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Peninsula Daily News Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

October 2, 2011

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Another La Niña; another snowy, wet winter likely unusual occurrence since last winter was also a La Niña. While it’s always difficult The Pacific Ocean near the equator is gradually cool- to predict weather, La Niña winters are noted for belowing, and that could mean another cold and snowy win- average temperatures, high winds and above-average ter on the North Olympic Peninsula and the rest of the snowfall, with accompanying wetter-than-usual springs — Northwest. Forecasters are predicting and a slow move into sumanother La Niña winter — an mer. Peninsula Daily News news sources

In other words, what the Peninsula had this year. “It looks like a good bet to get your annual ski pass,” said Cliff Mass, a professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. Mass said temperatures should be cooler than normal this coming year, especially after Jan. 1.

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But this winter will probably not be as cold as last winter, Mass said, when there was a stronger La Niña. And it would be unusual for the new La Niña weather pattern to extend deep into summer, as it did this year with cool temperatures until August. Turn

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Ooh la la! Tax-paid Paris trip Gregoire’s $100,000 trade mission came day after budget cuts By Mike Baker

The Associated Press

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Ron Linn of Sequim contemplates the names listed on the replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall on Saturday in Port Angeles. Linn said he knew people whose names are inscribed on the wall.

Vets memorial final day today By Tom Callis

He died July 12 at the age of 64, and was remembered during a ceremony as an Air Force veteran who never served in PORT ANGELES — During a chilly evening Saturday, about 70 people gath- Vietnam but nonetheless had a neverending compassion for those who did. ered to remember the 58,252 names “My dad is with them now,” said his listed on a Vietnam Veterans Memorial son, Darren Doty of Silverdale. Wall replica and one that wasn’t. “There’s a lot of veterans needing help Steve Doty was a Port Angeles native who helped organize the traveling exhibit up there and are talking to my dad,” he of the iconic wall and other memorials. added. Peninsula Daily News

Salaries not included

The memorial replica at 80 percent scale of the original in Washington, D.C., arrived at Olympic Cellars Winery grounds at 255410 U.S. Highway 101, Wednesday and will remain on free display for one more day today. Also included are exhibits honoring those who died in the War and Terror and other conflicts. Turn

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OLYMPIA — Before leading a state delegation on a European trade mission in June, Gov. Chris Gregoire downplayed the price of the journey by saying it would cost less than $40,000. In fact, the state’s taxALSO . . . payers spent more than ■ Other twice that much. states’ Gregoire’s hotel room officials went in Paris cost nearly $500 to Paris, per night while travelers too/A8 at times received per diems that estimated $84 dinners and $56 lunches, according to expense reports released to The Associated Press under state public records laws. The price of security alone was more than Gregoire’s initial estimate, although it still came in well under the totals for delegations from other states. The total bill for the governor’s office, her Washington State Patrol security and aides from the Department of Commerce reached more than $98,000.

That doesn’t account for the base salaries of workers who spent their time overseas or the expenses of other travelers with ties to state government, such as representatives from the University of Washington and Shoreline Community College. The Governor’s Office doesn’t typically include security costs when estimating expenses, which explains why her initial projection doesn’t match numbers compiled by AP, said Gregoire spokesman Cory Curtis.

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Seal killed, skinned near marine center By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Marine mammal scientists are looking for clues into the beheading and skinning of a seal pup in a parking area of Fort Worden State Park last week. Ironically, the carcass was discovered near the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, which is devoted to the research and preservation of such sea creatures as harbor seals. “I was shocked when I saw this,” said Chrissy McLean, marine science center program coordinator who is also principal investigator for the East Jefferson County Marine Mammal Stranding Network. “I had never seen anything like this before.”

The pup’s carcass was reported by a beach walker early Wednesday morning to McLean. “Part of my job is to investigate how animals die, and it hurts to see when an animal dies from unnecessary causes.”

Possibly overnight McLean said the incident happened sometime between 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and 8:45 a.m. Wednesday in a beach parking lot near the Fort Worden pier. The animal did not die of natural causes or suffer at the hands of a predator, McLean said. It was treated in a way that suggested human intervention, Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News she added. Port Townsend Marine Science Center program coordinator Chrissy McLean removes the Turn to Seal/A8 “crime scene” tape from where a baby seal was decapitated and skinned last week.

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News 95th year, 233rd issue — 8 sections, 76 pages

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Business/Politics D1 Classified E1 Clubs/Organizations C3 Commentary/Letters A10 Couples *PW Dear Abby C4 Deaths C7 Movies C4 Nation/World A3 * Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Poll Puzzles/Games Sports Weather

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UpFront

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Simon, other notables part of academy SINGER-SONGWRITER PAUL Simon and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft are among more than 175 artists, scientists and institutional leaders who have been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The induction ceremony took place Saturday in Sanders Theater at Harvard University. Other inductees included groundbreaking cancer researcher Clara Bloomfield and film producer Kathleen Kennedy, who’s well known for her work on “Jurassic Park” and “E.T.” Founded in 1780, the Cambridge, Mass.-based academy is one of the country’s oldest learned societies. Its membership includes more than 250 Nobel laureates, some 100 Pulitzer Prize winners and many of the world’s most celebrated artists and performers.

T.I. at concert RAPPER T.I. DIDN’T waste any time hitting the

The Associated Press

Paul Simon plays at the conclusion of the induction ceremony at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on Saturday. stage after his recent release from a halfway house. The Grammy-winning rapper made a surprise appearance in front of a packed audience Friday night, following a performance by the girl group the OMG Girlz that features his stepdaughter, Zonnique. The pop girl trio was one of the acts to kick off the 23-city Scream Tour. The tour also includes Diggy Simmons, Hamilton

Park, Mindless Behavior, and Jacob Latimore and New Boyz. As T.I. walked on stage, there was an enormous scream from the packed crowd of about 2,700 at the Bell Auditorium in Augusta, Ga. He told attendees that it feels “great to be back.” T.I. was released Thursday from an Atlanta halfway house after spending about 10 months in federal prison on a probation violation.

Passings

Did You Win? State lottery results

Friday’s Daily Game: 3-2-1 Friday’s Keno: 07-1214-15-19-22-23-31-34-3643-46-49-54-58-61-63-6769-77 Friday’s Match 4: 04-08-13-24 Friday’s Mega Millions: 03-19-21-44-45, Mega Ball: 29 Saturday’s Daily Game: 7-7-8 Saturday’s Hit 5: 01-05-19-28-35 Saturday’s Keno: 05-07-10-11-13-14-15-1825-35-38-40-42-44-48-5558-65-67-77 Saturday’s Lotto: 2-1418-28-29-43 Saturday’s Powerball: 01-12-23-27-43, Powerball: 31, Power Play: 3

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: How much of the time do you think you can trust the government in Washington, D.C., to do what is right?

Almost always  0.8%

Most of the time 

7.2%

Only sometimes 

55.4%

Never 

35.0%

Undecided  1.6% Total votes cast: 1,225 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

By The Associated Press

PETER GENT, 69, whose 1973 novel North Dallas Forty became a sports movie classic depicting the drugs, sex, greed and self-preservation of the professional football game, died Friday. Mr. Gent had an unlikely five-season career playing for Dallas before penning the story loosely Mr. Gent based on in 1974 the Cowboys. It later became a movie, nestled between comedy and tragedy, showing the drinking and drugging by thinly disguised football characters.

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

Mr. Gent, who died Friday at his boyhood home in western Michigan, seemed pleased with how the movie turned out but usually didn’t watch it years later, his son said Saturday. Mr. Gent went on to write several more books. “He was just a brilliant guy who had a lot of other interests. He read a lot and loved history,” Carter Gent said. “Watching sports didn’t do much for him.” He said his father died from a pulmonary illness at his home in Bangor where he’d lived since 1990. Peter Gent was a star basketball player at Michigan State University in the 1960s, and was drafted by the NBA’s Baltimore Bullets after averaging 21 points a game in his final college season. Although he didn’t play football in college, Gent got an NFL tryout with the Cowboys in 1964, and spent five seasons with the team. “He had heard you’d get $500 just for showing up,” his son said. “The wide receivers coach liked him.

Laugh Lines

He was long and lean and had good hands.” Gent wrote a sequel, North Dallas After Forty, as well as other books, including a memoir about coaching his son’s baseball team, The Last Magic Summer: A Season With My Son. __________ JOE TOFFLEMIRE, 46, a former Seattle Seahawks center, has died of heart failure, according to his brother, Paul Tofflemire. The SpokesmanReview of Spokane reported that Mr. Tofflemire died Tuesday at a Mr. Tofflemire hospital in in 1994 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, after being found unconscious in his Post Falls home. Mr. Tofflemire was the Seahawks second-round pick in the 1989 draft. His injury-plagued career lasted until 1995. His 33 appearances were concentrated mostly in 1990 and 1992.

Seen Around TAX REFORM IS takPeninsula snapshots ing the taxes off things that have been taxed in the BUMPER STICKER IN past and putting taxes on Sequim: “You’re Never Too things that haven’t been Old to Have a Happy Birthtaxed before. Art Buchwald day” . . . WE CREATE MORE jobs in Los Angeles than anywhere else in the country: Eye jobs, nose jobs, etc. Jimmy Kimmel

WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) With two units out of three proposed for the Ediz Hook Recreational Project — a small-boat marina and road paving — receiving presidential approval from the Roosevelt administration, organization of a concerted drive for matching funds was completed at a meeting in Port Angeles. A large percentage of the money has been allocated from Works Progress Administration funds, but $4,500 needs to be raised by the Ediz Hook Recreational Association for a clubhouse building and marina dredging. Herbert Pollock, Clallam County engineer, is in charge of plans for the project and the city of Port Angeles is sponsoring it.

1961 (50 years ago) Lack of log supply and higher prices due to Japanese export sales have reduced Merrill & Ring Western Lumber Co. mill production by two shifts a week. This amounts to 52 man days.

“If the trend continues, we may have to go down to a one-shift operation,” said mill manager A.H. “Gus” Haley. “We can land lumber in Japan cheaper than they can buy logs,” Haley said, “but they are not interested.”

1986 (25 years ago) While the Port Townsend City Council is considering what to do about vicious dogs, a police officer yesterday had to draw his weapon to ward off an angry pit bull terrier. The council will decide Oct. 7 whether changes are needed in the animal control ordinance to control dangerous dogs, Councilwoman Jean Camfield said. Animal control officials estimated that there are 35 to 40 pit bulls in Jefferson County. “Any dog potentially could bite somebody, and the owner is more guilty than the dog, I think, in a lot of these instances,” said Port Townsend Police Chief Bob Hinton, “because of how they handle the dog, how they train them and take care of them.”

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Oct. 2, the 275th day of 2011. There are 90 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Oct. 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court as the court opened its new term. On this date: ■  In 1780, British spy John Andre was hanged in Tappan, N.Y., during the Revolutionary War. ■  In 1835, the first battle of the Texas Revolution took place as American settlers fought Mexican soldiers near the Guadalupe River; the Mexicans ended up withdrawing. ■  In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson suffered a serious stroke at the White House that left him par-

alyzed on his left side. ■  In 1941, during World War II, German armies launched an all-out drive against Moscow. ■  In 1944, Nazi troops crushed the 2-month-old Warsaw Uprising, during which a quarter of a million people were killed. ■  In 1950, the comic strip “Peanuts,” created by Charles M. Schulz, was syndicated to seven newspapers. ■  In 1961, the TV game show “Password” premiered on CBS with host Allen Ludden and celebrity guests Kitty Carlisle and Tom Poston. The medical drama “Ben Casey,” starring Vince Edwards and Sam Jaffe, premiered on ABC. ■  In 1970, one of two chartered twin-engine planes flying the

Wichita State University football team to Utah crashed into a mountain near Silver Plume, Colo., killing 31 of the 40 people on board. ■  In 1971, the music program “Soul Train” made its debut in national syndication. ■  In 1985, actor Rock Hudson died at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 59 after battling AIDS. ■  Ten years ago: NATO Secretary-General Lord Robertson said the United States had provided “clear and conclusive” evidence of Osama bin Laden’s involvement in the attacks on New York and Washington. Acting Massachusetts Gov. Jane Swift unveiled security measures that included a new security chief at Logan International Airport,

where hijackers had boarded the two planes that smashed into the World Trade Center. ■  Five years ago: Charles Carl Roberts IV, an armed milk truck driver, took a group of girls hostage in an Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, Pa., killing five of the girls and wounding five others before committing suicide. Americans Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello won the Nobel Prize in medicine. Actress Tamara Dobson died in Baltimore, Md., at age 59. ■  One year ago: A coalition of progressive and civil rights groups marched by the thousands on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., and pledged to support Democrats struggling to keep power on Capitol Hill.


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Briefly: Nation U.S. commander predicts end to Libya mission WASHINGTON — The military mission in Libya is largely complete and NATO’s involvement could begin to wrap up as soon as this coming week after allied leaders meet in Brussels, according to the top U.S. commander for Africa. Army Gen. Carter Ham, head of U.S. Africa Command, told The Associated Press that American military leaders are Ham expected to give NATO ministers their assessment of the situation during meetings late in the week. NATO could decide to end the mission even though ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi is still at large. NATO’s decision-making body, the North Atlantic Council, agreed Sept. 21 to extend the mission over the oil-rich North African nation for another 90 days, but officials have said the decision would be reviewed periodically.

Troops to Mexico? MANCHESTER, N.H. — Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry says he is open

to sending American troops to Mexico to help battle drug cartels. Perry, the Texas governor, likens the situation to Colombia, where the government accepted American military support in battling the war on drugs. Perry says the current violence may require similar military action. He often calls for more National Guard troops to help protect the Mexican border and stem the flow of illegal immigration. But Saturday’s comments go further. They indicate he’s open to deepening America’s military involvement across the border. Perry’s comments came at a Saturday afternoon reception at the home of New Hampshire Republican gubernatorial candidate Ovide Lamontagne. A spokesman later clarified that Perry is open to all options to cooperate with Mexico.

Today’s news shows Guest lineups for the today’s TV news shows: ■ ABC’s “This Week” — 2012 GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain ■ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Govs. Bob McDonnell, R-Va., and Deval Patrick, D-Mass.; Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif. ■ CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.; Govs. Martin O’Malley, D-Md., and Haley Barbour, R-Miss. ■ CNN’s “State of the Union” — Former Vice President Dick Cheney and his daughter, Liz; former CIA Director Michael Hayden; former Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif.; Barbour. ■ “Fox News Sunday” — Cain.

Drone targets militant linked to plots in U.S. The Associated Press

CAIRO — A Saudi militant believed killed in the U.S. drone strike in Yemen constructed the bombs for the al-Qaida branch’s most notorious attempted attacks — including the underwear-borne explosives intended to a down a U.S. aircraft, and a bomb carried by his own brother intended to assassinate a Saudi prince. The death of Ibrahim Hassan al-Asiri would make the Friday drone strikes on a convoy in the central deserts of Yemen one of the most effective single blows in the U.S. campaign to take out alQaida’s top figures. The strike also killed Anwar al-Awlaki, a Yemeni-American cleric who had been key to recruiting for the militant group and a Pakistani-American, Samir Khan, who was a top English-language propagandist. But Christopher Boucek, a scholar who studies Yemen and al-Qaida, said al-Asiri’s death would “overshadow” that of the two Americans due to his operational importance to al-Qaida in

the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based group that is considered the most active branch of the terror network. Late Friday, two U.S. officials said intelligence indicated alAsiri was among those killed in the strike. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because al-Asiri’s death has not officially been confirmed.

Two attempts against U.S. The 29-year-old al-Asiri was one of the first Saudis to join the Yemen-based al-Qaida branch and became its key bombmaker, designing the explosives in two attempted attacks against the United States. His fingerprint was found on the bomb hidden in the underwear of a Nigerian man accused of trying to blow up Northwest Airlines Flight 253 over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009, according to U.S. counterterrorism officials. The attack failed because the would-be bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab botched detonating the explosives, ending

up only burning himself before being wrestled away by passengers. The explosives used in that bomb were chemically identical to those hidden inside two printers that were shipped from Yemen last year, bound for Chicago and Philadelphia in a plot claimed by al-Qaida. The bombs were intercepted in England and Dubai. In perhaps his most ruthless operation, al-Asiri turned his younger brother, Abdullah, into a human bomb in a 2009 attempt to kill Saudi Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, the kingdom’s top counterterrorism official and son of its interior minister. Abdullah volunteered for the suicide mission, asking to replace another militant named to carry it out, according to an account in Sada al-Malahem, an Arabic-language Web magazine issued by al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. While talking to the prince, Abdullah blew himself up. The prince, however, escaped with only injuries.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World Afghan leader gives up talking with Taliban

told The Associated Press. Ferreira said in an interview that Wright’s new identity was KABUL, Afghanistan — given to him President Hamid Karzai has by West Afrigiven up trying to talk to the can country Wright Taliban, saying in a video released Saturday that Pakistan Guinea-Bissau when it granted him political holds the only key to making peace with insurgents and must asylum in the 1980s and was accepted by Portugal. do more to support a political The U.S. is trying to extraresolution to the war. dite Wright to serve the remainKarzai revealed his tougher der of his 15- to 30-year senstance against Pakistan, which he claims is harboring militants, tence for a 1962 murder in New Jersey. He had served more on the same day that the than seven years before breakAfghan intelligence service said ing out of prison in 1970. it has hard evidence that the But Ferreira said his client assassination of former Presiargues that he has the right to dent Burhanuddin Rabbani was serve the time in Portugal planned on the southern outbecause he has Portuguese citiskirts of Quetta, the Pakistani zenship based on his new idencity where key Taliban leaders tity. are based. Interior Minister Bismullah Abduction by militants Khan Mohammadi went even NAIROBI, Kenya — Ten further, stating Saturday in an heavily armed Somali militants Afghan parliamentary session driving their boat under the that Pakistan’s Inter-Services cover of darkness kidnapped a Intelligence agency was involved in Rabbani’s killing — Frenchwoman on a resort island in northern Kenya early Saturan allegation Pakistan has day, officials said. denied. The government blamed the The claims follow similar attack on Somali militants from accusations against Pakistan al-Shabab, and Kenyan navy from the United States, reflectand police chased the suspected ing the growing frustrations boat at sea. with a central player in the At one point during the region whose cooperation is cruchase two Kenyan boats had the cial even as its intentions are suspected pirate boat surunder question. rounded, with four men and the woman on board, Fugitive’s new identity kidnapped said Tourism Minister Najib LISBON, Portugal — CapBalala. A plane overhead was tured American fugitive George also monitoring the situation, Wright will claim a new identity he said. to prevent the U.S. from extraBalala identified her as diting him, his lawyer said Sat- Marie Dedieu. French officials urday. said in a statement that she is Wright, 68, became a Portuin her 60s. guese citizen, called Jose Luis The woman often uses a wheelchair, according to a resiJorge dos Santos, in 1991 after marrying a Portuguese woman, dent of Manda Island. The Associated Press lawyer Manuel Luis Ferreira

The Associated Press

The car of a man who survived for six days after the vehicle plunged 200 feet off a remote mountain is recovered in Castaic, Calif., on Friday.

2 missing men, 2 crashes at same site; outcomes differ By John Rogers

The Associated Press

SANTA CLARITA, Calif. — Two separate missing persons cases. Two families wracked with worry for days. Two wrecked cars, nearly on top of each other. One man alive, the other dead. The fates of 67-year-old David Lavau and a man believed to be 88-year-old Melvin Gelfand met at the bottom of the same rugged ravine, 200 feet below a curvy stretch of mountain road where both men had lost control of their vehicles and crashed, authorities said Friday. It appeared to be sheer coincidence that led the men to end up in exactly the same spot of the Angeles National Forest some 50 miles north of Los Angeles. Lavau lived in the ravine for six days, eating bugs, leaves and drinking creek water to survive, with Gelfand’s badly decomposed body in another car only a few feet away. Lavau was rescued Thursday by his three adult children, who searched a highway between their father’s home in northern Los Angeles County and Ventura County, where a detective told them Lavau’s bank and cellphone

Quick Read

records had placed him. They drove slowly along the mountain road, stopping to peer over the treacherous drop-offs and call out for their father. Near him they found a body in a Toyota Camry that belonged to Gelfand, who had been reported missing on Sept. 14, more than a week before Lavau’s disappearance. “I love my kids. Dead man was not my fault. Love, Dad,” read a note Lavau scrawled on his dusty trunk, his family told the Los Angeles Times.

To be released soon Lavau was at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital with three rib fractures, a dislocated shoulder, a broken arm and fractures in his back. He was expected to be released in three to four days after surgery on his shoulder and to make a full recovery. Dr. Ranbir Singh, the hospital’s trauma director, said Lavau told him he was driving to his home when he was temporarily blinded by the headlights of an oncoming car. He braked, but failed to gain traction. The car flipped and plunged down the embankment.

The body found in the other car could not be visually identified due to decomposition, but Gelfand’s son-in-law Will Matlack said the family had been contacted by the coroner’s office, which was trying to match fingerprints or dental records to make a positive identification. Lavau’s children had reported him missing Sept. 23, though they were not certain when exactly he had disappeared. Parker said by the next day the sheriff’s detective assigned to the case turned up bank records showing Lavau had made a purchase in Oxnard in Ventura County, and mobile phone records showed he had been in the area. The children then organized themselves into a search party. “We stopped at every ravine and looked over every hill, and then my brother got out of the car, and we kept screaming, and the next thing we heard Dad saying, ‘Help, help,’ and there he was,” Lisa Lavau told NBC’s “Today” show. Gelfand, a veteran of World War II, simply disappeared, leaving no clues. How he ended up 50 miles north of Los Angeles in his own car remains a mystery.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Smoke fills some occupations, study finds

Nation: Congress to deal with currency manipulation

World: Ferris wheel hit by plane; no injuries reported

World: Spiritual leader must pay $80 million to ex

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS, MINERS and food service workers top the list of occupations that smoke the most, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts say it might have as much to do with lower education levels as the jobs themselves. Traits linked to higher smoking rates and seen in the employees include being younger, having fewer years of education and making less money. Also, some people who work outdoors are less likely to face the kind of indoor smoking bans seen in white-collar workplaces.

AFTER YEARS OF trying, Congress is taking another stab at punishing China for what many see as currency manipulation to keep its exports to the United States cheap and make American exports more expensive. On Monday, the Senate will take up legislation to impose higher duties on Chinese products to offset the perceived advantage China gets from undervaluing its currency. Supporters say the bill would narrow the trade deficit and bring home jobs that have been lost to Chinese producers. Foes include American-based multinational corporations.

AN ULTRALIGHT PLANE crashed into a Ferris wheel at a rural festival in eastern Australia on Saturday, trapping two children on the ride and two adults in the aircraft for 90 minutes. There were no serious injuries. The Cheetah S200 carrying two men did not topple the Ferris wheel when it hit the frame near the top on the first morning of an annual threeday festival at Old Bar, a coastal village 220 miles north of Sydney. A 9-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl were trapped in a carriage at the top of the wheel. Rescuers used a crane to free the four.

THE FRENCH PRESS is calling it the most expensive divorce settlement in the country’s history: A court has ordered the Aga Khan to pay his exwife $80 million. That’s in the ballpark of what Madonna paid Guy Ritchie when their marriage ended. The diva reportedly shelled out between $76 million and $92 million. The Aga Khan, who is a billionaire and spiritual leader to 20 million Muslims, married Gabriele Thyssen, a German princess, in 1998. They divorced several years later after having a son. A French court of appeals ordered the payment last week.


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Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Federal fund for schools, roads expires Support was meant to offset logging restriction effects By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

A federal funding stream that has supported road maintenance and schools on the North Olympic Peninsula for over a decade is about to run dry. The Secure Rural Schools Act expired Friday. Final payments will be distributed among counties in 41 states in December and January. Unless the act is renewed by Congress, Clallam and Jefferson counties and their school districts will be left with another hole to fill in their budgets. For the counties, that means less road maintenance. Jefferson County received about $1 million this year for roads, while Clallam County was allotted $531,194. “We can’t keep doing what we always have done because the revenue is not coming in anymore,” said Clallam County Administrator Jim Jones.

Logging restrictions The 2000 act, which has been phased out over the past four years, was intended to offset the financial hit from logging restrictions put in place in the early 1990s, and the amount allocated depends on the size of federal forest land in each county. Jefferson County Administrator Philip Morley and Jones said the impacts will be noticeable. “It means both less new projects and less maintenance,” Morley said. In Jefferson County, roads are being chip-sealed every 20 years instead of every 10; Clallam County is doing 20 miles of road paving a year instead of 50. The impact for Penin-

sula schools is less direct. The state has deducted the same amount they receive through the act, meaning, as Sequim School District Business Manager Brian Lewis put it, “It’s a wash as far as we’re concerned.” But school administrators say they are still concerned because it seems unlikely that the state will be able to make up the difference. “That would be a concern because they utilize that money in their budget,” said Port Angeles School District Superintendent Jane Pryne. For this school year, the act allotted $474,000 to the Port Townsend School District, $185,000 to the Sequim School District, and $258,000 to Port Angeles School District. Administrators with the other Peninsula school districts could not be reached for comment Friday.

On Capitol Hill Some efforts are being raised in Congress to reauthorize the act, including renewing payments at a lower level and allowing more logging on national forests. But without any assurances the money will be there in the end, administrators say they have to expect the worse. School officials “just don’t know what’s going to happen,” said Amy Khile, Port Townsend School District business manager.

_________ The Associated Press contributed to this report. Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

Heritage Days Fish and Brew Oct. 8 Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — The West End Business & Professional Association will hold its annual Heritage Days Fish and Brew event this coming Saturday, Oct. 8. The event will be held at the 110 Business Park Roundhouse, corner of U.S. Highway 101 and LaPush Road (state Highway 110), from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event celebrates residents’ smoked fish recipes and home brew varieties. Prizes will be awarded

for judge’s choice, firstthrough third-place best smoked fish, and there will be categories for people’s choice smoked fish and home brew. Entries can be submitted at the event from noon to 1 p.m. The event is open to the public, and admission is by donation. Homemade root beer will also be served. The musical group Loose Gravel will perform. For more information, phone 360-374-3141.

Enjoy your vacation memories every day.

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Tour

puts spotlight on solar projects

Bob Stipe of Blyn looks at an electric converter unit from a solar array that helps power McComb Nursery in rural Sequim on Saturday. The nursery was one of 16 solar projects featured during Saturday’s sixth annual Clallam County Solar Tour, sponsored by the Clallam County Public Utility District. The event featured presentations, home tours and demonstrations of solar power.

Corrections officer who shot inmate back on job Incident resulted in death of Clallam Bay prisoner By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

CLALLAM BAY — The Clallam Bay Corrections Center officer who shot and killed an inmate attempting to escape in June returned to his post last week after being cleared of the shooting. Sgt. Brad Hatt returned Monday to his job overseeing the maximum-security prison’s armory after spending about two months as an administrative assistant, said prison Superintendent Ron Fraker. The Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office determined Aug. 15 the shooting was justified, he said, but Hatt couldn’t return to the job until cleared by a psychologist and the state Attorney General’s Office. Ernest Barker, the corrections officer taken hostage during the escape attempt, remains on leave pending the completion of a mental evaluation, Fraker said.

Fence rammed Hatt fatally shot Kevin Newland on June 29 with a 12-gauge shotgun as the inmate rammed the perimeter fence with a forklift. Newland, a convicted murderer, ignored a warning shot and verbal commands, according to prison officials and the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office,

which investigated the incident. Another inmate, Dominick Maldonado, who took Barker hostage, surrendered after Newland was shot. “They did a tremendous job in a very critical, tense situation,” Fraker said of his staff. Maldonado was transferred to the Stafford Creek Corrections Center near Aberdeen after the incident. He is serving a 163-year sentence for a 2005 shooting rampage at Tacoma Mall that wounded seven people.

Charges considered Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said in an email Friday that she has not decided whether to file escape charges against him. According to the Sheriff’s Office, Newland paused after Hatt fired a warning shot into the ground from the other side of the fence and made eye contact with the officer. Yet he rammed the fence one more time and breached it before Hatt fatally shot him. The report from the Sheriff’s Office references statements Newland made during his trial for murdering Spokane teenager Jamie Lynn Drake in 2006 about suicide. It came to no conclusion as to whether that influ-

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Since the escape attempt, the prison has reinforced the perimeter fences around vehicle gates with “heavyduty” bollards, Fraker said. Some state-mandated security changes are also being enacted at Clallam Bay, though they are in response to the death of Monroe Correctional Complex Officer Jayme Biendl in January. As of Nov. 1, officers will be required to take their breaks at their posts. The prison has also ordered radios that come with distress buttons and is providing sergeants with pepper spray. Fraker said those changes, if enacted earlier, could have helped prevent the escape attempt or at least made it more difficult.

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most part, kept two officers in that area at all times,” Fraker said. Newland and Maldonado were among the 104 inmates working in the prison’s industries and laundry areas when the escape attempt occurred. Maldonado took Barker hostage by holding a pair of scissors to his throat once Barker’s co-worker left for their break. Industries Assistant Supervisor Denny Goudie saw what was happening and verbally sounded an alarm, according to the sheriff’s report. Newland hit Goudie before the assistant supervisor broke free and notified the communication’s center of the incident. After retrieving keys for a forklift chained to a wall from Barker, Newland rammed through a roll-up door and the two perimeter fences before being shot. Fraker said the prison still has two officers supervising the industries area, though the number of inmates working there has been reduced to around 80. That’s mainly due to new state requirements regarding which offenders can perform the work, which pays up to $1.60 an hour, he said. “We’re going to try to keep it fairly close to that number just because it’s more manageable,” Fraker said.

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enced his actions that day. Fraker and Ron Cameron, chief criminal deputy with the Sheriff’s Office, said there’s no indication that Newland attempted the escape to impel officers to shoot him. “Who knows what was going through his mind,” Cameron said, adding that the inmates didn’t leave any notes explaining their actions.

PORT ANGELES — The connection between video games and learning will be explored when the Peninsula College Foundation’s American Conversations brings Marc Prensky to Peninsula College for an evening of food, wine and conversation Thursday. The event will begin in the Pirate Union Building at 6 p.m. with wine and food, followed by the main event at 7:30 p.m. in the Little Theater. Prensky, an internationally acclaimed writer, consultant, futurist, visionary and inventor, is the founder of Games2train, an e-learning company, whose clients include IBM, Bank of America, Nokia, the U.S. Department of Defense and the Los Angeles and Florida

Virtual Schools. He is also the author of two critically acclaimed books, Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning, Digital GameBased Learning and Don’t Bother Me Mom I’m Learning. Audience members will have a chance for a question-and-answer session with Prensky following his presentation. American Conversations is sponsored by Forks Outfitters, KeyBank Foundation, Olympic Ambulance, Schacht Aslani Architects, 7 Cedars Casino and Wilder Auto Center. Tickets are $125 per person. Tickets may be purchased online at www. pcfoundation.ctc.edu.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

A5

Briefly . . . Burglary, attempted arson probed

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Crews

turn off water after main ruptures

Port Angeles water department workers Ron Anderson, left, and Jeff Groves search for a water cutoff valve at the intersection of Sixth and H streets on the west side of Port Angeles on Friday after a 6-inch water main ruptured near Fifth and H, flooding yards and nearby streets with a cascade of water. Crews managed to stop the flow to assess damage to the main and nearby street, which suffered a partial collapse.

Focus on the funny bone Juan de Fuca Festival fundraiser to be held Saturday By Diane Urbani de la Paz

“I absolutely love it. I wouldn’t change it for anything in the world.”

Canadian Laugh-Off champion Paul Myrehaug will entertain at this Saturday’s Juan de Fuca Festival Fall Fundraiser. Tickets to the dinner, show and auction at the Elks Naval Lodge are available till Tuesday. tried to get him for the festival,” Maguire said, adding that he hopes to add more stand-up comedy to the Juan de Fuca weekend in May. Of the life of a full-time stand-up comic — Myrehaug’s been living it since he was just 22 — “I absolutely love it. I wouldn’t change it for anything in the world.”

Saturday night, he promised to dish out comedy of the truth-is-funnierthan fiction variety. “I’m not afraid,” Myrehaug said, to tell true stories — as long as they’re truly hilarious.

________

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

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PORT ANGELES — Park Avenue between Race Street west to an alignment with Eunice Street will be closed to through traffic Wednesday from 8 a.m. until noon as city crews remove a fir tree at risk of falling on nearby power lines. For more information, contact Jim Klarr, city light operations manager, at 360-417-4731.

OLYMPIA — The state Transportation Commission is inviting residents to answer questions about funding and traffic priorities, at http:// www. voiceofwashingtonsurvey. Pedestrian hit org/. The survey takes about BLYN — A 46-year-old 12 minutes, including comSequim woman was listed in critical condition at Har- ment forms as well as mulborview Medical Center in tiple-option questions — with emphasis on tolls and Seattle on Saturday after gasoline taxes. being struck by a car the Earlier, postcards were night before. Sine L. Tveit was walk- sent by EMC Research to ing along U.S. Highway 101 100,000 randomly chosen at Blyn Road at about 9:20 residents, urging them to participate. p.m. Friday when she was Findings will be used to struck by a van driven by advise Gov. Chris Gregoire Thomas A. Stammer, 68, of and the Legislature. Port Townsend, according The state is running out to the State Patrol. of money — and will soon The incident, which blocked the westbound lane be spending 70 percent of fuel taxes just to cover debt until about midnight, is on projects already built or under investigation. Stammer was not cited, approved. Mukilteo tax fighter according to the State Tim Eyman’s Initiative Patrol. 1125 would prohibit tolls that vary by time of day Stranded boat and ban potential Interstate 90 floating bridge NEAH BAY — The tolls from being applied to Coast Guard rescued two Highway 520, among other men Friday who were points. stranded on rocks at Gregoire has suggested Makah Bay after their boat a ballot measure in 2012 to ran aground. increase transportation The 13th Coast Guard funding. District Command Center received an electronic position indicating radio beaSomalian donation con notification at 11:30 PORT ANGELES — p.m. Donations were collected at The beacon was registhe Michael Rivers CD tered to the 37-foot alumirelease concert held num-hull fishing vessel recently at Holy Trinity Western Nomad that Lutheran Church to benefit departed Friday morning Aid to Somalia through but had not returned. Lutheran World Relief. Coast Guard boats from Rivers suggested Neah Bay and Quillayute attendees put their pocket River stations and an Air change together to make a Station Port Angeles difference. MH-65 Dolphin helicopter A total of $420.61 was crew were launched to collected and will be forinvestigate the beacon noti- warded to the Somalia fication. Fund at Lutheran World The helicopter crew Relief through Holy Trinity located the Western Nomad Lutheran Church. aground on rocks in the Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press Pacific Ocean bay south of

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Port Angeles, plus brownie mix, a hippie hat, incense Peninsula Daily News and pastries. Sarah Tucker, a local PORT ANGELES — We artist and filmmaker, has could use a good laugh right contributed a handmade about now. piñata with strings the purAnd we need some good chaser pulls to reveal the buoying, of the spirits and treasures within. bank account. The Oven Spoonful is So went the train of proffering a cooking class thought behind the change and dinner for up to 10 in the Fall Fundraiser for people. the Juan de Fuca Festival of Myrehaug will also aucthe Arts. tion off two nights at the The party Saturday at Hotel Grand Pacific in Victhe Elks Naval Lodge has toria, a trip to Seattle for its traditional auction — the Nov. 5 Huskies-Ducks featuring a stay at The game with lodging at the Fairmont Empress hotel in Arctic Club and a two-night Victoria and a trip to Seat- stay for four at Leaventle to see the University of worth’s Brighton Chalet. The most luxurious aucWashington Huskies-University of Oregon Ducks tion item in Juan de Fuca game — but festival execu- Festival history comes early tive director Dan Maguire in the proceedings: a night booked a different kind of in the $3,500 Monarch Suite at the Hotel Andra in entertainment this year. Seattle. Instead And the of the bands final packfeatured at age compast fall bines stays balls, Paul at the MarMyrehaug, riott Inner the CanaHarbour dian Laughand the Off chamChateau pion from Victoria, Vancouver, two fourB.C., will star hotels P aul M yrehaug deliver a just across the Canadian Laugh-Off stand-up the Strait champion, on the life comedy set of Juan de of a stand-up comic before actFuca. ing as aucThe auctioneer. tion and festivities in SatThe live auction will fol- urday’s Fall Fundraiser are low dinner and a silent auc- crucial to the Juan de Fuca tion Saturday night at the Festival’s future, Maguire Elks ballroom, 131 E. First said. St.; the evening will start They generate support with doors opening at 5:30 for the Memorial Day weekp.m., dinner at 6 p.m. and end festival and concerts show time at 6:45. during the rest of the year, Tickets are $60 per per- and bring internationally son or $400 for a table for known performing artists eight, and must be pur- to local schools. chased by this Tuesday at Featuring a comedian Port Book & News, 104 E. instead of a band at this First St., or via the Juan de party is “a change of pace,” Fuca Festival office at 360- Maguire said. “It tightens up the event.” 457-5411. The Dessert Dash, an auction of sweets, will be Entertained troops back this year. This fall-ball Myrehaug, whose credits tradition will range from include second place in the Bella Italia’s tiramisu and Seattle International Com- Alder Wood Bistro’s chocoedy Competition and trips late bliss brownie to Maguto Kosovo, Kuwait and Iraq ire’s homemade banana to entertain North Ameri- cream pie. can troops, is poised to tackle his first auction in Booking conference Port Angeles. The 29-year-old comic Maguire added that he’s will find some unusual been trying to bring Myrematerial among the items haug to town since last up for bid. October, when he saw the There’s the Arlo Tool Kit, comedian’s set at the Northwhich includes a pair of west Booking Conference in tickets to Arlo Guthrie’s Bellevue. April 15, 2012, concert in “He was really great. We

JOYCE — The Clallam County Sheriff’s Office arrested a 60-year-old man Saturday who allegedly tried to set fire to a garage while committing a burglary. Mark B. Radke of Joyce was booked into Clallam County jail for investigation of first-degree burglary, first-degree arson and second-degree assault. The Sheriff’s Office gave this report: Radke broke into a garage at a home near Milepost 53 on state Highway 112 at about 7:24 a.m. When deputies arrived, he barricaded himself in the garage and began pouring gasoline onto the floor. The deputies forced their in and shot Radke with an electroshock weapon when he attempted to impale a deputy with a sharp piece of wood. A lighter was found on the ground near the gasoline.

Cape Flattery with the two unidentified men stranded. Both were hoisted into the helicopter and transferred to Coast Guard Station Neah Bay. There were no reported injuries. The Western Nomad poses no threat to navigation and was carrying approximately 200 gallons of fuel, the Coast Guard said in a statement.

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Wheelchair Rodeo returns Widow resurrects event to be held on ‘Make a Difference Day’ By Jeff Chew

Hot Wheelers Rodeo, it will be an obstaclecourse competition and drag race along with food and prizes, Witt said. The rodeo is held not only to have a lot of fun but also to call attention to the transportation problems the physically challenged have.

Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

Jamestown Excavation workers on Thursday carve out a site adjacent to the Holiday Inn Express & Conference Center for a future Black Bear Diner.

Site of Black Bear Diner readied, financing sought Location to be Holiday Inn Express plaza in Sequim By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Ground preparation work has begun on the future site of a Black Bear Diner, part of the Holiday Inn Express & Conference Center plaza. But the inn’s owner said financing still must be secured before the restaurant’s walls go up. Blyn-based Jamestown Excavation was using a shovel and dump trucks last week to level sites for the future restaurant and parking lot at 1471 E. Washington St., just west of Simdars Road. “We are doing some site work before the rains come to get a jump on it,” said Bret Wirta, owner and chief executive officer of Wirta Hospitality Worldwide, the company that runs the Holiday Inn Express. Wirta has been reluctant to say when the restaurant would be built on the 0.78-

acre site because of financing issues he said were related to the dour economy. “We are hopefully confident that we can be able to cement a lot of issues with the bank. I think, personally, we are very close.” The restaurant would be the third Black Bear homestyle food franchise in Washington state; the others are in Olympia and Federal Way. “It will employ 50 people, with some management jobs, so there will be some really good jobs,” Wirta said. In addition to Washington, Black Bear Diner has nearly 50 eating establishments in Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado and Iowa.

Building permit Wirta originally took out a city building permit, tentatively valued at $621,812.45, for a 5,000-square-foot restau-

rant in late 2008, records show. A building permit extension was later granted until the end of the year. The 125-seat restaurant and 77-room Holiday Inn Express will function independently or work together for the 250-seat conference center guests as needed, Wirta has said. The separate hotel and restaurant sites will share am existing pond and are linked with a bridge. Wirta said they will be linked electronically, too. For example, hotel guests will be able to charge a meal with their room keys while restaurant guests can reserve a room while enjoying their dinner. The restaurant’s large kitchen is designed to support busy meal times while at the same time catering hotel conference functions. A full range of buffetstyle food options will be

available for business conferences, wedding receptions or reunions, according to Wirta.

Different seating

SEQUIM — After a six-year hiatus, Margaret Witt is bringing back the Wheelchair Rodeo to Sequim’s “Make a Difference Day” on Saturday, Oct. 22. The event is scheduled from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Clallam County Fire District No. 3 fire Obstacle course station, 323 N. Fifth Ave. Owners of scooters, “It’s intended to power chairs and stanbring dard push awareness wheelto the dischairs will abled,” pilot them said Witt, through 88, who is an obstanot wheelMargaret Witt cle course chairorganizer of event in the fire bound but station’s knows parking how it lot — and feels after taking care of compete against each her disabled husband, other in drag races. Howard, for 20 years. Local businesses and He suffered from organizations are donatadvanced rheumatoid ing food and prizes for arthritis before he died winners. five years ago. Witt said the WheelWitt said because she chair Rodeo is done in suspended her involvement after her husband conjunction with Oct. died, so went the wheel- 22’s Make a Difference chair rodeo. Day, “the national day of Now that she had doing good” in which decided to bring it back, residents give back by Witt said she is looking participating in volunfor participants from all teer projects. over the North Olympic ________ Peninsula. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Phone her at 360Editor Jeff Chew can be 683-3091 to sign up for reached at 360-681-2391 or at the special event. jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews. com. Formerly called the

“It’s intended to bring awareness to the disabled.”

The restaurants have large booths, counter seating, a private dining area and outdoor seating. Black Bear Diner was founded in 1995 in Mount Shasta, Calif., by Bob and Laurie Manley, along with founding partner Bruce Dean. They named it for the native bear found in Northern California, and the owners place their signature bear carvings in front of each restaurant, created by Ray Schulz of Deer Park, a city in Eastern Washing- Peninsula Daily News ton. SEQUIM — Young ________ workers and families will Sequim-Dungeness Valley Edi- be the primary focus of a tor Jeff Chew can be reached at political debate co-hosted 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ by Peninsula Young Profespeninsuladailynews.com. sionals Network and Peninsula Daily News beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, 1965 Woodcock Road. before the short trips. The event, which begins Young Eagles flights are with a 5:30 p.m. social provided by volunteer EAA- mixer, will focus on the conmember pilots in aircraft cerns of younger residents ranging from the newest who are trying to build a airplanes to vintage future on the North Olymbiplanes. pic Peninsula, said MatSince 1992, the EAA thew Randazzo, Peninsula Young Eagles program has Young Professionals Netflown more than 1.6 million work co-chair. young people free of charge. Participating young peo- Q&A exchanges slated ple become official Young The debate will include Eagles with the flight, with the names of the pilots and q u e s t i o n - a n d - a n s w e r the participants also exchanges among Clallam included in the “World’s County commissioner canLargest Logbook” that is on didates Linda Barnfather, permanent display in the 48, a Democrat, and Jim EAA AirVenture Museum McEntire, 60, a Republican. Also taking part will be in Oshkosh, Wis., and online through the Young Eagles Olympic Medical Center website at www.young hospital commissioner candidates John Nutter, 40, an eagles.org.

Political debate focus on young families, workers

100-plus Young Eagles get free bird’s-eye view Peninsula Daily News

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incumbent who will answer questions with his opponent, Jeanne M. LaBrecque, and John Miles, 81, an incumbent, who will debate his opponent, Jack Slowriver, 34. There will also be a short presentations by Sequim and Port Angeles City Council candidates, though they will not debate. Candidates for Port Angeles City Council are incumbent and Mayor Dan Di Guilio, 62, who is running against Noelle Fuller, 26; incumbent and Deputy Mayor Don Perry, 66, running against Sissi Bruch, 50; and incumbent Brad Collins, 62, who is running against Andrew “Drew” Schwab, 26. Cody Blevins, who had filed to run against incumbent Cherie Kidd, dropped out of the race for personal reasons last week. Candidates for Sequim City Council are incumbent and Mayor Pro Tem Laura Dubois, 63, running against John Miller, 56; incumbent Erik Erichsen, 70, who is running against Peter Duncan, 42; and Candace Pratt, 72, running against Eric Miller, 56. Questions for the candidates are being accepted via email to www.GetConnected@PYPN.org. The debate will be moderated by Peninsula Young Professionals Network cochair Brian Kuh, Columbia Bank commercial banking officer, and PDN Senior Staff Writer/Commentary Co-Editor Paul Gottlieb.

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

A7

Question: Why pay bank fees? Pain of change weighed against avoiding ATM, debit card charge By Ron Lieber and Ann Carrns

The New York Times

paying new fees, $20,000 is a much higher bar to clear than the direct deposit requirement or the $1,500 to $10,000 minimum balances that the bank currently places on many checking account customers who wish to avoid fees.

