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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 50 cents

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

January 12, 2012

Fugitive captured in Forks Alleged killer held on $2 million bail BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Moises Ramirez Matias, the target of a nationwide manhunt, was arrested in Forks on Wednesday just three miles north of where he allegedly killed the mother of the couple’s 4-yearold child. Ramirez Matias, 25, who also uses the alias Dario Ramirez Moises, was arrested at about 11:10 a.m. Wednesday in a building on Merchants Road for the stabbing death of Laranda Konopaski, 18, early Sunday morning, said Forks Police Sgt. Ed Klahn. Ramirez Matias, who had been charged with first-degree premeditated murder-domestic violence Tuesday while he was still at large, was being held on $2 million bail at the Forks jail Wednesday. Konopaski’s family was “very

relieved� over his apprehension, said Auburn resident Lillian Wilbur, Laranda’s aunt. A national warrant had been issued Monday for Ramirez Matias Ramirez Matias’ arrest. Ramirez Matias probably will have a first-appearance court hearing at 3 p.m. today in Clallam County Superior Court, said county Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Ann Lundwall, who will prosecute the case. There, a judge will set his conditions of release from jail and may set an arraignment date, Lundwall said.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Law enforcement officers stand in an industrial yard Wednesday near the location TURN TO ARREST/A4 where suspected killer Moises Ramirez Matias was captured on Merchants Road in

Daughter, 4, phoned authorities Girl saw mother bleeding on floor BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — A 4-year-old girl alerted law enforcement to her mother’s injury from the house where Laranda Konopaski, was mortally wounded, court records said. Mariah Konopaski phoned 9-1-1 at 5:09 a.m. Sunday, saying her father, Moises Ramirez Matias, 25, had stabbed her

Mariah Konopaski In house of stabbing death

PT panel tries to help ousted parks manager

mother, 18, and that her mother was dead, said a Forks Police Department probablecause statement. Ramirez Matias, who L. Konopaski also uses the alias Dario Ramirez Moises, was arrested without incident Wednesday on Merchants Road in Forks for investigation of premeditated murder-domestic violence in the death of Laranda Konopaski.

He was charged with the murder Tuesday in documents filed in Superior Court. The murder occurred in a trailer at 1205 S. Forks Ave. that had bloodstains “from one end to the other� and a bloodstained kitchen knife on the bed in the master bedroom, said Officer Gene Hoagland of the Forks Police Department. “Mariah was in the house,� Mariah’s aunt, Melina Harris of Seattle, said Wednesday. “That’s the most horrid thing.� Laranda, lying in a hallway, was treated by emergency medi-

cal services personnel but died later at Forks Community Hospital, Hoagland said. The girl told authorities that during an argument between her mother and father, she saw Ramirez Matias take a knife from the kitchen, saw her parents in the bedroom, then saw her mother lying on the floor with a neck wound that was bleeding. “[Mariah] made a horizontal motion from one side of her neck to the other while describing the wound on Konopaski,� Hoagland said in his statement. TURN

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Legacy for departing Keegan Building renamed for 10-year president

BY CHARLIE BERMANT

BY ARWYN RICE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Possible ways of retaining Kate Burke in a supervisory position at Fort Worden State Park were discussed in a meeting Wednesday morning. Burke, who has served as manager of Fort Worden and Fort Townsend state parks and the small Rothschild House park in uptown Port Townsend since 2002 and oversaw 33 full-time-equivalent positions, will be displaced by a new direc- Burke tor, Allison Alderman, whose current job was eliminated because of agency-wide budget cuts intended to shave expenditures by $11 million. Burke is to leave by the end of the month, and Alderman is to take over Feb. 1. TURN

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PORT ANGELES — In a surprise ceremony to mark Peninsula College President Tom Keegan’s final trustees meeting at the school, the Board of Trustees renamed a building after the man who led the college for a decade. M Building, the ALSO . . . $22 million science and ■ Interim technology building built president’s in 2007, is now Keegan salary set Hall. through The action received a June 30/A7 standing ovation from the 30 people attending the Tuesday meeting. Keegan was struck almost speechless by the gesture of respect. “I’ve got nothing left,� he said. The 56,000-square-foot structure was KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS built on the grounds where the college’s Students Krystal Harrison, left, and Amity Coburn, both of Port Angeles, deteriorating dorms once stood and houses 13 labs, five classrooms and faculty offices. study in the commons area of the renamed Keegan Hall on the Peninsula College campus Wednesday. TURN TO KEEGAN/A4

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

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The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Ltd./ Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Ex-‘Designing Women’ star in new role FORMER “DESIGNING WOMEN” star Annie Potts is connecting with her TV and family roots in the new ABC series “GCB.” Potts plays a Dallas socialite in the prime-time comedydrama also known as “Good Potts Christian Belles.” She said she sees a lot of “my beloved Dixie Carter” in the show. Carter, who died at age 70 in 2010, starred with Potts in CBS’s “Designing Women” sitcom that aired from 1986 to 1993. Potts told the Television Critics Association on Tuesday that her “GCB” character, Gigi, also reflects Potts’ own mother.

Series executive producer Robert Harling is a longtime friend of Potts and called her mom, Dot, “magnificent.” Potts’ mother died a year ago. With a smile, Potts said they can use all her stories in “GCB.” The series, which debuts March 4 on ABC, also stars Kristin Chenoweth, David James Elliott and Leslie Bibb.

Watch your words If the U.S. Supreme Court is willing to listen, rocker Steven Tyler has something “old school” to say about nudity and profanity on broadcast TV. “There’s a certain charm and passion and magic in not showing full-frontal nudity” or using conTyler stant profanity, Tyler said, as the high court takes up a First Amendment case on the regulation of the airwaves.

“It’s really hot when you only show a little,” he said. Granted, the Aerosmith singer tossed off a bleeped strong expletive or two on Fox’s live “American Idol” after joining it as a judge last season. “I have [cursed on air] a couple times because it is 2012,” Tyler said. But an occasional swear word is different than a stream of them, which he suggested could happen without rules and wouldn’t be something he welcomes. “If you start surfing channel to channel and you’re on NBC and it’s [expletive] and channel 4 and it’s [expletive] and channel 7 and it’s [expletive], it wouldn’t be fun to surf,” he said. Besides, he said, where’s the creativity? A pun about an “American Idol” contestant’s revealingly short outfit may be fun — “Here’s to looking up your old address,” offered Tyler — but the use of blunt language “turns it into something crass.”

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Are you finding that it costs more, less or about the same to heat your home this winter compared with last winter? More

Passings By The Associated Press

GEVORK VARTANIAN, 87, a former Soviet intelligence agent who helped derail a Nazi plot to assassinate allied leaders at a 1943 conference in Tehran, Iran, has died. Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, a top KGB successor agency, said Mr. Vartanian died of an unspecified illness Tuesday in Moscow. President Dmitry Medvedev sent condolences to Mr. Vartanian’s widow, Goar, who worked together with him on intelligence missions abroad and helped cement their fame as a legendary Russian spy couple. The Foreign Intelligence Service said Mr. Vartanian, whose father was a Soviet intelligence agent in Tehran posing as a merchant, began working for Soviet intelligence when he turned 16. He played a role in foiling a Nazi plot to assassinate Soviet leader Josef Stalin, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill when they held a conference in Tehran in November 1943. Adolf Hitler ordered operation “Long Jump” after the Nazi intelligence learned of the conference. Mr. Vartanian’s group shadowed an advance team of Nazi agents, who arrived to set the ground for the mission, helping uncover the plot. The Foreign Intelligence Service, which goes under its Russian acronym SVR, said that acting on orders from Moscow, Mr. Vartanian also joined a British intelligence school in Tehran and obtained information about its graduates sent to the Soviet Union, allowing

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About same Soviet authorities to catch them. The SVR said Mr. Vartanian and his wife worked as intelligence agents in several countries between the 1950s and 1986 but didn’t name them. They got married several times in different places as part of their cover. The ITAR-Tass news agency said they worked in Iran, Italy, France and Greece, among other nations. Mr. Vartanian received the highest Soviet award, the Hero of the Soviet Union medal.

_________ JAMES F. CROW, 95, a leader in the field of population genetics who helped shape public policy toward atomic radiation damage and the use of DNA in the courtroom, died Jan. 4 at his home in Madison, Wis. The cause was congestive heart failure, his daughter Catherine Rasmussen said. Population genetics uses mathematical and statistical methods to understand evolutionary change, and Dr. Crow was a leading exponent of the subject for more than half a century at the University of WisconsinMadison. He was the author of two

Laugh Lines THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY loves its acronyms. The first time I saw the term proof of ownership was in a client’s file that read “Insured has POO on damaged items.” Your Monologue

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leading textbooks on the 8.9% Less subject, one of them written Don’t know 3.1% with Motoo Kimura, a prominent Japanese geneticist Total votes cast: 1,144 and former student. Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com The methods of populaNOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those tion genetics have emerged peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole. as the principal tool for exploring the genetic roots of disease and for interpreting the torrent of data now flowSetting it Straight ing out of the human Corrections and clarifications genome project, the effort to The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairdetermine the complete ness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to sequence of DNA in human clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com. chromosomes.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1937 (75 years ago) North Olympic Peninsula residents had the opportunity to inspect the new cruiser-type Coast Guard cutter Samuel D. Ingham, which has arrived in Port Angeles. The Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce followed the open house with a welcoming banquet for Cmdr. H.G. Hemingway, the cutter’s commanding officer, and his officers. The cutter will now complete a tour of Grays Harbor and Portland, Astoria and Marshfield, Ore., before returning to Bremerton for a 45-day final overhaul and installation.

1962 (50 years ago) Port Angeles’ centennial souvenir dollars are starting to make an appearance. Centennial Committee Chairman Bob Gardner said the large coins will be worth a dollar in trade at participating stores throughout the city, which is commemorating the

100th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s signed designation of the settlement in 1862. The purpose of the coin is to provide income for financing centennial activities and promotion of 100th anniversary events, Gardner said.

1987 (25 years ago) The Navy’s ordnancehandling facility at Indian Island is important to national security because of a Soviet naval buildup and the growing importance of Pacific Rim trade, a public affairs officer told Jefferson County commissioners. The commissioners

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asked the Navy representative, Lt. Cmdr. Mark Van Dyke, to appear before them to discuss the Navy’s proposed expansion of Indian Island — including local fears that nuclear weapons might be stored at the ordnance station. Van Dyke said he is prohibited by the Defense Department from confirming or denying nuclear weapons but said a proposed county ordinance declaring Jefferson a nuclear-free zone would be pre-empted by the U.S. Constitution’s “supremacy clause.”

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

PART OF SEQUIM elk herd bedded down in the field where the balloon festival is planned this fall . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Jan. 12, the 12th day of 2012. There are 354 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 12, 1912, textile workers at the Everett Mill in Lawrence, Mass. (most of them immigrant women) walked off the job to protest wage cuts. The “Bread and Roses Strike,” as it came to be known, spread to other mills in Lawrence and lasted until the following March. On this date: ■ In 1519, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I died. ■ In 1773, the first public museum in America was organized

in Charleston, S.C. ■ In 1828, the United States and Mexico signed a Treaty of Limits defining the boundary between the two countries to be the same as the one established by an 1819 treaty between the U.S. and Spain. ■ In 1915, the House of Representatives rejected, 204-174, a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. ■ In 1932, Hattie W. Caraway became the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate after serving out the remainder of the term of her late husband, Thaddeus. ■ In 1948, the Supreme Court ruled that state law schools could

not discriminate against applicants on the basis of race. ■ In 1959, Berry Gordy, Jr. founded Motown Records (originally Tamla Records) in Detroit. ■ In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson said in his State of the Union address that the U.S. should stay in South Vietnam until Communist aggression there was ended. ■ In 1969, the New York Jets of the American Football League upset the Baltimore Colts of the National Football League 16-7 in Super Bowl III, played at the Orange Bowl in Miami. ■ In 2010, Haiti was struck by a magnitude-7 earthquake, killing as many as 300,000 residents and

leaving more than 1.5 million people homeless. ■ Ten years ago: The United States intensified its anti-terror campaign in eastern Afghanistan, dropping bombs on suspected alQaida and Taliban hide-outs. ■ Five years ago: Two kidnapped boys, Ben Ownby and Shawn Hornbeck, were found alive in the same suburban St. Louis apartment — four days after Ben vanished and 4½ years after Shawn disappeared. The boys’ abductor, Michael Devlin, is serving multiple life terms for kidnapping and sexual assault. ■ One year ago: Torrential summer rains tore through Rio de Janeiro state’s mountains.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 12, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Snowed-in Alaska town out of big shovels ANCHORAGE, Alaska — When you’re trying to clear out 15 feet of snow, a regular shovel just isn’t going to cut it. That’s why city officials in Cordova, Alaska, have arranged with a Canadian company for a special order of large, scoop-type shovels capable of moving a cubic foot of snow. Cordova officials couldn’t find any of the large shovels available in Alaska, leaving Guardsman to do the backbreaking work of using regular shovels. The special order of 72 scoop shovels is expected to be shipped second-day air today, meaning that Guardsman should be using them by this weekend.

several times en route to landing. “Just because this is a welltraveled road to Mars given the number of trips we’ve made, I’m very careful to not let that experience cause us to be complacent,” said Arthur Amador of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is in charge of the mission to Mars.

Doc: No mental illness

ORLANDO, Fla. — A psychiatrist said in newly released depositions that he could find no evidence that Casey Anthony has a mental illness. Jeff Danziger said the results of a psychological test that Anthony took were normal and that he regarded that as surprising. Anthony The deposiMars rover shifts path tions of two psychiatrists who evaluated Anthony were LOS ANGELES — A NASA spacecraft hurtling toward Mars unsealed Wednesday by a Florida judge. prepared to fire its thrusters Casey Anthony is serving a Wednesday to put itself on year of probation at an undiscourse for an August landing. Engineers closely tracked the closed location in Florida on a check fraud charge. 1-ton rover nicknamed CuriosThe 25-year-old was acquitity, which rocketed from Earth ted last July of killing her last November. 2-year-old daughter, Caylee, in a The firing of its eight trial that captured the nation’s thruster engines is the most attention. important task Curiosity will Transcripts of the deposition perform during its 352 millionmile flight to the red planet, but had been sealed. But the Orlando Sentinel asked the it’s not unprecedented. court to make them public. Previous robotic explorers have had to adjust their paths The Associated Press

Briefly: World yang’s precondition for making the food-for-uranium-suspension deal happen. The North’s statement offers an early look at how the government now led by Kim Jong Il’s son, Kim Jong Un, will handle BANNU, Pakistan — An two of North Korea’s most American drone strike killed pressing issues: a long-running four Islamist militants in Pakistan, the first such attack since food crisis and years of internaerrant U.S. airstrikes in Novem- tional pressure to end its nuclear program. ber killed two dozen Pakistan Some feared Pyongyang troops and pushed strained ties between the two nations close to would try to rally support around young Kim’s rule with a collapse, Pakistani intelligence missile test or an act of aggresofficials said Wednesday. sion against South Korea. The attack Tuesday took place in North Waziristan, an al-Qaida and Taliban stronghold Iran professor killed close to the Afghan border that TEHRAN, Iran — It seemed has been pounded by U.S. a clockwork killing: Motorcycle strikes, the officials said. riders flashed by and attached a Three of the dead were Arab magnetic bomb onto a car carryfighters, the officials said. ing a nuclear scientist working The missile launch broke the at Iran’s main uranium enrichlongest pause between strikes ment facility. since the drone program began The attack, which killed in earnest in 2009. Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan, head of the Natanz uranium enrichNorth Korea food aid ment facility in central Iran, and fatally wounded his driver SEOUL, South Korea — Wednesday, was at least the North Korea signaled Wednesday it remains open to suspend- fourth targeted hit on a member of Iran’s nuclear brain trust in ing uranium enrichment in two years. Tehran quickly exchange for U.S. food aid, a blamed Israeli-linked agents deal that appeared imminent backed by the U.S. and Britain. before leader Kim Jong Il died Secretary of State Hillary last month. Rodham Clinton denied any The North complained that U.S. role in the slaying, and the the United States had “drastiObama administration concally” changed the amount and demned the attack. But provockind of aid it would send but ative hints from Jerusalem reinsaid officials would wait and forced the perception of a clan“see if the United States has a destine campaign to set back willingness to establish confiIran’s nuclear ambitions. dence” with North Korea — which observers saw as PyongThe Associated Press

U.S. drone kills four militants in Pakistan

DAVID GOLDMAN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, second from left, campaigns in Aiken, S.C. The Republican hopeful beat GOP front-runner Mitt Romney to the Southern state Wednesday.

GOP presidential race shifts to S. Carolina Romney boasts money lead as his opponents lie in wait BY BRIAN BAKST THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Rivals anxious to end Mitt Romney’s winning streak doubled down their criticism of him as unfeeling toward laid-off workers and out of step with conservative Christians as the presidential race headed to South Carolina on Wednesday. Romney made a show of dominance by touting his campaign’s $56 million in fundraising. In Rock Hill, S.C., former House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia continued his previous attacks on the front-runner as a former venture capitalist whose deals cost people their jobs. Gingrich told an enthusiastic crowd of about 300 that he wants “free enterprise that is honest. I want a free enterprise system that is accountable.”

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, mindful that some conservatives are unhappy with him for labeling Romney a “vulture capitalist,” struck a defensive tone Romney Wednesday but stood by his criticism. “The idea we can’t criticize someone for these get-rich-quick schemes is inappropriate from my perspective,” Perry told a crowd outside Columbia. While predicting that South Carolina will be “an uphill battle,” Romney projected self-assurance after his victory in New Hampshire. The former Massachusetts governor captured 39.3 percent of the vote in the nation’s first pri-

mary election there. Coming in second was Ron Paul with 22.9 percent, followed by Jon Huntsman with 16.9, and Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum both winning only 9.4 percent of the votes. Despite the rougher tone and tougher ideological terrain ahead, Romney is hoping to force his opponents from the race by achieving a four-state streak with victories in South Carolina on Jan. 21 and Florida 10 days later. He posted his double-digit win Tuesday night in New Hampshire after a squeaker the week before in Iowa — making him the first non-incumbent Republican in a generation to pull off the back-toback feat. The way ahead passes through minefields that held him to fourth place in the South Carolina primary when he ran four years ago: Republicans skeptical of his Mormon faith and reversals on some social issues. Perry, who didn’t invest much time in New Hampshire, was already waiting for them there.

FAA chief tells safety board air shows are safe enough BY CHRISTINE NEGRONI THE NEW YORK TIMES

WASHINGTON — More than three months after the crash in Nevada that killed 10 spectators and a pilot competing at the National Championship Air Races and Air Show in Reno, some of the biggest names in performance aviation gathered here on Tuesday to tell members of the National Transportation Safety Board that the industry was safe and not in need of further regulation. “We preach safety, safety, safety,” John Cudahy, president of the International Council of Air Shows, told the board. “That’s our main concern.” The hearing was billed as an informational session while the board investigates other air-show

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accidents from the past few years. Deborah Hersman, chairwoman of the NTSB, asked organizers of the Reno event and representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration if regulations were stringent enough. John McGraw, the FAA’s deputy director of flight standards service, said there are no plans to change the regulations. “If we become aware of a risk that exceeds the boundary of what we think is acceptable, we will make those changes,” he said. The hearing comes less than a week after Reno air race and show producers announced the event will go on as scheduled. The race features airplanes that fly at low altitudes at speeds upward of 500 miles per hour while keeping

audiences up to 1,500 feet away. Ms. Hersman wondered if the distances, established in the 1950s, were sufficient considering that in 2007, an air race competitor crashed on the course. But Mike Houghton, head of the Reno Air Racing Association said the group examined how widespread the wreckage was from that earlier crash and found that it was confined to the calculated area. The accident, Sept. 16 at RenoStead Airport, occurred when Jimmy Leeward, 74 and an experienced pilot, lost control of a World War II-era P-51 Mustang. The plane made several abrupt maneuvers before nosing down and smashing into a box seat area close to a packed grandstand.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Tiny frog claims title as smallest vertebrate

Nation: Ohio parents admit denying son care

World: French cameraman killed in Syrian explosions

World: Van der Sloot says he killed Peruvian woman

PAEDOPHRYNE AMAUENSIS IS the world’s smallest animal with a spine. So says journal PLos One, in which a Louisiana State University biologist writes that the average-sized frog of the species is so small, it can perch on the tip of your pinkie. The adult frogs are about threetenths of an inch long and are found in Papua New Guinea. But the males of a species of deepsea anglerfish are about 2 mm smaller, said University of Washington ichthyologist Theodore Pietsch, who described them in 2006. The males don’t have stomachs and live as parasites on 1.8-inch-long females.

THE PARENTS OF an 8-year-old boy who died from Hodgkin lymphoma after suffering from undiagnosed swollen glands pleaded guilty to denying him medical treatment. Monica Hussing, 37, and William Robinson Sr., 40, both of Cleveland, face up to eight years in prison at sentencing. They pleaded guilty Monday to attempted involuntary manslaughter in a last-minute plea deal. Willie Robinson collapsed at his home March 22, 2008. Prosecutors said he had begged his parents to take him to see a doctor but was rejected. Hodgkin lymphoma is a highly treatable cancer.

A FRENCH TV cameraman became the first Western journalist killed in the 10-month-old Syrian uprising Wednesday, dying in a barrage of grenades during a government-sponsored trip to the restive city of Homs, officials and a witness said. The violence came just hours after President Bashar Assad made a surprise appearance at a rally in the capital, Damascus, joining thousands of supporters as the conflict enters a dangerous and violent new phase. Killed in the attack was Gilles Jacquier, who worked for France-2 Television, as well as eight Syrians. A Dutch journalist was also injured.

JORAN VAN DER SLOOT pleaded guilty Wednesday to the 2010 murder of a young Peruvian woman he met at a Lima casino who was killed five years to the day after the unsolved disappearance in Aruba of a U.S. teen in which he remains the main suspect. Prosecutors in Lima are asking for a 30-year prison sentence. The 24-year-old Dutch citizen bowed his head when his lawyer, Jose Jimenez, argued that he killed Stephany Flores, 21, as a result of “extreme psychological trauma” he suffered from being “persecuted” over the disappearance of Natalee Holloway on the Caribbean island of Aruba in 2005.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Parks: Hiring represented departure from norm CONTINUED FROM A1 tion yet to be determined. Burke — who holds a “Kate has been a pillar of degree in business adminisintegrity. She has been hon- tration and management — est and efficient, and it is led a public process to create hard to imagine that some- a Lifelong Learning Center one else could take her role,� plan for the park that includes said Erin Fristad, director of partnerships with area colGoddard College’s Fort Wor- leges. Burke’s supervisor, State den branch, at a meeting of the Fort Worden Lifelong Parks Assistant Director Learning Center Public Larry Fairleigh, said at Development Authority. Wednesday’s meeting that “I still haven’t surren- the decision to remove Burke dered the idea that she will was an administrative one in be able to stay,� said Fristad, keeping with state law. who was one of about a dozen “I feel bad about this. It is Burke supporters who not what I wanted to hapattended the meeting. pen,� Fairleigh said. “But it is what it is, and I Seniority rules can’t change it.� Fairleigh said he chalAlderman, who has been lenged the decision to replace with State Parks for 21 years, Burke, asking if there were displaced or “bumped� Burke, no other option, and was told who has less seniority after there was not. her position as region operations manager in the State Unusual hiring Parks Northwest Region Burke’s hiring repreOffice was eliminated. According to state person- sented a departure from the nel system rules, when a staff usual employment of park position is eliminated, the directors, according to Tim person in the position has Caldwell, a PDA member and tenure rights to certain other former Chamber of Commerce director who was part positions. Ideas for retaining Burke of the advisory committee included turning Fort Wor- that helped select her. Burke was unusual in den over to the city of Port Townsend or to the public that she did not have any development authority and park experience but was “a naming Burke executive civilian who made the final cut,� Caldwell said. director. “We realized that state The PDA is scheduled to continue the discussion parks were changing, so their about finding a way to possi- management was changing, bly retain Burke at its next too,� he added. “Fort Worden was not a meeting, to be held at 8:30 a.m. Jan. 18 at a loca- normal state park, so we

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Kate Burke, right, shown at the Fort Worden Lifelong Learning Center Public Development Authority meeting with board member Ted Springstead. wanted someone who was outside of the norm.� Port Townsend Marine Science Center Executive Director Ann Murphy, a PDA board member, said at Wednesday’s meeting that Burke was the first state park manager who was not a ranger. That action “symbolized this movement that we had to run like businesses, and Kate brought a lot of business expertise,� Murphy said. “So I think the thing that is really difficult right now is that lot of partners don’t want to go through this loss, as well as you not wanting to, the PDA not wanting to.� “No one wants to,� Fair-

leigh said. “Allison doesn’t want it to happen.� “So why is this happening?� Murphy said. “Is there some avenue?� “No,� Fairleigh said. “I asked this question three times, to the highest level of the agency: ‘Do we need to do this?’ And the answer was yes.�

Won’t accept it Those in attendance as well as some members of the board were not willing to accept this directive. Port Townsend Development Director Rick Sepler, a member of the PDA board, said it would be “shortsighted� to “just say ‘these

Burke did not engage in the discussion about her future at Wednesday’s meeting. She said later that she was “overwhelmed� by the show of support but that she would not become involved in these efforts, though her first choice would be to stay in her job. During her tenure, Burke worked closely with the park’s advisory committee in creating ties with the local Chamber of Commerce, the city of Port Townsend and Jefferson County. She served on the chamber board as well as the board of the Jefferson County Land Trust and participated as an ex-officio member of the Fort Worden Advisory Committee and the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum. She also was an advisory member of the Centrum Foundation Board and the city of Port Townsend Shoreline Master Planning group. Centrum Executive Director John MacElwee is meeting privately with several Fort Worden partners and Burke supporters to find a way to keep her on. “When Kate was hired, the rules of seniority were ignored because there was a different vision,� he said. “I don’t see why they can’t disregard the seniority rules now.�

are the rules’ and walk away from this and allow this to happen. “There needs to be some avenue that we can explore, either with the Legislature or otherwise, that might allow us to get the dedicated resources we need to complete this project.� “What is ‘this’?� Fairleigh asked in response to Sepler. “Is ‘this’ retaining Kate here, or is it to provide the resources so that the parks and the PDA are successful in building the Lifelong Learning Center?� he asked. ________ “All of the above,� said one Jefferson County Reporter Charattendee. lie Bermant can be reached at 360“It’s connected,� said 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ another. peninsuladailynews.com.

