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October 8-9, 2010

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Candidate Driver dies in van plunge has past guilty plea Prosecuting attorney hopeful’s assault case, suit involves ex-wife By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew (2)/Peninsula Daily News

A U.S. Border Patrol agent and Clallam County Fire District No. 3 rescuers wade to the van in Dungeness Bay after the driver was taken to the hospital.

‘She launched herself about 100 yards . . .’ By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

DUNGENESS — Investigators had no answers late Thursday as to why a Sequim woman’s van had raced over a 30-foot bluff into the shallows of Dungeness Bay that morning in a fatal crash. Barbara Neil, 66, was pronounced dead at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles after she sustained serious injuries, including to the head, in the 9:20 a.m. crash. She had been pulled, badly hurt but alive, from the wreckage of her 1993 Chevrolet van that while traveling north on Cays Road, shot more than 300 feet over the bluff and crashed in about three feet of water. “She was going pretty fast. She launched herself about 100 yards into the water without hitting,” said Clallam County Sheriff’s Deputy Todd Yarnes. Turn

to

PORT ANGELES — Larry Freedman, a Democratic candidate for Clallam County prosecuting attorney, settled a 1991 civil lawsuit in which his former wife, Doreen, alleged he pounded her head against a sink and countertop two years earlier, “causing severe and permanent injury,” according to Fairfax County, Va., Circuit Court records. Freedman — a 72-year-old Sequim lawyer and Democrat running against twoterm incumbent Republican Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly, 57, in the Nov. 2 general election — called the allegation that he had struck his former wife Freedman “an absolute lie.” Details of the civil suit were recently supplied to the Peninsula Daily News by the state Republican Party. Kelly was out of town Thursday and did not return calls for comment. Her campaign manager, Maggie Roth, said Kelly’s campaign was unaware of any of the information until late Wednesday.

Other information

The wreckage of the 1993 Chevrolet van is pulled up by tow operators

Van/A4 from the water below later Thursday.

The documents given to — and confirmed by — the PDN also included court records about a misdemeanor assault and a 1998 bankruptcy that Freedman said resulted from his divorce from his former wife. Feedman pleaded guilty in 1995 to misdemeanor assault in an incident involving his ex-wife’s new husband, Freedman confirmed this week. A $500 fine on the charge was reduced to $100, and Freedman’s 10-day jail sentence was suspended. Said state Republican Party Chairman Luke Esser: “The bottom line is, he is a convicted criminal.” Esser would not say where he got the information and said he did not tell Kelly he was giving the information to the PDN. Turn

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Candidate/A4

More delay for PT’s new ferry Mid-November debut now seen by state agency By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Hopes of combining the inaugural run of the MV Chetzemoka with a Halloween celebration were shattered Thursday with the announcement that the first sailing on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route will occur closer to Thanksgiving. “We are moving forward with crew trials that we expect will take us into mid-November,” Washington State Ferries spokeswoman

Marta Coursey said in an e-mail. The newly built ferry, which will take over the route from the 50-car MV Steilacoom II leased for the past three years from Pierce County, was conducting trials loading and carrying heavy trucks between Ed­monds and Kingston, Coursey said. The lease for the Steilacoom II, originally set to expire at the end of October, has been extended, Coursey said. “We have a lease until Nov. 13th on the presumption that we will have an event within that time frame,” Coursey said. The inaugural sailing ceremony is scheduled to take place in Keystone Harbor. Gov. Chris Gregoire Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News is expected to attend. The new ferry MV Chetzemoka makes a second cameo appearance in Port Townsend Turn to Ferry/A4 last weekend during a crew training session.

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Business C7 Classified D1 Comics C9 Commentary/Letters A8 Dear Abby C9 Deaths C8 Movies *PS Nation/World A3 Puzzles/Games D2 * Peninsula Spotlight

Sports B1 Things To Do C5 C10 Weather Bonus: SPRY magazine


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UpFront

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Buy PDN Photos Online” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Toni Braxton files for 2nd bankruptcy

finale while recovering from removal of a benign breast tumor. Grassgreen said the Vegas show cancellations left Braxton, 43, saddled with debts from which she TONI BRAXTON HAS could not recover. filed for bankruptcy a secBraxton has assets ond time, citing millions of worth up to $10 million, dollars in debt and finanher filing states. cial problems exacerbated She previously filed for by a heart condition that bankruptcy in 1998. forced her to cancel a series Braxton sued Lloyd’s of of Las Vegas shows. London, which had insured The filher for the Las Vegas pering will formances in case they had likely result to be canceled. The insurer in the sixdenied her claim, stating time she had a pre-existing conGrammy dition, and court records Award winshow the case was disner having missed Sept. 20. to sell some Braxton Grassgreen said the of her bankruptcy will not preassets to pay off debts vent Braxton from future listed in court records as performances. ranging between $10 million and $50 million. Dobbs’ illegal help Her attorney, Debra The Nation magazine is Grassgreen, said in a reporting that former CNN statement the Sept. 30 filanchor Lou Dobbs relied ing will allow Braxton to pay off tax debts, sell heav- on illegal immigrants to help maintain his homes ily indebted property in even as he spoke out on the Atlanta and still care for air against them. her children. The Braxton has had highNation said profile health issues in the article, recent years. In 2008, she published was forced to cancel a online series of Las Vegas shows Thursday, is after experiencing chest pains that were later diag- based on a yearlong nosed as microvascular investigaangina. Later that year, Dobbs she performed on the ABC tion including interviews with five series “Dancing with the immigrants who worked Stars” but missed the

without papers on Dobbs’ properties in New Jersey and Florida. Dobbs said in an interview Thursday the article is “a political assault” based on what he called “the lie” that he has hired illegal immigrants. He says: “I have never, do not now and never will.” Dobbs was host of a weeknight news and commentary hour on CNN until abruptly resigning in November after 29 years. He continues to host a syndicated radio show.

Swift’s trademark Taylor Swift has won a court fight against 16 individuals she claimed violated trademark by selling counterfeit merchandise bearing her name and picture. Court documents said a federal judge in Nashville granted a default judgment last week Swift permanently barring 16 individuals from making or selling Taylor Swift merchandise. Swift claimed in the suit that her merchandise enforcement team found numerous individuals selling fake goods across the country during her 2009 tour, including T-shirts with her image on them.

Passings

________ SHERMAN J. MAISEL, 92, an economist and former Federal Reserve governor whose research on housing markets shaped decades of federal policy on mortgages, died Sept. 29 in San Francisco. The cause was respiratory failure, according to the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, which announced the death. Mr. Maisel taught there from 1948 to 1965 and again from 1972 until his

retirement in 1986. His research laid the groundwork for government supMr. Maisel port of the in 1972 mortgage market. Well into the 1960s, mortgages were mostly local products. Mr. Maisel found that the structure of the mortgage market tended to suppress home construction during downturns and that the government could help buffer the economy from those cyclical swings by supporting a secondary mortgage market. President Lyndon B. Johnson named Mr. Maisel to the Fed’s board of governors in 1965. While Mr. Maisel was on the board, Johnson tapped him to serve on a White House task force on federal mortgage policies. The group proposed allowing the Government National Mortgage Association, or Ginnie Mae, to

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

COYOTE TAKING A stroll on West 11th Street in Port Angeles . . .

FRIDAY’S QUESTION: There’s talk of a viable third-party effort in the 2012 presidential election. Should we preserve the two-party system?

Yes 

No 

Undecided 

23.3% 66.0% 10.7%

Total votes cast: 908 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press and The New York Times

MILKA PLANINC, 86, who was prime minister in the 1980s in what was then communist Yugoslavia, has died, says Croatian staterun news agency HINA. HINA, quoting family sources, said Ms. Planinc died Thursday in a Zagreb clinic following a long illness. Ms. Planinc was a highlevel communist official in Yugoslavia, a close associate of longtime president, Josip Broz Tito, and the first female premier of a communist country. In 1982-86, she headed the Federal Executive Council, the federal Cabinet. Yugoslavia disintegrated in wars in the early 1990s, and the country no longer exists. Ms. Planinc retired from politics. She was disliked in Croatia for crushing a 1971 movement seeking more independence for Croatia within Yugoslavia.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Corrections and clarifications

guarantee securities backed by pools of mortgages, freeing Fannie Mae from the constraints of the federal budget to assist mortgage markets. Those decisions helped create a national mortgage market that relied on bond financing rather than local banks. Later, Mr. Maisel helped lead a study of risk and capital adequacy in financial institutions, warning of the danger of letting them make risky loans against deposit insurance funds. Those recommendations, largely ignored, might have helped prevent the savings and loan crisis in the 1980s.

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

J.H. Keeler of Sequim told U.S. Rep. Mon C. Wallgren and the Port Townsend Chamber of Commerce that Wallgren’s move toward creating a national park out of Mount Olympus National Monument is supported only by a few men in Port Angeles without any consultation of the general citizenry of Laugh Lines Clallam, Jefferson, Mason and Grays Harbor counties. Hewlett-PackKeeler said the National ard’s new CEO, Leo Park Service is not content Apotheker, just signed a three-year deal worth more with the monument and than $50 million. wants to expand. It seems like a great He said the proposed deal now, but wait until he national park would be too finds out how much the ink great a price to the people cartridges cost. who are endeavoring to Jimmy Fallon develop industries and population on the Peninsula, and that concerted action Did You Win? should be taken against State lottery results Wallgren’s park bill.

■  Thursday’s Daily Game: 6-0-0 ■  Thursday’s Keno: 04-08-10-14-17-29-37-38WANTED! “Seen Around” 45-46-47-48-50-53-60-63items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles 66-71-73-78 WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or ■  Thursday’s Match e-mail news@peninsuladailynews. 4: 08-09-17-21 com.

In another action, the commissioners continued a public hearing to Oct. 19 on a petition to cut down the size of a proposed annexation to Port Angeles city of lands south of Lauridsen Boulevard. The continuance knocks out any chance of the measure appearing on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

1985 (25 years ago)

Olympic National Park officials heard again a message in Port Angeles and Forks to keep the Fairholme store operating at the west end of Lake Crescent. The park has drawn up four proposals for Fairholme, including three that would relocate the store and a fourth option that would leave things largely as they are now. Park officials are concerned about the safety of the store and gas station’s 1960 (50 years ago) current entrance from U.S. Clallam County comHighway 101 as well as missioners approved a peti- underground gasoline stortion extending the boundage tanks that could cause aries of Fire District No. 3 environmental damage to to the Diamond Point area the lake should they rupand territory near Fairview. ture.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, Oct. 8, the 281st day of 2010. There are 84 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 8, 1871, the Great Chicago Fire erupted; fires also broke out in Peshtigo, Wis., and in several communities in Michigan. On this date: ■  In 1869, the 14th president of the United States, Franklin Pierce, died in Concord, N.H. ■  In 1918, American Sgt. Alvin C. York led an attack that killed 25 German soldiers and captured 132 others in the Argonne Forest in France. ■  In 1934, Bruno Hauptmann was indicted by a grand jury in New Jersey for murder in the death of the son of Charles A. Lindbergh.

■  In 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced that the secret of the atomic bomb would be shared only with Britain and Canada. ■  In 1956, Don Larsen pitched the only perfect game in a World Series to date as the New York Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 5, 2-0. ■  In 1957, the Brooklyn Baseball Club announced it was accepting an offer to move the Dodgers from New York to Los Angeles. ■  In 1967, former British Prime Minister Clement Attlee died in London at age 84. ■  In 1970, Soviet author Alexander Solzhenitsyn was named winner of the Nobel Prize for literature. ■  In 1981, at the White House,

President Ronald Reagan greeted former Presidents Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon, who were preparing to travel to Egypt for the funeral of Anwar Sadat. ■  In 1982, all labor organizations in Poland, including Solidarity, were banned. ■  Ten years ago: Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski won a second five-year term. ■  Five years ago: A major earthquake flattened villages on the Pakistan-India border, killing an estimated 80,000 people. Delphi Corp., the largest U.S. auto supplier, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Delphi emerged from bankruptcy protection in 2009. An Associated Press Television News crew covering the aftermath

of Hurricane Katrina videotaped three New Orleans police officers beating retired teacher Robert Davis. Davis was charged with public intoxication and resisting arrest, but the charges were later dropped. Two of the officers involved were fired. ■  One year ago: An Arizona sweat lodge ceremony turned deadly as some participants became ill and collapsed inside the 415-square-foot structure; three died. Motivational speaker James Arthur Ray, who’d led the ceremony, has pleaded not guilty to three counts of manslaughter. A powerful car bomb exploded outside the Indian Embassy in Kabul, killing 17 people.


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 8-9, 2010

Second Front Page

Page

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Briefly: Nation Senate report: Warlords hired as contractors

quences on consumer protections.” The bill would loosen the process for providing a notary’s seal to documents and allow them to be done electronically. Obama will not sign a bill WASHINGTON — Heavy that would allow foreclosure U.S. reliance on private security and other documents to be in Afghanistan has helped to accepted among multiple states. line the pockets of the Taliban Consumer advocates and because contractors often don’t state officials had argued the vet local recruits and wind up hiring warlords and thugs, Sen- legislation would make it diffiate investigators said Thursday. cult for homeowners to challenge foreclosure documents The finding, in a report by prepared in other states. the Senate Armed Services The White House said ThursCommittee, follows a separate day it is sending the bill back to congressional inquiry in June that concluded trucking contrac- Congress for revisions. O. Max Gardner, a consumer tors pay tens of millions of dollars a year to local warlords for lawyer in Shelby, N.C., said the bill would have made the probconvoy protection. Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of lems with foreclosure documents worse. That’s because the Senate panel, said he is worried the U.S. is unknowingly mortgage companies would have fostering the growth of Taliban- been able to mass-produce documents and affix a digital version linked militias at a time when Kabul is struggling to recruit its of a notary’s seal rather than own soldiers and police officers. one on paper. “We need to shut off the spigot of U.S. dollars flowing Stimulus misdirected into the pockets of warlords and WASHINGTON — More power brokers who act contrary than 89,000 stimulus payments to our interests and contribute of $250 each went to people who to the corruption that weakens were either dead or in prison, a the support of the Afghan peogovernment investigator says in ple for their government,” he a new report. added. The payments, which were part of last year’s massive ecoForeclosure bill nomic recovery package, were WASHINGTON — President meant to increase consumer spending to help stimulate the Barack Obama has rejected a economy. bill that the White House fears But about $18 million went could worsen the mounting to nearly 72,000 people who problems caused by flawed or were dead, according to the misleading documents used by report by the Social Security banks in home foreclosures. White House press secretary Administration’s inspector general. Robert Gibbs said Thursday The report estimates that a that Obama is sending a newly little more than half of those passed bill back to Congress to payments were returned. be fixed because the current version has “unintended conseThe Associated Press

Briefly: World Peruvian wins Nobel prize for literature STOCKHOLM — Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa won the 2010 Nobel Prize in literature Thursday as the academy honored one of the Spanish-speaking world’s most acclaimed authors and an outspoken political activist who once ran for president in his tumultuous homeland. Vargas Llosa, 74, has written more than 30 novels, plays and essays, including Conversation in the Cathedral and The Green Vargas Llosa House. In 1995, he won the Cervantes Prize, the most distinguished literary honor in Spanish. He is the first South American winner of the prestigious Nobel literature prize since Colombian writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez won in 1982 and the first Spanish-language writer to win since Mexico’s Octavio Paz in 1990. The Swedish Academy said it honored him for mapping the “structures of power and [for] his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt and defeat.”

Peace talks hope JERUSALEM — The Palestinians said Thursday they have accepted a U.S. proposal calling

on Israel to extend a West Bank settlement slowdown for two months, the latest indication that a deal is emerging to keep peace talks from collapsing. Under U.S. pressure, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been sounding out key Cabinet members on extending the freeze in exchange for American political assurances, but he has run into stiff opposition from pro-settlement ministers. Another deadline of sorts has emerged with today’s planned summit of the 22-nation Arab League, where the Palestinians expect support for whatever they decide.

Sufi shrine bombed KARACHI, Pakistan — Two suspected suicide bombers attacked the most beloved Sufi shrine in Pakistan’s largest city Thursday, killing at least eight people, wounding 65 others and sending a stark reminder of the threat posed by Islamist militants to this U.S.-allied nation. The explosions at the Abdullah Shah Ghazi shrine in Karachi happened on Thursday evening, the busiest time of the week for Sufi shrines across the country. Thousands typically visit the Ghazi shrine on Thursdays to pray, distribute food to the poor and toss rose petals on the grave of the saint. Ghazi was an eighth-century saint credited with bringing Islam to the region along the coast. Local legend has it that his shrine protects Karachi from cyclones and other sea-related disasters. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Dead fish lie along the Marcal River near Boba, Hungary, on Thursday. “Life in the Marcal River has been extinguished,” rescue official Tibor Dobson said.

Toxic red sludge kills tributary, hits Danube By George Jahn

The Associated Press

KOLONTAR, Hungary — Red sludge flowed into the Danube River on Thursday, threatening a half-dozen nations along one of Europe’s key waterways. Monitors took samples every few hours to measure damage from the toxic spill, and emergency officials declared one Hungarian tributary, Marcal River, dead. As cleanup crews gathered deer carcasses and other wildlife from the villages in southwestern Hungary flooded by the industrial waste, environmental groups warned of long-term damage to the farming region’s topsoil. Conflicting information swirled about the dangers posed by the ankle-deep muck coating the most seriously hit areas after the collapse of a waste-storage reservoir at a nearby alumina plant Monday. The Hungarian Academy of Sciences maintained that while the material was a continued hazard, its heavy metal concentrations were not considered dangerous to the environment. “The academy can say whatever it wants,” fumed Barbara Szalai Szita, who lives in Devecser, one of the hardest-hit villages. “All I know is that if I spend 30

minutes outside, I get a foul taste in my mouth and my tongue feels strange.” Hungary’s environment minister, Zoltan Illes, said the hennacolored sludge covering a 16-square-mile swath of countryside does have “a high content of heavy metals,” some of which can cause cancer.

Hazards seen He warned of possible environmental hazards, particularly if it were to enter the groundwater system. With rain giving way to dry, warmer weather over the past two days, the caustic mud is increasingly turning to airborne dust, which can cause respiratory problems, Illes added. “If that would dry out then . . . wind can blow . . . that heavy metal contamination through the respiratory system,” he said. Amid the conflicting reports, officials had one piece of encouraging news: The mighty Danube was apparently absorbing the slurry with little immediate harm beyond sporadic sightings of dead fish. The red sludge, a waste product of aluminum production, reached the western branch of the Danube early Thursday and was flowing into its broad main stretch by noon.

By evening, it was moving southward toward Serbia and Romania. At monitoring stations in Croatia, Serbia and Romania, officials were taking river samples every few hours, though experts hoped the river’s huge water volume would blunt the impact of the spill. Hungarian rescue agency spokesman Tibor Dobson said the pH content of the sludge entering the Danube had been reduced to the point where it was unlikely to cause further environmental damage. An environmental group that monitors threats to the Danube said the breached reservoir was on a 2006 watch list of some 100 industrial sites that were at risk for accidents that could contaminate the 1,775-mile-long river. The International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River coordinates conservation efforts in the nations bordering the waterway and its tributaries. It is still not known what caused a section of the reservoir to collapse, unleashing a torrent of some 35 million cubic feet of sludge that killed at least four people and left three missing. More than 150 people were treated for burns and other injuries, and 11 remained in serious

Pirates target U.S. tourists; drug gangs handcuff search The Associated Press

ZAPATA, Texas — A search for a missing American tourist presumably shot and killed by Mexican pirates on a border lake has been thwarted by threats of an ambush from drug gangs, U.S. officials said Thursday. U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar told reporters that Mexican authorities are doing everything they can to find David Hartley’s body while trying to keep their own crews safe. “When darkness was falling [Wednesday evening], they got word that there might be an ambush,” Cuellar said. “People that are trying to do their job on the Mexican side are facing a risk, they’re right inside the hornets’ nest . . . they had to

Quick Read

suspend the search.” Cuellar said the search resumed midmorning Thursday. Tiffany Hartley said her husband, David, was shot to death by Mexican pirates chasing them on speedboats across Falcon Lake on Sept. 30 as they returned on Jet Skis from a trip to photograph a historic Mexican church. Neither his body nor the Jet Ski has been recovered. Texas officials have warned boaters and fishermen that pirates frequent the Mexican side of the lake, a 25-by-3-mile dammed section of the Rio Grande. That part of Tamaulipas state is overrun by violence from a turf battle between the Gulf Cartel and the Zeta drug gang, and both are battling the Mexican military. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, cam-

paigning for re-election in Houston, said such threats were no excuse. “I don’t think we’re doing enough. When you call off the search the way they did . . . and give as the reason because the drug cartels are in control of that part of the state, something’s not right,” Perry said. “We do not need to let our border continue to deteriorate from the standpoint of having drug cartels telling whether or not we can go in and bring the body of an American citizen who was killed. That is irresponsible.” Zapata County Sheriff Sigifredo Gonzalez said he has sent word to the Zetas that he wants the body returned and has no plans to prosecute.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Burning yam truck clogs L.A.-area freeway

Nation: Stolen hot dog stand sought by N.Y. police

Nation: Southern Baptist leader warns against yoga

Nation: Woman reaches for eye drops, grabs glue

A burning big-rig loaded with yams caused a hot potato of a traffic problem on a Los Angeles-area freeway. California Highway Patrol Officer Ed Jacobs said a tractor-trailer hauling 50,000 pounds of the sweet potatoes caught fire on the southbound Interstate 5 in Glendale at about 2:30 a.m. Thursday. No injuries were reported, but two of the four southbound lanes were closed for about 71⁄2 hours, slowing traffic until the yams could be loaded into another truck. The lanes reopened shortly after 10 a.m.

Police in a suburb northwest of New York City are searching for a stolen hot dog stand. Owner Fred Martucci said he’s devastated over the loss of “Fred’s Franks” — the 10-foot-long, 7-foot-wide stainless steel trailer he used to support his family in Orangeburg for more than a year. On the evening of Sept. 30, three men pulled into a parking lot, cut the trailer’s locks and cables, hitched it to their pickup truck and drove away. Police viewed surveillance footage, but they have a limited description of the suspects and vehicle because the crime happened on a rainy night.

A Southern Baptist leader in Kentucky who is calling for Christians to avoid yoga and its spiritual attachments is getting plenty of push back from enthusiasts who defend the ancient practice. Southern Baptist Seminary President Albert Mohler said the discipline, derived from Eastern religions, is not a Christian pathway to God. Mohler said he objects to “the idea that the body is a vehicle for reaching consciousness with the divine.” Mohler said feedback has come through the Internet since he wrote an essay to address questions about yoga he has heard for years.

An Arizona woman accidentally glued an eye shut when she mistook super glue for her eye drops. The Glendale woman had cataract surgery a year ago. She was reaching for what she thought was one of her half-dozen eye drop medications; their bottles are nearly identical to that for the glue. The burning sensation told her immediately something was seriously wrong. Hospital staff cut off the hardened glue covering her eye. Once the eye was opened, doctors washed it out to prevent major damage.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 8, 2010 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Ferry: 2 weeks Continued from A1

The ferry is stationed now in Eagle Harbor on Bainbridge Island and is scheduled to conduct trials involving Tahlequah, Edmonds/Kingston and Port Townsend over the weekend. “We are completely focused on finishing the outfitting and testing operability to ensure an early November delivery date,” Coursey said. “We are still planning to put the vessel into immediate service once the inaugural event is done.”

After the ceremony, the ferry will sail the route to Port Townsend, where another ceremony is planned. The two ceremonies originally were planned for Aug. 29, the original sailing date, but were postponed after excessive vibration was detected during ferry sea trials in July. The vibration has since been fixed. Port Townsend city officials said they will need about two weeks of plan________ ning for the ceremony, Jefferson County Reporter which is expected to include Charlie Bermant can be reached at using the vessel for the Port 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com. Townsend Family Photo.

Army officer recommends trial in Afghans’ deaths The Associated Press

JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — An investigating officer at Joint Base Lewis-McChord has recommended a court martial for one of the soldiers accused of killing three civilians in Afghanistan. The recommendation this week from Col. Thomas Molloy goes to the commander of the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, for a final decision on a

military trial. Spc. Jeremy Morlock, 22, of Wasilla, Alaska, is one of five Lewis-McChord soldiers accused of killing civilians for sport in a recent Stryker brigade deployment. All have denied the accusations. They could face the death penalty if convicted. Morlock was the first to have a pretrial hearing, on Sept. 27 at the Army base near Tacoma.

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Sampling

organically grown fare

The Grant Street Elementary School kindergarten class of Port Townsend spent Thursday morning learning about organic food at the Port Townsend Co-op. Here, from left, William Hiegel, Lukas Hausenfluck, Malachi Jackson, Madison Harris, Lizzy Krajewski, Rosy Crecca and Jesse Allan, background, scarf up samples. 

Van: ‘Saw a spray of water,’ one witness says could be pulled up the cliff and towed. Yarnes said the Sheriff’s Office called in a State Patrol trooper and crash technician to determine the rate of speed the car was traveling when it plunged off the bluff.

Continued from A1 No skid marks marked Cays Road where the van left the road, State Patrol Trooper Keith Nestor acknowledged, indicating that the brakes had not been applied. The cause of the wreck remained under investigation Thursday.

Boat, helicopter rescue

‘Humongous’ splash Ken Phillips, who lives at 220 Marine Drive, called in a report of the crash, saying he saw a “humongous” splash. “I thought at first someone had used dynamite,” he said. Steve Anderson, a plumber working at the Dungeness Barn House bed-and-breakfast at the corner of Cays Road and Marine Drive near the crash scene, said, “I heard it barreling down the road.” Turning toward the waterfront, Anderson said he heard a sound like

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

The driver is placed on a U.S. Coast Guard rescue helicopter that landed in a grassy field near the crash scene. a backfire. The Cays and Thornton “We saw a spray of water roads leading to Marine come up over the cliff” from Drive on Dungeness Bay were blocked off Thursday the bay, he said.

so that Sheriff’s Office deputies and State Patrol troopers could conduct an investigation and the wreckage

Neil was not wearing a seat belt, investigators said. Phillips said it was the second such crash in recent years off Marine Drive into the bay. His wife, Kris, said that four years ago, a motorist shot off the bluff near Thornton Road and Marine Drive and their sons had helped in the rescue. Speeding along Marine Drive has been a problem, she said, with some motorists traveling upward of 45 miles per hour on the narrow bluff-side road. “We would probably like to push for some speed tables out here,” she said, referring to the wide speedbump-like options for slowing traffic. “This lady had to be going in excess of 60 mph to go that far out in the bay,” Kris Phillips said.

The rescue of the injured woman entailed both a boat and a helicopter. Battling a rising tide, Clallam County Fire District No. 3 personnel rowed a small boat to the swamped van in the bay and used a tow line to bring Neil to land. District 3 paramedics carried her up the stairs at the bluff and across Marine Drive to a waiting Coast Guard MCH-65 Dolphin helicopter. The crew from Air Station/Sector Field Office Port ________ Angeles had landed in a Sequim-Dungeness Valley Edigrassy field off Marine tor Jeff Chew can be reached at Drive near Dungeness Bay 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com. to take Neil to OMC.

Candidate: Freedman pleaded guilty to assault Continued from A1 not name. “If this is all fact,” Roth Roth said Thursday that said, “if he beat his wife and on late Wednesday, she has a DV [domestic vioreceived the same two-page lence], if he beat up his ex“Factual Summary” received wife’s husband, is that the by the PDN — but not other person I want for county documents — by e-mail prosecutor?” from someone she would Freedman saw political

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motives behind the dissemination of the cases. “Obviously, they want to try to bring up something from 16 or 18 years ago to try to get Kelly elected,” he said.

Denies allegations Freedman denied beating his former wife 21 years ago or in any way ever assaulting her. He said he pleaded guilty to the assault and settled the civil suit so that his children — the couple had four — would not be drawn into what he described as a fractious marriage that ended in a messy divorce. Freedman had discussed the assault case in the past without giving specifics.

Freedman’s wife filed the civil suit after the couple were separated but before their divorce was finalized in 1992. The lawsuit alleged that while they were still living together in Oakton, Va., on Aug. 5, 1989, he assaulted her “by hitting her about her body and by grabbing her head and striking the same repeatedly against a sink and countertop.” The lawsuit said she “sustained various bodily injuries, including severe and permanent injury to her inner ear.” Freedman said his wife was injured when she hit her head on a dock during an argument with neighbors at Chesapeake Bay, Md. “She had too much to drink,” he said. She was knocking the neighbors’ chairs into the water when she fell in, hitting her head, Freedman said.

Freedman said he was about 25 yards away when she fell. He said that, once she was out of the water, he prevented her from throwing a chair at the neighbors by gripping the chair. Two years later, in 1991, when the two were separated, she filed a civil suit in Fairfax County Circuit Court for $100,000 in compensatory damages and $100,000 in punitive damages. Freedman agreed to pay all of her medical expenses stemming from the incident. “I never had to pay one dollar on it,” Freedman said. Otherwise, she would have filed the suit immediately and would not have dropped her demand for $200,000, he said. The misdemeanor assault case resulted from an incident that occurred after she had remarried,

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Picking up sons According to Freedman’s account, he had made previous court-approved arrangements to pick up his two sons, who were about 9 and 11, at her home to take them to a birthday party. The children did not appear to be there, and she and her new husband would not tell Freedman where they were, Freedman said. The three were arguing when his ex-wife’s husband “got up and came at me,” Freedman said. “He was bigger than I am,” he said. As the man stepped forward, Freedman stepped forward, too. “I straight-armed him with my left hand in the side of the cheek and moved away,” Freedman said. “That was it.” Freedman’s lawyer advised him to plead guilty. “I made a mistake in swinging before he got to me,” he said. “I should have known better.” The debts under the 1998 bankruptcy were satisfied within two years, Freedman added. Balloting in the prosecuting attorney’s race begins next week when ballots for the all-mail election are distributed starting Wednesday. Voting ends Nov. 2.

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he said. Both remained in Fairfax County after their divorce.

Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

A5

PA mulls budget without service cuts Much depends upon labor negotiations By Tom Callis

Staff members are proposing using $531,000 in reserves in 2011. About PORT ANGELES — $2.4 million in reserves will City Hall is proposing a be spent this year. 2011 budget that includes no cuts to services or staff Labor concessions and increases funding for The labor concessions infrastructure improvements despite stagnating the city is pursuing include no cost of living raises, a sales tax revenue. The proposed budget, to 50 percent reduction in be considered for adoption merit increase and a 1 perby the Port Angeles City cent increase in the employCouncil in December, uses ee’s contribution to medical little in the way of reserves insurance payments. All together, the proand is able to avoid employee and service cuts as a result posed concessions would of conservative planning, save the city between particularly during the eco- $310,000 and $330,000 next nomic recession, said year. Ziomkowski said the city Yvonne Ziomkowski, city already is cutting funding finance director. But whether services are for supplies and “outside maintained may depend on services,” and she doesn’t a handful of labor conces- think any more cuts can be sions the city will propose made without affecting serduring union contract nego- vices and staff. tiations that begin next “In my opinion, we’ve week. already made quite signifiZiomkowski said some cant cuts in the discretionservice and staff cuts would ary spending,” she said. have to be made if the proZiomkowski said the city posals are not met and the hasn’t determined what council doesn’t approve would be cut if the concesspending more from its sions are not made and reserve accounts. reserves are not used. Peninsula Daily News

investing more in infrastructure projects, which would total $35 million next year. Almost all of that is for utility-related projects, such parks, recreation, police, as the state-mandated effort fire, public works and other main services): to control the city’s sewage 2011 — $17,947,334. overflows and plans to 2010 — $17,278,695. install automated meters. Yvonne Ziomkowski, city More than $14 million finance director, attributed the will be spent on those projincrease to four other funds ects alone, she said. being merged with the general Another $4.1 million is fund. proposed for street improvePolice Department: 2011 — $4,830,742. ments. 2010 — $4,707,127. Ziomkowski said the city Fire Department: is mostly paying for the 2011 — $2,433,661. projects with $10.25 million 2010 — $2,415,744. in bonds, grants and a Parks and recreation: wastewater utility fee. 2011 — $2,011,629. Some of the other utility 2010 — $2,166,827. Street maintenance: projects include storm water 2011 — $1,715,557. improvements on west 2010 — $1,815,406. Fourth Street intended to Peninsula Daily News eliminate flooding there, the purchase of low-energy light bulbs for street lamps, contracts with the city concrete pipe replacement couldn’t be immediately and the construction of a reached for comment. sewer trestle at Francis and The overall proposed city Eighth streets. budget for 2011 is about $123.18 million, an increase Property taxes of about 24 percent over The city is proposing a 1 2010’s $99.4 million percent increase in property amended budget. tax revenue next year. A majority of the budget That would add $40,000 covers purchasing electric- to city coffers and cost the ity from the Bonneville owner of a $200,000 home Power Administration and an extra $4.52 a year. other utility costs. By law, the city could Ziomkowski attributed raise the property tax revethe increase to the city nue by 2 percent because it

Budget by the numbers PORT ANGELES’ PROPOSED 2011 budget includes no staff or service cuts. It also increases overall spending by about 24 percent as a result of $35 million in infrastructurerelated projects proposed next year. They are mostly funded by bonds, grants and a wastewater utility fee. Here are the numbers, comparing between 2010 and the proposed budget for 2011: Total budget: 2011 — $123,180,477. 2010 — $98,346,489. General Fund (includes

It’s the city’s policy to not use reserves on operating expenses, such as salaries and benefits, she has said. Representatives of Teamsters Local 589, which represents Port Angeles police officers, and the International Association of Fire Fighters in Port Angeles declined to comment on the city’s proposal since they are about to enter negotiations. The representatives of the other two unions with

didn’t increase it last year. The City Council has told staff that it wants to keep the raise to 1 percent. Sales tax revenue, which has been decreasing over the last six years, is expected to remain the same in 2011, Ziomkowski said. The only proposed fee increases would raise the cost for banner rentals from $85 to $100 and the city’s after-school day camp program from $155 to $165 per person. The city is also proposing to spend $1.6 million from its economic development fund. The money would mostly go the city’s waterfront improvement project and facade improvement program and assist Angeles Composites Technologies Inc. to expand its campus. The fund was established with $7.5 million from the state in compensation for the failed Hood Canal bridge graving yard project. About $4.4 million would be left after 2011. Ziomkowski said the city intends to use revenues from economic growth to maintain the fund.

________

Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Council nixes hike on electrical permit fee Rate is not high enough, deputy director of power systems says By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A proposed electrical permit fee increase was given the thumbs down from the City Council earlier this week. The Port Angeles City Council on Tuesday, noting the slow economy, told staff to find a way to keep the fee level next year. “My fear is negative repercussions,” said council member Brooke Nelson. “That is, people will not want to build in the city.” The electrical permit fee was proposed to increase by 25 percent, or between $30 and $41.40, depending on the size of the connection. Larry Dunbar, deputy

power systems director, told the council that the electrical permit fee is not high enough to cover the work done by the city’s inspector, that the proposed increase was intended to resolve that problem.

Every year since ’08

inspections are subsidized by utility rate payers. The city is also proposing to increase utility fees by $4.65 per month next year. The fee increases would apply to the electrical base charge, which hasn’t changed since 1993, and a wastewater fee that pays for the city’s approximately $40 million project to reduce its sewage overflows from up to 100 per year to no more than four. The electrical base charge would be $13 per month (a $2 increase), and the combined sewer overflow, or CSO, wastewater fee $14.95 per month (a $2.65 increase).

The fee has been raised each year since 2008, as approved by the council then, and this year was supposed to be the last increase needed to recover the costs of electrical inspections. “It may have made sense ________ in 2008,” said council member Brad Collins. “I don’t Reporter Tom Callis can be think it makes sense in reached at 360-417-3532 or at 2011.” tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. Dunbar said the cost of com.

Sequim police host public safety fair next weekend Peninsula Daily News

A clinic will be set up to inspect and install car seats and CarFit “helping the mature driver find the best fit” at the Sequim Skate Park. Sequim Police Department K-9 Chase and K-9 Officer Mike Hill will provide a demonstration in the afternoon. Participating agencies

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SEQUIM — The city of Sequim is seeking applicants for a Planning Commission term expiring Jan. 10, 2012. The commission serves as an advisory body to the City Council on land use and zoning issues. Applicants for this position must live in the city. Applications are available at Sequim City Hall, 152 W. Cedar St.; by phoning 360-683-4139; or at www.ci.sequim.wa.us.

Tom McKeown, left, and Don Clayton man the sign-in desk at the Clallam County Veterans Stand Down at the Clallam County Fairgrounds in Port Angeles on Thursday. Haircuts, employment services, counseling, housing assistance, legal aid and outdoor equipment were some of the services and items offered to veterans in need during the event.

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SEQUIM — About 30 booths with information about crime prevention, disaster preparedness, personal safety and senior resources will be featured at the Sequim Police Department’s Fifth Annual Public Safety Fair on Saturday, Oct. 16. The fair will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Guy Cole Convention Center at Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Blake Ave. Local, state and federal agencies will provide information from booths inside the center, while emergency vehicles will be parked outside for children to explore. “This is an outreach event for all agencies represented,” said Officer Maris Turner, Sequim Police

Department spokeswoman. “Our goal is to reach as many people as possible.” Police vehicles and fire trucks will be displayed. A Coast Guard helicopter will land. New this year will be Washington’s Most Wanted vehicle. The Sequim Masonic Lodge will offer a chip identification system for children.

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

30 vendors to participate at event

include Sequim Code Enforcement, PenCom, Clallam County Juvenile Services, Clallam County Department of Emergency Management, Clallam County Fire District 3, Clallam County Sheriff ’s Department — which oversees a search-and-rescue team, boat patrol and DUI task force — State Patrol, Sequim Masonic Lodge, Coast Guard, Coast Guard Auxiliary, Crime Stoppers, Health and Human Services, Senior Information and Assistance, Olympic Ambulance, Healthy Families of Clallam County, Border Patrol, Security Services, American Red Cross, KSQM-Sequim Community Broadcasting, CarFit, Washington’s Most Wanted and ARES/RACES.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

24th District hopefuls talk finances Candidates trade words on budget woes, services By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT LUDLOW — The balancing act between fiscal responsibility and providing services was the main topic at a forum earlier this week among candidates in the two races to represent the 24th District in the state Legislature. “Balancing the budget without raising taxes will be a priority for the Legislature,” said Dan Gase, speaking before about 150 people at the Port Ludlow Bay Club on Wednesday night. Gase, 56, a Port Angeles Republican, is challenging incumbent Kevin Van De Wege, 35, a Sequim Democrat, for the Position 1 seat. “The state doesn’t have an income problem,” Gase said. “It has a spending problem.” Gase, a real estate managing broker and consultant, called for “an end to the outrageous continued spending on item after item after item on programs that the state should not be involved in. “If we don’t have an economy, we can’t fund gov-

ernment and people don’t have jobs, and this must be the focus of the Legislature on all levels for the foreseeable future.” Gase and Van De Wege appeared along with the candidates for Position 2, Sequim Republican Jim McEntire, 60, and Sequim Democrat Steve Tharinger, 61. Tharinger, a Clallam County commissioner, and McEntire, a Port of Port Angeles comissioner and a retired Coast Guard captain, are seeking the seat vacated by Hoquiam Democrat Lynn Kessler, who is retiring this year. The forum was sponsored by the Port Ludlow Village Council and the Peninsula Daily News and was moderated by PDN senior writer Paul Gottlieb.

Job creation “Job creation is what will get us out of the recession,” said Van De Wege, a firefighter and paramedic. “When you have a job, you are part of your community and are less likely

Steve Tharinger Compromise is essential

Jim McEntire Private sector grows jobs

Dan Gase Kevin Van De Wege State has spending trouble Job creation is the key

to need state services, be involved in a domestic abuse situation or have health problems,” he added. Van De Wege said he has been successful in generating jobs in the past and will continue to do so in the future. McEntire said that government should “get out of the way of the private sector and let the private sector grow jobs, which is what it does best. “If we get the economy out of the ditch, tax revenue will take care of itself,” he said. Tharinger said that budgets won’t be developed

without compromise and that he is the best-equipped to help reach consensus. “We are in a very challenging fiscal environment because of the global recession,” Tharinger said.

resign his port position if elected to the Legislature, while Tharinger plans to stay put, at least until the end of his current county term. Tharinger, criticized during the primary election for “double dipping,” has presented his potential dual public job description as an advantage. “I think we need to create a government that is better integrated on all levels,” Tharinger said. “Being a legislator and a commissioner, and having a vote in both bodies, will actually help that consolidation.”

Coalition building “The key is to build coalitions and break down those barriers between city and county and the state, and look toward providing what the most essential services should be provided by our limited tax dollars.” Both Tharinger and McEntire now hold elective office. McEntire said he will

McEntire thinks that his single vote would be enough to represent the district. “During my career, I have developed a rich background in the understanding of policymaking on both the local level and the federal level,” he said. “I will be able to bring a very strong skill set on your behalf in Olympia and be effective from Day One.”

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Dicks confirms attendance Election sessions at league forum Wednesday set for this week Peninsula Daily News

Can submit any questions via e-mail now Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Rep. Norm Dicks and Doug Cloud will face off in their first debate of the general election Wednesday. The debate, hosted by the League of Women Voters of Clallam County, will be from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth St., Sequim. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. for the debate, which is free and open to the public. Dicks, a Democrat from Belfair who has served since 1976 as the representative of the 6th Congressional District — which includes

Norm Dicks 6th District incumbent

Doug Cloud Congressional hopeful

the North Olympic Peninsula — is being challenged in the Nov. 2 general election by Cloud, a Gig Harbor Republican. Mail-in ballots for the Nov. 2 general election will be sent to registered voters

Wednesday. Dicks’ spokesman, George Behan, confirmed Thursday that Dicks will attend the debate. Questions can be submitted now via e-mail from the league’s website, www. LWVCLA.org.

