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Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

Double bonus! TWO SPECIAL S SUPPLEMENTS — in including a preview off next week’s k’ Sequim S i Lavender Weekend — are featured in this edition of the Peninsula Daily News. Lavender Weekend is the only guide devoted to both organizations, Sequim Lavender Growers Association and Sequim Lavender Farmers Association, that put on their July 19-21 extravaganzas, and the magazine details events and locations. Also inside: Spry magazine, in which Dr. Oz describes five ways to take back your health, and Peninsula Spotlight, which details the upcoming PALOA production of “Guys and Dolls.”

Pierce retrial jury is seated BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Opening arguments in the retrial of Michael J. Pierce on double-murder charges will begin Monday after a jury was seated Thursday afternoon on the fourth day of selection — unless the judge grants a renewed request for a change of venue Friday. The change-of-venue hearing is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Friday in Jefferson County Superior Court, with Pierce — who stands accused of the murders of Pat and Janice Yarr, a well-known Quilcene couple — appearing by video monitor. “There were a number of things said by juror candidates about what they felt about the defendant that gives us some doubt about Mr. Pierce’s ability to get a fair trial,” said Richard Davies, the public defender who is representing Pierce. The trial, which is expected to continue until Aug. 1, is the

second for Pierce on first-degree murder charges in the killings of the Yarrs on March 18, 2009, in a farmhouse near Lake Leland. Pierce, 38, was convicted in 2010 and was serving a life sentence in Walla Walla State Penitentiary when the state Court of Appeals reversed the conviction July 27 after Pierce’s attorneys successfully argued that his post-arrest statements should be suppressed.

TO

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Coho ferry crashes into Victoria dock Boat sustains no damage PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

It will be Davis’ second try at moving the trial out of Jefferson County. Judge Keith Harper denied Davies’ previous venuechange motion in April. Prosecuting Attorney Scott Rosekrans said he “is not concerned” about the motion. “He made his motion and will try to create his record, and we’ll see what happens,” Rosekrans said.

VIA

The MV Coho pulls away from a damaged floatplane dock in front of the Regent Hotel on Victoria’s Inner Harbor after the 341-foot ferry backed into the landing late Wednesday.

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

Second try

TURN

CVT TWO/VANCOUVER ISLAND

VICTORIA — U.S. and Canadian authorities have begun an investigation into what caused the MV Coho ferry to back into a dock used to service seaplanes on its way out of Victoria’s Inner Harbour on Wednesday. The collision broke the floating structure into at least three pieces. No planes were tied to the dock, and no injuries were reported in the 7:30 p.m. crash, said Ryan Malane, director of

marketing for Black Ball Ferry Line, which operates the Coho. Capt. Elmer Grasser, an 11-year veteran of the Coho, immediately contacted Canada’s Harbour Patrol and the U.S. Coast Guard, as ferry line procedure dictates, Malane said. The Coho wasn’t damaged, he said Thursday, and no damage estimate to the dock was available. “[Black Ball Ferry Line] will take responsibility for the damage to the dock,” Malane said.

happened,” Malane said. The Coho likely was going no faster than 2 knots (2.3 mph) when it backed out of its landing area and into the dock, Malane said, adding that it averages 15 knots (17.26 mph) when crossing the Strait of Juna de Fuca between Victoria and Port Angeles. Malane said he was on the ferry at the time and did not feel the boat hit the dock. After the ship’s crew inspected the ship, Malane said the captain followed procedure and continued out of the harbor, and Harbour Investigation started Patrol did not ask it to return. “[Harbour Patrol] was twice in Malane could not say when the contact with the captain, and they investigation by U.S. and Canadid not call for the ship’s return,” dian officials would be completed. Malane said. “At this point, we’re still investigating to determine exactly what TURN TO FERRY/A7

Shipyard laying off PA workers yachts,” Swogger said. In an interview, Swogger would not comment on how many Westport Shipyard, the luxury- employees were laid off or how yacht maker, imposed company- many remained in Port Angeles. wide layoffs Wednesday at its facilities in Port Angeles, West- Lack of work port and Hoquiam because of a “They were terminated due to lack of work, a spokeswoman said. The company has a lack of work,” Swogger said, adding 100,000-square-foot plant at that she was the only one autho637 Marine Drive and a two- rized to comment on the layoff. A spokeswoman at the compabuilding cabinet shop on West 18th Street in Port Angeles that it ny’s Westport plant also referred rents from the Port of Port Ange- inquiries to Swogger. The email was almost identical les for $14,000 a month. “Westport Shipyard Inc. made to the statement the company adjustments to employment lev- issued March 18, when workers els at its yacht construction facili- also were laid off. Westport produces compositeties [Wednesday],” company Human Resources Specialist construction yachts of 85, 98, 112, Jennifer Swogger said Wednesday 130 and 164 feet. The longest yachts come out of afternoon in an email. the 72-foot-high Marine Drive “The reduction is reflective of the ongoing current market con- plant. ditions for premium luxury TURN TO LAYOFFS/A7 BY PAUL GOTTLIEB

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE NATION PENINSULA POLL * PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

B8 C1 B11 A8 B11 B10 B11 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER WORLD

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A2

UpFront

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

of improvement since the start of treatment Sunday for congestive heart failure and the insertion of a pump to help his heart increase blood flow. His doctors said COUNTRY MUSIC Wednesday in a video STARS and fans joined statement that his heart together to urge prayers for problem stemmed from an Randy Travis overnight upper respiratory infection as he recovered from brain caused by a virus, but they surgery following a stroke have not released any at a Texas hospital. information since. Travis Travis’ illness comes as remained in he’s been trying to put his critical conlife back together following dition after a series of embarrassing surgery public incidents involving Thursday alcohol. morning to Travis pleaded guilty to relieve presdriving while intoxicated in sure on his January following an Travis brain, publiarrest last year and cist Kirt Webster said. received two years of proThe 54-year-old bation and a $2,000 fine. Grammy Award-winning singer had been improving Bieber apologizes while being treated for Justin Bieber has heart failure caused by a apologized by phone to Bill viral infection when he had Clinton for cursing the the stroke. former president and The setback occurred spraying his photo with hours after doctors said cleaning fluid in a New Travis was showing signs York City restaurant

Singer Travis has stroke, brain surgery

kitchen earlier this year. Clinton’s office said Thursday the pop star called, and Bieber “he apologized and offered to help the Clinton Foundation.” Clinton’s office declined to provide any other details. A video released Wednesday by TMZ.com shows the 19-year-old Bieber urinating in a mop bucket as he and others race through the restaurant kitchen. Before exiting, Bieber sprays the Clinton photo and drops the f-bomb in reference to the former president. Bieber tweeted to his more than 41 million followers Wednesday night, thanking Clinton “for taking the time to talk.” Bieber tweeted: “Your words meant alot. (hash) greatguy.”

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL WEDNESDAY’S QUESTION: When you fly on an airliner, do you keep your seat belt fastened during a flight “just in case”?

Passings

Yes

By The Associated Press

PHILIP CALDWELL, 93, the first person to lead Ford Motor Co. who wasn’t a member of the founding family, died Wednesday at his home in New Canaan, Conn. An obituary provided by the company said Mr. Caldwell died of complications from a Mr. Caldwell stroke at his in 1977 home in Connecticut, where he had lived since his retirement. Mr. Caldwell, who was CEO from 1979 until retirement in 1985, is credited with leading Ford from deep financial troubles back to profitability. He also fostered development of the Ford Taurus sedan, which became the top-selling car in America for five years and helped save the company from financial ruin. Mr. Caldwell was named CEO in 1979 and board chairman in 1980. He retired in 1985 after 32 years with the company, but remained on the board until May of 1990. He replaced Henry Ford II as CEO and was picked shortly after high-profile President Lee Iacocca was fired and later joined crosstown rival Chrysler.

__________ CHARLES “CHUCK” FOLEY, 82, the father of nine who invented Twister, the game that became a naughty sensation in living rooms across America in the 1960s and 1970s because of the way it put men and women in compromising positions,

has died. Mr. Foley died July 1 at a care facility in the Minneapolis suburb of St. Louis Park. Mr. Foley His son, Mark Foley, said Thursday that his father had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Mr. Foley and a collaborator, Neil Rabens, were hired in the mid-1960s by a St. Paul manufacturing firm that wanted to expand into games and toys. They came up with a game to be played on a mat on the floor, using a spinner to direct players to place their hands and feet on different colored circles. “Dad wanted to make a game that could light up a party,” Mark Foley said. “They originally called it ‘Pretzel.’ But they sold it to Milton Bradley, which came up with the ‘Twister’ name.” The game became a sensation after Johnny Carson and Eva Gabor played it on “The Tonight Show” in 1966. Hasbro Inc., which now manufacturers the game, said it continues to be a top seller.

________ TOSHI SEEGER, 91, the wife of folk singer Pete Seeger for 70 years, has died. Longtime family friend Thom Wolke said Mrs. Seeger died Tuesday night at the couple’s home in Beacon in New York’s Hudson Valley, about 65 miles north of New York City. The cause of death was not immediately known.

Pete and Toshi Seeger were married July 20, 1943. The couple built their cabin in Beacon after World War II and have stayed on the high spot of land by the Hudson River ever since. They raised three children. Although she was never famous like her 94-year-old husband, friends say Mrs. Seeger’s commitment to social justice was just as strong. Wolke said Mrs. Seeger’s grounded nature complemented Pete’s idealism perfectly.

50.1%

Most of the time

21.5%

If I remember 1.0% No

14.6%

I don’t fly 12.9% Total votes cast: 1,174 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) Two Coast Guard pilots from the Port Angeles air station are in the process of bringing back a new Hall flying boat assigned to the station. Lt. D.B. MacDiarmid and Aviation Pilot W.N. Durham are returning to Port Angeles from Cape May, N.J., where they took delivery last week. Their route from the East Coast isn’t direct: The flying boat is following the water to Miami, then Veracruz and Acapulco in Mexico, and points along the Pacific Coast to its new home. The new flying boat was

built by Hall-Aluminum Aircraft Corp. at Bristol, Pa. Its wingspan is 72 feet, and its cruising range is more than 2,000 miles. Two Wright Cyclone engines, each with 850 horsepower, provide the power.

1963 (50 years ago) A person or people with a possible dislike for small cars — specifically the Volkswagen sedan known colloquially as the “bug” —

caused body damage to one and stole the front seat from the other. Port Angeles police are investigating the theft of the right front seat from a VW parked on North Liberty Street. At roughly the same time at night as the seat theft, someone punched heel prints on the left rear fender and door of another VW on Third Street.

1988 (25 years ago)

Investigators probing the cause of a $250,000 fire at the Port Angeles Moose Peninsula snapshots Lodge early July 5 think a type of firework known as a A TWO-MAN CREW trying to take out a small bottle rocket caused the tree in Port Angeles while blaze. fighting Wednesday Witnesses said they saw Laugh Lines afternoon’s strong, gusty a bottle rocket land on the A NEW SURVEY found winds. They eventually won, roof and ignite the wooden and the garden tree is but a shakes of the lodge at 809 W. that 70 percent of Ameristump . . . Pine St., Fire Marshal Bruce cans admit to “going Becker said. through the motions” at WANTED! “Seen Around” items. The roof collapsed, and their jobs. Send them to PDN News Desk, timbers fell into the buildAnd the other 30 percent P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA ing, damaging much of the blah, blah, blah, punch line. 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email building’s first floor. Jimmy Fallon news@peninsuladailynews.com.

Seen Around

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS FRIDAY, July 12, the 193rd day of 2013. There are 172 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On July 12, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill authorizing the Medal of Honor. On this date: ■ In 1543, England’s King Henry VIII married his sixth and last wife, Catherine Parr. ■ In 1690, forces led by William of Orange defeated the army of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. ■ In 1909, the House of Representatives joined the Senate in passing the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, allowing for a federal income tax, and submitted it to

the states. It was declared ratified in February 1913. ■ In 1943, the World War II tank battle of Prokhorovka between German invaders and Soviet defenders took place with no clear victor. ■ In 1948, the Democratic National Convention, which nominated President Harry S. Truman for a second term of office, opened in Philadelphia. ■ In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower was flown by helicopter from the White House to a secret mountaintop location as part of a drill involving a mock nuclear attack on Washington, D.C. ■ In 1967, six days of racerelated rioting erupted in Newark,

N.J.; the violence claimed 26 lives. ■ In 1977, President Jimmy Carter defended Supreme Court limits on government payments for poor women’s abortions, saying, “There are many things in life that are not fair.” ■ In 1984, Democratic presidential candidate Walter F. Mondale announced he’d chosen U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro of New York to be his running-mate; Ferraro was the first woman to run for vice president on a major-party ticket. ■ In 1988, Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis tapped Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas as his running-mate. ■ In 1993, some 200 people were killed when an earthquake of

magnitude 7.8 struck northern Japan and triggered a tsunami. ■ Ten years ago: Wrapping up a five-day tour of Africa, President George W. Bush said he would not allow terrorists to use the continent as a base “to threaten the world.” ■ Five years ago: Angelina Jolie gave birth at a hospital on the French Riviera to twins Knox and Vivienne, making a family of eight with Brad Pitt. ■ One year ago: A scathing report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh said the late Joe Paterno and other top Penn State officials had buried child sexual abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade earlier to avoid bad publicity.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, July 12-13, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation House passes scaled-down farm legislation WASHINGTON — The House has passed a scaled-down version of a massive farm bill, putting off a fight over food stamp spending and giving Republican leaders a victory after a decisive defeat on the larger bill last month. The GOP leaders scrambled to get the bill to the floor Thursday and gather enough votes this week after making a decision to drop a politically sensitive food stamp section of the bill and pass legislation that contained only farm programs. The plan faced opposition from Democrats, farm groups and conservative groups. But Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia navigated his colleagues to a 216-208 vote by convincing Republican members that this was the best chance to get the bill passed and erase the embarrassment of the June defeat. The dropped food stamp section would have made a 3 percent cut to the $80 billion-a-year feeding program. Many Republicans say that isn’t enough since the program’s cost has doubled in the past five years. Democrats have opposed any cuts.

Closing arguments SANFORD, Fla. — George Zimmerman profiled 17-year-old Trayvon Martin assuming he

was up to no good, and that led to the Miami teen’s death, a prosecutor said Thursday in closing arguments of the neighborhood Zimmerman watch volunteer’s second-degree murder trial. “A teenager is dead. He is dead through no fault of his own,” prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda said. “He is dead because a man made assumptions.” Prosecutors began their closing arguments after the judge presiding over the trial ruled that jurors can consider the lesser charge of manslaughter.

NYC building blast NEW YORK — An explosion inside a Chinatown building Thursday led to a fire and a partial collapse, injuring a dozen people, including firefighters. Three of those injured were hospitalized in serious condition. Injuries to the other people, including the four firefighters, were minor. An emergency call about the fire at the five-story brick building, which has businesses on the first level and apartments above, came in around 12:45 p.m., the fire department said. The explosion and fire shattered windows on the first three floors. It was unclear what caused the explosion on the first floor, and there was minimal collapse inside the building. The Associated Press

Briefly: World

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PROTESTERS

SCALE

CAIRO — Prosecutors will investigate allegations that Egypt’s ousted president escaped from prison during the 2011 revolution with help from the Palestinian militant group Hamas, officials said Thursday. Chief prosecutor Hesham Barakat received testimonies from a court in the Suez Canal city of Ismailia that will be the base for an investigation by state security prosecutors into the jailbreak by Mohammed Morsi and more than 30 other Muslim Brotherhood leaders, according to the officials who spoke on condition of anonymity The question of whether Hamas helped them escape amid chaos surrounding the 2011 uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak has been debated in the media for months. The issue has taken on more significance since Morsi was ousted July 3. The toppled Islamist leader has been kept at an undisclosed Defense Ministry facility.

Dead lawyer convicted MOSCOW — More than three years after he died in prison, whistle-blowing Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky was found guilty of tax evasion by a Moscow court Wednesday. The posthumous trial of Magnitsky was a macabre chapter in a case that ignited a high-

emotion dispute between Russia and Washington. Magnitsky was a lawyer for U.S.-born British investor William Browder when Magnitsky he alleged in 2008 that organized criminals colluded with corrupt Interior Ministry officials to claim a fraudulent $230 million tax rebate after illegally seizing subsidiaries of the company. He was arrested on tax evasion charges and died in prison in November 2009 of untreated pancreatitis at age 37.

Indonesian prisoners JAKARTA, Indonesia — About 150 prisoners escaped Thursday from an overcrowded prison, and others held officers hostage, following a riot triggered by a blackout. Prison directorate spokesman Akbar Hadi said the inmates forced their way out from Tanjung Gusta Prison in Medan, the capital of North Sumatra province, while others set the prison’s offices on fire. Police Spokesman Maj. Gen. Ronny Frengky Sompie said police were investigating media reports that 12 terrorist inmates were among those who escaped. Hadi said about 15 officers were being held captive inside the prison. It holds about 2,400 prisoners, but media reports say its normal capacity is 400. The Associated Press

TOWER

A woman, upper left, Thursday scales The Shard, at 1,017 feet the tallest building in western Europe, to protest against Shell oil’s drilling in the Arctic. In all, six female Greenpeace activists scaled the building and were arrested after reaching the top. The climb took them 15 hours.

Frantic passengers made calls to 9-1-1 ‘Not enough medics,’ one person says THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Egypt probing Morsi for 2011 jail escape

LONDON

SAN FRANCISCO — Passengers who called 9-1-1 minutes after a Boeing 777 crashed at San Francisco International Airport said not enough help had arrived and they were doing their best to keep the critically injured alive, according to 9-1-1 calls that portray a scene of desperation. Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash-landed July 6 when it came in too low and too slow, killing two passengers and injuring others as it skittered and spun 100 feet. Most of the injured suffered minor injuries. “We’ve been on the ground, I don’t know, 20 minutes, a halfhour,” one woman said in a 9-1-1

call released late Wednesday by the California Highway Patrol. “There are people laying on the tarmac with critical injuries, head injuries. We’re almost losing a woman here. We’re trying to keep her alive.” Another caller told a dispatcher: “There’s not enough medics out here.” The dispatcher said: “OK. We do have help started that way. You said that they’re there, but there’s not enough people, correct?” “Yes,” the caller said.

