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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS June 28-29, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Best of the best ALL O OF THIS month’s North Olympic Peninsula high school graduates who received scholarships and awards for their achievements are pictured in a 28-page tribute section appearing today as a special magazine supplement. In addition to the hundreds of photos and award profiles, Students of Distinction: Class of 2013 also lists the names of graduates in the keepsake magazine in this edition.

Budget deal means state ‘will continue to operate’ BY MIKE BAKER AND RACHEL LA CORTE

ALSO . . . ■ Van De Wege changes vote on gas tax increase/A6

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — State lawmakers reached a long-sought accord on a new state budget Thursday and hurried to schedule votes that would avert a widespread state government shutdown. At a news conference flanked by lawmakers from both parties, Gov. Jay Inslee said the Legislature hoped to approve the measure before state

employees leave work today. Political leaders declined to discuss details of the plan or to make the $33.6 billion spending proposal available for public review, as it was still being drafted Thursday afternoon. “The deal reached today makes it clear that state gov-

ernment will continue to operate,” Inslee said. Democratic Rep. Ross Hunter, the top negotiator in the House, said he and Republican Sen. Andy Hill finalized the new spending plan Thursday morning and shook hands on an agreement. Budget negotiators said they were confident the measure would swiftly make it through the Legislature, though Hunter indicated lawmakers simulta-

neously were discussing a variety of peripheral issues. “It’s a delicate agreement,” he said.

$1 billion more for schools Hill said the final plan puts an added $1 billion toward the education system in response to a state Supreme Court ruling that said lawmakers weren’t adequately funding schools. TURN

TO

BUDGET/A6

Olympic National Park’s Diamond Jubilee 75th birthday celebration is ‘the new 40’ BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — The North Olympic Peninsula’s national park is celebrating its diamond anniversary this weekend. And ONLINE . . . those who oversee ■ Video scenes Olympic of Olympic National National Park Park agree at peninsula that it dailynews.com looks pretty good for its age. “Seventy-five is the new 40,” National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said Wednesday from his office in Washington, D.C. “We look forward to her next 75” years, he said. As the park, signed into existence June 29, 1938, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, steps into its next 75 years, Jarvis and Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum agreed that two of the biggest challenges it faces is climate change and keeping the national park relevant for

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

U.S. FOREST SERVICE

Visitors park at the La Poel Forest Camp near Lake Crescent in the mid-1930s. The campground now is a day-use area. For a timeline of key events, see Page A6. younger generations. Creachbaum said she is undaunted. “I think what this last 75 years has shown us is that, as an agency and as a country, we are up to this challenge,” she said Thursday. “We’ll go forward and continue to protect our parks, and our visitors will continue to come and be inspired.” Global climate change has

the potential to have drastic, far-reaching effects on many of the country’s national parks, especially those that include glaciers within its boundaries and those whose borders include ocean coastal areas, Jarvis said.

A changing climate What this means for the 922,650-acre park depends on how the maritime environ-

ment is affected, Jarvis said, and how the wildlife that calls the park home, such as the weasel-like fisher and the Roosevelt elk, will react to a changing climate. “[The challenge is] how we adapt to that, how we mitigate, how we manage for [the impacts] and how we communicate with the public on that,” Jarvis said. TURN

TO

Kit Cramer of Winthrop pets a mule this week at the park’s Whiskey Bend Road corral.

Free entry, lunch, more PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Entrance fees will be waived Saturday and a special breakfast and picnic offered to the public to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the national park that dominates the North Olympic Peninsula. TURN

OLYMPIC/A6

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ACTIVITIES/A6

Commissioner: Litigation fear led to job shuffle BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A fear of potential litigation led to the Port of Port Angeles commissioners’ approval Monday of a one-year contract for former Executive Director Jeff Robb after he resigned, Port Commissioner John Calhoun said Thursday. Robb was hired immediately after he quit. Robb’s new job pays the same $138,000 he made as top administrator, but it has fewer responsi-

NEW 2013

PRIUS

bilities. Robb, 59, announced at Monday’s commissioners’ meeting that he was resigning as executive director for “serious health issues” and will retire Robb in July 2014. Those issues are related to stress, said his wife, Laura. Following Robb’s statement,

commissioners discarded his three-year contract and voted 2-1 to hire him for the unadvertised, unbudgeted position of environmental affairs director — for the same salary he has received since January as executive director. Calhoun, who along with Commissioner Paul McHugh voted for the contract, said Thursday the “dysfunctional” relationship between Robb and some members of the port’s senior staff had deteriorated to the point that it could have resulted in litigation “from either party involved in these con-

tion before it was approved. Port lawyer Dave Neupert has not returned calls for comment about the contract. Commissioners expect to pay the Seattle-based executivesearch firm Waldron between $30,000 and $50,000 to produce candidates for interim executive director and permanent executive On leave director, with an interim director hopefully named at the commisRobb is on leave until July 8. sioners’ regular meeting July 8, He did not return calls ThursCalhoun said. day for comment on his new contract and the potential for litigaTURN TO PORT/A7 flicts” had it been allowed to continue. “To avoid that, we settled on this course of action,” Calhoun said. “The salary was part of all the other elements of the settlement. “Nobody threatened us with litigation,” he said.

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 154h issue — 5 sections, 72 pages

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BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD * PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

B8 C1 B11 A8 B11 B10 B11 *PS A3

PENINSULA POLL A2 C2 PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS PULLOUT B5-B8 B12 WEATHER


A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Bieber sued by paparazzo in California JUSTIN BIEBER HAS been sued by a paparazzo who claims the singer kicked and punched him last year at a Southern California shopping center. A lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges the “Baby” crooner attacked Jose Osmin Bieber Hernandez Duran after Bieber and his then-girlfriend went to the movies at The Commons in Calabasas. Bieber’s representatives did not respond to a request for comment. Duran claims Bieber started to leave the shopping center in his Mercedes but got out of his car and sprinted toward Duran. Duran said Bieber jumped into the air from 6 to 8 feet away to deliver a

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MOVES

LIKE

JAGGER

Festival-goers participate in a flash mob dance to the Rolling Stones at the Glastonbury Music Festival in England on Thursday. Some 135,000 music lovers are expected to arrive for the three-day festival that starts today, with headliners Arctic Monkeys, the Rolling Stones — which is celebrating its 50th year together — and Mumford and Sons. martial-arts-type kick to the photographer’s gut before punching him in the face.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: How often in a year do you visit Olympic National Park?

The suit seeks unspecified damages for “severe and extreme emotional distress” and negligence.

None

32.5%

1-5 visits

Passings

6-10 visits

By The Associated Press

BERT STERN, 83, a commercial photographer best-known for his images of Marilyn Monroe in what became known as “The Last Sitting,” has died in New York City. Mr. Stern died Wednesday at his New York City home, said Shannah Laumeister, 43, a filmmaker who said the two were secretly married in 2009. She said the reason for keeping it secret was private. Mr. Stern shot thousands of pictures of Monroe at the Bel-Air Hotel in Los Angeles in 1962 for Vogue magazine just weeks before the movie star’s drug overdose death. They included nude and semi-nude images. The 2,500 images, including ones Monroe rejected, were published in a 1982 book titled The Last Sitting and a second book, Marilyn Monroe: The Complete Last Sitting, that came out in 2000. Mr. Stern photographed many other celebrities, too, including Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor and Truman Capote.

11-15 visits and coached both men’s and women’s Olympic medalwinning crews, died Tuesday in Boston. The cause was myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood disorder, Harvard said on its website. Mr. Parker, who rowed single sculls at the 1960 Olympics in Rome, where he finished fifth, was an omnipresent figure in rowing at both the collegiate and national levels for decades. Between 1964 and 1984, he coached men’s and women’s Olympic rowers; his 1972 men’s eight — a boat with eight rowers and a coxswain, whose prime responsibility is steering — won a silver medal. He was the head coach of the women’s Olympic rowing team in 1976, when the women’s eight earned a bronze. In 1975, he coached the first American women’s eight to compete in the world championships; the crew won a silver medal. Parker was among the best rowing coaches in collegiate history. His varsity heavyweight eights won eight national titles, earned

more than 20 championships in the prestigious Eastern Sprints, and had 22 unbeaten seasons in his 51 years as coach. His record in the allimportant Harvard-Yale regatta was 44-7, including a victory this month.

46.1% 9.1% 3.5%

16-24 visits 2.3% More than 25 visits

6.5%

Total votes cast: 1,121 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Peninsula Lookback

Setting it Straight

From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Corrections and clarifications

1938 (75 years ago) Angels’ Flight, a series of stairs from near sea level at Laurel and First streets to the top of the bluff at Laurel and Second streets, is being constructed by the city of Port Angeles to give pedestrians an opportunity to save many blocks of walking. No longer will one zig and zag, saunter or amble on easy bent gradients on a trail etched in the bluff. Kids with bikes will be automatically restricted. And for those who need it, there are decompression landings at which pedestrians can take short rests until they reach the top.

Johnston ruled that the man committed suicide after finding the left wrist slashed. Razor blades had been found last week near the Port of Port Angeles dock. Johnston’s finding ended a law-enforcement search that began a few days after May 15, when the man was last seen alive.

■ To clarify, Jane Pryne is superintendent of the Port Angeles School District, and retiree Mary Ann Unger will return to the district as interim deputy associate superintendent effective Monday. A headline Thursday on Page A7 abbreviated the label of the retiree as interim superintendent.

1988 (25 years ago)

■ Jeff Robb’s new contract with the Port of Port Angeles said he can be fired “for cause” or resign with 30 days’ notice. A Tuesday report on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition and Page A5 of the Jefferson County edition erroneously said the former executive director will serve “at will” as port environmental affairs director.

Six North Olympic Peninsula residents are among 32 people appointed to a state Commission on Old Growth Alternatives for Washington’s Forest Trust Lands by state Lands Commissioner Brian Boyle. They are Clallam _________ 1963 (50 years ago) County Commissioner DorHARRY PARKER, 77, A murder theory in con- othy Duncan, author Tim Seen Around who coached Harvard rownection with the disappear- McNulty of Quilcene, ITT ers with unrivaled success Peninsula snapshots Rayonier mill manager ance of a 68-year-old Port for more than a half-century Grant Munro of Port AngeAngeles resident ended SMALL SEDAN les, retailer Bert Paul of when his body was found DRIVING rather slowly Forks, Port of Port Angeles floating in Port Angeles with five kayaks on the Laugh Lines Commissioner Ted Spoelstop. Apparently, the driver’s Harbor. tra of Forks and state WildClallam County Prosehaving aerodynamic KANYE WEST AND life Commission member cuting Attorney Joseph H. concerns . . . Kim Kardashian have Johnston called a coroner’s Jim Walton of Port Angeles. named their newborn girl WANTED! “Seen Around” The task: to review the inquest a short time after North West. items. Send them to PDN News management of about the man’s body was found The baby was named Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles 60,000 acres of old-growth by a man rowing a skiff after the direction in which WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or just off the log booms of the trees on state-owned forestit will try to escape. email news@peninsuladailynews. Smith shingle mill. lands. Conan O’Brien com.

__________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, June 28, the 179th day of 2013. There are 186 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On June 28, 1863, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Maj. Gen. George G. Meade the new commander of the Army of the Potomac, following the resignation of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker. On this date: ■ In 1778, the Revolutionary War Battle of Monmouth took place in New Jersey; it was from this battle that the legend of “Molly Pitcher” arose. ■ In 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, Sophie, were assassinated in Sara-

jevo by Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip, the event that sparked World War I. ■ In 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed in France, ending the First World War. ■ In 1962, a jury in New York awarded $3.5 million to former radio-TV personality John Henry Faulk in his libel suit against the group AWARE Inc. and two individuals who’d accused him of Communist sympathies and gotten him blacklisted. The judgment was reduced to $550,000 by an appeals court. ■ In 1978, the Supreme Court ordered the University of California-Davis Medical School to admit Allan Bakke, a white man who

argued he’d been a victim of reverse racial discrimination. ■ In 2000, seven months after he was cast adrift in the Florida Straits, Elian Gonzalez was returned to his native Cuba. ■ Ten years ago: After days of intense searching by ground and air, U.S. forces found the bodies of two soldiers missing north of Baghdad, as the toll of American dead since the start of war topped the grim milestone of 200. ■ Five years ago: Jered Weaver and Jose Arredondo of the Angels combined to keep the Los Angeles Dodgers hitless, but the Dodgers won 1-0. The Dodgers became the fifth team in modern major league history to win with-

out getting a hit, but since they didn’t have to bat in the ninth, the game did not qualify as a no-hitter. ■ One year ago: America’s historic health care overhaul narrowly survived, 5-4, an electionyear battle at the U.S. Supreme Court with the improbable help of conservative Chief Justice John Roberts. Attorney General Eric Holder became the first sitting Cabinet member held in contempt of Congress, a rebuke pushed by Republicans seeking to unearth the facts behind a bungled gun-tracking operation known as Fast and Furious. The vote was 255-67, with more than 100 Democrats boycotting.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Boston suspect in marathon attack indicted BOSTON — A federal grand jury has returned a 30-count indictment against the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was indicted Thursday on charges that included using a weapon of mass destruction and bombing a D. Tsarnaev place of public use, resulting in death. Three people were killed, and more than 260 injured in twin explosions near the finish line of the marathon. Tsarnaev’s older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed following a shootout with police April 19. Authorities said the brothers used shrapnel-packed pressure cooker bombs in the bombing. They are also accused of killing an MIT police officer. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said 17 of the charges against 19-year-old Tsarnaev could bring life in prison or the death penalty.

Foxx confirmation WASHINGTON — Anthony Foxx, the mayor of Charlotte, N.C., and a political ally of President Barack Obama, was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on Thursday to be transportation secretary. The Senate voted 100-0 in

favor of Foxx. As secretary, the 42-year-old Foxx will oversee the agencies within the department that regulate the nation’s aviation, rail, transit and highway systems, as well as auto safety. He replaces outgoing secretary Ray LaHood, who campaigned against distracted driving and led the Obama administration’s efforts to boost the economy by improving the nation’s transportation. The mayor won national recognition when Charlotte hosted the Democratic National Convention last year.

500th execution HUNTSVILLE, Texas — The Lone Star State marked a solemn moment in criminal justice Wednesday evening, executing its 500th inmate since it resumed carrying out capital punishment in 1982. Kimberly McCarthy, who was put to death for the murder of her 71-year-old neighbor, was also the first woman executed in the U.S. in nearly three years. McCarthy, 52, was executed for the 1997 robbery, beating and fatal stabbing of retired college psychology professor Dorothy Booth. Booth had agreed to give McCarthy a cup of sugar before she was attacked with a butcher knife and candelabra at her home in Lancaster, about 15 miles south of Dallas. Authorities said that McCarthy cut off Booth’s finger to remove her wedding ring. It was among three slayings linked to McCarthy, a former nursing home therapist who became addicted to crack cocaine. The Associated Press

Immigration bill sails easily through Senate Debate ends in 68-32 vote THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Senate wrapped up its immigration debate with senators talking a lot about themselves and their immigrant families. Leading the way were the eight senators — four Democrats and four Republicans — who spent hour after hour since January working out a compromise at some political peril. They had reason to reflect. Unlike most bipartisan gangs from Senates past, this one actually ended up producing legislation that could help resolve one of the most complex and far-reaching policy conundrums facing the country. “We cussed one another, we

cheered one another, and we wrote a bill together,” Sen. Dick Durbin D-Ill., said of negotiations. Throughout the final day of debate Thursday, senators made clear the issue was personal to them. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., teared up when recalling his father-in-law, who was born in Russia. Sens. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and Durbin dedicated their votes to their mothers.

Recalled working as child Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., recalled working as a child with his family, side-by-side with immigrants here illegally “who worked harder than we did under conditions much more difficult than we endured.” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., spoke of his grandparents and great-grandparents who fled persecution in Europe.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., relayed several news reports recounting the thousands of people whose bodies have been found in the sweltering Arizona desert, evidence of the risks that people take in illegally crossing the border from Mexico. “Isn’t it in us to bring 11 million people out of the shadows?” McCain said on the Senate floor. Yes, the Senate later agreed, voting 68-32 to send to the House a bill that would put most of them on a path toward citizenship — and establish a military-style operation of 20,000 new guards, 700 miles of fencing and an array of war-developed technologies like drones and motion sensors to make the U.S.-Mexico border virtually impenetrable. The House is all for the latter, but majority Republicans are much less enamored with a creating a new path to citizenship for people breaking the law by their very presence in the U.S.

Briefly: World Obama jousts in Senegal on gay unions DAKAR, Senegal — President Barack Obama on Thursday praised the Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage as a “victory for American democracy” but clashed with his African host over gay rights. Obama said recognition of gay unions in the United States should cross state lines and that equal rights should be recognized Sall universally. It was his first chance to talk about the ruling, issued Wednesday as he flew to Senegal, an African country that outlaws homosexuality. Senegalese President Macky Sall rebuffed Obama’s call for Africans to give gays equal rights under the law. “We are still not ready to decriminalize homosexuality,” Sall said, while insisting that the country is “very tolerant.”

Mandela still critical JOHANNESBURG — Nelson Mandela’s health improved overnight, and although his con-

dition remains critical, it is now stable, the South African government said Thursday. One of the former president’s daughters said he is still opening his eyes and reacting to the touch of his family even though his situation is precarious. The report that the health of the 94-year-old anti-apartheid leader had improved came amid a growing sense in South Africa that Mandela was approaching the end of his life.

Unauthorized pass QUITO, Ecuador — Ecuador’s diplomatic mission in London issued a safe-conduct pass so National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden could travel to Ecuador to seek political asylum, but the action was unauthorized, and the pass is invalid, government officials said Thursday. President Barack Obama sought to downplay the international chase for a man he called “a 29-year-old hacker” and lower the temperature of an issue that raised tensions between the U.S., Russia and China. But Ecuadorean officials took a defiant tone as they scrambled to explain an unsigned letter dated June 22 that said Snowden has the right to travel to Ecuador for political asylum, and asks other countries to allow him safe passage. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RAILROAD

BRIDGE COLLAPSES IN WESTERN

CANADA

Crews work at the scene of a rail bridge collapse and train derailment over the Bow River, southeast of downtown Calgary, Canada, on Thursday. The sagging bridge was threatening to send five rail cars carrying a diesel-like substance into a river. Efforts were under way to keep the cars from falling into the river.

Lawmaker: Student loan rates to double if deadline’s ignored THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A compromise to keep student loan interest rates low proved unwinnable before Monday’s deadline and interest rates on new loans are going to double -— at least for a while — senators said Thursday. Sen. Tom Harkin, the chairman of the Senate education panel, said none of the proposals being circulated among lawmakers could win passage, and he urged lawmakers to extend the current rates for another year when they return from the July 4 recess. Harkin said that his colleagues could retroactively lower the rates when they return.

Quick Read

“Let’s put this off for a year,” Harkin, D-Iowa, told reporters. Interest rates on new subsidized Stafford loans are set to go from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent Monday unless lawmakers take action.

Average hike: $2,600 Congress’ Joint Economic Committee estimates the increase will cost the average student $2,600. “Neither party wants to see rates rise next week,” said Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C. But a one-year rate extension isn’t an acceptable option, either. “Last year, we kicked the can down the road and passed a one-

year extension for only a small group of students. . . . Why would we make the same mistake again?” said Burr, who was among a group who worked on a competing proposal with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. The Manchin-led proposal would link interest rates to the financial markets. It borrowed heavily from a version House Republicans passed earlier and from principles included in President Barack Obama’s budget proposal. “This agreement is very much like the proposal in the president’s budget . . . and it will save billions of dollars in interest,” said Tennessee’s Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Jewell delivers vow to Native Americans

Nation: Hobby Lobby can now challenge health law

Nation: Texas governor clashes with filibusterer

World: 7 aboard schooner missing in South Pacific

SALLY JEWELL MADE an emotional pledge in her first address to Indian Country as the 51st U.S. Interior secretary, saying she’ll help right past wrongs against Native Americans and work with tribes “nation-to-nation” to protect their sovereignty. Jewell fought back tears during remarks Thursday in Reno, Nev., to about 300 delegates of the National Congress of American Indians. The ex-outdoor retail executive from Seattle became secretary in April. She told delegates the U.S. government doesn’t have a proud legacy when it comes to upholding promises to native people.

IN A HEALTH care decision giving hope to foes of the federal birth-control coverage mandate, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday that Hobby Lobby stores won’t have to start paying millions of dollars in fines next week. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver decided the Oklahoma Citybased arts and crafts chain can proceed with its case. The reprieve gives Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. more time to argue in a lower court that for-profit businesses — not just currently exempted religious groups — should be allowed to seek an exception if the law violates their religious beliefs.

A FIGHT OVER attempts to limit abortion in Texas became a personal grudge match Thursday between Republican Gov. Rick Perry and a state senator whose one-woman filibuster has catapulted her to national stardom. Addressing the 43rd annual National Right to Life Conference in Grapevine, Texas, Perry singled out state Sen. Wendy Davis of Fort Worth, saying that her life story proves all children born into difficult circumstances deserve not to be aborted. In an e-mailed statement Wednesday, Davis shot back: “Rick Perry’s statement is without dignity and tarnishes the high office he holds.”

A NEW ZEALAND meteorologist took the last known calls from the seven people aboard an American schooner: “The weather’s turned nasty. How do we get away from it?” The phone calls and texts ended June 4. More than three weeks later, searchers said Thursday they have grave concerns for the crew on the classic 85-year-old wooden vessel that went missing while sailing from New Zealand to Australia. Authorities said the skipper of the 70-foot vessel Nina is American David Dyche. Two other American men and three American women are aboard, plus a British man, age 35.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim irrigation water back on after truck crash BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NORTH OLYMPIC LAND TRUST

The Sol Duc Sanctuary, owned by Paul Chasman and Anna Wiancko, is now part of a conservation easement with the North Olympic Land Trust.

Land near Sol Duc placed in conservation easement 13 acres, quarter-mile on river protected from development PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Landowners in partnership with the North Olympic Land Trust have permanently conserved about 13 acres and a quarter-mile along the Sol Duc River near the former town site of Hecklesville, between Port Angeles and Forks. The Sol Duc Sanctuary, owned by Paul Chasman

and Anna Wiancko, was placed in a conservation easement June 21, the land trust said this week, adding that it will help protect habitat for one of the largest wild steelhead populations in the state, according to the land trust. The area also provides habitat for cutthroat trout, chum, pink, sockeye, chinook and coho salmon.

A conservation easement protects land from development in perpetuity. “Preserving quality salmon and steelhead habitat is of high importance to our community,� said Tom Sanford, land trust executive director. “This new easement will help maintain and grow strong fish populations in the Sol Duc. We’re so pleased to help Paul and Anna achieve their vision of conserving their land.� The Sol Duc River flows about 65 miles from high in Olympic National Park down to where it joins the Bogachiel River and forms the Quileute River, about 5 miles from the Pacific Ocean.

“This new easement will help maintain and grow strong fish populations in the Sol Duc. We’re so pleased to help Paul [Chasman] and Anna [Wiancko] achieve their vision of conserving their land.� TOM SANFORD executive director, North Olympic Land Trust

SEQUIM –– The water system for a Highland Irrigation ditch was turned back on Thursday afternoon after a daylong shutoff followed a dump truck crash near River Road on Wednesday afternoon. Steve Gaither, ditch walker for Highland, said the company had to turn off its system as crews cleaned up diesel and motor oil that spilled after the crash. A driver hauling rock from the Haller pit for use in the state’s project to widen U.S. Highway 101 between Kitchen-Dick and Shore roads west of Sequim was taken to Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles for treatment of an injured shoulder after the crash, according to Ben Andrews, assistant chief for the fire district.

Name not released

The department did not release the driver’s name because of privacy concerns. The truck was towing a pup trailer down a service road from the quarry. The pup trailer apparently lost the use of its brakes and slid into the ditch, pulling the truck on top of it, Andrews said. The crash damaged one ________ of two 30-gallon tanks on the truck, according to Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiLinda Kent, spokeswoman tor Joe Smillie can be reached at for the state Department of 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at Ecology. jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly . . . New attorney general visits PA

The land trust was formed in 1990 as a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving land on the Olympic Peninsula. PORT ANGELES — Since then, the organization has conserved more New state Attorney General Bob Ferguson stopped by than 2,700 acres of land.

  

  

    



  

 

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Port Angeles on Wednesday to visit his agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Olympic Peninsula outpost of three lawyers and three support staff after touching base with Port Gamble Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Klallam tribal officials in Kitsap County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the smallest of all of our offices,â&#x20AC;? said Ferguson, who was elected to the position in November. Ferguson, 48, a Seattle Democrat, has been visiting all of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 13 state attorney general offices, and Port Angeles was his last stop, said spokeswoman Janelle Guthrie. Ferguson said he wants to meet with representatives of all of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 29 federally recognized tribes during his four-year term but has not yet visited any tribes on the Peninsula. There are 13 Washington state attorney general offices. Lawyers in the Port Angeles branch, 115 E. Railroad Ave., Suite 306, represent children in child dependency cases on behalf of the state Department of Social and Health Services, the state Department of Labor and Industries in workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compensation matters, the Department of Employment Security in unemployment compensation appeals and the state Department of Licensing in driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license revocation and suspension matters. Representation is provided in juvenile and superior courts, and administrative hearings.

New DUI measures Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Í&#x203A;Ć?Ĺ?ÄŤÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;

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An estimated 20-25 gallons of diesel oil spilled into the ditch. Kent said the truck also leaked hydraulic fluid and motor oil into the ditch. Emergency crews worked late Wednesday to deploy absorbent pads and booms to contain the oil and diesel. They turned off the irrigation system to allow the oil to flow out, Gaither said. By Thursday afternoon, what was left in the ditch was being skimmed off the top by booms. Fire district crews retrieved the oil spill response trailer from John Wayne Marina to clean up the spill along with Clallam County Emergency Management, the Department of Ecology spill response team, Highland Irrigation district and Scarsella Brothers. Andrews said fire district personnel spent 5½ hours on the scene before turning the incident over to Ecology and Scarsella Brothers. Kent noted the ditch is not a fish passage, and the spill was quickly contained, which limited its damage. There was no contamination found in Johnson Creek, where the ditch flows out, she said.

OLYMPIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Drunken driving offenders who are caught a second time will be more closely monitored under a bill approved by the state Legislature. The state House voted unanimously to finalize the measure Thursday. The plan would require drivers charged with a second impaired-driving offense to have an interlock device installed on their vehicles within five days of being charged. The state also would begin a pilot program to conduct daily alcohol monitoring on a person convicted twice under the DUI law. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

A5

Forks principal bids farewell, leaves for Ariz. Elementary school leader to take teaching post at 40,000-person city and her energy,” she said. Navarro previously was a teacher in Port Angeles and principal at Sedro-Woolley Elementary School in SedroWoolley. Four candidates have been found to take the position of principal, and one is expected to be in place by the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year, Reaume said. “Lisa has left the staff in a good spot, no matter who walks in the door,” she said.

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Lisa Navarro, principal of Forks Elementary School, will officially bid the school goodbye Sunday. Navarro, who has served as principal at the 480-student elementary school since 2009, has been hired to teach in Prescott, Ariz., a city with a population of about 40,000. “Lisa has done a great job of supporting the teachers, getting them ready for com________ mon core and building teams LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Reporter Arwyn Rice can be in the schools,” said Superin- reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Students line up at an assembly earlier this month to say goodbye to Lisa Navarro, center, who is tendent Diana Reaume. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula leaving as Forks Elementary School’s principal. Holding microphone is teacher Nancy Silcox. “We’re going to miss Lisa dailynews.com.

Student cellphone privacy issue sparks board debate BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JEREMY JOHNSON Port Angeles parent instead of returning the phone “at the discretion of the administrative staff,” as per the current policy. Johnson said the present policy exposes the district to lawsuits because there is often personal information on a cellphone, much of which school district employees have no right to see.

‘Highly personal’

content, and suggested turning over phones to administrators. Methner and Baxter said they believe student electronics should be searched only by parents or by police with probable cause. “Such a policy would protect us and administrators on school grounds,” Methner said. Baxter added that the policy should be clear that the student must turn off the phone before handing it to the teacher so the district employee cannot accidentally view sensitive personal information or photos on the phone. Other school districts in the region already have worked with the ACLU to create enforceable policies that follow constitutional law, Johnson noted. Board members instructed Pryne to check with those districts to Never look review those policies and If a student is suspected return with information at of misuse of a cellphone, it the board meeting Thursshould be given directly to day, July 11. ________ parents, Baxter said, adding that school staff should Reporter Arwyn Rice can be not ever look at the content reached at 360-452-2345, ext. of a cellphone. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula Board member Patti dailynews.com. Happe asked whether there is suspected evidence on a phone such as in the case of a bomb threat and who could look at phone

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PORT ANGELES — A staple of the Port Angeles Fourth of July parade will not happen this year because of federal budget cutbacks. The Coast Guard has announced it won’t conduct a flyover of helicopters for the parade. The change is because of federal sequestration and the Budget Control Act, said Lt. Tim Andersen, public affairs officer at Air Station/ Sector Field Office Port Angeles. “In order to help preserve our ability to meet the highest-priority mission activities, including search and rescue, critical security operations and emergency response while integrating the effects of the Budget Control Act, the Coast Guard has had to re-evaluate our ability to participate in community relations events,” he said in a statement. “Unfortunately, this means limiting or canceling U.S. Coast Guard support for most of these events.” The Coast Guard will continue its Color Guard participation, he said. The theme of the Fourth of July parade in Port Angeles is “Port Angeles: Celebrating our Local Heroes.” It will be led by this

year’s grand marshal, Betsy Reed Schultz, founder of the Captain Joseph House Foundation. The Captain Joseph House at 1108 S. Oak St. is named for her son, Army Capt. Joseph Schultz, who was killed in action in Afghanistan on May 29, 2011. It is to be a place of healing and relaxation for families of fallen military men and women. The parade will begin at 6 p.m. on the Fourth of July, a Thursday, at the corner of Fourth and Lincoln streets, travel to First Street and move west to Valley Street. Parade applications are available at Kitsap Bank, 716 E. Front St., and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce website, www.portangeles.org. There is no cost to participate because of the sponsorship of Kitsap Bank. After the parade, the Luck of the Draw and The Hooky’s will perform at City Pier at 7 p.m. Fireworks will be set off at about 10 p.m.

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“In many cases, an electronic device, like a cellphone, is not the property of the student but of the parent,” he said, adding that cellphones can contain “more information than a school library” and that it can be “highly personal.” “Gender identity, family relationships, friends, associations, political leanings, religious affiliations, health information, legal documents and more are all examples of sensitive information that can and often is stored on a portable telecommunications device,” Johnson said. Superintendent Jane Pryne said that after Johnson had contacted her about the policy, she submitted it to the district’s attorney, who suggested several changes and submitted a revised policy for the board to consider.

School Board member Sarah Methner said she wants district officials to consult with the American Civil Liberties Union to craft a policy. “This policy is a modernday Tinker,” Methner said, referring to Tinker v. Des Moines, a 1969 U.S. Supreme Court case in which the majority opinion wrote: “It can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.” Methner said: “If some teacher picks up a phone and sees something they shouldn’t, there will be problems.” Board member Steve Baxter said he is concerned about the school’s possible liability if something untoward happens with a staff member looking at a student phone.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

36795654

PORT ANGELES — A parent’s concern about electronic privacy sparked a debate among Port Angeles School Board members about viewing student cellphone content. Board members will continue a discussion, begun Monday night, on a possible revised policy at the July 11 board meeting, which will begin with a onehour executive session at the Central Services Building at 216 E. Fourth St. Port Angeles parent Jeremy Johnson said the Port Angeles School District Te l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s Device Policy, Section 3245 D and E, is outdated. It allows school officials with reasonable suspicion that a student is using a telecommunications device in a way that violates the law or school rule to confiscate it. “By bringing a cellphone and other electronic devices to school or school-sponsored events, the student and parents consent to the search of the device when school officials have a reasonable suspicion that such a search will reveal a violation of school rules,” the policy continues. “Content of images that violate state or federal laws will be referred to law enforcement.” The proposed revision would add that “the scope of the search will be limited to the violation of which the student is accused.” It also would say the cellphone “shall only be returned to the student’s parent or legal guardian”

“In many cases, an electronic device, like a cellphone, is not the property of the student but of the parent.”

No helicopter flyover for PA’s July Fourth parade

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Olympic: 73 miles of wild coast Activities: Park CONTINUED FROM A1 More specifically, Creachbaum said, the documented increasing acidity levels of the world’s oceans, likely linked to the globe’s changing climate, have the potential to affect the park, particularly because of the miles of coastline — 73 miles of wilderness coast — within the park’s borders. Creachbaum said how global climate change might affect the park is one of the issues addressed in the park’s wilderness stewardship plan, now under development. The plan — laying out how the 95 percent of the park devoted to wilderness areas will be managed, and ensuring both its conservation and public access — likely will attempt to address climate change by remaining flexible, Creachbaum said. “I think there will be an adaptive element to our plan, [and] we will continually be assessing it,” she said.

11 meetings on plan Park staff have conducted 11 public comment meetings on the plan. People were asked to weigh in on what they value most about the roughly 1,300 square miles of wilderness in the 1,442-squaremile park. “Right now, my goal is to take care of what we have and take care of it well,” said Creachbaum when asked about the park’s potentially expanding, action beyond the superintendent’s control since any changes in park boundaries are made through acts of Congress. Creachbaum said park staff is organizing comments and developing a number of alternatives for managing the park’s wilderness. The alternatives will be subjected to public comment, with meetings likely to begin in the fall, Creachbaum added. “I think it’s very important that parks remain relevant to people,” Creachbaum said. “And it is part of the [fed-

Key park milestones PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Here are several key events in Olympic National Park’s history: ■ 1889: James Wickersham, District Court judge in the 3rd Judicial Division — which was composed of 300,000 square miles and based in Tacoma — leads the first of two hiking expeditions into the Olympic Peninsula’s interior. He later became an ardent supporter of establishing Olympic National Park. ■ 1909: President Theodore Roosevelt creates the 610,000-acre Mount Olympus National Monument. ■ 1913: Elwha Dam becomes operational. ■ 1926: First congressional bill introduced to create Olympic National Park. ■ 1927: Glines Canyon Dam, upstream from Elwha Dam on the Elwha River, becomes operational. ■ 1937: President Franklin Roosevelt visits the North Olympic Peninsula, hears widespread support for the creation of Olympic National Park. ■ June 29, 1938: Roosevelt signs Olympic National Park into existence. ■ 1988: Congress designates 95 percent of Olympic National Park as wilderness. ■ 1990: Maureen E. Finnerty becomes Olympic National Park’s first woman superintendent. ■ September 2011: Removal of the two dams on the Elwha River begins as part of the process of restoring the river to a wild state. — Compiled from An American Eden: An Administrative History of Olympic National Park eral] Wilderness Act that we allow people the opportunity to experience wilderness.” Creachbaum and Jarvis agreed that keeping the park relevant to new generations of park visitors is goal to reach for in the next 75 years. “How we build a new constituency is one of the biggest challenges for the National Park Service in general,” Jarvis said. The park consistently ranks among the top 10 most-visited national parks, according to Park Service visitor data. Attendance has slipped slightly in the past five years, however, from slightly more than 3 million in 2008 to 2.8 million in 2012. Creachbaum said park visits are always a priority and cited a program starting this summer that will bring Latino journalists and bloggers from across the country to the park and

Budget: Policy CONTINUED FROM A1 He also said it provides no tuition increases over two years. “I do think it’s a budget that has broad appeal,” Hill said. “Everybody is excited and glad to be done.” Lawmakers didn’t immediately release the full details of the proposal. Much of state government would shut down — and more than 25,000 workers would be laid off temporarily — if the Legislature fails to approve the new budget by Monday, and political leaders believe it’s particularly important to finalize the plan before state employees leave work for the weekend.

Never had a shutdown Washington state has never had a government shutdown, but the Legislature has worked close to the end of the fiscal period before. In 2001, lawmakers finished the budget June 20; in 1991, then-Gov. Booth Gardner signed a budget just moments before midnight June 30. This year, a new Senate majority controlled by Republicans and two con-

and [is] looked up to around the service for [an] excellent, high-quality natural science program,” Jarvis said. Jarvis cited the efforts to reintroduce the fisher to the park, a project on which staff has worked hand-inhand with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. Jarvis also praised the work that staff has done with tribes that have made their historic homes in and around the park. “We’ve had, I think, over the years a positive working relationship with the tribes, and that’s set a model for us working across the country,” Jarvis said.

“I do think it’s a budget that has broad appeal. Everybody is excited and glad to be done.” ANDY HILL Republican senator servative Democrats pushed a no-tax message and policies that would overhaul government rules to aid businesses. Democrats who control the House and Inslee have pressed for more tax revenue and opposed many of the Senate policy plans. The Senate has talked about revisiting those policy matters next year, such as an overhaul to the state’s workers’ compensation system. Democrats have said the tax issues also will return next session, since lawmakers still will need to add more money to the education system in the coming years. “This is a good budget,” said House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan. “However, it doesn’t address the underlying questions we need to answer before we can honestly say we’ve met our long-term commitment to education in our state.”

River restoration

encourage them to write about their experience hiking and camping there. “I thinking making parks relevant to diverse audiences is where we start,” Creachbaum said.

Snow-capped peaks

Then there’s the Elwha River dam-removal and restoration project, the largest such effort in history. “A lot of other parks are watching what’s going on at Olympic with the Elwha,” Jarvis said. “Putting nature back together is a complicated process and expensive.” The $325 million project, in the works in some form since Congress passed the law authorizing the removal in 1992, seeks to unlock 70 miles of Elwha River habitat for use by migrating salmon. The once-108-foot-tall Elwha Dam, built in 1913 5 miles from the river mouth, was taken down by March 2012, while only 60 feet of Glines Canyon Dam, the Elwha Dam’s once-210foot-tall cousin, remain. Creachbaum and Jarvis agreed the historic dam removal is just one example of the country’s love affair with Olympic National Park ever since it was signed into existence threequarters of a century ago. “I think one of the reasons Olympic looks so good at the ripe old age of 75 is because the American people really wouldn’t have it any other way,” CreachPENINSULA DAILY NEWS baum said. Brazen Harris, 3, grandmother Mary Harris,

Overall, though, she said, the park’s roaring rivers, snow-capped peaks and dense rain forests can still draw crowds. “I don’t doubt at all that Olympic National Park, once someone comes for a visit, will have the ability to [ensure] return visits. “She can charm anybody, but I have to get them here first.” Many of those charms have to do with the environmental conservation going on in the park, and Jarvis said the work being done at Olympic has long been an ________ inspiration for national park managers across the Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can country. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. “Olympic has been one of 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula the pioneers in those areas dailynews.com.

10½-cent increase included in measure headed to Senate THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — A day after it was voted down, a $10 billion transportation revenue package that includes a 10½-cent increase in the gas tax was approved Thursday by the state House. The measure passed on a 51-41 vote and now heads to the Senate, where it is expected to face resistance. On Wednesday, the measure had failed to receive the required 50 votes, a rare bill failure in the Democraticcontrolled House.

Van De Wege changed mind Rep. Kevin Van De Wege of Sequim — who represents the 24th District, which includes the North Olympic Peninsula — was among the three Democrats who had nixed the measure Wednesday but voted for it Thursday. The other two were Reps. Brian Blake of Aberdeen and Marko Liias of Mukilteo. Liias had voted no initially only so he could bring the measure back for another vote Thursday, he said. Members of the prevailing side in a vote can ask the chamber to reconsider it. Liias warned that other states, such as South Carolina, could benefit if Washington state failed to take action

to improve its transportation infrastructure. “Inaction is a loss of competitiveness,” he said. Under the measure, the state gas tax would increase by 6 cents per gallon Aug. 1, with the remainder of the increase taking effect July 1, 2014. The package includes $3.2 billion for several state road projects and more than $1 billion for maintenance of highways and bridges. It has been a priority for Gov. Jay Inslee, who watched the vote from the House wings and thanked several lawmakers in the House Democratic wings after the measure passed. Democrats hold a 55-seat majority in the House. Several Democrats voted against the measure Thursday: Reps. Hans Dunshee of Snohomish, Kathy Haigh of Shelton, Chris Hurst of Enumclaw and Monica Stonier of Vancouver, Wash. Rep. Hans Zeiger of Puyallup was the lone Republican to vote in favor of the funding package. Republicans who spoke against the measure said nothing had changed to allay their concerns over the financing of the package or lack of reforms they had sought to address project costs. “The public continues to say no to this package. I continue to say no to this package. And this House chamber should continue to say no to this package,” said Rep. Ed Orcutt, R-Kalama.

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mother Brandi Harris and sister Berniece Harris, 6, all of Port Angeles, travel along the Marymere Falls Trail in Olympic National Park near Lake Crescent in 2011. Brandi was carrying her other child, Brylee, 1, in a backpack.

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CONTINUED FROM A1 Resort on the east side of Lake Crescent, the “sunny It was June 29, 1938, side of the lake.” Hamburgers, hot dogs that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill and sodas donated by Ed establishing Olympic Bedford of Port Angeles will National Park. be provided. To celebrate, the park A snow cone machine will waive entrance fees, and lawn games will be set and park concessionaire up. Aramark will host events at Park representatives Lake Crescent Lodge off will discuss this summer’s U.S. Highway 101 west of interpretive programs and Port Angeles and a picnic sustainable food programs, lunch at Log Cabin Resort while visitors can look over on East Beach Road, also off recent renovations to the Highway 101. resort. The day will begin with Changes include new a VIP breakfast to com- campsites, paddleboards, memorate the start of canoes, kayaks and a freshRoosevelt’s visit at Lake ened interior of the main Crescent Lodge from 9 a.m. lodge. to 11 a.m. For more information Dignitaries in attenabout the park’s history, dance will include Park Superintendent Sarah visit www.nps.gov/olym. The public can add phoCreachbaum, who will discuss ongoing efforts to pre- tos, videos or stories to the park’s online memory book serve the park. The lodge also will dis- at www.olympicpark75th. play historical memorabilia, com. For a complete list of and will offer lavender lemonade and cake between locations and times of numerous walks and eve9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Following breakfast, a ning talks at locations free community barbecue is throughout ONP, visit planned from 11:30 a.m. to http://tinyurl.com/onp1 p.m. at the Log Cabin events.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Native plants showcased in county park arboretum BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHIMACUM — A 1-acre portion of a popular county park has been converted to an arboretum that showcases native plants as a way for visitors to gain a scientific perspective about area vegetation. “This is a center of information about native plants,” said Linda Landkammer, the garden’s designer and project coordinator. “It is a place where you can see all the plants in the flesh, so to speak, and learn about them at the same time.” A grand opening is planned from 5 to 8 tonight. A plant sale, music, food carts and a raffle are planned. The space, which is located inside H.J. Carroll Park at 9884 state Highway 19, just north of the Chimacum crossroads, has been christened the Kul Kah Han Native Plant Demonstration Garden. It is named in honor of the last-known chief of the Chimakum tribe who, in the 1850s, lived not far from the present gardens and used the native plants for food, clothing and medicine.

Hundreds of plants The park includes 900 feet of pathways that lead through displays of 240 species of plants that are labeled and cross-referenced. Within the park are divisions keyed to the plants’ native environment, such as damp forest, dry forest, edgeland, meadow, montane (high elevation), subal-

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Ann Evans, left, and Linda Landkammer prepare the Kul Kah Han Native Plant Demonstration Garden in H.J. Carroll Park for its Saturday opening. pine and wetland. Landkammer said she hopes to acquire 160 more species for a total of 400. The organization has created a database with information on each plant, including its botanical name, its common name and whether a sign for the plant has been made. The database also includes a field to enter the names of plants she wants to add to the collection and the disposition of that acquisition. “Our goal is to sponsor educational presentations and to collaborate with other like-minded organizations,” Landkammer said, adding that the park could be a field trip destination for school classes. Landkammer said about

$3,000 had been spent in developing the park over a 15-year period. Area organizations, governmental entities and individuals donated cash and materials.

15,000 hours

Landkammer is recruiting volunteers for two teams of four people who will be asked to commit to a few hours twice a month. “We are looking for people who already know about native plants to join us,” she said. “And we can take a few more who know gardening in general but are willing to enrich their knowledge of native plants through research.” For more information, visit www.nativeplant garden.org, email wild4nature@q.com or phone 360-379-8733.

Landkammer said the success is attributable to volunteers, who she estimates contributed about 15,000 hours. After the park ceremony, she will step down as project coordinator. The park will run on volunteer labor, with the first order of business the ________ recruitment of a new volunteer part-time director. Jefferson County Editor Charlie The park requires care Bermant can be reached at 360and maintenance from 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula March to October. dailynews.com.

Port: Hallet criticizes rehiring CONTINUED FROM A1 Until an interim director is hired, expenditures over $5,000 must be approved by the commissioners instead of an executive director. So the commissioners must hold a special meeting at 9 a.m. today to approve renewal of the port’s property insurance premium and consider suspending a $2 million state Department of Ecology grant if funding is disrupted by the lack of a 2013-1014 state budget.

Grant to resume The grant will resume once a budget is passed, Port Finance Director Karen Goschen said Thursday. The meeting is in the port administrative office building, 338 W. First St. There is no scheduled public comment period on the agenda. The move hiring Robb for a lower-level position at the same executive director’s salary was criticized at Monday’s meeting by commission President Jim Hallett, who cast the lone dissenting vote, and speakers in the packed board meeting room who decried the contract as “a sweetheart deal” designed to allow Robb to get full state retirement benefits. Robb is one year away from retirement and from

Calhoun

McHugh

qualifying for state retirement benefits. The environmental director position was never advertised or posted, in contrast to what the port employee handbook states is “normally” done with position openings. And there was no official port job description when Robb said in his statement Monday that he and commissioners had “agreed” that he would take the environmental affairs director position. Hallett disputed the assertion there was an agreement. He did not return calls for comment Thursday. Robb’s salary as environmental affairs director is 64 percent higher than the salary paid to Goschen, who now has the next-highest director’s salary at the port.

Shouldn’t be punished “This situation was not all the executive director’s fault, and I didn’t think he should be punished with a reduction in salary as a

result of this,” Calhoun said. “He was being removed from the executive director position, and that was damaging enough,” he added. “When we signed the contract, we set the salary,” Calhoun said. “We were careful to do it according to the rules.” Robb informed the commissioners June 19 at a special board meeting at which an executive session was held to discuss his job performance that “he didn’t think he could continue,” Calhoun said. McHugh agreed that though there was no threat of legal action, litigation would have been possible if Robb had remained at his position. “There was that potential,” he said. He also defended giving Robb the same salary he received as executive director. Robb’s involvement in ongoing port environmental cleanup projects “simply can’t be replaced by a consultant,” McHugh said. “The port is truly getting value.” Robb began working for the port in 1984 and was the manager of port aviation and marinas when he was hired in August 2009 as executive director, a position in which his salary increased by 20 percent over three years to $138,000.

McHugh left no doubt that he would not support hiring from within port staff for the interim or permanent executive director positions. “I will not support anyone currently on our staff, absolutely not,” he said. “That will not help us to move forward.” He said the new permanent executive director may make more than Robb. “The new executive in almost all cases comes in at a higher level than the one that left,” McHugh said. The salaries for the interim and new executive directors will be taken from the 2013 general operating budget, he said. Those funds consist of income the port generates from operations, such as rent from tenants and other revenue. “It’s not really public money,” McHugh said. “The public’s money is the tax dollars we take in,” he said. “People can choose to utilize port facilities or not. “These are private individuals and businesses that would be paying the port to use facilities, or they would be paying someone else, so there is a difference.”

