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘B’ IS FOR BACK ON THE MARKET From the ceramic tiled entry to the living room with large windows and fireplace this house says home! Large family room area off kitchen leads to beautifully maintained and fenced backyard with storage and vast mountain view. Formal dining room, spacious and bright kitchen is light and bright, lots of closet space, upgraded flooring and designer paint tones. Access to beach, golf and equestrian facilities. $217,000. ML252157. Eileen Schmitz 360-452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Country Ranch Style Home For Sale By Owner. 41 Summit View Place, Port Angeles. This home has 3 bdrms, 2 bth, living & family room, wet bar, den, deck, and single car garage. This home has new windows and newer flooring. Asking price is $187,000. Call (360)457-0070 for more details and showing. DOMINION TERRACE Remodeled home in 2006 with new flooring, counters, appliances, provides good views, and short walk to clubhouse. Enclosed storage in carport area, and off covered patio. Wood burning grill in patio area for outdoor cooking. HOA fees include electricity, water, sewer, trash, and cable. Pets restricted to 2 per household. $109,000. ML252350. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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Homes

EASY LIVING HERE! Cozy home on landscaped lot. Remodeled interior, custom kitchen, rec room, cobblestone patio and sauna, fenced backyard with sprinkler system. $198,000 ML260508/196308 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND ELEGANT SHERWOOD VILLAGE Built with exceptional quality in 2008 with nearly $30,000 in upgrades including upgraded cabinets and fixtures, heat pump with an electronic air cleaner, spa tub, solar tube, Beal window treatments, recirculating hot water system and drip irrigation. $293,500 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 EMBRACE SEQUIM CHARM 1,952 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath, living room, family room, den/office, utility/laundry. Kitchen with granite counter tops, oak cabinetry and formal dining. Fenced yard, fruit trees, outbuilding and mtn view. $299,950. ML250431. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East HANGAR INCLUDED Diamond Point home with runway access to W2A1 airfield. 2 Br., 1 bath custom home, remodeled kitchen with high end appliances. Detached multi-level outbuilding has 1 car garage, large workshop with hangar on top level right on the tarmac to airfield. Guest quarters, 1/2 bath, and office/den. What are you waiting for? $239,500. ML260512 Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East HOMESTEAD WITH A HEART Yesteryear charm graces this updated farmhouse nestled on 10 lovely acres of pasture and trees, with barn, outbuildings, and creek. The spacious home features rich wood floors, walls and a stone fireplace. $625,000. ML260513. Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ‘I’ IS FOR IMPROVED PRICE Absolutely gorgeous mature trees surround this home on 2.10 acres. Large level area with antique outbuildings and gentle forest topography. New laminate floors, double pane windows, upgraded kitchen and baths. Breakfast nook, wood stove and extra storage inside and out. Covered parking and plenty of space to grow your garden and dreams. $99,900. ML252291. Jace Schmitz 360-417-8598 JACE The Real Estate Company

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Homes

If you seek fine quality and seclusion in a tranquil setting, this is the home for you. Hickory cabinets, a plethora of pullouts, convection oven and a breathtaking mtn view will make you want to stay in the kitchen, but each room offers something different. Spacious 3 Br., 2 1/5 bath home on over 6 acres with a stocked pond. $655,000 ML260244 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. IMMACULATE NEW LISTING This 3 Br., 2 bath home has granite counter tops and tile floors in the kitchen and baths, newer windows, trim and doors thoughout. The living room features a wood burning stove with brick and granite tile hearth. Family room with French doors to the beautiful back yard with deck and fruit trees. $219,500. ML260565/196873 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘L’ IS FOR LAKE Lake Sutherland access with shared dock! 2.74 private acres. This 2,277 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath has been meticulously cared for. Large master suite with sitting area. Walk-in closets, jetted tub, double sinks. Pergo flooring. Workshop, garden shed, storage building, sports court, horseshoe pit, hot tub and much more! $339,900. ML260576 Tammy Newton 360-417-8598 JACE The Real Estate Company METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED HOME On a beautifully landscaped lot. Great room style with fireplace office/den, kitchen with breakfast bar. Spacious master with walk-in closet. Finished double garage with work area and attic for storage. $235,000. ML196217 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow MOUNTAIN VIEW HOME Beautiful 3 Br., 2 bath, home in Woodland Heights with great southern exposure and mountain views. The home features freshly refinished hardwood floors though out most of the home, living room with fireplace, upgraded kitchen with granite tile counter tops, formal dining room, upgraded master bath with double sinks, and beautiful landscaping. $249,000. ML260568 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

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5000900

GARAGE Sale: Fri.- Correctional Officer @ Sat., 9-6 p.m., 730 Clallam Bay and Tala Shore Drive, Olympic Corrections Port Ludlow. Asian Centers. Non-Perarts and antiques, manent On-Call. Pay BIKE: Specialized solid oak teacher starts at $16.61 Hard Rock, like new, desk and chair, table hourly, plus benefits. extras. $375. 4/17/11. saw, drill press, Closes 775-2792 grinder, transmission Apply on-line at jack, tow bars, misc. www.careers.wa.gov Crescent Grange furniture, camping For further informaSpring Flea Market and fishing, misc. tion, please call JenApril 1st and 2nd nifer White at 360household items. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 963-3207. EOE. 507634 Hwy. 112, Handyman service. Joyce Port Townsend JTL Handyman servPlant Sale Goodwill ices. All types of Silent Auction Hiring Retail home and appliance Lots of Vendors Keyholder Bake Table and Lunch repair and installaMust have 6 mo. tions, Landscaping Tailgaters Welcome supervisor exp. and lawn care avail.25¢ Coffee Apply in person at able. No job too FORD: ‘95 F350. small, 602 Howard St. affordable Powerstroke EFI prices, free estiPt. Townsend, WA diesel, AT, PB, PS, mates. 98368 Licensed, three fuel tanks, 5th bonded, & insured wheel towing w/elec- contractor POWER #JTLtronic brake, regular HAHS906Q3. WHEELCHAIR tow package w/elec- Phone: 360-797-1512 Jazzy 1103 Ultra. tric brake, 164K Power seat height E-mail: miles. White color, adjustment, good jml4455@msn.com crew cab, one owner, condition, needs excellent condition. batteries. $8,500/obo. $500/obo. 360-450-3767 360-460-2382 GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 10-4 p.m., Looking for a lady SEQUIM: Room for height/weight prorent. $400. 808-4758 261820 Hwy. 101. portionate, nonGreat buys, too TREADMILL: Westlo smoker, sense of much to list, space saver, model humor, likes the antiques, tools, 10.0C, time, disoutdoors, animals household and art. tance, pulse. $100. and home life, 683-4739 who’s affectionate GARAGE Sale: Fri and caring for he TREX: 750 multi track and Sat, 9-3 p.m., 53 right man that S. Maple Ln, Four street bike. $185 or comes into her life. Seasons Park. Fishtrade for good off This is for a white ing poles and suproad mountain bike. male, 60, 6’, height/ plies, tools, house461-2788 weight proportionhold and yard supate that is still look- Young Couple, early plies. ing for that partner, 60’s. available for HUGE RUMMAGE best friend and misc gardening servSALE lover to share his ices, as well as haulTo benefit Crescent life with. ing, gutter and deck Co-Op Preschool. Email response to: cleaning, moss Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. wildcard@olypen.co removal, seasonal Lions Club on Hwy m cleanup, weeding, 112, off Holly Hill Rd. general maintenance (2) late ‘70s Ford PORSCHE: ‘86 944. and repair. Hard trucks, parts or Auto, black, many working and reliable with excellent referrebuild. $500/obo. updates. $7,900. ences. 457-1213. 683-8193 775-5836 AUTO DETAILER Call Arlin at Wilder Toyota 360-452-3888

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Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

Homes

MOVE IN READY! Conveniently located close to downtown. Breakfast bar and separate eating area. Low maintenance landscaping, new sidewalk around the house. 3 Br., 2 baths. $152,500 ML260429/191784 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND NEARLY NEW HOME With fabulous mountain views on 1.52 acres, with fruit trees, lavender and berries it’s a gardener’s delight. 3 Br., 2 baths, over 2,000 sf, 2 car garage plus detached workshop, close to town. $369,500 ML260439/192230 Jeff Biles 477-6706 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NO FOOLIN’ Very nice 3 Br., 2 bath home built in 1991 with 1,304 sf in a nice neighborhood in Sequim city limits, close to shopping, medical, etc. Mountain views, fenced easy care yard with gazebo, direct access 2 car garage. All appliances are included. $199,000. ML260452. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 477-9361 Plenty of room in this wonderful home in a wonderful neighborhood. Vaulted ceilings in the spacious kitchen and dining area. Kitchen boasts a garden window, eating bar and skylight. Stamped concrete patio to a view of the forest. $260,000. ML260597. Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. PRICE REDUCED! Motivated seller wants to sell! Great location, 4 Br. home with wonderful back yard, deck, patio, brick fireplace and bbq, fenced, also mtn view. Front yard boasts waterfall with small pond and bridge, lovely landscaping. Large garage with workshop. Close to almost everything! $185,000. ML252125. Beep Adams 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SELLER IS SERIOUSLY SERIOUS Have you ever wanted to live on a boat or in a cabin or in a tree house? An unusual eclectic home in the city with a quirky country feel? A man cave to die for? Then check out this contemporary northwest home on nearly 1/2 an acre. Motivated seller is seriously serious about selling this serene retreat so please bring an offer. $175,900. ML250920. Dick Pilling 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 __ masqué: dance with costumes 2 A good while back

