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Thursday Partly sunny; rain likely on Christmas B10

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Heftier riders reduce state ferry capacities BY DOUG ESSER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The state ferry service isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to start turning away hefty passengers, but it has had to reduce the capacity of some boats in the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest ferry system because people have been packing on the pounds. Coast Guard vessel stability

rules that took effect nationwide Dec. 1 raised the estimated weight of the average adult passenger to 185 pounds from the previous 160 pounds, based on population information from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That has resulted in a reduced capacity for some of the Washington State Ferry

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December 22, 2011

MV Coho still seats 1,000

systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boats. The change doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t affect the Salish, which can carry 750 passengers as it plies the route between Port Townsend and Coupeville on Whidbey Island, or any other vessels in the Kwa-di Tabil class, said Marta Coursey, Washington State Ferries spokeswoman. TURN

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THE NEW COAST GUARD vessel stability rules have no effect on the capacity of the privately owned MV Coho, said the Port Angeles district manager for Black Ball Ferry Line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had our stability numbers recalculated, and it was found that the new USCG stability rules will not effect our passenger capacity of 1,000,â&#x20AC;? said Rian Anderson in an email. The Coho plies the waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca year-round between Port Angeles and Victoria several times daily, depending on the season. It leaves Port Angeles from the Black Ball ferry terminal at Railroad Avenue and Laurel Street. For more information, phone 360-457-4491 or see www. cohoferry.com. Peninsula Daily News

FERRIES/A4

Downtown merchant tax credits

Adventuress hauled out next month to finish restoration for centennial

Fourth and final fix-up

New state law allows incentive investments in revitalization efforts BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; When the schooner Adventuress returns to Port Townsend on Jan. 9, it will begin the fourth phase of a restoration program that will lead up to its 2013 centennial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a yearlong celebration,â&#x20AC;? said Joshua Berger of Port Townsend, one of the tall shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two sailing captains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After this year, there will be ongoing maintenance operations, but we will be finished with the major restorative work that will prepare the Adventuress for another 50 years.â&#x20AC;? The Adventuress was built in 1913 by John Borden with the purpose of sailing to Alaska but was sold to the Port of San Francisco as a pilot ship a year later. It was sold again in 1952 and moved to the Pacific Northwest. It has been used for instructional purposes since,with the nonprofit Sound Experience, based in Port Townsend, operating the Adventuress since 1989. TURN

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The Adventuress, which will undergo the fourth phase of its

SHIP/A4 renovation, hangs in a Travelift sling during last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work.

PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Downtown merchants have an opportunity to apply donations to the Port Townsend Main Street Program to their 2012 business and occupation tax. The opportunity is available to anyone who pays the tax, generally known as B&O tax, and the deadline for contributions is Dec. 31. In 2005, the Port Townsend Main Street program worked with other revitalization programs across the state to introduce and help pass legislation creating a state B&O Tax Credit Incentive Program for businesses investing in local downtown revitalization programs. This year $1.5 million in tax credits is available statewide. The Port Townsend Main Street Program can receive up to $133,333 in contributions. Port Townsend Main Street Executive Director Mari Mullen said that businesses benefit in two ways, 75 percent of the donation is returned as B&O tax credits in 2012 and the entire contribution may qualify as a 501(c)(3) charitable deduction on businessesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2011 federal income tax return. TURN

RSVPs float in for rides at balloon fest BY JEFF CHEW PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reservations were slowly floating in Tuesday and Wednesday from those who want to fly in a balloon at the first Sequim Balloon Festival on Sept. 1-3 next year. The price: $250 a person, with up to three aboard per flight. A three-payment plan is available if passengers preferring to do that before liftoff. As of noon Wednesday, 12 had signed up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoever registers up first gets to fly, because there are going to be a limited number of spots and that

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Randall Tomaras, director of the first Sequim Balloon Festival, takes a reservation for a balloon ride after opening reservations earlier this week. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s based at the Holiday Inn Express on East Washington Street in Sequim.

reduces the numbers considerably,â&#x20AC;? said Randall Tomaras, the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director. Tomaras opened reservations at 9 a.m. Tuesday in a conference room at the Holiday Inn Express and Conference Center, 1441 E. Washington St., in Sequim. He had taken 10 reservations by phone and walk-in three hours later. Tomaras has planned firstcome, first-serve reservations for about 90 people to ride in about 15 balloons over three days, but it all depends on the number of balloons showing up for the latesummer event. TURN

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95th year, 303rd issue â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2 sections, 20 pages

BUSINESS B3 B5 CLASSIFIED B4 COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS A9 B4 DEAR ABBY A8 DEATHS B4 HOROSCOPE B10 MOVIES A3 NATION/WORLD

PENINSULA POLL A2 PUZZLES/GAMES A7, B6 B1 SPORTS B10 WEATHER


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UpFront

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). ■ See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.500), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Messing splits from husband IT’S BOUND TO be a bittersweet holiday season for Debra Messing. After a decade together, the “Will and Grace” star, 43, and husband Daniel Zelman have Messing called it quits, they told Us Weekly in an exclusive statement. “Debra Messing and Daniel Zelman privately separated earlier this year after a 10-year marriage,” Messing’s representative told Us. Messing and actor/TV producer Zelman, 44, met years ago as students at New York University, married in 2000 and share a 7-year-old son, Roman. Explains the representative of the separation: “The decision was mutual, and they remain supportive of

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KERMIT

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LAND DOWN UNDER

Comedian Jason Segel, right, and Kermit the Frog speak to audience during the premiere of the movie “The Muppets” in Sydney, Australia, on Wednesday. one another and committed to raising their son as a family.” Messing, who next stars in buzzed-about NBC series “Smash,” out in February, Zelman and their little boy recently relocated to New York and remain liv-

ing under one roof, according to a source close to the pair. “They have been separated the better part of the year but continue to live together in New York for Roman,” explained the source. “It’s very amicable.”

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think the price of gasoline on the North Olympic Peninsula will ever drop below $3 again?

No

By The Associated Press

NORMAN KRIM, 98, an electronics visionary who played a pivotal role in the industry’s transition from the bulky electron vacuum tube, which once lined the innards of radios and televisions, to the tiny, far more powerful transistor, died Dec. 14 in a retirement home in Newton, Mass. The cause was congestive heart failure, his son, Robert, said. Mr. Krim, who made Mr. Krim several breakthroughs in a long career with the Raytheon Co. and who had an early hand in the growth of the RadioShack chain, did not invent the transistor, but he saw the device’s potential and persuaded his company to begin manufacturing it on a mass scale, particularly for use in miniaturized hearing aids he had designed. Like the old tube, a transistor is a semiconductor that amplifies audio signals.

20.4%

Yes

Passings As Time magazine wrote in 1953: “This little device, a single speck of germanium, is smaller than a paper clip and works perfectly at onetenth the power needed by the smallest vacuum tube. Today, much of Raytheon’s transistor output goes to America’s hearing aid industry.”

________ J. LYNN HELMS, 86, the head of the Federal Aviation Administration who carried out President Reagan’s order to fire more than 11,000 striking air traffic controllers and oversaw efforts to keep airlines flying during the crisis, has died. He died Dec. 11 of cardiopulmonary failure at his home in Westport, Conn., a family spokesman said. Mr. Helms had a reputation as a decisive, technically brilliant aviation industry executive who led a number of companies out of financial straits, including Piper Aircraft, which he ran for six years. Several months into his tenure in August 1981,

more than 12,000 members of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization, known as PATCO, walked off the job after contract negotiations stalled over the union’s call for a reduced workweek and higher pay. After receiving assurances from Mr. Helms that a strike could be managed, Reagan declared the walkout illegal and warned that any workers who did not return to their jobs within 48 hours would be fired. The majority of controllers remained on strike and lost their jobs.

70.8%

Don’t know

8.8%

Total votes cast: 859 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ An item on a donation of $25,000 from the Sequim Dungeness Hospital Guild to Clallam County Fire District No. 3 on Page A10 Wednesday incorrectly named the organization. The photo was taken by guild member Lottery Bobbie Rhodes. A corrected version of LAST NIGHT’S LOTthe report appears today TERY results are available on Page B10. on a timely basis by phoning, toll-free, 800-545-7510 ■ Peninsula Plywood’s or on the Internet at www. investors provided walottery.com/Winning $700,000 to receive a Numbers.

$500,000 state Department of Commerce grant. An article on Page A1 Wednesday incorrectly reported that the $700,000 was provided to receive a $1 million Department of Commerce loan.

_______ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1936 (75 years ago)

R.J. “Bob” Acheson, wellknown Northwest shipping man, is the new president and manager of Black Ball Seen Around Freight Service. He said the company Peninsula snapshots Laugh Lines will continue to handle all MOTORIST DRIVING shore freight pickups and BARBARA WALTERS EAST on First Street in deliveries in the Puget RECENTLY named her 10 Port Angeles noting the Sound area for Puget most fascinating people of message on a reader board, Sound Navigation Co. the year. “Santa rocks,” then wonThe Seattle freight comThe list included the dering if the rocks would pany maintains staffs in Kardashian family, Donald look good in landscaping a Port Townsend, Port Angeles and Bremerton. Trump, Simon Cowell and garden . . . Katy Perry. WANTED! “Seen Around” Is that a list of the most 1961 (50 years ago) fascinating people or a list items. Send them to PDN News A pioneer woman with a P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeof the reasons the terrorists Desk, les, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; strong dream, Jennie hate us? or email news@peninsuladaily Campbell, died in Port Jimmy Kimmel news.com. Angeles at age 101.

She came to Port Angeles in 1901 with her four children and homesteaded a place on Blue Mountain. It was a one-room cabin in a little clearing that the family reached by two miles of trail after leaving the end of the road. With no horse or cow, Mrs. Campbell said she didn’t have much of anything except a strong dream. That dream lead to a home in Port Angeles in 1909 when her sons, Alfred and Francis, bought a mill on the Elwha River.

1986 (25 years ago) The governors of two Nicaraguan regions — the

equivalent of states or provinces — are visiting Port Townsend as part of the Jalapa-Port Townsend Sister City Association. Alejandro Guevarra, governor of Region 3, and Noel Escobar, governor of Region 4, spoke at a public meeting at the Port Townsend Community Center. The sister city association is collecting components for an electrical generator to be sent to the town of Jalapa next year. The generator will be used to help the city maintain power when electricity is disrupted by battles between federal Sandinista troops and Contra rebels.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Dec. 22, the 356th day of 2011. There are nine days left in the year. Winter arrives at 12:30 a.m. Eastern time. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Dec. 22, 1941, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill arrived in Washington for a wartime conference with President Franklin D. Roosevelt. On this date: ■ In 1775, Esek Hopkins was appointed the commander-in-chief of the Continental Navy. ■ In 1808, Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67, Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, and Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, had their world premieres in Vienna.

■ In 1864, during the Civil War, Union Gen. William T. Sherman said in a message to President Abraham Lincoln: “I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah.” ■ In 1894, French army Officer Alfred Dreyfus was convicted of treason in a court-martial that triggered worldwide charges of anti-Semitism. Dreyfus was eventually vindicated. ■ In 1910, a fire lasting more than 26 hours broke out at the Chicago Union Stock Yards; 21 firefighters were killed in the collapse of a burning building. ■ In 1944, during the World War II Battle of the Bulge, U.S. Brig. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe rejected

a German demand for surrender, writing “Nuts!” in his official reply. ■ In 1968, Julie Nixon married David Eisenhower in a private ceremony in New York. ■ In 1977, three dozen people were killed when a 250-foot-high grain elevator at the Continental Grain Co. plant in Westwego, La., exploded. ■ In 1984, New York City resident Bernhard Goetz shot and wounded four youths on a Manhattan, N.Y., subway, claiming they were about to rob him. ■ In 1991, the body of Marine Lt. Col. William R. Higgins, an American hostage slain by his terrorist captors, was found dumped along a highway in Lebanon.

■ Ten years ago: Richard C. Reid, a passenger on an American Airlines flight from Paris to Miami, tried to ignite explosives in his shoes but was subdued by flight attendants and fellow passengers. Reid, who later pleaded guilty, is serving a life sentence in federal prison. ■ Five years ago: Rape charges were dropped against three Duke University lacrosse players, but kidnapping and sexual offense charges remained. Those charges were later dropped as well. ■ One year ago: President Barack Obama signed a law allowing gays for the first time in history to serve openly in America’s military.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 22, 2011 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Guilty plea told in eight-state Ponzi scheme SANTA FE, N.M. — A former Albuquerque real estate executive pleaded guilty Wednesday to two felony charges and agreed to serve up to 12 years in prison to settle charges he ran a Ponzi scheme that swindled nearly $75 million out of investors in at least eight states. Doug Vaughan entered the plea Wednesday in federal court in Santa Fe to charges of mail and wire fraud. Chief Judge Bruce Black will determine the final sentence later, but the plea agreement calls for a minimum of 10 years and potentially up to 12 years. The 64-year-old Vaughan agreed to pay a fine of up to $250,000, as well as restitution ordered by the court. He will forfeit a house in Las Vegas, Nev., and the proceeds from personal property auctioned earlier this year. The plea agreement settled a 30-count indictment, which could have meant up to life in prison for Vaughan had he been convicted on all charges and given maximum sentences, according to his attorney, Amy Sirignano. Prosecutors say Vaughan swindled 600 investors in at least eight states, with victims in New Mexico, Arizona, Washington, Oregon, New Jersey, Texas, Virginia and Colorado.

Daggers in flier’s book WASHINGTON — The Transportation Security Administration said officers found two throwing daggers hidden in a hollowed-out book at a checkpoint at Reagan-Washington National Airport. A TSA spokesman said a passenger was stopped Monday when officers found the knives in the person’s carry-on bag. The daggers measured just over a half-foot long and were hidden in the hard-cover book. The passenger was flying to Chicago and surrendered the knives and book. The TSA has the authority to fine passengers who bring deadly weapons into the airport checkpoint. It was not known if this was done in this case.

Cutter delivers fuel JUNEAU, Alaska — The Coast Guard is enlisting its only functioning ice breaker to help with the delivery of fuel to Nome. The city on Alaska’s western coastline is iced-in and facing a winter fuel shortage because a massive storm prevented a fuel delivery by barge this fall. The plan is for an Russian tanker to deliver 1.5 million gallons of petroleum products to Nome in early January. The Coast Guard said it will have the cutter Healy break ice along the nearly 300-mile route from the ice edge to Nome. The Seattle-based Healy’s mission has been extended a month for this. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Activists claim Syria troops kill 100 in village BEIRUT — Government forces surrounded residents of a restive Syrian village in a valley and killed all those trapped inside — more than 100 people — in a barrage of rockets, tank shells, bombs and gunfire that lasted for hours, a witness and two activist groups said Wednesday. The attack Tuesday pushed the death toll for two days of violence across Syria to more than 200. It was one of the deadliest single events of the entire ninemonth uprising against President Bashar Assad’s authoritarian rule. The offensive targeted the village of Kfar Owaid, about 30 miles from the northern border with Turkey. Syrian officials have not commented on the allegations.

held captive by Gaza’s militant Hamas group. Muna, a 35-year-old West Bank woman, was serving a life sentence for using an Internet promise of romance to lure 16-year-old Ophir Rahum to the West Bank, where he was killed by waiting militants. Her mother, Samira, insists her daughter never intended for her victim to be killed. Israeli government spokesman Mark Regev said Israel was disappointed that Abbas chose to meet Muna, whom he called a “terrorist temptress” whose “internet trap led to the brutal murder of an innocent Israeli teen.”

Polish troops killed

KABUL, Afghanistan — A roadside bomb shattered an armored vehicle in a NATO convoy in eastern Afghanistan on Wednesday, killing five Polish soldiers — the deadliest single attack on Poland’s military in the war-torn country. Polish spokesman Jacek Sonta said in Warsaw that the soldiers were headed to Rawza, Meeting infuriates in eastern Ghazni province, JERUSALEM — Israel is furious at Palestinian President when their vehicle struck the bomb. Mahmoud Abbas for meeting The Taliban immediately Wednesday with a Palestinian claimed responsibility for the woman who infamously lured an attack in a text message to jourIsraeli teen to the West Bank in nalists. Taliban spokesman Zabi2001, where he was murdered by ullah Mujahid said “a Polish Palestinians. tank” was blown up and all its Abbas met Amna Muna in occupants were killed. Turkey, along with 10 other forSo far this year, 532 NATO mer prisoners who were released service members have been and banished there as part of a killed in Afghanistan. deal that freed an Israeli soldier The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HO, HO, HO

BEFORE GOING HOME

Brittany Staten, left, of Durham, N.C., and Rachel Prestage of Water Valley, Miss., spend some time with Santa and Mrs. Claus as the annual Army Exodus begins at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport on Wednesday. Thousands of soldiers training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., swarmed the airport as they headed home on their annual holiday leaves.

FAA issues rules to keep tired pilots out of cockpit THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Rules aimed at preventing airline pilots from flying while dangerously fatigued were issued Wednesday by the Federal Aviation Administration, a move safety advocates have been urging for more than two decades. The rules update current pilot work schedule regulations, which largely date back to the 1960s, to reflect studies on how much time pilots need for rest and an understanding of how travel through time zones and the human body clock’s response to light and darkness can affect performance. Carriers have two years to adapt to the new rules. The FAA estimated the cost to industry at $297 million over 10 years, a fraction of the $2 billion a year that an airline trade association had estimated a draft pro-

posal released by FAA over a year ago would cost. The airline industry had opposed the draft rule as too costly for the safety benefits it would achieve. But FAA officials made substantial changes to the final rule to lower the cost. The new rules come nearly three years after the deadly crash of a regional airliner flown by two exhausted pilots. The rules would limit the maximum number of hours a pilot can be scheduled to be on duty — including wait time before flights and administrative duties — to between nine and 14 hours. The total depends on the time of day pilots begin their first flight and the number of time zones crossed. The maximum amount of time pilots can be scheduled to fly is limited to eight or nine hours, and

pilots would get a minimum of 10 hours to rest between duty periods, a two-hour increase over the old rules. Pilots flying overnight would be allowed fewer hours than pilots flying during the day. But cargo carriers — who do much of their flying overnight when people naturally crave sleep — are exempted from the new rules. The FAA said forcing cargo carriers to reduce the number of hours their pilots can fly would be too costly compared to the safety benefits. Imposing the rules on cargo airlines like Federal Express or United Parcel Service would have added another $214 million to the cost, FAA officials said. The exemption for cargo carriers runs counter to the FAA’s goal of “one level of safety” across the aviation industry.

Chinese-American soldier’s suicide attributed to hazing THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Even before the Army sent him to Afghanistan, supporters say, Pvt. Daniel Chen was fighting a personal war. Fellow soldiers at a base in Georgia teased him about his Chinese name, crying out “Chen!” in an exaggerated Asian accent. They called him “Jackie Chen,” a reference to the Hollywood action star Jackie Chan. People would ask him repeatedly if he was Chinese, even though he was a native New Yorker. At one point Chen wrote in his diary that he was running out of jokes to respond with. Then he was sent overseas, and

Quick Read

the hazing began: Soldiers dragged him across a floor, pelted him with stones and forced him to hold liquid in his mouth while hanging upside down, according to diary entries and other accounts cited by a community activist. On Oct. 3, the 19-year-old Chen was found dead in a guardhouse in Afghanistan with what the Army said was apparently a self-inflicted gunshot wound. On Wednesday, the Army announced charges against eight soldiers in his death, saying Chen was a victim of illegal hazing. Five of those accused were charged with involuntary manslaughter and negligent homicide. The alleged offenses also

included maltreatment, assault and threats. Chen was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based in Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The military would not discuss the exact circumstances surrounding Chen’s death. But family members and community activists said they suspect the bullying may have driven him to suicide. Activists said Chen’s case has highlighted the military’s poor treatment of Asian-Americans, who remain a tiny percentage of new recruits even as the percentage of blacks, Hispanics, women and other groups has grown.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Christmas mail arrives 1 year, 6 days later

Nation: Santa puffs on hookah at Pa. smokeshop

Nation: ‘Joe Schmo’ not up to caring for ‘Lambo’

Space: Spacecraft sends up-close asteroid pictures

THE PACKAGE MARY Beth Mauldin mailed last December finally arrived in Florida on Dec. 16 — one year and six days after it was mailed from Greenbrier, Ark. Mauldin visited the post office numerous times over the past year to try to track the package, which contained a gift card and a flannel nightgown for her mother, Mary Lou Shelton. Post office officials apologized, and said they aren’t sure what caused the delay. Shelton got more holiday cheer when her daughter’s Christmas card arrived Monday, three days after it was mailed from Arkansas.

A NORTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA tobacco shop is turning the image of the jovial, pipe-smoking Santa on its head by having Saint Nick huff on a hookah. Up In Smoke store manager Sue Stoyer said customer reaction to the display has been mixed. But she notes many early depictions of Santa Claus have him puffing on a pipe. The tiny town’s holiday parade earlier this month made the window a source of both amusement and scorn. But Stoyer shrugs off any criticism. Santa’s history as a smoker is on the shop’s side, she said.

A UTAH TRUCK driver who won a $380,000 Lamborghini in a convenience store contest crashed the sports car six hours after he got it, and he now plans to sell the convertible because he can’t afford the insurance or taxes. David Dopp, 34, won the roadster in a “Joe Schmo to Lambo” contest. Dopp said the damage “isn’t super bad” — a punctured oil pan, a few dents and scratches. The father of six said he couldn’t afford to pay taxes on the car or the insurance, which runs $3,500 every six months. “That’s why rich people own them,” he said. “The poor people like me don’t.”