Keegan: Moving on to larger college campus CONTINUED FROM A1 t r u s t e e s who served Keegan was named pres- d u r i n g ident of Skagit Valley Col- K e e g a n ’ s lege last fall and will depart tenure as Peninsula College on Feb. 3. Pe n i n s u l a In March, Keegan will C o l l e g e replace departing President p r e s i d e n t Gary Tollefson at Skagit were pres- Keegan Valley College, a two-year ent for the community college about meeting. Keegan said he served one hour north of Seattle that has an enrollment of with “excellent board members, each with his or her about 23,000. During the ceremony, own passion for the college.� He said he knew the Keegan also received a painting of an eagle, titled trustees were planning “Se’let’se,� a gift from Ron something, but the secret was well-kept until trustee and Julie Johnson. All of the living former Dwayne Johnson had read

almost all the way through the resolution that renamed the building in Keegan’s honor. “I knew about a change to the agenda about a halfhour before the meeting started,� Keegan said. The newly named Keegan Hall is part of $120 million in replacement projects undertaken by Keegan during his decade at the school. “Nearly 75 percent of the campus was remodeled or replaced,� Johnson said. Those projects included: ■ The building now known as Keegan Hall.

■ The $830,000 Peninsula College Longhouse House of Learning, the only facility of its kind built on a college campus, which was opened Oct. 15, 2007, in conjunction with the Jamestown S’Klallam, Lower Elwha Klallam, Hoh, Quileute, Makah and Port Gamble S’Klallam tribes. ■ A $14 million library and administration building, linked by a bridge that forms a formal entryway to the campus, which were completed in August 2008. ■ The $36 million Maier Hall, which opened with 61,750 square feet of space

for art, math, liberal arts and music programs — as well as a 130-seat performance hall. ■ Soccer fields at the Wally Sigmar Athletic Complex, which were rebuilt with artificial turf for $1.5 million and rededicated.

In 2004, Peninsula College was allowed to grant baccalaureate degrees in conjunction with other colleges. The program was expanded in 2010, when the college was established as an independent degree-granting institution. Keegan was a key player Satellite campuses in the college being awarded From 2001-2011, Penin- $15 million in grants over six sula College also expanded years, earned through partclassroom space, locating sat- nerships with local industry. ellite campuses in buildings ________ in Fort Worden State Park in Reporter Arwyn Rice can be Port Townsend and expand- reached at 360-417-3535 or at ing into a larger space in arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com. downtown Forks.

Arrest: Slain woman had planned to be nurse CONTINUED FROM A1 within an hour of the incident. Blood was found Ramirez Matias is accused of murdering Kono- throughout the residence, paski in a trailer on Lot 28 and a bloody knife was of Rainforest Trailer Park, found in the master bed1205 S. Forks Ave., during room, court records said. an argument. Their daughter, Mariah, Illegally in U.S. who was in the trailer, Ramirez Matias, a Guaphoned 9-1-1 at 5:09 a.m. temalan citizen illegally in Sunday to report her the United States, had been mother was dead, according removed from the U.S. in to court records. 2008 for an immigration Konopaski died of multi- violation, Border Patrol ple stab wounds at Forks spokesman Jeffrey Jones Community Hospital said.

The agency will place a detainer on him, under which he will be processed again under immigration laws “once he goes through the court system,� Jones said. If convicted of murder, Ramirez Matias could be sentenced to 20 years to life in prison. Melina Harris of Seattle, Laranda’s aunt, said she supplied the couple with immigration forms for Ramirez Matias to become a legal resident, but he never filled them out.

When the family discovered that Konopaski was pregnant, that Ramirez Matias was much older than Konopaski and that he was an illegal resident, “we blew every gasket we could, and everyone cried,� Harris said. Klahn said Ramirez Matias’ arrest came about as the result of a tip from a citizen and was accomplished without incident by law enforcement officials from the Forks Police Department, Clallam County Sheriff’s Office, Jef-

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“As soon as she knew she was pregnant, she got a job,� Vinetta said. “She wasn’t the kind of person to sit back and get welfare.� Mariah remained in the custody of Child Protective Services on Wednesday, and a family member hopes to gain full custody and raise the girl, family members said. A public graveside service for Laranda Konopaski, who was born March 29, 1993, in Seattle, will be held Monday at 1 p.m. at Mount Angeles Memorial Park, Monroe Road at U.S. Highway 101 in Port Angeles, according to Drennan-Ford Funeral Home and Crematory Inc. of Port Angeles on Wednesday afternoon. Friends and family can Planned to be a nurse sign an online guestbook at Vinetta Konopaski, www.drennanford.com. Laranda’s older sister, told ________ the Peninsula Daily News Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb in an earlier interview that canSenior be reached at 360-417-3536 Laranda had wanted to be a or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily nurse. news.com.

ferson County Sheriff ’s Office and LaPush Tribal Police Department. “Now that he’s in custody, we have the pressure of a criminal proceeding,� Wilbur said. “This is going to be a long, drawn-out thing, but we are just glad he is in custody.� Konopaski attended Clallam Bay School District schools from kindergarten through 12th grade and graduated last year from Clallam Bay High School. She had earned scholarships to go to college. Grief counselors have been available to school district students and staff in the wake of the homicide.

Girl: Trust set up CONTINUED FROM A1 said Wednesday. A savings account — No. A family member will 9930468963 — that will be apply for permanent cus- turned into a trust account tody of the girl, who last fall for Mariah has been set up had extensive surgery at for donations at any Sterling Savings Bank, Harris Seattle Children’s Hospital said. for a bowlegged condition “She is effectively an she has had since birth, orphan,� Harris said. Harris said. ________ “She was smiling and Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb glad to see some family yescan be reached at 360-417-3536 terday, and she gets to see or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily family today, too,� Harris news.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

A5

Discovery Trail grows a mile on West End County gains single-lane, paved Forest Service road BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County has taken ownership of a one-mile section of U.S. Forest Service Road 2918 to extend the Olympic Discovery Trail on the West End. The one-lane paved road goes south from U.S. Highway 101 to the Sol Duc River between Fairholm Hill and Sappho. At the 0.86-mile mark, the Olympic Discovery Trail will cut right and cross the

Sol Duc River on a Merrill & Ring bridge and continue west on a former railroad grade. Points beyond the 0.86mile mark will remain Forest Service Road 2918. “This road goes through primarily Ring Family Trust and Merrill & Ring timberland,” said County Engineer Ross Tyler, who made the recommendation to accept the federal road into the county system. “The plan is to parallel the 2918 road for 0.86 miles to that bridge, and then we

have an agreement with Merrill & Ring to use that bridge to get across the Sol Duc River and head on westward towards the city of Forks.” The three commissioners voted unanimously to establish the new county road. No public testimony was offered during a Tuesday hearing on the matter. The Forest Service, which has cooperated with the county in its effort to extend the trail, was not comfortable with a trail running parallel to its road, Tyler said. “Their deal was, if you want to build the trail within the right of way of this 0.86 miles, then we

would like you to take responsibility for the road, also, for that length,” Tyler said. The Merrill & Ring company built the bridge to access its timberlands on the west side of the Sol Duc River. The Olympic Discovery Trail eventually will connect Puget Sound to the Pacific Ocean from Port Townsend to LaPush.

In 2012 appointments In other board action, commissioners confirmed their 2012 appointments to 39 advisory boards and established interest areas for 18 county departments. All three commissioners

serve on the Board of Health, Olympic Consortium Board, Peninsula Regional Support Network Executive Committee and the Olympic Area Agency on Aging as members of the Washington State Association of Counties. Each commissioner is a liaison to six departments to build working relationships with elected officials, department heads and county employees. Commissioner Mike Doherty is the liaison to District Court No. 2; Information Technology; Law Library; Parks, Fair and Facilities; Roads, Solid Waste and Sewer; and Washington State Univer-

sity Extension. Commissioner Mike Chapman’s interest areas are Clerk; District Court No. 1, Human Resources, Juvenile Services, prosecuting attorney and Sheriff’s Office. Commissioner Jim McEntire is the liaison to assessor, auditor, community development, health and human services, Superior Court and treasurer. The list of the advisory board appointments is available at www.clallam. net.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Briefly . . . PA detective is promoted to sergeant PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles Police Detective Cpl. Jason Viada has been promoted to the rank of detective sergeant, the city announced Tuesday. Viada was sworn in by Port Angeles Police Chief Terry Gallagher in a brief ceremony Viada attended by his family and fellow officers Monday. Viada has been with the Port Angeles Police Department since 1994. Viada received the Port Angeles Police Department’s 2010 Officer of the Year award. He obtained a master’s degree in adult education from Western Washington University in 2009.

Road reopens PORT ANGELES — Whiskey Bend Road, the 4.5-mile road that connects Olympic Hot Springs Road to the Whiskey Bend trailhead, has reopened to public vehicle access. Areas west and downhill of Whiskey Bend Road are closed because of dam removal activities and quickly changing sediment conditions around Lake Mills, said Barb Maynes, Olympic National Park spokeswoman, on Wednesday. The Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals are part of a $325 million federal project to restore the Elwha River’s salmon runs. The road had been closed to vehicles since December 2010, when winter storms caused extensive damage to the road. During an assessment of the damage, road engineers discovered large voids where log cribbing beneath the road had eroded away, seriously compromising the road’s stability and motorists’ safety, Maynes said. Park staff is working to provide public viewing opportunities of the Glines Canyon Dam removal by this summer, she said. Webcams of the work can be seen at tinyurl.com/ damwebcams.

Economist leaves

Snow mentioned SEATTLE — “Snow” has entered the weather forecast for next week in Washington. The possible amount of snow that far out is uncertain, and the National Weather Service is watching how conditions develop. Forecasters are more sure that cold, dry weather will continue for the rest of this week. The Weather Service said a front will move into the Pacific Northwest over the weekend that could bring snow showers to the Western Washington lowlands Sunday and into next

week. Heavy snow is possible in the mountains, and forecasters said there’s a good chance of snow next week accumulating in the valleys of Eastern Washington.

Oral histories PORT TOWNSEND — Jefferson County Historical Society oral history coordinator Ann Welch and committee member Dorothy Cotton will collect stories at Don’s Pharmacy on Tuesday. Residents are invited to drop in and share their stories from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the pharmacy at 1151 Water St. in Port Townsend. The recordings will become part of the oral history collection at the his-

torical society’s research center. Personal recollections and stories told by community members form an important part of county history, said Bill Tennent, historical society executive director. Oral histories are archived at the research center in audio, video and transcribed manuscript formats. While many oral histories are collected in lengthy formal settings, historical society members often gather stories in more casual settings such as the Valley Tavern, the Elks Lodge and the Jefferson County Fair. The research center is at 13692 Airport Cutoff Road. To reach the historical

society, phone 360-3851003.

Officer injured BELLINGHAM — A Bellingham police motorcycle officer crashed while making a turn Wednesday morning and was taken to a hospital with a leg injury. Police say a puddle of fresh oil may have caused the crash. No other vehicles were involved. The officer was returning to the police station at the time of the crash.

Flights delayed SEATTLE — Computer problems caused delays on 25 Alaska Airlines flights Wednesday. Airline spokeswoman

Bobbie Egan said each of the flights was delayed about an hour. The problem began at around 10 a.m. The Seattle-based airline, which averages about 780 flights a day, was advising people traveling Wednesday to call the airline or check their flight on flightstats.com before heading to the airport. Egan said the earlier delays could affect later flights. The airline’s website was also affected by the computer problems. Egan said the computer outage happened after a system-wide computer software upgrade earlier Wednesday morning. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

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3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A6

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

How much you get depends on work GOOD MORNING, SURVIVORS! Well, think about it: You’ve survived Medicare’s “open enrollment” for 2011, you’ve survived the Christmas holidaze with your faculties more or less intact, you’ve survived a few more weeks of government’s inability to do anything helpful about almost anything, and you’ve survived a New Year’s transition into 2012, so it seems to me that someone ought to say, “Congratulations!” Congratulations! OK, that’s enough of that. I’m going to charge straight ahead with our “Boomer Primer.” Now, what was the deal with that? Fair question. This “Boomer Primer” is an attempt at giving baby boomers, who are teetering precariously on the verge of retirement or just trying to figure out this whole “aging thing” a place to start — a list of “Things to Think About,” if you will, then actually do something about. Otherwise, it’s just another thing to clutter up the space in your mind between thoughts. And I’ve realized that no self-

you find it. Let’s begin by clearly stating what is and is not true: ■ Social Security payments come from the federal government. I’m sorry, but they do. ■ Social Security is not “welfare.” You’ve been paying into it throughout your working life. Think of it more as “insurance” or an “annuity.” You’ve paid for it, so it’s yours. If you doubt No. 2, consider the fact that your Social Security payment (“benefit”) is based on how long you worked and how much you made, which is a way of calculating how much you paid into it (more or less) so, yes, it’s yours.

If you continue working and retire later than your “full retirement age,” you’ll get more. respecting Mark If your year of birth is from “Boomer 1943 to 1954, your “full retireHarvey Primer” can ment age” is 66. call itself that If you were born in 1955, it’s without, at 66 plus two months. least, a nod to If you were born in 1956, it’s Social Security. 66 plus four months. Alas, it’s You get it. going to be a Can you work and collect your brief nod Social Security at the same time? because it is Yes. not possible to Your earnings in or after the explain Social month you reach your full retireSecurity in a ment age will not reduce your little column. Social Security benefit. It is not possible to explain If you started collecting Social Social Security in 30 “little colSecurity before you hit your full umns” because there are a milretirement age, they will, to the lion little nuances that turn on tune of $1 less for every $3 you your particular situation. 10 years of work earned. That’s what websites are for, Social Security isn’t taxable, so pour yourself a friendly beverIf you were born after 1929, age and visit www.socialsecurity. you have 40 “credits” to collect — right? Wrong, because it is, but gov, where you will find a wealth in other words, 10 years of work. that depends upon how much (no kidding!) of info. As noted above, the longer you you or both of you brought in Take your time. worked and the more you earned, from all sources and how you file Hey, there’s even a page your taxes (joint vs. separate, the larger your Social Security where you can “research popular benefit will be. etc.). baby names.” What about Social Security If you retire before your “full Well, OK, not a biggie for most retirement age” (“early retire“disability”? Well, what about it? of us, but entertainment is where ment”), you’ll get less. It’s a way of attempting to

HELP LINE

Birthday Alberta Garbrick Port Angeles resident Alberta Garbrick will celebrate her 90th birthday Saturday at 2 p.m. at Independent Bible Church, 116 E. Ahlvers Road, Port Angeles. The family invites friends to come and requests no gifts. She was born to Cora and Les Ball on Jan. 11, 1922, in SumMrs. mit, Ore. Garbrick She married Kenneth Garbrick on Aug. 20, 1937, in Lewisville, Ore. The Garbricks moved in 1951 from Philomath, Ore., to Forks,

where they raised six children. Mrs. Garbrick was one of the early members of Forks Bible Church. The next move was to Port Angeles in 1972, where Mrs. Garbrick worked for the U.S. Postal Service until her retirement in 1984. Her family includes children Verl Garbrick of Arizona, Caroline Hodgdon of Port Angeles, Susan Nordstrom of Forks, Florence Smith of Oak Harbor and Maureen Reynolds of Port Angeles. A daughter, Gail Garbrick, is deceased. Mrs. Garbrick also has 19 grandchildren, 22 greatgrandchildren and five greatgreat-grandchildren. Mrs. Garbrick spends her leisure time stitching cross-stich pictures.

sustain yourself if you’ve been disabled to the point where you can’t work. It’s complicated, and it can be harrowing, but it is not impossible, so if you find yourself in that circumstance, consider it. Another thing it is is well beyond the purview of anything we can tackle here, so just know it exists. When should I start planning for retirement? Yesterday, if you do, in fact, plan on retiring, in the classic sense. A better question might be, “How much will my Social Security benefit be?”

Online tools Go to the website I noted above, where you’ll find a tool for estimating your benefit that actually works remarkably well — and it will let you “play” with “what-ifs”: “What if I retire early?” “What if I retire later?” You get it. If I’ve enrolled in Medicare, haven’t I already signed up for Social Security? No. TURN

TO

HARVEY/A7

CORNER Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

Mrs. Speece has been a volunteer and genealogy archivist at the Sequim Museum & Art Center for many years. Mrs. Her family Speece includes Louis Carl and Donna Pinnell of Sequim, Steven and JoAnne Pinnell of Port Angeles, Jean Howard of Sequim, Sally and Steve Huen of Port Angeles, Bradley Pinnell of the Marshall Islands and Merrilyn and Gary Ide of Carlsborg. She also has numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren.

Zella Hamilton Pinnell Speece Lifelong Sequim resident Zella Hamilton Pinnell Speece will celebrate her 91st birthday with five generations of her family and other relatives and friends at an open house Sunday from noon to 3 p.m. at 201 Lochow Road, Sequim. She was born Jan. 15, 1921, in Sequim to Carl and Hildora Hamilton. Mrs. Speece raised a family of six and worked at several restaurants in Sequim and the variety store and bakery in Sequim. She is a 2006 Sequim Grand Pioneer. For many years, she enjoyed gardening, reading and baking.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

DOING WITHOUT BY TONY ORBACH / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 A person can take big strides with this 6 Hannibal’s foil in “The Silence of the Lambs” 13 Museum piece 20 Forum fashions 21 Glade, e.g. 22 Hue akin to olive 23 ___-Itami International Airport 24 “Just do drills for now”? 26 Undo 28 Back to Brooklyn? 29 Slaughter 30 Disturb one’s neighbors at night? 37 Comic strip “___ and Janis” 38 Inflation-fighting W.W. II org. 39 A pop 40 Former bill 42 Handful 44 Table saver 47 Don Quixote’s love 52 Duffer’s feeling toward a putting pro? 54 Meeting one’s soul mate, perhaps? 56 Bogart’s “High Sierra” role 57 Clive Cussler novel settings 59 Weight allowance 60 “Behold,” to Brutus 61 Represent with a stick figure, say

63 Words on a Wonderland cake 65 Nonentities 67 Successfully perform a download? 71 Who wrote “A true German can’t stand the French, / Yet willingly he drinks their wines” 75 Chamber exit 76 One who discriminates? 81 Naysayer 82 Fr. title 83 Fen-___ (former weight-loss drug) 86 Grow dark 87 Applied foil at the Hershey’s factory? 91 One man’s declaration to an upset party planner? 93 Sewing aids 94 Rider on a crowded bus, maybe 96 “I knew it!” 97 Relations 98 Shoppe modifier 99 Foreign football score 101 Blue shade 105 Drive by the United Nations? 113 Ponders 115 Upton Sinclair novel on which “There Will Be Blood” is based 116 Slum-clearing project, say

25 “Definitely!” 27 Go into la-la land, with “out” 31 Strong cast 32 2010 Emma Stone comedy set in high school 33 Highway sign abbr. 34 Was audibly surprised, maybe 35 Shake 36 Holiday season event 41 Loos DOWN 42 Animal house, say 1 Bundle bearer 43 Creepy: Var. 2 “I’ll have ___” 3 Response to a pledge- 45 Start drive request 46 Hovel 4 Glen Canyon 47 Removal of reservoir restrictions, informally 5 Get a bit misty 48 Path of Caesar 6 Academy enrollee 7 Constellation whose 49 One-named singer brightest star is for the Velvet Regulus Underground 8 Prince Valiant’s 50 Suffix with depend eldest 51 They might have it 9 Bunkum 52 Some appliances 10 EarthLink, e.g., for 53 Nag’s call short 55 ___-shanter 11 Actor Firth 58 Tarot user, maybe 12 Thrill 62 New York’s Tappan 13 One may be ___ Bridge overhead 64 Flat: Abbr. 14 “Little” singer of 65 Kill quickly the ’60s 66 “South Pacific” hero 15 Coll. elective 16 Capital city on the 68 Diplomatic efforts 69 Hindu spring Atlantic festival 17 Pundit Bill 70 French income 18 Model 71 Exclaim breathlessly 19 Vodka drink, informally 72 Ready for service 117 Impostor’s excuse? 124 “Me, Myself & ___” 125 Tainted 126 Part of some Tin Pan Alley music 127 Went into la-la land, with “out” 128 Take control of 129 Original 130 Twisty curves

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SOLUTION ON PAGE A7

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73 Conseil d’___ 74 Sports contest 77 Men of La Mancha 78 4-Down locale 79 Actress Sofer 80 Goal 82 Food in Exodus 84 Language from which “bungalow” and “jungle” come 85 Saxony seaport

51

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115 118

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97 104

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67 73

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88 Bad response upon first seeing one’s new haircut? 89 Insomnia cause 90 Adaptable aircraft 92 From now on 95 Khan man? 100 Take charge? 101 Drivers of some slow-moving vehicles 102 Allotment

103 Kind of nerve 104 One way to go, betting-wise 106 Word after an ampersand, maybe 107 Body cavity 108 Eccentric 109 What Oliver asked for more of 110 Berlin Olympics star 111 Rajah’s partner

112 Malamutes’ burdens 114 “Auld Lang ___” 118 Musician Montgomery 119 Things that may be 65-Downed 120 Cadge 121 Inventor Whitney 122 Itch 123 Motor finish?


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

A7

College inks interim president contract BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A contract for Brinton Sprague to serve as interim Peninsula College president has been approved by the Peninsula College Board of Trustees. “We are happy to have you as our new interim president,” board Chairwoman Julie McCulloch, a Port Townsend businesswoman, told Sprague, who was in the audience at the Tuesday afternoon meeting. Sprague, a retired community college leader now living in Port Ludlow, will take over after outgoing President Tom Keegan leaves in February and will oversee the transition to a new permanent president. His contract says he will

serve from Feb. 9 through June 30 and that he will be paid $59,195. That’s based on an annual salary of $150,000 for 261 days, prorated for the 103 days he is expected to serve. If no permanent president is in place by the end of June, the trustees and Sprague can agree to continue the contract.

Selected from three Peninsula College trustees selected Sprague, 70, from three applicants, none of whom currently work at Peninsula College, for the interim position to temporarily replace Keegan, whose last day will be Friday, Feb. 3. “The choice was clear and compelling,” said board

Vice Chairman Mike Glenn, who is the chief executive officer of Jefferson Healthcare hospital. Keegan, who has led Peninsula College for 10 years, was selected in October to be the new president of Skagit Valley College, where Sprague once served as vice president for educational services. After the meeting, Sprague praised Keegan and said he would do his best to assure a smooth transition to the new president. “I’m looking forward to getting to know the community as quickly as I can,” Sprague said. Sprague also will receive health and life insurance benefits, sick leave, 10 days of vacation, retirement benefits and be reimbursed

expenses and receive travel and per diem allowances as provided by state law. Keegan will earn a negotiated salary of $200,000 at Skagit Valley, said Sue Williams, Skagit Valley College executive director of human resources.