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Homes

SEQUIM VIEW HOME 3 Br., 2 ba, 1.25 acres, 16x20 sunroom, 24x36 shop, gardeners delight, 243 Brazil Rd. $349,000. 360-504-2504 Spacious 2,300 sf Sunland home, 2 car garage, golf cart garage, 3 Be., 1 bath and 2 half baths, wraparound deck, golf course access. $264,000 ML260258/180244 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS HOME AND WIDESPREAD VIEW Custom home in desirable Cresthaven, just below the college. Designed to make the views the backdrop to your home, you can see the views from the living/dining room and the kitchen. Generously sized rooms throughout from the kitchen to the master to the family room. Even has a private office. Come take a look at this fantastic home. $425,000. ML260205. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SUNLAND FAIRWAY HOME Charming 2,700 sf, 3 Br., 3 bath home on the 14th fairway of the SunLand Golf Course. Spacious kitchen with island. Master suite has jetted tub and separate shower. 3 car garage. View over lake to 14th fairway is spectacular. $359,000 ML260337/184906 Roland Miller 477-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY SWEEPING SALTWATER VIEW Looking for a super saltwater view in the city? This is it! Single story, 2 Br., 2 bath, plus a bonus room on a .22 acre lot. Outdoor living space includes a huge deck, terraced yard and garden. Well maintained home, move-in ready and priced to sell. $210,000. ML260501. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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C5

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. RECENT BRITISH ROYAL WEDDINGS

G C W O R L D W I D E L A C S By Steve Salitan

3 Crime of betrayal 4 Stylish waves 5 Cad 6 “How peculiar” 7 Tishby of “The Island” 8 Head M.D.? 9 Horse warming up, say 10 Bridge opener, briefly 11 Take for a chump 12 Chemical bonding number 13 Winning numbers 14 Flights that often span two days 20 LAX posting 22 Chest ripple 23 Transform eerily, in sci-fi 24 __ to one’s neck 25 Link with 26 Donald’s second ex 28 Coming and going spots: Abbr. 31 Carloads 32 Others, in Oaxaca 33 Proceeds 35 Sharp competitor 36 Hefner garb Homes

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 full bath, carpet, tile throughout, large lot, fruit trees, front yard, 2 car garage with attached shop area. $97,000, offers accepted. 683-6703 or 303-495-0433. SWEEPING VIEWS Of the Strait, San Juans, Mt. Baker, Discovery Bay. Restored historic home, 3 fireplace, 12’ ceilings and 7’ windows, private upstairs Br. with bath and kitchenette. Diamond Point Beach Club membership included. $529,000. ML260492/144957 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SWEET HOME SWEETER DEAL 2 Br., 1 bath, beautifully upgraded home with new appliances and newer roof. There is a greenhouse for the green thumbers and big shop for the fixers and builders. Check out the beautiful landscaping. Enjoy fruit from your own o rc h a rd . P o s s i b l e owner financing. $160,000. ML252388. Rita Erdmann 417-9873 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY VIEW HOO! Enjoy the mountain view from the wraparound porch from this nearly new 2 Br., 5 bath home on 5 acres. Relax in the spacious living area with vaulted ceiling. Retreat to the private master suite with fireplace. Let your inner chef whip up gourmet delights in the beautifully equipped kitchen and serve in formal dining room. Store cars and toys in extra large double garage. $299,900. ML260575 Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WHAT A DEAL Water view and mountain view from this lovely home. Large living room with vaulted cedar ceiling. Sliders lead to a wonderful trex patio with trex decking. Southern exposure. You will love the beautiful landscaping. Convenient kitchen, updated bath with heated tile flooring. Family room has propane stove to keep you cozy. All this with a new price of $185,000. Truly a great value. ML260249 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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3/31/11

Z M L A Y T R A P H I L I P E

© 2011 Universal Uclick

I O A T P O M P E E K U D L M

N N R S W C R I D P D A I E E

A W D R A S A R N N A P A P G

G E E E L Y E O A S U L N A A

www.wonderword.com

R A H D E S D L D A T M A H G

O L T A S N G A L R N E D C N

T T A E O N R B L M O T R E E

I H C L E I E R O Y A L H O Y

S O A E N R R N O S U G R E F

I P R G T R A D I T I O N N M

V E E H T E B A Z I L E T A D

3/31

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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

CFLIF ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LUPBM (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 Work 38 Unhappy home inspection find 40 African plain 41 Like some film effects 42 Sorority letters 44 Flow back 47 “The Vampire Diaries” heroine Gilbert 48 Play places 49 Secondary

Homes

YOU’LL FALL IN LOVE Cozy rambler located in nice neighborhood close to Sequim schools, shopping and services. Well maintained 2 Br., 2 bath (1 off master Br.), den/office for your choice of uses. Airy open floor plan with kitchen island. Fully fenced back yard with chain link dog run. Front is easy maintenance with nice landscaping and small lawn. $185,000. ML252216. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Manufactured Homes

SINGLE WIDE: ‘78, 2 Br. 1 ba, 14x56, owner occupy or move. $12,292. 457-0840.

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I M C T S A R A H N O I T A N

Albert, Anthem, Care, Cathedral, Chapel, Charles, Commonwealth, Date, Dear, Diana, Dress, Duke, Edmund, Elizabeth, Engagement, England, Ferguson, Hope, Lady, Leaders, London, Lord, Monarch, Nation, Organizing, Palace, Party, Paul, Philip, Pomp, Ring, Royal, Sarah, Scale, Scot, State, Tradition, Visitor, Wales, Westminster, Worldwide Yesterday’s Answer: Dictionary

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536.

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N O S E L R A H C R A N O M T

Solution: 8 letters

Lots/ Acreage

10 acres in Chimacum, 2 bedroom home. Very private, two 5 acre parcels sold together, zoned up to 2 houses each. Home is Rastra, metal roof, open floor plan, great sunlight, surrounded by forest. FSBO $340,000. 732-0507. 2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. CALL 253549-3345 PORT ANGELES lot at 222 W. Park Ave. Half acre + CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water. $69,000. Owner financing.

54

Lots/ Acreage

Spectacular views of Hurricane Ridge and the Olympic Mountain range. 1.5 acres with southern exposure just minutes away from either Port Angeles or Sequim. The property is bordered by a greenbelt on the east and south sides. $145,000. ML260392 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. UNPARALLELED WATER AND MTN VIEWS Abound from this rare 5.20 acre high bank waterfront parcel. Take in sweeping vistas of Victoria, Mt. Baker and the shipping lanes of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Watch as soaring eagles and Mother Nature entertain you. Build your dream home in this private setting. $347,000. ML260480. Margo Petersen-Pruss 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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Unbelievable opportunity to own the Armory Square at a 7.5% cap rate. 10 office units; 9 are currently leased. This building has several reliable longterm tenants, many of which are government agencies that contribute to its stability. Approx. 100 parking spaces. The gross sf is 40,200 and the rentable sf is 28,200. Leased at an average of $12.93/sf annually. Appraisal done in December, 2010. $3,350,000 ML260244 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

P.A.: $25,000 under assessed value. Beautiful 10,000 sf city lot in area of fine homes. $41,000. 457-4004

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

strategy 52 Chick chaser? 54 Quarterback Dawson 55 “Super!” 56 Actress Gasteyer 57 Some Windows systems 58 Epitome of slipperiness

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Upstairs, 1 Br. no smoking, no pets. washer/dryer on premises. Mo. to Mo. $500., $600. dep. 236 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Close to shopping, bus schools. 457-4538

ALGNOL

SROASC Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

62

Apartments Unfurnished

64

Houses

McHugh Rentals Apt 2 Br.,1 ba. $650 Dpx 2 Br., 1 ba. $650 mchughrents.com 360-460-4089

SEQUIM: 2 Br. in town, clean/quiet park, W/D, W/S/G incl. year lease. $650. 460-8978.

P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267

SEQUIM: Palo Alto Rd. new log cabin, 1 Br. $800, utilities paid. 683-4307.

P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409.

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: 2 Br. apt., no smoking/pets. $650. 457-1695

SEQUIM: Room for rent. $400. 808-4758

P.A.: Nice, newer 2 Br 1 ba, 930 sf W/D. $700. 808-4972.

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Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 1 & 2 Br. apt. $575 & $625. 683-3001, 460-9623

63

Duplexes

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. $650. 813 E. 2nd St. 460-7235.

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Houses

Commercial

4.77 acres off Mt. Angeles Rd. Surrounded by mountains, nice homes and the natural beauty of Port Angeles. http://portangelesprop.com FANTASTIC VIEWS OF DISCOVERY BAY! Gorgeous building lot in Diamond Point, paved and maintained county streets, site registration for conventional septic. Underground utilities, protective CC&Rs, community water, and beach access. $169,000. ML251198 Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

3/31/11

1,310 sf, single level 2 Br., 2 bath, 2 car, ocean/mtn view. Remodled all the extras, upscale area. 360-281-6928

Commercial Space

Between Seq./Carlsborg, 2,400 sf shop/ office. 683-1639. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 P.A.: Office/retail/storage. 4,400 sf, 50¢/ sf. All/part. 457-5678 PORT LUDLOW Suitable for retail or professional offices. Contact Larry at 360-437-8246 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Sequim’s Newest DOWNTOWN RETAIL Now Available. 683-331l, days 683-3300, eves.

Downtown Sequim Clean, 1,800 sf, 3 lg Br., 2 bath, 2 car gar., fenced, lots of extras, near park/ schools. $1,100 mo. 582-9848, 477-5070 HAPPY VALLEY: 3 Br, 2 ba, acreage, Sequim. $950. 461-2810.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APTS/ DUPLEXES P.A. A 1 br 1 ba .....$575 D 2/1 util incl...$625 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 A 2/1 util incl...$650 D 2 br 1.5 ba...$850 D 2 br 1.5 ba...$900 H 4 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 4 br 1 ba....$1200 H 2 br 3 ba....$1450 STORAGE UNITS From $40-$100 mo.