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly: State U.S. seeks to modernize river treaty

LEAVENWORTH — Dozens of people have reported feeling a 4.3-magnitude earthquake that rocked Central Washington. YAKIMA — The U.S. One person in Boardagencies responsible for man, Ore., roughly 150 managing the Columbia River under a U.S.-Canada miles away from the epitreaty say the treaty center, reported feeling the should be modernized to Wednesday night shaking better reflect current on the U.S. Geological SurPacific Northwest priorivey’s website. ties. The Wenatchee World The 1964 Columbia reported that there were River Treaty is an agreeno initial reports of damment between the two age or injuries after the countries for developing 7:45 p.m. quake. and operating the river and Centered 14 miles its dams for flood control north-northwest of Leavenand power. worth, the temblor was felt Either country may give in that city, as well as in notice beginning in 2014 Wenatchee, Chelan and the that it wants treaty proviMethow Valley. sions changed or terminated. Death penalty case For the U.S., the BonneOLYMPIA — Washingville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of ton’s Supreme Court is weighing whether King Engineers are working County prosecutors can with other stakeholders to seek the death penalty develop recommendations against a man accused of on the treaty. killing a Seattle police offiThe agencies released cer. their draft recommendaChristopher Monfort is tions for public comment accused of shooting Seattle Thursday. The working draft notes Police Officer Tim Brenton in 2009 on Halloween that the treaty must be modernized to adapt to the night, wounding another officer that night and setimpacts of climate change ting fire to police cars earand to include the ecosyslier in the month. tem as a focus. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity Rattler found to charges of aggravated SEATTLE — The direc- murder, attempted murder tor of the Seattle Animal and arson. Shelter has confirmed that A King County Superior a 2-foot Western rattleCourt judge barred Prosesnake was taking into cuscutor Dan Satterberg from tody after being found sunseeking the death penalty, ning itself on a rock wall. saying he failed to consider The venomous snakes enough mitigating eviare native to Eastern dence. Washington and rarely Satterberg’s office found in the wild on this appealed, and in arguside of the Cascades. ments Thursday, attorney KING-TV reported someone called animal con- Deborah Dwyer told the trol after seeing it last Sat- high court that the Legislature deliberately rested the urday. decision on whether to seek Seattle Animal Shelter the death penalty with Director Don Jordan said elected prosecutors — not this is a good example of why people should be care- with the courts. A lawyer for Monfort, ful when approaching any Suzanne Elliott, argued snake. He said you never that the lower court judge know what species may show up in Western Wash- did not abuse his discretion. ington. Authorities do not know Water bottling how the snake arrived in Seattle and said it probably TACOMA — The Niagwould not have survived ara Bottling Co. announced the climate. plans Wednesday to The state Department of develop a $50 million botFish and Wildlife sent the tling plant at a business snake back to Eastern park in Frederickson. Washington on Wednesday. The company said 90 percent of its water is botLife for theft tled for retailers under TACOMA — A 30-year- their private labels. The News Tribune old man was sentenced Thursday in Tacoma to life reported that at full proin prison without parole for duction of 1 million gallons his role in the theft of guns a day, the bottling plant from a sporting goods store will be the third-largest customer for Tacoma Pubin Fife. Soeun Sun was conlic Utilities after the Simpvicted earlier this month of son Tacoma Kraft mill and a burglary charge that was the city of Fife. his third strike. He has California-based Niagprevious strike convictions ara operates a dozen botfor robbery and assault. tling plants in nine states. The News Tribune Frederickson will be the reported that Sun tried to first in the Northwest. sell many of the 41 guns Tacoma Public Utilities that were taken in a 2001 draws the water out of the break in. Green River at the Howard Authorities have recovHanson Dam. ered nine of the guns, The Associated Press including one allegedly used in a carjacking in Follow the PDN on Connecticut. Pierce County Superior Court Judge James Orlando chastised Sun for not working with prosecutors on a plea deal that FACEBOOK TWITTER could have spared him the Peninsula Daily pendailynews life sentence.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2013 PAGE

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High court’s immeasurable impact WITH ONE OF its rulings, the Supreme Court mandated federal recognition of gay couples married in places that permit it. With another, it Frank reopened the Bruni door to samesex marriage in California, our most populous state. These practical consequences are huge. But the two decisions together also have another kind of effect, deeply emotional, potently symbolic and impossible to measure — but arguably much more sweeping. Like all that happens at the highest levels of our government, like all the judgments rendered and statements made by the officials chosen to guide us, the court’s actions set a tone. They send a signal. They alter the climate of what’s considered just and what’s not, of what’s permissible and what’s intolerable, and that change ripples into every last corner of American life, shaping

people’s very destinies. This was hammered home to me by the time I spent recently with a mother, a father and a brother who have known terrible heartbreak and, in its aftermath, spent no shortage of time thinking about the messages that gay Americans receive from the laws and the leaders of our land. Their surname, Clementi, is probably familiar to you. So is much of their story, though maybe not the current chapter. In September 2010, Tyler Clementi, an 18-year-old freshman at Rutgers University in New Jersey, hurled himself from the George Washington Bridge [over the Hudson River between New Jersey and New York]. And in the months following his suicide, the pain preceding it came into disturbing, shameful focus. He’d been harassed online by his college roommate, who had deemed his homosexuality worthy of taunts and titters. He’d worried about his mother’s comfort with his desires, his identity. He was a young man filled with dreams but also with a special set of concerns, with the knowledge that a fundamental part of who he was would cause

some people to look down on him and others to reject him. Is that why he jumped? There’s no way to know. “Suicide is an irrational action, so to try to rationalize it I don’t think can really be done,” his father, Joe Clementi, said to me. Even so, Joe and his wife, Jane, along with one of their two surviving sons, James, have dedicated themselves to educating people about the problems that perhaps conspired in Tyler’s fate. Through public speaking, lobbying and other work with the Tyler Clementi Foundation, they’re trying to stop young people from hurting one another, and they’re trying to call out aspects of American life that pass judgment on LGBT people and make some of them, teenagers especially, feel fear and despair. The Defense of Marriage Act, a central provision of which the Supreme Court struck down Wednesday, was one of those aspects. Jane said she didn’t see this clearly before Tyler’s suicide but that she did after, when she left her evangelical church over its opposition to gay marriage and its other anti-gay stances.

Peninsula Voices

“It’s not only people who can intimidate and harass,” she told me during a conversation at the Clementis’ home in Ridgewood, N.J. “It’s institutions. It’s legislation. With laws the way they are, we’re teaching that there’s a group of individuals who are ‘less than’ others.” The haters are thus given license, and the hated are further isolated. “And you never know,” said Joe, “where a person is at their particular point in life and what could drive them to a bad decision or to taking a wrong step.” He’s right, and that’s why it mattered when President Barack Obama mentioned Stonewall in his second Inaugural Address, putting heroes of the gay-rights movement on a par with heroes of any other. That’s why it matters that he hasn’t yet signed an executive order demanding that federal contractors not discriminate against gays and lesbians in hiring. He’s indulging, and thus excusing, possible bigotry. As for the Supreme Court, it didn’t go as far on Wednesday as it theoretically could have, nor

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES

PT Library I The organization opposing the [Port Townsend] library bond issue recommends a branch library on Castle Hill as a more reasonable and fair solution to the library’s space needs. Does a branch library make sense for Port Townsend? I don’t think so. I did a quick perusal of several states’ library standards concerning branch development. (Washington does not have statewide standards.) I found a fair amount of consensus about when a branch is needed: if library users have to drive more than 20 minutes (urban) or 30 minutes (rural) to get to a library, the standards recommend construction of a branch. By these measures, the current library location provides adequate geographic accessibility for everyone. Branches are expensive. When money is short, one of the first thing multibranch systems do is curtail branch services. Branches are laborintensive, requiring service staff in two separate locations rather than under one roof. I was library director during the 1990 library expansion project. I’m proud that our project resulted in a facility that has been able to support the dramatic increases in library use that have occurred since 1990. Once again, the library has outgrown its facilities, but a branch library is not the solution. The current project makes sense. It addresses space and design needs and will provide the foundation for continued library growth and change. I’m voting for the library bond issue and hope you will, too. Beverly Shelton, Port Townsend

Peninsula Visuals

Mark S. McCready Port Townsend McCready is a member of the Port Townsend High School Class of 1976.

JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR ■

________ Frank Bruni is a columnist for The New York Times. He can be reached via http://tinyurl.com/ pdn-bruni.

AND EMAIL

35 years. Before that I was a high school student myself — even served on student council. The whole time, I wondered why high schools pretend to have student government. I still think that a goal for student government should be to learn how representative government works — and to learn the importance of electing responsible, competent representatives to do the right thing. (It seems obvious that our nation could benefit from such a goal.) How are kids are going to learn self-government if their own representatives are denied the opportunity to make hard decisions? I once taught in a high school (not Port Townsend) where students wanted to change their mascot, but school administrators, alumni and local business and community leaders shouted them down. The issue never made it to the student council, let alone the School Board. What do kids learn from this? How do kids learn to make hard decisions when hard decisions are taken from them? Bill Flint, Port Angeles

never advertised or posted to allow others to apply, and to me the new contract appears to be specially created to help Mr. Robb build up his retirement funds. Why pay an individual a $69,000 severance package when we can pay approximately $200,000 for a salary and benefits package? The commissioners who voted for this should be terminated for this action. Then the port can apply the approved $30,000 “headhunter” outlay for three positions rather than just one. Mr. Robb had a big “stress-free” smile when he signed the contract. Mike Green, Port Angeles

Port personnel

I wish I could understand this — the director of a public taxfunded agency resigns after he was given a three-year contract renewal with a I’ve observed firsthand Libraries have been a PT Library II 12 percent pay increase in the positive impact a crucial part of my own What kind of noise January. dynamic library can have nurturing, as well as [that annoys an oyster? A noisy The commissioners of on communities. of] my children and noise annoys an oyster. that public agency then Due to structural grandchildren. That’s why I’m urging decided at the spur of the deficiencies, book stacks can That is the point: a all book-lovers to support moment to create a new, no longer be housed in our multigenerational center the library expansion bond. less-stressful job for that devoted to the love of Please don’t let our town Carnegie’s second story, director — at the same relegating half the reading. deteriorate into an salary as the position from collection to offsite storage. Richard Jesse Watson, intellectual low tide, where which he resigned. It will be costly renting Port Townsend Port decision access to books is limited, This new job was not climate-controlled storage, This week’s story about posted, no one else had a the hunger for learning is plus [paying for] labor and the Port of Port Angeles diminished and the only Let students vote chance to apply for it and it commissioners [“Port option for young people is to fuel to continually move The fate of the Redskins was done so the now Director Gets New Job at plop down on their oss ’n ott books between facilities. mascot should have been ex-director would be It makes sense to Same Pay,” PDN, June 25] ’n ottums to play video left to the Port Townsend eligible for a full pension in expand our library now to has proven that the “good games, spray-paint cans at High School student a year. meet current needs, while old boy” network is still the ready. government. Notably, only two of the the $500,000 National alive and well. In other words, vibrant The issue should be commissioners approved Endowment for the They accepted [former communities don’t happen this deal, and one voted Humanities matching grant thoroughly debated during Executive Director] Jeff by default. ASB elections and then, for against it. is on the table. Robb’s resignation due to As an author and Thank you, Jim Hallett. This is also an important better or worse, decided by his “serious heath issues” illustrator, I’ve visited the student council. Folks, these are your tax then rehired him, at no pay scores of libraries across the investment for future If the decision turns out dollars at work. generations. loss, and signed him to a country, presenting in to have consequences, the Makes Goldman Sachs Consider the relatively one-year contract for a everything from cramped student council should be look like small potatoes, small amount per newly created, work-attrailers to expansive doesn’t it? household ($14 per year for asked to address them. home position with no job architectural wonders to I was a high school Ann Chang, a $100,000 home) for the description. coffee shop-style library greater good. The new position was spaces. teacher for more than Port Angeles

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did it speak in a unanimous voice. The journey toward full equality for LGBT Americans is a long way from over. But what happened was progress. It was hope. James Clementi, Tyler’s brother, is himself gay, and he told me on the phone Wednesday afternoon that he felt different than he had a day earlier. He felt more included. Jane said that while the court’s rulings in the DOMA and Prop. 8 cases were “just a start,” they affirmed her belief in “the trajectory of where we’re going.” They might even save lives, she said. From what she’s lost and from what she’s learned, she knows that there are many wounded and fretful young gay people out there, along with many straight peers who may or may not decide that it’s OK to ridicule them. And there’s a chance, a crucial and wonderful chance, that the ripples from Wednesday will reach and teach all of them.

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

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NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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CommentaryViewpoints

A zombie scare with a chaser I LOVE MY monsters, sacred or straight up. I’m not as fond of zombies as I am of vampires. Vampires are urbane shape-shifters, Maureen sophisticated, Dowd seductive and nattily dressed. Unlike vampires, their undead brethren, zombies, don’t age well. Their muscle tone is shot. The rotting ghouls just groan and lumber about, except for the most highly evolved, who precede a meal with a succinct request: “Brains!” But last weekend, zombies were kicking off the summer movie season. So naturally, I was at the first showing of “World War Z,” where Brad Pitt fights an army of crepuscular demons to save the world — and without even having Angie’s help. One minute Pitt’s character, a former United Nations investigator, is making pancakes for his family, and the next, twitching zombies are dropping out of the sky onto his car. After decades of zombies who lurched like Frankenstein’s monster, Hollywood has finally realized the monsters are scarier if they are fast enough to actually catch someone. The ones in “World War Z” dart about like velociraptors, and they love sinking their teeth into humans, as one soldier puts it, “like fat kids love Twix.” Vampires have always been rich fodder for metaphors, standing in for everything from bloodthirsty capitalism to AIDS to teenage desire. Max Brooks, the son of Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft, who wrote the book the movie is based on, told The New York Times that his zombies were proxies for everything scary that has happened since 2001: 9/11, Iraq, Afghanistan, Katrina, anthrax letters, global warming, global financial melt-

down, bird flu, swine flu and SARS. The anxiety that we may have doomed ourselves and our planet through our own heedlessness pervades the culture. But the metaphor about the broken global system is less vivid than the metaphor about the broken Hollywood system. Before Pitt could save the planet, he had to save his movie, a feat on which a fortune was spent. People always want monsters to have a larger meaning, but in this case, the larger meaning is about the monstrous waste of money and the dearth of creativity in Hollywood. The last 40 minutes of the movie had to be rewritten and reshot, and the ending still isn’t fixed. The $190 million 3-D, CGIenhanced spectacle is kind of fun, but it isn’t a classic of the genre, like George Romero’s 1968 “Night of the Living Dead,” Val Lewton’s 1943 “I Walked With a Zombie,” and the 1932 “White Zombie,” the first full-length zombie feature, with Bela Lugosi playing the evil voodoo master of Haiti, Murder Legendre. Pitt just seems happy that the blockbuster is not as dreadful as it was when he saw the first cut. “It was pretty rank,” he told USA Today. In the movie, Washington gets wiped out quickly, of course, because the politicians can’t even come to an agreement on survival. The zombies seem to enjoy chowing down on the creaky joints of the Joint Chiefs. It seemed that no one had read the real-life Centers for Disease Control and Prevention blog called “Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse.” “You may laugh now,” wrote Dr. Ali S. Khan, the director of the CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, “but when it happens, you’ll be happy you read this — and hey, maybe you’ll even learn a thing or two about how to prepare for a real emergency.” The CDC recommended a kit including water (one does get

dehydrated from running away from these speedy zombies), nonperishable food, medications, knives, duct tape, a battery-powered radio and first-aid supplies. “Although you’re a goner if a zombie bites you,” Khan noted, “you can use these supplies to treat basic cuts and lacerations that you might get during a tornado or hurricane.” In the movie, the two smartest countries turn out to be Israel and, less predictably, North Korea. The Israelis erect a Great Wall that protects them until the zombies learn teamwork and make a nonhuman pyramid to scale the wall. In a crisis, tyranny has its benefits. The North Korean dictator orders that all 24 million citizens have their teeth pulled within 24 hours so that humans who turn into zombies can’t infect anyone by biting. A French military pilot, no doubt trying to abide by his country’s 35-hour workweek, flies off, leaving Pitt stranded with Israeli zombies. If the movie scares you, you can always calm down with a zombie, the paralyzing rum concoction invented at Don the Beachcomber’s bar in Hollywood. With the recipe a deep, dark secret, the drink was so popular that the tiki bar got nicknamed “the Zombie Palace.” Ava Gardner, who had many nightcaps at the bar when she was a teenager dating Mickey Rooney, revealed the ingredients to the British journalist Peter Evans: “Bacardi, dark rum, light rum, pineapple juice, lime juice, apricot brandy, orange juice, a sprig of mint and a cherry.” But, she advised, the secret of a good zombie is this: “Hold the mint and the cherry.”

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

Liberal can’t hide from racial epithet MEET RYAN PATRICK Winkler. He’s a 37-year-old lib- Michelle eral Minnesota state legislator Malkin with a B.A. in history from Harvard University and a J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School. He’s also a coward, a bigot, a liar and a textbook example of plantation progressivism. On Tuesday, Winkler took to Twitter to rant about the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down an onerous section of the Voting Rights Act. The 5-4 ruling overturned an unconstitutional requirement that states win federal preclearance approval of any changes to their election laws and procedures. Winkler fumed: “VRA majority is four accomplices to race discrimination and one Uncle Thomas.” This Ivy League-trained public official and attorney relied on smug bigotry to make his case against a Supreme Court justice who happens to be black. “Uncle Thomas” wasn’t a typo. Denigration was the goal, not an accident. It was a knowing, deliberate smear. After being called out by conservative social media users for his cheap attack on Clarence Thomas, Winkler then revealed his true color: yellow. He deleted the tweet (captured for posterity at my Twitter curation site, twitchy.com) and

pleaded ignorance. “I did not understand ‘Uncle Tom’ as a racist term, and there seems to be some debate about it. I do Winkler apologize for it, however,” he sniveled. “I didn’t think it was offensive to suggest that Justice Thomas should be even more concerned about racial discrimination than colleagues,” he protested. Holding a black man to a different intellectual standard based on his skin color. Accusing a non-white conservative of collectivist race traitorism. Employing one of the most infamous, overused epithets against minority conservatives in the Democratic lexicon. “Apologizing,” but disclaiming responsibility. Sorry that he got caught. Just another day at the leftwing racist office. Rabid liberal elitists expect and demand that we swallow their left-wing political orthodoxy whole and never question. When we don’t yield, their racist and sexist diatribes against us are unmatched. My IQ, free will, skin color, eye shape, name, authenticity and integrity have been routinely ridiculed or questioned for more than two decades because I happen to be an unapologetic brown female free-market conservative. My Twitter account biography jokingly includes the moniker “Oriental Auntie Tom” — just one of thousands of slurs hurled at

me by libs allergic to diversity of thought — for a reason. It’s a way to hold up an unflinching mirror at the holierthan-thou NoH8 haters and laugh. We conservatives “of color” are way past anger about the Uncle Tom/Aunt Tomasina attacks. We’re reviled by the left for our “betrayal” of our supposed tribes — accused of being Uncle Toms, Aunt Tomasinas, House Ni****s, puppets of the White Man, Oreos, Sambos, lawn jockeys, coconuts, bananas, sellouts and whores. This is how the left’s racial and ethnic tribalists have always rolled. But their insults are not bullets. They are badges of honor. The Uncle Tom card has been played out. Of course, Winkler didn’t think it was offensive. Smartypants liberal racists never think they’re being racist. In their own sanctimonious minds, progressives of pallor can never be guilty of bigotry toward minority conservatives. Ignorance is strength. Slurs are compliments. Intolerance is tolerance. And when all else fails, leftwing prejudice is always just a well-intended joke. Conservatives on Twitter have changed the dynamic in an underappreciated, revolutionary way. The pushback against liberal political bigotry is bigger, stronger and swifter than it’s ever been. You can delete, but you cannot hide.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PT merchants discuss top priorities Lighting, hours lead list BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Merchants believe improved lighting and extended hours are priorities for increasing sales traffic in the downtown area, according to results of an informal poll taken Thursday. “There is no lighting on this end of town, and we had no Christmas lights last year,” said Lois Venarchick, owner of Wynwoods Gallery & Bead Studio at 940 Water St. “We are the entry point to town, and instead of a warm greeting to visitors, it looks like a white trash area.” About 30 merchants met at the Main Street Merchant Breakfast at Pippa’s Real Tea, 636 Water St.

Participants discussed a list of 11 priorities. They used colored dots to rate each in importance: green for top priority, yellow for second-most-important and red for third.

‘Cream of crop’ Better lighting and extended shopping hours were the top choices among merchants. The priority receiving the most yellow dots was increasing participation with Centrum and re-establishing free lunchtime concerts to encourage people to come downtown. Increased training in social media was the thirdmost-popular priority. “This is the cream of the crop, so I’m not surprised that all the topics got at

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Judy Cavett, left, and Pippa Mills “dot” their priorities for downtown Port Townsend at a Main Street meeting Thursday. least one dot,” said Heather Dudley Nollette, Main Street president. “It surprises me that extended hours is such a

high priority,” she said. “We know that customers and visitors have asked for that, but it’s interesting that the merchants are will-

Snohomish porkers get an unusual flavor infusion

BY MANUEL VALDES THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Volunteers sought for PA city panels PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Board of Ethics

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jeremy Gross sits on his farm in Snohomish with some of his pigs, in background, that are being fed with a feed mix that includes leaves, stems and other byproducts of medical marijuana production. By feeding the pigs pot, Gross is trying to produce pork products with a unique, savory taste. “It’s like anything else: What you feed them is what they’re going to taste like. It’s almost like a savory alfalfafed cow or alfalfa-fed pig.” The meat, though, won’t get people high. It’s just a flavor infusion.

Marijuana excess While the passage of recreational marijuana inspired the experiment, Gross and von Schneidau get the marijuana excess — roots, stems and other parts of the plant that are grinded and not used for consumption — from a medical marijuana dispensary.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS will be closed Thursday, July 4th in observance of Independence Day The following are early Independence Day Holiday advertising deadlines:

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Port Ludlow. ■ Encourage people who visit downtown stores to shop in the uptown district. ■ Create a map of businesses that includes coupons and a walking tour. ■ Create window display contests that tie in with event themes. ■ Create a nighttime activity guide that can be distributed to local hotels. ■ Train merchants to develop a strategy to deal with shoplifting. Nolette said all of those on the list were important, no matter how many dots they received. “These are all the cream Other priorities of the crop. They are on the Other priorities that list because people care received varying support about them,” she said. from the merchants were: ________ ■ Coordinate a holiday Jefferson County Editor Charlie lighting ceremony and Bermant can be reached at 360parade in connection with 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula other communities, such as dailynews.com.

PORT ANGELES — The city is taking applications from volunteers to serve on several committees, including the Board of Ethics. The deadline for submitting applications for all but the Board of Ethics is 3 p.m. Tuesday. Applications will continue to be accepted for the Board of Ethics until positions are filled. Positions open are:

Farmer feeds pigs medical pot byproducts SNOHOMISH — The white van with tinted windows pulled up to the driveway with its cargo: cardboard boxes full of marijuana. And the customers eagerly awaited it, grunting and snorting. The deal was going down for three hungry Berkshire pigs from a Washington state farm, and a German television crew was there to film it. Part flavor experiment, part green recycling, part promotion and bolstered by the legalization of recreational marijuana in Washington state, pot excess has been fed to the hogs by their owners, pig farmer Jeremy Gross and Seattle butcher William von Schneidau, since earlier this year. Gross and von Schneidau now sell their “pot pig” cuts at von Schneidau’s butcher shop in Seattle’s Pike Place Market at a premium price: Bacon is $17 a pound, while chops go for $16.90 a pound. “He’s like, ‘Let’s see what kind of flavor it gives it.’ So we ran it, and it gave good flavor,” Gross said.

ing to commit to this because it’s a challenge for them.” Nollette said some of the priorities already have been assigned to committees who are studying them and determining a plan as to how they can be accomplished. “We have to decide whether we assign the others to committees or put them on a list that will go into our strategic plan for next year,” she said. “We need to decide what we can do with our current budget and what needs to be funded.”

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At the butcher shop, cuts from the pot pigs are signed with a little drawing of a marijuana leaf stuck on them with a toothpick. “It tastes like the best pork chop you’ve ever had,” said Matt McAlman, who runs Top Shelf Organic, the dispensary that is providing the pot plant waste for the pigs to eat. The idea has brought worldwide attention. On a recent afternoon, Gross hosted a crew from a German science show, while von Schneidau already has been interviewed dozens of times. The men, though, are relishing the spotlight to advertise von Schneidau’s idea of locally sourced food. Gross’ hogs at his Snohomish farm were being fed recycled byproduct before the marijuana idea. While Gross raises pigs on his property, he works full time as a construction foreman. The only way he can stay in the pig business, he said, is the free feed he collects from a local distillery and brewery. He feeds his pigs barrels of the distillery wheat “mash” every day, fortified by a nutrient mix his veterinarian created. Gross gets his free pig feed, while the distillery and brewery

get rid of waste. Gross is applying that model to the medical marijuana excess, and von Schneidau hopes it’s an example people use as production of marijuana ramps up under the state-approved system. “Absolutely, it’s a good opportunity to help people get rid of their waste,” said von Schneidau, who also is attempting to start a privately owned mobile slaughterhouse.

Draft state rules But currently, the state draft rules say pot plant waste must be “rendered unusable” by either grinding it or mixing it with non-consumable, recycled solid waste, such as food waste, compost, soil and paper waste. The state’s rules for medical marijuana do not say how to get rid of marijuana byproducts. John P. McNamara, a professor at Washington State University’s Department of Animal Sciences, doesn’t find the experiment amusing. “Of all the crazy things I’ve seen in my 37-plus years, this is the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen in my life,” he said.

■ Positions on the Board of Ethics, to be composed of members who are residents of the city and represent a diverse set of backgrounds and interests. At least one member should be a former judicial officer or have expertise in ethics acquired through education or experience. At least one other member should have experience in municipal government. City employees are not eligible. Board members will serve without compensation until Dec. 31, 2014. After reviewing applications, considering additional information and conducting interviews as the City Council deems appropriate, the council may approve those applicants eligible to serve on the board. These applicants then will make up a pool of eligible members. Should an ethics complaint come forward, three members will be selected from the pool to serve as the Ethics Board for that particular complaint. No complaints are pending. The board’s meetings will be open to the public.

Utility Advisory Board ■ One community representative position is open on the Utility Advisory Committee, which makes recommendations to the City Council about city utility policy and operation. Three council members serve on the committee, along with one industrial representative, one representing licensed care facilities and two community representatives.

Members are appointed to four-year terms, with a limit of two consecutive terms. The term for this position will expire Feb. 28. The panel meets at 3 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.

Adjustment ■ Two positions are open on the Board of Adjustment, which reviews administrative decisions of the Community Development director relating to the interpretation of land-use ordinances and grant variances from provisions of zoning ordinances. Decisions of the board are final and appealable only to Superior Court. The five members are appointed to four-year terms, with a limit of two consecutive terms. The board meets at 6 p.m. the first Monday of each month at City Hall.

Civil Service ■ One position will become vacant on the Civil Service Commission on or before Dec. 31. The appointee will fill an unexpired term until Feb. 28, 2015. The commission investigates concerns and reports on all matters relating to enforcement, hears and determines appeals or complaints on administrative work of the chief examiner, and decides on disciplinary actions, when needed, for city Civil Service employees. Members are appointed to four-year terms, with a limit of two consecutive terms. The commission meets at City Hall at 10 a.m. the third Thursday of May, July and October of each year if needed. Applications are available at www.cityofpa.us/ boardscc.htm or the City Manager’s Office at City Hall. For more information, contact Teresa Pierce, executive administrative assistant and deputy city clerk, at 360-417-4630 or tpierce@ cityofpa.us.

Friday, July 5

Mon., July 1; 2 p.m.

PA man pleads not guilty to car chase

Sunday, July 7

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

Monday, July 8

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

Pen. Spotlight, July 12

Mon., July 1; 2 p.m.

TV Week, July 14

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

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PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man allegedly involved in a car chase with police that ended with him being bitten by Port Angeles police dog Bogey has pleaded not guilty. Christopher Michael White, 23, pleaded not guilty last Friday to one count of attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle after he allegedly led a Lower Elwha Klallam tribal police officer on a June 10

chase that reached speeds of up to 100 mph. White is set to appear next in Clallam County Superior Court on July 12, with a tentative jury trial date set for Aug. 12.

Remains in jail White remains in the Clallam County jail on $25,000 bond, according to Superior Court documents. According to police accounts, the pursuit ended with White being found in the woods near the 200

block of Bishop Road, south of state Highway 112, after White reportedly abandoned a Chrysler New Yorker he was driving. Port Angeles Officer Lucas DeGand and canine partner Bogey helped Elwha police, Clallam County sheriff’s deputies and Border Patrol agents track White at about 10:15 p.m. and found him hiding in a stand of bushes. Police said Bogey was allowed to approach and bite White after police said White refused to come out

of the bushes with his hands visible, despite multiple orders to do so. White was treated at Olympic Medical Center for wounds to his right arm before he was booked into the jail. White’s arrest is the fifth that DeGand and partner Bogey have assisted in since the pair finished their training in March.

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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Voter registration deadline nearing PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MARGARET MCKENZIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SAMPLING

HER WARES

Shirley Liang, owner of Yong Jin Asian Bakery, 112-A S. Lincoln St. of Port Angeles, samples of one of the sandwiches she sells at the Wednesday farmers market in downtown Port Angeles. With her is son Jay Liang, 16, a junior at Port Angeles High School, who says he helps out his mom when not working his other job at Safeway.

With primary elections approaching Aug. 6, now is the time for residents in Clallam and Jefferson counties to either ensure they are registered to vote or update any changes to their voter registration status. Voter registration forms must be postmarked or received by Monday, July 8, to be processed in time for the primary election. Ballots for the primary will be mailed to voters July 17. The top two candidates in the primary — those who receive the most votes — in races in which there are three or more candidates will advance to the general election in November. Would-be voters who are not currently registered in Washington state have until July 8 to submit their voter registration form online or by mail. New voters also can register in person through July 29 at the Auditor’s Office in their county of residence. Both the Clallam and Jefferson counties’ auditors’

offices are open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Also, currently registered voters have until July 8 to make any necessary updates to their voter registration status — for example, a name change or change of address. If the deadline is missed, registered voters who recently have moved or changed address may still vote according to their previous address.

Clallam County Voter registration forms can be found at www. clallam.net/elections by clicking on “MyVote.” Forms can be submitted online or sent by mail to the Clallam County Auditor’s Office, 233 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. The following positions will be on the primary ballot: ■ Port of Port Angeles: Commissioner, District 1, six-year term. ■ Port Angeles School District 121: Director, Position 1, four-year term.

■ Fire District No. 3: Commissioner 3, six-year term. For more information, phone 360-417-2221.

Jefferson County Jefferson County residents can fill out an online registration form at www. vote.wa.gov/Jefferson. Forms also may be sent by mail to the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The following proposition and positions will appear on the primary ballot: ■ Proposition No. 1, City of Port Townsend, $3 million library improvement bonds. ■ Port of Port Townsend: Commissioner, District 2, four-year term. ■ City of Port Townsend: Council Member, Position 1; Council Member, Position 5; both four-year terms. ■ Fire Protection District No. 3: Commissioner, Position 3, six-year term. For more information, phone 360-385-9117.

Candidate forum set in Sequim PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The Clallam County League of Women Voters will host a forum for candidates in contested primary races at 1 p.m. Sunday. The two-hour forum will be at the Sequim Transit Center, 190 Cedar St. Candidates will discuss their reasons for running for office and answer questions from the audience. Candidates for commissioner of the Port of Port Angeles District 1 and commissioner of Fire District No. 3 are expected to attend. Both races have three candidates, one of which will be culled during the Aug. 6 “top-two” primary. The two candidates who get the most votes will proceed to the Nov. 5 general election. The Fire District No. 3 candidates are incumbent James Barnfather, Charles “Charlie” Perdono and Sean Ryan, a 2010 candidate for the elected position of director of the Clallam County Department of Community Development. The port commissioner District 1 candidates are incumbent Paul McHugh; Colleen McAleer, the port’s director of business development; and Del DelaBarre, owner of an event services company. Voting on the port position is limited to voters in District 1 in the primary. The general election vote will be countywide. Ballots will be mailed to voters July 16. In September and October, the Clallam County League of Women Voters plans to host forums and debates for the general election. No dates have been set. Information will be posted on the League of Women Voters website at www.lwvcla.org.

Got an idea for a story? Just email us the facts — topic, contact, phone number, name, etc. — and our staff will check it out.

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Welcomes Kitsap Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine

Harrison HealthPartners is pleased to welcome Kitsap Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine (KPSM) to our growing network of physicians. For more than 30 years, KPSM has provided excellence in pulmonary and sleep medicine to residents of Kitsap County. It is our privilege to be entrusted with your care, and we look forward to serving you as Harrison HealthPartners Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine. We continue to provide a full range of therapeutic options for pulmonary diseases and sleep disorders. With seven specialists and two sleep centers to choose from, you can breathe easier knowing you have access to the latest treatments in pulmonary medicine — right here in your own community. Clinic Locations:

OPEN HOUSE Free Pulmonary Function Tests Meet our doctors and tour our Poulsbo Clinic & Sleep Center July 18 , from 4 – 7 pm 19917 Seventh Ave. NE, Suite 210 Poulsbo, WA 98370 From left to right:

1225 Campbell Way, Suite 201, Bremerton, WA 98310

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19917 Seventh Ave. NE, Suite 210, Poulsbo, WA 98370

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Harrison Sleep Disorders Center, 2520 Cherry Ave. Bremerton, WA 98310

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A12

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

W

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2008 TOYOTA RAV4 4X4

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2009 FORD FLEX 2012 LINCOLN LEATHER, 3RD NAVIGATOR LOADED ROW SEATING Stk# P30806

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.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2013 SECTION

FOURTH OF JULY FLAG POSTER In this section

B

Wander

Other area events

Wonder

with

Sequim gardens abloom for Petals & Pathways tour BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — The last garden listed on the ticket for Saturday’s 20th annual Petals & Pathways Sequim Home Garden Tour is a secret Eden, a backyard paradise kept quiet for 20 years. While Bob and Linda Beatty have a view from their wide porch of the garden — most of Sequim, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and far to the north — the garden has been known only to a few friends who visit the home, including an annual Fourth of July picnic. Saturday’s tour will be the first time their garden on Ravens Ridge Road will be open to the public. “Some of our neighbors said they walk by here all the time, and they didn’t even know it existed,” Bob Beatty said this week.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Concerts, lectures, a regatta and miniature war games are among the activities on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For more information about arts and entertainment, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in today’s edition.

Port Townsend Meet-up planned PORT TOWNSEND — A Sustainability Meet-Up and Open Space will be held at Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. today. The meet-ups are sponsored by Local 20/20. The events are free, but donations are appreciated to cover the cost of the facility. Individuals of all ages and all involvement levels are welcome to bring news of projects and concerns to share with others. The majority of the meet-up will consist of a facilitated “Open Space” event, in which any individual can host a 20-minute small-group discussion about a specific area of interest. Those planning on hosting an Open Space discussion should come prepared to announce a topic. Local 20/20 is a grass-roots organization that since 2006 has been working toward local sustainability in East Jefferson County. It is allied with the international Transition Movement in building community resilience in the face of peak oil, climate change and economic instability, according to the organization.

Variety of gardens The seven Sequim-area gardens on the self-guided tour sponsored by the Master Gardener Foundation of Clallam County vary in design, from a burbling hillside oasis to a downsized, Colorado-inspired vegetable and hummingbird garden. Gardens open at 10 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. Advance tickets are $15 and can be purchased in Sequim, Port Angeles and Port Townsend. Tickets will be $20 the day of the tour and can be purchased at the first garden on the tour at 102 Owl Creek Lane, a garden owned by Walt and Sara Johnson that features a low wall curving along the driveway alongside a pump-fed stream leading to a

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Good walking shoes are recommended for a visit to Linda and Bob Beatty’s hillside garden, the last stop on Saturday’s Sequim Home Garden Tour. The tour begins at 10 a.m. and lasts through 4 p.m. Above, Bob Beatty looks out over his garden. pond surrounded by cherry trees. From Owl Creek Lane near Kitchen-Dick Road, the tour loops north toward the Strait, returns through central Sequim, then heads south into the hills, with the final three gardens tucked into the Highland Hills. Addresses and directions to each garden are printed on tickets, which double as a guide and description of each garden. The final three gardens are

steep, and walking shoes with good traction are recommended for those who want to walk in them.

Hillside beauty Among these final three is Bob and Linda Beatty’s 1-acre hillside garden high in the hills above Sequim. The garden has vertical appeal, with a series of switch-

Adopt a Pet

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LOCATION: PFOA

LOCATION: OPHS

Peninsula Friends of Animals

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www.cchumane.com email: info@cc.humane.com

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V E T E R I N A R Y H O S P I TA L

36813604

2

EVENTS/B2

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

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TO

These pets and many more are available for adoption. All pets adopted at these shelters have had their first vaccination and a vet health check.

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for more information call: 360-460-6258

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Clallam County

back pathways, pools connected through a cascading series of falls and ferns, evergreens and deciduous trees chosen for fall color surrounded by a tall screen of native trees, grasses and shrubbery. Even the porch is wellplanted, with a collection of bonsai trees, potted roses, fuchsia and annual flowers.

1-800-778-4295 Get Face to Face with Wildlife Privately Owned and Operated for over 40 years

1423 Ward Rd., Sequim, WA


B2

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tour: Beautiful, whimsical spaces Events: Free

summer concert scheduled in PT

CONTINUED FROM B1 The garden was first planted in 1991 and has matured over the years. Its development and growth are documented on information boards. It was designed by Tom Rankin of Ona Landscaping and is maintained by Turning Leaves landscaping service. The garden is decorated with wildlife-themed sculptures, a tribute to the many animals that visit the garden. Deer browse in the garden, but the Dungeness elk herd simply goes around it, he said. A small tribute to the “work” done by the browsing deer is semi-hidden, a humorous treat for those who spot it.

CONTINUED FROM B1 For more information, email shelly@sustainable together.com, phone 360301-2540 or visit www. l2020.org.

Rat Island Regatta

Steep terrain The other two gardens with notably steep pathways are owned by Larry and Marilynn Elliott and Byron and Sharon Childs. Pathways in the Elliotts’ garden take visitors past seven pools, waterfalls, decorative fencing and whimsical examples of yard art. The children’s garden also features winding paths and ponds, one with a working waterwheel. Other gardens on the tour are owned by: ■ Tom and Irma Colvin, who have turned 3 acres of pasture grass into a large garden with dwarf conifers, ornamental grasses and an enclosed orchard. ■ Doreen Petersen, who has converted a small lot of solid clay into a woodland retreat. ■ Marty and Ellen LaMarr, who are making a small garden that requires relatively little labor for upkeep, with the focal point a 41-year-old bridge built by Ellen’s father and surrounded by columbine. Advance tickets are

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A secret hillside garden that overlooks Sequim features ponds, waterfalls, mature plants, wildlife-themed sculptures and switchback paths is the final stop on the 20th annual Petals and Pathways Sequim Home Garden Tour. available at the Washington State University Extension office at the Clallam County Courthouse and area businesses, including Peninsula Nursery, McComb’s Garden, Over the Fence, Red Rooster Grocery, Sunny Farms Country Store, Vision Nursery, Airport Garden Center,

Country Aire, Port Book and News, Gross’s Nursery & Florist, the Greenhouse Nursery, at all Master Gardener plant clinics and in Port Townsend at Henery’s Garden Center. Tickets also are available for purchase online at www.gardentour.brown

papertickets.com. For more information about Master Gardeners, visit http://clallam.wsu. edu/mg.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

Special patrol to cite boozing boaters PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State marine law enforcement agencies will participate in a national special emphasis campaign today through Sunday to

cite people who are operating boats while under the influence of alcohol, also known as BUI. The campaign, called Operation Dry Water, is a coordinated effort to

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heighten enforcement and awareness. The goal of Operation Dry Water is to prevent injury and death in wrecks resulting from people consuming alcohol or drugs while operating boats.

According to Washington State Parks Boating Programs, between 2007 and 2013, at least 39 people were killed in reportable boating wrecks where alcohol use was a contributing factor. The emphasis patrol weekend is aimed at raising awareness of the problem and getting impaired boat

operators off the water by actively enforcing the law that prohibits using alcohol and drugs while operating a boat. Boat operators may be cited if their blood alcohol concentration exceeds the state limit of 0.08 percent. According the U.S. Coast Guard’s Boating Safety Division, alcohol can be more dangerous to boaters than drivers because boat operators often are less experienced and less confident on the water than on the highway. For more information on the national Operation Dry Water campaign, visit www. operationdrywater.org.

PORT TOWNSEND — The Rat Island Regatta, in which people row or paddle around Rat Island and back to Fort Worden State park, will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday. A mandatory pre-race gathering for participants is set for 9:15 a.m. on the beach south of the kitchen shelter on Fort Worden State Park beach. The entry fee is $20 per person for boats of one or two competitors. It is $10 for members of Sound Rowers, for rowers 18 and younger, and for boats with three or more competitors. The regatta, which is on a 7.8-mile course, is open to all human-powered boats. Participants will start and finish at Fort Worden State Park in the water outside the kitchen shelter. The course goes southeast by Point Hudson, continues across Port Townsend Bay, curls around Rat Island and then returns. Fish will be provided at a post-race potluck. A side dish can be brought to share. The race is sponsored by SoundRowers Open Water Rowing and Paddling Club and the Rat Island Rowing & Sculling Club. For more information, contact race director Steve Chapin at 360-385-0457 or sbchapin@msn.com.

Free outdoor concert PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Summer Band will present a free public concert at Chetzemoka Park at 3 p.m. Sunday. The band will perform two sets of music, separated by a brief intermission. One featured selection will be the Port Townsend premiere of the “Sequim Centennial March,” composed by the band’s conductor, Karl F. Bach. Herb Payson will serve as the master of ceremonies. The band also will play a special Independence Day concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the American Legion Hall, 209 Monroe St.

Chimacum Native garden opening

TATTING AND NEEDLEWORK

Send me to school! you go on vacation, donate the credit for your suspended copies to provide the PDN to schools. Phone 360-452-4507.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Fumie Gage is teaching Brazilian and silk ribbon embroidery and tatting, the lost art of lace-making. Brazilian embroidery is a dimensional embroidery technique which uses vibrant rayon flosses. Silk ribbon embroidery uses silk ribbons instead of the more standard and widely-recognized flosses to create works of art. Call 360-461-9158 for more information, or to schedule a visit with the needlework guild.

ALWAYS WANTED TO PLAY GUITAR? Come learn guitar basics in our oneweek intensive guitar workshop for adults and teens, beginners

LOOP MANIPULATION BRAIDING Cabled Fiber Studio Learn to make flat braid and round braid with a technique that has been in use for thousands of years using loops around your fingers. No experience needed and no fancy equipment is necessary! Saturday July 27 2:00 p.m. $20

plus supplies. Visit Cabled Fiber Studio website at www. cabledfiberstudio. com for more details or stop by the store at 106 N. Laurel in Port Angeles. The store can be reached at 360504-2233, or info@ cabledfiberstudio.com. Advertise in Classes & Lessons Only $20 per week for up to 75 words. 25¢ each additional word. Also listed online at peninsuladailynews. com. Submit by calling Margot at  360-452-8435  or  1-800-826-7714  or email her at  mconway@ peninsuladailynews. com. You may also come to our office at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles. Deadline is 12 noon each Tuesday for Friday publication.

36816383

SUPPORT EDUCATION: When

With Fumie Gage

and non-players. This course has a focus on folk music while teaching fundamental concepts applicable to all styles. July 22-26, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Crescent School in Joyce, WA. $115 includes book! Fun, and you learn so much! For information contact princessonionblossom@ hotmail.com. Professional and experienced instructors.

CHIMACUM — The grand opening of the Kul Kah Han Native Plant Demonstration Garden is today. The grand opening will be from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the garden in H.J. Carroll Park, 9884 Rhody Drive. Port Townsend’s Ukuleles Unite and the Seattle string duo of Georgia Browne and Tom McDonald will provide musical entertainment for the free public event. Representatives from area plant nurseries also will be at the park for a native plant sale. Garden designer Linda Landkammer said the 1-acre garden features 240 plant species native to the Pacific Northwest, and organizers plan to double that number in the future. The garden is named in honor of Chief Kul Kah Han, the last known chief of the Chimakum tribe.

Port Angeles Boys in the Boat PORT ANGELES — The author of The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and

ROBIN V. BROWN

Daniel James Brown will read from his best seller The Boys in the Boat today at the Port Angeles Library. their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, which features a Sequim native, will give a reading at 7 tonight. The reading will be at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Admission is free, while copies of the book will be available for purchase. The book by Daniel James Brown tells of Joe Rantz, who was 15 when his family left him behind in Sequim, and Rantz’s climb to the height of his sport of rowing, as well as how he learned to trust again through working with his crew. Rantz was one of the Washington oarsmen who rowed against Hitler’s handpicked team. The crew from the Pacific Northwest — sons of Depressionstricken loggers and dairy farmers — raced against regimented Germans in crisp whites with swastikas on their chests. Brown is on a national tour, reading from The Boys in the Boat, which landed Sunday on The New York Times best-seller list.

Basecamp series PORT ANGELES — Linda Silvas, owner of the Native American Footprints guide company, will present “Paddle to Quinault” at the Red Lion Hotel from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. today. The lecture is part of the Basecamp Adventure Talk each Friday at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. The hotel launched the series of free talks to showcase the outdoor activities and locations that can be explored on the Olympic Peninsula throughout the summer. Talks will touch on many of the various adventure options available to travelers visiting the Peninsula. Speakers will include ecologists, tour guides, storytellers, filmmakers, historians, anglers and mountaineers. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served, and Happy Hour “Basecamp” drink specials will be offered. The schedule for July is: ■ Charles Smith, chair of the Port Angeles Downtown Association’s Art on the Town committee, will present “Art on the Town” on July 5. ■ Meredith Parker, general manager of the Makah Cultural and Research Museum, will present “Ozette Dig and Makah Museum” on July 12. ■ Chris Gutmacher and Andy Stevenson, copresidents of the Peninsula Trails Coalition, will discuss “The Olympic Discovery Trail” on July 19. ■ Kathy Monds, Clallam County Historical Society director, will speak on a to-be-determined topic July 26. TURN

TO

EVENTS/B3


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

B3

Briefly . . . Book talk scheduled in Sequim

Caleb Klauder and Reeb Willms are among the performers in this concerts at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend.

SEQUIM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Haddonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time will be discussed at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., at 3 p.m. Saturday, July 13. The novelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s protagonist and narrator, Christopher John Francis Boone, knows all the countries of the world and their capitals, and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. The book details Chrisweekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Voice Works topherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s investigation into the suspicious death of a neighborhood dog, making for a captivating, unusual and widely heralded novel. Copies of the book, including audio and downloadable e-book formats, are available at the library. Preregistration for this program is not required, and drop-ins are welcome. For more information on programs, visit www.nols. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Roots and Branches of American org or phone branch manSinging, from the Secular to the ager Lauren Dahlgren at Sacred,â&#x20AC;? will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the 360-683-1161. McCurdy Pavilion. Admission is $20 for adults and free for those 18 and UW Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List younger. SEATTLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; North Performers include the BirmingOlympic Peninsula stuham Sunlights, Laurel Bliss, Caleb dents have been named to Klauder and Reeb Willms, Riley Bauthe winter quarter Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gus, John Lilly, Jason and Pharis List at the University of Romero, and others. Washington. The Birmingham Sunlights, with To qualify for the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their four-part a cappella gospel List, a student must have sound, are coming to Port Townsend completed at least 12 after having toured Europe, the Caribgraded credits and have a bean, Africa and Australia. grade-point average of at To find out more about this weekleast 3.5. endâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Voice Works activities and the â&#x2013; Chimacum: Dillon forthcoming Festival of American Fid- Dukek and Libby Strickdle Tunes, which begins this coming land. Thursday and continues through â&#x2013;  Forks: Shelbie Jones. Sunday, July 7, visit www.Centrum. â&#x2013;  Neah Bay: Synon org and phone 800-746-1982. Allen and Anthony Rascon.

Voice Works concerts celebration of singing Performances geared toward children kick off weekend PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vocalists from across the nation who participated in Voice Works, Centrumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s celebration of singing, will offer public concerts today and Saturday. All events are at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way. First off, a Concert for Kids with Kristin Andreassen will begin at 11 a.m. today at the Fort Worden Chapel. The concert is free for children and $5 for adults. Then comes a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Fridays at the Fortâ&#x20AC;? concert, with a showcase of Voice

Works singers, at noon today on the Nora Porter Commons. The Honky Tonk Dance and Polka Dot Contest happens tonight. Festivities will get started at 7:30 p.m. at the USO Building, and admission â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with tickets at the door only â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is $10. The Voice Works Faculty All-Star Band will dish out the music.

Seeing polka-dots The â&#x20AC;&#x153;best overall polka-dot presence,â&#x20AC;? aka the supremely dotted outfit, will win free tuition to the 2014 Voice Works festival. On Saturday, the finale concert,

Events: Ceremony honors vets CONTINUED FROM B2 training and practice playing two different miniature war games at Anime Kat, Honoring veterans 110 W. First St., between PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday. Local veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; groups will Anime Kat staff will hold a memorial ceremony instruct people on how to at Veterans Park, 271 S. command miniature solLincoln St., at 1 p.m. today. diers, complete objectives The ceremony will be in and defeat foes on the tablehonor of military men and top terrain. women who have died in Warhammer 40,000 will the past month. be played from 1 p.m. to Each service memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4 p.m. name and branch of service The game is set in a dyswill be read aloud, and the topian universe in the 41st Liberty Bell replica will be millennium, where the warrung in their honor. ring factions include The ceremony is held at humans, orks and various Veterans Park the last Fri- alien races. Infinity will be played day of every month. from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Set 175 years into the Multi-family sale future, former nations have PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A banded together in intergamulti-family garage sale lactic federations to battle will be held at the Olympic aliens and an artificial Unitarian Universalist Fel- intelligence for control of lowship Hall today and Sat- resources. urday. Both games are designed The sale will be from for ages 12 and older. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. both days at For more information, the hall at 73 Howe Road. visit www.animekat.com or Items include household phone 360-797-1313. goods, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toys, consignment-quality clothing, Short-story reading books, furniture and more. PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A Organizers request no public reading of Eleven early arrivals. Kinds of Mourning, a collection of short stories by Port Mini war games set Angeles author Todd DavidPORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; son, is set for Saturday. Gamers can receive free The reading will be from

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Strawberry shortcake PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A strawberry shortcake fundraiser to benefit the Port Angeles Farmers Market is planned for this Saturday and Saturday, July 6. Nashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organic Produce will provide berries for the event with handmade

shortcakes and real whipped cream. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strawberries are the first berry of the summer, and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crop of Nashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organic berries is extra sweet and delicious,â&#x20AC;? said market manager Cynthia Warne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The strawberry season is a relatively short one, so people who love this special summer fruit should come on out and enjoy them while they last.â&#x20AC;? Strawberry shortcake will be served from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day and will sell for $5 per serving while supplies last. TURN

TO

PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Port Angeles High School graduate Brianna Webb has been awarded the 2012-2013 Richard E. Fisch Memorial Scholarship for $700. Fisch was a member of the original faculty when Peninsula College opened in 1961, and in the 1980s, he served jointly on the college faculty and in the state Legislature. On his passing in 1987, his family established a scholarship in his name for a student living in Legislative District 24 whose interest lies in the social sciences or public service. Webb plans to attend Washington State University to study history and the German language. She is the daughter of Butch and Lisa Webb of Port Angeles.