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57, of Port Angeles, is seeking a third four-year term as prosecuting attorney. Her challenger, Democrat Larry Freedman, 72, is a Sequim attorney. Initiative 1082, the Washington Workers’ Comp Insurance Reform Initiative, would privatize the state system.

Port Townsend The Jefferson County League of Women Voters is hosting an informational meeting on ballot measures at 7 p.m. Monday in the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port Townsend. Earlier that day, the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce will host a forum with Van De Wege and Gase. It will be at noon at the Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St., Port Townsend. Jefferson County commissioner and prosecuting attorney candidates will be featured at a candidate forum hosted by the league on Thursday. The forum will be at 7 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 1350 Jefferson St. Jefferson County Commissioner Position No. 3 incumbent Democrat John Austin and his Republican challenger Jim Boyer as well as Prosecutor candidates Scott Rosekrans and Paul Richmond are expected to speak. The Clallam County league forums are co-sponsored by the American Association of University Women, KONP, The Sequim Gazette and the Sequim Senior Activity Center. The Port Townsend forum is co-sponsored by the American Association of University Women of Port Townsend, the Jefferson County League of Women Voters and the weekly Port Townsend Leader.

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Several candidates forums are scheduled in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend during the next week, including one on Saturday. Candidates for District 24 seats in the state House of Representatives will be presented in a League of Women Voters of Clallam County forum at 2 p.m. Saturday. The forum will be in the Port Angeles City Council chamber, 321 E. Fifth St. Incumbent Kevin Van De Wege, 35, a Democrat from Sequim who is a firefighter and paramedic, is being challenged by Republican Dan Gase, 56, a Port Angeles real estate managing broker and consultant, for Position 1. Republican Jim McEntire, 60, of Sequim, one of the three Port of Port Angeles commissioners and a retired Coast Guard captain, and Steve Tharinger, 61, also of Sequim, one of the three Clallam County commissioners, are vying to replace Rep. Lynn Kessler, D-Hoquiam, who is retiring this year from Position 2. On Wednesday night, Clallam County prosecuting attorney candidates and the pros and cons of Initiative 1082 will be presented at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St. The forum will be at 7 p.m. Republican Deb Kelly,

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Half of the questions presented to the candidates will be drawn from e-mailed questions, and the other half will be gleaned from the audience that attends the debate, said Laura Lanka, league spokeswoman. Each candidate will have the opportunity to answer each question. League member Cathy Claney will serve as moderator. Dicks, 69, is the secondranking member of the House Appropriations Committee and is a member of two appropriations subcommittees — Defense, and Interior and Environment. Cloud, a lawyer, unsuccessfully ran against Dicks in 2006 and 2008. The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization. This debate is co-sponsored by the American Association of University Women, radio station KONP and the Sequim Gazette.

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

A7

Sequim pedestrian struck by car in PA Police: No ticket for driver seen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A Sequim man was treated for head and shoulder injuries and discharged from Olympic Medical Center after he was hit by a car while walking across Front Street on Wednesday night. John De Stackelberg, 58, of Sequim was crossing Front Street at its intersection with Albert Street at about 10:15 p.m. Wednesday when he was hit by a 1988 Mazda driven by Paul Gottlieb, 58, of Port Angeles, according to the Port Ange-

les Police Department report. Port Angeles Police Deputy Chief Brian Smith said that Gottlieb, a senior staff writer for the Peninsula Daily News, likely will not be cited. “Based on what they know so far, the behavior of the driver doesn’t indicate that he broke any laws that would recommend getting a ticket,” Smith said.

Driver applied brakes Gottlieb braked as he approached the crosswalk but was not able to stop in time, Smith said. He was not hurt. De Stackelberg was treated and discharged from OMC, a hospital representative said Thursday. Smith said that

De Stackelberg was discharged the night of the mishap. The incident remains under investigation. Smith said police “have not ruled out” citing De Stackelberg. De Stackelberg was wearing dark clothing and appeared to be intoxicated, Smith said. “The officer saw clear evidence that he showed signs of being intoxicated. That contributes to their decision to look a little further,” Smith said. Smith did not know what De Stackelberg might be cited for but said that an Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News example could be disorderly conduct, which is defined as Port Angeles police Officer Dallas Maynard examines the vehicle that knowingly creating a haz- struck a pedestrian at Front and Albert streets in Port Angeles late Wednesday evening. ardous situation.

Briefly . . . Man, 47, goes to hospital after shooting

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

‘Girls’

enjoy their night out in

Port Townsend

Shopping during Girls Night Out in Port Townsend on Thursday are, from left, Sarah DuBose, Lisa Hickman and Lyn Glaviano. Proceeds from the sale of goody bags and hats benefited the Jefferson County Health Department’s breast/cervical fund for cancer screenings for women in need and the Port Townsend Main Street Program, one of the co-sponsors along with Jefferson Healthcare Home Health & Hospice and participating merchants.

Silent Witness Exhibit shown Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County

The next day, the display will be in Sequim, at the Bank of America, 114 S. Sequim Ave., from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a vigil and keynote speaker at noon. On Oct. 22, the display will be at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dove House Advocacy Services has previously displayed more than two dozen silhouettes borrowed from other domestic violence agencies in the state.

Silent Witness exhibits are planned in Port Angeles and Sequim later this month. On Oct. 20, a display will be at The Gateway at Front and Lincoln streets from Own stories 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a vigil and keynote speaker at This year, thanks to a noon. private donation of plywood

and the construction work of Boeing Bluebills, Dove House has its own statuettes and stories of Washington victims. The exhibits are meant to help people connect with local resources for ending violence in their lives and encouraging community and legislative action to end domestic violence Dove House’s 24-hour crisis line is 360-385-5291.

Film festival PORT ANGELES — A free film festival will highlight people with developmental disabilities on Saturday, Oct. 16. The festival will begin at 10 a.m. at the Port Angeles High School auditorium, 304 E. Park Ave., and continue throughout the day, with a performance by the group Sequimarimba at 3 p.m.

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SEQUIM — The League of Women Voters of Clallam County will sponsor the second of a series of forums on water issues in the Dungeness River watershed Monday, Oct. 18. The forum will be from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim. Invited speakers include Joe Holtrop of the Clallam Conservation District, Janet Nazy of the Partnership for Water Conservation and Dave Nazy, hydrogeologist with the state Department of Ecology. Additional technical experts will be available to answer questions regarding water availability in the Dungeness River Basin and offer tools for protecting water supplies. At least 30 minutes will be set aside for questions and answers. Informational tables and displays containing more information will be available before and after the formal forum program. Peninsula Daily News

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PORT TOWNSEND — Dove House Advocacy Services, a domestic violence/ sexual assault agency in Jefferson County, will host a Silent Witness Exhibit at locations in Port Townsend and Port Hadlock today and Sunday. The exhibit will be in Adams Street Park at Water and Adams streets in Port Townsend from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today, and at the Jefferson County Library, 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The events will be held in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October.

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PORT ANGELES — A 47-year old man was taken to Olympic Medical Center after sustaining a gunshot wound in his leg Thursday night, police said. Police found the unidentified wounded man while investigating a 6:45 p.m. report of an argument in the 3700 block of South Hill Circle, said Brian Smith, Port Angeles deputy police chief. The Port Angeles man, who was shot with a smallcaliber handgun, reportedly had been arguing with family members, Smith said. Investigators were at the home Thursday night to determine what had happened, the deputy chief said, adding that no arrests had been made. All those believed to be involved in the event were in contact with officers, and there were no additional suspects or witnesses at large, Smith said. The Port Angles Police Department was assisted by the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Border Patrol.

Snap, a nonprofit organization that aims to empower people with developmental disabilities and their families, is presenting The Sprout Touring Film Festival from New York City. The goal of Sprout Films is to make “the invisible visible,” said Snap in a prepared statement. “The film festival will provide an entertaining and enlightening experience that will help promote a greater acceptance of differences and awareness of similarities,” Snap said. For more information, phone Jenell DeMatteo at 360-379-8934.


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 8-9, 2010

Commentary

Page

A8

Consequences of choices we make JENNIFER CAME TO visit on Gramma’s only day to write a newspaper column. While Granddad Martha fixed Mom’s car, Jenni, Ireland Mom and Gramma went shopping. Mom had errands she had to see to. Jenni walked Gramma’s dog — or maybe Dixie dog walked her. Getting back in the car seat and moving on to the next errand upset Jenni, but eating lunch out cheered her up. At Gramma and Granddad’s farm, she helped gather a bucket of chickweed, fed it to the chickens and collected two eggs without breaking them. That’s quite a feat for a girl who’s not yet 2 years old. Jenni and Gramma played with blocks and balls and read books. Jennifer wore Gramma’s big straw gardening hat and sat on

Gramma’s antique saddle that Gramma doesn’t put on a horse anymore. Gramma took pictures. Mom got most of what she needed to do done. Gramma didn’t. But she had fun. A night of writing is the natural consequence of indulging in other priorities all day. Gramma thinks spending a rare day with Jennifer is well worth the consequences, but irresponsible life choices can exact a too-high price. Facing the consequences of one’s actions is good, but impacts are often far-reaching. A huge example comes from the more than $600,000 in real estate excise tax revenue that went missing from the Clallam County Treasurer’s Office in the past five years. Those funds may have briefly comforted the alleged embezzler, but in the long term all that money bought her is a ruined reputation and a disastrously derailed life. The damage spreads far beyond the perpetrator. The insurance settlement leaves county taxpayers holding the bag for nearly $50,000 in deductible

mer county employee allegedly did, isn’t rare. I suspect we all know people who’ve seized opportunities to take what wasn’t theirs, devastating people who trusted them. A local woman I’ve liked and admired for her tenacity in the face of adversity is among those suddenly without a job and without prospects for that very reason. Her friends are disappointed in her. Coworkers who relied on her are burdened by having to do Martha Ireland what was her work, as well as Granddaughter Jenni wears their own. Clients are waiting the author’s big gardening nervously to see how their losses hat. will be recouped. Another local family I know is tottering on the brink of losing and investigative costs. Clallam County’s capital proj- their home. The father maintained a porects fund, the state, and the cities nography habit, which he hid of Port Angeles, Sequim and Forks should have received their well until he recruited a teen friend of one of his children to act shares years ago, and may each out what he saw on the screen. come up 10 percent short, makOut of jail now, he’s prohibited ing for very real community-wide from living with his family, and consequences. is unable to get a job despite havIn addition, the incident could ing excellent technical skills. cost the incumbent treasurer her As his unemployment benefits office in the coming election. run out, he can scarcely pay his Unfortunately, succumbing to own rent, much less contribute to monetary temptation, as that for- his family’s mortgage payment.

Peninsula Voices Serious voting The privilege of voting in elections is one of the most important aspects of our freedom and helps define us as the greatest nation on the face of the Earth. I take voting very seriously and research issues and candidates carefully before each election. It was shocking to me to listen to Todd Ortloff’s KONP program on Sept. 30 as Dan Gase and Kevin Van De Wege squared off concerning their race for one of the 24th Legislative District, Position 1. A question was called in regarding I-960 (which required two-thirds legislative approval for tax increases), and their positions on the Legislature basically overturning the will of the majority of the people of Washington. Mr. Van De Wege’s answer was astonishing. He admitted that he voted to suspend I-960 in order to be able to balance the budget (as did many other Democrats). Nonsense. You balance the budget by spending less than you receive in revenue, not by thumbing your nose at the people who elected you. Make cuts where they are possible. Eliminate programs, departments or less essential personnel. Try running your household finances using the Legislature’s principles.

If you value transparency, good health and a clean environment, vote for Steve Tharinger to represent the 24th District in the state Legislature and for John Miller, director of the Clallam County Department of Community Development. Steve’s years of service and his various positions — boards to help those in need of special services, county Planning Commission, local and state natural resource committees, and Clallam County commissioner — well qualify him to represent us in the state Legislature. His opponent, Jim McEntire, port commissioner, has done the opposite of what his own campaign material reads: a “fiscal conservative,” “will

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Fluoride opponent Since recently moving to Port Angeles, I have been informed the city water supply is medicated with fluoride. Medicated? Yes, the FDA classifies fluoride as a substance which may be classified as either a drug or cosmetic. In toothpaste it is a cosmetic, but in water it is a drug. I understand the City Council authorized this mass medication several years ago. My question: How many physicians and/or dentists did it take to write the prescriptions for more than 20,000 people on the city water system? Thomas Utley, Port Angeles always put the needs of the people of the 24th Legislative district first,” and “will vote to eliminate spending programs not needed or have failed to achieve their goal[s].” Jim worked behind closed doors to keep the public ignorant (“public process would have seriously threatened our ability to accomplish our purposes” (port to city, Aug. 28, 2008) when creating HarborWorks to assume Rayonier’s polluter liability and pass cleanup costs to the public, and voted 600,000 of public

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Then things get weird. Pop star Lady Gaga is the world’s seventh most-powerful woman, according to Forbes. That ranking trumps TV host Ellen DeGeneres (No. 10), Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (No. 11), Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano (No. 13) and Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor (No. 18). Forbes said it decided to “look up and out into the broader culture” to compile the list of women from the arenas of politics, business, media and lifestyle. Peninsula Daily News news sources

Peninsula Daily News Executive Editor

Martha Ireland was a Clallam County commissioner from 1996 through 1999 and is the secretary of the Republican Women of Clallam County, among other community endeavors. Martha and her husband, Dale, live on a Carlsborg-area farm. Her column appears every Friday. E-mail: irelands@olypen.com.

Transparency

Here’s another first for Michelle Obama: First among Forbes magazine’s 100 most powerful women in the world. In the annual rankings released this week, Forbes says the first lady has been a “true change-maker” since coming to the White House. The business publication cited her high approval ratings, her status as a role model and her campaign against childhood obesity. Obama displaced German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who had held the top spot for the last four years. The first lady at No. 1 is followed by Kraft Foods executive Irene Rosenfeld, TV host Oprah Winfrey, Merkel and

n

________

Can you spell foreclosure? Maybe we should foreclose on the state Legislature. No. Better yet, just vote for Dan Gase, who is a staunch fiscal conservative. While you are at it, cast another vote for Position 2 candidate Jim McEntire, who will do a wonderful job if elected. It is time to take state government seriously. Vote Dan Gase and Jim ­McEntire. Michael B. Stenger, Port Angeles

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And then there are the small white signs along every highway, reminding drivers of others who made regrettable choices with deadly results: Don’t drink and drive. Don’t drug and drive. Each sign was bought with the blood of a victim of someone’s bad choices. The choices we the voters make when marking our ballots also have consequences. Taxes rise, economies tumble and excessive entitlements encourage unsustainable irresponsibility. Ballots will be mailed Wednesday and must be returned or postmarked by 8 p.m. on Nov. 2. Vote responsibly, for the sake of the growing generation, Jennifer and her peers.

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dollars for this scheme. John Miller oversees planning, development and building permitting, certain environmental health programs and more. He supports watershed buffers to protect streams, salmon and properties from flooding, is having the county develop a storm­ water plan and influenced watershed protection in WRIA 19 and 20. John served on the governor’s advisory committee addressing rising sea level impacts, an issue critical to coastal Clallam County. Please support Steve and John, candidates with solid, respectable records. Darlene Schanfald, Sequim

Earthlike planet

facing its star. That’s it. We do not have the spectroscopic data to say whether it actually does have an atmosphere, and if so, what that atmosphere contains. We do not have the spectroscopic data to say whether it actually does have water. We need much more data before we can be making claims of an almost 100 percent chance of supporting life. A Victoria radio station was already talking about us moving there when we finish polluting our own planet. Our Port Angeles High School integrated science students are studying observation and inference right now, and know that nothing is 100 percent unless you have it right there for you to see, smell, touch, taste and hear. In the spring, they study spectroscopy, so they know exactly what data it would take to find out what the planet is really like. We need to wait for all the data before we make any conclusions. John Gallagher, Port Angeles

I was very excited by the recent discovery of a planet in the habitable “Goldilocks” zone around another star. However, in the excitement of the announcement, some details need to be clarified. What do we really know about this planet? It has sufficient mass to be able to hold onto an atmosphere. It is the right distance from its star to be at an Antarctica-like temperature, Gallagher is a science so liquid water could exist. teacher at Port Angeles High It keeps one side always School.

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing reporter, 360-382-4645; sturdylegs@msn.com

Lead and fluoride When I took chemistry, the professor told us that at the turn of the last century there was no detectable lead in the seawater. Then leaded gasoline was introduced and it got to the point that lead pollution was so bad that leaded gasoline had to be prohibited. We are now fluoridating our water. In order to treat about 25,000 gallons of drinking water, we are fluoridating about 25,000,000 gallons of water daily. The fluoride is not biodegradable and will remain in the water forever. Now comes a report that fluoride levels in the Great Lakes exceed the Canadian water quality guidelines for aquatic species with some concentrations in sewage effluent five to 10 times in excess of the maximum. At these levels fluoride is known to be toxic to a variety of marine species. Isn’t it about time that we quit treating our water ways as waste disposal sites? Perhaps we should require an environmental impact study on fluoridation. Rudy Meyer, Port Angeles

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Motivated by maxims and money The second time the beach ball hit me on the head, I started feeling motivated. Not to become an instant millionaire with the help of Jesus and some cheesy business evangelists. Rather, I felt motivated to Maureen flee the 9-hour, $9.95 Get Moti- Dowd vated! seminar at Washington, D.C.’s Verizon Center, which had devolved into a faux beach party with DJs playing ’80s music and audience members tossing around plastic beach balls and dancing to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and Van Halen’s “Jump.” But I stayed in the church of capitalism, determined to hear what wisdom headliners Colin Powell, Rudy Giuliani, Dan Rather, Steve Forbes and Terry Bradshaw would dispense. Aren’t these guys affluent enough without whatever exorbitant fees they were collecting for their bromides to the beaten down? Nearby, Fortune was hosting a gathering celebrating the nation’s most powerful women, drawing speakers such as President Obama, Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton. But the sports arena featured some weird counterprogramming: famous men who once were considered prospects for president, now buck-raking and giving a patina of legitimacy to carnival barkers pushing quick-cash schemes bathed in Biblical inspiration and patriotism. Thousands of people mired in the new Age of Anxiety turned hopeful eyes to the parade of Professor Harold Hills, waiting for that one elusive diamond of advice that could change their lives. Never mind that it was all a variation on “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for,” or the scene in “The Wizard of Oz,” when Glinda the Good Witch reveals to Dorothy that she has

had the power to get home all along. Except at Get Motivated!, the seminar organizers entice audience members to Bradshaw sign up for more seminars that, for a fee, will teach them the secrets of cashing in on stocks, real estate and the Internet. I arrived at 8:30 a.m. as Steve Forbes was talking. Naturally, it was still about the flat tax, with the same lines he used when he ran a geek-chic campaign for the GOP nomination in 1996. Rick Belluzzo, the former chief operating officer for Microsoft, told us we need to “own our own development” and that “perseverance can pay off.” Then football analyst Terry Bradshaw lumbered on, momentarily alarmed when the shooting fireworks on stage nearly singed his backside. “I need a woman with money,” Bradshaw cackled, noting that he was a 62-year-old mama’s boy with three ex-wives. He seemed more like a man who could use some advice rather than one paid for giving it. “I’ve never really motivated anybody,” he announced cheerfully. The former Steelers quarterback grumbled that quarterbacks like Peyton Manning and Donovan McNabb get paid millions more than he did to follow plays dictated by coaches. After noting that “Jesus is my savior,” he shared this life lesson with the would-be entrepreneurs: When your receiver is about to be tackled, “keep it simple: Chuck it to him anyway.” After the audience was wooed to sign up for more sure-fire money-making classes and DVDs, Colin Powell came out to a rain of red and blue streamers. He was the most charming speaker, confessing that he coped with being out of the limelight by driving a Corvette, at 73, around suburban Washington.

His advice? Be nice to the little people, the ones who clean your office and park your car. Write thank you notes on 4-by6-inch cards. Giuliani “I write with a fountain pen,” he said. “Never a Sharpie. Never a ballpoint pen.” Then came another sales pitch from a guy who said he went from being a homeless drug dealer to the “world’s No. 1 Internet wealth entrepreneur” with a $2.4 million estate in Texas. He offered a course at an airport Marriott valued at $11,226.90 for a bargain $29. When it was his turn, Rudy Giuliani began with a few choice words about Al Gore and global warming, before moving on to his pearls of wisdom. The first one was: “You have got to have a computer.” As he explained to the diminished crowd that remained: “That other world that used to exist doesn’t exist anymore.” Having advised the audience to get computers, he went on to counsel on ways to “protect yourself against the information revolution.” The first was: “Read books.” He even got a little touchyfeely. “The government has to have a safety net. I’m not disputing that. But it’s not important. The one that’s really important is the one you create for yourself.” He concluded, “You know how you do that? You love people.” I came away with one important new insight about getting rich quick: An easy way to do it is to dole out fortune-cookie maxims at getrich-quick seminars.

_________

Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. Contact Dowd via http:// tinyurl.com/dowdmail.

Eco-radicals turn against children Halloween isn’t for another three weeks, but environmental ghouls are on the haunt. A sadistic video released Michelle by globalMalkin warming fearmongers reveals an inconvenient truth about eco-radicals: They despise the very children for whom they claim to be saving the planet. In the opening scene of “No Pressure,” a four-minute short clip produced by carbon reduction activist group “10:10,” a teacher urges her elementary school charges to fight climate change by cutting their carbon emissions by 10 percent by Oct. 10. When a few uncooperative students object, the teacher (played by actress Gillian Anderson) presses a red button at her desk — which immediately detonates the naysaying children. Their heads explode in graphic, bloody detail. Skin and body parts splatter all over their horrified classmates. Message received loud and clear: No dissent allowed, little rascals. Or else. The film’s corporate sponsors, including Sony and Kyocera, backed away from the project, and the 10:10 group offered a sulky, non-apology apology to “everybody who was offended.” But the group will not censor any copies of the video circulated on the Internet and stands by its “humor.” The 10:10 crew isn’t the only green group that gets a kick out of kiddie eco-snuff images. The Discovery Channel website Treehugger.com gave its “coolest environmental ad” award last year to a lobbying group that depicted the “human impact” of “climate change” with an illustra-

tion of a dead schoolgirl hanging from a noose with a melting glacier at her feet. Unfortunately for America’s children, demographic authoritarianism isn’t relegated to the global green fringes. President Barack Obama’s own science czar, John Holdren, has escaped accountability for his embrace of international eugenics champion and mentor, Harrison Brown. Brown looked at the world’s children in contempt, referring to them as a “pulsating mass of maggots.” Though Holdren denies that he believes “that determining optimal population is a proper role of government,” he still pays proud public homage to Brown’s population control work advocating better living through engineered abortions to protect the Earth. Perhaps all the fatuous parents who allow their sons and daughters to be junior lobbyists for the green agenda will now think twice about handing them over so blindly to the state. And perhaps some of their propaganda-swallowing teachers might actually talk to a family or two who find zero humor in environmental terrorism. Violence is no joke to the children of animal research scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Over the past two years, eco-terrorists have physically attacked and intimidated the biomedical experts and their spouses. As The Chronicle of Higher Education reported in 2008, one “researcher and her children cowered in the back of their house” while environmentalists assaulted her husband. “(A)cti­vists had scrawled the words ‘murderer’ and ‘torturer’ in chalk on the sidewalk in front of her house and leading up to her front porch. They wrote graffiti at the home of one of the postdoctoral research fellows in her laboratory, and they appeared at the homes of two other university

employees, smearing garbage and yelling at them.” In a separate incident two summers ago, another Santa Cruz-area researcher’s home was firebombed by animal-rights terrorists. The scientist and his two young children escaped on a fire ladder from a second-story window. Earlier this year, yet another researcher’s car brakes were sabotaged and emergency brake cables were cut. When these planetary crusaders aren’t harassing children with their terror campaigns, they’re openly deriding youngsters as loathsome burdens or selfish indulgences whose numbers must be curtailed. The eugenics-inspired officials of Planned Parenthood have blanketed the Third World with population control signs and stickers that preach, “The fewer, the merrier.” London academic John Guillebaud of the Optimum Population Trust assailed children as energy thieves a few years ago: “The effect on the planet of having one child less is an order of magnitude greater than all these other things we might do, such as switching off lights. “An extra child is the equivalent of a lot of flights across the planet. . . . The greatest thing anyone in Britain could do to help the future of the planet would be to have one less child.” Guillebaud accused large families of committing “eco-crimes.” Al Gore’s four children were unavailable for comment. The elite commanders of the green war on children get to live by their own special creed: Do as we say, not as we breed.

________ Michelle Malkin is author of Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks & Cronies. Her column appears in the PDN every Friday. E-mail: malkinblog@gmail. com.

Friday, October 8, 2010

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Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 8-9, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Outdoors

Silvers a force in Elwha River NOBODY’S WALKING ON their backs, but coho are certainly showing up in the Elwha River. Despite a so-so preseason Matt forecast, the North Olympic Schubert Peninsula’s secondary salmon are making an impact near Port Angeles. Lower Elwha Klallam natural resources director Doug Morrill said approximately 200 coho had reached the tribal hatchery as of Thursday. That’s good news, considering only 800 were expected to return for the entire season. “They are beautiful fish, I’d say easily 12-pound to 15-pound fish,” Morrill said. “We’ve already got a couple hundred here. “That’s pretty good for this time in the season. Usually we don’t get fish coming into the hatchery until we get higher water flows. “The fact that we’ve already got 200 at the hatchery rack is a pretty good indicator of some abundance this year.” So far, however, that abundance hasn’t translated into red-hot fishing for sports anglers on the Lower Elwha. Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-457-2357) in Port Angeles said anglers have run into a few fish, but “it sounds like the West End might have been better. “It sounds like fish are pouring into the Hoh and Sol Duc.” Randy Lato of All-Ways Fishing (360-374-2052) in Forks has yet to get on the rivers but has heard of a few good reports as well out west. “It’s been pretty good,” he said. “[The rivers] are all producing, but the Hoh seems to be doing really well. “The Sol Duc has a lot of fish in it too, but it’s not hard-boat friendly right now as low as it is. “This shot of rain [expected this weekend] should absolutely bring a bunch of fish in.” The river scene on the eastern Peninsula took a hit when the Quilcene River closed to fishing last weekend. Low coho returns to the hatchery led to a closure by the state. Such action likely won’t be necessary on the Dungeness River, which has already seen 100 returning coho this fall. That’s well ahead of the 2008 (40) and ’09 (75) runs at this same time. The Dungeness opens to salmon fishing Oct. 16.

Getting salty

Turn

Another pitching gem San Francisco’s Lincecum hurls Giants to 1-0 win The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — The Freak really showed up for San Francisco on his biggest stage yet. Tim LinceAlso . . . cum pitched a ■ Yankees, two-hitter and Rangers struck out 14 both go up in a dominat2-0 in ing postseason ALDS/B4 debut, and the Giants scored their only run after a questionable umpiring call to beat the Atlanta Braves 1-0 in Game 1 of their NL division series Thursday night. “That’s one of the best efforts I’ve ever seen,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “What a great job that kid did. He’s tough.” Lincecum pitched a gem, a day after Philadelphia’s Roy Halladay threw only the second no-hitter in postseason history in his debut. Lincecum outdueled playoff veteran Derek Lowe and caught

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Schubert/B4

a break, too. Cody Ross singled in the only run Lincecum needed in the fourth after Buster Posey was called safe on a steal of second by umpire Paul Emmel. It was the first career steal for Posey, even though he appeared to be tagged out by Brooks Conrad on the play — retiring Braves manager Bobby Cox, the all-time leader in ejections, did not argue. “I haven’t seen it,” Cox said. “Some of the guys came down after that inning and said he was out by six, eight inches. From the dugout you can’t see anything.” Lincecum struck out Derrek Lee for the third time to end the 119-pitch masterpiece in 2 hours, 26 minutes. He became just the 12th pitcher with 14 or more strikeouts in a postseason game. In a postseason already filled with plenty of stellar pitching, this was the first 1-0 game in the postseason since 2005. Turn

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The Associated Press

San Francisco Giants starter Tim Lincecum delivers a

Playoffs/B4 pitch to Atlanta on Thursday in San Francisco.

Preview

Crucial battle for PA Riders will host North Mason Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles football team may be facing a new league opponent when it hosts North Mason tonight at 7 p.m. in Civic Field. But these two teams are hardly strangers. The Roughriders lost backto-back season openers to the Bulldogs in 2008 and ’09 by a combined score of 67-12 before dropping down from Class 3A to 2A this offseason. Now both teams are in the same league and classification. And the Riders, sitting near the top of the Olympic League standings at 3-0 in league and 5-0 overall, aren’t about to take the Bulldogs (2-1, 3-2) lightly. Even with first-place Sequim (4-0, 5-1) waiting in the wings just three weeks later. “We have a great deal of respect for [North Mason],” first-year Port Angeles coach Tom Wahl said. “We are absolutely not looking past them by any means. Turn

Maybe the salmon lost their invitation in the mail. The crowds came out for the wild salmon fishery in Marine Area 6 (eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca), but the fish refused to dance. Anglers had a hard time hooking coho and blackmouth during the first week of the fall fishery, with the latter scarce and the former scattered. “Silver fishing in the Straits is kind of a hit-and-miss deal,” Aunspach said. “They can get them one day and not find them the next. It could be a six-hour trip to get two fish, because they really scatter out here for whatever reason. “There are just so many places the fish go to” The Area 3 (LaPush) bubble fishery has been a bit of a tough go as well. Between cruddy conditions and fasting fish, anglers have had a lot to deal with. “It’s pretty tough,” Randy Lato of All-Ways Fishing (360-374-2052) in LaPush said. “They are terminal, so it’s pretty tough to get them to bite, but every now and then they will grab a hold.” The LaPush Last Chance Salmon Derby went just one day (Saturday) due to inclement conditions. The winning chinook was 34 pounds, according to Lato. There were also some 12-pound coho caught.

SCOREBOARD Page B2

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Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Kelly Winn, front, looks toward her teammates after winning the 500yard freestyle event Thursday in Sequim. Behind her is Tori Bock of Port Angeles, who took second in the race.

Riders defeat Sequim PA undefeated in league action Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Jenna Moore and Tracie Macias were double winners to propel Port Angeles 134-42 over archrival Sequim in an Olympic League girls swimming meet Thursday at SARC. The Roughriders won all 12 events and swept three of them — 200-meter freestyle, 500 free and diving — while improving Preview/B3 to 5-0 in league and 5-1 overall. “That was a hard meet for us because out of our 14 girls, at least five were sick and trying to swim, and when we are swimming against a team that is that much bigger it is hard to stay positive and happy with our performance,” Sequim coach Susan Craig said. Moore won the 200 free in 2:16.47 and the 100 breaststroke in 1:20.56 while Macias won the 100 free in 59.57 and the 200

Football

Wolves demolish Kingston Peninsula Daily News

KINGSTON — A matchup of two of the Olympic League’s top football playoff contenders turned rather one-sided as Sequim smashed Kingston 56-29 on Thursday night. After giving up a touchdown on Kingston’s second possession of the game, the Wolves responded with six unanswered scores on their way to a blowout win. The victory put Sequim (4-0 in league, 5-1 overall) all alone atop the Olympic League standings . . . at least for 24 hours. Unbeaten archrival Port Angeles (3-0, 5-0) hosts North Mason (2-1, 3-2) tonight in another Olympic League tilt. “It’s a big win,” said Sequim coach Erik Wiker, whose team is now 29-0 in October games. Turn

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Preps individual medley in 2:28.71. Ashlee Reid of Port Angeles set a district qualifying time in the 100 butterfly in 1:14.35. She captured second place. Other Port Angeles winners were Tarah Erickson in 50 free, Tanesha Jackson in diving, Kaitlin Fairchild in the 100 fly, Kelly Winn in the 500 free and Lexie Pankowski in the 100 backstroke. Also winning were the Rider 200 medley, 200 free and 400 free relays. Sequim senior Rachel Hardy dropped two-tenths of a second off her 50 free time to bring her within a second of the state qualifying time while junior Autumn Kessinger dropped an amazing 5.5 seconds off her 100 back time. Port Angeles next swims at the North Kitsap High School pool against Kingston on Thursday while Sequim swims against

powerhouse Bainbridge on Tuesday in nonleague action and North Kitsap in league competition Thursday.

Volleyball Port Angeles 3, Klahowya 0 SILVERDALE — The Roughriders remained perfect in the Olympic League with the victory over the Eagles on Thursday. Port Angeles (3-0, 6-3) won 25-7, 25-16, 25-20. Taylyn Jeffers led the Riders with 12 kills, four blocks and two serving aces while Lauren Norton served 12-for-12 and had seven assists and three digs. Kiah Jones, meanwhile, earned five kills and five aces, and she served 27-for-28. Setter Emily Drake had 15 assists and two digs while Laney Boyd served two aces and had nine digs. Turn

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Preps/B3

PT hosts Fort Worden invite Peninsula Daily News

FORT WORDEN — As the high school cross country season hits the home stretch, some of the state’s finest runners will come to Fort Worden State Park on Saturday. Once the site of the state meet in the mid-1980s, the former military base now plays host to the Fort Worden Invitational each October. This year’s event will include 15 schools from five classifications. Among the schools attending are Class 2B Naselle; 1As Port Townsend, La Center and Orting; 2As Kingston, Olympic, Port Angeles and Sumner; 3As Auburn-Mountain View, Bainbridge, Liberty of Issaquah and Wolves/B3 Peninsula; and 4As Ballard,

Lake Stevens and MarysvillePilchuck. Defending 1A state champions Bereket Piatt of host Port Townsend could be considered the favorite in the varsity boys race. Although, teammate Habtamu Rubio, last year’s 1A runner-up, is just one of the runners that could give Piatt a push. Kingston’s Marina Roberts comes into the varsity girls race with two invitational titles under her belt this season. That included a resounding 42-second victory at the Salt Creek Invitational in September. This year’s course start/finish is located by the Balloon Hangar on Littlefield Green at Fort

Worden. There will be two loops, with the first slightly longer than the second. The course will have a combination of trails, grass, doubletrack, and pavement. There are a few short hills on each lap and some fast downhill sections, including going into the finish. “The trails are in beautiful shape,” race organizer Jon Muellner said, “with a number of good spectating spots at the top of the hill on the first loop and mid-point along the first trail section, as well as the long finish [straightaway].” The free open race begins at 9:30 a.m. That will be followed by the girls JV race at 10:15 a.m., JV boys at 11 a.m., varsity girls at 11:30 a.m. and varsity boys at noon.


B2

SportsRecreation

Friday, October 8, 2010

Today’s

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Peninsula Daily News

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

10 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Constellation Energy Classic (Live) 12 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, The McGladrey Classic (Live) 1:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Horse Racing, Breeder’s Cup Challenge (Live) 3 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Cincinnati Reds vs. Philadelphia Phillies, National League Division Series, Game 2, Site: Citizens Bank Park - Philadelphia (Live) 3:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing, NASCAR Pepsi 400 Sprint Cup Series Qualifying (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Connecticut vs. Rutgers (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Oklahoma vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (Live) 6:30 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Atlanta Braves vs. San Francisco Giants, National League Division Series, Game 2, Site: AT&T Park - San Francisco (Live) 10:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf APGA, Asian Amateur Championship (Live) 5:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, Site: St. Andrews Links - Fife, Scotland (Live)

SPORTS SHOT

Today Football: North Mason at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Port Townsend at Life Christian Academy, 7 p.m.; Vashon Island at Chimacum, 7 p.m.; Forks at Montesano, 7 p.m.; Highland Christian at Clallam Bay, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Easton-Thorp at Thorp High School, 3 p.m. Volleyball: Sequim at Vashon Island, 5:15 p.m. Boys Tennis: Port Townsend/Chimacum at Bremerton, 4 p.m.; Kingston at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.

Saturday Football: Muckleshoot at Quilcene, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Port Angeles at Monroe Tournament, 8:15 a.m.; Sequim at Capital City Invitational, 9 a.m. Cross Country: Port Angeles and Forks at Port Townsend’s Fort Worden Invitational, 10 a.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Oct. 6 Birch’s Wednesday Seniors Men’s High Game: Mac Shawver, 244 Men’s High Series: Ken McInnes, 633 Women’s High Game: Deone Keller, 213 Women’s High Series: Gladys Kemp, 517 League Leaders: Mountain Beavers Oct. 6 Lakeside Big Four Men’s High Game: Josh Fagan, 268 Men’s High Series: Josh Fagan, 706

Golf CEDARS AT DUNGENESS Lady Niners Sept. 23 Results First Division (11-17) 1st Place: June Hall, 26 2nd Place: Jan Boyungs, 28 3rd Place: Dona Scarcia, 29 Second Division (18-29) 1st Place: Jan Stromberger, 23 2nd Place: (tie) Pat Charters and Jinny Hunt, 25 PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Oct. 7 Medal Play Individual Gross: Mark Jefferies, 72; Lane Richards, 75 Individual Net: Bart Irwin, 65; Bill Hansen, 66; Quint Boe, 66; Jeff Colvin, 66; George Peabody, 66; Mike Ferong, 67; Keith Lawrence, 67; Bill Pampell, 68; Ray Dooley, 69; Chuck Turner, 69; Tom Hainstock, 69 Team Gross: George Peabody and Mark Jefferies, 66; George Peabody and Chuck Burkhardt, 67 Team Net: Tom Fryer and Lane Richards, 59; Tom Hainstock and Bart Irwin, 59; Quint Boe and Darrel Vincent, 60; Bob Dutrow and Mark Jefferies, 60; Dave Henderson and Gary McLaughlin, 61; Dwayne Dean and Mike Robinson, 61; Dwayne Dean and Keith Lawrence, 61; Jeff Colvin and Eric Kovatch, 61; Jeff Colvin and Win Miller, 61; Bob Dutrow and George Peabody, 61; Chuck Burkhardt and Mark Jefferies, 61 SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Club 2010 Fall Field Day 1,2,3 Results 1st place: Barrows, Kasher and Elvert, 113 2nd Place: Anderson, Fitzgerald and Aldrich, 116 3rd Place: Fuller, Dejong and Mattson, 118 4th Place: (tie) Olsen, Palmeri, Hightower & Vertegen and Hart, Prout, Chirhart & Leslie, 120 6th Place: Hirschfeld, Littlefield, Claussen and Barnhart, 121 7th Place: (tie) Dickin, Caufield, Meyer & Fogard and Coulter, Obrien, Rinker & Kelley, 122 9th place: Fortney, Nelson and Paine, 124 Lady Niners Oct. 7 Rally For a Cure 1st place: Christie Wilson, 37 2nd Place: Karen Postma, 38 3rd Place: gwyen Boger, 40 4th Place: Dorothy Plenert, 42 SWGA Oct. 7 Rally For a Cure 1st Place: Cheryl Coulter, Nancy Smith, Rose Lauritsen and Blossom Leslie, 122 2nd Place: Judy Flanders, Mary McIntyre, Dorene Berard and Mary Obrien, 123

Preps Football Stat Leaders As of Oct. 6 PASSING LEADERS Player (School) Comp.-Att Yds D. Rickerson (Sequim) 65-99 852 J. Greene (Neah Bay) 36-60 428 K. Walker (Port Angeles) 27-57 384 M. Moug (Chimacum) 26-58 374 D. Doherty Neah Bay 7-12 136 RUSHING LEADERS Player (School) Att-Yds J. Greene (Neah Bay) 27-502 I. Yamamoto (Sequim) 56-478 C. Sullivan (Port Angeles) 25-325 T. Pascua (Neah Bay) 37-288 K. Walker (Port Angeles) 59-266 K. Sewell (Port Angeles) 22-232 F. Catelli (Sequim) 26-220 D. Manix (Chimacum) 66-201 D. Rickerson (Sequim) 25-186 N. Cristion (Port Angeles) 38-167 RECEIVING LEADERS Player (School) Rec-Yds J. Hall (Sequim) 16-343 D. Doherty (Neah Bay) 23-251 I. Ward (Port Angeles) 9-141 T. Forshaw (Sequim) 12-129 D. Settlemire (Chimacum) 6-115 F. Catelli (Sequim) 9-119 I. Yamamoto (Sequim) 12-115 D. Toepper (Chimacum) 6-111 E. Monette (Neah Bay) 4-106 N. Ramirez (Sequim) 9-95 Note: Schools reporting were Port Sequim, Neah Bay and Chimacum.

TD 9 3 5 7 0

TD 7 7 6 5 3 4 4 2 2 1 TD 6 5 1 1 3 0 1 3 2 1 Angeles,

The Associated Press

LeBron-less Cavs Washington Wizards point guard Gilbert Arenas, right, puts pressure on Cleveland point guard Ramon Sessions in the second quarter of their NBA preseason game Thursday in Cleveland. The Cavaliers are playing without their longtime star LeBron James, who jumped to the Miami Heat as a free agent during the offseason.