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $600, last, dep. 452-1694 eves. P.A.: 2+ bd, 1 ba. w/d, garage, $850 + dep. 360-440-8388. P.A.: 4 Br., 1.75 ba, 2 story, on cul-de-sac, close to bus. $1,000, deposit. 460-3032. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 1 Br., 1 bath, $650 incl. util. W/D. 681-3988.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

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Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

ACROSS 1 *One way to reach a superhero 9 Blind slat 15 Concurred about 16 Lower, for now 17 Ogled 18 Skinned 19 One of two O.T. books 20 When Donne is done for the day? 21 Genesis outcast 22 Go by 23 *2008 Republican hopeful 27 Focus of some trips 28 Justice Sotomayor 29 Unsatisfactory marks? 30 Explain 32 Fiona, after Shrek’s kiss 34 *Roll-fed toy 36 Fertilizer component 39 “I can’t explain it” 43 Imitated 44 Old 51-Across devices 45 “The Simpsons” shopkeeper 46 *Musical about rock’s 4 Seasons 49 Benjamin et al.: Abbr. 50 Give pieces to 51 Trial site, perhaps 52 Jai __ 53 “The Executioner’s Song” Pulitzer winner 55 Burlesque act 59 Show up 60 Some feelers 61 Viewed to be 62 Its season starts today; its equipment starts the starred answers

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011

Appliances

Bosch Duel Fuel Range, Vermont Casting LP Stove, Jotul LP Stove. 4 year old stainless steel Bosch 4 burner gas top with electric oven, great condition! $500/obo, new $1,200. Vermont Castings ‘Radiance’ LP stove, ivory enamel, 38,000 BTU’s, 4 years old, works great, $2,600 new, only $1,350/ obo. Jotul GF 100 DC Nordic QT, ivory enamel, 17,000 BTU’s, heat capacity of 600 sq. ft., 4 years old, new $1,685, $650/obo. Located on Marrowstone Island. Contact Gary. 360-379-1673

(Answers tomorrow) FAINT CRYING FOSSIL Jumbles: BRICK Answer: What the magician had on the course — A BAG OF TRICKS

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Appliances

FRESH SHIPMENT of quality reconditioned appliances. 600 E. First Street, P.A. REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, side-byside, ice maker and water, 26 cf, white. $399. 417-0826. WASHER/DRYER Maytag Neptune washer and dryer, work great. Asking $600/obo. 775-0088.

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Furniture

CHAIRS: 2 nice chairs, one wooden with floral cushion, $30. Small wooden rocker, $20. With pillows if desired. 460-2546 Desks. 48 in. oak roll top desk in beautiful shape.$150. Antique oak executive desk also in great shape. $200. 452-3952. DINING TABLE Solid oak, nice shape, 4 chairs. $300/obo 452-6439 Full size, all foam mattress and box spring, in great shape, paid over $900 new. Sell $300/obo. 681-3299. Glider and Ottoman. Hoop Glider and Ottoman, oak, excellent condition, less than year old $95. 379-6880 MISC: All excellent condition. La-Z-Boy lift chair, $800. Green ultra-suede sofa, $500. Antique oak table/chairs, side board $1,500. Queen size bed, $200. Brass twin beds, $200. 457-0758. MISC: Deluxe power La-Z-Boy recliner, $450. Antique oak 4 drawer filing cabinet, ca. 1900-1920, $400. Mahogany sideboard, 1950s, 3 drawers, 3 cabinets, raised front panel design, $530. Landscape mirror, gold frame, beveled glass, 49”x35”, $250. Sofa 95”x38”, 5 matching pillows, $400. OBO, delivery available, all items excellent condition. 681-5326.

MISC: RECLINING SOFA LIKE NEW Signature Design, Upholstered Fabric, Dark Brown New December 2010, cost $849, sell $550/obo. CLOTHES VALET STAND, Smartek-Mahogany, new $50. Slitzer 15pc CUTLERY SET WOOD BLOCK, new, $60. 360-683-4856

72

Furniture

Leather Natuzzi sofa and love seat. Dark tan, in excellent condition. $1,000. Can send photos. 681-4945 MISC: Large dining table with 4 chairs, light blond finish, $135. 2 matching coffee tables, 1 large $40, 1 small $30. Very nice, must see to appreciate. 681-4429

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General Merchandise

FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-477-8832 Newer propane tank, 500 gallons. $1,100. 360-600-6845 POOL TABLE Dynamo coin operated. $1,000/obo. 460-2768

MISC: Sofa, reclines on each end, $600/ obo. Futon, queen, $200/obo. 4 folding tray tables, $20. 683-3386

POWER WHEELCHAIR Jazzy 1103 Ultra. Power seat height adjustment, good condition, needs batteries. $500/obo. 360-460-2382

PATIO SET: Purple, Filigreed, small round table with 2 chairs, rain-proof. $100. 460-2546.

RIDING MOWER: ‘08 Craftsman, 24 hp, 42” cut, less than 50 hrs. $1,200. 452-3051

Recliner Sofa. La-ZBoy recliner sofa, beige microfiber. $250. 360-683-1175.

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General Merchandise

BUTCHER BLOCK Staten Island butcher shop butcher block, 24”x24.5”x29” high, 4 dowel, rock maple, decorative turned legs, solid, 10” left of original surface depth, manufacturers mark. $225. 417-2062 CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 CDS: Country’s Got Heart, great deal, brand new, never played, still in box. $200. 452-6034. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

JUICER: Jack La Lanne’s Deluxe Power Juicer. Gently used several times. I have another juicer so am selling this one. The operating manual and recipe book are included. It retails for $125, your cost is just $60. Call 417-7691 MISC: Cement mixer, small, portable, electric motor, $200. 24’ fiberglass extension ladder, $90. 5 hp Craftsman rear tine rototiller, $300. 681-2016 Office moving: Legal 2 drawer fireproof filing cabinet, locking drawer, you haul, first floor, $400. Decorative filing cabinet, 2 drawer legal-size. $150. Ikea area rug (4x6) $80. 452-9519 or 461-1437.

UTILITY TRAILER ‘07 33’, tandem axel g.n., deck length 25’, 14K lbs GVWR, 5’ spring loaded pop up, dove tail with 5’ ramps. $4,500. 452-5457, 808-3899 WANTED: Usable building materials, scrap lumber, appliances, etc. We are building a mini house so if you have something we can take off your hands, please email n_knoles@hotmail.com with description and a contact number. WOOD STOVE Brand new, Hearthstone, Heritage model. $3,000. 457-0758

74

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

ACCORDION: Vintage Italian Bernelli Polka King. 120 bass, 2 treble shifts, hard case. Great condition. $350. 681-4945 GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200/obo. “Estrada” handmade acoustic guitar from Paracho, Mex., red with black accent, comes with soft case, $100/obo. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $200/ obo. All in new condition, great sound! 481-8955, 477-0903 Please leave msg PIANO: Grand Piano Company, small upright with matching bench, good cond. $495/obo. 360-344-3243


C6

Classified

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAWN/YARD CARE LOG HOMES RESTORATION

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

www.LundFencing.com

Chad Lund

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss Prevention Window Washing

24 yrs. experience

Paul Baur, owner

Call Bryan or Mindy

Home & Bus.

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

JP

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

360-681-7878 #BAURLH*023DJ

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Larry Muckley 135114329

#LUNDFF*962K7

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Baur Log Homes

Pressure Washing

Small jobs is what I do!

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s Handyman Services

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125111256

NEW CONSTRUCTION ROOM ADDITIONS REMODELS • REPAIR

Columbus Construction

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

5582-0384 82-0384

TREE SERVICE

ROOFING

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135114390

ANTHONY BUERNER • 360-379-8945 LIC.#BUERNCCO65J1

APPLIANCES

Licensed – Bonded – Insured

GROOFINGD 457-5186 ARLAN

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Specializing in Trees

135115624

• Hazardous Tree Removal • Storm Damage • Bluff Work • Ornamental Pruning • Total Clean-up • Senior Discounts

• View Trimming • Tree Topping • Selective Tree Removal • High Climbers • Chip On Site • Free Estimates

Scott A. Campbell, Owner afterhours.upholstery@q.com BY APPOINTMENT

360-417-8862

(360) 460-0518

Lic # LINKRR*910QR

On-Site Garden Coaching

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

C reate an A ctio n P lan

What to do; when & how to do it!

CALL KRISTINA TODAY!

RScanning O F E SPriSntiIngOServices NAL PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PPROFESSIONAL S c a n n i n g & Printing Se r v i c e s SERVICE DIRECTORY D DESIGN ESIGN ADVERTISE DAILY FOR AS LITTLE AS

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS! RATES AND SIZES:

1 COLUMN X 1” 1 COLUMN X 2” 1 COLUMN X 3” 2 COLUMN X 1” 2 COLUMN X 2” 2 COLUMN X 3”

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON advertise call PENINSULA To360-452-8435 or DAILY NEWS 1-800-826-7714

S SCANNING CANNING FFILM ILM O OUTPUT UTPUT P PRINTING RINTING P PACKAGING ACKAGING M MEMENTOS EMENTOS

(360) 457-8479

www.outonalimblandscape.com

ROOFING Peninsula

ROOFING EVAN BRADOW

360-912-2371

Senior Citizen

DISCOUNT Free inspection of

STORM DAMAGE We bill your insurance!

evanbradow@gmail.com Lic#PENINCR890DM

135115625

Clallam County

OUT ON A LIMB

Landscape Services

24 HR Emergency Don’t Wait Until it’s Too Late

135115623

360-461-7476

683-8328

offers a new service to do-it-yourselfers

TECH SERVICES

135114313

OWNER ON EVERY JOB

Tr e e s Shrubs Hedges

125111793

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

Mole Control

anthonystreetop@gmail.com 115108508

Call NOW To Advertise

#JKDIRKD942NG

LANDSCAPING SERVICES

One Call Does It All!