NEW YORK — The news last week that Bank of America is imposing a $5 monthly fee on people who have the nerve to use their debit card to buy things probably should not have Consumer alternatives come as much of a shock. As a result, plenty of Wells Fargo, the other giant coast-to-coast bank, customers will be looking at had already revealed its their options. What would cause people plans to test a $3 fee in the wake of new federal rules who count on debit cards to that made the cards less help them live within their means to stick around profitable for many banks. Bank of America proba- despite the $5 a month fee? The first factor is the bly has bigger financial problems than any of its perceived pain involved with switching. competitors. Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News And it is a pain, though So it stands to reason Ann Ricker, left, wearing The Quilcene Order of the Oyster With Pearls, walks with Stan Nealy that it would make a bolder not as much as you may after dedication ceremonies for a new sign proclaiming Quilcene as “The Pearl of the Peninsula.” think. It shouldn’t take move. After all, it is dealing much more than 90 minutes with a pile of troubled mort- to reboot direct deposit of gages, legal fallout from the your paycheck and move all sales of bonds made from the automated payments those loans and questions from one account to another. There may be a few hicabout how it serviced its cups over the next couple of home mortgages. months, but Still, the t h e y scale of its “It’s well worth $5 a shouldn’t changes energy created by this sign, who operates out of both of their necks. take more By Charlie Bermant mean that month to not have to “In a few years these it’s classic.” Quilcene and Kirkland. than a few Peninsula Daily News most debit carry a checkbook.” Helsper supervised the awards might be really valucard shopQUILCENE— About 80 project and received dona- able,” Nealy said, Claudia Smith m i n u t e s Future projects each to fix. pers who do people helped dedicate Gate- tions of plants, rocks and the who uses “Right now, not so much.” Try to not have After the ceremony, the her debit card extensively way Park and a new wel- use of equipment. leave some Bank of group moved to the Quilcene come sign at the south end Cathy Barsukoff, owner Inaugural honorees m o n e y America Community Center for a of Quilcene on Friday afterof the Mount Taylor Inn, mortgages or more than behind in the old account for Lori Millard, Cass Broth- potluck dinner and the regu$20,000 in account balances a few months just in case it noon. provided the site for the erton, Tom Brotherton, Bar- lar Quilcene Conversations The new sign, visible to will need to pay that $5 takes billers a few cycles to park. sukoff, Tom Meyer, Lynn meeting, to plan and discuss U.S. Highway 101 motorists make the switch. monthly fee. Thompson, Mary Carr and 28 future projects. traveling from the south Support rallied Much depends, then, on It is a tax on pretty much The new slogan, Gateway Linda Saunders were every customer without a how much you value that 90 into Quilcene, proclaims the Park and the sign all Helsper said the project inducted into the order. town of 1,500 as “Pearl of the healthy salary or invest- minutes, versus the $60 in required $8,900 in materiHelsper became a mem- resulted from Quilcene Conment income, plus those savings you might achieve Peninsula.” “This park is only the als, all donated, $1,400 in ber of the Order of the Dou- versations, a community volwho want to keep their sav- in Year 1 with your new beginning,” said Stan Nealy, out-of-pocket expenses and ble Oyster, getting a larger unteer movement that seeks ings elsewhere for whatever financial institution. shell, while sign designer to add attractions and serThen you need to weigh who emceed the 15-minute 214 hours of labor. reason. Nealy said the commu- Ann Ricker was specially vices that will capitalize on Bank of America and the value of your time ceremony. “It will be here for a long nity rallied to complete the honored with The Quilcene the town’s assets and Wells Fargo are hardly against the good feeling park, providing moral and Order of the Oyster With address needs identified by alone here, since other big that would come from time.” its citizens. The park and the sign financial support during its Pearls. banks have toughened the rewarding a checking Quilcene Conversations Jefferson County Comrules for people who want to account provider that wasn’t were the latest civic construction. “While we were working missioners John Austin and began in December 2010 improvements emerging keep free checking, or have so fee-happy. ATM convenience is from the year-old Quilcene people would come by with David Sullivan along with and targeted five areas of killed off rewards programs another factor that limits Conversations group, and sodas and cookies and muf- Port of Port Townsend com- community enhancement, to to save money. And we probably haven’t switching. was supervised by Beautify fins,” he said. missioner Leif Erickson beautify Quilcene, help busiConsumers who haven’t Quilcene, a subset of that heard the last of the new “They drive by and honk attended the ceremony but ness, monitor youth, develop looked at an online-only group. rules either. a community identity and their horn and some of them did not address the crowd. institution in awhile will be Gateway Park, a garden would stop and ask where “This is an example for improve outdoor signs. BofA account policies pleasantly surprised by the at the south end of Quilcene they could send us a check.” the rest of the community,” _________ developments here. Twelve people were sin- Sullivan said after the cereon Highway 101 at Milepost All of these moves Jefferson County Reporter Some of them have together, however, raise a tapped into nationwide net- 295, just south of the Mount gled out for special effort, mony. Charlie Bermant can be reached at Added Austin: “There is a 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant simple and rather obvious works of fee-free machines Walker Inn, was designed beginning with the bestowand built by Quilcene resi- ing of The Order of the wonderful community @peninsuladailynews.com. question: that are bigger than any Why is anyone still doing one bank’s collection of loca- dents under the leadership Quilcene Oyster, a shell on of John Helsper, a profess­ a ribbon that was ceremobusiness with banks like tions. ional landscape designer niously placed around each these? Others let you use any Just after noon on Fri- ATM you want and reimday, Elvita Dominique, who burse you for most or all of lives in Harlem, was trying the fees you pay to withto answer that question for draw money. herself. Banks like ING Direct, She had just left a Bank Ally, Charles Schwab and of America branch on Sev- USAA are all worth a look Peninsula Daily News assistance in giving them a enth Avenue in Manhattan here. SEQUIM — The Sequim- thank-you for their efforts. having made an appointThey may well pay better A catered dinner and ment with a bank employee interest too, though it won’t Dungeness Valley Chamber door prize drawings will be Tuesday–Saturday 10 am - 5 pm who could help her review amount to very much these of Commerce will honor part of the evening fun. 609 W. Washington, #11 (JC Penney Plaza) • 360.681.7655 her options. Visitor Information Center days. Gift certificates and gift “I want to know if they volunteers during the are going to make excep- No problem with $5 fee annual appreciation eve- basket donations would be tions,” she said. Rich & Amity Butler ning at the Pioneer Park appreciated. There could be plenty of Memorial Clubhouse, 387 (Later in the day, the Port Angeles School District To donate, phone the people who have no problem E. Washington St., at 5 p.m. chamber office at 360-683branch employee said no.) She had already heard with an extra $5 a month. 6197 or email lynn@sequim Thursday. that Citibank did not plan The chamber is seeking chamber.com. Turn to Fees/A9 to add monthly debit card fees, so she will investigate that possibility. She is also considering joining a credit union. Bank of America’s move is part of a broader effort to overhaul its checking account lineup. As of sometime early next year, it will have four basic accounts, only one of presents… which will waive the $5 monthly fee for debit card Experience an exciting, users who want to use the social fall season joining our card for purchases. ATM use will not incur “Contemporary Dances Series” the monthly fee, but charg8 week progressive series ing recurring bills like gym Oct 6, 13, 20; Nov 3, 10, 17; and Dec 1, 8 memberships or mobile phone plans to your debit at the Elks Lodge in Sequim card will. (143 Port Williams Rd) Only Bank of America customers with more than 5:30 West coast swing 1 $20,000 in combined checking, savings and certificate 6:30 Night club of deposit accounts or a two step 1 bank mortgage (of any size) will be able to avoid both 7:30 West the debit card fee and any coast swing other monthly fee for falling 1&2 below a required minimum balance level. 8:30 Merrill Lynch and U.S. Trust customers will also Salsa 1 get a waiver, as will unemValue for 8 week series ployed people who use certain government-issued starting October 6th is Bank of America cards that only $64 have benefit money loaded onto them. Bring this ad with you to enter the drawing for a private lesson with us and While the bank will not get $10 off rebate when signing in for more than one workshop series. ™ say what percentage of its For detailed information and questions: checking account customers Want to make a difference? Find out how at UNITEDWAYCLALLAM.ORG. it expects (or hopes) will be please visit http://www.uwdglobal.com/sequim/, call 425-753-8086 or email rvillamarin@uwdglobal.com

‘Pearl of the Peninsula’

Quilcene dedicates its new welcome sign and park

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Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Weather: Cool and

wet here, dry in Texas Continued from A1 tent with La Niña.” He said it definitely La Niña brings dry con- won’t be an El Niño winter, ditions to the southern U.S. with warmer than normal states — and its re-emer- temperatures. “I think a weak La Niña gence is bad news for Texas and its neighboring states. is a pretty good bet,” said Texas is in the midst of Mass. “I won’t be shocked if its its worst drought since the 1950s and enduring its dri- neutral. It probably won’t be as extreme as last year, est year dating to 1895. This has resulted in $5.5 and I don’t see it continuing billion in crop and livestock into next summer.” The Climate Prediction losses and Texas’ most Center, with NOAA, last destructive wildfires — blazes that have damaged month it upgraded its La millions of acres and more Niña watch to a La Niña advisory. than 1,000 homes. It said La Niña patterns Mass said forecasters typically occur every three earlier predicted this would to five years and back-tobe a “neutral” year, mean- back episodes occur 50 pering no extraordinary cent of the time. weather patterns. But that’s now shifted to New addition a prediction for a “weak” La This winter the National Niña. “There’s still some uncer- Weather Service will have a tainty,” he said, but subsur- new tool to better forecast face temperatures in the weather coming in from the Pacific “are below normal, west — the new $9 million and tradewinds are consis- Langley Hill Doppler radar

dome erected in Grays Harbor County near Copalis Beach. “It’s huge,” said Cliff Mass, University of Washington meteorologist and weather blogger. “Before, we were blind to the details of weather systems approaching the coast, and now we can see hundreds of miles offshore.” An existing radar station on Camano Island misses a large pie-shaped region which is blocked by the Olympic Mountains. Now, Mass said, forecasters can see a band of rain coming from 240 miles away. The new coastal radar is the first of its kind in the nation, said Dana Felton, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. The new coastal radar won’t have much effect on longer-term forecasts, which rely on satellites, Felton added, but will improve the accuracy of shorterterm predictions.

The Associated Press

Meteorologist Brad Colman, left, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell and Rep. Norm Dicks look out toward the Pacific Ocean from the new coastal Doppler weather radar tower at Copalis Beach during Thursday’s dedication of the new installation to better forecast West End conditions. Andy Wappler, a former TV meteorologist now working with Puget Sound Energy, said an extra halfday of notice could help people and emergency crews better prepare for severe weather. PSE serves most electrical users in East

Jefferson County. Along with several regional governments and utilities, PSE plans to launch a “Take Winter by Storm” public-education campaign this month. The campaign will feature weekly events highlighting safety tips on how

to prepare for downed power lines, severe flooding, driving in the snow and other situations. Last Nov. 22, Wappler noted, the earliest snowfall in more than a decade trapped people in their cars and caused chaos across Western Washington.

Paris: ‘No frills,’ Gregoire says about visit Continued from A1 He said the state is also disputing Gregoire’s hotel room expense and expects the rate to be below the $410 that the State Department considers standard for Paris. The meal costs are in line with those same federal guidelines, Curtis said. Curtis also pointed out a variety of ways the trip was organized to keep costs down: The hotel was comparatively cheap because it was far from the air show, and the delegation used public transit to get to the event. The schedule was designed to fit as many events as possible in the shortest period, including one two-day span that included meetings with more than 100 executives. Private funds covered the cost of the delegation’s booth at the air show. Other states racked up higher bills: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley spent $157,746 in taxpayer money on her trip to France. In North Carolina, state Secretary of Commerce Keith Crisco and six members of his staff spent about $112,228.

Aerospace industry Gregoire said in a statement that the air show provided the state with an invaluable opportunity to meet with leaders in the aerospace industry, and she said the small investment

T

he state is also disputing Gov. Chris Gregoire’s hotel room expense and expects the rate to be below the $410 a night that that the State Department considers standard for Paris. will pay off in the long term. She said the state has to aggressively market itself to attract new customers. “We do it with extremely limited budgets and strategic spending,” Gregoire said. “No frills, but a lot of rolled up sleeves and onthe-ground work to gain immeasurable exposure.”

Day after budget cuts Gregoire began her June trade trip just a day after signing a new state budget that included massive cuts to education, including proposed reductions of teacher salaries of 1.9 percent. The outlook for state government has grown worse since then, as lawmakers now face another budget shortfall of $1.3 billion, and Gregoire has asked agencies to prepare for cuts as high as 10 percent. Gregoire has called for a special session of the 2011 Legislature in late November to address the budget shortfall. The Democrat has said

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repair firm Absolute Aviation Services, said the state-organized delegation kept costs down for smaller businesses. He also said Gregoire’s presence helped broker high-level networking that

Continued from A1 of Dean Messersmith, a classmate of theirs killed in People have come both Vietnam. “I’ve always wanted to day and night to visit the see it,” Bailey said. “It’s nice wall, said organizers. Some come to find the to see his name someplace.” name of someone they Others came to just knew. reflect. Port Angeles residents “I think of the heartMary Johnson, Jim Bailey break for the families that and Ed Fisher said they had to subdue all of this,” came too look for the name said Terry Konopaski, a 71-year-old Air Force vetAre you a low cell phone user? eran, while holding back Feel like you’re wasting your tears. money each month on a plan Like the memorial in that is more than you need?? Washington, D.C., several notes remembering lost loved ones have been placed along the wall.

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state’s on Page A1 and this page, here are some other examples: ■  South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley spent $157,746 in taxpayer money on her trip to France, which was followed by a stop in Germany. Haley, a Republican who touts herself as a fiscal conservative, was accompanied by her husband, 11 staffers and a two-person security detail. ■  North Carolina Secretary of Commerce Keith Crisco and six members of his staff spent about $112,228 on travel and expenses. The receipts obtained by the AP show Crisco hosted a party of five at the seafood restaurant Le Ballon des Ternes for a $653 meal of veal medallions, prawns and snails, washed down with four bottles of wine. ■  Connecticut taxpayers spent about $88,500 for two staff members to host a booth at the show. ■  Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer can-

celed plans to attend because of wildfires in her state, although three Commerce Authority officials still traveled at a cost of $14,716. ■  In Mississippi, Republican Gov. Haley Barbour sent his chief of staff and five employees of a state-supported development group to Paris at a cost to taxpayers of $105,983, after deducting $40,000 in corporate sponsorships. ■  Oklahoma sent four state officials to the show and spent a total of $83,717, records show. As in the other states, Oklahoma Commerce Secretary Dave Lopez was unable to cite concrete results from the trip. ■  New York’s Department of Economic Development did not respond to requests for its expenses, though a list of exhibitors from the air show indicates the state hosted a booth. The Associated Press

he wouldn’t have been able to get otherwise. Julin said his company managed to establish a business relationship with Air France during the trip, and he expects the ground-

work laid at the air show to double the company’s international business in the next two years. “From my personal standpoint, it was definitely a benefit,” Julin said.

Memorial: ‘Heart of patriotism’

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RECORDS SHOW OFFICIALS from at least 14 states jetted across the Atlantic in June to attend the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget. The annual summertime exposition in France is among the world’s premier events for the aerospace industry, and officials in several states said gathering offered a unique opportunity to recruit potential employers. However, a review of receipts obtained by The Associated Press through an open records request found no direct evidence the taxpayer money spent in Paris resulted in the creation of new jobs back home. The sizable state delegations were often accompanied by officials from county and municipal economic development groups, which are typically also supported by taxpayer money. In addition to Washington

urday, talked about the two types of patriotism: one based in reason, the other absent of it. “I believe this [reason] is at the heart of our patriotism,” he said. “The traveling memorial is a remarkable example of all that is best about . . . our feeling of patriotic pride.” Port Angeles Police Chief Balloons released Terry Gallagher will speak Following the ceremony today at the final daily cerSaturday, red, white and emony. It begins at 6 p.m. ________ blue balloons were released into the air while “America Reporter Tom Callis can be the Beautiful” was sung. reached at 360-417-3532 or at Sequim Mayor Ken tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. Hays, selected to speak Sat- com. “For Doc . . . I was there. Thanks” read one accompanied by a poem honoring military medics. Another showed a picture of Tommy S. Ball, killed Nov. 30, 1967, at 19, as a five-month-old baby. “His father was a POWKorean War,” it read. “He never came home.”

Seal: Skin has value

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14 states’ taxpayers fund Paris trips

Continued from A1 selves, McLean said. Blood could be found in The male pup was most several spots that were not likely born in the spring directly adjacent to the and had probably been area. McLean contacted the weaned, but that could not be determined because the National Oceanic and head was missing, she said. Atmospheric AdministraThe pup’s skin, which tion Office of Law Enforcecan have value on the black ment and state Department market, was removed and of Fish and Wildlife officers, who opened an investigaits organs were exposed. McLean said she thought tion and will be pursuing the skin could be sold for the case. The carcass was removed around $150, but possessing or selling such an item and McLean staked the area where it was found so is illegal. the investigator could gather evidence. Illegal to touch The “crime scene” tape She said seals often was removed Friday aftercome up on the beach to noon. rest and could be easily All marine mammals are caught, but it is illegal for federally protected under humans to touch them. the Marine Mammal ProThe carcass was found tection Act and it is illegal near the end of the pier in to harvest or possess marine an area where seals would mammal parts without a normally not beach them- permit.

Violation of the act is subject to a civil penalty of up to $10,000 per violation, while an intentional violation is subject to a criminal penalty of up to $20,000 per violation, imprisonment for one year or both.

Steep fines McLean said she was uncertain whether similar incidents had occurred elsewhere, and encouraged anyone with knowledge of the incident to phone her at the marine science center at 360-385-5582, ext. 109. Information on the case or suspicious behavior can also be reported to the NOAA enforcement hotline at 800-853-1964.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or charlie.bermant @peninsuladailynews.com.


Peninsula Daily News

Fees: Banks

have expenses

Continued from A7 and USAA have started let­ ting many customers Claudia Smith, who lives deposit a lot of their checks in Fayetteville, Ark., said by snapping pictures of she wasn’t worried about them with a smartphone the new fee, even though and then sending the pho­ she used her debit card tos in. It’s hard to beat that for extensively. “It’s well worth $5 a speed of deposit. Chase does this, too, month to not have to carry even though it has plenty of a checkbook,” she said. She rarely uses a branch branches. It won’t work for cash, but had visited one on Fri­ day because the bank had however, so drug dealers notified her that her debit are out of luck. card information might Many options have been compromised. It issued her a tempo­ The fed-up have plenty rary replacement, and she of places to go to find a bet­ was grateful that there was ter bank these days. someplace she could go There is, in fact, a ser­ when the need arose. vice operating out of finda“I guess banks have betterbank.com that can expenses like everyone help. The Web site of the else,” she said. Move Your Money project is “Do we want to be able to worth a look, too. use live tellers?” You can search for a (Indeed, we sometimes credit union that will take do, though we don’t like to hear from their bosses. The you in at creditunion.coop. Lauren Peterson, a New York Times’ Arkansas correspondent was booted junior at the University of from the sidewalk of the Arkansas, may soon be Bank of America Joyce Ave­ among the money movers. She hadn’t heard about nue branch in Fayetteville for “soliciting” customers on the new fee until Friday and wasn’t pleased to learn Friday.) Some people who live that she would probably be hand to mouth and collect a paying it soon. Peterson opened her lot of paper checks like to be Bank of America account near a branch. That way, they can hand when she went to college piles of them over to a teller because the bank has and have the deposits clear branches and ATMs in Fay­ etteville as well as in Dal­ quickly. That need may make it las, which allows her to use seem as if the community them when she visits her bank in the next town or a family. But a $5 monthly fee Web-only institution is a gives her pause. poor option. “Honestly, I might switch,” she said. Using smarphone “I feel it’s an inconve­ In the last year or two, nience, especially for stu­ however, banks like Schwab dents. No one carries cash.”

PeninsulaNorthwest Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County commissioners will continue their review and deliberation of the draft response to the state Department of Ecology on changes to the shoreline master program when they meet Monday. The meeting begins at 9 a.m. in commissioners’ chambers at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. The county comm­ issioners approved a shore­ line master plan in 2009. In February, Ecology notified Jefferson County that it approved the plan on the condition that it reverse its ban on fin-fish farming, along with other considerations. Revisions have been under consideration since. The commissioners will also discuss renewing a proposed ordinance reestablishing a moratorium against the issuance of per­ mits or approvals pertain­ ing to adult businesses, which is on the consent agenda. It will also address requested appropriations and extensions from vari­

the first-floor conference room.

Eye on Jefferson ous county departments, also on the consent agenda. Other items on the con­ sent agenda include: ■ An agreement to pro­ vide support services for moderate/high risk offend­ ers. ■ An agreement to allo­ cate an additional $1,162 for a total of $32,674 to Jef­ ferson County Public Health to support the school nurse corps health program. ■  An agreement to allo­ cate $3,000 for the treat­ ment of invasive knotweed.

Port Townsend city The Port Townsend City Council will consider an emergency resolution to allocate funds for repair of the Bell Tower at a meeting on Monday. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in council cham­ bers, 540 Water St. Dry rot in the tower was discovered during routine maintenance and engi­ neers determined that the historical tower was in danger of collapsing. The repairs should be

done immediately, before the expected seasonal high winds, the council has been advised. The repairs would cost no more than $200,000 and would be funded from 2010 bonds, either from the bond’s contingency amount or by reducing the scope of other projects. Other city meetings this week: ■  The Arts Commission will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday in the firstfloor conference room at City Hall, 250 Madison St. ■  The Historic Preser­ vation Committee will meet from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday in the third-floor conference room. ■  The Hearing Exam­ iner will hold a public hear­ ing concerning the state Department of Transporta­ tion’s Ferries Division Shoreline Substantial Development Application from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the council chambers. ■  The Non-Motorized Transportation Advisory Board will meet from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday in

Planning Commission The Jefferson County Planning Commission will discuss extending formal support to local grass-roots food resiliency programs at a meeting on Wednesday. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in the first floor conference room of the Jef­ ferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St.

Hospital district The Jefferson Health­ care Board of Directors will hear a presentation about how the hospital can use social media to better inform the community at a meeting on Wednesday. The meeting begins at 3:30 p.m. in the audito­ rium, 834 Sheridan St.

Public utility district The Jefferson County Public Utility District will discuss approval of deposit and charges to its contract with the Bonneville Power Administration at a meet­ ing Monday. The meeting begins at 5 p.m. at 230 Chimacum Road in Port Hadlock.

Fancy for fennel leads to cooking crown The Associated Press

VANCOUVER, Wash. — A Vancouver, Wash., woman has won the second annual Foster Farms Fresh Chicken Cooking Contest.

The Columbian reported that Rebecca Spence won with a recipe for Crispy Orange Chicken with Fen­ nel, Avocado and Orange Salad.

Her recipe was selected out of about 2,000 entries. She said she created the recipe because she wanted to learn how to cook with fennel.

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Commentary

PAGE

A10

New medical codes cause dizziness GOOD NEWS FOR doctors! Under federal mandate, they will no longer be forced to pick from 18,000 numerical claim codes when filing an insurance claim for an office visit. Now, the number of W. Bruce claim codes will be 140,000. Cameron That’s a 678 percent increase in codes, which right there should end our unemployment problems in this country — every able-bodied person will be spending all their time looking up code numbers. As a result of these refined codes, there will also be a 678 percent increase in the quality of medical care, which I am sure we’re all in favor of. For example — and I kid you not — one of the codes is for “burns due to water skis on fire.”

Heck, did we even know this was a problem before? Now, due to these refined codes, we can stop the epidemic of burning water skis in midslalom. “Quick, throw some water on those water skis before they send someone to the hospital!” I spent some time reading the database of these refined codes. I’m trying to memorize them so that when I call the doctor, I don’t have to waste time explaining what has happened to me, I can just say, “Doc, it’s a case of Y93G1,” and she’ll say, “Get to the ER, stat!” Y93G1 is, of course, “injured while crocheting.” And “stat” is a word that means, “I am a doctor, so I don’t say ‘fast.’” Now, anyone who has ever suffered from a Y93G1 can tell you that if your treatment is nonstat, you could conceivably die from it, though no one can fully explain how. It’s crochet and should be left up to the professionals — that’s

Speaking Out

all you need to know. Strangely, while there are these codes for crochet, there are none for croquet. So if someone brains you with a croquet mallet, you won’t be able to get treatment because there isn’t a code. In my opinion, if you’re lying there with a croquet head injury, you’d better drag yourself to some water skis and set them on fire. Neither is there, as far as I can determine, a code for injuring yourself while crocheting on flaming water skis — that would be silly. Not at all silly, though, is W6132 — “struck by a chicken.” Let’s say you’re walking under a tree full of chickens who got up there by, oh, I don’t know, a ladder or something, and all of a sudden one of them falls and gives you a W6132 right on the head. That can really hurt, especially if the chicken is frozen. During my search, I found 150 codes for things that can go

wrong with your lips, including corrosion and ugly stuff growing on them, but not, oddly, kissing the wrong person at the office holiday party. Included in the 150 is “Laceration with foreign body of lip, sequela.” In medical terms, sequela is “bad outcome,” so apparently without sequela you can lacerate your lips with a foreign body and it will turn out OK — like, perhaps your cut lip prevents you from kissing the wrong person at the office holiday party. Or maybe you kiss her anyway, and she hits you with a chicken. Or perhaps she’s been trained in crochet, in which case she’s going to Y93G1 you right into the hospital. The point is, no matter what’s wrong with your lips or your chickens or your holiday sweater, there’s a medical code for it, so you’ll be OK stat. Where you got hurt is also part of the code, as in Y9272 — injured in a chicken coop.

(Hey, it’s not funny, I was hit by a falling chicken!) Or let’s say you walked into a lamppost — that’s a W2202XA. And if you got up and walked into the lamppost again, that’s a W2202XD. I’m not sure where this is happening to you, but if you keep walking into the same lamppost over and over, I’m pretty sure your problems started with too much cheer at the holiday party. Or, as your doctor would say, too much F1092 at the party, leading to you kissing the wrong person and getting your lips lacerated with a sharp blow from a chicken. It doesn’t matter, though — you’ll get treatment stat, because there’s a code for that.

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/pdnbcameron.

The economy is in bad shape, but how are you doing personally?

Leta Gibbs

Curtis Elliott

Marilyn Sandau

Danny Richards

Heather Wheeler

Jim Pickett

Vashina Donnell

Dwayne Roberts

College communication specialist Sequim

Unemployed roofer Discovery Bay

Retired special education teacher Port Townsend

Retired detective Port Angeles

Customer service representative Port Angeles

Retired school superintendent Sequim

Self-employed Joyce

Truck mechanic Port Angeles

“Life has been steady. I haven’t been [as] affected as many people I know. I didn’t lose my job. I am working. I feel lucky.”

“All right. I’m retired and managing to keep my head above water. Pleased to have what I have , and I help others who are less fortunate through Rotary, Hospice and ShelterBox.”

“I’m scared but OK. My investments are hurting. Property values are going down. Our area has lots of empty stores. No time or place for entrepreneurs to get started.”

“We’re struggling but getting by. I’m currently employed but cutting back everywhere I can. No vacations. No movies. No extras. Everything costs more. One day at a time.”

“I’m cutting back on expenses and careful with spending by making sure that every penny counts. I take it one day at a time by putting a smile on my face.”

“We recently moved here from California, where we lost most everything — jobs and homes. But today, we both have a job and a roof over our heads.”

“I’m very fortunate to have a pension, so I know I’ll always have an income. I don’t live high on the hog, but I’m doing fine.”

“I am doing fine. I’m trying to live simply and do with less. Best to quit complaining and get on with it. I feel fortunate to be alive and be retired.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Underage drinking

out of control. Washington state’s The month of September RCW66.44 Section was designated “Alcohol and 66.44.270 is very explicit on Drug Recovery Month” by the law and punishment the city of Port Townsend resulting from violating it. and Jefferson County. It’s best if you don’t let Accordingly, the Jefferyoung people talk you into son County Substance this scenario. Abuse Advisory Board took You should think about on this topic at its regular the consequences of the September meeting and problems that ensue from brought out some poignant the act. items that sometimes get Better parenting isn’t overlooked by the general popular at times, but it is public. far better to make good One of these deals with adults (parents) sponsoring decisions. When you look at the parties in their homes and incidents of drug and alcoallowing underage persons hol abuse with our younger to drink or use banned citizens and the costs of substances. recovery to the parents and Some say it’s cool to let community, it should be relthe kids have liquor or drugs in the home to experi- evant and pertinent to make the right decision. ence whatever and be conRay Hunter, trolled by the parents. Port Townsend With the holiday season upon us, this happens every Hunter is a member of year — with not so good the Substance Abuse Adviresults. sory Board. Parents think they are doing the kids a favor by A treasure letting them drink and To the fine people of smoke in a controlled place Port Angeles: and pulling the keys so no What a treasure. one drives, etc. But this usually leads to I am an artist who lives bad things when they get in the Seattle area.

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

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Dean Mangiantini Production Director

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Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Acting Advertising Director

360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

On a spectacular September day, I made the journey across Puget Sound to witness in person the outdoor sculpture garden and [Port Angeles] Fine Arts Center that I had recently been told about. I am bubbling over with renewed creative energy. Previous to this trip, I had only passed through Port Angeles on my way to the marina or Lake Ozette. Now I have an even better reason to visit your beautiful community. Bravo. Lisa Wickstrom Chandler, Kenmore

Football injuries I am the mother of the former quarterback for Sequim High School who over the last three years set not only the Sequim High School all-time scoring record but the all-time passing record as well. The Sequim-Bremerton varsity football game the night of Sept. 23 ended with Sequim undefeated, headed for a possible state championship and talk of how exciting the final

Our readers’ letters, faxes match-up between Sequim and Port Angeles will be. But the final quarter of the game looked like a war zone, with four ambulances and every medical person on the field engaged and lives on the line. At least two Sequim players suffered very significant concussions at this game. I have asked the Sequim School District to implement a schoolwide concussion program to allow concussion testing for their student-athletes and to create a sideline protocol for a very long time. With the help of our advisers from Harvard, Children’s National Medical Center and Boston University, we help organizations all over the country develop these strategies, which costs them nothing. To date, the Sequim School District has not acted upon, or outright refused (citing legal reasons), all three requests. The district used to be blind to the issue of sportsrelated concussions through ignorance. They are now making a conscious choice to ignore a

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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tremendous problem in the name of self-preserving liability. I predict that stance will backfire someday. I just hope an athlete does not have to die before the district finds its way. Jean Rickerson, Port Angeles

ing a concussion, the Sequim Athletic Department has been 100 percent compliant. This includes a specific sideline protocol that assigns a coach to monitor any injured student. Each athlete who has received a concussion in a school sporting event has Rickerson is president of been removed from play, SportsConcussions.org monitored and handed off We asked for a response to his or her parents to be from Sequim School Distaken in for medical care trict Athletic Director Dave by a licensed physician. Ditlefsen. Here it is: In addition, we have The Sequim High trained our coaches to School Athletic Departexpand these protocols to ment is deeply concerned include all other types of about the safety of our stu- injuries to provide the safdent athletes. est possible programs for Our coaches work hard our athletes. to ensure that all athletes The unfortunate injuries are equipped with the best that occurred the night of possible safety equipment Sept. 23 were no exception. and are taught the proper Each player who suftechniques to help avoid fered an injury was immeinjuries. diately removed from the Unfortunately, despite game and placed under the all proactive measures care of a physician on our being taken, some injuries sidelines. are simply unavoidable. Emergency-aid cars Since the introduction of with trained medical prothe Lystedt Law in the fall fessionals were also presof 2009, which outlines the ent, ready to respond exact protocols that each immediately. school must take in the Turn to Voices/A11 event of an athlete suffer-

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 when it comes to the city budget and city projects. Although each injury She will be a citizenwas unavoidable in what focused thinker, not a rubwas a very physical game, ber-stamper for a bigour players received the spending staff. best possible medical care. I look forward to voting I would like to personfor her this November. ally thank those medical Vote Sissi Bruch for City professionals who support Council. us at each and every game Pat Miller, for the care and attention Port Angeles they provide our kids. EDITOR’S NOTE: The state Auditor’s Office said Don Perry critic in its report released April Let’s recap some of the 14 that Rogers did not disantics from Port Angeles City Hall from the past few close her “remote interest” in city-contracted Capacity years, shall we? Provisioning Inc. — as We’ve had Karen Rogrequired by state law — ers, a former City Council member and mayor, inves- when she voted in 2007 on the company’s fiber optics tigated by the state Audicontract with the city, tor’s Office. We’ve seen hundreds of which has paid the company about $5,000 a thousands of dollars month. wasted on the HarborAfter completing its Works fiasco. investigation of Rogers, the Our utility rates have state Auditor’s Office did gone up, up, up, largely to not request further action help pay for Port Angeles from the state Attorney Public Works Director General’s Office. Glenn Cutler’s grandiose dreams of putting a sewage Makah hatchery treatment tank on our (supposedly) picturesque For the last two years waterfront. now, the Makah National Our city budget skyFish Hatchery has asked rocketed 25 percent in one the state Department of year. Fish & Wildlife to close And we have a city Makah Bay to sport fishing manager who is clearly during the peak of the checked out and has sport-fishing season to shopped his resume allow enough salmon to get around. up the two-mile-long Sooes Where is the City Coun- River to the hatchery. cil in all this? Specifically, Last year, a week after where is council member this closure, anybody who Don Perry in all this? bought a $22 Makah fishWhat leadership has the ing license could line the deputy mayor displayed? river bank at the mouth of He had no questions for the river and catch three the auditor’s office during fish a day. their presentation. Tribal members with a He voted for spending gill net could drop it in the your money on Harborriver and take as many Works. fish as they wanted. He voted to bloat the These black fish have budget. very little worth for their And he seemingly has flesh at this point, but their nothing but praise for roe is worth a fortune in Glenn Cutler and [City Japan, $10 a pound and up Manager] Kent Myers. for the sellers here. Don Perry needs a realSo, not only is the tribe ity check. killing the current run, it is Fortunately for all of us, also killing off future runs. he may well get it in the This year, it has finally next election. caught up with the tribe. His opponent, Sissi After walking the river Bruch, is a professional recently and looking into planner who has in-depth the holding ponds below experience with the issues the hatchery with my son, our city faces. we didn’t see 50 fish in the She has real-world whole river. knowledge that will help This is a national hatchery, run on 2 million save us real-world dollars

taxpayer dollars per year. If the tribe can’t run it properly, then it needs to either be shut down or taken over by someone who will run it to its potential. I spend more than $1,000 a year launching my boat and buying gas for it in Neah Bay. I deserve access to these fish. Herbert Mullen, Sekiu

Our readers’ letters, faxes salmon. We sympathize with those who catch Sooes River chinook in Makah Bay. But closing our inriver fisheries is of little benefit to the stock if the adjacent fishery is open in Makah Bay. This is why we asked Fish & Wildlife to close the Makah Bay sport fishery. It’s unfortunate, but in years like this, we must put conservation first.

Sunday, October 2, 2011

A11

and email

His definition of a fiscal conservative seems to be: Have taxpayers pay the bills while conserving the amount paid out of his own pocket. His opponent, Linda Barnfather, knows how to be frugal. She will get my vote. Norma Turner, Port Angeles

that no progress would be made.

Potting soil

A Sept. 18 letter to the editor [“Andrew May critic”] questions the use of vermiculite in potting soil based on safety concerns. That issue was clarified in a reply from [PDN Sunday gardening columnist] We asked McEntire for a Andrew May. There are, however, alternative soil response. Here it is: Mullen is a former comamendments that readers Obviously, the writer mercial fisherman. may wish to consider. has run out of positive We asked Russell Svec, As Mr. May stated in his fisheries manager for the McEntire ‘spender’ ideas and arguments. original Aug. 28 column Let’s start with the Makah tribe, for a response. Watch out, Clallam [“Moles Enablers Of Plantfacts: Port taxes only pay Here it is: County voters. for infrastructure, not port Eaters In Yard”], vermicuWhile we are pleased A big spender wants to lite is used as a soil condioperations, so taxpayer that people are concerned shift from the Port of Port tioner to increase the soil’s money is not at issue. about the Sooes River chiAngeles to a salaried porosity and water-holding I’m retired and can’t nook, the letter has a num- county job. capabilities and also to donate my time and effort ber of factual errors that Jim McEntire’s record “lighten” heavy clay soils to the port’s business. we wish to correct. as a port commissioner endemic to our area. The law allows reimThe Makah National shows that he doesn’t hesi- bursement of my out-ofPrior to 1990, the Fish Hatchery is operated tate to spend public money. pocket expenses while con- domestically available verby the U.S. Fish & Wildlife In his first year as a miculite was heavily conducting port business, just Service, not the Makah port commissioner, he was taminated with asbestos. like all elected people on tribe. part of the team that While it may be safe, official business. Makah Fisheries Mancommitted $1 million to with appropriate precauMy expenses are fully agement works in coordithe Harbor-Works scheme tions, to use less contamiscrutinized by the port’s nation with the U.S. Fish & without any prior public nated vermiculite, many internal auditor and the Wildlife Service to ensure discussion and later wrote state Auditor’s Office every may consider having a that our fisheries manage- off the Harbor-Works potential carcinogen year. The public can be ment supports the produc- “loans” as a bad debt. around children and used assured that all of them tion goals of the hatchery. Port travel vouchers for are legitimate. in the production of food an We also coordinate these January 2008 to present unnecessary risk. We commissioners efforts with the Washingreveal that McEntire leads Perlite is probably the believe it’s vital to mainton Department of Fish & the pack in personal spendmost commonly used soil tain close relationships Wildlife as co-managers of ing reimbursements. conditioner in commerwith our federal partners. these resources. His more than $35,000 Since I worked in Wash- cially available potting Unfortunately, in recent is not only more than the years the chinook produced other two port commission- ington, D.C., it’s logical that soils. Perlite is heatexpanded volcanic glass. I make the annual trip to by the hatchery have not ers combined but almost It is, however, very light discuss port interests. returned to the river in triple the total for all three when dry and will tend to When meetings schednumbers large enough to county commissioners “float” to the surface of uled late in the week support in-river fisheries ($12,150) for the same time changed, instead of altering soils, especially after it has while still meeting spawn- period. my airline tickets at consid- been worked or grown in ing escapement goals. Examples: After visiting more than once. This problem is common his daughter in Charlottes- erable extra expense, I While “clean” vermicutalked to several individuto many Washington chiville, he tacked on a trip to als I knew in the Transpor- lite is available from Africa nook runs, which are caught his former workplace, tation and Homeland Secu- or China, a good, locally in northern fisheries before Washington, D.C. available choice for a naturity departments, discusswe can fish them here. No appointments or con- ing port security and water ral soil conditioner is On average, more than ferences were scheduled. and aviation transportation pumice. 60 percent of the fishing He instead simply Pumice is essentially policy matters — a good mortality on Sooes River planned “to barge into a perlite that was made in use of the time freed up. chinook has been in Alaska number of career federal nature. It is denser than The writer repeats all and Canada. employee offices on Thurs- the old, stale arguments perlite and doesn’t “float” Perpetuating the chiday and Friday and hobto the surface of containers, regarding Harbor-Works. nook run is essential to the nob” (McEntire email). I hardly need to remind nor does it compress in Makah. This hobnobbing larger containers the way the public that we remain Therefore, over the past included a $300 hotel room stuck where we have been vermiculite does. two years we closed all and 413 cashews. He billed for a decade-plus, with the In my experience, pumfishing in the Sooes River $2,300 that month. ice has better water-holdonly progress being the to allow chinook spawners Charges submitted are ing capacity than perlite city’s having a solution in to return to the hatchery. not just for out-of-town and holds up well to hand for combined sewer Once the hatchery expenses. They also include overflows. repeated uses. exhausts all of its effort in local charges — too many Bethany Rondeau, If the city and the port reaching its chinook brood- to list — and include an Port Angeles had not tried valiantly to stock goal for the year, we eight-mile drive to a Rotary accelerate the cleanup and open the Sooes River to meeting, $2.75 coffees and Rondeau is the owner of return to the economy a tribal and non-tribal Secret Garden Supply in valuable property, we a $1.49 bottle of water would have guaranteed fishers alike, targeting coho in Sequim. Port Angeles.

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

Rave of the Week TO THE LADY who took my video back after she bought the video camera at Goodwill. Thank you so much. It’s the only one of my husband, who passed away.

. . . and other Raves MANY THANKS TO the gentleman gardener who keeps the large planters in front of the hospital in such beautiful condition. What a lift for all of those who have to go in and out. I’D LIKE TO rave about my rant from the week before which got all the convertible owners up in a dander. Way to go.

Maybe next time there’s a sunny day, you’ll have that top down. And as far as the Marine who worries about his wife’s hair, that’s what scarves are for.

Clallam Transit System driver or passenger who turned in my red bag with three money orders and the red umbrella still inside. It’s nice to live in a town where honesty still prevails.

A RAVE FOR the Clallam County Public Utility District. I made a call about a power line with a tree branch on it, and within 10 minutes they were there. Nice job, guys.

“ONCE MORE WITH Feeling” is perhaps the best entertainment bargain one can find. Not only do the Port Angeles Community Players do an outstanding job, but it is here. Not across the water. Only $12 per person. No traveling, no ferries, no meals out, and a very funny play. We are lucky to live in such a talent-rich area.

RAVES TO OLYMPIC National Park for the festivities to celebrate the beginning of the two Elwha dam removals, to Peninsula College for the stimulating two-day Elwha Science Symposium, to Nature Bridge (Olympic Park Institute) for the tours and educational activities on Sept. 18 and to the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe for all their special dances, prayers and gestures of celebration! A HUGE RAVE for the

EDITOR’S NOTE: For more information, call 360-452-6651 or go to wwwpacommunityplayers. com

Rant of the Week TO THE LOWLIFE who

stole the book bag out of a blue Toyota Yaris on Sunday, Sept. 25, at 7 Cedars parking lot [Blyn]. Too bad. No money.

U.S. Highway 101, nearly causing crashes. It is far too many, too often and too dangerous.

. . . and other Rants

(CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. On voice messages, spell out names for raves. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.

I’D LIKE TO rant about the recent ranter who was complaining about the marijuana smell that stunk. OUR NEIGHBORS HAVE a rant to the Port Angeles city road department for a very uncomfortable drive down 18th Street. The container trucks as well as constant traffic to the landfill have eroded this street. Please consider this a priority for repair. The whole city will appreciate this. IT IS TROUBLING, the numbers of vehicles turning out of the Blyn convenience store and gas station (The Longhouse) in front of vehicles traveling down

________


A12

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Gillian Wolfe, 7, of Port Angeles waits for her ride as Mary Gallagher, left, prepares to lead the horse at Freedom Farm near Agnew on Saturday.

Keith Thorpe (5)/Peninsula Daily News

Nicole Brewer of Sequim talks to her daughter, Raimey, 3, as another daughter, Maia, 13 months, reaches out to touch a baby lamb at a display set up by the Lambchops 4-H Club at Johnston Farms in Agnew, one of six farms taking part in Saturday’s Harvest Celebration Farm Tour.

Five-year-old Nathan Anderson of Port Angeles sits at the wheel of a John Deere tractor at Lazy J Tree Farm. Steve Johnson, owner of Lazy J Tree Farm east of Port Angeles, top, describes the workings of the farm to visitors during a hay bale ride.

Abby Kimball, 4, feeds a carrot to a miniture pony at Freedom Farm.

Tour turns fields and farms into a feast IT WAS AN opportunity for North Olympic Peninsula children to learn where food comes from. Six eastern Clallam County farms opened their fields and barn doors for six hours to the 14th annual Harvest Celebration Farm Tours on Saturday. And then on Saturday evening, a banquet with locally grown food and concert by the country rock band Deadwood Revival finished the celebration of all things agricultural. Each farm on the tour offered different activities, including educational displays, petting zoos, live music, tractor rides, arts and craft activities, contests and demonstrations. Proceeds from the Harvest Celebration Farm Tours go to support the work of Friends of the Fields, now a division of the North Olympic Land Trust, in its efforts to preserve local farmland and support sustainable local farming. Peninsula Daily News

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Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News Five-year-old Nathan Anderson of Port Angeles sits at the wheel of a John Deere tractor at Lazy J Tree Farm east of Port Angeles, one of six farms partici- pating

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Utes served

Prep Notes

Earning way on the field SO MUCH FOR any charges of nepotism. As Sequim junior Jack Matt Wiker proved in Schubert Friday night’s win over North Mason, there’s a reason why he’s a featured player in the Wolves’ spread offense. And it has nothing to do with who’s the head coach . . . other than genetics. “That’s probably one of the better quarters I’ve seen from a Sequim kid in a long time,” said Wolves coach and father Erik Wiker. “It was quite amazing what he did.” For the first 13 minutes against the Bulldogs, he put on a show. Leading Sequim on five straight touchdown drives, the 5-foot-11, 195pound junior displayed exactly the sort of talents one would expect out of the starting quarterback on a fifthranked team. Except, of course, he’s usually the Wolves’ starting running back. “I think that [North Mason] thought running back at quarterback, he probably can’t pass that great,” Erik Wiker said. “We knew he could pass.”

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Dawgs give Utah taste of Pac football

ALSO . . . ■ WSU ekes out victory/B4

Price football now? Is that OK?” Sarkisian chided. Price flashed a grin, said, “Sure, coach,” and the team roared. The Huskies then went on a 21-point scoring barrage en route to a 31-14 victory over Utah, spoiling the Utes’ first Pac-12 home game. “He challenged me, and as a group, we stepped up to the challenge,” said Price, who finished 22 of 30 for 226 yards and three touchdowns to give him 17 scoring tosses on the season.

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Washington wide receiver Kasen Williams (2) celebrates his touchdown against Utah during the second half of Saturday’s game in Salt Lake City.

SALT LAKE CITY — With his Huskies up just three points at halftime Saturday, Washington coach Steve Sarkisian asked for the “real” Keith Price to step up. The sophomore quarterback obliged, hopping up on a stool in front of the entire team. “Can we go back and play Keith

Turn

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Dawgs/B4

Daring to pass Indeed, North Mason rolled its safeties up near the line of scrimmage, betting that the converted QB wouldn’t be able to complete any deep throws on its secondary. After a shaky start that saw him complete just two of his first six passes, Jack Wiker made the Bulldogs pay for that gamble. He connected on six straight throws at that point — four going for 20 yards or more — that included touchdown passes of 5, 21, and 36 yards to wideouts Nick Ramirez and Tyler Forshaw. Ramirez came up with the first two to put the Wolves on top 12-0. Forshaw then caught the 36-yarder in stride at the goal line on a perfectly lofted spiral that was just the kind of throw first-string quarterback Frank Catelli would make were he not suspended. “I don’t think they expected us to pass as much as we did, and it worked out really well,” said Jack Wiker. “I expected them to have two safeties. That’s what we were planning on. When they didn’t, I knew I could throw deep, so I went for that.” Of course, Jack Wiker flashed a great deal of his power run style as well. Perhaps the most impressive was his 41-yard touchdown run near the end of the first quarter. Coming immediately after Michael Ballard recovered a fumble on defense, it was actually a broken play originally designed as a “choice’’ pass. Once things broke down following the snap, he decided to take off through a hole in the middle of the line. He shook off a tackler, then outran the rest of the defense into the end zone. After adding another 9-yard run moments into the second quarter, the Wolves were well on their way to a win with a 32-0 lead. “I don’t think anybody had any doubts [about Jack replacing Frank],” Forshaw said. “We all know what he’s capable of. “His passing game is elite and so is his running game, so we didn’t have any worries coming in. We just had to believe in him, and he came in and did his job.” Doubts are something Jack Wiker is used to. In recent years, he’s had to deal with the assumption made by some, including peers, that his major role in Sequim’s football program comes by virtue of his last name. Erik Wiker said it’s something he prepared his son for at a young age. “I think that happens a lot in the youth sports, that the dad who coaches puts his son in and he’s the star,” Erik Wiker said. “So I think people kind of grow up with the thought of [favoritism]. “That’s a natural thing that people think. He hears it from students at school and things like that. “It’s definitely not the case. People might think so, but people can think whatever they want.” Turn

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Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Port Townsend’s Matt Cain (29) runs for 12 yards and a first down despite pulling along Cedar Park Christian’s Andrew Rickman during Friday’s game at Memorial Field in Port Townsend.

Redskins run over Cedar Park too big for PT in 49-0 loss Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend football team couldn’t handle the bigger, older Cedar Park Christian Eagles in a 49-0 loss Friday night.

Coming off two games in which they scored 24 and 30 points, the young Redskins couldn’t find the end zone in a Class 1A Nisqually League matchup at Memorial Field. The result was the 15th

straight loss for Port Townsend (0-3 in league, 0-5 overall) dating back to the 2009 season. “They are pretty big and physical and they ran the doublewing,” Port Townsend coach Tom Webster said. “I drew up three plays this week [for defensive practice]: trap, counter and toss. And they are just really big up front and they overwhelmed us.” Cedar Park Christian scored three touchdowns in the first two quarters for a 21-0 first-half lead.

Prep Football The Eagles (1-2, 3-2) then broke the game open at the start of the second half when Daniel Watts took the opening kickoff 78 yards for a touchdown. Port Townsend, which has just one senior and one junior on its roster, was held to less than 200 yards of offense in the defeat. It didn’t help that Redskins Turn

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Preps

Cowboys slip past Redskins Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Former Peninsula College Trustee Dan Wilder Sr. speaks during a rededication ceremony Saturday for the Sigmar Athletic Complex and Sigmar Field in Port Angeles.

Day to remember Sigmar Field rededicated at Pirates soccer sweep By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Dan Wilder Sr. choked up while talking about his friend Wally Sigmar. Peninsula College’s fourth president was not present on a gray Saturday afternoon at a special rededication of newly renovated Sigmar Field. But given what Sigmar meant to the proceedings — it was he,

after all, who brought athletics back to the school and had the field posthumously named in his honor in 2000 — it was impossible not to feel his impact. “As I’ve been through life, I’ve met a lot of good men, but not a lot of great men,” Wilder, a former Peninsula College Board of Trustees chair, told the crowd at Saturday. “Wally was one of those great men.” Wilder and current president

Tom Keegan, the keynote speaker at the rededication, each credited Sigmar with beginning the transformation that turned Peninsula College into what it is today. Yet surely, even Sigmar would have been surprised to see what his athletic creation had become 11 years after he passed away in June of 2000. Not only was the school officially re-dedicating its new $1.4 million state-of-the-art artificial turf field during a Pirates soccer doubleheader against Whatcom, but standing on it were two of the premiere programs in the NWAACC. Turn

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CHIMACUM — This was the barn-burner volleyball match of all barn-burners. Archrivals Chimacum and Port Townsend just didn’t want to quit playing Saturday night in a five-game, 229-point, takeno-prisoners nonleague match. The Cowboys (2-6 overall) of the Nisqually League came out on top 25-12, 25-21, 29-31, 24-26, 19-17 for the 3-2 win. “It was interesting,” Chimacum coach Sally Dankert said. “Even though it was a nonleague match there was more intensity for us because they are our rivals.” The two teams matched up well. “This was definitely a wellmatched team for my girls,” Port Townsend coach Nettie Hawkins (Witheridge) said about Chimacum. “There was a lot of rivalry but a very close five games. It was nice to finally play against someone our size and in the league we belong in.” The Class 1A Redskins currently play in the 2A/3A-dominated Olympic League. “My girls have never played better than they did tonight,” Hawkins said. Turn

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SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Soccer

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Sept. 29 Men’s Club Medal Play Individual Event Gross: Bob Brodhun, 72; Jim Cole, 75. Net: Lawrence Bingham, 64; Gary Reidel, 66; Keith lawrence, 66; Joe Tweter, 67; Herb Renner, 68; Gene Norton, 69; Jim Root, 69; Win Miller, 69; Steve Callis, 69. Team Event Gross: Bob Brodhun and Rick Parkhurst, 67; Dennis Swope and Steve Main, 72; Tom Hainstock and Steve Callis, 72. Net: Dick Goodman and Bernie Anselmo, 59; Jerry Sparks and Lawrence Bingham, 59; Lyle Andrus and Ev Tozier, 60; Gary Reidel and Dennis Swope, 61; Gary Reidel and Steve Main, 61; Gary Murphy and Bernie Anselmo, 61; Joe Tweter and Larry Bourm, 61; Gene Norton and Gordon Thomson, 61; Frank Randall and Lawrence Bingham, 61; Dave Peterson and Lawrence Bingham, 61; Stan Feldman and Lawrence Bingham, 61; Ralph Anderson and Lawrence Bingham, 61. Sept. 28 Ladies Club Throw Out 3 Worst Holes 18 Hole Ladies Sherry Henderson, 51; Doris Sparks, 53; Ruth Thomson, 54; Cindy Schlaffman, 55; Dolly Burnett, 55. 9 Hole Ladies Barb Thompson, 13.5; Boots Reidel, 14.5; Sandy Granger, 15.5. SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Sept. 28 Men’s Selective 9 Flight 1 (0-16) Gross: Tom Chirhart, 33. Net: Ken Orth, 28.5; Len Hirschfeld, 29. Flight 2 (17-20) Gross: Lee Cox, 40. (19 plus) Net: Jim Hanley, 31; Bob Lilleston and Bob Berard, 32.5. Flight 3 (21 plus) Gross: Russ McClelland, 39; Frank Herodes, 39. Net: Ray Aldrich, 26; Maury Fitzgerald, 28. Couples Championship Overall winners Gross: Bill and Pennie Dickin, 83. Net: John and Patricia Palmeri, 60.7. Flight 1 Gross: Arlyn Nelson and Mary McIntyre, 84. Net: Jack and Janet Real, 65.5. Flight 2 Gross: Frank Herodes and Nancy Smith, 88. Net: Bob Hilsmann and Nadia Saulsbury, 63.7. Field Prizes Closest to pin: No. 2 Cec Black and Frank Herodes. Closest to pin: No. 5 Cynthia Edel, 37 ft. 8 in. Jim Coulter, 14 ft. 2 in. Closest to pin: No. 15 Janet Real, 11 ft. 8 in. Bill Dickin, 9 ft. 6 in. Closest to pin: No. 17 Janet Real, 2 ft. Russ McClelland, 1 ft. 9 in. 7 CEDARS AT DUNGENESS Sept. 30 Lady Niners Little Oranges 1. Carolyn Gill, Vernice Quigley, Lillian Gomes, Jan Boyungs, 38; 2. Terri Green, Lindsay Busch, Shari Miller, Pat Conway, 39; 3. Jo Hendrickson, Bonney Benson, Lori Purser, 41. Putts First Division: Bonney Benson and Lillian Gomes tied with 17. Second Division: Lee Stanley, 17. Birdie Vernice Quigley on Hole No. 4. Closest to pin Hole No. 4: Vernice Quigley. Hole No. 8: Pat Conway. DISCOVERY BAY Sept. 29 Ladies Club Criss Cross 1. Lynn Pierle, 24.5; 2. Sheila Kilmer, 26.5; 3. Edna chicarell, 27; 4. Janie Marcus, 28; 5. Mary Pat Griswold, 29; 6. Norma Lupkes, 30.

