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A good chance of showers today B10

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS August 27, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Port boots Hallett as president Recent controversies are at heart of vote BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Jim Hallett was replaced Monday as president of the Port of Port Angeles Hallett Board of Commissioners by his fellow two commissioners in the wake of controversy surrounding former Executive Director Jeff Robb’s resignation. Commissioner Paul McHugh also suggested that Robb reassume his position as executive director, but that went unsupported by Hallett and Commissioner John Calhoun. Calhoun, president in 2012, had joined McHugh in voting Hallett to the top spot in January. He was voted back as president until officers are chosen after the Nov. 5 general election. Hallett is now the board’s secretary-treasurer, while McHugh — already eliminated from the November election — remains its vice president. Hallett, a former Port Angeles city councilman and mayor who was elected to the port board in 2012, said in a later interview that he was not surprised at being replaced as board president. He voted for his own

removal and for Calhoun to become board president. “I suppose I could say I’m relieved, but that wouldn’t be a true statement,” Hallett said. “There’s a clear difference in philosophy, so that’s probably all I would want to comment on that.” McHugh will be replaced in January by either port Director of Business Development Colleen McAleer, who filed a port-lease-related whistle-blower complaint, or event services company coowner Del DelaBarre. McAleer and DelaBarre bested McHugh in the Aug. 6 primary.

Made the motion McHugh moved to have Hallett removed as board president. He said “revelations” in recent weeks centering on the June 24 resignation of Robb showed that Hallett no longer speaks for the rest of the board. Hallett was the lone vote against Robb’s new contract as director of environmental affairs through July 2014 at the same $138,000 salary he made as executive director. TURN

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First responders work on extracting a victim from a vehicle that collided with another car Sunday night at the intersection of Kitchen-Dick and Woodcock roads in Sequim.

Three sent to hospitals in 2-car Sequim wreck T-bone crash at Woodcock

Identities of those involved in the crash or their updated conditions were not available Monday afternoon because no report had been filed by Clallam County sheriff’s deputies who responded.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Called to scene about 8:30 p.m.

SEQUIM –– A girl passenger was transported to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, and two men reportedly were taken to Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles after a two-car crash at the intersection of KitchenDick and Woodcock roads Sunday night.

Tony Hudson, assistant chief for Clallam County Fire District No. 3, reported Monday that medics were called to the crash scene at around 8:30 p.m. Sunday. Hudson said that the drivers of the two cars involved in the “T-bone” crash had been taken to Olympic

Sequim seeing high turnover in school staff

Forks show rises from hall’s ashes BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

Medical Center. The juvenile passenger was airlifted to Harborview. Hudson said emergency crews did not get the identities of those involved or specifics on the crash. Ron Cameron, chief criminal deputy with the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office, said deputies had a heavy caseload of arrests over the weekend, which made a report on the crash a low priority because it does not involve criminal charges. Cameron expected a report on the crash would be issued by Monday evening.

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY JOE SMILLIE

FORKS — In the catastrophic fire that burned the Rainforest Arts Center, all was destroyed — save two elements. The Rainforest Players and their desire to make good theater.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

‘Terrible loss’ in October The October fire that destroyed the former International Order of Odd Fellows hall and an adjacent store building dealt the troupe “a terrible loss,” said Lela Kriebel, a Rainforest Player for about 30 years. Costumes, lighting and all of the other equipment: “ashes.” “But a group is not the things it’s accumulated,” Kriebel said. “It’s the

The Rainforest Players include Liane White, Curt White, Steve Kriebel and Ellen Matheny, from left. people you work with.” This week, the Rainforest Players will present their first production since the fire: “Mr. Pim Passes By,” a sendup of high British society by A.A. Milne. Dr. Steve Kriebel, Lela Kriebel’s husband, portrays Carraway Pim, the

man who appears out of nowhere and throws a proper British household into utter turmoil. Lela directs the show and plays the housekeeper, Anne. TURN

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SEQUIM –– Twenty-three new employees will start work at Sequim School District when classes begin Sept. 4, a trend that is expected to continue in future years as a large portion of the district’s staff reaches retirement age. “We’re going to continue to have a higher rate of retirees each year,” said Karen Sande, the district’s human resources director. Seventeen of the 23 new hires are teachers. Eight of the them have no prior teaching experience, Sande said. The cadre of teachers at Sequim High School will have five rookie teachers this year, plus three who begin the new school year with three years or fewer of teaching experience.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL

B5 B5 B4 A9 B4 B4 A10 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER WORLD

B7 B1 B10 A3


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UpFront

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Miley Cyrus, Timberlake own VMAs IT MAY NOT be a good thing for her, but Miley Cyrus had the most memorable moment at the MTV Video Music Awards. The provocative pop singer was the hot topic at Sunday night’s show: Cyrus eclipsed Timberlake Lady Gaga’s opening performance of her new single, Katy Perry’s closing rendition of Thicke her latest hit and Kanye West’s artsy set. The 20-year-old even grabbed more attention than Justin Timberlake’s performance with his ’N Sync band mates.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miley Cyrus arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday at the Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Cyrus twerked and gyrated, stripped and swayed. She sang, too. She had a helper at the VMAs: Robin Thicke. After performing her edgy hit, “We Can’t Stop,” she stripped off her outfit to reveal a nude bikini. She sang the first verse of Thicke’s “Blurred Lines,” then grinded on the R&B singer and made suggestive moves with a foam hand.

The wild child also slapped a girl’s buttocks onstage. It was an eye-popping performance, much like the party she’s having in her music video for “We Can’t Stop,” one of the most popular on YouTube. Within hours, the Buzzfeed site was posting the “15 Weirdest and Craziest Moments” from Cyrus’ performance, which was aired live from the Barclays Center in New York. Though they were attention grabbers and nominated for four moonmen each, Thicke and Cyrus walked away empty-handed. Timberlake earned three awards, including video of the year and best male video for “Mirrors.” Days ahead of the VMAs, his rumored reunion with ’N Sync dominated headlines, and he and his former band mates delivered at the awards show. As Timberlake performed a medley of his solo hits, JC Chasez, Lance Bass, Joey Fatone and Chris Kirkpatrick emerged from the bottom of the stage in suits to sing some lines from their hits “Girlfriend” and “Bye, Bye, Bye.”

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL SUNDAY’S QUESTION: Should the U.S. get involved in the Syrian turmoil, in which chemical weapons apparently were used last week? Yes

Passings

Only with NATO

By The Associated Press

MURIEL “MICKIE” SIEBERT, 80, who started as a trainee on Wall Street and became the first woman to own a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, has died of complications of cancer. Ms. Siebert died Saturday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Her Ms. Siebert death was in 1977 confirmed by Jane Macon, a director of Siebert Financial and a partner at the law firm Norton Rose Fulbright. Ms. Siebert was founder and president of brokerage firm that bears her name, Muriel Siebert & Co. Inc. The company went public in 1996 as Siebert Financial Corp. Macon said Ms. Siebert was “a fabulous woman, a trailblazer and a pioneer” who set a high standard for those who entered the financial world after her. Ms. Siebert, who was born in Cleveland and moved to New York in 1954 at age 22, started her career as a trainee in research at Bache & Co. earning $65 a week.

7.0%

She bought a seat on the New York Stock Exchange in December 1967 after months of struggling with the male-dominated business world that initially resisted her efforts to join. She established her investment firm the same year and transformed it into a discount brokerage house in 1975. Ms. Siebert took a leave of absence from the company in 1977 and placed it in a blind trust to be run by the employees when she was appointed the first woman superintendent of banking for the State of New York by Gov. Hugh Carey.

________ RICHARD “DICK” THIEN, 73, a veteran journalist who played a pivotal role in developing USA Today for Gannett Co. Inc., has died. Mr. Thien died Friday of natural causes at Missouri Baptist Hospital in suburban St. Louis, his son, Mark Thien, said Monday. Mr. Thien was a two-time cancer survivor. In 1981, Gannett’s CEO, Al Neuharth, chose Mr. Thien to be one of five prototype editors for USA

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

Laugh Lines

Today, the nation’s first national general-interest newspaper that made its debut the following year. USA Today immediately made a splash with its colorful look, frequent use of graphics and shorter, tighter stories, setting a trend followed by many newspapers around the world. Mr. Thien was described in the book The Making of McPaper: The Inside Story of USA Today, as “a gruff, cigar-chewing type who barked like an old-time city editor.” The Associated Press named Mr. Thien one of the 12 best editors in the country in 1986. It was among many awards he won in a career that spanned more than four decades.

38.6%

No

51.7%

Undecided 2.6% Total votes cast: 872 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■ To clarify, Scarsella Brothers Inc., based in Kent, is under contract to Clallam County to build the Deer Park Road underpass east of Port Angeles. The second paragraph in a report Monday on Page A1 of the Clallam County edition and Page A6 of the Jefferson County edition confused the con-

tractor’s hometown with the entity with which it holds a contract.

________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews. com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) A construction project to improve Olympic Highway between Mount Walker and Jackson Cove south of Quilcene has been completed by the contracting firm of Allen and Govan. Louis Elterich, formerly of Port Angeles who is now associated with the firm, reports that the 3.2-mile project eliminated dangerous curves and grades that slowed traffic on the highway, which is Primary State Highway 9 [now U.S. 101]. The contract price was $96,936.

A CROW CHASING a coffee cup blowing around in circles in the parking lot THE SECRET SERof a Port Angeles grocery VICE is asking people on Twitter to report any suspi- store . . . cious tweets. WANTED! “Seen Around” So now if your boss Send them to PDN News catches you on Twitter, just items. Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles 1963 (50 years ago) tell him you’re protecting WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or the country. A 63-year-old man who email news@peninsuladailynews. Conan O’Brien com. was threatened, tied and

gagged, gave the alarm that led to the capture of two escapees from the Clallam Bay Honor Camp. Ben Hughes, a state highways maintenance man, entered his home near Joyce to find a man holding his rifle. Hughes ran at the man and grabbed the rifle, but a second man came up from the rear and subdued him. Both tied Hughes to a kitchen chair and gagged him. Then they drove off in his car. Getting angrier by the moment, Hughes worked himself free and hailed a passing car on the state highway. The two escapees were eastbound on U.S. Highway 101 in Hughes’ car when

Jefferson County deputies stopped and arrested them at a roadblock east of Gardiner.

1988 (25 years ago) Residents of Sequim are preparing for a Diamond Jubilee Festival celebrating the 75th anniversary of the city’s incorporation. The main festivities, to be held Oct. 14-15, will include a beard-growing contest, fireworks, an antique car show, arts and crafts fair, Native American dances and square dances. The city was incorporated in 1913 and now is one of the fastest-growing communities on the North Olympic Peninsula. The city alone has a population of 3,180.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS TUESDAY, Aug. 27, the 239th day of 2013. There are 126 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On August 27, 1883, the island volcano Krakatoa erupted with a series of cataclysmic explosions. The resulting tidal waves in Indonesia’s Sunda Strait claimed some 36,000 lives in Java and Sumatra. On this date: ■ In 1776, the Battle of Long Island began during the Revolutionary War as British troops attacked American forces, who ended up being forced to retreat two days later.

■ In 1859, Edwin L. Drake drilled the first successful oil well in the United States at Titusville, Pa. ■ In 1942, the Times of London published an editorial calling on the British government to promote the production of penicillin, the first mention of the antibiotic by a newspaper. ■ In 1957, the USS Swordfish, the second Skate Class nuclear submarine, was launched from the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine. ■ In 1962, the United States launched the Mariner 2 space probe, which flew past Venus in

December 1962. ■ In 1963, author, journalist and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois died in Accra, Ghana, at 95. ■ In 1967, Brian Epstein, 32, manager of the Beatles, was found dead in his London flat from an overdose of sleeping pills. ■ In 1989, the first U.S. commercial satellite rocket was launched from Cape Canaveral, Fla. — a Delta booster carrying a British communications satellite, the Marcopolo 1. ■ Ten years ago: A granite monument of the Ten Commandments that became a lightning rod in a legal storm over the separa-

tion of church and state was wheeled from the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court building as protesters knelt, prayed and chanted, “Put it back!” ■ Five years ago: A federal judge in Boise, Idaho, sentenced longtime sex offender Joseph Edward Duncan III to death for the 2005 kidnapping, torture and murder of 9-year-old Dylan Groene. ■ One year ago: Republicans opened their national convention in Tampa, Fla., a day late, then immediately adjourned as Tropical Storm Isaac surged toward New Orleans and the northern Gulf Coast.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, August 27, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Fort Hood trial in sentencing phase in Texas

Trayvon Martin petition

WASHINGTON — NAACP President Ben Jealous said he plans to turn over petitions with millions of signatures calling on the Department of Justice to pursue charges against George FORT HOOD, Texas — Zimmerman for violating TrayJurors deciding whether to von Martin’s civil rights. impose a rare military death Zimmerman was acquitted sentence on the Army psychiatrist who fatally shot 13 people by a Florida court for the Februat Fort Hood in 2009 heard testi- ary 2012 shooting death of mony Monday from victims and 17-year-old Martin, who was their families, including a soldier unarmed. who was shot in the head. Martin has emerged as a Staff Sgt. recurring symbol at protests of Patrick continued unequal treatment of Ziegler was blacks and other minorities. among the His mother was among the first people to speakers at Saturday’s events testify during marking the 50th anniversary of the sentencthe March on Washington for ing phase of Jobs and Freedom. Images of Maj. Nidal the slain teenager were disHasan’s trial. played on T-shirts and signs. Hasan Military jurors conGuards escort students victed Hasan last week for the CHICAGO — Busy, unfamilattack that also wounded 30 iar streets were made a bit people at the military base. Ziegler said he was shot four friendlier Monday, the first day times and underwent emergency of school in Chicago, thanks to hundreds of newly hired safety surgery that removed about 20 guards. But some parents percent of his brain. He told expressed doubt the effort would jurors that doctors initially expected him to die or remain in protect their children, who now must cross gang boundaries to a vegetative state. Instead, he get to their new classrooms after was hospitalized for about 11 their old ones closed. months and had 10 surgeries, The Safe Passage program and his injuries left him paraguards in neon vests lined city lyzed on his left side. streets in neighborhoods with The sentencing phase will allow surviving victims and rel- closed schools. Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who atives of those killed to tell called Monday “a new beginjurors how the shooting ramning” for the district, planned to page has affected their lives. join students on the South Side. Ziegler was among three solThe Associated Press diers expected to testify.

2nd Afghan veteran gets Medal of Honor THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama bestowed the nation’s highest military honor, the Medal of Honor, on Army Staff Sgt. Ty Carter on Monday in the East Room of the White House, saluting the veteran of the war in Afghanistan as “the essence of true heroism,” one still engaged in a battle against the lingering emotional fallout of war. Carter, who was raised in Spokane, risked his life to save an injured soldier, resupply ammunition and render first aid during intense fighting in a remote mountain outpost four years ago. As an Army specialist, Carter had sprinted from his barracks into a ferocious firefight, a daylong battle on Oct. 3, 2009, that killed eight fellow soldiers as they tried to defend their outpost from the onslaught of a much larger force of Taliban and local fighters. Still suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome, Carter stood nearly emotionless during the ceremony, though a faint smile crossed his face near the

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama hangs the Medal of Honor around the neck Staff Sgt. Ty Carter on Monday. end that turned into a broad grin as Obama hung the metal and its blue ribbon around his neck. In February, Obama bestowed the Medal of Honor on another survivor of that firefight, former

Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha. Carter, 33, is a former Marine who later enlisted in the Army and is currently assigned to the 7th Infantry Division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma.

Briefly: World Snipers strike vehicle carrying U.N. inspector DAMASCUS, Syria — Snipers opened fire Monday and struck one of the vehicles in a U.N. convoy carrying a team investigating the alleged use of chemical weapons outside of Damascus, a U.N. spokesman said. The Syrian government accused rebel forces of firing at the team, while the opposition said a pro-government militia was behind the attack. Activists said the inspectors eventually arrived in Moadamiyeh, a western suburb of the capital and one of the areas where last week’s attack allegedly occurred. They said the team members spent three hours at a makeshift hospital, meeting with doctors and taking samples from victims before they headed back to Damascus. Meanwhile, Secretary of State John Kerry said that chemical weapons were used last week and accused President Bashar Assad of destroying evidence. Kerry called the Aug. 21 attack a “moral obscenity” that should shock the conscience of the world. He said the U.S. has additional information about the attack that wiill be made public.

Derailment toll rises CHONTALPA, Mexico — The death toll in the derailment of a cargo train carrying at least 250

Honduran migrants trying to make their way to the United States is now at six, officials said Monday. Mexico’s National Institute of Migration said another five migrants were hospitalized with serious injuries suffered early Sunday morning as they rode on the roof of the train, or tied between the cars to keep from slipping onto the tracks. The dead migrants were between 19 and 58 years old. Rescue workers were trying to move the eight derailed cars Monday morning to see if more people were trapped below.

Greek treasure hunters ATHENS, Greece — Police have arrested three armed men who allegedly broke into a Greek monastery, tied up monks and planned to search for treasure with a mechanical digger. They were caught Sunday when a friar who avoided capture phoned police before the digging could start at the Orthodox Monastery of St. George near Aliartos, northwest of Athens. It was rebuilt in modern times on medieval ruins. The four monks who were captured along with the mother of one of them were not hurt. Police said four other suspects in the attack are being sought and quoted the captured suspects as saying they had planned to search for buried coins, not religious artifacts. Illegal treasure hunting has become increasingly popular during Greece’s economic crisis. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rim Fire burns along state Highway 120 near Yosemite National Park on Sunday.

Yosemite wildfire threatens San Francisco water supply THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUOLUMNE CITY, Calif. — Crews working to contain one of California’s largest-ever wildfires gained some ground Monday against the flames threatening San Francisco’s water supply, several towns near Yosemite National Park and historic giant sequoias. Containment of the Rim Fire more than doubled to 15 percent, although it was within a mile of the park’s Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the source of San Francisco’s famously pure drinking water, officials said Monday. “We’re paying a lot of attention to that,” said Glen Stratton, an operations section chief on the fire. San Francisco water authorities were scrambling to fill area

Quick Read

reservoirs with water from Hetch Hetchy before ash taints supplies, said Harlan Kelly Jr., general manager of the city’s Public Utilities Commission. The city is able to move water quickly out of Hetch Hetchy because of a multibillion-dollar improvement to the piping system.

State of emergency declared The threat to the city’s utilities prompted Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency for San Francisco. The governor planned to visit a fire base camp Monday to meet with state and federal emergency officials. Kelly said the city has a sixmonth supply of water on hand. If

ash causes turbidity, it will have to filter supplies. He was unsure how much that would cost. The agency also was checking 12 miles of hydroelectric transmission lines that supply city facilities with power. An emergency declaration has allowed the city to spend $600,000 for power on the open market. The fire also posed a threat to giant sequoias in Yosemite National Park. Crews were activating sprinklers and lighting fires to clear brush, though the fire remained several miles from the massive trees, Stratton said. Another part of the fire that is also burning into the park was not of major concern because it was running into rocks, Stratton said.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Arizona inmate will testify in N.M. murder case

Nation: Newtown school shooter’s records sought

Nation: Pair wed 65 years die only 11 hours apart

World: Teen survives flight in wheel well of a jetliner

THE CAPITAL MURDER trial of an Arizona inmate accused of killing an Oklahoma couple after breaking out of prison resumed Monday in Albuquerque, N.M., with prosecutors calling a fellow inmate to the witness stand. The prosecution’s case against John McCluskey hinges partly on the testimony of inmate Tracy Province. The two, along with an accomplice, sparked a nationwide manhunt when they escaped from a medium-security prison near Kingman, Ariz., in 2010. Prosecutors said the trio targeted Gary and Linda Haas of Tecumseh, Okla., at a rest stop near the TexasNew Mexico state line.

A PORTRAIT OF a highly isolated young man is emerging as a state office investigating the Newtown, Conn., school shooter seeks the release of his educational records. Connecticut’s child advocate office is seeking Adam Lanza’s records as part of an investigation with its Child Fatality Review Panel into last year’s massacre of 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The 20-year-old Lanza killed himself after the shootings. Faith Vos Winkel, assistant child advocate, said a theme is emerging of a very isolated child. She said the case is like a puzzle for which they have only a few pieces.

RELATIVES OF AN Ohio couple who died at a nursing home 11 hours apart on the same day said their love story’s ending reflects their devotion over 65 years of marriage. Harold and Ruth Knapke died in their shared room Aug. 11, days before their 66th anniversary, The Dayton Daily News reported. Their daughters said they believe their father willed himself to stay by his wife’s side despite failing health. He went first, and she followed. “We believe he wanted to accompany her out of this life and into the next one, and he did,” daughter Margaret Knapke said.

A YOUNG TEENAGER dashed across a runway at a Nigerian airport, hid in the wheel well of a jet and survived a 35-minute domestic flight, airline and aviation officials said Sunday. Passengers and crew had alerted the pilots that a boy was seen running to the plane as it taxied to take off Saturday from Benin City, Arik Airline spokesman Ola Adebanji said. The pilots alerted the country’s aviation agency, he said. The incident highlighted concerns about airport security in Nigeria, which is fighting an Islamic uprising mainly in the northeast of the country, where there is a state of emergency.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

New school year marked by run/walk PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

T

he route will be

SEQUIM — The second entirely on school annual Back-2-School 2-Mile Family Fun Run/ district property Walk will be Saturday, and will include Sept. 7. The course will begin obstacles such as a and end at the high school hay bale climb, tire stadium at 601 N. Sequim Ave. Parking is available in drill, flat Stanley the Fir Street stadium limbo, precipitation parking lot. pass and homework The route will be entirely on school district property hill. and will include obstacles such as a hay bale climb, Sequim Education Foundatire drill, flat Stanley limbo, precipitation pass and tion and Anytime Fitness. Proceeds will benefit homework hill. Sequim students through Sequim Education FoundaRegistration tion classroom grants. Race-day registration Cash or checks will be will begin at 10 a.m. The accepted for registration. race will start at 11 a.m. Checks should be made Registration also can be out to the Sequim Educadone in advance. tion Foundation, a nonprofit The entry fee is $5 per organization that sponsors person. Families of five or such events as the Student more who are living in the Film Festival, Student same household can regis- Engineering Challenge, Classroom Grants Program, ter for $20. Enrichment First-, second- and third- Student place ribbons will be Grants, Shoes for Kids Proawarded to each age group. gram and the annual SEF Age groups are kinder- Variety Show. garten through second grade, third through fifth Donations grade, sixth through eighth All donations are taxgrade, ninth through 12th deductible. grade and adults 18 and For more information older. about SEF, visit www. Kindergarten-through- sequimed.org. fifth-grade participants For preregistration, conmust be accompanied by tact Community Liaison parents or guardians. Patsene Dashiell at the All participants can take Sequim School District part in drawings for door office, 503 N. Sequim Ave., prizes at the end of the race. at 360-582-3264 or The run is organized by mdashiell@sequim.k12. the Sequim School District, wa.us.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

RAIN

GARDEN DEMONSTRATION

Feiro Marine Life Center docent Disa Wilson explains to visitors the workings of a rain garden model on display at the center at Port Angeles City Pier. The display was set up last weekend in conjunction with Port Angeles’ Stormwater Green Infrastructure Rebate Program that encourages residents to build their own rain gardens and disconnect the downspouts from their homes from the combined sewer or stormwater system. Information about the rebates is available at the marine life center, City Hall or online http://www.cityofpa.us/Stormwater.htm.