Baseball MLB Playoffs All Times PDT Thursday’s Games Texas 6, at Tampa Bay 0 Texas leads 2-0 NY Yankees 5, at Minnesota 2 NYY lead 2-0 San Francisco 1, Atlanta 0 San Fran lead 1-0 Today’s Games Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 3:07 p.m. Arroyo vs Oswalt Atlanta at San Francisco, 6:37 p.m. Hanson vs Cain Saturday’s Games Tampa Bay at Texas, 2:07 p.m. Garza vs Lewis Minnesota at NY Yankees, 5:37 p.m. Duensing vs Hughes Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay at Texas, 1:07 PM Davis vs Hunter San Francisco at Atlanta, 4:37 PM Sanchez vs Hudson Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:07 PM Hamels vs Cueto Minnesota at NY Yankees Blackburn vs Sabathia

Basketball NBA Preseason Western Conference NORTHWEST W L GB DIV CONF Minnesota 2 0 - 0-0 1-0 Utah 1 0 ½ 1-0 1-0 Oklahoma City 1 0 ½ 0-0 0-0 Portland 1 1 1 0-1 1-1 Denver 0 0 1 0-0 0-0 PACIFIC W L GB DIV CONF LA Clippers 1 1 - 1-0 1-1 Sacramento 1 1 - 1-1 1-1 Golden State 0 0 - 0-0 0-0 LA Lakers 0 2 1 0-0 0-1 Phoenix 0 2 1 0-1 0-1 SOUTHWEST W L GB DIV CONF Memphis 2 0 - 0-0 0-0 Dallas 1 1 1 0-0 0-0 Houston 1 1 1 1-0 1-0 New Orleans 0 0 1 0-0 0-0 San Antonio 0 1 1 ½ 0-1 0-1 Eastern Conference ATLANTIC W L GB DIV CONF Boston 2 0 - 2-0 2-0 Toronto 1 0 ½ 0-0 0-0 New Jersey 2 1 ½ 1-1 1-1 New York 1 1 1 0-0 0-0 Philadelphia 0 2 2 0-2 0-2 CENTRAL W L GB DIV CONF Milwaukee 1 0 - 1-0 1-0 Cleveland 1 1 ½ 0-0 1-1 Detroit 0 1 1 0-0 0-1 Indiana 0 1 1 0-0 0-0 Chicago 0 2 1 ½ 0-1 0-1 SOUTHEAST W L GB DIV CONF Washington 2 0 - 0-0 1-0 Orlando 1 0 ½ 0-0 0-0 Miami 1 0 ½ 0-0 1-0 Atlanta 0 1 1 ½ 0-0 0-0 Charlotte 0 2 2 0-0 0-1 All Times PDT Thursday’s Games FC Barcelona 92, LA Lakers 88 Memphis 115, Atlanta 111 (OT) Washington 97, Cleveland 83 Boston 96, New Jersey 92 Dallas 88, Chicago 83 Houston 90, San Antonio 87 Utah 100, Portland 96 LA Clippers 120, Sacramento 88 Today’s Games Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Denver, 9 :00 PM LA Clippers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at New Jersey, 10 a.m. Indiana at Houston, 4 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Miami at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 6:30 p.m.

Football College PACIFIC-10 STANDINGS Con Over W-L W-L PF PA STRK Oregon 2-0 5-0 283 75 W5 Arizona 1-0 4-0 137 44 W4 Oregon State 1-0 2-2 111 123 W1 Washington 1-0 2-2 111 130 W1 USC 1-1 4-1 179 119 L1 UCLA 1-1 3-2 129 119 W3 Stanford 1-1 4-1 223 107 L1 California 0-1 2-2 144 72 L2 Arizona State 0-2 2-3 173 122 L3 Washington State 0-2 1-4 105 214 L3 All Times PDT Today’s Games Connecticut at Rutgers, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Louisiana-Laf., 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Indiana at Ohio State, 9 a.m. Minnesota at Wisconsin, 9 a.m. Syracuse at South Florida, 9 a.m. Boston College at North Carolina St., 9 a.m. Illinois at Penn State, 9 a.m. Central Michigan at Virginia Tech, 9 a.m. Western Michigan at Ball State, 9 a.m. Temple at Northern Illinois, 9 a.m. Baylor vs. Texas Tech, 9 a.m. Tennessee at Georgia, 9:21 a.m. Colorado State at Air Forces, 11 a.m. Memphis at Louisville, 11 a.m. Bowling Green at Ohio, 11 a.m. Alabama at South Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Wyoming at TCU, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas vs. Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m. Michigan State at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. UCLA at California, 12:30 p.m. Virginia at Georgia Tech, 12:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Notre Dame, 12:30 p.m. Clemson at North Carolina, 12:30 p.m. UNLV at West Virginia, 12:30 p.m. Western Kentucky at Florida Int., 12:30 p.m. Akron at Kent State, 12:30 p.m. Army at Tulane, 12:30 p.m. Utah State at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Oregon at Washington State, 2 p.m. Oregon State at Arizona, 3 p.m. San Diego State at Brigham Young, 3 p.m. Navy at Wake Forest, 3:30 p.m. Utah at Iowa State, 4 p.m. Colorado at Missouri, 4 p.m. Eastern Michigan at Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Arkansas State at North Texas, 4 p.m. Miami (OH) at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Louisiana-Monroe, 4 p.m. Auburn at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. LSU at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Purdue at Northwestern, 4:30 p.m. East Carolina at Southern Miss, 4:30 p.m. Toledo at Boise State, 5 p.m. Florida State at Miami (FL), 5 p.m. USC at Stanford, 5 p.m. New Mexico at New Mexico State, 5 p.m. Mississippi State at Houston, 5 p.m. Tulsa at Southern Methodist, 5 p.m. Rice at UTEP, 6:05 p.m. Arizona State at Washington, 7 p.m. Hawaii at Fresno State, 7 p.m.

Hockey NHL Western Conference CENTRAL GP W L OTL Chicago 1 0 0 1 Nashville 0 0 0 0 St. Louis 0 0 0 0 Detroit 0 0 0 0 Columbus 0 0 0 0 NORTHWEST GP W L OTL Edmonton 1 1 0 0 Colorado 1 1 0 0 Vancouver 0 0 0 0 Minnesota 1 0 1 0 Calgary 1 0 1 0

PTS 1 0 0 0 0 PTS 2 2 0 0 0

PACIFIC GP W L OTL San Jose 0 0 0 0 Anaheim 0 0 0 0 Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 Dallas 0 0 0 0 Phoenix 0 0 0 0 Eastern Conference ATLANTIC GP W L OTL Philadelphia 1 1 0 0 New Jersey 0 0 0 0 NY Islanders 0 0 0 0 NY Rangers 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh 1 0 1 0 NORTHEAST GP W L OTL Toronto 1 1 0 0 Ottawa 0 0 0 0 Boston 0 0 0 0 Buffalo 0 0 0 0 Montreal 1 0 1 0 SOUTHEAST GP W L OTL Carolina 1 1 0 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 0 0 Washington 0 0 0 0 Atlanta 0 0 0 0 Florida 0 0 0 0 All Times PDT Thursday’s Games Carolina 4, Minnesota 3 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Toronto 3, Montreal 2 Edmonton 4, Calgary 0 Colorado 4, Chicago 3 (OT) Today’s Games Minnesota at Carolina, 9 a.m. San Jose at Columbus, 12 p.m. Dallas at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Phoenix at Boston, 9 a.m. Columbus at San Jose, 12 p.m. NY Rangers at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Dallas at NY Islanders, 4 p.m. Montreal at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Toronto, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Nashville, 5 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

PTS 0 0 0 0 0 PTS 2 0 0 0 0 PTS 2 0 0 0 0 PTS 2 0 0 0 0

Transactions Baseball American League Tampa Bay Rays: Removed DH-OF Rocco Baldelli from the playoff roster. Activated INF Willy Aybar. National League San Diego Padres: Named Dave Roberts first base coach.

Basketball National Basketball Association Golden State Warriors: Waived G Cheyne Gadson. Sacramento Kings: Named Shareef AbdurRahim assistant general manager.

Football National Football League Cleveland Browns: Signed DB DeAngelo Smith to the practice squad. Released DL Boo Robinson. Houston Texans: Signed DE Mark Anderson. Waived DE Ryan Denney. Indianapolis Colts: Signed RB Javarris James. Released LB Tyjuan Hagler. New England Patriots: Re-signed OL Quinn Ojinnaka. Signed QB Brett Ratliff to the practice squad. Washington Redskins: Signed P Hunter Smith. Placed P Josh Bidwell on injured reserve.

Hockey National Hockey League Columbus Blue Jackets: Announced a working agreement with the Fort Wayne (CHL) for the 2010-11 season. Vancouver Canucks: Acquired D Nathan Paetsch from Florida for D Sean Zimmerman.

Saturday 9 a.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Indiana vs. Ohio State (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Illinois vs. Penn State (Live) 9 a.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Baylor at Texas Tech (Live) 9:30 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Constellation Energy Classic (Live) 10 a.m. (2) CBUT 2010 Commonwealth Games, Day 6 - Delhi, India (Live) 12 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Columbus Blue Jackets vs. San Jose Sharks (Live) 12 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, The McGladrey Classic (Live) 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO (26) ESPN (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Michigan State at Michigan (Live) 12:30 p.m. (5) KING Football NCAA, Pittsburgh vs. Notre Dame (Live) 12:30 p.m. (7) KIRO Football NCAA, Alabama vs. South Carolina (Live) 12:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, UCLA at California (Live) 1:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, CampingWorld.com 300 Nationwide Series (Live) 2 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Tampa Bay Rays vs. Texas Rangers, American League Division, Series Game 3, Site: Rangers Ballpark - Arlington, Texas (Live) 4 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Ottawa Senators vs. Toronto Maple Leafs (Live) 4 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Colorado at Missouri (Live) 4:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football NCAA, Auburn vs. Kentucky (Live) 4:45 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Louisiana State vs. Florida (Live) 5:05 p.m. (4) KOMO Football NCAA, USC vs. Stanford (Live) 5:30 p.m. (6) KONG Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC vs. Kansas City Wizards (Live) 5:30 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Minnesota Twins vs. New York Yankees, American League Division Series, Game 3, Site: Yankee Stadium - Bronx, N.Y. (Live) 6:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Dallas Mavericks vs. Phoenix Suns (Live) 7 p.m. (2) CBUT Hockey NHL, Los Angeles Kings vs. Vancouver Canucks (Live) 7 p.m. (25) FSNW Football NCAA, Arizona State at Washington (Live) 10:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf APGA, Asian Amateur Championship, Final Round, Site: Kasumigaseki Country Club - Kawagoe City, Japan (Live) 4:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, Final Round (Live)


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Preview: Grid

PDN Weekly Football Picks

Continued from B1

This weekend’s games (Day) High School North Mason at Port Angeles, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Port Townsend at Life Christian, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Vashon Island at Chimacum, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Forks at Montesano, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Highland Christ. at Clallam Bay, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Crescent at Easton-Thorp, 7 p.m. (Fri.) Muckleshoot at Quilcene, 1 p.m. (Sat.) College Alabama at South Carolina, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) Michigan State at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. (Sat.) USC at Stanford, 5 p.m. (Sat.) Oregon at Washington State, 2 p.m. (Sat.) Arizona State at Washington, 7 p.m. (Sat.) NFL Kansas City at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Green Bay at Washington, 10 a.m. (Sun.) Tennessee at Dallas, 1:15 p.m. (Sun.) Philadelphia at S. Francisco, 5:20 p.m. (Sun.) Minnesota at NY Jets, 5:30 p.m. (Mon.)

Brad LaBrie Sports Editor

Matt Schubert Sports Reporter

Mike Carman Golf Columnist

Mike McMahan Guest Picker (Eagles coach)

Port Angeles Life Christian Chimacum Montesano Clallam Bay Crescent Quilcene

Port Angeles Life Christian Vashon Island Montesano Highland Christian Crescent Quilcene

Port Angeles Life Christian Vashon Island Montesano Highland Christian Crescent Quilcene

Port Angeles Life Christian Chimacum Montesano Clallam Bay Easton Thorp Quilicene

Alabama Michigan Stanford Oregon Washington

Alabama Michigan Stanford Oregon Washington

Alabama Michigan Stanford Oregon Arizona State

Alabama Michigan Southern Cal Oregon Washington

Indianapolis Green Bay Dallas San Francisco NY Jets

Indianapolis Green Bay Dallas San Francisco Minnesota

Indianapolis Green Bay Dallas San Francisco NY Jets

Indianapolis Green Bay Dallas Philadelphia Minnesota

Record: 50-26

Record: 54-22

Record: 57-19

Record: 44-32

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Sequim’s Rachel Hardy competes in the 100-yard freestyle race in a dual meet against Port Angeles on Thursday at in Sequim.

Preps: Neah Bay beats Bruins Continued from B1 The Port Angeles JV won 25-12, 25-12, 13-15 while the C team tied 25-22, 14-25. The Riders next host Bremerton on Tuesday.

Neah Bay 3, Clallam Bay 1 CLALLAM BAY — The Red Devils held off the Bruins in the tightly fought North Olympic League match Thursday. Neah Bay won 25-18, 25-19, 24-26, 26-24 to improve to 1-1 in league and 4-1 overall. The Bruins are now 0-2 in league and 3-5 overall. “Overall, we’re improving week by week,” Clallam Bay coach Kelly Wilson said. “We’re always right there,” she said about the close scores. Cherish Moss served five aces and she had two kills for Neah Bay while Cierra Moss also had five aces and two kills. Rebecca Thompson ended up with seven kills and nine aces for the Red Devils while Kaela Taylor had two aces and a kill. Courtney Winck was strong at the net with four blocks and three kills. Kirsten Erickson, meanwhile, had nine assists and seven kills for the Bruins while Melissa Willis had seven blocks. Jamie Parker added five kills. Neah Bay next hosts Port Townsend JV on Saturday in a nonleague match while Clallam Bay is at Crescent next Thursday.

Tenino 3, Forks 2 TENINO — The Spartans dropped the Southwest Washington League match to fall to 3-5 on the year. Tenino won 20-25, 25-16, 25-19, 11-25, 15-9. Casey Williams put down 10 kills and had a stuff for the Spartans while Whitney Fairbanks had six kills and setter Jillian Raben dished out 13 assists. Forks next plays at Elma on Tuesday.

Life Christian 3, Chimacum 1 TACOMA — Chimacum fought hard but lost the Nisqually League match by the scores of 23-25, 27-25, 26-28, 16-25. Danny Kaminski had six kills for the Cowboys while teammate Lauren Thacker had five kills and four blocks of her own. “We were really pumped up with all of the support we had,” Chimacum coach Sally Dankert said. “We just had too many missed serves.” Sienna Madary and Megan Dukek both had perfect serving nights for Chimacum with Mallori Cossell helping out with great defense. Chimacum(0-7, 4-7) will next host Orting on Monday.

Sequim 3, Kingston 0 SEQUIM — The Wolves dominated the whole night, winning three straight games by scores of 25-18, 25-11, 25-10. “We served them off of

the court,” Sequim coach Jennie Webber-Heilman said. “All nine girls had at least one kill.” Taylor Balkan controlled the pace of the night, serving a perfect 15-for-15 with nine aces, 23 assists and four digs. Haleigh Harrison also played big, hammering seven kills, two aces, nine digs and four perfect passes for the Wolves. “It’s going to be good to play some bigger schools,” Webber-Heilman said as Sequim gets ready for its upcoming tournament. Sequim (4-0, 7-2) is on the road this Saturday, competing in the Capital City Invitational.

Bremerton 3, Port Townsend 0 BREMERTON — The Redskins remained winless on the season after a 25-7. 26-24, 27-25 Olympic League loss to the Knights on Thursday night. “The first game was rocky,” Port Townsend coach Nettie Witheridge said. “We came back and gave a great fight the last two games, but it was a little to late.” Enani Rubio led the Redskins with three aces, one block, two kills and two digs. Christine Unrue added eight assists and two kills. Britta Janssen had one ace, two assists, one kill and three digs.

fought Olympic League game Thursday. The Roughriders, who fell to 0-3 in league and 4-5 overall, were outshot 15-3. Backup goalkeeper Tori Holcomb, starting her second straight game for the Riders, recorded nine saves. “Tori did a great job for us again,” coach Scott Moseley said. Holcomb was named the defensive player of the game while Brittany McBride was picked the offensive player and Caylie Cook was named the transition player. “We played with them for a half, and when they scored we pushed the ball up the field, trying to get the tying goal,” Moseley said. “They scored the second goal to put the game away.” The Eagles scored their final goal just seven minutes before the end of the game.

Port Angeles 7, North Mason 0

BELFAIR — The Riders cruised to their second sweep of the Bulldogs in as many days Thursday. Port Angeles, undefeated in league play, didn’t drop a set on their way to the convincing win. Rider coach Brian Gundersen singled out the doubles due of Matt Watkins and Kevin Herzog, 6-0, 6-1 winners, as the players of the match. Girls Soccer “Matt and Kevin were Klahowya 2, playing their first varsity Port Angeles 0 match and I expected them SILVERDALE — The to have some nerves, but Eagles scored twice in the they came out ready,” Gunsecond half to win the hard- dersen said.

Pac-10 officials study expansion options The Associated Press

The Pac-10’s athletic directors wrapped up two days of agenda-setting meetings in San Francisco on Thursday and, not surprisingly, nothing was settled. Faced with the complex task of creating plans for revenue sharing, divisional alignment and a championship game in football, the athletic directors hashed out the details that will set the foundation for the conference’s presidents and chancellors at their meeting on Oct. 21.

“I’m very pleased with how the meetings went,” Pac-10 commissioner Larry Scott said. “I would describe it as significant progress on the important strategic issues we’ve been debating and I feel good about where we are. “In my view, we’ve narrowed the options and kind of flushed out the pro and cons of different scenarios in a way we hoped we would.” The meetings were never intended to reach any final conclusions, only recom-

mendations for the board as the conference expands to 12 teams next school year with the addition of Colorado and Utah. The three major, interconnected issues are complex and wide-ranging, each school having its own unique stake in what happens. Revenue sharing is the marquee issue, whether to continue with the current appearance-based model, which favors USC and UCLA, or to split up the money equally among the 12 schools.

B3

The football championship game appears to be a done deal, but the conference still needs to decide whether to use an NFLbased model where the higher-ranked team plays at home or to hold it at a neutral site like San Diego or Las Vegas. Finding a way to break the 12 teams into divisions has been a complex task, with schools wanting to make sure they still get to play traditional rivals every year and to play in Southern California.

“They are going to be our toughest opponent of the season. There is no question about it.” The Port Angeles offense broke out in its last game, going for 563 yards in a 55-25 drubbing of winless Olympic, with quarterback Keenen Walker accounting for 308 yards of offense. That included 130 yards passing and 178 on the ground. In the four games before that, the Riders had leaned heavily on their defense, which has surrendered just 41 points in five games this season. Against North Mason, they will face a flexbone attack that is run first, second and third. Fullback Tommy Renne is the team’s main option (517 yards on 68 carries), but the Bulldogs also have a major home run threat in Tevin Williams. The senior kick returner/ wide receiver burned Sequim on an 85-yard kickoff return last week and is averaging 7.65 yards per carry this season. “Our guys that run the scout team offense . . . they’ve done a nice job of doing the best they can to give us a good look at their run game, which is potent,” Wahl said. A Rider victory would put Port Angeles within one win of clinching a playoff spot. It would also match the program’s best start to a season since the 1992 team began its year 6-0. That team ended up finishing 9-2 after making an appearance in the state playoffs.

Vashon Island at Chimacum PORT TOWNSEND — The Cowboys’ playoff hopes are on the line when they take on the Pirates in 1A Nisqually League action tonight at Memorial Field at 7 p.m. Chimacum’s heartbreaking 14-13 loss to Life Christian last week meant it would have to win out the rest of the year and get some help in order to reach the postseason. That quest begins tonight with the Pirates (1-2, 2-3), who come into the game on a two-game losing streak after falling to Nisqually powers Cascade Christian and Orting. Chimacum (0-3, 1-4) is currently on a three-game skid of its own.

Port Townsend at Life Christian TACOMA — The Redskins are looking for their first win of the season in tonight’s 1A Nisqually League road game. Port Townsend has managed just one touchdown in each of its five losses this fall, getting outscored 16434. They will take on a Life Christian team (1-2, 2-3) that just barely squeaked past Chimacum last week 14-13.

Forks at Montesano MONTESANO — The Spartans get perhaps their toughest test of the season tonight when they face SWL-Evergreen Division power Montesano. The fifth-ranked Bulldogs (3-0, 5-0) have been undefeated in Evergreen play since moving down from 2A to 1A in 2006. They have outscored teams 222-54 this season under former Forks coach Terry Jensen. Montesano is 7-1 against Forks since Jensen took over.

Crescent at Easton-Thorp THORP — The Loggers (2-1) break away from their Northwest Football League schedule to take on the Jaguars in a nonleague contests today at 3 p.m. The Northeast-South League squad is 1-2 on the season, with its last loss a 49-0 setback to No. 3 Almira-Coulee-Hartline last Friday. Crescent is coming off a 52-6 drubbing of Highland Christian in Joyce.

Muckleshoot at Quilcene QUILCENE — The Rangers will try to shake off the cobwebs in Saturday’s Northwest Football League tilt after suffering a humbling defeat at the hands of Neah Bay the week before. Quilcene, which hadn’t allowed a score in its first three games, fell 66-16 to the Red Devils in nonleague action last Friday for its first loss of the season. The Rangers (2-0 in league, 3-1 overall) now host a Muckleshoot team coming off back-to-back mercy-rule losses to Neah Bay and Evergreen Lutheran.

Wolves: Win

Continued from B1 strike on the Wolves’ next offensive play for a 21-7 “I think they’re one of edge. Joey Hall returned an the better teams in the interception 30 yards for a league. “I don’t know who’s bet- touchdown on the following ter out of them, North possession, and the Wolves Mason and PA, but I think rout was on. Sequim held Kingston they are definitely a top-tier running back Lou Hecker to team.” If so, the Buccaneers 65 yards on 21 carries. Buccaneer quarterback (2-2. 3-3) did little to show it against a Sequim team that Sam Byers completed 12 of was firing on all cylinders. 23 passes for 215 yards, Wolves quarterback Both of his interceptions, Drew Rickerson completed however, were returned for 16 of 30 passes for 188 touchdowns. Sequim hosts winless yards, three touchdowns Olympic next Friday night and one interception. Running back Isaac for its homecoming game. Yamamoto ran for 83 yards Sequim 56, Kingston 28 and one touchdown on 14 14 28 0 14— 56 carries and had three recep- Sequim 7 7 0 14— 28 tions for 13 yards and a Kingston First Quarter score. K—Gorman 69 pass from Byers (Stone kick) Wide receiver Tyler For- S—Forshaw 88 kickoff return (run fail) 26 pass from Rickerson (Catelli pass shaw added six grabs for 92 S—Bigger from Rickerson) yards and one TD. Second Quarter Sequim’s defense and S—Forshaw 45 pass from Rickerson (Koonz kick) S—Hall 30 interception return (Koonz kick) special teams accounted for S—Yamamoto 22 run (Koonz kick) another four other scores, S—Catelli fumble recovery in end zone (Koonz including an 88-yard kickoff kick) from Byers (Stone kick) return from Forshaw that K—Marinan 44 pass Fourth Quarter immediately answered S—Yamamoto 16 pass from Rickerson (Koonz Kingston’s initial touch- kick) K—Marinan 19 pass from Byers (Stone kick) down. S—Yamamoto 23 interception return (Koonz kick) Following a Bucs turn- K—Byers 1 run (Stone kick) Individual Stats over, Rickerson hooked up Rushing— S: Yamamoto 14-83, Catelli 4-6, Rickwith Chase Bigger on a erson 4-4. K: Hecker 21-65, Goller 3-25, Byers 26-yard touchdown pass to 10-2. help give Sequim a 14-7 Passing—S: Rickerson 16-30-1, 188. K: Byers 12-23-2, 215. lead. Receiving—S: Catelli 3-26, Ramirez 2-15, Hall Rickerson then hit For- 4-69, Forshaw 6-92, Bigger 1-26, Yamamoto 3-13. K: shaw for a 45-yard scoring Klopp 3-32, Gorman 1-59, Hecker 1-(minus 6), Marinan 3-70, Lujan 2-42, Reece 2-18.

Ducks’ James opening eyes The Associated Press

EUGENE, Ore. — After his second game this season, Oregon running back LaMichael James sheepishly faced reporters with the admission that he had coasted.

James had rushed for 227 yards and two touchdowns in the Ducks’ 69-0 victory over Portland State. As the Ducks get ready to face Washington State on Saturday, James is averaging 178 yards a game.


B4

SportsRecreation

Friday, October 8, 2010

Schubert: Fish

Fish Counts Saltwater Salmon Ediz Hook Monday, Sept. 27 — 9 boats (15 anglers): 7 coho; Wednesday, Sept. 29 — 9 boats (15 anglers): 3 coho; Friday, Oct. 1 — 44 boats (78 anglers): 34 coho; Saturday, Oct. 2 — 41 boats (93 anglers): 1 chinook, 17 coho; Freshwater Bay Ramp Thursday, Sept. 30 — 3 boats (6 anglers): 1 coho; Saturday, Oct. 2 — 21 boats (37 anglers): 2 chinook, 29 coho; Sunday, Oct. 3 — 12 boat (27 anglers): 4 chinook, 12 coho; Cline Spit Ramp Friday, Oct. 1 — 1 boat (2 anglers): No fish; Olson’s Resort Thursday, Sept. 30 — 28 boats (67 anglers): 29 coho; Olson’s Resort East Wednesday, Sept. 29 — 37 boats (84 anglers): 107 coho; Olson’s Resort East Wednesday, Sept. 29 — 11 boats (24 anglers): 20 coho; Van Riper’s Resort Thursday, Sept. 30 — 5 boats (9 anglers): 4 coho; Port Townsend Boat Haven Friday, Oct. 1 — 1 boat (1 angler): 2 coho; Quilcene Bay Ramp Saturday, Oct. 2 — 1 boat (3 anglers): No fish; Marrowstone Beach Sunday, Oct. 3 — 10 anglers: 1 coho; Point Wilson Beach Monday, Sept. 27 — 3 anglers: No fish; Friday, Oct. 1 — 1 angler: No fish;

Continued from B1 ducks will be fair game once again Oct. 23 through Jan. 30. I’d love to provide full details on the derby ladder, Down to dig but that information has been surprisingly difficult Razor clam season to come by. begins this weekend at five

ocean beaches, including Kalaloch. The set of afternoon Peninsula elk continued digs began Thursday at their ant-social behavior Twin Harbors, which opens this past week. each day through Sunday. For whatever reason, Copalis, Mocrocks, Kalathe horned herders just don’t want to talk to armed loch and Long Beach all open to digging today and individuals. Saturday only. Go figure. The state approved the “I’ve heard of a fourpoint taken . . . but overall digs after finding that clams at all five beaches [it’s been] kind of slow,” were safe to eat (as long as Bob Aunspach of Swain’s you actually chew before General Store (360-4522357) in Port Angeles said. swallowing, of course). Digging is not allowed “They are just kind of clamming up and not talk- before noon. That works out well ing much,” he added. And in the thick and tall brush since low minus tides all come during the afternoon hunters tend to stake out in the fall and winter anyfor elk, “you need them to way. make a little noise.” While today might see Muzzleloaders have just the best surf conditions, one more day (today) before Saturday is the better tide their early elk season (although the difference comes to a close. appears negligible). One would’ve expected It’s always best to hit the bulls to be in the rut at the beach at least one hour this point in the season, but alas, that didn’t appear before high tide. Here’s a list of tides for this weekto be the case. end’s digs: Hunters won’t get ■ Today — Minus 1.0 another shot at elk until feet at 6:55 p.m. the modern firearm season ■ Friday — Minus 1.4 begins Nov. 6-16 in the feet at 7:42 p.m. Hoko, Dickey, Pysht, Sol ■ Saturday – Minus 1.5 Duc, Goodman, Clearwater, feet at 8:28 p.m. Matheny and Coyle (except ■ Sunday – Minus 1.3 for elk area 6071) GMUs. The focus will shift back feet at 9:15 p.m. For more information on to the bucks next week, coastal razor clams, visit with modern firearm deer season set for Oct. 16-31 in wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/. each of the Peninsula GMUs. The Olympic GMU (621) Also . . . has been the most steady ■ Dave Jackson of Dunproducer of deer during the geness River Audubon Cenpast two years, with 371 ter will lead a trip to Carcoming out of the area in rie Blake Park and John 2009 and 314 in ’08. Wayne Marina for beginThe Coyle (627) is comning birders on Oct. 16 ing off a decent year as from 9:30 a.m. to noon. well, with 346 taken in ’09 The trip will allow parcompared to 214 in ’08. ticipants to learn birding Out west, the Pysht techniques and get to know GMU (603) has been the birds in the area. It will most steady producer, with also benefit Peninsula resi167 deer taken in 2009. dents who are new to the As for other hunting area. options: Pre-registration is ■ The Dungeness Recre- required. To do so, contact ation Area is once again Jackson at 360-683-1355 or the Peninsula’s lone pheas- djackson@wavecable.com. ant release site. ■ Admiralty Audubon’s Pheasants are put out Ron Sikes will be leading a for hunters on Saturday, birding trip by kayak Sunday and holiday morn- through the Quilcene Bay ings from the first weekend estuary Oct. 16. in October through Nov. 30, A group will depart the according to Fish and Wild- Haines Place Park-n-Ride life’s Western Washington near Safeway in Port Pheasant Release Program Townsend at 11 a.m. Parbrochure. ticipants must bring their Due to the tightness of own kayak, gear, lunch and the hunting grounds and water. close proximity of other To register for the trip, hunters, hunter orange contact Sikes at 360-385must be worn at all times. 0307 or sikes@olympus.net. ■ An early duck season ■ As was mentioned in opens statewide Oct. 16-20. Thursday’s column, Gibbs After a brief closure, the and Teal lakes in Jefferson

Peninsula Daily News

Not talking

Bill Waddington, right, and his son, Jeff, show off a few coho caught near Pillar Point in September. The hook-nose on the left weighed in at 13 pounds. County each received jumbo rainbow trout plants in mid-September. The fish, which average about 0.75 pounds in size, were added to both lakes to boost its winter fishing prospects. Gibbs received 390 jumbo trout and Teal 210. ■ Puget Sound AnglersEast Jefferson chapter will hold its monthly meeting in the Marina Room of the Point Hudson Marina on Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Details on the guest speaker were not available because of a last-minute cancellation. The public is invited and refreshments will be served. ■ Puget Sound AnglersNorth Olympic chapter will hold its monthly meeting at Trinity Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., in Sequim this Thursday at 7 p.m. Information on the guest speaker was not available. ■ Washington Trails Association will gather a volunteer work party at Humes Ranch Loop on the Elwha River on Saturday, Oct. 16., starting at 8:30 a.m. Volunteers will help finish off a re-route of the trail inside Olympic National Park. Volunteers must pre-register 48 hours in advance. To pre-register, contact Washington Trails at 206625-1367 or visit www.wta. org. ■ The Coastal Conservation Association-North Olympic Peninsula Chapter will hold its first fundraising banquet in John Wayne Marina on Oct. 16 at 4 p.m. There will be live and silent auctions of fishing gear, trips, art and more. Tickets are $65 per person or $120 for couples. That

includes a one-year membership in the CCA. For information on ordering tickets, contact banquet chair Bill Batson at 877-875-2381 (ext. 20) or bill@batsonenterprises.com. ■ The Gardiner Salmon Derby Association will host a “Taste of Italy” fundraising event at the Gardiner Community Center on Nov. 6. The event will feature live and silent auctions that will include fishing trips, vacations, sporting event tickets and various other items. Proceeds will support the nonprofit Olympic Peninsula Salmon Derby (formerly Discovery Bay Salmon Derby) on Presidents Day weekend. Dinner tickets cost $15 and must be purchased in advance. To do so, contact Marylou Tatum (360-7977710) or Linda Hanel (360797-0050). Those interested in sponsoring the event or donating auction items can contact Dan Tatum at 360797-7710.

Send photos, stories Want your event listed in the outdoors column? Have a fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outdoors experience or a tip on gear or technique, why not share it with our readers? Send it to me, Matt Schubert, Sports Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; phone, 360-417-3526; fax, 360-4173521; e-mail matt.schubert @peninsuladailynews.com.

■ Elwha coho — My favorite fishing instructor Ron “the Missing” Link had one mantra: “Always fish where there are fish.” Given the early returns of coho to the Elwha, methinks that just might be the place. ■ Clamtastic ­— Razor clams are fidgety, fast burrowing machines. So come equipped with your sharpest shoveling skills and some agile hands to this weekend’s first opener of the season at Kalaloch and four other ocean beaches. For more details, see today’s outdoors column. ■ Report crabs — Puget Sound crabbers must submit summer catch record cards to Fish and Wildlife by Sunday. Those who fail to file catch reports by the deadline will face a $10 fine, which will be imposed when they apply for a 2011 Puget Sound crab endorsement. Cards can be mailed in or recorded online. Additional information is available at http:// tinyurl.com/29f2n2c. ■ Pop a shot — Washington Trails Association is accepting submissions for its annual

Northwest Exposure photo contest through Oct. 17. Given the array of autumn colors currently decorating the Peninsula, methinks now might be a good time to score a winning shot. Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place in five categories: Wild Landscapes, Flora and Fauna, Hikers in Action, Families on Trail and Offbeat Outdoors. For more information on the contest, including how to submit photos, visit http://tinyurl.com/ yj29nxg. ■ Mushroom Mania — It’s damp, it’s dark and it’s beginning to border on depressing. Translation: It’s mushroom season. I’ve already received a handful of fungal photos to prove such is the case. So head for the hills. You just might come upon a piece of fungus so fantastic it could claim the PDN’s annual mushroom photo contest. Winners are awarded in three categories: biggest, prettiest and mushroom most resembling a notable figure. Send all entries to matt.schubert@ peninsuladailynews.com. Matt Schubert

Matt Schubert is the outdoors columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column appears on Thursdays and Fridays.

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Rays on Thursday for a 2-0 lead in their division series. “I just think that we’ve had a great mentality these first two games,” Young said. “We’re not really thinking about some huge, grand picture here.”

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Playoffs: Yanks, Rangers win Continued from B1

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Peninsula Weekend

Peninsula Daily News

The Ultimate Garage Sale will be in Port Townsend, a “Cabinet of Wonders” will celebrate art in Port Angeles, and a World War I Liberty Cadillac will be displayed in Sequim this weekend. Those are just a few of the special events scheduled on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For arts and entertainment news, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide in today’s PDN. For more information on other activities, see “Things To Do” on Page C5. Here’s a sample of other events planned this weekend.

Port Angeles Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Volunteer workers Kim Clevenger, Patrick Bartlett and Robert Ackerson, from left, work to attach bright red table skirts to vendor booths inside the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival tent in Port Angeles on Thursday.

Go grab a crab at the pier Festival fetes delectable Dungeness By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Tonight’s community crab feed will kick off a weekend devoted to crustacean admiration in Port Angeles. The ninth annual Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival on City Pier, at The Gateway, in the Red Lion Hotel parking lot and points in between will begin officially at 10 a.m. Saturday, wrapping up at

8:30 p.m., only Also . . . to begin again ■ Chef at 10 a.m. Sundemos set day and conat The tinue until 5 Gateway/C3 p.m. Admission is free. But locals get a preview of good eating tonight.

Community feed The community crab feed sponsored by the Peninsula Daily News will offer a freshly cooked, whole Dungeness crab, sweet corn and organic coleslaw from 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Windermere Crab Central Pavilion in the Red Lion Hotel parking lot,

221 N. Lincoln St. The cost is $25 per plate. A coupon knocking $5 off that price can be clipped from today’s PDN. It’s on Page C2. The annual festival expanded last year from City Pier into The Gateway at the corner of Front and Lincoln streets and will continue to operate in The Gateway, across Lincoln Street from the 7,000-square-foot tent in the parking lot of the Red Lion Hotel.

7,000 pounds of crab “We’re ordering 7,000 pounds of live crab — and if attendance goes up, we’ll order more,” said Scott Nagel, producing director of the festival. “We’re expecting bigger num-

bers than usual because all the major hotels in town are full already and we’ve had great mention in all the regional papers.” He estimated that, given good weather, about 15,000 people would show up for the vendors, the activities, the cooking demonstrations and, of course, the food. About 20 restaurants will sell delectable delights in the tent in the Red Lion Hotel parking lot, and more than 60 vendors will sell their goods on City Pier from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Lower Elwha Klallam tribe’s dance group will lead the festival’s opening ceremony at 11 a.m. Saturday. Turn

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Join the party, activists urge Goal to plant 350 trees by this Sunday By Diane Urbani

de la

Peninsula Daily News

Paz

Pat Milliren, a member of a small, interfaith group called the North Olympic Creation Care Alliance, heard recently about something called the Global Work Party. The more she learned about this gathering, planned for Oct. 10, 2010 — 10-10-10 — the more she wanted to be part of it. So Milliren, who lives in Port Angeles, got the Creation Care Alliance connected with www.350.org, the website that explains the Global Work Party’s mission: to tackle the Earth’s

already seeing from global warming will continue and accelerate, wrote 350.org’s leaders. “But 350 is more than a number,” they said. “It’s a symbol of where we need to head as a planet.” Those leaders include Bill McKibben, the educator and environmentalist whose books include Deep Economy and Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered Age. Milliren and the alliance decided their role in the work party would be to inspire North Olympic Peninsula residents to plant 350 trees by Sunday. They sent letters to area Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News churches and put up posters urgPat Milliren holds a basket of apples she picked from her ing families, clubs and businesses Liberty apple tree outside her Port Angeles home on to report their planting plans at Monday. www.350.org/NOCCA or by phoning alliance member Ken climate crisis. carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Burres at 360-582-0893. The effort focuses on the num“If we can’t get below that, sciber 350, as in parts-per-million entists say, the damage we’re Turn to Trees/C4

‘Fright Night’ to scare up some fun Sequim Pumpkin Patch hosts haunted house weekly through end of October Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Tonight is “Fright Night” at the Sequim Pumpkin Patch and corn maze at the corner of Kitchen-Dick Road and U.S. Highway 101. A “Hack Shack House of Horrors” haunted house is open for Friday “Fright Nights” throughout the month of October, with a $3 entry fee per person. Although no general admission is charged to the annual Pumpkin Patch, which opened Oct. 1 and will continue daily through Halloween, fees are charged for each of the activities. Pumpkins are available for 45 cents a pound. Admission to the corn maze is $7 for those 12 and younger, and $10 for ages 13 and older. The straw maze is $5, a horse

ride is $5, and a hayride is $2. One of the most popular activities is the pumpkin shoot. For $5, visitors can launch three small, hard pumpkins — called ironsides — from a catapult, aiming for a barrel in a field. If a pumpkin lands in the barrel, the shooter gets $100. So far, no one has won the prize this year, owner Theresa Lassila said Thursday, but she added that about 10 people on average have successful launches annually.

Corn maze design

‘Cabinet of Wonders’ PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Fine Arts Center’s fundraising extravaganza, “The Cabinet of Wonders,” is Saturday. It will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Port Angeles Masonic Lodge, 622 S. Lincoln St. Ticket sales to the center’s fourth annual party closed Thursday. But bids can continue to be made on auction items, which include pieces by artists in Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend, Seattle and elsewhere in the Northwest. Auction items can be viewed online at www.pafac. org, and bids placed by e-mail. The title “Cabinet of Wonders” refers to the curio cabinets of exotic and unique collectibles, which were the forerunners of modern museums. The Port Angeles Fine Arts Center is at 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Genealogical event PORT ANGELES — Susan Karren from the National Archives and Records Administration’s Seattle branch will present “If You Think the National Archives Don’t Have Anything for You, Think Again!” on Saturday. The Clallam County Genealogical Society is hosting the presentation at the First Presbyterian Church Parish Hall, 139 W. Eighth St., from 10 a.m. to noon. Karren will talk about online archives as well as resources in Seattle that may not be available on the Internet. She has worked for the administration since 1987 and holds a master’s degree in modern U.S. military history. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-417-5000 or visit www.olypen.com/ccgs/.

‘Becloud’ screened PORT ANGELES — The Mexican film “Becloud” will be screened as part of the 2010 Global Lens Series at Peninsula College tonight. The film will be shown at 7 p.m. at Peninsula College’s Little Theater, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is $5 for the general public, with Peninsula College and area high school students admitted free with current student identification. The film series is sponsored by Peninsula College and the Port Townsend Film Festival. For more information on the series, e-mail Bruce Hattendorf at bhattendorf@pencol.edu or visit www.pencol.edu.

Volkswalk slated

Dave Woodcock

A spurred boot and the words “Hee Haw” cut into the cornfield are visible from the air above the Sequim Each year, the Pumpkin Patch Pumpkin Patch, at the corner of Kitchen-Dick Road and carves a design in its corn maze U.S. Highway 101. The patch — which includes a corn that is visible only from the air. maze, pumpkin catapult and, of course, pumpkins for sale Turn to Patch/C4 — will open at 9 a.m. daily through Oct. 31.

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Explorers Volkssport Club will walk the Spruce Railroad Trail on Saturday. The group will leave the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, at 9:15 a.m. A carpool will leave the Sequim QFC parking lot, 990 E. Washington St., at 8:30 a.m. Turn

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Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Events: One-day Zen retreat set on Saturday Continued from C1 third community mural painting session from The walk has 7.4-mile or 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The mural will take its 3.7-mile options, mostly along the abandoned rail- inspiration from the Dungeroad grade along the north ness Crab & Seafood Festival taking place today shore of Lake Crescent. It skirts two tunnels, through Sunday in downwhich can be dangerous to town Port Angeles. All are invited to pick up a enter. Parts of the trail are brush and contribute to the rocky and sometimes a bit mural throughout the day. The first two murals had muddy. Baby joggers can be used with difficulty; wheel- high participation from the chairs are not recom- public. The youngest artist was mended. Pets are not 7 months old — she contriballowed. Restrooms can be found uted her footprint — and at the trailhead and at the the oldest was in his 80s. People from Brazil, CanFairmount Restaurant. After the walk, the club ada and around the United will convene for a lunch States contributed to the meeting at Fairmount Res- murals, which were displayed in the gallery. taurant. The mural will be disThe walk is open to the played in the gallery for public. For more information, several weeks. phone Bob Forcier at 360Sequim 681-4058.