NASA’S DAWN SPACECRAFT has snapped more than 10,000 pictures of the asteroid Vesta since it slipped into orbit around the giant space rock last summer. The views were taken from a distance away — until now. On Wednesday, the space agency released new images of the hummocky surface as Dawn circled from an average altitude of 130 miles above the surface — the closest it’ll get. From this low orbit, scientists can count numerous small impact craters and see textured grooves and outcrops in sharp detail.


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011 — (J)

PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Downtown: 14 Park re-examines Spruce Railroad merchants join trail plans after facing opposition tion from the Peninsula Trails Coalition, the Clallam County commissioners and Port Angeles City Council who said the trail should be wider and use an alternative route to avoid the steep, 18 percent grade. Barb Maynes, park spokeswoman, said solutions to those concerns could be considered among the new alternatives.

BY TOM CALLIS CONTINUED FROM A1 national nonprofit network that supports and promotes “This is a way to make historical commercial dissure that the money paid tricts. Anyone who pays B&O for B&O tax stays in the community,” Mullen said. taxes in Washington State “It helps keep the dollars can participate in the incenhere and supports what we tive program. do for the support and presThose wishing to particiervation of our Downtown pate need to sign up to e-file and Uptown shopping dis- with the Washington State tricts.” Department of Revenue at Mullen said that 14 mer- www.dor.wa.gov, then select chants have signed on so List of Services, then Apply far. for Main Street Tax Credit, “This is a great way to support Main Street with- and Get Started before out costing us very much,” selecting the Port Townsend said Elevated Ice Cream Main Street Program as the recipient and entering a bookkeeper Marge Roark. contribution amount. For more information For civic programs about the program, contact “The money gets used in Tiffany Volkman at the our civic enrichment pro- state Department of Revegrams.” nue at 360-902-7126 or Roark said the store tiffanyv@dor.wa.gov. made a $600 contribution For more information that — with all of the about Port Townsend Main deductions — in the end Street, phone 360-385-7911. cost only $57. This is the third year that Elevated Ice Cream has participated in the program, Roark said. The Port Townsend Main Street Program is part of a

________

Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — Olympic National Park is going back to the drawing board for plans to extend the Olympic Discovery Trail along Lake Crescent. The park announced Wednesday it will create a new environmental assessment to replace the one in development after reviewing 143 comments, many of which voiced concern over safety and wheelchair access. “Members of the public brought up important issues, particularly surrounding accessibility, safety and visitor experience, and we will fully examine and analyze them as we develop the revised EA,” park Superintendent Karen Gustin said in a written statement. A new 30-day public comment period also will be held, though dates have not been selected. The park was considering plans to construct the 3.5-mile segment along the former Spruce Railroad grade at 6 feet wide, rather than the 8 feet typically

No decisions

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

seen along the trail system, in order to preserve the original railroad ballast. That would mean a portion of the former railroad

would be too steep for wheelchairs to avoid cutting down trees and disturbing soil near the lake. That prompted opposi-

But the park has made no decisions, she said, as to what the trail will look like, and whether proposals made by the county and trails coalition will be adopted. “I know people are eager for a decision . . . we’re examining a full range of alternatives,” Maynes said. “We got to do it right and make sure we are making a decision based on as much information as we can get.” Andy Stevenson, trails coalition vice president, said he views the announcement as a “very positive outcome” but added he is still somewhat skeptical that the new process will resolve the coalition’s concerns.

Ferries: Smaller charter vessel may be affected CONTINUED FROM A1 has complied with the new stability rules by simply The change does apply to reducing the listed capacity some larger ferries, such as of some of its vessels, Coast the Evergreen State and Til- Guard Lt. Eric Young said Wednesday. likum, she said. “That has effectively And the Coast Guard reduced the amount of passaid smaller charter fishing sengers by about 250 pasvessels could be affected. sengers or so depending on During the past 20 years, the particular ferry,” said there has been a dramatic Young, who is based in increase in obesity in the Seattle. United States and about “They generally carry one-third of American about 2,000, so it’s down to adults are now considered 1,750 now.” obese, the CDC says on its With that many passenwebsite. gers, the ferry wouldn’t tip The state ferry system over even if everyone ran to

the side at the same time to look at a pod of orcas, he said. The reduced passenger capacity is unlikely to have much practical effect on the spacious ferries, Coursey said. The ferries often fill up with vehicles, but the number of passengers, especially walk-ons is seldom a problem, she said. The new stability rules may have a bigger impact on the smaller charter fishing boats, such as those that take anglers fishing out of the Pacific Ocean ports of

Westport and Ilwaco, Young said. Any vessel that carries more than six paying customers has to be inspected and certified by the Coast Guard as a passenger vessel.

23 ferries The state operates 23 white and green vessels on 10 routes across Puget Sound and through the San Juan Islands to British Columbia. Carrying more than 22 million passengers a year,

it’s the biggest ferry system in the United States and one of the four largest in the world, Coursey said. The ferries themselves could be contributing to passenger girth. The galleys cater to customers looking for fast food they can eat while looking out the windows at the scenery and seagulls. Calorie counters typically aren’t buying the hamburgers, hot dogs and chicken strips. “We do serve light beer,” said Peggy Wilkes who has worked 20 years for the food

concessionaire, Olympic Cascade Services, which serves food and drinks on 12 of the state ferries. News reports of overloaded ferries sinking in other parts of the world are sometimes a topic of discussion, she said. “I think it’s cool the Coast Guard is keeping up on that,” she said. “Not that we overload them. A couple of times, like for a Seahawks game, we’ve had to cut off passengers and had to leave them at the dock.”

Ship: Centennial renovation effort began in ’10 CONTINUED FROM A1 reframing of the bow area on the starboard side from In recent years, an aver- the stem aft to the new age of 5,000 people annu- frames installed in 2005ally have participated in 2006 and building new sailing programs, with that sails. Additionally, it included many again visiting the removing and inspecting ship in port. “We are a working ves- the transom, replacing the sel,” Berger said. “We are rim timber, the aft section of the horn timber, the starnot just a museum piece. “We have a mission as a board quarter fashion piece school ship ,and help to and associated planking keep the ship’s tradition and covering boards. The fourth phase of the alive and exciting.” The centennial renova- reconstruction includes tion program began in early replacing the ship’s tail 2010 with its first phase shaft and forward mast. The renovation has cost which included giving the boat a new fore chain plate, about $600,000 so far, with $300,000 or a new stem, new forecastle, another or fo’c’sle, bunks and a new $400,000 needed, although anchor and headrig configu- “we are still determining how much we can accomration. Phases two and three, plish, how much it will cost taking place between and how much we can November 2010 and March raise,” Berger said. 2011, included the topside He said that fundraising

is more difficult in a slow economy, but that the vessel has built a number of partnerships that keep the money coming in. That the Adventuress placed first in a 2010 historical preservation contest sponsored by American Express gave the vessel a considerable financial and perceptual boost. “My vision is that, when you walk into any convenience store in the Puget Sound area, you will see four pictures, Pike Place Market, the Space Needle, Mount Ranier and the Adventuress,” he said. “We used to call ourselves Puget Sound’s best kept secret, but we aren’t a secret anymore,” he added. Aside from its educational benefits, the Adventuress gives Port Townsend an economic boost, having

brought more than $500,000 a year into the local economy for the past several years, said Sound Experience Executive Director Catherine Collins.

Restoration techniques While there are slight improvements in materials and techniques, wooden boat restoration is pretty much the same as it has been for the last 100 years, said Haven Boatworks owner Stephen Gale. “Many of the people working on this are generalists,” he said. “They can do a variety of things, but it is very specialized as it pertains to wooden boats.” “You are trying to put something together that was first built 100 years ago and all the pieces are interconnected and rely on each

other,” he explained. “You actually find clues about how it was done before, layout directions and pencil lines on the wood. “It’s very complex. It’s a bit of a puzzle finding out how to put it all together.” The renovation strives for integrity and authenticity but sometimes uses more modern materials, such as Dacron instead of cotton sails and fiberglass arts. “We replaced the rudder tube with fiberglass,” Gale said. “It’s hidden away where no one can see but some of the traditionalists may have a hard time with that. “Mostly we are dealing with something that was built 100 years ago, and there are methods you are stuck with.” Berger said the Adven-

turess has integrated itself into the community, sponsoring one “volunteer weekend” each month during the winter where 30 people donate their time to “scrape, scrub, varnish and sand” the vessel wherever needed. Berger said that people participate from around Puget Sound. Those who are not local sleep and eat on the boat — even when it is out of the water. “We have partnerships wherever we go and there are lots of ways for people to get involved,” Berger said. For more information or to volunteer, phone 360379-0438 or go to http:// www.soundexp.org/.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Balloon: 20 rides, crews expected for first fest CONTINUED FROM A1 at Taylor Cutoff Road, was the first one through the “The whole purpose of door Tuesday to reserve a getting an early sign-up is place on a balloon. His family chipped in for to get more balloons,” Tomaras said, adding it helps his flights, he said, giving defray the balloonists’ him an early Christmas expenses. gift. He expects up to 20 bal“I just want to see loons and their crews will Sequim from on high show up for the first festival because I’ve never been at the 40-acre site on pas- over Sequim before,” he ture land owned by Fred said. Grant across East Washington Street from the hotel. Worthwhile Balloon riders, who will Dupont said he believes float at about 1,500 feet depending on wind behav- the festival, its balloon rides ior, could have an expansive and several other related view of the Dungeness Val- events was worthwhile ley from the Olympic Moun- “because what it is going to tains to the Strait of Juan do for Sequim. “It’s going to being more de Fuca, depending on air people here.” quality. “I’m trying to get other Randy Dupont, owner of Hardy’s Market at North people to ride with me, but I Sequim Avenue and Old can’t find anyone brave Olympic Highway and enough to go up,” Dupont another store in Carlsborg added.

Tomaras, on the festival’s Web site, www.sequim balloonfestival.com, explained how balloon rides and balloon tethers will work for the Sequim Balloon Festival. “We have no doubt that balloon rides will sell out, so if you are interested sign up now,” Tomaras said. “To be fair we will take people on a first come first serve basis. The balloons will fly three mornings, weather permitting, and usually only go up early before the temperature heats up and the winds become unpredictable, he said. Most balloons hold three people and a pilot. All the pilots will be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration, Tomaras said, and must have a required number of hours before they can take pas-

sengers on rides. For the safety of the passengers, balloons will not go up if it is raining or windy, he said, which is why the festival was planned for September, which is normally the driest and most windless time of year. Tomaras drives home the point that in the past 31 years there have only been two days that it rained and two days that the wind has blown more than 12 miles per hour in September. If balloons do not go up, people will receive a full refund, he said. The expense of ballooning is another factor in the cost per flight, he said. A four-person balloon starts at $30,000. The more colors and design a balloon has, the more expensive it is. Balloons with unique shapes are far more expen-

sive, he said. The cost of chase vehicles and the trailers can run up to $70,000. All balloonists that take people up for rides carry insurance that cost $1,000 a year per balloon. Then there is the propane fuel, which can run up to $150 a run. Since there are not many balloons, most balloonists travel a long distance to get to a festival. Gasoline and other expenses can cost $300 to 1,000 for a round trip. A balloon is good for 500 to 600 hours of flying time. Most balloon festivals do not offer rides because it increases the festival insurance, Tomaras said. “I say all this because most people ask me why do balloon rides cost $250 per person,” he said. “The truth is balloonists

love their sport and they love to share and while you may be paying $250 for a lifetime experience, you are being partly subsidized by the balloonist, their sponsor, and the Sequim Balloon Festival.” Sponsors of each balloon pay $1,500. “It is some of the best advertising they can possibly have because so many pictures are taken and people talk about the event forever,” Tomaras said. A festival volunteers meeting is planned for 7 p.m. Jan. 12 at the Holiday Inn conference center. Reservations can be made by emailing Sequim BalloonFestival@gmail.com or calling 360-461-2202.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

A5

OlyCap names director to serve for year ‘An opportunity to see if it’s a good fit,’ new leader says BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Janet Anderson, the chief operating officer of Olympic Community Action Programs, is succeeding Executive Director Tim Hockett on an interim — but potentially permanent — basis. Anderson, a 22-year OlyCAP employee, was named interim director by the nonprofit organization’s board of directors last week and will continue as its chief operations officer, according to a statement released Tuesday by Human Resources Director Betsi Farrell. Anderson “brings a wealth of experience to this position” but eventually will delegate some of her opera-

tions officer duties, the statement said. Hockett announced Dec. 9 that he is resigning effective Dec. 31, though his last day on the job with OlyCAP, which administers low-income programs in Clallam and Jefferson counties, was Friday. Anderson, 59, of Marrowstone Island, said Wednesday she and the board agreed she would head the organization for a year before deciding whether to apply for the executive director position on a permanent basis. “It’s a year time period to make sure there is sufficient time to get in there and see the effects of my efforts,” said Anderson, who began working at OlyCAP in 1989 as a grant writer.

“What I would say is, this is clearly not a short-term commitment, my taking on this interim Anderson role,” she added. “I don’t think you work 20-plus years at Community Action without having a real strong commitment and passion for services for members in your community. I certainly do have that.” The board is still formalizing her $82,000-a-year contract, an increase of $12,000 over her present salary, she said Wednesday.

‘Challenging time’ “It’s a very challenging time for nonprofits and for community action agencies, and I think the board certainly wants a commitment

for whomever they put in that role, and I am willing to make that a firm commitment for a year,” she said. “That gives them and me an opportunity to see if it’s a good fit. “It’s not a requirement to make it beyond that at this point.” Anderson has been working out of OlyCAP’s Port Townsend office and will continue to do so but will make frequent trips throughout Jefferson and Clallam counties, including Port Angeles, where Hockett lived.

agency that is trying to serve the needy with fewer grants and less government funding. Hockett’s hiring in 1989 coincided with OlyCAP’s first year of partnership with the Peninsula Daily News’ annual Peninsula Home Fund drive, which began Thanksgiving and ends New Year’s Eve. The Home Fund generated $248,267 that OlyCAP distributed to low-income residents in 2010, a record. OlyCAP serves 11,000 individuals and households annually, Hockett said in an earlier interview.

Hockett resignation When he announced his resignation, Hockett said he never fully came back from a year of treatment after being diagnosed with colon cancer in 2003. He also cited stress as a major reason for his departure and the “frustration” of directing a social services

Shrinking staff

keep close watch on the budget and the flow of grants and government funding. “Internal monitoring will extend up to the board as far as them getting updates in real, targeted ways,” she said. The stresses of holding both jobs will be “a real challenge,” Anderson added. “For me, it certainly is helpful to feel like I have a team of folks at work that can communicate pretty directly and clearly so you are not isolated and manage it on your own,” she said. “I feel very fortunate.” In addition, “I find I rest a lot on the weekends,” Anderson added, spending time with her husband, Michael Bowe, 62. The couple has a daughter, Sophia, in college.

But its staff shrank from 268 in January to 201 as of the beginning of December, and the budget dwindled ________ from $12.4 million in 2009 to a projected $9.4 million Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb in 2012 — an anticipated 24 can be reached at 360-417-3536 percent drop in two years. or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily Anderson said she will news.com.

PA council approves city wireless project Police, fire chiefs biggest supporters BY TOM CALLIS PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Get ready to plug in. Well, sort of. The Port Angeles City Council gave the go-ahead Tuesday evening to a $3.7 million project that will turn the city into one large Internet hot spot, allowing residents and visitors to connect to the Web wirelessly from anywhere in town. The project, funded with the help of $2.6 million in federal stimulus funds, is expected to be completed mid-2013, but customers should be able to begin tapping in by September, said Craig Johnson, vice president of Capacity Provisioning Inc., which will install and maintain the network.

Better connected Johnson said the network will make the city both better connected and, with its use by law enforcement, safer. “You’re going to be able to step outside your door and be connected through this anywhere in town,” he said. The council, which passed three agreements in 6-0 votes to approve the network, also lauded the project for its expected benefits. Councilwoman Brooke Nelson, who recently gave birth, was absent. “This is a huge step for

the city,” Mayor Dan Di Guilio said. “Not too many communities can say their entire city is a Wi-Fi hot spot.” Two of the agreements were with CPI of Port Angeles, whose fiber cables will be the backbone of the network. They include a $2.5 million installation contract and a $28,383 annual network management contract, which also includes maintenance estimated at $4,560 a year. The company is working with three subcontractors: Aruba Networks of Sunnyvale, Calif., Cascade Networks of Longview and Olympic Electric Co. of Port Angeles. The third agreement went to OlyPen, which signed a non-exclusive contract with the city to sell Internet access. It plans to charge $17.95 and $37.95 per month, depending on speed, which will range from 1.5 to 6 megabits per second. Additionally, OlyPen will provide one-hour free access every day. Access will also be free for 24 hours 12 days a year. Those days are yet to be determined.

Police, fire

fitted with new computer equipment to allow officers to connect to the network and essentially be able to do all of their work from their cars. The Port Angeles Fire Department will also have five of its vehicles equipped to use the network.

Lower Elwha The Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, which will also receive a few wireless hot spots, will equip about eight of its police vehicles as well, said acting Police Chief Phil Charles. But connecting the vehicles to the network comes at a cost — $70 per month for each vehicle. For Port Angeles, that means an annual cost of $31,920. Gallagher said he thinks the network is worth it. The network will allow the department to eliminate use of Internet air cards, a cost of $47 per month for each vehicle. Additionally, the city will receive a share of revenue from people accessing the network. That could be as much as $72,000 a year at the start, but that depends on how many customers OlyPen receives. Chuck Beaudettee, OlyPen operations manager, said the company will charge existing cable and DSL customers $4.95 per month for wireless access on mobile devices.

Police Chief Terry Gallagher, one of the strongest proponents of the network, called the network a “giant step forward.” “I don’t know of any other project in the last 25 years that is as a significant as this to public safety and ________ our ability to deliver services to the community,” he Reporter Tom Callis can be said. reached at 360-417-3532 or at As part of the project, 33 tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. police vehicles will be out- com.

KEITH THORPE (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Retiring Clallam County Fire District No. 2 Chief Jon Bugher, right, receives accolades from Port Angeles Fire Chief Dan McKeen, left, and Port Angeles Mayor Dan Di Guilio during Tuesday’s meeting of the Port Angeles City Council. Bugher was honored for providing 17 years of service as head of the district.

HONORED

FOR THEIR SERVICES

Di Guilio, left, congratulates outgoing City Council member and Deputy Mayor Don Perry during Tuesday night’s meeting. Perry, who lost in the November election to Sissi Bruch, was honored for his service as council member and for serving two years as deputy mayor.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Holidays in harmony with areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s live music THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT is upon us â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the air, the stores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and in the live music this week across the Peninsula. And wait, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get a heads up on New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve events so you can make your plans.

Port Angeles â&#x2013;  Tonight at Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Country Jam is having a special Christmas program of carols and more, including a singalong on some, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Friday night, the Jimmy Hoffman Band will give you that muchneeded break in your holiday preparations. Dance away to Jimmyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s country rock from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. â&#x2013;  On Friday at Wine on the Waterfront (WOW), 115 Railroad Ave., the CornStalks return for another great night of solid rhythms, grooves and sweet harmonies with Stephanie Doenges, Paul Stehr-Green and Kim Trenerry at 8 p.m., $5. â&#x2013;  Tonight, Kim Tren-

â&#x2013;  On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, erry goes 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues John solo at with a brew and barbecue Nelson Bella from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Italia, 118 E. First St., Sequim and Blyn â&#x2013;  On Friday at the at 8 p.m. This is so Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., the Old not TwiSidekicks play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Golden light. Countryâ&#x20AC;? at 5:30 p.m. â&#x2013;  On Next Wednesday, zoom Friday, in for the boomer music of Les Final Approach, 5:30 Wamp.m. to 8:15 p.m. boldt and Olde Tyme â&#x2013;  Judy Clark sings Country perform at the Christmas standards, Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, smooth jazz and a variety of songs from her new CD, from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Dave and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bag Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tunes,â&#x20AC;? at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Sequim Rosalie Secord and the Starbucks, 1095 W. WashLuck of the Draw Band ington St., next to Home play old-time music with Depot. guests W.L. Martin and â&#x2013;  Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Buffet, 10181 the Old Sidekicks, for an old-fashioned good olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time, Old Olympic Highway, presents seasonal stylings from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. by Judy Clark Wednesâ&#x2013;  Every Tuesday evedays and Thursdays in ning at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh December from 6 p.m. to 8 and Peabody streets, the p.m. Port Angeles Senior SwingOn Friday and Saturers present Wally and the day, enjoy the holiday Boys, playing ballroom expressions from the keydance favorites for the board of Sandy Lockdancing pleasure of all wood from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. seniors 45 years plus from â&#x2013;  At The Buzz, 128 N. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 Sequim Ave., Kelly cover, first-timers free! Thomas and Victor

LIVE MUSIC

Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. â&#x2013;  On Friday at Stymieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, the jazz and blues stylings of Jenny Davis will put you in a holiday mood from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. â&#x2013;  On Friday at the Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino in Blyn, let Danny Vernon put you in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Christmasâ&#x20AC;? mood with his fantastic Elvis Tribute Show from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Sunday, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Li-li Christmas when the Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Li-li and Dennis Crabbe perform all your Christmas favorites from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On Monday, join Barry Burnett and world-class drummer Tom Svornich for We Be Jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Bring your axe or tickled tonsils and join the fun from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Port Townsend â&#x2013;  Tonight at the Upstage, 923 Washington St., the Old Crusty Minstrels host a Key City Players fundraiser and singalong. Cover by donation.

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High notes My wish for you is a music-filled holiday season. Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas!