Briefly . . . Center, 91 Maple Ave., from Sept. 6 through Dec. 13. All library events for youth are being held at the community center during the Forks Branch Library FORKS — The Forks remodeling project. Library will present weekly Storytime programs feastorytimes for preschoolers ture rhymes, songs, dancages 3 to 5 throughout the ing and books for young fall. children. Storytimes will be FriTips on effective ways to day mornings at 10:30 a.m. read, talk, sing and play at the Forks Community with children are offered.

Forks Library storytimes scheduled

For information on storytimes and other programs for youth, go to www.nols.org and click on “Youth” or contact West End Youth Services Librarian Pam Force at 360-3746402, ext. 7797, or Forks@ nols.org. While the library is being renovated, limited services are available in the ICN building at 71 N. Spartan Ave.

GOP ladies meet PORT LUDLOW — Jefferson County Sheriff’s Deputy Brian Petersen will speak to the Republican Women of Jefferson County on Thursday, Sept. 12. The meeting will be held at the Inn at Port Ludlow, 1 Heron Road, at 11:30 a.m. For reservations, phone Peggy Reep at 360-3854953. Peninsula Daily News

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A5

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

Fisher may be reintroduced to Cascades BY RACHEL LACORTE

ogist at Mount Rainier National Park. Reid noted that fishers had once been used to control the porcupine population because of the damage porcupines cause to trees. “Each component is part of a puzzle,” he said. “Each component has a role to play in the ecosystem.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (2)

Researcher Scott Horton climbs a tree while searching for a fisher den in Olympic National Park. Horton was unsure which hole the den was in, so he stuck a camera in each hole to take a photo, finally confirming a den when the kits growled back at his camera.

OLYMPIA — A predator that disappeared from Washington state two decades ago is in the midst of a comeback, and wildlife officials are looking to give the cat-sized carnivore known as the fisher some new help. Wildlife officials reintroduced 90 fishers into Olympic National Park beginning in 2008. They now are preparing a plan to reintroduce more of the weasel-like animals that hunt porcupines, beavers and hare to Mount Rainier and North Cascades national parks as early as 2015. “Being able to restore this species is an exciting opportunity,” said Elly Boerke, an environmental protection specialist for the National Park Service. The initial plan is to introduce 40 fishers a year, with each park receiving a total of 80 animals. First, though, the national parks, working with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, is seeking public comment through the end of September. Then, Boerke said, they’ll assess any environmental impacts or other

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ping, logging and development, according to wildlife officials. By the mid-90s, they were gone from the region. The state listed the species as endangered in 1998, and in 2004, the fisher was listed as a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act. Fishers are the only native carnivore missing from the Cascade Range in Washington state, officials said. “When you take one of the predators out of the system, you’re affecting all the species it preys upon,” said Mason Reid, a wildlife ecol-

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As with the Olympic National Park reintroduction, the fishers for the new plan would be relocated from British Columbia. Three batches of fishers were introduced into ONP over a three-year period, and monitored by radio collars. “One of the first things that we learned was boy, they could really move across the landscape,” said Patti Happe, the project leader for the ONP introduction. Happe said that one fisher that was released in the Quinault area trekked as far south as Centralia, about 100 miles away. While fishers have been reintroduced in places in the West, including Oregon, there are only two native populations in the West, both in California, according to the Forest Service.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Captain Joseph House remodel ‘coming along’ Foundation needs funds for project’s completion BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TO SCHOOL PREP

Seven-year-old Gabriel Vanzant, who is entering second grade at Roosevelt Elementary School in Port Angeles, receives a haircut from River Cyr during a school supply giveaway on Saturday at Jefferson Elementary School for students of the Port Angeles School District. Students entering school this fall were given the opportunity to pick out school supplies as well as a variety of other services.

$2 million bail set in WWII vet’s death BY NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPOKANE — A 16-yearold Spokane boy was ordered held on $2 million bail Monday and will be tried as an adult in connection with last week’s beating death of an 88-year-old World War II veteran. A second teen was arrested in the case Monday morning. Demetrius L. Glenn is charged with first-degree murder and first-degree robbery in Spokane County District Court and made an initial court appearance Monday afternoon. The charges carry a potential life sentence.

Attack’s brutality District Judge Richard Leland, presiding over a packed courtroom, said the brutality of the attack and vulnerability of the victim make the high bail proper. Glenn had turned himself in Thursday night, the same day Army veteran Delbert Belton died of his injuries. The slightly built youth

gave yes and no answers to questions from the judge but otherwise said nothing. Defense attorney Chris Phelps noted after the hearing that the case has gone viral on the Internet, with many people expressing strong opinions. “The evidence doesn’t indicate what happened,” Phelps said, adding that eyewitnesses only reported “two kids running away.”

Second suspect

Rooms ‘torn apart’ “Almost every room in the house at the present time is torn apart.” Schultz, 63, suffered a minor stroke Aug. 16. She was said to be recovering well. Schultz named the house after her son, Army Capt. Joseph Schultz, a Green Beret who was killed in action in Afghanistan on May 29, 2011. Demolition of the interior of the 102-year-old house at 1108 S. Oak St. is about 80 percent complete, project architect Chuck Smith said. The five bedrooms will be converted into three large, wheelchair-accessible suites. Contractor Bill Feeley said a $30,000 to $40,000

A second 16-year-old boy, Kenan Adams-Kinard, was arrested without incident early Monday on a warrant for first-degree murder and first-degree robbery. He has a court appearance scheduled for today and will also be tried as an adult. “The two individuals we believe are responsible for the robbery and murder of Mr. Belton are in custody,” Police Chief Frank Straub said at a news conference. Belton, who was wounded in the Battle of Okinawa, was beaten in his vehicle as he waited for a GOLD BAR — Rescuers friend in the parking lot of an Eagles Lodge. have found three experi-

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Borden estimated that it would cost about $1 million per year to operate. Families of fallen service members will stay at the Captain Joseph House from Monday through Friday at no cost. “Any family that’s lost a military person since 9/11 is eligible to come to this house,” Smith said. “That’s for the whole United States in all different branches of service. They are coming here free of charge. So it’s a wonderful project and it’s an area where there’s not a lot of support for these families.” Borden, who is a military retiree, urged the chamber members to learn

about the foundation and to spread the word about its efforts. The foundation will hold a seafood and chowder cookoff fundraiser at the Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival from Oct. 11-13. Anyone wishing to volunteer on the Captain Joseph House can contact Borden at 360-461-1619 or borden@olypen.com. For more information on the Captain Joseph House and its foundation, click on www.captainjosephhouse foundation.org.

hadn’t returned home as scheduled. Search and rescue personnel and volunteers headed out at about 5:30 a.m. Monday.

Investigators said the brother was taken to Harborview Medical Center. He reportedly said the attack happened when two men came to the door demanding money. The sheriff’s office said the stabbing may have occurred late Sunday night or early Monday. Her identity was not immediately released. The Associated Press

_________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com.

Seatac stabbing SEATAC — The King County Sheriff’s Office says a woman is dead and her brother injured in a stabbing at a Seatac residence.

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The foundation, which is marketing the Captain Joseph House across the nation, is seeking local volunteers to assist with the demolition and cleanup. The primary volunteer work days are Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning at 8:30 a.m. “If you desire to work at some other time, we can accommodate that,” Borden said. Because of insurance and safety concerns, volunteers must be accompanied by a project manager. “You just have to let one of us know, and somebody will be there,” Borden said. “At this point, we’re tearing apart bathrooms with hard tile. That means a hammer and a chisel. “It’s hard work. It’s not easy work, but we also have easy work that you can do. If all you can do is sweep the floor and mop the floor, or do those kinds of things, we can make that happen, too. He added: “We have jobs for everyone.” Local contractors, subcontractors and families have “stepped up to the plate” with volunteer labor, Smith said. “The community has been so supportive of this project,” he added. The 1911 house will get an expanded kitchen, new library, new plumbing and wiring. “We do need volunteers, and we also need money,” said Feeley, who is waiting for an architect’s plans to apply for a building permit. Smith said the remodel will cost about $500,000.

that are going to PORT ANGELES — help her Betsy Reed Schultz is take care recovering at home with of that.” slight speech and memBorory loss after suffering a den minor stroke on Aug. 16, added Joe Borden told the Port that Schultz Angeles Regional Cham- Schultz ber of Commerce lunhas a “slight memory cheon audience on Mon- problem, but nothing day. serious.” Schultz, 63, founded He said Schultz does the Captain Joseph not display the outward House Foundation to physical signs of a havconvert her former bed- ing had a stroke. and-breakfast inn in Borden urged the Port Angeles into a audience of about 50, place of healing for the most of whom are families of fallen service friends of Schultz, a formembers. mer Chamber of Commerce president, to give Will be ‘fine’ her some time to rest and recover. “Betsy is fine,” said “She will get back on Borden, chairman of the the trail, trust me,” he board of the Captain said. “She will get back Joseph House Foundaon the horse as quickly tion. as she can.” “She is going to be Anyone wishing to fine. She is home,” he contact Schultz is asked told the audience at to route his or her correMonday’s chamber lunspondence through cheon at the Red Lion Borden. Hotel. Borden can be “She has a slight reached by cellphone at speech problem, but 360-461-1619 or by nothing serious. She’s working with some folks email at borden@olypen. PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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PORT ANGELES — Interior demolition of the Captain Joseph House in Port Angeles is “coming along very well,” but its nonprofit foundation needs money, an elevator and more volunteers to complete the one-of-a-kind project by next June 14 as planned. That was the message foundation board member Joe Borden told business leaders gathered at Monday’s Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce weekly luncheon. The Captain Joseph House Foundation is raising funds to convert Betsy Reed Schultz’s former Tudor Inn bed-and-breakfast into an all-expensespaid respite for families of fallen members of the armed services. It would become the only sanctuary of its kind in the nation. “The demolition is progressing nicely,” Borden told the audience of about 50 at the Port Angeles Red Lion Hotel.

elevator will be needed to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. “We can’t do an elevator shaft until we have an elevator,” Feeley added. “They come in all shapes and sizes.”

Schultz recovering from mild stroke


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PeninsulaNorthwest

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013 — (C)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Man’s body found in Strait Show: Make-do BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The body of a 58-year-old Olympia man was discovered in the water between Point Wilson and Point Hudson on Monday after the small skiff in which he was riding apparently capsized. The man has not been publicly identified pending notification of his family, according to Deputy Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney David Alvarez, who also is acting as the Jefferson County coroner. Someone aboard a pleasure craft observed the capsized boat and body about a mile from shore and phoned it in to 9-1-1 dispatchers at 9:45 a.m. Rescue workers arrived at the site in about 15 minutes,. They retrieved the body and towed the skiff back to Port Townsend Boat Haven. It was at that marina that the body was met by

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sheriff’s Deputy Gordon Tamura inspects the 6-foot skiff that was retrieved from Port Townsend Bay on Monday. An Olympia man drowned Monday after rowing the skiff into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Alvarez and Kosec Funeral Home director Real Robles. Personnel from the Jefferson County Sheriff ’s Office and the Port Townsend Police Depart-

ment also were on the scene. A Coast Guard rescue helicopter from Port Angeles was called in, then was advised to stand down by

East Jefferson Fire-Rescue Chief Gordon Pomeroy. It circled the area for several minutes to make sure there wasn’t a second body.

Kilmer: Proud to be Dicks successor BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — One year ago at the Jefferson County Democrats’ annual fish fry, then-state Sen. Derek Kilmer appeared alongside the man he hoped to succeed in Congress: Norm Dicks. Having accomplished that, freshman U.S. Rep. Kilmer on Sunday night spoke seriously about his goals as a representative while using his family, pres-

ent at the fish fry, to underscore the importance of his mission. Kilmer, a Gig Harbor resident who grew up on the North Olympic Peninsula, began with a conversation he had after Dicks announced his retirement, when a friend said that he “pitied the poor schmo who takes this job.” “I am here to tell you that I am proud to be that schmo, and proud to be the first new congressman from the district in 36 years,”

Turnover: Lots

Port terms, seats on fall ballot

of experience

BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CONTINUED FROM A1 get people familiar with the culture of a district is through “We have a lot of experi- those mentorships that ence on our staff,” Superin- develop naturally,” he said. tendent Kelly Shea said. “That’s good for now, but Fewer positions it means we’re going to In total, the district will have a lot of turnover in the begin the 2013-2014 school next few years.” The roster of Sequim year with 162 full-time teachers includes 50 of 175 equivalent teaching positeachers older than 55 tions, down from the 164 in the 2012-2013 school year. years, Sande said. Business Manager Brian The aging workforce extends to support staff as Lewis told the School Board well, with 65 of the 161 at its meeting Aug. 19 that employees on the classified the reduction in full-time teaching positions reflects roster older than 55. “That’s a lot of attrition,” an anticipated decline in School Board member enrollment of 30 students across the district’s two eleSarah Bedinger said. New staff have been mentary schools, middle slated for all-day orienta- school, high school and tion programs to acclimate alternative school. Spending on teachers to the district as the new will increase slightly in school year approaches. Shea, though, said the dis- 2013-2014. The upcoming year’s trict’s procedures and culture are best passed on through- budget spends $18,356,870 out the year as bonds form on teachers and classroom between the new hires and support, up from the $18,155,190 in the 2012existing employees. “I think the best way to 2013 school year.

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Concern “I became concerned that with the nature of our county that enjoys a diversity of cultural and value systems and economies and that sort of demographics, that we might not be well represented with a three-commissioner set-up,” Calhoun said. He estimated that individual commissioner costs average about $20,000 a year in salary, benefits and travel expenses. It also would cost more if terms are reduced to four years because there would be more elections. But expanding to five members would be “a reasonable investment to satisfy the public concerns about having broader representation,”

Calhoun added. Calhoun also said the controversy over the June 24 resignation of former Executive Director Jeff Robb was “exacerbated” by the inability of port commissioners to “talk to each other about these issues and get some idea on where our fellow commissioners were on this deal.” The three commissioners cannot talk about port business outside of an officially called meeting because two members constitute a quorum. But Johnson cautioned that individual members of five-person boards cannot participate in “serial meetings.” by meeting one-on-one until a quorum is reached on a particular topic. “That’s called a special meeting, and you can’t do that,” Johnson said, adding that a five-member board “is not a panacea for getting around the awkwardness of the Open Public Meetings Act.” “My motivation is more effective communication between commissioners,” Calhoun responded.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at pgottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.

“If either or both of you instruments on behalf of CONTINUED FROM A1 the fallout from all this issue,” Calhoun said. commission, and wants to change who chairs the the meetings, that’s within reviews proposed agendas. In a May 15 email to Hallett, the 2010 and McAleer, Hallett said he Yields gavel your power. 2011 president of the Port wanted “to make a change “Let’s swap seats. We Hallett, a professional Angeles Regional Chamber at the top,” encouraged financial adviser in Port might as well do it now. It’s McAleer to run for office, of Commerce, was on the cool.” Angeles, immediately said he would file a whistlePort Angeles City Council When he swapped nameblower complaint if he could yielded the president’s plates with Calhoun, Hal- from 1986 through 1993, and pledged to back gavel — and his seat in the lett quipped: “You don’t including time spent as McAleer or any other middle of the three commis- want to be me.” mayor. employee who believes they sioners — to Calhoun. ________ The board president pre“It’s real clear that anyhad been “harmed” by Robb. sides at all commission pubbody that speaks for the Hallett said last week Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb lic meetings and executive can be reached at 360-452-2345, that he was not referring to commissioners speaks at removing Robb as executive the pleasure of the commis- sessions, signs all resolu- ext. 5060, or at pgottlieb@ tions, contracts and other peninsuladailynews.com. sioners,” Hallett said. director. The other two commissioners took issue during Responsible Stewardship Continues Monday’s board meeting. “You are actually proBeyond Our Lifetimes ceeding with your own We are dedicated to reducing our carbon footprint by agenda,” McHugh said. Funeral Home & Crematory Calhoun agreed with • Donating eyeglasses, hearing aids, prosthetics & McHugh’s assessment that medical appliances Hallett no longer could lead • Recycling medical metals to reduce raw mining and planet scarring the board. (360)385-2642 • Providing options for Certified Green biodegradable “I am concerned whether casket and urns you, now, as chairman 1615 Parkside Dr. • Using non-formaldehyde embalming fluids [president] of the commisPort Townsend Call us today to discuss your plans sion, you are as effective as we would like because of all 32732606

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PORT ANGELES — Clallam County voters will decide Nov. 6 if they want the Port of Port Angeles Board of Commissioners to expand from three to five members and have their terms reduced from six years to four years. Port commissioners approved the ballot measures Monday, a move that suspended an independent signature-gathering campaign spearheaded by community activist Norma Turner to put a term-reduction measure on the ballot. “We are suspending it for a day or two in hopes the port will, in a very timely way, get their language to the auditor,” she said after the meeting. Interim port Executive Director Ken O’Hollaren said ballot language would be ready for review by the Clallam County Auditor’s Office by Friday at the latest. New board president John Calhoun joined Commissioners Jim Hallett and Paul McHugh in voting to put the measures on the ballot. “My motivation is to make sure there is some regional representation in the West End,” he said. Eric Johnson, executive director

of Washington Public Ports Association gave a presentation on port terms and port commission sizes statewide before commissioners voted. Port commissioner districts are the same as Clallam County commissioner districts, with the West End’s eastern boundary in Port Angeles in the area of the Eighth Street bridges just a few blocks from Lincoln Street, the city’s main north-south thoroughfare.

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want to do what I can to do he said. “Or as I like to say, since to turn the Congress and the country around.” I was 2 years old.” Kilmer, whose sprawling 6th District includes all of Blend of old and new Jefferson and Clallam counKilmer’s speech offered ties, drew loud applause some new material. from the crowd of 300 by “Last year, someone saying that he is sponsoring asked me why on Earth a bill that will ensure equal would I run for Congress pay for all, as well as a conwhen it’s such a mess — stitutional amendment that ‘and you have two little will reverse the Supreme kids,’” Kilmer said. Court’s Citizens United “My answer was, [I ran] decision that designated because it is a mess, and I corporations as people and have two little kids, and I equated money with speech.

CONTINUED FROM A1 thought, let’s do a reading now, so people know we’re It all starts at 7:30 p.m. still thinking positively and Thursday through Satur- still having fun.” day in a makeshift theater “Mr. Pim” is “just a at the state Department of charming play,” she said, Natural Resources, 411 Til- adding that Milne is most licum Lane. famous for his “Winnie the The department isn’t Pooh” stories, but also charging a rental fee, said Rainforest Players board penned popular plays during the early 20th century. member Ellen Matheny. Admission to “Mr. Pim” is by donation, and all ages The cast are welcome. When “Mr. Pim” comes to This is a dramatized Forks, Warren Brown plays reading rather than a fully Lord Marden; Morris plays staged production, but the his nephew George Marden actors are quite animated, added Matheny, also a cast and Matheny plays George’s wife Olivia. Liane White is member. An arm of the Rainforest their niece, Dinah, while Players is negotiating the her husband Curt White purchase of a downtown plays her sweetheart Brian Forks lot that could become Strange. “So a husband and wife the site of a new arts center, play the young lovers who Matheny said. The empty lot once was want to get married,” home to the Olympic Phar- Matheny noted. macy building before last “There’s a lot of fun fall’s fire in the former humor,” she said, in the IOOF hall at 35 N. Forks 90-minute show. Ave. destroyed the two “We’re so glad to be back adjoining buildings. on stage. We’ve missed it a The 87-year-old IOOF lot. building had been turned “We’re here to entertain over to the city and used as you, even though we don’t a community center and have a home.” theater. Kriebel, for her part, said her cast members have On with the show a nice chemistry. And it’s Last spring, the Rainfor- fun to direct her husband est Players decided to get to Steve. work on a show, playhouse “I can move him around or not. like a piece on a chess“We couldn’t just sit idly board,” she joked. by and wait for something “He has talents I never to happen,” said Lela knew he had — as do they Kriebel. all.” “We said, ‘Let’s start ________ reading plays. Let’s try to build toward the future.” Features Editor Diane Urbani Actor Gerry Morris de la Paz can be reached at 360opened his home, “and we 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. read there for a while. We urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, August 27, 2013 PAGE

A9

More to Mr. Sutherland than just lake JOHN SUTHERLAND FIRST cast his eyes upon the body of water that would eventually bear his name around 1865. He and his partner, John Everett, had made their way into areas known only the local Native populations. In 1911, 46 years after that discovery, civilization closed in on the old trapper, farmer and gold miner. Sutherland took his last breath in a little town called Forks. After leaving his birthplace of Pennsylvania, John Sutherland traveled west and had lived in Port Townsend, the Dungeness area, Freshwater Bay and, finally sometime before 1900, the south Forks Prairie. One can only speculate that Sutherland, who was used to life in the wilderness, moved farther west as the towns in the east part of the North Olympic Peninsula became more populated. He lived in an area which today is near where Forks Outfitters is located (950 S. Forks Ave). In those days, it was the end of the road. Anyone who ventured beyond Mill Creek went by a trail. You might say it was kind of a dead end. When Sutherland passed away at the age of 82, the Forks Cemetery was sparsely populated, too. Sutherland was buried along the west side of the cemetery near Merchant Road, and a large granite rock was placed upon his

WEST END NEIGHBOR Christi Baron

grave. Fast forward 80 years. Forks resident and wife of Mayor Warren Paul, Ella Paul, thought she remembered that John Sutherland’s rock in the Forks Cemetery once had a

plaque on it. According to her daughter-inlaw, Martha Paul, Ella decide that she would see to it that Sutherland’s rock once again had some kind of recognition on it. Before Ella’s death in 2009, she set aside some money for a new plaque. With the help of the Forks Lions Club, the new plaque was ordered. This past year, Forks Cemetery Association volunteer Mike Snyder installed the new plaque on the old granite rock. Once again, John Sutherland’s place in West End history was restored. While Sutherland carries a more recognizable name in the Forks Cemetery, he is not the only one to have been a recipient of updated recognition. Forks Cemetery Association volunteer Snyder has assisted several other families with their desire to update the status of their family members with a per-

CHRISTI BARON (2)/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

John Sutherland’s grave at the Forks Cemetery got a new plaque to commemorate the namesake for the lake between Forks and Port Angeles. His grave is marked by a large granite rock near a dead end on Merchant Road. manent gravestone. The Killgore family added a marker for Elmer Killgore, whose son, Dean, once was superintendent at Forks High School. Annette McAlpin of Idaho came to Forks a few months ago to correct a misspelling of her grandfather’s temporary marker. With the help of Snyder, a new permanent marker for Nova Olmstead is now in place. Doreen Thawley lives in California. Her father, Gordon, grew up on the Shuwah, and his mother, Una Wallace, had no stone to mark her final resting place. This past week with the help of Snyder, a marker for Una Benner Wallace was added to the Forks Cemetery grounds.