Fear of explosion San Francisco officials said ambulances could not come too close out of concern that the plane would explode. Authorities have said that during the chaos, one of the emergency response trucks might have run over one of the two Chinese teenagers killed in the crash. Meanwhile, federal investigators are examining the cockpit interaction of two Asiana Airlines pilots who had taken on new roles

before the crash of Flight 214 — one of whom had seldom flown a Boeing 777, and an instructor who was on his first training flight. There were four pilots on board, but the National Transportation Safety Board is focusing on the working relationship between Lee Gang-kuk, who was landing the big jet for his first time at San Francisco International Airport, and Lee Jeong-Min, who was training him. While the two men had years of aviation experience, this mission involved unfamiliar duties. The pilots were assigned to work together through a tightly regulated system developed after several deadly crashes in the 1980s were blamed in part on inexperience in the cockpit, NTSB Chairwoman Deborah Hersman said Wednesday. “We are certainly interested to see if there are issues where there are challenges to crew communication, if there’s an authority break in where people won’t chal-

50 presumed dead in Quebec Provincial premier criticizes rail chief THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec — Crews worked tirelessly Thursday to find the burned remains of the 50 people presumed dead in Saturday’s catastrophic oil train derailment, as Quebec Premier Pauline Marois toured the traumatized town and took the U.S. railway’s chief to task for not visiting sooner. Marois arrived in Lac-Megantic hours after police said they had recovered more bodies, raising the body count to 20. Workers searched through the epicenter of the explosions for the remaining 30.

Quick Read

Edward Burkhardt, CEO of U.S.based Rail World Inc., which owns the runaway train, also was in town. He arrived We d n e s d a y Marois with a police escort and faced jeers from residents. Marois earlier faulted Burkhardt for what she said was a slow response, and called the company chief’s behavior “deplorable” and “unacceptable.” She renewed some of the criticism Thursday. “I already commented on his behavior and the behavior of his company yesterday. The leader of

this company should have been there from the beginning,” Marois said at a news conference. Burkhardt said he had delayed his visit in order to deal with the crisis from his office in Chicago. “I understand the extreme anger,” he said. “We owe an abject apology to the people in this town.” Burkhardt has blamed the engineer for failing to set the brakes properly before the unmanned train hurtled down a 7-mile incline, derailed and ignited in the center of LacMegantic early Saturday. All but one of its 73 cars was carrying oil, and at least five exploded. Burkhardt said the train’s engineer had been suspended without pay and was under “police control.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: Saudi princess held in human trafficking case

Nation: Long prison term for ex-Army Corps official

Nation: Lawyer disputes Boston Strangler DNA link

World: Distant quakes can affect oil fields, study says

A 30-YEAR-OLD DOMESTIC worker from Kenya flagged down a bus in California and told a passenger she had been held against her will. It wasn’t long before a Saudi princess was under arrest. Meshael Alayban, wife of Saudi Prince Abdulrahman bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz al Saud, appeared Thursday in an Orange County court wearing a jail jumpsuit. Alayban, 42, was charged Wednesday with human trafficking. She was arrested at an Irvine condominium after the Kenyan woman told authorities she was forced to work excessive hours and was not allowed to leave.

A FORMER MANAGER with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was sentenced Thursday to more than 19 years in prison for masterminding a $30 million bribery/kickback scheme. U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan called Kerry Khan’s conduct, which included wiretapped conversations referring to a planned sexual encounter with a teenage girl, “shocking, vicious and cruel.” The 55-year-old Khan, a resident of Alexandria, Va., pleaded guilty last year to orchestrating the fraud, called the largest domestic bribery and bid-rigging scheme in the history of federal contracting.

THE FAMILY OF a deceased man suspected of being the Boston Strangler is outraged that police secretly followed his nephew to collect DNA. Attorney Elaine Sharp said Albert DeSalvo’s family also believes there’s still reasonable doubt that he killed the Strangler’s last supposed victim, even if DNA tests show a 100 percent match. Authorities said Thursday new tests led them to conclude DeSalvo is a 99.9 percent match to DNA found on Mary Sullivan’s body. They’ve obtained a court order to exhume his body. DeSalvo confessed to the 1960s killings but recanted before dying in prison in 1973.

THE POWERFUL EARTHQUAKE that rocked Japan in 2011 set off tremors around a West Texas oil field, according to new research that suggests oil and gas drilling operations may make fault zones sensitive to shock waves from distant big quakes. A study led by Columbia University researchers and published Friday in Science suggests a strong quake halfway around the globe can set off quakes near injection wells in the U.S. “The seismic waves act as the straw that breaks the camel’s back, pushing the faults that last little bit toward an earthquake,” said researcher Nicholas van der Elst said in an email.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

State offers funds to avert 7-year-old bluff crumbling at PA landfill assaulted; BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ

teen in jail

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The state Department of Ecology will provide $3.9 million to help fund a project to keep a crumbling bluff at the city’s closed landfill at the west end of 18th Street from releasing decades of accumulated garbage into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. At the same time, City Council members are expected to consider next week spending an additional $931,000 to finalize designs for the landfill bluff-stabilization project. Strips of the 135-foot bluff are as narrow as 11 feet in places at the landfill the city operated from 1979 to 2007, and that is all that is holding back “a mountain of garbage,” City Engineer Mike Puntenney has said. The total cost of the project is expected to be about $17.5 million, Puntenney said, though he added that number could change. Work is expected to begin next summer. The emergency financial assistance from Ecology, which will not need to be paid back, had been included in all versions of the state 2013-2015 biennium budget, a final version of which Gov. Jay Inslee signed at the end of June. “We’re delighted to get the [$3.9] million for the regional landfill,” Mayor Cherie Kidd, a member of the Utility Advisory Committee, said at the panel’s meeting Tuesday. “We began aggressive discussions with Ecology regarding this last fall,” Kidd added. Utility Advisory Committee members voted unanimously Tuesday to recommend that council members

BY DOUG ESSER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Exposed trash protrudes in June 2012 from the top of a bluff where erosion has undercut a portion of the former Port Angeles landfill. approve a $931,000 amend- project in March. At Tuesday’s committee ment to the city’s contract with Seattle-based Herrera meeting, Herrera project Environmental Consultants. manager Tom Bourque said his firm is now recommending the seawall be augSeawall design mented by “pinning up” each The money is to complete end of the wall with addidesigns for reinforcing a sea- tional wall stretches angled wall built at the base of the to prevent waves from erodfailing bluff in west Port ing the 135-foot bluff behind Angeles and moving about the wall. 250,000 cubic yards of accuThis is a change from the mulated waste back from the poured concrete structures edge of the bluff to another called Core-locs that Herrera area of the landfill. initially had proposed earlier Puntenney said Wednes- this year to add to the ends of day the amendment to Her- the wall. rera’s contract, which will City Councilwoman Sissi increase Herrera’s contract Bruch, also a Utility Adviamount to $2,498,771, likely sory Committee member, will come before the full City expressed concern that addCouncil for approval this ing to the wall would exacerTuesday. bate bluff erosion east of the The council is expected to wall. meet at 6 p.m. at City Hall, “I just feel like we’re mak321 E. Fifth St. ing things worse in some Of the total amount of the ways,” Bruch said. project, some $15 million has “At this point, I’d prefer been tapped for construction, just having the wall go away.” an amount Puntenney said Bourque and Puntenney has decreased since council said recent wave-action studmembers last heard an ies Herrera has done show update from Herrera on the the wall is contributing to

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BRYAN JETER police chief found the girl early Thursday after midnight. The girl, who had been choked, was able to identify the suspect by name, Jeter said. They live close to each other but not in the same building. Officers served a search warrant at 4:45 a.m. Thursday and arrested the teen. Investigators in Puyallup still questioned him at midmorning, and he was to be booked into Remann Hall, the Pierce County juvenile detention facility in Tacoma.

Likely charges He’ll likely be charged with assault and other counts. Detectives are asking residents of the complex about what they may have seen. “It appears he had some story about finding an injured animal in the woods to lure her away,” Brokaw said. Investigators are trying to determine whether the girl was abducted or went willingly, since she knows the suspect, Jeter said. Police had had previous contact with the teen a week earlier when he was a victim in an unrelated assault, Jeter said. The attack is a reminder to children and parents to be wary, even in their own neighborhood, officers said. “Stay in a group, and don’t wander off with someone, even if you think you trust them,” Jeter said. “If you’re not comfortable, listen to your intuition, find an adult or go home.”

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“That’s what it’s all about: having the smallest amount of impact possible,” Puntenney said. “It should have no more impact than what’s already out there.” Herrera also said moving the landfill’s garbage will include modifying two landfill cells’ stormwater drainage and gas extraction systems, and obtaining permits required by Ecology for reopening the closed cell, into which the garbage closest to the bluff edge will be moved. “Ecology has never done this before,” Bourque said. “No one has ever done this before.” Puntenney said Herrera expects to have all permit applications completed by August, adding that the city is still on schedule to begin moving garbage and working on the wall by summer 2014. Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

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bluff erosion east of the wall, though less so than initially thought. “The fact is, the bluff’s retreating,” Bourque said. Puntenney said pinning up the ends of the wall probably would cost slightly more than the Core-loc option, though the wall ends will have less of a footprint on the shoreline than the concrete structures would.

SEATTLE — A 7-yearold girl was playing outside with other children at an apartment community Wednesday evening in Puyallup when she apparently was lured into nearby woods and sexually assaulted, police said. She was found choked and unable to walk but gave police enough information to arrest a 14-yearold neighbor boy, said Capt. Dalan Brokaw and Chief Bryan Jeter. The girl was taken to Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma in serious condition and is expected to survive. Her parents were with her Thursday morning. “She did have quite extensive injuries and was not able to walk under her own power,” Jeter said. “She’s an extremely brave and strong young girl to be able to survive this brutal attack.” Investigators were waiting for a medical report to confirm suspicions of a sexual assault, he said. It was a warm summer evening, and children at the Glenbrooke apartment community were playing outside when the girl disappeared at about 6 p.m. Wednesday. Family and friends searched for about two hours before reporting her missing. “My guess is they thought she was in the complex somewhere. After a couple hours, it was not normal, and they panicked a little bit,” Jeter said. Police went door-to-door in the complex and checked cars in the parking lot. A police dog from the Normandy Park Police Department was brought in, and it picked up a scent from a tennis shoe that was found on a trail. The dog led its handler and searchers into a nearby wooded area, where they

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

A5

Father charged in 3-year-old’s death BY MATT VOLZ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HELENA, Mont. — Preliminary autopsy results show a Lacey boy whose body was found in southwestern Montana likely died of injuries from bluntand sharp-force trauma, authorities have said. Montana Department of Justice officials identified the 3-year-old boy as Broderick Daniel Cramer of Lacey. His father, Jeremy Brent Cramer, has been charged with deliberate homicide and is in jail on $250,000 bond. No other details were released about how the boy died, and authorities said an additional pathology examination and investigation is needed. “It does appear that there was some sort of weapon used that caused the blunt-force trauma and also the sharp-force trauma,” said AnacondaDeer Lodge County Attorney Ben Krakowka. Authorities have found what may be the weapon, but Krakowka declined to say what it was or where it was found.

“It does appear that there was some sort of weapon used that caused the blunt-force trauma and also the sharp-force trauma.” BEN KRAKOWKA Anaconda-Deer Lodge County attorney rural road and discovered the boy’s body the next morning about 150 to 200 yards away, Krakowka said. Cramer’s wife told police her husband had left their home with their son Monday. Lacey Police Cmdr. Jim Mack said an Amber Alert wasn’t issued because the mother never indicated that the child was in danger. But police requested help from law enforcement in Eastern Washington, Idaho and Montana in a search for the boy after the 31-year-old woman reported her husband’s fuel card was used in Moses Lake. Police said the couple had been arguing about finances. “He had asked her earlier within the last couple of weeks if they could do a road trip to the East Coast, and she said, ‘No, we don’t

have the money,’” Mack said. Cramer had been living in Lacey for about a year and had a Montana’s driver’s license, Mack said. Krakowka said he had no information on Cramer’s background.

First court appearance Cramer has requested a public defender, but Krakowka said he did not know whether one had been appointed. Cramer made an initial court appearance Tuesday to hear the charges against him, and a new court date has not been set. Police were still investigating the crime scene and interviewing witnesses Wednesday. The state Division of Criminal Investigation and the Anaconda-Deer Lodge County Department of Law Enforcement are leading the investigation.

Body found Tuesday

Downtown redesign under way in Sequim Bike ramps, new benches, signs to remake core with city’s vision BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– New eggplant-colored bicycle racks have popped up on the streets of Sequim as partial evidence of a $50,000 makeover of downtown decor. With revenue from hotelmotel lodging taxes, the city is placing the bike racks, new benches, garbage cans and wayfinding signs around its commercial core. The bicycle racks followed the installation of a $2,500 full-color vinyl decal of the city’s logo, which was melted onto the asphalt in the middle of the city’s main intersection of Sequim Avenue and Washington Street on July 1. Sequim City Manager Steve Burkett said at Monday night’s City Council meeting he has heard “it’s a lot smaller than I thought it would be” from citizens about the 9-foot-diameter decal. “On the street, it doesn’t look so big,” Burkett said.

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The benches, garbage cans and wayfinding signs are expected to be installed during the week of July 24, Burkett said, just after Sequim Lavender Weekend, which brings tourists to town for the Lavender Festival, put on by the Sequim Lavender Growers Association, and the Lavender Farm Faire, organized by the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association. Plans for the makeover of the city’s downtown were made with members of the Sequim Chamber Merchants Group, a subcommittee of the SequimDungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce. Among the panel’s top requests were more furniture — benches, for instance — in the downtown core and a makeover of Seal Street Park in the middle of West Washing-

tries for $215,000 with the idea of controlling development at the city’s busiest intersection. The Gull station closed in the 1980s. Burkett said the potential tenant is “a people place” that would fit into the city’s vision for the corner.

37814004

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

New eggplant-colored bike racks have been placed around Sequim to mark the start of a $50,000 campaign by the city to makeover its downtown core.

Broderick’s body was found Tuesday 5 miles southeast of Anaconda, Mont. Authorities began searching for him after his father was arrested Monday night in a convenience store bathroom washing blood from his clothes. They found the 38-yearold Cramer’s truck on a

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PA officials react to loss at hatchery down, there’s no backup for the backup.� Morrill said the tribe has not ascribed blame in the death of the fish. “The [National Park Service] didn’t kill the fish,� he said, adding that no thought has been given at this point to considering whether a request for compensation is warranted. “We’re weighing our options and looking at what to do next,� Morrill said. The estimated 200,000 dead coho represented about half of the 420,000 salmon on hand when the water pump failed, Morrill said, adding that hatchery staff released 299,755 coho last year. The hatchery had about 120,000 steelhead trout in its pools when the pump stopped working and released a similar number last year, Morrill added. The surviving fish will be released into the wild next spring as planned, Morrill said.

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES POLICE DEPARTMENT

Gale Turton, a longtime Port Angeles police officer, sits in a patrol car earlier this week. The 65-year-old will retire today after 37 years of service with the department.

Longtime police officer to retire after 37 years itive things. You work through the negatives and try to accentuate the posiPORT ANGELES — tives. Gale Turton, Port Angeles He added: “I love going Police Department support to work every day.� services officer and former patrol sergeant, will retire First certified EMT today after 37 years of serTurton took a night vice. Turton, 65, has set a course at Peninsula College number of firsts for the and became the departdepartment since becoming ment’s first certified EMT during his first year in unian officer in May 1976. He was the first officer to form. “I just thought it would be certified as an emergency medical technician be good to know a little bit and the first to hold a bach- extra, a little more than a first-aid class that you could elor’s degree. “It’s gone by so fast,� do in eight hours or a day,� Turton said. “I can’t believe he said. I’ve been here this long.� “We [the police] were Born and raised in usually the first ones at car Sequim, Turton attended wrecks where people are all Peninsula College and screwed up.� earned a bachelor’s degree Turton, who earned an in business administration associate degree in criminal from the University of justice from Peninsula ColWashington in 1971. lege in 1978, was one of the He was drafted into the first officers in the departArmy, where he spent ment to be assigned as a nearly two years working in detective. the personnel data support When off duty, Turton center at the Edgewood enjoyed coaching his now(Md.) Arsenal. adult children, Sarah and Realizing he wasn’t cut Ryan, on the baseball and out for a routine desk job, softball diamonds. he returned to the North “It’s a good place for kids Olympic Peninsula to to grow up,� Turton said of became a Port Angeles Port Angeles. police officer. Since becoming a sup“Every day is different, port services technician in and everybody you deal May 2000, Turton has with is different,� Turton supervised volunteers and said of being an officer. managed the junk vehicle “There are many, many pos- abatement program and BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

sex offender notification program in partnership with the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office. He has assisted with fleet management, served subpoenas and managed traffic control for civic events. Turton also took on the role of department historian, with Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith crediting Turton for saving a large number of historical documents and artifacts from the old police station on Oak Street. Looking back, Turton said his most difficult cases were those involving young people who committed suicide. Smith said Turton and his productivity will be sorely missed, adding that Turton has always been willing to lend a hand to a fellow officer. “There’s always one guy in a police department who’s got the institutional knowledge and actually shows you stuff,� Smith said. “Gale is that guy.�

and a public safety employee,� Port Angeles Police Chief Terry Gallagher said in a statement. “His everyday contributions to the operation of the police department are many.�

PORT ANGELES — Scores of dead young coho salmon and steelhead trout have been buried in a hole in the ground not far from the Lower Elwha Klallam fish hatchery after they were found dead at the hatchery last weekend. Now, tribal staff are figuring out what needs to happen at the hatchery, located off Stratton Road across the street from the Elwha River Casino, to prevent a similar fish loss in the future. “We’re still assessing and still looking for ways to make sure it doesn’t happen again,� said Doug Morrill, natural resources manager for the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. In a Thursday interview, Morrill said hatchery staff likely will know more next week about a pump failure that led to the deaths of at least 200,000 coho salmon, spawned last fall, and roughly 2,000 year-old steelhead trout last weekend. Probably suffocated

The fish that died likely suffocated in the still water that the pump should have been circulating, Morrill explained. He compared the situation to a meeting room crowded with people packed shoulder-to-shoulder but with no air flowing through and all the windows and doors closed. “The same thing happens in a stagnant pond, with no air going in and out,� Morrill said. Morrill said there are no plans to actively move new young fish into the hatchery, though some naturally spawned fish from Indian Creek and Little River, both tributaries of the Elwha River, could find their way in on their own. Although hatchery staff were hit hard by the fish loss, Morrill said, the entire Elwha River restoration is unprecedented and as such is creating river conditions and other challenges that have never been dealt with before. “I hate to say we’re learning as we go along, but we certainly have to adapt as we find out more info about what’s going on in the river,� Morrill said.

