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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

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December 15, 2010

Spice up your holidays

$7.5 million addition to 7 Cedars Casino

Great ideas from Relish magazine

BONUS INSIDE!

5,000-square-foot expansion slated for summer finish

Inlet said ideal for tidal power

By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Construction of a $7.5 million, 5,000-square-foot addition to 7 Cedars Casino in Blyn should start in March, Ron Allen, Jamestown S’Klallam tribal chairman, said Tuesday. Speaking to more than 50 people at the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce luncheon at SunLand Golf & Country Club, Allen said a 300-room, seven-story twin-tower hotel resort planned south of the casino is Allen still five years away. Difficult loan financing must be secured, and a wastewater reclamation system such as the city of Sequim’s and a 600-car underground parking garage must be built for the hotel, Allen said. “We’re not letting go. If you’ve got a vision, don’t let go,” Allen said of the tribe’s long-term intentions to build the destination resort that he describes as a “four-star” world-class project.

UW studies potential of underwater turbines The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Nearly two years of monitoring show Admiralty Inlet is an ideal place to harness tidal energy, University of Washington researchers say. UW oceanographer Jim Thomson said they have measured currents of up to 8 knots, or 9 miles per hour, faster than initially expected. He said data collected so far also show the site isn’t used much by marine species. The Snohomish County Public Utility District wants to put two large turbines about 200 feet below the surface of Puget Sound.

Factors monitored

Related construction He said the tribe decided to build a wastewater reclamation system specifically for the hotel resort because hooking up to the city of Sequim’s newly expanded water reclamation and sewer system would be too costly. Meanwhile, the casino addition will add a wing to the bingo hall and a restaurant. The facility, expected to be completed by next summer, will extend into the parking lot and bring the casino area to about 20,000 square feet, Allen said.

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

The 7 Cedars Casino expansion will include a wing to the bingo hall and Turn to Casino/A7 a new restaurant, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Chairman Ron Allen said.

UW researchers have been monitoring water speed, ambient noise and water quality at the site. The pilot project would generate 100 kilowatts of electricity, or enough to power between 50 to 100 homes. “We think it’s a good site, and we think it’s the right place to do a pilot project,” said Thomson, who is also a UW assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering. The school has been working with the public utility to find a good spot for two 30-foot turbines that will likely be installed by the PUD in late 2013. Turn

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Taxes can help fund PT history

Calendar has bonus: ‘Friendtober’

By Charlie Bermant

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A portion of a year-end contribution to the Port Townsend Main Street Program can also count toward a business and occupation tax obligation. “If you choose to do this, you can determine exactly where your taxes go,” said Main Street board President Susan Windle. “And you can choose exactly how much goes to us and to your taxes.” Port Townsend Main Street has participated in the tax incentive program for five years and in 2009 earned $13,000, approximately 10 percent of its budget, from that source. Small businesses are assessed business and occupation taxes measured on the value of products, gross proceeds of sale or gross income of the business, according to the Washington Department of Revenue’s website, www.dor.wa.gov. Turn

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By Charlie Bermant CHIMACUM — When Mitch Brennan’s class decided to publish a fundraising calendar that would feature student art, they faced a mathematical problem — the class had 27 students and only 12 months in a year. The idea that emerged was that the Chimacum Elementary School class — composed of students from third to fifth grade — would print two calendars, each with a different set of drawings. And instead of just 12 months, the calendars would feature 13, inserting “Friendtober” between October and November — a month intended to be removed by the user. To even everything up, the 27th kid did the cover for both versions. “The art the kids do for the calendars doesn’t end up on the refrigCharlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News erator and then get thrown away,” Students Halli Trafton, left, and Brianne Williamson chat while Seth Richey listens in Brennan said.

their Chimacum Elementary School classroom. The three are among students who are selling calendars they printed and designed.

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Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 94th year, 293rd issue — 5 sections, 40 pages

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UpFront

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2010, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2010, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Usher kicked in face by frenzied fan BEING A SEX symbol has its dangers as Usher learned firsthand at his New York City concert. The crooner brought an ecstatic female fan onstage Monday night for a serenade of Usher his sensual song “Trading Places” at Madison Square Garden. He sat her on a couch while he caressed her. Then, after they changed positions, the overexcited fan tried to move her leg to get closer to him. Her stiletto boot heel knocked him in the nose. The fan tried to smooth things over by massaging Usher’s face, but there was no need: Usher wasn’t hurt and cracked a joke about it.

Portman producing Natalie Portman thinks gross-out, juvenile humor isn’t just for guys. She believes women appreciate lewd humor, too. In the January 2011 issue of Vogue magazine,

the Academy Awardnominated actress said she’s started her own production company and is Portman interested in making comedic films like “The Hangover” for women. In the article, Portman said women are typically “not allowed” to be “beautiful and funny.” She also believes it’s frowned upon for females to be vulgar. Her latest movie, “Black Swan,” is now in theaters. The January issue of Vogue goes on sale nationwide Tuesday.

Copyright case Funk pioneer George Clinton wants a federal judge to force the Black Eyed Peas to shut up when it comes to sampling his music. Clinton sued the Grammywinning pop group in Los Angeles on Friday, claiming it used eleClinton ments of his 1979 song “(Not Just) Knee Deep” in remixes of its song “Shut Up.” The song first appeared

on the group’s 2003 album “Elephunk,” and it released “Shut Up Remix” the same year. It also was used in another remix included on the deluxe edition of the Peas’ 2009 release, “The E.N.D.,” according to the complaint. Clinton said he never granted permission for the use of his music, and he is seeking copyright infringement damages and an injunction to block further sales of the remixes. His lawsuit also names as defendants will.i.am and Fergie, the two highest-profile members of Black Eyed Peas. He is also suing the group’s label, Universal Music Group. A representative for attorney Ken Hertz, who represents the Black Eyed Peas, said he doesn’t comment on client issues. A phone message left for Universal Music Group was not immediately returned. Clinton claims producers tried to license “(Not Just) Knee Deep” in 2009, but he refused. He claims his signature was forged on a release form later provided to his attorneys and that he has never been paid royalties on the remixes. The musician previously obtained the rights to his music after suing his label in federal court.

Passings

_________

JOHN B. FENN, 93, who shared the 2002 Nobel

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

CIGARETTE SMOKE COMING from the driver of a Smart car . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

MONDAY’S QUESTION: Is your Christmas tree real or artificial?

Real 

Artificial 

29.9% 45.6%

No tree  24.4% Total votes cast: 1,052

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

WALTER HAEUSSERMAN, 96, a member of the team of former Nazi German rocket scientists who helped America send a man to the moon, has died. Mr. Haeusserman, who died Dec. 8 in Huntsville, Ala., was buried Monday in a private serMr. vice. The Haeusserman Huntsville in 2008 Times, which first reported his death, said he died at Huntsville Hospital of complications from a fall. He is survived by his wife, Ruth. Mr. Haeusserman was with Dr. Wernher von Braun at Pennemunde, the German site where V-2 rockets were built in World War II. He joined the team of scientists and engineers who worked on America’s space program at Huntsville after the war. He was in charge of guidance and control systems for rockets that landed American astronauts on the moon in 1969.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Corrections and clarifications

Prize for chemistry for developing a technique that sped up the development of new drugs and the study of the molecules of life, died Friday in Richmond, Va. A spokeswoman for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, where Dr. Fenn was a professor of chemistry, confirmed Dr. Fenn’s death but did not provide information about its cause or his survivors. Dr. Fenn was in his 70s when he published the research that won the Nobel Prize, focusing on a new way to identify and map proteins, carbohydrates, DNA and other large biological molecules. He shared the prize with Koichi Tanaka, an engineer in Kyoto, Japan, and Kurt Wüthrich, a professor of biophysics in Zurich, who worked independently on related protein research. Dr. Fenn improved a technique known as mass spectrometry, which identifies molecules like proteins by how quickly they are accelerated in an electric field. Using his approach, biologists can now identify molecules in a matter of seconds rather than weeks,

speeding up research on new drugs. The techniques have helped create a new field of biology, proteomics, in which scientists are trying to catalog the interplay of hundreds of thousands of proteins in human cells. The problem that had stymied biologists in using mass spectrometry on larger proteins is that such proteins clump together, and thus the scientists would end up measuring the clumps rather than individual proteins. Dr. Fenn’s breakthrough was to turn a solution containing the proteins into vapor. “We learned to make elephants fly,” Dr. Fenn said in an interview after the announcement of the Nobel. “There’s an awful lot of luck in this,” he added. “In fact, there’s a lot of luck in science.”

■  Sam Paxton is the brother of Thomas Paxton, who is in Harborview Medical Center in Seattle after his motorcycle and a car collided on state Highway 112 west of Port Angeles on Dec. 3. Sam Paxton’s first name was erroneously published as Steve in a Tuesday story

on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex. wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1935 (75 years ago)

News notes:   The newly formed Peninsula Oil and Gas Co., headed by Ed Sims of Port Townsend, will start drilling a test oil and gas well on a prospect dome about 15 miles up the Wishkah River from Aberdeen.   Dr. Gail C. White was elected president of the Port Angeles Golf and Country Club for 1936 at the annual dinner meeting of that organization. Laugh Lines   The Merchants Hotel building at the corner of Front and Laurel streets in A new report found that sales of jean leg- downtown Port Angeles was gings — also known as jeg- purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Claude Carlson, who own gings — doubled over the City Drug Store located last year. Also doubling: the use of inside the 50-year-old Merthe phrase, “Wow, that per- chants building. Did You Win? son really shouldn’t be State lottery results 1960 (50 years ago) wearing jeggings.” Jimmy Fallon One of Port Angeles’ Tuesday’s Daily main industries — the Game: 5-7-3 THE UNOFFICIAL Crown Zellerbach Corp. Tuesday’s Keno: 01-04SLOGAN of NASA astropaper mill — celebrated its 06-12-14-15-16-28-29-30nauts is “Expect the unex- 40th birthday yesterday. 36-37-39-44-54-63-66-69pected.” Three millworkers from 73-77 But doesn’t expecting the start, Claude L. ­Rivetts, Tuesday’s Match 4: the unexpected make the day shift paper machine 04-15-20-23 unexpected become the supervisor, William M. Tuesday’s Mega Milexpected? Locke, steam plant supervilions: 18-22-25-31-38, Mega Ball: 29 Your Monologue sor, and Jack F. Webster Sr.,

journeyman painter, gathered near a stack of 8-foot pulp wood and counted annual growth rings on the logs. They counted 37 rings on one, 39 on another and 40 on a third. “Most of this wood grew during the 40 years we’ve worked in this mill,” ­Rivetts noted.

1985 (25 years ago) Federal authorities say they soon will assign a new emergency radio frequency to the Joyce fire department, squelching a controversy that spans the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The department has used the frequency since 1955, but forgot to renew its license in 1982, so the band was reassigned to a group of Canadian firefighters. The frequency has been shared since then, causing confusion to emergency personnel on both sides. Approval by the Federal Communications Commission depends on a statement from Canadian authorities saying the new frequency will not interfere with other Canadian operations in the area.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15, the 349th day of 2010. There are 16 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights went into effect following ratification by Virginia. On this date: ■  In 1890, Sioux Chief Sitting Bull and 11 other tribe members were killed in Grand River, S.D., during a confrontation with tribal police. ■  In 1893, Antonin Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, “From the New World,” was rehearsed before the public at New York’s Carnegie Hall; the official world premiere was held the next day.

■  In 1938, groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial took place in Washington, D.C., with President Franklin D. Roosevelt taking part in the ceremony. ■  In 1939, the motion picture “Gone With the Wind” had its world premiere in Atlanta. ■  In 1944, a single-engine plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller, a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces, disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris. ■  In 1960, Teflon-coated skillets first went on sale at Macy’s flagship store in New York City. ■  In 1961, former Nazi official Adolf Eichmann was sentenced to death by an Israeli court.

■  In 1964, Canada’s House of Commons approved dropping the “Red Ensign” flag in favor of a new design. ■  In 1965, two U.S.-manned spacecraft, Gemini 6A and Gemini 7, maneuvered to within 10 feet of each other while in orbit. ■  In 1979, the deposed Shah of Iran left the United States for Panama, the same day the International Court of Justice in The Hague issued a provisional order for Iran to release all its American hostages. ■  Ten years ago: The longtroubled Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was closed for good. Federal regulators ordered an overhaul of California’s electricity

market in a push to control skyrocketing prices and curtail supply shortages. First lady and Sen.-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton agreed to an $8 million book deal with Simon & Schuster for her White House memoirs. Living History was released in 2003. ■  Five years ago: Millions of Iraqis turned out to choose a parliament in a mostly peaceful election. ■  One year ago: The Washington, D.C., City Council voted to legalize same-sex marriage. Boeing’s new 787 jetliner went on its long-delayed first test flight, lifting off from Paine Field in Everett.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Second Front Page

Page

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Briefly: Nation Health care will move forward despite ruling

high-end, Italian-themed hotelcasino with a wall of famous fountains along the Las Vegas Strip. The 3:50 a.m. robbery at a craps table happened “about as quick as you can do it,” when a WASHINGTON — The man wearing a motorcycle helWhite House insisted Tuesday met pulled a gun on patrons, that the implementation of police Lt. Clinton Nichols told President Barack Obama’s land- The Associated Press. mark health care law will not Police later released an be affected by a negative federal 11-second video showing a man court ruling, and the Justice in a jumpsuit running through Department said it would a casino entry lobby with a gun appeal. in his right hand. “There’s no At one point, he turned and practical pointed the weapon behind him. impact at all His helmet appeared to be as states move red with twin white stripes forward in from front to rear. implementing . . . the law School board shooting that Congress passed and the PANAMA CITY, Fla. — president Video of a shooting at a Florida signed,” White Gibbs school board meeting shows the House press superintendent begging the secretary Robert Gibbs told gunman to let board members reporters. go before the man fires a shot at Justice Department spokeshim that misses. woman Tracy Schmaler said In video from Tuesday’s clash that, as expected, the departposted by WMBB television on ment would appeal Monday’s its website, gunman Clay Duke ruling by U.S. District Judge is shown calmly confronting the Henry E. Hudson in Virginia. board. Hudson declared that a cenDuke stands about 10 feet in tral provision of the law — the front of the board with the gun requirement for nearly everyone at his side. Superintendent Bill to carry health insurance — Husfelt asks Duke to let the was unconstitutional. others go. After some back-and-forth, Bellagio heist Duke points the gun at Husfelt, who pleads “Please don’t, please LAS VEGAS — An armed don’t.” Duke fires a shot that bandit escaped Tuesday on a misses. motorcycle after stealing at What happens next isn’t least $1.5 million in casino chips shown. Police said district secufrom the posh Bellagio resort rity chief Mike Jones entered and may have pulled a similar the room and exchanged fire caper across town less than a with Duke, wounding him. week ago, police said. Police said Duke then fatally The culprit, however, might shot himself. find it hard to redeem his loot The Associated Press at any other casino except the

Briefly: World Sunni-backed politician to join Iraq government BAGHDAD — The head of a Sunni-backed political party will join the Shiite-led government being assembled by his top rival, a spokeswoman said Tuesday, clearing a final hurdle to end months of tortuous, postelection dealmaking. The breakthrough cements what the Obama administration has been pushing for as U.S. troops prepare to leave Iraq by the end of 2011: an inclusive government that distributes power among Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds to forge stability after more than seven years of war. As part of the deal, Ayad Allawi will join Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government as head of a newly created council to oversee security and foreign policy issues. The two rivals will make the same annual salary, believed to be at least $360,000.

to extradite him for questioning — arguing that he could be questioned from Britain. In a day of courtroom drama, the Assange 39-year-old Australian was first told by a judge that he would be freed, then less than two hours later was informed he had at least another 48 hours in custody. Britain’s High Court will hear the Swedish appeal, but it wasn’t clear exactly when.

Dozens die in fire

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Dozens of people were killed after a devastating blaze raced through a garment factory that supplies major multinationals such as Gap and JCPenney near Bangladesh’s capital. Many of the dead included trapped workers who jumped from the smoldering building engulfed by flames, witnesses at the scene said. Fire official Golam Mostafa Sweden appeals bail said the fire Tuesday started in LONDON — A British judge a 10-story factory owned by ordered Julian Assange released local business giant Ha-Meem on $316,000 bail Tuesday, but Group in the Ashulia industrial zone, just outside Dhaka. the WikiLeaks founder will It was not immediately clear remain in custody for at least what caused the blaze, and the two more days after Swedish government ordered an investiprosecutors challenged that gation. decision. Interior Minister Shahara Assange has spent a week in a U.K. jail following his surren- Khatun said after visiting the site her ministry would probe der to British police over a Swedish sex-crimes warrant. whether it was related to recent He denies any wrongdoing violent protests at textile factobut has refused to voluntarily ries over wages. surrender to Sweden’s request The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Colin Firth, left, portrays King George VI, and Helena Bonham Carter portrays the queen mother in a scene from “The King’s Speech.”

7 Globe nominations go to ‘King’s Speech’ Other top films include ‘The Social Network,’ ‘The Fighter’ The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — “The King’s Speech” is precisely the kind of film that has long appealed to awards voters: It’s historical, focuses on royalty, depicts a character overcoming physical adversity and features a classy cast. So, it should come as no surprise that it received the most Golden Globe nominations Tuesday with seven, including best picture, on a morning when there were few surprises to be found. The film’s director, Tom Hooper, was also among the nominees, as were stars Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter. Based on the story of how King George VI (Firth) battled a stammer with the help of an unorthodox speech therapist (Rush) just prior to World War II, “The King’s Speech” hits all the right notes and does it with impeccable polish. But beneath the flawless production values and period trappings is a relevant story about uplift — always popular come

awards time. Other top nominees were David Fincher’s “The Social Network,” which traces the origins of Facebook, and David O. Russell’s “The Fighter,” inspired by the true story of Boston-area boxer “Irish” Micky Ward. Both films received six nominations, including best picture and best director.

Common thread seen “The Social Network” has been racking up top honors from critics groups across the country in recent days, including those in New York and Los Angeles. These may all sound vastly different, but Rush, a supportingactor nominee, sees a uniting thread among the front-runners. “When I look at the films that have been nominated and the films that have been emerging through festivals in the last couple of months, it’s fascinating to me. “Somebody actually did comment online that maybe we’re

going back to the great old days of the ’70s where films had a bit of meat and a bit of bite and a bit of social commentary,” he said. “The themes seem to be, particularly with our film, themes about leadership, communication, friendship — qualities that I think people are yearning for on some kind of grander scale. “And that applies to certainly the ones I’ve seen, like ‘The Social Network’ or the individual ruggedness through ‘127 Hours,’ it’s quite fascinating how these things become the zeitgeist.” The visceral, intimate “127 Hours,” based on the true story of a hiker who was trapped beneath a boulder for that duration, has also been a favorite so far, but it only received three Golden Globe nominations: best actor in a drama (James Franco), screenplay and original score. Still, it’s been in the mix among awards prognosticators and critics filling out their top-10 lists. Even some of the wackier picks that had people all worked up Tuesday morning — the flashy but critically panned “Burlesque” and “The Tourist” earning three nominations each, including best musical or comedy — also make some sense historically.

Earmarkers feast on pork one last time before diet Lawmakers try to put $1.27 trillion into ‘omnibus’ bill The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The spending barons on Capitol Hill, long used to muscling past opponents of bills larded with pet projects, are seeking one last victory before tea party-backed GOP insurgents storm Congress intent on ending the good old days of pork-barrel politics. You might call it the last running of the old bulls in Congress. In the waning days of the lameduck congressional session, Democrats controlling the Senate — in collaboration with a handful of old school Republicans — are pushing to wrap $1.27 trillion worth of unfinished budget work into a single “omnibus” appropriations bill. Their 1,900-plus-page bill

Quick Read

comes to the floor this week stuffed with provisions sought by lawmakers. It contains thousands of pet projects, known as earmarks, pushed by Democratic and GOP senators alike — despite a pledge by Republicans to give up such projects next year. “That omnibus bill will be loaded down with earmarks and pork-barrel spending, which is a direct — a direct — betrayal of the majority of voters on Nov. 2 who said ‘Stop the earmarking, stop the spending, stop the porkbarrel projects,”’ protested Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. Altogether, the bill contains about $8 billion worth of earmarks, less than in previous years since House Republicans didn’t ask for any. The earmarked funds equal

less than 1 percent of the measure. The catchall bill is designed to bankroll the operations of every Cabinet agency for the budget year that started Oct. 1, as well as $158 billion to pay for Pentagon operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. It also challenges President Barack Obama. One administration-opposed provision would block the Pentagon from transferring Guantanamo Bay prisoners to the United States. Another would provide $450 million for a program to develop a second engine for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter despite a veto threat by the administration, which said it’s a waste of money.

. . . more news to start your day

West: No corrosion found in gas pipeline explosion

Nation: ‘Jeopardy!’ pits humans against machine

Nation: Ohio couple get married in favorite diner

Nation: Carrier arrested for delivering mail naked

A gas pipeline that ruptured and caused a deadly explosion in a Northern California neighborhood showed no signs of corrosion and wasn’t dented or leaking, federal accident investigators said Tuesday. The National Transportation Safety Board has yet to determine what caused the transmission line to rupture Sept. 9, killing eight people and destroying dozens of homes. Investigators found no physical evidence of a pre-existing leak in the pipe pieces, nor did they see dents or gouges suggesting that someone struck the pipe with excavation equipment.

The game show “Jeopardy!” will pit man versus machine this winter in a competition that will show how successful scientists are in creating a computer that can mimic human intelligence. Two of the venerable game show’s most successful champions — Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter — will play two games against “Watson,” a computer program developed by IBM’s artificial intelligence team. The matches will be spread over three days that will air Feb. 14-16, the game show said Tuesday. The competition is reminiscent of when IBM developed a chess-playing computer to compete against chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997.

Guests sat in booths, not church pews, for a wedding at an Ohio diner where the bride and groom often go for breakfast. Tim Shoenfelt proposed to Hallie Richwine in March in the parking lot of Deb’s Heavenly Hash Diner in Marshallville, Ohio, 40 miles south of Cleveland. They returned Saturday to exchange vows there. The new wife said the diner seemed like the perfect wedding spot because it’s one of their favorite places. She met her husband 12 years ago at the University of Akron. They left the area for jobs in other states but eventually returned to northeast Ohio and reconnected in 2008.

A Wisconsin postal carrier said he simply wanted to cheer up a woman on his rounds who seemed “stressed out” when he decided to deliver mail in the buff. But upon further review, the worker told police that delivering mail while completely naked probably wasn’t a good idea. A police report said the 52-year-old man told the woman he would deliver the mail in the nude to her office in Whitefish Bay to make her laugh. The report said that Dec. 4, he brought the mail wearing only a smile. The mail carrier was arrested for lewd and lascivious behavior several days later.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Forks man is found guilty of murder By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Etienne Choquette of Forks was found guilty Tuesday of first-degree premeditated murder in the shooting death of Antonio Rodriguez Maldonado. A Clallam County Superior Court jury of six men and six women determined that Choquette — who turned 47 on the same day he was found guilty — fatally shot Rodriquez Maldonado, 33, at about 11 p.m. Sept. 24, 2009. Choquette, whose sentence will be enhanced because of the use of a firearm, faces from 20½ years

to life in prison and a fine of up to $50,000. Sentencing is scheduled Jan. 27. Choquette looked straight ahead with little expression as Judge Brooke Taylor polled the jury. “I think the jury did a good job and gave a lot of thought to the verdict,” said Deputy Prosecutor Ann Lundwall, who handled the case. “It was a very considered verdict, and a just one.” Juror April Lawson said that the jury debated the evidence from Monday afternoon until Tuesday afternoon with a break for the night hours.

“It was intense,” she said. “It was a lot harder than I thought it would be.” The prosecution argued during the trial that Choquette had become close with Forks resident Kellie White, who was the estranged girlfriend of Rodriguez Maldonado.

Taylor ruled in October that Choquette’s confession to police could be used against him. The defense had made a motion to exclude his statements because he wasn’t re-advised of his rights during the second interview, according to court documents. Choquette’s attorneys have said that he confessed to protect White, who he believed was also a suspect. Taylor ruled that because Choquette testified that he had understood his rights at the time and because he was properly advised of his right to remain silent at the beginning of the interview

Talked of abuse White had told Choqutte that Rodriquez Maldonado was abusing her and that she would be safer if he were dead, the prosecution said. Defense attorney Gary Sund said that the case was over before it began — when

process, his statements could be used, according to court documents. A .38-caliber revolver was found in the Quillayute River. Forks police officers testified that Choquette had told them he threw it there.

‘Faith in jury system’

happen later with Choquette. Lawson, who said she has served on a jury once before on a minor case, said the jurors primarily debated the evidence Monday and began to reach their decision Tuesday. “We took this very seriously,” she said. “It is a man’s life.” She said there wasn’t one thing in particular that the decision turned on. “It was everything, all of the evidence,” she said.

“I have a lot of faith in the jury system,” Sund said. “And I still believe in it. I’m not surprised with what they got to hear at trial. “This case was over when __________ the court failed to suppress his false confession.” Reporter Paige Dickerson can Sund said he wasn’t sure be reached at 360-417-3535 or at if an appeal would be filed, paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily but that discussion would news.com.

Hoh tribe wins passage of land transfer into trust. The Senate passed the The Hoh tribe soon will Hoh Indian Tribe Safe move from its flood-ravaged Homelands Act by unaniand dwindling reservation mous consent in October. in West Jefferson County to higher ground. Minor amendments The House of Representatives approved legislation The House had passed Tuesday, now awaiting the act earlier this year but President Barack Obama’s had to vote on it again signature, that transfers 37 because of minor amendacres of Olympic National ments made in the Senate. Park to the tribe and places “This news could not have another 425 acres it bought come at a better time for the over the last three years Hoh tribe,” said Chairwoman Peninsula Daily News

within a tsunami zone. Flooding and storms have chewed away at the small amount of land the tribe now holds.

Maria Lopez in a statement. “We nearly avoided yet another flooding this past weekend, and the rainy season is upon us.” The National Weather Service said that the Forks area has received nearly 10 inches of rain this month. Most of the 1-square-mile reservation for the small Hoh tribe — which has about 130 members — is within a floodplain at the mouth of the Hoh River. All the tribal land is

Move housing, offices Once legislation is signed, the Hoh will be able to move housing and administrative offices out of the tsunami zone onto 425 acres of land it has purchased. The act prevents the tribe from building on the

parkland, which sits between the reservation and the property the tribe purchased. The addition of parkland is meant to keep the reservation contiguous. “We hope that President Obama will expeditiously sign the bill, and once that is done, we look forward to working with the various agencies on implementation to formally place the land into trust and begin help in relocating and rebuilding

our village,” Lopez said. The tribe hopes to begin building between 30 and 50 homes in the spring, Lopez has said. A fire station and small grocery store also are planned. The act was sponsored by Sens. Patty Murray, D-Bothell, and Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, and was introduced into the House of Representatives by Rep. Norm Dicks in 2009.

Clallam County approves $83.3 million budget By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County commissioners Tuesday approved an $83.3 million budget for 2011 that keeps core services intact and draws $1.43 million from reserves. The same budget was discussed in two public hearings last week. No public testimony was taken.

“We had six months’ worth of discussion,” Commissioner Mike Chapman said. The county laid off four employees and left 19 positions unfilled to close what was originally a $3.1 million budget deficit in August. The $1.43 million drawn from reserves leaves more than $8.07 million in the

rainy day fund for the health and the county jail. future. Small reductions in customer service hours were ‘Challenging time’ made to allow reduced staff “It’s been, as you know, a to complete mandated tasks. The Prosecuting Attorrather challenging time for local governments,” Commis- ney’s Office and District and sioner Mike Doherty told the Superior Court Clerk’s offices audience in the weekly busi- will be closed from noon to 12:30 p.m. ness meeting. Projected expenses in the The county’s general fund covers core services like sher- county’s general fund outiff’s deputies, courts, public weigh revenue $32.5 million

to $31.1 million. The county will spend $83.3 million in the total budget, which includes grants and tax revenue.

No wage increases There will be no cost-ofliving increase for the county’s 391 full-time equivalent employees. The three commissioners and County Administra-

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tor Jim Jones will not get a pay raise in 2011. Jones has said that the budget will put as much as $58,419,782 back into the local economy through salaries, outside services and capital improvements. Meanwhile, commissioners also established the 2011 general purpose and road fun property tax levies. Both are the standard 1 percent increase. The increase amounts to $93,793 for general purpose and $63,270 for the road fund.