Peninsula Voices Bats and rabies On Aug. 10, Center Valley Animal Rescue was notified of a brown bat found by a 16-year-old attending Centrum Camp at Fort Worden State Park. A counselor called to see if we could rehabilitate it. The bat was mildly dehydrated, probably from overheating on a metal roof near where he was found. This is not uncommon. The bat was looking great the next day. I should have released it. Instead, I thought I would give it a day or so more. On Aug. 12, the Jefferson County Health Department informed me that they wanted to test the bat’s brain for rabies. Before testing, though, the bat would be euthanized. Campers said no one had been bitten by or had skin contact with the bat. Why would it be killed and tested if no one had direct contact? The Health Department’s answer: the 16-yearold may be lying. They were not expecting the bat to have me on its team. My mission is to stand for what I believe in and give voice to those who don’t have one. I pleaded my case for three days, but after Health Department officials made threats, my patient and I lost the battle. He was euthanized — the first healthy animal I have ever euthanized. I made a promise to this bat: People would hear his story, and his life would not be taken in vain. If you think the death of this bat was wrong, please share your concerns with the Jefferson County Health Department at 360385-9400.

Christi Baron is a longtime West End resident and Forks High School alumna who is an administrative assistant at Forks City Hall. Phone her at 360-374-5412, ext. 236, or 360-374-2244 with items for the column. Or email her at hbaron@ centurytel.net. West End Neighbor appears on the PDN’s Commentary page every other Tuesday. Her next column will appear Sept. 10.

AND EMAIL

Penhallegon is a certified wild animal rehabilitation specialist and veterinary technician. We asked Dr. Tom Locke, public health officer for Jefferson and Clallam counties, to respond: Since 1995, over 90 percent of human cases of rabies in the United States have been linked to bat exposure. Human rabies can be prevented with an expensive series of injections following exposure to the rabid animal. Once rabies infection occurs, the disease is almost always fatal. Evaluating a potential bat exposure is not a simple process. Bites from bats are very subtle and usually leave no mark. People can be exposed to infectious bat saliva while handling the animals without knowing it. In cases where there is potential human exposure and a bat is available for testing, it is almost always best to test the bat for rabies. Between 5 and 10 percent of bats tested by the state Public Health Laboratory each year turn out to be infected with rabies. The letter writer operates an animal rescue center in Jefferson County. She appears determined to “rehab” sick bats despite my strong recommendation that she discontinue this practice. The best way to prevent human rabies is to avoid contact with bats. Rabid bats can appear healthy. Bats should be left unmolested and wild.

JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR ■

OUR READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES

________

My voice was not loud enough, but with enough support we will be heard. Sara Penhallegon, Quilcene

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 360-417-3500

Snyder can be seen many days on the grounds. “People from all over the world stop by this cemetery,” he said. Snyder would like to remind descendents of those laid to rest in the Forks Cemetery that there are rules regarding what is a proper type of headstone. It should be a low-profile marker. John Sutherland came to Forks to live the final days of his life, and he resided near what was the dead end of the West End at that time. Today, his rock and new marker sit next to a sign on Merchant Road. It says, of all things, “Dead End.”

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

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I strongly urge Olympic Peninsula residents to follow the longstanding advice of public health experts and avoid all contact with bats. Under no circumstances should anyone attempt to nurse a sick bat back to health or transport it to an animal rescue center. Anything that increases human contact with bats has very real dangers for both species.

Bales’ sentencing Newspaper headlines on Sunday [Aug. 25] trumpeted the anger felt by some Afghans over the sentence of life in prison without parole — rather than a sentence of execution — handed down to [Army Staff Sgt. Robert] Bales by a military jury Aug. 23 [“Afghans Unsatisfied By Soldier’s Sentence,” PDN, Aug. 25]. Someone should be imprisoned for life — and it is not this soldier, who was deployed again and

again. And again, with his family’s security also yanked from under them again and again. And again. Exhausted, no doubt suffering from post-traumatic stress and possibly strung out on some substance or another, he essentially had a total meltdown — a break from reality. Those who trained, indoctrinated and sent him back and back (and back) are the ones who would be well served by a little time in military prison. Likely it will be the closest many of them will ever get to military service. Marie Campbell, Port Angeles

DCD director The Aug. 23 decision by the state Attorney General’s Office, which found that no criminal charges were warranted against Clallam County Director of Community Development Sheila Roark Miller, finally ended the investigation

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

with justice being served. She admitted up front that she made a wrong into a right. Yes, she served the people of Clallam County, as she promised to during her campaign. Now, we taxpayers are obligated to pay a group of lawyers and investigators more than $70,000 in factfinding fees? Through all of this, I’m sure she stayed focused on her obligations to the people of this county. She is truly an elected official with the integrity to do what is right and worry about the consequences later. If only we had more of them. As one might have guessed, I voted for Sheila Roark Miller in the last election and would proudly vote for her again in the next election cycle. Ted Bedford, Sequim

Economic stress Blaming our welfare system, party affiliations

and secularism on high suicide rates [“The Value of Work,” Peninsula Voices, Aug. 18] is like eliminating soda to prevent a hangover. Are work houses and debtors’ prisons alternatives to poverty and unemployment? Since the Great Depression, our national population has nearly tripled. Technology has advanced and so has competition for fewer jobs. Our educational system for such jobs has stagnated. Companies outsource jobs. Unions, which now represent just over 11 percent of the U.S. workforce, are no longer the ladder to the middle class. Retirement has become an illusion, and job loss sounds the death knell for older workers. We have become an hourglass society. With no contracts, companies hire and fire parttime workers with impunity. Job security has become an anachronism. Stress has become our mortal enemy. Unemployment insurance, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and Social Security have become a government-sponsored suicide prevention bureau, if you will. Like those who opposed them and reap their benefits today, they would oppose a national health care plan depriving those who would benefit from it most. Suicide, rather than destitution and welfare, has become a viable alternative, especially for the elderly poor. The enemy of change is ignorance. Roger B. Huntman, Port Angeles

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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meeting will be on District 3 candidates who will each be given three minutes to describe their backgrounds and platforms, followed by a question-and-answer session. QUILCENE — The JefThe Jefferson County ferson County Republican Republican Party has not party is sponsoring a forum taken a position for or on charter government today against the initiative. at 6:30 p.m. at the Quilcene For more information, Community Center, 294952 contact Party Chairman U.S. Highway 101. Gene Farrat at 360-343Representative from the 4041 or visit www.JeffGOP. Jefferson County Republicom. can Party, the Jefferson County Democratic Party, and the Community Rights Art demos slated SEQUIM — The Coalition will address the Museum & Arts Center in issues surrounding the charter government initia- the Sequim-Dungeness Valtive, which will be voted on ley will present two free art demos at its MAC by Jefferson County resiExhibit Center, 175 W. dents in the November Cedar St. election. All candidates for the Artist Paulette Hill will freeholder positions are demonstrate jewelry makinvited, and all will be ing and beading from introduced. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday. The emphasis of this Barbara Ralph and cer-

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Fruit club to meet CHIMACUM — Wanda and Leonard Horst will present “Fall Fertilization: Micronutrients, Minerals & Biology� at a meeting of the North Olympic Fruit Club on Tuesday, Sept. 3. The meeting will be held at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, at 7 p.m.

SPOKANE — Katelyn Slack of Port Hadlock has been named to the Whitworth University Laureate Society for spring semester 2013. Slack qualified for the academic honors society by maintaining a grade-point average of at least 3.75 during the semester. Peninsula Daily News

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, August 27, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B U.S. Open

Pirates back for more NWAACC champs aim for repeat BY LEE HORTON PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Venus Williams returns a shot to Kirsten Flipkens during the first round of the U.S. Open.

Venus opens with upset BY RACHEL COHEN THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Venus Williams had been 14-0 in the first round of the U.S. Open, though she never had to face an opponent ranked in the top 30 at that stage. Williams was usually the seeded player, but after two years of illness and injury, the seven-time major champ was the one pulling the upset Monday when she defeated Wimbledon semifinalist Kirsten Flipkens. Her ranking down to No. 60, Williams beat the 12th-seeded Flipkens 6-1, 6-2 for one of her biggest wins since she pulled out of this tournament two years ago because of Sjogren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease. “For me, I stay positive because I know I can play great tennis,” Williams said. “Sometimes you just have to go through more than what you want to go through. Sometimes you have to have losses. “When I had losses, it always motivates me a lot to do better and to work harder.” The 33-year-old looked strong Monday, purple braids poking out of her visor that matched her floral dress. Williams fought off three break points at 2-2 in the second set in a game that went to six deuces. Bothered by a lower back injury, Williams was playing just her third event since a first-round loss at the French Open. She hadn’t defeated a top-20 opponent since last October. “I realize that I haven’t had a lot of chances to play this year or a lot of chances to play healthy this year, have had injuries and what have you,” she said. “So I’m just going to have to keep working my way into it maybe more than some of the other players. But I know I can do that.” Flipkens, meanwhile, had been enjoying a career year. The Belgian had never reached the round of 16 at a major tournament before the Australian Open, then made her run at Wimbledon.

Nadal wins easy Rafael Nadal’s stay at Wimbledon ended in his opener, but in his first Grand Slam match since — and first U.S. Open since 2011 — the secondseeded Spaniard rolled past American Ryan Harrison 6-4, 6-2, 6-2. Nadal, who missed last year’s tournament because of a left knee injury, improved to 16-0 on hard courts this year. In the day’s first big upset, a British man not named Andy Murray — 179th-ranked qualifier Daniel Evans — stunned 11th-seeded Kei Nishikori in straight sets. Evans won 6-4, 6-4, 6-2 in his U.S. Open debut. Both are 23, but Nishikori was playing in his 17th Grand Slam event, with a 25-16 record coming in. Evans was 0-2, both matches at Wimbledon. “I was pretty calm today,” Evans said. TURN

TO

TENNIS/B3

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula College’s Alex Martinez, center, heads the ball upfield during an exhibition match against St. Martin’s University in April as part of the Rumble in the Rainforest held at Wally Sigmar Field on the campus of Peninsula College. Martinez is one of the key returners to this season’s team, having scored 21 goals in 2012. Ashkanov Apollon, right, is expected to be one of the Pirates’ top newcomers for the defending NWAACC champions.

PORT ANGELES — The Peninsula College men’s soccer team is on a roll. The Pirates won their second NWAACC championship in three years in November, and they haven’t lost a game in nearly a year, their last setback coming since Sept. 1 of last year. They scored 86 goals, allowed only 10, and notched 15 shutouts in 2012 — all three marks were the best in the entire NWAACC — and went 22-1-1 overall and 12-0-1 in West Division play. The 2013 Pirates aren’t the same team, but they have the same expectations. For starters, Peninsula is ranked 10th in the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Junior College Division I preseason poll. There also is expectations from within the program. “We have big shoes to fill [this] year, and as the returners, we’re holding the new guys accountable for it,” sophomore forward Alex Martinez said after a recent practice. “We want to do it again, and we have to work hard to do it, and that starts now.” Central defender Mark Cottrell, also a sophomore, said this season’s team appears to be up to the task. “It’s going to be tough to repeat the same thing, but we have a lot of hard-working guys, and a lot of good guys on the team, a lot of skilled players,” he said. TURN

TO

PIRATES/B3

Wedge won’t give up on Maurer Manager thinks young hurler’s future is starting BY RYAN DIVISH MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

SEATTLE — Brandon Maurer may be pitching in relief right now, but Mariners manager Eric Wedge is adamant that he thinks the young righthander’s future with the organization will be as a starter. “I think most people do,” Wedge said. “With the number of quality pitches he has, with his size and strength, I think it’d be a shame if he’s not a starter down the road. “You look at his repertoire of pitches and his stuff, it’s what he should be.” Wedge has always preached about the idea of never giving up on a player too soon, and giving up on Maurer as a starter and making him a full-time

reliever seems ludicrous to him. “Giving up on him shouldn’t be a Next Game even question on a guy like Today that,” he vs. Rangers said. at Safeco Field “If an Time: 7 p.m. organizaOn TV: ROOT tion ever considered taking that option away from a guy like that would be crazy. What is he 23 years old?” Yes, Maurer just turned 23 on July 3. His first stint as a starting pitcher in the big leagues wasn’t a great success. With an injury to Erasmo Ramirez and the opt-out clause of Jon Garland, Maurer earned a spot in the starting rotation on THE ASSOCIATED PRESS the opening day roster, thanks Mariners relief pitcher Brandon Maurer, right, talks to a stellar spring training. TURN

TO

M’S/B3

with catcher Humberto Quintero after giving up a run to the Los Angeles Angels last weekend.

Seferian-Jenkins has yet to be cleared Finger injury, not suspension might keep star TE out BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The question remains unanswered over whether Washington star tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins will be available for the Huskies’ season opener against No. 19 Boise State. It may linger right up until kickoff Saturday. It’s now as much about Seferian-Jenkins’ health as it is any possible team discipline for off-field troubles. Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said Monday that Seferian-Jenkins has not been

cleared medically to play in Saturday’s o p e n e r against the Broncos First Game w h i l e recovering Saturday from a brovs. Boise State ken right at Seattle pinkie. Time: 7 p.m. SarkiOn TV: FS1 sian gave no indicat i o n whether he believed SeferianJenkins would be cleared this week in time to play in Washington’s return to renovated Husky Stadium. Seferian-Jenkins is listed as the starter on the depth chart that was released over the weekend. “He’s not cleared to play at

all. If you read it properly this is a post-training camp depth chart,” Sarkisian said. “He was limited in this morning’s practice. He has not been cleared to play physically as of yet at all.” Whether Seferian-Jenkins would take the field against the Broncos has been up for debate since the spring, when he was arrested on investigation of driving under the influence. Sarkisian did not announce any team discipline beyond Seferian-Jenkins being suspended from spring practice. The status of the big tight end was thrown further into flux when he pleaded guilty in July to the DUI charge and served one day in jail as part of his sentence. Sarkisian has remained mum throughout and when asked if Seferian-Jenkins would

play Saturday should he be cleared, referenced his statement made before fall camp started in early August that he wouldn’t discuss any discipline. “Come on, dude. Were you at my preseason press conference?” Sarkisian said. Seferian-Jenkins suffered the injury during practice Aug. 12 and had surgery later in the week to insert a pin and stabilize the finger. Last season, Seferian-Jenkins caught 69 passes for 850 yards — both single-season records for Washington tight ends — and seven touchdowns. He was a third-team AP AllAmerican. If Seferian-Jenkins can’t go in the opener, the Huskies will lose one of their biggest passcatching options. TURN

TO

DAWGS/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College vs. Edmonds, NWAACC Friendlies Tournament at Starfire Sports Complex (Tukwila), 4:30 p.m.

Wednesday Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College vs. Everett, NWAACC Friendlies Tournament at Starfire Sports Complex (Tukwila), 4:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College vs. Trinity Lutheran, NWAACC Friendlies Tournament at Starfire Sports Complex (Tukwila), 6:30 p.m.

Football National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 88 Arizona 2 1 0 .667 36 San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 55 St. Louis 0 3 0 .000 52 East W L T Pct PF Washington 3 0 0 1.000 76 Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 67 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 72 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 51 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 76 Carolina 2 1 0 .667 67 Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 54 Atlanta 0 3 0 .000 49 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 2 1 0 .667 84 Detroit 2 1 0 .667 72 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 29 Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 43 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Denver 2 1 0 .667 47 Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 52 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 65 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 62 East W L T Pct PF Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 71 New England 2 1 0 .667 65 N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 78 Miami 1 3 0 .250 80 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 74 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 67 Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 40 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 79 Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 57 Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 46

PA 30 31 37 73 PA 41 64 69 57 PA 56 58 85 88 PA 78 50 41 81 PA 72 52 79 71 PA 66 83 60 68 PA 61 62 65 95 PA 73 53 52 68

Thursday’s Games Detroit 40, New England 9 Carolina 34, Baltimore 27 Friday’s Games Seattle 17, Green Bay 10 Chicago 34, Oakland 26 Saturday’s Games Washington 30, Buffalo 7 Indianapolis 27, Cleveland 6 N.Y. Jets 24, N.Y. Giants 21, OT Kansas City 26, Pittsburgh 20, OT Philadelphia 31, Jacksonville 24 Tampa Bay 17, Miami 16 Denver 27, St. Louis 26 Dallas 24, Cincinnati 18 Tennessee 27, Atlanta 16 San Diego 24, Arizona 7 Sunday’s Games New Orleans 31, Houston 23 San Francisco 34, Minnesota 14 Thursday Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Detroit at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Jacksonville at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at New England, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Carolina, 4:30 p.m. Tennessee at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. Green Bay at Kansas City, 5 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 5 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Arizona at Denver, 6 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 7 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 7 p.m.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORMER COUGAR

MIGHT GET START

Buffalo Bills plan to start former Washington State quarterback Jeff Tuel (8) in Week 1 of the regular season if fellow rookie E.J. Manuel is not ready to return from a knee injury, according to an ESPN report. If Tuel does indeed start the Bills’ first game, he will be the first undrafted rookie quarterback in the common draft era (since 1967) to start a season opener, according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

Baseball American League West Division W L Texas 75 55 Oakland 72 57 Seattle 59 70 Los Angeles 58 71 Houston 43 86 Central Division W L Detroit 77 53 Cleveland 71 59 Kansas City 65 64 Minnesota 57 72 Chicago 54 75 East Division W L Boston 77 55 Tampa Bay 74 54 Baltimore 70 59 New York 69 61 Toronto 58 73

Pct .577 .558 .457 .450 .333

GB — 2½ 15½ 16½ 31½

Pct .592 .546 .504 .442 .419

GB — 6 11½ 19½ 22½

Pct GB .583 — .578 1 .543 5½ .531 7 .443 18½

Sunday’s Games Cleveland 3, Minnesota 1 Detroit 11, N.Y. Mets 3 Baltimore 10, Oakland 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, Tampa Bay 2, 11 innings Chicago White Sox 5, Texas 2 Toronto 2, Houston 1 Kansas City 6, Washington 4 L.A. Angels 7, Seattle 1 Boston 8, L.A. Dodgers 1 Monday’s Games Tampa Bay at Kansas City, late. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, late. Oakland at Detroit, late. Houston at Chicago White Sox, late. Texas at Seattle, late. Today’s Games N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 9-9) at Toronto (Happ 3-3), 4:07 p.m. Oakland (Milone 9-9) at Detroit (Verlander 12-9), 4:08 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 7-6) at Boston (Dempster 6-9), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 1-1) at Atlanta (A.Wood 2-2), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 13-6) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 6-13), 4:10 p.m.

Houston (Clemens 4-4) at Chicago White Sox (Quintana 7-4), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Shields 8-8) at Minnesota (Correia 8-10), 5:10 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 9-6) at Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6), 7:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Texas at Seattle, 12:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Oakland at Detroit, 4:08 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.

National League West Division W L Los Angeles 76 54 Arizona 66 63 Colorado 61 71 San Diego 59 71 San Francisco 58 72 Central Division W L Pittsburgh 76 54 St. Louis 76 54 Cincinnati 74 57 Milwaukee 57 73 Chicago 55 75 East Division W L Atlanta 78 52 Washington 65 65 Philadelphia 59 71 New York 58 70 Miami 49 80

Pct GB .585 — .512 9½ .462 16 .454 17 .446 18 Pct GB .585 — .585 — .565 2½ .438 19 .423 21 Pct GB .600 — .500 13 .454 19 .453 19 .380 28½

Sunday’s Games Colorado 4, Miami 3 Detroit 11, N.Y. Mets 3 Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 1 Philadelphia 9, Arizona 5 Kansas City 6, Washington 4 Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2 San Francisco 4, Pittsburgh 0 San Diego 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 15 innings Boston 8, L.A. Dodgers 1 Monday’s Games Cincinnati at St. Louis, late.

Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, late. San Francisco at Colorado, late. San Diego at Arizona, late. Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, late. Today’s Games Miami (Eovaldi 2-4) at Washington (Ohlendorf 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Lohse 9-8) at Pittsburgh (Locke 9-4), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (Salazar 1-1) at Atlanta (A.Wood 2-2), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 10-10) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-6), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 13-4) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 5-3), 5:15 p.m. San Francisco (Petit 0-0) at Colorado (Bettis 0-2), 5:40 p.m. San Diego (Kennedy 5-9) at Arizona (Undecided), 6:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 7-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-7), 7:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, 12:10 p.m. Miami at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Reinstated SS Derek Jeter from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Preston Claiborne to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed OF Josh Reddick on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of 1B Daric Barton from Sacramento (PCL). Designated RHP Pat Neshek for assignment. Recalled RHP Evan Scribner from Sacramento. SEATTLE MARINERS — Activated OF Franklin Gutierrez from the 15-day DL. Designated RHP Aaron Harang for assignment. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Announced OF Jason Bourgeois cleared waivers and accepted an outright assignment to Durham (IL).

SPORTS ON TV

Today 10 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, First Round, Site: USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center - Flushing Meadows, N.Y. (Live) 11:30 a.m. FS1 Soccer Champions League, Fenerbahce at Arsenal (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Tennis ITF, U.S. Open, First Round, Site: USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center - Flushing Meadows, N.Y. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Texas Rangers vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live) 7 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, Chicago Cubs vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, Site: Dodger Stadium - Los Angeles (Live) TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Reinstated LHP Aaron Loup from the paternity list. Designated RHP Chien-Ming Wang for assignment. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Sent 2B Dan Uggla to Gwinnett (IL) for a rehab assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned INF Gil Velazquez to New Orleans (PCL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed OF Casper Wells on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF/OF Pete Orr from Lehigh Valley (IL). Transferred 1B Ryan Howard to the 60-day DL. Minor Leagues TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Exercised the 2014 options on RHP Dan Britton-Foster, LHP Garrett Bullock, LHP Alex Burkard, LHP Rob Cooper, RHP Sean Keeler, RHP David LeBlanc, RHP Matt McDonald, RHP Luis Munoz, RHP Nick Purdy, RHP Nick Sarianides, RHP Jeff Shields, RHP Tyler Wilson, C Kyle Nisson, C Bubby Williams, INF Josh Colafemina, INF David Cooper, INF Jon Dziomba, INF Brett Flowers, INF Cam Kneeland, OF Steve Brown, OF Carlos Guzman, OF Drew Miller, OF Jeremy Nowak and OF Jon Smith. LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed LHP Alex Hinshaw.

