Issuu on Google+

Summer firefighting

Thursday Partly sunny today into the weekend A8

Clallam’s forestry station in PA remembered C2

Peninsula Daily News 50 cents

July 28, 2011

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Ex-treasurer’s cashier guilty Jury convicts her of stealing up to $793,595 By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Former Clallam County Treasurer’s Office cashier Catherine Betts is shown in Clallam County Superior Court on Wednesday, moments after she was pronounced guilty of embezzlement in connection with more than $617,000 in missing Clallam County revenues.

PORT ANGELES — Catherine Betts was handcuffed and taken into custody as she sat in her wheelchair Wednesday after a Clallam County Superior Court jury found her guilty of stealing at least $617,467 in public money that never has been recovered. After a 1½-week trial, the eight-woman, four-man jury took four hours to find the former Clallam County Treasurer’s Office cashier guilty of all the charges against her: aggravated firstdegree theft, money laundering and 19 counts of filing false or fraudulent tax returns on behalf of the county with the state Department of Revenue. “There was no doubt in my mind whatsoever” about the verdict, juror Kenneth Abrahams of Port Angeles, a retired logger and formerly of Forks, said in a telephone interview. What Betts did “was a betrayal of trust,” he said.

The jury found the 47-year-old former Port Angeles resident guilty of stealing between $617,467 and $793,595 in public money from the Treasurer’s Office cash drawer between 2003 and 2009, when the theft was first discovered. Betts, who now lives in Shelton, has been on her own recognizance since her arrest in June 2009. After the verdict was read Wednesday afternoon by Judge Brooke Taylor, he set her bail at $100,000, and she was immediately jailed.

Sentencing in August Taylor set a sentencing hearing for 9 a.m. Aug. 24. Betts faces 43 months to 21 years in prison, said state Assistant Attorney General Scott Marlow, the fraud and white-collar-crime specialist who prosecuted the case.

Betts covers her face with cuffed hands as she is led away in her wheelchair to jail custody following the Turn to Guilty/A6 jury verdict.

Weeklong PT jazz fest notes youthful turn

SUV takes a beeline off road Driver, 77, loses control while trying to swat bee By Jeff Chew

Peninsula Daily News

DUNGENESS — A 77-yearold Dungeness woman walked away from a dramatic car crash Wednesday afternoon when she lost control of her SUV while swatting away a bee while driving north on Sequim-Dungeness Way. Donna Sommer’s newer-model Subaru Outback veered into and severed a power pole, then plummeted down an embankment, where her car came to rest on its side in a thicket of berry brambles about 100 feet south of Taylor Ranch Road at about 3 p.m. Sommer was not cited because the cause of the crash was an act of nature, an investigating deputy said.

“I think she’s already been punished enough, and I think it’s a good opportunity for her husband to get that convertible he’s always wanted,” said Clallam County Sheriff’s Deputy Ralph Edgington, who shared the joke with Sommer’s husband, Trent, who was comforting his wife at the scene. The crash temporarily stopped and slowed north- and southbound traffic on Sequim-Dungeness Way. After Clallam County Fire District No. 3 responders extracted her from the car, she was transported by ambulance to Olympic Medical Center for observation. Sommer, a Brittany Lane Road resident, was not on the admittance list at the hospital early Wednesday night, a supervising nurse said, which likely meant she had been discharged. Turn

to

Bee/A5

By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County Fire District No. 3 personnel rescue Donna Sommer from the wreckage of her car.

Gerald Clayton, whose photograph is on this year’s Jazz Port Townsend promotional poster, is also the poster child for what Centrum strives to provide during its summer events. “We want participants to get exposure to emerging artists as well as established masters,” said Centrum marketing director Mark Livingston. “And Gerald Clayton is the face of the next generation of jazz.” Pianist Clayton, 27, Clayton leads the Gerald Clayton Trio, which will be featured in one of the three faculty main stage performances that are culminating acts — along with Jazz in the Clubs — of the weeklong Jazz Port Townsend classes at Centrum at Fort Worden State Park. The trio — composed of Clayton, bassist Joe Sanders and drummer Quincy Davis and joined by tenor saxophonist Joel Frahm — will perform at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Turn

to

Jazz/A6

Future big quake under our Peninsula? Much deeper potential, new study suggests Peninsula Daily News news services

PORT ANGELES — The fault line where tectonic plates are colliding in the Pacific Northwest is much deeper than previously thought, according to a new study, which could mean

the North Olympic Peninsula will be hit hard when a “megathrust” earthquake next occurs off the West Coast. A team of Canadian and U.S. scientists, led by Andrew Calvert, a professor in Earth Sciences at British Columbia’s Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, made the discovery by poring through data collected by a research project known as SHIPS, for Seismic Hazards Investigations in Puget Sound, which since 1998 has been examining earthquake dangers

in the region. The findings were published recently in the journal Nature Geoscience. “What we have put forward in our paper is that beneath the Olympic Peninsula, in northwest Washington state, there’s a large volume of sedimentary rock that extends actually from the Olympic Mountains at surface . . . down to a depth of almost 40 kilometers [25 miles],” said Calvert. “That large volume of rock actually sits above the fault, or

close to the fault, between the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and the overriding North American continent,” said Calvert. He said the fault is about 4.3 miles deeper than scientists had previously thought, but the implications of that aren’t fully understood. The research does not allow scientists to conclude where the next big earthquake is most likely to strike. But it does add an important new piece to the seismic puzzle on the West Coast, heightening

Member FDIC

*First Federal was voted Best Place to Bank and Best Customer Service in 2010 Peninsula Daily News ‘Best of the Peninsula’ poll.

to

Quake/A6

95th year, 177th issue — 3 sections, 22 pages

125112408

800-800-1577 ourfirstfed.com

Turn

Inside Today’s Peninsula Daily News

Thank you for voting us Best Place to Bank for 15 years!*

Your Business Bank...

interest in the potential hazards on the North Olympic Peninsula. And it points to new research that’s needed. “One of the things we need to understand better is the degree of variation in the subsurface [from] Vancouver Island to Northern California . . . we also need to try and follow the structures that we’ve identified offshore, to the region where the fault approaches the surface,” Calvert said.

Business B4 Classified C4 Comics B3 Commentary/Letters A7 Dear Abby B3 Deaths A6 Movies C4 Nation/World A3 Peninsula Poll A2

Puzzles/Games C3, C5 Sports B1 3rdAge C2 Weather A8


A2

UpFront

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3541 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 50 cents daily, $1.25 Sunday

Reprints, commercial PRINTING! Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, see “Own the Moment,” bottom. Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527 To print your newspaper, brochure or catalog: 360-417-3520

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2391; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714, Ext. 531 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3536 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527

Job and career OPPORTUNITIES! Carrier positions: 360-4524507 or 800-826-7714 (8 a.m.5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays). Job applications/human resources: 360-417-7691 See today’s classified ads for latest opportunities.

Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Berry stalker jailed for burglary count PROSECUTORS HAVE CHARGED a man accused of stalking Halle Berry with felony burglary for being in the actress’ guest house earlier this month. Richard A. Franco pleaded not guilty to the additional charge during a court appearance Wednesday Berry in Los Angeles. He now faces two felonies stemming from three incidents in which he was spotted on the Oscar winner’s property in mid-July. Berry has written in court filings that she is “extremely frightened” of the 27-year-old. She said he nearly gained entry into her kitchen before she was able to lock the door. Criminal and civil judges have issued restraining orders against Franco in case he is released. He has pleaded not guilty to stalking the actress and is due in court Aug. 4.

Sarajevo

film festival

Actor Michael Fassbender arrives on the red carpet at the entrance of the Bosnian National Theatre for the 17th Sarajevo Film Festival in Sarajevo on Wednesday. A showing of “Jane Eyre” with Fassbender in the role of Mr. Rochester opened the sixth night of the festival, expected to show more than 220 movies from 44 countries worldwide.

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you believe there are UFOs that truly cannot be identified by anyone?

Yes 

No 

Undecided 

59.4% 33.0% 7.7%

Total votes cast: 928 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Passings By The Associated Press

RICK KAMINSKI, 67, a Safeco Field vendor who entertained Seattle Mariners fans since their first season in 1977 as the “Peanut Man,” has died. Evergreen Hospital in Kirkland said his partner, Candi Mindt-Keener, announced Wednesday that Mr. Kaminski died overnight due to complications from a brain aneurysm. Mariners President Chuck Armstrong said Mr. Kaminski’s “speed and accuracy with a bag of peanuts was matched by his quick wit and smile.” Armstrong said he’ll be sorely missed at Safeco

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

The Associated Press

Field as well as Peoria, Ariz., where he took his spring training with the team.

Peek, told The Associated Press. An autopsy ________ will be conducted to DAN PEEK, 60, a determine founding member of softthe cause of Mr. Peek rock trio America, which death. in 1972 shot to the top of the pop Mr. Peek charts in the 1970s with rode to mainstream success bouncy, lightweight hits including “A Horse With No with half a dozen top 10 Name,” “Ventura Highway” singles with fellow band members Gerry Beckley and “Sister Golden Hair,” died Sunday at his home in and Dewey Bunnell. Mr. Peek left the group Farmington, Mo., outside in 1977, devoting himself St. Louis. to writing and recording Mr. Peek’s wife, Cathecontemporary Christian rine, found him dead in music. bed, his father, Milton

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

1961 (50 years ago)

1986 (25 years ago)

A metallurgical process for the extraction of manganese from Olympic Mountains ores is now being developed at the state electrometallurgical research laboratories at Pullman. Ore taken from the old Crescent mine near Lake Crescent and sent to Washington State College by the Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce has been analyzed by the labs. A detailed report received by the Chamber of Commerce says: “The large, high-silica manganese ore deposits of the Olympic Peninsula (20 to 40 percent manganese) offer real possibilities for the near future, with lowpriced Grand Coulee power and cheap tidewater ship transportation to all parts of the world.”

A 35-year-old man, Terry McGuire, allegedly confessed to taking $43,500 in a robbery of Forks State Bank with a single-shot, .22-caliber rifle as his weapon. He forced bank cashier C. Bruce Mathison to accompany him on his escape in Mathison’s car, according to authorities. He forced Mathison out of the car, a black Volkswagen, near the Snider Ranger Station, then continued east on U.S. Highway 101. On the new stretch of highway around Lake Sutherland, Sgt. Ray Fry and Trooper Richard L. Bradley of the State Patrol forced the Volkswagen to the shoulder of the road. McGuire, asked some routine questions, allegedly told the troopers: “I give up. I did it.”

People who have been waiting a year for jobs at the new Clallam Bay prison can now apply for 225 positions that will be filled during the next nine months. The first batch of openings are 136 correctional officer positions. Other job categories will include secretaries, accountants, dentists, cooks, bakers and maintenance trades.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

MAN AND HIS small grandson spray-painting flowers along a fence on Wilcox Lane in Sequim. . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

■  To clarify further, Olympic Medical Center CEO Eric Lewis has no current plans to subcontract any hospital services. The issue of subcontracting was brought up by Tom Herber, a registered nurse, whose point at a July 20 meeting of hospital commissioners was that employees want subcontracting addressed in a contract now being negotiated with unions. A story on Page A5 in Sunday’s edition erroneously reported that Lewis at the July 20 meeting mentioned subcontracting some hospital services. Lewis did not speak of subcontracting services and told employees in an email message Monday that OMC “has no current plans to subcontract services. Our goal is to retain our work force.” Herber said Wednesday that he brought up the issue because of employee concern that the hospital administration might contemplate subcontracting some services. Herber’s name also was misspelled in both the Sunday story and a Setting It Straight item published Tuesday. ■  A stormwater construction management permit for the city of Port Angeles’ sewage overflow elimination project would cost $204,500 if approved by the City Council. A report appearing Sunday on Page A5 erroneously said the permit would cost the city $224,500.

City Engineer Mike Puntenney said he expects a small portion of that to be reimbursed by Rayonier Inc. Additionally, the city has not received approval for another, less costly stormwater construction management permit for the project that it was previously expecting to need.

_________ The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex ­Wilson at 360-417-3530 or email rex. wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Laugh Lines TIGER WOODS’ EXWIFE is dating again. Where does a gorgeous woman with $500 million find a man? David Letterman

Did You Win? State lottery results

■ Wednesday’s Daily Game: 0-0-2 ■ Wednesday’s Hit 5: 04-08-13-27-31 ■ Wednesday’s Keno: 06-08-15-16-17-30-32-3336-37-40-46-59-60-64-6567-69-75-78 ■ Wednesday’s Lotto: 02-05-21-25-26-46 ■ Wednesday’s Match 4: 11-12-13-16 ■ Wednesday’s Powerball: 38-40-41-51-59, Powerball: 33, Power Play: 2

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, July 28, the 209th day of 2011. There are 156 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On July 28, 1914, World War I began as Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. On this date: ■  In 1540, King Henry VIII’s chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, was executed, the same day Henry married his fifth wife, Catherine Howard. ■  In 1609, the English ship Sea Venture, commanded by Adm. Sir George Somers, ran ashore on Bermuda, where the passengers and crew founded a colony. ■  In 1794, Maximilien

Robespierre, a leading figure of the French Revolution, was sent to the guillotine. ■  In 1821, Peru declared its independence from Spain. ■  In 1932, federal troops forcibly dispersed the so-called “Bonus Army” of World War I veterans who had gathered in Washington to demand money they weren’t scheduled to receive until 1945. ■  In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the end of coffee rationing, which had limited people to one pound of coffee every five weeks since it began in November 1942. ■  In 1945, a U.S. Army bomber crashed into the 79th floor of New York’s Empire State Building, kill-

ing 14 people. The U.S. Senate ratified the United Nations Charter by a vote of 89-2. ■  In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced he was increasing the number of American troops in South Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000 “almost immediately.” ■  In 1976, an earthquake devastated northern China, killing at least 242,000 people, according to an official estimate. ■  In 2002, nine coal miners trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine in Somerset, Pa., were rescued after 77 hours underground. ■  Ten years ago: Alejandro Toledo, Peru’s first freely elected

president of Indian descent, was sworn into office. ■  Five years ago: A gunman who witnesses said identified himself as a Muslim American walked into the offices of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle and opened fire, killing one woman and wounding five others before he was arrested. Naveed Haq was later convicted of aggravated firstdegree murder and sentenced to life in prison without possibility of release. ■  One year ago: A federal judge put most of Arizona’s toughest-in-the-nation immigration law on hold just hours before it was to take effect.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, July 28, 2011

Second Front Page

PAGE

A3

Briefly: Nation Navy prepares subs for first female officers HARTFORD, Conn. — For Ensign Peggy LeGrand, the biggest concern about serving on a submarine is not spending weeks at a time in tight quarters with an entirely male crew. What worries her is the scrutiny that comes with breaking one of the last gender barriers in the U.S. military. “I have a feeling more people will be focused on us. Our mistakes and successes will be magnified more than they deserve,” said LeGrand, a 25-year-old Naval Academy graduate from Amarillo, Texas. LeGrand is among a small group of female officers who are training at sites including Groton, Conn., to join the elite submarine force beginning later this year. While the Navy said it is not treating them any differently from their male counterparts, officials have been working to prepare the submarine crews — and the sailors’ wives — for one of the most dramatic changes in the 111-year history of the Navy’s “silent service.” The initial class of 24 women will be divided among four submarines, where they will be outnumbered by men by a ratio of roughly 1 to 25. The enlisted ranks, which make up about 90 percent of a sub’s 160-sailor crew, are not open to women although the Navy is exploring modifications to create separate bunks for men and women.

Going public NEW YORK — The hotel

housekeeper accusing Dominique StraussKahn of sexually assaulting her is telling her story publicly, she said, because she wants the for- Diallo mer International Monetary Fund leader behind bars. But it’s hard to say whether her striking move will help or hobble her goal. Nafissatou Diallo’s decision to speak out in media interviews is an unusual and risky move for an accuser at this point in a criminal case, legal experts said. It gives her an empowering chance to tell her side of the story as prosecutors weigh whether to press ahead with the case amid their concerns about her credibility. But it also enshrines a version of events that defense lawyers could mine for discrepancies with her grand jury testimony or use as fodder to argue she was seeking money or public attention.

Small-town America WASHINGTON — Rural America now accounts for just 16 percent of the nation’s population, the lowest ever. The 2010 Census numbers hint at an emerging America where, by mid-century, city boundaries become indistinct and rural areas grow less relevant. Many communities could shrink to virtual ghost towns as they shutter businesses and close down schools, demographers said. More metro areas are booming into sprawling megalopolises. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Mexican police find 18 bodies in secret graves MONTERREY, Mexico — Police found 18 bodies in a clandestine grave in a northern Mexican town where several hidden burial pits have been discovered in the past year, authorities said Wednesday. Shepherds came across two decomposing bodies near a dirt road late Tuesday in the town of Juarez and alerted police, said a Nuevo Leon state police investigator who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to talk about the case. Another 16 bodies were buried underneath, the officer said. He said the bodies were badly decomposed and had been buried for at least a month. Last month, police found two separate pits containing human remains in Juarez, a town near the industrial city of Monterrey. Last year, soldiers found 51 bodies buried at an isolated ranch in the same town.

Bomber at rally TRIPOLI, Libya — The Libyan man convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing attended a pro-Gadhafi rally, and Libyan state TV images showing the bomber in a wheelchair in a crowd in Tripoli revived criticism in Britain on Wednesday of the decision to grant him early release on medical grounds. Abdel Baset al-Megrahi’s presence at Tuesday’s rally appeared to be another sign of defiance by the embattled

regime of Moammar Gadhafi, locked in a civil war with antigovernment rebels for the past five months. Britain officially recognized Libya’s main opposition group as the country’s legitimate government and expelled all diplomats from Gadhafi’s regime on Wednesday. Al-Megrahi was convicted in the 1988 downing of a Pan Am plane that killed 270 people, most of them Americans, over Lockerbie, Scotland. He was released from a Scottish prison in 2009 after being diagnosed with prostate cancer, and at the time was given three months to live. Al-Megrahi returned to a hero’s welcome in Libya later that year.

Protests praised CAIRO — Al-Qaida’s new leader praised Syrian protesters seeking to topple the regime of President Bashar Assad while trying to portray the uprising as an Islamic battle against American and Israeli interests. The video message posted on extremist websites Wednesday is Ayman al-Zawahri’s first since al-Qaida named him its new leader in June following the death of Osama bin Laden in a U.S. commando raid in Pakistan. The Egyptian-born alZawahri, who long served as bin Laden’s top deputy, directly addressed the Syrian protesters who have risen up against Assad’s rule despite a bloody government crackdown. The message appeared to be an attempt to place al-Qaida firmly on the side of the antigovernment demonstrators. The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Rising

from the ashes

One World Trade Center, left, rises up in the Manhattan skyline in this aerial photo Wednesday in New York. The tower has reached the 76th floor of 105 stories total. The Empire State Building is in the distant center.

Boehner’s big debt bid undone from right, left ‘Grand bargain’ abandonment, doomed plan highlight limits By Charles Babington The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Despite his image as a button-down Republican, House Speaker John Boehner walked to the brink of a dramatic and historic agreement to change the government’s spending habits. But as he twice approached a $4 trillion deficit-reduction deal with President Barack Obama that would have rocked both parties’ bases, Boehner was reeled back in by his caucus’ conservative wing. The muscular, tea party-fueled group not only forced him to abandon a “grand bargain” with Obama, it made him scramble Wednesday to secure the votes for a far more modest deficit-ceiling plan, which in turn is all but doomed in the Senate. The events highlight the limits of power for an experienced and well-liked politician who has struggled to budge his caucus’ staunchest conservatives despite constantly reminding them that

their party doesn’t control the Senate or White House. “The problem with leadership is it has to be conjoined with follower-ship,” Duke University political scientist David Rohde said. “Boehner is not in a position to give orders to his members.” A grand bargain might have passed, with scores of Democratic votes replacing GOP dissenters, Rohde said. But it also could have put Boehner’s speakership in jeopardy.

Precipice of compromise No matter how the White House and Congress handle next week’s expiration of the government’s borrowing power, the messy finish will make it easy to forget that Boehner and Obama once stood on the precipice of a daring compromise. While never completed, the general outlines would have cut spending by about $3 trillion over 10 years. It would have started reining in Medicare and Social Security benefits, and raised tax

revenues by $800 billion or more. Both men knew the tax component would be the toughest sell for Boehner, whose party has raised the “no new taxes” mantra to near-religious status. In turn, however, liberals would have shrieked at Obama’s willingness to curb entitlement programs and severely trim other government programs, changes that Boehner could have touted as a remarkable GOP victory. “There was always a desire to go forward with as large a package as possible that would deal with the underlying structural challenges that face the entitlement systems,” a top House leadership aide told reporters at a Friday briefing after the deal collapsed. “We thought we could get to significant entitlement and tax changes.” Boehner, a mainstream conservative from Ohio, would have insisted that the changes were not “tax increases.” That’s a familiar semantics game in Washington. It would emphasize a freeze or even reduction in most tax rates while drawing attention away from an overall growth in tax revenues, thanks largely to eliminating loopholes and subsidies.

Norway suspect borrowed from Unabomber’s manifesto By Kristen Wyatt

The Associated Press

DENVER — Parts of the manifesto written by the suspect in Norway’s terrorist attack were taken almost word for word from the writings of “Unabomber” Ted Kaczynski. The passages copied by Anders Behring Breivik appear in the first few pages of Kaczynski’s manifesto. Breivik changed a Kaczynski screed on leftism and what he considered to be leftists’ “feelings of inferiority” — mainly by substituting the words “multiculturalism” or “cultural Marxism” for “leftism.” For instance, Kaczynski wrote: “One of the most widespread manifestations of the craziness of our world is leftism, so a discussion of

Quick Read

the psychology of leftism can serve as an introduction to the discussion of the problems of modern society in general.” Breivik’s manifesto reads: “One of the most widespread manifestations of the craziness of our world is multiculturalism, so a discussion of the psychology of multiculturalists can serve as an introduction to the discussion of the problems of Western Europe in general.”

Didn’t cite Unabomber Breivik did not cite Kaczynski, though he did for many other people whose writings he used in his 1,500-word manifesto. He used at least one portion verbatim: “Feminists are desperately anxious to prove that women

are as strong and capable as men. Clearly they are nagged by a fear that women may NOT be as strong and as capable as men.” Breivik is accused of killing at least 93 people Friday by setting off an explosion in downtown Oslo and then gunning down young campers on a nearby island. Kaczynski is serving a life sentence in a Colorado federal prison for mail bombs that killed three people and injured 23 others across the U.S. from the 1970s-1990s. Former FBI Agent Terry Turchie, who supervised the federal task force to capture the Unabomber, said Sunday, “They seem to have this anger, the loner aspect, this desire to look back at the way things were and think of themselves as self-reliant.”

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Man jailed after drunken cooking leads to fire

Nation: Pa. bishop gets bobblehead for birthday

Nation: Analysis reclassifies famous fossil creature

World: Goldfish survive without food for 134 days

A PENNSYLVANIA MAN is jailed on charges of reckless endangerment and resisting arrest after police said he passed out drunk while cooking, causing a small fire that forced the evacuation of his public housing apartment building. Online court records show 25-yearold Avery McCall was arrested about 3 a.m. Tuesday at his apartment in the Solomon Homes public housing complex in Johnstown. The Tribune-Democrat of Johnstown is reporting that firefighters had to use a pass key to enter the smoky apartment, where they found McCall on the couch as food burned on his stove.

AS A PRIEST, he’s probably not going to get a big head over it. Donald Trautman, the Roman Catholic bishop in Erie, Pa., received a special gift in honor of his 75th birthday: a bobblehead in his likeness. The Erie Times-News reported that Trautman was presented with the swaying-headed statue last month at a gathering of priests from 13-county diocese. An Erie priest came up with the idea for the dolls, which were also distributed to all the priests in the diocese. Trautman has sent his resignation letter to Pope Benedict XVI, as canon law requires for priests turning 75. No replacement has been named.

ONE OF THE world’s most famous fossil creatures, widely considered the earliest known bird, is getting a rude present on the 150th birthday of its discovery: A new analysis suggests it isn’t a bird at all. Chinese scientists are proposing a change to the evolutionary family tree that boots Archaeopteryx off the “bird” branch and onto a closely related branch of birdlike dinosaurs. It was a crow-sized creature that lived about 150 million years ago. It had wings and feathers, but also quite un-birdlike traits like teeth and a bony tail. Discovered in 1861 in Germany, it quickly became an icon for evolution.

TWO GOLDFISH, NAMED Shaggy and Daphne after characters from the animated television show Scooby Doo, have become the smallest and hardiest survivors of the devastating February earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, that killed 181 people. The fish spent 41⁄2 months — 134 days — trapped in their tank in the city’s off-limits downtown without any electricity to power their tank filter before they were discovered this month and rescued. Luckily for the fish, they lived in a large 26-gallon tank, had weed to munch through and may have gleaned nutrition from eating algae growing on the tank’s rocks and walls.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

BPA price hike to up consumer costs By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Utility customers in Clallam County can expect to pay a little more to heat their homes this winter. Bonneville Power Administration, the primary electrical power supplier for the Clallam County Public Utility District and the city of Port Angeles, announced Tuesday that it will raise wholesale electric prices to public utilities by 7.8 percent Oct. 1. The Portland, Ore.-based federal power marketing agency said the hike was

the coming months, with decisions from the City Council and PUD commissioners expected in the fall. Both entities will hold public hearings before considering a rate hike. “In general terms, whatever the increase is on our wholesale cost, we have to pass on half of that as a retail increase,” said Port Angeles Deputy Director of Power Systems Larry Dunbar. Power customers in East Proposals planned Jefferson County will not be PUD and city officials afforded by the BPA wholewill develop proposals for sale rate increase. Puget Sound Energy genan electric rate increase in needed to cover the costs of fixing aging Columbia River dams, fuel purchases and repairs for the Columbia Generating Station nuclear plant, and fish and wildlife conservation. “Now that we know the exact nature of the BPA rate increase, staff will begin to evaluate its impact on the PUD and our customers,” said Clallam County PUD General Manager Doug Nass.

erates about 45 percent of its power and buys the rest from sources other than Bonneville. “Our Jefferson County customers will not be directly affected,” PSE spokesman Roger Thompson said. Clallam County PUD and city utility customers were notified about the impending BPA price hike through mailings and newsletters. “None of this should be a surprise,” said Dunbar, who added: “It’s not a pleasant topic.” In November, Bonneville announced that its anticipated 12 percent to 20 per-

the past few years, but because we are a nonprofit organization, any BPA increase will have a direct impact on our rates,” Nass said. “We were able to delay an increase in 2009 until 2010 but will unfortunately have no choice but to increase rates to cover Power sales BPA’s rate increase this Bonneville sells power year.” from 31 federal hydroelec________ tric dams and its nuclear Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be plant to about 140 publicly owned utilities in the reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. region, most of which are ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com. consumer-owned. “The PUD has been The Associated Press contribimproving efficiency during uted to this report. cent increase would probably be in the 6 percent to 10 percent range. The Oregonian of Portland reported this week that the higher increase was avoided by borrowing more from the U.S. Treasury.

Legislators: Shooting range stalled for now By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

Brush

fire quickly contained

Firefighters with Clallam County Fire District No. 3 quickly contain a grass fire near a home off Washington Harbor Loop on Wednesday afternoon in East Sequim. The small blaze was south of Purple Haze Lavender Farm and is believed to be the first grass fire of the summer season. Cause was not known late Wednesday afternoon, but the fire was under investigation.

SEQUIM — Gun enthusiasts will be waiting for a while for a shooting park near Sadie Creek. Democrats Steve Tharinger of Sequim and Jim Hargrove of Hoquiam, two of the 24th District’s three legislators, told the monthly meeting of Concerned Citizens of Clallam County on Monday that a shooting park won’t be happening anytime soon. The gym at the Sequim unit of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula was filled with more than 100 meeting participants. Marv Chastain, a proponent of a shooting park near Sadie Creek, lamented to Tharinger and Hargrove that the state Department of Natural Resources has refused to transfer land back to Clallam County for the shooting park. “This project is in absolute paralysis,”

Chastain said. The park is needed by law enforcement, will draw tourists and would be “an alternate location for shooting that goes on in places it shouldn’t,” he said. “I’m asking for help in coaxing the [state] land commissioner,” Chastain said. “What are you gonna do?”

Nothing they can do At the moment, there’s nothing they can do, Hargrove and Tharinger said. Hargrove said conversations with Natural Resources have been fruitless, adding that the agency was using a “bureaucratic excuse” for not reconveying the property. Tharinger said the agency wants an environmental impact statement before transferring it back. “That’s probably a $250,000 bill because of the nature of a shooting park in a fairly sensitive landscape,” Tharinger said. Tharinger and Hargrove were guests of the group also

THE HOT ONE SALE THE HOT ONE SALE % % % %

5O -85 OFF STOREWIDE SAVINGS & VALUES NOW THROUGH SUNDAY! STOREWIDE SAVINGSAT&MACYS.COM VALUES NOW SUNDAY! FREE SHIPPING with THROUGH $99 online purchase

($8 FLAT-FEE SHIPPING WITH PURCHASES $99). NO PROMO CODE NEEDED; EXCLUSIONS APPLY. FREE SHIPPING AT UNDER MACYS.COM with $99 online purchase

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE NOW 9.99 SPORTSWEAR NOW 9.99 You save 55%-80%. SPORTSWEAR Orig.* 24.50-$50.

You save 55%-80%. Polos, sportshirts Orig.*tees, 24.50-$50. &Polos, more.tees, sportshirts & more.

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE 5O% OFF

5O%SHOES OFF MEN’S Orig.* $60-$140. MEN’S SHOES Now $30-$70. Orig.* $60-$140. Select & Nowdress $30-$70. casual styles. Select dress & casual styles.

($8 FLAT-FEE SHIPPING WITH PURCHASES UNDER $99). NO PROMO CODE NEEDED; EXCLUSIONS APPLY.

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE NOW 12.99 DRESS NOWSHIRTS 12.99 OR TIESSHIRTS DRESS You 65%-75%. ORsave TIES Orig.* 37.50-59.50. You save 65%-75%. From makers. Orig.*famous 37.50-59.50. From famous makers.

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE 75% TO

75% OFF TO 85% 85% OFF WHEN YOU TAKE

WHEN YOU50% TAKE AN EXTRA OFF Orig.* $29-$299.50% OFF AN EXTRA

Final 3.63-74.75. Orig.*cost $29-$299. Final cost 3.63-74.75. Tops, skirts, pants, more from Tops, skirts, pants, more from our Style & Co., Alfani, Charter our Style & Co., Alfani, Charter Club, Karen Scott & more. Club, Karen ScottWomen’s & more. Misses & petites. Missesslightly & petites. Women’s prices higher. prices slightly higher.

50% OFF SWIMWEAR 50% OFF Reg./Orig.* $18-$146. SWIMWEAR Sale/Now $9-$73.

Reg./Orig.* $18-$146. From Coco Reef Sale/Now $9-$73. and more. From Coco Reef Misses & juniors. and more. Misses & juniors.

5O% OFF 5O% OFF SPORTSWEAR Reg. $29-$299 SPORTSWEAR

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

SHOES FOR HER Orig.* $39-$139. Orig.* $39-$139. Now 13.65-69.50. Now 13.65-69.50. Dress & casual Dress & casual selections from selections from our clearance racks. our clearance racks.

WHEN YOU30% TAKE AN OFF AN EXTRA EXTRA 30% OFF Orig.* 8.99-49.50.