Zen retreat

‘Step Up’ for kids

PORT ANGELES — NO Sangha will hold a zazenkai, a one-day zen retreat, at Murre Cottage, 420 W. Third St., from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. NO Sangha is a Zen community that has been based in Port Angeles for more than 14 years. Alternated zazen (seated meditation), kinhin (walking meditation) and private individual instruction are available. There will be silent coffee/tea breaks, and a vegetarian soup and bread lunch will be offered. A sutra (chanting) service will be held at 10 a.m. Sensei Kristen Larson, a teacher in the Diamond Sangha Teachers Circle, will give a dharma talk on Case No. 12 in The Wu-Men Kuan koan collection, “Juiyen Calls Master,” at 1 p.m. For more information, phone 360-452-5534 or e-mail NOSangha@aol.com.

SEQUIM — A fundraiser for Parenting Matters is planned Saturday night. “Step Up to the Plate for Kids” will run from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Sequim unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula at 400 W. Fir St. Tickets are $25 and available by phoning 360681-2250. “Step Up” is a fundraiser for a range of services, from parenting classes and the monthly parenting newsletters distributed across Clallam County to the First Teacher library and playroom at the Sequim Community School, 220 W. Alder St. The keynote speaker is Vaughnetta J. Barton, executive director of the Foundation for Early Learning in Seattle. Appetizers and desserts will be served, and an auction of gift packages, dinners and home decor is also part of the event, as is free child care on site.

host a harvest festival and sale at the Pioneer Memorial Park Clubhouse, 387 E. Washington St., from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The sale will include such fall decor items as pumpkins, gourds, Halloween decorations, twisted willow branches, Yakima Valley produce and homebaked good such as cookies, pies and cakes, as well as green tomatoes and green tomato recipes, cookbooks, gardening books and bulbs and plants. Raffles with items from local merchants will be held. Freshly popped popcorn will be available. Proceeds will go toward the maintenance and beautification of Pioneer Memorial Park. For more information, phone 360-477-0636.

Dinner fundraiser SEQUIM — The Sequim Student Ambassadors will hold an all-you-can-eat spaghetti and meatball dinner on Saturday. The meal will be from 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Guy Cole Convention Center at Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Blake Ave. Sequim Student Ambassadors is a group of high school students involved in a cultural exchange with Japan. The dinner is a fundraiser to help with travel expenses to the country. The cost is $6 for adults, $3 for children 3-10 and free for children younger than 3. For more information, phone Michelle Earley at 360-683-2785 or e-mail michelleearley@msn.com.

The cost is $20. The paperwhites should be blooming just in time for Thanksgiving. For reservations or more information, phone 360683-6969.

Apple press festival SEQUIM — A “Fall into the Apple Press Festival” is planned at Groveland Cottage Bed and Breakfast and Vacation Rentals, 4861 Sequim-Dungeness Way, from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Attendees should bring apples and containers to hold pressed cider. The festival will offer live marimba music, pumpkin carving, a bonfire, tricks and treats and Nash’s Organic Farm representatives. For more information, phone 360-683-3565 or e-mail simone@olypen.com.

WWI car program SEQUIM — The Museum & Arts Center will host a presentation on the last known surviving World War I Liberty Cadillac on Saturday. Marc Lassen will display his wartime Cadillac at the Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road, from 10 a.m. to noon. Lassen will share photographs, letters and publications that document the vehicle’s war record. Registration is through the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., with a suggested donation of $8 for MAC members and $10 for nonmembers. For more information, visit www.macsequim.org.

Book discussion

Centerpiece class

SEQUIM — Henery’s Garden Center, 1060 Sequim-Dungeness Way, will host a Thanksgiving centerpiece class at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. Paint a mural Attendees will create a Harvest festival set holiday centerpiece using PORT ANGELES — The Waterfront Art Gallery, 120 SEQUIM — The Sequim paperwhites and assorted W. First St., will host its Prairie Garden Club will greens in a glass container.

SEQUIM — A book discussion is planned at the Sequim Library at 3 p.m. Saturday. The Guernsey Literary and Potatoe Peel Pie Society will be discussed at the library at 630 N. Sequim Ave. For more information,

phone 360-683-1161 or see www.nols.org.

Microsoft Word basics SEQUIM — “The Basics of Using Microsoft Word” will be presented at a meeting of the Sequim PC Users Group on Saturday. Tom LaMure will lead the hands-on presentation of free online tutorials at 10 a.m. in the computer lab, Room E-3, at the Sequim High School, 601 N. Sequim Ave. A $5 donation from nonclub members is asked to help defray expenses. For more information, visit http://spcug.net or e-mail spcug1@gmail.com.

Fiddlers perform SEQUIM — The Washington Old Time Fiddlers will perform at the Sequim Prairie Grange on Saturday. The concert at the grange hall at 290 Macleay Road will be free and open to the public. An all-players jam is set from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The concert will be from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Donations support fiddle lesson scholarships. For more information, phone Hershel Lester at 360-417-6950 or e-mail handrlester@olypen.com.

Fundraising jog SEQUIM — The Greywolf Elementary School Parent Teacher Association will hold “The Jog is On” fundraiser at the school, 171 Carlsborg Road, from 1:40 p.m. to 2:40 p.m. today. In this jogathon, each student will run for 20 minutes each to raise funds for improvements to the school playground, the music program, purchasing books for the school library and other projects. Donations can be mailed to Greywolf PTA, 171 Carlsborg Road, Sequim, WA 98382. For more information, e-mail andicort920@yahoo. com.

Port Townsend/ Jefferson County ‘Ultimate Garage Sale’ PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Rotary Club will hold its third annual Ultimate Garage Sale on Saturday. The sale will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Oscar Erickson and 4-H buildings at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 4907 Landes St. Proceeds will benefit local nonprofit organizations. The Ultimate Garage Sale relies on donations from community members and merchants to raise funds for the community. Port Townsend Rotary has set a goal of $30,000 for the 2010 event, more than double last year’s take. Volunteers will accept drop-off donations for the garage sale at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. today. All donations are taxdeductible. There may be items that cannot be accepted and items for which Rotary will ask a drop-off fee (in the event they don’t sell and must be disposed of). Volunteers can handle a limited number of pickups. If donors are unable to transport their items, they are invited to contact Dave Backman, 360-301-5530, or Erik Frederickson, 360-3012995, for possible assistance. For more information, visit www.ptrotaryultimate garagesale.org.

Mental health films PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County National Alliance on Mental Illness and Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship will co-sponsor two free films Sunday. The screenings will be at 1:30 p.m. at the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave. Turn

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Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival

Presented by Westport Shipyards, Inc. & Elwha River Casino

WESTPORT

October 9th & 10th

Under cover, rain or shine Saturday 10am-8:30pm Sunday 10am-5pm

FREE ADMISSION!

High Tide Seafood & Wilder Auto Grab-A-Crab Tank Derby

Windermere Real Estate Crab Central Pavilion

Port Angeles City Pier Saturday 10 am - 5pm Sunday 10 am to 4 pm

under the Big Top

Saturday 11:00am to 8:30pm Sunday 11:00am to 5:00pm

Participate in the Grab-A-Crab Derby by crabbing from large tanks. A $5 entry will allow you to crab for 10 minutes. If you catch a tagged crab, you can keep it! No license or gear whatsoever is required. You can purchase the crab you caught and have it cleaned and cooked on the spot!

Old-fashioned crab feed complete with large kettles of fresh crab, fresh organic corn and coleslaw. Local restaurants compliment the crab feed with more than 25 seafood dishes and great desserts. Wine tasting by award winning local wineries, a beer garden, and music sponsored by Elwha River Casino & Jim’s Pharmacy.

Environmental Education

OPENING CEREMONIES Saturday 11 am

Step into the Fiero Marine Life Center for a hands on experience. Visit the organizations such as the Olympic Coast Marine Sanctuary. The National Park and others in the environmental education area., or bring your family to take part on the children’s program.

Join us on Lincoln Street in celebration of the festival with local officials and members of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe. The tribe’s elders will share stories and a blessing. The Elwha Klallam Dancers will perform.

First Federal Education Program Chef’s Demonstrations

City Pier and Gateway Center

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe & Elwha River Casino

Get an up close look at a Coast Guard Boat, on display on Lincoln Street. Don’t miss the Air-Sea Rescue demonstration at 2 pm on Saturday just off the City Pier. It’s awesome to watch!

EVENT SPONSORS

The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe will be showcasing a variety of projects. The Elwha River Casino will offer a free shuttle service to the casino. 0A5098153

You’ll find great food at both locations. On the pier enjoy more than 60 craft & merchant booths. You can watch Beach Volleyball and on Sunday a 5K Fun Run.

U.S. Coast Guard

Air - Sea Rescue Demonstration & Static Display.

Enjoy demonstrations by celebrity chefs at the Gateway Center. Learn fabulous recipes and techniques from Peninsula Chefs from 11:00am to 6:00pm Also sponsored by Olympic Restaurant Equipment, Inc and The Olympic Culinary Tourism Association.

SAVE ON YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT CRAB FEED

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

C3

Chefs to cook up feasts at crab festival Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker (2)/Peninsula Daily News

A large crab banner billows in the wind at the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival tent in Port Angeles on Thursday. Workers were busy preparing the site for the festival, which takes place this weekend.

Saturday

Crabs: Rescue demonstration

■  11 a.m.: “Everything Salmon, Methods Class,” presented by Arran Stark, chef at Cultivated Palette Catering, Port Townsend. ■  Noon: Wild salmon au poivre with maple and balsamic-glazed strawberries, wild huckleberry and mushroom risotto, and grilled asparagus prepared by Jess Owen, chef and owner, Ocean Crest Resort, Moclips. ■  1 p.m.: Linguini with butternut squash, mussels and wilted greens prepared by Jon Luzadder, chef at Ajax Cafe, Port Hadlock. ■  2 p.m.: Cider-steamed blueshell mussels, smoked ham hock prepared by Ron Anderson, special guest chef from Etta’s Seafood, Seattle, a Tom Douglas Restaurant. ■  3 p.m.: “Imperial Crab Spring Rolls” prepared by Les Chang, chef and cook-

Continued from C1 The “Grab-a-Crab” Derby — in which visitors paying $5 have a chance to snag a live crab from a tank and take it home — will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The Coast Guard will present a combined air-sea rescue demonstration at 2 p.m. Saturday off City Pier. A raptor demonstration is planned for 1 p.m. Sunday on Hollywood Beach. Hands-on educational activities and exhibits are at the Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center on City Pier.

Volleyball tourney “We also have a volleyball tournament set up for both Saturday and Sunday, and all the teams for that have already signed up,” Nagel said. The volleyball tournament is a first for the festival. So is Sunday’s fun run. “We’ll have a 5K fun run on Sunday that people can still sign up for,” Nagel said. Runners can just show

Seafood Festival is produced by the nonprofit Olympic Peninsula Celebrations and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce. For more information, visit www.crabfestival.org,

Sunday ■  11 a.m.: “Imperial Crab Spring Rolls.” ■  Noon: “Seared Pacific Scallops with Curried Nante Carrots” and a pumpkin seed vinaigrette prepared by Anderson. ■  1 p.m.: “Foraged and Found, Scallop Ceviche with Pickled Chanterelle Mushroom,” prepared by Gabriel Schuenemann, chef at Alder Wood Bistro, Sequim. ■  2 p.m.: Kabocha pumpkin and Dungeness crab agnolotti carbonara, alderwood-smoked bacon, Washington state apples, Oregon truffles, Dairy Fresh Farms’ goat cheese-sage cream, spicy Dungeness crab and peanut soup prepared by Terry Sheehan, executive chef at Lake Crescent Lodge, Port Angeles. ■  3 p.m.: “Geoduck Prepared by the Master,” presented by Xinh Dwelley, chef at Xinh’s Clam and Oyster House, Shelton. ■  4 p.m.: Northwest paella prepared by Steve McNabb, freelance chef and culinary consultant, Coast Consulting, Port Angeles.

Postpartum talk slated

Philip Eichner with Event Management Services walks atop the Dungeness Crab & Seafood festival tent in Port Angeles while rigging a large crab banner on Thursday. up to register for the run, which will leave from Lincoln Street near The Gateway at 10 a.m. “We also have a new beer garden set up at The Gateway this year,” Nagel said. The Dungeness Crab &

PORT ANGELES — Master chefs will demonstrate how to cook up delectable delights during the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival. The chef demonstrations will be at The Gateway center at Front and Lincoln streets from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Chef appearances are courtesy of the Olympic Peninsula Loop Culinary Tourism Association, a nonprofit organization that exists to define and promote Olympic Coast Cuisine and celebrate the region’s unique culinary experience. Here’s the lineup.

ing instructor from Victoria. ■  4 p.m.: “Comfort Food at its Local Best, Dungeness Crab Mac & Cheese” prepared by Jon Unruh, chef at Wildfire Grill, Port Angeles. ■  5 p.m.: Fresh pasta with chanterelle mushrooms and Dungeness crab with Olympic Cellars chardonnay butter prepared by Kaleb Wallace, chef at Michael’s Seafood & Steak Restaurant, Port Angeles.

Peninsula Daily News

e-mail info@crabfestival.org or phone 360-452-6300.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

PORT ANGELES — Peninsula Community Mental Health Center registered nurse Margaret Love will present “Postpartum Mental Wellness and Self Care” at First Step Family Support Center, 325 E. Sixth St., from 2 p.m. to

4 p.m. Thursday. The free event is sponsored by Peninsula Community Mental Health Center and First Step Family Support Center. Child care will be provided. For more information, phone First Step at 360457-8355.

Events: Marine Science Center sets open house “When Medicine Got It Wrong” flashes back to the 1970s when parents were “fed up” with being blamed for “bad parenting” as the cause of their children’s mental health issues, particularly schizophrenia. Efforts of a group of determined parents led to the founding of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. This is a PBS documentary, released in May. In “Walking in Recovery,” individuals living in Washington state tell their stories of recovery, revealing the idea that recovery from mental health issues/brain disorders is not only possible but happening every day. This 2010 film was funded by the Washington Mental Health Transformation Project. A question-and-answer period will follow each film. For more information, phone 360-379-9949.

Open house

Watershed Day PORT HADLOCK — Washington State University Jefferson County Extension will hold the 12th annual WSU Watershed Day at the extension offices, 201 W. Patison St., from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The theme of the day is “Big Spills, Little Drips.” John Incardona, research toxicologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, is the keynote speaker. Incardona will discuss current research on the impacts of both big oil spills and the “little drips” of pollution from storm water runoff. He will be joined by local

experts who will discuss oilspill response and provide examples of what is happening in Jefferson County to reduce the pollutants in storm water. WSU Watershed Day is presented by the WSU Jefferson County Beach Watchers program. For more information about the beach-watcher program in Jefferson County, visit jefferson.wsu. edu and click on “Water.” For more information on Watershed Day or to RSVP, phone beach-watcher coordinator Darcy McNamara at 360-379-5610, ext. 230, or e-mail darcym@jefferson. wsu.edu.

Wine, cheese tasting PORT LUDLOW — The Resort At Port Ludlow will host an evening of wine and cheese tasting tonight. The event will be from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the resort at 1 Heron Road.

The cost is $39 per guest. More than 40 artisan cheeses and 30 regional wines will be presented by Francois Kerautret, Rachael Van Laanen of Mystery Bay Farm and Mark Kieras, sommelier, the resort said. To make reservations, phone 360-437-7412. For more information, visit www.portludlowresort. com.

Music and Everly Cleartone Strings will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Customers will receive a free string change and a free set of strings when they buy a set of Everly strings. Josephina Hunner will lead a beginning mandolin workshop covering basic

chord charts and tab readings from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Attendees will learn three songs, including a Celtic tune. Cost is $20. Seating is limited for each workshop. To reserve a seat or for more information, phone 360-385-1471.

Linty Hope

Music events set PORT TOWNSEND — Crossroads Music, 2100 Lawrence St., will host two musical workshops and a string clinic Saturday. Mark Moore will teach a beginning ukulele workshop from 10 a.m. to noon. Loaner ukuleles will be available for the workshop. Cost is $25 per person. A guitar, mandolin and electric bass string clinic provided by Crossroads

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PORT TOWNSEND — Visitors will hear about the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s plans to exhibit an orca skeleton during an open house Saturday. The open house, which will be between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., will kick off the center’s Orca Project Capital Campaign to help it build an exhibition hall for the skeleton of an orca that died near Dungeness Spit in 2002. At 3 p.m., staff and volunteers will tell the story of that orca, named Hope by children who attended spring programming and the Whale Camp. The orca beached herself and died, carrying a high load of toxic contaminants. A male orca ­— probably her son ­— was stranded in shallow water nearby.

He refused to leave until rescuers coaxed him into deeper waters. During the open house, visitors will hear about what the Orca Project has accomplished so far, hear of fundraising plans and see architectural sketches. The goal of the capital campaign is to build onto the Natural History Exhibit and create a new space to feature the orca skeleton, video, hydrophone technology and other displays, in addition to room for class instruction. For more information, visit www.ptmsc.org.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 8, 2010

New members welcome at Jefferson 4-H’s Groups focus on variety of projects Peninsula Daily News

PORT HADLOCK — The following Jefferson County 4-H Clubs are welcoming new members: ■  Cedarbrook 4-H Club. Projects include gardening, sewing, fiber arts and crafts, foods of the Pacific Northwest, performing arts. Phone Linda Gately at 360-385-5774 or e-mail gately@olypen.com. ■  Clover Cut Riders 4-H Club. Horses. Phone Michelle Christiansen at 360-385-4962 or e-mail ellec131@yahoo. com or Tanya Schweitzer at 360-301-3559 or e-mail Tanya_n_chase@yahoo. com. ■  County Mountys 4-H Club. Horses. Phone Karlene Chapman at 360-385-6241 or e-mail chaphill@waypt. com. ■  Critter Co-op 4-H Club. Rabbits and cavies. Open to youths in third grade or older. Phone Cheryl Rafoth at 360-379-1926 or e-mail crafoth@aol.com. ■  Golden Clovers 4-H Club. Goats and sheep. Phone Felecia Allen at 360-732-0638 or e-mail harmonyswayfarm@ earthlink.net. ■  Healthy Helpers. Food and sewing. Phone Sue Hay at 360385-4614 or e-mail barriesue.hay@gmail.com. ■  Jefferson County 4-H Horse Project. Horses. Phone Tanya Sch-

weitzer at 360-301-3559 or e-mail Tanya_n_chase@ yahoo.com. ■  Know Your Government Project. Open to youths in grades 9-12. Phone Sue Hay at 360385-4614 or e-mail barriesue.hay@gmail.com. ■  OPROC 4-H Club. Rocketry. Phone John Ludwig at 360-385-0341 or e-mail gunstar@hotmail.com. ■  Quilcene Clovers 4-H Club. Rabbits, honeybee entomology, crafts, chickens, cooking, gardening. Phone Colleen Winn at 360-531-0023 or Gloria Neal at 360-732-4642 or e-mail cwinn22@embarq mail.com. ■  Paws-N-Claws 4-H Club. Cats. Phone Laurie Hampton at 360-437-2388 or e-mail catwoman@olympus.net. ■  Silver Spurs 4-H Club. Horses. Phone Mona Sharpe at 360-643-1575 or e-mail msharpee@olypen.com. ■  Wild Angels 4-H Club. Horses. Phone Glenda Kilmer at 360-302-5119 or e-mail gandgkilmer@msn.com. ■  Wild Clovers 4-H Club. Dogs, photography. Phone Su Tipton at 360-385-7528 or e-mail beefliverpie@msn.com. For more information on the Jefferson County 4-H Program or to find out how to start a 4-H club, phone Pamela Roberts, Washington State University Extension Jefferson County 4-H coordinator, at 360-379-5610, ext. 207.

Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Lazy J Tree Farm owner Steve Johnson stands next to a line of noble fir trees on his farm east of Port Angeles on Wednesday. He will be giving away free noble firs Saturday, Oct. 16.

Trees: Co-op offers vouchers Continued from C1 Quimper’s Green SancBut by this week, only tuary Comabout a handful had made mittee. the pledge, Burres said. The congregation is Port Townsend having a work party In Jefferson County, the Griffin story’s similar. The Port of its own Townsend Food Co-op S u n d a y , offered vouchers for 100 Kolff said. “We’re just going Douglas fir trees, donated to be planting a few trees on by the Hood Canal Nurser- our grounds: some cedars ies in Port Gamble, last and vine maples.” Sunday. Meanwhile, back in ClalOnly about 60 people lam County, the tree-plantclaimed a coupon, so co-op ing and -donating idea has outreach manager Brwyn spread, though not quite in Griffin gave the rest to the time for the Global Work Quimper Unitarian Univer- Party on 10-10-10. salist Fellowship to distribute this Sunday. Lazy J Tree Farm Tree planters are invited to the fellowship hall at Steve Johnson, owner of 2333 San Juan Ave. in Port the Lazy J Tree Farm at Townsend for services at 225 Gehrke Road — east of 9:15 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Port Angeles, off Old OlymVouchers will be handed pic Highway — is inviting out after each, said Helen would-be planters to pick Kolff, chairwoman of up a free noble fir Saturday,

Oct. 16. That’s when he’ll have them ready to go; Johnson said people can stop by between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. for a free bare-root tree. He’s giving the trees away because they’ve grown too big to sell as Christmas trees and would otherwise go into his compost heap. “In my book, Steve’s the real hero here,” Diana Somerville, a Port Angeles journalist, said of Johnson. “He’s trying to find good homes for trees that have grown too big . . . he wants to keep them alive instead of doing them in.” Somerville, who often writes about environmental issues, is joining the Global Work Party this Sunday. “For what it’s worth,” she said. “I’m planting a tree . . . a little vine maple that I got from StreamFest,” the North Olympic Land Trust’s Aug. 29 festival at Port Angeles’ Ennis Arbor Farm.

As it turns out, Somerville and Kolff are part of one enormous Global Work Party. The 350.org site this week counted 6,631 events in 188 countries, from a bicycle ride on the Jordan River through Tel Aviv to the solar-cooker-building workshop and children’s book exchange in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. At the Port Townsend Food Co-op, staffer Deborah Schumacher used her October newsletter article to urge her neighbors to join or form even more work parties. “We can’t afford to throw up our hands now,” she wrote. “There’s nothing to do but get to work.”

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly . . . Talk on herbal interactions scheduled

conference room of the Olympic Medical Services Building, 840 N. Fifth SEQUIM — Retired pharmacist Deta Stem will Ave. Stem Stem present “Drugs, Herbs and will cover Supplements: Interactions That Can Rock Your World” the “Dirty Dozen,” supplements that have been at 2 p.m. Wednesday. determined by the Food The free forum will be and Drug Administration held in the second-floor

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Garden art talk PORT ANGELES — Washington State University Clallam County Extension Master Gardeners Marilynn Elliott and Conni Lee will present garden art ideas at noon Tuesday. The talk will be held at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St. Elliott will discuss design, selection and placement of artwork, including seasonal displays, to enhance a home garden landscape. Clallam County’s 2007 Master Gardener of the Year, Elliott will be sharing

Master Gardeners Marilynn Elliott, left, and Conni Lee will present ideas for collecting, creating and displaying garden art at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., at noon Tuesday. her experience in landscaping, container gardening and establishing thriving garden “rooms” accented with art that she has both purchased and created. Lee, owner of Never Di, will demonstrate how to make garden art, including collecting, recycling and assembling materials.

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She sells her original reclaimed glass garden art flowers at the Sequim Open Aire Market. Both speakers will talk about working within a personal budget for collecting and creating works of art. This presentation is part of the “Green Thumbs Garden Tips” brown bag series sponsored by the WSU Clallam County Master Gardeners on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month in Port Angeles. Presentations are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-417-2279.

downtown each fall will have some company this year — they’ll be joined by vampires. The Port Angeles Downtown Association and Soroptimist-Jet Set are sponsoring a scarecrow or vampire contest. “Anyone — a club, organization, classroom, individual or business — can make and enter a scarecrow or vampire,” said Soroptimist member Jean Hordyk. A store-bought scarecrow can be embellished, but decorations must be securely attached. Construction needs to be freestanding, durable and mobile so it can be moved inside for the night for protection. Entry name must be visible on all entries. The entry fee is $5. The money will go to cash prizes for the winners. Entries from those who are not businesses must be taken to the Port Angeles Downtown Association office, 208 N. Laurel St., between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Friday, Oct. 15. They will be assigned a location downtown. Voting will be by popular vote from Oct. 16-30. Winners will be announced at http:// Portangelesdowntown.com on Oct. 31. For more information, phone Hordyk at 360-4571041 or the PADA office at 360-457-9614. Peninsula Daily News

Continued from C1 7 p.m. or 8 p.m., while on Friday and Saturday nights, This year, the design the patch is open later, closmarks a departure from the ing at 9 p.m. or 10 p.m. The maze is open on Fri“Wizard of Oz” theme of the day and Saturday nights as last few years. A cowboy boot with a well as during the day. Food also is available, spur and the words “Hee Haw” decorate the spread including corn on the cob for $2 and kettle corn for instead. The Pumpkin Patch $5. Coffee, cider, lemonade opens each day at 9 a.m., and hot chocolate are availLassila said. Closing time depends able for $2. To plan field trips, birthsomewhat on customers, she said, but Sunday day parties or for more through Thursday closing information, phone Lassila hours are generally at at 360-461-0940.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Things to Do Today, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 8-10, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today

Clallam County Civil Service Commission — Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., 9 a.m.

Play and Learn Port Angeles — Program for children as old as 5 to attend with a parent, Tatting class — Golden grandparent or caregiver with individual and group play, Craft Shop, 112-C S. Lincoln songs and story time. 9 a.m. to St., 10 a.m. to noon. Phone 11 a.m. For location and infor- 360-457-0509. mation, phone 360-452-5437. Olympic Coast Discovery Walk-in vision clinic — Center — Second floor, The Information for visually impaired Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad and blind people, including Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. accessible technology display, Port Angeles Farmers library, Braille training and various magnification aids. Vision Market — Clallam County Loss Center, 228 W. First St., Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Suite N, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh proPhone 360-457-1383 or visit duce, crafts and music. www.visionlossservices.org/ Feiro Marine Life Center vision. — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Olympic Coast Discovery Admission by donation. Phone Center — Second floor, The 360-417-6254. Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Joyce Depot Museum — Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. 15 miles west of Port Angeles Nicotine Anonymous — on state Highway 112, 10 a.m. Klallam Counseling,1026 E. to 4 p.m. 1915-era log depot First St., 10:30 a.m. Phone houses, photographs and historical information regarding 360-452-1060. Joyce, Port Crescent, Twin, Insurance assistance — Lake Crescent, Camp Hayden, Statewide benefits advisers the Spruce Railroad and early help with health insurance and logging. Phone 360-928-3568. Medicare. Port Angeles Senior Guided walking tour — Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone Marge Historic downtown buildings, Stewart at 360-452-3221, ext. an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Cham3425. ber of Commerce, 121 E. RailScrapbook and paper- road Ave., 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. crafts class — Clallam County Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior Family YMCA Art School, 723 citizens and students, $6 ages E. Fourth St., 10 a.m. to noon. 6 to 12. Children younger than Cost: $8, $5 for YMCA mem- 6, free. Reservations, phone bers. For children 8 to 14. To 360-452-2363, ext. 0. register, phone 360-452-9244, Dungeness Crab and Seaext. 309, or e-mail cheryl@ food Festival — City Pier, The ccfymca.org. Gateway and Red Lion Hotel, Guided walking tour — 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Free. Historic downtown buildings, an Clallam County Genealogold brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of ical Society — Susan Karren Commerce, 121 E. Railroad of Seattle branch of National Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Archives and Records AdminTickets: $12 adults, $10 senior istration presents “If You Think citizens and students, $6 ages the National Archives Don’t 6 to 12. Children younger than Have Anything for You, Think 6, free. Reservations, phone Again.” First Presbyterian Church parish hall, 139 W. 360-452-2363, ext. 0. Eighth St., 10 a.m. to noon. Port Angeles Fine Arts Free. Phone 360-417-5000 or Center — “Safe Harbor.” 1203 visit www.olypen.com/ccgs. E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 Port Angeles Fine Arts p.m. Free. Phone 360-457Center — “Safe Harbor.” 1203 3532. E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 Bingo — Port Angeles p.m. Free. Phone 360-457Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh 3532. St., 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Second Saturday Sculp360-457-7004. ture Walk — The Landing mall, Museum at the Carnegie 115 E. Railroad Ave., 11 a.m. — Featured exhibit, “Strong Free guided walk of downtown People: The Faces of Clallam sculptures and art galleries. County.” Miniatures exhibit till Peace rally — Veterans Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Chil- Park, 217 S. Lincoln St., noon dren welcome. Elevator, ADA to 2 p.m. Sponsored by Green access and parking at rear of Party of Clallam County. Phone 360-683-0867. building. 360-452-6779. Introduction to line dance for beginners — Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Phone 360-457-7004.

Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431. Senior meal — Nutrition program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-4578921.

Veterans for Peace — Tony van Renterghem Chapter, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road, 2:30 p.m. For information, phone David Jenkins at 360-385-7612 or click on www.veteransforpeace.org.

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews.com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Cost: $5. Phone 360-4529136.

Sunday PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Olympic Coast Discovery Center — Second floor, The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival — City Pier, The Gateway and Red Lion Hotel, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Admission by donation. Phone 360-417-6254. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Safe Harbor.” 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Phone 360-4573532. Port Angeles Community Market — The Gateway, First and Lincoln streets, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 360-417-0486 or e-mail mimi@portangeles market.com. “Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming” — Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 2 p.m. Tickets $12 general, $6 students at Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., www.shop. nwperformingarts.com or at the door. Dance — Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 minutes of instruction, followed by folk and ballroom dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments, 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com.

Sequim Student Ambassadors benefit dinner — Spaghetti and meatballs with salad dessert, beverages. Guy Cole Convention Center, Carrie Blake Park. 202 N. Blake Ave., 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., $6 adults, $3 children 3 to 10, younger than 3 free. Raffle items, door prizes will be given away. Phone Michelle Earley 360683-2785 or e-mail michelle earley@msn.com.

Sequim Duplicate Bridge — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth Ave., 12:30 p.m. Phone 360681-4308, or partnership 360683-5635.

Crochet Circle — Sequim Public Library, 630 N. Sequim Sunday Ave., 1 p.m. Stitch, share, learn Olympic Outdoor Club and chat. Open to beginners. hike — The Baldy Trail, a diffiPhone 360-681-2552. cult hike of 9 miles round trip; elevation gain of 3,700 feet; French class — 2 p.m. For high point at 6,550 feet. Port more information, phone 360- Angeles hikers meet 8:30 a.m. at Clallam County Courthouse. 681-226. Quimper Peninsula hikers meet Chanting for World Peace 8:30 a.m. at Quimper Credit — Center for Infinite Reflec- Union, Port Hadlock. These tions, 144 Tripp Road, 6:45 and Sequim hikers meet 9:15 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Free. Phone a.m. at entrance to Sequim Bay State Park. E-mail olympic. 360-504-2046. outdoors@yahoo.com.

Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for youth (6-17); free for science center members. “Whales in Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. org. Conversation Cafe — Victorian Square Deli, 940 Water St., No. 1, noon. Phone 360-3856959 or visit www.conversation cafe.org. Topic: Homeland. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free hour-long tour of new headquarters and telling of property’s story. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone Saturday VFW breakfast — 169 E. 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or Sequim Open Aire Market Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. — Farm, food and art and craft p.m. Cost: $5 a person. Port Townsend Library vendors. Cedar Street between Pittsburgh Steelers Fan website demo — Learn about Sequim and Second avenues, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit www. Club — Stymie’s Bar & Grill, expanded services available Cedars at Dungeness Golf and new website. Library lobby, sequimmarket.com. Course, 1965 Woodcock Road, 1220 Lawrence St., 3 p.m. to 5 Meditation group — Dun- 10 a.m. Phone 360-775-8663. p.m. Phone 360-344-3068. geness Valley Lutheran Church, Adult Scrabble — The Overeaters Anonymous — 925 N. Sequim Ave., 9 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Phone 360-683- Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. 4775. Phone 360-385-6854. Trivia night — Oasis Sports Sequim Prairie Garden Club’s Harvest Festival — Bar and Grill, 301 E. WashingWhole Person Drumming Pioneer Memorial Park club- ton St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360- — Beginners Mind with Zorina house, 387 E. Washington St., 582-3143. Wolf. Madrona Mind Body Insti9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more infortute, Fort Worden State Park, 6 mation, phone 360-477-0636. Port Townsend and p.m. to 8 p.m. Visit www.village heartbeat.com. Phone 360Jefferson County 681-5407 or e-mail vhb@ Overeaters Anonymous — Literature meeting at St. Luke’s villageheartbeat.com. Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Today St., 10 a.m. Phone 360-452“Here’s to the Ladies! The Port Townsend Aero 0227. Museum — Jefferson County Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Key City Public Theatre at Key Book sale — Friends of International Airport, 195 Air- City Playhouse, 419 Washingport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sequim Library, Sequim Library ton St., 8 p.m. Tickets $18 630 N. Sequim Ave., 10 a.m. to Admission: $10 for adults, $9 general and $10 students. for seniors, $6 for children ages 3 p.m. Proceeds for special 7-12. Free for children younger Advance tickets online or at needs of library. than 6. Features vintage air- Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, phone Sequim PC Users Group craft and aviation art. 360-385-7396 or visit www. — Room E3, Sequim High keycitypublictheatre.org. Puget Sound Coast ArtilSchool, 601 N. Sequim Ave., lery Museum — Fort Worden 10 a.m. Visit spcug.net. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday Clallam-WSU Master Gar- Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for Olympic Outdoor hike — deners plant clinic — Co-Op children 6 to 12; free for chil- The Silver Lake Trail, a moderdren 5 and younger. Exhibits Farm & Garden/True Value, ately difficult hike of 11 miles 216 E. Washington St., 10 a.m. interpret the Harbor Defenses round trip; elevation gain of of Puget Sound and the Strait to 2 p.m. Free and open to the 3,400 feet; high point of 5,700 public. Bring samples of plants of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- feet. Port Angeles hikers meet 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ for identification. Phone Muriel 8 a.m. at Clallam County CourtNesbitt, program coordinator, olypen.com. house PA and Sequim hikers at 360-565-2679. Jefferson County Histori- meet 8:45 a.m. at southeast corner of Sequim Walmart Sequim Museum & Arts cal Museum and shop — 540 parking lot Quimper Peninsula Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Center — “Your Daily Fiber: hikers meet 9 a.m. Quimper Conspicuous Consumption, Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Credit Union, Port Hadlock. All children 3 to 12; free to historiCommunity and Ceremony.” cal society members. Exhibits hikers meet 9:30 a.m. at state 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 include “Jefferson County’s Route 20 and U.S. Highway p.m. Free. Phone 360-683- Maritime Heritage,” “James 101 in Discovery Bay. E-mail 8110. Swan and the Native Ameri- olympic.outdoors@yahoo.com. cans” and “The Chinese in Light lunch — Free hot Early Port Townsend.” Phone Turn to Things/C8 meals for people in need, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Phone 360-683-4862.

Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way 8 Cribbage — Port Angeles a.m. Free. Phone 360-683Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh 2114. St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For all Circuit training exercise ages. class — Sequim Community Embroidery class — Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 Golden Craft Shop, 112-C S. a.m. to 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Lincoln St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360Bring an embroidery needle, 477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@ hoop, scissors and a 12-inch wavecable.com. square of plain cotton fabric. Phone 360-457-0509. Line dancing lessons — Washington Old Time FidBeginning dancers. Sequim Museum at the Carnegie Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams dlers concert — Sequim Prai— Featured exhibit, “Strong Road, 10 a.m. to 11a.m. $3 per rie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. All players Jam, 11:30 a.m. to People: The Faces of Clallam class. Phone 360-681-2826. 1:30 p.m. Performance, 1:30 County.” Miniatures exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln Sequim Museum & Arts p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Free and streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Chil- Center — “Your Daily Fiber: open to the public. Donations dren welcome. Elevator, ADA Conspicuous Consumption, support fiddle lesson scholaraccess and parking at rear of Community and Ceremony.” 175 ships. Phone Hershel Lester at building. 360-452-6779. W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 360-417-6950 or e-mail Free. Phone 360-683-8110. handrlester@olypen.com. League of Women’s Voters forum — For state House District 24 Position 1 between Dan October is Customer Gase and Kevin Van de Wege and Position 2 between Jim Appreciation Month! McEntire and Steve Tharinger. Port Angeles City Council Cham* bers, 321 E. Fifth St., 2 p.m.

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Veterans for Peace — Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 73 Howe Road, Agnew, 2:30 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. p.m. Use personal experiences Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, to raise public awareness of drinks and pull tabs available. costs and consequences of Phone 360-457-7377. militarism and war. Phone David Jenkins 360-385-7612 Global Lens Film Series or visit www.veteransforpeace. — Mexican film “Becloud.” Little org. Donations accepted. Theatre, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 The Answer for Youth — p.m., $5. Students free. English Drop-in outreach center for subtitles. youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, “Smoke on the Mountain: Narcotics and Alcoholics AnonHomecoming” — Port Ange- ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. les Community Playhouse, Second St., 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7:30 p.m. p.m. Tickets $12 general, $6 students at Odyssey Book“Smoke on the Mountain: shop, 114 W. Front St., www. Homecoming” — Port Angeshop.nwperformingarts.com or les Community Playhouse, at the door. 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7:30 p.m. Tickets $12 general, $6 students at Odyssey BookSaturday shop, 114 W. Front St., www. Intro rowing classes — For shop.nwperformingarts.com or beginners and intermediates at the door. ages 16 and older. Olympic Peninsula Rowing Association Strait Wheelers Square Boathouse, 1431 Ediz Hook, 8 Dance Club — Mount Pleasa.m. and 9:30 a.m. Member- ant Grange, 2432 Mount Pleasship fees apply. E-mail Tim ant Road. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Contract bridge — Sequim Senior Center, 921 E. Hammond St., 6:30 p.m. $4 members, $5 for nonmembers. Bring own partner. Phone Eleanor McIntyre 360-683-2948.

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The Answer for Youth — Drop-in outreach center for youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

C5

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Tucker at tim@ccfymca.org. Zazen — NO Sangha, a Zen community, offers zazen alternated with kinhin. 420 W. Third St., 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Also opportunities for private teaching interviews with Sensei Kristen Larson. For directions, phone 360-452-5534 or e-mail nosangha@aol.com.

Friday, October 8, 2010

457-1411 • 1404 E. Front St. • Port Angeles • fairchildfloors.com

Sequim - 360-681-2877 490 South Blake Ave. Port Angeles - 360-457-3371 4001 Tumwater Truck Route


C6

FaithReligion

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Turn off the screens to picture God’s word

The Associated Press

Ritual

on the

Ganges River

A Hindu man performs rituals on the banks of the Ganges River during sarvapitri amavasya in Calcutta, India, on Thursday. Sarvapitri amavasya is the last day of the 16-lunar-day period when Hindus pay homage to their ancestors and perform rituals to ensure that the souls of their ancestors go to heaven.

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC CHURCH 209 West 11th Port Angeles

360.452.2351 www.queenofangelsparish.org

Parish School

457-6903

www.queenofangelsschool.edu

Rev. Thomas Nathe, Pastor Mass: Saturday Vigil 5 p.m. Sunday 8:30 and 11 a.m. Tuesday 6 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Confession: Half hour before all Masses & 4-5 p.m. Saturdays Youth Religious Ed Classes: Sundays 9:35-10:35 a.m. at Parish School Life Teen Night: Sunday 6-7:30 p.m. at Parish Hall Eucharistic Adoration: Fri. 9:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. Sat.

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

IN THE COOL of the evening, with the noise of a day’s work behind him and the aroma of a day’s sweat following him, Isaac went out into the field to meditate (Genesis 24). But his mediation was suddenly interrupted by the sight and sounds of camels approaching — camels approaching with his bride, Rebekah. It’s a great love-at-firstsight story. But I am left curious: What was Isaac meditating about when he was interrupted by the sight and sound of camels? Unfortunately, we aren’t told. Meditation. I dare say Christians have largely lost the biblical discipline of mediation. Maybe there is a resistance to meditation because it is perceived as an Eastern religion discipline and not a Christian discipline. Maybe meditation is only thought of as a word that follows transcendental. But maybe we have thrown the baby out with the bathwater. The Bible has much to say about meditation. Just prior to the Israelites entering the land promised to their forefathers, Joshua told them to be “strong and courageous” (Joshua 1:6). We like stories about strong and courageous people. But he also told them their success would be dependent upon their obedience in meditating day and night on the “Book of

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages: 9:45 a.m. Nursery Provided: Both services

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m.