Basketball National Basketball Association SAN ANTONIO SPURS — G-F Tracy McGrady announced his retirement.

Football National Football League NFL — Suspended Minnesota FB Jerome Felton for the first three games of the regular season for violating the NFL Policy and Program for Substances of Abuse. ATLANTA FALCONS — Waived WR Rashad Evans, WR Marcus Jackson and WR Marcus Sales. BUFFALO BILLS — Released DB Dominique Ellis, CB Jumal Rolle, WR Da’Rick Rogers, WR DeMarco Sampson and C Ryan Turnley. Placed OT Chris Hairston on the reserve/non-football illness list. Reached an injury settlement with G Keith Williams. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Waived DB Vernon Kearney, DL Dave Kruger, WR Cordell Roberson and LB Tommy Smith. Terminated the contract of WR Jordan Norwood. Placed RB Dion Lewis on injured reserve. DALLAS COWBOYS — Released DT Jeris Pendleton. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released K Giorgio Tavecchio. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Re-signed CB Stephon Morris and DL Scott Vallone. Released WR Kamar Aiken, CB Brandon Jones, LB Niko Koutouvides, CB LeQuan Lewis and LS Mike Zupancic. Placed DL Cory Grissom and OT Markus Zusevics on injured reserve. Placed DL Armond Armstead and WR Mark Harrison on the reserve/non-football injury list. NEW YORK GIANTS — Activated DE Jason Pierre-Paul off the PUP list. NEW YORK JETS — Released WR Joe Collins, WR Braylon Edwards, DB Donnie Fletcher, G Patrick Ford, OL Trey Gilleo, S Bret Lockett, RB Joe McKnight, G Stephen Peterman, LB Sean Progar-Jackson, P Ryan Quigley, WR Marcus Rucker, LS Patrick Scales, RB Chad Spann, WR K.J. Stroud and WR Rahsaan Vaughn. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Waived RB D.J. Harper, LB Joe Holland, G Al Netter, P Colton Schmidt and QB Scott Tolzien. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Perez Ashford, LB Kyle Knox, TE Jameson Konz, TE Andrei Lintz, TE/LS Kyle Nelson, DT Martin Parker and LB Craig Wilkins. Terminated the contract of WR Brett Swain. Placed DT Jesse Williams on injured reserve.

Alabama players dismiss talk of 3-peat, expectations BY JOHN ZENOR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron offers a primer for what it takes to fit in with the top-ranked Crimson Tide football team. For starters, don’t fixate on the shot at a historic three-peat, BCSor-bust expectations or the anointment by pollsters as the team to beat. It’s all about Virginia Tech, taking it one game at a time, staying focused and all the other cliches that get trotted out in the football building each year about this time. In short, ignore what coach Nick Saban puts under the “external factors” umbrella. “I feel like if you don’t think that way, you’re kind of irrelevant a little to the team,” McCarron said Monday. “Everybody needs to have the

same mindset. “We can’t worry about what everybody thinks, what everybody’s predicting. Just go out and play the game and take one play at a time, one game at a time and we’ll be all right.” That starts Saturday in Atlanta with the Hokies, who are coming off a 7-6 season. But hard as the coaches and players try to ignore it, the Tide is aiming to make history. Major college football has had repeat national champs 10 times since the first AP poll in 1936. None, however, has made it three in a row and none has gone wireto-wire at No. 1 since USC in 2004. But Alabama has the expectations born of winning 49 games and three national titles the last four seasons. The exception was a 2010 team that opened at No. 1 and lost a whopping — by the

Tide’s current standards — three times. Right or wrong, that season became an oft-cited example of what can happen if a team buys into the hype. “It’s an example but we’ve been preaching that for years now,” McCarron said. “We can’t worry about it. That was a different team then and it’s a different team now. Got different players and different mindsets among the team as individuals. “We’ve got to focus on our goal this year, our purpose to be out there. You don’t really win the game on Saturday. You win it every day before that.” Once again, Alabama has a chance to make a statement early. The Tide has played a ranked team from a BCS conference other than the SEC in the first or second game each of the past five

seasons and won all of them. The closest call was when fifthranked Alabama beat No. 7 Virginia Tech 34-24 to start the 2009 title season, including a 41-14 rout of No. 8 Michigan last year in Arlington, Texas. The Hokies aren’t ranked but Saban calls them a “good allaround team.” This time the Tide has back-toback potential statement games, counting the Sept. 14 visit to No. 7 Texas A&M after an open date. Saban has had few public gripes about his team’s attitude or focus during preseason camp, a good sign with a coach who’s not given to sugarcoating. Monday he praised the team’s work ethic and the way the leadership is developing. It helps that senior leaders McCarron and linebacker C.J. Mosley also happen to be two of the better players.

The word “complacency” has likely been heard far more around the football building than “threepeat.” How often? “You don’t want to say too many times because that’s a pretty complacent answer,” tight end Brian Vogler said. “It’s definitely an emphasis that we’re focusing on. We really want to focus everything we have on getting our best potential out there.” To Saban, that means concentrating on winning, not past successes. “There’s no external factors that matter at all to any player on our team,” he said. “It’s all about how they perform in this game. It’s not what they did last year, it’s not about the girlfriend, it’s not about anything but playing this game. None of it means anything unless you make it mean something.”


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

B3

Pirates: Defense lost goalie, three All-Stars CONTINUED FROM B1 was one of the top 6A players in Oregon last year. Chapman also plucked a “[Coach Andrew] Chapman’s done a good job at few more players from Alex recruiting against this year, Martinez’s hometown of Reno, Nev., forward Chrisso we look to do it again.” Cottrell and Martinez tian Martinez (no relation are two of eight returning to Alex) and defender Victor players from the 2012 title Sanchez. team. They will be joined by 20 Rebuilding the defense newcomers. Defense was the phase of Chapman said he is still the game most depleted by working to integrate those graduation. new players, but injuries to For starters, All-West as many as six players Division goalkeeper Guilrecently has slowed that herme Avelar, who led the process. NWAACC with 11 shutouts, Although much remains has moved on to play at to be learned about his Division I Winthrop Uniteam, Chapman likes what versity in Rock Hill, South he has seen so far. Carolina. “It’s still early yet. We’re Taking over for Avelar trying to put some things will be sophomore Angel together, we’ve got to move Guerra, who recorded two some players around,” shutouts of his own in 2012. Chapman said, adding that “He’s looked just as good as many as six players are as last year [so far]. He battling injuries. worked really hard last “So, we don’t know where year, put in a lot of work, we’re really at yet. But from and was right there at the what we’ve seen, the level of top with Guilherme, who the team, they look really was our starter last year,” good.” Cottrell said. One newcomer, forward “He’s done a lot of hard Ashkanov Apollon of Port- work and he’s looking to do land, showed off his poten- the same thing this season, tial when he played with if not better. He pushes us Peninsula during the all.” Guerra will be backed up spring. freshmen Aaron “He . . . had a great by spring season and scored a Zavolokin and Edwin Guanfew goals against [the Uni- dique. Chapman said the versity of Washington], and St. Martin’s, so we think Pirates also lost three he’s going to do some good defenders who were AllStars last season. things,” Chapman said. “So, we’re trying to put New midfielder Victor Sanchez, also of Portland, that together, I think that is

our biggest hole right now,” he said. Cottrell said his fellow defenders are rising to the occasion. “We have a whole new back line this year,” he said. “The guys who have stepped up have done an amazing job, and, you know, are looking to be even stronger than the ones last year.”

Offense wants more Daniel Gonzalez, last year’s the West Division Player of the Year, concluded his junior college eligibility, and Henrique Noujeimi left after one year to play at Bethany College, an NAIA school in Kansas. Gonzalez scored 17 goals and had eight assists in 2012, while Noujeimi scored 15 goals. So, the Pirates lost a lot of offensive production. But, they have a lot coming back, as well as newcomers with point-scoring abilities. “Obviously, we lost Danny Gonzalez, which is a huge piece of [last year’s team], but we’ve got some other players in that we hope will help on the offensive side of things,” Chapman said. The main returner is Alex Martinez, who scored 21 of Peninsula’s 86 goals last season — nearly a quarter of the team’s total, and the second most in the NWAACC. He said Peninsula is aiming even higher

this season. “The offense is looking good,” Martinez said. “We have depth; not just two players on the field, we have depth on the bench. “And we work really well together. “We actually [set] a 100-plus-goal goal.”

Season outlook

our back, let’s keep it on our article about the Rumble in back.” the Rainforest, the fundraising event the Peninsula Friendlies tourney College soccer programs held in April. The third annual The magazine, which NWAACC Friendlies Tour- goes out to athletic departnament begins today at the ments at colleges and high Starfire Sports Complex in schools all over the nation, Tukwila. highlights the Rumble as a The Peninsula men’s good example of not only team plays both days of the raising money, but as a way tournament. The Pirates to get a community involved play Edmonds today at 4:30 in the school’s soccer prop.m., and Wednesday face grams. Everett at 4:30 p.m. Chapman said the Port The Peninsula women Angeles and surrounding will only play once, against communities have found Trinity Lutheran on various ways to help the Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. school’s soccer programs. Most of the NWAACC “The community’s been — 19 of the 20 men’s teams great with us. They really and 22 of the 24 women’s love having us around and teams — will participate in seeing our players out in the tournament. the community helping and The games count of stats doing things,” Chapman and rankings, but have no said. bearing on the postseason. “A lot of people in the Chapman said the tourcommunity have stepped nament is valuable for the up and shown their supexperience it offers the port, you know, fan base or players, especially the newwhatever they can do to comers, and as an opportuhelp us out. nity to scout other teams. “When you’re doing “It’s a good chance to go those things, I think the in and just watch everybody community really wants to and see what everybody be involved and really help has,” he said. out, and they take a real “More games, and a good self-interest in what chance for them to kind of we’re doing here, which is judge themselves. You know, nice.” 20 new players, they’ve Read the article online never seen an NWAACC here: www.tinyurl.com/ game, so they don’t really PCinAM. know what it’s like.”

Peninsula’s recent success, along with the 2012 NWAACC championship, they have a 40-2-3 record over the last two seasons, obviously has the rest of the West Division looking up at the Pirates, each team wanting to dethrone the champs. “I’m sure we got a big target on our back because we’ve done some good things in the past, being ranked nationally right now has also probably helped put a target on our back,” Chapman said. “But we’ve got some pretty hard opponents. Bellevue’s always strong with as big of a population as they have. “Highline is always the competitor, and they’re looking pretty good, too. It will be a good showdown.” Martinez said the Pirates welcome the target. “It gives us something to work for,” he said. ________ “If we have a game on Rumble recognized Saturday, they’re going to Sports reporter/outdoors colcome for us, and we have to The August/September umnist Lee Horton can be reached be prepared for that. issue of Athletic Manage- at 360-452-2345, ext. 5152 or at “If we have a target on ment magazine features an lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.

M’s: Maurer has struggled early in his starts CONTINUED FROM B1 with a 5.21 ERA before being called up to pitch in His hot pitching in long relief. “He’s learned a lot this spring didn’t carry over into the regular season, where season,” Wedge said. “I like the fact that he’s Maurer’s lack of experience — having made the move in the big leagues and in from Double A to the major the bullpen because he sees leagues — was readily it from a different light. I apparent. He made 10 think that’s going to help starts, going 2-7 with a 6.93 him too in his developERA before being sent down ment.” Wedge hopes the immeto Triple-A Tacoma. Maurer made 10 starts diacy of pitching in the bullwith the Rainiers, going 3-4 pen will help Maurer come

out and pitch with purpose immediately. As a starter, first innings were a problem for Maurer as Seattle opponents were hitting for a .449 average with a 1.232 on-base percentage in that inning alone. He also gave up 17 earned runs in 92/3 innings for a 15.83 ERA in cumulative first innings. As a reliever, Maurer never knows when he’s going to pitch and what the

situation will be, but he has to be ready. And he doesn’t have a ton of innings to figure it out. “The first pitch of a ball game is as important as anything else. The first hitter of the game is important as anything else,” Wedge said. “He’s got to figure that out. He had to fight through those first couple of innings . . . Those are the limitations he needs to figure out.”

Short hops Michael Saunders was out of the lineup for a second consecutive day with a sore neck Sunday. Wedge said Saunders woke up with it on Saturday morning. ■ Wedge was pleased with Mike Zunino’s first batting practice on Saturday, saying, “His batting practice yesterday was without hesitation. He

looked great, even fouled a couple pitches off where you thought [you] might see something.” Zunino worked on throws down to second base before Sunday’s game and looked sharp. “I think he’s on the path,” Wedge said. “What we’ll look to do the next couple days is . . . catch bullpens, take batting practice. If all is well, we’ll get him out.”

Seahawks place DT Williams on IR, Mariners activate Franklin Gutierrez from DL, designate Aaron Harang trim roster by making eight cuts THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RENTON — The Seattle Seahawks placed defensive tackle Jesse Williams on injured reserve Monday with a knee injury. Williams, one of three fifth-round draft picks by Seattle, was unable to practice more than a few days in a row before having to take

at least a day off throughout training camp. He played in the team’s first two preseason games and started their opener against San Diego, but didn’t record a tackle. Seattle also terminated the contract of wide receiver Brett Swain and waived receiver Perez Ashford, line-

backers Kyle Knox and Craig Wilkins, long-snapper Kyle Nelson, tight ends Jameson Konz and Andrei Lintz and defensive tackle Martin Parker. Seattle still needs to make six additional moves to get under the leaguemandated 75-man limit by Tuesday.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The Seattle Mariners have activated outfielder Franklin Gutierrez from the disabled list and recalled him from his rehabilitation assignment with Triple-A Tacoma on Monday. Gutierrez, who has been on the disabled list since June 25 and with a strained

right hamstring, is expected to start Monday’s game against the Texas Rangers in right field. He was also on the disabled list from May 16 to June 2 with the same ailment, and he has had four rehab assignments with Tacoma this season. In 18 games for the Mariners, Gutierrez is .267 with

five home runs and 11 RBI. Seattle designated righthander Aaron Harang for assignment. Harang (5-11, 5.76 ERA) started 22 games for the Mariners. He lost 7-1 to the Angels on Sunday, giving up all the runs. The Mariners have 10 days to trade, release or outright Harang’s contract to the minors.

Dawgs: More options Tennis: Blake to retire CONTINUED FROM B1 kies pass game from being so focused on either In last December’s Las Seferian-Jenkins — when Vegas Bowl against Boise he returns — or wide State, Seferian-Jenkins had receiver Kasen Williams. “We had a lot of youth six catches for 61 yards and last year. This year guys a touchdown. The doubt about were making plays in trainSeferian-Jenkins could also ing camp,” Price said. “Kevin Smith has had a hamper the Huskies’ new up-tempo offense, consider- tremendous camp, one of ing this is the first time the better camps out of the Washington is choosing to receivers and we’ve had a go no-huddle almost exclu- couple of young guys, John Ross and DiAndre Campsively. Seferian-Jenkins was bell making plays. “When guys are making the security quarterback Keith Price often turned to their plays it’s hard to throw it to just one guy.” last season. Price says he has more The Huskies’ other contrust in the others around cern is the distraction this him going into the season week brings with the specand should keep the Hus- tacle of retuning to Husky

FIRST

CONTINUED FROM B1 at Cincinnati on Aug. 15 before her quarterfinal against Li to fly home for “It wasn’t that much of her grandfather’s funeral. a big deal what was hapAmerican teen Lauren pening on the court. I Davis lost by a “double wasn’t nervous serving it bagel,” falling to 18thout.” Third-seeded Agnieszka seeded Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain 6-0, 6-0 Radwanska and fifthin 57 minutes. seeded Li Na advanced in No. 16-seeded Sabine straight sets on the womLisicki, the Wimbledon en’s side. runner-up, beat Vera DushRadwanska beat Silvia evina 6-2, 7-6 (3), while Soler-Espinosa 6-1, 6-2, 23rd-seeded American while Li defeated Olga Jamie Hampton defeated Govortsova 6-2, 6-2. Lara Arruabarrena Radwanska withdrew from her last tournament

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6-4, 6-2. On the men’s side, eighth-seeded Richard Gasquet eliminated American Michael Russell 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Bernard Tomic rallied past Albert Ramos in five sets, winning 6-3, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (1), 6-3 in nearly four hours. The day started with big news from a veteran U.S. player: Three-time Grand Slam quarterfinalist James Blake said he would retire after the tournament at age 33.

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Stadium for the first time since November 2011. The $280 million renovation will finally be shown off Saturday night, although the team has been able to enjoy the facilities for the past couple of weeks. “It makes for a special night. I think our staff and players have done a really nice job with the move in because anytime there is moving there are natural distractions,” Sarkisian said. “I think they’ve all handled it really well . . . and I think the team is ready to go play.”


B4

Fun ’n’ Advice

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

Dilbert

Mike Du Jour

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

Woman looks back on life’s decisions

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

by Lynn Johnston

by Mike Lester

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

DEAR ABBY: I am a 65-year-old active woman who still works. I play tennis several times a week and have a loving relationship with my kids. I know with certainty that I have many good things in my life. However, since my sister died last year, I have been having second thoughts about a lot of the decisions I have made over the years — especially regarding relationships and my choice of jobs. I realize now that more than a few of my decisions were based on low self-esteem, although I don’t come across that way. I’m feeling depressed and lonely, and it’s hard to be positive. I feel like my world is shrinking, and I don’t know how to get back on track and be a positive and happy person again. As it is, I’m faking it with my children, and my friends have no idea how I really feel. How do I improve my life at this late stage? Depressed in San Diego

DEAR ABBY subject that may be embarrassing Van Buren and risking angering someone isn’t fun, but it’s communication. If you have a problem, large or small, address it in private with the individual. And if someone tries to talk to you about something you’d rather not hear, be an adult, listen and respond civilly instead of reacting childishly. We teach children to respect authority, be kind to others and be leaders — but we don’t teach them healthy confrontation, which is something we all encounter in our lives. Talking It Out in Indiana

Abigail

Dear Depressed: One way would be to be more honest with your friends and fake it less. If they are good friends, they’ll be willing to listen and give you an honest perspective or the benefit of their life experience. That’s what friends do for each other. You are lucky to be vital and active because it means your world doesn’t have to shrink any more than you want it to. Because you say you’re lonely, perhaps it’s time to consider enlarging your circle of acquaintances. The loss of your sister is probably what started your re-evaluation of your life and choices, and that’s normal. But please remember that regret is the cancer of life. You can’t change the past, and you mustn’t allow it to cloud your future. While you may be having second thoughts about choices you made when you were younger, the lessons you learned from them have made you the person you are today.

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dear Talking It Out: I agree with you. The kind of communication you’re describing is a skill. It requires not only a strong ego on the part of the “confronter,” but also tact and diplomacy. And the “confrontee” needs to have the ability to listen without responding with hostility to what is being said. Dear Abby: In my university classroom, students place their feet on chairs, teachers lecture while sitting on their desks, and the dean of the school herself sits atop her desk and places her feet on a chair in front of her. Please tell me that this is not OK! Proper in Washington Dear Proper: It appears you come from a generation or culture in which the atmosphere has always been quite formal. I can tell you it’s “not OK” if it will make you feel better, but if it’s acceptable to the teacher, the dean and the school, then it’s time for you to loosen up.

Dear Abby: I think our culture is severely lacking when we don’t teach our children how to politely and nonaggressively stand up for themselves when the need arises. People suffer in all sorts of relationships — work, family, friends — because they’re afraid of confrontation. Raising a

by Mell Lazarus

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Whatever you do, offer your best effort and plenty of enthusiasm. The impression you make now will bring about better opportunities in the future. Don’t let a relationship stop you from being productive. Get your work finished before you socialize. 4 stars

Rose is Rose

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A challenge will create new friendships and an opportunity to use your skills in an unusual capacity. Let your emotions drive you to excel. Don’t get angry when you should get moving. If you want something, make it happen. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Express your feelings. It’s better to say what’s on your mind than to display actions that may be inappropriate. A change of plans will turn out in your favor. Put your energy into making personal improvements that will enhance your life. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Friends will play a role in the decisions you make. Problems with an older or younger family member should be taken care of using unusual methods. Show compassion, but don’t give in to a situation in which

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

by Eugenia Last

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You can listen to what others have to say, LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): but do what’s best for you. Keep a close watch over the Someone is not going to way others react to the situ- have your best interests at ations that unfold at work heart. Leave some time to and at home. Staying enjoy socializing or getting grounded and making last- together with someone you minute alterations will show love. 3 stars your leadership ability and CAPRICORN (Dec. attract an interest in your 22-Jan. 19): Your sensitivity personality. 2 stars toward a situation will not go VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. unnoticed. Take pride in your 22): Don’t wait for someone ability to get things done. else to make the first move. Make your choices based on Strike while the iron is hot and what you see and know to make your point clear. Don’t be true, not what someone feel you have to pay for others’ tries to lead you to believe. mistakes. Take over and do 5 stars things your way. 5 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t dwell on 22): Don’t assume anything the obstacles when there is if you don’t want to be disap- so much you can do if you pointed. Do your own thing let your talent and ability and refuse to cave if some- lead the way. An interesting one is pushy. Take time to connection you have with chill out and rejuvenate. Pick someone will spark an idea up an item that boosts your that can lead to financial ego or confidence. 3 stars gains. 2 stars you don’t feel comfortable. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Believe in your abilities and talents, and trust in your judgment. Follow through with your plan and speak on behalf of yourself and those you feel you can represent honestly. You can make a difference if you follow through. 3 stars

The Family Circus

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Focus on partnerships, love and the opportunities you will encounter through the connections you make. Keep your feelings hidden until you have a chance to see if someone shares your sentiments. Invest in an idea you have. 2 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Tuesday, August 27, 2013 PAGE

B5 $ Briefly . . . Cookie dough with peanuts being recalled

FOUR

GRADUATE FROM RURAL NURSING PROGRAM

Four Jefferson Healthcare employees recently graduated from the Port Townsend hospital’s Rural Outreach Nursing Education program. Shown with program administrator Amber Hudson, second from left, are graduates Cindy Detering, Christa Ligtenberg, Me’l Christiansen, from left, and, in front, Rachel Collins. The RONE program, which now has 13 graduates, is a two-year online curriculum presented in collaboration with Lower Columbia Community College in Longview.