Peninsula Daily News news sources

TACOMA — Police are trying to gather more information about a human foot that washed ashore in the city’s Tideflats area. Police spokesman Mark Fulghum said Tuesday that the right foot was still inside a boy’s size 6 “OzArk Trail” hiking boot and likely belonged to a juvenile or small adult. He said the boots were sold in Walmart stores from 2004 to 2005. The foot found recently is believed to have floated in from either the Puyallup River or Puget Sound. In late August, a right foot washed up on a beach on Whidbey Island. Island County sheriff’s officers said that foot likely belonged to a woman or a child. Adult feet clad in shoes — mostly running-style shoes known for their “air” buoyancy — have been washing ashore in Canada and the United States in the straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca since 2007. Five were discovered in British Columbia. One foot clad in a black Everest-brand shoe was found on a North Olympic Peninsula beach near Pysht in August 2008. Few clues, even after DNA testing, have come forth on the identity of any of the feet. Fulghum said Tacoma police don’t know whether there might be any connection to the other cases.

Growing pains? Andrew May’s garden column. Sundays in

Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

A5

Some oppose Carlsborg sewer project About 20 residents voice their concern, but businesses in favor of the proposal By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A group of Carlsborg property owners told Clallam County commissioners Tuesday that a current proposal to build a sewer along Carlsborg Road stinks. Thanks but no thanks, they said in a public hearing to extend temporary zoning for Carlsborg, because the cost will be too high. Others said the existing Carlsborg Urban Growth Area, which needs a sewer to be valid and compliant with the 1990 Growth Management Act, will change the rural characteristic of the unincorporated village west of Sequim. “I reject this sewer proposal,” said Susanne Severeid of Carlsborg. “I reject the continuation of declaring Carlsborg an urban growth area. “We don’t need this sewer. We don’t want this sewer. We can’t afford this sewer. And we haven’t asked for this sewer.” Nearly 20 property owners spoke out against the

sewer proposal. A few business owners, however, spoke in favor of it. Urban growth areas like Carlsborg need sewers for businesses to expand. “We’re talking about our livelihoods here,” said Cory Startup, who owns businesses in Carlsborg Industrial Park. The estimated $15 million sewer and wastewater treatment plant is a joint project of Clallam County and the Clallam County Public Utility District. The county has already committed $4 million. PUD approved a draft facilities plan in August and sent it to the state for review. PUD would operate the sewer if a local utility district, or LUD, is formed in June and the sewer gets built, likely in 2012. “The effort to form an LUD is not, I repeat not, a grass-roots movement of the residents of Carlsborg,” Severeid said. “The only genuine grassroots movement here is to stop this sewer and the LUD, and to preserve the

rural flavor of Carlsborg.” Scott Frederick submitted a petition on behalf of Citizens for the Preservation of Carlsborg with more than 170 signatures of residents opposed to the project. “We don’t know the cost; we know that you don’t know the cost,” Frederick told the three county commissioners. “We have some real concerns about the sewer project as a whole.”

Lively public testimony After more than 90 minutes of lively public testimony, the commission unanimously extended interim zoning for the county to continue down its Growth Management Act compliance track. A state hearings board in April 2008 ruled that Carlsborg was noncompliant with the 1990 legislation because it doesn’t have a sewer. The deadline to extend interim zoning was today. Among those in favor of the project was Art Green, who owns a medical manu-

facturing company with 23 employees in the industrial park and wants to expand to a neighboring lot. “I think we should be finding a solution for the UGA, based on implementation in 2000,” Green said. “Hopefully, we can come up with a solution. I’d like to keep my company there. I’d like to have it continue to grow.” Startup said there are more than 150 business supporting 1,000 jobs in Carlsborg. “I don’t even know if I’m for or against the sewer,” he said. “I just need to preserve what I have.” Startup said the county should host more community forums to clear up misconceptions about the project. “I don’t know the cost, just like these people don’t know the cost,” he said. “If there’s an alternative, I’d sure like to hear it.”

Costs unknown Commissioner Steve Tharinger said the reason the county hasn’t hosted more forums is because the costs are still unclear. “Everyone needs to know that cost — we don’t know it yet,” Tharinger said. “We won’t know if there’s

any public grant money or other dollars to lower that price probably until about May or June. That’s part of the moving target here.” The project was one of a dozen targeted for a $10 million state loan, but whether the state approves the loan is up in the air. Washington faces a $5 billion budget deficit. Frederick said concerns over nitrates from septic systems polluting the groundwater were not supported in a 2004 study. He also said PUD has produced several different maps of the proposed local utility district, which, if formed, will determine the boundaries for sewer assessments.

Special benefits study

“We don’t know where they got their 10 percent.” Bryan Frazier and others said the urban growth area designation should be lifted and that rural zoning should take its place.

Liens, hookup fees Severeid said she and her neighbors are concerned over “possible multithousand-dollar liens against our property, hookup fees, monthly charges and possible costs to disable existing properly functioning septic systems.” “Commissioners, you cannot move forward without this community,” she said. Another sewer opponent, who answered his cell phone while addressing the commissioners, asked the audience members to raise their hand if they “don’t want the damn thing in.” Nearly everyone in the boardroom raised their hand. One of the few who didn’t said: “We don’t have enough information.”

A special benefits study would come first. “I’m not sure which map is the correct one for the LUD,” Frederick said. Frederick also questioned a nonbinding advisory petition that established the required 10 percent support for the local utility district. “We are seeing multiple ________ names on petitions of the PUD of the same Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be residencies — up to nine reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. for the same residency,” ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. Frederick said. com.

‘Tuneup for the body’ slated for Thursday An evening of meditation is open to public

“[Geraldine Lesser and I] will simply focus our attention on seven areas of the body [the chakras], starting at the base of the spine, and sing specific notes and vowel sounds for each. In between, we will chant or hear special music.”

By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

AGNEW — It’s like a tuneup for the body, while it relies on an open mind. A “sacred sound experience,” aka an evening of meditation, drumming, chanting and focusing on the chakras — the body’s energy system, according to ancient Indian tradition — is open to the public Thursday. The gathering is part of the monthly Intuitive Circle at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road, off North Barr Road just east of Port Angeles. Admission is free, though a “gratitude offering” is welcome. Sophia Engkvist, a singer and songwriter, and Geraldine Lesser, a drummer and student of the chakra system, will lead the proceedings from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Together, they will use quartz-crystal singing bowls, drums, gongs, chimes — and the participants’ voices — to “take us on a journey,” Engkvist said. This two-hour trip “will be awakening, revealing, revi-

Sophia Engkvist singer and songwriter

Diane Engkvist

Sophia Engkvist of Sequim will lead a “sacred sound experience,” with music, meditation and chanting on the seven chakra energy centers, Thursday evening at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship hall just east of Port Angeles. talizing and life-affirming,” she said. “I will be singing some of my music, but I am not a performer. This is not a performance; it’s an opportunity. Geraldine and I are just facilitating the flow,” Engkvist added.

“We will simply focus our attention on seven areas of the body [the chakras], starting at the base of the spine, and sing specific notes and vowel sounds for each. In between, we will chant or hear special music.” “Our hope is that you can

relax and recharge while having some fun,” Engkvist said. Lesser, for her part, will offer a drumming meditation and a few chants in hopes of helping participants get in touch with their natural inner energy.

This is an evening to open the mind, she said, “a little further, to the possibility of having a good time and a little fun learning some new things about the world as we go round and round.” Engkvist acknowledged that this is an especially busy time to be inviting people to stop and chant for a couple of hours. “It’s only going to get busier, and you need rest and revitalization to keep going,” she said. “Oh, and we are going to have cookies and tea.” To find out more about the event and about Engkvist’s music, which includes an album titled “What If a Day,” e-mail songfire@ olympus.net. For information about the Intuitive Circle, a gathering held every third Thursday of the month at the Unitarian Universalist hall, phone facilitator Marie-Claire Bernards

Sequim focus: solar energy, then wind By Jeff Chew

ViSion BenefitS

‘Solar-oriented’ lots The proposed ordinance would include mandatory “solar-oriented” lots for major subdivisions and consideration of shading issues for major subdivision. It would require 65 per-

cent of lots smaller than 15,000 square feet to be positioned in a manner that protects solar access for future homeowners. Irvin said staff members believe that, with Sequim’s topography, such a provision should not be an undue burden on future developers. Should a particular project have difficulty in meeting this requirement, however, staff members have included a provision that allows for other options to be in compliance, he said. The shading provision would require major subdi-

Dr. eric Van orman

Welcomes One and All!

To To the the Tribe’s Tribe’s Annual Annual

Christmas Bazaar 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

Tribal Gymnasium Please come and join in the festivities and fun of this annual event facilitated by the Tribe. There will be many unique gifts to choose from. Smoked salmon, jewelry, glass-works and much more.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL!

0C5106281

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Angeles Vision

Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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visions, where feasible, to position structures in a manner that does not interfere with another structures’ solar access. Staff did not include provisions that would apply to existing residences.

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Friday, Dec. 17th, 2010

A Christmas Tradition

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Don’t lose your 2010

of a home,” he said in a memo to the council. Irvin said city staffers also want to provide in the proposed ordinance “alternative methods” of compliance, perhaps through conservation and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, certifications of buildings.

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County Public Utility District. Later, Irvin said a public SEQUIM — City Coun- hearing could be conducted, cil members have agreed to and the council agreed. work on a solar energy ordinance before tackling regu- Renewable energy lation of wind power. One of the council’s goals The Sequim City Council reached a nonbinding is to establish Sequim as a renewable energy leader. consensus Monday. Staff members have “I agree we should keep solar and wind separate to drafted a renewable energy move forward,” said council ordinance that provides standards and guidance for member Ted Miller. “But I think we should the use of solar and wind continue to work on a wind energy. The importance of buildordinance.” ing and lot orientation is part of the proposal. More public outreach The idea is that to get Interim Planning Direc- the most from a building tor Joe Irvin and the council site, the sun and how it agreed that more public affects the site must be outreach was needed, taken into consideration, including with the North Irvin said. Peninsula Home Builders “The sun or lack of sun Association and Clallam adds to heating and cooling Peninsula Daily News

at 360-681-4411 or visit www.TheWillowPond.com.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula spared from storm’s damage By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

Bursts of rain and high winds Tuesday hit areas of both Clallam and Jefferson counties but caused no major damage. Although sporadic downpours plagued the entire area — more on the West End than the rest of the North Olympic Peninsula — no heavy damage was incurred, and no more river flooding occurred after the weekend’s rising waters. The highest wind gusts Tuesday were in the West End and on the Hood Canal, according to Dennis D’Amico, Seattle meteorologist for the National Weather Service. A gust of 52 mph was recorded in the very early morning in Forks. Winds of 55 mph hit Tatoosh Island off Neah Bay.

Gusts in Brinnon Brinnon had the highest winds in East Jefferson County, with gusts of about 38 mph during the day Tuesday and about 40 mph

the night before, he said. The Weather Service is predicting more rain to come — but a slower, steadier rain than was seen Tuesday, said D’Amico. “We are looking for showers but not as unstable as we’ve seen [Tuesday],” he said. Port Angeles and Sequim will be spared much of the rain, with Forks and Neah Bay areas receiving the most, he said.

The rain Tuesday brought Forks up to 9.95 inches of rain for December alone — 3.36 inches above the typical rainfall by the middle of December, D’Amico said. The Weather Service has recorded 108.71 inches of rain for the year in Forks so far — or 9.06 feet, he said. AccuWeather had recorded an annual accumulation of 125.86 inches for Forks as of Monday.

West End

Russell Road closed

In Forks early Tuesday, hail, thunder and lightning were followed by off-and-on rain all day, said Mayor Bryon Monohon. “It was the sort of thing that if you holed down for about 15 minutes, it all went away,” he said. “It would be pouring, but in the sky to the west, you could see the end of the storm was close.” The Weather Service recorded just under a halfinch of rain — 0.42 inches — at the Quillayute Airport weather station Tuesday.

Russell Road in Forks remained closed Tuesday at the culvert for Mill Creek. “We are still trying to figure out what to do because we have some [federal] funding figured out, but we don’t know for sure that it is coming through,” Monohon said. The “rain shadow” effect — created by the Olympic Mountains blocking weather coming from the southwest — protected Port Angeles and Sequim from much of the weather. Port Angeles had a gust

of 41 mph Tuesday afternoon and 0.29 inches of rain. Sequim had gusts of 26 mph and very little rain, D’Amico said. The Port Townsend area had winds of about 33 mph Tuesday and about 0.08 inches of rain, D’Amico said. About 0.85 inches of rain were recorded in Brinnon, D’Amico said.

Duckabush River The Weather Service listed no flooding for the Duckabush River or the Dosewallips River. Brinnon Fire Chief Bob Herbst said that both lack monitoring equipment, and that the area did have high water last weekend. All roads have been reopened after floods Sunday, he said. The Duckabush soaked areas near Shorewood and Kelly Road on Sunday, and one family who lived in a fifth-wheel trailer in the area was evacuated,

‘Shop ’Til You Drop’ on Thursday can be used like cash at many downtown busiPORT ANGELES — nesses. Sales, treats, music and A shopper must be at Santa will be available as least 18 to participate in part of “Shop ’Til You the drawing. Drop” on Thursday night. The drawing will be More than 30 stores held in front of the downand shops in downtown town Christmas tree at the Port Angeles and at The Conrad Dyar Fountain, Landing mall will stay corner of First and Laurel open until 8 p.m. streets, at 8:15 p.m. There will be compliThe winner must be mentary gifts, sales, special present. discounts on merchandise, Santa will be downdrawings for door prizes town, too — seated with and holiday cocoa, hot one of his elves at The Togcider and cookies at many gery, 105 E. First St., and of the stores for people who handing out candy canes. come in between 5 p.m. Parents should bring and 8 p.m. their children — and a Shoppers can also enter camera. a drawing at participating Hot cider will be served stores for a prize of $500 in from First Street Haven’s Downtown Dollars, which Christmas Room next to Peninsula Daily News

The Toggery. Participating stores will have special red shopping bags for purchases. Music by Double Exposure — Howard and Leslie Fisher, husband and wife DJs — will be heard throughout downtown.

Caroling There will also be caroling in front of the downtown Christmas tree. Betsy Reed Schultz, owner of The Tudor Inn Bed and Breakfast in Port Angeles, organized the seventh annual “Shop ’Til You Drop.” Co-sponsors are the Port Angeles Downtown Association and the Port Angeles Regional Chamber

of Commerce. First Federal and the downtown association are the sponsors of the $500 Downtown Dollars drawing. Also Thursday night, the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce will hold its December holiday after-hours business mixer from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Holiday mixer The mixer is in the second-floor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. It is open to chamber members and their guests. Beverages and appetizers will be provided.

Herbst said. “The owner informed me that he found that there was a mechanical problem and the trailer could not be moved, so it was left in the path of the flood,” Herbst said. “The occupants went to Shelton for the duration.” The Lazy C Development roads also were shut down because of water from the Dosewallips River and a tributary stream flowing over Appaloosa Drive, Herbst said. Jefferson County Roads Department placed boulders along the Lazy C Development roads earlier in the year, which prevented a washout of Appaloosa Drive on Sunday, Herbst said.

Kitsap woman killed Other areas of the state had more severe weather problems. Kitsap County sheriff’s deputies said 55-year-old Diane M. Walker was killed early Tuesday when a tree

blew down and crashed into her house near Southworth. Two others in the home were not hurt when a huge, old-growth Douglas fire smashed into the home just after midnight during a windy rain storm.

Six flood warnings At one point during last weekend, flood warnings were posted for more than 20 rivers in the state, but that was down to six by Monday night, with all receding. By Tuesday afternoon, only four flood warnings still were in effect. Those were for Skokomish River, Snohomish River, Snoqualomie River and Chahalis River.

__________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lower Elwha bazaar set for this weekend Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — More than 35 vendors will sell authentic Native American artwork during the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe’s annual Christmas Bazaar on Friday and Saturday. “It will be largest bazaar we’ve ever had,” said Brenda Francis, tribal spokeswoman. The bazaar will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in the Lower Elwha gymnasium at 2851 Lower Elwha Road west of Port Angeles. Artists and craftspeople from the Lower Elwha will be joined by vendors from Jamestown and Port Gamble S’Klallam, Muckleshoot, Quinault, Makah and Quileute

tribes, Francis said. Items for sale will range from baked goods to handcrafted jewelry. Admission will be free. Both visitors and vendors will be entered into a drawing to win door prizes that will be drawn every hour. Tables are available to all at a cost of $16 for the entire event. The Port Angeles High School Indian Club will conduct a food fundraiser Saturday in the Lower Elwha dining hall. For more information, phone Francis at 360-4528471, ext. 137, or visit www. elwha.org. Vendors can phone Rachel Hagaman, the tribe’s economic development director, at 360-452-8471, ext. 142.

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Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Wednesday, December 15, 2010

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Casino: Tribe admits it’s ‘trying to buy Blyn’ Continued from A1 with that,” Allen said. “We are trying to buy “We will expand it 30 to Blyn.” 35 feet to the east in the The tribe owns more parking lot, gut it, put in than 20 acres along the new restrooms, a bar and head of Sequim Bay along more card tables and U.S. Highway 101. games,” Allen said after his Allen, who has served as presentation, as he leaned the tribe’s chairman since on a cane after recent knee 1977 and the tribe’s execusurgery. tive director since 1982, The addition is the latest said the tribe today has in a string of tribal developabout 600 members. ments in Blyn since the The tribe also has built 1990s. the Jamestown Family That includes the tribal Health Clinic off North campus, art gallery, community center, the casino, Fifth Avenue in Sequim Longhouse Market and gas that Allen described as station, and Clallam County “comfortable” in its design. The clinic provides genFire District No. 3’s most eral health care services easterly fire station. “People give us a bad and a 24-hour emergency time that we are buying care. It accepts Medicare Blyn, and we don’t argue and Medicaid, he said, and

serves the community atlarge. Also among its holdings is the former Dungeness Golf Course at 1965 Woodcock Road in Sequim, renamed the Cedars at Dungeness after the tribe bought it in December 2006. Plans for the future could include another nine holes for a golf “academy” to teach newcomers to the game how to drive, pitch and putt.

Rayonier site Allen reiterated the tribe’s interest in developing the former mill site owned by Rayonier, which is on Port Angeles’ east side. “Port Angeles could be another Bar Harbor,” Allen

said of the quaint seaside village in Maine. “We think Port Angeles is a diamond in the rough and that the harbor has potential,” he told the audience. The tribe’s “Salish Village” concept for the 75 acres owned by Rayonier Properties LLC would see the site transformed into a “living community” of commercial, light industrial, residential, cultural, lodging, retail, convention and park uses nestled between a restored waterfront pier and upland wildlife habitat and urban farmland, Allen and architects with Gentry Architecture Collaborative in Port Angeles said. Gentry Architecture Col-

laborative designed the Jamestown S’Klallam’s Longhouse Market and Deli, community center and firehouse, all along U.S. Highway 101 in Blyn, as well as the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe’s heritage center on First and Peabody streets in Port Angeles. Allen said it was not the tribe’s intent to take command of the Rayonier site, which has been a cleanup site since 2000, with the state Department of Ecology working with Rayonier and the Lower Elwha. Instead, he said, Jamestown S’Klallam the tribe would “be a player.” “Some want to see it go back to nature,” he said. “Some want it to be heavily developed. Some want it to

be somewhere in between.” The tribe also has agreed to pay for a Clallam County sheriff’s deputy and squad car for the Blyn area. “We are looking at one more [deputy] to be dedicated to the East End,” he said. He said the tribe’s extensive Christmas lights displayed throughout the Blyn village is part of “giving back.” “We’re making a difference and contributing to the development and welfare of the community,” he said.

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Downtown: Program available to all in state Continued from A1 are often slow, any contribution will probably cover the The amount and sched- tax bill for a good part of the ule of the tax can vary, but year even if business is Windle estimated that good, Windle said. The program has drawmany local businesses pay about $750 per year in taxes backs for both merchants and Main Street, Windle on a monthly basis. To participate in the pro- said. Merchants who are gram, a business would, for instance, make a contribu- stretched for cash must tion of $1,000 to the Port come up with a large Townsend Main Street Pro- amount by the end of the year rather than paying the gram before Dec. 31. Of this, $750 would be tax in smaller increments. And since merchants designated toward the tax, usually wait until the deadwith the remainder documented as a direct contribu- line to determine exactly tion, since the process how much they can afford, requires the donation to be Main Street cannot accu33 percent above the cred- rately determine its yearly budget until all the contriited tax. butions are received. The good news, Windle Tax bill credit said, is that the money is The business will then credited to the tax account have the $750 credit on its immediately and satisfies a tax bill, which would be debt that will be due in the applied toward the tax as it next calendar year. is assessed. The program is open to Since the winter months any business that pays

business and occupation taxes in the state. It is not restricted to those in the Port Townsend area. The full amount of the contribution qualifies as a charitable deduction, while up to 75 percent can be designated as a tax credit. To participate, visit www. dor.wa.gov and register to e-file, then click on the Main Street Tax Credit link and select Port Townsend Main Street Program as the recipient. Once approved, contributions should be delivered to Port Townsend Main Street, 211 Taylor St., Suite 1. For more information, visit www.ptmainstreet.org or phone 360-385-7911.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Local merchants can use some of the extra money they make during the busy holiday season to pay their taxes in advance and double as a contribution to the Port Townsend Main Street Program.

Calendars: Sales have raised $1,800 this year Continued from A1 “The kids walk into the bank and other places around town and see their art on the wall, so it gives them a sense of pride — that along with the fact that it makes them some real money,” Brennan said. The class sells calendars, cards and recipe books for $8 each, or any two for $12, to community members and — the standard market for such items — out-of-town relatives.

Brennan said the sales have raised about $1,800 this year, down from the high of $2,500 three years ago, which pays for field trips, art supplies and technology. “We are getting less money from the state, so we need to get creative about paying for supplies and programs,” he said. The class’ profit margin is wide because it uses school equipment for printing and design, and students run all the machines.

As a result, the students learn a variety of skills to produce the handmade product.

Variety of skills This is still a time-consuming process, since pages are printed one at a time on the classroom printer. When things go wrong, as it did this week when one cartridge failed, Brennan must fix it himself. “I would have liked to take this to the local printer

and support that business, but it would have cost $6.50 per calendar,” Brennan said. “We couldn’t make any money at those rates.”

Desk calendars The calendars are meant for the desk instead of the wall and are housed in a plastic case resembling those used for compact discs. Each month is printed on a single card, which can

Tidal: ‘No showstoppers’ yet application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission early next year. More work is being done to understand how the turbines will affect marine life. Researchers are also trying to better understand

Each card has the art on the front and a more utilitarian calendar, on which appointments can be entered, on the back. The initial printing of 100 calendars quickly sold out. The class is working now on a second printing of an undetermined number. To order a calendar, phone 360-732-4471.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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Continued from A1 it stops at the pilot stage,” Polagye said. One issue is how the turBrian Polagye, a UW research assistant professor bines may affect marine particularly of mechanical engineering, mammals, presented recent findings at endangered orcas. So far, it appears that the American Geophysical Union’s annual meeting orcas don’t hang out in the area but tend to move Monday in San Francisco. He and his colleagues through the channel closer have been studying the to the surface, Thomson said. physical attributes of the “At this point, the good site, including the noise and news is that there are no currents. showstoppers,” he said. They also will monitor “We haven’t found a lot the environmental effects of of use of marine species in the turbines once they’re the area. We haven’t found installed in the water. anything that would really “The results of this pilot be a red flag.” project will help decide if Craig Collar, PUD’s this is an industry that has energy resource developpotential for going forward ment manager, said PUD is at the commercial scale or if planning to submit a license

be moved to the front during that time. Friendtober fits exactly between October and November. October ends on a Monday, so the extra month begins on a Tuesday and ends on a Monday and is 28 days long. Brennan is betting that most people will remember to discard Friendtober right after Halloween but admits that the extra month “might confuse some people” when the time comes.

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Unemployment up sightly on Peninsula By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A growing work force contributed to a half-percent increase in North Olympic Peninsula unemployment, the state Employment Security Department reported Tuesday. While the state’s jobless rate remained flat, the Clallam County jobless rate rose from a revised 9.1 percent in October to 9.6 percent in November, and Jefferson County’s unemployment rate rose to 9.0 percent, up from 8.5 percent in

October. “The labor force grew in both counties,” said Elizabeth Scott, a regional economist for Employment Security. “We knew certain people would be coming back [to the work force] as things picked up, and things are starting to pick up. That’s one of the reasons you see that uptick.” Clallam County’s work force grew by 410 last month — from 30,230 to 30,640 — with 2,950 job seekers looking for work in November. Jefferson County’s labor

force grew by 150 — from 12,960 to 13,110 — with 1,180 unemployed last month. Scott said Clallam County lost 140 nonfarm jobs but gained 40 in retail trade and 30 in transportation and warehousing in November. New unemployment claims rose from 668 to 748 in Clallam County. “Jefferson County was very flat,” Scott said. New unemployment claims in Jefferson County rose from 183 to 207. Unemployment in both counties fell by a half-percent from Septem-

ber to October. The Peninsula’s unemployment rate crested in February at 11.5 percent in Clallam County and 10.9 percent in Jefferson County.

Highest in February Washington state’s jobless rate for November was unchanged from October at 9.2 percent, with only an estimated net gain of 100 jobs statewide over the month, Employment Security said. “Job growth is in a holding pattern,” Employment

Security Commissioner Paul Trause said. “We’re really experiencing just about the most tepid and uneventful recovery we’ve experienced since World War II,” said Greg Weeks, director of the department’s labor market and economic analysis section. The national unemployment rate rose from 9.6 percent to 9.8 percent. Despite predictions that the recovery will take years, Scott said: “Basically a lot of the economic data is really good.” The growth rate, gross

domestic product, smallbusiness optimism, consumer price index and the stock market are improving, Scott said. Whitman County in Eastern Washington had the lowest unemployment rate in November at 5.0 percent. Clark County in Southwest Washington had the highest at 13.1 percent.

________ The Associated Press contributed to this report. Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

Woman faces 21 charges in Treasurer’s Office theft By Tom Callis

tant Attorney General Scott Marlow said after the brief hearing. PORT ANGELES — Marlow, who is prosecutCharges against a former ing the case, declined to Clallam County Treasurer’s elaborate. Office employee who is accused of stealing $617,467 Jan. 10 arraignment in public funds ballooned Betts, who participated Tuesday from one to 21. in the hearing by speakerCatherine Betts was charged in Clallam County phone from Shelton, will be Superior Court with one arraigned on the new charges Jan. 10. count of money laundering That’s the date she origiand 19 counts of filing false nally was going to face or fraudulent tax returns trial. with the state Department But because of the new of Revenue. charges and a mountain of That’s in addition to a financial documents the charge of first-degree theft defense still has to pore that was filed in March. through, Judge Brooke Tay“As we reviewed the case lor agreed to let that lapse. and prepared for trial, it A new trial date will be became clear that addi- set at the same hearing as tional charges would be the arraignment. appropriate,” state AssisBetts allegedly stole the Peninsula Daily News

funds by manipulating and destroying paper and computer records at the Treasurer’s Office in a checksfor-cash fraud involving real estate excise tax proceeds over six years, a state Auditor’s Office investigation concluded. Betts allegedly confessed to stealing about $1,200 after the theft was first discovered, according to a Port Angeles police affidavit. The county approved a $597,516 insurance settlement to cover the missing funds in October. That doesn’t include a $10,000 deductible.

________

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Clallam County Superior Court Judge Brooke Taylor, center, speaks to Loren Oakley of the Clallam Public Defender’s Office, left, and Assistant Attorney General Scott Marlow during a status hearing Tuesday for Catherine Betts, who listened to the proceedings by speakerphone.

No assault charges filed against Seattle officers for stomping Both now subject to internal investigation The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The Seattle city attorney’s office said Tuesday no assault charges will be filed against two Seattle police officers who stomped a prone Latino man in April. One officer used ethnically offensive language during the videotaped incident, authorities have said. “Though the incident

was marred by an unacceptable and unnecessary racist comment, our office concludes that neither officer’s conduct was criminal,” City Attorney Peter Holmes said in a statement.

‘Racist comment’ His announcement regarding Detective Shandy Cobane and patrol Officer Mary Lynne Woollum comes after the King

County prosecutor decided in September not to charge Cobane with malicious harassment under the state’s so-called “hate crime” law.