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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Two Port Townsend students graduated last month from Coloâ&#x2013; Port Angeles: Hanrado College. nah Bear, Margaret Flynn George earned a Maynes Bohman, Alice Bachelor of Science in Bradford, Cassidy Butler, physics. He is the son of Rebekkah Curtin, Justin Sarah Spaeth and Tom Gailey, John Ketchum, George of Port Townsend. Megan Lindley, Sebastian Hallie Kopald graduOstrovsky, Nicole Stephens, ated cum laude with a Kane Swanson and MorBachelor of Arts in art. She gan Wilbanks. is the daughter of Jack and â&#x2013;  Port Hadlock: Kevin Christopher Buretta, Candy Kopald of Port Townsend. Cali Kopczick, Sean MisPeninsula Daily News kimins and Tara Peters.

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3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Davidson is an addiction counselor and has written a memoir, The End of Innocence: Looking Back. Books will be available for purchase after the reading.

â&#x2013; Port Ludlow: Hannah Spitzbart. â&#x2013;  Port Townsend: Emelina Berkshire, Emma Clithero-Michaels, Simone Elizabeth De Rochefort, Jacob Deberry, Renee Depew, Khloe Frank, Graham Hadden, Benjamin Krabill, Tara Madrone, Kurt Maegerle, Todd Maegerle, Maria Nesset, Samuel Nowak, Benjamin Reinhart, Mackenzie Sepler, Kristen Skeel, Seiji Thielk and Anne Young. â&#x2013;  Sequim: Michael Ballard, Katlyn Edwards, Jay Hennen, Nicole Mendoza Masangkay, Steven Moore, Laura Moser, Chase Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil, Teyloure Ring, Alexander Skinner, Cody Sokkappa, Jared Stewart and Taylor Thorson.

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B4

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Group

car washes set CONTINUED FROM B3 donations of Clallam County school annuals, city For more information, directories, Bible records phone Warne at 360-460- and photos of early Clallam County residents. 0361. For more information, Streamkeepers training phone 360-417-5000. PORT ANGELES — Streamkeepers, Clallam County’s volunteer streammonitoring program, will conduct the first of two summer field training days from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. The training will be in the county commissioners’ meeting room (160) in the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St. Those who want to learn more about watershed stewardship and stream monitoring are invited to attend. No prior experience is necessary. Attendees will receive volunteer orientation at the courthouse before heading to Peabody Creek for an insect-sampling training session. A second field training day, covering quality assurance and water-quality monitoring, will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 28 at a location yet to be announced. For more information or to register, phone 360-4172281 or email stream keepers@co.clallam.wa.us.

Genealogy research PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Genealogical Research Center, 402 E. Lauridsen Blvd., will be open from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Volunteer staff will be on hand to help researchers. Regular hours for the center are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. The center welcomes

Football car wash PORT ANGELES — Members of the Neah Bay Eagles eight-man football team will hold a car wash at Price Ford Lincoln, 3311 E. U.S. Highway 101, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The team recently won the Northwest 8 Man League title and are raising funds to play in a national championship playoff in Las Vegas. DIANE URBANI

Rainbow car wash PORT ANGELES — A car wash benefit is set Saturday for the Port Angeles Assembly Rainbow for Girls. The car wash will be held at Les Schwab, 2527 E. U.S. Highway 101, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds will help send Rainbow girls to the annual Rainbow Convention in Yakima from July 12-14.

Gun club visits PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Gun Club is inviting nonmembers to shoot at its range through Sunday. The gun club offers several types of clay-bird shooting, including singles, handicap, doubles, continental and five-stand. Shooting is available from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays and Sundays. Cost is $3.50 for a line of 25 shots, which is reduced from the standard price of $4 per line. TURN

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DE LA

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Flirting their way through “The Mikado” are, from left, Dorothy Hensey, Bonnie Christianson and Linda Grubb. The comic opera runs today through Sunday at the Dungeness Schoolhouse.

‘The Mikado’ transforms schoolhouse into Titipu Readers Theatre Plus show benefits college scholarships PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — “The Mikado,” Gilbert and Sullivan’s play set in a town where flirting is a crime, continues this weekend at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. Curtain times at the historic building at 2781 Towne Road are at 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15 each or two for $25 when purchased in advance. The play stars Trent Pomeroy as EVENTS/B10 Nanki-Poo; Karen Pritchard as his

beloved Yum-Yum; Joel Yelland as Ko-Ko, Lord High Executioner of Titipu; and John Silver as Pooh-Bah, Lord High Everything Else. The Peninsula Singers and Readers Theatre Plus put on a Gilbert and Sullivan musical every year at this time.

Satire of British politics “The Mikado,” Gilbert and Sullivan’s satire of British politics set in Japan, opened in March 1885 and ran for 672 performances. The show is a benefit for Readers

Theatre Plus’ college scholarships, awarded every spring to Port Angeles and Sequim high school students. Advance tickets are available at Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington St. in Sequim; or Odyssey Books, 114 W. Front St. in Port Angeles. Tickets also will be sold at the door. To find out more, phone 360-7973337 or visit www.ReadersTheatre Plus.com.

Who’s playing? John Nelson’s “Live Music” column tells you. Thursdays in

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

36816369


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

Olson’s party features derby

Neah Bay kids derby Big Salmon Resort (360-6452374) in Neah Bay will hold its fourth annual kids salmon derby from Thursday, July 4 through Saturday, July 6. The derby is open to kids up to 18 years old, with a buy-in of $10. The prizes are various, things such as video game systems, bikes, mp3 players, gift certificates and hats.

Spot shrimp closure Remember how a larger percentage of the shrimp allotment was given to recreational shrimpers in Marine Area 6 (Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca) this year? Well, the sport shrimpers have taken advantage of the increase. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife announced Thursday that Marine Area 6 will close to recreational spot shrimp fishing tonight at 9 p.m. due to the quota already being reached. It will be interesting to see how this affects next year’s spot shrimp season. TURN

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HORTON/B7

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson, right, hands off to Marshawn Lynch during minicamp on June 12 in Renton. With Wilson getting a full season and off-season of work with the first-team under his belt, the Seahawks’ offense expects to be improved this coming year.

A well-oiled machine Seahawks’ offense will be hard to stop

last year to where we are right now,” Wilson said. “That growth is really, really good. We’re basically putting in the same plays that we’ve had in the playoffs.

MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

‘Focused on the details’

RENTON — As a rookie during the Seattle Seahawks offseason program, Russell Wilson was immersed in a three-way battle for the quarterback job, relegated to splitting reps three ways with the first-unit offense. The limited reps for Wilson hindered his ability to develop chemistry with the first unit, which played a role in the team’s slow start offensively. The Seahawks averaged 17.2 points a contest through the first five games. But once Pete Carroll loosened the reins, Wilson led Seat-

NFL tle’s offense to 29.6 points a contest for the final 11 games of the regular season. Wilson’s inconsistent play during the first month of 2012 is distant memory as the Seahawks completed the team’s offseason program two weeks ago. With all 11 starters from last season still in the fold, Seattle’s offense is ahead of the curve heading into the 2013 season. “The playbook is so much more extensive from this point

“That type of offense right now where we’re really intricate and really focused on the details, and when you focus on the details and continue to harp on those details, the more you’ll grow and learn, and the better you’ll be when you have those big opportunities in games. “I think that’s going to give us a good chance when we get to preseason, and the regular season, also.” Center Max Unger said the offense went through installations for the team’s base plays three to four times during the offseason training program,

which allowed for Seahawks to tweak and add new wrinkles along the way. “The way we’re able to run through our drills is lightning compared to two years ago, or even last year,” Unger said. “Everyone knows what they’re doing. Everyone knows where they’re supposed to be, which lets us focus on a lot of other things we should be doing.” Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell will have a good problem to solve when training camp begins at the end of July — how to get the ball to all of Seattle’s talented playmakers. “That’s why it’s important to build your foundation first — so here’s who we are, and what we are,” Bevell said. TURN

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HAWKS/B6

Wedge: No more wiggle room M’s manager angry about lack of offense BY RYAN DIVISH MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

SEATTLE — Eric Wedge is tired of talking about approach, swing mechanics, confidence and all of the things that go into hitting a baseball well. S i n c e taking over as manager of one of the most offensively chall e n g e d teams in b a s e b a l l Next Game before the 2011 sea- Today son, Wedge vs. Cubs has heard at Safeco Field u n e n d i n g Time: 7 p.m. debate and On TV: ROOT analysis about his team’s hitting. So, after watching his team waste another solid outing by Felix Hernandez in a 4-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates on Wednesday, Wedge was moved past the point of discussion. “I’m tired of even talking about it,” he said. “You’ve got to hit. “We can break it down 10 times and then break it down 10 times again. We’ve been doing that here for 21⁄2 years. And it hasn’t gotten any better. “We’ve got to hit.” The Mariners, who came into the game last in the American League in runs per game (3.6) and batting average (.236), mustered eight hits.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Endy Chavez fouls off a pitch in the ninth inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates on Wednesday in Seattle. Chavez later struck out as the Mariners failed to rally to a victory yet again. But none of them came in the five at-bats with runners in scoring position while the Mariners stranded 10 runners on base.

Too little, too often Wedge has seen hitting performances like that too many times during his 21⁄2-season tenure. “You are not going to win games unless you hit,” Wedge said. “They got the two-out hit, we didn’t. Game over. That’s the difference.” The Pirates’ two-out hit came in the top of the ninth inning of a 2-2 game. Pittsburgh’s Pedro Alvarez

led off with a hard single to right off reliever Charlie Furbush. Neil Walker bunted Alvarez into scoring position. Wedge then called on righthander Yoervis Medina to finish the inning. Medina got Gaby Sanchez to ground out to third for the second out. With first base open, Medina then intentionally walked left-handed hitting Travis Snider. But the move backfired when No. 9 hitter Jordy Mercer singled sharply up the middle to drive in Alvarez. The Pirates added a run when Medina uncorked a wild pitch on a swinging third strike

to Starling Marte that allowed Snider to score. “I’ve been on the other side of that stick,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. “Sometimes, you get the matchups you want, and you don’t get the results you want.” Down 4-2 in the bottom of the ninth, the Mariners’ victory hopes seemed slim. But they managed to put the tying run on base against reliever Mark Melancon. Pinch-hitter Mike Zunino delivered a one-out single and Nick Franklin later singled with two outs. TURN

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M’S/B7

SPORTS/BUSINESS

OLSON’S RESORT IN Sekiu is going all out as it celebrates its 80th anniversary next week. It’s no surprise that a Lee salmon derby is Horton involved, because what would a major event in Sekiu be without a fishing derby? On Saturday, July 6, Olson’s Resort (360-9632311) will host a one-day derby that will dish out $10,000 in cash prizes. Yes, the comma is in the correct place and that figure contains the correct amount of zeros — $10,000 in cash. There will be three different derby ladders; one each for chinook, coho and pink salmon. The biggest chinook wins $4,000, second place takes $1,300, and third place receives $500. For coho, the top fish earns $2,000, second place gets $500, and third takes home $200. The pinks prize money is $1,100, $300 and $100, respectively, for first, second and third place. The buy-in for the derby is $25. So, the angler who catches the top chinook will earn 160 times more than they invested. The salmon season begins Monday in Sekiu (Marine Area 5), and chinook will be the biggest ticket next week. But, Tara Hergert of Olson’s Resort said commercial fisherman have reported seeing coho starting to show up around Sekiu. There also will be a free-entry kids derby with prizes of $30, $20 and $10. Weigh-in for the derbies is 6 p.m. Saturday. The celebration of Olson’s 80 years consists of more than a salmon derby, though. It is a three-day affair (July 4-7) that includes events and activities for the entire family. My favorite is a carving show put on by Chainsaw Jack, also known as Jack McEntire, who was once featured on the TV show “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.” Chainsaw Jack makes amazing wood carvings of all sizes. Including school mascots. Since Port Townsend High School is in the market for a new mascot, here are a few ideas from Chainsaw Jack’s work: www.tinyurl.com/ WoodMascots. The celebration also will include a flame thrower/juggler, live entertainment, food booths, vendors and salmon on a stick. For more information, contact Olson’s Resort at 360-963-2311.


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today No events scheduled

Saturday Baseball: Blaze of South Kitsap at Sequim U18 (doubleheader), TBA; North Kitsap Americans at Wilder (doubleheader), at Civic Field, noon.

Sunday Baseball: Sequim U18 at Wilder (doubleheader), at Civic Field in Port Angeles, 1 p.m.

Area Sports Adult Softball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Wednesday Women’s Division Smuggler’s Landing 7, Airport Garden Center 3 California Horizon 12, Elwha Bravettes 8 Smuggler’s Landing 8, Elwha Bravettes 4 Men’s Purple Division Next Door Gastropub 8, Moose Lodge Bulls 4 Moose Lodge Bulls 15, Cafe New Day 5 Elwha Young Gunz 10, Cafe New Day 5 Elwha Young Gunz 7, All Weather Heating 2 All Weather Heating 14, Earth Tech Construction 13 Next Door Gastropub 9, Earth Tech Construction 6

BRINGING

Baseball American League West Division W L Texas 46 33 Oakland 46 34 Los Angeles 36 43 Seattle 34 45 Houston 30 49 East Division W L Boston 47 33 Baltimore 43 36 New York 42 36 Tampa Bay 41 38 Toronto 39 38 Central Division W L Detroit 42 35 Cleveland 40 37 Kansas City 36 39 Minnesota 34 40 Chicago 32 43

Pct GB .582 — .575 ½ .456 10 .430 12 .380 16 Pct .588 .544 .538 .519 .506

GB — 3½ 4 5½ 6½

Pct GB .545 — .519 2 .480 5 .459 6½ .427 9

Wednesday’s Games Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 0 Miami 5, Minnesota 3 Oakland 5, Cincinnati 0 Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 2 Boston 5, Colorado 3 Cleveland 4, Baltimore 3 Texas 8, N.Y. Yankees 5 L.A. Angels 7, Detroit 4 Kansas City 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Houston 4, St. Louis 3 Thursday’s Games Texas 2, N.Y. Yankees 0 L.A. Angels 3, Detroit 1, 10 innings Cleveland at Baltimore, late Toronto at Boston, late Kansas City at Minnesota, late Today’s Games Cleveland (Bauer 1-2) at Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-5), 2:10 p.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (D.Phelps 5-4) at Baltimore (Gausman 0-3), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 11-0) at Tampa Bay (Colome 1-0), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-2) at Boston (Webster 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 4-1) at Texas (M.Perez 1-1), 5:05 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 2-6) at Minnesota (Walters 2-3), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Williams 5-3) at Houston (B.Norris 5-7), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carrasco 0-3) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 3-2), 5:40 p.m., 2nd game St. Louis (S.Miller 8-5) at Oakland (Colon 10-2), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 5-6) at Seattle (Iwakuma 7-3), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 1:05 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 1:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Texas, 4:15 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 4:15 p.m. Sunday’s Games Toronto at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 11:10 a.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 11:10 a.m. Cincinnati at Texas, 12:05 p.m. St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m.

HOME THE SILVER

The Port Angeles 11U baseball team captured second place at Bremerton’s Battle of the Bats tournament. Team members include, top row from left, coaches Rob Merritt, Patrick Nickerson, Emmett Jarnagin and Kevin Miller. Middle row from left, players Ethan Floodstrom, Alex Lamb, Tanner Lunt, Nathan Miller, Timmy Adams, Milo Whitman, Brady Nickerson and Derek Bowechop. Front row from left, bat boy Parker Nickerson, Brody Merritt, Lucas Jarnagin, Gabe Ritchie and Tyler Bowen.

National League West Division W L Arizona 41 36 Colorado 39 40 San Diego 39 40 San Francisco 38 40 Los Angeles 35 42 East Division W L Atlanta 45 34 Washington 39 38 Philadelphia 38 41 New York 31 43 Miami 27 50 Central Division W L Pittsburgh 48 30 St. Louis 48 30 Cincinnati 45 34 Chicago 33 44 Milwaukee 32 45

Pct GB .532 — .494 3 .494 3 .487 3½ .455 6 Pct GB .570 — .506 5 .481 7 .419 11½ .351 17 Pct .615 .615 .570 .429 .416

GB — — 3½ 14½ 15½

Wednesday’s Games Miami 5, Minnesota 3 Oakland 5, Cincinnati 0 Pittsburgh 4, Seattle 2 Boston 5, Colorado 3 Washington 3, Arizona 2 Kansas City 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 4 N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Houston 4, St. Louis 3 Philadelphia 7, San Diego 5, 13 innings L.A. Dodgers 4, San Francisco 2 Thursday’s Games Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee 2 Arizona at Washington, late N.Y. Mets at Colorado, late Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, late Today’s Games Milwaukee (Hellweg 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Cole 3-0), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Volquez 5-6) at Miami (Nolasco 4-7), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Detwiler 2-6) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 7-1), 4:10 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 0-1) at Atlanta (Teheran 5-4), 4:30 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 4-1) at Texas (M.Perez 1-1), 5:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 4-5) at Colorado (Chacin 6-3), 5:40 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 8-5) at Oakland (Colon 10-2), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 5-6) at Seattle (Iwakuma 7-3), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Lannan 0-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 2-4), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Washington at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. San Diego at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 4:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Texas, 4:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

Sunday’s Games San Diego at Miami, 10:10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 10:10 a.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Cincinnati at Texas, 12:05 p.m. St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Seattle, 1:10 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 1:10 p.m.

Transactions

coach.

FOOTBALL National Football League MINNESOTA VIKINGS_Signed LB Desmond Bishop. Waived LB Stanford Keglar.

GYMNASTICS USA GYMNASTICS_Named Luan Peszek vice president of women’s program.

BASEBALL

HOCKEY

American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES_Re-signed RHP Freddy Garcia to a minor league contract and assigned him to Norfolk (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS_Activated RHP Chris Perez from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP T.J. House to Columbus (IL). Traded INF John McDonald to Philadelphia for cash or a player to be named. LOS ANGELES ANGELS_Placed RHP Tommy Hanson on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 21). Recalled LHP Michael Roth Arkansas (Texas).

National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS_Announced the resignation of special assistant to the general manager Mark Messier. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS_Agreed to terms with F Chris Kunitz on a three-year contract extension. SAN JOSE SHARKS_Signed D Jason Demers to a one-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES_Re-signed D Kevin Shattenkirk to a multiyear contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING_Bought out the contract of C Vincent Lecavalier. Re-signed F Mike Angelidis to a one-year contract.

National League CHICAGO CUBS_Signed RHP Tyler Skulina to a minor league contract. COLORADO ROCKIES_Signed INF Reid Brignac to a minor league contract and assigned him to Colorado Springs (PCL). Carolina League WINSTON-SALEM DASH_Released INF Mark Tracy. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS_Signed OF Rogelio Noris. KANSAS CITY T-BONES_Signed INF Kody Hightower. LAREDO LEMURS_Signed INF John Alonso and released LHP Edwin Walker. Can-Am League NEWARK BEARS_Traded OF Brandon Newton to Rockford (Frontier) in exchange for a player to be named. Frontier League FRONTIER GREYS_Signed RHP Ryan Woolley. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS_Signed 1B Steven Liddle. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS_Signed RHP Jacob Roberts. Released INF Jonathan Clark and LHP Mark Kuzma.

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association INDIANA PACERS_Named Larry Bird president of basketball operations. Announced assistant coach Jim Boylen also will not return next season. MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES_Named Dave Joerger

LACROSSE National Lacrosse League NLL_Approved the relocation of the Stealth franchise from Everett, Wash. to Vancouver.

SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK RED BULLS_Waived F Rafhinha. SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC_Waived D Ashani Fairclough. SPORTING KANSAS CITY_Recalled F Dom Dwyer from Orlando City (USL PRO). TORONTO FC_Placed D Logan Emory on waivers.

COLLEGE FAIRFIELD_Named John Cirillo sports media relations/marketing consultant. HIGH POINT_Named Jon Litchfield associate athletic director for communications and Jared Micklos associate athletic director for internal operations. Announced men’s junior basketball G Brian Richardson has transferred from South Carolina and will be eligible for the 2014-15 season. LOUISIANA TECH_Announced the resignation of athletic director Bruce Van De Velde. SOUTH CAROLINA_Announced 1B Ryan Ripken was leaving the program. VIRGINIA TECH_Announced the resignation of baseball coach Pete Hughes to take the same position at Oklahoma. Named Patrick Mason baseball coach.

Hawks: ‘Real tough offense to stop’ CONTINUED FROM B5 offense apart is having Wilson at the controls. “These are the ones that we do. “We know who’s going to lead And then you’re just going to start the team with Russell, obviously,” adding little wrinkles along the way. And all of them are still off Rice said. “Everybody’s comfortable with the core plays.” Receiver Sidney Rice said the him. The way he carries himself, one thing that sets Seattle’s and the way he studies and pre-

pares, I don’t think we want anybody else back there. He’s taken control of this team.” Rice added one thing that will make it easier for him to get open is having Percy Harvin on his team again. “It’s going to be huge,” Rice said. “I know I’m excited myself.

“Golden [Tate] has to be excited — even Percy. He’s just going to open up things for the whole offense. “With Marshawn [Lynch] in the backfield, Russell back there tossing around the rock, it’s going to be a real tough offense to stop.”

SPORTS ON TV

Today 6 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Irish Open, Round 2, Site: Carton House Golf Club Maynooth, Ireland (Live) 9 a.m. (27) ESPN2 X Games, Site: Olympic Stadium - Munich, Germany (Live) 9:30 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Constellation SENIOR PLAYERS, Round 2, Site: Fox Chapel Golf Club - Pittsburgh, Pa. (Live) Noon (27) ESPN2 Golf LPGA, U.S. Women’s Open, Round 2, Site: Sebonack Golf Course - Southhampton, N.Y. (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, AT&T National, Round 2, Site: Congressional Country Club - Bethesda, Md. (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Auto Racing NASCAR, Feed the Children 300, Nationwide Series, Site: Kentucky Speedway Sparta, Ky. (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Boxing, Friday Night Fights, Proska vs. Mora, Site: Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena - Jacksonville, Fla. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT WGN Baseball MLB, Chicago Cubs vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live)

Saturday 5 a.m. (26) ESPN Tennis ITF, Wimbledon, Semifinals, Site: All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club - Wimbledon, England (Live) 5 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Irish Open, Round 3, Site: Site: Carton House Golf Club - Maynooth, Ireland (Live) 10 a.m. (4) KOMO X Games 19, Site: Olympic Stadium - Munich, Germany (Live) 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Softball NPF, Chicago Bandits vs. Akron Racers, Site: Firestone Stadium - Akron, Ohio (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, AT&T National, Site: Congressional Country Club Bethesda, Md. (Live) 11:30 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, Constellation SENIOR PLAYERS, Round 3 (Live) Noon (5) KING Golf LPGA, U.S. Women’s Open, Round 3, Site: Sebonack Golf Course - Southhampton, N.Y. (Live) Noon (7) KIRO Golf PGA, AT&T National, Round 3, Site: Congressional Country Club - Bethesda, Md. (Live) 12:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football CFL, Saskatchewan Roughriders at Edmonton Eskimos (Live) 1 p.m. (26) ESPN X Games, Site: Olympic Stadium - Munich, Germany (Live) 1 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Cleveland Indians vs. Chicago White Sox, Site: U.S. Cellular Field - Chicago (Live) 4 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Chicago Cubs vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live) 4:30 p.m. (31) TNT Auto Racing NASCAR, Quaker State 400, Sprint Cup Series, Site: Kentucky Speedway - Sparta, Ky. (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Softball NPF, Chicago Bandits vs. Akron Racers, Site: Firestone Stadium - Akron, Ohio (Live) 4:30 a.m. (24) CNBC Auto Racing F1, British Grand Prix, Site: Silverstone Circuit - Silverstone, England (Live) 5:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Irish Open, Final Round, Site: Carton House Golf Club - Maynooth, Ireland (Live)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

B7

Horton: Albacore tuna within 20 miles CONTINUED FROM B5 darted toward the bottom. Eldon quickly gathered the halibut landing gear. Will the state decrease The fish would not the length of the season or budge from the bottom, so the amount allotted to the Mitzi had to employ the lift sport shrimpers? rod up, reel down techMarine Area 6 remains nique. open through Oct. 15 for When the fish broke the the harvest of non-spot shrimp (coonstripe and surface 20 minutes later, it pink), but keep in mind was revealed as a 42-pound that any spot shrimp red-fleshed male chinook, pulled up in a pot must be not a halibut. immediately returned to â&#x20AC;&#x153;After I shouted somethe water. thing that cannot be The marine areas on the printed, the halibut landNorth Olympic Peninsula ing gear was scrambled, still open to recreational [and] the landing net readspot shrimping are 3 ied,â&#x20AC;? Eldon wrote in a letter (LaPush), 4 (Neah Bay) to me a few months ago. and 5 (Sekiu).

Tuna in close

Nice catch, Mitzi

Ward Norden, a fishing tackle wholesaler and former fishery biologist, reports that albacore tuna are less than 20 miles off the mouth of the Quinault River. But it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t likely they will stay that close. When the forecasted winds shift, the albacore will move 30 to 50 miles offshore within a few days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It does happen that fast,â&#x20AC;? Norden said.

This fish story happened last August, but it and the accompanying photo are so great that I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it go to waste. Maybe it will serve as inspiration for the ocean salmon season that begins Monday in much of the Peninsula. Sequim summer residents Mitzi and Eldon Baker (also of Telegraph Cove, British Columbia) were fishing off Malcolm Island, British Columbia, on their boat Sea Jazz II. Using a 5-inch LuhrJensen Coyote spoon trolled behind a Pro-Troll flasher, Mitzi hooked a big fish. After three long runs that required a chase with the kicker engine, the fish

Take a dip Norden said warmer temperatures should increase water temperatures enough for swimming. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the weatherman is right about this coming heat wave, water will be

warm enough for a swim at many of our local popular swimming holes,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of the favorites are the public beach at the boat harbor in Quilcene â&#x20AC;&#x201D; water should be into the 70s there by next Saturday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Tarboo Lake, with water temps in the high 60s.â&#x20AC;?

the saltwater salmon seasons. The portion of Marine Area 6 that is open to hatchery chinook fishing (west of a north-south line through the No. 2 buoy immediately east of Ediz Hook), also will be open to hatchery coho fishing. Thanks to John Albiso of the North Olympic PenMenkal class insula Chapter of the Now that he has moved Coastal Conservation Assointo his new location, Brian ciation for setting me Menkal of Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sporting straight. Goods and More (360-683Also, while weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on this 1950) in Sequim will once subject, Marine Area 9 again teach his two-part (Admiralty Inlet) doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rivers salmon and steelopen to chinook fishing head course. until Tuesday, July 16, but The first class is Tuesdoes open to coho and day (July 2), and the secpinks on Monday. ond is the following TuesI intentionally didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t day (July 9). Both sessions start at 6 include this in Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column, but a question p.m. and end at 8:30 p.m. The cost for the class is from a reader prompted me $25. Bring a notepad, pen to lay it all out there. or pencil and a chair. Class attendance is lim- Send photos, stories ited to 20 participants. To Have a photograph, a reserve a spot or for more information, phone Menkal fishing or hunting report, an anecdote about an outat 360-683-1950. doors experience or a tip on The classes are held at Brianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sporting Goods and gear or technique? Send it to sports@peninMore at 609 W. Washington suladailynews.com or P.O. St. in Sequim. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Correction Sigh. Despite poring over the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fishing regulations for a good hour, I still managed to make a mistake in Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column about

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Mitzi Baker, a summer resident of Sequim, caught this 42-pound chinook while fishing off Malcolm Island, British Columbia.

Worst showing for U.S. men since 1912 BY HOWARD FENDRICH

Wimbledon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; What a stark statistic for the nation of Bill Tilden and Don Budge, John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors, Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been 101 years since no men from the United States reached Wimbledonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third round. And the last time it happened, way back in 1912, no Americans even entered the oldest Grand Slam tournament. By the end of Thursday, all 11 U.S. men in the 2013 field at the All England Club were gone, with topseeded Novak Djokovic accounting for the last one by beating 156th-ranked qualifier Bobby Reynolds 7-6 (2), 6-3, 6-1. Earlier in the day, former top-five player James Blake lost to Bernard Tomic of Australia 6-3, 6-4, 7-5, while qualifier Denis Kudla was beaten by Ivan Dodig of

Croatia 6-1, 7-6 (4), 7-5. That trio joined 18thseeded John Isner, 21stseeded Sam Querrey, Ryan Harrison, Steve Johnson, Alex Kuznetsov, Wayne Odesnik, Rajeev Ram and Michael Russell on the way home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough stat to hear, but I still believe, right now, where U.S. tennis is, not too many guys are in their prime,â&#x20AC;? said Kudla, a 20-year-old from Arlington, Va., who is ranked 105th. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the numbers are like that. But a lot of guys are, maybe, in the tail end of their careers and a lot of guys are coming up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe next year, or the year after that, things could change. You have to go through a little bit of a struggle to get some success.â&#x20AC;? Led by top-seeded and defending champion Serena

Williams, the U.S. women still are represented in singles at Wimbledon this year. Williams extended her winning streak to 33 matches, the longest on tour since 2000, by eliminating 100th-ranked qualifier Caroline Garcia of France 6-3, 6-2, while 18-year-old Madison Keys knocked off 30th-seeded Mona Barthel of Germany 6-4, 6-2. Keys next plays 2012 runner-up Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland, and Williams goes from a 19-yearold opponent in Garcia to a 42-year-old opponent in Kimiko Date-Krumm, the oldest woman to reach the third round at Wimbledon since the Open era began in 1968. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have so much respect for her. I think sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so inspiring to be playing such high-level tennis at her age,â&#x20AC;? said Williams, who at 31 is the oldest No. 1 in WTA rankings history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real danger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Novak Djokovic of Serbia returns to Bobby Reynolds of the United States during their second-round match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on Thursday. on the grass court, I know that. I definitely will have to be ready.â&#x20AC;? Already into the third round with a victory a day earlier was No. 17 Sloane Stephens, while yet another American, wild-card entry

Alison Riske, had her match against Urszula Radwanska â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Agnieszkaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger sister â&#x20AC;&#x201D; postponed by rain Thursday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put my finger on why the women are doing better than the men,â&#x20AC;? Reyn-

olds said. He wound up facing Djokovic with Centre Courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retractable roof closed because of the first drizzles of the fortnight, which prevented five singles matches from starting.

Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Wedge tired of teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s punchless offense CONTINUED FROM B5 and Michael Saunders flew out to left field to kill the That brought up Kyle rally. Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two runs came Seager, one of the Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; better hitters, representing from a sacrifice fly from Saunders in the fourth the winning run. Seager swung at the inning and a solo homer first pitch from Melancon from Raul IbaĂąez in sixth and grounded out to first to inning off left-hander Justin Wilson. end the game. While Wedge is clearly The Mariners also missed out on a prime scor- irritated with most of his ing opportunity in the playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; inability to manueighth inning against facture runs, he has no such reliever Vin Mazzaro, get- anger toward IbaĂąez, who ting runners on first and leads the team in homers (18) and RBI (43). second with one out. Justin Smoak struck out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raul has been fantas-

tic,â&#x20AC;? Wedge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shining example what you want a big leaguer to be. But we got other guys that need to be doing better, both young and old.â&#x20AC;?

Back in form Hernandez was better on Wednesday. After an awful start in Anaheim, Calif., where he gave up seven runs on 12 hits in five innings against the Angels, the Marinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ace looked more like himself. He threw seven innings,

giving up two runs on six hits with 11 strikeouts and two walks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had pretty good command with the fastball, and my breaking ball was much better,â&#x20AC;? Hernandez said. The two runs came on one swing of the bat. Hernandez made a mistake to Neil Walker, who ripped a two-run homer to right. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was behind in the count and tried to throw a sinker and it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sink,â&#x20AC;? Hernandez said. And with his team unable to put up any

offense, Hernandez took a no decision. So what can the Mariners do to fix this issue of meager hitting that has dogged them the last five seasons? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a matter of working harder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had any issues with working or their effort. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been there,â&#x20AC;? Wedge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They bring it every day. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not it. [Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] about getting it and getting over the top. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where our issue is.â&#x20AC;?

IbaĂąez had no easy solution to it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to keep grinding and keep fighting,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mentality. If you win small battles on a daily basis from pitch to pitch and at-bat to at-bat, then good things will happen for the team.â&#x20AC;? But Wedge is losing patience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come to the ballpark and try to win games like this every single day,â&#x20AC;? Wedge said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just too damn hard.â&#x20AC;?

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, June 28-29, 2013 PAGE

B8 $ Briefly . . . Torrential rain taking a toll on cherries

MERCHANTS

GROUP DONATES TO

PA FOOD BANK

Port Angeles Food Bank Operations Manager Julie Woodin-Stockert, left, receives a check for $615 from Port Angeles Downtown Association board member and promotions committee co-chair Tessa Jackson. The donation was part of the proceeds of the sale of goodie bags at the PADA Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Night Out on May 16. Three bins of food also were donated during the event. The food bank will use the donations toward Friday Food Bags that provide weekend meals for 550 children and their families.

Gettysburg app guides Civil War buffs to sites High tech gives boost to history

National Park Service rangers and guides will offer many tours of the battlefield this week. Otherwise, before smartphones, visitors to Gettysburg could hire a private guide, take a bus tour or drive the battlefield on their own guided by an audio tour from a CD. Adelman said products like the Battle Apps fill the space in between, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proving to be a big space. According to Michael Bullock of NeoTreks, the company that develops the apps with the Civil War Trust, downloads of the Gettysburg iPhone Battle App recently surged.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILADELPHIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; At the 150th anniversary celebration of the Battle of Gettysburg, many Civil War reenactors will eschew the use of modern technology, but scores of tourists will embrace it. More than 5,700 Foursquare users have checked in at sites in the historic borough; more than 16,000 Facebook users have liked it. And in the weeks leading up to the anniversary, apps that offer maps and information about key battle spots have surged in popularity. Garry Adelman has been a licensed Gettysburg battlefield guide for 19 years and recently has moved his high-energy tour into the realm of the smartphone. The project was initiated four years ago by the Civil War Trust, a nonprofit battlefield preservation group where Adelman is the director of history and education. The group has since released 11 free Battle Apps for the iPhone and Android. Guides like Adelman appear in videos in the apps, telling the stories behind the historic sites where smartphone users are standing. Old photos show how a landscape looked during the war. And when a tourist points a smart-

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Strong downloadsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Gettysburg battlefield application on a smartphone. phone camera toward some history, virtual signs appear to show whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In-person historical interpretation, where you can answer peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s questions, will always be superior to a touring product on your phone,â&#x20AC;? Adelman said. The problem, he said, is there often arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough tour guides to serve the number of Gettysburg visitors. For a week like the upcoming celebration, Adelman said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not even close.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gettysburg has always had strong downloads in the past,â&#x20AC;? Bullock said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s increased significantly in the last month or two.â&#x20AC;? When Jim Percoco, a now-retired high school teacher, brought his class to tour Gettysburg using a Battle App in October 2011, the reactions from students were mixed, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For these kids, they need a person to interact with,â&#x20AC;? he said. After the tour, Percocoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense was that some of his students would â&#x20AC;&#x153;rather interact with a warm body than a phone screen.â&#x20AC;? Other students, though, seemed to engage with the appâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multimedia features. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It can bring the experience to a whole new level, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re into that sort of thing,â&#x20AC;? Percoco said.

YAKIMA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Recent showers have been bad news for some cherry growers in Central Washington. Growers have been trying to prevent wet cherries from splitting by drying them with wind turbines and air sprayers, and hiring helicopters to fly over their orchards. One copter crashed Monday while drying trees in Grant County. The pilot reportedly injured his back. The amount of crop damage depends on several factors. But the president of the Northwest Cherry Growers, B.J. Thurlby, estimated that about 25 percent of the Bing cherry crop has been lost. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point, I just feel so sorry for the growers,â&#x20AC;? Thurlby said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have fruit day-today.â&#x20AC;? According to Nic Loyd, a meteorologist with Washington State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Agricultural Weather Network, â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a very strange month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just ends up being where you are,â&#x20AC;? he said. Central Washington has experienced several cool, wet Junes in the past five or six years, he said. In fact, 2011 was the coolest spring since the station began keeping records in 1989. What makes this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rains stand out is that they followed a hot May.

Jeep recall deal DETROIT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A deal between the government and Chrysler over Jeeps linked to deadly fires isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sitting well with many Jeep owners and auto safety advocates. In early June, after a nearly three-year investigation, the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration recommended that Chrysler recall 2.7 million older Jeep SUVs because the fuel tanks could rupture, leak and cause fires in rear-end crashes. But last week, after talks between outgoing Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, the agency compromised, letting Chrysler limit the recall to about 1.5 million vehicles. The agreement removed about 1.2 million

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

Jeep Grand Cherokees, model years 1999 to 2004, from the recall, leaving some owners confused about the safety of their vehicles. Chrysler argued that those Jeeps have a different design than the ones it agreed to recall and are as safe as comparable models from other automakers. Chrysler wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t comment on the recall, beyond the documents it filed with NHTSA outlining its case.

Target cuts Deen NEW YORK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Retailers Target Corp. and Home Depot Inc. and diabetes drugmaker Novo Nordisk became the latest companies to sever ties or distance themselves from celebrity cook Paula Deen as fallout builds from revelations that the Southern celebrity chef used racial slurs in the past. Minneapolis-based Target said Thursday it is phasing out Paula Deenbranded cookware. Diabetes drugmaker Novo Nordisk said Thursday it and Deen have â&#x20AC;&#x153;mutually agreed to suspend our patient education activities for now.â&#x20AC;? The developments are the latest blow to Deenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business. Wal-Mart Stores said Wednesday itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also cutting ties with Deen.

Gold and silver Gold futures for August delivery dropped $18.20, or 1.5 percent, to settle at $1,211.60 an ounce Thursday. Silver for July delivery fell 6 cents to end at $18.53 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Something fishy in bikini barista investigation THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

EVERETT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; To the detectives investigating allegations of prostitution and lewd behavior by â&#x20AC;&#x153;bikini baristasâ&#x20AC;? working at a string of coffee shacks in Snohomish County, the whole operation smelled fishy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from the way the baristas seemed to know when police were watching to the stacks of $20 bills the owner deposited at a local credit union. The money reeked of fish, explained Carmela Panico, the 51-year-old owner of the Java Juggs and Twin Peaks drive-thru espresso stands, because she hid it in her freezer, according to a search warrant filed in Snohomish County Superior Court late Monday.

The problems hindering the investigation werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so easily explained â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is, until one of the young baristas mentioned a â&#x20AC;&#x153;sheriffâ&#x20AC;? who routinely visited the stands, usually in uniform. She said â&#x20AC;&#x153;it was common knowledgeâ&#x20AC;? among the baristas that Panico and her top manager, a 22-year-old exotic dancer and barista, â&#x20AC;&#x153;have engaged in sex acts with him in exchange for information about law-enforcement investigations targeting the stands.â&#x20AC;? That information led to an investigation that identified Snohomish County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sgt. Darrell Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, 58, a 30-year department veteran who has been arrested for investigation into charges of promoting prostitution

and official misconduct. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill bailed out of jail Friday before he was scheduled to make a court appearance. The sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office said he has been placed on administrative leave and is the subject of an internal investigation. Named as co-suspects in court documents are Panico and the manager, identified as Samantha Lancaster. Panico, according to the search warrant, had ties to Talents West, the Lake City management agency that the late Seattle racketeer Frank Colacurcio Sr. used to hire dancers and launder money from his strip clubs. The U.S. Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office dismantled Colacurcioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s empire several years ago, prosecuting his son

and associates on racketeering and prostitution charges. Colacurcio died while under federal indictment for racketeering in 2010 at the age of 93. Because of those ties, the FBI aided Everett police in their investigation. Police say that some of the baristas at Java Juggs were making big bucks, including one who reportedly earned $100,000 in tips last year. Customers would routinely pay $20 for a cup of coffee and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;showâ&#x20AC;? by scantily clad barista that ranged from flashing the customer to sex, according to the search warrant. With Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, one barista said, there was an â&#x20AC;&#x153;unwritten ruleâ&#x20AC;? on how the women should treat him,

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and another said that when he showed up he would comment on their bodies and sometimes ask them to flash him. He first began showing up as early as 2010, according to the court documents. The search warrant says that surveillance footage captured by hidden cameras placed around the stands by the FBI showed Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill showing up repeatedly at two Java Juggs locations in Everett while on duty and in uniform and chatting up the baristas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The surveillance video also shows Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill hugging and kissing several of the baristas,â&#x20AC;? the warrant says, noting that he never bought a cup of coffee.


FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

B9

Love works with faith to heal ills IN THE BIBLE’S New Testament, there is a story about a young boy said to be possessed by a spirit because he suffered from seizures. Today, he probably would be diagnosed as epileptic. The boy’s father brought him to Jesus’ disciples to be healed, but they were unable to help him. The boy was then brought to Jesus. The father said, “If you can do anything, have pity on us and help us” (Mark 9:22). Jesus responded: “If you can! All things are possible to him who believes” (Mark 9:23). Faith and belief are major recurring Bible themes, especially in the New Testament. We often understand faith as a necessary condition to experience the blessings of God. Most of us, then, can relate to the boy’s father, who replies, “I believe; help my unbelief!” (Mark 9:24).

ISSUES OF FAITH in all of this. Rhoads The father’s love for his son inspired his faith and his actions. In reality, faith is like a soul muscle that can be applied in a variety of ways. We can have faith in the supremacy of goodness and truth or, conversely, in the dominance of wickedness and falsehoods.

Robert

Trust in God

When we love each other and ourselves as expressions of sacred life, we have faith in the source of all life, God, and in what God can do. When we focus on the size of our faith, we perversely can give far more attention to our doubt and ‘Help my unbelief!’ feel separated from God. The father deeply loves So it can be more suphis son and is desperate to portive to focus on loving have him healed. rather than on strengthenHe is asked to believe ing one’s faith. yet is concerned his faith One can direct love may not be enough. towards one’s body, relaIt’s a common concern. tionships, work, etc. Our challenges appear Love and appreciation gigantic to us, which is why can transform one’s experithey challenge us. ence in any area of one’s They appear as immov- life. able as a mountain. Although we may quesTherefore, we undertion the sufficiency of our standably believe that they faith, our love is always require a gigantic faith to enough. meet them. Love heals, blesses, Yet Jesus said only a lit- directs and expands our tle faith was actually faith. required. Although the father of He compared it to a tiny the epileptic boy doubted mustard seed, infinitesithe strength of his belief, mally small next to a his son was healed. mountain. Divine love worked with The father did indeed the faith he had. have faith. __________ He was open to the posIssues of Faith is a rotating sibility of his son’s healing, by seven religious leaders and he acted on that possi- column on the North Olympic Peninsula. bility. The Rev. Barbara Wilson of Port What we often overlook Angeles is an ordained Unity pasis the role that love played tor-at-large.

Briefly . . . PT Evensong service set next month PORT TOWNSEND — An Evensong contemplative prayer service will be held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1020 Jefferson St., at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 7. The service, held the first Sunday of each month, will feature music from the Iona community in Scotland and the Taize community in France. All are welcome. For more information, phone 360-385-3075.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHECKING

THINGS OVER

An Indian paramedical staff member checks a Hindu man before he registers for the annual pilgrimage to the Amarnath cave shrine in Jammu, India, on Wednesday. Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims flock each year to the shrine, which contains a large icicle revered by Hindus as an incarnation of Lord Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction and regeneration. Pilgrims begin their journey today.

No blessing circle set this month due to holiday monthly first Thursday meetings from 6:30 p.m. to July Fourth holiday PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1. monthly Oneness Blessing For more information, Circle at Unitarian UniverThe Oneness Blessing AGNEW — Due to the Fourth of July holiday, the salist Fellowship, 73 Howe Circle will resume its phone 360-640-1254.

Meetings resume Aug. 1 at Agnew church

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH

209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

360.452.2351

www.queenofangelsparish.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076

www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Unity service set PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will present “Magnet in the Heart” at Unity in the Olympics’ 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship service. Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Everyone is welcome.

Church on the Pier

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. June 30

Jean Stratton & Margaret Preston

Celebrating Summer with an off-site picnic Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 301 E. Lopez Ave., PA (Disciples of Christ) 452-2323 Park & Race, Port Angeles Pastor Richard Grinstad 457-7062 Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. Pastor Neil Allen & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided SUNDAY Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 11 a.m. most Sundays 10:00 a.m. Worship www.htlcpa.com

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

& Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Summer Breakfast 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Family friendly

34569893

PORT ANGELES — Calvary Chapel Port Angeles will host Church on the Pier at Port Angeles City Pier from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, July 7. The Rev. Andrew McLarty will lead worship Bible school slated with a message based on freedom. SEQUIM — First BapAfter the service, a baptist Church of Sequim, tism will be held. 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Music, a kids zone and Way, will host a free “Colossal Coaster World”-themed hot dogs are all part of the Vacation Bible School from event. The service is open to Monday, July 8, to Friday, the public. July 12. For more information, Children entering kindergarten through sixth visit www.calvarypa.org. grade will “learn to face their fears and trust God Free Gospel Opry through the roller coaster PORT TOWNSEND — of life.” A free Gospel Opry perforDaily music, Bible study, mance is held at 6 p.m. the crafts, snacks and games first Sunday of each month are planned for each day. at New Life Church, 1636 Middle school students Hastings Ave. will be treated to “VBX,” Melannie Leigh will perwith activities geared especially for them in their own form Sunday, July 7. For more information, carnival tent. phone Arielle Vodder at To register, visit www. 360-385-7717 or email fbcsequim.com, email newlifeptwa@gmail.com. office@fbcsequim.com or Peninsula Daily News phone 3609-683-2114.

Confession:

30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

Road, will not be held.


B10

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Lions Club sponsors annual crab feed CONTINUED FROM B4

George Lindamood will offer passages from his novel The Accidental Peacemaker in a free readers and writers gathering tonight at Sequim’s Rainshadow Coffee Bar.

For safety reasons, 12-gauge trap shells must be purchased at the club for $6 per box of 25. Shooters must have a 12-gauge shotgun in safe, usable condition; knowledge of safe gun handling; and wear adequate hearing and eye protection. Club rules and etiquette brochures are available at the club, located at 253093 U.S. Highway 101 across from Wilder Auto Center. For more information, visit www.shootpagc.com or George Lindamood phone 360-457-4053. Reads at Rainshadow

Sequim Fourth Friday reading SEQUIM — George Lindamood will serve as featured writer during the Fourth Friday Readings today. The reading will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Rainshadow Coffee Bar, 157 W. Cedar St. Lindamood will read from his recently published book, The Accidental Peacemaker. Open-mic readings will follow for those who want to read a five-minute-maximum piece of poetry or prose. Those interested in reading should arrive at 6 p.m. to sign up.

Accordion concert SEQUIM — Scottish accordionist Gary Blair will perform at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, at 6:30 p.m. today. Blair will perform a variety of music from around the world. He will have CDs available for purchase. Admission is $5.

Lions crab feed SEQUIM — The third annual Crab Feed sponsored by the Sequim Valley Lions Club will be held at

Pioneer Park, 387 E. Washington St., from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. Crab dinners will be available for $18, with Domino’s pizza available for $2 per slice. Live music will be provided by The Old Sidekicks. The event will include raffles and a silent auction. Beer and wine sales to those 21 and older will be offered by The Oasis Bar and Grill.