Bill Link

contact@jkdirtworks.com

035075404

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

20 years experience 0C5106860

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LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED NEW ROOFS RE-ROOF • REPAIRS

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

MOLE/PRUNING

After Hours Upholstery

Anthony’s Services

“From Concrete to Cabinets”

ROOFING

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

LIC

Carruthers Construction

LINK

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• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

TREE SERVICE

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360

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LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

CONSTRUCTION

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Inspections - Testing Surveys

945036615

72289323

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

Licensed & Insured #CARRUC*907KJ

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Small Jobs A Specialty

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Professional, Honest & Reliable FREE ESTIMATES

ASBESTOS

DIRT WORK

Contr#KENNER1951P8

• Kitchen and Bath Updates and Remodels • Additions, Garages, Framing and Siding • Finish Carpentry, Cabinets, Trim, Doors, etc. • Tile: Floors, Showers, Walls and Countertops • Concrete Driveways, Walks and Retaining Walls • Drywall: New, Repair, Painting and Texture • Creative Help with Design and Layout • Small Jobs, OK

COLUMC*955KD

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YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

0A5100969

Serving the entire Peninsula

75289698

0A5100336

Lic# DELUNE*933QT

Honest & Reliable at a reasonable price

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

expires: June 17, 2011

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M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

$400 OFF NEW ROOF

Free Quotes! (3 60)461 -1 89 9 – OR –

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REFERENCES/ON JOB SITE EVERY DAY

BUERNER CONSTRUCTION

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

86313195

78289849

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If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right! FREE Estimates

REPAIR/REMODEL

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Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs

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Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

115108502

John Pruss 360 808-6844

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

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AIR DUCT CLEANING

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From Curb To Roof

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Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

PAINTING

HOME REPAIR

72289360

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115105618

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085092331

FENCING

135115639

SERVICE DIRECTORY

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011

C7

1999 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 1/2 TON LS 4X4

2002 VW GTI 1.8T HATCHBACK

2004 GMC ENVOY SLE 4X4

2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA POLICE INTERCEPTOR

5.7L VORTEC V-8, AUTO, LOADED, MAROON EXT IN GREAT SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH INT IN GOOD COND, PWR SEAT, CD/CASS, 3RD SEAT, AC, CRUISE, TILT, TOW PKG, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS, CLEAN, 1-OWNER CARFAX, THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

1.8L TURBO, 4 CYL, TIP-TRONIC, AUTO, LOADED, SILVER MET EXT IN GREAT COND W/BLACK LEATHER INT IN GREAT COND, MOON ROOF, DUAL HTD SEATS, CD W/ PREM SOUND, SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, 27+ MPG. THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.2L I6, AUTO, 76K ORIG MILES, LOADED!, DK GRAY EXT IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH INT IN GREAT COND, PWR SEAT, CD/CASS, CRUISE, TILT, MOON ROOF, PRIV GLASS, TOW PKG, ALLOYS, SPOTLESS CARFAX!! THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.6L V8, AUTO, WHITE EXT IN GOOD COND W/TAN INT IN GREAT COND, PWR SEATS & MIRRORS, AIRBAGS, AM/FM, AC, EX-WASHINGOTN STATE POLICE CAR, FLEET MAINTAINED! THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$6,995

$8,995

$12,995

$4,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2002 FORD F-250 XLT SUPERDUTY CREWCAB SB 4X4

2004 FORD F-350 LARIAT SUPERDUTY CREWCAB LB FX 4X4 OFF ROAD

2003 GMC SIERRA C3500 SINGLE CAB DUALLY UTILITY 2WD

1997 HONDA ACCORD EX COUPE

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED, DK BLUE MET EXT IN EXCEL SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH INT IN SUPERB COND! 6” LIFT, ALUM WHEELS, CD/CASS, BED LINER, TOW, SPOTLESS CARFAX REPORT!! THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

6.0L POWERSTROKE, AUTO, LAODED!!, BLUE MET EXT IN EXCEL COND W/ GRAY LEATHER INT IN GREAT COND, DUAL PWR HTD SEATS, MOON ROOF, 6 DISK CD, PARK SENSORS, WOOD TRIM, TOW, MATCHING LEER CANOPY, LINE-X BED LINER, SPOTLESS 2 OWNER CARFAX!! THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

6.6L DURAMAX DIESEL, ALLISON AUTO TRANS, WHITE EXT IN GREAT SHAPE W/BLACK INT IN GREAT SHAPE! AM/FM, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, ROYAL TRUCK BODIES UTILITY BOX W/ 8 STORAGE COMP & 2 ON TOP, WALTCO HYDRAULIC LIFT GATE, 1 OWNER!! $6000 LESS THAN KBB!! THIS WEEK ONLY $1000 COSTCO GAS CARD INCLUDED AT OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

77K ORIG MI!!! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! 2.2L V-TEC 4 CYL, AUTO! CHAMPAGNE MET IN GREAT SHAPE! W/TAN CLOTH IN EXCEL COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, DUAL AIRBAGS, CASS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, MOONROOF, PWR SEAT, ALLOYS W/80% TOYO RUBBER! THIS WEEK ONLY $500 COSTCO GAS CARD @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$12,995

$19,995

$12,995

$6,495

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2002 CHEVROLET SILVERADO LS C2500HD EXT CAB LB 2WD

2008 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW LARIAT 4X4

6.6L DURAMAX DIESEL, ALLISON AUTO TRANS! LOADED! WHITE IN EXCEL SHAPE W/BLACK CLOTH IN EXCEL COND! CD, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL AIRBAGS, PRIV GLASS, TOW PKG, RUNNING BOARDS, ROYAL SUMMIT TRUCK BODIES UTILITY BED THAT LOOKS LIKE STOCK BED & HAS 8 STORAGE COMP! $4000 LESS THAN KBB! THIS WEEK ONLY $1,000 GAS CARD INCLUDED @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN EXCEL COND W/TAN LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! DUAL PWR HTD SEATS, 6 DISC CD W/AUX, CRUISE, TILT, TOW PKG, PARK SENSORS, WOOD TRIM, FACT 18” ALLOYS, SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! OVER $8000 LESS THAN KBB! THIS WEEK ONLY $1,000 COSTCO GAS CARD @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$13,995

$19,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

2008 TOYOTA COROLLA S SEDAN

2004 FORD F150 FX-4 SUPERCREW 4X4

2004 FORD E250 EXT. CARGO VAN

2003 DODGE DURANGO SLT 4X4

1.8L 4 CYL, 5 SPEED, FACTORY ALLOY WHEELS, REAR SPOILER, TILT, CRUISE, CD PLAYER, AC, POWER WINDOWS, LOCKS, 37 MPG HWY, 35K MI, BLUE BOOK $14,190, LIKE NEW!

5.4L V-8, AUTO, LARIAT PKG WITH EVERY OPTION, INCLUDING CANOPY AND TOW PKG, ONE OWNER, 24K MI, NONE NICER, A MUST SEE! $40K NEW!

5.4L V-8 AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, STEREO, ALUMINUM RACK WITH TIE DOWNS, NEW TIRES, LOW MILES, JOB SITE READY!

4.7L V-8, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, CD, 3RD SEATING, LOW MILES! GREAT FAMILY SUV!

$12,995

$22,995

$9,995

$8,995

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

13406418

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2008 HONDA CIVIC EX COUPE

2008 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING EDITION

2005 CHEVROLET ASTRO CARGO VAN

2007 CHEVROLET HHR LT

VERY ECONOMICAL 1.8L 4 CYL, 5 SPD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, PWR MOONROOF, ALLOYS, ONLY 32K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX REPORT! JUST REDUCED!

3.5L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, LEATHER, PWR MOONROOF, KEYLESS ENTRY, ALLOYS, 50K MILES, BEAUTIFUL BLACK CRYSTAL CLEAR COAT, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! JUST REDUCED!

ECONOMICAL 4.3L V6, AUTO, AC, SAFETY BULKHEAD, CARGO LINER & MAT, ONLY 32K MILES! SUPER CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NONSMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/ FM/CD W/PIONEER AUDIO, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, LEATHER HTD SEATS, FOG LAMPS, ONSTAR READY, SIDE AIRBAGS, CHROME ALLOYS, ONLY 43K MILES! VERY NICE LOCAL TRADE, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

AD EXPIRES 4/30/11

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$14,995

AD EXPIRES 4/30/11

$16,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

AD EXPIRES 4/30/11

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$10,995

AD EXPIRES 4/30/11

$12,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 M O T O R S 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

www.reidandjohnson.com

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


C8

ClassifiedAutomotive

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Gears adjust — but not by much Dear Doctor: I own a new 2011 Mercedes-Benz E-350 with just 1,600 miles on it. The dealer tells me that the gear’s hard shifts will adjust as more miles are driven. Is this true? Albert Dear Albert: The transmission is computercontrolled, and these vehicles do have firm shift points. It’s the nature of this car. There will be some minor — and I emphasize minor — shift changes over time as the transmission adapts to your driving style. However, I do not think this will satisfy your concerns. I would go back to the dealer and inquire about a reprogramming possibility.