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in â&#x20AC;&#x153;KLMA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Keep Live Music Aliveâ&#x20AC;? on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column. Also, check out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightlife,â&#x20AC;? a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

BY MIKE BAKER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gov. Chris Gregoire has approved a plan to ease the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $1.4 billion budget deficit and asked lawmakers to tell her when they expect to finish making more grueling cuts that are expected in the coming months. The new budget uses a variety of cuts, transfers and delayed payments to save $480 million. Gregoire had asked lawmakers to fully fix the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spending imbalance before Christmas and is now asking them to finish it early in the new year.

jobs, including a variety of cuts at the Department of Ecology. Another part will delay new rules for mental health assessments, which were expected to increase reliance on psychiatric care, saving about $23 million. Democratic Rep. Ross Hunter said negotiators have done more work than is evident in the $480 million saved. He said they have spent recent weeks building consensus on other areas to cut and have a lot of groups working on smaller projects within the budget. He said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more difficult for the Legislature to develop consensus on a plan than it is for the governor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a complicated problem,â&#x20AC;? Hunter said. Along with fixing the $1.4 billion deficit, lawmakers hope to leave several hundred million dollars more in the bank as a buffer. Democrats such as Gregoire also want voters to approve a temporary sales tax increase to offset a chunk of the cuts.

Players sought for roles in murder mystery slated on New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is there more to life than this?â&#x20AC;?

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Christmas Eve 3-7pm Sat., Dec. 24

If you could ask God one question what would you ask?

PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A circus-themed murder mystery will be held at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 31. Was it the raging ringmaster, the talented tightrope walker, the amazing acrobatist or the lion tamer? Organizers are looking for attendees interested in

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playing a role at the event. To play a role, phone Rose Marschall at 360-8082662 by Monday. This is a potluck gala with vegetarian soup provided. Suggested donation is $5 to $10, and proceeds will go to MANNA and Friends of the Fields. For more information, phone Marschall or Sandra Howard at 360-417-8812.

Get home delivery.

Includes Soup or Salad, Dessert â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $

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Join us January 8th, 5 pm at Fairview Bible Church, 385 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Rd., Port Angeles. RSVP 457-5905 Lv Message

Charters and Tours will be providing free transportation from within the city and west to Freshwater Bay. Phone 360-775-9128 to make a reservation. Pickups start at 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Castaways, 1213 Marine Drive, Port Angeles, has the Jimmy Hoffman Band at 8:30 p.m. Raffle prizes. Presale: $5 per person, $8 per couple; $6 per person at the door. â&#x2013;  Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, Port Angeles, has â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eveâ&#x20AC;? from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. with Luck of the Draw Band and Old Tyme Country. â&#x2013;  Upstage, 923 Washington St., Port Townsend, will have the Mark Dufresne Blues Band at 8 p.m. Dinner/show, $59; show only, $25. â&#x2013;  Sirens, 823 Water St., Port Townsend, has a special New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Evetheme party Friday featuring the Solvents at 9 p.m. $5 cover.

Gregoire signs budget, seeks time estimate on additional reductions

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The longer we wait, the bigger the hole,â&#x20AC;? Gregoire said Tuesday. The budget will save $50 million by delaying school bus payments by several months and another $50 million by more quickly transferring unclaimed securities to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund. The plan also will impact

452-6545

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â&#x2013;  Junction Roadhouse, junction of U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112 five miles west of Port Angeles, enjoy Tie Dye New Years Eve with Deadwood Revival and the CornStalks, 9 p.m. to midnight. $10 cover, $5 cover with potluck. Need a ride? All Points

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On Friday, the Polly Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keary Blues Band plays award-winning blues at 8 p.m. $12 cover. Phone 360-385-2216 for info and reservations. â&#x2013;  On Friday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., the Pitfalls return to their rock roots at 9 p.m. $5 cover. â&#x2013;  Tonight, the Crow Quill Night Owls play at 8 p.m. at the Undertown, 211 Taylor St. On Friday at 6:30 p.m., catch Christmas HiJinks with George Rezendes, Paul Rogers, Dirk Anderson and Tom Svornich followed by Brett Pemberton, Chris Sands and friends from 8 p.m. to midnight. $5 cover. â&#x2013;  Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., tonight and Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Tonight, classical guitarist Trevor Hanson plays at Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine, 1208 Water St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays guitar at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. â&#x2013;  Steve Grandinetti plays and sings at the Northwest Maritime Center Cafe in Port Townsend, Thursdays and Friday from noon till 2 p.m.

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2010

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Christmas can be a day of hope amid our troubles IT’S CHRISTMAS TIME, and try as I may to ignore it for the purposes of a column, I can’t seem to evade that simple, irrevocable fact. On Christmas Day, depending on who you are, where you are, who is or isn’t there with you and what you believe about the 25th day of December, it may be a wonderful day, a horrible day, a meaningful day, a great TV day, a terrible TV day, a loud and busy day, a lonely and dreary day, an emotional day or just another day. But there will be no escaping the fact that it is Christmas Day. So, near as I can tell, here’s the one thing that every single one of us, regardless of the day’s circumstances, can agree upon: We aren’t dead. I know this to be true because every applicable marketing study and poll reveals that very few dead people read this column. So what? If it’s Christmas Day, so what? No, try “NOW what?” Right: Now what? What now? What next? The end of the world, in another form or in another place or in another way, depending on which talking head has captured our imaginations. All bad. All crises. The end of freedom, the end of capitalism, the end of everything we’ve ever known. Crime, viciousness, brutality. Greed.

The wrong stuff All around us, all the time, 24/7: What was wrong, what is wrong, what will be wrong — Fear motivates! Us vs. them! And you know who’s right, right? Sure: Us! Us. We. And “we” are all having Christmas Day. And every single one of us feels very small. Powerless. Incon-

Birthday CORNER

when they can, take when they HELP LINE need to and be able to remember Ruth Lund which is which. sequential. We hope for fewer raised voices Mark Ruth Lund will celebrate There’s no and blood pressures, and we hope her 100th birthday on Harvey way that any of for gentleness. Christmas Day surrounded us can possibly We hope for privacy as we by family. solve all the hope for “community,” and we On world’s horrible hope more for health care than Tuesday, problems, so we we do for health insurance. just agree with she will be We hope for dignity, personal whomever honored at responsibility and self-determinaseems less an open tion — and we wonder how many harmful and house from laws we really need. call it “us.” 1 p.m. to And we wonder when we’ll Or just 4 p.m. at remember that we are our brothignore it all, in the home ers’ keepers. the name of “mental health” — I of her son- Mrs. Lund We hope that people will stop get that. in-law and doing bad things for good reasons daughter, and good things for bad reasons. Hoping . . . Doug and Trudy RittenWe hope that we can take care house. of ourselves and take care of the And we hope. She was born in Hoquiam caretakers. We hope for something better, on Christmas Day in 1911 We hope that longevity won’t something saner, something more be a curse, and we hope that the to Carl Otto and Esther civilized. good don’t die young. Nyberg. We hope for a time when peoWe wonder if our leaders will She was valedictorian of ple take care of one another and ever figure out that the planet her Hoquiam graduating share the burdens. class of 1930 and worked in We hope for a society in which isn’t getting any bigger, and we hope that the babies will be fed. the finishing office at Raypeople encounter people as “peoonier Mill. ple,” not political, philosophical or And clothed. And loved. She married Al Lund in religious partisans — people. We hope for patience, civility People can be good and decent 1933, and they had two chiland courtesy, while we hope for people and still disagree. dren, Ron Lund of Vancouhonesty. Bigotry, in the name of being ver, Wash., and Trudy Lund And we hope that “we” get so correct, is still bigotry. Rittenhouse of Port Angeles. big that we totally consume We hope that people we are Mrs. Lund was active in supposed to be able to believe will “them!” her church, Holy Trinity; in We hope for love, in all its just tell us the truth. the Red Cross blood drives; We hope that we will be able to many colors. and in square-dancing, We hope because it’s Christvote for someone instead of round-dancing and ballroom mas Day. against someone. dancing. We hope that common sense _________ She has four grandchilwill become a common commodity, Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefand we hope that aging really will ferson Information & Assistance, which be an achievement, and not an operates through the Olympic Area affliction. Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), We hope that people will still 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or hold doors open for other people. 360-374-9496 (West End); or by emailing We hope that people will say harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can Sequim “please” and “thank you” — and be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Tom Loveday directed the 14-table mean it. Agency on Aging-Information & Assisgame Friday, Dec. 9, with winners: Helen We hope that people will share tance.

PORT ANGELES — Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County invites the public to drop by

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

Duplicate Bridge Results

Stratton-Paul Stratton, first; Thomas Larsen-Patrick Thomson, second; Paula Cramer-Gert Wiitala, third; Carol KellerWilma Lambert, fourth (north/south); Eileen Deutsch-Bonnie Broders, first; Bob MacNeal-Jack Real, second; Ted MillerLarry Phelps, third; Rick Zander-Jim Tilzey, fourth (east/west). Sharon Hills directed the 12-table game Monday, Dec. 12, with winners: Paula Cramer-Wilma Lambert, first; June Nelson-Chris Class, second; Frank Herodes-Nancy Herodes, third; Carol

Hospice offers stars, tree of remembrance PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

dren and four great-grandchildren. The Lunds moved to Port Angeles in 1986. Mrs. Lund’s husband passed away a year later after 54 years of marriage. After moving to Port Angeles, she volunteered in the reading program at Jefferson School for 10 years. Mrs. Lund has always been active, and she continues to do so to this day by cooking, gardening and caring for her home.

the office to select and hang a star on its Christmas tree in memory of a loved one. Donations are welcome but not required.

Volunteer Hospice is located at 540 E. Eighth St. It is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

Keller-Brian Robbins, fourth (north/south); Ted Miller-Vern Nunnally, first; Judy Hagelstein-Krys Gordon, second; Nancy Smith-Joyce Coney, third; Frank BrownDavid Jackso, fourth (east/west). Chimacum The winners Tuesday, Dec. 13, were: Vern Nunnally-Jim Tilzey, first; Tom Loveday-Suzanne Berg, second; Mary Norwood-David Johnson, third; Bob MacNealJune Nelson, fourth. Port Townsend Winners for Dec. 14 were: Betty Abersold-Mike Edwards, first; Delle Craig-Deborah Lewis, second; Pat Karls-Sonja Schoenleber, third.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

AGAIN? 59 Mag space seller, e.g. 62 Golf cup name 63 Not just my 66 Practical joke used on squirrels? 70 Things may be picked up with this 71 Cohesion 74 Brown, maybe 75 Highlighter colors, often 78 Catholic university in Philly 80 County on one side of the Golden Gate Bridge 83 Hauled, in a way 87 What sweaty dancers create at an annual awards show? 90 Rush to get on the train? 92 Jewish mourning period 93 Dwarf with a purple hat 94 Arm part 95 Mein ___ 98 Like some cookware 101 “Lumber” collector in a park 103 Where worms don’t last long? 106 It’s found between the shoulders 108 Rubber man? 109 Lunch inits. 110 “Consider it done!” 115 Air pump setting: Abbr.

116 What black holes swallow to bulk up? 119 “Horatio, thou art ___ as just a man …” 120 “___ ride” 121 10E and 40 long, e.g. 122 Former Red Sox star Garciaparra 123 Lines with crossings: Abbr. 124 Utopias 125 Mai ___ (drinks) 126 Purchase that’s canceled

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BY PATRICK MERRELL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Natives of the land known as Aotearoa 6 One with eyes for a cook? 10 Implied 15 Silken construction 18 Pasty 19 Share a view 20 Split 21 Plant’s grain-bearing part 22 Dislike of the son of Mary, Queen of Scots? 25 Prefix with bar 26 It’s hard to understand 27 Heavy metal rock? 28 Springtime calendar hunk 30 Suffragist Carrie Chapman ___ 31 Catwalk no-show? 33 March sisters’ creator 37 Threatened ferociously 39 Conservative 40 Take the plunge 41 Southwest natives 42 “No introduction needed” phrase 45 Soft-spoken prayer ending? 48 Build a publishing empire? 53 Mosaicist, e.g. 54 First Arab country to have sanctions imposed on it by the Arab League 56 Poet Pablo 57 Radioactivity unit

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19 Neglect 23 Trapped like ___ 24 Shore bird 29 Some terra cotta 31 Precipitating 32 Drink for a toddler 33 Unwanted swimming pool bit 34 What rakes may do 35 Tilt 36 Kind of disc 38 Unidentified people 41 Marx Brothers, e.g. 43 Yahoo! alternative 44 FEMA part: Abbr. DOWN 46 The Tigers of the N.C.A.A. 1 Fashion 47 Tombstone figure 2 “No guarantees” 48 2000 musical with 3 “Yikes!” the song “Every 4 Mil. unit below a Story Is a Love division Story” 5 Give a shot 49 Singer Anthony 6 A to Z, e.g. 50 Bro 7 University of ___, 51 13th, at times where Andrea 52 40 million-member Bocelli earned a org. founded in law degree 1958 8 Italian article 55 Not so prevalent 9 Engulfs 58 Cleanup org. 10 It may get stuck in 60 Gigayear an eye 61 Fairly 11 Small batteries 63 Unseat 12 Desert and rain forest 64 “For ___ us a child …” 13 Material in old mahjongg sets 65 Rembrandt van ___ 14 Common break 67 Shoe named for hour a cat 15 Kook 68 LAX data 16 Less stressful 69 Romance novelist Roberts 17 Brit’s bumbershoot

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72 Geoffrey the Giraffe’s store 73 “I suppose so” 76 Core 77 Paid sports spectator 79 Title of veneration 81 Justin Bieber and others 82 Ponytail locale 84 Newsman Marvin or Bernard

SOLUTION ON PAGE B10

85 Cube creator Rubik 86 When Juno and Gold Beach were assaulted 88 Think too much of 89 “Look ___ hands!” 91 They’re often sold by the dozen 93 One who works with canines 95 Hold back 96 It gets the lead out

97 Prepares a bow, with “up” 99 Monastery heads 100 Casting locale 101 Naked 102 Festoons 104 Writer Zora ___ Hurston 105 Like much of Fire Island’s shore 107 Decides

110 Foe in the first Indiana Jones film 111 Unseat 112 Certain bean 113 Dutch cheese town 114 Car sticker letters 117 Coal container 118 “Three Days of the Condor” org.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

FLOOD Water flows down a gutter on East Fourth Street near Chambers Street in Port Angeles on Wednesday morning after a water main broke beneath the street, sending water cascading down the hill. Crews were working to isolate the break, which was coming out from under the pavement on both sides of the street.

Hearing for Steim postponed PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Volunteers sought for First Night fun PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Volunteers are needed to assist with the Jefferson County Historical Society’s First Night Celebration on New Year’s Eve. The alcohol-free community event needs volunteers to act as greeters at several venues in downtown Port Townsend. Volunteers also can assist with fireworks debris cleanup at Memorial Field on New Year’s Day. To volunteer or for more information, phone 360385-1003.

More commute off Peninsula to work Unemployment rises in Clallam, falls in Jefferson BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jefferson County last month, “up slightly from October,” Scott said. Both counties saw an increase in their labor force. Clallam County’s workforce grew from 29,390 to 29,610 in November. Jefferson County’s went from 12,390 in October to 12,550 in November. There were 2,770 Clallam County residents looking for work in November. Jefferson County had 1,090 residents looking for work. Unemployment rates don’t reflect the people who have stopped looking for work.

in November, while the number of jobs within the county fell by 260. Jefferson County gained 10 jobs in the manufacturing sector but lost 100 jobs overall, Scott said. Job losses were distributed across most sectors. The lone exceptions were transportation, warehousing and utilities, which gained a total of 20 jobs, Scott said. First-time unemployment claims in Clallam County went from 534 in October to 678 in Novem________ ber, with construction workers accounting for 180 of Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be the new claims. reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. There were 199 new ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. unemployment claims in com.

PORT ANGELES — Unemployment crept up to 9.4 percent in Clallam County and inched down to 8.7 percent in Jefferson County last month, the state Employment Security department reported this week. The revised jobless rates for October were 9.1 percent for Clallam County and 8.8 percent for Jefferson County. “What really stands out is that people are commuting more,” said Elizabeth Scott, regional economist for Employment Security, on Tuesday. It appears more people are driving off the North Olympic Peninsula for work because more are working while jobs have not increased. Colleen ‘Kelly’ The number of Clallam German County residents with jobs rose from 26,710 to 26,840 Jan. 2, 1957 — Dec. 16, 2011 Colleen “Kelly” German died at her Port Angeles residence from complications of cerebral palsy. She was 54. new home, enrolled their Services: Dec. 29, 10 boys in school and then a.m., Funeral Mass at built Fred’s dream garage. Queen of Angels Catholic Fred worked for a couChurch, 209 W. 11th St., ple of different businesses Port Angeles. The Rev. until 2006, when he Thomas Nathe will officiate. opened his own business, Drennan-Ford Funeral Fast Fred’s, where he Home, Port Angeles, is in designed and built supercharge of arrangements. chargers for EZ Go golf www.drennanford.com carts and custom engines for cars and boats. Fred enjoyed boating, riding in the desert, going to the Glamis sand dunes and drag racing, but most PHYLLIS M. of all he just enjoyed life (JOHNSON) and being with friends and family. BERRY Fred is survived by his May 22, 1916 wife, Debbie; two sons, December 7, 2011 Mitch and Jay; daughter, Jenny Rayson; his mother, The end of an era Loraine Bolling; sister, arrived for Phyllis M. Janine Sanford; and (Johnson) Berry when brothers, Tom, Doug and she died on December Ron. He also leaves 7, 2011. She was born behind many nieces and May 22, 1916, in Seattle nephews. to Max and Delores Fred would want all of (Erikson) Johnson. his family and friends to She married Edward live their lives to the fullest A. Berry in 1936. Phyllis and remember that life is worked as a dental clerk, just one big beautiful retail clerk, finisher at adventure. Rayonier mill during In lieu of a service World War II and as a being held, please make housewife and mother. a donation to your favorite Edward died in 1990. charity in his name. Brothers Max and Hartle;

Death Notices

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Death and Memorial Notice FRED BOLLING March 2, 1954 December 9 2011 On December 9, 2011, Fred Bolling lost his fourmonth battle against cancer. Fred Lee Bolling was born March 2, 1954, to Harvey and Loraine Bolling in Yakima, Washington. His family moved to Port Townsend, where he attended school and graduated from Port Townsend High School in 1972. He then went on to join the United States Air Force, where he spent the next four years of his life on three different bases in Texas. He returned to Port Townsend, where he worked the next years at a few different jobs. In 1979, he met his future wife, Debbie. They dated for two years and were married in April of 1982. Both were employed by Murray Auto Parts until it was sold in 1998. They were blessed with two sons, Mitch and Jay, and lived in the Bol-

Oct. 5, 1919 — Dec. 19, 2011

Alice M. Olsen died of age-related causes at her Port Angeles home. She was 92. Services: Friday, Dec. 23, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., open house for family and friends at the Olsen/Sinnes residence. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, 360457-1210, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Death and Memorial Notice

Mr. Bolling ling family home which they purchased from Fred’s mom, Loraine, when his dad Harvey passed away in June of 1984. Fred and Debbie spent the next 15 years raising their sons, restoring 409 Chevrolet Impala cars, going to car shows and spending time with all their many friends in Port Townsend. In July 1999, Fred took his family on an adventure and moved to Lake Havasu City, Arizona, where they purchased a

Death and Memorial Notice MARY CAROLYN PALMER February 2, 1918 December 14, 2011 Mary Carolyn Palmer joined Ted, her one true love, on December 14, 2011. Born to Robert and Ruby Clough on February 2, 1918, Mary was known for her ability to bloom where she was planted, competitive gamesmanship and perfect pie crusts. Mary and Theodore J. Palmer married on September 4, 1938, and remained each other’s soft place to fall until Ted’s death in 2008. Mary is survived by her four children: Jane Palmer (Warren Dillon), Nancy McKinnon (Doug), Carol Kruckeberg (Walt) and Bill Palmer (Kaye); as well as seven grandchildren, Mary Galley (Kevin), Jennifer Rick (Brian), Joseph Gargiulo (Erica), Angela Adams, Andrew Kruckeberg (Sheri), Molly Rose Forsman (Todd), and Carrie Hall (Justin). There are 10 — very soon to be 11 — greatgrandchildren: Taylor,

Alice M. Olsen

Mrs. Palmer Megan and Camille Galley, Anya and Madeline Rick, Kate Gargiulo, Mitchell Adams, Zachary and Alex Kruckeberg, and Mia Rose and Baby Boy Hall. Mary was preceded in death by three sisters, Rosamond, Thora and Ruby; her brother, John; as well as by her granddaughter, Sara Beth Kruckeberg. Although orphaned at an early age, somehow, with no model, Mary became a “homemaker” in the true sense of the word; meals as a family every day, served up in

the kitchen nook, Momsewn school clothes, prom dresses and bridal gowns, matching shirts for family vacations. She gave her kids roots as well as wings. She played all kinds of games from go-fish with the grandkids to bridge with anyone available. She was happily competitive and often said, “You may win, but I’m not going to LET you win” — a game-player’s motto as well as a metaphor for life’s hardships. Cruising with the family for their 60th wedding anniversary, Mom and Dad even won the ship’s “Newlywed Game.” In her last three years, Mary extended her family to include the beyondbelief caregivers at Sherwood Assisted Living. The entire Sherwood staff provided unparalleled love and support at a difficult time for “Mary Blue Eyes” as well as for her family. Mary says, “Thank you and behave yourselves!” A private celebration of our mom’s life will be held in Bellingham on Mothers Day.

sisters Dolores and Della; and great-grandson Maxwell Jeremiah Berry preceded her in death. She was the oldest and last of the siblings. She is survived by son Bruce and wife Bettyanne; four grandsons, Michael (Barrie), Timm (Cheryl), William (Wendy), and Jason (Donna); four greatgranddaughters and six great-grandsons. She enjoyed fishing, crabbing, clamming and camping as well as family get-togethers. At her request there will be no service. She will be dearly missed.