Aviation discussion SEQUIM — Matt Wallinter of the Federal Aviation Administration will speak at the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 430’s monthly meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday. Wallinter will present

Ben Tillotson died peacefully on June 22 at the age of 89, lovingly surrounded by his family after a long struggle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease). Ben was born in Bismarck, North Dakota, on November 26, 1923, the youngest of five children. His early life was spent in Bismarck. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and after the war earned a degree from the University of North Dakota. He met the love of his life, Gladys “Dinah” Miller, in Great Falls, Montana, where she was teaching and he was employed by General Mills. They were married in 1951, settled in

Death and Memorial Notice

CHRISTOPHER JAMES BARNETT January 27, 1973 June 21, 2013

BEVERLY G. WELCH

After retiring in 1992, he and Dinah moved to Sequim. Ben was selflessly devoted to his family and greatly respected by all who knew him. He was a voracious reader, and enjoyed a daily walk while listening to classical music. He had a tea-making ritual that was fascinating to behold, and was a major dessert fan, especially of dark chocolate bars. More importantly, Ben was a thoughtful and wise husband, father and grandfather, always with a twinkle in his eye and ready to lend a helping hand. He was a compassionate man of faith who even during his deepest sorrow in the loss of his son Robert looked after the rest of us with comforting words and love. Ben will be greatly

Beverly G. Welch passed away in Marysville, Washington, on June 17, 2013. Bev lived in Sequim for the last 37 years with her partner, Bill Welch, who proceeded her in death on April 13, 2013. She leaves her children, Susan (Jerry) Riffe and Billy W. Welch Jr.; a grandson, Bryson; a niece, Wendy Welch; and a great-niece, Olivia Houseman. Beverly will be laid to rest at the Evergreen Cemetery in Everett, Washington. There will be no service.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at

peninsula dailynews.com

Mr. Tillotson Great Falls and were happily blessed with five children. Ben spent his career in the banking industry, which brought him to the Northwest in 1967, later transferring to work for the government with the Small Business Administration.

GOP barn sale SEQUIM — A barn sale benefit will be offered by the Republican Women of Clallam County from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The sale of household and garden treasures will be at the Ireland farm at 20 Spath Road off KitchenDick Road. Items offered include furniture, books, tools, plants, an organ, men and women’s clothing, and more. Proceeds will benefit community projects.

Remembering a Lifetime

missed by his wife, Dinah; children Ann (Bill) Goetz, Ben (Joyce) Tillotson, John (Gwen) Tillotson and Paul (Sandra) Tillotson; six grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren; sisters Ellen Kelsch and Alice Just; and many in-laws, nieces and nephews. Memorial services will be held at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 North Fifth Avenue in Sequim, on Saturday, June 29, at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; the Salvation Army, 206 South Peabody Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362; or a charity of your choice. Ben, you were a joy to all of us in life, and we’re blessed with beautiful memories.

Death and Memorial Notice SR. MARGARET ANN ROHLING, OSB December 25, 1921 June 24, 2013 Sister Margaret Ann (Finette) Rohling, 91, of St. Placid Priory, Lacey, Washington, died at Providence Mother Joseph Care Center in Olympia, Washington, on June 24, 2013. She was born December 25, 1921, in Swanville, Minnesota, to Joseph and Rose (Gau) Rohling. Sister Margaret Ann entered Saint Benedict’s Convent in St. Joseph, Minnesota, and made her monastic profession on July 11, 1942. She taught for 10 years in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota. She completed her Bachelor of Arts and teacher certification at Seattle University. Sister Margaret Ann was a founding member of St. Placid Priory in 1952. Sister taught at Holy Rosary, Visitation and St. Ann’s schools, Tacoma, Washington; All

st ce Voted 1 Pla 2008 - 2012 e Hom Best Funeral nty Cou in Clallam

Sister Margaret Ann, OSB Saints School, Puyallup, Washington; and Queen of Angels School, Port Angeles. She also served as principal, most notably at Holy Rosary School and Queen of Angels School, where she was a much-beloved leader. Sister retired in 1998 to St. Placid Priory, where she welcomed our guests, taking time to visit with them. Many came to share their burden with her and departed confident of the power of her

prayer and the wise counsel she gave them. Sister Margaret Ann’s first priority was a life of prayer, spending hours before the Blessed Sacrament praying for the many requests given her. She was deeply devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Preceding her in death are her parents; her sisters, Bette Walsh, Rosemary and Kathleen Rohling, Evangeline Kuka and Mary Lou Hegg; and brothers Norman, Raymond, John, Harvey and Joseph Rohling. Surviving are her are her brother, James of California; many nieces, nephews and cousins; and her Sisters at St. Placid Priory. A vigil will be held at 7 p.m. on Sunday, June 30. A funeral will take place at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, July 1, 2013. Both will be at St. Placid Priory. Donations in memory of Sister Margaret Ann may be sent to St. Placid Priory, 500 College Street Northeast, Lacey, WA 98516.

The ONLY Locally Owned Funeral Home and Crematory Serving the people of Clallam County Scott Hunter

Immediate, Dependable and Affordable services 24 hours a day • Our staff has over 100 years experience

Douglas Ticknor

com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased appears once at no charge. For further details, call 360-417-3527.

Jim Drennan

2C706936

■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday. A form is at www.peninsuladailynews.

SEQUIM — A free firsttime-homebuyers class will be held at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave., from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

November 26, 1923 June 22, 2013

SEQUIM — Terry Martin will lead attendees in a discussion of the life and work of Alexander Wilson, known as the Father of American Ornithology, during a lecture at the Dungeness River Audubon Center, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, at 10 a.m. Saturday. Information will be presented on his journeys through the eastern Americas as he discovered and documented bird species into one of the first field guides. Admission is by donation and supports center programs. The lecture is part of a Dungeness River Audubon Center series on early American ornithologists. For more information, phone 360-681-4076 or visit www.dungenessrivercenter. org.

instantly at ease. Now Chris is smiling with the Lord. And though he has left us, his memory will live on forever. Chris had to endure and struggled but had turned the corner and righted his ship. His beautiful girl, Caydence, will be our look into Chris’ eyes, for he loved his daughter more than anything, and she loved her daddy. Our pain will subside, and we know Chris never has to hurt again. We love our son, brother, father and friend to many. A celebration of Chris’s life — of his unparalleled kindness and warmth — will take place at 821 North Gale Street, Port Angeles, at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 29. Sail on, Chris, and we will see you again in heaven.

SEQUIM — The Praise Sisters will provide an “Afternoon of Song and Praise” in concert directed by Viletta Skillman and

BEN TILLOTSON

Bird-lover lecture

Mr. Barnett

Homebuyer class Benefit concert set

Michele Adkisson from Eagle Home Mortgage and Claire Koenigsaecker from RE/MAX Fifth Avenue will speak. A free lunch and refreshments will be served. This class is sponsored by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. To RSVP, phone 360-6832688.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice

Christopher James Barnett, known for his easy smile and charm, passed away at the age of 40 in Port Angeles. He was born in Mobile, Alabama, to Teresa Colene and Thomas Henderson Barnett. His family moved to Port Angeles, and he graduated from Port Angeles High School in 1991. Chris worked in waste management and for FedEx in Port Angeles. He married Tiffany Barnett on March 27, 2004. Although the couple separated in 2010, the relationship left Chris with his beloved daughter, Caydence Jade Barnett. Chris is survived by his parents, Robert and Teresa Beausoleil; brothers Brandon (Cathy) Barnett and Hody Barnett; sister Colene (Scott) Ellis; and his beautiful daughter, Caydence. He is preceded in death by his father, Thomas Barnett; and grandfather Robert Apage. Chris was always willing to share his lightningquick smile with us all. He made people feel

“Aviators: Supervisor of Approach Control” at the meeting at Sequim Valley Airport, 468 Dorothy Hunt Lane. A potluck will follow at noon. The public is invited.

accompanied by Dave Brubaker in a benefit for the Sequim Basque Program on Sunday. The benefit will be at 2 p.m. at Sequim Community Church, 950 N. Fifth Ave. Music will range from old-time hymns and gospel to contemporary. Admission is free. There will be a free-will offering and donation opportunity during the concert. The benefit will support the Sequim/Port Angeles Basque Student Exchange Program in association with Summer in the USA. For more information, phone 360-207-0037 or email sequimbasquefund@ gmail.com.

Leah & Steve Ford

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

B11

Troubled ex needs help with hygiene

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

DEAR ABBY: I have been divorced for almost 15 years. In that time, my ex-husband has been selfemployed and works out of his home. He rarely leaves his house, and I think he suffers from depression. At a school honors event for our daughter for which most of the attendees dressed for the occasion, he arrived in dirty shorts and a T-shirt. I sat next to him to be polite until I realized he also smelled awful. When I tried to excuse myself by saying I needed a “better seat for my camera,” he got up, too! It was an unpleasant two hours. I felt bad for the others in our vicinity. I have tried to suggest that he may suffer from depression in the past, but he denies it. Is there anything I can say that won’t be resented (with him possibly showing up even more disheveled the next time just out of spite)? Unpleasant Situation, Gettysburg, Pa.

DEAR ABBY Their parents let them run through Van Buren the store like it’s a playground. I have signs posted at the entrance and around the store reminding parents to attend to their children. We have lost a lot of inventory due to these brats, and my time is consumed trying to keep them in line instead of working with my customers. I don’t go to their homes and wreck them. I wish they’d show the same respect for my business. Thanks for any advice you can offer. Had It with Overindulged Kids

Abigail

Dear Had It: If possible, designate a small area of your store where kids can go to play while their parents are shopping. Also, post a sign at the cash register that reads: “Customers Will Be Charged for Broken or Damaged Items.” The problem you are experiencing is one that is shared by many other retailers. If any of them are reading this column, I’d love to know how they resolved this problem.

Dear Unpleasant situation: While you may have ended your marriage 15 years ago, it doesn’t appear you have truly divorced yourself from your ex. Rather than having pussy-footed around the reason you wanted to change your seat, you should have told him it was because he smelled like a goat and showed he lacked enough respect for those around him and his daughter to shower and put on clean clothes. He may — or may not — suffer from depression. Because he denies it, there is no way you can force him into treatment. You are no longer responsible for his attire or his welfare. Because you’re concerned that he may show up looking more disheveled “out of spite,” you have my permission to distance yourself if it happens. And if your daughter is embarrassed by his attire, she has every right to talk to her father about it.

Dear Abby: Since my mother passed away, I feel awkward when my parents’ anniversary comes up. I don’t want to ignore this important date for my father (we are very close), but I don’t feel saying “Happy Anniversary” is appropriate either. What do you suggest? Remembering in Orange County, Calif.

Dear Remembering: Your father already knows what the date means. Pick up the phone, say, “Dad, I’m Dear Abby: I’m a small-business thinking about you, and I love you,” owner. I have an educational supply and if he lives close by, invite him to and toy store. Business has been pretty dinner if he doesn’t have plans. good, even through the hard times. _________ My problem is that my customers’ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, children are about to put me out of business. They are out of control. They also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Philclimb on shelving, open products, tear lips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. things apart and throw screaming Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via tantrums. email by logging onto www.dearabby.com. by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Emphasize love, looking good and being happy. Avoid anyone goading you into an argument or tricking you into something that will complicate your life. Change can be good, but only if it is on your terms. Travel and romance are highlighted. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Sit back and wait patiently for your turn. Trying to impress someone by showing off or bragging will backfire. Humble and gracious actions will make the best impression. Romance is highlighted and making selfimprovements will enhance your life. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Deal with emotional matters head-on. If you try to avoid a situation, it will end up costing you financially as well as emotionally. Put more into your future by tying up loose ends so that you can move on without guilt or barriers. 2 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take a cautious approach to physical activity or travel. Mishaps will be due to confusion or uncertainty. Prepare properly and you will turn any negative into a positive. Send an emotional message if you want to get your point across. 4 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Enjoy working alongside others. Take pride in what you do and how you complement what is going on around you. Engage in finding solutions and making improvements that will impress someone you want to get to know better. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take control. Don’t allow changes to happen if they are not going to benefit you. Problems with partners or dealing with expenses or a co-worker will surface if you aren’t direct about terms and agreements. Protect your assets. 4 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll face someone withholding information or not explaining what needs to be done. Ask questions and make a point of showing your intelligence and knowledge. A change in plans will end up being to your advantage. 2 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Set your goals and strive to succeed. Your intuition will not let you down. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing. Your determination and dedication will lead to victory. Embrace friendships and partnerships. 5 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

by Eugenia Last

Candorville ❘ by Darrin Bell [Send feedback to pdncomics@gmail.com]

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The busier, the better. Take extra courses that will heighten your earning potential. Interact with people who have something to offer you. A change with regard to a relationship will be to your benefit. Walk away from anyone trying to control or use you. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You are heading in the right direction. Attend whatever will help you advance, but don’t take on so much that you become physically exhausted. Gauge your time so you can do and be your very best. Talks will lead to bigger and better prospects. 5 stars

The Family Circus

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Hard work will pay off. Ingenuity, innovation and imagination will help you develop your abilities. Greater prosperity and good fortune can be yours if you offer a service that helps others. Accept a challenge and give it your best shot. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Pay attention. Missing vital information will lead to arguments or complaints. Get whatever chores you have out of the way before you move on to pleasurable pastimes. Learn from past experience and choose your friends and activities wisely. An investment will pay off. 3 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Yesterday

Neah Bay 64/52

ellingham e llin 72/57

Olympic Peninsula TODAY AM FOG

Forks 75/54

Port Angeles 68/55

Olympics Snow level: 11,500 ft.

FOG AM

Townsend 70/55

Sequim 72/56

Port Ludlow 74/55

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 65 53 0.08 10.34 Forks 67 60 0.31 56.81 Seattle 72 62 0.16 16.69 Sequim 70 57 0.09 5.60 Hoquiam 65 59 0.00 31.73 Victoria 67 57 0.08 13.55 Port Townsend 72 56 0.10* 10.70

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

National TODAY forecast Nation

Forecast highs for Friday, June 28

Billings 90° | 59°

San Francisco 72° | 55°

Last

New

First

Chicago 81° | 70°

Atlanta 93° | 72°

El Paso 106° | 75° Houston 102° | 79°

Full

Miami 90° | 77°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Fronts

Jun 29

Jul 8

Jul 15

Low 55 Mostly clear

71/55 Mostly sunny

Marine Weather

69/55 Sun smiles on Peninsula

73/57 Sun, sun and more sun

72/56 Plenty of sunshine

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: Light wind. Patchy morning fog. Tonight, W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Ocean: NE wind 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 5 ft at 12 seconds. Tonight, NW wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. SW swell 5 ft at 14 seconds.

CANADA

Seattle 81° | 59° Olympia 84° | 57°

Spokane 88° | 59°

Tacoma 90° | 61° Yakima 91° | 61°

Astoria 77° | 57°

ORE.

Tides

© 2013 Wunderground.com

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Hi 82 98 103 77 85 88 90 101 92 85 91 89 87 84 96 78

Lo Prc Otlk 65 Rain 69 Clr 76 Clr 62 Cldy 65 .91 Rain 75 Rain 71 Rain 76 Clr 69 .34 Rain 59 .05 Clr 71 .07 Cldy 57 Clr 58 Clr 61 .04 Rain 77 PCldy 67 Rain

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 4:37 a.m. 7.4’ 11:08 a.m. -0.8’ 5:40 p.m. 7.9’ 11:52 p.m. 1.4’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 5:39 a.m. 6.6’ 11:56 a.m. 0.2’ 6:30 p.m. 7.9’

SUNDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 6:47 a.m. 5.9’ 12:58 a.m. 7:21 p.m. 7.9’ 12:47 p.m.

Ht 1.2’ 1.1’

Port Angeles

6:44 a.m. 4.9’ 8:15 p.m. 7.4’

1:56 a.m. 3.4’ 1:06 p.m. 0.4’

8:07 a.m. 4.4’ 8:52 p.m. 7.2’

3:09 a.m. 2.6’ 1:57 p.m. 1.6’

9:56 a.m. 4.2’ 9:29 a.m. 7.0’

4:15 a.m. 2:53 p.m.

1.8’ 3.0’

Port Townsend

8:21 a.m. 6.0’ 9:52 p.m. 9.1’

3:09 a.m. 3.8’ 2:19 p.m. 0.4’

9:44 a.m. 5.4’ 10:29 p.m. 8.9’

4:22 a.m. 2.9’ 3:10 p.m. 1.8’

11:33 a.m. 5.2’ 11:06 p.m. 8.6’

5:28 a.m. 4:06 p.m.

2.0’ 3.3’

Dungeness Bay*

7:27 a.m. 5.4’ 8:58 p.m. 8.2’

2:31 a.m. 3.4’ 1:41 p.m. 0.4’

8:50 a.m. 4.9’ 9:35 p.m. 8.0’

3:44 a.m. 2.6’ 2:32 p.m. 1.6’

10:39 a.m. 4.7’ 10:12 p.m. 7.7’

4:50 a.m. 3:28 p.m.

1.8’ 3.0’

LaPush

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

NEW

2013 Subaru

OUTBACK KOENIG

2.5i MODEL CODE: DDB PACKAGE CODE: 01

3501 HWY 101, E., PORT ANGELES

360.457.4444 • 800.786.8041

Pressure Low

High

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 79 Casper 94 Charleston, S.C. 90 Charleston, W.Va. 85 Charlotte, N.C. 90 Cheyenne 93 Chicago 80 Cincinnati 85 Cleveland 85 Columbia, S.C. 92 Columbus, Ohio 87 Concord, N.H. 78 Dallas-Ft Worth 98 Dayton 83 Denver 97 Des Moines 93 Detroit 83 Duluth 80 El Paso 104 Evansville 89 Fairbanks 90 Fargo 87 Flagstaff 84 Grand Rapids 84 Great Falls 79 Greensboro, N.C. 89 Hartford Spgfld 87 Helena 76 Honolulu 84 Houston 98 Indianapolis 83 Jackson, Miss. 92 Jacksonville 92 Juneau 65 Kansas City 96 Key West 86 Las Vegas 105 Little Rock 93

Automatic!

AWD

67 .35 Cldy Los Angeles 51 Clr Louisville 74 .62 Rain Lubbock 68 1.07 Rain Memphis 72 Rain Miami Beach 64 Clr Midland-Odessa 64 .39 PCldy Milwaukee 67 1.71 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 69 1.42 Rain Nashville 74 Rain New Orleans 68 .44 Rain New York City 60 .92 Rain Norfolk, Va. 79 Clr North Platte 69 .36 Cldy Oklahoma City 67 Clr Omaha 67 PCldy Orlando 71 .29 Cldy Pendleton 63 .10 PCldy Philadelphia 74 Clr Phoenix 72 .85 PCldy Pittsburgh 66 Cldy Portland, Maine 67 Clr Portland, Ore. 52 Clr Providence 68 Cldy Raleigh-Durham 52 Clr Rapid City 68 .23 Rain Reno 67 Rain Richmond 53 PCldy Sacramento 73 .04 Clr St Louis 75 PCldy St Petersburg 68 PCldy Salt Lake City 74 .02 PCldy San Antonio 69 Cldy San Diego 52 .24 Rain San Francisco 67 Rain San Juan, P.R. 80 .61 PCldy Santa Fe 85 Clr St Ste Marie 76 Clr Shreveport

82 88 107 94 90 108 74 89 93 92 85 95 96 93 92 94 71 91 107 81 78 73 88 92 87 88 95 88 93 90 94 99 76 78 87 97 86 94

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 114 at Death Valley, Calif. ■ 38 at Yellowstone Lake, Wyo. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

66 PCldy Sioux Falls 88 68 70 2.30 Cldy Syracuse 85 65 74 Clr Tampa 90 74 .45 80 Clr Topeka 98 73 76 .22 Cldy Tucson 104 76 75 Clr Tulsa 96 78 63 .10 Cldy Washington, D.C. 91 72 .01 72 PCldy Wichita 101 73 73 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 82 64 77 PCldy Wilmington, Del. 90 73 74 .05 Rain ________ 71 .05 Cldy 64 Clr Hi Lo 73 Clr 56 43 68 .01 Cldy Auckland 112 82 71 Rain Baghdad 92 73 54 .09 Clr Beijing Berlin 67 53 74 .01 Rain 62 55 87 Clr Brussels 96 72 69 .31 Rain Cairo 78 56 54 .15 Cldy Calgary 84 62 62 .08 Rain Guadalajara Hong Kong 88 83 67 Rain 88 65 67 .29 Rain Jerusalem 65 47 58 Clr Johannesburg 90 64 58 Clr Kabul London 69 54 70 .29 Rain 76 54 63 Clr Mexico City 63 58 74 .66 PCldy Montreal 86 67 78 .16 PCldy Moscow 96 83 68 Clr New Delhi 64 57 77 Clr Paris 66 Cldy Rio de Janeiro 79 68 74 59 60 PCldy Rome 61 53 75 .77 Cldy Sydney 78 69 65 Cldy Tokyo 71 64 64 .43 Rain Toronto 72 60 76 PCldy Vancouver

PCldy Rain PCldy PCldy Clr Clr Rain PCldy Rain Rain

Otlk Clr Clr Cldy PCldy Sh PCldy PCldy Ts Ts Clr Clr Clr Rain Ts Rain Ts Ts Sh Ts Sh Rain Ts Ts Sh

√ POWER WINDOWS √ POWER LOCKS √ TILT √ CRUISE √ AC √ ALLOYS √ ROOF RACK √ ALL WEATHER FLOOR MATS √ REAR CARGO NET √ REAR BUMPER COVER √ A FULL TANK OF GAS & MUCH MORE!

$

22,849

www.koenigsubaru.com

Sale price does not include tax, license and a negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. Vehicles are one only and subject to prior sale. Photo for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. VINs posted at dealership. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 7/31/13.

36794392

Subaru Since 1975

-10s

9:18 p.m. 5:17 a.m. 12:16 p.m. 12:01 p.m.

Nation/World

Victoria 72° | 57°

Warm Stationary

Jul 22

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

New York 86° | 72°

Detroit 77° | 66°

Washington D.C. 90° | 75°

Los Angeles 93° | 70°

Cold

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Minneapolis 81° | 64°

Denver 95° | 64°

Almanac

Brinnon 76/56

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 81° | 59°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Aberdeen 74/57

Sunny

36795212


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

Friday, June 28, 2013 C1

Peninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N DEADMLisIs It! Don’t

Place Your Ad Online 24/7

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

Sneak a peek Peninsula Daily news •

t o day ’ s h o t t e s t n e w c l a s s i f i e d s !

ALLIED LOADER: For tractor. For internation H-size tractor. $150. (360)385-2792 BAILEY: Total emersion sur vival suit, Sealine bag, USCG approved, X L s i ze, n eve r u s e d . $175. (360)452-8102. BARN Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 3175 Old Olympic H i g h w a y. A n t i q u e s , misc. fur niture, tools, toys, fishing gear, and more! BIG Sale: Saturday, 8-3 p.m., 112 Grace Ln. Vintage, collectibles, antiques, art, home decor, kitchen, books, LOTS of new scrapbooking tools, rubber stamps, fishing, lawn mowers, and lots more! CAMPING: Columbia 10x15 tent, camping kitchen, shower shelt with battery pump, com e l a n s t ove w i t h L P hooup. $350. (360)457-9608 or (360) 460-7216 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Fireplace, garage. W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r pets. $800. 460-8797.

C R E D I T A N A LY S T with Craft3. Position is responsible for ensuring in-depth analysis o f C r a f t 3 ’s m i s s i o n based loans which often includes borrowers who cannot get credit elsewhere. Credit analysts are responsible for the financial analysis of potential new b o r r ow e r s, ex i s t i n g borrowers, and also assisting lenders with relationship management and ongoing financial analysis. Bachelor’s degree or relevant exper ience required. Significant coursework in accounting, finance or economics required. Four to six years related experience and/or training. Learn more at www.craft3.org.To apply, please complete the application at: https://home.eease.ad p . c o m / r e cruit/?id=5574711 Application deadline is July19, 2013. Craft3 is an equal oppor tunity employer; women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

GARAGE Sale: 505 East 9th St., in alley, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday. Many items; portable aromatherapy spa, lg doll house with furniture, books, household, horse items and lots more. No Earlies! GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8:30-4:30 p.m., 328 Vautier Rd. Contractors p a i n t , m i t e r s aw a n d stand, compressor, electrical and plumbing items, tables, chairs, bedroom furniture, hospital/day bed, collectibles, new tube side rails for ‘92-’95 Nissan truck, new 5’ x 6.5’ arched Milgard window, houseware items, etc. GARAGE Sale: Tons of Baby clothes and items, household items, nicnac’s, furn. books/DVDs, canning jars, Christmas decor, and lrg Christmas blow up yard displays. Sat.-Sun. 9-4 p.m. 3820 C. st. Ext. P.A.

FORD: ‘95 F-150. Matching canopy, 92k, GMC: ‘01 Yukon. Ver y clean, 4.9 ltr. in-line 6. nice, below KBB, sacrifice at $6,850. 460-8610. $4,500. 452-1646. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : F R E E : D o g s . W e ’ r e Sat., 9-2 p.m., 1822 W. 1 2th St. Furniture, CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. moving and can’t take h o u s e h o l d , a r t s a n d CARGO van. Only 13K our dogs with us. Beauti- c r a f t s , e d u c a t i o n a l orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. ful, loving Golden re- books, clothing, baby tr iever, male, 9 years $8,800. (360)457-3903. old. Handsome, friendly stuff and toys, and hand crafted jewelry. FORD: ‘87 F350. New chocolate lab, 4 years paint, tires, r ims and old. Both free to good P.A.: Room for rent. Orbrakes. $1,595.97. Be- home, neutered. ganic far m. $350 + (360)477-7753. fore 7 p.m. 457-8388. utilities. (360)452-4021. CENTRAL SEQUIM: 2 Br. duplex, fenced yard, all appliances, single car garage, smoking and pet negotiable. $825. (360)457-6092

3020 Found FOUND: Dog. 6/22, m i xe d b r e e d fe m a l e , black and white, 30 lbs., white paws and chest, white lightening bolt m a r k o n b a ck o f h e r neck, Joyce area. (360)461-3919 or (360)461-9295 F O U N D : Key s . M a n y key s, D o d g e r e m o t e, etc., downtown Port Angeles. (360)452-8435. F O U N D : K e y s . Tw o keys, downtown Port Angeles. (360)452-8435.

3023 Lost LOST: Australian Shepherd, one blue eye, one brown, tattoo on belly, Pe n i n s u l a S o c i a l S e curity Office, P.A. REWARD! (360)775-6728. LOST: Cat. Gray, male, Freshwater Bay area. Frightened away by dog. (360)451-7504 LOST: Cat. Large tabby, off Hooker Rd., Sequim. (360)683-7397

3023 Lost

P.A.: 2 br., 1 ba., 2 car gar., fenced, no smoke/pet $900. (360)477-4056 RIFLE: Complete 1945 MN M-44 sighted with bayonet folded. Includes 7.62x54R milsurp ammo a n d r e l o a d i n g i t e m s. $300. (360)457-1597. SEEKING ft position as executive assistant/office manager. Seattleite relocating. jgordon65@earthlink.net VOLVO: ‘93 940. White, 4 door, auto, full power, moon roof, leather heated seats, 88,500 original m i . B l u e B o o k va l u e $2,500. (360)457-8051. YARD SALE AND SWAP MEET Port Townsend Elks Lodge #317 June 29th at the Lodge north east parking area. Fees for vendor spaces for Elks members are $10 and non-Elk members as guest are $12. For reser vations of a space, contact Lodge member Chuck Palumbo at (360)301-4244. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 4005 S. Tiller Rd., off Mt. Angeles and Scrivner. College student cleaning house, furniture, name brand clothes (Med. women’s), kitchen items, books, etc.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

L O S T: D o g . F e m a l e AUTO PARTS m i n i Au s s i e , 2 0 l b s , COUNTERPERSON black and brown, white Quality worker needed. chest, West Joyce. HS graduate min. Must (360)928-9538 have full knowledge of auto systems and operaLOST: LG-840G Trac- tions, heavy duty knowlfone. Fell out of pocket edge and shop skills a at Smugglers Landing, plus, computer skills, Alber tson’s or Library, ability to learn and apply P.A. $20 reward. specific computer proCall (360)417-9526 grams pertaining to the job, be able to follow diLOST: Welding helmet. rections, display a posi500’ west of Kitchen- tive attitude and ability to Dick Rd., between P.A. be a team player, excellent communication skills and Sequim. and ability to multi-task (360)460-1182 is required, job can be fast paced. Wor king 4026 Employment weekends is required. Pa i d h o l i d ay s, s a l a r y General DOE. Only qualified resumes will be accepted. Assistant Planner Mail to: City of Port Angeles Peninsula Daily News F/T with benefits. Salary PDN#706/Auto DOQ. Requires BA degree in planning, urban Port Angeles, WA 98362 studies or related field and one year of profes- CAREGIVER needed, sional planning experi- prefer CNA, HCA, but ence. MA degree may n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l be substituted for year of Cherrie, experience. To view full (360)683-3348 recruitment go to www.cityofpa.us. First review is June 28, 2013. COPA is an EOE.

LOST: Cat. Long-haired black cat, newly shaved, near Peabody Creek. AUTO TECH: Well-es(360)928-3015 or t a bl i s h e d a u t o m o t i ve (360)461-5105 dr ivetrain repair shop GARAGE SALE ADS seeking full-time, experienced auto tech. Salary Call for details. DOE. (360)452-9644 or 360-452-8435 (360)477-1604, evening 1-800-826-7714

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 201 Valley View Drive, off Silberhorn. Kitchen, bedding, bath, electronics a n d m o r e. Pe t i t e m s : 50% of sales go to dog park.

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Sequim area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early mor ning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. Call Dave at (360)460-2124.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General General General Clallam County Clallam County JOURNEY LEVEL CNA/RNA: Ideally LINEMAN available for all shifts inCity of Port Angeles cluding weekends. Apply in person at Park View $38 hr. plus benefits. Villas, 8 th & G Streets, Must have completed state approved apprenP.A. ticeship, have a good driving record and WA C R E D I T A N A LY S T ST DL and CDL plus with Craft3. Position is Flagging and First responsible for ensurAid/CPR card. To view ing in-depth analysis full recr uitment go to o f C r a f t 3 ’s m i s s i o n www.cityofpa.us. Posibased loans which oftion is open until filled. ten includes borrowers COPA is an EOE. who cannot get credit elsewhere. Credit anaKWA HOMECARE lysts are responsible Part/full-time Caregivers. for the financial analyBenefits, Flexible Hours. sis of potential new Call P.A. (360)452-2129 b o r r o w e r s , ex i s t i n g Sequim (360)582-1647 borrowers, and also P.T. (360)344-3497 assisting lenders with relationship management and ongoing financial analysis. Bachelor’s degree or relevant exper ience required. Significant coursework in accounting, finance or economics required. Four to six years related experience and/or training. Learn more at www.craft3.org.To apply, please complete the application at: https://home.eease.ad p . c o m / r e cruit/?id=5574711 Application deadline is July19, 2013. Craft3 is an equal oppor tunity employer; women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

EMPLOYEE HEALTH NURSE Te m p o r a r y p o s i t i o n n o w a va i l a b l e . W i l l provide immunizations, TB tests, complete L&I claims and provide required follow up. Must have active WA. RN license. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org or nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org.

HOUSEKEEPERS Detail oriented. Wage based directly on quality of work, with bonus oppor tunities. May top $11 an hour. Apply in person at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. Port Angeles. No calls please. If you’re not earning $12-$17 per hour... Call today!!! Great Clips offers: ·Guaranteed wage ·Best compensation & benefit package in the industry! ·Commissions and bonuses paid daily If you’re a licensed cosmetologist, call today for your confidential interview. Tana at 253-988-5508

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning Quillayute Valley delivery Monday through School District Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. Is accepting applications First St., P.A. No phone for For ks Elementar y School Principal. Please calls. NURSE: RN, LPN, or visit the district website M A fo r p r i m a r y c a r e www.forks.wednet.edu medical office, FT, office or contact QVSD Adminexp. preferred. istration Office at COOK: Expereicned. Peninsula Daily News (360)374-6262 ext. 267 Apply in person at PDN#708/Nurse for position details and Downriggers Port Angeles, WA 98362 application procedure.

Crestwood Health and Rehab Center in Port Angeles, WA is seeking Part Time and Full Time Dietary Aides.

Finance / saLes assistant

The Dietary Aides assist in preparing palatable, nourishing, well-balanced meals to meet the daily nutritional and special dietary needs for each resident. Experience as a food service aide or cook in an institutional setting preferred apply onsite at the center or online at extendicare.com EOE

36816586

www.crestwoodskillednursing.com

· MS Office Proficient · Strong Organizational Skills · Creative

internet saLes cOOrdinatOr · · · · ·

Building our e-commerce Marketing experience a plus Customer Service Driven Sales Consultant Strong communication skills Driven to succeed · Energetic

· Technical Certifications · Strong Customer Service Skills · Prior Ford Experience a plus · Aggressive compensation · Full Benefits Package / Paid Vacations · Highest Volume Dealership on the Peninsula · Brand new state of the art facility

Equal Opportunity Employer

OB RN Will work as needed schedule. Must be experienced in OB with CPR/NALS/Fetal Monitoring. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org or nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org EOE

Permanent and On-call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center Correctional Officer 1 On- Call Pay starts at $16.48 hr., Plus full benefits. Closes 07/09/13. Cook Adult Correctional Permanent and On-Call Pay starts at $14.67 hr., Plus full benefits. Closes 06/30/13. Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov. For further information please call Roxann at (360)963-3207. EOE. RECEPTIONIST: Family practice has opening for full-time receptionist, includes Saturday. Wages DOE, benefits. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#712/Receptionist Port Angeles, WA 98362 REPAIR PLUMBER Full-time, good driving record. (360)683-7719. SIREN’S PUB: Seeking b o t h a n ex p e r i e n c e d cook and a dishwasher. Fast-paced environment, must be a team player. Apply in person at 823 Water Street. SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR Peninsula Daily News A d ve r t i s i n g D e p a r t ment is looking for a talented Special Sections Editor to produce quality special sections and adver tisersupported supplements. The successful candidate must be a skilled writer and digital photographer who can also paginate articles and photos using Adobe CS6 software on a Mac operating system (proficiency with Adobe InDesign and Photoshop required). Must be a self-star ter who can wo r k i n d e p e n d e n t l y and as part of a team in a fast-paced, deadl i n e - d r i ve n e nv i r o n ment. Journalism experience and knowledge of AP style preferred. This position is based out of the Port Angeles office.

CAREGIVER available for private care. Very experienced, good local refs. Seeking 8-24 Hr. shifts. $10-15/hr. (360)504-2227

BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT Nearly the last view lot o n W. 4 t h S t . i n P. A . Close to waterfront so you can hear the waves. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward b e a u t i f u l wa t e r v i ew, oversized city lot easy to build on. Easy access utilities in at street or alley. Located in a fine established area, across from Crown Park - Close to walking trails. MLS#261167. $69,950. JEAN (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

BEST OF PORT LUDLOW Ta s t e f u l l y u p g r a d e d home with main floor living and 180° water view. Master Suite occupies entire east end. Rock, brick, wood and tile combine for a comfortable, rich interior. Lower level has 2 Br., 1 bath and family room. Some finishing touches needed. MOWING, PRUNING, $335,000. MLS#271051. BARKING THELMA DURHAM Honest and dependable. (360)460-8222 (360)582-7142 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES Mowing, trimming, mulch and more! Call Ground CHARMING SUNLAND Control Lawn Care for HOME honest, dependable Remodeled in 2009, lawn care at your home convenient deck off dino r b u s i n e s s . G r o u n d ing area, plenty of storControl Lawn Care age inside and out, 360-797-5782 easy care landscaping on corner lot, enjoy SunOlyPets In-Home Pet land amenities. ML#497597/271270 Care offers a conven$244,500 ient alternative to ken(360)683-6880 neling your pets and WINDERMERE leaving your home unSUNLAND attended. Call ( 3 6 0 ) 5 6 5 - 5 2 5 1 f o r Custom 1 level home I your complimentar y Milwaukee Heights with “ M e e t ‘ n G r e e t .” O r tons of character. Vaultvisit www.OlyPets.com ed ceilings, sunroom, private deck off family RUSSELL room. Beautiful new ANYTHING w o o d s t ove o n r a i s e d Call today 775-4570. hearth with flagstone alcove, vented to hall for SCUBA DIVER great heating, plus FOR HIRE forced air unit. Master Call 681-4429 wit large bath, soak tub and separate shower. 9’ SEEKING ft position as X 12’ heated sunroom executive assistant/of- off dining room, not infice manager. Seattleite cluded in sq. ft. 1 block relocating. from Olympic Discovery jgordon65@earthlink.net Trail. MLS#271388. $249,000. 105 Homes for Sale Harriet Reyenga (360)460-88759 Clallam County WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES JUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248.

2127 Driftwood Place 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. built in surround sound, French doors t o s l a t e p a t i o, b i g backyard, shed, double attatched garage, fireplace, crown molding. great cul de sac neighborhood! call Ta m m y n o w ! $169,000. (360)457-9511 or 461-9066!

DON’T MISS THIS BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY! Charming home with Mountain Views in town and close to a park, YMCA, and bus lines. Kitchen has been updated with oak cabinets and laminate floors. There are 2 free-standing fireplaces. There is a 440 sf. carport/patio between a shop and a detached garage which has been converted to a multi-use room with a bathroom. There is plenty of garden space, roses, lowers, and berry plants. There is even a place to park and RV or boat. Home is par tially fenced. Great neighborhood. MLS#271062 $151,900. Patti Morris (360)461-9008 JACE The Real Estate Company

SHOP LOCAL

3 BR., 2 bath, propane fireplace, 1,600 sf on 1.07 acres, Mt. View, orchard, raised bed gardens, 2 car carport with attached 200 sf shop, detached 28’ X 36’ shop with loft, storage barn and more. For sale by Owner $250,000.00 11 Mapleton Way Pt. Angeles. By appointment only. (360)460-1235, Sheryl (360)460-3708, Kristi

ELEGANCE Traver tine stone entr y porch opens to a beautiful entry hall with stained vaulted wood ceiling and Italian porcelain tile floor. Great room style home with Brazilian Cherr y hardwood floors, cherry cabinets and black slab granite counters in the kitchen and laundry r o o m . Fr e n c h d o o r s open to spacious deck. Master bath is appointed with porcelain tile, a jetted tub and separate s h o w e r. T h e m a s t e r closet is a must see. Views of the Strait and Mt. Baker. $525,000 ML#27127/496987 Patty Brueckner (360)460-6152 TOWN & COUNTRY

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Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

Email resumes to: specialsectionseditor @yahoo.com

Our team enjOys

Email Resume to NewCareer@PriceFord.com Or call Joel at 360-457-3333 to schedule an appointment

MEDICAL Office data processor, PART TIME. 4080 Employment 20 hrs/week. Experience Wanted using data management software required, scanADEPT YARD CARE ning, MS Office Suite. Weeding, mowing, etc. Peninsula Daily News (360)452-2034 PDN#709/Data Port Angeles, WA 98362 Are you looking for a private caregiver/companion? I have excellent references. Available immediately. (360)460-1193.

20 hrs. wk, vacation, paid holidays.

service technician

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? 815441

1116 East Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, WA 98362 Phone: 360.452.9206 Fax: 360.452.7718

OppOrtunities at price FOrd LincOLn

The Quileute Tribe has several job openings, Barista Supervisor and Barista workers, Domoic Acid Coordinator and Youth and Family Intervention Advocate, visit our website at www.quileutenation.org to obtain a complete job description & application or call (360) 374-4366

ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE COTTAGE Absolutely adorable cottage! Lovingly cared for home with mountain view from kitchen and dining room. Spacious living room with cozy wood stove, the kitchen is large enough for a s m a l l t a bl e. S i p yo u r morning coffee on the deck off the living room and enjoy a peek-a-boo water view. MLS#270183 $178,000 Helga Filler (360)461-0538 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

GORGEOUS DUTCH COLONIAL Gorgeous Dutch Colonial This 4 br., 2 bath, 2,852 sf home was built high-style in one of Port A n g e l e s ’s m o s t d e sirable neighborhoods. Enjoy water and mount a i n v i ew s f r o m m o s t r o o m s. M a ny o r i g i n a l features in this period h o m e. Fo r m a l l i v i n g room, library with firep l a c e, b e a u t i f u l s u n room, for mal dining room with French leaded glass doors and a saloon door to the kitchen. R e f i n i s h e d h a r d wo o d floors on main floor and abundant built-ins. MLS#270907. $275,000. Terry Neske (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD Nice 2 br., 2 bath, with all appliances, in a great location with a water view! Third garage /studio for crafts, or shop. Huge fenced backyard. Newer heat pump and roof. $189,000. MLS#271345. PAM CHURCH 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

ICONIC DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL BUILDING Built as city jail in 1951. Building has solid concrete foundation, walls and roof. Full basement a portion of which was used as gun range. Outstanding water/harbor views especially from u p p e r l eve l a n d r o o f. D ow n t ow n wa t e r f r o n t area one block Nor th currently undergoing extensive upgrade project t o fe r r y t e r m i n a l a n d promenade. Plenty of o p p o r t u n i t y h e r e fo r creative uses. $399,900 MLS#271262 Paul Beck (360)461-0644 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

NEED SPACE? CHECK OUT THIS HOME! 2.45 Pr ivate acres, 5 minutes from the city, 4 br, 3 bath, 3,022 sf, built in 1994, 2-car garage plus separate workshop, gorgeous mountain view! spacious master and spa-like bath, wonderful guest space - pot e n t i a l m o t h e r - i n - l aw qrtrs. MLS#270444. $300,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

NEW LISTING D i s c o ve r t h e p e r fe c t amount of living space in this 3-bedroom/2-bath home in Por t Angeles. Great features include a chic living room with wood floors, fireplace, inviting kitchen with work island, laundr y room, work shop and garage garden space with chicken coup. Beautifully accented home. $330,000.MLS#271316. Jean Irvine (360)460-5601 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

NEW LISTING-WITH VIEWS! Northwest contemporary with salt water and mountain views. Triple level deck with hot tub and fire pit, double level s u n r o o m , s a l t wa t e r view balcony, gorgeous landscaping and beautiful interior. Master crafte d s t a i r c a s e, l o f t o n u p p e r l eve l c u r r e n t l y used as office and media room. Vaulted ceilings and perfectly placed windows and skylights throughout the home. So much storage too! Finished basement currently being used as family room and exercise space. One room ready for sauna and more stora g e ! 3 b r. , 2 . 5 b a t h , 2,839 sf. MLS#271304. $365,000. Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

THE SOUNDS OF SILENCE C a l m yo u r s e l f i n t h i s peaceful setting, buffered with trees, at the end of a private drive on 4.3 acres. This special home offers 3 br., 3.5 baths, lots character and style with beautiful tile a n d wo o d a c c e n t s, a large patio, rocker ies andgardens. $559,000 Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

DOWN 1 “Out!” 2 Image on a poster for Eastwood’s “Hang ’Em High” 3 2006 A.L. home run champ

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. DANCE RECITALS Solution: 10 letters

P H O T O G R A P H E R D G R By Victor Barocas

4 Period marked by copper use 5 Title word with eleven, twelve or thirteen 6 Tour toter 7 Quiche Lorraine ingredient 8 German I 9 Title foe of Loki in a 2011 film 10 “Sorry, wrong guy” 11 Wharton’s Frome 12 Vogue 13 Birthplace of Pythagoras 19 People 24 Ship with two zebras on it 25 Long periods 29 Lemon attachment 30 Blubber 31 One or more 32 Shylock, e.g. 33 Get down 34 Movement that fought stereotypes 35 Spleen 36 Rolodex no. 37 __ pants 39 Dept. with a plow on its seal

6/28/13 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, Jun 29 1:00 to 3:00 pm

36817261

117 Greenway Dr., Sequim COLORFUL plantings frame this home that nestles above the street & 6th Tee! Extensively remodeled in 2007; new kitchen & baths! Oak hrdwd floors; river rock fireplace! Heatpump! 2628’ sq ft. MLS#271288 $297,750 Directions: Enter Sunland on Taylor Blvd, right on Greenway!Lake Sutherland, past the gate on the right hand side.

© 2013 Universal Uclick

www.wonderword.com

P R P G N T C O N U T U G E L

K P I E R D M E R C M S N U E

S L R E T M  S I S I E E O N A

E N T H U S I A S M E G S I P

E C I S T I F T U O A S D Q M

H E I P A P P L A U S E C U U

X C L A S S R E H C A E T E J

6/28

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A c c e s s o r i e s , A g i l e , A p p l a u s e , Aw a rd , C l a p , C l a s s , Costumes, Crowd, Dancers, Dress, Enthusiasm, Finale, Focus, Friends, Judge, Jump, Leap, Leggings, Motivated, Music, Outfits, Participate, Performance, Photographer, Practice, Props, Recital, Solo, Songs, Spins, Splits, Staging, Steps, Stretch, Teacher, Teams, Tutu, Twirl, Unique, Work Yesterday’s Answer: Wine

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

PENIT ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

THIMG (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

40 Spiced tea 43 Columbus’s elusive destination 44 Ella’s English counterpart 46 Nod, say 47 “Star Wars Episode II” soldiers 48 Schools where boards may be used to measure ability

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba., no smoke/pets. $750. (360)461-2438.

49 Where Davy Crockett died 50 Pointed at the dinner table? 51 Ties 53 Seneca, to Nero 54 Boxer’s protection 55 It’s a stunner 56 Operation Redwing event, 1956 58 “__ Lang Syne” 62 Black or Labrador

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba..............$500 A 2 br 1 ba..............$650 A 3 br 1 ba..............$700 H 2 br 2 ba..............$875 H 4 br 1.5 ba...........$950 H 3 br 2 ba...........$1,100 H 4 br 2 ba...........$1,120 DUPLEX/4-PLEX P.A. D 1 br 1 ba..............$575 D 2 br 1 ba..............$600 D 3 br 1 ba..............$800 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

HENTGL

DARITE

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

$99 MOVES YOU IN! FIRST MONTH FREE EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today to schedule a tour

P.A.: Room for rent. Organic far m. $350 + utilities. (360)452-4021.

GUNS: Glock 26 9MM., with Cr imson Trace laser, 3 mags new, $795. Colt AR15, m a t c h t r i g g e r, f r e e float hand guard, new, $1195. 300 Blackout caliber AR15 with scope, quad rail $1295. (360)860-0035

of your new home. Managed by Sparrow, Inc.

P. A . : R o o m i n h o m e, $375 mo., share utilities, no pets. (360)417-5063. ROOMMATE WANTED To share expenses for very nice home west of P.A. on 10+ acres. $500 mo., includes utilities, DirectTV. Must see. Call L o n n i e a f t e r 5 p. m . (360)477-9066.

AT T R AC T I V E , s p a cious 1 Br.-$545, 2 Br.-$645, in P.A. New carpet, vert blinds, pvt patio, updated appliances, laundr y r ms, v i ew s, o n - s i t e m g r. Ask about our current discount. www.olympic square.com. 457-7200 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540. COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br, W/D, fireplace. $550, 1226 Craig Ave. (360)452-3423 P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 mo., $300 dep., util. included. (360)457-6196.

P.A.: 1 Br., downtown, P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 m t n . v i e w. N o p e t s . mo., $300 dep., util. included. (360)457-6196. $550. (360)582-7241. P.A.: 2 br., 1 ba., 2 car P.A.: 1 Br. Apt., water g a r . , f e n c e d , n o view, quiet, clean. $615 mo. (206)200-7244 smoke/pet $900. (360)477-4056 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, remodeled, no pets/ P.A.: Amazing 2 Br., 2 smoke. $675. ba, fenced. $850 mo., no (360)670-9418 pets. (360)452-1395. Properties by P.A.: Downtown area, 2 Landmark. portangelesb r. , 1 b a , f p, fe n c e d landmark.com yard. No smoke/pets. $875, f/l/d. 457-0014. SEA BREEZE APTS. Now accepting applicaProperties by tions. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Br. Landmark. portangeles- Income limits apply. Call landmark.com (360)683-5858 8-noon, Mon.-Fri. 525 W. McCurS E Q : 3 b r. , 2 b a t h , dy Rd., Sequim. gourmet kitchen, large living/dining. No smoke. July 1. $1,250, dep. 683-0906 or 775-6222 WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br. SEQ: 3 Br., on Discov- $600, 1st, last, damage. ery Trail. $925 mo. (360)457-6252 tourfactory.com/581670

665 Rental SEQ: Acre with style. 1 B r. , c u t e / t i d y. $ 6 2 0 . Duplex/Multiplexes Lovely 2 Br., 2 ba, $975. Lease. (360)504-2905. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Fireplace, garage. SEQUIM: 2+ Br., 1 bath. W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r Pe t s o n a p p r ova l , n o pets. $800. 460-8797. smoking. $800 f/l/d. (360)683-8745 CENTRAL SEQUIM: 2 Br. duplex, fenced yard, SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, all appliances, single car laundry room, 1 car gar., garage, smoking and pet no smoking. $850 incl. negotiable. $825. water/septic. 683-0932. (360)457-6092

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market L I G H T I n d u s t . W. o f PA, 2 spaces avail at 1 9 2 1 W. H w y 1 0 1 : (1) 4,000 sf., with offices, restroom, 3 phase p ow e r, wa t e r, c o m pressed air, basic heat in shop area. $2,100/mo., (2) 2700 sf., with office, 3 phase p ow e r, wa t e r, c o m p r e s s e d a i r, b a s i c shop heat. $1,300. Adjoining space can be rented for a total 4,700 sf space for $2,000. Call (360)417-1828 for appt. to view.

CAMERON U PICK STRAWBERRIES Open June 12 683-5483

6075 Heavy Equipment

BURIAL SPACES Three prime adjoining, in the beautiful Garden of Devotion; Mt. Angeles Memorial Park. $1,900 each. (206)322-0665.