Questions remain

Gallagher recalled one of his first encounters with Turton. “In 1985, I remember a young patrol officer struggling to write his first search warrant during the course of a residential burglary investigation,� Gallagher said. “It was Gale that stepped up and taught that patrol officer what he needed to know. The burglary was solved, and the heirloom silverware set that had been stolen was recovered. “That patrol officer was me, and I have never forgotten that it was Gale that took the time to get my career off on the right track.� In retirement, Turton and his wife, Susan, plan to Wednesday luncheon remain on the Peninsula Current and former Port and go camping. “I would do it all over Angeles police officers recagain,� he said. ognized Turton at an infor________ mal luncheon Wednesday. “Gale Turton has spent Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be the greater part of his life in reached at 360-452-2345, ext. service to others, both as a 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula Vietnam-era Army veteran dailynews.com.

Morrill said he could not yet estimate how much the dead fish were worth or how much permanent repairs, or any needed upgrades, to the hatchery’s secondary pump system might cost. Hatchery staff restored water circulation quickly after the pump failure was discovered, tribal officials had said. The secondary pump system, used to circulate ground water through the hatchery, had been in use since December 2012 because Olympic National Park’s Elwha Water Treatment Plant had not been providing enough treated river surface water to the hatchery. The treatment plant, built as part of the $325 million Elwha River damremoval and restoration project, has been operating at reduced capacity since fall because sediment released during dam removal has been unexpectedly finding its way into the inner workings of the plant. The hatchery’s secondary pump system was not designed to be continuously used like it has been since December, Morrill added. “The take-home message ________ is that this is the backup Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can system we were having to be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. use,� Morrill said. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula “So when this [went] dailynews.com.

The boat, which is reported to be carrying between 2,700 and 3,000 gallons of diesel fuel, then ran aground. The cause is under investigation, the Coast Guard said. After divers rig the boat for removal, it will be lifted to the waterline, pumped free of flood water and towed to Lovric Sea-Craft’s dry dock. An incident post was being established on Anacortes.

banking, leaving the industry running on mostly cash DENVER — Congress in the states that allow members from Colorado marijuana. and Washington are planThe pot banking bill ning to try again to help marijuana business access would allow businesses to make deposits, apply for banking services. loans and accept credit A bill introduced cards. Wednesday revives an Colorado Rep. Ed Perleffort to shield financial mutter and Washington institutions from prosecuRep. Denny Heck are lead tion if they allow marisponsors. The measure juana businesses to access faces dim prospects in the any banking services. Republican-controlled Financial institutions House. now violate federal drug The Associated Press law if they allow marijuana

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Thursday after a 59-foot fishing vessel ran aground on Guemes Island, just north of Anacortes, with about 3 feet of the vessel’s bow remaining above the waterline. The Port Angeles crew saw no sheen or pollution from the wreck of the Clam Digger. The Coast Guard, National Response Corp. Environmental Services, Global Diving and Salvage, and state Department of Ecology personnel are coordinating the pollution miti-

gation and salvage boat with its owner, the Coast Guard said. Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound had received a mayday call, saying the boat was taking on water, from the vessel’s lone crew member at about 5 p.m. Wednesday. The Victoria Clipper ferry arrived at 5:11 p.m. and helped the person off a life raft. A Bellingham Coast Guard boat crew transferred the person safely off the ferry, the Coast Guard said.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(J) — FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

A7

Famed author’s boat awaits PT work BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A fishing boat that provided the setting for some of Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck’s books is on blocks in the Boat Haven, where the owner will determine the next step for the vessel. Gerry Kehoe, a businessman and developer in the prolific late author’s old stomping ground of Salinas, Calif., purchased the 72-foot Western Flyer in 2010 with the intention of using it as a tourist attraction in the downtown area that is already anchored by the National Steinbeck Center. “It was a wreck when we bought it, but it is part of literary history, and we wanted to give it a home,” Kehoe said, speaking from Salinas. At the time of the purchase, the vessel was submerged near Anacortes and had to be raised twice before repairs were considered, Kehoe said.

Kehoe had the boat towed to Port Townsend. “We got bids from people in Port Townsend and Seattle to tow the boat in for repairs, and the Seattle people wanted twice as much as Port Townsend,” he said. “The planks on the hull are very brittle, so on the way over, we had a crew bailing water so it would stay afloat,” Kehoe said. The vessel, built in Tacoma in 1937, was pressed into service as a sardine fishing boat.

the Bering Sea. It sank twice before Kehoe bought it. Kehoe plans to come to Port Townsend in August “to go over the whole thing with a fine-toothed comb” to determine what repairs are practical. He would like to restore it to its original condition with one exception: Kehoe said the boat isn’t seaworthy and will need to be transported to California on land, perhaps in pieces.

Chartered by Steinbeck

Kevin Bailey, a Seattle author working on a book about the boat, said estimates of repair and restoration fall between $700,000 and $1 million, with an additional maintenance cost of $100,000 per year. “There are a lot of people who want to restore the boat, but they are all kind of dreamers,” Bailey said. ________ “They see this old boat, Jefferson County Editor Charlie they see its value and want Bermant can be reached at 360to do something, but they 385-2335 or cbermant@peninsula don’t realize the cost of the dailynews.com.

During that time, it was chartered by Steinbeck and marine biologist Ed Ricketts, who became the model for the character “Doc” in Steinbeck’s Cannery Row, published in 1945. Steinbeck, who lived from 1902 to 1968, was born in Salinas. His novel The Grapes of Wrath — about the migration of a family from the Oklahoma Dust Bowl to California — won a

Repair restoration

Cannery Row author John Steinbeck chartered the Western Flyer in 1940 for a trip to Baja California’s Sea of Cortez. He later wrote about it in The Log From the Sea of Cortez, published in 1951. The Western Flyer went Pulitzer Prize in 1940 and a National Book Award. Stein- through several owners, beck was awarded the Nobel was renamed Gemini and Prize in Literature in 1962. became a fishing boat on

maintenance and the tremendous amount of energy that it will take to accomplish this.” Bailey said he has “seen a lot of people come and go” in efforts to restore the vessel. Jim Pivarnik, deputy director of the Port of Port Townsend, said the port collected a $25,000 deposit from Kehoe to cover the cost of disposal if needed. “If they stick us with the boat, we have enough money to cut it up and put it in the landfill, but so far, they have acted in good faith,” Pivarnik said. Kehoe would not disclose how much he paid for the Western Flyer but said he would make the cost of the purchase and restoration public in the future. Kehoe said final decisions about the future of the boat will be deferred until after his on-site evaluation.

Bloodstained jeans to be allowed in trial A Clallam County sheriff’s deputy is shown wearing Darold Stenson’s pants in April 1993.

Suppress motion denied in trial of double murder BY ROB OLLIKAINEN

spent 14 years on death row and was eight days away from being executed by lethal injection when a judge issued a stay of execution in late 2008. Stenson has maintained his innocence.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Clallam County Superior Court judge has denied Darold Stenson’s motion to suppress the bloodstained jeans he wore when he allegedly shot and killed his wife and business partner more than 20 years ago. Stenson, 60, will be retried on two counts of first-degree aggravated murder in Kitsap County in September. Judge S. Brooke Taylor denied a defense motion to suppress the pants and gravel evidence at trial — and ruled on several other motions — in a daylong pretrial hearing Wednesday. Stenson’s lawyers argued that the pants should be suppressed because they were mishandled by investigators. Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly said the motion to suppress the pants and gravel was one of the biggest, “if not the biggest, motion” that Taylor con-

Deputy wore jeans

CLALLAM COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

sidered this week. Stenson is charged with double murder in the killings of his wife, Denise, and business partner, Frank Hoerner,

at his bird farm on Kane Lane near Sequim in March 1993. Convicted in Clallam County in 1994, Stenson

In an 8-1 ruling, the state Supreme Court in May 2012 overturned Stenson’s original conviction on the grounds that his rights were violated because the state wrongfully suppressed evidence, including photographs depicting a Clallam County sheriff’s deputy wearing the bloodspattered jeans. The high court remanded the case back to Clallam County for a new trial. Taylor in April granted a defense motion for a change of venue because of substantial publicity surrounding the case over the past 20 years. Although Taylor still will preside over the trial, a Kit-

sap County jury will determine his fate. Blake Kremer, one of Stenson’s three attorneys, argued in open court June 12 that the detective, Monty Martin, broke the chain of custody when he took the pants to his “unsanitary garage and spread them out on the floor and experimented with them” in the wake of the murders. Bloody patches of the jeans were cut out and sent to an FBI lab and discarded. Kremer, a University Place lawyer, said the only value of the pants was the “prejudicial shock value of showing a pair of pants that a defendant was wearing that had blood on them.” After denying the motion to suppress the pants and gravel from Hoerner’s pants, Taylor denied a state motion to prohibit other evidence and a defense motion to suppress video recording of Stenson walking through the crime scene with investigators. Taylor also authorized out-of-state witness subpoenas for the four- to six-week trial, which will begin with jury selection Sept. 16. Multiple witnesses are scheduled to testify in sup-

udge S. Brooke Taylor also denied a defense motion to suppress gravel evidence at trial — and ruled on several other motions — in a daylong pretrial hearing Wednesday.

J

port of a defense argument that a person other than Stenson may have been involved in the murders. Stenson’s other attorneys are Roger Hunko of Port Orchard and Sherilyn Peterson of Seattle. Kelly is the only lawyer representing the state. She was granted a two-month trial continuance in June. Taylor on Wednesday set a pretrial hearing for 10 a.m. Aug. 28 in Clallam County Superior Court.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb contributed to this report.

Ferry: ‘Unusual’ Layoffs Jury: Selection process CONTINUED FROM A1 events were planned for the dock, Grad said, though the The dock is between 100 lack of a dock during the and 120 feet in length, said summer will mean less Curtis Grad, president and moorage space for boats. “We’ll definitely have to CEO of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority, and was work around finding capacparallel to the mainland ity for boats, especially durwhen the ferry backed into it. ing event periods,” Grad The three pieces of the said. Malane said Ryan Burdock were secured soon after the impact, he added. les, Black Ball Ferry Line The dock will have to be vice president, could not rebuilt before it can be used remember a similar inciagain, Grad said; he could dent happening in Burles’ not estimate how long that 30 years with Black Ball Ferry Line. might take. “It’s certainly an unusual “Once we’re done dealing with the insurance claim, occurrence,” Malane said. “That’s probably an we can work on both the timing and the plan for the understatement.” Grad agreed that such rebuild,” Grad said. “We’re still in that an incident is rare. “The [ferry line] is a assessment phase.” Grad said the dock, great operator, a great host which the Greater Victoria and [has] a great track Harbour Authority bought record,” Grad said. three years ago, was used to ________ service seaplanes and proReporter Jeremy Schwartz can vide additional moorage for be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. boats in the harbor. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula No harbor-centered dailynews.com.

CONTINUED FROM A1 Hundreds of well-wishers attended the grand opening of the Marine Drive facility in November 2003. Workers at the $13 million facility built the company’s 164-foot-long superyacht, which was to sell for a reported $27.5 million in 2003, the Peninsula Daily News reported at the time. The building, constructed by Fisher and Sons of Burlington, is located on a 3-acre site that Westport bought from the Port of Port Angeles for $530,000. The company was anticipating employing 200 workers at the facility in 2004, according to the PDN. The cabinet shop was already in operation when the yacht-building facility was constructed.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5060, or at paul.gottlieb@ peninsuladailynews.com.

The schedule now is that Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Chris Ashcraft, who is trying the case with Rosekrans, will make an opening statement at 9 a.m. Monday in Jefferson County Superior Court at the courthouse at 1820 Jefferson St. The prosecution’s opening statement will be followed by one from the defense. A jury was seated at about 2:45 p.m. Thursday after four days of sifting through the jury pool. Sixteen people were chosen: eight men and eight women. Four of these will be designated as alternates before testimony begins, Harper said during his instructions to the jury. Jury selection was completed without the attorneys using all of their peremptory challenges. “The judge was extremely thorough,”

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Richard Davies, left, who is representing Michael J. Pierce, and Jefferson County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Chris Ashcraft discuss opening statement schedules after a jury was seated Thursday. Rosekrans said. “We started at 177 and got down to 49, and he left no stone unturned.” Superior Court Administrator Michelle Lorand said, “We actually finished before I expected.” The attorneys in this second trial are the same as those who argued in the

original 2010 trial. The presiding judge is new, having been elected to fill the post once held by Judge Craddock D. Verser.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or cbermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, July 12-13, 2013 PAGE

A8

Fishy business about men’s health PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

TAKING FISH-OIL SUPPLEMENTS or even eating too much fatty fish may be linked to an increased risk for prostate cancer, according to a new study from Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The result confirms findings from an earlier study by the same team, but they are puzzling, given fish oil’s supposed anti-inflammatory effect, which would protect against cancer. Researchers could not offer a biological reason for the link, and called for more study. The study analyzed levels of omega-3 fatty acids — the type of oil found in some fish — in the blood of 834 men who developed prostate cancer race- and agematched with 1,393 men who did not. Men who had the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids had a 43 percent increase in risk for prostate cancer and 71 percent increase in risk for the highgrade prostate cancer that is the most likely to be fatal. These results were published

online Wednesday by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Researchers affiliated with institutions including the University of Washington, the National Cancer Institute and Cleveland Clinic were also involved. An initial 2011 study, which found similar results in a different group of men, surprised epidemiology professor Alan Kristal’s team at “The Hutch.” “To be honest, I didn’t believe it,” Kristal said. “It was striking enough to get it into the literature just to see if

with taking fish-oil supplements or eating at least three servings of fish per week. Those men with the highest levels were the most likely to eventually be diagnosed with prostate cancer. However, Kristal notes that different people can have somewhat different levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood despite similar intake. The link between prostate cancer and eating fatty fish or taking fish-oil supplements is far from clear. Other studies have found a protective effect, though a large anyone would repeat it.” analysis of many studies found The team’s most recent study that fish oil had no compelling — and another European study effect on cancer risk in general — confirmed the earlier findings. Edward Giovannucci of the The newest data come from a Harvard School of Public Health, study whose initial goal, when it who was not involved in the began in 2001, was investigating study, noted in an email that this the roles of selenium and vitamin study looked at diagnosis but not E in prostate cancer. patient outcomes. Researchers collected blood Prostate cancers can lie dorsamples from study subjects, who mant for decades, and the risk were not given dietary instrucfactors for developing a tumor tions for omega-3 intake. may not be the same as those The highest blood levels of that cause a tumor to become three omega-3 fatty acids, EPA, fatal. DPA and DHA, were consistent The researchers conceded they

Peninsula Voices 5 instead of 3 I moved to this area in 1989. Yes, from California. Shortly thereafter, there was an issue on the ballot to change from three [Clallam] county commissioners to five. I was amazed to find out we had only three commissioners. I voted for the change to five; however, the people of the Clallam County voted the issue down. The general consensus was that the people could not justify the additional salaries of two more commissioners. With only three commissioners, if two commissioners were to get their heads together in order to move the county in one direction, the third would be powerless. Over the past 20 years, I have seen many problems arise at both the county, and the port [of Port Angeles] because of this threeperson situation. This has led to many needless and costly surveys, the cost of which could have more than paid for the added salaries of two more commissioners. This latest situation at the Port of Port Angeles concerning Mr. [Jeff] Robb’s contract would never have

OUR

did not know of a biological mechanism to explain their findings. “If there were a compelling mechanism, that would make the findings more worrisome,” added Giovannucci. Nevertheless, Kristal said his study should make men think twice about taking fish-oil supplements or eating more than two servings of fish per week. Omega-3 fatty-acid supplements and enriched foods account for more than $5 billion in sales every year, according to a market-research report from Packaged Facts. Kristal emphasized that his study casts doubt on the health effect of dietary supplements such as fish oil and vitamins. In the same study, researchers had previously found that vitamin E was also linked to increased risk for prostate cancer. “Humans are designed for a certain level of micronutrients, and huge doses may not be good,” Kristal said. “More micronutrients does not mean better health — and sometimes means worse.”

