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Sequim promoter, civic leaders discussing hot-air balloon fest D1

Peninsula Daily News $1.25 Sunday

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August 7, 2011

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SEATAC — The Washington State Labor Council voted Saturday to support a resolution asking officials and “friends of labor” to boycott the Sept. 14-18 Elwha dam removals celebration. The resolution was presented during the council’s convention in SeaTac, where the membership passed the resolution during its Saturday morning session, said Lee Whetham, the Olympic Peninsula Building and Construction Trades Council president who spearheaded the boycott effort. The Olympic Peninsula Building and Construction Trades Council is based in Clallam County and also has membership from Jefferson, Kitsap and Mason counties. The Washington Building and Construction Trades Council endorsed the resolution a week earlier. “Celebrate Elwha!” will be a cluster of mid-September events ranging from a science symposium to sunset cruises and concerts. Barb Maynes, Olympic National Park spokeswoman, and Russ Veenema, Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce executive director, both declined to comment on the passage of the resolution Saturday night, saying they wanted to review the resolution first. Turn

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IN COUPON SAVINGS $

Union will walk lines on day it sought strike

By Paul Gottlieb

By Arwen Rice

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Pickets planned at OMC

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is part one of a two-part series on more than $10 million in claims filed in the wake of the October death of Bob Boardman, who bled to death after he was gored by a mountain goat in Olympic National Park.

Labor group urges snub of dam fete

LOOK INSIDE!

$566

Hiker’s heirs say park knew of rogue beast

PORT ANGELES — Wrongful death and personal injury claims totaling $10,022,700 have been made against Olympic National Park over the death of Bob Boardman, and a full-blown lawsuit may be imminent, according to his estate’s lawyer. “We are intending to file a wrongful death suit,” personal injury lawyer John Messina of Tacoma said. He said the park is liable for Boardman’s death. “Negligence is the basis,” he said Friday. “Our goal is to seek jusBoardman tice in this case and wake up the park system.” Three claims were made. They are from Boardman’s estate; his widow, Susan Chadd of Port Angeles; and her son, Jacob Haverfield, Messina said, and were made as a prelude to likely filing the lawsuit

$10 million in claims over ONP goat death

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By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

A mountain goat is shown in Olympic National Park in the vicinity of Switchback Trail, where hiker Bob Boardman was killed by an aggressive goat last fall. against the park in federal District Court in Tacoma. Park officials would not comment on the claims, said Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman. The claims were served on park Superintendent Karen Gustin on May 1, Messina said. Boardman, 63, of Port Angeles was fatally gored by a 370-pound mountain goat while hiking on Klahhane Ridge with Chadd and their friend Pat Willits, also of Port Angeles, on the afternoon of Oct. 16.

“I feel like they weren’t protecting people and the ecosystem, and I feel that on the day of the accident, they responded very poorly to our calls for help,” Chadd said in an interview. According to Chief Park Ranger Colin Smith, the mountain goat had a history of “aggressive behavior.” Boardman had not acted aggressively toward the animal, according to park reports. Turn

to

PORT ANGELES — Olympic Medical Center union-represented employees plan to picket the hospital Thursday — the day they wanted to strike but were barred by a judge — to protest proposed labor contracts that raise health care costs and don’t guarantee minimum staffing. Service Employees International Union Healthcare 1199NW spokeswoman Linnae Riesen said the informational picket will start at 5 p.m. outside the hospital at 939 E. Caroline St. Nurses and other health care workers who are unionized will participate before and after their shifts and during breaks, Riesen said. Union members will make signs and a banner at 5 p.m. today at 721 E. First St., Suite 102, next to the KONP office, Riesen said.

Claims/A5

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Everyone’s in a Daze in Joyce Plenty of pie, whiskers, fun at celebration By Arwyn Rice

Peninsula Daily News

JOYCE — The streets were packed with visitors enjoying sunshine and plenty of blackberry pie Saturday during the 29th annual Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival. The celebration of the Joyce community, west of Port Angeles, and blackberries also offered a beard and mustache contest, a parade and an arts and crafts fair. Central to the festival was the blackberry pie contest, which welcomed 17 entries. Roxanne Olsen’s blackberry pie won first place, the judges’ unanimous choice. Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News The contest was judged by Tony Sample of Port Angeles, leads his mule, Mr. Murphy, as part of a contingent from Crescent School District Superthe Peninsula Back Country Horsemen in the Joyce Daze grand parade. intendent Tom Anderson, Crescent School Board Chairwoman Tracey Grover and Peninsula the best natural beard. Many visitors brought dogs, ALSO . . . Daily News senior writer and and some shared their blackIn the “anything goes” catecommentary co-editor Paul Gott- ■ Additional photos from berry treats with their canine gory, Dan Lieberman of Port Saturday’s Joyce Daze/C1 lieb. friends. Angeles took the top prize. Mac Hefton’s pie took second “They’re people, too, and they Parade enthusiasts began linplace, and an entry by Sharon Championship’s best beard went ing the parade route on state like blackberry pie,” said Patty Webb-Bauerman was awarded to Rick Broderson of Sekiu. Crawford, 51, of Seattle, who fed Highway 112 before noon to get third place. pie to her schipperke, Bob. Anthony Szabo of Clallam the best seats for the 1 p.m. One group that risked blackDogs were everywhere. BoxBay won the prize for best mous- parade. berry stains on their entries ers, golden retrievers, Shiba Inu tache. Old cars, horses, festival roywere contestants for the Beard and common mutts trotted hapTim Cella of Port Angeles was alty and local personalities and Moustache Championship, pily on leashes, enjoying the day determined to have the best goashone under the sun, greeted by held at the Family Kitchen reswith their owners. tee. cheers and friendly needling taurant. Rick Broderson of Sekiu had from neighbors and friends. The Beard and Moustache Turn to Joyce/A5

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Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C2 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C7 Movies C2 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Poll Puzzles/Games Sports Weather

A2 E6 B1 C8


A2

UpFront

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Detroit rapper charged after N.Y. concert

Court and released on $500 bail.

Stalking charge

French actress Marion Cotillard received threatening emails and videos RAPPER BIG SEAN from a New York City faces charges in upstate woman through a fan webNew York after a woman complained she was sexually site, law enforcement officials said. assaulted during a concert. FBI State park police charged agents said the 23-year-old Detroit rapin a court per with misdemeanor filing that counts of forcible touching, unlawful imprisonment and Teresa Yuan sent a sex abuse. Another Detroit man, Will­ie Hansbro, faces series of spooky mesthe same charges. sages in Police received the comCotillard July to the plaint Thursday at Artpark Oscar winner that included State Park in Lewiston, ramblings about wanting to downriver from Niagara play Russian Roulette with Falls. Anderson was perher. forming there with rapper “[W]ould you be willing Wiz Khalifa. Authorities won’t elaborate on the com- to play Russian Roulette?” the woman said, according plaint. to a complaint that was Big Sean and Hansbro unsealed Thursday in fedwere given Sept. 6 court eral court in the Eastern dates for Niagara County

District of New York. “If you weren’t willing and you had no choice, I’d say ‘yeah, that’s pretty unfair.’ But would you still like it that at least there’s only one bullet in this pistol?” Yuan faces a charge of interstate stalking. Her lawyer, Michael Schneider, told The New York Daily News he wouldn’t comment on the case. Yuan was arraigned Thursday and released on $50,000 bail. She was ordered to stay away from Cotillard and her fan website and barred from using Internet access outside her home or on any mobile device. Cotillard won an Academy Award in 2008 for her role as Edith Piaf in “La Vie en Rose,” appears in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” and has a role in the upcoming Batman sequel, “The Dark Knight Rises.”

Passings By The Associated Press

JOHN W. TEETS,77, the former CEO of the Dial and Greyhound corporations in Arizona, has died. Family spokesman Steve Roman said Mr. Teets died Friday night at his Paradise Valley, Ariz., home of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. Mr. Teets once headed several major companies in the 1980s and 1990s including The Dial Corp., a Scottsdale-based soap maker. He also was the chief executive officer of the Phoenix-based Greyhound Lines, the nation’s largest provider of intercity bus transportation. Greyhound Lines was sold in 1986, and the Dial Corp. was spun off into two separate companies that included the Phoenix-based Viad Corp. in 1996. Mr. Teets retired from the company in 1997.

_________

ANNETTE CHARLES, 63, an actress best-known for her role as Cha Cha DiGregorio in “Grease,”

has died. Longtime friend Tom LaBonge, a Los Angeles councilman, said she died in the city after a battle with cancer. She died Wednesday night, said her agent, Derek Maki. Her death comes a little more than two months after the death of “Grease” actor Jeff Conaway, whose character Kenickie was Cha Cha’s date at the school dance. Oozing a sultry confidence on film, Ms. Charles introduced her character at the dance by saying, “They call me Cha Cha, ’cause I’m the best dancer at St. Bernadette’s.” “With the worst reputation!” responded Frenchie, played by actress Didi Conn. Ms. Charles also appeared on many television shows during the 1970s and early 1980s, including “Barnaby Jones,” “The Bionic Woman,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “Bonanza,” “The Mod Squad,” “Gunsmoke” and “The Flying Nun.”

She later became a speech professor under her birth name, Annette Cardona, at California State University, Northridge.

Did You Win? State lottery results

Friday’s Daily Game: 1-3-0 Friday’s Keno: 01-0411-15-19-20-23-24-36-38-4243-44-47-62-66-70-72-74-78 Friday’s Match 4: 03-06-07-22 Friday’s Mega Millions: 06-24-28-33-42, Mega Ball: 19 Saturday’s Daily Game: 9-9-0 Saturday’s Hit 5: 04-06-13-20-37 Saturday’s Keno: 03-04-05-12-16-17-20-29-3840-41-42-43-52-60-65-66-7174-78 Saturday’s Lotto: 14-17-20-39-47-48 Saturday’s Match 4: 07-12-13-18 Saturday’s Powerball: 25-30-54-57-59, Powerball: 6, Power Play: 3

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) Prospect bits will begin probing deep under Hoh Head again this week as the Washington Gas and Oil Co. resumes operations. Malcolm Scott, veteran Peninsula driller, said in Aberdeen that he will be taking his drilling crew back to the mouth of the Hoh River to end a drilling shutdown of a few weeks. Well Kipling No. 1 has bottomed at less than 400 feet and at best has pumped and flowed at a 3.5-barrel per hour pace, he reported. Kipling No. 2, located up the road from No. 1, has been drilled to 550 feet without any appreciable showing of oil but a fairly strong show of natural gas,

Scott said.

1961 (50 years ago) Port Angeles police and firemen patrolled city streets last night in search of unnecessary watering after the city’s water reserve dropped to a danger level. The shortage developed after a two-day shutdown of the main water line from Morse Creek to the city’s storage reservoirs. The wooden line was exposed when the surface level of a peat bog lowered during construction of a new line and the water flow was shut down. Fearing the exposed old line would break under the water pressure, crews tied the wooden line to a log

spanning the bog and reinforced it. But it will take time for water reflowing through the line to refill Peabody Heights reservoir and others to acceptable levels.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Should the Washington State Labor Council and politicians boycott the Sept. 14-18 events noting the beginning of the Elwha River dam removals?

Yes 

No 

34.6% 56.4%

Undecided  9.0% Total votes cast: 769 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  Robert Fowler, 73, of Sequim — the founder of the Peninsula Dream Machines car club who has driven his Edsel in the Joyce Daze Grand Parade in the past — is alive and well. A report on Page C1 Friday quoted Bob Pensworth of Joyce as saying erroneously that the man who drove the Edsel in the past would be missed because he had been killed. Another man named Robert Fowler was shot to death in June in Port Angeles at the age of 63. The story also erroneously described Pensworth as webmaster of Joyce Daze. He is not. He is webmaster of www.joycewa.

Laugh Lines

TOP THINGS NEVER before said by a Superhero: An 11,000-year-old tooth n  “I got $400 worth of from an extinct species of groceries for just eight bison has been unearthed bucks thanks to extreme from a peat bog at the couponing.” Manis Mastodon Site near n  “You know, I origiSequim. nally wanted to be an event The molar about the planner.” size of a walnut was found n  “Aquaman and I are by Jeff Dugan, a student in moving to New York to get Peninsula College’s summarried.” n  “In a few years, Capmer archaeology class. tain America will be known The tooth was in sediment just above glacial till as Captain China.” n  “My weakness? Sara — the rocks and gravel left Lee cheesecake bites.” behind at the end of the David Letterman last glacial period.

1986 (25 years ago)

com, a community website. For more on the life of Robert Fowler, see Page A6. ■  In the past, a write-in candidate had to get 1 percent of the vote in a primary election to proceed to the general election. A report on Page A7 Friday incorrectly said that in the past, it took only one vote to move a write-in candidate to the general election. The point is moot now because a write-in candidate, just like other candidates, must be one of the top two vote-getters to move on to the general election.

__________

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots CROUCHING BEHIND A bush at the Port Angeles post office, a gentleman wearing surplus Army fatigues taking a “break” . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Aug. 7, the 219th day of 2011. There are 146 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Aug. 7, 1961, Yale psychology professor Stanley Milgram began conducting his famous — as well as controversial — human behavior experiments concerning obedience toward authority figures. In the experiment, supervised volunteers were fooled into believing they were punishing a “learner” in an adjacent room for answering test questions incorrectly by administering increasingly strong electrical shocks, though in fact there were no shocks. Most of the “teachers,” with verbal prodding, kept delivering what they thought were actual jolts even as the “learner” cried out in pain and banged on the door before falling silent. On this date:

■  In 1782, Gen. George Washington created the Order of the Purple Heart, a decoration to recognize merit in enlisted men and noncommissioned officers. ■  In 1882, the famous feud between the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky erupted into full-scale violence. ■  In 1911, movie director Nicholas Ray (”Rebel Without a Cause”) was born in Galesville, Wis. ■  In 1942, U.S. and Allied forces landed at Guadalcanal, marking the start of the first major Allied offensive in the Pacific during World War II. ■  In 1947, the balsa wood raft Kon-Tiki, which had carried a sixman crew 4,300 miles across the Pacific Ocean, crashed into a reef in a Polynesian archipelago; all six crew members reached land safely. ■  In 1959, the United States launched the Explorer 6 satellite,

which sent back images of Earth. ■  In 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin resolution, giving President Lyndon B. Johnson broad powers in dealing with reported North Vietnamese attacks on U.S. forces. ■  In 1971, the Apollo 15 moon mission ended successfully as its command module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. ■  In 1991, former Iranian Prime Minister Shapour Bakhtiar, 76, was slain, along with his aide, at his home in suburban Paris. ■  In 1998, terrorist bombs at U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania killed 224 people, including 12 Americans. ■  Ten years ago: Three researchers told a committee at the National Academy of Sciences they were unswayed by arguments against human cloning and would soon try to clone human beings. The Vatican denounced what it

called a “slanderous campaign” against the Roman Catholic Church over the actions of Pope Pius XII during the Holocaust. Harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler died in London at age 87. ■  Five years ago: Oil prices jumped after BP said it had discovered corrosion so severe it would have to replace 16 miles of pipeline at the huge Prudhoe Bay oil field in Alaska. Colombia’s President Alvaro Uribe was sworn in for an unprecedented second term. ■  One year ago: Elena Kagan was sworn in as the 112th justice and fourth woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. A healthy-looking Fidel Castro appealed to President Barack Obama to stave off global nuclear war in an address to parliament that marked his first official government appearance since emergency surgery four years earlier.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, August 7, 2011

Second Front Page

PAGE

A3

Briefly: Nation

U.S. suffers deadliest loss of Afhgan War Copter shot down; many from SEALs unit that got bin Laden The Associated Press

The Associated Press

This file image obtained by The Associated Press shows Cpl. Charles Graner Jr. appearing to punch a detainee in late 2003 at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad.

Ringleader in Abu Ghraib abuse released The convicted ringleader of detainee abuses at Abu Ghraib was released Saturday from the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Charles Graner Jr., 42, was released around 10 a.m. after serving more than 6½ years of a 10-year sentence, spokeswoman Rebecca Steed said. Graner will be under the supervision of a probation officer until Dec. 25, 2014, she said. Steed said she could not release any information about Graner’s whereabouts or his destination after release. Graner was an Army Reserve corporal from Uniontown, Pa., when he and six other members of the Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company were charged in 2004 with abusing detainees at the prison in Iraq. The strongest evidence was

photographs of grinning U.S. soldiers posing beside naked detainees stacked in a pyramid or held on a leash.

Today’s news guests ■ ABC’s “This Week” — Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley; Robert Ford, U.S. ambassador to Syria; author Gloria Steinem. ■ CBS’s “Face the Nation” — White House adviser David Axelrod; Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; and Howard Dean, former Vermont governor and ex-Democratic Party chairman. ■ CNN’s “State of the Union” — Steve Forbes, CEO of Forbes; Larry Summers, former White House economics adviser; California Gov. Jerry Brown; Anita Dunn, former White House communications adviser; former Rep. Tom Davis, R-Va.; Mike McConnell, former director of national intelligence. ■ FOX’s “Fox News Sunday” — Rep. Paul Ryan. R-Wis.; Bill Miller, chairman and CIO of Legg Mason Capital Management; presidential candidate Tim Pawlenty. ■ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., and John McCain, R-Ariz; former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan; Austan Goolsbee, former chairman, White House Council of Economic Advisers.

KABUL, Afghanistan — Insurgents shot down a U.S. military helicopter during fighting in eastern Afghanistan, killing 30 Americans — most of them belonging to the same elite Navy SEALs unit that killed Osama bin Laden — as well as seven Afghan commandos, U.S. officials said Saturday. It was the deadliest single loss for American forces in the decadeold war. The downing was a stinging blow to the lauded, tight-knit SEAL Team 6, months after its crowning achievement.

Setback for coalition It was also a heavy setback for the U.S.-led coalition as it begins to draw down thousands of combat troops fighting what has become an increasingly costly and unpopular war. None of the 22 SEAL personnel killed in the crash were part of the team that killed bin Laden in a May raid in Pakistan. The strike is also likely to boost the morale of the Taliban in a key province that controls a strategic approach to the capital Kabul.

number of coalition troops killed this year in Afghanistan and 42 this month. The overnight raid took place in the Tangi Joy Zarin area of Wardak’s Sayd Abad district, The Taliban claimed they about 60 miles southwest of downed the helicopter with a Kabul. rocket while it was taking part in a raid on a house where insur- Good cover for Taliban gents were gathered in the provForested peaks in the region ince of Wardak overnight. “Their deaths are a reminder give the insurgency good cover, of the extraordinary sacrifices and the Taliban have continued to made by the men and women of use it as a base despite repeated our military and their families, NATO assaults. An American official in Brusincluding all who have served in Afghanistan,” President Barack sels said the helicopter was a twin-rotor Chinook. Obama said in a statement. The casualties are believed to The U.S.-led coalition said in a statement that 30 American ser- be largest loss of life in the history vice members, a civilian inter- of SEAL Team Six, officially called preter and seven Afghan com- the Navy Special Warfare Develmandos were killed when their opment Group, or DEVGRU. The team is considered the CH-47 Chinook crashed in the best among the elite SEALs, early hours Saturday. A current U.S. official and a which have 3,000 personnel. The death toll surpasses the former U.S. official said the Americans included 22 SEALs, three previous worst single-day loss of Air Force air controllers and a dog life for the U.S.-led coalition in handler and his dog. Afghanistan since the war began The two spoke on condition of in 2001 — the June 28, 2005, anonymity because military offi- downing of a military helicopter cials were still notifying the fami- in eastern Kunar province. lies of the dead. In that incident, 16 Navy Geneva Vaughn of Union City, SEALs and Army special operaTenn., told The Associated Press tions troops were killed when on Saturday that her grandson their craft was shot down while Aaron Carson Vaughn, a Tennes- on a mission to rescue four SEALs see native, was one of the SEALs under attack by the Taliban. who was killed. Three of the SEALs being rescued The deaths bring to 365 the were also killed.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Hacker with ties to Europe hits U.S. sheriffs LONDON — The group known as Anonymous said Saturday it hacked into about 70 mostly rural law enforcement websites in the United States, a breach that Gassville, Ark., Police Chief Tim Mayfield said had leaked information about an ongoing investigation. The loose-knit international hacking collective posted a cache of data to the Web early Saturday, including emails stolen from officers, tips that appeared to come from members of the public, profiles of gang members, credit card numbers and other sensitive information. Last month, the FBI and British and Dutch officials made 21 arrests, many of them related to the group’s attacks on Internet payment provider PayPal Inc. Anonymous said it had stolen 10 gigabytes’ worth of data in all. The emails were mainly from sheriffs’ offices in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Mississippi. Many of the websites were operated by Brooks-Jeffrey Marketing, a Mountain Home, Ark., media services hosting company. Most, if not all, were either unavailable Saturday or had been wiped clean of content.

Libyan rebels attack BIR AYAD, Libya — Rebels launched a new offensive Saturday out of their stronghold in

Libya’s western mountains, battling regime forces in a drive toward the heartland of Moammar Gadhafi’s rule on the Mediterranean coast. The rebels are aiming to break a monthslong deadlock and eventually fight their way to the capital, Tripoli. Booms of shelling and rocket fire echoed from the front lines, centered around the town of Bir Ghanam, where the rebel force backed by tanks fought Gadhafi’s troops much of the day. Later, witnesses saw flattened buildings presumably targeted in NATO airstrikes and three smoldering government tanks in the town.

Miners targeted COPIAPO, Chile — It has been a bittersweet anniversary for Chile’s rescued miners, who were honored as heroes in their hometown only to come under attack by anti-government protesters who threw fruit and small stones at them, accusing them of being ungrateful, greedy sellouts. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera and his ministers joined most of the 33 miners Friday at a Catholic Mass and then the inauguration of a regional museum exhibit recognizing their remarkable survival story. But the events were marred by scuffles between riot police and students, teachers, environmentalists and other miners, all trying to make Pinera bow to their pressure on issues from reforming public education and increasing miners’ pay to stopping controversial dams and power plants. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Texas Gov. Rick Perry hosts a call to prayer for a nation in crisis Saturday in Houston.

Perry courts evangelicals, calls for prayers to fix nation The Associated Press

HOUSTON — Texas Gov. Rick Perry sent a strong message to the nation’s evangelicals Saturday: He is a member of the important constituency for Republicans that he soon may call upon to help him secure the GOP presidential nomination. Perry hosted what he called a national day of prayer, an event at Reliant Arena that drew roughly 30,000 people and that was broadcast on Christian cable channels and the Internet nationwide, including in at least 1,000 churches. “Father, our heart breaks for America,” Perry said in 12 minutes of remarks that included prayer and Bible passages — but no direct mention of politics or his

Quick Read

presidential plans. “We see discord at home. We see fear in the marketplace. We see anger in the halls of government and, as a nation, we have forgotten who made us, who protects us, who blesses us.” He asked Christians to turn to God for answers to the nation’s troubles and asked the audience to pray for President Barack Obama — though he did not use the Democratic incumbent’s name — as well as for the American troops killed in the weekend attack on a U.S. helicopter in Afghanistan. The moment gave Perry a national spotlight before a pivotal voting group in the GOP nomination fight — in the early voting states of Iowa and South Carolina in particular — as he nears a deci-

sion on whether to run for president. His entrance into the field could shake up the contest because Perry could attract both social and economic conservatives at a time when the GOP electorate is unsettled with the current slate of candidates. Many have been campaigning for months and are trying to break out of the pack. As Perry held court in Houston, for instance, former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann were holding multiple campaign events each day in Iowa ahead of next weekend’s test vote, a straw poll that is a barometer for a campaign’s organizational strength five months before the state’s leadoff caucuses.

. . . more news to start your day

World: Mexican villagers kill alleged gang members

World: U.S. economic woes could hit Venezuela

World: Police shooting death triggers London riot

World: Pocketbook protest by Israelis is biggest ever

DOZENS OF ARMED villagers in southern Mexico confronted members of a suspected crime gang in their home. A child, a woman and four men were killed in the resulting gunbattle. A statement Saturday from the public security chief for Oaxaca state said a town assembly voted to arm 90 of its members and sent them to detain the group allegedly behind cattle thefts, rapes and murders. The people in the house refused to surrender and opened fire first. Remote Mexican villages without a police presence sometimes engage in mob justice. But it is unusual for them to do so with weapons.

PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ said Saturday that Venezuela is not immune to the economic woes afflicting the U.S. and Europe despite efforts to distance itself from world powers and establish a socialist system. Chavez warned that economic problems around the globe would probably hurt Venezuela as international oil prices fall. Venezuela is one of the world’s top petroleum producers. But he added that the South American nation has partially protected itself by diversifying its economy and forging trade ties with countries like China and Russia.

THE GRITTY NORTH London neighborhood of Tottenham exploded in anger Saturday night after a young man was shot to death by police. Two patrol cars, a building and a double-decker bus were torched as rioters clashed with officers in front of the Tottenham Police Station, where people had gathered to demand “justice” for the death of a 29-year-old killed in an apparent gunfight. Shop windows were smashed as residents looted the stores, pushing shopping carts full of stolen goods down the street. Police said there were about 300 people gathered.

AT LEAST A quarter-million Israelis fed up with the mounting cost of living poured into the streets of the country’s major cities Saturday night to demand that their leaders address their plight. The snowballing protest, which started out three weeks ago with a few 20-somethings pitching a tent encampment on a posh Tel Aviv street, has swiftly become a big headache for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, seen by many middle-class Israelis as too friendly to big business. An aide to the Israeli leader said the government would soon devise a program to break the monopolies and cartels he blames for Israel’s economic ills.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, August 7, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Judge hopes to work during chemo By Charlie Bermant

week and is expected to last for 10 weeks. Chemotherapy will be followed by surgery to remove the tumor. His treatment is a joint effort between the University of Washington Northwest Hospital and Medical Center and the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Superior Court Judge Craddock Verser hopes to be able to work while he undergoes aggressive chemotherapy treatment to combat stage one pancreatic cancer. “I’m anxious to come back to work, although I don’t know when that will be,” Verser said Saturday. “Treatment will be for one day a week, and hopefully, I can work the other four. “But nothing’s certain,” he added. “With cancer treatment, there are a million ifs, ands or buts.” Stage one is the earliest stage of cancer. The most severe is stage four. Verser, 62, said he is in

Medical team optimistic

Craddock Verser Grateful many pitched in good spirits as long as his pain is managed. He has been working from home and emailing opinions about pending cases, he said. Treatment begins next

Verser said his medical team is optimistic, calling him “young and strong” in comparison with other cancer patients. He has been impressed by the treatment, which addresses nutritional and spiritual issues in addition to fighting the tumor. “I have never been in a hospital in my life,” he said. “This has been a new

Voter turnout at 22.66% for Clallam’s primary Peninsula Daily News

Voter turnout in the all-mail primary election grew to 22.66 percent in Clallam County by Friday. Out of 19,097 ballots issued, 4,327 had been returned, said Patty Rosand, Clallam County auditor. To be counted, ballots must be placed in a drop box by 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16, or postmarked by that date. Drop boxes are at Sequim City Hall at 152 W. Cedar St., Sequim Vehicle/Vessel Licensing at 1001 E. Washington St. and at the Clallam County Courthouse at 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Jefferson County vot-

ers had returned 27.25 percent — 5,948 out of 21,827 issued — by Friday. The Clallam County primary is being held only in Commissioner District No. 1 and involves 41.37 percent of the 45,927 active registered voters in the county. The boundaries of District No. 1 are from McDonald Creek to the eastern county line.

One contest Only one contest will be narrowed in the toptwo primary: the race for Sequim Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois’ seat in which the incumbent is challenged by Ron Fairclough and John Miller. The top two vote-get-

ters in the primary will advance to the Nov. 8 general election. In addition to the Sequim race on the Clallam County primary ballot, voters in District No. 1 will vote on the race between Sequim Democrat Linda Barnfather and Sequim Republican Jim McEntire for the Clallam County commissioner’s seat now held by Steve Tharinger, who did not run for re-election. That race also will be on the general election ballot and will be voted on by all voters in the county. Any voter who has not yet received a ballot should call the county Auditor’s Office at 360417-2221.

experience for me.” Verser, the Jefferson County Superior Court judge since 1994, went on vacation July 15. He was initially hospitalized July 19 in Kalispell, Mont., where he had traveled with his wife after her mother died. He was admitted to the Kalispell Regional Medical Center with a complex abdominal situation that included a suspicious spot on his pancreas, Moore said. He was released July 22 with medication and a care plan and returned home, but the symptoms recurred. The situation was determined to be too complicated for Jefferson Healthcare hospital, so Verser sought treatment in Seattle. During his absence, the judge’s chair has been occu-

pied by visiting judges from Kitsap and Clallam counties along with court commissioners, who can hear all trials aside from jury trials unless both parties agree to the substitution.

Visiting judges “I’m grateful for all the sacrifices and support from my fellow judges,” Verser said. Verser said his wife, Joyce, whom he married in February in a small courthouse ceremony, was his “savior” for her keeping track of his treatment regimen and getting him to appointments on time. He also singled out court administrator Michelle Moore for managing the court schedule and keeping people informed.

“Everyone has pitched in, and I want to thank them for that,” he said. Verser, a native of Virginia, arrived in Port Townsend in 1986 and began work as the ClallamJefferson public defender, according to his Superior Court biography. He practiced law in Jefferson County from 1991 to 2004, representing the Port of Port Townsend and serving as a part-time public defender during that time. Cards for Verser can be sent in care of Michelle Moore, Superior Court, P.O. Box 1220, Port Townsend, WA 98368.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Briefly: State No cases of salmonella from turkey

Center, which housed 9,000 Japanese-Americans, predominantly from Oregon, Washington, and Alaska.

bacteria like salmonella.

Internment marker

OLYMPIA — The state Department of Health said there have been no cases of salmonella in Washington associated with the recent recall of ground turkey from Cargill Value Added Meats Retail. Some of the recalled turkey was distributed in the state, but no illnesses related to that product have been reported. Consumers are advised to return any unused portion of the recalled meat to the stores where they bought it. Cargill products were distributed in Washington at Wal-Mart and WinCo. Health officials note that thorough cooking and safe handling and preparation of meat and poultry will kill

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND — A ribbon-cutting ceremony Saturday at Bainbridge Island marked the second phase of the development of a monument that marks the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. It’s a 276-foot-long wall — one foot for each of the islanders who were interned. The first phase of the memorial included walkways and a passenger dropoff area. Future phases will include an interpretive center and a pier at the site of the former dock where soldiers loaded residents on a ferry in 1942. The Bainbridge Island memorial is a satellite of the Minidoka National Historic Site in Idaho. It commemorates the Minidoka War Relocation

Pleads guilty JOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD — A soldier who tried to blow the whistle on a plot to murder Afghan civilians has pleaded guilty at his courtmartial to a charge of involuntary manslaughter in one man’s death. Spc. Adam Winfield of Cape Coral, Fla., is the second soldier to admit to participating in what the Army has characterized as an Afghan “kill team.” Winfield, 23, pleaded guilty Friday in a plea agreement to involuntary manslaughter and to smoking hashish. He was sentenced to three years in prison, demotion to private and a bad-conduct discharge. The Associated Press

Commissioners to open bids for Horizon Center Peninsula Daily News

The three Clallam County commissioners will open bids for the Horizon Center building Tuesday. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom (160) at the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Also on the agenda: ■  An agreement with the Longview Housing Authority for housing assistance to people with HIV and their families. ■  A contract with Peninsula Community Mental Health Center for services to adult unfunded clients. ■  An amendment with Cross Telecom Corp. extending the contract 36 months beginning July 28 and changing price and payment terms. ■  A revised agreement with the state Department

of Transportation obligating funding for Lake Crescent segments of the Olympic Discovery Trail. On Monday, the commissioners will hold a 9 a.m. work session in the same boardroom to discuss action items and a condition assessment and cost findings for the former City Hall building at 215 S. Lincoln St. An archaeologist told the Port Angeles City Council last week that the building needs $230,000 in repairs to keep it standing. On Tuesday at 1:30 p.m., the commissioners will attend the Olympic Area Agency on Aging hearing on its 2012-2015 plan.

Eye on Clallam

Bonneville Power Administration rate adjustments during a special joint meeting Tuesday. The two will meet at 3:30 p.m. in the Jack Pittis Conference Room in City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. On the agenda is discussion about a BPA notice for Tier 2 power supply and wholesale power rate adjustments, as well as industrial transmission electric rate ordinance amendments and the Stormwater National Pollution Discharge Elimination System and capital needs assessment study profesPort Angeles council/ sional services agreement. A report will be preutility committee sented on stormwater sysThe Port Angeles City tem modeling. Council and Utility AdviInformation will be presory Committee will discuss sented on the advanced metering infrastructure system, the wireless mobile data system and the Dry Creek Water Association easements. A closed door executive session is planned to disSteamer Automobiles

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Forks City Council

The Forks City Council will hear from a representative of the Border Patrol during its meeting Monday. The council will meet at 7:30 p.m. at 500 E. Division St. The Border Patrol representative will speak during the public comment period. The council also will discuss a letter to the Federal Aviation Administration about the issue of drag racing at the Forks Municipal Airport. It will consider munici- Port of Port Angeles pal code updates and appointments to the park Port of Port Angeles comboard of commissioners. missioners will consider commission redistricting Clallam PUD when they meet Monday. Commissioners will The three Clallam meet at 9:30 a.m. at 338 W. First St. They also will consider adoption of the 2012 budget calendar, hear a permit status report, consider a corporate hangar lease and the Sekiu Airport tree removal project and hear a financial AUTO | HOME | LIFE| RETIREMENT variance report. The commissioners plan to meet in a closed-door executive session.

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The Quillayute Valley School Board will review district priorities and goals when it meets Tuesday. The board will meet at 6 p.m. at 411 S. Spartan Ave. The board also will hear

Port Angeles schools The Port Angeles School Board will conduct a public hearing on the 2011-2012 budget when it meets Monday. The meeting at the Central Services Building, 216 E. Fourth St., will begin with a 6 p.m. executive session, followed by the budget hearing at 6:30 p.m. and the regular meeting at 7 p.m. The budget is expected to be adopted Aug. 22. Copies of the preliminary $36,814,806 budget can be picked up at the Central Services Building.

Conservation District Clallam County Conservation District commissioners will consider a partnership with the Agnew Irrigation District for the McDonald Creek Diversion Project when they meet Tuesday. The commissioners will conduct their monthly meeting at 3 p.m. at the USDA Service Center, 1601 E. Front St., Suite A, Port Angeles. Other new business will be consideration of pay schedule revisions, an interlocal agreement with the Jefferson County Conservation District and cooperator and cost-share agreements. Old business will include updates on the Graysmarsh and Sequim Valley Ranch lawsuit and the budget, as well as consideration of sponsorship of the Meadowbrook Creek Restoration Project. The commissioners will meet in a closed-door executive session to discuss personnel matters.

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County Public Utility District commissioners will consider approving a request for statement of qualifications for engineering firms interested in the design and construction services for the replacement of the Bluffs Well at its Monday meeting. The meeting starts at 1:30 p.m. in the commissioners’ boardroom at the PUD’s main office, 2431 E. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles. Other agenda items include a boundary line adjustment near the Laird’s Corner Substation and a resolution supporting House Bill 2124 and Senate Bill 5964, which narrow the requirement for utilities to purchase eligible renewable energy resources or credits that are not needed to serve customers’ loads.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Sunday, August 7, 2011

A5

Claims: ‘Irresponsible’ Continued from A1 tion Act request. The hiking party was sitThe mountain goat, which ting and eating lunch after severed Boardman’s artery, hiking on Switchback Trail stood over Boardman for when the mountain goat about 30 minutes, making it came up to them, circled impossible for Chadd to them at a close distance with reach him, according to park its head down, pawed the ranger reports of the inci- ground, made bleating noises and would not leave, Willits dent. Boardman likely died said in her written statewithin five minutes of being ment to the park. Boardman told Chadd gored, the reports said. Chadd said the park was and Willits to keep walking “very irresponsible” by sug- ahead of him, at times telling gesting that throwing rocks them to “keep going” while would ward off the animal the animal followed next to him, Willits said. that killed her husband. It followed beside him for The wrongful death claims include $5 million for up to a mile before it gored Boardman’s estate, him, according to park $3 million for Chadd and ranger reports. Rangers shot the moun$2 million for Haverfield. The personal injury tain goat dead the same claims of $22,700 include afternoon with 1-ounce shotexpenses for counseling ses- gun shells. A necropsy detersions, massage therapy, mined it was healthy. Boardman, a registered newspaper obituaries, emergency room procedures and nurse, accomplished guitarist, diabetes educator, artist funeral expenses. Documents about the and writer, was honored as a incident were obtained by hero at a memorial service the Peninsula Daily News attended by 350 mourners at under a Freedom of Informa- the Lower Elwha Klallam

Tribal Center. Maynes said Chadd’s claims were forwarded to the Office of the Solicitor, Pacific Northwest Region, U.S. Department of the Interior in Portland, Ore. Messina said the deadline for the park’s response is Nov. 1. Kelly Powell, an attorneyadviser in the Office of the Solicitor, said Interior intends to answer the claims. Options include an offer of settlement “to a simple letter acknowledging part of the claim or denying the claim,” Powell said. Messina said the federal government’s willingness to respond to such claims and to negotiate is “the exception to the rule.”

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Building

a dream

Tonja Linson of Port Angeles applies paint to a portion of the Dream Playground at Erickson Playfield in Port Angeles as Mike Downey, also of Port Angeles, paints a tower cupola in the background Saturday. Volunteers descended upon the playground for annual repairs and maintenance in a weekendlong effort. The popular play area will reopen to the public Monday.

On Monday: Had the same goat that killed Bob Boardman been aggressive toward him in the past?

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Unions: $324 million dams project largest in U.S. Continued from A1 which had to pay $32,721 in back wages to 19 workers The resolution, spear- building a water treatment headed by Whetham, said plant for the project for misthe $324 million dam remov- classifying their jobs, also als project — the largest in brought in workers from as the nation’s history — should far away as Guam to do work that could have been done by not be celebrated because the local labor. Park Service didn’t create a “With one voice, we ask in project labor agreement to support of the affected workgovern dam removal work- force that all friends of orgaers’ wages. nized labor boycott the “It is in support of the Elwha River celebrations,” injured 19 Watts Construc- said the proposed resolution tors employees,” Whetham he sent to the council. said Saturday. The proposed resolution Whetham said Watts, also asked that Washington’s

congressional delegation contact President Barack Obama about the lack of a project labor agreement. The wording may have been changed before it was adopted. The wording of the adopted resolution was not available Saturday evening. Workers will be paid prevailing wages for the area, a requirement of the federal Davis-Bacon Act, which governs wage structures for public works projects, according to the National Park Service, the lead agency for the project.

Samantha Richardson, a spokeswoman for the Park Service’s Denver Service Center, has said prevailing wages exceeded $31 an hour for power equipment operators, $35 an hour for carpenters and $40 an hour for electricians. Whetham said a project labor agreement would guarantee that workers not be misclassified on a pay scale lower than what they should be. Barnard Construction Co. Inc. of Bozeman, Mont., won the $27 million, three-year

contract to tear down the Glines Canyon and Elwha dams, beginning Sept. 17. Company project manager Brian Krohmer has estimated that the company will have 12 to 14 of its own workers, about half of those administrative personnel, out of an estimated 40 workers at the peak of construction. Krohmer said local subcontractors include Bruch & Bruch Construction Inc., Northwestern Territories Inc., Straits Electric, Pacific Office Equipment Inc., Star

Welding & Wrenching, N C Power Systems and United Rentals, all of Port Angeles, and D&H Enterprises of Forks. Tear-down of the Glines Canyon and Elwha dams on the Elwha River is expected to last three years. The Elwha River Restoration Project is intended to restore salmon habitat.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com.

Pickets: Union threatened 18-hour strike Aug. 11 Continued from A1 SEIU Healthcare 1199NW — which represents 205 nurses, 120 service workers and 38 dietary workers at OMC — threatened to conduct an 18-hour strike Aug. 11. A Kitsap County Superior Court judge granted OMC a two-week temporary restraining order to stop the strike Wednesday and set a hearing Aug. 17, the day the order expires, on enjoining the union from striking “during the pendency of this action.” The court found the strike was illegal.

OMC officials said it would have cost $600,000 to hire and train 150 replacement workers to work from 6 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Mediated contract talks resumed Thursday with no settlement.

Union proposals “We brought forward new counter-proposals to hospital management, but they didn’t have any response for us,” said Ginny Majewski, a registered nurse at OMC, in a union statement. “We still haven’t reached agreement on our key issues of affordable health care for our families and guaranteed

Joyce: Parade Continued from A1

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“Unlike the picketing SEIU conducted on April 6, we have not been given the courtesy of any advanced direct notice,” Curry said, noting that Thursday is the same day the union originally had planned to strike. “The hospital district will maintain normal operations on Aug. 11 the same as it would any other day of the week,” she said. “While an unusual occurrence, informational picketing does not alter our No. 1 priority: We are here to pro________ vide our patients with needed care and services. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be They are depending on us. reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. “We expect that all ollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

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more than 10 percent in 2010 alone, OMC officials said OMC officials said the union’s staffing-level claims are unfounded, saying they work closely with employees through unit-based staffing committees to analyze capacity data and trends. The union staged a picket at OMC in April to make the same grievances. The current three-year collective bargaining agreements expired in October. Rhonda Curry, assistant administrator for strategic development, released a statement after learning of the picket late Friday.

scheduled staff will report to work. We anticipate that any picketing will be conducted on public sidewalks only and that access to and from our facilities will not be impeded.” OMC officials said they are facing unprecedented financial challenges and need to control costs so as to keep health care affordable for patients. “Despite these challenges, we look forward to advancing a fair settlement that protects the interests of our patients,” Curry said. “Negotiations with SEIU are ongoing. We remain committed to negotiating a fair settlement for employees but cannot allow the medical center to be pressured — whether through threat of an illegal strike, lawful picketing or other labor tactics — to enter into agreements that would force this public hospital into deficit spending.”

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Under OMC’s proposal, employees who work at least four days a week would continue to receive full health care coverage. They would be asked to pay $95 per month more for their children’s medical premiums and $17 per month more to insure a spouse. Changes to medical benefits would be made equally for managers and executives. OMC spends 60 percent of its net revenue on salaries and benefits, CEO Eric Lewis has said. That ratio is 52 percent at most hospitals in the Seattle area, he has said. The average hourly wage for an OMC registered nurse has risen from $38.19 in 2007 to $43.20 in 2010. Nurse wages rose by

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The North Olympic Peninsula is a very dog-friendly area; dogs are welcome almost everywhere, she said. She, and Jock, appreciates it, she said. Bringing dogs along for festivals and other events also provides dog owners some quality time with their dogs, said Philbin’s sister, Margaret Philbin, 64, of Sequim. Terrie Kaplan, 60, of Bellingham brought her ________ border collie, Olivia. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be “She’s one of the family reached at 360-417-3535 or at — my other child,” Kaplan arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com. said.

OMC proposal

“We are here to provide our patients with needed care and services. They are depending on us. We expect that all scheduled staff will report to work. We anticipate that any picketing will be conducted on public sidewalks only and that access to and from our facilities will not be impeded.”

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A group of teenagers gathered under the Joyce General Store porch roof, taking turns holding a snuggly dachshund puppy. The friendly wagging tails helped grease the wheels of greetings among strangers. Bernadette Philbin, 51, of Sequim brought her Scott­ish terrier, Jock. “It get people talking to you more,” Philbin said.

Parade winners were: ■  Best in Show — Clallam County Fair royalty float. ■  Royalty Choice Award — Sequim Irrigation Festival float. ■  Chairman’s Choice Award — 1937 Packard, owned by Will Gluth. ■  Wild Blackberry Award — Poulsbo Vikings. ■  Most Congenial — Eaglet. ■  Best float — Forks Old-Fashioned Fourth of July. ■  Best patriotic theme — Korean War veterans. ■  Best youth group — Girl Scouts of America. ■  Best novelty group — Happy Tymers clowns. ■  Best antique/old car — 1940 Ford Coupe, owned by Allan Wang. ■  Best antique/old tractor — 1954 Chevrolet log truck, owned by Dick Admundson. ■  Best car club — Strait Air Volksgruppe.

staffing minimums to improve patient care. “We’re still committed to settling a fair contract, but right now, the hospital hasn’t confirmed any additional bargaining dates with us.”

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Man assures friends he’s not dead By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Robert Fowler was busy Friday telling his friends he isn’t dead. A report in the Peninsula Daily News on Page C1 Friday quoted Bob Pens­ worth of Joyce as saying that Fowler, who had driven his restored Edsel in the Joyce Daze parade in the past, would be missed this year because he had been shot and killed in Port Angeles in June. He wasn’t. The Robert Fowler who was killed in June was 63 years old, moved to Port Angeles from Salem, Ore., about a year and a half ago and lived at 209 E. Vashon Ave. in Port Angeles.

Joyce Daze parade Satur­ day in his trademark Edsel, riding with his dog, Willie. His other Edsel isn’t ready for the road yet, Fowler said. “I have a new engine in it now,” he said, but he has to add an exhaust system. He’s also planning some “fancy bucket seats.”