CHINA: Complete set of fine china, service for 12. Pastel, floral pattern $100. (360)683-2338.

CEMETERY PLOT Sequim. $1,300. (360)683-3119

6045 Farm Fencing & Equipment TRACTOR: ‘52 Ferguson. 6-way back blade, scraper box, and ripper t o o t h , g o o d r u n n e r. $2,500. (360)710-4966.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition RIFLE: Complete 1945 MN M-44 sighted with bayonet folded. Includes 7.62x54R milsurp ammo and reloading items. $300. (360)457-1597.

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MISC: Dining sets; Glass tops, 1 dark Chippendale, $150, 1 light ash, needs minor repair,. $100. Large oil painting by Daniels, The Musicians, 4x6’, beautifully framed, $1,500. (360)683-2338

6105 Musical Instruments BOOMTOWN FIREWORKS We have the BOOM that will make you SHAKE! Come see us 6/28-7/5. On 6/29 there will be a free Car Show. We are located next to Walmart in PA. We h ave t h e B E S T SELECTION and the LOWEST PRICES. Mention this ad to receive 10% off!

6100 Misc. Merchandise 5 GALLON glass carboys. Pallet of used 5 gallon glass carboys $20 each. For water, wine, beer or cider. Also have a p u m p a n d f i l t e r fo r sale. Call 681-0753.

BUSINESS SOLD, EQUIP. FOR SALE. Large rolling and small metal shop tables, $250. File cabinet safe, $200. 50,000 btu electric heate r, $ 9 0 0 . Pa l l e t j a ck , $500. Hand truck, $20. All OBO. (360)457-3378.

MATTRESS: Temerpedic Cloud Supreme, California king size, medium firm, like new, paid over $2,500 in Aug. 2011, no frame, selling because softer mattress is needed. Asking $1,395. (360)683-5731 MISC: 3 cushion sofa, cranberries and green, $145. Queen Anne highback chair, cranberries and green, $75. Honeymaple solid wood dining table and hutch, (4) chairs, $360. Call Mary at (360)460-3607. MISC: Bed, Restonic mattress and box springs, plus headboard, a n d f r a m e, ex c e l l e n t condition, $100. Sofa, walnut tr im, standard size, 3 cushion, excellent condition, blue, $100. You haul. (360)379-5386

6100 Misc. Merchandise

UTILITY TRAILER 1964 with new tires and tags. 9.5x6.5 wide. Removable sides. $500/ obo. 683-0763.

AMP: Fender M-500, half stack, with foot switch, cables, (4) 12” speakers in cabinet, ex c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n . $550/obo. (360)477-3093 P I A N O : B a by G r a n d , Samick. $2,500. (360)681-3049

6115 Sporting CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. Goods CARGO van. Only 13K orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. $8,800. (360)457-3903. BAILEY: Total emersion sur vival suit, Sealine LOOM: Norwood, excel- bag, USCG approved, lent condition. $900/obo. X L s i ze, n eve r u s e d . (360)457-8345 $175. (360)452-8102.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS will be closed Thursday, July 4th in observance of Independence Day

6080 Home Furnishings

6035 Cemetery Plots

CEMETERY LOT Double depth plot for (2). Mt Angeles Cemeter y, $ 4 , 9 0 0 / o b o. C o n t a c t E.H. Gilbert, 3900 Jupiter Lane A106, Butte, MT 59701. (406)494-7662

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: OPERA HEFTY BOUNCE CAMPUS Answer: The baseball player bought a treadmill for — HOME RUNS

SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 30’. Electric tar p system, excellent condition. $6,500/obo. (360)417-0153

CHAIRS: (4) Low breakfast room castered armchairs, excellent meduim b l u e u p h o l s t r y, p l u s brass and wood. Nearly new condition, little use. C o s t $ 1 , 3 0 0 . S e l l fo r $500. (360)457-3903.

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

HIM

A:

605 Apartments Clallam County

1163 Commercial Rentals EAST P.A.: House rental, 2 br., 1 bath, den, lrg. fenced yard, gardens, views, laundr y, dwr, bsmt. $1,050 mo. contact: 1 (360)809-0026

6/28/13

The following are early Independence Day Holiday advertising deadlines:

DISPLAY STYLE/LEGAL ADS ISSUE

AD DEADLINE

Friday, July 5

Mon., July 1; 2 p.m.

Sunday, July 7

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

Monday, July 8

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

Pen. Spotlight, July 12

Mon., July 1; 2 p.m.

TV Week, July 14

Tues., July 2; 2 p.m.

CLASSIFIED LINE ADS ISSUE Friday, July 5

AD DEADLINE Wed., July 3; Noon.

36816439

BARB BUTCHER

1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Office: 360.683.4131 Cell: 360.461.2422 www.johnlscott.com/barbarabu

D F C L A R R R R S C A A I O F C C W E D O E T A W C R S I O S O M S R O P S A C S T L T S A A I I G T V E N I A F O C T U T U S ‫ګګګګ‬ L A N I F N C E R S

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

EAST P.A.: 1 Br. cottage, incl. water, sewer, garbage, on bus line. SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide $ 4 5 0 , 1 s t , l a s t , $ 2 0 0 mobile home, 55+ park, dep. (360)670-5615. 2 Br., 2 bath, garage with spare room, large covered deck. $29,500/ obo. (360)385-4882.

Owner financing in Sequim. 5 private acres of timber with new building in Sequim. You finish turning into residence. Septic approved, water in. Mostly complete with 408 For Sale many extras! See to beCommercial lieve money maker priced just above county assessment. By appoint- SUPER CLEAN HOME ment only, no agent list- Smaller 2br home in town with easy access to ings please. $250,000. everything. Features in(360)461-1707 clude a fully fenced in TOOTHBRUSH CLEAN back yard with AND MOVE IN READY RV parking pad and full This home will surprise RV h o o k u p. L o w e r and delight with features maintenance landscapdesigned for ease of liv- ing and alley access. ing. From the hickor y $134,500. MLS#271360. cabinets and dovetailed Tom Blore drawers to the thick (360)683-4116 glass panel pocket PETER BLACK doors; from the interior REAL ESTATE wall and ceiling insulation that lowers noise and helps lower utility 505 Rental Houses Clallam County bills to the rounded corners and contemporary s t y l i n g . A s h ow p l a c e 113 W. 3rd, P.A.: 1 Br. h o m e a t a ve r y r e a - all appl.. $625 + dep. no sonable price. pets/smoke. 477-2207. $163,000 1230 CAROLINE St. MLS#271110 P.A.: 2400 sf 4 br., 2 Doc Reiss bath home. $1,150. (360)457-0456 Fenced yard. No smokWINDERMERE ing, pets considered with PORT ANGELES additional deposit. LONG DISTANCE (360)461-2152 No Problem! 130 W. 11th, P.A.: Nice Peninsula Classified 2 Br., no smoke/pets. 1-800-826-7714 $850. 1st, last, dep. (360)457-9776.

P A R T I C I P A T E I C E A

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

311 For Sale 505 Rental Houses 105 Homes for Sale Manufactured Homes Clallam County Clallam County MOBILE HOME: ‘84 14’ x 6 0 ’ , 2 B r. , 2 b a t h . $17,000, price will be reduced if mobile home is removed from park. (360)461-0907

L E G G I N G S O L O R N E D

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Pooh-pooher of the provincial 5 Round trip? 10 Barclays Center team 14 Irish pop group family name 15 How most fly 16 Overseas “other” 17 Start to till? 18 With 33- and 52Across, what 23-, 42- and 61-Across have in common 20 B-boy link 21 Foofaraw 22 It’s often grated 23 Intermediate level 26 Lets use for now 27 Skye writing 28 Tree sacred to the Druids 30 Wheel man? 33 See 18-Across 38 Force on Earth, for short 39 “__ of Identity”: Conan Doyle story 41 __ Cakesters 42 How some veggies are sold 44 Get value out of, in a way 45 Firing org.? 46 Massage target 48 Not now? 52 See 18-Across 57 1972 self-titled pop album 59 Service support gp. 60 Blind element 61 Creator of Emma Woodhouse 63 Drop 64 Eclipse, to some 65 Sierra __ 66 Connecticut’s State Composer 67 Puts turf on 68 Game with doubles and triples 69 “Sesame Street” roommate

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SERVICE

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013 C3

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

WINDOW WASHING TREE SERVICE

LAWN CARE

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

REPAIR/REMODEL

TREE SERVICE

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Columbus Construction

360-461-4609

360-460-0518

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HOME REPAIR

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“AFFORDABLE HOME IMPROVEMENTS” Remodels Interior & Exterior Kitchen, Baths, Decks, Fences,

Tile & Stone, ADA and Senior Access.

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POWER WASHING • ROOF SERVICES ASPHALT SEALING & STRIPING

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INC.

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681-4303 • 452-MOSS (6677)

PAINTING Davis Painting Residential • Commercial Interior • Exterior

(360) 457-8102

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

36812652

35787609

Full Service Fence Contractor Licensed, Bonded, Insured Professional Installation Chain-link, Wood, Ornamental Aluminum & Vinyl Fence Military & Senior Discount Available Chris Mackfay

360-775-9286

Windows - Gutters Home Cleaning - Eco Friendly - Pet Safe - Free Estimates -

Soils - Bark - Gravel

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GROOFINGD 457-5186

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Since 1987

Serving the entire Peninsula

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Honest & Reliable at a reasonable price

SMALL LOAD DELIVERY

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(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

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Classified

C4 FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

GARAGE G ARAGE On t h e Pe n i n s u l a

For Better or For Worse

&

8142 Garage Sales Sequim 2 - F A M I LY E S T A T E Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-4 p.m., 31 Nicole Pl., off Woodc o ck . K i n g s i ze h e a d board, upright freezer, almost new electric mower, 2 complete sets of fine china. Collections: Cambells Soup items, pewter and silver, books, LPs and more. 6-Family Sale: Fr i.Sat., 8:30-3 p.m., Panorama Vista (Buck Loop, Doe Pl.). Rugs, Tiffany/ Mediterranean hanging lamps, dining table, antique high chair, jewelry, boat and misc.

BARN SALE “Ireland Farm” Sat., June 29, 8-3 p.m. 20 Spath Rd. and Kitchen-Dick. Furn., household items, books, tools, TVs, plants, weed eater, 6’ bookcase, recliner, F-250 8’ canopy, Lowry organ, antique typewriter, Sharp cash register, toys, snow tires, clothing. Proceeds benefit local vets, military, high school seniors, etc. BIG BARN and FARM Sale: AGAIN! Fri.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 550 N. Sequim Ave., across from high school. Farm equipment, tools, house items, furniture, vehicles, boats, 4 horse aluminum custom trailer, livestock panels, firearms, saddles, tack, scaffolding, Kawasaki Mule, 65 hp tractor and lots more of everything! BIG Sale: Saturday, 8-3 p.m., 112 Grace Ln. Vintage, collectibles, antiques, art, home decor, kitchen, books, LOTS of new scrapbooking tools, rubber stamps, fishing, lawn mowers, and lots more! DOWNSIZING: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 120 Royal Loop, o f f S e q u i m Av e . I n flatable kayak, 70+ yr old Lionel train set, antqiue furniture, Scanoe, tile saw, lots of other stuff. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m., 201 Valley View Drive, off Silberhorn. Kitchen, bedding, bath, electronics a n d m o r e. Pe t i t e m s : 50% of sales go to dog park.

E s t a t e S a l e. E s t a t e Sale: Fri.-Sat., 28th29th, 9-3 p.m., 610 W. Spruce #116. Park on Spruce behind Safeway. Incls. fur niture, portable fireplace, flat screen TV, Vista laptop, Collector dolls, serger sewing machine, newer microwave, p o r t a bl e A / C heater, massage table, Casio keyboard, quilts, fabr ics, notions and much more! ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9 - 5 p. m . , 1 0 0 6 2 O l d Olympic Hwy. Quality woodshop tools, benches, hardware, cabinets, mechanic tools, fishing, garden and lumber. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8:30-4:30 p.m., 328 Vautier Rd. Contractors p a i n t , m i t e r s aw a n d stand, compressor, electrical and plumbing i t e m s, t a bl e s, c h a i r s, bedroom furniture, hospital/day bed, collectibles, new tube side rails for ‘92-’95 Nissan truck, new 5’ x 6.5’ arched Milgard window, houseware items, etc. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 733 E. Spruce Street. Variety of useful items that need a new home. Some furniture.

GARAGE/BAKE SALE Sat., 8:30-2 p.m., 1207 E. 6th St., off Chambers. Table saw, fabr ic and patterns, tomato plants, books, LOTS of great misc. items. Something for everyone. Loads of homebaked goodies by P.E.O. Chapter CR. All proceeds benefit women’s education. GARAGE Sale: 505 East 9th St., in alley, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday. Many items; portable aromatherapy spa, lg doll house with furniture, books, household, horse items and lots more. No Earlies! HOARDERS! COLLECTORS! ebay SELLERS! This one’s for you! 52 yr. collection. Vintage: books, games, toys, glassware, dishes, tea cups, hats, carnival glass, insulators, bottles, soda bottles, etc. Tom & Jerry bowl collection (it’s a drink, not a cartoon), salt & pepper shakers, dolls, 2 china cabinets, c h i n a s e t s, c r y s t a l , clothes, tavern table top games, restaurant supplies, video games (X-Box, Playstation). Much much more! Sat., 8 a.m. 1021 S. Chase No earlies--at all.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 124 Strawberry L n . Po n d p u m p, a n d S t i h l w e e d w h a c k e r. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Something for everyone! S a t . , 7 - 2 p. m . , 1 0 1 7 Homestead, off Mt. AnGARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., geles Rd. to McDougall. 9-3 p.m., 641 Wilcox Ln. Kids toys, books, furniNo early sales! ture, household items. GARAGE Sale: Sat. onl y ! , 9 - 5 p. m . , 6 0 0 N . MULTI-FAMILY yard D u n l a p R d . C l o t h e s , sale. Lots of ever yhousehold items, garden thing! Home/garden, tools, and some furni- tools/toolbox, furniture, ture! Please, not before fencing, mens/womens clothing. Quality 9:00 a.m. m e r c h a n d i s e, g r e a t prices! Fri.-Sat., 9-3 M OV I N G S a l e : Fr i . , p.m. 617 E. 9th St. 9 - 4 p. m . , S a t . , 9 - 1 p.m., 119 San Juan Dr., in Sunland. Furni- M U LT I - FA M I LY Ya r d ture, ar twor k, tools, Sale: Sat., June 29, 9-3 outdoor furniture and p.m., In alley of 124 W. outdoor tools, Royal 1 2 t h S t . A va r i e t y o f A l b e r t c h i n a s e t , items! d i s h e s, a l l k i n d s o f ST. VINCENT DE PAUL kitchenware, beautiful 2nd SALE large round hook rug F r i . - S a t . , 9 - 3 p . m . , set, ACER laptop, and Queen of Angels Gym, tons more! Everything 209 W. 11th St. Fill a must go! Cash only brown bag of clothing for a n d n o e a r l y b i r d s, $2. Everything 50% off. please! E v e r y t h i n g m u s t g o. “Come on down, we are M U LT I - FA M I LY y a r d still around” FREE COFsale! Saturday only, 8 FEE. Proceeds will proa.m. - 4 p.m. A little of vide Medical and Funereverything! Toys, books, al expenses for those in clothes (kids and adult), need. housewares, SS dishwasher, furniture, exer- YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., cise equipment, etc. 412 9-4 p.m., 4005 S. Tiller N. Haller Avenue. Rd., off Mt. Angeles and Scrivner. College stu#1 Online Job Site dent cleaning house, furon the Olympic niture, name brand Peninsula clothes (Med. women’s), www.peninsula kitchen items, books, dailynews.com etc.

6115 Sporting Goods

6135 Yard & Garden

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

CUB CADET Sub-compact Tractor. Cub Cadet S u b - c o m p a c t Tr a c t o r Sc2400, 2008. Hardly used, has front loader and bush hog attachment. Must sell; moving to smaller home. $12,000. Contact (360)460-3249

9820 Motorhomes

YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., Sun., 8-1 p.m., 223 Mt. Pleasant Est a t e s R d . B r i n g yo u r tr uck! Don’t miss this one! Simply too much to list, but here’s a brief sample: Fine ar ts and crafts, furniture, two likenew 32” high def. flat screen TVs, 19 quar t c a n n e r, m a s o n j a r s , kitchen appliances, etc., etc., etc.

GARAGE Sale: Tons of Baby clothes and items, household items, nicnac’s, furn. books/DVDs, canning jars, Christmas decor, and lrg Christmas blow up yard displays. Sat.-Sun. 9-4 p.m. 3820 C. st. Ext. P.A. GARAGE Sale: Tools, tools, tools, fishing reels, lawn mowers, old cement mixer, old wheel barrow, row boat, truck trailer, 1 hp boat motor, big ugly Bekins moving truck, 2 motor homes, screen door, lots and l o t s o f h a r d wa r e a n d kitchen stuff, small appliances, yar n, books, quilting magazines, plus antiques. Inside large outbuilding/crowded. 11 Chinook Lane Freshwater Bay area 10-4, Sat.-Sun. No early birds please. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri., 9-2 p.m., Sat., 9-1 p.m., 1408 Shirley Ct. A little bit of ever ything. F u r n i t u r e, t o o l s, c o l lectibles, towing gear. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Sat., 9-2 p.m., 1822 W. 12th St. Furniture, household, ar ts and crafts, educational books, clothing, baby stuff and toys, and hand crafted jewelry. WE LOVE ESTATE SALES! Judy Haggerty and Gerri 592 Elwha Bluffs Rd., Fr i . J u n e 2 8 , 1 0 - 6 p.m., Sat., June 29, 10-5 p.m., Sun., June 30, 12-4 p.m. Christmas in July! Wulitzer piano, furniture galore, vintage Tupperware, w a s h e r a n d d r y e r, blow-gun and dar ts, lawn furniture, tools, garden supplies, ThermoWare, wooden hand-carved art from around the world, artwork, beautiful china hutch, king-sized brass bed with mattress. Come and check it out! Lots of fun stuff! Sat. 1/2 off.

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers CAMPER TRAILER: ‘80 Holiday Rambler, Presidential 28’. New fridge and furnace. $3,500. (360)928-9436

MOTORHOME: ‘84 30’ Spor tscoach III. 454 CANOE: 17’ Coleman ALLIED LOADER: For eng., rear queen bed, canoe. Paddles, motor, tractor. For internation full bath, new convection micro, new fridge, wood bracket. $300. H-size tractor. $150. cabinets, runs well, (360)344-4327 (360)385-2792 clean, 47k miles. $7,500. CANOE: Grumman, 16’, (360)683-1851 aluminum, good shape. 7025 Farm Animals $550. (360)452-4636. MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ & Livestock Toyota Slumberqueen. GUNS: 2 Springfield MISC: 2 Watusi cows Low miles, 4 cyl., good XDM 3.8. 9 mm and with 2 mo. old Angus s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o 40 caliber. $600 each. cross calfs, $1,100 pair. health. $7,000/obo. New in box. (360)452-7246 2 Yak bulls, $800 each. (360)460-4491 (360)582-3104 MOTORHOME: ‘88 22’ JOHN BOAT: 12’, AluClass A Winnebago. minum. Good cond. 7035 General Pets $4,000/obo. 912-1305. $400. (360)452-8102.

TRAILER: 13.5’ Big Foot fiberglass. Older but exc. $3,500. (360)683-8668.

P I S TO L : S m i t h a n d Wesson .357, 4” walnut grip, car tage belt and h o l s t e r, gr e a t s h a p e, n i c e r i g . $ 9 5 0 . B a ck g r o u n d c h e ck o r WA Concealed Weapons Licence. (360)765-0201 RIDE IN COMFORT On a recumbent bike built by Burley in Oregon. Sit upr ight on a wide seat with a vented back. Relaxed riding on a quality bike. $450. (360)452-7136 RIFLE: CHAMPLIN 7 mm Mag. Stock by WEEBE. Beautiful. $3,500. (360)379-4134. S H OT G U N : L e feve r double-barrel shotgun. 12 ga., 30” full and modified, excellent b o r e s , t i g h t a s n e w. $400/obo. (360)681-4188

6140 Wanted & Trades BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

TRAILER: ‘06 23’ Komfort. Loaded, immculate, MOTORHOME: ‘77 El smooth sides, 1 slideDorado. 27’, A/C, excel- out, $19,000 new. Sell lent condition. $2,500 for $12,000/obo. firm. (360)457-5649 (360)797-1771

6081 Bargain Box

CHICKS: Year-round, top quality native egg layer chicks. $4, $6, $8, $10. We take your rooster, exchange for chick any time. Fer tile eggs available, will hatch in as early as 3 days, $4, $2, $1. Jon, (360)809-0780

MOTORHOME: ‘92 31’ Holiday Ramber. 59,250 mi., Onan generator, oak c a b i n e t s, q u e e n b e d , bathroom separate from shower, new refrigerator. $9,850. (360)683-4710

MOTORHOME: Dodge ‘76 Class C. 26’, good c o n d . , n ew t i r e s, l ow miles, nonsmoker, in PA. F R E E : D o g s . W e ’ r e $5,000 firm. 460-7442. moving and can’t take our dogs with us. Beautiful, loving Golden re- RV: 3 8 ’ RV a n d To w tr iever, male, 9 years C a r . 2 0 0 1 N e w m a r old. Handsome, friendly Mountainaire and a 2009 chocolate lab, 4 years Honda CRV tow car ofold. Both free to good fered together or separa t e l y. T h e R V h a s home, neutered. 61,400 miles on a gas (360)477-7753. driven Trident V10 with a PUPPIES: (4), two male, Banks system added. two female, dachshunds. The interior is dark cher(1) chocolate, (3) black r y w o o d w i t h c o r i a n and tan. 3 weeks old. counter tops. The RV is Ta k i n g d e p o s i t s n ow. in very good condition. We just returned from a $400. (360)477-3385. trip to Arizona which was P U P P I E S : B l a c k l a b trouble free. The CRV p u p p i e s . Ve r y g o o d tow car is in excellent hunting stock. (3) males condition with 47,000 miles. Asking $35,000 at $250 each. for the RV and $20,000 (360)461-1273 for the CRV or $53,000 PUPPIES: Mini-Dachs- together. Please call Bill h u n d p u p p i e s . O n e or Kathy at (360)582-0452 beautiful smooth coat black and silver dapple to see the vehicles. m a l e, $ 5 0 0 . a n d o n e black and tan smooth WA N T E D : C l a s s A c o a t m a l e, $ 3 5 0 . 1 s t m o t o r h o m e. A p p r ox s h o t a n d d e w o r m e d 26’-32’, Vortec engine, ready now. slide. (360)631-9211. (360)452-3016

YARD Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., 916 S. B Street. Refrigerator, sectional sofa with sleeper, chairs, tables, area rug, clothes, books, tools and more.

4-SEASONS RANCH NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE AND ESTATES SALES

furniture, refrigerator, f i s h i n g g e a r, s k i s, crafts, sewing table, j e w e l r y, b o o k s , dishes, toys, stained glass, clothes, Bergsma and Riemunoz prints, quality household items. Park your car and SHOP ALL DAY! Sat., June 29, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

A BA R N S a l e : S wa p meet in barn behind Port Angeles Les Schwab, 9-3 p.m., Fri.-Sat., 10-3 p.m., Sun. Come join us for a large space, just $ 1 5 p e r d ay. L o t s o f tools. (360)452-7576 for info. BARN Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., 3175 Old Olympic H i g h w a y. A n t i q u e s , misc. fur niture, tools, toys, fishing gear, and more! CLEANING OUT/moving sale June 29, 8-3. 1619 E. 5th St. 1996 Ford F-150, fur niture, LOTS of books, homeschool materials, quilting, decorations, bikes, trampoline, generator, Christmas dishes and decos. GALES ADDITION NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE Sat., 8-3 p.m., numerous families west of Baker Street from 3rd to 6th S t r e e t . L o o k fo r b a l loons! G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . Sat., 8-4 p.m. 283 Hulse Rd., off Sutter. Ladies: seamstress-made clothes and name-brand outfits, shoes and accessories, bath and kitchen items (new and used), plus accessories. Linens new in box! Guys: woodworking tools, sports and misc. items. Priced to sell. All must go! MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., June 28-29, 9-3 p.m., Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road, Agnew. Household goods, children’s items, consignment-quality clothing, books, fur niture and more. No earlies.

9802 5th Wheels 5TH WHEEL: 26’ Alpenlite. New fridge/freezer, toilet, A/C, micro, dual batteries and propane tank, nice stereo, queen air adustable bed, awning, all in good condition, clean and ready to go. $3,850/obo. Leave message at (360)452-4790. 5TH WHEEL: 30’ Crossroads Patriot upgrade model, used twice overnight, immaculate, towable with half ton. Below book value at $38,750 includes slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

TRAILER: 24’ Nomad Lite. Loaded, front walk around bed, rear bath, a i r, m i c r o, d u a l t a n k , dual battery, front/rear 5TH WHEEL: ‘94 27’ entry, exellent. $9,500. Coachman Catalina. (360)457-6372 Great cond., single slide, TRAILER: ‘96 24’ Kit. new tires. $3,900/obo. (360)417-8840 Walk-around queen bed, dinette and sofa make additional double beds, 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 6 2 6 ’ large fridge/freezer, 3 Jayco Eagle. Clean conburner propane stove, dition. $4,500. m i c r owave. B a ck h a s (360)452-1646 shower, sink, toilet, closet. Perfect for snowbirds! 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ Al$4,000/obo. 437-0165. pen Lite, single slide, l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t T R A I L E R : Te r r y ‘ 0 2 shape. $11,500/obo. 26W pull trailer. Slide, (615)330-0022 new tires, with A/C and cold-weather package. 5TH WHEEL: Fleetwood $10,500. (406)531-4114 ‘98 Wilderness. Hitch included, 24L5C, clean, TRAVEL TRAILER Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide smoke-free, 1 slide, full bath, A/C, elec. jacks. out, great cond., $9,500. $5,195. (360)452-7967. (360)452-6677

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: $13,750 /obo cash only, must sell. ‘01 Corsair 32’ Lots of extras, lamin a t e w o o d f l o o r, 2 slideouts, clean, comfor table, queen bed, central vac & more! Come see in Sekiu. Text/call 582-7130.

9808 Campers & Canopies

8183 Garage Sales PA - East

8182 Garage Sales 12 homes. Antiques, PA - West

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. (360)452-7870 after 6.

CAMPING: Columbia 10x15 tent, camping kitchen, shower shelt with battery pump, com e l a n s t ove w i t h L P hooup. $350. (360)457-9608 or (360) 460-7216

by Lynn Johnston

YARD SALES

8120 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales Jefferson County Sequim PA - Central PA - Central PA - West YARD SALE AND SWAP MEET Port Townsend Elks Lodge #317 June 29th at the Lodge north east parking area. Fees for vendor spaces for Elks members are $10 and non-Elk members as guest are $12. For reser vations of a space, contact Lodge member Chuck Palumbo at (360)301-4244.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KOMFORT: 1997 23F 5th Wheel. Great condition, New tires, water pump (2012) 2 skylights 2 t w i n b e d s, Aw n i n g , Purchase option of deluxe hitch, Chev PU tailgate, 1000 Trails Membership, Por table grey water tank. $5,500. (360)683-4552

9808 Campers & Canopies CAMPER: ‘11 10’ Alaskan cab-over. Original owner, excellent cond. $9,000. (360)452-8968.

5th WHEEL: 19’ Alpen- CAMPER: ‘97 10’ Alpenlite. TV, micro, self cont., lite. No leaks. $3,295. excellent cond. $6,000. (360)775-1288 (360)928-9770 after 5. 5TH WHEEL: 24’ flatPACKAGE: ‘85 Dodge bed. Tri-axle. $400. 350 and 11.5’ self con(360)344-4327 tained camper. 5TH WHEEL: 24’ Holi- $1,900. (360)457-1153. day Rambler Alumalite. Nice, clean condition, PAC K AG E : ‘ 8 5 C h ev new rubber, with hitch. truck, ‘85 Lance camper. $3,600. (360)457-4066. $3,000. (360)417-0951.

LANCE Lite: 2003 845 Truck Camper. Great condition-used twice. Roof air, queen bed, d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o bed. Shwr stall/pan full h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. Lots of storage. Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. Call (360)681-0172

9050 Marine Miscellaneous 12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiak, set up with a 30 HP Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Motor has just been to the shop for a complete check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup for rivers or salt water. $3,500. Inquiries please call, (360)531-0402.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

CANOE: 15’ Cedarstrip, ash gunwales, carr y thwar ts, includes 3 handmade paddles, very good condition. $1,000/ obo. (360)452-4301.

SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C with sails and new 8 hp engine, sleeps 4, toilet/sink. $4,500/obo. (360)808-7913

COLUMBIA: ‘75 14’. 15 HP O.B., trolling motor, many extras, 1981 trailer. $850/obo. Will consider a 30-06 rifle or firewood splitter in trade. (360)912-1783 CRESTLINER: ‘03 12’ aluminum, 8 HP Johnson motor, new trailer, with accessories. $2,000. (406)531-4114. DEATH TAKES OWNER OF FISHING BOAT 20 ft. Robolo Boat,Center Counsel, with 4 stroke 115 Yamaha Motor, has 400 hrs. on it. Electronics, trailer, (gal i va n i z e d ) d u a l a xe l , many extras. $23,500 takes all. 800-619-8723.

G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n cr uiser, flying br idge, single Cummins diesel engine, low hours, radar, VHF radio, CB, depth/ f i s h f i n d e r , d i n g h y, downriggers, 16’x32’ boathouse. $27,500. BAYLINER: 17’, 70 hp (360)457-0684 Yamaha, needs some engine work but runs. JET SKI: Kawasaki STX 12F, 3 seater, ‘06, excel$1,500. (360)460-9365. lent condition, trailer. BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w $5,800. (360)460-2689. Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruiser, freshwater cooling. LONESTAR: 17’, 100 hp Johnson motor, 9.5 kick$4,950/obo. er, motor in great shape, (360)775-9653 g a l va n i ze d E Z - l o a d e r B O AT : 1 7 ’ , 9 0 H P t r a i l e r, d e p t h f i n d e r, Ya m a h a , g a l v. t ra i l e r. $2,500. (360)928-9436. $1,700. (360)457-8109. MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, I/O . Needs work. trailer, 140 hp motor. $1,500. (360)461-2056 $4,980. (360)683-3577. S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e BOATS: 14’ Livingston, tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 with Shorelander trailer, HP motor, exceptionally $495. New, 10’ Walker clean. $3,950. B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, (360)477-7068 $995. (360)452-6677. SLICKCRAFT: 1976 23’ C A N O E : 1 3 ’ , s q u a r e inboard/outboard. 302 stern, Old Town, excelle- engine, boat and trailer. nt. $600. (360)797-1771. $5,200. (360)457-8190.

9817 Motorcycles

BMW: ‘99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 miles. Throttlemiester. BMW touring hard cases. Corbin saddle. BMW aftermarket alarm. S A I L B O AT : H o l d e r $4,350. (425)508-7575. 14/Hobie One-Fourteen. Goldspace@msn.com Excellent cond., EZ Loader galvanized trail- DIRTBIKE: Honda ‘04 CRF100. Looks and er. $1,700. runs great. $750/obo. (360)681-8528 (360)670-5282 SEA RAY: ‘74 24’ HT Cruiser. Reconditioned/ GOLDWING: ‘90 1500. e q u i p p e d fo r o c e a n / Runs great, well mainrough weather fishing/ tained. $3,000. (360)461-2619 cruising with ALL NEW equipment and features: repowered w/ Merc Hori- HARLEY: ‘02 FXD Suzon Engine/Bravo-3 (du- per Glide, original ownal prop), stern drive (117 er, less than 13K mi., exhrs.), complete Garmin cellent condition. $6,500. (360)504-2168 electronics, reinforced stern, full canvas, downriggers, circ water heat- HARLEY: ‘05 Dyna Cusing, Yamaha 9.9 kicker, tom. Low mi., upgrades. EZ Load trailer, w/disk $7,000/obo. Call before brakes (1,200 mi.), elec- 4:30 (360)460-7777. tric winch. Other extras, H A R L E Y : ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 $52,000 invested. Sacri- Sportster, 7k miles, mint. fice for $18,500. $6,900. (360)452-6677. (360)681-5070 HARLEY DAVIDSON TRAILER: EZ Loader, ‘07 FXSTC. Custom softtandem axle, 22-24’. tail, 7k, Vance & Hine, $1,250. (360)460-9680. ex. shape, garaged. $12,500. (360)683-8027.

9817 Motorcycles APRILIA: Scarabeo motorcycle/scooter 2009. This is a pristine motorcycle with less then 1000 miles on it! Hardly used! NOT A SR. S C O OT E R ! 5 0 0 C C s Needs a battery charge. $3600/obo. (360)808-6160 BMW: ‘74 R75/6. Airhead Boxer, excellent condition, 29K mi., new powder coat, shocks, always garaged. $3,500/ obo. (360)912-2679.

HARLEY Davidson: ‘97 1200 Spor t. Red and Black, 15K miles, new tires and battery, custom painted tank, extra tank, 4 extra seats, lots of chrome, blinkers integral in mirrors, detachable sissy bar, custom fender, 2 into 1 exhaust, adjustable shocks. Have or iginal par ts too. $4,250. (360)460-7893

HONDA: ‘00 XR100R. Excellent cond., low miles. $1000/obo. (360)477-9777

HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. Excellent shape. $2,900. H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only (360)461-3415 500 ever made. 33.4k original miles, too much HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing to list. Call for details. A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , $12,000 to loving home. black/chrome, exc. cond. (360)460-8271 $3,500/obo. 417-0153.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County RESOLUTION 31, 2013 CALL FOR HEARING ON THE PROPOSED SALE OF SURPLUS PROPERTY THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS finds as follows:

1. Various Clallam County departments have accumulated property, listed on Exhibit 1 and incorporated herein by reference, that they have determined is no longer of use by the County now or in the foreseeable future.

2. Pursuant to Chapter 36.34 RCW and Clallam County Administrative Policy 455, the Board of Clallam County Commissioners has the responsibility to declare property surplus and to approve the minimum bid price after holding a public hearing to determine the propriety and advisability of such proposed action. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consideration of the above findings of fact: 1. That a public hearing on the proposed sale of surplus property listed on Exhibit 1 be held in the Commissioners’ meeting room, 223 E 4th Street, Room 160, Port Angeles, Washington at 10:30 a.m. on July 9, 2013.

PASSED AND ADOPTED this twenty-fifth day of June 2013 BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Michael C. Chapman, Chair Jim McEntire Howard V. Doherty, Jr. ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board EXHIBIT 1 SURPLUS SALE ITEMS JULY 26-AUG 9, 2103 Make Model/Description Year Min Bid Department Ford Taurus Wagon 2000 $ 100.00 ER&R Chevy 3500 Dump Truck 1993 400.00 ER&R GMC 2500 Pickup 1990 100.00 ER&R Ford F350 Pickup 1994 100.00 ER&R Ford Crown Victoria 2001 100.00 ER&R Ford Crown Victoria 2003 100.00 ER&R Chevy Celebrity 1989 100.00 ER&R Chevy C20 Pickup 1985 100.00 ER&R MISC Pallet of Drums & Rotors 25.00 ER&R Kia Optima 2005 300.00 OPNET Pontiac Montana Van 2000 300.00 OPNET Yamaha (2) Kodiak Quads/Trailer 2004 300.00 OPNET Dodge Ram 2500 Pickup 1994 300.00 OPNET Ford Explorer 2000 300.00 OPNET WILDERNESS TRAVEL TRAILER 23 FOOT 1974 100.00 OPNET GMC YUKON-DIFFERENTIAL GEARS 1999 100.00 OPNET TOYOTA ROYAL ROYAL SHARP SHARP SHARP

CRESW-FLOAT 1983 100.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG (6) 583CX CASH REGISTER 5.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG (11) DRAWERS THAT FIT 583CX 1.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG (2) ER-3220 CASH REGISTER 5.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG (10) DRAWERS THAT FIT ER-3220 1.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG (1) ER-A460 CASH REGISTER 7.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG W/2 DRAWERS SHARP (1) ER-2386S CASH REGISTER 7.00 PARKS/FAIR/BLDG W/2 DRAWERS EXHIBIT 1 ER&R EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT # MAKE MODEL YEAR DESCRIPTION MINIMUM BID 1640 VIKING 1980 SNOW PLOW $100.00 1644 FLINK 1987 SNOW PLOW $100.00 124 CHEV 3/4T 350 V8 1972 VEGETATION MAINTENANCE TRUCK W/BARRELL $500.00 436 FORD 7710 TRACTOR 1991 TRACTOR $2,500.00 437 FORD 7711 TRACTOR 1991 REACH MOWER W/BOOM $2,500.00 2357 ENERGY ABSORB 350DX 2000 ATTENUATOR $200.00 754 ATWOOD 1976 2-AXLE TRAILER $100.00 732 FRUEHAUF 4TD TRAILER 1970 4TD TRAILER $500.00 215 FORD 3208 10V8 1983 5 YD DUMP TRUCK W/ PLOW & SANDER $3,000.00 1748 SWENSON 1984 SANDER ON TRUCK 215 N/A 1645 FLINK 1987 SNOWPLOW ON TRUCK 215 N/A 208 KW 350 13 6 1978 10 YD DUMP TRUCK $7,000.00 205 KW 350 13 6 1981 10 YD DUMP TRUCK $7 ,000.00 2198 STIHL HT75 PRUNER 1999 POLE SAW/PRUNER $10.00 DP159 STIHL 18 2001 CHAINSAW/LONG BAR $10.00 MP24 HUSQVARNA 61 1999 CHAINSAW $10.00 MP35 HUSQVARNA 61 1990 CHAINSAW $10.00 MP34 HUSQVARNA 61 1999 CHAINSAW $10.00 2107 STIHL MS260P 24 2004 CHAINSAW $10.00 2108 STIHL MS260P 24 2004 CHAINSAW $10.00 SCP92 STIHL 26 1998 CHAINSAW $10.00 MP37 HUSQVARNA 51 1999 CHAINSAW $10.00 2108 STIHL MS260P 24 2004 CHAINSAW $10.00 DP164 STIHL GB65 2005 BLOWER $5.00 2153 STIHL 1987 CUT-OFF SAW $25.00 JV127 JOHN DEERE LX-289 2005 MOWER WITH BAGGER $100.00 2104 SANDSTROM SANDBLASTER 1953 SANDBLASTER $10.00 6222 CANON iR330 2001 PRINTER/COPIER $1.00 PUBLIC WORKS EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT # MAKE MODEL YEAR DESCRIPTION MINIMUM BID N/A FIBERGLASS BRIDGE GAP/STREET PLATES $200.00 N/A CHEVROLET SILVERADO TRUCK BOX @6’ $100.00 N/A KENWORTH 400 ENGINE MOTOR CORE/CUMMINS CAM400 $100.00 N/A AMERICAN SIGN DIAMOND BRITE LIGHT BOX/DIRECTION SIGN $50.00 N/A OTC REVOLVER ENGINE STAND $500.00 N/A HYDRAULIC CYLINDER $10.00 N/A ARC WELDER $50.00 N/A SIOUX HEAVY DUTY DRILL PRESS $50.00 N/A LOCKER BAYS=3 SETS OF 3 LOCKERS $50.00/SET N/A MISC PUMPS x 4 $100.00/EA N/A DIESEL AUXILIARY TANK $100.00 N/A FORD 11-4186 SWEEPER ATTACHMENT W/3 TUBE BROOMS $100.00 N/A FORD 950 950 AUGER $500.00 N/A FULLER (?) HVY DUTY TRANSMISSION JACK $50.00 Pub: June 28, July 7, 2013 Legal No. 492853


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013 C5

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others Others Others Others MOTOR SCOOTER 2008 Jetmoto, 50cc, 350 miles, like new. $650. (360)681-7560

AMC: Rare 1970 AMX 2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd, 95% original. $18,000/ obo. (360)928-9477. SCOOTER: 2007 Roketa Bali 250 Scooter. Fun and economical, 60 mpg. Original owner selling. 1055 miles on it. This bike gets up and goes! Includes helmet and gloves. (360)374-6787

CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. $4,850. (360)928-9724.

CHRYSLER ‘12 200 LIMITED Economical 2.4 liter 4cyl, auto, A/C cruise,tilt, A M / F M / C D / DV D / M P 3 , bluetooth, navigation, power windows, locks and seats, full leather, heated seats, keyless entry, side airbags, fog lamps, home link, only 18,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/100 warranty, immaculate 1owner corporate lease r e t u r n , n o n - s m o k e r, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. near new condition. $18,495 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEV: ‘56 Belair. 6 cyl., auto, 4 door, paint, interior, chrome, re-done to stock, California car, SUZUKI: ‘08 V-Strom 2nd owner, always garCHRYSLER: 2002 LTD 650. Like new condition. aged. $21,000. (360)683-7789 PT Cruiser. 78k miles 7 9 5 0 m i l e s. N o A B S. New battery. Black with $5,750/obo. Scott h r o m e t r i m , ex t r a s . (360)461-7051 9292 Automobiles cMoonroof, great stereo Others and a gas to drive. too YAMAHA: ‘77 TT500. much fun in the sun! Custom and spare parts. BMW ‘08 328I SEDAN One owner who loved it! $1000/obo. This one is in excellent $5500/obo. (360)477-4007 condition, fully loaded, (360)808-6160 YAMAHA: ‘79 XS 1100. auto, 6 cyl, moon roof, 35K, fairing, saddle bags leather and more. Low CHRYSLER PT CRUISER LIMITED EDITION excellent cond. $1,650/ 44K mi. Must drive to 2.4L 4 cylinder, automatobo. (360)808-1922 or appreciate. $19,900 ic, chrome alloy wheels, (360)681-3023 after 6. Preview at: sunroof, privacy glass, heckmanmotors.com key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r Heckman Motors w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, 9805 ATVs 111 E. Front, P.A. and mirrors, heated (360)912-3583 l e a t h e r s e a t s, c r u i s e QUAD: 90 cc Eton. 2 BUICK: ‘01 Regal Tour- control, tilt, air conditions t r o ke, l i ke n ew. R e - ing. 107+K mi. $3,000/ i n g , C D s t e r e o, d u a l front airbags. Only duced $1,300. 452-3213 obo. (702)366-4727. 74,000 original miles! Loaded Limited Edition! CADILLAC ‘07 STS Immaculate condition inAWD V6 side and out! Clean CarThe ultimate in luxur y fax! This is the top of the a n d h a n d l i n g p e r fo r - line PT Cruiser! Come mance, this car is im- s e e t h e m o s t t r u s t e d maculate inside and out, source of used vehicles s t u n n i n g w h i t e p e a r l for over 50 years! Stop paint, 66K mi. by Gray Motors today! SUZUKI: ‘05 LT-Z 250 $17,500 $5,995 Quadspor t ATV. Excelheckmanmotors.com GRAY MOTORS lent condition. About 20 Heckman Motors 457-4901 hours run time with Big 111 E. Front, P.A. graymotors.com Gun exhaust K & N air (360)912-3583 filter. Sport quad white DODGE: ‘00 Intrepid. C H E V: ‘ 9 9 M a l i bu . 115k, 28 mpg, front with blue frame. $1,995. $1,200/obo. (360)460-0405. wheel drive, new tires (360)681-3820 and chains. $3,500/obo. (360)379-8755 9740 Auto Service C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 2 P T Cruiser LTD. Silver. 93K. & Parts FORD ‘06 CROWN VIC$4,500/obo. 457-0238. TORIA POLICE MISC: Ranch Hand grill C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 3 P T INTERCEPTOR guard from ‘06 Ford Su- C r u i s e r. 1 1 5 k m i l e s , Two to choose from, auperduty, $350. Tork Lift Shar p and well main- tomatic. Lowest in-house Tr u f r a m e m o u n t e d tained. $4,250. financing rates guarancamper tie downs for teed! (360)796-4270 ‘99-’07 Ford F250/F350 $2,995 long bed, $325. Happijac FORD: ‘90 Taurus WagThe Other Guys turnbuckles, $375. Stock on. Runs fine, body OK, Auto and Truck Center rear springs from F350. has some issues. 360-417-3788 $30. (360)808-4959. theotherguys.com $850. (360)457-4399.

FIAT 2012 500 POP This compact car took Europe by storm when it came out in 2007. It was introduced to the U.S. market in 2012. It’s peppy, ver y fuel efficient, and most of all fun to drive! Auto, 4 cyl, antilock brakes, A/C, CD, power windows/locks, alum. wheels, and more. $12,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD: ‘94 Crown Victoria. New tires, good shape. $2,500. (360)928-9920 HONDA: ‘06 Accord LX. V6, 49K. orig. owner, recent maint. $12,500. (360)417-8859 HONDA: ‘07 Civic Hybrid. $9,000. (425)508-7575 HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. AT, AC, AM/FM/CD. 80K mi. Ex. shape. $7,600. 452-7630. See PDN on line add. JEEP CHEROKEE Four to choose from! Three Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredos, one Jeep Cherokee Limited. Starting at $5,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 theotherguys.com L I N C O L N : ‘ 8 8 To w n C a r. C o z y 2 0 M P G . Runs great. Good body and interior with some rust spots. Good tires. Brakes redone. All accessories work, includi n g A / C, 1 3 0 k m i l e s. $1,500 or best offer. Call (360)683-1683

VW ‘03 PASSAT 1.8T Heated leather interior, 5 speed manual trans, tinted windows, new tires, sunroof, excellent mechanical condition and ver y clean inside and out! $6,250 NISSAN: ‘89 300 ZX. Lipman’s Automotive Red. V6. Automatic. T- IN HOUSE FINANCING t o p. M a ny n ew p a r t s. AVAILABLE $4,500/obo. (360)452-5050 (360)681-3579 www.lipmansauto.com 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA PONTIAC: ‘03 Bonneville SSEi. Great-riding V W : 1 9 7 3 B e e t l e . car, 90k miles, power $2,250/obo. (360)477-3725 everything, always garaged. $7,000/obo. VW: ‘66 Bug. Excellent (360)809-0356 shape. $5,000. (360)457-7022 SATURN: ‘07 Aura. Low mi. $8,000. VW: ‘72 Super Beetle. (360)796-4762 Great shape. $2,300/ obo. (360)809-3656. SCION: ‘08 XB. 40K, exVW: ‘74 Classic concellent. $12,500. ver tible Super Beetle. (360)928-3669 $9,500/obo. Call after 6 SUBARU: ‘99 Outback p.m. (360)460-2644. Limited. 134K mi., excelelnt condition. $5,200. VW: ‘78 Super Beetle (360)457-5691 conver tible. Runs good, good cond., manual trans. $5,500. MITSUBISHI: ‘03 (360)683-8032 E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t cond., 188k miles. $5,700. (360)460-2536. MINI COOPER ‘08 CLUB MAN Spor ty unique styling that’s a fan favorite for yo u n g a n d o l d a l i ke ! Spunky 4 cyl. combined with a 6 speed manual Getrag trans. makes h e a d s t u r n a s yo u ’r e cruising down the highway with BOTH of the moon-roofs open listening to the MINI Hi-Fi premium sound system. This car is not only FUN and responsive, but very economical to drive, getting 37 mpg or better on the open road. One d o e s n ’ t wa n t t o s t o p driving and get out of the very comfortable leather seats. Oh! Did I mention the 3rd door for easy access to the rear seat. You don’t want to miss out on this exciting automobile. 39k. $17,750 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

NISSAN: ‘01 Altima. Studded tires, gold color. $1,500. (360)457-7753. NISSAN ‘03 SENTRA SE-R SPEC V This isn’t your grandmother’s Sentra! This race inspired Sentra SER features a 175hp 2.5L 4 cylinder engine, 6 speed manual transmission, Spec V rated suspension, Helical Limited Slip differential, Rockford Fosgate Audio Fanatic package, Skyline inspired Spor t Bucket Seats, Black and Silver accented interior, 96k miles, like new inside and out, nice tires, sunroof and more! This hard to find model is a whole lot of fun to drive, don’t let this one pass you by! $7,950 Lipman’s Automotive IN HOUSE FINANCING AVAILABLE (360)452-5050 www.lipmansauto.com 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA

NISSAN ‘10 MAXIMA SPORT A true sport sedan with room for 5 passengers. This is one fine road machine, auto, 3.5L V6, 290 hp, moonroof, fully loaded, fuel efficient. It’s pretty much got it all. 32K low miles. $18,950 Preview at: PORCHE: ‘88 944. 1 heckmanmotors.com owner, 129,500 mi. , exHeckman Motors cellent condition. $6,995. 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)452-4890 (360)912-3583

TOAD: Saturn ‘07 VUE equiped with BlueOx tow bar and base plate. Pat r i o t b r a k e . L e a t h e r. Power seat. Heated front seats. $12,100. (360)457-0522 TOYOTA ‘10 COROLLA LE Very economical 1.8 liter 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, only 38,000 miles, very very clean 1-owner factory lease return, nonsmoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y report, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, EPA rated 26 city/34 hwy mpg. very nice little car! $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear axle, 3’ deck with 13’ dump bed, 70 gal. diesel tank. $2,000/obo. (360)457-4521 or 477-3964 after 6 p.m. CHEV: ‘81 3+3. Dump b ox , 4 W D, 4 5 4 a u t o. $3,000/obo. 460-6176. CHEV: ‘85 pickup. 48K original mi. $3,500/obo. (360)504-5664 CHEV: ‘88 Dually. Crew cab. $1,500. (360)477-1761 FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. 6 cylinder, manual transmission, 2 WD, clean, runs great. 153,000 miles. Has new tires, Tonneau cover. Call (360)477-4195

FORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, matching canopy, good running. $6,500. 1-360-269-1208 or VOLVO: ‘93 940. White, 1-360-269-1030 4 door, auto, full power, moon roof, leather heat- FORD: ‘89 4X4 Longed seats, 88,500 original bed. Auto/air, runs great. m i . B l u e B o o k va l u e $2,500/obo. 457-5948. $2,500. (360)457-8051.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01-ALT-002931 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on July 12, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST FOURTH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington: THE SOUTH 170 FEET OF THE NORTH 621 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER AND THE WEST 200 FEET OF THE SOUTH 25 FEET OF THE NORTH 451 FEET OF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 6 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT THE WEST 30 FEET OF SAID SOUTH 170 FEET OF THE NORTH 621 FEET FOR COUNTY ROAD NO, 3567, KNOWN AS ROUNDTREE ROAD. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 06-30-13410010, commonly known as 13 ROUNDTREE ROAD , PORT ANGELES, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 2/16/1999, recorded 2/23/1999 , under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 1999 1024640, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from DELOY A. REAUME, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, AS HER SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor, to LAND TITLE OF CLALLAM COUNTY, as Trustee, in favor of MERITAGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, AN OREGON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY AS SUCCESSOR TO THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE FOR C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-CB2. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 2/1/2012, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of March 13, 2013 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2012 14 payments at $ 925.65 each $ 12,959.10 (02-01-12 through 03-13-13) Late Charges: $ 140.24 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TSG GUARANTEE POLICY $ 417.34 SELECTED FEES $ 971.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 14,487.68 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $70,466.23, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on July 12, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by July 1, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before July 1, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after July 1, 2013, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: DELOY A. REAUME, 737 ROUNDTREE ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 DELOY A. REAUME, 13 ROUNDTREE ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 SPOUSE OF DELOY A. REAUME, 13 ROUNDTREE ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 SPOUSE OF DELOY A. REAUME, 737 ROUNDTREE ROAD, PORT ANGELES, WA, 98362 by both first class and certified mail on 1/31/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 1/31/2013, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME, You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Comm i s s i o n Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 9 8 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) We b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 3/5/2013 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: MELANIE BEAMAN, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4367640 06/07/2013, 06/28/2013 Pub: June 7, 28, 2013 Legal No. 485548

FORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. Matching canopy. $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 or 1-3601269-1030.