Michael E. Fish Aug. 28, 1948 - Dec. 21, 2008

In our hearts forever memories of love, joy, kindness, patience and laughter. We love you. Mary Sperling Roberta and Brian Gray Mike Gray Stephanie & Brad Atticus Weaver Trinity Babichuck

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

1C5142011

PORT ANGELES — A bail hearing for Amber Steim scheduled earlier this week was postponed to give lawyers more time to consult with a treatment provider. Clallam C o u n t y Superior Court Judge Ken Williams struck the hearing on Tuesday. A new hear- Steim ing date was not set. Steim, 24, is charged with vehicular homicide and witness tampering in connection with the March 6 death of Ellen DeBondt, a 44-year-old outdoorswoman and home health nurse from Crescent Bay. Investigators said Steim was driving nearly three times over the legal limit for alcohol when she crossed the center line on state HIghway 112 just outside of Port Angeles and struck DeBondt’s vehicle. Steim awaits a Feb. 13 trial on $500,000 bail in the Clallam County jail. Steim, who originally posted $100,000 bail, was remanded back to jail Dec. 14 after the alcohol monitoring device she was wearing detected alcohol in her system. In a four-minute hearing on a motion to modify Steim’s conditions of release, defense attorney Ralph Anderson reported Tuesday that he has spoken with a substance abuse treatment provider who recommended inpatient treatment for Steim. Anderson moved to continue the hearing to gather more information from the expert.

FROM WATER MAIN

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 22, 2011 PAGE

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Something special for this Christmas It is the same in every war. Memories of Christmases past can only add to the pain, especially for those experiencing their first Christmas without a loved one opening presents and eating their fill at the dinner table. On Monday, I drove past Arlington National Cemetery near the Pentagon. It is fitting that the building where war is made would be in such close proximity to the graves of those who died fighting them. Veterans cemeteries ought to remind civilians, as well as generals, that war should never be entered into lightly, but rather always as a last resort. Every Christmas, volunteers place wreaths on each of the headstones in Arlington. The tableau could be a Christmas card, except such a card would express sorrow, not joy. There is a show on Fox News Channel called “The Cost of Freedom.” It’s about money.

There’s a grief that can’t be spoken. There’s a pain goes on and on. Empty chairs at empty tables Now my friends are dead and gone. — Marius, from the musical “Les Miserables” “IT’S THE MOST wonder- Cal ful time of the Thomas year,” Andy Williams reminds us over tinny speakers in crowded shopping malls. It may be wonderful for the majority, but for those whose fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers or children have died in Iraq and Afghanistan, there is a void this Christmas (and Christmases to come) that can never be filled.

The grave markers at Arlington and at veterans cemeteries around the nation are the true cost of freedom, which has always been paid, not with cash but with blood. Freedom is not the natural state of humanity, otherwise more of us would be free. Oppression, discrimination, religious fanaticism, hunger, dictatorship, censorship of the press, denial of women’s rights — these seem to be the norm. To be free means to rail against such injustice. Christians believe Jesus came to set us free from sin. Those who have died in our wars fought and gave their lives that we might have our many freedoms, including the religious freedom to hear and accept or reject his message. Passing Arlington, I recall a line from one of our wonderful patriotic songs, “America, the Beautiful,” which says of our war dead, “O beautiful for heroes

Peninsula Voices Wild Olympics In a recent Peninsula Voices letter [Dec. 18], the writer said she is a supporter of the Wild Olympics Campaign, that she is a regular hiker in the Olympic park and surrounding areas, and that she is concerned that the recent compromises that Sen. [Patty] Murray and Rep. [Norm] Dicks made with opponents of the campaign might have limited how much more land the campaign could acquire. After meeting with a staff member and scanning some material, she is satisfied that the

compromises will allow the campaign to continue to move forward. One must assume that to the two officials involved in the negotiations, moving forward means federalizing more locally controlled and/ or private property. According to the Oxford History of the American West, by 1994 almost half of the total land area of the 11 westernmost states in the Lower 48, including 86 percent of Nevada, was owned or administered by federal agencies such as the Interior, Agriculture and Defense. The effect has been the nationalization of Western America and the loss of

local control with all of the negative ramifications that entails. I believe the people who support the Wild Olympics Campaign should ask themselves how much federalizing of local property will they finally, if ever, be satisfied. John Joseph Malone, Port Angeles

PenPly memories The sad demise of Peninsula Plywood brings back memories of my first job after graduating from the University of Washington in 1950. I was a sales/service technician for an adhesive

OUR

proved in liberating strife, who more than self their country loved, and mercy more than life!” In a narcissistic age this may seem odd, even offensive to those whose favorite nouns are “I” and “me.” Perhaps that’s why so many of us don’t know anyone who has served in the military. It’s called military “service,” after all. Making money serves self. If we haven’t served in the armed forces, it is less likely we would know people who are serving, or have served. I served, albeit not on the battlefield, making my contribution as part of Armed Forces Radio in the 1960s. As the ads and emails suggest last-minute gift ideas, here’s a suggested gift that will last longer in your heart than any purchase you make for yourself or your family: Find someone who has lost a loved one to war and take them a present.

It doesn’t have to be expensive. Tell them, “I wanted to bring you a gift in recognition of the gift your loved one gave our country.” If you don’t know anyone, search online for organizations that assist families whose loved ones paid the ultimate price for our country. If you do that, I suspect this Christmas will be unforgettable for the person on the receiving end of your compassion. It could also be a transforming event in your own life and a Christmas you will never forget.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

manufacturer, calling on plywood mills on the West Coast. Some of the men I met at PenPly may be familiar to local families: Enar Erickson, manager; Cliff Kirk, superintendent; Bert Thompson, John Bergman, Connie Johanson, foremen; Gus Lund, Carl Oberg, glue mixers. I recall that PenPly, at that time, was a co-op, as were many other mills in Washington and Oregon. It was an exciting era of a huge building boom after World War II. Bud Critchfield, Sequim

Why we should be saving Pvt. Manning ACCUSED WHISTLEBLOWER Pvt. Bradley Manning turned 24 Saturday. He spent his birthday in a pre-trial military hearing that could ultimately lead to a sentence of life — or death. Manning stands accused of causing the largest leak of government secrets in United States history. More on Amy Manning Goodman shortly. First, a reminder of what he is accused of leaking. In April 2010, the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks released a video called “Collateral Murder.” It was a classified U.S. military video from July 2007 from an Apache attack helicopter over Baghdad. The video shows a group of men walking, then the systematic killing of them in a barrage of high-powered automatic fire from the helicopter. Soldiers’ radio transmissions narrate the carnage, varying from cold and methodical to cruel and enthusiastic. Two of those killed were employees of the international news agency Reuters: Namir

Noor-Eldeen, a photojournalist, and Saeed Chmagh, his driver. Renowned whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg, who released the Pentagon Papers that helped end the war in Vietnam and who himself is a Marine veteran who trained soldiers on the laws of war, told me: “Helicopter gunners hunting down and shooting an unarmed man in civilian clothes, clearly wounded . . . that shooting was murder. It was a war crime. “Not all killing in war is murder, but a lot of it is. And this was.” The WikiLeaks release of the Afghan War Logs followed months later, with tens of thousands of military field reports. Then came the Iraq War Diaries, with close to 400,000 military records of the U.S. war in Iraq. Next was Cablegate, WikiLeaks’ rolling release (with prominent print-media partners, from The New York Times to The Guardian in Britain) of classified U.S. State Department cables — more than a quarter-million of them — dating from as far back as 1966 up to early 2010. The contents of these cables proved highly embarrassing to the U.S. government and sent shock waves around the world. Among the diplomatic cables released were those detailing U.S. support for the corrupt Tunisian regime, which helped fuel the uprising there.

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the incident. Noting that Citing Time magazine named “The attacks like Protester,” these, the Iraqi generically, as government Person of the said it would Year, Ellsberg no longer said Manning grant immushould be the nity to U.S. solface of that diers in Iraq. protester, since President the leaks for Obama which he is responded by accused, folannouncing he lowing their would pull the impact in troops out of Tunisia, “in Iraq. turn sparked Like a modthe uprising in ern-day EllsEgypt . . . WILLIAM HENNESSY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS berg, if Manwhich stimuning is guilty Army Pvt. Bradley Manning lated Occupy of what the Wall Street and Pentagon the other occuclaims, he pations in the Middle East and helped end the war in Iraq. elsewhere. So, one of those ‘perBack in the Fort Meade, Md., sons of the year’ is now sitting in hearing room, defense attorneys a courthouse.” painted a picture of a chaotic forAnother recently revealed ward operating base with little to Cablegate release exposed details no supervision, no controls whatof an alleged 2006 massacre by soever on soldiers’ access to clasU.S. troops in the Iraqi town of sified data, and a young man in Ishaqi, north of Baghdad. uniform struggling with his sexEleven people were killed, and ual identity in the era of “don’t the cable described eyewitness ask, don’t tell.” accounts in which the group, Manning repeatedly flew into including five children and four rages, throwing furniture and women, was handcuffed, then once even punching a superior in executed with bullets to the the face, without punishment. head. His peers at the base said he The U.S. military then bombed should not be in a war zone. the house, allegedly to cover up Yet he stayed, until his arrest

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ JEFF CHEW, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ CHARLIE BERMANT, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

18 months ago. Since his arrest, Manning has been in solitary confinement, for much of the time in Quantico, Va., under conditions so harsh that the U.N. special rapporteur on torture is investigating. Many believe the U.S. government is trying to break Manning in order to use him in its expected case of espionage against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. It also sends a dramatic message to any potential whistleblower: “We will destroy you.” For now, Manning sits attentively, reports say, facing possible death for “aiding the enemy.” The prosecution offered words Manning allegedly wrote to Assange as evidence of his guilt. In the email, Manning described the leak as “one of the more significant documents of our time, removing the fog of war and revealing the true nature of 21st century asymmetrical warfare.” History will no doubt use the same words as irrefutable proof of Manning’s courage.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON AND PAUL GOTTLIEB, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 22, 2011 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B

A wish list for the fat fellow THROW OUT THE tube socks, Santa. I’ve got more than enough whites to survive another wet North Olympic Peninsula winter. What I really want this holiMatt day season can’t be stuffed into a Schubert stocking or thrown under the tree. Rather, I have a few yuletide wishes of the sporting variety. So summon up some of that Christmas magic, and give your overburdened elfin workforce a day off. There will be no Occupy North Pole demonstration on my account. Consider it a trade off for all the times I’ve been naughty this season (think more Bart Simpson and less Tiger Woods.) I know you’re a busy man, Mr. Claus, so without further ado, here’s the list: ■ Ridge return — The holiday season is here and Hurricane Ridge is still hurtin’ for snow. If we could get a couple more feet, it wouldn’t be long before skiers and snowboarders could enjoy the Ridge with the luxury of an operational rope tows. This might fall under Jack Frost’s purview, but it never hurts to ask. ■ Pujols in peril — Maybe it’s not in the holiday spirit to wish ill on another, but perhaps there are exceptions? After all, we are talking about a man — ex-St. Louis Cardinal slugger Albert Pujols — who broke the hearts of millions just so he could go from “wealthy” to “moderately wealthier.” The Los Angeles Angels of Disneyland lured Pujols away from a World Series champion in a baseball crazy city with a 10-year, $254-million deal. (You know, because a 9-year, $210-million contract was hardly appreciative enough of the future Hall of Famer.) I’m not asking for any injuries or personal problems, Santa. I’d just like to see Pujols’ skills diminish so abruptly that he rues the day he chose the Rally Monkey over the most loyal fanbase in all of baseball. ■ Ring for the Ferrets — The Felonious Ferrets, my fantasy football team, find themselves in the Front Porch League title game for the second year in a row. Given all the time and effort I’ve put into making the franchise a winner — we’re talking hours of waiver wire sifting, trade talks and predraft strategy sessions — I think it’s only right that I come away with a championship ring. Trust me, this isn’t about the money, Santa. It’s about sticking it in the faces of all my old high school buddies. (OK, and maybe it’s a little bit about the money, too.) ■ Association return — It’s been four long years since the Seattle SuperSonics left the Emerald City for dustier pastures down in Oklahoma City. I think that’s a long enough time in professional basketball purgatory for the jewel of the Pacific Northwest — an area responsible for such NBA immortals as John Stroeder and Brian Scalabrine. At this point, I’ll take anything; even that mess of a franchise down in New Orleans. Just make sure NBA Commissioner David Stern isn’t running the show. If there’s anyone who’s been naughty, it’s that guy.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.

Touchdown maker Lynch goes up against stout 49er run defense BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RENTON — Marshawn Lynch knows exactly how significant it would be for the Seattle Seahawks to be the first team this season to score a rushing touchdown on San Francisco. And in typical Lynch fashion, his answer had nothing to do with his current franchise-record streak of 10 consecutive games with at least one touchdown. “Points on the board get us closer to a victory,” Lynch said. The Seahawks’ midseason turnaround began because of their recommitment to being a run-first team, relying on the angry power running of Lynch to turn a 2-6 start

into a 7-7 record with their playoff hopes still alive entering Saturday’s home Next Game finale against Saturday the 49ers. So along vs. 49ers with trying to at Seattle keep their play- Time: 1:15 p.m. off hopes alive, On TV: Ch. 13 the Seahawks have another goal of trying to stop a little bit of NFL history. San Francisco is the first team in NFL history to not allow a touchdown rushing through the first 14 weeks of the regular season. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B2

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch (24) celebrates after scoring on a 2-yard run in the first half of Sunday’s game in Chicago.

Preps

Spartans unbeaten in league PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TENINO — The Forks boys basketball team is going into winter break on a high note. The Spartans remained unbeaten in SWL-Evergreen Division play after beating Tenino 53-43 on Tuesday night. Braden Decker and Tyler Penn combined for 33 as the Spartans (3-0 in league, 5-1 overall) won their fourth in a row. “This was a big win for us,” coach Scott Justus said. “Anytime you can win at Tenino, it is a big win. This is a tough place to play.” Decker canned a game-high 18 points while Tyler Penn added 15. Brady Castellano brought down eight rebounds, while Tyler Penn had seven and Decker six. Point guard Jonah Penn dished out a team-high six assists, and Decker, Tyler Penn and Jonah Penn earned four steals each. Michael Dean, meanwhile, came off the bench to grab five important boards for the Spartans. “Those were big rebounds for us because that’s something that Michael doesn’t normally do,” Justus said. Forks hosts Neah Bay tonight in a nonleague rematch of their Dec. 10 game that the Spartans won 50-33. The Spartans will then get a week off before heading to the North Beach Christmas Classic on Dec. 29 and 30. KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles’ Marshall Elliott, center, looks for a shot over North Kitsap’s Danny Mitchell, right, as Hayden McCartney watches during Tuesday’s game in Port Angeles.

Riders win ugly McCartney scores 22 in PA’s 6th straight victory BY MATT SCHUBERT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Hayden McCartney got the dunk he was looking for. But as the senior’s puffed-up bloody lip illustrated, the Port Angeles boys basketball team’s 58-42 victory over North Kitsap on Tuesday was far from pretty. McCartney sparked a shaky Rider offense with 22 points, eight rebounds, seven steals, five assists and one thunderous stuff, helping Port Angeles come up with enough bursts to get past the Vikings.

It was the sixth straight Olympic League win for Port Angeles (6-1 in league, 7-1), which played without 6-foot-8 senior post Easton Napiontek in the lineup for the first time this winter. “It’s good for us to work with him not being in there,” Rider coach Wes Armstrong said. “At times we struggled a little bit, but I was really pleased with how we played in spurts.” Napiontek tweaked his back last week in a win over Klahowya. With the Riders starting a twoweek stretch that includes only one league game — they host a holiday tournament next week —

this was as good a time as any to rest him. McCartney more than filled in the gaps, hitting 8 of 14 shots from the field and making plays on both ends of the court. His final three baskets of the second quarter punctuated a 12-0 run that put Port Angeles ahead 27-18 going into the break. That included a two-handed breakaway dunk that woke up a relatively sedate home crowd on winter break. “I’ve kind of been waiting for an opportunity all season,” McCartney said. “I got the ball and just as I got it I heard one of my coaches yell out, ‘Dunk it!’ “I looked and I saw [teammate] Reggie [Burke] running in front of me, but I figured that I could make it for the dunk. I thought it would be pretty sweet.” TURN

TO

RIDERS/B2

Forks 53, Tenino 43 Forks Tenino

10 9 15 19 — 53 10 6 11 16 — 43 Individual Scoring

Forks (53) J. Penn 6, T. Penn 15, Castellano 8, Decker 18, Dean 2, Leons 4. Tenino (43) Love 10, Kaufman 2, Hammonds 3, Harris 9, Waterson 2, Peterson 10, Poundsley 7.

Clallam Bay 57, Quilcene 41 CLALLAM BAY — Jacob Portnoy swished in 24 points and Ryan Willis added 15 as the Bruins topped the Rangers in nonleague play Tuesday night. The Bruins pulled away in the second half after leading 8-5 after one quarter and 22-18 at halftime. Clallam Bay outscored the Rangers 35-23 in the second half to win by a comfortable margin. “We played a good defensive game,” Clallam Bay coach Cal Ritter said. “The guys hustled and played their all. I’m really proud of them.” Willis grabbed a gamehigh 13 rebounds for a doubledouble while Kevin Hess had 12 boards for the Bruins. TURN

TO

PREPS/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calender

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Crescent at Port Angeles C squad, 5:15 p.m.; Neah Bay at Forks, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Crescent at Port Angeles C squad, 7 p.m.; Clallam Bay at Cross Point; 11 a.m.

Friday Wrestling: Port Townsend at Montesano Invitational, 10 a.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES 7 Cedars Mixed Friday Men’s High Game: Brandon Eshom, 269. Men’s High Series:Dan Fereira Jr., 674. Women’s High Game: Sage Brown, 197. Women’s High Series: Sage Brown, 537. League-leading Team: We Deliver Junior Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Nathan Dewey, 200. Boys High Series: Nathan Dewey, 454. Bantam Kids League Saturday Girls High Game: Sierra Burkett, 75. Girls High Series: Sierra Burkett, 196. Pee Wee Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Robert Wold, 92. Girls High Game: Abby Robinson, 112.

AXE

TO GRIND

Port Angeles’ Kody Steele, top, takes on Central Kitsap’s Ryan Konkler in the 152-pound weight class during Wednesday’s Battle for the Axe tournament at Port Angeles High School. The Roughriders ended up winning the tournament, while Sequim took second. Look for more in Friday’s editions of the PDN.

Team Net: Leo Greenawalt, Bernie Anselmo, 61; Ray Dooley, Dave Henderson, 62; Leo Greenawalt, Ray Santiago, 62; John Pruss, Terry Jackson, 62; Steve Jones, Dave Boerighter, 63; John Pruss, Bob Bodhun, 63. Better Nine Sunday Individual Gross: Rick Parkhurst, 33; Gary Thorne, 36. Individual Net: Mike Sorenson, 31.5; Rick Hoover, 34; Bill Lindberg, 34.5; Leo Greenawalt

35.5; Gerald Petersen, 36; Mark Leffers, 36. Better Nine Saturday Individual Gross: Rick Parkhurst, 35; Mike Dupuis, 35. Individual Net: George Peabody, 32.5, Bob Brodhun, 33; Gerald Petersen, 33; Dave Henderson, 33.5; Lawrence Bingham, 33.5. Best Ball Gross: Gerald Petersen, Greg Thomas, 69. Best Ball Net: Gerald Petersen, Dennis

Ingram, 64; Dave Henderson, Bernie Anselmo, 64; Paul Stutesman, John Tweter, 64; Gerald Petersen, Mark Leffers, 65; Dave Henderson, Gary Murphy, 65; George Peabody, Bob Dutrow, 65. SKYRIDGE GOLF COURSE Better Nine Monday Net: Marty Pedersen, 33.5; Don Tipton, 34; Kui Solomon, 34; Bud Bowling, 36; Mike Tipton, 36.5; Walt Barker, 37.5.

Clallam Bay 57, Quilcene 41 5 13 13 10 — 41 8 14 21 14 — 57 Individual Scoring

Quilcene (41) M. Jordan 9, Smith 8, J. Jordan 6, Pleines 3, Perez 3, Seitz 3, Newman 5. Clallam Bay (57) Portnoy 24, Willis 15, Hess 9, Welever 4, Cheeka 2, Gregory 2.

Port Townsend 47, North Mason 39 BELFAIR — The Redskins broke open a halftime tie with a 13-5 third quarter for their first win of the season Tuesday night. Port Townsend had three scorers in double figures as Paul Spaltenstein scored 13, Kyle Kelly 11 and Chad Smith 10 in the Olympic League victory. The Redskins (1-6 in league and overall) get a week off before hosting the Crush in the Slush tournament Dec. 28-29. Port Townsend 47, North Mason 39 Port Townsend 7 17 13 10 — 47 North Mason 10 14 5 10 — 39 Individual Scoring Port Townsend (47) O’Brien 7, Russell 2, Kelly 11, King 2, Spaltenstein 13, LeMaster 2, Smith 10. North Mason (39) Price 14, Krummey 5, Sandquist 10, Henderson 8, Rowland 2.