Going to Skagit He replaces outgoing President Gary Tollefson at the college, a two-year community college about one hour north of Seattle that has an enrollment of about 23,000. Keegan was earning $204,434 in August at Peninsula College, which has an enrollment of about 8,100. Sprague most recently has worked as special assistant to the president at the

Cabaret troupe holds Briefly . . . PA resident tryouts for new blood named to fall dean’s list PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The Girdle Scouts, a performing troupe specializing in cabaret, burlesque, comedy and drag, is holding auditions for new members. Men and women age 18 and older are encouraged to try out. The troupe is looking for dancers as well as singers, comics, vaudevillians, performance artists and masters and mistresses

of ceremonies. Those interested in joining the Girdle Scouts — and who can commit to rehearsals and performances — should email the troupe at troopleater@girdlescouts. com by Sunday. Auditions will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 21. Information about the location of auditions and subsequent rehearsals will be sent out to applicants. At the auditions, each candidate will be inter-

viewed and asked to perform a two- to four-minute piece to best reflect his or her particular talents. Creativity is highly encouraged. Candidates will also learn a group piece from the Girdle Scouts’ choreographer and perform it together with the troupe. To learn more, visit www.GirdleScouts.com or find the Girdle Scouts of Port Angeles on Facebook.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Port Angeles resident Maldeep Kang was named to the fall semester dean’s list at the University of Portland. Kang is a sophomore electrical engineering major. Students need at least a 3.5 grade-point average to be eligible for the dean’s list.

Lake Washington Institute of Technology in Kirkland and also taught at Cascadia Community College in Bothell. He has lived in the Puget Sound area since he was stationed at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in the early 1970s. He was a founding member of North Seattle Community College in September 1970. From 1975 to 1988 — when he began as dean at Skagit Valley College’s Whidbey Island campus — he served as division chair and director of North Seattle Community College. From 1993, when his tenure as dean ended, he served as vice president at Skagit Valley College, based in Mount Vernon, until 1998.

He was a founding vice president for Cascadia Community College in Bothell in 2000. He retired in 2001 but continued as a senior associate member of the faculty, teaching American and Pacific Northwest history and American foreign relations. In 2004, he became the interim president of Cascadia, serving until 2005. Sprague received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington, a Master of Arts in history from Western Washington University in Bellingham and a doctorate from the University of Washington.

Beginner sessions

people who wish to understand or brush up on the fundamentals of Windows XP/Vista and Windows 7, email, letter writing and Internet browsing; and for people transitioning from Windows XP or Vista to Windows 7. Classes will run from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays from Feb. 29 to March 28. Cost is $30, which includes the text. For more information, phone instructor Bernie Kestler at 360-437-5102. Peninsula Daily News

PORT LUDLOW — The winter session of Beginning Computer Classes sponsored by the Port Ludlow Computer Club is open for registration. These classes, held at the Bay Club, have been offered for the past 14 years as a community service by PLCC, and club membership is not a requirement. The classes are suitable for beginners; for people contemplating a computer purchase; for

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsuladailynews. com.

Brace for the winter with music, dancing and fun WINTER HAS BEEN LYING back, waiting to pounce on us all at once, so take advantage of these chances to warm up and dance the doldrums away.

LIVE MUSIC

10-minute portrait by Nelson Port Angeles artist Sarah Tucker. Port Angeles $3 cover. ■ Dead■ Tonight at Castwood aways Restaurant and Revival is Night Club, 1213 Marine back by popDrive, come on down for ular demand Jerry’s Country Jam, at Next with guest musician Jim Door GasRosand today only from tropub, 113 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. If country’s your style, come and dance W. First St., for another “Pickin’ on Sundays” event or play plugged or from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. (or unplugged. so). Super groovy music by On Saturday, the super groovy folks. Jimmy Hoffman Band ■ On Friday, Les Wamwill play some classic country, classic rock and classic boldt and Olde Tyme Country perform at the Southern rock, with some Fairmount Restaurant, newer classics thrown in 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, for a classic night of dancing to the classics by a clas- from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Stop in Sunday for a sic band from 9 p.m. to great jam from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. 7:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Wine ■ On Tuesday, Dave on the Waterfront, 115 and Rosalie Secord and Railroad Ave., the increasthe Luck of the Draw ingly popular jazz duet of Band play old-time music Linda Dowdell and Craig Buhler will perform with guests The Night Beats, with Dee Coburn classic jazz at 7:30 p.m. You’ll hear jazz from Amer- and Jim Armstrong singican jazz standards to The- ing the songs of country’s Golden Age, for an oldlonious Monk and Duke fashion good old time from Ellington. $3 cover. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ The Second Friday ■ Every Tuesday eveArt Rock (2FAR) at Bar N9ne, 229 W. First St., fea- ning at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh tures the pickin’ of Cort and Peabody streets, the Armstrong, backed by Port Angeles Senior SwingBlue Rooster, at 8 p.m. ers present Wally and the Come and dance the night Boys playing ballroom away and maybe get a

John

dance favorites for the dancing pleasure of all adults 45 years and older from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free. ■ On Wednesday at Dupuis Restaurant, 256861 U.S. Highway 101, Bob and Dave play blues with a brew and barbecue from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn ■ On Friday at Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., Fret Noir (Gil Yslas and Mary Tulin) performs at 5:30 p.m. On Saturday, dance to the classic rock of Chantilly Lace at 8 p.m. These boys will take you back to the 1950s, the ’70s, the ’90s, the ’60s, the ’80s and back to the ’50s again. Not necessarily in that order. On Tuesday, stop in for a wee bit o’ the Irish during Irish Session from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Wednesday, the Denny Secord Jr. Trio plays classic country at 5:30 p.m. ■ At The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host the very popular and rousing open mic Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, Jenny Davis sings jazz from the Great American

Harvey: Social Security CONTINUED FROM A6 The two are hopelessly (and probably incestuously) entwined, but they are two very different critters. OK, then how do I sign up for Social Security? Well, you can (a) go to the website above and do it online (really!), (b) call 800772-1213 and do it on the phone, or (c) you can make an appointment at any Social Security office and do it eyeball to eyeball. Aren’t the Feds messing with Social Security? Well, the Feds are talking about messing with Social Security, but so far, it’s talk.

Look: All any of us can realistically do is play by the rules as they currently exist and hope for the best because hoping for the worst would be stupid. Do I think that folks who are currently collecting their Social Security benefits are going to lose them? No. Do I think that folks who are a short step away from collecting will lose it? I sincerely doubt it. Is that my personal opinion, based on nothing in particular? Yes. Finally, remember this: Millions of people have figured this out, so you can, too.

Go to the website, take your time, make notes and think. What you’ve heard from your neighbors, buddies, cronies or family may or may not have anything to do with what’s true for you. And that’s why you’re a “survivor.”

Songbook from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Friday at Club Seven Lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, Denny and Bob are countrified from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. On Saturday, get in the groove with the Top 40 tunes of GruVbox from 9 p.m. to 1 p.m. On Sunday, are you ready for this? Hell’s Belles, the all-female AC/ DC tribute band are set to “burn”’ down the house from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Lossy Coils perform at 10 p.m. $7 cover. ■ On Friday at the Undertown, 211 Taylor St., the original Toolshed Trio, Sam Rezendes, Brett Pemberton and George Rezendes, with special guest Dave Meis, will be playing a special one-time show from 8 p.m. It’ll be experimental, improvisational and maybe even psychedelic versions of their favorite roots-rock tunes. ■ Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., today and Friday from Port Townsend 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Tonight at The ■ Today, classical guiUpstage, 923 Washington tarist Trevor Hanson St., the Red Trio, just in plays at Ichikawa Japafrom Boston, performs from nese Cuisine, 1208 Water 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. $4 to $7 St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. cover. ■ Every Monday, On Friday, superior, Trevor Hanson plays guirenowned, historical landtar at Alchemy, 842 Washmark jazz trio Scenes perington St., from 6 p.m. to forms songs from its latest 9 p.m. CD “Silent Photographer” ■ Steve Grandinetti at 7:30 p.m. $10 cover. plays and sings at the On Saturday, awardNorthwest Maritime winning jump blues band Center Cafe, Port from Canada The TwistTownsend, on Thursdays ers performs at 8 p.m. and Fridays from noon till $12 cover. 2 p.m. Phone 360-385-2216 for info and reservations. ■ On Friday, get in gear High notes ■ The Second Saturday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water Community Dance at the St., with the Annie Ford Port Townsend Quimper Band at 10 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, well-trav- Grange, 1219 Corona St., Port Townsend, will be held eled Austin, Texas, guitarSaturday with the Wharf ist/singer/songwriter Ian Rats playing the tunes to Moore, who now makes the calling of Karen MarVashon Island home, and

Solution to Puzzle on A6 S T O R K

T O S E E

I G A V E

F E G R E E A R S T Y

L A K E P O W E L L

G A S P

O N E A

E T A T

T I L T

A M I S H

Q U O T A

U L N A R

A L L I N

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-3852552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on AgingInformation & Assistance.

T C L E A E A D O R S E U P T H P A E C O A N E N V E S E I Z E G E T T H E A M L E D A K E R N S K I N P A S S O Y W A N N E D E S S

A R I C R O S O N T P L I E J O N A C H S T E R Y D A A S T E A T H E P R O R T A L E P I S S S T A O L S F L Y I L N A B E U K U L S E M I

E C L A A Y M T E E S E L D U T E D A R E M E O G R E H E N I M T N D E D E I N G R Y O U E L E N A L

E R A M V O C A A T C H C R E S A R A W L C I N E S T I E C Z E R O A M P I C U L A T H E B A E A H N I L C O L O E N E W I R E Z O N E S S

I D E A L

C O S M O

E N C E

A Y E S

R E E N N D A R A N E E

S L E D S

shall from Anacortes from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., give or take. Cover is $6, $3 for 3 to 18, free for younger than 3. Visit www.PT Communitydance.blogspot. com for more info. ■ On Saturday, Washington Old Time Fiddlers play live music at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, Sequim. All-players jam from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and performance from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. Donations support scholarships. More information is at their website, http://d15.wotfa.org. ■ On Friday, the CornStalks (Kim Trenerry, Stephanie Deonges and Paul Stehr-Green) will rock the books off the shelves at the Port Angeles Library Art Blast from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The library is located at 2210 S. Peabody St. ■ Here’s a heads up on the 10th annual Snowgrass bluegrass festival for the First Step Family Support Center. The concert is at the Port Angeles High School auditorium Saturday, Jan. 28, at 6 p.m. The lineup includes Abby Mae & the Homeschool Boys, Crescent Blue, the Old Sidekicks and Rocky Island Bluegrass. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and $7 for seniors, 10 and younger admitted free. Tickets can be purchased at First Step, KONP, Strait Music, Odyssey Books, Port Book and News, Renaissance and Necessities & Temptations in Port Angeles; in Sequim at Pacific Mist Books and in Forks at the Forks Outfitters.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s new deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest Death and Memorial Notice Death and Memorial Notice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

ANN DELIA MCCARTNEY October 9, 1929 January 8, 2012 Mrs. Ann McCartney of Port Angeles, beloved wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died peacefully in her sleep on Sunday, January 8, 2012. Ann, the daughter of James and Ann Hartwig, was born in Seattle on October 9, 1929. She graduated from West Seattle High School and attended the University of Washington. In 1950, she married Robert McCartney in Seattle. They moved to Everett in 1950, where they raised four sons, Michael, Christopher, Terrence and Kevin (deceased). In 1972, they relocated to Port Angeles. Ann had six wonderful grandsons, Shane, Dane, Joshua,

Mrs. McCartney Kaleb, Yannick and Hayden. She became a great-grandmother in November 2011 to Lawrence Thomas McCartney. Ann was a busy homemaker, a PEO member, a founder of the Port Angeles “Crafty Ladies” and was also active in St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. Above all, her greatest devotion was to

Robert, her sons (wives Sheila, Jinny and Marie), grandsons (Dane’s wife, Gwen) and newborn great-grandson Lawrence. Ann loved to travel, especially touring the West with Robert as they explored the world of antiques and collectibles. She enjoyed gardening and spent hours tending her plants at home and at the family retreat on Hood Canal. Besides being a world-class chef, Ann will always be remembered for her sense of humor and love of life. A memorial service celebrating Ann’s life will be held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 East Park Avenue, Port Angeles, on Saturday, January 14, at 1 p.m. All who were touched by Ann are welcome to attend. Flowers or donations may be sent in Ann’s name to St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church.

SARAH ALVA MATTEMCKENNEY July 1, 1937 January 5, 2011 Sarah Alva MatteMcKenney, 74, of Neah Bay passed away January 5, 2012, of heart failure. She was born in Neah Bay to Richard Joseph and Amy Mercilene (Markishtum) Matte. Sarah worked as a receptionist at the Seattle Indian Center in the early 1960s and did furniture upholstering and custodial work from the 1980s to 2000s. Sarah married Clyde Shue in Seattle. The marriage lasted from 19561965. In 1967, she married Kenneth McKenney in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Mrs. Matte-McKenney

Mrs. Matte-McKenney loved gardening, reading, sewing and teaching her grandchildren cooking and other skills. She was a Makah tribal member and elder. Sarah is survived by her husband, Kenneth McKenney Sr.; son and daughter-in-law Kenneth

McKenney Jr. and Julie McKenney of Neah Bay; daughters and son-in-law Lorilee and Norman Calhoun and Iris Shue of Neah Bay; sister Shirley Matte of Neah Bay; grandchildren Felecia, Amy, James and Pamela Shue, Tiffany, Eva, Sarah, Doris and Annette McKenney, and Tyler Emard; and great-grandchildren Paulina, Santos, Jasmine, Frank, Solomon, Kenney, Starlena and Alison. Mrs. Matte-McKenney was preceded in death by her parents; sisters Ann Tryon and Sherry Matte; brother Blanchard Matte; and children Harold, Linda and Lisa Shue. Funeral services will be held Friday, January 13, 2012, at 1 p.m. at the Assembly of God Church in Neah Bay. Dinner at the community hall will follow the services.

Death and Memorial Notice Death and Memorial Notice DONALD E. SCHLEMMER May 19, 1936 January 8, 2012 Donald E. Schlemmer, 75, of Port Angeles passed away January 8, 2012, from complications of diabetes. A celebration-of-life ceremony is planned for mid-February, when the MV Coho returns from dry dock, so as to accommodate his many Canadian friends. Time and location will be announced. Don was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, to Otto and Sylvia Schlemmer on May 19, 1936. He attended Lincoln Elementary School, Roosevelt High and was a member of the first class from Port Angeles High School to graduate from the school’s present location in 1954. He was a four letterman in football, basketball and baseball and was given the nickname “The Big Bear” by coach Dan Gagnon. Don was named all-state in football prior to attending Grays Harbor Community College on a full football scholarship. He proudly served in the U.S. Air Force from 1956 to 1959 with Security Police. During this time, he was selected to be the Air Force representative on President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s personal honor guard. The highlight of his honor guard service came when President Eisenhower’s wife, Mamie, personally baked him his favorite pie for his birthday. Upon his return from the military, Don met and married Elizabeth Melvin on July 16, 1962. He began working at ITT Rayonier in 1962, retiring from the machine room in 1997, with more than 35 years of service, having never missed a single work day. “Bear” was best known, however, for his

Mr. Schlemmer many devoted years to area fast-pitch and youth sports. For more than 51 years, he coached area men’s fast pitch, winning five state titles and taking his team to nationals three times, finishing 11th, 13th and finally fifth place. He coached the Port Angeles entry in the highly competitive Victoria Stuffy McGinnis Major Men’s Softball League for more than 19 years, winning coach of the year an amazing 14 times. So respected by his Canadian peers, he was chosen to coach Canada at the World Masters Championships, leading them to a second-place finish in 1998. On August 11, 1996, in Kent, Washington, he won his 2,000th game as a head coach. Although a somewhat intimidating figure, Don had a huge heart for helping local youths. His true passion was giving back by volunteering more than 50 years of his life to umpiring youth baseball and softball. Considered by many to be the father of Little League in Port Angeles, the “Bear” helped jump-start the effort that eventually affiliated Port Angeles youths with Little League baseball in 1973. He served as umpire-in-chief for decades until health issues prevented him from participating. Having the unofficial title of commissioner, he was one of three inaugural inductees to have his

name placed on the Lincoln Park Monument honoring his years of service in 2011. In addition, he served for many years as a volunteer reading tutor at Hamilton Elementary School, which he enjoyed greatly. A gifted sports writer, he served as a sports reporter for many years, submitting local coverage for The Chronicle and Port Angeles Evening News, twice being named the Amateur Sports Writer of the Year by the Amateur Softball Association. Don is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; sister and husband Marsha and Elvin Sofie of Port Angeles; sister and husband Carol and Wayne Purdy of Burns, Oregon; sister-in-law Connie Needles of Stockton, California; son and daughter-inlaw Ron and Mitzi Schlemmer of Port Angeles; daughter Theresa Schlemmer of Bremerton; stepson and wife Rick and Kim Melvin of Port Angeles; stepson Doug Melvin of Soldotna, Alaska; stepdaughter and husband Pat and Tom Shandrow of Tacoma; stepson and wife Ken and Helen Koleber of Tacoma; and stepson and wife Gary and Penny Koleber of Afton, Minnesota. He is also survived by 11 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. He is preceded in death by his parents and brother, Milton Schlemmer. “The Bear” will be forever remembered by all those whose lives he touched. From the hundreds of players he coached to the thousands of kids he helped, Don will truly be missed. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to North Olympic Baseball and Softball, c/o Jim Lunt, 221 East Lopez Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. A guestbook may be signed at www.drennanford.com.

Death Notices Darlene M. Burrow

Pauline Ann Houk

March 16, 1983 — Jan. 4, 2012

Sept. 11, 1934 — Jan. 9, 2012

Darlene M. Burrow, 28, died at her Port Angeles home. Cause of death is pending. Services: Saturday at 10 a.m., memorial at Grace Baptist Church, 4210 S. Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Pauline Ann Houk died in Port Angeles at 77. Her obituary will be published later. Services: Friday, viewing from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., then memorial at 2 p.m., at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles. A reception at the family home will follow. www.drennanford.com

Tina Annette Johnson Oct. 24, 1957 — Jan. 6, 2012

Port Angeles resident Tina Annette Johnson died in Seattle of renal failure. She was 54. Services: Saturday, Jan. 21, at noon at Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles. www.drennanford.com

ROBERTA JANET ‘ROB’ MCINTIRE November 3, 1954 December 27, 2011 Roberta Janet “Rob” McIntire, age 57, of Boise, Idaho, died at The Resort Lodge in McCall, Idaho, on Tuesday, December 27, 2011. She fought a lifelong battle with bipolar depression. Rob was born November 3, 1954, in Wheatland, Wyoming, to Robert and Jessie McIntire. She attended elementary public school and St. Mary’s Catholic School in Cheyenne, Wyoming. She graduated from Wheatland High School and attended the University of Wyoming in Laramie. She received an associate degree in business from Metro State College in Denver. Rob started her career at Mountain West in Cheyenne in 1985 as a service representative. Later, she

Ms. McIntire moved to Denver and continued working with U.S. West, where she excelled her quotas in sales and won trips and many awards. In 2004, she moved to Boise, where she worked as a data specialist with Qwest DSL Center (now CenturyLink) until her death. She will be lovingly remembered by mother and stepfather Jessie and

Bert Grable, sisters Lizabeth Morrison and Maureen Kunesh, favorite aunts and uncle, nieces, nephew, many cousins and her friends and coworkers from Denver and Boise. She was predeceased by her father, Robert, and brothers, Christopher and Matthew McIntire. A celebration of Rob’s life was held at the Center for Spiritual Living in Boise on January 7, 2012. A memorial mass was celebrated at St. Patrick Roman Catholic Church in Wheatland, Wyoming, on Wednesday, January 11, 2012. Rest in peace, Rob. Your loving spirit and big heart will remain forever in the hearts of all who knew you. Memorial donations may be made to National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Clallam County, P.O. Box 3416, Sequim, WA 98382.

Death and Memorial Notice DAVID EARL GAULT November 29, 1958 January 7, 2012 David died peacefully at home after a brief battle with cancer at the age of 53. He lived in the Colony Surf Community on Hood Canal with his longtime companion, Adriane Myers. He was born at Olympic Memorial Hospital in Port Angeles on November 29, 1958, to Esther B. (Bascom) Forsyth and the

Death and Memorial Notice REV. ROBERT WARREN POSTMA May 22, 1921 December 18, 2011 Memorial service for the Rev. Robert W. Postma, who passed away December 18, 2011, will be held Saturday, January 14, 2012, at 11 a.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 1111 Franklin Street, Port Townsend. A reception will follow at the church. Contact the family at mrpostma@yahoo.com for directions and other information.

late Earl K. “Lefty” Gault. David attended school in Port Angeles. He worked construction for several years around Western Washington. He also worked at a fishing lodge in Alaska, the Rayonier cleanup site in Port Angeles and other odd jobs in Eastern Washington, Idaho and Texas. David met Adriane while working as caretaker at the Colony Surf Community, where he settled for the duration of his life. He was an active member of Alcoholics Anonymous for many

years. He also enjoyed the outdoors — walking, hiking, camping and clamming with his family and dogs. David is survived by Adriane Myers of Lilliwaup; his mother, Esther Forsyth of Puyallup; and his two sisters, Marilyn (Greg) Parrish of Port Angeles and Marcia Hughes of Puyallup, and their families. A celebration of life will be held at the Camp Fire Clubhouse, 619 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, on Saturday, January 14, 2012, at 1 p.m.

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360417-3528.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at www.peninsuladailynews.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 12, 2012 PAGE

A9

Media load questions for Republicans EVEN FAIR-MINDED LIBERALS, of which there must be a few, should acknowledge that the Saturday-Sunday “blitz” of the Republican presidential candidates by ABC and NBC correspondents looked like a play designed by the left wing of the Democratic Party. Clearly the questions by Cal ABC’s George Stephanopoulos Thomas and Diane Sawyer about contraception and same-sex marriage were asked to trap the GOP candidates into delivering sound bites that the Barack Obama re-election campaign could use against the eventual nominee and the party at large. These were the types of accusatory questions that would never be asked of a Democratic president.

One would not expect to hear, for example, a question like this to President Obama: “Mr. President, millions of babies have been legally aborted in this country since 1973; how can you so callously dismiss unborn children, many of whom would now be productive, taxpaying citizens, by taking a prochoice stance on abortion?” This is how it works: If you are a journalist who clearly favors the re-election of President Obama, you ask questions of Republicans in an effort to make them look foolish, forcing them to address subjects other than the economy and threats to national security. When you question Democrats, you ask questions people care most about and usually allow the answer, however inaccurate, to go unchallenged. During last Sunday’s NBC News/Facebook debate on “Meet the Press,” the conservative Media Research Center (mrc.org) found: “Out of the 41 questions directed to the six Republican

presidential candidates . . . 25 of them were from the left, 13 questions were neutral, mainly about the campaign horse race and electability, and only three questions pressed the candidates from the right.” On “60 Minutes” last month, correspondent Steve Kroft delivered this fat softball to President Obama: “Since the midterm elections, you made an effort at bipartisanship. It hasn’t worked out that way. . . . You gave up a lot. You said you wanted a balanced approach. You didn’t get it. “You cut a trillion dollars and set up the framework to cut another trillion plus, and the Republicans gave up nothing. “I mean, there are people in your own party who think that you were outmaneuvered, that you were stared down by John Boehner and Grover Norquist and capitulated. . . . “It seems to be all the compromising is being done by you.” And so it goes in every modern election cycle.

To the mainstream media, Republicans are pigheaded and unwilling to compromise with a Democratic president (or a Democratic Congress). That’s because in media-land, only Democrats want what is best for “real Americans.” Get it? MSNBC has apparently suspended conservative Pat Buchanan because that network doesn’t like his “biases,” but Democratic biases are just fine with management. None of this will change as long as liberals continue to dominate major media. Instead of complaining, which changes nothing, Republicans should run the equivalent of a Tim Tebow option play. They should refuse to participate in any more dog-and-pony shows designed to trip them up. Instead, they should create their own panels with an ideological mix of interrogators. Invite a couple of “wild card” conservative partisans like Rush Limbaugh or Sean Hannity to add to the journalistic mix.