FORD: ‘87 F350. New paint, tires, r ims and brakes. $1,595.97. Before 7 p.m. 457-8388.

FORD ‘93 F150 XLT LONG BED 4X4 EFI V8, 5 speed manual, chrome wheels, great tires, matching canopy, dual tanks, tow package, trailer brake controller, power windows and door locks, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, cassette stereo, CB Radio. This truck was the manager’s demonstration vehicle for a year! Great running and driving truck! Fiberglass high-rise canopy! Plenty of life left in this one! Pr iced to move! Stop by Gray Motors today! $3,495 GRAY MOTORS DODGE: ‘06 Ram. 457-4901 Manual, 59k miles, exgraymotors.com cellent cond., reg. cab. $9,800. (360)477-6149. FORD: ‘95 F-150. Matching canopy, 92k, clean, 4.9 ltr. in-line 6. $4,500. 452-1646.

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-506334-SH APN No.: 033031439000 Title Order No.: 120126937-WA-GNO Grantor(s): CHRISTI K. VORHIES, JAMES F. VORHIES Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2009-1231112 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/5/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1 OF ATWOOD SHORT PLAT NO. 1 RECORDED JUNE 28, 1989 IN VOLUME 19 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 37, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 618623, BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 3 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 40 VORHIES WAY, SEQUIM, WA 98382-5010 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 1/8/2009, recorded 1/14/2009, under 2009-1231112 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAMES F. VORHIES AND CHRISTI K. VORHIES, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $28,638.73 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $197,513.87, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 9/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/5/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 6/24/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 6/24/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 6/24/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JAMES F. VORHIES AND CHRISTI K. VORHIES, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 40 VORHIES WAY, SEQUIM, WA 98382-5010 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 11/1/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: FEB. 28, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-506334-SH A-4364855 06/07/2013, 06/28/2013 Pub: June 7, 28, 2013 Legal No. 485546

DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4X4 This truck literally has it all. 5.7 L HEMI V8 bighor n package, lift kit, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, tow package, sliding rear window, running boards, oversized off-road tires, premium alloy wheels and much more! What a truck! This lifted 4WD cruises down the highway remarkably smooth and cruises over almost any obstacle with its professionally installed liftkit. Talk about power! The 5.7 HEMI V8 has it all over the competition. One fine, well-appointed truck! $22,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD: ‘98 F150. Rims, tinted, black, extended cab. Priced to sell! $1,875. (360)460-0518.

DODGE: ‘99 Ram 4X4 Flatbed tr uck. Low miles, recent oil change, transmission flush and filter changes. 3/4 ton 360 engine. call 461-4151. Photos available by request. Price reduced to $3500/obo. FORD ‘09 F150 KING RANCH 4X4 SUPER CREW This truck literally has it all! Full luxur y power, power moonroof, heated and cooled leather captains chairs, navigation system, SYNC voice activated communications and entertainment system. KING RANCH! Awesome truck! Priced right at $29,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD: ‘99 14’ box truck. Diesel, 133k, good truck. $7,800. (360)452-4738.

M A Z DA : ‘ 8 4 P i c k u p. Runs good, low miles. $1,200. (360)452-5126.

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 door, low miles 82,400. Extended warranty. 6’ bed. Excellent Condition. G o o d T i r e s . To w i n g Package. V6 4 liter. Bed Tool Box. $17,900. (360)504-2374

9556 SUVs Others

FORD: ‘95 Bronco 4X4. Good rubber, runs great, 139k. $4,500/obo. (360)457-9148

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-13-542789-TC APN No.: 063000-0334500000 Title Order No.: 130029941-WA-GSO Grantor(s): OCTAVIO GONZALEZ Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2006 1192414 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/26/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 10 AND 11 (EXC S 75) BLK 334 TPA LOTS 10 AND 11 IN BLOCK 334 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES; EXCEPT THE SOUTH 75 FEET THEREOF. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON More commonly known as: 1015 S EUNICE ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/29/2006, recorded 12/5/2006, under 2006 1192414 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from OCTAVIO GONZALEZ, A SINGLE PERSON, as Grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $25,213.15 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $112,342.92, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/26/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME OCTAVIO GONZALEZ, A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 1015 S EUNICE ST, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 2/21/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: MAR. 26, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-542789-TC A-FN4367731 06/28/2013, 07/19/2013 Pub: June 28, July 19, 2013 Legal No. 490808


Classified

C6 FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013 9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

LINCOLN: ‘04 NavigaRESOLUTION 32, 2013 t o r. 9 5 k , AW D, 4 X 4 , leather, seats 7 comCALL FOR HEARING ON THE PROPOSED fortably, good family veTRADE-IN OF SURPLUS PROPERTY hicle, new compressor and tabs, 6 disc changer THE BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISand Bose sound sysSIONERS finds as follows: ter m, ver y reliable. $12,000/obo. ISUZU: ‘01 Rodeo LS. 1. The Sheriff’s Office has determined that six Glock (360)460-5421 Looks good runs great! 22 .40 S&W pistols, each with three magazines, are Under 78,000 original TOYOTA: ‘92 4Runner. no longer usable by the department now or in the miles. Black with gray in4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, foreseeable future. The serial numbers of these six terior. Power locks, win199,500 mi., fair to good pistols are: GEP387, GEP422, GEP421, GEP374, dows and driver seat, GEP415, GEP416. cond. $1,950. 461-0054. p r e m i u m s o u n d , A / C, tow package. Original SUBARU ‘04 2. The Sheriff’s Office desires to trade-in these six owner. $7000/obo. FORESTER 2.5X AWD pistols with a local federally licensed firearms deal(360)912-2296 Like new inside and out, er for credit against future county law enforcement great green color, roof equipment purchases. JEEP ‘04 GRAND rack, power windows, DODGE: ‘01 Durango CHEROKEE LAREDO power door locks, reS LT. N e w t i r e s . 3. Pursuant to Chapter 36.34 RCW and Clallam 4X4 mote keyless entry, 100k $4,800/obo. 683-0763. 4.7L V8, automatic, alloy miles, new tires, rear de- County Administrative Policy 455, the Board of Clalwheels, new tires, new frost and much more! lam County Commissioners has the responsibility to FORD: ‘04 Explorer. Exbatter y, tow package, This one drives as good declare property surplus and to approve the tradecellent condition, new roof rack, privacy glass, as it looks, come test in of this property after holding a public hearing to tires/brakes, all power, determine the propriety and advisability of such prop owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r drive before its gone! trailer hitch, 102K mi. posed action. HUMMER ‘05 locks, mirrors, and driv$7,000. (360)683-5494. $10,750 H2 V8 4WD ers seat, cruise control, Lipman’s Automotive Full size luxur y SUV. FORD: ‘87 Bronco II. tilt, air conditioning, CD IN HOUSE FINANCING NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners, in consid4x4. $1,500. 1-360-269- The Hummer H2 is a stereo, information cenAVAILABLE eration of the above findings of fact: 1208 or 1-360-269-1030. powerful off roader with ter, dual front airbags. (360)452-5050 upscale interior appoint- Kelley Blue Book value www.lipmansauto.com ments. 4 doors, full pow- of $9,752! Only 89,000 1. That a public hearing on the proposed trade-in of 2840 E Hwy 101 E PA er package, leather, CD, miles! Immaculate condisurplus property listed above be held in the Commoonroof, heated seats, t i o n i n s i d e a n d o u t ! missioner’s meeting room, 223 East 4th Street, tow pkg., much more. L o a d e d w i t h o p t i o n s ! 9730 Vans & Minivans Room 160, Port Angeles, Washington at 10:30 am Others This H2 has 5 passen- 4X4 capability for anyon July 9, 2013. ger seating with a small t h i n g m o t h e r n a t u r e CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. t r u ck - l i ke b e d o n t h e throws at you! Come see PASSED AND ADOPTED this twenty-fifth day of GMC: ‘01 Yukon. Ver y back that has a foldable the guys with over 50 CARGO van. Only 13K June 2013 nice, below KBB, sacri- door between the cargo years of experience pro- orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. fice at $6,850. 460-8610. box and cab. You must viding the best value for $8,800. (360)457-3903. BOARD OF drive it to appreciate the CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. handling and power of your buck! Stop by Gray FORD: ‘91 Van. WheelMotors today! chair lift, 97k miles, enMichael C. Chapman, Chair Auto trans, A/C, 350, this SUV. $8,995 gine purrs. $3,800. Jim McEntire 247900 mi, seats 8, $24,950 GRAY MOTORS (360)681-5383 Howard V. Doherty, Jr. great cond, well cared Preview at: 457-4901 ATTEST: for. $2,150. Call heckmanmotors.com graymotors.com (360)531-0854 9931 Legal Notices Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Heckman Motors Pub: June 28, July 7, 2013 Legal No. 492844 Clallam County 111 E. Front, P.A. JEEP ‘05 WRANGLER KIA 2010 SOUL + (360)912-3583 “X” The name says it all. THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFOR4.0 liter inline 6-cyl., Youthful, distinctively MATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. styled unique looks, with JEEP: ‘05 Rubicon. 44K 6-speed manual, 4x4, If you have filed bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this commany features at an af- mi., 6 speed, air, cruise, A / C , c r u i s e , t i l t , munication is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an attempt AM/FM/CD, hardtop, roll fordable price. You get new tires. $20,000. (360)417-0539 bar, alloy wheels, fog to collect this debt from you personally. that soulful feeling cruisNOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE lamps, chrome step ing down the road, lisPURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON tening to the rich sound JEEP: ‘80 CJ5 Rene- bars, only 38,000 miles, g a d e. O r i g i n a l , g o o d CHAPTER 61.24, ET.SEQ. ver y, ver y clean local system equipped with trade in, non-smoker, TO: Mark Bonanno S i r i u s s a t e l l i t e ra d i o, shape. $3,750. (360)385-2792 spotless “Autocheck” ve- Angela Bonanno Bluetooth and steering Occupants of the Premises hicle history report. wheel audio controls. I. WHY PAY $16,995 Yo u c a n c h a n g e t h e NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Rainier ForecloREID & JOHNSON SHIPPING ON tunes with fingertip consure Services, Inc., will on July 26, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., outside the MOTORS 457-9663 trols. All of the above an INTERNET main entrance of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th Street, in the City reidandjohnson.com over 30 mpg to boot. PURCHASES? of Port Angeles, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and 38K miles. $14,900 ADD A PHOTO TO best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: SHOP LOCAL Preview at: YOUR AD FOR THAT PORTION OF LOT 17 LYING EAST OF THE MOUNT ANGELES heckmanmotors.com ONLY $10! ROAD, AND ALL OF LOTS 18, 19 AND 20 IN BLOCK 2 OF ILLINOIS ADDIHeckman Motors www.peninsula peninsula TION TO PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON AS PER PLAT THEREOF RE111 E. Front, P.A. dailynews.com dailynews.com (360)912-3583 CORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF PLATS, PAGE 71, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, EXCEPT RIGHT OF WAY FOR ROAD. 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices [The property may also be described as Lots A and B of Boundary Line Adjustment Survey recorded in Volume 67 of Surveys, page 12, under Auditor’s file Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County No. 2008 1227549] Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington (Tax Parcel Nos. 063014-540246; 063014-540248) 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-538353-SH APN No.: 08-30-24-340150 Title Or- (commonly known as 3119 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles, Washington, der No.: 120402614-WA-GSO Grantor(s): REBECCA M MCFARLAND, JOSH98362, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated April 13, 2007, and UA L MCFARLAND Grantee(s): WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007 1200793 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that recorded on April 16, 2007 under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 2007-1199566, Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on records of Clallam County, Washington, from Mark Bonanno and Angela Bo8/2/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, nanno, husband and wife, as Grantors, to Land Title and Escrow Company of 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest Jefferson, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Westsound Bank. and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of The beneficial interest is now held by 2010-1 RADC/CADC Venture, LLC, folcashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at lowing closure of Westsound Bank by the Washington Department of Financial the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Institutions and the appointment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: COMMENCING AT THE EAST LINE (“FDIC”), as receiver, and transfer of this loan by the FDIC, as receiver, to OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF 2010-1 RADC/CADC Venture, LLC, by allonge and under Assignment of Real SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 8 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM Estate Deed of Trust, effective August 26, 2010, and recorded under Clallam COUNTY, WASHINGTON; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG NORTH BOUN- County Auditor File Number 2011-1261677. II. DARY OF PSH HIGHWAY NO. 9 RIGHT OF WAY, 165 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO TH SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT; THENCE NORTH AP- No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending PROXIMATELY 128 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHWEST COR- to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s NER; THENCE EAST 165 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHEAST or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. CORNER; THENCE SOUTH APPROXIMATELY 136 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO STARTING POINT. SITUATE IN COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF The Default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 236131 HIGHWAY 101, PORT when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated a. Failure to pay the following amounts in arrears: 5/4/2007, recorded 5/4/2007, under 2007 1200793 records of CLALLAM Payment: County, Washington, from JOSHUA L MCFARLAND AND REBECCA M LOAN MATURED 9/1/12, at which time all principal and interest became fully MCFARLAND, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to NORTHWEST TRUS- due and payable. Principal balance: $206,761.51 TEE SERVICES LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WELLS Interest due at 6% per annum from 8/12/12 to 4/15/13: $8,361.11 FARGO BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was as- Default Interest at additional 12% per annum from 9/2/12 to 4/15/13: signed by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or $15,294.69 assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the TOTAL PAYMENT: Per Diem $101.96 $230,417.31 Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obli- b. Default other than failure to make monthly payments: gation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the ob- Delinquent General Taxes for 1st ½ 2013 for Tax Parcel Nos. 063014-540246 ligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which and 063014-540248 in the amount of $233.29 and $724.16, plus applicable inthis foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the follow- terest and penalties. ing amounts which are now in arrears: $9,773.80 IV. The sum owing on the IV. obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $154,286.89, The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2012, and such othBalance $206,761.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other iner costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured strument secured and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/2/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale 7/22/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, posses7/22/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is sion, or encumbrances on the 26th day of July, 2013. The defaults referred to cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or in paragraph III must be cured by the 26th day of July, 2013 (the sale date) to with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale may be terminated any time besale may be terminated any time after the 7/22/2013 (11 days before the sale fore the 26th day of July, 2013, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any re- recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus corded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Gran- A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the tor at the following address(es): NAME JOSHUA L MCFARLAND AND RE- Borrower or Grantor at the following addresses: B E C C A M M C FA R L A N D, H U S B A N D A N D W I F E A D D R E S S 2 3 6 1 3 1 Mark Bonanno All at: 136 Orcas Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362 HIGHWAY 101, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified Angela Bonanno mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Mark Bonanno All at: PO Box 2378, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of De- Angela Bonanno fault or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the by both first class and certified mail on March 1, 2013, proof of which is in the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of served on March 2, 2013, when said written Notice of Default and/or the No2/20/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will tice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property deprovide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due scribed in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has in his possession proof of at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the such service or posting. Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their inVII. terest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to The Trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing, this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be to any person requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant prior to the sale. to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of VIII. any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to pos- The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, session of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Gran- through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described propertor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to ty. IX. the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occu- afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections, if they bring a lawpied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accor- suit to restrain the sale, pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a dance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the TrusTHE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from tee’s Sale. X. the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONNOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS TACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHThe purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on INGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determin- occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the puring your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the fol- chaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary prolowing: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing ceedings under the unlawful detainer act, chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occounselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1- cupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in 877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consu- accordance with RCW 61.24.060. mers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United DATED: April 22, 2013. States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569RAINIER FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC., 4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local Successor Trustee c o u n s e l i n g a g e n c i e s i n W a s h i n g t o n : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c By: /s/ Kathleen Kim Coghlan e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n d ex . c f m ? we b L i s t A c t i o n = s e a r c h a n d a m p ; s e a r c h Kathleen Kim Coghlan, Treasurer/Secretary state=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assisRainier Foreclosure Services, Inc. c/o tance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1SCHWEET RIEKE & LINDE, PLLC 800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set 575 S. Michigan Street aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the PurSeattle, WA 98108 chaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the (206) 275-1010 Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The pur- STATE OF WASHINGTON ) chaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the ) ss. Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have COUNTY OF KING ) previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS AT- On this day before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of TEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared Kathleen WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby Kim Coghlan, to me known to be the Treasurer/Secretary of the corporation notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be that executed the foregoing NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE, and acknowlsubmitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit edged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said obligations. Dated: APR. 01, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned and on oath stated as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: that she is authorized to execute the said instrument. Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. Given under my hand and official seal on April 22, 2013. /s/ Leah A. Bartoces 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Leah A. Bartoces Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Notary Public in and for the Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or State of Washington, residing at Mountlake Terrace Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-538353-SH A-4367418 My commission expires: 10/29/14 06/28/2013, 07/19/2013 Pub: June 28, July 19, 2013 Legal No. 478089 Pub: June 28, July 19, 2013 Legal No. 490837

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES v. KARAMANOS LOAN NO. 2013617763 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 26th day of July, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. in the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East Fourth Street in the city of Port Angeles, state of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the county of Clallam, state of Washington, to-wit: LOT 2 OF DE VOS SHORT PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 12 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 40, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 539170, BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 29 NORTH, RANGE 5 WEST, W.M. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. commonly known as NNA Watershed Rd, Port Angeles, Washington, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated July 25, 2005, recorded July 26, 2005, under Auditor’s File Number 2005-1161477, records of Clallam County, Washington, from JULIE C. KARAMANOS, a single woman, Grantor, to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ANGELES as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust or the Beneficiary’s successor is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Six monthly payments of $716.89 each for the months of November 2012 through April 2013: $4,301.34; Five monthly late charges of $32.39 each for the months of November 2012 through March 2013: $161.95; TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND LATE CHARGES: $4,463.29 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal of $63,968.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 1st day of October, 2012, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 26th day of July, 2013. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 15th day of July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 15th day of July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 15th day of July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, the Grantor or the Grantor’s successor(s) in interest, any guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor or the Grantor’s successor(s) in interest at the following address: Julie Karamanos 4827 Utah St San Diego, CA 92116-1426 by both first class and certified mail on the 8th of March, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee. A written Notice of Default was also posted in a conspicuous place on the premises located at 8th of March, 2013, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants other than tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants other than tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. Pursuant to the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009, a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that is purchased at the trustee=s sale, under any bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure, has the right to occupy the property until the end of the remaining term of the lease, except that the purchaser (or a successor in interest) who will occupy the property as a primary residence may terminate the lease by giving written notice to the tenant at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice. The purchaser (or a successor in interest) may give a written notice to a tenant to vacate the property at least ninety (90) days before the effective date of such notice to a bona fide month-to-month tenant or subtenant in possession of the property, or a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property without a bona fide lease. A lease or tenancy shall be considered bona fide only if: (1) the tenant is not the mortgagor/grantor or the child, spouse, or parent of the mortgagor/grantor under the foreclosed contract/Deed of Trust; (2) the lease or tenancy was the result of an arms-length transaction; and (3) the lease or tenancy requires the receipt of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property or the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a Federal, State, or local subsidy. If a tenant’s occupancy of the property is not under a bona fide lease entered into before the notice of foreclosure (as defined by the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act), the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED this 12th day of April, 2013. PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM, TRUSTEE By: Christopher J. Riffle 403 South Peabody Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Pub: June 28, July 17, 2013 Legal No. 493062

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-11-467032-SH APN No.: 063000 038280 0000 00 Title Order No.: 5851236 Grantor(s): NEAL A LANNING, CHRISTI A LANNING Grantee(s): CENTEX HOME EQUITY COMPANY, LLC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2003 1121383 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/26/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 16 IN BLOCK 382 OF THE TOWNSITE OF PORT OF PORT ANGELES, SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 323 EAST 13TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/27/2003, recorded 10/31/2003, under 2003 1121383 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from CHRISTI A LANNING AND NEAL A LANNING AS JOINT TENANTS, as Grantor(s), to STEWART TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of CENTEX HOME EQUITY COMPANY, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by CENTEX HOME EQUITY COMPANY, LLC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $33,085.56 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $102,609.29, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/26/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/15/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME CHRISTIA LANNING AND NEAL A LANNING AS JOINT TENANTS ADDRESS 323 EAST 13TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/9/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandamp;searchstate=WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: MAR. 25, 2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Paul Hitchings, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 9 8 3 7 0 ( 8 6 6 ) 6 4 5 - 7 7 1 1 S a l e L i n e : 7 1 4 - 7 3 0 - 2 7 2 7 O r L o g i n t o : http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-11-467032-SH A-4371421 06/28/2013, 07/19/2013 Pub: June 28, July 19, 2013 Legal No. 490915


Centrum’s Voice Works concert | This week’s new movies

Peninsula

Olympic Music Festival California-based baritone Zachary Gordin will sing at the Olympic Music Festival this Saturday and Sunday.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE WEEK OF JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2013


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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Coming Up

Wordplay flavors PT coffee house PORT TOWNSEND — Scrabble games are open to all players each Friday afternoon and evening at Better Living Through Coffee, 100 Tyler St. There’s a new game time now that it’s summer: 3:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. “Drop in when you can; leave when you feel like it,” says Patrick Jennings, a Scrabbling instigator. “Bring a board if you have one,” though “there are usually a few spares at the coffee shop,” he adds, and “bring a friend, or two.” For details, phone 360385-3388.

Mary Tulin will perform twice in the coming week with a Saturday gig at Wind Rose Cellars and a Friday, July 5, performance at Rainshadow Coffee Co., both in Sequim.

This Saturday, Shea and band will appear at Krush, the new restaurant and lounge at the intersection of Sequim-Dungeness Way and Old Olympic Highway, from 9 p.m. till 11 p.m. For details, phone the venue at 360-797-1081.

Folk noir

SEQUIM — Guitarist Mary Tulin will reappear at Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., on Saturday from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. There’s no cover charge to enjoy her “Celtic folk noir” brand of music. Then on Friday, July 5, Tulin will collaborate with multi-instrumentalist Mike Saunders at Rainshadow Coffee Co., 157 W. Cedar St. “Mike is a great storyteller and songmeister with a beautiful baritone voice,” said Tulin. Summer songs She invites acousticSEQUIM — Songbird music lovers to RainSarah Shea and her ensemshadow from 6 p.m. to 8 ble Chez Jazz will bring p.m. on that Friday, which their music to a pair of venis also the night of the free ues this weekend, both Sequim art walk among times with no cover charge. downtown galleries and Jazz standards, from cafes from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Critic.com will be shown “Summertime” to “Fever” to one more time this Satur“Cry Me a River,” will flow Behold ‘Lo’ day night. from 6:30 to 8:30 at Wind The venue for the 8 p.m. Rose Cellars, 143 W. WashPORT ANGELES — event is the Allé Stage at ington St., tonight. “Lo,” called “warped, origiThe wine bar can be nal, imaginative and quite Studio Bob, 118½ E. Front reached at 360-681-0690. funny,” by TheIndependent St., and admission is just $5. Seating will be in Studio Bob’s hand-painted cushy chairs, and popcorn, candy and other treats will be available from The Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s Loom, the lounge adjacent weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items to Studio Bob. about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Doors will open at Sending information is easy: 6 p.m. Saturday for those Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to who want to enjoy refresharrive 10 days before Friday publication. ments and conversation Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before before the movie. publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port “Lo,” directed by Travis Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publicaBetz, is a love story about

May we help?

Fiddling Fourth PORT TOWNSEND — The Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, a 36-year-old tradition at Fort Worden State Park, happens July 4-6, bringing together music and performers from Canada, Mexico, Texas,

ets are $20 to $25. All Fiddle Tunes activities are at Fort Worden, 200 Battery Way, and abundant information can be found at www.Centrum. org and 800-746-1982.

Swing town PORT TOWNSEND — Seattle area dance teacher Roberto Villamarin will return to the Quimper Grange for classes — including an “absolute beginners” West Coast swing session — next Saturday, July 6. Here’s the lineup. ■ The beginners’ class will start at noon and cost $10 per person. ■ An open-level West Coast swing foundations class will come next at 1 p.m. for $12. ■ An all-levels choreography session — no swing dance knowledge required — will go from 2:15 p.m. till 3:40 p.m. for $15. ■ An intermediate/ advanced West Coast swing choreography class finishes the day from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. for $15. A number of students must be signed up in order to hold the classes, so advance contact is encouraged. If the classes go forward, dancers can sign up at the door of the grange hall, 1219 Corona St., on July 6. Meantime, phone Villamarin at 425-753-8086 or email RVillamarin@ uwdglobal.com for information and registration. More details await at www. UWDglobal.com. Peninsula Daily News

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tion. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

Justin (Ward Roberts) and his sweetheart April (Sarah Lassez), who is kidnapped by demons. For more on the movie and other activities at Studio Bob, see the Allé Stage page on Facebook or email stage manager Sarah Tucker at Sarah@Tucker Art.com.

Louisiana and beyond. Chirps Smith and Dot Kent, Bobby Taylor and Kim Johnson, Curly Miller and Carole Anne Rose, Los Jilguerillos del Huerto, Edward Poullard, Cedric Watson and Desiree Champagne are a few of the musicians soon to arrive for this event, which is presented by the Centrum foundation. First comes the “Fiddlin’ on the Fourth” afternoon show next Thursday: Joseph Decosimo from Tennessee, Riley Baugus, Matt Kinman and Moses Nelligan from North Carolina and Dawn Beaton and Barbara Magone from Cape Breton will step up at 1:30 p.m. in McCurdy Pavilion. Then comes the Thursday evening show, with Yvon Mimeault and Guy Bouchard from Quebec, blueswoman Suzy Thompson and klezmer players Cookie Segelstein, Joshua Horowitz and Mark Rubin, among others. That’s at 7:30 p.m. in the McCurdy Pavilion. Tickets range from $20 to $25 for these events. On Friday, July 5, admission is free to the Fiddle Showcase, outdoors on Fort Worden’s Nora Porter Commons from noon to 1 p.m. The Cajun and Creole Dance follows at 7 p.m. on Littlefield Green, with admission at $15. Saturday brings the festival finale, with six acts from Maine to Mexico giving a concert at 1:30 p.m. in McCurdy Pavilion. Tick-


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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Sharing America’s musical roots Performers bring euphonic heritage to Centrum stage BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

fly, B.C.; Pacific Northwesterners Caleb Klauder and PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Laurel Bliss; John Lilly from Charleston, W.Va., PORT TOWNSEND — and Riley Baugus from It’s not that the BirmingNorth Carolina are all part ham Sunlights want to of the show. shine their music down on The “Roots and the listener. Branches” concert will start It’s much more, said Sun- at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at light James Taylor, that “we McCurdy Pavilion, the big want to share it with people. hall at Fort Worden, 200 We would like to share the Battery Way. Tickets are roots of American popular $20 for reserved seating, music: Southern gospel and while those 18 and younger Negro spirituals.” get in free. More details are The Sunlights, a fiveat www.Centrum.org and man ensemble from Bir800-746-1982. mingham, Ala., are here as teachers in Centrum’s A cappella Voice Works workshops Taylor offered a couple this week, and then, once of hints about the Birmingschool is out, to headline ham Sunlights set. It will the final concert Saturday include “It’s Gonna Rain,” a night. That event has a kind of “traditional rap long title: “Roots and song,” in his words, plus Branches of American “Handwriting on the Wall,” Singing: From the Secular a Bible-inspired song about to the Sacred.” how God can always come The name fits. The Birdown and address those mingham Sunlights are who “misuse some of his one part of a lineup of tools and wares.” musicians from all over The Sunlights sing a this continent. Yvette cappella because their Landry from Breaux Church of Christ has never Bridge, La., Pharis and allowed musical instruJohn Romero from Horse-

The Birmingham Sunlights — from left, Everette Taylor, Wayne Williams and James, Steve and Barry Taylor — will shine on Fort Worden State Park this Saturday night. ments. And the singers don’t miss them. “Like Quincy Jones said, [we] ‘bring it from the hip pocket,’” added Taylor. His mother and father and all four grandparents sang in gospel groups. Together with his brothers Barry and Steve Taylor, he founded the Birmingham Sunlights in 1978. The ensemble has sung all over the Americas and in foreign lands including South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, Malawi, Swazi-

land, Lesotho, Jamaica, Trinidad and Haiti. Four years ago, the Sunlights were awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellowship. Taylor, 62, has been singing since he was 4 years old. He proudly added that the Sunlights now include Brandon Taylor, his brother Barry’s son. Another group of offspring is coming up, too: the Sons of the Sunlights, composed of their 12- to 15-year-old sons and grandsons.

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Louisiana’s Yvette Landry is in Port Townsend this weekend for “Roots and Branches of American Singing.”

To those who have not heard much gospel singing, Taylor said: “Come and


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Free-writing class scheduled Wednesdays in PT business PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

write with the direction of creative prompts. PORT TOWNSEND — Left to the vices of A free-writing class is held chance, writers will pick at the Writers Workprompts from an anointed shoppe, 234 Taylor St., box, using the first 40 each Wednesday from minutes of class to write noon to 1 p.m. and the last 20 minutes to The class is free and read if wanted. open to the public. Prompts can range Each week, a group of anywhere from telling a writers convenes to freememory backward to solv-

2-for-1 weekend Readers Theatre Plus presenting ‘The Mikado,’ the Dewey Awards

ing the mystery of an inclass crime scene. Loosely facilitated by Nina Sajeske and Phil Montenegro, the class is meant to be an encouraging atmosphere for keeping in the practice of putting words to paper. For more information, phone 360-379-2617.

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

ping — with proceeds to benefit the Readers Theatre Plus scholarship fund PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for local high school stuSEQUIM — “The dents. A silent auction, Mikado,” that Gilbert and with items ranging from Sullivan comic opera, is on 5th Avenue Theatre tickets this weekend at the Dungeto ukulele lessons to a ness Schoolhouse, 2781 Sunny Farms gift certifiTowne Road, along with cate, will be open in the another Readers Theatre downstairs hall at the Plus event. Dungeness Schoolhouse The Dewey Awards, while “The Mikado” plays honors for local actors and upstairs. directors who have been Then, at 4:30 p.m. Sunpart of Readers Theatre day, the Dewey Awards — Plus shows since spring named in honor of Penin2012, will be presented at sula Singers director and 4:30 p.m. Sunday afternoon “Mikado” conductor Dewey at the schoolhouse. That’s Dewey Ehling Ehling — will begin. Public right after the final perforvoting took place on the mance of “The Mikado.” Christianson and Valerie Readers Theatre Plus webLape, respectively. site with ballots due June ‘Mikado’ cast Curtain times are 7:30 22 for best production, tonight and Saturday night director, lead actor and The show, a story of and finally 2 p.m. Sunday, actress, supporting actor love, misunderstanding and the ticket outlets are and actress and best and marriage in the town ensemble. The envelopes of Titipu, has its last three Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. will be opened and trophies performances tonight, Sat- Washington St., Sequim, and Odyssey Books, 114 W. presented in Sunday’s cereurday and Sunday. It stars Front St., Port Angeles. monies. Ric Munhall as the Mikado The prices are $15 per perAll Readers Theatre — a Japanese emperor — son or two tickets for $25. Plus productions raise and Trent Pomeroy as our money for local causes, hero Nanki-Poo and Karen Get tickets early which include the PeninPritchard as his sweetheart Yum-Yum. If any tickets are left at sula Friends of Animals, Joel Yelland is Ko-Ko, show time, they will be sold the Sequim guild for Seattle Children’s Hospital and Lord High Executioner of at the door. But last Sunthe theater troupe’s own Titipu, and John Silver is day, the performance was scholarship program. Pooh-Bah, Lord High sold out and people were For more information Everything Else. Carl turned away, said Readers about the Dewey Awards, Honore portrays Pish-Tush Theatre Plus board mem“The Mikado” and Readers the Noble Lord. Yum-Yum’s ber Paul Martin. Theatre Plus, see www. sisters, Pitti-Sing and While attending these ReadersTheatrePlus.com or Peep-Bo, are brought to shows, theater-goers can coquettish life by Bonnie also indulge in some shop- phone 369-797-3337.

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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A comedic look at world history In “The Big Bang,” Jeff Allen Pierce, left, and David Natale play desperate theater producers hoping to stage a musical about the major events in world history.

Key City takes stab at humans’ timeline BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

ELIGIUS WOLODKEWITSCH

and Thursday performance. And on Sunday, July 7, it’s Bike Night, sponsored by The ReCyclery community

bike center of Port Townsend, so those who pedal their bicycles to the show will enjoy valet park-

ing for their two wheels plus $5 off admission or concessions. For much more “Big

Bang” information, see www.KeyCityPublicTheatre. org, or phone 360-385-5278 (KCPT). “The show is a great tribute to vaudeville and the value of live performance, reminding us how fun it is to laugh along with an audience,” says Dowdell. “ I predict belly laughs.”

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HISTORIC DUNGENESS SCHOOLHOUSE Sequim-Dungeness Way & Towne Road Tickets: $15.00 Donation at Door or 2 for $25 in Advance at Pacific Mist Books (Sequim) • 683-1396 Odyssey Bookshop (Port Angeles) • 457-1045 More information: 797-3337 • www.readerstheatreplus.com

36813075

the apartment. “‘The Big Bang’ is hilariPENINSULA DAILY NEWS ous,” declares Dowdell. Natale and Pierce deliver PORT TOWNSEND — tour de force performances, Think “Titanic.” Or “The she adds, “reminiscent of Producers” — on the Key Danny Kaye, Bing Crosby, City Playhouse stage. the Honeymooners and “The Big Bang,” a musiLaurel and Hardy, not to cal history of the whole mention Lucille Ball and world, is about to hit Port Desi Arnaz. Townsend, opening this “It’s exhilarating to see very night for a four-week them jump through all run courtesy of three busy sorts of hoops for 90 minperformers. utes, while singing gloriDavid Natale and Jeff ously in multiple dialects Allen Pierce, last seen . . . They play all the roles, together in the Key City male and female,” Dowdell Shakespeare in the Park says. production of “Twelfth “The songs are derivaNight,” are at their comedy tive, which is usually not a game again. This time, they have musical director compliment. But the familiar styles contribute to the Linda Dowdell backing humor. them up. She’s behind the “Personally, I’m grateful baby grand piano playing I remain at the piano, for all she’s worth while rather than changing coschaos swirls around her. tumes and chasing props as much as my fellow cast.” Delusions of grandeur Key City Public Theatre Natale and Pierce, you artistic director Denise see, play Jed and Boyd, Winter is at the helm of desperate wanna-be pro“Bang,” with a crew includducers seeking to line up ing set designer Abbie backers for their new musi- Greene, costume designer cal, “The Big Bang.” It is to Beverly Michelsen and probe the most expensive pro- duction apprentices Jessica duction ever, with a cast of Reid and Henry Nolan, two 318 with 6,428 costumes, recent Port Townsend High 1,400 wigs and a budget of School graduates. $83 million. We meet them inside ‘AfterWords’ their borrowed work space: Show time at the Key a swank apartment on Park Avenue in Manhattan. City Playhouse, 419 WashThings get messy quick. ington St., is 8 p.m. each “The Big Bang” starts right Friday and Saturday, and on Thursdays and Sundays out with Adam, Eve and the curtain rises at 7 p.m. the Snake, then leaps forTickets range from $18 to ward to Queen Nefertiti $20, with discounts for stuand the slaves, Caesar, dents, though this first Attila and Columbus. We also meet Mrs. Gan- Sunday and Thursday’s dhi, Tokyo Rose, Eva Braun shows are pay-what-youand many, many other peo- wish. “AfterWords” discussions follow each Sunday ple from history — in


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

farm Down on the

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Californiabased baritone Zachary Gordin will sing at the Olympic Music Festival this Saturday and Sunday.

with

Concerts in the

BARN

Baritone Zachary Gordin to open 30th summer of musical series BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

QUILCENE — To open its 30th season of “Concerts in the Barn,” the Olympic Music Festival is bringing a “barihunk.” Yes, Zachary Gordin, a San Francisco Bay Area baritone, will sing in a program titled “Songs and Dances of Love” this Saturday and Sunday at what may be the most casual of all classical music venues. On the farm at 7360 Center Road in rural Jefferson County, the Olympic Music Festival is marking its third decade of presenting chamber-style concerts with musicians from across the continent. These performances, at 2 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday now through Sept. 1, feature haybale seating inside the barn, picnicking on the lawn outside, and a dress code calling

for jeans and T-shirts. And Gordin “is something a bit different from regular festival fare,” said event spokeswoman Kristin Mineah. An opera singer who has appeared in “Carmina Burana,” “Pagliacci,” “Rigoletto” and the 2013 “Barihunks” charity calendar, Gordin will offer Robert Schumann’s “Dichterliebe,” Franz Liszt’s “Liebestraume” and the lesser-known “Chansons Grises” by Reynaldo Hahn.

‘Feel it’ “Even if you don’t understand every word of the French and German,” Gordin said, “you’ll feel what is happening. “It’ll be an honest and touching performance of some incredible music,” he added. “You don’t have to dress up, and there’s no pretense. TURN

TO

BARN/7

Violinists Ilana Setapen, at far left, and Michael Chen are among the guest artists coming to play the Olympic Music Festival this summer.


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Barn: ‘Coming together’ CONTINUED FROM 6 “It’s all about coming together for the music and the poetry.” Beside the singer will be an Olympic Music Festival veteran: pianist Paul Hersh of San Francisco. “His exquisite playing is so vital to these performances, where both singer and pianist are storytellers,” Gordin said.

Upcoming performers In coming weekends, Concerts in the Barn will bring players from across the West. Pianist Julio Elizalde, violinist and violist Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, cellists Jennifer Culp and Matthew Zalkind, clarinetist Teddy Abrams, violinists Korine Fujiwara and Ilana Setapen and Olympic Music Festival founder and violist Alan Iglitzin are among those who will offer the music of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Bartok, Schubert and many other classical masters. Gordin, for his part, said he’s both excited and nervous about singing in a barn. It’ll be a first for him. “In a theater, you have the surety of the four walls and ceiling, giving you a reasonably stable acoustic environment,” he said. “I hear the barn has great acoustics, which I can’t wait to experience.” He encouraged those who don’t go to classical concerts to join him in this new venture. The music, after all, is what matters. “If you come with an open mind, you’ll

A public art show in honor of Gail St. Peter, painter of this watercolor titled “Pink Flames,” opens in July at The Fifth Avenue Retirement Center. Violinist Stefan Milenkovich, above, violinist and violist TienHsin Cindy Wu will also come to Quilcene for the Olympic Music Festival this summer. leave with a full heart.” Advance tickets to the Olympic Music Festival are $30 for adults for barn seating; $28 for seniors 62 and older and $18 for youth age 7 to 17. At the gate on concert day, those prices go up $3. For lawn seating, there are no advance sales; tickets at the gate are $20 for adults, $14 for youth and free for children 6 and younger. Patrons are invited to come early to picnic, walk around the 55-acre farm and browse in the Milking Shed souvenir and snack shop. Complete information — program listings, directions and more — is at www.OlympicMusicFestival.org. Tickets and details are also available by phoning 360-732-4800.

In memory of . . . Watercolorists honor mentor with exhibition of artwork BY DIANE URBANI

PAZ

tion, said the show’s organizer, Carol Wilhelm. The watercolorists’ display will SEQUIM — The North Olympic stay open to the public through the Watercolorists are inviting art lovers end of July at The Fifth Avenue, 500 to see a special exhibition — a showW. Hendrickson Road. The center case of painting styles — at the also will be among the venues open Fifth Avenue Retirement Center in to visitors during Sequim’s First FriJuly. day Art Walk from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. This show, featuring 15 artists and about 30 canvases, is in remem- on July 5. And on Sunday, July 7, The Fifth Avenue will host an openbrance of Gail St. Peter, the watering reception with the watercolorists colorists’ mentor and friend. St. from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Peter, who was 67, died June 18 Admission is free to all of these after a long illness. events, and more information is At the Straitside Studio in available at wilhelmbiz@olypen.com Sequim, the North Olympic Watercolorists got together once a week to or by phoning The Fifth Avenue at share ideas, techniques and inspira- 360-683-9439. DE LA

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Honing their skills Summer musical theater intensive helps teenagers sharpen stagecraft BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Vocal technique, Broadway songs, dance, Shakespeare, lunch from the Red Rooster: Such are the facets of the second annual Musical Theater Intensive for Teens at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. The workshop, from 9:45 a.m. till 4 p.m. weekdays July 22-Aug. 2, is for teenagers who dream of a life on stage — and who are determined to make their dreams real. Composer, jazz pianist and musical theater director Linda Dowdell, singer Elinore O’Connell and dancer Annuel Preston, with interns Jessica Reid and Liz Dennison, will lead this exploration of theater skills. Audition coaching is also on the agenda, as is improvisation and, for relaxation and body awareness, some yoga. Sequim High School graduate Ayla Iliff, now a student at Seattle’s Cornish College of the Arts, took part in the 2012 summer intensive.

DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ/ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sara Jackson, 17, became a singer in last year’s Musical Theater Intensive at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. The two-week program for teens returns in July.

The deadline to register and make a deposit is next Friday, July 5. For information, phone Dowdell at 360-928-5132 or email linda@rajbongo.com; a brochure can be seen at www.OlympicMusicSchool.com. Joey Ripley, a 16-year-old actor from Port Townsend, took part in the intensive last year, and appreciated the chance to work with people who feel as strongly about theater as he does.

‘Professionalism’

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“I really liked the professionalism,” said Joey, who appeared in Port Townsend High School’s “The ComSara Jackson, 17, said plete Works of Wilshe went into last sumliam Shakespeare mer’s intensive thinking (Abridged),” “Urinetown” she lacked ability as a and “The Imaginary singer. She’d acted in proInvalid.” ductions at Sequim High At the close of last School, but singing wasn’t year’s intensive, the teens yet in her repertoire. staged “Take Us to the O’Connell taught her World,” a musical revue of that yes, she could sing. song, comedy and dance. ‘Spoke my language’ And dance and act. They will present a show “She said, ‘Here are “I got to be with people again this year, Dowdell some singing exercises,’ who spoke my language,” promised, Aug. 2 at the and now I have them on she said, adding that durDungeness Schoolhouse, my laptop,” Sara added. ing the workshops, there 2781 Towne Road. A perforTuition for the two-week mance at the Port Angeles was a feeling of pulling together, not of competition. intensive is $475 including Community Playhouse, the noon meal from the “My favorite part,” 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., is Red Rooster Grocery in added alumna Misha also planned on that day. Sequim. Some scholarship Casella-Blackburn, “was One of the best parts, funding may be available. the audition section. It Dowdell observed, was the Dowdell and crew timed bond that developed during helped me so much.” The the workshop to make it 16-year-old is part of The the workshop. possible to ride the JefferChairs improv troupe of “In addition to benefits Port Townsend and of other son Transit bus from Port of performing,” she said, Townsend to Sequim each productions at Key City “students formed strong day; carpools are also avail- friendships with one Public Theatre and Manable. resa Castle. another.”


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Evenings of sound to connect to heart Organizers to use voice, instruments BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

Monday at Studio Bob, 118 E. Front St. in Port Angeles. Admission is by donation, with $5 to $20 suggested. “Organic Matters of the Heart,” Dodd said, are the songs, sounds and universal prayers that come from inside us. They’re sacred songs that heal the heart, she believes. For more information, phone Wolf at 360-6815407 or visit www.Village Heartbeat.com. To learn more about Dodd and her music, see www.Sacred SoundSchool.com, and for more about Stanwood, visit www.MichaelStanwood. com. 1/2

Dodd

Wolf

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

evenings, first in Sequim this Sunday and then in Three musicians and metaphysicians, didgeridoo Port Angeles on Monday. Music of the didgeridoo player Michael Stanwood, — an Australian aboriginal percussionist Zorina Wolf instrument —as well as and vocalist Vickie Dodd, the mouth harp, drums will soon gather for two sessions exploring “Organic and voice will flow from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sunday Matters of the Heart.” at the Village Heartbeat “Come prepared,” Dodd Studio, 353 Chickadee writes in her invitation, to Lane in Sequim, and then feel “joy, ease and inspiration” in one or both of these from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

PS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Barhop Brewery (124 W. Railroad Ave.) — Scott Sullivan Duo (folk/rock), tonight, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) — Cody Rentas Band (blues), tonight, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Justin Scott and the Riveters (rock/blues), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Soul Ducks (rockabilly/blues), Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Jerry’s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) — Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the Draw Band, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; country jam, Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Mary McPage and the Assassins (blues), tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight, $5 cover; BMR (Rachael, Mick and Barry), Sunday, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Joy in Mudville, Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Chesnut Junction, Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

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Every Friday in PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles Senior Center (328 E. Seventh St.) — Wally’s Boys (ballroom), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free.

Port Townsend

R Bar (132 E. Front St) — Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — all-ages open mic, Thursday, 8 p.m., signups start at 7 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn The Cedars at Dungeness Stymie’s Bar and Grill (1965 Woodcock Road) — Rachael and Barry, tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Old Sidekicks (classic country), tonight, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Mary McPage and the Assassins, Saturday, 8 p.m. to midnight; Blue Hole Quintet (jazz), Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) — Victor hosts an open mic, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign-ups start at 6 p.m.) 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Testify (rock ‘n’ roll), tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight; Joey James Dean, tonight in Rainforest Bar, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Country Rock Association, Saturday, 8 p.m. to midnight; Rachael Jorgenson, Saturday in the Rainforest Bar, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Stardust Big Band, Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Chez Jazz, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Mary Tulin (Celtic), Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Cort Armstrong and Friends (bluegrass/country),Thursday, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Hadlock Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Saturday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Ludlow Resort at Port Ludlow (1 Heron Road) — Trevor Hanson, tonight, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Trevor Hanson, Wednesday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson, Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine (1208 Water St.) — Trevor Hanson, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m. The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Port Townsend Brewing Co. (330 10th St.) — Blues Counselors, tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Low Ones (folk/rock), Saturday, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.; The Better Half (blues), Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Gerald Braude (singersongwriter), Sunday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Southbound (country/ blues), Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sirens (823 Water St.) — Crow Quil Night Owls (jug band/swing), Saturday, 10 p.m., $5; fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, Thursday, 9 p.m. The Upstage (923 Washington St.) — Todd Wolfe Band (rock/blues), Saturday, 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.; open mic, Monday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — The Twins & Easily Persuaded, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Matt Sircely (singersongwriter), tonight, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Open mic hosted by Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m.

________ This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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PS At the Movies: Week of June 28 - July 4 Port Angeles (Deer Park listings through Monday, Lincoln through Tuesday.)