Peninsula Daily News

Port Angeles Youth Soccer Sept. 27 U12 games Girls Drakes 6, Payne Law Firm 0 Boys Smugglers 1, Pacific Primary Care 1

Preps Football Friday’s Scores Adna 20, Toutle Lake 0 Almira/Coulee-Hartline 54, Wilbur-Creston 12 Battle Ground 54, Evergreen (Vancouver) 13 Bellarmine Prep 49, Central Kitsap 17 Bellevue 43, Mercer Island 28 Black Hills 24, Aberdeen 0 Bothell 32, Inglemoor 30 Brewster 33, Liberty Bell 7 Camas 35, Prairie 6 Capital 29, Yelm 6 Cashmere 69, Tonasket 7 Castle Rock 26, Columbia (White Salmon) 6 Cedarcrest 48, Sultan 26 Chelan 48, Okanogan 7 Cheney 28, Deer Park 23 Chiawana 22, Richland 14 Cle Elum/Roslyn 52, Goldendale 21 Clover Park 25, Sumner 14 Colfax 32, Reardan 6 Colton 52, LaCrosse/Washtucna 40 Columbia River 37, Hudson’s Bay 0 Columbia(Hunters)-Inchelium 50, Selkirk 26 Colville 20, Lakeside (Nine Mile Falls) 16 Concrete 42, Seattle Lutheran 13 Connell 55, Columbia (Burbank) 7 Darrington 51, Chief Leschi 12 Davenport 27, Mary Walker 0 Davis 41, Walla Walla 16 Dayton 30, Tri-Cities Prep 0 Decatur 36, Enumclaw 7 East Valley (Spokane) 43, Clarkston 7 Eastlake 52, Newport (Bellevue) 14 Eastmont 21, Pasco 16 Eastside Catholic 46, Chief Sealth 0 Edmonds-Woodway 63, Jackson 42 Eisenhower 34, Wenatchee 22 Ephrata 33, Wapato 13 Federal Way 28, Bethel 26 Ferris 28, Central Valley 10 Franklin 21, Ingraham 12 Freeman 41, Jenkins (Chewelah) 12 Friday Harbor 40, Lynden Christian 20 Gig Harbor 30, South Kitsap 20 Graham-Kapowsin 31, Emerald Ridge 14 Grant, Ore. 45, Heritage 0 Hazen 41, Evergreen (Seattle) 19 Hermiston, Ore. 28, Moses Lake 24 Hockinson 49, Lakeside (Seattle) 14 Issaquah 42, Kamiak 7 Kalama 41, Toledo 34 Kamiakin 28, West Valley (Yakima) 23 Kelso 41, Fort Vancouver 0 Kentlake 42, Tahoma 33 Kentwood 24, Auburn 17 Kettle Falls 28, Oroville 14 King’s 35, South Whidbey 6 Kiona-Benton 41, Naches Valley 6 La Salle 28, Granger 6 LaCenter 50, Ilwaco 8 Lake Stevens 42, Arlington 32 Lakes 33, Peninsula 13 Lakewood 26, Archbishop Murphy 22 Lewis and Clark 28, North Central 16 Liberty (Renton) 16, Juanita 14 Liberty Christian 54, Garfield-Palouse 46 Lincoln 45, Foss 14 Lind-Ritzville 34, Liberty (Spangle) 0 Lindbergh 45, Highline 0 Lynden 27, Ferndale 7 Manson 47, Entiat 0 Mariner 40, Cascade (Everett) 6 Marysville-Pilchuck 26, Stanwood 22 Mead 31, Shadle Park 7 Meadowdale 34, Glacier Peak 17 Medical Lake 15, Pullman 14 Monroe 17, Snohomish 14 Mount Baker 44, Blaine 41 Mount Si 26, Interlake 14 Mount Vernon 41, Burlington-Edison 3 Napavine 34, Pe Ell 6 Naselle 55, Willapa Valley 0

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

Nathan Hale 42, Rainier Beach 14 Nooksack Valley 31, Meridian 21 North Beach 6, Ocosta 0 North Thurston 42, Centralia 0 Northport 63, Curlew 20 O’Dea 35, Blanchet 3 Oak Harbor 68, Lynnwood 14 Odessa-Harrington 56, Mansfield 16 Olympia 39, Mount Tahoma 7 Omak 48, Cascade (Leavenworth) 24 Othello 42, East Valley (Yakima) 6 Pateros 25, Bridgeport 13 Prosser 32, Ellensburg 28 Puyallup 35, Curtis 28 Quincy 54, Grandview 8 Raymond 62, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 0 Ridgefield 49, Stevenson 7 River View 46, Mabton 0 Riverside 42, Newport 36 Roosevelt 41, Garfield 7 Royal 57, Wahluke 12 Sammamish 48, Lake Washington 42 Seattle Prep 24, Bainbridge 21 Sedro-Woolley 17, Mountlake Terrace 6 Sehome 28, Bellingham 24 Selah 24, Toppenish 7 Shelton 47, Stadium 31 Shorecrest 28, Everett 7 Shorewood 46, Marysville-Getchell High 27 Skyline 56, Redmond 17 Skyview 61, Lincoln, Ore. 6 South Bend 36, Winlock 14 Southridge 31, Hanford 10 Squalicum 13, Anacortes 12 Steilacoom 15, Franklin Pierce 6 Taholah 58, Oakville 18 Timberline 36, Wilson, Woodrow 14 Touchet 40, St. John-Endicott 0 Union 33, Mountain View 21 W. F. West 48, River Ridge 29 Wahkiakum 40, Mossyrock 7 Waitsburg-Prescott 33, DeSales 14 Warden 48, Waterville 7 Washington 43, Fife 7 Washougal 42, R.A. Long 14 Wellpinit 44, Cusick 32 West Seattle 35, Cleveland 0 West Valley (Spokane) 35, Lakeland, Idaho 28 White River 19, Eatonville 14 White Swan 38, Kittitas 7 Woodland 21, Mark Morris 14 Zillah 22, Highland 0

Football NFL Standings NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 70 Seattle 1 2 0 .333 30 Arizona 1 2 0 .333 59 St. Louis 0 3 0 .000 36 East W L T Pct PF Dallas 2 1 0 .667 69 Washington 2 1 0 .667 66 N.Y. Giants 2 1 0 .667 71 Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 78 South W L T Pct PF Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 60 New Orleans 2 1 0 .667 104 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 60 Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 60 North W L T Pct PF Green Bay 3 0 0 1.000 99 Detroit 3 0 0 1.000 101 Chicago 1 2 0 .333 60 Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 60 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Buffalo 3 0 0 1.000 113 New England 2 1 0 .667 104 N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 83 Miami 0 3 0 .000 53 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 90 Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 57 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 29 Indianapolis 0 3 0 .000 46

PA 52 67 56 96 PA 67 53 60 77 PA 60 88 68 77 PA 74 46 69 74 PA 73 79 61 78 PA 60 43 62 84

North L T Pct PF PA 1 0 .667 85 40 1 0 .667 61 62 1 0 .667 54 55 2 0 .333 57 54 West W L T Pct PF PA Oakland 2 1 0 .667 92 82 San Diego 2 1 0 .667 65 69 Denver 1 2 0 .333 58 62 Kansas City 0 3 0 .000 27 109 Today Detroit at Dallas, 10 a.m. Washington at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Carolina at Chicago, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Houston, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Atlanta at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. New England at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Denver at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m. Monday Indianapolis at Tampa Bay, 5:30 p.m. W Baltimore 2 Cleveland 2 Pittsburgh 2 Cincinnati 1

Baseball MLB Playoffs All Times EDT DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) All games televised by TBS American League New York 1, Detroit 0 Friday, Sept. 30: Detroit 1, New York 1, 1½ innings, suspended, rain Saturday, Oct. 1: New York 9, Detroit 3 Sunday, Oct. 2: Detroit (Scherzer 15-9) at New York (Garcia 12-8), 12:07 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3: New York (Sabathia 19-8) at Detroit (Verlander 24-5), 5:37 p.m. x-Tuesday, Oct. 4: New York (Burnett 11-11 or Hughes 5-5) at Detroit (Porcello 14-9), TBA x-Thursday, Oct. 6: Detroit at New York, TBA Tampa Bay 1, Texas 1 Friday, Sept. 30: Tampa Bay 9, Texas 0 Saturday, Oct. 1: Texas 8, Tampa Bay 6 Monday, Oct. 3: Texas (Lewis 14-10) at Tampa Bay (Price 12-13), 2:07 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4: Texas at Tampa Bay, TBA x-Thursday, Oct. 6: Tampa Bay at Texas, TBA National League Philadelphia 1, St. Louis 0 Saturday, Oct. 1: Philadelphia 11, St. Louis 6 Sunday, Oct. 2: St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 17-8), 5:37 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4: Philadelphia at St. Louis, TBA x-Wednesday, Oct. 5: Philadelphia at St. Louis, TBA x-Friday, Oct. 7: St. Louis at Philadelphia, TBA Milwaukee 1, Arizona 0 Saturday, Oct. 1: Milwaukee 4, Arizona 1 Sunday, Oct. 2: Arizona (D.Hudson 16-12) at Milwaukee (Greinke 16-6), 2:07 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4: Milwaukee at Arizona, TBA x-Wednesday, Oct. 5: Milwaukee at Arizona, TBA x-Friday, Oct. 7: Arizona at Milwaukee, TBA

Transactions Baseball American League Chicago White Sox: Acquired RHP Jhan Marinez and INF Ozzie Martinez from Florida. Assigned the contract of the RHP Ricardo Andres to Florida. Cleveland Indians: Exercised the 2013 contract option on manager Manny Acta. Announced the resignation of pitching coach Tim Belcher. Kansas City Royals: Announced bench coach John Gibbons and pitching coach Bob McClure will not return next season.

Briefly . . . Klahhane set to host free gym events PORT ANGELES — Klahhane Gymnastics will host two free open gym events this month at its indoor playground at 3318 E. Acorn Lane. The first open gym is scheduled Tuesday for toddlers and preschoolers, while the second will be on Saturday, Oct. 22, for elementary school students. This week’s free event first opens to parents and toddlers ages 18-36 months from 9:45 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. A session for children ages 3-5 follows from 11 a.m. to noon. Parental supervision and a participation waiver are required. The Oct. 22 open gym will be separated into two age groups as well.

Kindergarten through second grade students will go from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., while third through sixth graders get time from 3-4 p.m. There will be staff on hand to supervise. For more information, contact Klahhane Gymnastics at 360-457-5187.

The junior logged about 75 miles per week throughout the summer in preparation for his first year on the cross country team.

PA C football team

PORT ANGELES — The Bainbridge High School wing-T gave the Port Angeles C football team fits in a 54-34 loss Wednesday. Rider athletes The Roughriders played PORT ANGELES — well on offense, particularly Kiah Jones and Kyle in the second half, and hadTupper were honored as fumble recoveries from Lane Port Angeles High School Lustig, Roberto Coronel and athletes of the week for the Damon McGoff (two). week of Sept. 19-24. Matt Robbins ran for two Jones was recognized for touchdowns and Micki her play in a 3-0 Roughrider Andrus caught two TD volleyball win over defendpasses from Nathan ing league champion North Angevine. Ricky Crawford Kitsap. also ran a kickoff return The senior captain had back for a score. 20 kills in the match (6.7 kills per set) while also addLogger JV upset ing 11 digs and one block. Tupper earned the boys QUILCENE — The honor after winning a cross Crescent junior varsity country race at Fort Worden. pulled off a three-game

sweep of Quilcene’s varsity with a 25-14, 25-9, 25-22 win Wednesday night. “Overall, each player did well contributing to winning the match, although they played with less focus and relaxed during game three, and Quilcene played very well” Crescent coach Chon Clayton said. “This is a great group of young ladies and I like their drive and intensity to play together as a unit.”

Mitchell ace SEQUIM — John G. Mitchell sunk the fourth hole-in-one of his lifetime Tuesday at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. The Sequim resident used a 7-iron and Wilson ball to ace the 140-yard 17th hole. Among the witnesses to the shot was Sherry Evans of Sequim. Peninsula Daily News

College Football Scores FAR WEST Boise St. 30, Nevada 10 E. Washington 27, Weber St. 21 Montana 55, N. Colorado 28 Montana St. 31, Sacramento St. 21 North Dakota 26, S. Utah 20 Portland St. 42, Idaho St. 35 San Diego 42, Davidson 0 San Jose St. 38, Colorado St. 31 Southern Cal 48, Arizona 41 Washington 31, Utah 14 Washington St. 31, Colorado 27 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 42, Texas A&M 38 Cent. Arkansas 38, Stephen F. Austin 28 SMU 40, TCU 33, OT

MIDWEST Butler 29, Dayton 27 Cent. Michigan 48, N. Illinois 41 Cincinnati 27, Miami (Ohio) 0 Drake 31, Campbell 14 E. Michigan 31, Akron 23 Illinois 38, Northwestern 35 Kansas St. 36, Baylor 35 Michigan 58, Minnesota 0 Michigan St. 10, Ohio St. 7 Morehead St. 38, Valparaiso 14 N. Dakota St. 20, Illinois St. 10 N. Iowa 42, Missouri St. 7 Ohio 17, Kent St. 10 Penn St. 16, Indiana 10 SE Missouri 37, E. Illinois 30 South Dakota 30, Lindenwood 0

Texas Tech 45, Kansas 34 W. Illinois 27, S. Illinois 21 SOUTH Arkansas St. 26, W. Kentucky 22 Auburn 16, South Carolina 13 Clemson 23, Virginia Tech 3 Florida A&M 34, Delaware St. 7 Furman 47, W. Carolina 21 Georgia 24, Mississippi St. 10 Georgia Southern 41, Elon 14 Georgia Tech 45, NC State 35 James Madison 31, Richmond 7 LSU 35, Kentucky 7 Lamar 48, SE Louisiana 38 Marshall 17, Louisville 13 Maryland 28, Towson 3 McNeese St. 20, Northwestern St. 18

Miami 45, Bethune-Cookman 14 NC A&T 24, Morgan St. 3 Norfolk St. 17, SC State 14 Samford 41, Gardner-Webb 14 Southern U. 28, MVSU 21 Tennessee 41, Buffalo 10 The Citadel 28, Chattanooga 27 Virginia 21, Idaho 20, OT Wofford 28, Appalachian St. 14 EAST Air Force 35, Navy 34, OT Albany (NY) 41, St. Francis (Pa.) 20 Army 45, Tulane 6 Brown 35, Rhode Island 21 Bucknell 35, Georgetown 18 Colgate 38, Fordham 14 Cornell 31, Wagner 7

Duquesne 31, Bryant 28 Harvard 31, Lafayette 3 Jacksonville 21, Marist 9 Lehigh 37, Yale 7 Maine 31, Delaware 17 New Hampshire 39, Holy Cross 32 Penn 22, Dartmouth 20 Princeton 24, Columbia 21 Robert Morris 23, Monmouth (NJ) 20 Rutgers 19, Syracuse 16, 2OT Sacred Heart 37, CCSU 24 Toledo 36, Temple 13 W. Michigan 38, UConn 31 Wake Forest 27, Boston College 19 West Virginia 55, Bowling Green 10 William & Mary 20, Villanova 16

SPORTS ON TV Today 10 a.m. (7) KIRO NFL Football, Tennessee Titans at Cleveland Browns. 11 a.m. (26) ESPN NASCAR Auto Racing, AAA 400 Sprint Cup at Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del. 12:55 p.m. (27) ESPN2 La Liga Soccer, Real Madrid at Espanyol. 1 p.m. (10) CITY NFL Football, New England Patriots at Oakland Raiders. 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ NFL Football, Atlanta Falcons at Seattle Seahawks. 1 p.m. (47) GOLF PGA Golf, Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open at TPC at Summerlin in Las Vegas, Nev. 1:30 p.m. (25) ROOT MLS Soccer, Portland Timbers at Vancouver Whitecaps. 1:30 p.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, Arizona Diamondbacks at Milwaukee Brewers in NLDS Game 2. 5 p.m. (5) KING NFL Football, New York Jets at Baltimore Ravens. 5 p.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, St. Louis Cardinals at Philadelphia Phillies in NLDS Game 2. 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN WNBA Basketball, Atlanta Dream at Minnesota Lynx in WNBA Finals. National League Los Angeles Dodgers: Named Alex Tamin director of baseball contracts, research and operations. San Diego Padres: Announced hitting coach Randy Ready will not return next season. American Association Shreveport-bossier Captains: Acquired RHP Hector Carrasco from Bridgeport (Atlantic) to complete an earlier trade.

Basketball National Basketball Association Golden State Warriors: Named Dr. Bill Maloney, Dr. Tim McAdams and Dr. Steve Isono team orthopedists and Dr. Leroy Sims director of medicine.

Football Arena Football League Arizona Rattlers: Signed WR Aaron Valentin, WR Sean Creadick and WR Shamar Graves.

Hockey National Hockey League Anaheim Ducks: Assigned F Jean-Francois Jacques to Syracuse (AHL). Carolina Hurricanes: Assigned F Drayson Bowman, F Zach Boychuk, F Chris Durno, F Jon Matsumoto, F Jerome Samson, F Brett Sutter, F Chris Terry, D Justin Krueger, D Mathieu Roy, D Bobby Sanguinetti, G Mike Murphy and G Justin Peters to Charlotte (AHL). Chicago Blackhawks: Assigned F Rob Klinkhammer to Rockford (AHL). Los Angeles Kings: Re-assigned F Justin Azevedo and F Jordan Nolan to Manchester (AHL). Minnesota Wild: Claimed RW Nick Johnson off waivers from Pittsburgh. Montreal Canadiens: Assigned D Alex Henry to Hamilton (AHL). Nashville Predators: Assigned G Jeremy Smith to Milwaukee (AHL). Ottawa Senators: Reassigned G Mike McKenna to Binghamton (AHL). Washington Capitals: Signed LW Jason Chimera to a two-year contract.

Preps: Rivals Continued from B1 Olivia Baird had 11 digs for Chimacum. “They were busy,” Added Hawkins, “They wanted to win so bad and Dankert said about her fought harder each game, defenders. “It was a busy but fell just a tad bit short. night.” Megan Dukek was 18 of “The passion and hearts of these girls make every 20 serving for the Cowboys game a win even though we while Cray made 17 of 19 serves. are winless.” “Lexie was a huge asset The Cowboys have been struggling a little this year, for us,” Dankert said. Port Townsend was led too, but finally won a fivegame match. They lost sev- by setter Christine Unrue, who had 21 assists, four eral earlier in the year. “We came back in the digs, five aces and 100 perend, and we finally got a cent serving. Abby McGuire wasn’t win from a five-game set,” far behind with 18 assists, Dankert said. Alyssa Gale led the two digs and four aces. Codi Cowboys at the net with 13 Hallinan had a team-high kills and two blocks, while four kills and three blocks Lauren Thacker added 11 while Enani Rubio had kills and a block and Aubry three kills, two blocks and an ace. Gale had 10 kills. Ellie Forbes earned a Lexie Cray led on defense with 14 digs while team-high 11 digs.

Schubert: Wiker Continued from B1 recovery and nine tackles on defense. “I always have to deal It would certainly be with that, but I just try my hard for such skeptics to hold that opinion after Fri- best to prove them wrong day night. by doing good,” Jack Wiker After all, Jack Wiker said. “I can only do so accounted for 282 total much. It’s always going to yards and six touchdowns happen.” on the game. ________ He threw for 149 yards Matt Schubert is the outdoors and three TDs on 9-of-22 passing with one intercep- and sports columnist for the Pention while also running for insula Daily News. His column regularly appears on Thursdays 133 yards and three scores and Fridays. He can be reached at on just 14 carries. matt.schubert@peninsuladailyHe also had a fumble news.com.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, October 2, 2011

Replacement player Sequim romps without star QB By Matt Schubert

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — From year to year, few Olympic League football teams replace outgoing players quite like the Sequim Wolves. As Friday night’s game against the North Mason Bulldogs proved, however, head coach Erik Wiker and company can also do it from week to week. Subbing for suspended two-way star Frank Catelli at quarterback, Erik’s son, Jack Wiker, guided the fifthranked Wolves to a 48-20 rout of the Bulldogs on a crisp autumn night in Dungeness Valley. The first-string running back ripped off 282 yards of offense and had a hand in six Wolves touchdowns as he more than made up for the absence of Catelli and three other key players from the Sequim lineup. “I like it because I’m like half coach and half dad,” said Erik Wiker, whose Wolves (3-0 in league, 5-0 overall) have won 23 straight league games. “I can go, ‘Good job. That’s my boy.’” With Catelli serving a one-game suspension for his controversial ejection from last week’s win over Bremerton, Jack Wiker assumed the controls of Sequim’s shotgun spread offense Friday. And for the first 16 minutes against North Mason, it was just as explosive as it has been each of the past three seasons. Taking advantage of five first-quarter turnovers from the Bulldogs — they ultimately had 10 giveaways — Sequim scored five touchdowns in 13 minutes to take a 32-0 lead. Jack Wiker threw touchdowns passes of 5, 21 and 36 yards on the first three scoring marches, and had scoring runs of 41 and 9 yards on the last two. By the time he led the Wolves on another scoring drive that ended with Jonathan Campbell’s 26-yard field goal, the game was all but over at 35-0.

And there was still eight minutes left in the second quarter. “I thought we came out with good intensity,” said Erik Wiker. “I also think everybody came together as a team and was doing their roles like we said that they should all week. “I think [Catelli and others’ being out] probably had them focussed more. Everybody focussed a little tighter for this game. They knew it could be maybe close if we didn’t execute well.” Jack Wiker finished with 133 yards rushing and three touchdowns on 14 carries for the game. With the North Mason defense daring him to throw all game with no safety help, he also had 149 yards through the air, completing 9 of 22 passes with one interception and three TDs. Senior Nick Ramirez hauled in five of those passes for 84 yards and two touchdowns and had an interception on defense. Meanwhile, Tyler Forshaw had four grabs for 71 yards and a score as well as 60-yard interception return for a touchdown. “I knew it was going to be hard [without Catelli and the two other offensive starters], but I knew we could do it if we were playing our best,” Jack Wiker said. “Our linemen, Clay Charley, and [Jake] Hudson and Jacob Cooper, they all killed it. That’s why we won the game, because we shut down their dive.” Indeed, North Mason’s triple-option attack didn’t get a first down until it was trailing 35-0 with 7:10 left in the second quarter. The Bulldogs then staged a brief rally, scoring touchdowns on two straight drives to put the score at 35-12. They threatened to score again late in the first half, driving down to Sequim’s 1-yard line. But quarterback Tommy Renne was stuffed at the goal line on a third-down QB sneak, and time ran out before his team could get off another play.

B3

Preps Football Standings As of Oct. 1 Olympic League Conf. Overall Port Angeles 3-0 5-0 Sequim 3-0 5-0 North Kitsap 3-0 3-2 Kingston 2-1 3-2 Olympic 1-2 1-4 Bremerton(3A) 0-3 1-4 Klahowya 0-3 1-4 North Mason 0-3 0-5 Friday’s Games Sequim 48, North Mason 20 Port Angeles 20, Olympic 7 Kingston 35, Klahowya 3 North Kitsap 24, Bremerton 6 Oct. 7 Games Port Angeles at North Mason Kingston at Sequim Bremerton at Klahowya Olympic at North Kitsap 1A/2B Nisqually League Conf. Overall Orting 3-0 3-2 Charles Wright 2-0 3-0 Cascade Christ. 2-0 3-1 Life Christian 2-1 3-2 Cedar Park Christ. 1-2 3-2 Vashon Island 1-2 1-4 Chimacum 0-3 0-5 Port Townsend 0-3 0-5 Friday’s Games Cedar Park Christian 49, Port Townsend 0 Orting 56, Vashon Island 0 Saturday’s Games Life Christian 35, Chimacum 6 C. Wright at Cascade Christian, LATE Oct. 6 Game Orting at Charles Wright Oct. 7 Games Life Christian at Port Townsend Chimacum at Vashon Island Cascade Christian at Cedar Park Christian

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Sequim quarterback Jack Wiker breaks away from the North Mason defense for a run to the end zone in the first quarter on Friday night at Sequim High School. Forshaw then came up with his interception return for a touchdown on North Mason’s first offensive drive of the second half, quelling any thoughts of a miraculous Bulldog comeback. “If we would have punched that in at the half . . . it sure would have been more competitive,” North Mason coach Jeff Bevers said. “We’re just trying to learn how to finish some stuff right now.” The Bulldogs (0-3, 0-5) actually out-gained the Wolves 386 yards to 290 on the game. Much of that, however, had to do with all of the short fields North Mason gave Sequim because of its 10 turnovers, six of which were fumbles. Renne led the Bulldogs with 109 yards rushing and

a touchdown on 22 carries, while fullbacks Tommy Marsh (13 carries, 98 yards) and Brody Stromberg (8-85) also rack up yardage. Yet Renne was also intercepted four times while completing just 1 of 9 passes for 16 yards. Unlike Jack Wiker — another running back turned QB — Renne couldn’t make the opposing defense pay for stacking the box against him. And Sequim’s own turnovers, of which there were five, did little to keep it from claiming its ninth straight win over North Mason since 2004. “That’s the team that we all want to be like in this league,” Bevers said. “That’s the team that you’ve got to beat, and they are great competitors.

“That’s one of the fun things about playing Sequim is they compete hard and are always a well-coached football team.” Sequim 48, North Mason 20 North Mason 0 12 0 8— 20 Sequim 25 10 13 0— 48 First Quarter S—Ramirez 5 pass from Wiker (pass failed) S—Ramirez 21 pass from Wiker (pass failed) S—Forshaw 36 pass from Wiker (Koonz kick) S—Wiker 41 run (kick failed) Second Quarter S—Wiker 9 run (Campbell kick) S—Campbell 26 field goal NM—Renne 50 run (run failed) NM—Marsh 1 run (run failed) Third Quarter S—Forshaw 60 interception return (Campbell kick) S—Wiker 20 run (kick failed) Fourth Quarter NM—Price 33 run (Allen run) Individual Stats Rushing— S: Wiker 14-133, Knapman 6-18, McElrath 7-9, Forshaw 2-(minus 2), Field 3-(minus 15), Moroles 2-(minus 12). NM: Renne 22-109, Marsh 13-98, Stromberg 8-85, Allen 10-44, Price 7-34, Burggraaf 1-0. Passing—S: Wiker 9-22-1, 149; Field 2-3-0, 10. NM: Renne 1-9-4, 16. Receiving—S: Ramirez 5-84, Forshaw 4-71, Lidstrom 2-4. NM: Allen 1-16.

Southwest Washington League Evergreen Division Conf. Overall Montesano 3-0 5-0 Hoquiam 2-1 4-1 Tenino 2-1 4-1 Elma 2-1 3-2 Forks 2-1 2-3 Rainier 1-2 2-3 Onalaska 0-3 0-5 Rochester 0-3 0-5 Friday’s Games Forks 49, Onalaska 0 Elma 35, Rainier 14 Montesano 46, Tenino 0 Hoquiam 52, Rochester 0 Oct. 7 Games Montesano at Forks Tenino at Onalaska Rochester at Elma Rainier at Hoquiam Northwest Football League Conf. Overall Neah Bay 4-0 4-1 Lummi 3-0 5-0 Lopez 2-0 2-0 Evergreen Luth.(2B) 2-1 3-1 Tulalip Heritage 2-2 2-2 Crescent 2-2 3-2 Quilcene 1-1 2-1 Clallam Bay 1-2 1-3 Highland Christian 1-3 1-4 Muckleshoot 0-3 0-3 Rainier Chr. (2B) 0-4 0-4 Friday’s Games Crescent 56, Highland Christian 28 Saturday’s Games Neah Bay 74, Rainier Christian 28 Lopez at Quilcene, Not reported Lummi 59, Tulalip 26 Muckleshoot at Ev. Lutheran, NR Oct. 7 Games Quilcene at Muckleshoot Clallam Bay at Highland Christian Oct. 8 Games Rainier Christian at Crescent Tulalip at Lopez Lummi at Evergreen Lutheran

Football: Spartans roll for second straight win Continued from B1 ran in a two-point conversion to account for 26 points It didn’t help that Red- in the game. “Shane had a huge day,” skins quarterback Jacob King suffered a concussion Forks coach Mark Feasel during the game. He was the said. For the first time this team’s leading rusher with year, the Spartans won the 51 yards on seven carries. “We played much better turnover war with zero. It was just in time as in every aspect,” Webster said. “We keep learning. The Forks will be challenged this experience we are getting is week against second-ranked Montesano (3-0, 5-0), which valuable.” Port Townsend next hosts has given up just one touchdown all year and has outLife Christian on Friday. scored opponents 240-7. Cedar Park Christian 49, “This will be a huge test Port Townsend 0 for us this week,” Feasel said C.P. Christian 14 7 14 14— 49 about Forks’ 2011 homecomPort Townsend 0 0 0 0 — 0 ing game this Friday night. First Quarter “I’m looking forward to it. CPC—Ionesi 1 run (kick no good) CPC—Watts 2 run (Watts run) I told the kids that this is a Second Quarter good opportunity for them. CPC—Hunsaker 14 pass from Ionesi (kick good) Third Quarter This is a good way for the CPC—Watts 78 kickoff return (kick good) rest of the state to take CPC—Watts 17 run (kick good) notice of us.” Fourth Quarter CPC—Johnson 56 run (kick good) It won’t help that Forks CPC—Johnson 17 run (kick good) will be missing one of its top Individual Stats Rushing— PT: King 7-51, Cain 3-26, Graham 4-19. defensive players, outside CPC: Not available. linebacker Mark Jacobson, Passing—PT: King 5-6-0, 27; Seton 1-2-1, 35. CPC: who was kicked out of Not available. Receiving—PT: Cain 2-10, Graham 2-10, CoppenOnalaska’s game at the end rath 1-35. CPC: Not available. of the first half in a situation similar to what happened to Forks 48, Sequim’s Frank Catelli last week, according to Feasel. Onalaska 0 Forks had intercepted the ONALASKA — Shane ball and ran it to the WhiteEagle ran for 207 Onalaska 8-yard line with yards and four touchdowns seconds left in the first half as the Spartans rumbled when a Forks player was past the Loggers for their tackled after the play out of second straight SWL-Ever- bounds and Jacobson green Division win Friday jumped on the Onalaska night. player in a bid to protect his The Spartans (2-1, 2-3) own teammate, Feasel said. led 21-0 at halftime and “Mark Jacobson was never looked back as Brady doing the right thing, standCastellano had two touch- ing up for his family,” Feasel down passes and sophomore said. “But there are consebackup quarterback Andrew quences. We could use JacobWeltz threw another. son this week against Tyler Penn had two of the Monty.” TD catches, one from each Both Jacobson and the quarterback, while Braden Onalaska player were Decker had the other receiv- ejected from the game and ing score. now also will miss this WhiteEagle, who had 11 week’s games. carries on the day and only There was some rough played three quarters, also play before that happened,

and Feasel said he believes the refs ejected the players so they wouldn’t lose control of the game. Forks had 283 rushing yards and 113 passing yards for 396 total yards in the Onalaska game. WhiteEagle had the majority of the running yards as the Loggers tried to plug up the middle and WhiteEagle was able to get outside. It took the Spartans a whole quarter to get a handle on the Loggers’ triple option, however. “They were able to get 200 rushing yards on us,” Feasel said. Junior James Salazar, a cornerback, had four solo tackles in the first quarter to keep the Loggers out of the end zone after Onalaska had gotten by the other Forks defenders. “Salazar had a great game,” Feasel said.

And Findley, who had nine catches for 219 yards, also had an interception return for a score in addition to his four TD grabs. “The Story-to-Findley combo in our passing game was tremendous,” Crescent coach Darrell Yount said. “Derek Findley, with over 200 yards receiving and five touchdowns on the night, that’s a career for a lot of kids. “Just great young men, the both of them.” Crescent, 2-2 in the Northwest Football League and 3-2 overall, was in a barn-burner for the first three quarters, trailing 28-26 going into the fourth period. But a 30-0 fourth quarter gave the Loggers a comfortable margin at the end. “Friday night was a struggle,” Yount said. “Highland Christian certainly came out to play. “We struggled mightily but were able to get some Forks 48, Onalaska 0 stops and some explosion on Forks 0 21 20 7— 48 offense to get a much-needed Onalaska 0 0 0 0— 0 road win.” Second Quarter The Loggers, who strugF—Shane WhiteEagle 52 run (kick blocked) F—Tyler Penn 77 pass from Brady Castellano gled with illness much of the (WhiteEagle run) week, had 765 total yards. F—WhiteEagle 26 run (Cresencio Uzueta kick) In addition, Mike Zapien Third Quarter F—WhiteEagle 25 run (Uzueta kick) had an outstanding defenF—WhiteEagle 45 run (Uzueta kick) F—Braden Decker 30 pass from Castellano (kick sive night. blocked) “Big Mike Zapien had a Fourth Quarter stellar night with 14 solo F—Tyler Penn 10 pass from Andrew Weltz (Uzueta tackles and four assists,” kick) No individual stats available Yount said. “A giant of a night for a giant of a young man.” Crescent 55, The Loggers now host Highland Chri. 28 Rainier Christian on SaturARLINGTON — Kai day at 1 p.m. in their 2011 Story hooked up with Derek homecoming game. Findley for four touchdowns, three coming in the fourth Crescent 55, Highland Ch. 28 quarter, as the Loggers got Crescent 6 14 6 30— 55 back on the winning track Highland Chr. 6 8 14 0— 28 First Quarter Friday after losses to state (run failed) powers the past two weeks. HC—Touchdown C—Zapien 3 run (kick failed) Story was 15 of 20 Second Quarter through the air for 350 yards HC—Touchdown (two-point conversion) C—Story 3 run (conversion failed) and five touchdowns all C—Findley 52 pass from Story 3 run (Larson pass together. from Story)

Third Quarter HC—Touchdown (two-point conversion) C—Larson 15 pass from Story (conversion failed) HC—Touchdown (conversion failed) Fourth Quarter C—Findley 68 pass from Story (Findley pass from Story) C—Findley 10 pass from Story (Findley kick) C—Findley 70 interception return (kick failed) C—Findley 70 pass from Story (Larson pass from Story) Individual Stats Rushing— Crescent: Zapien 12-100, A. Hutto 9-60, Story 6-58, K. Hutto 2-30, Eric Larson 4-55. Passing—Crescent: Story 15-20-1, 350 yards. Receiving—Crescent: Findley 9-219, Larson 6-131.

Port Angeles 20, Olympic 7 SILVERDALE — Keenen Walker passed for 259 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another as the unbeaten Roughriders held off the Trojans in Olympic League action Friday night. It was a defensive battle for both teams, Rider coach Tom Wahl said. “They kept Keenen pretty well in check for the game,” he said. “And our defense did a good job as usual.” Walker connected on 17 of 32 passes, including a 30-yard touchdown pass to Eli Fiscalini and a 25-yarder to Cameron Braithwaite, with no interceptions. Fiscalini (6-72) and Braithwaite (6-115) combined to catch 12 passes for 187 yards. The Riders (3-0, 5-0) led the Trojans (1-2, 1-4) 14-0 at halftime and led 20-0 before Olympic finally scored in the fourth quarter to avoid a shutout. Olympic had some success running the ball in the second half as Randy Grier finished with 111 yards on 18 carries, but the Riders smothered the Trojans’ short passing game. Quarterbacks Zach Thornton and Rob Howard combined to complete 8 of 16 passes, but the completions only went for 30 yards. The Riders next travel to North Mason on Friday night.

Port Angeles 20, Olympic 7 Port Angeles 0 14 6 0— 20 Olympic 0 0 0 7— 7 Second Quarter PA—Walker 2 run (Haskins kick) PA—Fiscalini 30 pass from Walker (Haskins kick) Third Quarter PA—Braithwaite 25 pass from Walker (kick failed) Fourth Quarter O—Lawver 1 run (Dane Bohlman kick) Individual Stats Rushing— PA: Braithwaite 4-48, Brewer 8-29, Gray 4-18, Walker 20-11, Lasorsa 1-3, Fiscalini 2-2. Passing—Port Angeles: 17-32-0, 259 yards. Receiving—Port Angeles: Braithwaite 6-115, Fiscalini 5-72, Brewer 2-38. Gray 3-29.

Neah Bay 74, Rainier Chr. 28 AUBURN — The Red Devils barely worked up a sweat against the Mustangs in the Northwest Football League game Saturday. It was over by halftime because of the mercy rule. “We played a lot of our younger kids,” Neah Bay coach Tony McCaulley said. “We hardly played the other kids.” Scoring details were not available Saturday night.

Life Christian 35, Chimacum 6 TACOMA — Derek Ajax had a 3-yard quarterback sneak in the fourth quarter to keep the Cowboys from getting shut out in a 1A Nisqually League game Saturday night. Life Christian scored 14 points in the first quarter and 21 in the second but was shut out in the second half. Ajax shared quarterback chores with Alex Morris. Morris was 4 of 14 for 37 yards and an interception while Ajax was 2 of 8 for 35 yards and an interception. Justin Morris led the ground attack with 58 yards on 19 carries, while Victor Cienga was the top receiver with three catches for 41 yards. The Cowboys (0-3, 0-5) next travel to Vashon Island on Friday night.


B4

SportsRecreation

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Mountain magic Cougs outlast Buffs The Associated Press

BOULDER, Colo. — Bottled up most of the afternoon by a depleted defensive backfield, Marquess Wilson came up with the big play — and down with the ball — just in time. Speeding past two defenders, Wilson hauled in a 63-yard touchdown pass from Marshall Lobbestael with 1:10 left to lead Washington State to a stunning 31-27 comeback win over Colorado on Saturday. The Buffaloes (1-4, 0-1) were primed for a win in their Pac-12 debut before surrendering two touchdowns in the final 2½ minutes. Colorado had thwarted Washington State’s highpowered aerial attack most of the afternoon with a patchwork secondary that included two converted offensive players. Coming into the game, Wilson’s average of 143.6 yards receiving was tops in the nation among BCS schools, but he’d been held to just 58 yards on five catches up to that point. One stutter-step and a pump-fake later, Wilson found himself 10 yards past cornerback Greg Henderson and safety Anthony Perkins as he raced toward the end zone. Lobbestael’s pass hung in the air as the crowd of 51,928 grew silent. “I knew Marshall would be able to get it there,” Wilson said.

NORTH Conf. Overall Stanford 2-0 4-0 Washington 2-0 4-1 Oregon 1-0 3-1 Washington State 1-0 3-1 California 0-1 3-1 Oregon State 0-1 0-3 SOUTH Conf. Overall Arizona State 1-0 3-1 USC 2-1 4-1 UCLA 1-1 2-3 Colorado 0-1 1-4 Utah 0-2 2-2 Arizona 0-3 1-4 Saturday’s Games USC 48, Arizona 41 Washington State 31, Colorado 27 Washington 31, Utah 14 Stanford 45, UCLA 19 Oregon State at Arizona State, LATE

The Associated Press

Washington State’s Alex Hoffman-Ellis (17) and Taylor Meighan celebrate a 31-27 win over Colorado in Saturday’s game at Folsom Field in Boulder, Colo. the Cougars forced a punt and got the ball back with 1:50 left. This time, they needed just 40 seconds to cover 90 yards. “They ran a double move and we got beat,” Perkins said. “We’ll leave it at that.” After Wilson’s TD, the Buffs had one more chance, but receiver Paul Richardson was stripped of the ball by cornerback Damante Horton after a 23-yard gain and linebacker C.J. Mizell recovered for Washington State. Afterward, Buffaloes coach Jon Embree ripped into his team for finding a

way to lose yet again. “I asked them, ‘When is it going to be enough? When is enough enough? You put in all this work, you do all this stuff you’ve done from spring ball to coaches’ week to training camp for this. This is what we did the work for. So when is it enough?’” Embree said, his voice rising. “When are they going to get tired of losing? When are they going to get tired of finding ways of losing? “This staff, we’ve been here for five freaking weeks and I’m tired of it. So, if I’ve been here for five years, I have to be tired of it myself, too.”

Dawgs: Price steps up in 2nd Continued from B1 It didn’t hurt that Chris Polk ran wild in the third quarter, carrying nine times for 101 yards. He finished with 29 carries for 189 yards. He not only surpassed the 3,000-yard mark in his career, he became the Huskies’ No. 2 all-time rusher. He surpassed Joe Steele (3,168) and now trails only Napoleon Kaufman (4,106). “That guy’s like a bowling ball,” Price said of the 5-foot11, 222-pound junior. “Maybe he’ll get stopped [one play], then rip off a 30-yard run. He’s a great player.” The Huskies (4-1, 2-0) also forced five turnovers by Utah (2-2, 0-2), including a fumble on the opening kickoff that Jamaal Kearse returned 18 yards for a touchdown.

“It feels good to get one that counts,” said Kearse, who made his first start at linebacker. “The feeling was great to be in the end zone with the ball.” It took just nine seconds, but Washington had a 7-0 lead. Utah quarterback Jordan Wynn tied the game at 7-all on a 16-yard pass to Dres Anderson with 6:59 left in the quarter. But the Huskies took the lead for good on a 44-yard field goal by Erik Folk on the final play before halftime. Wynn did not play in the second half due to an injury to his left (non-throwing) shoulder. He finished 12 of 17 for 149 yards with a touchdown and interception. Utah coach Kyle Whittingham did not disclose the nature of the injury and said

he would know more Monday. Jon Hays, who had previously thrown one major-college pass, was intercepted on his second attempt Saturday. He fumbled in the fourth quarter before tossing a lastminute 4-yard TD pass to Dallin Rogers. The Utes entered the game plus-nine in turnovers, but committed three in the first half — twice in the red zone in the second quarter. Wynn threw his second interception of the year, as Sean Parker made the grab at his own 4-yard line with 10:29 left in the quarter. Six minutes later, Anderson cut back and looked for the end zone after a pass from Wynn, but Desmond Trufant forced a fumble and recovered at the Huskies’ 6-yard line.

Washington converted the third turnover into Folk’s field goal. It was all Washington in the second half. “I thought our defense was the key to this ball game,” Sarkisian said. “Their ability to keep us around while the offense could get going was critical.” The Huskies are off to their best start since 2006 but don’t want to follow the script for that season, when they lost six straight to finish 5-7 overall. They have a bye before facing the Pac-12’s other new conference member, Colorado. Then comes a showdown at Stanford on Oct. 22 before home games against Arizona and Oregon. Utah, meanwhile, may have to lower its expectations.

Pirates

“We have been very uncharacteristic in terms of our consistency in the first three ballgames,” Smith said. “There’s spurts in the ballgame you’ll see that we’re doing things very The Associated Press well, and there’s other SEATTLE — Things times that it’s just not up to were much easier for Matt our level of expectations. Ryan when he was one of “Right now we are not the NFL’s best-protected operating as efficiently or quarterbacks while leading as effectively as we’re capathe Atlanta Falcons to the ble of.” NFC’s best record in 2010. Tarvaris Jackson has It’s been a been sacked 14 much different times — tied for story this season, the most in the as Ryan hopes to league — and stay on his feet didn’t look capaand help his ble of much in his offense find its Next Game first two games rhythm when Today in a Seahawks Atlanta visits the uniform. S e a t t l e vs. Falcons He heard boos at Seattle Seahawks today. early in Seattle’s Ryan has Time: 1:05 p.m. home opener last been sacked 13 On TV: Ch. 13 Sunday against times, including Arizona, and his four last week team went into when the Falcons (1-2) lost the locker room trailing 16-13 to Tampa Bay. 10-6. He went down only 23 But Jackson led a times all of last season — 14-play, 72-yard drive to 29 fewer than the league- start the second half, finishhigh suffered by Chicago’s ing it with an 11-yard Jay Cutler — and coach touchdown run that lifted Mike Smith said he will the Seahawks (1-2) to a evaluate his offensive line 13-10 victory. in order to better protect “[The fans are] scrutihis franchise quarterback. nizing [him] very sharply at Ryan has been sacked at this point. He’s not wavered least four times in each by it at all. I’m not, either,” game. He’d been sacked coach Pete Carroll said. four times in a single con“But it’s going to take test just twice in his first some time until everybody three regular seasons. gets comfortable and sees “We are very disap- what he’s all about and sees pointed with the way we his play. have protected our quarter“They didn’t boo him in back in the first three ball- the second half. I think that games,” Smith said. “We’ll second half was OK.” have to look at what’s going Having former Vikings wrong schematically as teammate Sidney Rice, who well as evaluate our per- made his Seahawks debut after sitting out the first sonnel.” Ryan, though, refuses to two games with a shoulder place all the blame on the injury, certainly helped. The two connected eight line. “We just need to execute times for 109 yards, and a little better — myself will now face an Atlanta included,” said Ryan, who pass defense that’s 22nd in threw for a career-high 330 the league, allowing 261.0 yards against the Bucs. yards per game. The Falcons have also “The ball needs to come out. “You can’t keep hanging surrendered 248 yards on the ground and three touchonto it back there.” Though he may see downs the past two weeks, some relief against a Seat- which bodes well for a Seattle defense that is tied for tle ground game that broke 23rd with only five sacks out for 122 yards against this season, Ryan and the Cardinals after combinSmith both admitted the ing for 95 in losses to San offense needs more balance. Francisco and Pittsburgh. Lynch ran for 60 yards The Falcons rushed for only 30 yards last week, and a touchdown on 12 carwith Michael Turner gain- ries against Atlanta on Dec. 19 last season, though ing 20 on 11 carries. Atlanta had rushed for Ryan’s three touchdowns 248 yards combined its first helped the Falcons to a 34-18 victory. two games.

Sounders win 2-0 The Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Fredy Montero scored twice as the Seattle Sounders beat the New England Revolution 2-1 Saturday night for their fourth straight road victory. The Sounders (16-6-9) have scored 16 goals while winning five of their last six and moved to 8-3-5 on the road. Montero, who now has 11 goals on the sea-

Continued from B1

son, has five goals and three assists over the last six matches. Diego Fagundez scored for New England (5-14-12), which dropped to 4-5-6 at home while totalling just 16 goals. The Revolution are also 1-5-5 over their last 11 outings. New England led 1-0 after the 16-year-old Fagundez headed in Benny Feilhaber’s corner kick in the 35th minute.