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

happened with five commissioners representing the will of the people. If you have lived in this area for 10 to 15 years, you are well aware of all the situations and the costly surveys in county government and the port authority that have arisen due to the three-person board of authority. Perhaps someone out there has kept a list of all these situations and surveys and can list them for us in the paper? Chuck Blum, Sequim

dents. Isn’t it for them? Is this their high school? Don’t they have a voice in what’s going on in their school? As a full-blooded Quileute tribal member, I see no problem in what the students want for their school. It seems like the students get left out of the loop when any major decision comes down that affects their education and how they feel about their school. I have served on the Quileute Tribal Council, the Quileute Tribal School Board and have been recogRockets’ red scare nized nationally for my work in providing the best I have always supported for the students and young Fourth of July fireworks dispeople of our tribe. plays as a way to celebrate I have helped instill the our nation when presented shooting colors for days wrongly believed it would be should be swift and meancultural aspect along with by cities or groups in a safe before and after July 4. safe to forgo this on July 9.) ingful. the academic so that our and sane manner. Many years ago, while If the horse cannot To not do this is irrestudents could have the However, I believe the riding my horse to Port recover, he may have to be sponsible and dangerous. time has passed when any- Angeles from our home at destroyed. Beth Blay, best of two worlds. I see no problem with one should be able to purHeart o’ the Hills, a “funMy position? Sequim the name Redskins, and I chase fireworks to fire for loving” individual threw 1. Fireworks should be their own amusement. firecrackers under my horse limited to “official” displays. A student decision don’t find it offensive. I support those students Every year, fires, injuries, — just for “fun.” 2. Fireworks sales of any I have been reading with who stood up to the powersannoyed neighbors, missing On July 9 of this year, kind should be banned by interest about the debate that-be and want to keep pets, terrified livestock and my horse — recently treated all levels of government over Port Townsend High this name. frightened wildlife occur as and confined for torn ligawithout regard to nationalSchool’s giving up the RedThe only time I feel it is a direct result of certain ments — broke through sev- ity or heritage. used in a negative manner individuals’ promiscuous eral fences during my neigh3. If fireworks are sold in skins name and mascot. It seems like the majoris when it is used to put and wrong-headed “celebra- bors’ 10 p.m.-to-midnight sovereign nations, then the down the Native populations.” festivities and undid any fireworks should be legal for ity of the students at the high school would like to tion. Furthermore, they ignore mending that had occurred. personal use only in those continue with the name, Roy Black Jr., dry conditions and fill the (I tranquilized the horses sovereign nations. LaPush air with loud explosions and July 4 as a precaution, but I and I support those stu4. Law enforcement

More carbon dioxide, less water in trees THE FATE OF the world’s forests on a warming planet has long been one of the great unanswered questions about climate change. Now, new research is complicating the picture further, suggesting that big shifts are already under way in how forests work. A paper published this week suggests that trees in at least some parts of the world are having to pull less water out of the ground to achieve a given amount of growth. Some scientists say they believe that this may be a direct response to the rising level of

carbon dioxide in the air from human emissions, though that has not yet been proved. If the research holds up, it suggests some potential benefits for forests. They might be able to make do with less water, for instance, becoming more resilient in the face of drought and higher temperatures as climate change proceeds. But the new finding also has potential downsides, scientists said. The immense volume of water that trees pull out of the ground winds up in the atmosphere, helping supply moisture

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to farming areas downwind of forests. So if trees use less water, that could ultimately mean less rain for thirsty crops in at least some regions of the world. Several scientists predicted that the new research would set off a flurry of efforts to clarify whether trees are really using less, and what the implications might be, not only for forests but for the human and ecological systems that depend on existing patterns of moisture flow. The work was led by Trevor F. Keenan of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and published online by the scientific

journal Nature. Keenan did most of the work while working as a research associate at Harvard. The study is based on technology that, for about two decades, has allowed scientists to make careful measurements of the water vapor and other gases flowing in and out of forests. Large-scale patterns are starting to emerge. Examining 21 of these records for forests scattered across northern latitudes, Keenan’s group found that broadleaved trees, in particular, are becoming more efficient in their water use.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

For a given amount, they are essentially able to take more carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere than they could only a decade ago. He and his collaborators were able to rule out several possible explanations, leaving one likely candidate: the rising level of carbon dioxide in the air. That increase apparently means plants are able to partly close their leaf pores and still get enough of the gas. And closing pores reduces the evaporation of water from the leaf, meaning the tree needs to suck less of it out of the ground. The New York Times

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CommentaryViewpoints

A visit with France’s ‘optimism professor’ Montebourg’s defenders say he represents the French tradition of dirigisme, wanting a king, desirI AM SITTING across from ing direction from the top, even Arnaud Montebourg, a free-market villain and romantic hero, the though the government now, as pol selected by Frenchwomen in a part of the European Union, has new French Elle magazine poll as fewer tools. It’s hard to fathom how he can a top candidate for having “a be for deglobalization and foreign vacation love affair.” investment at the same time. The tall, eleBut as he looks for unrealistic gant MonteMaureen solutions to problems that may be bourg, dressed insoluble, many “Les Misérables” in a black suit Dowd here admire him for keeping his and black tie dukes up, which keeps their and flanked by hopes up. black leather A bit of an outsider himself — couches and he did not get into the top polititwo Blackcal school, his grandfather was a Berrys, sits in a wealthy Algerian and he calls the chic office above Algerian war and colonization the Seine, unresolved — he relishes sticking charged with it to the bourgeoisie. the quixotic As a young lawyer, he helped task of reviving defend Christian Didier, the killer French industry. of René Bousquet, the Vichy chief He famously sent sales of of police who went above and Breton sailor tops surging when beyond Nazi instructions to send he posed in one to promote his Jews, including thousands of chil“Made in France” campaign. The 50-year-old bachelor’s love dren, to death camps. In 1995, he nearly forced thenlife has been avidly chronicled, including the night he and his for- Prime Minister Alain Juppé out of office over the legality of his mer girlfriend, the attractive apartment. black TV journalist Audrey PulIn 2001, he petitioned to var, were attacked by racist thugs. Montebourg became the Social- impeach President Jacques Chiist kingmaker after a surprisingly rac, under investigation for financial malfeasance. strong result in the 2011 presiHe got into a sizzling row with dential primary on an anti-globalization platform against Ségolène the American tire titan Morry Royal, a former boss, and her for- “The Grizz” Taylor after Taylor said he would not rescue a French mer partner, François Hollande. factory because French workers “I failed the first time, but it are “lazy, overpaid and talk too doesn’t mean I’ll fail the second,” much.” he said about the presidency, Montebourg dismisses that as speaking in a mix of French and “nonsense,” and told me that “in British-accented English. The Economist called him “the Germany, one works less than in France, this needs to be known,” Enfant Terrible” for fencing with foreign capitalists with such feroc- providing booklets to back it up. But, given conflicting French ity that he almost got sacked. statistics, he may be living up to His apache dances with the sobriquet he awards himself: moguls are at odds with the gov“professor of optimism.” ernment’s “Say Oui to France” The French have to learn that campaign designed to lure foreign investment and stop France from if employers can’t fire someone for not working, they’ll never hire dissolving into Greece. From Paris

anyone. It’s hard to believe that the country that gave us a musical based on Victor Hugo’s revolutionaries really needs the government to guard against the latest Disney remake of a bikini beach movie. But Montebourg defends the French threat to blow up the European-U.S. economic talks because they want to keep barriers to U.S. movies and television. Then he concludes, charmingly, “We love American movies.” I ask him about another contentious move: blocking Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer from buying a controlling stake in DailyMotion, the French version of YouTube, which was denounced in a New York Times editorial as protectionism “grounded in meaningless nationalism.” “I didn’t say no to Yahoo,” he insists. “I said let’s make it 50/50. Let’s go together and not let the big eat the small.” He says he trusts President Barack Obama to “clean up the mess” on NSA snooping. “I blame Facebook, Google and all the Internet giants who agreed to spy on us,” he said, “so Europe is going to be tougher on these companies.” French business leaders are howling about Hollande’s wishywashy economic policies. And Nicolas Sarkozy, once excoriated by Montebourg as “a spoiled brat who uses France as a toy that does not belong to him,” is dropping a handkerchief. Can Sarko make a comeback? “Maybe,” Montebourg replies roguishly. “Maybe in handcuffs.”

________ Maureen Dowd is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. Email her via http://tinyurl.com/dowdmail. Her column appears here Fridays.

Even sociopaths have their groupies I WOULD LIKE to declare a war on women — namely, all those cringe-inducing ninnies who lust after every celebrity criminal defendant who has big muscles, tattoos, puppy-dog eyes or Hollywood hair. You know who I’m talking Michelle about, right? Malkin America’s Bad Boy groupies. They’re on the courthouse steps with their “Free Jahar” signs, cooing over how “hot” and “cute” the bloodstained Boston Marathon bombing suspect is. He “can blow me up with babies,” one moral reprobate quipped shortly after his capture. “I’m not gonna lie, the second bombing suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is hot. #sorrynotsorry,” another young girl boasted. Among the callous accused killer’s victims, in case you’d forgotten: 8-year-old Martin Richard, who had been cheering on his dad and other family friends at the race. But who cares about an innocent dead child blown to bits by pressure cooker bombs in the name of Allah? Far from a minuscule fringe, the Ja-harem is a growing social media phenomenon. Its members mimic Justin Bieber’s Beliebers, adopting the last name of their Tiger Beat terrorist and doodling hearts around his mugshot. In heat or in jest, these depraved females continue to spread viral photos, memes and hashtags of their Islamist Idol. One woman showed up at Tsarnaev’s court appearance Wednesday donning a “Free the Lion” T-shirt. Another sported a “Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is innocent” tee, while her gal pal shouted, “Exonerate!” For those ladies who prefer

jocks to jihadis, there’s accused murderer/NFL star Aaron Hernandez. He’s “fine as wine,” one woman lusted. He’s “too damned sexy to go to prison,” another lamented. “He can come to jail at my house,” sighed yet another. In response to one of gangsta Hernandez’s Glock-wielding Instagram pics, one sick chick slavered, “Soooo hot with the combination handgun-mirror selfie.” Fugitive cop-killer Christopher Dorner also had his own fan club. Parked in front of their TV sets, women cheered on the “kinda sexy” homicidal maniac as he terrorized Southern California before perishing in a cabin inferno. “I’d honestly hide Dorner in my house,” one fan girl enthused. Tens of thousands “liked” Dorner’s various support pages on Facebook. Harmless Internet chitterchatter? Don’t kid yourselves. While some of the murderers’ panting minions may be joking, it’s irresponsible women like these who end up enabling, marrying and conspiring with public menaces. They’re your neighbors and relatives, suburban gals like Colleen “Jihad Jane” LaRose and Jamie “Jihad Jamie” PaulinRamirez of Colorado, who agreed to wed Muslim terrorists and conspired to kill Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks. Paulin-Ramirez dragged her 6-year-old (whom she renamed “Walid”) to Ireland to assist with the plot. Family members said she was “easily influenced” and that “any man that came along . . . she kind of followed like a lost puppy.” It would be one thing if these morally stunted followers segregated themselves in enclaves outside the American mainstream. But some of these damaged goods end up on juries, entrusted

to weigh evidence fairly, digest complex instructions, and render impartial verdicts in matters of life and death. Indeed, they are aggressively sought after by predatory defense lawyers. I’ll never forget the female jurors of the first murder trial of confessed parent-killers Lyle and Erik Menendez. Star-struck by “glamorous” defense lawyer Jill Abramson, the women of the Menendez jury told Los Angeles reporters that “they admired her wardrobe and biting wit.” Their swooning for the hunky Menendez brothers, whom they praised as “bright” and “nice,” was obscene. After a mistrial was declared, Abramson arranged for “her jurors” to meet the boys. Soon after, talk show queen Sally Jesse Raphael hosted a program on “women who would leave their husbands to marry a Menendez.” From Menendez mania to Free Jahar, the pathologies persist: Easily led. Emotion-driven. Desperate for male approbation. Prone to acting with their lady parts instead of their lady smarts. Heckuva job, feminism! All the equalization and parity in education and the workplace are for naught if women can’t distinguish right from wrong and “hot” from evil. Lesson learned: You can indoctrinate generations of American women in the ways of gender empowerment, but you can’t make a goodly portion of them think straight. Hormones trump basic human decency and good judgment in the crowded coven of sociopaths.

________ Michelle Malkin’s nationally syndicated column appears in the PDN every Friday. Email malkinblog@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, July 12-13, 2013 SECTION

SPORTS, DEATHS, COMICS, BUSINESS In this section

B

fun & games

Other area events

It’s all

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A library murder-mystery and butterfly wooing for gardeners are among the activities on the North Olympic Peninsula this weekend. For more information about the “Guys and Dolls” show in Port Angeles and the “Evening with the Kingston Trio” in Sequim, as well as other arts and entertainment news, see Peninsula Spotlight, the Peninsula Daily News’ weekly entertainment guide, in today’s edition.

Clallam Bay-Sekiu fest fires up today

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CLALLAM BAY-SEKIU –– A three-day festival to celebrate these two picturepostcard coastal communities kicks off today. The 32nd Clallam BaySekiu Fun Days will run through Sunday with music, painted fish, whimsical comic books, poker, a fun run and the traditional Fun Days fireworks extravaganza. Clallam Bay’s Three Sisters Art Gallery, 16950 state Highway 112, will help youngsters paint fish that will then be used to brighten up the city’s main drag. The Friends of the Library will sell historic photos and used library books throughout the weekend to fund the Clallam Bay Library’s programs. The work of amateur shutterbugs can be spotted throughout the three-day festival in the Chamber of Commerce’s Visitor Center just off state Highway 112.

Helping a vet Special to this year’s Fun Days is a fundraiser to help send injured Navy veteran Jonathan Moore to the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Bob Wall of Compass Rose in Clallam Bay and Main Ax custom fishing rods assembled a mediumheavy RDR Rainshadow Rod that will be given away Saturday afternoon to those who purchased tickets for a special drawing. Tickets are $5 each and are available from Compass Rose, 16803 state Highway 112, and Fisherman’s Outlet, 11 E. Runnion Road in Sequim. Proceeds will help Moore, a cousin of Carol Batson at Fisherman’s Outlet, build up a fund to pay travel costs to get to the games to compete in archery and sharpshooting. “This is a good way to help someone who helped us,” Wall said. Moore lost his right leg above the knee after an accident on an aircraft carrier. “I appreciate so much that they’re doing this for me,” Moore said Monday by telephne from Tampa Bay, Fla., where he was preparing for the National Veterans Wheelchair Games. The drawing will be between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. at Compass Rose. The Grand Parade will take off from Weel Road at 11 a.m. Saturday and :inds

Antique cars in Clallam

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Bob Wall, owner of Compass Rose in Clallam Bay, stands with a fishing pole he will give away in a fundraiser drawing for injured Navy veteran Jonathan Moore during Saturday’s Fun Days celebration. past parade fans to Bogachiel Way. Floats from other festivals on the North Olympic Peninsula regularly participate in the promenade. The kids’ parade will precede the main show. One of the regular highlights of Fun Days is the gala explosion of fireworks

fun. “Everybody loves fireworks,” said Tricia HutsonFun Days fireworks English, Fun Days chairwoman. The two communities of She is also president of Clallam Bay and Sekiu the Clallam Bay-Sekiu save up their potential Chamber of Commerce and Fourth of July firepower chief of the Clallam Bay until Fun Days to give cele- Fire Department. brants a chance to stretch TURN TO FESTIVAL/B2 out the Independence Day off the Breakwater Inn, 15582 state Highway 112.

90 Bogachiel Way, 7 p.m.

Here is the schedule for the 32nd Clallam Bay-Sekiu Fun Days, which runs today through Sunday:

Today ■ Amateur photo contest viewing and judging — Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center on state Highway 112, all day. ■ Kids Fish Painting — Paint a fish to spruce up the Clallam Bay streetscape, Three Sisters, 16950 state Highway 112, all day. ■ Friends of the Library local historic photo sale — School bus barn, 16933 state Highway 112, evening. ■ Festival potluck social — Bus garage, 6 p.m. ■ Poker game — Lions Club,

Saturday ■ Amateur photo contest viewing and judging — Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, all day. ■ Poker Ride — Sign-up in Clallam Bay School parking lot, 16933 state Highway 112, at 8:30 a.m., ride departs at 9 a.m. ■ Kids Fish Painting — Three Sisters, all day. ■ Lions Club Barbecue — Gary’s Pay & Save, 16755 Frontier St. ■ Messy Palettes Art Show — Sekiu Community Center, 42 Rice St., 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ■ Friends of the Library book sale — Clallam Bay Library, 16990 state Highway 112, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. TURN

TO

Trophies awarded Trophies will be awarded for a variety of categories, including Best of Show, People’s Choice and Farthest Distance Traveled. Due to the limited number of spaces, project cars (those not completed) and post-1983 cars are not allowed. Members from nearly a dozen different car clubs are expected, and individuals are welcome as well. Co-hosting the event is the Old Timers car club from Bremerton. “We expect cars from

PORT ANGELES — Home gardeners can get advice from local experts about vegetable gardening during today’s installment of the “Lunch in the Garden” educational series. TURN

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PORT ANGELES — Live music, a dunk tank and, of course, many, many cars will highlight the 17th annual Ruddell Cruise-In today. Ruddell Auto Mall, 110 S. Golf Course Road, and Ruddell Hyundai, next door at 1718 E. First St., are hosting the car show, which will be from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Registration for show cars begins at 3:30 p.m. Spectator admission and auto registration is free. “We expect this year’s show to be another terrific event with hundreds of cars,” dealer Howie Ruddell said. “We are usually full within an hour of opening the gate and expect the same again this year.” As has been the tradition, live music will set the tone for afternoon and evening activities.

There will be a benefit dunk tank, with proceeds going to support local charities. Food will be offered for a nominal charge. Parking will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

‘Lunch in the Garden’

SCHEDULE/B2

Cruise-In today expects smorgasbord of vehicles PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles

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3-day extravaganza schedule PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Sea-Tac Horseless Carriage Club will tour Clallam County this weekend during the 60th anniversary of Red Carpet Tours. The club’s 60 or so drivers of antique cars are headquartered at the Red Lion Hotel in Port Angeles and will tour areas near Sequim and Port Angeles, as well as drive out to participate in the Clallam Bay-Sekiu Fun Days.