Glad he’s alive

Pensworth’s confusion upset him — but he was glad to learn that Fowler was indeed alive. “My wife and I knew Bob Fowler, and we were shocked when we heard of the death,” Pensworth said. “I’m so happy to find out that he’s still among us and that he’s still going to be driving his antique cars. “To see those cars beau­ Joyce Daze tifully restored reminds me of our history. The Robert Fowler who “I really admire what has in past years driven his he’s doing in keeping his­ Edsel in the Joyce Daze tory alive.” Grand Parade is 73 years old, comes from a North Founded car club Olympic Peninsula pioneer family, founded the Penin­ His love of Edsels is the sula Dream Machines car reason Fowler founded the club and lives in a mobile Peninsula Dream Machines home park on the west side 20 years ago. of Sequim. “I had an Edsel when I How did Robert Fowler started the club,” he said. of Sequim feel about read­ “I was trying to find a ing about his own death? club to belong to, and I “That’s not so bad,” he couldn’t find any. said Friday. “I met a guy who had a “When you get to be this red Chrysler.” age, when you look at the The two talked about obituaries first — well, vintage cars, including mine was on a different Fowler’s white Edsel, and page,” he said philosophi­ Fowler asked his new cally. acquaintance if he knew of “I tell everybody I ain’t any car clubs in the area. dead.” “He said, ‘No. Why don’t Fowler said he had you start one?’” fielded eight to 10 phone So Fowler founded the calls from concerned club in September 1991, he friends. said. Fowler made it to the The club has eight char­

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Robert Fowler of rural Sequim, with his dog, Willie, stands next to his two vintage Edsels on Friday. ter members, and its mem­ bership has grown to more than 100, Fowler said. He prepares the club’s monthly newsletter and said the latest edition went to 149 people. Each year, the club con­ ducts a fundraising event for a worthy cause. This year, that cause is money for the Shane Park playground. The Shane Park Play­ ground Committee is work­ ing with the city of Port Angeles to come up with the $130,000 needed to install a state-of-the-art play area at the west Port Angeles park.

PORT ANGELES — The investigation into the killing of Robert Fowler of Port Angeles in June remains open and active, said Deputy Chief Brian Smith. The 63-year-old man was allegedly fatally shot by his neighbor, Bobby Smith, 58, while in Smith’s home June 20. Bobby Smith was not arrested in connection with the shooting. He has not been charged with a crime. According to initial reports, Bobby Smith phoned dispatchers at 1:25 p.m. June 20 to say he had been involved in a shooting

with a neighbor. Fowler lived next door to Smith at 209 E. Vashon Ave. “We’re actively working the case,” Deputy Chief Smith said, saying that all five detectives and several officers on the police force have worked on it.

State Patrol helps The State Patrol also assisted. “It’s a major investiga­ tion,” Deputy Chief Smith said. “We reach out as wide as we need to to complete the investigation.” Deputy Chief Smith said the department is

lacking some of the ballis­ tic and forensic test results from the State Crime Lab, “which is pretty normal in a case like this.” He also said the depart­ ment is working closely with the Clallam County prosecuting attorney. Karla Pennington, Fowler’s fiancee, said he had moved to Port Angeles about a year and a half ago from Salem, Ore. They were planning to wed within a couple of months, she said. “I was used to talking to him every day, and now I don’t have that anymore,” she said. “He was a wonderful guy.”

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PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula Dream Machines car club expects more than 100 cars at a fundraiser in September for the Shane Park playground, said a club organizer. It will help the Shane Park Playground Committee raise money for a state-ofthe-art play area at the west Port Angeles park. The latest fundraiser, which began Saturday and continues today, is at Swain’s General Store at 602 E. First St., Port Angeles. Members of the play­ ground committee are sta­ tioned at Swain’s for a bicycle raffle and fundraiser for the playground campaign. The committee is working with the city of Port Angeles to come up with the $130,000 needed for playground equip­ ment. The city has set aside $60,000 for the project. Before this weekend’s fundraiser, the committee had raised another $21,000 through a series of commu­ nity fundraisers over the past year. The new playground will be 111 feet by 57 feet and feature several slides, climb­ ing areas, swings and a safety surface. Volunteers are raffling off a Baja mini bike and Mon­

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Bob Love of Port Angeles, left, purchases tickets for a raffle from Julie Reandeau of Port Angeles to benefit a drive to purchase playground equipment for Shane Park on the west side of Port Angeles. goose trick bike at Swain’s. The committee also will have a booth at the Clallam County Fair from Aug. 18-21. The car club’s event, planned from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, at the park in the 1300 block of West Sixth Street, will be more than a car show, said Ed Upton, Peninsula Dream Machine car club past presi­ dent and organizer of the event. He said the Shane Park Playground Committee will offer games for children. There will be a raffle and live music, he said, and KONP Radio will broadcast

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live from 9 a.m. to noon. Vendors will sell items related to cars, and he expects speedboats to be on display. “It’ll be fun,” Upton said. “Everybody’s welcome, and it’s free to attend.” Upton expects some 110 to 150 vintage cars at the show, among them cars from Oregon and from the I Cruis­ ers car club from Parkers­ ville, B.C. Registration is $15 per car. All proceeds will go to the playground fundraising effort. A full breakfast is planned for each of the car drivers who also are invited to par­ ticipate in a poker run the day before, Upton said. The car club with the most cars present will win $100. Trophies will be given in several categories, he said. The car club always has its annual show in Septem­ ber. For more information about participating in the September event, phone Upton at 360-452-4837. Donations for the play­ ground equipment, with checks made out to the Kiwanis Club, can be mailed to Shane Park Playground, P.O. Box 1064, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

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Fowler has lived in the area most his life. “My family came here in 1888, so I’ve been here awhile,” he said, leaving only to attend high school in Oregon and to try life briefly in Los Angeles. ________ He worked in construc­ tion much of his life and Managing Editor/News Leah operated a secondhand Leach can be reached at 360-417store known as Bob and 3531 or leah.leach@peninsula Willie’s — named for him dailynews.com.

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Family came in 1888

and his dog — that he closed about five years ago. He and the late Robert Fowler of Port Angeles are not the only men with that name in the area. Fowler also has a 51-year-old son named Rob­ ert Fowler. “There’s another Bob Fowler here, and that’s my son,” he said. His son lives not far from the home of the Bob Fowler who died in June.

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“So I called her and said we wanted to do a fund­ raiser.” The fundraiser will be Sept. 25 at the park.

Club to help raise park funds

Investigation into death continues Peninsula Daily News

Fowler wanted the club to help out for a personal reason. Shane Fowler, for whom the park is named, is his son. Shane died at age 9 in 1973 in a construction mis­ hap when the park was being built. Janet Young, Shane’s mother — who is now presi­ dent of the fundraising committee — is Fowler’s exwife. “My ex-wife wanted equipment” for the park across the street from her home at 1331 W. Sixth St., Fowler said.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

A7

A DC-8 like the one to fly low over Quillayute Airport is shown in 2005.

By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

LOCAL BUYER

Walkers with the Forks Relay For Life stroll through downtown Forks at the junction of East Division Street and Forks Avenue on Friday evening.

Briefly: State Two men skin 16-foot-long roadkill python SEDRO-WOOLLEY — Two Sedro-Woolley men were driving down a road when they noticed something that turned out to be a dead 16-foot-long python. Lino Silva and Nick Pfeifer told the Skagit Valley Herald they skinned it and plan to use the skin to make a jacket or a vest. They said they learned how to skin a python by

watching the Discovery Channel.

Train accidents STEILACOOM — Two men have been killed in Washington train accidents in less than 24 hours. On Friday at around 9:30 p.m., a pedestrian was hit in Kent by a northbound Amtrak train, said Burlington Northern Santa Fe spokesman Gus Melona. On Saturday just before noon, another pedestrian was hit and killed by a northbound freight train near the ferry terminal

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in Steilacoom. Train traffic was delayed for about three hours after the accident. Identification for neither man has been released. Melonas urged members of the pubic to be careful near train tracks and to remember that trains can move on any track in any direction at any time. The Associated Press

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idea, and so they are flying over Washington state instead. Once the design is completed, a C02 sensor will be installed in a satellite to be launched around 2018 or 2020, Brockett said. NASA calls the program by the acronym ASCENDS, which means Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days and Seasons. It’s intended to “provide improved ability to predict/ model long-term changes in the climate cycle based both on the understanding of the natural processes driving the variability of natural carbon sources and sinks, and on the transport of carbon through the atmosphere,” NASA says on the website, http:// decadal.gsfc.nasa.gov/ ascends.html.

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FORKS — A “flying laboratory” testing components destined to become part of a satellite measuring carbon dioxide in the planet’s air will dip over Quillayute Airport today. People in the Forks area may see the white and blue DC-8, a massive jet with a wing span of 150 feet that was an airliner before NASA acquired it, descending in a spiral over the Quillayute Airport at about 1:45 p.m. It won’t land. It will come down to about 200 feet above the runway and then pull up and away, heading north, said Bill Brockett, a research pilot with NASA at Edwards Air Force Base in Palmdale, Calif., on Saturday. Others on the North Olympic Peninsula aren’t likely to see anything remarkable, he said, since he and the other pilot of the four-engine jet will be flying high, like any airliner. The 26 people onboard are flying from Edwards Air Force Base to test five remote sensing laser-based instruments over the snow and ice fields in the Cascades and the Olympics, Brockett said. The instruments were developed to measure CO2 in

the planet’s air, which isn’t now done from satellites, Brockett said. “It’s like a competition to see which one can be perfected and do the best job,” Brockett said. “Some will probably fly; some will be eliminated.” The components measure carbon dioxide in the air by sending out light and measuring the differences in the light reflected back to pinpoint the chemicals in the air, Brockett said. Today’s test is to see how snow and ice fields reflect back the light. The dip over Quillayute Airport is to get a “reality check” by pulling in air samples in real time at the surface and comparing the measurements to the results from remote reading instruments. This allows researchers to calibrate the instruments. Originally, researchers planned to test the components over glacier fields in the panhandle of Alaska and southeast of Anchorage, but bad weather squelched that

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

FLOOR MODELS

‘Flying laboratory’ to dip over airport

257151 Highway 101 • 452-3366

In Tough Times We All Need to Give A Little, Including SEIU OMC has been the locally owned and operated hospital for our neighbors on the North Olympic Peninsula for more than 60 years. And we’d like to stay that way. But the truth is, the recession and reductions in Medicare and Medicaid are hitting us hard – our costs are increasing and our income is down. The course we are on is not sustainable. In tough times, we all must give a little. And during our current negotiations with SEIU, we’re asking them to do just that. OMC nurses and health care workers will still earn some of the highest wages in the county and won’t pay a dime for their own health care. OMC is proposing a cost-share of medical benefits for children similar to what most other hospitals already have in place. In times like these, we think that’s fair. And we hope you do, too.

We’re all in this together.

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Go to www.OlympicMedical.org and click on “Negotiation News”, or email Management@OlympicMedical.org with your comments.


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Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

A9

Victoria, PA closer Court to reconsider Ressam sentence than one thinks EDITOR’S NOTE: Jack Knox, a regular columnist for the daily Times-Colonist of Victoria, a PDN news partner, visited Port Angeles last week and filed this report. By Jack Knox

Victoria Times Colonist

PORT ANGELES — “You know Robin Farrell?” I have just gone waaay up in Jessica Kahler’s estimation. T h e 21-year-old, p a r k e d behind the counter at Port Angeles’ Dazzled by Twilight store, is Knox addicted to Victoria’s KOOL-FM (107.3) and won’t listen to anything else. Loves Farrell and morning co-host Brian Bailey. Kahler’s colleague, Brandon Doran, on the other hand, tunes in to The Zone (91.3 FM).

Ferry terminal Down by the MV Coho ferry terminal, Toby Applegate says he prefers Ed Bain and The Q (100.3 FM). Up the hill at Port Book and News, Alan Turner has found a spiritual radio home: “We listen to the CBC [90.5 FM] a lot.” Here’s a news flash for Victorians who smugly take Yankee ignorance of all things Canuck as a sign of Canadian superiority: Our neighbors on the Olympic Peninsula are far more plugged in to us than we are to them. They listen to our radio, watch our TV and, yes, even buy the Times Colonist at Turner’s bookstore.

If weather permits “If I want a weather forecast, I’ll check Victoria,” said Mary Beavers, standing in a First Street antique store where The Ocean (98.6 FM) played in the background. “You’re a closer neighbor to us than anyone else.” Port Angeles, population 19,000, is just 18.7 miles across the Strait from Victoria (close enough to make out the Canada Day fireworks) but isolated from everywhere else, giving its residents a unique relationship with us. The Olympics loom to the south (Victorians have a magnificent national park on their doorstep; it’s just in someone else’s nation) while Seattle is two hours

all You can eat

to the east. Nothing lies to the west except the vampires and werewolves of Forks, the focal point of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight novels. The result is a place that feels close to us, both geographically and culturally, but still separate, comfortably familiar yet unmistakably American. Safeway sells wine, gas is $3.69 a gallon, and the old courthouse has a clock tower straight out of “Back to the Future,” but other than that, Port Angeles is Duncan. (Retiree-heavy Sequim, by contrast, is Sidney, but with a marina named after John Wayne.) Selling points to visitors include the park, the Victoria-Seattle link and Meyer’s vampire saga. Twilight tourism has faded but is still big, tweenage girls flocking to places mentioned in the books, which have sold more than 100 million copies worldwide.

in Chinatown. Applegate, who lives in Sequim, goes to White Spot. His wife, Candi Applegate, had so many visitors who wanted her to take them to Butchart Gardens that she bought an annual pass. “Everyone does the Strathcona,” says Andrea Walden Morden, a server at Bella Italia. Victoria is more than just a quick getaway, though. The Applegates come up to go square dancing. Ball teams cross the border, too. A surprising number of Americans come here for medical and dental work. A few years ago, Victoria carved out a nice niche trade in pharmaceutical tourism. Americans would sail in, get the Canadian equivalent of their U.S. prescription at a walk-in clinic, then have it filled at a downtown pharmacy.

Bella Italia

The difference between Canadian and U.S. drug costs could more than pay for the trip. “We used to go for the dental,” Candi Applegate said. “But the money’s changed now,” Toby added. Right, the money. The once-anemic loonie has nosed past the U.S. dollar, making us less of a bargain. Passport requirements have thickened the border, too. Still, international travel means a lot to our neighbors. “On any given night, 20 [percent] to 25 percent of the rooms in Port Angeles are occupied by people using the Coho,” says Russ Veenema, executive director of the local chamber of commerce. Veenema is keen to lure more traffic the other way with events like today’s Ride the Hurricane, when cyclists will have the steep climb of Hurricane Ridge Road all to themselves. Don’t just stand on Dallas Road and look at the Olympics, he says; come over and explore. Learn as much about them as they know about us.

It’s Groundhog Day every night for the chef at Port Angeles’ Bella Italia, turning out order after order of mushroom ravioli, the dish consumed there by the series’ fictional heroine. The guestbook in the Dazzled by Twilight souvenir store is filled with names from Taiwan, Australia, Holland, everywhere. “This town got put on the map because of Twilight,” says Kahler. Victoria was a regular field trip destination when Kahler was in school. “It was my favorite place to go.” The Royal B.C. Museum, the Imax, the Legislature (“The best part was looking up at the ceiling”) and, of course, the candy stores. Many on the Olympic Peninsula have a favorite Victoria haunt. Aboard the Coho, Trisha McMahon raved about the Pink Bicycle’s poutine with rosemary gravy. When Cindy Turner comes over to run a half-marathon, she brings a Tupperware container and loads up on barbecued pork from Wah Lai Yuen

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SEATTLE — The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will once again consider whether the 22-year prison sentence imposed on would-be millennium bomber Ahmed Ressam by a federal judge in Seattle was adequate. Ressam, now 42, w a s arrested in Port Angeles after he arrived aboard the MV Coho Ressam ferry from Victoria in a rental car loaded with bomb-making materials Dec. 14, 1999. It was later revealed Ressam was on his way to bomb Los Angeles International Airport on Jan. 1, 2000. Last year, a divided three-judge panel of the court voted to reject the sentence imposed — for the second time — by U.S. District Judge John Coughenour, questioning his impartiality and saying the sentence failed to protect the public from the alQaida-trained terrorist. An order by Circuit Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, issued last week, vacated that ruling and sent the case to be reheard by a larger panel of judges. Coughenour presided over Ressam’s trial in the spring of 2001. Ressam later credited the fairness of the proceedings when he decided to cooperate with federal authorities after he was convicted of attempting to bomb the Los Angeles airport. Ressam became a crucial source of information about al-Qaida in the months after the Sept. 11 attacks, and as a result, federal prosecutors ini-

T

he Department of Justice told the judge that prosecutors in New York had been forced to drop charges against two other terrorism suspects — including the man believed to be al-Qaida’s chief recruiter in Western Europe — whose prosecutions turned on Ressam’s testimony. tially suggested a sentence of around 35 years for crimes that could have resulted in life in prison, including a count of conspiracy to commit an act of international terrorism. Sentencing guidelines suggested a 65-year sentence.

2005 sentence Prosecutors appealed when Coughenour first imposed the 22-year sentence in 2005. Ressam has been held in solitary confinement and over years of repeated questioning had soured on his cooperation. When the case was sent back to Coughenour for a procedural error in 2008, prosecutors urged the judge to impose the life sentence, saying Ressam had reneged on his deal. Ressam, in the meantime, fired his lawyers and recanted everything he had ever said. The Department of Justice told the judge that prosecutors in New York had been forced to drop charges against two other terrorism suspects — including the man believed to be al-Qaida’s chief recruiter in Western Europe — whose prosecutions turned on Ressam’s testimony. Even so, Coughenour imposed the same sentence, saying the information Ress­am provided when he was cooperating almost certainly stopped other attacks and

saved lives. The government appealed that sentence, which resulted in last week’s order. Last year’s 72-page ruling said Coughenour’s decision failed to protect the public. Ressam, an Algerian who trained with al-Qaida in Afghanistan, already has completed nearly half of his sentence and will be 53 years old when he is released. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle, which handled Ressam’s prosecution, declined to comment. Federal public defender Thomas Hillier, who has represented or advised Ress­am since his first court appearance in 1999, applauded the court for granting his request to reconsider the earlier decision, which not only exposed Ressam to many more years in prison, but also stripped Coughenour, the trial judge, of the case. “We were concerned about its impact on the evolution of federal sentencing, as well as how it might impact Ahmed,” Hillier said. “We’re grateful for another shot at it.” Emily Langlie, spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle, said the rehearing is “the next step in holding Mr. Ressam accountable for his crimes.” Ressam is reportedly being held in a solitary confinement cell two stories underground at the “supermax” federal penitentiary in Florence, Colo.

Port Angeles Downtown Association Clallam County Historical Society

Heritage Days August 12 - 14 Horseless Carriage Club of America Show corner of Laurel and First St. Friday 11 am - 2:30 pm Heritage Harbor Tours produced by Expeditions Northwest Friday and Saturday 10:30 am - 12:30 pm $15 Saturday 6 pm - 9 pm $25 (light appetizers) Reservations required by August 9th - go to www.expeditionsnw.com or call 452-6210 Murder Mystery Follow the clues to solve the murder of a Port Angeles resident in 1914

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elling points to visitors to Port Angeles include the park, the Victoria-Seattle link and Stephanie Meyer’s vampire saga. Twilight tourism has faded but is still big, tweenage girls flocking to places mentioned in the books, which have sold more than 100 million copies worldwide. Many on the Olympic Peninsula have a favorite Victoria haunt.

The Associated Press and Peninsula Daily News

PLANNED POWER OUTAGE

Snapshots From Our Past photo show Friday 6 pm - 9 pm Saturday 10 am - 6 pm, Sunday 10 am - 4 pm Studio Bob Historic Guided Walking Tours Each hour starting at 10 am until 4 pm Saturday 10 am until 2 pm Sunday $12 adults, $10 children - Tickets at Landing Mall Self-guided Driving Tours of Historic Homes Maps available at Landing Mall

PUD No. 1 of Clallam County

Guided tour of Queen of Angels School

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Free Clallam County Courthouse Clock Tower Tour 10 am Saturday only (meet at Lincoln Street entrance)

There is a planned outage required to conduct line and substation maintenance on Sunday, August 14, 2011.

Model T and Historic Car show across from the fountain Saturday Kid’s Carnival 10 am - 4 pm at the Downtown fountain Saturday

The outage is planned between 12:01 A.M. and 6:00 A.M., and will affect all customers in the Forks area, Jefferson County south of Forks, LaPush, Beaver, Sappho, Sol Duc, and the west side of Lake Crescent.

Artisan Demonstrations at the fountain Saturday Steam Ball at Masonic Hall 8 pm - Midnight Saturday Featuring Abney Park live in concert

If you have any questions, please contact: Quimby Moon at 360.565.3210 or 1.800.542.7859, Ext 210 or info@clallampud.net

Old Style photos at Sterling Impressions Friday and Saturday

Thank you for your patience.

Vintage Steam Machine across from fountain Sunday

185129326

For a full listing of all the events and activities visit www.portangelesdowntown.com

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Tea with Teddy Luncheon 1 pm Sunday Elks - Limited Tickets $20 Available at Rissa’s Consignment, Odyssey Bookshop & Elks


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, August 7, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A10

Mom’s adventure with the remote WHEN MY MOTHER calls and says, “Do you have just a second?” I know I’d better find a comfortable chair because this is going to take awhile. “Your dad and I want to W. Bruce watch a DVD, and I can’t Cameron remember how to make it work,” she says. “OK,” I say. “Is the DVD player on?” “Should I turn it on?” “Yes, that would probably help.” “OK. Do I use the DVD remote or the TV remote?” “The DVD remote.” “Or, what’s this? This is the cable remote.” “The DVD remote.” “Is this . . . there’s another one here, what’s this one?” “Use the DVD remote.” “OK. The DVD remote. What button do I push?” “The one that says power.” “OK, I pushed it.” “What happened?” “The lights went out on the DVD player.”

“Oh, OK, that means it was already on. Push the button again.” “I don’t remember turning it on.” “Push the button again.” “Would I have had to turn it on to put in the DVD?” “Yes. Push the button again.” “OK, I did. The lights came on and then went off.” “Did you push the button twice?” “I did what you told me.” “OK, push the button again.” “Again?” “Push the button again.” “OK.” “Do you see lights on the DVD player?” “Yes.” “And what do you see on the TV?” “A duck.” “A duck?” “A goose. Some sort of animated thing.” “Is it the movie you wanted to watch?” “No! That’s really funny. No, the movie has Al Pacino. Is that his name?” “OK. Get the TV remote.” “Do you ever watch this? You like animation.” “Mom. How can I know what

Speaking Out

show you’re watching? I can’t see what’s on your TV.” “Well I can’t either.” “You can’t see it?” “I mean, I don’t know what show it is.” “Point the TV remote at the TV and push the button that says ‘Menu.’” “OK. Whoa! Now there’s text all over the screen!” “Those are menu selections. What do they say?” “Well, I don’t know.” “What do you mean?” “When I saw the words, I pushed the menu button again, and they went away.” “Why did you push the menu button twice?” “You had me push the DVD button twice.” I sigh. “You’re right. OK. Push the menu button once, then read me the words you see.” “It says, ‘Signal, External Input’ . . . ” “External Input. Highlight External Input and push Select.” “OK. Whoa!” “What happened?” “The dog just about knocked me over.” “Are you OK?” “Of course.” “Did you push select?”

“I can’t remember.” “What does it say on the screen?” “Nothing.” “Nothing? Did you push menu again?” “No. Let me ask your father.” “Wait, why?” “He took the remote. He said he was getting impatient. Bill! Do you want to watch the movie or not?” “Was he able to get the DVD working, then?” “He says he doesn’t care if we watch the movie. But I do. It’s got that actor in it, Mel Gibson. Do you like him? He was so good in ‘Da Vinci Code.’” “He . . . you mean Tom Hanks?” “Who? Was he in the ‘Godfather’ movies?” “No, that was Al Pacino.” “What did I say?” “You said Mel Gibson.” “Well, that’s not what I meant. Who played Indiana Jones?” “That was Harrison Ford.” “OK, not him.” “Mom, why don’t you either hand the phone to Dad or have him give you the remote back?” There’s a loud rustling sound, and then my father comes on the line.

“Hello?” he barks gruffly. “Hi, Dad, I’m trying to help you get the DVD going. Do you have the remote?” “Me? No, I handed it back to your mother.” “Why did she give you the phone, then?” “I don’t know, she traded it for the remote.” “Maybe you should give her the phone back.” There’s a rustling sound and my mom comes back on. “Hello?” “Hi, Mom, so what’s on the screen now?” “The movie!” “What? You got the DVD player working? How?” “I don’t know, I was just pushing buttons.” “Well, if you don’t know how you did it, how will you watch DVDs in the future?” “Oh, that’s simple,” she says brightly. “I’ll just call you!”

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/pdnbcameron.

What do you think about the Border Patrol’s increased presence here?

Joe Offutt

Benette Sanner

George Deacon

Perrilinn Antioquia

Robert Cuello

Tonia Tucker

Dave Burrows

Ann Kortman

Retired law enforcement Forks

Teacher Port Townsend

Retired hospital lab manager Port Townsend

Medical assistant Forks

Landscaper Port Angeles

Residential adviser Port Angeles

Minister Sequim

“I agree with it, since I’m living in Forks. The Border Patrol makes Forks a safer place.”

“It uses up too much taxpayer money. They went way overboard. Maybe a dozen agents is better. We’re not like the Mexican border. Canadians come and spend money here.”

“I feel it’s a waste of money. The incident in Forks where a man drowned trying to escape them is so sad. They should leave regular people alone. We are all human.”

“Someone must see that there are problems around here that are worse than years ago. If there are problems, then the Border Patrol is a good thing. Also, it’s a job for someone.”

Retired radiology technician Port Angeles

“I’m shocked at the Border Patrol’s increased presence. I wonder what the intent and purpose is. It certainly makes me more aware of my surroundings.”

“I’m for the Border Patrol, but they’re overstaffed now. Those resources could be used other places. Years ago, we did just fine with three agents. Have things changed that much?”

“The Border Patrol is here to protect our borders, and I welcome their presence. I hope they continue to do a good job . . . and keeping illegals out.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Get a mammogram

mammogram when there is dense tissue. I have breast cancer, The mammography and I would like to tell my report will give information story. on your breast tissue. Last year, I found a Also, you can check with lump in my breast and your doctor. immediately called and (I acquired this informamade an appointment with tion from watching “The my medical provider. Dr. Oz Show.”) It was time for my My doctor at Swedish annual mammogram, so I told me all breast lumps scheduled it. should be biopsied. My doctor received my So insist on a biopsy. results by the time I had All lumps are not maligmy appointment a few days nant, but it’s best to be later. safe. The report showed no Linda Beard, evidence of cancer. Port Angeles Although I didn’t detect any changes, this year my ‘Wrong conclusion’ annual mammogram did. I had a biopsy perRegarding a July 31 formed, which confirmed letter, “Delayed Objections,” that it was cancer. [former Clallam County It was the same lump Districting Commission with an off-shoot of another Chairman] John Marrs tumor. misunderstood my objecMy message is: If you tion to the Clallam County have dense breast tissue, redistricting results as I have, insist on an [“Redistricting Rethinking ultrasound. Sought,” July 26 PDN artiStatistics show that cle]. about 35 percent of cancers As I stated clearly in the go undetected with just a Port of Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

commission meeting of July 25, I have no quarrel with the process led by Mr. Marrs. I am confident the commission charged with recommending new districts that reflect approximately equal populations based on new census data did its job correctly and with integrity. Mr. Marrs jumped to the wrong conclusion. My concern is that as the population of Clallam County shifts eastward, new district boundaries dilute the representation of economic and cultural interests of the West End, since most of the voters in the new West End district do not live and work there. If the county were one homogeneous population from west to east with similar interests, this would not be an issue. Clallam County is fortunate enough to encompass a great diversity of interests — Sequim, Port Angeles and Forks have distinct perspectives — and giving

Our readers’ letters, faxes voice to all three regions in countywide affairs is important. This is especially true of economic issues. The port district is countywide, and the port’s primary mission is to facilitate economic prosperity in the entire county. Many ports in Washington state operate with elected commissioners from district boundaries that do not correspond to county commissioner districts. These reflect specific economic interests or regions. Perhaps one way to ensure diverse regional representation at the Port would be to create additional districts within the county. Expanding from three commissioners to five might provide a better balance of representation of diverse interests, although at additional cost to taxpayers. John M. Calhoun, Forks Calhoun is the Port of

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

Follow the PDN online

Peninsula Daily News

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by

Dave Logan

“I haven’t really noticed it lately. I used to live on a boat and saw the Border Patrol a lot. I’m a landlubber now. I know there are problems, but with so many agents, it’s overloaded.”

and

Steve Mullensky

and email

Port Angeles commission president. He represents West End District 3.

Council ‘lemmings’ Port Angeles City Council member Pat Downie was wrong when he said, “I feel like we have a hammer over our heads at [Ecology]. It’s always our skin that gets bruised.” (“Paying For Sewage Overflow Project Permit Mulled By PA,” July 24 PDN). The council should not pass the buck to Ecology. The City Council approved this project on the Strait of Juan de Fuca shoreline to the Rayonier mill tank. The council was handed documents that showed the consultant inflated the project costs and that staff keeps massaging costs upward, now exceeding $4 million just for consultant fees. The majority of the council members consistently approve these never-

ending costs. It is the city’s project, not Ecology’s. Any wrong belongs to the council. It is the council that can stop these neverending costs. This city unnecessarily taxes each household and business, at a minimum $8,500 over a 20-year period for this project. Council could stop this project and direct staff to invest in natural forms of handling and cleaning stormwater and upgrading city stormwater and sewage-piping systems. These steps would stop sewage overflows. Municipalities throughout the nation and the world use these methods and save enormous funds. Some do not even charge their citizens. Earlier this year, the City Council on a majority vote passed an ordinance that no longer allows shoreline permit appeals to the City Council. Turn

to

Voices/A11

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 dering aimlessly in the parking lot — but had to Yet council is asked to stifle a chuckle as he said, fund the very projects on “It’s those Californians.” which it is ignorant. I said: “What?” Bottom line: Staff leads, And again he said: “It’s most council members folthose Californians. They do low like lemmings. it all the time.” So, council, stop passing The reason for the stithe verbal buck and stop fled chuckle was that I approving the monetary have just recently retired bucks the public cannot to the North Olympic Penafford and for projects you insula myself — from Calidon’t want to know details fornia. about that differ from what Thank you for the glowyou are spoon-fed. ing endorsement and the Darlene Schanfald, stifled chuckle — which I Sequim quickly let become out-andout laughter as he walked Schanfald is with the out of hearing distance. Olympic Environmental Shopping cart retriever, Council. now proudly of Port Angeles, VIMO clinic Glen Muir, Port Angeles I just want to say “Yahoo!” to the Volunteers in Medicine of the OlymBeing a ‘martyr’? pics for starting an emerIf you are thinking about gency dental clinic. publicly chastising your This is wonderful news. boss and/or your employer, Even if a person has be sure you can prove (with dental insurance, it’s not documentation) there is a always affordable in this law or laws being violated economy, but for people before you go public. without insurance, it’s a [“‘Black Hole’ For Borvery painful nightmare. der Patrol” Whistle-blower VIMO clinic is once again answering the needs In D.C. Alleges Peninsula Waste,” July 31 PDN]. of this community. This applies to anyone You are all wonderful. Rose Dailey, who is dissatisfied with a Port Angeles boss or job assignment. If you are simply disThose Californians gruntled about some aspect of your job and/or your job A recent shopping trip assignment(s), then probatook me to the Costco in Sequim, and the first thing bly you should seek private, honest, legal counsel I encountered was an errant shopping cart (a pet on the pros and cons of speaking your mind overtly. peeve of mine). The possibility of being I muttered something terminated, being given no derogatory about the lazy so-and-so under my breath promotions or being given even worse job assignas I pushed it toward its ments is just not worth the proper destination. risk, especially if you have As I reached the store family responsibilities. entrance, a fellow shopper These “15 minutes of approached and said he would take it from me as I fame” may haunt you for a began to express my long time. disdain at finding it wanIt’s cynically called

being “martyr for a day.” Sadly, after working for 55 years in the private sector and in the federal government, I have seen many examples of this illthought-out, publicly expressed emotion, most of which ended in unwanted consequences. For example, remember what happened to Anita Hill in her confirmation testimony about Clarence Thomas, who is now a Supreme Court justice? She might have been right, but she had no proof. This is a word to the wise. Richard Hahn, Sequim

‘Gestapo-like’? We appreciate the article in the July 31 PDN article [“‘Black Hole’ For Border Patrol? Whistleblower In D.C. Alleges Peninsula Waste”] calling attention to the overstaffing of the Border Patrol in Clallam and Jefferson counties. We are seeing them everywhere. And since there obviously isn’t enough real work for 40 agents, we have been told that they are monitoring responses to 9-1-1 calls. As a result, residents who are (or look) Hispanic, regardless of their legal status, are afraid to call for emergency help. Imagine needing an ambulance, police protection or the fire department and not knowing if calling for help will result in you or your family members being hauled in for extended questioning by the Border Patrol. Is this the kind of country we have become? We are very uncomfortable having a Gestapo-like

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Sunday, August 7, 2011

A11

and email

they are including all benefits and taxes paid in addition to wages. The average nurse does not see anything even remotely close to $100,000 a year in a paycheck. Per capita personal income for 2009 (the latest year available) in Clallam County was $35,852. That is per capita — Yay PA! every man, woman and On behalf of the Babe child in the county. Ruth Baseball League, I Obviously, a significant would like to say how number of these people are much I appreciate the city not in the workforce and of Port Angeles and its local Babe Ruth League for receive little or no income. If we look at the workhosting the recent 16-18 Pacific Northwest Regional force of Clallam County (29,670) and not the overall Tournament. population (71,021), sudThe hospitality, firstclass facilities and gracious denly registered nurse wages are not out of line volunteers made the tour(http://tinyurl. nament a memorable experience for all involved. com/3cebtgw — Page 71). Given the amount of Bill Peterson and his tournament staff — with a money going to capital lot of support from the city expenditures, it is impossible not to view OMC’s of Port Angeles — set the actions as a cynical ploy to bar extremely high for other future hosts to follow. seize upon a weakened economy in order to squeeze You have a beautiful concessions out of its staff. community, and I’m sure This fight is not about many like me will take the pay raises. opportunity to visit again It is about protecting in the near future. Butch Hert, one of the few sources of The Dalles, Ore. decent middle-class jobs left in this county and about patient safety. Hert is the Babe Ruth That is why we voted League Pacific Northwest overwhelmingly (by a 19:1 16-18 commissioner. margin) to approve a strike. Clifton Brown, OMC ‘misleading’? Forks In a full-page July 31 PDN advertisement, OlymBrown is a registered pic Medical Center made a nurse at Olympic Medical number of statements that Center. were misleading. Space will not allow for Quit complaining a full rebuttal. Olympic Medical Center OMC stated: “The averworkers need a reality age annual wage in Clalcheck — free health care lam County is about benefits for employees and $33,000. For an average children is a luxury that full-time RN, OMC pays most people haven’t over $100,000 annually in enjoyed for many years. wages and benefits.” When they say this, I have worked for large agency roaming our gentle byways looking for people to haunt. Perhaps, as Congress searches for ways to reduce the federal budget, it can start with an overblown department like Homeland Security. Jack and Jan Forrest, Port Townsend

entities for most of my career, including a hospital, and have had to pay a portion of the cost of health insurance — for myself (not including children) since 1995. Anyone complaining about a reduction in pay during these times of high unemployment clearly doesn’t understand how fortunate he or she is to have a paycheck coming in at all. If people actually had to pay the outrageous costs of health insurance, medications, treatments, procedures, etc., themselves, maybe they’d start taking more responsibility for their own health care. Maybe they’d start questioning what’s really necessary. Maybe they’d even start asking: Why is it that we’re all so sick? Beth Loveridge, Port Angeles

‘Rogue’ cashier So, one rogue [Clallam County Treasurer’s Office] cashier stole all that money [“Ex-Treasurer’s Cashier Guilty. Jury Convicts Her Of Stealing Up To $793,595,” July 28 PDN]? After two years under a microscope, the cops still can’t find it? That suggests either they’re not looking very hard or somebody else stole three-quarters of a million dollars of public funds. I’m not bragging, but I know a loan shark who could find that money in less than 10 minutes. In China, they execute officials over this kind of corruption. Show me the money. This thing should have been turned over to the FBI. John DeBoer, Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week IT’S GREAT TO hear the chimes on the [Clallam County] Courthouse clock again!

. . . and other Raves A HUGE RAVE to our community for its continued support of the 4-H 11th annual Kiss the Pig Contest. Also a rave to the participating Sequim and Port Angeles veterinarians. We could not do it without them. Thank you all for helping keep 4-H in Clallam County. RAVES TO THE officer in the unmarked vehicle who caught a speeder on one of the main arterials in Port Angeles. Nice to see officers keeping the city streets safe and not just U.S. Highway 101.

This is your true calling. A BIG RAVE for Sarah, Jim and Hilary, who managed to pull off for the second year running a celebration for the Class of 1985 in Sequim. They had an awesome time connecting on Facebook, and it just was an awesome time for them to pull together — two times in a row, and they loved it. A HUGE RAVE and thankyou for the nice young man who returned my bag of greeting cards to Hallmark that I accidentally left in my Safeway shopping cart in Sequim. A RAVE ABOUT the paving done from the east part of town [Port Angeles] going out west on U.S. Highway 101. It’s sure nice and smooth. Too bad we couldn’t have the same contractor do First Street. It’s a lot like a goat trail through there. HUGE RAVES TO the groundskeeper and crew that take care of Civic Field [Port Angeles]. I have attended the past two baseball tournaments, and the perfectly groomed field was amazing. What a great impression for out-of-town visitors. Great job!

RAVE TO SANDY Sinnes, who is marvelous! She taught me so much about the importance of physical activity and how it affects my blood sugars. Sandy is patient and kind! She has a great sense of humor and is a true expert in her A BIG RAVE to Sequim’s field. public worker, Kathy Ann, and Thanks, Sandy. Please conthe guy on the mower for cutting tinue to help all of us.

back the brush on West Sequim Bay Road. Now, city buses are staying in their own lanes, and we can spot the deer along roadway.

window for handicapped, and you’re not. What’s wrong with you? Shame on you.

A PRIME EXAMPLE of the poor driving habits in the area was stated as fact in a July 31 Rant of the Week rant. No, you may not assume TO ALL GUYS out there: either lane when making a leftAny public restroom I visit hand turn at a green light. seems to have a large amount of Please re-read the Washington urine that doesn’t hit the mark! state drivers manual. While I’m appreciative of conYou must, in fact, turn into venient plumbing for doing No. 1, the left lane. I’m appalled at the lack of control If clear, use your turn signal exhibited and disregard for basic and move over into the right sanitation. lane. It’s a pretty easy process. If you can’t manage it, sit EDITOR’S NOTE: Many down already! thanks to all the ranters who pointed out the error. Here’s Clallam County Deputy . . . and other Rants Prosecuting Attorney Lewis M. Schrawyer on how to correctly RANT TO THOSE who give make this kind of turn: unsolicited advice. The July 31 Rants & Raves Sometimes, folks just want to included a rant from a person feel heard and understood and who claimed the vehicle turning find their own solutions. left at an intersection could turn Trying to fix other people is into either lane, so other drivers just condescending! had to yield. Fix yourself, instead. This is incorrect. RCW 46.61.290 (2) requires a BIG RANT TO the people driver turning left to enter the who park their cars in handileft lane so that other traffic can capped parking places. utilize the right lane. If you aren’t handicapped, get It is a traffic infraction for a your car out of that spot. driver to turn into the outer lane That’s for people who truly when turning left. need to be there. And those people drive with THIS IS A huge rant. the parking permit in the Where are the cops?

Gasman Road in Port Angeles is nothing but a race track. I guess the cops could care less. I WISH SOMEBODY would tell these government people that they cannot park on private property and walk all over your land. They may think they’re God, but they’re not. MY RANT IS: I can’t figure how they want guardrails on level ground when they’re short of money. There at North Barr and Gunn roads and Old Olympic Highway, they’re putting up guardrails. (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A12

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, August 7, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

On NFL

North Olympic splits Kuch’s walk-off hit gives team much-needed win Peninsula Daily News

LAMAR, Colo. — The North Olympic all-star bats caught fire at just the moment in the first day of the 16U Babe Ruth Softball World Series on Saturday. Hours after seeing its offense go silent in a 2-0 loss to Lodi, Calif., North Olympic came up with a dramatic 9-8 walk-off vicThe Associated Press

NFL Comissioner Roger Goodell, left, and NFLPA Executive Director Demaurice Smith stand together before signing their collective bargaining agreement at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, on Friday.

SCOREBOARD Page B2

tory over host Lamar, Colo., to keep its Series hopes alive. Tori Kuch nailed a walk-off RBI triple to cap a wild five-run seventh inning as North Olympic rallied to avoid going 0-2 in its first two games of pool play. North Olympic (1-1) will next play Lancaster, N.H., today at 11 a.m., before closing out pool play

Monday with a game against Fern Creek, Kent. “That was a game we had to have,” North Olympic coach Warren Stevens said of the Saturday night win. “We watched the other two teams [in the pool] and they are pretty damn good. “Our offense was dormant, but they showed resilience in the last inning when we had to have it.” Indeed, North Olympic had scored just four runs in 13 innings prior to the bottom of the seventh barrage against Lamar.

16U World Series Trailing 8-4 entering the frame, the 16U all-stars got triples from Madison Hinrichs, Raelyn Lucas and Ralena Black Crow before Kuch stepped to the plate with the game on the line. Coming up with the score tied and two outs, Kuch responded with a drive that went all the way to the fence and scored Kearsten Cox from first base for the game-winning run. Turn

to

All-stars/B4

Spit ball pitcher?

Testing a step in right direction IF THE INITIAL returns in from Congress are any sign, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and union chief DeMaurice Smith scored a big hit by agreeing to blood tests for human growth hormone. That’s important because one Tim of the reasons both pushed for Dahlberg HGH testing was to get politicians in the nation’s capital off their backs. They seem to have succeeded, with influential California Democrat Henry Waxman quickly weighing in to congratulate all parties involved with a “welcome breakthrough in the campaign to rid sports of the scourge of doping.’’ I wouldn’t go that far because, even with a blood test, the odds of catching anyone using HGH are remote. A player tested after, say, a morning practice would have almost had to shoot himself up just before breakfast to test positive. But a breakthrough is a breakthrough even if in the near term it’s largely a symbolic one. Until Goodell and Smith signed off on their deal no major sport had any plans for blood testing, though baseball has been randomly testing the blood of minor leaguers for the last year or so. Now the NFL will have it by opening day — or at least Goodell hopes. There are some details still to be cleared up, namely concerns by players about how the tests will be conducted, how many there will be and how appeals will work. Just how they are settled will determine whether blood testing will be an effective deterrent or just a public relations gimmick.

Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles’ Janson Pederson sticks out his tongue as he delivers a pitch while teammate Taylor Milsap looks on in the Port Angeles 12-year-old team’s first game Saturday at the 14th annual Dick Brown Memorial Baseball Tournament at the Lincoln Park fields. The two-day tourney attracted 19 teams — four from Port Angeles — to compete in three age divisions. It ends today with winner bracket games at 4 p.m.

M’s youth puts hurt on Halos The Associated Press

Less resistance Still, the fact that athletes in the nation’s most popular sport agreed to have blood taken from their arm by a needle — there is no urine test for HGH — shows how far the pendulum in drug testing has swung in organized sports. Those whose mission is to rid sports of performance-enhancing drugs aren’t exactly dancing in the streets over the agreement. They still see lots of possible holes drug cheats can run right through. For now, though, they’ll take it. “To put in a test is certainly a win for clean athletes,’’ said Travis Tygart, executive director of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. “How big a win will be the next question once details of how it will be implemented are released.’’ Goodell and Smith gave little indication what those details would be when they met Friday in Canton, Ohio, to sign the 300-page collective bargaining agreement that will be in place over the next decade. But it was notable that Smith later told the league-owned NFL Network that blood testing for HGH was necessary for the integrity of the game. Turn

to

Dahlberg/B3

The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks’ Marcus Trufant (23) walks with his teammates during a training camp sessions Monday in Renton.

Out on an island Seattle secondary may make or break season The Associated Press

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks didn’t completely revamp their secondary from last season, but the depth of Seattle’s defensive backs is younger and bigger. A year after ALSO . . . the Seattle ■ Browner Seahawks gave up 60 passes of gets NFL 20 yards or redo/B3 more, the second-highest total in the NFL and five more than any other playoff

team, John Schneider has taken a pass on several high-talent cornerbacks who hit the free agent market and opted instead to stick with the young defensive backs that he and head coach Pete Carroll drafted in the last two years. “I think it’s great,” he said. “I’m really excited about it. The size, the strength — you got some guys that are big and can run. “I think when you look at that defensive backfield right now, there’s a lot of young guys out there that look fast and big and strong and tough.”