The video — shot by a freelance videographer — shows a group of officers surrounding several men lying on the ground. At one point, an officer Freelance videographer approaches one of the men Internal investigation Patrons had called police and can be heard saying: “You got me? I’m going and described the suspects Both officers will now be to beat the [expletive] Mexas Hispanic. subject to an internal investigation by Seattle police that was put on hold while the April 17 incident was reviewed by county and city prosecutors. The incident occurred as

August 7, 1948 December 9, 2010 Robert Frederick “Bob” Janssen passed away on December 9, 2010. Bob was born August 7, 1948, in New York, to Frederick Janssen and the former Jenette LiCausi. Bob was the oldest of five children. His family lived in many different places such as San Diego, Florida and New York during his childhood while his father served in the U.S. Navy. Bob graduated from Fox Lane High School in 1965. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served onboard USS Constellation and USS America during the Vietnam War between 1965 and 1969. He moved to Forks in 1972 and worked as a logger. After a few years, Bob started Janssen Paint Company and worked as a painter in Forks. He painted many houses and

st ce Voted 1 Pla2010 2008, 2009 &Home Best Funeral nty in Clallam Cou

Mr. Janssen buildings inside and out around the West End throughout the years. In 1982, Bob married Audrey Quigley of Forks. They had two sons and were married for seven years. In 2004, medical problems forced Bob to quit painting. However, he went back to school and just last summer received an Associate of Applied Science degree. At the time of his death, Bob was on his way towards earning a Bachelor’s degree. Throughout his life,

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Bob enjoyed watching, playing and coaching baseball. He was always quick to tell a joke, enjoyed talking and would go out of his way to help people around him. You always knew where you stood with Bob. He loved his sons and would do anything for them. He is survived by his two sons, Steven (Lisa) Janssen of Pullman, Washington, and Erik Janssen of Anchorage, Alaska; as well as his siblings, Fred (Dreana) Janssen of Sedona, Arizona, Diane (Phil) Salerno of Thousand Oaks, California, Steven Janssen of New Orleans, Louisiana; and Timothy Janssen of Thousand Oaks, California. He was preceded in death by his parents. A memorial service is being held at Forks Church of the Nazarene on Saturday, December 18, at 2 p.m. Memorial donations are suggested to the HHT Foundation International at hht.org.

Thursday, December 16, 2010 5-8 p.m. Stores will be open late; pick up a complimentary red shopping bag at any of the participating stores. Many stores providing refreshments, samplings and/or demonstrations. SANTA will be in front of The Toggery to visit and pass out candy canes. Complimentary Hot Cider served at First Street Haven. Christmas Music provided by Howard and Leslie Fisher at the Christmas Tree for caroling prior to the Downtown Sweepstakes Drawing (sponsored by First Federal and PADA)

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ican [expletive] out of you homey. You feel me?” Soon after, officers kick the man in the head, hand and leg. A tearful Cobane later apologized to the Latino community for his role and said the words he used “were offensive and unprofessional.”

Annual

Death and Memorial Notice Robert Frederick ‘Bob’ Janssen

Seattle police were responding to an armed robbery call near a nightclub in Seattle’s Westlake neighborhood April 17.

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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Commentary

Page

A9

In search of the perfect yule tree The best way to eliminate holiday stress is to shelve outdated notions of the perfectChristmas syndrome. This is not a perfect world. Pat Do you Neal think the first Christmas was perfect? Jesus was born in a barn! Christmas doesn’t have to be perfect, unless you’re talking about the perfect Christmas tree. I’ve always been very proud of cutting the perfect Christmas tree. We’re not after just any tree here. We are after the perfect alpine fir Christmas tree. Abies lasiocarpa grows high in the Olympic Mountains, and

there’s snow up there in December. Any Christmas tree expedition had better be prepared for blizzard conditions on treacherous roads. Sometimes you have to hunt around for a while to find a perfect Christmas tree. That’s because the tree’s degree of perfection occurs at an inverse ratio to its distance from a road. They say you should always tell someone where you’re going on your Christmas tree hunt and when you are coming back. Except that the locations of the perfect Christmas tree patches are a closely guarded secret I won’t give away. A low winter’s sun found me at the end of the road where the climb up the side of the mountain began. There was only a foot of snow, but it had a good crust that made it perfect to skid a tree back down the hill.

I started climbing. By the time I remembered I’d forgotten my water bottle, I was sweating like a walrus. At least I remembered the ax. It was sunset when I reached the crest of the ridge. I’ll never forget the view. It looked like a burning city of clouds the night before the end of the world. There was nothing to do but keep going. I needed a perfect tree, and it was one day closer to Christmas. Then I came out into a clearing in the forest — and there was the perfect tree. It was perfectly symmetrical without a limb out of place. There were little cones in the branches near the crown. I shook the blanket of snow loose and noticed the strangest thing. There was a bird’s nest in the lower branches. It looked like the nest of a Canada jay. This tree was so perfect, it

Peninsula Voices Economy is broke On Dec. 10, one frontpage headline [in the Clallam County edition] was “Back to the Drawing Board,” an article about a new welcome sign for Port Angeles — the stated cost is $50,000. The other headline was “‘Gross Waste of Public Money,’” an article about how the Washington State Parks Department spent $7 million on a $170,000 project. Politicians must understand that our economy is broke! We don’t have any money! Workers are not working! No tax money is coming in! Why can’t they understand that? They want to continue spending. Does the city of Port Angeles really need a new sign telling folks traveling into town where they are? I’ll bet all of them know where they are. The politicians must

stop spending on projects that can be done when times are better. Look at the Discovery Trail. It would be interesting to know how much money it has cost per mile, then what it costs per person using the trail. My guess is that 2 percent of the county residents have used it. That is a big expense for a few residents. What about the Elwha dams removal? The cleanest form of energy available to us, but they spend millions to take them out. I don’t get it. I think it is time for the politicians in the city, state and federal governments to start finding ways to stop spending our hard-earned tax dollars. Just say no! Gene Collet, Sequim

Delicious memory In “Rants and Raves” [Dec. 3], there was a rant from a person complaining of being served meatloaf instead of turkey at one of

was already decorated for Christmas with strands of silver lichen strung through the branches. I remembered the old Indian curse about messing with a Canada jay nest, but this was the perfect tree. I had to cut it down. It was getting dark. The belly of a moon showed through the clouds so I could see pretty well until I got in the timber. That’s when I lost the perfect tree. We started sliding down an icy slope. It was me or the tree, so I let go. After a while I worked my way to the bottom of the cliff, the tree fell off. The top was busted but I figured I could haywire it back together with the angel and nobody would know. I took off my belt and used it to lower the tree down the mountain. This was tough to do with my pants falling off.

Our readers’ letters, faxes

the free dinners on Thanksgiving week. I was reminded of a mass demonstration that took place in the 1960s or early ’70s in Oakland, Calif. Truckloads of food were being distributed to the poor. It was interrupted by the arrival of a rowdy group and ended up in all the news broadcasts.

People started tossing the chicken they were given, shouting, “We want steak!” Well, what started with good intentions became a chaotic rampage. Now, what does this have to do with Sunday’s rant? One little seed of discontent grew into a giant, ugly mob.

I knew I was getting closer to the road once I hit an old clearcut. By the time I dragged the tree through the slash, the cones, bird’s nest and a lot of the bark and needles were stripped off the tree. A couple of limbs were broken clear off. None of that mattered once the tree tumbled down onto the road where my truck was parked. I’d found the perfect tree.

________

Pat Neal is a North Olympic Peninsula fishing guide and ­“wilderness ­gossip columnist.” He can be reached at 360-6839867 or e-mail at patnealwildlife@ yahoo.com. Pat’s column appears here every Wednesday. Happy holidays! Pat will present a reading of his original Christmas stories Thursday at 6 p.m. at Sequim Village Starbucks, 1095 W. Washington St. in Sequim.

and e-mail

How much can we be shocked when one person complains of meatloaf? I’m 75 years old. Not much shocks or surprises me anymore. Many things make me happy. Having been born in the middle of the Great Depression and remembering much of the homefront efforts during

World War II, I’d like to share one particular incident. When, one Thanksgiving, we could not afford a turkey, my mother, being very inventive, mixed up a large bowl of ground beef, onions, eggs and bread crumbs, and shaped it into a turkey. Included were the drumsticks and wings, molded around popsicle sticks. She also prepared dressing, mashed potatoes, gravy, Waldorf salad, green beans and pumpkin pie. When all the food was placed on the table, including a very convincing meatloaf turkey, my father proceeded to carve. I got a drumstick and Dad, crazy about white turkey breast, carved for himself from the top center his piece. It was one of the most fun and delicious Thanksgiving feasts in our family memories. Donna Wasankari, Forks

A whirlwind update on human behavior Every day, hundreds of thousands of scholars study human behavior. Every day, a few of their studies are David bundled and Brooks distributed via e-mail by Kevin Lewis, who covers the social sciences for The Boston Globe and National Affairs. And every day, I file away these studies because I find them bizarrely interesting. In this column, I’m going to try to summarize as many of these studies as space allows. No single study is dispositive, but I hope these summaries can spark some conversations: n Female mammals tend to avoid close male relatives during moments of peak fertility in order to avoid inbreeding. For the journal Psychological Science, Debra Lieberman, Elizabeth Pillsworth and Martie Haselton tracked young women’s cell-phone calls. They found that these women had fewer and shorter calls with

their fathers during peak fertility days, but not with female relatives. n Classic research has suggested that the more people doubt their own beliefs the more, paradoxically, they are inclined to proselytize in favor of them. David Gal and Derek Rucker published a study in Psychological Science in which they presented some research subjects with evidence that undermined their core convictions. The subjects who were forced to confront the counter­evidence went on to more forcefully advocate their original beliefs, thus confirming the earlier findings. n Physical contact improves team performance. For the journal Emotion, Michael Kraus, Cassey Huang and Dacher Keltner measured how frequently members of National Basketball Association teams touched each other. Teams that touched each other frequently early in the 2008-2009 season did better than teams that touched less frequently, even after accounting for player status, preseason expectations and early season performance. n According to John Gaski and Jeff Sagarin in the Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology and Economics, there is a surpris-

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ingly strong relationship between daylight saving time and lower SAT scores. No explanation was offered. n For an article in The Review of Economics and Statistics, Mark Duggan, Randi Hjalmarsson and Brian Jacob investigated whether gun shows increase crime rates. They identified 3,400 gun shows in Texas and California and looked at crime rates for the areas around the shows for the following month. They found no relationship between gun shows and crime in either state. n Self-control consumes glucose in the brain. For an article in the journal Aggressive Behavior, Nathan DeWall, Timothy Deckman, Matthew Gaillot and Brad Bushman found that research subjects who consumed a glucose beverage behaved less aggressively than subjects who drank a placebo beverage. They found an indirect relationship between diabetes (a disorder marked by poor glucose toleration) and low self-control. States with high diabetes rates also had high crime rates. Countries with a different condition that leads to low glu-

cose levels had higher killing rates, both during wartime and during peacetime. n We tend to admire extroverted leaders. But Adam Grant, Francesca Gino and David Hofmann have added a wrinkle to this bias in an article in The Academy of Management Journal. They found that extraverted leaders perform best when their employees are passive, but this effect is reversed when the employees are proactive. In these cases, the extroverted leaders are less receptive to their employees’ initiatives. n Beautiful women should take up chess. Anna Dreber, Christer Gerdes and Patrik Gransmark wrote a Stockholm University working paper in which they found that male chess players pursue riskier strategies when they’re facing attractive female opponents, even though the risk-taking didn’t improve their performance. n People remember information that is hard to master. In a study for Cognition, Connor Diemand-Yauman, Daniel Oppenheimer and Erikka Vaughan found that information in hard-to-read fonts was better remembered than information

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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transmitted in easier fonts. n Would you rather date someone who dumped his or her last partner or someone who was the dumpee? For an article in Evolutionary Psychology, Christine Stanik, Robert Kurzban and Phoebe Ellsworth found that men will give a woman a lower rating when they learn that she dumped her last boyfriend, perhaps fearing they will be next. But women rated men more highly when they learned that they had done the dumping, perhaps seeing it as a sign of desirability. These studies remind us that we are strange, complicated creatures — deeply influenced by primordial biases and our current relationships. But you don’t have to settle for my summaries of these kinds of studies. Go to the National Affairs website, where there are links to Kevin Lewis’ daily batch of studies. A day without social science is like a day without sunshine.

________

David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times. He can be reached via e-mail link at http://tinyurl.com/nytdbrooks.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson, weekday commentary editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


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Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Golf

Ready golf is good for all PLAY READY GOLF. Passed down by then-Port Townsend High School golf coach Jim Kerns, this simple lesson has stuck with me since I began playing the game in the late 1990s. Keep up with the group in Michael front of you, Carman park your cart or place your bag away from the green so the next group can swing to the green, read the green as you approach it, avoid the Sergio Garcia-esque wiggles and waggles, etc . . . Feel free to add your own addition. Basically, the adage boils down to being considerate and taking into account positioning and politeness while playing a round. I think I am on target with my playing pace when I am either just walking up to my approach shot to the green, or ready to swing as soon as the group in front has departed the putting green. I’ll usually give them a few more seconds to get to safe locations, behind trees, screens or what have you. If players behind me are showing more skill (not too difficult) or just plain playing at the speed of the University of Oregon’s football team’s offense, I will politely let them play through. For a certain local men’s club, the Ready Golf lesson had apparently been lost or obscured in recent years and pace of play was becoming a real concern. I won’t pull a Seymour Skinner and “out” the club with a poorlythought out pseudonym like L. Simpson or Lisa S., as the hapless principal did in a classic episode of “The Simpsons.” I just wanted to touch on this issue and show what a local men’s group had done to find a solution. Membership had made comments about a decreased pace of play at annual meetings. Being responsive, the club leadership put together a policy to help speed things up during rounds. The men’s club began to enforce their beefed up Pace of Play Policy last week. It boiled down to groups finishing their rounds in 4 hours and 15 minutes or less. Groups do have to clock-in after the first player in a group has hit and clock out after the final putt has been holed to avoid stroke or point penalties. They also had to finish within 10 minutes of the group in front of them to avoid penalties. While they might sound a little harsh, the rules have some wiggle in them for shotgun start events, and any penalty applies only to bragging rights and not official handicaps. It turns out the added enforcement may not have been necessary. No groups were penalized after the first day under the new policy. The “slowest” group finished with three minutes to spare and most groups finished under 3:55. All groups remembered to clock in and clock out and the men’s club committee didn’t find anyone who felt rushed or made to play differently. Every course is different, 4:15 may not be enough time to play 18 at a course with some large slopes and it may be ample time for some of our flatter tracks. I just want courtesy to be the overriding rule on all North Olympic Peninsula courses. I really don’t want to write about anything like this golf course fight (http://tinyurl.com/2exr9at) that happened in Auburn in 2008 after complaints of slow play. Play nice out there!

Turkey shoot Port Townsend Golf Club’s annual Turkey Shoot/Toys for Tots Scramble will tee off at 10 a.m. this Saturday. The blind-draw scramble event raises funds for the Marine Corps Toys for Tots (and teens!) toy drive. Turn

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BUSINESS, POLITICS & ENVIRONMENT Page B4

Down under thunder Wolves top Aussies in 65-52 win Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Sequim boys basketball team won its fifth straight game after holding off a foreign invader Tuesday night. The Wolves dropped St. Luke’s Grammar School of Sydney, Australia, 65-52, getting a second straight 20-point game from senior guard Nick Camporini. Sequim kept the Australians at bay most of the first half before eventually pulling away in the final two quarters. “I was really pleased with how our reserves played,” Sequim coach Greg Glasser said. “They came in and gave us a great effort and really energized our team.” Camporini dropped in 24 points for the Wolves one night after going for 20 in a big win over Olympic League rival Bremerton. Teammate Jason Brocklesby worked up a double-double, scoring 18 points and grabbing 11 rebounds. Sequim shot out to a 10-point lead by the end of first quarter but allowed the Aussies to pull back within five points with the score at 33-28 at the half. The Wolves extended their lead in the third and didn’t look back. Sequim (3-1 in league, 6-1 overall) plays at Klahowya tonight.

Preps

Sequim 65, St. Luke’s 52 St. Luke’s Sequim

12 16 14 10 — 52 22 11 20 12 — 65 Individual Scoring

St. Luke’s (52) Cullen 21, Taylor 21, Skinner 5, Oni 3, Campbell 2. Sequim (65) Camporini 24, Brocklesby 18, Webb 11, Carter 10, Pinza 2.

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Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Sequim’s Jayson Brocklesby, right, shoots as he falls back from Mitchell Cullen of St. Luke’s Grammar School of Sydney, Australia, during Tuesday’s game in Sequim.

Lee deal not just for cash By Ronald Blum

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Gonzaga guard Steven Gray, an Irondale native, is the lone senior on a Bulldog team that is off to its worst start since 1989-90.

Zags’ rocky road Difficult non-conference schedule rocks Gonzaga The Associated Press

SPOKANE — Gonzaga is 4-5, the worst record in coach Mark Few’s dozen years at the helm, and the team’s worst opening since the 1989-90 squad posted the same mark. Four of their losses are to teams ranked in the Top 25. With games coming up against No. 9 Baylor, Xavier, Oklahoma State, Wake Forest and No. 18 Memphis, even Few is beginning to wonder whether the tough nonconference scheduling has gone too far. “The schedule is just beating us up and really taking its toll, but we have to respond,” Few said.

Because they play in the lightly regarded West Coast Conference, the Zags have retained their status as a national power for the past decade by playing a murderer’s row of top opponents during the nonconference season. The most ranked opponents Gonzaga has played in a year was seven during the 2006-07 season. The losing has taken a toll. Gonzaga was ranked as high as No. 11 early in the season but is no longer receiving Top 25 votes. The Zags’ five losses have been to No. 6 Kansas State, No. 11 San Diego State, No. 12 Illi-

nois, No. 24 Notre Dame and unranked Washington State (7-1), which has the best record in the Pac-10. They have lost three games in a row. “We’ve got to keep our heads up,” center Robert Sacre said. “It’s a long season.” Players come to Gonzaga for the chance to play this type of schedule, Sacre said. “The coach trusts us,” Sacre said. “The schedule is for what he thinks this team could be.” Conventional wisdom is that the Zags will still win the WCC — they are 64-6 the past five seasons and have won 10 straight regular season titles — and reach a 13th consecutive NCAA tournament. But their run of 13 straight 20-win seasons is in jeopardy. Turn

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NEW YORK — At some point, it seems, Cliff Lee figured it wasn’t about the money anymore. Baseball’s hottest free agent could have had $150 million and a spot on the biggest stage in the game with its most successful team — the New York Yankees, winners of 27 World Series. Instead, the star pitcher got up from the table and left $30 million behind. He picked the Philadelphia Phillies, Lee winners of just two titles in more than a century — and a team that brusquely traded him after he led them into the World Series in 2009. The PhilAlso . . . lies will give ■ There’s a him $120 mil- new front lion guaran- runner in teed over the MLB/B3 next five seasons, according to several people in baseball familiar with the deal. Why does a guy leave all that money behind? Apparently, because he had all he needed — something that agents and others in the financial end of baseball say happens more than you might expect. Lee and his family liked Philadelphia. Plus, his wife had complained that New York fans were rude and spat at the Rangers’ wives during the American League championship series this fall when Lee was pitching for Texas, his other big suitor this offseason. “Players seem to like living here,” Phillies chairman Bill Giles said. “There’s nice housing — and not as expensive as some other places if you want to buy or rent. The schools are good.” Turn

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SportsRecreation

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

4 p.m. (26) ESPN NBA Basketball, Boston Celtics at New York Knicks. 7:30 p.m. (26) ESPN NBA Basketball, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks.

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Basketball: Port Angeles at Bremerton, 7 p.m.; Sequim at Klahowya, 7 p.m.; Kingston at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Clallam Bay, 8 p.m. Girls Basketball: Bremerton at Port Angeles, 7 p.m., Klahowya at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Port Townsend at Kingston, 7 p.m.; Crescent at Clallam Bay, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Forks at Rochester, 6 p.m.

East W L T Pct PF x-New England 11 2 0 .846 415 N.Y. Jets 9 4 0 .692 273 Miami 7 6 0 .538 225 Buffalo 3 10 0 .231 256 South W L T Pct PF Jacksonville 8 5 0 .615 295 Indianapolis 7 6 0 .538 347 Houston 5 8 0 .385 316 Tennessee 5 8 0 .385 291 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 10 3 0 .769 290 Baltimore 9 4 0 .692 294 Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 235 Cincinnati 2 11 0 .154 262 x-clinched playoff spot All Times PST Thursday’s Game Indianapolis 30, Tennessee 28 Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay 17, Washington 16 Buffalo 13, Cleveland 6 Detroit 7, Green Bay 3 Jacksonville 38, Oakland 31 Pittsburgh 23, Cincinnati 7 Atlanta 31, Carolina 10 N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, ppd. San Francisco 40, Seattle 21 New Orleans 31, St. Louis 13 San Diego 31, Kansas City 0 Arizona 43, Denver 13 New England 36, Chicago 7 Miami 10, N.Y. Jets 6 Philadelphia 30, Dallas 27 Monday Night Football N.Y. Giants 21, Minnesota 3 Baltimore 34, Houston 28, F/OT

Thursday Boys Basketball: Quilcene at Shorewood Christian, 7:30 p.m.; Neah Bay at Rainier Christian, 3 p.m. Girls Basketball: Quilcene at Shorewood Christian, 5:45 p.m.; Neah Bay at Rainier Christian, 3 p.m. Wrestling: Port Angeles and Bremerton at Port Townsend, 5 p.m. Boys Swimming: Port Angeles at Olympic, 3 p.m. Girls Bowling: Olympic at Sequim, 3:30 p.m.

Area Sports Bowling LAUREL LANES Dec. 11 Pee Wee Kid’s League Women’s High Game: Abby Robinson, 76 Dec. 11 Bantam Kid’s League Men’s High Game: Cade Flanigan, 105 Men’s High Series: Cade Flanigan, 278 Dec. 11 Junior Kid’s League Men’s High Game: Justin VanWinkle, 189 Men’s High Series: Justin VanWinkle, 556 Dec. 13 Monday Night Mixed Men’s High Game: Jake Werrion, 199 Men’s High Series: Jake Werrion: 501 Women’s High Game: Brenda Haltom, 177 Women’s High Series: Brend Haltom, 474 League Leaders: Undescovered Dec. 13 Les Schwab Mixed Majors Men’s Hig Game: Jerry Demetriff, 259 Men’s High Series: Tracey Almond, 949 Women’s High Game: Louise Demetriff, 212 Women’s High Series: Louise Demetriff, 661 League Leaders: James and Assoc. Dec. 13 Baxter Auto Parts Old Timers Men’s High Game: Ken McInnes, 239 Men’s High Series: Ken McInnes, 620 Women’s High Game: Una Flanigan, 164 Women’s High Series: Una Flanigan, 439

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Dec. 14 Better Nine Idividual Gross: Gerald Petersen, 36; Bob Brodhun, 37 Idividual Net: Craig Jacobs, 33.5; Ray Dooley, 34; John Pruss, 34.5; Steve Jones, 35.5 Team Gross: Bob Brodhun and John Pruss, 72; Bob Brodhun and Rick Parkhurst, 72 Team Net: Rick Parkhurst and John Pruss, 65; Bob Brodhun and Terry Jackson, 66; Terry Jackson and John Pruss, 67

Volleyball PORT ANGELES PARKS AND RECREATION Dec. 13 Coed Results Dave’s All-Around Repair 2, A Brewed Awakening Espresso 2: 18-25, 25-17, 25-19, 22-25 Michael’s Seafood and Steakhouse 3, Les Schwab 0: 25-11, 25-17, 30-28 D.A. Davidson 3, Fitness West 0: 25-6, 25-15, 25-23 McCrorie Carpet One 2, Olympic MEdical Center 1: 30-32, 25-16, 26-24

The Associated Press

Hug

it out

Orlando Magic guard Vince Carter (15) strips the ball from Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony (15) during the second half of Tuesday’s game in Denver. The Nuggets won 111-94. Tuesday’s Games Cascade Christian 85, Chimacum 27 Life Christian 83, Orting 41 Seattle Christian 55, Charles Wright 41 Vashon Island 80, Auburn Adventist 53 Friday’s Games Life Christian at Vashon Island Seattle Christian at Cedar Park Christian Charles Wright at Chimacum

Tuesday’s Games Cascade Christian 58, Chimacum 21 Seattle Christian 54, Charles Wright 20 Orting 52, Life Christian 40 Vashon Island at Auburn Adventist,late Friday’s Games Life Christian at Vashon Island Seattle Christian at Cedar Park Christian Charles Wright at Chimacum

Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Onalaska 1-0 4-0 Hoquiam 1-0 4-1 Montesano 1-0 3-1 Rainier 0-0 2-0 Forks 0-0 1-2 Tenino 0-1 2-2 Rochester 0-1 1-4 Elma 0-1 0-3 Tuesday’s Games Forks at Rainier Onalaska 71, Tenino 63 Hoquiam 78, Rochester 48 Montesano 51, Elma 41 Friday’s Games Tenino at Hoquiam Rochester at Forks Elma at Seaside tourney

Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division League Overall Rainier 1-0 3-2 Elma 1-0 2-1 Onalaska 0-0 3-0 Rochester 0-0 1-2 Tenino 0-0 0-2 Hoquiam 0-0 0-4 Forks 0-1 1-2 Montesano 0-1 1-3 Tuesday’s Games Rainier 60, Forks 20 Elma 47, Montesano 41 Onalaska at Tenino, late Hoquiam at Rochester, late Friday’s Games Tenino at Hoquiam Rochester at Forks Montesano at Onalaska Elma at Seaside tourney

North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 0-0 3-0 Clallam Bay 0-0 4-1 Crescent 0-0 1-4 Today’s Game Crescent at Clallam Bay

BOYS As of Dec. 13 Olympic League Standings League Overall Kingston 3-0 4-1 Sequim 3-1 5-1 Port Angeles 3-1 4-1 Bremerton(3A) 2-1 3-2 Klahowya 2-1 3-2 Olympic 1-2 1-3 North Mason 1-3 2-4 Port Town. (1A) 1-3 1-4 North Kitsap 0-4 0-6 Monday’s Games Port Angeles 53, Port Townsend 45 Sequim 77, Bremerton 66 Kingston 63, North Mason 40 Klahowya 76, North Kitsap 61 Today’s Games Klahowya at Sequim Kingston at Port Townsend Port Angeles at Bremerton Olympic at North Mason

GIRLS As of Dec. 13 Olympic League Standings League Overall Port Angeles 4-0 4-0 Sequim 3-1 4-1 Bremerton(3A) 2-1 3-3 Kingston 2-1 3-2 North Kitsap 2-2 3-2 Port Town. (1A) 2-2 2-3 Olympic 1-2 1-4 Klahowya 0-3 1-4 North Mason 0-4 0-5 Monday’s Games Port Angeles 86, Port Townsend 36 Sequim 41, Bremerton 37 Kingston 61, North Mason 30 North Kitsap 60, Klahowya 49 Today’s Games Sequim at Klahowya Port Townsend at Kingston Bremerton at Port Angeles North Mason at Olympic Friday’s Games Sequim at North Kitsap Kingston at Bremerton Olympic at Port Townsend Port Angeles at Klahowya

1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 2-0 4-1 Life Christian 1-0 5-0 Cas. Christian 1-0 2-1 Chimacum 0-1 2-2 Vashon Island 0-1 2-2 Charles Wright 0-1 3-4 Orting 0-1 1-3

1A Nisqually League Standings League Overall Seattle Christian 2-0 4-1 Cas. Christian 1-0 3-1 Orting 1-0 1-3 Charles Wright 0-1 4-2 Vashon Island 0-1 1-1 Life Christian 0-1 1-3 Chimacum 0-1 0-5

Preps Basketball

North Olympic League League Overall Neah Bay 0-0 3-0 Clallam Bay 0-0 4-2 Crescent 0-0 0-3 Today’s Game Crescent at Clallam Bay

Southeast Division W L Pct 18 8 .692 16 9 .640 16 10 .615 9 15 .375 6 17 .261 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 15 8 .652 Indiana 11 12 .478 Milwaukee 10 13 .435 Detroit 8 18 .308 Cleveland 7 17 .292 All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Charlotte 97, Toronto 91 Philadelphia 82, New Jersey 77 L.A. Lakers 103, Washington 89 Detroit 103, Atlanta 80 Houston 118, Sacramento 105 Denver 111, Orlando 94 Minnesota at Golden State, late Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at New York, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Charlotte at Memphis, 5 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Washington at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

NBA Standings and Schedule

NFL Standings and Schedule

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 20 3 .870 Dallas 19 5 .792 New Orleans 14 10 .583 Memphis 11 14 .440 Houston 10 14 .417 Northwest Division W L Pct Utah 18 8 .692 Oklahoma City 17 8 .680 Denver 15 9 .625 Portland 12 13 .480 Minnesota 6 18 .250 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Lakers 18 7 .720 Phoenix 11 12 .478 Golden State 8 16 .333 Sacramento 5 17 .227 L.A. Clippers 5 20 .200 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 19 4 .826 New York 16 9 .640 Philadelphia 9 15 .375 Toronto 9 16 .360 New Jersey 6 19 .240

GB — 1 1/2 6 1/2 10 10 1/2 GB — 1/2 2 5 1/2 11 GB — 6 9 1/2 11 1/2 13

GB — 4 10 1/2 11 14

NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 6 7 0 .462 261 St. Louis 6 7 0 .462 245 San Francisco 5 8 0 .385 243 Arizona 4 9 0 .308 243 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 9 4 0 .692 329 Philadelphia 9 4 0 .692 374 Washington 5 8 0 .385 238 Dallas 4 9 0 .308 321 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 335 New Orleans 10 3 0 .769 330 Tampa Bay 8 5 0 .615 260 Carolina 1 12 0 .077 164 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 9 4 0 .692 253 Green Bay 8 5 0 .615 306 Minnesota 5 8 0 .385 230 Detroit 3 10 0 .231 285 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 8 5 0 .615 295 San Diego 7 6 0 .538 354 Oakland 6 7 0 .462 314 Denver 3 10 0 .231 269

PORT ANGELES — Martin Waldrip dropped in 38 points for Crescent Middle School to lead his team to a 58-40 win over Queen of Angels on Monday night in Port Angeles. Waldrip’s point total was the most scored in a single game by a Crescent player in the past 15 years. Teammates Berrit Casad and Zach Fletcher helped out scoring eight points each in a game that was not decided until the last three minutes. Crescent was able to come up with a series of defensive stops down the

NHL Standings

PA 250 308 310 366 PA 243 240 267 338 PA 228 189 274 309 PA 268 253 307 376

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 32 20 7 5 45 108 78 Pittsburgh 32 21 9 2 44 103 74 N.Y. Rangers 32 18 13 1 37 96 83 New Jersey 29 8 19 2 18 53 88 N.Y. Islanders 28 5 18 5 15 59 98 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 30 18 10 2 38 78 61 Boston 28 16 8 4 36 81 56 Ottawa 32 13 16 3 29 71 96 Buffalo 30 12 14 4 28 78 84 Toronto 30 12 14 4 28 69 87 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 32 18 11 3 39 98 92 Atlanta 31 17 11 3 37 99 91 Tampa Bay 30 16 10 4 36 94 106 Carolina 28 12 12 4 28 78 87 Florida 28 13 15 0 26 71 72 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Toronto 4, Edmonton 1 Today’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Phoenix at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Washington, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 5 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games Anaheim at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Phoenix at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Minnesota, 5 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m.