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FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Events: Mystery CONTINUED FROM B1 Library murder-mystery

Clallam Bay Comicon organizer Donna Barr presents gift certificates for art supplies to Seattle artists/writers Mark Monlux, center, and Kevin Boze at last year’s event.

Festival: Fun Run to cap event CONTINUED FROM B1 963-2221. “So if you didn’t get enough last week, we’re giving you another chance to catch them,” she said. The annual auction to pay for the explosives will be in the Clallam Bay bus garage after the grand parade.

Arts show Throughout the weekend will be an arts and crafts show sponsored by the Messy Palettes Art League at the Sekiu Community Center, 42 Rice St. The show will run from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. It is open to all residents of the Cape Flattery School District or members of the Messy Palettes. Cash prizes and ribbons will be awarded in adult and children’s categories. Entries will be judged by popular vote. Entrants can submit up to five original pieces per person between 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. today. For more information, phone June Bowlby at 360-

Fun Run The 3.7-mile Fun Run from Front Street in Sekiu along state Highway 112 to Clallam Bay will cap the festival Sunday. Registration is at 9 a.m. Entry fee is $5. Awards will be given to the top three men and women in each division.

Comicon II Although not officially part of the Fun Days festivities, Clallam Bay comic artist Donna Bar has organized the second annual Clallam Bay Comicon for the weekend to help add whimsical art to the celebration. The show will be in the Clallam Bay Lions Club Hall, 90 Bogachiel Way, beginning at 3 p.m. today and continuing from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to noon Sunday. The first convention probably had only about 20 visitors. Barr didn’t keep count because, unlike most comicons, Barr says of hers: “We don’t have no stink-

Schedule: Shows FROM B1

Saturday (continued) ■ Grand Parade — Preceded by kids’ parade, grand parade runs from Weel Road to Bogachiel Way, 11 a.m. ■ Kids games — After parade on the hill above vendor row. ■ Breakwater Inn Fireworks Auction — Bus garage, following parade. ■ Breakwater Inn Fireworks — Annual gala explosion, 15582 state Highway 112, dusk.

Sunday ■ Amateur photo contest viewing and judging — Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, all day. ■ Fun Run — Run from Sekiu to Clallam Bay. Sign-up begins at 9 a.m., race at 10 a.m., awards at 11 a.m. ■ Messy Palettes Art Show — Sekiu Community Center, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ing badges.” Admission to the Comicon will be free. Panels will cover cosplay — “costume play” — based on media or personal design. Comic artists expected for the event are Seattle

comics author Robert Gregory, Ann S. Koi from Virginia and Your Mom Comics. Other events include gaming tournaments and original pirate songs from the convention’s official high-seas singer, Dara Korrati.

Writers’ conference to present free readings, talks this weekend BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Lovers of novels, poetry, memoir and short stories are invited to free readings and lectures presented this weekend and next week by the Centrum Port Townsend Writers’ Conference. The public readings will take place at the Wheeler Theater at Fort Worden State Park, 200 Battery Way, while the lectures will be given in the Fort Worden Schoolhouse.

M o r e details are available at Centrum. org via the “Writing” link. Here are the writers Addonizio scheduled to appear: ■ Tonight, 7:30 p.m. — Readings by novelist Ann Hood, poet Dorianne Laux. ■ Saturday, 7:30 p.m. — Readings by poet Cate Marvin and short-story writer Jennine Capo Crucet. ■ Sunday, 7:30 p.m. —

Hood

Hayes

Reading by National Book Award-winning poet Terrence Hayes. ■ Monday, 1 p.m. — Lecture by short-story writer Midge Raymond; at 7:30 p.m., readings by Cate Marvin and memoirist Sayantani Dasgupta.

Guest Coming?

_________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

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Bring Your Own Art PORT ANGELES — Studio Bob, 118½ E. Front St., will hold a free public reception for the opening of its 13th semiannual Bring Your Own Art (BYOA) exhibition from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. The exhibition also will be open Sunday from noon to 3 p.m. Then, through the end of this month, the exhibition is open Thursdays and Fridays from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Basecamp series PORT ANGELES — Meredith Parker, general manager of the Makah Cultural and Research Museum, will talk about the Ozette archaeological dig and the Makah Museum from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. tonight. Her presentation, “Ozette Dig and Makah Museum,” will be at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. It is part of the Basecamp Adventure Talk series, a series of free talks that the hotel launched to showcase the outdoor activities and locations that can be explored on the Olympic Peninsula throughout the summer. Speakers will include ecologists, tour guides, storytellers, filmmakers, historians, anglers and mountaineers. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served, and Happy Hour “Basecamp” drink specials will be offered. The upcoming schedule for Basecamp Adventure Talks: ■ Chris Gutmacher and Andy Stevenson, copresidents of the Peninsula Trails Coalition, will discuss “The Olympic Discovery Trail��� on July 19. ■ Kathy Monds, Clallam County Historical Society director, will speak on a to-be-determined topic July 26.

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PORT ANGELES — A murder-mystery play will provide a different approach to the quarterly Art Blast opening at the Port Angeles Library tonight. “Framed at the Art Blast” will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the library, 2210 S. Peabody St. As usual, there will be music. Jazz songbird Sarah Shea and her band, Chez Jazz, will be waiting to take the stage with guest vocalist Starr Rising, who’s about to make her debut. Then, the mystery will be laid out in a performance of a script written by library staff. Guests to the Art Blast — the opening party for the library’s new display of works by local artists Peggy Wesley, Scott Erickson, Dee Colores, Randolph Foster, Sky Heatherton and Jeff Becker — can find any of seven clues to the mystery while they mingle. “Framed” will run about 90 minutes with a refreshment break, and at the end, audience members will be asked to cast votes for who they believe is the guilty party. For more information, phone 360-417-8500 or visit the North Olympic Library System online at www. NOLS.org.

Kids’ musician to play PORT ANGELES — Musician Johnny Bregar will perform at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., at 10:30 a.m. Saturday. The performance is part of Dig Into Reading, the North Olympic Library System’s summer reading program. His songs are about everyday life as a child. His music has received positive reviews from NPR’s “All Things Considered” as well as ParentMap, Zooglobble. com and Parenting magazine. The library system oversees public libraries in Port Angeles, Sequim, Forks and Clallam Bay. For more information about the reading program, visit www.nols.org, phone the library at 360-417-8502 or email kids@nols.org.

Bake sale benefit PORT ANGELES — A bake sale benefit hosted by the Joyce Fire Department Auxiliary is set for Swain’s General Store, 602 E. First St., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Auxiliary members are raising funds to purchase a four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle for use in improving response time on backcountry terrain rescues. Specialty breads, cakes and cookies will be laid out on a table staffed by auxiliary members Donna Buck, Barbara Cash, Chris Gutmacher and Shirley Coker. An authentic “Fireman’s Boot” will collect donations. The auxiliary also provides scholarships for the Fire District No. 4 Junior Fire Fighters Program. TURN

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■ Tuesday, 1 p.m. — Lecture by Cate Marvin; at 7:30 p.m., readings by poetry and short-story writers Joy Passanante and Midge Raymond. ■ Wednesday, 1 p.m. — Lecture by poet Patricia Henley. ■ Thursday, 1 p.m. — Lecture by Ann Hood; at 7:30 p.m., readings by poets Sam Ligon, Kim Addonizio and Gary Copeland Lilley. ■ Friday, July 19, 7:30 p.m. — Readings by poet Maya Jewell Zeller and novelist Skip Horack. ■ Saturday, July 20, 7:30 p.m. — Readings by Ann Hood and Arthur Sze.

The free event will be at the Fifth Street Community Garden, 325 E. Fifth St., from noon to 1 p.m. “Lunch in the Garden” is sponsored by Washington State University Clallam County Master Gardeners the second Friday of each month through September. Each month, local Master Gardeners lead a one-hour walk through a community garden to show which vegetables grow well on the North Olympic Peninsula and share recipes that use fresh produce and locally grown herbs. Today, Master Gardeners Laurel Moulton and Jeanette Stehr-Green will talk about proper watering, renovation of June-bearing strawberry beds, edible flowers and fall/winter gardens. Barbara Heckard will tell about growing and using rosemary. For more information about “Lunch in the Garden,” phone 360-565-2679.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

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Events: Butterfly gardening tips on tap Saturday will be hosted by the Port Townsend Marine Science Center on Saturday. “X Out Toxics” will be conducted from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Natural History Exhibit at Fort Worden State Park. People can bring items and get them scanned by an XRF Analyzer. The event is free, with standard admission to the exhibits: $5 for adults, $3 for youths and free to marine science center members. The portable XRF Analyzer, formerly confined to laboratory use, safely uses X-ray fluorescence to detect certain chemical elements such as lead and other heavy metals, bromine (indicating the presence of brominated flame retardants) and chlorine (indicating the presence of PVC/ vinyl). For more information, phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

CONTINUED FROM B2

Car wash slated PORT ANGELES — The Answer For Youth will hold a car wash at Angeles Pawn, across from Swain’s at 619 E. First St., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. The group will wash motor homes with prior arrangement. Proceeds from the fundraiser will support services for homeless youths in the community. For more, phone 360670-4363.

Sequim Butterfly gardening

SEQUIM — Veteran Washington State University Clallam County Master Gardener Rosalie Preble will provide tips for making home gardens more hospitable for butterflies during a talk at the Woodcock Demonstration Garden, 2711 Woodcock Road, at 10 a.m. Saturday. Grange dance Preble will identify butterflies commonly found in Clallam County WSU Master Gardener Rosalie Preble will present “Gardening for Butterflies” at PORT TOWNSEND — Clallam County and discuss 10 a.m. Saturday at the Master Gardener Woodcock Demonstration Garden in Sequim. Kristin, Otto and Friends butterfly habitat, including will provide the tunes and host and nectar plants. starting point on the Dis- neighborhood dog, making Eric Curl will call the She also will explain the covery Trail. for a captivating, unusual dances at a contra dance at needs of butterflies at each Strollers and wheel- and widely heralded novel. Quimper Grange, 1219 stage of their life cycles. chairs are welcome. Pets Copies of the book, Corona St., on Saturday. Preble has gardened in must be on a leash. including audio and downThe dance will begin at Clallam County for 16 years loadable e-book formats, are 7:30 p.m. and end at about and is a recipient of the available at the library. Cub Scout car wash 10:30 p.m. Golden Trowel Award for Preregistration for this Admission is $6 for SEQUIM — Cub Scouts her longtime achievements program is not required, adults, $3 for ages 3-18 and from packs 4101, 4102 and and drop-ins are welcome. and contribution to the free for 3 and younger. 4103 will hold a car wash Clallam County Master For more information on For more information, benefit in front of Domino’s programs, visit www.nols. Gardeners. visit www.ptcommunity Pizza, 755 W. Washington St., The presentation is free org or phone branch manfrom 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Satur- ager Lauren Dahlgren at dance.blogspot.com. and open to the public; howday. ever, donations to help off360-683-1161. Cash for Gold The Scouts are raising set copying costs for handmoney for a new pinewood PORT LUDLOW — outs are accepted. Show-and-tell derby race car track. “Cash for Gold” is planned It is part of the Master SEQUIM — Sequim at the Beach Club, 121 Car washes will be availGardeners “Class Act at Seventh-day Adventist Marina View Drive, from able by donation. Woodcock Garden” series. To donate, phone Janell Church, 30 Sanford Lane, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. For more information, will host a “show-and-tell Heintz at 360-683-4921. phone 360-417-2279. Attendees will be paid extravaganza” from 2 p.m. cash for broken or unused to 5 p.m. Sunday. Book discussion Friends book sale gold, silver or other preExhibits at Hobbie & SEQUIM — Mark Had- More include sculpture, art- cious metal jewelry, gold or SEQUIM — The Friends don’s novel The Curious work, homemade items, silver coins, sterling silver of Sequim Library will hold Incident of the Dog in the converted lawn mowers and flatware, hollowware and its monthly book sale Satother precious metal items. Night-Time will be dis- antique cars. urday at the Friends buildThere will be a $25 cussed at the Sequim ing behind the Sequim Food will be available for admission fee that will be Library, 630 N. Sequim Library at 630 N. Sequim purchase. returned if the attendee Ave., at 3 p.m. Saturday. Ave. Activities for children sells his or her items. The novel’s protagonist There will be a sale for will include a puppeteer Ten percent of the proand narrator, Christopher and free balloons. members only inside the ceeds will be donated to the John Francis Boone, knows building from 8 a.m. until Community Enrichment all the countries of the 10 a.m. The inside sale will Alliance’s scholarship fund. Port Townsend world and their capitals, then be open to the public and every prime number up from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Solar home tour to 7,057. Outside sale areas on The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightScreen for toxins Time, by Mark Haddon, will be discussed at the He relates well to anithe north and south sides of PORT TOWNSEND — mals but has no underPORT TOWNSEND — Power Trip Energy Corp. the building will be open to Sequim Library on Saturday afternoon. standing of human emo- A chance to check if chil- will present the Jefferson all beginning at 8 a.m. dren’s toys, bedroom pillows Solar Home Tour from Memberships may be 681-5469 or legreenmusic@ hike from Railroad Bridge tions. gmail.com, or Phil Morgan- Park to Robin Hill Park on The book details Chris- or other household items 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. purchased at the sale. topher’s investigation into have flame retardants or Featured this month are Ellis at pcellis@gmail.com. Saturday. Hikers have the option the suspicious death of a hidden toxic compounds TURN TO EVENTS/B4 self-help, religion and hisVolkssport club outing of taking a 7.5- or 3.1-mile tory books. route. Both trails are rated The Friends of the SEQUIM — The Olym- 1A, an easy hike. Sequim Library also have The group will meet at received a large donation of pic Peninsula Explorers VHS tapes of all sorts: Volkssport Club invites the QFC in Sequim, 990-B action movies, children’s, members of the public to E. Washington St., at 9 a.m. dramas, comedy and docu- join club members for a and then carpool to the On or about Thursday, July 25, 2013, D.A. Davidson & Co. expects to offer: mentaries. * A buck-a-bag promotion for outside items begins at Limited Tax General Obligation Bonds, 2013A (Tax-Exempt) noon. * Proceeds from the sale fund programs at the Limited Tax General Obligation Bonds, 2013B (Taxable) Sequim Library.

D.A. Davidson & Co.

MUNICIPAL BONDS $10,000,000 $105,000 City of Sequim, Washington

Ice-cream social

New Issue Maturities*: 2013A Bonds: 12/1/15–12/1/43 & 2013B Bonds: 12/1/15–12/1/16 Book-Entry Only Standard & Poor’s Rating: Applied For 2013A Bonds are Bank Qualified

SEQUIM — The Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, will hold an ice-cream social from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Banana splits or sundaes will be available for $5. Proceeds will benefit the Northwest Wildlife & Raptor Center. The center will have some of its birds available for viewing during the social. For more information, phone Shelley Smith at 360-681-3881.

Tax-Exempt: In the opinion of Bond Counsel, under existing federal law and assuming compliance with applicable requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), that must be satisfied subsequent to the issue date of the Bonds, interest on the Limited Tax General Obligation Bonds, 2013A (the “2013A Bonds”) is excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes and is not an item of tax preference for purposes of the alternative minimum tax applicable to individuals. While interest on the 2013A Bonds also is not an item of tax preference for purposes of the alternative minimum tax applicable to corporations, interest on the 2013A Bonds received by corporations is taken into account in the computation of adjusted current earnings for purposes of the alternative minimum tax applicable to corporations, interest on the 2013A Bonds received by certain S corporations may be subject to tax, and interest on the 2013A Bonds received by foreign corporations with United States branches may be subject to a foreign branch profits tax. Receipt of interest on the 2013A Bonds may have other federal tax consequences for certain taxpayers. In the opinion of Bond Counsel, interest on the 2013B Bonds is not excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes under Section 103(a) of the Code.

Orchestra concert

Purpose: The Bonds will be issued to finance a portion of the costs of a new city hall and public safety facility and to pay costs of issuance and sale of the Bonds.

Maturities/Interest Rates*: The 2013A Bonds will mature on December 1, in the years 2015 through 2043. The 2013B Bonds will mature on December 1, in the years 2015 through 2016. Interest rates on the Bonds are expected to be established on July 25, 2013. Security: The Bonds constitute a general obligation of the City and are payable from tax revenues of the City and such other money as is lawfully available and pledged by the City for the payment of principal of and interest on the Bonds. For so long as any of the Bonds are outstanding, the City irrevocably has pledged that it will, in the manner provided by law within the constitutional and statutory limitations provided by law without the assent of the voters, include in its annual property tax levy amounts sufficient, together with other money of the City that is lawfully available, to pay when due the principal of and interest on the Bonds. The full faith, credit, and resources of the City have been pledged irrevocably for prompt payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds and such pledge will be enforceable in mandamus against the City. In addition, the City has pledged to repayment of the Bonds certain revenues from a local option sales and use tax approved by the voters. The City’s tax levy is subject to various limitations. The Bonds do not constitute a debt or indebtedness of the State or any political subdivision thereof other than the City. *Preliminary: subject to change.

Please contact D.A. Davidson & Co. in advance for expected yield information.

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The Bonds are subject to availability and to the acceptance of an offer to purchase. This is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy any of these securities. The offering of these securities is made only by the Official Statement, copies of which are available from the undersigned.

(360) 565-7500 or (877) 779-4321 917 East Front Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362

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SEQUIM — The Sequim Community Orchestra will present its final concert of the season at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave., at 7 tonight. Orchestra members will perform works by Berlioz, Dvorak, Mozart, SaintSaens and Vaughn Williams. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. For more information, contact Lili Green at 360-

Redemption*: The 2013A Bonds are subject to optional redemption on and after December 1, 2023 at par.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Celebration is planned in Hadlock Three-day ‘block party’ to host music, food, more BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT HADLOCK — A three-day celebration planned in Port Hadlock this weekend won’t be the traditional full-blown Hadlock Days but still will be something special, organizers said. Port Hadlock Days has taken place during the second weekend of July for 24 years, so it didn’t sit well with some people when it was canceled this year. So a group of local merchants banded together for a less formal celebration, something that is closer to a block party than a festival or a major event. “I was disappointed when it was canceled because I’d already made

plans,” said Cindy Brown, manager of the Valley Tavern, which has served as the epicenter for Hadlock Days. “I had already booked the Dukes of Dabob for Saturday, and I talked to a lot of merchants who were interested in doing something, even if it wasn’t something major.”