Next Game

Thursday vs. Chargers at San Diego Time: 5 p.m. On TV: ESPN

What they are not is experienced, beyond starting cornerbacks Marcus Trufant and Kelly Jennings. The 31-year-old Trufant has lost a step along the way, and the 175-pound Jennings struggles to keep up with bigger receivers. Fifteen-year veteran safety Lawyer Milloy was not asked back to the team, and with Schneider’s proclamation that he’s “happy with our young guys,” things could change further. Turn

to

Hawks/B3

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Far out of playoff contention, the Seattle Mariners have turned to a youth movement as they bank on the future. Blake Beavan and Trayvon Robinson are two reasons for optimism. Beavan pitched in and out of trouble Next Game through eight Today i m p r e s s i v e vs. Angels innings, Robin- at Anaheim son hit his first Time: 12:35 p.m. major league On TV: ROOT homer in his second game up from Triple-A, and Seattle beat the Los Angeles Angels 5-1 on Saturday night. “We’re going to make some young mistakes from time to time, but they’re going to learn from it,” manager Eric Wedge said. “They’re starting to understand that and they’re taking ownership of it, too.” Former Angels postseason star Adam Kennedy hit a tworun double for the Mariners, who are 6-3 since a franchise-record 17-game losing streak. The victory was only their third in their last 20 games at Angel Stadium. Beavan (3-2) allowed a run and eight hits, struck out two and walked none in his sixth big league start. The 22-year-old right-hander has pitched into the seventh inning in every one of them. Turn

to

Mariners/B4


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Aug. 4 Men’s Club Medal Play Individual Event Gross: Mike DuPuis, 68; Mark Mitrovich, 69. Net: Keith Lawrence, 63; Frank Randall, 65; Ray Dooley, 66; Dennis bourget, 67; Jerry Hendricks, 67; Gary Murphy, 68; Rick Hoover, 68; Bobby Lehman, 70; Gene Middleton, 70; Andy Duran, 70; Jack Morley, 70; John Pruss, 70; Darrell Vincent, 70; Harry Thompson, 70; Curtis Johnson, 70. Team Event Gross: Mike DuPuis and Mark Mitrovich, 62; Mike DuPuis and Rob Botero, 64. Net: Ray Dooley and Gary Murphy, 57; Dick Goodman and Gary Murphy, 59; Keith Lawrence and Jim Root, 59; Lawrence Bingham and Frank Randall, 59; Bernie Anselmo and Gary Murphy, 61; Andy Duran and Jack Morley, 61; Darrell Vincent and Pat Covey, 61; Jerry Sparks and Frank Randall, 61; Win Miller and Curtis Johnson, 61; Andy Vanderweyden and Doug Tissot, 62; Ray Dooley and Dick Goodman, 62; Rudy Arruda and Jack Morley, 62; John Pruss and Pat Covey, 62. SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Aug. 3 Men’s Throw Out Three Worst Holes Flight 1 (0-18) Gross: Jay Tomlin, 56. Net: Lee Cox, 48; Bill Wheeler, 49; Tom Fitzgerald, 50; Fritz Field, 50. Flight 2 (19 plus) Gross: Ken Orth, 19. Net: Michael Lawrence, 45; Ray Aldrich, 50; Bob Greer, 50. CEDARS AT DUNGENESS Aug. 4 Merchant League Team Points 1. AM Systems 28 2. McAleer Team USA 27 3. Raske Insurance 26 4. Eagle Home Mortgage 23 5. Dungeness Golf Shop 21.5 6. Kettel’s 76 21.5 7. America’s Finest 21 8. Eric’s RV Repair 20.5 9. Mischmidt 20 10. Phil’s Cabinets 18 11. Jamestown Aces 17.5 12. Stymies Bar and Grill 15.5 13. Dungeness Plumbing 15 14. The Alternates 13.5 15. Bigg Dogg 12 16. Olympic Synthetic 5 Individual Results Low Handicap Division Gross: Sid Krumpe, 32; Robert Bourns, 37; Ken Chace, 38; Robbie Bourns, 39; Rob Wright, 39. Net: Gary Kettel, 32; Everett Thometz, 33; Jason Hoffman, 34; Darren Stephens, 35; Steve Lewis, 35. Closest to pin: Hole No. 4 Low Handicap Division Gary Kettel, 8 ft. 3 in. High Handicap Division Bill Bailey, 7 ft. High Handicap Division Gross: Mike McAleer, 40; Levi Larsen, 45; San D Sparks, 47; Phil Yurjevic, 47; Rob Onnen, 48; Josh Francis, 48. Net: Kirk Gries, 30; Gerad Nucci, 31; Diane Gange, 31; Rick Vennetti, 32; Coleen Berry, 32. Closest to pin: Hole No. 8 Low Handicap Division Konrad Sutterlin, 6 ft. 2 in. High Handicap Division Jane Walker, 10 ft. 3 in.

Softball Aug. 4 Purple Division Port Angeles Hardwood 21, The Daily Grind 12 Olympic Power Painting 11, California Horizon 8 Port Angeles Hardwood 18, Olympic Power Painting 15 California Horizon 10, Shirley’s Cafe 5 The Hanger 7, The Daily Grind 1 Shirley’s Cafe 12, The Hanger 9

Baseball Mariners 5, Angels 1 Saturday’s Box Seattle Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi ISuzuki rf 4 1 1 0 MIzturs 3b 4 0 1 0 JaWlsn ss 4 1 2 0 Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 2 1 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 2 0 Carp dh 4 1 1 1 Abreu dh 4 0 1 0 AKndy 1b 3 0 1 2 V.Wells lf 4 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 0 2 1 HKndrc 2b 3 0 1 0 FGtrrz cf 4 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 4 1 1 0 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 0 Roinsn lf 3 1 1 1 BoWlsn c 3 0 1 1 Totals 32 5 8 5 Totals 33 1 8 1 Seattle 202 0 00 100—5 Los Angeles 000 0 00 100—1 E—Seager (2). D—_Seattle 2, Los Angeles 1. LOB—Seattle 3, Los Angeles 6. 2B— Ja.Wilson (4), Carp (6), A.Kennedy (18), Abreu (20), Bo.Wilson (5). HR—Robinson (1). SB—I.Suzuki (29), Bourjos (15). CS—Olivo (4), Tor.Hunter (6). IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Beavan W,3-2 8 8 1 1 0 2 League 1 0 0 0 1 0 Los Angeles Chatwood L,6-8 6 1/3 7 5 5 1 6 Ho.Ramirez 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 Cassevah 2 0 0 0 1 2 HBP­—by Chatwood (A.Kennedy). WP—Beavan 2. Umpires—Home, Dale Scott; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, CB Bucknor. T—2:33. A—42,017 (45,389).

Angels 1, Mariners 0, 10 innings Friday’s Box Seattle Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Ichiro rf 4 0 2 0 Aybar ss 5 0 0 0 JaWlsn ss 4 0 0 0 Abreu dh 4 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 4 0 1 0 TrHntr rf 5 1 3 0 Carp 1b 4 0 1 0 V.Wells lf 5 0 1 1 AKndy 3b 4 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 2 0 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 4 0 3 0 C.Wells dh 4 0 1 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 1 0 FGtrrz cf 2 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 Roinsn lf 3 0 1 0 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 MIzturs ph 1 0 0 0 BoWlsn c 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 0 7 0 Totals 37 1 10 1 Seattle 000 000 000 0 —0 Los Angeles 000 000 000 1—1 No outs when winning run scored. DP­—Los Angeles 3. LOB—Seattle 4, Los Angeles 12. 2B—Tor.Hunter 2 (18). C—Carp (2).

The Associated Press

Head

first

Los Angeles Angels’ Bobby Wilson slides into second base safe as Seattle Mariners’ Jack Wilson can’t make the tag in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game in Anaheim, Calif. The Mariners won 5-1.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL American League

American League Texas LA Angels Oakland Seattle

W L 63 51 62 52 50 63 49 63

PCT GB .553 - .544 1 .442 12.5 .438 13

Boston NY Yankees Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore

W L 69 43 69 43 59 53 57 56 44 66

PCT GB .616 - .616 - .527 10 .504 12.5 .400 24

Detroit Cleveland Chicago Sox Minnesota Kansas City

W L 61 52 56 55 54 58 51 62 48 65

PCT GB .540 - .505 4 .482 6.5 .451 10 .425 13

WEST HOME ROAD 36-22 27-29 31-25 31-27 31-24 19-39 29-29 20-34 EAST HOME ROAD 36-22 33-21 37-22 32-21 27-27 32-26 28-26 29-30 27-29 17-37 CENTRAL HOME ROAD 33-25 28-27 29-24 27-31 24-32 30-26 26-27 25-35 30-32 18-33

RS 575 439 437 373

RA DIFF 485 +90 418 +21 452 -15 428 -55

STRK Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 1 Won 1

L10 4-6 6-4 4-6 6-4

RS 614 601 479 527 454

RA DIFF 471 +143 433 +168 446 +33 520 +7 584 -130

STRK Won 1 Lost 1 Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 1

L10 5-5 8-2 6-4 6-4 3-7

RS 505 475 439 443 500

RA DIFF 510 -5 481 -6 462 -23 544 -101 546 -46

STRK Won 2 Won 1 Won 2 Lost 3 Lost 2

L10 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7 5-5

RS 396 511 516 412 416

RA DIFF 405 -9 490 +21 526 -10 447 -35 426 -10

STRK Lost 3 Lost 3 Won 1 Won 2 Won 3

L10 2-8 5-5 5-5 6-4 5-5

RS 498 462 504 453 446

RA DIFF 369 +129 416 +46 493 +11 487 -34 469 -23

STRK Won 9 Lost 1 Won 1 Lost 3 Lost 1

L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 5-5 5-5

RS 505 544 428 527 467 425

RA DIFF 483 +22 496 +48 462 -34 493 +34 563 -96 566 -141

STRK Won 3 Won 3 Lost 9 Lost 3 Won 7 Lost 2

L10 9-1 6-4 1-9 4-6 7-3 4-6

National League W L San Francisco 62 52 Arizona 61 52 Colorado 53 61 LA Dodgers 52 60 San Diego 50 64

PCT GB .544 - .540 .5 .465 9 .464 9 .439 12

W L 74 39 65 49 56 56 55 58 54 59

PCT GB .655 - .570 9.5 .500 17.5 .487 19 .478 20

W L Milwaukee 64 50 St. Louis 61 53 Pittsburgh 54 58 Cincinnati 54 59 Chicago Cubs 49 65 Houston 37 76

PCT GB .561 - .535 3 .482 9 .478 9.5 .430 15 .327 26.5

Philadelphia Atlanta NY Mets Florida Washington

WEST HOME ROAD 33-23 29-29 29-25 32-27 28-30 25-31 28-31 24-29 23-36 27-28 EAST HOME ROAD 41-18 33-21 34-22 31-27 23-29 33-27 23-33 32-25 32-23 22-36 CENTRAL HOME ROAD 41-15 23-35 29-24 32-29 26-31 28-27 30-27 24-32 27-31 22-34 19-39 18-37

IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Vargas 6 7 0 0 1 3 Laffey 0.2 0 0 0 0 1 J.Wright 1.3 1 0 0 1 2 Lueke 1 0 0 0 0 2 Cortes L,0/1 0 2 1 1 0 0 Los Angeles Weaver 9 7 0 0 1 8 Walden W,3/3 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cortes pitched to 2 batters in the 10th. HBP—by Vargas (Bourjos). W—Cortes. Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor; First, Dale Scott; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jerry Meals. T—3:03. A—38,727 (45,389).

League Leaders American League BATTING — AdGonzalez, Boston, .353; MiYoung, Texas, .336; Kotchman, Tampa Bay, .332; Ellsbury, Boston, .319; Bautista, Toronto, .319; VMartinez, Detroit, .318; MiCabrera, Detroit, .315. RUNS — Granderson, New York, 99; Ellsbury, Boston, 83; Bautista, Toronto, 81; AdGonzalez, Boston, 78; MiCabrera, Detroit, 75; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 75; Kinsler, Texas, 73; Pedroia, Boston, 73. RBI — AdGonzalez, Boston, 91; Granderson, New York, 86; Teixeira, New York, 85; Beltre, Texas, 76; Konerko, Chicago, 76; Youkilis, Boston, 76; MiYoung, Texas, 76. HITS — AdGonzalez, Boston, 158; MiYoung, Texas, 149; Ellsbury, Boston, 145; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 142; AGordon, Kansas City, 136; Pedroia, Boston, 135; ACabrera, Cleveland, 128; Cano, New York, 128; Markakis, Baltimore, 128. DOUBLES — Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 35; AdGonzalez, Boston, 34; AGordon, Kansas City, 34; MiYoung, Texas, 33; Ellsbury, Boston, 31; Beltre, Texas, 29; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 29; Francoeur, Kansas City, 29; Youkilis, Boston, 29. TRIPLES — Granderson, New York, 9; AJackson, Detroit, 8; Bourjos, Los Angeles, 7; RDavis, Toronto, 6; Gardner, New York, 6; 8 tied at 5. HOME RUNS — Bautista, Toronto, 33; Teix-

eira, New York, 31; Granderson, New York, 28; Konerko, Chicago, 25; NCruz, Texas, 24; MarReynolds, Baltimore, 24; Quentin, Chicago, 23. STOLEN BASES — Crisp, Oakland, 33; RDavis, Toronto, 33; Gardner, New York, 33; Andrus, Texas, 31; Ellsbury, Boston, 31; ISuzuki, Seattle, 28; Aybar, Los Angeles, 23; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 23. PITCHING — Sabathia, New York, 16-5; Verlander, Detroit, 15-5; Weaver, Los Angeles, 14-5; Haren, Los Angeles, 12-6; Lester, Boston, 11-5; Tomlin, Cleveland, 11-5; Ogando, Texas, 11-5; Porcello, Detroit, 11-6; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-6. STRIKEOUTS — Verlander, Detroit, 178; Sabathia, New York, 162; FHernandez, Seattle, 162; Shields, Tampa Bay, 159; Weaver, Los Angeles, 150; Price, Tampa Bay, 147; GGonzalez, Oakland, 138. SAVES — Valverde, Detroit, 31; MaRivera, New York, 29; League, Seattle, 26; Walden, Los Angeles, 24; Papelbon, Boston, 24; CPerez, Cleveland, 22; SSantos, Chicago, 22; Feliz, Texas, 22.

National League BATTING — JosReyes, New York, .336; Braun, Milwaukee, .329; Votto, Cincinnati, .322; Morse, Washington, .320; DanMurphy, New York, .319; Kemp, Los Angeles, .318; Holliday, St. Louis, .314. RUNS — JosReyes, New York, 79; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 74; Braun, Milwaukee, 73; Pujols, St. Louis, 72; JUpton, Arizona, 71; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 71; Rollins, Philadelphia, 70; Votto, Cincinnati, 70. RBI — Howard, Philadelphia, 87; Kemp, Los Angeles, 84; Fielder, Milwaukee, 79; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 75; Berkman, St. Louis, 74; Braun, Milwaukee, 74; Votto, Cincinnati, 69. HITS — SCastro, Chicago, 146; JosReyes, New York, 142; Bourn, Atlanta, 134; Pence, Philadelphia, 134; Votto, Cincinnati, 133; Kemp, Los Angeles, 128; JUpton, Arizona, 127. DOUBLES — Beltran, San Francisco, 31; JUpton, Arizona, 30; Pence, Philadelphia, 29; Braun, Milwaukee, 28; Freeman, Atlanta, 28; Headley, San Diego, 28; DanMurphy, New York, 28; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 28.

Saturday’s Games Boston 10, N.Y. Yankees 4 Baltimore 6, Toronto 2 Chicago White Sox 6, Minnesota 1 Detroit 4, Kansas City 3 Oakland 8, Tampa Bay 0 Cleveland at Texas, late Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 1 Today’s Games Toronto (R.Romero 9-9) at Baltimore (Simon 3-4), 1:35 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 9-10) at Tampa Bay (Price 9-10), 1:40 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-5) at Minnesota (Duensing 8-9), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 11-6) at Kansas City (Chen 5-5), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-9) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 7-8), 3:35 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 11-5) at Texas (C. Lewis 10-8), 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 10-7) at Boston (Beckett 9-4), 8:05 p.m

National League Saturday’s Games Chicago Cubs 11, Cincinnati 4 Philadelphia 2, San Francisco 1 Milwaukee 7, Houston 5 San Diego 13, Pittsburgh 2 N.Y. Mets 11, Atlanta 7 St. Louis 2, Florida 1 L.A. Dodgers 5, Arizona 3 Colorado 15, Washington 7 Today’s Games Atlanta (Minor 1-2) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 10-3), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 10-5) at Florida (Vazquez 7-9), 1:10 p.m. San Diego (Latos 5-11) at Pittsburgh (Correia 12-9), 1:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Greinke 9-4) at Houston (Norris 5-7), 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-9) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 3-4), 2:20 p.m. Washington (Lannan 8-7) at Colorado (A.Cook 2-6), 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Oswalt 4-6) at San Francisco (Lincecum 9-9), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-4) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 13-3), 4:10 p.m.

TRIPLES — JosReyes, New York, 16; Victorino, Philadelphia, 12; Fowler, Colorado, 10; SCastro, Chicago, 8; Bourn, Atlanta, 7; SSmith, Colorado, 7; Infante, Florida, 6; Maybin, San Diego, 6; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6. HOME RUNS — Berkman, St. Louis, 28; Kemp, Los Angeles, 26; Pujols, St. Louis, 25; Stanton, Florida, 25; Fielder, Milwaukee, 24; Howard, Philadelphia, 24; Uggla, Atlanta, 23. STOLEN BASES — Bourn, Atlanta, 40; JosReyes, New York, 32; Kemp, Los Angeles, 28; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 27; Maybin, San Diego, 26; Rollins, Philadelphia, 26; Bonifacio, Florida, 25. PITCHING — Halladay, Philadelphia, 14-4; IKennedy, Arizona, 13-3; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 13-4; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 13-7; Jurrjens, Atlanta, 12-4; Hamels, Philadelphia, 12-6; Correia, Pittsburgh, 12-9. STRIKEOUTS — Kershaw, Los Angeles, 177; ClLee, Philadelphia, 167; Lincecum, San Francisco, 160; Halladay, Philadelphia, 159; AniSanchez, Florida, 150; Hamels, Philadelphia, 145; Hanson, Atlanta, 137. SAVES — BrWilson, San Francisco, 33; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 33; HBell, San Diego, 31; LNunez, Florida, 31; Axford, Milwaukee, 31; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 30; Street, Colorado, 28; Storen, Washington, 28.

SPORTS ON TV Today 9 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. 10 a.m. (26) ESPN NASCAR Auto Racing, Pennsylvania 500 at Pocono Raceway in Pocono, Pa. 10 a.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, Atlanta Braves at New York Mets. 11 a.m. (47) GOLF NWT Golf, Cox Classic at Champions Run in Omaha, Neb. 11 a.m. WGN MLB Baseball, Chicago White Sox at Minnesota Twins. Noon (27) ESPN2 ATP Tennis, Legg Mason Classic at William H.G. Fitzgerald Tennis Center in Washington, D.C. 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC PGA Golf, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. 12:30 p.m. (25) ROOT MLB Baseball, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. 1 p.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS Golf, 3M Championship at TPC Twin Cities in Blaine, Minn. 2 p.m. (27) ESPN2 WTA Tennis, Mercury Insurance Open at La Costa Resort & Spa in San Diego, Calif. 5 p.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. McCray 0-1, Greene 0-1), Seattle 12-19 (Bird 4-7, Cash 3-6, Willingham 2-2, Smith 2-3, Wright 1-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Connecticut 31 (Charles 10), Seattle 34 (Cash 7). Assists—Connecticut 17 (White 4), Seattle 22 (Wright, Cash 5). Total Fouls—Connecticut 13, Seattle 18. Technicals—Charles. A—7,289 (9,686).

Golf Bridgestone Invitational Firestone Country Club Akron, OH 1. Adam Scott 62,70,66—198 -12 T2. Jason Day 63,70,66—199 -11 T2. Ryo Ishikawa 67,68,64—199 -11 T4. Martin Laird 66,67,67—200 -10 T4. Keegan Bradley 67,65,68—200 -10 T6. Rickie Fowler 68,64,69—201 -9 T6. Fredrik Jacobson 68,66,67—201 -9 T6. Luke Donald 68, 69,64—201 -9 9. Zach Johnson 70,68,64—202 -8 T10. Steve Stricker 71,65,67—203 -7 T10. Rory McIlroy 68,68,67—203 -7 T12. David Toms 68,68,68—204 -6 T12. Kyung-tae Kim 66,72,66—204 -6 T14. Robert Karlsson 68,65,72—205 -5 T14. Frances Molinari 73,64,68—205 -5 T14. Nick Watney 65,70,70—205 -5 T14. Matt Kuchar 71,69,65—205 -5 T18. Ryan Moore 66,66,74—206 -4 T18. Lee Westwood 67,71,68—206 -4 T20. Peter Hanson 70,67,70—207 -3 T20. Stewart Cink 66,70,71—207 -3 T20. Charley Hoffman 68,69,70—207 -3 T20. Aaron Baddeley 68,70,69—207 -3 T20. Bubba Watson 69,70,68—207 -3 T25. Brandt Snedeker 66,68,74—208 -2 T25. Lucas Glover 68,68,72—208 -2 T25. DA Points 66,70,72—208 -2 T25. Retief Goosen 72,68,68—208 -2 T25. Edoardo Molinari 72,66,70—208 -2 T30. Gary Woodland 70,66,73—209 -1 T30. Scott Stallings 69,68,72—209 -1 T30. Jim Furyk 73,69,67—209 -1 T30. Matt Manassero 70,72,67—209 -1 T30. Bo Van Pelt 68,70,71—209 -1 T30. Anders Hansen 72,70,67—209 -1 T30. Mark Wilson 69,69,71—209 -1 37. Hennie Otto 69,66,75—210 E T38. Heath Slocum 71,65,75—211 +1 T38. Phil Mickelson 67,73,71—211 +1 T38. Richard Green 69,68,74—211 +1 T38. Tiger Woods 68,71,72—211 +1 T42. Simon Dyson 77,66,69—212 +2 T42. YE Yang 72,71,69—212 +2 T42. Louis Oosthuizen 71,71,70—212 +2 T42. Alex Noren 69,73,70—212 +2 T42. Arjun Atwal 68,73,71—212 +2 T42. Dustin Johnson 73,69,70—212 +2 T42. Martin Kaymer 69,70,73—212 +2 T42. Hunter Mahan 71,69,72—212 +2 T42. Sergio Garcia 68,72,72—212 +2

Transactions Baseball

Storm 81, Sun 79

National League Atlanta Braves: Placed RHP Jair Jurrjens on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Mike Minor from Gwinnett (IL). Colorado Rockies: Placed RHP Juan Nicasio and OF Ryan Spilborghs on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Greg Reynolds from Colorado Springs (PCL). Activated OF Carlos Gonzalez from the 15-day DL. Houston Astros: Optioned LHP J.A. Happ to Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed RHP Enerio Del Rosario on the 15-day DL. Called up LHP Wesley Wright and RHP Jeff Fulchino from Oklahoma City (PCL). Pittsburgh Pirates: Optioned LHP Tony Watson to Indianapolis (IL). Recalled RHP Brad Lincoln from Indianapolis. Signed RHP Tyler Glasnow and OF Rodarrick Jones. San Diego Padres: Placed OF Chris Denorfia on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Blake Tekotte from San Antonio (Texas). Frontier League Normal Cornbelters: Traded RHP Brett Lester to Lake County (NAL) for 1B Mark Samuelson. River City Rascals: Released C Landis Wilson.

CONNECTICUT (79) Greene 1-4 2-2 4, Jones 6-11 0-2 12, Charles 8-17 2-4 18, Montgomery 7-13 2-2 19, McCray 0-2 0-0 0, White 1-3 0-0 2, Lawson 4-7 1-2 11, Griffin 4-8 1-1 11, Moore 0-0 2-2 2, Hightower 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-65 10-15 79. SEATTLE (81) Cash 5-12 1-1 14, Little 5-7 3-4 13, Robinson 0-2 0-0 0, Bird 7-15 2-2 20, Wright 6-10 5-6 18, Willingham 3-3 0-0 8, Smith 3-4 0-0 8, Kobryn 0-0 0-0 0, Snell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-53 11-13 81. Connecticut 14 26 17 22—79 Seattle 24 23 16 18—81 3-Point Goals—Connecticut 7-13 (Montgomery 3-3, Griffin 2-3, Lawson 2-4, White 0-1,

National Football League Kansas City Chiefs: Signed DL Amon Gordon. Miami Dolphins: Signed OT Ray Willis. New York Giants: Re-signed DE Dave Tollefson. Oakland Raiders: Re-signed RB Michael Bush. St. Louis Rams: Resigned OL Adam Goldberg. Washington Redskins: Signed OT Sean Locklear, C Donovan Raiola and P Sav Rocca. Released LB Robert Henson, DT Joe Joseph and LB Kyle O’Donnell.

Basketball

Football


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

B3

When diamond dogma strays How baseball can sometimes imitate congress

Canadian Football League

Former Calgary Stampeder Brandon Browner is ready to return to the NFL and give the Seattle Seahawks a large presence in the secondary.

Back and better CFL standout gets shot with Hawks The Associated Press

RENTON — Brandon Browner is not a typical NFL cornerback. The 6-foot-4, 221-pound Browner towers over the Seattle Seahawks’ secondary. He looks out of place, like a wiry linebacker. But the Seahawks are hoping he can bring a physical presence to the edge of their defense. “The only guy I can ever think of that was this big was Mel Blount a million years ago,” coach Pete Carroll said Friday. “He just is so tall. “Most people would say he can’t play being that tall, but he’s doing it.” Carroll had the chance to recruit Browner when he was the head coach at Southern California. Browner was a standout player at Sylmar High School, just north of Los Angeles. But Carroll decided to pass.

Browner went on to star for Oregon State and was an undrafted free agent when he signed with Denver in 2005. The Broncos decided to move him to safety. The transition was a difficult one for Browner, who broke his arm in a preseason game against San Francisco and was placed on injured reserve. He eventually was released and signed with the Canadian Football League’s Calgary Stampeders. Browner made the CFL All-Star team each of the past three seasons. “I’ve matured,” Browner said. “When I came out I was an underclassman. I was only 20 years old. I’m 27 now, so a lot of things have changed over the years. “I did well up there in the CFL and it all worked out the way it was supposed to. I’m back where I want to be.” Carroll didn’t pass up another opportunity to chase Browner.

“I had lost track of him — that he was playing in Canada for a few years and he was all-Canada or whatever and made the All-Star team [three] years in a row. I said let’s bring him in,” Carroll said. “Let’s see what we’ve got. “I always knew that he was very effective at the line of scrimmage.”

Opportunity knocks With second-year cornerback Walter Thurmond missing time with an ankle sprain, Browner has been thrown in with the firstteam defense opposite cornerback Marcus Trufant. He’s been matched up against the Seahawks’ larger wide receivers, Mike Williams and Sidney Rice, during workouts. “He kind of has the physical attributes we’re looking for, good speed, good size, good strength,” defensive backs coach Kris Richard said. “Put it all together with a little bit of technique and a lot of wins should come out of that. “He’s doing a fantastic job thus far.”

Seattle ranked 27th against the pass last season. Larger receivers proved to be a really difficult matchup. Dwayne Bowe had 13 catches for 170 yards and three touchdowns in a 42-24 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. Hakeem Nicks had six catches for 128 yards and a touchdown for the New York Giants. With Thurmond’s injury, the coaching staff is getting an extended chance to evaluate Browner with the hope he could be the piece to help keep opposing receivers in check. “He’s come out here and he’s competed like crazy,” Carroll said. “He’s had some very good days, one after another. “He’s a four-year professional veteran if you look at it. He’s played a ton of football games and he just keeps growing and he fits in. “I’m looking for him to challenge for some play time. “He looks like he can do that. We’re so fortunate that we hit that so we’ll see how it goes.”

Hawks: Secondary questions Continued from B1 speed, the ability to jump in coverage — as opposed to The only guaranteed positional development or holdover in the secondary is years of experience. “We’re always looking for second-year safety Earl Thomas, one of two Seattle people with special dimenfirst-round picks last sea- sions — you’ve heard me say that before. Aspects of son. Strong safety Kam their play, unique characChancellor, another NFL teristics that they have,” he sophomore, is expected to said. take Milloy’s starting position. And at depth for cor- Meet the prototype nerback, the Seahawks Sherman is one good present a series of question example. marks. A receiver during his The proposed future first two seasons at Stanstarter at cornerback, 2010 ford, Sherman switched to fourth-round pick Walter Thurmond, has been on the cornerback before the 2009 sidelines for the last week season and showed enough in two years to merit a fifthwith an ankle injury. The 2011 late-round round pick by Seattle in the picks and undrafted free 2011 draft. In his first NFL training agents such as Richard Sherman and Byron Max- camp, he’s still putting the well are just trying to hang ideal skill set together. But on for preseason playing he fits the Seahawks’ new prototype, and that’s why time. According to Carroll, Carroll seems excited about making the grade in the his potential. “I’m really happy with defensive backs rotation has as much or more to do his progress so far. He’s with taking advantage of done a lot of really good pure physical gifts — size, things,” Carroll said.

“He’s a very, very competitive kid, very bright and he gives you the feeling that he might be able to contribute. “It looks like a terrific pick for us.” The primary responsibility for developing these young players goes to defensive backs coach Kris Richard, who played for Carroll at USC and was selected in the third round of the 2002 draft by Seattle. When his NFL career ended, he went back to USC as a graduate assistant coach, and followed Carroll to Seattle in 2010. “We love their physical attributes,” Richard said of his young charges. “We want to allow them to let their physical nature take over in certain situations. “We want our cornerbacks to be up in the faces of the receivers, and challenge them. “They understand that, and that’s why they come here [as undrafted free agents].

“And when we draft them, and he have the opportunity to talk to them before, that’s that we let them know.” In the short term, Trufant and Jennings are important because they bring experience — they’re “good in the meeting room,” as coaches like to say. And while all young players are affected by the compressed preseason time frame brought about by the lockout, Richard makes it very clear that no excuses will be tolerated. If you want more playing time, you’d better stand out to earn it. The Seahawks have put their money on other positions and left the defensive backfield to tenuous experience and unproven athletic talent. The return on that investment may be the difference between a playoff berth and a long offseason in which the choice to avoid those pricey free agents is questioned over and over again.

The elaborate, if illdefined, system of self-policing that is supposed to encourage players to play the game the right way can ultimately have the opposite WHAT A SPECTACLE effect. With their midgame of undignified behavior, of adrenaline flowing, their hypocrisy, of extremism, of sense of baseball righteouscivility abandoned, of epic ness rising up in them like, brattiness. well, an ideological Could a disgraced taking root city possibly have Jonathan crusade inside the mind of a proved itself more worthy of its reputa- Mahler zealous young politician, players can tion? wind up following The Angels’ Erick their principles off a Aybar tried to bunt cliff. his way on in the The process eighth inning, a quickly becomes cirmove Justin Vercular: Retaliation lander, who was begets retaliation. pitching a no-hitter Individual reputaat the time, later tions are compromised. described as “bush league.” Teams’ prospects are damI’m talking, of course, aged. about last Sunday’s TigersNot to get too Bart GiaAngels game at Comerica matti on you, but the Park in Detroit. Maybe you were tuned in strength of the game’s social fabric is tested. to a different channel, Did I say that baseball watching a different group of people in a different place imitates Congress? violate a different code of Back to Motown conduct that has long held together another one of our It was pretty easy for nation’s most cherished even the most partisan institutions. among us, which is to say I’ll recap. Tigers and Angels fans, to First, the setup. The see who went over the edge stakes were high. in Detroit. This was the final game If opinion research firms of a four-game series conducted approval-ratings between two American polls for baseball players, League playoff contenders, the Tigers’ Carlos Guillen teams that might collide would have suffered the again in the postseason. steepest decline Sunday. It also happened to bring In the seventh inning, together the league’s two Cy when Guillen smashed a Young front-runners, a pair ball into the right-field of lanky former first-round seats, he lingered in the batdraft picks with starkly difter’s box to admire his ferent pitching styles: Jered handiwork and pointedly Weaver, with his magician’s flipped his bat, a strictly deception and surgeon’s conprohibited form of grandtrol, and Justin Verlander, standing. with his three-digit fastball He compounded the and paralyzing changeup. infraction by trotting slowly The game certainly lived down to first, angled toward up to its billing. the mound, taunting Verlander took a no-hitWeaver all the way. ter into the eighth inning, Bear with me, because and the Tigers managed to this is where the narrative hold off a late Angels rally gets a little convoluted. to win, 3-2. In Guillen’s mind, he was As a baseball game, it actually taking the moral had everything you could high ground by paying possibly want: some domiWeaver back for disrespectnant pitching, flashes of ing one of his teammates, power, a lot of hard-fought Magglio Ordonez, earlier in at-bats and a couple of drathe game. matically manufactured (In the third inning, runs complete with a Weaver had shouted at botched rundown. Ordonez as he circled the But what was most bases slowly after a home memorable about the game run, another variation of — and the reason why I’m home-run pimping.) still thinking about it Weaver responded to almost a week later — was Guillen’s taunts by throwwhat you couldn’t necessaring at the Tigers’ next hitter, ily see, or at least concluAlex Avila. sively decipher. The beanball has been Like maybe no other sinan accepted part of basegle game in history, this one ball’s code pretty much was packed with violations, since the game’s inception. both real and imagined, of But it’s one thing for a baseball’s unwritten rules. pitcher to make a rhetorical Along the way, it propoint with a knockdown or duced roughly the same brushback pitch. It’s gob-smacking effect among another to throw near a hitbaseball fans that most of ter’s head, which is what the nation was experiencing Weaver did. as it watched the parallel He was instantly kicked debt-ceiling theatrics in out of the game, and on his Washington. Baseball imiway to the locker room was tates Congress. so worked up that he had to

be physically restrained from the umpire by his The purpose of the base- teammates. He was later ball codebook, passed down suspended for six games. Considering the tightin the clubhouse from generation to generation like an ness of the pennant race — the Angels and the Rangers ever-evolving collection of are running neck and neck tribal rites, was probably most succinctly described by — it’s entirely possible that Bob Brenly, who led the Ari- the start he’ll miss will zona Diamondbacks to their make the difference for his team’s season. 2001 World Series champiNot that Weaver had any onship. “I can break it down into regrets. “I wouldn’t do anythree simple things,” Brenly thing different,” he said. So there you go. That’s told the authors of “The what happens when dogma Baseball Codes.” Continued from B1 Unfortunately, blood NFL drug program, which needles in the arm, and and misguided principle win “Respect your teamtesting for HGH is not the last year involved some that line is a huge one to the day. mates, respect your oppopanacea it might first 14,000 urine tests. cross. That’s a switch from In no time at all, our nents, respect the game.” Players will have one Blood testing catches years past, when unions in appear to be. There are combatants could very well If only it were as simple issues, most notably that more thing to worry about, more things, and it’s a good the major sports almost be at it again when the the time frame to catch one more reason not to bet the list of things tested as Brenly makes it sound. instinctively resisted drug playoffs start — I am As with the unwritten cheaters is very limited. inject themselves when the will eventually expand far testing as an invasion of already envisioning the Fox rules that govern any instiIndeed, to be caught a temptation to both get big- beyond HGH. personal rights. pregame lead-in of a showtution, baseball’s are subject player would have to be ger and get bigger money Blood testing will one Lately, though, a new boating Guillen and a furyto endless interpretation: either very stupid or very proves hard to resist. day become the norm, not generation of players filled Weaver — and ConYou can’t steal on an unlucky. And, just maybe the only in the NFL but evenbrought up in the steroid gress returns to the debt opponent when you have a The test can detect HGH number of 300-pounders tually in baseball and the era has taken over, and drawing board. big lead late in the game, use only within 24 to 72 running around like NBA, too. those who are clean have It will certainly make for but what constitutes a big Who knows, there may come to the conclusion they hours of blood being taken, gazelles on NFL fields some more compelling thelead? And when, exactly, is and the chances of that every Sunday will finally even come a time when we don’t want to be playing ater. happening in a random start to decrease. can watch players on a field it late in the game? against others who have Whether it will make for No bunting to break up a draw would be laughed at But the greater signifiand not wonder what they gotten stronger through good legislation is a differno-hitter, but what if it’s a by any Vegas bookmaker. cance of the agreement isn’t took to get themselves the aid of modern chemisent question. tight game in the heat of a Still, blood testing could necessarily the HGH test there. try. It’s hard to believe we’re serve a deterrent, which is itself. That will be of limNo, blood tests for HGH pennant race and the batter “You can’t have an in a good place when our has been known to successited value, at least until aren’t going to catch many advantage like that,’’ Cow- good in itself. elected representatives and fully bunt for base hits? And there is a new test there are new, improved cheaters. boys’ player representative our professional baseball (This last scenario isn’t now under development tests. But maybe it’s a huge Jason Witten said this players start to look so hypothetical: The Angels’ that could open the window The big thing is getting deal after all. week. “You’ve got to have much alike. Erick Aybar tried to bunt for positive tests to 10 days players to agree at all to an equalizer. ________ ________ his way on in the eighth or more from the time of blood testing. “I think we’ve seen in Tim Dahlberg is a national inning of Sunday’s game, a usage. The NFL is the first other sports how it’s kind Jonathan Mahler is a contributing sports columnist for The Associmove Verlander later Adding HGH testing can league to cross the line of blown up in their face a writer for The New York Times Magated Press. Write to him at tdahldescribed as “bush league.”) azine. only strengthen the current from samples in a cup to little bit.’’ berg@ap.org.

Dahlberg: Taking the first step

Baseball code


B4

Sunday, August 7, 2011

SportsRecreation

License fees set to go up

Briefly . . . Orcas bring home medals from regional TACOMA — The Clallam County Orcas golf team earned six medals at the Special Olympics Regional Golf Tournament last Sunday at Meadow Park Golf Course. The medal haul included gold medal performances from the nine-hole unified teams of David Carver and Bill Shea, Amanda Forbes and Garrett Smithson and Kimberly Wing and Mike Johnson. All three teams earned a spot in the Summer Sports Classic state event later this month with their first-place finishes. Michael Reif and his partner Grant Smithson earned silver in the ninehole team competition, while Ursula Schletter and her partner Matt Eveland grabbed bronze. Meanwhile, Bonny Cates received a bronze for her efforts in the individual skills competition.

Peninsula Daily News

Many hunters, fishers affected by fee increases Peninsula Daily News

Members of the Clallam County Orcas golf team gather for a photo after the Special Olympics Regional Golf Tournament in Tacoma. Team members include, from left, Garrett Smithson, Amanda Forbes, David Carver, Bill Shea, Bonny Cates, Matt Eveland, Michael Reif, Grant Smithson and Ursula Schletter. Not pictured are Kim Wing and Mike Johnson.

2011 summer tour is Port Angeles, home to U.S. Taekwondo Instructor of the Year, Grandmaster Robert Nicholls of White Crane Martial Arts. Tickets for the Aug. 13 show are $9 for adults and $6 for children. A family package — two adults and three children — can be purchased for Tigers visit soon $25. PORT ANGELES — The show includes demThe Hodori “Little Tigers” onstrations of martial art Korean Taekwondo demon- weapons, self defense and stration team will perform acrobatic aerial board at the Peninsula College breaking. gymnasium in Port Angeles The White Crane school next Saturday, Aug. 13, at 5 will also demonstrate durp.m. ing intermission. Started in 1986 two For more information, or years before the Summer to buy tickets, visit White Olympics in Seoul, South Crane Martial Arts at 129 Korea, the team is made W. First St, in Port Angeles, up of black belts ages 8-14. or call 360-477-4926. The elite team makes two U.S. tours each year — one of the west coast in the PT athletics dates PORT TOWNSEND — summer and another of the Athletes looking to particieast coast in the winter. The first stop on the pate in Port Townsend

High School sports have a few dates to keep in mind for the fall season. ■ Aug. 16 — Fall sports parent meeting at the high school library at 6 p.m. ■ Aug. 17 — ASB office opens for fall sports paperwork from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Also, this is the first day of football practice. ■ Aug. 22 — ASB office opens for fall sports paperwork from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Also, first day of practice for cross country, boys tennis, volleyball and girls swimming. Players without clearance will not practice the first day of any fall sport. All incoming freshmen will need a current physical no earlier than April 2011. Athletes who need physicals can visit the high school health clinic Aug. 16, 19 and 23 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To schedule an appointment, call 360-385-9400. Walk-ins are welcome.

PA athletics PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School and Stevens Middle School athletic departments now have athletic applications for fall sports posted online. The necessary athlete participant forms include athletic clearance, student handbook and eligibility information. Once the forms have been filled out, copies must be delivered in person to Port Angeles High School starting next Friday, Aug. 12. Athletic forms for Stevens will be accepted beginning Aug. 17. In addition, local health professionals and clinics encourage student athletes to complete their necessary sports physicals before the school year begins. To access forms for the two schools, visit www. portangelesschools.org/ students/athletics.html. Peninsula Daily News

OLYMPIA — Budget shortfalls continue to affect hunters and fishers in Washington. Starting Sept. 1, the base cost for most state hunting and fishing licenses will increase. This is the first general recreational license fee increase in more than a decade. Coming two months after the institution of the Discover Pass — a new vehicle access pass required at most state lands — the increase was approved by the 2011 Legislature in May. It was done to help meet rising costs and shortfalls in revenue for managing hunting, fishing and the fish and wildlife populations that are the focus of those activities. Not all license fees will increase. Some will decline, including those for youth, seniors and persons with disabilities. New license fees are available on the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website at http:// wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/ license_fees.html. “The new fees are critically important in maintaining fishing and hunting opportunity and make it possible for the department to fulfill its dual mission of conserving species while providing sustainable fishing, hunting and outdoor

Outdoors recreation across the state,” Fish and Wildlife Director Phil Anderson said in a news release. “The fees reflect the cost of managing specific fisheries and hunts, and are competitive with fees charged in neighboring states. “At the same time, we made an effort to encourage broad participation through youth and senior discounts.” The increases are expected to generate about $8 million annually for activities that support hunting and recreational fishing, according to Fish and Wildlife. Recreational license and permit revenue is used to manage fisheries and hunting seasons, produce trout and steelhead for recreational fisheries, enforce regulations, monitor fish and game populations and help maintain state wildlife lands. Revenues from the license fee increase will replace a temporary 10 percent license sale surcharge that expired in June, and will fill a projected deficit in the account that funds fishing and hunting activities. “Fishing and hunting contribute more than $1.4 billion a year to the state’s economy, benefitting local communities, small business owners and the people they employ,” Anderson said. “Maintaining fishing and hunting opportunity is vital to Washington’s economy and quality of life.”

Villwock off to hot start Spirit of Qatar runs well in opening hydro races The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Dave Villwock quickly established himself as the favorite in the Albert Lee Cup at Seafair after driving the Spirit of Qatar to an easy victory in heat 1A on the two-mile oval course on Lake Washington on Saturday. Villwock’s start was timed perfectly, leading

through the first turn and pulling away up the first backstretch. Villwock wasn’t challenged the rest of the way, averaging 134.868 mph. Second went to Kip Brown in Red Dot. “The other guys all fought for the inside,” Villwock said. “They were early and had to slow down before the start.” Scott Liddycoat was third

in Valken.com. Mark Evans finished fourth in Formulaboats.com, and Ken Muscatel was fifth with Procraft Windows. Before the start, J.W. Myers was leaving the pit area in Peters & May when the propeller shaft broke. Steve David drove Oh Boy! Oberto to victory in heat 1B, at an average speed of 136.519. He was briefly challenged by Jeff Bernard in Graham Trucking, but Bernard’s boat had obvious handling problems and he gave up the chase after the first lap.

Seafair Mike Webster took third in Campaign WSU winning a close duel over Jon Zimmerman in Miss Visit TriCities.com. “It’s rough,” David said of the water conditions, “but the boat’s running perfectly. “I didn’t have to use everything. Tomorrow won’t be as easy.” Two more rounds of elimination heats are scheduled today, before the winnertake-all final heat for the top six boats at 4:35 p.m.

All-stars: Rebound from 2-0 defeat Continued from B1

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Saundra Kent

kicks off

Kyle McKenzie of Sequim returns the ball in his match Saturday against Sequim’s Mallory Maloney in the Saundra Kent Memorial Tennis Tournament at the courts at Erickson Playfield in Port Angeles. McKenzie ended up winning the match 6-4, 6-4. The singles tourney ends today with the championship rounds.

Tennis Results 26th annual Saundra Kent Memorial Tennis Tournament

infield for both teams,” SteLodi scored its two runs vens said. in the bottom of the fourth “We just didn’t do what off three base hits and a we needed to do.” North Olympic error. North Olympic did have Lodi 2, North Olympic 0 one golden chance to take control of the game in the Olympic 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ­— 0 2 1 Lodi 0 0 0 2 0 0 X — 2 3 2 top of the third inning. WP- Trotter; LP- Steinman Pitching Statistics That’s when the all-stars Steinman 6IP, 3H, 2R, BB, 7K. loaded the bases with no Olympic: Lodi: Trotter 7IP, 2H, 2BB, K. outs on miscue from the Hitting Statistics shortstop and back-to-back Olympic: Black Crow 1-3; Steinman 1-3. North Olympic 9, Lamar 8 walks. Three straight ground Lamar 1 5 0 1 0 0 1 ­— 8 9 4 0 1 0 1 0 5 — 9 8 4 outs, however, kept any of Olympic 2 WPCurtis; LP- Chelsea V. those runners from scoring. Pitching Statistics “We played a good game,” Lamar: Chelsea V. 6+IP 4H, 4R, ER. Olympic: Curtis 7IP, 9H, 7ER, 3BB, 5K. Stevens said. Hitting Statistics “We had the opportunity, Olympic: Kuch 2-4 (2B, 2RBI); Lucas 2-4 (3B, 3R, RBI); Holcomb 1-2 (3B, 2RBI, R); Black Crow 1-4 and we didn’t take advan(3B, R); Steinman 1-4 (R, RBI); Hinrichs 1-4 (3B, tage.” RBI, R).

Mariners: Youth served in 5-1 road victory Continued from B1 to do is just throw strikes and get ahead and let your He faced the Angels on defense do the work,” BeaJuly 8 at Seattle, getting a van said. no-decision after giving up “I’m not a strikeout guy, a pair of solo homers over 6 so I try to locate every1/3 innings. thing.” “The biggest thing I try Brandon League worked

the ninth in a non-save situation after Beavan threw 103 pitches. “I’ve been impressed with all of Blake’s outings, but his last two I felt like he was using all his weapons more effectively and really

balancing it out with his fastball and his secondary stuff,” Wedge said. “If he hadn’t thrown 113 pitches in his last outing on regular rest, I probably would have sent him back out there for the ninth.”

Sounders rally, win The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Mauro Rosales and Lamar Neagle scored less than two minutes apart at the close of the second half, giving Seattle Sounders a 2-1 win Saturday night and snapping Sporting Kansas City’s 14-match unbeaten streak. Kansas City (7-7-9) lost its first game since May 21 — ending a 6-0-8 stretch.

Rosales tied the game at 1 in the 90th minute for Seattle (11-5-8), and Neagle’s game-winner in the second minute of stoppage time came on a loose-ball scramble in the area. Sporting forward Omar Bravo was issued a straight red card — his second of the year and Kansas City’s club-record seventh of the year — for a hard challenge on Pat Noonan in the 58th minute.