Trump sued over university THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York’s attorney general claims that Donald Trump is making wild accusations, just like others who commit fraud and get caught. Eric Schneiderman said Trump’s TV interviews Monday calling the attorney general a hack are attempts to distract the public from Schneiderman’s fraud case against the tycoon and his Trump University. Trump held several TV interviews to further contest the lawsuit filed Saturday. Trump said Monday that his university is a booming success for student entrepreneurs. “We have a terrific school. It’s done a fantastic job,” Trump told ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

Schneiderman’s suit alleges that the real estate mogul’s university promised to make students rich but instead steered them into expensive and mostly useless seminars. Trump Trump’s attorney, Michael Cohen, said Saturday that Schneiderman was upset the reality TV star didn’t give him more campaign contributions. Cohen called it extortion. Trump, in TV interviews, denied Schneiderman’s claims that Trump never met with students and didn’t pick instructors. “I was totally involved to a very high degree,” he said. “I told people what to do, and if they had listened to

me, would have made a lot of money.” Schneiderman declined to comment Monday. He is suing Trump and Trump University for $40 million, accusing them of engaging in persistent fraud, illegal and deceptive conduct and violating federal consumer protection law.

Promised apprenticeships He said the developer of hotels, casinos and more also failed to deliver promised apprenticeships. New York State Education Department officials had told Trump to change the name of his enterprise years ago, saying it lacked a license and didn’t meet the legal definitions of a university. In 2011, it was renamed the Trump Entrepreneur Institute.

OMAHA, Neb. — ConAgra Foods Inc. is recalling some Kroger’s Break ‘N Bake chocolate chip cookie dough packages because they contain peanuts. ConAgra said peanut butter cup cookie dough was inadvertently packed into the packages, posing a danger to people with peanut allergies. No illnesses have been reported so far. The recall is limited to 16-ounce packages of Kroger’s Break ‘N Bake Chocolate Chip cookie dough with the unit UPC code “11110 87530” and the use by date “24NOV13C21.” They were sold in QFC, Kroger, Fred Meyer, Dillons, Baker’s, Gerbes, Foods Co., Food 4 Less, Fry’s, Jay C, Owen’s, Pay Less, Scott’s, Ralphs and Smith’s stores in 26 states. Consumers can return the dough for a refund.

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

Amgen-Onyx deal

NEW YORK — A handful of corporate deals helped nudge the stock market up in midday trading Monday. Amgen surged 8 percent, the biggest gain in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Server crashes index, after the biotech NEW YORK — Amagiant said it plans to buy zon’s unit that runs Web Onyx Pharmaceuticals for servers for other compa$10.4 billion. nies had problems Sunday The merger would give that coincided with outAmgen three approved ages or slowdowns on sevcancer treatments. eral popular websites. AirBnB says its site was one of those affected. Gold and silver Gold futures for Other services that were December delivery fell slow or unavailable $2.70, or 0.2 percent, to included Instagram and Twitter’s Vine video-shar- settle at $1,393.10 an ounce on Monday. ing application. Silver for September Online home rental service AirBnB tweeted at delivery rose 27 cents to 4:32 p.m. ET it was one of end at $24.01 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News several sites that were and The Associated Press temporarily down.

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NOW HIRING! Nursing Assistants Certified Full Time, Part Time and Per Diem All shifts available! Apply online: www.teamavamere.com Avamere Olympic Rehab of Sequim 1000 S. 5th Ave (360)582-3900

HR GENERALIST Responsible for HR L aw s o n m o d u l e i n cluding daily entry of data, running reports, maintaining codes and tables. Works closely with benefits, payroll, and managers to explain system requirements, and problem solve, etc. Prior Laws o n t ra i n i n g / ex p e r i ence required. Apply online at www.olympic medical.org or nbuckner@ olympicmedical.org. OFFICE ASSISTANT Fast paced office looking for part-time employee who will need to be able to work under pressure, type 60 wpm, proven record of excellent customer service, strict adherence to confidentiality is a must. Bring resumes to 315 E. 8th St., P.A.

HUMAN RESOURCE DIRECTOR HR Director’s job is to implement HR programs and policies, and to manage every aspect of employee development and relations. The main responsibility of the HR director is to manage recruiting and staffing, performance management, benefits and compensation administration, organizational development, employee counseling services, and training. Most HR directors report to the Financial Officer. Must have either Bachelor’s degree in Business or Human Resources from an accredited university or institution. AA in Business or Human Resources. At least four years’ experience in Human Resources. Salary: $33,280-$41,600 DOE/Q For complete job description and application you can contact Kristina Curr ie; Administrative Assistant, phone: (360)374-6582 email: kristinac@ hohtribe-nsn.org


Classified

B6 TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 683 Rooms to Rent Clallam County Roomshares General General General Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

PHARMACY ASSISTANT Mon.-Fri. rotating weekend shifts. Exceptional customer service skills, high school diploma or NURSE: RN, LPN, or GED equivalent. Apply M A fo r p r i m a r y c a r e at Jim’s Pharmacy, 424 medical office, FT, office E. 2nd St., P.A. EOE. exp. preferred. Peninsula Daily News RESIDENT Care CoPDN#708/Nurse ordinator / LPN. RePort Angeles, WA 98362 sponsible for the health services department. Hires/trains/ supv/schedules our care-giving staff. Coordinate, monitor and evaluate the services for resident care PARK VIEW VILLAS, needs. Must be exp in An Independent and staff dev, medication Assisted Living admin, scheduling, Community regulations and geriatNow accepting applir ics. Apply direct to cations for CNA, and Seaport Landing ReLine Cook. Both full tirement Assisted Livand part-time positions ing Comm, 1201 Hanavailable. Great benecock St, Por t fit package with generTownsend, WA 98368 ous 401k. Pick up apor send resumes to plication or drop off Employment@ resume at Park View LiveBSL.com Villas at the corner of 8th and G street, P.A. No phone calls, please RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Full time, great benePART-TIME fits, M-F! Support the SPORTS WRITER well-being of our resiThe Peninsula Daily dents through the News has an immedicreation of care plans, ate opening for a interaction with family spor ts writer to help members, and being a with Nor th Olympic key m e m b e r o f o u r high school football team. Must be a WA coverage as well as State licensed RN. other fall athletics on Ideal candidate is exthe prep and commuperienced, personable, nity college levels. dependable, and enthusiastic. Give us a This is a temporar y, call to talk about the part-time position. The position and schedule writer will cover selecta tour! ed games and write Contact HR: follow-up game stories (360)683-3348 as well as feature arti550 W. Hendrickson cles. The job requires Sequim, WA 98382 Friday night and Saturday work; other times can be worked out according to the applicant’s personal schedule. GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. Requirements include 360-452-8435 good and accurate 1-800-826-7714 wr iting skills, and a VICTIM ADVOCATE knowledge of sports — ASSISTANT particularly football. This position, funded by the Department of JusPlease email tice, Office on Violence Rex Wilson, Against Women and will executive editor, at provide direct intervenrex.wilson@peninsula tion and related assisdailynews.com with questions as well tance for victims/survias a letter of interest v o r s o f d o m e s t i c v i o l e n c e, d a t i n g v i o and resume. lence, sexual assault and/or stalking who live on the Hoh Indian ResSEKIU: PT cook/server, ervation and/or are enrolled Hoh Tribal memwilling to train. Apply at bers living off(360)963-2894 reservation. Victim Advocate Assistance will contribute to the service of adult, youth and child victims as well as family and household members of victims/survivors and those collaterally affected by the victimization (except for the perpetrator/offender). The Victim Advocate Assistance will T h e Q u i l e u t e Tr i b a l provide assistance to the Council has a job open- P r o g r a m D i r e c t o r i n ing for a Payroll Techni- working with the commucian II: The payroll tech nity to create education will perform accounting a n d p r eve n t i o n c a m tasks related to payroll paigns and facilitating or for the Quileute Tribe. organizing related trainMust have two years of ings for staff and staker e l a t e d e x p e r i e n c e holders. and/or training in pro- Preferred qualifications cessing payroll. Must are experience training have experience with the in working with adults use of a computerized a n d / o r c h i l d r e n w h o p ay r o l l s y s t e m . M u s t have survived domestic have High school diplo- v i o l e n c e, d a t i n g v i o ma or GED with lower lence, sexual assault level college accounting and/or stalking situacourses/degree. Must be tions. bondable. Indian Prefer- Training and experience e n c e a p p l i e s. S a l a r y in cr isis inter vention. DOQ/E, Must submit job DOE/Q. application and referenc- For complete job dee s by S e p t e m b e r 0 6 , scription and application 2013. Visit our website you can contact Kristina a t w w w . q u i l e u t e n a - Curr ie; Administrative tion.org for job applica- A s s i s t a n t , p h o n e : tion and job description (360)374-6582 email: or call the Personnel kristinac@ Dept. (360)374-4366. hohtribe-nsn.org

RESIDENTIAL AIDE 3 Po s i t i o n s. F T s h i f t work & on-call. Promote daily living skills of residents, cooking/housekeeping skills. Work exper ience with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred, Req. H.S./GED. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. EOE. Details at http://peninsula behavioral.org

BEAUTIFUL HOME on 19.6 acres between Sequim and Port Angeles, 5 br., 5 bath, great for enter taining, gour met kitchen, deck, dramatic master suite, fireplace, walk-in shower, hydrot h e ra py t u b. G a r d e n s and vineyard. Perfect VETERINARY mother-in-law apt with RECEPTION Pa r t - t i m e , w e e k e n d s own entrance or home req. Apply in person, office or B&B. 3182 Blue G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y Mountain Road. $799,900 Hospital, Sequim. NWMLS 40941 Appt (360)461-3926 VET KENNEL/ JANITORIAL POSITION CHERRY HILL Part-time, weekends reCHARMER quired. Apply in person, You’ll love this 2 Br., 1 G r e y w o l f Ve t e r i n a r y bath with an updated Hospital, Sequim. kitchen with new cabinets, custom tile counter 4080 Employment top and back splash and tile floor. Dining room Wanted with door to the multi level deck with beautiful ADEPT YARD CARE views of the Strait of Weeding, mowing, etc. Juan de Fuca. Living (360)452-2034 room with wood stove and views of the MounADULT Tender Care. tains. Newer roof, updatPersonalized In Home ed wiring and plumbing, Care. Excellent Refer- double pane windows ences, Available Sep- and upgraded insulation tember 1st. in the attic. Fully fenced (360)461-0913 b a ck ya r d . 2 c a r d e tached garage plus an EXP. ADMIN Position RV/Boat garage. Wanted. Highly Qualified MLS#271862. $142,500. Adm Mgr/Ex Asst 9-yrs Kelly Johnson exp const ind. Skilled (360) 477-5876 cust serv, Mktg asst, AA WINDERMERE acctg, HR and Paralegal PORT ANGELES certs, RE exp. You will CLEAN AND COMFY! be pleased you hired This 3Bd, 2BA manume. 360.775.1573 factured home offers an open floor plan, over 1500 sq. ft. a 2 car carport with plenty of onsite parking & a fenced backyard with a patio, a storage building & lovely landscaping. The pride in ownership is evident throughout. MLS#271824. $139,000. I am a loving and comKathy Brown passionate person (360)417-2785 with several years of COLDWELL BANKER experience in the SeUPTOWN REALTY q u i m c o m m u n i t y. I f you or your loved one ELEGANT SUNLAND need help in your HOME home, please call De- 3 Br., 2.5 bath on 4th anna, (360)565-6271. Fairway, remodeled with q u a l i t y fe a t u r e s , t o p quality appliances, cherJUAREZ & SON’S HANDYMAN SERVICES ry cabinets and built-ins, Quality work at a rea- tile floors with in floor sonable price. Can han- heat, cozy librar y and dle a wide array of prob- golf course view atrium. MLS#527355/271791 lem projects. Like home $380,000 maintenance, cleaning, TEAM SCHMIDT clean up, yard mainteMike: 460-0331 nance, and etc. Give us Irene: 460-4040 a call office 452-4939 or WINDERMERE cell 460-8248. SUNLAND RENT-A-MAN Labor for END OF THE ROAD hire. Inside or out. Call RANCH PROPERTY and we’ll talk. John The secluded living on (360)775-5586 this 78 acre parcel alRE-SCREEN lows many opportunities. WINDOW/DOOR Create your own horse 775-4570 or 681-8582 ranch or far m on this beautiful view acreage. RUSSELL Level acreage in front ANYTHING and a forest with tax ad775-4570 or 681-8582 vantages in the rear portion. Adjacent to miles of 105 Homes for Sale DNR land to explore. Well cared for home with Clallam County large carpor t and outbuildings. Open and ACREAGE sunny setting with QuilNeed about 12 acres of cene Bay nearby for recpasture with a mountain reational fun and seaview to create your own food! Year round creek n i r va n a ? Fr a m e d i n a n d p o s s i b l e w a t e r home for a 3 br., 2 bath rights. Owner will carry needs completing, while contract. the pasture is waiting for MLS#500297. $425,000. your critters. Lots of hillJim Munn side trails to ride nearby. (360)301-4700 Crescent water share inMUNN BRO’S cluded. This is a farHOOD CANAL mette in the rough waitPROPERTIES ing for your ideas. Washington Federal of- E S TA B L I S H E D c o n fers an owner-builder signment business for construction loan. Call sale. Fabulous business for more information. opportunity to purchase MLS#270576 $125,000 a loved business with Michaelle Barnard loyal customers and cli(360) 461-2153 ents . Ebay opportunity WINDERMERE and constant flow of new PORT ANGELES inventor y! Wanting to sell to continue my health career. Don’t let this chance to be a new bu s i n e s s ow n e r p a s s you by! $10,000. Call for details, Michele, (360)461-4799.

No labor for us on Labor Day!

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

EXCELLENT CONDITION Roomy 2 Br., 2 bath + Rec Room, Over 1,900 sf of cozy living, oversized garage + storage shed, rv parking by garage (water, sewer and 50 amp), 3 decks and fenced backyard, distant water and mt. views MLS#473981/270810 $225,500 Deb Kahle (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

will be closed Monday, Sept. 2nd for Labor Day. The following are early advertising deadlines:

DISPLAY/LEGAL ADS ISSUE Tuesday, Sept. 3 Wednesday, Sept. 4 Thursday, Sept. 5 Pen. Profile, Sept. 8 TV Book, Sept. 15

AD DEADLINE Wed., Aug. 28; 2 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 29; 2 p.m. Fri., Aug. 30; 2 p.m. Fri., Aug. 30; 2 p.m. Wed., Sept. 4; 2 p.m.

FOR SALE By Owner. $185,000. Immaculate, spacious 1,848 sf on 1.01 acres, between Sequim and Port Angeles. 2004 doublewide, 3 br., 2 bath, large kitchen, with breakfast bar, dining room, living room, large family rm. Attached 2-car garage, storage shed. Private septic and well. (360)457-8345.

CLASSIFIED LINE ADS AD DEADLINE Fri., Aug. 30; 4 p.m.

38862160

ISSUE Tue., Sept. 3

FRESHWATER BAY Beautiful home built to enjoy the view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Mt. Baker and Vancouver Island in a private setting on 5 acres just 1 mile to the public boat SALE or RENT launch and beach which is known for the best 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliances included+ w/d. fishing and kayaking. The main level features b u i l t i n s u r r o u n d a living room w/pellet sound, French doors s t o v e , d i n i n g r o o m , to patio, big backyard, kitchen with pantry, laun- shed, double garage, dr y room, main bath- fireplace, crown moldroom, 2nd bedroom and ing. Cul-de-sac neighthe master suite with tile borhood! Rental price shower. The loft can be $1200 monthly. Call a fa m i l y r o o m , g u e s t Tammy now (360)457-9511 or bedroom or office. 2 car (360)461-9066! garage + shop, shed, garden and orchard. UNDER MLS#271878. $399,900. CONSTRUCTION Kelly Johnson Located in a nice west (360) 477-5876 side neighborhood. The WINDERMERE main level features a livPORT ANGELES ing room, kitchen with breakfast bar dining FRESHWATER BAY This casually elegant, area and pantry, family 4-star, green-built home room, mud room with by Dave Bukovnik is on laundry and half bath5.1 acres of high bank room and an entrance to waterfront with unbe- the 2 car garage. Upl i eva bl e v i ew s o f t h e stairs features the masStrait of Juan de Fuca. t e r b e d r o o m w i t h a t This home features 4 t a c h e d f u l l b a t h a n d bedrooms, 2 baths and walk-in closet, two other 3,828 square feet includ- bedrooms with views of ing the basement, as the Strait and a full bathwell as an exquisite local room. There is still time wood, r iver rock fire- to pick colors. p l a c e d e s i g n e d i n a MLS#271863. $229,000. Terry Neske Nor thwest rustic style. (360) 477-5876 Also includes a guest WINDERMERE cabin, a separate studio, PORT ANGELES native landscaping, privacy and beach access. VERY MLS#271879 WELL CARED FOR $1,500,000 Newer roof and furnace. Jean Irvine Just repainted inside for (360)417-2797 a fresh palate and new COLDWELL BANKER blinds in the living/dining UPTOWN REALTY room. Kitchen has a breakfast bar, pantr y, and lots of cabinets. All appliances stay. Newer roof and furnace. There are lots of beautiful smaller trees on the property included apple. Property also has a storage garage and green FSBO $237,000 Open building for lawn equipplan triple wide 2300 sf, ment. Brand new septic 3 br., 2 bath, large bo- being installed. nus room or 4th bedMLS#271595/514609 room. Mountain view on $200,000 1.01 acres, close to DisDave Stofferahn covery Trail, not in the Cell: 477-5542 Carlsborg Urban Growth TOWN & COUNTRY Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, 308 For Sale extra large 28 x 36 (1008 sf) detached garLots & Acreage age and workshop. (360)582-9782 GREAT RAMBLER On 2.5 park-like acres a n d eve n i n c l u d e s a wonderful barn, used as the ideal shop with wo o d s t ove a n d l a r g e loft. Beautiful setting with paved circular drive & privacy trees that surround the proper ty. 3 Br., 2 bath. A must see! MLS#270998. $269,000. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 A Studio-Furn ..........$500 A 1 br 1 ba ..............$575 H 2 br 1 ba ...............$600 H 2 br 2 ba ...............$795 A 3 br 1 ba ...............$875 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 H 3 br 2 ba .............$1200 A Penthouse ..........$1200 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1200 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1350 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, like new, dead end st. $850 mo., dep. (360)452-6118

1163 Commercial Rentals P.A. Commercial warehouse, 5,000 sf, 4 14’ roll up doors, lots of parkign, visibility. $2,500 plus dep. (360)460-7200 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

P. A . : 2 B r. , 1 b a t h , washer/dr yer hookup, SEQUIM: Office/retail 900 sf., 1 car det. gar. space 850 sf. $800 mo. $795. (253)761-1613. (360)460-5467 P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $650, last, dep. 6010 Appliances 452-1694 eves. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba., gar. $1,100 mo. $1,100 se- FRIDGE: Kenmore, 6 months old, with ice curity. (360)417-0153. maker. Excellent condiP.A.: 3 br., 2 miles up tion. $300. Race St., $800. (360)457-8700 (360)461-1500

6042 Exercise Equipment

P. A . : 4 B r. , 1 . 5 b a , fenced yard. $925, 1st, last, dep. (360)452-7530 P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, view, 1 yr. lease. Small dog 35 lb. or less negotiable. $ 1 , 1 5 0 , $ 1 , 1 5 0 d e p. Avail. now. 457-3099.