JUNIORS’ COLLECTIONS COLLECTIONS Orig.* $29-$59.

5O% 5O%TO TO 65% OFF 65% OFF SHOES FOR HER

6O% 6O% TO TO 7O% OFF 7O% OFF WHEN YOU TAKE

Orig.*cost 8.99-49.50. Final 3.48-13.98. Final cost 3.48-13.98. Select tops, sets, dresses, Select tops, sets, boys’ dresses, more. Girls’ 2-16; 2-20; more. Girls’ 2-16; infants’ 3-24 mos.boys’ 2-20; infants’ 3-24 mos.

50%TO TO 50% 80% OFF 80% OFF JUNIORS’

Orig.* Now $29-$59. 5.80-29.50. Now Tops,5.80-29.50. skirts, shorts, Tops, skirts, shorts, more from BCX, more from BCX, Grass & more. Grass & more.

CLOSEOUT CLOSEOUT

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

LUGGAGE COLLECTIONS COLLECTIONS Orig.* $120-$460.

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA EXTRA 40% 40% OFF OFF Orig.* 3.50-$550.

WHEN YOU TAKE ANEXTRA EXTRA20% 20%OFF OFF AN

60% 60%OFF OFF LUGGAGE

Orig.* $120-$460. Now Now47.99-183.99. 47.99-183.99. From famous From famous makers. makers.

50%-80% OFF WHEN YOU TAKE AN Orig.* 3.50-$550. Final Final cost cost 1.19-119.99. 1.19-119.99. Sheet sets, Sheet sets, sets, comforter comforter sets, bath bath towels, towels, more. more.

Urges restraint

Sale$29-$299 14.50-149.50. Reg. Tanks, tees, skirts, Sale 14.50-149.50. capristees, & more from Tanks, skirts, our JM Collection; capris & more from New Collection our JMYork Collection; New YorkMisses; Collection & AGB. &JM AGB. Misses; also Collection JM hasCollection petites. also has petites.

CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

6O%0FF 0FF 6O% WHEN YOU TAKE Orig.*$400-$6000. $400-$6000. Orig.* Finalcost cost$160-$2400. $160-$2400. Final Finejewelry jewelryclearance. clearance. Fine Diamonds,14k 14kgold, gold, Diamonds, more. Extra savings more. Extra savings ends 7/30/2011. ends 7/30/2011.

17407228

FIND MACY'S MACY'S EVERYWHERE! EVERYWHERE! Shop, FIND Shop, share shareand andconnect connectanytime. anytime. REG.&&ORIG. ORIG.PRICES PRICESARE AREOFFERING OFFERINGPRICES, PRICES,AND ANDSAVINGS SAVINGSMAY MAY NOT NOT BE BE BASED BASED ON ON ACTUAL ONE SALE ININ REG. ACTUAL SALES. SALES. SOME SOMEORIG. ORIG.PRICES PRICESNOT NOTIN INEFFECT EFFECTDURING DURINGTHE THEPAST PAST9090DAYS. DAYS.HOT HOT ONE SALE EFFECTNOW7/31/2011, NOW7/31/2011,UNLESS UNLESSOTHERWISE OTHERWISENOTED. NOTED.*Intermediate *Intermediate price price reductions reductions may jewelry atat select EFFECT may have have been been taken. taken.Jewelry Jewelryphoto photomay maybe beenlarged enlargedororenhanced enhancedtotoshow showdetail. detail.Fine Fine jewelry select stores;log logonontotomacys.com macys.comfor forlocations. locations.Advertised Advertisedmerchandise merchandise may may not not be be carried carried at Prices stores; at your your local local Macy’s Macy’s and andselection selectionmay mayvary varyby bystore. store.Prices Pricesmay maybebelowered loweredasaspart partofofa clearance. a clearance. Prices andmerchandise merchandisemay maydiffer differatatmacys.com. macys.com.Extra Extrasavings savingsare aretaken taken off off already-reduced already-reduced sale prices after and sale prices; prices; “fi “final nal cost” cost”prices pricesrefl reflect ectextra extrasavings. savings.Orig./now Orig./nowitems itemswill willremain remainatatadvertised advertised prices after theevent event&&are areavailable availablewhile whilesupplies supplieslast. last.Luggage Luggagecarries carriesaawarranty; warranty; to to see see aa mfr’s mfr’s warranty POPO Box 1026 the warranty at at no no charge chargebefore beforepurchasing, purchasing,visit visitaastore storeororwrite writeto: to:Macy’s Macy’sWarranty WarrantyDept., Dept., Box 1026 MarylandHeights, Heights,MO MO63043, 63043,attn attnConsumer ConsumerWarranties. Warranties.N1060020. N1060020. For For store store locations locations & Maryland & hours, hours, log log on onto tomacys.com macys.com OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 15% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS WITH MORE REWARDS new account OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 15% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS WITH MORE REWARDSTO TOCOME. COME.Macy’s Macy’scredit creditcard cardisisavailable availablesubject subjecttotocredit creditapproval; approval; new account savingsvalid validthe theday dayyour youraccount account isis opened opened and and the the next next day; day; excludes excludes services, savings services, select select licensed licensed departments, departments,gift giftcards, cards,restaurants, restaurants,gourmet gourmetfood foodand andwine. wine.OnOnfurniture, furniture, mattresses and rugs/fl oor coverings, the new account savings is limited to $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible. mattresses and rugs/floor coverings, the new account savings is limited to $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible. 30247_N1060020AREV.indd 1 30247_N1060020AREV.indd 1

known as 4C to give a legislative update. The 24th District — Democrat Kevin Van De Wege of Sequim is the district’s third legislator — represents Clallam and Jefferson counties and about half of Grays Harbor County. Clallam County Auditor Patty Rosand and county Elections Supervisor Shoona Radon also gave an update on election procedures in anticipation of ballots that were mailed out Wednesday for the Aug. 16 primary, which affects Sequim-area residents. Hargrove said that while Democratic President Barack Obama and Republican House Majority Leader John Boehner were blaming each other for the debt-limit crisis in competing addresses to the nation the very night he and Tharinger were in Sequim, Democrats and Republicans in the state Legislature were actually getting along. Hargrove spoke of the bipartisan support it took for lawmakers to approve a $32 billion 2012-2013 biennial budget that included $4.6 billion in budget cuts. “It’s much more pleasurable not to be blame, blame, blame — which tends to be going on back in Congress now — but actually working together in finding a solution,” he said. Tharinger, also completing his third and final term as District 1 county commissioner, said $18 billion was cut from state spending over the past four years. He defended the holding of a special session to pass the most recent biennial budget. With scores of legislators with different views, “it all has to be worked out in a process,” Tharinger said. “The complexity of the problem and magnitude of the problem is why it took extra time,” he added.

7/22/11 5:36:17 PM 7/22/11 5:36:17 PM

Jerry Sinn, president of the board of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula — which has units in Sequim and Port Angeles — urged budget restraint. “We’ve got to contain our costs in some way to keep a balanced budget, do priority items and get done what needs to be done,” he said. Hargrove, in another jab at Congress, said that while the federal government “can print and borrow endlessly, we have to project what revenue is two years into the future and write a budget.” Those revenue projections recently have fallen short, he said. “This is a very unusual recession and not patterned after anything we have data on,” he said. “We’ll have better data once this is all over.” During their presentation, Rosand and Radon said the only requirement for proof of U.S. citizenship when people register to vote is that they take an oath that they are citizens. In addition, she said, voter registration lists are available to the public, and the U.S. Border Patrol has obtained those lists “on several occasions,” Rosand said. Voting over the Internet is “closed” for the general public, Rosand added.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(C) — Thursday, July 28, 2011

A5

Peninsula jobless rates higher in June By Rob Ollikainen Peninsula Daily News

North Olympic Peninsula unemployment inched up last month despite an increase of 170 service-providing jobs. Clallam County’s jobless rate went from 9.9 percent in May to 10.2 percent in June, the state Employment Security Department reported Tuesday. Jefferson County’s unemployment rate went from 9.4 percent to 9.8 percent last month. The state added 3,600 new jobs but saw its unemployment rate rise from a

revised 9.1 percent in May to a preliminary 9.2 percent in June. “The bottom line is we’re not producing jobs fast enough,” said Elizabeth Scott, regional economist for Employment Security. For the state to return to 2008 levels, it needs to create about 6,000 new jobs per month, Scott said. “We’re just nowhere near those numbers,” she said. “Things are not moving fast enough.” Clallam County added 180 private-sector jobs but lost 90 in the public sector last month.

There were 70 new service-providing jobs, 60 new natural resources and mining jobs, and a loss of 40 manufacturing jobs, Employment Security said. Meanwhile, Jefferson County added 100 serviceproviding jobs and gained 20 government jobs.

Tourist season Scott said the increase in service jobs can be attributed to the tourist season. “Basically, things were really, really flat in Jefferson,” Scott said. The rise in Peninsula unemployment despite the

Report on PA Main Street status due Peninsula Daily News

Met with petitioners

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-417-3537 or at rob. ollikainen@peninsuladailynews. com.

August 13 with live performance by

businesses and recruit new ones, according to its contract with the city. PADA also is contracted to manage downtown parking lots, improve the appearance of the business district and hold events. The state’s Main Street program, run by the Department of Archaeology and Preservation, provides financial assistance and training for member organizations, which Zeller claims PADA is not putting to good use. Sarah Hansen, state Main Street coordinator, said in a letter to the city last Thursday that PADA has been an “extremely successful Main Street community in Washington state.” “PADA’s work to revitalize downtown Port Angeles . . . has made a dramatic difference to the city and local economy,” she wrote.

Zeller, who is seeking the review because he thinks the group is out of touch with its members, called the move a “step in the right direction.” PADA Vice President Charlie Smith disagreed with Zeller’s claim that the organization doesn’t communicate well with its members and makes decisions without properly consulting them. “They voted us in,” he said, “and we’re trying to . . . get input from them in a lot of ways.” Smith declined further ________ comment until the board meets with the city. Reporter Tom Callis can be As a Main Street organi- reached at 360-417-3532 or at zation, PADA is directed to tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. improve downtown, support com.

Port Angeles Masonic Temple 622 S. Lincoln Street

Doors Open at 8:00 pm

Tickets $20 in advance, $25 at the door Tickets on sale at Twisted, Anime Kat and www.nwperformingarts.com Heritage Days Aug 12-14

Where To Go... Who To See... What To Eat!

Port Townsend Summer Bead Market July 29-30

Friday 12-7 & Saturday 10-5

Pope Marine Building, 603 Water street Port Townsend, WA Free admission! Mermaids and Pirate Queens, this one’s for you! Check out the piles of tempting treasure filled with almost every kind of BEAD you can imagine. Info: Wynwoods Gallery, 360-385-6131

175128508

SATURDAY, JULY 30TH FOURTH ANNUAL

N SU M M A I E D 2011 N

R

I

City Manager Kent Myers met with petition organizer Don Zeller and seven other association members Wednesday to determine which issues fall under the city’s contract with PADA. They include, he said, participation in the Main Street program, parking

‘Step in right direction’

Unemployment peaked in both counties in February 2010, when the jobless rates were 12.3 percent in Clallam County and 11.4 percent in Jefferson County. For Employment Security’s June situation report, visit http://tinyurl.com/ ycr6t5x.

175128350

PORT ANGELES — City Hall expects to have a report regarding the Port Angeles Downtown Association’s compliance with the state’s Main Street Program and other contracted duties within the next three weeks. The city of Port Angeles is conducting the review of its contract with the group, which includes involvement in the Main Street Program, in response to a petition signed by 81 downtown merchants that states they have lost confidence in the association’s leadership. PADA has 186 members.

management, event promotion and communication with the group’s members. Myers said the staff will review the documents, file a report within “two to three weeks” and then meet with the PADA board and director.

together, we’re seeing federal and state jobs feeling the cutbacks because of revenue shortages,” Scott said. About a third of the jobs on the Peninsula are federal, state and local government jobs, Scott said. Clallam County had 80 more government jobs in June 2010. Jefferson County had 30 more government jobs last summer. Unemployment rates in both counties were lower in June 2010 — at 9.6 percent in Clallam County and 8.9 percent in Jefferson County.

&

By Tom Callis

overall job gains can be explained by commuters who work elsewhere, Scott said. If someone who lives in Clallam County gets laid off in Kitsap County, for example, that person is counted in the Clallam County unemployment rate. “A big part of unemployment in Clallam was government,” Scott said. Most of the government jobs that Clallam County lost were state jobs, she said. “In both counties

BENEFIT POKER RUN SEQUIM, WA

Sign up: 10 am

Start: 11 am

Start and Finish at

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

A power pole was severed by Dungeness resident Donna Sommer, 77, who lost control of her SUV when she was swatting a bee that blew into her late-model Subaru while she was northbound on Sequim-Dungeness Way near Taylor Ranch Road on Wednesday afternoon.

Continued from A1 their truck around and drove down to Taylor Ranch Two Good Samaritans, Road, where they found the the first to arrive at the SUV with Sommer inside wreck, talked to Sommer and called emergency 9-1-1. “There was absolutely no when she was inside the smashed sport utility vehi- sound of a skid,” said an cle and found her to be Alderwood Drive resident who asked not to be identiresponsive but shaken up. “We were driving home fied. He added that he did from work, and we saw that pole just hanging there,” hear the impact of the car said John Allen, with Allen hitting the power pole. “What’s weird is we had and Charters Construction of Blyn, who was with work someone go off the road last year,” he said. partner Joe Elias. Allen and Elias swung Power was not affected,

and the power pole was repaired Wednesday night, said Mike Howe, Clallam County Public Utility District executive communications coordinator. The SUV, extensively damaged on its right front fender where it hit the power pole and with its windshield knocked out, was towed away.

$20 per Driver - $15 per Passenger INCLUDES RIDE, T-SHIRT, CHEESEBURGER LUNCH & PRIZE GIVEAWAYS

“BEST IN SHOW”

TROPHIES AWARDED FOR BEST CYCLE

17407231

Bee: Car struck pole

ISLANDER PIZZA AND PASTA SHACK 580 E. Washington, Sequim

For more information 360-683-9999 Proceeds benefit Lions Club projects

________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Jeff Chew can be reached at 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Charges for man in casino shooting The Associated Press

A

male friend as well as her two sisters. Three bystanders were also injured inside the Club Galaxy at the

Muckleshoot Casino in Auburn. The facility is owned and operated by the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe.

Court papers According to court papers, the man told police he followed his estranged wife and her new boyfriend to the club and opened fire early Sunday because he “couldn’t stand it.” If convicted as charged, the man faces a sentencing range of 89 to 101 years.

17407220

SEATTLE — A 42-yearold man accused of shooting seven people at a crowded nightclub south of Seattle has been charged with seven counts of first-degree assault. King County prosecutors charged Cesar ChaparroVielma of Covington on Wednesday. He remains jailed with bail set at $1 million. Arraignment is scheduled Aug. 9. Chaparro-Vielma is accused of shooting his estranged wife and her

ccording to court papers, the man told police he followed his estranged wife and her new boyfriend to the club and opened fire early Sunday because he “couldn’t stand it.”


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Thursday, July 28, 2011 — (C)

Peninsula Daily News

Jazz in the Clubs starts tonight in PT By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Downtown and uptown, tonight through the weekend, small stages will pulse with live music by luminaries from around the jazz world. It’s the annual Jazz in the Clubs series, presented by Centrum in a variety of venues, tonight at 8 and both Friday and Saturday from 10 p.m. on into the night. There’s even more jazz during the day Friday, with Jazz Port Townsend’s free “Workshop Blowout,” a slate of classes and rehearsals in the Wheeler Theater and other venues at Fort Worden

State Park, 200 Battery Way. All of this is open to the public, and complete details are available at www. Centrum.org and 800-7461982. Jazz in the Clubs isn’t just in the nightclubs.

Some all-ages venues It spreads to three allages venues, some of which open their doors for free while others charge a cover. Jazz lovers can pay at one place at a time or buy an allvenue pass for $25 each night. This evening’s lineup is a good indication of the variety offered through the weekend. At the Public House, 1038 Water St., alto saxophonist

Jeff Clayton, trumpeter Jay Thomas, Dan Balmer on guitar, pianist Benny Green, bassist Christoph Luty and drummer Matt Wilson will play. At The Upstage, 923 Washington St., the band is tenor saxophonist Joel Frahm, baritone saxman Gary Smulyan, Bruce Forman on guitar, Tamir Hendelman on piano, bassist Doug Miller and Alvester Garnett on drums. The Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St., will showcase participants tonight from this week’s Jazz Port Townsend workshops. The center offers free admission to all ages. On Friday night, more venues come on board.

The Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St. — an all-ages venue — will host Smulyan on saxophone plus trombonist Jiggs Whigham, the young pianist Gerald Clayton, Chuck Kistler on bass and drummer Clarence Acox. Also Friday, the Castle Key inside Manresa Castle at 651 Cleveland St. will bring together guitarist Forman, pianist John Hansen, bassist Chuck Deardorf and Quincy Davis on drums. The Undertown, 211 Taylor St., features guitarist Balmer, bassist Doug Miller and drummer Kelby MacNayr on Friday night. The Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., is a free, all-ages venue hosting pianist Dawn Clement, Tom

Wakeling on bass and drummer Byron Vannoy on Friday. Starting at 10 p.m. Saturday, the Public House features tenor saxophonist Pete Christlieb and baritone saxophonist Smulyan, pianist Randy Halberstadt, Kistler on bass and drummer Greg Williamson.

Some concerts

vocal workshop participants with John Hansen on piano, bassist Doug Miller and drummer Kelby MacNayr on Saturday, while the Rose Theatre has Mark Taylor on alto sax, trumpeter Thomas Marriott, pianist Marc Seales, Paul Gabrielson on bass and drummer Matt Jorgensen. Saturday at the Northwest Maritime Center brings the 2011 Next Generation Jazz Orchestra and the BuJazzO Youth Jazz Orchestra, both at Jazz Port Townsend for the first time.

The Upstage features the trio of George Cables on piano, Chuck Deardorf on bass and drummer Alvester Garnett, and the Castle Key features an evening with guitarist Dan Balmer, Tamir ________ Hendelman on piano, bassist Tom Wakeling and drummer Features Editor Diane Urbani Byron Vannoy. de la Paz can be reached at 360The Key City Playhouse 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ features Jazz Port Townsend peninsuladailynews.com.

Jazz: ‘Playing, you ride a wave of uncertainty’ Continued from A1 of the nighttime concerts is $35, $28 and $18, with 18 Reserved seating is $45, and younger admitted free. Pianist Clayton was twice $31 and $20, with 18 and a student at the festival, younger admitted free. Friday at 7:30 p.m. will be where his father, bassist the first of the three featured John Clayton, serves as musical director. faculty concerts. Clayton has just released The vocals of Centrum veteran Dee Daniels and his second solo album, “Bond: newcomer to Jazz Port The Paris Sessions.” The New York City resiTownsend Charenée Wade will be accompanied by dent began playing piano Benny Green on piano, when he was 7 years old. He Christoph Luty on bass, was nominated for a Clarence Acox on drums and Grammy in 2010 for his alto saxophonist Jeff Clay- instrumental composition. “As it has been handed ton. The final faculty concert down, jazz is a social music,” will be at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. he said. “It has a format where Vibraphonist Stefon Harris will perform with Sand- musicians who have never played together can sit down ers, Davis and Clayton. Reserved seating for each and make music on the spot.”

With these conversations, musicians can transmit their feelings and emotions to others who then respond. “If someone plays one thing and you play the exact thing back, it really isn’t a conversation,” Clayton said. “When you are playing, you try to tap into the vibe of the other musicians, take someone’s ideas and finish it or respond to it.” Clayton said “there are no rules,” and in some cases, a musician may play something that is crunchy or dissonant that disrupts the flow. If the feeling is honest, the dissonance is acceptable, Clayton said. Spontaneity is important, and many of the songs recorded for his album repre-

sent the first or second time the musicians tackled that particular selection. “There is a certain freshness in the first two takes. After that, you tend to overthink things,” he said. “While playing, you ride a wave of uncertainty, and you roll with it, riding the wave wherever it takes you.” Livingston said there are 270 students at this year’s festival, ranging in age from their teens to their 60s. Each one is looking to expand their musical horizons, and they all had to audition to get in.

just another box in the box factory,” Clayton said. “They need to develop a personal relationship with music and know what inspires them, learning how they can use it to express themselves with honesty.” Clayton looks back to his own time as a student at Centrum, which he said was the first time he was inspired to check out music in a new way. “Anytime you can get people together to hear music in a different way, it is a good thing,” he said. “You have people here from New York who play in clubs, or they play on subway ‘Not just another box’ platforms and try not to get “The challenge for these robbed, and they bring a cerstudents is to not become tain energy to this place

where people might be feeling that energy for the first time.” Despite accolades, Clayton isn’t chasing widespread fame but will ride the wave wherever it takes him. “There are no rules,” he said. “The goal is to get to the deeper meaning of what it is to be human and touch upon those feelings in ways that are a little bit more magical and a little less obvious.” For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.centrum.org.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

Guilty: May never be known how much stolen Continued from A1 could not explain large cash deposits that were made to Loren Oakley, one of two her bank account. “I wasn’t aware,” Betts lawyers from Clallam-Jefferson Public Defenders repre- had testified. That did not sit well with senting Betts, said he disagreed with Marlow’s calcu- Abrahams, he said Wedneslation of a minimum sen- day. “You don’t ignore $10,000 tence. He also said he intends to in cash; I don’t care who you are,” Abrahams said. file an appeal. “That money had to be A seven-month state Auditor’s Office investigation coming from somewhere, and by chief investigator Jim she couldn’t come up with a Brittain, who testified at the reason for it being there.” In his closing argument, trial, determined that real estate excise tax checks from Harry Gasnick, who with the public were exchanged Oakley represented Betts, with cash from the office said she never spent the cash drawer and that docu- $877 she stole and did not ments were altered and exhibit the lifestyle of somedestroyed, and phantom one who had embezzled more spreadsheets created, to hide than $600,000 over six years. Gasnick said lax controls the scam. Brittain’s report said that at the Treasurer’s Office at least $617,467 in public made it impossible to deterfunds was taken, adding that mine who the culprit was. “What you are being “the actual amount of the asked to do is to find that this loss cannot be determined.” Marlow said there were lady here should be taking a “1,000 instances of improper fall for all of the misconduct and possible misappropriataking.” He said Tuesday in his tions and absolute mismanclosing argument that the agement of that office for bank deposits approached that period of time, and you can’t do that,” Gasnick told $10,000 at a time. the jury Wednesday. Marlow responded in his Betts on the stand rebuttal Wednesday that it Betts was the only wit- didn’t matter how the money ness for the defense, but was spent and that Betts what she said — and didn’t was the only person in the say — was damning, Abra- office who balanced real estate excise tax transachams said. Betts had admitted she tions. took one $877 check but She would have noticed

2 4 - H O U R

C R I S I S

L I N E

HEALTHY FAMILIES of Clallam County www.healthyfam.org

3 6 0 . 4 5 2 . H E L P

( 4 3 5 7 )

0A5100780

• Services for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, & Child Abuse • Parenting Classes & Support Groups, Safe Shelter • Supervised Visitation & Third Party Transfer of Children • Speakers Bureau

1210 E. Front St., Suite C • Port Angeles • 360-452-3811

Peninsula Daily Deal

50% OFF

CUSTOM SILK SCREENED T-SHIRTS Available til midnight tonight 175126526

Click on Daily Deal at peninsuladailynews.com

had anyone else been committing the scam, Marlow said. That point, too, convinced the jury, Abrahams said. “If someone else had been dipping, she would have been blowing the whistle, and she wasn’t,” he said. Port Angeles Police Department Detective Jason Viada investigated the case with Brittain and a state Attorney General’s Office investigator.

Viada, who attended the entire trial, sat in a chair on the first floor of the courthouse about a half-hour after the verdict. “I guess I’m making a shift right now from she was alleged to have stolen that money from the people of this county to she stole that money from the taxpayers of this county, period,” Viada said. It may never be known exactly how much was stolen.

The county received a $597,516 insurance settlement, minus a $10,000 deductible, after forensic accountants for Great American Insurance Co. said they could confirm $607,516 was stolen. Clallam County put the total at $611,485. The $617,467 figure makes the theft the fifthlargest embezzlement of public money in Washington since 2000, the state Audi-

tor’s Office said last week. After the scam was discovered, internal controls at the Treasurer’s Office were tightened by then-Treasurer Judy Scott, who testified in the trial, and current Treasurer Selinda Barkhuis, who defeated Scott for re-election in November.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul.gottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Quake: Last major one in 1700 Continued from A1 the south and didn’t stop until it was 1,200 kilomeThe plates on the West tres (744 miles) north, three Coast regularly become minutes later, which was “stuck,” but in parts of the why the earthquake was so fault there is regular slip- large,” he said. Calvert said every time page, every 14 months or so, there is a small slip on the which causes tremors. Calvert said people don’t West Coast, “it is probably feel those tremors because loading the shallow part of they are relatively small the fault and so that . . . and are released over sev- eventually will lead to a very large earthquake, a eral weeks. A megathrust event magnitude 9 earthquake occurs when there is a sud- probably.” He said it is impossible den and rapid release of seismic energy over a huge to predict when a megathrust earthquake will occur, area. “In the 2004 Sumatra but it is only a matter of megathrust earthquake, time before an event simithe fault started to slip in lar to the one in Sumatra

strikes the West Coast. “I’m not sure we are overdue, but it is certainly getting more likely,” he said, noting there is a megathrust earthquake in the Cascadia subduction zone — which stretches offshore along the West Coast from Northern California and Oregon to Washington and the west side of Vancouver Island — every 500 to 600 years.

Last quake in 1700 The last massive earthquake in the region was in 1700. Native legends both on the North Olympic Penin-

Death and Memorial Notice MORTON POLLOWITZ January 6, 1925 July 23, 2011 Morton Pollowitz, known as “The Duke,” died peacefully on July 23, 2011, at the Sam Swope Comfort Care Center in Louisville, Kentucky. Morty and his wife, Melinda, had been living in Kentucky only a month at the time of his death. Formerly, they were 18-year residents of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, and 20-year residents of Rancho Palos Verdes, California, before that. Morty was born January 6, 1925, to Joseph and Frances (nee Goldklang) Pollowitz in Brooklyn, New York. His death was related to asphyxiation pneumonia. Morty was predeceased by his son, Dr. Scott Pollowitz of Dallas, Texas. He is survived by his

wife, Melinda (Kilborn) Pollowitz; his daughter, Randye Feltman, and son-in-law, Hal Feltman of New York City; his daughter, Rebecca Broughton, and son-in-law, Bill Broughton of Louisville; his son, Greg Pollowitz, and daughter-in-law, Karen Riley of Miami, Florida. Grandchildren are Maggie Shulman and her partner, Sarah Marshall, Jared Shulman and his wife, Melissa Shulman, Francesca Broughton (9), Scott Pollowitz (8) and Ashley Pollowitz (4). Morty’s brother, Jack, and sister-in-law, Doris, of Scarsdale, New York, also survive along with their children, Robert Pollowitz and Lisa Beckerman, Dr. James Pollowitz and family, and Dr. Michael Pollowitz and family. Missing Morty badly are his great friends from their days at Ohio State University; Mr. Allan R. “Uncle the Bruiser” Goldman and his wife, Mildred, of New York City, as well

as Naomi Oltarsh, widow of another best friend from OSU, Mr. Kenneth “Uncle the Spider” Oltarsh of New York City. Naomi and Ken’s children, Valerie and Frederick, were always very dear to Morty. He is also survived by many loving and attentive cousins, especially Mr. Bernie Sonsky of Lake Worth, Florida, Fran Jacobson of Long Island, New York, and Beverly Lang of Chappaqua, New York. Morty’s long career as a jewelry manufacturer and salesman made him well-known and well-loved by retailers all over the United States. In lieu of flowers, donations would be welcome to the Alzheimer’s Caregivers Association and the Little Traverse Conservancy, 3264 Powell Road, Harbor Springs, MI 49740. The family held a graveside service on Tuesday, July 26, 2011, at Rest Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

sula and Vancouver Island recall that event, with stories of villages being swept away by giant waves and canoes ending up in treetops. Scientists have found ample geological evidence to support those stories, including ocean sand deposited far inland. The co-authors of the study with Calvert are Leiph Preston of the Department of Geophysics at the Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and Amir Farahbod of the Department of Earth Sciences at Simon Fraser University.

Death Notices Larry W. Cason Sept. 13, 1947 — July 26, 2011

Port Angeles resident Larry W. Cason died of cancer at Olympic Medical Center. He was 63. Services: Private burial at Ocean View Cemetery in Port Angeles. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Remembering a Lifetime ■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday. A form is at www.peninsula dailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. For further information, call 360-417-3528.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, July 28, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A7

No place is safe — not even Norway WHEN PARENTS SEND their children off to summer camp, they reasonably expect them to return refreshed and more attuned with the world than when they left home. Even in their wildest Cal nightmares, they don’t fore- Thomas see them returning in a pine box. We must now add Norway to the expanding list of unsafe places that includes Columbine, Oklahoma City, the World Trade Center, London, Madrid, Fort Hood and Virginia Tech. The host of the 1994 Winter Olympics and home to the Nobel Peace Prize has had its sense of safety and security violated in

ways it could never have imagined — shattered by a crazed gunman with an inflated sense of self, on a mission from hell where he’ll soon be sent. Police are calling the gunman, Anders Behring Breivik, a “Christian fundamentalist” because we must have labels (except when describing Muslim fundamentalists, which police, politicians and much of the media try to avoid for fear of angering Islamists). Breivik is as much a “Christian fundamentalist” as Judas Iscariot was, and he deserves a similar fate. Writing in London’s Daily Telegraph, reporter Mark Hughes noted: “Norway’s intelligence service had previously been criticized for its failure to keep track of suspected terror cells, and the country was felt to be complacent about the prospect of a terror attack,” according to secret cables

from WikiLeaks files. That may be true, but how does a government crack a “cell” that isn’t a cell? Breivik only recently created a Facebook page, and his 1,500-page manifesto ranted against Muslims (about 2 percent of Norway’s population is made up of Muslim immigrants, and that number is growing) and indigenous Europeans, whom he accused of betraying their heritage. That none of his young victims are responsible for the conditions he railed against adds to the madness of this inexplicable event. Listening to some of the survivors tell their stories is heartbreaking. It took Norway police 90 minutes to arrive on scene, probably because of the “diversionary” bomb Breivik exploded outside government offices in Oslo. Breivik used the time to hunt down more victims until police

Peninsula Voices Default’s risk The July 21 Cal Thomas column [“Fixing The Present, Ensuring The Future”] outlines a speech he recently delivered advocating Calvin Coolidge’s presidency as a guideline for an ideal administration. Coolidge’s quotable quote during his term in office was, “The business of America is business,” and he never understood business very well. There’s a fair consensus among economists that the monetary policies of Coolidge and Hoover were a major contributing factor of the Great Depression. Tea party prima donna Michele Bachmann recently accused President Barack Obama of lying to the American public about the seriousness of the current fiscal crisis. Make no mistake about it: The risk of downgrading the credit rating of the U.S. government by Moody’s is very real and very, very serious and would most likely make the Great Depression look like a walk in the park. This is the voice of the

contingent in Congress that has literally sworn a blood oath against raising taxes (well, technically, they signed in ordinary ink, rather than actual blood — but you get the point, right?) and they defend this with some compelling arguments about making government “live within its means.” How did we get here, anyway, into a credit hole of historic depth? How about the cost of not one but two unnecessary wars? What about the billions of dollars that this netted for defense industry investors? Is it really necessary to gut all of our social programs to avoid touching so much as one penny of this precious booty? Is this really what you voted for? Ron Hatch, Sequim

Serve local I read with sadness the July 22 PDN article on the demise of the Olympic Community Action Programs’ senior nutrition program [“OlyCAP To

finally arrived. Norway forbids civilians from carrying concealed weapons or owning an automatic weapon unless they are gun collectors. As in America, gun laws do not deter criminals who are determined to cause harm with a weapon. What would have deterred Breivik would have been a gun in the hands of a competent person capable of stopping his massmurdering spree. If Norway can be a site for terror, is there a safe place on Earth? The answer is no. There are no “safe” places; no one can be 100 percent safe. Does that mean everyone should be armed? Not necessarily. What it means is that for some countries, some people and some places, a way to make the environment as safe as humanly possible is to have properly

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Downsize Senior Meals Program/$20,000 in Funding Lost From January Through April”]. The article gave me pause. While I and many citizens watch dumbfounded at the antics of our elected officials attempting to come to grips with and end unlimited federal budget and deficit

growth after 80 years of near criminal mismanagement, it occurs to me that the root of the problem, the immediate problem, is us. How is it that we accept that the closing of grossly inefficient federal taps means people in our communities go hungry? That drying up of federal grants will damage

armed and trained people who can respond to such events. Would Anders Behring Breivik have thought twice about his killing spree if he had known in advance that someone would shoot back? That is impossible to know. But if someone on Utoeya Island had returned fire, there’s a possibility that far fewer would have been killed. This approach may not be pleasant for some to contemplate, but the alternative is more personal and national mourning, as is now being experienced in Norway.