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ERICKSON COURTS Friday and Saturday Men’s 3.5 Singles Quarterfinal Round Gunstone, Andrew def. Martineau, Mike 6-3; 5-7; 6-4 Lee, Donovan def. Terrill, Jeffery 0-6; 6-3; 6-3 Semifinal Round Gunstone, Andrew def. Beglyakov, Alex 7-6(2); 6-1 Lee, Donovan def. Gustin, Ross 6-0; 6-0 Men’s 4.0 Singles Quarterfinal Round Berg, Julien def. Gunstone, Andrew 6-1; 6-0 Boots, Byron def. O’Connor, Brett 6-3; 6-1 Lam, Waylon def. Ratzman, Dean 6-7(7); 6-3; 6-4 Pogue, David def. Matheny, Chuck 6-1; 6-1 Semifinal Round Lam, Waylon def. Berg, Julien 7-5; 7-5 Boots, Byron def. Pogue, David 6-3, 1-6, 6-1 Men’s 4.5 Singles Quarterfinal Round Schouten, James def. O’Connor, Brett 6-1; 6-0

Boots, Byron def. Godfrey, David 7-6(1); 7-6(5); 6-1 Semifinal Round Boots, Byron def. Matheny, Chuck 6-0; 6-1 Gunstone, Reed def. Schouten, James 4-6; 6-2; 6-3 Men’s 5.0 Singles Quarterfinal Round Maloney, Mallory def. Gunstone, Reed 6-2; 2-6; 7-5 Brown, Eric def. Roos, Micah 6-3; 6-1 Semifinal Round Hastings, Douglas (1) def. Brown, Eric 6-1; 6-2 McKenzie, Kyle (2) def. Maloney, Mallory 6-4; 6-4 Men’s Over 60 Doubles Round Robin Adams, Jim/Brown, Jeff def. Birney, Bil/Shargel, David 6-3; 6-2 Birney, Bill/Shargel, David def. Erskine, John/Killins, Dan 6-1; 6-3 Women’s 3.5 Singles Quarterfinal Round Stratton, Tricia def. Drake, Wendy 6-0; 6-0 Semifinal Round Terrill, Katie def. Allard, Val 6-0; 6-3 Schouten, Sherrie def. Stratton, Tricia 6-4; 1-6; 6-3 Women’s 50 Singles Round Robin Allard, Val def. Schultz, Sandy 6-4; 6-4 Quaintance, Valli def. Allard, Val 6-0; 7-5

“It was crazy,” Stevens said. “We just couldn’t get anything going until the bottom of the seventh.” Lauren Curtis earned the win on the mound. The right-hander gave up eight runs in seven innings of work, and was also hurt by North Olympic’s four errors in the field. “We can play a lot better than we played today as a team,” Steven said. “It’s an ugly win, but we’ll take it.” North Olympic struggled to make things happen in its 2-0 loss to Lodi earlier in the day.

Sarah Steinman struck out seven Lodi batters and allowed just two runs in six innings to keep North Olympic in it. But Lodi hurler Liz Trotter was equally as sharp, keeping North Olympic hitters off balance all afternoon and allowing only one hit to reach the outfield on the fly. Both North Olympic base hits were sharply hit ground balls by Steinman and Black Crow. Neither girl advanced beyond second base. “In the whole game I think there was only three balls that went out of the


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, August 7, 2011

c

SECTION

Our Peninsula

WEATHER, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEATHS In this section

Lou and Erwin Solloway of Boulder City, Nev., eat slices of blackberry pie as their dog, Upity, yawns from its carrying bag during Saturday’s Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival in Joyce.

First-place winners in the Joyce Daze beard and mustache contest are, from left, Tim Cella of Port Angeles in the goatee category, Rick Broderson of Sekiu for native beard, Dan Lieberman of Port Angeles in the “anything goes” category and Anthony Szabo of Clallam Bay for best mustache.

Keith Thorpe (4)/Peninsula Daily News

A sunny day at Joyce Daze The Joyce Daze royalty, clockwise from top, Queen Kailee Rose and Princesses Lynn Grover, Ashley Knight and Bonny Hazelett, preside over the festivities of the annual celebration from their float in the grand parade.

Roxanne Olsen of Joyce took top honors for her creation in the Joyce Daze blackberry pie contest.

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Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Kiwanis Clubs Three Kiwanis clubs meet every Thursday in Port Angeles. n  The Olympic Kiwanis Club meets at 7 a.m. weekly at the Cornerhouse Restaurant, 101 E. Front St. n  The Juan de Fuca Kiwanis Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. n  The Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles meets at noon at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, Eighth and B streets, Port Angeles. For more information, visit the club website at www.kiwanispa.org. Other Kiwanis clubs meet in Sequim and in Port Townsend. n  Sequim-Dungeness meetings are every Thursday at noon at Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. For further information, phone Shell McGuire at 360-681-0805. n  The Port Townsend meetings are every Wednesday at noon at Manresa Castle, Seventh and Sheridan streets. For further information, phone Jim Strong at 360-7320574.

ter, 431 Water St., Port Townsend, 360-385-5688. n  Wednesdays: Port Townsend Sunrise Rotary meets at 7:15 a.m. at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend. Port Angeles Rotary Club meets at noon upstairs at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. n  Thursdays: East Jefferson County Rotary meets at 11:45 a.m. at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. Sequim Rotary Club meets at noon at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim. n  Fridays: Port Angeles Nor’wester Rotary meets at 7 a.m. at the Olympic Medical Center cafeteria, 939 Caroline St., Port Angeles. Sequim Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim.

Weight Watchers

Sequim meetings at 150 E. Bell St. are at the following times: Mondays at 10 a.m., Thursdays at 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Fridays at 8:45 a.m. and Saturdays at 9 a.m. Port Angeles meetings at 513 S. Lincoln St. are at 7 Rotary clubs the following times: MonThe seven Rotary clubs days at 5:30 p.m., Wednesof the North Olympic Pendays at 11 a.m. and Saturinsula meet at various days at 9 a.m. times throughout the week, Port Townsend meetings encouraging meeting at the Madrona Hill Profes“makeups” from visiting sional Building, 2500 Sims Rotarians. Way, are at the following Here are the clubs and times: Mondays at their meeting times and 6:30 p.m. and Wednesdays locations: at 9:30 a.m. n  Tuesdays: Port The club requests that Townsend Rotary Club members arrive 30 minutes meets at noon at the before the meeting time to Northwest Maritime Cenregister.

Things to Do online The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

Submit your club news

Meetings usually last less than one hour. Additional information is available at 800-3749191 or at www.weight watchers.com.

Summer walkers

Port Angeles TOPS meetings There are four weekly meetings of TOPS groups in Port Angeles. TOPS 125 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7 p.m., at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles. TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. TOPS 1493 meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m. with weigh-in from 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. at the Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest St. For further information, phone 360-683-2007. TOPS 1296 meets Mondays with weigh-in at 10:30 a.m., followed by an 11 a.m. meeting, at 2531 E. Helm Drive. Phone Carol Packer at 360-452-1790. For further information about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Dream Machines The Peninsula Dream Machines will meet today at 11 a.m. at Fairview Grange, 161 Lake Farm Road. For more information, phone 360-452-3288.

VW club Strait Air Volksgruppe, a club for Volkswagen own-

STORE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9-5:30 • SAT. 10-4

Mark Leffers mark@mccrorie.com

The Sunday Summer Walkers meet every Sunday through the end of September at 5 p.m. at Seiberts Creek on Wild Currant Way. For further information, phone Debbie Clapp at 360-461-5862.

Boys & Girls Club The Mount Angeles unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula meets regularly weekdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 2620 S. Francis St. For information on membership, phone 360417-2831.

Eagles Club The Eagles club has an Aerie or Auxiliary meeting Mondays at 7 p.m. — Aerie the first and third Monday of the month, Auxiliary the second and fourth Monday of the month. Other club events include: Tuesdays — Texas Hold ’Em Poker, 6 p.m. Wednesdays — Auxiliary Ladies Bingo, 11 a.m.; Paddle Wheel Game, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.; membership drawing, 6 p.m. Thursdays — Bar Stool Bingo, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays — Texas Hold ’Em Poker, 6 p.m.

The Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam Transit Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. For further information, phone Bill Thomas at 360460-1040 or Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655.

American Legion Walter Akeley Post 29 meets the second Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Veterans Center at Third and Francis streets. Potential members are welcome. Military veterans as well as Merchant Marine personnel (December 1941-August 1945) may be qualified to become members.

n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“Captain America: The First Avenger” (PG-13) “Cowboys and Aliens” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG-13) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (PG-13) “The Smurfs” (PG)

“A Better Life” (PG-13) “Crazy, Stupid, Love” (PG-13) “Winnie the Pooh” (G)

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “The Tree of Life” (PG-13)

n  Wheel-In Motor Movie, Port Townsend (360-385-0859) “Super 8” (PG-13) “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” (PG-13)

Tuesday Special

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Men’s chorus

schedule your appointment today

2010 S. Oak St., P.A. • 457-5372

Christian women The Port Angeles Christian Women’s Connection’s August luncheon will take place Tuesday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Port Angeles CrabHouse, 221 N. Lincoln St. Deb Ferguson, owner of the Bedazzled Boutique, will discuss the boutique and have objects on display. Teri Schwiethal will provide the musical program, and there will be a special speaker. For luncheon reservations, phone 360-452-4343 or 360-457-8261.

German speakers

16 oz. T-Bone Steak includes rice, beans and pico de gallo

Tampering with any utility equipment can cause serious injury and may even cause death. Vandalism and theft is costly and could set off extensive power and utility outages.

American Legion Riders of Port Angeles is a group of motorcycle enthusiasts who ride to show their patriotism and support for the United States military. They ride for patriotic escorts and, occasionally, just for fun. The official meeting is the second Monday of every month and will immediately follow the American Legion meeting at the Veterans Center, Third and Francis streets. All qualified veterans riding any kind of motorcycle are welcome to join. For more information, phone Ron Macarty at 360808-2959.

American Legion

UTILITY VANDALISM AND THEFT = DANGER Utility facilities contain high voltage systems and are VERY DANGEROUS. Keep out of electric substations; pump houses and other utility facilities and buildings, as the equipment carries high voltage. Stay away from any PUD property marked “Danger,” “High Voltage,” or “Warning”.

Motorcyclists

The Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the The Port Angeles Alzheimer’s Caregiver Sup- Monterra Community Center in the Agnew area port Group, for caregivers, between Sequim and Port family members and Angeles. friends of those suffering Take Gunn Road to Finn from memory loss, meets the second Monday of each Hall Road. Turn left onto Finn Hall, turn right on month at 9:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Monterra Drive, and Monterra Community Center 328 E. Seventh St. will be straight ahead. The support group, The chorus, a chapter of which is sponsored by the the Barbershop Harmony Alzheimer’s Association, Society, is open to any men provides a confidential, who have an interest in comfortable setting in music and singing. which participants can There are no requireshare experiences, discuss ments to read music, nor is concerns and obtain inforsolo singing a requirement mation about the disease. to join the chorus. For more information, The chorus sings songs contact the group’s facilitain four-part harmony in bartors: Scott Buck at 360775-0867 or sfbuck@olypen. bershop style and also other a cappella song styles. com or Mardell Xavier at Visitors are welcome at 360-477-5511 or mxavier@ any meeting. olypen.com. For more information, phone 360-681-7761.

n  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

“Cars 2” (G) “The Change-Up” (PG-13) “Crazy, Stupid, Love” (PG-13) “Friends With Benefits” (R)

For qualifications, visit www.legion.org and click on “Join the Legion.”

Alzheimer’s group

Now Showing

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

185128445

PORT ANGELES

Toastmasters

ers and enthusiasts, will meet today at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. For further information, phone 360-452-5803.

“With over 25 years experience, I can provide you with direction, detail and purpose for all your floor covering needs.” 547 N. Oakridge (next to Wal-Mart) • 457-7500

The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit Community Tennis Association, meets regularly for free community play at Erickson Park, Fourth and Race streets. The Peninsula Tennis Club promotes tennis play and supports improvements to tennis facilities in Clallam County. For information on club activities, visit www. peninsulatennisclub.com or phone 360-460-2588.

The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Your Style, Our Expertise

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Tennis club meets

A German conversation circle, der Stammtisch, for those who speak and understand German meets weekly Wednesdays, with time and location variable. Members discuss current events, movies, books, music, food, evolving and changing language, or other subjects. For further information, phone 360-457-0614 or 360808-1522.

Garden club meets The Port Angeles Garden Club will meet Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at the home of Lou Lawrence, 704 Lawrence Road, for a summer potluck and bingo party. It will be hosted by Lou Lawrence and Mary Lou Waitz, with entertainment by Gertrud Rohrbach. Besides a dish for the potluck, members are asked to bring a wrapped bingo prize. Driving directions are: state Highway 112 to Freshwater Bay Road, Freshwater Bay Road to Lawrence Road, follow to end of the road. Turn

to

Clubs/C4

Peninsula Births Olympic Medical Center Meghan and Jack Hueter, Sequim, a son, Beckett, 8 pounds 11 ounces, 1:32 p.m. July 8.

Forks Community Hospital Stephanie Feist and Kyle Jewett, Forks, a son, Michael Tomas Politte, 6 pounds 2.7 ounces, 4:05 p.m. July 31. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

C3

Fruit-eating waxwing a handsome bird CEDAR WAXWINGS BELONG to the family “Bombycilladae.” This combination of Greek and Latin words translates as “silky-tailed.” Almost the entire name of this elegantly attired bird describes its appearance. Waxwing refers to the tips of its wings. They are red and look as if they have been dipped in sealing wax. A waxwing also has a yellow band on its tail and sports a sleek-looking crest that can be depressed or flattened. Its black mask resembles that worn by the Lone Ranger. August has long been the month when we expect to see (and hear) cedar waxwings in the yard as well as other favorite Northwest destinations. They can show up at any time, and this year, we were hearing their whispering calls in June and July. When it comes to birds, they have the softest of voices. The sound has been described as a high, thin lisp or a slightly trilled “zeee.” It’s sounds like a ringing whisper to me — if you can imagine such a sound. Waxwings usually call from the treetops or fruitladen thickets, and it takes time for the sound to pierce your thoughts and alert you to their presence. These are fruit-eating birds, but they are primarily insect eaters and will engage in some serious fly-

BIRD WATCH catching when Carson conditions are right. During the late summer months, we’ve watched them catching flies over the Hoh River. As the flying red ants emerge about this time, our hope is that the waxwings are shrinking the ant population. This action can be expected on other large rivers and river bars throughout the state, especially where the riverbanks are lined with trees. Once the berries on the shrubs and trees begin to ripen, that soft whispering chatter will be heard more and more. Mountain ash berries are a favorite. So are red dogwood buttons, pyracantha berries, the native white hawthorn, wild blackberries and both domestic and wild cherries. Like robins, waxwings gorge themselves on the fruit. It’s impressive when you see them swallow some of these berries whole. When the fruit is overripe and beginning to ferment, these mild-mannered birds can overindulge and become inebriated. Waxwings don’t get drunk. At this time of the year

Joan

Paul Carson

A cedar waxwing elegantly perches near a waterfall. when the waxwings arrive in our yards and other outdoor haunts, we can expect to see lots of youngsters traveling in these flocks. They are grayish-brown in color and appear to be more slender than the adults. There is a generous amount of faint streaking over their breasts and backs. Waxwings travel in large flocks, especially after the young are off the nest.

Briefly . . . for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service. For more information, email Bonnie Schock at bonnie.schock@goddard.edu or phone 360-344-4100.

PORT TOWNSEND — Goddard College presents “Gaia’s Garden, or How I Became an Ecological Artist” with guest artist Ana Flores on Saturday. The free event is the next installment in Goddard’s MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts, Port Townsend Residency, Visiting Artist Series. It will be held in the USO Hall at Fort Worden State Park. Flores, a Cuban-American sculptor, ecological designer and activist, will discuss the trajectory of her creative practice and the turning points in her artistic path that led to a reinterpretation of her role as an artist in society. She will also share her work. Her sculptural work focusing on cultural and ecological narratives is shown internationally and included in private, corporate and institutional collections throughout the U.S. and abroad. In 2006, Flores became the first artist-in-residence

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bear heavy crops and are worth checking out. “Sleek,” “handsome,” “gregarious” — these descriptions are a good hint of what to expect when we you spot the cedar waxwings. They’re one of the Northwest’s special birds.

________

Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

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SEQUIM — Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road will host its last ice-cream social of the year from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Cost for the event is $5. Proceeds will go toward maintenance and upkeep at the grange. Peninsula Daily News

175122109

185129322

1. Our local honey is not a person. 2. Our cookbooks are read and our beets are red, too. 3. Our Ukon Energy Drinks are from Japan, not the Yukon. 4. Our cigarette tobacco comes in humongous bags. 5. Our 99¢ chocolate muffins are more chocolaty than our blueberry ones. 6. Our oranges are sweet and juicy, but our jokes are just corny. 7. The newspaper costs 50 cents all over town, but here it’s just half a dollar. 8. We stock all the grocery staples but none of the stapler staples. 9. Our Garam Masala Curry Paste is hotter than our Biryani Curry Paste. 10.Our origami paper costs less than their origami paper. 10.Our woks can walk walks around their woks.

Ice-cream social

115109287

McPhee’s Grocery

SEQUIM — Chapter 430 of the Experimental Aircraft Association will offer free introductory Young Eagle flights to youths 7 to 17 at Sequim Valley International Airport starting at 10 a.m. Saturday. The Young Eagle Program was created to welcome young people into the world of aviation. Minors must be accompanied by or have written

permission from a parent or legal guardian. Flights are dependent on weather conditions. Youths will receive a free logbook with information on taking a free Sporty’s Flight Training ground school course (a $390 value.)

mature forests, parks, orchards and even the suburbs during the summer. In short, you can look for them almost everywhere there are trees. The best way to get a look at “Bombycilla cedrorum” is to listen for that soft lisp or ringing whisper. If there are cedar trees nearby, search the treetops. True to their name, they are fond of cedar berries. As summer creeps along, the cedar trees will

175125666

Visiting artist to speak Saturday

Family groups gather together and spend late summer into fall feeding on the ripening fruit as well as the latest hatch of flying insects. These gregarious birds that enjoy each other’s company are found in a wide mix of habitats. Open woodland, both wet and dry, deciduous or coniferous forests as well as forest edges attract them. They are found in

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C4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Give bride choice if she dislikes beard DEAR ABBY: I am a 40-year-old man with a baby face. It makes me appear much younger than I am — so much so that I have been carded when buying alcohol or lottery tickets. People also seem to relate to me based on the age they perceive me to be. Four months ago, I grew a beard, which makes me look more my age. I’m an actor, and in the past, audiences had difficulty accepting me in certain roles because of my youthful appearance. My beard solved that problem. My sister-in-law is getting married this summer and insists I shave my beard for the ceremony and wedding photos. I keep it well-groomed,

Dear Conflicted: Your letter reminds me of the ones I have printed about and it gives Abigail brides who don’t want anyme more Van Buren one associated with their confidence wedding to be overweight, when dealtattooed or have an ing with unusual hairdo. people. They’re so preoccupied I don’t with how things will look want to that they forget there are shave it. people, not mannequins or My sispuppets, involved. ter-in-law is You should not have to recovering shave your beard in order from cancer, and my wife to be an usher. thinks I’ll look like a jerk if Offer your sister-in-law I refuse to comply. a choice: Either you can I’m not part of the wed- remain as you are, or she ding party, but I am the can find someone else to head usher and will be in steer her guests to their many of the family photos. seats. Is her request appropriDo not be confrontaate? tional about it. My father-in-law has a The choice will be hers. beard, but he hasn’t been asked to shave it. Dear Abby: You often Conflicted in Canada advise readers who have

DEAR ABBY

the time to reach out and volunteer. There’s a little-known program in every state that was mandated by a 1978 amendment to the “Older Americans Act.” It’s the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. Its goal is to help ensure that long-term care facility residents live harmoniously and with dignity, feeling free to voice complaints or concerns without reprisal. There’s a need nationwide for volunteers to make this program work. The ultimate goal is to have one volunteer in each nursing home. After training is completed, volunteers spend eight to 16 hours a month visiting their assigned nursing homes.

They talk with the residents and observe conditions. If there’s a complaint, they take it to their regional ombudsman for resolution. Once residents get to know and trust you, they will share wonderful life stories. Some of them have no one to talk to, no visitors or family. A volunteer ombudsman is the voice for those who have none and helps to make each community a better place to live for all its residents. The nursing homes like to have volunteer ombudsmen visit their facilities because they want to provide the best care possible for their residents. Jill in Van Buren, Ark.

Dear Jill: Forgive me if this seems cynical, but some do and some don’t — which is exactly why it’s so important that there are trained observers willing to regularly visit nursing home patients to ensure they are properly cared for. Readers, this is important work. If you are interested in volunteering, contact your local social services agency, Department of Aging or search online for the word “ombudsman” and the state in which you reside.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C2 Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets. The group’s mission and Peninsula Paddlers core purpose is to improve The Olympic Peninsula the lives of women and Paddlers Club meets every girls in local communities second Wednesday at and throughout the world. 7 p.m. at the Vern Burton Those wishing to volunCommunity Center meetteer in an atmosphere of ing rooms, 308 E. Fourth support, friendship and fun St. are invited to join. The meeting is open to For further information, the public. visit the group’s website at www.sijetset.com.

Harmonica Society

The Port Angeles Harmonica Society meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Place Assisted Living Community, 520 E. Park Ave. All levels and ages of players welcome. For more information, phone Bob Vreeland, secretary, at 360-457-0239.

Soroptimist meets The Soroptimist International Port Angeles — Jet Set meets every Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Port

Golden Agers The Golden Agers meet every Thursday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., for bingo and socializing. Once a month, the group has a potluck. For further information, phone 360-417-8044.

PA Lions Club The Port Angeles Lions Club will meet Thursday at noon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. Amanda Rosenberg from

the Masters Gardeners will present the program. Watch for the Free Health Screening Unit coming in September. For information on the screening or on the Lions’ eyeglass recycling program, phone 360-417-6862.

phone Janet E. Boyce at 360-417-2896.

Wood artisans

The Pacific Northwest Wood Artisans meets the second Thursday of each month from 9:30 a.m. to noon in the craft room of the Port Angeles Senior Surgical weight Center, Seventh and Peabody streets. Surgical Weight Loss Members include but Support Group meetings are not limited to carvers, are Thursdays from 7 p.m. driftwood artists, wood to 8 p.m. at Terrace Apartturners, intarsia artists, ments, 114 E. Sixth St., in furniture makers and chain the multipurpose room. saw artists. This group has a Anyone interested in licensed practical nurse as giving old wood new life is one of the starting memwelcome. bers. For more information, There will be a broad phone Don Taylor at 360spectrum of people, some beginning the process to get 582-0505. a gastric bypass and some Olympic Minds who have already had surgery and are willing to help Olympic Minds, The others acquire vital inforInstitute of Noetic Sciences mation on the process. community group for Guest speakers will Sequim and Port Angeles, assist with information and meets the first three Thursa question-and-answer days of each month at time. 1 p.m. in the conference For further information, room of The Lodge at Sher-

wood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

Alzheimer’s group Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the second Thursday of every month from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Room 401 of Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone Kathy Burrer at 360582-9309.

Grennan Post 62 meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at American Legion Hall, 107 E. Prairie St. All veterans are welcome. For more information, leave a phone number at 360-683-5915.

Radio controllers

Olympic Radio Control Modelers Group meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. The models fly at 1520 Sequim Lions Critchfield Road, off EdgeThe Sequim Valley Lions wood Drive. Club meets the second and For more information, fourth Thursday of every phone Rich Hixson at 360month at the Islander 461-7470. Pizza and Pasta Shack, 380 E. Washington St. Timber Town Dinner is at 5:30 p.m., Monthly meetings of followed by a meeting at Olympic Timber Town are 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the For more information, month at 7 p.m. at the Port phone 360-683-9999. Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. American Legion American Legion Jack

Turn

to

Clubs/C5

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In this Mt. view 3 BR/2.5 BA, 2,029 SF on 1.70 acres. Deck, concrete patio, fire pit & great landscaped garden to sit and enjoy the awesome Mt. view. Large kitchen w/maple floors, butcher block island. Plus detached 2-car garage w/RV parking. ML#251996 $377,500

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Nice homes in this development close to town. Owner financing available on this lot. ML#251194 $48,000

CUTE COTTAGE

In gated Maple Grove, 2 BR/2 BA + loft. Open floor plan, nice kitchen, enclosed porch with storm windows, laundry room & 1-car garage. Home has never been lived in full time nor used as a rental. Laminate & tile flooring - all appliances PLUS your own boat slip. ML#261459 $275,000

NICE NEIGHBORHOOD

With privacy - 1999 mfg. 3 BR/2 BA home. New carpet, paint, move-in ready. Large LR/ DR with pellet stove, kitchen with eat-in area. Home is on 1.25 acres + additional 1.25 acre with an older septic system could be possible building site or 2.5 acres for privacy. ML#251922 $235,000

WILLOW PARK 185129342

Liz Parks

Best view lot, close to everything, quality homes in this small subdivision. Owner financing available. ML#251183 $46,000

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

C5

Sedums, herbs good at warding off deer FINALLY, AUGUST IS beginning to look like our typical, gorgeous summer climate. Your now trimmed-down flowers (for those of you with nerves of steel) along with that monthold vegetable garden (I know you all took my advice and planted) are really going to soak up the sun. And speaking of that elusive sunshine, make sure you adjust your watering habits; we aren’t accustomed to numerous warm and sunshine-filled days, and the ground beneath your flowers will be getting drier than you may suspect or have gotten used to. When the ground gets very dry, arid soil does not soak up water very well. In fact, I just missed two days of watering my wife’s flowers at the clinic, and it took me more than double the normal time in order to soak the soil to at least

A GROWING CONCERN 4-6 inches in depth. May So please, now that all is well in the garden, take care of your plants by watering them properly in what should be our typically beautiful August — dry, hot and sunny weather. And since we are mentioning elusive things, how about deerresistant plants? A question came into the mailbox that had the No. 1 question I get everywhere I speak or travel. Q: Thank you for your interesting column on sedum and herbs.

Andrew

How interested are deer in these plants? Thanks, Laurel, Port Townsend A. Oh, Laurel, you have asked the age-old question: What plants do deer eat? We all know that when we have purchased those tagged deer-resistant plants, the deer have chewed them up. I have a theory that is welltested in my work here, on the East Coast, the heartland of America and Europe: Deer will eat your favorite plant. First you really like your favorite plant, adore it, treat it right. You give it great soil, water and fertilizer, then prune it well, for after all, it is your favorite plant. Then you give it a great location, easy to see, a really standout spot perfect for your favorite plant. When deer pass by your yard, they are always looking to see

what you brought them home from the nursery. And they will always walk over to inspect this new morsel, by which I mean your new plant. And here is the trick: They will always take a bite, each and every deer that sees this new treat. Regardless of whether or not they will like it, each and every deer will take a bite. But this means that even plants that are deer-resistant will be chomped on by each and every deer, so they may never learn it is foul-tasting. So just because a plant is pulled out of the freshly planted bed or pot and chewed almost to nothing does not mean deer like it. It only means that all the deer that will ever come on to your property must learn that they don’t like it. And deer are stupid, unable to communicate to their new off-

spring how bad your favorite plant tastes, so each and every newborn must take a bite for themselves. However, Laurel, the great news is sedums and almost all herbs, especially the aforementioned Mediterranean herbs, are definitely detested by deer. They aren’t desired at all, except for the first bite, and Laurel and everyone, if you have planted five different types of sedum, each and every deer must take a bite out of all five. This is why sedums and herbs are even more wonderful because the deer think they aren’t.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4

Veterans for Peace German club

Counseling, 1020 Caroline St. For further information, phone 360-452-2443.

HOPE meets Humorous OpenMinded Parent Educators, HOPE, is an inclusive group of home-schooling parents and children who meet Fridays. Time and location are variable. All are welcome. For further information, phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at 360-452-5525 or visit http://tinyurl. com/476hj8b.

Korean vets meet The Olympic Peninsula Korean War Veterans group and Korean Defense Veterans Chapter No. 310 meet the second Friday of the month at 1:30 p.m. at the Elks Naval Lodge in the second-floor boardroom, 131 E. First St. Anyone who served in Korea during the war and after the truce was signed in 1953 is eligible for membership. For more information, phone Gerald P. Rettela at 360-457-6994.

Olympic International Footprint Association Chapter 74 meets the second Overeaters Anonymous Monday of every month at meets Mondays at 4:15 the Sequim Elks Lodge, p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal 143 Port Williams Road. Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave. The group is an associaFor further information, tion of active and retired phone 360-683-4682 or law enforcement and fire 360-417-80083. personnel and welcomes community members who Chorus invitation support public safety. The Grand Olympics Dinner begins at 6 p.m., Chorus invites women who followed by the business enjoy singing to join the meeting. Sweet Adeline practice any For more information, Monday night at 6:30 p.m. phone 360-681-0533. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. French Club No formal training or The French Club invites experience needed. anyone who knows French For further information, or would like to learn to phone 360-683-0141 or, meet every week at Sequim from Port Townsend, phone Bible Church, 847 N. 360-385-4680. Sequim Ave. Beginners meet Tues-

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SEQUIM HEALTH & REHABILITATION, located at 650 West Hemlock St., recently conducted a satisfaction survey for its residents and family members, in conjunction with My InnerView, an independent survey, research and data management firm. The results of the survey indicate that 88% of respondents were satisfied overall with the services offered at the center and 90% of respondents would recommend the center to others. “These survey results are a true reflection of the quality care we give at Sequim Health and Rehabilitation and the people who provide that care to our residents,” said Ed Ebling, Administrator. “All of our team members are passionate about patient care and customer service and our survey results are taken very seriously,” he added.

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The Sequim Bereavement group meets Tuesdays from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Assured Hospice office, 24 Lee Chatfield Way. For further information, phone 360-582-3796.

Sequim Senior Softball Recreational Club meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie Blake Park (weather permitting) for practice and pickup games. All levels of players, men 55 years and older and women 50 years and older, are welcome to participate for good fun and exercise. For further information, phone John Zervos at 360681-2587 or email jazervos@gmail.com.

“We would like to thank our residents and family members for taking time from their busy lives to complete these surveys. The results are vital in helping to celebrate and share our achievements with our peers, while providing opportunities for growth and improvement in each of our centers,” stated Tim Lukenda, President and CEO, Extendicare, Inc.

Keith Sheeler, LD, 30+ Years Experience 680 W. WASHINGTON, SUITE E-106, SEQUIM, WA LOCATED IN THE SAFEWAY PLAZA

Bereavement

Senior softball

Current residents are surveyed each year to help both the center and the corporation gain feedback about the care and services residents receive. The information is then used to develop and implement quality improvement plans for both the center and the organization as a whole, which are designed to enhance the customers’ experience.

FREE CONSULTATIONS

The Clallam County Pilots Association Safety Breakfast will be Friday at 7:30 a.m. at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101.

Footprinters

Overeaters

The Sequim City Band rehearses each Monday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Swisher Hall behind the Square dance club bandstand at the James Center for the Performing Strait Wheelers Square Arts, 563 N. Rhodefer Dance Club meets the secRoad, just north of Carrie ond and fourth Saturday of Blake Park. every month from 7:30 p.m. For further information, to 10 p.m. at Mount Pleasphone 360-683-4896 or ant Community Hall, 2432 visit www.sequimcityband. Mount Pleasant Road. org. The cost is $5. For more information, Bridge club phone 360-452-6974. The Sequim Duplicate Bridge Club meets reguSequim and the larly each Monday and FriDungeness Valley day at noon at the Masonic Temple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. The club is affiliated Cooties meets with the American Contract Bridge League, which Cooties meets the first provides sanctions for stanSunday of the month at dard duplicate, unit and 3 p.m. at the VFW Hall, championship games. 169 E. Washington St. Play is open to the pubFor more information, phone the post at 360-683- lic, with visitors welcome at any time. 9546.

Pilots breakfast

Monterey $499

A German club meets Mondays at 2 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone 360-681-0226 or 360-417-0111.

days from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., intermediates meet Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., and advanced meet Fridays for a reading and conversation group from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-681-0226.

185128455

Veterans for Peace, Tony Olympic Timber Town is van Renterghem chapter, developing a 57-acre will meet Saturday at museum and heritage cen- 2:30 p.m. at Olympic Uniter on the former Clallam tarian Universalist FellowLog Yard on West U.S. ship Hall, 73 Howe Road, Highway 101. off North Barr Road. The group encourages All veterans of military all timber and logging his- service, foreign or domestic, tory buffs to join in preare eligible for full memserving this part of the bership. Olympic Peninsula heriNonveterans are weltage. comed as associate memFor further information, bers. phone Bob Harbick at 360Membership includes 452-8248. veterans and nonveterans from Clallam and Jefferson Soroptimists meet counties. VFP works to support Soroptimist Internaveterans and bring about tional Noon Club meets every Friday at noon at the peaceful solutions to interBushwhacker, 1527 E. First national problems. For more information, St. phone David Jenkins at Soroptimist is an international organization with 360-385-7612. a focus on making a differCoin club meets ence for women. Locally, the club supThe Port Angeles Coin ports the community Club will meet Saturday though scholarships, Oper- from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. ation Uplift and other proj- in the Raymond Carver ects. Room at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. Quit nicotine The meeting is open to The Nicotine Anonythe public. mous Fellowship Group For more information, meets every Friday at phone 360-928-0239. 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove

Coffee and refreshments are offered at each game. For further information, phone 360-691-4308; for partnership arrangement, phone 360-582-1289.


C6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5 N. Sequim Ave. Visitors are welcome. For further information, Ladies auxiliary phone Lynnette Baughman Veterans of Foreign at 360-683-7178. Wars Ladies Auxiliary 4760 meets the second LapBand support Tuesday of each month at The Peninsula LapBand 1 p.m. at the VFW Post Support Group meets the building, 169 E. Washingsecond Wednesday of every ton St. month at 6 p.m. in the For more information, basement of St. Luke’s phone Bonnie Woeck at 360-681-0434 or the post at Episcopal Parish, 525 N. Fifth Ave. 360-683-9546. Those attending should use the ramp on the left VFW meets side of the building. Veterans of Foreign For more information, Wars meets every second phone 360-582-3788 or Tuesday of the month at 360-681-0202, or email 2 p.m. at the VFW Post PenLapBand@q.com. building, 169 E. Washington St. Round-table talk For more information, The Clallam County phone the post at 360-683Democratic Club will host 9546. a round-table discussion Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Brain-injury group Pioneer Park Club House The Brain Injury Associ- at 387 E. Washington St. ation of Washington meets The event will be modthe second Tuesday of erated by Clallam County every month from 3 p.m. to Democratic Central Com4:30 p.m. at the VFW Hall, mittee Chairman Matthew 169 E. Washington St. Randazzo. Among the speSurvivors of strokes or cial guests will be county brain injuries of any kind and environmental leaders as well as family, friends Bob Lynette, co-chairman and caregivers are welof the North Olympic come. Group of the Sierra Club; For more information, Darlene Schanfald, Olymleave a message for Stepic Environmental Council; phen Stratton at 360-582and Diana Somerville, an 9502. environmental journalist. Refreshments will be available. Outriders meet For further information, The Olympic Peninsula Outriders, an organization phone the Democratic headquarters at 360-683of informal retired motorcycle riders, meets Wednes- 4502. days at 7:30 a.m. at The Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Wash- PC Users Group ington St. The Sequim PC Users No dues, no rules, just Group (SPCUG) will presfriendship among retired ent “Video Editing with Al riders. Bergstein” on Wednesday The group has day rides at 7 p.m. at the Sequim and other rides throughout Senior Activity Center, 921 the year. E. Hammond St. Bergstein of MountainQuilters meet stone Video Productions in Port Townsend will discuss The Sunbonnet Sue current aspects of video Quilters meet every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the editing for both consumers and professionals. Sequim Masonic Temple, The discussion will 700 S. Fifth Ave. include video editing The second Wednesday options, such as Adobe Preof the month is the busimier and Sony’s Vegas softness meeting. At the close of the busi- ware, and demonstrations concerning why he chose ness meeting, birthdays of the current month are cele- Vegas. brated with cakes and the This presentation will gift of a fat quarter (an provide information to 18-inch-by-22-inch piece of those interested in editing fabric popular with quilvideo for YouTube or ters). Vimeo. On the last Wednesday A suggested donation of of the month, the guild $5 is requested from nonmeets to work on commumembers to help defray nity quilts. costs. Completed quilts are For further information, distributed to fire victims, visit http://spcug.net or Habitat for Humanity email spcug1@gmail.com. home recipients, foster children and other needy or Food addicts meet worthy causes. Food Addicts in RecovAll meetings are open to ery Anonymous meetings the public. For further information, are Thursdays. For information on place phone Joan Mack at 360and time, phone 360-452681-0795. 1050.

TOPS 1135

TOPS 1135 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847

Orchid Society The Olympic Peninsula Orchid Society will host a special presentation by Norman Fang of Norman’s

Orchids, vice president of the American Orchid Society, on Thursday at 1 p.m. at the Sequim Prairie Garden Club at Pioneer Memorial Park, 387 W. Washington St. Fang will present a workshop on Harlequin Phalaenopsis orchids. His website can be found at www.orchids.com. Nonmembers are invited. A donation of $2 per person is requested to defray the cost. Seating is limited. For further information, phone 360-385-3723.

Gamblers Anonymous meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road. For further information, phone 360-460-9662.

the Sequim Masonic Lodge, South Fifth and Pine streets. The show is free and open to all. Postage stamps featuring graphic novels (comics) will be exhibited, as well as the postal history of Washington and Oregon. Children will be given free stamps, and there are free stamp publications available while they last. Six stamp dealers from both sides of Washington and from Oregon will be available to evaluate collections, as well as sell new and used stamps. The Strait Stamp Society also provides a penny table for collectors of all ages. Door prizes are drawn on the hour. The Sequim Post Office will be represented, with current U.S. stamps and a special cancellation, which this year commemorates the 100th anniversary of Sequim High School. Snacks will be available on-site, and attendees may vote on their favorite stamp exhibit. For more information, phone Cathie Osborne at 360-683-6373 or email rickcath@wavecable.com.

Calligraphy group

Gem and mineral

Spanish club A Spanish club with conversation and study for intermediate Spanish students meets every Thursday at 2 p.m. at Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St. For further information, phone 360-681-0215.

Gamblers meet

Peninsula Scribes meet the second Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Parkwood Clubhouse across from Sunny Farms in Sequim. Participants will learn more about calligraphy and paper arts. There is a new project each month. Those coming may bring a bag lunch, and coffee and refreshments will be provided. For more information, phone Linda O’Neill at 360-477-4356 or email Fontluvr@aol.com.

The Clallam County Gem and Mineral Association will have its annual open house Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lapidary Shop on 81 Hooker Road, Space No. 5. There will be demonstrations and some completed projects on display.

Forks and the West End

Exchange group A local currency group, North Olympic Exchange, will host an orientation to explain how this system works to build a more sustainable community by trading services, skills and goods today at 5 p.m. at Dundee Hill Center, 32nd and Hancock streets, Port Townsend. For further information, phone Mike Dobkevich at 360-379-2627 or email dobkevich1@q.com.

Quilcene Lions The Quilcene Lions Club will meet Monday at 6:30 p.m. at the Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene. For more information, phone Harold Prather at 360-765-4008.

Falls Interpretive Trail will follow the business meeting. Members are asked to begin thinking of ideas and contacts for next year’s programs and field trips. A planning meeting will be held following the September meeting when ideas can be submitted. Prior to that, ideas can be given directly to President Tom Giske or program Chairwoman Kathleen Taylor. For further information, phone Tom Giske at 425302-5925.

Coast Guard flotilla

The East Jefferson Chapter of Puget Sound Anglers will meet Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Marina Room at Hudson Point Marina, 103 Hudson St., Port Townsend. Refreshments will be served, and the public is invited.

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 41, Port Ludlow, meets the second Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Port Ludlow Fire Station, 7650 Oak Bay Road, Port Ludlow. All are welcome. Participants are invited to make a contribution to the local community, meet new people and get involved in boating on the Puget Sound. (You don’t have to own a boat.) For more information, visit http://a1300401. uscgaux.info/.

PT Scrabble Club

TOPS meeting

Puget anglers

The Port Townsend Scrabble Club meets Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Water Street Creperie, 1046 Water St. (next to Public House). Players will be matched up at their level and will be helped to improve their score. The group provides Scrabble dictionaries. Participants are asked to bring a Scrabble board if possible. For more information, email newsmann@ mannpublications.org.

TOPS 1393 meets Thursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and a meeting at 9 a.m. at the Evergreen Coho Resort Clubhouse, 2481 Anderson Lake Road, Chimacum. Visitors are welcome. For further information, phone Jack West at 360765-3164.

PT Lions Club

The Port Townsend Lions meet the second Thursdaysof each month at FOFA meets 6 p.m. at the Highway 20 Road House, 2152 Sims Friends of Forks Animals monthly meetings are Garden club meets Way, Port Townsend. After dinner, there will the first Wednesday of the The Port Ludlow GarPC genealogy month at 6:30 p.m. at the be a presentation by a den Club will meet The Computer GenealForks Community Center, Wednesday at 11 a.m. at guest speaker. ogy Users Group will meet 91 Maple St. the Beach Club. Meetings are open to all Friday from 10 a.m. to Guest speaker Idie The public is welcome to parties interested in assistnoon at the Sequim Ulsh, founding president of ing the hearing- and visionattend. Library, 630 N. Sequim For further information, the Washington Butterfly impaired members of the Ave. Association, will present a visit www.friendsofforks community. Kit Stewart will share fast-moving program on animals.org or phone the For further information, her research of New York butterflies, including plants phone 360-379-4686. message line at 360-374during the Revolutionary and gardening designs for 3332. War period. attracting butterflies. PT SLUG meets Meetings are free and She will identify many Historical society PT SLUG, a Macintosh open to the public. butterflies found in our The West End Historical area and share her photousers group, will meet meets every second graphs of the butterfly’s Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Deaf Coffee House Society Tuesday at noon at JT’s Tri-Area Community Cenlife cycle. The Deaf Coffee House Sweet Stuffs, 120 S. Forks ter, 10 West Valley Road, The August meeting is a meets the second Friday of Ave., Forks. Chimacum. brown bag lunch, with bevevery month from 6 p.m. to For more information, erages and dessert supA basic Mac “how-to” 9 p.m. in the Geneva Hall phone 360-327-3318. plied by the month’s hostbegins at 6:30 p.m. of Sequim Community esses. The public is welcome. Church, 960 N. Fifth Ave. It is open to nonmemFor further information Port Townsend and and Cape Hope Way. bers for a $5 fee. and for newsletters, visit Participants are asked Jefferson County Dues of $20 for 2011 www.ptslug.org. to bring a refreshment to may be paid at the door or share. mailed to PLGC, P.O. Box Food Addicts Donations are appreciTOPS in PT 65235, Port Ludlow, WA ated. Food Addicts in RecovThe Port Townsend 98365. Membership proFor further information, Chapter of Take Off ery Anonymous, a support vides free attendance at email sdch_2010@comcast. Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) group, meets Saturdays meetings, discounted field net. from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. meets every Monday at trips and an invitation to at First Baptist Church, 5:30 p.m. at the Church of the members-only holiday Stamp show 1202 Lawrence St., Port Christ, 230 A St., Port tea. Townsend. Townsend. The 2011 Strait Stamp A tour of the Native For further information, For further information, Plants Garden located at Show will be held Saturday phone 360-385-1081. from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the entrance to the Ludlow phone 360-385-0318.

Briefly . . . Symphony to host wine, food, music

She is responsible for 379-8051 or email nerreca@ the establishment of the nosc.org. Protection Island National Nominations open Wildlife Refuge. The winner and nomiPORT TOWNSEND — nees will be honored at the The Port Townsend Marine Port Townsend Marine SciScience Center is seeking PORT ANGELES — ence Center’s Stewardship nominations for the 2011 The Port Angeles SymBreakfast at the Fort Worphony will present an eve- Eleanor Stopps Environden State Park Commons mental Leadership Award. at 8 a.m. Thursday, Sept. ning of “Wine, Food and Nominations must be Music” at Camaraderie 29. submitted by email or Cellars, 334 Benson Road, For more information, received at the Port at 6 p.m. phone Brian Kay at 360Townsend Marine Science Attendees can enjoy a 385-5582 or email info@ Center office at 532 Batconcert by the ensembles ptmsc.org. from the Port Angeles Sym- tery Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368, by 5 p.m. phony in a garden setting Food drive Wednesday, Aug. 31. while enjoying wine from Papa Murphy’s locations The application form Camaraderie Cellars. in Port Angeles, Sequim can be downloaded at Tickets are $75 per perand Port Townsend are www.ptmsc.org. son. joining Northwest Harvest Nominees are North Attendees should bring to host a food drive Olympic Peninsula citizens a lawn chair. through August. who are “stewards of the For reservations, phone Customers who bring a environment and have 360-457-5579. demonstrated leadership in nonperishable food item to efforts to protect the natu- a Papa Murphy’s location Salmon group will receive $1 off the total ral world.” pizza purchase that day, in PORT ANGELES — Eleanor Stopps is an The North Olympic Salmon advocate for lasting protec- addition to any other special discounts. Coalition will hold its tion of the North Olympic For more information, annual meeting at the Peninsula environment. visit www.northwest Elwha Klallam Heritage With no special political harvest.org. Training Center from base or powerful financial 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, backers, she testified before Volkswagen show Aug. 27. the state Legislature and The event is open to the Congress and was instruBLYN — The Strait Air public, but reservations are mental in getting legislaVolksgruppe will hold the required by Friday. tion and public support for fifth annual Volks Fair at 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 protection of the area. To RSVP, phone 360-

6:30 p.m. Friday. There is no charge for admission. For more information, Environment talk phone Kelly Lovall at 360SEQUIM — Clallam County Democratic Central 417-9551 or email klovall@ Committee Chairman Mat- portangelesschools.org. thew Randazzo will moderWalk to remember ate the Clallam County Democratic Club’s roundFORKS — The second table discussion at Pioneer annual A Walk to RememMemorial Park, 387 E. ber will be held at Tillicum Washington St., at 7 p.m. Park from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday. Saturday. Bob Lynette, co-chairThe event is for those man of the North Olympic who have lost loved ones Group of the Sierra Club; and serves as a fundraiser Darlene Schanfald of the for the Kassi Hansen Olympic Environmental Board reunion set Council; and writer Diana Memorial Scholarship Fund. Somerville will be among PORT ANGELES — The fund provides a the special guests attendThe Friends of the Port scholarship to a graduating ing. Angeles Library will hold senior interested in pursuRefreshments will be their first board reunion ing a career in the medical from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tues- available. field. For more information, day. Hansen was killed while phone 360-683-4502. The event will be held riding as a passenger in a at the Elwha Heritage drunken driving accident YMCA hosts play Center, First and Peabody in March 2008. streets. PORT ANGELES — Cost is $25 for a family, The Friends of the Port The Clallam County Fam$15 for an individual, with Angeles Library hope to ily YMCA Drama Camp honor former members who will present “The Lion, the lunch available for $7. T-shirts are available for have made it possible for Witch and the Wardrobe” $15 from This End Up Custhe success of the Friends at the Port Angeles High tom T’s. in recent years. School auditorium, 304 E. For more information, All former members are Park Ave. phone 360-640-8722, 360invited. Casual dress is Performances will be 374-3351 or 360-640-9913. requested for the event. held at 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Thursday and For more information, Peninsula Daily News U.S. Highway 101, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 28. The free event includes a car show, a swap meet and raffles. The car show is open to all Volkswagens. Car show entries are $20 each. Ditty bags go to the first 50 entrants. Swap meet spaces are $15 each. For more information, phone 360-452-2550 or email straitairvolks gruppe@earthlink.net.

phone Fowler Stratton at 360-452-0700.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

MAC to host open house Peninsula Daily News

50-mile

hikers

Members of Port Angeles Boy Scout Troop 1460 recently completed a 50-mile hike in the Olympic Mountains from the Whiskey Bend Ranger Station, over Low Divide, to the North Fork of the Quinault River. Along the way, they encountered snow, swift-water river crossings and bears. Shown in the photo at the Whiskey Bend Trailhead are, from left, Tom Wahl, Jakob Lindquist, John Henry, Marc Henry, Matthew Waldrip, Martin Waldrip and Pete Waldrip.