683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

REDEEMING GRACE ORTHODOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH REFORMED Scandia Hall, 131 W. 5th St., P. A. Andy Elam, Pastor SUNDAY 9:15 a.m. Study Hour 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 360-504-1950

FIRST UNITED METHODIST and Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Jo Ann Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship 4:00 p.m. Youth Group portangelesumc@tfon.com www.gbgm-umc.org/portangelesfumc

Parking lot sale slated for Saturday

Sunday 9:30 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936 www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

SEQUIM CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING

PIONEER MEMORIAL PARK, SEQUIM REV. LYNN OSBORNE 681-0177

Teaching the principles of Science of Mind SUNDAY 10 a.m. Services

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know C hrist and to m ake H im know n www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) Park & Race, Port Angeles 457-7062 David R. Moffitt, Pastor SUNDAY

9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

St. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH 101 E. Maple St., Sequim Father Victor Olvida Mass Schedule

Saturday, 5:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Confessions: 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. Saturday

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Fam ily friendly

Can you hear the violent wind or see the flaming tongues of fire at Pentecost? Again, we rely too much on big screens or tiny screens to fill our heads with sights and sounds; and we rely too little on God’s word and Holy Spirit to do so more excellently. And we wonder at the mess we are in. I challenge you to turn the TV off for half an hour. C’mon, you can do it! And I dare you to open up the ancient text, read a passage that is familiar or new and then close the book. And meditate. Invite God to fill your head and heart with the sights and sounds and aromas and textures of the scene. Believe me, the Holy Spirit can outdo Spielberg. And when you re-enter your world, you will discover that the application of God’s word will be clearer and easier and more exciting. God’s word will make the transition from being distant and abstract to becoming close and personal. “For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart” (Hebrews 4:12). His word is also a lamp that guides our feet (Psalms 119:105), but to be either sword or lamp, we must give the word meditative time and effort to do its divine and holy work. “May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O Lord, my Rock and my Redeemer” (Psalms. 19:14).

________ Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Rev. Greg Reynolds is the pastor at Joyce Bible Church may be contacted by e-mail at jbc@ joycebiblechurch.org.

Briefly . . .

0A5099685

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH GARBC 683-7303 7652 Old Olympic Highway Sequim Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Worship: 11 a.m. Praise and Fellowship Service 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6 p.m. Nursery Available

conversation following the service.

“Enduring”

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship

tiny screen of an iPhone. Life must have a screen — and sound. If we ever the Law” Greg dare to stop, close our eyes Reynolds (1:8). By medi- and seriously contemplate God’s word or wonders, tating on either our minds quickly that book, they would wander or our minds quickly slumber. be able to I admit that too often, do what it my attempts to meditate asked of on God’s word are lost them. when I begin to envision In the New Testa- that word and all its implications being spoken or ment, James applies the taught to others. same principle: “Do not It’s a preacher’s handimerely listen to the word, cap. I begin to formulate and so deceive yourselves. 12-point PowerPoint serDo what it says” (James mons. But meditation 1:22). should not be sermon prepThe Psalmist writes aration. about meditation often. Meditation should be a Like Joshua, he reveals quiet time when God’s that meditation is neither word is allowed to deeply passive nor fleeting; it requires both devotion and penetrate my soul. Meditation invites me and time. requires me to slowly con“Oh, how I love your template the nuance of law! I meditate on it all every word in a Bible day long” (Psalms 119:97). verse. But the Psalmist I must resist the expands the spectrum of impulse to insert a verse meditation far beyond the into my microwave brain, law to include all of God’s mighty deeds and wonder- push the 30-second button and quickly devour the ful works (77:12, 145:5). I believe the real reason verse while hoping to receive all its nutritional Christians today fail to meditate is because we are benefits. There is no such thing simply too busy and too as microwave meditation. noisy. Meditation takes Biblical meditation is more time and quiet solitude, like eating and savoring which are rare commodigood jerky. ties today. Biblical meditation also We can find time to sit in front of a big-screen TV; gives me the opportunity to visualize a passage. we can find time to sit in Relax. I’m not talking front of a computer screen; and when we leave the big about modern psychological visualization to create; I’m screen or the computer talking about biblical visuscreen, we can carry the alization to contemplate. What did that burning bush look like to Moses? What drew him to that strange flame? How hot was it? I imagine Abraham not wanting to wake Sarah that early morning when he saddled his donkey to take young Isaac to the mountain in Moriah. Surely Sarah would have THE OLYMPIC UNITARIAN forbidden that journey. UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP Have you ever contemA Welcoming Congregation 73 Howe Rd., Agnew plated the aroma of fish 417-2665 being cooked by Jesus or www.olympicuu.org the aroma of the expensive Sunday Service begins at 10:30 a.m. ointment Mary used to Handicap accessible; Childcare available; Religious exploration anoint His feet? classes for children, refreshments, and

Issues of faith

from the Aramaic language. The workshop is offered on a love-offering basis. Sunday school is held at the same time as worship services. Meditation in the sanctuary is from 10:15 am. to 10:25 a.m. The church is at 2917 E. Myrtle St. For more information, phone 360-4573981.

PORT ANGELES — A parking lot sale will be held by the St. Agnes Guild ladies on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. Proceeds will be donated to various charitable agen- Mosque controversy AGNEW — The Rev. cies throughout Clallam Amanda Aikman will County. address the proposed Spiritual exercises establishment of a mosque near New York’s ground PORT TOWNSEND — zero in her lesson “Gandhi The Rev. Bob Slater will and the Ground Zero offer “Going Deeper With Mosque” at 10:30 a.m. SunGod,” a six-week program day at Olympic Unitarian beginning Saturday at Universalist Fellowship, 73 10 a.m. in the fellowship Howe Road. hall of First Presbyterian Church, 1111 Franklin St. Surfing priests The series will continue HUNTINGTON through Saturday, Nov. 13. Based on a 500-year-old BEACH, Calif. — Huncontemplative prayer tradi- dreds of Californians joined tion developed by St. Igna- surfing priests and religious tius of Loyola, this program leaders from multiple faiths involves daily prayer, visu- to honor the ocean and protest coastal pollution. alization, journaling and The third annual Blessweekly group direction. ing of the Waves was held There is no cost for the Sunday at the Orange materials. For more information or County surfing mecca of to receive the introductory Huntington Beach to recognize the spiritual signifipacket, phone Slater at cance of the water and 360-385-2525 or e-mail at coastline. slater@cablespeed.com. “We find that the ocean can bring people of all Lamsa scholar faiths together,” said Rev. PORT ANGELES — Christian Mondor of St. Wyming Sun will be guest Simon and Jude Catholic speaker at Unity in the Church. “And since this is Olympics at 10:30 a.m. Surf City USA, it’s the perSunday. The title of his les- fect place to gather.” son will be “The Language The event is organized of Jesus.” by the Roman Catholic Sun is a Lamsa Bible Diocese of Orange and feascholar, an Aramaic linguist tures a floating interfaith and a professional feng prayer circle, Christian shui consultant. rock band The Wedge and Following the service at priests and a rabbi on surf1 p.m., he will present a boards. workshop with insights on Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press “The Lord’s Prayer” viewed


Peninsula Daily News for Friday/Saturday, October 8-9, 2010

Business

Page

C7

Politics & Environment

9th Circuit upholds ban on voting by prisoners By Gene Johnson

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — A federal appeals court reversed course Thursday and upheld Washington state’s ban on voting by prison inmates in a case that challenged the disproportionate effect it has on minority voters. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals caused a stir by ruling in January that Washington’s inmates should be allowed to vote. That decision was expected to give momentum to other efforts to expand voting to inmates; only Maine and Vermont allow those behind bars to cast ballots. But an 11-judge panel reconsidered the case at a hearing in San Francisco

last month and came to a different conclusion. The judges said that to challenge the ban under the Voting Rights Act, inmates would have to demonstrate intentional discrimination in the state’s criminal justice system — not just a disparity in the racial makeup of the prison population. The inmates suing in Washington made no such showing, they said. “Felon disenfranchisement laws have a long history in the United States,” the court said. “These laws predate the Jim Crow era and, with a few notable exceptions, have not been adopted based on racial considerations.” The suit against Washington’s law — which dates

to 1866, before statehood — was filed by Muhammad Shabazz Farrakhan, formerly of Bellevue.

Sued in 1996 He was serving a threeyear sentence at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla for a series of felony-theft convictions when he sued the state in 1996. Five other inmates, all members of racial minority groups, later joined as plaintiffs. They argued the voting ban “results in a denial or abridgement of the right . . . to vote on account of race” and thus violated the Voting Rights Act. The first milestone ruling in the case came in 2003, when a 9th Circuit

panel ruled 2-1 that inmates could challenge the voting ban by presenting evidence of racial disparities in the prison population. The 9th Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court declined to reconsider that ruling, but on Thursday the 11-judge panel backed away from it, saying it was too sweeping and ran counter to opinions from other federal appeals courts. Instead, they adopted the rule that inmates must show intentional racial discrimination. “This ruling affirms the rights of states to withhold the right to vote from those who’ve committed the most serious crimes against society,” state Attorney General Rob McKenna said in a written statement.

 $ Briefly . . . 2nd quarter retail sales dip 1 percent

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

OLYMPIA — Washington’s taxable retail sales were down just slightly in the second quarter of 2010, welcome news after a big decline last year. Retail sales are an important factor in government finances because nearly half the state’s general revenue comes from sales taxes. The state Revenue Department said sales dropped by 1 percent to $24.9 billion through the end of June. A year earlier, taxable sales were down by 14 percent. And in 2008, the decline was 2.4 percent. The figures in Thursday’s report were held down by a weak construction sector, which dropped about 11 percent from a year earlier. Car sales were up, along with accommodations and food services. The peak for secondquarter sales was in 2007, when they reached $29.8 billion.

Law back in place

The Associated Press

Boeing

enjoys

10

percent rise in commercial deliveries

Boeing Co.’s assembly facility in Everett is seen from the air as the company’s third quarter ends in September. Boeing said Thursday that it delivered 124 commercial airplanes during the third quarter, almost 10 percent more than last year. Boeing has delivered 346 commercial planes so far this year. Orders for Boeing commercial jets suffered last year during the recession. Now it is planning on a recovery and has announced plans to increase production of the 737.

Certain e-mail data public, state Supreme Court rules

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Conviction tossed OLYMPIA — Washington state’s Supreme Court has vacated a man’s child-

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Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

peninsuladailynews.com

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had been a written letter, It can be used to authen- took issue with that. Under the law, a public rather than an e-mail, Alexticate e-mails and other SEATTLE — Metadata record is defined as a record ander said, he doubted the electronic documents. associated with electronic held by a government court would require the city documents — such as the agency — not one that to search Fimia’s home Accusatory e-mail “to” and “from” fields in exists on a city employee’s recycling bin in an effort to e-mails — is a public record That type of information home computer, Justice find an envelope that might subject to disclosure, Wash- became important to Shore- Gerry Alexander wrote. verify where and when the ington’s Supreme Court line resident Beth O’Neill in If the communication letter was mailed. ruled Thursday. 2006, when the city’s deputy The 5-4 ruling concerned mayor, Maggie Fimia, a Shoreline resident’s claimed at a public meeting request under the Public that O’Neill had sent an Records Act for an e-mail e-mail accusing the city that had been sent to the council of improper conduct city’s deputy mayor. in a zoning dispute. The resident received a O’Neill had not written copy of the e-mail without or forwarded any such the metadata and subse- e-mail, and she wanted to quently filed a request for know why Fimia was claimthe information. ing she had. It turned out that Government conduct O’Neill’s name was men- 426 E. Washington St., Sequim • (360) 683-9284 tioned in an e-mail Fimia “Metadata may contain received from someone else. www.castellinsurance.com • info@castellinsurance.com information that relates to After the meeting, Fimia the conduct of government forwarded the e-mail from and is important for the her city account to her perpublic to know,” Justice sonal account — stripping Susan Owens wrote. out the address fields in an “It could conceivably effort to protect the identity …helping people live better include information about of the person who sent her whether a document was the e-mail. altered, what time a docuThat copy of the e-mail ment was created, or who was eventually turned over sent a document to whom.” to O’Neill, who wasn’t satisOwens wrote that only fied. one other state high court — Arizona’s — has consid- Sought original e-mail ered the question, and it, too, held that the informaShe asked for the origition is subject to disclosure. nal e-mail with its metaThe issue has arisen data. Fimia searched her Health Care Services elsewhere as courts grapple e-mail folders and concluded • Skilled Nursing with the intersection of she must have accidentally • Long Term Care technology and disclosure deleted it. • Post Operative Care laws. The high court ruled it • Palliative Care Services An appeals court in New was improper for Fimia to York ruled early this year delete the original e-mail, Comprehensive Rehabilitation Program that an agency should have especially since it was subreleased certain metadata ject to a public disclosure • Physical Therapy associated with photo- request. • Occupational Therapy Because Fimia used her graphs pursuant to a disclo• Speech Pathology personal computer for offisure request. 360-582-2400 Metadata is generally cial business, the justices defined as data about data, sent the case back to a lower 650 West Hemlock St., Sequim and it can include informa- court with instructions for www.sequimskillednursing.com tion such as the address the city to search the hard EOE fields in e-mails, file types, drive of Fimia’s home comfile creation and modifica- puter in an attempt to find tion dates and the author of the metadata. The four-justice minority such modifications. The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Federal appeals judges have temporarily reinstated a state law that limits campaign contributions in the final weeks of ballot measure campaigns. U.S. District Judge Ronald Leighton ruled last month that the limit is an unconstitutional infringement on political speech. But the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals blocked that ruling from taking effect while the state appeals. The 9th Circuit’s stay was issued late Tuesday. The law in question bans contributions larger than $5,000 in the final three weeks of an initiative or referendum campaign. Leighton kept in place a requirement to identify donors who contribute more than $25. Attorney General Rob McKenna’s office is representing the state Public Disclosure Commission in the case. A group called Family PAC is challenging the PDC on the limits.

rape conviction over concerns about how investigators obtained his DNA. Alejandro Garcia-Salgado was sentenced to more than nine years in prison for a sexual assault on an 11-year-old at the home of his friend’s mother-in-law in 2006. The justices unanimously overturned his conviction, saying that a court order requiring Garcia-Salgado to submit to a cheek swab for his DNA was not based on a sworn statement of probable cause and thus violated his Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search and seizure. The King County Prosecutor’s Office can try to obtain a new court order or warrant for Garcia-Salgado’s DNA.

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C8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . .

Things to Do

Harvest Dinner set for Oct. 15

Continued from C5 cal Museum and shop — 540 Sunday Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Washington State University Watershed Day — Learn to reduce stormwater runoff pollution. WSU-Jefferson County Extension offices, 201 W. Patison St., Port Hadlock, 9 a.m. to noon.

Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org. Commanding Officer’s Quarters museum tour — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for children. Phone 360-385-1003.

Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for youth (6-17); free for science center members. “Whales in Boatbuilding — The Boat Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone School, 42 N. Water St., 10 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ a.m. Phone Wayne Chimenti ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. 360-379-9220 or e-mail force org. 10sails@hotmail.com. Peace vigil — Ferry interdowntown Port Ukelele workshop — With section, Mark Moore. Crossroads Townsend, 12:30 p.m. Bring Music, 2100 Lawrence St., 10 flags, banners or posters. a.m. to noon, $25 per person. Loaner ukuleles available. Quilcene Historical Phone 360-385-1471. Museum — 151 E. Columbia St. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by Food Addicts in Recovery appointment. Artifacts, docuAnonymous — First Baptist ments, family histories and Church, 1202 Lawrence St., 10 photos of Quilcene and sura.m. to 11:30 a.m. Visit www. rounding communities. New foodaddicts.org. exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High Global Lens film series — School’s 100th anniversary. “Ocean of an Old Man,” a 2008 Phone 360-765-0688, 360release from India. Rose The- 765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or atre, 235 Taylor St., 10 a.m., e-mail quilcenemuseum@ $5. Phone 360-379-1333. olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden Beginners’ mandolin workState Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for shop — Josephina Hunner will children 6 to 12; free for chil- teach basic chord charts and dren 5 and younger. Exhibits tab readings. Attendees will interpret the Harbor Defenses learn two songs and a Celtic of Puget Sound and the Strait tune. Crossroads Music, 2100 of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- Lawrence St., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ $20. Phone 360-385-1471. olypen.com. Bingo — Booster Club, String instrument clinic — Corey Lane, Brinnon, 6:45 Guitar, mandolin and electric p.m. bass by Crossroads Music and Everly Cleartone Strings. Second Saturday CommuCrossroads Music, 2100 Law- nity Dance — With local caller rence St., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Jo Yount. Music by the ContraCustomers receive free string dictions. Dance workshop, 7:30 change and free set of strings p.m. Dance, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. when buying set of Everly Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona Strings. Phone 360-385-1471. St., $6 adults, $3 ages 3-18. Visit www.ptcommunitydance. Northwest Maritime Cen- blogspot.com. ter tour — Free hour-long tour of new headquarters and tell“Here’s to the Ladies! The ing of property’s story. Meet docent in the chandlery, 431 Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators Key City Public Theatre at Key available, children welcome City Playhouse, 419 Washingand pets not allowed inside ton St., 8 p.m. Tickets $18 and building. Phone 360-385-3628, students $10 available online ext. 102, or e-mail sue@ or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, nwmaritime.org. phone 360-385-7396 or visit Jefferson County Histori- www.keycitypublictheatre.org. Port Townsend Friends of the Library used book sale — Books, CDs and DVDs. Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone 360-379-1061.

City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., pay-what-you-wish at Port Townsend Aero 2:30 p.m. and $15 general and Museum — Jefferson County $10 students at 7 p.m. Advance International Airport, 195 Air- tickets online or at Quimper port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more Admission: $10 for adults, $9 FORKS — The 76th for seniors, $6 for children ages information, phone 360-3857-12. Free for children younger 7396 or visit www.keycity annual Forks Harvest Dinthan 6. Features vintage air- publictheatre.org. ner will be held in the felcraft and aviation art. Salsa lessons — The lowship hall of First ConUpstage, 923 Washington St. gregational Church, 280 S. Chimacum Grange FarmIntermediate lessons at 5:30 Spartan Ave., from 4:30 ers Market — 9572 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., beginning lessons at 6:15 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. p.m., free; DJ salsa dance from 15. p.m. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., $5 a person. The dinner will precede Puget Sound Coast Artil- Instructors are Alan Andree the Forks High School footlery Museum — Fort Worden and Jean Bettanny. Phone 360- ball team’s homecoming State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 385-6919. game against Rainier High Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for School. children 6 to 12, free for chilForks and Roasted turkey, savory dren 5 and younger. Exhibits stuffing, baked salmon, interpret the Harbor Defenses the West End sweet potatoes, salads, of Puget Sound and the Strait cranberries, green beans, of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360- Today all the trimmings and 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ Forks Timber Museum — apple and pumpkin pies olypen.com. Next door to Forks Visitors will be served. Jefferson County Histori- Center, 1421 S. Forks Ave., 10 The cost of the dinner is cal Museum and shop — 540 a.m. to 4 p.m. $3 admission. $10 for adults and $6 for Phone 360-374-9663. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. children 4-12 and senior Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for citizens 60 years and older. children 3 to 12; free to histori- Saturday Family passes are availcal society members. Exhibits Forks Open Aire Market able for $35. include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James — Parking lot, Forks Timber Proceeds will help cover Swan and the Native Ameri- Museum, 1421 S. Forks Ave., the costs of nonprofit cans” and “The Chinese in 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. groups that meet at the Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. Forks Timber Museum — church and will contribute jchsmuseum.org. Next door to Forks Visitors to the church’s building Center, 1421 S. Forks Ave., 10 fund. To volunteer, donate a Commanding Officer’s a.m. to 4 p.m. $3 admission. Quarters museum tour — Phone 360-374-9663. meal item, make a cash Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for children. Phone 360-385-1003.

Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission: $5 for adults; $3 for youth (6-17); free for science center members. “Whales in Our Midst” till Dec. 31. Phone 360-385-5582, e-mail info@ ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc. org. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848 or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcenemuseum@embarqmail.com. Mental Illness Awareness films — Jefferson County NAMI and Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship sponsor two free films. Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave., 1:30 p.m. Phone 360-379-9949. “Here’s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alley” — Key City Public Theatre at Key

donation or for more information, phone Warren or Cathy Johnson at 360-3749382.

Send in photos PORT ANGELES — Recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month with a photo on the Olympic Medical Center website. Get a camera; gather a group of friends, family or co-workers; and take a photo of everyone wearing pink. Pictures can be e-mailed to bbeeman@olympic medical.org or delivered to Olympic Medical Center, Attn: Strategic Development, 939 Caroline St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. All photos will be displayed on www.Olympic Medical.org through Nov. 5. Peninsula Daily News

Death Notices Ervin E. Wotasiak Oct. 13, 1921 — Oct. 6, 2010

Sequim resident Ervin E. Wotasiak died at age 88. Services: None. Sequim Valley Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Death and Memorial Notice

Steven David Brackett December 10, 1974 October 4, 2010 Steven David Brackett, 35, left this earth to be with the Lord and his loving parents on October 4, 2010. Steven was born on December 10, 1974, in Port Angeles to the great joy of his parents, Sewell “Donald” and Cathy (Omert) Brackett. Steven was the apple of their eyes. Steven grew up in Port Angeles and graduated from Port Angeles High School in 1992. Tragically, Cathy, Steven’s mother, died when he was only 6 years old. With the everlasting love between Steven and Don, they moved on in life together. Don raised Steven to be a loving and caring person, and Steven

Mr. Brackett touched the lives of everyone he met. Steven moved to Shelton, Washington, with his father, when Don’s job moved him there. Steven always brought a great joy to Don as Don did to Steven. Steven lost his father in May of this year. He then moved to Oakville, Washington, to

live with his Uncle Bill and Aunt Emily Rodocker, whom he loved very much. Steven brought a joy to their home with his great sense of humor, his beautiful smile and the love he gave every day. Steven went to be with the Lord and his parents with his family at his side. Steven was loved by many and will be missed by all who knew him. Steven was preceded to heaven by his parents, Don and Cathy; his grandparents, Sewell and Lola Brackett and Trudy Omert Smith and William Omert; as well as his cousin, Terry Spencer. Steven is survived by his aunt, Weezie (Louise), and uncle, John Kahler; aunt, Emily, and uncle, Bill Rodocker; his aunt, Shirley Cargile; and his cousins, Gary and Angela Spencer, as well as numerous other cousins and friends.

Death and Memorial Notice Dr. Donald G. Bettger November 12, 1931 October 6, 2010 Dr. Donald G. Bettger of Port Angeles, born November 12, 1931, died October 6, 2010, at the age of 78 years young. The cause of death was pulmonary constriction. Born in Portland, Oregon, to Anna Marie Schneider and Salomon Bettger, he graduated from Central Catholic High School in 1949. He then attended Portland State College from 1949-1951. Dr. Bettger also attended and graduated from Pacific University from 1951-1952. He served in the United States Air Force from 1950-1951. On November 27, 1954, he married his true love, the woman he spent his entire life with, Sandra J. VanDerford in Portland, Oregon. Together they bore five children. In 1959, Don and his love made their way to

Dr. Bettger Port Angeles, where he opened his first optometric practice, later adding optical care to Forks and Clallam Bay prison. Donald was a very active member of our community! Including: City Councilman, 5½ years, 1964-1970; Chamber of Commerce — Co-chairman, Downtown Beautification and Waterfront Development Commission; Campfire Board of Directors; Arts in Action — Chairman, 1972-1975;

Liberty Bell Project Initiator through Port Angeles Lions Club; Derby Days — Treasurer during re-organization, 1965; Derbyaires — President, 1984; Swimming Pool — Member, fundraising committee; Citizen of the Year Award, Recipient, 1976; Clallam County Community Action Council — Board Member, 2 years; Clallam County Freeholders, elected position, 2 years; Clallam County Animal Ordinance Committee Chairman; Washington State Combined Health Agencies Program Board member, 2 years; Governor Evans Council on Aging; Member, American Heart Association of Washington, volunteer 2 years and chairman of the Board for 2 years; Northwest Rocky Mountain Region Heart Committee Presidentelect; recipient of the Distinguished Service Medallion, 1980; recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Medallion; Elks member, 28 years; Lions International perfect atten-

Remembering a Lifetime downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

st ce Voted 1 Pla2010 2008, 2009 &Home Best Funeral nty in Clallam Cou

carpentry, stained glass, golf, skiing and running. He was also involved in Port Angeles Light Opera, and participated in three productions (1984, 1985, 1986). He is preceded in death by his father, Salomon Bettger, and mother, Anna Marie Bettger; and sister, Shirley O’Reilly. Dr. Bettger is survived by stepmother, Mildred Bettger of Portland, Oregon; his brother, James, and his wife, Cynthia, of Oregon City, Oregon; children, Brian Bettger and his wife, Linda, Valerie Bettger-Tiderman and her husband, Dale, Brad Bettger and his wife, Tammy, Vince Bettger and his wife, Michele, and Stephanie Bettger. Don and Sandra have seven grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren, with more on the way. Don has always had a heart for community! His many commitments to service has proven his character and passion for caring for those in need.

Don has always been very active in the Catholic Church with perfect attendance. So many of Don’s patients remember him as the doctor who cared enough to explain thoroughly his diagnosis and corrective actions to be taken in such a way that the patient felt they were truly cared for. As his children, we are proud of our dad when people remember him and tell their story of how well he’d taken care of them as patients during their eye exams. As a dad, Don was always willing to help with his amazing carpentry skills or plain old solid advice. We so love him and miss him, but his character and passions live on through us. Funeral service and Mass will be at Queen of Angels Church in Port Angeles on Monday, October 11, at 10:30 a.m. Sequim Valley Chapel (360-683-5242), Sequim, is in care of arrangements.

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by

dance 28 years; Lions International secretary, 1 year, President, 19631964; Zone Chairman, 1965-1966; District Governor, 1970-1971; Washington Optometric Association Society President, Member, Board of Directors; Secretary to President Richard Cooke; President of Washington Optometric, 1971-1972; State Board of Examiners in Optometry. Visual Welfare of the Public: As a member of his Lion’s Club, and in the interest of sight conservation, Dr. Bettger examined eyes from 1985-1987 free of charge, and supplied glasses at cost for the underprivileged who were referred by the Lions Club. While District Governor of the Lions Club, his effort led to renaming Seattle Low Vision Clinic, to The Lions Low Vision Clinic, with subsequent funding for books and equipment provided by the multiple District 19, Lions International. His hobbies included

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Leah & Steve Ford

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Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Luann • “Cathy” has been retired; we’re auditioning this comic. Share your thoughts: comics@peninsuladailynews.com.

Friday, October 8, 2010

Wait to become serious with beau DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend, “Chucky,” and I have been together for a while, and things are starting to get serious. I’m 15, and he’s almost 18. I’m falling in love with him, which has never happened with any other guy. I really think he’s “The One.” Chucky proposed, but it isn’t official yet. I still have no ring, but I’m thinking of accepting. Now he says he wants a baby. I’m too young to be having a baby, but he says he’ll take care of me if it happens. I trust him, but I don’t know what to believe. A part of me says he’ll stay with me; the other part says he’ll get scared and leave. What if something goes wrong and I get pregnant by accident? I’m so confused. Can you please help me? Chucky’s Girl in Victorville, Calif.

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Chucky’s Girl: At “almost 18,” Chucky is not yet self-supporting, let alone in a position to support a child — and at 15, neither are you. Chucky may want a baby to prove to himself that he’s a man, but a real man wouldn’t put a woman he loves in a vulnerable position — and motherhood at 16 is exactly that. Did you know that when young men reach the age of 18, they are considered adults? Adult males who have sex with underage girls can find themselves in jail for it. If you don’t have sex with Chucky, there will be no “accidents.” It’s hard to think clearly when you think you’re falling in love, but I’m asking you to make a superhuman effort. I can’t stress strongly enough how important it is that you finish high school, so that when you do become a mother, you’ll be able to support yourself and your child if you need to. Many women do. They also sometimes have to support a husband who can’t find work. Before things go any further, please find an adult woman you can confide in. She’ll set you straight.

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Dear Abby: A friend of mine, “Barbie,” volunteered to be the maid of honor in my wedding. She didn’t attend any of the dress fittings because she doesn’t have a car. She volunteered to throw a bridal shower

Momma

dear abby despite having no money and asked Van Buren my fiance to contribute. After he told Barbie he was “tapped out” (because of the wedding bills), she suggested he return some of the gifts he had bought me. Two days before the shower, I learned she had selected a dress more suited to a stripper pole than a church wedding ceremony. At that point, my fiance decided to remove her from the bridal party. Barbie feels slighted and doesn’t understand why we made the day about “us” and not her. She’s genuinely hurt that we didn’t “consider her financial position.” (We didn’t ask for her help in the first place.) Would you please lend your vast wisdom and insight to this matter? Denial is Not a River in Egypt

Abigail

Dear Denial: When Barbie volunteered to be your maid of honor, knowing her financial situation, you should have politely told her no. Because you didn’t, you should have made sure she understood the financial responsibilities that went with being in the wedding. And since she had no transportation, someone should have offered her a ride to the dress fitting, which would have enabled you to see her dress selection. That said, your friend was pushy to ask to be in the wedding in the first place, gutsy to expect your fiance to return your gifts to help her pay for the shower and clueless about wedding etiquette. Make a pact to forgive her if she’ll forgive you, and all of you should go on with your lives. I predict it will be in opposite directions. ________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last ARIES (March 21-April 19): You may feel split about what you should be doing and what you want to do. You can push someone to contribute to your end goal, allowing you to enjoy both accomplishment and celebration. Love relationships can bring changes in the way you live. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): There is plenty to gain by observing what others do, say and propose. Consider ways to make someone you care for feel special. Don’t be afraid to show your emotions; the response you get will make you feel secure about your current situation and your future. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Give more time to the young and the old in your life. Use your creativity to dazzle those you encounter with smashing ideas and brilliant plans to turn something you do well into a profitable endeavor. Serious talks will bring long-lasting results. 3 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll feel torn between two options and two groups of people. Your heart will lead you in one direction and your responsibilities in another. Share your dilemma with someone you respect, and

Dennis the Menace

C9

Doonesbury

you will come up with a workable plan. 5 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Now is a great time to interact with friends, neighbors and relatives who have just as much to offer as you. A pleasure trip will spark some ideas. Serious talks will bring results, but expect someone to question and push you a little in the process. 4 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let someone from your past or an old memory stop you from making progressive moves. You cannot stay put because of someone else’s needs or jealousy. A change at home may be necessary for your own emotional well-being. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Shake off the negativity. There is always a balance in life; look beyond what isn’t working for you, and you will discover what’s available. Not everything has to run according to your plans. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can delegate work, but keep a tight watch over what everyone around you is doing. An unexpected opportunity may conflict with something already taking place. Negotiate wisely. Don’t pass up a good deal. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t let per-

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!

sonal relationships cause you to miss an opportunity. Unexpected changes at home will be to your advantage in the end, even if at the moment, you feel a little lost or left out. 4 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put everything you’ve got into work, and you will make headway. Too much thought and interaction with people who don’t think the same way as you will interfere in your productivity and progress. It’s about accomplishment, not what everyone else thinks or does. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Put your emotions aside, and focus on the real issues. You cannot give someone the benefit of a doubt, especially if it could cost you emotionally, personally or financially. Arguments will develop if there is jealousy. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You have the potential to negotiate deals, resolve settlements or make a long-lasting and meaningful commitment. There is good fortune heading your way, making this an ideal time to invest in something solid, like property or one of your talents. 5 stars


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

SaTurday

Sunday

Yesterday

Monday

TueSday

High 57

Low 50

60/51

58/42

55/41

57/42

Periods of rain.

Windy with rain at times.

Rain.

Rain.

Clouds limiting sun.

Times of clouds and sun.

The Peninsula The jet stream will take aim at the Pacific Northwest this weekend, ushering a couple of low-pressure systems into British Columbia. Rain associated with the first system will fall across the region today and tonight. Rain will be heavy at times tonight. Rain Neah Bay Port will continue Sunday and Sunday night as the next storm 57/53 Townsend system passes northwest of the Olympic Peninsula. Rain Port Angeles 60/51 will be heavy at times Sunday night. Gusty winds will 57/50 accompany the heavy rain Sunday night and continue Sequim into Monday. Wind gusts past 40 mph are possible.

Victoria 61/51

61/50

Forks 59/51

Olympia 62/54

Seattle 63/55

Everett 62/53

Spokane 62/47

Yakima Kennewick 68/46 72/48

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Times of rain today. Wind from the east at 10-20 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Periods of rain tonight. Wind east at 10-20 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind east-northeast 10-20 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 3 miles. Sunday: Rain. Wind west 20-30 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

1:09 a.m. 1:11 p.m. 3:54 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 5:39 a.m. 4:45 p.m. 5:00 a.m. 4:06 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.3’ 9.4’ 6.9’ 7.3’ 8.3’ 8.8’ 7.8’ 8.3’

7:04 a.m. 7:42 p.m. 9:22 a.m. 9:53 p.m. 10:36 a.m. 11:07 p.m. 10:29 a.m. 11:00 p.m.

0.6’ -1.4’ 2.8’ -0.9’ 3.7’ -1.2’ 3.5’ -1.1’

High Tide Ht 2:02 a.m. 1:51 p.m. 4:54 a.m. 3:31 p.m. 6:39 a.m. 5:16 p.m. 6:00 a.m. 4:37 p.m.

8.2’ 9.4’ 7.1’ 7.2’ 8.6’ 8.7’ 8.1’ 8.2’

Sunday

Low Tide Ht 7:48 a.m. 8:28 p.m. 10:10 a.m. 10:37 p.m. 11:24 a.m. 11:51 p.m. 11:17 a.m. 11:44 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

1.0’ -1.4’ 3.6’ -1.3’ 4.7’ -1.7’ 4.4’ -1.6’

High Tide Ht 2:53 a.m. 2:32 p.m. 5:55 a.m. 4:05 p.m. 7:40 a.m. 5:50 p.m. 7:01 a.m. 5:11 p.m.

2009 KIA SPORTAGE EX V6 4WD 2007 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4WD

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V6, AUTO, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, TACH, SWINGOUT REAR DRS, TRAC CTRL, ALLOYS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SEC SYS, AC, CRUISE, AM/FM/CD & MORE! STK#9062A

$

Billings 73/49

Sunset today ................... 6:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:24 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 8:49 a.m. Moonset today ................. 6:42 p.m.

Moon Phases Full

Last

New

1 5, 8 7 3

7.8’ 9.1’ 7.2’ 7.1’ 8.7’ 8.5’ 8.2’ 8.0’

Low Tide Ht 8:32 a.m. 9:14 p.m. 11:01 a.m. 11:22 p.m. 12:15 p.m. ----12:08 p.m. -----

1.6’ -1.1’ 4.2’ -1.3’ 5.5’ --5.2’ ---

Oct 22

Oct 30

Nov 5

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 66 53 pc Baghdad 101 68 pc Beijing 71 53 s Brussels 73 56 s Cairo 91 67 s Calgary 65 38 s Edmonton 67 39 s Hong Kong 79 77 r Jerusalem 75 59 t Johannesburg 86 56 pc Kabul 86 40 s London 72 60 s Mexico City 73 50 pc Montreal 61 41 pc Moscow 52 35 pc New Delhi 96 67 s Paris 75 58 s Rio de Janeiro 77 63 c Rome 75 62 s Stockholm 54 41 c Sydney 69 55 s Tokyo 70 61 pc Toronto 72 51 s Vancouver 61 51 r Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Minneapolis 80/58

Denver 76/44

San Francisco 68/53

Detroit 76/48

Atlanta 82/56

El Paso 85/54

0s

Washington 76/53

Kansas City 84/56

Los Angeles 80/60

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

New York 74/57

Chicago 78/55

Houston 88/55 Miami 85/71

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 74 47 65 82 74 75 69 73 84 71 70 70 82 69 78 82 62 73 90 76 82 76 71 39 68 87 88 48

Lo W 46 s 35 pc 58 r 56 s 51 s 50 s 41 pc 49 pc 51 pc 47 pc 51 s 51 s 54 s 43 t 55 s 48 s 43 c 55 c 57 s 44 t 56 s 48 s 54 c 24 pc 40 pc 72 s 55 s 43 r

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 84 80 88 80 85 74 80 84 85 74 88 87 85 90 74 88 69 78 69 76 82 64 86 70 68 86 60 76

Lo W 56 s 61 s 56 s 60 s 71 s 56 s 58 s 49 s 61 s 57 s 54 s 52 s 62 s 62 s 53 s 65 s 54 r 47 s 41 s 50 s 57 s 45 sh 57 s 61 s 53 s 54 s 39 pc 53 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 93 at Wharton, TX

Low: 19 at Bodie State Park, CA

2006 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X 2005 CHEVROLET EXPRESS 1500 CARGO 2001 FORD TAURUS SES

2.5L, AUTO, AWD, FRT AIR DAM, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AC, TILT, CRUISE, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, SECURITY SYSTEM STK#9488A

$

8, 9 4 3

AUTO, FULL-SIZE SPARE, SWING-OUT REAR DRS, SWING-OUT SIDE DRS, TILT, CRUISE, AC, TOW HAUL MODE, SIDE ACCESS DRS ON BOTH DRV & PASS SIDES & MORE! STK#9502A

$

V6, AUTO, TACH, TILT, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, TRAC CTRL, ALLOYS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SEC SYS, AM/FM/CD, AC, CRUISE & MORE! STK#P2164B

9, 8 6 7

$

Prices do not include tax, license & documentation fees. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typographical errors. VINs posted at dealership. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 10/15/10.

5, 8 8 7

0A5099008

1 6, 4 9 8

Seattle 63/55

Sun & Moon

Oct 14

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Friday, October 8, 2010

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 61 41 0.00 7.50 Forks 62 44 0.00 84.18 Seattle 62 50 0.00 28.01 Sequim 63 45 0.00 7.98 Hoquiam 60 53 0.00 44.14 Victoria 59 42 0.00 22.32 P. Townsend* 61 48 0.00 10.38 *Data from www.ptguide.com

First

Port Ludlow 62/51 Bellingham 63/51

Aberdeen 61/58

Peninsula Daily News

Now you can place your classified ad 24/7! Try our new Classified Wizard — www.peninsuladailynews.com

0A5089983


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

D1

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK •

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S ! CAMPER: 10’ Alpenlite. Oak cabinets, frige, range, oven, stereo, skylights, tinted windows, bathroom/shower, antenna, electric camper jacks, immaculate, used only 4 times. $4,000. 452-6441. Campground memberships TT/NACO Alliance. $600 plus tfr fee. Coast to Coast Hart Ranch B $900 plus tfr fee. Dues paid both $1,400. 452-6974.

2ND SATURDAY BOOK SALE Oct. 9, 10-3 p.m. Special this month: Crafts and Christmas. Friends of Sequim Library. ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT Part-time, flexible hrs. Apply in person. 520 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CLALLAM CONSERVATION DISTRICT is accepting applications for a half-time Administrative Assistant to perform fullcharge bookkeeping and general office administration. Proficiency in QuickBooks and Excel required. Starting pay DOQ. Excellent benefits. Full description and application materials available at Clallam Conservation District, 1601 E. Front St., Bldg/Ste A, Port Angeles, WA 98362, 360-452-1912 ext. 5 or http://clallam.scc. wa.gov/ Applications due by 10/18/10. ANTIQUES: Brass bed, settee, lg. oak rocker. $900 all or $350 each. 670-9264 CAMPER: 8’ cabover, warm and dry. $600. 683-3639.

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 25’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10, 97K. $16,500. 457-7097. www.peninsula dailynews.com

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, Powder Puff China-Jacks, registered, vet checked, shots, wormed. $800 each. 582-9006 RAIDER: ‘07 24’ aluminum, well equipped. $53,500. 683-5120 Sequim Rental: 3 bdrm, 2 bth, livng rm, lrg den, fncd yrd, pets OK. $1,100/mo. 360-460-9917 SNOW/WINTER TIRES Nokian Hakkapelitta 4 Set of 4. Tires are studded with sipping. Size is 225/50R-17. Approx. 75%-80% tread left. $350. 360-460-5420

TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002

TRAILER: ‘88 32’ Aljo Alliance. Everything works, good condition. $3,500/obo. 457-7600

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cash. Clallam County Courthouse, call with exact details to claim. 360-417-2268

Compose your Classified Ad on Vintage, completely remodeled 2 Br., 1 bath Port Angeles home. $900. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. First, last and deposit, credit check. Sorry no smoking or pets. Contact Susan at 206-948-6653 WANTED: Arc welder or wire feed MIG. 360-379-6456 WANTED TO BORROW Peninsula College drama department seeking a motorized wheelchair to use for first two weeks in November. Please contact director Dr. Starcevich 477-5368 or at larastarcevich@yahoo.com WANTED LOGS FOR FIREWOOD 477-8832 YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun. 8-3 p.m. 1818 E. 4th use alley between 4th and 5th. Some household, lots of power tools, etc.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br. $695, 2 Br. $495, Studio $390 + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 FOUND: Cash. Clallam County Courthouse, call with exact details to claim. 360-417-2268 INFANT CARE: In your home. Over 20 yrs exp., will do light housework. 1-2 infants. Please call 360-460-9918 LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LRG 2 Br. apt, $650. W/G paid, P.A Pet ok. 417-6638.

Charming, Vintage 2 Br., 1 bath remodeled Port Angeles home. $137,000 Improvements include: newly painted exterior and interior, new carpet. Bath includes maple vanity, ceramic tile and new fixtures. Updated kitchen with new countertops, flooring and appliances. Slider off master opens to large backyard. 12x12 deck and backyard fence in progress. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. 628 W. 9th Contact: Susan 206-948-6653. Lake Sutherland, 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589.