Have you missed us? Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Jean Sigmar, wife of late Peninsula College president Wally Sigmar, right, receives a hug from college soccer player Morgan Atchley as other players stand in line during rededication ceremonies for the Sigmar Athletic Complex on Saturday on the school’s Port Angeles campus. Miguel’s brother, Daniel Gonzalez, had an electrifying goal of his own in the 15th minute. The freshman midfielder, who also had an assist, took a flick on pass from Miguel, then weaved past two defenders before blasting the ball into the net for a 1-0 Pirates lead. “We looked really good, really dangerous,” Chapman said. “We moved the ball well, a lot of combination play, a lot of one-touch stuff. It was just nice, crafty soccer.” The women weren’t as explosive but were just as effective in getting their 4-0 win over the Orcas. Krystal Daniels had her fifth shutout of the season in goal, and the Pirates got goals from Ashlyn Frizzelle, Jackie Rodgers, Carolina

Flores and Shelby Solomon. The last three all came in the final 10 minutes of the match. “They got tired,” Pirate women’s coach Kanyon Anderson said of the Orcas. “We were able to just play faster than they wanted to, I think, for 90 minutes.” Women Peninsula 4, Whatcom 0 Whatcom Peninsula

0 0 — 0 1 3 — 4 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Peninsula, Frizzelle (Bullington), 37th. Second Half: 2, Peninsula, J. Rodgers (PK), 83rd; 3, Peninsula, Flores (Miner), 84th; 4, Peninsula, Solomon (Flores), 90th.

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0 0 — 0 4 1 — 5 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Peninsula, D. Gonzalez (M. Gonzalez), 15th; 2, Peninsula, Gaynor (D. Gonzalez), 30th; 3, Peninsula, M. Gonzalez (Gaynor), 33rd; 4, Peninsula, M. Gonzalez (Gaynor), 36th. Second Half: 5, Peninsula, Gaynor (Ambrocio), 53rd.

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11th straight win to begin the season. “We did mention to them and say, ‘Hey, let’s make it a show,’” Pirate men’s coach Andrew Chapman said. “We did tell them that there’s some fans here and some people here, it means a lot of things to them, so let’s go out and give them something to watch.” Forwards Miguel Gonzalez and Dean Gaynor didn’t disappoint, with each scoring two exquisite breakaway goals that had some grade schoolers in the audience speculating who’s autograph they wanted. Gaynor added a pair of assists, while Gonzalez had an assist to go along with his 19th and 20th goals of the season, which furthered his single-season and career scoring (35) Pirate records.

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On one side were the eighth-ranked Pirate women, fresh off their fifth shutout victory in six matches thanks to a 4-0 triumph over the Orcas. On the other were the top-ranked men, moments away from another display of offensive brilliance in a 5-0 win of their own. And gathered in front of them were scores of youth soccer players, community members and friends and family of the since-passed college president. That included Sigmar’s wife, Jean Sigmar, and her boys, Erik and John. “This is unbelievable,” said Jean, whose husband also coached soccer for several years at Skagit Valley Community College. “I think [Wally] would be very honored. It’s quite a tribute to have such a beautiful facility, and he was all about connecting with other people. This certainly is a place where people can be connected.” That was most assuredly the case Saturday. With hundreds on hand for the re-dedication, the men’s and women’s teams played in front of their largest crowds of the season. The women (5-1-0 in West Division, 6-2-2 overall) delivered three late goals to secure another gritty defensive victory. Meanwhile, the men (5-00, 11-0-0) provided a whole lot of flash during a four-goal first half on the way to their

QBs in need of protection Atlanta, Seattle offensive lines both struggling

Pac-12 Standings

Getting it to him wasn’t the issue for Lobbestael, who threw for 376 yards. Overthrowing him was. “It looked like he put too much on it,” Cougars coach Paul Wulff said after just his second road win in four years. Wilson cradled the pass at the 15, then trotted into the end zone, giving the Cougars (3-1, 1-0) one more win than in any of Wulff’s previous three full seasons. The Buffaloes led 27-17 with 5:11 left after Rodney Stewart’s 1-yard TD run. Lobbestael drove Washington State 77 yards in seven plays, hitting Isiah Barton from 19 yards out with 2:35 left to pull the Cougars within a field goal. With three timeouts remaining, Wulff elected to forgo a risky onside kick, and the strategy paid off when

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 2, 2011

c

SECTION

Our Peninsula

WEATHER, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEATHS In this section

For the

Glory!

Kinetic SkulPTure Race launches at ‘low-noon’

Steve Mullensky (7)/for Peninsula Daily News

Dennis Pettitt, left, and Jeremy Colburn, both of Port Townsend, pedal their creation, “Big Bad Wolf,” alongside another conestant, “Fros ’N Peas,” during Saturday Parade on Water Street.

Dianna Denny of Port Townsend is a fairy cat in the parade — and a contestant for Rose A pair of skulptures are tested in the flotation test portion in Port Hips Queen. Townsend Bay as hundreds watch on shore.

KINETIC SKULPTURE FANS got sneak peeks Saturday at the contraptions that will vie for glory in today’s 2011 Kinetic SkulPTure Race. A wacky “wannabe” parade preceded the always buoyant flotation tests, where kontestants and race loose-organizers see where the race vehicles float. Floating on the water will be a key aspect of today’s race, which launches at noon on the streets of Port Townsend. This year’s race and parade theme is “A Kinetic Fairy Tale, Once Upon a Time,” which went even further at Saturday night’s Rose Hips Koronation Ball. But today is race day. For those ready to handikap, skulptures will line up on Water Street by the American Legion Hall around 10 a.m. The race starts at “low-noon” with a quick pedal around downtown; then the pilots put into the water, pedal up and down the bay and dry themselves off for the pedal up Monroe Street. The grueling race continues up Lawrence Street, by Aldrich’s Market, and then heads for Fort Worden State Park and the always-popular mud bog at Jefferson County Fairgrounds, back down San Juan Avenue and up to Kearney Street for a brief break at Kinetic Koffee. Then it’s off to the finish line at the American Legion Hall on Water Street. A detailed map of the route awaits at www.ptkineticrace.org. Peninsula Daily News

By land and by sea Dean Vartle of Port Townsend pulls his kinetic skulpture out of the bay after the contraption sank during the flotation test segment of the annula Kinetic SkulPTure Parade on Saturday.

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Anna Lynn Maxfield of Corvallis, Ore., guides her kinetic skulpture, “Mousetrap,” down Water Street during the parade, and then into the real water for the flotation test.

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C2

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Oil money boon to Alaskan portfolio High prices and prudent investing key to success Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Tysons Corner Center awaits a Metro stop that will connect it more closely to Washington, but the sprawling shopping mall in Washington’s Virginia suburbs is already linked to a place even farther away: Alaska. The Alaska Permanent Fund, the state’s sovereign wealth fund, owns half of Tysons Corner Center, just one piece of a $38 billion portfolio amassed in the four decades since the state’s coffers started overflowing with oil revenue. In 1969, Alaska received a $903 million check from the first sale for oil- and gas-drilling leases on the North Slope. The check was more than five times the size of the state’s annual budget.

North Slope benefit

the second-largest city in Alaska.” At a time when most states are scrambling to cover budget deficits, Alaska and its permanent fund are enjoying the fruits of high oil prices and years of prudent investing. In September, the fund shelled out more than $400 million in cash to buy a 49.5 percent stake in the 42-story North American headquarters of UBS on Park Avenue in midtown Manhattan.

For residents: $1,174 The fund also announced the annual dividend it will pay to every Alaska resident this year — $1,174. Tysons Corner Center, with more than 2 million square feet of space, is one of the fund’s best investments, Burns said. The Alaska Permanent Fund’s half of the property is worth about $800 million, five times the initial investment. The decision two decades ago to move the truck port that was underneath the mall and transform that space into additional retail added value. Replacing J.C. Penney with movie theaters, a food court and new retail space added more. Now Tysons is poised to benefit anew from the extension of the Metro rail line, which will stop “literally right at our front door,” Burns said. Burns said there is no pressure on the fund to plow more money into Alaska. The statute that created the fund ordained that any investment in Alaska must compete with investments elsewhere. Moreover, he said, the permanent fund is so big that if it invested even in the state’s largest city, Anchorage, it would throw all the property values out of whack.

The North Slope has turned out to be one of the richest oil areas in the country, and the giant fields known as Prudhoe Bay are on state land. Today, 90 percent of Alaska’s government revenue comes from the oil industry in the form of severance taxes, income taxes and royalties. But unlike many oil-rich countries and states, Alaska has squirreled away some of its oil riches in a taxexempt fund for the citizens of the state. The state channels a quarter of its oil- and gasroyalty payments to the fund. Today, the Alaska Permanent Fund owns shares of 2,000 public companies, domestic and international bonds, a few hedge-fund investments and a vast real-estate empire that includes half of Tysons Corner. “We average 75,000 people a day through the shopping center,” said Mike Investment goofs Burns, the executive director of the fund. The fund has made its “I like to remind our share of mistakes. It lost $10 million on a partners that that would be

The Associated Press

The last ship of the Alaska cruise season, the Celebrity Century, sits docked on Saturday, Sept. 24, in Juneau. A tram which ferries tourists and others up a nearby mountain is seen on the left. Flush with export earnings and foreign investment, China also has a sovereign wealth fund. The International Monetary Fund has a working group to increase the transparency of such funds, and the Treasury Department and the Alaska Permanent Fund both send representatives. “We really don’t have a peer group,” Burns said. “We’re not a pension, where there’s somebody at your front door every month seeking payment. We do pay that dividend each year to the people of Alaska, but that dividend fluctuates.” The fund pays according to a formula — 10.5 percent of the realized income over the past five years.

The Alaska Permanent Fund . . . n Has received $15 billion from its share of oil revenue and paid out $19.5 billion in dividends while building its portfolio to $38 billion. n As of June 30, it had a $207 million stake in Apple, about three times its initial investment. It held $162 million worth of Exxon Mobil, 48 percent over its cost. Shares of public companies make up 36 percent of its portfolio. n Real-estate holdings: 11 retail, 13 residential, 19 office buildings, and 11 industrial parks. n The fund owns only one building in Alaska: its headquarters in Juneau. Peninsula Daily News news services

currency trade when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt. It bought property in southern Tennessee only to watch Arkansas offer incentives for people to move across the river. And as of June 30, it owned $53.5 million of Bank of America, down more than a third from its initial investment, and $4.4 million in the National Bank of Greece, down nearly half. The stock portfolio has

followed the yo-yo market. After touching $40 billion in early 2008, its value plunged to $26 billion at one point before bouncing back. “It’s been a bumpy road and one I don’t want to take again,” Burns said. While unusual for a U.S. state, Alaska’s permanent fund is similar to sovereign wealth funds fueled by oil and gas money in countries such as Norway and in the United Arab Emirates’ Abu Dhabi.

Prudhoe going dry The source of all this money, Prudhoe Bay, is starting to run dry. That’s a problem for the United States, which still needs oil supplies, and for Alaska, which depends on oil revenue. So far, high prices have

made up for the sagging production levels. “If you think back, in the early ’90s, there was over 2 million barrels a day coming down the pipeline” from Prudhoe Bay, Burns said. “Today it’s about 650,000 a day. “So clearly we’re riding a high price. “But this is very important to the state of Alaska. “It’s their lifeblood. We’ve got to find a way to replace the oil in that pipeline through new exploration and new development.” But for the permanent fund, the flow of oil is not crucial. Burns said the fund’s share of oil revenue last year was about $875 million. “There’s no question that’s a lot of money,” he said. “But our income from investments was $6.9 billion. “The success of the fund has much, much more to do with what happens on Wall Street than with what happens on the North Slope.”

Record-search fines could rise, high court warns Spokane County case triggers ruling for state By Mike Baker

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Government agencies could face higher penalties if they fail to properly search for documents in response to publicrecords requests, the state Supreme Court said in a decision last week.

In their 7-2 decision, justices said an inadequate search might be considered an aggravating factor in calculating daily penalties. The court said agencies must search for records in all areas where they are reasonably likely to be found. Michele Earl-Hubbard, an open-government attorney who filed a brief on behalf of newspapers in the case, said agencies in the past have said they don’t have responsive documents

County, wanted to examine hiring practices in the county’s Building and Planning Department after the son of a commissioner was hired. The court said in its Thursday decision that the search was inadequate because it examined only an employee’s computer that had recently been replaced. “Where, as occurred here, the computer containing the record has been destroyed, the agency must look to other locations,”

“If they know of a place that might have the information, they ought to be searching that place.”

Michele Earl-Hubbard open-government attorney

but may not have been looking in all the right places. She said the ruling provides a strong message that agencies need to diligently look for available records. “If they know of a place that might have the information, they ought to be searching that place,” Earl-

Hubbard said. Justices said Spokane County failed to sufficiently search for records in response to a request focused on a log of information about a government seating chart. A group, the Neighborhood Alliance of Spokane

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wrote Justice Charles Johnson in the majority opinion. Breean Beggs, an attorney for the Neighborhood Alliance, said the county’s handling of the case was particularly egregious because officials looked in the only place where the information wouldn’t be found. He said they could have examined the old hard drive that was in storage or an overall county network where the information would likely be saved. Beggs said he expects the case will result in a substantial fine of many thousands of dollars. Attorneys in the case did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Peninsula Births Olympic Medical Center Chenay Bryass and Daman Foust, Port Angeles, a son, Wyatt Ryatt-Lee, 7 pounds 4 ounces, 3:14 a.m. Sept. 18. Amanda M. and Stefon L. Williams, Sequim, a son, Jayvon James, 8 pounds 14 ounces, 1:42 a.m. Sept. 21.

Forks Community Hospital Cynthia and Francisco Centeno, LaPush, a daughter, Jacquelyn Rose, 6 pounds 15.7 ounces, 10:23 a.m. Sept. 14. Mistina Joann Fuson, Forks, a daughter, Pyper Rose, 6 pounds 3.5 ounces, 7:32 a.m. Sept. 25. Phone information about athome or out-of-town births to 360417-3527 or 800-826-7714.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

C3

Wigeon’s arrival heralds fall’s coming MANY THINGS SIGNAL the changing seasons, and not everyone is effected by the same event or events. The majority of us recognize fall’s approach when we notice the tree leaves beginning to change color. Cooler morning temperatures remind us that the season’s first frost isn’t far off. Birders mark the seasons by the changing bird population. Rufous hummingbirds started moving south several weeks ago. That raspy sucking sound that is being heard in the trees and bushes is the Anna’s claiming territories the two argued over all summer. Seasonal reminders are even more pronounced on the marine waters. Heermann’s gulls, parasitic jaegers and the terns arrive in late August. Their numbers build into September, and then most continue south for the winter.

Fall’s arrival They are migrants that announce summer’s ending while other marine species emphasize fall’s arrival. When the American wigeon begins to show up, summer is over. Even the double-crested cormorants returning to the inland waters don’t announce fall as the wigeons do. The first cormorants showing up on our bays and in our harbors are this year’s young. It will be a while before the adults that nested along the coast or in the northern waters will join them. In addition to the wigeon,

BIRD WATCH another marine species always Carson tells me that fall has arrived. The first small horned grebe that will just appear one morning emphasizes that there is no more hanging on to summer. Give it up and put away the outdoor furniture. That hasn’t happened yet, but I’m sure there are red-necked grebes being seen farther offshore. They usually arrive early enough to still retain some of their breeding colors. The birds that signal fall to birders can vary from one region to another. Flying wedges of Canada geese dotting the skies over the eastern portion of the state carry fall on wings that push summer southward. Even on the western side, there are migratory routes for the geese. In a few short weeks, they will settle in on west-side refuges and large tracts of private farmland. Snow geese will flock to the fields in Skagit County. Sandhill cranes gather for the winter at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge in the southwest corner of this state. Trumpeter swans, tundra swans and millions of ducks flood into these protected havens where they will spend the winter. Turkey vultures have also

Joan

Paul Carson

An American wigeon glides through the water at a sedate pace. the world. started their southward migraWhile these thoughts of birds tion, and the farther south you travel at this time of the year, the signaling the seasonal changes were wandering about in my more vultures you will see. head, I happened to pick up a magazine in a waiting room. Turkey vultures It was one I’d never seen From southwest Oregon into before and published in Great coastal California, the number of Britain. turkey vultures wending their Fall was the issue’s current way to southern California and focus, and one writer mentioned Mexico is amazing to watch. a bird he looks for every year Autumn is still in the beginabout now. ning phase, but the signs are When the woodcock, a close relative of our comm­on snipe, all around us, and they exist in northern climes all over puts in an appearance, it tells

him that fall is here. Its arrival coincides with the coming of Halloween. When it comes to the birds that signal summer’s demise and fall’s arrival, it’s time to start looking for them. I know that some of you have already spotted the wigeon.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Kiwanis Clubs Three Kiwanis clubs meet every Thursday in Port Angeles. n  The Olympic Kiwanis Club meets at 7 a.m. weekly at the Cornerhouse Restaurant, 101 E. Front St. n The Juan de Fuca Kiwanis Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. n  The Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles meets at noon at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, Eighth and B streets. For more information, visit the club website at www.kiwanispa. org. Other Kiwanis clubs meet in Sequim and Port Townsend. n  Sequim-Dungeness meetings are every Thursday at noon at

Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. For further information, phone Shell McGuire at 360681-0805. n  The Port Townsend meetings are every Wednesday at noon at Manresa Castle, Seventh and Sheridan streets. For further information, phone Jim Strong at 360732-0574.

Seven Rotary clubs The seven Rotary clubs of the North Olympic Peninsula meet at various times throughout the week, encouraging meeting “makeups” from visiting Rotarians. Here are the clubs and their meeting times and locations: n  Tuesdays: Port Townsend Rotary Club meets at noon at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431

Water St., Port Townsend, 360385-5688. n  Wednesdays: Port Townsend Sunrise Rotary meets at 7:15 a.m. at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend. The Port Angeles Rotary Club meets at noon upstairs at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. n  Thursdays: East Jefferson County Rotary meets at 11:45 a.m. at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. Sequim Rotary Club meets at noon at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim. n  Fridays: Port Angeles Nor’wester Rotary meets at 7 a.m. at the Olympic Medical Center cafeteria, 939 Caroline St.,

Port Angeles. Sequim Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim.

with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7 p.m., at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles. TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Weight Watchers Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 Sequim Weight Watchers meet E. Park Ave. at various times and locations in TOPS 1493 meets Wednesthe Sequim area. days at 10 a.m. with weigh-in Additional information is from 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. at the available at 800-651-6000. Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest St. For further information, phone Pat Ferris at 360Port Angeles 504-2143. TOPS 1296 meets Mondays with weigh-in at 10:30 a.m., folTOPS meetings lowed by an 11 a.m. meeting, at There are four weekly meet2531 E. Helm Drive; phone Carol ings of TOPS groups in Port Packer, 360-452-1790. Angeles. Turn to Clubs/C4 TOPS 125 meets Wednesdays

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Stickers at funeral cause sibling rift DEAR ABBY: My mother passed away recently. My sister, who lives in another state, flew in with her 4-year-old daughter, “Nikki,” to attend Mom’s wake. When the wake ended, Nikki began to place stickers on Mom’s hands and one on her face. The stickers had been given to her by another guest before the service started. When my 18-year-old daughter saw what her cousin had done, she removed them, and Nikki threw a tantrum and refused to leave the casket. My sister spoke quietly to her, trying to get the child to leave, then allowed her to put at least two more stickers on my mother’s hand.

DEAR ABBY Abigail

Finally, I

Van Buren gently

picked Nikki up and took her away from the casket. My father is a mild-mannered man and, though he frowned in disapproval, he said nothing. This has caused a huge rift between my sister and me. I feel a 4-year-old is too young to attend a wake. Nikki should not have been allowed to put stickers on my mother. My sister says I “undermined” her parenting and had no right to intervene.

What are your thoughts? Saddened in New Jersey

much drama relating to his ex-wife and dealing with the post-divorce behavior problems of his kids, I sometimes don’t know how Dear Saddened: If one much more I can handle. defines parenting as teachThe ex constantly ing a child appropriate throws herself in my face, behavior, your sister wasn’t trying to be friends. parenting at all. And the shuffling of his Although the child was kids from our house to hers well-intentioned, unless the creates issues. stickers said “Return to I need advice on what to Sender,” they had no place do. I’m unhappy, and it is at the funeral. getting worse. My condolences to your How can I improve the family. situation before I just give up? Dear Abby: I’m a Overwhelmed 32-year-old single female. in Iowa I have a child and am currently in a relationship Dear Overwhelmed: with “Ty,” who has two chil- Before giving up, let me dren of his own from a remind you that as a divorce. 32-year-old single mother, This is a very difficult you will be encountering situation for me. more and more men with I love Ty, but there’s so “baggage” — so you might

as well learn to cope with it. If you’re going to have a future with Ty, it is in your best interest to become a “friend” of his ex-wife. Should you marry him, a cordial and cooperative relationship will be better for everyone. Look at it this way: Because Ty’s children are acting out — which is to be expected — the most effective way to deal with it is to form a united front. Dear Abby: I recently started dating a wonderful man, but there’s one problem: On several of our dates, he was dressed like he was staying home to watch TV — wearing dirty pajamatype shorts, ripped T-shirts, stuff I’d barely wear even if I were home sick. I have gently tried to

suggest he wear something else, but he has no concerns about his appearance. Any ideas? Baffled In Baltimore Dear Baffled: The wonderful man you are seeing is either eccentric or a slob. If you have “gently” tried to suggest that he make himself look more presentable when you go out and have gotten nowhere, you have two choices: Accept him just as he is, or look further for male companionship.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3 Bingo, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays — Texas For further information Hold ’Em Poker, 6 p.m. about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, Tennis club meets at 360-275-2179. The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit CommuDream Machines nity Tennis Association, meets regularly for free The Peninsula Dream community play at ErickMachines will meet today son Park, Fourth and Race at 11 a.m. at Fairview streets. Grange, 161 Lake Farm The Peninsula Tennis Road. Club promotes tennis play For more information, and supports improvephone 360-452-3288. ments to tennis facilities in Clallam County. VW club For information on club Strait Air Volksgruppe, activities, visit the website a club for Volkswagen own- at www.peninsulatennis ers and enthusiasts, will club.com or phone 360-460meet today at noon at 2588. Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. For further information, Toastmasters The Port Angeles Toastphone 360-452-2550. masters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to Boys & Girls Club 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam The Mount Angeles Transit Office, 830 W. LauUnit of the Boys & Girls ridsen Blvd. Clubs of the Olympic PenFor further information, insula meets regularly phone Bill Thomas at 360weekdays from 2 p.m. to 460-1040 or Leilani Wood 6 p.m. at 2620 S. Francis at 360-683-2655. St. For information on Fibromyalgia group membership, phone 360The Fibromyalgia Sup417-2831. port Group meets the first Monday of the month at Eagles Club 11:30 a.m. at the Port The Eagles club has an Angeles Senior Center, 328 Aerie or Auxiliary meeting E. Seventh St. Mondays at 7 p.m. — Aerie The support group is for the first and third Monday those diagnosed with fibroof the month, Auxiliary the myalgia and for family and second and fourth Monday friends to better underof the month. stand the condition. Other club events For more information, include: phone Penny Brewer at Tuesdays — Texas Hold 360-681-3045. ’Em Poker, 6 p.m. Wednesdays — Auxiliary Ladies Bingo, 11 a.m.; Fly fishers club Olympic Peninsula Fly Paddle Wheel Game, 5 p.m. Fishers club meets the first to 7 p.m.; membership Monday of every month at drawing, 6 p.m. Thursdays — Bar Stool 7 p.m. at the Camp Fire

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Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Wapiti Bowmen The Wapiti Bowmen Club meets the first Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. at their clubhouse, 374 E. Arnette Road. For more information, phone Pete Joers at 360681-2972.

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“Drive” (R) “Sarah’s Key” (PG-13) “Senna” (PG-13)

“Abduction” (PG-13) “Killer Elite” (R)

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n  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

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for making our

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Retired Public Employees Council Chapter 23 will meet Thursday at 11 a.m. Soroptimist meets at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, The Soroptimist InterEighth and B streets. national Port Angeles — The meeting will Jet Set meets every Thursinclude a report on the There are no requireClubhouse at 619 E. Fourth day at 7 a.m. at the Port 40th annual state convenments to read music, nor is Angeles Senior Center, St. tion held recently in solo singing a requirement Seventh and Peabody The public is invited. Yakima. to join the chorus. For more information, streets. Clallam County Area The chorus sings songs phone Darlene Whitney at The group’s mission and Chapter 23 delegate Lois in four-part harmony in 360-457-2799. core purpose is to improve Danks will present inforbarbershop style and also the lives of women and mation about keynote other a cappella song Garden club meets girls in local communities speeches, resolutions styles. and throughout the world. passed and decisions on The Lincoln Heights Visitors are welcome at Those wishing to volun- the organization’s LegislaGarden Club will meet any meeting. teer in an atmosphere of Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. at tive and Action Priorities For more information, support, friendship and fun for 2012. Scandia Hall, 131 W. Fifth phone 360-681-7761. are invited to join. St. RPEC is affiliated with For further information, AFSCME and the WashTami Tegman will presvisit the group’s website at ington State Labor Council ent the program “Container German speakers Planting for Fall Color.” A German conversation www.sijetset.com. and membership is availPresident Gladys Walcircle, der Stammtisch, for able to any retired state, those who speak and lace encourages members Golden Agers county or local government to bring nonperishable food understand German meets The Golden Agers meet employee. weekly Wednesdays, with items for the food bank. For more information or every Thursday from For further information, time and location variable. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the to RSVP for optional lunch Members discuss curphone 360-452-4207, 360Port Angeles Senior Center, at a cost of $9, phone Rob417-7531 or 360-457-9607. rent events, movies, books, ert Zindel at 360-457-1435. 328 E. Seventh St., for music, food, evolving and Meetings are open to bingo and socializing. changing language, or Men’s chorus Once a month the group interested visitors. other subjects. The Olympic Peninsula For further information, has a potluck. Men’s Chorus meets every For further information, Beekeepers meet phone 360-457-0614 or Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the phone 360-417-8044. The North Olympic Pen360-808-1522. Monterra Community Ceninsula Beekeepers Associater, in the Agnew area Weight loss tion will meet at the Port Methodist women between Sequim and Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Surgical Weight Loss Angeles. The Port Angeles United Peabody St., at 7 p.m. Support Group meetings Take Gunn Road to Methodist Women will Tuesday. are Thursdays from 7 p.m. Finn Hall Road. Turn left meet Wednesday at The Beginning Beekeepto 8 p.m. in the multipuronto Finn Hall, turn right 10:30 a.m. in the parlor of ers class will be held one pose room of the Terrace on Monterra Drive, and United Methodist Church, hour prior to the meeting. Apartments, 114 E. Sixth Monterra Community Cen- 110 E. Seventh St. For more information, St. ter will be straight ahead. Rosanna Yates-Bailey phone 360-457-9335. This group has a The chorus, a chapter of will present “Immigration, licensed practical nurse as the Barbershop Harmony the Hard Questions,” a one of the starting memPA Lions Club Society, is open to any men report from the UMW bers. who have an interest in National Seminar. The Port Angeles Lions There will be a broad music and singing. Lunch will be served. Club will meet Thursday at spectrum of people, some noon at the Red Lion Hotel, beginning the process to 221 N. Lincoln St. get a gastric bypass and October is Customer Turn to Clubs/C5 some who have already

360-808-6005

WANTED

had surgery and are willing to help others acquire vital information on the process. Guest speakers will assist with information and a question-and-answer time. For further information, phone Janet E. Boyce at 360-417-2896.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

C5

Weather on Peninsula great for garden I OFTEN WRITE about just how fantastic the weather is here on the Olympic Peninsula. And so enthusiastic am I of our glorious climate that even this year (with little or no summer, some say), I am more excited about just how special and unique our wonderfully mild weather is. Humidity, even this year like all others, is very low, nonexistent for any of us from the South, Midwest or East Coast who know when humidity is above 90 percent (almost all summer long), shade offers no cover. Then look nationally this year: hurricanes (not here), massive droughts (think rain forest nearby), record-breaking tripledigit heat (yeah right, never here!), tornadoes, thunder and lightning storms (what are those?) — the nation annually gets plastered with all of these, but not here! Yay, whoop-de-doo. We never get all hot and warm; it was gray or cool. I’ll say real cool — cool in that any day of the summer, one can go outside, barbecue, sit in the swing and enjoy the gazebo every evening free of bugs.

Free of humidity Free of humidity that makes people miserable. What makes the weather here is twofold: It’s very mild and forgiving causing, little or no stress to your plants, and the growing season is soooo long. And today, I want to hopefully imprint upon you just how long (and mild) the growing season really is. This is so important because we live in a unique gardening spot — unique to the world, not just North America. You should see (come and look) just how gorgeous the delphin-

A GROWING CONCERN ium, lupine, poppy and colMay umbine are looking at my wife’s veterinary clinic (across the street from Traylor’s Restaurant in Port Angeles). And why? Because of how mild and long our growing season is. The longevity means I can rebloom many spring perennials again in the fall — only they are far better because our season extends until November, and our mild summer weather does not burn them out like the rest of the nation, so they thrive.

Andrew

Sole purpose Today, my sole purpose is to make you fully understand how to capitalize on fall with (attached photo) evidence, so you will be totally prepared for next year (or gloat to friends now). This mild weather, late frost and northern latitude we find ourselves in all translate into a lush, nutrient-packed, compact, dense, green-stalked, robust plant. I just wrote about how great dahlias are, and they are fantastic here because they fully capitalize on our long growing season, looking absolutely fabulous until a hard frost (November) puts them into dormancy. For the Fourth of July, I wrote and told you how fellow PDN columnist Pat Neal reminded me of his pioneer gardens that were planted in July for a great late

A photo of Andrew May’s garden last week that was planted in July. summer-fall harvest, so I planted then, too. The photo was taken late last week of that garden I planted at my house at 994-foot elevation July 3 and 4. Every day, the peas and beans are more plentiful, with salad greens coming out our ears and delicious broccoli for the steamer, to mention a few of the garden munchies. Go to the farmers market and bring home some vegetables. Just taste how delicious they are. This time of year, temperatures are even lower, and sunlight is so much less intense due to our latitude. This means a longer time

needed to ripen, so more time to condense nutrients. Cool weather doesn’t stress plants, so the flavor of vegetables is far enhanced. A more nutrient-rich, crisper, tastier produce, which is the fall garden. A huge display of flowers on compact lush plants that is the fall flower garden. So please, look around your neighborhood, pay attention as you drive the county, look for these fabulous stands of vegetables and flowers in various people’s yards. Admire how even though it is October, gardens can be and are great.

Make notes, plan beds, be prepared so now that it is in front of your eyes, you will be convinced fall is a prime time of year in your yard and vegetable garden, so you will always act in the future and plant accordingly. Please use our climate to its fullest because for most of the nation, this double opportunity is nonexistent.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4 Thursday of every month from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Olympic Unitarian Mary Beth Wegener, Universalist Fellowship, 73 executive director of the Howe Road. Olympic Peninsula Everyone is invited to Humane Society, will give an update on the activities experience receiving divine at the Humane Society and grace with the blessings. Drop-ins are welcome. its plans for the future. Love offerings are Guests are welcome. accepted. For information on the For more information, Lions’ eyeglass recycling visit www.oneness program, phone 360-417university.org or phone 6862. 360-681-4784.

Woodworkers

The Peninsula Woodworkers Club meets the first Thursday evening of every month. The club is composed of members interested in all phases of woodworking, furniture and cabinetmaking, wood-turning, carving, boat-building, instrumentmaking and construction. For location, which varied from month to month, phone Ed McKay at 360928-3331 or Gary Haubold at 360-452-4919.

Clowns meet Laff Pack Clowns meet the first Thursday of every month from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road. Anyone interested in clowning is welcome. For further information, phone 360-457-7640. The Oneness Blessings group meets the first

Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

http://tinyurl.com/ 476hj8b.

PA Peggers PA Peggers meet Fridays with a 5:30 p.m.

check-in and a 6 p.m. start for games at 112 E. Eighth St. The weekly events are nine games played against nine different opponents.

New members are welcome. The group is an American Cribbage Congress, Grass Roots Cribbage Club. Turn

to

Clubs/C6

Ex-smokers The Nicotine Anonymous Fellowship Group meets every Friday at 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove Counseling, 1020 Caroline St. For further information, phone 360-452-2443.

HOPE meets

Humorous OpenMinded Parent Educators, HOPE, is an inclusive group of home-schooling parents and children who meet Fridays. Soroptimists meet Time and location are variable. Soroptimist InternaAll are welcome. tional Noon Club meets For further information, every Friday at noon at the Bushwhacker, 1527 E. First phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at 360-452-5525 or visit St.

Port Angeles Hardwood LLC 333 Eclipse Industrial Pkwy Port Angeles, WA 98363 Tel: (360) 452-6041 • Fax: (360) 417-6805

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! KEEP YOUR ALDER & MAPLE SAWLOGS ON THE PENINSULA!

Contact Randy Bartelt at (360) 739-6681

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Oneness Blessings

MOPS meets

Soroptimist is an international organization with a focus on making a difference for women. Locally, the club supports the community though scholarships, Operation Uplift and other community projects.

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C6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5 experience needed. For further information, phone 360-683-0141 or, The season runs to the from Port Townsend, phone end of May. 360-385-4680. For additional information, phone Jim or Lisa Duff at 360-808-7129 or Sequim City Band email papeggers@hughes. The Sequim City Band net. rehearses each Monday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at VFW Post 1024 Swisher Hall behind the bandstand at the James Veterans of Foreign Center for the Performing Wars Post 1024 meets the Arts, 563 N. Rhodefer first Friday of each month Road, just north of Carrie at 1 p.m. at the Veterans Blake Park. Center, 216 S. Francis St. For further information, For more information, phone 360-681-6872 or phone the service office at visit the website at www. 360-417-0294. sequimcityband.org. The Clyde Rhodefer VFW Post 1024 Ladies Auxiliary also meets the Bridge club first Friday of every month, The Sequim Duplicate and a potluck lunch is Bridge Club meets reguserved at noon, prior to the larly each Monday and Friregular meeting at 1 p.m. day at noon at the Masonic For the ladies auxiliary, Temple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. phone Venay Money at The club is affiliated 360-681-7085. with the American Contract Bridge League, which Genealogy talk provides sanctions for standard duplicate, unit and The Clallam County championship games. Genealogical Society will Play is open to the pubmeet Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon in the Ray- lic, with visitors welcome at any time. mond Carver room of the Coffee and refreshments Port Angeles Public are offered at each game. Library, 2210 S. Peabody For further information, Street, to hear a talk by phone 360-691-4308; for Rod Fleck on researching partnership arrangement, veterans from the Ameriphone 360-582-1289. can Revolution through World War II. Food addicts meet Fleck’s hobby has been family history for nearly Food Addicts In Recovtwo decades. ery Anonymous meetings He has a Bachelor of are Thursdays. Arts in history from the For information on place University of Washington and time, phone 360-452and a law degree from 1050. Seattle University. He has completed three Garden club meets lineage proofs for the The Sequim Prairie GarNational Society of Children of the American Revo- den Club meets the first Monday of the month at lution and is a member of 10:30 a.m. at the Pioneer the board of advisers for Memorial Park clubhouse, the Pilgrim Hopkins Heri387 E. Washington St. tage Society. Each month, a speaker The talk is open to the presents a program on garpublic. den related topics. The members break for Veterans for Peace lunch, and the business Veterans for Peace, Tony meeting is conducted at van Renterghem chapter, 12:30 p.m. will meet Saturday at The clubhouse and park 2:30 p.m. at Olympic Unitar- grounds, owned and mainian Universalist Fellowship tained by the club, are supHall, 73 Howe Road, off ported through the rental of North Barr Road. the clubhouse. All veterans of military For information regardservice, foreign or domestic, ing rentals, phone 360-683are eligible for full member- 7206. ship. For membership informaNonveterans are weltion, phone 360-683-8693. comed as associate members. Vegetarian potluck Membership includes The group meets to veterans and non veterans enjoy a monthly vegetarfrom Clallam and Jefferson ian/vegan potluck and procounties. gram the first Monday of VFP works to support every month at 5:30 p.m. at veterans and bring about the fellowship hall of the peaceful solutions to interSeventh-day Adventist national problems. Church, 30 Sanford Lane. For more information, Those attending are phone David Jenkins at 360asked to bring a favorite 385-7612. dish along with the recipe to share with the group. Coin club meets Future programs might The Port Angeles Coin include cooking demonstraClub will meet Saturday tions and lessons on from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. healthy living. in the Raymond Carver For more information or Room at the Port Angeles directions, phone Laura Library, 2210 S. Peabody Kittle at 360-681-5430 or St. Tim Guthrie at 360-681For more information, 2580. phone 360-928-0239.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Cooties meet Cooties meets the first Sunday of the month at 3 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. For more information, phone the post at 360-6839546.

German club A German club meets Mondays at 2 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone 360-681-0226 or 360-417-0111.

Overeaters Overeaters Anonymous meets Mondays at 4:15 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave. For further information, phone 360-683-4682 or 360-417-80083.

Chorus invitation The Grand Olympics Chorus invites women who enjoy singing to join the Sweet Adeline practice any Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. No formal training or

French Club The French Club invites anyone who knows French or would like to learn to meet every week at the Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Beginners meet Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., intermediates meet Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., and advanced meet Fridays for a reading and conversation group from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-681-0226.

Grieving group The Sequim Bereavement group meets Tuesdays from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Assured Hospice office, 24 Lee Chatfield Way. For further information, phone 360-582-3796.

Senior softball Sequim Senior Softball Recreational Club meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie Blake Park (weather permitting) for practice and pickup games. All levels of players, men 55 years and older and women 50 years and older, are welcome to participate for good fun and exercise. For further information,

phone John Zervos at 360681-2587 or email jazervos@gmail.com.

Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St. There will be a small display of finished sculptures and information about the Bonsai society club. The Dungeness Bonsai Artists will be available Society meets the first to talk about the technique Tuesday of each month at involved in creating a work 10 a.m. at the Pioneer Park of art from a piece of driftclubhouse, 387 E. Washing- wood, or “found” wood. ton St. For information on Each month, a speaker upcoming driftwood sculppresents a program or ture classes taught by certiworkshop related to bonsai fied LuRon instructor Tuttie or general garden topics. Peetz, phone 360-683-6860. Guests are welcome. Prior to an available For further information, class, prospective members phone Bob Stack at 683are invited to attend a 1315. meeting the first Wednesday of each month to pick Just Dolls club up some instruction from The Just Dolls of Wash- experienced club members. For further information, ington Doll Club meets the phone 360-681-2535, visit first Tuesday evening of every month and is open to www.olympicdriftwood sculptors.org or email info@ anyone interested in dolls olympicdriftwoodsculptors. and/or bears. org. Club members conduct business and share dolls, engage in community serRV club meets vice and organize an Hurricane Ridge RV annual doll show. Club meets the first New members are welWednesday of every month. come. This month, it will meet For further information for dinner at 6 p.m., foland location, which varies lowed by a 7 p.m. meeting, from month to month, at Paradise Restaurant, phone Dori Beachler at 703 N. Sequim Ave. 360-683-1006. RV owners or those interested in RVing are Toastmasters welcome. For more information, SKWIM Toastmasters phone 360-683-3197 or meets the first and third 360-683-0120. Tuesday of every month promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest VFW auxiliary Road. The Veterans of Foreign Arrival at the meeting Wars men’s auxiliary meets is requested for 6:50 p.m. the first Wednesday of the Guests are welcome. month at 6 p.m. at the For more information, VFW Hall, 169 E. Washingphone the president and ton St. chairman at 360-808-2088. For more information, phone the post at 360-683Outriders meet 9546. The Olympic Peninsula Outriders, an organization SMUG meets of informal retired motorThe next Straitmac cycle riders, meets Wednes- Users Group meeting will days at 7:30 a.m. at The be Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Wash- at St. Luke’s Episcopal ington St. Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave. No dues, no rules; just The presenter will be friendship among retired past President Richard riders. Serkes, who will discuss The group has day rides the Internet and forum etiand other rides throughout quette. the year. October’s demonstration will examine backup stratQuilters meet egies, including hardware and software options both The Sunbonnet Sue on-site as well as online. Quilters meets every Hard drives will fail, but Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the with a backup plan, you Sequim Masonic Temple, can avoid disaster. 700 S. Fifth Ave. Apple is supposed to The second Wednesday release the new iPhone 5 of the month is the busion Tuesday, so the group ness meeting. At the close of the busi- should have some latebreaking news to report. ness meeting, birthdays of Refreshments will be the current month are celeserved. brated with cakes and the gift of a fat quarter (an 18-inch-by-22-inch piece of Spanish club fabric popular with quilA Spanish club with ters). conversation and study for On the last Wednesday intermediate Spanish stuof the month, the guild dents meets every Thursmeets to work on commuday at 2 p.m. in Prairie nity quilts. Springs Assisted Living, Completed quilts are 680 W. Prairie St. distributed to fire victims, For further information, Habitat for Humanity phone 360-681-0215. home recipients, foster children and other needy or Gamblers meet worthy causes. Gamblers Anonymous All meetings are open to meets Thursdays at the public. For further information, 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road. phone Joan Mack at 360For further information, 681-0795. phone 360-460-9662.

TOPS 1135 TOPS 1135 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Visitors are welcome. For further information, phone Lynnette Baughman at 360-683-7178.

Driftwood art The Olympic Driftwood Sculptors will meet Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. Visitors are welcome. There will be a short meeting to take care of club business with the balance of the meeting time spent on members working on their wood projects. At the club’s third anniversary show Sept. 25 at the Dungeness River Festival, Sharon Scairpon held the winning ticket for the driftwood sculpture titled “Spirit of the Olympics,” a collaborative piece by several club members. The club will participate in the Clallam County Gem & Mineral Show to be held Oct. 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the

Retired scientists Retired Scientists of Sequim meets the first Thursday of every month at 1:30 p.m. in the Sequim Library meeting room, 630 N. Sequim Ave. North Olympic Peninsula residents with scientific training and background are invited to attend meetings. There are no dues or other obligations.

Stamp society Strait Stamp Society will meet Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. The meeting includes a show-and-tell by collectors with unusual stamps, covers or other philatelic items. There will be a silent auction by club members. The club has stamps and other philatelic material available. Strait Stamp Society is a chapter of the American Philatelic Society and the Northwest Federation of stamp clubs and receives the latest news on new stamp releases, stamp shows and other related information to help collec-

tors find and sell stamps. There are no dues, though donations are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-6373.

Olympic Minds Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets the first three Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

PC genealogy Computer Genealogy Users Group will meet Friday at 1:30 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. The meeting involves discussion on problems or interesting finds for family research Meetings are free and open to the public.

P.E.O. meets The P.E.O. Chapter’s Reciprocity Gathering will take place Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 7 Cedars Casino, 270756 U.S. Highway 101, Blyn. There will be a buffet luncheon for $17.50.

Fiddlers play Washington Old Time Fiddlers play music the second Saturday of every month through May, with an all-players jam from noon to 1:30 p.m. and a performance from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. The events are free and open to the public. Donations support scholarships. For more information, visit http://d15.wotfa.org.

Gem/mineral show The Clallam County Gem and Mineral Association will hold its annual Rock and Gem Show on Oct. 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Sequim Boys & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir St. Demonstrations will include cabochon formation, faceting, wire wrapping and chain making. Those attending can find out about and sign up for classes. Unique gifts, jewelrymaking supplies, tools, rocks and fossils will be available for purchase. There will also be a silent auction, raffle and a game and prizes for children. Food will be available for purchase Saturday and Sunday. For further information, visit www.Sequimrocks.com or phone Terry Stockman at 360-457-4764.

West End FOFA meets Friends of Forks Animals’ monthly meetings are the first Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the Forks Community Center, 91 Maple St. The public is welcome to attend. For further information, visit the FOFA website at www.friendsofforksanimals. org or phone the message line at 360-374-3332. Port Townsend and Jefferson County North Olympic Exchange, a local currency group, will host an orientation to explain how the system works by trading services, skills and goods today at 5 p.m. at Dundee Hill Center, Hancock and 32nd streets, Port Townsend. For further information, phone Mike Dobkevich at 360-379-2627 or email dobkevich1@q.com.

TOPS in PT The Port Townsend Chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 230 A St., Port Townsend. For further information, phone 360-385-1081.

Car club Rakers Car Club, a

50-year-old organization, meets the first Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Highway 20 Road House, 2152 Sims Way, Port Townsend. People interested in old cars and trucks are invited. There is a minimum age of 21 to attend meetings.

PT Scrabble Club The Port Townsend Scrabble Club meets Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Water Street Creperie, 1046 Water St. (next to Public House). Players will be matched up at their level and will be helped to improve their score. The group provides Scrabble dictionaries. Participants are asked to bring a Scrabble board if possible. For more information, email newsmann@ mannpublications.org.

TOPS meeting TOPS 1393 meets Thursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and a meeting at 9 a.m. at the Evergreen Coho Resort Clubhouse, 2481 Anderson Lake Road, Chimacum. Visitors are welcome. For further information, phone Jack West at 360765-3164.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/ Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen’s club, meets the first and second Thursday of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. On the third Thursday of the month, the group meets at 5 p.m. at Pizza Factory, 1102 Water St., followed by a business meeting at 6 p.m. On the fourth Thursday of the month, there is a dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. held at homes of members on a rotating basis. For further information, phone Betty Oakes at 360385-2455. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

Rhododendron The Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. Frank Fujioka will discuss hybridizing for foliage. Fujioka is known for his hybrids including pomegranate splash, starlight champagne and midnight mystique. The meeting is open to the public, and refreshments will be provided.

Rhody Os Dance The Rhody Os Dance Club holds dances every first and third Friday with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. There are also Tuesday night square dance lessons from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-797-2106 or 360-457-8620.

Food Addicts Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, a support group, meets Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., Port Townsend. For further information, phone 360-385-0318.

Singles dine out Reservations should be made by Wednesday for the Senior Singles lunch Wednesday, Oct. 12, at the Mus Kan Indian Restaurant, 2330 Washington St., Port Townsend. For the necessary reservations, phone 360-4379935. The buffet lunch is $8.95 plus tax and gratuity, and there is an extensive menu. Those attending are asked to wear their name tags.


Peninsula Daily News

Art entries sought for MAC exhibit Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Museum & Arts Center in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley (MAC) is seeking entries for “Abstractions: A Show Celebrating Color, Line & Shape,” its November 2011 featured art exhibit. Qualifying art must be abstract in subject and original in interpretation and composition, and preference will be given to work not previously shown at the MAC. All media will be accepted, including, but not limited to, watercolor, oil, acrylic, pencil, pen and ink, pastel, collage, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, fine arts textiles, assemblage, printmaking and photography. Entry forms are available on the MAC website at www.macsequim.org and at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., in Sequim. The entry fee for MAC members is $10 for up to and including three pieces, and $15 for up to and including three pieces for nonmembers.

Entry fees help support the MAC. Artwork will be accepted at the exhibit center from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, and 9 a.m. to noon Monday, Oct. 31. Artists are encouraged to submit their completed entry forms and fees as soon as possible, as display space is limited and artwork will be accepted until the space is full. “Abstractions: A Show Celebrating Color, Line & Shape” will run Nov. 1-26. An artists’ reception celebrating the show, part of the First Friday Art Walk Sequim, will be held at the exhibit center from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4. Artists are encouraged to direct any entry-related inquiries to MAC Art Exhibit Committee Chair Linda Stadtmiller at art exhibits@macsequim.org. For more information about arts-related MAC events, programs and upcoming exhibits, phone the exhibit center at 360683-8110 or visit www.mac sequim.org.

PeninsulaNorthwest Briefly . . . Walk/Bike to School Day slated in PT PORT TOWNSEND — International Walk/Bike to School Day will be recognized in Port Townsend on Wednesday. This one-day event is a part of an international effort in more than 40 countries to celebrate the many benefits of safely walking and bicycling to school. Local organizers hope to encourage more families to consider getting out of their cars and onto their feet and bicycles on the way to school Lowell Jons, a member of Port Townsend’s NonMotorized Transportation Advisory Board and a small committee of volunteers will be organizing and promoting the Walk/ Bike to School Day at elementary, middle and high schools. Members of the local bicycle club, the Port Townsend Bicycle Association, have also agreed to help families bicycle to school for this special celebration by riding the streets along with students on their way to school. Leif Hansen, who organized and promoted a “Walk Your Child to School day” in Port Townsend last May, is again helping to

make this autumn event happen. “Over 200 kids, plus 200 parents, friends and relatives, walked to school that day. . . . It was an overwhelming success,” said Hansen. No signups are needed, and it will be up to parents to self-organize. If you live farther than walking or biking distance an option is to drive part way, park and walk the rest of the way. For more information, phone Jons at 360-3799911 or visit www. ptwalkorbiketoschool.org.