Free workshops slated on turning debris into fertilizer Peninsula Daily News

QUILCENE — Free workshops on Hugelkultur, a method of turning woody yard debris into self-fertilizing raised garden beds, will be offered in August and September. A workshop will be held at Quilcene’s Serendipity Farm from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 21, and at Port Hadlock’s Sunfield Farm from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18.

All are welcome, and no registration is required. Jefferson County Conservation District Manager Al Latham and Public Works Solid Waste Coordinator Al Cairns will lead these hands-on workshops and demonstrate how to create a fertile garden from “waste” materials that are readily on hand and usually free for the taking. A farm-grown lunch will be served at the Serendipity Farm event for $10, and

strawberry shortcake is planned for the Sunfield Farm event. The first 100 attendees will receive a free canvas tote bag, compliments of the Jefferson County Farmers Market.

Partnership “You just couldn’t ask for two more beautiful settings for these workshops and we’re delighted to have found such great hosts for

them,” said Cairns. These workshops are a partnership between the Jefferson County Department of Public Works, Jefferson County Conservation District and The Jefferson County Farmers Market Association along with Serendipity Farm and Sunfield Farm. For more information, phone Cairns at 360-5938941 or email acairns@ co.jefferson.co.wa.

Death and Memorial Notice RICHARD D. SCHWARTZ April 17, 1941 July 28, 2011

Mr. Schwartz both a teaching and research facility. It is also used for monthly public open houses that draw hundreds of people annually to the campus to view the moon, stars and planets. Upon his retirement in 2003, the board of curators approved naming the campus observatory the Richard D. Schwartz Observatory in honor of his distinctive service to the University of MissouriSt. Louis. Just as important as Dick’s service to promote public interest in astronomy was his effort to make the campus observatory a research facility. Dick equipped and maintained the observatory with state-of-the-art detectors that allowed students to get their first taste of

Remembering a Lifetime available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

Slide show A Sequim schools alumni retrospective digital slide show will also be shown on a running loop during the open house, which is being held in conjunction with the Sequim All-Schools Reunion. A 10-panel Sequim schools history exhibit that was showcased at Sequim High School during its centennial celebration in January and recently donated to the MAC by the Sequim School District will also be on display. For more information about upcoming MAC events and the historical Dungeness Schoolhouse, including rental rates, visit www.macsequim.org.

Briefly . . . Cabiri troupe to perform Saturday

Discover or Access Pass is required to attend. These artists will dance, twirl and spin through the air on Daedalus, their freestanding 26-foot aerial dance stage. This evening is presented by Friends of Fort Flagler.

NORDLAND — The Cabiri performance troupe, a Seattle-based ensemble of 12 dancers who combine aerial arts, acrobatics, stilt Clarinet concert walking and fire dancing, SEQUIM — Clarinet will perform at Fort Flagler State Park at 7 p.m. Satur- quartet The Marmalades will perform at 1 p.m. day. Admission is $5, and no Sunday, Aug. 14. The concert will be held in the shade garden at McComb Gardens, 751 McComb Road. Initially a study group, Helen Z. Lewis the quartet, composed of Bob Golightly, Susan May 25, 1913 — Aug. 5, 2011 Helen Z. Lewis of Sequim Schultz, Jan Proebstel and died in Olympia. She was Signe Crawford, has developed into a performance 98. Her obituary will be pub- ensemble. The group has played lished later. Services: Services are together for 15 years, explorpending. Sequim Valley ing many ethnic styles. The program will include, Chapel is in charge of classical, jazz, modern, comiarrangements. www.sequimvalleychapel. cal and show tunes. Peninsula Daily News com

Death Notices

Richard O. Williams, Jr.

December 11, 1922 – June 14, 2011 Born in Hammond, Ore., Dick passed away peacefully in his Sequim home on Flag Day at 88. Dick kept his wit and was always considerate of others. Dick graduated from the RCA Institute after serving in the U.S. Coast Guard. He retired from WABC-TV in New York.

Wilma R. Williams

October 12, 1925 – June 24, 2011 Born on Staten Island, N.Y., Billie passed away peacefully at The Sequim Health & Rehabilitation Center at 85. Billie had an amazing memory and was a wonderful conversationalist. She graduated from New Dorp High School, S.I., N.Y. Billie and Dick were soul mates who shared a most amazingly loving marriage of 66 years. In their leisure time they traveled the USA in their R.V. The couple relocated to Sequim, Wash. in 1991 from their Oakwood, S.I., N.Y. home of many decades. They were an extraordinary couple, to know them was to love them. They are survived by: a son, Richard O. Williams III of S.I., N.Y.; two grandchildren; a sister, Janet E. Whitlock; a nephew, Archer Smith. They will be greatly missed by their loving niece Gail Jacobsen-Jovais and loving friends/aides: Alice Welch, Debra Bays, Tua Oberg, Kimberly SzubartSanders and Bonnie Filgol. Their daughter Jill sadly predeceased them in 2006.

Donations may be sent to: Volunteer HOSPICE of Clallam County, 540 East 8th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362, 360-452-1511, in loving memory.

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Drennan & Ford

Funeral Home and Crematory 260 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 www.drennanford.com www.veteransfuneralhomes.com PROUDLY SERVING THOSE WHO HAVE PROUDLY SERVEDSM

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is

Award for Excellence in Research and Creativity for his distinguished research record. Dick retired in 2003 after 28 years at UMSL. However, he kept active in research, using the Galaxy View Observatory, which he constructed adjacent to his home in Sequim. Characteristic of his broad scientific interests, this year, the Geological Society of America Today will publish Dick’s commentary on the scientific basis of anthropogenic global warming. He brought a deep compassion to local activities to raise awareness of climate change, offering thoughtful comments in local newspapers that reflected his unique combination of degrees in astrophysics and divinity. Dick is survived by his wife of 23 years, Eleanor McIntyre; six stepchildren; 14 grandchildren; two brothers; two nieces; and their families. Contributions in his memory can be made to the Richard D. Schwartz Scholarship at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. A memorial service celebrating Dick’s life will be held on Sunday, August 21, at 3 p.m. at the Sequim Senior Center. Donations for the Sequim Food Bank are preferred to flowers.

SEQUIM — The Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is heading back to school in August by hosting a special open house and booksigning event at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. The public is invited to meet local schools historian and a u t h o r I r e n e Wyman and tour the his- Wyman t o r i c a l schoolhouse, located at 2781 Towne Road, from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14. Wyman will also sign copies of her 2010 book, Clallam County Schools, East to West, which chronicles the history of North Olympic Peninsula schools from Blyn to Neah Bay and will be available for purchase at the event. Free raffle tickets to win an autographed copy of Wyman’s book will be given out during the event, and

light refreshments, including cookies and lemonade, will be served. Attendees can also have their photographs taken by MAC photographer-in-residence Robert Cooper in the historical classroom exhibit, located on the first floor of the schoolhouse.

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Richard D. Schwartz, professor emeritus of astronomy, died at his home in Sequim after a nearly three-year battle against pancreatic cancer. Richard was born in Pretty Prairie, Kansas. He was active in sports and band and graduated in 1959. After completing a Bachelor of Science at Kansas State University and a master’s degree in divinity at Union Theological Seminary in New York, he further studied astrophysics, receiving his doctorate from the University of Washington in 1973. When Dick arrived at the University of MissouriSt. Louis in 1975, he was the only astronomer in the Department of Physics. He built the astronomy program and initiated the Bachelor of Science in physics with an astrophysics option that the majority of physics majors choose. Dick was a wonderful teacher and provided outstanding leadership to the campus. He designed and provided oversight on the construction of the campus observatory that was completed in 1981. Since that time, the observatory has served as

scientific research. From 1991-2003, he managed the campus program for the NASA/Missouri Space Grant Consortium and mentored more than 30 research students in projects at the observatory. Some of the results have been published in astronomical journals. Many of those students went on to graduate school, and several have achieved tenure and distinction at major universities. In addition to Dick’s service to the University of Missouri-St. Louis, he compiled a distinguished record of research that gave him an international reputation as an astrophysicist. During his career, Dick pioneered a new research area studying the energetic mass loss in young stars, leading to hundreds of astronomers and physicists working in this area worldwide. He used a variety of unique telescopes to conduct his research, including the Hubble Space Telescope. There have been more than 2,000 citations to his 80 scientific papers. From 1979-1998, he had continuous funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation, and in 1999, he received the Chancellor’s

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WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 66

Low 50

66/51

66/49

69/48

67/49

Clouds giving way to some sun.

Increasing cloudiness.

Clouds giving way to some sun.

Clouds giving way to some sun.

Clouds giving way to some sun.

Partly sunny.

The Peninsula A weak dip in the jet stream will persist across the Pacific Northwest over the next few days, while surface high pressure will sit off the coast. The result will be largely dry weather with a weak onshore flow. Other than some low clouds to start along the Neah Bay Port coast, expect plenty of sunshine today with afternoon tem60/51 Townsend peratures right around average for this time of the year. Port Angeles 66/52 Tonight will start off clear, then low clouds will form near 66/50 the coast once again. The next couple of days will be Sequim similar to today.

Victoria 74/53

70/51

Forks 68/50

Olympia 75/48

Everett 70/53

Seattle 77/54

Spokane 84/57

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Clouds giving way to some sun today. Wind west 10-20 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Increasing cloudiness tonight. Wind west-northwest 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Clouds giving way to some sun tomorrow. Wind west 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Clouds breaking for some sun. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush

7:31 a.m. 7:21 p.m. Port Angeles 11:56 a.m. 8:57 p.m. Port Townsend 1:41 p.m. 10:42 p.m. Sequim Bay* 1:02 p.m. 10:03 p.m.

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

5.8’ 8.0’ 5.5’ 7.0’ 6.6’ 8.4’ 6.2’ 7.9’

1:14 a.m. 1:08 p.m. 3:57 a.m. 3:34 p.m. 5:11 a.m. 4:48 p.m. 5:04 a.m. 4:41 p.m.

0.3’ 2.5’ -0.3’ 4.5’ -0.4’ 5.9’ -0.4’ 5.5’

8:51 a.m. 8:28 p.m. 1:12 p.m. 9:51 p.m. 2:57 p.m. 11:36 p.m. 2:18 p.m. 10:57 p.m.

5.8’ 7.9’ 6.1’ 6.7’ 7.3’ 8.1’ 6.9’ 7.6’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 2:22 a.m. 2:17 p.m. 5:00 a.m. 5:03 p.m. 6:14 a.m. 6:17 p.m. 6:07 a.m. 6:10 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

New

0.2’ 2.8’ -0.6’ 4.9’ -0.8’ 6.4’ -0.8’ 6.0’

High Tide Ht 10:09 a.m. 9:35 p.m. 2:04 p.m. 10:55 p.m. 3:49 p.m. ----3:10 p.m. -----

6.0’ 8.0’ 6.6’ 6.5’ 7.9’ --7.4’ ---

Low Tide Ht 3:28 a.m. 3:25 p.m. 6:01 a.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:15 a.m. 7:44 p.m. 7:08 a.m. 7:37 p.m.

Aug 21

Sep 4

0.0’ 2.8’ -0.8’ 5.0’ -1.0’ 6.5’ -0.9’ 6.1’

City Hi Lo W Athens 91 75 s Baghdad 110 77 s Beijing 89 77 sh Brussels 69 51 sh Cairo 97 75 s Calgary 72 50 pc Edmonton 70 51 c Hong Kong 90 81 sh Jerusalem 82 63 s Johannesburg 59 38 s Kabul 99 61 sh London 68 54 r Mexico City 75 53 t Montreal 82 66 t Moscow 73 53 pc New Delhi 89 80 t Paris 75 57 pc Rio de Janeiro 89 76 s Rome 83 67 s Stockholm 77 55 r Sydney 70 49 pc Tokyo 86 77 t Toronto 82 68 pc Vancouver 74 59 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

AFFORS*06503

Atlanta 95/76 El Paso 97/76

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 99/80 Miami 92/80

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 95 63 63 95 88 89 85 88 84 90 77 84 97 88 88 92 82 85 106 95 83 89 82 57 85 88 99 61

Lo W 68 s 51 sh 54 pc 76 t 74 t 72 t 47 s 59 t 61 pc 63 s 67 t 69 t 78 t 54 s 66 t 70 t 51 s 52 pc 81 s 59 s 65 pc 68 t 46 pc 42 sh 53 s 74 s 80 s 46 pc

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 96 104 100 82 92 83 79 93 92 84 108 84 94 104 89 105 78 92 90 85 96 85 100 74 63 78 82 91

Lo W 72 pc 85 s 78 s 64 pc 80 t 63 t 63 pc 79 t 79 t 75 t 80 s 66 pc 78 t 83 s 74 t 89 s 55 pc 74 t 60 s 55 s 73 t 61 s 78 s 68 pc 53 pc 62 pc 54 s 76 t

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 113 at Chandler, OK

Low: 32 at Bodie State Park, CA

683-9619 385-2724 452-0840

✔ Trusted Experts ✔ Senior Discount ✔ Lifetime Warranty

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

New York 84/75

Washington 91/76

Los Angeles 82/64

First

Aug 28

Denver 95/59

Kansas City 96/72

Chicago 88/66

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A

San Francisco 63/53

Moon Phases

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 88/52 90/54

Today

Detroit 89/68

Sunset today ................... 8:42 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 5:58 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:09 p.m. Moonset today ....................... none Last

Minneapolis 79/63

Billings 88/59

Sun & Moon

Aug 13

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 77/54

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 67 55 0.00 10.66 Forks 70 55 0.02 76.29 Seattle 73 58 0.00 24.13 Sequim 74 59 0.00 10.99 Hoquiam 65 57 0.00 45.48 Victoria 71 55 0.00 20.66 P. Townsend* 64 55 0.00 12.22 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 70/52 Bellingham 71/53

Aberdeen 62/54

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, August 7, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . Legal issues of social media topic

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch

PORT ANGELES — A Aug. 5, 2011 Port Angeles lawyer will Dow Jones +60.93 outline “legal nightmares” industrials 11,444.61 involving Facebook, Twitter and other social media Nasdaq -23.98 composite in a presentation for this 2,532.41 week’s Port Angeles BusiStandard & -0.69 ness Association breakfast Poor’s 500 1,199.38 meeting on Tuesday. Donna Russell -12.17 2000 Knifsend, 714.63 whose NYSE diary company, Advanced: 810 Lawsuit Declined: 2,302 Prevention & ManageUnchanged: 51 ment, speVolume: 8.6 b Sue Stoneman/Peninsula Daily News cializes in Knifsend Nasdaq diary risk manAdvanced: 781 agement, business conhe big dig Declined: 1,856 tracts, employment issues Earth-moving equipment digs trenches that show the partial layout of the sprint boat and conflict management, Unchanged: 79 racetrack under construction at 2917 W. Edgewood Drive in west Port Angeles. A2Z will discuss how “innoVolume: 3.7 b cent” messages can harm AP Enterprises is developing the track, which will be filled with water to allow small, twoa person or business person, jet-propelled speedboats to race one at a time around the winding course. The debut Editors: All figures as of: legally. races are planned for Sept. 17. The investors plan for 3,000 to 5,000 spectators to attend. 6:05 PM EDT Subway of Port Open to the public, Townsend provides variTuesday’s PABA meeting NOTE: Figures reflect market a fluctuations of may sandwiches availafterety close; not match other AP content begins at 7:30 a.m. at able to the chamber audiJoshua’s Restaurant, 113 ence for $8 each. DelGuzzi Drive. Credit cards are not There is a $2.16 miniaccepted. mum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order MARKET BRIEF 080511: Chart shows daily market figures for Dow, S&P, Russell Hospital talk breakfast. 2000 and Nasdaq, along with NYSE and SEQUIM — The CEO diary; stand-alone; 1c x 4 inches; Marine attractions Nasdaq of Olympic Medical Center 112 pt x 288 pt; ETA 6:30 p.m. will deliver his first busiPORT ANGELES — ness group talk Tuesday Two Port Angeles-based since the hospital received marine attractions, the a temporary restraining Feiro Marine Life Center order last week against a and the Olympic Coast planned one-day strike by National Marine SanctuOMC’s labor union. ary, will be the topics of Eric this week’s Port Angeles Lewis will Regional Chamber of Commerce luncheon meet- keynote Tuesday’s ing on Monday. bimonthly Schedmeeting of uled speakBy Jeff Chew the ers are Peninsula Daily News SequimDeborah Dungeness Lewis SEQUIM — A group of business Moriarty, Valley leaders led by a former Everett events Feiro cenChamber of Commerce. coordinator hope that a balloon festiter director, The OMC Hospital val will lift the Sequim economy. and George Randy Tomaras — a Sequim resiDistrict, which covers Galasso, Moriarty dent and commercial photographer Sequim and Port Angeles, acting who previously organized the Everett last week achieved the superintendent of the centennial celebration, which included restraining order against marine sanctuary. a hot-air balloon festival — proposes the Service Employees Both two concurrent events in September have tour- International Union local, 2012: which had planned an ist attracn The balloon festival Sept. 1-3. 18-hour strike this comtions on n Accompanying tourist-drawing ing Thursday — but will the Port events during the “Best 10 Days in hold informational picketAngeles Washington” from Sept. 1-10, a referwaterfront ing instead. ence to the best weather period in the In addition to the hos— the region, statistically speaking. pital’s continuing labor Feiro Galasso Bret Wirta, owner of Holiday Inn negotiations, Lewis is Marine Express in Sequim, who voiced confiexpected to discuss Life Center, open daily at dence in Tomaras for his past history OMC’s proposed affiliathe entrance to City Pier, Randall Tomaras in events coordination, said he tion with Seattle’s Swedand the Olympic Coast believes the festival could fly. Promotional materials for a hot-air balloon festival and “Best 10 ish Medical Center, the National Marine Sanctu“It’s not just going to be balloon Days in Washington” in Sequim that would debut next year. effects of health-care ary’s Discovery Center festival,” Wirta said. “There are going reform on OMC, the nearby in The Landing to be a lot of related pieces.” growth of OMC’s services wind goes along quicker in the Strait business,” said Tomaras. mall. in the Sequim area and [of Juan de Fuca], then turns the cor“Particularly the artists need this. Open to the public, 40-acre location expansion of the OMC ner on Sequim Bay” and is in a more This is something for the artists.” Monday’s chamber lunch­ emergency room in Port Tomaras figures the events could The balloon festival is proposed on protected pocket, Wirta explained. eon begins at noon in the Angeles. The event will be formally draw up to 30,000 people over 10 days. 40 acres owned by Fred Grant, which upstairs meeting room at Tuesday’s chamber “I’m very confident that if Randall is leased to dairy hay farmer Troy announced Aug. 24 with balloons and the Port Angeles Crabevent begins with busiother attractions on display, Tomaras can work out the logistics, it’s going to Smith, just west of Purple Haze LavHouse Restaurant at the ness networking at 11:45 be a wonderful, wonderful festival,” ender Farm and between East Wash- said. Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. a.m. and food service at “Basically, it came up because of Wirta said. ington Street and West Sequim Bay Lincoln St. noon. the economy, and I said ‘What can we Road. Luncheon tickets are “It’s real good property because the do to build things up.’ — we need new Turn to Briefly/D5 Turn to Balloon/D3 $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

T

Hot-air balloon fest proposed for Sequim Events timed to ‘10 best’ weather days, backers say

Labor situation

Business

week of the

paid advertisement

The Water Limousine, a 26-foot vessel affectionately named Livin’ the Dream, gives passengers their own personal cruise ship. The 5-year-old business offers the only private water service on the North Olympic Peninsula. “It’s a cozy boat,” says Capt. Charles Martin. “It’s not at all like getting on a whale watching boat with 80 other people.” The boat’s classy, intimate quarters can accommodate up to six people (and pets are welcome too). While the vessel and its captain are all about ensuring passenger comfort —there’s even a queen-sized bed and bathroom on board — the itinerary is left up to you. Whether it’s a day of wildlife viewing and photographing or a romantic evening, Livin’ the Dream is at your service. Passengers can visit the Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge, the San Juan Islands or any other Pacific Northwest destination of their choice. They have also just announced landing passengers at the Dungeness Spit for tours of the lighthouse. Many people simply can’t make the

5-mile hike to see the lighthouse so arrangements have been made to accommodate that very popular destination. Trips typically leave from the John Wayne Marina in Sequim, but Capt. Martin says he can pick passengers up anywhere, whether it be Port Angeles or Seattle. “That’s why we call it ‘The Water Limousine,’” he says. “You just tell me where and when, and I’ll be there.” Livin’ the Dream is a powered catamaran which offer a smoother ride when the water gets a bit rough. The vessel is often chartered for transportation to unique destinations, day trips on the water and even memorial services where a loved one’s ashes can be spread at sea. Two-hour trips leaving from John Wayne Marina start at $195 and run up to $475 a day for up to six passengers. The Water Limousine can also arrange accommodations for passengers interested in overnight trips. The Water Limousine sails yearround and is available for service seven days a week. Capt. Martin is U.S. Coast Guard

Capt. Charles Martin, owner of The Water Limousine.

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Docking at John Wayne Marina in sequim

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5128704

PORT TOWNSEND — The state Department of Employment Security’s regional labor market economist will speak to this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce luncheon on Monday. Elizabeth Scott, the state labor economist serving Jefferson, Clallam and Kitsap counties, is expected to discuss Jefferson County’s labor outlook Jefferson County’s unemployment rate went from 9.4 percent to 9.8 percent in June, the latest figures available. The rate climbed even though the county added 100 service-providing jobs and gained 20 government jobs. “The bottom line is we’re not producing jobs fast enough,” Scott told the Peninsula Daily News when the figures were announced. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St.


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Memorable way to spend a birthday IN THE LATE 1700s, Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of the Treasury, pressed the case to Congress of the need for a fleet of boats to patrol the Eastern Seaboard to stem the tide of contraband that was flowing into the country. On Aug. 4, 1790, George Washington signed legislation that created the Revenue Cutter Service, the forerunner of today’s U.S. Coast Guard. What began as a fleet of 10 cutters and 100 people has evolved through the years into a worldwide force that encompasses hundreds of surface vessels, aircraft and field offices that are staffed by nearly 42,000 men and women. Last week — on Thursday morning, the 221st anniversary of the Revenue Cutter Service’s founding — a MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from the Port Angeles Coast Guard station on Ediz Hook made an unscheduled landing in a field between the old Port Angeles Speedway race track and Armstrong Marine, the aluminum boat fabricator on U.S. Highway 101 midway between Port Angeles and Sequim.

ON THE WATERFRONT Joe Beck of Sellars Armstrong Marine arrived at work at about 8:30 a.m. and learned from fellow coworkers that the helicopter first attempted to land in a field at Olympic Christian School at Highway 101 and O’Brien Road, but apparently the copter was kicking up too much dust for the pilot’s liking, so the crew opted for the race track site. Lt. Keidi Niemann, a Coast Guard public affairs officer, told me that a warning light aboard the copter had gone off, indicating the possibility of metal filings in the oil of the tail rotor’s gearbox. Niemann said protocol for this type of warning light dictates that the aircraft be landed at the first opportunity.

David G.

David G. Sellars/for Peninsula Daily News

The 88-foot motor-sailer Sea Angel sits at Platypus Marine Inc. in Port Angeles during her threemonth stay for refurbishing. Aircraft mechanics were sent out from the air station to make the necessary repairs. By about 2 p.m., the rotor system was back up and running and, according to Niemann, the helicopter was able to take off to keep a prior commitment at the Sequim Grange. Quite a birthday.

Harbor visitor

175128364

Erik Spirit, a 819-foot oil tanker, moored to the Port of Port Angeles’ Terminal 1 North early Wednesday afternoon. According to Chandra “Hollywood” McGoff of Washington Marine Repair, David G. Sellars/for Peninsula Daily News the topside repair company at the foot of Cedar Street, The 100-foot yacht Victoria 5 is getting new paint, among other projects. the Bahamian-flagged vessel will be dockside for and winters in the CaribPersonnel will also will soon be back in the about a week to allow its remove her stabilizers and bean. water and will make her workers to make a variety perform general mainteSix guests are accommo- way to Anacortes, where a of welding repairs. nance service including dated in three staterooms, rigger will install a new replacing the seals and and the motor-sailer has mast that is being fabriJoe Beck Stowed for 3 months bearings. enough water skis, knee cated on the East Coast. A Port Angeles Coast Guard helicopter sits near Platypus Marine has boards, fishing gear and Capt. Charlie said that the former Port Angeles Speedway after a Unusual exhibit had Sea Angel stowed in a kayaks to satisfy any recre- although the boat is listed warning light came on last Thursday. ational taste. Rubb building for about for sale, he is hearing rumAn exhibit that is Personnel at Platypus blings that the owner three months. inspired by the effects of made extensive repairs to might keep her because the time and the sea upon She is a 88-foot Sparkthe teak decking, sandrefurbishing is turning out marine woods and metal man & Stephens sailing Port Angeles Hardwood LLC yacht that was built by blasted the aluminum hull so well. will be on display at the Stephens Marine in Stock- and superstructure and Northwest Maritime Cen333 Eclipse Industrial Pkwy ton, Calif., and launched in gave the boat a new paint On the hard ter in the Tretter Gallery Port Angeles, WA 98363 job. 1986. at 431 Water St., Port Platypus last Monday On Friday morning, the Her 2,890 square feet of Townsend, from Aug. 18-31. Tel: (360) 452-6041 • Fax: (360) 417-6805 hauled out Victoria 5 and sails can have her cruising centerboard was pulled out Mare Tietjen is a sailor has her sitting on the hard and it, too, will be sandwho culls the beaches of SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! at about 10 knots. in the company’s yard on Sea Angel’s hailing port blasted and repainted. the Pacific Northwest durMarine Drive. According to Capt. is Newport, R.I., and is ing summer cruises for the KEEP YOUR ALDER SAWLOGS ON THE PENINSULA! She is a 100-foot HarCharlie Crane, director of usually available for charmaterials that are the grave Custom Yacht that Contact Randy Bartelt sales and marketing at ter during the summer basis of her art. was built by Kha Shing Platypus Marine, the boat At some point, Mare months in New England at (360) 739-6681 Enterprises in Kaohsiung, came to realize that most Taiwan, and launched as of the pieces of colored La Marchesa. wood she was picking up Buy One Buy One The composite vessel is were from boats that had powered by a pair of Cater- been lost. Breakfast Entrée Late Lunch Entrée pillar 3412E diesel engines “My art aims to find and get second entrée and get second entrée generating a combined meaning in the history and 3,100 horsepower that will character of these bits of of equal or of equal or wood, and to bring out push this pretty lady lesser value lesser value through the water at about their strange beauty,” she PRESENT THIS COUPON TO SERVER says.” PRESENT THIS COUPON TO SERVER 18 knots. A rrive for late lunch, after 1:30 pm Margie McDonald, a forValid M onday - Saturday While out of the water, Valid A ny D ay Open 7 Days Expires 09-03-2011 mer yacht rigger who uses Victoria 5 will have her Expires 09-03-2011 A Week Not valid with any other promotional offers wire and other recycled Not valid with any other promotional offers bottom painted and twin marine metal as her 7 a.m.-3 p.m. props tuned and coated medium, will also display with PropSpeed. her art. The exhibit will be open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 40 percent of their sales will benefit the Northwest Maritime Center. A reception with wine, finger food and conversations with the artists will be held on Thursday, Aug. 18, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

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BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

D3

Q&A: What U.S. credit downgrade means The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The real danger from the downgrade of U.S. government debt by Standard & Poor’s isn’t higher interest rates. It’s the hit to the nation’s fragile economic psyche and rattled financial markets. S&P’s decision to strip the U.S. of its sterling AAA credit rating for the first time and move it down one notch, to AA+, deals a blow to the confidence of consumers and businesses at a dangerous time, economists say. The agency is “striking at the heart of what makes the global economy tick,” says Chris Rupkey, chief financial economists for the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ. “It isn’t just dollars and cents.” One economist, Paul Dales of Capital Economics, worried Saturday that the downgrade could even trigger another financial crisis. The timing could hardly be worse for the U.S. The economy added 117,000 jobs in July, more than expected. But other economic indicators, including manufacturing, consumer spending and overall growth, are getting weaker. And the markets just came through their most harrowing two weeks since the financial crisis of 2008. The Dow lost about 10 percent of its value on fears of a new recession and Europe’s spiraling financial problems. Here’s a look at the S&P downgrade, and downgrades in general — and what they mean:

S&P officials defend lower U.S. credit rating The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Standard & Poor’s says it downgraded the U.S. government’s credit rating because it believes the U.S. will keep having problems getting its finances under control. S&P officials on Saturday defended their decision to drop the government’s rating to AA+ from the top rating, AAA. The Obama administration called the move a hasty decision based on wrong calculations about the federal budget. It had tried to head off the downgrade before it was announced late Friday. But S&P said it was the months of haggling in Congress over budget cuts that led it to downgrade the U.S. rating. The ratings agency was dissatisfied with the deal lawmakers reached last weekend. And it isn’t confident that the government will do much better in the future, even as the issuer (in this case, the government), since investors demand a higher interest rate if they’re taking a bigger risk.

Q: Does it mean U.S. interest rates will go up? A: The 10-year Treasury note is considered the basis for all other Q: What does a downgrade interest rates, so higher rates on that and other long-term U.S. debt mean? could lead to borrowing costs on A: A downgrade is a warning to buyers of bonds and other debt everything from mortgage loans to credit cards. that the chance that they won’t That would also make it more get their money back has expensive for state and local govincreased, however slightly. ernments, companies and consumIn theory, downgrades should lead to higher borrowing costs for ers to borrow money.

the U.S. budget deficit grows. David Beers, global head of sovereign ratings at S&P, said the agency was concerned about the “degree of uncertainty around the political policy process. The nature of the debate and the difficulty in framing a political consensus ... that was the key consideration.” S&P was looking for $4 trillion in budget cuts over 10 years. The deal that passed Congress on Tuesday would bring $2.1 trillion to $2.4 trillion in cuts over that time. Another concern was that lawmakers and the administration might fail to make those cuts because Democrats and Republicans are divided over how to implement them. Republicans are refusing to raise taxes in any deficit-cutting deal while Democrats are fighting to protect giant entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare. But it’s not clear that investors will sell their Treasury notes in response to S&P’s downgrade, so it may have no effect on rates. Treasury bonds are a foundation of the U.S. financial system, and there are few safer alternatives that are easy to trade. As stocks plunged the last two weeks, price of Treasurys soared because demand was high, even though investors knew there might be a downgrade. Since yields on debt securities fall as prices rise, the yield on the 10-year note dropped from 2.96 percent on July 22 to 2.39 percent on Friday.

The Associated Press

The U.S. Capitol building. S&P so far is the only one of the three largest credit rating agencies to downgrade U.S. debt. Moody’s Investor Service and Fitch Ratings have both issued warnings of possible downgrades but for now have retained their AAA ratings. Ratings agencies assign ratings on bonds and other forms of debt so investors can judge how likely an issuer — like governments, corporations and non-profit groups — will be to pay the debt back. A downgrade could spur a “quick jolt of nervous, knee-jerk selling” of bonds, raising rates in the short term, said Guy LeBas, chief fixed income strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott. But investors are so worried about the economy and need the safety of Treasurys that they could quickly become buyers again. However, some money-market funds could be forced to sell U.S. government debt if they require client money to be invested in only AAA-rated debt. Q: How big is the market for U.S. government bonds?

A: At $9.3 trillion, the U.S. government bond market is massive compared to other countries’. Daily trading of Treasurys runs at $580 billion, far higher than British gilts ($34 billion) or German bunds ($28 billion), according to a recent study by Fitch. “I think no matter what happens, Treasurys are the safe haven,” said Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist at the brokerage BTIG in New York. “No other market is as large or as liquid.” Treasurys have a solid appeal for the world’s central banks. China’s central bank holds an estimated $1.16 trillion. Japan, the second largest foreign owner, holds $912 billion. Fitch said the status of the U.S. dollar and the size of the Treasury market are the biggest reasons investors won’t abandon Treasurys soon. Q: How many times has the U.S. been downgraded below AAA? A: Never. The U.S. has been rated AAA since 1917 and has only faced the threat of a downgrade once. In 1995, when Bill Clinton was president, a similar default loomed and the credit rating agencies warned of a downgrade. At the time, the country had $4.9 trillion in debt — nearly $10 trillion less than now. Once Congress resolved that debt crisis a year later, the credit agencies removed their warning. Q: How has a downgrade affected other countries? A: In May 1998, S&P knocked Belgium, Italy and Spain from AAA to AA. A week later, their 10-year rates had barely budged. Later, in some cases, rates actually fell. A week after S&P took Ireland’s AAA rating away in March 2009, 10-year rates in that country fell 0.18 percentage points.

Balloon: Idea being floated across Sequim area Continued from D1 get everybody in the community involved,” Tomaras said. Wirta said the festival “It’s something that’s going would precede the popular to help our entire economy.” A couple who own a hotWooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, giving peo- air balloon repair business ple something to do inland in Redmond, Mandy and from the water and enjoy Vic Johnson, agreed to orgathe North Olympic Penin- nized the balloonists. “We have about 60 balsula’s reaches farther west. Tomaras, executive loonists in Washington,” director for the project, has Tomaras said. “We’re looking to get about 20 of them lived in Sequim six years. “The idea is let’s all work this first year.” “If the wind picks up together,” he said. A steering committee of past 10 mph or if it rains, diverse business leaders in the balloons typically do not Clallam County and the go up,” Tomaras said, as a Dungeness Valley has been safety precaution. Shelli Robb-Kahler, formed. “Basically, I just want to Sequim-Dungeness Valley

________

“I think I’d love to see “I would certainly supChamber of Commerce executive director and a more stuff like that happen port it as a businessman. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Edi“I would think that our tor Jeff Chew can be reached at member of the festival in Sequim,” the mayor said. “We need more year- council would support any- 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ steering committee, said thing like that.” peninsuladailynews.com. she believes the event could round stuff. extend the tourism season. “I definitely think it has great possibilities of being another amazing festival . . . because it would be very unique,” she said. “There’s a lot of work that has to be put into it. “But I think it’s great that somebody has the desire to do it.” Mayor Ken Hays, an architect whose home would be within eyeshot of the floating balloons, called it “an interesting idea.”

Wells Fargo settles The Associated Press

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NEW YORK — Wells Fargo & Co. on Friday said it has agreed to pay $590 million to settle a classaction lawsuit filed by investors in Wachovia securities. The settlement would end a suit filed in 2008 in federal court in Manhattan, N.Y., charging that Wachovia misled investors in its bonds and preferred securities by understating losses associated with risky mortgages. Wells Fargo bought Wachovia that year at the height of the financial crisis.

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D4

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Push for gay marriage in Washington grows Jefferson a leader in state

“Personally, it gets old. Politically, I think we’re on the right road. This isn’t going to take many years. It’s going to take a few years.”

Same-sex homes county by county THE NUMBER OF Washington state households led by declared same-sex couples grew by 50 percent between 2000 and 2010. Here’s a breakdown by county of the number of households led by same-sex partners compared with couple-led households overall:

By Mike Baker

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Rachel Smith-Mosel and her partner have been married in County Same-sex couples Total couples Percent California, where she was Clallam 200 17,667 1.13% born. Jefferson 167 7,998 2.09% And they’ve been marKing 10,637 418,767 2.54% ried in Canada, where her San Juan 95 4,236 2.24% spouse was born. Pacific 91 5,259 1.73% Thurston 964 58,003 1.66% And they’ve been marMason 230 14,520 1.58% ried at a Jewish summer Skamania 43 2,797 1.54% camp, where they had supWhatcom 639 44,512 1.44% port of their faith commuKitsap 828 58,460 1.42% nity. Ferry 26 1,843 1.41% Clark 1,362 96,400 1.41% But what the couple Grays Harbor 226 16,151 1.40% really wants is to be offiIsland 283 20,432 1.39% cially married in WashingPierce 2,281 170,839 1.34% ton, where they work, live Kittitas 115 8,588 1.34% and raise five children. Okanogan 128 9,602 1.33% Klickitat 67 5,115 1.31% Smith-Mosel, 38, said Spokane 1,298 102,591 1.27% the state’s domestic partSnohomish 2,009 160,968 1.25% nership laws are insuffiWhitman 95 7,759 1.22% cient, failing to provide the Pend Oreille 38 3,278 1.16% couple the proper benefits Clallam 200 17,667 1.13% Cowlitz 266 23,561 1.13% and protections that come Skagit 298 27,320 1.09% with marriage. Stevens 116 10,900 1.06% She said it’s now time for Lewis 181 17,640 1.03% Washington to follow the Yakima 499 48,523 1.03% lead of states like New York Wahkiakum 11 1,089 1.01% Chelan 157 16,627 0.94% and recognize gay couples Asotin 47 5,074 0.93% in marriage. Walla Walla 112 12,223 0.92% “My family needs it yesFranklin 138 15,270 0.90% terday,” said Smith-Mosel, a Grant 163 18,754 0.87% middle school teacher in Adams 33 3,832 0.86% Columbia 9 1,047 0.86% Tacoma. Douglas 75 8,997 0.83% “I’m impatient, and I’m Benton 330 39,581 0.83% tired of waiting.” Lincoln 20 2,738 0.73% The yearning for marGarfield 1 592 0.17% riage among gay couples Statewide total 24,278 1,489,553 1.62% and their supporters has been growing along with their public ranks. of urban centers during the its namesake islands, more past decade. than one out of every 50 Jefferson County n More than 24,000 couples is same-sex. n Seattle shows that 3 New Census data last households in Washington week illustrate a surge in are led by same-sex part- percent of couples are male partners and more than 2 households led by declared ners. n In Jefferson County on percent are female partsame-sex partners across the state, growing by more the North Olympic Penin- ners. The number of same-sex than 50 percent and sula and in San Juan expanding in areas outside County, comprising most of couples in King County

Elaine Thompson/The Associated Press

Same-sex

Ed Murray state senator

grew by 37 percent over the decade, slower than the state as a whole. n Nearly one-quarter of same-sex couples lead a household with children. n Garfield County in southeastern Washington, the least populous county in the state with 2,266 people, had the lowest number of households led by a samesex couple — with one. Activists and lawmakers are currently strategizing how and when to best push the issue. Democratic state Sen. Ed Murray, who has consistently filed bills to approve gay marriages since 1997, said the Senate does not have the votes right now to get it approved in 2012. He hopes that will change and isn’t ruling out success in the coming session of the Legislature. Murray, who has been with his partner for 20 years as of this coming week, also said supporters need to ensure that the law will stand, even if it faces a referendum challenge. He doesn’t believe it would have survived four years ago, when the domestic partnerships law passed, but he does think things are changing. “Personally, it gets old. Politically, I think we’re on the right road,” Murray said. “This isn’t going to take many years. It’s going to take a few years.”

marriage in

Heather Purser, a Suquamish tribal member who worked to change the tribe’s marriage ordinance to include same-sex couples, stands near a memorial for Chief Seattle on the tribe’s reservation in Kitsap County. The change in tribal law came after a four-year campaign by Purser, 28, to get the tribe to adopt a law recognizing gay marriage, which the Tribal Council did last Monday. Both sides of the gay marriage debate claim that public opinion is on their side. Gary Randall, president of the Bellevue-based Faith and Freedom Network, said he doesn’t think there’s a race toward gay marriage like supporters of the effort would like people to believe. He also thinks that people who want to keep marriage between one man and one woman will come off the sidelines to voice their opinions.

Biblical issues Randall said groups are also having discussions about the best way to educate the public about their arguments — namely that the Bible doesn’t condone gay marriage and that redefining marriage could eventually lead to condoned polygamy. “I don’t think they’re ready to approve gay marriage,” Randall said. Josh Friedes, director of marriage equality at Seat-

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SEQUIM — Lynda Perry, co-owner of InGraphic Detail, a Sequim printing company, has been elected 2011-2012 president

31 Years!

of the board of Sequim Community Broadcasting Inc., the nonprofit corporation that owns KSQM 91.5 FM. Perry has been a member of the board of directors

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Paul McHugh and Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict were also appointed to the board. McHugh is a long-time Sequim resident who recently retired from the real estate business and is a past member of the Sequim City Council. Benedict also oversees the county Emergency Management Program of which KSQM is a participant. For more information, click on www.ksqmfm.com or phone the station at 360681-0000.

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since its 2007 formation. Perry replaces the founder of KSQM, Rick Perry (no relation), who recently stepped down as president. In his resignation letter, Rick Perry cited the organization’s need for new, strong leadership to continue the station’s growth. “We are all exceedingly fortunate to have a man with a devotion to the health and welfare of our community, such as our founder, Rick Perry,” said Jeff Bankston, KSQM general manager. “Seeing the absolute need for local radio and an emergency broadcaster in our area, Rick had the vision, skills, leadership, commitment and guts to get the job done and build a first class radio station.”

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and a very special thank you to everyone who’s been close to me during the past 3 years while I’ve endured an incredible amount of personal headaches & hardships unlike anything I’ve ever had to cope with.

31 Years!

tle-based advocacy group Equal Rights Washington, said gay marriage proponents need to focus on increasing social acceptance. That means educating people about the marriage benefits that aren’t extended to domestic partners, such as tax benefits or health insurance coverage. He also wants to demonstrate to the public that it’s a matter of dignity for couples who want the state to recognize their relationships equally. Smith-Mosel carries around a folder of documents detailing her family’s relationships, worried that during a medical crisis or some other problem they will face questions and lack the same protections as officially recognized spouses. “Our kids need to feel that our family isn’t just second-class,” Smith-Mosel said. “We’re a married couple, and we want to be treated as such. We deserve to be treated as such.”

New president elected of Sequim radio board

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, August 7, 2011

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1 Luncheon reservations closed Friday for the meeting at SunLand Golf and Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive. Seating is available for those who don’t have lunch. Further information is available by calling 360683-6197 or emailing lynn@sequimchamber.com.

‘Making your Mark’ PORT ANGELES — Clallam County Planning Manager Steve Gray has won the Department of Community Development’s Employee of the Quarter award, department Director Sheila Roark Miller announced. Gray was recognized in a staff meeting “for his selflessness, dedication and commitment to serving the citizens of Clallam County,” Miller said. He was given a choice parking spot outside the county courthouse called the “Place to Park for Making your Mark” to use for the remainder of this quarter. Gray was selected by a team of non-management department employees. The team picks a winner every quarter. Miller said Gray was noted for his willingness to adapt under stress of reorganization and numerous day and evening meetings, including the Shoreline Master Program update. “Not only is he an exemplary example of a dedicated public servant, he is also a great leader,” Miller said. “Mr. Gray coached his team of girls, North Olympic 14U Babe Ruth to a Regional win last month. He’s a winner in our book, too.”

Send us your business news DO YOU HAVE a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

Peninsula Daily News wine country in January. For more information, phone Volmut at 360-3585469.

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WaMu case closed THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT says it has closed its investigation into the collapse of Washington Mutual without any criminal charges filed. In September 2008, the federal government seized Washington Mutual’s flagship bank, based in Seattle, and sold its assets to JPMorgan Chase & Co. for $1.9 billion. It was the biggest bank failure in U.S. history. The Justice Department, the FBI and the Securities and Exchange Commission opened investigations into WaMu’s collapse shortly after, in October 2008. The U.S. attorney’s office for the western district of Washington, which includes Seattle, on Friday evening issued a statement saying that after an “extensive investigation that included hundreds of interviews and the review of millions of documents,” there were no grounds for criminal charges. The Associated Press

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drop of $8.82 from the week before. Brent crude, which is used to price many international varieties, climbed $2.12 to settle at $109.37 per barrel on the ICE Futures Exchange in London.

Perception drives all of your market’s decisions and behaviors.