If the “Miss America” contest could invite Limbaugh as a judge in 2010, why can’t the Republican presidential candidates invite him, or Hannity, to judge and question them? The ratings would be huge and the public would get better answers to more substantive questions than the “gotcha” questions they must now endure. Perhaps it’s too late for this election cycle, but maybe not. All it would take is one such event and the public will instantly see what it’s been missing. After that, there would likely be no turning back.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

Guantanamo at 10: From the prisoner and the prosecutor TEN YEARS AGO, Omar Deghayes and Morris Davis would have struck anyone as an odd pair. While they have never met, they now Amy share a profound conGoodman nection, cemented through their time at the notorious U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Deghayes was a prisoner there. Air Force Col. Morris Davis was chief prosecutor of the military commissions there from 2005 to 2007. Deghayes was arrested in Pakistan and handed over to the U.S. military. He told me: “There was a payment made for every person who was handed to the Americans. . . . We were chained, head covered, then sent to Bagram [Afghanistan] — we were tortured in Bagram — and then from Bagram to Guantanamo.” At Guantanamo, Deghayes, one of close to 800 men who have been sent there since January 2002, received the standard treatment: “People were subjected to beatings, daily fear . . . without being convicted of any crime.” While Deghayes and his fellow inmates were suffering in their cages, the Bush administration was erecting a controversial legal framework to prosecute the Guantanamo prisoners. It labeled those rounded up “enemy combatants,” argued they had no protections under the U.S. Constitution, nor

under the Geneva Conventions, no rights whatsoever. Guantanamo became a legal black hole. When I asked Col. Davis if he felt that torture was used at Guantanamo, he said: “I don’t think there’s any doubt. I would say that there was torture. Susan Crawford, a Dick Cheney protegee, said there was torture. John McCain has said waterboarding was torture, and we’ve admitted we’ve waterboarded. “There have been at least five judges in federal court and military courts that have said detainees were tortured.” Chained, kept in cages in orange jumpsuits, subjected to harsh interrogations and humiliations, with their Muslim faith vilified, the prisoners at Guantanamo began to fight back, through the time-honored tradition of nonviolent noncooperation. They began a hunger strike. In response, examples were made of Deghayes and the other protesters. He recalled: “After beating me in the cell, they dragged me outside, and then one of the guards, while another officer was standing, observing what was happening, [tried] to gouge my eyes out. . . . I lost sight in both of my eyes. “Slowly, I regained my sight in one of the eyes. The other eye has completely gotten worse. “And they went to do the same thing to the next cell and the next cell and next cell . . . to frighten everyone else from campaigning or from objecting to any policies.” Deghayes now has sight in one eye. His right eye remains shut. After his release from Guantanamo, he was sent back to Britain. He is suing the

Peninsula Voices Rates and dams On Saturday, Jan. 7, I received my mail and among the contents was the public utility district bill. I do remember reading about a rate increase but I can’t remember what the reason was for the increase. Could it be that the people who govern these things are “blowing smoke up our pants? I for one think that the

sole reason for this increase is because of the loss of power production due to the loss of these dams. “Great day in the morning” for doing away with the dams. Now we have drained a water resource and an energy producer and a possible recreation area for generations to come. Let’s all rejoice for the reason they say this is all taking place: salmon production.

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Do you really believe that this will happen? The river that flows west of Sequim hasn’t any dams on its entire length. Where are all the salmon in that stream? People who have been here for many years tell me that a person once could have walked to the other side on all the salmon in the stream. Joel R. Pursell, Sequim

British government for its collaboration in his imprisonment and torture. Col. Morris Davis, disgusted with the military tribunal process, resigned his position in 2007, and in 2008 retired from the military. He went to work at the Congressional Research Service. After penning an opinion piece critical of the Obama administration’s embrace of the military tribunals, which was published in The Wall Street Journal in 2009, Davis was fired. Deghayes notes that the hundreds of men who have left Guantanamo this past decade have been released because of pressure on governments from grass-roots campaigning. That is why more than 350 separate protests were held this week, on Guantanamo’s 10th anniversary. One hundred seventy-one men remain imprisoned there, more than half of whom have been cleared for release, but languish nevertheless. To make matters worse, in what Col. Davis called a “complete act of cowardice,” President Barack Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act, giving the U.S. government the power to

OUR

detain anyone, without charge, for an indefinite period of time. Davis explained that it “is not a dramatic departure from what the policy has been for the last few years, but now it’s law.” One could imagine an “Occupy Guantanamo” movement, but that would be redundant: The United States has occupied Guantanamo since 1903. Since the U.S. has maintained a crushing embargo against Cuba for more than a half-century, presumably because it doesn’t like Cuban policies, you’d think the U.S. would exhibit model behavior on its little slice of Cuba. It does just the opposite. Which is why grass-roots movements are so important. With the U.S. presidential race heating up, be assured that the Republican and Democratic parties see eye to eye on Guantanamo.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@democracynow. org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

much of that time speaking of work. Several eloquent letters Instead, it is a time of have been written regardletting go and enjoying one ing the [Port Angeles] city another’s company. finance director, Yvonne I can attest to Yvonne’s Ziomkowski. honorable, sincere, loyal I can only say what I and caring character. know about my dear friend, That character carries Yvonne. over to her work environShe is among a group of ment as well. my close-knit friends. After 20-plus years of We spend a lot of time service with integrity to together. We don’t waste our city, I find this whole

This whole circus

circus ridiculous. It is an outrage that simply being accused of wrongdoing may sully her outstanding name. Those of us who really know Yvonne intrinsically know she is incapable of these allegations. We don’t need no stinking investigation. We already know the truth. Patty Ford, Port Angeles

NEWS DEPARTMENT

HAVE YOUR SAY

Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531, leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ ROY TANAKA, news editor; 360-417-3539, roy.tanaka@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525, brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-417-3550, diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hot line: 360-417-3506


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Firefighters douse 1-room blaze near PA BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A quick-thinking teenager helped firefighters contain a Wednesday morning house fire to one room southwest of Port Angeles, Clallam County Fire District No. 2 Chief Sam Phillips said. No one was hurt in the blaze that occurred shortly before 8 a.m. at 3818 Airport Road. Tyler Barr, 16, reported the fire to dispatchers. Phillips said Barr had the presence of mind to close the bedroom door where the fire started, exit the home and phone 9-1-1. “Tyler’s quick, calm action and his clear thinking to close the door reduced the amount of oxygen to the fire, helping to keep it in the room of origin,” Phillips said.

Phillips said the cause of the fire appeared to be combustible materials too close to a heater. A detailed investigation is needed to rule out electrical malfunction of the heater, he said.

Heavy smoke

from all of the rooms and protected furnishings from water used in mop-up activities. The homeowner, Jamie Barr, praised firefighters for keeping the blaze contained to one room, Phillips said. Clallam County Public Utility District crews disconnected the power to aid the safety of firefighters battling the fire. The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office provided traffic control. Phillips said the Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the American Red Cross will help the family with food and lodging until the home can be repaired.

Crews were met with heavy black smoke throughout the home when they arrived. Firefighters attacked the blaze after laying a supply line from a nearby hydrant. The fire was under control within 25 minutes, Phillips said. Fifteen firefighters and a command officer responded with two engines, one water ________ tender, one squad and one command vehicle. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be CLALLAM COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT NO. 2 After the blaze was reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. Firefighters leave them home at 3818 Airport Road, where a fire was under control, crews ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. reportedly caused by a heater. removed noxious smoke com.

Local group The CornStalks to sow tunes during Art Blast

Love poem, Strauss in concerts this weekend

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

blues tunes,” Jakubcin said. The bimonthly second Friday Art PORT ANGELES — The January Art Blast at the Port Angeles Library celeBlast will bring The CornStalks’ threebrates the talents of local performance part harmonies and driving rhythms to artists. the Port Angeles Library on Friday. This month’s blast also provides an The free concert will be at 7 p.m. at opportunity to meet the visual artists the library at 2210 S. Peabody St. It will be preceded at 6:30 p.m. by the showcased in the winter exhibit on display from today through March 7. opening reception for the winter Art in Artists featured in the show are Ed the Library visual arts exhibit. The concert will be an opportunity to Morales, David Haight, Marilyn Santiago, Valerie Thomas and Mary Beth enjoy this new musical configuration, The CornStalks, said Margaret Jakubcin, Beuke. All Art in the Library programs are assistant director. free. They are supported by the Port The group is composed of popular Angeles Friends of the Library. local favorites Kim Trenerry (of DeadLimited library services are available wood Revival), Stephanie Doenges (of Rollin’ Waters) and Paul Stehr-Green (of during these after-hours events. For more information, contact JakubSuperTrees). cin at 360-417-8505 or AssistantDirector@ “The CornStalks will rock the books nols.org, or visit www.nols.org and click off the shelves with their soulful mix of on “Events-Art in the Library.” original and traditional country and

Briefly . . . Seattle-based vet to speak on gorillas

2 4 - H O U R

Wild Olympics talk

In a rare pair of concerts in Port Angeles and Sequim, local actor Lee Harwell will recite a love poem, and Seattle-based music director Adam Stern will accompany him, playing the music of Richard Strauss. And that’s just part of the program to be presented by the Port Angeles Chamber Orchestra on Friday and Saturday nights. In addition to “Enoch Arden,” the poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, the evening features three chamber works: Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in G Major for Violin and Piano, Robert Linn’s Concertino for Violin and Wind Octet, and Mozart’s 12th Serenade for Winds. Stern, also the conductor series of educational presen- of the Port Angeles Symtations with a conversation phony Orchestra, will be at about the Wild Olympics the piano, while John proposal. Weller, assistant concertThe event will be held at master of the Seattle Symthe Sequim Boys & Girls phony, will be the violin Club, 400 W. Fir St., at soloist at both concerts. 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23. The Friday concert will Speakers include Carol be at Holy Trinity Lutheran Johnson of the North Olym- Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., pic Timber Action CommitPort Angeles, and the Sattee; Bill Pickell, former exec- urday performance will be utive director of the Washat the Sequim Worship ington Contract Loggers Center, 640 N. Sequim Ave. Association; and Wild OlymBoth performances will pics representative Jim Gift. start at 7 p.m., and all seats The meeting is open to are $12. all, and questions from the Harwell is well-known public are encouraged. on the North Olympic PenSend questions to fourc. insula for his work in more info@yahoo.com by Wednes- than 100 shows, from day. “Here’s to the Ladies!” at Peninsula Daily News Key City Public Theatre in

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30 Years Experience

strength of [the sailor’s] love that I find most compelling,” Harwell added. “But to explain why would be giving away the ending.” A recitation such as this one is an unusual occurrence in a chamber concert, Harwell Stern according to Mark Port Townsend to “You Wendeborn, Port Angeles Can’t Take It with You” at Symphony executive direcOlympic Theatre Arts in tor. Sequim. He is primed to deliver Tickets Tennyson’s tale, which is Tickets to the concerts the story of a fisherman- are on sale in Port Angeles turned-merchant sailor. at Port Book and News, 104 “The heart of the tale E. First St., and at the Port centers on the young man’s Angeles Symphony office, childhood love, whom he 216-C N. Laurel St. marries when they come of In Sequim, they’re availage,” Harwell said. able at BeeDazzled at The “Through various turns Buzz, 130 N. Sequim Ave. of events, he leaves home to Tickets will also be sold serve his family and seek at the door Friday and Sathis fortune — only to be urday evening. shipwrecked.” Details about this and Harwell noted, too, that forthcoming orchestra the 1864 poem inspired events are at www.Port Strauss to compose music AngelesSymphony.org and 360-457-5579. for it in 1897. Then, two “Enoch Arden” ________ movies were made: by D.W. Features Editor Diane Urbani Griffith in 1911 and by de la Paz can be reached at 360Christy Cabanne in 1915. 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ “It is the power and peninsuladailynews.com.

21571193

SEQUIM — Seattlebased lawyer and veterinarian Jode Garbe will discuss her work setting up a gorilla sanctuary in the African nation of Rwanda at a Reader Theatre Plus event at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The free event will be held at the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, 2781 Towne Road. Garbe will discuss her work running RwandaNOW (Nurturing Our World), a nonprofit promoting sustainability, conservation, education, environmental consciousness and green economic empowerment

in Rwanda. Former KIRO and KING television personality Penny LeGate will join Garbe in the presentation, and Readers Theatre Plus members Jim and Carol Dries will speak about their recent trek to Africa to visit gorillas in their native habitat. Garbe is developing Rwanda Wildlife Sanctuary & Science Education Center, which will serve as a venue for Rwandans to learn about their environment and protect it in a sustainable way. This sanctuary also will house rescued wildlife that have been illegally captured and confiscated.

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 12, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Ridge seeks more snow PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THIS IS REALLY getting old. The sky just doesn’t want to cooperate for winter sports enthusiasts. It’s cold out there, check. There are some clouds around, check. The rope tows are up and ready to go on Hurricane Ridge, check. There’s some snow up on the Ridge, check. But not enough to get started with downhill skiing. It’s been dry this week after a somewhat rainy week (down low) last week. It snowed in the mountains but just not enough to start a party. Lori Lynn Gray, Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club president, was a little testy Wednesday afternoon and just didn’t want to talk about the Ridge until there’s positive news to report. But she did open up a little. “We still need another foot [of snow],” she said. “We’re on hold for now.” Mountain manager Craig Hofer was on the Ridge on Wednesday afternoon checking the snow level. He was set to report his findings to Olympic National Park officials afterward and a determination as to whether the Ridge will be open to downhill skiing this weekend would be made at that time. But don’t hold your breath for this weekend, even though it is another three-day holiday weekend. So far the Ridge has been closed for downhill skiing for all the major holidays of the winter sports season. Thanksgiving holiday weekend missed, check. Christmas holiday weekend missed, check. New Year’s holiday weekend missed, check. Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday weekend missed, well, uh, that one is still up in the air but it doesn’t look good. Hey, there’s still Presidents Day holiday weekend in February. Whoopie, let’s party. According to the Northwest Weather and Avalanche Center web site, www.nwac.us/weatherdata/ hurricaneridge/now, the Ridge had 48 inches of snow as of 2 p.m. Wednesday.

Hunter’s courses It’s time for youthful potential hunters to think about taking a hunter’s education/safety course this year. The North Olympic Peninsula Hunter Education program will be holding five classes in 2012. They are set for Feb. 7, March 6, May 1, June 5 and Aug. 7, all Tuesdays. All classes start at 5:30 p.m. at Port Angeles Veteran’s Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles. All enrollment is online this year at http://tinyurl.com/23p4b5o. Sponsored by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, the classes offer one or more instructors offering detailed classroom instruction, practical exercises and live-firing activities to prepare successful students. The classes focus on three broad topical areas, including firearms and outdoor safety, wildlife management and hunter responsibility. The average class includes four to six sessions, spanning 16-plus hours. Successful students must pass a written test, demonstrate safe firearms handling skills and a positive attitude. All hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972, are required to show proof of hunter education course completion or a previous Washington hunting license before purchasing a new hunting license. Increasingly, states require proof of hunter education training prior to purchase of an initial hunting license.

________ Matt Schubert, PDN outdoors editor, is out of town this week.

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend’s Daniel Charlton (25) finds himself surrounded by Sequim players Jayson Brocklesby (21), Tim Guan, second from left, and Evan Hill (3) during Tuesday’s game.

Wolves overtake PT Sequim and PA boys set for Friday battle PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Jayson Brocklesby and Corbin Webb combined for 43 points to spark the Sequim boys basketball team to a second-half comeback against Port Townsend on Tuesday night. The Wolves (7-2, 10-3) beat the Redskins (1-8, 2-11) 59-41 in Olympic League action. Youthful Port Townsend took a 31-30 lead at halftime but the Wolves held the Redskins to 10 points in the second half to run away with the victory. “The first half was the best we have played all year,” Port

Preps Townsend coach Tom Webster said. “Sequim is hard to score against.” Sequim coach Greg Glasser was impressed with the Redskins’ first-half play. “They shot the ball very well and they played good defense,” Glasser said. But in the second half the Redskins couldn’t contain Webb and Brocklesby. “Webb and Brocklesby pretty much took over in the second

half,” Webster said. Brocklesby led all scorers with 22 points while Webb was right behind with 21. Brocklesby also brought down a game-high eight rebounds. “We played really good defense in the second half to hold them to 10 points,” Glasser said. Sickness is hitting the Sequim ranks as starting junior forward Gabe Carter missed the game because of illness. But Glasser is hoping his players will be healthy and ready for a crucial showdown with archrival Port Angeles on Friday night in Port Angeles. Both teams are tied in league with 7-2 records. The game starts at 7 p.m. following the girls contest. “We are going to use the next two days to watch film and pre-

pare for Port Angeles,” Glasser said. “It will be a great atmosphere for the game.” Sequim 59, Port Townsend 41 Sequim Port Townsend

13 17 13 14 17 6 Individual scoring

16— 59 4— 41

Sequim (59) Hill 7, Berry 5, Brocklesby 22, Catelli 4, Webb 21. Port Townsend (41) O’Brien 2, Kelly 8, S. Coppenrath 4, L. Coppenrath 9, Charlton 8, Spaltenstein 8, LeMaster 2.

Port Angeles 63, North Mason 50 BELFAIR — It wasn’t pretty but the Roughriders improved to 7-2 in Olympic League competition Tuesday night. Port Angeles (11-2 overall) blasted out to a 24-9 lead at the end of the first quarter and held on for the win. TURN

TO

PREPS/B2

Forks boys turn back Onalaska Spartans give Loggers their first league loss of year; both at 5-1 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FORKS — Braden Decker ripped the nets for 20 points to spark the Forks boys basketball team to a crucial victory of league co-leader Onalaska in SWL-Evergreen Division action Tuesday day. “This is a big win for us,” a very tired and sick Forks coach Scott Justus said after the game. The Spartans, with only eight varsity players suited up because of a nasty cold or flu going through the team, still managed to beat Onalaska 51-36 to forge a tie at 5-1 for both teams at or near the top of the league standings. Elma was tied with Onalaska for first at 5-0 going into Tuesday’s game. “We could end up being tied for first if Hoquiam beats Elma [Tuesday night],” Justus said. Forks is 9-3 overall. Defense was the key as it always is for the Spartans. “We hang our hat on defense,” Justus said. “We’re not a scoring team.” Forks has scored in the 50s just twice this year but is holding opponents to an average of 39 points a game, holding Onalaska under that at 36. The Spartans held the Loggers to single digits in each quarter. But Onalaska was consistent, scoring nine in each period. “We were able to make enough shots tonight that we got great looks and put them in,” Justus said. And the Spartans were rebounding kings, grabbing 26

boards to Onalaska’s 16. “We owned the glass,” Justus said. Tyler Penn sank 12 points and just missed a double-double with nine rebounds. He also had four assists. “Tyler had a great all-around game,” Justus said. Brady Castellano pulled down a game-high 12 boards and he dished out three assists. Everybody contributed, even the athletes on the bench who didn’t get a lot of playing time. Shaquille Cress and Michael Dean saw their coach struggling with his illness and both gave him ideas for plays. “They said to me, ‘Hey coach, I think this play will work,’ ” Justus said. “We used the plays and we scored on them. It was just a great job by the bench. Everybody contributed in this game.” That included assistant coach Rick Gooding. “Rick did all the coaching tonight,” Justus said. “I would yell something and it would take five minutes for me to recover. “Everybody picked it up for the old, sick guy tonight.” The Spartans next will host Hoquiam on Friday night. “That will be another big game for us,” Justus said. Forks 51, Onalaska 36 Onalaska Forks

9 9 9 9— 36 8 14 15 14— 51 Individual scoring

Onalaska (36) Nedved 11, Ritchey 8, Krause 9, McMillions 5, Barrett 3. Forks (51) J. Penn 5, T. Penn 12, Castellano 8, Cress 2, Decker 20, Leons 4.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Brady Castellano of Forks, left, battles Onalaska’s Devin Hoyt at the net in SWL-Evergreen Division action. Forks gave Onalaska its first league loss.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calender

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Wrestling: North Mason at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Sequim at Port Angeles, 7 p.m. Boys Swimming: Klahowya at Port Angeles, 3 p.m.

Friday Boys Basketball: Hoquiam at Forks, 5:45 p.m.; Sequim at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Vashon Island at Chimacum, 7 p.m.; Neah Bay at Crescent, 8 p.m. Girls Basketball: Vashon Island at Chimacum, 5:15 p.m.; Neah Bay at Crescent, 6:30 p.m.; Sequim at Port Angeles, 5:15 p.m.; Hoquiam at Forks, 7 p.m.

Saturday Boys Basketball: Chimacum at Port Townsend, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Chimacum at Port Townsend, 5:15 p.m. Wrestling: Port Townsend and Sequim at Bainbridge Tournament, 9 a.m. Men’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Edmonds, 7 p.m. Women’s Basketball: Peninsula College at Edmonds, 5 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Monday Mixed Men’s High Game: Calen Walz, 248. Men’s High Series: Calen Walz, 699. Women’s High Game: Nancy VanWinkle, 202. Women’s High Series: Nancy VanWinkle, 572. League-leading Team: P.A.Pigs. Les Schwab Mixed Majors Monday Men’s High Game: Scott Van Dyken, 263. Men’s High Series: Darrell Thomas, 641. Women’s High Game: Karen Paulsen, 196. Women’s High Series: Karen Paulsen, 544. League-leading Team: Red Carpet/Sunrise Carwash. Baxter Auto Parts Old Timers Monday Men’s High Game: Bob Thompson, 198. Men’s High Series: Jay Cameron, 523. Women’s High Game: Una Flanigan, 161. Women’s High Series: Joan Wright, 426. Pee Wee Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Robert Wold, 103. Girls High Game: Jayde Wold, 97. Bantam Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Elijah Chapman, 34. Boys High Series: Elijah Chapman, 97. Girls High Game: Sierra Burkett, 106. Girls High Series: Sierra Burkett, 254. Junior Kids League Saturday Boys High Game: Justin VanWinkle, 182. Boys High Series: Justin VanWinkle, 459. 7 Cedars Mixed Friday Men’s High Game: Bill VanGordon, 256. Men’s High Series: Bill VanGordon, 665. Women’s High Game: Rita Berson, 225. Women’s High Series: Rita Berson, 558. League-leading Team: We Deliver.

SPORTS ON TV

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Today 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Wisconsin vs. Purdue (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Clemson vs. Boston College (Live) 4 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Sony Open, Site: Waialae Country Club - Honolulu (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, New York Knicks vs. Memphis Grizzlies, Site: FedEx Forum - Memphis, Tenn. (Live) 5:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Oregon State vs. Arizona (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Virginia vs. Duke (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Tennessee vs. Mississippi State (Live) 7:30 p.m. (25) ROOT Basketball NCAA, Oregon vs. Arizona State (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Orlando Magic vs. Golden State Warriors, Site: The Oracle - Oakland, Calif. (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Gonzaga vs. St. Mary’s (Live)

Basketball

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PLAYOFF

PRACTICE

Denver quarterback Tim Tebow throws a pass during practice in Englewood, Colo., on Wednesday. The Broncos will play New England in the divisional playoffs Saturday at New England. The winner advances to the AFC championship game.

SEQUIM OLYMPIC LANES Thursday Nine-Pin No Tap Jan. 5 Men’s High Game: Cliff Silliman, 287. Men’s High Series: Jay Cameron, 585. Women’s High Game: Joan Wright, 223. Women’s High Series: Marilyn Hooser, 484. First Street Federal Jan. 4 Men’s High Game: *Wayne H, 210. Men’s High Series: *Wayne H, 577. Women’s High Game: *Dona E, 186. Women’s High Series: *Eva, 442. League-leading Team: Muzzle Loaders *Names reported as provided. Sunlanders T Jan. 3 Men’s High Game: Ray DeJong, 204. Men’s High Series: Ray DeJong, 465. Women’s High Game: Jan Jones, 147. Women’s High Series: Kathlean DeJong, 430. League-leading Team: The Swamp Rats. Wall Street Journal Jan. 3 Men’s High Game: Cliff Siliman, 189.

Men’s High Series: Cliff Silliman, 478. Women’s High Game: Kelly Meyer, 169. Women’s High Series: Kelly Meyer, 474. League-leading Team: Funnies.

Golf SKYRIDGE GOLF COURSE Player’s Day Sunday Individual Net: Dusty Henry, 66; Mark Willis, 73; Don Tipton, 73; Brian Cays, 74; Dave Koehler, 75; Mike Tipton, 75;John O’Rourke, 76; Jerry Pedersen, 76; Pete Nesse, 77. PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Sub Par Any Two Holes Sunday Individual Gross: Gary Thorne, 68; Paul Reed, 69. Individual Net: Jan Hardin, 61; Bob Dutrow, 62; Tom Hainstock, 65; Todd Irwin, 65; Rick Hoover, 67; Rick Parkhurst, 67; Bill Lindberg, 68; Gary McLaughlin, 68; John Tweter, 68; Al Osterberg,68. Better Nine Saturday Individual Gross: Mike Dupus, 33; Gary

Thorne, 33. Individual Net: Gary McLaughlin, 31.5; Tom Humleker, 32; Al Osterberg, 33; John Tweter, 33.5; Bob Dutro, 34; Leo Greenawalt, 34. Best Ball Gross: Mike Dupuis- Gary Thorne, 60. Best Ball Net: Kit Metcalf- Steve Main, 58; Tom Humleker- Don Coventon, 59; Gary McLaughlin- Dave Henderson, 61; Gary McLaughlin- Leo Greenawalt, 61; Bob DutrowAl Osterberg, 61; Gary McLaughlin- Ray Dooley, 63; Dave Henderson- Leo Greenawalt, 63; Chuck Burkhardt- Al Osterberg, 63; Gerald Petersen- Al Osterberg, 63; Tom Humleker- Mel Triggs, 63; Tom Humleker- Mark Mast, 63.