________

Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

and email

homeless and mentally ill people? It is well known that federal spending is, at best, inefficient when applied to municipal programs. One size fits all in the federal picture but that is not always the case locally. If I give $20 to OlyCAP, it goes to OlyCAP. If my $20 is rendered in federal tax collection,

OlyCAP might see $3. We need to end the dependency on our national government’s egregious waste and mismanagement and take ownership of our community programs. We have seniors in need (and many others in need) who can benefit locally from OlyCAP. We have a food bank. We have a Humane Society. We have Serenity House and Sarge’s Place for homeless veterans. We can’t each take on them, all but let’s each commit to taking on something. We always preach, “Buy local.” Let’s serve local as well. Let’s take ownership of our community-service programs and quit depending on the bloated largess of elected officials whose motives for “service” to local programs are shaky at best. Oppose any and all tax increases, and put your own increases to good use locally. Steve Deutermann, Port Angeles

War profiteering is a longtime racket “WAR IS A racket,” wrote retired U.S. Marine Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler in 1935. That statement, which is Amy also the title of Goodman his short book on war profiteering, rings true today. One courageous civil servant just won a battle to hold war profiteers accountable. Her name is Bunnatine “Bunny” Greenhouse. She blew the whistle when her employer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, gave a no-bid $7 billion contract to the Halliburton subsidiary Kellogg, Brown and Root (KBR) as the U.S. was about to invade Iraq. She was doing her job, trying to ensure a competitive bidding process would save the U.S. government money. For that, she was forced out of her senior position, demoted and harassed. Just this week, after waging a legal battle for more than half a

decade, Greenhouse won. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers settled with her for $970,000, representing full restitution for lost wages, compensatory damages and attorneys’ fees. Her “offense” was to challenge the KBR contract. It was weeks before the expected invasion of Iraq, in 2003, and Bush military planners predicted Saddam Hussein would blow up Iraqi oilfields, as happened with the U.S. invasion in 1991. The project, dubbed “Restore Iraqi Oil,” or RIO, was created so that oilfield fires would be extinguished. KBR was owned then by Halliburton, whose CEO until 2000 was none other than then-Vice President Dick Cheney. KBR was the only company invited to bid. Greenhouse told her superiors that the process was illegal. She was overridden. She said the decision to grant the contract to KBR came from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, run by VP Cheney’s close friend, Donald Rumsfeld. As Greenhouse told a congres-

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

360-417-3500

n

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

Rex Wilson Executive Editor 360-417-3530 ■ rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com Michelle Lynn

Circulation Director

360-417-3510 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com

Dean Mangiantini Production Director

360-417-3520 dean.mangiantini@peninsuladailynews.com

Ann Ashley

Newspaper Services Director

360-417-7691 ann.ashley@peninsuladailynews.com

Sue Stoneman

Advertising Operations Manager 360-417-3555 sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

Bonnie M. Meehan

Business/Finance Director

360-417-3501 bonnie.meehan@peninsuladailynews.com

Dave Weikel

Computer Systems Director

360-417-3516 dave.weikel@peninsuladailynews.com

sional committee: “I can unequivocally state that the abuse related to contracts awarded to KBR represents the most blatant and improper contract abuse I have witnessed during the course of my professional career.” The oilfields were not set ablaze. Nevertheless, KBR was allowed to retool its $7 billion nobid contract, to provide gasoline and other logistical support to the occupation forces. The contract was so-called costplus, which means KBR was not on the hook to provide services at a set price. Rather, it could charge its cost, plus a fixed percentage as profit. The more KBR charged, the more profit it made. As the chief procurement officer, Greenhouse’s signature was required on all contracts valued at more than $10 million. Soon after testifying about the egregious RIO contract, she was demoted, stripped of her top-secret clearance and began receiving the lowest performance ratings. Before blowing the whistle, she had received the highest ratings. Ultimately, she left work, fac-

ing an unbearably hostile workplace. After years of litigation, attorney Michael Kohn, president of the National Whistleblowers Center, brought the case to a settlement. He said: “Bunny Greenhouse risked her job and career when she objected to the gross waste of federal taxpayer dollars and illegal contracting practices at the Army Corps of Engineers. “She had the courage to stand alone and challenge powerful special interests. She exposed a corrupt contracting environment where casual and clubby contracting practices were the norm. “Her courage led to sweeping legal reforms that will forever halt the gross abuse she had the courage to expose.” The National Whistleblowers Center’s executive director, Stephen Kohn (brother of Michael Kohn), told me: “Federal employees have a very, very hard time blowing the whistle. . . . I hope it’s a turning point. The case was hard-fought. It should never have had to been filed. Bunny did the right thing.” According to Nobel Prize-winning economist Joe Stiglitz, the

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Philip L. Watness, contributing freelance reporter, 360-379-3703; whatnews@olypen.com

Follow the PDN online

Peninsula Daily News

pendailynews

cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan alone will exceed $5 trillion. With a cost like this, why isn’t war central to the debate over the national debt? Two-time Medal of Honor recipient Maj. Gen. Butler had it right 75 years ago when he said of war: “It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious [racket]. . . . It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives. “It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many.” As President Barack Obama and Congress claim it is Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security that are breaking the budget, people should demand that they stop paying for war.

________

Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

Have Your Say ■ Rex Wilson and Paul Gottlieb, commentary editors, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


A8

WeatherNorthwest

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Friday

SaTurday

Yesterday

Sunday

Monday

High 66

Low 52

67/50

67/51

68/49

67/49

Partly sunny.

Partly cloudy.

Partial sunshine.

Partial sunshine.

Partly sunny.

Mostly sunny.

The Peninsula A ridge will begin to build into the area for today. Flow from the ocean will keep clouds around through Friday along with slightly below-normal temperatures. An upper-level disturbance will move north of the area as well Friday, but it will only produce showers over Neah Bay Port British Columbia. The upper-level ridge will continue to sit 65/53 Townsend over the area through early next week, bringing higher Port Angeles 65/53 temperatures and sunshine to Washington and Oregon, 66/52 while a few disturbances will pass to the north over Sequim British Columbia.

Victoria 70/53

68/53

Forks 66/52

Olympia 75/53

Seattle 74/56

Spokane 82/55

Yakima Kennewick 87/51 88/55

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Partly sunny today. Wind from the west-northwest at 12-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Partly cloudy tonight. Wind west at 15-25 knots. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Sunshine and some clouds tomorrow. Wind west-northwest 15-25 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility clear. Saturday: Sun and some clouds. Wind west 20-30 knots. Wave heights 3-5 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush

12:04 p.m. 11:21 p.m. Port Angeles 3:44 p.m. ----Port Townsend 1:17 a.m. 5:29 p.m. Sequim Bay* 12:38 a.m. 4:50 p.m.

Today

Billings 88/60

Tomorrow

SaTurday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

6.6’ 8.3’ 6.7’ --7.7’ 8.1’ 7.2’ 7.6’

5:29 a.m. 5:28 p.m. 7:42 a.m. 8:10 p.m. 8:56 a.m. 9:24 p.m. 8:49 a.m. 9:17 p.m.

-0.3’ 2.7’ -1.1’ 5.0’ -1.4’ 6.5’ -1.3’ 6.1’

12:50 p.m. ----12:28 a.m. 4:07 p.m. 2:13 a.m. 5:52 p.m. 1:34 a.m. 5:13 p.m.

6:14 a.m. 6:18 p.m. 8:23 a.m. 8:51 p.m. 9:37 a.m. 10:05 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 9:58 p.m.

12:10 a.m. 1:33 p.m. 1:25 a.m. 4:31 p.m. 3:10 a.m. 6:16 p.m. 2:31 a.m. 5:37 p.m.

6:57 a.m. 7:05 p.m. 9:03 a.m. 9:34 p.m. 10:17 a.m. 10:48 p.m. 10:10 a.m. 10:41 p.m.

7.0’ --6.5’ 6.9’ 7.8’ 8.3’ 7.3’ 7.8’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-0.8’ 2.2’ -1.4’ 4.7’ -1.8’ 6.1’ -1.7’ 5.7’

8.6’ 7.4’ 6.5’ 7.0’ 7.8’ 8.4’ 7.3’ 7.9’

-1.1’ 1.8’ -1.5’ 4.2’ -1.9’ 5.5’ -1.8’ 5.2’

Aug 6

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Aug 21

City Hi Lo W Athens 96 76 s Baghdad 116 87 s Beijing 92 77 pc Brussels 68 54 sh Cairo 100 77 s Calgary 73 51 pc Edmonton 72 50 pc Hong Kong 90 84 r Jerusalem 84 65 s Johannesburg 62 34 pc Kabul 94 63 t London 75 58 sh Mexico City 77 57 t Montreal 81 64 pc Moscow 88 65 s New Delhi 87 80 t Paris 74 56 sh Rio de Janeiro 82 71 s Rome 77 60 r Stockholm 75 64 r Sydney 65 46 s Tokyo 82 73 t Toronto 78 68 t Vancouver 72 59 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Houston 96/76

Fronts Cold

Miami 92/82

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 93 65 66 94 84 95 83 88 86 88 80 78 94 88 90 96 80 85 104 90 88 89 82 72 85 87 96 59

Lo W 71 t 55 s 57 pc 76 t 73 s 72 s 47 s 60 s 61 pc 62 s 67 pc 70 t 76 pc 58 t 71 t 71 s 51 s 54 pc 83 pc 63 t 74 t 71 t 49 s 52 pc 54 s 73 s 76 t 50 sh

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 98 99 95 80 92 84 89 98 91 88 104 88 94 102 90 107 78 100 94 91 98 86 98 72 69 86 81 92

Lo W 76 s 88 s 76 t 66 pc 82 pc 70 t 69 pc 76 pc 78 t 73 pc 78 s 73 t 75 t 84 s 74 pc 90 pc 58 pc 75 pc 63 s 58 s 78 s 65 pc 78 pc 67 pc 56 pc 68 t 53 s 76 s

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 113 at Salina, KS

Low: 30 at Stanley, ID

Why skip foods you love or feel embarrassed to smile? FREE evaluation. Call today.

Greg Barry, DDS

0C5106424

Quality makes a big difference in the looks, fit, comfort, and function you’ll experience. We help you afford the best your budget allows. See one practitioner, pay one price for your personalized treatment – preparation, fitting and follow-ups.

0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

World Cities Today

Affordable Dentures And Implants To Look And Eat Your Best

Atlanta 94/76 El Paso 97/75

Last

Aug 13

New York 88/73 Washington 92/76

Kansas City 98/76

Los Angeles 80/66

Moon Phases Full

Detroit 89/71

Chicago 90/71 Denver 90/63

Sunset today ................... 8:56 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 5:45 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 3:25 a.m. Moonset today ................. 7:28 p.m. First

Minneapolis 89/69

San Francisco 69/56

Sun & Moon

July 30

Everett 72/54

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Seattle 74/56

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Statistics are for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 65 51 0.00 10.65 Forks 67 50 0.00 76.11 Seattle 72 57 0.00 24.13 Sequim 74 54 0.00 10.99 Hoquiam 67 53 0.00 45.46 Victoria 69 53 0.00 20.66 P. Townsend* 63 56 0.00 12.22 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 68/53 Bellingham 70/55

Aberdeen 64/56

Peninsula Daily News

(360) 379-1591

Major credit cards or terms on approval.

Briefly . . . Road closes Monday for dam removal PORT ANGELES — Olympic Hot Springs Road, which provides the only vehicular access to the Elwha Valley of Olympic National Park west of Port Angeles, will close to all public access, including cars, pedestrians and bicycles, just past the Altair campground Monday. A gate has been installed and will be locked Monday to allow U.S. Bureau of Reclamation employees to begin the six-week process of decommissioning the 210foot Glines Canyon Dam, part of the three-year, $327 million Elwha River dams removal project that begins in mid-September. Following decommissioning, Barnard Construction Inc. will assume control of the Glines Canyon area and prepare the site for dam removal work. The closure of Olympic Hot Springs Road south of the Altair campground will last for the duration of dam removal project. Access to the campground and other areas in the Elwha Valley, including the Elwha campground, will not be affected by the road closure. Effective Monday, Glines Canyon Dam, Lake Mills, Olympic Hot Springs and the Boulder Creek trail and campground will no longer be accessible via Olympic Hot Springs Road. Olympic Hot Springs itself will be inaccessible from the Elwha Valley. Hikers who want to visit Olympic Hot Springs during the dam removals project can reach the area by hiking 14 miles from the Sol Duc Valley via Appleton Pass.

Keep up with the sights and sounds on the North Olympic Peninsula.

Peninsula Spotlight

PA council meeting PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles City Council will hold a special meeting Friday to hear a presentation by Quinault tribal Budget Officer David Montgomery on “budgeting for outcomes.” Open to the public, the meeting will be held at 11:30 a.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.

Rhythm circle PORT TOWNSEND — Zorina Wolf, a facilitator of the rhythm process called TaKeTiNa, is hosting an open rhythm circle Friday

THE largest supplier of ls roofing materia on the Peninsula!

evening at the Madrona MindBody Institute at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way. Wolf, a former student of the late drumming master Babatunde Olatunji, welcomes people with any or no experience with rhythm to the gathering from 6 p.m. till 8 p.m. Friday. “We are all natural musicians,” she said. “Here is an invitation to step into rhythm and be surprised by what you find out.” The entrance fee is on a sliding scale — $15, $20 or $25 — according to each participant’s ability to pay. For more information, phone 360-681-5407 or email zorina@villageheart beat.com. Details about TaKeTiNa are also at www. VillageHeartbeat.com. Peninsula Daily News

Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News

Keeping

it cool

Candy McQuay waters colorful potted plants outside her restaurant, Kokopelli Grill, in Port Angeles on sunny Wednesday.

The Peninsula’s BesT Roofers shop at Hartnagel Building supply

aSC

pabCO

OWenS COrning

LOOking FOr a reputabLe buiLDer Or rOOFer? We deliver all types of roofing and

metal siding materials to the Peninsula’s best contractors every day. So whether you need a small repair or a whole new roof — start at Hartnagel Building Supply! Get all of your roofing questions answered. See our wide selection of roofing materials. Ask about residential, commercial, composite, metal, torch down, flat roofs and more. Stop procrastinating! Come in today! We’ll get you started in the right direction so you can check that project off your list.

urs: Store Ho 5:30 0 M-F 7:0 - 5:00 0 :0 Sat 8 ndays Open Su :00 10:00 - 3

Come see our extensive display of roofing samples.

INNOVATIONS FOR LIVING

®

HARTNAGEL

SHOP

3111 E Hwy 101, Port Angeles 452-8933 • hartnagels.com

We can match most metal roof colors, cut and bend to your specs for your custom project.

Where employee owners care about your building and home improvement projects.

175128358

Every Friday in Peninsula Daily News

The closure does not affect access to Sol Duc Hot Springs, which is 20 miles southwest of the dams.


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, July 28, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

BUSINESS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY In this section

Outdoors

Look for smelt on area beaches KEEP AN EYE on North Olympic Peninsula beaches. With the calendar days away Matt from turning over into August, Schubert we’re getting awfully close to what is considered traditional surf smelt dip netting season. The tiny forage fish — distinguished from other bait fish by their adipose fins — tend to pop up near Peninsula beaches in large numbers to breed during the summer. Spots like Kalaloch, Ruby and Rialto beaches on the coast, and Twin and Lyre rivers, Dungeness Bay, Point Wilson or Old Fort Townsend to the east, are all known smelt locations. If you see large collections of feeding birds flying around one of those spots, there’s a decent chance smelt are there too. “If the birds are out there diving, you can see [smelt] popping around in the surf,” said Bob Gooding of Olympic Sporting Goods (360-3746330) in Forks. “They come right up on the shore. Sometimes there aren’t so many, but sometimes I’ve been down there and there’s gobs of them.” Anglers armed with dip nets — either long-handled aluminum ones or maple wood frames with netting — can scoop a few smelt during the right slack high tides. A dip netter might wade out into water as high as their waist to get into the fish, according to Gooding. “You usually go out get 6, 8, 10 or a dozen,” he said. “Sometimes you dip in there and get 10 pounds. “I think the biggest bunch I ever got was close to 80 pounds in one dip. “They will kind of ball up you know. If you get into one of those balls, it’s solid smelt. If they are there you’re going to get them, you absolutely are.” While reports of smelt have been nonexistent on the coast so far this summer, there have been some sightings inside the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bob Aunspach of Swain’s General Store (360-452-2357) in Port Angeles said he’d heard of a few success stories out near the Twin and Lyre rivers a few weeks back. “I’m assuming they are probably still there,” Aunspach said. “They mostly gill net them [in those spots]. There are a few guys who use dip nets.” The daily limit for smelt is 10 pounds throughout the Peninsula salt. Hood Canal is closed to smelt fishing, while waters inside the Strait and Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) are open to dip netting from 8 a.m. on Fridays to 8 a.m. on Wednesdays. All smelt caught must count toward the daily limit, except for Columbia River smelt (eulachon), which must be released. Of course, those who do run into their limit encounter a whole new problem once they get home — cleaning the little buggers. As Gooding can attest, the more you get, the bigger a pain in the rear the entire enterprise becomes. (Unless, that is, you eat them guts and all, which some unfortunate souls do.) “Ten pounds of smelt is plenty, because you’ve got to clean every one of them,” Gooding said.

Some more stuff ■ River anglers desperate for some action have a couple of viable options on the West End. The Sol Duc continues to churn out sockeye, the occasional springer and a few summer coho, and the Calawah has more than its fair share of steelhead. There is one problem with the latter, according to Gooding. “They’ve been worked over pretty good for a couple of months now,” he said. “And they start figuring the game out. They aren’t positive what all the people up an the bank are doing, but they are positive it ain’t good for them.” ■ Washington Trails Association will soon begin its annual Hike-aThon fundraiser. Turn

to

Schubert/B2

The Associated Press

Seattle Mariners, from left, Dustin Ackley (13), Ichiro, Brendan Ryan and Franklin Gutierrez celebrate their 9-2 win over the New York Yankees on Wednesday at Yankee Stadium in New York

All’s well that ends M’s snap 17-game skid with 17-hit day By Howie Rumberg The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Dustin Ackley and the rest of the Seattle Mariners had the same thought as they piled up the hits Wednesday: Don’t stop. By the time they were done, everyone was happy to talk about the No. 17. The Mariners snapped their 17-game losing streak with a 9-2 victory over the New York Yankees, boosted by a season-high 17-hit attack that featured strong performances by Ichiro and Ackley. “It seemed like everything was clicking today,” Ackley said. “It’s a good feeling.”

Felix Hernandez pitched seven innings for his third straight win in the Bronx. Ichiro had four hits and scored two runs. Ackley tripled among his three hits and drove in three runs as the Mariners did something they failed to accomplish during the skid: They turned an opponent’s mistake into a big inning. Seattle took 21 days worth of frustration out on three relievers, scoring five runs in the seventh inning — highlighted by Mike Carp’s bases-loaded triple — after Robinson Cano flubbed a flip to Derek Jeter at second base for an error.

The Mariners added two more in the ninth when Adam Kennedy hit an RBI double that center fielder Curtis Granderson lost in the sun, then scored on Carp’s single to give Seattle its most runs since it had nine in a win against Tampa Bay on June 5. “These guys haven’t felt good in a long time,” manager Eric Wedge said. “We’ve got a long flight, an off day tomorrow and this is a real big win for us. When you’ve got a monkey on your back that size, it’s damn hard to get it off.” After a win July 5, the Mariners were 43-43 and 2½ games back in the AL West, a pleasant early season surprise. But it all fell apart in a hurry. The longest skid in the major leagues since Kansas City lost 19 in 2005 began with a loss at Oakland on July 6 and included four-game sweeps against division rivals, the Los Angeles Angels and Texas Rangers.

Next Game Friday vs. Rays at Safeco Field Time: 7:10 p.m. On TV: ROOT

The Mariners led in seven of the games, twice in the seventh inning, and loss No. 10 — to the Blue Jays — came in 14 innings. Their last nine games have been against the AL East. They lost three to Toronto, three to Boston then dropped the first two to New York, managing just one hit Tuesday night. Wedge shaved his mustache after losing Saturday, pushed back the report time and canceled batting practice Tuesday but had nothing up his sleeve Wednesday. “No, the only trick is these guys have to go out and do better,” he said before the game. And that’s what they did.

Free Agency

McNabb trade part of frenzy The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Longtime Seattle Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck walks off the field during his final game as a Seahawk last January in Chicago.

Life after Matt Seahawks begin camp without their old leader By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

RENTON — When the NFL lockout sent players scrambling to look for structure and organization to stay sharp, it was Matt Hasselbeck serving as the de facto leader for players based in the Seattle area, regardless of what team they played for last season. It was just part of the role Hasselbeck grew into during his decade as the Seahawks quarterback.

And it’s a massive void the Seahawks will need to quickly fill when training camp begins today, with Hasselbeck now a member of the Tennessee Titans and the only two quarterbacks on Seattle’s roster with NFL experience having a total of 22 NFL starts. “It’s weird because you think of the Seattle Seahawks: Matt Hasselbeck, and now he’s not going to be a part of the team,” receiver Golden Tate said. “I’m sure a lot of people are hurt like I am, especially the fans.”

Pete Carroll’s second training camp in charge of the Seahawks already has a specific question: Who will be the quarterback when the season begins on Sept. 11 at San Francisco? It could have been a simple answer had Seattle and Hasselbeck reached agreement on a new contract that likely would have kept him in a Seahawks uniform for the rest of his career. In what turned out to be his final game as a Seahawk at home, Hasselbeck threw a playoff career-high four touchdown passes as he directed one of the biggest upsets in playoff history when Seattle beat New Orleans 41-36 in January. Turn

to

Hawks/B2

Donovan McNabb’s time in Washington is over after only a year. The Minnesota Vikings acquired the veteran quarterback from the Redskins on Wednesday night in exchange for a sixth-round draft pick. The deal gives the Vikings a six-time Pro Bowler who will play until first-round draft choice Christian Ponder is ready to take over. The deal also includes a conditional sixth-round pick in 2013. Ponder tweeted that he welcomes McNabb to the team and looks forward to learning from him. But he also says he still plans on fighting for the starting job in Week 1. McNabb will have to restructure the five-year, $78 million deal he signed with the Redskins because the Vikings don’t have enough room to fit him in their salary cap. McNabb’s departure closes the book on coach Mike Shanahan’s first major Redskins gaffe. He gave up second- and fourth-round draft picks for McNabb last year but ended up benching him. “He was going to come in and really help us win more games, but it didn’t work out,” said linebacker Lorenzo Alexander. “Relationships broke down, and now he’s not here, but you can’t really focus on that.” Two days after the lockout ended, NFL teams are making deals at a frantic pace, with some big names changing addresses, and others staying put. Turn

to

Football/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

SPORTS ON TV

Latest sports headlines

Scoreboard Area Sports

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

LAUREL LANES Spring Classic July 25 Men’s high game: James Paulsen, 242. Men’s high series: James Paulsen, 677. Women’s high game: Barb Davidson, 213. Women’s high series: Barb Davidson, 490. League leaders: Team I

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB Men’s Club Competition July 26 Better Nine Individual gross: Bob Brodhun, 33; Mark Mitrovich, 34. Individual net: Pat Covey, 28½; Stan Feldman, 30½; Chuck Turner, 32; Ray Santiago, 32½; (tie) Larry Aillaud and Gene Northon, 33; Bernie Anselmo and Craig Jacobs, 33½. Team gross: (tie) Bob Brodhun-Rick Parkhurst and Mark Mitrovich-Steve Jones, 66. Team net: (tie) Craig Jacobs-Pat Covey and Stan Feldman-Lawrence Bingham, 60; (tie) Bob Brodhun-John Pruss, Ray Santiago-Jim Williams and Stan Feldman-Dave Peterson, 61; (tie) Ray Santiago-Dave Peterson, Stan Feldman-Frank Randall, Steve Callis-Ralph Bauman and Chuck Turner-Ralph Bauman, 62. CEDARS AT DUNGENESS GOLF COURSE Lady Niners Invitational July 21 First place team: Bonney Benson (Cedars), Joyce Wenz (Discovery Bay), Cassie Docking (Cedars), Peg Rinker (SunLand). Second place team: Lindsay Busch (Cedars), Kathleen DeJong (Cedars), Julie Hightower (SunLand), Connie Norman (Port Ludlow). Third place team: Ginny Thompson (Cedars), Lani Warren (SunLand), Judy Kelley (SunLand), Kathy Tiedeman (SunLand). Putting contest: Donna WIllenberg (Peninsula). Chipping contest: Kathleen DeJong (Cedars). KP’s 4th hole: Donna Willenberg (Peninsula). 8th hole: Cassie Docking (Cedars). SUNLAND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Field Day July 26 Pennie-Bill Dickin and Janet-Jack Real, 125; (tie) Nancy Smith-Frank Herodes and CarolBob Patterson, Jan-Wes Stoecker and Rose Lauritsen-Ray Aldrich, 128. Closest to the Pin KP Men No. 2: Russ McClelland, 14’6” KP Ladies No. 2: Judy Nordyke, 3’0” KP Men No. 5: Wes Stoecker, 8’1” KP Ladies No. 5: Pennie Dickin, 23’ KP Men No. 15: Jack Real, 45’6” KP Ladies No. 15: Mary O’Brien, 22’1” KP Men No. 17: Jack Real, 9’10” KP Ladies No. 17: Cec Clack, 10’7”

American League Standings

PORT ANGELES — Colton Boddy of Anytime Fitness is donating two Nautilus weight training machines to the Port Angeles High School athletic department. Boddy will give the school a biceps curl and triceps extension, which, added together, has Boddy a value of $5,390. Anytime Fitness, a 24-hour gym located at 112 Del Guzzi Dr., in Port Angeles, is making room for new equipment as well as a future expansion.

All-Star

showing

Port Angeles Youth Baseball’s 10U tournament team took third in the “King of the Northwest” baseball tournament last weekend in Lacey. Team members are, in front, from left, Triston Dodson, Daniel Basden, Hayden Woods, Devin Batchelor, Eric Emery, Gavin Guerrero and Jadon Seibel. In back, from left, are Ty Bradow (bat boy), Bo Bradow, Ryan Begley, Colton McGuffy, Joel Wood, Hayden Gresli and Seth Woods (bat boy).

Baseball Mariners 9, Yankees 2 Seattle New York ab r h bi Ichiro rf 5 2 4 0 Gardnr lf Ryan ss 5 1 1 0 Jeter ss Ackley 2b 5 2 3 3 Grndrs cf Smoak 1b 4 1 0 0 Teixeir dh AKndy 3b 5 1 2 1 Cano 2b Carp lf 5 1 4 4 Swisher rf Halmn lf 0 0 0 0 Martin c

ab r h bi 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 4 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 3 0 1 0 4 1 1 0

FGtrrz cf 4 0 1 1 Posada 1b 4 0 1 0 Cust dh 5 1 1 0 ENunez 3b 4 0 1 0 J.Bard c 4 0 1 0 Totals 42 9 17 9 Totals 31 2 6 2 Seattle 001 010 502—9 New York 000 010 010—2 E_Carp (3), Cano (8). DP_Seattle 1, New York 2. LOB_Seattle 8, New York 7. 2B_Ichiro (15), A.Kennedy 2 (17), F.Gutierrez (5), Granderson (14), Posada (12). 3B_Ackley (3), Carp (1). SB_Ichiro 2 (28), Gardner (32), E.Nunez (15). SF_Jeter.

IP H R ER BB SO Seattle F.Hernandez W,9-9 7 5 1 1 4 5 Gray 1 1 1 1 0 0 League 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York P.Hughes L,1-3 6 9 2 2 1 3 Wade 0.1 2 2 1 0 0 Logan 0.1 1 3 0 1 1 Ayala 1.1 2 0 0 0 2 Noesi 1 3 2 2 0 1 Umpires_Home, Hunter W.; First, Brian Knight; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Bob Davidson.

Football: Moves Competing in the 70-74-year-old division, the Port Angeles resident broke a meet record in winning the high jump (4 feet, 6 inches) while also claiming the pole vault (8-0) and super weight throw (22-7). Sequim’s Charles Milliman won the 75-79-year-old high jump competition with a mark of 3-8. He also placed second in the pole vault (7-0) and third in the long jump (10-6), standing long jump (4-¾) and 50 meter dash (9.35 seconds). Phillip Milliman, also of Sequim, was first in the 60-64-year-old pole vault (10-6) and second in the high jump (4-9¾).

The finale ends with a halftime exhibition at the Eagles’ last home game of the season Aug. 13 against Everett Junior College in Civic Field at 7 p.m. Registration is open through Aug. 5, with all registrations taking place in person at the YMCA at 302 S. Francis St., in Port Angeles. Cost is $25. For more information, contact the YMCA at 360452-9244 or Eagles coach Mike McMahan at 425-9315111.

Once the networks launch in August 2012, they will broadcast about 850 sporting events a year — 350 nationally and 500 regionally. Subscribers will also be able to watch games on mobile devices. Every football and men’s basketball game will be televised nationally. The conference already had a 12-year television contract worth about $3 billion with Fox and ESPN, which will air many of the most highprofile games.

Pac-10 network

Santana no-no

NEW YORK — The Pac12 will launch national and regional conference television networks next year. Football camp Commissioner Larry PORT ANGELES — The Scott announced Wednesday Olympic Peninsula Eagles at an East Coast football semipro football team and media day in Manhattan Clallam County Family that the Pac-12 had partYMCA will hold a skills and nered with cable companies camp Aug. 8-12 Comcast, Cox, Time Warner Senior Games stars conditioning at Stevens Middle School. and Bright House. OLYMPIA — Bob The camp, which will There will be a national Sheedy led a trio of North meet each day from noon to network along with six Olympic Peninsula athletes 3 p.m., focuses on football regional channels: Washingat the 2011 Washington conditioning as well as drills ton, Oregon, Northern CaliState Senior Games last and flag games for boys and fornia, Southern California, Saturday. girls ages 6-18. Arizona and Mountain.