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(360) 681-4481 • 1-800-467-0292

for just Victoria, the count dropped from 42,348 to 23,289. While a number of factors are at play — global economy, strong Canadian dollar, passport confusion and terrorism threats — visits from the U.S. have been on a steady slide since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and that has been felt across all transportation categories. The most recent statistics published by the province show total U.S. visitation to British Columbia is down 11.3 percent through the first five months of this year compared with the same period in 2010, and it’s down 8.1 percent from January-May 2009. NEW YORK — Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude has declined $12.71, about 13 percent, in the past 12 days. Oil on Friday added 25 cents to settle at $86.88 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, a

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MOUNTAIN VIEW

SEQUIM — The Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center in Sequim has received the InterContinental Hotels Group 2010 Global Partners in Safety Award. As one of 14 hotels selected for the award, the Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center met the group’s highest standards for quality, customer service and safety. The hotel was recognized during the recent Holiday Inn Express’s Washington State Town Hall meeting in Everett. Toni Skinner, general manager, and Steve Kratz, maintenance supervisor, accepted the award. “This award represents a team effort that was led by Toni and Steve and included our safety partners, Approach Management, Northwest Warn, the Clallam County Fire Department [Fire District 3] and Bell-Anderson Insurance,” said hotel owner Bret Wirta.

Oil falls 13%

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VICTORIA — Tour bus traffic to Vancouver Island has dropped 44 percent in vice Employees Internathe past 10 years and tional Union, which is shows no sign of bouncing planning an informational back, says hospitality picket against Olympic industry consultant Frank Medical Center on ThursBourree. day. Bourree, ■  Thursday: Author principal of Larry Howard of the novel Chemistry Blood of the Dragon. Consulting, In the second segment, told the VicClallam County Public Utility District spokesman toria Times Colonist Mike Howe. ■  Friday: Patrick Loaf- that tourism busiBourree man, Waterfront Art Galnesses that lery featured artist for rely on tour bus traffic will August. likely have to broaden their In the second segment, target markets to survive. Jeff Tocher, John Ricken“It has to do with the bacher and Doug Parent, U.S. market and changing who will be in Port Angedemographics,” he said. les’ Second Friday Art Rock. “B.C. Ferries used to get In the final segment, so many buses that it Jake Seniuk and Harry became a problem. Von Stark on the Elwha “They never have that dam removals party sched- problem anymore.” uled in September. Bourree’s numbers show bus traffic on ferries to and Employee honored from Vancouver Island dropped from 53,514 buses PORT ANGELES — in 2000 to 30,148 in 2010; Peninsula Community

SECURITY & FIRE

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Peninsula Daily News

0C5107197

Ship everything you can’t live without

Safety award to hotel

Tour buses slide

452-2727

Off to College?

Sequim’s Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center General Manager Toni Skinner, left, and Maintenance Supervisor Steve Kratz accept the InterContinental Hotels Group 2010 Global Partners in Safety Award.

155120876

SEQUIM — The U.S. Patent Office has issued a patent to yacht designer Guy M. Hupy of Port Townsend for a compound displacement wave form hull for electric-powered, cruiser-type vessels. Sequim’s Innovation Law Group, Ltd., assisted in the preparation, filing and prosecution of the patent application. For more information, Balducci on board phone ILG at 360-681-7305 PORT ANGELES — or visit www.InnovationMelissa Balducci has joined Law.com. the staff of Bliss Hair Design, 501 E. First St. KONP talk guests Balducci PORT ANGELES — specializes Here is this week’s schedin “naturalule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 looking p.m. local talk show segcolor.” ment on KONP radio at The full1450 AM, 102.1 FM and service www.konp.com on the salon offers Internet outside the Port hair, waxBalducci Angeles area. ing, nail Station and skin manager care services. Todd Ortloff For more information or hosts the an appointment, phone the Monday salon at 360-460-4569. through Thursday Winery opening segments, SEQUIM — Wind Rose and Karen Robb Hanan Cellars, 155 W. Cedar St., Suite B, now offers wine by hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. the glass on the tasting This week’s scheduled room’s outside patio from lineup: noon to 6 p.m. Friday ■  Monday: Clallam through Monday. County Sheriff Bill BeneThe windict. ery will celIn the second segment, ebrate its stamp collector Phil Casgrand opentell. ing with ■  Tuesday: Port of food, live Port Angeles Executive music and Director Jeff Robb. specials ■  Wednesday: White Saturday, Volmut Crane Martial Arts Grand Aug. 13. The winery is owned by Master Bob Nicholls. In the second segment, winemaker David Volmut spokeswoman Michelle and his wife and business Maike discussing a charity partner, Jennifer States. spaghetti dinner. They moved to Sequim In the final segment, a from Eastern Washington’s representative of the Ser-

Mental Health Center recently named Nancy Johnson as Employee of the Month for August. Johnson Her coworkers described Johnson as “the rock upon which many of us found support during our transition to Profiler [medical records software].” She was also praised for her attention to helping her fellow employees “through sticky procedural problems.” Johnson “did a great job of running the Records Department on a short staff and in training new staff to manage clinical records in both Profiler and CMHC,” according to her award citation. “She is still making innovative improvements to make the department more efficient and responsive to the needs of the clinicians and she does it all with the most pleasant attitude and disposition.”


D6

Sunday, August 7, 2011

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Another bank in state shut by regulators Columbia assumes Whitman Peninsula Daily News news services

COLFAX — Columbia Banking System in Tacoma on Friday bought all of the deposits and some assets of the Bank of Whitman, making the Eastern Washington bank the third in the state to fail this year. Federal regulators also shut on Friday a small bank in Illinois, lifting to 63 the number of U.S. bank failures this year. The pace of closures has slowed, as the economy has stabilized and banks work their way through the bad debt accumulated in the Great Recession. By Aug. 6 last year, regulators had shuttered 109 banks. “Large loan losses made it impossible for Bank of Whitman to continue,” said Richard Riccobono of the state Department of Financial Institutions. “Bank management was unable to raise sufficient capital to remain viable. “It hurts to lose an institution like the Bank of Whitman because they extended services to our state’s smaller communities.”

Has Peninsula branches

OMC accredited by radiology association THE AMERICAN COLLEGE of Radiology has awarded a threeyear term of accreditation in computed tomography to Olympic Medical Center. The accreditation award extends to the CT units in both Sequim and Port Angeles. “A large amount of hard work by our skilled technologists, particu-

larly from our lead CT Technologist Rod Horstman, has gone into gaining this distinction with our diagnostic CT program — we’ve also had the administrative support needed to make this accreditation a reality,” said Deby King, director of diagnostic imaging. The ACR Gold Seal of Accreditation is awarded only to facilities

meeting the ACR’s Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Olympic Medical Center is also accredited through the ACR for its hospital-based nuclear medicine and all its digital mammography sites. Peninsula Daily News

Thank you for voting us Best Place to Bank for 15 years!*

$134.8 million cost The bank couldn’t meet either requirement. The failure will cost the federal government $134.8 million, the FDIC said. The bank was started by a group of Whitman County farmers and businessmen in 1977 in Colfax. Columbia will reopen eight of the 20 branches of Bank of Whitman on Monday. The eight branches are in Clarkston, Colfax, Othello, Pullman, Ritzville, two in Spokane, and in Walla Walla. All depositors of Bank of Whitman will automatically become depositors of Columbia State Bank. Deposits will continue to be insured by the FDIC Columbia Bank bought out the failing American Marine Bank chain, including its four branches on the North Olympic Peninsula, in January 2010. In May, Columbia Bank acquired the three-branch Summit Bank in Skagit County and First Heritage Bank, which operated five branches in Snohomish County. As of June 30, Columbia Bank has total assets of $5.43 billion and total deposits of $3.58 billion.

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*First Federal was voted Best Place to Bank and Best Customer Service in 2010 Peninsula Daily News ‘Best of the Peninsula’ poll.

FORT DISCOVERY toms s u C U.S. opter Helic

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Columbia Banking System is the holding company for Columbia State Bank, which has 68 branches in Washington state — including Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend and Port Ludlow — and 25 branches in Oregon. As part of the deal,

Columbia Bank will acquire about $315 million in assets and about $516 million in deposits. Excluded from that purchase are delinquent loans, along with some land and construction loans, large commercial real estate loans and some land. In February the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. ordered Bank of Whitman officials to either raise more capital or merge with another bank.

Peninsula Daily News

“Unity of Effort”™

A celebration dedicated to those that protect our way of life!

Hon Gues orary Wash t Speaker in Attor gton Stat ney G e Rob M eneral cKen na

Please join us to celebrate the hard work and dedication of the men and women that protect our communities and Nation. Fort Discovery’s “Unity of Effort”™ celebration will be held on Saturday, August 13, 2011, at 12:00 pm. Ms. Krista Gunstone, will open with the singing of the National Anthem at 1 pm, followed by the U.S. Army’s 56th Army Band, who will play patriotic music from 1:05 to 2:30 pm. Honorary guest speaker will be Washington State Attorney General Rob McKenna. Other guests include Airlift NW, U.S. Customs helicopter, Jefferson Country Sheriff’s K-9 Unit, Jefferson County Fire District 3 & 5, Port Angeles Police K-9 Unit, Clallam County Fire District 3, USN, USMC Security Forces Bangor, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Army 4-6 Air Cav, Washington Army National Guard 66th TAC, FLIR systems, Intellicheck Mobilisa, Loomis, Advanced Interactive Systems (AIS), Safe Boats International, and Washington’s Most Wanted.

RSVP by August 10, 2011.

The “Unity of Effort”™ is limited to 1,500 attendees. A $10.00 donation per adult (kids free) to the Special Operation Warrior Foundation is requested at the gate. Call 1-877-876-4750 or email: info@ssnwhq.com to reserve your spot on the guest list.

will be providing shuttle bus services from the South Casino parking lot to Fort Discovery.

Parking is limited at Fort Discovery

Sponsored by:

SECURITY

SERVICES

NORTHWEST, INC. 185129259

Service as follows: Leaving Fort Discovery: Leaving Casino: 1200 • 1300 • 1400 1130 • 1230 • 1330 1500 • 1600 • 1700 • 1800 1430 • 1530 • 1630

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Park Here for Shuttle


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

BELL HILL VIEW LOT

LOOKING FOR SPACE?

190 Priest Rd. Ed Sumpter PO Box 1060 360-808-1712 Sequim, WA 98382 edseds@olypen.com 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Remodeled in the mid 80s and updated in 2008. Vinyl windows, custom tile work, quartz counters, Victorian-style light fixtures, upstairs social room, lots of storage - including a lighted attic above the master suite. Updated plumbing and electrical. Lots of natural light. Very nice dual views from master, kitchen and dining areas. ML#261630/256917 $239,500

ML#144957/260492 $569,000

WRE/SunLand

Brenda Clarke

Mark McHugh Office: (360) 683-0660 Toll Free: 1-800-708-0660 Fax: (360) 683-2527 www.marknmchugh.com

477-5542 dstofferahn@olypen.com

JUST LISTED!

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

UNOBSTRUCTED MT. VIEW

MT. ANGELES WATER VIEW

Energy efficient is an understatement. Lots of room awaits you inside this 3 BR/2 BA, 1,878 SF home on 1.25 acres. Oversized 2-car garage as well as a studio apartment included in addl. 2-car detached garage. Offers a sophisticated living room with wood floors, propane fireplace, beautiful kitchen with loads of storage, xeriscape irrigation system, heat pump, radiant-floor heating. $325,000

18407293

18407277

18407306

18407289

Cute starter home with a fantastic yard! 3 BR home w/1-car garage, fully landscaped and fenced yard, storage, vinyl windows & open floor plan is clean & ready to move into. Call Kimi to schedule a showing 360-461-9788. ML#261655 Priced to sell at $120,000.

18407287

18407303

• Strait, San Juans, Discovery Bay & Mt. Baker • This Historic Home Sits on a Double Corner Lot • Restored to Original Condition; 3 FP, 12’ Ceilings, 7’ Windows • Private Upstairs Guest Suite, etc. • 2-Car Garage + Heated Workspace • Diamond Pt. Beach Club Membership Included

Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE

Dave Stofferahn

4 bedroom home, private setting on 5 acres with excellent view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca & mountains. CC&Rs protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $429,000 ML#261181/231468 Call the DODDS

VIEWS, VIEWS, VIEWS

This custom, 2,154 SF, 3 BR/2 BA home w/3car garage on 2.52 acres has great southern exposure, outdoor living spaces & beautiful landscaping. Vaulted ceilings, tigerwood floors, wood stove, hot tub & more! $299,000 #260997

TOWN & COUNTRY

SPACIOUS

360-457-6600 www.onlymark.com

SUNNY VIEW ESTATES!

WRE/Port Ludlow

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

Mark DeRousie

DOC REISS

Affordable 3 BR/1 BA home centrally located between Port Angeles and Sequim with a mountain view. New septic installed along with a new roof and new exterior paint. ML#261358/242454 $120,000

Laura Halady

EVERGREEN

Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

18407295

18407310

With Mt. view situated on approx. 1 acre. Finished with hardwood floors, granite counters, stainless appliances, built-ins, Murphy bed, media room, large deck and more. Main level living. ML#243199 $649,000

This custom built home has views from all rooms. 3 BR/2 BA on 5 acres. Quality features include granite tile countertops, custom cabinetry and heated tile walk-in shower and custom designer window treatments and so much more... ML#261448 $474,900! Call Mark today! 1(800)454-2340 x4482

WRE/Port Angeles

JUST REDUCED

18407311

UPTOWN REALTY Kathy Brown, CRS, ABR, GRI Office: (360) 417-2785 Cell: (360) 461-4460 www.RealEstateinPortAngeles.com

18407297

18407309

18407275

Saltwater and Mt. views from this easily buildable Bell Hill 1 acre lot. Very nice location, close to town and surrounded by well kept custom homes; build your custom view home and have plenty of room left for a great yard. Owner financing available to qualified buyer. Priced to sell at $79,900. ML#261401 Call Ed Sumpter 360-683-3900/808-1712

E1

VIEWS • VIEWS • VIEWS

PAINTED LADY

This home has plenty, over 2,100 SF with a spacious family room & 3rd bath which could convert to separate quarters. All located on a double corner lot, with paved parking & a detached 2-car garage. Only $239,000 ML#261558 Call KATHY

BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN STYLE

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Custom built contemporary home with super great room, spacious guest apt. and large shop all on 3 private acres. Top-of-the-line everything! Just minutes from downtown. $575,000! ML#261634

WRE/Sequim - East

CAROLYN & Robert DODDS Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

UPTOWN REALTY Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

CRESTHAVEN LOT

JOIN THE BIG LEAGUE!

TOP-OF-THE-WORLD VIEWS

UPTOWN REALTY PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

If the views are your dream for a future building site, this is it! 5 acres at the top of the hill. Good road, well and power and parked-out site, RV carport & storage. A must see. ML#260737 $199,000

UPTOWN REALTY Rebecca Jackson, CRS, GRI

LIVE THE LIFE OF RILEY

in this affordable Sherwood Condo. Convenient to shopping, SARC & medical facilities. Stay cozy in winters in front of the fireplace. Private patio, landscaped greenbelt, storage area, (2) covered carport parking spaces. $210 monthly condo fees include water, sewer, trash pickup, insurance and outside maintenance. Call CHUCK ML#261332 $140,000

Right from the start this tidy house says Welcome Home with a custom stained-glass entry & Pergo floor. Wood-burning stove in living room, double sink in kitchen and a roomy, newer family room. Kitchen has extra storage with a pantry in the adjoining laundry room. Mt. view corner lot. AHS Home Warranty for Buyer! ML#261556 Only $189,900 Always Call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

WRE/Sequim - East

Eileen Schmitz

TOWN & COUNTRY

Heidi Hansen 477-5322 heidi@olypen.com

18407305

WRE/Port Angeles

‘W’ IS FOR WELCOME HOME

18407288

18407296

18407294

Custom home designed to enjoy privacy while displaying the awesome 180º view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island, lights of Victoria at night, the ships passing thru, harbor activity and even on good days, a stunning view of the snow capped peak of Mt. Baker. Few homes in Port Angeles have such a view as this. This home is definitely worth considering if you want the best view in town, a chef style kitchen and a low maintenance yard. ML#261182/231495 $319,000

UPTOWN REALTY

MARC THOMSEN, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Office: (360) 452-7861/Direct: 417-2781 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 BeckyJ@olypen.com Website: www.BeckyJ.com

VOTED BEST IN VIEWS!!

Overlooking the 3rd fairway on the SunLand Golf Course in this custom built home. Easy to entertain with a large living room, open concept family room and sunny sun room. Circular drive makes parking easy. 2 BR plus a den/office and 2 BA. All the SunLand amenities, too! ML#261497/249694 Offered at $239,000

This 4 BR/2 BA home has so much to offer. Almost 1/2 acre in the city, an awesome hot tub room connected to the family room, patio on the south side, 728 SF attached garage plus a large carport in back, outside sink area to clean fish, tools, etc, circular drive & much more! Maintained to perfection! ML#261644 $275,000

Team Thomsen Realtors®

UPTOWN REALTY Brooke Nelson Office: (360) 417-2812 www.RealtorBrooke.com BrookeNelson@olypen.com

ENJOY LIFE

18407278

When you move into a bigger space at this 2-story home. Great features include 4 BR/2.5 BA, saltwater view, quiet neighborhood, casual living room w/carpeting, wood stove for chilly nights, comfortable family room w/pellet stove, efficient kitchen with Corian countertops, laundry on each floor. $199,900 ML#261194. 2810 S. Oak St., PA

THE PERFECT FAMILY HOME

18407276

18407280

18407279

Just $69,000 this lot is in the prestigious Cresthaven neighborhood. Buy now while prices are low; build when you are ready. Some views available from this site. ML#261555 Call Pili for more information

Chuck Turner

Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 chuck@portangelesrealty.com www.portangelesrealty.com

Michaelle Barnard

(360) 461-2153 Email: mlee@olypen.com

Chuck Murphy

(360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

360.565.2020 mrsjace@jacerealestate.com 1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362


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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

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Classified

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

Homes

$189,900 3 bed /2 bath, 1 story home, 1,440 sq.ft on corner lot. Enjoy nature from your walkout deck. 60 Stratus Loop, Fair Weather Sub, near Red Caboose B&B in Sequim. All appliances included, lots of upgrades. (360)797-4200 to schedule showing. 2 1/2% to Realtors.

$210,000. Beautiful 1,500 sqft Water View Home in the Mount Angeles area! The backyard is beautifully landscaped with a rock wall border and apple trees and a fence. Visit: peninsuladailynews.com for more photos. Home is located at 1122 Olympus Ave. in Port Angeles. Call Scott at 477-9266 or email adamssoft@gmail.co m

AFFORDABLE AND CONVENIENT This cozy 3 Br.,1 bath site-built rambler is priced to sell! Conveniently located between Sequim and Port Angeles and sits on .4 acre. Close to Solmar community, but without their CCR’s. $139,900. ML260414 Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East BARGAIN OF THE MONTH Quiet street, harbor, strait, and mtn views, totally remodeled 4 Br., 2 bath house, garage, concrete patio, full RV parking with hookups and all for only $180,000. What a smoking deal! Plus only 2 blocks from bus line and hospital. $180,000. ML261196. Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN STYLE HOME With mtn view situated on approximately 1 acre. Finished with hardwood floors, granite counters, stainless appliances, built-ins, Murphy bed, media room, large deck and more. Main level living. $649,000. ML243199. Lara Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

By Owner: $799,900 NW style home and grounds. Close-in SWEEPING View 2006, 3 + Br., 3.5 bath, 4,050 sf, 13+ acres, large garage open beams, granite slab, fir doors, gated and paved. 212 Scenic View Ln - off Mt Pleasant Heights Lane. See www.peninsuladailynews.com ad for more. 360-461-5321.

COMFORTABLE CAREFREE LIVING Mtn view and beautiful sunsets, single level townhouse adjacent to greenbelt, chef’s kitchen, silestone counters, breakfast bar, access to Sunland pool, tennis courts and beach. $270,000 ML254333/261570 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

COZY CUSTOM HOME 3 Br., 1.5 bath plus soothing sauna. Kitchen has copper range hood and custom cabinetry, nice bright recreation room, cobblestone patio, fenced backyard, landscaped with sprinkler system. $185,000. ML196308/260508 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND CUSTOM BUILT CONTEMPORARY HOME With super great room, dramatic water views and 1st class guest apartment (Stuka) above a large shop all on 3 private acres. Designed by Lindberg and built by J & J Construction, this is a top quality home. Home and stuka combined total 3 Br. Appliances include a sub zero side by side refrigerator and Bosch dishwasher. $575,000. ML261634. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY ENJOY LIFE Overlooking the 3rd fairway on the Sunland Golf Course in this custom built home. Easy to entertain with a large living room, open concept family room and sunny sunroom. Circular drive makes parking easy. Two Br. plus a den/office and 2 baths. All the Sunland amenities, too! $239,000 ML261497/249694 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY EXCELLENT CONDITION Warm colors, nice floor plan, located minutes from downtown Sequim, fully landscaped and set up for low maintenance, great room, formal living room and dining room, 55+ community with exercise room, spa, and clubhouse. $68,500 ML255353/261603 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND EXPANSIVE DUAL VIEWS Large enough to be comfortable, small enough for easy care. Adorable home with great garage and shop with wood stove. Full views of the Straits and the Olympics. 3 Br., 2.5 baths. This is a must see! $230,000. ML261559 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Extensively remodeled in the mid-80’s and updated in 2008. Features vinyl windows, custom tile work, quartz counters, Victorian-style light fixtures, upstairs social room, lots of storage including a lighted attic above the master suite. Updated plumbing and electrical. Lots of natural light. Very nice dual views from master, kitchen and dining area. $239,500. ML261630/256917 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

FOR SALE BY OWNER: 4 Br, 1 bath, fenced back yd, deck, mtn view, garage, wk. shop, exceptional condition, cls to college, schools, well landscaped, waterfall. W/D included. Reduced: $175,000. 360-461-6847 or 360-340-6095 FSBO: 11 Flemming Dr., Diamond Point. Well kept home on .5 acre. 2 Br., 1.5 bath, 980 sf Marlette with attached garage. This home features a new roof and deck, efficient Trane heat pump, wood stove, and new carpets. A must-see at $112,000. 683-0908 leave message.

HUGE Country home in Sequim on 1.25 acres. 4 Bdrm 3 bath, country style home. This home is one of a kind! 2 separate sinks in kitchen, kitchenette upstairs, lofts, high ceilings and more. This is a REALLY COOL place! If you have a large family or want to start a home based business - this place is for you. New carpet, paint, tile etc. Move in ready. Priced way below current appraisal! Leave message at 360-681-0765 or pinkhands@me.com IN TOWN ESTATE Wow, custom 2,200 sf home on 2 acres in downtown Sequim. The home features 4 Br., 3 full baths, freshly painted interior and new carpet and vinyl. The property is mostly fenced with chain link. $310,000. ML261633. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

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Homes

JOIN THE BIG LEAGUE When you move into a bigger space at this 2 story home. Great features include 4 Br., 2.5 bath, saltwater view, quiet neighborhood, casual living room with carpeting, wood stove for chilly nights, comfortable family room with pellet stove, efficient kitchen with Corian countertops, laundry on each floor. 2810 S. Oak St., P.A. $199,900. ML261194. Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY JUST LISTED Cute starter home with a fantastic yard! You will enjoy coming home to smell the roses and spend time in your fully landscaped and fenced yard. 3 Br. home with 1 car garage, storage, vinyl windows and open floor plan is clean and ready to move into. $120,000. ML261655. Kimi Robertson 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company JUST REDUCED Affordable 3 Br., 1 bath home centrally located between Port Angeles and Sequim with a mountain view. New septic installed along with a new roof and new exterior paint. $120,000 ML261358/242454 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY LIKE NEW HOME Nestled in a landscaped 1/2 acre, many upgrades: security system, 2 RV pads. Energy saving heat pump, solar tubes, insulated plantation shutters, red alder cabinets, front porch and back patio to enjoy private setting. $220,000 ML257171/261638 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Homes

FSBO: Cottage in the woods overlooking Ennis Cr. Total privacy, close to town. $269,500/or make offer. 457-9761, 406-4571 LIVE THE LIFE OF RILEY In this affordable Sherwood Condo. Convenient to shopping, SARC and medical facilities. Stay cozy in winters in front of the fireplace. Private patio, landscaped greenbelt, storage area, 2 covered carport parking spaces. $210 monthly condo fees include water, sewer, trash pickup, insurance and outside maintenance. $140,000. ML261332. Chuck Murphy 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East LOOKING FOR SPACE? This home has plenty, over 2,100 sf with a spacious family room and 3rd bath which could convert to a separate quarters. All located on a double corner lot, with paved parking and a detached 2 car garage. $239,000. ML261558 Kathy Brown 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LOVE TO GARDEN? Amazing landscaping featuring an array of fabulous perennials, ornamentals and trees in a fully fenced setting with pond. This tri-level home with large deck and hot tub offers spectacular views of Discovery Bay and Cape George. $259,000 ML260711/206519 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. MOUNTAIN VIEW Great 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.16 acres close to the game farm. Terrific mountain views, lots of fruit trees in the yard, plus detached two car garage with workshop. Start your own mini-farm. $165,000. ML261444. Jo Cummins Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

NEW, NEW, NEW Windows, roof, floors, countertops, deck, copper plumbing and more. Relax and enjoy 2 decks, backyard pond, fruit trees and raised-bed garden. Master bath has walk-in closet, oversized shower and soak tub. Wood stove keeps house cozy. Built-in dining hutch and large kitchen. Attached carport, RV parking, circular driveway, detached garage and shop - all on .5 private acre close to town. $134,000. ML261291 Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Newer, 1,456 sf 2 Br., 2 bath, den/office, all appliances, heat pump. Carport for RV, shop/storage. Lg deck w/private yard. Entire inside freshly painted. Must see! $169,900. Call 509-951-5980 Nice entry level home. 2 Br., 1 bath. Spacious corner lot fronting on Cedar and 10th. Mature landscaped for privacy. Single car detach garage connected with breezeway/roof. Cozy fireplace for those cold winter days. $118,000 ML261642/257408 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

P.A.: This 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,380 sf home was beautifully remodeled on the inside in 2008. The kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and maple cabinets. The open living area has bamboo hardwood floors and lots of windows. It is located near Shane Park. $187,500. Call at 477-5363 Rare Lake Sutherland Property. Two homes on sunny side of lake with privacy! Moving out of state,priced to sell! $375,000. 360-461-3986

51

Homes

SPACIOUS 4 Br. home, private setting on 5 acres with excellent view of Strait of Juan de Fuca and mountains. CCR’S protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $429,000. ML261181. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND HOME On 3rd Fairway, just remodeled, brand new kitchen including granite, tile and all new appliances, 3 Br., 2.5 ba, lg. rec room with picture windows as well as a 330 sf sunroom both facing the course, heat pump, beautiful low maintenance landscaping. $324,900. 477-8311. THE PERFECT FAMILY HOME This 4 Br., 2 bath home has so much to offer. Almost 1/2 acre in the city, an awesome hot tub room connected to the family room, patio on the south side, 728 sf attached garage plus a large carport in back, outside sink area to clean fish, tools, etc, circular drive, and much more! Maintained to perfection! $275,000. ML261644. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY UNOBSTRUCTED MOUNTAIN VIEW Energy efficient is an understatement. Lots of room awaits you inside this 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,878 sf home on 1.25 acres. Oversized 2 car garage, as well as a studio apartment included in additional 2 car detached garage. Offers a sophisticated living room with wood floors, propane fireplace, beautiful kitchen with loads of storage, Xeriscape irrigation system, heat pump, radiantfloor heating. $325,000 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Homes

SUNNY VIEW ESTATES! This custom, 2,154 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath home with 3 car garage on 2.52 acres has great southern exposure, outdoor living spaces and beautiful landscaping. Vaulted ceilings, tigerwood floors, woodstove, hot tub and more! $299,000. ML260997 Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE 683-0660 VIEWS, VIEWS, VIEWS Straits, San Juan’s, Discovery Bay, and Mt. Baker. This historic home sits on a double corner lot. restored to it’s original condition; 3 fireplaces, 12’ ceilings, 7’ windows. Private upstairs guest suite etc. 2 car garage and heated work space. Diamond Point Beach Club Membership included. $569,000 ML144957/260492 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND VIEWS, VIEWS, VIEWS This custom built home has views from all rooms. 3 Br., 2 bath, on 5 acres Quality features include granite tile countertops, custom cabinetry and heated tile walk-in shower and custom designer window treatments and so much more. $474,900. ML261448. Mark DeRousie Re/Max Evergreen 457-6600 VOTED BEST IN VIEWS! Custom home designed to enjoy privacy while displaying the awesome 180 view of the Straits of Juan de Fuca, Vancouver Island, lights of Victoria at night, the ships passing thru, harbor activity, and even on good days, a stunning view of the snow capped peak of Mt. Baker. Few homes in Port Angeles have such a view as this. This home is definitely worth considering if you want the best view in town, a chef style kitchen, and a low maintenance yard. $319,000. ML261182 Michaelle Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-1 PM

618 E. Fir St., Sequim

In Town Estate. Wow, custom 2,200 SF home on 2 acres in downtown Sequim. The home features 4 BR/3 full BA, freshly painted interior and new carpet and vinyl. The property is mostly fenced with chain link. $310,000 MLS#261633 DIRECTIONS: From Hwy 101 take the Sequim Ave. exit. N. to Fir St., R. on Fir to 618.

18407315

CHERRY HILL! An astounding 5 Br., 2 bath home. Large rec room with fireplace, office with built-in bookshelves, garage and a large fenced yard. $234,900. ML251988. Ania Pendergrass Re/Max Evergreen 461-3973

Homes

18407314

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1096 sq. ft on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertops. Peek a boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $199,000 360-460-7503

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18407304

A ‘NEARBY FARAWAY PLACE’ A place where you can hear the wind, see the stars, walk moonlit paths and tell the time of day by watching the sun move across the mountainside. This great corner lot is about 1.48 acres in size and is ready for your building project. Utilities available & soils analysis complete. If you look around you’ll notice the nice homes being built in the neighborhood. Of course your new home could be the nicest one on the block. Seller may finance. Submit all offers. $94,000. ML261423 Barclay Jennings 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Homes

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1719 S. Butler St., Port Angeles

82 Cypress Circle, Port Angeles

Come and Experience Light & bright newer 3

Cute as a button. Neat as a pin! Site built 2

BR/2 BA home within the Port Angeles City limits. Kick back and relax on the deck and enjoy the nicely landscaped yard in this quiet neighborhood. You won’t believe how wonderful and classy this home looks and feels - COME SEE! $152,000. MLS#251853/145266

BR/1.5 BA home in Monterra! The perfect scale down home or maybe a nest for snow birds in a terrific and quiet adult community. Low maintenance landscaping and a carport with a storage/utility room. All this conveniently located between Sequim and Port Angeles. $132,000. MLS#250763/145335

TOM BLORE

tom@sequim.com

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

Mark Macedo

Mark Macedo

(360)477-9244 questionmark@olypen.com

(360)477-9244 questionmark@olypen.com

18407319

MOUNTAIN VIEW

A “NEARBY FARAWAY PLACE”

An astounding 5 BR/2 BA home. Large rec room with fireplace, office with built-in bookshelves, garage and a large fenced yard. ML#251988 REDUCED TO $234,900! 1(800)454-2340 x9802

17407135

Great 3 BR/2 BA home on 1.16 acres close to the game farm. Terrific mountain views, lots of fruit trees in the yard, plus detached two car garage with workshop. Start your own mini-farm. $165,000 ML#261444 Call Jo at 360-683-3900/360-460-7725

'R' IS FOR RANCHETTE

18407312

18407308

18407307

A place where you can hear the wind, see the stars, walk moonlit paths and tell the time of day by watching the sun move across the mountainside. This great corner lot is about 1.48 acres in size and is ready for your building project. Utilities available & soils analysis complete. Seller may finance. Submit all offers. ML#261423 $94,000

CHERRY HILL!

8.51 gorgeous mountain view acres of pasture land with 3 BR, 2,802 SF home with daylight basement. Large detached garage with 2-car garage & enclosed RV parking, barn & single wide mobile that is currently rented. Fields are fenced & cross fenced. Only $475,000. ML#261363

®

Barclay Jennings 360.808.4142 barclay@jacerealestate.com

190 Priest Rd. PO Box 1060 Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

EVERGREEN Ania Pendergrass

Jo Cummins 360-460-7725

360-461-3973 www.AlwaysAskAnia.com

Patti Morris 360.461.9008 pmorris@wavecable.com 1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

Homes

‘W’ IS FOR WELCOME HOME Right from the start this tidy house says ‘welcome home’ with a custom stainedglass entry and Pergo floor. Woodburning stove in living room, double sink in kitchen, and a roomy newer family room with a Br. tucked away from the others is ideal for home office, library or guest Br. Kitchen has extra storage with a pantry in the adjoining laundry room. Two storage areas in the backyard including one with power. Mountain view corner lot. AHS Home Warranty for buyer! $189,900. ML261556. Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. WHAT A VIEW Nearly the last 2 view lots on W. 4th Street in P.A. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lots are ready to build on; easy access - Utilities in at street or alley. Established area - across from Crown Park. Close to trails. Oversized city lots give plenty of room to build. Owner is licensed real estate broker. $79,950 each. ML261276 Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

52

Manufactured Homes

2007 in Sequim 55+ park, 1,620 sf, 3 Br. $118,900. 504-1168.

54

Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. PORT ANGELES lot @ 222 W Park Ave Half acre+ CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Pt. lot with water view, perc, water $69,000. Owner financing. Call 253-549-3345.

CRESTHAVEN LOT Just $69,000 this lot is in the prestigious Cresthaven neighborhood. Buy now while prices are low; build when you are ready. Some views available from this site. $69,000. ML261555 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SEQUIM: 2.5 wooded acres with potential water view, power and building pad in, on quiet country road, discount for cash, owner financing available. $65,000 360-460-2960 TOP OF THE WORLD VIEWS If the views are your dream for a future building site, this is it! 5 acres at the top of the hill. Good road, well and power and parked out site, RV carport and storage. Good road to property. A must see. $199,000. ML260737. Becky Jackson 417-2781 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

58

Commercial

FSBO: Large truck shop. Russle Road, Forks. Inquire at: 360-640-0472 or 360-374-9478

62

P.A.: 1 Br. Downtown location on bluff, mtn view, no pets. $525. 582-7241 P.A.: 1 Br., clean, cozy, no pets/smoking, storage, references. $475 mo., $450 deposit. 809-9979. P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $700. 808-4972. P.A.: Water view 1 Br., just remodeled. $595. 206-200-7244. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113.

63

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br., unfurnished from $438480, 2 Br., $514-541, 3 Br., $685 + util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258 COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, $550, $550 dep., no pets. 452-3423 EAST P.A.: 1 Br., W/S/G paid, no pets /smoking. $475, plus $450 dep. 683-1012. EAST P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage, upstairs unit. No smoke/pets. $625 + $500 dep. 452-8239. EVERGREEN COURT APTS 1 month free, 1&2 Br. apts avail. $320$670. Some restrictions apply. Please call today to schedule a tour of your new home. 360-452-6996

Duplexes

P.A.: East side, quiet 2 Br., deck, carport. $675. 452-6611. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, laundry room, 1 car gar., no smoking. $800 incl. water/septic. 683-0932. WANTED: Mature woman with one cat, seeks living space to rent in quiet location. Have W/D, yard equip. Flexible. 541-465-2197 bardra95@yahoo.com

64 61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

Apartments Unfurnished

904 E. 4th P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, gar., W/D, dishwasher, remodeled. $775 mo., 1st, last, dep. No smoking/ pets. 775-6739. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer near beach, utilities furnished. $600. 928-3006. EAST P.A.: Small 1 Br., trailer. $475 mo. 457-9844, 460-4968 FSBO Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great rm, and rec rm. 2 full baths/4 bdrms. Private, near schools, shopping, busses. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on first floor. Shop. Warm, south facing tiled patio. Large lot, fruit trees/ garden. $325,000 457-2796 House for Rent. Nice 4 Br., 2-1/2 bath on 1/3 acre near Sequim. $1,200/mo plus $1,200 deposit. 683-5166 Leave message.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

Houses

64

Houses

P.A.: 2 Br., quiet dead end st., pets neg. $850 mo. 461-7599.

WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $825. No smoking/ pets. 452-6750.

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153.

WEST P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba no smoke, sm pets ok. $750. 460-7963.

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath 1,800 sf, 2 carports, 2 porches, shed, close to bus stop and Olympic Trail, mountain view, 2 acres. $1,150. 775-1316, appt.

WEST P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, no smoking/pets. $850. 457-5723. West P.A.: 4 Br., 2 bath, dbl car garage, fenced yard,close to schools & town, $1,250. 565-0131.

P.A.: 3 Br., gar., house, $990. 3 Br. gar., dplx, $835. 452-1395.

65

PALO ALTO: Remod. cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307.

P.A.: Room $400 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

Room with bathroom for rent nice quiet area 10 minutes from Sequim. $400/mo., +$200 deposit. Must have a job and references. 683-8792.

SEQ: 28x70 mobile, 3 Br., 2 bath, in town. $850/mo. 681-5142 SEQ: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced yd, pets ok. $1,000/mo. 460-9917.

Sequim house for rent. Nice house with 3 Br., 1.75 bath + sun room. Large fenced back yard w/fruit trees. Close in, 317 Govan. $1,000 mo. + util. 681-8017.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

SEQUIM: Share home $400 plus utilites. 504-2344

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

P.A.: Single/dbl. wide MH pad in family park $325. 457-7436

68

Commercial Space

Boardwalk Square Sequim. Spaces for rent. 683-3256. CARLSBORG: Office space. 461-4085. Sequim/Blyn, new 2 Br., 2 bath home w/den & deck on 1 acre w/pond. W/D, DW $950/mo. First/last/deposit. No smoke or pets pls. 360-461-2588 SEQUIM: 4 Br., water view. $950. tourfactory.com/525687 SEQUIM: Waterfront home, stunning views, beach access, comfortable, 3/2.5. $1,300. 504-5113.

CLALLAM BAY: Commecial buildings. 206-246-0881 or 360-963-2481 Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 WEST SIDE P.A.: 1,100 sf, $675 mo. 460-3646/452-0226

Property Management is not our sideline Free Investment Consultations 330 E. 1st St., Ste #1

Port Angeles

360.452.1326 Fax: 360.457.3212

portangeleslandmark.com

HOUSES IN P.A. 3 br 1 ba.........$700 3 br 1.5 ba......$800 3 br 1 ba.........$875 4 br 2 ba.......$1200 2/2 acreage...$1200 APT/4-DUPLEX P.A. 4 2 br 1 ba......$675 A 2 br 1 ba......$750 D 3 br 2 ba......$875 D 2 br 1.5 ba...$875 A 2/2 upscale.$1050

UPTOWN N REALTY

360-417-2810

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, August 7, 2011

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 1 car gar., FP, no pets. $750. 775-8047.

12:30 pm to 2:00 pm

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm ST JU

190 LeRoux, Sequim

Beautiful Home with views of the Strait, Mt.

Baker and Victoria. Immaculate condition. Red birch custom cabinets, granite counters, South American pear hardwood floors, carpet and ceramic tile floors. Heated tile floor in Master bath. 3 BR/2 full BA + 1/2 BA. Built in 2009, 2,133 SF. Heat pump, ceramic stove, 3-car garage, RV parking, irrigation rights. Large laundry room. $389,000. MLS#260943/243145

901 W. 5th St., Port Angeles

804 E. 10th St., Port Angeles

WANT THE FEELING OF THE COUNTRY? Space for kids and animals? Very clean 3 BR/2 BA manufactured home on 3.48 acres. It has 2 outbuildings plus a 2-car garage and a garden. See you there! $195,000 MLS#261429

ENDLESS UNOBSTRUCTED WATER, MOUNTAIN & CITY VIEWS! New gourmet kitchen, quartz, cherry, gas. Large family room with a wall of energy efficient windows overlooking the views. The master suite has everything you could want including more spectacular views! Energy efficient & well maintained. ONLY $360,000 ML#260833.

BEAUTIFUL BRICK HOME. 4 BR/2.5 BA - partial saltwater view. Classic 1950s built-ins, gleaming hardwood floors. Newer 854 SF 2-car garage w/separate workshop & hobby/guest room & 1/2 BA. This home sits on a hill overlooking the neighborhood - enjoy the views! ONLY $229,000 ML#261069 $4,500 credit at closing to buyer!

Directions: West 8th, R. On “B”.

Directions: Front/First, S. on Race, W. on 8th, S. on Eunice, E. on 10th.

AMY POWELL

(360)417-9871 amy@olypen.com

(360)670-9418

teamtopper@olypen.com

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm ST JU

18407317

1436 East 2nd St., Port Angeles

STUNNING AND DESIRABLE PROPERTY IN THE CITY. THIS IS NOT A DRIVE BY. Please come inside to preview this uniquely designed ranch style home. Architecturally pleasant with plenty of room inside and outside. Courtyard with a fountain, hot tub, 1.42 acres, walking trail to creek, storage, seclusion and privacy. All appliances, kennel, complete with current building inspection. ML#261378/243690

Cell: 360-461-0500 mwomack@olypen.com www.MargaretWomack.net

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

D CE U D RE

916 S. “C” St., Port Angeles

1416 E. 3rd St., Port Angeles

COMMERCIAL OR RESIDENTIAL for running a business from your home. Office, salon, massage, chiropractic, art studio, repair - no need to pay a landlord - BE YOUR OWN LANDLORD! This home is in a great location for good exposure. New kitchen, windows, tile, roof, gorgeous wood floors, fenced backyard. Would make a great family home also! $164,500 MLS#261134

NOT A DRIVE-BY - STOP IN AND SEE WHY! Beautifully remodeled home in desirable Sunrise Heights. You will love the spacious kitchen with many special features. Gleaming hardwood floors, large bedrooms, sunroom! New roof, huge garage, tons of storage. 3 BR/2 BA, 1,865 SF plus basement. $244,000 MLS#261205

Directions: Front/First, S. on Ennis, E. on 3rd.

Directions: W. on 8th, L. on “C”.

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com

18407302

Margaret Womack

D CE U D RE

3080 Dan Kelly Rd., Port Angeles

Directions: 3 miles up Dan Kelly Rd. on the right.

One of the best view parcels in Sequim with valley and mountain views. Quality development with CC&R’s to protect your investment. Paved roads and underground utilities. $134,900. ML261316. Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Property and hangar for sale by owner. 1.5 view acreage with 46 X 60 hangar on private airstrip near Sequim. Runway is adjacent to the hanger which has a full bathroom, walk in closet and lots of storage. Ready for an RV with hookups both inside and outside, has a septic system and the driveway and apron are asphalt. Overhead propane heaters keep you and your airplane(s) warm in the winter. Buyers agents welcome. $299,000. 360-912-0030

64

Houses

18407316

BELL HILL VIEW LOT Saltwater and mountain views from this easily buildable Bell Hill 1 acre lot. Very nice location, close to town and surrounded by well kept custom homes; build your custom view home and have plenty of room left for a great yard. Owner financing available to qualified buyer. $79,900. ML261401. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

Lots/ Acreage

E3

165123277

$79,900! 2 bedroom, 2 bath on 2 acres! 9 miles west of downtown Port Angeles. New double pane windows, pergo floors, metal roof newer dishwasher, stove and refrigerator included. L&I certified! This home is move in ready and bank financeable. Lovely old trees surround the property for privacy but land is cleared and parked out. $79,900 Freshwater Bay Rd, Port Angeles, WA. Please leave msg at 360-681-0765 or email pinkhands@hotmail.c om

54

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

OPEN HOUSE

LOVE TO GARDEN?

VIEWS

BARGAIN OF THE MONTH!!

-3

-2

1 N.

SU

2 .1

N

SU

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Port Angeles

(360) 457-0456 (360) 461-7633 hcoburn@olypen.com

helga@olypen.com (360) 461-0538

OPEN HOUSE 1-4

Paul Beck

COZY CUSTOM HOME

WRE/Sequim - East

Jean Ryker Managing Broker 360-477-0950 rykerproperties@olypen.com

Karen Kilgore 477-5718 KarenK@olypen.com

EXCELLENT CONDITION

WRE/SunLand TEAM SCHMIDT 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim Irene: 460-4040 Mike: 460-0331 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

ML#255353/261603 $68,500

WRE/SunLand

18407286

ML#254333/261570 $270,000

• Warm Colors, Nice Floor Plan • Located Minutes from Downtown Sequim • Fully Landscaped & Set Up for Low Maintenance • Great Room, Formal Living Room + Dining Room • 55+ Community (Exercise Room, Spa + Clubhouse)

18407320

• Mt. Views & Beautiful Sunsets • Single Level Townhouse Adjacent to Greenbelt • Chef’s Kitchen, Silestone Counters, Breakfast Bar • Access to SunLand Pool, Tennis Courts & Beach

LIKE NEW HOME

18407285

18407284

Kim Bower 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

18407283

WRE/SunLand

Nearly the last 2 view lots on W. 4th Street in PA. Spectacular Strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lots are ready to build on - Easy access - utilities in at street or alley. Established area - Across from Crown Park - Close to walking trails. Oversized city lots give plenty of room to build. Owner is licensed real estate broker. $79,950 each. ML#261276 Call JEAN

Windows, roof, floors, countertops, deck, copper plumbing & more. Relax and enjoy 2 decks, backyard pond, fruit trees & raised-bed garden. MABA has walk-in closet, oversized shower & soak tub. Wood stove keeps house cozy. Built-in dining hutch & large kitchen. Attached carport, RV parking, circular driveway, detached garage & shop - all on .5 private acre close to town. Call Karen ML#261291 $134,000

WRE/Sequim - East

COMFORTABLE CAREFREE LIVING

18407292

Directions: Hwy 101 to Dryke Rd., to Woodridge Ct. to 90.

WHAT A VIEW!

18407291

18407290

18407301

AFFORDABLE & CONVENIENT. This cozy 3 BR/1 BA site-built rambler is priced to sell! Conveniently located between Sequim & Port Angeles & sits on .4 acre. Close to Solmar community, but without their CC&Rs. $139,900 ML#260414 Call the DODDS

WRE/Sequim - East

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

Michaelle Barnard (360) 461-2153 Email: mlee@olypen.com

NEW, NEW, NEW

CAROLYN & Robert DODDS Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

WRE/Port Angeles

ML#260508/196308 $185,000

WRE/Port Angeles

Holly Coburn

2 BR/1 BA home on spacious corner lot fronting on Cedar and 10th. Mature landscaped for privacy. Single car detached garage connected with breezeway/roof. Cozy fireplace for those cold winter days. ML#261642 $118,000

NEW PRICING

Directions: W. on Front, N. on Jones, E. on Water St.