Carman: Giving

Briefly . . . Waldrip rips the nets for Crescent MS

PA 329 268 280 351

PA 198 229 252 345

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 29 19 7 3 41 96 78 Nashville 29 15 8 6 36 76 70 Chicago 32 16 13 3 35 101 96 Columbus 29 16 11 2 34 76 79 St. Louis 28 14 9 5 33 72 75 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 28 16 8 4 36 91 74 Colorado 30 16 10 4 36 108 95 Minnesota 29 13 12 4 30 71 86 Calgary 31 13 15 3 29 84 91 Edmonton 30 11 14 5 27 78 105 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 30 18 10 2 38 86 82 Anaheim 33 16 13 4 36 87 98 Los Angeles 28 17 10 1 35 78 65 San Jose 30 15 10 5 35 90 87 Phoenix 28 14 8 6 34 81 77

GB — 4 5 8 1/2 8 1/2

Football

PA 331 318 355 265

Hockey

GB — 1 1/2 2 8 10 1/2

Basketball

PA 276 242 244 339

stretch against Queen of Angels. That resulted in a scoring spree that extend its six-point lead to 18. Crescent will next face Stevens Middle School in Port Angeles today at 3:30 p.m.

PT pool updates PORT TOWNSEND — The city of Port Townsend will be offering more time in the water after it made a series of improvements to its municipal pool facility and operations. A new chlorination system was purchased and installed, a new accounting system was introduced and hours of operations were expanded for the pool located at 250 Madison St. in Port Townsend.

A scholarship program was also created to help low income families gain better access to swimming lessons. There will be extended hours for a variety of operations, more swimming lessons added in the evening and on weekends and new classes added to the schedule. For more information on what’s new at the Port Townsend pool, phone 360385-7665.

Hawks ink lineman RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks have placed wide receiver Deon Butler on injured reserve and signed offensive lineman Paul Fanaika off the Cleveland Browns practice squad.

The Seahawks made the moves on Tuesday. Butler suffered a broken right leg catching a 2-yard touchdown pass late in Seattle’s 40-21 loss to San Francisco on Sunday. Butler underwent surgery Sunday night at Stanford Hospital and was expected to remain in the Bay Area for a few days to heal. He finished the season with 36 catches for 385 yards and four TDs. Fanaika was originally a seventh-round pick of Philadelphia in 2009. He spent the end of last season on Washington’s active roster before signing with the Browns in the offseason. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Continued from B1 Give the gift of golf Cost is $30 per player with a $10 greens fee for nonmembers.

Gift tree still going Port Townsend Golf Club held a rousing holiday party last week, with attendance set at around 100 people. Most of them donated toward the course’s Dollars for Coats program with PT Kiwanis and took tags from the Port Townsend Golf Club Christmas giving tree. There are still some tags left on the tree and stockings up at the course to collect donations for the coat program. Help out if you can, it’s the best way to get into the holiday spirit.

The best gift for a Peninsula golfer will not involve a trip to the mall or fighting for parking spots in a crowded lot. Take a short jaunt over to one of our local courses and golf staffers can help with gift cards for rounds or for lessons with club professionals. The clubs also have merchandise and equipment that make for good stocking stuffers. Play locally, shop locally. It helps the game in the long run.

________ Michael Carman is the golf columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. He can be reached at 360417-3527 or at pdngolf@gmail. com.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

B3

Step aside Yanks . . . Lee could not have missed Jeter’s sizzle when he finally reupped, saying in very un-Jeterian tones that he did not appreciate the snide comments in public. IT IS GOING to take a This staff is competing Since the intrusive news while to think about the with the great Atlanta staff media is a given, Jeter could Phillies as the overlords of of the past generation, the only have been talking baseball, the team that can Cleveland staff of the midabout management. outspend and outrecruit all 1950s and the Los Angeles Cashman was compliof the others. But that day Dodgers staff of the ’60s, mentary toward Lee on is here. and some Yankees staffs of Tuesday, although he did With their various ages. note that Lee had not permidnight strike to George As a sobering sonally informed him of his acquire Cliff Lee, Vecsey observation, decision — “but that’s fine,” the Phillies have Giants fans could Cashman said. assembled a remind people He added that he was pitching staff — that the Phillies prepared to “climb down the Cole Hamels as were not even in mountain and get a new No. 4? — that the World Series trail,” and he praised his really should win this year. starters, with or without the World Series The Giants Family unfriendly Andy Pettitte, who may come late October. were a delightful retire. Everybody will play Anything less will surprise put Now the Yankees must down the incident in the be failure. together late in pick through the leavings at American League ChampiYankees fans, the season, and the end of the free-agent onship Series when a lout or season. It’s just like holiday who must wonder they deserved three accosted Lee’s wife if New York their championshopping. among the travel party of bumptiousness in ship, but that is But they have as much management and in the ancient history now that the the Texas Rangers. as $20 million a season to Lee assured everybody it play with and they will stands turned off Lee and Phillies have parlayed his wife, always embrace attendance, cable and other was not an issue, which think of something. does not mean they forgot the awesome responsibility income to snatch Lee from Frankly, this setback will about it. of front-runner. the Yankees and the Rangbe good for Yankees players They could have used the and fans, force them to be Now Phillies fans will ers. Yankees to raise the tide to learn to live with it. The Phillies should win creative, see how the other float his humble little skiff Remember when Phillies next season, which is the side feels. to Philadelphia. fans had a surly underdog only season that matters, All eyes are on the PhilIt is even possible Lee mentality every time the even though the Phillies lies now. observed the way the YanMets and their raffish fans signed Lee for five years. A note of reality: signing kees management whacked an established superstar came to town and took over In a nation racked by away at their captain — No. pitcher is tricky because the their ballpark? Ha! unemployment and debate 2, Derek Jee-tah! — with That era is long gone, on over how to recover, these allure is his body of work. leaked challenges to go look both sides. offers all sound like funny In the past decade, the elsewhere as a free agent. The Phillies have assem- money. Mets have subsidized That gibe did not sound bled one of the great pitchThe Yankees were apparsuperb competitors for great like Brian Cashman but ing staffs in history, just ently offering a seven-year work done elsewhere. rather somebody higher up going by the credentials of contract while the Phillies This is known as the in the Yankees hierarchy, (might as well use alphabet- swooped in with a frontPetey Syndrome, after Pedro ical order and let the manended five-year contract for channeling the Boss, saying Martinez, who went downthat a real general manager hill after a honeymoon, as ager work out a rotation) a pitcher who will turn 33 does not let the help be too Roy Halladay, Hamels, Lee in August. did Johan Santana and demanding. and Roy Oswalt. Frankie Rodriguez. The Yankees, who had

The Phillies surely noticed that Lee did not exactly dominate the World Series, with two starts, two losses, 11 2/3 innings and a 6.94 earned run average. The postseason will chew up pitchers. Now Major League Baseball is threatening to expand its playoffs. Lee should be fine for a few years. But five? It’s a different sport, but the Islanders fell apart collectively after winning four straight Stanley Cups (and playing in a fifth final) because they had essentially skated an entire extra season. Intensity adds up, particularly in the arm of a pitcher. Lee pitched for four different teams in the past

Preps: Sequim

Lee: No to N.Y.

Continued from B1 win after getting past Puget Sound Adventist on Tuesday P.S. Adventist 55, night. Leanne Weed scored a Quilcene 54 game-high 15 points to lead QUILCENE — The the Rangers — down two Rangers (1-2, 2-2) lost a close entering the fourth quarter one on Tuesday to the 613’s — to a comeback win. after exchanging leads a few Quilcene 38, P.S. Adventist 35 times throughout the game. Brandon Bancroft scored P.S. Adventist 3 10 13 9 — 35 Quilcene 2 11 11 14 — 38 25 points for the Rangers Individual Scoring and grabbed nine rebounds, Puget Sound Adventist (35) Not reported while Dan Davidson man- Quilcene (38) aged a double-double with Weed 15, Kaiser 9, Turley 9, Berringer 3, Beukes 2. 11 points and 10 rebounds.

Continued from B1 agent and gaining the power to choose his destination. His last stay in Philadel“I think our front office and manager and coaches phia was a good one for Lee have a good reputation and his wife, Kristen. around baseball right now During the latter half of as being good people.” the 2009 season, he helped Lee’s move was the buzz the defending champion of baseball Tuesday. Phillies return to the World He is expected to take a Series, where he won twice physical and seal the deal but Philadelphia lost to the today in Philadelphia. Yankees in six games. “That’s the most I’ve ever Lee wasn’t happy when seen a player walk away he got traded in a four-team, from,” former Mets general nine-player deal that brought manager Omar Minaya said. another ace, Roy Halladay, to “It’s unprecedented.” the Phillies from Toronto. The Yankees are used to “At first, I didn’t believe flexing their financial muscle it. I thought we were workto land free agents of their ing out an extension with choosing. the Phillies,” Lee said last Baseball’s top four sala- December after he was dealt ries this year belong to play- to Seattle. ers in pinstripes: “I thought I’d be spending Alex Rodriguez, CC the rest of my career there.” Sabathia, Derek Jeter and The Phillies moved from Mark Teixeira, whose com- dingy Veterans Stadium to bined $100.5 million Citizens Bank Park in 2004, exceeded the entire payrolls changing the culture of Philof all but eight major league adelphia fans, famous teams. around the world for booing Perhaps the last time a Santa Claus and throwing premier free agent turned snowballs at him during an down this much money rela- Eagles’ game in 1968. tive to his salary was in Philadelphia also has December 1992, when Greg become one of baseball’s bigMaddux stayed with the gest spenders. Atlanta Braves for $28 milThe Phillies’ $5.7 million lion over five years. average salary this year was He declined a $34 million second only to the Yankees’ offer from the Yankees that $7.6 million, according to figagent Scott Boras said could ures complied by the players’ have escalated to about $38 association. million. “We used to have a hard “The four primary factors time getting free agents to are winning, family, the geo- come here, so it seems to graphical and economics,” have changed 180 degrees,” Boras said Tuesday. “Maybe Giles said. 30 percent of the players are The Yankees were ready where the focus is primarily to offer $150 million to Lee, economic. with a $148 million guaran“The vast majority want teed over seven years plus to meld those four factors. $2 million on hand for genOnly about 20, 25 percent of eral manager Brian Cashplayers take the biggest deal. man to close the agreement. They often take the second- But New York’s money ary offer.” wasn’t enough. Lee’s first big-money con“He really liked Philadeltract was a $14 million, four- phia. I remember hearing year deal with Cleveland that. The word on the street covering 2006-09 that was that [the trade] stunned included a team option for him, that he really liked that 2010 that would grow to $9 environment,” Cashman said. million. “And I think that the fact He then bounced around the country, getting traded to he’s going to Philadelphia Philadelphia, Seattle and proves how much he really Texas before becoming a free enjoyed Philly.”

. . . the Phillies are MLB’s new front-running squad

P.S. Adventist 55, Quilcene 54 Puget Sound Quilcene

13 13 14 15 — 55 13 8 21 12 — 54 Individual Scoring Puget Sound Adventist (55) Ashton 15, Hutton 13, Nye 11, Nash 8, Petersen 6, Waleon 2. Quilcene (54) Bancroft 25, Davidson 11, Pleines 9, Jordan 8, Perez 1.

dreamed of throwing C. C. Sabathia and Lee as twin aces, always expect to get their man. Big Bronx bucks are almost always enough to bring anybody to the Bronx. Some of them thrive — Mark Teixeira, Sabathia, Hideki Matsui, David Cone, Paul O’Neill, and even Alex Rodriguez, in his diva way. But there is a whole history of players who have not thrived in New York, for one reason or another: Johnson, Brown, Pavano. It’s not for everybody. And presumably not for Cliff Lee from Arkansas.

Clallam Bay 26, Lake Quinault 25

LAKE QUINAULT — The Bruins (4-2 overall) held the Elks to just one point in the fourth quarter to complete a stunning comeback win in nonleague action Tuesday. Cas. Christian 85, Melissa Willis had 12 points, eight rebounds and Chimacum 27 Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News four steals to lead a dramatic PUYALLUP — The Cow- Bruins rally from a 10-point Sequim’s Columbia Haupt, right, has the ball boys (0-1, 2-2) ran into an third quarter deficit. knocked away by Isabel Marynissen of St. Luke’s inspired group of Cougars in Grammar School of Sydney, Australia, in the their Nisqually League closing minutes of Tuesday’s game in Sequim. Clallam Bay 26, Lake Quinault 25 opener Tuesday night. Clallam Bay 4 4 6 12 — 26 Playing their first game Lake Quinault 2 16 6 1 — 25 Rainier 60, Forks 20 ston Babb (140). Individual Scoring since longtime assistant Forks 8 5 3 4 — 20 “This is kind of an upset Clallam Bay (26) Rainier 23 20 13 4 — 60 coach Mike Kilcup passed Willis 12, Randall 7, Erickson 7. for us, so we’re pleased,” Individual Scoring away Sunday, the defending Lake Quinault (25) Forks (20) coach Borchers said. 2, Wilder 3, Neelan 4, Walker 3, Allen 4, Dankan Class 1A state champions 2,Obi Morris 7, Williams 6, Raven 3, Brown 2, Sheriff 2. Castillo 7. Rainier (60) laid the wood to an underSchoenherr 15, Brown 11, Owens 10, McMullen 9, Boys swimming manned Chimacum team. Cas. Christian 58, Eygabead 8. Port Angeles 111, “I don’t think they need Chimacum 21 much motivation anyway,” Kingston 72 Sequim 53, Chimacum head coach Jim PUYALLUP — The CowPOULSBO — Charlie St. Luke’s 34 Eldridge said. boys (0-1, 0-5) were shutout Chimacum was missing a in the first quarter and never SEQUIM — The Wolves Parks and Tyler Burke each pair of key players in for- recovered in their 1A (5-1) won their fifth game in won two individual events ward Mason Moug (injury) Nisqually League opener a row Tuesday night. Details to lead the Roughriders (3-0) to an Olympic League were not reported. and guard Rafael Pagasian Tuesday night. win Tuesday night. (ineligible), but the Cougars Parks claimed the 100took little pity as they piled Cas. Christian 58, Chimacum 21 Wrestling yard individual medley (2 up 57 first half points. Chimacum 0 14 2 5 — 21 Sequim 42, minutes, 20.25 seconds) and Cascade Christian 20 20 11 7 — 58 Individual Scoring 100 breaststroke (1:12.13), Olympic 33 Cas. Christian 85, Chimacum 27 Chimacum (21) Chimacum 10 5 7 5 — 27 SILVERDALE — Len while Burke took the 100 Hanson 3, Hathaway 5, Nelson 5, Castillo 4, Thacker Cascade Christian 27 30 18 10 — 85 4. Borchers earned his first win freestyle (53.45) and 100 Individual Scoring Cascade Christian (58) backstroke (1:02.14). Chimacum (27) Coltom 18, Centioli 8, Creech 19, Rozumny 4, Read against the Trojans as his The Riders also won all Cray 7, Eldridge 7, Ajax 2, Brown-Bishop 7, Riggle 5, Spencer 4. Wolves scored three pin vic4. three relays, and Avery tories in Tuesday night’s Cascade Christian (85) Koehler and Parks each put Olympic League dual. King 11, Kushan 6, LeFrancois 4, Mahnken 4, ShackRainier 60, ett 24, Ruttle 14, Zepernick 8, Archer 6, Spencer 6. Cody Field (145 pounds), up district-qualifying times Forks 20 Dakota Hinton (171) and in the 100 back and 100 RAINIER — The Spar- Emilio Perete-Colin (215) breast, respectively. Girls Basketball Austin Fahrenholtz led a tans (0-1, 1-2) had a tough each put their opponent to Quilcene 38, night and couldn’t get much the mat to lead the Wolves Rider sweep of the 1-meter P.S. Adventist 35 started in their SWL-Ever- (1-1) to an upset. diving event with a score of QUILCENE — The green Division opener Also scoring victories 172.34. Sam Beasley took Rangers (1-1, 3-3) earned against the Mountaineers on were Austin Middleton (a30), second (151.70) and Philip their first 1B Sea-Tac League Tuesday. Derek Fruin (135), and Win- Scott (115.65) third.

The Associated Press

The acquisition of pitcher Cliff Lee gives the Philadelphia Phillies one of the deepest rotations in major league baseball history two seasons and maybe he was tired of orienting himself, learning new player parking lots and new gate attendants and new routes to new ballparks. He had a trial run with the Phillies at the end of 2009 — he did not get a ring — and chose the Phillies over the Yankees as the best way to get one. He chose chesty Jimmy Rollins and the rest of that confident band. Phillies fans should now study the traditional presumptiveness of Yankees fans. As of now, the Phillies should never lose a game in 2011. That’s how it works.

________ George Vecsey is a sports columnist for The New York Times.

Zags: Rough schedule has Gonzaga reeling Continued from B1 In addition to the tough schedule, the Zags have been dogged by lousy defense, uneven guard play and a lingering Achilles’ injury to forward Elias Harris that has limited the NBA prospect to 10 points and 4 rebounds per game.

As a freshman last year, he averaged 15 points and 7 rebounds. Three-pointers are also killing the Zags, who are giving up nine per game. They are averaging 16 turnovers per game, three more than last year. They had 25 turnovers in the loss to Washington State.

Most of the losses have been close, with short slumps putting Gonzaga in a hole. “We have three- or fourminute lapses with total defensive breakdowns that lead to easy baskets, and that affects our offense a little bit,” Few said. “Before you know it, against these good teams,

you are down 10 or 12 points.” Kelly Olynyk, a 7-foot forward, is struggling, averaging only seven points per game. Starting point guard Demitri Goodson is averaging only three assists and five points per game. Irondale native Steven

Gray, the only senior, has played well as their top offensive weapon, averaging 18 points per game. Sacre is averaging nearly 12 points and 7.5 rebounds. The Zags have shown some fire. At Notre Dame on Saturday, they were down by 14 in the second half before rallying to trail by only two

in the final 13 seconds. But the Irish made free throws and time ran out. “We’ve played one of the hardest schedules in the nation this year,” Harris said. “I’m pretty sure if other teams played the same schedule, they’d be in the same situation probably right now.”


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Business

Page

B4

Politics & Environment

Governor’s budget fix: fewer state agencies The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire on Tuesday announced a plan that would consolidate several state agencies and eliminate three dozen boards and commissions, a move she said will save the state nearly $30 million over the next two years. Gregoire said her proposal would reduce the number of state agencies from 21 to nine, saving the state $22 million. The announcement is part of a multiday rollout of her two-year budget, set to be formally announced today. On Monday, Gregoire announced proposals to the state pension system and health care costs as part of her effort to address a projected $5 billion deficit for the next two-year budget. “To help offset the shortfall, we must put forward to the Legislature transformative ideas,” she said. “It can’t just be about cutting; it has to be about changing.”

Consolidations Under the plan, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, the State Parks and Recreation Commission, the Recreation and Conservation Office and the law enforcement unit of the Department of Natural Resources would be consolidated into a new Department of Conservation and Recreation. Gregoire also wants to create an Office of Civil Rights, which would encompass the consolidation of the state’s Human Rights Commission, Office of Minority and Women’s Business Enterprise, Commission on African Affairs, Commission on Hispanic Affairs and Commission on Asian

State workers OK furloughs The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire and state workers have reached an agreement on health insurance increases and a 3 percent salary decrease that will come in the form of unpaid leave. The agreement was reached Tuesday but needs to be ratified by the union, and the Legislature must approve funding for the overall contract. State workers currently pay 12 perPacific American Affairs. Other areas that would be consolidated under Gregoire’s proposal: ■  The work of the Columbia River Gorge Commission, the Pollution Liability Insurance Agency and the Department of Health’s reclaimed water program moves to the Department of Ecology. ■  The state Conservation Commission is merged into the Department of Agriculture. ■  The Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation is consolidated into the Department of Natural Resources. ■  The departments of General Administration, Personnel, Printing and portions of the Department of Information Services and the Office of Financial Management would merge into a new Department of Enterprise Services.

Cut 125 jobs Gregoire said that about 125 state jobs will be cut as a result, many of which would be seen as duplicates under the consolidation, such as receptionists or manager positions. Gregoire said she also wants to eliminate more

cent of their health care premium costs, and the state pays the rest. Starting Jan. 1, 2012, the state workers’ portion of the cost would increase to 15 percent. The health insurance change covers inflation, so it won’t save the state any money. But the furloughs will save the state $269 million over two years, of which $176 million will help address the state’s two-year projected budget shortfall of nearly $5 billion.

boards and commissions. More than 140 of the state’s boards and commissions were either eliminated or consolidated in past years. The move to eliminate an additional 36 would save the state an estimated $7.4 million, Gregoire’s office said.

Proposed eliminations Some of the groups that Gregoire suggests eliminating are the Council for Children and Families, the Family Policy Council and the Sentencing Guidelines Commission. Gregoire said she also wants to look for savings in corrections services, including opportunities to coordinate use of state prisons and local jails. She said the Department of Corrections was working with the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs to discuss options. A policy paper issued by the Governor’s Office Tuesday said one of the ideas being discussed is how to control health care costs, as well as how better to use jail space in the state instead of building new facilities or sending inmates out of state.

Gregoire said that most of the ideas presented Tuesday came out of her work with a bipartisan committee of people representing business, environment and other groups created earlier this year to help develop new strategies on dealing with the budget. Rep. Gary Alexander, R-Olympia and ranking Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee, called the proposals “a small part of the needed overhaul to the size and scope of government.” “The public wants an efficient, streamlined government that lives within existing revenues,” he said in a statement. Sen. Ed Murray, D-Seattle and chairman of the budget-writing Ways and Means Committee in the Senate, said that when lawmakers return to the Capitol for the 105-day legislative session that begins in January, they will have to make some tough changes. “We have two responsibilities in the next two years,” he said. “One is our responsibility to balance the budget, but the other is to decide what kind of state we want to be for the next 20 years.”

Hopes raised as retail sales rise The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A strong start to the holiday season is raising confidence that the consumer is back and that 2011 could be a better year for the economy than expected. Retail sales are rising, boosted by the best month for department stores in two years. Inflation remains tame. Businesses are restocking their shelves in anticipation of more consumer demand. And a survey of CEOs at America’s biggest companies suggests hiring will pick up in the next six months. (See lead item in the Briefly column.)

High unemployment remains a concern. The Federal Reserve singled out the nation’s 9.8 percent jobless rate Tuesday when it said it plans to maintain the pace of its $600 billion Treasury bond-buying program. But the latest government data, combined with an emerging package of tax cuts and long-term unemployment benefits, are prompting economists to ramp up their forecasts for growth in the months ahead. “We could be on the verge of a period of economic activity that will surprise everybody by how strong it is,” said Jonathan Basile, a

vice president for economics at Credit Suisse Securities. “That tends to happen in recoveries when everything starts to ignite at the same time.” Retail sales jumped 0.8 percent in November, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. It was the fifth straight monthly gain. Department stores led the way with a 2.8 percent gain, the biggest for this category since a 3 percent increase in November 2008. Retailers have been particularly aggressive in their holiday sales promotions this year, putting many consumers in the mood to spend

despite high unemployment and weak job gains. The holiday shopping season accounts for as much as 40 percent of annual revenue and profits for retailers. Consumer spending is closely watched because it accounts for 70 percent of total economic activity. A drop in retail sales in May and June had raised fears that the economy could be in danger of slipping back into recession. November’s better-thanexpected sales figures are prompting many economists to revise their forecasts for consumer spending growth in the OctoberDecember quarter.

 $ Briefly . . . More hiring, spending expected NEW YORK — More top corporate executives expect to hire workers and boost spending on their companies over the next six months. A survey released Tuesday by Business Roundtable, an association of CEOs of big U.S. companies, shows 45 percent of executives say they expect their companies to add more workers. That’s the highest percentage who have said they planned to add jobs since the survey began in late 2002. Only 18 percent said they expected their work forces to shrink, one of the lowest readings over the past five years; 38 percent predict no change.

Untaxed smokes NEW YORK — New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration is suing a tobacco company in Washington state, saying it illegally sells and distributes untaxed cigarettes in New York. The suit was filed Tuesday in federal court in Brooklyn. It alleges that King Mountain Tobacco Co. made numerous shipments of unstamped cigarettes to New York state, a violation of three federal statutes. King Mountain is Native American-owned and is located on the Yakama reservation. The company’s CEO, Kamiakin Wheeler, said in a statement the city brought the suit because Bloomberg “hates Native Americans” and does not understand the rights of sovereign nations. Bloomberg has fought reservations in New York state that sell untaxed cigarettes. He says the practice cheats the city out of tax revenues.

Appeal filed LONGVIEW — Conservationists are challenging the approval of a Columbia River port that will export coal to Asia. Cowlitz County commissioners voted in November to allow a subsidiary of Australiabased Ambre Energy to redevelop a port near Longview to handle 5 million tons of coal annually. Earthjustice on Monday appealed the permit decision to the Washington state Shorelines Hearings Board on behalf of four conservation groups. Attorney Jan Hasselman said the county failed to consider the environmental effects of increased mining, trains transporting coal and potential threats to human health.

Real-time stock quotations at

peninsuladailynews.com

The port project would serve mines in Montana and Wyoming. It would be the first of several proposed coal terminals to be built on the West Coast.

Holiday plant talk PORT TOWNSEND — Authors and plant experts David Deardorff and Kathryn Wadsworth will discuss “Caring for Holiday Plants” at Henery’s Garden Center, 405 Benedict St., at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The event is free. Deardorff and Wadsworth will answer questions about topics such as how long a live Christmas tree can be kept indoors and how one takes care of it, how to care for a poinsettia after the holidays and whether amaryllis will bloom again next year. The duo are the authors of What’s Wrong With My Plant (And How Do I Fix It)? Their book will be available for purchase, and the authors will sign copies at the event. For more information, phone Henery’s Garden Center at 360-385-3354 or e-mail henerysgarden center@olypen.com.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Tuesday. Aluminum - $1.0418 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.1774 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.2015 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2419.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0529 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1394.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1403.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $29.625 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $29.759 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum - $1703.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum - $1713.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue.

Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Medical marijuana tax targeted by state Peninsula Daily News news services

Serve thousands In the Seattle area, some of the collectives have dispensaries that serve thousands of members. The law is silent on such collectives, and prosecutors around the state have taken differing views on whether they’re permissible. The state Health Department maintains they’re not. The Revenue Department’s letter said medical marijuana isn’t exempt from the sales tax — as prescrip-

tion medications are — because it can’t be prescribed under state and federal law. Washington’s law instead requires an “authorization” from a medical professional. “We’re not involved in determining whether selling medical marijuana is illegal or not,” Gowrylow said. “Our job is to administer state tax codes. If you’re selling medical marijuana, it’s a retail sale.” The news upset medical marijuana activists. “My first reaction was, did they legalize it?” said Laura Healy, who helps run the Green Hope Patient Network in Shoreline. “How do you tax something that we’re technically not allowed to sell? You can’t have it both ways.” Dale Rogers, director of The Compassion Program, a nonprofit patient collective in Seattle, said taxing medical marijuana would have a disproportionate effect on low-income people, includ-

ing AIDS and multiple sclerosis patients already burdened by health care costs. Seattle medical marijuana attorney Douglas Hiatt noted that authorities in some counties continue to raid dispensaries and prosecute their operators, while those in some other counties — including King County, the state’s largest — have allowed them to stay in business. There’s even a new trade organization for the medical marijuana industry, the Washington Cannabis Association.