Today through Sunday The celebration will run from today through Sunday. There is no parade, lawn mower races or vendor fair. The local merchants have pulled together a less-structured event that in Brown’s words doesn’t “need SaniCans or permits.”

PENINSULA COLLEGE

Jeff Monson, a recent recipient of a $1,000 Washington Indian Gaming Association scholarship, is shown in the work tent on the Peninsula College campus as he prepares a cedar log to begin carving the Welcome Pole for the Peninsula College Longhouse House of Learning. The first Welcome Pole was raised in 2010.

Jamestown member readies Events: Power for study on new scholarship CONTINUED FROM B3

The event will begin at the Power Trip Energy office, 83 Denny Ave., at 10 a.m. with a presentation called “Solar 101: Spinning Your Meter Backwards.” Power Trip staff will give an overview of the different types of solar technology, as well as pricing information and performance estimates for solar homes on the Olympic Peninsula.

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At 11 a.m., guests will depart on a tour of four Port Townsend homes that have had solar technology installed by the company. “The real value is in talking to homeowners who are already using and benefiting from solar in their homes,” said Andy Cochrane, Power Trip Energy president. This is the 11th consecutive year for the Jefferson Solar Home tour.

State Indian Gaming Association awards $1,000 to college student PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Jeff Monson, a member of the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe, said he is ready for his next year of study at Peninsula College after receiving a $1,000 scholarship for the

2013-2014 academic year from the Washington Indian Gaming Association, or WIGA. Monson is one of only eight community college and technical school WIGA scholarship winners in the state. He is pursuing an

associate degree in the arts at Peninsula College. “College has been a positive experience for me,” Monson said. “I’m discovering new things all the time, and it has brought out a lot of things that I didn’t know existed.” One of those is a new career plan: “I’ve discovered that I want to teach,” Monson said. He has been teaching

the art of woodworking and carving for a number of years, but his college experiences have made him want “to take my teaching to a new level,” he said. Outside of classes at the college, Monson is active in the campus Shades of Color Club and involved in tribal community activities, both of which he plans to continue as he works on completing his degree.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, July 12-13, 2013 PAGE

B5 Outdoors

A lot of fish: big ones out there PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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M’s rookie shortstop playing well BY DON RUIZ MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

SEATTLE — One of the great moments of Brad Miller’s life came June 27 when he was told he was being promoted to the big leagues. Miller was called into the manager’s office at Cheney Stadium and was told he was being Next Game sent from Today the Tacoma vs. Angels Rainiers to the Seattle at Safeco Field Time: 7 p.m. Mariners. M i l l e r On TV: ROOT said he was left speechless. Rainiers manager John Stearns was moved to tears. Teammates delivered handshakes and hugs. Now, a dozen games into his big-league career, Miller was asked how the reality is living up to all that he expected that night in Tacoma. “I had no clue,” he said. “It totally caught me off guard, and I didn’t know what to think or say or anything. “It was just so cool to come out of the office and see all of my teammates and how excited they were, too. It was just really special, getting to share it with them. It’s been awesome.” The Mariners seem pretty happy with the decision, too. Entering Wednesday’s game

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Brad Miller displays his speed as he runs from second toward third base in the fourth inning in Tuesday’s game against the Boston Red Sox in Seattle. Miller went 2 for 5 with a double in Thursday’s 8-7 loss in 10 innings to the Red Sox. against the Boston Red Sox, their leadoff hitter. Over his first five leadoff Miller was hitting .275 with six appearances, Miller hit .350 RBI. with two doubles, two triples and five RBI. Hits well Thursday “I like the energy,” manager He upped that average to Eric Wedge said. “I like the way .286 Thursday afternoon after he makes the adjustments from going 2 for 5 with a double in an one at-bat to the other — at 8-7 loss to the Red Sox in 10 times from one pitch to another. innings. “I think those are all positive Miller scored two runs in the things. He’s been doing a nice game and had an RBI and a job.” walk. He also struck out three Wedge said Miller also has times. the speed to make things hapMiller, though, has estab- pen at the top of the order. lished himself as the Mariners’ “He’s a galloper,” Wedge said, regular shortstop, and he seems laughing at his own description. to be establishing himself as “He’s a good galloper — long

strider. And it’s right out of the box, and you like to see that.” On Tuesday, Miller set records in his young career with three hits and four RBI. He also became the 12th Mariners rookie to record at least three hits and four RBI in a game, and the first to do it at Safeco Field. Miller was asked if any of this surprises him, if that happy night at Cheney Stadium was ever followed by doubts that he was ready. “I just think it’s fun,” he said. “It’s a new challenge.” TURN

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M’S/B6

Larson Brothers Coed Classic set Twenty softball squads to play PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The fourth annual Larson Brothers Coed Classic softball tournament is set for the Shane and Elks playfields Saturday and Sunday. Twenty teams will be in the area for the event, including

LEANING

eight from outside the North Olympic Peninsula. Some of the visiting teams are from Bremerton, Port Orchard and even Bellingham. The area teams playing in the tourney are from all over the Peninsula, including Port Angeles, Sequim and Jefferson County. The top team from last year’s tournament, runner-up The Hanger from Port Angeles, will be seeking to get into the title

game again. The tournament championship game is set for 4:10 p.m. Sunday at the Shane West field. Action starts at 8 a.m. Saturday with Whitehead Auto Parts taking on Fusion on the Elks field, The Weekend Warriors facing Higher Grounds on Shane West, and Wal-Mart Heat against Total Meltdown on Shane East. Round-robin games are scheduled Saturday from 8 a.m.

to 6:30 p.m., while single-elimination rounds are set for Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. Other teams at the tourney include New 2 You, Daily Grind, Forks Merchants, J. Power Painting, Wild Buffalo, Ramrod, Bob’s Team, Woody’s Wheels, Lucky Eagle Casino, Mixer’s, Nobody Know’s, Shirley’s Cafe and Belfair Auto. The following weekend will be the 20th annual Larson Invitational softball tournament for men’s teams.

TOO FAR

OUTDOORS/B7

Horton on vacation OutLee doors columnist and Horton sports reporter Lee Horton is taking his family on a road trip for a welldeserved vacation this week. His outdoors columns, which run Thursdays and Fridays, will resume next week.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

North Olympic second baseman Jensen Pederson tags out Ephrata’s Hagen Nelson during a retreat to the bag in the second inning during the 14U North Washington Babe Ruth state tournament at Volunteer Field in Port Angeles. The Ephrata Tigers held off Port Angeles 12-9 in the round-robin pool game. North Olympic next plays at 5:30 p.m. today and Saturday to conclude pool play.

SPORTS/BUSINESS

FISH ARE EVERYWHERE, but there are a few problems in reeling them in. There’s a lot of wind and choppy waters in the Pacific Ocean off Neah Bay and off the Strait for saltwater anglers, and there’s low and clear rivers in the West End for freshwater anglers. There’s a lot of fish out there, though, and some pretty big ones if you have patience, the right equipment and a sturdy boat. The Neah Bay and Sekiu areas are reaping the benefits of a lot of kings, silvers and pinks hanging around and holding off their trek down the Strait to Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend. “The silvers are just starting to show off Port Angeles,” Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More (360-683-1950) in Sequim said. The main group of silvers haven’t arrived yet, he added. “They’re stacked up out there to the west in Sekiu,” Menkal said. “When the rain hits the Strait,” the fish start moving eastward. “I don’t know why that is,” Menkal said. And just in time for the start of the silvers and pinks hitting off Port Angeles and Sequim, Menkal will be putting on a special one-day seminar on trolling for silvers and pinks. More on that below. Fishing off both Neah Bay in the ocean and Sekiu and Clallam Bay in the Strait should continue to go great guns. Both Big Salmon Fishing Resort (360-645-2374) in Neah Bay and Olson’s Resort (360-963-2311) in Sekiu have been reporting a lot of activity and a lot of salmon being caught during the past week on their web sites. Some kings in the 30-pound range and many in the 20-pound range are being hauled in. Big Salmon listed the following post on its web site Tuesday: “We went out fishing for four hours or less, out-front by Waadah Island and landed seven salmon. Using darts and jigging for salmon. One of the anglers landed a nice ling, too, with that same dart. “Joe Ward, a Big Salmon Fishing Resort employee, had two great reports. “1). My first customer came in this morning and told me he caught a nice 30-pound king. He was using spoons, and turned and burned in front of Waadah Island. “2). Then a second angler came in with almost the same report. He, too, landed a 30-pound king, leaving bloodstains on his deck. He was using bait.” The fish are there, but, oh, that wind. “The wind has really been hampering anglers,” Menkal said. “If the wind is flat, there’s a break in the weather, go on out and fish while you can. This is a good time to get out there when you can.” Right now kings, silvers and pinks can be caught from Port Angeles west, but only silvers and pinks are in season off of Sequim.

Miller loving life at top


B6

SportsRecreation

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

AREA SPORTS SHOT

Today Baseball: 14U Junior Babe Ruth state tournament in Port Angeles at Volunteer Field: North Olympic game, 5:30 p.m.; Wilder at Clackamas Tournament in Clackamas, Ore., TBA; Sequim 18U at North Kitsap, TBA.

Saturday Baseball: 14U Junior Babe Ruth state tournament in Port Angeles at Volunteer Field: North Olympic game, 5:30 p.m.; Wilder at Clackamas Tournament in Clackamas, Ore., TBA.

Sunday Baseball: Wilder at Clackamas Tournament in Clackamas, Ore., TBA; Sequim 18U at Oak Harbor, TBA.

Area Sports Youth Baseball North Washington 14U State Babe Ruth Tournament Port Angeles, Volunteer Field Pool Play Second Round Wednesday’s Scores Burlington A’s 7, Kitsap Baseball 5 Dow Baseball (Redmond) 11, Sedro-Woolley 1 Mount Rainier 9, Othello 1 Ephrata Tigers 12, North Olympic (Port Angeles) 9 Pool Play First Round Tuesday’s Scores NW Bandits Blue (Seattle) 12, Othello 2 Kitsap Baseball 19, Mount Rainier 13 Federal Way Knights 15, Ephrata Tigers 0 Dow Baseball (Redmond) 9, North Olympic (Port Angeles) 4 Pool Play Records American Division Dow Baseball 2-0 Federal Way 1-0 Ephrata 1-1 Sedro-Woolley 0-1 North Olympic 0-2 National Division Burlington 1-0 NW Bandits 1-0 Kitsap Baseball 1-1 Mount Rainier 1-1 Othello 0-2

Adult Softball Port Angeles Parks and Recreation Wednesday Men’s Gold Division All Weather Heating 17, The Moose Lodge Bulls 7 Earth Tech Construction 16, Elwha Young Gunz 9 Earth Tech Construction 11, The Moose Lodge Bulls 7 Next Door Gastropub 16, Elwha Young Gunz 5 Cafe New Day 13, All Weather Heating 2 Next Door Gastropub 11, Cafe New Day 7

Baseball Red Sox 8, Mariners 7, 10 innings Thursday’s Game Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi Ellsury cf 4 1 2 2 BMiller 2b 5221 Nava rf-1b 6 0 1 1 EnChvz rf 3022 Pedroia 2b 6 1 1 0 Ackley pr-cf 2 1 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 3 2 0 0 Ibanez lf 4020 JGoms lf 4 1 1 0 KMorls dh 5011 Carp 1b 1 1 0 1 Seager 3b 5122 Victorn ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 4110 Sltlmch c 0 0 0 0 Zunino c 4110 Lvrnwy c 4 0 1 0 MSndrs cf-rf 5 0 1 1 BrdlyJr pr-rf 0 1 0 0 Ryan ss 4100 Holt 3b 4 1 2 2 Bay ph 1000 Iglesias ss 5 0 2 2 Totals 38 810 8 Totals 42 712 7 Boston 100 330 000 1—8 Seattle 041 200 000 0—7 E—Carp (2), Holt (1). DP—Boston 2. LOB— Boston 10, Seattle 9. 2B—Lavarnway (4), B. Miller (5). HR—Ellsbury (3), Seager (14). SB— En.Chavez (1). S—Holt. SF—Carp. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Dempster 31⁄3 9 7 4 1 4 S.Wright W,1-0 52⁄3 3 0 0 2 3 Uehara S,7-10 1 0 0 0 0 2 Seattle E.Ramirez 42⁄3 6 7 7 4 4 Furbush 21⁄3 3 0 0 0 4 O.Perez 12⁄3 0 0 0 1 3 Wilhelmsen L,0-3 11⁄3 1 1 1 2 2 HBP—by Dempster (Zunino), by E.Ramirez (Carp). WP—Dempster, S.Wright. Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Cory Blaser. T—4:04. A—25,367 (47,476). Boston

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Chloe Leverington of the Forks 10U softball team, left, steals second base against Upper Kittatas in the Babe Ruth state tournament Thursday afternoon in Othello. Forks ripped Upper Kittatas 19-0. Forks played North Olympic of Port Angeles later Thursday evening in pool play, results not available by press time.

Wednesday’s Game Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi Ellsury cf 4 2 3 1 BMiller ss-2b 4 0 1 0 Carp ph-lf 2 0 1 1 Frnkln 2b 3000 Victorn rf 4 1 2 2 Ryan ss 2111 BrdlyJr rf-cf 2 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 2000 Pedroia 2b 3 1 0 0 Ackley lf 1110 BSnydr 3b 2 0 0 0 KMorls dh 4111 D.Ortiz dh 3 2 2 3 Seager 3b 4010 Lvrnwy ph-dh1 0 0 0 Bay rf 4110 Napoli 1b 3 1 0 0 Smoak 1b 4011 Nava lf-rf 2 1 1 0 MSndrs cf 4010 Sltlmch c 3 2 1 1 HBlanc c 4011 Iglesias ss 3 0 1 1 Holt 3b-2b 4 1 1 0 Totals 361112 9 Totals 36 4 9 4 Boston 022 104 002—11 Seattle 000 000 130— 4 E—B.Miller (2). DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Boston 10, Seattle 7. 2B—Ellsbury (21), D.Ortiz (22), Ackley (7), K.Morales (22), Bay (6), Smoak (12), M.Saunders (10). HR—D.Ortiz (19), Ryan (3). SF—D.Ortiz, Saltalamacchia, Iglesias. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Doubront W,6-3 7 5 1 1 2 6 Workman 2 4 3 3 0 4 Seattle Harang L,4-8 5 8 7 7 3 0 2⁄3 2 Luetge 2 0 0 0 Capps 11⁄3 0 0 0 2 1 O.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 1 Wilhelmsen 1 2 2 2 2 2 Harang pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. HBP—by Harang (Nava), by Capps (Iglesias). WP—Wilhelmsen. Umpires—Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Jim Joyce. T—3:23. A—20,480 (47,476). Boston

American League West Division W L Oakland 54 38 Texas 53 38 Los Angeles 44 46 Seattle 40 52 Houston 32 59 East Division W L Boston 57 37 Tampa Bay 53 40 Baltimore 50 42 New York 50 42 Toronto 44 47 Central Division W L Detroit 50 41 Cleveland 48 44 Kansas City 43 46 Minnesota 37 52 Chicago 36 53

Pct GB .587 — .582 ½ .489 9 .435 14 .352 21½ Pct GB .606 — .570 3½ .543 6 .543 6 .484 11½ Pct GB .549 — .522 2½ .483 6 .416 12 .404 13

Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Kansas City 1

Pittsburgh 5, Oakland 0 Baltimore 6, Texas 1 Toronto 5, Cleveland 4 Detroit 8, Chicago White Sox 5 Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 3, 13 innings L.A. Angels 13, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 5, Houston 4 Boston 11, Seattle 4

New York Miami St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati Chicago Milwaukee

Thursday’s Games Cleveland 4, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 3 N.Y. Yankees 8, Kansas City 4 Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 3 Boston 8, Seattle 7, 10 innings Texas at Baltimore, late Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-6) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-3), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 6-5), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 5-8) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 7-6), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 5-5) at Baltimore (Tillman 10-3), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 7-6) at Detroit (Fister 6-5), 4:08 p.m. Houston (Cosart 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Price 3-4), 4:10 p.m. Boston (Lackey 6-6) at Oakland (J.Parker 6-6), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Williams 5-4) at Seattle (J. Saunders 7-8), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 4:15 p.m. Boston at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas City at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Texas at Detroit, 10:08 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Houston at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Boston at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 1:10 p.m.

National League West Division W L Arizona 47 44 Los Angeles 45 45 Colorado 44 48 San Diego 41 51 San Francisco 40 50 East Division W L Atlanta 52 39 Washington 47 44 Philadelphia 45 47

Pct .516 .500 .478 .446 .444

GB — 1½ 3½ 6½ 6½

Pct GB .571 — .516 5 .489 7½

40 48 33 57 Central Division W L 55 34 54 36 51 40 40 49 37 53

.455 10½ .367 18½ Pct GB .618 — .600 1½ .560 5 .449 15 .411 18½

Wednesday’s Games Miami 6, Atlanta 2 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 2 Pittsburgh 5, Oakland 0 Washington 5, Philadelphia 1 L.A. Angels 13, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 5, Houston 4 L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 5, 14 innings Colorado 5, San Diego 4 Thursday’s Games Washington at Philadelphia, late Cincinnati at Atlanta, late St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, late Milwaukee at Arizona, late Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late San Francisco at San Diego, late Today’s Games St. Louis (J.Kelly 0-3) at Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-4), 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-6) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-3), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Hefner 4-6) at Pittsburgh (Morton 1-2), 4:05 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 5-6) at Miami (Eovaldi 1-0), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-7) at Atlanta (Medlen 6-8), 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee (Gorzelanny 1-2) at Arizona (Corbin 10-1), 6:40 p.m. Colorado (Nicasio 4-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 8-5), 7:10 p.m. San Francisco (Gaudin 2-1) at San Diego (O’Sullivan 0-0), 7:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 4:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 4:15 p.m. Washington at Miami, 4:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 7:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 7:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Washington at Miami, 10:10 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 1:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Arizona, 1:10 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.