Volleyball

Men’s League Results Monday Peninsula College 82, Northwest Builders 81. Peninsula - Nick Camporini, 26; Dustin Walsh, 16. Northwest - Jakoba Square, 23; Jim Slowey, 21

Football NFL Playoffs Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 7 Houston 31, Cincinnati 10 New Orleans 45, Detroit 28 Sunday, Jan. 8 New York Giants 24, Atlanta 2 Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 14 New Orleans at San Francisco, 1:30 p.m. Denver at New England, 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 Houston at Baltimore, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 1:30 p.m. Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 22 TBD

PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Coed Results Monday High Energy Metals def. Fitness West 25-22, 25-19, 25-20. Higher Grounds/Dual Clean Services def. D.A. Davidson 26-24, 25-16, 27-25. Nuts and Honey def. A Brewed Awakening Espresso 25-19, 25-14, 25-22.

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 29 At Honolulu NFC vs. AFC, 4 p.m. Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 5 At Indianapolis NFC vs. AFC, 3:20 p.m.

Preps: Port Townsend girls hold off Sequim CONTINUED FROM B1

Chimacum next will host Vashon Island on Friday night.

“We had a really good start to Life Christian 65, Chimacum 57 the game and then went on cruise 15 16 16 10— 57 control,” coach Wes Armstrong Chimacum Life Christian 15 21 11 18— 65 said. Individual scoring “It was an ugly win, we did not Chimacum (57) play solid defense, but we will Cray 22, Pagasian 21, Eldridge 8, Dukek 1, Ajax 3, Glessing 2. take it.” Life Christian (65) Hayden McCartney, though, Gillage 2, Huber 3, King 14, Lockert 6, Davis 10, Divers 2, shot lights-out with a season-high Bourge 3, Tooner 8, Johansen 13, Comfort 2. 27 points. Girls Basketball Keenen Walker added nine points while Cole Uvila had eight. Life Christian 54, The Riders will have to Chimacum 32 improve by Friday night when TACOMA — The Cowboys they host tough archrival Sequim at 7 in Olympic League action, trailed Life Christian Academy by only one point at the break but Armstrong said. couldn’t keep pace in the second half of their Nisqually League Port Angeles 63, North Mason 50 game Tuesday night. Port Angeles 24 11 16 12— 63 North Mason 9 11 14 16— 50 Life Christian outscored ChiIndividual scoring macum 16-4 in the third quarter Port Angeles (63) Braithwaite 6, Walker 9, Burke 4, McCartney 27, Uvila 8, to break the game open. Elliott 4, Payton 4. Chimacum found itself in a North Mason (50) Price 12, McKen 14, Crummey 2, Allen 2, andquist 13, Dav- 10-0 hole early but started to enport 2. press to even it up and went ahead for a bit but couldn’t hold on. Life Christian 65, Kiersten Snyder led the CowChimacum 57 boys with 12 points. TACOMA — Landon Cray and The Cowboys, now 2-2 in Rafael Pagasian combined for 43 league and 3-9 overall, next will points but the Cowboys (3-2, 8-4) host Vashon Island on Friday came up short in the Nisqually night in league competition. League game Tuesday night. Life Christian 54, Chimacum 32 Cray sank a game-high 22 points while Pagasian added 21. Chimacum 12 7 4 9— 32 Life Christian had a more bal- Life Christian 12 8 16 18— 54 Individual scoring anced scoring attack with three Chimacum (54) players scoring in double figures. Nelson 6, Thacker 8, Johnson 1, Snyder 12, Cossell 4, Jordan King had a team-high Sutherland 1. Christian (54) 14 while Stefan Johansen netted LifeGarcia 1, Bouffiou 5, Trittin 16, Goodman 2, Moore 12, Long 13 and Charles Davis added 10. 8, Weston 2, Anderson 8.

Port Angeles 59, North Mason 7 PORT ANGELES — The Bulldogs, missing their top player — who is out of the country for two weeks — struggled mightily against the Roughriders in Olympic League action Tuesday night. Coach Michael Poindexter wasn’t happy about how the score looked and said they didn’t try to run it up. “We didn’t want it to be that way,” he said. But the Riders came out on fire after struggling against league power Kingston the Friday night before. The Riders worked on their man-to-man defense in practice and used it in the first half against the Bulldogs. “We came out with good focus,” Poindexter said. North Mason was shut out in the second half when the Riders switched to zone defense. Port Angeles had balanced scoring with Krista Johnson leading the way with 12 points and Kylee Jeffers adding 11. “Krista, Kylee and Maddy [Hinrichs] all shot the ball well from the outside,” Poindexter said. “All the kids shared the ball well.” The Riders improved to 6-3 in league and 7-5 overall. Port Angeles next will host archrival Sequim on Friday night in the first game of a doubleheader with the boys teams. The girls start play at 5:15 p.m.

Port Angeles 59, North Mason 7 North Mason 3 4 0 0— 7 Port Angeles 18 17 16 8— 59 Individual scoring North Mason (7) Stromberg 3, Shumaker 2, Satron 2. Port Angeles (59) Johnson 12, Jeffers 11, Hinrichs 9, Rodocker 8, Cox 4, Northern 4, Frazier 3, K. Jones 2, Walker 2, B. Jones 2, Norberg 2.

Port Townsend 37, Sequim 33 SEQUIM — The Redskins held off the Wolves in the Olympic League game Tuesday night. Port Townsend improved its record to 3-7 in league play and 6-7 overall. With the loss, the Wolves drop to 1-8 in league play and 3-10 overall for the season. “This game was like a survival of the fittest,” Port Townsend coach Randy Maag said. “It was a close game with the score within three points for most of the night.” At the halfway mark, the Redskins led by the slim margin of three points. The second half was even tighter as the Redskins outscored the Wolves by only one point. Codi Hallinan of Port Townsend had a game-high 10 points while Gabbi Hossack scored nine and Jewell Johnson netted eight. Port Townsend next hosts its archrival Chimacum on Saturday night. Port Townsend 37, Sequim 33 Port Townsend13 Sequim

9 7 8— 37 9 10 7 Individual scoring

7— 33

Port Townsend (37) Johnson 8, Maag 6, Lyons 2, Hossack 9, Hallinan 10, Phillips 2. Sequim (33) Balkan 5, Haupt 2, Stofferham 3, Harrison 6, Guan 3, Wallner

3, Briones 4, Besand 7.

Boys Swimming Olympic 108, Sequim 71 SILVERDALE — The Wolves didn’t have the depth for the Trojans in the Olympic League meet but they had several quality swims, including district qualifying times Tuesday. “Many of our swimmers swam their best times,” said Sequim coach Linda Moats. “Overall, we are happy with our athletes’ performances [Tuesday].” Highlights for the Wolves included Matt Cays swimming a fantastic 50-yard freestyle leg of the 200 medley relay in the time of 27.49 seconds. Noe Calderon qualified for districts in the 200 free, improving his best time by three seconds. Kyle Webster also improved his best time by half a second in the 50 free. Aaron Witherell dove for the varsity squad and captured first place with a score of 132.05 points. Steve Dewey dropped 21 seconds off his previous best in the 100 butterfly. In the 500 free, Eric Prosser cut two seconds off his best time while David Vollenweilder dropped 13 off his previous best. The 200 free relay found the team of Calderon, Dewey, Doug Dunbar and Cays highlighting the day as they captured first place. The Wolves next will host Bremerton on Jan. 19 at 3:30 p.m.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, January 12, 2012 PAGE

B3

Hostess seeks Chap. 11 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Hostess Brands Inc., the maker of Twinkies and Wonder Bread, is seeking bankruptcy protection, blaming its pension and medical benefits obligations, increased competition and tough economic conditions. The Chapter 11 filing Wednesday comes just two years after a predecessor company emerged from bankruptcy proceedings. That company, called Interstate Bakeries and based in Kansas City, Mo., filed for bankruptcy protection in 2004. It emerged in February 2009.

But Hostess said Wednesday that its previous efforts to produce incremental change, including the prior Chapter 11 case, were insufficient. In its filing, Hostess disclosed that its biggest unsecured creditor is the Bakery & Confectionary Union & Industry International Pension Fund, which it owes approximately $944.2 million. Its second-largest unsecured creditor, Central States, Southeast and Southwest Areas Pension Plan, is owed far less, about $11.8 million. Hostess President and

CEO Brian Driscoll said in a statement that the company is working to reach a consensual agreement with its unions to modify its collective bargaining agreements. The company said that its current cost structure is not competitive mostly because of legacy pension and medical benefit obligations and restrictive work rules. Hostess said those issues, coupled with more competition and the difficult economic conditions, created a worsening liquidity situation that drove its need to reorganize. The privately held Irving,

Texas-based company said that it will be able to maintain routine operations thanks to a $75 million financing commitment from a group of lenders led by Silver Point Capital LP. It will continue to run bakeries, outlet stores and distribution centers and deliver its goods during the process. The company said that it does not anticipate any disruptions in the making of or delivery of its breads or cake products and reassured that its popular brands, which also include Drake’s, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos, will still be available.

$ Briefly . . . ‘My Life, My Plan’ topic of workshop PORT ANGELES — “My Life, My Plan� is the first in a free, four-part “Navigating Life’s Journey� series by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans that begins Wednesday. The values-based educational workshop will be at St. Matthew Lutheran Church, 132 E. 13th St., from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The presenters will be Stephen C. Moser and Lisa H. Pierson, financial associates with Thrivent Financial in Sequim. “‘My Life, My Plan’ is intended to help individuals discover their values and priorities,� said Moser. “Once participants have identified what’s most important, it’s easier for them to make a plan, stick to it and achieve their goals.� A complimentary soup supper will be served. Child care will be available. To register for the series, phone Thrivent Financial at 360-681-8882 or email stephen.moser@ thrivent.com.

Name change

JEFF CHEW/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM-DUNGENESS

CHAMBER BOARD

Members of the 2012 Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce board of directors were introduced Tuesday at a chamber luncheon at SunLand Golf & Country Club’s community center. They are, from left, Scott Clausen, Joe Borden, Phil Castell, Dion Capitan, Teresa Rubens, Michelle Sorrentino, Vickie Oen, Steve Perry, Liz Harper, Bill Thomas and Christy Rookard, who was re-elected to a second one-year term as board president. Not pictured: board members Liz Parks, Linda Barnfather and Bill Littlejohn. Departing board members who were recognized at the luncheon were Deborah Rambo Sinn, Jean Wyatt and Ron Gilles.

Canada-Asia oil pipeline dispute aired THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KITIMAAT VILLAGE, B.C. — The chief of an aboriginal community that stands to be most affected by a proposed pipeline to Canada’s Pacific coast is questioning whether Canada’s Conservative government already plans to approve the pipeline just as the review gets under way. The challenge from Haisla First Nation Chief Ellis Ross comes as Prime

Minister Stephen Harper ratchets up support for Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline, which would allow Canadian oil to be shipped to Asia. Harper’s new public support for the pipeline was shown after the United States delayed a decision to approve TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline that would take oil from Canada to the U.S Gulf Coast. Public environmental

hearings into the Northern Gateway pipeline began Tuesday in Kitimaat Village, an aboriginal community on British Columbia’s Pacific coast that would overlook Enbridge’s proposed tanker facility. Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver released a public letter on the eve of the environmental review attacking opponents of the pipeline, saying “environmental and other radical

groups� are trying to block it no matter the benefit to Canada. Environmental and aboriginal opponents fear pipeline leaks and a potential Exxon Valdez-like disaster on the pristine Pacific coast. About 220 oil tankers a year would visit Kitimaat’s port. The hearings into the proposal are expected to last for 18 months.

PORT ANGELES — Enterprise Cascadia has changed its name to Craft3. It will continue to specialize in helping borrowers who cannot get financing from traditional sources, including businesses owned by lowincome people, minorities, women, immigrants and Native American tribes and their members. Craft3 senior business lender Mark Bowman works out of its Port Angeles office. Other offices are in Ilwaco, Seattle and Portland and Astoria, Ore. Loans support childcare businesses, businesses dependent on natural resources, those employing sustainable “green� building practices that create family-wage jobs in low-income communities and private businesses organized as sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations or nonprofit organizations. Craft3 also work with property owners seeking to upgrade failing septic systems or implement energy-efficiency measures

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

in their homes. For more information, phone Bowman at 360565-2063 or email mbowman@sbpac.com.

Mine closed COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho — Federal safety inspectors have ordered Lucky Friday Mine, one of the nation’s top silver producers, closed for a year following an investigation prompted by a series of accidents that killed two miners over the past year. Inspectors determined that sand and concrete material that had piled up over the years needed to be removed. Workers will spend the next year essentially power washing the material from the walls of the shaft.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $0.9697 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $3.4657 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $3.5100 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $1999.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8674 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1634.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1631.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $30.090 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $29.783 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1487.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1462.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Religious employee can’t sue church, court rules THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued the Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School of Redford, Mich., on behalf of employee Cheryl Perich, over her firing, which happened after she complained of discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Writing the court’s opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts said allowing anti-discrimination lawsuits against religious organizations could end up forcing churches to take religious leaders they

no longer want. other types of suits, includ- tortious conduct by their “Such action interferes ing actions by employees religious employers,â€? Robwith the internal governance alleging breach of contract or erts said. of the church, depriving the church of control over the selection of those who will personify its beliefs,â€? he said. “By imposing an unwanted minister, the state infringes the Free Exercise Clause, which protects a religious group’s right to shape its own faith and mission 401 East st First Street, Street S Port Po Angeles Angell through its appointments.â€? 360.417.8546 The court’s decision was a www. elwhagallery.com narrow one. “We express no view on Mon–Fri 7am–6pm • Sat & Sun 9am–6pm whether the exception bars

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WASHINGTON — In a groundbreaking case, the Supreme Court on Wednesday held for the first time that religious employees of a church cannot sue for employment discrimination. The court’s unanimous decision in a case from Michigan did not specify the distinction between a secular employee, who can take advantage of the government’s protection from discrimination and retaliation, and a religious employee,

who can’t. It was, nevertheless, the first time the high court has acknowledged the existence of a “ministerial exception� to anti-discrimination laws — a doctrine developed in lower court rulings. This doctrine says the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of religion shields churches and their operations from the reach of such protective laws when the issue involves employees of these institutions. The case came before the court because the federal

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B4

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: I am a very feminine 23-year-old woman who lives at home with my father. I am completely uninterested in getting married or having children now or in the future. I don’t believe it’s the end of the world to be a woman and not want children, but my dad and my grandmother act as though I’m abnormal. Dad says he blames himself for “failing to raise me right.” He also blames himself for the fact that I’m not interested in guys. The thought of being intimate with a guy is disgusting to me. I identify as mostly asexual, though I have had passing infatuations with women. Dad takes this personally like he is responsible for my desires or lack thereof. Grandma is worse. She constantly makes excuses to my male friends about how I’m just “not ready yet” and that they should be “patient.” Abby, I know nothing I say will change their minds, but is there something I can do to make them understand they didn’t fail? This is who I am. How can I end the guilt trip and keep the peace? Born This Way in North Carolina

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

by Corey Pandolph

by Hank Ketcham

DEAR ABBY But when she’s here, she constantly Van Buren corrects my children (ages 8, 14 and 18) and instructs my husband and me on how we should spend our money. She also doesn’t like it when I swear (which I usually don’t do unless she’s around) or mention what I think of people she has sent my way who have burned me. By the time she leaves — usually four days — I am so stressed and emotional that I cry at the drop of a hat. I cannot, nor do I want to, continue to have her here when she doesn’t respect my rules. I respect her rules when I visit her home. Obviously, there is much more, but I’m stressed to the max and nearly at the point of being done. Abby, can you give me any pointers to deal with this? Visit or Not?

Abigail

Dear Born This Way: People who have no sexual feelings are asexual. People who are attracted to members of the same sex are gay, and they, too, are born that way. It has nothing to do with the way they are raised. You cannot live your life trying to please your father and grandmother, and you have nothing to apologize for. If you need help explaining why you are the way you are, contact PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays), an organization that can provide you with literature that will explain it to them. You can find more information at www.pflag.org.

Dear Visit or Not?: After you have calmed down and before your mother’s next “raid,” write her a letter. Explain that while you love her, her visits are taking a significant emotional toll on you. Say she is welcome as long as she refrains from correcting your children because that’s your job. Say also that she must stop telling you what to do with your money and correcting your language because you’re an adult now. Remind her not to send any more people your way, and why. If she can accept those terms, she’ll be welcomed with open arms. Some people need ground rules spelled out for them, and your mother appears to be one of them.

Dear Abby: I’m a 37-year-old wife and mother of three. My mother visits us when she’s in town during work-related trips, so it’s not like she’s around all day, thank heavens.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

__________

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

‘Abnormal’ woman was born this way

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Expect someone to confuse you or misrepresent you. You are best to take control and refrain from letting anyone speak on your behalf. You may have to take on more, but in the end you will face less controversy. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Time spent working toward a professional goal will pay off. Don’t give in to someone trying to talk you out of finishing what you start. Being responsible will make a good impression on someone looking for a partner. Invest in you. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll have to face the music if you have been evading issues that keep coming up in conversation. Covering up an incident that needs to be addressed or trying to avoid hurting someone’s feelings will only make matters worse. 3 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You will fall heir to valuable information if you attend a conference or seminar, or just listen to what someone with experience has to say. Your ability to learn and masterfully apply what you discover will lead to advancement. Love is in the stars. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make plans to attend an event that will allow you to expand your interests and your friendships. Your ability to interact intelligently will attract someone who wants to help you develop a project that can boost your reputation. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You can handle whatever you are up against. Keeping your plans a secret until you are ready to put them into motion will allow you to avoid opposition. The element of surprise will give your plan added appeal. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Don’t let emotions or the people you love stand in your way. You have to pick your battles wisely and protect your money and your status from anyone trying to damage your reputation or take your cash. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Spending time with children or getting together with someone you love will help you form a closer bond. Taking time to enhance your image or to gain greater confidence is highlighted. Don’t let anyone push you into something you don’t want to do. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Form an alliance with someone you trust. You can stabilize your life personally, financially and medically by doing what’s best for you. A positive change at home and to your lifestyle should be your goal. Love is highlighted. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Talk to close friends or your partner about your future plans. Getting an outside opinion as to how you should proceed professionally will give you greater insight into the best way to prepare for the future. Impulsiveness is the enemy. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Look to the past for answers that will help you out now. The experience you have had with someone will give you insight into how to handle a situation you currently face. Don’t let emotion cloud your vision. Act on principle. 2 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Play to win. You have all the right moves and will outshine anyone who competes with you. A partnership from your past can be revisited with a different set of rules. What hasn’t worked in the past can work now with minor adjustments. 3 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

Peninsula

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Thursday, January 12, 2012 B5

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GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-5 p.m., 50 Mocking Bird Lane, Port Ludlow. L o t s o f f i s h i n g g e a r, huge collection of high end rods and reels, salt water, fly fish, etc. 100s of nautical charts, tools, guns, knives, collectibles, household stuff, 4 hp Suzuki boat m o t o r, h a r d b o t t o m dingy, dual mig welder, motorcycles and kid stuff.

BEEF: Grass fed, 2.5 yr c o w, h a n g i n g w e i g h t $1.70 lb. 452-0837. FIREWOOD: $160 c o r d . D e l i ve r e d . P. A . Joyce. 461-9701. FORD: ‘97 F350 XLT. 7.3L turbo diesel, super cab, auto, dual tank, 5th wheel, dually. $8,500. 360-775-5418

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HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Road King FLHRI 4,950 miles! Fuel-Injection, removable windshield, foot pegs, back rest,hard saddle bags, foot boards, heel-shift, oval-tip pipes,and many other extras. $10,900. 360-808-4176

Announcements

Found

FREE: 10 mo. old female Plott Hound. (360)452-6111

Ignorant The Co2 in the air is making the oceans more and more acid. This is making the planet Earth die. Scientists are aware of this. Are you? What will educated people do to you if your TV succeeds in persuading you to elect Rick Santorum? Think about it. Ask Jack: wenay@olypen.com www.dailyclimate.org/acidification

FOUND: (2) tennis rackets. On 5th and Race St., P.A. on Saturday, 12/31/11. 360-457-8940. FOUND: Cat. Black and white, jumped out of a red truck on Old Olympic H w y, n ex t t o A g n e w Store, P.A. Call to identify. 360-460-7453. FOUND: Cat. Black male, in Sequim. Call to identify. 681-5370 FOUND: Cat. Freshwater Bay area, P.A. Call to identify, and leave message. 670-3644.

LOST: Cat. All black and wite, about 16 lbs, on S. Laurel and Viewcrest St., near P.A.H.S. 360-775-9114

LOST: Dog. Blue Merle Au s t ra l i a n S h e p h e r d , neutered male, wearing HAY: Good quality grass choke collar, long hair, extremely friendly. From hay. $5.50 bale. Lower Elwha area/ 360-461-5804 Chr istmas Tree Lane, MAZDA: ‘84 Pickup. P.A. 360-461-5495. $1,950. (360)452-5126. L O S T: D o g . E l d e r l y, MISC: JVC 800x digital gray muzzle, med. size v i d e o c a m e r a , $ 1 0 0 . black and white shor t Bounty Hunter metal de- hiar, female, deaf, 15th tector, w/carrying case, and F Streets, Port An$75. 360-457-4322. geles. 477-9315. P.A.: 4 Br., 2 BA, fenced LOST PROPERTY? yard, pets ok. $925, 1st, Always check with last, dep. 452-7530. Clallam County Sheriff’s SEQUIM: Beautiful ‘82 Office for lost property. 360-417-2268 14x66 Skyline, in A-1 cond., 55 park, corner LOST: Silver bracelet, lot. $17,500/obo. with intricate link pattern, 683-3639 or 808-0298 between hospital and d o w n t o w n P. A . o n WANTED: OLD BARN 12/31. 206-419-9417 W O O D. O l d b a r n , Employment fence, shed boards for General u s e i n a r t p r o j e c t s. 1x8, 1x10 especially, or wider. Negotiable. Administrative AssistWill haul away. ant. Duties include 360-452-7308 control and distribution of engineering docuWO N D E R F U L h o u s e - ments, greeting visicleaning. Experienced, tors and general front references. Call Esther office activities for a (360)775-9513 manufacturing compaPeninsula Classified ny. Will also act as Executive Assistant to 360-452-8435 the CEO and support F O U N D : C a t . Yo u n g Finance and HR functabby, near hospital in t i o n s a s n e c e s s a r y. Send resume to: P.A. Call to identify. HR@acti.aero 360-457-6430 Drug Free, EEOC/AA FOUND: Dog. Neutered male Australian Shep- AIDES/RNA OR CNA h e r d / R o t t w e i l e r m i x , Best wages, bonuses. near Lower Elwha, P.A. Wright’s. 457-9236. Call to identify. Leave BA RT E N D E R : Pa r t msg. 206-330-6034. time, exp. Apply in perFOUND: Keys in Shane son at Peak’s Brew Pub. Park, P.A. Call to identify. 457-6125. BOOKKEEPER Manufacturing company seeks an organized Lost and self-motivated inLOST: Bracelet. Gold, dividual with attention very unique - 2 chains, 1 to detail for a full-time thin, 1 thick. Either in position as a BOOKTendy’s Restaurant or K E E P E R i n P o r t the Ver n Bur ton Gym, Townsend. Candidate will be proficient with P.A. 360-457-3361. Microsoft Word and Excel. Experience should include A/R, A/P, Payroll & some General Ledger. Exper ience with QuickBooks or QuickBooks Enter pr ise software strongly preferred. $20/hour DOE, plus benefits. Qualified team players with problem-solving skills willing to work under pressure should send resume to hr@imspacific.com Sneak-a-Peek

4B235387

Peninsula Classified makes short work of matching the right employment opportunities with the right employees. Whether you’re looking for help or seeking a position, it only takes MINUTES when you turn to Peninsula Classified.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

FUN, friendly dental office looking for full-time dental assistant to add to our family. Send resumes with references to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#238/DENTAL Pt Angeles, WA 98362 HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR Must be a dependable & positive person. Responsibilities include: managing a staff of 16, scheduling, inventory, able to maintain policies and procedures. Be able to multitask and complete assigned tasks within all d e a d l i n e s. Wa g e a n d benefits DOE. Please apply in person at: Olympic Lodge Hotel 140 Del Guzzi Drive, Pt Angeles WA 98362 HOUSEKEEPING POSITIONS AVAIL. Apply in person at Olympic Lodge, 140 Del Guzzi Dr., Port Angeles. www.peninsula dailynews.com

Employment General

Employment General

LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE SEEKS HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONAL Position is under the supervision of the Employment Services (ES) Director. Responsible for all personnel matters, provides administrative support for needs of the HR Department for the L owe r E l w h a K l a l l a m Tribe. Minimum qualifications include: Bachelor’s degree and five (5) years experience in the Human Resource field of work OR High School Diploma or Equivalent; required nine (9) years experience in the Human Resource field of work; any appropriate combination of educat i o n a n d ex p e r i e n c e . Wa g e s : D O Q , O p e n s 01/05/12 until filled. Please contact 360.452.8471 for additional information.