Port Angeles The North Olympic Peninsula’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Olympian Canna, is planning to open soon in Port Angeles. Police and city officials said they will allow it to operate as long the dispensary provides marijuana only to those who have been authorized to use it by a doctor. Requiring dispensaries to register with the state

and pay sales tax could expose those involved to criminal prosecution, in violation of their Fifth Amendment right to avoid selfincrimination, Hiatt said. Hiatt also argued medical marijuana authorizations are functionally equivalent to a prescription and should thus be exempt from the tax. Washington isn’t the only

state to address the issue of marijuana taxation. Mike Meno, spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project in Washington, D.C., said Colorado and some California cities currently tax medical marijuana sold from dispensaries. Maine and Washington, D.C., plan to collect such taxes once their dispensary laws are up and running.

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OLYMPIA — The state Department of Revenue has launched a statewide effort to collect sales tax from medical marijuana dispensaries — even as some prosecutors and the Health Department maintain such dispensaries are illegal. Spokesman Mike Gowrylow said Tuesday that the Revenue Department mailed letters to 90 dispensaries and related organizations Friday, insisting that medical marijuana is not exempt from state sales tax and that dispensaries must collect that money and turn it over to the state. The letter said dispensaries must also pay the state business and occupation tax. “We were contacted by a medical marijuana dispensary who was collecting sales tax and said many competitors weren’t,” Gowrylow said. “We went on the Web and tried to come up with all the names and addresses of

medical marijuana dispensaries to inform them they’re required to charge sales tax.” Voters approved medical marijuana in Washington in 1998, but the law does not allow for marijuana sales. Instead, patients must grow marijuana themselves or designate a caregiver to grow it for them. Because growing marijuana can be expensive and difficult, some patients have formed collectives to grow pot together, contributing dues to help cover costs.


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010 SECTION

c

Our Peninsula

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, PUZZLES, DEAR ABBY In this section

Tim Hockett/for Peninsula Daily News

Rich Ciccarone meets with clients in the OlyCAP/Peninsula Home Fund office in Port Townsend.

The helping hands behind the Home Fund EDITOR’S NOTE — For 21 years, Peninsula Daily News readers in Jefferson and Clallam counties have supported the “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund. Today, we feature another in a series of articles on how the Home Fund operates and who benefits from our readers’ generosity. The next article will appear Sunday along with a list of new donors. Peninsula Daily News

For 21 years, the Peninsula Daily News’ “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund has provided a unique lifeline on the North Olympic Peninsula. All the money collected for the Home Fund goes — without any deductions for overhead or administration — for hot meals for seniors, warm winter coats for kids, home repairs for the low-income, needed eyeglasses and prescription drugs, dental work, safe, drug-free temporary housing . . . The list goes on and on. The Home Fund is a safety net for local residents when there is nowhere else to turn. As the fund has grown, so has the OlyCAP work force that administers it — many of whom are big-hearted volunteers. OlyCAP is the nonprofit Olympic Community Action Programs, the No. 1 emergency care agency in Jefferson and Clallam counties. OlyCAP oversees the Peninsula Home Fund for the PDN, screening the applicants and distributing the funds. Here is an interview with Rich Ciccarone, a retired corporate executive from New York City who volunteers with OlyCAP in the agency’s Port Townsend office. The interview was conducted by Sheila Ramsey, AmeriCorps volunteer coordinator stationed at OlyCAP. Q, What is your work at OlyCAP? A. I provide help from the Home Fund, interviewing clients to determine their needs and eligibility for our services. In the course of any interview, I can offer the client financial assistance, a referral to an agency that can provide the support they need or, simply, encouragement if we are unable to assist. For example, when a woman came into the office, she wanted to “walk away” from her mortgage. We discussed what that would mean for her future, and I suggested she speak with someone on the mortgage-crisis hot line. Q. What is rewarding about this volunteer position? A. There is a sense of accomplishment knowing that you can help people in crisis. In addition, I have the ability to offer immediate assistance if possible. Unfortunately, there are circumstances where I can only offer a listening ear and genuine empathy. My minimum goal is to help people smile. When I leave OlyCAP, I feel fulfilled; like walking a foot

Give voice to your heart A GIFT OF any size is welcome. The Peninsula Home Fund has never been a campaign of heavy hitters. If you can contribute only a few dollars, please don’t hesitate because you think it won’t make a difference. Every gift makes a difference, regardless of its size. To donate, write a check to “Peninsula Home Fund” and attach it to the coupon that accompanies this story. Mail both items to Peninsula Home Fund, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Or drop them at the newspaper’s offices in Port

Townsend, Sequim or Port Angeles (addresses on page A2 of the PDN daily). Again, all contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. The fund’s IRS number, under the auspices of OlyCAP, is 91-0814319. You can also donate online by credit card — just visit www.peninsuladailynews.com, then click near the top of the home page on “Peninsula Home Fund.” Whether you donate by coupon or online, you will receive a written thank-you and acknowledgment of your contribution. To delay may mean to forget.

Q. What is your advice to prospective volunteers at Q. What are the chalOlyCAP? lenges? A. So many people are experiA. The biggest challenge is encing financial crisis, home loss, assessing each individual’s needs job loss and low self-esteem that to best determine the most help- it is important to have strong ful approach. people skills to volunteer and Every individual has a unique help people with the Home Fund. set of circumstances. It is paramount to leave your preconceived notions of poverty Q. How did you get at the door. involved in volunteer service A genuine interest in people, commitment to the OlyCAP orgaat OlyCAP? A. I was working with the Big nization and empathetic listening are needed attributes. Brothers Big Sisters program There also are many other when it was dissolved on the diversified volunteer programs Peninsula. within the OlyCAP organization Another OlyCAP volunteer, Bill James, introduced me to the if emergency services doesn’t suit your volunteer desires. emergency services program at Port Angeles created a wellOlyCAP, which provides assisrun program called “All About tance by means of the Home You and Your Potential.” Fund. My wife and I have brought When I initially observed this workshop to Port Townsend what was involved, I was emoand have expanded this skillstionally overwhelmed by the and confidence-building workscope of how deeply affected all shop to include job preparation people are in these difficult times. interview skills. After 35 years in the corpoQ. How long have you been rate world, I have never experion the North Olympic Penin- enced the satisfaction that I have sula? encountered volunteering at OlyA. I retired from the corporate CAP. world in Manhattan three years I am grateful for the opportuago. nity to assist the OlyCAP staff. My wife and I loved the area Always remember, “There, but and bought property in Jefferson for the grace of God go I.” County because the area suited our old hippie roots. No deductions After a year of settling in and getting our home in order, we So far this year, from Jan. 1 looked at each other and asked, through last Friday, the PDN’s “Now what are we going to do?” Peninsula Home Fund has helped We both decided to volunteer more than 2,040 individuals and so that we could make a differfamilies in Jefferson and Clallam ence. counties. Since Thanksgiving and Q. How would you describe OlyCAP’s impact on through Dec. 31, Home Fund is the communities of Jefferson seeking contributions for its and Clallam counties? annual holiday season fundraisA. I know that OlyCAP has ing campaign. many programs throughout the From Port Townsend to area, including Working Image Forks, from Quilcene and Brinand the food bank among many non to LaPush, it’s a “hand up, others. not a handout” for children, But, the most important impact I see is the OlyCAP mind- teens, families and the elderly. n No money is deducted for set. administration or other overThe attitude throughout the head. organization is to help people in Your entire donation — 100 need, and they all go to great percent, every penny — goes to lengths to accomplish this goal. above the ground.

help those who are facing times of crisis. n All contributions are fully IRS tax-deductible. n Your personal information is kept confidential. Peninsula Daily News does not rent, sell, give or otherwise share your address or other information with anyone or make any other use of the information. n Instances of help are designed to get an individual or family through the crisis — and every effort is made to put them back on the path to self-sufficiency. That’s the “hand up, not a handout” focus of the fund. In many instances, Peninsula Home Fund case managers at OlyCAP work with individuals or families to develop a plan to become financially stable — and avoid a recurrence of the emergency that prompted aid from the fund. n Begun in 1989, the fund is supported entirely by Jefferson and Clallam residents. Individuals, couples, businesses, churches, service organizations and school groups set a record for contributions in 2009 — $230,806.95. With heavy demand this year, the carefully rationed fund is being rapidly depleted.

So far, $199,000 had been spent. The last $30,000 of the money collected in 2009 is expected to be exhausted before Dec. 31. n Money is usually distributed in small amounts, usually up to $150. n Assistance is limited to one time in a 12-month period. n Peninsula Home Fund contributions are also used in conjunction with money from other agencies, enabling OlyCAP to stretch the value of the contribution.

Applying to the Home Fund To apply for a grant from the fund, phone OlyCAP at 360-4524726 (Port Angeles and Sequim) or 360-385-2571 (Jefferson County). There’s also an OlyCAP office in Forks — 360-374-6193. If you have any questions about the fund, phone John Brewer, Peninsula Daily News editor and publisher, at 360-4173500. Or e-mail him at john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com. Peninsula Daily News publishes stories every Sunday and Wednesday during the fundraising campaign listing contributors and reporting on how the fund works.


C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Things to Do Today and Thursday, Dec. 15-16, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today

referrals, play area, emergency supplies, access to phones, computers, fax and copier. Phone 360-457-8355. Museum at the Carnegie — Featured exhibit, “Strong People: The Faces of Clallam County.” Miniature exhibit till Dec. 31. Second and Lincoln streets, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Children welcome. Elevator, ADA access and parking at rear of building. 360-452-6779.

Dance lessons by appointWomen’s belly dancing ment — Phone Carol Hathaway at 360-460-3836 or e-mail exercise class — Focus on toning upper arms, chest, waist carolha@olypen.com. and hips. Port Angeles Senior German conversation — Center, 328 E. Seventh St., All ages invited to German chat 2:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Drop-ins group. Must speak and under- welcome. Cost: $45 for six stand German. Discussion top- weeks or $8.50 per class. ics include current events, Phone 360-457-7035. music, food and other topics. Braille training — Vision Phone 360-457-0614 or 360Loss Center, 228 W. First St., 808-1522. Suite N, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Phone Biz Builders —August 360-457-1383, e-mail info@ Glass office building, 312 E. visionlossservices.org or visit Fifth St., 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Open www.visionlossservices.org. to business representatives. The Answer for Youth — Phone 360-460-0313. Drop-in outreach center for Walk-in vision clinic — youth and young adults, providInformation for visually impaired ing essentials like clothes, food, and blind people, including Narcotics and Alcoholics Anonaccessible technology display, ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. library, Braille training and vari- Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. ous magnification aids. Vision Domestic violence supLoss Center, Armory Square Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. port group — Healthy Families Phone for an appointment 360- of Clallam County, 1210 E. 457-1383 or visit www.vision Front St. Suite C, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free to attend. Free lossservices.org/vision. childcare. Phone 360-452Art classes — Between 3811. Port Angeles and Sequim. 10 Mental health drop-in cena.m. to 12:30 p.m. For directions and costs, phone Susan ter — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Spar 360-457-6994. For those with mental disorPort Angeles Fine Arts ders and looking for a place to Center — “Art Is a Gift” sale socialize, something to do or a and show. 1203 E. Lauridsen hot meal. For more information, Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven phone Rebecca Brown at 360days a week through Dec. 24. 457-0431. Free. Phone 360-457-3532. Boy Scout Troop 1473 Port Angeles Parkinson’s Christmas tree sales — disease support group — Marine Drive across from SunPort Angeles Senior Center, set Do it Best Hardware 328 E. Seventh St., 10:30 a.m. between Simmer Down coffee to noon. For those with Parkin- and Action Brake & Muffler. 4 son’s or family, friends or care- p.m. to 8 p.m. givers of Parkinson’s patients. Senior meal — Nutrition Phone Darlene Jones at 360program, Port Angeles Senior 457-5352. Center, 328 E. Seventh St., Acupuncture session — 4:30 p.m. Donation $3 to $5 per Licensed acupuncturist Jim meal. Reservations recomFox. Port Angeles Senior Cen- mended. Phone 360-457ter, 328 E. Seventh St., 10 a.m. 8921. $20 members, $25 nonmemBallet and modern dance bers. Walk-ins are welcome. classes — Mixed-level for stuGuided walking tour — dents 16 and older. Adults welHistoric downtown buildings, come. Sons of Norway Buildan old brothel and “Under- ing, 131 W. Fifth St. Ballet, 4:45 ground Port Angeles.” Cham- p.m. to 6 p.m. Modern, 6:15 ber of Commerce, 121 E. Rail- p.m. to 7:30 p.m. $8 to $10 per road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 class. Student rates and p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 reduced class cards available. senior citizens and students, Phone Kayla Oakes 360-477$6 ages 6 to 12. Children 2050. younger than 6, free. ReservaOvereaters Anonymous — tions, phone 360-452-2363, Bethany Pentecostal Church, ext. 0. 508 S. Francis St., 5:30 p.m. Bingo — Eagles Club Auxil- Phone 360-457-8395. iary, 110 S. Penn St., 11 a.m. to Bingo — Masonic Lodge, 3 p.m. Lunch available. Open to the public. Phone 360-452- 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, 3344. drinks and pull tabs available. First Step drop-in center Phone 360-457-7377. — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 Celebrate Recovery — p.m. Free clothing and equipprogram ment closet, information and Christ-centered addressing all hurts, hang-ups and habits. Olympic Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 3415 S. Peabody St., 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Phone 360-460-3786. Al-Anon — St. Columbine

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Gastric bypass surgery Room, Queen of Angels Church, 209 W. 11th St., 7:30 support group — 114 E. Sixth St., No. 116, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Open to the public. Phone 360Live music — Good Medi- 457-1456. cine Band, The Junction, Newborn parenting class 242701 U.S. Highway 101. 6:30 — “You and Your New Baby,” p.m. No cover. third-floor sunroom, Olympic Christmas light tours — Medical Center, 939 Caroline All Points Charters and Tours. St., 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Meet bus at Safeway, 110 E. Phone 360-417-7652. Third St., 6:30 p.m. $7.50 Boy Scout Troop 1473 adults, $3.50 children 6-15, children younger than 5 free. Christmas tree sales — See Tour is about two hours long. entry under Today. Refreshments served. To Mental health drop-in cenreserve a spot, phone 360ter — See entry under Today. 460-7131 or 360-565-1139.

Thursday Shop Till You Drop — More than 30 stores and shops in downtown Port Angeles and at The Landing mall stay open from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Santa Claus; music and caroling; complimentary gifts; special discounts on merchandise. Drawing for $500 in Downtown Dollars. Chamber mixer — Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce’s December holiday after-hours business mixer, second-floor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St., 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. For chamber members and their guests. Beverages and appetizers will be provided. PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information including time of day and location. Tai chi class — Ginger and Ginseng, 1012 W. 15th St., 7 a.m. $12 per class or $10 for three or more classes. No experience necessary, wear loose comfortable clothing. Phone 360-808-5605. Guided walking tour — See entry under Today. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — See entry under Today. Mental illness family support group — For families and friends of people with mental disorders. Peninsula Community Mental Health Center, 118 E. Eighth St., noon to 1:15 p.m. Phone Rebecca Brown, 360457-0431.

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Sequim Open Aire Market Knit, crochet and spin — All ages and skill levels, Veela — Sequim and Washington Cafe, 133 E. First St., 4:30 p.m. avenues. Noon to 4 p.m. E-mail manager@sequimmarket.com to 6 p.m. or phone 360-460-2668. Sacred meditation healing Poetry group — Informal — Unity in the Olympics Church, 2917 E. Myrtle St., reading, writing and critique of 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. To regis- poems, led by Bob Mitchell. Sequim Senior Activity Center, ter, phone 360-457-3981. 921 E. Hammond St., 1 p.m. to Volunteers in Medicine of 2:30 p.m. Phone 360-477the Olympics health clinic — 3650. 909 Georgiana St., 6 p.m. to 9 Clothing bank — Used p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health clothing and other items for care. For appointment, phone adults and children. Redeeming Life Fellowship, 425 E. 360-457-4431. Washington St., 1 p.m. to 4 Olympic Peninsula Entre- p.m. Donations welcomed. preneurs Network — Coldwell Phone 360-460-4291. Banker Uptown Realty, 1115 E. Italian class — Prairie Front St., 6:30 p.m. Inventors, innovators and entrepreneurs Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. of all ages welcome. Members Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681cane share resources and tal- 0226. ent. Phone Tim Riley at 360Creative living workshop 460-4655. — “Who Are You Now? CreatPeninsula Men’s Gospel ing the Life You Always Intended Singers Christmas concert to Live!” Center of Infinite — Park View Villas Retirement Reflections, 144 Tripp Road, 2 Center,1430 Park View Lane, p.m. to 4 p.m. Kristine Walsh, 6:30 p.m. Admission is by metaphysician and facilitator. For preregistration, phone 360donation. 582-0083. Bariatric surgery support Good News Club — Ages 5 group — Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., 7 p.m. to 8 through 12. Greywolf Elementary room 136, 171 Carlsborg p.m. Phone 360-457-1456. Road, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Christmas light tours — Phone 360-683-9176 or visit www.cefop.us. See entry under Today.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Today Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m., 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com.

Open mic — Kelly Thomas and Victor Reventlow host. The Buzz Cafe, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Music, comedy, poetry and dance. Phone 360-681-5455.

Thursday Sequim High School Choir Booster Club— Sequim High School choir room, 601 N. Sequim Ave. Phone Jim Stoffer at 360-775-9356. Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. Phone 206321-1718 or visit www. sequimyoga.com.

Strength and toning exercise class — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Bird walk — Dungeness Ave., 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. $5 per River Audubon Center, Rail- class. Phone Shelley Haupt at road Bridge Park, 2151 W. 360-477-2409 or e-mail Hendrickson Road, 8:30 a.m. jhaupt6@wavecable.com. to 10:30 a.m. Phone the Audubon at 360-681-4076 or e-mail Line dancing lessons — rivercenter@olympus.net. High-beginner, intermediate and advanced dancers. Sequim Cardio-step exercise class Elks Lodge, 143 Port Williams — Sequim Community Church, Road, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Drop-

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Meditation class — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 p.m. Admission by donation. Gamblers Anonymous — Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 6:30 p.m. Phone 360460-9662. Puget Sound Anglers — Local Fish Hatchery Specialist Dan Witczak on Salmon Restoration and Hatchery Production in Clallam County. Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., 6:45 p.m. Phone 360460-0331 or visit www.puget soundanglers.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous — Calvary Chapel, 91 S. Boyce Road, 7 p.m. Phone 360-452-1050 or visit www.foodaddicts.org.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Today Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger than 6. Features vintage aircraft and aviation art. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org.

in Downtown Dollars!

Chess — Dennis McGuire, Port Townsend Public Library, 1220 Lawrence St., 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Learn to play or improve skills. Open to all ages. Phone 360-385-3181.

Receive a free ticket to enter at participating businesses, then every time you spend $10 you can receive another ticket. Must be present at drawing on Dec. 16, during ‘Shop Till You Drop’ to win.

Full details at www.portangelesdowntown.com

Northwest Maritime Center tour — Free tour of new headquarters. Meet docent in chandlery, 431 Water St., 2 p.m. Elevators available, children welcome and pets not allowed inside building. Phone 360-385-3628, ext. 102, or e-mail sue@nwmaritime.org. to

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Family Caregivers support group — 411 W. Washington St., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Phone Carolyn Lindley, 360-4178554.

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Health clinic — Free medical services for uninsured or under-insured, Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m.. Phone 360-582-0218.

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Spanish class — Prairie Kids crafts — First Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10:30 a.m. Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St., 2 p.m. 360-681Phone 360-582-3428. 0226. Intuition workshop — Chess Club — Dungeness “Introduction to Intuitive Development,” Center of Infinite Valley Lutheran Church, 925 N. Reflections, 144 Tripp Road, 11 Sequim Ave. 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Kristine Walsh, p.m. Bring clocks, sets and metaphysician and facilitator. boards. All are welcome. Phone 360-681-8481. Phone at 360-582-0083.

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1000 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to ins welcome. $3 per class. 10:15 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Phone 360-681-2826. Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 Sequim Senior Softball — or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. Co-ed recreational league. com. Carrie Blake Park, 9:30 a.m. for Line dance class — Pio- practice and pickup games. neer Park, 387 E. Washington Phone John Zervos at 360St., 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Begin- 681-2587. ning, intermediate and Sequim Museum & Arts advanced classes. $5 per class. Center — See entry under Phone 360-681-2987. Today. Free blood pressure Meditation class — Willow checks — Cardiac Services Department, Olympic Medical Pond Consulting and Intuitive Center medical services build- Development Center, 131 ing, 840 N. Fifth Ave., 9 a.m. to Kitchen-Dick Road, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Learn different meditanoon. tion techniques. To register, Free karate lessons — phone Marie-Claire Bernards Ideal for people fighting cancer at 360-681-4411, e-mail encouraged by medical provid- willowpond@olympus.net or ers to seek physical activity. visit www.thewillowpond.com. Kathrin J. Sumpter at Sequim Parent connections — First Martial Arts, 452 Riverview Drive, 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Teacher, 220 W. Alder St., 10 Space limited. For reserva- a.m. Phone 360-461-9992. tions, phone 360-683-4799. Olympic Minds meeting — Sequim Museum & Arts Conference room, Lodge at Center — “Small Works Art Sherwood Village, 660 EverShow” show and sale. 175 W. green Farm Way, 1 p.m. Open Cedar St., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to the public. Phone 360 6818677. Free. Phone 360-683-8110.

Participating Businesses: Brown’s Outdoor, Port Book & News, Unique Treasures, Anime Kat, Olympic Stationers, Bay Variety, Tiger Lily Clothing, Steppin’ Out Salon, The Trading Post, Sterling Impressions Photographic, Necessities & Temptations, Odyssey Bookshop, Northwest Fudge & Confections, Landings Art Gallery

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A gift that costs peanuts.

Senior meal — See entry under Today.

First Step drop-in center Overeaters Anonymous — — See entry under Today. Men’s meeting, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., Museum at the Carnegie 7 a.m. Phone 360-582-9549. — See entry under Today. Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-6832114.

Having difficulty finding comfort?

Confessions of a Restaurateur

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Woman should get tested despite fear

Tundra

DEAR ABBY: I am a 34-year-old dear abby woman who finally beat a 13-year battle with drugs. I now have a job, a Dear Bleeding car, a place of my own and a bank Abigail Ears: Could it be account. Van Buren that your husband My problem is while I was on suffers from heardrugs, I prostituted myself in order ing loss (probably to support my habit. Now, I’m terrifrom listening to fied I have AIDS and afraid I’ll be too-loud music), told I don’t have long to live. which is why he I’m not dating right now, but I’ve needs the volume had a couple of boyfriends since getturned up so high? ting sober. I’m scared for them but so Arguing with afraid of getting a death sentence him won’t help. that I’ve never mentioned my fears He should be to anyone. checked by an I know I’m being selfish with audiologist — a hearing specialist — these guys’ lives, but I’m paralyzed so that he doesn’t damage his hearby my fear. What am I going to do? Terrified in the U.S. ing further and yours won’t be affected. Protecting your hearing is imporDear Terrified: What you are tant. That’s why you should consider going to do is get yourself tested! Please understand that the fear you using ear plugs when you drive with him. are dealing with is the same that P.S. And when you get to the gas anyone who has had multiple sex station, offer to pump the gas for partners has had to face. him. If he refuses, then leave the car You must realize that being exposed to HIV and having AIDS are with him. not the same. If you have been Dear Abby: My husband is 7 feet exposed to HIV — and therefore test tall, and we recently became parents “positive” — you need to know it ASAP so you can be prescribed anti- of a beautiful baby girl. Everywhere we go, people make viral medications that can prevent comments about my husband’s you from getting AIDS. height. Getting on those meds can save He is used to being the target of your life. And you can save the lives of your former boyfriends, too, if you stares and comments, having experienced it his whole life. are HIV positive, by telling them to Our daughter may grow up to be get tested. tall; how would you handle this? Angela Dear Abby: I have known my in Bethlehem, Pa. husband for eight years and have been married to him for three. He is Dear Angela: I would teach my a unique and funny man, but he daughter — regardless of her height does have a few annoying quirks. — to be proud of who she is. The biggest one, and the reason I’m If your daughter turns out to be writing to you, is his need to have tall, she’ll have plenty of company music blaring in our car. because each generation seems to be It’s not just when we’re driving, growing taller than the last one. but also when we’re going through A woman’s height does not have drive-thru restaurants, banks and gas stations. to be a disadvantage unless she Gas stations are the worst views it that way. because he turns the volume up even If you stress the qualities you feel louder so he can hear it outside. Not are important, chances are that’s the only is it painful to my ears, but it’s person she’ll grow up to be. embarrassing. _________ I have asked him a number of Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, times to turn it down, but it just also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was leads to arguments. Can you help me founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Lettalk to him before I lose my hearing? ters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box Bleeding Ears 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail in Spring Valley, Calif. by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

The Last Word in Astrology By Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): If it’s not possible to have a day of pampering, consider an outing with the kids or fixing up your place. Avoid all the people who aggravate you and focus on those offering love and appreciation. 3 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll learn something about someone that will help you make a good choice. Love and romance are in the stars and time should be put aside to socialize, if you are single, or to spend time with the special person in your life. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Whether it’s someone you work with, a relative or just a good friend, use your imagination to come up with a token of your appreciation that will go over well. It will ensure you get the support you need emotionally, financially or professionally in the future. 4 stars

Elderberries

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Welcome change with open arms. Being adaptable will enhance your career and your future. Throw a little romance into the mix late in the day and you won’t be sorry. Don’t hold back when there is so much to say and do. 2 stars

Dennis the Menace

C3

Doonesbury

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Take time to have some fun with friends or colleagues. Mixing business with pleasure may not be wise. Don’t be fooled by a financial deal that has no substance. A personal relationship may take a nosedive if jealousy or possessiveness take over. 5 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Invite friends over or spend time decking the house with festive decorations. You have plenty to look forward to and to be thankful for. Love is on the rise and getting involved in something that uses your talent skillfully will pay off. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You should sit back and observe. If you jump in too soon, you will face opposition and complaints. Changes within friendships can be expected and must be accepted for what they are. Be willing to move on. 5 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t be afraid to tell the people you love how you feel and what your intentions are. You need an emotional release and, in order to make it favorable, it’s important that you get your feelings out in the open. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Someone will be very critical if you don’t stick to the rules. Politely turn down any invitation in which you have no interest and focus on something or someone who can add to your plans and your popularity. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Use a little discipline and you will get back on track and feel good about what you are doing. You’ll make the people you love proud if you take on a responsibility that shows you are ready to do something good for others. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Look at the past, present and future and you will see where you may have gone wrong. Back up and redo. Imagination, coupled with talent, will help you break ground in new territory. Network and sell your expertise. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Make some adjustments to your surroundings. Romance looks favorable and can lead to a promise. A financial gain through winnings, a settlement, an old debt paid or even a gift is forthcoming. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!


C4

Classified

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video Office Hours Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 Monday - Friday IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY 8AM - 5PM

22

SNEAK A PEEK •

Community Notes

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

MISC: Drew dining set, table, 8 chairs, china hutch, credenza buffet, $1,000. Sportsart recumbent bike, $350. DuncanPhyfe table, $200. 2 lg. chest of drawers, $75 ea. Antique needle point chair with stool, $100. Retro bar, $50. Glass/brass shelf, 2 end tables, $150. All OBO. 477-4785 SEAHAWKS VS RAMS January 2. 2 tickets. $156 both. 360-461-3661

23

SOFA: Dual recliner, new cond., beige. $395. 477-2022. TIRES: (4) Michelin 255-65R-16. Very good condition. Off Mercedes SUV. $120. 681-4218. WANTED: Slot machine in good condition. Cash paid. Call 681-4218.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

Community Notes

Adult care home in Sequim has a private room available. Best care at best rates. Call Wild Rose at 360-683-9194

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

6A113352

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

GRAND OPENING! NOV. 30TH. HANDCRAFTED ITEMS, JEWELRY, CLOTHES, GLASS WORK, QUILTS! DRAWINGS GIVEN AWAY ALL WEEK! TUES THRU SAT 10AM TO 5PM. 803 CARLSBORG RD #D 360-681-7655. ART CONSIGNERS WANTED & BIRD HOUSES.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Lost and Found

FOUND: Cat. Long hair, gray Tabby female, 3 mo. old, yellow eyes, rescued her out of a tree on Taylor Cutoff Rd., Sequim. 582-0907. FOUND: Dog. 5 lb. Maltese?, Port Angeles Library, 12:30 p.m. on Friday. 452-6577 FOUND: Keyless entry. On curbside grass, between skating rink and senior center, P.A. Monday 12/13. P.A. Senior Center 457-7004. FOUND: Watch. Dec. 3rd at Captain T’s, P.A. Call to identify. 452-6549 FOUND: Will the person who lost a wheel and tire, early morning of 12/10 on the corner of 8th and Oak, P.A. please come pick up your tire, it is under the big tree. LOST: Bag. Cloth bag with angel on each side with pray books inside, Whidby, Chase, Lauridsen, Hwy. 101, 11th St., P.A. Reward. 452-5275 LOST: Cat. 5 yr. old male, silver Tabby, cream colored belly with curls, very friendly, microchipped, has heart condition and been without meds since Dec. 3rd, sentimental. Sequim Ave. and Prairie area, Sequim. 670-5843 LOST: Dog. Black lab, older, (Travis). Blue collar, from Black Diamond area. 452-3633, 477-5433 LOST: Dog. Border collie-Australian shepherd cross, brown and white, in Dan Kelly-Karpen Rd area. Likes people but afraid of thunder and other dogs. 452-2806 LOST: Large gold nugget on long gold chain. Possibly one month ago. Reward. 457-1329 LOST: Lincoln electric grease gun. In black plastic case. Dec. 10th. Between Kays Rd and Hwy 101 in Carlsborg intersection. Reward. 360-301-4501 LOST: Two Bostitch Roofing Staple guns and 1 nailgun. Fluorescent green paint on guns. 460-4107 REWARD 4 INFO. $1,000 for person(s) name that stole property from PDQ parking lot Fri. night -Sat. morning.