POULSBO — Kiah Jones scored 23 points and the Roughriders handed the Vikings their first loss of the season Tuesday night. The Riders (5-2, 5-3) built up a 28-16 halftime lead and rolled to the victory, outscoring the Vikings (5-1, 6-1) 32-14 in the second half. Part of the credit for the win goes to the defense of Madison Hinrichs and Kathryn Moseley on North Kitsap freshman Rebecca Baugh. Baugh had been scoring in the high teens and 20s all year but was held to just six points Tuesday. “This was a really solid LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS win for us,” Rider coach Clallam Bay’s Jacob Portnoy drives to the hoop Michael Poindexter said. Port Angeles North Kitsap

14 14 16 15 — 59 10 6 7 7 — 30 Individual Scoring Port Angeles (59) K. Jones 23, Frazier 7, Johnson 6, B. Jones 5, Rodocker 5, Moseley 4, Walker 3, Hinrichs 2, Cox 2, Northern 2. North Kitsap (30) Williams 8, Cardoza 6, Baugh 6, Brown 2, Mueller 2, Simmons 2, Nold 4.

Port Townsend 42, North Mason, 37 PORT TOWNSEND — The Redskins clipped the Bulldogs in Olympic League play Tuesday night. Port Townsend took a 7-point lead going into the half and held on from there.

against Quilcene’s Mason Jordan (14) during Tuesday night’s game in Clallam Bay.

“We could have closed them out sooner if we had hit our free throws in the fourth [quarter],” Redskins coach Randy Maag said. “But a win is a win” Kiley Maag had the hot hand for the Redskins, finishing with 14 points.

Tenino 59, Forks 24 TENINO — The Spartans were dealt their third straight SWL-Evergreen Division loss Tuesday night. The undefeated Beavers (3-0, 6-0) limited the Spartans (0-3, 1-6) to 11 of 46 shooting from the field.

Port Townsend 42, North Mason 37 North Mason 6 7 13 11 — 37 Port Townsend 10 10 12 10 — 42 Individual Scoring North Mason (37) Q. Satman 3, Hicks 8, Schumacher 5, Martin 11, Nelson 1, E. Satman 9. Port Townsend (42) Maag 14, Johnson 6, Hossack 3, Hallinan 7, Gamble 2, Lyons 8, Meek 2.

Tenino 59, Forks 24 Forks Tenino

4 8 6 6 — 24 11 13 16 18 — 59 Individual Scoring

Forks (24) Sheriff-Penn 9, Paul 2, Raben 2, Price 4, Collins 5, Christiansen 2. Tenino (59) Morales 4, Frasl 2, Mankowski 6, Young 9, Blosl 5, Huber 6, McClure 11, Forest 16.

Hawks: Running into a brick wall CONTINUED FROM B1 According to STATS LLC, whose database goes back to 1932, the fewest touchdowns rushing allowed through an entire season is two — set by the 1934 Detroit Lions, 1968 Dallas Cowboys and 1971 Minnesota Vikings. “I don’t have too much to say. History speaks for itself,” Seattle center Max Unger said. “It’s pretty impressive.” It’s not that San Francisco has just been good at stopping the run near the goal line. They’ve been shutting running backs down all over the field and not just this season.

San Francisco has gone 36 straight games without allowing an individual 100yard rusher, and its 71.5 yards per game allowed this season on the ground is nearly 20 yards per game better than second-place Baltimore. Philadelphia in Week 4 is the only team this season to top 100 yards rushing against the 49ers. “It’s a big goal to stop the run. You don’t set up on your goal board at the beginning of the year to not allow a rushing touchdown for the first 14 games of the season. You want to be good against the run, you want to stop the run,” San Francisco coach Jim Harbaugh said.

Overall 8-0 7-2 7-1 6-5 3-4 2-4 2-5 2-5 0-8

WOMEN North Division Bellevue 0-0 Peninsula 0-0 Shoreline 0-0 Whatcom 0-0 Seattle 0-0 Skagit Valley 0-0 Everett 0-0 Edmonds 0-0 Olympic 0-0

7-2 6-4 5-3 3-4 2-4 3-5 1-7 0-7 0-7

CONTINUED FROM B1

Girls Basketball Port Angeles 59, North Kitsap 30

Port Angeles 59, North Kitsap 30

MEN North Division Division Bellevue 0-0 Whatcom 0-0 Peninsula 0-0 Shoreline 0-0 Skagit Valley 0-0 Seattle 0-0 Everett 0-0 Olympic 0-0 Edmonds 0-0

Riders: Streak

Preps: Bruins

Quilcene Clallam Bay

9 a.m. (47) GOLF Golf, Accenture Match Play Championship Final Day. 11:50 a.m. (27) ESPN2 EPL Soccer, Chelsea vs. Tottenham Hotspur. Noon (47) GOLF Golf, American Century Celebrity Championship Round 2 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Memphis at Georgetown. 5 p.m. (26) ESPN College Football, Arizona State vs. Boise State in Las Vegas Bowl. 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Men’s College Basketball, Illinois at Missouri. 6 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Air Force at Gonzaga. 8 p.m. (25) ROOT Men’s College Basketball, Kansas at USC.

NWAACC Standings KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Golf

Hess also scored nine points. Mason Jordan had a team-high nine points for the Rangers. Clallam Bay improved to 2-6 on the year with the win.

Today

Basketball

PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Sub Par One Hole Each Nine Tuesday Individual Gross: Mark Mitrovich, 69; Kerry Perkins, 70. Individual Net: Leo Greenawalt, 64; Ray Dooley, 65; Steve Jones, 65; Mike Sorenson, 66; Dale Doran, 66; Terry Jackson, 66; Dave Boerighter, 66; Lyle Andrus, 66. Team Gross: Mark Mitrovich, Dave Boerighter, 69; Kerry Perkins, Larry Bourm, 70; Bob Bodhun, John Pruss, 70.

CONTINUED FROM B1

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

The back San Francisco is being asked to stop this week could be among the most challenging this season. Lynch saw his string of 100-yard efforts snapped last week at Chicago, but he still found the end zone twice in the Seahawks’ 38-14 win. He’s got 11 touchdowns rushing for the season, all of them in his past 10 games. “Marshawn is running that ball — like I told guys, he’s running like he just got out of jail or something,” 49ers cornerback Carlos Rogers said. “He’s running that ball hard. It’s going to be a challenge, and just going into their place is a challenge with the way they’re playing.”

What Lynch and the Seahawks have accomplished is even more impressive considering the losses on the offensive line. Three starters — Russell Okung, John Moffitt and James Carpenter — have all gone down with seasonending injuries during Seattle’s run of success this season. Lynch called Paul McQuistan the team’s MVP after McQuistan first stepped in for Moffitt at right guard, only to switch to left tackle when Okung went down. “Just to see the way that they’re being coached to where it’s not an individual player but a position is really good,” Lynch said.

The slam followed McCartney’s second straight steal near the end of the second quarter, when the Rider press stirred an offense that hit just 2 of 15 shots to begin the game With the Vikings scrambling in the final minute, the Riders followed it up with two offensive rebounds on their final first-half possession before McCartney buried a 3-point shot moments before the buzzer. “I thought the first half we had so many opportunities to move out by 6, 8, 10 points,” North Kitsap coach Tony Chisholm said. “We missed opportunities in the second quarter. We could have went in with a nice lead, and then you get that momentum swing and we’re all right. Well, it didn’t work out that way.” Instead, the Riders took advantage of a North Kitsap (2-4, 2-5) team missing starting point guard Jacob Hill. The Vikings turned the ball over 23 times without their lead ball handler — 10 in the second quarter alone — and never could find a comfort zone. The Riders looked equally unstable without Napiontek in the middle against North Kitsap’s matchup zone. It wasn’t until midway through the third quarter that they began to hit their stride. Senior Reggie Burke sank a coast-to-coast lay-in and Cole Uvila drained the first of two third-quarter 3-pointers to spark a 15-1 Rider run. The ball moved and the Riders knocked down shots to surge ahead 43-24 going into the fourth. “We didn’t have that confidence to start off the game,” McCartney said. “We’ve got great shooters on the team, especially with our inside presence. “We’ve really got to work the inside out and try and avoid the one pass and shoot.

“When we’re patient is when we really do our best.” Burke scored eight of his 13 points in the third quarter, including a fastbreak lay-up at the buzzer off a long pass from McCartney. McCartney opened the fourth quarter with a lay-in, fed Burke for a 3, and was then fouled hard on another fastbreak bucket, resulting in a bloody lip and a hasty trip to the locker room. The Riders were ahead 52-24 at that point, and there was no reason to bring the senior back in. “Hayden is such a great senior leader,” Armstrong said. “He plays with such heart and emotion. “He was the catalyst defensively for us.” Burke had a solid allaround game of his own for the Riders, adding eight rebounds and five assists to his 13-point night. Port Angeles dished out 15 assists as a team, with Cameron Braithwaite and Uvila each adding two apiece. Uvila also had 10 points. Even with Napiontek out, the Riders out-rebounded North Kitsap 36-28, 20 coming on the offensive glass. It still ended up being an incomplete performance for the Riders, however, as they turned the ball over 17 times and shot 33.8 percent from the field (22 of 65). “I think our defense is what got us going,” Armstrong said. “That’s a good cure for a bad offense. Good defense gets transition buckets on the other end. “I was pleased with that, but it was an ugly win. “Overall we’re not that pleased with our effort, but we did just enough in spurts.” Port Angeles 58, North Kitsap 42 North Kitsap Port Angeles

5 13 6 18 — 42 6 21 16 15 — 56 Individual Scoring North Kitsap (42) Lindsey 5, Mitchell 4, Harrel 14, Gill 6, Waller 11, Urquhart 2. Port Angeles (56) Braithwaite 4, Walker 7, Burke 13, McCartney 22, Uvila 10, Elliott 2. JV: Port Angeles 49, North Kitsap 40 (High scorer: Tristen Isett, 13)

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, December 22, 2011 PAGE

B3

Largest-ever fair-lending settlement told by DOJ Bank of America to pay for Countrywide failures THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bank of America agreed to pay $335 million to resolve allegations that its Countrywide unit engaged in a widespread pattern of discrimination against qualified African-American and Hispanic borrowers on home loans. The settlement with the U.S. Justice Department was filed Wednesday with the Central District Court of California and is subject to court approval. The DOJ said it’s the largest settlement in history over residential fair lending practices. According to the DOJ’s complaint, Countrywide charged more than 200,000 African-American and Hispanic borrowers higher fees and interest rates than nonHispanic white borrowers

Shoppers bring joy to retail world THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dan Frahm, a Bank of America spokesman, said in a statement that the bank does not practice lending based on race. “We discontinued Countrywide products and practices that were not in keeping with our commitment and will continue to resolve and put behind us the remaining Countrywide issues,” Frahm said.

Hispanics, blacks hurt Justice’s complaint says that Countrywide was aware that the fees and interest rates that its loan officers were charging discriminated against AfricanAmerican and Hispanic borrowers but failed to impose meaningful limits or guidelines to stop it. By steering borrowers

into subprime loans from 2004 to 2007, the complaint alleges, Countrywide harmed those qualified African-American and Hispanic borrowers. Subprime loans generally carried costlier terms, such as prepayment penalties and significantly higher adjustable interest rates that increased suddenly after two or three years, making the payments unaffordable and leaving the borrowers at a much higher risk of foreclosure. The settlement amount will be used to compensate victims of Countrywide’s discriminatory mortgage loans from 2004 through 2007, when Countrywide originated millions of residential mortgage loans as the nation’s largest singlefamily mortgage lenders.

Coal plants must reduce emissions or shut down THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The largest remaining source of uncontrolled toxic air pollution in the United States, the nation’s coal- and oilfired power plants, will be forced to reduce their emissions or shut down, under a federal regulation released Wednesday. The long-overdue national standards for mercury and other toxic pollutants are the first to be applied to nation’s oldest and dirtiest power plants. About half of the 1,300 coal- and oil-fired units nationwide still lack modern pollution controls, despite the Environmental Protection Agency in 1990 getting the authority from Congress to control toxic air pollution from power plant smokestacks. A decade later, in 2000, the agency concluded it was necessary to clamp down on

the emissions to protect public health. Decades of litigation and changing political winds have allowed power plants to keep running without addressing their full environmental and public health costs. EPA administrator Lisa Jackson said in a statement that the standards “will protect millions of families and children from harmful and costly air pollution and provide the American people with health benefits that far outweigh the costs.” The rule ranks as one of the most expensive in the EPA’s history, with an estimated $9.6 billion price tag. Its release comes after intense lobbying from power producers and criticism from Republicans, who said the rule would threaten jobs and electric reliability and raise electricity prices. To ease those concerns,

the administration will encourage states to make “broadly available” an additional fourth year to comply with the rule, as allowed by the law. Case-by-case extensions could also be granted to address local reliability issues, according to a presidential memorandum to Jackson. An AP survey of 55 power plants producers found that more than 32 mostly coalfired power plants in a dozen states would retire because of the regulation issued Wednesday and because of another rule aimed at reducing pollution downwind from power plants. The survey found, however, that the power plant retirements alone would not cause homes to go dark: Another 36 power plants may have to shut down because it would be cheaper than complying with the rule.

Broad rules to speed pace of union elections approved THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

procedures in their haste to finish the rules. The board rushed to approve the new rules before the end of the year, when the term of Democratic member Craig Becker expires. The board currently has only three members instead of the usual five, and the Supreme Court has ruled that it can’t issue any decisions with less than three members in place. Congressional Republicans have blocked President Barack Obama from filling vacant posts on the board, and lawmakers have used procedural tactics to prevent Obama from bypassing the Senate to make recess appointments.

CES tech show last for Microsoft NEW YORK — Microsoft Corp. is pulling out of the International Consumer Electronics Show, the largest trade show in the Americas, joining Apple in saying that it prefers to put on its own events when the time is right to show off its products. Microsoft said the next show, to be held Jan. 9-12 in Las Vegas, will be the last show at which it has a booth or the CEO delivers the customary kickoff speech. Company founder Bill Gates delivered keynote speeches at the show for 11 straight years. Current CEO Steve Ballmer has delivered the speech for the past three shows and will present his last next month. The software company has been one of the biggest U.S. supporters of the annual event, which gathered nearly 150,000 people this year. Originally focused on living-room electronics, the show has become the big annual U.S. event for all consumer technology after the demise of big computer-focused shows such as Comdex. Microsoft says it will continue to use CES as a place to connect to customers, but it won’t have a booth because its product milestones don’t align with the show’s January timing.

Johnson joins firm PORT ANGELES — Catherine Johnson has joined the staff of Casi Fors Financial Consulting as an administrative assistant. The business is at 330 E. First St., Suite 9. Johnson comes to Johnson Casi Fors Financial Consulting with eight years of experience in financial operations and more than 20 years in office management. The office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

787 flies home SEATTLE — Seattle will see the new Boeing 787 serving the area where it was designed and assembled. All Nippon Airways announced Wednesday in

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Tokyo it would begin nonstop service to the West Coast in fiscal 2012 from Narita International Airport to Seatte-Tacoma International Airport. ANA also will serve San Jose. The airline said the destinations maximize the ability of the fuel-efficient mid-size widebody to fly long-range routes. It will be the first U.S. service for the new plane that Boeing delivered to the launch customer in September, nearly three years late. The announcement was welcomed by Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire, who said she’s pleased to see the Boeing product will become a fixture at Sea-Tac.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $0.8939 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.2997 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.3630 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $1933.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8348 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1608.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1615.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $29.370 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $29.496 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1428.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1432.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Who’s playing? John Nelson’s “Live Music” column tells you. Thursdays in

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WASHINGTON — In a win for organized labor, the National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday approved sweeping new rules that would speed the pace of union elections, making it easier for unions to gain members at companies that have long rebuffed them. Business groups quickly denounced the move, saying it limits the time that employers have to educate workers about the impact of joining a union. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has already filed a federal lawsuit challenging the rules. The rules, which take effect April 30, simplify procedures and reduce legal delays that can hold up union elections after employees at a work site gather enough signatures to form a union. Most union elections currently take place 45 days to 60 days after a union gathers enough signatures to file a petition. The rules could shorten that time by several weeks, depending on the situation. Many employers use the time leading up to an election to talk to workers about the cost and impact of joining a union. But union officials claim the lag time is often used to pressure or intimidate workers against forming a union.

While union leaders publicly tried to play down the new rules as a modest development, labor experts called the change significant. Unions have seen their ranks dwindle steadily over the last three decades to 11.9 percent of the workforce. The rules were approved by the board’s two Democratic members. Its lone Republican, Brian Hayes, has not yet cast his vote, but he is expected to cast a dissenting opinion sometime before the rule takes effect. Hayes is so strongly opposed to the plan that he threatened to quit the commission last month, claiming its Democratic members were ignoring longstanding

0A5099905

NEW YORK — The holiday shopping season is wrapping up to be bigger than anyone expected. Now, retailers are holding their breath and hoping consumers will keep spending in the final days before Christmas. Sales from November through Saturday rose 2.5 percent, compared with the same period a year ago, according to research firm ShopperTrak, which did not give a dollar figure. Online, shoppers have spent almost $32 billion online for the holiday season so far, a 15 percent increase from a year ago, according to comScore, which tracks Web use. Stores are expected to ring up $469.1 billion during the holiday season, according to the National Retail Federation, nation’s largest retail trade group. Heading into the holidays, retailers were nervous that Americans were so scared about another recession that they wouldn’t do much shopping. In fact, consumers themselves told consulting firm Deloitte in September that they planned to spend about 5 percent less on Christmas this year. That led stores to begin discounting earlier in the season, opening as early as Thanksgiving Day, and offering profitbusting incentives, including free shipping on clothes and juicy financing deals on furniture. Despite all the worrying, though, the season has been a lot brighter than expected. As a result, the National Retail Federation recently upgraded its forecast for holiday sales to increase 3.8 percent, up from its 2.8 percent forecast in October.

with a similar credit profile. The complaint says that these borrowers were charged higher fees and rates because of their race or national origin rather than any other objective criteria. “These institutions should make judgments based on applicants’ creditworthiness, not on the color of their skin,” said Attorney General Eric Holder. “With today’s settlement, the federal government will ensure that the more than 200,000 African-American and Hispanic borrowers who were discriminated against by Countrywide will be entitled to compensation.” Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank of America Corp. bought the nation’s largest subprime lender, Countrywide Financial Corp., in 2008.

$ Briefly . . .


B4

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: You printed a letter DEAR ABBY from “Bruised and Abused,” a man who is dating a woman who becomes Dear Abby: I physically violent when they argue. Abigail was a victim. PeoI know this is a touchy subject. Van Buren ple asked me why I I have heard from authorities that didn’t fight back. I about half of domestic violence occurs wasn’t raised to hit when a woman throws the first blow. women. Most women believe, as the abuIn the end, my sive girlfriend said, that her attack on wife put me in the him isn’t violence because she’s a hospital twice and woman and he is a man. left me blind in my As difficult as it may be, we need to left eye. talk about the role women play in the She spent nine domestic violence cycle as well as the months in jail for responsibilities of men. I’m saving the everything that letter from “Bruised” to remind me. happened. Donald, A California Dentist Violence is violence regardless of who is throwing the punches. Tell that man he needs to get out Dear Donald: Since I printed that now! God forbid he ends up dead. letter, I have heard from readers tellBattered in Arizona ing me my answer didn’t go far enough. (I advised him to end the relaDear Abby: It doesn’t matter if he tionship.) is a boy and she is a girl, or that he is Among those who wrote to me bigger and stronger. Women do abuse were doctors, members of law enforce- men. ment and mental health specialists — It’s a crime that too often goes as well as former victims. unreported. My newspaper readers comment: He should contact the National Dear Abby: Because we are bigger Domestic Violence Hotline 800-799and stronger does not mean we don’t 7233 or SAFE (Stop Abuse for Everyget abused. I was abused by my forone) at www.safe4all.org. mer wife and an ex-girlfriend before I Claudia, Ph.D., Long Beach, Calif. recognized it for what it was and got Dear Abby: I agree with you that myself the help I needed. Nobody else the man needs to leave “Carmen.” was there for me. But something he wrote in his letIf she is hitting him, he needs to call the police. If he has marks on him, ter concerns me. He said, “I don’t want to end the relationship, but I think it’s she will go to jail. the only way I can make her see Men are too often ashamed to call things from my perspective.” the police because men think it This indicates to me that he thinks reflects on their manhood. he can “teach her a lesson” by breakHowever, they need to put that ing up with her, and that this would shame aside and get the help they stop her behavior. need. That would be a huge misconcepJoe in Missouri tion on his part. Carmen’s behavior isn’t something Dear Abby: I’m a retired cop. that can be modified through a “Bruised” asked you if what his girlbreakup. It is something that will friend is doing is domestic abuse. Your require intense counseling to correct, reply did not mention that his girlif it can be corrected at all. friend hitting him is domestic abuse. The boyfriend needs to end things It doesn’t matter if the abuser is for good — and run like the wind! male or female, nor the size of the vicBruce in Houston tim. ________ “Bruised” should call the cops and Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, report this before she goads him into a also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was response that gets him arrested. founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. LetThe courts can mandate the therters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box apy she apparently needs. 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by Russ in Helena, Mont. logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Women hitting men not a rarity

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

by Mell Lazarus

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t let someone distract you. It’s important to finish what you start so you feel confident and stressfree. Added discipline and a little extra detail on your part will ensure that you get what you want. Love is in the stars. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Plan your actions carefully. Spontaneity may be fun, but in retrospect you will realize your impulsive act was a mistake. Someone is sure to point out where you went wrong and judge you for it. Think before taking action. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

by Corey Pandolph

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Social networking will work wonders for your personal and professional life, as well as your attitude and confidence. The things you say and do will enhance a love relationship. You don’t have to overspend to impress; just be you. 3 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t let the festive hustle and bustle get you down. Emotions are running wild and tempers are short, so make a point to relax and enjoy the festivities going on around you. The choice is yours. Choose positive over negative. 2 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Love, affection and divulging your personal plans for the future will make you feel good and enhance your life. A trip to see someone special will resolve any uncertainty about your future. A partnership will take a favorable turn. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take care of debts or collect what’s owed to you. Talk is cheap and can help you get matters under control. Love is highlighted, and spending quality time with someone special will result in ideas you can work toward together. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t worry about changes going on around you at work or regarding a job that interests you. In the end, you will benefit from what’s happening as long as you don’t make a fuss or show any signs of being unprofessional. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be upset if you haven’t been managing your money properly. Set up a strict budget that will help you pay down debt and secure your financial position. Negotiate with a company, institution or agency to get the best deal. 3 stars

The Family Circus

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Make a lastminute move or decision that will spice up your life. Romance is highlighted, and offering something special to someone you love will enhance your relationship. Don’t let someone from your past meddle in your affairs. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Helping others will be good for you emotionally, mentally and physically. You’ll be attracted to someone’s idea. The potential to offer something special to the public looks positive. A financial change is apparent. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Put in a couple of hours at work if it will ease stress. Don’t limit what you can do because you are fearful of making a mistake. Discipline is all that’s required if you want to avoid overindulgence and trouble. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Conversations will lead to upset. Avoid topics you feel strongly about. You will send the wrong message and can easily end up in an argument that ruins a friendship. Back off. It’s not worth the loss you will face. 2 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

B5

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CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individual interested in assuming delivery carrier contract routes in the Port Townsend area. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insurance. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Contact Port Townsend District Manager Linda Mustafa 301-2747 for information.