2002 Subaru Legacy GT THE AUTO DOC 4-cylinder with 170,000 miles. upgrade. I Junior The original timing belt some- was replaced at 105,000 Damato know one with a miles (100,000-mile manu2006 PT facturer recommendation). Cruiser and The shop advised that I a 2005 PT replace the timing belt Cruiser again between 165,000 and turbo just 170,000 miles. like mine, Why isn’t the second and neither belt recommended to be has a hum changed at 200,000 miles? or whine. I believe Keith Dear Keith: The best I have a way to answer your quesproblem and want the tion is to advise you that dealer to fix it under the warranty that I purchased. when it comes to engine timing belts, I always tell Any advice? Gerald my customers to follow the Dear Gerald: These front-wheel-drive Chrysler carmaker’s recommendations on timing belt vehicles do have a history replacement. of head gasket and transI also insist on the use mission problems. Indeed, a good extended of the factory brand timing belt. warranty program is wise The factory timing belts for you to have and utilize have marks on them to aid (do not buy a warranty through the mail or online). in lining up the pulleys. Drivetrain whines I recommend that you Dear Doctor: I recently have the car checked by a Time for fluid change? purchased a used 2005 transmission specialty Dear Doctor: I have a Chrysler PT Cruiser Conshop, as well. vertible with the 4-cylinder There could be a service Toyota RAV4 AWD with 100,000 miles. turbo engine with an auto- charge to check the car at I followed the owner’s matic transmission. both dealer and indepenmanual recommendation I’m concerned about a dent shops, but it is worth and never changed the pronounced hum or whine every penny. transmission fluid. that seems to be coming The fluid is now a grayfrom the drivetrain. Time to change belt? ish brown color. It is more noticeable Dear Doctor: I have a Should I change the when accelerating or going

76

Sporting Goods

BIKE: Specialized Hard Rock, like new, extras. $375. 775-2792 HAND GUN: CZ-97B, .45 auto, new in box. Blued (2) 10-round magazines. $650. 461-7647 MISC: Colt Lawman nickle-plated, 357 Magnum, $500. HK .45 auto, NIB, $600. 683-9899 Pontoon Boat. 375fc Seaeagle. Two swivel seats, casting bar, pole holders, and a motor mount. It’s in great shape! Call to see. $600. 452-3952 Total Gym XLS. Great condition, see pictures for accessories included. Contact Mike or Shaila Allen, $600. 360-565-8104. TREADMILL: Westlo space saver, model 10.0C, time, distance, pulse. $100. 683-4739 TREX: 750 multi track street bike. $185 or trade for good off road mountain bike. 461-2788

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

WANTED: Quality items in good condition for garage sale on 6/4. No clothing or shoes. Profits benefit WAG, local dog rescue. For pickup call 452-8192

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

Crescent Grange Spring Flea Market April 1st and 2nd 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 507634 Hwy. 112, Joyce Plant Sale Silent Auction Lots of Vendors Bake Table and Lunch Tailgaters Welcome .25¢ Coffee

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

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84

Pets

HUGE RUMMAGE SALE To benefit Crescent Co-Op Preschool. Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. Lions Club on Hwy 112, off Holly Hill Rd.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 10-4 p.m., 261820 Hwy. 101. Great buys, too much to list, antiques, tools, household and art.

AKC Alaskan Malamute Puppies. AKC Champion Bloodlines, Loving and Adorable, $1,000. 360-701-4891

Renaissance Woman’s Estate Sale 50 years of great stuff! Illness forces homeowner to sell large collection of dolls, crafts, antiques, tools and more. All must go this weekend! Saturday and Sunday only, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 15 Miller Creek Rd., off of Benson Rd. Early bird admission $20.

St. Joseph’s Church Plant and Rummage Sale 101 E. Maple St., Sequim. Fri., April 1st, 9-3 p.m. Sat., April 2nd, 9-3 p.m.

BLACK LABS: (2) 5 mo. old males with all shots, playful, sweet and gentle, I would love someone to adopt them together. $150 ea. or $200 both 360-417-0808

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Fri and Sat, 9-3 p.m., 53 S. Maple Ln, Four Seasons Park. Fishing poles and supplies, tools, household and yard supplies.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

CONTRACTOR’S SALE Fri.-Sat., April 1 & 2. 11-3 p.m. 841 E. Willow St. Power tools, equipment, electric wire, misc items. 2 knack boxes. Cash only. PRE-MOVING and clean out sale! Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m. 361 Towne Road. Lots of household and yard tools. Plus table saw, air compressor, routers, misc. garden and shop stuff. Downrigger balls, flytying kit, ladders, quilting supplies, Mustang Survivor jacket, dehumidifier, juicer, shelving, dog crate, luggage, etc.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-6 p.m., 730 Tala Shore Drive, Port Ludlow. Asian arts and antiques, solid oak teacher desk and chair, table saw, drill press, grinder, transmission jack, tow bars, misc. furniture, camping and fishing, misc. household items.

79

Wanted To Buy

FREE: Cat. 10 yr. old Main Coon, 15 yr. old long hair white, fabulous cats, smart, neutered males, must find good homes due to health and moving. 360-981-8222 PITBULL PUPS Ready now. $200 ea. 683-5943 or 360-780-0021. PITBULL PUPS Ready now. $200 ea. 683-5943 or 360-780-0021.

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

PUPPY: Pembroke Welsh Corgi, 8 week old female, all shots, dewormed. $325. 640-5417.

WANTED: Senior veteran needs upright 3 speed, 3 wheel bike. 477-4774

83

Farm Animals

Barn-stored, local grass hay. $4/Bale. 683-3518, 460-7020

93

Horses/ Tack

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

Marine

19’ Lightening sailboat, full sails. Teak woodwork, new seats, extended tiller arm, trailer. Good condition, and newly laminated bottom. Must sell, moving. $2,000/obo. 253-245-4531

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Horses/ Tack

SADDLE: Rare 1920 Stubben. Two colors of leather. Very good shape. $1,250 or trade for hay. 452-0837

Food Produce

SNOW AND ICE GONE... MAYBE, WE HOPE! Fruit trees, flowering trees, blueberries, cypress, and deer fencing. G&G Farms, off Taylor Cutoff Rd., Sequim. 683-8809.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

94

Marine

BAYLINER: ‘89 24’ Ciera w/5.0 liter Cobra OMC. Full living, 110V/30A shore power w/cord. Dual batt. w/charger. Slim platform with kicker motor mount. Clean, runs good! $1,900. 360-452-6663

GLASPLY: ‘8- 20’. Very nice, loaded, ready to fish. 140 hp Evinfude, 6 hp Johnson kicker EZLoad trailer w/new tires and spare, elec. winch, 2 cannon elec. downriggers, Hummingbird N025 GPS w/chart reader, new VHF, dual batteries new in 2010, 40 gal in hull fuel tank. Boat in excellent shape, ready for 2011 salmon season. $7,500/obo. 461-7071 Livingston Model 12T Resort, seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer, extras, show room condition. $6,800. 681-8761 OWENS: 16’ I/O, 125 hp Mercury motor, needs work. $700/ obo. 681-0828. TOLLY: ‘66 38’. Twin 318s, 200 hrs., loaded. Trade for 20’ alum. $25,000. 360-770-2410

HAY: Good quality grass hay, $5.50 bale. 461-5804.

84

BASE PRICE: $20,495 for 2.5X; $23,195 for 2.5X Premium. AS TESTED: $26,084. TYPE: Front-engine, all-wheel-drive, five-passenger, compact crossover sport utility vehicle. ENGINE: 2.5-liter, double overhead cam, horizontally opposed four cylinder. MILEAGE: 21 mpg (city), 27 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 179.5 inches. WHEELBASE: 103 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,306 pounds. BUILT AT: Japan. OPTIONS: All-weather package with TomTom (includes heated front seats and side mirrors and TomTom navigation system) $1,095; automatic transmission $1,000; all-weather floor mats $69. DESTINATION CHARGE: $725. The Associated Press

Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

93

2011 Subaru Forester 2.5X Premium

––––––––

TRAILER: ‘90 Logan Coach, 2 horse. $2,300/obo. 457-1280

92

Car of the Week

fluid at this point? Mechanics have said if I change it now, I may experience transmission problems. Presently, the vehicle is shifting well, and I have no problems with the automatic, which has always maintained the proper fluid level. Chris Dear Chris: I would recommend changing the fluid. This is done on most Toyota vehicles with a simple drain plug in the transmission pan. When the plug is removed, about 3.4 quarts will drain out. I suggest you continue to do a fluid drain once a month for the next three months. This will slowly change the fluid over time without any concern. Make sure you use only factory Toyota transmission fluid.

FOR SALE BY OWNER BOAT SHOW & MARINE SWAP Saturday April 16th The show will feature privately owned boats in the water and on trailers and is open from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kayaks, Dinghies, Sailboats, Power boats Register your vessel or to sign up for the Flea Market call 360-437-0513.

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

TROPHY: ‘06 21’ model 2002. Walkabout, Alaskan pkg., 150 hp Mercury, 15 hp kicker, downriggers, radar, 2 depth finders, GPS, Winless, 2 canvas tops, many extras. $37,550. 681-0717.

94

Motorcycles

DIRT BIKES: ‘05 Suzuki 110, $900. ‘06 CRF 70, $1000. Both in excellent condition. 461-6000

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘11 Soft Tail Deluxe. Pearl blue, lots of chrome, bags, windshield, never driven, must sell due to health. $21,000/obo. 360-681-4245

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘99 XR200R. Includes riding gear. $1,000. 461-5609. QUAD: ‘04 Kawasaki 700 KFX. Very good shape. $3,200/obo. 461-2056 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 YAMAHA: ‘07 TTR125 LE. Big wheel, electric start, excellent condition. $1,600. 681-2594

HARLEY: ‘03 FLSTFI Fat Boy Custom. Only 3,100 mi., $38,000 invested. Just a few custom features; Harley custom paint set, Thunder Star chrome wheels, D&D Slash Cut exhaust system, Headwins custom headlights with turn signals, Lepera custom seat, chrome passenger back rest, custom foot board, custom windshield (easy removable), leather bag kit, leathers, helmets, and more. All goes. Never outside on a rainy day, must see. $13,900. Call Jim at 360-379-3646

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ Jayco. Big slide, sleeps 6-8, barely used, in great shape. Priced to sell at $10,900. 461-9054. 5TH WHEEL: Terry. $1,500. 808-5722

HARLEY: ‘06 Soft Tail Deluxe, special edition, 123rd of 150, 1450cc, fully dressed, immaculate, always garaged, never in rain, in parades and won lots of awards. $17,000/obo. 360-808-3444 HONDA: ‘03 Shadow 600cc. Saddlebags, 2,400 miles, showroom quality, stored in heated area. Health forces sale. $3,500. 385-2065 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. LEATHERS: Black, 2X. New; vests, man’s $80, woman’s with red roses and fringe, $125. Used; jacket with zip lining, $150. Pants, $80. 417-9257

33’

5TH WHEEL: ‘99 25’ Artic Fox. $10,850. This particular fifth wheel is heavily insulated and ideal for the great northwest. Rv cover included. Please call for more information. 360-732-7540

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft. 3 slides, 6 speed Allison trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner stovetop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table,light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, 6 KW generator, leveling sys, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k) gently used, non smokers. $108,000/obo 360-683-3887

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘00 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260.