Rock ‘N’ Roll.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31 Some restrictions apply.

Place your ad today • 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

43220697

Where buyers and sellers meet!

City of Sequim is seeking qualified professionals for the following positions: Engineer Engineering Tech II WRF Electronics Tech PW Admin Asst II Accounting Asst III Finance Project Manager Details at http:// www.ci.sequim.wa.u s. Send cover letter, resume and job application to Kathy Brown-HR Manager, 152 West Cedar St., Sequim, WA 98363, or email kbrown@ ci.sequim.wa. EOE.

DELIVERY DRIVER Part-time. 3-7 p.m., Mon.-Fri., rotating weekends. Clean driving record req. Durable medical equip. set up/maintenance exp. preferred. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. DRIVER: Looking for an exp. Class A-CDL driver. Motivated, hard worker, Local delivery, home every night. Must be able to make repeated hand truck deliveries down a ramp. Doubles and hazmat a plus. Will need a TWIC card. Contact Tony 461-2607. HOME HEALTH DEPARTMENT SERVICE REP Knowledge of home health equipment/ retail sales experience required. Fulltime position, varied shifts, some weekends, with benefits, wage DOE. Apply in person at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. LOGGING COMPANY Looking for log truck driver. Experienced only, clean driving record, current CDL and medical card. Drug testing required. Immediate opening. Paid on percentage. 360-460-7292 RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE RESIDENTIAL STAFF For new Maloney Heights 28-unit residence for chronically homeless: º Site Coordinator, Bachelor’s degr with 3-5 yrs. relevant exper. $29$31K, DOE. º Residential Aides, Assist w/daily living skills, cooking & housekeeping. Req h.s./GED; exper pref’d. $10.13-$11.05 hr., DOE. Both posns FT w/benes. resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE The Museum & Arts Center located in Sequim, WA, is seeking applicants for the position of executive director. Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications. The complete position description is available on the Museum & Arts Center website: www.macsequim.org. Copies are also available at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest with resume to: MAC Executive Director Search Committee PO Box 2056 Sequim, WA 98382 All inquiries must be directed to the mailing address above. The search committee will only consider applications received on or before Wed., Dec. 29, 2010.

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard Pick your ad package and rate that works for you. Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday Pay for your ad on our secure site.

www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SSNW DISPATCHER Part-time, 3 yrs. exp. 911 exp. preferred. Fax 360-797-8482 or email resume info@SSNWHQ.com TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325

There's never been a better time to start a new career. One where you can reach out and make a difference by helping seniors in their homes. We're seeking quality people who are truly committed to working at least 20 hrs. a week: days, evenings, overnights, weekends, and holidays. Call 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 360-681-2511 VETERINARY RECEPTIONIST POSITION Fast paced small animal practice seeks the right individual to join our customer care team. FT receptionist for multi-line telephone system. Job responsibilities include extensive customer interaction, appointment scheduling, check in/out, and filing. Exceptional computer and telephone skills required. Some evening and weekend work expected. Experienced only. Drug Free Workplace. FAX resume to 452-7430.

34

Work Wanted

HAPPYDAY CLEANING. Housecleaning, move out’s, rentals, offices, RVs, help with holiday messes, No Job is too big or too small. Call for your free estimate 360-808-3017, Port Angeles and surrounding area.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

51

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

HOUSEKEEPING + $13 hr. your supplies. 457-2837 I Do Errands, Chores and More ∞Organize closets, cupboards, drawers and files. ∞Grocery shop, prepare a meal/do the laundry. ∞Water plants, walk the dog, light yard work. ∞Holiday special, Christmas lights, decorations, gift wrapping. Lynn 360-797-3555 P.A. AUTO TINTING 20% discount. 360-912-1948 PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com. We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@ helpertek.com

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officelive.com I'm Sew Happy! WHO ECONOMY MUSIC SERVICE. 582-3005. Winterize lawns, rake leaves, etc. 797-3023. Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513 Yard Work and Odd Jobs. Xmas light hanging, tree and hedge trimming, weed-eating, weeding, gutter cleaning, hauling, and any odd job you can find. Experienced and dependable. 2 men at $35 per hr. 461-7772

A HOME TO REMEMBER Open flowing 1,900 sf floor plan. 3 Br., 3 bath plus bonus room. Spacious kitchen with separate dining room. 800 sf garage and storage. Easy care landscape and 35’ deck. $278,000. ML251696/114788 Cath Mich 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTIFUL CONTEMPORARY CUSTOM HOME Super private location, just minutes from Port Angeles. Very light and bright with wall of picture windows facing Olympic Mountain range. Vaulted ceilings, massive kitchen with Bleimeister cabinets and new appliances. 3,818 sf. Finished downstairs suitable for mother-in-law apt. 3 car garage plus 2,500 sf RV/shop. Great for car enthusiastic. Large pond, 8 raised garden beds. Flowers for all seasons. $499,900. ML252124. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEAUTIFUL NEW HOME In desirable Monterra. 3 Br., 2 bath, and lots of storage. Established, low maintenance landscaping and peaceful surroundings. Ideal for a second home or rental. RV and boat storage is $5/month upon availability. $175,000. ML251723. Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $208,000 360-460-7503 A HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS This spacious 3 Br., 2 bath triplewide on 1/3 acre in town, has a private fenced backyard and a 2 car detached garage. The home is light and open, move-in ready and the yard is extra special. $224,000. ML251581 Cathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SELL YOUR HOME IN PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 1-800-826-7714

Homes

BREATHTAKINGLY BEAUTIFUL! Gated entry leads to wonderfully situated custom luxury view home on acreage. Formal living areas and gourmet chef’s kitchen. Dog kennel and landscaped. $585,000. ML152107. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

CHARMING HOME With wonderful views. This solid built 1946 4 Br., 1.5 bath home is definitely a great find. The interior remodel has livened up this special place in a bright and cheery way; the original character of this home is still in tact. Ample storage space throughout, daylight basement with a workshop, and a one car garage. $185,000 ML251748/119496 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY CHRISTMAS GIFT! One of a kind, gated Northwest contemporary home with amazing features. One level, open concept with large kitchen and gorgeous fire place. Water and mountain views, easy care landscaping, raised garden beds and a koi pond. Detached art studio makes this home the perfect place to work and live. Just glorious. $449,500. ML252371. Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CUTE AS A BUTTON Neat as a pin! Site built 2 Br., 1.5 bath home in Monterra. The perfect scale down home or maybe a nest for snow birds in a terrific and quiet adult community. Low maintenance landscaping and a carport with a storage/ utility room. All this conveniently located between Sequim and Port Angeles. $135,000 ML250763/145335 Mark Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY DOMINION TERRACE Remodeled home in 2006 with new flooring, counters, appliances, provides good views, and short walk to clubhouse. Enclosed storage in carport area, and off covered patio. Wood burning grill in patio area for outdoor cooking. HOA fees include electricity, water, sewer, trash, and cable. Pets restricted to 2 per household. $119,000. ML252350. Robert and Carolyn Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Sequim

Health & Rehabilitation

0C5106532

Sell your skates and just about anything else starting at only $16.50. Reach more than 36,000 readers of the Peninsula Daily News every day!

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

5000900

Antique Steamer GUITAR: 1968 Gibson Trunk. Refinished Les Paul Gold Top. steamer type trunk- Serious inquiries rounded top. Com- only. $12,000. pletely refinished, 360-681-8023 great shape. 36 X 24. HP Mini Case and Photos by request. portable mouse with $150/obo. 379-9520. 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never DELIVERY DRIVER Part-time. 3-7 p.m., used. 452-6439. Mon.-Fri., rotating weekends. Clean KITTENS! 3 sweet black/gray driving record req. male Durable medical tabby kittens, 10 equip. set up/main- weeks old. $10 ea. 417-3906 tenance exp. preferred. Apply at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 E. MISC: Mini pinto mare and stud, $250 and 2nd St., P.A. EOE. $350. Corn snakes DRIVER: Looking for and tank, $150. Paran exp. Class A-CDL rot cages, $100driver. Motivated, $350. 457-9775. hard worker, Local NOW ACCEPTING delivery, home every APPLICATIONS night. Must be able Hilltop Ridge Apts. to make repeated 1914 S. Pine, P.A. hand truck deliveries 457-5322 down a ramp. Doubles and hazmat a plus. Will need a P.A. AUTO TINTING TWIC card. Contact 20% discount. Tony 461-2607. 360-912-1948

31

NOW HIRING

Maintenance Asst. • CNA Dietary Mgr. • Activity Asst. Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx EOE

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

Homes

COUNTRY CHARM Nice home on 3.17 acres. Mountain view with pond. Garden area and orchard. Barn and Clallam ditch irrigation. Bordered by Matriotti Creek. $299,000. ML241623/29093313 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND GREAT LOCATION Beautiful 3 Br., 2 bath home centrally located in down town Sequim. The home has been freshly painted inside and out, has laminate flooring in the living areas, great kitchen with plenty of cabinets, huge pantry, fireplace in the living room, large master Br., covered patio, and fenced in backyard, and 3 cherry trees. $185,000. ML250978 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 HORSE PROPERTY 3 Br., 2.5 bath, 2,840 sf home. Den and 450 sf bonus room. Large master Br. with jacuzzi tub in bath. Pole barn with RV opening. On 5.99 acres with fenced pasture. $499,000. ML241304/ 269072566 Team Topper 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

51

C5

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. JUDGE JEANINE PIRRO

By Julian Lim

12/15/10

DOWN 1 Boxer’s target 2 Escort to a seat, in slang 3 Cultural funding gp. 4 C to C, e.g. 5 Nuisance to gardeners 6 Kooky 7 Suffix with sub 8 Singer/songwriter DiFranco 9 Low-pH substance 10 “Goodness!” 11 Try and try again 12 Mowed strips 14 Pricey strings, for short 17 Witnessed 18 Chess sacrifice 21 Altar words 22 Gnus’ group 23 Hairstyle for Hendrix 24 These, in Juarez 25 “... two fives for __?” 29 Prefix with gram 31 __ cavae: large blood vessels 32 Frequently, to a bard 34 Dance-storm link Homes

MOUNTAIN VIEW, PRIVATE SETTING 1.18 acres, 1,632 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath, large open floor plan with big kitchen. Double garage, detached single garage. Covered deck and immaculate landscaping! $295,000. ML252013 Cathy Reed and Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEW HOME LOCATED IN THE CITY OF SEQUIM New Home currently under construction! 3 Br., 2 bath, great room, spacious master. Built by top quality craftsmen. 1,411 sf home. Great price, great location! Within close distance to Safeway. Electric wall heaters, laminate countertops, pre-finished wood floors. Builder is willing to work with buyer to make changes. Located in home subdivision off S. 7th Ave. Beautiful mountain views and over an acre of community open space. Individual building lots also available starting at $50,000. $219,900. ML252324. Nicki Reed 360-582-7757 Platinum Real Estate & Development LLC Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES PROFESSIONAL WE’RE LOOKING FOR an Internet-savvy advertising sales professional. www.peninsuladailynews.com is the area’s number 1 website with over 600,000 impressions every month. This is a high-profile opportunity for you to showcase your strengths as a self-starter and make a real impact on our continued success by growing our online advertising. At least one year of proven experience selling advertising for a Web site preferred. Experience with online advertising plus demonstrated ability to generate sales through in-person, business-to-business sales are required. Strong selling and closing skills required. We will be providing competitive compensation -- base plus commission -- based on proven experience. Compensation based on experience and will include medical, dental, vision, 401K and more. Free parking and no tiring commute. We are family-focused, community-minded -- we are the main news provider for people in two counties on the North Olympic Peninsula. E-mail resume, with a detailed cover letter addressing our requirements (above) and your salary requirements plus three references, to suzanne.delaney@peninsuladailynews.com Please include “Digital Sales Professional” in the subject line. Many thanks.

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M A R G O R P R E S I D E S N

I S L A E D E N W O X O F T G

K R E D B N E W Y O R K N S I

E L E C T E D T S P L D T E A

© 2010 Universal Uclick

R Y E N R O T T A E I A S U P

E E L M I R A I I C T E Y G M

Solution: 10 letters

T K A P L T D M O A I L L N A

S R W U I S A U C R G D A I C

www.wonderword.com

E O S O E G R A C S A E N K I

H W N I A T S E B W N R A Y T

C T R Z S E N A T E T L T R S

T E I H O S T E D N S Y O R E

S N O R R I P E G D U J D A M

E W A R N E R B R O S A A L O

W C H I C A G O E M I T Y A D

12/15

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Analyst, Attorney, Best, Campaign, Case, Chicago, Court Show, CW Network, Daytime, Deals, Domestic, Elderly, Elected, Elmira, Fox Owned, Guest, Hosted, Judge Pirro, Larry King, Laws, Lead, Litigants, Magazine, Mike, News, New York, Paid, Presides, Program, Race, Red Eye, Senate, Series, Station, Syndicated, Today, Warner Bros., Westchester Yesterday’s Answer: British

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FINEK ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LULET (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Like some showers 36 Wingless parasites 37 Gulp from a flask 38 “Gross!” 41 Creature that “sees” using echolocation 42 Pulling one’s leg 43 Schoolyard argument retort 44 Controversial rocker Marilyn

Homes

3 Br., 2 bath, formal dining room, full basement, breakfast nook, 1.5 lot, new roof, separate 2 car garage. $245,000. 1410 E. 2nd St., P.A. 360-457-9740 ON-SITE SECURITY Swimming pool, golf course, club house, pool house. All new in 2008: 40 year roof, cedar fence, appliances, carport, floors, patio. New paint inside/out, new bath counters and toilets. Great wood burning fire place. 3rd Br. can be used as rec room - has counters, sink, cook top and fridge. $205,000. ML252067. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East P.A.: 3 Br., 1 bath, with rec room, 1,266 sf, built in 1972, concrete foundation, wood stove. Below assessed value, great deal at this price! Must see! $140,000 360-477-2334 PRIVATE COUNTRY ESTATE On 5 acres located in an exclusive gated community in Sequim. Expansive 2002 custom home with over 3,000 sf. Large 2 car attached garage and a nearly 2,000 sf 4 car detached garage perfect for your RV’s. $500,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 RARE OPPORTUNITY! New, mountain view home on one acre with no restrictions. Home features a great room concept with vaulted ceilings, kitchen with island and pantry, 3 Br. plus a den. 2 car attached garage. Just minutes from town. $205,000. ML252140/141264 Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

Homes

SHOW OFF Your business at this great location. Do the math! Central location plus high visibility plus high traffic count, equals opportunity. 12+ person office building. Furnished or unfurnished. Tons of parking. Owner financing possible. $388,000. ML252421. Dick Pilling Carroll Realty 457-1111 SPLIT LEVEL HOME Enjoy a leisurely stroll through neighborhood and wooded areas. 3 Br., 2.25 bath, multi-story, recently painted exterior and reroofed in 2008. Open style kitchen with island bar. Dining area and master Br. have access to wood deck. Living room wired for surround sound and has wood stove for cozy winter evenings. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND CONDO Wonderful community, great water views, open feeling throughout. 2 Br., 2 bath, 2 decks. End unit. $235,000. ML251669 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SUNLAND RAMBLER Affordable 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,176 sf home. Enjoy all the amenities Sunland Gold Community. With pool and tennis courts. $145,000. ML252281/149748 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. TERRIFIC MOUNTAIN VIEW 3 Br., 1.75 bath. Features attached 2 car garage, private rear yard with fire pit. Upgraded kitchen and heating system, 8x10 garden shed, water view, too. $188,000 ML250695/50368 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. Very nice 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,180 sf home located on the 9th fairway in Four Seasons Ranch. Nearly everything in this home has been updated from the siding down to the floor coverings. Circular driveway, 2 car attached garage, covered R.V. parking, great fenced in backyard with lots of gardening space, small outbuildings/ shops, private deck and more. $229,900. ML252074/137506 Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

45 Old Persian rulers 46 Heracles’ beloved 47 Klutz 50 Gearshift letters 51 Heads, to Henri 53 Partner of yin 56 __-tzu 57 Pasta ending 58 Native of Nigeria 59 Prohibit 60 “Gloria in Excelsis __”

51

Homes

WATER VIEW WOW Hard to find water view rambler in convenient location. 3 Br., 1.75 baths, hardwood floors, updated kitchen and baths. Right across the street from ONP headquarters means miles of trails and quiet await you. $259,000 ML251992/131494 Jennifer Holcomb 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. WATER VIEW! Better than partial water view from this 2 Br. bungalow! Wood fireplace, vinyl windows, large fenced backyard with covered porch. $135,000. ML252403. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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Manufactured Homes

LOTS OF UPGRADES You’ll be happy with the many upgrades in this cozy 3 Br., 2 bath mobile home; fresh paint, newer counter tops and laminate floors and new roof. Oversized master, new exterior paint plus outside storage. 55+ park. $52,950. ML251807. Jo Cummins Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 460-7725

53

Open House

WOW! Best offer over $230,000 by 12/31. 2,250 sf home 3-5 Br., 3 bath. Gar, new windows, 1/2A Owner 452-1919 1515 Butler St., P.A. Sunday 2-4.

54

Lots/ Acreage

AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE Best buy in Solana! Just shy of a half acre, this parcel features Sequim’s most sought after views including Protection Island, Sequim Bay, Mt. Baker and the Cascades. Gently sloped with covenants protecting your view. The most view for the money of any property on the market in Sequim today. Neighborhood ammenities include a convenient in-town location, tons of open space with walking paths, a clubhouse with a pool, and much more. $129,950. ML252407 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company

54

LAMAMM

DOBOLY Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: HE Yesterday’s

CARLSBORG: 1 acre lot, mtn. view, flat, PUD water, power, phone. $49,500. 681-3992 LAKE CRESCENT AREA ACREAGE This 4.86 acres is just 5 minutes from Lake Crescent Lodge. A nature lover’s paradise, with “Olympic National Park” as your backdrop. Outstanding area of very private homes. Level to slightly sloped property with cleared home site. $125,000. ML250021. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY ROOM TO ROAM This great property is perfect for a new home and you’ll have room to roam on 3.79 acres. Close to town but not too close. The parcel is fenced to keep the livestock inside. It is lightly treed and mostly level. Power and water are already installed and ready for hook up. A new engineered septic system would be required for residential use. The existing storage structures need building permits so the parcel is offered for sale as land only. The seller may carry for a qualified buyer with a good down payment. Seller is anxious. Submit your offer. $150,000. ML252352. Barclay Jennings 360-417-8581 JACE The Real Estate Company

Commercial

DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION Own a piece of P.T. history. High viability/potential. 1 block south of Thomas Street roundabout, 3,800 sf, circa 1920s, R3 zoning. $235,000 360-385-7653

64

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., no smoke, new carp. $650. 457-8438. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Hilltop Ridge Apts. 1914 S. Pine, P.A. 457-5322 P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. $560. Now accepting pets. 4020 Newell Rd. 360-452-4524. P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244 P.A.: Really large 2 Br., 1 ba., $625, 1st, last. No pets. 452-1234.

63

Duplexes

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

Houses

peninsula dailynews.com

Houses

64

Houses

Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006.

SEQUIM: Downtown, small 1 Br. $525, 1st, last dep., no dogs. 460-0096

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

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P.A. APTS & HOUSES H 1 br 1 ba......$575 A 1 br 1 ba......$600 A 2 br 1 ba......$650 H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba......$850 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 SEQ APTS/HOUSES H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1100 H 3 br 3 ba....$1350

P.A.: Share my house. Own room and bath, furnished, laundry, near college, nonsmoker, no pets. Prefer female 35 - 55 yrs. But call, we will talk. $400 plus 1/2 ult. Mike 452-9685.

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

ONE MONTH FREE RENT with 12 mo. lease! Neat/clean 2 Br. mfd home, Sequim, in town. W/S/G, W/D inc. New upgrades $625. 360-582-1862 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $685 mo., $700 dep. 460-5290. P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, laundry room, liv/fam/din rms, gar., 5 ac., view, 3.5 mi. Mt. Pleasant Rd., quiet, no smoking. $900. 452-0415. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $1,100. 452-1395. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Newer 3 Br., 3 bath. Neighborhood, location, garage, yard, weatherized. No smoking/pets $950 mo. 452-9458.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

Room W/Private Bath for Rent in Puyallup. $500. per month requires $500. deposit. If you work in Pierce or King County and need a place to live. You will have access to separate living room and only share the kitchen and laundry room. This is a nonsmoking, drug free environment. Furnished or unfurnished. Very quiet and private home. Available 1/1/2011 call 360-809-3603 for more information.

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Spaces RV/ Mobile

RV SPACES: $375 mo., incl. W/S/G, WiFi, Cable. 461-6672. WEST JOYCE: 2.5 ac. Close to Lyre River. $200 plus groundskeeping. W/S/G incl. 206-784-8239

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Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P.A.: Small 1 Br., water view, W/D, near Albertsons. $575 mo., dep. 452-8092. PALO ALTO: Rustic cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307.

Beautifully furnished 1 bd, 1 ba home with carport on 5 quiet acres, e. of PA. 180 degree marine views. $850/month incl cable TV/Internet, and $110/month electricity credit. No pets. 360-452-9471. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, 606 S. Laurel, references required. $700. 457-6600. CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL

(Answers tomorrow) EIGHT JITNEY MIDDAY Jumbles: MADAM Answer: How she felt when the plane bounced around in the storm — “AGITATED”

Lots/ Acreage

ADORNED BY FOLIAGE 5 acres cleared, level and ready for a home, pasture, barn, garage, whatever you need! End of the road setting with creek access and No CC&R’s. $150,000. Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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THE

Great view, central P.A. 119 Fogarty. 3 bd, 1.5 bath. Credit/refs. Occupied, don't knock. 805-448-7273

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 SEQUIM AREA BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN-BUILT FARMHOUSE 4 Br., 2 ba, modern kit., fplc., sun rm., gar., fenced yard. Bright and spacious. No smoking or pets. $1350 plus dep. Call 360-3874911 for appt. to view. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, clean, quiet, garage, credit ck, no smoking/pets. $995 mo, last, dep. 683-0123. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

72

Furniture

Antique Steamer Trunk. Refinished steamer type trunkrounded top. Completely refinished, great shape. 36 X 24. Photos by request. $150/obo. 379-9520.

New Medical Office space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

97315731

SANTA’S CLOSING COSTS With an offer accepted in December, buyer qualifies for a 2% credit for closing costs. Beautifully remodeled 4 Br. home with all the character of the old days combined with the convenience and style of today. The updated kitchen is awesome. The accessory building is a bonus to use as an office, fitness room, or your own personal timeout room. $280,000. ML250181. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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12/15/10

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

ACROSS 1 2007 Oscar winner (Best Original Screenplay) about a pregnant teenager 5 Greenish-blue 9 Astronaut’s thumbs-ups 13 “Gimme __”: “Be right with you” 14 Turn one’s nose up at 15 __ the fat 16 Words of protest 19 High nest 20 Very capable 21 King’s memorable words 26 Sound during a massage 27 Do a goalkeeper’s job 28 Island in the French West Indies, familiarly 30 Hockey great 31 Elect 33 Lennon’s last album released before his death 39 Uses a LaserJet 40 “Oh, what a tangled __ we weave”: Scott 42 Island nation west of Haiti 45 Mineral used in glassmaking 48 “... man __ mouse?” 49 Pensive state 52 Nairobi is its capital 54 Kingdom 55 Sports psychologist’s mantra ... or what can be said about the last word of 16-, 21-, 33- or 49-Across 61 Time for lunch 62 Machu Picchu’s range 63 Theater honor 64 Instrument in a Chinese temple 65 Makes slick, in a way 66 Letters at the end of a love letter

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010


C6

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

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Furniture

BED: Sealy Backsaver, full matt/ box, metal headboard, footboard, frame, great shape. $300/obo. 681-3299. COFFEE TABLES: 2 matching, 1 large, $50/obo and 1 small, $40/obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. DESK: Lg. solid oak, 5’x2.5’, 6 drawer, good condition. $250. 683-9670. DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $150/ obo. 681-4429 or 417-7685. DINING TABLE: With 6 chairs, good condition, light oak. $125. 360-461-1767 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOFT BED: Metal, desk & shelf. $100/ obo. 415-420-5809. LOUNGE CHAIRS: (2) matching swivel rockers. 1 never used, 1 used 1 month, light gold fabric, $100 each or both for $175/obo. 360-683-4898 MATTRESS: Simmons Beauty Rest king size mattress set. $250. 452-5813. MISC: Antiques: 1950s cherry dining set, $300 and buffet, $200, both $400. Ludwig upright piano, $500. Blue/ cream love seat, $250. 2 gold wing chairs, $45 ea. Oak dresser, $195. Modern: Oak dining table, 4 chairs, $395. Side-by-side Maytag frige/freeze, $250. 360-437-9297 MISC: Lg. 2 piece china hutch, top section 5’ wide with lighted glass shelves, bottom section 6’ wide, $400. Electric lift chair, like new, neutral color, $350. Rocker/recliner, almost new, light blue/gray, $150. Wheelchair, $100. 683-8202 MISC: Wingback recliner, like new, rust red color, $225. Antique Stickley twin size wood bed frame, $150. Antique upright piano, $550. Antique child’s school desk, metal and wood, $110. Small 3 drawer dresser, $40. 4 panel privacy screen, $45. Metal baker’s rack, $45. Oak mirror, $40. 4’ wall mirror, $10. 1947 Packard Bell record/radio, $75. 360-683-1851 RECLINER: Brown leather recliner, like new, excellent condition, a chair lover’s delight! $450. 681-0477. SOFA: Dual recliner, new cond., beige. $395. 477-2022.

73

General Merchandise

AIR COMPRESSOR Brand new Speedaire, 3 phase, 60 gal. tank. $800/obo. 417-5583. BATH CHAIR: Goes down at the press of a button, and comes up at the press of a button when you’re ready to get out of the tub. $650. 360-681-0942 CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504 FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: White fir. $125 cord. 360-808-1958 GAS STOVE: Hampton gas stove with pad and vent kit. $300/obo. 452-6318, 775-0831 GENERATOR: Winco 3 KW, 1,800 rpm, well built. $400/obo. 417-5583

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

General Merchandise

HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439. MISC: Drew dining set, table, 8 chairs, china hutch, credenza buffet, $1,000. Sportsart recumbent bike, $350. DuncanPhyfe table, $200. 2 lg. chest of drawers, $75 ea. Antique needle point chair with stool, $100. Retro bar, $50. Glass/brass shelf, 2 end tables, $150. All OBO. 477-4785 MISC: Pride Revo Mobility Scooter, not used, excellent condition, paid $3,000, sell for $1,300. Lift chair, good shape, paid $1,000, sell for $300. Walkers, $25. 461-4861, 417-5078 MISC: Ramps, $80. Mantis, $100. 4 ton Port-A-Pac, $80. High lift jack, $30. 360-808-6929 MISC: Spinet Piano, blonde finish, French & Sons $260. 9’ Ocean Kayak Frenzy, seat w/backrest & knee braces exc. cond. $375 Clown painting measures 97” x 41” $100. No delivery, must haul. 360-582-9488 MISC: Women’s Next beach bike with basket, like new, $30. RCA TV 27” with dual player, entertainment center with glass doors, beautiful condition, all $300. 417-0619. OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR Inogen ONE portable oxygen concentrator, runs on batteries and is approved for use on airlines, paid $4,800 new. Asking $950. Includes 3 batteries/variable output, charger, adapter for plugging into outlets, adapter for charging/running via car cigarette lighter. 582-0022. SCOOTERS/TREADMILL-2 PACESAVER SCOOTERS $950 each (battery chargers included), WESLO FOLDUP TREADMILL with wheels $150, all like new. 457-4837. SEAHAWKS VS RAMS January 2. 2 tickets. $156 both. 360-461-3661 SEASONED FIREWOOD $200 cord. 360-670-1163 SOFA BED: Reddish brown, great condition. $100/obo. 683-9194 UPHOLSTERY: Equipment and supplies. $1,500. 452-7743. VACUUM: Rainbow SE plus accessories and rug shampooer. $450. 670-6230.