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AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Full time opportunity with benefits and pay. Please submit your resume materials to jobs@kwacares.org CARING AIDES Needed at 680 W. Prairie, Sequim. Bring any certs. and apply in person at Prairie Springs. DENTAL ASSISTANT Sequim office seeking an experienced and responsible dental assistant to join our caring and dedicated dental team. Exp. with Dentrix and digital X-rays preferred. Send resumes to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#240/Dental Pt Angeles, WA 98362 Dispatcher/Social Media. 20/30 hrs a week. Must have exp. with FB/twitter/web editing, video editing, phone skills w/smile and great spelling. $14 hr. Sequim area. Please email resume to: info@SSNWHQ.com ELECTRICIAN: Journeymen, residential or commercial. Vehicle provided, WSDL. Call 360-477-1764 Fun friendly dental office looking for fulltime dental assistant to add to our family. Send resumes with references to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#238/Dental Pt Angeles, WA 98362 LOG TRUCK DRIVER Experienced, immediate opening. 360-417-8022 or 360-460-7292 ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

Operations Manager Physical Therapy Full-time interesting position now available to manage Physical Therapy and Rehab Personnel for outpatient services. Will develop programs for development of staff and provide for delivery of quality rehab services. Must be licensed Physical Therapist with five years clinical experience with management and program development and marketing experience. Excellent pay and benefits! Contact: nbuckner@olympicm edical.org Or apply online at www.olympicmedical.org EOE

Order Fulfillment/ Customer Service Must lift 50 lbs. consistently, Customer and computer experience a must, team player, detail oriented, part-time (32 hrs) $9 hr. Please email resume to: jdickson@starmaninc. com Permit Technician City of Port Angeles: $3,347-$3,996 mo. plus benefits. Requires some technical or vocational coursework plus 3 yrs. cust. serv. exp. AND 3 yrs technical exp in the building trades reviewing building const. plans, processing permits and/or conducting inspections. Municipal exp. is desirable. To apply go to www.cityofpa. us or call Human Resources at 4174510. CLOSES 1/13/ 12. COPA is an EOE. Pers Lines Customer Service Rep P&C license preferred. Insurance service & sales. Good benefits. Prior insurance exp. pref. Send resume Peninsula Daily News PDN#239/CSR Pt Angeles, WA 98362 PIERCING ARTIST Looking for licensed body piercer. 360-643-0643 Clallam Bay & Olympic Corrections Center is currently recruiting for On-Call Cook A/C. Pay starts at $14.67 hourly, plus benefits. Closes 1/8/12. Apply on-line at www.careers.wa.gov For more information, please call Tanja Cain at 360-9633208. EOE From July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions. The salary range noted in this recruitment announcement reflects this temporary reduction. SEQUIM PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER Seeks experienced licensed physical therapist for private practice outpatient therapy clinic. Manual therapy skills preferred, will consider part or full-time. Contact Jason Wilwert at 360-683-0632.

34

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM 51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

Centrally located in Port Angeles. 1,296 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath in a quiet neighborhood. Open living area, kitchen with lots of counter space. Bright windows with views of mountains and the Strait. Private fenced in yard, large detached 2 car garage. $189,000 Call 360477-9597 for more info. Offers with a Buyer's agent considered. CHARMING COTTAGE BY THE SEA With lovely cameo water views, private community beach access and a private airport nearby. Updated baths and a gourmet kitchen with new stainless appliances including a Jenn-Air convection oven. This is special and unique home has vaulted ceilings, maple laminate flooring and a lovely covered porch. $198,500 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 CLOSE TO TOWN Neat and clean rambler with extra rooms off garage for workshops or hobby rooms. This home has been updated with vinyl dual pane windows, and a 50+ year tile roof. RV garage is 24x31 with 10x10 doors. Lanai for outdoor entertaining is 21x14. Sunroom is 8x18. $249,000. ML262382. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

51

Homes

BEAUTIFUL SUNSETS Single level townhome, mountain views, adjacent to greenbelt, private courtyard entry, great kitchen. French doors to den, spacious master suite. $279,500 ML210867/260784 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND COUNTRY HOME Custom home with over 3,000 sf of living area on 2.76 acres located in a great area just north of Sequim. The home features large living areas with fireplaces and beamed ceilings, a great kitchen with plenty of cabinets, master suite, private deck, attached 3 car garage plus 2,400 sf RV garage/shop. $475,000. ML261884. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 CUSTOM DESIGNED VIEW HOME Quality craftsmanship combine with custom design plus incredible views to make this a paradise. Spacious home has lots of living space. The garage/workshop is fit for a craftsman plus it has an unfinished apartment upstairs. The 7 acres are great for horses and complete with a pond. ML260687 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CUSTOM HOME WITH PRIVACY Newer custom home on 2.5 private acres with top notch details throughout. Brazilian hardwood floors, granite countertops, outstanding craftsmanship. Two detached garages and lovely wraparound covered porch. $299,000. ML262356 Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900

51

Homes

FOUR SEASONS RANCH Close to town and shopping. This home has 3 Br., two baths, large family room off the kitchen. Onestory floor plan including a living room with a propane fireplace and a formal dining room. Access to beach, golf course and equestrian facilities. Home has a sprinkler system installed and is located near the Discovery Trail and Morris creek. $169,900. ML262113. Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Main house has 2,332 sf of living space and custom features. Custom landscaping, koi pond with waterfall. Large greenhouse and garden area. Laminate wood floors, builtins, great sunroom, too. Includes two outbuildings for extra investment opportunities. $429,000. ML241656 Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEAR GOLF COURSE This 4 Br. rambler is impeccable inside and out! Completely remodeled with new roof, vinyl windows, heat pump, new kitchen and solid wood doors. Spacious family room with water view. 4th Br. and bath offers separate privacy. Excellent neighborhood and close to golf course. $259,900. ML260725. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

5000900

Facilities Manager The Port of Port Angeles is seeking qualified candidates for HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. the position of FaciliRuns good, looks ties Manager. The fair. $745. 683-9071 WANTED: Award Facilities Manager is responsible for the Peninsula Classified travel trailer. daily operations of 1-800-826-7714 683-8810 the Facilities Maintenance department & personnel. The Lost and Facilities Manager Found also manages maintenance at the following facilities: LOST: Dog. Lab/ marinas, industrial Chow, looks like properties/buildings, Black Lab, 5 yrs. old, airports, waterfront Gasman Rd. area, properties, marine P.A. 360-791-9478. terminal docks, piers, log yard faciliLOST: Dog. Male ties, boat launch brindle neutered facilities, boat yards 22 Community Notes American Bull Dog, & rental properties. 23 Lost and Found 80 lbs, very friendly, Qualified candidates 24 Personals name Achilles, must have 5-10 yrs between the bridges of experience in Community on 8th St., P.A. facilities manageNotes 360-912-1041 ment preferably in the public sector & Best gift ever, Wild sufficient knowledge Rose Care Home of the methods, gives love year materials, tools, & round. We have a equipment used in all vacancy. 683-9194. phases of facilities maintenance, includLost and ing a basic general Found knowledge of electricity, plumbing, carpentry, HVAC sysFOUND: (2) dogs. tems, etc. ExperiBlack Labrador ence with marinas, Retrievers, male, docks, piers & near Sunny Farms at 31 Help Wanted marine work preRainbow’s End RV 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info ferred. Salary is DOE Park, Sequim. Call 34 Work Wanted with an anticipated Linda at 683-3863. 35 Schools/Instruction hiring range of FOUND: Dog. Yellow $60,000 to $75,000. Lab, Golf Course Applications & job Help Rd., P.A. 460-3050. descriptions may be Wanted obtained at the Port FOUND: Male dog. Admin Office, 338 Large, gray, Aussie, West 1st St., Port at Fairmont Grocery Director of Angeles between in P.A. on Sunday Engineering, 8am & 5pm M-F or afternoon. Please Planning and online at call to identify. Public Works www.portofpa.com. 360-477-7226 The Port of Port AngeApplications will be les is seeking qualiLOST PROPERTY? accepted until 5pm fied candidates for Always check with January 6, 2012. the position of DirecClallam County Letters & resumes tor of Engineering, Sheriff’s Office without an applicaPlanning and Public for lost property. tion will not be Works. The Director 360-417-2268 accepted. Drug testis responsible for all ing is required. LOST: Dog. Border capital construction, Collie/Blue Heeler, maintenance and female, black with small works projects Write ads that get white chest and involving marinas, RESULTS paws, no collar, E. terminal dock faciliBluffs, behind State ties, log yard faciliDescription Patrol Office, P.A. ties, airport, industriDescription 605-216-9705 al rental properties Description and equipment. Compose your Let your potential Qualified candidates Classified Ad buyer get a must have extensive mental picture on engineering, planof your item ning, public works www.peninsula OR and project/conadd a picture dailynews.com struction manageto your ad! ment experience preferably in the Classified public sector. Must customers are Always include the have in-depth knowlsmart consumers. edge of local/state/ price for your item. The ones with federal law as it money call the You will get better good ads first! relates to public results if people works projects and know that your item 360-452-8435 planning and enviis in their price 1-800-826-7714 ronmental issues. range. The ideal candidate www.peninsula will have a BS or AS dailynews.com Make sure your in civil or related information is clear engineering field with PENINSULA and includes details at least 5-10 years of CLASSIFIED that make the reader applicable work experience. Salary is want to respond. DOE with an anticipated hiring range of Since readers often $65,000 to $85,000. scan, include a Applications & job catchy headline descriptions may be and/or a obtained at the Port photo or graphic. Admin Office, 338 West 1st St., Port Highlight your ad in Angeles between Yellow on Sunday to 8am & 5pm M-F or help it stand out. online at www.portofpa.com Applications will be You are a reader, so accepted until 5pm make sure the ad December 30, 2011. looks appealing and Letters and resumes is clear to you. without an application will not be PENINSULA accepted. Drug testCLASSIFIED ing is required.

31

Homes

A great investment or starter home. Charming features. 2 bedrooms, 1.25 bath. plus a big garage. Priced to sell! $109,900. ML262310/297432 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. NEAT AS A PIN! Clean with awesome location in a great community of homes. This beautiful, light and bright well maintained 3 Br., 2 bath home is ready to move in and is priced well below assessed value. End of the cul-de-sac privacy with a nearly zero maintenance yard. $76,000. ML262029/282661 Mark Macedo 477-8244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY NEW LISTING Very well cared for 1 Br., 1 bath home in Dominion Terrace with 936 sf and a view of the Strait. Indoor heat pump being installed soon. $80,000 ML262363/301376 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

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Manufactured Homes

Let’s make it a happy New Year for you and me! Buy my single wide with low down and low payments - will carry contract. 2 Br., 1 bath, with new shower stall, appliances, W/D, fridge, stove, and new flooring through out the home. Attached large laundry room or shop. Large deck and carport. 55 park located between Sequim and P.A. Small yard with garden shed and established perrenials and trees. Must see to appreciate. Asking $12,000/obo. 452-4165 or 360-301-5652

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


ACROSS 1 Popped (out) 6 Pet welfare org. 10 Swear 14 One drawing a bead 15 Feeds, as cattle 16 Kevin’s “A Fish Called Wanda” role 17 *Neat, practical types, so it’s said 19 Father of Cordelia 20 Slip 21 Swore 22 Piano’s opposite, in a score 23 Rhone feeder 25 Keys for a music room? 27 Department store employees 30 Dog days mo. 31 Sing like Michael Bublé 32 Is leery of 37 Kin of -ess 38 Different kinds of them are split (but not in an embarrassing way) in the four starred answers 39 Make __ with: impress 40 Radiation detection device 42 Inclined (to) 43 Here-there link 44 Invaded, with “on” 46 Epitome of thickness 50 Clutch 51 Insect-trapping resin 52 Man of many words 54 Le Mans law 57 Kind of miss 58 *Easter Bunny’s delivery 60 Bar peel 61 Pulitzer-winning author James 62 As if it were scripted 63 Mars, to the Greeks 64 Lout 65 Ninnies

54

Classified

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTERS Solution: 6 letters

F A C T S T R O P E R S U Y A By John Lampkin

DOWN 1 Deal with 2 Whopper creator 3 Puts away 4 It’s always in Shakespeare 5 Big screen locale 6 Slip preventer 7 Peel 8 Singer Lauper 9 Beast of burden 10 *Ceremonial flag carriers 11 Wombs 12 Country 13 Abrasions 18 Innermost part 22 Final complement, perhaps 24 *Arch supports, e.g. 26 Relatives of drums 27 Emailed a dupe to 28 Cartoonist Peter 29 Resilient strength 33 Poky follower 34 Hearst Castle, for one

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Lots/ Acreage

For Sale by Owner Health forces sale of this 4.73 acres with end of road privacy on Whites Creek, site cleared, septic perk, partial salt water view, power/phone, minutes to downtown P.A. $99,000. 480-946-0406 PORT LUDLOW WATER VIEW LOT In resort community at end of cul-de-sac. $10,000 sewer has been paid and house plans available with sale of lot. CC&R’s. Beach club amenities. $129,900. ML108519 Lois Chase Johnson 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING There are 3 nice, level 5 acre parcels just west of Joyce for only $64,900 each. Near fishing, camping and hunting. Power, water and phone in at the road. Buyer will need to purchase a Crescent Water share. Manufactured homes are OK but must be at least 1,200 sf and must be less than 8 years old. $64,900. ML252411 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘S’ IS FOR STOCKING STUFFER The deed for this cut in-town cabin will fit nicely into a holiday stocking. What a great gift idea! $79,000. ML261899. Jeanine Cardiff 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company ‘Y’ IS FOR YULE LOVE This beautiful, level and gentle sloping pastured 5 acre parcel. Absolutely stunning mountain views with a southern exposure. PUD water, power and telephone waiting for your dream home, change your address on your Christmas cards next year. $114,900. ML260970. Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

Apartments Unfurnished

1 Br., 1 bath APT. $550/mo. Washer + dryer, full kitchen, deck. 683-3491. CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $575 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, fireplace $575, $575 dep., no pets. 452-3423. Condo at Dungeness Golf. 2 Br., 2 ba, no smoke/pets. All appl. Must see. $650. 1st, last, dep. 775-6739. P.A.: 1 Br. $475-$530. Some pets ok. Dwntown. 425-881-7267. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $575 + dep. 460-4089. mchughrents.com

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Houses

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 2 br 1 ba......$475 H 2 br 2 ba......$800 H 3 br 2 ba......$990 H 4 br 2 ba....$1000 HOUSES/APT SEQ A 2 br 1 ba......$725 A 2 br 1.5 ba...$825 H 3 br 2 ba......$900 H 2+ br 2 ba....$950 H 3 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1350

360-417-2810

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12/22

Accidents, Accountability, Anonymous, Association, Business, Crime, Decades, Distinct, Editors, Effects, Exposed, Facts, Files, Focus, Freelance, Identify, Information, Issues, Laws, Live, Maps, Media, News, Offices, Plans, Preparing, Primary, Readers, Records, Reports, Security, Source, Subject, Time, Undisclosed, Viewers, Work Yesterday’s Answer: Coffee Table

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

SOJIT ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

FDYFA (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Brown of publishing 36 Dump closing? 38 Chincha Islands country 41 Marshy wasteland 42 Marshy fuel source 45 Neutral shade in London

P.A.: 2 Br., 606 S. Laurel. $695. 3 Br., 119 W. 5th St., $1,000. Ref. req. 808-2340.

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P.A.: 315 Columbus, 3 Br., 2 ba, lease. $1,050. 457-4966.

1950s original kitchen table and 4 chairs plus leaf. Green and silver, excellent condition. $250. 683-6393

P.A.: Efficient 1 Br., carport, storage. $550 mo. 457-3614. P.A.: Great 1 Br., lots storage, no pets. $575 mo. 452-4671. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ.: Condo, 3 Br., 2 ba W/S/G, 55+ Pets? $875. 461-5649. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 car garage, no smoking/pets, W/D freezer, c;ose to QFC. $1,200 mo. 460-9499, 460-7337

Share Rentals/ Rooms

ROOMMATE wanted, $400, plus util. with extras incl. $300 dep. 360-301-9521. SEQUIM: Bedroom with bath, private entrance, water view, kitchen privlidges. Must love dogs. $500, dep. 683-2918 SEQUIM: Room, by Dairy Queen. $375, deposit. 683-6450.

Spaces RV/ Mobile

DIAMOND POINT RV park. 55 yr lease. Space 32. $32,150. 719-661-6828

Commercial Space

EAST P.A.: Warehouse/workshop. 22x32 $250 ea. 457-9732 or 457-9527. PORT ANGELES 8th Street Office w/great straight & mountain views. 800 sf. $600 month plus $85 utilities. 808-2402. PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

Furniture

BED: Mismatched plus California king mattress and box springs, great shape, over $1,000 new. Sell for $400/obo. 681-3299 DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429 or 417-7685 MISC: Beautiful hardwood lighted show case, 51” tall, 60” wide, two glass shelves, mirror back, $700. (3) antique gold velvet captains chairs, $75 each. 360-374-2633 REDECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Victorian wall sconce lamps, $25 ea. Recliner chair, $50. Camel back sofa, brown/plumb tapestry, $150. Small vintage tole painted table, $25. Sewing machine in wood cabinet, $140. Two vintage upholstered side chairs, $50 ea. Wood kitchen table with 4 chairs, $45. Camel back love seat, red pattern, $45. Elegant sofa with exquisite woodwork, $500. Victorian tapestry print and frame, $40. Small stain glass table lamp, $15. These items would make great gifts! 460-0575.

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

12/22/11

46 Quixote’s squire Sancho 47 Arab chieftain 48 Demean 49 Barilla rival 53 Butter alternative 55 Albatross 56 “Got it” 58 Punch that might make you reel 59 Yachtsman’s course: Abbr.

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Houses

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290.

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T P C P B O I A I I U C I A M

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

66

© 2011 Universal Uclick

I L E O V U L D T S C R R N Y

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Newly remodeled farmhouse, 3 Br., close in. $950. Also, 2 Br., 1.5 bath 2 story, $750. No pets. 457-6181

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S W E N O A F S N A L I V E R ‫ګګګګ‬ S L D E S R E W E I E S O E M A S R A S D T K I C E N N S E R E I N N S D T U T N I O I O F C N S C C C S E C T A N O N

PPEMIL Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) THEME WILLOW POCKET Jumbles: VODKA Answer: When little Raymond Romano was born on 12-21-57, everybody — LOVED HIM

Furniture

SOFA: Buttery yellow with sage/rust floral design. 7.5’, three cushions, excellent cond. Purchased new 6 years ago, 1 mature female owner. No smokers or pets. Downsizing. Photos online. $325. 683-3219 SOFA: Elegant sofa with exquisite carved trim and claw arms, burgundy and cream tapestry fabric, 66” long x 45” wide, excellent condition, paid $1,500 from upscale store. Selling for $500. 460-0575

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SLTUCP

HOW LONG WILL THIS AD RUN?

General Merchandise

ELECTRIC BIKE: By “City Bike”. With charger, new condition. $800. 683-6813 ELECTRIC FIREPLACE Cherry wood color, 47.5” wide x 18” deep x 40” high. Great condition. Great use for a classy TV stand. $300. 460-0575. FIREWOOD: $160/ cord. Delivered. P.A. Joyce. 461-9701. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FOR THE MAN WHO HAS EVERYTHING Classic (Jokerz) pinball machine. Circa 1980s, good cond. $1,000. 683-8716.

Got a vehicle to sell? Nothing moves it faster than a guaranteed classified ad. You get a 3 line ad that runs daily until you sell your truck, car, boat or motorcycle.*

All for just $

19

*Up to 90 Days Maximum (Only $4.00 for each additional line).