P.A.: Fantastic 2,500 sf 3 Br., 3 ba, 3 car gar., office, family room, rec room. $1,375, $1,000 dep. (360)460-7254. EXERCISE BIKE: Exercise bike, magnetic, caP.A.: West side, 2+ Br., pacity 300 lbs., like new. w o o d s t ove, c a r p o r t , $255. (360)683-4856. patio. No pets. $750 mo. Dep./ref. (360)808-4476. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

AMMO: 223 PMC 55 R E S TO R E D v i n t a g e grain, 1,000 rounds, h o m e . 3 / 2 + , g a r a g e , FMJBT. $700. (360)417-0539 acreage, view. Possible horse boarding nearby. $1,500. Info at www.rejww.net/774 (360)461-9434 SEQ.: 3 br., 2 bath, 2 car gar. $950, f/l/d. Open Sept. 1. (360)460-0380. SEQUIM: Beautiful house in Sunland, 2,495 sf, dbl garage, fenced yard. $1,400, plus dep. (360)681-8723 SEQUIM COTTAGES •Brand new 1 Br., 1 car gar., small pet ok, 101 Ritter Rd. $850 mo. •Studio cottage with beach access, br ight, modern, $850 mo. JACE the Real Estate Company. Call or text (360)808-0338

BEAUTIFUL secluded 4 acres in Port Angeles urban growth area near Hwy 101 and Mt. Pleasant Road, fabulous mountain views, devel605 Apartments opment potential. $150,000, some shor t Clallam County ter m owner financing considered. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 (360)808-7107 ba, no smoking/pets . roger@gmail.com $500. (360)457-9698. LIVE IN FARM Agents protected. COUNTRY CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, 2.47 acres, fenced and quiet, 2 Br., excellent 311 For Sale surrounded by trees, 3 references required. br, 3 bath, 1,610 sf, built Manufactured Homes $700. (360)452-3540. in 1996, 1,100 sf 3-car garage plus workshop, 2 MOBILE HOME: 2 Br., rv parking spaces with good condtion, soaking all utilities, irr igation, tub, ready to move. well, fruit trees, enclosed $4,000. (360)460-5358. g a ze b o, w ra p a r o u n d deck. MLS#271887. $240,000. Team Thomsen CENTRAL P.A.: Con(360)808-0979 venient 1 br., and 2 br. COLDWELL BANKER Apts. 2nd floor, clean, UPTOWN REALTY light, $553-$661 incl. util! No Smoke/pet maybe, NEAR NEW (360)504-2668. 1,626 sf 3 Br., 2 ba on S E Q U I M : 2 4 x 4 8 d b l 0.66 acres east of P.A. wide ‘84, heat pump & Enjoy Your One Month Quiet tree setting, end of wood stove, in park but FREE and Pay Only r o a d . L i v i n g , f a m i l y, can be moved. $24,000/ $99 TO MOVE IN! laundry, dining rooms, obo. (360)683-9229. EVERGREEN walk-in closets, storage COURT APTS shed, 2 car att. garage. SEQUIM: 24x60 2 Br., 2 (360)452-6996 b a m o b i l e , n ew w i n Price reduced. $174,000 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. dows, heat pump, shop/ (360)640-0556 $685 and $760. storage building, fenced, Some restrictions apply. PARKWOOD LIVING carport. $28,500. Call today! Well maintained 3 Br., 2 (360)460-9999 Managed by Sparrow, bath home, newer roof Inc. and front deck, new win408 For Sale dows, carpet and paint Commercial throughout, updated bathrooms, bonus room PICTURE PERFECT Properties by off kitchen. Beautiful 1,760 sf triple Landmark. portangelesMLS#271877/532602 wide home in Clausen landmark.com $84,500 Cove. This spotless Tyler Conkle home features laminate S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 (360)670-5978 flooring in the kitchen, Br., great location, unfurWINDERMERE living and dining areas, n i s h e d , $ 7 0 0 , o r f u r SUNLAND kitchen with plenty of nished, $750. 809-3656. PRICED RIGHT AT THE cabinets, comfor table WEST P.A.: Clean, quiet RIGHT TIME fa m i l y r o o m , m a s t e r 1 br. studio, with deck One acre landscaped suite with office or sitting and yard. property with plenty of area, utility room with $550. (360)670-6160. elbow room. Very large cabinets, garage with metal shop with 2-10’ plenty of storage, private 665 Rental h i g h o v e r s i z e d b a y patio, and much more. doors. Gardeners will MLS#271764. $184,000. Duplex/Multiplexes relish the park-like back Tom Blore yard, including various (360)683-4116 CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 fruit trees and garden PETER BLACK bath. Fireplace, garage. areas. Enjoy leisurely reREAL ESTATE W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r treats on the back deck. pets. $800. 460-8797. Front yard has lovely 505 Rental Houses P.A.: 2831 E. 101. UnOlympic Mountain views Clallam County furn., large, 2 br. $725. MLS#271888. $289,000. (360)452-9195. Chuck Murphy DISCO BAY: Waterfront, (360)808-0873 newly renovated 3 Br., 2 Windermere ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. 683 Rooms to Rent Real Estate Roomshares $900. (360)460-2330. Sequim East

SPACIOUS Lovely 2,400 sf custom home with a beautifully landscaped 1/2 acre of manicured grounds. This expansive and well maintained home has new car pet and has been freshly painted. This home is perfectly designed for entertaining and for hosting large P.A.: 2 houses on ap- gatherings. $249,900 prox. 1.5 acres, with apJim Hardie p r ox . 3 , 0 0 0 s f s h o p. U-$ave Real Estate $425,000. 775-7146 (360)452-7743

SEQUIM: Master bed and bath on one acre. $435/month + utilities. Garden space, quiet, stable. No smoke/ dr inking. Must have references, cat must approve you. (360)582-3189

DOWNTOWN SEQUIM P.A.: 2 rooms for rent. 1,800 sf, 3 Br., 2 ba, 2 Organic farm. $350 ea.+ car gar., fenced, clean, utilities. (360)452-4021. extras, near park/ ROOMMATE schools. $1,200 mo. WANTED 582-9848 or 477-5070 To share expenses for DRY Creek area: Peace- very nice home west of ful, near Elwha/Discov- P.A. on 10+ acres. $425 ery Trail, immaculate, 2 mo., includes utilities, Dibr., 2 bath, loft, 1 acre, rectTV. Must see. Call sun and trees. $975, no Lonnie after 5 p.m. smoke, animals neg. (360)477-9066 (360)461-4428 GARAGE SALE ADS P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, carCall for details. port, no pets. $775, dep. 360-452-8435 (360)457-7012 1-800-826-7714

G R E AT G u n D e a l s : Ruger mini-14, with 3 m a g s, $ 8 0 0 . R u g e r Blackhawk, 357, 4 5/8 bl. NIB, $429. S&W m. 439, 9mm, $400.Ruger Vaquero 44 mag. $600. (360)504-5127.

Gun & Knife

SHOW Buy A Sell A Trade

Sept. 7th & 8th SAT. 9-5 A SUN. 9:30-3

Masonic Temple 622 S. Lincoln, Port Angeles WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

Sunday - Door Prizes! WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

6080 Home Furnishings B E D : B ra n d n ew, q u e e n , Te m p u r - Pe d i c with box spring, never been slept in. Just too large for my room! Paid over $2,000. Asking only $1,500. (360)928-9525.

CAPTAINS BED: Full size, birch hardwood, 8 drawers and 3 doors, excellent condition. $500/ obo. (360)808-4237.

COFFEE TABLE: Antique, oak, carved fluted legs, glass top, unique. $350. (360)504-2999, Sequim.

C U S TO M B u i l t B u n k Bed. Hand crafted bunk bed for sale. Kids are grown and gone, no longer needed in our shrinking household. Used for about 10 years. Side rails show some wear but overall still in great shape! Assembles with lag bolts, included. Solid 2 x 6 and 2 x 10 wood construction! Two large storage drawers on casters roll away beneath lower bunk. Bed is convertible to be made into two separate beds. One mattress is included. $500. Call Laura at (360)531-1510

DINING ROOM SUITE Pine. Table, 2 leaves, 6 c h a i r s, l i g h t e d c h i n a cabinet. $750 all. Will separate, photos available (360)504-2581 or email golfgirl44@ wavecable.com FURNITURE: Couch/ Bed, futon couch black metal frame with burgandy full size futon mattress, $150. Executive desk chair, gray padded, $20. Twin box spring and rack, $40. All in great shape! (360)461-5731

MISC: Brass bed, needs some refinishing, queen size Englander pillow top mattress, $500/obo. Dining table with hidden leaf, 4 chairs, $250/obo. (248)880-2837

MISC: Dining room set with 4 chairs, $200. K i t c h e n t a bl e w i t h 2 chairs, $75. Twin bed with mattresses, etc., $75. 2 enter tainment centers, $150 and $25. 2 end tables, $40 ea. Desk, $50. Cedar chest, $25. (360)683-4611.

S E T: L o g b e d , 4 p c, queen bed frame, dresser, 2 night stands, all hand crafted. $1,750/ obo. (360)683-4056. SOFA: With loveseat, Italian leather, dar k green, ex. cond. $350. (360)683-7016

6100 Misc. Merchandise

AIR CONDITIONER Por table A/C, with remote, new, never used. $175. (360)374-2624.

$

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Info- 360-202-7336

GUN SHOW Sequim Prairie Grange Aug. 31-Sept.1. Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3. Admission $5, Family $7. Tables both days $35. Don Roberts (360)457-1846 Donr@olypen.com

CANOE: 16’, Navarro Loon, used once, current list price $2,600. Asking $1,300. (360)379-1836.

COOKTOP: We’ve got g a s n o w. G E P r o f i l e black glass top, 5 burners, 36”, like new. $300/ obo. (360)477-4838.

FUEL TANK with tool box for pickup, 100 gallon, hand pump, HUNTING Rifles: Stain- $400/obo. (360)374-6661. less Savage 116 bolt action 300 WSM, $525. HOME BREWING Stainless Tikka T3 bolt EQUIPMENT a c t i o n 7 R e m M a g , Everything for advanced $ 5 5 0 . B r o w n i n g B L R brewer. $1,050. take down lever gun 300 (360)681-0988 WSM, $550. Winchester S X R s e m i a u t o 3 0 0 MISC: 3 hanging shop WSM, $550. heaters, 5800 watts, 220 (360)775-1544 volt, $150 ea. Propane gas free standing stove, MISC: Ruger 22 Mark III $400. 8” radial arm saw Hunter, stainless, 4.5” with stand, $200. 10” b a r r e l , $ 6 7 5 . B e r e t t a miter saw, $100. PanTom Cat, 32 cal, auto, 8 c a ke a i r c o m p r e s s o r, shot, $475. $150. (360)460-6891. (360)452-3213 MISC: Front Coilovers, STI, AST 4100 6055 Firewood, Subaru series, never installed, Fuel & Stoves $300. MTX 81000D T h u n d e r a m p. , 1 5 0 0 FIREWOOD: $179 deliv- watts, class D amplifier, ered Sequim-P.A. True never installed, $250. cord. 3 cord special for Kicker SX 1250.1 Ampli$499. Credit card acfier, 1,250 watts, class D cepted. 360-582-7910. amp., $300. 12” kicker www.portangeles Solo Baric L7 Subwooffirewood.com er, dual sealed box, (2) for $300. 2.0 Farad Capacitor, never opened, REAL FIREWOOD $ 5 0 . P I O n e e r Av l t (360)460-3639 P3200BT DVD receiver, bl u e t o o t h , $ 1 0 0 . C a l l Brian, (808)348-7542. 6065 Food &

Farmer’s Market

TICKETS: Seahawks vs. Broncos (Preseason), BLUEBERRIES: Certi- Cardinals, Buccaneers, fied organic, Dungeness R o w T, S e c t i o n 3 3 7 , Meadow Farm. U-Pick. Seat 20-21. $100 ea. $3.25/lb. (360)582-1128. (360)461-3661 TUNA: Whole Albacore Tuna. Loins avail. by order. High Tide Seafoods, (360)452-8488

6075 Heavy Equipment KABOTA: Diesel tractor, model 5100 15 HP, 2 w h e e l d r i ve , 3 p o i n t hitch, scraper blade and bucket, uncludes shop manual. $2,650. (360)683-8567 SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 30’. Electric tar p system, excellent condition. $6,500/obo. (360)417-0153

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Classified

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Seepage at sea 6 King’s tenure 11 Attach a button, e.g. 14 “Bye, José!” 15 WWII sub 16 “Go, José!” 17 Easy-to-swallow gelatin pill 19 Luau instrument 20 Util. supply 21 Gets a load of, so to speak 22 Backpack part 24 Daily Planet cub reporter 26 Swab brand 27 Pirate on the Jolly Roger 28 Sydney natives 31 Decorative piece behind a couch 34 Cost-of-living fig. 35 Sticks around 36 Wish undone 37 “For goodness __!” 39 European peak 40 Aromatic burner made from vegetable wax 42 Lake __: “Prairie Home Companion” town 45 Thin coin 46 Colorado natives 47 Valuable violin 49 Persian Gulf emirate 51 Refinery waste 52 Arduous expedition 56 Flow back 57 Seafood selection suggested by this puzzle’s circles 60 Gibson of “Braveheart” 61 Artist Rousseau 62 Pisa place 63 Pay dirt 64 Out of the harbor 65 Styles DOWN 1 Slider’s goal 2 Recipient of bags of fan mail

AIR RIFLES: (2) Daisy air rifles. $20 for both. (360)683-0033

Tuesday, August 27, 2013 B7 By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizon­ tally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. GLADIOLUS Solution: 7 letters

S U C C E S S F U L I L Y E E 8/27/13

By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke

3 “That’s __!” 4 Snuggled up on the couch, say 5 PC “oops” key 6 Mumbai money 7 Jed Clampett portrayer Buddy 8 Promissory notes 9 Guy’s pal 10 Experimental bomb blasts 11 Cucumber in brine 12 Betty’s role in “Hot in Cleveland” 13 Have a bawl 18 Desirable quality 23 “__ the season ...” 25 Grassy expanses 26 “__ Sera, Sera” 27 Bathtub popper 28 Actor Guinness 29 Fencer’s sword 30 Family nickname 31 1944 invasion city 32 Presley’s middle name 33 Pay cash for 35 Tool with teeth

CAMPER SHELL White, 5.5’ x 8’, nice. (360)582-9622

AMMO: .22 LR Rem- CANOPY: Brahma fiberm i n g t o n T h u n d e r b o l t , glass, 60” x 91”, tinted $80. (360)379-3699. windows, lock broken, silver. $125. 457-3770. AQUARIUM: Large. CANOPY: Fits ‘96 Ford $25. (360)681-3556. F150 Longbed, green, fiAQUARIUM: With lights b e r g l a s s, t i n t e d w i n ( 2 ) , $ 3 0 . P u m p, $ 2 0 . dows. $100. 477-1903. Stand, $20. CAR: ‘83 Mazda 626, (360)452-9530 needs clutch work. $200. AUTO CHAINS: Never (360)582-3189 used, (2) cable, (1 CARPET CLEANER: chain), all $50. Bissell. $25. (360)437-0437 (360)683-1397 BACKPACK: Large, 8 p o c k e t s , a l u m i n u m CARPET: New. 7.5’ x9’, beige, never used. $60. frame, support belts. (360)582-9700 $10. (360)683-5614. BED: Sleigh, Queen, black. $200. (360)417-1277

CAR RAMPS: For working on car. $10. (360)457-4383

BICYCLE: Mongoose, Model 100 racing bike. $70. (360)417-2056.

CHAIN: 1/2” x 22’. $20. (360)457-9529.

CHEST WADERS: New BIKE: Cephas Fever 7.7 camo Hodgman, size 9, T6 Mountain Bike, ex. 1200 gram. $110. cond. $100. (360)640-0556 (360)681-5194 C L A R I N E T: S t u d e n t BIKES: (2), 26” moun- m o d e l , B u n d y, n e w tain bikes, 18 speed, pads. $100. Italian (Fila), good cond. (360)477-1903 $100. (360)912-1990. CLOCK: Regulator BIKE: Women’s special- c h i m i n g 3 1 d ay w a l l i ze d c r o s s r o a d s p o r t clock, dark wood. $35. bike, purchased locally. (360)670-6230 $125. (360)683-1065 CLOCK: Sessions BOOKS: Harr y Potter, Chiming mantel clock, hardcover, 1-7. $69 for dark wood. $45. all. (360)775-0855. (360)670-6230

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

S P E C I E S T N A L P I N K

C R E A T I O N U N I Q U E I

R U A C O R M S D R O W S R P

© 2013 Universal Uclick

D E L I T N A I G O D S P G S

E O W T N A V A L L E Y R Y U

R O B O U B C O L O R S I E N

O T R S L R O U R O A A N L L

www.wonderword.com

T T U E E F E W L I C E G L I

S A H B T R A L H A G A O O G

K T S G U A V V P I R I L W H

L A T S D E E S ◯ ◯ ◯ ◯ B L U B L B Q F I I U R L R O E W A B S E I R H O S L L R R A D T U E V S E P D N E A T O R G M T A L L 8/27

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Bouquet, Bright, Bulbs, Care, Colors, Corms, Creation, Culture, Easy, Energy, Favored, Flower, Fresh, Giant, Grow, Lily, Local, Neat, Observe, Origin, Pink, Plant, Purple, Rainbow, Seed, Soil, Species, Spectacular, Spike, Spring, Stalks, Stored, Sturdy, Successful, Sunlight, Sword, Tall, Tattoo, Tubular, Unique, Valley, Vase, Water, White, Wild, Yellow Yesterday’s Answer: Those Were the Days THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

PETMY ©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

LIRGL (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

37 Fit of temper 38 Acknowledges responsibility for 40 “Mayday!” 41 Maxim 43 LAX listing 44 Teahouse hostess 47 Four-time Emmy winner Woodard 48 Underworld society

COFFEE TABLE: Slate D R Y S U I T : K o k a t a t , m e n ’s m e d i u m , n e w top, beautiful, must see. booties and gaskets, ex. $95. (360)681-7579. cond. $200. 928-9988. COMFORTER: For day bed, blue, with oversized DVD: Sons of Anarchy, all 4 seasons, was $160. pillows. $25. Asking $100. (360)582-0022 (360)808-9417 COUNTERTOPS: Some with sinks, faucets, call ENT. CENTER: 6 comfor sizes. 1 at $20, 1 at par tments, large, nice wood. $150. $70. (360)640-0556. (360)797-1179 CROCS: Size 13, tan, EXERCISE EQUIP excellent. $5/obo. B o d y r i d e r, exe r c y c l e, (360)457-1994 like new. $50. (360)683-5805 CUTTING TORCH: Victor, guages, cart. $125. FENCE PANELS: (2), (360)460-4054 white lattice, top vinyl, CYLINDER: Heavy duty 6’x6’. $50. (360)457-3274 cardboard, 6.5’ long, inner diam. is 7.5” wide. FENCING: Cedar fence $20. (360)460-4039. ra i l s, a p p r ox ( 1 0 ) , 8 ’ DAY BED: White and long. $25. (360)683-6519 gold, bolsters and sheets. $75. FREE: 42” Viszio flat(360)975-3624 screen TV, doesn’t work. (360)461-7722, DECK RAILING: Severafter 4 p.m. al 10’ cedar deck railings. $75 for all. FREE: Craftsman auto (360)452-1308 trans. riding mower, moDESK: 7 drawer execu- tor dead, use for parts. (360)461-2486 tive desk, nice. $50. (360)683-5805 FREE: Enter tainment DESK: Solid oak, rolltop, center, glass door, drawers and shelves. modern, new cond. (360)379-6437 $150. (360)452-5250.

FREE: JVC Television, DINING SET: Table, (6) 32”, works great! matching chairs, drop (360)457-9053 leaf, (3) 9’’ leaves. $200. (360)457-4610 F R E E : M ay t a g d r ye r, works. (360)457-4225. DINING TABLE: Country Style, with 6 chairs. FREE: Twin box spring $195. (360)990-6053. and frame, ex. cond. (360)808-4952 BOOTS: Western, 9.5, COFFEE TABLE: Mod- D I N I N G TA B L E : E x black with red stitching. ern, light oak, 3 glass in- p a n d a b l e , w o o d , ( 3 ) FUEL FILTERS: 12 Ra$20. LD, 7.5, $15. serts. $42.50. chairs. $90. cor fuel tilters, 2010 SM. (360)452-6974 (360)681-5492 (360)457-4610 $120. (360)457-5647. C A M C O R D E R : S o ny, COFFEE TABLES: (2) D RU M S E T: A s t r o, 8 new, complete kit, CCD- Dark wood, glossy yel- piece, includes like-new FX310. $69. low. $20 ea. seat. $125. 683-4727 or (360)928-0236 (360)797-1179 775-4199

GOLF CLUBS: 30 metal wo o d s, gra p h i t e p l u s large Calloway bag. $50 for all. (360)452-1277.

49 Tutorial feature 50 Slangy prefix meaning “super” 51 Phoenix cagers 53 Place for a pothole 54 Couture monthly 55 Jinglers on rings 58 Vietnamese New Year 59 Poorly lit

TILNOO REAQUS

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: EVOKE SHIFT SPRING BOTTOM Answer: The player on third base was anxious for the game to be over and wanted to — GO HOME

P A R T S : F r o m o l d SINK: Double sink, $10. GOLF PUTTERS: (15) KNIFE SHARPENER d i f fe r e n t p u t t e r s , ( 8 ) Like-new, chef’s choice, F r e n c h m o t o r c y c l e , (360)681-3556 we d g e s, n i c e D u n l o p s e l l s fo r $ 8 7 . A s k i n g whole bike. $25. SINK: Oval bone-col(360)681-2222 bag. $45/all. 452-1277. $39. (360)928-0236. ored bathroom vanity G U I TA R : l e f t - h a n d e d LADDER: Aluminum ex- P L AT E S : ( 1 0 ) H a n d - sink, Kohler, ex. cond. acoustic with case. Fen- t e n s i o n l a d d e r, 2 8 ’ , painted, Russian Fairy $200. (360)477-4838. Tales. $20 each. d e r c o n c e r t e l e c t r i c . heavy duty. $170. (360)460-4054 (360)683-7435 $150. (360)457-7942. SLIDE PROJECTOR Like new in box. $50. POPCORN POPPER HALL TREE: Oak, mir- LAMPS: 3 sets, $15-$30 (360)452-7439. per set, 1 pottery set. Westend, electric, like ror, coat hooks, cup(360)683-1397 new. $10. board, 30” x 74”, beautiSOFA: Basset Hide-a(360)457-5720 ful. $175. 631-9211. Bed, 7’ wide, well-padMETAL DETECTOR ded, like new, beautiful. HEATER: Propane patio Tesoro Bandido, dish P O R T- A - P OT T Y: Fo r $175. (360)631-9211. RV, as new. $30. heater, 46,000 BTU, 8’ and headphones. $135. (360)683-7161 (360)683-5871 tall. $70. (360)457-0651. SOFA: Daveno, 7’, oldMETAL DETECTOR PURSE: Coach, black, er, fair condition. $50. HIDE-A-BED: $35. (360)460-5668 W h i t e s , c o i n m a s t e r shoulder strap, gently (360)460-5668 6 0 0 0 , D i S e r i e s 2 . used. $65. SOFA: Nice, floral with (360)683-1774 HOME GYM: Marcy 130 $150/obo. 452-6842. wicker tr im, matching lb stack, little used, as MIRROR: 36” octagonal QUILTING FRAME: Vy- coffee table. $100. new, fully assembled. with signed etching, met- n a l t u b i n g , ex c e l l e n t (360)683-5871 $75. (360)207-4935. al frame. $25. quality. $50. (360)582-9700 STAINED GLASS: One (360)975-3624 HOOD: Buick ‘48 Roadpanel, fits front door or ? master hood. $75. MIRROS: (7), variety, all R E C L I N E R : R o c k e r, $150. (360)681-7579. (360)683-6519 framed. $5-$20 ea. swivel, greenish-blue. (360)452-9685. $80. (360)808-2892. HUNTING PACK S TA P L E R : B o s t i t c h Crooked Horn trailblazer wide crown stapler with MOBILITY SCOOTER R E C O R D S : 2 4 o l d approx. $86. 2000, bow/rifle pouch. E l e c t r i c r o u n d a b o u t record albums, 78s and $75. (360)683-9882. (360)477-3834 wheelchair, good batter- 33s. (360)683-0033. IRIS: Roots, various col- ies. $75. (360)681-2222. STORAGE CASE: Caso r s, 6 d o ze n , $ 7 p e r MODEL KIT: Star Trek, R E G R I G E R ATO R : 1 7 sette storage case, 21 cubic ft., Sears, dar k doz., $30 for all. free music cassettes, Ferengi, Klingon, Romu- brown. $60. (360)452-6974 holds 30. $15. 457-3274. lan. $30/obo. (360)452-1661 (360)452-6842. IRON: Vintage General TABLE: 42” diameter, ROTOTILLER: $100. Mills, GMIB, with box. M O D E L K I T: U n bu i l t drop leaf, dark wood. (360)457-9368. $25. (360)683-7161. $35. (360)582-0022. TWA model kit, Heller SADDLE: 17” tree, JAZZ CD: The best of 1.72 Lockeed Super G. TA B L E S AW : W i t h needs cinch. $30. $45. (360)452-6842. Chick Corea, Blue Note. blades, Dado. $150. (360)417-2056. $5. (360)457-5790. MOTOR SCOOTER (360)379-6437 Electric, 500 watt, 28 SAW: Radial arm saw, JFK COLLECTION full size. $50. mph. $200. 504-2113. TABLES: Oak, 3 piece Books, pictures, maga(360)681-2222 set, coffee and (2) end zines, misc. $100. MUG SET: Coffee travel tables, like new. $100. (360)452-6842 mug set, stainless, never SAWS: Big table saw, (360)452-7292 $100. Radial arm saw, used. $15. KEYBOARD: Technics $100. (360)457-9368. (360)457-5720 TELESCOPE: Reflectelectric dual keyboard, ing telescope, 4.5” many instruments. $200. OFFICE CHAIR: ExecuSERGER: $75. diam., on floor stand. (360)681-0528. (360)683-4324 tive office chair, padding, $80. (360)681-0528. oak, 46” x 23” x 22”. KITCHEN RANGE: 30” S H I RT S : ( 5 ) m e d i u m $59. (360)775-0855. Whirl Pool, self cleaning, Tommy Bahama shirts, TILLER: Electric, Mantis, brand new. $200. spotless. men’s, like new. $100. REFRIGERATOR: $50. (360)452-1661 $175. (360)683-6935. (360)504-2113. (360)457-9368.