CLEVELAND — Ervin Santana pitched the first no-hitter for the Angels in nearly 27 years, striking out 10 and leading Los Angeles over the Cleveland Indians 3-1 Wednesday. Santana allowed only two runners — there was an error on the leadoff batter in the first inning and a walk in the eighth. Santana was in control the whole way while throwing the Angels’ first solo nohitter since Sept. 30, 1984. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Schubert: Hiking for health of state trails Registration for the event is available online at Washington Trails’ website (www.wta.org.) For more information, contact Kara Chin at kara@ wta.org. ■ Speaking of trails, hikers can now drive all the

Continued from B1 Hikers can raise money for state trail maintenance by collecting sponsors and pledges from friends and family, then spend the month of August hiking trails throughout the state.

West Division W L Pct GB 59 46 .562 — 57 48 .543 2 46 57 .447 12 44 60 .423 14½ East Division W L Pct GB Boston 64 38 .627 — New York 61 41 .598 3 Tampa Bay 53 49 .520 11 Toronto 52 52 .500 13 Baltimore 41 59 .410 22 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 55 49 .529 — Cleveland 52 50 .510 2 Chicago 51 52 .495 3½ Minnesota 49 55 .471 6 Kansas City 43 61 .413 12 Wednesday’s Games L.A. Angels 3, Cleveland 1 Seattle 9, N.Y. Yankees 2 Chicago White Sox 2, Detroit 1 Toronto 3, Baltimore 0 Boston 12, Kansas City 5 Minnesota 7, Texas 2 Tampa Bay at Oakland, Late Today’s Games L.A. Angels (Pineiro 5-5) at Detroit (Penny 7-7), 10:05 a.m. Kansas City (Hochevar 6-8) at Boston (Beckett 9-3), 10:35 a.m. Tampa Bay (W.Davis 7-7) at Oakland (Harden 2-1), 12:35 p.m. Baltimore (Bergesen 2-6) at Toronto (C.Villanueva 5-2), 4:07 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 8-5) at Texas (M.Harrison 8-7), 5:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. Texas at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Boston at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Minnesota at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

Briefly . . . PAHS gets donation from Fitness

11 a.m. WGN MLB Baseball, Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers. Noon (27) ESPN2 USGA Golf, U.S. Senior Open at Inverness Golf Club in Toledo, Ohio. Noon (47) GOLF PGA Golf, The Greenbrier Classic at The Old White Course in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. 4 p.m. (26) ESPN X Games 17, Los Angeles. 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer, World Challenge Juventus vs. Chivas Guadalajara at Carter Finlay Stadium in Raleigh, N.C.

way up Deer Park Road into Olympic National Park. The road gives hikers direct access to trails that lead to Elk Mountain (6,764 feet), Grand Valley and the Gray Wolf River. Here’s guessing a few of those hikes will be adorned

with colorful wildflower blooms.

________ Matt Schubert is the outdoors and sports columnist for the Peninsula Daily News. His column appears on Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at matt. schubert@peninsuladailynews.com.

Continued from B1 Not going anywhere is New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin, who signed a oneyear extension Wednesday that keeps him with the team through 2012. Also remaining in the New York area will be Santonio Holmes, who will continue to be a big benefit to Jets QB Mark Sanchez. The Jets made the 2009 Super Bowl MVP their top priority among their five key players who are not under contract, and will keep him for the next five years. Holmes has had some offfield issues, which led to the Steelers trading him to New York. He performed very well for the Jets on the field, with 52 catches for 746 yards and six touchdowns after missing the first four games while suspended. Free agents aren’t allowed to sign contracts until Friday. In other moves Wednesday: ■ Quarterback Matt Hasselbeck is leaving Seattle for Tennessee. He spent the past 10 seasons with the Seahawks, leading them to the 2005 NFC title. The Titans drafted quarterback Jake Locker eighth overall in April, but needed a veteran presence after Kerry Collins retired; they plan to trade or release Vince Young. ■ DeAngelo Williams, the Panthers’ career rushing leader, agreed to remain in Carolina.

Williams’ 2010 season was cut short by a right foot injury. He had his best pro season in 2008, rushing for a team-record 1,515 yards, 18 touchdowns. ■ In perhaps the wildest day of transactions in franchise history for Carolina, linebackers James Anderson and Thomas Davis agreed to five-year contracts. Also agreeing to terms were seven free agents, including kicker Olindo Mare, defensive tackle Ron Edwards, tight end Ben Hartsock, fullback Rick Brockel, defensive backs Cletis Gordan, Devon Hall and Kevin Payne. ■ Placekicker Adam Vinatieri agreed to a three-year contract with Indianapolis. ■ Cleveland will release quarterback Jake Delhomme today. He was 2-2 as a starter in 2010, but Colt McCoy has that job this year. Delhomme was scheduled to make $5.4 million in base salary. ■ Cincinnati reached an agreement with Bruce Gradkowski, who knows the team’s new offensive system and will help develop rookie Andy Dalton. The 28-year-old quarterback was in Tampa from 2008-09 with Jay Gruden, the Bengals’ new offensive coordinator. ■ Safety Eric Weddle agreed on a five-year, $40 million deal with San Diego with $19 million guaranteed. ■ The Texans agreed to terms with backup quarterback Matt Leinart.

Hawks: Begin camp today without Hasselbeck Continued from B1 this team and this organization,” Seattle tight end John The final image from that Carlson said. “He’s beloved night was Hasselbeck walk- in this city for what he does ing off the field with his son on the field but also what he hoisted on his shoulders and does off the field, so he will be greatly missed.” his daughters at his side. With Hasselbeck gone Hindsight shows it was a storybook final image to a the job will fall immediately career in Seattle that started to Charlie Whitehurst — at off shaky but eventually saw least until Aug. 4, when TarHasselbeck lead the varis Jackson can get on the Seahawks to the highest field along with the rest of points in their history, Seattle’s free agent signings. Jackson was Seattle’s including their only Super first free agent target, agreeBowl appearance. “I wish he was here, ing to a deal that ultimately because he’s a good friend of allowed Seattle to pull back mine and he’s a leader for from Hasselbeck.

After Jackson was locked up, Seattle spent Day 2 of free agency agreeing to a three-year deal with offensive lineman Robert Gallery, plugging the final gap in Seattle’s line. Bringing in Gallery was expected the moment Tom Cable was hired as an assistant head coach in charge of the offensive line and revamping Seattle’s running game. Later Wednesday, the Seahawks added another big name when a person with knowledge of the agreement told The Associated Press

that Seattle had agreed to terms with former Minnesota wide receiver Sidney Rice. Foxsports.com first reported Rice’s five-year deal with Seattle. Two seasons ago, Rice was a Pro Bowl selection after catching 83 passes for 1,312 yards and eight touchdowns. While Rice and Gallery bring big names to the Seahawks, much of the focus during training camp will be on Whitehurst and whether he can make the strides he failed to make last year

when he was first brought over from San Diego in a trade and given an opportunity to win the starting job. The only two starts Whitehurst made last season came in games that Hasselbeck was injured, although one of those was the season finale when he managed the Seahawks to a 16-6 win over St. Louis to wrap up the division title. There are other areas to be quickly solved besides quarterback. Seattle lost slot receiver Brandon Stokley to Washington on Wednesday and

kicker Olindo Mare is reportedly headed to Carolina. Special teams standout and reserve linebacker Will Herring will reportedly sign with New Orleans, leaving a depth issue at linebacker. Depth is also a concern on the defensive line, where free agent tackle Brandon Mebane remains one of the biggest targets out there. Seattle went into this free agent period with 22 unrestricted free agents. Last season, the Seahawks made just under 300 roster moves. No one is expecting this season to be any different.


Peninsula Daily News

Fun ’n’ Advice

Thursday, July 28, 2011

B3

Blind tilt can stop Peeping Toms

Dilbert

DEAR ABBY: “In the Dark in Texas” was wondering about the correct way to tilt blinds. Light coming in through a window should not be the deciding factor for which way the blinds close. Privacy should be of the highest importance. After years of living in apartments, I have learned the direction of a blind’s slats should change depending on the location of the window. If the window is on the ground floor, the blind should be closed slats up. Otherwise, people can see in from the floors above. This information is particularly useful in multistory neighborhoods and apartment complexes. If, however, you are on an upper floor and the slats are up, anyone can see in from the ground floor. For that reason blinds on an upper floor should close slats down. If you live in the middle, your best bet is curtains. Azaliah in Washington state

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Dear Azaliah: Readers’ views on this subject came from varying perspectives — privacy, light, heat, etc. But the general consensus was the same. Read on: Dear Abby: “In the Dark” asked whether blinds should be closed with the slats up or down. As you said, it’s a matter of personal preference. However, as a former apartment manager, I can say from experience that closing them with the slats in a downward position will allow in enough sunlight to fade carpets, furniture and drapes. I close mine with the slats up — for privacy and to prevent the fading of items near the window. Former Apartment Manager in Texas

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Dear Abby: My husband had a window treatment store years ago, and this is what we learned: If you are upstairs, the slats go down. If you are downstairs, they go up. To check this out, after dark with the lights on inside, go outside and look inside. You will be able to see clearly what is going on in the house.

DEAR ABBY Abigail

Van Buren

Follow this rule to keep Peeping Toms at bay. Shannon in Olympia

Dear Abby: It is common knowledge (I thought) that slats tilted up deflect both heat and light. Blinds tilted down let light in from above as well as heat in the summer and cold in the winter. Like toilet paper rolls, toothpaste tube squeezing and thermostat setting, this is yet another bone of contention in marriage. Cooling Down in South Carolina Dear Abby: Dust and clothing have started to build up in my bedroom. I have told my mom, and she doesn’t do anything about it, and I’m tired of telling her! The mess makes it hard to live in. I think she does not love me since she will not do anything about the mess. What should I do? Unloved Girl in Spokane Dear Unloved Girl: Your mother does love you. What she’s doing is trying to teach you how to be independent. The first thing you should do is pick up the clothes that are lying around in your bedroom. Any items that are soiled should go into the hamper to be washed. The rest should be hung up or folded and put away. Once that’s done, you will need to clean any surfaces that are dusty, including under the bed. If you don’t know how, ask your mother to show you.

________

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Invest in ARIES (March 21-April LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): what you know and do 19): You’ll be far too emoIt’s important that you rec- best. You can make extra tional to hang around the ognize who is on your side. cash if you start your own house. Get your responsismall enterprise. Consider Stick to the people you bilities out of the way buying or selling somehave always been able to quickly and move on to count on and avoid anyone thing that will help you in more pleasurable pastimes. who is requesting too the future. Put more effort Avoid anyone who puts much for too little. Change into partnerships. 3 stars pressure on you. 2 stars is good, but too much of CAPRICORN (Dec. TAURUS (April 20-May anything isn’t. 3 stars 22-Jan. 19): You’ll be 20): Plan to do something emotional regarding partVIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. out of the ordinary or to nerships. Don’t let the past 22): Looking the part is sign up for an interesting stand in the way of a half the battle when you course. Keep your disbright new future. A are trying to get ahead. tance from anyone who is change of residence or Expand your horizons as likely to complain or burden you with chores. Short well as your skills and you buying and selling investments will turn out well. A will have better luck findtrips that allow you to creative but forceful ing opportunities that fit experience something new approach to business and your lifestyle and goals. 4 will help you expand your working with others will stars awareness. 4 stars give you an edge. 3 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. GEMINI (May 21-June AQUARIUS (Jan. 22): You can make a wise 20): Put pressure on any20-Feb. 18): Put your one who owes you a favor. investment if you don’t let energy into moneymaking Discuss anything that you your emotions intervene. investments and increasPostpone a trip or any feel is holding you back. ing your circle of friends. Express your position and dealing you have with The more you interact with institutions or agencies. how you wish to proceed. others, the greater your Good fortune can be yours Time is on your side, and chance of finding sometaking longer to prepare if you handle your current will pay off. A problem with one who can contribute to situation with confidence. your life. 3 stars a friend or relative can be An innovative idea will bring in extra cash. 3 stars expected. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 20): Don’t bother getting CANCER (June angry, upset or emotional 21-July 22): An impulsive 21): Your high creative regarding domestic energy will help you comdecision, move or statement will cause problems. plete your projects and put changes. Acceptance is the quickest way to win favors Putting pressure on others your ideas into motion. in return and to make whatDon’t be surprised if you will backfire. Keep your complaints to yourself, and receive interest from some- ever situation you face work to your advantage. Enjoy one who can help you honor any promises you socializing late in the day made. Someone from your develop something you past will disrupt your life if have been struggling with. with someone who shares your sentiments. 5 stars Protect your heart. 5 stars you are too quick to forBy Eugenia Last

Momma

Rose is Rose

Elderberries

Dennis the Menace

Doonesbury

give and forget. 3 stars

The Family Circus

Now you can shop at www.peninsuladailynews.com!


Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, July 28, 2011

Business

PAGE

B4

Politics and Environment

Boeing’s profits beat Wall Street expectations By Joshua Freed

priced planes. The 737 has a list price of around $80 million. It doesn’t make as many of its big 777s, but they sell for three times as much. Boeing delivered 19 777s during the quarter, three more than a year ago.

The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Boeing’s profit surged in the second quarter as it delivered more passenger planes, a development that helped it raise its 2011 earnings guidance. But Boeing Co. also said Wednesday that it will not deliver as many of its new 787s and 747-8s this year as previously hoped. Still, investors seemed content to hear that delivery of the first planes remains on schedule — Boeing shares rose slightly. Analysts believe Boeing and other plane builders are at the beginning of another boom cycle after enduring a recession.

Raising production Airlines have been ordering so many Boeing 737s and competing single-aisle planes from Airbus that the companies are raising production rates. Boeing already cranks out one 737 every day.

Up to 495 planes

The Associated Press

A Boeing Co. 747-8F is shown in Seattle in June. It is aiming for 42 per month in 2014. Boeing reported that its earnings increased 20 percent to $941 million, or $1.25 a share, from $787 million, or $1.06 a share, in the year-ago quarter. Revenue rose 6 percent to $16.5 billion from $15.6 billion. Analysts had expected Boeing to earn 97 cents a share. The company raised its

earnings forecast for all of 2011 to $3.90 to $4.10 a share. Its earlier forecast was $3.80 to $4 a share. The company’s stock rose 47 cents to $70.63 Wednesday as the overall market was down sharply. Boeing delivered 118 planes during the quarter, four more than a year ago. In addition to more deliveries, Boeing benefited from a shift toward higher-

Boeing now expects to deliver 485 to 495 planes this year, five fewer than previously predicted. That reflects fewer expected deliveries of the long-delayed 787 and 747-8. Chicago-based Boeing said it expects to deliver both “later in the third quarter,” which ends Sept. 30. Boeing now expects to deliver a combined 25 to 30 of the planes, down from 25 to 40. Boeing had firm orders for 827 of the 787s at the end of the quarter. It is trying to speed up 787 production in both Everett, Wash., and at a new factory in North Charleston, S.C.

Seattle mayor signs city’s new medical marijuana law Dispensaries to follow same rules as other businesses The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The city of Seattle will regulate medical marijuana shops like any other business under a law signed Wednesday by Mayor Mike McGinn. The ordinance, which unanimously passed the city council this month, requires medical marijuana operations be licensed, pay taxes and fees, obtain foodhandling permits if they sell marijuana cookies and follow all other regulations such as land-use codes. “This ordinance gives us

more tools to protect public safety while ensuring businesses are good neighbors in their communities,” McGinn said in a statement. “This will help us work toward a more rational and sensible way of regulating marijuana use, instead of continuing an irrational policy of prohibition that just doesn’t work.” The approach contrasts with several other cities in Washington that are taking steps to impose moratoriums on such operations. Medical marijuana reg-

ulations in the state have been uncertain since Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed much of a bill that would have created a system of licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. She left in sections allowing collective medical marijuana operations.

Law praised Many in the medical marijuana community have praised Seattle’s new law, saying that at least the city is doing something to rebel against federal and state laws prohibiting cannabis. But one medical marijuana attorney, Douglas Hiatt, has threatened a lawsuit to block it.

The city does not have the authority to regulate an illegal substance, he argued, and forcing the operations to obtain a business license essentially forces them to acknowledge they’re breaking the law. McGinn said he will continue working with state lawmakers and the governor to support a bill to provide greater clarity and legal protections for qualified medical marijuana users and providers. The mayor’s office will also work with the City Council and the planning officials to develop zoning regulations for medical cannabis facilities. The law takes effect in 30 days.

 $ Briefly . . . ‘Lucky 13’ anniversary on Friday PORT ANGELES — Necessities and Temptations gift store, 217 N. Laurel St. in downtown Port Angeles, will hold a 13-hour sales event to celebrate its 13th anniversary Friday. The event is advertised as “13 hours of fun and games” from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. with several 13-themed specials: n $13 gift certificate for every 13th purchaser. n $13 Surprise Table and $13 Sale Rack. n·Espresso or latte, $1.30 each, with second shots 13 cents each. Free cookies, coffee and other treats all 13 hours — and “stop by after work for a great surprise.” There will also be drawings for Emu boots, Not Your Daughter’s Jeans and a man’s Cutter & Buck sweater. For more information, phone Necessities and Temptations owner Edna Petersen at 360-457-6400.

Dead whale

Removal effective Steve Williams, assistant chief of fisheries for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, said they would apply for a new permit and expected to get it. “It’s a disappointing frustrating situation for us in the state, but it appears to be the best course of action at this point in time,”

HIGHEST

he said. “We believe that removal of the animals at the dam has been effective.” Since 2008, Oregon and Washington have killed dozens of sea lions that feed on salmon migrating upriver to spawn in the spring as they hit the bottleneck of fish ladders over Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River east of Portland. Arguing that the dams and overfishing kill more salmon than sea lions, the Humane Society won a 9th U.S. Court of Appeals ruling last year that NOAA Fisheries had not properly justified its decision to take lethal action. Last May, NOAA Fisheries authorized the two states to resume killing sea

lions, saying it had complied with the court ruling. The Human Society went back to court, and the states agreed to voluntarily suspend the program because most of the sea lions had left for the year. Only one was killed. Humane Society lawyer Ralph Henry said they expected a tougher evaluation of the new applications, but if they are approved, they will be back in court. A 2010 taskforce concluded the program had not been effective at reducing the numbers of threatened and endangered salmon eaten by sea lions to less than 1 percent, and suggested improving trapping so more sea lions could be removed.

QUALITY HOME CARE.

MOST

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wednesday. Aluminum - $1.1847 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper - $4.4346 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper - $4.4405 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2705.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.1314 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1625.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1615.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $41.055 Handy & Harman; $40.553 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum - $1819.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract); 1806.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed.

Tuesday Special

16 oz. T-Bone Steak includes rice, beans and pico de gallo MEXICAN RESTAURANT (360) 452-3928 636 E. Front St. Port Angeles

POOL TABLE: Brunswick, with extras. You haul.

$400/obo. 460-4408 035074779

PORTLAND, Ore. — Federal fisheries authorities have lifted their authorization for Oregon and Washington to kill sea lions eating endangered salmon at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River while a legal challenge from the Humane Society of the United States works its way through court. In a letter dated July 22, James H. Lecky, director of the Office of Protected Resources for NOAA Fisheries, told Oregon and Washington fish and wildlife agencies they can apply for a new authorization for next year. “We have evaluated the litigation risks and dis-

cussed with your staffs various options for proceeding,” Lecky wrote. “In light of the fact that sea lion activity will be limited until next spring, we have concluded it is in our collective interest to permanently suspend the 2011 (authorization) and instead consider a new request for 2012.”

to determine the cause of death, but the whale may first be towed to a moresecluded beach where it will be left to naturally decay.

165124425

The Associated Press

peninsuladailynews.com

BREMERTON — A gray whale that washed up on a Bremerton beach was alive when the stranding was reported Wednesday morning, but it was dead when a National Marine Fisheries employee arrived on the site on Dyes Inlet. Spokesman Brian Gorman said the whale was very emaciated and may have been old, injured or loaded with parasites. Peninsula Daily News A necropsy is planned and The Associated Press

Sea lions eating endangered salmon get reprieve By Jeff Barnard

Real-time stock quotations at

AFFORDABLE PRICE.

kwahomecare.com

Call t o and day get

For a FREE consultation:

*œÀÌʘ}iiÃÊÎÈä‡{xӇӣәÊUÊ-iµÕˆ“ÊÎÈä‡xnӇ£È{ÇÊUÊ*œÀÌÊ/œÜ˜Ãi˜`ÊÎÈä‡Î{{‡Î{™Ç UÊ7Êœ“iÊ >ÀiʈÃÊ>Û>ˆ>LiÊ>ÊœÛiÀÊ Ê *Õ}iÌÊ-œÕ˜`]ÊÓ{‡Ç]ʈ˜VÕ`ˆ˜}ʅœˆ`>ÞÃ

UÊ7ʅi«ÃÊޜÕÊÀi“>ˆ˜Êˆ˜`i«i˜`i˜Ìʈ˜Ê Ê Ì…iÊVœ“vœÀÌʜvÊޜÕÀʜܘʅœ“iÊ

UÊ/>ˆœÀi`Ê̜ÊޜÕÀʘii`Ã]ÊvÀœ“Ê>ÃʏˆÌ̏iÊ>ÃÊÊ Ê ÌܜʅœÕÀÃÊ̜ÊÓ{ʅœÕÀÃʜvÊV>Ài

CALL FOR A FREE ASSESSMENT TO HELP DETERMINENE YOURR NENEED NEEDS EDS. THERE’S NO OBLIGATION. WE’LL EVEN GIVE YOU A COUPON THAT CCANAN BE REDEEMED FOR $100 WORTH OF FREE HOME CARE.

CARE

! 165124992

UÊ7ʅ>ÃÊLii˜Ê>ʘœ˜‡«ÀœwÌ]Ê`i«i˜`>LiÊ Ê …œ“iÊV>ÀiÊ«ÀœÛˆ`iÀÊȘViÊ£™n™Ê

$100

FREE


(C)

c

SECTION

Peninsula Daily News for Thursday, July 28, 2011

Our Peninsula

CLASSIFIEDS, 3RDAGE and PUZZLES In this section

Making movies the thrilling way High school students work on summer film By Arwyn Rice

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Picture this: A Pacific Northwest island summer horse camp’s idyllic days are shattered by the unexplained deaths of several horse farm employees. The young campers are evacuated, leaving behind the remaining camp counselors to care for the horses, counselors who soon find themselves seeking an escape from the horror by hiding in hidden military bunkers under the island. If that sounds like the plot of a summer popcorn thriller — then, yes, it is. Several dozen high school students from Port Angeles and Sequim spent the spring and summer working on “Serenity Farm,” a movie produced by Port Angeles resident John Rodsett, who has been worked in films and TV for more than 30 years. “Serenity Farm” is still in postproduction; no release date is available at this time. The movie will first be a directto-DVD release in Europe, said Robert Beebe of Olympic Game Farm, which provided animals for the venture. If it performs well, it may be released later in the U.S., he said.

Students work on film Port Angeles High School senior Marlee Glatz, 17, served as a production assistant to props director Tonya Carlson-Jolly, keeping track of equipment used by each actor in the film. “It gets really organized,” Glatz said. The filmmakers spent three days shooting on the North Olympic Peninsula — at the real Serenity Farm on Blue Mountain Road in Port Angeles and in abandoned military bunkers at Fort Worden State Park. Glatz, who also had a chance to help with a smaller film in July and visited an uncle’s food TV set, giving her a frame of comparison, said she was impressed by the three big, professional motion picture cameras the filmmakers used. “It’s a low-budget film, but they had good equipment,” Glatz said. A dozen digital-media students from the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center joined them, learning

the ins and outs of movie-making and earning a spot in the film’s credits. The skills center offers additional vocational classes and draws high school students from Cape Flattery, Chimacum, Crescent, Port Angeles, Port Townsend, Quillayute Valley and Sequim school districts. Many of the center’s classes, from automotive technology to digital graphics, offer college credits for students who successfully complete courses and are taken in addition to their regular high school course load. “Many are at the top of their class,” said instructor Lisa Hitt. They became involved when filmmakers contacted Hitt at the skills center, seeking interns to assist in the production of “Serenity Farm.” The chance for students to work on a real Hollywood-style film provided students a frame of reference for the skills they were learning, Hitt said. Some worked from classrooms, creating digital special effects or on other technical aspects of the film, while others worked as assistants on the set, working with makeup artists, in costuming or on sets. “The film experience was absolutely tremendous,” Hitt said. Initially, spring semester students worked on the project, but when school let out for the summer, the movie makers still had several scenes to film, Hitt said. The summer class Glatz signed up for was initially planned as a three-week introduction to digital graphics. Glatz, an avid amateur photographer, had some basic skills in editing her own photos but wanted to do more, she said. The three-week class was exactly what she needed. Then filmmakers contacted Hitt — they needed students for more filming. After contacting students who signed up for the class, the class became a one-week crash course in filmmaking, plus travel and long days on the movie sets. Some dropped out, but others lined up to take their place. “When word got out we would be on the film set, it really took

Marley Glatz, left, was one of a group of students who worked on the set of “Serenity Farm.” Students worked with a crew to learn how to make a movie. Another student created the “creature” makeup for Sequim actor David Toman, right.

From left, students Ben Hurley, Cheyenne Nuzum, Hanna Hendrickson, Marley Glatz, Brandon Pappas and Drew Pryne can put “worked on the set of thriller” in their “What I Did This Summer” essay. off,” Hitt said. Seventeen students, including Glatz, joined the film crew. Glatz, who is known for always having a camera ready, found her calling on the set.

“I know I want to go into film now,” Glatz said. “I want to be behind the cameras — a cinematographer,” she said. For more about the film, visit

www.serenityfarmthemovie.com.

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

Hot spots for music across the Peninsula “THEY” SAY IT’S going to get warmer outside, but don’t wait for the weather report ’cuz I’m goin’ to tell ya where all the live music hot spots are inside and out.

Sequim and Blyn

Pavilion at Fort Warden State Park, for its Jazz Port Townsend ■  On Friday at the Oasis Festival On Tuesday, Bar and Grill, 301 E. WashingJohn ■  Today at 8 p.m., you’ll find ton St., the Discovery Bay Dave and live jazz at the Public House, Nelson Pirates stir things up from Rosalie Sec1038 Water St., and at The 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ord and the Upstage, 923 Washington St. On Wednesday Final Luck of the On Friday and Saturday, jazz Port Angeles Approach brings boomer music Draw Band will be played at the Public ■  Returning Friday to the welcome guests in for a landing from 5:30 p.m. to House; The Upstage; Castle 8:30 p.m. Junction Roadhouse, junction Marty Kaler Key, Seventh and Sheridan ■  On Saturday at Three of U.S. Highway 101 and state and Bob Lawstreets; the Rose Theater, 235 Crabs Restaurant, 11 3 Crabs rence of Highway 112 five miles west of Taylor St.; Undertown, 211 TayRoad, the Old Sidekicks kick Twisted Roots Port Angeles, is Blu Meadow, lor St.; and Key City Playup their heels and tunes from for a rousing which has packed the place in house, 419 Washington St. For 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. evening of the past. more info and updates, visit ■  At The Buzz, 128 N. acoustic counYes, I know there is highway try, bluegrass and old-time music Sequim Ave., Kelly Thomas and www.centrum.org/jazz. work being done, but All Points ■  At The Upstage, in addiVictor Reventlow host the very Charters & Tours will be running from tion to Jazz in the Clubs, on Fripopular and rousing open mic the shuttle from 8 p.m. to closing. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. day and Saturday, the Louis Wednesday from 6:30 p.m. to ■  On Saturday at the farmJust phone 360-460-7131 or 360Aissen Sextet will be jazzing it 9:30 p.m. ers market at The Gateway, 775-9128 to arrange your ride. ■  On Friday at Stymie’s Bar up at 6 p.m. $6 cover. Dave Hannon and Automatic $5 cover. There’s a change of pace Sun& Grill at Cedars at DungeTheory play from 10 a.m. to Johnnie Mustang hosts the day with the zydeco of the New ness, 1965 Woodcock Road, dine Sunday Junction Blues Jam from 1 p.m. Iberians at 7 p.m. to the lovely, lilting voice of Lili On Wednesday, Franco Ber7 p.m. to 11 p.m. There have On Wednesday, Old Pledge, a tucci treks to Port Angeles for a Crabb from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. been some great jams and blues ■  On Friday at 7 Cedars group of young musicians from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. performance. improvisations lately. Come and Casino, Blyn, the Roger Enders the Blue Ridge Mountains of Vir■  Sundays are special at the join in. Smokin’ Hot Blues Band will ginia, bring you old tunes from ■  On Saturday night at Wine R Bar, 132 E. Front St., when the golden era of country, hillbilly the Voo-Doo BBQ Blues Band rock you from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on the Waterfront (WOW) at On Saturday, dance to the and blues music. Adults $8, entertains at 10 p.m. The Landing mall at 115 Railcountry of Chris Ward and get youths $5 and sliding scale. ■  On Monday, Rusty and road Ave., it’s going to be a party your two-steppin’ in gear from Phone 360-385-2216 for reserDuke entertain at the Smugwith a free concert by Sarah 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. vations. Shea and the release of her new gler’s Landing at The Landing Keep the two-steppin’ and ■  On Friday at the Banana mall at 115 Railroad Ave. with CD at 7:30 p.m. So go on down movin’ and grooving Sunday with Leaf, 609 Washington St., some pickin’ and sweet singin’ for some jazz. Denny Secord Jr. and HayHowly Slim with his vocals and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  Tonight at Castaways wire from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. guitar provides a touch of coun■  Every Tuesday evening at Restaurant and Night Club, At 8 p.m., sit back and relax try at 6 p.m. the Port Angeles Senior Cen1213 Marine Drive, come on and enjoy Ted Vigil’s terrific ■  Steve Grandinetti plays down for Jerry’s Country Jam ter, Seventh and Peabody tribute to John Denver until solo guitar at the Owl Sprit, 218 streets, the Port Angeles Senior (no jelly here) from 5 p.m. to Polk St., on Friday from 5:30 p.m. Swingers present Wally and the 9:30 p.m. This is a great show. 8 p.m. If country’s your style, On Monday, we be jammin’ to 8 p.m. Boys playing ballroom dance come and dance or play plugged ■  On Friday at the Port favorites for the dancing pleasure with host Barry Burnett and or unplugged. friends, so bring your ax and/or Townsend Brewing Co., 330 of all adults 45 years and older ■  Enjoy the classic rock of vocal talents for the fun from 10th St., boogie to the Cajun from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Toll City Trio on Friday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. $5 cover, first-timers free! strains of the Delta Rays from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at Bar N9ne. ■  On Wednesday at Dupuis 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Friday, Les Wamboldt Port Townsend Restaurant, 256861 U.S. HighOn Sunday, Gerald Braud and Olde Tyme Country perperforms on acoustic guitar from form at the Fairmount Restau- way 101, Bob and Dave play ■  This weekend, Centrum 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. rant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, blues with a brew and barbecue presents Jazz in the Clubs from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 2011, as well as at McCurdy from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■  On Friday, Sirens Pub,

LIVE MUSIC

623 Water St., has Marilyn Kay and Co. on tap at 9 p.m. with acoustic Americana, bluegrass, country and blues. $5 cover. On Saturday, the Sour Mash Hug Band, an Americana/folk/ jug band, plays old-time dance music to Gypsy swing and originals at 9 p.m. $5 cover.