MOTOR HOME: 2002 Newmar Kountry Star Class A Diesel 37' 59,000 miles, Generator, Leveling System, 2 Slideouts, Backup Camera, New Tires, W/D, Queen Bed, No Pets, Non-Smoking. Must See. Only $59,500. Bill 360-301-5735 MOTOR HOME: ‘98 31’ Itasca Class C. Ford V10, 35K, 14’ slide, sleeps 6. $16,500. 452-2148 for details. TAILER: ‘87 29’ Regal. Great shape, air, awning. See to appreciate! $3,500. 360-460-1029 TRAILER: ‘02 25’ Layton. Excellent condition. Call for details. $8,500. 928-2404, evenings

TRAILER: ‘06 Fleetwood Wilderness. 27’ travel trailer. Immaculate condition, 12.5’ slide, rear bath, sleeps 6, awning, air cond. microwave, stove/ oven etc. Lots of storage. $15,900. 360-452-4878

96

Parts/ Accessories

TRUCK BED: GMC Dually ‘73-’88 with tailgate. Straight, solid, no dents, 2 fuel doors, red. $500/ obo. 461-1750. TUBE STEPS: Stainless steel, excellent condition, ‘92-’99 Suburban, no drill installation. $100. 457-4756

2004 CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD

2004 PLYMOUTH GRAND VOYAGER LE AWD

2002 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

2002 TOYOTA TACOMA EXT CAB SR5

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LOCAL VAN WITH ONLY 88K MI, 3.8L V-6, AUTO, DUAL AC & HEAT, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEAT, AM/ FM/CASS, 7 PASS. SEATING, DARK GLASS, ROOF RACK & MORE! VIN#66347

ONLY 72K MI, LOCAL TRADE, 4CYL, AUTO, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS, AM/ FM/CD, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VIN#339341

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GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

97

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘94 Blazer Silverado 4WD. Very good cond., 5.7L, auto, ABS, all power, tinted, air, tow pkg., luggage carrier, 177K $3,800. 457-8917. DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 CREW CAB 4X4 6.7 liter Cummins diesel, rare 6 speed manual, air, tilt, cruise, CD player, power seat, heavy chassis (12,000 GVW), new tires, low miles, hurry on this one! Kelley Blue Book $30,290. Sale! $27,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

DODGE: ‘07 Ram 2500 quad cab 4x4, turbo diesel, 6.7L, auto, 56K. $26,995. 971-226-0002 FORD: ‘01 F150 crewcab Lariat. 92K, V8, 4.6L, auto, Carfax, leather, hard tonneau cover, bedliner, running boards. $12,000. 457-4185. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

101

Legals Clallam Co.

4 Wheel Drive

DODGE: ‘99 Ram 2500. Cummins turbo diesel, 47,400 mi. $17,800. 379-0575. FORD: ‘08 F350 LARIAT DIESEL. 4x4 crew cab, dually, 23K mi., new cond., leather interior, dual heaters and heated seats, auto, air, power rear windows, door locks, seats, mirrors, windows, tilt keyless entry, cruise, tow pkg., alloy wheels, moonroof, tinted, adj. pedals, deluxe stereo, limited slip rear end, plus $3,000 aftermarket accesor. $36,750. 452-3200, 452-3272 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460 HONDA ‘07 CRV ALL WD SUV 2.4 liter V-tec 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, 6 disc CD with MP3, moonroof, factory alloy wheels, side airbags for safety, 45K miles, highly rated 4x4, priced to sell! $18,500 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

SALE OF TIMBER BETSY LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled "Proposal for the Betsy Logging Unit," addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m., local time, May 10, 2011, for the purchase of timber on the Betsy Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Department of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 88.3 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 4,000 MBF of sawlogs, including 3,560 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 279 MBF of western redcedar sawlogs, 86 MBF of Sitka spruce sawlogs, 63 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs and 12 MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs; 77 cords of western redcedar salvage; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs and western redcedar salvage are removable at the Purchaser’s option, except they may not be removed from allotment T4017. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier's check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of Thirty Six Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($36,500.00), must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Sixty One Thousand Dollars ($61,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder's failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this 16th day of March, 2011 at Taholah, Washington, Greg Masten, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: March 24, 31, 2011

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘86 F350 Crew cab. Utility box. $1,500. 460-5765.

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: 97 Expedition XLT. 7 pass, power options. $4,390. 461-2145 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $5,500. 460-9323.

HONDA: ‘08 CRV EXL AWD. I am the original owner of this 08 CRV. It has 24,500 mostly highway miles and is excellent throughout. No stop and go driving! It has $1,100 of dealer installed upgrades including fog lights, rear spoiler, door guards, rubber floor mats and unused carpet mats. Kelley Blue Book private party value is $24,900. Will sell for $23,900. Check out dealer offerings and prices then give me a call. 360-452-7342.

97

98

4 Wheel Drive

GMC: ‘83 Jimmy 4WD. $500. 460-9776

98

Pickups/Vans

(2) late ‘70s Ford trucks, parts or rebuild. $500/obo. 683-8193 CHEV: ‘03 S10, 5 speed. $5,800/obo. 457-7014

TOYOTA: ‘02 Lifted Toyota Tacoma SR5. V6, 5 speed, 79,000 miles, 6" Fabtech lift, 35" BFG's, Leer canopy, tinted windows, exhaust, MTX sub and amp, power windows/locks, MP3 player. $16,500/obo. 360-460-0723

CHEV: ‘07 Silverado. Crew cab, 1/2 ton, tow pkg., power, 70K, canopy, running boards, clean, well under book at $16,500. 681-0103. CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs and drives. $1,000/ obo. 477-2202.

TOYOTA ‘96 TACOMA SR5 EXTRA CAB 4X4 3.4 liter V6, 5 speed, air, tilt, cruise, CD player, rear slider, bedliner, tow package, new tires, garage kept beauty! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA: ‘09 Venza AWD. 13,000 miles, 3.5L V6, excellent condition, metallic dark grey, leather interior, auto climate control, "Star Safety System", power everything, keyless remote $27,450 Call 360-385-4267 or cell 360-390-5267.

DODGE ‘03 GRAND CARAVAN SE 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, AM/FM cassette, tow package, 7 passenger, luggage rack, privacy glass, 78,000 miles, very, very clean local trade in, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report! $6,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

101

101

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.11-2-00100-1; 11-9-00100-6 Sheriff’s No.11000246 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB, Plaintiff, VS DONNA LEWIS, Defendant(s) TO: DONNA LEWIS THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $4,573.38 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 111 S ALDER LANE PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Lot 14 of Four Seasons Park, Division 3, as recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, (page(s) 38, records of Clallam County, Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-2-00958-5; 10-9-01008-2 Sheriff’s No.11000242 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam FOUR SEASONS PARK COMMUNITY CLUB Ron Scott, agent Plaintiff, VS JAMES AND JULIE HOUK Defendant TO: JAMES HOUK AND JULIE HOUK THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY 04/22/2011, IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $3,859.16 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 654 S ALDER STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 LOT 32, Four Seasons Park Division No. 5, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page(s) 56, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010

NOTICE OF REQUEST TO CHANGE CONSERVATION RATES FOR PUGET SOUND ENERGY CUSTOMERS Puget Sound Energy on March 1, 2011 filed a request with the state Utilities and Transportation Commission to adjust electric and natural gas rates to recover the costs of investments made in energy efficiency programs that are made available to customers. The requested adjustment to the Natural Gas Conservation Program Charge, listed on PSE bills and originally proposed to become effective on April 1, 2011, would increase natural gas rates by an overall average of 0.5 percent (one-half of 1 percent). The UTC has requested adjustments for both the Natural Gas Conservation Program Charge and the Electric Conservation Program Charge be reviewed concurrently so that both adjustments can be expected to go in effect May 1, 2011. The requested adjustment to the Electric Conservation Program Charge will decrease the cost for electric service an overall average of 0.088 percent (88 one-thousandths of 1 percent). An electric residential customer who uses an average of 1,000 kWh per month will see a reduction of 29 cents per month, bringing the total monthly Electric Conservation Program Charge to $4.34. The overall average change for electric customers is as follows:

CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Mark III, auto, 232K mi., runs excellent. $800. 683-7173. DODGE: ‘79 Stake, with HD dump bed. $2,700/obo. 452-4820 DODGE: ‘89 Custom van. Great for camping, new tranny, low mi., will trade for car in good condition or $2,500/obo. Cell 940-391-9957 DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. 4 cyl. runs excellent. $2,500. 809-3215. FORD ‘01 F450 SUPERDUTY POWERSTROKE BUCKET TRUCK 7.3 liter diesel powerstroke turbo diesel, auto, air, power inverter, tow package, Altec PTO boom, 35’ manlift, heavy duty 15,000 lb GVW, dual rear wheels, service bed, platform, clean and reliable corporate lease return, spotless Carfax report. $12,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘85 Clubwagon. 8 passenger, great shape, diesel. $2,800. 360-460-3162 FORD: ‘90 Aerostar van. Runs good $1750/obo 808-4661 FORD: ‘95 F350. Powerstroke EFI diesel, AT, PB, PS, three fuel tanks, 5th wheel towing w/electronic brake, regular tow package w/electric brake, 164K miles. White color, crew cab, one owner, excellent condition. $8,500/obo. 360-450-3767 FORD: ‘95 F350. Service body, 145K mi., 5.8L V8, auto. $2,850. 461-1835. FORD: ‘98 E350. 110K miles, power locks/windows, A/C, cruise. Ladder rack, all inside racks. $6,000/obo. 460-0556 FORD: ‘98 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 106,500 miles; 6 cyl 4.0 liter 5 sp. man trans; A/C CD AM/FM; power windows & doors; alloy wheels; bed liner; shell; air shocks; very good tires. No body damage, never wrecked. $3,600. 306-797-1624 GMC: ‘70 Servicebox. Perkins diesel, Allison tranny. $1,200/ obo. 360-301-3902. GMC: ‘72 3/4 ton pick up. $500. 460-9776.