74

Home Electronics

CHRISTMAS COMPUTERS Cheap, reliable, guaranteed. 683-9394. DISH 500 SYSTEM Dish SD-PVR, smart card and remote. $175/obo. 683-4898. HOME THEATER Sony, Blue Ray/DVD, 5 speakers, woofer, new, never opened box, makes great gift. $200/obo. 360-620-2366

75

Musical

ANTIQUE PIANO Excellent condition. $800. 452-5876. Give the gift of music. Guitar instruction by Brian Douglas. 360-531-3468 GUITAR: 1968 Gibson Les Paul Gold Top. Serious inquiries only. $12,000. 360-681-8023 MISC: Sofa blue print, excellent condition, $100. Dark wood hutch, $50. Single headboard, $10. Dark wood desk with chair, $25. 452-5876.

76

Sporting Goods

6.8 SPCII unfired M4 AR-15 with accessories, private sale. $800. 460-7628. FLY RODS: 2 bamboo with extras. $450. 360-301-4721 MISC: Colt gov’t 1911 45 ACP, SS, full custom, $1,150. Mossberg 500 12GA, blk synthetic stock, 18” bbl and 28” vent rib, $200. 360-683-1790 RECUMBENT BICYCLE: Sun Sport CX. $475. 452-9302. US Arms Abilene 45 Colt, rare. $650. 681-0814.

77

Bargain Box

TIRES: Studded snow, 175 SR 14. $40. 417-1593.

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

CHRISTMAS Sale: Thurs.-Sat., 9-5 p.m. Free tree boughs, buy $100 worth of items, get 10 lb. free beef. 1 package per customer. Biggest sale I’ve ever had! Hundreds of repossessed items, tools, drill press, wood stove, antiques, fishing gear, mix and match $.25 per lb. Cant get it all under cover. 3633 Old Olympic Hwy. No earlies.

79

Wanted To Buy

1ST AT BUYING FIREARMS Cash for the Holidays. Old or new, rifles, shotguns, and pistols. 1 or whole collection. Please call, I will bring cash today. WA State Firearms Transfer paperwork available. 681-4218. BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Cemetery niche/plot (for infant) in any of the 3 local cemeteries. 417-7009, msg.

WANTED: Donation of artificial Christmas trees for fundraising Christmas party. Leave message at 417-3555 WANTED: Sail boat trailer. For 27’ keel boat that weighs 2,300 pounds. 360-379-6960 WANTED: Slot machine in good condition. Cash paid. Call 681-4218. WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092. WANTED: Would like to purchase young male parakeet. Excellent home with three other male ‘keets. Please call 457-8385

82

Pets

Puppies: Lhasa Apso, ready now for Christmas, adorable. $400 ea. 477-2115. PUPPIES: Schipperke/Jack Russel, ready for Christmas. $100. 808-5948. PUPPIES: Schipperke/Jack Russel, ready for Christmas. $100. 808-5948. PUPPIES: Yorkshire Terriers. Darling, excellent health background, companion only. Prices start at $700. olympichollyhill.com 461-9121 Purebred Miniature poodle pups both male excellent dispositions, 1 cafe au lait, 1 black. 6 weeks on 12/13. Crate trained and 1st set of shots. 461-4576. SHIH-TZU: 3 mo. old male, vet checked, shots. $300 firm. 582-9382 Toy Aussie Pups. One male blue merle and one female black tri pup. Tails are docked, dew claws removed, 1st shots, wormed, vet checked. Just in time for Christmas! $450. Call 360-374-5151. WANTED: St. Bernard or Mt. dog stud by Dec. 15. 683-7001. Yorkshire Terrier male, 20 mos. old. Friendly, outgoing temperament. He’s been neutered, had his shots, is papertrained. Weighs 8 lbs. $350. Please ask for Debbie: 360-6832732, 360-775-4255.

83

Farm Animals

ALFALFA GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn. 683-5817. 81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Hay & butcher beef. Grass round bales, cow quality. Cubes horse, $4.25 bale. Grain fed angus butcher beef. By the lb. Quarters available. Ready by Dec 10th. $5 lb & up. Rnd bales $25 & up. 360-457-3900

82

Pets

(2) male neutered Chihuahuas to good home ASAP. Honda, 3 yrs at $250. Harley, 4 yrs at $150. Very loveable, smart, and obedient. $350 for both. Work load forces change. Leave msg for Amber. 670-5676. AKC Champion Sired Black Lab Puppies. 8 wks., wormed, 1st set of shots. $450. 912-2785 AKC Registered MiniSchnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. 360-460-7119 Beautiful tiny female Yorkshire Terrier 7 months old. She has had all her shots and comes from Ch bloodlines. Will be 4 lbs full grown. Wonderful lapdog and will do great in a family with another small dog or dogs for companionship. $800. 360-452-3016 CAGE: One very large wire cage free standing for birds, rabbits or ?. $15 you haul or we will haul with gas money included. 681-4429 eves or 417-7685 weekdays. CHIHUAHUA PUPS 1 female, $200. 2 males, $175 ea. 683-6597 CHRISTMAS AKC GOLDEN PUPS Pedigreed. Loving and steadfast, blonde, loving little faces! Paper trained, Ready Christmas Eve, prefer Jan. 6. $550. 681-3390 or 775-4582 evenings. FREE: To good home. 3 year old neutered male Terrier mix. References required. 360-457-8667 KITTENS! 3 sweet male black/gray tabby kittens, 10 weeks old. $10 ea. 417-3906 MISC: Mini pinto mare and stud, $250 and $350. Corn snakes and tank, $150. Parrot cages, $100$350. 457-9775. Old English Sheepdog Puppies. Purebred, non-papered, DOB Oct 2, very socialized, very smart, playful, adorable fluff balls. Both parents on site. 3 males $300 ea., 3 females $350 ea. 360-775-4182. PUPPIES: Holiday Hunt Terriers, 1 male, 1 female, cute, registered, shots. Ready now. $400 ea. 582-9006 PUPPIES: Lhasa Apso Purebred Puppies. 2 boys left, 12 weeks old. Potty pad trained & working with doggie door. Comes with starter pack. $300. 360-774-1430

GRASS HAY $5 per bale 460-4294 GRASS HAY No rain, $5 bale. 457-8704, 460-6847 GRASS HAY: Excellent local orchard grass. $9 bale. 460-0085 HAY: Local good grass horse hay, $5 bale. 683-4427. Weaner pigs, 12 weeks, $65. Soy sheep, excellent meat, $100-$350. Goats, $100-$175. Turkeys, $30-$45. Chickens, different ages, $15-$18. All can be live or butchered. Call John 681-4191, 360-6703579

93

Marine

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us ALUMALITE: Drift boat, very clean, great bottom, oars, trailer included. $3,200, make offer. Must sell due to health. 681-0717. BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles. LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. OLYMPIC: ‘94 22’ Resorter. Alaska bulkhead, ‘06 225 Merc Optimax. ‘07 9.9 4 cycle Merc Bigfoot. Large fishing deck, solid and fast. 84 gal. fuel. $14,500/ obo. 683-4062 or 530-412-0854

SADDLE: 16” men’s, heavy, Tex-Tan. $250. 681-7270.

RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480

85

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711.

WEANER PIGS:, 7 week Duroc-York and Duroc-Berkshire cross. Winter price. $55 each. 775-6552.

84

Horses/ Tack

Farm Equipment

TRACK LOADER: ‘06 Bobcat T300. Heat and A/C, contact me for details and pics. tterfuu7@msn.com 425-671-0192

SAIL BOAT: 1932 42’ Frank Prothero fishing scooner, 50 hp Isuzu diesel, Paragon gear, solid construction, needs TLC. $3,000. 360-468-2052 SAIL BOAT: 1940 34’ Rhodes 6 meter cruising sloop, heavy construction. $2,500. 360-468-2052

94

Motorcycles

94

Motorcycles

MISC: Honda ‘01 XR50R, exc. cond., $850. Kaw ‘93 KX80, big wheel, very clean $950. 452-9194.

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 Western Star. 3406E, 500 hp, does not use oil, no leaks, good Dyno report, cruise, air, jakes, air ride cab, power mirrors/ windows, new 16’ box and wet kit, and hitch for pup, exc. inside/out, all new brakes. $42,000/ trade. 460-8325.

FORD: ‘64 Ford 350. Dump Truck. Truck runs great! Recent upgrades such as: Rebuilt 312Y-Block, New Clutch, Battery & Hydraulic Brakes. 2 Speed Browning Manual High & Low Transmission Alternator Conversion Scale weight is 4,470 Gross weight 10k $1,900/obo. Please contact Mark at 850- 890-2783. GN 33’ FLAT-BED EQ TRAILER. $4,900. Like-new, 25ft deck includes 5ft flip-over loading ramps with pop-up center for a flat deck. 14,000 lbs GVWR. MSRP $7,990. 808-5636, b6942@hotmail.com SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

BMW: ‘94 K1100RS. Exceptionally clean bike, 41,000 miles, ABS brakes, 4 cylinder engine, stainless steel exhaust, Corbin seat, saddlebags, no road-rash, blue paint. For information call Ed. 360-681-2334 HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020. Harley Davidson 1993 Wideglide, custom wheels, lots of extras. $15,000. 477-3670 HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153. HONDA: ‘99 XR400. All stock, low hrs., good tires, new graphics. $1,700. 461-1202 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973.

95

Recreational Vehicles

MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512

QAUD: ‘05 POLARIS PHEONIX 200. Red, automatic, approx. 5-10 riding hours, Like new $2,300. 360-460-5982 QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bonaville. 1,000 mi., extras. $5,500. 460-6780 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

5TH WHEEL: '01 36' Cardinal by Forrest River. Fully equipped home. 3 slides, 3 axles, 2 AC, Trailaire pin box, hydraulic brakes, Alum rims. Retail $35,000 asking $26,000 w/ or w/o tow vehicle. 582-0803 5TH WHEEL: ‘02. 32’ Alpenlite. 2 slides, solar panel, gas and elec., Dish TV setup, stablilizer jacks, very good condition. Paid $65,000 new. $18,000. 457-1329. CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426.

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $8,900. 797-1625

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148

TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177.

96

Parts/ Accessories

Chevy Transmissions. 1969 Powerglide + Turbo 350, $125 each. 1970 Turbo 400, $175. 360-452-9876 RIMS: 5 excellent condition Jeep Rubicon wheels, 17”, 5x5 bolt. $300. 360-797-3571 SNOW TIRES: (4) mounted 205/70/14 Toyo studless, 80% tread. $300. 683-9294 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $1,000 for all, will separate. 683-7789 TIRES: (4) Michelin 255-65R-16. Very good condition. Off Mercedes SUV. $120. 681-4218.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CADILLAC ‘02 ESCALADE ALL WD Only 73,000 miles and loaded, including 6.0 liter V8 with cold air intake, and super charger, auto, dual air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, and dual power heated seats, leather interior, 3rd row seating, power moonroof, OnStar, Bose, AM/FM CD stacker and cassette, 4 wheel ABS and electronic traction and stability control, front and side airbags, running boards, tow package, 22” custom wheels and more! Expires 1218-2010. $17,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEV: ‘02 Club Cab. Long bed. 4WD. Loaded. 44,000 mi., $15,500. 452-8713.

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056. FORD: ‘00 F150. 5.4L, V8, 4WD, ext. cab, excellent cond., 187K. $4,000/obo. 461-3980, 477-6610

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 FORD: ‘96 Explorer. Good condition, ‘302’, AWD. $3,000. 683-7192, 460-9523 FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GET READY FOR WINTER All WD, great in snow, ‘99 Oldsmobile Bravada. Leather, loaded, 129K, exc. cond. $6,299. 928-2181, 461-6273 GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401. HONDA ‘07 CRV ALL WD SPORT UTILITY 2.4 liter 4 cylinder iVTEC, auto, alloys, sunroof, privacy glass, power windows, locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, 6 CD MP3 stereo, information center, dual front, side impact and side curtain airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $20,905! Only 45,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $19,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com. ISUZU: ‘98 Rodeo. Loaded, new tires, good condition, must see. $3,500. 457-3327 or 457-7766 MERCURY ‘07 MARINER PREMIER ALL WD 3.0 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD changer with Audiophile audio, power windows, locks, and seat, keyless entry, leather/cloth interior, heated seats, alloy wheels, privacy glass, luggage rack, side airbags, back sensors, 59,000 miles, beautiful 1owner corporate lease return, spotless Carfax. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV/GMC: (3) 19491950, projects and spare parts. $2,400 all. 457-9329. CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139 CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097 CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210.

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876 DODGE ‘07 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, alloy wheels, privacy glass, roof rack, keyless entry, power windows, locks, and mirrors, dual power sliding doors, power rear hatch, power heated leather seats, rear captains chairs, front and rear stown-go, automatic climate control, rear air conditioning, cruise, tilt, DVD video system, CD/cassette stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $19,215! Only 37,000 miles! Carfax certified one owner, no accidents! This Grand Caravan is loaded with all the options! Stop by Gray Motors today! $13,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE ‘10 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 3.8 liter V6, auto, dual air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, dual power sliding doors, power adjustable 7 passenger with stow and go seating, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 26,000 miles, balance of factory warranty, non-smoker, spotless Carfax. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

FORD: '83 F-150. XLT EXT CAB, 351 manual, auxiliary fuel tank. Well maintained, runs great, canopy, tow package. $950. Call 457-1491 after 6:00 p.m. FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655. FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER • 2ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER • Bargain BoxAds will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & • Private parties only Tuesdays • 4 lines,2 days • No firewood or lumber • No pets or livestock • No Garage Sales

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Name Address Phone No. MOTORHOME: ‘02 37' Newmar Kountry Star. Cummins diesel on freightliner chassis, 2 slideouts, Allison transmission. auto tracking satellite dish, new tires, new washer/dryer, 59,000 miles. $67,500 360-301-5735

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HOMELAWN/YARD SERVICES CAREROOFING

TRACTOR

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C8

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘97 Ranger. Runs good. $1,200. 461-6319 FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839.

GM: ’92 Gladiator conversion van. 350, auto, 140K, runs/ looks good! $3,500. 452-5522

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 MAZDA: ‘86 B2000, 5 sp, canopy, bed liner. $700/obo. 460-7974. MAZDA: ‘88 B2200. Runs good. $1,000/ obo. 582-7486. NISSAN ‘95 SE KING CAB PICKUP 3.0 liter V6, 5 speed, alloy wheels, running boards, bedliner, tow ball, rear slider, power windows, locks, and mirrors, factory sunroof, CD stereo, cruise, tilt, air. Only 127,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Senior owned! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

Cars

CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440 CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 DODGE ‘04 NEON SXT 4 DOOR 4 cylinder, 5 speed, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, and mirrors, AM/FM CD, rear spoiler, alloy wheels, remote entry, and only 72,000 miles! Expires 12-18-2010. $4,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com FORD ‘03 MUSTANG COUPE Economical 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry, rear spoiler, alloy wheels, 83,000 miles, bright red, very clean sport coupe, spotless Carfax report. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

99

Cars

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. Buick: ‘90 Century Ltd. 64K, new tires/ batt/brakes/pump, all electric, tilt A/C 2.5 liter, auto. $950. 775-7048. BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038 CADILLAC: ’92 Sedan Deville. 144K, 4.9L, auto, runs/ looks good. $2,750/ obo. 452-5522. CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327 CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado Commemorative Edition. Excellent condition, spoke wheels, loaded, no rust, always garaged, beautiful blue, 30K miles on new motor; 112K total miles. $2,900. 360-477-4817 CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV ‘04 IMPALA Silver, power locks, windows, mirrors, sunroof, 6 cylinder, gray cloth. The original Buy Here Pay Here! Est. 1996. Offering military discounts with the lowest in house financing rates! $7,495 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 CHEV ‘06 COBALT 4 cylinder, auto, gray cloth interior, 111K. Lowest Buy Here Pay Here interest rates! Be approved in minutes! Lowest in house financing guaranteed! $6,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $6,500/obo. 775-1821 CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915

Cars

FORD: ‘01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430.

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619. HONDA ‘99 CIVIC VP 4 DOOR SEDAN 1.6 liter 4 cylinder, automatic, tinted windows, CD stereo, power door locks, tilt, air, dual front airbags, priced under Kelley Blue Book value! Only 127,000 miles! Immaculate condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

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FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542. HONDA: ‘85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702. HYUNDAI ‘06 TIBURON SE 2.7 liter V6, 6 speed manual, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and moonroof, leather/ cloth interior, rear spoiler, alloy wheels, fog lamps, side airbags, only 28,000 miles, near new local car, spotless Carfax, very cool orange crush color. $11,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204 MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387. MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $4,500/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385. MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062. MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828

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APPLICANT: WASHINGTON STATE DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION LOCATION: Front Street between Lincoln Street east to Golf Course Road Pertinent information may be reviewed at the City’s Department of Community & Economic Development, City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, prior to the hearing date. City Hall is accessible for persons with disabilities. Please let us know if you will need any special accommodations to attend the meeting. For further information contact Sue Roberds 417-4750 Pub: Dec. 15, 2010

Legals General

Cars

MERCEDES: ‘74 280. Runs well. $500. 683-2436

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NO. 10 4 01549 9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In Re the Estate of: DONALDSON H. GRAYBILL. Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney of record at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred., except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. DATE OF FILING: December 10, 2010 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 15, 2010 BRADLEY D. GRAYBILL Personal Representative ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Thomas F. McDonough Attorney at Law ADDRESS FOR MAILING 510 Bell Street Edmonds, WA 98020 (425) 778-8555 Pub: Dec. 15, 22, 29, 2010

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Cars

PORSCHE: ‘02 Boxter S. 56K miles, 6 spd, black on black. $19,500. 461-9635. PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965.

MINI COOPER: ‘05. White, 103,000 miles, Runs/drives great, no accidents, has had all scheduled tune-ups & oil changes, very clean interior, 2 new tires, highway miles, GREAT MPG. $9,995. Call Angela. 360-460-4802 NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $4,995 or make offer. 681-0717 OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PONTIAC: ‘97 Sunfire. Great condition. $3,000/obo. 582-3813

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959

TOYOTA: ‘03 Camry LE One owner, no accidents, well maintained, 4 cyl, auto trans, 95,000 mi. $7,250. 477-2183.

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CITY OF PORT ANGELES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the PORT ANGELES BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT will conduct a PUBLIC HEARING on JANUARY 3, 2011, to consider a request to permit a VARIANCE FROM THE CITY’S NOISE STANDARDS to allow construction work to continue between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. in the to allow repair/maintenance work to be performed on Front Street when the least traffic is present. The Board meeting will begin at 6 P.M., or as soon thereafter as possible, at City Hall, 321 East Fifth Street, Port Angeles, Washington. Verbal testimony is encouraged at the public hearing. Work will begin during the summer 2011 and will take approximately 85 working days. Paving work will occur in late summer, with signal and sidewalk work continuing until early winter.

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FORD: 1929 Model “A�. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

MERCEDES: ‘29 Replica Gazelle. 10K miles, immaculate. $12,500/obo. 681-3339

NISSAN: ‘87 pickup. 4 cyl, 5 spd. $1,250. 683-7516 PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Cars

SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909 SUZUKI: ‘00 Grand Vitara. Exc. cond., 87K mi., very clean. $3,950. 775-1132. Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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Case No.: 10-4-00331-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM L. CAMPBELL, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative's lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(i)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent's probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: December 15, 2010 Deborah J. Palmer Personal Representative Lawyer for estate: Robert N. Tulloch, WSBA #9436 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Dec. 15, 22, 29, 2010

File No.: 7037.07936 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000513905 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 2, BK. 39, K/1 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2, Block 39, Norman R. Smith's Subdivision of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume K of Plats, Page 1, records of said County; except the East 10 feet of the North half of said Lot 2; also except that portion conveyed to June Price by deed recorded September 9, 1999 under Auditor's File no. 1999-1035736, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2, said point also being the True Point of Beginning; thence North 33 degrees 22'22" East, along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'00" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 34 degrees 39'57" West, a distance of 25.11 feet; thence South 32 degrees 14'08" West, a distance of 33.74 feet to the South line of said Lot 2; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, along said South line of said Lot 2, a distance of 9.90 feet to the True Point of Beginning; also except that portion conveyed to Bonnie A. Fidler, individually and as Personal Representative of the Estate of Clarence H. Fidler, by deed recorded September 9, 1999, under Clallam County Auditor's File no. 1999-1035737, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 2; thence North 32 degrees 22'22" East along the East line of said Lot 2, a distance of 58.84 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence continuing North 32 degrees 22'22" East, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence North 56 degrees 38'03" West, a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 33 degrees 22'22" West, a distance of 11.15 feet; thence South 56 degrees 38'00" East, a distance of 10.00 feet to the True Point of beginning. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 734 GEORGIANA ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/07/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217530, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254561. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $6,399.60 Late Charges $277.32 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $6,842.92 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $603.79 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,358.53 Total Amount Due: $8,201.45 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $143,020.87, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John W. Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/19/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/19/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07936) 1002.163454-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

TOYOTA: ‘89 Camry. $1,200. 928-9774.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. Loan No: 7432407245 APN: 04-30-24-500055 TS No: WA-219665-C I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LSI Title Agency, Inc., the undersigned Trustee will on 12/27/2010, at 10:00 AM at The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, Washington sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 6, PALO VERDE VISTA, AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 7 OF PLATS, PAGE 46, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/25/2000, recorded 11/3/2000, under Auditor's File No. 2000 1054779, in Book , Page records of Clallam County, Washington, from JANICE M. PELTIER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE COMPANY OF KITSAP COUNTY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of LOANCITY.COM, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by LOANCITY.COM to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RAMP 2004SL3 BY: RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY, LLC, FKA RESIDENTIAL FUNDING CORPORATION, AS ITS ATTORNEY-IN-FACT. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: PAYMENT INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO.PMT 2 AMOUNT $876.23 TOTAL $1,752.46 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/21/2010 NO.PMT 3 AMOUNT $888.17 TOTAL $2,664.51 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION FROM 5/1/2010 THRU 6/30/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 2 TOTAL $77.34 FROM 7/1/2010 THRU 9/21/2010 NO. LATE CHARGES 3 TOTAL $116.01 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: 10/25/2000 Note Amount: $132,000.00 Interest Paid To: 4/1/2010 Next Due Date: 5/1/2010 IV. The amount to cure defaulted payments as of the date of this notice is $7,949.20. Payments and late charges may continue to accrue and additional advances to your loan may be made, it is necessary to contact the beneficiary prior to the time you tender the reinstatement amount so that you may be advised of the exact amount you would be required to pay. As of the dated date of this document the required amount to payoff the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $124,525.53 (note: due to interest, late charges and other charges that may vary after the date of this notice, the amount due for actual loan payoff may be greater). The principal sum of $118,153.73, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/27/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/16/2010, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier's or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): JANICE M. PELTIER, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 JANICE M. PELTIER 921 WEST OAK COURT SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 8/17/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED: 9/21/2010 LSI Title Agency, Inc. 1111 Main St., #200 Vancouver, WA 98660 Sale Line:: 714-730-2727 Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3746722 11/24/2010, 12/15/2010 Pub.: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010 File No.: 7037.07937 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-526584 Abbreviated Legal: Lts. 27 & 28, Bk. 65, PSCC Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 27 and 28, Block 65, Puget Sound Cooperative Colony's Subdivision of Suburban Lot 23 of the Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 1, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Commonly known as: 517 E 4TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/18/08, recorded on 06/20/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1222877, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254251. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $10,658.94 Late Charges $448.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $11,273.32 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,513.54 Total Amount Due: $12,786.86 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $223,461.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07937) 1002.163230-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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File No.: 7037.17601 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance LLC Grantee: Lance Kuesener, Jr. and Stacy A. Kusener, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 05-30-10-500126/500154 Abbreviated Legal: LTS 15-17, & 32-34, ALL BLK 1 UNION PACIFIC ADDN 1/67 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lots 15, 16, 17, inclusive and Lots 32, 33, 34, inclusive in Block 1 of Union Pacific Addition, as recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 67, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/15/08, recorded on 02/22/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1216561, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Stacy A. Kusener and Lance H. Kusener, Jr, wife and husband, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., a Delaware Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Chase Home Finance LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2009-1231028. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/17/2010 Monthly Payments $18,691.34 Late Charges $754.25 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,668.65 Total Arrearage $21,114.24 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Recording Costs $62.00 Total Costs $534.50 Total Amount Due: $21,648.74 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $101,444.29, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Stacy A. Kusener 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Lance H. Kusener, Jr 41 Largent Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/07/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/08/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/17/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.17601) 1002.107281-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010 File No.: 7886.22596 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PNC Bank, National Association sbm National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank Grantee: Janet L. Segel, as her separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 04-30-20-410050 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel "A" of Survey recorded February 24, 1993 in Volume 26 of Surveys on Page 59 under Recording No. 682595, being a portion of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter and of the Northeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter, all in Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More accurately described as: Parcel "A" of boundary line adjustment survey recorded February 24, 1993 in Volume 26 of surveys, page 59, under Clallam County Recording No. 682595, being a portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 20, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Together with an easement for ingress, egress and utilities as disclosed by Clallam County Auditor's File No. 477369. Commonly known as: 203 Some Day Way aka 151 Some Day Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/24/07, recorded on 04/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007 1200393, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Janet Segle a single person, as Grantor, to Old Republic Title, Ltd., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/15/2010 Monthly Payments $44,805.99 Late Charges $2,122.38 Lender's Fees & Costs $371.00 Total Arrearage $47,299.37 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $475.00 Title Report $947.42 Statutory Mailings $28.68 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,536.10 Total Amount Due: $48,835.47 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $373,062.91, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Janet Segle 203 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 Janet Segle 18 Tripp Road Sequim, WA 98382 Janet Segle 151 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 203 Some Day Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 18 Tripp Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janet Segle 151 Some Day Way SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/10/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/15/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7886.22596) 1002.166140-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. APN: 042902-119020 TS No: WA-08-200457-SH I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 1/14/2011, at 10:00 AM, The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 2 OF RUBINO SHORT PLAT RECORDED JULY 15,1980 IN VOLUME 8 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 78, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 509589, BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL 3 OF SURVEY RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 8, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR'S FILE NO. 449420, BEING A PORTION OF THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 29 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Commonly known as: 73 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/17/2005, recorded 10/21/2005, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1167874, in Book -, Page -, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from DOUGLAS B HAWES, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, (only if current beneficiary different from original beneficiary)the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. to MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $124,970.97 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $511,144.49, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/14/2011. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/3/2011(11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/3/2011(11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1/3/2011(11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): DOUGLAS B HAWES, A MARRIED MAN 73 WAGGLER WAY SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail on 9/18/2008, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. T.S. No.: WA-08-200457-SH Dated: 10/11/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp of Washington, as Trustee By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary For Non-Sale, Payoff and Reinstatement info Quality Loan Service Corp of Washington 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com For Service of Process on Trustee: Quality Loan Service Corp., of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE Suite N-20 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 ASAP# 3769301 12/15/2010, 01/05/2011 Pub.: Dec. 15, 2010, Jan. 5, 2011 File No.: 7037.07935 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Chase Home Finance, LLC Grantee: John W. Rickenbacher, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: Abbreviated Legal: LT. 8, BK. 91, TPA 1/27 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 8, Block 91, Townsite of Port Angeles, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 27, records of Clallam County, Washington Commonly known as: 126 W 5TH ST PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/06/08, recorded on 03/11/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1217531, records of Clallam County, Washington, from John W. Rickenbacher, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc solely as nominee for American Mortgage Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc to Chase Home Finance, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1254253. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/21/2010 Monthly Payments $7,161.24 Late Charges $307.20 Lender's Fees & Costs $166.00 Total Arrearage $7,634.44 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.46 Statutory Mailings $48.24 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,379.20 Total Amount Due: $9,013.64 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $158,422.89, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 126 West 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 121 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 517 East 4th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 734 Georgiana Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Rickenbacher 725 East 5th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/15/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/15/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/21/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.07935) 1002.163195-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. APN: 07-30-06-220150 TS #: WA-10-368488-SH I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 12/27/2010, at 10:00 am at THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 223 EAST 4TH ST., PORT ANGELES, WA sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier's check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 5 AND THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4 IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT THE SOUTH 330 FEET OF THE EAST 396 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID GOVERNMENT LOT 5; AND THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF OF GOVERNMENT LOT 3 IN SAID SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING WESTERLY OF COUNTY ROAD KNOWN AS FRESHWATER BAY ROAD. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. TAX ID: 073006220150 Commonly known as: 505 FRESHWATER BAY ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/14/2008, recorded 3/24/2008, under Auditor's File No. 20081218152, in Book xxx, Page xxx, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from TAMBER MEYER AND JASON MEYER, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FRANKLIN AMERICAN MORTGAGE COMPANY A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FRANKLIN AMERICAN MORTGAGE COMPANY A CORPORATION to Wells Fargo Bank, NA.. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower's or Grantor's default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $65,534.35 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $406,463.84, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 12/1/2008, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The abovedescribed real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 12/27/2010. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 12/16/2010 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): TAMBER MEYER AND JASON MEYER, WIFE AND HUSBAND 505 FRESHWATER BAY ROAD PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 7/16/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS : The purchaser at the trustee's sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. T. S. No.: WA-10-368488-SH Dated: 9/15/2010 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary For Non-Sale, Payoff and Reinstatement info Quality Loan Service Corp of Washington 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com For Service of Process on Trustee: Quality Loan Service Corp., of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 ASAP# FNMA3738481 11/24/2010, 12/15/2010 Pub.: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010

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Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7228.22084 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Aurora Loan Services, LLC Grantee: Joshua Easley and Jennifer Easley, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 961200606 Abbreviated Legal: S 1/2 Lt. 10 & 11, Bk. 6, 1/26 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On December 27, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The South 1/2 of Lot 10 and all of Lot 11, Block 6, James H. Hussey's Addition to the City of Port Townsend, as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 26, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/11/06, recorded on 08/16/06, under Auditor's File No. 514478, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Joshua Easley and Jennifer Easley, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Aurora Loan Services, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 554066. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/15/2010 Monthly Payments $18,608.28 Late Charges $762.63 Lender's Fees & Costs ($1,055.31) Total Arrearage $18,315.60 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,592.36 Total Amount Due: $19,907.96 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $229,501.50, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on December 27, 2010. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/16/10 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Joshua Easley 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 Jennifer Easley 2633 Sherman Street Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/09/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/15/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7228.22084) 1002.165972-FEI Pub: Nov. 24, Dec. 15, 2010


C10

WeatherNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Thursday

Friday

Yesterday

saTurday

sunday

High 43

Low 32

43/33

41/33

41/32

40/32

Snow and rain this morning; cloudy.