GENERATOR: 4,600/ 5,000 watt propane generator. $400. 928-9404 GENERATOR: Coleman Powermate, 3.5 hp, 1850 watts, 68 lbs. $350. 928-3692. JACUZZI: 5 jets, 5 person, great condition. $2,800. 683-6393 MISC: Dona Marie pool table, 8’ solid oak, Italian slate, have all accessories, $2,500/obo. 36” convectional Gen-Air gas stove, stainless steel, $700/obo. Parrot cage, used for chinchilla with accessories, 44”x 37x24, $150/obo. Set of U2 20x7.5 and 5x114.3 with offset of -/+ plus 40 chrome wheels, $600/ obo. 206-496-4549

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Call today for the only classified ad you’ll ever need. CALL 452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PROPERTY

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Call 452-8435 • classified@peninsuladailynews.com *COMMERCIAL VEHICLES NOT INCLUDED IN THIS SPECIAL

02863

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

12/22/11

3/2, updated, 1768 sf, plus basement, water view, garage/ shop/storage. $1,100 1st, last, deposit. 808-3721.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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General Merchandise

MISC: 16 cf upright freezer, excellent condition, $150. Treadmill, excellent condition, $125. 457-4379 MISC: 6-wheeled Jazzy electric scooter, $150. New 4wheeled walker, $100. Electric bed, $50. 457-7605 or 360-384-1592 MISC: Elliptical trainer, Life Gear, leg/arm and aerobic exercise, $100. Body by Jake + abs, back, etc., $85. Executive chair, high back, adjustable, leather, $100. All items like new. 681-4284. MISC: Freezer, small upright, 5 cf, Kemmore, excellent condition, $50. Juicer, excellent condition, $25. Patio table with 4 chairs, aluminum, $50. 683-1143.

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General Merchandise

MISC: Table saw, excellent condition, $400. Teen bicycle, $50. 683-8669. MISC: Tires, 245/7017 10 ply, new cond., $500. Antique woman’s bike, 3 spd, $300. Gas stove, new, $1,200, asking $600. 452-5803. Mobility Scooter 3-wheel, Go-Go Elite traveler. $300. 582-0749 POWER CHAIR Jazzy 6 power chair. Excellent condition, good batteries. $600/obo. 670-1541. RAINIER YERT: 30’, 2008 Eagle Model, insulated, 6 windows, platform included. $14,000. Natalia 360-774-1445

General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: Mixed load. $200. 477-8832 SEWING MACHINE Montgomery Ward convertible bed sewing machine. Model UHT J 1414 in wood cabinet. Both excellent condition. Includes all parts and manual. Recently serviced. Used very little. $140. Susan 460-0575 STOVES: 710 Earthstove, 3 spd fan. Fireplace insert, 3 spd fan. Turbo fire pellet stove. $400/obo each. Washington State approved. UL. Listed. 360-670-3739.

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General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: $200 cord. 797-1414. UTILITY TRAILER ‘03 Eagle, 6.5’x13’ deck with side boards, ramps, load on all sides, hauls 3 quads, new tires. $950. 360-640-0320 UTILITY TRAILER 13’x5’, single axle, flat bed, will finish the sideboards if desired. $500. 460-0262, 681-0940 WANTED Riding lawn mowers, running or not. 206-940-1849.

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Home Electronics

COMPUTERS/GEAR Flat panels from $25. Laptops from $125. Broadband routers, $21. Kid’s computers from $30. Parts galore! 683-9394.

74

Home Electronics

iPAD 2: 16GB, white color, compatible WiFi and blue tooth, original pkg, unopened from Apple. Model A1395. $475. 683-7072. PC: Vaio, 2.4 ghz, 1 gig ram, VID card, mouse, speakers, anti-viral update. Never used. $150. 417-0111, 417-1693

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75

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

76

Musical

GUITAR: Fender, 12 string, dreadnought acoustic. $300 cash. 460-3986 GUITAR: Very rare Fender Stratocaster, 30th Anniversary #199 of only 250 made. $800. 452-1254 or 460-9466 PIANO: Upright. Werner, great shape, $600. 565-6609.

Musical

DRUM SET: Pearl Export, 5 piece, all hardware, cymbals and throne. $500. 457-7158 ELECTRIC DRUMS Yamaha DTXpress IV Special V2 Electronic Drum Set. This a nearly new kit in perfect working order. Includes all pads, head, and Tama bass pedal. Asking $950. 360-460-0405

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

76

Sporting Goods

4 Sale: Rifle: HighStandard AR15, .223/Nato. 16” chrome H-barrel,6 pos. stock, Bayonet lug, mil spec comp., 30 rd mag, made in USA to Colt specs, Factory Warranty, New in Box. $825. 360-683-7716

79

Sporting Goods

GUNS: Browning BLR 7mm-08, $600 firm. Sturm Ruger Bearcat, 22 LR, $375 firm. Both mint condition. 775-4838. KAYAKS: (2) Hobie Quest. Includes, wheels, life jackets, wet suits, paddles, car rack. $1,600. 460-0476 POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746.

REMODELING? BUILDING A NEW HOME? Consider this: two sided see-thru propane fireplace. Enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once. New in crate. Regency Panorama P121. $1,300 - great price! Compare online! 460-0575.

Desktop Computer Dell Optiplex GX280. Windows XP Pro. 19” Flat Panel Monitor. Stereo speakers and subwoofer. Includes keyboard and mouse. Excellent condition. $195 Call 460-0405.

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

PAINTING

REPAIR

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Lund Fencing

Bob’s Tractor Service Bob’s

Window Washing

FOX PAINTING

B&B Sharpening & Repair

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

AUTOMATIC: 40 cal, Heckler Koch. $550. 460-0658.

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 I

BUY gold 10% below spot and silver at spot. 809-0839.

WANTED: Old fishing reels, working or not. Cash. 582-9700. WANTED: Used chainsaw chain grinder. 360-461-7506

Walther PPK/S 380 ACP Collector James Bond by Interarms stainless w/box & 2 mags, Superb cond., manual and 2 mags $550. 360-477-0321

TOOLS: Like new Forney elec. welder, 225 amp ac/150 amp dc, w/face shield, chip hammer, 2 boxes of electrodes, $250/obo. Clean wheel weight metal in 1 lb ingots, $1.50/lb. 5th wheel trailer hitch w/canvas cover, $50. New tire chains, 13”, 14”, 15”, $20/obo. 797-1900, 460-6776

MISC: Lumber rack, new Surefit, fits F250, $220. Handheld marine VHS radio, $125. Garmmand 45 GPS, $80. 360-796-4502

82

Wanted To Buy

77

Bargain Box

CHRISTMAS TREE 7.5’, white lights, used once. $15. 683-3434

79

Wanted To Buy

ANTIQUES WANTED Old postcards and bottles. 460-2791.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

A Winter Lap Warmer Cats and kittens available for adoption. $85. PFOA 452-0414

B7

Pets

BOXER PUPPIES CKC, only 2 left so hurry. Both females, one brindle, one fawn. $450. 360-460-7858 or 360-460-5485 Cocker Spaniel Puppy DOB 6/10/11. AKC registered. Chocolate and white. Sweet disposition. Fully potty trained. Allergies force sale. $500/obo. Thank you. 360-477-7703. EIGHT WEEK OLD CHOCOLATE LABRADOODLES Beautiful, precious puppies ready to go to loving homes. Have had first shots and vet visit. Mom is Choc. Lab, dad is Choc. Stand. Poodle (both AKC reg.) which results in less shedding! Raised in a loving home with other dogs and lots of kids! 4 females, 4 males, asking $650, can keep until Christmas. 301448-0898 cell. 4570637 home.

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

1C560600

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Moss Prevention

461-4609

HANDYMAN

JP

s Handyman Services

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

CCLEACHC*892QQ

1C5141421

Custom Building • Remodeling Site Work Licensed, Bonded & Insured

(360) 683-8332

Reg#FINIST*932D0

tmccurdy@olypen.com

AIR DUCT CLEANING

REPAIR/REMODEL Call NOW To Advertise

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COLUMC*955KD

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

155120082

1B5140971

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR – river1966@msn.com Lic# DELUNE*933QT

EXCAVATING

360/460•9824

LANDSCAPING

MOLE/PRUNING

Thor’s Organ Repair 24 Years Experience ALL MAKES

683-8328 PA & PT

Thor’s Antique Radio

360 417-2908

830-741-1677 Or Register Online www.translationmarks.com

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

CARPER*044JA

#JKDIRKD942NG

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Quality cleaning at a discount price

ADVERTISE DAILY FOR AS LITTLE AS

$2500 PER ROOM

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS!

2 rm. minimum

(Heavy soil may require extra charge).

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right Glen Spear, Owner

155121476

Windows & Doors Concrete

1 1 1 2 2 2

Steam cleaned & deodorized, 4 rm.& free hallway, up to 800 sq.ft.

Done Right Home Repair Remodels Handicap Access Painting

RATES AND SIZES:

$9900 WHOLE HOUSE SPECIAL

HOME REPAIR

Lic#DONERRH943NA

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING Sofa 7' $5500 Recliner $3500 Love Seat $4500

360-457-6039

1BSPEC_Carp1111

Enjoy Interactive Sessions! Improve Your Conversation Skills, Vicabulary And Perfect Pronunciation In Spanish

LIC

Steam cleaned & deodorized,

1C5141426

Radios Repaired Right Since 1973. Repairs & Restorations Free Estimates F.C.C. Licensed

Expert Pruning

contact@jkdirtworks.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

CARPET

195133545

Mole Control

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

X X X X X X

1” 2” 3” 1” 2” 3”

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON advertise call PENINSULA To360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714 DAILY NEWS

1C562762

ORGAN/RADIO REPAIR

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

025073138

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Small Jobs A Specialty

72289323

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 23 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

DIRT WORK

Contr#KENNER1951P8

Full 6 Month Warranty

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

1A5136085

Licensed – Bonded – Insured

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

S EM PER R F I T R EE E S ER VIC E

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

At The Historic Dungeness Schoolhouse 2781 Towne Road, Sequim

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

TREE SERVICE

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Ongoing Conversation Classes

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

Lena Washke

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Tues & Thurs 5:00 pm To 7:00 pm & 7:00 pm To 9:00 pm

Quality Work

Accounting Services, Inc.

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

Professional Instruction For Adults & Teenagers

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

(360) 477-1805

APPLIANCES

Classes Start Tuesday January 3, 2012

Columbus Construction

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

aleach1066@gmail.com 360.612.2062 - Sequim

SPANISH CLASSES

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

1C562759

LEACH CONTRACTING

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

1C562743

CONTRACTING

Call NOW To Advertise

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

86313195

115108502

JPSHAHS92BE

452-9355

PAINTING

John Pruss 360 808-6844

333A E. 1st St. • PA

360 Lic#buenavs90818

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Tractors Gas & Diesel Small Engines & Equipment

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper 1C562786

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

457-6582 (360) 808-0439 (360)

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

9C5066307

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

93313234

76289935

#LUNDFF*962K7

Pressure Washing

1C5141426

Chad Lund

452-0755 775-6473

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Painting & Pressure Washing 1C562789

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Small jobs is what I do!

BAGPIPER


B8

Classified

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

And don’t forget: Breaking Local News 24/7

2005 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB Z71 SLE 4X4

2005 BUICK LACROSSE SEDAN

2004 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB 4X4 SLT

2001 MERCEDES-BENZ E-430 AWD SEDAN

5.3L VORTEC V8, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL ZONE AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $22,377! ONLY 58K MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY TO SAVE SOME SERIOUS BUCKS ON YOUR NEXT TRUCK!

3.8L SERIES III V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, ONSTAR, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $13,015! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! 1 OWNER! ONLY 29K MILES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.7L V8, 5 SPD MAN, ALLOYS, NEW TIRES, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $12,240! CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 81K MILES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.3L V8, AUTO, 4MATIC AWD, 20” RIMS, TINTED WINDOWS, SUNROOF, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS, SEATS & HEADRESTS, LEATHER, DUAL ZONE CLIM CTRL, AC, CRUISE, TILT, 6 DISC CD CHANGER, 8 AIRBAGS, KBB OF $15,609! EXTRA CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 79K MILES! GOOD MECHANICAL COND! LOADED W/OPTIONS! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2005 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE

2003 CHEVROLET S10 ZR5 CREW CAB 4X4

2001 TOYOTA SEQUOIA LIMITED 4X4

2000 FORD RANGER XLT 4DR 4X4 OFF-ROAD

3.3L V6, AUTO, LOADED! WHITE IN EXCEL COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PWR SEAT, DUAL SLIDING DRS, CD, DUAL AIRBAGS, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, DUAL CLIMATE, REAR AC, AFTERMARKET 16” ALLOYS W/70% RUBBER! GREAT LITTLE VAN @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

82K ORIG MILES! 4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, LOADED! BLACK IN GREAT COND W/BLACK LEATHER IN EXCEL SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEATS, CD, CRUISE, TILT, PRIV GLASS, AC, DUAL AIRBAGS, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, DIAMOND PLATE TOOLBOX & BED CAPS, ALLOYS, VERY NICE S10 @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.7L I-FORCE V8, AUTO, LOADED! DK MET GREEN IN GREAT COND W/GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEATS, MOONROOF, 6 DISC CD W/ JBL SOUND, VHS ENTERTAINMENT, 3RD SEAT, REAR AC, CRUISE, TILT, SIDE AIRBAGS, TINT, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, CHROME 17” WHLS! LOCAL TRADE! VERY NICE SEQUOIA @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

4.0L V6, 5 SPD MAN, BLUE MET IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, PIONEER CD, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, AC, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, 17” POLISHED ALUM AMERICAN RACING WHLS, PRIV GLASS, TOW PKG, 2 OWNERS! CLEAN LITTLE RANGER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

$16,995

GRAY MOTORS

$6,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$9,995

GRAY MOTORS

$9,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$9,995

GRAY MOTORS

$8,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$7,995

GRAY MOTORS

$5,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

1995 FORD F350 XL CREWCAB LB 2WD

2004 FORD F350 XLT 4X4 SUPERDUTY CREWCAB LB DUALLY

2002 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN ES AWD

1997 TOYOTA TERCEL COUPE

69K ORIG MILES! 1 OWNER! 7.5L (460CI) V8, AUTO, BLUE IN GREAT COND W/BLUE CLOTH/VINYL IN GREAT SHAPE! CASS ST, RUNNING BOARDS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, MATCHING CANOPY 16” ALLOYS, FRT CAPTAIN’S CHAIRS, TOW PKG, EXTREMELY LOW MILEAGE F-SERIES @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

103K ORIG MILES! 6.0L POWERSTROKE TURBO DIESEL V8, 6 SPD MAN, WHITE IN EXCEL COND W/TAN CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PIONEER TOUCH SCREEN HEAD UNIT, CRUISE, TILT, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, RUNNING BOARDS, ALLOYS, TOW PKG, NO 5TH WHL OR GOOSENECK! $6,400 BELOW KBB @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

3.8L V6, AUTO, LOADED! DK MET BLUE IN GREAT COND W/GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEATS, DUAL PWR SLIDING DRS, 4 DISC CD CHANGER, CRUISE, TILT W/CTRLS, QUADS, 3RD SEAT, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, PREM ALLOYS W/ 75% RUBBER! A TON OF VAN @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

1 OWNER! 1.5L 4 CYL, 5 SPD MAN, RED IN GREAT SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH IN GOOD COND! PIONEER CD, DUAL AIRBAGS, REAR SPOILER, ALLOYS, 35+ MPG! GREAT LITTLE FUEL SIPPING TOYOTA @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

$4,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$18,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$6,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

$2,795

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-417-3541 TODAY for more information

1C563667

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

Taurus needs voltage test Dear Doctor: My 2002 Ford Taurus had trouble with some interior lights, electric windows and the moonroof not functioning after starting. After driving a few minutes everything was normal. Then it had additional trouble of not starting. After sitting for two days, it started and ran fine. I replaced the Gem box with an identical-numbered one and everything was fine. Now, it won’t start again. I replaced the Gem box again, but the problem persists. Is there something powering the Gem box that needs replacing? Bob Dear Bob: The Gem module (aka body computer or body module) handles a lot of driver inputs. Before replacing any module, check for trouble fault codes and perform a voltage test at all inputs and outputs. If I were working on this car, I would check all the basic power and grounds. Next, would be research on our Identifix website to view all other vehicles with similar problems. Alldata has all the wire

82

Pets

92

THE AUTO DOC Junior Damato

PEKINGESE 1 female, 4 mo. Adorable. $300. 452-9553 or 360-461-6855 POODLES: Offering AKC Poodles, males and females in a variety of colors (Parti’s and solids), sizes and ages. Rehoming fee set at $150$700. For more information and pictures: 360-452-2579

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

PUPPIES: Black Lab mixed breed. $50. 452-5290 PUPPIES: Blue/Red Heelers, purebred, no papers. 5 weeks old. $100 each. 360-796-4236 or 360-821-1484 PUPPIES: Toy Poodles, CKC registered. 1st litter: 2 apricot females, ready 12/24. 2nd litter 1 sable, 1 apricot, and 1 brown, all males, ready 1/6. $500 ea. 477-8349 SNAKES: Corn snake and Ball Python. $75 each or $100 w/cage. $150 for both w/cages. Beautiful, very tame, good feeders. 565-1284 or 565-6954

83

Farm Animals

HAY: Local, no rain, barn stored. $4.50 bale, delivery available. 683-7965. SADDLE: Western, Big Horn. 16” seat, good condition. $300. 683-9274.

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE TRAILER: ‘73 Miley 2 star. Good shape. $1,000. 582-9006 HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight load. $2,000. 360-808-2295 HORSE: 3 yrs., registered AQHA, ready to start. $375. Wililng to deal with 4-H’er 360-963-2719 or 360-640-2325 TO GOOD HOME Cute little mini horse. Female, 8 yrs old. Adorable and good mannered. Christmas gift? $100/obo. 457-6584

EXCAVATOR: Runs great! $8000. Call 360-928-0273 for details. PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071. UTILITY TRAILER 16’x5’, dual axle. Good condition. $1,350. 460-4488.

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 9, eves. Capt. Sanders. 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350 BAYLINER: ‘87 3450 Tri-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 683-5099. BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 15’ custom aluminum, with motor and trailer. $3,500. 461-7506. CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 1973 Larson 16’ Shark, open bow. New cushion and floor board, with Calkins roller trailer. $950/obo. 1984 Johnson 25 hp short shaft, good cond., $650/obo. 461-7979. DURABOAT: ‘08 14’ aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, trailer. $1,500. 360-580-1741 DUROBOAT: 12’. 15 and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calkins trailer. $1,500. 683-6748. GLASPLY: 21’ boat and trailer, BMW B220 Inboard, brand new Honda 15 hp 4 stroke kicker. $10,000 or make offer. 452-4338. MISC: 18 hp Evinrude, $350/obo. 6 hp Chrysler, $250. Phone 457-9650.

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

COMPRESSOR: ‘79 tow behind. $2,000. 457-8102

94

Motorcycles

SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891

94

Motorcycles

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/ obo. 460-9556.

HONDA: ‘01 XR50R. Low hr, helmet $800 452-9194, 452-6160

5TH WHEEL: ‘90 28’ Kit. Average cond. $3,500/obo. 360-683-6131

HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. 7K miles. $4,700. 504-2599. HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953.

CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615.

HONDA: ‘03 XR50. Low hrs, must see! $650. 417-3978.

DODGE: ‘68 200 pickup. Camper, good hunting/camping rig. $2,000. 797-1508.

HONDA: ‘05 CR85R. Low hours, never raced. $1,500/trade. 360-460-6148 HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $950. 385-0096. HONDA: ‘81 Goldwing. $1,200. 360-963-2659 HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. Runs good, looks fair. $745. 683-9071 HONDA: ‘83 Ascot. $1,500. 360-963-2659

HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘94 XLR. 600 cc, hardly used, good cond. $1,600. 452-5412 HONDA: Fat-Cat. New battery, new oil, fresh tune up, carburator rebuilt, rack to haul out your deer. $1,600 cash 683-8263

MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Brave. Low mi., always garaged, must see/ Vortec 8.1, $35,000. 683-4912 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Cat, Allison. Will take 20’-24’ cargo trailer or Ford 12’ cube van part trade. $15,000/obo. 460-6979. MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. MOTORHOME: Southwind by Fleetwood and a Honda Accord tow car, a package deal. Will not separate. We are the original owners. $18,500 COD. Less than the cost of a new car! Call 360-681-0144 TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. No slide, exc. cond. $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514

HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $950. 460-1377.

TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used $12,000/ obo. 417-0549.

QUAD: ‘87 Honda TRX 125. W/trailer. $1,495/obo. 681-6300

TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182, 452-6932

QUAD: Suzuki 250 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Very nice, Porta-Potty, micro. $9,500. 683-5871.

YAMAHA: ‘04 Raptor 660 limited edition, black. Brand new clutch, carrier baring in back axel, extra header and pipe. aluminum wheels and meaty tires. this a great looking quad not to mention fast. I’m asking $2,800. Great price. 360-670-6366

TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032

YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 700cc. Green Rhino, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165.

TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $5,900. 681-7381

YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st $3,100 cash. Street/Trail. 670-2562

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, great storage. $20,000. 477-7957

5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210

29’

TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 WANTED: Award travel trailer. 683-8810

96

DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519. HARLEY DAVIDSON 1995 Fat Boy. All custom, new tires, chrome with a Jim’s Drag motor with blower. Must see. $10,900 452-2275

95

HONDA: ‘01 XR 250. Low hrs., $1,500. 683-4761

SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 360-504-2623

SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347. 91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

Oil consumption

Dear Doctor: I own a 2005 Chevrolet Monte Carlo with 128,000 miles. It uses a quart of oil every 900 miles. The Washer engine runs great, but Dear should I have a valve job Doctor: done to correct the oil Are there differences usage? Jay among all the various Dear Jay: Do not even windshield washer cleaners think about taking the I see in the auto parts engine apart. stores? If you do anything, just Some are more than change the oil and filter double the price than the lower-priced washer fluids. and start using high-mileage oil. This will cut down Mary on the oil consumption and Dear Mary: This is a give extra protection to the great question. engine. Yes, there are big differA lot of engines will use ences among the washer a quart of oil every 1,000 fluids, especially in the miles or so. The auto manSnow Belt and areas that ufacturers consider this a suffer from extreme cold normal condition. temperatures. The blue color fluid is Lines rot the most common and often the cheapest. The Dear Doctor: I own a good stuff is either orange 2003 Chevy Silverado with or purple. rotted brake lines. I conI have purchased a case tacted Chevrolet, and they of the orange color that said it is a wear item and contains Rain-X additive — my responsibility.

JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! 3 Chihuahua mix male puppies. 8 wks., 1 tan, 2 brown. Shots. $250 ea. 360-504-2140 LABRADOODLES 1/2 Lab, 1/2 Standard Poodle, black, born Oct. 1st shots, wormed, very sweet. $600. Will hold for Christmas. 360-259-6347

diagrams, pin numbers and wiring colors to help find the source of the problem.

that really does work. The original blue color, often-discounted washer fluid, is great for the summer months and in nonfreezing conditions.

Parts/ Accessories

97

I think it’s defective and should not have rotted out. My mechanic suggested replacing the lines with stainless steel lines. What are your thoughts? Stan Dear Stan: Brake lines and other metal lines, gas lines and transmission lines are also included in the rotting. GM is not alone with this problem. The reason for the rotted lines is simple: poor quality, cheap metal. I own a 2004 Silverado with 27,000 miles, and I had to replace all the brake lines and transmission lines at a cost of $1,600 at my shop. I was able to purchase some of the lines from GM, the others we made up. You do not have to use stainless steel. There is a metal line called coated bundy flex that is easy to work with and will not rot.

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $7,950. 360-477-6969

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $3,900. 460-8155. CHEV: ‘05 Colorado Ext Cab. 61,600 miles with Z71, Toyo A/t tires, bed liner, tool box, running boards. Interior options include Cruise, A/C, Tilt, power windows and doors, cd/mp3 player. $12,800. Call 460-3586 CHEV: ‘91 K5 Blazer. 93k, Immaculate. Loaded, ALL original, 350FI, Auto, 4x4, Adult Owned, non smoker, never off roaded. Build sheet, owner’s and shop manuals. Runs and Drives Like New. $10,750. 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘94 Silverado 2500. Good cond. $5,500. 683-4830. CHEV: ‘97 Blazer. Runs great. $3,150/ obo. 681-6300. FORD: ‘00 F150 Lariat Ext. cab. Fiberglass cover, 162K mi., 1 owner, new tires/battery. $8,000/obo. 452-2225 FORD: ‘00 Ranger XLT. 4x4 Off Road edition, 4.0 V6, 160K, extended cab, auto, tow, bedliner, clean. $5,950. 457-4363. FORD: ‘03 F150. 4WD 5.4L, 117K, leather CD, new Nokian tires, dark green/tan, very nice. $12,500. Curt at 460-8997.

FORD: ‘08 Super Duty F350 4x4 crew cab. 6.4L V-8 diesel King Ranch. 16K miles, 20K in options. Exc. cond., never smoked in. Dealer maintained. Power Glide removable 5th wheel hitch. $39,900. Ron at 360-477-9659 FORD: 1989 F250 4WD 460, canopy. 101K mi. $3,000. 808-5182, 452-6932 FORD: ‘87 F250. 4x4 standard, 6.9 liter diesel. $3,200. 457-5649

ENGINE: ‘87 Subaru engine. $150. 460-0262

FORD: ‘90 Bronco Eddie Bauer. EFI 5.8, OD, air, CD, clean, straight, runs excel. $2,900. 808-0153.

97

FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘03 SILVERADO K2500 HD CREW CAB 4X4 6.0 liter Vortec V8, auto, premium wheels, oversized BFGoodrich All-Terrain tires, spray-in bedliner, privacy glass, tilt, air conditioning, Pioneer CD player, upgraded door speakers, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,405! Clean inside and out! Only 95,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $11,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD: ‘99 F-150 XLT 4X4 Triton. 5.4L 110K Mi. Moving! MUST SELL. $6,500/ obo. GREAT DEAL! 206-300-9007 JEEP ‘07 LIBERTY SPORT 3.7 liter V6, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, luggage rack, privacy glass, only 39,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $14,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

97

4 Wheel Drive

B9

Car of the Week

2012 Kia Soul Plus BASE PRICE: $13,900 base with manual; $15,700 for base with automatic; $16,300 for Soul Plus manual; $17,300 for Soul Plus automatic. PRICE AS TESTED: $19,845. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, five-passenger, small wagon. ENGINE: 2-liter, double overhead cam, four-cylinder engine with CVVT. MILEAGE: 26 mpg (city), 34 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 162.2 inches. WHEELBASE: 100.4 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 2,778 pounds. BUILT AT: South Korea. OPTIONS: Audio upgrade package (includes UVO infotainment system, rear camera, Infinity audio system, subwoofer and speaker lamps) $900; power sunroof and front fog lights $800; carpeted floor mats $95. DESTINATION CHARGE: $750. The Associated Press

98

Pickups/Vans

99

Cars

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘79 1 ton service truck, 88K, 4 sp, 350, 7K Onan generator, 3 air tanks, 110 outlets, etc. $3,980. 360-302-5027

CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $10,500. 452-7377.

JAGUAR: XJS-V12. Excellent cond., $9,600. 775-5827.

CHEV: ‘80 Chevette. $500. 460-7131.

GMC: ‘84 Jimmy 4x4. $500. 460-9776.

CHEV: ‘95 Lumina minivan. V6, 7 pass. $2,000. 457-1053.

GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. Rebuilt 4.3 Vortec engine, fully loaded, 181K, good condition. $3,500/obo. 477-4838

CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170.

KIA: ‘03 Spectra GSX. Hatchback, auto, 131K, new trans in 6/11, runs great, maint. records avail. $3,500/obo. 417-9040

CHRYSLER: ‘05 Town and Country LTD. 1 owner, great cond. 73,200 miles. $10,500. 683-1957.

CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. Reduced $3,000. 808-3374.

Mechanic’s special Nissan ‘99 Sentra GXE. 109K. $1,500. Needs minor work. 452-7737

FORD ‘06 E-350 SUPERDUTY 15’ BOX VAN 5.4 liter V8, auto, air, tilt, cruise, only 28,000 miles, 15’ fiberglass box, roll up door, tow package, dual rear wheels, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, 11,500 lb GVW, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, spotless Carfax report, near new condition! $14,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEV: ‘98 Malibu. Ex. cond., needs motor. $450. 457-7671.

MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,750/obo. 4575500.

FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323.

JEEP ‘99 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4 4.0 liter Inline-6, auto, Selec-Trac, alloy wheels, Yakima roof rack, tow package, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and seats, cruise, tilt, air, CD/ cassette stereo, Infinity Sound, information center, dual front airbags. Immaculate condition inside and out! Popular Selec-Trac and 4.0 liter options! Nice roof rack! Get ready for winter in a 4X4 Jeep! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com JEEP: ‘98 Wrangler Sport. 89K hwy. mi. $7,900. 360-580-1741 MERCURY ‘07 MARINER PREMIER EDITION 3.0 liter V6, auto, air, all wheel drive, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD with Audiophile audio, power windows, locks and seats, full leather, toasty heated front seats, keyless entry, back-up sensor, fog lamps, side airbags, privacy glass, 59,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com NISSAN ‘04 XTERRA SE SPORT UTILITY 4X4 3.3 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, roof rack, privacy glass, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Low miles! Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Get ready for winter with a Nissan 4x4! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 TOYOTA: ‘79 Land Cruiser. Mil-spec inline 6, 67K, barn doors w/jump seats. $5,700. 670-1146.

FORD 1996 F150 REGULAR CAB 4.9 liter (300) Inline 6 cylinder, 5 speed manual trans, dual fuel tanks, good rubber, bedliner, tow package, vinyl flooring, air. Only 74,000 miles! Last year of the legendary 300 Inline 6! You won’t find one nicer than this! Like new! Stop by gray motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘82 Windsor F350 Truck. With hydraulic crane/ winch. Rebuilt almost everything $3,000. 360-460-5483 FORD: ‘85 F150. Cherry, 61K original miles, turn key and start, runs great. $4,250. 928-2181. FORD: ‘92 E250 van. Ladder rack, interior racks, good runner. $1,800. 460-9257. FORD: ‘92 Econo 150 van work truck, 185K, runs god. $2,100. 452-9363. GMC: ‘00 3500 utility truck. 6.5 liter diesel, 151K mi., 4 studded tires, good condition. $7,800. 683-3425. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey EX. Runs great, 212K $3,900. 385-2012. HONDA: ‘95 Accord. Runs excellent, very clean, 48K, 4 cylinder. $4,000. 360-797-3865 TOYOTA: ‘84 work truck. 22R Long bed/canopy. $875. 417-8046

99

Cars

TOYOTA: ‘87 4-Runner 4x4. As is. $1,800. 477-0577. TOYOTA: ‘94 4-Runner. Sunroof, lifted, big tires, power windows and seats, leather interior, good shape. $4,500. 452-9693

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘06 Silverado 4x4 p/u, 3/4T. Ex cab, 6L V8 <36k mi. Lots of extras. Ex cond. $21,500. 360-460-8285

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiful, must see. $6,800. 681-3093.

CHRYSLER ‘01 PT CRUISER LTD EDITION 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, AM/FM CD and cassette, leather interior, power sunroof, roof rack, alloy wheels, remote entry and more! VIN583034. Exp. 12-24-11. $4,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance in House* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com COLLECTORS: Olds Cutlass 442 1986, sharp lines, new int. $5,500. 683-8332. DODGE: ‘07 Caravan Town & County LX. Low mi., excellent condition. $10,600 firm. 457-8129. FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. 360-808-1242. FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX convertible. 5.0 auto, 71K mi., excellent condition. $3,800. 928-0213.

FORD: ‘92 Taurus GL. V6, 139,000 miles. Nearly new tires and new battery. Good cond. $1,700/obo. Call 360-808-2523. FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858 HONDA: ‘00 EK Hatch. New swap, B18C type R suspension, yellow HID lights, Apexi exhaust, intake, 118K miles. $5,500. 452-9693, 461-6506

MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. MG: ‘65 Midget. 85,672 orig. mi., mostly orig. interior. In running cond. $4,800. 417-2606. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. MITSUBISHI: ‘08 Convertible Spyder Eclipse. Must sell, sacrifice, beautiful dream car, low mi. First reasonalbe offer takes it. $14,000, worth much more. 360-797-3892 PONTIAC ‘04 VIBE 4 cylinder, auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows, locks and mirrors, AM/FM CD, power sunroof, alloy wheels, remote entry and more! Made by Toyota! VIN422591. Exp. 12-24-11. $6,995 Dave Barnier *We Finance in House* Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero. 91K miles, well taken care of. Great Christmas gift! Collector’s item! Good mpg! $3,000. 775-9754 PONTIAC: ‘98 Sunfire. Auto, 4 dr, clean, well maintained, red, 26-30 mpg. $2,750/ obo. 360-808-5800. STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed flat head 6 cylinder engine, all original, excellent condition. $12,000/ obo. 683-8810. STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963

HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. HYUNDAI: ‘09 Sonata Limited. Black beauty, all the options plus tinted windows and navigation system, extra set of wheels and tires. $17,800. 477-3191. JAGUAR: ‘90 XJS Coupe. Black, tan int., only 42K mi., car is like brand new in/out, mechanically. $11,750 Call John, Euro Auto Works 683-3876. KIA ‘11 SOUL+ Economical 2.0 liter 4 cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD/MP3 and Sirius, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, alloy wheels, 29,000 balance of factory 5/60 warranty, spotless Carfax report. Just reduced $1,000. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

SUBARU: ‘06. 40,000 miles. Excellent condition inside and out. Silver. Factory maintenance current. New tires. 28.5 mpg on most recent trip. KBB is $17,315. Private party. $16,215. Please call 360-457-1215 TOYOTA: ‘08 Scion XB. Excellent, dark blue, extras $18,000/ obo. 928-3669. VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,200. 681-7381. VW: ‘67 Red Classic. Good engine and body, exc. interior, new tires. $6,500/obo. 461-4025 VW: ‘74 Sunbug Special Edition gold. $2,400. 683-7397. VW: ‘88 Fox. As is. Needs some electrical work. $500/obo. 457-0277


B10

WeatherNorthwest

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

High 41

Low 28

45/35

43/34

44/31

41/31

Fog in the a.m.; some sun, then clouds.

Cloudy and cold; late-night rain.

Cloudy with a little rain.

More clouds than sun.

Cloudy with a chance of rain.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain.

The Peninsula A dome of high pressure will lose its grip on the region today as a storm system approaches from the Pacific. Ahead of the system, areas of freezing fog in the morning will give way to a few breaks of sunshine throughout the day. Periods of rain will push into Neah Bay Port the Peninsula overnight with a few snow showers in the 46/38 Townsend highest elevations of the Olympic Mountains. Periods of Port Angeles 43/35 rain will last into Friday, but temperatures will be warm 41/28 enough to keep the precipitation warm. Conditions will Sequim dry out for the start of the holiday weekend.

Victoria 42/32

44/34

Forks 47/34

Olympia 43/30

Seattle 42/29

Spokane 25/10

Yakima Kennewick 32/15 30/13

Temperatures are todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highs and tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lows.

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š 2011

Marine Forecast Areas of fog in the morning; otherwise, some sun giving way to clouds today. Wind east-northeast 8-16 knots. Waves 1-3 feet. Visibility under a mile. Considerable clouds tonight with a bit of rain late. Wind north 4-8 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. Cloudy tomorrow with a little rain. Wind west-southwest 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times. TABLE Location High Tide LaPush

9:31 a.m. 11:05 p.m. Port Angeles 1:55 a.m. 10:48 a.m. Port Townsend 3:40 a.m. 12:33 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:01 a.m. 11:54 a.m.

TODAY Ht 9.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

TOMORROW

Low Tide 3:29 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 5:52 a.m. 6:45 p.m. 7:06 a.m. 7:59 p.m. 6:59 a.m. 7:52 p.m.

Thursday, December 22, 2011 Seattle 42/29

Billings 32/17 Minneapolis 26/13 San Francisco 56/37

Ht

High Tide

Ht

2.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -0.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -1.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

10:26 a.m. ----2:41 a.m. 11:36 a.m. 4:26 a.m. 1:21 p.m. 3:47 a.m. 12:42 p.m.

9.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; --7.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Low Tide 4:27 a.m. 5:21 p.m. 6:56 a.m. 7:30 p.m. 8:10 a.m. 8:44 p.m. 8:03 a.m. 8:37 p.m.

SATURDAY Ht

High Tide Ht

2.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -1.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

12:01 a.m. 11:19 a.m. 3:23 a.m. 12:27 p.m. 5:08 a.m. 2:12 p.m. 4:29 a.m. 1:33 p.m.

7.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Low Tide Ht 5:22 a.m. 6:09 p.m. 7:55 a.m. 8:14 p.m. 9:09 a.m. 9:28 p.m. 9:02 a.m. 9:21 p.m.

2.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -1.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -2.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Dec 31

Jan 8

Last

Jan 16

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 59 46 r Baghdad 71 51 pc Beijing 34 21 s Brussels 48 46 c Cairo 65 48 s Calgary 35 26 s Edmonton 29 21 s Hong Kong 64 53 s Jerusalem 62 44 s Johannesburg 76 55 t Kabul 48 18 s London 52 46 pc Mexico City 73 43 s Montreal 37 25 pc Moscow 32 20 sn New Delhi 76 41 s Paris 51 45 c Rio de Janeiro 90 75 s Rome 52 41 s Stockholm 34 30 c Sydney 74 65 t Tokyo 56 38 pc Toronto 40 21 pc Vancouver 40 35 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

$IIRUGDEOH'HQWXUHV$QG,PSODQWV 7R/RRN$QG(DW<RXU%HVW

El Paso 51/31

Atlanta 73/50

Fronts Cold

Miami 81/71

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

0s

National Cities Today City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 38 23 49 73 57 58 37 32 28 30 55 46 75 22 40 48 27 45 61 20 32 44 41 4 24 80 67 39

Lo 21 14 31 50 46 42 18 17 8 17 37 31 60 5 26 34 8 30 39 1 17 28 28 -12 6 70 45 34

W sn c pc t pc pc s s pc s pc c c sn sf r s pc pc sn sf c pc c s s r sn

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 36 52 53 65 81 38 26 56 72 56 47 28 82 62 57 60 44 72 34 56 46 26 68 63 56 28 24 60

Lo 18 37 37 43 71 22 13 38 48 42 27 14 61 38 44 38 27 59 11 24 29 10 41 44 37 12 9 46

W sf pc r s s sf pc r r pc pc sf pc s pc pc pc c s s c c pc s s c s pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 83 at Fort Myers, FL

Low: -2 at Alamosa, CO

:K\VNLSIRRGV\RXORYHRU IHHOHPEDUUDVVHGWRVPLOH" )5((HYDOXDWLRQ&DOOWRGD\

*UHJ%DUU\''6

1C564290

4XDOLW\PDNHVDELJGLIIHUHQFHLQWKHORRNVÂżWFRPIRUWDQG IXQFWLRQ\RXÂśOOH[SHULHQFH:HKHOS\RXDIIRUGWKHEHVW\RXU EXGJHWDOORZV6HHRQHSUDFWLWLRQHUSD\RQHSULFHIRU\RXU SHUVRQDOL]HGWUHDWPHQWÂąSUHSDUDWLRQÂżWWLQJDQGIROORZXSV

Washington 60/46

Houston 67/45

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Moon Phases Full

New York 56/42

Kansas City 36/18

Sunset today ................... 4:23 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:02 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 5:51 a.m. Moonset today ................. 2:38 p.m.

First

Detroit 44/28 Chicago 40/26

Denver 20/1

Los Angeles 65/43

Sun & Moon

Dec 24

Everett 41/28

Shown is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather.

TIDE

National Forecast

-10s -0s

Bellingham 40/23 Aberdeen 48/33

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 44 29 0.00 17.24 Forks* 48 41 0.05 111.38 Seattle 44 33 0.00 34.41 Sequim 47 33 0.00 16.32 Hoquiam 43 31 0.00 64.36 Victoria 43 27 0.00 30.03 P. Townsend 44 41 0.00 16.55 *Data from Tuesday

New

Port Ludlow 43/34

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

 

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Hospital guild presents $25,000 to Clallam County Fire District 3 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Sequim Dungeness Hospital Guild has given $25,000 to Clallam County Fire District No. 3. The guild presented the check to Chief Steve Vogel at a recent luncheon attended by about 60 members along with the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety officer, Bryan Swanberg; Olympic Medical Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CEO, Eric Lewis; and Rose Gibbs, director of the Dungeness Health and Wellness Clinic. The luncheon was in appreciation of the volunteers who staff the guildâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thrift shop at Second and Bell streets in Sequim.

Solution to Puzzle on A7 M A K E

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O A M R I A T T Z E A A N R I P E S S R O I V E D R U R N A E T D E

Angeles (360-457-7997)

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Gathering at a recent Sequim Dungeness Hospital Guild luncheon are, from left, Clallam County Fire District No. 3 Chief Steve Vogel and District Safety Officer Bryan Swanberg with guild President Jean Janis and members Connie Hixon, Addie Curtis and Sue Tondreau. The guild presented the district with a donation of $25,000, and the district gave the guild a wooden plaque. The fire district also sur- ax on it for the $600,000 prised guild members by total given by the guild as of presenting them with a 2011 to the fire district. The Peninsula Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wooden plaque with a silver

(360-385-1089) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl With the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;? (R)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugoâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x2013;  Uptown Theatre,

Port Townsend

$800 Flat Fee 2 Wills, 2 Healthcare Directives & 2 Power of Attorneys

Chorus provided Christmas entertainment and Sunny Farms contributed 7 pounds of turkey for the event.

Olympic Peninsula Law OfďŹ ces, LLC in Port Ludlow Free initial consultation by phone. Call today (360)437-4172 Amanda Wilson, Esq. Estate Planning Attorney Home Visits

enjoy luxurious, pillowy, softness without sacrificing support

(360-385-3883) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadowsâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13)

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING A special meeting of the Port Commission of the Port of Port Angeles is called for Wednesday, January 4, 2012, beginning at 9:30 AM at the Port Administration Building, 338 West First Street, Port Angeles, WA. The meeting concerns the Commissioner Candidate Selection Process and is scheduled in accordance with title 42.30.110 of the Revised Code of Washington. The public is invited to attend open sessions. If you have any questions, please call 457-8527.

1114 East First, Port Angeles

457-9412 1-800-859-0163 Mon.-Sat. 8:30 - 5:30

1B5139058

Port Townsend

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Estate Planning Package for Couples BOBBIE RHODES

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocolâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl With the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sitterâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawnâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x2013;  The Rose Theatre,

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W E I P R O D T O T E D R U Y D E S C K O A U L T B

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alvin and the Chipmunksâ&#x20AC;? (G) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugoâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Muppetsâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Puss in Bootsâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadowsâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Adventures of Tintinâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x2013;  Lincoln Theater, Port

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A C I T A L V E S I O N M R A W A Y M A T W E M E A S S M N E E P R O R N N E O N T R U R T A B E Y D B A R O A D O P R O S T E R E S N S S

Who Will BeneďŹ t From Your Lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Work?

Now Showing â&#x2013;  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

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P U D T I N E H S A V E R A O R E R U N A O A R E D N I S E N A M S Y R I A A D R P E R A C U T E M A R I N A S D A D O P A M E L E B I N S B L T N O L I C A T S I Z S T A I

peninsuladailynews.com

A yearly commitment It also is when the guild presents its yearly gift of proceeds from the gift shop to the fire district. Guild President Jean Janis presented the money for the purchase of I-STAT EC8 Cartridges and testing guidelines. The cartridges will be used by fire district paramedics in the field to screen patients for multiple conditions, with results available in two minutes.

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