P.A.: 2 story, 3 Br. plus den, 2 ba, garage plus carport, all appliances, built in ‘04, no pets. Dep. and refs. $1,150 mo. 360-808-4476

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

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***Up to 36 months on approval of credit plus $150 dealer document fee. VINs posted at dealership. Photos for illustration purposes only. Offer ends September 30, 2010. 1. Value Package Savings only available on purchase of a new 2010 Rogue 360. Based upon MSRP of individual options purchased separately. Dealer sets price. See dealer for details. 2. Air bags are only a supplemental restraint system; always wear your seat belt. Even with the occupant classification sensor, rear-facing child restraints should not be placed in the front-passenger’s seat. Also, all children 12 and under should ride in the rear seat properly secured in child restraints, booster seats, or seat belts according to their size. Air bags will only inflate in certain accidents; see your owner’s manual for more details. *2010 Fuel Economy Estimates. Actual mileage may vary with driving conditions - use for comparison only. Mileage listed for Altima 2.5-L with CVT 23 city/ 32 hwy, Rougue FWD with CVT 22 city/ 27 hwy, Sentra 2.0-L with CVT 26 city/ 34 hwy and Versa 1.8-L Versa Hatchback with CVT 28 city/ 34 hwy. **The 2010 Nissan Rogue & Versa are winners of a Consumers Digest Best Buy Award. The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. ΩGovernment star ratings are part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) New Car Assessment Program (www.safecar.gov). Rogue model tested with standard side air bags. Fold-flat front passenger seat not tested. ****Cargo and load capacity limited by weight and distribution. +See Specifications for availability. Never program while driving. GPS mapping may not be detailed in all areas or reflect current road regulations. 2009 Top Safety Pick Award applies to 2010 model year. For more information, see www.iihs.org <http://www.iihs.org/>. Always wear your seatbelt and please don’t drink and drive. Nissan, the Nissan Brand Symbol, SHIFT_tagline, and Nissan model names are Nissan trademarks. ©2010 Nissan North America, Inc. Visit www.NissanUSA.com All vehicle sales are subject to a negotiable $150 document fee. Expires October 31, 2010.

* Up to 60 months on approval of credit. For well qualified buyers. All vehicle sales subject to a negotiable $150 document fee. Photos for illustration purposes only. Offer ends October 31, 2010.

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0A5099831

YOU CAN COUNT ON US!


ACROSS 1 Mother of Horus 5 Cheap reads 10 Divulge 14 1959 British Motor Corp. debut 15 Last Olds 16 Ostrich cousins 17 Routing abbr. 18 Subordinate to 19 Give off 20 Milton Hershey, e.g.? 23 MPG rating agency 24 Millenniumending year 25 E. African nation 28 Fictional tree shepherd 30 Place to see an Audi 34 A.L. player whose team logo includes an Uncle Sam hat 37 Got in on a deal 38 Form often requiring an SSN 39 Extra, and this puzzle’s title 42 Master: Abbr. 43 Buck parts 45 Improve one’s bargaining power, in a way 47 Radar user 50 “Star Trek” sequel, briefly 51 St. crosser, on signs 52 Yahtzee score sheet row 54 Suffix with ranch 56 Segundo matrimonio result, maybe? 62 Imitation 63 Playgroup reminder 64 Reference work, usually 65 Curly coif 66 Austrian dessert 67 Thought 68 “It’s __ fun” 69 Malibu, for one

23

Classified

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. OKTOBERFEST 2010

N O I S S E C O R P N P O R K By Paul Guttormsson

70 Word avoided by optimists DOWN 1 Apple variety 2 Jedi nemesis 3 Involved with 4 From that time 5 “She’s a Lady” songwriter 6 Radius neighbor 7 Helped come about 8 Grooms 9 Frozen dessert 10 Body of brewing rules? 11 Gun shop stock 12 Wreck 13 Winter hrs. in N.J. 21 Not booked 22 Lover of Cal, in “East of Eden” 25 Put on the books 26 Blood __ 27 Therapy lead-in 29 Rocker Nugent 31 Comic unit 32 Jump on, as an opportunity 33 Beat by a bit 35 Ancient

31

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Gray and white, short hair, Sequim. 681-4129. FOUND: Dog. Male Silky Terrier, collar with no tag. West Sequim Bay and Washington Harbor, Sequim. 681-2936. FOUND: Ferret. Call after 3 p.m. on weekdays. 360-461-4511. FOUND: Glasses. At barn sale on Buckhorn Rd., Sequim. Fri., Oct. 1st. 681-5468 LOST: Alaska Sled Dog. REWARD for info on “Sneaky Pete”, black w/white toes, had collar and leash when got away on Center Rd. in Chimacum, eve. of 9/29, very shy, but gentle. 907-957-0462 360-385-2020 LOST: Cat. Bobtail, black and white, neutered, chipped, small male, red collar/bell, “Tucker”, Forks. 360-374-5496 LOST: Cat. Large long haired, dark gray striped tiger male, around 14 lbs, no collar, Al’s RV Park, N. Lees Creek Rd., P.A. Reward. 585-764-7300 or 585-645-9860 LOST: Cat. Large, elderly, black, since Tues. 9/28, Solmar area, Sequim. 681-3953 LOST: Dog. 9 yr old female brown Chihuahua with green collar from W.12th St., P.A. Missing since 10-3-10, 9 p.m. Please call 457-5255 w/info. LOST: Dog. Female fawn Boxer wearing a shirt, Race and 7th St., P.A. 775-9575.

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435

Help Wanted

ACCOUNTING/ ADMINISTRATOR Must be exp. Proficient in all areas of QuickBooks - set up, payroll, taxes, etc. Insurance - company and medical, master license renewals. Wages DOE, fulltime. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#178/Accounting Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE BOOKKEEPER Accounting degree or 4 years relevant exp. w/automated accounting systems & electronic med. records. F-T w/bene. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT Part-time, flexible hrs. Apply in person. 520 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CLALLAM CONSERVATION DISTRICT is accepting applications for a half-time Administrative Assistant to perform fullcharge bookkeeping and general office administration. Proficiency in QuickBooks and Excel required. Starting pay DOQ. Excellent benefits. Full description and application materials available at Clallam Conservation District, 1601 E. Front St., Bldg/Ste A, Port Angeles, WA 98362, 360-452-1912 ext. 5 or http://clallam.scc. wa.gov/ Applications due by 10/18/10.

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

10/8/10

C O S T U M E S B E E R D E W

N A I C I S U M X A B D I B A

E C I T Y S W O C A N U V M I

© 2010 Universal Uclick

M S S E C T D E V U L M E E T

Solution: 8 letters

E F G S S A R A O L E P R T R

L A A U E E R R Y Y Z L S P E

F M L D M I G T N S T I I E S

www.wonderword.com

I I F O A R R A T T E N T S S

R L N N I N M E I A R G Y S E

E Y F A S R C I W R P S R T S

T W F I E L D E V E R O Y A L

I I O G S L E S U O R A C O L

L N L A N D L O R D S B C G A

S E K A C N A P O T A T O P H

10/8

Join us on Facebook

Attraction, Bavarian, Beer, Breweries, Carousels, Carriages, Ceremony, City, Costumes, Cows, Dance, Days, Diversity, Dumplings, Fairground, Family, Field, Flags, Folk, Germany, Goats, Halls, Landlords, Large, Liter, Mugs, Musician, Oxen, Pork, Potato pancakes, Pretzel, Procession, Riflemen, Royal, September, Tents, Waitresses, Wine Yesterday’s Answer: Geometry

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

VARBE ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

MURYM (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Germanic singer? 36 http://mit.__ 40 Man. and Minn. neighbor 41 What an apostrophe may stand for, in dates 44 Reinterpret, in a way 46 Brute

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CLALLAM CO. YMCA Play Care Aide, $8.55/ hr., 3:30-7:30 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Childcare Group Leader Substitutes, $9/hr., 1:306:00 p.m., Mon-Fri., as needed. Member Services Rep., $8.75/hr, P-T, hours to be determined. Apply in person at 302 S. Francis St., P.A. JEFFERSON CO. YMCA Childcare Group Leader Substitute, $9/hr., 2-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri., as needed. Apply in person, 1919 Blaine St., (Mountain View School), P.T. CLINIC ADMINISTRATOR Family Medicine of Port Angeles is seeking an experienced full-time clinic administrator. We offer a competitive salary and benefit package. Required Qualifications: 5 yrs. healthcare mgmt. BA degree in a relevant field. Leadership, supervisory, human resources, risk mgmt., accounting, QuickBooks, Excel. CQI or Lean Thinking. Send a cover letter and resume to: Katrina Weller MD, Family Medicine of Port Angeles PLLC, 240 W. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. See our website at FMPA.net, or email katrinaweller@ gmail.com. DENTAL HYGIENIST Part-time position available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Dr. Clark Sturdivant at 608 Polk St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. Expanding Preschool needs afternoon Aide ASAP. Part time/minimum wage. Check out online add for description or send me an email: rr2larsen@msn.com Call me if you have any questions. Regan, 683-9572. EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

CAREGIVERS Needed for in-home care. Experience preferred. Salary DOE and license. Call 681-6206 FRONT DESK ASSISTANT For digital/dental office, experienced, self-motivated, friendly and customer service oriented person. Must be a team player, helping when needed in other areas. Cross-trained as well as competency in dental software. Send resumes to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#176/Assistant Pt Angeles, WA 98362 LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LEGAL SECRETARY For experienced attorney. Less than fulltime. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#177/Legal Pt Angeles, WA 98362 MENTAL HEALTH Crisis Intervention Specialist for mobile crisis interventions/ assessments/stabilization svcs. Req. Master’s degr. or RN plus 2 yrs mental health exp. Case Manager/Therapist for chronically mentally ill adults. Pref. Master’s w/2 yrs exp. Resume and cvr ltr: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org AA/EOE BUSINESS MANAGER For Crescent School District, full-time. Complete job description and application at www.crescent.wednet.edu or contact 360-9283311, ext. 100. Closing date for applications October 27, 2010. PIANIST needed for Sunday worship service, 10-11:30. Call 457-3981, or 452-6750. RETAIL MANAGEMENT Positions available in our Sequim location. Send resume and cover letter to resume@tacomagoodwill.org or 660 C W. Washington St., Sequim, WA 98382.

10/8/10

48 Is 49 Work on hooves 53 Pottery piece 55 Sight-related 56 Protected 57 Not corrupted 58 Madrid miss: Abbr. 59 Club __ 60 Comet, to some 61 Tidy 62 “Cool!”

31

Help Wanted

MANAGER: For small RV park, salary negotiable. 460-4968. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840

34

Work Wanted

34

TOESGO

TACCRI Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:

Yesterday’s

Work Wanted

Yard work & Odd Job Services. Mowing & yard work, gutter cleaning, debris pickup/hauling, small painting projects, experienced motivated and dependable. 2 men at $35 per hour. 360-461-7772.

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding and mowing. 452-2034 HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, offices, RV’s, and event/party clean up. No job too small or too big. Move out’s, rentals, foreclosures, or for sale. Call for your free estimate. 360-808-3017 HOME CLEANING Meticulous and honest. Amie 452-4184. HOUSECLEANING Organizing. Reliable. Call Lisa 683-4745. INFANT CARE: In your home. Over 20 yrs exp., will do light housework. 1-2 infants. Please call 360-460-9918 Janitorial Services. Honest, reliable and hardworking. Looking for business’s that need cleaning in the evenings and on weekends. Licensed and Bonded. Ready to keep your office clean. Call Bailey. 477-9256 MOWING, pruning. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142. RENT-A-MAN I can perform many types of labor both inside & out. No job too small! Call & we’ll talk. John 775-5586.

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations and new projects... Call me today! Appointments in my central Port Angeles home. Patti Kuth, 417-5576. isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy! TUTORING: Certified teacher, all subjects except higher math. 360-609-2927 VHS to DVD copying services. Call Nancy 360-774-0971

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

CEDARS AND STREAM Wonderful cedars, creek, paths, and patio from this lovely remodeled and updated 2 Br., 2+ bath home in Dungeness Meadows. Fully fenced backyard with sun deck, awning and TV/ stereo. 2 car garage plus extra storage. Beautiful granite and exotic hardwood floors. $259,000. ML250869 Claire Koenigsaecker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

” (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: MOUND CHOKE COWARD BOTTLE Answer: What the mason faced when he was let go — “ROCK” BOTTOM

51

Homes

Charming, Vintage 2 Br., 1 bath remodeled Port Angeles home. $137,000 Improvements include: newly painted exterior and interior, new carpet. Bath includes maple vanity, ceramic tile and new fixtures. Updated kitchen with new countertops, flooring and appliances. Slider off master opens to large backyard. 12x12 deck and backyard fence in progress. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. 628 W. 9th Contact: Susan 206-948-6653.

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

51

Homes

COMPLETELY REBUILT Vaulted wood beam ceilings, hand-milled rustic pine floors, Bleimeister custom cabinets, one Br., one bath in house, detached studio/ office with bath. $197,900 ML251685/113851 Marti Winkler 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Del Guzzi built home on .63 acres in Port Angeles. 2,800 sf, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Spacious living room with large windows and fireplace. Two family rooms with fireplace and wood stove. Straight views in upstairs living, family and bed rooms. Two car carport, shop, fruit trees. $325,000. 457-2796 EZ LIVING Well-maintained home with formal living room, dining room and a family room. Large master suite with walk-in closet, guest Br., and full guest bath. Kitchen has oak cabinets and lots of storage and counter space; built in desk and breakfast bar. Inside laundry room. Two sets of French doors open out into the large patio area in backyard. $98,000. ML252044/134760 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY FALL IN LOVE Spacious country home on 1.37 acres. Home features gorgeous master suite with a dream bath, 100 year old fir floors, light and bright sunroom overlooking the truly unique property with gardens, a “woman cave” studio with 3/4 bath, old homestead outbuildings, fruit trees and privacy. $355,000. ML252007. Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

COMPLETELY REMODELED Ready to sell, 2 Br., 1 bath, 14x56, includes separate storage shed, nice quiet country setting. $25,000 ML241972/29115823 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FANTASTIC VIEW AND PRICE Nice home on a .3 acre lot. Mtn and Strait views, watch the ships from your deck. Overlooks wildlife refuge. Nicely landscaped. 2 car garage and RV/boat plus shop. Open floor plan with woodstove. $234,000. ML251108/76011 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FISH FROM YOUR PATIO! Rare opportunity to own a nearly new waterfront home in close-knit community! Private marina and clubhouse. RV parking, beautiful kitchen. Flowers galore. $460,000. ML29161371 Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow For sale by Owner. New home one acre, Mtn view, 1,770 sf, attached garage, 3 Br., 2 bath, computer rm. Mt. Pleasant area. Private financing. $225,000. 360-460-2625 GARDENER’S DREAM Country living only minutes from downtown Sequim. 3 Br., 2 bath rambler. 2.98 acres with irrigation water. Large outbuilding with charming features. $265,000. ML251536. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

peninsula dailynews.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

D2

91190150

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS For Better or For Worse

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1st floor 3 Br. $695, 2 Br. $495, Studio $390 + Util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 LRG 2 Br. apt, $650. W/G paid, P.A Pet ok. 417-6638.

51

Homes

GREAT CURB APPEAL Corner lot home with 2 Br., 1 bath. Open floor plan with a fireplace and hardwood floors throughout the home. Mountain view and a fenced backyard with a garden. $133,400. ML251784/118379 Shawnee Hathaway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GREAT EXPECTATIONS You don’t usually find such a great master suite at this price! You’ll love the deck off the kitchen. Built in 1990, this 3 Br., 2 bath home is light and bright. Terrific floor plan puts the master at an opposite end from the other Br. $205,000. ML251496. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Great Home, Great Location, Great Price. 622 W 11th, PA. FSBO 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, 840 sq feet. Private setting between the bridges on a deadend. Wood stove, private deck. New flooring, windows, paint inside and out. Close to Elks Playfield. Can't beat the price. $134,900. Call Katie at 457-6788. GREAT LOCATION Quiet cul-de-sac, fantastic landscaping, 3 Br., 2 bath, close to the strait, eat in kitchen with formal dining room, covered patio. $235,000. ML241697/29098253 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT OPPORTUNITY Sunland for less than $200,000. Comfortable, easy to live with floor plan. Cozy fireplace for those chilly evenings. Great kitchen and dining area combo for easy living. All appliances included. $195,000. ML251993/131039 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT OPPORTUNITY Water view, 3 Br., 2 bath with heat pump, vaulted ceilings and skylights, wraparound deck. $175,000 ML252064/135857 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GRIFFITH FARM Private setting on 1.18 acre. Custom 1,632 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home. Great room concept, lots of cabinets and counters in kitchen. Vaulted ceiling, large windows, light and bright. Double garage, detached single garage. Covered deck and immaculate landscaping! Your opportunity to have it all. $315,000. ML252013. Cathy Reed or Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $89,000. 460-2667.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

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51

Homes

Large A frame with beautiful view of the river. Detached garage and office. Open concept with fireplace to keep it warm and friendly. 3 Br., 3 baths. $269,900 ML251513/103085 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LOOKING FOR... Mountain view, southern exposure, clean as a whistle, 1,700 sf with loads of storage. 1,800 sf of RV garage, shop, possible ADU. $349,000. ML251450/98961 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND MAGICAL SETTING Grand water views, quality custom home, detached selfcontained guest apartment, barn and hay storage areas, upper and lower pastures, convenient workshop and lovingly landscaped. $765,000 ML240911/29049719 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE! Impeccable inside & out. Original oak floors and open living/dining concept. Custom master has built-in vanity and walk-in closets. Family room, exercise room and storage! New heat pump and electric furnace. Fenced backyard, established landscaping, sprinkler system and perfect patio for barbeque! Detached double garage. All this plus water and mountain view! $269,000. ML250976 Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY MOUNTAIN AND PASTURE VIEWS “Man cave” with fireplace and 1/2 bath in double garage with room for office and workout. Separate garage with shop and storage. RV dump, water, power and covered carport. New 4 stall barn with tack room. Fenced and cross fenced, pond. 2 Br., 2 bath, serene covered deck to entertain on. Apple, pear, cherry, 2 kinds raspberries. $385,000. ML252059. Lori Tracey and Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Mountain view 32.50 acre ranch, retreat, expansive pastures and more. Home has 4 Br, 2.5 bath. Minutes from Sequim and Port Angeles. $995,000. ML250670 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NORTHERN LIGHT Backing onto one of SunLand’s common area greenbelts, the view and light coming in to this home are wonderful. 3 Br., 2 bath, with living room and family room. $197,000. ML251645 Jane Manzer 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NORTHWEST CONTEMPORARY HOME Designed by local owner/artist, lots of windows bring in light and views of lush vegetation. Almost half acre with nearly 200 rhodies, several madronas and old growth evergreens. Private feel, yet close to town. 2 Br., 2 bath, open greatroom/dining area. $189,000. ML250453 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

BANK OWNED HOME TOUR OCT. 9TH, 2010 12:00 - 3:00 PM MLS:251525 - 1120 E. 5th St. PA MLS:251613 - 1222 S. “O” St. PA MLS:251943 - 2218 E. 6th St. PA MLS:251869 - 20 America Blvd. Seq. MLS:251323 - 63 Twin Peaks Ln. Seq. STOP BY OUR OFFICE OR CALL 1134 E. FRONT ST. P.A.

0A405196

360-457-8593

Homes

$207,000. 3 plus Br., 2 bath, 3.99 acres new hot tub fenced yard adjacent to national forest. 360-461-4278 NOW WITH NEW PRICE Enjoy open floor plan with water views. Light and bright condo. All one level, 2 decks facing south/one north. Sunland amenities, close to pool/clubhouse. $235,000. ML251669/113078 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND OH DEAR… A DEER Deer and other wildlife wander about on this secluded half-acre lot. Minutes from town but with a country feel, this 3 Br., 2 bath rambler sports a vaulted ceiling living room, a formal dining room exiting onto the private deck, and a spacious garage. The heat pump will warm you in winter and cool you during summer. There is even a place for your RV. Motivated seller has dropped price and wants offers. $215,000. ML251707. Amy Powell Carroll Realty 457-1111 ON ACREAGE If you are looking for a refuge in the trees, this modest 2 Br. home surrounded by peaceful privacy may just fit the bill. Great shop/garage. Economy forces short sale. $185,000. ML251502. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ON-SITE SECURITY Swimming pool, golf course, club house, pool house. All new in 2008: 40 year roof, cedar fence, appliances and more. New paint inside/out, new bath counters and toilets. Great wood burning fire place. 3rd Br. can be used as rec room has counters, sink, cook top and fridge. $205,000. ML252067. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East OUTSTANDING CUSTOM HOME 3 Br., 2 bath home in a convenient location. Quality built in the Northwest, custom craftsman style, exterior accents include board and batt, stone and shingle. Interiors include granite tops, painted millwork, 9’ ceilings, hardwood floors, stainless appliances and more in a home thoughtfully designed for an easy living lifestyle. The neighborhood is fully maintained allowing you freedom to travel or winter elsewhere. $299,950. ML252057. Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company PANORAMIC WATER VIEWS Panoramic water and island views for this contemporary style home on one acre. Exceptional potential in this nearly 2,000 sf home. Expansive deck allows you to look out over the Sequim Valley and Straits of Juan de Fuca. Soaring windows fill this home with soft light and allow exceptional viewing of the ships as they pass by. $245,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 PICTURE PERFECT Enjoy time outside with the covered porch and sheltered deck. 3 spacious Br., 2 baths, practical kitchen with pull-out shelving, kitchen bar and dining space. Living room with exquisite marble wrapped fireplace and mantle. $249,500. ML250762. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East PRIME LOCATION 3 Br., 2 bath, Sherwood condominium, prime private location, sunny private patio, open green spaces, 2 car garage. $249,000. ML251606/108765 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND REMODELED 3 Br., 2 bath, in beautiful Diamond Point. Area features airfield, boat launch and community beach. Property lush with fruit trees, native trees and plantings. Fenced garden area, site-built workshop, detached 1 car garage and room to park RV’s, etc. $129,900. ML251521. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

Homes

SALT WATER VIEW HOME Sits on private 3.37 acres. Hardwood floors and custom oak cabinets. Master Br. suite has 2 separate baths. Shared dual shower and Whirlpool tub. Propane fireplace in living room, loft family room with wet bar. $499,900 ML251054/72643 Marti Winkler 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Sequim 2 bed 1 ba, must see gardens! Close to downtown. New laminate flooring, nearly new roof, fenced all around, gardens, water feature, auto propane 'wood' stove. Appliances included. $160,000. Shown by appt only. Call Hall Stuart-Lovell, 360670-1003. Many pics: SequimSecretGarden.com SINGLE LEVEL TOWNHOUSE Adjacent to the fairway, beautiful kitchen, extra large double garage, lovely deck, generous sized rooms throughout. $314,500. ML251966/129689 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SPACIOUS SUNLAND HOME Corner lot, 3 Br., 3 bath, 2 fireplaces, nice deck with mountain views, 2 car garage, and golf cart area, nice landscaping and fruit trees. $289,000. ML252062/136048 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND UNBEATABLE A half acre right on the Discovery Trail in Carlsborg. Property is site registered for septic, power in to lot, zoning allows for a wide variety of uses. Manufactured homes are allowed. Reduced. $49,900. ML240846 Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 UNOBSTRUCTED WATER AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS On 3.77 acres. The main house boasts vaulted ceilings with exposed beams, a large brick fireplace, and a large master Br. and bath. The guesthouse is a studio design with a loft. $599,900 ML251745/118957 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY VIEW OF THE STRAITS! This home was just reduced to $189,000 for a quick sale! 3 Br., 1 bath home on a large lot features great water views from the kitchen, dining room, living room and library. Bring your paint brush and make this house your own. $189,000. ML242014 Kimi Robertson 360-417-8595 JACE The Real Estate Company WATER VIEW 3 Br., 2 bath 1,930 sf rambler well maintained 1.03 acre with large vaulted ceilings, excellent natural lighting with windows all along the north side of home to take advantage of views of the strait and Canada. Large north deck with water views from hot tub access from dining room and master suite with garden soaking tub, separate shower and large walk in closet. 1683 Place Rd., Port Angeles. $399,000. ML251808 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WATER VIEW Unique NW water view home! Watch the shipping lanes from your living room. Artistically updated gourmet kitchen with granite tile and garden window. Dining area in kitchen with breakfast bar. Upper level includes hardwood floors and master Br. Lower level has two Br. and bath. Large lot with fenced backyard and area for parking a boat or RV. Just listed. $274,500. ML252032. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WEST: Lindal cedar home, 10 ac, pond. $450,000 cash. 928-9528

51

Homes

Wonderful 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,158 sf home located on a very private 3.22 acre parcel. This home has a large detached garage with room to park all your toys, a circular driveway and is located at the end of a long country road. $275,000. ML252058/135819 Nason Beckett 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. YOU HAVE TO SEE THIS ONE! Golf course, Strait, and Mt. Baker views. Main living area has everything. Guests have own kitchen area, bath, and privacy. Spacious wrap around deck. Wood burning fireplace, built-in sound system. Bar with sink, refrigerator, and ice maker. $498,800. ML251737/117675 Tom Cantwell 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

52

Manufactured Homes

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, single wide, 55+ park, owner may carry contract. $23,500. 683-5120. SEQUIM: Updated single wide mobile home in 55+ park, must see to appreciate. $22,950. 461-2554, 681-0829 USED 1979 24x64 2 Br. 1979 28x66 3 Br. Buy Rite Homes 681-0777

54

Lots/ Acreage

7TH AND RACE ST. PRIME COMMERCIAL 2 contiguous lots bordering very busy Race St. Traveled by many locals and tourists for yearround exposure. This property has many permitted uses. $195,000. ML251067. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Bigfoot Ridge Forest Reserve. Six view 2.7 acre ridge top forested parcels and 16 acre community forest. 11 miles from Port Townsend near Port Hadlock. Available individually from 139k or as a single unit. Great family estate potential. Big photos and more information at forestgems.com 360-732-0095 For Sale By Owner 2.5 acre parcel. Great water and mtn views. Partially wooded, pri. road. Owner financing available. Good well area, power to property. Near Seq. Bay State Park. $80,000. 460-2960. GOT LAVENDER? Bring your house plans or lavender plants. Beautiful acreage in Agnew, breath taking mountain views, Sequim School District, owner finance available. $199,000. ML250847/56475 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT FUTURE HOMESITE Nice level lot ready for your dream home, with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. Beautiful area only minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Priced to sell! $55,000. ML251879. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Lake Sutherland, 3+ acres with beach rights with dock, Hwy 101 frontage. electrical close by. Subdividable, zoned R1. 360-460-4589. WEST P.A.: 30 acres, utilities. $100,000 discount. $150,000 cash. 928-9528.

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoking. $665. 360-670-9418 P.A.: Lg 1 Br., storage, no smoke/pets. $650. 457-8438.

63

Duplexes

64

Houses

611 CHERRY, P.A.: 1 Br. $600. Pets OK. Avail. now. 417-8250

Between P.A. and Sequim. 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 bed, 1 bath with W/D on 1.5 acres. Storage shed. No smoking or pets. $775 mo. 452-7721.

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CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br., ground floor, excellent refs. req. $700. 360-460-3124

Houses

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $1,095 mo, last, dep. 683-0123. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath + 1,200 sf shop, 3 min. to town, yet private. $1,200 mo. 405-640-7314 or 360-681-8066 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, 1800 sf, 5 quiet acres, mtn view. $1,200. 477-0747. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2.5 ba, 231 sf office or family room, living room with fireplace, lg. pantry, 13x21 solarium, 16x 32 rear deck, lg. carport, $1,150 mo., 1st, last, security deposit. 477-8180

SEQUIM: Energy efficient 1 Br. Water view. $870 mo. 1st/last/SD, ref rqd. No pets/smoke. 582-0637 SEQUIM: Nice, clean 2 Br. mobile in town. W/D, no pets. Refs., $675. 582-1862.

EAST P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 5 acres, mtn./ water view. Horses ? $1,200. 477-0747.

Vintage, completely remodeled 2 Br., 1 bath Port Angeles home. $900. Open House Saturday, October 9, 10-2 p.m. First, last and deposit, credit check. Sorry no smoking or pets. Contact Susan at 206-948-6653 WEST P.A.: 4 Br, 2 ba, no smoking. $1,000, $1,000 sec. 417-0153

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

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P.A. APTS & HOUSES A Studio 1 ba..$475 A 2 br 1 ba......$550 H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$750 H 3 br 1 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1150 SEQ APTS/HOUSES A 2 br 1.5 ba....$875 H 2+ br 2 ba.....$950

P.A.: Private room and bath in lovely 6 Br. house near high school. Quiet professional wanted. $385/mo. 797-1245. ROOM FOR RENT $400-$500 mo., Sherwood Village in Sequim. For details, call Betty 504-2685. SEQUIM: Shared kitchen and living space. $450 mo. includes utilities. 681-2184

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean and newer 2 Br., 1 bath, garage. No smoking/pets. $795. Duane 206-604-0188.

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com JOYCE: Whiskey Cr. Bch. 3 Br., 1 bath. Shop, kennel, pond. Wood/elec. heat. $1,050 mo. Ready 11/5. 907-530-7081.

Lake Front Condo 2 Br., 1.5 bath. $950 mth water/garb included, 6 mth lease. Available now. 360-461-4890 MAINS FARM: 2 Br., 2 bath, gar. $875. 928-9528

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Share Rentals/ Rooms

Spaces RV/ Mobile

P.A.: Full RV hook up, 1/3 acre, incl. elec. $325. 460-4107 SEQUIM: Idle Wheels Park on 5th Ave. RV or mobile. 683-3335.

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Commercial Space

P.A.: Rent or sale, 1409 E. 1st. 2 lots. 4,400 sf. 457-5678. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

NEED A RENTAL? Windermere Property Mgmt. 457-0457. olympicpeninsularent als.com P.A.: 1131 Columbia. 3 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $825. 477-3051. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoke. $800, 1st, last, dep. req. 360-683-4336 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, newly remodeled, no pets/smoking. $690 mo., $700 deposit. 460-5290

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Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

P.A.: 2 story, 3 Br. plus den, 2 ba, garage plus carport, all appliances, built in ‘04, no pets. Dep. and refs. $1,150 mo. 360-808-4476

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P.A.: 218 W. 8th. 2 Br., W/D, no smoking/ pets. $600. Credit check. 460-5639.

72

P.A.: 3 Br., 1.5 ba, office, beautiful mtn/water views, all new carpet/paint. Fire-place, garage. $995. 775-7129. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, DW, very clean, no smoking, pets neg. $900, lease, 1st, last, dep. You see it, you’ll rent it. 808-0009. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $990. 452-1395.

Appliances

WASHER/DRYER Kemmore stacker. $500. 461-3164.

Furniture

ANTIQUES: Brass bed, settee, lg. oak rocker. $900 all or $350 each. 670-9264 Computer desk and leather computer chair. Beautiful cherry computer desk from Home Decorators, leather computer chair. Both like new. Desk is $200. Chair is $75. Both for $250. Contact: 360-344-3706

P.A.: 6 Br., 2 bath. $1,000 mo. Call for details. 457-7216.

DESK Medium sized, black, shabbychic. Very cute, vintage piece. $75/obo. 360-775-8746

P.A.: 636 Georgiana, large shop/garage, 4 Br., 2 ba, great location. $1,150, dep. 460-7516

DINING ROOM TABLE With 4 chairs. Very nice set. $175/obo. Call 681-4429.

P.A.: Country 2 Br., $700/mo. Incl. util., No dogs. 417-9207.

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746

P.A.: Studio, fully furn, Wi-Fi, secluded. $700. 452-6014.

Apartments Unfurnished

64

SEQUIM: Sherwood Village immaculate duplex, 2 Br., 2 ba, sewer and water incl. $1,000 mo., 1st, last, security. 681-0253.

P.A.: Cute mobile, 2 Br., 1 ba, lg. detach gar., lovely fenced yard with trees. $625. 775-7129.

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

P.A.: Travel trailer for rent in exchange for maintenance work. 460-4968 Sequim Condo: Penthouse on golf course, 1 Br., furn. 2 decks, incredible view, EVERYTHING inc. $950 mo. 460-9917 Sequim Rental: 3 bdrm, 2 bth, livng rm, lrg den, fncd yrd, pets OK. $1,100/mo. 360-460-9917

LOVE SEAT Blue. $60. 477-7834 or 452-9693 MISC: Bedroom set, hunter green, full bed, 5 drawer chest, bedside stand, $500. Love seat, southwest print, $150. 4 drawer chest, $50. small table and two chairs, $50. Wing arm chairs, rose, $100. brown recliner, $75. 582-0185

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Furniture

MISC: Dining set, very large heirloom quality 4-piece, 6 high back chairs. $1,099/ obo. Sofa, large plush velour fabric living room, very comfortable, light color green-blue, tan & brown, $249/obo. 452-9562 MISC: Matching hutch & dining table with 6 chairs, $225. Sewing machine in cabinet, $100. 7 drawer dresser, with mirrored top, $150. All obo. 460-8675. MISC: Oak entertainment center 5’x6’ x20”, with 30”x36” TV opening, $200. 34” Toshiba HDTV, flat screen, tube TV, $200. 565-8131, leave message.

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General Merchandise

Campground memberships TT/NACO Alliance. $600 plus tfr fee. Coast to Coast Hart Ranch B $900 plus tfr fee. Dues paid both $1,400. 452-6974. CASH FOR: Antiques and collectibles. 360-928-9563 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 5 nice prom dresses 4 size small, 1 size med, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 417-3504. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910 www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Fir, $175 a cord or $185 delivered. 808-5891. FIREWOOD: Stacked in rows. $65 and up, you haul. 928-3872. For Sale: 2006 8 horse Honda short shaft 4 stroke boat motor 30 hrs $1500. 430sq ft Forest green Champion snaplock metal roofing $1000. Stainless Steel Protech full size full polish tool box $500. Nautilus weight gym $400. Please call 360-460-2533 Gas lawn mower. $45. 457-8656. Go Go Elite Mobility Scooter. Like New $1,200. Nice Scooter, less than 2 hours use. Purchased for $1,900, sell for $1,200. Great for small spaces, folds to fit in most vehicles. Suitable for a large or small person. 360-928-3625. MISC: Gas smoke house, 5Wx7Lx7H, all aluminum inside and out, 4” insulated walls, $500. Pellet stove, insulated stainless steel pipe, new hot vacuum, $550. 452-2162. MISC: Husqvarna chainsaws: #395, $650. #385, $450. #575, $300. Leister plastic air welder, $200. Antique partridge bamboo fly rod, #8, $200. Commercial canopy, side and full backdoors, short bed, white, $800. Willies Jeep tranny, 3 speed with overdrive, $800. 461-8060 MISC: Kirkland brand chest freezer, works great, only $50. Student desk, nice wood with 7 drawers, $40. Acoustic guitar, custom made, $50. 541-279-9108 day or night. MOBILITY CART New, paid $2,399. Will sell for $1,550. 775-9669 Mobility Scooter Must sell 1 yr. old Golden Companion II, dual batteries, swivel seat, tilt handlebars, shopping basket, light and horn, disassembels for easy transport, cost $5,500. Sacrifice $2,500/ obo. 360-477-4774. MOVING: Garden tool, Dr. Moore, 10.5 hp, like new, $1,150. 300 gal regular gas tank, with fixtures, $350. Propane tank, 10 gal., $35/obo. 928-2115 PELLET STOVE Enviro EF. Free standing, good condition. $600. 460-2502.

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D3

General Merchandise

WANTED TO BORROW Peninsula College drama department seeking a motorized wheelchair to use for first two weeks in November. Please contact director Dr. Starcevich 477-5368 or at larastarcevich@yahoo.com XBOX 360 ELITE With Grand Theft Auto 4, wireless controller, like new condition, with high definition cables. $350/obo. 775-5767 or 681-7771

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Home Electronics

CAMERAS: Minolta 35 mm, Maxxum 430 si R2 camera with bag and 4 lenses, 50 mm AF, 28-80 mm AF, 100-200 mm AF, 2x AF teleconverter plus wireless remote flash, $200 firm. JVC Everio G series hard disk camera and camcorder, model GZ-MG630, 60 GB, 40x Dynamic zoom, will take 9,999 pictures, 4 hr. 15 min. recording time, extra lg. battery pack and case, $200 firm. Call Walter 360-452-8122 or cell 477-8575. COMPUTERS: Desktops, laptops. Rock solid computers, Rock bottom prices. Guarantee 683-9394

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Musical

BANJO: Tenor. Excellent condition. $350/obo. 582-3082. GUITAR: Acoustic left handed Carlos brand adult size, like new condition with semi soft case and two beginning books. $350 firm. 452-9401. Marshall & Wendell upright piano. No bench. You provide mover. Easy access only one step. Sequim, Wa. $850. 360-683-0645. Call after 3 p.m. VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $150. 452-6439

76

Sporting Goods

GUN: Stoeger Coach, 12 gauge, sxs, 20” blue. $325. 461-6808 GUNS: 45-70 plus ammo, $400. German sporting rifle, $700. 461-6339 after 4 p.m. GUNS: Glock 23 40 cal., plus accessories, $500. Interarms 44 mag. single action, $300. Thompson 54 cal. black powder, plus accessories, $200. 360-385-7728 GUNS: Savage 110, 7 mm, Rem. mag, bolt action rifle, LH, Redfield 3 to 9x50 scope, ammo and sling, $375. Marlin 22 mag bolt action rifle, 3 to 9 scope, $150. S&W model 57, 41 mag, 6” barrel, clam shell shoulder holster, $650. 360-912-1277 PISTOL: Smith & Wesson, model 686, 4” barrel, stainless steel finish, wood grip, great condition. $500/obo. 461-9585. SKATES: Bauer aggressive skates, black, size 11 good shape $20. 460-0845 SKS: 7.62x39, new black stock, tactical scope. $450. 457-0943

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 BUYING FIREARMS Fair honest prices, 1 or collection. Northwoods Firearms federal and state licensed. 477-9659. LOOKING FOR HAND CARVED HITTY DOLL Please call 417-7691 WANTED: Arc welder or wire feed MIG. 360-379-6456 WANTED: Stock trailer, good condition. 683-1179 WANTED: Vintage camper trailer, 1969 or older, no longer than 14’, good condition. 417-8097 day, 452-4403 eves.

SEPTIC TANK: Norwesto, never used, 4.5” inlet/outlet, 1,000 gal. capacity, dual tops. $1,000 firm. 360-640-1220. TIMESHARE WEEK Hot August Nights! RENO August 6th-13th Tons of old cars and old time music. LOCAL SELLER. Great Christmas Gift! $500. 460-6814. TOOLS: Wood planer, Delta model DC-380, $750/obo. Bosch router table, compete, $450/obo. 460-5762 TRAILER: Snowmobile, quad, utility trailer, 7x12, always garaged, excellent condition, 3,500 lb. axle. $1,495. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 VENDORS WANTED Eagles Crafts Fair and Flea Market. Nov. 6th. Table rental, $25. 360-683-6450 WANTED LOGS FOR FIREWOOD 477-8832

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

CYPRESS: 6’-7’, $13 ea. G&G Farms, 95 Clover Lane, off Taylor-Cutoff. 683-8809.

82

Pets

30 gallon aquarium with stand for sale. $45. 457-1560. AKC Mini Schnauzer Puppies. Litter of 2 male, 3 female puppies. Tails docked and dewclaws removed. Black/silver and salt/pepper coloring. First shots. $500 each. 360-460-7119


D4

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

Classified

&&

GARAGE GARAGE YARD SALES YARD SALES

On he e Peni n ns ssu ul lla On tth h he e Pe Pe Peni niin n ns u ul a

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 3610 Galaxy Place, off Laurel and Ahlvers. Furniture, appliances, tools, housewares. Everything priced to sell. GARAGE Sale: Electronics Only. Sat., 93 p.m. 3413 S. Mt. Angeles Rd, Port Angeles. Large amount of test equipment from the 70s and 80s. Oscopes, Sig Gens, HeathKits, Knight Kits, parts. Cash only. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-2 p.m., 522 E. 8th St., The Duke of Flowers. Patio set, portable A/C, ribbon, vases, floral supplies, lamps, telephones, cash register, Christmas decorations, baskets, open sign, bar stools, flower pots, stemming machines, and much more. PARKING LOT Sale: Sat., 10-3 p.m., St. Andrew’s Church, 510 E. Park Ave. Household, decor, electric, misc. If it rains we will be downstairs in the church. PORCH Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-5 p.m., 239 W. 9th St. Military clothing for hunters, new or like new, big selection. 2 solid bar stools, boat motor and other stuff. YARD Sale: Fri., 9-?, 504 E. Park Ave. Porcelain dolls, old Mad Magazines, odds and ends. Rain or shine.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

MOVING Sale: Fri.Sat., 7-3 p.m., 1225 W. Spruce, behind house. Everything goes.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 8-2 p.m. 2009 W. 10th St. Tools, lots of household stuff, Bob stroller, REI baby pack, and lots of baby stuff. Even a slot machine! GARAGE Sale: Sun., 9-5 p.m. Mon., 9-2 p.m. 1720 W 8th St. Antique jars and bottles, quality home decorating items, some are new. Rugs, furniture, stained glass, light fixtures, dishes and more. Free coffee, so come rain or shine. MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m. 1234 W. 17th St., in alley. Tools, furniture, and misc. THREE GALS MEGA ESTATE SALE Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 9-3 2101 Driftwood Place Home loaded with original art by Carole Bourdo! Sculptures by Rick Cain! Western collectibles! ‘07 UM 50cc scooter, haul trailer. Art supplies, easels, yard art, patio set, kitchen full, queen bed, furniture, jewelry, linens and toys. Garage has hand and power tools for shop and garden. Bandsaw, drill press, pressure washer, mower and lots more. Christmas on patio! (Between 12th &14th off N). WE ARE OUTTA HERE MOVING SALE Dressers, bookcases, maternity clothes, books, TVs, framed art, a Weber grill! All this and more. Sat., 9-3 p.m., Airport Road Self Storage, #305, 4114 S. Airport Rd. All items must be picked up and removed by buyer at time of sale. Bring your truck! Come rain or shine.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

3-FAMILY Sale: Sat. only, 8-4 p.m., no earlies please. Harmony, off N. Barr Rd. Tools, household, custom work bench, cockatiel with cage, dog kennel, guitar, lots of misc. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m., 646 Osborn Rd., Agnew area. Kitchenware, dishes, clothing, camping gear, sporting goods, etc., etc. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun. 8-3 p.m. 1818 E. 4th use alley between 4th and 5th. Some household, lots of power tools, etc.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

2ND SATURDAY BOOK SALE Oct. 9, 10-3 p.m. Special this month: Crafts and Christmas. Friends of Sequim Library. ESTATE Sale: Thurs.Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m., 706 Three Crabs Rd. Several free sofas and recliners. Glassware, knickknacks, adjustable beds, lots of books. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-4 p.m., 384 Knapp Rd. Antiques, colletibles, glassware, furniture, linens, very old portraits, unique stone jewelry, range, dishwasher, Dell monitor, huge selection DVDs, women’s clothing (18-3X), all quality and priced well. Rain or shine, earlies welcome. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 40 Meadow Dr., Sequim Dungeness to Sequim Blvd., right on Meadow Dr. Books, clothes, furniture, etc.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-? 311 N. Solmar Dr. A little of everything! HARVEST FESTIVAL Oct. 9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 387 E. Washington, Clubhouse. Local fresh produce, pies, cookies, cakes, bulbs and plants for spring bloom, fall decor items, pumpkins, gourds, Yakima Valley fresh vegetables and fruit, great raffle items, popcorn, books, lots more. HOLIDAY MAGIC SALE Fri.-Sat., 10-5 p.m. 1133 Olson Road off Hooker Road. Gifts, live and artificial trees, lights, decorations, and misc. Multi-Family Garage Sale: Sat.,10/9, 812 p.m., 101 N. Boyce Rd. Furniture, electronics, toys, puzzles, stuffed animals, clothes, coats, shoes, boots, scrapbook supplies, stamps, cookbooks, decorations, etc. 360-808-4528 Multi-Family Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-5 p.m. 45 Spencer Rd., between N. Boyce and Joslin, off Hwy 101. Tools, toys, auto parts, housewares, antiques, DVDs, furniture, electronics, clothing for all ages, books, games, Partylite home decor. Rain or shine. MULTI-PERSON Sale Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 101 E. Pheasant Ln., follow signs on Silberhorn. Misc. household items, tools, young women’s designer clothes, baseboard heater, digital cameras and more.