NEEDED: Bookkeeping services, AP/AR, payroll, P&L, tax prep; QB and Excel proficient. Send info: Peninsula Daily News PDN#241/Bookkeep Pt Angeles, WA 98362 ON-CALL RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req HS/GED and cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chromic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Po r t A n g e l e s, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

Makah Tribal Council is seeking a Business Enterprise Manager that is enthusiastic and thrives on challenges, ove r a l l c o r p o r a t e r e sponsibility for management of the enterprise and it’s divisions including planning, budgeting and evaluation, financial management, human resource management, proper ty management, public relations and marketing, business development and all other related activities. The educational requirements are a Bachelors or Masters degree with emphasis in financial management, organization planning, human resources plus min. 6 yrs. in organizational and business management positions, including production and supervision. M i n . 5 y r s. m i d l eve l m a n a g e m e n t ex p e r i ence. Mail resume, name of 3 professional references to: Makah Tribal Council Attn: Personnel Office PO Box 115 Neah Bay, WA 98357 or fax to: (360)645-3123 or email to mtcpersonnel@centurytel.net Makah Tribal Council is seeking a Forestry Program Manager that is enthusiastic and thrives on challenges. O ve ra l l c o r p o ra t e r e sponsibilities for management of the forest and it’s divisions including planning, budgeting and evaluation, financial management, human resources management, proper ty management, public relations and marketing, business development and all other related activities. Educational requirem e n t s : B a c h e l o r ’s o r M a s t e r ’s d e gr e e w i t h e m p h a s i s i n fo r e s t r y management, organization planning, human resources plus min. 6 yrs. of organizational and forestry management positions including production and supervision. Min. of 5 yrs. mid level management exp. Mail resume, name of 3 professional references to: Makah Tribal Council Attn: Personnel Office PO Box 115 Neah Bay, WA 98357 or fax to: (360)645-3123 or email to mtcpersonnel@centurytel.net

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

Operations Manager Physical Therapy/ Rehab Use your enthusiasm, clinical, and management skills while developing programs and providing for deliver of quality rehabilitative ser vices. PT license required with advanced degree/training strongly encouraged. Management program development, and marketing experience key. Contact nubckner@ olympicmedical.org EOE PORT TOWNSEND GOODWILL Now Hiring Experienced Sales Lead Must have 2 years retail exp at supervisor level. Apply at 602 Howard Street, Port Townsend. RESIDENT ADVISOR To work with developmentally disabled adults, no exper ience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m. For more info: 452-9548. RNA/CNA: All shifts available, good wages. Golden Years Personal Care. 452-3689, 452-1566 SALES REP: SSNW looking for a motivated sales rep to sell dispatching/answering services. Salary + commiss i o n . 5 ye a r s s a l e s experience. Please send resumes to: info@SSNWHQ.com Employment Wanted

ALL around handyman, anything A to Z. 360-775-8234 FOR HIRE mature Christian man Sequim/ P.A. area. $80 per day, 6 hours. 360-683-9499. HOME cleaning. Metic. a n d h o n e s t , ex c . r e f. Amie P.A. 360-500-3272 Put the ‘WIN’ in Winter. Prune - Weed Feed - Mulch Outstanding results! Sunshine Gardening 452-9821. WO N D E R F U L h o u s e cleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther (360)775-9513 www.peninsula dailynews.com

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it. Real Estate for Sale Clallam County

4 SEASONS RANCH Updated one level 3 Br., 2 bath home. Kitchen includes granite counter tops, stainless refrigerator, recessed lighting, and tiled back splash. Cozy sunken living room with fireplace inser t. Very close to Discovery Tra i l . B u y a l i fe s t y l e, golfing, horse and barn, swimming pool. Close to the beach or fish from the creek. $229,900. ML262219 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Real Estate for Sale Clallam County

CENTRALLY located in Port Angeles. 1,296 sf, 3 Br., 2.5 bath in a quiet neighborhood. Open living area, kitchen with lots of counter space. Bright windows with views of mountains and the Strait. Private fenced in yard, large detached 2 car garage. $189,000 Call 360-477-9597 for AFFORDABLE Cozy mobile, recently more info. Offers with a painted. Almost as much Buyer’s agent considstorage sf (556) as the ered. mobile itself. ADA indoor access ramp with zero CUSTOM BUILT lawn maintenance and Craftsman with extremeconcrete patio. Hear the ly private acreage on the nearby creek plus enjoy border of the city limits. the garden boxes, rose No expense was spared bushes and rhododen- and the list of amenities drons. is long. Covered wrap $10,500. ML262007 around porch. Open Holly Coburn floor plan on the main 457-0456 level with a kitchen to WINDERMERE P.A. die for. Porcelain Title floors, built-ins, gas BEST MOVE stove with or nate tile FOR 2012! backsplash. Attached So you are looking for two car garage and a privacy, a large fenced d e t a c h e d 3 c a r s h o p ya r d a n d a b e a u t i f u l with storage and a loft house in great shape plus a RV carport. ready to move in? Bingo! $599,000. C a l l i n g o n t h i s 3 B r. ML261244/235697 home could be the best Jennifer Felton move you make for the 457-0456 new year! $162,500. WINDERMERE P.A. ML262425 Dan Gase 417-2804 DEAD SOLID COLDWELL BANKER PERFECT UPTOWN REALTY Enjoy hiking trails next to Dungeness River, clubBLUE MTN MINI FARM house, and golf. 3 Br., Complete with 8 pas- 2.5 bath, recently retured acres, creek and freshed with new carpond, 1,800 sf barn, 900 pets, vinyl floors, kitchsf polebuilding, many en/bathroom counter tother outbuildings, and a ops, and interior paint. 3,170 sf rambler. Relax Bonus room with firein the indoor hot tub or place, 2 car attached swim in the lap pool after garage. Chain-link backa long day. Suitable for yard for pets. Fruit trees, any farming venture. landscaped yards and $439,900 more. ML262311/297751 $199,500. ML261300. Michaelle Barnard Jean Ryker 683-4844 457-0456 Windermere WINDERMERE P.A. Real Estate Sequim East BRAND NEW Opportunity to select inDESIRABLE terior appointments. HO LOCATION dues include water, sew- G o r g e o u s m t n v i e w. er, garbage, insurance, Near Olympic Discovery l a n d s c a p i n g a n d ex t . Trail and Sky Ridge Golf building maintenance al- Course. 1,878 sf, 2 Br., so. $295,000. spacious den skylights, ML262422/305838 security system, re-cirBrenda Clark 683-6880 culating hot water, panWINDERMERE try. Large covered deck, SUNLAND 2 car garage with .75 bath, garden shed and The pros at workshop, greenhouses, PENINSULA DAILY NEWS raised garden beds. can design AND $247,500. ML262417. print your publication. Great Sheryl Payseno-Burley quality at 683-4844 competitive prices. Windermere Real Call Dean at 360-417-3520 Estate Sequim East 1-800-826-7714

5000900

Administrative Assistant. Duties include control and distribution of engineering documents, greeting visitors and general front office activities for a manufacturing company. Will also act as Executive Assistant to the CEO and support Finance and HR funct i o n s a s n e c e s s a r y. Send resume to: HR@acti.aero Drug Free, EEOC/AA

Lost

Real Estate for Sale Clallam County

DON’T HESITATE O r yo u w i l l m i s s t h i s great home. 1,500 sf, 3+ Br., 1.5 bath, basement, on a huge 20,000 sf lot in a sought-after neighborhood. 2 car garage plus enclosed RV storage. $189,500. ML262434 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY GOLF COURSE VIEW Large daylight basement style home that abuts the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. This well maintained home features over 2,800 sf of living area, 3 Br., 2.5 baths, great living room plus a family room, deck with views of the golf course. $230,000. ML262433 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 GORGEOUS FAIRWAY TOWNHOME Desirable Sunland 2 Br., 2 bath plus den townhome located on the 10th fairway with many extras. Light airy kitchen, large living room with cathedral ceiling. Master bath has jetted tub, large tiled shower and powder room. $259,000. ML252435/161644 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY HOME SWEET HOME This home has been in this family for 3 generations. Great backyard for gardening and enjoying mountain view. Generous living space in the living room and “parlor.” Conveniently located on busline and close to grocery. You’ll love the vintage touches throughout. $149,000. ML261890. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY IF you’ve been waiting for a large home with dual views in a central n e i g h b o r h o o d , h e r e ’s your chance to have a great home for less than you could build it! The rooms are ample with a large lower level family room and upper level living room with gorgeous water views. $190,000 ML261965/278378 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. IMMACULATE SINGLE LEVEL Beautifully Landscaped. Spacious living 10’ ceilings, tall doors/windows. Gourmet kitchen, cherry cabinets, honed granite counters, wide planked cherry floors, breakfast bar and pantry. $237,500. ML156557. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising , whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


PRICE REDUCED TO $84,500 This proper ty sits on oversized lot, with a fully fenced yard. Close to bus routes, schools, and shopping. This property is two blocks away from the public library. Home has a chimney for a propane stove, built-in cabinets in living room and hardwood floors. Roof looks relatively good, a one car garage with room for a workbench. ML261770 Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SUPER GOOD CENTS! Affordable light and bright home in Port Angeles mobile home park. New counter tops, hot water heater and entry doors. Remodeled with porcelain sinks, carpets and laminate flooring. Landscaped low maintenance lot. $44,900 ML261451/246908 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. UNIQUE HOME Solid cedar perimeter walls in and out with spacious living area complete with woodbur ning inser t in fireplace. Newer roof, septic system and interior VOC paint. Hardwood floors under carpet. Large yard featuring fruit trees and mature plantings. $199,000. ML252379. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS By DAVID OUELLET

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. ABRASIVES Solution: 6 letters

1/12/12 Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

A U T O B O D Y G N  I F F U B

M G E S O N A N S T S I R I F ҹ D ҹ O M I P O S ҹ L U N R D H ҹ D L S E N E R C T I O E R A N I M A O S O E T C O S N C T T I T H L T O L E A R H C S E T T A

© 2012 Universal Uclick

O E O A P E A S T A A A G S M

L E S N L A C I G T I N E I S

www.wonderword.com

N L R B E E L N E R I D N D S

P O M E R U I D E H G E A L G

W  U Z A C L I T S E R P L R R

T I M A L B A I S A A O A O I

S I V I R M L T L P R I U U N

C O R A C O C L E A N I N G D

N D C G P E B R E M E R Y E H

1/12

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Alumina, Autobody, Belts, Borazon, Buffing, Carbide, Ceramic, Cleaning, Coated, Diamond, Disc, Drilling, Edges, Emery, Grain, Grind, Grit, Lapping, Loose, Marine, Material, Matte, Metal, Mineral, Novaculite, Pads, Paper, Polishing, Pumice, Rods, Rolls, Rotated, Rouge, Rough, Sand, Satin, Scratches, Sheet, Size, Smooth, Sold, Steel, Stone, Tumbler, Worn Yesterday’s Answer: Culinary THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

VEEOK ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

AOTUQ (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Oscar night hopeful 42 Twain, at birth 43 Abbr. between a first and last name, maybe 45 Revolved around 46 Gelid treat 49 Mean 51 Revels 53 Biomedical research org.

Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

‘D’ IS FOR DREAM STARTER Dreaming of land and open spaces with a great mountain view? This fantastic treed acreage in Sequim is close to hiking and horseback trails. Give us a call to see all the possibilities of this .96 acre homesite. $49,900. ML261550 Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company GORGEOUS ACREAGE Close to John Wayne Marina, gently sloping hilltop property, cleared with well already in. Ready to build. Check out the possibilities! $174,000 ML262402/304414 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND LEVEL ACREAGE Mountain views, country feel on 2.51 acres, close to town, build your dream home. PUD water available. $115,000. ML184105/260328 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

FOR SALE: 14x70 mobile in 55+ park. Wood flooring throughout home, new appliances, shop, garden shed, new bathroom. Must see! Asking $12,000 - will carry contract, low down. $10,000 cash. 360-3014-5652 or 360-452-9401 MFG HOME: Barrington 14’x66’, must be moved. Offer incl. carport plus shed. $6,995. 457-0950. SEQUIM: Beautiful ‘82 14x66 Skyline, in A-1 cond., 55 park, corner lot. $17,500/obo. 683-3639 or 808-0298 Real Estate for Sale Office/Commercial

EAST P.A.: Warehous e / wo r k s h o p. 2 2 x 3 2 $250 ea. 457-9732 or 457-9527 TURN KEY OPERATION S e q u i m ’s l e a d i n g d r y cleaning and laundry business. Full service, well equipped with mostly newer equipment. Environmentally fr iendly operation. Experienced employees would stay on at new owner’s option. Owner(s) would assist with transition at no charge. Perfect corner location with high visibility window frontage. $165,000. ML262073 Dave Sharman Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

SECLUDED High bluff waterfront. Great privacy and unobstr ucted views of the strait. 330 ft. of frontage o f h i g h b a n k . Wa t e r share available through Crescent Water Assoc. Real Estate for Rent $144,900. ML261753. Clallam County Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ALMOST new 3 Br., 3 bath numerous upReal Estate for Sale grades close to DiscovManufactured Homes ery Trail, Carrie Blake Par k, the mar ina and AFFORDABLE, MOVE- more. Call Marie. IN READY! Nice home 253-394-3903 with access to all SeJACE REAL ESTATE quim downtown stores Downtown Sequim and services. Rear private fenced yard with 2 Br., 2 ba, single gar., d u plex, new car pet/ wood gazebo. Home has as-new wall-to-wall car- paint, close to sch-ools, pet, double pane vinyl fenced, clean. $900. 582-9848. windows, and attached garage. Stay comJAMES & fortable year-round with ASSOCIATES INC. forced air system with Property Mgmt. heat pump assist. $350 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. park rent includes city wa t e r & s e p t i c . H e n - A 1 br 1 ba................$400 drickson Park is for 55+ H 1 br 1 ba................$500 o l d e r . $ 5 1 , 9 0 0 . A 2 br 1 ba................$675 ML262417 Chuck Mor- H 3 br 2 ba................$990 phy and Lori Tracey H 3 br 2 ba..............$1050 683-4844 Windermere H 2 br 1.5 ba...........$1100 R e a l E s t a t e S e q u i m A Penthouse...........$1200 LAKE HOUSES East H 1/1 furnished.........$550 FOR SALE: 14x70 mo- H 2/2 furnished.........$895 bile in 55+ park. Wood H 2/2 furnished.......$1350 flooring throughout 360-417-2810 home, new appliances, More Properties at shop, garden shed, new www.jarentals.com b a t h r o o m . M u s t s e e ! NEWER SEQUIM WAAsking $12,000 - will T E R V I E W H O U S E . carry contract, low down. 3BR, 2BA. One stor y. $10,000 cash. $ 1 , 1 0 0 . E i l e e n JAC E 360-3014-5652 or TRE Co 360-808-0338 360-452-9401 P.A.: 2 Br. $600, $600 LONG DISTANCE deposit. No pets. Refs. No Problem! 457-5847. Peninsula Classified P.A.: 3 Br., 1.75 bath, new inside. $925 mo. 1-800-826-7714 452-1395

1/12/12

54 Leaves off the guest list 56 Rapper who said, “the ‘P.’ was getting between me and my fans” 58 Annoying insect 62 Two-time ETO commander 63 Blues-rocker Chris 64 Word with run or jump P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, fenced yard. $980. 360-460-7222 P.A.: 4 Br., 2 BA, fenced yard, pets ok. $925, 1st, last, dep. 452-7530. P.A.: 4 Br., 2 ba, with water view. $1,200, 1st, last, + $1,000 dep. 452-1153

TEIHNZ

PEORCP

Print answer here: A Yesterday’s

P.A.: 1 Br. $475-$530. Some pets ok. Downtown. 425-881-7267.

Heavy Equipment

CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, W/D, no smoking. $650 mo., $650 deposit. 457-5352. P.A.: East side, quiet 2 E X C AVAT O R : R u n s Br., deck, carport. $675. great! $8000. Call for de360-452-6611 tails. 360-928-0273 .

P.A.: Female, 60 and older, kitchen privilege, 12 mi. west, near Joyce. P.A.: 913 W 15 ST, 4 $150 mo. 928-1090. Br., 2 ba, 2,280 sq ft, WANTED: Mother-in-law $1,100. apt. for older adult with deanman@olypen.com disabilities. Sequim area or 360-417-9451 pref. 683-5460. P.A.: Clean 3 Br. 2 ba., Commercial Rentals 2 car gar., wtr view. Office/Commercial $1,050. 452-1016. P. A . E a s t 3 / 2 , c l e a n , FOR LEASE: 1,800 sf, 1,650+ sf, garage, stor- open space, 18’ ceilings, a g e , w a t e r v i e w , at 508 W. 8th., P.A. 360-452-9296 days. $1050/mo., 1st/last/ dep. PROPERTIES BY 360-808-3721. LANDMARK PA L O A LTO, S E Q : 1 452-1326 Br. cabin, wdstve, W/D WEST P.A.: 1215 S. C $550. 683-4307. St. 1,200 sf. Dr ive by Properties by Landmark. portangeles- and see! 460-4379. landmark.com Appliances SEQ: Nice lg, 2 Br., + office + sunroom, 2 ba, dbl D RY E R : W h i r l p o o l , 6 gar. By park. $1,000. mo. old. $175. 707-478-5664 504-1165 SEQ/P.A.: 3 Br., mtn. REFRIGERATOR: GE view. $895 mo. tourfac- P r o f i l e s i d e by s i d e . tory.com/517739 White. Large. Frostfree. SEQUIM: 1 Br. 1 bath 29+ cu. ft., ice in door. c o t t a g e. B a ck gr o u n d / $375/obo. 681-7300 credit ck. 1st, last, dep. $550. 477-8180. Electronics SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba. 2 , 6 0 0 s f, h u g e s h o p, ASUS NOTEBOOK 17”, n e a r Wa l - M a r t , n i c e . AMD dual core 1.8ghz, 3 gigs ram, Ati radeon HD $1,200. 681-2500. 2600. $300. 477-4219. SEQUIM: Solmar, 3 Br., 2 ba, gar., new floors/ MISC: JVC 800x digital kitchen. W/D, D/W. Pets v i d e o c a m e r a , $ 1 0 0 . Bounty Hunter metal denegot. $875. tector, w/carrying case, 360-775-1414 $75. 360-457-4322.

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 Condo at Dungeness Golf. 2 BR, 2 BA, no s m o ke / p e t s. A l l a p p l . Must see $650. 1st, last, dep. 775-6739 P.A.: 1 and 2 Br., $600 and up. Crystal Properties, 360-457-2838. P.A.: Great 1 Br., lots storage, no pets. $575 mo. 452-4671. P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $750. 808-4972 P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $500 mo. Cats ok. Move-in cost negotiable for qualified applicants. 452-4409. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

(Answers tomorrow) THUMP FEWEST TICKET Jumbles: SMIRK Answer: His glue business would eventually succeed if he did this — STUCK WITH IT

WA Misc. Rentals Duplexes/Multiplexes

WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent

Apartments for Rent Clallam County

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Firearms & Ammunition

GUNS: Olympic Ar ms .223 caliber model P. C. R . 0 0 A R 1 5 , 3 0 round clip, ammo, flash suppressor, soft case, only 2 rounds fired, $850. Ruger Security Six revolver 2 3/4 barrel, .357 mag, $450, S&W stainless revolver 2 1/2 barrell .357 mag $500. Ruger 94DC 40 cal semi-auto, 3 clips, $500. Llama Super Comanche .44 mag revolver 6 inch barrel, $450. Night Vision monocular, Famous Trails (Russian made) FT950 ‘Night force’ 5x magnification, infra red illuminator, $80. Call 808-6399 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

FIREWOOD: $160 c o r d . D e l i ve r e d . P. A . Joyce. 461-9701. Apartments for Rent Port Angeles-Unfurnished FIREWOOD: $180 cord. 460-5765 CLEAN , SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $575 plus dep. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 1 5 0 2 C S t . , P. A . N o smoking/ pets. 360-452- Commercial Printing Services 417-3520 3423

Home Furnishings

BED: Full size mattress and boxspring. Euro Top p l u s h , l i ke n ew, ove r $ 5 0 0 n e w. S e l l fo r $300/obo. 681-3299. D I N I N G TA B L E : 7 3 ” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very n i c e s e t . $ 1 3 0 . Tw o matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429 or 417-7685 MISC: Classic for mal dining room set, table with 3 leaves and pads, 6 chairs, 2 arms, $800/ obo. Custom formal sofa, new condition, paid $3,500, sell $700/obo. 206-999-7139. MISC: Plaid double recliner $150. Leather sofa and love seat, blue $600. Both ver y nice. 379-1099 MISC: Solid oak dining table with 2 leaves and 8 chairs, $450. Vintage Victorian vanity, $125. Oriental cabinet, $200. All in excellent condition. 808-0471 M I S C : Tw i n b e d s , 2 headboards, 2 frames, 2 box springs, 1 mattress, all $250/obo. Giant cherry execuitve L shaped desk, matching lateral file cabinet, 4 drawers, paid $1,800, like new, sell $400/obo. 206-999-7139

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

REDECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS Victorian wall sconce lamps, $25 ea. Recliner chair, $50. Camel b a c k s o f a , brown/plumb tapestry, $150. Small vintage tole painted table, $25. S ew i n g m a c h i n e i n wood cabinet, $140. Tw o v i n t a g e u p h o l stered side chairs, $50 ea. Wood kitchen table with 4 chairs, $45. Camel back love seat, red pattern, $45. Elegant sofa with exquisite woodwork, $500. Victorian tapestry print and frame, $40. Small stain glass table lamp, $15. These items would make great gifts! 460-0575. SOFA: Elegant sofa with exquisite carved trim and claw ar ms, burgundy and cream t a p e s t r y fa b r i c, 6 6 ” long x 45” wide, excellent condition, paid $1,500 from upscale store. Selling for $500. 460-0575 Miscellaneous

CANOPY: Leer Fiberglass, insulated, red, sliding front cab window, sliding windows on sides, locking rear window/door with keys, 4 clamps included. Came off a red ‘97 Dodge Dakota Long Bed. $500/obo. 360-452-4460 lv msg. Commercial cabinets, shelving, from Twilight Store. $800/OBO. 4573355. naval@wavecable.com

FIREWOOD: Seasoned, ready to burn, come see quality. $190. 461-6843. H OT T U B : 4 p e r s o n . Works, good cond. $350. 360-477-7130. KIRBY: Kirby Centr ia vacuum. Excellent condition, heavy duty, all attachments including carpet cleaner. $400. 681-4861 LOVE SEAT: Stressless brand, less than 1 yr. old, double ottoman with t a bl e, n ew c o n d i t i o n . $3500. 360-457-6887 MOTORIZED wheel chair for sale. Pronto M41, used less than 1/2 h r. Pe r fe c t c o n d i t i o n , compact, easy to drive, tight tur ning radius, stable, six wheels, joystick, comfor table fold down seat, adjustable & fixed height ar ms. $2,000. Pt Hadlock. Pick-up only. 360-732-4097 cgohn@embarqmail.com SEWING MACHINE Montgomery Ward convertible bed sewing machine. Model UHT J 1414 in wood cabinet. Both excellent condition. Includes all par ts and manual. Recently serviced. Used very little. $90. Susan 460-0575. SEWING MACHINE Singer Featherweight. Good condition. Recently serviced. $400. 681-3225 WHISTLER CONDO 2 Br., 2 ba. on Blackcomb lift line for 1 week, 2/10/12-2/17/12. $1,000. 683-1967 Musical Instruments

CONSOLE PIANO. Conn with bench. Gently used. $500/OBO. 452-2805 GUITARS: Gibson Les Paul, Honey Burst AA top, $1850. Fender Amer ican Strat, Sunburst $850. Fender M e x i c a n Te l e c a s t e r FIREWOOD: $179 deliv- $400. Mandolin: Epiphone MM 50/VS Sunered Sequim-P.A. True burst, $450. Amplifiers: cord. 3 cord special for Marshall MG 250 DFX, $499. Credit card ac$450. Peavey Express cepted. 360-582-7910. 1 1 2 , $ 1 5 0 . C r y B a by www.portangeles “Zakk Wylde” wah $90. firewood.com Behringer V-Amp 2 efFIREWOOD: Seasoned, fects/modeler, $85. All all types. $200 delivered. excellent like new. 808360-477-8832 6399

ESTATE Items For Sale. 40’s Duncan Phyfe-style dining table,2 leafs 6 chairs $325, 60’s Broyhill China Hutch $325, 40’s Kelvinator refrigerator $500, Antique Oak R o l l To p desk $1,000/obo. Call 360460-8092.