GMC: ‘97 V-8 SLE 3 door 5.8l, auto/OD new battery, locking bed cover, bed liner. Alloy wheels/new tires. CD, power, tinted, dual bags, antilock, cruise, tilt, flow exhaust, 123,000. $4,500/obo. 775-7048 JEEP EAGLE: ‘95 Minivan. AWD, 4 new tires, runs good. $3,500. 457-3521. MISC: ‘04 GMC Savana 8 Passenger Van, $7,800. ‘96 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 2WD Pickup, $2500. Both well maintained vehicles. Call for details or see online add. 360-374-6850 PONTIAC: ‘01 Montana Van. 137K, A/T V6. Needs minor work. Runs well, clean. $3,000/obo. 360-457-5081 TOYOTA: ‘98 Tacoma. 2WD, 5 speed, 124,500 miles, AM/ FM/CD, great tires, new brakes, 21 MPG, bed liner & canopy, GOOD condition. $5,050. 452-6965

PSE requested this change through the existing Electric Conservation Service Rider mechanism previously approved by the UTC and as a result of changes agreed to in Docket No. UE-100177. The mechanism allows PSE to periodically adjust its electric rates to reflect changes in investments in energy efficiency for customers made by the company. The UTC has the authority to set final rates that may vary from PSE’s request, either higher or lower or structured differently depending on the results of its review. Comments or questions on proposal: PSE customers may submit comments to the UTC about this proposal by using the online comment form at www.utc.wa.gov/comment; emailing to comments@utc.wa.gov; faxing to 360-664-4291; or mailing your comments to the UTC at: P.O. Box 47250, Olympia, WA, 98504. If you write, include your name and mailing address, the name of the company (PSE), and Docket No. UE-110399. You may also ask questions of the UTC and request that the UTC notify you of the open meeting at which these proposals will be considered by the three-member Commission. The public, including residential and small business customers, is represented by the Public Counsel Section of the Washington State Attorney General’s office. You can reach the Public Counsel Section by writing to Public Counsel, Assistant Attorney General, 800 5th Avenue, Suite 2000, Seattle, WA 98104-3188, or by e-mail at utility@atg.wa.gov. If you have questions or comments for PSE about this proposal, you may submit those questions or comments by mailing, e-mailing or calling PSE at: Puget Sound Energy, ATTN: Customer Service, P.O. Box 90868, Bellevue, WA 98009-0868, by e-mail at customercare@ pse.com or by telephone at 1-888-225-5773. Additional information about the filing is available at www.pse.com.

99

Cars

BMW: ‘94 530i. 3L, V8 5 spd. $2,950. 425-753-1666 FORD: (2) ‘88 Mustangs GT. $2,500 for both. 797-3784. FORD: ‘59 2 door wagon, V8, stick, good shape, 105K. $4,900. 683-7847.

99

Cars

LINCOLN: ‘95 Towncar. exc. cond., 81K orig. miles. $5,000. 602-677-7453 MAZDA: ‘97 Miata. Red, new top/tires, 67K mi. $5,500. 417-3965

FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053 FORD: ‘93 Escort Wagon. Must sell. $1,400/obo. 670-6883 FORD: ‘95 Mustang GT. 5 sp, V8, black, very nice, 114K mi. $5,850. 460-9078. HD: ‘96 Ultra classic. 20,657 mi., stored in garage. $7,500. 360-374-5755 HYUNDAI ‘10 ACCENT GLS 4 DOOR Very economical 1.6 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, AM/FM CD and MP3, side airbags, 31,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, spotless Carfax report. $10,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. Low mi. $9,900. 797-3130, after 5. KIA ‘10 SPORTAGE LXV6 2.7 liter V6, auto, all WD, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD and MP3, power windows and locks, luggage rack, privacy glass, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 12,000 miles, very, very clean factory program car, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, non-smoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $2,300 452-9693 eves. LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 NISSAN ‘00 MAXIMA GLE Auto, tan leather, air, cruise, CD, sunroof, power locks, windows, mirrors, military discounts! 90 day same as cash! $6,495 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 SUBARU ‘04 LEGACY ALL WD WAGON 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, MP3 player, dual sunroofs, Enkei alloy wheels, power windows and door locks, this thing is loaded! Only 62K miles! Sharp! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

TOYOTA: ‘03 Sequoia. Immac., runs perf, Carfax, all eqpt + rear A/C, dual pwr sts, moonroof (slide, tilt), run brds, priv glass, grill grd, tow pkg, alloys, wnd deflects, 2 rem keys, sir XM & boost, grt tires. 133K. Can't beat this deal! $11,000/obo. 360-461-1595 www.peninsula dailynews.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

C9

Cars

NISSAN: ‘05 Altima. Excellent condition. $9,800. 775-340-2652 PORSCHE: ‘86 944. Auto, black, many updates. $7,900. 775-5836 VW: ‘00 New Beetle. 1.8 liter turbo, only 25K mi. on factory purchased motor. Sunroof, ABS, loaded. $4,200.385-2318 VW: ‘70 Karmann Ghia. Project. $700. 681-2382 VW: ‘71 Camper. Good cond. $2,500. 360-820-0339 VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,895/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Erick Ammon, Inc , 9226 Bay Shore Dr NW, Suite 140, Silverdale WA, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Elwah River Restoration Project – Nippon Paper is located at Elwah River Treatment Plant and Nippon Paper Industries in Port Angeles, in Clallam. This project involves 1.5 acres of soil disturbance for .98 construction activities. Stormwater will be discharged to Straight of Juan De Fuca and Elwah River. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Department of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in Ecology’s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173-201A320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, Construction Stormwater P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Pub: March 31, April 7, 2011 Case No.: 11-4-00069-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE L. ARMACOST, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 17, 2011 JUDITH G. GRANLEE-GATES Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: March 17, 24, 31, 2011

CHEV ‘06 AVEO Auto, air, tilt, stereo, black cloth, nice! The original buy here pay here! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! $6,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 CHEV: ‘04 Impala LS. Low mi., leather, all power, great gas mi., excl. cond. $7,500. 452-6174.

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No.10-9-00768-5, 07-2-00811-2 Sheriff’s No.11000205 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam KAPPERT'S ENTERPRISES, INC., D/B/A KAPPERT’S WATERFRONT CONSTRUCTION, Plaintiff, VS JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH AS TRUSTEES OF THE JAMES W. AND KIMBERLY ANN CIACIUCH REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, DATED MAY 14, 1997, Defendant TO: JAMES W CIACIUCH AND KIMBERLY A CIACIUCH THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 09:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 04/22/11 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $66,779.72 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED March 21, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 310 LONGFELLOW ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 LOT 2 OF BECKLEY SURVEY, RECORDED APRIL 6, 1992 IN VOLUME 24 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 8, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 666580, BEING A SURVEY OF PARCEL 12, EAGLE RIDGE, AS RECORDED APRIL 9, 1979, IN VOLUME OF SURVEYS, PAGE 142, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494268 AND RE-RECORDED APRIL 12, 1979 IN VOLUME 3 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 143, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 494423, BEING A PORTION OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 2010

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Schedules/Type of Service Percent Increase (Decrease) Schedule 7, Residential ....................................................................................... (0.266) Schedule 24, Business General Service, 50 kW or less............................................ (0.114) Schedule 25, Business General Service, 50 kW to 350 kW...................................... (0.166) Schedule 26, Business General Service, more than 350 kW .................................... (0.155) Schedule 29, Seasonal Irrigation & Drainage Pumping Service .................................. 0.097 Schedule 31, Business, General Service ................................................................ (0.488) Schedule 35, Primary Voltage Irrigation ................................................................. (0.234) Schedule 40, Large General Service Greater than 3 aMW ......................................... 4.660 Schedule 43, Schools, Interruptible ...................................................................... (0.034) Schedule 46, High Voltage Interruptible Service ...................................................... 2.962 Schedule 49, High Voltage General Service ............................................................. 3.565 Schedules 50-59, Outdoor Lighting Service ............................................................ 0.050 Schedules 449, 459, Wheeling Service .................................................................. 0.000

Pickups/Vans

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2011

Cars

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

135116134

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of MICHAEL L. SWISHER, Deceased. NO. 11-400073-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 24, 2011 Personal Representative: Kent D. Swisher Attorney for Personal Representative: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 11-4-00073-7 Pub: March 24, 31, April 7, 2011

Case No.: 11-4-00088-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF H. GORDON BUNNELL, Deceased. The personal representatives named below have been appointed as personal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limita¬tions, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representatives or the personal representatives’ lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: March 31, 2011 PATRICIA F. BUNNELL Personal Representative MARGARET S. (“PEGGY”) MCCALLUM Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: March 31, April 7, 14, 2011


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 54

Low 37

52/34

50/34

49/37

50/37

Rain.

A little rain early; otherwise, overcast.

Cloudy.

Chance for a couple of showers.

Periods of clouds and sunshine.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain.