82

Pets

AQUARIUM: 30 gallon aquarium. $45. 360-457-1560 BLACK LABS: AKC/ UKC Black Lab pups excellent hunting lines. $650. 461-7583 CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 3 females, 2 males, ready to go after Oct. 11th. $350 ea. 452-7746 FREE: Cat. 3 yr. old, needs lots of attention and love, great for older person. Neutered and has all shots. 417-2130. FREE: To loving family, friendly female 2 yr. old Pit Bull, great with kids/dogs, loving, hyper, needs more attention, big yard, with kennel, current with shots. 206-375-5204 or 360-683-0082 HALLOWEEN PUPPIES AKC Golden Retriever pups, 5 male $400 ea., 1 female $500, 20 yr. breeder, father on site, 1st shots, wormed, quality, guarantee health. 582-3181 Loving Staffy. American Staffy, 5 years old, male. Great watch dog and very loving! Needs home with no other dogs or cats and no small children. Call for details. Free to good home. Great companion! 460-2446.

92

Pets

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, Powder Puff China-Jacks, registered, vet checked, shots, wormed. $800 each. 582-9006 Training Classes Oct. 12. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106.

83

Farm Animals

HAY: Alf/grass. $5.50 bale. Grass, $4.50. In barn. 683-5817.

84

Horses/ Tack

AQHA: Gelding, 15 yrs., reining/cow horse, $25,000 in training. $2,500. 461-7583 HORSE TRAILER: 2 horse, straight load, Safari 1969, good condition. $950/obo. 683-1179 HORSE: 22 yr. old mare, great 4-H or beginner horse. $800, price negotiable. Call Tawny at 360-460-6816

85

Farm Equipment

TRACTOR: John Deere 4400. With 5 attachments. $16,000. 452-5012. TRACTOR: John Deere Model H. Resotred. $3,200. 457-3120

PARROT CAGE 76”H, 40”W, 30”D, for Amazon or Macaw, on wheels. $350. firm. 681-2022. PUPPIES: (3) adorable female Pocket Poms, each one unique. Ready October 14, will have all shots. $400. 360-670-3890 PUPPIES: Adorable Chihuahua 1 male, $300. 2 females, $250 ea. Ready to go home. 808-1242 or 808-1598. PUPPIES: AKC registered Golden Retrievers, ready now, 2 female $450. 1 male $400. 808-2959. PUPPIES: Boston Terrier pups. $250$350. Call 797-3189 after 4 p.m. PUPPIES: Golden Retrievers, beautiful AKC, dark golden, championship lines on sires side, ready 10/15. 6 males, $450 ea. 4 females, $500 ea. 1st shots, wormed. 681-3160, after 4 p.m.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

82

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOZER: ‘70s John Deer 450c, 2 cylinder, gas, blade, winch, rebuilt. $4,000. 928-3669. DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirror and windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, excellent inside and out, all new brakes. $42,000. 460-8325. FLAT BED: ‘73 Ford F600 with liftgate, needs work. $1,000. 457-3120 GMC: ‘91 Top Kick. GVWR 26,180 lbs, 19,466 mi., 16’ bed, dump-through lift gate, Fuller 10 spd. $19,995. 683-2383. PARTS: John Deere 440 skidder for parts. $50 and up. 928-3872 SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153. TRACK LOADER 125E, I-H Dresser, 1,900 hrs. $11,000. 683-3843 TRACTOR: Kubota B21 Industrial grade backhoe loader. $15,000. Dual axle Big Tex trailer with ramps. $1,500. 461-3986

93 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

91

Aircraft

ULTRALITE: Avenger/Hurricane. 503 Rotax engine, 10 gal tank, new tires, 4 year old sails, always hangered, full instruments including CHT, EGT, RPM, airspeed, recording G meter, hr meter, hydraulic disc brakes, ballistic chute. $7,500. 360-640-1498 360-374-2668

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

Marine

APOLLO: ‘77 20’. Must see! Very clean in and out. Rebuilt 302 IB OMC OB. Fresh water cooled, hydraulic trim tabs, head, galley. Priced to sell. $3,800/obo. 681-0411 ARIMA: ‘89 17’, 70 hp Yamaha, canvas top, galv. trailer, with extras. $8,000. 928-3900 BAYLINER: ‘02 2452 Classic with ‘05 EZ Loader Trailer. 250HP, Bravo 2 outdrive, micro, stove, refrigerator, marine head, masserator, heated cabin, radar, fish finder, VHF radio, GPS, (2) Scotty electric down riggers, Yamaha 8T kicker motor, all safety equip., trim tabs, hot water, cruising canvas, fresh water cooling. $28,500/obo. 360-683-3887

93

93

Marine

Aluminum 17 ft., C/C, 2 Mercury 4 strokes. $8,000 firm. 452-2779 BAYLINER: With 70 hp Evinrude. Fully equipped with EZ Loader trailer, lots of extras. $4,000. 683-4698 COOKIE MONSTER ‘78 Sloop, 30’. 4 head sails, main, 3/4 and 1/2 oz. spinnakers. Head foil and hydraulic backstay. All new halyards, knot, depth, and wind meters in ‘08. Best of all, new 14 hp FWC Yanmar diesel in ‘09. Propane 2 burner stove and cabin heater. Marine UHF radio and Sony AM/FM CD radio. Sleeps 5. See at slip Q-5 in P.A. Boat Haven. $18,500. 457-8382. GLASPLY: ‘79 19’. 30 years of super fishing experience. Fully equipped, galvanized trailer, electric winch, stored inside, ready to go. $7,000. 360-417-2606 GLASPLY: They don’t make ‘em like they used to! ‘77 24’. Lots of extras. $12,000/obo 360-374-2234 JET SKI: ‘96 ZXI750. Low hours. $2,600/ obo. 928-3450. MALIBU: ‘01 Sportster LX. Fuel injected 350, great shape, only 240 hours. $17,000. 808-6402. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. MOTOR: ‘00 25 hp Johnson longshaft hand tiller, 2 stroke. $1,600. 683-3289 evenings. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $16,000/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854 OUTBOARD: 2010 Yamaha 4 hp, 3 hrs., no salt ever, as new. $875. 681-0151. RAIDER: ‘07 24’ aluminum, well equipped. $53,500. 683-5120 REINELL: ‘95 19.5’ V6 I/O. EZ-Load galvanized trailer, half cutty. $4,800/obo. 452-2459 RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

Marine

SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 30’ sloop. Yanmar diesel, low hrs., VHF radio, depth and knot meter, working galley and head, color TV, CD player, wheel steering, sleeps 5. $10,500. 457-0684. SAILBOAT: 12’ wooden, extra sail, trailer. $990. 683-6889. SAILBOAT: 16’ classic daysailer. Very stable, very good condition, a beauty, trailer and more incl. $10,000/obo. 360-582-1683 SANGER: ‘76 Super Jet. Built 455 Olds, Hardin in water exhaust, seats 5, upholstery good, dog house fair, turnkey ready. $2,500/obo. 681-3838

Sea going sailing canoe. Project wood boat partially restored, all parts including good sail, mast, tiller,dagger board, lines, mast and rudder with all fittings except for oars. 17 feet long with a wide beam. $500. 360-683-6575 or 360-808-5200 TOLLY CRAFT ‘69 24’ ‘350’ Chev, gal. trailer. $4,950. 582-1330 YAMAHA: 8 hp long shaft, 2 cycle, excellent condition. $750/obo. Call Terry 461-6462

94

Motorcycles

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FENCING

LAWN/YARD LAWN CARE CAREROOFING

TRACTOR

KITCHENS/BATHS/DOORS

PRUNING

MANUFACTURED/MOBILE HOMES

PAINTING

AIR DUCT CLEANING

HANDYMAN

HOME REPAIR

REPAIR/REMODEL

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

HANDYMAN

ROOFING

APPLIANCES M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

94

Motorcycles

CAN-AM ‘08 OUTLANDER XTMAX QUAD 4x4, 2 seater, 400cc EFI, winch. VIN#000298 $5,700 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY: ‘02 1200 Sportser. Black, lots of chrome. Saddle bags, detachable windshield, beautiful bike! $5,995. 360-461-0961

QUAD: ‘04 Honda 250 EX Sportrax. Low mi. $2,200. 683-2107.

KAWASAKI: ‘03 KX125. 2 stroke, exc. cond., hardly ridden, must go. $2,200/ obo. 452-5290.

QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki 250. Like brand new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

KAWASAKI: ‘09 KLX 250s Dual-Sport Excel. cond., 1,600 mi., street legal, 65 mpg, elec start, 6 speed, liquid cooled, new tires, Comes w/ riding gear and helmet, perfect for commute and trail! $3,850. 360-477-7589 KAWASAKI: ‘00 Vulcan 800. Mustang seat, also has stock seat, K&N air filter, new chain and rear sprocket, 29K miles. $2,000. 206-913-7906

HD: ‘05 Electra Glide Ultra Classic. Black cherry/black pearl, 10,850 miles. One owner, garage kept. Screamin' Eagle and Tall Boy package. never down or in rain. Excellent condition! $15,900. 360-461-4222 HD: ‘06 1200 Sportster. 7K miles, mint, extras. $7,900. 452-6677

KAWASAKI: ‘01 Ninja EX 500R. Excellent condition, recent tune-up. $1850/obo. For details call, 360-477-1630 POLARIS ‘08 TRAILBOSS 330 QUAD Auto, racks. VIN#316882 $3,200 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272

HONDA: ‘04 CFR 100F. Less than 60 hrs., original owner. $1,500. 417-1151. HONDA: ‘04 XR650L. Only 3,000 mi., excellent condition, includes hitch carrier. $3,500. 460-4420. HONDA: ’06 Shadow VLX 600. Saddle bags, windshield, custom paint, lots of chrome, 1,800 mi., super clean, must see. $4,000/obo. 452-5813 HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,950. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘07 Rebel Sport 250. Low miles $3,000. 461-6469.

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘08 1200C. 450 miles. $8,495/obo. 452-6448 Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670

94

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘00 Polaris. 250cc, plus extras. $1,500. 417-9170.

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com

SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 YAMAHA ‘07 GRIZZLY 350 4X4 QUAD Auto, reverse, warn winch. VIN#OU1599 $4,300 Randy’s Auto Sales 457-7272 YAMAHA: ‘03 V-Star 1100. Excellent condition, windshield, bags, air kit, crash bars, 15K mi. $4,300. 452-7184. YAMAHA: ‘05 FJR 1300. 8,400 miles, lots of extras. $8,750. 460-3162. YAMAHA: ‘09 250 Star. Under 500 mi., mint cond. $3,500. 765-4775, leave msg

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘88 25’ Alpenlite. $7,000. 457-4914 5TH WHEEL: ‘93 30’ Komfort. 18’ slide out. Needs some work. $4,000. 681-8860

95

Recreational Vehicles

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘94 11.5’ Northland. Always under cover, needs some work. $3,500. 360-374-8761 5TH WHEEL: ‘05 34’ Montana Mountaineer 348RLS. 3 slides. Great condition. Extended warranty. 50 amp, central heat/air. Kelley Blue Book is $32,000. Asking $24,900/obo. Call Steve at 360-477-3949

5TH WHEEL: 2007 Mckenzie Lakota 33SKT 4 SEASON. 3 slides, no smoke/ pets, dual Euro recliners, king bed, large corner shower, washer/dryer closet, large wardrobe closets, central vac, more than adequate storage, very nice little one bedroom on wheels. Over 11,000 under dealer value at $37,900. elgreengos@hotmail.com for more pictures or come see. 683-7411 or 477-5621. 5TH WHEEL: ‘89 25’ Alpenlite DL. Gas stove/oven, electric/gas freezer, fridge, air, microwave, antenna, AM/FM cassette stereo, roof ladder, storage, new tires, Hijacker Ultraslide hitch with mounting brackets, Super Shade awning, ONAN gen. set, low hours, very good condition. $5,000. 360-452-3402 5TH WHEEL: ‘95 25’ Terry. Slide hitch and air tailgate, bought last spring, never used, one previous owner, excellent condition. $5,000 all. 683-7877 CAMPER: ‘72. Fits 8’ bed, no leaks. $350. 797-4518 CAMPER: 10’ Alpenlite. Oak cabinets, frige, range, oven, stereo, skylights, tinted windows, bathroom/shower, antenna, electric camper jacks, immaculate, used only 4 times. $4,000. 452-6441.

CAMPER: 8’ cabover, warm and dry. $600. 683-3639. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Bounder diesel pusher. Loaded. $95,000/obo. 360-460-0432 MOTOR HOME: ‘74 23’ Dodge. 41K, new tires, needs TLC. $2,500/obo. 775-5465 MOTOR HOME: ‘99 34’ Coachmen Catalina. Loaded, 20K, V10, basement, lg. slide, excellent condition. $29,999. See at 2372 Hwy. 101 E., P.A. 457-4101. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 38’ Country Coach Affinity, their best model. Mint condition, loaded, 325 Turbo Cat, 7,500W diesel generator, solid oak and leather throughout, air ride and leveling, was $400,000 new, very livable. Reduced again! $52,000/ obo. 360-460-1071. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $9,500. 797-1625

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 25’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10, 97K. $16,500. 457-7097. MOTORHOME: ‘03 29’. Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tipout. $55,000/ obo. 360-808-6392. TRAILER: ‘00 24’ SandPiper By Forest River. Built in the Northwest, for the Northwest, w/queen bed up front, sofa & dining areas convert to bed, awning. In Sequim. $8,000. 602-615-6887 TRAILER: ‘04 25’ Prowler. With slide, 4 new tires. $12,995. 582-9061

95

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘05 22’ Arctic Fox. 1 slide, most options on board. $14,000. 417-5082. TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $13,000. 477-3695. TRAILER: ‘72 Sportsmaster 20’ living space and tongue. Good condition. $3,000/obo. 775-7504 TRAILER: ‘88 21’ Nomad. New tires, lights, battery. In good shape. $4,500/ obo. 681-0595 Jeff. TRAILER: ‘94 40x10 Woodland Park. 2 slide outs, micro, W/D, air, full length porch with metal awning, refrigerator ice maker. $10,500. 425-776-5816 or 206-853-5546

TRAILER: ‘03 30’ Airstream. Interior in great condition, some dents on exterior, reconstructed title. $9,995. 971-226-0002 TRAILER: 22’ Terry. New tires/propane bottles. $1,500/obo. 417-3579 TRAILER: ‘62 20’. No leaks, self contained, most everything works. $850. 360-385-3336 TRAILER: ‘88 32’ Aljo Alliance. Everything works, good condition. $3,500/obo. 457-7600

96

Parts/ Accessories

Dee Zee Running Boards. ‘99-’10 F250/F-350 long beds. Includes cab running boards and side box boards, drivers side and passenger side. Comes with brackets, bolt/ nuts, and instructions. $250. 360-460-5420 FORD: ‘89 F250 2WD. Good runnig fuel injected ‘302’ never fully installed, good tranny and rear end, good tires, parting out. $1,000. 477-6512

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

96

Parts/ Accessories

97

4 Wheel Drive

GAS PUMP: Old gas pump and oil dispenser. $700 firm. 452-5803

CHEV: ‘98 S10 Blazer. 4 dr, passenger door damage, runs/drives great, must see. $1,295. 452-5803.

SNOW/WINTER TIRES Nokian Hakkapelitta 4 Set of 4. Tires are studded with sipping. Size is 225/50R-17. Approx. 75%-80% tread left. $350. 360-460-5420

DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 4X4 LONGBED 5.7 liter HEMI V8, 6 speed manual, chrome wheels, running boards, tow package, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $19,910! Vinyl makes it a breeze to clean! Only 38,000 miles! Save some serious bucks on your next truck at Gray Motors! $13,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

BUICK: ‘04 Rainier. V8, AWD, leather, 87K, premium sound, wheels, all power. $12,800. 460-3037 CHEV ‘07 TAHOE LTZ 4X4 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto, 20” alloys, running boards, roof rack, tow package, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, locks and mirrors, heated power leather seats, adjustable pedals, tilt, cruise, air, rear air, DVD player with Navigation, backup camera and sensors, OnStar, dual front and rear side curtain airbags. This SUV is loaded! Even the back seats fold up at the push of a button! No option left out! Kelley Blue Book value of $32,900! Save some serious $$$ at Gray Motors! $27,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘02 Trailblazer LTZ. Low mi., all power, air, leather, new tires/brakes, Bose audio & more. Low book. $9,250. 460-4765 CHEV: ‘97 1/2 ton extended cab, 3 doors, short bed, 80K mi. $5,000. 406-381-9362 CHEV: ‘88 S-10 4x4. As is. $1,000. 457-9292 CHEV: ‘90 1 ton 4x4. 454. New trans, rear end, and u joints, canopy, wheels and tires, black, 195K. $3,850. 461-1229.

97

D5

4 Wheel Drive

HONDA: ‘06 Element EX AWD. $18,000. 43K mi. Excellent cond, Automatic, Air cond, Roof rack, 2" tow receiver, Hood and window wind deflectors, Warranty to 2014. Call 360-477-2196 between 10 AM and 10PM ISUZU: ‘91 Trooper. Runs good, new tires. $1,500/obo. 670-6041

DODGE: ‘88 3/4 ton long bed. $850/obo. 452-2459 DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556 FORD: ‘09 F150 4x4. XLT super cab, 15K mi. $26,500. 360-765-4599 FORD: ‘79 Bronco. Full size, ‘351’ Cleveland, good body. $2,000. 797-3436. FORD: ‘85 Bronco. Sat. radio, 33” tires. $1,300. 640-8996. FORD: ‘94 Explorer. All power, auto, air, runs/drives great. $1,500. 457-8193 or 460-7534 FORD: ‘03 Ranger. V6, extra cab, O/D 4x4, 40,000 mi., nice wheels/tires. $9,000. 360-640-8749 FORD: ‘98 Expedition XLT. Leather, loaded, very clean, 97K mi., $6,500/obo. 775-6673 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC: ‘73 3/4 ton. Runs good, ugly. $1,495. 582-1381. GMC: ‘96 Sonoma. Two color, extra cab. $3,800/obo or trade for equal value SUV/ car. 360-460-3756.

JEEP: ‘02 Grand Cherokee Overland 4WD, V8, fully loaded, excellent cond., 85K miles, class III tow pkg, power memory seats, moonroof, etc. Blue Book $11,300, call to see and drive. 360-457-1168 MAZDA: ‘03 Tribute ES. Loaded, leather, great shape, 62K, towing pkg. $10,510. 928-9527 TOYOTA ‘97 T-100 EXTENDED CAB 3.4 liter V6, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM cassette, slider, sprayed-on bedliner, only 70,000 miles, very, very, clean local trade, non-smoker. $8,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

TOYOTA: ‘94 4Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. Needs tranny work. $2,800. 452-9693

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WINDOW/CARPET CLEANING

REMODELING

HOME/YARD SERVICES

MOLE CONTROL/PRUNING

RENOVATION/REPAIR

RESTORATION

DIRT WORK

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

LANDSCAPING

TREE SERVICE

ASBESTOS

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 PRINTING

ELECTRICAL

COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT

CARPET CLEANING

Call NOW To Advertise Here 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

0A5098727

SERVICE DIRECTORY


D6

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

97

4 Wheel Drive

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. TOYOTA: ‘01 Tacoma SR5. 4x4 extra cab, brand new 3.4 V6 engine installed by Toyota dealer, auto, PW, PDL, CD, tow pkg. with air bags and electric trailer brakes, canopy. $13,000. Call Bill at 460-3429

DODGE: ‘69 Flat bed. Strait 6, needs tune up. $285. 683-6597.

98

DODGE: ‘91 Cargo Van. Runs excellent, dependable. $850/ obo. 253-310-2799.

Pickups/Vans

BOX TRUCK: ‘00 GMC. 12’ box, runs great. $10,500/obo. 582-9006 CHEV: ‘00 Silverado. $10,000. 808-1731 or 360-477-7864. CHEV: ‘05 Suburban. Excellent, 1/2 ton. $16,800. 681-5403 CHEV: ‘89 1/2 ton. ‘350’ V8, auto, nice. $2,000. 681-7632.

CHEV: ‘95 S10 Drag Truck. 383 stroker, Brodix Heads built turbo 359 trans. Nod 9 inch, 4 link rear, spindle front end 14x32 slicks. Price reduced. $14,000 360-640-0887 CHEV: ‘95 G-20 cargo van. Ladder rack, new radiator, tires and trans, tow package, clean. $1,900. 460-9178 CHRYSLER ‘08 TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING EDITION One owner and loaded, including 3.8 V6, 6 speed auto, front and rear air and heat, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power heated seats, power sliding side doors and tailgate, leather interior with sto-n-go quad seating, AM/FM CD stacker and MP3 player, hard disk drive controls, rear back-up sensors and camera, dual rear DVD players with headsets, electronic traction and stability control, privacy glass, roof rack, satellite radio ready, premium alloy wheels, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-16-10. $21,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com DODGE ‘06 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, traction control, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, stow-n-go seats, power sliding doors, cruise, tilt, air, rear air, DVD video system, wireless headphones, CD/ cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,485! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 60,000 miles! Loaded! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE ‘10 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, Homelink, overhead console, side airbags, dual power sliding doors, 7 passenger, quad seats, stow and go seating, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, keyless entry, fog lamps, 34,000 miles, balance of factory warranty, non-smoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE: ‘05 Grand Caravan SE. 86K, good condition. Trailer hitch. $7,725. 460-0351 DODGE: ‘86 D350 1 ton stakeside, 7’8”x 12’6” bed, new carb, seats, battery, hitch. 119K, Runs great. $2,300/obo. 360-504-9954

DODGE: ‘95 Grand Caravan SE. 43K with lift and scooter. $5,000. 457-4837 leave message. DODGE: ‘96 Caravan. Great condition, gold color. $2,100. 683-3851

FORD: ‘78 E250 3/4 T Van. 351 V8, new tires. $1,200. 417-9207 FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929.

Classified 99

99

Cars

BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Nice old man must part with his 2nd love! Beautiful blue, exc. condition, spoke wheels, loaded. 30K miles on new motor; 112k total miles. $3,400. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘92 SeVille. Exc. shape, good mpg, new tires. $3,000/obo. 452-5406 CADILLAC: 1951 Coupe DeVille. 46,600 original miles, powerful, great driving car. Nice chrome, paint & upholstery, WW tires, Auto, V8, Sequim, $27,900. 360-683-3385 Rrobert169@Qwest. net CADILLAC: ‘38 LaSalle 91K miles. Calif V8 “Harley Earl” design, needs new restore. $9,500/obo. James 360-460-3467

FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 4 cyl, 5 spd, 87K, sb. $3,400/obo. 683-8328 GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522 GMC: ‘88 Rally. Wheel chair van, needs minor work. $1,500. Scott. 504-2478. GMC: ‘95 Short bed. V6, 1500 Sierra, 5 speed, 130K. $3,500. 452-5427.

CADILLAC: ‘95 Seville. Gray w/67K miles. Loaded. All serviced, must see! $5,500/obo. James at 360-460-3467. CHEV: ‘00 Cavalier. 126K mi., very clean, maroon, 2 tone brown/beige interior. $3,500. 452-8098 or 360-670-9199 CHEV: ‘68 Camaro Z28. 302, 4 speed, stock. $29,999/obo or trade. 683-7965.

GMC: ‘03 3500 Box Van. GMC heavy duty 12 foot box van. 3500 series Savanah. Power windows, AC, power locks, power steering, cloth seats, v-8 power, dual rear wheels, access door to box from cab, 23,000 miles, very clean, wood floor box, roll top lockable rear door, white truck and box, step rear bumper, good tread on all tires, runs great! Drives great! Beautiful truck, just dont need anymore. $12,500. 460-1168. See pictures online at Penninsula Daily News site.

HONDA: ‘05 Odyessy EX-L. 36.300 miles, excellent condition. $24,000. 504-2404.

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN: ‘86 EX cab. 2.4L eng., good mpg, auto w/over drive, power steer., Pioneer stereo, rear jump seats, dark tint, 95,354 orig. mi., good tires/shocks, well taken care of, senior owned, bought locally. Must see to appreciate. $3,800 firm. 461-2709 PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773 PLYMOUTH: ‘94 Voyager. Auto, seats 7, 128K. $800. 460-4693

CHEV: ‘78 Corvette Silver Anniversary Edition. Fully restored interior and exterior. Silver twotone paint with sport striping. L48 automatic. Runs excellent. $18,500. 425-888-4306 or 425-941-4246 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863 CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA ALL WD 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry, alloy wheels, side airbags, privacy glass, only 39,000 miles, very, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHRYSLER: ‘06 300C Hemi, 63K, super clean, every option, silver, leather, must see and drive, sold new for $39,000. $14,900. 582-0696. CHRYSLER: ‘86 LeBaron. 4 cyl eng., auto, new head gasket, front and rear brakes, rear brake cylinders, right front caliper, outer boot. $450. 385-2304. CLASSIC: ‘59 Cadillac model 62, 4 door hard top, red, good shape. $14,000. 360-683-7640 DODGE ‘05 NEON SXT SEDAN 2.0 liter 4 cylinder, auto, after market alloy wheels, power windows, locks, and mirrors, Pioneer CD stereo, air, tilt, cruise, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $7,390! Only 68,000 miles! Extra clean! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

Cars

CHEV: ‘84 Corvette. Silver, 5.7 liter V8. $5,800. 437-7649.

HONDA: ‘89 Civic. Runs/drives great. $700. 797-3767.

DAEWOO: ‘01 Lanos S . 60,780 orig. mi., 2 door hatchback, burgundy/gray, 4 cylinder, auto, 32+mpg, tabs July ‘11, newer tires plus windshield, A/C, heat, radio cassette. $2,700. 681-5326. DODGE: 93 Stealth RT. Great condition, only 2 owners, no accidents, 129K mi., AWD, 5 sp., all power, awesome stereo, CD changer and battery. $3,000. Chris 360-732-4514 FORD ‘07 FOCUS SE 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD/MP3, remote entry and more! Expires 10-16-10. $8,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com FORD: ‘05 Focus ZX4. Auto, 73K, new tires, all power. $8,000/obo. 460-4693 FORD: ’62 Thunderbird Coupe. Mostly all restored, approx. $30,000 put into it. $15,900/obo. 460-0401, 582-9597

MAZDA: ‘99 Miata. Perfect autumn car! Mint condition. 5 spd, Bose audio. 25K original miles. $8,200. 683-0146.

FORD: ‘98 Mustang convertible. 3.8 V6, 73,000 mi., power locks-trunk-left front seat, power top, leather seats, sharp car! $8,500/ obo. 457-6156. FORD: 1929 Model “A”. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403 GEO: ‘93 Storm. Runs great. $2,500/obo. 775-9612 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. Maroon, 4x4, studded tires and rims. Good condition. $2,800. 681-7032. HONDA ‘05 CIVIC LX 4 DOOR One owner with only 61,000 miles, 4 cylinder, 5 speed, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, custom alloy wheels, and more! Expires 10-16-10. $8,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com HONDA: ‘06 Civic. Top 5 best mpg car, red/tan int., auto, CD, sunroof, exc. cond., 38K mi. $15,750. 461-1202. HONDA: ‘05 S2000. Fabulous 2 seater convert., wonderful handling, great mpg, exc cond., 27K mi. $17,500. 461-1202 HONDA: ‘06 Civic. 67,000 mi., 2 door coupe, clean, white with black/ gray interior. $10,000/obo 460-0845

99

Cars

PLYMOUTH: ‘67 Fury Sport coupe 2 door, ‘383’, runs. $1,000/ obo. 417-3579. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $21,500. 461-9635. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 477-4865

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339 MERCEDES: ‘99 230 SLK. 70K, blk/blk, compressor, S/C, HT convert. $11,900. 452-6677 MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436 MERCURY: ‘89 Cougar. Hobby stock race car, fully loaded, seat belts, window net, ready to race. $1,000/obo. 477-9602 MERCURY: ‘91 Capri. Runs good, fair condition, 239K mi., convertible. $995. 360-928-2115

SUBARU: ‘05 STI Black STI with tinted windows and silver BBS wheels. Stock except for headers, down pipe and complete stainless steel exhaust and muffler. Manual boost controller and front and rear alum skid plates. Tuned on a 4 wheel dyno and produced 300 hp and 364 ft/lb torque at the wheels. A fantastic daily driver with 65,000 miles. Adult owned and maintained. $14,900/ obo. Call Tim at 360-912-1467

LINCOLN: ‘87 Towncar Signature Series. Leather interior, power doors, windows, sunroof, low miles, grandpa car, excellent condition. $3,950. 452-9693 eves. MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $12,000/obo 206-375-5204

99

Cars

SUBARU: ‘05 Forester. Mint condition, 30K mi. $16,000. 457-9183 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 24,500 mi., perfect condition, under warranty. $18,250. 452-6014 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS 4 DOOR The flagship of the Toyota fleet, V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and dual power seats, leather interior, power sunroof, front and side airbags, 4 wheel ABS, electronic traction control, alloy wheels, AM/FM CD and cassette, remote entry, and more! Expires 10-16-10. $10,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA: ‘01 Celica GT. Silver, sunroof, auto, spoiler, 136K, excellent condition. $8,000. 732-0689.

101 MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802

SUZUKI: ‘07 Reno. $9,000/obo. Keyless entry alarm system excellent condition & perfectly maintained excellent mpg 7 yr powertrain warranty, AAA service 1 more year. Maureen Osterberg, 360-670-5335.

101

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of Bruce A. Phillips, Deceased. NO. 10-4-00277-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Administrator named below has been appointed as Administrator of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Administrator or the Administrator’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Administrator served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: October 1, 2010 Administrator: Steven Phillips Attorney for Administrator: Simon Barnhart, WSBA #34207 Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 10-4-00277-4 Pub: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 2010

RESOLUTION 78, 2010 CALL FOR HEARING TO CONSIDER AMENDMENTS TO THE “DRAFT TEN YEAR PLAN TO END HOMELESSNESS IN CLALLAM COUNTY” THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows:

HONDA: ‘08 Fit-Sport. Auto, low miles, 35 mpg, A/C, cruise, CD/MP3, side airbags, alloy wheels. $14,495. 683-1044. KIA: ‘02 Sportage. Black, low 66K miles, 5 speed, great cond., great mileage. $4,500. 670-5375. LINCOLN: ‘63 Continental. Partially restored, suicide doors, runs. $2,750. 457-0272

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1. Following a duly noticed hearing on December 13, 2005, the Board of Commissioners took action to adopt the “Draft Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness in Clallam County.” 2. In the years following adoption of the “Plan,” many of the goals established in it were accomplished; an interim “Plan” was adopted by Resolution 21 on February 23, 2010. 3. Additional changes further refine completed projects and set new goals. The proposed changes reformat the “Plan” to improve readability. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact: 1. That a public hearing be held in the Commissioners’ Meeting Room, 223 East 4th Street, Room 160, on October 19 at 10:30 a.m. to hear public testimony on the proposed “Clallam County Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness.” PASSED AND ADOPTED this fifth day of October 2010 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair Stephen P. Tharinger Michael C. Chapman ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Oct. 8, 2010

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘05 Prius Hybrid. Black, new tires, under, 67K mi. $11,085. 928-9527. TOYOTA: ‘10 Prius. As new, save $4,000. $20,000. 452-7273. TOYOTA: ‘93 Celica GT Coupe. Higher mileage but runs great, much new. $2,700. 477-6873.

99

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774. VW: ‘07 Bug convertible. Leather, exc. cond., 16K, all options. $19,500. 460-0462 after 6 p.m. VW: ‘70s Super Beetle. Body has very little rust. $300. 477-2610 VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $3,295/obo. 775-9648

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183.

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

101

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Special Public Meeting NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Clallam County Fire Protection District (FPD) No. 4 Board of Commissioners will hold a special public meeting on 17th day of October, 2010 beginning at 9:00 a.m. at Joyce Fire Hall. The Board of Commissioners will conduct a work session to develop a proposed 2010 budget amendment and draft 2011 budget. Copies of current 2010 budget information will be available prior to the special public meeting by phoning Secretary/Commissioner Mary E. Bower, CMC at 360-928-3132 Marcus “Ben” Pacheco Chairman Clallam County Fire Protection District No. 4 Board Of Commissioners Pub: Oct. 8, 2010

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 0428188866 APN: 043010329050 TS No: WA-249432-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 10/15/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 2 OF EWART SHORT PLAT RECORDED ON MARCH 18, 1977, IN VOLUME 2 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 90, UNDER AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 465265, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM CPIMTU. STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 74 CEDAR BEND LANE SEQUIM, Washington 98382-0000 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/21/2006, recorded 4/26/2006, under; Auditor's File No. 2006-1179152, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from MICHAEL R. MANTLE AND JENNIFER M. MANTLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as = Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK; INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by "MERS" MORTGAGE ' ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION to GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC FKA GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 2/1/2010 THRU 7/9/2010 NO.PMT 6 AMOUNT $1,788.13 TOTAL $10,728.78 ; LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 2/1/2010 THRU 7/9/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 5 TOTAL $410.80 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 4/21/2006 Note Amount: ; $260,000.00! Interest Paid To: 1/1/2010 Next Due Date: 2/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $14,906.23; Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation Secured by the Deed of Trust is: $260,893,41 (note: due to interest, Sate charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $248,356.88, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 2/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 10/15/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 10/4/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/4/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph HE is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 10/4/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME MICHAEL R. MANTLE AND JENNIFER M. MANTLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE MICHAEL R MANTLE AND JENNIFER M MANTLE ADDRESS 74 CEDAR BEND LANE SEQUIM, Washington 98382-0000 74 CEDAR BEND LANE SEQUIM, WA 98382-0000 by both first class and certified mail on 6/7/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described lin Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VSI, The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale, VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the! right to evict i occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. if you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of! this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 7/9/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 K Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Rick Montoya Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3646033 09/17/2010, 10/08/2010 Pub.: Sept. 17, Oct. 8, 2010

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101

Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 7440786986 APN: 063000-030320 TS No: WA-218513-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 11/5/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, ;in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 5 IN BLOCK 303 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES. CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 1220 W. 9TH ST PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/30/2005, recorded 12/6/2005, undfer Auditor's File No. 2005 1170778, in Book , Page records of Ciallam County, Washington, from BRIAN E ZAVODNY AND TRACI L ZAVODNY, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE AND ESCROW, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of HOME123 CORPORATION A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by HOME123 CORPORATION A CORPORATION to U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for RAMP 2006NC2 By: Residential Funding, LLC fka Residential Funding Corporation, Attorney-in-Fact.. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: . PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 11/1/2009 THRU 2/28/2010 NO.PMT 4 AMOUNT $1,502.96 TOTAL $6,011.84 FROM 3/1/2010 THRU 8/3/2010 NO.PMT 6 AMOUNT $1,531.37 TOTAL $9,188.22 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 11 /1 /2009 THRU 2/28/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 4 TOTAL $264.28 FROM 3/1/2010 THRU 8/3/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 5 TOTAL $330.35 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 11/30/2005 Note Amount: $189,000.00 Interest Paid To: 10/1/2009 Next Due Date: 11/1/2009 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $19,988.39. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation, secured by the Deed of Trust is: $203,570.84 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). . The principal sum of $186,253.76, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 11/5/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 10/25/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/25/2010 [Hi days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 10/25/2010 (11 days before the sale date)jand before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME BRIAN E ZAVODNY AND TRACI L ZAVODNY, HUSBAND AND WIFE BRIAN ZAVODNY and TRACI ZAVODNY ADDRESS 1220 W 9TH ST PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 1220 W 9TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98363-5618 by both first class and certified mail on 7/2/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust; including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED W LL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 8/3/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3681052 10/08/2010, 10/29/2010 Pub.: Oct. 8, 29, 2010 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 7441230406 APN; 06-30-17-430120-1000 S 06-30-17-430120- TS No: WA-250499-C 2001 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 11/5/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable!, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY WASHINGTON; EXCEPT RIGHT OF WAY FOR EXISTING PUBLIC ROAD. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 274 ALICE RD PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/3/2006, recorded 3/7/2006, under Auditor's File No. 2006-1176145, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from VICKI R. HAWES, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR PEMM.TEK MORTGAGE SERVICES, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE, FOR PEMM.TEK MORTGAGE SERVICES, LLC to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RAMP 2006RS3 by: Residential Funding Company, LLC, fka Residential Founding Corporation, as its Attorney-in-Fact. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 10/1/2008 THRU 12/31/2009 NO.PMT 15 AMOUNT $2,271.15 TOTAL $34,067.25 FROM 1/1/2010 THRU 8/2/2010 NO.PMT 8 AMOUNT $3,627.27 TOTAL $29,018.16 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 10/1/2008 THRU 12/31/2009 NO. LATE CHARGES 15 TOTAL $1,703.25 FROM 1/1/2010 THRU 8/2/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 7 TOTAL $794.85 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 3/3/2006 Note Amount: $292,000.00 Interest Paid To: 9/1/2008 Next Due Date: 10/1/2008 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $90,073.56. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $360,472.12 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $286,209.42, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 10/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 11/5/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 10/25/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/25/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 10/25/2010 (11 days before the sale date and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME VICKI R. HAWES, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, VICKI R. HAWES ADDRESS 274 ALICE RD PORT ANGELES, Washington 98363 93 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 7/1/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust {the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the trustee's sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 8/2/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St, #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3679088 10/08/2010, 10/29/2010 Pub.: Oct. 8, 29, 2010

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 501287361 APN: 063000-530910 TS No: WA05000002-09-1 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on October 15, 2010 10:00 AM, the main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA. MTC Financial Inc dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashiers' check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 9, PUGET SOUND COOPERATIVE COLONY'S SUBDIVISION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 5, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. which Is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated November 29, 2006, recorded on December 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-1192521 of Official Records In the office of the Recorder of Clallam County, WA from MATTHEW C ALMADEN A MARRIED MAN, AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY, OCCUPANT as Grantor(s) ,to JOAN H. ANDERSON, EVP ON BEHALF OF FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER AND LENDER'S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS FOR FLAGSTAR BANK, F.S.B., as Beneficiary . More commonly known as 1328 CAROLINE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers' or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION From 09/01/2009 To July 7,2010 Number of Payments 11 Monthly payment $_1072.32 Total $11,795.52 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION From 09/01/2009 To July 7,2010 Number of Payments 10 Monthly payment $53.62 Total $536.20 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: November 29, 2006 Note Amount $142,000.00 Interest Paid To: August 1, 2009 Next Due Date: September 1, 2009 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $137,220.15, together with interest as provided in the Note from the September 1, 2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on October 15, 2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by October 4, 2010, {11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before October 4, 2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier" s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the October 4, 2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS 1328 CAROLINE STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 1328 CAROLINE STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail on March 2, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; DATED: July 7, 2010 MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba Trustee Corps Rande Johnsen, PRESIDENT 1700 Seventh Avenue Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Trustee Corps 30 Corporate Park, Suite 400, Irvine, CA 92606 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT WWW.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 ASAP# 3642690 09/17/2010, 10/08/2010 Pub.: Sept. 17, Oct. 8, 2010

NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, October 19, 2010, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for: The improvement of Old Olympic Highway from milepost 2.80 to milepost 3.58 by realigning, regrading and widening the road, installation of hot mix asphalt, guardrails, and other related work.. Complete plans and specifications may be obtained from the office of the Public Works Department, Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Rich Fox (360) 417-2316 or Joe Donisi at (360) 4172404. The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, "BID PROPOSAL – OLD OLYMPIC HIGHWAY- MATSON TO GUNN ROADS CONTRACT CRP C1201". Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners' Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail. Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12.080 and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County. Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award. The attached contract plans, these contract provisions and the Standard Specifications for the above-described project are hereby APPROVED THIS fifth DAY OF October, 2010. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Oct. 8, 11, 15, 2010 NOTICE OF INVITATION FOR BIDS SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners at 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, October 19, 2010, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud for: The grading and surfacing of the Olympic Discovery Trail on the east side of the Elwha Bridge from Crown Z Water Road (M.P. 0.00) to M.P. 1.6 just west of the intersection of the Elwha Valley Road, and other related work. Complete plans and specifications may be obtained from the office of the Public Works Department, Courthouse, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 6, Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015, (360) 417 2319. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Ray Bradford (360) 417-2530 or Joe Donisi at (360) 417-2404. The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, "BID PROPOSAL – OLYMPIC DISCOVERY TRAIL EAST APPROACH CONTRACT CRP C1211". Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 E. 4th St., Ste. 4, Port Angeles, WA 983623015 or hand-deliver to 223 E. 4th St., Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners' Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail. Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12.080 and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County. Clallam County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award. The attached contract plans, these contract provisions and the Standard Specifications for the above-described project are hereby

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

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Legals Clallam Co.

Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the Members of First Federal will be held in the Home Office of the Association located at 105 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles, Washington, in accordance with its Bylaws at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, October 20, 2010, for the purpose of the Managing Officer’s Annual report, the election of directors, and such other business as may properly come before the meeting. First Federal Joyce Ruiz, Senior Vice President Corporate Board Secretary Pub: Oct. 8, 15, 2010

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NO. 10-4-00268-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In Re the Estate of BETTY JEAN RIGGS LOWTHIAN, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statue of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) Four months after the date of the first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: October 1, 2010 Personal Representative: James C. Lowthian Address for Mailing or Service: 753 W. Anderson Road, Sequim, WA 98382 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court 223 East 4th Street, Suite #8, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Cause Number 10-4-00268-5 Pub: Oct 1, 8, 15, 2010

WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE If you filed bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this communication is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an attempt to collect this debt from you personally NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TO:

Occupants of the Premises Jane Doe Rodius John W. Rodius John W. Rodius, dba aka John Wayne Rodius John Wayne Tree Service aka John Rodius United Rentals Northwest, Inc. Gerald S. Zirkle First Federal Savings & Loan Mary Beth Hamblen-Zirkle Association of Port Angeles All Other Interested parties I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on October 15, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the Main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E 4th ST, in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: Exhibit A attached hereto Abbreviated Legal: PCLS B & C: PT SW4 S24 T30N R08WWM(Tax Parcel Numbers: 08-30-24-330175; 08-30-24-330150); PCL D: LT 6 BLK 36 N R SMI SUBD (Tax Parcel No. 06-30-00-513625) (commonly known as undeveloped land at 9999 & 9999 Highway 101, Port Angeles WA 98363; and 9999 Caroline Street, Port Angeles WA 98363), which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust, dated November 24, 2008, recorded November 25, 2008, under Auditor's File No. 2008 1229464, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rodius, as Grantor to secure an obligation in favor of First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Port Angeles, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Monthly Payments: 18 monthly payments at $1,927.29 each 01/24/09 through 06/24/10 Unpaid Accrued Late Charges: 17 late charges of $96.36 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date Additional Default Interest: TOTAL *plus all attorney’s fees and costs and foreclosure fees and costs incurred

$34,691.22

$ 1,638.12 $ .00 $36,329.34

Default other than failure to make monthly payments: Bring current all real property taxes: $1,067.70 Personal Property Relocation charges: $8,330.00 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $259,730.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from December 24, 2009, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 15th day of October, 2010. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 4th day of October, 2010 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the 4th day of October, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4th day of October, 2010, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults VI. A written Amended Notice of Default and notice required by RCW 61.24.042 was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower or Grantor and Guarantors at the following addresses: Occupants of the Premises 9999 & 9999 HWY 101,Port Angeles WA 98363 John W. Rodius 710 Caroline ST,Port Angeles WA 98363 John W. Rodius dba John Wayne Tree Service 710 Caroline ST,Port Angeles WA 98363 Jane Doe Rodius 710 Caroline ST,Port Angeles WA 98363 Occupants of the Premises 9999 Caroline ST,Port Angeles WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on May 13, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on May 14, 2010, with said written Amended Notice of Default notice required by RCW 61.24.042 and/or the Amended Notice of Default notice required by RCW 61.24.042 was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting VII. The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's Sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the unlawful detainer act, chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED: June 24, 2010. RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., Successor Trustee By:/s/ Paul V. Rieke PAUL V. RIEKE, Vice President Rainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 575 S Michigan ST Seattle WA 98108 (206) 275-1010 STATE OF WASHINGTON

) ) ss. COUNTY OF KING ) On this day before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared PAUL V. RIEKE, to me known to be the Vice President of the corporation that executed the foregoing NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE, and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned and on oath stated that he is authorized to execute the said instrument. Given under my hand and official seal on June 24, 2010.

APPROVED THIS fifth DAY OF October, 2010. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Pub: Oct. 8, 18, 2010

D7

/s/ Maureen A. Fitzgerald Maureen A. Fitzgerald Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, residing at: Issaquah My commission expires: 9/27/12 Pub: Sept. 17, Oct. 8, 2010


D8

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2010

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Second Weekend Art Walk | This week’s new movies

Here’s to the Ladies!

Peninsula

Pages 6-7

Eligius Wolodkewitsch

Lee Harwell and Marlette Buchanan star in “Here’s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alley,” a musical revue opening this weekend at the Key City Public Theatre in Port Townsend.

Peninsula Daily News

The week of October 8-14, 2010


2

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Haiku poet slated at Peninsula College Verse serves as uniting element Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — He’s a rock and blues drummer who’s played with Joni Mitchell and John Lee Hooker; a lay monk who studied Zen Buddhism in California and formed his own band, Kingfish. And through this life of artistic pursuits, another

creative thread runs: haiku poetry. Christopher Herold, 62, will give a free haiku reading at 12:35 p.m. Tuesday in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Top priority He quit the music business when he became a father 30 years ago and moved to Port Townsend in 1998. “Family is definitely my top priority,” Herold says. He and his wife raised

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their daughter in Port Townsend; grown now, she still lives there. Herold’s first book of haiku, In Other Words, was published in 1980, followed by Coincidence in 1987 and Voices of Stone in 1995. In 2000, his book A Path in the Garden won a Haiku Society of America Merit Book Award. That same year, he won a manuscript contest put on by Britain’s Snapshot Press, which subsequently published the collection as In the Margins of the Sea. Herold’s newest collection of haiku, Inside Out, has just been released. Among many other awards, Herold has won the Museum of Haiku Literature Award twice. Cor van den Heuvel, editor of The Haiku Anthology, calls him

Rock drummer-turnedhaiku poet Christopher Herold gives a free lunchtime reading of his work in Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, on Tuesday at 12:35 p.m.

haiku in schools and in adult workshop settings. Herold was on the organizing committee of the first Haiku North America Conference in 1991 and co-

one of the pillars of the development of haiku creativity in North America. His work has been translated into at least 11 languages, and he has taught

organized the 2005 event when it took place in Port Townsend. In 1999, Herold cofounded an international journal of English language haiku, The Heron’s Nest. Details about Herold’s books can be had by e-mailing theheronsnest@ q.com. For more information about Tuesday’s reading, phone Peninsula College at 360-452-9277.

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-417-3550 weekdays.

at

Kelbi’s

Standup comic Ron Osborne appears tonight at Kelbi’s Comedy Stop, 10115 Old Olympic Highway in Sequim. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door; show time is 8 p.m. For details, phone Kelbi’s at 360-681-7625.


Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Workshops, demos set for Second Weekend art walk Diana Miller’s paintings are on display at the Waterfront Gallery in Port Angeles.

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — “A Tell Tale Heart,” a photography workshop and trips to Hawaii and Papua New Guinea are on the art-walk agenda tonight and Saturday in downtown Port Angeles. Here’s the Second Weekend lineup of events, which are free unless otherwise noted: ■  Ernst-Ulrich Schafer and nine other photographers fill Studio Bob, upstairs at 118½ E. Front St., with the second annual “Photo PA 2010” exhibition. The opening party is today from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and the show stays open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. The diverse mix of images include a few by the late surfing photographer Ron Church. ■  A photography workshop open to all levels will be taught by Schafer from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday; cost is $25, and the starting point is Studio Bob. Participants can pay at the door or phone 360-808-

3

coln Street and Railroad Avenue with a reception today from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  The Center for Community Design, suite 213 inside The Landing mall at Lincoln Street and Railroad Avenue, will share information from its sustainabilityfocused field trip to the Big Island of Hawaii in September. It also will present “Walking Through History — Time and Time Again,” a program of historical photos of downtown Port Angeles and the waterfront, from the Clallam County Histori6058 for details. filling the rest of the night; cal Society. KONP-AM’s ■  Art Rock takes over the cover charge is $3. Sandy Keys will narrate Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., ■  Linda Crow’s recent the show from 6:30 p.m. to journey to Papua New at 8:30 p.m. today, as Port 7:30 p.m. today, while the Angeles artist Sarah Tucker Guinea is documented in shows her original movie, “A her photographs on display center will be open to visitors from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m. at Karon’s Frame Center, Tell Tale Heart,” based on ■  The Art Front Gal625 E. Front St. An openEdgar Allan Poe’s story lery, 118 E. Front St., feawhile DJ Shmeejay provides ing reception runs from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. today. tures automatism — a the soundtrack and live ■  Painter Hazelle Hout technique in which the artmusic mixing. Screenings ist bypasses the influences premieres her work at the are slated for 8:30 p.m., 10 of conscious thought — in p.m. and 11 p.m., with dance Landings Gallery inside paintings by Jim Ramsey music and projected images The Landing mall at Lin-

Linda Crow

A new exhibition of photographs from Linda Crow’s trip to Papua New Guinea opens today at Karon’s Frame Center. of Port Angeles. An opening reception is set for 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. today. ■  The Waterfront Art Gallery, 120 W. First St., presents watercolors and other works by Diana Miller plus music by Howly Slim and Connie Goddard from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. today.

Upcoming Shows!

Good Luck Alyssa! Allysa Polly will be competing in the Miss Washington Teen USA Pageant, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9th & 10th at the Performing Arts Center in Burien.

Downtown Trick or Treat Saturday, Oct. 30th 2-5 pm FREE Photos Zombie Crawl Haunted Houses & Parties

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■  Randy Foster of Randolf Frederick Co. invites the public to join him for demonstrations of silversmithing and lapidary from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at the Art Front, 118 E. Front St. Foster also has jewelry on display at the gallery.


4

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Pick your dance or do both Provocative

lecture series returns to PT

Venues to swing partner in PA, PT this weekend By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Spotlight

This weekend presents a choice of dance styles on the North Olympic Peninsula — but then again, you don’t have to choose if you don’t mind a bit of driving. On Saturday night at the Black Diamond Hall, 1942 Black Diamond Road, this month’s community contra dance stars a pair of Seattle’s best, according to organizer Bob Boardman.

“The heavy syncopation and driving rhythms,” Boardman said, “make for magic on the dance floor.” Dance-caller Mates “likes nothing better than to have a frenzy of dancers in front of him and a fine band behind. He’s known for great dances, clear delivery and a fine sense of humor,” added Boardman.

Workshop set

Anybody can come and learn the contra and line dances that will fill up Saturday evening. A beginners’ First PA appearance workshop starts at 7:30 p.m.; “Devon Leger and Tony after a half-hour of practice, Mates have had dancers on the dance gets moving. their toes for years, and Singles, couples, whole this is their first Port Ange- families and people with no les appearance,” Boardman dancing experience are all noted. encouraged to join. Leger, a fiddler, plays Admission is a donation the music of French Canat the door, and more inforada, from Montreal to the mation is available by Gaspe Peninsula. phoning 360-457-8359.

T S E A OF T A

Peninsula Spotlight

Devon Leger plays music of French Canada on Saturday at the Black Diamond Hall. The monthly contra dance starts with a beginners’ workshop at 7:30 p.m. This Sunday evening — and every second Sunday of the month — is salsa night at The Upstage Theatre and Restaurant, 923 Washington St., just off Water Street in Port Townsend. And just like the contra dance, participants needn’t be experts. Alan Andree and Jean Betanny will

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teach an intermediate salsa lesson from 5:30 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. on the Upstage dance floor. Then comes the beginning salsa class, covering basic steps and rhythms, at 6:15 p.m., and an open dance from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. “Come for one or both lessons and dance,” urged orchestrator Hiroko Dennis. “Everyone [is] welcome,” and admission is $5 for the entire evening. For more information about salsa night, phone 360-385-6919.

PORT TOWNSEND — The School of Athens Port Townsend Extension, an autumn-intospring lecture series established in 2004 by local residents hungry for provocative speakers, resumes this Sunday at the Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St. The monthly lectures run through April, on topics ranging from religion to classic literature to natural disasters. Each starts at 1 p.m. on the second Sunday of the month. Tickets are $12 per lecture or $60 for the series and may be purchased at the door on the day of the talk or in advance at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. Details await at www. athens-pt.org. The series includes: ■  Sunday: David Barash, author of Madame Bovary’s Ovaries: A Darwinian Look at Literature and The

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Three Rs: Retaliation, Revenge and Redirected Aggression. ■  Nov. 14: Mark Lilla, best known for his books The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics and The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics and the Modern West. ■  Jan. 9: Anu Taranath, a professor of English and comparative history of ideas at the University of Washington who uses literature from around the world to spark conversations about current issues. ■  Feb. 13: Donald Hyndman, a scholar of natural hazards and disasters and their effects on people and co-author of Northwest Exposures, the Geological Evolution of the Pacific Northwest. ■  March 13: Lorraine McConaghy, the historian at Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry and author of Warship Under Sail: USS Decatur in the Pacific Squadron, an exploration of life aboard an overcrowded man-of-war. ■  April 10: Emily Doolittle, a composer and researcher who has discovered human music’s relationship to birdsong and other animal songs.

Thursdays in

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

5

Feast for the ears at annual crab festival Music slated throughout weekend

Howly Slim will play under the circus tent on City Pier on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. during the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival.

Peninsula Spotlight

PORT ANGELES — City Pier will vibrate with Gypsy jazz, country blues, Latin rhythms and a band called Watch the Sky! this weekend during the sensory feast known as the Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival. All of the live music is free, under the circus tent outside the Red Lion Hotel at the north end of Lincoln Street alongside the pier. The festival itself is open from 4 p.m. till 8:30 p.m. today, 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The main-stage schedule is:

Today ■  5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.:

Tanga plays contemporary and Latin jazz

Saturday ■  11 a.m. to noon: String Theory plays stringband tunes ■  12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.: Elwha Klallam Dance Group ■  1:30 p.m. to 2:30: Pearl Django of Seattle plays hot-club-style and

Gypsy jazz ■  2:45 p.m. to 3:45: Armstrong Lawton Katz, featuring Cort Armstrong, plays country blues ■  4 p.m. to 5 p.m.: Pearl Django reappears ■  5 p.m. to 6:15: Crescent Blue and the Finleys play bluegrass ■  6:30 p.m. to 8:30:

Lonely No More

Deadwood Revival dishes out old-time Appalachian and other American roots music ■  Also at 8 p.m.: Prun’d, a subset of the rock’n’roll band SuperTrees, plays Kokopelli’s Underground, 203 East Front St.; Steve Koehler, Paul Stehr-Green, and Declan Westcott offer their interpretations of rock classics for a cover charge of $3.

Sunday ■  11 a.m. to noon: The Alternators offer accordionand fiddle-driven swing ■  12:15 p.m. to 1:15: Cort Armstrong and Jangle Bones play country blues ■  1:30 p.m. to 2:30: Howly Slim and da Boyz offer country-flavored folk and rock. ■  2:45 p.m. to 3:45:

Watch the Sky!, a Seattle folk band, play Celtic-influenced traditional, contemporary, and original ballads and pub songs ■  4 p.m. to 5 p.m.: Kevin Magner & Bound to Happen close the festival with classic rock For information about all things crabfest, visit www.crabfestival.org or phone 360-452-6300.

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Third play of The Smoke on The mounTain Trilogy


6

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Feminine

Peninsula Spotlight

h s i r flou

‘Here’s to the Ladies!’ opens tonight at Key City Playhouse

Eligius Wol

odkewit

sch

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Sequim actor Lee Harwell and Marlette Buchanan, a Seattle-area singer, star in “Here’s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alley,” at the Key City Playhouse.

Together, they cook up a repast of 29 songs written by Tin Pan AlleyPeninsula Spotlight era women. Listen to just a few sung by Buchanan: “God Bless the PORT TOWNSEND — Child,” “Fine and Mellow,” “I Can’t Baby, I’m cookin’ with Give You Anything but Love” and gas. “Can This Be Love?” Oh, I’m a gumdrop, Nollette glides in to sing “No A sweet lollipop, Other One,” “If You Hadn’t but You A brook trout right Did” and “What a Difference a Day out of the brook, Makes” plus duets and medleys — And what’s more, all from the women who shared Tin baby, I can cook! Pan Alley with men such as George So goes “I Can Cook Gershwin, Cole Porter and Irving Too,” one of the Betty Berlin. Comden-Adolph Green These composers and lyricists songs in “Here’s to the include Tot Seymour, Betty Comden, Ladies! The Women of Kay Swift and Dorothy Fields — Tin Pan Alley,” a club- see, those names aren’t as known as style musical revue the guys’ — who worked through opening tonight at the 1930s and ’40s, imbuing the the Key City Playgreat American songbook with femihouse, 419 Washing- nine flourishes. ton St. This is no run-ofthe-mill community Only once before theater production. “Ladies!” has been performed just “Ladies!” brings once before, at the Theater Alliance together formidable in Washington, D.C., with Schmoll ones: Linda in the cast and Dowdell as musical Dowdell, a New arranger. The two met in Chicago in York musical the fall of 2001, when they worked arranger who together on “Gauguin!” a musical moved to Sequim; about artist Paul Gauguin, but Joanne Schmoll, a seven years passed before they Washington, D.C., reconnected. singer who worked with Dowdell Out of the blue in summer 2008, to create the show; Seattle singer Schmoll called Dowdell to ask if she Marlette Buchanan; and Port wanted to collaborate on a project. Townsend actress Heather Dudley “It’s kind of wacky,” Dowdell said. Nollette. “She called me from Washington,

D.C., when just put an Sequim . . that wher Townsend So exac October Sa Silverwate away from As they revue, Sch they want women, D named Mi the story o side. And Do wanted to


Peninsula Spotlight

n my husband and I had n offer on a house in . . somehow it became clear re we should meet was Port d.” ctly two years ago, on an Saturday, they met at the er, a restaurant steps m the Haller Fountain. y plotted the musical hmoll and Dowdell agreed ted to keep it simple: two Dot and Dorie, and a man ister would sing and tell of Tin Pan Alley’s feminine

owdell knew where she o stage it: the Key City

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

7

Heather Dudley Nollette sings “What a Difference a Day Makes” and many other songs in “Here’s to the Ladies!” at Port Townsend’s Key City Playhouse. between being sort of the antagonist, the good old boy of the era, and at times I’m the inferred love interest,” depending on the song. Harwell gushes a bit about other elements of the revue, such as the medleys, which he predicts will be show-stealers, and the theater’s intimate atmosphere. And “the music is absolutely gorgeous,” he added. Dowdell, for her part, sings Harwell’s praises. “I had seen Lee in ‘Cabaret,’” in February at Olympic Theatre Arts in Sequim, she recalled. “He is a song and dance man; he’s been terrific.” While scouting in Seattle, Dowdell spotted Buchanan, who “chose to do this over something else, which I am so grateful for. And Heather [Nollette] is lovely. I’ve had a ball. “Marlette and Heather are kind of like night and day,” she added. “Marlette has a rich, deep voice; Heather has a bell-like quality . . . I love the blend.”

has Dorie and Dot writing the music as they go along, each slipping a foot in the door of the maledominated industry. “We get to interact with the audience,” added Buchanan, though she grew coy when asked to elaborate. Theater-goers can find out what she meant at 8 p.m. today or Saturday or at 2:30 p.m. or 7 p.m. Sunday. The show continues through Oct. 24, with performances at 8 p.m. Fridays and Sat-

urdays and at 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. next Sunday, Oct. 17. The final performance is at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 24. A pay-what-you-wish performance is slated for 2:30 p.m. this Sunday; otherwise general admission is $18 on Fridays and Saturdays, $15 on Sundays and $10 for students at all performances. Tickets are on sale at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., in downtown Port Townsend and online at www.keycitypublictheatre.org. More details are also available by phoning 360-385-7396.

Playhouse transformation

Eligius Wolodkewitsch

Public Theatre, where artistic director Denise Winter had impressed her in recent productions. Winter and Dowdell cast “Ladies!” together, and Dowdell said she couldn’t be more delighted with the results. Nollette plays Dorie, and Buchanan plays Dot. Dowdell plays piano, and Kia Armstrong, another Sequim resident, plays the upright bass. Lee Harwell — Sequim again — has the role of Mister. So how is it being the man among “Ladies!”? “It’s tough,” Harwell said. Seriously: “It’s absolutely wonderful . . . I go back and forth

Winter, meanwhile, has turned the Key City Playhouse into an art deco cabaret, with table and bar seating sprinkled amid the traditional theater seats. Patrons will be able to enjoy snacks during the show, along with the spicy songs. For Dowdell, a favorite moment comes when all three singers take “Diga Diga Doo” and “Doin’ the New Low Down,” two cowritten by Dorothy Fields, for a romp. The pairing “has kind of a Charleston feel; it’s just really fun and lively,” she said. Buchanan calls variety the spice. “I’m singing everything from blues to traditional musical theater to jazz,” she said. “The only things not in here are hard rock and rap.” And there’s some dancing and some story woven through, said Nollette. “Ladies!”

Bassist Kia Armstrong, left, and pianist Linda Dowdell will provide the accompaniment in “Here’s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alley.”

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

Dance performance, poetry readings set at Northwind p.m. Admission is free to the public. PORT TOWNSEND — The dance will contain Port Townsend dancers elements of butoh, the mysNala Walla and Maureen terious, Japanese-born “Momo” Freehill are pairmovement form. Afterward, ing up this Sunday for an the audience is encouraged unusual performance at the Northwind Arts Center, to stay for an informal discussion of the dance and of 2409 Jefferson St. Inspired by the center’s the “Transforming Gesture” art, which includes visual art exhibit titled paintings and jewelry by “Transforming Gesture,” Walla and Freehill will give Tacoma Metal Arts Center owner Amy Reeves, Seata 20-minute performance tleite Karen Kosoglad on the themes of art, nature and fertility at 2 and Andrea Lawson Peninsula Spotlight

of Port Townsend. Another Northwind event comes on Thursday evening as Michael Spence, a veteran Seattle bus driver, and English literature scholar Judith Skillman share their writing. Admission is free to hear the two poets at 7 p.m. Skillman has authored 12 books, including this year’s The Never on Dream Horse Press. She’s also written for many poetry journals and teaches for

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the Richard Hugo House in Seattle. Spence, who served in the Navy on the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy, has driven public transit buses in the Emerald City for more than 25 years. He received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in 1990 and has published poems in The New Republic, The American Scholar and other journals. Spence’s books include The Spine and Adam Chooses. While all Northwind poetry readings are free, donations help the center continue to host such events. For more information about readings, phone Bill Mawhinney at 360437-9081.

Maureen Freehill will give a short Butohesque dance performance on the themes of art, nature and fertility at the Northwind Arts Center this Sunday. Joining her will be fellow Port Townsend dancer Nala Walla.

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Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

PS Calendar: Port Angeles

PS â&#x20AC;&#x2030;Calendar: PT

Friday

Friday

Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; City Pier, The Gateway and Red Lion Hotel, 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. today; 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Free.

Port Townsend Library website demo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Learn about expanded services available. Library lobby, 1220 Lawrence St., 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-344-3068. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to the Ladies! The Women of Tin Pan Alleyâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Key City Public Theatre at Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m., $18; Sunday, 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. $15. Students $10 all shows. Advance tickets online or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St., Pay-what-youwish performance Sunday, 2:30 p.m. For details, phone 360-385-7396 or visit www. keycitypublictheatre.org.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safe Harbor.â&#x20AC;? 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. Free. Phone 360-4573532 or visit www.PAFAC.org. Global Lens Film Series â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mexican film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Becloud.â&#x20AC;? Little Theater, Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7 p.m., $5. Students free. English subtitles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m., Sunday. Tickets $12 general or $6 for students. Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., www.shop.nwperforming arts.com or at the door.

Saturday Silversmithing and lapidary demonstrations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Artist Randolf Foster. Art Front Gallery, 118 E. Front St., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free and open to the public. Phone Foster at

Saturday Friends of Port Townsend Library used book sale â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Books, CDs and DVDs. Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Phone

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Becloud,â&#x20AC;? a parable of modern Mexico, is the Global Lens Series film screening today at 7 p.m. in the Little Theater at Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Admission is $5, or free for students with identification. 360-582-7948.

Thursday

International Forest Storytelling Festival. Little Theatre, Peninsula

Friday Sequim Museum & Arts Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Daily Fiber: Conspicuous Consumption, Community and Ceremony.â&#x20AC;? 175 W. Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Free. Phone 360-683-8110 or visit www.MACSequim.org.

Saturday Washington Old-Time Fiddlers concert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. All playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; jam 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; performance 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. Donations support fiddle-lesson scholarships. Phone Hershel Lester at 360-417-6950 or e-mail handrlester@olypen. com.

360-379-1061.Benefits Port Townsend Library. 2010 Global Lens film series â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ocean of an Old Man,â&#x20AC;? a 2008 release from India. Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St. 10 a.m. Admission $5. Phone 360-379-1333. Second Saturday Community Dance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Local caller Jo Yount will guide contras, mixers and a square dance or two. New England-style tunes provided by the Contradictions. Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St. Workshop, 7:30 p.m. Dance, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., $6 adults and $3 18 and younger. Visit www.pt communitydance.blogspot.com.

Thursday Author reading â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jamie Ford reads from best-selling book The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. Port Townsend Library, 1220 Lawrence St., 7 p.m. Free. For more information, phone 360-385-3181.

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

PS    Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles and Joyce

Jazz singer Jenny Davis performs with her quartet at The Upstage in Port Townsend this Thursday night. The music starts at 7:30 p.m. and the cover charge is $7.

Bar N9NE (229 W. First St.) — Open mic Thursday, 9 p.m. Bushwhacker Restaurant (1527 E. First St.) — Charlie Ferris (Memories and Melodies show), Monday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Sundowners, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Coo Coo Nest (1017 E. First St.) — Craig Logue hosts the open mic and plays tunes, Wednesdays, from 8 p.m. Cracked Bean (108 Del Guzzi Dr.) — Open mic with hosts Larry and Rene Bauer, Thursday, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. Highway 101) — Acoustic jam hosted by Victor Reventlow, Tuesday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Kokopelli (203 E. Front St.) — Prun’d (rock and roll), Saturday, from 8 p.m., $3; Howly Slim with George Radebaugh on accordion, Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; Howly Slim (vocals and guitar), Thursday, 6 p.m.

The Junction Roadhouse (US Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Jam session hosted by Barry BurPort Angeles Senior Cennett, Sunday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.; ter (Seventh and Peabody Jason Mogi (multi-instrumenstreets) — Wally and the Boys talist), Wednesday,

Come Celebrate With Us! Olympic Stationers invites you to attend the grand opening of Living It Up! Our upstairs has been completely redone into a beautiful showroom. Please join us for an evening of fun, refreshments and fabulous prizes!

Draw Band (variety of music types with guest, Naki’i, Hawaiian music), Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Veela Cafe (133 E. First St.) — Jim Lind (rock and country), tonight, 7:30 p.m. Wine on the Waterfront (115 E. Railroad Ave.) — Sarah Shea and her band (jazz), tonight, 8 p.m., $5; Rose Laughlin (Celtic folk) Saturday, 8 p.m., $5.

Sequim and Blyn Alder Wood Bistro (139 W. Alder St.) — Howly Slim (vocals and guitar), Tuesday, 5 p.m. The Buzz (128 N. Sequim Ave. ) — Open mic hosted by Kelly Thomas, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Cedars at Dungeness (1965 Woodcock Road) — Jimmy Hoffman (country rock), tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

(ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first timers free. RBar (132 E. Front St.) — Big Fine Daddies (rock), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Cover. Salt Creek Inn (state Route 112 and Camp Hayden Road, Joyce) — Dirty Joe hosts open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Smuggler’s Landing Restaurant and Lounge (115 Railroad Ave.) — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the

Las Palomas (1085 E. Washington St.) — Howly Slim (vocals and guitar), Saturday, 5 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Gil Yslas and Rick May, tonight, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Cat’s Meow (vocals with piano, drums and sax), Monday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Final Approach (boomer music), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30

p.m.; Chantilly Lace (open mic jam), Thursday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. 7 Cedars Casino (270756 Highway 101) — The Move (“New Jack City” with hip-hop and rap), tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Bizzle, Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Jimmy Hoffman Band (country rock and blues), Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Comedy Night with Jake Sharm and Mike Pace, Wednesday, 8:30 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Hadlock Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) — Jim Nyby (piano harmonica and vocals with blues, ballads, jazz and soul), Sunday, 5:30 p.m.; Jess (piano), Tuesday, 6 p.m.; Buzz Rogowski (jazz and originals on the piano), Thursday, 6 p.m. Hadlock House (141 Chimacum Road) — Mastermind Productions Karaoke with DJ B-Man, tonight and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Inn at Port Hadlock (310 Hadlock Bay Road) — Open mic hosted by Dave Sheehan, Thursday, 7 p.m.

Port Townsend Banana Leaf (609 Washington St.) — Howly Slim (vocal and guitar), tonight, 5 p.m.

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — Orion Walsh (singer/songwriter), tonight, 8 p.m.; Enso (electronica trio), Saturday, 8 p.m.; open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue. Castle Key Restaurant and Lounge (Seventh and Sheridan streets) — Pearl Djago, Saturday, 7 p.m., $15. Sirens (823 Water St.) — Ambulance, Sunday, 9 p.m., $5. Undertown (211 Taylor St.) — Pete Lack, tonight, 7 p.m.; George Rezendes and the Toolshed Trio (American roots, rock and country blues), Saturday, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Upstage (923 Washington St.) — Kolvane Blues Band, tonight, 8 p.m., $10; Dragstrip Riot (rock’n’roll), Saturday, 8:30 p.m., $5; open mic, Monday, 6 p.m.; Pete Herzog (roots and blues), Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., $6; The Jenny Davis Quartet (jazz), Thursday, 7:30 p.m., $6. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Open mic hosted by Greg Vinson, Tuesday, 8 p.m. This listing, which appears every Friday, announces live entertainment at Clallam and Jefferson counties night spots. Phone your information by Tuesday to 360-417-3527, fax it to 360-4173521, or e-mail news@peninsuladaily

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Peninsula Spotlight


Peninsula Spotlight

Peninsula Daily News

PS At the Movies: Week of October 8-14 Port Angeles

“Easy A” (PG-13) — A clean-cut high school student (Emma Stone) relies on the school’s rumor mill to advance her social and financial standing. With Penn Badgley and Amanda Bynes. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5 p.m. daily, plus 7 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:05 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Legend of the Guardians” (PG) — In this animated adventure-fantasy, an owlet must find a mythic band of winged warriors. The film is based on the first three books in the series Guardians of Ga’Hoole by Kathryn Lasky. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 12:50 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Where to find the cinemas ■  Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360452-7176. ■  Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■  The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■  Uptown Theater: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883.

________ Motion Picture Association of America rating definitions G — General audiences. All ages admitted. PG — Parental guidance suggested; some material may not be suitable for children. PG-13 — Special parental guidance strongly suggested for children younger than 13. R — Restricted. Younger than 17 requires parent. NC-17 — Adults only. NR — Not rated by MPAA.

“Life as We Know It” (PG13) — Two single adults become caregivers to an orphaned girl when their mutual best friends die in an accident. Starring Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:10 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 12:50 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“Secretariat” (PG) — The story from Walt Disney Studios of the 1973 Triple Crown winner. Stars Diane Lane as the owner and John Malkovich as the trainer. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:50 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:30 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

his computer and heatedly begins working on a new idea: In a fury of blogging and programming, what begins in his dorm room soon becomes Facebook, a global social network and a revolution in communication. Six years and 500 million friends later, he is the

youngest billionaire in history. But for this entrepreneur, success leads to both personal and legal complications. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:55 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. daily, plus 9:35 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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“The Town” (R) — Doug MacRay (Ben Affleck) is an unrepentant criminal, the de facto leader of a group of ruthless bank robbers who pride themselves in stealing what they want and getting out clean. With no real attachments, Doug never has to fear losing anyone close to him. But that all changes after the gang’s latest job with a hostage, bank manager Claire Keesey (Rebecca Hall). At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 9 p.m. today and Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday through Thursday.

the girl who bullied her in high school, she sets out to expose the fiancee’s true colors. Starring Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis and Sigourney Weaver. With Betty White and Victor Garber. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:10 p.m. daily, plus 9:15 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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“Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theater. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today, 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

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“The Social Network” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4:30 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily.

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“Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” (PG-13) — As the global economy teeters on the brink of disaster, a young Wall Street trader (Shia LaBeouf) partners with disgraced former Wall Street corporate raider (Michael Douglas, reprising his 1987 Oscar-winning role) on a two-tiered mission: To alert the financial community to the coming doom, and to find out who was responsible for the death of the young trader’s mentor. Directed by Oliver Stone. Also staring Josh Brolin and Carey Mulligan. With Susan Sarandon and Frank Langella. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 4:50 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 9:45 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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“My Soul To Take” (R) — In this horror/thriller, a serial killer stalks seven children. Stars Max Thierot, John Magaro and Denzel Whitaker. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 5:05 p.m. and 7:05 p.m. daily, plus 9:05 p.m. today and Saturday, plus 1:05 p.m. and 3:05 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, October 8, 2010

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12

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, October 8, 2010

Peninsula Spotlight

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SALE PRICE

SIZE

225/55VR-16 186.02 215/55VR-17 197.80 225/55HR-17 201.47 225/55VR-17 201.64 235/55HR-17 184.08 235/55TR-17 183.56 215/55TR-18 187.66 225/55TR-18 193.99 235/55VR-18 216.76 215/50VR-16 160.87 225/50VR-16 182.55 205/50VR-17XL193.82 215/50VR-17XL 182.49 225/50VR-17 210.35 225/50ZR-17 223.35

SUPERMARKET

SIZE 155/80TR-13 P155/80TR-13 165/80TR-13 P165/80SR-13 P225/75SR-15 175/70TR-13D P175/70TR-13 P185/70HR-13 185/70TR-13D 175/70TR-14 185/70TR-14

moneY back guarantee

235/50VR-17 222.67 245/50VR-17 255.62 225/50TR-18 240.01 235/50VR-18 270.55 245/50VR-18 184.08 225/45VR-17 202.43 235/45ZR-17 207.63 245/45VR-17 227.29 255/45VR-17 147.07 235/45VR-18 249.47 245/45VR-18 252.08 255/45VR-18 250.77 235/40ZR-18XL 207.63 245/40VR-18 256.27 275/35VR-18 294.54

longer tread life

smooth quiet ride Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

“Silent Wall” technology diSturbS air floW for a quieter ride!

sxt m/t

ecliPse

70,000 mile warrantY SALE PRICE

P155/80SR-13 62.94 P165/80SR-13 65.82 P185/75SR-14 84.46 P195/75SR-14 89.44 P205/75SR-14 95.44 P205/75SR-15 96.08 P215/75SR-14 94.59 P215/75SR-15 98.64 P225/75SR-15 107.30 P235/75SR-15 107.97 P175/70SR-13 71.98 P185/70SR-13 77.73

SIZE

This is the newest generation in the SXT lineup. It has rugged open lugs for great off road performance.

SIZE 195/70TR-14 P175/70TR-13 P185/70HR-13 P175/70HR-14 P185/70HR-14 P195/70HR-14 205/70TR-15 195/55VR-15 205/55VR-15 205/55VR-16 225/55VR-16

2527 e. HIgHWAY 101

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT245/75R-16/10 E 244.03 LT265/75R-16/10 E 275.05 LT235/85R-16/10 E 233.32 LT235/80R-17/10 E 292.49 LT245/70R-17/10 E 303.24 LT265/70R-17/6 C 266.72 LT265/70R-17/10 E 295.56

SIZE

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

SUPERMARKET

P195/65TR-15 103.94 P205/65TR-15 110.22 P215/65TR-15 111.47 P205/65TR-16 116.05 P215/65TR-16 125.91 235/65TR-16 129.64 P185/60HR-14 97.04 195/60HR-14 98.31 P185/60TR-15 98.21 P195/60TR-15 99.14 P205/60TR-15 108.44 P215/60HR-15 125.07

Hours

8 A.m.-6 P.m. mon.-FrI. 8 A.m. - 5 P.m. sAt.

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE LT315/75R-16/8 D 298.92 LT225/75R-16/10 E 215.79 LT245/75R-16/10 E 227.51 30/950R-15/6 C 199.27 31/1050R-15/6 C 197.62 33/1250R-15/6 C 245.30 33/1250R-17/8 D 283.12

ON SALE!

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS SHOCK INSTALLATION EXTRA

batteries

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • TRAINED PROFESSIONALS • LATEST IN TESTING EQUIPMENT

rv deeP cYcle

xhd - 24 MONTH FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTy - SUPERIOR VIBRATION RESISTANCE - ENGINEERED FOR EXTENDED LIFE

· 12 MONTH FREE REPLACEMENT WARRANTy · 36 MONTH PRO-RATED WARRANTy · 95 TO 220 AMP HOURS

quiet ride SALE PRICE

SIZE

SALE PRICE

P205/60TR-16 116.80 P215/60TR-16 121.58 P225/60TR-16 125.01 P235/60TR-16 151.80 P215/60TR-17 143.75 P225/60TR-17 146.74 205/55HR-16 134.27 P205/55TR-16 130.38 P225/55TR-16 150.15 P225/55TR-17 169.09 205/50HR-15 99.21 P215/50TR-17 159.73

excellent handling

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE 245/70SR-17 216.44 LT305/70R-16/8 D 306.49 LT275/70R-18/10 E 363.08 LT235/75R-15/6 C 191.36 LT265/75R-16/6 C 228.94 LT265/75R-16/10 E 256.29 LT285/75R-16/8 D 266.86

PRICE 58.94 46.39 49.46 57.30 53.27 58.93 63.98 72.30 81.01 84.25 89.83

ALSO, SELECT PASSENGER CAR SHOCKS AND STRUTS...

SUPERMARKET

SIZE & LOAD RANGE PRICE 35/1250R-17/8 D 344.65 LT255/85R-16/8 D 256.87 LT215/85R-16/10 E 212.69 LT235/85R-16/10 E 219.54

sequIm 360-683-7261 802 e. WAsHIngton

whY les schwab brakes? There are many important parts that wear out in your brake system. This PROFESSIONALLy TRAINED TECHNICIANS is why we don’t just replace your brake pads and shoes. BEST BRAKE It’s also why we WARRANTy can stand behind our brake service with the best brake PREMIUM warranty. QUALITY PARTS

OVER 25 yEARS EXPERIENCE

(Free Replacement 25,000 Miles – Parts & Labor)

BRAKE SYMPTOMS TO WATCH FOR: Do your brakes grab? Do your brakes squeal when you step on the pedal? Does your vehicle pull when you apply the brakes? Do you hear a grinding noise when you step on the brakes? Is your brake pedal spongy or maybe too hard?

les schwab brake service includes: DISC BRAKE SERVICE

DRUM BRAKE SERVICE

CALIPER ASSEMBLY

Boot Piston Seal ea WE REPLACE WE REPLACE Sleeve & Bushings

WE REPLACE Bleeder Screw Caliper p Housing

WE REPLACE Outer/Inner Pad & Plates

We reSurface braKe rotorS

WE REPLACE Primary y Shoe Return Spring

BRAKE ASSEMBLY

WE REPLACE Primary Shoe WE REPLACE Shoe Hold-Down Parts WE REPLACE Adjuster j Lever Spring

WE REPLACE Secondary Shoe Return Spring WE REPLACE Wheel Cylinder y Assembly

WE REPLACE Secondary y Shoe

We reSurface braKe druMS

Port toWnsend 360-385-0124 2355 sIms WAY

095095276

Port Angeles

452-7691

SUPERMARKET

outlined white letters

SUPERMARKET

Free

SALE PRICE

P175/70TR-14 75.99 P185/70SR-14 81.84 P195/70SR-14 86.51 P205/70SR-14 92.52 P215/70SR-14 106.60 P205/70SR-15 99.19 P215/70SR-15 101.11 P225/70SR-15 106.74 P175/65TR-14 93.17 185/65HR-14 105.06 P195/65TR-14 101.93 185/65HR-15 105.50

aggressive tread design

Mounting • AiR CHECKS • RotAtionS RoAd HAzARd • FlAt REpAiR

PRICE 29.16 30.78 36.79 34.95 73.01 46.38 46.39 49.46 49.46 57.31 53.28

BUY 3 GET ONE FREE! ON SELECT LIGHT TRUCK SHOCKS

A quality all season tire with a 70,000 mile warranty. It’s modern tread pattern provides quality handling for increased vehicle safety.

Free SIZE

all season traction

Free

This is an excellent value on highway and all season radials. Offers a smooth quiet ride and tough steel belt construction.

SALE PRICE

SIZE

16

P155/80TR-13

excellent value

SIZE

RIGHT NOW AT LES SCHWAB


PDN10082010C