Lots

of local Homes

360-452-8435 43220691

PRIVACY IN THE CITY Spacious 3 Br., 3 bath rambler on 3 lots with family room and den. Tastefully updated, this contemporary home with a large private patio is perfect for year-round entertaining. $279,000. ML262264 Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES VERY CLEAN REALTY 1 owner home, built in 1990 in Dungeness PRIVATE 9.89 ACRES Rambler home plus art- Meadows, with 2 Br. and ist’s log cabin. Detached 2 baths, 1,188 sf. Priced garage with roughed in perfect for your first time a p a r t m e n t . C l o s e t o home buyers. All applitown yet private. Large ances stay. $159,000 ML262107/286257 deck off rambler. Great Dave Stofferahn room and two large Br. 477-5542 $235,000 COLDWELL BANKER ML252160/261542 TOWN & COUNTRY Terry Peterson 683-6880 VERY well maintained WINDERMERE manufactured home on SUNLAND large sun filled lot. Beautiful mountain view, 2 car PRIVATE COUNTRY detached garage, toasty ESTATE Perched atop a nearly wood stove, generous 10 acre wooded ridge s i z e d b e d r o o m s a n d with spectacular moun- n e w r o o f m a k e t h i s tain views. Perfect for home a great package those seeking the quiet, for the price. $125,000 ML261597/255803 country life. Custom built Jennifer Holcomb in 2005 with beautiful 457-0456 hardwood floors and an WINDERMERE P.A. expansive dream kitchen. Upgrades include WONDERFUL HOME granite counters, metal WITH SHOP roofing, hardiplank sid- Want a gorgeous home? i n g , c o v e r e d w r a p - Located on 4.78 private a r o u n d p o r c h , Tr e x acres, beautifully landdeck, heat pump; 9-foot scaped. Eat-in kitchen ceilings and Bliemeister with Corian countertops, cabinets. Living room stainless steel appliancfeatures a built-in enter- es, Bosch stove oven, tainment center and river skylight, laminate floorr o c k g a s f i r e p l a c e . ing and dark wood cabi$569,000 netry. 3 Br., 2 bath, masJim Hardie ter suite with soaking U-$ave Real Estate t u b. Wa l k - i n c l o s e t s . 775-7146 L a r g e s h o p w i t h RV REDUCED Beautiful set- parking and lots of storting for this newer 3 Br., age! $315,000. ML260917 2 bath, 1,720 sf manuTammy Newton factured home in Heri452-1210 tage Loop Park, Sequim. Listen to the ripple of the JACE The Real Estate Company irrigation stream while enjoying beautiful views WORK AT HOME of the peaceful pastures With this comfor table and mountains from your home and huge shop. deck. Attached garage Home has large modern and a separate wor k- kitchen viewing east toshop/storage building, ward their open field. fenced back yard. The Olympics can be $120,000. ML251357 seen from the front. Two Marc Thomsen Br., two baths, family 417-2782 room, large pantry, forCOLDWELL BANKER mal dining room, atUPTOWN REALTY tached garage and detached shop and heated ADD A PHOTO TO work space. Great for YOUR AD FOR home based business. ONLY $10! $225,000. ML261774. www.peninsula Diann Dickey 683-4131 dailynews.com John L. Scott Sequim

Classified

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

B6 Thursday, January 12, 2012 ACROSS 1 Certain blocker’s target 5 Chaste 11 Spotted, to Tweety 14 Fix 15 “Finished!” 16 Lacto-__ vegetarian 17 Spring blossom 18 *Publicist, often 20 QB’s scores 21 Actress Zadora 22 At the pawn shop 23 *Have nowhere to go but up 27 Minuscule bits 28 Represented, with “for” 29 Jewish wedding favorite 31 “Star Trek: DSN” character 32 Oakley with a gun 34 *1952 Cooper classic By Gareth Bain 37 Shore scavenger 2 “101 Dalmatians” 39 “Git!” mother 40 *Shared 3 “Bruce Almighty” 44 One of a Dumas actress trio 4 Docs 47 Sun, in Sonora 5 Call on 48 One of two 6 Sci-fi psychic elimination 7 Star Wars abbr. games 8 Mounds of 50 Carried pounds 52 Foreshadowers 9 “... __ quote:” 55 *Place for a row 10 Actress Téa of potted plants 11 Glinda’s 57 Everything, so reassurance to they say Dorothy 59 Small songbird 12 Guacamole fruit 60 Place for drips, 13 Attempts to sway briefly 19 Comic Margaret 61 It suggests the 21 Conductor’s vowel pattern in place the five starred 24 Drum heard answers around a fire 64 Mil. plane 25 “I’m impressed!” requiring minimal 26 Some hosp. pics runway space 30 Muslim official 65 Cooler 33 Bark beetle 66 What Bonnie and victims Clyde came to 35 Search engine 67 Maidstone’s launched by county Wired magazine 68 Some MIT grads in 1996 69 Beau 36 “Ain’t gonna 70 Mid-month time happen” 38 MGM co-founder 40 Tritium, to DOWN hydrogen 1 Metalworkers


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Thursday, January 12, 2012 B7

21560600

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

PAINTING

REPAIR

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

BAGPIPER

Lund Fencing

Bob’s Tractor Service

Window Washing

FOX PAINTING

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Pressure Washing

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

B&B Sharpening & Repair

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

JP

Tractors Gas & Diesel Small Engines & Equipment

333A E. 1st St. • PA

461-4609

452-9355

360 Lic#buenavs90818

HANDYMAN

s Handyman Services

“Need something fixed?� Call Me!

(360) 683-8332

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

Home & Bus.

#BAURLH*023DJ

Tues & Thurs 5:00 pm To 7:00 pm & 7:00 pm To 9:00 pm

Ongoing Conversation Classes

At The Historic Dungeness Schoolhouse 2781 Towne Road, Sequim

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

Small Jobs A Specialty

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Contr#KENNER1951P8

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

FOR

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS! AND SIZES: COLUMN X 1� COLUMN X 2� COLUMN X 3� COLUMN X 1� COLUMN X 2� COLUMN X 3�

for Delivery

Top Soil, Compost, Firbark, Sand Drain Rock, Crushed Rock, Wall Rock And More...

WE DO LANDSCAPING

Expert Pruning

683-8328 PA & PT

AS LITTLE AS

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com LIC

TREE SERVICE

Callahans Landscape Maintenance

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

SPECIALIZING IN TREES

FREE S ATE ESTIM

Winter! Time to Prune Fruit Trees Ornamental Trees Shrubbery

(360) 461-2788

Done Right Home Repair

Licensed • Insured

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON advertise call PENINSULA To 360-452-8435 or DAILY NEWS 1-800-826-7714

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right

Glen Spear, Owner

(360) 460-0518

anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

#JKDIRKD942NG

PRUNING

Call now for your appt. 17 yrs. experience

HOME REPAIR

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

360/460•9824

LANDSCAPE PRODUCTS

MOLE/PRUNING

Mole Control

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

DIRT WORK

1C564581

830-741-1677 Or Register Online www.translationmarks.com

Lic# DELUNE*933QT

1C564569

Enjoy Interactive Sessions! Improve Your Conversation Skills, Vocabulary And Perfect Pronunciation In Spanish

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

ADVERTISE DAILY

1 1 1 2 2 2

river1966@msn.com

Now Offering

EXCAVATING

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

RATES

We recently moved downstairs. Stop by and see our new suite of offices.

Lic#DONERRH943NA

21565835

Professional Instruction For Adults & Teenagers

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR –

21569329

Classes Start Tuesday January 3, 2012

Licensed – Bonded – Insured

1C562762

SPANISH CLASSES

• Income Tax Preparation • QuickBooks Training & Support • Small Business Start-ups/Consultation • Payroll and Payroll Taxes • Excise Tax Returns (B&O)

1C563934

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

1C563942

Full 6 Month Warranty

Lena Washke

Accounting Services, Inc.

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

COLUMC*955KD

1C564613

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

S EM PER F I T R EE S ER VIC E

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

Quality Work

1C564598

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

TREE SERVICE

1C563910

AA

Columbus Construction

360-681-7878

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Baur Log Homes

Paul Baur, owner

Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch�

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

REPAIR/REMODEL

24 yrs. experience

(360) 477-1805

APPLIANCES

LOG HOMES

21566943

Reg#FINIST*932D0

tmccurdy@olypen.com

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

1C562743

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(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

1C562759

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

21569312

JPSHAHS92BE

21569323

John Pruss 360 808-6844

Call NOW To Advertise

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

AIR DUCT CLEANING

PAINTING

‘

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

21569320

Lic#BOBDADT966K5

(360)

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

21569331

360-670-1350

1C564596

1C564593

#LUNDFF*962K7

457-6582 (360) 808-0439

1C562789

Chad Lund

452-0755 775-6473

Moss Prevention

Painting & Pressure Washing

1C563950

www.LundFencing.com

Small jobs is what I do!

1C562786

FENCING

Call NOW To Advertise 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

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4B235385

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Classified

B8 Thursday, January 12, 2012 Musical Instruments

Wanted/Trade

VIOLIN: 3/4, nice shape. $125/obo. 775-9648

WANTED: OLD BARN W O O D. O l d b a r n , fence, shed boards for u s e i n a r t p r o j e c t s. 1x8, 1x10 especially, or wider. Negotiable. Will haul away. 360-452-7308

YAMAHA Clavinova Piano Mint. Private estate sale! Used 4 times comes with bench, manual, music book. N eve r n e e d s t u n i n g ! Perfect gift for anyone. Paid $2,500 sell quick $750. Sequim! Delivery! 360-582-7893 Sporting Goods

BUYING FIREARMS Any and All - Top $ Paid. One or Entire Collection. 360-477-9659

MAUSER: M48, Yugoslavian mauser, 8 mm, excellent condition, incl. issue sling, Redding reloading dies, ammo and 300+ bullets and 100 brass. $250. 452-4158 leave message. POOL TABLE: Coin operated, good condition. $1,000/ obo. 461-1746.

WANTED: Guns. One or whole collection. New and old, but older the better. Call 452-1016, 683-9899.

WANTED: PARAKEET MALE Wanted To Buy or Trade. Pref. courtly older g e n t w h o h a s a w ay w/the ladies. Can trade young Cobalt male ‘keet or pay cash. 457-8385 leave message for Marybeth. Garage/Moving Sales Jefferson County

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-5 p.m., 50 Mocking Bird Lane, Port Ludlow. L o t s o f f i s h i n g g e a r, huge collection of high end rods and reels, salt water, fly fish, etc. 100s of nautical charts, tools, guns, knives, collectibles, household stuff, 4 hp Suzuki boat m o t o r, h a r d b o t t o m dingy, dual mig welder, motorcycles and kid stuff.

Farm Animals & Livestock

General Pets

HAY: Quality grass hay, $5 bale. 808-1052. Horses

HORSE TRAILER: ‘88 Circle J. 2 horse, straight PUPPIES: Bull Dog mix. load. $2,000. Brindle and white. 3 360-808-2295 males, 3 females. $350. 360-457-7013 General Pets PUPPIES: White fluff ball American Eskimos. AKC LABRADOR $400/obo. 461-3254 PUPPIES 8 week old female black PUREBRED AKC Goldlab pups. Great family en Retr iever puppies! pets or hunters! $600 to B e s t f a m i l y d o g s ! 4 approved homes. These adorable boys left. Only pups are beautiful and $500. First shots and dehave tons of personality! wormed. Serious inquirP i c s o n l i n e a t P D N . ies only. Call 360-4779214 for more info. $600. 360-808-5635. BIEWER Yorkie Puppy. Gorgeous Male Biewer Yo r k i e P u p py, B l a ck , white, and gold. Current on vaccinations, wormed, dew claws removed, 1st vet. visit, non-shedding, hypoallergenic. See pics online at w w w. p e n i n s u l a d a i l y news.com $900. 360-452-9650

BLUE ROTT: Rottweiler/Australian Shepherd. (1) female left, 9 weeks, 1st shot given. Loyal lovG A R AG E S a l e : S u n . , ing family dog. $200 or 10-3 p.m., 246 W. Maple trade for cord dry wood. Jenny at 461-6851 St. Everything must go. Garage/Moving Sales Sequim

DOGS: 4 yr old Mini Farm Animals Beagle, fixed female, & Livestock Wanted/Trade $250. Pair of 7 yr old BEEF: Grass fed, 2.5 yr Poms, male & female, BOOKS WANTED! We c o w, h a n g i n g w e i g h t fixed, must go together, love books, we’ll buy $1.70 lb. 452-0837. $200 both. 457-1448. yours. 457-9789 G R A S S H AY: $ 4 . 5 0 FREE: 10 mo. old feLONG DISTANCE male Plott Hound. bale. 452-8713 or No Problem! (360)452-6111 808-1842

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

LABRADOODLES Black, 1st generation, 4 males, born Oct. 1st shots, wormed, ver y sweet. $400. 360-259-6347

HAY: Good quality grass FREE: To good home. C h i h u a h u a , o l d e r fe hay. $5.50 bale. male. 452-3633 . 360-461-5804

Motorhomes

TRAILER: ‘05 27’ Okanagan. Excellent, hardly used. $12,000/ obo. 417-0549. TRAILER: ‘07 30’ Denali. Dbl. slide, like new. $25,000. 808-5182 or 452-6932 TRAILER: ‘09 16’ Casita. Very nice, Porta-Potty, micro. $9,500. 360-683-5871 TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry. New 13’ awning, refrigerator, A/C, everything works, must see. $3,300. 683-1032. TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 Tents & Travel Trailers

Motorhomes

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W / D, g r e a t s t o r a g e . $20,000. 477-7957. 5TH WHEEL: ‘03 37’ toy hauler. $19,900/obo. 360-460-9556 D O D G E : ‘ 6 8 c a b ove r c a m p e r, g o o d c o n d . , sleeps 5. $1,900. 360-797-1508 MOTOR HOME: ‘02 30’ Winnebago Bra-ve. Low m i . , a l way s g a ra g e d , must see/Vortec 8.1. $35,000. 683-4912. MOTORHOME: ‘92 32’ Southwind, Chevy 454 with Banks Power Pack, 7KW gen, driver’s side d o o r, r e p l a c e d r e fe r cooling unit, 2 A/C units. In exc. cond., garaged. $12,500. 681-0144. TRAILER: ‘04 24’ Coachman Catalina Lite. N o s l i d e , ex c . c o n d . $9,500/obo or trade. 797-3770 or 460-8514

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Marine Miscellaneous

Motorcycles

D U R A B OAT: ‘ 0 8 1 4 ’ aluminum. 9.9 Johnson, trailer. $1,500. 360-580-1741 DURABOAT: ‘96 14’ 20 hp Merc low hrs. $3,200. 452-8092 D U R O B OAT: 1 2 ’ . 1 5 and 6 hp Evinrudes, Calkins trailer. $1,500. 6836748. GLASPLY: 21’ boat and trailer, BMW B220 Inboard, brand new Honda 15 hp 4 stroke kicker. $10,000 or make offer. 452-4338 MOTOR: 25 hp Evinrude long shaft, electric start, runs good. $900. 6815229. SEA RAY: Boat, trailer, low hours, cash. $7,995. 582-0347

TRAILER: ‘03 29’ Terry. Dbl door, front Br., large Motorcycles slide, great for living or pulling. $9,200. DIRTBIKE: ‘00 110 off 457-9038 brand. Lots of extra, after market parts. $700/obo. 582-7519. Campers/Canopies CAMPER: ‘01 11’ Lance. $3,000/obo (251)978-1750

Marine Miscellaneous

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 Road King FLHRI 4,950 miles! Fuel-Injection, removable windshield, foot pegs, back rest,hard saddle bags, foot boards, heel-shift, oval-tip pipes,and many other extras. $10,900. 360-808-4176

BAY L I N E R : ‘ 8 7 3 4 5 0 Tr i-Cabin. $14,999 or trade. 683-1344 or 6835099. B OAT: 1 4 ’ a l u m i n u m with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162. BOAT: 15’ custom alu- HONDA: ‘82 XR200R. minum, with motor and Runs good, looks fair. trailer. $3,500. 461-7506 $745. 683-9071

Automobiles Classics & Collectibles

STUDEBAKER: ‘50 Champion. Starlight coupe, complete frame off restoration, 3 speed HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800. flat head 6 cylinder en7K miles. $4,700. gine, all original, excel504-2599 lent condition. $12,000/ YAMAHA: ‘09 XTR 250. obo. 683-8810. HONDA: ‘02 XR 70R 80 mpg, new 2 mo. ago Great condition. Automobiles for $4,900, 700 mi. 1st 460-7013 Leave mesFord $3,100 cash. Street/ sage. Trail. 670-2562. FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $8,500/ obo. H O N DA : ‘ 0 5 C R 8 5 R . 360-808-1242 Utility Trailers Low hours, never raced. $1,500/trade. Automobiles TRAILERS: ‘10 20’ Car360-460-6148 Jaguar go Mate encl. insul. trailHONDA: ‘81 Gold-wing. er, extras, $4,000. ‘05 $1,200. 360-963-2659. 24’ Cargo Mate, insul., J AG UA R : ‘ 9 0 X J S H O N D A : ‘ 8 3 A s c o t . 5K axles, set up as con- Coupe. Black, tan int., t r a c t o r ’s t r a i l e r, l o w only 42K mi., car is $1,500. 360-963-2659 m i l e s , $ 5 , 2 0 0 . B o t h like brand new in/out, mechanically. $11,750 lights & outlets. Call John, Euro Auto 452-8092 Works: 683-3876. H O N DA : ‘ 0 1 X R 5 0 R . Low hr, helmet $800. 452-9194. 452-6160.

Auto Service/Parts/ Accessories

CHEV: ‘70 Body parts. 2 HONDA: ‘84 Goldwing door. Hood, L.F. fender, 1200. 30K mi. $2,400. bumper, window assem360-461-2627 bly including glass. $450/obo. Excellent conHONDA: ‘94 XLR. 600 dition. No rust. 360-457-9650. cc, hardly used, good cond. $1,600. 452-5412. Q UA D : S u z u k i 2 5 0 Quad Sport, reverse, like new. $2,500 firm. 452-3213

RV Spaces/Storage

DUNGENESS: RV space. Good view, $300 mo. 683-7847.

Motorcycles

YAMAHA: ‘08 4x4 Rhino 7 0 0 c c . G r e e n R h i n o, windshield, roof and sound system. Asking $7900/ obo. For more info call 360-477-6165.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Automobiles Others

BUICK: ‘99 Century, 4 d o o r, 1 6 5 , 5 0 0 m i . , 1 owner. $1800. 477-6684

CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorad o E T C. 8 0 K , bl a ck / black, leather, beautiful, Automobiles Classics & Collectibles must see. $6,800. 360-681-3093 ‘51 FORDS: ‘51 Ford 4 door complete, needs CHEV: ‘80 Chevette. $500. 460-7131. restoration, $3,000. ‘51 Ford 2 door complete, CHRYSLER: ‘04 Crossn e e d s r e s t o r a t i o n , fire, 80K, $12,000. $2,000. 452-8092. 452-8092. C O L L E C TO R S : O l d s FORD: ‘92 Mustang LX Cutlass 442 1986, sharp conver tible. 5.0 auto, lines, new int. $5,500. 71K mi., excellent condi683-8332 tion. $3,800. 928-0213. FORD: ‘28 2 dr sedan, FORD: ‘92 Taurus GL. restored in 1980. V6, 139,000 miles. Near$15,000. 360-452-8092. ly new tires and new bat-

FORD: ‘54 F7, 283, re- tery. Good cond. $1,700/obo. stored, 2x4 spd, $3,500. 360-808-2523 360-452-8092

21572058

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4.0L V6, 5 SPD MAN, ALLOYS, RUNNING BOARDS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, TOW PKG, PRIV GLASS, 4 OPENING DRS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $16,011! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 60K MILES! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY TO SAVE SOME BUCKS ON YOUR NEXT TRUCK!

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www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

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2009 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

2008 FORD EDGE SE AWD

2006 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 4DR

2008 FORD E-250 SUPERDUTY CARGO VAN

3.8L V6, AUTO, DUAL AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD W/DVD, MP3, JPEG, WMA, NAV, BACKUP CAMERA, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, 7 PASS W/STO-N-GO SEATING, SIDE AIRBAGS, FOG LAMPS, LUGGAGE RACK, PRIV GLASS, ALLOYS, ONLY 28K MILES! BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

3.5L V6, AUTO, AWD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, PRIV GLASS, ALLOYS, BACKUP SENSORS, ONLY 37K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORPORATE LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX! JUST REDUCED $1,000!

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1,000LBS “TOMMY GATE” HYDRAULIC CARGO LIFT, 5.4L V8, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, SAFETY BULKHEAD, BIN PKG, HD 3/ 4 TON CHASSIS, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS CARFAX!

Expires 2/9/12

Expires 2/9/12

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GRAY MOTORS

$17,995

V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$7,995

GRAY MOTORS

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V.I.N.S POSTED AT DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$12,995

GRAY MOTORS

Expires 2/9/12

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$10,995

GRAY MOTORS

Expires 2/9/12

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Race St., Race St., Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663 www.reidandjohnson.com

2007 SUZUKI XL-7 LIMITED AWD

www.reidandjohnson.com

Expires 1/21/12

$14,995

360-452-6599

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2002 FORD F-350 CREW CAB 4X4

2003 SUZUKI AERIO SX 4DR HATCHBACK

1994 MAZDA B4000 EXT CAB 4X4

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4 CYL, 5 SPD, AC, TILT, CRUISE, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, AM/FM/ CD STACKER, ALLOYS, REMOTE ENTRY & MORE! VERY NICE 1 OWNER, LOW MILEAGE HATCHBACK! VIN#209451

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Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-417-3541 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Aftermarket ultra brights work Dear Doctor: My daughter bought a used 2010 Ford Fusion SE. She complains that her low-beam headlights don’t seem as bright as her sister’s 2009 Ford Fusion SLE. When we compared the headlights on these two vehicles, we found that the 2009 has a silver reflective area around the low-beam bulb. On the 2010, it looks like the bulb is behind a frosted area. Can we get a brighter low-beam bulb for the 2010 that won’t be too hot for the wiring and/or negate the warranty? Is it possible that the low beam on the 2010 can be adjusted higher to compensate for this? Jean Dear Jean: We replace a lot of headlight bulbs on a variety of vehicles. We use the Silver Star brand of ultra bright lights. These bulbs do make a big difference and will not void the warranty and/or cause any wiring issues. As for adjusting the light height, you need to use a headlight board or wall with the vehicle on a level surface and follow the manufacturer’s height adjustment. Automobiles Others

denly one day, the car will not start, or it will just stop running while I am drivI think Junior ing? Frank brighter Dear Frank: The alterDamato the bulb nator light is illuminating replacebecause there is a feedback ment will from the alternator, which make your is most likely a weak diode. daughter The alternator can happy. charge normally for many years to come or could fail Indicator at any time. comes, You can have the technigoes cian perform a full load test and check the ripple Dear Doctor: I have a 2002 Sat- lines of the alternator with urn SL that has served me a professional charging well and has 110,000 miles. system tester — not just a The battery indicator small hand held tester. light is coming on occasionally and stays on for about Chevy tranny fluid one mile of driving. Dear Doctor: I own a This started two months 2004 Chevy Silverado 1500 after I had an oil change. When I went back to the 4x4 with 75,000 miles. I would like to change shop, they said everything the tranny fluid now. The checked out OK and no linkage is blocking one of problems were found with the pan bolts. the battery or its power. I can’t seem to locate It’s intermittent as to where the bolts are that when the light comes on, hold that linkage. but usually it is when I Also, do you recommend first start it. a complete fluid change or After I drive about one mile, the light goes off and just the fluid and filter from dropping the pan? does not light up again. Several days may go by Mike Dear Mike: Removal of before it happens again. the transmission pan is Is this a cause for concern in any way, like sudstraightforward.