Area concerts ■  Tonight in Port Townsend’s Concert on the Dock series in the Pope Marine Park Plaza, it’s rock ’n’ roll with the Pitfalls at 5:30 p.m. ■  On Tuesday for Music in the Park at Sequim’s James Center for the Performing Arts, get your country up with The Old Sidekicks from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■  On Wednesday in Port Angeles’ Concert on the Pier, rock ’n’ roll with Bound to Happen from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

High notes ■  The Clallam County Fair is having a variety and talent show at the fair Sunday, Aug. 21, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Wilder Stage. Those interested in performing can get more info at www.clallamcountyfair.com. Tune up that old guitar, tweak those tonsils and join the fun.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-5651139 or emailing news@peninsuladailynews. com (subject line: John Nelson). Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

C2 — (C)

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Fire crews always busy in summer SEVERAL READERS RECOGNIZED the June 28 Picture from the Past as the state forestry division firefighting team of 1951. The Forestry Department building was located in Port Angeles at Third and Francis streets — the current veterans’ hall. The names of those in the photo are, from left: ■  Top row: Two unidentified boys from Forks. ■  Second row: David Morris (or Bill Rooney?), Raymond Morris. ■  Third row, on the left side of picture, a fellow in a hat named Bob; next person wearing cap is unidentified. ■  Third row, right side of picture: Rod Downen, unidentified man, and Phil Rains. ■  Fourth row is Larry Scoles and Ken Hubbard. ■  Bottom row: Wayne Wait, Dick Hopkins, Rusty Hilt, Gene Mullen (or Donald Wilber?) and Scotty (?), the pickup truck driver. Ed Ketchum was the radio operator and Bill Erickson was the foreman, but they are not in the

BACK WHEN Alice

Alexander

photo. Norman Gallacci recognized the building and thought two of his cousins, the Morris boys, were in the

photo. Bev Davidson didn’t recognize where the photo was taken, but she thought that two of her brothers and a couple of their friends are in the photo. Warren Hilt said his John Hubbard collection brother, Rusty, is in the The state forestry division firefighting team outside its headquarters in Port Angeles in 1951. bottom row. Warren also See column for identifications of those in the photo. worked for the state forestry fire crew in 1947.

Across the street Joey Wood wrote that she and her brother, George, lived across the alley from the Department of Natural Resources at Third and Francis streets.

(In the late 1950s, the county and state combined agencies and the name was changed to the Department of Natural Resources.) Joey said, “Several men, young and old, lived there all summer and worked on

putting out forest fires in the area. When they were not putting out fires, they worked on their building for maintenance and cut logs for trail markers that were placed in the parks and forest.” Joey and her brother became friends with most of the guys. They often rode with Scotty in the pickup, keeping him company on his many miles of travel. It was his job to spot fires and call in reports about how many men and equipment were needed when a fire was spotted. Joey and George also got pretty good at climbing up the brass fire pole. They also helped “Cookie” fix the meals.

Two-story building

Picture

from the

Dick Hopkins, in the front row, said that the building was two stories, with living quarters on the second floor. “We stayed upstairs with not many days off,” Dick said. He remembered “Cookie” [Valera Cochran] as one of their cooks who kept everyone well-fed. The monthly grocery bill was divided among the workers and deducted from their paychecks (about $135 a month). Dick said he got another $15 to $20 for driving the crew bus and fire truck. They were always busy, when not fighting fires. He remembers replanking a bridge up Deer Park — the lumber came from a mill that used to reside where Wilder Auto Center is now located at Deer Park Road and U.S. Highway 101. Dick also remembered the big Fibreboard fire started by a train in

Past

Do you know where this barn is? Hint: It is a little west of Sequim. If you know, send your memories about it to columnist Alice Alexander at cdalex@olypen.com or write to her at 204 W. Fourth St., Apt. 14, Port Angeles, WA 98362 by Aug. 12 for use in her next column, appearing Aug. 25.

PLEASE MAKE THE CALL TO HELP THE KIDS Phone-A-Thon

Live KONP 1450 Radio Coverage

Saturday, July 30th, 2011 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

095 -8

or drop off your donation at the Sequim Boys and Girls Club (400 W. Fir St.) & get a free hot dog and soda (Noon - 2 p.m.)

Women’s Toyah

LOCAL BUYER FOR OLD COINS

GOLD & SILVER 360.452.3358

155120120

683

17701231

Call 360-683-8095

Women’s

Women’s

Frederick Larson wrote: “Who as a youth could forget the summer months on their first real job working for the Department of Forestry on Third and Francis streets in Port Angeles? “Who could forget Valera Cochran, ‘Cookie,’ who fixed us breakfast and our evening meals? Yes, we had to wash our dishes after each meal. “She was our ‘mother’ away from home as she kept us boys from losing our table manners or fighting at times.” Groceries came out of the boys’ paychecks each month, and if they chose luxurious foods, their paychecks were smaller. Frederick also wrote that he remembers the Woods girls, who lived across the street. Their visits were an excuse to stop working. Frederick recalled Albert Zaccardo (from the Blyn district) and George Rains (from the Mount Pleasant district) teaching them fire-suppression courses on weekends,

which included digging fire trails and laying hose up at Lake Dawn. At the start of summer, they would spend many hours walking up state logging roads ahead of a roadgrader, clearing fallen logs and brush or cleaning out culverts while the grader operator dug ditches alongside the roads.

Dump truck Frederick continued that there was a vacant lot behind the Port Angeles forestry building — “not really vacant as there was a three-car garage on the alley end of the lot that had a blue, 1952 Chevy three-quarter-ton dump truck that we used to gravel roads.” He continued: “In one of the garage slots was a 500-gallon empty water tank that hung on chain blocks that we could lower onto the dump truck in case we needed extra water for a fire.” Each fire warden had a 1954 Ford pickup truck that carried a 100-gallon water tank. Two of the wardens he remembered were Harry Brown and Nate Coleman. Frederick said: “It was a kind of carefree summer outside working, which became a learning experience in life for three summers.”

__________ Alice Alexander is a Clallam County historian, author, descendent of an Elwha Valley pioneer family and member of the Clallam County Heritage Advisory Board. She can be reached at cdalex@olypen.com. Alice’s history column, Back When, appears on the final Thursday of every month. The next installment, based on today’s “Picture from the Past” on this page, will appear Aug. 25.

TAXES UP

INCOMES DOWN

HAD ENOUGH?

Men’s

Venice

First real job

INFLATION UP

ENJOY SUMMER IN STYLE! Targhee Mid

August 1951. After it had crowned, there was not much to do except put out spot fires and build fire trails. He also remembers getting out of school to fight the Great Forks Fire, which started a few weeks after the Fibreboard fire. Dick recalled how firefighters evacuated residents and helped carry belongings. Sandberg Logging Co. lost two new International log trucks. Many people spent a lot of hours fighting this huge fire. John Hubbard often came to visit his older brother, Ken, who was living at the forestry center. Mrs. Hubbard would send a watermelon for the boys, so John got to slide down the fire pole while he was delivering the fruit.

Finlay

ELECT

JIM McENTIRE (R) CLALLAM CO. COMMISSIONER (DIST. 1)

Randy Stone

609 West Washington, Suite #3 • Sequim (Penney’s Plaza)

Paid by Comm. to elect Jim McEntire PO Box 631, Sequim 98382

BUSINESSES CLOSED

UNEMPLOYMENT UP

175127738

Open Tues. - Fri. 9:30 - 5; Sat. 9:30 - 4

Darcy Gort

175128002

(360) 582-1247


3rdAge

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, July 28, 2011

C3

Don’t panic about not being 39 anymore TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, back when I started doing whatever it is I do at the tender age of 14, our job was to help “seniors” (not my favorite term, but we’ll leave that rant for another Thursday). I loved it then, and I love it now. Interestingly, though, a lot of “seniors” back then, and many who have achieved the age of majority and, presumably, maturity during these 25 years, while I attempted to cope with puberty and acne, knew their way “around the block” — that is, folks kind of “got” Social Security, Medicare, retirement, aging, etc. They’d anticipated it; they’d seen it done; they understood it. That’s not to say that everyone got it “right” (whatever “right” is) or never needed help (Did I mention Medicare?) or were just happy as clams until they moved on to better things, but the majority of the majority “got it.” They spoke the language. So, 25 years later, what’s changed?

HELP LINE Mark

Harvey

going to have to sign up for Social Security (maybe) or Medicare (maybe) or think about retirement (maybe). Oops! What do you mean I’m not 39? (Well, actually, I am. Just do the math

above.) That’s an astounding realization for most busy, hard-working people because most busy, hardworking Boomers are in their early-to-mid-’60s or rapidly closing in on the same.

Shocking, scary

It’s shocking, it’s scary, and it’s sufficiently overwhelming for many to lapse back into denial (“I’ll think about that some other time”), which can actually work Baby boomers pretty well when you’re busy and Well, Medicare is exponenworking hard. tially more complicated, it takes Unfortunately, that “other more money just to live, while time” often occurs late in the evethe economy is tanking, families ning, in bed, with the lights out. are spread out over multiple time And then it’s morning. zones, and the largest demoOops. graphic hiccup in the history of I hear this a lot from a lot of the planet (yes, the Baby Boomfolks who aren’t 39: “What do I ers) have been working their coldo? How do I do it? What do I lective tails off trying to raise need to know? I don’t know what kids and help Mom and Dad I don’t know! Oh my!” (and/or Grandma and Grandpa First, don’t panic. It doesn’t and/or in-laws). So, what? help, it isn’t pretty, and it scares Well, the “So, what?” is that pets. vast numbers of Boomers are Second, we’re going to go finding themselves within strik“there,” meaning we’ll start talking range of “aging.” ing about this “aging stuff.” What that usually means is No, I have no intention of that it suddenly dawned on offering some scholarly treatise somebody that somebody was

Birthday Mildred M. Harris Friends of the family are welcome to join in celebrating Mildred M. Harris’ 90th birthday with cake and coffee Saturday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 212 McCarver Road, Port Angeles. The family requests no gifts. She was born Aug. 3, 1921, in Kansas and married Forrest Harris in 1937. In 1960, the couple moved to Sekiu, where she worked at the post office. They moved to Port Angeles in 1967, and Mrs. Harris worked as a rural route substitute and meat wrapper at Evergreen Meats. Mrs. Harris’ family

D

on’t panic. I’m serious. Look around you, and tell me what you see. Never mind, I’ll tell you: What you see is a lot of “seniors” who are happy, healthy, alive, well, laughing, “part of the solution” and wondering how they ever found time to hold down a job. Or maybe they are holding down a job. Whatever! What you need to notice is: They aren’t dead. ever found time to hold down a job. Or maybe they are holding down a job. Whatever! What you need to notice is: They aren’t dead. True, they (like you — or me, if I weren’t 39) have their troubles and/or medical issues and/or chronic conditions and/or difficulties, and they (like you, not me!) probably can’t do everything they used to be able to do or as fast or as . . . often, but they aren’t dead.

or comprehensive compendium of everything that everybody could possibly need to know about being older than 39. I probably couldn’t if I wanted to, but I don’t want to. No, let’s just talk about stuff that seems to come up a lot — or should. And I’ll assume that you (whoever “you” are) are in your early-to-mid-’60s or rapidly closing in on the same, so you have some time to think and plan. Note: If that assumption is not true for you, and you need help with something right now, call any of the numbers at the end of this column, and decent people will help you for free, I promise.

Scary to die

Don’t be too quick to shrug this off: The personal realization that we aren’t going to be 39 forever can be devastating for some No denial because it means that we will, OK? So, this is not a crisis, but eventually, die. Sure we knew that, but not really — and that’s if you keep lapsing back into denial and losing sleep while you scary. And then we start imagining pretend that calendars go back(or, even worse, assuming) that ward, it will be — and soon our lives will spiral down and enough. down into increasing disability, OK? Have you had enough of needing more and more help, “Oops”? Me, too, so kick back able to do less and less, until we because this is going to take become whatever it is (or whoawhile, but the “good news” is ever it is) that we saw that hapwe’ve got awhile. Here we go: pen to, so our lives “end” long Don’t panic. I’m serious. Look before they end. around you, and tell me what Does that happen? Yes. Does you see. Never mind, I’ll tell you: it happen to everybody? No! Can What you see is a lot of “seniors” I keep it from happening to me? who are happy, healthy, alive, Maybe. Can you guarantee that, well, laughing, “part of the soluHarvey? No. This is Earth. Nobody guarantion” and wondering how they

________

Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula resi-

Lived, loved life And I’ll bet that you’ve laughed and loved and reveled and played and savored and celebrated and gloried in the wonder of it all. And all along the way, you’ve decided who this person is that you will be. Well, nothing has changed. You will still be required to make that same decision, every single day, so start today: Who do you choose to be? And how do you choose to be? And what do you want the people around you to take from your “take” on life? It’s OK to be a little scared — that’s natural — but if that’s all there is, then that’s all there is. And remember, we’re just getting out of the gate, so for now, don’t panic.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Briefly . . .

CORNER

includes son and daughter-in-law Kenneth “Sonny” and Billie Harris of Crawford, Colo., and daughter Linda MatMrs. lock of Lacy. Harris She also has seven grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, 15 great-great-grandchildren and four step-grandchildren.

teed you anything from the day you got here, and nobody is going to start now, but you’ve made it this far — somehow. Somehow, you’ve gotten through five to six (or more) decades, and I’ll bet more than your anticipated Social Security that it wasn’t always easy. I’ll bet it took courage and stamina and will. I’ll bet you suffered, and I’ll bet you got hurt. I’ll bet you won some and you lost some, and I’ll bet you laid dreams, hopes, pets and people to rest along the way — but here you are.

PA High School band car wash slated Saturday

Angeles Fine Arts Center. Anderson is a nationally touring singer and songwriter with a fiery passion that has people making comparisons to Janis Joplin. Anderson has performed at PORT ANGELES — The Port festivals in Atlanta, San FranAngeles High School Band will hold a car wash at Angeles Pawn, cisco, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Savannah, Los Angeles and in 619 E. First St., from 9 a.m. to New York City’s Museum of Mod3 p.m. Saturday. Students will be raising funds ern Art. She released her fourth CD, for uniforms, travel expenses, “One Fine Day” in 2010. band camp and other bandTickets are $10 with the Port related costs. Angeles Fine Arts Center receivFor more information, phone ing 50 percent of proceeds. band booster secretary Leslie Tickets are available in Perrizo at 360-452-2536. advance at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 E. Lauridsen Benefit concert Blvd.; at Port Book & News, 104 PORT ANGELES — Lynn E. First St.; and online at www. Frances Anderson will perform olympiccellars.com or at the door. at Olympic Cellars Summer ConOlympic Cellars is located at cert Series at 7 p.m. Saturday, 255410 U.S. Highway 101. Aug. 6, as a benefit for the Port Peninsula Daily News

dents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle 1

NINE OF DIAMONDS

2

3

19

BY KURT MUELLER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 58 Arizona is the only state to have one 59 Attach to 61 “Rocks” 62 Certain helicopter 63 Piece of blackmarket playground equipment? 69 Cousin of kerplunk 71 ___ for life 72 Purple shade 73 Press 76 It comes out in the wash 77 Northernmost borough of London 81 Freud’s one 82 Antlered animal 83 Wool or cotton purchase request? 85 Disgusting advice? 87 Way out 88 24 hrs. ago 90 Isle of the Inner Hebrides 91 Brown-___ 94 New York’s historic ___ Library 97 Top of a ladder?: Abbr. 98 Whiskey bottle dregs? 103 Courtroom entry 107 Corporate shake-up, for short 108 Beyond ___ 109 People whose jobs include giving tours 111 To have, in Le Havre 112 “I don’t give ___!”

113 Nobleman after a banquet? 114 Rita Hayworth’s femme fatale title role of 1946 115 Effects of many waterfalls 116 Felt bad 117 Bind 118 Toothpaste brand once advertised as having the secret ingredient GL-70 119 Not settled 120 Hits and runs 121 Rev.’s address

18 Thou follower? 24 Some volcanoes 28 Doesn’t stop, in a way 32 Pitcher part 33 Animal with a snout 35 Urgent transmission, for short 38 Result of a pitch, perhaps 39 Schedule opening 40 Trolley sound 41 Distant 42 Side in checkers 43 Metered praise 44 Tasseled topper DOWN 45 Leader exiled 1 Mosey in 1979 2 Perform Hawaiian 47 Not much music, say 48 Nobelist Walesa 3 Shell alternative 49 Queen’s request, 4 “Uncle Moses” maybe novelist Sholem 50 Skin cream 5 Smack ingredient 6 French first lady ___ 51 Adds insult to Bruni-Sarkozy injury, say 7 Staggering 52 Land on the Sea of 8 Game tally: Abbr. Azov: Abbr. 9 It was invaded in the 53 Cultural org. War of 1812 59 Stomach area 10 Prayer 60 Deferential denial 11 Airlift, maybe 62 Junk bond rating 12 Really bugged 64 Something on 13 Orphan girl a hog? in Byron’s 65 Stalk by a stream “Don Juan” 66 Feudal lands 14 Seldom 15 Urging at a birthday 67 Ex-governor Spitzer of New York party 68 When repeated, a 16 I-5 through Los TV sign-off Angeles, e.g. 69 Kind of story 17 Heckle, e.g.

5

6

7

8

9

20

23

AC R O S S 1 Crackerjack 4 Org. fighting pirates? 9 Pink shade 14 Wyle and Webster 19 Man of mystery 20 Stylish 21 Mountain ridge 22 Hit TV show that ended in 2011 23 Cuts in a cardboard container? 25 American-born Japanese 26 Prefix with meter or methylene 27 Tax lawyer’s find 28 Heel 29 7’1” former N.B.A. star 30 Feminine suffix 31 Yelled initially? 34 Nursery noise 36 Empty 37 26 of the 44 U.S. presidents: Abbr. 38 Instruction part 40 Beach site, maybe 42 It might be skipped 44 So-so formal dance? 46 Went far too slowly during the 10K? 54 State symbols of North Dakota and Massachusetts 55 Leader who said “All reactionaries are paper tigers” 56 Slight 57 “Use the Force, ___”

4

24

27

11

12

13

14

21

22

25

26

28

30

31 34 38

35

39

40

33

36

37

41

42

45

46

54

55

56

58

59 63

60

64

47

48

77

83

78

61 66

79

67

80

88 94

51

52

53

73

74

75

104

105

106

68

81

82

85

93

50

72

87 92

18

62

84

91

17

57

71

76

16

43

49

65

70

15

29

32

44

69

10

95

86

89

90

96

97

98

99

107

108

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

118

119

120

121

70 Hi-tech organizer 74 Sonoma neighbor 75 Metric wts. 77 Vast, in verse 78 Vietnam’s ___ Dinh Diem 79 “What ___?” 80 Towel 82 Reach at a lower level 84 Emoticon, e.g. 86 See 102-Down

SOLUTION ON PAGE C4

100

89 “___ tu” (Verdi aria) 91 Words following see, hear and speak 92 1972 Best Actor nominee for “The Ruling Class” 93 Winning length in a horse race 94 Finally 95 Side in a pickup game

101

102

109

96 Minute 97 Swiss quarters?

103 110

102 With 86-Down, what Washington purportedly could not do

98 Confederate general 104 Boors who won at Chickamauga 105 Banks who was known as Mr. Cub 99 Noted 1991 Harvard Law grad 106 Late bloomer 100 Supplied, as data 101 Slot machine symbols, often

110 Some notebook screens, for short 113 Fourth notes


C4

PeninsulaNorthwest Briefly . . .

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Power company uses solar rebates Peninsula Daily News

“Using group purchasing, we save money on equipment, and by focusing on one geographic area, we install more solar systems than we normally would. We pass those savings back to our customers.”

SEQUIM — Port Townsend-based solar installation company Power Trip Energy Corp. has started a group solar purchasing program available to Clallam PUD customers located east of the city of Port Angeles. The program is called Solarize Sequim and will include $300 to $700 per kilowatt cash rebates for participants. An orientation workshop for Solarize Sequim will be held at McComb Gardens Educational Center, 751 McComb Road, from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday. Following the workshop, a walking tour will be offered of nearby grid-tied solar PV systems. The entire event is free and open to the public. Grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems generate electricity from sunlight. This power is used on-site by the system owner and excess electricity is fed back to the utility, which results in lower monthly power bills.

Jeff Randall Power Trip Energy

Federal tax credits and annual production incentive payments are also available. “We just finished a similar program in east Jefferson County and Port Townsend,” said Jeff Randall of Power Trip Energy. “The program goal is to install more solar power while achieving the maximum savings possible. “Using group purchasing, we save money on equipment, and by focusing on one geographic area, we install more solar systems than we normally would,” Randall said. “We pass those savings back to our customers.” Power Trip Energy equipped 17 Port Townsend and Jefferson County homes

Solution to Puzzle on C3 A M B L E

C R O O N

S F A E L Z E S P O D B A

B R A G G

N O E V I L

E A S X S M X S C O O P H O N E C W A H T E P I R B A M S M E P I S W I N L A T O R E T T I N D O O S E R T T O M O R G O I R L D A E E M

C A R L A

A R E E L

C L A N G

A L O O F

N F G O O R O B A M A

F E D I N

P T S

C A N R A L E D I N A P E W A S L N I O R T S E T I E L R D E A T L A S T

S H I R T S

T E E N S Y

O R I S O N

R E S C U E

A T E A T

L E I L A T A R O P L K E D I E N D E R C E H E F E N L I L A D E I N R F O U Y E S T O R C F I F T H F R E A F U L L A I L E S T A T

N O T O F T E N

O P E N I T

A R T E R Y

H A R A S S

S H A L T

A L C O C E C S L T I O E O P L T C O D S

R U B S I T I N

U N K E R A N K A G P S A

L O U T S

E R N I E

A S T E R

with solar PV systems earlier this year through Solarize Port Townsend. A community solar project that will be installed at the Jefferson International Airport later this summer will bring the total amount of power installed through the program to 83 kilowatts. Each participant in the Solarize Port Townsend received a rebate of $700 per kilowatt. The average system size was 3 to 4 kilowatts, and the average rebate received by homeowners about $2,600. Randall thinks Clallam County residents might exceed these numbers. “Last year, most of our solar PV installations occurred in the Sequim area. I expect the response to Solarize Sequim will be strong,” said Randall.

Free dental appointments available

50-minute educational workshop to actively The Oregon Shadow Theater will perform “Puss engage scouts in the troop and their parents to learn and Boots” in Sequim and about money and the valPort Angeles on Wednesues that influence money day. choices. Performances will be SEQUIM — The Wash“Parents, Teens and held at the Sequim High ington Dental Service Money Matters” will be School auditorium, 601 N. Foundation SmileMobile Sequim Ave., at 10:30 a.m. held at the United Methodwill visit the Sequim Boys ist Church, 100 S. Blake and at the Port Angeles & Girls Club, 400 W. Fir Ave, at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., from Monday to Friday, St., at 3 p.m. The workshop will be Aug. 12. The ethnic diversity and presented by Stephen C. The SmileMobile will be rich musical traditions of Moser and Lisa H. Pierson providing screening exami- New Orleans and the Loui- with Thrivent Financial for nations from 12:45 p.m. to siana bayous are the back- Lutherans in Sequim. 4 p.m. Monday; 8:45 a.m. to ground for Oregon Shadow Parents and scouts 4 p.m. Tuesday and   Theatre’s adaptation of this attending this workshop will increase their underclassic French fairy tale. 8:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. standing of stewardship, Seating is limited for Wednesday. learn how to make intenthe Port Angeles perforFollow-up treatment mance. tional choices about sharappointments will be Passes will be handed ing, saving and spending scheduled on a space-available basis for the duration out in the library on a first- money and talk about come, first-served basis. money and values in their of the stay. The Oregon Shadow family. Children from birth Theatre’s appearances are “Communicating with through high school with presented as part of “One teens and pre-teens can be limited access to dental World, Many Stories,” the a difficult task, especially care can schedule appoint- North Olympic Library when it is about money ments by phoning the Boys System’s annual summer and the responsibility asso& Girls Club at 360-683reading program for young ciated with it,” said Moser. 8095. people of all ages, which “This workshop facilitates Medicaid and sliding runs through Saturday, the understanding and scale payments will be Aug. 6, at all four NOLS communication of money accepted as reimbursement libraries: Port Angeles, between parents and their Sequim, Clallam Bay and for services. sons in a relaxed and Forks. The SmileMobile is enjoyable atmosphere.” For more information, staffed by a clinic manager, For information about phone 360-417-8502, visit dentist and dental assishosting a workshop for a tant and teams of local vol- www.nols.org or email group, phone the local unteer dental professionals kids@nols.org. office of Thrivent Financial at 360-681-8882 or email in each community it visits. Teen money stephen.moser@thrivent. com. SEQUIM — Boy Scout Troop 90 will host a Peninsula Daily News

n  Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176)

“Cars 2” (G) “Captain America: The First Avenger” (PG-13) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG13) “Larry Crowne” (PG-13) “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” (PG-13)

n  The Rose Theatre,

n  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (PG-13)

n  Lincoln Theater, Port Angeles (360-457-7997)

n  Wheel-In Motor Movie,

“Friends With Benefits” (R) “Horrible Bosses” (R) “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides” (PG-13) “Winnie the Pooh” (G)

“Transformers: Dark of the Moon” (PG-13) “Priest” (PG-13)

Port Townsend (360-3850859)

ANTIQUE/ESTATE Sale: With numerous unique and very rare treasures priced at $5-$500. Jewelry from ‘20s-’30s and tables from ‘50s-’60s (soda fountain table), life size Elvis Statue/ Elvis velvet. Yamaha PSR7000 keyboard. Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 290 W. Washington, (3rd and Washington). Big Neighborhood Garage SALE: Fri.Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m., take O’BRIEN RD. (across Hwy. 101 from State Patrol Office) exit off Hwy. 101 to Hidden Valley Rd. Multiple homes participating. Bow Flex Ultimate. With accessories, $350. I live in Sequim, Alan at: 702-328-7311 CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. COMMUNITY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m. 32 Buck Loop Rd and neighboring homes. Take Panorama Blvd., off E. Sequim Bay Rd. 21’ Sabercraft boat, crab pots and puller, large smoker, 6,500 watt generator, air compressor, pressure washer, fishing gear, tools and large construction toolbox, lawn furniture and much more. Other: sofa, oak bar stools. CRAFT Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m., 2034 E. 3rd Ave., Gales Addition. Homemade crafts, come and see what we have!

EVERYTHING Construction materials, lights, electrical, household, retail business leftovers, solid wood furniture, much more. Sat., 9-5 p.m., look for signs on Barr Rd. and Old Olympic Hwy. 360-457-7222 FERRET: White with black markings, includes cage and accessories. $100. 681-8718 FORECLOSURE/ DIVORCE Sale: Sat. 9-3, Sun. 12-3, 332 Dungeness Meadows. Everything must go. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 10-3 p.m., 902 E. Fir St. Household items, tools, collectible stamp, coins and baseball cards, jewelry, fishing gear, 13 hp key start motor. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-5 p.m., 63 Wall St., bottom of Deer Park Rd. Lane cedar chest, entertainment center, kids items, household items. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 22 Mtn. View Dr., Old Dungeness off E. Anderson Rd. Misc. items from furniture to automotive and books. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-1 p.m., 314 Reservoir Rd. Household items, clothes, tools, garden tractors, etc.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat. 9-4 p.m., Sun. noon-4, 33 Peterson Rd., off Lewis Rd. Lots of great items, vintage/collectibles, Hallmark, household, kitchen, linens, glass, pottery, china, crystal, Corning, Lenox, furniture, tea cart, cabinets, chairs, books, mags, needlework, puzzles and lots more. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m. 3310 Edge Wood Dr. No early birds please! All kinds of furniture, stereo’s, computers, TVs, GPS’, outdoors stuff. There’s something for everyone! A must see! HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. St. Herman of Alaska Church, 1407 30th St., P.T. Furniture, household items, book, clothing, toys, and much, much more! Lab/Husky mix. Characteristics: great listener, respectful, love property so I can run. Call: 360-477-7364

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN FT for exp. tech. $12/hr + benefits. 408 W. Washington Sequim 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-?, 3601 Edgewood Dr.

MOVING Sale: Fri. 104, Sat. 8-4, 46 Harmony Ln., off Barr Rd. Furniture, Christmas items and too many other things to list. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., no earlies, 3257 Old Olympic Hwy. Tools, collectibles, housewares, pressure washer, yard art, kids toys and clothing, Formica counter tops and material, some car stuff, ‘67’69 Camareo parts, MULTI-FAMILY Sale Indoor. Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. 903 W 8th St. All GREAT stuff: clothes for all, children baby stuff, books, lots of household goods, furniture and hobby supplies. MULTI-FAMILY Sale. Fri.-Sat., July 29th and 30th, 8-4 p.m. 1206 Rook Drive (up Race on left.) First garage sale in over 15 years. Lots of good quality items furniture, home-school books and supplies, art supplies, clothes, electronics, and plenty of guys stuff too! Come on out and find a treasure! MUZZLELOADER Knight Wolverine model 209, .50 cal., with Williams peep sight. Lots of bullets, powder caps, includes speed loaders, cappers and cleaning supplies. $350/all. 457-8227. NEIGHBORHOOD Sale: Fri., 8-4 p.m., follow signs from Chimacum Rd. and Elkins Rd., left into Port Hadlock Heights. NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., Forrest Ave. and Columbus Ave. Something for everyone. PORK: Grain fed, $2.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3198.

O/B: Honda 15 hp, long shaft, less than 3 hrs. in freshwater only. $2,000. 457-8254

OPEN HOUSE Sun., 12-4, 1421 W. 6th St. 3 Br., 2 bath. $187,500. 477-5363. POOL TABLE Brunswick, with extras. You haul. $400/obo. 460-4408. PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION Has opportunities for entry level workers. Work is classified as heavy for strength requirements. Application and skills proficiency must be completed at the Work Source Office in Port Hadlock or Port Angeles first. Qualified applicants will be required to pass drug/alcohol and physical capacities test. PRE-MOVING Sale: Fri. & Sun. (no Saturday), 9-3 p.m., 151 W. Deytona, off Sequim Ave. Lots of men’s tools, household, furniture, 30 yrs. accumulation. PUPS: AKC Golden Retrievers. 1st shots, wormed, quality. Experienced reputable breeder. Father on site. 2 females, $500 each. 360-582-3181 or 360-912-2302 SALE: Sat., July 30, 82 p.m. 52 Benson Crest Drive, off Benson Rd. Items for dog owners, stack W/D, antique hutch, ATV rims, RCBS set, retail racks, grid panels, furniture, downriggers, antique outboard motor, spotting scope, lots of misc. SEQUIM: Fully furnished, 2 Br., 2 ba, turnkey ready, 2 car garage on Sunland Golf Course Fairway. Sorry, no smoking/ pets. $1,250 mo. 681-7975 SUNLAND: 3 Br., 2 ba, elegant! John L Scott-RE 457-8593.

SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 SHIH-TZU: Puppies. 2 Females, black and brown, cute and fluffy. 1st shots, dewormed. $595 ea. 477-8382 SIZZLING SUMMER SALE Sat., 9-3 p.m. Benefit: The Answer for Youth Furniture, Household, Plants, Crafts, Bake Sale. First Presbyterian Church 139 West 8th St. WANTED: Quality regulation pool table. Sterling flatwear set, consider incomplete, with or without serving pieces. 452-8092 YARD Sale: Fri., Sat., 8-2:00 p.m. 1012 W. 9th St. Annual family yard sale. Early birds pay double! Bargains galore! Furniture and more. Rain cancels. Refreshments available for purchase. YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., 471 Joyce Piedmont Rd., 1/4 mile from Joyce School, watch for signs. Oh come on out, it’s a nice drive and it’s the weekend! YARD Sale: Sat., 8noon, 1402 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Stove, vacuum cleaners, corner pine china hutch, PSE compound bow, Peavy Classic 50 amp and aux speakers, books, teaching material, and small items. YEARLY SALE Come One... Come All! Sat., 8:30-3 p.m., 1541 Monroe Rd. Brand new stroller and gently used car seat, tons of baby items, household items, furniture, clothes. Way too much to list!

http://tinyurl.com/pdnthings . . . or via the QR code above for smartphones or tablets. Submitting items of events open to the public is easy and free: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Things to Do” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521.

23

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

23

Lost and Found

FOUND: Dogs. 2 breeder boxers, 1 Brindle, 1 white with dapple gray, both female, between 8th St. bridges, P.A. 670-1188 FOUND: License plate, No. 1532-TR. Looks like boat or camper plate, on Hwy 113 by Beaver Lake, Sappho, on 718. 360-327-3353. LOST: Cat. Black and white tuxedo, neutered male. Declawed with 4 white feet. “Owen” lost on W. 14th and Samara Dr., PA. Reward. 452-3670, 461-7882 LOST: Cat. Orange/ white male, not neutered, might be near Race St. or between bridges on 8th St., P.A. $100 reward. Please call 504-2614 if found. LOST: Cat. Short hair, gray/orange marbled, half a tail, shy. Thurs., July 21st, near IGS off Hwy 101, P.A., Please call 503-709-9561

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

Lost and Found

FOUND: Bicycle odometer. O and 12th St., P.A. 417-2194. LOST: Cycling glove. For right hand, P.A. area. 460-3578. LOST: Diamond willow walking stick. Sentimentally valuable. Please call 452-7702 LOST: Diaper bag. Light blue and brown, along road between Baker St. and Ennis Creek in Gales Addition and Thurman Supply, P.A. Desperately need back! REWARD. 452-9693, 461-6506 LOST: Gold Charm. With two lovebirds with jade, Sat., 07/23, at Sequim Costco. Reward. 360-683-4455 LOST: Keys. Sat., in Blue Top Cab or downtown P.A. 461-6713 LOST: Nintendo DS. Crimson color, near Baskin Robbins or Walmart, P.A. 360-670-3463 LOST: Silver earring. At/near Wine on the Waterfront, P.A., on 7/22/2011. Pam at 461-3104

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

31

Help Wanted

COOK-HOST Olympic Park Institute. Benefits, closes July 29. For info, email: olympicfacility@nature bridge.org EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT For the Executive Director of the Peninsula Housing Authority. Performs variety of responsible, confidential, and complex administrative, technical, programmatic and secretarial duties to support the agency’s ED and Board of Commissioners. Position description and employment application can be obtained at our website: peninsulapha.org or by calling 360-4527631, ext. 10. Please submit employment application, resume and cover letter to Executive Director, 2603 S. Francis Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Position open until filled. PHA is an equal opportunity employer. Health Center Manager Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest Seeking an exceptional Manager for Port Angeles/ Sequim/Forks Health Centers! Oversees all h/c operations; ensures excellent customer service & quality reproductive h/c & family planning services. 3-5 exp; EMR skills +. EOE www.ppgnw.org/job s

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst.

Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11. Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim.

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you.

AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

(compare at www.medicare.gov)

175127326

Electric Street Bike Brand new, never ridden, 24 mile range, up to 22 mph. Cost $1,300. Sell for $950. 460-9517

ESTATE/MULTIFAMILY YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-?, 1136 W. 8th St., in alley. Tools, furniture, 2 leather recliners, beds, appliances, bikes, canning supplies. Free stuff. New bike raffle. No early birds.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 282 Dungeness Meadows. Misc., antiques, collectibles.

MALE Sale: Fri., 8noon, 590 KitchenDick Rd. Tools, fishing equipment, tent, saddle, and some household, nearly new Jadite hobnail tumbler. No junk. No earlies.

The daily Things to Do calendar, the North Olympic Peninsula’s most comprehensive listing of public events of all kinds updated daily, appears exclusively online at . . .

“Buck” (PG) “Super 8” (PG-13) “The Trip” (R)

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S ! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-? 1018 Flores St., end of W. 10th St. Household items, boy toddler toys and clothes, ladies clothes, and more!

Things to Do online

Port Townsend (360-3851089)

SNEAK A PEEK ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m, 616 N. 7th Ave. Full house and garage. Refrigerator, pool table, antiques, mid century china cabinet, dining set, waterfall bedroom set, grandmother clock, sofa, love seat, end tables, dinnerware, sewing machine, antique dolls, silverware Onita stainless, collectibles, much more

‘Puss and Boots’

Now Showing

ANNUAL ELKS GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m. 143 Port Williams Rd Big Sale! Furniture, household, clothing, electronics, appliances, Christmas items, Barbie dolls, Beanie Babies, yard and much more. Food is available!

Peninsula Daily News


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 Out of the picture 2 Start up after a fire, say 3 Dumbbells 4 Before 5 Tip for a writer? 6 __ gratiam habeamus: Kentucky’s Latin state motto

31

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840. LOG TRUCK DRIVER Experienced, mmediate opening. 360-417-8022

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN FT for exp. tech. $12/hr + benefits. 408 W. Washington Sequim 360-683-7047 office@ discoverymc.com

Make a Difference Join a special team of people who make a real difference in the lives of seniors. We provide non-medical companionship and help in their homes. Flexible day, evening and weekend shifts available. Home Instead Senior Care, Sequim 360-681-2511 NEW CAREER? If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding new career, we are in need of a highly self-motivated, goal driven, honest, dependable, professional sales person. We offer a great compensation plan, with 401K, medical, dental, and training. Send resume to: sales@ priceford.com NEWSTAND COIN COLLECTOR Part-time weekend work. Must be able to pass a background check. Contact Bonnie Meehan at bonnie.meehan@ peninsuladailynews. com or send your resume to Peninsula Daily News ATTN: Bonnie Meehan, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

PORT TOWNSEND PAPER CORPORATION Has opportunities for entry level workers. Work is classified as heavy for strength requirements. Application and skills proficiency must be completed at the Work Source Office in Port Hadlock or Port Angeles first. Qualified applicants will be required to pass drug/alcohol and physical capacities test.

31

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. THE KALAHARI DESERT Solution: 10 letters

A F A U N A K S S E I C E P S By John Dunn

7/28/11

7 Boehner’s predecessor 8 Plays Simon says with 9 Harley outings 10 Got fed up? 11 Follow 12 Texting exclamation 13 Cancels (out) 17 Like this answer’s position, and what can follow the starts of 16-, 24/51-, 38-, 60and 69/1-Across 18 Macabre master 22 Tepid response to “How’s this?” 23 Tower (over) 25 Home of Nationals pitcher Chien-Ming Wang 26 Try to convince 27 PC key 28 Nautical spine 30 Passbook ID 32 Sonoran Desert resort city 35 Plot device? 37 Work wk. start 38 Prefix with -zoic 39 “The Last King of Help Wanted

OlympusNet Cust Support needed. ISP experience helpful. Work from home. Must be organized and selfdisciplined. See: http://support.olymp us.net/employment Reliable/customer service oriented/ motivated with flex schedule. Restaurant and/or retail exp req. Must be 21+. Resumes in person to Good to Go Grocery.

RN/Emergency Department 32 hours week, 311:30pm shift. Must have previous experience and ACLS, PALS, or ENPC preferred. Great pay and benefits! An RN with five years experience would receive $30.52 hr plus $2.75 hr evening differential and $4.00 weekend differential. Apply: nbuckner@olympic medical.org or fax 360 417 7307. EOE. ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Social quarters manager position open: Applications available at Port Angeles Moose Lodge, 809 S. Pine St., PA. Resumes a plus. Please return applications by Aug. 15, 2011. WAIT STAFF: Experienced. Apply in person at Dockside Grill in John Wayne Marina, Sequim. No phone calls please.

34

C5

Work Wanted

ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. Ground Control Lawn Care. Mowing, trimming, mulch, and more. Reasonable rates, great service! Call for free estimates. 360-797-5782 HAPPYDAY CLEANING. For all your cleaning needs Residential, Commercial, Move-out’s, Movein’s, R.V.’s, Call for a free estimate. 360-808-3017 I am a licensed nurse, offering child care in my loving Christian home. Call for info. 457-4185 LAWN & YARD CARE. Mowing, weeding, hedge trimming and landscape maintenance. Tom at 452-3229

34

R U E A W H S I D N I T C G O

D I R A S T B P T U A I U O I

© 2011 Universal Uclick

A T N U U L R E V I R S O H L

K O B N E E T S D F A L L T I

S M R O T S W O A E A G O R S

S D D A T O G N L E E R F A S

www.wonderword.com

A H E R B S R I P M T T L W O

R G S S R E D Y E R E U I N T R A H E T E P E K T L O E O B S ҹ E S I ҹ G L O ҹ G A A S N R R ҹ D R G G O R A E C A M E F S E M

H O R N E D M E L O N I N L I

S N A M I B I A N A W S T O B

7/28

Join us on Facebook

Antelope, Area, Arid, Arrows, Birds, Botswana, Bows, Bushes, Camel, Dogs, Dry, Edible, Eggs, Eland, Fall, Fauna, Flora, Fossil, Fruit, Game, Gemsbok, Grass, Great, Herbs, Horned, Hunt, Hut, Hyenas, Kiwano, Kudu, Large, Leopard, Lions, Melon, Namibia, Nuts, Rain, Reptile, River, Room, Sand, Semi, Southern Africa, Species, Steenbok, Storm, Tortoise, Trees, Warthog Yesterday’s Answer: Treatment

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

RERBY ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ENSSE (c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Scotland” tyrant 40 Lethargic 41 Skelton persona Kadiddlehopper 46 Not of the cloth 48 Standoffish one 49 Like Care Bears 50 “Avatar” extras 52 Ready and willing to do 54 Like a stick-inthe-mud 57 ’80s tennis

Work Wanted

Professional Window Washing: 20 years experience in window washing, weatherization, repair and replacement. See my online add at Peninsula Marketplace. Call Jack for an estimate at 360-201-6409.

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Y R O O M I E U D T N U H A N

Homes

$189,900 3 bed /2 bath, 1 story home, 1,440 sq.ft on corner lot. Enjoy nature from your walkout deck. 60 Stratus Loop, Fair Weather Sub, near Red Caboose B&B in Sequim. All appliances included, lots of upgrades. (360)797-4200 to schedule showing. 2 1/2% to Realtors.

51

Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1096 sq. ft on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertops. Peek a boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $199,000 360-460-7503 AMAZING VIEWS Open living spaces, great kitchen with propane fireplace and cook stove, full deck and fully fenced yard, 800 sf attached garage, RV parking and hookup, easy care landscaping. $349,900 ML201216/260629 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEACHFRONT TOWNHOME No bank waterfront in the Resort of Port Ludlow. Finished with Maple cabinetry, granite tile counters, Bosch stainless appliances and hard wood. 2 Br. plus den, propane fireplace in living room and master Br. $599,950. ML232465 Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow BEAUTIFUL DIAMOND POINT Dining area with coffered ceiling and breakfast nook with partial salt water view. Kitchen with large granite tile counter and walk-in pantry. Energy efficient heating/cooling pump. Built in cabinets throughout. 28” deep garage (220 wiring), room for storage racks. Includes beach rights and close to the air strip. $359,000. ML261234. Carol Dana 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: $210,000. Beautiful 1,500 sqft Water View Home in the Mount Angeles area! The backyard is beautifully landscaped with a rock wall border and apple trees and a fence. Visit: peninsuladailynews.com for more photos. Home is located at 1122 Olympus Ave. in Port Angeles. Call Scott at 477-9266 or email adamssoft@gmail.co m

Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

7/28/11

great Mandlikova 59 New Testament figure 60 Sticker stat 61 Shoe spec 62 Coastal raptor 63 Prufrock poet’s monogram 64 Cable sta. for vintage films 65 “Gotcha!”

FAFEWL

TNEJKU Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday’s

51

Homes

BEAUTIFUL GOLF COURSE HOME Situated on the signature 3rd hole of the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course. Gourmet kitchen with black granite counters and abundant cabinets. Cooking island with smooth top cooktop and telescoping exhaust fan. South facing windows overlooking the golf course. Sunroom just off living room with access to the deck and overlooking the water feature. $439,000 ML261294/238780 Patty Brueckner 460-6152 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY BEAUTIFUL HOME With views of Straits, Mt. Baker, and Victoria. Immaculate condition. Red birch custom cabinets, granite counters South American pear hardwood floors, carpet, and ceramic tile floors. Heated tile floor in master bath 3 Br., 2 full baths, 1/2 bath. Built in 2009, 2,133 sf. Heat pump, ceramic stove. 3 car garage, RV parking, irrigation rights. large laundry room. $389,000 ML260943/243145 Team Topper 670-9418 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY BEHOLD THE BEAUTY! Epic water and mountain views from this Dutch Colonial style home on 3.19 landscaped acres. This 3,680 sf home includes 3 Br., 3 baths, large great room with wood floors, impressive gourmet kitchen, bonus apartment for guests as well as a billiard/game room. So many possibilities. You have to see this home. It is incredible. $725,000. ML261417 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

By Owner: $799,900 NW style home and grounds. Close-in SWEEPING View 2006, 3 + Br., 3.5 bath, 4,050 sf, 13+ acres, large garage open beams, granite slab, fir doors, gated and paved. 212 Scenic View Ln - off Mt Pleasant Heights Lane. See www.peninsuladailynews.com ad for more. 360-461-5321.

#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic Peninsula www.peninsula dailynews.com

51

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

ACROSS 1 See 69-Across 7 Catch-22 14 Retro headgear 15 Quintessence 16 Breakfast option 18 Mountain Dew producer, informally 19 Slight winning margin 20 Not divided 21 Easy melodies 24 With 51-Across, Presley hit with “glue” in the lyrics 29 Mediterranean smoker 31 “__ Coy Mistress”: Andrew Marvell poem 33 Uffizi display 34 “Big Love” actress Sevigny 36 Asylum seeker 38 “A Clockwork Orange” star 42 Gushed on stage 43 Massey of “Rosalie” 44 Talk with one’s hands 45 Like days of yore 47 “Great shot!” 51 See 24-Across 53 Professional pitcher? 55 Edit out 56 Comedian Hartman 58 Excludes 60 End the chat room suspense, in a way 66 Chaplin’s tramp, e.g. 67 Boorish sorts 68 Non-specific 69 With 1-Across, spend time frivolously

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

Homes

CAREFREE LIVING Dominion Terrace condominium, immaculate 1 Br., 1 bath unit, upgraded flooring and appliances, cozy den addition, too many amenities to list. $94,500 ML172278/260131 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND CHARMING AND DELIGHTFUL Country home with manicured landscaping and private, community beach access. Living room with a large brick fireplace and post and beam type ceilings. This house has many updates including a new roof in 2007 and vinyl windows. Master suite with French doors opens out to a patio that is perfect for entertaining. $259,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-71466

Clean, well maintained 2 Br., 1 bath, 864 sf (plus garage), built in 1992. New lighting, oven, washer and dryer, interior and exterior paint, faucets, garbage disposal and more. Fully fenced in back yard, new deck built in 2010. Back patio with hot tub. $174,000/obo. Call Joe @ 360-460-9196 DOMINION TERRACE Remodeled home in 2006 with new flooring, counters, appliances, provides good views, and short walk to clubhouse. Enclosed storage in carport area, and off covered patio. Wood burning grill in patio area for outdoor cooking. HOA fees include electricity, water, sewer, trash, and cable. Pets restricted to 2 per household. $99,000. ML252350. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East EMBRACE SEQUIM CHARM 1,952 sf, 3 Br., 2 bath, living room, family room, den/office, utility/laundry. Kitchen with granite counter tops, oak cabinetry and formal dining. Fenced yard, fruit trees, outbuilding and mtn view. $250,000. ML250431. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

(Answers tomorrow) MINTS HAGGLE ANNUAL Jumbles: BATTY Answer: When Mr. and Mrs. Albacore had a baby, they played this — NAME THAT “TUNA”

51

Homes

FOUR SEASONS RANCH 4 Br., 1 3/4 bath rambler a short distance from the beach! Some of the recent updates in the home include the corian countertops, laminate flooring and vinyl windows. Open floor plan in living/ dinning/kitchen area. Southern exposure brings in lots of warm, bright light to home. Home has a great view of the 3rd and 4th hole of the golf course. $245,500 ML260973/131093 Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. FSBO: 11 Flemming Dr., Diamond Point. Well kept home on .5 acre. 2 Br., 1.5 bath, 980 sf Marlette with attached garage. This home features a new roof and deck, efficient Trane heat pump, wood stove, and new carpets. A must-see at $112,000. 683-0908 leave message. GREAT LOCATION Beautiful home located in Summer Breeze, a quiet planned unit community in downtown Sequim, with easy access to shopping. This home features new carpet, laminate flooring in the kitchen and dining areas, master suite with large walk in style shower and 2 walk in closets, private backyard with deck off the dining area. $239,000. ML260466 Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 HOME SWEET HOME Not only does this sturdy home enjoy 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, a 3 car carport and a central location, but it sits on a double lot that could be divided and built on. $209,000. ML261501 Kathy Brown 417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

HOOD CANAL SEAMOUNT ESTATES Brinnon: Nice 3 Br., 2 bath, private 1/2 acre, new carpet, paint and huge deck. Wood stove, newer roof. Large private community beach area with access to shellfish, adjacent lot avail. Priced to sell! $95,000. 460-2667. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

A PERFECT MINI FARM 9.78 acres of pasture and trees. 3 Br., 1 bath home, 3 car garage with workshop space and a barn. $245,000. ML251990/131093 Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ‘I’ IS FOR INCREDIBLE 4.5 acres of lovely level land, perched on the bluff above the breathtaking Strait of Juan de Fuca. Spot gray whales off the Dungeness Spit and bald eagles soaring overhead and roosting on their favorite trees. $349,000. ML261330. Jace Schmitz 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

Million $ View Front and Back, Spacious, Comfortable - Del Guzzi Built. 3340 sq ft., brick, 4 bedroom, 2 bath, a block west of the Golf Course Road, overlooks the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the North and the Olympic Mountains to the South. New heat pump, fresh appliances, 2 level, large backyard. 360-481-0856, 360-426-4730 or 360-701-1606 MOVE IN READY! New carpets, new vinyl, new paint! This 3 Br., 1.5 bath home is priced to sell. Must see inside to appreciate. $109,000. ML261277 Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY Nice 3 Br., 2 bath home on level acre. Conveniently located between P.A. and Sequim. Open floor plan. Custom cement path curves nicely around outside, and nice oversized two car detached garage. Mountain views. $156,000 ML260864/215282 Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

P.A.: This 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,380 sf home was beautifully remodeled on the inside in 2008. The kitchen features stainless steel appliances, granite counters, and maple cabinets. The open living area has bamboo hardwood floors and lots of windows. It is located near Shane Park. $187,500. Call at 477-5363

51

Homes

NEW LISTING Property sits in a great location north of Sequim, nice patio and barbecue covered. 2 Br., 1 bath. Very nice 2 car garage room for a bench. $152,460. ML261454 Dan Blevins 417-2805 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY PARKWOOD HOME 2 Br., 2 bath, 1,998 sf home, master Br. with sitting area, oversized 2 car garage with work bench, enclosed patio and landscaped yard, large corner lot. $115,000. ML108036/251593 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SALTWATER VIEWS Many potential uses for this delightful water and mountain view home and guest cottage. The historical character and central location create an excellent atmosphere for a B&B or a vacation rental. Or rent the guest home and live in the main house. The guest house has its own utilities. $239,900. ML260845. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SPACIOUS 4 Br., 2 bath home on a half acre within the city limits with city services. Large yard includes garden space, fenced area for pets, and access to seasonal stream. Mature and fruit trees on property provide privacy in a serene setting. Home has fireplaces in living room and family room, patio and wrap-around deck. Move-in ready. Lots of parking space for all your vehicles and RV hook ups. $226,500. ML261191/232244 Heidi Hansen 477-5322 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY SPACIOUS HOME AND WIDESPREAD VIEW Custom home in desirable Cresthaven, just below the college. Designed to make the views the backdrop to your home, you can see the views from the living/dining room and the kitchen. Generously sized rooms throughout from the kitchen to the master to the family room. Even has a private office. Come take a look at this fantastic home. $399,900. ML260205. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY


C6

Classified

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

175127798

LAWN/YARD WINDOW WASHING CARE LOG HOMES

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

www.LundFencing.com

Chad Lund

360-670-1350 360-670-1350 Lic#BOBDADT966K5

Pressure Washing Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss Prevention

360-681-7878 #BAURLH*023DJ

Larry’s Home Maintenance

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

Done Right Home Repair

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair

Residential and Commercial Excavating and General Contracting

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

(360) 683-8332

AIR DUCT CLEANING

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

Yard Service • Odd Jobs Hauling • Property Clean up Moving • Brush Removal Hedge Trimming Roof/Gutter Cleaning Tree Pruning Accepting New Contracts

• Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

ASBESTOS

Asbestos Inspections - Testing Surveys

& Leaky Roofs

D 457-5186

www.OlyPenAsbestos.com

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING Small Jobs A Specialty

Call NOW To Advertise

Contr#KENNER1951P8

Washers • Dryers • Refrigerators • Ranges

Design & Installation Maintenance & Renovation - Hard Scapes Custom Rockeries - Stone Terraces - Paths Patios - Irrigation - Lawn Restoration Top Soil - Bark - Compost - Landscape Boulders

SEALCOATING

PRESSURE WASHING

WINDOW CLEANING

TREE SERVICE

COMMERCIAL SEALCOATING

Pressure Washing

RS SCHMIDT ENTERPRISES

ANTHONY’S SERVICES

Striping • Crack Filling Parking Lots • Community Roads

360-871-6607

LANDSCAPING

Window Washing

PAINTING

. 35 yrse on th la u s in Pen

FREE Estimates

Visit our website www.dungenesslandscaper.com Certified Horticultural Specialist Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

GRAND OPENING At Our NEW Location! st

JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER contact@jkdirtworks.com

th

501 E. 1 Street • August 13 – 1-5pm

LIC

Gina stylist

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

ADVERTISE

DAILY FOR AS LITTLE AS

$90 FOR 4 WEEKS! RATES AND SIZES:

Missie stylist

Mikela stylist

417-8888

1 1 1 2 2 2

Mandy nail tech Bliss stylist 175127221

D DESIGN ESIGN S SCANNING CANNING F FILM ILM O OUTPUT UTPUT P PRINTING RINTING P PACKAGING ACKAGING M MEMENTOS EMENTOS

Tonni permanent cosmetics/ aesthetics

Call NOW To Advertise Here

#JKDIRKD942NG

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

Martia stylist

P PROFESSIONAL RScanning O F E SPriSntiIngO NAL S c a n n i n g & Printing Services Se r v i c e s

• Small Excavating • Brush Mower on Small Rubber Track Excavator • Utility Install & Lot Clearing • Spring & Storm Clean-up • Post Holes & Field Mowing • Help with Landscaping

945036615

Licensed, Bonded, Insured - DAVISP*926KZ

Free Estimates Plants • Design Construction Sprinkler Systems

681-0132 165124112

Owner: Steve Davis Over 25 Years Experience

HAIR DESIGN

175127220

(360) 457-8102

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

LIC#GUTTEA*950NS Bonded/Insured

360/460•9824

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle

Interiors, Exteriors, Drywall Repair Pressure Washing, Sandblasting New and Existing

165122599

452-3480

461-4609

Cockburn.INC

Residential • Commercial Industrial • Marine

DIRT WORK

CALL FOR ESTIMATE

Call Bryan or Mindy

Davis Painting

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Cont #ANTHOS*938K5

GUTTER CLEANING PRESSURE WASHING DEBRIS HAULING • CARPET CLEANING

360 Lic#buenavs90818

Landscapes by

(360) 460-0518

anthonystreetop@gmail.com

165125038

Moss Prevention

FREE S ATE ESTIM

WINDOW CLEANING

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

Guaranteed Workmanship • SEALCAM953J1 • 23+ years experience

SPECIALIZING IN TREES

165122885

683-8328

LANDSCAPING

Driveway - Drainage Systems - Clearing Brushing - Demolition - Site Prep - Park Outs Rock Walls - Concrete Removal - Stump & Brush Removal - Brush Hog - Field Mowing Crushed Rock - Fill Dirt

175125821

035075404

Mole Control

EXCAVATING

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

025073138

MOLE/PRUNING

72289323

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

452-9995

0A5100969

G

ARLAN ROOFING

360

75289698

155120082

Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

360-452-2054 Kenneth Reandeau, Inc.

Full 6 Month Warranty

• Fences • Decks • Small Jobs ok • Quick, Reliable

COLUMC*955KD

No job to small! Serving Diamond Point, Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Quality roofing at a reasonable price Honest & Reliable

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Reconditioned Appliances • Large Selection

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

WANTED: Wind Damaged

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC

914 S. Eunice St. PA • 457-9875

Quality Work

360-775-6678 • 360-452-9684

ROOFING

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

Columbus Construction

5582-0384 82-0384

WINDOW CLEANING

APPLIANCES

ami’s JJami’s

86313195

Licensed Cont#FOXPAP*981JN

155122063

457-6582 808-0439

360452-8435 or 1-800826-7714

REPAIR/REMODEL

155119356

In sid e , O u tsid e , A nysid e

Reg#FINIST*932D0 125111256

Painting & Pressure Washing

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

SERVICES PROPERTY P ROPERTY MAINTENANCE MAINTENANCE

Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Lic#DONERRH943NA

Call NOW To Advertise

Locally Operated for 24 years Contractor # GEORGED098NR

LARRYHM016J8

78289849

FOX PAINTING

Call NOW To Advertise

Glen Spear, Owner

Family operated and serving the entire Olympic Peninsula since 1956

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

115108502

PAINTING

Windows & Doors Concrete

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right

s Handyman Services JPSHAHS92BE

Remodels Handicap Access Painting

Septic Systems • Underground Utilities Roads • Driveways • Rock Retaining Walls Land Clearing • Building Site Prep Building Demolitions

Larry Muckley

PAINTING

360-460-6176 Decks & Fences

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

John Pruss 360 808-6844

(360)

Home & Bus.

461-4609

360 Lic#buenavs90818

“Need something fixed?” Call Me!

(360)

24 yrs. experience

Paul Baur, owner

Call Bryan or Mindy

HANDYMAN

JP

• Building All Types • Specializing in Hand-crafted Full Scribe • Shells or Turn Key

135114329

#LUNDFF*962K7

+e w W We will ill m meet e e t oorr bbeat eat m most o s t eestimates stimates

93313234

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

Baur Log Homes

Window Washing

Small jobs is what I do!

HOME REPAIR

155121476

ob’s TTractor ractor SService er vice BBob’s

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

9C5066307

Lund Fencing

LAWN CARE

115105618

TRACTOR

085092331

FENCING

COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN COLUMN

X X X X X X

1” 2” 3” 1” 2” 3”

$100 $130 $160 $130 $190 $250

DEADLINE: TUESDAYS AT NOON

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

51

Homes

CREEK FRONT LOT Full sun. 102 S. Maple Lane, 4 Seasons Park. Has septic and rented trailer. $60,000. 457-3089. Rare Lake Sutherland Property. Two homes on sunny side of lake with privacy! Moving out of state,priced to sell! $375,000. 360-461-3986 STELLAR SUNRISES AND SUNSETS From this one level water and mtn view 3 Br., 2 bath home. Enjoy watching the ships, the lights of Victoria and the ever changing sky from the large picture windows in the great room. Hardwood floors, updated kitchen and bathrooms, new windows and doors. $248,000 ML260755/210025 Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. STYLISH AND SOPHISTICATED NW Contemporary style with water view. Architecture optimizes space and dramatic windows/ skylights infuse home with natural light. Large family room, kitchen with large bar/island and walk-in pantry. $385,000. ML260341. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East SUNLAND ELEGANCE 3 Br., 2.5 bath on 43 acre lot. Master suite opens to nice yard, covered tile patio and gazebo, 3 car garage with 1,296 sf, finished loft + RV bay and shop. $595,000. ML93595/251378 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND SUNLAND HOME On 3rd Fairway, just remodeled, brand new kitchen including granite, tile and all new appliances, 3 Br., 2.5 ba, lg. rec room with picture windows as well as a 330 sf sunroom both facing the course, heat pump, beautiful low maintenance landscaping. $324,900. 477-8311. TASTEFULLY UPDATED Dungeness Meadows home with Brazilian cherry floors in the main areas and tile in the master bath. Beautiful woodburning fireplace with heatolator. Laundry/mud room has extra storage. Fully landscaped with garden area, mature plantings and fruit trees. Property abuts the dyke leading to the Dungeness River. Community pool and golf course for residents. $238,400. ML261371. Lin Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East TIME TO THINK ABOUT FUN IN THE SUN Or even fun in the rain! If you have a boat slip at Maple Grove, which happens to come with a great building lot, then you’ll be set for sailin’ ‘round the lake and watch your house be built before your very eyes! Grab it and get with it. $70,000. ML252442. Beep Adams 417-2794 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY WARM FEEL Great 3 Br., 2 bath home on 1.16 acres close to the game farm. Terrific mountain views, lots of fruit trees in the yard, plus detached two car garage with workshop. Start your own mini-farm. $165,000. ML261444. Jo Cummins Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 WONDERFUL COUNTRY SETTING 5 car garage with shop on 5 acres. Borders state land with trails and wildlife. 4 Br., 3 1/2 bath, 3,059 sf. Living room w/propane fireplace, TV room, light and open kitchen w/eating nook. Formal dining room w/tray ceiling, heat pump. Located at the end of a paved quiet lane. Community beach. $575,000. ML260969. Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

52

52

Manufactured Homes

SUPER GOOD CENTS! Affordable light and bright home in Port Angeles mobile home park. New countertops, hot water heater and entry doors. Remodeled with porcelain sinks, carpets and laminate flooring. Landscaped low maintenance lot. $54,000 ML261451/246908 Holly Coburn 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. USDA LOANS Low/medium income, 0 down, low interest rate, land/home pkgs Buy Rite Homes 360-681-0777

53

Open House

OPEN HOUSE Sun., 12-4, 1421 W. 6th St. 3 Br., 2 bath. $187,500. 477-5363.

54

Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. PORT ANGELES lot @ 222 W Park Ave Half acre+ CLOSE IN TOWN Water, Power, and Sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Pt. lot with water view, perc, water $69,000. Owner financing. Call 253-549-3345. LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT Why not build your dream. 4 lots to choose from. Some would have nice water views. Low impact development. $45,000 ML252458/163041 Harriet Reyenga 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

58

Commercial

CHEFLESS IN SEQUIM Make your culinary mark in this lavender infused cafe. Beautiful setting. Owner will consider longterm lease. $325,000. ML260473. Dewyn Roberts 452-1210 JACE The Real Estate Company

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

Accepting applications for studio and 1 Br. apts. at the Lee Plaza. Rent $400 to $450 mo., plus electric. Income limits apply. 457-7785.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br., unfurnished from $438480, 2 Br., $514-541, 3 Br., $685 + util. no smoke, pet maybe. 452-4258 COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., W/D, $575, $575 dep., no pets. 452-3423 P.A.: All utilities. $850 mo. 360-808-2568. P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., 1 bath, W/D. $700. 808-4972. P.A.: Water view 1 Br., just remodeled. $595. 206-200-7244. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113.