E E F R E Eand Tuesdays A D SS R F Monday D

M a il to : Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

TIRES: (4) BF Goodrich a l l t e r r a i n , LT 265/75R16. $100/obo. (360)683-7435 T I R E S : AT V t i r e s , (2) 25X10-12, (2) 25X8-12. $40 for all. (360)457-5647 TIRES: Goodyear Eagle St., 75% thread, P215 70R14. $100. (360)461-7722 TOASTER: Convection oven, small. $12.50. (360)681-5492 TOOL BOX: Truck tool box, large, weather grade. $75. 452-7439. TORQUE WRENCH 3/4”, Dr. 400 Ft. LB. $150. (360)457-9529. TREADMILL: Lifestyler, older, up to 200 lbs. (360)417-1277 TREADMILL: NordicTra ck m o d e l C 1 9 0 0 , many features. $200/obo. 457-4225. T-SHIRTS: Men’s, Fruit of the Loom, 4X, neon chartreuse. 3 for $15. (360)457-6343 TV: Big screen, 65”, projection. $85. (209)604-2133 TV: Zenith, 20”, analog, conver ter, wall mount, 60 family videos. $100. (360)437-0437 VACUUM: Kirby, all attachments, rug shampooer. $50. (360)683-6764 VAN ROOF: White, popup van roof, 6 glass windows. $200. 457-3770. WET SUIT: Bare Aqua Lite full-length men’s wet suit, ML/MG. $150/obo. (360)681-5194

B rin g yo u r a d s to : Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., PA

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• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only

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o r FA X to : (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

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Peninsula Daily News


Classified

B8 TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013 6100 Misc. Merchandise

6105 Musical Instruments

MISC: Large china cabin e t , $ 3 0 0 . Ke n m o r e washing machine, $300. Whirlpool dr yer, $200. Kenmore standing freezer, $400. Queen hide-abed, $350. Leather double recliner, $150. Curio cabinet, $150. Yamaha keyboard, $75. Filing cabinet, 4 drawers, $40. Storage cabinet, double doors, 2 drawers, $75. Elongated table, underneath storage unit, $100. Dresser, 5 drawer, $50. Will take best offer on anything. (360)452-3761 MODEL TRAINS: Nscale, (3) engines, 38 various cars, 8 buildings, 8 switches, 660� of track, lots of misc. pieces. Purchased new for over $1,600. Will sell all for $500. (360)437-0908.

6140 Wanted & Trades

8182 Garage Sales 7035 General Pets 7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes 9820 Motorhomes PA - West

T R O M B O N E : C o n n , WANTED: Old tractors, w a s $ 9 0 0 w h e n p u r - no junk, no lawn mowc h a s e d . A s k i n g o n l y ers. (360)452-2145. $400! (360)683-1037.

6135 Yard & YAMAHA: Console piaGarden no with bench, model M2E, restored to new condtion. $949. FRONT SCOOP: Front (360)683-2331 end loader. Tractor attachment, Craftsman, new $560. Asking $250. 6115 Sporting (360)477-4573 Goods

B OW S : 3 l e f t - h a n d bows, 1 compound, 2 recurve. Extras. $300. (360)683-8418 BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

6140 Wanted UTILITY TRAILER & Trades ‘82, metal frame, wood box, new wir ing, new lights, new tags. $550. BOOKS WANTED! We (360)683-0763 love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789. Visit our website at www.peninsula SLAB Maple: Slab madailynews.com ple with 1 raw edge. 2 Or email us at pcs 53x23, 1pc 46x23. classified@ Or we can cut. Afpeninsula fordable. Call dailynews.com (360)461-3133. Thanks!

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central Port Angeles Friends o f t h e L i b ra r y b o o k clearance sale Fr i., Au g . 3 0 , 9 : 3 0 - 5 : 3 0 p.m., and Sat., Aug. 31, 9:30-4:00 p.m. Fill our bag with books for only $2, no limit on the number of bags you purchase. Hundreds of books to choose from. Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-2 p.m., 2024 W. 7 t h S t . To n s o f computer electronics, bags, Harley parts and gear, cell phones and a c c e s s o r i e s, k n i ck knacks, full mattress s e t , t a b l e , w a s h e r, bikes, Playstation 3 a n d g a m i n g c h a i r, clothes. Port Scandalous Roller Derby Fundraiser!

AFRICAN GRAY Male Congo, large cage, mellow bird, owners want to travel, bird needs to be with people. $ 4 0 0 . A l s o, Pe a c h Fa c e d L ove B i r d , fe male, with cage, FREE. (360)809-3480 BEARDED DRAGONS 2 Bearded Dragon lizards, full-grown, with tank, light, screen, bowls, other habitat features. $400 for ever ything. (360)452-2527.

7025 Farm Animals & Livestock

FARM COLLIE PUPPIES Purebred, no lines breeding, males, parents ALFALFA GRASS: $5 on site. $500. bale. Grass, $4 bale. (360)928-0245 (360)683-5817 FREE: 2 sweet and soBEEF: Grass fed. $1.80 cialized de-scented ferper pound for hanging rets. (360)775-9117. weight. (360)683-5441 or email at tcsmiths@ MISC: Great Pyrenees wavecable.com Mountain Dog, 7 years old, good family dog, BOARS: Choice from $200. Quarter/Arabian, (3) 2 year olds, proven 20 years old, 16 hands, and good. A York-Duroc, good western trail, $200. a Grade Berk, a Hamp- Pigeons, 6 for $50. Duroc. $125/each. (360)477-1706 (360)775-6552 PUPPIES: Bullmasador, WEANER PIGS: Nice avail. 9/12/13, 3 male, 4 pigs. $75 each. female, call for details. (360)460-7196 $300. (360)460-1481.

PUPPIES: Miniature Chihuahua, 9 wks. old. MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ $350 ea. (360)808-3090. Toyota Slumberqueen. Low miles, 4 cyl., good TREEING Walker Coon- s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o hounds: Born July 25. health. $7,500/obo. (360)452-7246 Be the first to out your pup! Ready Sept. 10. Males, $150. Females, MOTOR HOME: ‘88 38’ $200. Will be dewormed, Beaver Motorcoach. Cat first shots. Only 2 fe- 300 diesel, Allison trans, males left! 53K mi., has everything (360)457-4838 but slide-out. $27,000. (360)477-1261

9820 Motorhomes MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, must sell. $40,000 firm. (360)452-7870 after 6. MOTORHOME: ‘85 21’ Toyota Rogue. 56K mi., manual trans, sound engine, 6 new tires, needs work, rear bath, A/C cab a n d b o d y, s l e e p s 4 . $5,000/obo. (360)504-2619 or (360)477-8807 mornings MOTORHOME: ‘86 Ford Shasta Class C. 52K, good condition, recently purchased, not being used, want to sell. $5,900. (360)457-6434.

MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ Fleetwood Southwind, Class A, 27,500 original miles, dual roof AC, lg. s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy draulic levelers, 2 TVs, rear camera, Onan generator, neutral interior, must see. $23,999. (360)452-4136 MOTOR HOME: ‘99 40’ Monaco Exec. Excellent cond., ‘450’ Cummins M11, Allison trans., lots of extras. $65,000/obo. (360)460-7200 MOTORHOME: Bounder ‘93, 31’. 454 Banks Power Pack, 55k, extras. $11,250. Avail ‘02 CRV tow. (206)920-0418.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

MOTORHOME: Georgie boy Persuit. 25’, coach, ve r y c l e a n , ex c e l l e n t condition, 39.7k, brand new batter ies, walkaround bed, trailer hitch, body straight. $14,750. (360)477-2007 MOTORHOME: Rexhall ‘ 0 2 R o s e a i r. 3 2 ’ , 2 slides, basement model, 4 leveling jacks, fireplace, convection oven microwave, 47k miles, comes with everything! Can be sold with or without tow car, Isuzu ‘98 O a s i s, w i t h b r e a k i n g system. $50,000/obo. (360)452-6318

KO M F O R T: ‘ 8 6 , 2 4 ’ , sleeps 6, reconditioned 2013, has full bath, tub a n d s h o w e r, A / C , 4 burner stove with oven, ever ything works. $3,750. (360)683-8567.

R O A D M A S T E R To w Dolly. Model RM440, excellent condition, good tires, self steering wheels,electric brakes for easy secure transport. 620 lbs. empty with max weight of towed vehicle 4,380 lbs. $1,400/obo. (360)912-0030

TRAILER: ‘16 Scamp. L i k e n e w, s l e e p s 2 , shower, lots of storage, 4.6 cu. ft. fridge, microwave, p r o p a n e s t ove and furnace, TV. $9,900. (360)379-4987

MOTORHOME: Winnebego ‘93 Adventure. 34’, ex. cond., nonsmokers, 65k miles, 2 roof air, hydraulic levelers, Onan generator, microwave, ice maker/fridge, 4 burnTRAVEL TRAILER er stove, laminate floor- Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide ing, lots of storage, very out, great cond., $9,500. livable. Possible trade (360)452-6677 for smaller pull trailer. $13,000. (360)565-6221.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 30’ Lakota. Ver y nice cond., kept in shed. $12,500. (360)452-1308

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9802 5th Wheels

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

5th WHEEL: ‘03 32’ Thor. 3 sliders with slide toppers, rear kitchen, wood cabinets, roomy and ready to roll or park. Chimacum. $9,500. (760)415-1075

BAYLINER 2859. Price reduced from $26,000 to $20,000. Selling because of health. Engine overhauled last year, outdrive replaced 3 yrs ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp kicker. Great electronics 5TH WHEEL: 30’ Cross- including radar, color roads Patriot upgrade fish finder, GPS char t model, used twice over- plotter. Diesel heater, night, immaculate, tow- c u s t o m c a b i n e t s a n d able with half ton. Below master bed. Great boat book value at $38,750 for fishing. Electr ic includes slider hitch. downriggers, rods and 683-5682 or gear. Comfortable week541-980-5210 end travel with stove, re5TH WHEEL: ‘89, 34’ frigerator, shower and Au t o m a t e, ex . c o n d . , head. Excellent condimust see!, $4,500/obo. tion. Call 327-3695. 670-5957, or 460-5128. BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 9 4 2 7 ’ Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruisC o a c h m a n C a t a l i n a . er, freshwater cooling. Great cond., single slide, $3,900/obo. (360)775-9653 new tires. $3,900/obo. (360)417-8840 BOAT: 14’, aluminum, 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ Al- with an E-Z loader trailpen Lite, single slide, e r, 1 8 H P E v e n r u d e l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t elec. start motor and 4 H P E v e n r u d e m o t o r. shape. $11,500/obo. $2,200. (360)683-4175. (615)330-0022 5TH WHEEL: Carriage ‘04 Cameo. Three slides, center kitchen with island. King bed. Automatic HDTV Sat. on roof. In great condition, this has been a nonsmoking unit and no animals. $19,250. Contact via e-mail: bjgarbarino@hot mail.com or (360)390-8692

CAMPER: ‘92 10’ S&S. Self-contained, barely used, with generator. $2,100. (360)683-4175. CAMPER: ‘97 10’ Alpenlite. TV, micro, self cont., excellent cond. $6,000. (360)928-9770 after 5. CAMPER: Outdoorsman, bed, refrigerator, stove. $1,800. (360)417-9223

LANCE Lite: 2003 845 Truck Camper. Great condition-used twice. Roof air, queen bed, d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o bed. Shwr stall/pan full h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. Lots of storage. Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. Call (360)681-0172

9050 Marine Miscellaneous 12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiak, set up with a 30 HP Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Motor has just been to the shop for a complete check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup for rivers or salt water. $3,500. Inquiries please call, (360)531-0402. APOLLO: 17’ Classic Runabout. 140 hp OMC I / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t condition. $3,300. (360)683-0146 APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, new 165 OMC with heat exchanger, recently serviced outdrive, custom trailer, new tires and brakes, pot puller, extras. $3,600/obo. (360)582-0892 CLASSIC: ‘67 Yankee Dolphin, masthead sloop, 24’, fiberglass, k e e l / C. B . L o n g s h a f t , trailer. Fast, dr y. Easy cruise Sound, San Ju a n s, Va n c o u ve r I s land. In water Port Angeles. $6,600. Call (360)452-0700

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9817 Motorcycles 9292 Others Others Others

SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, Yanmar diesel, wheel s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, sleeps 4. $9,995. (360)457-8221 SAILBOAT: ‘69 Victory 21’. With trailor. $1,500. (360)509-4894 SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C with sails and new 8 hp engine, sleeps 4, toilet/sink. $3,500/obo. (360)808-7913

H O N DA : ‘ 0 9 R e b e l . Only 10 Original Miles! S h o w r o o m p e r fe c t ! M a n y e x t r a s ! Yo u must see this to believe it! $2,650/obo. (360)775-0703 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153.

K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X 250F. Few aftermarket accessories, 2 stands, S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n set of tires. $2,500. (360)670-5321 26’. Project boat. $3,500/obo, or trade. (360)477-7719

SAILBOAT for sale: 21’ Aquarius Sailboat, on t ra i l e r. 8 h p M e r c u r y Outboard, 1 hr on motor. Many extra sails. Life BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, j a c k e t s , o t h e r m i s c . SCOOTER: 2007 Roke$1,500. (360)681-8017. trailer, 140 hp motor. ta Bali 250 Scooter. Fun samk@olypen.com $4,980. (360)683-3577. and economical, 60 BOAT HOUSE: Excel- SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speed- mpg. Original owner selllent shape, 43’ x 20’, s t e r . T w i n R o t e x . ing. 1055 miles on it. This bike gets up and $5,000. (360)452-3213. P.A. Marina. $5,000 firm. goes! Includes helmet (360)452-2039 and gloves. (360)374-6787 BOATS: 14’ Livingston, with Shorelander trailer, $495. New, 10’ Walker B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, $995. (360)452-6677.

5TH WHEEL: Sportking CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson 1981, 18’. $850. cedar strip, made in Port (360)808-7545 Townsend. $750. (360)683-0146

9808 Campers & Canopies

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra Cuddy Classic. 120 Johnson, 7.5 Honda kicker. galv. trailer, life jackets, 2 downriggers, ski pole, water skis, rope, canvas and many extras. $4,995/obo. Located in Sequim. (360)477-1011

FIBERFORM: 75, 21’, 3 5 1 Fo r d , 2 8 0 Vo l vo, 565 hrs, never been in salt water, always stored inside, Runs and looks n e w, o w n e d fo r 3 0 TIDE RUNNER: 18’, years, $6,000. great boat, good shape, (360)582-9983 lots of extra goodies. $9,000/obo. 374-2646. HEWE: 17’ River Runner. 115 Mercur y jet, new 5 hp Ricker, depth sounder, GPS, lots of 9817 Motorcycles extras. $7,950. (360)452-2162 BMW: ‘99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 miles. Throttlemiester. BMW touring hard cases. Corbin saddle. BMW aftermarket alarm. KAYAK: $1,900. Cus- $4,350. (425)508-7575. t o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . Goldspace@msn.com Newfound Boat Works E x p l o r e r . B e a u t i f u l CRF 250, ‘08, $3,200. sculptured cedar and TTR 230, ‘06, $1,700. basswood strip planked Both ready to ride. Brush deck. A work of art. Pad- gaurds, spare parts for dled once, I have too CRF. May accept trades. many Kayaks! (360)461-6282 (360)774-0439 DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, yellow, pristine, many I/O . Needs work. upgraes. $4,900. $1,500. (360)461-2056 Bryan (360)681-8699 OUTDRIVE: Mercruiser Bravo 1. Complete with S. S. P r o p, ex c e l l e n t cond. $2,200. (360)417-3936 PORTLAND PUDGY ‘06 multi-function dinghy, unsinkable, double hulled, 7’8”x4’5”, can be used as life raft. $1,000. (360)437-0908

SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard M50. Mid size 800 cc cruiser. As new condition, only 650 miles. Eye catching color combination. Electronic fuel injection, shaft drive, water cooled. Selling for health reason. also have helmets and jackets. $4,000. (360)385-6370.

9740 Auto Service & Parts M I S C : C a n o py fo r 6 ’ bed, good condition, l i g h t bl u e, $ 3 0 0 / o b o. Stow Master tow bar, like new, $350. (360)710-4966

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect. AMC: ‘78 Pacer. Nice body. $1,000. (360)452-2892 CADILLAC: ‘72 Sedan Deville. Mint condition, original owner, 74,874 mi., garaged. $4,500. (360)683-1288 afternoon CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. $4,850. (360)928-9724.

HARLEY: ‘04 Davids o n N i g h t Tr a i n FXSTBi. 15300 miles. Extras! Can Deliver. Brad (360)683-2273. Awesome bike! $7,995. brad@stinton.com

RACING SAILBOAT 28’ Star. Sails, genoa and trailer. $3,500. (360)963-2743 H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 Sportster, 7k miles, mint. R OW / M o t o r / S a i l : 1 0 ’ $6,900. (360)452-6677. molded hull boat. Elec. motor, galv. trailer, all H.D.: ‘84 FLHS. Only like-new. $1,650. 500 ever made. 33.4k (360)681-8761 original miles, too much to list. Call for details. RUNABOUT: 16’ fiber- $12,000 to loving home. glass. Closed bow, high (360)460-8271 gunnel and transome, 30 h p E v i n r u d e , ex t r a s . HILLCLIMB $1,750/obo. Aug. 31 - Sept, 1. Gates (520)403-1910 open 7 a.m. Entrance 1 mi. up Deer Park Rd., S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n P.A. Follow signs. 1st Oughtred whilly, sail- bike up at 10 a.m. ing/rowing, better than (360)417-7509 n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h oars, trailer, many up- HONDA: ‘06 CRF 250X. g r a d e d a c c e s s o r i e s . Excellent shape. $2,900. $7,250/obo. (360)461-3415 (360)774-6720 S A I L B OAT : 2 1 ’ , r e tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 HP motor, exceptionally clean. $3,950. (360)477-7068

HONDA: ‘75 360 CBT. Runs great. Blue. Windshield. Includes helmut. $850/obo. (360)417-9403

CHEV: ‘86 El Camino, Conquista package. PS, P B , P W, P D, A / C , cr uise, filt, full gages i n c l . t a c h . , V 8 , a u t o, Gaylord bed cover with l i n e r, f a c t o r y r a l l e y wheels, low miles, not smoked in, garage kept, gold/brown color, tan int. Very original! $10,750 (360)683-7789

F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000 (360)461-4665 FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net MAZDA: ‘94 RX7. Twin t u r b o, l o t s o f p ow e r, many modifications, 59K, $15,000. Serious buyers only. 461-0847.