M’s: Miller: ‘You’ve got to earn it’ CONTINUED FROM B5 Short hops “That’s obviously every level and every day.,” Miller said. “You show up, and you’ve got to earn it. I think that’s the fun part of it: getting to show up and compete. ‘That’s what we want to do. It’s been awesome.”

The day after the Red Sox and Mariners combined for 19 runs and seven home runs, Boston manager John Farrell said he had never seen Safeco Field play like that, and he estimated that half of the home runs might not have gone out before the outfield dimensions were shortened this

Today 9:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic, Round 2, Site: Grey Silo Golf Course - Waterloo, Ontario (Live) Noon (47) GOLF PGA, John Deere Classic, Round 2, Site: TPC Deere Run - Silvis, Ill. (Live) 1 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Golf CHAMPS, U.S. Senior Open Championship, Round 2, Site: Omaha Country Club Omaha, Neb. (Live) 1 p.m. WGN Baseball MLB, St. Louis Cardinals vs. Chicago Cubs, Site: Wrigley Field - Chicago (Live) 3 p.m. (47) GOLF Web. com, Utah Championship, Round 2, Site: Willow Creek Country Club - Sandy, Utah (Live) 5 p.m. (26) ESPN Softball World Cup, United States vs. Australia, Site: ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City, Okla. (Live) 5 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Soccer MLS, Chivas U.S.A. vs. Washington D.C. United, Site: RFK Stadium - Washington, D.C. (Live) 7 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Boxing, Friday Night Fights, Francisco vs. Avalos (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Los Angeles Angels vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live)

Saturday

TO A STRONG START

Red Sox 11, Mariners 4

SPORTS ON TV

season. Wedge, however, wasn’t convinced. “There was a lot of hitting going on [Tuesday], I know that,” he said. “I think that’s the central theme regarding that game. Most of the guys struggled from a pitching standpoint. I think it was more about that than anything.”

Mariners pitcher Stephen Pryor (shoulder) threw 25 pitches in a simulated inning Wednesday, and outfielder Michael Morse (quadriceps) did some running. However, Wedge said the club will wait until at least Saturday, when Pryor will have another simulated outing, before determining the next move toward their return.

6:30 a.m. (47) GOLF EPGA, Scottish Open, Round 3, Site: Castle Stuart Golf Links - Inverness, Scotland (Live) 7 a.m. (27) ESPN2 Auto Racing NASCAR, New England 200, Qualifying, Site: New Hampshire Motor Speedway - Loudon, N.H. (Live) 9 a.m. (5) KING Golf EPGA, Scottish Open, Round 3, Site: Castle Stuart Golf Links - Inverness, Scotland (Live) 10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, John Deere Classic, Round 3, Site: TPC Deere Run - Silvis, Ill. (Live) 10:45 a.m. (26) ESPN Soccer FIFA, U-20 World Cup, Final (Live) 11 a.m. (2) CBUT Show Jumping, Spruce Meadows Classic (Live) 11:30 a.m. (47) GOLF LPGA, Manulife Financial Classic, Round 3 (Live) Noon (5) KING Golf CHAMPS, U.S. Senior Open Championship, Round 3 (Live) Noon (7) KIRO Golf PGA, John Deere Classic, Round 3 (Live) Noon (13) KCPQ Soccer CONCACAF, Belize vs. Costa Rica, Gold Cup Group C (Live) 12:30 p.m. (2) CBUT Calgary Stampede, Wild Card Calgary, Alberta (Live) 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO Auto Racing NASCAR, New England 200 (Live) 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC Golf PGA, John Deere Classic Round 3 (Live) 3:30 p.m. (47) GOLF Golf Web.com, Utah Championship Round 3 (Live) 4 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, Colorado Rockies vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, Site: Dodger Stadium - Los Angeles (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Lacrosse MLL, All-Star Game (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Rallycross, Global Championship (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Softball World Cup, United States vs. Japan (Live) 6:30 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Football CFL, British Columbia Lions vs. Edmonton Eskimos (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Baseball MLB, Los Angeles Angels vs. Seattle Mariners, Site: Safeco Field - Seattle (Live) 7:30 p.m. (5) KING Soccer MLS, Seattle Sounders FC vs. San Jose Earthquake, Site: Santa Clara, Calif. (Live)


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

B7

Cavendish no longer fastest Tour rider BY JOHN LEICESTER THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOURS, France — At this Tour de France, it is Marcel Kittel and no longer Mark Cavendish who is looking like the fastest man on two wheels. Everything was primed on Thursday for Cavendish to win a 25th Tour stage in his illustrious career. His beefy teammate from Belgium, Gert Steegmans, did his job to perfection, guiding Cavendish into position for the final sprint to the line in Tours in the Loire valley. But Cavendish simply wasn’t quick enough. Kittel overtook him just before the line. That this was a man-toman contest, fair and square with no excuses, made the German’s victory feel more significant than the winning margin of mere inches. “He was just simply faster,” Cavendish conceded. “I can go back and look over and over again. I don’t think myself or the team could have done anything different. He was just simply better, you know?” It would be foolish and premature to suggest the Cavendish era at the Tour is ending. He is still by far the most successful stage winner still active. Two of the riders with more stage wins — Bernard

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The pack with Christopher Froome of Britain, in the center, passes during the 12th stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 218 kilometers (136.2 miles) with start in Fougeres and finish in Tours, western France, on Thursday.

Tour de France Hinault (28) and Eddy Merckx (34) — are long retired. The third, Andre Leducq (25), died in 1980. Cavendish came to this Tour with 23, the number is written in green on the black bike he

rode Thursday. He won his 24th last week in Marseille and could still get to 25 and match Leducq’s total at this Tour. The last stage, especially, on the Champs-Elysees in Paris almost always offers a golden opportunity for sprinters. Cavendish is unbeaten on those cobble-

stones since 2009. Still, the 28-year-old rider must have been hoping for better from this 100th edition of the race. Since his first victory in 2008, he has always won multiple stages at every Tour. In 2009, he won six. Cavendish switched teams this year — from Sky

to Omega Pharma-Quick Step — because he wanted to be even more successful at the Tour, specifically. Unlike at Sky, which last year focused its resources on Tour winner Bradley Wiggins and, at this Tour, race leader Chris Froome, Omega has built its team around Cavendish.

Yet, aside from his win in Stage 5, this isn’t proving to be a vintage Tour for Cavendish. He had a heavy cold in the first week. He collided with Tom Veelers, knocking the Dutch rider off his bike, in the sprint finish of Stage 10. Cavendish insisted it wasn’t intentional. The next day, a spectator doused him in urine during the time trial. But perhaps worst of all is that Kittel is dominating Cavendish. The Argos-Shimano sprinter has three wins at this Tour. That makes a total of five for German riders, with Tony Martin winning the time trial and Andre Greipel winning a sprint on Stage 6. “As we say in Germany, good things come in three,” Kittel said. Rolf Aldag, an Omega director, said he still regards Cavendish as “the best sprinter in the world.” Given the tightness of the finish, Aldag says it “would be unfair to say that he doesn’t have it. I think he still has it.” At Sky, Cavendish’s former boss, Dave Brailsford, also warned against jumping to conclusions. He suggested Cavendish simply needs to completely gel with his Omega teammates responsible for maneuvering him into position to compete in the final sprints.

Outdoors: Clear rivers make fishing tough CONTINUED FROM B5 right now. “Don’t use bright floats,” he said. Clear rivers Like the saltwater fish, the freshwater fish are there, and they’re big, but it can get a little tricky catching them. That’s because the West End rivers are clear and low because of a lack of rain. “There’s fish around but not a whole bunch of water,” Bob Gooding of Olympic Sporting Goods (360-374-6330) in Forks said. “The rivers are very low, very clear and very bright. You can see them [the fish], and they can see you.” There are sockeyes, steelhead and a few kings still around, Gooding said. The rivers could use some rain, but don’t tell that to Gooding, who is never one to mince words. “I have lived in Forks my whole life, and I have seen plenty of rain,” he said. “If it never rains [here] again, I would be fine with it.” Menkal fished the Calawah on Sunday, hooking three fish and landing two. “The rivers are going down,” Menkal said. “They are really clear, and so you have to take special care. “There is a lot of pressure on the fish, and they spook easily.” Menkal recommends wearing dark earth-tone clothing and to paint your floats dark green or brown when fishing the rivers

Trolling class Menkal is sponsoring a seminar for trolling for silvers and pinks at Brian’s Sporting Goods and More in Sequim (609 W. Washington St.) on Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. “This is a huge one because it’s happening right now with silvers and pinks hitting the Port Angeles area,” Menkal said. “Fishing has been good off of Port Angeles.” Area angler Rick Wray will be conducting the seminar. “Rick is extremely successful at trolling for silvers and pinks,” Menkal said. “He knows all aspects for trolling.” Right now the silvers and pinks are showing up in the Port Angeles area, and they are pretty good size at 7 to 9 pounds, Menkal added. Menkal wants to keep the seminar, which costs $25, to about 20 anglers. Call 360-683-1950 to reserve a spot for the talk, and remember to bring a notepad, pencil and chair Tuesday night.

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Weigh-in location is The Fishin’ Hole at the Port Townsend Fuel Dock, 199 Benedict St. in Port Townsend’s Boat Haven. First place will win $1,000, second takes $500, and third-place and mystery-weight finishers will Hiking weather take home $250. The weather’s warm, Prizes for fifth through but not too warm, sunny 10th place will be donated and nice. by local businesses. That means it must be In the kids derby, chiltime to pitch a tent, cook dren can win $100 for first chili and beans over a place and bicycles for fincamp fire, and take a hike ishing second and third. in the woods. An awards ceremony “A lot of people are will be held at the Port camping and hiking right Hadlock Marina at 2 p.m. now,” Menkal said. July 21. Prize winners need not “It’s a good time to take be present to win. advantage of the weather, Tickets are $25 per and get out to camp or hike. Hiking season is just adult, with children 14 and younger admitted free for starting. “There’s good hiking up the kids derby. All anglers must have a there in Upper Dungeness.” ticket to participate. Tickets are available at Port Hadlock derby the event’s sponsoring Coming up is the fourth businesses: Four Corners annual Chimacum Alumni Store; Westside Marine, Association Salmon Derby The Fishin’ Hole at Port in Port Hadlock. Townsend Fuel Dock and It is scheduled for SatLPL Financial Services/ urday and Sunday, July Rich Gastfield in Port 20-21. Townsend; Eldridge Homes The derby is open to all Inc. in Port Ludlow; and and will be held in Marine Olympic Equipment RentArea 9. als in Port Hadlock. Fishing is open from Suggested boat launches dawn to 3 p.m. July 20 and are Lower Port Hadlock from dawn to noon July 21. Boat Launch, Fort Flagler

State Park, Port of Port Townsend Marina, Mats Mats Bay or Port Ludlow. Proceeds benefit scholarships provided by the Chimacum Alumni Association. For more information, phone Billy Eldridge at 360-821-1007.

Puget Sound Anglers Sam Brenkman, chief fisheries biologist for the Olympic National Park, will be the speaker at the next meeting of the North Olympic Chapter of the Puget Sound Anglers club on Thursday. Brenkman will give an update on the current sta-

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Friday/Saturday, July 12-13, 2013 PAGE

B8

First Federal announces new positions, staffers PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — First Federal recently announced the addition of two new staff members and a new role for a longtime employee. Dawnya Textor has accepted the role of director of retail bank- Textor Kelley Long ing. Textor will be responsible for expansion plans. expanding the relationship oriented She began her career with First sales and service efforts throughout Federal in 1984 and was most First Federal branches. recently a regional manager for First She will direct and oversee the Federal’s Sequim-East market. branch managers’ implementation of cross-departmental sales and service New branch manager goals to ensure our customer experience is centered on meeting lending, Jesse Long has accepted the posideposit and non-deposit needs and tion of branch manager of the Sixth desires. Street branch in Port Angeles. Textor also will be an integral Since 2004, Long has gained expepart of First Federal’s future branch rience in many areas in banking,

including marketing, financial planning, business banking, consumer, residential and commercial lending with advanced credit fundamentals. Long earned a degree in business management at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and was the former Port Angeles branch manager of Union Bank.

Business development officer Patricia Kelley has accepted the position of business development officer for First Federal’s Poulsbo branch/lending center. Kelley has 28 years of experience in financial planning, business development and customer service. She is the former Bainbridge Island branch manager of Kitsap Credit Union.

Microsoft Corp. shakes up its organization, personnel THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Microsoft Corp. is reshuffling its business. The move by the world’s largest software maker comes amid lukewarm response to the latest version of its flagship Windows operating system and a steady decline in demand for PCs as people turn to tablets and other gadgets. CEO Steve Ballmer said in a memo to employees Thursday that the changes mean the company is “rallying behind a single strategy” and organizing by function. “Although we will deliver multiple devices

“The single core strategy will drive us to set shared goals.” STEVE BALLMER Microsoft CEO and services to execute and monetize the strategy, the single core strategy will drive us to set shared goals for everything we do. We will see our product line holistically, not as a set of islands,” Ballmer wrote. The company’s new divisions include engineering, marketing and business development. Veteran executive Julie Larson-Green is now head

of its devices and studios engineering group, overseeing hardware development, games, music and entertainment. She had been promoted in November to lead all Windows software and hardware engineering after Steven Sinofsky, the president of its Windows and Windows Live operations, left the company shortly after the launch of Windows 8. Terry Myerson will lead Microsoft’s operating systems and engineering group. Qi Lu will head applications and services. Ballmer stressed the company’s focus on “one

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Microsoft” in his memo. He said Microsoft will move forward operating as a cohesive company rather than a “collection of divisional strategies.”

Competitive pressures The shake-up is being driven by competitive pressures as two of Microsoft’s once much-smaller rivals, Apple and Google, have emerged as the technology trendsetters. In a world that increasingly revolves around mobile devices and Internet services, Microsoft has been scrambling to adapt to the upheaval.

$ Briefly . . . Annie’s Flower Farm opens for season SEQUIM — Annie’s Flower Farm, 303½ Dahlia Llama Road, recently opened for the season. A “you-pick” flower garden is open daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. through mid-October. Customers can choose from more than 100 varieties of flowers and design their own custom bouquet for $8.50. Annie’s Flower Farm will hold a “grand opening” lavender party from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 20. Guests are welcome to stop by for free lavender lemonade and cookies. Music performances will be by Cort Armstrong, Jim Faddis, Donna Rankin, Ron Munro and Getta Rogers. Annie’s Flower Garden has a staff florist who can provide expert arrangements for weddings. It also offers “do-it-yourself” and combo wedding options. Community-supported agriculture (CSA) shares are available. Formerly part of The Cutting Garden, the 1-acre flower operation is now a separate business run by owner Sid “Annie” Sherwood, who leases the plot from owners Catherine and Tom Mix. For more information, visit www.anniesflower farm.com.

Lavender program SEQUIM — To celebrate its new year-round calendar of events, the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association has created Friends of Lavender, a special membership program for lavender lovers. The cost of a membership is $35 a year.

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1

M–Th 7:30am–8:00pm Friday 7:30am–9:00pm (360) 457-1390 Saturday 9:00am–9:00pm 2851 Lower Elwha Rd. Port Angeles Sunday 10:00am–6:00pm

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Friends of Lavender benefits include: ■ A 15 percent discount on purchases at all Sequim Lavender Farmers Association member farms throughout the year. ■ Two tickets to the Sequim Lavender Farm Faire ($30 value). ■ Complimentary Lavender Faire poster ($10 value). ■ Annual and periodic newsletters. To join, sign up at www. sequimlavender.org or at any member farm or phone 360-452-6300. The Sequim Lavender Farm Faire, presented by the Sequim Lavender Farmers Association, is part of the annual Sequim Lavender Weekend. Lavender Weekend, which also includes the Sequim Lavender Growers’ Lavender Festival, is next weekend, July 19-21.

Leaking nuke plant TOKYO — The stricken nuclear power plant at Fukushima has probably been leaking contaminated water into the ocean for two years, ever since an earthquake and tsunami badly damaged the plant. In unusually candid comments, Shunichi Tanaka, the head of the Nuclear Regulation Authority, also said that neither his staff nor the plant’s operator knew exactly where the leaks were coming from, or how to stop them. The operator, Tokyo Electric Power, has reported spikes in the amounts of radioactive cesium, tritium and strontium detected in groundwater at the plant, adding urgency to the task of sealing any leaks. Radioactive cesium and strontium, especially, are known to raise risks of cancer in humans. Tanaka’s comments bring into sharp relief the precariousness of the cleanup at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, where core meltdowns occurred at three of the six reactors. A critical problem has been the groundwater that has been pouring into the basements of the damaged reactor buildings and becoming contaminated. Workers have been pumping the water out to be stored in dozens of tanks at the plant, but have not stopped the inflow. Until recently, Tokyo Electric, known as Tepco, flatly denied that any of that water was leaking into the ocean.