“Man of Steel” (PG-13) — In the newest reboot of the Superman franchise, a young journalist is forced to confront his secret extraterrestrial heritage when Earth is invaded by members of his race. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:25 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. today and Monday plus 12:45 p.m., 3:35 p.m., 6:25 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Monsters University” (G — Animated) — Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasn’t always the case. When these two mismatched monsters met, they couldn’t stand each other. The prequel to “Monsters, Inc.” unlocks the door to how Mike and Sully overcame their differences and became the best friends. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5 p.m., 7:15 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. daily through Monday, plus 12:30 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Now You See Me” (PG13) — An elite FBI squad is matched in a game of cat and mouse against “The Four From left, Isla Fisher, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson and Dave Franco star in “Now You See Horsemen,” a super-team of Me,” screening at Deer Park Cinema in Port Angeles. the world’s greatest illusionists. “The Four Horsemen” pull off a Los Angeles. As the world “World War Z” (PG-13) — series of daring heists against United Nations employee Gerry unravels outside, dwindling corrupt business leaders durWhere to find the cinemas Lane (Brad Pitt) traverses the supplies and cabin fever ing their performances, showworld in a race against time to threaten to tear apart the ■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer ering the stolen profits on their stop a zombie pandemic that is friendships inside. Eventually, Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. audiences while staying one toppling armies and governthey are forced to leave the step ahead of the law. At Lin■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; ments and threatening to decihouse, facing their fate and coln Theater. Showtimes 7:15 360-457-7997. mate humanity itself. At Deer the true meaning of friendship p.m, 9:30 p.m. daily through ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 and redemption. At the LinTuesday, plus 5 p.m. today Townsend; 360-385-1089. p.m., 7:25 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. through Sunday. coln Theater. Showtimes 7 ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, daily through Monday, plus p.m. and 9 p.m. daily through Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. 12:30 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. Sat“The Heat (R) — Uptight Tuesday, plus 5 p.m. today ■ Wheel-In-Motor Drive In: 210 Theatre Road, urday and Sunday. FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashthrough Sunday. Discovery Bay; 360-385-0859. burn (Sandra Bullock) and foul-mouthed Boston cop “White House Down” (PGPort Townsend Shannon Mullins (Melissa 13) — While on a tour of the McCarthy) couldn’t be more “Despicable Me 2” (PG) — Showtimes 8 p.m. daily through White House with his young incompatible. But when they Gru is recruited by the Antidaughter, a Capitol policeman “Star Trek: Into Darkness” Tuesday, plus 5:25 p.m. today join forces to bring down a Villain League to help deal springs into action to save his through Sunday. (PG-13) — After the crew of ruthless drug lord, they with a powerful new super child and protect the president criminal in this sequel to the the Enterprise finds an unstopbecome the last thing anyone “This Is the End” (R) — from a heavily armed group of pable force of terror from within expected: buddies. At Deer 2010 animated hit. At the Celebrities Seth Rogen, paramilitary invaders. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 their own organization, Capt. Uptown Theatre. Debuts at Kirk leads a manhunt to a war- James Franco, Jonah Hill and Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:15 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m. more are trapped in a house p.m. and 8 p.m. today and zone world to capture a onedaily through Monday, plus Monday, plus 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., man weapon of mass destruc- after a series of strange and 12:30 p.m. and 2:50 p.m. Sat“The Heat” (R) — At Rose 6:45 p.m. and 9:25 p.m. urday and Sunday. catastrophic events devastate tion. At Lincoln Theater. Theatre. Showtimes today and

Monday through Thursday at 4:20 p.m. and 7:20 p.m., also 2:15 p.m., 5 p.m. and 7:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Much Ado About Nothing” (PG-13) — Shakespeare’s classic comedy is given a contemporary spin by director Joss Whedon. Shot in just 12 days (and using the original text), the story of sparring lovers Beatrice and Benedick offers a dark, sexy and occasionally absurd view of the intricate game that is love. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes begin Wednesday. “Man of Steel” (PG-13) — See synopsis in Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theatre. 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday. “Mud” (PG-13) — Two teenage boys encounter a fugitive and form a pact to help him evade the bounty hunters on his trail and to reunite him with his true love. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily through Tuesday, and 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Fast & Furious 6” (PG13) — Agent Luke Hobbs enlists Dominic Toretto and his team to bring down former Special Ops soldier Owen Shaw, leader of a unit specializing in vehicular warfare. “Star Trek: Into Darkness” (PG-13) — See synopsis under Port Angeles listings. At the Wheel-In Motor Movie. Box office opens at 8 p.m. today through Sunday with showtime at dusk.

Keepsakes for sale Purchase a PDN photo — on T-shirts, drink mugs or just the photo itself. www.peninsuladailynews. com Click on “Photo Gallery”


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Anniversary Player Appreciation Day Saturday, June 29th | 8:00 AM - 10:00 PM $5,000 in CASH drawings! One (1) FREE Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner Buffet! Visit the Wildcard Club for details.

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The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe.


W

ITH PRIDE, HERE are the 2013 Students of Distinction for North Olympic Peninsula high schools. Congratulations to all of them! This special section is produced in cooperation with the high schools. Special acknowledgment and gratitude for assistance go to: ■ Clallam County: Clallam Bay High School, Kris Hanson; Crescent High School, Kathy Silva; Forks High School, Allen Lewis and Steve Erickson; Neah Bay High School, Jack Benedetto; Port Angeles High School, Marielle Eykemans, Debbie Lane and Bev Eisele; and Sequim High School, Mitzi

High Schools Clallam Bay/Page 3 Port Angeles/Page 3 Sequim/Page 11 Port Townsend/Page 17 Chimacum/Page 20 Forks/Page 22 Crescent/Page 24 Neah Bay/Page 25 Quilcene/Page 26

Plus lists of graduates for Lincoln/Page 19 Sequim Alternative/Page 19 Jefferson Community/Page 19 Quileute Tribal/Page 24 Mar Vista/Page 25

Sanders, Jim Heintz and Maria Roragen. ■ Jefferson County: Chimacum High School, Mary Novak; Port Townsend High School, Jan Boutilier; and Quilcene High School, Pamela Mack. Acknowledgment also goes to Peninsula Daily News news staff members Michael Carman, who coordinated the information-gathering with the schools, Keith Thorpe, who was photo coordinator, and Rex Wilson, who designed this section — and to the advertisers in this section who join us in supporting and congratulating these Students of Distinction.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam Bay High School

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Port Angeles High School

Class of 2013

Donald Hanson II Parents: Donald Baker and Heidi Crumb Plans: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Awards: Embry-Riddle University Scholarship and Grant package, $11,800 per year, renewable for four years; Mac and Phyllis Munro Memorial Fund Scholarship, $1,500; Hull Family Foundation, $1,000; Charlotte M. Kirby Foundation, $1,000; Clallam Bay – Sekiu Loin’s Club, $1,000; Herb and Marlyn Olsen Foundation, $500; West End Seniors, $500; Clallam Bay/ Sekiu Chamber of Commerce, $250.

Thomas Jesse Cheeka Andrew Jeffery Goplen Dean Donald Grant Hanson II Kevin Larence Hess Joseph Felix Larrechea Austin Andrew Ritter Jeremy Lee Rock Philip Guy Tejano Krista Van Tassel Justin Tanner Welever Ryan James Willis Megan Wonderly

Joseph Larrechea Parents: Felix and Lori Larrechea Plans: Peninsula College. Awards: Merrill & Ring Tree Farm, $250; Cape Flattery Education Association, $350; Ben & Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $400; Presbyterian Church, $500; Herb and Marlyn Olsen Foundation, $500; Clallam Bay/ Sekiu Chamber of Commerce, $500; Charlotte M. Kirby Foundation, $1,000; Scottish Rite Organization, $1,000; Hull Family Foundation, $1,000; Mac and Phyllis Munro Memorial Fund Scholarship, $1,500; Elks State Level Scholarship, $2,500; Washington State Opportunity Scholarship, $1,000 for freshman and sophomore years and $5,000 for junior and senior years.

Megan Kristine Wonderly

Charlotte M. Kirby Foundation, $1,000; Rocky Hinkle Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; West End Youth and Community Center, $500; Herb and Marlyn Olsen Foundation, $500; Presbyterian Church, $500.

Joshua Basden

Brittany Bennett

Catrina Bennett

Parents: Jason and Linnea Balfour Plans: Medical school/military Awards: Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Jet Set Economic and Social development/ North Olympic Skills Center, $500.

Parents: Char and Brent Basden Plans: Brigham Young University Awards: Nor’Wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Runner’s Parent Group Scholarship, $200; Tami Goodwin Memorial Scholarship, $500; Hope Scholarship, $3,000; Brigham Young University award, $2,426.

Guardians: Melissa Jo and Brent Miles. She is the daughter of the late Brooke and April Bennett Plans: Spokane Community College/Eastern Washington University Awards: Karen Byrd Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Lotzgesell Scholarship, $1,000.

Parents: Larz Bennett and Lisa Williams Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Jet Set Economic and Social development/ North Olympic Skill Center, $500.

Lucy Bert

Joseph Barnes Parent: Lisa PeneBarnes Plans: Walla Walla College Awards: Reath Ellefson Honorary Football Scholarship, $750; Albert Haller Foundation Scholarship, $4,000, renewable for two years, $8,000; Port Angeles Lions Club, $500; Elaine Sandison Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Peninsula Ladies Golfers, $500; Esther Chapter No. 19, Order of Eastern Star, $750; Port Angeles Kiwanis, Fred Owens Memorial Scholarship $1,000; Peninsula Golf Club Scholarship, $1,000.00 Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $2,000; Walla Walla Foundation Governors Award of Diligence, $3,000; renewable per quarter for two years,Walla Walla Community College Golf Scholarship, per quarter for two years, undisclosed.

Parent: Karen Bert Plans: Cornish College of the Arts Awards: Readers Theater Plus Scholarship, $800; Cornish College of the Arts Theatre Grant, $5,400 renewable for four years; Assistance Grant, $6,500 renewable for four years; Young Maritime Contest Award, $500.

Savannah Burke

Amanda Burton

Justin Bradley

Parents: Amanda and Jason Swain Plans: Oregon Community College/ University of Oregon Awards: Soroptimist International of Port AngelesJet Set Environmental Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Rick and Julie Burton Plans: Central or Eastern Washington University Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $350; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $1,000.

Parents: Aimee and Tony Bradley Plans: Peninsula College/Fouryear university Awards: Port Angeles Rotary/Noon Club/ Peninsula College Scholarship, $500; Queen of Angels “Simple Selections” Scholarship, $200; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $350.

Brandon Barrett Parents: John Barrett and Heather Catuzo Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Roy Britton Memorial Scholarship, $625.

Best Wishes s

Queen of Angels Catholic School would like to salute our 8th grade graduates of the class of 2013: Cody Anderson Molly Braaten Denver Kedish

2013

Kaitlyn Palacios Cassidy Derrick Kaitlin Buckmaster Braedi Starks Anthony Frey Katarina Lidstrom

Samuel Lidstrom Hailey Hoover Gabriella Gill *ULIÀQ6PLWK Phillip Teall

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package, $28,715, renewable for four years; Washington State School Retirees, $3,600; Scottish Rite Organization, $1,000;

Parents: Ken Welever and Debbie Baulke Plans: Aurora University. Awards: Aurora University Scholarship and Grant package, $18,295, renewable for four years; Clallam Bay – Sekiu Lion’s Club, $1,000; Charlotte M. Kirby Foundation, $1,000; Herb and Marlyn Olsen Foundation, $500; Green Crow Corporation, $500; Ben & Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $400.

Kelsie Balfour

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Parents: John and Evie Wonderly Plans: Pacific Lutheran University. Awards: Pacific Lutheran University Scholarship and Grant

Justin Tanner Welever

You Can Count On Us!

Hwy101 & Deer Park Rd. • Port Angeles, WA 98362 • 360-452-9268 • 1-800-927-9372 • 360-457-8511


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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES Hope Chamberlain Parents: Tim and Janet Chamberlain Plans: St. Martin’s University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation: Kathleen Rae Halloran Memorial Scholarship, $400; Port Angeles Education Foundation: Thomas Scholarship, $10,000; Port Angeles Light Opera Association, $200; Queen of Angels Simple Selections Scholarship, $200; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $500; Queen of Angels Sister Alice Craig Scholarship, $250; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $650; Peninsula Singers: Dewey Ehling Vocal Music Scholarship, $500; Peninsula Singers: Denis Graham Memorial Scholarship, $500; Saint Martin’s University Chancellor’s Scholarship, $16,000 reneawable for four years; Benedictine Institute Scholarship, $10,000 renewable for four years, Parish Youth Leadership Scholarship, $2,000 renewable for four years; Phi Delta Kappa Scholarship, $250; Prospective Educator Scholarship, $1,000.

Katlyn Bolewicki Parents: Mark and Mary Strong Plans: Peninsula College/ Western Washington University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Merrill and Ring Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation: BradfordHutchinson Jewelers, $2,000; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club/ Peninsula College Scholarship, $1,000.

Brit Boe Parents: Anthony and Amy Boe Plans: Peninsula College Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000; Port Angeles High School DECA scholarship, $75; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $100.

Annabelle ChesneyLucero Parents: Mary Kay McCable and Greg Short Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Angeles Rotary / Noon Club/ Peninsula College Scholarship, $500.

Stefanie Colliton Parents: Sheila and John Eastwood Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Mount Olympus Detachment of the Marine Corps Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000

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Sophia Brandon

Virginia Caynak

Courtney Chittick

Elspeth Charno

Shane Clark

Christina Costello

Brian Cristion

Parents: T. Scott and Teresa Brandon Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 483 Auxiliary Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation: John Norton Norton Memorial Scholarship, $500; Constance Hoare-Mead OMC Foundation, $500; Washboard Class of 1963 Scholarship, $5,700.

Parents: Eric and Robyn Caynak Plans: University of Utah Awards: VFW Post 1024 Gariepy Foundation Scholarship, $2,000; Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $500; University of Utah Freshman Science and Math Scholarship, $1,000; University of Utah Tuition Grant, $800; Naval ROTC Scholarship, $180,000; University of Utah Sorenson Legacy Foundation Scholarship, $20,000 renewable for four years.

Parents: Jason and Kristin Chittick Plans: Peninsula College/fouryear university Awards: Port Angeles Garden Club, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation: John Norton Environmental Science Scholarship, $500; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set Vocational Scholarship, $1,500.

Parents: Steve and Melody Charno Plans: Willamette University Awards: Olympic Peninsula Y-High School Judo team, $500; Franklin Elementary PTO Scholarship, $250; Port Angeles Kiwanis, Glenn Gallison Key Club Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation: Monroe PTO Scholarship, $779.17; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles-Jet Set, Academic Scholarship, $1,500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $3,000; Willamette Merit Scholarship, $22,500 renewable for four years; Willamette University Olympic Scholarship, $2,700.

Parent: Scott Clark Plans: Peninsula College/Le Gordon Blue Institute Awards: William N. Brothers Memorial Scholarship Fund, $500; Karen Byrd Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; K.O. Erickson Trust Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Kiwanis, Culinary Arts Scholarship, $250; Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $300;

Parents: Timothy and Shari Costello Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Rotary/Noon Club/ Peninsula College Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles High School FBLA Scholarship, $200; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $100.

Parents: Robert and Ivy Cristion Plans: Cornell College Awards: Reath Ellefson Honorary Football Scholarship, $750; Sandy Bailey Memorial Scholarship, $500; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Noon Club, $1,000; Cornell College R. Keeler Academic Scholarship, $15,000 renewable for four years; Cornell College Grant, $13,780 renewable for four years.

GRAY WOLF RANCH

Parents: Johanna Louise Ingalls and Gill Orr Plans: University of Washington Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000.

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Graduates of 2013!

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EXTRA COPIES of this tribute section are available on a limited basis. Please call the PDN circulation department at 360-452-4507 weekdays

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Ciana Deberry Parents: Michael Deberry and Janet Scott Plans: Undecided Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School FBLA Scholarship, $100; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $100.

Brian DeFrang Parents: Fred and Jeanie DeFrang Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Port Angeles Police Department Scholarship, $500; Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Esther Chapter No. 19, Order of Eastern Star, $500; Port Angeles Youth Baseball Scholarship, $300; Olympic Junior Babe Ruth Scholarship, $400; North Olympic Timber Action Committee Harriet Buchman Scholarship, $1,000; Stevens / Roosevelt Middle School Parent/Faculty, $500; City of Port Angeles Employees Association Scholarship, $500; Central Washington Freshman Scholar Tuition Award, $1,200.


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

5

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PORT ANGELES

Brendan Alan Dennis Parent: Todd Dennis Plans: Peninsula College/fouryear university. Awards: Willard Traylor Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Alyssa Derma Parents: Dustin and Melissa Derma Plans: Peninsula College/fouryear university Awards: Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $3,000.

Rachel Dorcy

Jack Doryland

Marshall Elliott

Joshua Egnew

Christy Fagundes

Kayla Feeley

Karrin Francis

Maria Gallegos

Celia Gracey

John Hanson

Parents: Susan Dekreon, Bruce and Laura Dorcy Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Xi Iota Chapter of Beta Sigma Pi Susan Morse Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Jeff Doryland and Diane Williams Plans: Evergreen State College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation AAES Sports Soccer Scholarship, $500; Constance Hoare-Mead OMC Foundation, $500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $2,000; Port Angeles High School Band Boosters, $250; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $2,000; Evergreen State College Scholastic Achievement Award, $9,000.

Parents: Joel and Tamara Elliott Plans: Oregon State University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Lions Club Scholarship, $500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $3,000; Oregon State University Tuition Grant, $2,500 renewable for four years; Tuition Grant Scholarship, $2,000 renewable for four years; Washington State Auto Dealers Association American Dream Scholarship, $2,500.

Parent: Jessica Egnew Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Herky Carlson Scholarship, $300; Franklin Elementary PTO Scholarship, $250; Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $300.

Parents: Ron and Margaret Fagundes Plans: Peninsula College, fouryear university Awards: Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500; Hope Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Parents: Andi and Jeremy Hefton Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Bright Haygood Copsey Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School Band Boosters, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000.

Parents: Joni and Robert Francis Plans: Peninsula College/ Institute of American Arts Awards: Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $300; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $100.

Parents: Sandra Medina and Ramiro Gallegos Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Albert Haller Foundation Scholarship, $4,000 renewable for two years; K.O. Erickson Trust Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Peninsula College Scholarship, $500.

Parent: Katie Gracey Plans: University of Washington Awards: K.O. Erickson Trust Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $350.

Parents: Cynthia and Todd Hanson Plans: Peninsula College Awards: North Olympic Mustang Club, $1,000; AWPPW Local 155 Nippon Union Employees, $500;

Benjamin Freilich Parents: Jerry and Helen Freilich Plans: University of Redlands Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Merrill and Ring Scholarship, $500; American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local No 1619, City of Port Angeles Employees Union, $1,000; Port Angeles High School FBLA Scholarship, $100; City Of Port Angeles Employees Association Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $75; University of Redlands Achievement Award, $14,500 renewable for four years; University of Redlands Grant, $10,500 renewable for four years.

Michael Myers

$1,000; Sister Gemma Quinn Memorial Scholarship, $350; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $500; International Footprint Association Olympic Peninsula Chapter 74, $1,000.

Wesley GiddingsBeck Parents: Amanda Beck and David Giddings Plans: VOLTA Line Academy Awards: Sam Haguewood Memorial Scholarship, $750; Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Kiwanis Graham Ralston Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation Kirby Scholarship, $1,000; Mac Ruddell Community Fund, $1,000.

Megan Gustafson Parent: Chad Gustafson Plans: Peninsula College, fouryear university Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000; Grays Harbor Community Foundation/ Westport Shipyard National Scholarship, $3,000; Washington State University, First Scholar Scholarship, $5,000, renewable for four years.

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Parents: Shawn and Trina Gallacci Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Peninsula Youth Equestrian Foundation, John Slack Memorial Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Guardian: Jessica Eshom Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250.

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Parent: Julie Myers Plans: Skagit Valley Community College Awards: Port Angeles Police Officer Brian Raymond Memorial Scholarship, $5,000;

Lauren Gallacci

Allison Hampton


6

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES

Kynzie Hendricks

Aubrianna Howell

Parents: Theresa and Scott Hendricks Plans: Peninsula College/ Oregon State University Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $350.

Parents: Stephanie and Jerry Howell Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Gallacci Art Scholarship, $1,000, renewable for four years.

Abinet Hayden

Taylor Kuchan

Elizabeth Helwick

Kevin Herzog

Selbey Jelle

Ross Jensen

Erin Hennessey

Luke Johnson

Heidi Jernigan

Savannah Johnson

Parents: John and Suzanne Hayden Plans: Peninsula College/ Washington State University Awards: Green Crow Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Parent: Wendy Hoffman Plans: Everest Community College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Kepplinger Vocational Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Greg and Victoria Helwick Plans: University of Idaho Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Readers Theater Plus Scholarship, $800; Port Angeles Kiwanis Dutch Haag Academic Scholarship, $1,000; Elks Naval Lodge No. 353 Local Scholarship, $1,000; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Noon Club, $1,000; Stevens/Roosevelt Middle School Parent/ Faculty, $500; First Presbyterian Church Scholarship, $1,000; University of Idaho Western Undergraduate Exchange, $10,000 renewable for four years.

Parents: Kathy and James Herzog Plans: University of Portland Awards: Jim’s Pharmacy Scholarship, $1,000; Carrie L Covert Memorial Nursing Scholarship, $1,500; Port Angeles Youth Baseball Scholarship, $150; Olympic Junior Babe Ruth Scholarship, $150; Fairview Elementary/ Roosevelt PTA Scholarship, $500; University of Portland/ Arthur A Schulte Jr. Scholar, $5,000, renewable for four years; University of Portland Grant, $15,740, renewable for four years.

Parents: Brian and Jenna Jelle Plans: Peninsula College/ Western Washington University Awards: Sons of Norway Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Bob and Robin Jensen Plans: Peninsula College/ Montana Tech Awards: Dry Creek Elementary PTO Scholarship, $500.

Parents: William and Kathy Hennessey Plans: Oberlin College and Conservatory Awards: Peninsula Children’s Clinic, $1,000; Van Eek Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation Academic Scholarship, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,500; Monday Musicale Scholarship, $4,000; Oberlin Conservatory Dean Scholarship, $7,000, renewable for four years; John F. Oberlin Scholarship, $7,000, renewable for four years; National Merit Scholarship, $1,000;

Parents: Mark and Susan Johnson Plans: Seattle Pacific University Awards: Olympic Peninsula Y-High School Judo team, $500; Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $125; Seattle Pacific University Dean’s Scholar Award and Grant, $19,000, renewable for four years.

Parents: Dawn and Jason Cary and Jeffrey and Tracy Jernigan Plans: Peninsula College/PIMA Veterinary Technician Program Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250.

Parent: Karen Beck Plans: Peninsula College/ University of Washington Awards: Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $300.

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Parents: Graig and Gloria Johnson Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Gallacci Art Scholarship, $1,000, renewable for four years; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Peninsula College Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $2,000; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $350.

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Chase Jangula Parent: Amy Jangula Plans: Northwest Lineman College Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250.

Abigail Kheriaty Heather Kaufmann Parents: John and Laurel Kaufmann Plans: University of Idaho or South Puget Sound Community College Awards: Readers Theater Plus Scholarship, $800; Port Angeles Kiwanis Rose Owens Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles High School FBLA Scholarship, $100; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $50.

Parents: George and Linda Kheriaty Plans: Pacific Lutheran University Awards: Elmer and Alice Marshall Trust, $3,700; Port Angeles Education Foundation William Bissell Scholarship, $1,500; Port Angeles Education Association, $250; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $250; Pacific Lutheran University Dean’s Scholarship, $10,000, renewable for four years; Artistic Achievement Dance Scholarship, $9,000, renewable for four years.


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PORT ANGELES

Marcus Michael Konopaski Konopaski Parents: Colin and Kathy Konopaski Plans: Gonzaga University Awards: Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Academic Scholarship, $2,000; Zenovic & Associates, Inc. Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Youth Baseball Scholarship, $300; Olympic Junior Babe Ruth Scholarship, $400; Athletic Academic Scholarship, $300; North Olympic Baseball / Softball Scholarship, $250; AWPPW Local 155 Nippon Union Employees, $1,000; Bremerton Valley Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $750; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $500; Peninsula Tennis Club Scholarship, $500; Gonzaga University Dean’s Scholarship and Gonzaga Grant, $19,280, renewable for four years.

Bradi McFarlen

Sam Langley

Kristina Lenning

Chelcie Mack

Kristina Marvelle

Kara Lindley

Zachary Lovik

Forrest Maynock

Taylor McCallister

Parents: Mike Langley and Anita McMillan Plans: Peninsula College/New World School of Violin Making Awards: Jesse Sayre Thanem Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Buffy Lenning and Cheri and Dennis Lefevre Plans: Washington State University Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250; College Bound Grant, renewable for four years, $1,036.

Parent: Rikki Mack and grandmother Maggie Little Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Ryan Giger Memorial Scholarship Trust Fund, $1,500; Port Angeles Fire Department Auxiliary, $825.

Parents: Missy and Joe Marvelle Plans: Peninsula College/ Western Washington University Awards: Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Peninsula College Scholarship, $500; Dry Creek Grange Scholarship, $250.

Parents: Lea and Greg Heaton Plans: Peninsula College/San Diego State University Awards: Darlene MariHugh Memorial Scholarship, $2,000; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Peninsula College Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Brenda and Steven Lovik Plans: Brigham Young University of Idaho Awards: Constance Hoare-Mead OMC Foundation, $500; Native American Athletic Scholarship, $300; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $1,275; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,200; First Presbyterian Church Scholarship, $1,000; Brigham Young University Scholarship, $1,800.

Parent: Sylvia Arterberry Plans: Peninsula College/ Gonzaga University Awards: Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation Emily Meyer Scholarship, $5,000 renewable for four years.

Parent: Kristi McCallister Plans: Northwest Lineman College or Peninsula College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Kepplinger Vocational Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Carly La Laurel Jenkins Parents: Kurt Jenkins and Patti Happe Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Port Angeles Kiwanis Charles Willson Citizenship Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation Superintendent Meritorious Scholarship, $500; Olympic Peninsula Health Fair Scholarship, $1,000; Hope Scholarship, $1,000.

Kelley Mayer Parents: Ed Mayer and the late Cheryl Mayer Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Angeles Kiwanis, George Charno Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation William Bissell Scholarship, $1,500; Port Angeles Education Foundation Thomas Scholarship, $10,000; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $2,000.

Parent: Yihua La Plans: University of Washington Awards: Six Port Angeles Chapters of the PEO Sisterhood, $2,000; Port Angeles Kiwanis, Norris Academic Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation Academic Scholarshi, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation Emily Meyer Scholarship, $5,000, renewable for four years; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Academic Scholarship, $2,000; Port Angeles Light Opera Association, $100; Constance Hoare-Mead OMC Foundation, $500; Olympic Kiwanis Club, $1,000; University Scholarship, $3,000; Undergrad University Grant, $5,984, State Need Grant, $6,964.

Erin McKenna Parents: Cynthia and Todd Hanson Plans: Peninsula College/Art Institute of Seattle Awards: Sequim Arts Scholarship, $625.

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Parents: Rick and Sherri McFarlen Plans: Peninsula College/ Central Washington University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation Bradford-Hutchinson Jewelers, $2,000; Port Angeles Rotary Noon Club Peninsula College Scholarship, $1,000; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $3,000; AFSCME Local #1619, City of Port Angeles Employees Union, $1,000; Dry Creek Grange Scholarship, $750; Soroptimist International Violet Richardson Award, $500.

Congrats Grads & Good Luck in your race into the future From the Pros at Whitehead’s 36810677

Parents: Colin and Kathy Konopaski Plans: Washington State University Awards: Zenovic and Associates, Inc. Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Youth Baseball Scholarship, $300; Olympic Junior Babe Ruth Scholarship, $400; Athletic Academic Scholarship, $300; North Olympic Baseball / Softball Scholarship, $250; AWPPW Local 155 Nippon Union Employees, $1,000; Bremerton Valley Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $750; Queen of Angels Church Parish Scholarship, $500; Peninsula Tennis Club Scholarship, $500; Gladys Christopher Pollanz Scholarship, $8,000, renewable for four years; Washington State University Regents Award, $4,000, renewable for four years; Elks Foundation Scholarship, $2,000.

7

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Peninsula Daily News

pendailynews

371 N. Forks Ave., Forks • 374-6065


8

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES

Stephanie Moan

William Moulton III

Parents: Jon and Cora Moan Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Trevor A. Homer Memorial Scholarship,$1,000; Port Angeles High School Band Boosters, $250.

Parents: Cherie Mulder and Billy Moulton Jr. Plans: Film Connection College Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation Gallacci Art Scholarship, $1,000.

Tyler Rixon

Malachi Mulhair Parents: Sarah and Robert Moore Plans: University of Idaho Awards: Bright Haygood Copsey Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School Band Boosters, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Tyler Napiontek

Jill Nickles Shayla Northern Parents:

Kaitlyn Palacios

Martin Quarto

Lexie Onna Pankowski Raemer

Parents: Allen and Tammy Napiontek Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Heidi’s Hair Studio and Glazing Arts Scholarship, $500.

Joe and Debbie Nickles Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Hope Scholarship, $500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $1,275.

Parents: Roberta PalaciosJacobson and Lee Jacobson Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $500.

Parents: Monica and Alfredo Quarto Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500; Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Education Foundation Kirby Scholarship, $1,000; Hope Scholarship, $500; Federal Pell Grant, $5,495; College Bound State Grant, $7,882; College Bound Scholarship,, $640.

Parents: Joni Bentz and Trent Pankowski Plans: Community college Awards: Port Angeles Education Foundation, Gallacci Art Scholarship, $1,000, renewable for four years.

Parents: Todd and Tamra Northern Plans: Olympic College Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $350; Olympic College, Student Athlete Scholarship, $945, renewable for two years.

Kayla Rhinehart KyrieAnne Reyes Parent: Birgit Reyes Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Port Angeles Garden Club, $500.

Parents: William Rhinehart and Tabatha Leigh Plans: Peninsula College/Central Washington University Awards: Roy Britton Memorial Scholarship, $625; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $150.

The Clallam Community Foundation congratulates the Class of 2013 and recipients of our scholarship funds. Bright Haygood Copsey Fund Call or text to make your appointment!

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Congrats & Good Luck to the Class of 2013!

Melissa Robbins Parents: Mike and Elma Robbins Plans: St. John’s University Awards: Elks Naval Lodge No. 353 Local Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundaiton Kirby Scholarship, $1,000; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $2,000; St. John’s University Academic Achievement Award, $12,000, reneweable for four years; St. John’s University Grant, $7,621, renewable for four years; Federal grant, $7,145, renewable for four years.

Parents: George and Kristin Rixon Plans: Pacific Lutheran

University Awards: Olympic Electric Parents: Co., Inc Scholarship, $1,000; Brett and PEO Chapter CR, Leora BradRuth Raemer shaw Memorial Scholarship, Plans: $500; Reath Ellefson Honorary Seattle Pacific Football Scholarship, $750; University Albert Haller Foundation ScholAwards: arship, $4,000, renewable for AAUW Claltwo years; Port Angeles Lions lam County Club, $500; Port Angeles AssoBranch Schol- ciation of Realtors, $1,000; Sisarship, ter Gemma Quinn Memorial $1,000; D.W. Scholarship, $350; Port AngeMorse Family les Education Foundation Trust Fund, AAES Sports Track Scholar$1,000; Seat- ship, $500; Queen of Angels tle Pacific Church Parish Scholarship, University $350; Port Angeles Education President’s Foundation Andy Palmer Scholar Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Award, Pacific Lutheran University $15,000 Grant, $8,992; Washington renewable for State College Bound Scholarfour years; ship, $3,387; Federal SEOG Seattle Pacific Grant, $1,000; Pacific Lutheran University University Federal Pell Grant, Grant, $4,650. $5,645; State need grant, $8,517.

Taylor Rutz

Alexandra Schimetz Parents: Stacey Price, Tad Price and Robert Schimetz Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Angeles Association of Realtors, $1,000; Grand Olympics Chorus Sweet Adelines International, $500; Green Crow Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $650.

Parents: Kari and Steven Rutz Plans: Peninsula College/ Eastern Washington University Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $350.

Danielle Schimschal Parents: Erich and Missy Schimschal Plans: Whitworth University Awards: Port Angeles Kiwanis Palmquist Academic Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation Academic Scholarship, $1,000; Port Angeles Education Foundation AAES Sports Soccer Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $2,500; Whitworth University Mind and Heart Scholarship, $20,000, renewable for four years.


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

9

PORT ANGELES

Cecily Schwagler Parents: Stacie Schawagler and Scott Schwagler Plans: Boise State University Awards: Merrill and Ring Scholarship, $500; Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Noon Club, $1,000; Dry Creek Grange Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School DECA Scholarship, $50; Western Undergraduate Exchange Scholarship, $9,494, renewable for four years.

Spencer Scott Parents: Kathy and Travis Scott Plans: Missouri University of Science and Technology Awards: Hope Scholarship, $500; Mount Olympus Detachment of the Marine Corps, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $2,000; Missouri University, Metallurgical Department Scholarship, $1,500, renewable for four years.

Anna Tyndall

Lindsi Smith

Sara Smith

Stefani Sommers

Chace Souza

Maizey Starks

Parents: Dana and Joseph Lightner Plans: Washington State University Awards: Karen Byrd Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Jefferson Elementary PTO Scholarship, $500; Heckman Motors Inc. Scholarship, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $2,500.

Parents: Michael and Brenda Smith Plans: Undecided Awards: Port Angeles Association of Realtors, $1,000.

Parents: Nina and Gary Smith Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Angeles Kiwanis Michael Kalish Memorial Scholarship, $2,500 for four years.

Parents: Tracy and Amy Sommers Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250.

Parents: Gretchen and Rod Souza Plans: Peninsula College, fouryear university Awards: Esther Chapter No. 19, Order of Eastern Star, $250; North Olympic Baseball / Softball Scholarship, $250; Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, $800; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $900.

Parents: Chelsey Boeckermann and Tristan Terpening Plans: Seattle Central Community College Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles High School FBLA Scholarship, $100.

Uneek Thompson Parents: Theresa and Ernie Thompson Plans: Peninsula College/ Pierce College Awards: Port Angeles High School Band Boosters, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000.

Robert Stephens Parents: Richard and Liane Stephens Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; Port Angeles Lions Club, $500; Port Angeles Light Opera Association, $200; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $3,000; Gladys Christopher Pollanz Promise Scholarship, $8,000, renewable for four years.

Coleman Tomason

Caleb Treider

Parents: Carrie and Dwight Parents: Bennett Wayne and Plans: Nikki Peninsula Tomason College Plans: Awards: Central Gellor Washington Insurance and University Gellor Family Awards: Port Angeles Partnership, $250; Youth AWPPW Baseball Local 155 Scholarship, $150; Olympic Nippon Union Employees, Junior Babe $500. Ruth, $150; North Olympic Baseball / Softball, Don Bear Schlemmer Award, $250; Olympic Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $500.

Nikki Joann Stidham Parents: Tracy and David Stidham Plans: Cornish College of the Arts Awards: Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $750.

Phillip Garrett Swordmaker Teall Parents: Joe Swordmaker and Elizabeth Whittaker Plans: Undecided Awards: Port Angeles Association of Realtors, $1,000.

Parents: Cynthia and Todd Hanson Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Michael Sindars Memorial Fund, $3,000; Karen Byrd Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Wilder Family Auto Scholarship, $500;

Jacob Thomas Parents: Mark and Judy Thomas Plans: Northwest University Awards: Port Angeles Education Association, $250; Emery and Helen Koster Gariepy Joyce Community, $300; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $750.

Kyle Tupper Parents: Mary and Charles Tupper Plans: Military Awards: Nor’wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500.

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Parent: Christine Tyndall Plans: University of Washington Awards: Ron Carr Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Albert Haller Foundation Scholarship, $4,000, renewable for two years; K.O. Erickson Trust Scholarship, $500; Native American Adeline Smith Memorial Scholarship, $300; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $150; Federal Pell Grant, $5,645; State Need Grant, $10,868; Federal Supplemental Grant, $150.

Irene Shipman


10

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Class of 2013

PORT ANGELES

Justin Upcraft Parents: David Blore and Terri Upcraft-Blore Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Native American Dream Catcher Scholarship, $300.

Eric Wahl Parents: Tom and Paula Wahl Plans: Dakota State University Awards: Reath Ellefson Honorary Football Scholarship, $750; Norâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;wester Rotary Academic Scholarship, $500.

Aubrey Walker

Cassie Watne

Parents: Thomas and Sophia Walker Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Norâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;wester Rotary Vocational Scholarship, $500; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $500.

Parents: Sandra Watne and Lisa Barnes Plans: Peninsula College/ Animal behavior college Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,000.

Courtney Wilson Parents: Collette Wilson and Harry Wilson Plans: Peninsula

Kailee Wise Parent: Bonnie Pittis Plans: Peninsula College/ Eastern Washington University Awards: D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $350.

McKenna Young Parents: Julie Young and Paul Keeler Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Vocational Trust, $250; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $350.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

College Awards: Soroptimist International of Port AngelesJet Set Environmental Scholarship, $500; Rayonier Peninsula College Scholarship, $1,000; D.W. Morse Family Trust Fund, $1,500; Port Angeles High School Choir Boosters, $250.

Logan Alward Clarissa Baker-Frease Kelsie Balfour Joseph Barnes Brianna Lindsey Brandon Barrett Joshua Basden Webb Wilson Brittany Bennett Parents: Parents: Catrina Bennett Ira and Lisa Tim and Lucy Bert Webb Jennifer Ashley Bies Plans: Wilson Curtis Blevins Washington Plans: Brit Boe State Western Katlyn Bolewicki University Washington Awards: University Sarah Bolton Fairview Awards: Kyle Bozich Elementary/ Mac Ruddell Justin Bradley Roosevelt Community Timothy Bradley PTA Fund, $1,000; Sophia Brandon Scholarship, Peninsula Jr Amelia Breitbach $500; Port Rodeo Thomas Brown Angeles Association Chapter of Matt Edwards Savannah Burke Public School Award, $250; Amanda Burton Virginia Caynak Employees, Queen of $400. Angels Hope Chamberlain Church Parish Elspeth Charno Scholarship, Annabelle Chesney $350. Nicole Childers Courtney Chittick Dmitri Chomica Cassidy Ciochon Shane Clark Chase Stefanie Colliton Wilson Christina Costello Parents: Brian Cristion Stephanie Harrison Day Wilson and Ciana Deberry Chad Wilson Brian DeFrang Plans: Brendan Dennis Seattle Alyssa Derma University Rachel Dorcy Awards: Port Angeles Jack Doryland Police Department Aaron Dudley Scholarship, $500; Seattle University Campio Scholarship, Caleigh Duncan Christopher Eddleman $15,000, renewable for four years; Federal Undergraduate Joshua Egnew Pell Grant, $5,645; Washington Taylor Eichberg State Need Grant, $8,571; Marshall Elliott Washington State Opportunity Zachery Ennis Scholarship, $1,000; D.W. Christy Fagundes Morse Family Trust Fund, Kayla Feeley $500. Dakota Felton

Karrin Francis Mariah Francis Benjamin Freilich Lauren Gallacci Maria Gallegos Wesley Giddings Ashley Godinez Celia Gracey John Greiner Devin Groseclose Megan Gustafson John Hansen John Hanson Abinet Hayden Hunter Heckenlaible Dustin Hellwig Elizabeth Helwick Kynzie Hendricks Erin Hennessey Kevin Herzog Jerod Hollen Hailey Hoover Aubrianna Howell Kyle Howell Chase Jangula Selbey Jelle Laurel Jenkins Ross Jensen Heidi Jernigan Ashlyn Johnson Hayden Johnson Luke Johnson Savannah Johnson Hunter Jones Abigail Kheriaty Adam Kinoshita Brandy Kitchen Autumn Knight Marcus Konopaski Michael Konopaski Taylor Kuchan Carly La Kyle Lammie Shailah Landes Sam Langley Kristina Lenning Randee Linde Kara Lindley Kimberley Littlejohn Jasmine Long

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Irene Shipman Vita Shuman Kolton Sinskie Devin Smith Lindsi Smith Sara Smith Stefani Sommers Chace Souza Maizey Starks Robert Stephens Terrance Stevenson Nikki Stidham Forest Suess Brian Sullivan Shawn Swanson Garrett Swordmaker Dustin Taylor Phillip Teall Jacob Thomas Brittany Thompson Uneek Thompson Coleman Tomason Caleb Treider Daniel Trujillo Kyle Tupper Anna Tyndall Austin Underwood Justin Upcraft Jerrica Vaughan Eric Wahl Austin Waldron Aubrey Walker Macy Walker Robertson Walker Shae Walters-Vandeberg Elijah Ward Shane Washburn Cassie Watne Brianna Webb Dylan Wickersham Madison WilhelmHughes Matthew Williams Chase Wilson Courtney Wilson Lindsey Wilson Kailee Wise Kyle Woods Devin Wyant McKenna Young

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Joseph Lorentzen Doell Zachary Lovik Caleb Lucas Kyle Lucas Raelyn Lucas Joseph Luce Chelcie Mack Kristina Marvelle Kelley Mayer Forrest Maynock Taylor McCallister Bradi McFarlen Erin McKenna Gavin Medley Tanner Merrigan Brianna Miles Stephanie Moan William Moulton Malachi Mulhair Michael Myers Tyler Napiontek Chance Nichols Jill Nickles Shayla Northern Brandon Notar Bryan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Brandin Oakley Sydnie Orr Kaitlyn Palacios Lexie Pankowski Garrett Payton Kiana Pimentel Martin Quarto Onna Raemer Brandon Raymer Kyrie-Anne Reyes Kayla Rhinehart Tyler Rixon Melissa Robbins Duncan Robertson Benjamin Rowland Ashley Rutherford Taylor Rutz Alexandra Schimetz Danielle Schimschal Thomas Schreiner Tegan Schulz Cecily Schwagler Spencer Scott Forest Seavey


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

11

Sequim High School Michelle Abell

Brianna Albright

Aimee Allen

Parents: Peter and Deborah Abell Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Nurse-toNurse Scholarship, $1,000.

Parents: Brian and Anna Albright Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Central Washington Merit Scholarship, $1,200; Central Washington Dean’s Scholarship, $2,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Peninsula Equestrian John Slack Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Karl and Linda Allen Plans: California Lutheran University Awards: Sequim Kiwanis Club, $1,000; Cal Lutheran Founders Scholarship, $72,000.

Gabe Carter Parents: Jeff and Chrysalis Carter Plans: Whitworth University Awards: SEA Future Educator Scholarship, $500; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Whitworth Presidential Scholarship, $70,000.

Courtney Cassal

Parents: Debbie Chamblin and Keith Chamblin Plans: University of Washington Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; UW-Seattle Merit Scholarship, $6,000; UW-Seattle University Undergrad Grant, $40,000.

Parents: Jesus and Concepcion Ayala-Flores Plans: University of Washington Awards: Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000; Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; UW Husky Promise University Undergrad Grant, $70,200.

Austin Clement

Taylor Balkan

Emma Barrell

Lauren Bell

Amanda Bennett

Parents: Shawn and Rebecca Stanton Plans: Clackamas Community College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Clackamas CC Volleyball Scholarship, $3,000.

Parents: Lisa and Adam Barrell Plans: Western Washington University Awards: WWU Scholarship, $2,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Kevin and Shelly Bell Plans: Seattle Pacific University Awards: SPU Deans’ Scholar Award, $48,000; Sons of Norway, $500.

Parent: Charity Dronenburg Plans: Oregon Culinary Institute Awards: Readers Theatre Plus, $800; Oregon Culinary Institute Scholarship, $2,000; Sequim Irrigation Royalty Scholarship, $750; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Rich Meyers Spirit of Band Scholarship, $1,000.

Hannah Grubb Adrian Clifford Parents: Peter and Beth Clifford Plans: Linfield College Awards: Linfield Music Achievement Award, $16,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000.

Trevor Parents: Consoliver Chris and Parents: Brigham and Linda Consoliver Plans: University of Wyoming Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Judy and Allen Berry Plans: Gonzaga University Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sunland Owners’ Association, $3,000; Sequim Ladies of Elks, $1,000; Gonzaga University Trustee Scholarship, $62,000; Gonzaga University Honors Scholarship, $4,000; Gonzaga University Grant, $2,000.

Parents: Michael and Linda Brocklesby Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Kevin Burke and Ann Seiter Plans: University of Idaho Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; University of Idaho Western Undergraduate Exchange Scholarship, $40,000.

Jon Donahue Parent: Julia Grinnell Plans: Western Washington University Awards: VFW Ladies Auxiliary, $500; VFW Sequim Post 4760, $750; WWU College Bound Scholarship, $30,000; WWU Education Grants, $13,600; Priscilla Brekka Scholarship, $500; Jamestown S’Klallam tribe, $68,000.

Emily Carel Parents: Jill and Bill Carel Plans: Southern Oregon University Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; Sequim Senior Center Scholarship, $1,000; Readers Theatre Plus, $800; Olympic Driftwood Sculptors, $750; Southern Oregon University WUE Scholarship, $37,200.

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Parents: Theresa Mills and Arthur Clement Plans: Evergreen State College Awards: Shelby Evergreen Coyne Regional Counselor Award, Parents: $900; EverMindi Young green College and Todd Bound ScholarYoung ship, $32,000; Plans: Sequim Peninsula Masonic College Lodge, $1,000. Awards: Nurse-to-Nurse Scholarship, $1,000.

Teresa Grubb Plans: Undecided Awards: Thomas Building Center, $500.

Aran Jayson Brocklesby Burke

819 EAST 1ST ST. Port Angeles, WA

36810707

Parents: Robin and Kevin Cassal Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000; WWU College Bound Scholarship, $30,000.

Derek Chamblin

Juliana AyalaFlores

Abigail Berry


12

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM

Douglas Dunbar

Omar Flores

Parents: Larry Dunbar and Julie Dunbar Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Sequim Volunteer Firefighters Dale Kruse Scholarship, $1,000.

Parents: Rafael and Maria Mercedes Flores Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim School District Rowland Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Tim Guan Parents: Kevin and Melissa Guan Plans: University of Washington Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Arianna Flores

Giovanni Gallo

Melissa Gonzalez

Alyssa Habner

Kayla Hagberg

Dorian Halverson

Cameron Harrison

Haleigh Harrison

Columbia Haupt

Katie Hedgecock

Parents: Arturo and Herlinda Flores Plans: University of Washington Awards: Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000; Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sea Mar Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Irrigation Royalty Scholarship, $750; Helen Haller Elementary PTO, $500; UW Husky Promise/ University Undergrad Grant, $70,200.

Parents: Annette Gallo-Debler and Richard Debler Plans: Washington State University Awards: Sandra Bailey Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000.

Parents: Sergio and Monica Gonzalez Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; WWU President’s Scholarship, $4,000; Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Rex and Karen Habner Plans: Eastern Washington University Awards: Sequim School District McDonald Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Soroptimist Violet Richardson Award, $500; Sequim Education Foundation Fish-Rosales Scholarship, $1,000; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; EWU Presidential Scholarship, $12,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Eric and Tracy Hagberg Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Prairie Rhododendron Grange, $1,500.

Parents: Dale and Stacy Halverson Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Olympic Medical Center Foundation, $500; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; WWU College Bound Scholarship, $34,000; WWU President’s Scholarship, $4,000.

Parents: Roger and Darcy Harrison Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Agnew Helpful Neighbors Club, $3,000.

Parents: Timothy and Kayana Harrison Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Bremerton Valley Scottish Rite, $1,000; Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000; Denise Graham Memorial Scholarship, $500; WWU Athletic Talent Award, $37,500; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: John and Shelley Haupt Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Sequim Education Foundation 0-43 Basketball Scholarship, $250.

Parents: Mark and Cindy Hedgecock Plans: University of Washington Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $4,000; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000.

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Parents: Mark and Suzanne Heike Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Sequim School District Lyons Memorial Scholarship, $500; CWU Trustee’s Tuition Award, $2,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Xenia Hernandez Parents: Hector Hernandez and Kezzy Hector Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Tony Juliano Memorial Scholarship, $1,000.

Erin Henninger Parents: Ray and Ann Marie Henninger Plans: University of 36810964

Elizabeth Lawrence Madison Lindsay Makenzi Lindsay Asia Martin Shane Martin Joey Monje Merissa Murner Alexander Parent Sawndra Smith Samantha Wilson

36810672

Alyssa Bellew Sandra Bowechop Laurence Buzzell Nathaniel Claplanhoo Edith Corpuz Dale Dawson Jr. Leyton Doherty Sebastian Gagnon Deshawn Halhunen Keefer Herda

Emily Heike

Mary Awards: University of Mary Scholarship, $9,500; Queen of Angels Parish, $1,150; Soroptimist of Port Angeles, $1,000.

Kaitlin Heike Parents: Mark and Suzanne Heike Plans: Washington State University Awards: Sequim School District Jeff Caterina Memorial Scholarship, $500; WSU University Achievement Award, $2,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; WSU Cougar Connection Scholarship, $1,000.

Randy Hogoboom Parents: Marty and Kristi Hogoboom Plans: Northwest Lineman School Awards: Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Tony Juliano Memorial Scholarship, $1,000.

Brendon Hudson Parents: Greg and Esther Hudson Plans: University of Washington Awards: Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship, $84,000; Washington State Elks, $2,000; Sequim High School Honor Society Scholarship, $400; Sequim Education Foundation Film Festival, $750.