64

Houses

BRINNON: 2 Br. mobile home, quiet setting, near Senior Center. $300 mo. 360-796-4270 CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath. 1,400 sf, Nice fenced backyard, detached 1 car garage, all appliances, W/D. Fireplace, Family Room, No Smoking $1,100/ mo 1st, last and deposit. 360-461-7749 Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer near beach, utilities furnished. $600. 928-3006. EAST P.A.: Small 1 Br., trailer. $475 mo. 457-9844, 460-4968

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. 3 br 1 ba.........$700 3 br 1.5 ba......$800 3 br 1 ba.........$875 4 br 2 ba.......$1200 2/2 acreage...$1200 APT/4-DUPLEX P.A. 4 2 br 1 ba......$675 A 2 br 1 ba......$750 D 3 br 2 ba......$875 D 2 br 1.5 ba...$875 A 2/2 upscale.$1050

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com P.A.: 2 Br. $600, $600 deposit. No pets. References. 457-5847 P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, W/D, $700, util incl., 1st, last. 425-445-7850. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ pets. $600, last, dep. 452-1694 eves. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba, garage, no smoking. $1,100 mo., $1,100 security. 417-0153. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced yard, close to fairgrounds, no smoking. Pets ok. $1,100. 360-640-4438 P.A.: Charming 2 Br., yard, garden, quiet city living. $715. 805-245-0900 P.A.: East 1 Br., immaculate, appliances. $600 mo. 457-3614. PALO ALTO: Remod. cabin. 1 Br., loft, W/D $700. 360-683-4307. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: Fully furnished, 2 Br., 2 ba, turnkey ready, 2 car garage on Sunland Golf Course Fairway. Sorry, no smoking/ pets. $1,250 mo. 681-7975 SEQUIM: Studio. $500, utilities paid 683-4250 after 5 p.m SUNLAND: 3 Br., 2 ba, elegant! John L Scott-RE 457-8593. WEST P.A.: 2 Br. $825. No smoking/ pets. 452-6750. WEST P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba no smoke, sm pets ok. $750. 460-7963.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: 2 rooms for rent. Organic farm. $350, utilities. 452-4021. P.A.: Room $400 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408 Room with bathroom for rent nice quiet area 10 minutes from Sequim. $400/mo., +$200 deposit. Must have a job and references. 683-8792. ROOMMATE wanted: M/F, $400 mo. East PA. 808-4986. SEQUIM: Room for rent, bath, kitchen, no pets/smoking, close to town. $500, utilities paid. 683-4250 after 5 p.m. SEQUIM: Share home $400 plus utilites. 504-2344

68

Commercial Space

Boardwalk Square Sequim. Spaces for rent. 683-3256. Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737 PEABODY PLAZA Hard to find business space on Peabody St., 2 upstairs small space units soon available. Exc. 1 or 2 person office. $175 and $375 mo. Call 452-1232 ext. 11 PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

Houses

3 Br., 2 bath, newer home for rent in Sequim. $1,100/mo. 1 yr lease,w/1st mo rent & sec dep of $1,100 on signing. Ref's req'd. Scott: 360-388-8474 320 West 15th Street. $800/mth. 2 bedroom 1 bath, large laundry includes wshr/dryer, woodburning stove, no smokers, small pet possible, lst mths rent of $800 plus security deposit. 452-4933 to see. 506 1/2 H ST PA: 2 Br. $550, 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-3423. 904 E. 4th P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, gar., W/D, dishwasher, remodeled. $775 mo., 1st, last, dep. No smoking/ pets. 775-6739.

72

Furniture

DINING TABLE: 73” long 30” wide, blond finish with 4 chairs. Very nice set. $130. Two matching blond finish coffee tables one large $40, one small $30. 681-4429. DINING TABLE: Oak, 4 chairs. $150. 683-7896 HOUSE FULL OF FABULOUS FURNITURE Comfy overstuffed olive green sofa with large rolled arms, round wood feet, $350. Coordinating floral overstuffed chair, $200. Beige tapestry sofa with brass nail head trim, excellent, $400. Pair Queen Anne wingback chairs, wine colored fabric with wood claw feet, $125 ea. Vintage rocker, new upholstery, $125. Vintage upholstered footstool, $30. Vintage vanity stool, $10. HP all in one printer, scan, copy, works great, $25. Vintage vanity with mirror, $125. Antique wood smoke stand, copper lined, $40. Vintage 3 leg side table, $20. Vintage floral side chair, $125. Gold framed mirror, $20. Oval wood dining table with double pedestal base, 6 chairs and matching lighted hutch $500 for entire dining group. Two electric cherry wood fireplaces with remotes, $275 each. Gold framed mirror, hangs vertical or horizontal, $20. Half round wood/glass China cabinet showcase, $250. Regency Panorama P121 two sided see through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate, GREAT PRICE AT $1,750. Can email photos upon request. Susan 360-460-0575 HUTCH: Beautiful, oak, colonial style, 2 locking drawers with key, must see. $500/obo. 582-0988. MISC: 8’ leather sofa, like new. $750. 46” round real antique blonde oak table, $350. 379-9051. MISC: Waterfall design dresser with mirror, matching chest of drawers, $250. Maple dresser, $75. 1 maple end table, $30. Antique wooden twin bed frame, $50. 683-7896 TABLE LAMPS Several different ones to choose from. Matching sets for $25, or $15 each. 681-4429. TABLE: 5’ oak, (2) 18” leaves, great condition. $135. 582-3177

73

General Merchandise

AIR COMPRESSOR Like new, 6 hp, 60 gal, 125 max PSI. $600. 360-452-8224 BOOKS: 194 books, Louis L’Amour collection. $150/obo. 452-6524 BUNK BED SET Lower and upper, complete with mattresses and bunky boards, chifforobe with shelves, desk w/drawers and chair, all match, good cond., $625. 775-1035 CEDAR POSTS: (10) 8’, hand split, $22 ea. (4) corner posts, $25 ea. 457-7883. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

FIREWOOD: Log length, dump truck load delivered. Reasonable. 477-2635 GARAGE: Metal pole building, 24’x24’, you take down and haul. $2,500/obo. 452-2685 GARDEN TRACTOR 7.5/42, with dual grass catcher. $600. 452-8324

2 Br., all util. $750. $250 dep. 3 mi. west of Joyce, on bus line. 928-9705

Manufactured Homes

$79,900! 2 bedroom, 2 bath on 2 acres! 9 miles west of downtown Port Angeles. New double pane windows, pergo floors, metal roof newer dishwasher, stove and refrigerator included. L&I certified! This home is move in ready and bank financeable. Lovely old trees surround the property for privacy but land is cleared and parked out. $79,900 Freshwater Bay Rd, Port Angeles, WA. Please leave msg at 360-681-0765 or email pinkhands@hotmail.c om

64

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

DISHWASHER Whirlpool Quiet Partner II. $250. 582-0347 or 360-461-0780 MICROWAVE: Kenmore. Like new, large, 1,100 watt. $220. 582-0347, or 461-0780.

72

Furniture

BED: Twin sleigh bed, by Henredon. Beautifully carved, burl wood. Show piece never used. $295. 360-681-0187 360-301-9120

LUGGAGE: Samsonite luggage, two new sets (never used), dark red, black trim, 4 wheels, pull-up handles, 11”x21”x 29”, (paid $229 ea.), $200 ea./ obo. Two new matching carry-on bags, 17”x10”x 8”, handles, straps, (paid $89 ea.), $69 ea./ obo. 360-202-0928. MANTLE CLOCK High quality HowardMiller model 613-530 Atlantic, solid brass, crystal face (5.25”), Quartz, ships bell (or quiet), new (never used), paid $465 + $40 base, current EBay rice $279. $265/ obo. 360-202-0928. MISC: 1901 antique rope maker, $120. Fox string holder, $60. Antique shuttle, $85. Cast iron and vintage toys, $25$40. American Flyer train set with track, in original boxes, $150. 1925 Carbide headlamp, $25. Antique mirrored window, $60. 775-1035.

73

General Merchandise

MEDICAL MANLIFT Sunrise, lifts up to 400 lbs. Excellent condition. $1,000. 360-681-4191 MISC: 40 hp Mercury O/B motor, $350. 5,000 watt Coleman electric generator, $150. 683-9015. MISC: Antique oval picture frame, with raised glass, $85. Assorted pictures, $3-$45. Large wooden goose, $60. Nerf guns, $65 all with extra ammo belt. Bakgun, with cards, $25 firm. 775-1035. MISC: Computer desk $45. New bird cage, $30. Handmade rugs, $15-30. Chessie print, $50. Table lamp, $15. Vintage chair, $25 Go to NiceThings4Sale.com for descriptions, photos. 360-379-5724 MISC: Craftsman 6” cast iron jointer/planer on portable table 3/4 hp,115/230 volt, $125. Merchandise in Sequim. Cell 206-940-1849 MISC: Hardwood floor, 9x12 Brazilian hardwood, $275. Tile saw, $50. Bench sander, $50. 1/2” drill, $45. Cordless drill, $25. Comm’l fan, $65. Pole saw, $65. Tony Little Glider, $30. 775-1035. MISC: Lift chair, minor damage, $150/obo. Craftsman table saw, 10”, $150/ obo. 460-8709 MISC: New king/ queen bed spread, drapes, pillows, etc, new in box, $375. Area rug, beautiful, cust., quality, used 1 week, 12x14, $250. Sm. antique ladies desk and chair, $350. 775-1035 MISC: Whirlpool dishwasher, $150. Range hood with fan, $20. Stainless dbl. sink, $35. 683-5567. MISC: Yamaha trombone, with Pro-Tec case, $300. 12’ boat trailer, $250. 457-4931 PICTURE FRAME Antique oval picture frame. $80. 775-1035 POOL TABLE Brunswick, with extras. You haul. $400/obo. 460-4408.

PROPANE INSERT Regency Panorama P121 two sided see-through propane fireplace insert, enjoy heat and the view in two rooms at once, new in crate. GREAT PRICE! $1,750. 477-8826. SOCKEYE & KINGS Fresh, local. 360-963-2021

74

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

ELECTRONIC ORGAN Rogers, three rank, full auxiliary sound stops and full foot pedal board. Comes with 1 large speaker and smaller speaker. Full matching organ bench. Exc. cond. Asking $799. Good investment for smaller church family. 683-4200 leave msg. Piano tuning and repair. Gary Freel Piano Service. Since 1984. 360-775-5480.

76

Sporting Goods

BMX BIKE Redline Raid, 18” frame, red, great shape. $80. 477-2322 Bow Flex Ultimate. With accessories, $350. I live in Sequim, Alan at: 702-328-7311 FISHING REELS: Various left-handed reels. $25-$50. 452-2029 GOLF BALLS: Used Titleist Pro V 1, 20 dozen available, good shape, $15 dozen. 2,000 others, clean, 35¢ per ball. 360-912-1688 GOLF CLUBS: Left handed, Ping S-56 irons, used once, 2LW (11 clubs), Dynamic Gold stiff shaft, $1,200 retail. Sell for $650. 452-9228 KAYAK: 13’ America, with Werner paddles, vest. $425. 681-0994 MISC: Remington 7mm mag, 4 to 12 scope, with dyes, $550 with dyes. 3006 with Leopold scope, with dyes, $450. 457-8254. MUZZLELOADER Knight Wolverine model 209, .50 cal., with Williams peep sight. Lots of bullets, powder caps, includes speed loaders, cappers and cleaning supplies. $350/all. 457-8227.

RIFLE: French Lebel Model 1886 8mm Lebel rifle. $599/obo 760-702-7192

76

Sporting Goods

AR15: Armalite 5.56, $750. Extras available. 683-6934. TULA-TOZ .22 LR, made in U.S.S.R., exceptional condition, stellor bore with perfect rifling, great for small game hunting, 5 round magazine. $200. 4524158, leave message. WINCHESTER COLLECTION Models: 73, 44-40 cal; 92 cal 32 WCF; 94 30 cal WCF; 97 12 ga.; 37 12 ga; 12 12 ga; 90 22 long; 90 22 WRF; 07 351 auto. $6,200. 460-0314 9-5 p.m.

78A

Garage Sales Central P.A.

MULTI-FAMILY Sale. Fri.-Sat., July 29th and 30th, 8-4 p.m. 1206 Rook Drive (up Race on left.) First garage sale in over 15 years. Lots of good quality items furniture, home-school books and supplies, art supplies, clothes, electronics, and plenty of guys stuff too! Come on out and find a treasure! NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-3 p.m., Forrest Ave. and Columbus Ave. Something for everyone. SIZZLING SUMMER SALE Sat., 9-3 p.m. Benefit: The Answer for Youth Furniture, Household, Plants, Crafts, Bake Sale. First Presbyterian Church 139 West 8th St.

78B

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

ESTATE/MULTIFAMILY YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 9-?, 1136 W. 8th St., in alley. Tools, furniture, 2 leather recliners, beds, appliances, bikes, canning supplies. Free stuff. New bike raffle. No early birds. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 8-? 1018 Flores St., end of W. 10th St. Household items, boy toddler toys and clothes, ladies clothes, and more! GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m. 3310 Edge Wood Dr. No early birds please! All kinds of furniture, stereo’s, computers, TVs, GPS’, outdoors stuff. There’s something for everyone! A must see! GARAGE Sale: ThursFri.-Sat.-Sun., 8-6 p.m., Everything you need to remodel, top quality. Windows, doors, cabinets, sinks, shower, jet tubs, appliances, etc. 58432 Hwy. 112, watch for signs on Hwy. MOVING OUT SALE Stuff for every room in the house! Sat., 8 a.m.- 1 p.m, 824 W. 15th St. Furniture, dishes, clothes, lots of misc. MULTI-FAMILY Sale Indoor. Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. 903 W 8th St. All GREAT stuff: clothes for all, children baby stuff, books, lots of household goods, furniture and hobby supplies. MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-?, 3601 Edgewood Dr. SALE: Sat., July 30, 82 p.m. 52 Benson Crest Drive, off Benson Rd. Items for dog owners, stack W/D, antique hutch, ATV rims, RCBS set, retail racks, grid panels, furniture, downriggers, antique outboard motor, spotting scope, lots of misc. YARD Sale: Fri., Sat., 8-2:00 p.m. 1012 W. 9th St. Annual family yard sale. Early birds pay double! Bargains galore! Furniture and more. Rain cancels. Refreshments available for purchase. YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., 471 Joyce Piedmont Rd., 1/4 mile from Joyce School, watch for signs. Oh come on out, it’s a nice drive and it’s the weekend!

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

Big Neighborhood Garage SALE: Fri.Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m., take O’BRIEN RD. (across Hwy. 101 from State Patrol Office) exit off Hwy. 101 to Hidden Valley Rd. Multiple homes participating. CRAFT Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-3 p.m., 2034 E. 3rd Ave., Gales Addition. Homemade crafts, come and see what we have! EVERYTHING Construction materials, lights, electrical, household, retail business leftovers, solid wood furniture, much more. Sat., 9-5 p.m., look for signs on Barr Rd. and Old Olympic Hwy. 360-457-7222 GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat. 9-4 p.m., Sun. noon-4, 33 Peterson Rd., off Lewis Rd. Lots of great items, vintage/collectibles, Hallmark, household, kitchen, linens, glass, pottery, china, crystal, Corning, Lenox, furniture, tea cart, cabinets, chairs, books, mags, needlework, puzzles and lots more.

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 8-5 p.m., 63 Wall St., bottom of Deer Park Rd. Lane cedar chest, entertainment center, kids items, household items. MOVING Sale: Fri. 104, Sat. 8-4, 46 Harmony Ln., off Barr Rd. Furniture, Christmas items and too many other things to list. MT. PLEASANT GRANGE Indoor/Outdoor flea market/yard sale. 2432 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Sat., 9-2 p.m. Vendors call 670-9035 MULTI-FAMILY Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., no earlies, 3257 Old Olympic Hwy. Tools, collectibles, housewares, pressure washer, yard art, kids toys and clothing, Formica counter tops and material, some car stuff, ‘67’69 Camareo parts, YARD Sale: Sat., 8noon, 1402 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Stove, vacuum cleaners, corner pine china hutch, PSE compound bow, Peavy Classic 50 amp and aux speakers, books, teaching material, and small items.

79

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789

IN A BIND? We’re ready to buy. Gold, silver, cars, boats, ATVs, willing to look at almost anything. 24 hours a day. 360-912-1412. WANTED: Game pieces. Albertson’s “Sizzlin’ Summer Sweepstakes” Ticket # C112, C116, C143, C119, C120, C139, C140, C132, C135. Amount? 457-4577. WANTED: Quality regulation pool table. Sterling flatwear set, consider incomplete, with or without serving pieces. 452-8092 WANTED: USED LAPTOPS! Working or broken! We’ll even pick them up! All laptops we receive are wiped clean using military grade utilities preventing any data recovery. 775-2525. www.helpertek.com

81 82 83 84 85

78E

81

ANNUAL ELKS GARAGE SALE Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m. 143 Port Williams Rd Big Sale! Furniture, household, clothing, electronics, appliances, Christmas items, Barbie dolls, Beanie Babies, yard and much more. Food is available! ANTIQUE/ESTATE Sale: With numerous unique and very rare treasures priced at $5-$500. Jewelry from ‘20s-’30s and tables from ‘50s-’60s (soda fountain table), life size Elvis Statue/ Elvis velvet. Yamaha PSR7000 keyboard. Fri.-Sat.-Sun., 11 a.m.-3 p.m., 290 W. Washington, (3rd and Washington). CLOSING Sale: Thurs.-Fri.-Sat., 10-4 p.m., Munchkin’s, 166 E. Bell St. Everyting must go. Bookcases, counter, cash register, refrigerator, and more. COMMUNITY Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-4 p.m. 32 Buck Loop Rd and neighboring homes. Take Panorama Blvd., off E. Sequim Bay Rd. 21’ Sabercraft boat, crab pots and puller, large smoker, 6,500 watt generator, air compressor, pressure washer, fishing gear, tools and large construction toolbox, lawn furniture and much more. Other: sofa, oak bar stools. ESTATE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-2 p.m, 616 N. 7th Ave. Full house and garage. Refrigerator, pool table, antiques, mid century china cabinet, dining set, waterfall bedroom set, grandmother clock, sofa, love seat, end tables, dinnerware, sewing machine, antique dolls, silverware Onita stainless, collectibles, much more FORECLOSURE/ DIVORCE Sale: Sat. 9-3, Sun. 12-3, 332 Dungeness Meadows. Everything must go. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat., 9-4 p.m., 282 Dungeness Meadows. Misc., antiques, collectibles. GARAGE Sale: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 10-3 p.m., 902 E. Fir St. Household items, tools, collectible stamp, coins and baseball cards, jewelry, fishing gear, 13 hp key start motor. GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-1 p.m., 314 Reservoir Rd. Household items, clothes, tools, garden tractors, etc. GARAGE Sale: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 22 Mtn. View Dr., Old Dungeness off E. Anderson Rd. Misc. items from furniture to automotive and books. MALE Sale: Fri., 8noon, 590 KitchenDick Rd. Tools, fishing equipment, tent, saddle, and some household, nearly new Jadite hobnail tumbler. No junk. No earlies. PRE-MOVING Sale: Fri. & Sun. (no Saturday), 9-3 p.m., 151 W. Deytona, off Sequim Ave. Lots of men’s tools, household, furniture, 30 yrs. accumulation.

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

HUGE YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m. St. Herman of Alaska Church, 1407 30th St., P.T. Furniture, household items, book, clothing, toys, and much, much more! NEIGHBORHOOD Sale: Fri., 8-4 p.m., follow signs from Chimacum Rd. and Elkins Rd., left into Port Hadlock Heights.

82

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

Food Produce

PORK: Grain fed, $2.50 lb. hanging weight. 928-3198.

82

Pets

4 beautiful black and white male *Parti Poodles*. Parents AKC registered. Available after August 6th. Now taking deposits to hold. They will have had their first shot and first grooming. Call 360-452-2579 Adorable kittens/cats $85 adoption fee PFOA 360-452-0414 safehavenpfoa.org AQUARIUMS: 55 gallon glass aquarium with metal stand, complete tropical set up including filter, hood and lights, heater, background, gravel and decorative rock, like new. Clean and ready for fish! A steal at $150. 20 gallon long aquarium also available, filter, light, gravel, and heater included. $55. 360-481-8955, leave message.

Pets

WANTED: Older miniDachshund for older couple. 457-0242.

83

YEARLY SALE Come One... Come All! Sat., 8:30-3 p.m., 1541 Monroe Rd. Brand new stroller and gently used car seat, tons of baby items, household items, furniture, clothes. Way too much to list!

Garage Sales Sequim

Wanted To Buy

C7

Farm Animals

ALFALFA/MIX or GRASS HAY TAIL FEATHER FARM has cut ALFALFA/ MIX or GRASS hay; field dried-no rained on bales; fields have been walked 2x after cutting to remove weeds. CALL SCOT: 360460-7500 or 360681-5476. Our fields are fertilized with organic fertilizer; fall flailed cut to remove old stubble; rotated fallow sections single yearly cuts put under cover after baling. $5.00 bale plus tax. FREE HAY: 3 acres, Shore Rd. in Agnew. You cut. 797-0091. LIMITED: Chicks, $2.50-$7. Young pig, $100. Lamb, $100, Sheep, $150. Call or text. 360-670-3579

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE BOARDING Pasture, barn, feed, trails. West P.A. 360-417-0304 HORSE TRAILER: ‘99 Morgan, 2 horse slant, tack room, excellent condition. $4,250. 928-3157. HORSE: 13 yr. old Arab Welsh “Princess Pony”, good companion horse. $300. 681-5030 eves Used electric vinyl cord and hardware for 5 cord high 1000 feet of perimeter horse fence, $50. Approximately 35 8’ x 4.5” round fence posts, $40. 15 10’ x 1.5” boards and 19 8’ x 1.5” paddock boards $25. 360-797-1379

85

Farm Equipment

Chipper 6 cyl 1969 Asplundh contiuous feed and 1968 Ford 1 Ton DmpTrk rebuilt V8 4 spd man trans. 2 sets of new blades, manual. $5000 cash or cashiers check. Gregg 360-385-6088 9:00 AM-9:00 PM. TRACTOR: Like new Kubota tractor, 12 attachments, 1 or all. $30,000. 452-2162. TRACTORS: International model 350, late 1950s. $3,000 for both. 582-9869, leave message. WANTED: Single bottom plow, 14”. 360-732-4311

FERRET: White with black markings, includes cage and accessories. $100. 681-8718 FREE: To good home. 2 yr old neutered male cat, black w/little white, short hair, mostly indoor, very loving. Moving, can’t take with me. Call 360-374-2126, leave msg. German Shepherd, black female. 3.5 yr old AKC reg small German Shepherd, spayed. Great with people and other animals. Very affectionate; loves catching frisbees and balls. $250 360-460-0930 Lab puppies for sale $400 each. 4 black pups, 2 males, 2 females. 3 blonde pups, 2 males, 1 female. Born 6-1411 Ready to go to good home 7-26-11. 360-504-2535 or 360-461-4038 mnlsimons@gmail.co m Lab/Husky mix. Characteristics: great listener, respectful, love property so I can run. Call: 360-477-7364 MINI-DACHSHUND Beautiful black and tan smooth coat male puppy, champion bloodlines, $300. 360-452-3016

PARROT: African Grey, named Boba. 10 years old, female, beautiful, well behaved. Speaks very nicely. Asthma forces sale. Need to find good home. $2,000. 681-4191. PUPPIES: Delightful Mini-Schnauzers, tails/dew claws done, vet checked, wormed and first shots. Various shades of salt and pepper. $475. View by appt. 681-7480. PUPPIES: Doberman Pinchers, AKC registered, ready July 30, (1) black male and (1) red male. $650 ea. 477-8349 PUPS: AKC Golden Retrievers. 1st shots, wormed, quality. Experienced reputable breeder. Father on site. 2 females, $500 each. 360-582-3181 or 360-912-2302 SHIH-TZU: Puppies. 2 Females, black and brown, cute and fluffy. 1st shots, dewormed. $595 ea. 477-8382

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

DUMP TRUCK: ‘87 Ford dbl axle, Cat 3208, Allison auto. $8,300/obo. 457-5299 FORK LIFT: Hyster, 11,000 lb lift. $7,000. 457-3120

93

Marine

2 KAYAKS: 16’ fiberglass in very good condition. $1,600 new, asking $750 ea. 582-9409 4 WINNS: ‘90 17.5’, 90 hp Johnson. $3,500. 775-6662. ARIMA: ‘91 17’. Johnson 90 hp, exc., new top, galv. trailer. $11,500. 477-3884. BAYLINER: 19’ project boat. $800. 477-7012 after 6

BAYLINER: ‘86 32’, 3270 twin diesel, 8 knots at 2,100 rpm, tops out 12-14 knots, all standard features plus radar, gps, depth sounder, anchor, windless, RIB tender, G14 John Wayne $54,995 360-670-6166 BOAT: 10’ fiberglass with new oars. $390. 452-9598 CAMPION: 21.5’ Explorer. Suzuki 225 hp, Yamaha 8 hp 4 stroke, radar, fish finder plotter, lots of extras. Exc. shape. 30 mile offshore boat. Call for details. $12,500. 385-7728.

CATALINA: ‘88 22’ SAILBOAT. Wing Keel; 2 jibs, main, 5 HP outbd. pop top; cushions, sink, Ppotty, depth knot meters, compass. good cond. $4,500/ obo. (NADA $6,000+) Sequim. Cells 602-499-5779 or 602-290-2144


C8

THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

93

Marine

93

BOAT: 13’ fiberglass, with trailer and electric motor, pole, net, etc. $900. 452-1106. BOAT: 14’6” fiberglass, with paddles. $750. 683-4523. CHAMPION: ‘78 16’. 80 hp Merc., runs great. Caulkin trailer. $2,000. 477-3884.

DIVE BOAT: Inflatable 14’, heavy duty Hypalon, 40 hrs. on Honda 9.9 4 stroke, Transom wheels. $2,950 971-226-0002 FIBERFORM: ‘74 24’, new rebuilt 302, new exhaust, cruised 2024 mph before outdrive blew. Calkins rollerbed trailer. $2,750. 928-9545, or 565-6906

Classified 93

Marine

FOUR WINNS: 245 Vista, only 285 hrs., V8, galv trailer, appraised at $20,000. Sell for $10,000. 619-320-4002 GLASTRON: 16’ ‘80 85 hp Johnson, EZ Loader trailer. No salt, must sell! $1,800. 928-9645. HARBERCRAFT: 12’ aluminum, rigged for crab, late 8 hp Mercury, depth finder, rebuilt trailer, oars, etc. $2,200. 683-0904 HEWESCRAFT: 14’ w/trailer, 9.9 Mercury O/B, low hours, fish finder. $2,000. 360-681-4293 HI-LAKER: Quit wishing and go fishing. 14’, EZ Loader trlr, nearly new 25 hr 4 stroke Suzuki with elec. start and power tilt. many extras. $3,500. 460-4957.

93

Marine

Marine

KAYAK: Brand new 15.5’ Airalite Touring with rudder, 2 bulk heads, 2 flush fitting hatches. 320 lb. capacity, $8,650 cu. in. of storage space. Cost $2,500. Asking only $1,500. 683-5284

O/B MOTOR: 6 hp Mercury, good condition. $450. 460-1318

LIVINGSTON: 12’ fiberglass, Calkins trailer, brand new Honda 5 hp 4 stroke, 2 seats, fishfinder/ fathometer, numerous extras. Cancer forces sale. Reduced, $4,450. 457-9689

RESORT BOAT: 15’ fiberglass. ‘07 40 hp Yamaha 4 stroke, low hrs., manual start, tiller handle. $4,500. 452-4384, msg

LIVINGSTON: 12’, Merc 25 4 stroke, elec. start/tilt, kicker, galv. tlr, seats, console, many extras, all new condition. $5,800. 681-8761. LIVINGSTON: 14’ w/ trailer, elec. crab pot puller, 20 hp Evinrude, 2 seats, 6 crab rings, misc. equip. $3,800. 683-1957.

O/B: Honda 15 hp, long shaft, less than 3 hrs. in freshwater only. $2,000. 457-8254

SAIL BOAT: Prettiest boat in the Marina. ‘81 Catalina 22, new sails, roller furler, 4 hp kicker, Slip E12 John Wayne Marina. $9,500. 582-0147. SAILBOAT: ‘07 16’ Daysailer. Wood double-ender, modified Bolger design, in storage since built in ‘07 in Port Townsend, w/trailer PURPLE sail, extras. $3,500/obo. 360-385-0122

93

93

Marine

RUNABOUT: 16’ and trailer, Sunbrella top. $350/obo. 477-0711. SAILBOAT: 30’ Sloop fiberglass, head, galley. $10,500. 360-457-0684 SAILBOAT: ‘73 29’ Ericson. New diesel, new gps, depth finder, roller furling jib. Health forces sale. Slip Q15. $15,000. 760-792-3891 SEA SPORT: ‘92 22’ Rebuilt engine w/200 hours. 9.9 Honda, radar, video sounder, GPS, vhf radio, stereo, Scotty downrigger, porta potti, sink, rod holders, anchor, dual batteries, trailer. $33,000. 206-914-3276 SNARK: 1 boat, all uses! Sail, motor, row, fish. 115K sold. $3,927 + frt. Sound Sailboats. 457-3903.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

94

Marine

Electric Street Bike Brand new, never ridden, 24 mile range, up to 22 mph. Cost $1,300. Sell for $950. 460-9517 HARLEY: ‘88 883. Low miles. $3,800/ obo. 457-1289. HD: ‘81 XLS Sportster. 1,000 cc, 9K. $2,900. 461-1501. HONDA: ‘03 XR 80R. Like new. $1,500. 477-2633 HONDA: ‘79 GL 1000. Ready for touring with vetter fairing handbags and trunk, runs great with only 39,197 actual mi. $2,250/obo. 460-7874 HONDA: ‘82 XL500. Runs great. $1,200. 683-4761 HONDA: ‘95 Goldwing 1500 GL Interstate. Excellent condition, always garaged. $7,000/ obo. 360-808-9526 or 360-808-5809.

SPORTLINE: ‘86 20’ Cabin. Exc. cond., 165 hp eng., 2 downriggers, extras, located in Clallam Bay. $5,200. 327-3775. WATER QUEST: 9.4 lake boat, 2 hp Honda 4 stroke, 2 oars, 6 sp elec. motor, 2 life jackets, $500/obo. 670-1560

94

94

Motorcycles

Motorcycles

3-WHEELER: ‘84 Yamaha YT60L, helmet. $500. 681-7904. HARLEY: ‘03 Anniversary model Electra Glide Standard. 6,500 mi., black, always garaged, leathers, helmet, manuals, extras, 1 owner, serv. & maint. w/care. Senior citizen owned. $13,000. 640-1688.

Motorcycles

94

Motorcycles

HONDA: ‘98 XR100. Excellent condition. $1,200. 797-4518.

KTM: ‘08 XCFW 250. New, about 30 hrs. $4,500. 417-8840.

KAWASAKI: ‘01 Vulcan 1500 Nomad Fi. Cruiser. Exc. cond. $3,800 360-640-9670

MOPED: Brand new. Perfect condition. $1,050. 452-2795.