THE AUTO DOC

Automobiles Others

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7Eå&INANCEåINå(OUSE

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Pickup Trucks Ford

Pickup Trucks Others

&/2$å@å&å8,4å 350%2$549 #2%7#!"å3"å7$å  å LESSå THANå +ELLEYåå "LUEå "OOKå 0OWERSTROKEåå TURBOå DIESELå 6 å AUTO åå LOADEDå 7HITEå EXTERIORå INåå LIKE NEWå CONDITIONå "LACKåå CLOTHå INTERIORå INå LIKEå NEWåå CONDITIONå -OONå ROOF åå DUALå POWERå SEATS å å DISK åå SLIDER å SPRAY INå BEDLINER åå TOW å RUNNINGå BOARDS å TINT åå BANKSå UPGRADES å vå LIFT åå vå CHROMEå WHEELSå WITHåå ALMOSTå NEWå 'OODYEARåå -4 2å RUBBERå 6ERYå NICEåå TRUCKå ATå OURå NOå HAGGLEåå PRICEåOFåONLYå å #ARPENTERå!UTOå#ENTERåå  

&/2$å@å& 350%2#!"å($å," å LITERå 6 å AUTO å ALLOYS åå NEWå TIRES å SIDEå STEPS åå TOWå PACKAGE å MATCHINGåå CANOPY å SPRAY INå BEDLIN å ER å DUALå FUELå TANKS å REARåå SLIDINGå WINDOW å POWERåå W I N D O W S å A N D å L O C K S åå BACKUPå CAMERA å CRUISE åå T I L T å A I R å # L A R I O N å # $åå PLAYER å IMMACULATEå CON å DITIONå INSIDEå ANDå OUTåå 3ENIORå OWNEDå .ONEå NIC å ERå "RANDå NEWå TIRESå 3TOPåå BYå'RAYå-OTORSåTODAY   '2!9å-/4/23   GRAYMOTORSCOM &/2$å @å &å 8,4åå ,å TURBOå DIESEL å SUPERåå CAB å AUTO å DUALå TANK å THåå WHEEL åDUALLYå å    -!:$!å@å0ICKUP  å   -)3#å @å &ORDå & åå  OBOå @å 3UBUR å BANå + å 7$ å  åå OBOå-OVING åMUSTåSELLå   

&/2$å @å 3UPERå $UTYåå &å Xå CREWå CABå ,åå 6 å DIESELå +INGå 2ANCHåå +å MILES å +å INå OP å TIONSå %XCå COND å NEVERåå SMOKEDå INå $EALERå MAIN å TAINEDå 0OWERå 'LIDEå RE å MOVABLEåTHåWHEELåHITCHå  å2ONåATå   

Sport Utility Vehicles Dodge

$/$'%å @å $URANGOåå 7HITE å GRAYå LEATHERå INT åå + å POWER å EXCå COND åå SEATSåå   

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Automobiles Toyota

'-#å @å å UTILITYåå TR UCKå å LITERå DIESEL åå 4/9/4!å @å 3CIONå 8"åå    + å M I  å  å S T U D D E Dåå %XCELLENT å DARKå BLUE å EX å TIRES åGOODåCONDITIONå #(%6å @å +å "LAZERåå TRASå  å OBOå  å  å  K å )MMACULATEå ,OAD å  ED å !,,å ORIGINAL å &) åå Pickup Trucks !UTO å X å ADULTå OWNED åå Pickup Trucks Others NONå SMOKER å NEVERå OFFåå Chevrolet $ / $ ' % å @   å $ A K O T Aåå R O A D E D å " U I L D å S H E E T åå #(%6å @å PICKUPå å CYL åå Q U A D å C A Bå   + å EX C åå OWNERSå ANDå SHOPå MANU å R U N S å G R E A T  å 6E R Y å D E å COND å MATCHINGå CANOPY åå A L Så 2 U N S å A N D å $ R I VE Såå PENDABLEå WOODå HAULERåå 2HINOGUARD å AUTO å #$ åå ,IKEå.EWå OBOå      O B Oå        åå !# å CR UISE å EXTRAå SETåå      S N O W å T I R E S  W H E E L S åå #(%6å@å 4!(/%åå4/.å,4å #(%6å @å å TONå SERVICEåå  OBOå  TRUCK å + å å SP å  å +åå &/2$å @å %å COMLåå "LUE å LEATHER å LOADEDåå /NANå GENERATOR å å AIRåå VE H I C L Eå   å E N C L O S E Dåå " U Y å H E R E å P AY å H E R E åå TANKS ååOUTLETS åETCå CAR PETEDå BOX å 4OMMYåå ,OWESTå INå HOUSEå RATESåå  å   LIFT å ROLLå UPå REARå DOOR å SIDEåå 3HOPå ANDå COMPAREå .Oåå CREDITåCHECKSå # ( % 6å @   å 3 I L VE R A D Oåå MANå DOOR å STRONGå åå THEOTHERGUYSAUTOåCOMå DIESEL å NEWå TRANNYå ANDåå å'OODåCONDå  å DIF å LOWå HWYå MI å NEWERå å  å  4HEå/THERå'UYSå WHITEåPAINTå OBOå !UTOåANDå4RUCKå#ENTER  åDAYS Pickup Trucks    Ford &/2$å @å & å &ORDåå $/$'%å@å2!-ååå &/2$å @å &å 7$åå -OVINGå 6ANå å @å "OXåå 3,4å,!2!-)% , å + å LEATHERå #$ åå 6A N å    å G A S å 6  å åå 15!$å#!" NEWå .OKIANå TIRES å DARKåå SPEEDå AUTOå W/$å '67åå ,/.'å"%$å8 GR E E N  T A N å VE R Y å N I C Eåå  å LOADINGå RAMP åå å LITERå -AGNUMå6 å AU å  å #UR Tå ATå  å !# å !-&-å RADIO å POW å TO å LOADEDå å TONEå MA å ERå STEERINGå ANDå BRAKESåå ROONSILVERå EXTER IORå INåå  NEWå FRONTå DISKå BRAKES åå &/2$å @å &å 4URBOåå SHOCKSå ANDå ALIGNMENTåå GREATå CONDITIONå 'RAYåå DIESEL å UTILITYå BED å RACKåå  å MIå LOCATEDå 3E å CLOTHå INTER IORå INå GREATåå S H A P E  å 0 O W E R å S E A T åå   å WONTå LASTå  å QUIMå  #$CASSETTE å CRUISE å TILT åå     P R I VA C Y å G L A S S å S L I D E R åå &/2$å @å &å Xåå SPRAY INå BEDLINER å TOW åå The pros at STANDARD å å LITERå DIESELåå ALLOYå WHEELSå WITHå åå PENINSULA  å  RUBBERå 2EALå NICE å WELLåå DAILY NEWS KEPTå 2AMå ATå OURå NOå HAG å &/2$å @å &å ,ARIATåå can design AND GLEåPRICEåOFåONLY %XTå CABå &IBERGLASSå COV å print your   ER å +å MI å å OWNER åå publication. Great #ARPENTERå!UTOå#ENTERåå NEWåTIRESBATTERYå quality at    OBOå  competitive prices. &/2$å @å "RONCOå %DDIEåå GARAGE SALE ADS Call Dean at "AUERå %&)å  å /$ å AIR åå Call for details. 360-417-3520 #$ å CLEAN å STRAIGHT å RUNSåå 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 EXCELå å  1-800-826-7714

Sometimes a pan bolt is blocked by the rear transmission mount or cross member. Some of the GM truck transmission pans have a drain plug that can be hard to remove because the 15 mm bolt head is very weak and shallow. An option is to have the fluid changed at a shop with a fluid exchange machine that hooks up to the transmission cooler lines. Removing the transmission pan, or just a drain, will get out about 6 quarts vs. a complete fluid change, which averages 13 quarts, the total fluid in the transmission. As for the filter change, most of the transmission filters today are a plastic screen type, and the transmission pan gasket is reusable.

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

Sport Utility Vehicles Others

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4 / 9 / 4!  å @   å , A N Dåå #RUISERå &*å ORIGINALå &åå ENGINE å ALUMINUMå BODY åå LIFTå WITHå S å !2"å LOCK å ERS å SNORKEL å 04/å WINCHåå -ANYå EXTRASå  åå OBOå   4/9/4!å @å  2UNNERåå Xå!SåISå å   4/9/4!å @å  2UNNERåå 3UNROOF å LIFTED å BIGå TIRES åå P O W E R å W I N D O W S å A N Dåå SEATS å LEATHERå INTERIOR åå GOODåSHAPEå å   Vans & Mini Vans Chevrolet

#(%6å @å ,UMINAå MINI å VANå6 ååPASSå å   Vans & Minivans Chrysler

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Vans & Minivans Others

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

B9

Car of the Week

2012 Toyota Camry BASE PRICE: $21,955 for L; $22,500 for LE; $23,000 for SE with four cylinder; $24,725 for XLE with four cylinder; $26,640 for SE with V-6; $29,845 for XLE with V-6. PRICE AS TESTED: $33,372. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, fivepassenger, mid-size sedan. ENGINE: 3.5-liter, double overhead cam V-6 with Dual VVT-i. MILEAGE: 21 mpg (city), 30 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: 143 mph. LENGTH: 189.2 inches. WHEELBASE: 109.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,395 pounds. BUILT IN: Georgetown, Ky. OPTIONS: Premium navigation with Entune and JBL $1,550; blind spot monitor $500; Safety Connect $450; carpeted floor mats $130; emergency/assistance kit $70; wheel locks $67. DESTINATION CHARGE: $760. The Associated Press

Legal Notices Clallam County

Legal Notices Clallam County

Legal Notices Clallam County

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SALEå UNDERå STATUTESå OFå THISå STATE å INCLUDINGå SEC å TIONå  å åå ANDå å OFå THEå 2E å VISEDå #ODEå OFå 7ASHING å TON å INå THEå MANNERå DE å SCRIBEDå INå THOSEå STATUTESåå $!4%$å $ECEMBERå  åå     7 , å " E N E D I C T åå 3 ( % 2 ) & & å # L A L L A Måå # O U N T Y å 7 A S H I N G T O Nå + AY L E N E å : E L L A R å # I V I Lå $ E P U T Y å    å %  å  T Håå 3TREET å 3UITEå  å 0OR Tå ! N G E L E S å 7! å     å 4%,å 0UBå $ECå  å  å  åå *ANå å å å å 3 ( % 2 ) & &  3 å 0 5 " , ) #åå ./4)#%å /&å 3!,%å /&å 2 % ! , å 0 2 / 0 % 2 4 9åå #AUSEå .Oå    åå 3HERIFF Så .Oåå 350%2)/2å #/524å /&åå 4(%å 34!4%å /&å 7!3( å ).'4/.å INå ANDå FORå THEåå #OUNTYå OFå #LALLAMå "!.+åå / & å ! - % 2 ) # ! å .  !  å 35##%33/2å "9å -%2 å ' % 2 å 4/ å " !# å ( / - %åå , / ! . 3 å 3 % 26 ) # ) . ' å ,0 å ITSå SUCCESSORSå INå IN å TERESTå ANDORå ASSIGNS åå 63å 5.+./7.å (%)23å ! . $ å $ % 6 ) 3 % % 3 å / &åå 254(å %å #5229 å $% å # % ! 3 % $ å 5 . + . /7 .åå (%)23å !.$å $%6)3%%3åå /&å '/2$/.å !å #52 å 29 å $%#%!3%$ å "%.% å &)#)!,å 7!3().'4/.å ).#å $"!å "%.%&)#)!,å - / 24 ' !' % å # /å / &åå 7!3().'4/.å 7!3( å ) . ' 4/ . å 3 4!4 % å $ % å 0! 2 4 - % . 4 å / & å 3 / å # ) ! , å ! . $ å ( % ! ,4 (åå 3%26)#%3å /CCUPANTSåå OFå THEå 0REMISESå ANDå ANYå PERSONSå ORå PARTIESå CLAIM å INGå TOå HAVEå ANYå RIGHT å TI å TLE å ESTATE å LIENå ORå INTER å ESTå INå THEå REALå PROPERTYå DESCRIBEDå INå THEå COM å PLAINTå 4/å 5.+./7.åå (%)23å !.$å $%6)3%%3å /&å 254(å %å #5229 å $ % # % ! 3 % $  å 5 . å + . /7 . å ( % ) 2 3 å ! . $åå $ % 6 ) 3 % % 3 å / & å ' / 2 å $ / . å ! å # 5 2 29 å $ % å #%!3%$å 4(%å 350%2) å / 2 å # / 5 2 4 å / &å # , ! , , ! - å # / 5 . 4 9åå ( ! 3 å $ ) 2 % # 4 % $ å 4 ( %åå 5.$%23)'.%$å 3(%2 å ) & & å / & å # , ! , , ! -åå #/5.49å 4/å 3%,,å 4(%åå 0 2 / 0 % 2 4 9 å $ % å 3#2)"%$å "%,/7å 4/å 3!4)3&9å !å *5$'-%.4åå ).å 4(%å !"/6%å %.4) å 4,%$å !#4)/.å )&å $% å 6%,/0%$ å 4(%å 02/0 å % 24 9 å ! $ $ 2 % 3 3 å ) 3 åå å &,%-).'å $2)6%å 3 % 1 5 ) - å 7! å     åå 4(%å 3!,%å /&å 4(%å $% å 3#2)"%$å 02/0%249åå )3å 4/å 4!+%å 0,!#%å !4å å !-å /.å &2)$!9 å           å ) . å 4 ( %åå -!).å ,/""9å /&å 4(%åå # , ! , , ! - å # / 5 . 4 9åå # / 5 2 4 ( / 5 3 % å % . å 42!.#%å ,/#!4%$å !4å    å % å  T H å 3 4 2 % % 4 å 0 / 2 4 å ! . ' % , % 3 åå 7! 3 ( ) . ' 4 / . å 4 ( %å * 5 $ ' - % . 4 å $ % " 4/ 2åå #!.å !6/)$å 4(%å 3!,%å "9å 0!9).'å 4(%å *5$' å - % . 4 å ! - / 5 . 4 å / &å  å 4/'%4(%2å 7 ) 4 ( å ) . 4 % 2 % 3 4 åå #/343å !.$å &%%3å "% å & / 2 % å 4 ( % å 3 ! , %å $!4 % å & / 2 å 4 ( % å % 8 å !# 4 å ! - / 5 . 4 å # / . å 4!#4å 4(%å 3(%2)&&3å / & & ) # % å !4 å 4 ( % å ! $ å $ 2 % 3 3 å 3 4!4 % $ å " % å ,/7å $!4%$å $ECEM å B E R å   å     7  , åå "ENEDICT å 3(%2)&&å #LAL å LAMå #OUNTY å 7ASHINGTONå + AY L E N E å : E L L A R å # I V I Lå $ E P U T Y å    å %  å  T Håå 3TREET å 3UITEå  å 0OR Tå ! N G E L E S å 7! å     å 4%,å å ,% å ' ! , å $ % 3 # 2 ) 0 4 ) / .åå , /4 å   å " , / # + å h ( v åå 3 % # / . $ å 0 , !4 å / &åå 35.3().%å !#2%3 å !3å 0%2å 0,!4å 2%#/2$%$å ) . å 6 / , 5 - % å  å / &å 0 , !4 3 å 0! ' % å   å 2%#/2$3å /&å #,!, å ,!-å #/5.49 å 7!3( å ).'4/. å 3)45!4%å ).å 4 ( % å # / 5 . 4 9 å / &åå #,!,,!-

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3 ( % 2 ) & &  3 å 0 5 " , ) #åå ./4)#%å /&å 3!,%å /&åå 2 % ! , å 0 2 / 0 % 2 4 9åå #AUSEå .Oå    åå 3HERIFF Så .Oåå 350%2)/2å #/524å /&åå 4(%å 34!4%å /&å 7!3( å ).'4/.å INå ANDå FORå THEåå #OUNTYå OFå #LALLAMå "!.+åå / & å ! - % 2 ) # ! å .  !  åå 35##%33/2å "9å -%2 å ' % 2 å 4/ å " !# å ( / - %åå , / ! . 3 å 3 % 26 ) # ) . ' åå ,0 å ITSå SUCCESSORSå INå IN å TERESTå ANDORå ASSIGNS åå 63å 5.+./7.å (%)23å

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com


B10

WeatherNorthwest

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 2012

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast TODAY

TONIGHT

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

High 44

Low 27

44/28

44/32

43/27

40/27

Mostly cloudy.

Partly cloudy and cold.

Some sunshine giving way to clouds.

Rather cloudy, chance of a little rain.

Mostly cloudy with showers possible.

Cloudy, a rain and snow shower possible.

The Peninsula A ridge of high pressure will provide dry and chilly weather across the Peninsula today with a mostly cloudy sky. Tonight will be partly cloudy and cold. Friday will start with some sunshine, then clouds will increase throughout the day ahead of the next storm system. That storm system will bring a cloudy day on Saturday along with the chance for rain. The storm system will linger on Sunday, bringing a mostly cloudy sky along with the chance for showers. Monday will be cloudy and cold with a rain or snow shower possible.

Victoria 43/32 Neah Bay 47/33

Port Townsend 45/32

Port Angeles 44/27

Sequim 44/30

Forks 46/26

Port Ludlow 44/29

Olympia 46/20

Seattle 44/28

Everett 40/28

Yakima Kennewick 34/16 32/15

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Š 2012

Marine Forecast Mostly cloudy today. Wind light and variable. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Patchy clouds tonight. Wind light and variable. Waves under a foot. Visibility clear. Some sun giving way to clouds tomorrow. Wind light and variable. Waves 0-1 foot. Visibility clear. Saturday: Mostly cloudy, chance of a little rain. Wind southwest 6-12 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility under 3 miles at times.

LaPush Port Angeles Port Townsend Sequim Bay*

2:36 a.m. 2:06 p.m. 5:15 a.m. 3:53 p.m. 7:00 a.m. 5:38 p.m. 6:21 a.m. 4:59 p.m.

TODAY

TOMORROW

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.2’ 8.3’ 7.8’ 5.9’ 9.4’ 7.1’ 8.8’ 6.7’

8:21 a.m. 8:41 p.m. 11:06 a.m. 10:43 p.m. 12:20 p.m. 11:57 p.m. 12:13 p.m. 11:50 p.m.

2.0’ -0.3’ 3.8’ 0.0’ 5.0’ 0.0’ 4.7’ 0.0’

High Tide 3:11 a.m. 2:53 p.m. 5:45 a.m. 4:59 p.m. 7:30 a.m. 6:44 p.m. 6:51 a.m. 6:05 p.m.

Thursday, January 12, 2012 Seattle 44/28 Billings 36/20

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Moon Phases

SATURDAY

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

8.2’ 7.9’ 7.9’ 5.4’ 9.5’ 6.5’ 8.9’ 6.1’

9:08 a.m. 9:21 p.m. 11:59 a.m. 11:24 p.m. 1:13 p.m. ----1:06 p.m. -----

1.8’ 0.2’ 3.2’ 0.9’ 4.1’ --3.9’ ---

High Tide Ht 3:47 a.m. 3:45 p.m. 6:16 a.m. 6:15 p.m. 8:01 a.m. 8:00 p.m. 7:22 a.m. 7:21 p.m.

8.3’ 7.4’ 7.9’ 5.0’ 9.5’ 6.0’ 8.9’ 5.6’

Low Tide Ht 10:00 a.m. 10:05 p.m. 12:55 p.m. ----12:38 a.m. 2:09 p.m. 12:31 a.m. 2:02 p.m.

Jan 22

Jan 30

1.6’ 0.9’ 2.4’ --1.2’ 3.1’ 1.1’ 2.9’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Full

$IIRUGDEOH'HQWXUHV$QG,PSODQWV 7R/RRN$QG(DW<RXU%HVW

0s

Houston 53/32

Fronts Cold

Miami 79/63

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

Feb 7

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

City Hi Lo W Athens 52 37 pc Baghdad 61 41 s Beijing 39 21 s Brussels 48 34 sh Cairo 58 48 s Calgary 38 19 c Edmonton 29 14 pc Hong Kong 63 59 c Jerusalem 48 39 s Johannesburg 80 61 t Kabul 48 20 s London 52 37 pc Mexico City 73 45 pc Montreal 28 27 sn Moscow 31 24 sf New Delhi 68 38 pc Paris 52 39 pc Rio de Janeiro 88 76 c Rome 57 37 s Stockholm 37 34 sh Sydney 73 64 s Tokyo 42 35 pc Toronto 38 24 sn Vancouver 42 33 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Hi 36 24 49 53 58 60 40 36 15 35 46 44 66 32 30 44 29 45 48 36 21 42 44 1 30 77 53 36

Lo 20 2 25 27 42 36 22 20 4 23 39 33 31 10 13 19 17 21 29 12 8 27 26 -40 13 67 32 27

W s sn s pc r pc s pc pc s r sh s s sn sh pc s s s c sh s sn pc sh s c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 26 58 42 74 79 30 15 42 54 54 40 20 77 70 60 68 44 63 45 58 28 34 55 68 62 16 28 60

Lo 9 36 24 50 63 18 3 21 32 44 20 8 46 46 42 44 24 35 17 31 14 19 29 48 42 0 13 38

W c s pc s pc sn sf pc pc r s c s s r pc s pc s s sf s pc pc s pc s pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 83 at Edinburg, TX

Low: -19 at Clayton Lake, ME

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*UHJ%DUU\''6

1C564290

4XDOLW\PDNHVDELJGLIIHUHQFHLQWKHORRNVÂżWFRPIRUWDQG IXQFWLRQ\RXÂśOOH[SHULHQFH:HKHOS\RXDIIRUGWKHEHVW\RXU EXGJHWDOORZV6HHRQHSUDFWLWLRQHUSD\RQHSULFHIRU\RXU SHUVRQDOL]HGWUHDWPHQWÂąSUHSDUDWLRQÂżWWLQJDQGIROORZXSV

Atlanta 53/27

El Paso 48/30

First

New York 54/44 Washington 60/38

Los Angeles 74/50

Sunset today ................... 4:43 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:01 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 9:18 p.m. Moonset today ................. 9:28 a.m.

New

Detroit 42/27

Denver 36/12 Kansas City 26/9

Sun & Moon

Last

Minneapolis 15/3 Chicago 30/13

San Francisco 62/42

World Cities Today

Spokane 30/14

Temperatures are todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highs and tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lows.

TABLE Location High Tide

National Forecast

Jan 16

Shown is todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weather.

TIDE

Yesterday Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 2 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 41 27 0.00 0.66 Forks* 42 30 0.00 5.70 Seattle 42 32 0.00 1.62 Sequim 46 32 0.00 0.25 Hoquiam 45 30 0.00 2.42 Victoria 41 26 0.00 1.34 P. Townsend 41 35 0.00 0.23 *Data from Tuesday

-10s -0s

Bellingham 38/18 Aberdeen 46/29

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

 

0DMRUFUHGLWFDUGVRUWHUPVRQDSSURYDO

Briefly . . . Chimacum club to install 2012 officers CHIMACUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; With a traditional ritual used for the 100-year history of Daughters of Norway, Thea Foss Lodge No. 45 will install its 2012 officers Sunday. The event will be held at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, at 1 p.m. New President Symbolyn Jacobsen will head the slate of 18 elected and appointed officers. The public is invited

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to attend. For more information, phone 360-379-1802.

Melora Hiller, board advocacy project trainer from Common Ground of Washington will host the workshop, which is Advocacy event designed for members of PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; boards of nonprofit entities Effective Advocacy will be the topic of a special work- working on homelessness shop held during a meeting and affordable housing issues. of the Shelter Providers Board members planNetwork of Clallam County ning to attend the workon Wednesday. shop are encouraged to The Shelter Providers complete a quick survey in meeting will be held in advance at http://tinyurl. Holy Trinity Lutheran Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downstairs fellow- com/7qlu3cl. ship hall, 301 E. Lopez Common Ground also Ave., at 9 a.m. offers an introductory video

at http://tinyurl.com/ 77co2w4. The advocacy workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m., following reports about upcoming events, housing and services, grants and funding, and legislative action impacting homelessness programs. RSVPs for the workshop can be emailed at serenity martha@gmail.com. Shelter Providers meetings are open to everyone who is interested in ending local homelessness. For more information,

phone Serenity House at 360-452-7224 or email serenity@olypen.com.

Energy Lunch set PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Jefferson County Energy Lunch Program will be held at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. Attendees will learn how neighbors on Bainbridge Island are using minute-by-minute energyuse data to reduce their

consumption and alleviate the need to build a new substation. Information on Bainbridge Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy use is available at www. positiveenergybi.org/ dashboard. The Jefferson County Energy Lunch Series is sponsored by Power Trip Energy, the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, Huberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inn and Sunshine Propane. For more information, phone 360-643-3080. Peninsula Daily News

Do you know about our services? We are so much more than just your local building materials suppliers. HARTNAGEL

â&#x2013;  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Adventures of Tintinâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alvin and the Chipmunksâ&#x20AC;? (G) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugoâ&#x20AC;? (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadowsâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;War Horseâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Bought a Zooâ&#x20AC;? (PG)

â&#x2013;  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Darkest Hourâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl with the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocolâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13)

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