Janel Howat Parents: David and Terilee AllsopHowat Plans: Washington State UniversityVancouver Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Elizabeth Hubbard Parent: Twila Bridwell Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Albert Haller Foundation, $1,000; College Bound Scholarship, $8,000.


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

13

SEQUIM

Ian Jones Jeffry Hutt Parents: Caron Moore, Ted Hutt Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Pioneer Association, $1,000; Tony Juliano Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; North Olympic Mustang Club, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Sequim Valley Car Club, $1,500.

Brandon Jones Parents: Alan and Kathy Jones Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Mark Jones and Kathryn Galbraith Plans: University of CaliforniaBerkeley Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sequim Education Foundation Engineering Challenge, $750; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $4,000.

Mitch Koonz

Tiffany Langmack

Parents: Jerry and Julie Koonz Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Sequim Senior Center Scholarship, $1,000.

Parent: Wendy Inman Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Agnew Helpful Neighbors Club, $3,000; Nurse-toNurse Scholarship, $1,000.

Verenice Lopez

Victoria LaCroix Parent: Shellie Gillis Plans: University of AlaskaAnchorage Awards: Ben Merscher Memorial Scholarship, $500; Tony Juliano Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; Sequim School District Rowland Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; SSAC Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scholarship, $600; Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500; Sequim Kiwanis Club, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Readers Theatre Plus, $800; University of AlaskaAnchorage WUE Scholarship, $31,200; University of AlaskaAnchorage Grant, $22,800.

Torrie McIntyre Parents: John and Deana Mcintyre Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Agnew Helpful Neighbors Club, $3,000; Sequim Education Foundation Film Festival, $1,500; Clallam County Fair Royalty, $500.

Parents: Lisa and Kerry Law Plans: University of Washington Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Washington State Elks, $2,000; National Elks Association, $4,000; Sunland Ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association, $3,000; Sequim Ladies of Elks, $1,000; Washington State Grange, Kathryn Lorentzen $500; Washington State Opportunity Parents: Scholarship, John and $12,000; Laura Sequim PraiLorentzen rie RhodoPlans: dendron Western Grange, $500; Washington VFW Voice of University Democracy Awards: Award, $100; Sequim UW Seattle Masonic University Lodge, $1,000; Grand Scholarship, $12,000; UW Olympic Seattle Sweet Undergrad Adelines, $500; Dewey University Grant, Ehling Vocal $28,000. Scholarship, $500; Monday Musicale, $1,500.

Annika Lawrence

Richard LeBlanc

Donovan Lee

Scott Lester

Carson Lewis

Jared McMinn

Parents: Lee and Diane Lawrence Plans: University of Washington Awards: Sequim Community Church, $500; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; UW Husky Promise College Bound Scholarship, $52,000.

Parents: Nancy and Richard Leblanc Plans: Washington State University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: George and Cinday Lee Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Kiwanis Club, $1,000.

Parent: Toni Blankenship Plans: University of Washington Awards: UW Undergrad University Grant, $28,000.

Parents: Brian Lewis and Deborah Lewis Plans: Western Washington University Awards: William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; WWU College Bound Scholarship, $30,000.

Parents: Beth and Doyle McMinn Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Katelynne McDaniels Parent: Renee Cloutier Plans: University of CaliforniaSanta Barbara Awards: Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; UC-Santa Barbara Freshman Scholarship, $1,500; UC-Santa Barbara University Grant, $76,000.

Linda Markham Parents: Adolph and Sandra Ortiz Plans: Portland Community College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

WATER CONDITIONING & BOTTLED WATER

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CERTIFIED WATER SPECIALIST

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Parents: Anne Keane and Curt Miller Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Arts, $625; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Congratulations to the Class of 2013 from

Eleven Eleven Dental

683-4285 ASSOCIATION

Julianne Miller

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Parents: Brian and Diane Magner Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Tony Juliano Memorial Scholarship, $1,000.

Good Luck Grads! 36810781

Parents: Javier and Olga Lopez Plans: Whitworth University Awards: Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000; Clallam Branch of AAUW, $1,000; Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Olympic Medical Center Foundation, $500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Foundation, $400; Ewing Kelly Foundation, $2,500; Whitworth University Scholarship, $50,000; Whitworth Diversity Scholarship, $8,000; Whitworth College Bound Scholarship, $73,000.

Austin Law


14

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM

Kortney Oen

Jasmine McMullin Parent: Jane McMullin Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Sequim School District Rowland Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Ladies of Elks, $1,000; PEO Chapters EP, FY and HM, $2,250; Sequim High School Honor Society Scholarship, $300; Rick Kaps Memorial Scholarship, $500; SEA Future Educator Scholarship, $500; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; WWU University Grant, $4,000.

Anna Mittman Parent: David Mittmann Plans: University of WashingtonBothell Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Luke Mooney

Haley Montelius

Nicholas Moroles

Parents: Eric and Laura Mooney Plans: Coast Guard Awards: Sequim Education Foundation Film Festival, $500.

Parents: Amy and Ray Montelius Plans: Eastern Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Thomas Building Center, $500.

Parents: Larry and Christy Moroles Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S. Marine Corps Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Brooke Parsinen Parents: Geoff and Terra Parsinen Plans: Peninsula College Awards: VFW Sequim Post 4760, $750.

Angelina MorrisMorales

Nathaniel Neale Parents: Jim and Sharri Neale Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S. Marine Corps Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Ameilia Ohnstad

Parents: Stephen and Janet Ohnstad Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sequim Ladies of Elks, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Greg Phillips Lodge, Parents: Not listed $1,000; VFW Sequim Post Plans: Peninsula 4760, $750. College Awards: Sequim Education Foundation Alternative School Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Joy Newman and Ronald Newman Plans: Film Institute of Seattle Awards: VFW Ladies Auxiliary, $500; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Idris Ostrovsky

Bailey Rhodefer

Parents: Andrew and Oksana Ostrovsky Plans: University of Washington Awards: Sequim Ladies of Elks, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; UW Seattle University Scholarship, $6,000.

Parents: Dean and Keri Rhodefer Plans: Pacific Lutheran University Awards: Sequim Pioneer Association, $1,000; PLU Academic Achievement Scholarship, $52,000; PLU Q-Club Scholarship; $32,000; PLU University Grant, $16,000.

Parents: Jay and Vickie Oen Plans: Corban University Awards: Sequim School District Rowland Memorial Scholarship, $1,500; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; International Footprint Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Schools Alumni Association, $1,000.

Miranda Pedersen Parents: David and Becki Pedersen Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000; CWU College Bound Scholarship, $32,000.

36810729


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM

Samantha Schock

Kendall Perlwitz Parents: Paul and Scooter Perlwitz Plans: Point Loma Nazarene University Awards: Sequim School District Rowland Memorial Scholarship, $1,500; Agnew Helpful Neighbors Club, $2,000; VFW Ladies Auxiliary, $500; Sequim High School Honor Society Scholarship, $300; Point Loma Nazarene University, $48,000.

Jeremiah Powless

Anna Santjer

Allison Seeber

Andrew Shimer

Parents: Mark and Margie Powless Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S. Marine CorpsPost-9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Parents: Jennifer Manchester and Larry Santjer Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Kiwanis Club, $1,000.

Parents: Laura Lestage Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Drew Shimer and Mikki Shimer Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S.Marine Corps Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Elisa Sallee Parents: Andrew and Jane Sallee Plans: Washington State University Awards: WSU Cougar Grant, $42,800; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $1,000.

Ian Steward Parents: Douglas and Sherri Steward Plans: Army Awards: U.S. Army Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Kiano Stoppani Parents: Brandon and Tracy Stoppani Plans: Utah State University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Kathy and Rod Schock Plans: Cal Poly State University Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; PEO Foundation Scholarship Chapter HM-WA, $2,500; Sequim Education Foundation Fish-Rosales Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Education Foundation Outstanding Service Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Education Foundation STEM Scholarship, $10,000; Sunland Ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association, $3,000; Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club, $2,500; Olympic Peninsula Health Fair Volunteerism Scholarship, $1,000; Ewing Kelly Foundation, $2,500; Washington State PTA Association, $1,000; Cal Poly Outreach Scholarship, $2,000; Soroptimist Violet Richardson Award, $500.

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Hillary Smith Parents: Betsy and Henry Smith Plans: Whitman College Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Washington State Elks, $2,000; National Elks Association, $4,000; Monday Musicale, $2,500; Ewing Kelly Foundation, $2,500; Washington State PTA Association, $2,000; Sequim Education Foundation Performing Arts Scholarship, $1,000; Soroptimist International of Sequim, $1,000; Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club, $1,000; Peninsula Tennis Club, $500; Whitman University Merit Scholarship, $44,000.

Mollie Smith Parents: Craig and Andra Smith Plans: Pacific Lutheran University Awards: PLU Presidential Honors Scholarship, $84,000; Sequim School Board Student Rep, $500; Sequim School District John Wright Memorial Scholarship, $500; Sequim Education Foundation FishRosales Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim Sunrise Rotary Club, $1,500; Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church, $1,000; Soroptimist Violet Richardson Award, $500.

Joel Stephens Parents: John and Sandy Stephens Plans: Undecided Awards: Wave Broadband Scholarship, $500.

Jefferson Healthcare

Congratulates

class of

2013 Good Luck As You Face New & Exciting Opportunities. We encourage you (and job seekers of all ages) to consider a health care career. Demand is expected to continue for most health care careers. For more information, contact: Jefferson Healthcare Human Resources 360-385-2200 or check our website, www.JeffersonHealthcare.org for our current employment opportunities.

Cameron Harrison Pualani Makalia Sequim High School Momoa Brown Port Townsend High School Son of Daughter of Roger Harrison, Janan Brown, OR Nurse IS Director

15

Nathan Allen Port Townsend High School Son of Kirsten Pickard, FBC Director

Hannah Chu Joshua Ream Kaylee Christine Taylor Port Townsend High School Chimacum High School Port Townsend High School Son of Brandie Manuel, Daughter of Volunteer at Director of Patient Safety Jefferson Healthcare Michelle Hinds, OR and Quality


16

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Class of 2013

SEQUIM Natalie Stevenson Parents: Craig and Rebecca Stevenson Plans: Pacific Lutheran University Awards: Sequim Irrigation Royalty Scholarship, $750; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; PLU Alumni Scholarship, $4,000; PLU Q-Club Scholarship, $14,000; PLU Academic Achievement Scholarship, $52,000.

Elizabeth Thomas Parents: Kim and Eric Thomas Plans: University of Idaho Awards: University of Idaho, $4,000; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Tracie Sophie Memorial Award, $300; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Jacqueline Chanti Sweet Thrash

Andrea Tjemsland

Tristan Tosland

Grace Trautman

Ashley Wallace

Taylor Washburn

Jennifer Welches

Parents: David and Camilla Sweet Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Ann and Pete Tjemsland Plans: Undecided Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Bremerton Valley Scottish Rite, $1,500; Sequim Education Foundation Fish-Rosales Scholarship, $1,000; Sequim High School Honor Society Scholarship, $400; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Troy and Terra Tosland Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Virginia Nitterhouse Foundation, $5,000; Sequim Education Foundation June Robinson Scholarship, $10,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; Sequim Education Foundation Film Fest, $750.

Parents: Don and Judi Trautman Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; CWU Presidential Scholarship, $4,000; Olympic Driftwood Sculptors, $750; Sequim Arts, $650; Sequim High School Honor Society Scholarship, $200.

Parents: John and Jennifer Hipple Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Parents: Kim Washburn and Susan Washburn Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S. Marine Corps Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000.

Parent: Vicki Hovey Plans: Portland Community College Awards: William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation, $1,000.

Jack Wiker

Parent: Janine Griffith Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000; William and Esther Littlejohn Foundation; $1,000.

Parent: Pat McComb Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Gardiner Garden Club, $1,000; Sequim Prairie Garden Club, $1,000; Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

David Vollenweider Parents: Katherine and Michael Vollenwieder Plans: University of Denver Awards: University of Denver, $55,240.

Parents: Erik Wiker and Carmen Wiker Plans: Marine Corps Awards: U.S. Marine Corps Post9/11 GI Bill, $120,000

CongratulaĆ&#x;ons, Class of 2013 Graduates from Lincoln High School and Port Angeles High School!

Lopaka Yasumura Nichole Wolery

Parents: David and Alice Yasumura Plans: MidAmerica Nazarene University Awards: MidAmerica Nazarene University, $40,000.

Rylleigh Zbaraschuk Parents: Jennifer and Richard Zbaraschuk Plans: University of Washington Awards: Sequim Masonic Lodge, $1,000.

Michelle Abell Brianna Albright Aimee Allen Mersadeaz Allie Britni Allman Jeshua Anthony-Gauthier Sarena Austin Juliana Ayala-Flores Aerl Bailey Cedric Bailey Taylor Balkan Emma Barrell Mason Barrett Elaine Baskett Karl Behrens Lauren Bell Devin Bellis Amanda Bennett Abigail Berry Elijah Berry Calin Blanchard Rebecca Blouin Hailey Brock Jayson Brocklesby Aran Burke James Byers Emily Carel Gabriel Carter Courtney Cassal Matthew Cays Tyke Chace Rodgers Derek Chamblin Austin Clement Adrian Clifford Amariah Clift Trevor Consoliver Cheyanne Cooper Hayley Corbett Eric Corral Shelby Coyne Colby Crisafi Tylar Decker Cassidy Derrick Stefan Dewey Jon Donahue

CONTINUED

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Congratulations to Andrea Tjemsland



Financial Advice for the Long Run

Congratulations Graduates!

Class of 2013!

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

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17

Port Townsend High School Jenny Apker

Rinnah Becker

Bentley Breithaupt

Hannah Chu

Ethan Flanagan

Xavier Frank

Larissa Freier

Olivia Gibbons

Plans: Port Angeles Hair Academy Awards: Arnold and Lucille Eggert Vocational Scholarship, $1,000

Plans: St. Olaf College Awards: St. Olaf College Presidential Scholarship, $13,000 per year; St. Olaf College Music Scholarship, $11,500 per year; American Association of University Women Award in Mathematics, undisclosed.

Plans: University of WashingtonTacoma Awards: Glenn Abraham Memorial Scholarship, $1,000

Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000

Plans: Western Washington University Awards: San Juan Baptist Church Pastor Scholarship, $500.

Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend High School Athlete of the Year Scholarship, $250.

Plans: University of Puget Sound Awards: University of Puget Sound Merit Scholarship, $19,000 per year; University of Puget Sound Music Scholarship, $8,000 per year.

Plans: California State University at Monterey Bay Awards: Western Undergraduate Exchange Scholarship, $8,424 per year.

Erika Hoglund Plans: Washington State University Awards: Daughters of Norway Scholarship, $700.

Gabrielle Hossack

Kevin Hughes Plans: California Maritime Academy Awards: Norm Manly YMTA Maritime Scholarship, $500.

Plans: Edmonds Community College Awards: Bremerton Valley of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend Elks Lodge #317 Vocational Grant, $1,000; Port Townsend High School Alumni Association Scholarship, $2,000; Windermere Port Townsend Realty Scholarship, $500.

Brittany Grant Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,000; Western Washington Leadership Scholarship, $1,000; Western Washington Presidential Scholarship, $3,000.

Brian LeMaster Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $1,000.

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Katelynne McDaniels Ross McHenry Torrie McIntyre Jared McMinn Jasmine McMullin Elora Meeker Christian Miles Julianne Miller Anna Mittmann Haley Montelius Justin Montelius Alec Moore Ashton Moore Jennifer Moroles Nicholas Moroles Angelina Morris-Morales Kourtney Mueller Ashley Mulvahill Kortney Oen Amelia Ohnstad Dao Bich Ong Idris Ostrovsky Morgison Overby Brooke Parsinen Nathan Patton Christopher Paulsen Miranda Pedersen Mikaela Perdomo Kendall Perlwitz Gregg Phillips Jr. Jedd Posadas Jeremiah Powless Amber Rhodefer Bailey Rhodefer Ella Rickerson Cody Robbins James Root Brian Russell Elisa Sallee Andrew Sampson Taylor Sams Anna Santjer Samantha Schock Ashley Shoenle Josiah Schroeder Morgan Seamands Allison Seeber Federico Serrano David Sheltren Andrew Shimer Hillary Smith Mollie Smith Joel Stephens Natalie Stevenson Ian Steward Kiano Stoppani Rosa Swain Jacqueline Sweet Robert Tadina Elizabeth Thomas Robert Thompson Chanti Thrash Andrea Tjemsland Tristan Tosland Grace Trautman John Troglia Thoma Vangesen Simon Vilella Keil Wood Lopaka Yasumura Rylleigh Zbaraschuk Exchange student Aristea Bagia (Germany)

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Douglas Dunbar Tiana Duncan Dylan Eekhoff Benjamin Fanestil Arianna Flores Omar Flores Joshua Forberg Emily Fowler Dylan Foxlee Mariah Frazier-Espejo Travis Frogge Giovanni Gallo Wilfred Garrard Havilah Gautschi Emily Giammalva Jamie Gilchrist Nicole Giordano Melissa Gonzalez Ashley Gowdy Jace Green Paige Greening Timothy Guan Alyssa Habner Kayla Hagberg Darian Hall Dorian Halverson Cameron Harrison Haleigh Harrison Olivia Hatton Columbia Haupt Katherine Hedgecock Emily Heike Kaitlin Heike Kenneth Henning Xenia Hernandez Randall Hogoboom Janel Howat Elizabeth Hubbard Brendon Hudson Jeffry Hutt Ian Jackson Breann Jennings Tyler Jennings Bethany Jensen Zackery Johnston Brandon Jones Ian Jones Riley Jorgensen Jazmin Knaack Mitchell Koonz Heather Kovach Victoria LaCroix Peter Lajambe Tiffany Langmack Steven Larsen Austin Law Annika Lawrence Richard LeBlanc Donovan Lee Jordan Lester Scott Lester Carson Lewis Christian Lopes Angelyna Lopez Eva Lopez Verenice Lopez Kathryn Lorentzen Abigail Loucks Kelsie MacDonald Alexander Machenheimer Grace Magner Linda Markham Christopher McCarter

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013


18

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PORT TOWNSEND Emily Huntingford Plans: Whitman College Awards: Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,500; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Thomas J Majhan Scholarship, $1,300; Port Townsend Elks Lodge No. 317 Most Valuable Student Scholarship $2,000; Washington State Elks Lodge Most Valuable Student Scholarship, $2,000; Port Townsend High School Elks Lodge No. 317 Legacy Award, $1,000; Port Townsend High School Alumni Association Scholarship, $2,000; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000; Whitman College Pearson Scholarship,

Irina Lyons

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Britta Janssen Plans: Edmonds Community College Awards: Soroptimist of East Jefferson County Scholarship, $1,000, renewable for four years; Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,500; Daughters of Norway Scholarship, $700; Port Townsend Elks Lodge No. 317 Most Valuable Student Scholarship $2,000; Washington State Elks Lodge Most Valuable Student Scholarship, $2,000; Jefferson County Democrats Scholarship, $500; Wild Rose Chorale Scholarship, $1,000; Gerry Hyatt Bergstrom Vocal Music Scholarship, $1,500; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000; Grace Lutheran Church Scholarship, $500; Jefferson County Historical Society Scholarship, $500.

Plans: Edmonds Community College Awards: Edmonds Community College Athletic Scholarship, $2,607.

Nakaia MillmanMacomber

Benjamin Matthews

Molly McGuire

Addison Monahan

Kristin Mounts

Plans: Caroll College Awards: Carroll College Trustee Scholarship, $12,500 per year; Carroll College Dean’s Grant, $1,000 per year; Carroll College Community Living Grant, $1,747.

Plans: University of Victoria Awards: U.S. To UVic Welcome Grant, $1,000.

Plans: Seattle Central Community College Awards: Glenn Abraham Memorial Scholarship, $1,000.

Plans: George Washington University Awards: American Association of University Women’s Scholarship, $1,500; Gordon Papritz Scholarship, $1,250; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000; George Washington University and Alumni Award, $5,600 per year; George Washington University Grant, $30,000 per year.

Enani Rubio

Frehiwot Piatt Plans: Undisclosed Awards: Port Townsend High School Holiday Wreath Scholarship, $1,000.

Plans: Edmonds Community College Awards: Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $2,500; Lorena Northup Gahr Memorial Scholarship for the Fine Arts, $1,000; First Baptist Church of Port Townsend Scholarship, $500.

Karling Rutenbeck Plans: Seattle University Awards: Seattle University Campion Scholarship, $15,000 per year; Seattle University Grant, $1,900 per year.

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Plans: Central Washington University Awards: The Andy Mackie Foundation Scholarship, $500; Turtle Bluff Music Scholarship, $1,000; Kairos Lyceum Music Scholarship, $750; Central Washington University Music Scholarship, $2,500.

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Plans: Washington State University Awards: Bremerton Valley of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Scholarship, $1,000; Maxine Brown Washington State University Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend High School Alumni Association Scholarship, $2,000; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000.

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Plans: University of Washington Awards: Port Townsend High School Alumni Association Scholarship, $2,000; Rhododendron Festival Royalty Scholarship, $1,000; Rhododendron Festival Past Royalty Scholarship, $100; Washington Officials Association Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend High School Athlete of the Year Scholarship, $250; American Association of University Women Award in Technology, undisclosed.

Madison Pruitt

Plans: Lewis and Clark College Awards: Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,500; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend Elks Lodge No. 317 Most Valuable Student Scholarship $2,000; Washington State Elks Lodge Most Valuable Student Scholarship, $2,000; Elks Grand Lodge Scholarship, $1,000 for four years; Ewing C. Kelly Scholarship, $2,500; National Association for the Self-Employed Scholarship, $4,000; Lewis and Clark College Endowed Scholarship, $1,500 per year; Lewis and Clark College Faculty Scholarship, $12,000 per year.

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND

Michael Shively

Nicholas Silberman

Plans: University of Portland Awards: Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend Elks Lodge No. 317 Most Valuable Student Scholarship, $2,000; SokolowTyrrell Perseverance Award, undisclosed; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000; Sarah “Dusty” Westall Scholarship, $2,500; University of Portland Arthur Schulte Academic Scholarship, $15,000 per year.

Plans: Arizona State University Awards: Port Townsend High School Activity Leader of the Year Scholarship, $250; New American University Scholarship, $8,000 per year.

Class of 2013

Allison Tuuri

Sarah Tucker Plans: University of Puget Sound Awards: Earl Grondahl Music Scholarship, $1,000; The Andy Mackie Foundation Scholarship, $500; University of Puget Sound Merit Scholarship, $17,000 per year.

Plans: California Polytechnic State University Awards: Port Townsend Letter Carriers Mike McCary Memorial Scholarship, $1,000; Gordon Papritz Scholarship, $1,250; Port Townsend Rotary Club Scholarship, $1,000; St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Scholarship, $1,000; St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Altar Service Scholarship, $250; Jefferson County Bar Association Scholarship, $500; California Polytechnic State University Academic Scholarship, $2,000; Port Townsend High School Activity Leader of the Year Scholarship, $250; American Association of University Women Award in Science, undisclosed.

Alexandra Akins Nathan David Allen Jenny Mae Apker Nolan Arthur Rinnah Becker Bentley Breithaupt Dakota Brown Pualani Brown Dylan Bruneau Madison Cantrell Justin Carson Casey Scott Carter Hannah Chu Dawn Conway Olivia Cremeans Emmerson Davis Daniel Dawson

Forrest Walker Plans: University of Puget Sound Awards: Port Townsend High School Scholarship Foundation Scholarship, $1,000; University of Puget Sound Merit Scholarship, $19,000 per year; University of Puget Sound Music Scholarship, $7,000 per year.

Jasmine Zavalza Brandon Webb

Alethea Westlund

Plans: Undisclosed Awards: Andy Palmer Memorial Scholarship $1,000.

Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Townsend Marine Science Center Scholarship, $500.

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Port Townsend Rotary Club Neil Potthoff Service Above Self Scholarship, $1,000.

Elizabeth Dennison Ethan Jon Flanagan Kate Darby Flanagan Bethany Foster Xavier Frank Larissa Freier Olivia Gibbons Brittany Grant Clint Guilford Felicia Hanna Winter Harms Erika Hoglund Gabrielle Hossack Kevin Hughes Emily Huntingford Megan James Britta Janssen Emma Kelety Jody Kimmel Rosemary Lambert Yarro Ester-Tios Lanpher-Ramirez Chace Larsen Brian LeMaster Brianna Lundgren Irina Lyons Nakia MacomberMillman Benjamin Matthews Bela McCarthy Aidan McClave Lily McCrea-Welle Molly McGuire Andrew McNamara Addison Monahan Kristin Mounts Jordyn O’Meara Kaila Olin Bailey Olson

19

Class of 2013

Frehiwot Piatt Raven Pope Madison Pruitt Dillon Ralls Natalie Range Joshua Ream Coleman Riddle Jordon Ristick Olivia Rogers Enani Rubio Karling Rutenbeck Jake Scott Heather SherwoodChochrach Michaely Shively Nicholas Silberman Chad Smith Cory Smith Mikays Somes Samuel Spaltenstein Tabatha Spegal Mileta Thornton Sarah Tucker Allison Tuuri Serena Vilage Reneda Walcome Forrest Walker Brandon Webb Kevin Webber Alethea Westlund Molly Yarr Jasmine Zavalza Honorary Diplomas Benjamin Bacsa Shih Jui Chen Peter Collin Marharyta Hasyn Ana Velasco

Lincoln High School Jessica Blevins Jena Chamberlin Shanna Coffee Sara Cassel Nathan Doty Garrett Goudie Greg Gross Will Hartman Samantha Hodgdon Nick Huffman Shayna Parr Angel Shaw Brandy Swan Larissa Walker Gary Wurden

Sequim Alternative High School Elijah Berry Jimmy Byers Cheyeanne Cooper Hayley Corbett Darian Hall Kenny Henning Tyler Jennings Victoria LaCroix Nate Neal Chris Paulsen Gregg Phillips Jedd Posadas Andrew Sampson David Sheltren Ian Steward Jacob VanGesen Taylor Washburn

Jefferson Community School Maya Ruby Rome

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chimacum High School Derek Ajax Parents: Mark and Kimberly Ajax Plans: North Idaho Community College Awards: East Jefferson Little League Scholarship, $250; Rotary of East Jefferson County Scholarship, $400; Friends of Chimacum (Larry Wiener Scholarship Award), $500; Big Blue Boosters, $300; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500; Franson Trucking and Excavating, $500.

Erin Bainbridge

Ryland All Parents: Terri Ysseldyke All and William All Plans: Agnes Scott College Awards: Agnes Scott College Award, $15,500.

Parents: Tina Bainbridge, Paul Bainbridge Plans: Washington State University Awards: East Jefferson Little League, $250; Friends of Chimacum Judy Gunter Memorial, $500; Chimacum Alumni Association, $800; Peace Lutheran Fellowship, $500.

Nathan Browning

Andrea Bell

Corinthia Cardona

Alyshia Cienega

Dustin Finley

Parents: Scott and Lori Browning Plans: University of Idaho Awards: University of Idaho Merit Tuition Waiver, $4,000, fouryear renewable; Friends of Chimacum Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Rachel and Wesley Bell Plans: Brigham Young UniversityIdaho Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $500; Friends of Chimacum Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship, $500; AAUW, $1,500; BYUIdaho Award of Excellence, $3,650; Chimacum Education Association, $500; Jefferson County Bar Association, $500.

Parent: Anita Schmucker Plans: University of Washington Awards: Friends of Chimacum Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship, $1,000; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club, $2,500; Rhododendron Scholarship, $1,000; Governor Scholarship for Foster Youth, $4,000, fouryear renewable.

Parents: Sheri Fernandes and Victor Cienega Plans: Bates Technical College Awards: Chimacum Alumni Association, $800.

Parents: Charlene and Raymond Finley Plans: North Idaho College Awards: Friends of Chimacum (Quilcene Lions), $300.

The Montessori Garden School & Childcare

Kyla Gabriel Parents: Burton Gabriel and Cynthia BasdekianGabriel Plans: Seattle Pacific University Awards: Seattle Pacific University, $12,000, renewable for four years.

Mallori Cossell

Bridget Galle

Olivia Garten

Krista Hathaway

Parent: Bobby Cossell Plans: Edmonds Community College Awards: East Jefferson Little League, $250; Friends of Chimacum Chimacum Staff, $500; Big Blue Boosters, $300; Chimacum Alumni Association, $800; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club, $1,000; Brad Brown Memorial, $500; Edmonds Community College Athletic Scholarship, $1,000; Pat & Janice Yarr Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Jennifer Galle and John Galle Plans: Jennifer Galle and John Galle Awards: Brad Brown Memorial, $500.

Parents: Amanda and Scott DeCastro Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Community Enrichment Alliance, $500, renewable for four years; Rotary of East Jefferson County, $1,200; Friends of Chimacum First Federal, $500.

Parents: Jeff and Sabrina Hathaway Plans: Olympic College Awards: Friends of Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship), $500; Big Blue Boosters, $300; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500; Olympic College, $1,000;

Seth Ham Parents: Michelle and Cameron Hamm Plans: University of Washington Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $500;

Eric Hartz Parents: Not listed Plans: Undisclosed Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $500.

Ages 2½ to 6 Summer Program begins July 1

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CHIMACUM Hailee Johnson Parents: Sarah and Keith Johnson Plans: Skagit Valley Community College Awards: Friends of Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship), $500; Chimacum Alumni Association, $800; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500; Pat and Janice Yarr Memorial Scholarship, $500; Brad Brown Memorial, $500; St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Scholarship, $1,000.

Maxwell Peet Parents: Phil and Elaine Peet Plans: Brigham Young University-Hawaii Awards: Port Ludlow Artists League, $500; Andy Mackie, $500.

Ryan Marrs

Kevin Miller Cydney Nelson Parents:

Trisha and Parents: Rhonda Marrs Rob Miller Plans: and Chris University of Marrs Idaho Plans: Awards: University of University of Arizona Idaho Robert Awards: McCaslin EnUniversity of dowment Arizona (A2 Scholarship, Excellence $1,000; Tuition Scholarship), Friends of Chimacum (Duke $8,000; and Jeannine University of Shold ScholarArizona ship), $1,000; Achievement Chimacum Award, Alumni Asso$5,000; ciation, $800; Arizona Jodi Cossell Leadership Memorial Scholand iPad arship, $500; Scholarship, Pat and Janice winners receive iPads. Yarr Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Parents: Brett and Christina Nelson Plans: Undisclosed Awards: East Jefferson Little League, $250; Community Enrichment Alliance, $500, renewable for four years; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Casey Settje Parents: Larry and Teri Settje Plans: North Seattle Community College Awards: East Jefferson Little League, $250; Friends of Chimacum (Evergreen Fitness), $500; Big Blue Boosters, $300; Pat and Janice Yarr Memorial Scholarship, $500.

Morgan Music

Christopher Pieper

Abigail Robocker

Parents: Freddy and Fawn Music Plans: Eastern Washington

Parents: Don and Claudia Pieper Plans: Whitworth

Parents: David and Tami Robocker Plans: Washington

University Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $500; Friends of Chimacum Duane Montgomery Memorial Music Scholarship, $1,000; Port Ludlow Artists League, $500; Andy Mackie Scholarship, $500; Eastern Washington University Dean’s Scholarship, $2,000.

University Awards: Community Enrichment Alliance, $500, renewable for four years; Rotary of East Jefferson County, $1,200; Elks - Local, $2,000; Elks - State, $2,000; Elks - National, $1,000, renewable for four years; Whitworth University (Honors Colloquium Scholarship), $35,320, renewable for four years; First Presbyterian Dusty Westall Memorial, $2,500.

Daryl Settlemire

arship), $1,000; Big Blue Boosters, $300; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $500; Washington State University Achievement Award, $2,000.

Parent: Roselyn Settlemire Plans: Washington State University Awards: Friends of

21

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Schol-

State University Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $1,200; Friends of Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship), $1,000; Port Townsend Kiwanis Club Majhan Award, $1,333; Norman Christie Science/ Math/Engineering, $1,200; Washington State University, $12,000.

Andrew Van Ness Parents: Kimberly and Keith Van Ness Plans: Western Washington University Awards:

Rotary of East Jefferson County, $500; Friends

of Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship), $1,000; Jackpot Scholarship, $500; Western Washington University, $2,000.

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Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

CHIMACUM

MaryJane Eilena Richardson Sharpe Parents: Mike Richardson and Marion Nisbet Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Rotary of East Jefferson County, $750; Friends of Chimacum (Duke and Jeannine Shold Scholarship), $1,000; Chimacum Alumni Association, $800; Jodi Cossell Memorial Scholarship, $600; Washington Contract Loggers Association, $500; Western Washington University Presidential Scholarship, $1,000; Chimacum Education Association (Maggie Romine Scholarship), $600.

Parents: Mona and Patrick Sharpe Plans: Cornish College of the Arts Awards: Port Ludlow Artists League, $1,000; Peninsula Youth Equestrian Foundation John Slack Memorial Scholarship, $500; Jefferson County 4-H, $200; Cornish College of the Arts Cornish Art Scholarship, $5,600; Cornish College of the Arts College Bound Scholarship, $4,600.

Class of 2013 Derek Ajax Ryland All Genevieve Arnold Brooke Bainbridge Erin Bainbridge Naemoie Barrow Andrea Bell Thomas Beres Nathan Browning Jaelin Campbell Corinthia Cardona Katelyn Casella Brianna Chamberlin Sarah Chisick Caylie Christie Alyshia Cienega Robert Clausen Micah Conklin Mallori Cossell Marina Diehl Taylor Farrell Dustin Finley Hunter Firkins Kyla Gabriel Bridget Galle Olivia Garten Sara Halliburton Seth Ham Taylor Hare Trevor Hare Eric Hartz Krista Hathaway CarolAnn Hoffman Hannah Jahnke Brittney Johnson Hailee Johnson Mercina Kastikapes Ezalyne Lamour

Emma White Thunder Parent: Beth Ann O’Dell Plans: University of the Arts,

Philadelphia

Awards: Rhodendron Scholarship, $1,500; University of the Arts, Philadelphia, $15,000, renewable for four years.

Kayla Leuenberger Kaleb Lingle Kristin Louthan Abigail Lowe Cole Lovekamp Dylan Manly Ryan Marrs Ian McLaughlan Kevin Miller Devan Morain Justice Morgan-Bailey Anum Mushtaq Morgan Music Cydney Nelson Michael Nordberg C.J. Nydegger Cara Pace Dacia Paden Rafael Pagasian Ellie-Mae Parfrey Max Peet Christopher Pieper Colby Povsche Hannah Pritchard Marcos Reyes MaryJane Richardson Kaleib Richey Kori Riggle Abbigail Robocker Leah Russell RhiAnnon Ryan Angelynn Shafer Kolby Schreier Casey Settje Daryl Settlemire Eilena Sharp Nicholas Singleton McKayla Szczepanik Kaylee Taylor Ryan Taylor Mel Thornton Andrew Van Ness Michael U’Ren Emma White Thunder

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forks High School Kassidi Allen

Garrick Brandt

Elizabeth Brown

Plans: Cosmotology school Awards: North Olympic Skills Center Grant, $1,000; The Hair School, $1,200; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Hull Family, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600; Forks Education Association, $250.

Plans: Spokane Community College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship,$1,600.

Plans: Seattle University Awards: Hull Family, $500; Forks Education Association, $250; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600; Seattle University Scholarships and Grants, $18,500, renewable for four years.

Plans: Eastern Oregon University Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed; Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Hull Family, $500.

Morgan Gaydeski Plans: Eastern Washington University Awards: Merrill and Ring Scholarship, $250; Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600.

Plans: Spokane Valley Community College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Plans: Pacific Lutheran University Awards: Patty Knorr Babe Ruth Scholarship, $100; Hull Family, $500; Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Concerned Citizens, $500; Forks Chamber of Commerce, $1,000; Forks Coaches Association, $300; Forks Lions Club, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,800; PLU Merit Scholarship, $13,000 per year, renewable for four years.

Tre’Shawn Harris Plans: Pierce College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed; Patty Knorr Babe Ruth Scholarship, $100.

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Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Hull Family, $500; Kassi Hansen Memorial, $300; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

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Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Forks Lions Club, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Ashlynn Coburn

Braden Decker

Leah Harris Anastasia Fleck

Erik CamachoRoldan


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

23

FORKS Rachel Harner Plans: Harvard University Awards: Washington State PTA, $2,000, Foresters Insurance, $2,000, Scottish Rite of Bremerton Valley Powell Scholarship for Academic Excellence, $1,500; Carlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jr., $1,000; Link Crew, $500; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust, $400; Forks Lions Club, $500; Forks Emblem Club No. 488, $200, Forks Education Association, $250; Forks Elks, $500; Washington State Elks Association, $2,000; Elks National Foundation, $2000, renewable for four years; Fred Orr, $700; Quillayute Valley Scholarship,$2,500; Harvard Faculty Scholarship, $48,850, renewable for four years.

Fischer Hagen Plans: Undisclosed Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Tyler Hoke Plans: Northwest Lineman College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Mark Jacobson

Troy Johnson

Kaylea Kraft

Jessica Kenney

Mitchell Leppell

Plans: Utah State University Awards: Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Hull Family, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Plans: Dakota College at Bottineau Awards: Patty Knor Babe Ruth Scholarship, $100.

Plans: Eastern Washington University Awards: Forks Emblem Club No. 488, $200; Hull Family, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,300; Albert Haller Foundation, $8,000.

Plans: Central Washington University Awards: Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Hull Family, $500; Soroptimist, $1,000; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Patty Knorr Babe Ruth Scholarship, $100.

Alissa Shaw

Sebastian Velasquez

Jillian Raben Plans: Shoreline Community College Awards: Elks Vocational, $1,900; Forks Community Hospital, $750; Forks Coaches Association, $400; Charlotte Kirby Memorial Scholarship, $500; Hull Family, $500; Kassi Hansen Memorial, $300; Forks Emblem Club No. 448, $200; Forks Lions Club, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $2,000.

Plans: Southwestern Assemblies of God University Awards: Ewing C. Kelley Scholarship, $2,500; Concerned Citizens, $500; Bremerton Scottish Rite, $1000; Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Forks Coaches Association, $400; Forks Lions Club, $500; Fred Orr, undisclosed; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Terra Sheriff Plans: Washington State University Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600

Alejandra Oropeza

Plans: Bates Technical College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Stevi MartinezJewett Plans: Centralia College Awards: Charlotte Kirby Memorial, $500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600.

Sapphire Price

Jordan Pegram

Kayla Simons

Megan Suslick

Plans: Art Institute of Seattle Awards: Institute Merit Award, $250; Culinary Grant, $750; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,800.

Plans: Peninsula College/ Central Washington University Awards: Jefferson County Democrats, $500; Forks Education Association, $250; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,800.

Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Clallam County 4-H Scholarship, undisclosed; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Plans: Washington State University Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600.

Shane WhiteEagle

Tia Weaver

Casey Williams Plans: Pierce College Awards: Volleyball scholarship, $1,000; Elks Scholarship, $500; Scottish Rite of Bremerton, $1,000.

Plans: Central Washington University Awards: CWU Freshman Award, $1,500; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, undisclosed.

Shayla Wilbur

Plans: El Camino College-Compton Plans: Center Tacoma ComAwards: munity College Muckleshoot Awards: Tribal ScholQuillayute arship, undisValley Schol- closed. arship, $1,600.

Plans: Tacoma Community College Awards: Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600.

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Plans: Pacific University Awards: Patty Knorr Babe Ruth Scholarship, $100; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600; Forks Coaches Association, $300; Green Crow, $500; Loggers Playday, $300; Quillayute Valley Scholarship, $1,600; Pacific University Grant, $15,000, renewable for four years; Pacific University Presidential Merit Award, $15,000, renewable for four years.

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24

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Crescent High School

FORKS

Class of 2013 Kenneth Abrahams Kassidi Allen Garrick Brandt Justin Breithaupt Nathan Brock Elizabeth Brown Erik Camacho-Roldan Virginia Castaneda Sergio Chase Ashlynn Coburn Crystal Cortez Braden Decker Anastasia Fleck Morgan Gaydeski Nicholas Gilmore Walker Gimlin Lucio Gonzalez Fischer Hagen Megan Hall Damian Hamlin Rachel Harner Leah Harris Tre’Shawn Harris Tyler Hoke

Class of 2013 Quileute Tribal School Jonah Black Willie Hatch Alexis Ward

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Mark Jacobson Ryan Johansen Kelsie Johnson Troy Johnson Kayla Jones Kaylea Kraft Jessica Kenney Hailey Larkin Mitchell Leppell Wesley Leppell Stevi Martinez-Jewett Marcus Mendez Alejandra Oropeza Jordan Pegram Mason Ponton Sapphire Price Jillian Raben Marco Ramos Josue Rice James Salazar Alissa Shaw Terra Sheriff Jamie Silva Kayla Simons Stephen Smith Megan Suslick Kayla Teachout Nehemiah Tejano Sebastian Velasquez Tia Weaver Meliena Whidden Michael Whidden Shane White Eagle Shayla Wilbur Casey Williams Alejandra Zaragoza

Eric Baker Parents: Donald Baker and Heidi Crumb Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500.

Beau Bamer

Kellie Belford

Donovan Christie

Derrick Findley

Jandi Frantz

Bonnie Hazelett

Rebecca Bowen

Parents: Barb Bamer and Jeff Bamer Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Bay Lions $200.

Parents: Michael and Janet Belford Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Elks Naval Lodge BPOE 353 $500.

Parents: Chris and Julie Christie Plans: Military Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Booster/PTO $500; Joyce Fire Department Auxiliary $500; Crescent Classified Employees – PSE $100.

Parents: Garry and Missy Edwards Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Dahl Family Scholarship $1,000; Crescent Grange – Cain Memorial $500.

Parents: Brett and Susie Frantz Plans: Washington State University Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Nor’wester Rotary $500; Crescent Booster/PTO $500; Durrwachter Family Scholarship $500; Washington State University Institutional Grant $6,565.

Parent: Mike Hazelett Plans: Olympic College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Joyce Daze $300; Nor’wester Rotary $500; Crescent Booster/PTO $500; Republican Women’s Club of Clallam County $500; Dahl Family Scholarship $500; Crescent Grange $500; Crescent Bay Lions $500; Albert Haller Foundation $4,000 renewable for 2 years.

Parents: Rick and Tracey Grooms and Kevin Bowen Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Merrill & Ring Timber Land Trust $250; Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Scholarship $400; Crescent Booster/ PTO $500; Port Angeles Soroptimist — Noon Club $1,000; Clallam County Bar Association $750; Durrwachter Family Scholarship $500; City of Port Angeles Employees Association $250.

Kristen Lester

Congratulations Graduates!

Go get ‘em

Class of

Parents: Jennifer Frye and Michael Lester Plans: Undisclosed. Awards: Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500.

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Eric Larson Parents: Rick and Terry Larson Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Bay Lions $200.

Kyle Hutto Parents: Tim and Kelly Hutto Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Dahl Family Scholarship $500.

Monica Kempf Parents: Mel and Peggy Kempf Plans: International Air and Hospitality Academy Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; International Air and Hospitality Academy $1,000.


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CRESCENT

Gene Peppard

Josh Sowders

Parents: Trent and Dara Peppard Plans: Eastern Washington University Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Booster/PTO $500; Gladys and Lemuel Ross Memorial Scholarship $1,000; International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers – undisclosed; City of Port Angeles Employees Association $250.

Parents: Keith and Linda Sowders Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Bay Lions – Tommy Thompson Award $500.

Kai Story

Neah Bay High School

Eric Baker Beau Bamer Kellie Belford Rebecca Bowen Donovan Christie Macarena Corral Lopez Elena Eguiarte Derrick Findley Jandi Frantz Bonny Hazelett Kyle Hutto Monica Kempf Eric Larson Kristen Lester Gene Peppard Josh Sowders Kai Story Catherine Youngman Michael Zapien

Elizabeth Lawrence

Parents: Steve and Kari Cook Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Charlotte Kirby Scholarship, $1,000.

Parents: Michael and Wendy Lawrence Plans: Whatcom Community College Awards: Washington Indian Gaming Association Scholarship, $1,000; Northwest Indian Housing Association Scholarship, $1,000; Makah Cultural and Research Center Alan Youngblood Scholarship, $2,000.

Parents: Ray and Colleen DiVacky Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Crescent Grange $500; Crescent Bay Lions – Johnny Gossett Award $800.

Samantha Wilson Parents: Tammy and Dale Akin Plans: Bellevue College Awards: College Bound Scholarship, undisclosed.

Catherine Youngman

C reek

Parent: Patricia McCarty Plans: Tacoma Community College Awards: Clallam County Bar Association Scholarship, $1,000; Native American VFW scholarship, $2,000.

Joey Monje Merissa Murner Parents:

Alexander Parent

Deena and Joshua Barton Plans: Hanover College Awards: Benjamin Templeton Scholarship, full-ride scholarship to Hanover College; Ed Claplanhoo Memorial Scholarship, $250.

Parent: Kathleen Parent Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Peninsula College Longhouse Scholarship, covers tuition and fees for one year.

Sawndra Smith Parents: Tammy and Dale Akin Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Hull Family Scholarship, $1,000; Clallam County Bar Association Scholarship, $1,000; Cape Flattery Education Association Scholarship, $350; Charlotte Kirby Scholarship, $5,000.

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Parents: Larry and Alice Murner Plans: Everett Community College Awards: Neah Bay Booster Club Scholarship, $1,500; Makah Cultural and Research Center Alan Youngblood Scholarship, $2,000.

25

Class of 2013 Alyssa Bellew Sandy Bowechop Laurence Buzzell V Ariel Corpuz Nathaniel Clapanhoo Dale Dawson Jr. Leyton Doherty DeShawn Halttunen Sebastian Gagnon Barbara Gagnon Keefer Herda Elizabeth Lawrence Madison Lindsay Makenzie Lindsay Asia Martin Shane Martin Edith McCarty-Corpuz Joey Monje Merissa Murner Alexander Parent Sawndra Smith Samantha Wilson

Class of 2013 Mar Vista High School Nolan Arthur Pualani Brown Justin Carter Shae Dupey Felicia Hanna Olivia Rogers Josh Thompson Molly Yarr

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Parent: Jami Green Plans: Northwest Indian College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500; Lower Elwha Tribe $1,000; Northwest Indian Housing Association Youth Scholarship Program $1,000; Durrwachter Family Scholarship $1,000.

Alyssa Bellew

Mike Zapien

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Parents: Carl and Shannon Story Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Joyce Community Scholarship Foundation $1,200; Gossett Charitable Foundation $1,500.

Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013


26

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Quilcene High School Jason Low

Brandon Collins Parents: Roy Collins and Connie Jaragosky Plans: Awards: College Bound Scholarship, $4,400.

Lesly Andrea Lara Parent: Virginia Lara Plans: Cosmetology school Awards: College Bound Scholarship, $4,400.

Parents: Dorine and Jason Low Plans: Olympic College Awards: Bob and Maggie Bergman, $3,000; Brinnon Dosey Dux, $500; Quilcene Alumni Association, $250; Quilcene Education Association, $400; South County Classic Cruisers, $500; Whitney Gardens, $500.

Lucas Murphy Parents: Geary Murphy and Debbi Murphy Plans: Tongue Point

Parents: Christina Steele and Colin Steele Plans: Western Washington University Awards: Quilcene-Brinnon Dollars for Scholars, $2,500, renewable for four years; Bob and Maggie Bergman, $500; Bergman Seattle Foundation, $3,500, renewable for four years; Brinnon Dosey Dux, $500; College Bound Scholarship, $4,400; Port Townsend Elks, $2,000; Port Townsend Kiwanis Thomas J. Majhan, $1,300; East Jefferson Rotary, $750; Quilcene Alumni Association, $500; Quilcene Booster Club, $500.

Bee Sitthisin

Crystina Griffith

Steven Gossette

Parents: Crystal and Allen Griffith Plans: Olympic College Awards: Bob and Maggie Bergman, $500; Bergman Seattle Foundation, $3,500, renewable for four years; College Bound Scholarship, $4,400; Quilcene Museum, $200; Quilcene Education Association, $300; Quilcene VFW Post 3213, $500.

Parents: Jessica and Jerry Gossette Plans: Olympic College/Central Washington University Awards: Bob and Maggie Bergman, $500; College Bound Scholarship, $4,400; Quilcene Alumni Association, $500; South County Classic Cruisers, $500; Quilcene VFW Post 3213, $1,000.

Parents: Thomas and Nusra Barelli Plans: Peninsula College Awards: Kawahara Memorial, $900; Bob and Maggie Bergman, $1,500; Brinnon Dosey Dux, $500; College Bound Scholarship, $4,400; East Jefferson Rotary, $1,200; Quilcene Alumni Association, $250; Quilcene Fair: Al Jakeway Memorial, $1,000; Quilcene Education Association, $300; Quilcene VFW Post 3213, $500.

Class of 2013 Brandon James Collins Steven Chillman Gossette Devon Scott Greenwood Crystina Marie Griffith Kelsea Micaela Knutzen Lesly Andrea Lara Jason Patrick Low Haley Joanna Mack Lucas Clayton Murphy Cole Mark Owens Edgar Ernesto Perez-Lopez Phatson (Bee) Sitthisin Joshua Elias Steele Samantha Elizabeth Sumpter Tyson James Svetich

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

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FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

Students of Distinction/Class of 2013

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