Voters forum set PORT TOWNSEND — The American Association of University Women, Port Townsend Leader and the League of Women Voters of Jefferson County are sponsoring a free pre-election public forum at the Masonic Temple, 1338 Jefferson St., at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The forum will showcase candidates for Port Townsend City Council Position No. 3 Jack Range and Deborah Stinson; Position No. 4 candidates Robert Gray and George Randels; and a discussion about the city of Port Townsend’s Proposition No. 1, Fire and Emergency Services Levy Lid Lift. The League of Women Voters of Jefferson County was gifted 40 art posters

Death and Memorial Notice DANA YVONNE ‘VONNIE’ MCLEAN February 12, 1959 September 17, 2011 Dana Yvonne “Vonnie” McLean, 52, of Sequim passed away September 17, 2011, at home after a brave and courageous fight with cancer. Vonnie was born February 12, 1959, in Ruidoso, New Mexico, to Lee Roy and Bonnie Iris (Staples) Packard. Vonnie was raised and attended school in the Vancouver, Washington, area. She moved to the North Olympic Peninsula around 1982. She was an administrative assistant for Target Focus Training of Sequim and Las Vegas. Vonnie was also employed by Olympic Cellars Winery. Vonnie married Dean

Mrs. McLean K. McLean Jr. on August 20, 1999, at Pioneer Park in Sequim. Her family, especially her grandchildren, was particularly precious to her. Vonnie touched many people’s lives in special ways, through both her personal life and job. Her

special interests include crocheting, reading, cooking and her home. She also loved to go camping and went out nearly every weekend. She especially enjoyed finding lighthouses along the Washington and Oregon coasts. Vonnie is survived by her husband, Dean K. McLean of Sequim; mother Iris Ball of Sequim; daughter and son-in-law Jennifer and Don Rothganger of Sequim; son and daughter-in-law Jeremie and Kyla Adolphe of Port Angeles; stepsons Brian McLean and wife Stacie of Lakebay, Washington, and Ben McLean of Port Angeles; brother and sister-in-law Michael and Quenie Packard of Tyler, Texas; brother-in-law Bob McLean and wife Margaret of Port Angeles; sisters and brothers-in-law

Kae and Terry Stormo of Gilmer, Texas, and Diane and Ron King of Onalaska, Washington; sister-in-law Doreen Merideth and husband Roger of Sequim; grandchildren Adrienne Whitlock of Boise, Idaho, Alyssa Rothganger and Donny Rothganger of Sequim, Kendall Adolphe of Port Angeles and Mason McLean of Lakebay; 11 nieces; and nine nephews. She was preceded in death by her father, Lee Roy Packard, and stepfather, James Ball. A celebration of life potluck will be held Sunday, October 9, 2011, from   2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Pioneer Park, 387 East Washington Street, Sequim. Memorial contributions may be made in her name to the American Cancer Society or the charity of your choice.

Sunday, October 2, 2011

that will be for sale, reasonably priced, as a fundraiser to finance future civics education projects.

Director to speak CHIMACUM — State Department of Agriculture Director Dan Newhouse will present “Reconnecting Urban Consumers to Agriculture Producers” on Wednesday. The free event will be held at the Chimacum Grange Hall, 9572 Rhody Drive, at 6:30 p.m. Newhouse Newhouse will discuss bridging the gap between urban and rural areas. He will also address how local communities can help to provide some of the necessary services for small producers that have been eliminated by budget cuts at his agency. Funds for programs such as farmers’ markets, connecting producers with schools and institutional customers, helping farmers through the myriad of regulations, both state and federal and many other aids for small-scale producers have been cut. The appearance is spon-

Death and Memorial Notice JANICE LYNN PLUTE July 1, 1946 September 23, 2011 Janice Lynn Plute passed away peacefully in her Port Angeles home on Friday, September 23, 2011. A full obituary will be published at a later time. At her request, no services are planned. All donations may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

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sored by Citizens for Local Food. Citizens for Local Food is an ad hoc group of people participating in presentations and discussions with local farmers, food purveyors and community groups to encourage support and awareness of local food issues. Members are also working with the county planning commission in their desire to improve the regulatory atmosphere that impacts local farming.

A Fashionable Tea SEQUIM — Tickets are now on sale for a Sequim event that will combine two great passions, food and fashion. The Second Chance Consignment Shop, which specializes in fine clothing and accessories for women, will host “A Fashionable Tea” at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., at 12:30 p.m. Thursday. Part fashion show and part English-style tea, the event is a fundraiser for the consignment shop, which supports the Museum & Arts Center, or MAC, in the SequimDungeness Valley. “We thought it was time to get out into the community,” Second Chance Consignment Shop Manager Carole Platt said. “There are still so many people in the area who have never been to our store.” Tickets for the event are $15 and may be purchased at the consignment shop, 155 W. Cedar St., and the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., both in Sequim. While enjoying tea, savories and sweets including scones, cookies, sweet breads and tea sandwiches, models of various sizes and ages will be wearing clothing that is straight off of the shop’s racks. Platt said the shop typically carries 300 to 400 consigned clothing items ranging in size from 4 to 3X and style from casual to business wear and formal attire befitting women in their 20s and beyond, all of which will be reflected in the fashion show. Peninsula Daily News

Death and Memorial Notice DAVID N. JOHNSON May 29, 1945 September 18, 2011

Death and Memorial Notice ROBERT STEPHEN LAMM November 13, 1922 September 16, 2011 Robert Stephen Lamm, 88, passed away on September 16, 2011, at Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles. Bob, or R.S. as he was sometimes known, was born in Mankato, Minnesota, on November 13, 1922, to Stephen and Faith (Graham) Lamm. After graduating from Mankato High School, he learned to fly, receiving his training from the Civil Aeronautics Administration’s Civilian Training Program. Soon after, his dream of becoming an Army Air Force pilot went unfulfilled due to his color blindness. During World War II, he was assigned to China as a field meteorologist for the Air Force. Stationed at

Mr. Lamm air strips and villages in the interior, he provided weather reports vital to the Allied air campaign. After the war, he attended the University of Washington before starting his career with the Boy Scouts of America in 1948. Bob’s experience as an Eagle Scout and the example set by his father,

Stephen, influenced this decision. Bob’s journey with scouting took him to Seattle, Bremerton, and Walla Walla, Washington; Kansas City, Missouri; Boston; and San Jose, California. Along the way, he served as a district executive, assistant and chief Scout executive, and assistant regional and regional executive. His final position as a program director for the Western region gave him the opportunity to travel to Japan and Hawaii, where he fell in love with the island of Molokai. During his retirement, he vacationed there frequently. Of his 35-year career with the Scouts, some of his fondest memories were of being director of Camp Parsons on the Olympic Peninsula and of the wonderful staff mem-

Remembering a Lifetime available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.”

Mr. Johnson and son-in-law Shannon M. Johnson and Matt Schmitt of Aloha, Oregon; brother James Johnson of Jefferson, Oregon; and two grandchildren, Matthew and Joshua of Aloha. A memorial service will be held Saturday, October 22, 2011, at Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest Street, in Port Angeles. A reception will follow services. Please visit the online guestbook at www. harper-ridgeviewfuneral chapel.com.

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More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

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■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is

bers who assisted him there. It was at Parsons that he met Mary, the nurse in charge of the diabetic campers. She became the love of his life and wife of 63 years. Bob’s signature story, which he told around the Parsons campfire, ended with the thought that one should “carve your steps wide and deep.” He did just that throughout his life. We will miss him. Bob is survived by his wife, Mary; son Stephen; daughters Barbara and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his twin sister, Betty; sister Jane; and brother James. A remembrance will be scheduled at a later time. Memorial donations can be made to the Scout Memorial and Tribute Fund, P.O. Box 440408, Seattle, WA 98114.

David N. Johnson, 66, of Port Angeles passed away at home on September 18, 2011. David was born May 29, 1945, to Alton Clifford and Ruth Augusta (Fosdick) Johnson in Albany, Oregon. Mr. Johnson was a private first class and light weapons infantryman in the Army National Guard in Oregon from 1966 to 1969. He lived and worked in Western Oregon until 1980, when he moved to Washington. David was employed with the Clallam County Public Utility District and a member of the Port Angeles Planning Commission. Mr. Johnson married Silvia “Sally” Hermosada on December 31, 1998, in Sequim. He enjoyed woodworking, backpacking, camping and gardening. David is survived by his wife, Sally Johnson; son Aaron T. Johnson of San Francisco; daughter


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WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 63

Low 47

56/46

59/47

56/40

55/42

Considerable cloudiness.

Breezy with rain.

Rain.

Rain.

Cloudy with a couple of showers.

Overcast with a shower possible.

The Peninsula A cold front will be well off the east and south today, while an area of low pressure moves northeastward off the Pacific coast toward British Columbia. In between these two systems, expect plenty of clouds across the Peninsula. Neah Bay Port Much of the day will be rain-free; however, some rain will 62/50 Townsend start to move onshore by evening. The storm system will Port Angeles 60/50 bring breezy and chilly conditions with rain tonight and 63/47 Monday. There will likely be more rain on Tuesday as Sequim another storm system approaches the coast.

Victoria 61/51

62/49

Forks 62/48

Seattle 66/52

Oct 3

Everett 63/52

Marine Forecast

Mostly cloudy today. Wind east-northeast at 6-12 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Occasional rain and drizzle tonight. Wind east 8-16 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility under 4 miles at times. Rain tomorrow. Wind east 8-16 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles. Tuesday: Rain. Wind east-southeast 15-25 knots. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility under 3 miles.

4:57 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Port Angeles 8:20 a.m. 6:05 p.m. Port Townsend 10:05 a.m. 7:50 p.m. Sequim Bay* 9:26 a.m. 7:11 p.m.

Tomorrow

Tuesday

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

7.0’ 8.3’ 6.8’ 6.5’ 8.2’ 7.8’ 7.7’ 7.3’

10:31 a.m. 11:22 p.m. 12:39 a.m. 1:20 p.m. 1:53 a.m. 2:34 p.m. 1:46 a.m. 2:27 p.m.

2.3’ -0.2’ -1.1’ 4.7’ -1.4’ 6.1’ -1.3’ 5.7’

5:57 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 9:37 a.m. 7:01 p.m. 11:22 a.m. 8:46 p.m. 10:43 a.m. 8:07 p.m.

11:29 a.m. ----1:37 a.m. 2:55 p.m. 2:51 a.m. 4:09 p.m. 2:44 a.m. 4:02 p.m.

7:04 a.m. 6:38 p.m. 10:50 a.m. 8:13 p.m. 12:35 p.m. 9:58 p.m. 11:56 a.m. 9:19 p.m.

12:22 a.m. 12:36 p.m. 2:41 a.m. 4:58 p.m. 3:55 a.m. 6:12 p.m. 3:48 a.m. 6:05 p.m.

6.6’ 7.7’ 6.8’ 6.1’ 8.2’ 7.3’ 7.7’ 6.9’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

2.8’ ---0.7’ 4.9’ -0.9’ 6.3’ -0.8’ 5.9’

6.3’ 7.1’ 6.8’ 5.6’ 8.2’ 6.7’ 7.7’ 6.3’

Oct 19

0.3’ 3.1’ -0.2’ 4.5’ -0.2’ 5.9’ -0.2’ 5.5’

Atlanta 68/46

New

Oct 26

0s

Houston 84/54 Miami 84/72

Fronts Cold

AFFORS*06503

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 80 53 65 68 60 58 72 86 84 80 64 54 69 84 63 61 72 77 87 84 70 59 71 46 80 86 84 51

Lo W 58 pc 43 c 53 c 46 s 47 sh 46 c 41 pc 56 pc 50 s 56 pc 54 r 49 sh 47 s 51 pc 47 s 43 s 47 pc 50 c 57 s 54 pc 46 s 46 pc 48 c 29 c 50 pc 74 pc 54 s 29 s

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 72 92 76 80 84 62 75 63 76 68 82 75 80 97 63 99 70 64 80 78 68 85 88 73 66 76 77 56

Lo W 51 s 75 pc 46 s 65 pc 72 pc 49 s 49 s 45 s 57 s 50 sh 54 s 47 s 59 s 74 pc 48 sh 76 pc 51 c 42 pc 51 pc 53 pc 44 s 59 t 60 s 65 pc 55 pc 50 s 52 pc 46 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 105 at Bullhead City, AZ

Low: 19 at Embarrass, MN

683-9619 385-2724 452-0840

✔ Trusted Experts ✔ Senior Discount ✔ Lifetime Warranty

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

New York 68/50 Washington 56/46

145118410

A

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

City Hi Lo W Athens 75 64 t Baghdad 88 56 s Beijing 68 48 s Brussels 76 57 s Cairo 88 68 s Calgary 65 39 c Edmonton 54 35 c Hong Kong 84 75 c Jerusalem 75 54 s Johannesburg 65 46 r Kabul 95 48 s London 82 59 s Mexico City 70 50 t Montreal 57 46 r Moscow 46 25 r New Delhi 95 70 s Paris 81 53 s Rio de Janeiro 81 68 pc Rome 81 61 s Stockholm 64 58 pc Sydney 63 54 sh Tokyo 66 55 r Toronto 56 49 sh Vancouver 63 53 c Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Yakima Kennewick 70/45 75/47

Ht

Oct 11

Chicago 63/47

El Paso 84/62

World Cities Today

Spokane 70/49

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

LaPush

Last

Detroit 59/46

Denver 84/54 Kansas City 72/51

Los Angeles 80/65

Moon Phases Full

Minneapolis 75/49

San Francisco 66/55

-10s -0s

Olympia 66/48

Today

Billings 86/56

Sunset today ................... 6:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 7:15 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 1:53 p.m. Moonset today ............... 10:30 p.m. First

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 66/52

Sun & Moon

Port Ludlow 62/50

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 59 47 trace 11.20 Forks 60 46 0.01 85.06 Seattle 59 50 0.03 25.57 Sequim 62 50 0.03 11.38 Hoquiam 61 52 0.00 48.23 Victoria 58 48 0.01 22.93 P. Townsend* 60 50 0.00 12.56 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Bellingham 62/48 Aberdeen 64/52

Peninsula Daily News

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, October 2, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

Politics and Environment

 $ Briefly . . . PA chamber begins political forum series PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce begins a four-week series of forums involving candidates in the Nov. 8 election with an appearance by the two Clallam County commissioner candidates on Monday. Scheduled to appear are Democrat Linda Barn­ father and Republican Jim McEntire, who are vying to replace Steve Tharinger as Barnfather East End commissioner. Tharinger, now also a member of the state House of Representatives, is not seeking re-election to the county post. Other scheduled chamber forums: ■  Oct. 10: Port Angeles City Council candidates Andrew Schwab and McEntire Brad Collins (Position 1) and Dan Di Guilio and Noelle Fuller (Position 5). ■  Oct. 17: City Council candidates Sissy Bruch and Don Perry (Position 6). (For Position 7, incumbent Cherie Kidd’s challenger, Cody Blevins, withdrew from the race last Thursday. Blevins’ name remains on the Nov. 8 ballot.) ■  Oct. 24: Hospital District No. 2 (Olympic Medical Center) board candidates Jeanne Labrecque, John Nutter, John Miles and Jack Slowriver. In addition to Barn­father and McEntire on Monday, the Chamber of Commerce will introduce its three candidates for the chamber board — Todd Ort­loff, Shenna Straling and Sharon Stevenson Open to the public, the chamber’s Monday lunch­eons begin at noon in the upstairs banquet room at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

Consultant to speak PORT TOWNSEND — Organizational development consultant Jerry Swanson will discuss “The Importance of Connection” at this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. Swanson, who will discuss “connectedness as a fundamental issue in improving organization and community performance,” is Swanson retired from Boeing and a Port Townsend resident. He holds advanced degrees in behavioral science and chemistry and teaches at the graduate level. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. Monday’s meeting sponsor is Uptown Nutrition.

Business meeting FORKS — The Forks Chamber of Commerce will hold a business meeting for its members on Wednesday. The chamber normally has a series of weekly luncheon speakers between September and June, but reserves the first Wednesday meeting of each month to discuss items of interest to chamber members. Wednesday’s meeting, open to the public, starts with no-host lunch at noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks Ave. Lunch costs $8; a bowl of soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, $4. Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch Sept. 30, 2011

Dow Jones industrials

10,913.38

Nasdaq composite

2,415.40

Standard & Poor’s 500

-240.60

-65.36 -28.98 1,131.42

Russell 2000

-18.64 644.16

NYSE diary Advanced: Declined: Unchanged: Volume:

624 2,453 61 National Park Service

4.7 b

A

Nasdaq diary Advanced: Declined: Unchanged: Volume:

586 1,983 92 2.0 b

School discussion

AP

big whack out of

Elwha Dam

This webcam image taken of the Elwha Dam on Saturday shows the right spillway almost demolished — in less than a week after the river was diverted to where the left spillway used to be. Remaining in the center are infrastructure related to the former power plant, lower right. For a Saturday view of simultaneous Glines Canyon Dam demolition, see Page D6.

$9.04 minimum wage highest in the nation

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles School Superintendent Jane Figures Pryne reflect will speak this NOTE: marketat fluctuations after close; may not match other of APthe content week’s breakfast meeting Port Angeles Business AssociaMARKET BRIEF 093011: Chart shows tion on Tuesday. dailyPryne, market figures for Dow, S&P, Russell 2000 Nasdaq, along with NYSE and who and became Nasdaq diary; stand-alone; 1c x 4 inches; superinten112 x 288 pt; ETA 6:30 p.m. dentptin 2010, is expected to discuss the Port Angeles School District’s financial situation in light of Pryne declining enrollment and reduced state funding. Peninsula Daily News Open to the public, Tuesday’s news services PABA meeting begins at 7:30 OLYMPIA — Washington a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, state’s minimum wage will rise 37 113 DelGuzzi Drive. cents to $9.04 next year, keeping There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those it as the highest minimum hourly who do not order breakfast. rate in the nation. The jump from $8.67 per hour is based on increases to the fedBankers noted eral Consumer Price Index, the SEATTLE — The president state Department of Labor & of a regional banking corporaIndustries announced Friday. tion with branches in Port AngeWashington voters approved les and Sequim has been named an initiative in 1998 tying the one of “25 women to watch” state minimum wage to inflation. nationally by American Banker The particular index used to magazine. calculate minimum wage meaLaurie sures price changes in goods and Stewart, services purchased by urban wage president and earners and clerical workers, such CEO of as food, clothing, shelter and serSound Comvices. munity Bank, L&I said the index increased was named 4.258 percent during the by the magazine last week. Also on Stewart the list are Beth Mooney, chairman and CEO, and Maria Coyne, executive vice president of business banking, of KeyCorp, whose KeyBank branches include sites in Port Angeles and Sequim; Patricia Callahan, chief Peninsula Daily News administrative officer of Wells news services Fargo, which has branches in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port OLYMPIA — Doctors have Townsend; Lynn Heitman, filed suit to stop a new state rule senior vice president of US limiting payments for emergencyBank, which has branches in room visits by Medicaid patients. Port Angeles, Sequim, Port The lawsuit adds fuel to an Townsend and Quilcene; and already acrimonious relationship Kelly Mathieson, managing between doctors, hospitals and director of ­JPMorgan Chase, Medicaid officials over the rule, which operates Chase Bank which went into effect Saturday. branches in Port Angeles, The rule limits payments to Sequim and Port Townsend. three visits a year for any of the 700 diagnoses the state says are ‘Rising star’ typically not emergencies, including chest pain, abdominal pain PORT ANGELES — Clallam and early-pregnancy hemorrhage County Democratic Party Chair— conditions doctors argue must man Matthew Randazzo has be evaluated because they could been announced as the recipient in fact prove to be genuine emerof the Washington State Demogencies. cratic Party’s Warren G. Magnuson Award for “rising star of the Patient judgment year.” Randazzo “You’re asking patients to will receive make a decision about whether the award [chest pain] is an emergency, Oct. 22 at a when physicians can’t make a party funddiagnosis without an EKG,” says raising dinDr. Nathan Schlicher, an emerner in Seattle. gency doctor at St. Joseph MediThe “rising cal Center in Tacoma. star” award is Doctors say more than a dozen defined by other states have expressed interRandazzo the state est in Washington state’s rules, Democratic which — if allowed to stand — Party as “the fresh new face to could affect not only Medicaid patients here and in other states the Democratic Party; an indibut could be adopted by private vidual whose ideas and enthusiinsurers as well. asm are new and innovative.” In discussions with the state, A New Orleans native, RanSchlicher represented the state dazzo, 27, moved to the North chapter of the American College Olympic Peninsula in 2006. of Emergency Physicians, which Turn to Briefly/D5 filed the lawsuit in Thurston

37-cent jump to be felt in many eateries

Because of a consumer price index decrease in 2009, the mini■ Is the minimum wage too mum wage in Washington stayed high, too low or just right? at $8.55 through 2010. peninsuladailynews.com The biggest increase in minimum wage in the last five years 12-month period ending in was from 2008 to 2009 when workers received a 45 cent an August. Fuel costs topped the price hour increase. increases in the index over the ‘Pretty big deal’ last year. The minimum wage applies to A survey by The Associated workers in both agricultural and Press showed that some Washingnon-agricultural jobs, although 14­ ton restaurants are considering and 15-year-olds may be paid 85 menu price hikes to cope with percent of the adult minimum next year’s 37-cent hike. wage, or $7.68 in 2012. “It’s a pretty big deal, because Washington is one of 10 states all I have is minimum wage labor,” that adjusts its minimum wage said Teri Ramsbottom, co-owner based on inflation and the Conof JT’s Steak and Fishhouse in sumer Price Index. Longview, which has eight The others are Arizona, Coloemployees. rado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, “We’re very angry about it. Nevada, Ohio, Oregon and Ver“It goes up every year, but I mont. thought we’d get by without an Oregon has the nation’s second increase this year.” highest minimum wage. Michele Bergeson, general It recently announced that its manager of Kelso’s Red Lobster, per-hour wage will rise 30 cents to has 70 employees, 33 make mini$8.80 an hour next year. mum wage. Idaho follows the federal miniTurn to Wage/D2 mum wage, $7.25 cents an hour.

PENINSULA POLL . . .

Doctors sue state over Medicaid ER visit limits Other court actions THE DOCTORS’ SUIT to stop new limitations on repeat visits to the emergency room is the latest in a series of legal salvos that could deepen the state’s budget sinkhole. The state budget shortfall now stands at $1.3 billion. Other interest groups and advocates taking the state to court in reaction to the Legislature’s cuts to human services and public employee compensation: n A hearing was held Friday in front of a King County Superior Court judge on another cut to hospitals. The Legislature cut hospital reimbursements for Medicaid services by $260 million in state and federal money. Lawmakers said the change lined up the reimbursements with federal Medicare rates, but hospitals call it an illegal diversion of fees they agreed to pay in 2010 to help pull down more federal health care money. n Nonprofit community health centers have also challenged their payment rates, according to the governor’s budget office. n Two unions and a group representing retired public employees plan to sue in October to restore retirees’ cost-of-living increases. Turn

County Superior Court on Friday. The group and the Washington State Medical Association have been in discussions about the rule with state Medicaid officials. The lawsuit, which asks the court for an injunction, says the state did not follow proper rulemaking procedures, ignored lawmakers’ directions and is violating state and federal Medicaid laws, including “prudent layperson” standards governing the coverage of ER visits. Washington State Hospital Association spokeswoman Cassie Sauer said hospitals support the

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lawsuit as well. “We are absolutely not OK with how it has turned out,” Sauer said. “The state is making bad policy and legislating bad medicine based solely on cutting the budget,” with potentially severe consequences for some of the most vulnerable patients. “The medical community is united in opposition,” she said. State officials said Friday they had not yet seen the suit and had no comment at this time. Turn

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Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

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About a month ago, Russ Veenema, executive director of the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce, sent the first photo to Port Angeles city officials showing how the street sign at the bottom of Lincoln Street was ruining a beautiful photo opportunity and a scenic spot with sign clutter. The city agreed and did something about it — workers relocated the signs. The second photo shows the results.

Medicaid: $35 million cut for ER visits Continued from D1 patients is what this is going to be causing.” Most emergency doctors, The state’s medical director for Medicaid, Dr. including Schlicher, are not Jeff Thompson, said the employed by a hospital but budget crisis forced him to by a group that will bear cut at least $35 million a the brunt of unpaid bills. Thompson, on the other year from the ER-visits tab. Lawmakers directed side, contends that attempts Medicaid to collaborate to argue about specific conclosely with doctors and ditions ignore the hard hospitals on the list and an financial reality. “We have no flexibility in appeal process. But Schlicher and Sauer terms of the budget numsaid collaboration was non- bers,” Thompson says. “I existent, with providers’ need serious people to come proposals routinely dis- to the table because we have serious issues.” missed. He concedes that the “This list is not based in meetings weren’t as collabscience,” Schlicher says. “It’s based on which line orative as they could have item is going to save the been. For example, he said, he most money.” In the long run, he says, resisted a provision that the new policy may not would have Medicaid pay even do that, if patients for children no matter what wait until problems are their diagnosis because, he more serious — and more says, he needed to save the money. costly. “We had no flexibility in “If you don’t have coverage, you won’t come in until removing either large your kid with asthma is groups, like kids, or large blue,” he says. “Sicker [more frequent] diagnoses

from the list.” Thompson notes that the budget is so bad lawmakers have had to cut whole programs, such as Basic Health for working poor. “I will grant you that this is a disruptive innovation,” he concedes. “We’re working with the communities to ensure the least amount of unintended consequences.”

3 nonemergency visits Medicaid will pay for the first three nonemergency visits, Thompson notes. Only a small minority — about 3 percent of Medicaid patients who use ERs in a year, or about 11,000 patients — seek care in ERs more than three times a year. Those patients have been specifically notified by Medicaid about the changes, Thompson said. A few patients visit ERs 20, 30 or more times a year, he said. In 2005, the top Medic-

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Wage: 37-cent increase Continued from D1 operating cost next year of around $60,000. Mike Casetta, owner of Bergeson said the increase will become some- Fire Mountain Grill & Sumthing else she has to factor merland Catering Services as she guides her business in Vancouver, across the Columbia River from Portthrough the recession. “Overall, it just makes it land, said he could see how the increase could irk some a little tougher,” she said. At Spokane’s Tomato business owners — but sees Street restaurant, “it’s been why the increase would be 19 months since I’ve raised beneficial to employees. prices here at the restaurant,” said owner Dean ‘Mixed feelings’ Haynes. “I have mixed feelings Now he is considering because I can’t see how anydoing just that. “Somewhere we have to one could survive off of even pass it on to your guests,” $9 an hour,” he said. Casetta employees make he said. “And again, that at least $10 an hour. can be evil.” “But if you were to own a In Washington, tips don’t count toward minimum couple fast food joints, those wage. So Haynes said he is pennies could add up,” he looking at an increase in said.

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For Mindi Campbell, a college student who operates a gondola ride in Spokane’s Riverfront Park, the raise seems fair. “With tuition going up, it’s good to see that increase going up in minimum wage to be able to keep up with that,” she said. But the raise may pinch the Spokane Parks and Recreation Department. Almost all of its 350 seasonal employees are minimum wage earners, which translates to tens of thousands of dollars in increased operating costs next year. “Maybe we have a 10-week program for youth in the summer at our summer camps, maybe it reduces down to 8 weeks,” said a spokesman.

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aid ER user, a 27-year-old woman, visited ERs 172 times, mostly with migraine and headache complaints, according to DSHS. Continued from D1 As many as half the Lawmakers ended the main annual increase high-use ER patients are this year for two older pension plans, saving $400 seeking drugs, Thompson million in the two-year budget. says, and because ERs are Expect claims to be similar to those in the union so crowded, patients with challenge of a 2007 repeal of another pension benetrue emergencies may not fit, known as “gain-sharing.” get the attention they need. A King County judge struck down that cut, but Helping steer patients the case remains in court. with chronic conditions n A federal judge this year halted the Jan. 1 away from the ER isn’t a elimination of the state’s food stamp program for bad thing, he says, because legal immigrants, saying the cut violated equalERs can’t help with the protection guarantees in the U.S. Constitution. long-term management of An appeals court panel is considering the class diseases such as asthma. action lawsuit. But Thompson concedes The benefit helps about 13,000 noncitizens who that he doesn’t know how are ineligible for federal food aid. many patients come to ERs n Another challenge to cuts that would have because they’re unable to taken effect Jan. 1 came from the home health care find primary-care providers workers of Service Employees International Union Local 775, which challenged reductions of their or because they can’t get hours. time off from work during A judge declined to forestall the cuts, and both regular office hours. sides are waiting on an appeals court ruling. “That may be in fact n A judge is deciding whether to prevent the true,” he says, and Medicaid state from removing patients from the rolls of the is working to increase coorstate-subsidized Basic Health insurance for adults dination between primarywho don’t qualify for Medicaid. care doctors and ERs. Peninsula Daily News One compromise that news services was reached in the collaboration was the creation of a list of automatic exceptions to the limits, including foster children; patients who end up admitted to the patients who arrive by seeking mental-health or hospital or who undergo ambulance, police or EMTs; detox services; and patients emergency surgery.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

D3

Japan’s answer to next tsunami: mini-Noah’s Ark The Associated Press

TOKYO — A small Japanese company has developed a modern, miniature version of Noah’s Ark in case Japan is hit by another massive earthquake and tsunami — a floating capsule that looks like a huge tennis ball. Japan’s Cosmo Power says its “Noah” shelter is made of enhanced fiberglass that can save users from disasters like the one on March 11 that devastated Japan’s northern coast, leaving nearly 20,000 people dead or missing. Company president Shoji Tanaka says the capsule can hold four adults and has survived many crash tests. It has a small lookout window and breathing holes on top. It also can be used as a toy house for children. The company completed the capsule earlier this month and already has 600 orders, including two delivered. The capsule sells for $4,000.

Hispanic students leave Ala. schools following new law Peninsula Daily News news services

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Hispanic students have started vanishing from Alabama public schools in the wake of a court ruling that upheld the state’s tough new law cracking down on illegal immigration. Education officials say scores of immigrant families have withdrawn their children from classes or kept them home this week, afraid that sending the kids to school would draw attention from authorities. There are no precise statewide numbers. But several districts with large immigrant enrollments — from small towns to large urban districts — reported a sudden exodus of children of Hispanic parents, some of whom told officials they planned to leave the state to avoid trouble with the law, which requires schools to check students’ immigration status and report back to the state.

What law does

By Robert Pear

The New York Times

WASHINGTON — President Obama is backing legislation that would prohibit employers from discriminating against job applicants because they are unemployed. Under the proposal, it would be “an unlawful employment practice” if a business with 15 or more employees refused to hire a person “because of the individual’s status as unemployed.” Unsuccessful job applicants could sue and recover damages for violations, just as when an employer discriminates on the basis of a person’s race, color, religion, sex or national origin. In a radio interview last month, Obama said such discrimination made “absolutely no sense,” especially at a time when many people, through no fault of their own, had been laid off. Obama’s proposal would also prohibit employment agencies and websites from carrying advertisements

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The dozens of people in tie-dyed T-shirts and star-spangled underwear have been camped out in a granite plaza in lower Manhattan for more than two weeks — and show no signs of going away. They sleep on air mattresses, use Mac laptops and play drums. They go to the bathroom at the local McDonald’s. A few times a day, they march down to Wall Street, yelling, “This is what democracy looks like!” It all has the feel of a classic street protest with one exception: It’s unclear exactly what the demonstrators want. “When all the bailout money was spent on bonuses and stuff everyone was outraged, but no one did anything because no one feels like they can,” protester Jesse Wilson, 22, said last week when asked to take articulate the cause. “It’s time for us to come together to realize we are the masses, and we can make things happen.” But he couldn’t say what, exactly, he wanted to happen. Does it matter that the protest is vague? Academics and longtime activists give varying opinions.

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National Public Radio, which hasn’t aired stories, has fielded angry communiques demanding coverage. “The recent protests on Wall Street did not involve large numbers of people, prominent people, a great disruption or an especially clear objective,” said Dick Meyer, an NPR editor.

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response, thanks in part to technology, said Gabriella Coleman, a New York University professor of media. “We are in a cultural moment where people think the dictator will topple tomorrow, after four days of protests, and also the media is going to jump to pay attention,” Coleman said.

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“A lot of this revolves around economic justice, who gets what in this society, who has a safety net, who doesn’t and how much corporate influence exists in Washington,” said Bill Dobbs, an activist involved in the 2004 demonstrations at the Republican National Convention. Some demonstrators say they are against Wall Street greed, others say they are protesting global warming and still others say they are protesting “the man.” The modern protester also expects an immediate

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passed, would encourage litigation by sending a message to millions of Americans: “If you’re unemployed and you go to apply for a job, and you’re not hired for that job, see a lawyer.” The Labor Department reports that 14 million people are unemployed. About 43 percent of them — 6 million people — are classified as longterm unemployed, having been out of work for 27 weeks or more. Of that group, nearly 4.5 million have been unemployed for a year or more. The average duration of unemployment among jobless workers is 40 weeks, the longest in more than 60 years. Charges of employment discrimination tend to increase in a sluggish economy with a high jobless rate. In the fiscal year 2010, which ended last September, job-bias charges filed with the employment commission reached a record of nearly 100,000, up 20 percent from 2007.

Wall St. protest vague, persistent

Columnist David G. Sellars is taking the week off from his maritime column.

How’s the fishing?

for job openings that exclude people who are unemployed. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has received reports of such advertisements — but does not have data to show how common they are. Republicans and some employers said that discrimination was not common and that the proposed remedy could expose employers to a barrage of lawsuits. Michael Eastman, executive director of labor-law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, said the Civil Rights Act already outlaws employment practices that have “a disparate impact on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin,” unless an employer can show that a particular practice is “job related for the position in question and consistent with business necessity.” Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, said the president’s proposal would, in effect, establish the unemployed as a new “protected class.” Gohmert said the proposal, if

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No ‘On the Waterfront’

nor parents will be arrested for trying to get an education. The anxiety has become so intense that the superintendent in one of the state’s largest cities, Huntsville, went on a Spanish-language television show Thursday to try to calm widespread worries. “In the case of this law, our students do not have anything to fear,” Casey Wardynski said in halting Spanish. He urged families to send students to class and explained that the state is only trying to compile statistics. Police, he insisted, were not getting involved in schools. But many Spanishspeaking families aren’t waiting around to see what happens. A school worker in Albertville — a community with a large poultry industry that employs many Hispanic workers — said Friday that many families might leave town over the weekend for other states. About 22 percent of the community’s 4,200 students are Hispanic. Victor Palafox graduated from a high school in suburban Birmingham last year and has lived in the United States without documentation since age 6, when his parents brought him and his brother here from Mexico. “Younger students are watching their lives taken from their hands,” said Palafox, whose family is staying put. In Montgomery County, more than 200 Hispanic students were absent the morning after the judge’s Wednesday ruling.

‘Unemployed’ could be added to protected status

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The law — which The New York Times labeled in an editorial as “the country’s cruelest, most unforgiving immigration law” — effectively makes it a crime to be an undocumented immigrant in Alabama by criminalizing working, renting a home and failing to comply with federal registration laws that opponents say are largely obsolete. It nullifies any contracts when one party is an undocumented immigrant. It requires the police to check the papers of people they suspect are in the U.S. illegally. It does not spare American citizens. Businesses that knowingly employ illegal immigrants can lose their licenses. The Obama administration filed court documents Friday announcing its plans to appeal the ruling that upheld the law. Local and state officials are pleading with immigrant families to keep their children enrolled. The law does not ban anyone from school, they say, and neither students

T

he anxiety has become so intense that the superintendent in one of the state’s largest cities, Huntsville, went on a Spanishlanguage television show Thursday to try to calm widespread worries.

The Associated Press

Cosmo Power Co. President Shoji Tanaka crawls out from a spherical earthquake and tsunami shelter “Noah” made of fiber enforced plastic at the company’s factory in Hiratsuka, west of Tokyo.


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BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Supreme Court to face health care law New term opening with political issue By Mark Sherman

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The nine justices of the Supreme Court, who serve without seeking election, soon will have to decide whether to insert themselves into the center of the presidential campaign next year. The high court begins its new term Monday, and President Obama’s health care overhaul, which affects almost everyone in the country, is squarely in its sights. The Obama administration’s request last week that the justices resolve whether the health care law is constitutional makes it more likely than not that they will deliver their verdict by June 2012, just as Obama and his Republican opponent charge toward the fall campaign. Already, GOP presidential contenders use virtually every debate and speech to assail Obama’s major domestic accomplishment, which aims to extend health insurance to more than 30 million people now without coverage. If as now expected the justices agree to review the law’s constitutionality, those deliberations would certainly define the court’s coming term. Their decision could rank as the court’s most significant since the December 2000 ruling that effectively sealed George W. Bush’s election as president. Health care is only one of several issues that the

court could hear that would make for a “fantastic Supreme Court term,” said former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal, now in private practice at the Hogan Lovells law firm. Other high-profile cases on the horizon concern immigration and affirmative action, hot-button issues at any time and only more so in an election year. Less likely, though still with a chance to make it to the court this year are cases involving gay marriage and the landmark Voting Rights Act that some Southern states argue has outlived its usefulness. Decisions about whether to even to consider health care, affirmative action and immigration are a month off or more.

Other cases In the meantime, the justices will take up a First Amendment case looking at the regulation of television broadcasts as well as a couple of appeals involving the Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. One of those cases is a digital age dispute over the government’s power to track a suspect’s movement using a GPS device, without first getting a judge’s approval. Among the cases involving criminal defendants is one from an inmate awaiting execution in Alabama who missed a deadline to appeal his death sentence because the big-firm lawyers in New York who had been handling his case for free moved on to new jobs and letters from the court clerk sat in the firm’s mailroom before being returned to sender. The case of Cory Maples,

The Associated Press

President Obama is applauded after signing the health care bill in the East Room of the White House in Washington on March 23, 2010. convicted 15 years ago in the shooting deaths of two men, presents the question: “How much poor representation can one criminal defendant receive” before it violates the Constitution? said University of Maryland law professor Sherrilyn Ifill.

Jerusalem’s location A lawsuit over a baby’s passport also will be before the court in a case that has a taste of Middle East politics and a fight between the president and Congress. Jerusalem-born Menachem Zivotofsky’s parents want his U.S. passport to list his birthplace as Israel

even though U.S. policy does not recognize the oncedivided city as belonging to Israel. Congress, though, passed a law in 2002 giving Jerusalem-born U.S. citizens that option. Presidents of both parties have directed the State Department to ignore the law, saying it wrongly interferes with the president’s powers. Just over a third of the 48 cases the court has so far agreed to hear are of interest to the business sector, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. But that list includes few big-ticket cases, unlike last term’s victories for business interests in major

cases seeking to limit consumer and employee access to the courts. Foremost among those was the decision to throw out a class-action lawsuit on behalf of up to 1.6 million female Wal-Mart employees.

TV case The nation’s major broadcasters are focused on one case that has the potential to reshape regulation of the airwaves. The federal appeals court in New York threw out the Federal Communications Commission’s rules that apply when children are likely to be watching. That includes a ban on

the use of curse words as well as fines against broadcasters who showed a woman’s nude buttocks on a 2003 episode of ABC’s “NYPD Blue.” The television networks argue that the policy is inconsistently applied and outdated, taking in only broadcast television and leaving unregulated the same content if transmitted on cable TV or over the Internet. “Singling out broadcast television doesn’t make much more sense anymore,” said Jonathan Cohn, a former Justice Department official. Cohn’s law firm, Sidley, Austin, represents Fox Television Stations in the case.

Supreme Court to hear deportation case THE SUPREME COURT agreed last week to decide whether the length of immigrants’ lawful residence in the United States should be considered in determining whether their children may be deported. Federal immigration law allows people who have been lawful permanent

residents for at least five years and have lived continuously in the United States for at least seven years to ask the government for leniency if they are threatened with deportation. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in San Francisco, has ruled that immigrants who entered the United States as

children may count their parents’ years here to satisfy the residency requirements. The court accepted two appeals from such rulings, consolidating them into a single case. One of the appeals, Holder v. Gutierrez, No. 10-1542, concerns Carlos M. Gutierrez, a Mexican citizen who became

a legal permanent resident of the United States in 2003, when he was 19. Two years later, the government sought to deport him after catching him trying to drive across the border from Mexico with three undocumented minors in his car. The New York Times

Rising health premiums shift to workers Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — Premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance continued to escalate this year even as the share of work-

ers receiving less generous coverage reached a new high, according to new survey data. In 2011, for the first time, half of workers at small firms with individual policies faced annual

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Parents’ insurance One provision allowed all young adults — not only those in college — to remain on their parents’ plan until age 26. The other provision prohibits plans from charging co-pays for annual checkups and other preventive care. Together, those two provisions contributed to about one-fifth of the 9 percent increase, the study calculated. Employers seem to be turning to cost-shifting as an alternative to dropping coverage outright. The share of companies offering insurance shrank from 68 percent to 60 percent in the first half of the decade, and the figure for very small firms dropped from 58 percent to 48 percent. But that decline has leveled off since then.

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ance-company profits, which were up, and some new costs associated with two main provisions of the new health-care law, signed into law in March 2010.

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deductibles of $1,000 or more. That figure was 16 percent in 2006. The share at large firms has grown from 6 percent to 22 percent over the same five years. At the same time, the survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that premiums for family plans rose 9 percent in 2011, after years of slower annual growth. A similar recent survey by the consulting firm Mercer found that yearly premium increases have been hovering around the 6 percent mark and will grow by slightly less in 2012. Why are costs up?

Premiums paid directly by workers have galloped ahead of wage increases and inflation — rising 131 percent between 2001 and 2011 for family plans. Employer costs for those plans have increased 113 percent over the same period. Still, employers primarily are coping with rising health-care expenses by moving workers into plans with higher out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles, co-pays and coinsurance. Peter Cunningham, a researcher at the Center for Studying Health System Change, has found that about one in every five families with employer-sponsored insurance was spending more than 10 percent of its income on out-of-pocket health-care costs by 2008 (the most recent year for which those statistics were available). Advocates for the new health-care law maintain its changes to the way Medicare pays for care ultimately could encourage providers to restructure in ways that slow the growth of private insurance costs substantially. Still, for the moment at least, “there’s not a sense for most people that their costs and benefits will be better under the new legislation if they already have insurance,” said Robert Blendon, a Harvard University professor who monitors public views on healthcare issues. That feeling, he said, helps explain the stubborn divide in public opinion on the law, which has remained evenly split since its adoption.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

D5

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D1

viduals. The union plans to appeal the decision, attorney Robert Remar said after the hearing. He had argued that the union has the right to assess whether the proposed damages and expenses were proper, saying that he believes some of them were excessive and inflated.

in August, the first decline The rate reported Friday in nearly two years. from the European Union’s At the same time, statistics agency was the He is a published though, Americans spent a highest since October 2008 author, development direcbit more in August despite and represented a big tor of North Olympic Land seeing incomes drop 0.1 increase from August’s 2.5 Trust, volunteer public percent. according to the percent. relations director of the Commerce Department. The scale of the rise was Northwest Raptor & WildConsumer spending rose unexpected. life Center and co-chair of just 0.2 percent after a the Peninsula Young ProVanguard index more robust 0.7 percent fessionals Network. gain in July. BOSTON — Vanguard DO YOU HAVE a business expansion planned, Now digital book Most of the increase in on Friday announced strastaffing change or a new product line? Are you spending went to pay tegic and management PORT ANGELES — starting a new business? GOP challenger higher prices for food and changes for six of its The North Olympic PeninThe Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention SEATTLE — A Republi- gas. mutual funds. sula’s best-selling truenews of your business in our daily Business Briefly When adjusted for inflacan state senator from SpoFive mutual funds will crime book, The Lady of the column. kane is set to announce his tion, consumer spending begin to exclusively employ Lake by Mavis Amundson, Simply send in the information — including a candidacy for the U.S. Sen- was flat last month. a low-cost index investing is now available as a digiphone number for us to get additional information, Many tapped their savate, challenging Democrat approach, rather than relytal book from Amazon.com. if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following incumbent Maria Cantwell. ings to cover the steeper ing partly on professional Consummethods: KING-TV reported that costs. managers to guide investers can In August, the savings ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. Michael Baumgartner will ment selection. download rate fell to its lowest level ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port announce his candidacy In addition, Vanguard is the digitial since December 2009. Angeles, WA 98362. Monday. replacing an outside manedition from The decline in income Baum­ ager at another fund in Amazon to ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. offered “more evidence that favor of a multi-manager gartner was the compaPhotos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing households are in quite a elected to approach. ny’s Kindle a photo, be sure it is of high resolution. bind,” said Paul Dales, the state Vanguard is the nation’s readers for Please note: We cannot publish items by Amundson senior U.S. economist at Senate in largest mutual fund com$2.99. private businesses soliciting business — e.g., Capital Economics. 2010, oustpany, with $1.6 trillion in Papermerchandise sales, paid seminars, openings in U.S. fund assets in its lineup ing a Demoback editions of the book preschools or other paid educational or training Website woes of more than 170 funds. crat in one are still available for $5.95 programs. These need to be addressed as paid NEW YORK — Bank of of the most at various retailers in Port advertisements. Baumgartner America’s home­page and Gas prices fall expensive Angeles, Lake Crescent For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form legislative online banking service were and Forks, including the PORT ANGELES — faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 races in history. Peninsula Daily News’ experiencing problems FriWith the summer driving weekdays. He has served one sesoffices in Port Angeles, 305 day, a day after the comseason now history, gasoline sion in Olympia. W. First St. pany said it would start pump prices are falling Baumgartner was born The book by Amundson, eninsula aily ews charging a $5 monthly fee across the country. in Pullman, attended a former reporter and feafor customers who make But Washington’s price Washington State Univertures editor at the PDN, debit card purchases. drops are not as steep as sity before going to Hartells the story of Hallie IllA message on the bank’s some other states, according Patrol Academy, 631 West sive medical care. vard and launching a ingworth, who was murhomepage said that page to price surveys Friday. Dayton Airport Road, in By cutting the papercareer in international pol- was temporarily unavaildered in 1937. Shelton. work for routine medical “Gas prices in the westicy, working in Iraq and Her weighted body was able, despite earlier assurApplicants should show visits, Qliance says it can ern U.S. states have Afghanistan. wrapped in blankets and ances from the bank that reduce costs and give dropped, but more slowly Cantwell won her U.S. dumped in Lake Crescent. up by 7:30 a.m. — along the site had been fully patients a better experithan in other areas – MisSenate seat in 2000 by Nearly three years later, with a change of clothes, restored. because a physical fitness ence. souri and South Carolina beating incumbent Repubher body floated to the surSome customers who test is required. It was started in 2006 now have averages below lican Slade Gorton. face, giving investigators tried to sign onto their Recruitment is for the by two doctors and has Baumgartner will be the accounts were greeted with $3.20 a gallon, while Oregon the evidence they needed agency’s 100th trooper clinics in Seattle, Mercer and Washington averages first to officially throw his to bring her killer to justhe message that the site basic training class. Island and Kent and an are in the $3.80 range along name in the ring. tice. was “operating slower than For more information, affiliate in Mill Creek. with California,” said Jeffrey U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert, usual” and that the bank The book was first pubclick on wsp.wa.gov/ Other direct primary a Seattle-area Republican lished in 2000 by Western Spring, a spokesman for the was working to restore sercare clinics already are who has fended strong Gull Publishing, a division employment/trooper.htm. Automobile Club of Southvice. operating other states, but challenges from Democrats of the PDN. ern California. KONP talk guests Qliance may be the first in in his district, continues to It has since been reisPoker buy-in The North Olympic PenWashington. PORT ANGELES — consider a run. sued in several print ediinsula’s average price SatLAS VEGAS — Troubled Here is this week’s schedA former TV reporter, tions. urday was $3.85, down 6 online gambling operator Union fined ule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 Phillip Yin, has told supAmundson is also the cents from the previous SatFull Tilt Poker said Friday TACOMA — A federal p.m. local talk show segporters that he is preparauthor of The Great Forks that French business tycoon urday — but still a bit judge has fined a longshore ment on KONP radio at ing to run for the office. Fire, a book about the 1951 higher than it was on Aug. Bernard Tapie has agreed union $250,000 for its tac1450 AM, 102.1 FM and forest fire that almost 30 and a full 85 cents to buy the company and its tics in a Longview labor www.konp.com on the Nation/World claimed Forks, and Sturdy higher than a year ago. assets despite its legal troudispute, and he warned Internet outside the Port Folk, a collection of memThe week’s national averbles in the United States that individual protesters Angeles area. oirs about life on the North A NEW recession? age was $3.45 per gallon. and the revocation of its could face their own penalStation Olympic Peninsula in the gambling license. Benchmark crude oil ties for future violations of manager WASHINGTON — Are early 20th century. Full Tilt dropped Friday by $2.94, or his orders. Todd Ortloff things about to get even All three books are for said in a 3.6 percent, to end the day U.S. District Judge Ron- worse? hosts the sale at the PDN’s office in news at $79.20 per barrel after ald Leighton had already Monday The U.S. economy is Port Angeles and at local release that bearish indicators of U.S. held the International through staring down another bookstores. Tapie — a economic growth and conLongshore and Warehouse recession, according to a Thursday cern of a Greek default on Union in contempt for segments, forecast from the Economic former govGunsmith moves ernment blocking a train and storm- Cycle Research Institute. and Karen its sovereign debt — and the PORT ANGELES — Thatcher minister, ing a grain terminal earlier Hanan “It’s either just begun, possible effects that might Gaining more space and sports this month. hosts “Art or it’s right in front of us,” have on an already sluggish better parking, Hi-Caliber Tapie tycoon and Authorities said the proBeat” on Fridays. said Lakshman Achuthan, international economy. Gunsmithing has moved testers overpowered secuThis week’s scheduled managing director of ECRI. actor — has from 2720 E. U.S. Highway rity guards, damaged raillineup: “But at this point that’s agreed to the sale on condi- Nonferrous metals 101 into new offices at tion that the company settle Monday: Port Angeroad cars and dumped ■  a detail. The critical news 903A W. Eighth St. NEW YORK — Spot nonferits legal troubles favorably. les City Manager Kent grain. is there’s no turning back. The new location is the rous metal prices Friday. Company executives are Myers. “What’s going on out “We are going to have a Aluminum - $0.9911 per lb., former home of Westside facing federal charges of ■  Tuesday: Olympic there is awful,” Leighton new recession.” London Metal Exch. Video & Tan. money laundering and Medical Cancer Center said Friday. “We have to do The ECRI produces Copper - $3.1637 Cathode full Services at Hi-Caliber fraud to run a gambling patient navigator Susan something about it, and I’m widely followed leading plate, LME. provided include repairs, Copper - $3.1450 N.Y. Merc business in defiance of a Clements on breast cancer going to do something.” indicators which predict alterations, rebarreling, spot Fri. 2006 law that prohibits awareness. The National Labor when the economy is movbluing, parkerizing and Lead - $2005.00 metric ton, online poker operations in In the second segment, Relations Board had asked ing between recession and custom rifle building London Metal Exch. the U.S. Dungeness Crab & Seafood the court to fine the union expansion. including stock fitting, finZinc - $0.8482 per lb., London Festival producer Scott more than $290,000 to cover Achuthan said Friday Metal Exch. ishing and checkering. Inflation in Europe Nagel. the damages and expenses, that all those indicators Gold - $1620.00 Handy & HarHi-Caliber has been in ■  Wednesday: Larry such as overtime for law are now pointing to a new FRANKFURT, Germany man (only daily quote). business for more than 30 Howard discusses organ enforcement agencies. Gold - $1620.40 troy oz., NY economic downturn in the — Inflation jumped to a years. transplants. Leighton said he immediate future. startling 3.0 percent in Sep- Merc spot Fri. For more information, Silver - $30.250 Handy & HarIn the second segment, rounded down to be cautember in the 17 countries phone Hi-Caliber at 360man; $30.041 troy oz., N.Y. Merc Kim Wing and Bonnie tious and ordered addiWe’re a bit poorer that use the euro, a sur417-6847. spot Fri. Smith on the Sprout Film tional penalties for future prise increase that makes it WASHINGTON — No, Platinum -$1517.00 troy oz., Festival. violations, including Sheriff trains less likely the European you’re not mistaken: N.Y.; $1519.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc In the final segment, $25,000 for the union, Central Bank will cut inter- spot Fri. You’re now a little PORT TOWNSEND — author and former TV chef $5,000 for union officers Peninsula Daily News poorer. est rates this week to head Jefferson County Sheriff Graham Kerr, “The Gallop- and $2,500 for other indiAmericans earned less and The Associated Press off a possible recession. Tony Hernandez recently ing Gourmet,” who will participated in the 101st appear at the Dungeness session of the National Crab & Seafood Festival. The Peninsula Daily News wants to Sheriffs’ Institute. ■  Thursday: Scott The congratulate North Olympic Peninsula Tucker on a new bike institute is event coming to Port Angebusinesses celebrating anniversaries in the only A sprightly little market les. October. On Oct. 7th, we will publish a national In the second segment, unlike any you’ve seen executive FREE ad listing the businesses who author Dr. Jan Thatcher developAdams discusses her book, respond to this special event by Oct. 3rd. ment proTen Reasons Football Wife: Coming of Is your business having an anniversary gram Age with the NFL as Mrs. to Shop at designed for later this year? You can use this coupon Hernandez Karl Kassulke. sheriffs. McPhee’s Grocery ■  Friday: Kathleen now to let us know the date. All Alcala and Maria Victoria, 1. Our diet tea comes in pretty expenses, including travel, novelists who are part of Business Name _____________________________________________________________________ little green boxes. $2.99 meals and lodging for the Centrum’s bilingual writAddress____________________________________________________________________________ 2. Our Wonder Bread comes in a one-week program in Long- ers’ workshop program. pretty white bag-thing. $2.09 City__________________ State________________ Type of Business________________________ mont, Colo., are paid by the The second segment will 3. Our potatoes come in a skin National Institute of CorZip Telephone________________________________ focus on the 17th annual kind-of-thing. rections, an agency within What date is your anniversary?_______________________________________________________ Forest Storytelling Festithe Federal Bureau of Pris- val. 4. Our Pepsi Cola comes in a Which anniversary is can whatchamacallit. 59¢ ons. The final segment will your business celebrating?______________________________________________ Hernandez joined 28 feature Dan Maguire, Juan 5. Our plantain chips ($2.99) are Please Mail or Bring to: Peninsula Daily News other sheriffs from across lightly salted, but our kosher de Fuca Festival of the Arts salt ($3.19) isn’t. It’s heavily the country at the institute. executive director, on the 305 W. 1st St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 salted. They explored the role organization’s fall fundAttn: ANNIVERSARY EVENT of the local sheriff in pro6. We sell different flours, but raiser. don’t sell different flowers. viding leadership in public safety, criminal justice sys- Flat-rate clinic 7. Our peanut butter selection During your anniversary month, you can run an ad at the following discount prices: runs the full gamut from A to B. tem policy, community relaSEATTLE — A Seattle (One time only – any day of the week. No variations of size or price) tions and organizational 8. Is a special day coming up startup that is changing effectiveness and efficiency. the way some people in PDN for a loved one? Get her a necklace! (35¢) Ages 4 and Washington receive priFull Page..............................$1000 Older. Candy State Patrol jobs mary medical care opens a 9. We sell candy bars–from Half Page...............................$650 SHELTON — The State new clinic Monday in Abba-Zabas to Zagnuts. 90¢ Patrol will conduct tests Tacoma. Quarter Page..........................$450 10. Buying cookies here exhibits this coming Saturday, Oct. Qliance doesn’t take Plus we will give you 1 COLOR FREE maturity. Buying cookies 8, for more than 50 trooper insurance. It charges indielsewhere exposes a sugar positions. viduals or businesses a flat dependency and possibly a Those who have not monthly rate of $49 to character flaw. emailed an application can $129, based on patients’ bring one by hand when age. The service is typically 717 RACE ST. the agency holds it testing bundled with a separate PORT ANGELES (360) 417-3541 • FAX (360) 417-3507 • 1-800-826-7714 at the Washington State insurance plan for expen-

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BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

National Park Service

A

bigger bite

$

This photo snapped Saturday by a webcam watching the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River shows more of the dam missing as water flows over the spillways at right. The dam is 210 feet tall. The companion Elwha Dam (see Page D1) is about half the height. Progress on the planned three-year demolition of both dams — plus the drawdowns of the reservoirs behind them — can be followed via a link at the top of www. peninsuladailynews.com.