The Peninsula As a strong westerly flow persists across the Pacific, the unsettled and wet weather pattern will continue across the Peninsula today. With this combination of moderate rainfall and snowmelt, it is possible for some localized flooding. Expect a bit of a break Neah Bay Port in rainfall tonight and tomorrow as Western Washington sits 51/42 Townsend between systems and high pressure attempts to build in Port Angeles 54/43 from the south. Expect snow levels around 5,500 feet in 54/37 the afternoon to drop to around 4,500 feet overnight Sequim and down farther to 4,000 feet on Friday.

Victoria 56/41

55/41

Forks 54/39

Olympia 57/38

Seattle 57/42

Spokane 60/36

Yakima Kennewick 72/34 76/41

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Rain today. Wind west 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. A little rain in the evening; otherwise, considerable cloudiness tonight. Wind west 10-20 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Cloudy tomorrow. Wind west 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Saturday: Mostly cloudy with a couple of showers possible. Wind west 15-25 knots. Waves 3-6 feet.

LaPush

11:14 a.m. 11:48 p.m. Port Angeles 2:11 a.m. 1:57 p.m. Port Townsend 3:56 a.m. 3:42 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:17 a.m. 3:03 p.m.

Today

Billings 56/32

San Francisco 72/53

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Full

Last

Tomorrow

SaTurday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

7.0’ 7.4’ 6.7’ 5.6’ 8.1’ 6.8’ 7.6’ 6.4’

5:11 a.m. 5:26 p.m. 8:28 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 9:42 a.m. 9:14 p.m. 9:35 a.m. 9:07 p.m.

1.7’ 1.0’ 2.7’ 1.9’ 3.5’ 2.5’ 3.3’ 2.3’

12:00 p.m. ----2:29 a.m. 2:48 p.m. 4:14 a.m. 4:33 p.m. 3:35 a.m. 3:54 p.m.

5:55 a.m. 6:05 p.m. 8:49 a.m. 8:36 p.m. 10:03 a.m. 9:50 p.m. 9:56 a.m. 9:43 p.m.

12:20 a.m. 12:42 p.m. 2:43 a.m. 3:33 p.m. 4:28 a.m. 5:18 p.m. 3:49 a.m. 4:39 p.m.

6:34 a.m. 6:42 p.m. 9:12 a.m. 9:11 p.m. 10:26 a.m. 10:25 p.m. 10:19 a.m. 10:18 p.m.

7.3’ --6.6’ 5.8’ 8.0’ 7.0’ 7.5’ 6.6’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.1’ 1.0’ 2.2’ 2.3’ 2.8’ 3.0’ 2.6’ 2.8’

7.8’ 7.4’ 6.6’ 6.1’ 7.9’ 7.3’ 7.4’ 6.9’

0.6’ 1.2’ 1.5’ 2.8’ 2.0’ 3.6’ 1.9’ 3.4’

Apr 17

Apr 24

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 63 56 r Baghdad 85 58 s Beijing 72 43 pc Brussels 57 48 sh Cairo 84 67 s Calgary 45 26 c Edmonton 42 24 pc Hong Kong 70 65 pc Jerusalem 76 57 s Johannesburg 81 55 s Kabul 62 36 s London 63 48 c Mexico City 81 52 pc Montreal 44 30 pc Moscow 35 19 c New Delhi 95 63 s Paris 62 50 sh Rio de Janeiro 81 72 sh Rome 67 45 s Stockholm 45 44 pc Sydney 72 62 sh Tokyo 58 45 pc Toronto 46 30 c Vancouver 56 39 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Affordable Dentures And Implants To Look And Eat Your Best

New York 46/36

Washington 48/37

Atlanta 58/39

Houston 77/56 Miami 86/70

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 72 45 s 40 27 sn 54 38 r 58 39 c 46 39 r 46 37 r 64 35 pc 56 32 sh 44 27 c 66 43 s 42 34 c 43 32 c 69 46 t 65 41 pc 48 31 pc 48 30 c 57 34 sh 64 43 pc 77 58 s 74 42 pc 50 34 r 41 25 pc 62 43 pc 22 -17 sf 58 34 sh 84 68 s 77 56 pc 43 33 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 52 84 57 89 86 46 48 54 70 46 72 50 84 94 45 92 62 50 70 78 53 62 83 76 72 44 58 48

Lo W 39 r 63 s 48 c 61 s 70 s 30 pc 34 r 41 c 56 pc 36 r 47 pc 34 r 58 t 66 s 37 r 65 s 44 c 36 r 39 s 49 s 40 c 41 s 57 s 59 s 53 s 30 r 35 pc 37 r

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 92 at Palm Springs, CA

Low: -1 at Embarrass, MN

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0s

Detroit 41/25

Kansas City 52/39

El Paso 83/51

Moon Phases

Apr 11

Denver 74/42

Los Angeles 89/61

Sunset today ................... 7:42 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 6:53 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 5:29 a.m. Moonset today ................. 5:16 p.m. First

Minneapolis 48/34 Chicago 48/31

Sun & Moon

Apr 3

Everett 53/41

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 57/42

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 52 43 0.15 6.16 Forks 49 42 2.43 50.12 Seattle 51 48 0.22 13.96 Sequim 54 45 0.31 6.02 Hoquiam 50 49 2.52 30.28 Victoria 55 44 0.04 13.95 P. Townsend* 50 43 0.17 7.23 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 56/43 Bellingham 53/39

Aberdeen 56/42

Peninsula Daily News

(360) 379-1591

Major credit cards or terms on approval.

Things to Do Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County Puget Sound Coast Artil- International Airport, 195 Airport lery Museum — Fort Worden Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. AdmisState Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. sion: $10 for adults, $9 for Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for seniors, $6 for children ages children 6 to 12; free for chil- 7-12. Free for children younger dren 5 and younger. Exhibits than 6. Features vintage aircraft interpret the Harbor Defenses and aviation art. of Puget Sound and the Strait of Tax-Aide — Free assistance Juan de Fuca. Phone 360-385- with tax preparation provided by 0373 or email artymus@olypen. trained volunteers. Bring any com. and all necessary documentation. Port Townsend Recreation Northwest Maritime Center Center, 620 Tyler St. By appointtour — Free tour of new head- ment, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone quarters. Meet docent in chan- 360-385-9007. dlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welPuget Sound Coast Artilcome and pets not allowed lery Museum — Fort Worden inside building. Phone 360-385- State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 3628, ext. 102, or email sue@ Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for nwmaritime.org.

Continued from C1

Stand-up Comedy Night with David Crowe — Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 8 p.m. Tickets $15 general; $25 for VIP with two free drinks and priority seating. Available online, or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, visit www.keycitypublictheatre.org.

Friday Yoga classes — Room to Move Yoga, Second floor, 1008 Lawrence St. For more details or questions, visit www.roomto moveyoga.com or phone 360385-2864.

Now Showing n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) “The Adjustment Bureau” (PG-13) “Battle: Los Angeles” (PG13) “Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules” (PG) “Mars Needs Moms” (PG) “Red Riding Hood” (PG-13) “Sucker Punch” (PG-13)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

n  The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“The Adjustment Bureau” (PG-13) “Made in Dagenham” (R) “Poetry” (NR)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-3853883) “Paul” (R)

Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360-7653192 or 360-765-4848 or email quilcenemuseum@olypen.com or quilcenemuseum@embarq mail.com.

WSU Jefferson County Master Gardeners plant clinic —Alcove at Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Bring a sample or a few photographs for help with plant problems, gardening advice, general questions or plant identification.

25 suggested donation. Boiler Room Benefit. Phone 360-5312535 or visit www. b r i a n r o h r . c o m / Tr i c k s t e r Tales2011.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headConversation Cafe — The quarters. Meet docent in chanUpstage, 923 Washington St. dlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elenoon. Phone 360-385-6959 or vators available, children welvisit www.conversationcafe.org. come and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385Topic: True Love. 3628, ext. 102, or email sue@ Quilcene Historical nwmaritime.org.

Rhody O’s Square Dances — Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road, 6:30 p.m.

Port Ludlow Performing Arts concert series — “Too Marvelous for Words: The Songs of Johnny Mercer” with cabaret performer Lee Lessack and actress-singer Linda Purl. Port Ludlow Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, 8 p.m. Phone 360-437-2208.

children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360-385-0373 or email artymus@olypen.com. Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youth and free to PTMSC members. Phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

“And the Lamp Went Out” — Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, 7 Overeaters Anonymous — p.m. Tickets $4. Available at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Olympic Art Gallery, Quilcene, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. or by phoning Sally Brown at Phone 360-385-6854. 360-765-0200 or 765-3934.

Trickster Tales: A Night of Storytelling — Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave., 7 p.m. $12-

Roofing Open House - April 7

MEET LOCAL ROOFING PROS Need a new roof, but don’t know where to start or who to call?

Meet Chris Duff April 12 Open House Chris Duff, local contractor and lifetime traveler of oceans in small boats, is attempting to row across 500 miles of ocean, from Scotland to Iceland in his specially modified rowboat, the “Northern Reach.”

Stop by Hartnagel Building Supply to visit with several local, professional roofers on Thurs., April 7 from 11 am - 2 pm.

• Get answers to your roofing questions. • Ask about composite and metal roofing, flat roofs and more. • See our wide selection of roofing materials on display. • Learn about our in-store custom metal shop. We can bend and cut metal, including copper and stainless, for your custom project. lier THE largest supp ls ia er of roofing mat a. ul on the Penins

Mon -Fri 7:00 - 5:30 Sat 8:00 - 5:00 Now Open Sundays 10:00 - 3:00

Come meet Chris and see his boat, before he departs for this upcoming expedition. April 12 • 10 am - 1 pm at Hartnagel Building Supply

3111 Hwy 101 E, Port Angeles 452-8933 • hartnagels.com

Northern Reach t-shirt sales and donations will support his Northern Reach expedition.

Where employee owners care about your home improvement and building projects.

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“Limitless” (PG-13) “The Lincoln Lawyer” (R) “Rango” (PG)

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

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