Cloudy with a little rain.

Chilly with rain, mixed with snow early.

Mostly cloudy, rain possible; chilly.

Cloudy and chilly with a chance of rain.

Mainly cloudy, rain possible; chilly.

The Peninsula A large, powerful storm spinning in place over the Gulf of Alaska will continue to send loads of moisture onto the Olympic Peninsula the next several days. An upper-air disturbance will trigger showers today into tonight. With plenty of cold air aloft, the snow Neah Bay Port levels be near only 1,000 feet. There will be 6 to 12 inches 44/38 Townsend of fresh snow in the highest elevations. Mostly cloudy into Port Angeles 43/35 Friday morning, then another disturbance will bring the 43/32 chance of additional rain and mountain snow Friday Sequim afternoon into the weekend.

Victoria 46/33

43/33

Forks 44/34

Olympia 41/32

Seattle 43/35

Spokane 35/23

Yakima Kennewick 38/22 45/26

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2010

Marine Forecast

Considerable cloudiness today with spotty showers. Wind from the southeast at 4-8 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility less than 2 miles at times. Cloudy tonight with a little rain. Wind from the east at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility less than 3 miles at times. Chilly tomorrow with rain. Wind from the east at 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility less than 3 miles.

LaPush

7:04 a.m. 7:53 p.m. Port Angeles 8:59 a.m. ----Port Townsend 1:19 a.m. 10:44 a.m. Sequim Bay* 12:40 a.m. 10:05 a.m.

Today

Seattle 43/35

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

7.6’ 5.8’ 7.1’ --5.4’ 8.6’ 5.1’ 8.1’

12:41 a.m. 1:55 p.m. 2:51 a.m. 5:09 p.m. 4:05 a.m. 6:23 p.m. 3:58 a.m. 6:16 p.m.

2.6’ 1.9’ 3.9’ 1.2’ 5.1’ 1.5’ 4.8’ 1.4’

7:52 a.m. 9:01 p.m. 12:58 a.m. 9:27 a.m. 2:43 a.m. 11:12 a.m. 2:04 a.m. 10:33 a.m.

7.9’ 6.1’ 5.3’ 7.1’ 6.4’ 8.6’ 6.0’ 8.1’

Friday

Low Tide Ht 1:38 a.m. 2:51 p.m. 3:59 a.m. 5:39 p.m. 5:13 a.m. 6:53 p.m. 5:06 a.m. 6:46 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

High Tide Ht

3.0’ 1.4’ 4.7’ 0.5’ 6.1’ 0.6’ 5.7’ 0.6’

8:39 a.m. 10:02 p.m. 1:48 a.m. 9:57 a.m. 3:33 a.m. 11:42 a.m. 2:54 a.m. 11:03 a.m.

8.2’ 6.5’ 6.1’ 7.1’ 7.4’ 8.5’ 7.0’ 8.0’

Low Tide Ht 2:34 a.m. 3:42 p.m. 5:08 a.m. 6:10 p.m. 6:22 a.m. 7:24 p.m. 6:15 a.m. 7:17 p.m.

3.3’ 0.7’ 5.3’ -0.2’ 6.9’ -0.2’ 6.5’ -0.2’

901 NESS CORNER RD., PORT HADLOCK

City Hi Lo W Athens 53 45 r Baghdad 64 44 pc Beijing 27 22 s Brussels 37 23 sf Cairo 71 55 s Calgary 35 -2 c Edmonton 20 -9 sn Hong Kong 65 46 r Jerusalem 64 47 pc Johannesburg 67 56 r Kabul 55 22 s London 39 36 sh Mexico City 73 39 s Montreal 21 14 sn Moscow 13 10 c New Delhi 81 44 s Paris 35 31 sf Rio de Janeiro 83 75 r Rome 44 29 s Stockholm 27 19 pc Sydney 82 68 s Tokyo 47 36 s Toronto 26 18 sf Vancouver 46 33 sh Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

OPEN 7 DAYS Monday - Friday 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Visit us at www.hadlockbuildingsupply.com

Things to Do Continued from C2 begins at 6:45 p.m. Game at

7:15 p.m. Hosted by Corey Trivia night — One to four Knudson. Uptown Pub, 1016 players per team, $8 per team. Lawrence St. Phone 360-385Winner takes all. Sign up 1530.

Jan 12

Atlanta 38/36

El Paso 70/41

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

Houston 75/60

Fronts Cold Warm

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

National Cities Today Hi Lo W 62 38 pc 5 -9 s 47 37 c 38 36 c 33 19 pc 32 16 pc 36 20 sn 37 18 c 24 8 sn 36 20 c 30 21 c 25 19 sf 46 32 pc 44 16 sn 23 17 c 26 19 c 36 25 sn 44 33 r 73 42 pc 52 19 c 24 17 sn 25 12 pc 43 31 r -33 -46 s 32 13 sn 82 66 s 75 60 pc 26 11 c

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 34 61 50 62 66 22 16 33 62 30 56 26 58 72 32 72 43 35 38 52 32 37 74 63 53 24 28 34

Lo W 20 c 42 pc 45 i 50 sh 50 s 17 pc 9 sn 32 sn 57 c 24 pc 28 pc 14 sn 35 s 48 pc 21 pc 52 pc 34 r 27 pc 21 pc 32 c 25 i 14 sn 46 s 53 sh 41 pc 8 sn 9 pc 21 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 83 at Pecos, TX

Low: -33 at Orr, MN

OFF The next UPS package you ship with us.

(One per customer. Expires 12/31/10.)

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

“Seven Poor Travelers” — Adapted and performed by Charlie Bethel. Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., 7 p.m. Tickets $15 general and $10 students available online at www.keycitypublictheatre. org/tickets.htm or at Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, phone 360-3857396 or visit www.keycity publictheatre.org.

Road, Chimacum, 9 a.m. Visitors welcome. Phone: 360-7653164.

Blue Heron Middle School Band Concert — Sixth-grade band performs. Blue Heron Middle School, 3939 San Juan Ave., 7 p.m.

Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — See entry under Today.

Washington St., 7 p.m. Tickets $15 general and $10 students available online www.keycity publictheatre.org/tickets.htm or

Quimper Sound, 230 Taylor St. For more information, phone 360-385-7396 or visit www. keycitypublictheatre.org.

East Jefferson County Senior Co-ed Softball — H.J. Carroll Park, 1000 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to noon. Open to men 50 and older and women 45 and older. Phone 360-437-5053 or 360-437-2672 ■  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-452or 360-379-5443.

Now Showing

7176)

“Burlesque” (PG-13) “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG) Jefferson County Histori“Harry Potter and the cal Museum and shop — See Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PGentry under Today. 13) Thursday “Tangled” (PG) Port Townsend Aero Northwest Maritime Cen“The Tourist” (PG-13) Museum — See entry under ter tour — See entry under Today. Today. ■  Lincoln Theater, Port Chimacum TOPS 1393 — “The Eight: Reindeer Evergreen Coho Resort Club Monologues” — Not for chilHouse, 2481 Anderson Lake dren. Key City Playhouse, 419

Marilyn Loy-Every, M.S. Certified Clinical Audiologist, CCC-A

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Due Date” (R) “Faster” (R)

“Megamind” (PG) “Unstoppable” (PG-13)

■  The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089)

“The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” (R) “Inside Job” (PG-13))

■  Uptown Theater, Port

Townsend (360-3853883)

“The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG)

home of the hand tossed pizza Broad medical background

Celebrating our 27th year

Most experienced Audiologist in Kitsap County

0C405722

115 Village Way, Port Ludlow

Susan Brothers, Tim Gillett, Owners. Susan Cannon, Administrative Assistant & Betty Owbridge, Manager.

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Dedicated to promoting hearing health and provide high quality personalized care for our patients and the community

Miami 66/50

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

2

$

Washington 34/21

0C5105324

360-385-1771 / Fax 360-385-1980 1-800-750-1771

Jan 4

New York 30/24

Los Angeles 62/50

First

World Cities Today

HADLOCK BUILDING SUPPLY Building partnerships since 1984

Dec 27

Detroit 25/12

Kansas City 34/20

Denver 52/19

Moon Phases New

Chicago 23/17

San Francisco 53/41

Sun & Moon

Last

Minneapolis 16/9

Billings 37/18

Sunset today ................... 4:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:58 a.m. Moonrise today .............. 12:43 p.m. Moonset today ................. 2:04 a.m.

Dec 21

Everett 42/36

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 45 36 0.39 13.65 Forks 52 36 0.99 126.85 Seattle 49 39 0.77 44.61 Sequim 48 37 0.07 9.94 Hoquiam 49 43 0.56 68.67 Victoria 48 36 0.69 34.75 P. Townsend* 51 49 0.07 15.79 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Full

Port Ludlow 42/33 Bellingham 42/31

Aberdeen 45/38

Peninsula Daily News

902 E. First St., Port Angeles

0C5103477


Peninsula Daily News for Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Features

SECTION

D

Food and Family

The cookie extravaganza Clallam Bay contest hosts batch of winners By Zeller Westabrook

red and green maraschino cherries. Wow, and yes, rich. It wouldn’t seem like The two Christmas in Clallam Bay recipes that without the annual cookie had that contest and merry visit magic word from Santa (aka Bill “chocolate” Drath) at the post office. in their This year, of the 12 names, entries in the competition, Chocolate Best of Show went to Julie Drops by Janda Janda of Beaver for her Joanna Merry Christmas Bars. McLean Sometimes, presentation and Chocois everything, but Merry late Mint Christmas Bars teamed Sandwich with a praline (brown Cookies by sugar and pecans) taste Hannah Larrechea, with cream cheese and a both of Clalsplash of assorted flavorlam Bay, ings (lemon, vanilla and Herman almond) also serve a happy tied for first place. palate. Judges lauded flavor, Holiday color is protexture and eye appeal. vided by chopped bits of Peninsula Daily News

After the judging, Postmaster Linda Dillard revealed that Larrechea is a student who has visited the event every year of her life. Last year, Marlene Herman of Joyce was honored for her Biscotti recipe. This year, she claimed second and third places. Her Pitzelli, which is cooked in a decorative press, took second, and her Genetti, shaped into knots before being baked and frosted, won third. Coincidentally, each of Herman’s winners has just a hint of anise. Congratulations to all who got into their kitchens and “whipped up a batch” for this contest. You are all winners for intent, energy and enthusiasm.

Heather Loyd (6)/Peninsula Daily News

Merry Christmas Bars by Julie Janda of Beaver won Best of Show.

The winners, clockwise from the top left, are Merry Christmas Bars, Best of Show; Genetti, third place; Pitzelli, second place; Chocolate Drops, tied for first place; and Chocolate Mint Sandwich Cookies, tied for first place. Best of Show won a cookie jar, first-place winners received cookbooks, and the other winners earned ribbons.

Best of Show: Merry Christmas Bars Julie Janda of Beaver Crust: 2⁄3 cup butter, softened 2 cups flour 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup pecans, chopped Filling: 2 8-ounce packages of cream cheese, softened 2 eggs 1⁄2 cup sugar 4 tablespoons lemon juice 4 tablespoons milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1⁄2 teaspoon

almond extract 1⁄2 cup red maraschino cherries, chopped 1⁄2 cup green maraschino cherries, chopped

________ Preheat oven to 350 degrees. For the crust, mix ingredients until wellblended. Reserve 2 cups for topping. Press crust into bottom of ungreased 8-inchby-10-inch pan.

Bake for 10 minutes. While bottom crust is baking, combine cream cheese and eggs with sugar. Add lemon juice, milk and extracts. Mix until smooth. Stir in cherries. Pour filling onto hot crust. Cover filling evenly with reserved crust. Return to oven and bake for 25 minutes. Place pan on wire rack to cool. Cut into squares and serve.

Alex Bannan, right, a Clallam Bay High School student working on a special project, gives Santa, portrayed by Bill Drath, samples of awardwinning cookies from the community’s annual Christmas cookie contest at the Clallam Bay Post Office on Dec. 7.

“takemefishing” Chocolate Drops by Joanna McLean of Clallam Bay tied for first place.

For more cookies, see Page D2.

First Place (tie): Chocolate Drops The “Original” Since 1957

Joanna McLean of Clallam Bay Heat chocolate and butter until butter is melted. Stir until chocolate is melted. Add sugar and mix. Blend in eggs and vanilla. Add flour. Cover and refrigerate

one hour or until dough is easily handled. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Shape dough into balls. Bake for 8 minutes. Garnish with walnuts. Allow cookies to cool.

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4 squares unsweetened chocolate 3⁄4 cup butter 2 cups sugar 3 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 21⁄2 cups flour Walnuts, for garnish

PORT ANGELES, WA U.S.A. © 2010 Swain’s General Store Inc.

602 E. FIRST ST., PORT ANGELES 452-2357 www.swainsinc.com


D2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Peninsula Daily News

Pitzelli by Marlene Herman of Joyce won second place.

Second Place: Pitzelli Marlene Herman of Joyce 2 cups sifted flour 1 cube butter, melted (1⁄2 cup) 4 eggs 1 cup sugar 6-8 drops anise oil Pinch of salt

Beat eggs and add sugar, melted butter, anise and dry ingredients. Dough will be like pancake mixture.

Place by teaspoonful on pitzelli press and cook over stove burner about 1 minute per side or, if electric press is available, follow its directions.

Heather Loyd (4)/Peninsula Daily News

Chocolate Mint Sandwich Cookies by Hannah Larrachea of Clallam Bay tied for first place.

First Place (tie): Chocolate Mint Sandwich Cookies Hannah Larrechea of Clallam Bay Cookies: 4 tablespoons butter 11⁄2 cups brown sugar 2 tablespoons water 2 cups chocolate chips 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 21⁄2 cups flour 11⁄2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt Filling: 21⁄2 cups powdered sugar 1⁄4 cup butter, softened 3 tablespoons milk 1⁄2 teaspoon peppermint extract

3 drops green food coloring Dash of salt

baking soda and salt in a separate bowl. Gradually add flour mixture to the chocolate ________ mixture. Preheat oven to 350 Drop rounded teadegrees. spoonfuls 2 inches apart For the cookies, combine butter, brown sugar, on ungreased baking sheets. water and chocolate Bake for 8 minutes. chips in a small sauceRemove to wire racks pan. to cool. Cook and stir over low Meanwhile, combine heat until chips are the filling ingredients melted. until smooth. Pour into mixer bowl Spread the filling on and cool. the bottom side of half of Beat in eggs and the cookies; top with vanilla. Combine the flour, remaining cookies.

Genetti by Marlene Herman of Joyce won third place.

Third Place: Genetti Marlene Herman of Joyce 4 cups flour 2 cubes butter, melted (1 cup) 8 eggs, separated 1⁄2 cup sugar 6-8 drops anise oil 4 teaspoons baking powder

________ Beat egg whites until frothy.

finger-sized strips, about 5 inches in length. Tie into knots and place on cookie sheet. Bake for 20 minutes. Allow cookies to cool, then frost with buttercream frosting or glaze by brushing with egg white beaten with 2 drops anise oil and powdered sugar.

In a separate bowl, add all other ingredients and mix well. Fold in egg whites. Batter will be very sticky. Place in refrigerator for a few hours. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove from refrigerator and roll into small

A closer look at the winners from the annual cookie contest.

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closet intellectual, while smart 12 year-old Paloma is secretly suicidal. They live parallel lives in the same exclusive apartment building in Paris, until a wealthy and perceptive Japanese businessman named Ozu moves in. Copies of the book are available at the Sequim Library and can be requested online through the library catalog at www. nols.org. Preregistration for this program is not required, and drop-ins are always welcome. For more information, visit www.nols.org and click on “Events” and “Sequim,” phone branch manager Lauren Dahlgren at 360-683-1161 or e-mail Sequim@nols.org.

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SEQUIM — The Museum and Arts Center

in Sequim is asking for artists in all media to donate handmade bowls for the “Empty Bowls” exhibit in January. Bowl donations will be accepted at the exhibit center, 175 W. Cedar St., from noon to 4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 3, or by arrangement before that date. Handmade bowls will be displayed and sold for a set donation to benefit the Sequim Food Bank. They may be pottery, ceramic, paper, fibers, wood, glass or any other material the artist wishes. Donation forms are available at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., and at www. macsequim.org. There is no fee. For more information, phone 360-681-4884 or e-mail artexhibits@mac sequim.org. Peninsula Daily News

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

D3

Easing the transition to parenthood Child-rearing guide created by 3 mothers

port townsend Neighbor

ery Physical Therapy. Jackson After Soren was born, she discovered another social Which church outlet: the offers free child care at a Breastfeeding “Mom’s Time Out” from 9:30 a.m. Tea on to 11:15 a.m. Monday mornings? Wednesdays Which gourmet, waterfront from 1:30 p.m. restaurant welcomes families to 3 p.m. at the and has a “kids eat free” night Jefferson Wednesdays? County Public And where in Jefferson Health Department in Port County can you buy a diaper Townsend. cake? “It was my lifeline, the thing I If you know what a diaper looked forward to once a week,” cake is, you may also be in the Randall said. “You could get out market for the latest accessory of the house with your kid.” for new parents: The Little Guide That’s why the Breastfeeding for Little Ones (and Their FamiTea is the first thing listed in The lies) — Birth to Five Resources in Little Guide, under the “ConnectJefferson County. ing with People” heading in the Created by three mothers, the “Getting Acquainted” section. guide — which made its debut at Another example is a weekly a book release party Saturday — drop-in parenting group in Quilis designed to ease the shock of a cene on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. life-changing event. to 2 p.m. — where kids play “I had no idea of what it was while parents exchange war stolike to have child,” said Shelly ries, discuss concerns with a pubRandall, a writer/editor who lic health nurse, browse the helped compile the guide. resource library or exchange “It took awhile to find a combooks and children’s clothing. munity of other moms.” Another resource: the First Teacher program’s free monthly Three creators newsletter and development guides for children from 3 A year in the making, the months to school age. guide was the brainchild of The Little Guide also lists Robin Mills, a teacher in Chiplaygrounds, pools, parks and macum School’s Pi program. beaches in Jefferson County, as The mother of Ruby, then 4, well as Sequim and the Silverand Bailey, 2, Robin came up dale area, and play spots near with the guide as a fundraising idea for the Port Townsend Coop- ferry terminals and airports as erative Playschool, which is affili- part of the “Out and About” section. ated with Peninsula College’s The “Events and Activities” Family Life Education program. section offers five pages of classes Mills recruited graphic and camps, grouped by type designer Tonya Cole, whose (music, art, exercise, etc.), that twins, Ana and Jack, were 2 include age eligibility. years old at the time, and Randall, whose son, Soren, was a Options offered year old. All donated their time to cre“One thing about the guide is ate the book. the different options, like two “It’s been a long haul in our pages of preschools,” said Sarah limited spare time — a project of McNulty, mother of Noah Isenthe heart,” Randall said. berg, 2. “If you Google Port Randall had lived and worked Townsend and preschool, you get in Port Townsend for 10 years two.” For Bridget Gregg, the first but discovered that once she gave connecting point was the Port birth, her social options narTownsend Library’s Baby Hour. rowed. Gregg moved to Port Ludlow But she had a place to start expanding it: the women she had from Seattle five years ago after her son, Riley, was born. met in the Fit Momma classes At Baby Hour, she learned for expectant mothers at Discov-

Jennifer

Jennifer Jackson/for Peninsula Daily News

Mom Sarah Rubenstein, right, helps to hold the book, but 17-month-old Yemaya Rubenstein, center, does most of it on her own as she leafs through The Little Guide for Little Ones at Saturday’s book release party. Noah Isenberg, 2, left, plays with a maze. Sarah McNulty, Noah’s mother, is behind him. The third adult is Shelly Randall, one of The Little Guide creators. about the Port Townsend Cooperative Playschool, where she now goes with her daughter, Norma. Norma Avila, who has two sons, Carlos and Daniel, said the Cooperative Playschool was an important resource at a time when she had a huge change in her life. Both Gregg and Avila brought their children to the book release party, which was held at Randall’s house, as did Luke Cherney, who brought daughter Evelyn and her friend Aurora. “It’s nice to have something like this, where you’re not relying just on word-of-mouth,” Cherney said of the guide.

More births When Evelyn was born, Cherney said, the nurses told him and spouse Audrey Cherney, a childbirth educator who is expecting again, that Jefferson County was experiencing a bump in the number of babies being born. So a resource guide for parents is an idea whose time has come. Other “Did You Know?” listings: When your child turns 4,

Grant Street School offers a series of three free classes called “Ready for Kindergarten.” A local dentist offers free “happy visits” to familiarize young children with the dental office and the importance of dental hygiene. At a local grocery store, kids can sign up for a card that entitles them to a free apple, banana or carrot at each visit. And on Page 21, under “Diapering Resources,” you can find out where to order a diaper cake, the ultimate centerpiece for a baby shower. People whose children are grown can buy a guide to be placed in a church, public health center, women’s shelter or other community outreach program, the editors suggest. Having the guides available at the three WIC (Women, Infants and Children) clinics would be a natural way to reach mothers of young children throughout Jefferson County, she said. “The conduit is there,” Randall said. And the guide, sized to fit into a diaper bag, makes a great baby shower gift for an expectant

mother, Randall said, because that’s when she has the time to read it. The Little Guide is $10 and is available at Henery’s Hardware stores in Port Townsend and Quilcene, Sport Townsend and Seams to Last. To order a copy by mail or support the project by buying copies to be distributed, send a check to the Port Townsend Cooperative Playschool, P.O. Box 768, Port Townsend, WA 98368. You can designate where you want the copies to go and in whose name. For more information, e-mail Robin Mills at ptcpfundraising@ gmail.com or phone 360-3852517. For more information about Port Townsend Cooperative Playschool, e-mail PTCP membership@gmail.com or phone Dana Maya, 360-301-6626.

________ Jennifer Jackson writes about Port Townsend and Jefferson County every Wednesday. To contact her with items for this column, phone 360-379-5688 or e-mail jjackson@olypen.com.

Briefly . . . Christmas story reading on Thursday

4 p.m. Saturday. Gus, a local canine that has inspired Ryan and others for many years and to whom the book is dedicated, will join Ryan for this event. SEQUIM — Pat Neal Gus is a 15-year-old will give a reading of his American cocker spaniel Christmas stories at the who was rescued by Tim Sequim Village Starbucks, and Jenni Dix. 1095 W. Washington St., at Jenni Dix, a trainer 6 p.m. Thursday. with Legacy Canine BehavNeal is a fishing guide, ior & Training, and Gus radio show host on KSQM have competed in agility and a humor columnist for competitions throughout the Peninsula Daily News. the Northwest. The Toolbox for Building Family dogs a Great Family Dog is a SEQUIM — Terry Ryan guide to helping families will sign copies of her new raise a happy and wellbook, The Toolbox for mannered dog using techBuilding a Great Family niques and games. Dog, at the Sequim Library, The focus of this book is 630 N. Sequim Ave., the family dog, including between 2 p.m. and the interactions between

kids and dogs, household management strategies, common behavioral problems and training games the family — and dog — can enjoy. For more information, phone Karen Kilgore at 360-683-1522 or e-mail karen@legacycanine.com.

Pet photos PORT ANGELES — Santa Claus will be available for pet pictures at Park View Villas, corner of Eighth and G streets, from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday. Bring canines, felines or other pets and pose with Santa while helping a good cause. Photos will be available for a donation of pet food, pet supplies or a money to the Olympic Peninsula

Humane Society.

Fairgrounds dance PORT TOWNSEND — Olympic Peninsula Dance will present the Port Angeles band The Soulshakers at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds Erickson Building, 4907 Landes St., from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday. The dance is open to all and will be smoke- and alcohol-free. Adults’ admission is $15, $10 for students with school IDs and persons with disabilities, and $7 for those 12 and younger. A cha-cha lesson with Joe Thompson and Nancy Palmer will precede the dance at 7 p.m. For more information,

Food co-op observes NW Neutral Day Peninsula Daily News

other uses. . . . NW Neutral allows those small landowners to sell carbon offsets by providing a group structure to minimize transaction costs.” The Food Co-op supports the NW Neutral program by offering forest carbon offsets to the store’s ownermembers. “The [carbon dioxide] offset provides a conscious,

ecologically sound gift for friends and family, and the program promotes awareness of the need to sequester carbon from the atmosphere as part of a strategy which also includes reducing your emissions as much as possible,” the co-op’s announcement of the event said, noting “CO2 in the atmosphere is the leading cause of global warming.”

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Fiber arts FORKS — A fiber arts open house for spinners, weavers and knitters will be held at the Rainforest Art Center, 35 N. Forks Ave., from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Attendees can bring spindles, wheels and knitting work. The center’s new weaving studio will be featured at the event.

Student honored PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School senior Corbin Brabant has been selected as Nor’wester Rotary’s Career and Technical Education student of the month. Rotary selects students based on activity in a vocational program, community service, extracurricular activities, achievements such as grade-point average and teacher recommendations.

Brabant holds a 3.6 GPA, served as Future Business Leaders of America president for two Brabant years and is a member and past officer of DECA, a business marketing club. He is also an active volunteer with many community charities. Brabant plans to attend Peninsula College and major in business administration. Brabant will receive a $500 college scholarship from Nor’west Rotary. Peninsula Daily News

Get home delivery. Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews. com

Peninsula Daily News

Volunteers Needed! Interested in improving local senior services?

The Olympic Area Agency on Aging (O3A) seeks a Regional Minority Representative for O3A’s Advisory Council. O3A coordinates senior services in Clallam, Jefferson, Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties. This volunteer represents the interests of the local elder ethnic population in the service area. Emphasis on identifying a volunteer with ties to local cultural communities to provide a voice for diversity on the board. Request more information or application packet from Carol Ann Laase at 866-720-4863; laaseca@dshs.wa.gov. Meetings are once per month in Shelton; mileage reimbursement and meals included. Need not be 60+ to apply.

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PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., will observe NW Neutral Day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday. Representatives of the Northwest Natural Resource Group, a Port Townsend-based forest stewardship nonprofit, will be at the front door to discuss the NW Neutral program and how it can help sustain quality of life. The staff at the co-op membership desk will help attendees learn about becoming carbon-neutral. NW Neutral is a program of Northwest Natural Resource Group (NNRG) that guarantees small forestlands will be healthy for a century or more by connecting local businesses and forestland owners who share a common goal of protecting the environment. By signing contracts with the NNRG to manage their forests according to standards of the Forest

Stewardship Council for 100 years, the landowners can sell their carbon offsets to businesses seeking to reduce their carbon footprint. NNRG’s Northwest Neutral Web page (http://nnrg. org/NW-Neutral) also notes that small, privately owned forestlands in the Pacific Northwest “are often at high risk of conversion to

phone 360-385-6919 or 360-385-5327.


D4

Peninsula Daily News

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

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