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Cheap quit-smoking pill works, study says Peninsula Daily News news services

BOSTON — For as little as $6, there may be a smoking-cessation remedy that actually works. A clinical test of Tabex, sold in Eastern Europe for more than four decades, shows that the plant-based medicine can triple smokers’ chances of quitting compared with a dummy pill. The results of a study on 740 people were published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The tablet, developed and sold by Bulgaria’s Sopharma, may help smokers with limited means quit, scientists said. Most of the 6 million people who die from tobacco use each year are from low- and middle-income countries,

according to the World Health Organization. “The benefits of Tabex are comparable with those of other smoking-cessation treatments, but at a fraction of the cost,” Robert West of University College London’s Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, who led the research team, said in a statement. In the study, 8.4 percent of patients taking Tabex for 25 days with “minimal” counseling abstained from smoking for a year, compared with 2.4 percent of those given a placebo. The smokers who took the plant-based remedy reported more gastrointestinal upset, the research shows. Tabex tablets contain cytosine, a substance found

7,750

in the seeds of a tree called laburnum that produces yellow pea-flowers, which mimics the effect of nicotine. Pfizer’s Chantix, a smoking-cessation drug available in the U.S. and Europe on prescription, is also derived from cytosine. One week’s worth of tablets for a patient taking three a day costs about $63 on the website drugstore.com. A course of Tabex, which was first sold in Bulgaria in 1964, costs about $15 in Poland and $6 in Russia. The absolute difference in rates of tobacco abstinence between the two patient groups in the Tabex study was lower than for Chantix and similar to what has been found for nicotinereplacement therapy, the scientists wrote.

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(1) 1.00% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) valid as of 9/16/11 for balances of $10,000-$499,999. The High Rate MoneyMarket account requires a minimum opening deposit of $10,000 and a linked Union Bank personal Tiered Interest Checking account (minimum $100 to open). Rates not guaranteed and subject to change without notice. Fees may reduce earnings. Interest rate tiers are based on the combined balance of the linked Tiered Interest Checking account and High Rate MoneyMarket account and applied to the High Rate MoneyMarket balance. Rates as of 9/16/11 are: 0.01% APY for balances of $0-$2,499; 0.05% APY for balances of $2,500-$9,999; 1.00% APY for the following balances of $10,000-$24,999, $25,000-$49,999, $50,000-$99,999, $100,000-$499,999; and 0.25% APY for balances of $500,000-$999,999 and $1,000,000 or more. If the Tiered Interest Checking Account is closed or becomes inactive, the High Rate MoneyMarket account will convert to a regular MoneyMarket account. Maintain a daily ledger balance of $15,000 in your High Rate MoneyMarket account and we’ll waive the regular monthly service charge of $15. Signature Banking requires a Signature Banking Tiered Interest Checking or Signature Banking Regular Checking account, a minimum opening deposit of $100 and a minimum combined average monthly balance of $10,000 in qualified accounts. The regular monthly service charge is waived if the combined average monthly balance remains above $10,000. Other charges such as NSF and overdraft fees of $22-$34 may be assessed. Offer available in Oregon and Washington branches only with funds not presently on deposit with Union Bank. Available for personal accounts only. Not valid with other offers. See our All About Personal Accounts & Services Disclosure and Agreement and Fee Schedule for account details.

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Visit us at unionbank.com/rate © 2011 Union Bank, N.A.

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Classified

Peninsula Daily News

PRIVATE COUNTRY ESTATE

LOCK IN THIS OPPORTUNITY!

4 bed, 2 bath, multi-level home on a cul-de-sac in NW Port Angeles. Great first time buyers home. 2 car garage, lots of storage, fenced back yard. Now only $189,000 ML#261835/270829

UPTOWN REALTY PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

Dave Stofferahn

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GREAT SPACE-INSIDE & OUT VIEWS EVERYWHERE YOU TURN

WRE/Port Ludlow

Bryan Diehl

GREAT LOCATION

TOWN & COUNTRY

Mark Macedo

(360)477-9244 questionmark@olypen.com

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• 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Home • Elaborate Master Suite • Views From Every Room • Near the SunLand Clubhouse • Pond, Water & Fairway Views ML#252282/149886 $329,000

Artistic touches abound in this stunning 3 BR, 3 Bath home. Open living area with high ceilings to allow viewing of the mountains and the water from the upper covered viewing deck. Easy care yard, detached garage with covered breeze-way. ML#261668 Only $378,900

WRE/SunLand

WRE/Sequim - East

Dave Sharman

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

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Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com www.portangelesrealty.com

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1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

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This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint & lots of other updates. Wonderful family home; or, lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen, perfect for mother-in-law unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ & water view. ML#261270 A GREAT VALUE AT $175,000

360.670.3560

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(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

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from this quality built custom home. Fabulous waterfall pond at the entrance. Beautiful brick fireplace is the focus of the comfortable living room. Formal dining rm., super kitchen, a wonderful separate guest house. Just minutes from Port Angeles & oh so private feeling. ML#261360 $385,000

Stacey Schimetz, REALTOR®

WRE/Port Angeles

Kim Bower

(360) 683-4844 842 E. WASHINGTON ST. SEQUIM, WA 98382 dsharman@olypen.com

Vivian Landvik, GRI Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

360º filled with Straits, Islands, Shipping Lanes, Hurricane Ridge, and gorgeous territorial landscaping with beautiful water features on 20 acres! The home is 3400 SF of master craftsmanship with no detail missed. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, propane stove/oven, granite and tumbled tile counter tops throughout. There are two master suites on separate floors, each with it’s own fireplace. $1,465,000 ML#261648/257562

UPTOWN REALTY Kathy Brown, CRS, ABR, GRI Office: (360) 417-2785 Cell: (360) 461-4460 www.RealEstateinPortAngeles.com

(360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

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Team Thomsen Realtors®

Many possible uses for this beautiful multi-purpose property. 3,392 SF on 1.90 acres. For INVESTORS - Present Owner would consider Sale/Lease Back for at least 2 years. Shown by appointment only. Call DAVE ML#260991 $425,000

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This home has over 2,100 SF with a spacious family room & 3rd bath which could convert to a separate quarters. All located on a double corner lot with paved parking & a detached 2-car garage. Only $239,000 ML#261558 Call KATHY today!

Beautiful waterfront home complete with deck, spa, firepit and steps to the beach. Community clubhouse & private marina. Oversized 2-car garage. ML#172697 $429,500

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BEACHFRONT DREAM HOME

MARC THOMSEN, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

UPTOWN REALTY DICK PILLING Office: (360) 457-1111 Cell: (360) 460-7652 rightguy@olypen.com

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1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

UPTOWN REALTY

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360.565.2020 mrsjace@jacerealestate.com

Panoramic unobstructed city, saltwater, harbor, Ediz Hook, shipping lanes, Coast Guard Base, Victoria, Canada & beyond! Central location - easy walk/bike ride to downtown, medical facilities, groceries, harbor, etc. New remodel on this DelGuzzi built home. ML#261924 Priced to sell at ONLY $279,000

Check out this 4 acre parcel, zoned Urban Moderate Density (MD) complete with a BINDING SITE PLAN APPROVING AN 18 SPACE MANUFACTURED HOME PARK. Where will you get the water, you say?? No sweat, PUD already provides it. Sewer?? Rayonier has plans to run a sewer line right down the road in front of it by year’s end. What about county approval? Already approved!! Great Mt. view? Included already!! ML#261711 $249,900

WRE/Port Angeles

Eileen Schmitz

DO YOU WANT A VIEW?

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

Panoramic Freshwater Bay & Strait water view parcels beginning at $99,500 for 2.5 acres; $189,000 for each of the two 5 acre parcels and $249,000 for another 5 acres. Power to each, wells on two, wells negotiable on others. Call Alan for more details ML#261178

WRE/Sequim - East

Jean Ryker Managing Broker 360-477-0950 rykerproperties@olypen.com

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

477-5542 dstofferahn@olypen.com

Ideal Sequim home makes single story living great. Open kitchen with pantry & your water view right from the kitchen sink window. Large living & great room has views & fireplace & deck. Master suite has two walk-in closets & two sinks. Immaculate, view and easy cul-de-sac location. Low maintenance yard in an area of nicely maintained homes. ML#261128 Just Reduced to Only $275,000 Always Call JACE for Land & Homes on Land! Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

Nearly the last view lot on W. 4th Street in PA. Spectacular Strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lot is ready to build on Easy access - utilities in at street or alley. Located in a fine established area - Across from Crown Park - Close to walking trails. Oversized city lot gives plenty of room to build. $79,500 ML#261167 Call JEAN

Affordable ownership at this updated 1,044 SF home in Port Angeles. Offers 2 BR/1 BA, casual living room with carpeting, updated kitchen with breakfast area, pantry, fenced yard. Nice mountain view too! $135,000 ML#261968

UPTOWN REALTY

TOWN & COUNTRY

‘V’ IS FOR VIEW-VACIOUS!

1A407653

BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT

Partnership dissolution forcing asset liquidation - updated rental property with solid rental history in great location - take advantage of historic low rates and lock in this opportunity. ML#261673 Priced an incredible $234,000

E1

BEGIN YOUR DREAM

1A407660

www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.COM

PRICE REDUCED

18407655

19407588

Perched atop a nearly 10 acre wooded ridge with spectacular Mt. views. Perfect for those seeking the quiet, country life. Custom built in 2005 w/ beautiful hardwood floors and an expansive dream kitchen. Upgrades include granite counters, metal roofing, Hardiplank siding, covered wrap-around porch. $569,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.COM

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Beautifully upgraded 3 BR/2 BA home has quality materials and design throughout. With oversized windows and lots of skylights, this home has plenty of light, 10’ architecturally detailed ceilings, custom wood floors and cabinets, and granite countertops and stainless appliances in the large kitchen. Professionally designed easy care landscaping and a spacious garage. See more at www.208Fairway.com. $264,000. ML#261886 Call Gail Sumpter 360-683-3900/477-9361

Gail Sumpter

190 Priest Rd. 360-477-9361 PO Box 1060 gail@gailsumpter.com www.gailsumpter.com Sequim, WA 98382 www.blueskysequim.com


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula MARKETPLACE IN PRINT & ONLINE PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB: Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video

Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles • Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. New carpet. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower and granite countertops. Peek-a-boo water view and mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. $199,000. 360-460-7503

Homes

Beautiful 23.5 acre ranch with 4 Br., 2.5 bath, 2636 sf home. New driveway off Hidden Highlands allows for even more privacy. Mtn views, pond and a 2,880 sf barn, tack room and storage. Fenced and partially fenced. Possible uses include horse or livestock ranch, vineyard, corporate retreat, wildlife lookout and more. $495,000. ML260659/203063 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. BEGIN YOUR DREAM Of affordable ownership at this updated 1,044 sf home in Port Angeles. Offers 2 Br., 1 bath, casual living room with carpeting, updated kitchen with breakfast area, pantry, fenced yard. Nice mountain view too! $135,000. ML261968 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CEDARS DUNGENESS HOME Complete lower level (mother-in-law space), sliding doors lead to large deck, dining area with 3rd fairway views, larger garage with built-ins. Nice mtn views, too! $239,000 ML228352/261125 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Country Living Ranch Home on acreage for sale by owner. Beautiful end of the road privacy on 2.5 acres w/optional adjacent parcels available up to 20 acres. 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths, 1996 custom built 1825 sq. ft. home. $295,000. Jerry, 360-460-2960.

51

Homes

DO YOU WANT A VIEW? Panoramic unobstructed city, salt water, harbor, Ediz Hook, shipping lanes, Coast Guard Base, Victoria, Canada and beyond! Central location – close to downtown, medical facilities, groceries, harbor, etc. New remodel on this DelGuzzi built home. $279,000. ML261924 Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY EXPANSIVE DUAL VIEWS Large enough to be comfortable, small enough for easy care. Adorable home with great garage and shop with wood stove. Full views of the Straits and the Olympics. 3 Br., 2.5 baths. This is a must see! $230,000. ML261559/225881 Thelma Durham 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FAIRWAY VIEW Beautiful single level townhome. Generous sized rooms throughout. Updated kitchen, extra deep 2 car garage (golf cart/shop). $295,000 ML129689/251966 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND FOR OWNER/USERS Many possible uses for this beautiful multi-purpose property. 3,392 sf on 1.90 acres. For investors present owner would consider sale/lease back for at least 2 years. Shown by appointment only. $425,000. ML260991. Dave Sharman 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

Homes

FOUR SEASONS RANCH 4 Br., 1 3/4 bath rambler a short distance from the beach! Some of the recent updates in the home include the corian countertops, laminate flooring and vinyl windows. Open floor plan in living/ dinning/kitchen area. Southern exposure brings in lots of warm, bright light to home. Home has a great view of the 3rd and 4th hole of the golf course. $245,500 ML260973/220434 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. GORGEOUS LOG HOME Artistic touches abound in this stunning 3 Br., 3 bath home. Open living area with high ceilings to allow viewing of the mountains and the water from the upper covered viewing deck. Easy care yard, detached garage with covered breeze-way. $378,900. ML261661. Stacey Schimetz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company GREAT SPACE INSIDE AND OUT This home has over 2,100 sf with a spacious family room and 3rd bath which could convert to a separate quarters. All located on a double corner lot, with paved parking and a detached 2 car garage. $239,000. ML261558 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

For Sale By Owner 3 Br., 2 ba, 1.25 acres, built in ‘94, newly renovated, insulated, thermo pane windows, 1,400 sf plus 2 lg. decks, garage, breakfast nook, Discovery Trail out back door, natural spring. 526 N. Bagley Ck., P.A. $165,000. 206-856-0279 or 360-808-2981 If privacy is what you crave, you will love this light and airy home on 8+ acres. Living room with vaulted ceilings and propane fireplace; family room with a wet bar, deck and propane fireplace; kitchen with large pantry; dining room with built in hutch and a master suite with vaulted ceilings. All of these rooms surround the solar heated pool and patio. This is truly a home made for entertaining! $325,000 ML261872/272555 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY Check out this 4 acre parcel, zoned Urban Moderate Density (MD) complete with a binding site plan approving an 18 space manufactured home park. Where will you get the water, you say? No sweat, PUD already provides it. Sewer? Rayonier has plans to run a sewer line right down the road in front of it by year’s end. What about county approval? Already approved! Great mountain view? Included already! $249,900. ML261711 Dick Pilling 417-2811 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

51

Homes

GREAT LOCATION 3 Br., 2 bath home, elaborate master suite, views from every room, near the Sunland Clubhouse, pond water and fairway views. $329,000 ML149886/252282 Kim Bower 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

MONTERRA COMMUNITY Newer, 1,456 sf 2 Br., 2 bath, den/office, all appliances, kitchen with island & pantry, heat pump, attached dbl carport for RV, incl. shop/storage. Lg. deck with private yard. Entire inside freshly painted. Must see! Reduced to $159,900. Call 509-951-5980 PRIVATE COUNTY ESTATE Perched atop a nearly 10 acre wooded ridge with spectacular mountain views. Perfect for those seeking the quiet, country life. Custom built in 2005 with beautiful hardwood floors and an expansive dream kitchen. Upgrades include granite counters, metal roofing, hardiplank siding, covered wraparound porch, Trex deck, heat pump; 9foot ceilings and Bliemeister cabinets. Living room features a built-in entertainment center and river rock gas fireplace. $569,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

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51

Homes

Partnership dissolution forcing asset liquidation - updated rental property with solid rental history in great location. Take advantage of historic low rates and lock in this opportunity! ML261673 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY QUALITY SUNLAND HOME Beautifully upgraded 3 Br., 2 bath home has quality materials and design throughout. With oversized windows and lots of skylights this home has plenty of light, 10 foot architecturally detailed ceilings, custom wood floors and cabinets, and granite countertops and stainless appliances in the large kitchen. The propane fireplace will keep you toasty in the winter and there is a fenced patio for outdoor living. Professionally designed easy care landscaping and a spacious garage. This house truly shows the owners’ pride and attention to detail. $264,000. ML261886. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 SPACIOUS 4 Br. home, private setting on 5 acres with excellent view of Strait of Juan de Fuca and mountains. CCR’s protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $375,000. ML261181. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

VERY CUTE BUNGALOW Close in location, zoning is office commercial. Convenient to court house, City Hall, shopping. Super well loved and maintained with mtn view. Use as your residence or it could be a great property for attorney office, beauty shop, etc. etc. Come and see this very special home. $149,500. ML261360 Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY VIEWS EVERYWHERE YOU TURN 360 degrees filled with Straits, Islands, shipping lanes, Hurricane Ridge, and gorgeous territorial landscaping with beautiful water features on 20 acres! The home is 3,400 sf of master craftsmanship with no detail missed. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, propane stove/oven, granite and tumbled tile counter tops throughout. There are two master suites on separate floors, each with it’s own fireplace. $1,465,000 ML261648/257562 Mark Macedo 477-9244 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday, October 2, 2011

618 E. Fir St., Sequim

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

In Town On 2 Acres Very solid 2200 sq. ft., 4 br, 3ba home, on 1.99 flat mostly fenced in acres within walking distance of schools and shopping. Features include, fresh interior paint, new carpet and vinyl, large kitchen with ample cabinets, living room with wood stove, laundry room with utility sink. Attached 2 car garage plus detached 2 car garage/shop. ML#261633 $310,000

12:00 pm to 1:30 pm

Compose your Classified Ad on

1416 E. 3rd, Port Angeles

1115 E. 8th Street, Port Angeles

1441 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED 1950’s home in Sunrise Heights. 3 BR/2 BA, 1,865 SF, gleaming original hardwood floors, spectacular spacious kitchen w/vaulted ceiling, skylights, breakfast bar, built-in appliances, lots of cabinets for storage. A climate controlled sunroom looks out onto the fenced backyard. 1.5 lots, 720 SF garage/RV door, workshop area. NOT A DRIVE-BY - COME IN AND SEE WHY! $239,000 MLS#261205

PANORAMIC UNOBSTRUCTED City, saltwater, harbor, Victoria, Canada & beyond! Newly remodeled. 4 BR/2 BA, 2,280 SF beauty. Walk in from street level. Daylight basement, living & family rooms. Central location, easy walk/bike ride to downtown, medical facilities, groceries, harbor, etc. DelGuzzi built home. $279,000 ML#261924

UPDATED HOME ON ACREAGE!. Hardwood and bamboo floors, tiled countertops. A gardeners delight! Wonderful deck on the Southside with views of the gardens. Master is on the upper level with loft area for library or den. Detached garage and detached barn/storage or shop 30x60. Great useable land for horses as well. All inspection have been completed. $259,500 MLS#261303 Jean will greet you.

Directions: From Front/First Streets, S. on Chambers, E. on 8th.

Directions: Hwy 101 East to Deer Park, S. on Deer Park to #1441 on left side.

DIRECTIONS: E. Washington St. to Sequim Ave., North on Sequim Ave. to E. Fir. Follow to 618 E. Fir.

TOM BLORE

Directions: First/Front, S. on Ennis, E. on 3rd.

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

‘V’ IS FOR VIEW-VACIOUS! Ideal Sequim home makes single story living great. Open kitchen with pantry and your water view right from the kitchen sink window. Large living and great room has views and fireplace and deck. Master suite has two walk-in closets and two sinks. Immaculate, view, and easy cul-de-sac location. Low maintenance yard in an area of nicely maintained homes. $275,000. ML261128 Eileen Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Fantastic Strait and mtn views. Freshly painted inside and out, newly planted landscaping, open floor plan, and large deck. $235,000. ML198841/260592 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

OPEN HOUSE

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm

TIPS

STUPENDOUS OLYMPIC MTN VIEWS Horse property, chain link fenced and cross fenced with pond and irrigation rights. 50’x80’ riding arena, 24’x36’ barn. 22’x24’ foaling barn insulated with removable wall. Fruit trees. Shop with 220. Separate office (12’x16’). Excellent well. Heat pump and freestanding wood stove in home. Updated kitchen. Pond with koi. $269,900. ML261927 Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Homes

1A407664

UPTOWN N REALTY

BEACHFRONT DREAM HOME Beautiful waterfront home complete with deck, spa, fire pit and steps to the beach. Community clubhouse and private marina. Oversized 2 car garage. $429,500. ML172697. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

PRICE REDUCED 4 Br., 2 bath, multilevel home on a culde-sac in NW Port Angeles. Great first time buyers home. 2 car garage, lots of storage, fenced back yard. $189,000. ML261835/270829 Dave Stofferahn 477-5542 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

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SUNDAY 12-2 PM

AT COST - $212,000 Owner has moved out of area, needs to sell. P.T. 2 Br. house + ADU + 2 more units allowed. Clean, great cond., remodeled 2009. 457-7222.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

Team Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

1:00 pm to 2:30 pm

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

OPEN HOUSE Sun., Oct. 2 • 1 - 3 pm

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

1A407665

Team Thomsen Realtors®

Team Thomsen Realtors®

tom@sequim.com

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

370 Maple Grove Road

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

GATED MAPLE GROVE on Lake Sutherland. 2 BR/2 BA + loft, built in 2006, original owner, 1237 sq. ft., lovely enclosed back porch, open floor plan, all appliances PLUS your own boat slip, home is not on the lake. $264,500. ML#261459

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

DIRECTIONS: West on Hwy 101 to Maple Grove Road to #370.

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds.

And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

Fifth Avenue Liz Parks

1407 E. 2nd Street, Port Angeles

409 S. Ennis, Port Angeles

710 Del Guzzi Drive #301, Port Angeles

CLASSIC TRADITIONAL. This new listing is a Great classic home in Sunrise Heights. 4 BR/1.5 BA. Hardwood floors throughout. Full basement, newer kitchen and baths. You will call this home once you step inside the door. Double lot. $229,900 ML#261982 JOYCE will greet you.

RENTAL INCOME Great location close to the college for these 2 duplexes. Total of four 1-bedroom units. Make your investments work for you. Many improvements made in last 4 years. ML#261673 Great value at $234,000 Daphne will greet you.

Directions: Corner of 2nd & Ennis.

Directions: Front/First Street, S. on Ennis to 409.

LOVELY CONDO ON THE GOLF COURSE You will love the gorgeous view of the golf course w/beautiful Mt. and water view. Absolutely impeccable condition. Propane fireplace. 2 BR/2 BA plus office/den. Carefree living in this delightful home. 1,540 SF, great kitchen w/lots of built-ins. Just listed at $229,000 Vivian will greet you.

JOYCE UNDERWOOD

Managing Broker, ABR, CRS Direct: (360) 417-2784 Email: joyce@olypen.com

DAPHNE ESHOM

Office: 360-417-2791 Email: Daph@olypen.com

(360) 460-7322 (360) 683-1500

www.sequimagent.com

Directions: From Hwy 101, S. on Del Guzzi Dr. to the top and then R. at 710. Home is on the 3rd floor.

VIVIAN LANDVIK, GRI

Managing: Residential, Furnished, Commercial and Storage

Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

Property Management is NOT our sideline

Free Investment Consultations 330 E. 1st St., Ste #1 360.452.1326 Port Angeles Fax: 360.457.3212 portangeleslandmark.com

195133101

1A407666

6A113352

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty 1115 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.7861 • Toll Free 1.800.292.2978 • www.UptownRealty.com


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 51

Homes

FSBO: Cherry Hill Delguzzi 3 Br., 2 ba 1600 sf, quiet, remodeled, extras ++. $195,000. P.A. 928-4537454. SUNLAND TOWNHOME 1,831 sf built in 1990, 3 Br., 2 bath, newer designer kitchen, northwest murphy style bed in guest Br., on the 19th fairway. $319,000. ML231504/261183 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND WATER VIEW This home is a delight! Loads of charm with beautiful wood floors, tile, fresh paint and lots of other updates. Wonderful family home, or, lower level has separate entrance, second kitchen perfect for motherin-law unit. Nice deck to enjoy BBQ and water view. $175,000. ML261270. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

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Manufactured Homes

Desperately must sell! 2 Br., 2 bath, new carpet, new appliances, brand new central air/heat with warranty. Serious only. $8,000. 683-8495, between 97 p.m. only Low maintenance landscaped front/ back yards. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. $74,900. ML252439. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

54

Lots/ Acreage

BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT Nearly the last view lot on W. 4th St. in P.A. Spectacular strait view. Gentle slope toward beautiful water view. Lot is ready to build on easy access, utilities in at street or alley. Located in a fine established area, across from Crown Park - close to trails. Oversize city lot gives plenty of room to build. $79,500. ML261167 Jean Ryker 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East Fantastic Ocean View of San Juans Diamond Point lot (150’x123.5’) with runway access to 2WA1. Ready to build, city water/ meter installed, septic approved, height variance to 26’ approved. $110,000/obo 477-0948, 477-5211 FRESHWATER BAY 5 acres. $110,000. 928-3572 Secluded high bluff waterfront. Great privacy and unobstructed views of the strait. 330’ of frontage of high bank. Water share available through Crescent Water Assoc. $144,900. ML261753 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. STRIPED PEAK Panoramic Freshwater Bay and Strait water view parcels beginning at $99,500 for 2.5 acres; $189,000 for each of the two 5 acre parcels; and $249,000 for another 5 acres. Power to each, well on one, wells negotiable on others. ML261178. Alan Barnard 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., W/D. No smoking. $650. 457-8438. CLEAN, SPACIOUS 2 Br., W/D. $600 plus dep. 1502 C St., P.A. No smoking/ pets. 360-452-3423 P.A.: 1 Br., 1 bath, nice. No smk/pets. $450. 452-1234. P.A.: Darling country furn. 1 Br. $1,000. 452-7609, eves. P.A.: Newer west side studio apt., utilies incl., no smoking. $650 mo., $500 dep. 670-9329 Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 1 Br., close to town, onsite laund $540. 360-461-7113.

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br., 1.5 ba. No smoke/pets. $750, $750 dep. 457-5206.

64

Houses

1012 W. 10th, P.A. 2 Br., wood stove, no smoking/pets. $700, reference check. 928-2165 20 MIN. TO SEQ. OR P.T.: 3 Br, 2 ba, water view, lg. deck, 3-car gar., all appl., boat ramp near by, cr. ck, ref $1,175. 683-2799 516 E. 2nd St., P.A. 2 Br., lg gar., fenced yd. $800. 452-4933. AGNEW: 1,600 sf log home 2 Br., 1 bath, fenced yard, storage, quiet street. Between PA and Seq. $900. 970-712-0523

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

64

Houses

CENTRAL P.A.: Country in the city, 2 Br., 2 ba, updated with computer room. $825/$850. Drive by 415 S. Valley then call 460-7652. DISCOVERY BAY Beach front, like new, 2 Br., 2 ba, all appliances, gas fireplace, 20 min. to Sequim. $1,000. 460-2330. IN COUNTRY: 3 Br., 2 bath. Lg secluded lot, Gasman Rd. $600. 452-6475.

64

Houses

P.A.: Available now, 2 Br. deluxe town house, 1,400 sf. 1.5 bath. $800. No pets. 457-6181 P.A.: Pvt 2 Br., 2 bath, pics ezpa.net, 1,400 sf. $675. 452-5140. PA: 2/3 Br., 1 bath. Views, remodeled. $825-$925. Quiet studio, $450. No smk/pets. 457-7035. PALO ALTO: 1 Br. cabin, pasture avail. $650. 683-4307.

64

E3

Houses

SEQUIM: 5.8 ac, 3 Br. 2 ba, gar., Hwy. 101. $950. 913-217-7272. SEQUIM: Lg 1 Br., 1 ba., great location. $725. 683-6746. SEQUIM: New, 2 Br., 2 car gar., granite/ hardwoods, yard maintained. $1,150 mo. 460-0432.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

AGNEW: Room plus bonus room and private bath, female, furn., no smoking/ pets. $500 mo. incl. util. 808-2949.

HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$750 H 2 br 2 ba......$895 H 4 br 2 ba....$1050 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 H 4 br 1 ba....$1200 HOUSES IN JOYCE H 2 br 1 ba......$500 H 3 br 1 ba......$850 H 4 br 2 ba....$1100 H 3 br 2 ba....$1500

SEQ: Horse property, Sunland 3 Br John L Scott-RE 457-8593.

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360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 3 Br. house, $895. 3 Br. duplex, $795. 452-1395. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153. P.A.: 3 Br., 3 ba, Strait view near high school, laundry room, recent upgrades, single garage. $1,150 mo. 360-775-5327.

Boardwalk Square Sequim. Spaces for rent. 683-3256.

SEQUIM/BLYN: 2 Br., 2 ba w/den on 1 acre w/pond. W/D, D/W. 1,200 sf, high ceilings, bkfst bar, deck. No garage. $900/mo. F/L/dep. 461-2588. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, fenced, hdwd floors, no pets, Nov. 1st. $1,200. 461-9593. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, furnished, 2 car gar., 2 ac, no pets/ smoking. $1050. 461-3112 SEQUIM: 3.5 Br., 1 ba. $1,075 mo. 477-6859

P.A.: 4 Seasons Ranch. 3 br, 2 ba, Aframe on river, hot tub, shop, com. beach, golf, pool $975. 360-461-6258.

AGNEW: Private, wooded 1 Br. on 5 ac. $795. 460-9710.

P.A.: 511 E Lopez. 3 Br., 2 bath w/garage, $925/mo., no pets or smoking. 809-0538.

Between P.A. & Sequim. 2 Br., 1 bath with W/D/S/R on 1.5 acres. Super clean! Storage shed. No pets. $775. Available now. 360-452-7721.

P.A.: Available 11/1, 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.25 acres. Barn, 3car garage. Pets ok w/deposit. $1,400/ month, deposit required. 417-2841.

Commercial Space

SEQUIM: 4 Br., 3 ba for rent now. $1,150/mo. 1 year lease. No smokers. Ref's req'd. Scott: 360-388-8474 SEQUIM: Bright and cheering, 3 Br., 2 ba, all appl., close to market, small pet ok. $950. 681-2875.

LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 P.A.: Therapy building in lovely quiet location. Mental health, massage therapist, acupuncturist or? Off street parking, WiFi, group room avail. 417-8018 PRIME OFFICE 1 or 2 person, 7th and Peabody. $375 mo. 452-1232 ext. 11 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Clallam County Safeway Stores Inc., pharmacy remodel, 2709 E. Highway 101, $12,500. Hidden Valley Development LLC, single family dwelling with attached garage, 41 Saydee Lane, $168,360. Washington State Employee Credit Union, manufactured home placement, 444 La Paloma Lane, $63,912. Vivian Fisher, wood stove, 700 Dan Kelly Road, $3,000. Kydaka Point Properties LLC, wood stove, 16795 Highway 112, $2,000. ATC Tower Services Inc., diesel generator, 218 Pierce Road, $30,000. Safeway Stores Inc., fire sprinkler head relocation, 2709 E. Highway 101, $1,500. Margaret Insley, single family dwelling with attached garage, 628 E. Runnion Road, $145,214. Jeff Abram, gas insert and 120-gallon above-ground propane tank with piping, 290 Meadow Lark Lane, $1,000. Julie A. Price, heat pump, 3322 Highway 101, $3,000. Todd and Kimberly Ortloff, manufactured home placement with 500-gallon aboveground propane tank, 4339 Mount Angeles Road, $98,698.

Port Angeles Rachel M. Richmond, re-roof, 328 E. 10th St., $4,390. Richard C. Melville, replace water line, 1320 Marine View Drive, $1,000. David M. Ferguson, water heater, 1131 W. 10th St., $2,000. Daishowa America Co. LTD, truck dump foundation, 1902 Marine View Drive, $477,703. Church of Christ of Port Angeles, re-roof, 1233 E. Front St., $16,600. Charles and Carlene Hatfield, repair deck, 910 W. Sixth St., $5,000. Diane L. Charron, heat pump, 2115 Driftwood Place, $5,450. Vivian Fisher, pellet stove, 510 Orcas Ave., $3,500. Clallam County, commercial remodel, 223 E. Fourth St., $42,054. Malik V. Atwater and Vivian Wai, siding, 536 Marine Drive, $1,294. Richard and Christine McDaniel, entry roof and remodel, 1015 E. Eighth St., $50,628. Edward J. Hepokoski, residential remodel, 1601 W. 12th St., $3,373. Kent Alan and Dianne P. Myers, steffes heater, 3215 S. Peabody St., $4,500. Charles D. and Lilibeth U. Jaynes, heat pump, 1510 W. 10th St., $3,915. William and Carolyn Calhoun, heat pump, 212 W. Ninth St., $5,450.

Sequim Safeway Inc. #1448, expand pharmacy waiting room, add consulting room and ADA restroom, 680 F W. Washington St., $70,000. Gary and Carol Zellmer trust, re-roof, 112 W. Washington St., $5,700. Rosalie DiMaggio, re-roof, 413 W. Spruce St., $3,912. Vicki and Jay Bergamini, heat pump and coil to LP furnace, 41 Tanoak Court, $4,350. McNish Family II, LLC, remove and replace heat pump at Tarcisio’s, 609 W. Washington St., $8,900.

Jefferson County

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

61

Apartments Furnished

HWY 112: Large 1 Br. country apt. 1 mile from Elwha Dam. W/D, DW, DSL, utl. $800. 452-7714.

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540 CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br. No smoking/pets $500. 457-9698.

Port Townsend L. Craig Britton and Carleen R. Bruins, convert garden shed to satellite bedroom, 1034 Franklin St., $40,000. McCullough Real Estate LLC, finish unit #36, 1930 Lawrence St., $19,000. Chris Stylan, reinforce footing, 739 Lincoln St., $5,000. Douglas W. and Diklawan S. Palmer, residential re-roof, 536 Root St., $25,009.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 48 building permits issued from Sept. 1923 with a total valuation of $2,389,020: Port Angeles, 15 at $626,857; Sequim, 5 at $92,862; Clallam County, 11 at $; Port Townsend, 4 at $89,009; Jefferson County, 13 at $1,051,108.

1A5135704

CENTRAL PA: 2 Br., 1 bath. Close to Safeway, quiet. No smoke/pets. Ref req. $575. 460-5892.

James Boyd, detached pole garage, 90 Rocky Point Road, $10,572. Mark David Knudsen, residential addition and remodel, 851 Camp Discovery Road, $250,000. Walter Dickerman, demolish single family residence, 2230 Bee Mill Road, $0. Judith French Scott, swap-out 250-gallon above-ground propane tank, 500 Sand Road, $0. Li Li Mei Raiguel, retaining wall, 82 N. Pittsburg Ave., $3,000. Kenneth Collins, change of use to winery tasting room, 423 Meade Road, $200,000. Robert Marshall, residential addition and remodel, 91 Canal Lane, $146,944. Heather Bosch, residential addition and remodel, 341 Verner Ave, $156,912. Charles Thrasher; interior remodel, new decks, new exterior wall, replace canopy; 294963 U.S. Highway 101; $87,700. Janet Burr, detached garage, 821 Misty Ridge Road, $19,747. Jefferson County Rural Library District, replace heat pump, $7,699. Mark Ingham trustee, single family residence with attached garage, 201 Lake View Drive, 90,176. Terence Germaine, residential addition and remodel, 104 Rhododendron Lane, $78,298.


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Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

SPECIAL PARKWOOD OPEN HOUSE STUPENDOUS OLYMPIC MT. VIEWS . 12

30 - 3:

SPACIOUS

PM

SUNLAND TOWNHOME

CE

W

I PR

NE

N SU

WRE/Sequim - East

4 BR home, private setting on 5 acres w/excellent view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca & mountains. CC&Rs protect your investment. This property will also be available with an adjacent 5 acres. $375,000 ML#261181 Call the DODDS

WRE/Sequim - East

Carolyn & Robert DODDS Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

Linda Ulin

(360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891

FAIRWAY VIEW HOME

CEDARS DUNGENESS HOME CE

W

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N SU

NE

EXPANSIVE DUAL VIEWS

1A407638

1A407646

• Complete Lower Level (Mother-in-Law Space) • Sliding Doors Lead to Large Deck • Dining Area w/3rd Fairway Views • Larger Garage w/Built-ins • Nice Mt. Views, Too

ML#129689/251966 $295,000

Terry Peterson

PM

1A407650

1A407649

• Beautiful Single Level Townhome • Generous Sized Rooms Throughout • Updated Kitchen • Extra Deep 2-Car Garage (Golf Cart/Shop) • Sunset Views

1-3

ML#231504/261183 $319,000

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 (360) 797-4802 tpeterson@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

OPEN HOUSE

I PR

• 1,831 Square Feet, Built in 1990 • 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath • Newer Designer Kitchen • Northwest Murphy Style Bed in Guest BR • On the 10th Fairway

WRE/SunLand

WRE/Sequim - East

Lori Tracey Chuck Murphy

1A407648

Horse property, chain link fenced and cross fenced w/pond and irrigation rights. 50’x80’ riding arena, 24’x36’ barn. 22’x24’ foaling barn insulated w/removable wall. Fruit trees. Shop w/220. Separate office (12’x16’.) Excellent well. Heat pump and free-standing wood stove in home. Updated kitchen. Pond w/Koi. Call LINDA ML#261927 $269,900

1A407645

1A407644

1A407643

140 Parkwood Blvd. - Sequim

New - Gorgeous low maintenance landscaped front/ back yards. House interiors are sure to please. Extra roomy triplewide in Parkwood Community for 55+. Clubhouse and outdoor rec features make this a winning combination. ML#252439 Call CHUCK & LORI $74,900 Directions: Hwy 101 Parkwood entrance (next to Sears) R. onto Parkwood Blvd and continue to #140.

Large enough to be comfortable, small enough for easy care. Adorable home with great garage and shop with wood stove. Full views of the Strait and the Olympics. 3 BR/2.5 BA. This is a must see! ML#261559/225881 $230,000

120 Brittany, Sequim • Fantastic Strait & Mt. Views • Freshly Painted Inside/Out • Newly Planted Landscaping • Open Floor Plan & Large Deck ML#260592/198841 $235,000 Directions: N. on Sequim Dungeness, L. on Brigadoon, R. on Brittany to #120.

ML#228352/261125 $239,000

WRE/SunLand WRE/SunLand

Brenda Clark 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 brendac@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

FOUR SEASONS RANCH

WRE/SunLand

Deb Kahle

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

(360) 460-8222 (360) 683-3158 thelma@olypen.com

1A407658

1A407637

1A407636

If privacy is what you crave, you will love this light and airy home on 8+ acres. Living room w/vaulted ceilings and propane fireplace, family room w/wet bar, deck and propane fireplace, kitchen w/large pantry, dining room w/built-in hutch, master suite w/ vaulted ceilings. Solar heated pool and patio. Please visit the photo gallery at www.windermere.com/ tid325392 ML#261872/272555 Only $325,000

Thelma Durham

BEAUTIFUL 23.5 ACRE RANCH

HOME FOR ENTERTAINING

1A407635

4 BR/1.75 BA rambler a short distance from the beach! Open floor plan in living/dining/kitchen area. Southern exposure brings in lots of warm, bright light to the home. Great views of the 3rd and 4th hole of the golf course. ML#260973/220434 $245,500

WRE/Port Angeles

4 BR/2.5 BA, 2,636 SF. New driveway off Hidden Highlands allows for even more privacy. Mt. views, pond and a 2,880 SF barn, tack room and storage. Fenced and partially fenced. Possible uses include horse or livestock ranch, vineyard, corporate retreat, wildlife lookout and more. ML#260659/203063 $495,000

WRE/Port Angeles WRE/Port Angeles

Jennifer Felton (360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com

Kelly Johnson Realtor®, SRS, SFR Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

WRE/Port Angeles

Clarice Arakawa (360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

The Last Word in Astrology SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You can accomplish whatever you set out to do. Be upfront and honest about what you want and get moving in whatever direction suits you. Romance is in the stars and special plans will result in a fulfilling long-term commitment. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Envy or greed may cause problems at home. Don’t let work come between you and your family. Changes asked of you should be considered without fuss. It’s important to nurture what you have worked so hard to acquire. 2 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t bully or push to get your way.You will meet with opposition. Follow your own path without counting on anyone but you to reach your destination. Making changes to your living quarters may not be well received but can ease your stress. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Too many choices can turn into a dilemma, especially if they involved other people. Love is highlighted, but if you flirt too much you are likely to hurt someone’s feelings, leading to an emotional upset. Networking will help to open doors. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Talking can help you evaluate the possibilities before you. Put muscle behind your thoughts and demonstrate your ability to follow through. Romance looks promising and should be in your evening plans. A day drip will have its bonuses. 4 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Call on old associates to help you out and you will discover options that will be of financial assistance. A commitment, contract or promise will solidify a relationship you have with someone special. Improve your home with a couple of updates. 4 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Accept what’s going on or get out of the line of fire. You cannot have it both ways. Compromise or be willing to move on. A professional opportunity may shed some light and allow you to solve a problem you’ve been harboring. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You need a break. A day of rest or enjoying the company of someone you love will help revitalize you. Discussing personal plans will bring you closer to your goals. Be responsible and you’ll be respected. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let your mind wander or you will miss your objective. An emotional issue with someone you deal with daily must be put to rest before it costs you financially and personally. Don’t act on assumptions. Observation will pay off. 2 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Go outside your comfort zone to be presented with interesting options. Reevaluate the changes that have occurred and you will see the positives. Love and romance are in a high cycle. Have an open mind and a receptive heart. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your future will depend on how well you get along with the people you spend the most time with. Don’t let someone from your past disrupt your personal life. History will repeat itself if you haven’t learned from your experiences. 3 stars

You can help us protect America! Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

1-866-247-2878

The mission of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Air and Marine (OAM), the world’s largest aviation and maritime law enforcement organization, is to protect the American people and the nation’s critical infrastructure through the coordinated use of integrated air and marine forces to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband toward or across U.S. borders.