WRE/Port Angeles

Helga Filler

NICE ENTRY LEVEL HOME

• 3 BR/1.5 BA + Soothing Sauna • Kitchen has Copper Range Hood & Custom Cabinetry • Nice Bright Recreation Room • Cobblestone Patio, Fenced Backyard • Landscaped with Sprinkler System

Open House - 1226 Water St., Port Angeles. Quiet street, harbor, Strait & Mt. views, totally remodeled 4 BR/2 BA house, garage, concrete patio, full RV parking w/hookups and all for only $180,000. What a smokin’ deal! Plus only 2 blocks from bus line and hospital. ML#261196/232207

One of the best view parcels in Sequim with valley & mountain views. Quality development with CC&Rs to protect your investment. Paved roads and underground utilities. ML#261316 $134,900

Thelma Durham (360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

18407300

Amazing landscaping featuring an array of fabulous perennials, ornamentals & trees in a fully fenced setting with pond. This trilevel home with large deck & hot tub offers spectacular views of Discovery Bay & Cape George. ML#260711/206519 $259,000

18407299

Directions: E. of Port Angeles to Gales Addition. 3rd Ave. on the Bluff.

18407298

18407313

2345 E. 3rd Ave. Expansive Dual Views Large enough to be comfortable, small enough for easy care. Adorable home with great garage and shop with wood stove. Full views of the Strait and Olympics. 3 bedrooms/2.5 baths. This is a must see! ML#261559 $230,000

• Nestled in a Landscaped 1/2 Acre • Many Upgrades - Security System, 2 RV Pads • Energy Saving Heat Pump, Solar Tubes • Insulated Plantation Shutters, Red Alder Cabinets • Front Porch & Back Patio to Enjoy Private Setting ML#257171/261638 $220,000

WRE/SunLand

Deb Kahle

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

Subscriptions Simplified. Paying for your subscription is just a click away. Visit us online and click on the Subscriber Services tab to make your payment securely and conveniently.

175126326

www.Peninsuladailynews.com


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

AUCTION: ANGELES MINI STORAGE, 1 p.m. on Thurs. Aug. 11, 2011 at 919 W. Laurisden Blvd., P.A. tenants & Units as follows: T. Turner A21, K. Armstrong A40, B. Braghetta A43, M. White A159, C. Evans A205, T. Thomas A209, and A. Hernandez A218. 452-2400 to verify. AVON: Inflatable boat, with hard floor & 3 hp Evinrude motor. $425. 683-0416.

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following full time job opportunities: • Personal Banker • Investment Representative For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

Bike/Utility Trailer: 2004 wood box enclosed, little TLC, Wants to be used $575/obo. 461-9103. BUICK: ‘03 Lasabre Custom Sedan. 37K miles, 1 owner, excel cond. A must see! $8,400. 360-437-0337 10am-9pm only pls! FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100

CAREGIVER: Private home, will train, good pay and health benefits. 461-5865. CLALLAM BAY: Commecial buildings. 206-246-0881 or 360-963-2481 Clallam Bay Corrections Center is currently recruiting for On-Call Cook A/C. Pay starts at $14.67 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 8/21/11. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.gov For more information, please call Tanja Cain at 360-9633208. EOE From July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions. The salary range noted in this recruitment announcement reflects this temporary reduction. COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER (911 Dispatcher) City of Port Angeles Full-time $3,227$4,116 mo. plus benefits. Requires: 2 yrs. customer service exp., strong computer and keyboard skills, must pass background check. Apply ASAP, one current vacancy. Go to www.cityofpa.us to apply or stop by City Hall. For more info call 417-4510. COPA is an EOE. EAST P.A.: 2 Br., W/D, D/W, carport, storage, upstairs unit. No smoke/pets. $625 + $500 dep. 452-8239.

23

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Backpack. Blue and yellow. 452-6053 FOUND: Boat oar. Caviness. 452-6053. FOUND: Cat. Black, River Rd., Sequim. 582-0695 FOUND: Gold tone cross. Looks like part of a necklace, with red stone. 452-6053.

Lost and Found

LOST: Cat. Male Siamese, no collar, declawed and neutered, dark markings, top of Pine St., before Black Diamond in P.A. 360-797-4495 LOST: Cat. White with gray markings, very petite, blue eyes. Missing from behind east side Safeway, P.A. Call with any info. 670-9840. LOST: Dog. “CHARLIE” REWARD. Golden Pitbull, located right behind lower Chevron, P.A. 775-9065 LOST: Dog. Tiny brown and white female Shih-Tzu, no collar, around 5th and Jones St., P.A. Thursday, 8/4/11. 457-0852, 460-6192

FOUND: Jacket. Red/ white stripe waterproof windbreaker, Ediz Hook, P.A. 452-6053 FOUND: Keys. Let’s Shop WCC, 123 N. Sequim Ave., Seq. 683-2531

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AGNEW GROCERY Full-time. Mail resume to: P.O. Box 2638, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

COMPOUND BOW PSE Mohave compound bow, good condition. Includes quiver, site and whisker biscuit. $200/obo 477-2416 EAST P.A.: 1 Br., W/S/G paid, no pets /smoking. $475, plus $450 dep. 683-1012. EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER For children in church nursery Sunday mornings for two hours weekly. Infant/child CPR training needed. Resume to SPRC, Trinity United Methodist Church, PO Box 3697, Sequim, WA 98382. EOE FSBO Great water/ mountain views from Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great rm, and rec rm. 2 full baths/4 bdrms. Private, near schools, shopping, busses. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on first floor. Shop. Warm, south facing tiled patio. Large lot, fruit trees/ garden. $325,000 457-2796 GARAGE Sale: Sun., 9-5 p.m. 1710 W. 15th St. Washer, dryer, filing cabinet, flat files (maps paper), queen head/ footboard, desks, BBQ.

HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376 House for Rent. Nice 4 Br., 2-1/2 bath on 1/3 acre near Sequim. $1,200/mo plus $1,200 deposit. 683-5166 Leave message.

HUGE Country home in Sequim on 1.25 acres. 4 Bdrm 3 bath, country style home. This home is one of a kind! 2 separate sinks in kitchen, kitchenette upstairs, lofts, high ceilings and more. This is a REALLY COOL place! If you have a large family or want to start a home based business - this place is for you. New carpet, paint, tile etc. Move in ready. Priced way below current appraisal! Leave message at 360-681-0765 or pinkhands@me.com

KITTENS: $10 each. Also FREE 5 mo. old and 10 mo. old kittens. Gray tabby & black. April, 417-3906 19’ Lightning Sailboat with trailer. $2,500. 360-460-6231 MAZDA: ‘06 Miata. 8,900 mi., really fine example of late body style. All stock. Owned by very senior fellow. Just home from back surgery, can no longer drive stick shift. Priced under KBB, and any other ‘06 around. $16,900. 681-0151. MOVING SALE: For Sale: Sofa bed, $100. Blue recliner, $25. 2 pale pink living room chairs, $50 ea. Ping pong table with paddles, net and balls, $25. Drop leaf work or craft table, $20. 417-9078 Nash’s Farm Store Weekend worker. Apply at 1865 E. Anderson Rd. Seq. 683-4642

HOUSEKEEPING + $15 hr. your supplies. 457-2837

HYUNDAI: ‘09 Santa Fe Limited AWD. Like new 7,682 actual miles. Color: natural khaki. 3.3L V6 5 speed auto transmission, all wheel drive. $24,500 206-499-7151

Newer, 1,456 sf 2 Br., 2 bath, den/office, all appliances, heat pump. Carport for RV, shop/storage. Lg deck w/private yard. Entire inside freshly painted. Must see! $169,900. Call 509-951-5980

31

31

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444

Be a part of our growing success! Join the only locally owned and managed mutual bank on the North Olympic Peninsula. We have the following full time job opportunities: • Personal Banker • Investment Representative For job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at www.ourfirstfed.com EOE

CAREGIVER: For eldery woman, daytime hours, possible weekends, salary neg. 360-477-4704.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

Help Wanted

Clallam Bay Corrections Center is currently recruiting for On-Call Cook A/C. Pay starts at $14.67 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 8/21/11. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.gov For more information, please call Tanja Cain at 360-9633208. EOE From July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions. The salary range noted in this recruitment announcement reflects this temporary reduction. Clallam Co. FD 3 accepting apps for Fire Mechanic position. Must be: 21 y/o, HS diploma/ GED, valid WSDL. See further info & requirements/req application. Contact: CCFD3 at 360-683-4242 www.clallamfire3.org COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER (911 Dispatcher) City of Port Angeles Full-time $3,227$4,116 mo. plus benefits. Requires: 2 yrs. customer service exp., strong computer and keyboard skills, must pass background check. Apply ASAP, one current vacancy. Go to www.cityofpa.us to apply or stop by City Hall. For more info call 417-4510. COPA is an EOE.

CAREGIVER: Private home, will train, good pay and health benefits. 461-5865. DISHWASHER: Experienced, full/parttime. Apply in person at El Cazador, Seq. EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER For children in church nursery Sunday mornings for two hours weekly. Infant/child CPR training needed. Resume to SPRC, Trinity United Methodist Church, PO Box 3697, Sequim, WA 98382. EOE

Make a Difference Join a special team of people who make a real difference in the lives of seniors. We provide non-medical companionship and help in their homes. Flexible day, evening and weekend shifts available. Home Instead Senior Care, Sequim 360-681-2511 NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com NEWSTAND COIN COLLECTOR Part-time weekend work. Must be able to pass a background check. Contact Bonnie Meehan at bonnie.meehan@ peninsuladailynews. com or send your resume to Peninsula Daily News ATTN: Bonnie Meehan, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

You can help us protect America! Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

1-866-247-2878

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

P.A.: 1 Br. Downtown location on bluff, mtn view, no pets. $525. 582-7241 PALO ALTO: Remod. cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307. PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, sweet, CKC, assorted colors. Males $400. Females $500. 582-9006, 565-6104

Sequim house for rent. Nice house with 3 Br., 1.75 bath + sun room. Large fenced back yard w/fruit trees. Close in, 317 Govan. $1,000 mo. + util. 681-8017. SKI CENTURION: ‘91 20’, stereo. $8,000 firm. 452-3213. TRAILER: ‘96 M16RK Aerolite. Ultra light 1,975 lbs., MW, frige, stove, bathroom, furnace, canopy, etc. Low mi., good shape, easy to tow. $2,500/obo. 683-1963

34

72

Work Wanted

Caregiver with 18 yrs exp. will run errands, doc appts, light housekeeping, bathing, Will work Tues.Fri., 10-3 p.m., $17/hr. 461-9664.

WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536.

HOUSEKEEPING + $15 hr. your supplies. 457-2837

WANTED: Horse trailer or stock trailer. 452-3633

Lawn/Garden Care. Fast friendly reliable experienced. Reasonable rates. Mowing/edging, weed pulling/ whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Specialty advice P.A./ Sequim area. Call:681-3521 Cell:541-420-4795

WEST SIDE P.A.: 1,100 sf, $675 mo. 460-3646/452-0226 YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701.

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LOG TRUCK DRIVER Experienced, mmediate opening. 360-417-8022 Nash’s Farm Store Weekend worker. Apply at 1865 E. Anderson Rd. Seq. 683-4642 Clallam Bay and Olympic Corrections Centers are currently recruiting for On-Call Correctional Officers. Pay starts at $16.11 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 8/8/11. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.go For more information, please call Jennifer White at 360963-3207. EOE From July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions. The salary range noted in this recruitment announcement reflects this temporary reduction. QUILEUTE TRIBAL SCHOOL Has openings for the following: 5/6 combination teacher, Special Education Teacher/Coordinaor, 1/2 time Special Education Early Childhood Teachers, 1/2 time Special Education 9-12 Teacher. For more information and or application call 3603745606 or 3745700. Applicaitons should be sent to Quileute tribal School, PO Box 39, La Push, WA 98350 or dropped off at accounting office. Posotions open until filled. RECEPTIONIST Part-time for veterinary clinic, computer, phone and people skills a must. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#223/Vet Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Thai Peppers is accepting applications for servers. 21 and older. No phone calls. VET TECH: 3/4 time, for veterinary clinic. Send resume to Peninsula Daily News PDN#224/Tech Pt Angeles, WA 98362

34

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034.

Mowing, and clean up. Reasonable rates. 360-797-3023. Mowing, weeding, pruning/trimming, hauling, landscaping and many other services. 2 men $40 per hr or a set price. We do outstanding work. Many references. Experienced and dependable. 461-7772 Professional Window Washing: 20 years experience in window washing, weatherization, repair and replacement. See my online add at Peninsula Marketplace. Call Jack for an estimate at 360-201-6409.

Sewing. I Sew 4U *Hemming *Curtains *Alterations *Any project, don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576. isew4u.goods.officeliv e.com I'm Sew Happy! Young couple, early 60’s, available for garden restorations, moss removal, fence and deck repairs. Excellent references. Chip and Sunny’s Groundskeeping Services. 457-1213.

Furniture

DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429. HOUSE FULL OF FABULOUS FURNITURE Comfy overstuffed olive green sofa with large rolled arms, round wood feet, $350. Coordinating floral overstuffed chair, $200. Beige tapestry sofa with brass nail head trim, excellent, $400. Pair Queen Anne wingback chairs, wine colored fabric with wood claw feet, $125 ea. Vintage rocker, new upholstery, $125. Vintage upholstered footstool, $30. Vintage vanity stool, $10. HP all in one printer, scan, copy, works great, $25. Vintage vanity with mirror, $125. Antique wood smoke stand, copper lined, $40. Vintage 3 leg side table, $20. Vintage floral side chair, $125. Gold framed mirror, $20. Oval wood dining table with double pedestal base, 6 chairs and matching lighted hutch $500 for entire dining group. Two electric cherry wood fireplaces with remotes, $275 each. Gold framed mirror, hangs vertical or horizontal, $20. Half round wood/glass China cabinet showcase, $250. Regency Panorama P121 two sided see through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate, GREAT PRICE AT $1,750. Can email photos upon request. Susan 360-460-0575 HUTCH: Beautiful, oak, colonial style, 2 locking drawers with key, must see. $500/obo. 582-0988.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today!

Appliances

MICROWAVE: Kenmore. Like new, large, 1,100 watt. $220. 582-0347, or 461-0780.

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

72

Furniture

LIFT CHAIR: Pride, extra large, 2 motors, used only 1 mo., marine blue. $900. 417-9471 MISC: Hard rock maple hutch, $125. Hard rock maple dining room table with 6 chairs, glass for top, 2 leaves, $125. 452-6524 MOVING SALE: For Sale: Sofa bed, $100. Blue recliner, $25. 2 pale pink living room chairs, $50 ea. Ping pong table with paddles, net and balls, $25. Drop leaf work or craft table, $20. 417-9078 SOFA/CHAIR: Cream colored microfiber sofa and oversized chair in excellent condition. $800. 460-9931 SOFA: Double reclining. Green/brown with fold down table in middle, with cup holders. Great shape. Will deliver. $500/obo. 681-3299. TABLE LAMPS Several different ones to choose from. Matching sets for $25, or $15 each. 681-4429.

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General Merchandise

AIR COMPRESSOR Like new, 6 hp, 60 gal, 125 max PSI. $600. 360-452-8224 BOWFLEX ELITE Excellent condition. Paid $1,000 at Costco. Asking $300. Moving must sell! 360-457-4292 BUNK BED SET Lower and upper, complete with mattresses and bunky boards, chifforobe with shelves, desk w/drawers and chair, all match, good cond., $625. 775-1035 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Seasoned old growth, $160. White fir, $130. 775-7244 FLOORING: 450’ of oak laminate flooring. $300. 681-2135. GARAGE: Metal pole building, 24’x24’, you take down and haul. $2,500/obo. 452-2685 MACHINING TOOLS Micrometer, 2-3, $80. Tool post for lathe, series 300, $80. Tool post for lathe, complete set, 400 series, $350. Model 535 pipe threader tool and die, $150. 477-3812

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim Are you looking for a rewarding career?

Come work with the best team on the Peninsula!

Now Hiring

Nurses & Certified Nursing Assistants

185128918

135114275

The mission of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Air and Marine (OAM), the world’s largest aviation and maritime law enforcement organization, is to protect the American people and the nation’s critical infrastructure through the coordinated use of integrated air and marine forces to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband toward or across U.S. borders.

Help Wanted

P.A.: 2 Br., quiet dead end st., pets neg. $850 mo. 461-7599.

We offer excellent career opportunities, as well as highly competitive compensation packages. To join our team, qualified candidates may apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave., Sequim AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare


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Classified

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword ACROSS 1 Pastry preserver of the past 8 “Johnny __”: 1948 film 15 Dreads sporter 20 What 100 is to 2, in the base 10 21 Rampaging 22 Dole out 23 Bathtub ring with no discernible cause? 25 Martial artsbased regimen 26 Hoo-ha 27 Balkan portico 28 Actor Dillon 29 Like a porterhouse 30 Augur’s concern 31 He gave Jackie her O 32 Nuclear age govt. org. 33 Gangster film extras 35 EMILY’s List, e.g. 36 Lawyer’s thing 37 Schusser’s name traced in the snow? 40 Escalate 41 Orb’s partner, in British iconography 42 “Friends” Emmy winner 44 Defames 47 Brings up 50 Birth name of Smallville’s most famous resident 53 Let loose, in a way 54 Garden party? 56 Wacky 58 Chevron feature 59 Giggle 60 “Alas” and “Ah, me”? 63 Former Pakistani president 64 Prayer conclusion 65 The __ Store 66 Suffix with Israel 67 Doce meses 68 Edinburgh girl 69 “Neither snow, __ rain ...” 70 Surveillance satellite? 73 Beginning 74 Truck capacity 76 Many a saga 77 Word with garden or party 78 Soup scoop 79 Arrowsmith’s first wife 80 Pied-à-__: parttime residence

82 Blasphemes 83 Lamborghini rival 87 Dr. Scholl’s products 90 It isn’t right 92 Make Oreos? 95 “Survivor” network 98 Home of the Braves: Abbr. 99 Rating for many “Simpsons” episodes 100 Consume 101 Ltr. container 102 Astronomer Sagan 103 Satisfies a debt 105 Vitamin also known as PABA 107 Deceptive hockey maneuver 108 “Typee” sequel 109 Senior Saarinen 110 What grumpy old men might experience? 113 Disneyland usually has long ones

114 You or me 115 Failed school curriculum that was the subject of the 1973 book “Why Johnny Can’t Add” 116 Tau preceder 117 “It’s __ guess” 118 Lubricates

12 Erstwhile depilatory 13 One may be used to bring down an elephant 14 Is for two? 15 Expose 16 Astronaut Shepard 17 Geckos that don’t set their DOWN alarm clocks? 1 Leader of the 18 “This Boy’s Life” author Wolff flock 19 Medical stat? 2 It might be 24 Damp unearned 29 Apiphobe’s fear 3 Musical 32 “A Death in the technique Family” author builders 34 Diagnostic pic 4 Simple guy 5 Franklin’s 1936 37 Public spectacle 38 Like some “as foe is” mdse. 6 Deserts 39 Sampling 7 Bit of selfaggrandizement 40 Certain king’s proclamation? 8 __ fide 41 Luster 9 Ambient music 43 NYC Theater pioneer District discount 10 Tin star booth wearers 44 Experimental 11 Home of biofuel Odysseus

General Merchandise

MICROSCOPE Stereo eye piece. 4, 10, 40, and 100x. Locking wood storage box. $350. 360-582-0605 MISC: 1901 antique rope maker, $120. Fox string holder, $60. Antique shuttle, $85. Cast iron and vintage toys, $25$40. American Flyer train set with track, in original boxes, $150. 1925 Carbide headlamp, $25. Antique mirrored window, $60. 775-1035. MISC: 4 snow tires, 215/60 R16, only used 2 mo., like new, paid $600, $225. 2 crab pots, 2 crab rings, $60. all. 681-5473 MISC: 5,000 watt Generac generator, 10 hp, like new, with owner manuals, $350/obo. TNT 20’ flat bed utility trailer, rear underframe equipment loading ramps, 12,000 GVW, $2,950/obo. All merchandise in Sequim. Cell 206-940-1849 MISC: Antique oval picture frame, with raised glass, $85. Assorted pictures, $3-$45. Large wooden goose, $60. Nerf guns, $65 all with extra ammo belt. Bakgun, with cards, $25 firm. 775-1035. MISC: Delta 10” Miter saw, model 36-070 with owners manual, $90/obo. Black & Decker 1.5 hp router with owners manual, $60/obo. Router table with Black & Decker router 1.5 hp, $100/obo. All merchandise in Sequim. Cell 206-940-1849 MISC: EPA approved woodstove, ceramic/soap stone, extras incl. $2,000/obo. Prof. leather massage chair, like new, $600. Cream distressed TV armoire, very good cond., $200. 477-4479. MISC: Hardwood floor, 9x12 Brazilian hardwood, $275. Tile saw, $50. Bench sander, $50. 1/2” drill, $45. Cordless drill, $25. Comm’l fan, $65. Pole saw, $65. Tony Little Glider, $30. 775-1035. MISC: New king/ queen bed spread, drapes, pillows, etc, new in box, $375. Area rug, beautiful, cust., quality, used 1 week, 12x14, $250. Sm. antique ladies desk and chair, $350. 775-1035

81 82 84 85 86 88 89 90 91 93 94 95 96 97 99 102 104 106 107 110 111 112

Real card More shrewd Invitation letters Netmen’s gp. Rec room scrape Summer Olympics sport Pen pals’ exchange? Often-satin tuxedo features And others, to Pliny __ pain: be numb Gorge Was costumed to look like Literary family name Arboreal rainforest denizens Oklahoma city Signal to pause Look “Iliad” setting Cozy rooms Thalassotherapy site Regret Woolly mama

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. BEALE STREET IN MEMPHIS Solution: 9 letters

L Y B S R R A S A E A S N I R T D A G A  I N F S E U A E N C G B N M S E E A T P T V O N A S R E R T Y D T N O R  T W F T ҹ O R O O A ҹ C A R D E ҹ K P P A R ҹ © 2011 Universal Uclick

E T I S D I H C O R H E S O C

T N S T H Y T W M L R O F I D

A E M U I I N E A U E E N R R

www.wonderword.com

E L U E O V R A T B S V A Y U

H A E N N S I L M T O I E R M

T T S V E E U T I I L O C D S

B L U E S C R V C L C L G S D

F A M O U S A G I A N N A I Y

S O S B U L C B Y S I O N H E

S R A T S H O P S K R E V I R 8/6

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Activities, Anthony, Attractions, Bands, Bars, Billiard, Blues, Boogie, Clubs, Crowds, Culture, Daisy, Development, Downtown, Drums, Dyer, Dynamic, Energy, Events, Famous, Fans, Festivals, Food, Guitar, Hall, History, King, Lange, Museums, Music, Noisy, Park, Party, Performers, River, Rock, Schwab, Shops, Stars, Talent, Tennessee, Theater Friday’s Answer: Educational THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

OHDNU ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

OTINJ TCETIK

NITEIG

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: (Answers Monday) SIXTH GOBBLE MAYHEM Jumbles: BLURT Answer: What the Amazon explorer and the Amazon River had in common — A BIG MOUTH

Friday’s

8/7/11

73

45 Windflower 46 Pilots’ milieu 48 “__ Day in Paradise”: Phil Collins #1 hit 49 Mumbai money 51 Formal letter 52 Walking aids 54 Catch a glimpse of 55 Drop in 57 Part of a mongoose’s diet 58 Happy letters for an angel 61 Blackjack demand 62 Singer born Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin 65 “Moesha” network 68 They’re not true 70 Go through the roof, as prices 71 “__ you were the last one on earth!” 72 Shorthand pro 73 Muddy Waters genre 75 Deduction for waste

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

“SWORDPLAY” By DONNA S. LEVIN

By DAVID OUELLET

73

General Merchandise

MISC: Yard vacuum, $90. Lawn mower, $90. Wheelbarrow, $25. Lawn roller, $35. 54” car jack, $35. Electric tiller, $50. Air compressor, $45. 452-8324 PLATES: Norman Rockwell. 6 plate set of the Light Campaign for $150. 12 plate set of the Rediscovered Women for $190. Prices firm. 683-6419

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,750. 477-8826. RIDING MOWER: 44” deck, commercial zero turn, 21 hp Kawasaki engine. $3,800 360-912-1074 SARC gift certificate, value $371.71. Can be used towards any kind of membership/classes/coupon books. No expiration date. Must sell! SAVE MONEY! Sell for $325. 683-0973. SEMI-TRAILER: 38’ with building materials, will trade for masonry labor $2,500/obo 797-7063, after 9 am SOCKEYE & KINGS Fresh, local. 360-963-2021

74

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

Musical

PIANO: Beautiful, cherry wood, spinet size. Built by Baldwin. $500. 360-379-9300 PIANO: Like new Yamaha Clavinova CVP - 309/307. Polished jet black. Perfect condition. $4,000/obo. 4605035, Sequim area. Email for photos, dory@olympus.net SPINET PIANO: Great beginner piano. Been tuned regularly. $395. 452-7349.

76

Sporting Goods

BICYCLE: Specialized Crossroads Trail LX, 16 speed, new $500. Sell for $350/obo. 681-3361. BMX BIKE Redline Raid, 18” frame, red, great shape. $80. 477-2322 BMX BIKE: Haro, new excellent condition, freestyle, bright pink. $175/obo. 477-8052 COMPOUND BOW PSE Mohave compound bow, good condition. Includes quiver, site and whisker biscuit. $200/obo 477-2416 FISHING REELS: Various left-handed reels. $25-$50. 452-2029 GOLF BALLS: Used Titleist Pro V1, 20 dozen available, good shape, $15 dozen. 2,000 others, clean, 35¢ per ball. 360-912-1688 GOLF SET: Men’s 16 piece NICKLAUS GOLDEN BEAR. Right handed, used twice, stand bag, backpack strap attachment and hood, balls, glove, driver headcovers. $200. 683-0973.

GUN SHOW SEQUIM PRAIRIE GRANGE Sept. 3rd & 4th Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3 Admission $5 Family $7 Food Available Setup 9/2 6-9 p.m. Tables $25 day Both days $35 Tables: Don Roberts 457-1846 Donr@olypen.com

GUNS: Sig Sauer 1911, 45 caliber, carry, Elite, 2-tone, brand new, $950. Ruger 45 Colt revolver, 4” barrel, brand new, $850. 460-4491 MISC: Womens graphite golf club set with bag, $90. 2wheel collapsable golf cart, $25. 683-4467 MUZZLELOADER Knight model 209, .50 cal., with Williams peep sight. Lots of bullets, powder caps, includes speed loaders, cappers and cleaning supplies. $325/all. 457-8227.

76

Sporting Goods

RIFLE: French Lebel Model 1886 8mm Lebel rifle. $599/obo 760-702-7192 RIFLE: Rem 700, 3006, scope, hard case, dies, brass, powder. $525. 681-0814 SHOT GUN: Remington 870, super magnum, 12 gauge, 2 3/4, 3” and 3.5” shells, 1 yr old, in box. $300. 360-796-4784 TULA-TOZ .22 LR, made in U.S.S.R., exceptional condition, stellor bore with perfect rifling, great for small game hunting, 5 round magazine. $200. 4524158, leave message.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

AUCTION: ANGELES MINI STORAGE, 1 p.m. on Thurs. Aug. 11, 2011 at 919 W. Laurisden Blvd., P.A. tenants & Units as follows: T. Turner A21, K. Armstrong A40, B. Braghetta A43, M. White A159, C. Evans A205, T. Thomas A209, and A. Hernandez A218. 452-2400 to verify. GARAGE Sale: Sun., 9-5 p.m. 1710 W. 15th St. Washer, dryer, filing cabinet, flat files (maps paper), queen head/ footboard, desks, BBQ. GIANT WAREHOUSE ESTATE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., 2255 Edgewood Drive, Furniture, glassware, hunting, camping, Native American art, showcases, wine refrigerators, household items. MOVING Sale. Sofa bed, La-Z-Boy recliner, cabinets, etc. Everything Must Go. 8/4-8/6 Thurs-Sat. 85 457-4292 1214 W. 19th St. cross street “E”. MULTI-FAMILY Yard Sale & Preschool Center Sale: Sat.Sun., 8-3 p.m. 254 Power Plant Road. A ton of items, from household goods to brand new daycare/ preschool items. Early birds will pay double!

78D

GARAGE Sale: Sat. 81 pm, Sun. 9-1 pm, 695 Pearce Rd., off Mt. Pleasant. Automotive, clothing, electronics, toys, exercise bike, tires, flute, student violin, recliner, camcorder w/tripod, bread machine, movies, books, stereo, Tupperware, lots of misc and freebies! One not to miss!

Huge Sale w/100s of items! Antiques, Collectibles, Breyers, Trains, microsuede sofa set, twin log bed, deco office set, office/retail equip, dragon/griffin chairs, exercise equip, crafts, pet/farm equip, tools, kitchen/dishware, toys/movies/books, tons more! 7am3pm SAT/SUN 8/68/7 @ 123 Draper Valley Rd. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat.-Sun, 9-3 p.m., 153 Cedar Park Dr., by C’est si Bon. Furniture, electronics, books, name brand men’s and juniors school clothes, shoes, canning jars, patterns and material, linen, salon supplies, fishing supplies, misc. Half price Sunday 12-3 p.m. YARD Sale: Rain or Shine. Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 8-2 p.m., 1044 Campbell Ave. Tools, lift chair, dresser, end tables, riding lawn mower and trailer, much more, new things added daily. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 1831 E 5th St (in alley). Chain saws, spittoons, brandy snifters, collectables and off the shelf. No earlies.

78E

The Last Word in Astrology

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

Garage Sales Sequim

BARN Sale: Fri.Sun., 9-4 p.m. 2654 Atterberry Rd. Air hockey table; player piano (we haul, reasonable dis.) & music rolls, boating/fishing, tools, fire hoses, TVs, games, books, +size ladies clothes, insul. blower, 25 gal sprayer, elec. dart board, entermnt center, VHS tapes, guitars, much more. Gary, 360-809-0443

BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): A little ingenuity, coupled with luck, will result in a financial gain. Getting out with friends or taking part in activities conducive to networking will bring about a good connection to someone who has as much to offer as you. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Common sense and practical application will be required. Avoid anyone who wants something for nothing or who is playing mind games. The best place to invest your cash is in you. Sign up for a course that will help you get ahead. 3 stars

hobby will bring pleasure. 5 stars LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t give in to emotional blackmail. Keep on top of all your expenditures or you may overpay for something you really don’t need. Before you travel down a path you know little about, do your research. Mistakes will be difficult to reverse. 2 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Participate in an activity that interests you and you will get a better handle on what you can do to improve your life. If you have to overspend to impress someone, reconsider the relationship. 4 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Focus on pampering, shopping or updating your image.You need a break that will allow you to live, love and laugh. A change will encourage you to take on new adventures. Include the things you enjoy most in your itinerary. Romance is highlighted. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Not everyone will be happy with your choices, but you have to satisfy your own needs first. Concentrate on being unique and expanding your expertise and skills. A change of plans will allow you to do something you’ve wanted to do for a long time. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t get caught up in other people’s problems when you should be spending time doing what makes you happy. Entertaining friends will set the mood for a fun time and enhance your relationship with someone you cherish. A creative

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Size up your situation and consider your professional alternatives. You can get ahead, but you may have to change the way you present what you have to offer. Don’t be fooled into thinking you can get something for nothing. Prepare to do your

78E

Wanted To Buy

Garage Sales Sequim

GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m. 62 Manzanita Dr., Diamond Point area., Sunshine Acres. Riding mower, leaf sweeper, dog stuff, clothes, books, art, exercise equipment and furniture.

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fair share. 3 stars SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): It will be difficult to hide your emotions. Honesty will help you stay out of trouble. A love relationship can be enhanced if you make the changes necessary to accommodate someone you feel is special. Plan a day trip that will allow you to express your intentions. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): You may have second thoughts about how to improve your financial situation. Getting rid of some of your overhead will be a good place to begin. Once you feel secure, you will be able to commit to someone or something you feel strongly about. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): You can reinvent what you have to offer, apply for a new position or redo your resume to better suit the changing economic climate. Strive for greater security in your personal life. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Fix up your living space or use what you have at home to create additional income opportunities. Come up with ideas that combine your skills and experience to create a prosperous service. 2 stars

Pets

82

Pets

PUPPIES: (8) Pit Bull/Husky mix. 8 weeks old. To good home, $50. Also have (2) 10 gal. fish tanks, complete with accessories and fish, $30 ea. 360-463-1699

WANTED

AQUARIUMS: 55 gallon glass aquarium with metal stand, complete tropical set up including filter, hood and lights, heater, background, gravel and decorative rock, like new. Clean and ready for fish! A steal at $150. 20 gallon long aquarium also available, filter, light, gravel, and heater included. $55. 360-481-8955, leave message.

Old Logging Tools

FERRET: White with black markings, includes cage and accessories. $100. 681-8718

PUPPIES: Jack Russell Terriers, sweet, CKC, assorted colors. Males $400. Females $500. 582-9006, 565-6104

FREE: To good home. 2 yr old neutered male cat, black w/little white, short hair, mostly indoor, very loving. Moving, can’t take with me. Call 360-374-2126, leave msg.

PUPS: AKC Golden Retrievers. 1st shots, wormed, quality. Experienced reputable breeder. Father on site. 2 females, $500 each. 360-582-3181 or 360-912-2302

KITTENS: $10 each. Also FREE 5 mo. old and 10 mo. old kittens. Gray tabby & black. April, 417-3906

SHIH-TZU: Puppies. 2 Females, black and brown, cute and fluffy. 1st shots, dewormed. $500 ea. 477-8382

79

WANTED: USED LAPTOPS! Working or broken! We’ll even pick them up! All laptops we receive are wiped clean using military grade utilities preventing any data recovery. 775-2525. www.helpertek.com

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

Large tongs, Marlin spikes, blocks, large anvil. Collector. 360-687-1883, leave msg. WANTED: Horse trailer or stock trailer. 452-3633

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

FREE HAY: 3 acres, Shore Rd. in Agnew. You cut. 797-0091. PORK: Grain fed, $2.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3198.

PUPPIES: Delightful Mini-Schnauzers, tails/dew claws done, vet checked, wormed and first shots. Various shades of salt and pepper. $475. View by appt. 681-7480.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

93

Marine

19’ Lightning Sailboat with trailer. $2,500. 360-460-6231 BOAT: 10’ fiberglass with new oars. $390. 452-9598 BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. BOSTON WHALER ’96 15’ Dauntless, 75 hp Merc, 6 hp Merc kicker, EZ Loader, like new. $11,000/ obo. 360-460-4950. BUOY: A-5 Polyform. $65/obo. 775-0415. CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728.

82

Pets

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org

83

Farm Animals

HAY FOR SALE: Local grass hay for your horses or cows. In field or delivery is available. Please call for more information and pricing. 477-9004 or 565-6290.

85

Farm Equipment

KUBOTA: ‘90s. Attachments include: brush cutter, disk, plow, and rototiller. Good shape. $6,500/ obo. 360-374-9478 or 360-640-0472. TRACTOR: Like new Kubota tractor, 12 attachments, 1 or all. $30,000. 452-2162.

MINI-HORSE: Gorgeous stallion. $300. 461-7353

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE: 13 yr. old Arab Welsh “Princess Pony”, good companion horse. $300. 681-5030 eves

85

Farm Equipment

Chipper 6 cyl 1969 Asplundh contiuous feed and 1968 Ford 1 Ton DmpTrk rebuilt V8 4 spd man trans. 2 sets of new blades, manual. $4,200 cash or cashiers check. Gregg 360-385-6088 9:00 AM-9:00 PM.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

FORK LIFT: Hyster, 11,000 lb lift. $7,000. 457-3120 SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618 TRACTOR: BX24 Kubota, diesel 4WD, backhoe, front loader, post hole digger, box scraper. $14,000. 683-7541.

93

NO RAIN HAY $5/bale. 460-8586 STEERS: Two year old, whole or half. $2 lb. hanging weight. 928-3733.

92

CATALINA: ‘88 22’ SAILBOAT. Wing Keel; 2 jibs, main, 5 HP outbd. pop top; cushions, sink, Ppotty, depth knot meters, compass. good cond. $3,950. (NADA $6,000+) Sequim. Cells 602-499-5779 or 602-290-2144 CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884.

Marine

2 KAYAKS: 16’ fiberglass in very good condition. $1,600 new, asking $650 ea. 582-9409 ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. AVON: Inflatable boat, with hard floor & 3 hp Evinrude motor. $425. 683-0416. BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6

BAYLINER: ‘86 32’, 3270 twin diesel, 8 knots at 2,100 rpm, tops out 12-14 knots, all standard features plus radar, gps, depth sounder, anchor, windless, RIB tender, G14 John Wayne $54,995 360-670-6166

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 FIBERFORM: ‘74 24’, new rebuilt 302, new exhaust, cruised 2024 mph before outdrive blew. Calkins rollerbed trailer. $2,750. 928-9545, or 565-6906 FOUR WINNS: 245 Vista, only 285 hrs., V8, galv trailer, appraised at $20,000. Sell for $10,000. 619-320-4002 HARBERCRAFT: 12’ aluminum, rigged for crab, late 8 hp Mercury, depth finder, rebuilt trailer, oars, etc. $2,200. 683-0904 HI-LAKER: Quit wishing and go fishing. 14’, EZ Loader trlr, nearly new 25 hr 4 stroke Suzuki with elec. start and power tilt. many extras. $3,500. 460-4957.

93

Marine

GLASTRON: 16’ ‘80 85 hp Johnson, EZ Loader trailer. No salt, must sell! $1,800. 928-9645. LIVINGSTON: 12’ fiberglass, Calkins trailer, brand new Honda 5 hp 4 stroke, 2 seats, fishfinder/ fathometer, numerous extras. Cancer forces sale. Reduced, $4,450. 457-9689 LIVINGSTON: 12’, 10 hp Honda, good cond., dependable. $1,600. 461-2627. LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,800. 683-1957. O/B: Honda 15 hp, long shaft, less than 3 hrs. in freshwater only. $2,000. 457-8254

Olympic '90 Resorter 22, LOA 25', Heavy Duty hull, 2006 HondaVTec 225 hp outboard on solid transom extension,83 hrs., 80 gal.gas tank, EZ Ldr.dbl-axle trlr. new tires, spare; Lowrance DS/FF, Furuno GPS, Uniden VHF, boat totally repainted, large aft cockpit w/newer removable vinyl enclosure, dual batteries, Scotty downrigger, auto anchor windless and Bruce Anchor, excellent shape, turn-key ready. $28,500. Call 360-271-2264 RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $4,500. 452-4384, msg RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: ‘07 16’ Daysailer. Wood double-ender, modified Bolger design, in storage since built in ‘07 in Port Townsend, w/trailer PURPLE sail, extras. $3,500/obo. 360-385-0122 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new gps, depth finder, roller furling jib. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. $15,000. 760-792-3891 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 SKI CENTURION: ‘91 20’, stereo. $8,000 firm. 452-3213. SNARK: 1 boat, all uses! Sail, motor, row, fish. 115K sold. $3,927 + frt. Sound Sailboats. 457-3903. SPORTLINE: ‘86 20’ Cabin. Exc. cond., 165 hp eng., 2 downriggers, extras, located in Clallam Bay. $5,200. 327-3775. TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $10,000. 457-4384 WATER QUEST: 9.4 lake boat, 2 hp Honda 4 stroke, 2 oars, 6 sp elec. motor, 2 life jackets, $500/obo. 670-1560

94

Motorcycles

3-WHEELER: ‘84 Yamaha YT60L, helmet. $500. 681-7904. CASH paid for 1975 or earlier British, European or American motorcycles, running or not. Fred 457-6174 HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘03 Anniversary model Electra Glide Standard. 6,500 mi., black, always garaged, leathers, helmet, manuals, extras, 1 owner, serv. & maint. w/care. Senior citizen owned. $13,000. 640-1688.

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘82 XL500. Runs great. $1,000. 683-4761 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great, low mi. $2,750/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘95 Goldwing 1500 GL Interstate. Excellent condition, always garaged. $7,000/ obo. 360-808-9526 or 360-808-5809. HONDA: ‘95 Scooter. 80cc, 1,400 mi. $900 683-3119 HONDA: ‘98 XR100. Excellent condition. $1,200. 797-4518. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670

KAWASAKI: ‘06 KLX 250. Great bike!! dual sport, knobby back tire, street legal with new tabs. $2,995. 477-6873. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942.

QUAD: ‘05 Honda Trx 450R Quad. Epic +3A-arms Axis shocks HLO2 rear suspension,more. LOW hr. bike raced 1 season-call 5656451 for more info. Need to sell IMMEDIATELY! $5,250/obo. 565-6451

94

Motorcycles

KIDS ATV: Barely used. Asking $500. 360-417-2047 KTM: ‘08 XCFW 250. New, about 30 hrs. $4,500. 417-8840. MOPED: Brand new. Perfect condition. $1,050. 452-2795. QUAD: ‘05 Kawasaki 400. Runs great. Added aftermarket skid plate and black plastic. $2,500/obo. 477-6542 QUAD: ‘06 Eton Viper 70. New battery, tires, chain. $700/ obo. 457-2780. QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 C-50 Boulevard. 4,600 mi. $4,900. 460-9556.

94

Motorcycles

YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957 5th WHEEL: ‘04 Jayco Eagle. 3 slides, very good condition. $20,000 obo. 360-302-0966 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222 5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroad. Fireplace, used one trip. $45,000. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210. 5TH WHEEL: ‘92 32’ Jayco. 2nd owner. $5,800. 379-0575.

SUZUKI: 2005 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, 800cc, well maintained, garage stored. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. $3,000/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com YAMAHA: ‘02 Zuma 50cc. Road legal, low miles. $800 cash as is. 452-9102. YAMAHA: ‘05 PW80. Runs great. $700/ obo. 477-6542. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 1,650 mi., 2 racks. $4,500. 374-5463.

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $5,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 31’ Alpenlite Hillcrest RX. 2 slide outs, extras. Excellent condition. $13,500. 859-248-7566

YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701.

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105.

YAMAHA: ‘09 V-Star 650 Silverado. Only 73 miles! Perfect. $5,200. 457-8824.

CAMPER: 6’ Six-Pac cabover, fits small truck. $2,700. 808-0153

95

E7

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘91 11.5’ Caribou. Good condition, stove, oven, air, furnace, TV, DVD, everything works. $4,000. 385-0558. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $40,000/obo. Cal Mary 452-2287 or 360-477-6675. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slide out, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, 8 CD player, video camera, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty, plus a ‘03 PT Cruiser tow car. Great cond, ready to go! $70,000/ obo. 683-2958.

Clallam County Kydaka Point Properties, removing roof and adding trusses, 16795 Highway 112, $100,000. Robert J. Watkins, monument sign relocation, 258051 Highway 101, $1,000. Christoph and Diana Young, detached agricultural building, 2493 Doe Run Road, $150,206. Christopher Lee Cameron, detached garage, 445 Elk Valley Road, $20,027. Robert and Jennifer Imholt, detached garage, 104 Seahawk Drive, $37,205. John C. Burdick, quadra-fire insert, 25293 Highway 112, $3,000. Coulee Sheets, single family dwelling, 22 N. Evergreen Place, $80,021.

Port Angeles Beverly J. Lindell, replace water service, 535 E. 10th St., $3,000. Peggy A. Robb, re-roof, 1729 W. 16th St., $5,501. Gay L. Whitman, re-roof, 820 W. Seventh St., $3,172. Peninsula College, signs, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., $3,500. Curtis Barnett, re-roof, 422 L St., $3,600. Florence M. Chamberlain et al., grease trap, 101 E. Front St., $960. Daniel and Rhonda Jalbert, gas fireplace and tank set, 3732 Crabapple Place, $4,438. Paul E. and Carolyn E. Cooper, re-roof, 302 Hillcrest Dr., $5,300. Port of Port Angeles, commercial building waterline into building, 2220 W. 18th St., $2,111,500. Port of Port Angeles, commercial new construction, 2230 W. 18th St., $2,292,154. Grandview Grocery, new walls, doors and cooler, 802 C St., $10,000. Robert and Debra Petty, re-roof, 1040 W. 11th St., $4,000. Edward A. Chadd, heat pump, 307 W. Sixth St., $2,985. James W. Clark, steffes heater, 625 Viewcrest Ave., $2,000. Mary and Richard Smithton, re-frame garage door, 901 C St., $200. Layton W. Lund, re-roof shed, 2811 S. Peabody St., $900. H. James Lunt, re-pipe house, 221 Lopez Ave., $4,200. Patricia L. Zellinsky, re-roof, 723 Caroline St., $6,400. David A. and Alice V. Ramey, replace patio and deck, 922 Glenbrook Circle, $14,000.

Sequim Olympic View Properties Inc., re-roof two buildings, re-side four buildings, re-roof covered sidewalk awning with metal roof, add nonstructural shed roofs to gabled sign areas, 135, 139, 141, 145, 149, 151 W. Washington St., $43,780. Choice Development LLC, tenant improvement, Westside Pizza, 10125 Old Olympic highway, $2,500. Robert and Judith Schram, mini split heat pump system, 716 E. Spruce St., $0. Olga Douglas trust, re-shingle roof, 235 N. Sunnyside Ave., $2,800.

Jefferson County Queets-Clearwater School District #20, new roof cover in existing playground, 146000 U.S. Highway 101, $32,000. Victoria Winteringham, new rock retaining wall, 841 Fairmount Road, $10,500. Seattle Council, demolish store, 970 Bee Mill Road, $0. Michael Bair, single family residence with 500-gallon underground propane tank, 5411 State Route 20, $752,100. Michael Bair, accessory dwelling unit with attached garage, 5411A State Route 20, $209,305. Judith McCay trustee, re-roof, 40 Mariner Place, $12,985. James Hodges, electric water heater replacement, 267 Foxfield Drive, $0. Geraldine Sutherland, re-roof and roof pitch change, 21 E. Boat Drive, $17,000. Bradley Bringgold, detached woodshop, 6220 Cape George Road, $0.