KAWASAKI: ‘06 KLX 250. Great bike!! dual sport, knobby back tire, street legal with new tabs. $2,995. 477-6873. KAWASAKI: ‘84 ZX1100. New paint, tires, brakes. Runs good. 120 hp. $2,800. 457-1942. KIDS QUAD: ‘04 Eton 90. Auto, electric start, runs great, red. $950/obo. 460-4322.

QUAD: ‘05 Kawasaki 400. Runs great. Added aftermarket skid plate and black plastic. $2,500/obo. 477-6542

SUZUKI: 2005 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, 800cc, well maintained, garage stored. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. $3,000/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com

17407230

GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS 1996 TOYOTA 4RUNNER SR5 4X4 V6

1997 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 4X4

2001 LINCOLN LS V8

2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER LS 4X4

AUTO, LOADED! SILVER IN EXCEL SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH IN EXCEL COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & MOONROOF, CRUISE, TILT, CASS, TINTED WINDOWS, TOW PKG, RUNNING BOARDS, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE! FANTASTIC COND! WON’T LAST LONG @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF

5.4L TRITON V8, AUTO, LOADED! SPOTLESS 1 OWNER CARFAX! WHITE IN EXCEL COND W/GRAY LEATHER IN GREAT SHAPE! PWR SEAT, CASS, 3RD SEAT, CRUISE, TILT, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS, REAR AC, VERY WELL-KEPT SUV @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

75K ORIG MILES! 3.9L V8, AUTO, LOADED! PEARL WHITE IN EXCEL COND W/GRAY LEATHER IN EXCEL SHAPE! DUAL PWR SEATS, MOONROOF, 6 DISC CD/PREM SOUND, PWR ADJ PEDALS, PWR ADJ STEERING WHL, SIDE AIRBAGS, WOOD GRAIN, ALLOYS, VERY CLEAN LINCOLN @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF MERELY

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, PEWTER MET IN GREAT SHAPE W/GRAY CLOTH IN GOOD COND! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, ROOF RACK, PRIV GLASS, ALLOYS, NICE LITTLE 4X4 SUV @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$7,495

$4,995

$7,995

$5,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

681-5090

2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA POLICE INTERCEPTOR

2004 FORD RANGER XLT SUPERCAB 4DR 4X4

4.6L V8, AUTO, WHITE IN GOOD COND W/TAN CLOTH IN GOOD SHAPE! PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & DRV SEAT, AC, FULL POLICE INTERCEPTOR PKG W/UPGRADED COOLING SYS, TRANS, REAR END, WHEELS & SUSPENSION, GOOD RELIABLE SEDAN, THIS WEEK ONLY! $1,000 OFF OUR PRICE OF

4.0L SOHC V6, AUTO, LOADED! DK MET RED IN GREAT COND W/GRAY CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! CD, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, TOW PKG, PRIV GLASS, SLIDING REAR WINDOW, AC, RUNNING BOARDS, ALLOYS, LOCAL TRADE! REAL NICE LITTLE 4X4 RANGER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

$4,995

$10,995

Carpenter Auto Center

Carpenter Auto Center

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

681-5090

681-5090

1999 GMC SIERRA 1500 Z71 SLE EXT CAB 4X4

1998 TOYOTA CAMRY LE SEDAN

2003 FORD RANGER SUPERCAB XLT 4X4

2004 NISSAN FRONTIER XE CREW CAB 4X4

5.3L VORTEC V8, AUTO, WELD ALLOYS, NERF BARS, CARPETED BEDLINER, CANOPY, DIAMOND PLATE BEDRAILS, TOW PKG, KEYLESS ENTRY, 3 OPENING DRS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS, MIRRORS & SEATS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $12,105! ONLY 78K MILES! ABSOLUTELY IMMACULATE INSIDE & OUT! NONE NICER! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

3.0L 24V V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, NEW BFG TIRES, KEYLESS TIRES, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD/CASS, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 93K MILES! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! LOADED W/ LEATHER & PWR OPTIONS! LEGENDARY TOYOTA RELIABILITY! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

4.0L V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, RUNNING BOARDS, TOW PKG, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, SOFT TONNEAU COVER, BED RAILS, REAR SLIDING WINDOW, KEYLESS ENTRY, 4 OPENING DRS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD/CASS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $13,855! ONLY 44K MILES! IMMACULATE COND INSIDE & OUT! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

3.3L V6, AUTO, OFF-ROAD PKG, ALLOYS, MATCHING CANOPY, BEDLINER, TOW PKG, KEYLESS ENTRY, PRIV GLASS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CD, CRUISE, TILT, AC, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, KBB OF $17,125! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! ONLY 39K MILES! 1 OWNER! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

$10,995

$7,495

$12,995

$15,995

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

GRAY MOTORS

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

2002 DODGE DAKOTA SLT

1999 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

1999 MERCURY COUGAR

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE PAY HERE!

LOWEST IN-HOUSE

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

V6, AUTO, 4X4, QUAD-CREW, AC, CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, TOW READY! FOLD-A-COVER 90 DAYS WHY PAY SAME AS CASH!

$9,995 WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

MORE?

WE HAVE THE LOWEST INHOUSE RATES!

NO CREDIT CHECKS!

4 CYL, 5 SPD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, AC, SUNROOF, ALLOYS MILITARY DISCOUNTS!

LOWEST IN-HOUSE

FINANCING!

THE ORIGINAL BUY HERE! PAY HERE!

FINANCING!

***SPORTY*** 2 DR COUPE, 5 SPD, AC, CD, SUNROOF, ALLOYS NO CREDIT CHECKS!

$2,695

$3,995

WE FINANCE

WE FINANCE

(360) 417-3788

(360) 417-3788

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Lyndi @ 360-417-3551 TODAY for more information


ClassifiedAutomotive

Peninsula Daily News

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Mixing gas to get right octane Dear Doctor: My mother drives a 2000 Acura TL. The recommended fuel octane is 89. She buys her gasoline at BJ’s wholesale club, and they only sell 87 and 93 octane. She mixes the two together in her fillups. Will this give her the 89 the car needs — or is she wasting her time and money? Rob Dear Rob: The 87 octane gasoline will work fine under normal driving conditions. The 89 octane could show an increase in gas mileage because it ignites at a higher temperature and burns slower. My answer, however, would be different if the engine required 93 octane.

Tire pressure light Dear Doctor: I have a 2006 Toyota Highlander. Lately, the tire pressure light has been illuminating. I’ve taken it to the dealer four times, and they check the tire pressure (including the spare) and readjust the pressure, but the light comes on again, sometimes the same day taking it home from the dealer. I turn the light off by holding the reset button under the dash, but it is

94

Motorcycles

QUAD: ‘06 Eton Viper 70. New battery, tires, chain. $600. 457-2780 QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051 SUZUKI: ‘04 Bergman 650. Only 700 miles, like new. Dual trans. $5,000. 452-6643.

95

THE AUTO DOC annoying. you Damato shedCan some “light” on this issue? Bob Dear Bob: Any vehicle that has an ongoing tire pressure monitor light illumination issue means the TPS is getting a signal of “low” or unequal pressure. I would use a tire pressure monitor tool and check each tire pressure monitor for an output signal. I purchased a tool called the Bartec 400. This has proved to be the best tool I could find — with great factory support.

Junior

Sebring is oil-eater Dear Doctor: Our Chrysler Sebring with the 3.5-liter V-6 engine has about 38,000 miles on it. It is not driven hard, but it’s starting to consume oil — approximately 1 quart every 1,000 miles. The dealer said that’s within the acceptable range. It seems

Recreational Vehicles

CAMPER: ‘97 8’6” Passtime. $2,950. 360-683-6585 CAMPER: ‘99 8’ Lance. Crank jacks, excellent cond. $5,000/ obo. 732-4779. MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ Ford Sunseeker, under 8,000 mi, double tipout. $50,000/ obo. 360-808-6392.

SUZUKI: ‘06 C-50 Boulevard. 4,600 mi. $4,900. 460-9556. YAMAHA: ‘05 PW80. Runs great. $700/ obo. 477-6542. YAMAHA: ‘08 TW200. 1,650 mi., 2 racks. $4,500. 374-5463. YAMAHA: ‘09 V-Star 650 Silverado. Only 73 miles! Perfect. $5,200. 457-8824. YAMAHA: ‘82 Virago. Clean. $1,500. 477-2633

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘02 34’ Big Sky Montana. 3 slides, W/D, used to live in. Great storage. $20,000. 477-7957 5th WHEEL: ‘04 Jayco Eagle. 3 slides, very good condition. $20,000 obo. 360-302-0966 5TH WHEEL: ‘07 37’ Sandpiper F37SP toy hauler by Forest River. 2 slide outs, dbl axle, 2 sun panels, aftermarket A/C unit. $24,500. 460-8222 5TH WHEEL: ‘11 30’ Crossroad. Fireplace, used one trip. $45,000. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210. 5TH WHEEL: ‘92 32’ Jayco. 2nd owner. $5,800. 379-0575. 5TH WHEEL: ‘93 Grand Teton 5th Wheel. 2 Slides’ walk around Qu bed; W/D hookup, dishwasher, tiled bath. 35’. Exc cond. Could be year round livable. $15,000. 437-7706.

5TH WHEEL: ‘94 29' Fleetwood Prowler. Used, but in good condition. Plenty of room for multiple people. Has everything you'll need for a comfortable vacation. $5,500/obo. Call Kim after 6 p.m. 460-2634 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 31’ Alpenlite Hillcrest RX. 2 slide outs, extras. Excellent condition. $13,500. 859-248-7566 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 35’ Nuwa Snowbird. Triple slide. Exc. cond., low mileage. $16,900. 775-5105. 5TH WHEEL: ‘99 24 1/2’ Terry. Excellent condition. Updates, like new. Slider, rear kitchen, heat on all year. $8,000. 457-5970 CAMPER: 6’ Six-Pac cabover, fits small truck. $2,700. 808-0153 CAMPER: 8’ cab over. Clean, dry. $400. 681-2143 CAMPER: ‘91 11.5’ Caribou. Good condition, stove, oven, air, furnace, TV, DVD, everything works. $4,000. 385-0558. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 32’ Georgetown. 2 slides, 25K, tow bar pkg., King Dome TV system, extra brake system, many extras inside. $40,000/obo. Cal Mary 452-2287 or 360-477-6675. MOTOR HOME: ‘02 Itasca 32V. 31,500 miles, good condition, 2 slide outs, sleeps 6, 2 tvs, queen bed, DVD player, V10 engine, generator and built in A/C. $40,000. Tow car and hitch available. 582-0617.

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft, 3 slides, 330 Cat Diesel, Allison Trans, solar battery charger, pressure regulator, water filter, slide toppers, 10,000 lbs. hitch, micro/ conv. oven, 3 burner stove, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TV's, Sat Dome, Sony AM/FM/ CD VHS player, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, memory foam mattress, 6KW generator, leveling system, gently used, non smokers. Low mileage 22,000. $99,500. 683-3887. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 29’ Itasca. 2 slide out, sleeps 6, 2 TVs, queen bed, 8 CD player, video camera, auto levelers, lots of storage, 50K mile transferable all coach warranty, plus a ‘03 PT Cruiser tow car. Great cond, ready to go! $70,000/ obo. 683-2958. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Winnebago Itasca Suncruiser. Better than new, only 17K mi., 3 slides, many extras, price includes ‘07 Honda CRV, ready to tow with brake system. $120,000. Call for more info or to make an appt. to come check it out. 360-683-1679 MOTOR HOME: ‘07 31.6’ Winnebago Outlook. Good condition, extras, located Chimacum, WA. $58,950 928-210-7044 www.rollinrollin.com/ motorhome MOTOR HOME: ‘76 Tioga. Good shape. $2,300. 477-1478. MOTOR HOME: ‘81 23’ Dodge Jamboree. Runs good, Health forces sale. $2,995/obo. Jim, 477-4774 MOTOR HOME: ‘84 22’ Itasca. Runs great. $3,400/obo. 460-5435 MOTOR HOME: ‘87 34’ Fleetwood. New toilet, hot water tank, sealed roof. Live-in model with large closet. $4,000. 460-2127, 504-2535 MOTOR HOME: ‘91 Toyota Odyssey. V6, 5 speed, low miles, new tires, brakes exhaust, batteries. Willing to trade for camper. $9,500. 460-4420. MOTOR HOME: ‘93 21’ Damon Ford Hornet. Close to 70K mi., good condition. Fast sell for college student. $9,500. 461-0867 TENT TRAILER: ‘85 Coleman. Good condition. Licensed. Lights work. Poulsbo area. $1,200/obo. 460-9561 after 5 pm

TIFFIN: ‘95 35’ Allegro Bus. DP 230hp Cummins, 3060 Transmission. Reduced $6,000! 230HP Cummins, MD3060, Oshkosh Chassis, exhaust brake, propane genset Corian counter tops, all records. $21,400. 417-9401 TRAILER: ‘00 23’ Sierra Classic. Excellent condition. $9,500. 683-1508.

95

Recreational Vehicles

TRAILER: ‘04 19W Jayco Jay Feather LGT, Ultra Light. 2,835 lbs., aluminum frame, vacuum laminated construction, low mileage, excellent condition, many extras, 2 batts, 12 volt TV, CD, fishing rods and lures, BBQ, etc. Ready to roll. Must see. $9,500. 360-385-2318 TRAILER: ‘05 25’ Jayco Jay Flight. Always garaged, microwave, slide out, only used 6x. A/C, $12,500. 460-0139 TRAILER: ‘07 27’ Rainier. 3x12’ tip out, a list of extras, excellent condition. $16,500. 928-2099. TRAILER: 16’ Shasta. Neat & easy to tow. $1,200. 457-0684 TRAILER: ‘80 17’ Alpenlite. Very clean, everything works. $3,500. 797-3326. TRAILER: ‘88 16’x8’ Aljo. Great shape, with extras. $3,200. 457-9782 WANTED: RV motor home class A, gas. 2003 and later, great condition, take over payments or cash out for right deal. Call Ann 360-640-9566

Winnebago 2010 Era Limited 170X, 24' Class B, Mini Motor Home Fully Equipped. Quiet fuel-efficient Mercedes-Benz turbo diesel engine, 1824 mpg, under 8,000 mi. Private seller. www.erarv.com $69,895 Call 360-460-8889

96

Parts/ Accessories

CANOPY: Camp Out Time silver topper for ‘04 and up Dodge long bed. $600. Call 461-1459 MISC: 350 Chev engine, $200. 3 speed tranny, over drive, $150. Reece tow bar, $50. 457-6540 PICKUP CANOPY: 8’, good condition. $150. 452-2705.

TIRES: Set of 4. Toyo 245/65 R17, brand new, only about 50 miles. $600. 460-4491.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘04 Silverado. 2500HD 6 L, ext. cab tow pkg, cmpr shell 43K miles, like new. $21,000. 681-2620. CHEV: ‘05 Trailblazer LS. AC, PS, PW, PDL, CC, towing pkg., 4.2 auto 4WD. $10,500/obo. Must sell. Great for camping. 683-7789.

CHEV: ‘09 Silverado. 4WD. 5.3 liter, flex fuel, auto, A/C, tow. Only 18K miles! $35,000 in receipts. $18,700 buys it! 3 yrs., 82K mi. full warranty. 670-2562. CHEV: ‘83 3/4 ton diesel. 6” lift. $2,500. 477-6098. CHEV: ‘83 Suburban. 4x4, newer ‘454’ engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 CHEV: ‘95 Suburban 1500. 4WD, 7 pass., tow pkg., well cared for, low mi., priced well below book. $2,500. 457-0406.

excessive to me. Is it? Rolf Dear Rolf: The dealer is correct. A quart of oil usage every 1,000 miles is not unusual. If you are really bothered with the oil consumption, then you can change the viscosity to a heavier one, such as a 15W40 until the winter months. You can also try synthetic oil or high mileage oil. The choices are yours.

Fob not working Dear Doctor: I own a 2007 Chevrolet Equinox with 40,000 miles and now have a small issue. When I press the open button on the remote key fob, nothing happens. I must open the door with the insertion key at the driver’s door. Then the horn sounds until I either put the key in the ignition and turn the key or after opening the door press the open button on the key fob. I changed the battery but have the same issue with both of my remotes. What’s going on? Alan Dear Alan: I see a lot of problems such as yours on a variety of vehicles. You need to bring the car to a shop that has a factory Tech 2 Scan Tool. The technician can watch

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘96 Blazer. 4door, 4x4, new tires, excellent, all the elec., 149K. $3,500, would consider RV trade. 460-4488. CHEV: ‘98 K2500 pickup extra cab. New brakes, wheel bearings, U joints, shocks, fuel pump, rear axles. Tow pkg, CB. $2,800. 460-2127, 504-2535 DODGE ‘99 D2500 CLUB CAB SLT LARAMIE 4X4 Long bed, 5.9 liter 24V Cummins turbo diesel, auto, alloy wheels, oversize offroad tires, dual Interstate batteries, tow package, sprayin bedliner, Nerf bars, rear sliding window, 4 opening doors, keyless entry, power windows, door locks and mirrors, Pioneer CD stereo, information center, cruise, tilt, air, dual front airbags. Looks and drives like a new truck! Low miles! Absolutely immaculate inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $14,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘03 Ram 1500 SLT quad cab. 5.9 V8, auto, A/C, cruise, P/W, P/L, seat, AM/FM with CD, matching Leer fiberglass canopy, rear air suspension, 62K, excellent cond. $16,000. 640-3709 in Forks, WA. DODGE: ‘05 Dakota Laramie. 30K mi., V8, loaded! $14,900. 452-5402 FORD: ‘02 Explorer XLT. Exc cond., V6, air, tow, CD changer, 119K mi. $7,950. 457-4363 FORD: ‘88 F-150 super cab. Tow pkg, 5.0 L, canopy, 1 owner. $2,495. 360-374-3259 FORD: ‘94 Bronco. Midnight black pkg, tow pkg, newer tires, trailer brake, leather seats, tint, power locks/windows, auto, 351 ci, well-maintained, recently serviced. Nice truck. Great for grad or dad. 200K. $4,000. 477-1874 FORD: ‘95 F150. Red, 351, 5.8L, low miles. $3,800/obo. 477-3638 FORD: ‘99 Explorer. Limited Edition. Good running, well maintained. $3,500. 460-4957 FORD: ‘99 F150 Sport 4x4. V8, ext. cab, 111K mi., excellent cond, Sony Xplod sound system, remote start, no A/C, located in Flagstaff. $6,000 delivered to P.A. Phone Brandon at 928-221-8564 (will email photos). GMC: ‘02 Sierra SLE. Ext. cab, 4WD, 75K, excellent. $13,900. 683-6935 GMC: ‘89 3/4 ton. V8, runs/looks good. $1,500. 460-1760. GMC: ‘95 Jimmy SLE. 4.3 Vortec, 2” lift kit, grill guard, shift kit, running boards, roof rack, excellent cond. $4,000/obo. 477-4838 JEEP: ‘00 V8 Laredo. All power leather heated seats fully loaded CD player 132K in good shape, has exhaust leak needs minor work. $6,000/obo. 477-1782 call or text. JEEP: ‘01 Laredo. Red, 4WD, 121K, all power, leather, heated seats, fully loaded, CD/stereo, excellent mechanical shape, garaged. $6,500/obo. 928-9988 PKG: GMC ‘03 Sonoma 4x4 ext. cab with ‘90 18’ Fleetwood Prowler 5th wheel. Both for $13,600. 457-4247

97

the operation of the key fob to see where the problem is located. It could be a simple reprogramming, unlock solenoid, weak key fob or battery. Dear Doctor: I own a 2007 Hyundai Sonata with 83,000 miles. It’s equipped with a four-cylinder engine and automatic transmission. Last weekend, as I was pulling into a parking space at a bank — and with my foot on the brake — the car lurched forward and crashed through the bank window. What could have caused the car to lunge forward? Ken Dear Ken: For an engine to race or surge something has to open the throttle body in the engine. The heavy pressure from your foot on the brake pedal would be enough to stop the car in very slow speed, such as when pulling into a parking space.

_________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

4 Wheel Drive

JEEP: ‘99 Grand Cherokee. 31K. $11,900. 683-2175. TOYOTA: ‘05 Tacoma TRD. 4 door, V6, auto, 48K. $22,500. 452-6316 TOYOTA: ‘93 extra cab. Match. canopy, V6 5 spd., well maint., w/extras. $7,500. 683-1851.

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV ‘07 G3500 EXPRESS CARGO VAN 4.8 liter V8, auto, air, safety bulkhead bin package, ladder rack with pipe holder, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, new tires, 83,000 miles, balance of factory 5/100 warranty, very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, spotless Carfax report. $12,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV ‘95 SILVERADO 1500 2WD 5.7 liter (350 CID) V8, auto, alloy wheels, roof rack, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, bucket seats, console, cruise, tilt, air, cassette stereo, drivers airbag. One owner! only 63,000 miles! Absolutely immaculate inside and out! Like new a real must see! Stop be Gray Motors today! $8,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘06 Uplander. 29K miles, DVD player. $12,000. 683-3147 CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton. Extended cab, clean. $5,500. 457-6156. CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWN & COUNTRY LIMITED MINIVAN 3.8 liter V6 engine, auto, alloy wheels, roof rack, privacy glass, power windows, door locks, mirrors and seats, quad captains seating, heated leather power programmable seats, dual power sliding doors and liftgate, cruise, tilt, automatic climate control, rear air, 4 disc CD changer and cassette stereo, DVD system, dual front and side airbags, Kelley Blue Book value of $11,180! Clean Carfax, one owner! Only 88,000 miles! Top model loaded with options! Immaculate inside and out! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE ‘08 GRAND CARAVAN SE 3.3 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, 7 passenger half stow and go seating, privacy glass, only 29,000 miles, very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, spotless Carfax report, nonsmoker. $15,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

FORD: ‘04 F-150 XLT 4x4 Extended Cab. 101K, 5.4 Liter with Canopy. 3" Lift kit, 35" Tires (7K miles) and 18" original rims/tires, ArmaCoat bedliner, Raider canopy, Tow package. Well maintained, recently detailed. Second owner, truck located in Sequim. $13,900 253-381-8582

98

Pickups/Vans

CHEV: ‘93 Tahoe. 2WD, auto, power windows, cruise, canopy, seats 6, 163K, new tires/battery. Comfortable and fun to drive! $3,500/obo. 504-2001 FORD: ‘66 Flatbed. Recent rebuilt engine. $1,600/obo. 460-5435 FORD: ‘84 F-150. Body in very good cond., w/many amenities incl. (2) brand new front tires w/less than 100 mi. $2,099. 683-4200 leave message. FORD: ‘84 F150 SL. Red and black, long bed, ‘351’ Winsor V8 124K, new tires, well maintained, $1,500/ obo. 360-301-1911. FORD: ‘85 Econoline 150 wheelchair van. 58K mi., $2,000/obo. 360-640-1970 or 360-461-8709 FORD: ‘91 Explorer. Good shape. $1,750. 582-0360 lv msg. FORD: ‘94 Aerostar. Runs great, has new alternator, brakes. $800/obo. 808-7830. GMC: ‘76. Auto, 350 eng., runs great. $1,500. 327-3775. HONDA: ‘00 Odyssey. Excellent condition. 93K. $6,500. 360-385-6702 PLYMOUTH: ‘89 Voyager Deluxe. 7 pass, good power tran, V6. $1,500/obo.457-7916. TOYOTA: ‘87 ‘350’ Chev motor and tranny, 8” Ford rear end, MSD ignition, 16’ slide deck trailer. $5,000 both. 460-2127, 504-2535

99

Cars

2000 Honda CRV Very Good Condition, just detailed in & out. All scheduled maintenance has been done over the years. All wheel drive, tinted windows, auto start w/alarm, 4 mounted snow tires. 200,700 hwy mi. $5,800. 681-5157 or 360-801-1931

Car of the Week

2012 Acura TL BASE PRICE: $35,605 for base model; $39,155 for TL with SH-AWD; $39,335 for TL with Technology Package; $41,535 for TL with Advance Package; $42,885 for TL SH-AWD with Technology Package; $45,085 for SH-AWD with Advance Package. AS TESTED: $45,970. TYPE: Front-engine, front-wheel-drive, fivepassenger, mid-size sedan. ENGINE: 3.7-liter, single overhead cam, V-6 with VTEC. MILEAGE: 18 mpg (city), 26 mpg (highway). TOP SPEED: NA. LENGTH: 194 inches. WHEELBASE: 109.3 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,889 pounds. BUILT IN: Marysville, Ohio. OPTIONS: None. DESTINATION CHARGE: $885. The Associated Press

99

Cars

CADILLAC: ‘85 Eldorado. Excellent condition, loaded, 112K. $2,800. 809-0697. CADILLAC: ‘88 Eldorado. 4.5 V8, 60K org. mi., pristine condition. $5,000 firm. 602-369-5617 CHEV: ‘65 Impala. All original, excellent. $24,000. 452-6840.

CHEV: ‘87 Corvette. Auto, black/graphite, 350/240, all power, leather, air, original, 2nd owner, always garaged, excellent condition, 46K mi., beautiful car! $14,000. 582-1260. CHRYSLER ‘08 300 TOURING Economical 3.5 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, and seat, full leather, power moonroof, keyless entry, alloy wheels, fog lamps, side airbags, privacy glass, 50,000 miles. Very very clean 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $17,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHRYSLER: ‘01 PT Cruiser. Everything in great shape, no dents, well cared for, clean and ready to cruise! Custom aftermarket body kit. 105K orig. mi. 26 mpg. Color purple. $4,200/obo. 452-4269 or 461-2538 CHRYSLER: ‘78 Lebaron. Very nice. $1,200. 457-8656 CHRYSLER: ‘92 Imperial. 106K mi., new tires/brakes, new vinyl top, also set of studded tires, showroom condition, loaded. $3,000 360-683-2529 DATSUN: ‘64 Roadster. $2,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FIERO: ‘88 GT. 5 speed, good driver, straight body, needs paint and TLC to be first class. $5,000. firm. 928-3728. FORD ‘05 EscapeXLS $7,950/obo. Strait View CU 452-3883.

2008 Volkswagen Beetle S Convertible. Red with blk top. 2.5L 5cyl. 5-spd. 36k miles. Blk interior. Fun car. Comes with almost $1000 in extras. Also Class 1 Hidden hitch installed. $15000. Call 360-460-7119 BUICK: ‘68 Skylark Special. 4 door, auto, 1 owner, runs good. $1,800. 461-4475 or 457-7886 BUICK: ‘73 Centurion Convertible. ‘455’ engine, new top and interior, recent white paint. $6,995/obo. 683-8567 CADILLAC: ‘01 Seville SLS. 120K, nice. $5,495. 460-9556. CHEV ‘10 IMPALA LT 3.5 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD with Bose audio, power windows, locks, and seat, full leather with heated seats, power moonroof, keyless entry, Home Link, side airbags, OnStar ready, alloy wheels, rear spoiler, only 17,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/100 warranty, spotless Carfax report. Immaculate local trade, nonsmoker. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

C9

FORD: ‘62 Thunderbird. Runs great, good paint/chrome. Red/black. $11,000. 683-2958

101

Legals Clallam Co.

99

Cars

FORD: ‘03 Mustang convertible. $10,000/ obo. 808-1598. FORD: ‘69 Galaxy 500. $3,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FORD: ‘78 Ranchero GT. ‘351’, low mi., good condition, runs excellent. $1,500. 460-6979 FORD: ‘82 Thunderbird. Collectible 2 door, sunroof, runs great, 6 cyl. $1,500. 582-9869, lv. msg. FORD: ‘96 T-Bird LX. Runs good, nice car. $3,500. 452-2150. FORD: ‘99 Taurus. New tune up, 107K mi $3,495. 460-9556 HONDA: ‘07 Accord. Good condition, 70K. $12,500. 208-559-4023 HONDA: ‘10 Fit. 4 dr hatchback, 5 speed, metallic copper, like new condition, average 32 mpg, 36-40 on Hwy., great to drive. $16,500. 360-301-9061 HONDA: ‘11 Fit Sport. 72 miles. $20,000. 683-6352 HONDA: ‘95 Accord. 4 dr, 133K, new tires sunroof, great cond. $5,000. 457-3078.

MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $7,995. 582-9966

99

Cars

LINCOLN: ‘86 Mark 7. All electric. V8 5.0. $1,400. 460-9046. OLDS: ‘90 3.8L V6, runs/looks good. $600. 460-1760. PONTIAC: ‘68 Tempest. ‘350’ auto, runs great, rare, fun. $3,500. 670-3634. SUZUKI: ‘04 XL7. 4x4, 48,500 mi., red, excellent shape. $11,000. 452-9857. TOYOTA ‘98 CAMRY LE SEDAN 3.0 liter 24 valve V6, auto, alloy wheels, new BF Goodrich tires, keyless entry, power windows, door locks and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD/cassette stereo, dual front airbags. Only 93,000 miles! Sparkling clean inside and out! Loaded with leather and power options! Legendary Toyota reliability! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,495 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA: ‘06 Hylander Hybrid Limited Edition. Silver with large ski box. Navigation system. Heated leather seats. 28 mpg city/25 mpg highway. Third row seating. $20,000. 360-681-8450

NISSAN: ‘00 Maxima GLE. Loaded, exc. cond., 99K miles, see to appreciate. $6,900. 457-0860.

TOYOTA: ‘96 Camry. 5 speed, low miles. $3,500. 681-3023. VOLVO: ‘96 850 sedan. 2.4 liter, 20 valve, 158K, metallic gray/beige, well maintained, good condition. $2,100/ obo. 360-301-1911. ZAP: ‘06 Xebra. Electric car. Emits no CO2 for global warming. $5,000. Ask for Jack, 683-2259

101

101

MERCURY: ‘68 Monterey, 4 door sedan, 88K, 1 owner. $2,988. 379-0575. MG: ‘79 BCV series. Color blue, excellent condition. $7,000. 683-5614

Legals Clallam Co.

Legals Clallam Co.

Port Angeles School District Surplus Item The Port Angeles School District has surplus property available for sale to the public. Such property has either exceeded its useful life or no longer meets the program needs of the District. In accordance with RCW 28A.335.180 we are notifying public schools, approved private schools, and other interested parties of the opportunity to purchase surplus materials and equipment through sealed bid. 1 – Covel pedestal grinder, 1- Rockwell surface grinder, 1Emco-Maier CNC slant bed lathe. The condition of property sold is “as is” with no expressed or implied guarantee of warranty. The Public Surplus sale will occur on August 29, 2011 at 10am. A general description of property is available upon request to bphillips@portangelesschools.org. Pub: July 28, 2011

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 09-4-01399-6 Sheriff’s No.11000626 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam In re the Guardianship of: GERALDINE D. STREGE, An Incapacitated Person, Plaintiff TO: FREDERICK STREGE THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 353 W SILBERHORN ROAD SEQUIM, WA 98382 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 9:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 08/05/2011 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $28,871.71 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED June 23, 2011 W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington Kaylene Zellar, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: 353 W Silberhorn Rd, Sequim, WA 98382 That portion of the West half of the East half of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 25, Township 30 North, range 4 West, W.M., described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of the said West half of the East half of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Section 25, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M.’ Thence South along the West line thereof 264 feet; Thence East 165 feet; Thence North 264 feet; Thence West 165 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING EXCEPT County Road. Pub: July 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011


C10

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Peninsula Daily News


pdn07282011c