135114275

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Everyone will want to jump on your bandwagon. Generosity will be your downfall, so don’t promise too much or exaggerate what you can do. Love is on the rise and will lead to an understanding between you and the person you care about most. 5 stars

BY EUGENIA LAST


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. CAREGIVER: Live-in flexible hrs., daytime shifts avail. also. 477-9938, 461-9735

AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444 CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804 CANOPY SHELVING New aluminum, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810

FRENCH TEACHER For 2 high schoolers individually. Prefer 3 hours twice a week, mornings only. $20 hr. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#232/French Pt Angeles, WA 98362 GRANT DIRECTOR Peninsula College is recruiting for a fulltime Director to lead grant development activities and serve as lead grant writer. Position information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu. EEO IN COUNTRY: 3 Br., 2 bath. Lg secluded lot, Gasman Rd. $600. 452-6475.

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155.

ISUZU: ‘93 Rodeo 4WD. Low mi., 5 sp, rear tire, rear defrost, new larger sized tires with excellent grip for snow and ice, new radio/CD. $2,500/obo. 253-208-4596.

CHEV: ‘98 4x4. New tires, canopy, 90K. $8,250. 461-1677.

REHAB OPPORTUNITIES Life Care Center of Port Townsend

Dental Hygienists Jamestown Dental Clinic seeks per diem Dental Hygienists to fill-in various days of the week & to cover a 90-day time period beginning March 1st. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com and state available days of the week. Indian preference. Call 360-582-4876.

PT Full-time and PRN positions are available for licensed physical therapists.

Desperately must sell! 2 Br., 2 bath, new carpet, new appliances, brand new central air/heat with warranty. Serious only. $8,000. 683-8495, between 97 p.m. only Enrich your garden. Fall program. Prune, weed, feed, mulch. Outstanding results. Sunshine Gardening 452-9821 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘97 Escort LX. 4 dr, parting out. $5$500. 206-794-1104 FREE: 2003 Pinto Stallion. 14hh. Unbroke, but worth looking at if you have the time and/or money to train him. When trained, I think he’ll make a good kids horse. Call Kim at 360-460-2634.

SLP Part-time and PRN opportunities are available for licensed speech-language pathologists. OT PRN positions are available for licensed occupational therapists. We offer great pay and benefits to fulltime associates, including medical coverage, 401(k) and paid vacation, sick days and holidays. Please apply in person to Debra Stallings, rehab manager/SLP. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Debe_Stallings@ LCCA.com Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D - 26792

22

Community Notes

FALL YOGA SERIES Get the weekend off on the right foot with an eight-week series of Saturday morning yoga classes. Classes will focus on a range of yoga postures, flowing movement, and breathing. Class will be both nurturing and challenging. Beginners are welcome. Held at the Sons of Norway Hall from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Oct. 8 through Nov. 26; $80 for the series. For more information, or to register for class, phone instructor Jennifer Veneklasen at: 360-775-8746 or e-mail: jennven@hotmail.co m Space is limited.

LOOKING FOR A CHANGE? Olympic Corrections Center is looking for a full time permanent RN2; pay (DOE); with full benefits. OCC is an EOE. Apply online at www.careers.wa.gov. For further information, please contact Lori Dedman at 360374-8303. From July 1, 2011 through June 29, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. MISC: Cat 12 grader, 99E, $8,500. Detroit 4-53 engine, $2,500. Deutz BF6L913 engine, $1,500. Ranco end dump trailer, $17,000. ‘87 Peterbuilt 10 WH tractor, $16,000. Utility 40’ flatbed trailer, $6,000. 4-17 .5x25 loader tires, $1,000. 18”x14” steel beams, .30¢/lb. 360-379-1752

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for: Infant & Toddler Coordinator Assistant: Two Positions To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA P.A.: Available 11/1, 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.25 acres. Barn, 3car garage. Pets ok w/deposit. $1,400/ month, deposit required. 417-2841. MAINTENANCE WORKER Applications now being accepted for Maintenance Worker with Clallam Transit System. Current starting wage $16.36/hr. Full-time represented position. Excellent benefits. Job description and application available at CTS Administration Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, WA 98363. EOE/AA. APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 3:00 p.m., 10/21/2011. A number of eligible candidates will be retained on a next hire list for six months.

P.A.: Pvt 2 Br., 2 bath, pics ezpa.net, 1,400 sf. $675. 452-5140.

MISC: Canopy for small truck, $200. Pipe rack, $300. Tool box for small truck, $100. 206-794-1104

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Community Notes

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Gas cut off saw, in Clallam Bay area. Describe to claim. 360-963-2743 FOUND: Ring. In parking lot near Paddle Park on Ediz Hook, PA. Call to identify. 808-4527. LOST: Male cat. In the vicinity of Westview Dr./Hamilton Elementary in West Port Angeles on 9/28. “Sailor Boy” is recently rescued and unneutered. He is gray and white, has a bobcat-like look, a bushy tail and green eyes. Please call Amy at 808-8507.

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add:

Lost and Found

LOST: Dog. 3 yr. old Yellow Lab Boxer, red collar, east side P.A., between Fairview and O’Brien. 360-460-3074 LOST: Keys. Truck key with fob, house keys and smaller mailbox key, in Sequim. 477-1466 LOST: Sunglass clips. On Waterfront Trail, P.A. 452-9956.

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

Yellow Highlight on Sunday

Must be able to pass drug screening and a criminal background check.

Logos

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

SHOP LOCAL

www.peninsula dailynews.com

peninsula dailynews.com

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

PT/PRN Employment Opportunities in Clallam County/ West End RN AND MSW

Please send resume by email only to: Bonnie Meehan, Controller Peninsula Daily News bonnie.meehan@ peninsuladailynews. com

SALES + SERVICE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Currently seeking self-motivated individuals for Family Service to staff our facilities We offer: Excellent income potential Comprehensive benefit package Thorough training (paid) Wage + Commissions + Bonuses Recession-proof industry Don’t reject what you don’t understand, give us an email to learn more about our tremendous opportunity. Send your resume to: renee.harpe@dignitym emorial.com SEARAY: 18’ 120 hp 220 Chev 4 cyl., Mercruiser O/B, new water pump, needs engine work, EZ Load trailer in great condition. $600/obo. 206-794-1104

SEQUIM: 4 Br., 3 ba for rent now. $1,150/mo. 1 year lease. No smokers. Ref's req'd. Scott: 360-388-8474 SUBARU: ‘00 Outback. Very clean, 135,000 miles. $5,900. 360-683-4446 TOOLS: Small propane torch, $15. Carving tools, $46. Tongsten tap and die set, 40 piece combination, like new, $60. Angle grinder, $45. 457-3078 TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104 TRUCK TIRES: 11R 225 on minum rims, rubber, 8 total. ea. 461-1677.

Toyo alu90% $450

WATER TANK: 150 gallon. Polypropylene. Made to fit in pick up. $150. 457-0171

31

Help Wanted

AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444

For further Information or an application call 360-582-3796

Compose your Classified Ad on

Bold Lines

Borders

ASSURED HOSPICE OF CLALLAM AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES PROUD MEMBER OF LHC GROUP

You may also apply online at www.lhcgroup.com

ACCOUNTING CLERK NEEDED Must have spreadsheet knowledge and be experienced in front desk procedures, payments processing, cash reconciliations, data entry.

Pictures

Help Wanted

RUGER: M77 Tang Safety 7mm mag, new Leupold VX-III, 6 boxes ammo, sling, case, custom stock. $1,000 firm 417-2165

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

C.N.A. Full time, night shift. Great benefits and salary. Apply at www.olympicmedical.org Human Resources Olympic Medical Center 939 Caroline Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Fax: 360-417-7307 jobs@ olympicmedical.org CAREGIVERS-CAN Afternoons and Evenings HIRE ON BONUS Must be able to work weekends. Apply at Golden Years 202 Birdsong Ln., P.A. Dental Hygienists Jamestown Dental Clinic seeks per diem Dental Hygienists to fill-in various days of the week & to cover a 90-day time period beginning March 1st. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com and state available days of the week. Indian preference. Call 360-582-4876. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

FRENCH TEACHER For 2 high schoolers individually. Prefer 3 hours twice a week, mornings only. $20 hr. Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News PDN#232/French Pt Angeles, WA 98362 GRANT DIRECTOR Peninsula College is recruiting for a fulltime Director to lead grant development activities and serve as lead grant writer. Position information and application forms are available at www.pencol.edu. EEO Driver We need experienced drivers Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. Minimum six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within last three years required. One year commercial driving experience strongly preferred. • 21 years or older • Clean driving record • Drug screen, background checks, and physical • Customer service skills Apply by email only: NWSTDW@ tempdriver.net Rate of Pay: $13.75. EOE REHAB OPPORTUNITIES Life Care Center of Port Townsend PT Full-time and PRN positions are available for licensed physical therapists. SLP Part-time and PRN opportunities are available for licensed speech-language pathologists. OT PRN positions are available for licensed occupational therapists. We offer great pay and benefits to fulltime associates, including medical coverage, 401(k) and paid vacation, sick days and holidays. Please apply in person to Debra Stallings, rehab manager/SLP. 360-385-3555 360-385-7409 Fax 751 Kearney St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 Debe_Stallings@ LCCA.com Visit us online at LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D - 26792

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LIBRARIAN Temporary through 9/2013 Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks highly innovative librarian to implement a twoyear, grant-funded project with the following components: plan and conduct programs & outreach that promote 21st Century literacy & lifelong learning; support Tribal programs; mentor & train support staff; assist with archival preservation & improve overall service delivery. Requires BA/BS in Library/Info Sciences, 3 yrs exp. in public or school libraries, background check, driver’s license, solid writing & planning skills, proficiency with computer & automation systems & the ability to recruit & train volunteers. Indian pref. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com Call 360-681-4669. LOGGING JOBS Exp. processor operator, dump truck driver, and log truck driver. 360-417-8022 or email resume to: nwloggingjobs@aol.c om

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Help Wanted

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR A CHANGE? Olympic Corrections Center is looking for a full time permanent RN2; pay (DOE); with full benefits. OCC is an EOE. Apply online at www.careers.wa.gov. For further information, please contact Lori Dedman at 360374-8303. From July 1, 2011 through June 29, 2013 a 3% temporary salary reduction is in effect for most state positions.

SALES: Cabinets, counters, doors and millwork. Thomas Building Center, 301 W. Washington, Sequim, 98382.

NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com

34

CUSTOM WOODWORKING Entertainment centers, mantles, work stations, bookcases, design through installation. Local references. Reasonable rates. 452-4347.

NOW HIRING Insulation installers. Good driving record, work ethic, respectful. Apply in person at Tracy’s Insulation, 261372 Hwy. 101, Sequim. 582-9600.

Enrich your garden. Fall program. Prune, weed, feed, mulch. Outstanding results. Sunshine Gardening 452-9821

Olympic ESD 114 is hiring for: Infant & Toddler Coordinator Assistant: Two Positions To apply: oesd.wednet.edu 360-479-0993 EOE & ADA PENINSULA DAILY NEWS is seeking a Part-time Reporter to work 20 hours per week covering news and events in Port Townsend and East Jefferson County. Prior newspaper experience required. Reply with a resume to Leah Leach, managing editor at leah.leach@peninsula dailynews.com

MAINTENANCE WORKER Applications now being accepted for Maintenance Worker with Clallam Transit System. Current starting wage $16.36/hr. Full-time represented position. Excellent benefits. Job description and application available at CTS Administration Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles, WA 98363. EOE/AA. APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 3:00 p.m., 10/21/2011. A number of eligible candidates will be retained on a next hire list for six months. RESIDENT ADVISOR To work with developmentally disabled adults, no experience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m. For more info: 452-9548. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SALES + SERVICE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Currently seeking self-motivated individuals for Family Service to staff our facilities We offer: Excellent income potential Comprehensive benefit package Thorough training (paid) Wage + Commissions + Bonuses Recession-proof industry Don’t reject what you don’t understand, give us an email to learn more about our tremendous opportunity. Send your resume to: renee.harpe@dignitym emorial.com

Seeking non-medical caregivers in Sequim. Home helper, personal care, companionship. Home Instead Senior Care in Jefferson and Clallam Counties. Call 360-681-2511. homeinstead.com/6 50

Work Wanted

Eddy’s Small Engine Repair. Mowers, trimmers, saws. 360-681-3065

Handyman/Yard work. Household fixes misc. $10-$20 an hr. 360-477-6878 HELP FOR SENIORS Errand service, companionship, house cleaning. Dependable, great rate. Call Juridy 360-797-5127 Housecleaning, Seq area. Experienced. 301-2974 LAWN & YARD CARE SERVICES Mowing, Weeding, Edging, Hedge Trimming, Pruning, Landscape Maintenance & General Clean-up. Tom at 452-3229 Lawn/Garden Care ENVIOUS GREENS Fast, reliable, reasonable rates, fall clean-up, gutter cleaning, weed pulling/whacking, brush clearing, debris hauling. Sequim/P.A. area. Local: 681-3521. Cell: 541-420-4795. Mowing, weeding, pruning/trimming, hauling, landscaping and many other services. We do outstanding work. Many references. Experienced and dependable. Additional help if needed. 461-7772. Wonderful housecleaning. Experienced, references. Call Esther 775-9513 Yard cleanup, hedges, fire wood, misc. 452-3076 Mark.

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

FREEZER: Chest type Cold Spot. 15 cf, 27x48”, runs good. $100. 683-1532. MISC: 25 cf refrigerator side-by-side, front door ice and water, excellent, $650. Upright freezer, 15 cf good condition, $150. 452-3200

72

Furniture

BED: Queen size Sleep Number type bed, $150. Moving, must sell. 457-8193. BUNK BED: Complete unit with desk, chair, shelves, wardrobe, mattresses, bunky boards, good condition, paid $1,400. Sell for $575/obo. 775-1035.

72

E5

Furniture

DESK: Computer station, hand crafted oak, 36”x64”, 2 lockable file drawers plus copious storage cabinets. $1,000/ obo. 360-385-3214. DINING TABLE: Oak leaf, seats 6, recently upholstered chairs, excellent condition, pictures available. $300. 379-6456 or 360-302-0239. HOSPITAL BED: Sunrise medical electric. Model #IC5890. $2,000 new. Asking $350/obo. You haul. 582-0373 LIFT CHAIR: Pride, new, large, burgundy, half price. $500. 683-5396 MISC: 83” sofa, red and gold plaid, exc. cond., $400. Cherry queen headboard, $150, matching mirrors, $75. (2) occasional tables, $75 and $50. 582-0954. MISC: Pine china hutch, $250. Pine armoire, $500. (2) Flat screen projection Sony tvs, $250 ea. Light wood dining table with leaf, 6 chairs, $125. 452-1003, call after 5. MISC: Professional size L shaped desk with upper cabinets, $200. 4 pc oak queen size bedroom set, $425. Quality glass and metal coffee and end table, $150. All OBO. 808-1694 SOFA: Double reclining, fold-down table with cup holders in middle section. Fabric sofa in great shape. $300/obo. 681-3299 SOFA: Leather 7’, comfy, excellent condition. $500/obo. 360-385-3214

73

General Merchandise

ANTIQUE: Vintage kitchen wood stove. Glenco #4228, by the Werhle Co. Newark, OH. $1,500. 775-6180 CANOPY SHELVING New aluminum, to fit inside pickup bed camper shell. Used with side doors. Call for details. $500. 683-8810 CEMETERY PLOT: 1, Sequim View Cemetery, space #3, Lot 507, division 3, value approx. $1,200. Asking $750. 452-5638, evenings. CEMETERY PLOTS (2) Plots in Dungeness Cemetery, lot 133. Retail $1,900 each, both $2,500. 509-341-9082 CIDER PRESSES New, single or double tub presses, hard wood tubs, motorized. $495 or $625. 461-0719 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

FLATBED TRAILER 20.5’ dual 3,500 lb. axles trailer with new brakes, wiring, battery, wheel bearings and paint. Licensed and ready for your choice of decking. Must sell! $1,500/obo. 477-0903 GPS: Megellan, used very little, instructions included. $70/ obo. 457-4347. LOOKING FOR SPACE! Do you have an empty warehouse or space that you want to rent out for a few days for an event? We need 10,000+ sf of flat ground with room for parking for the weekend of November 11th. Please email portscandalousroller derby@gmail.com or call 360-670-9840, leave msg.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

Now Hiring

Bath Aides & Restorative Aides Avamere Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim is looking for 3 Bath Aides & Restorative Aides to complete our care team. Please call Heather Jeffers at 582-3900 for more information.

195135153

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

LIBRARIAN Temporary through 9/2013 Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks highly innovative librarian to implement a twoyear, grant-funded project with the following components: plan and conduct programs & outreach that promote 21st Century literacy & lifelong learning; support Tribal programs; mentor & train support staff; assist with archival preservation & improve overall service delivery. Requires BA/BS in Library/Info Sciences, 3 yrs exp. in public or school libraries, background check, driver’s license, solid writing & planning skills, proficiency with computer & automation systems & the ability to recruit & train volunteers. Indian pref. Apply: http://jamestowntribe. iapplicants.com Call 360-681-4669.

MISC: 25 cf refrigerator side-by-side, front door ice and water, excellent, $650. Upright freezer, 15 cf good condition, $150. 452-3200 MISC: Washer/dryer, $200. XXXL leather jacket, $200. (2) twin beds, $80. Rear hitch carrier, $225. 457-8376 MISC: Piano, Samick upright, ebony black, used once. $2,000. 4’ iron rooster, dark brown, $400. 681-0227 MISC: Pine china hutch, $250. Pine armoire, $500. (2) Flat screen projection Sony tvs, $250 ea. Light wood dining table with leaf, 6 chairs, $125. 452-1003, call after 5.

RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $450. 360-643-3065 WANTED: Old flat head Ford parts, speed equip. 452-8092.

Wild Rose Adult Care Home has a private room available. Best care at best rate. 683-9194

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

KITTENS: (6) 3 mo. old, orange and calico, mostly males, weaned and ready for homes. $20 ea. 452-5471

Chip Truck Driver: Day shift, steady work, pay weekly, excellent benefits, minimum 5 yrs experience. Allen Log, 360-374-6000.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

73

General Merchandise

GREENHOUSE GLASS 24 sheets. New, tempered. Cost $1,900, sell $480. 360-301-2974 MISC: Ford ‘99 F250 Super Duty XLT, diesel with flat bed trailer, $9,950. 2+ cords of fir firewood, $300. Small cement mixer, $50. 461-1194 MISC: Ladies golf clubs, with cart, $40. Buffet cart on wheels, $50. 452-6318, 775-0831 MISC: Metal shelving to fit 2 garages. Cost about $1000, sell for $750/obo. 12’ automatic awning, never used, cost $1,500, sell $750. 452-7745. MISC: Piano, Samick upright, ebony black, used once. $2,000. 4’ iron rooster, dark brown, $400. 681-0227 MISC: Solid cherry computer desk and matching credenza, 71”x21”, in good condition, $200 each. Microwave oven, $50. 683-3586 MISC: Washer/dryer, $200. XXXL leather jacket, $200. (2) twin beds, $80. Rear hitch carrier, $225. 457-8376 POWER CHAIR Jazzy, 1103 Ultra, with power seat, 300 lb. weight capacity, used very little only in house. $3,300 681-2346

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,300. 477-8826. REFRIGERATOR Amana 16’ frost free refrigerator, $150. 461-2145 ROTOTILLER Troy Built, 8 hp. $300. 808-1052 SEAHAWKS TICKETS (2) adjoining seats, all games. Sold in sets only. Section 302, row J. $100/set. 477-3292 TICKETS: Seahawks vs. Falcons, Oct. 2nd, Row T, Section 337, Seat 20-21. $80 ea. 360-461-3661.

73

127 Drapery ornament 128 Ltr. add-ons 129 Observe 130 Most clever DOWN 1 Spew 2 Call-andresponse singing 3 Relaxed, upscale restaurant 4 Eye cover 5 The “Iliad,” e.g. 6 Revealer of hits 7 DMV card 8 U.S. Open stadium 9 Ex-German chancellor Willy 10 Shrews 11 Baba with magic words 12 Walt and Roy 13 Rows 14 1,000-yr. realm 15 Blowhard 16 Get hung-up (on) 17 Veintiuno ÷ tres

General Merchandise

SALMON Fresh ocean Coho. 360-963-2021 TONNEAU COVER Atlantic blue, fits short bed Ram 1500 ‘06 vehicle, good cond. New $1,100. Asking $350/obo. 683-3504. TOOLS: Small propane torch, $15. Carving tools, $46. Tongsten tap and die set, 40 piece combination, like new, $60. Angle grinder, $45. 457-3078 UTILITY TRAILER 18’ tilting car and utility trailer, nice. $2,000. 681-7400. UTILITY TRAILER 2010, 8’x5’ Atlas. Fully enclosed. Black with diamond plate, wood interior with tie downs. Mint condition. $1,700. 360-670-2979, leave message Wood Stove Pellets Eureka, Olympus, Pacific. $185-$240 ton. 452-1400.

74

Home Electronics

MISC: 16 GB Blackberry tablet, brand new, Otterbox protective case, $350. Queen size Sealy mattress, $50. Both OBO. 477-2202.

75

Musical

2 VOILINS: 1/4 size, with cases and bows, $100 and $200. 452-7304, before 5 p.m. Antique 1910 Gabler piano, Orig. finish, a few dings, $950. Janice at 683-7333. janice@dcchurch.org GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $150. Both in new condition, great sound! Make an offer! 477-0903. ORGAN/PIANO Small, electric, excellent condition, includes seat, light, earphones and music. $450. 452-9084 or 460-2375 PIANO: Baby Grand. $1,500. 385-3214. SPINET PIANO $375. 452-7349.

18 Where the Styx flows 21 Seething 25 Backs, in anatomy class 28 Tram loads 33 Prefix with Chinese 35 “Terrible” ruler 37 Despotic Amin 38 “Romanian Rhapsodies” composer 39 Silver stopper 40 Back nine opener 41 “What a shame” 42 Having three sharps, musically 47 Boss’s prerogative 49 San __, California 50 French for “rung” 52 Sword handles 53 Ocean predator 54 “Home on the Range” word 55 Hamburg’s river 58 Turner autobiography

60 FBI employee 61 Any of 12 popes 62 Backup plan lead-in 64 Green sauce 65 Phone no. gowiths 67 Follow 68 Peter and Paul, but not Mary 69 Swindle 70 Legendary Greek ship 71 Legume whose gum is used as a thickening agent 73 Sung syllable 76 Hoops big man 78 Be moved, say 82 Dana’s “forbidden fragrance” 84 Arcade attraction 85 Stimulates 86 Obtains 88 “__ me!” 89 Temporary solutions 90 Marx who’s much older than Harpo

92 Bangkok bread? 94 Choreographer Alvin 95 Peak experience? 96 That, in Tijuana 98 Some lit. degrees 100 Matters for courts 101 Salon rinses 102 __ draft: was chilled 103 Bay windows 104 Appraisers’ reports 105 Use PayPal 106 Sphere of activity 111 CCLV x X 113 Barn bundle 115 One raised with Cain 117 Chap 119 Metal-shaping block 120 Some printers: Abbr. 121 Employ 123 Powell partner in “Thin Man” films

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. JACK LAYTON (1950-2011) Solution: 9 letters

N A  I D A N A C T  I V  I S T C

L E A D E R H O P E F U L O A

S O W D E D I U G U I T A R N

S P N D D D E R I P S N I O V

© 2011 Universal Uclick

A D D L I T I M I S E R D L E A E O E A E I C N M I M P H G C W O H C A G E C A B O O K R ҹҹҹҹ O L L H B T A U E L T D U L T S Q Y E R N T O L L A S S E R www.wonderword.com

U T S O C I A L E A A Y I A Y

B I E L I V I C R B T T A B G

E C I F F O V T E I E I H E R

R Y T R A P I D A K D C C T E

C O U N C I L E L E C T I O N

R O D E P R O F E S S O R V E

10/1

Join us on Facebook

Activist, Ballot, Bikes, Book, Calm, Canadian, Canvasser, Chair, Chow, City, Civil, Council, Courage, Debate, Duties, Election, Energy, Guided, Guitar, Hopeful, Hudson, Inspired, Leader, Media, New Democratic, Office, Olivia, Optimistic, Party, Piano, Poll, Professor, Quebec, Rally, Rebuild, Rode, Seat, Social, Speech, Strong, Talk, Toronto, Vote Friday’s Answer: Fertilizer THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

KNBLA ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

KNELA DTSUDE

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

“VINTAGE HUMOR” 91 “Griffin & __”: 1991 best-seller By JIM LEEDS 93 4:00 p.m. service, maybe ACROSS 1 Hawthorne title 97 Emeril catchword septet 7 Frankenstein’s 99 West Pointer 100 Reds handed milieu down from 10 Taken in a con winery 13 “Yikes!” founders? 19 Green 105 Redder inside 20 Amos Oz, for 107 Chicago L, for one one 22 Oil-rich 108 Vegas opening peninsula 109 Dress (up) 23 106-Downs 24 Wearing a suit 110 Julia played her in 2000 made of white111 Kitty plaint wine labels? 26 “Shoop Shoop 112 Slick-talking Song (It’s in __ 114 Org. with a “Popular Baby Kiss)” Names” Web 27 __-Magnon page 29 Organic 116 Jazz job compound 30 Most slush pile 118 Winery owner’s autobiography? responses 122 Bright with light 31 Brest beast 124 Like mosaic 32 23rd Greek stones letter 125 Seriously 34 Dernier __: shocks latest fashion 126 Faithful servants 36 More risky 38 Abates 39 Traditional time to bottle wine? 43 Mass of people 44 “On the Road” narrator Paradise 45 Herbal tea 46 They make tasty rings 48 Tom, Dick and Harry 51 Washed up, in a way 56 “Yes, Captain!” 57 Mai __ 59 Anatomical pouch 60 Prefix with culture 63 PostThanksgiving Muzak fare 64 Neo- ending 66 Present from a winery? 69 Mint family herb 72 Listing on a winery inventory? 74 Not feral 75 French wineries’ regulations to assure quality? 77 Heads up 79 Colorful marble 80 Implied part of ESL 81 Ump’s call 83 Crowd, in Cremona 84 Chill (out) 87 Dolts 89 Move furtively 10/2/11

By DAVID OUELLET

DTSODE

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: Friday’s

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

75

Musical

TROMBONE: Yamaha, with case. Great condition. $189/obo. 417-5063

76

Sporting Goods

GOLF CLUBS: Taylormade RH burner 2.0, graphite shaft, reg flex irons (PW-5), played 10 rounds, $450. Driver, 6 mo. old Cleveland RH XL270 12 deg, reg flex graphite shaft, lightest men’s driver, $150. 582-3025. GUNS: SIG P226 Tac OPS 40, NEW IN BOX, 4 mags, 357 sig barrel plus ammo, $950. Springfield Armory, XDM 3.8 40, new, $500. Cash only. 477-4563 HunterÕ s Truck Camper Dry. $175. 360-809-8000 PISTOL: Ruger new model Blackhawk, 41 mag, extra grips included. $450. 360-963-2347 Ruger K-LCR; 357 Mag or 38 Spl. Super light, $380 for the gun or $450 with 3 holsters. Smith & Wesson M&P 40c; 40 S&W, thumb safety, 2 mags, practically new, $450. 360-477-0321 RUGER: M77 Tang Safety 7mm mag, new Leupold VX-III, 6 boxes ammo, sling, case, custom stock. $1,000 firm 417-2165 SHOTGUN: Chas Daly made in Prusia. 12 ga. SxS. $3,800. 681-0814 WANTED: Gun parts, reloading items, ammo. 379-6519.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Sat. 95, Sun. 9-3, 301 E. 12th St., in alley. Building materials, wood stove and piping. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 7 a.m. Vintage lamps, Louie Vuitton purse, DS video systems, toys, designer jeans sizes 16-20, jackets, bedding, tons of yarn, toys, books, entertainment centers, and usual misc. No reasonable offers refused.730 E. 4th St. Please park in alley. 360-912-0005 GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-2 p.m., 436 E. 6th St. Household, furniture, electronics.

78B

84

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., indoors, 9-5 p.m. 3310 W. Edgewood Dr. Something for everyone! GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 8-5 p.m. 820 W. 6th St., in alley between A & B St. Large variety of items, great prices, household, scrapbook and other crafts, clothes and lots more. A Mary Kay corner set up with many products, available for purchase with a special weekend only sale! NEIGHBORHOOD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-4 p.m. 1112 W. 7th St., in alley. Something for everyone, old and new. Sofa, table, chairs, housewares, satellite dish, and many more things! YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-2 p.m., 1239 W. 6th St. Nice futon, built-in dishwasher, mini pool table, queen bed H/F/R, older small tvs, crib, books, clothes, toys, kid’s stuff, and stuff!

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

AUCTION: Sun., 12 noon, 612 N. Larch, unit 108 and 315. 460-0314 to verify.

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

3-FAMILY Sale: Sat.Sun., 8-5 p.m., 63 Senz Rd., off Taylor Cutoff Rd. 2 man inflatable kayak with paddles, 5’ Burton snowboard with bindings, mtn. bike, lots of tools, Sear’s band saw, radial arm saw, 2 chain saws, good women’s clothing and accessories and lots more. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-3 p.m., 2241 Atterberry Rd. Electric scooter, fishing gear, tools, knickknacks, luggage, golf clubs, much more.

79

Wanted To Buy

ANTIQUES WANTED Old postcards and bottles. 460-2791.

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

82

Pets

ADORABLE DORKIE PUPPIES Out of our Yorkie and dapple mini-dachshund. Tiny, first shots and dewormed. $400 and up. 452-3016.

Horses/ Tack

FREE: 2003 Pinto Stallion. 14hh. Unbroke, but worth looking at if you have the time and/or money to train him. When trained, I think he’ll make a good kids horse. Call Kim at 360-460-2634. QUARTER HORSE 7 yrs. old, sure footed, well trained, trail riding horse, 14.4 hands, soral colored, beautiful must see. $900/obo. Text message or call 360-912-1122 Please Serious inquires only

85

Farm Equipment

Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org COCKATIELS: 2, male and female, 3 yrs. old. $150. 582-7877 COCKATIELS: Hand fed. Single $25. Mates $45. Turkeys, young, $25 ea. 452-9084 or 460-2375 FREE: To good home. Female Lutino Cockatiel. Must bring own cage to pick up. If you want more info please call Kathy Barnes at 683-5796. FREE: To good home. Older dog, older cat. Desperately need home to love them. Can go separately. 477-3117

'69 Flatbed Dump Ford. V8, 4 speed man. Metal lined. $2,000 cash, or cashier's check. 360-385-6088 after 9:30 a.m. Gregg. TRACTOR: B21 Kubota with all attachments. $22,500. 452-2162 TRACTOR: MasseyFerguson 1250, diesel. FWD, shuttle trans., ballasted ag tires. $5,500. 457-8824 WATER TANK: 150 gallon. Polypropylene. Made to fit in pick up. $150. 457-0171

KITTENS: (6) 3 mo. old, orange and calico, mostly males, weaned and ready for homes. $20 ea. 452-5471 PUPPIES: Half Blood Hound, half Pit Bull, shots, wormed. $150/obo. Serious inquiries only. 461-0095 PUPPIES: Super cute Chihuahua/Min-Pin. Sweet and friendly. $250. 360-963-2959 or 360-640-2303. RAT TERRIERS Adorable. Black and white tri, UKC tails, shots, dewclaws, wormed. $450. 360-643-3065

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

83

WANTED: Old flat head Ford parts, speed equip. 452-8092.

ALF GRASS: $5/ bale. Grass, $4. In barn, no rain. 683-5817.

Farm Animals

(Answers Monday) AWAIT DREAMY FLEECE Jumbles: CLING Answer: He knew so much about model railroads because he’d been this — WELL-TRAINED

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

MISC: Cat 12 grader, 99E, $8,500. Detroit 4-53 engine, $2,500. Deutz BF6L913 engine, $1,500. Ranco end dump trailer, $17,000. ‘87 Peterbuilt 10 WH tractor, $16,000. Utility 40’ flatbed trailer, $6,000. 4-17 .5x25 loader tires, $1,000. 18”x14” steel beams, .30¢/lb. 360-379-1752 PETE-377, $160,000 in 1999, 550 Cat, 18 sp, 3.55, 244”, Studio sleeper, 640,000 mi. $19,000, less without drop, sleeper and rack. 732-4071. SKID STEER: ‘02 Gehl 5635. 1,846 hours, 80 hp 2 spd turbo, foam filled tires and tracks, comes w/bucket and pallet forks. $12,500/obo. Char at 425-220-7618 TRUCK TIRES: Toyo 11R 225 on aluminum rims, 90% rubber, 8 total. $450 ea. 461-1677.

93

Marine

ALUMINUM BOAT: 17’ Bass Tracker, 100 hp Mercury, Calkins trailer, motor serviced by Anchor Marine and runs great, trailer new in ‘02, great fishing and crabbing boat. $2,400. 681-4684. ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6 BAYLINER: ‘69 17’, 120 I/O. Orig. owner, garaged, elec. winch, fish finder, full top, E-Z Loader trailer w/spare. $3,200. 360-385-3350

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘00 WS. Exc. condition, 3406 Cat, all new brakes, new 10-12 yd box, hydraulics, plumbed for pup, possible part time job. $42,000/obo, may trade. 460-8325

BOAT: 12’ aluminum with trailer, 6 hp motor and accessories. $1,500/obo. 808-0156 BOAT: 14’ aluminum with trailer, 10 hp Honda O/B. $2,500. 681-6162 BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523.

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

93

Marine

BOSTON WHALER ‘95 13’, galv. trailer w/spare tire, 8 hp Merc, very low hours, ext steering and shift arm, sounder, boat cover. $3,500/obo. 437-7658 CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728. CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884. DINGHY: Mint condition sailing nesting dinghy including trailer, motor, mast, boom, sails, canvas cover. $3,200. 360-379-1616

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 HEWESCRAFT: 14’ with trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 JET SKI: ‘97 Kawasaki SS Waverunner 750. With ‘96 Spirit trailer. $1,500. 670-3256 LARSEN: 14.5’ Lapline. Nice, extras. $1,900/obo. 452-9445 LIVINGSTON: 12’, 18 hp Nissan O/B, covered steering station. $1,600. 452-6714. LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,000. 683-1957. LUND: 12’ with EZ Loader trailer, 8 hp 4 cycle Honda motor, like new. $2,975. 683-5382 RAYSON CRAFT: ‘66 17’ V drive flat bottom, 326 Pontiac with trailer. $4,700. 457-5921 RENKEN: ‘80 17’. 90 Merc, new water pump, 2 downriggers, never in salt water. $2,500. 681-3714

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Marine

RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $3,000. 452-4384, msg RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAILBOAT: 22’ Columbia. 9.9 Merc ob. Well maint. $3,400. 206-397-9697 SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new electronics. Roller furling. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. Take as is, $10,000. 760-792-3891 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 SEARAY: 18’ 120 hp 220 Chev 4 cyl., Mercruiser O/B, new water pump, needs engine work, EZ Load trailer in great condition. $600/obo. 206-794-1104 TROPHY: ‘87 20’. In great shape. New electronics and custom canvas. Many extras, including fishing reels and rods, and crab pots. Asking $8,000. 457-4384

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Motorcycles

ATV: ‘07 Eton 150. 2WD, Viper, as new. $2,200. 683-6203. HARLEY: ‘02 Low Rider. Loaded, 15K mi. $10,000 firm. 460-4950 HARLEY: ‘06 Sportster. 7K mi., like new. $6,900. 452-6677. HARLEY: ‘90 SportsterXLH 883. Cust. pearl paint w/ wolf/moon emblem, Screaming Eagle pkg, Corbin saddle, windshld, fwd contrls, saddlebags w/ quick-release brackets, Kuryakyn ISO grips, more. Stock seats, svc manual, HD sissybar/rack incl. Lots of power and modified gearing for hwy speeds. 20,900 mi. $3,600. 360-683-2182 HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

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Recreational Vehicles

CHEV: ‘01 Blazer. 4x4. 144K mi., runs great. $4,500. 460-8155.

TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326.

CHEV: ‘03 Tahoe 4WD 4.8 liter V8, runs great, cloth interior excellent shape, power seat, windows, locks, newer tires, custom rims. $9,900. 460-7901.

TRAILER: ‘94 Terry. $4,900. 681-7381

29’

TRAILER: ‘94 30’ Komfort Travel Trailer. Great shape, living room slide-out, A/C, micro, refrigerator/freezer. $4,000. Brinnon area. 360-535-2078 TRAILER: ‘98 35’ Jayco. Lg. slide, self cont. $10,550 ave. retail. $8,490. 360-775-1316

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Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘03 XR100R. Excelelnt condition. $1,500. 808-3953.

YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

HONDA: ‘04 750 Aero Shadow. Gorgeous black and silver. $4,500. 452-0837.

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HONDA: ‘04 Shadow 650. Showroom condition, low miles, lots of extras. $2,800. 457-8376

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957.

HONDA: ‘71 Trail 90. Runs great. 4 cycle, hi/lo gear change. $1,100. 385-0096.

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222

HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘86 250 trials bike. Unique, factory street legal. $850. 461-2627. HONDA: ‘86 Goldwing trike. $5,900. 360-683-9175 HONDA: ‘87 Goldwing. Looks/runs great. $2,200/obo. 457-1533 HONDA: ‘99 Night Hawk 750cc. Black chrome 10.7K miles new battery excellent condition $2,800. 360-457-5012, or cell, 559-642-8200. HONDA: Trail 90. New tires, runs great! $750. 460-1377. KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670 KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KAWASAKI: ‘93 KLX 650. $1,800. 460-3530 MOPED: New, 16 mi., needs battery. $900. 452-2795. QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SCOOTER: ‘05 Honda Reflex. Like new condition, very low mi., 50+ mi. to the gal., Versahaul, other extras. $2,600. 360681-7102 for appt. SCOOTER: ‘09 200 cc Kymco. Like new. $2,099/obo. 582-0841 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643. SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, many extras, always garaged $9,500. 461-1911. TRIUMPH: ‘05 Bon. Exc. cond., extras. $5,500. 460-6780. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 2,300 mi. $3,000. 457-3701.

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Recreational Vehicles

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Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

LAYTON ‘00 TRAVEL TRAILER 17’ very clean travel trailer. Separate shower and toilet, full kitchen, built-in radio with CD player, TV, microwave. Perfect for 2 or 3 people. No credit checks! Lowest in-house financing guaranteed! Military discounts! 90 days same as cash. $5,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Lexington GTS 28. 3 slide-outs. $50,000. 681-7601 MOTOR HOME: ‘75 Newell Coach 35’. Aerodynamic aluminum body, Original, not a conversion, Cat, many featurs, updates. $18,500/obo. 460-6979 MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478. MOTOR HOME: ‘88 29’ Suncrest. 35K, runs good, updated int $4,500. 683-2325 MOTOR HOME: ‘91 30’ Allegro Bay. 85K, runs/drives well, new brakes, satellite King Dome, very clean. $12,500. 477-9436. SALEM: ‘09 27’ with Slideout. Sleeps 6 or 7. Only used a handful of times. $16,000. 253-820-7237, Rob. TRAILER: ‘03 25’. Slightly used, front bedroom, rear bath, single slide. $9,500. 681-7110

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5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroads Cruiser Patriot. 3 slides, fireplace, 2 recliners, 16” wheels. Asking $42,000 incl. 6’ slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 5TH WHEEL: 33’. New hot water tank, etc. $700 775-6075 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105. CAMPER: ‘03 10.6’ Bigfoot truck camper. 2500 series, color bamboo, model 25C106E. Highest quality, excellent condition. $9,000/obo. 360-379-1804 CAMPER: ‘74 Conestoga. Stove, fridge, port-a-potty, sleeps 4, no leaks. $800. 461-6615.

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

Campground Business Opportunity at Lake Quinault! The Olympic National Forest is seeking a concessionaire partner to operate three campgrounds and day use areas at Lake Quinault under a special use permit. The concessionaire will be responsible for collection of fees, daily operations and maintenance of the facilities. The permit will be issued for a five year term with a possible 5 year extension. For details, please visit http://www.fs.usda.gov/ goto/olympic/CGProspectus or contact Pete Erben at perben@fs.fed.us or 360-288-0202. Proposals must be submitted by 4:00 PM on Nov. 18, 2011 to Dean Millett, District Ranger, Pacific Ranger Station, 437 Tillicum Lane, Forks, WA, 98331. Pub: Sept. 27, 28, 30, Oct. 2, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING COMMISSION CLALLAM COUNTY Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 84.34.037 RCW and Chapter 27.08, Clallam County Code, that the Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing for October 19, 2011, at 6:30 PM in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 The purpose of the hearing is to receive public testimony regarding applications for Current Use Classification (Open Space or Timber Land taxation) from the First-Half 2012. Applications under consideration are summarized as follows: First-Half 2011 Current Use Assessment Applications CUA2011-0027 – Open Space Land – William Dillman: 7.41 acres, TPN 132901-200120; CUA2011-0028 – Open Space Land – North Olympic Land Trust: 4.36 acres, TPN 053011-440120; CUA2011-0029(A&B) – Timber Land – Rene Davis: 6.64 acres, TPN 132802-130275, 132802-120100; CUA2011-0030 – Timber Land –Stan & Linda Peterson: 5.40 acres, TPN 103029-220100; CUA2011-0031 – Open Space Land – North Olympic Land Trust: 37.34 acres, TPN 123114-430000; CUA2011-0032– Open Space – Gary & Leith Grahn: 11.22 acres, TPN 113027-420070; CUA2011-0033 – Timber Land – June Cassell: 18.01 acres, TPN 113027420060; CUA2011-0034(A&B) – Timber Land – Dan Kousbaugh: 8.38 acres, TPN 132802-130010, 132802-130050; CUA2011-0035 – Timber Land – Joel & Melissa Sisson: 15.94 acres, TPN 142815-120100; CUA2011-0036(A&B) – Open Space Land – Held over to next year; CUA2011-0037 – Timber Land – David Engel: 5.05 acres, TPN 132834138050; CUA2011-0038 – Timber Land – Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe: 21.26 acres, TPN 022907-228010; CUA2011-0039 – Open Space Land – Lazy Snake Lodge LLC: 9.05 acres, TPN portion 093126-248010; CUA2011-0040(A&B) – Open Space Land – Roland, Sharon, Darron & Larae McCarter: 5.19 acres, TPN 043136-450760; CUA2011-0041(A&B) – Open Space Land – Roland, Sharon, Darron & Larae McCarter: 18.64 acres, TPN 043136-450780; CUA2011-0042 – Timber Land – Kenneth Gray: 20.03 acres, TPN 052913-210420;

TRAILER: ‘99 24’ Mallard. New cond. $6,500/obo. 797-3730 TRUCK/CAMPER COMBO Chev Silverado 2500, 3/4 ton, 4x4, plus fully provisioned Lance Squire Lite camper. $14,750. 683-4830

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

96

Parts/ Accessories

FORD: ‘97 Escort LX. 4 dr, parting out. $5$500. 206-794-1104 MISC: Canopy for small truck, $200. Pipe rack, $300. Tool box for small truck, $100. 206-794-1104 TOW DOLLY: Stihl brand, used only once. Like new. $650. 360-670-9115, cmfryrear@gmail.com

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4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘05 SILVERADO 1500 SHORT BED 4X4 PICKUP 5.3 liter Vortec V8, auto transmission, nice lift kit, BFGoodrich all-terrain tires, alloy wheels, dual Bilstein reservoir shocks, spray-in bedliner, tool box, tow package, trailer brake controller, running boards, Flowmaster Exhaust, air, cruise, tilt, Kenwood DVD video system, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $19.130! Loads of extras! Nicest lift I’ve seen! Only 58,000 miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $13,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CHEV: ‘04 AWD full size contractor van. $7,850. 452-5803.

CHEV: ‘11 Silverado 2500 HD 4WD LT Ext Cab. Vortec 6L V8 gas engine. Estate truck 3,125 miles. Includes interior plus pkg and convenience pkg. Loaded with back up camera to trailer pkg, remote start, heated mirrors, too much to list. $38,500. 683-2342. CHEV: ‘86 SUV. Runs well, 7 passenger, snow tires. $2,495. 477-0710 CHEV: ‘90 Suburban. $4,000/obo. 360-683-1967 CHEV: ‘96 Suburban. CD, leather, exc. $3,650. 461-2627. CHEV: ‘97 Tahoe. 4x4, leather interior, air conditioning, tow pkg., runs/drives great, must sell. $3,995. 775-9648. CHEV: ‘98 4x4. New tires, canopy, 90K. $8,250. 461-1677. DODGE ‘05 D3500 QUAD CAB LONG BED SLT BIGHORN 4x4 pickup, 5.9 liter 24V Cummins turbo diesel, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, bedliner, tow package, brush guard, sliding rear window, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 62,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Popular 5.9 liter diesel engine! This pickup is in like new condition! Stop by Gray Motors today! $29,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘91 F250 Lariat 110K, blue ext., lots of extras, good cond $2,500/obo. 457-4347 FORD: ‘93 Explorer. Runs good. $1,900. 582-9006, 565-6100 FORD: ‘98 Explorer. runs great. $2,500/ obo. 206-794-1104. FORD: ‘99 F250. 7.3L diesel. 154K, 4 dr. $13,500. 912-2323.

FORD: F150 4WD. 108,000 orig miles 4" lift on 33's, new brakes and rotors all around, trailer brakes (never used), spray in bedliner premium sound system very clean adult owned. $7,400. 461-9054. GMC: ‘88 Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4. 5.7L V8, 198K miles. Solid engine and trans. 4x4 works great. Gutted inside. Was used for camping and hauling fire wood. Extra set of 17” tires, wheels and lug nuts included. $900. Jason, 452-3600 ISUZU: ‘93 Rodeo 4WD. Low mi., 5 sp, rear tire, rear defrost, new larger sized tires with excellent grip for snow and ice, new radio/CD. $2,500/obo. 253-208-4596. JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text. JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988

97

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175. NISSAN: 01 Pathfinder. 134K, 6 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, all power, sun/moon roof, AM/FM CD iPod, tow pkg., nonsmoker. $7,400. 457-3891 PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247 TOYOTA ‘01 HILANDER 4x4 auto, sunroof, alloy wheels, power windows and locks, heated leather seats, air, CD. The original Buy Here Pay Here! Military discounts! Why pay more? We have the lowest in house rates. 90 days same as cash. $13,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 TOYOTA: ‘93 extended cab pickup. SR5 4x4. $3,500. 460-1481 VACATION ADVENTURE PACKAGE 4 wheel & paddle! ‘97 Ford Explorer, 2 kayaks, paddles, carry system and accessories. All you need for a Northwest kayak adventure! Over $700 in accessories included FREE with this package! Package price $4,457 ($200 off). 460-7833.

98

Pickups/Vans

DODGE: ‘05 Caravan. Limited Edition, DVD player, AM/FM radio/ cassette, great shape, 90,500 mi. $7,500/obo. 360-640-9756

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Legal Notice

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That the Clallam County Department of Community Development, Planning Division, has issued a Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) on September 28, 2011, under SEPA Rules (Chapter 197-11350 WAC) and the Clallam County Environmental Policy Ordinance (Chapter 27.01) for the following proposal: Proposal: The proposal (ECL 2011-14) Clallam County Six-Year (2012 to 2017) Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The Six-Year TIP is updated annually and establishes the funding of upcoming transportation projects for the next six year period. The TIP includes transportation projects administered by Clallam County, such as county road projects, county trail projects, and county bridge projects. The Six-Year TIP is required by RCW 36.81.121. Location: Transportation projects subject to the Six Year TIP are distributed throughout the political boundaries of the County of Clallam in the State of Washington. SEPA: The Six Year TIP is a non-project action (per WAC 197-11-704(2)(b)). Phased review is a component of a non-project action. The lead agency determines the appropriate scope and level of detail of environmental review to coincide with meaningful points in the planning and decision-making processes. Environmental review may be phased if it assists agencies and the public to focus on issues that are ready for decision and exclude from consideration issues not yet ready. Broader environmental documents may be followed by narrower documents such as site specific analysis (project specific) per WAC 197-11-060(5) of SEPA Rules. When project actions (i.e. specific transportation projects) to implement the TIP are proposed, these project actions will be subject to further environmental review. The Clallam County Planning Department is lead agency for this proposal under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) and has issued a Determination of Non-Significance (DNS). Enclosed is a copy of the TIP, Determination of Non-Significance (DNS) for this non-project action, and Environmental Checklist. The threshold determination is made on September 28, 2011. Comments on the threshold determination will be received until October 12, 2011. This may be the only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts of the proposal. Unless the Responsible Official withdraws the threshold determination pursuant to WAC 19711-340(3)(a), the threshold determination shall be final at the end of the comment period. Agencies and interested parties will be notified if the threshold determination is withdrawn. The threshold determination may appealed as part of the Board of County Commissioner’s final decision regarding the TIP. Pub: Oct. 2, 2011

DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $13,750. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘05 Expedition. 1 owner, low mi., exc. cond. $17,000/ obo. 683-9791.