9292 Automobiles Others

RUN A FREE AD FOR ITEMS PRICED $200 AND UNDER s 2 ADS PER HOUSEHOLD PER s Bargain Box Ads will run as WEEK space permits Mondays & s Private parties only Tuesdays s 4 lines, 2 days s No firewood or lumber s No pets or livestock s No Garage Sales

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3A181257

Peninsula Daily News Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 305 West 1st St., Port Angeles Port Angeles, WA 98362 NO PHONE CALLS or FAX to: (360) 417-3507

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013 B9

CHEV ‘05 COBALT LS Military discounts! Book says “sell it for $6,760.” Our price? $6,295. See it online! Lowest inhouse financing! 90 days same as cash! The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 theotherguys.com

CHEVROLET ‘02 IMPALA LS SEDAN 3.8L Series II V6, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, sunroof, rear spoiler, keyless entry, power w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and drivers seat, l e a t h e r s e a t s, c r u i s e control, tilt, air conditioning, dual zone climate control, information center, OnStar, dual front airbags. Only 7,000 Or iginal Miles! Clean Carfax! This Impala is in like new condition inside and out! You won’t find one nicer than this! Loaded with leather and all the options! Why buy new when you can find one with this low of miles? Come see the Peninsula’s most trusted auto dealer for over 50 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero SE Coupe. Rare automatic. Clear title. V6. Nice shape. Black with gray interior. 171,500 miles. Sunroof. Good transmiss i o n , ex c e l l e n t s p o r t tires. Power windows. Not a show car but a great driving fun sports car. $2,000. (360)452-1049 PORCHE: ‘88 944. 1 owner, 129,500 mi. , excellent condition. $6,995. (360)452-4890 TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, white, nav., leather, 5 CD change. $18,990. 1 (805)478-1696 VW: ‘78 Super Beetle conver tible. Runs good, good cond., manual trans. $5,500. (360)683-8032 VW: ‘79 Dasher. 4-door, good shape. $2,000. (360)452-2711

CHRYSLER: ‘94 New Yorker. Loaded, tinted 9434 Pickup Trucks Others windows, new suspension. $1,300/obo or CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ trade. (360)461-6642. engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear DODGE: ‘03 Caravan. axle, 3’ deck with 13’ Looks good. $3,500. dump bed, 70 gal. diesel (360)457-9162 tank. $2,000/obo. (360)457-4521 or DODGE: ‘04 and ‘02 477-3964 after 6 p.m. Neon. $4,000 each. Call (360)457-8729 CHEV: ‘93 1500. 4x4, lumber rack, AM/FM CD. DODGE ‘08 CALIBER $3,000/obo. 461-0657. SXT HATCHBACK Only 62k miles and load- CHEV: 94 1500 4x4 Xed. 2.0 LTR, 4 cyl., auto, Cab. 43K on motor, tool A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, b ox , h i t c h , C B, r u n s / power windows, locks drives/looks good. and mirrors, AM/FM/CD, $3,000 firm. electronic stability con457-1355 or 460-4727 trol, alloy wheels, remote e n t r y a n d m o r e ! O n e CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed dump. $6,800. 457-3120 week special at only or (360)808-1749. $9,995. VIN#729977 Exp. 8-31-13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com CHEVY: ‘01 S-10 En2946 Hwy 101 E. PA hanced Cab 4-spd Auto V6, 2WD. Runs FORD ‘00 FOCUS Red. Books for $5,295. great; good looking; Buy it at The Other Guys t o n n e a u c ove r ove r for $4,995. See all our lined bed. 93,200 mi. inventory online! Making AM/FM w/cassette. 4.3 your money go fur ther liter V6; auto fuel inj. with the lowest in-house $5,800/obo. Call (360)477-4697 ra t e s ! B u y h e r e, p ay here! DODGE ‘02 RAM 1500 The Other Guys SHOT BED SLT 4X4 Auto and Truck Center 4.7L V8, automatic, 360-417-3788 chrome wheels, spray-in theotherguys.com bedliner, tow package, FORD ‘12 FOCUS SEL alarm system, keyless SEDAN entr y, power windows, One of the best selling door locks, mirrors, and cars in the world today. drivers seat, cruise conAuto, 4 cyl. Excellent trol, tilt, air conditioning, performance, handling cassette stereo, dual and economy. This SEL front airbags. Accidentis fully equipped, leather, F r e e C a r f a x ! O n l y moonroof, 6-way power 90,000 original miles! seat, CD, SYNC, power Kelley Blue Book Value windows/locks, alumi- o f $ 8 , 7 2 8 ! S p a r k l i n g num wheels, and more. clean inside and out! the gray metallic paint is This is one nice Dodge striking when cruising pickup! Stop by Gray down the road with the Motors today to save big roof open and the tunes b u c k s o n y o u r n e x t playing. Vin# posted at truck! dealership. $7,995 $15,490 GRAY MOTORS Preview at: 457-4901 heckmanmotors.com graymotors.com Heckman Motors DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 111 E. Front, P.A. CREW CAB (360)912-3583 Cummins Turbo Diesel, F O R D : ‘ 9 2 M u s t a n g hard to find long box, auC o nve r t a bl e. S e c o n d to, A/C, SLT package, tilt owner, new tires, new al- w h e e l , c r u i s e, p owe r ternator, new front end, windows, locks, mirrors new starter. $5,300. and seat, AM/FM/CD, (360)681-0532 sliding rear window, tube running boards, sprayFORD: ‘94 Crown Vic- o n b e d - l i n e r, c h r o m e toria. New tires, good wheels, tow package, shape. $1,500. adjustable airbags, re(360)928-9920 mote entr y and more! HONDA: ‘07 Civic Hy- Local trade with only 69k miles. One week special brid. $9,000. at only (425)508-7575 $23,995. VIN#176717 H O N DA : ‘ 1 1 C i v i c . 4 Exp. 8-31-13 d o o r, 1 2 k m i l e s, l i ke Dave Barnier new. $15,500. 461-5913. Auto Sales HONDA ‘90 CIVIC Si *We Finance In House* 3 DOOR HATCHBACK 452-6599 4 c y l i n d e r, 5 s p e e d , davebarnier.com moon roof, alloy wheels, 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA CD, great running car, clean inside and out. D O D G E : ‘ 0 6 R a m . Vin# posted at dealer- Manual, 59k miles, excellent cond., reg. cab. ship. $9,800. (360)477-6149. $3,250 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com DODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton Heckman Motors white 4x4, 1 owner, 111 E. Front, P.A. very good condition. (360)912-3583 $23,000 (505)927-1248 MERCEDES: ‘79 240D (diesel). 4 sp manual D O D G E : ‘ 9 2 D a k o t a trans., excellent condi- 4WD. $2,000/ obo. tion mechanically and (360)797-1198 physically, extensive upgrades, work orders in FORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, my file. $4,980/obo. Call matching canopy, good me for details. Alan at running. $6,500. (360)461-0175, Port An1-360-269-1208 or geles. 1-360-269-1030 MITSUBISHI: ‘03 E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t cond., 188k miles. $5,700. (360)460-2536.

FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 utility SCELZI. 11’ combo body with rack, 36,000 miles. $27,000. (360)531-1383

M U S TA N G : ‘ 8 5 G T 5 Speed convertable. 302 FORD: ‘84 Bronco. ReHO, loaded. $3,400/obo. liable. $500. CHEV ‘05 IMPALA SS (360)460-8610 (360)808-0565 Books for $7,920. Our price is $5,495. See it FORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. online! Buy here, pay Matching canopy. here! Bad credit or no $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 credit. We have the lowor 1-3601269-1030. est in-house financing! The Other Guys FORD: ‘89 4X4 LongAuto and Truck Center bed. Auto/air, runs great. 360-417-3788 $2,500/obo. 457-5948. theotherguys.com NISSAN: ‘89 300 ZX. FORD: ‘90 F-150. 4WD, CHEV: ‘06 HHR. Excel- Red. V6. Automatic. T- 5 speed, 6 cyl., longbox, l e n t c o n d . , 5 5 K , n ew t o p. M a ny n ew p a r t s. canopy, runs ex. $2,000. tires, 1 owner. $8,500. $4,500/obo. (360)683-2172 (360)808-2974 (360)681-3579 F O R D : ‘ 9 0 R a n g e r. CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. P O N T I AC : ‘ 0 0 G ra n d Canopy, recent tune up, O r a n g e , T- t o p , 6 5 K P r i x . E x . c o n d . , h i g h 5 speed. $2,000. miles. $7,000. Call for miles. $4,500/obo. 452-2766 or 477-9580 (360)457-1019 details. (360)775-9996. FORD: 93’ F150 XLT. PONTIAC: 2001 Bonne- Ext Cab. 2WD 351, runs Place your ad ville SSEi. Bose Stereo, great, well maintained, with the only H e a t e d Powe r S e a t s, clean truck. $3,800/obo. DAILY K e y l e s s E n t r y, F o g (360)460-6918 Lights, Leather, new batClassified Section on the tery and tires, A/C, Pow- FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. er Windows, plus much 6 cylinder, manual transPeninsula! m o r e . O n l y 7 4 , 0 0 0 mission, 2 WD, clean, miles. 6,500. runs great. 153,000 (360)452-4867 PENINSULA miles. Has new tires, Tonneau cover. Call CLA$$IFIED THUNDERBIRD: Unbe(360)477-4195 lievable condition 1978 360-452-8435 or Red Thunderbird with FORD: ‘96 F350 460 cid white leather interior and 4x4 Crew Cab. 114k 5 1-800-826-8435 7 8 K o r i g i n a l m i l e s . speed A/C, good tires, $8,500. Call anytime for m a t c h i n g c a n o p y . peninsula viewing $7,850 firm. Call (360)461-7071 dailynews.com (360)477-6218

FORD ‘97 F250 HD SUPERCAB LONGBED 4X4 5.8L (351) EFI V8, 5 speed manual, dual fuel tanks, alloy wheels, side steps, matching fiberglass canopy, spray-in bedliner, tow package, r e a r s l i d i n g w i n d o w, power windows, and door locks, tow mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, cassette s t e r e o. O n l y 1 2 6 , 0 0 0 or iginal miles! Carfax cer tified one owner! Sparkling clean inside and out! If you need a h e av y - d u t y t r u ck bu t don’t want to spend a fortune in gas, this 351 V8 and 5 Speed combination is the ultimate truck for you! Already set up with all the extras! Come see the Peninsul a ’s t r u ck ex p e r t s fo r over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 door, king cab, 4WD, auto, air, CD, new trans., radiator, alternator, battery. $5,500/obo. (360)683-8145

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

G M C : ‘ 9 9 Yu ko n 4 x 4 . FORD ‘02 ESCAPE XLT 4X4 173K mi., A/C not working, good shape. $2,000/ V6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, curise, power windows, obo. (360)477-6501. locks, mirros and seat, A M / F M / C D, p r i v a c y JEEP: ‘80 CJ5 Rene- glass, roof rack, alloy g a d e. O r i g i n a l , g o o d wheels, tow package, reshape. $3,750. mote entr y and more! (360)385-2792 E x t ra s h a r p w i t h l ow miles! Only TOYOTA: ‘92 4Runner. $7,995. 4WD, V6, auto, sunroof, VIN#A34699 199,500 mi., fair to good Exp. 8-31-13 cond. $1,950. 461-0054. Dave Barnier Auto Sales HUMMER ‘05 H2 4WD *We Finance In House* 3/4 TON SUV 452-6599 Full size luxury SUV this davebarnier.com 2005 Hummer H2 is a 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA powerful off-roader that cruises down the highw a y e x c e p t i o n a l l y FORD: ‘87 Bronco II. s m o o t h , t h i s 4 d o o r 4x4. $1,500. 1-360-269s e a t s 6 v e r y c o m - 1208 or 1-360-269-1030. fortably. This H2 has it all; leather, 6-way power 9730 Vans & Minivans heated seats, full power Others p k g . , m o o n r o o f, t ow pkg., premium 17” alumiDODGE: ‘90 Ram 150 num wheels and tires, roof rack, chrome run- work van. 110 A/C inn i n g b o a r d s , b r u s h verter, bulkhead, 3.9 V6, guard and more. Low could be camper. Runs 81K mi. Vin# posted at great. $1,500/obo. (360)808-4237 dealership. $24,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD: ‘01 Windstar SEL. 144k, lots of new par ts, looks and r uns great. $3,995. (360)452-9002.

FORD: ‘99 box tr uck. 14’, Diesel, 133k, good truck. $7,200. 452-4738.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County

GMC: ‘86 Step side. V6, runs great, rusty. $900. (360)670-6160

No. 12-2-01138-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF STEVEN P. JENNINGS; AMELIA JENNINGS; PAUL JENNINGS; WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs and Devisees of Steven P. Jennings; Occupants of the Premises; and any persons or parties claiming to have any right, title, estate, lien or interest in the real property described in the complaint: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after July 30, 2013, and defend the real property foreclosure action in Clallam County Superior Court, and answer the complaint of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (“Plaintiff”). You are asked to serve a copy of your answer or responsive pleading upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff at its office stated below. In case of your failure to do so, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The purpose of this lawsuit is to obtain a judgment, and if not immediately paid, to be satisfied through the foreclosure of real property located in Clallam County, Washington, and legally described as follows: PARCEL A: BEGINNING AT A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE SET ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SECONDARY STATE H I G H WAY 9 - A , A S L O C AT E D A N D E S TA B LISHED, SAID POINT BEING SITUATED IN GOVERNMENT LOT 3, SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS BEING SOUTH 219.24 FEET AND EAST 424.11 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE QUARTER SECTION CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 5 AND 6 OF SAID TOWNSHIP AND RANGE; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID SECONDARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 9-A A DISTANCE OF 97.25 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 44º00’ WEST 200 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 45º27’ WEST 100.97 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 47º55’ EAST 200 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL B: BEGINNING AT A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE, SAID POINT BEING SITUATED IN GOVERNMENT LOT 3, SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS BEING SOUTH 353.24 FEET AND EAST 275.64 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE QUARTER CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 5 AND 6 OF SAID TOWNSHIP AND RANGE; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING SOUTH 45º27’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 44º WEST A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 45º24’26” WEST A DISTANCE OF 114.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 47º56’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS: PARCEL A: BEGINNING AT A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE SET ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SECONDARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 9-A, AS LOCATED AND ESTABLISHED, SAID POINT BEING SITUATED IN GOVERNMENT LOT 3, SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS BEING SOUTH 219.24 FEET AND EAST 424.11 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE QUARTER SECTION CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 5 AND 6 OF SAID TOWNSHIP AND RANGE; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID SECONDARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 9-A A DISTANCE OF 97.25 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 44º00’ WEST 200 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 45º27’ WEST 100.97 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH 47º56’ EAST 200 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL B: BEGINNING AT A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE SET ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SECONDARY STATE HIGHWAY NO. 9-A, AS LOCATED AND ESTABLISHED, SAID POINT BEING SITUATED IN GOVERNMENT LOT 3, SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON, AND FURTHER DESCRIBED AS BEING SOUTH 353.24 FEET AND EAST 275.64 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE QUARTER SECTION CORNER COMMON TO SECTIONS 5 AND 6 OF SAID TOWNSHIP AND RANGE; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING SOUTH 45º27’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 44º WEST A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 45º24’26” WEST A DISTANCE OF 114.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 47º56’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON Commonly known as: 8460 Highway 112, Sekiu, WA 98381. DATED this 30th day of July, 2013. RCO LEGAL, P.S. By /s/ Jennifer Russell, WSBA #45255 Janaya L. Carter, WSBA #32715 Lauren Davidson Humphreys, WSBA #41694 Valerie I. Holder, WSBA #42968 Babak Shamsi, WSBA #43839 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th Street, Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 Legal No. 500507 Pub: July 30, Aug. 6, 13, 20, 27, Sept. 3, 2013

NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier 4 x 4 S E C r ew C a b. 4 door, low miles 82,400. Extended warranty. 6’ bed. Excellent Condition. G o o d T i r e s . To w i n g Package. V6 4 liter. Bed Tool Box. $16,900. (360)504-2374 TOYOTA: ‘00 Tacoma. V6, super charger and exhaust, 2 sets of wheels and tires, 161K mi. $10,000/obo. (360)683-8479, after 6 TOYOTA : ‘ 8 9 E x - c a b Pickup 4x4. Strong driver, V6, 5 speed manual, s u n r o o f, a n d c a n o py. $2,000/obo. (360)808-2357 TOYOTA: ‘93 2WD pickup. Canopy, runs good. $3,960. (360)452-5126.

9556 SUVs Others C H E V : ‘ 1 1 Tr ev e r s e . Gray, great condition. $18,500. (605)214-0437

DODGE ‘01 DURANGO SLT 4X4 4.7L V8, Automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, roof tack, tinted windows, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and drivers seat, third row seating, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, panasonic CD/MP3 Stereo, Dual front airbags. Only 102,000 original miles! Clean Carfax! Sparkling clean inside and out! Brand N ew T i r e s ! T h i r d r ow seating means room for the whole gang! This is one very nice family vehicle for an even nicer price! Come see the Peninsula’s value leader for over 55 years! Stop by Gray Motors today! $5,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘01 Durango S LT. N e w t i r e s . $4,800/obo. 683-0763. GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. Auto trans, A/C, ‘350’, 247,900 mi, seats 8, great cond, well cared for. $1,999. Call (360)531-0854 FORD: ‘04 Explorer. Excellent condition, new tires/brakes, all power, trailer hitch, 102K mi. $7,000. (360)683-5494. FORD: ‘95 Bronco 4X4. Good rubber, runs great, 139k. $4,500/obo. (360)457-9148 GMC ‘04 YUKON 4WD SLT This Yukon is a full-sized premium SUV powered by a 285 HP V8, with plenty of space for up to 8 passengers and cargo! Combine this power to tow up to 5,000 pounds and you have one fine SUV! This is a one-owner luxur y trade-in immaculate condition. New tires, leather, moonroof, full power amenities and more! $13,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 GMC ‘04 YUKON DENALI 4X4 V8, auto, dual A/C and heat, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and pedals, dual power heated seats, leather interior, power sunroof, electronic traction and stablitity control, Bose AM/FM/CD and cassette with 6 disc stacker, third row seating, privacy glass, roof rack, running boards, alloy wheels, tow package, remote entry and more! Only $13,995. VIN#292233 Exp. 8-31-13 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com 2946 Hwy 101 E. PA


B10

WeatherWatch

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013 Neah Bay 61/53

ellingham elli el e ling ng g 70/56

Olympic Peninsula TODAY Port Townsend 67/52

Port Angeles 65/53

Forks 68/54

AM

Olympics Snow level: 8,500 ft.

Sequim 65/54

Port Ludlow 69/54

Yesterday

SH

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 69 47 0.00 10.52 Forks 72 49 0.00 57.77 Seattle 72 61 0.01 16.95 Sequim 67 51 0.00 5.98 Hoquiam 68 48 0.00 31.82 Victoria 73 54 0.00 13.98 Port Townsend 73 48 0.00 11.29

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forecast highs for Tuesday, Aug. 27

OW ER S

Aberdeen e 71/57

Billings 93° | 66°

San Francisco 73° | 57°

New

First

Chicago 95° | 75°

Full

Low 53 Cloudy, chance of showers

63/55 50% chance of showers

Marine Weather

THURSDAY

63/55 Good chance of showers

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

66/55 Mostly cloudy

65/55 Clouds and possibly rain

Miami 90° | 77°

Fronts

Aug 28 Sept 5

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

8:04 p.m. 6:27 a.m. 11:26 p.m. 2:03 p.m.

Nation/World

Strait of Juan de Fuca: Variable wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Chance of showers. Tonight, Light wind. Wind waves less than 1 ft.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Sept 12 Sept 19 -10s

Burlington, Vt. 79 Casper 84 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 86 CANADA Albany, N.Y. 65 .01 Rain Charleston, W.Va. 84 Victoria Albuquerque 67 .05 PCldy Charlotte, N.C. 82 66° | 54° Amarillo 69 Clr Cheyenne 87 Anchorage 47 PCldy Chicago 89 Asheville 55 PCldy Cincinnati 87 Seattle Atlanta 62 Clr Cleveland 85 Spokane 73° | 61° Ocean: SE wind 10 to 20 Atlantic City 61 Cldy Columbia, S.C. 85 84° | 57° Columbus, Ohio 86 Austin 77 Cldy kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W Tacoma 82 Baltimore 61 Cldy Concord, N.H. Olympia swell 5 ft at 7 seconds. Show75° | 63° Billings 73 PCldy Dallas-Ft Worth 98 77° | 57° ers likely. Tonight, S wind to 86 Yakima Birmingham 65 Clr Dayton 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. 90 Bismarck 66 Cldy Denver 86° | 59° W swell 4 ft at 8 seconds. 96 Boise 62 Cldy Des Moines Astoria 87 Boston 68 Cldy Detroit 72° | 57° 94 76 .01 Cldy Duluth ORE. © 2013 Wunderground.com Brownsville 94 Buffalo 71 .02 Rain El Paso Evansville 89 Fairbanks 62 TODAY TOMORROW THURSDAY Fargo 95 64 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Flagstaff Grand Rapids 89 92 LaPush 5:50 a.m. 6.0’ 11:28 a.m. 2.5’ 6:56 a.m. 5.6’ 12:38 a.m. 1.0’ 8:09 a.m. 5.5’ 1:43 a.m. 1.1’ Great Falls 5:42 p.m. 7.6’ 6:37 p.m. 7.2’ 12:21 p.m. 3.1’ 7:39 p.m. 7.0’ 1:26 p.m. 3.5’ Greensboro, N.C. 79 Hartford Spgfld 83 92 Port Angeles 9:31 a.m. 5.3’ 2:06 a.m. 0.9’ 11:12 a.m. 5.4’ 3:04 a.m. 0.9’ 12:29 p.m. 5.8’ 4:06 a.m. 0.9’ Helena Honolulu 88 7:35 p.m. 6.2’ 2:12 p.m. 4.6’ 8:18 p.m. 5.8’ 3:31 p.m. 5.1’ 9:09 p.m. 5.6’ 5:05 p.m. 5.3’ Houston 89 Indianapolis 88 Port Townsend 11:08 a.m. 6.5’ 3:19 a.m. 1.0’ 12:49 p.m. 6.7’ 4:17 a.m. 1.0’ 2:06 p.m. 7.1’ 5:19 a.m. 1.0’ Jackson, Miss. 88 Jacksonville 85 9:12 p.m. 7.6’ 3:25 p.m. 5.1’ 9:55 p.m. 7.2’ 4:44 p.m. 5.7’ 10:46 p.m. 6.9’ 6:18 p.m. 5.9’ Juneau 60 Kansas City 93 Dungeness Bay* 10:14 a.m. 5.8’ 2:41 a.m. 0.9’ 11:55 a.m. 6.0’ 3:39 a.m. 0.9’ 1:12 p.m. 6.4’ 4:41 a.m. 0.9’ Key West 89 8:18 p.m. 6.8’ 2:47 p.m. 4.6’ 9:01 p.m. 6.5’ 4:06 p.m. 5.1’ 9:52 p.m. 6.2’ 5:40 p.m. 5.3’ Las Vegas 90 Little Rock 92 *To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Washington TODAY

New York 84° | 73°

Detroit 90° | 73°

Hi 81 85 93 66 76 82 80 95 81 92 85 97 93 83 93 80

Tides

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

64 63 68 57 56 58 70 61 68 56 63 60 75 65 59 73 67 70 74 70 43 69 56 68 56 56 66 57 77 76 64 71 71 52 71 79 74 72

.16

.01

.11 .06 .07

.89 .01

.01 .02 .01 .04

Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Clr Cldy Clr Clr PCldy Clr Clr Cldy PCldy Clr Cldy Clr PCldy PCldy PCldy Clr Clr Cldy Rain Cldy PCldy Clr Rain PCldy Clr Rain Clr Clr Cldy Rain Clr Rain Rain PCldy

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 110 at Death Valley, Calif. ■ 36 at Lakeview, Ore.

Atlanta 86° | 61°

El Paso 90° | 72° Houston 93° | 77°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

WEDNESDAY

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 90° | 73°

Los Angeles 84° | 66°

Cold

TONIGHT

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 95° | 79°

Denver 91° | 59°

Almanac Last

Sunny

Seattle 73° | 61°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 76/58

The Lower 48:

National TODAY forecast Nation

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

80 91 93 89 89 95 90 96 88 83 83 77 98 94 97 86 85 81 89 82 77 71 82 80 96 85 82 87 94 89 89 100 77 73 90 80 77 97

63 PCldy 71 PCldy 67 PCldy 73 PCldy 75 .44 Rain 72 PCldy 74 PCldy 80 PCldy 65 PCldy 76 .34 PCldy 68 Rain 58 Clr 73 Clr 71 Clr 74 Clr 75 PCldy 51 .08 PCldy 65 Cldy 81 .01 Cldy 63 PCldy 62 .24 Rain 61 .08 Cldy 64 Rain 55 Clr 67 Cldy 58 Cldy 57 Clr 60 Clr 76 Clr 79 PCldy 73 Cldy 77 .01 Rain 69 Cldy 61 PCldy 79 .16 Rain 60 .04 PCldy 68 2.28 PCldy 73 PCldy

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Sioux Falls Syracuse Tampa Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington, Del.

89 83 89 94 94 94 83 93 83 79

75 67 76 74 74 75 64 73 66 61

Clr Rain Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Cldy Clr Rain Cldy

.04 .59 .06

________ Auckland Baghdad Beijing Berlin Brussels Cairo Calgary Guadalajara Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Mexico City Montreal Moscow New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi Lo 62 52 108 72 88 68 73 56 74 53 93 72 78 50 77 61 90 81 89 64 73 52 91 63 74 51 74 54 81 63 67 45 95 80 75 58 77 64 79 65 74 53 89 76 82 68 69 59

Otlk PCldy Clr Ts Clr PCldy PCldy Clr Ts Clr Clr Clr Clr PCldy Ts Clr Clr Clr Sh Sh Ts Clr PCldy Ts Sh

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