Port Townsend Fusion Spa and Wellness, commercial tenant improvement - rebuild interior walls, 800A Polk St., $2,500. Erin M. Fristad, residential addition, 1709 Spruce St., $15,157.72.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 41 building permits issued from July 18-22 with a total valuation of $5,969,596: Port Angeles, 19 at $4,477,809; Sequim, 4 at $49,080; Clallam County, 7 at $391,459; Port Townsend, 2 at $17,658; Jefferson County, 9 at $1,033,590.

185128519

HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376

94

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


E8

Classified

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

185129149

LAWN/YARD WINDOW WASHING CARE LOG HOMES

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

95

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tipout. $50,000/ obo. 360-808-6392. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘07 31.6’ Winnebago Outlook. Good condition, extras, located Chimacum, WA. $58,950 928-210-7044 www.rollinrollin.com/ motorhome MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478. MOTOR HOME: ‘81 23’ Dodge Jamboree. Runs good, Health forces sale. $2,995/obo. Jim, 477-4774 MOTOR HOME: ‘84 22’ Itasca. Runs great. $3,400/obo. 460-5435 MOTOR HOME: ‘87 34’ Fleetwood. New toilet, hot water tank, sealed roof. Live-in model with large closet. $4,000. 460-2127, 504-2535

MOTOR HOME: ‘93 21’ Damon Ford Hornet. Close to 70K mi., good condition. Fast sell for college student. $9,500. 461-0867 SLEEP POD: Bed Bug trailer. New condition; tows EZ behind car. $2,150. 457-6127 TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457.

TIFFIN: ‘95 35’ Allegro Bus. DP 230hp Cummins, 3060 Transmission. Reduced $6,000! 230HP Cummins, MD3060, Oshkosh Chassis, exhaust brake, propane genset Corian counter tops, all records. $21,400. 417-9401 TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508. TRAILER: ‘03 25’. Slightly used, front bedroom, rear bath, single slide. $9,500. 681-7110 TRAILER: ‘04 19W Jayco Jay Feather LGT, Ultra Light. 2,835 lbs., aluminum frame, vacuum laminated construction, low mileage, excellent condition, many extras, 2 batts, 12 volt TV, CD, fishing rods and lures, BBQ, etc. Ready to roll. Must see. $9,500. 360-385-2318 TRAILER: ‘05 25’ Jayco Jay Flight. Always garaged, microwave, slide out, only used 6x. A/C, $12,500. 460-0139 TRAILER: ‘07 27’ Rainier. 3x12’ tip out, a list of extras, excellent condition. $16,500. 928-2099. TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326. TRAILER: ‘88 16’x8’ Aljo. Great shape, with extras. $3,200. 457-9782 TRAILER: ‘96 M16RK Aerolite. Ultra light 1,975 lbs., MW, frige, stove, bathroom, furnace, canopy, etc. Low mi., good shape, easy to tow. $2,500/obo. 683-1963 WANTED: RV motor home class A, gas. 2003 and later, great condition, take over payments or cash out for right deal. Call Ann 360-640-9566

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

96

Parts/ Accessories

4 Big Tires. 4 tires, 38.5 inch on rims for 3/4 ton truck, never been on truck, worth $1,600, asking $1,400/obo. Tires are located in Forks. Please call Matt at 360-780-2740 FORD: ‘94 Crown Victoria. Tranny shot, good engine, 4.6L, runs excellent, police interceptor set for 6 yrs. $799. 928-9659 MISC: 350 Chev engine, $200. 3 speed tranny, over drive, $150. Reece tow bar, $50. 457-6540

Parts/ Accessories

Bike/Utility Trailer: 2004 wood box enclosed, little TLC, Wants to be used $575/obo. 461-9103.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘04 Silverado. 2500HD 6 L, ext. cab tow pkg, cmpr shell 43K miles, like new. $21,000. 681-2620. CHEV: ‘05 Trailblazer LS. AC, PS, PW, PDL, CC, towing pkg., 4.2 auto 4WD. $10,500/obo. Must sell 683-7789

CHEV: ‘09 Silverado. 4WD. 5.3 liter, flex fuel, auto, A/C, tow. Only 18K miles! $35,000 in receipts. $18,700 buys it! 3 yrs., 82K mi. full warranty. 670-2562. CHEV: ‘83 3/4 ton diesel. 6” lift. $2,500. 477-6098. CHEV: ‘83 Suburban. 4x4, newer ‘454’ engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘95 Suburban 1500. 4WD, 7 pass., tow pkg., well cared for, low mi., priced well below book. $2,500. 457-0406. CHEV: ‘96 Blazer. 4door, 4x4, new tires, excellent, all the elec., 149K. $3,500, would consider RV trade. 460-4488. CHEV: ‘98 K2500 pickup extra cab. New brakes, wheel bearings, U joints, shocks, fuel pump, rear axles. Tow pkg, CB. $2,800. 460-2127, 504-2535 DODGE ‘07 2500 HD QUAD CAB BIG HORN LONG BED 5.9 liter Cummins 24V diesel, AFE intake, 4” exhaust, dual batteries, auto, alloy wheels, oversize offroad tires, running boards, bedliner, tow package, trailer brake controller, rear airbags, sliding rear window, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Priced under Kelley Blue Book! One owner! Low miles! The last of the 5.9 liter Cummins diesels. You won’t be able to find a nice one like this for much longer! Stop by Gray Motors today! $32,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE 1997 RAM 2500 DIESEL 3/4 ton, Laramie SLT. Extra cab. 4WD. 85,000 original mi. Excellent condition, clean and well taken care of. Spray-in bed liner and diamond plate bed rail caps, window vent visors, bug visor, running boards, new tires mounted on new ER Dodge mags. $14,000 Andy 360-477-8832 DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $16,000. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. FORD ‘00 F-450 XL SUPERDUTY BUCKET TRUCK 6.8 liter V10, auto, air, 28’ Telsta manlift, nice service body, power inverter, work platform, dual rear wheels, clean and reliable 1 owner corporate lease return, service history. Ideal for tree service, contractors, electricians. $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD ‘01 RANGER SUPER CAB SPLASH STEPSIDE 4x4 4.0 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, bedliner, rear sliding window, 4 opening doors, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, Pioneer CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,945! XLT package with alloy wheels! Clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259

97

4 Wheel Drive

DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874 FORD: ‘95 F150. Red, 351, 5.8L, low miles. $3,000/obo. 477-3638 FORD: ‘99 F150 Sport 4x4. V8, ext. cab, 111K mi., excellent cond, Sony Xplod sound system, remote start, no A/C, located in Flagstaff. $6,000 delivered to P.A. Phone Brandon at 928-221-8564 (will email photos). GMC ‘97 YUKON SLT 5.7 liter V8, 4x4, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD and cassette, power windows, locks, seat, and moonroof, full leather, running boards, tow package. Alloy wheels, privacy glass, luggage rack. Clean and reliable local trade. Just reduced. $3,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com GMC: ‘02 Sierra SLE. Ext. cab, 4WD, 75K, excellent. $13,900. 683-6935 GMC: ‘89 3/4 ton. V8, runs/looks good. $1,500. 460-1760. GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. 4.3 Vortec, 2” lift kit, grill guard, shift kit, running boards, roof rack, excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 477-4838 JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text. JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175. PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247 TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma TRD. 4 door, V6, auto, 48K. $22,500. 452-6316 TOYOTA: ‘93 extra cab. Match canopy, V6 5 sp, well maint, extras. $6,800. 683-1851

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘06 Uplander. 29K miles, DVD player. $12,000. 683-3147 CHEV: ‘93 Tahoe. 2WD, auto, power windows, cruise, canopy, seats 6, 163K, new tires/battery. Comfortable and fun to drive! $3,500/obo. 504-2001 CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWN & COUNTRY LTD MINIVAN 3.8 liter V6 engine, auto trans, alloy wheels, roof rack, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and seats. Quad captains seating, heated leather power programmable seats, dual power sliding doors and liftgate, cruise, tilt, auto climate control, rear air, 4 disc CD changer and cassette stereo, DVD system, dual front and side airbags. Kelley Blue Book Value of $11,180! Clean Carfax, one owner! Only 88,000 miles! Top model loaded with options! Immaculate inside and out! Special PDN price! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE ‘08 GRAND CARAVAN SE 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, 7 passenger with stow and go seating, keyless entry, privacy glass, side airbags, only 29,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com DODGE 1995 RAM 2500 DIESEL 3/4 ton, Laramie SLT. Extra cab. 2WD. B & D exhaust brake, big injectors, locking rear end, K & N filter, air bags, running boards, sliding tonneau cover, 5th wheel hitch and tail gate, trailer brakes, towing mirrors. $8,500/obo. Andy 360-477-8826

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton PU. V8, auto, clean body, sharp interior, 127K, new brakes/tires, ext. cab. $2,500. 457-6156

98

Pickups/Vans

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘66 Flatbed. Recent rebuilt engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435

PLYMOUTH: ‘89 Voyager Deluxe. 7 pass, good power tran, V6. $1,500/obo.457-7916.

CHEV: ‘98 Passenger van. Conversion pkg, 139K, records available. $5,400. 6834316, Diamond Pt.

FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911.

TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $9,000/obo 360-640-9756

FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709

DODGE: ‘98 2500 Ram. 4x4, diesel, 50 gal. aux. fuel tank, 5th wheel hitch, tow package, canopy. $11,500 360-808-4673 FORD ‘96 EDDIE BAUER SHORTBED 2WD 4.9 liter Inline 6, 5 speed manual trans, alloy wheels, running boards, bedliner, dual fuel tanks, sliding rear window, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, JVC CD player, drivers airbag. Low miles! Last of the legendary 4.9 liter Inline 6 engines! Excellent condition. Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

FORD: ‘91 Explorer. Good shape. $1,750. 582-0360 lv msg. FORD: ‘94 Aerostar. Runs great, has new alternator, brakes. $800/obo. 808-7830. GMC: ‘76. Auto, 350 eng., runs great. $1,500. 327-3775. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Excellent condition. 93K. $6,500. 360-385-6702

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,800. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931

&$+ FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

135114426

MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. Willing to trade for camper. $8,500. 460-4420.

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1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

FORD: ‘04 F-150 XLT 4x4 Extended Cab. 101K, 5.4 Liter with Canopy. 3" Lift kit, 35" Tires (7K miles) and 18" original rims/tires, ArmaCoat bedliner, Raider canopy, Tow package. Well maintained, recently detailed. Second owner, truck located in Sequim. $13,900 253-381-8582 FORD: ‘84 F-150. Body in very good cond., w/many amenities incl. (2) brand new front tires w/less than 100 mi. $1,750. 683-4200 leave message.

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Legals Clallam Co.

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

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NOTICE A public Budget Hearing to be conducted by the Board of Directors of the Sequim School District will be held on August 22, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The Board of Directors shall adopt the 2011-12 Budget at a regular Board Meeting on August 22, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the board room located at 503 N. Sequim Avenue, Sequim, Washington. Copies of said budget are on file in the district administration office located at 503 N. Sequim Avenue, and will be furnished to any person upon request. Any person may appear at the meetings and be heard for or against the budget or any part thereof. Bill Bentley, Supt. Sequim School District No. 323 503 N. Sequim Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Pub: Aug. 7, 14, 2011

File No.: 8318.20072 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank Grantee: Alfred A. Allencastre, an unmarried man, and Alfred J. Allencastre Jr., as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1182040 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033131-540020 Abbreviated Legal: LT 2 MEADOWBROOK VILLAGE, 7/36 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 9, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of Meadowbrook Village, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, Page 36, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 20 Dungeness Bay Road AKA 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/06/06, recorded on 06/12/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1182040, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Alfred A. Allencastre, an unmarried man, and Alfred J. Allencastre Jr, a married man as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula TitleSequim, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Sound Community Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/07/2011 Monthly Payments $7,085.00 Late Charges $283.40 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $7,368.40 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $73.20 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,491.27 Total Amount Due: $8,859.67 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $169,612.38, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 9, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Alfred A. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Alfred A. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 20 Dungeness Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 20 Dungeness Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Alfred A. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Alfred A. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 Alfred A. Allencastre 6243 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Alfred A. Allencastre 6243 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 6243 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner Alfred J. Allencastre Jr 6243 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Linda J. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Road Sequim, WA 98382 Linda J. Allencastre 6243 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Linda J. Allencastre 20 Dungeness Bay Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/05/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/06/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/07/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20072) 1002.192550-FEI Pub: Aug. 7, 28, 2011

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2008 Volkswagen Beetle S Convertible. Red with blk top. 2.5L 5cyl. 5-spd. 36k miles. Blk interior. Fun car. Comes with almost $1000 in extras. Also Class 1 Hidden hitch installed. $15000. Call 360-460-7119 BUICK: ‘03 Lasabre Custom Sedan. 37K miles, 1 owner, excel cond. A must see! $8,400. 360-437-0337 10am-9pm only pls! BUICK: ‘68 Skylark Special. 4 door, auto, 1 owner, runs good. $1,800. 461-4475 or 457-7886

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AUCTION: ANGELES MINI STORAGE, 1 p.m. on Thursday Aug. 11, 2011 at 919 W. Laurisden Blvd., P.A. - Tenants & Units as follows: T. Turner A21, K. Armstrong A40, B. Braghetta A43, M. White A159, C. Evans A205, T. Thomas A209, and A. Hernandez A218. Call 452-2400 to verify. Pub: Aug. 7, 8, 2011 The Olympic Area Agency on Aging (O3A) will host public hearings requesting feedback on its next four year Area Plan for 2012-2015. The hearing for Jefferson County will be held on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at the Jefferson County Courthouse. The hearing for Clallam County will be held on Monday August 8, 2011 from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Clallam County Courthouse. O3A provides state and federally funded services to seniors and adults with disabilities in a four county area (Clallam, Grays Harbor, Jefferson and Pacific). For more information or to request a copy of the draft document, please call Carol Ann Laase at 1-866-7204863. Pub: July 13, 17, 20, 24, 27, 31, Aug. 3, 7, 2011

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BUICK: ‘73 Centurion Convertible. ‘455’ engine, new top and interior, recent white paint. $6,995/obo. 683-8567

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Cars

CADILLAC: ‘88 Eldorado. 4.5 V8, 60K org. mi., pristine condition. $5,000 firm. 602-369-5617

CADILLAC: ‘01 Seville SLS. 120K, nice. $5,495. 460-9556.

CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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Legals City of P.A.

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CITY OF PORT ANGELES INVITATION TO BID for Catchbasin Cleaning Jetter Sealed bids will be received by the Public Works and Utilities Director until 2:00 PM, Wednesday, August 24th, 2011, and will be opened and read in the Public Works & Utilities Conference Room, Port Angeles City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98362. Bids will be taken for the following: one (1) new, unused truck mounted combination catchbasin cleaner, jetter, hydroexcavator Bidders shall bid all item. Bid documents may be obtained at the Public Works and Utilities Department, Corp Yard, between the hours of 8:30am and 3:30pm, at 1703 South B Street, Port Angeles, Washington 98363, or by contacting Lucy Hanley, Contract Specialist at lhanley@cityofpa.us or (360) 417-4541. Pub: Aug. 7, 2011

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Legals Jefferson Co.

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Port of Port Townsend is inviting bids for its 75 Ton Travelift Rebuild Project at The Boat Haven Marina, Port Townsend. Sealed Bids for the 75 Ton Travelift Project must be received at the Office of the Port of Port Townsend, 375 Hudson St, PO Box 1180, Port Townsend, WA 98368 by 1:00 p.m. on 12 September, 2011. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on site, August 15, 2011 and will start promptly at 1:00 p.m. at the Port Townsend Boat Haven Moorage Office located at 2601 Washington Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368. The Work generally consists of : Construction of a 75 Ton concrete travelift pier, including: a. Design and Construction of concrete pier with steel piles to accommodate our 70 and 75 ton travelifts. The design shall be designed and stamped by a licensed Washington State engineer. b. Installation of new timber floats, steel piles, and concrete approach. c. Alternate bids will also be accepted for the removal of existing timber travelift pier. QUALIFIED COMPANIES BIDDING ON THIS PROJECT MUST HAVE DIRECT EXPERIENCE BUILDING CONCRETE PIERS WITH SIMILAR WEIGHT REQUIREMENTS. For more information please visit www.portofpt.com or phone (360) 385-0656 Pub: Aug. 7, 2011

File No.: 7023.92574 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc Grantee: Grover Edward Grady, III, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 481055 Tax Parcel ID No.: 901 242 016 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 4 of Survey 5/97, Ptn NENW Sec 24 T29N R1W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 9, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Tract 4 of Survey recorded February 16, 1982, under Auditor's File No. 276801, in Volume 5 of Surveys, Page 97, records of Jefferson County Washington: being a portion of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 24, Township 29 North, Range 1 West, W.M., except that portion thereof lying Westerly of County Road: and except Chimacum - Beaver Valley County Road #12, situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 7782 Beaver Valley Road Chimacum, WA 98325 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/06/04, recorded on 02/19/04, under Auditor's File No. 481055, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Grover Edward Grady III, an unmarried individual., as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of First Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by First Mutual Bank to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 481931. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/06/2011 Monthly Payments $7,833.36 Late Charges $231.35 Lender's Fees & Costs $80.00 Total Arrearage $8,144.71 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $775.00 Title Report $635.90 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,500.42 Total Amount Due: $9,645.13 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $131,605.16, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 9, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Grover Edward Grady III 7782 Beaver Valley Road Chimacum, WA 98325 Grover Edward Grady III 90 West Robert Place Sequim, WA 98382-9075 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Grover Edward Gray III 7782 Beaver Valley Road Chimacum, WA 98325 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Grover Edward Grady III 90 West Robert Place Sequim, WA 98382-9075 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/28/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/28/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/06/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7023.92574) 1002.191835-FEI Pub: Aug. 7, 28, 2011


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SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011 Cars

CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado. Excellent condition, loaded, 112K. $2,800. 809-0697. CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840. CHEV: ‘79 Camaro Z28. 4 spd project car, not running. $1,000/obo. 206-715-0207

CHEV: ‘80 Convertible Corvette. Auto, blk, 350, mirrored T-tops, new brake system, carb, ceramic headers, cam, lifters, rotor cap, wheel bearings, u joints, 500 watt stereo system, etc. receipts all avail $12,000/obo. Eves After 6 pm 460-4243.

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Cars

FORD ‘08 TAURUS X SEL WAGON 3.5 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry, 3rd seat, luggage rack, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 28,000 miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, super clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958

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Cars

HYUNDAI: ‘09 Santa Fe Limited AWD. Like new 7,682 actual miles. Color: natural khaki. 3.3L V6 5 speed auto transmission, all wheel drive. $24,500 206-499-7151 MAZDA: ‘06 Miata. 8,900 mi., really fine example of late body style. All stock. Owned by very senior fellow. Just home from back surgery, can no longer drive stick shift. Priced under KBB, and any other ‘06 around. $16,900. 681-0151.

FORD: ‘69 Galaxy 500. $3,500. Call for details. 452-3488.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $13,500. 582-1260. CHRYSLER: ‘01 PT Cruiser. Everything in great shape, no dents, well cared for, clean and ready to cruise! Custom aftermarket body kit. 105K orig. mi. 26 mpg. Color purple. $4,200/obo. 452-4269 or 461-2538 CHRYSLER: ‘78 Lebaron. Very nice. $1,200. 457-8656 CHRYSLER: ‘92 Imperial. 106K mi., new tires/brakes, new vinyl top, also set of studded tires, showroom condition, loaded. $3,000 360-683-2529 DATSUN: ‘64 Roadster. $2,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728.

FORD: ‘78 Ranchero GT. ‘351’, low mi., good condition, runs excellent. $1,500. 460-6979 FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘82 Thunderbird. Collectible 2 door, sunroof, runs great, 6 cyl. $1,500. 582-9869, lv. msg. FORD: ‘91 Explorer, Eddie Bauer. Runs great! $900/obo. 360-461-0792 FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150. FORD: ‘99 Taurus. New tune up, 107K mi $3,495. 460-9556 HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023 HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061 HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $2,988. 379-0575. MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614 NISSAN: ‘00 Maxima GLE. Loaded, exc. cond., 99K miles, see to appreciate. $6,900. 457-0860. OLDS: ‘90 3.8L V6, runs/looks good. $600. 460-1760. SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $11,000. 452-9857. TOYOTA: ‘96 Camry. 5 speed, low miles. $3,500. 681-3023. VOLVO: ‘96 850 sedan. 2.4 liter, 20 valve, 158K, metallic gray/beige, well maintained, good condition. $2,100/ obo. 360-301-1911.

FORD ‘05 EscapeXLS $7,950/obo. Strait View CU 452-3883.

HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, 133K, new tires sunroof, great cond. $5,000. 457-3078.

ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

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Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7023.75930 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of Diane D. Eldredge, deceased and Sandra L. Hills, a single woman Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1222777 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033020-787000-3010 Abbreviated Legal: Unit 1, Ph 1, Windsong Park Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 9, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Unit 1, Windsong Park, Phase 1 Condominiums, according to the Declaration thereof recorded under Recording No. 744377 and amendments thereto recorded under Recording No. 1999 1032303 and 2000 1055098, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 836 East Washington Place Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/13/08, recorded on 06/19/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1222777, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Sandra L. Hills, a single person, as her separate estate and Diane D. Eldredge, a single person, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, a Washington Stock Saving Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1253656. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/03/2011 Monthly Payments $21,516.79 Late Charges $302.76 Lender's Fees & Costs ($121.38) Total Arrearage $21,698.17 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $647.15 Statutory Mailings $38.24 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $31.50 Total Costs $1,344.64 Total Amount Due: $23,042.81 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $181,471.19, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 9, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Sandra L. Hills 836 East Washington Place Sequim, WA 98382 Sandra L. Hills PO Box 2082 Sequim, WA 98382-2082 Heirs and Devisees of Diane D. Eldredge 836 East Washington Place Sequim, WA 98382 Heirs and Devisees of Diane D. Eldredge PO Box 2082 Sequim, WA 98382-2082 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Sandra L. Hills 836 East Washington Place Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Sandra L. Hills PO Box 2082 Sequim, WA 98382-2082 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Diane D. Eldredge 836 East Washington Place Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Diane D. Eldredge PO Box 2082 Sequim, WA 98382-2082 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/17/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/17/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/03/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.75930) 1002.188291-FEI Pub: Aug. 7, 28, 2011

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File No.: 7023.93812 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Robert S. Ellis and Colene E. Ellis, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1154002 Tax Parcel ID No.: 05-3009-319050 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1 SP 13/87 Ptn NE4SW4 S9-T30NR5W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 9, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Hellene Short Plat, recorded in Volume 13 of Short Plats Page 87, under Auditor's File No. 551492, being a portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 9, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam, State of Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 110 Breezy Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/05/05, recorded on 04/07/05, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1154002, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Robert S. Ellis and Colene E. Ellis, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 06/02/2011 Monthly Payments $9,762.93 Late Charges $347.12 Lender's Fees & Costs $895.00 Total Arrearage $11,005.05 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $24.40 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,311.22 Total Amount Due: $12,316.27 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $161,192.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on September 9, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/29/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Robert Scott Ellis 110 Breezy Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Colene Elizabeth Ellis 110 Breezy Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/29/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/29/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/02/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.93812) 1002.192052-FEI Pub: Aug. 7, 28, 2011

File No.: 7883.20011 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Branch Banking and Trust Company Grantee: Todd A. Dennis, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009-1246338 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-017920 Abbreviated Legal: Lt. 5, Bk. 179, TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On August 19, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 5 in Block 179 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1218 EAST 4TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/07/09, recorded on 12/14/09, under Auditor's File No. 2009-1246338, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Todd A Dennis, as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Sterling Savings Bank to Branch Banking and Trust Company, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1265427. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 05/17/2011 Monthly Payments $9,097.20 Late Charges $361.60 Lender's Fees & Costs $60.00 Total Arrearage $9,518.80 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $543.75 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,311.38 Total Amount Due: $10,830.18 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $161,049.45, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on August 19, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS TODD A DENNIS 1218 EAST 4TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Todd A Dennis 1218 EAST 4TH STREET PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 02/23/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 02/25/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 05/17/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Kathy Taggart (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7883.20011) 1002.186451-FEI Pub: July 17, Aug. 7, 2011

File No.: 7283.26639 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Steven P. Henry, an unmarried individual Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1175347, and modified by Agreement Recorded 12/13/2010 under Auditor's File #: 2010 1260354 Tax Parcel ID No.: 13-28-09-700140 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 9 BK A TERRA EDEN Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On August 19, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 9, Block A, Terra Eden, according to plat thereof Recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, page 22, Records of Clallam County. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 340 Flora Place Forks, WA 98331 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/21/06, recorded on 02/23/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1175347, and modified by Agreement Recorded 12/13/2010 under Auditor's File #: 2010 1260354, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Steven P Henry, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1252454. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 5/16/2011 Monthly Payments $9,170.04 Late Charges $358.74 Lender's Fees & Costs ($1,901.85) Total Arrearage $7,626.93 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,447.24 Total Amount Due: $9,074.17 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $186,684.61, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on August 19, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 08/08/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Steven P. Henry 340 Flora Place Forks, WA 98331 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Steven P. Henry 340 Flora Place Forks, WA 98331 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/11/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/11/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 5/16/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26639) 1002.190195-FEI Pub: July 17, Aug. 7, 2011

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File No.: 7023.93962 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of Vernon James Deroco, deceased Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 540205 Tax Parcel ID No.: 990 603 130 Abbreviated Legal: 130, Area 3, Port Ludlow #2 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On September 9, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 130 Area 3, Port Ludlow No. 2, as per plat recorded in Volume 5 of Plats, Pages 41 through 48, inclusive records of Jefferson County, Washington. Commonly known as: 70 McCurdy Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/23/09, recorded on 01/28/09, under Auditor's File No. 540205, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Vernon James Deroco, a single person, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Note and Deed of Trust pursuant to paragraph 9(a)(i) a borrower dies and the property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving borrower: Amount due to satisfy by 06/06/2011 Unpaid principal balance Due in full (Maturity Date 7/17/2010) $213,850.46 Interest $182.10 Lender's Fees & Costs Mortgage Insurance Premium $287.00 $41.01 Total Arrearage Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $797.86 Statutory Mailings $34.16 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,523.52 Total Amount Due: $215,884.09 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $213,850.46, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/17/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 9, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advance costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale, the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with accruing interest, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Vernon Deroco 70 McCurdy Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Alan P. Deroco 3805 Dunston Court Chesapeake, VA 23322 The Estate of Vernon Deroco 70 McCurdy Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 The Heirs and Devisees of Vernon Deroco 70 McCurdy Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Vernon Deroco 70 McCurdy Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Alan P. Deroco C/O Stephen W. Gillard, Attorney at Law PO Box 1007 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Alan P. Deroco C/O Stephen W. Gillard, Attorney at Law 210 Taylor Street # 10 Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/26/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/26/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/06/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.93962) 1002.191620-FEI Pub: Aug. 7, 28, 2011


Sky Heatherton artist, hospice nurse

Inside ■ Generations: What is the most beautiful place on the Peninsula? ■ Two women prefer being single with married lovers ■ Weddings and anniversaries

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS DIANE URBANI

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

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May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Tales from the Front

dent. I’m in an egalitarian, open relationship. The reason I date married men is not because I can’t find an available single man. I date them Claire because they’re not monogamous and neither am I. Marriage and a serious Cheryl Lavin The state of their marcareer for a woman don’t riage is none of my conmix because men want a cern. If some wives are woman who’s always avail- send a man rushing to naive or deluded enough to able and willing to serve Ashley Madison. believe their husbands are and pamper them. They can’t stand not faithful despite all evidence I know. I’ve had and still being the center of a womhave married lovers whose an’s attention. Women can’t to the contrary — and aren’t prepared to embrace wives work. have it all — the big career, non-monogamy themselves Having a high-powered the kids and a faithful hus- — then that’s their probcareer that requires a band who’ll just wait at lem. woman to work long hours, home while they roam the I’m neither bitter nor travel extensively and world. unhappy about life. A bit bring work home regularly Goes against the grain. cynical? Perhaps. is just about guaranteed to Ain’t gonna happen. So, ladies, it’s your mar- Nora riage or your hotshot It seems that Claire and career. You pick. And I’m not saying mar- I both understand married men, and most, if not all of riage is always the best choice. It’s mostly drudgery. them, fool around on the Do what’s right for you. side. I’ve had lots of affairs with married men. It’s a lot easier being a But I say, why should a part-time lover than a fullwoman pick either career time wife. or marriage when her marFor myself, I’m not a riage will likely result in slave to some man. I have a high-powered career and the same infidelity? Better am completely indepenshe have the career to fall IT’S SO RARE anyone says anything nice about adultery. So today we hear from Claire and Nora, who make the case.

You Can Count on Me!

Ellen Dearinger

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

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back on and take lovers of her own, no? Women who think they have a great marriage are only fooling themselves. I counsel women to maintain their careers if they’re going to be married because their man will most likely cheat no matter how solid they think their relationship is. And the things their husband will say about them while they’re in bed with other women — like me — would break their hearts. On a side note, to the women out there swearing your men are faithful — it’s so cute you think so! So, women, learn to play the game and keep your dignity and your bank accounts intact. No woman should give up everything for a marriage and family. And believe me, once you get past the judgmental types and learn not to let the holier-than-thou’s bother you, you’ll love all the hot sex you’re having with someone else’s husband. And the beautiful thing is, she’ll be doing the nasty things like cooking and cleaning for him while you get to go on great vacations and get fabulous jewelry, and then you get to send him home! It’s truly a great arrangement. Just do it! Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront. com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA WOMAN

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

3

the

journey Easing

Hospice nurse helps patients navigate rough path of grief night it had been. If she’d painted in bright colors, it wasn’t bad. Dark tones FOR PENINSULA WOMAN meant it was. SEQUIM — Sky HeathStill, Heatherton said, “I erton has navigated more could shut off the voices of than her share of nights doubt, anger and fear, as I filled with fear. immersed myself [in] the They started after one paint colors and the feel of Tuesday afternoon in Septhe brush strokes.” tember, when she was diagLast October, when she nosed with breast cancer. was strong enough to go On Wednesday morning, out, Heatherton thought she was in surgery. Heath- she’d attend a cancer superton, 67, underwent a dou- port group meeting at the ble mastectomy, the begin- Olympic Medical Cancer ning of a twisting, turning Center in Sequim. path she has managed to Trouble was, “I couldn’t walk with two companions walk through the door.” by her side: love and art. A painter who has Helping hand adorned large canvases with scenes from across the A woman saw her world — she painted Porto- standing outside and fino, Italy, on a door, for merely held out a hand. instance — Heatherton She and Heatherton knew that making art went in to the meeting would help. But with her together. body recovering from major In the months since, surgery, she also knew she Heatherton has met other had to choose smaller proj- cancer survivors who ects, ones she could finish lighted their dark tunnels in a night or two. with art: music, quilting, So she set to painting painting, poetry, photograwooden walking sticks, phy. with the dotted style she’d And so this spring, she seen in Australian aborigi- got an idea. Bring these nal art. Then she painted artists together in a gallery wooden birdhouses and exhibition, a display that wooden fish to look like the celebrates life through art vivid swimmers she’d met of any kind. while snorkeling Oahu’s Next, Heatherton asked Hanauma Bay. Sharon Shenar, manager of Her husband, Thomas the Landing Art Gallery in East, could always tell the Port Angeles, for her opinion. next morning what kind of “I thought it was a brilBY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

liant idea,” Shenar said in an interview last week. And since October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, she scheduled the show for that month at the gallery inside The Landing mall at 115 E. Railroad Ave. As for Heatherton, “She just took the ball and ran with it,” Shenar added. Heatherton is also back at work in Sequim, back at the profession she loves: nursing at Assured Hospice. The agency supports her art exhibition as a community education project — part of her work as patient care representative and volunteer coordinator — though it’s “not normally part of the job description.”

Art show The show, titled “Embracing Life Through Art: The Journey Back,” is open to textiles, paintings, sculpture collage, pen and ink, carvings, jewelry and just about everything else, Heatherton notes. She hopes to see contributors from all backgrounds — and certainly not only from professional artists. And she shrugs at those who might judge the entries as not “real art.” “It’s from someone who has reached out and expressed themselves,” she

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ/FOR PENINSULA WOMAN

Hospice nurse Sky Heatherton, seen here with walking sticks she created, jokes that she works for an “escort service” — helping to escort her patients and their families through the grieving process. says. And that makes it real. Heatherton knows plenty about reaching out. As a nurse for the past 34 years, she has worked in many settings, from hospitals to helicopters, where she flew with patients airlifted from the Tahoe National Forest in California.

As a hospice nurse who cares for terminally ill patients and their families, Heatherton believes she has come to one of the most honorable types of health care that exists. She likes to say that she works for “an escort service,” escorting the dying across the bridge.

Hospice workers — such as the 15 staffers and 12 volunteers at Assured Hospice — also seek to bring relief to the living. They offer respite care; they bring meals to help spouses who are too exhausted to cook. TURN

TO

HEATHERTON/6


4

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA WOMAN

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Anniversaries

Erika and Frank Bird on their wedding day. Cindy and Fred Smith on their wedding day.

Cindy and Fred Smith today.

The Smiths Fred and Cindy Smith of Port Angeles celebrated their 50th anniversary with family June 12 in Seguin, Texas. Fred Smith married Cindy McCoy July 9, 1961, in Golden, Colo. Mr. Smith held numer-

ous executive sales positions in the photocopier industry, retiring as regional vice president with Ikon Office Solutions for Alaska, prior to moving to the North Olympic Peninsula in 2005. Mrs. Smith was a home-

maker and held positions in the dental field as office manager or as receptionist in Spokane, Portland and Anchorage. The couple’s family includes daughters and sons-in-law Angie and Todd Telford of Hailey, Idaho,

and Debbie and Rich Anders of Katy, Texas; daughter Tracie Smith of Ketchum, Idaho; and, son and daughter-in-law Mickey and Julie Smith of New York. They also have five grandchildren.

The Welckers Gilman “Gil” and Bliss Welcker of Port Angeles celebrated their 70th anniversary with a dinner out with family and friends. Gilman Welcker married Bliss Lundrigan on June 21, 1941, in Seward, Alaska. Mr. Welcker was with Alaska Communications Service in Anchorage when they were married. He retired from Pacific Northwest Bell in 1981 after 35 years. Mrs. Welcker worked for the state Department of Social and Health Services for 12 years, retiring from her position as a clerical supervisor in 1981. The Welckers came to the Olympic Peninsula from Tacoma in 1955. The couple’s family includes sons and daughters-inlaw Douglas and Julieta of Port Angeles and Kent and Lori of Snohomish; daughter and son-in-law Marilyn and John Ecker of Arlington; and, son Bruce of Port Angeles. They also have seven grandchildren and three greatgrandsons.

Erika and Frank Bird today.

The Birds

Gilman and Bliss Welcker today.

peninsuladailynews.com

Frank and Erika Bird of Port Angeles celebrated their 60th anniversary with family Sunday, July 31. Frank Bird married Erika Johnson July 31, 1951, in Bremerton. Mr. Bird is a retired career Air Force member. He also worked for a short time at the Port Angeles paper mill. Mrs. Bird was a dedicated Air Force wife and a

mother. Currently, she is an artist and doll collector. The Birds came to the Olympic Peninsula in 1977. They enjoyed camping and fishing with their children. The couple’s family includes daughter Karen Lovell of Elko, Nev.; and sons Erik Bird of Port Angeles and Steven Bird of Vancouver, Wash. They also have five grandchildren.


PENINSULA WOMAN

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

5

Weddings

Teresa and Thomas Hines

Hines — Oakley

Kimberly and Russell Bailey

Teresa Jeanne Oakley and Thomas Earl Hines, both of Port Angeles, were married June 12 at CresKimberly Leonard of lotte Leonard were flower Port Angeles and Russell girls and Jacob Gitchel was cent Beach west of Port Angeles. Hans Bailey officiBailey of Renton were mar- ringbearer. ried June 3 at the Ballard The wedding had a fish- ated at the 1 p.m. cereJoy and Nelson Bjork mony. Elks Lodge. Don Wells offi- ing theme. The bride is the daughciated at the 7:30 p.m. cereThe bride graduated ter of Donald and Geralmony. from Port Angeles High dine Hoyt of Auburn. The bride is the daugh- School in 1988 and from The groom is the son of Joy Didrickson of Port ter of Charles and Deborah Life Bible College in CaliShelley Shamp and Richard and Edna Hines of Leonard of Port Angeles, fornia in 2000. She is Angeles and Nelson Bjork Karen Smith, the bride’s Hemet, Calif. sisters, were candlelighters. and the groom is the son of employed by Mohawk of Olympia were married Starlet Albin was maid Industries. The decorative altar and Leo and Barbara Bailey of May 14 at a historic church of honor, and Todd Welter The groom graduated unity candles were created Renton. in Port Gamble. Pastor was best man. Shelli Gitchel was from Lindberg High in Mike Jones officiated at the by the bride’s sister, Carla, matron of honor, and Ennisa Albin was flower 1994. He is the owner of at the Holy Protection 3 p.m. ceremony. girl, Jaiden Albin was ringTabetha Magnuson was RB Carpet Care. The bride is the daugh- Greek Orthodox Monastery bridesmaid. bearer and Brandin Oakley The couple honeyin Pennsylvania. ter of Jon and Jana Didand William Hartman were Jeremy Gitchel was best mooned with a cruise to The bride graduated rickson of Port Angeles. tiki torch lighters. man and Kevin Peterson Belize, Honduras and the from Port Angeles High The guests were ushwas groomsman, while Mexican island of Cozumel, The groom is the son of School in 2002 and Trinity Daisy Peterson and Charered down a boardwalk and now live in Renton. Robert and Rita Bjork of Western University in CanOlympia. ada in 2004. She is Lynzie Brodhun was employed by Elizabeth maid of honor, and Laura Holmes Travel Agency. Hansen, Makenna Sherer, The groom graduated 33, and Stephanie Jo Ann Marie Kelly, 28, Clallam County Heather Blackwell and from Black Hills High and James Dugan Brooker, Achten, 32; both of Port Kirsten Bjork were brides- School in Tumwater in Dorothy Marie Hansen, Townsend. 32; both of Port Angeles. 93, and L.C. De Witt, 86; maids. 2002 and from Trinity Deborah Lynn Thetford, Christine Marie both of Port Angeles. Neil Anderson was best Western University in Can26, and Harlan Amhurst Stockman, 38, and Jeremiah Nicole Marie Shields, man, and Matthew Brown, ada in 2006. Joseph Griffith, 29; both of Lafollette, 27; both of Port 20, and Ryan Kirk Rigby, David Hill, Levi WadsHe is employed by Townsend. Port Angeles. 28; both of Forks. worth and Stephen Ward Northland Services Inc., an Nicole Elaina Caccioppo, Amanda Marie Layton, were groomsmen. organization of tug and 23, and Robert Francis 23, and Trenton Lee Jefferson County Bergen and Vienna barge shipping to Hawaii Powell, 27; both of Chimacum. Critchfield, 22; both of Shamp and Hayden Smith and Alaska. Daniel Evan Coates, 33, David Lloyd Bayne, 35, Sequim. were flower girls, and The couple honeyand Mary Kristina Peterson, Abigail Nicolle Irwin, 21, and Erin Mei-Quin Wyatt Didrickson was ring- mooned in Thailand. They Cassidy, 35; both of Seattle. 29; both of Port Townsend. and Alec Ian Schmidt, 22; live in West Seattle. bearer. Florence Maejeanne Morris Lee Cooley III, both of Vancouver, Wash.

Bailey — Leonard

Bjork — Didrickson

lined with tiki torches, and the wedding party followed a path of blue and pink sand with the pastor, groom and best man carrying their surf boards to the ocean shore where the couple exchanged vows. A Hawaiian potluck followed at Crescent Beach Park. The bride graduated from Port Angeles High School in 1975 and from Peninsula College in 1996. She is employed by High Tide Seafoods Inc. The groom graduated from Colton High School in Colton, Calif., in 1971. He is the owner of Tom’s Painting. The couple live in Port Angeles.

Marriage Licenses

Whiteman, 47, and James Ray Lail, 50; both of Port Townsend. Chelsie Lee Pruiett, 23, of Kingston, and Jarod Micheal Jennings, 27, of Poulsbo. Cristin Marie Rasmussen, 40, and Larry Joe Taylor, 58; both of Port Hadlock. Jessica Ashley Sutton, 28, and Michael Bryan Travis, 37; both of Ketchikan, Alaska.


6

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

PENINSULA WOMAN

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Heatherton: Husband, friends help recovery CONTINUED FROM 3 And they simply stay beside the ones who are grieving. Heatherton herself experienced that kind of devotion as she was recovering from her surgeries last fall. Her friends fed her, literally and spiritually, and her husband was her “faithful nurse.” He was there when she stepped in front of a mirror for the first time after her double mastectomy. Heatherton had had a voluptuous figure — and she didn’t think she could bear to look at the scars left by the surgery. Thomas, seeing her pain, laid his head gently on her chest. He said, “This is the closest I have ever been to

Art show seeks entries “EMBRACING LIFE THROUGH Art: The Journey Back” is open to textiles, paintings, sculpture, collage, pen and ink, carvings, jewelry and just about everything else. Applications are due by Aug. 25, and works must be delivered to the Landing Art Gallery between Sept. 21 and 24. The show will be on display during the month of October. For details, phone Landing Art Gallery manager Sharon Shenar at 360582-5259 or Sky Heatherton at your heart.” Then there’s her friend Laraine Gau, who became like a sister after she heard of Heatherton’s illness. When Heatherton was too weak to cook, Gau “made

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up pots of stew, and just ‘happened to be in the neighborhood.’ “She didn’t ask ‘Can I do anything for you?’” Heatherton recalls. Instead, “she saw a need, and she filled it.”

II’s Battle of the Bulge just four days after Heatherton was born. Her mother later married her father’s best friend, Charles Duggie, a theologian who taught his stepdaughter to appreciate differences in religious beliefs.

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Heatherton and Gau became fast friends when Heatherton moved the Peninsula nearly three years ago. She and Thomas rented a house Gau owns until they found their own place between Port Angeles and Sequim. Coming to the Olympic Peninsula was “a huge life change,” Heatherton says. She grew up in San Diego and lived in cities all over California before the move north. She was raised by her mother and stepfather, after her father, a medic, was killed in World War

Rites of death Heatherton is now writing a book for hospice workers on Olympic Peninsula Native American tribes’ rites of death and dying. She’s interviewing elders in the Hoh, Elwha, Quileute, Jamestown S’Klallam, Lower Elwha Klallam, Makah and other tribes, to learn about their traditions around death and grieving process, with the intention of helping hospice workers complement them. Each tribe has developed its own distinct

beliefs and practices, she says. As a nurse and as an artist, Heatherton finds inspiration — and fresh energy — in her environment. She still considers herself new to the North Olympic Peninsula, and she’s still awestruck. “I have the ocean, the strait, the trees, the eagles — I have everything,” she says. “Sequim I consider my home base; Port Townsend is my backyard and Port Angeles is my front yard.” Heatherton also finds a sweet camaraderie among the people in Assured Hospice’s Sequim office. When there is a difficult passing, when a patient has suffered far too much, she and her colleagues get together and simply “vent.” They also take “minute vacations,” stepping outside to look up at the Olympic Mountains. She touts the volunteers, too, devoted workers such as John Glover, who cooks meals for his patients’ families. Through training and experiences, Heatherton adds, she’s watched these unpaid workers “blossom into volunteers who are absolutely incredible.” Hospice care is not for the faint of heart, of course. Sometimes there are longstanding family conflicts, and sometimes, a nurse or a volunteer can help make peace. For the husbands, wives,

sisters and brothers of the one who is dying, hospice workers provide respite care, so a spouse can slip out for a cup of coffee with friends. So a relative can write in a journal about the swirling emotions that can come with an impending loss. “You have to take care of the living,” Heatherton says, adding that she tries to “pull things together . . . to give people peace of mind.” Heatherton is herself finding a new kind of peace, one that feels just like joy. She’s still on a regimen of medication, and is not yet entirely free of malignant cells — but Heatherton insists on gratitude. “You can’t live on whatifs. You’ve got to be in the now,” she says. “Death is there, facing us all.” Having suffered enough from her mastectomies, Heatherton chose not to have reconstructive surgery. Nowadays, though, she feels quite pretty, and loves to dress well, wear a flashy necklace, and enter a meeting or a social gathering with “head up, shoulders back,” showing people just how good life can be after cancer. “I am thrilled with life,” she says. “I’m enjoying this time . . . I’m old enough to flirt; I’m old enough to enjoy just being a woman.”

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PENINSULA WOMAN

Generations Perspectives of three Peninsula women PHOTOS

AND INTERVIEWS BY

DAVE LOGAN

This week’s question: What is the most beautiful place on the Olympic Peninsula?

SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

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“I can think of several hikes that are pretty. One is to Marymere Falls on Lake Crescent. “I like to hike through the forest and be in nature and not something that is man-made. “The other one is to hike to Olympic Hot Springs. I don’t think you can do that one right now, but we love going in the hot water up there. It’s so beautiful in nature.�

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 “The Clallam Bay and Lake Ozette area. We like to hike out there and hike to the ocean. Always gorgeous. “We like to eat seafood at a little restaurant in Sekiu and watch the fishermen haul in fish. “We really like the hike out from Lake Ozette on the boardwalks out to the ocean. Absolutely wonderful. “My last trip it was supposed to be a bad day, but the weather turned out wonderful.�

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Peninsula Woman columnist Jodie Lynn is taking the week off. Her column, “Parent to Parent,� will resume next week.

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“Along the Pacific Ocean beaches. We’ve been there several times, like Ocean Shores. “In March, we watched the clouds roll in with a storm and saw the crashing waves. It was nature at its best. The next day there are all kinds of prizes to be found on the beach. We love to walk on the sand and find treasures. “All the sunsets out there are extra beautiful with clouds in them.�

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