CHEV: ‘00 Tahoe. Low miles, lots of extras. Good tires. $8,500. 360-928-3440

FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259

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Legals Clallam Co.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Public Hearing on Proposed System Passes and Fare Structure Changes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Clallam Transit System will hold a public hearing to receive public input and comments on a proposed system passes and fare structure changes during the regular meeting of the transit governing Board on Monday, October 17. The public meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. at the Clallam Transit System, 830 West Lauridsen Boulevard, Port Angeles, Washington. The public is encouraged to attend the public meeting and hearing and provide testimony. Written comment is also being taken and will be considered as public testimony for the public hearing. All written comments are due by October 7. The proposed system passes and fare structure changes include: 1. Establishment of new monthly pass structure and increases to all monthly pass fees. 2. Elimination of paratransit discount tickets. 3. Require proof of eligibility for reduced cash fares and passes. 4. Simplification of paratransit trip pricing. 5. Changes the fare for paratransit service that extends beyond ADA corridor to be actual cost. 6. Elimination of pro-ration of monthly passes. 7. Reduction of commission rate for bus pass outlets and establishment of purchase threshold. 8. Reduction of subsidy for employer-sponsored bus pass program and establishment to purchase threshold. 9. Establishment of a higher target operating farebox recovery ratio to direct future fare changes. These proposals have been developed to address the system’s need to balance its operating budget, to simplify the pass system for riders, and to streamline administrative processes. Copies of information detailing the proposed service change are available prior to the public meeting and hearing at the Clallam Transit System or phone 360/452-1315. Americans with Disability Act (ADA) accommodations provided upon request. Please contact Clallam Transit System at 830 West Lauridsen Boulevard, Port Angeles, or phone 360/4521315 or 1/800-858-3747 by October 14. Foreign language interpreters, interpreters for people with hearing impairments, and taped information for people with visual impairments may be provided if requested with advance notice. Clallam Transit System complies with all federal requirements under Title VI which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, and sex. Terry G. Weed General Manager Pub: Oct. 2, 2011

1A701331

Interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing and make their views known to the Planning Commission. For more information, contact Robert Knapp at rknapp@co.clallam.wa.us or 360-417-2416 or the Planning Division at 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Pub: Oct. 2, 2011

4 Wheel Drive

TENT TRAILER: New ‘10 Coleman Yuma. $7,900. 683-2457.

TRAILER: ‘88 26’ Shasta Riviera. Air, needs interior work. $1,000/obo. 206-794-1104

Motorcycles

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

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Pickups/Vans

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DODGE: ‘98 3/4 ton. Short bed, quad cab, w/fiberglass shell, V8, posi rear end, all power, air, leather int., tow pkg, 102K miles, very good cond. $6,000/obo. 683-8810 FORD: ‘32 Truck. ‘350’ Chev engine, needs TLC. $10,000. 360-732-4125 FORD: ‘74 F250 Camper Special. Body and interior are exc. 390 eng w/auto. $900/obo. 477-1949 FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911. FORD: ‘95 Aerostar. 170K, 4x4, lots new parts, good cond. $1,300/obo. 457-4347 HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Runs great, nice body, forest green, captains chairs. $4,900. 385-2012. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

Classified 99

Pickups/Vans

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Runs good. $500. 460-0262 TOYOTA: ‘08 Tacoma SR5 ext. cab. 4 cyl, auto, all pwr. CD stereo, 1 owner. 14,680 original miles. $18,000/obo 417-8291 TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

99

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘84 El Dorado. Exc. 60K. $8,500. 452-7377.

ACURA: ‘90 Acura Integra LS. Barbie Pink. 5 speed. 133,000 mi. Runs and drives great! Cruise control, underglow, sunroof, exhaust, much more! Minor body damage. $5,500/obo. See online add for more info. 360-461-4154. CADILLAC: ‘00 El Dorado ETC. 80K, black/black, leather, beautiufl, must see. $7,800. 681-3093.

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,500. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931

99

Cars

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

CADILLAC: ‘97 Catera. Well maintained, sunroof, leather. $4,150. 461-1160 or 457-1419 CHEV: ‘67 El Camino. 400/T400. $12,000. 707-241-5977 CHEV: ‘68 Impala. 327 cid, 400 at. $7,500. 450-3767. CHEV: ‘91 Z28 Camero. Red t tops, excellent condition. $4,200. 928-1170. CHRYSLER ‘04 PT CRUISER WAGON 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, sunroof, keyless entry, power windows and door locks, air, CD/cassette stereo, cruise control, dual front airbags. Only 69,000 miles! Extra clean! Sharp! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

99

Cars

CHEV: ‘93 Corsica. Auto. $500. 460-0262, 681-0940 CHEV: ‘94 Suburban. 3/4 ton. 2 owner, larger ‘454’ engine, tow pkg., 120K. $3,500. 808-3374. FIAT: ‘72 Model 850 Spyder. $2,000. 681-4119 FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘76 LTD. 2 dr, 351, good cond., runs exc., very dependable, some new. $950. 460-6979. FORD: ‘79 Fairmont. Good condition, new brakes, great transportation vehicle, one owner. Asking $1,200. 582-9227. FORD: ‘86 Taurus. Runs great, clean. $600/obo. 681-3313. FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150. FORD: ‘98 Mustang GT. V8, 5 sp, leather int., all power. $4,500 477-1805

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Cars

99

Cars

HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023

FORD: ‘99 Ford Escort. 156,000 miles, 35 MPG, excellent condition, has many repairs, good tires 4 extra rims, have receipts, owner Chilton manuals. $2,500/obo. 360-461-6214 360-912-2858

HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352 HONDA: ‘89 CRX HF. $2,500. 683-1006. HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, new tires, cruise control, great cond. $4,400. 457-3078.

HONDA ‘05 ACCORD LX SEDAN 2.4 liter 4 cylinder, auto, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, 8 airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $16,600! 31 mpg highway! Only 31,000 miles! Like new condition inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today to find the right car, at the right price. $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

MAZDA: ‘06 Miata MX5 Touring. Red, leather, 10K. $14,500/obo. 681-0863

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘95 Grand Marquis. Good transportation. $1,850. 457-5500.

HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061

MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614

99

Cars

MERCURY: ‘99 Grand Marquis. $4,000/ obo. 681-0353. MGB: ‘76 Under 80K, new carb, exhaust, alternator, fuel pump and more. $2,950/ OBRO. 417-2165. OLDS: ‘65 98 LS 4 dr Sedan. 2 owner in great condition, int. like new, 83K. $6,000. 582-0208. PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Classic, fun, fast, auto or stick. $11,950. 683-7768. PONTIAC: ‘02 Grand Am GT. 122K miles, V6 auto, leather, power seats, windows, mirrors with sun roof, iPod/USB connection, Pioneer Radio, new tires, recent brakes. Bright red, super clean $6,500 firm. 360-683-7577 PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am. Lots new, nice. $4,800/obo. 477-3180 STUDEBAKER: ‘62 Lark Cruiser. 289 Packard V8, body pretty good, but project. Time and money. $1,200/obo. 460-4963

Cars

SUBARU: ‘00 Outback. Very clean, 135,000 miles. $5,900. 360-683-4446 SUBARU: ‘06 Tribeca. 62,000 miles with recent required service $14,500 or best reasonable offer. 360-683-2049 SUBARU: ‘07 Forester. 98K, auto, power windows/seats, moon roof, great condition. $11,900. 461-1539

TOYOTA ‘03 COROLLA LE Sandrift metallic - 4 door, automatic, anti-lock brake, tilt & slide sunroof, new tires, driver & pass side airbags. 145,000 miles. Outgrew car. $6,900. 417-3545 for appt. VW: ‘03 Passat Sedan. Auto, 72K miles, 25+ mpg, 4 cyl, 1.8liter, silver. Great Shape. $7,500. Call Jeff 808-1804, 452-3270

1A5135497

FENCING

TRACTOR

Lund Fencing

BBob’s ob’s Tractor Service

A M 27DYearAuto, Inc. Certified

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

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+ will meet or beat We most estimates

Call Bryan or Mindy

360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Pressure Washing

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Free initial Check Engine Light Inspection! Free Estimates! 294752 Hwy 101 Quilcene

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Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair Larry Muckley

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

LARRYHM016J8

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

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ASBESTOS

WANTED: Wind Damaged

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G

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ARLAN ROOFING

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www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN TREES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Small Jobs A Specialty

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

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anthonystreetop@gmail.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges 72289323

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

EXCAVATING

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

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025073138

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452-9995

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YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

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360

0A5100969

155120082

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Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

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(360) (360)

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195134780

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

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JP

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195133749

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

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DIRT WORK JK DIRTWORKS INC. 360/460•9824

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JJami’s ami’s

Davis Painting

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

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Jim Green Painting

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• • • •

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

99

Cars

VW: ‘04 Passat GXL. 2 yr. warranty, 65K mi. $9,500. 681-7381.

VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs well, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,295/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

135114426

VW: ‘74 Super Beetle. Show quality. $10,000. 457-7184.

&$+ 1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

www.reidandjohnson.com • mj@olypen.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

CLALLAM COUNTY PARKS, FAIR & FACILITIES DIVISION NOTICE OF CALL FOR BIDS SEALED BIDS will be received by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners 223 East Fourth Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington until 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, October 11th, 2011 and shall include a 5% Bid Bond for the: - Fairgrounds Backflow PreventionComplete drawings and specifications may be obtained from Pen Print, Inc., Phone 360.457.3404. All bidding and related questions should be directed to Zenovic & Associated, Incorporated 360.417.0501. The sealed bids must be clearly marked on the outside of the envelope, “BID PROPOSAL-Fairgrounds Backflow Prevention- Address bid proposal to: Board of Clallam County Commissioners, 223 East 4th Street, Suite 4, Port Angeles, Washington 98362 or hand-deliver to 223 East 4th Street, Room 150, Port Angeles, Washington. Bid documents delivered to other offices and received late by the Commissioners' Office will not be considered nor will bids received by facsimile or e-mail. Clallam County hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Clallam County will determine the lowest responsible bidder in accordance with the terms of Clallam County Code Section 3.12 and reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive informalities in the process or to accept the bid, which in its estimation best serves the interests of Clallam County. Construction Timeframe: October 17, 2011 through November 18, 2011 There will be a mandatory on-site walk-through conducted Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 2:00 pm. All interested bidders are to meet at the Fairgrounds office prior to walk-though. APPROVED this twentieth day of September 2011. BOARD OF CLALLAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair ATTEST: Trish Holden, CMC, Clerk of the Board Publish: Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2011

File No.: 7283.26721 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Cherilyn R. Reed, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1210882 Tax Parcel ID No.: 053017320000 Abbreviated Legal: Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: That portion of the Southwest quarter of Section 17, Township 30 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Callam County, Washington, Described as follows: Beginning at a point on the West line of said Southwest Quarter which lies South 3 degrees 10' 36" East 430.43 feet from the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter; Thence South 3 degrees 10' 36" East 418.37 feet; Thence South 78 degrees 30' 00" East 553.31 feet; Thence North 9 degrees 0' 00" East 240.67 feet to a tangent curve concave to the East having a radius of 500.00 feet; Thence Northerly along said curve 122.07 feet through a central angle of 13 degrees 59' 14" to a point of reverse curve; Thence Northerly 22.25 feet along a reverse curve concave to the West having a radius of 15.00 feet through a central angle of 84 degrees 59' 14"; thence North 62 degrees 0' 00" West 147.70 feet to a tangent curve concave to the Northeast having a radius of 470.00 feet; thence Westerly along said curve 54.77 feet through a central angle of 6 degrees 40' 35" to a point of reverse curve; thence Westerly 22.17 feet along a reverse curve concave to the South having a radius of 15.00 feet through a central angle of 84 degrees 40' 35"; Thence South 40 degrees 0' 00" West 317.09 feet to a point in a nontangent curve concave to the North having a radius of 50.00 feet, a radial line of said curve through said point bearing North 76 degrees 52' 09" East; Thence Southerly along said curve 203.44 feet through a central angle of 233 degrees 07' 51"; Thence North 50 degrees 0' 00" West 130.27 feet; Thence North 40 degrees 0' 00" East 90.00 feet; thence North 3 degrees 10' 46" West 158.88 feet; thence South 64 degrees 30' 00" West 79.21 feet to the point of beginning. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 23 Red Cedar Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/17/07, recorded on 10/19/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1210882, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Cherilyn R Reed, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Colwell Banker Mortgage, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Colwell Banker Mortgage, its successors and assigns to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011 1267436. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/02/2011 Monthly Payments $9,560.21 Late Charges $355.30 Lender's Fees & Costs $319.28 Total Arrearage $10,234.79 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $703.52 Statutory Mailings $9.76 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,486.28 Total Amount Due: $11,721.07 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $110,752.33, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Cherilyn R Reed 23 Red Cedar Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Cherilyn R Reed 23 Red Cedar Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/29/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/30/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/02/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26721) 1002.197837-FEI Pub: Oct. 2, 23, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7023.93256 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA Grantee: Marshall J. Brennan And Consuelo A. Brennan, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 496147 Tax Parcel ID No.: 962 113 405 Abbreviated Legal: Lots 15-19, Block 134, Irondale #6 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lots 15 to 19, Block 134, Irondale No. 6, as per Plat recorded in Volume 2 of Plats, Page 139, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 173 NORTH ANDREW AVENUE PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/17/05, recorded on 03/22/05, under Auditor's File No. 496147, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Marshall J. Brennan, and Consuelo A. Brennan, husband and wife, as Grantor, to William L. Bishop, Jr. Bishop, Lynch & White P.S., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Webster Bank, National Association, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Wells Fargo Bank, NA, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 560074. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 7/28/2011 Monthly Payments $17,666.02 Late Charges $758.68 Lender's Fees & Costs ($712.46) Total Arrearage $17,712.24 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $540.00 Title Report $739.16 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,382.68 Total Amount Due: $19,094.92 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $184,598.36, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS MARSHALL J. BRENNAN 173 NORTH ANDREW AVENUE PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 CONSUELO A. BRENNAN 173 NORTH ANDREW AVENUE PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 MARSHALL J. BRENNAN 3117 EDDY STREET PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 CONSUELO A. BRENNAN 3117 EDDY STREET PORT TOWNSEND, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/19/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/19/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 7/28/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.93256) 1002.191019-FEI Pub: Oct. 2, 23, 2011 File No.: 7037.06429 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, successor by merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Daniel G. Youra, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 462517 Tax Parcel ID No.: 989400113 Abbreviated Legal: Ptn. Lts 2 & 3, Blk 1 Plat of Town of Port Hadlock 1/44 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lots 2 and 3, Block 1 of the Plat of Town of Port Hadlock, as per Plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 44, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Except the East 110 feet of said Lots 2 and 3. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington Commonly known as: 110 Curtis St Port Hadlock, WA 98339 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/14/02, recorded on 11/22/02, under Auditor's File No. 462517, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Daniel G. Youra, an unmarried individual, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of M & T Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by M & T Mortgage Company to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 464941. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 7/27/2011 Monthly Payments $36,315.64 Late Charges $1,488.18 Lender's Fees & Costs $4,264.04 Total Arrearage $42,067.86 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $472.50 Sale Costs $162.60 Total Costs $635.10 Total Amount Due: $42,702.96 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $135,649.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/08, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Daniel G. Youra 110 Curtis St Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Daniel G. Youra PO Box 1169 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Daniel G. Youra 110 Curtis St Port Hadlock, WA 98339 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Daniel G. Youra PO Box 1169 Port Hadlock, WA 98339 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/21/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/21/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 7/27/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Becky Baker (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.06429) 1002.153978-FEI Pub: Oct. 2, 23, 2011

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7827.20183 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC Grantee: Machel E. Fox, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1176161 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000045835 Abbreviated Legal: 7 Blk. 458. TPA Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 7, Block 458, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/03/06, recorded on 03/08/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1176161, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Machel E. Fox, as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Pacific Northwest Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a subsidiary of IndyMac Bank, FSB, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("MERS"), a Delaware Corporation, its successors or assigns, as nominee for Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC to Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20111267601. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Note and Deed of Trust pursuant to paragraph 9(a)(i) a Borrower dies and the property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving Borrower: Amount due to satisfy by 07/12/2011 Unpaid principal balance Due in full (Maturity Date 11/26/2010) $99,599.68 Interest $19,528.41 Lender's Fees & Costs Mortgage Insurance Premium $1,980.00 $6,836.26 Total Arrearage Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $607.50 Title Report $493.22 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,218.24 Total Amount Due: $129,162.59 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $99,599.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/26/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on October 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by before the sale to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the sale, the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with accruing interest, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Machel E. Fox 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Machel E. Fox 835 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Machel E. Fox 1230 West 19th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Machel E. Fox 835 East 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/09/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/09/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/12/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Claire Swazey (425) 586-1900. 1002.195654-FEI Pub: Sept. 11, Oct. 2, 2011

File No.: 7081.22657 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar Bank, FSB Grantee: Bruce R. Carlson, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1211420 Tax Parcel ID No.: 04-30-23-439070 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 2 SP 6/11, PTN SW4SE4, S23-T30N-R4WWM Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 2 of Short Plat Recorded December 1, 1978 in Volume 6 of Short Plats, Page 11, under Auditor's File No. 489752, records of Clallam County, Washington, being a portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter in Section 23, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M. More Accurately Described As: Lot 2 of Short Plat, recorded December 1, 1978 in Volume 6 of Short Plats, Page 11, under Clallam County recording no. 489752, being a portion of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 23, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam county, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 51 Alaska Way Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/24/07, recorded on 10/30/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1211420, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Bruce R. Carlson a single man, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Clift Enterprises Inc., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Clift Enterprises Inc., its successors and assigns to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1268081. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/01/2011 Monthly Payments $19,305.00 Late Charges $747.12 Lender's Fees & Costs $231.78 Total Arrearage $20,283.90 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $859.61 Statutory Mailings $19.52 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,654.13 Total Amount Due: $21,938.03 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $284,802.56, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Bruce R. Carlson 51 Alaska Way Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Bruce R. Carlson 51 Alaska Way Sequim, WA 98382 Bruce R. Carlson 109 North Ennis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Bruce R. Carlson 109 North Ennis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/27/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/27/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/01/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7081.22657) 1002.197488-FEI Pub: Oct. 2, 23, 2011


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Classified

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County, State of Washington

Director District No. 2

Gregory Colfax 181 Wispoo St, Neah Bay WA 98357

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the qualified voters of Clallam County, State of Washington, that on November 8, 2011 there will be held a General Election, conducted all by mail. The purpose of this election is to adopt or to reject State Measures, and to elect officials to various County, Port, Hospital, City, School, Fire, Park and Recreation, and Water District offices. Local candidates will appear only on the ballots within the special districts calling for such elections.

Director District No. 4

Donald R. Baker PO Box 1, Clallam Bay WA 98326

Director District No. 5

Tracey Rascon PO Box 506, Neah Bay WA 98357

Director District No. 1

David L. Dickson 9772 Oil City Rd, Forks WA 98331

Director District No. 3

Bill Rohde 251 Lupine Ave, Forks WA 98331

Director District No. 5

Starla Daman PO Box 338, Beaver WA 98305

Commissioner No .1

Gerry Morris PO Box 306, Beaver WA 98305

Commissioner No. 2 6-year short and full term

Chet Hunt 321 Evergreen Lp, Forks WA 98331

Commissioner No. 1

Tom Martin 103 Round Tree Rd, Port Angeles WA 98362

Commissioner No. 2

Richard Houts 133 Penny Ln, Sequim WA 98382

Commissioner No. 1

Ben Pacheco 90 Thompson Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Commissioner No. 2

Mary Elizabeth Bower 151 Kingo Ridge Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Commissioner No. 1

Bill Drath PO Box 171, Clallam Bay WA 98326

registration forms must be postmarked by this date

registration forms must be postmarked by this date A registered voter who fails to transfer his or her residential address by this deadline may vote according to his or her previous registration address. http://www.clallam.net/elections Below is a list of candidates, including addresses, which will appear on the ballot:

District No. 1

Jim McEntire (Prefers Republican Party) PO Box 631, Sequim WA 98382

Roy (Spider) Wright PO Box 254, Sekiu WA 98381

Linda Barnfather (Prefers Democrat Party) PO Box 793, Sequim WA 98382

Commissioner District No. 2 Commissioner District No. 2

Commissioner District No. 2 Position No. 1

Commissioner District No. 3 Position No. 2

Council Position No. 1 2-year unexpired term

Commissioner No. 1 6-year short and full term

Richard Chesmore PO Box 1222, Forks WA 98331

Commissioner Position No. 3

Melinda E. Griffith 206 Sanford Ln, Sequim WA 98382

Commissioner Position No. 4 4-year short and full term

Gill Goodman 71 Wright Rd, Sequim WA 98382

John B. Nutter John B. 2524, NutterPort Angeles WA 98362 PO Box PO Box 2524, Port Angeles WA 98362 Jeanne M. LaBrecque Jeanne LaBrecque 104 ParkM. Forest Dr, Port Angeles WA 98362 104 Park Forest Dr, Port Angeles WA 98362

Commissioner Position No. 5

Jan L. Richardson 670 Keeler Rd, Sequim WA 98382

John Miles 454 Striped John Miles Peak Rd, PortStriped Angeles WARd, 98363 454 Peak Port Angeles WA 98363 Jack Slowriver 132 E 11th St, Port Angeles WA 98362 Jack Slowriver 132 E 11th St, Port Angeles WA 98362

Commissioner Position No. 1 2-year unexpired term

Donald N. Grafstrom 884 Bear Creek Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Commissioner Position No. 2 2-year unexpired term

Laura Huling 907 S Forks Ave, Forks WA 98331

Commissioner Position No. 4 4-year short and full term

Nedra Reed 371 Flora Pl, Forks WA 98331

Commissioner Position No. 5

Gordon Gibbs 60 Maris Blvd, Forks WA 98331

Dan Di Guilio 1335 E 8th St, Port Angeles WA 98362

Commissioner Position No. 1 2-year unexpired term

Jim Larison 102 Fawnwood Pl, Sequim WA 98382

Noelle Fuller 108 E 1st St, Port Angeles WA 98362

Commissioner Position No. 2

Pepper Putnam 129 Harleman Dr, Sequim WA 98382

Sissi Bruch 518 W Lauridsen Blvd, Port Angeles WA 98362

Ballots for this election will be mailed to all qualified voters on October 19. Returned ballots must be postmarked or placed in a ballot drop box by November 8.

James Hallett PO Box 3048, Port Angeles WA 98362 Gerry Lane 1465 Bogachiel Way, Forks WA 98331

Andrew (Drew) Schwab 116 E 10th St, Port Angeles WA 98362

Sonu Deol 100 Harriette Ln, Sequim WA 98382

Brad Collins 2211 W 6th St, Port Angeles WA 98363 Council Position No. 5

Council Position No. 6

Don Perry PO Box 3116, Port Angeles WA 98362 Council Position No. 7

Cody Blevins 1117 W 5th St, Port Angeles WA 98363

Postage is required on all ballots returned by mail. If you are mailing your ballot on Election Day, be sure to check the postmark cut off time at your Post Office. Ballots bearing postmarks after November 8 will be considered late, and will not be accepted.

All drop boxes are available 24 hours a day. On Election Day ballots will be accepted in the drop boxes until 8:00 PM. Drop boxes are located at the following sites: _ Sequim Vehicle/Vessel Licensing 1001 E Washington St, Suite 5, Sequim, WA _ Sequim City Hall (Parking Loop) 152 W Cedar St, Sequim, WA _ Forks District Court 502 E Division St, Forks, WA _ Clallam County Courthouse 223 E 4th St, Port Angeles, WA (In the circular drive)

Voters who are unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office at the Courthouse. The Accessible Voting Unit will be available from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM weekdays starting October 19 through November 7, and from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM on Election Day, November 8. The front entrance to the County Courthouse is handicapped accessible.

If any voter does not receive their ballot, or needs a replacement ballot, they may visit our website at http://www.clallam.net/elections and click the icon, contact the Auditor’s Office at 360.417.2221 or Toll Free 1.866.433.8683, or come to the Auditor’s Office at 233 E 4th St, Port Angeles WA 98362.

An additional drop box is also available in the Auditor’s Office during business hours.

Cherie Kidd 101 E 10th St, Port Angeles WA 98362 Council Position No. 1

Juanita Weissenfels PO Box 212, Forks WA 98331 Giancarlo Buonpane 520 F St, Forks WA 98331

Council Position No. 4 4-year short and full term

Kevin Hinchen PO Box 2626, Forks WA 98331

Council Position No. 5

Michael D. Breidenbach PO Box 1832, Forks WA 98331

Council Position No. 1

Peter Duncan 91 Alpine Lp, Sequim WA 98382 Erik A. Erichsen 120 Valley Farm Ct, Sequim WA 98382

Council Position No. 2

Laura J. Dubois 644 W Summer Breeze Ln, Sequim WA 98382 John Miller 433 N Knapman Ave, Sequim WA 98382

Council Position No. 6

Ken Hays PO Box 322, Sequim WA 98382

Council Position No. 7

Candace Pratt 893 N Oxford Way, Sequim WA 98382

o o

Normal office hours are 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM. Election Day office hours are 7:00 AM – 8:00 PM.

The Canvassing Board of Clallam County, or their appointed designees, pursuant to RCW 29A.60.160, will hold open public meetings at the dates and times listed below. The meetings of the Canvassing Board are open public meetings under the applicable provisions of chapter 42.30 RCW, and each meeting shall be continued until the activity for which the meeting is held has been completed.

Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Eric J. Miller 452 W Hammond St, Sequim WA 98382 Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA Director Position No. 3

Patti Happe 2103 Monroe Rd, Port Angeles WA 98362

Director Position No. 4

Lonnie Linn 708 S Francis St, Port Angeles WA 98362

Director Position No. 5

Steven J. Baxter 4008 S C St Ext, Port Angeles WA 98363 Arlene Wheeler 2951 Lower Elwha Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Director Position No. 3

Trisha Haggerty 242 Whiskey Creek Beach Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Director Position No. 4

Susan Hopper 277 Bishop Rd, Port Angeles, WA 98363

Director Position No. 5

Tracey Grover 271 West Lyre River Rd, Port Angeles WA 98363

Director District No. 1

Sarah Bedinger 277 W Nelson Rd, Sequim WA 98382

Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA

Clallam County Elections Center Clallam County Courthouse, Basement Port Angeles, WA Dated at Port Angeles, Washington, this 2nd day of October 2011.

John Bridge 333 N Govan Ave, Sequim WA 98382

Director At Large, Position No. 5

Stephen Rosales 891 Thornton Dr, Sequim WA 98382 Walter Johnson 102 Owl Creek Ln, Sequim WA 98382

195134640

Director District No. 3

PATRICIA M. ROSAND CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR


Peninsula Daily News

â– for October 2, 2011

Sunday Fun

Dilbert by Scott Adams

Something to sell? Now you can place your classified ad Try our new classified wizard at www.peninsuladailynews.com

24/7!


2

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sunday Fun

Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

Classic Peanuts by Charles Schulz

For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston

Dennis the Menace by Hank Ketcham

Peninsula Daily News


Peninsula Daily News

Sunday Fun

Blondie by Dean Young and John Marshall

H A G A R the horrible by Dik Browne

The Wizard of Id by Jeff Parker

Sunday, October 2, 2011

3


4

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sunday Fun

Zits by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

B.C. by Mastroianni and Hart

Born Loser By Art and Chip Sansom

Peninsula Daily News


Alice Ramey nurse, cancer survivor

Inside ■  Kids are hard to get up for school ■  If you could give someone an award for outstanding service, who might it be and for what service? ■  Sexual assault leaves behind questions for woman

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, October 2, 2011 Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman


2

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Difficult to wake kids up for school EVERY SCHOOL YEAR, we go through great stress trying to get our three kids, ages 7, 9 and 11, woken up, dressed, fed and out the door for school. The biggest challenge is getting them out of bed to start their day. It doesn’t make for a very positive beginning for eight hours of school. What tips are there to help eliminate these crazy mornings?

Portland parent We used to go through this with our four kids. One morning the youngest needed to go into school a half hour earlier but knew the only way this

Parent to Parent Jodie Lynn was going to take place was if the others would get up. He went into his two sisters’ room and woke them up by bouncing on their beds and started a game of tag. The oldest boy was still asleep when the three of them jumped onto his bed, and everyone was laughing so hard that he joined into the chase as well. Turn

to

Lynn/4

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Best friend not happy about woman’s upcoming nuptials DEAR JOHN: MY best friend hasn’t talked to me since I got engaged. In fact, when I told her the great news, she tried to talk me out of it! She told me that my fiance is all wrong for me, and that, now that we’re older than 40, there’s no need to get married. She said: “It’s not as if you’re going to have kids, right?” That really steamed me. Even if that is the case, it upsets me that she can’t be happy for me. I think she needs to apologize, even if she doesn’t want to come to the wedding, not that I’d invite her now. What do you think? — Engaged and Upset in Boca Raton, Fla. Dear Engaged and Upset: What she said was insensitive, most assuredly. Had she expressed her

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John Gray is the author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@mars venusliving.com.

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he wants to give me time to “bond” with them. How can I put it politely to him that he should see us separately? — Not Stepmom Material in New York

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116208473

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

John Gray

she may feel about your fiance. Friendships do change when one person’s priorities shift, especially if that shift involves spending more time with someone else. If you cherish this friendship and I’m sure you do, reinforce that you also love and appreciate her. Then, back this up with action: stay in contact and set dates to see each other. In marriage, outside friendships are always important, so let her know how important she is to you.

Dear Not Stepmom Material: Something tells me that your boyfriend’s concerns about your fiance children have already before now? If she has, perpicked up on the fact that haps she’s has some knowlyou aren’t interested in edge of something you may their friendship. However, if you are not be aware of regarding interested in a relationship your fiance. with him, I suggest you Her honesty would be open your heart and mind appreciated and you should to them. tell her so, without making When in their presence, her feel as if you’ll “shoot the Doesn’t like his kids treat them with the same messenger” if she does so. Dear John: I can’t respect you’d hope they’d If she’s never expressed stand my new boyfriend’s treat you. Ask them quesconcerns about him, then children. I think they feel I’m sure it was an irratioas if I’m trying to take their tions about their lives and nal remark. Most likely mom’s place. Of course, I’m answer their own about you. Kids are people too. based more on her feelings not. In fact, it’s the last They quickly know if you’re thing I’d want to do. of concern for how your doing no more than toleratI prefer he see them marriage will affect your ing them. when I’m not around, but friendship, than anything If you haven’t realized it already, they will always take precedent with him. If you resent their place in his life, he may have to choose. Guess what? It won’t be Purchase a PDN photo them he drops, but you.

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

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love

Sunday, October 2, 2011

3

It’s all about the

Woman beats cancer with help from doctors, friends, family

By Diane Urbani de la Paz for

Peninsula Woman

PORT ANGELES ­— Alice Ramey calls them “an avalanche of angels.” In June 2010, Ramey received frightening news: She had breast cancer. “It was a complete surprise. Nobody in my family had had it. I have always been really healthy,” Ramey said. Yet Ramey, a keynote speaker at the sold-out Mad Hatter’s Tea this Friday in Sequim, did not get all that upset when given her diagnosis. A home health nurse at Olympic Medical Center, she worked for a few weeks before it hit her.

Facing the unknown “I called and said, ‘I don’t think I can come to work today,’” Ramey remembered. “And my supervisor said, ‘We’ve been expecting this.’” Facing surgery, chemotherapy and the unknown, “I was blubbering about ‘I don’t have anybody to take care of me.’” Then Ramey’s husband of 39 years, Dave, went to his computer. He sent out

an email. Then came the wave: friends, people from Independent Bible Church, more friends. So while Ramey has a relatively small family — she was an only child, and her parents Arthur and Viola Landry are deceased — she found herself engulfed in care. Whenever Dave, a real estate broker, wasn’t at her side, she had those “angels,” taking her to chemo treatments, calling and visiting.

ance; she underwent surgery July 25, 2010. That, as any cancer patient knows, was the beginning of a journey. It showed Ramey, a nurse for 40 years, the other side of healing. “There is emotional pain, and there is physical pain,” she said, adding that emotional pain can be the worst. But her experience has been that love from family — and friends who are like family — makes it bearable.

Helpful book

Showing up

Soon after learning she had cancer, a fellow nurse, the late Ellen DeBondt, found Ramey a pretty perfect book. It’s Not About the Hair, and Other Certainties of Life & Cancer is by Debra Jarvis, a chaplain — and former breast cancer patient — at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. “You read it, and you cry,” Ramey said. But the book is also filled with humor-leavened perspective from the author who’s known as “the irreverent reverend.” Ramey’s local oncologist, Dr. Thomas Kummet, advised her to go to the Seattle Cancer Care Alli-

The people who have, as she says, “shown up,” include the Rameys’ sons John, 33, and Adam, 31, both busy commercial electricians in Seattle. Even though Adam works very long hours, he made sure he was there to wheel his mother out when she was released from the hospital. As soon as Ramey was up to it, the family went to see Teatro Zinzanni, the “love, chaos and dinner” show in Seattle; Dave was festive in a top hat. Ramey plans on wearing that to the Mad Hatter’s Tea, which is a veritable pageant of headgear. Turn

to

Ramey/7

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

These days, Dave and Alice Ramey are celebrating their good health as well as their 39 years together.

“You don’t realize how much difference a little kindness makes until you’re the one on the receiving end.”

Alice Ramey nurse and cancer survivor


4

Sunday, October 2, 2011

8th annual Girls’ Night Out slated By Diane Urbani de la Paz for

Peninsula Woman

PORT TOWNSEND — From morning till night later this week, you can “unleash your inner leopard.” That’s the invitation from Mari Mullen, she of the Main Street Program and the eighth annual Girls’ Night Out, an extended stretch of shopping, sipping and supping this Thursday. The theme this year is “Wild About Girls’ Night Out,” which means everybody is urged to wear animal prints as they hit the uptown, the downtown and the in-between shops participating in the event, which benefits both Jefferson County Public Health and the nonprofit Main Street Program.

org and 360-385-7911. On Girls’ Night Out itself, women can enjoy special sales and services, such as chair massages and foot rubs at Uptown Nutrition, 1002 Lawrence St., organic tea tasting at Wild Sage, 924 Washington St., and treats at Elevated Ice Cream, 631 Water St. And later in the evening, Alchemy at 842 Washington St. will host a “wrap party,” with complimentary appetizers and desserts and a nohost bar. Admission is a suggested $5 donation for the party from 8 p.m. till about 9:30.

Two purposes

Girls’ Night Out is both a fund- and awareness-raiser for Jefferson County Public Health’s breast and cervical canAll day too cer screening fund, And “Girls’ Night Out is which provides mammograms and Pap tests for all day, too,” Mullen said, local women with little since the event officially or no medical insurance. starts at 11 a.m. and goes Julia Danskin, Jefferson till 8 p.m. Together, the 27 County Public Health’s businesses put on a womnursing director, thinks en’s solidarity celebration, along with a chance to sup- of Thursday’s event as another way to promote port good health and good women’s overall health. business in and around “My message for Port Townsend. Girls’ Night Out is that Among the new attracall women need to take tions this time are a draw- care of themselves,” she ing for a night at the said. “The American Resort at Port Ludlow with Cancer Society has a dinner at the Fireside Res- great website listing all taurant — a package worth the things we can do to $400 — winnable through stay healthy: www. a $5 raffle ticket. cancer.org/healthy/ The tickets are already index. on sale, along with the $10 “Women spend most Girls’ Night Out goodie of their time and energy bags full of gifts including taking care of others,” Ozone cotton socks and Danskin added. “Girls’ animal-print scarves. Night Out is a great Tickets and bags are on opportunity to have fun sale now at many Port and encourage all Townsend shops; details women to take care of are at www.PTMainStreet. ourselves.”

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Anniversary

Jan and Ray Morgan on their wedding day.

Jan and Ray Morgan today.

The Morgans Ray and Jan Morgan of Port Angeles celebrated their 50th anniversary Aug. 27 with a renewal of their vows and a 5 p.m. Mass at Queen of Angels Church in Port Angeles. Father Thomas Nathe officiated. After Mass, the Morgans and more than 100 family members and friends enjoyed a dinner, dance and reception at the

Red Lion Hotel. The cake top and cake knife were from their 1961 wedding, and three members of the original wedding party were present. Ray Morgan married Janet Grenfell on Aug. 26, 1961, at St. Rita’s Catholic Church in Kellogg, Idaho. After graduating from the University of Idaho with a degree in chemical engineering, Mr. Morgan

worked for Northwest Petro­ Chemical in Anacortes. The couple came to Port Angeles in 1962. Mr. Morgan was hired as senior chemist by Crown Zellerbach and retired from Daishowa as technical manager in October 1999. Mrs. Morgan graduated from Providence Hospital School of Radiology in Seattle and worked for Dr. W.R. Duncan, retiring in

May 1996. She also works part time for Gross’s Nursery-Florist. The Morgans are active as volunteers at Queen of Angels Church and school, where Mr. Morgan oversees all maintenance. The couple’s family includes son Jeff Morgan of Gig Harbor and daughter Julie Millsap of Port Angeles. They also have six grandchildren.

Lynn: Prepare the night before Continued from 2 night before is imperative. Setting out their clothes, shoes, socks and accessoFrom then on, they ries, as well as packing made a game out of it where each one got to come their backpacks with books up with a way to wake the and school supplies will others up and the four of make the mornings run them voted on which one much smoother once they was the most fun. are up. The winner of the most There are some pretty unique wake-up strategy cool alarm clocks on the got to choose what we ate market today that come for dinner, movie and one with a wide array of variother family activity once a ous types of alarms. The month. kids have a great selection — Jordan Smith to choose from. Once they in Portland, Ore. seem to tune out the sound of the alarm, change it to a From Jodie different option. Some let them record Since your challenge is their own noises or words getting them out of the bed, being organized the to wake up to. It can be as

loud, wacky or weird as they want. Many alarm clocks play mp3s and/or CDs, so your kids could wake up to their favorite song or maybe one that particularly energizes and pumps them up. Then, each child will have an unusual sound to help wake them up in the mornings. To make things less hectic, try to be organized yourself before waking them up. This will provide you with more of an opportunity to be relaxed, calm and patient when an inevitable situation occurs that needs your direct attention.

Can you help? I recently had my third child, and the second one seems to be reverting back to babyhood. Among many things, she also wants me to hold and rock her like I do the new baby. She is almost 3, and I hate to see her become so upset when I spend time with the infant. What can I do to help her make the transition without feeling guilty?

________

Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2contact@ parenttoparent.com via e-mail.


Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Woman

Sunday, October 2, 2011

5

Weddings Chaney — Critchfield Nicole Robyn Critchfield and Kohry Alan Chaney, both of Port Angeles, were married Sept. 10 at the Moose Lodge in Port Angeles. Kelli Sweeney officiated at the 3 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of April Perry of Bainbridge Island and Ronald Critchfield of Port Angeles. The groom is the son of Donna Arnold of Longview. Veronica Critchfield was maid of honor, and Amanda Perry-Gentry, Ashley Harsh, Danielle Ruzicka and Tina Lee were bridesmaids. Jacob Lee was best man, and Joey Galvin, Brian Graham, Justin Tarver and Jerry Jacobson Nichole and were groomsmen. Anna Menkal and Jaelynne Lee were flower girls, and Kole Sonnabend and Rylen Lee were ringbearers. The bride graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2007. She is employed by

Kohry Chaney Joshua’s Restaurant. The groom graduated from Port Angeles High School in 2006 and is employed by Evergreen Towing. The couple live in Port Angeles.

Simon — Hoveskeland Kim Hoveskeland of Port Angeles and Matt Simon of Sequim were married Aug. 13 at the Old Fairview Bible Church. Calvin Roedell officiated at the 12:30 p.m. ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Helen Brandt Hoveskeland of Port Angeles and Steve Hoveskeland of Twisp; the groom is the son of Camille Reid Simon of Sequim and the late Glenn Simon. Scott Hoveskeland gave the bride away, and Staci Almaden, the bride’s sister, was matron of honor, while Patrick Simon was best man and Hanna Almaden was the candlelighter. The main color of the ceremony was purple: a Matt and Kim Simon combination of pink for females and blue for males. uated from Sequim High School in 1980. The couple were married in the church The couple honeymooned in Ocean they attended as youths. The bride graduated from Port Angeles Shores and along the Oregon coast. They High School in 1983, and the groom grad- live in Sequim.

Courts — Nightingale Emily Louise Nightingale and Jeffrey Daniel Courts, both of Oklahoma City, were married Aug. 21 in Port Gamble. Roger Yarrow officiated at the 3 p.m. ceremony. The bride, born in Port Angeles, is the daughter of James Nightingale of Port Angeles and the late Katie Nightingale. The groom is the son of Sherry and Craig Courts of Poway, Calif. Katie Leffers was matron of honor, and Linda Weidner, Chrissy Grantz, Jessie Allen and Britney King were bride’s attendants. Emily and Jeffrey Courts Matt Henry was best man, and Chris Gibson, State College. She is a nursing student Chris Kreitzer, Kyle Weidner, Nick Luni and a member of the Air Force Reserve. and Lisa Courts were groom’s attendants. The groom graduated from Poway High Zoe and Lily Leffers were flower girls, School in 2000. He is a staff sergeant in and Zak Alton was ringbearer. the Air Force. The couple will honeymoon at a later The bride graduated from Orting High date. They live in Oklahoma City. School in 2004 and is attending Rose

Marriage Licenses Clallam County Kenneth Eugene Lamb, 37, and Shila Lyn Homan, 42; both of Sequim. Frank William Romeo, 70, and Melody Williams, 64; both of Port Angeles. Tearsa Marie Peterson, 35, and Ty Carl Pervin, 43; both of Denver. Bonnie Marie Semonick and Justin Derek Carver; both 30 and both of Sequim. Jacob Emmanuel Blume, 21, and Rachel Lee Ann Torrence, 20; both of Sequim.

Huyen Le Hoang, 24, of Sydney, Australia, and Joshua Michael McDougall, 28, of Port Angeles.

Jefferson County Aimee Annette Miller, 39, and Eric Allen Iverson, 37; both of Portland, Ore. Juan Mario Cuvertino, 71, of Port Hadlock, and Judith Ann Johnson, 64, of Seattle. Karl William Saul, 63, and Penelope Jean Hamisch, 65; both of Port Ludlow.

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in

Peninsula Daily News


6

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Woman

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Generations

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Ramey: Showing up

most important thing

Continued from 3 interest in what was around the next bend in In her speech at the tea, the trail. Ramey’s friends showed Ramey hopes to convey a up, time and again, with simple message. each new procedure: Sally Photos and interviews by Dave Logan “The most important thing you can do for some- Wilder went with her when she had the JP drain body is to show up,” she removed, and it didn’t hurt said. “Your presence is the a bit. best. A phone call is good, More friends, as well as too. It’s good to hear some- her cousin Barbara Pelett, body’s voice,” and sending a came and stayed with her card is OK. But to her, a during the chemotherapy personal visit is tops. treatments that started in Gentleness makes all September 2010. Ramey the difference, Ramey was grateful for Sequim’s Olympic Medical Cancer added. After surgery, she Center, which enabled her had to have a Jackson Pratt drain put in, to drain to have her infusions close her body of excess fluid. In to home. her years of nursing, Complications Ramey has put JP drains into many a patient. But by December, Ramey was suffering from Kindnesses a baffling shortness of breath. It grew worse, until “You don’t realize how she had to go to the emermuch difference a little gency room. Ramey had kindness makes,” she said, pneumonia, a complication “until you’re the one on the that a small percentage of receiving end.” patients get from the Ramey had to stay chemo drug Methotrexate. “Cherie Trebon of home from work for five “Belinda Rumble. She “My mother, Teresa She spent Christmas in weeks due to that JP drain. the hospital; Dave sent out Port Angeles. She is the lives here in PA and is Beausoleil. Then, in August, when she an email on this fact. In organizer of the Forest in her 60s, I think. I “My mother is an at last could go out and came “more presents, more Storytellers Festival. It have worked with her at amazing woman. She play a little, her women flowers, more love,” Ramey is coming up in midConcerned Citizens. has struggled with friends took her kayaking. marveled. October, I believe. “She works with cancer at times. And This is what Ramey The pneumonia, how“She is very busy disabled people. She is she takes care of my ever, was reason enough for talks about when she with a lot of things, but always very patient and brothers who have remembers the beginnings her to quit chemotherapy, she is passionate about kind and understanding physical problems. One of recovery: paddling across at least according to her the power of of the people she works of my brothers recently Lake Sutherland, then hav- doctor. ing pizza and M&M’s for storytelling. She herself with. I have seen her at had a traumatic brain Determined to finish lunch. tells stories as well as the home where I work injury, and she cares for Also in August, Dave But Ramey would have finds others to come and she is always him now at home. She took her up to the Paradise none of it. She was deterand share their talents. smiling and positive. I works full-time besides Inn on Mount Rainier. mined to finish. And so she “I’d call her award “It’s one of my favorite see her, too, out in the taking care of them. went bald — “when you ‘The Power of the community at different “She is my hero. She places in the world,” said lose your hair, you look like Story.’” an egg” — and went ahead times. puts everyone ahead of Ramey, whose mother, Viola Landry, taught her with the chemo. She even “She is one of the herself. My mom is all about hiking. Landry, celebrated, with ice cream kindest persons I know.” amazing.” who moved from Bremercake at the cancer center ton to Port Angeles in 1980, on her birthday March 8, Janet Lamont, 65 Pam Rogers, 53 Colene Ellis, 33 was a member of the Over and with a tiara and a educator caregiver pharmacy technician the Hill hiking club, and “Good-Bye Chemo” song Port Angeles Port Angeles Port Angeles known for her unflagging she wrote for April 9, the

Perspectives of three Peninsula women

This week’s question: If you could give someone an award for outstanding service, who might it be and for what service?

7

day of her last treatment. “The linear accelerator is the best / Where they scribble with markers on your chest/ For the chemo, radiation and the knife/ Want to thank you all for saving my life,” the last verse goes. Ramey plans on handing out lyric sheets at the Mad Hatter’s Tea on Friday, so everybody can belt it out together. Pelett has watched her cousin face her illness with an attitude that blends of the spiritual and the temporal.

Faith “Alice has deep religious faith. She prayed a lot,” Pelett said. “And being a reasonably practical person, whenever she was feeling nauseous and needed something to settle her stomach, she went for wholesome foods. So she didn’t put on a lot of weight during her chemotherapy.” Pelett added that Ramey’s husband and her friends gave her unstinting moral support — along with cleaning the house when she was convalescing. These days, Ramey is back to work and then some. She went to Seattle twice last week: to see her doctor and to attend the a chronic care management training at the Holiday Inn at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. And in her Mad Hatter’s speech, Ramey will affirm what the tea is about: friendship and healing. “If you let people take care of you, and show you how they feel,” Ramey said, “it’s so much better.”


8

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sexual assault leaves behind questions WHEN NATALIE WAS 13, she began baby-sitting for a neighborhood family with two little girls. “The mother and I would often talk and see each other around the neighborhood,” she said. “I barely knew the father and only remember calling him Mr. Whatever and answering ‘Yes, sir’ and ‘No, sir’ to his questions.” When Natalie was 15, the Whatever family moved eight miles away. The first time they asked her to sit for them, they asked if she’d also watch their nextdoor neighbor’s children. The two couples were going out together. When they returned home, the two fathers got in a car to drive Natalie back.

Climbed in back “A block from their homes, the neighbor dad pulled over, and the dad I knew climbed into the back seat with me and said, ‘I’ve always fantasized about making out with the baby sitter,’” she said. “I could smell liquor on his breath. The neighbor drove around while Mr. Whatever kissed and groped me. I cried and begged him to stop. “After what was probably a much shorter time than it seemed, the neighbor pulled over and the men changed places,” she said. “I was hysterical. The neighbor was not nearly as

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

enthusiastic as the father I knew, and they soon took me home. “The neighbor walked me to the door and tried to give me an extra $20. I remember screeching at him to get away from me, and once I was in the screen door, I said, ‘I hope you remember this when your daughter is old enough to baby-sit.’ “Needless to say, I never went there again,” she said. “The mother told neighbors that I was almost 16, boy crazy and didn’t want to baby-sit anymore. I never told anyone what happened.”

and I told them the whole story,” she said. “My mother said, ‘What did you do to make him think you were that kind of girl?’ My father said, ‘Why didn’t you tell us?’ “I said because I knew everyone — just like my own mother — would think I had in some way caused this. “If you had asked, I

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S

would have said that this incident had no real impact on me,” she said. “It was just something bad that happened in the past, but as I write this I’m shaking. “Did these men deserve to be labeled child molesters or sex offenders? Did they deserve to go to jail or lose their wives and families over this?” she asked. “I don’t know. It seems

APPAREL

harsh, but they did molest a child. “I know Mr. Whatever read Playboy because I saw it in the bathroom,” she said. “Is this where he learned to fantasize about making out with the baby sitter? Was alcohol the deciding factor? Was this something they never would have done on their own, but with a friend they

felt free to try? Were they just perverts?” Readers, Natalie has asked a lot of questions. What do you think?

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront. com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

D AY PA C K S

BAGS

Mom faults her About 10 years later, Natalie was visiting her parents when her mother asked if she remembered Mr. Whatever. Her mother said, “He dropped dead of a heart attack last week, and he was only in his 40s.” Natalie said, “It couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy.” “Of course, my parents asked why I’d said that,

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