Gold and silver Gold futures for August delivery rose $32.50 or 2.6 percent, to settle at $1,279.90 an ounce on Thursday. Silver for September delivery jumped 79 cents to end at $19.96 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press


FaithReligion

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

An American creed we can still aspire to I’M WRITING THIS column on July 4, the 237th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This date also marks the 158th anniversary of the emergence of “America’s poet,” Walt Whitman (1819-1892). On this day, Whitman self-published the first edition of his great poetic experiment, Leaves of Grass, a slim volume of only 12 poems. Over a lifetime of adding and revising, however, Whitman republished Leaves eight more times, the final “deathbed edition” (1891) being a substantial volume of nearly 400 poems. Whitman was the sweet singer of a democratic and egalitarian America. “I hear America singing,” he cried, “the varied carols I hear.” With the first two editions of Leaves, Whitman hoped he might save the Union by putting before the nation a vision of unity that all might behold. If only the nation could see the value of each person to the life of the whole, he said, how could it split apart?

ISSUES OF FAITH United States is Bode not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges or churches or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors . . . but always most in the common people.”

Bruce

Poet’s credo

Also, easily overlooked in the midst of a lengthy paragraph of this lengthy preface are lines that might be lifted out as Whitman’s credo: “This is what you shall do: Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to Horrors of war nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of That was not to be, and men, go freely with powerfollowing the fracturing of ful uneducated persons and America through “the horwith the young and with rors of fratricidal war,” the mothers of families, Whitman’s pen at first read these leaves in the went dry. open air every season of Later, serving as a every year of your life, renurse in that civil conflict, examine all you have been Whitman again picked up told at school or church or his pen to write about what in any book, dismiss whathe saw and felt . . . and to ever insults your own soul; write about a new vision and your very flesh shall for America, a chastened be a great poem and have America that might reach the richest fluency not only an even deeper unity, one in its words but in the tested by conflict. silent lines of its lips and Abraham Lincoln was face and between the the figure who embodied lashes of your eyes and in Whitman’s new vision for every motion and joint of America, and some of Whit- your body.” man’s greatest poems are _________ about him. Always, Whitman was a Issues of Faith is a rotating column by seven religious leaders poet of the people. In a lengthy prose pref- on the North Olympic Peninsula. The Rev. Bruce Bode is minister ace to his first edition, a of the Quimper Unitarian Univerpreface dropped from subsalist Fellowship in Port Townsend. sequent editions, he wrote: His email is bruceabode@gmail. “The genius of the com.

Pope criminalizes information leaks THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

tion to reflect the treaty’s core proviVA T I C A N sions. CITY — Pope The VatiFrancis overcan’s penal hauled the laws code is based that govern the on the 1889 Vatican City Italian code. State on ThursMuch of the day, criminalizhodgepodge of ing leaks of laws passed Vatican inforThursday — Pope Francis mation and listwhich range Overhauling laws ing sexual viofrom listing lence, prostitucrimes against tion and possession of child humanity to the illicit pornography as crimes that appropriation of nuclear can be punished by up to 12 material — bring the Vatiyears in prison. can up to date with the The legislation covers many U.N. conventions it clergy and lay people who has signed over the years. live and work in Vatican City and is different from International norms the canon law covering the universal Catholic Church. Others were necessary It was issued at a critical to comply with internatime, as the Vatican gears tional norms to fight moneyup for a grilling by a U.N. laundering, part of the Vaticommittee on its efforts to can’s more recent push protect children under a toward financial transparkey U.N. convention and ency. And still others were prevent priests from sexu- designed to update the Vatially abusing them. can’s legal system with conThe Vatican signed and temporary practice: The ratified the U.N. Conven- new law cancels out lifetime tion on the Rights of the prison sentences, for examChild in 1990 yet only now ple, and instead imposes has it updated its legisla- maximum sentences of

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

B9

Briefly . . . Philippines will get 168 dresses thanks to project PORT ANGELES — Filipinos on the island of Mindanao will soon receive the benefits of a dress-making project organized by First Christian Church parishioner Lyn Madison. Madison has long received church help with a missionary program in the Philippines, her native country. For the past 17 years, Madison has spent the month of March delivering food, toys, clothing and other supplies collected from Port Angeles community members throughout the year to villagers scattered across the mountainous area. Recently, Madison received a handmade sundress from a church member as a donation. Inspired by a need for such garments back home, Madison asked fellow parishioner and seamstress Margaret Katz if she could make as many as 100 more sundresses of various sizes for distribution. Katz joined the cause and began contacting local businesses to assist. She organized a group of seamstresses from Viking Sew and Vac — which also donated workspace for the two-day sewing project — and received a discount on fabric and supplies from Jo-Ann Fabrics. The Church’s Christian Women’s Fellowship raised funds to cover project costs. Together, the seamstresses crafted 168 dresses, which were formally blessed and dedicated during a recent church service. To help Madison’s missionary efforts, phone First Christian

QUEEN OF ANGELS CATHOLIC PARISH

209 West 11th St. Port Angeles

360.452.2351

www.queenofangelsparish.org

Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday evening 6:00 p.m. Wed. thru Sat. 8:30 a.m. Old Latin Mass every 2nd & 4th Sunday 2:00 p.m. Confession: 30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Lyn Madison, left, and Margaret Katz show off some of the locally crafted sundresses that will be sent to the Philippines. Church, 2606 S. Race St., at 360457-7062.

Grace Baptist programs PORT ANGELES — Grace Baptist Church hosts a Summer Bible Time from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. each Wednesday through Aug. 14. The evening “will be filled with fun, food and a Bible adventure featuring Joshua and Caleb in the Promised Land,” according to organizers. For rides or more information, phone 360-460-7456.

Bible school set PORT ANGELES — Kids from age 5 through sixth grade can attend Kingdom Rock Vacation Bible School at Bethany Pentecostal Church, 506 S. Francis St., from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday.

BETHANY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH E. Fifth & Francis Port Angeles 457-1030 Omer Vigoren, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m., 6:30 p.m. Worship WED. & SAT.: 7 p.m. Eve. Service

www.unityintheolympics.org 2917 E. Myrtle, Port Angeles 457-3981 Sunday Services 10:30 a.m. Rev. John Wingfield

www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

Confession:

INDEPENDENT BIBLE CHURCH Sunday: 116 E. Ahlvers Rd. 8:15 & 11 a.m. Sunday Worship 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Nursery available at all Sun. events Saturday: 112 N. Lincoln St. 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Worship Admin. Center: 112 N. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA / 360-452-3351 More information: www.indbible.org

PORT ANGELES — The Rev. John Wingfield will present “What Do You Want” at Unity in the Olympics’ 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship service. He also will continue his series on the Beatitudes, delving into “Blessed Are the Peacemakers.” Special meditation will be from 10 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. A special membership meeting will be held following fellowship. Everyone is welcome to attend all church activities, including this special meeting. Peninsula Daily News

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

139 W. 8th Street, Port Angeles 360-452-4781 Pastor: Ted Mattie Lay Pastor: Shirley Cruthers Worship Hours: 8:30 & 10:00 a.m. Nursery Provided: both services

UNITY IN THE OLYMPICS

101 E. Maple St., Sequim 360.683.6076

30 minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Unity service set

“Praying & Living” Rev. Corey Schlosser-Hall

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC PARISH Mass Schedule: Saturday Vigil: 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Monday & Tuesday: 8:30 a.m. Thursday-Saturday: 8:30 a.m.

The Vacation Bible School is free, but donations will be accepted. Songs, Bible activities, crafts, games and snacks are planned each day. Bus rides are available by phoning the church at 360-457-1030.

PENINSULA WCG Gardiner Community Center A Bible Based Church Services: Saturday at 1 p.m. Visitors Welcome For information 417-0826 980 Old Gardiner Road

DUNGENESS COMMUNITY CHURCH 683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, Sequim Sunday Service 10 a.m.

Sunday 10:00 a.m. Meeting @ Deer Park Cinemas - Hwy 101 & Deer Park Road, Port Angeles Glen Douglas, Pastor 452-9936

An Inclusive Community Celebrating Shared Values & Putting Them Into Action in the Larger Community OLYMPIC UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 417-2665 www.olympicuuf.org 73 Howe Rd., Agnew-Old Olympic to N. Barr Rd., right on Howe Rd. July 14, 10:30 Joseph Bednarik

Driving Lesson #1: Get the Big Picture Welcoming Congregation

www.thecrossingchurch.net

Casual Environment, Serious Faith

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL

510 E. Park Ave. Port Angeles 457-4862 Services: Sunday 8:00 and 10:00 a.m. Godly Play for Children 9:00 a.m. Monday 8:15 p.m. “Compline”

Wednesday 11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

To know Christ and to make Him known www.standrewpa.org

PORT ANGELES CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

HOLY TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCA)

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 301 E. Lopez Ave., PA (Disciples of Christ) 452-2323 Park & Race, Port Angeles Pastor Richard Grinstad 457-7062 Sunday Worship at 8:30 a.m. Pastor Neil Allen & 11:00 a.m. Nursery Provided SUNDAY Radio Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 11 a.m. most Sundays 10:00 a.m. Worship www.htlcpa.com

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles 360-457-3839 Dr. Jerry Dean, Minister A Christ–Centered message for a world weary people. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

& Congregational Church 7th & Laurel, Port Angeles 360-452-8971 Joey Olson, Pastor SUNDAY Childcare provided 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Summer Breakfast 11:00 a.m. Worship Youth Activities - Contact Church office@pafumc.org www.pafumc.org

847 N. Sequim Ave. • 683-4135 www.sequimbible.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Worship Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Adult Discipleship Hour 6:00 p.m. E3/Mid-Hi School Bible Study Dave Wiitala, Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor

Bible centered • Family friendly

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FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013


B10

PeninsulaNorthwest

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Puget porpoises make a comeback BY LYNDA V. MAPES THE SEATTLE TIMES VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — After nearly disappearing from local waters for decades, harbor porpoises are once again a common sight in Puget Sound. “They are back, big time,” said biologist John Calambokidis with the Cascadia Research Collective in Olympia. “They are probably the most common cetacean in Puget Sound.” Common in these inland waters through the 1940s and ’50s, harbor porpoises virtually disappeared in Puget Sound south of Admiralty Inlet and Hood Canal by the early 1970s. Entanglement in gill nets, which drowns the airbreathing mammals; vessel noise; and contamination from industrial pollution are all possible culprits, pushing the animals farther north in their range, researchers posit. But beginning in about 2007, the sight of the quick slipslide of porpoises through the waters of Puget Sound has become common once again. In calm conditions, the animals can be seen everywhere, from the Mukilteo ferry dock to Burrows Pass near Anacortes to the waters of West Seattle. Just why isn’t known, but it could be from declines in gill-net fisheries in Puget Sound, as well as ongoing cleanup efforts that have reduced industrial sources of pollution to Puget Sound.

Unique to Sound Phocoena phocoena is a distinct species unique to Puget Sound’s inside waters. They live out their lives near ours, foraging herring, smelt and sand lance in shallow nearshore waters, usually fewer than 500 feet deep. Living 15 to 20 years, females produce a calf each year for most of those years. They are about the size of a lithe adult woman, at 5 feet and 120 pounds. They are the only cetacean — dolphin or whale — in the Northwest entirely

MARK HARRISON/THE SEATTLE TIMES

VIA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Harbor porpoises are shown that are part of a small group feeding in Useless Bay off Whidbey Island earlier this month. resident to our inland marine waters. Harbor porpoises have been detected as deep as 770 feet in the waters of the San Juan Islands. But they usually stay near the surface, coming up regularly to breathe. Some say their puffing sounds like a sneeze. According to a natural history of the harbor porpoise by Joe Gaydos — chief scientist with the SeaDoc Society, a nonprofit marineconservation science program at University of California, Davis — harbor porpoises are the smallest of 22 species of cetaceans in the Salish Sea and probably one of the few that are resident year-round. They are easy to confuse with Dall’s porpoise, which are slightly stockier and all black on top, with white flanks along the belly, whitetipped dorsal fins and flukes, Gaydos noted, or with the Pacific white-sided dolphins, which have similar gray backs to the harbor porpoise but also sport white stripes on their sides and a bicolored and more curved dorsal fin.

Behavior the clue Behavior is the big clue here, Gaydos said. Pacific white-sideds travel in bigger groups and are more exuberant, some-

times even leaping from the water and cruising midair. Scientists have been taking more notice of harbor porpoises of late. A research conference convened on the harbor porpoise in February drew interest from state and federal agencies, as well as nonprofits around the region. The Pacific Biodiversity Institute, based in Winthrop, Okanogan County, has taken up the cause of the porpoise, advocating for its use as an indicator species of the health of Puget Sound.

Tracking sightings Volunteers with the Skagit County Beach Watchers are tracking sightings from headlands, recording porpoise sightings for the institute in two-hour intervals. And the biodiversity institute has deployed two acoustic monitors to track the animals, using buoys to observe harbor porpoise travel paths. Already, the recorders, which pick up the animals’ distinctive sounds of echolocation, have detected that the porpoises keep to a schedule. About twice as many pings are detected at night, beginning about 6 p.m. and continuing until 6 a.m.,

said Aileen Jeffries, a retired physicist and principal investigator for the institute’s harbor-porpoise project. “If you think about it, it’s an incredible world. “They live in an acoustic world, whereas we live in a visual world. “It is fun learning about another creature. It’s humbling.”

She said her volunteer work with porpoises was her retirement gift to herself. “It’s all very nerdy, but I get to do what I want, and this is it. “This is a sensitive, curious, playful little animal with a personality. “They are really intelligent little creatures, and I don’t think we have appreciated them.” She pointed out that the last population survey, counting about 10,680 porpoises in Puget Sound, is out of date, occurring in 2002-2003. “We want to set a baseline as a way to follow trends in the population that can be used to realistically assess the stability of the harbor porpoise in Puget Sound,” Jeffries said.

More strandings Such data could even be used to evaluate the prospect of creating more marine reserves in the Sound. “You can’t protect something unless you know something about it.” Scientists also are concerned about a spike in strandings, Gaydos said. A stranding is any occa-

“They are really intelligent little creatures, and I don’t think we have appreciated them.” AILEEN JEFFRIES principal investigator for the Pacific Biodiversity Institute’s harbor-porpoise project sion in which a marine mammal is on land, dead or alive, such as on a beach, on rocks or on a boat ramp or marina. Until the mid-2000s, statewide annual harbor porpoise strandings were rather consistent, at an average of six animals. But strandings have climbed since then, more than tripling, for reasons that remain unclear. “Is that just because the population is increasing?” Gaydos said. “Or is there something else going on?” He said a new stock assessment from NOAA, which monitors marine mammal populations, is needed. “If they are dying of something and we are missing it, that is really serious. “And we don’t have enough data to tell us that.”

Death and Memorial Notice VELDA GWEN PATRICK January 5, 1933 June 30, 2013 Ms. Velda Gwen Patrick of Port Angeles passed away at the age of 80. She was born in Thorp, Washington, to Jess Vernon and Neva Maurine (Britton) Curry. Velda enjoyed her life as a homemaker and school bus driver. Velda enjoyed quilting, antiques, sewing, tole painting and home decorating. She was also an avid reader. Velda’s pet dogs and her family meant the world to her. She leaves behind her

Ms. Patrick son, Paul Lyman Patrick; daughters Robin Noel Patrick and Suzanne Carol Borneman; brother John Singleton Curry; and

sisters Cheryl Hayden and Lola Poland. She also leaves behind her grandchildren, Scott Takacs, Mathew Kellen, Jennifer and Sarah Borneman. She is preceded in death by Jane Brandt, Twila Johnson, Lyman Patrick, Dorothy Pease, Colleen Bennett and Marjorie Poston. Private family services are to be arranged at a later date. Memorial contributions should be made to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, www.aspca.org/ donate. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, Port Angeles, was entrusted with the arrangements.

Death and Memorial Notice SAM CHADD August 25, 1912 July 7, 2013 Sam died peacefully at home in Port Angeles at age 100 of age-related causes — or, as he put it: “I got no problems! I’m just too damn old!” Sam was born in Rezischev, Ukraine, in the Russian Empire of Czar Nicholas to Alex and Leah (Chorney) Chudnovsky (also spelled Chodnowsky, Chadnowsky and other ways in English). His father immigrated to the U.S. shortly after Sam was born, escaping from anti-Jewish pogroms and intending to send for his wife and son when he raised the money. But world events intervened — World War I, the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War — and Alex could not send money into Russia. Leah paid a smuggler

Mr. Chadd to sneak them across the border, but they were caught and detained. However, when a fight broke out at the border station, Leah grabbed Sam and ran out into the forest, where they eventually made their way to Poland, then Antwerp for the voyage to Ellis Island and ultimately Chicago to join Alex.

Sam first attended school at age 9 and sat in the first grade for three years until he learned English from his cousin. Then he quickly advanced to his grade level, graduated from Marshall High School in 1931 and went on to graduate from what later became the University of Illinois Pharmacy School. He practiced pharmacy and became the manager of a Walgreens store in 1940, the same year he married Evelyn Matloff. Tragedy struck that same year, when Sam’s father was accidentally shot by his partner at their pawn business, becoming paraplegic. Overnight, Sam quit his pharmacy job to preserve the family business. He quickly adapted, aided by the fact that he had grown up on Chicago’s South Side and knew many of the people

Remembering a Lifetime available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further details, call 360-4173527.

ce Voted 1 st Pla 2008 - 2012 e Hom l Best Funera nty in Clallam Cou

In Port Angeles, Sam and Evelyn enjoyed spending time with their friends and family, taking walks in nature, attending cultural events and caring for their home. They delivered Meals on Wheels, which appealed to Sam’s love of driving. In 2006, they moved to Park View Villas, where they were warmly received by the other residents and staff. Evelyn died there in 2008, and Sam continued on, experiencing remarkably few health problems until his death. Sam had been an avid aficionado of the stock market since the 1930s, and the market became both a pastime and job in retirement. He took an investment class and joined an investment club, making many friends in both, and stayed active in the stock market

till the very end. He had lived his own version of the American Dream, but he never forgot about the concerns of poverty, having come from there himself. Sam is survived by children Charles (Susan), Susan and Edward; grandchildren John, James and Edmund Chadd, and Alex and Jacob Haverfield; five great-grandchildren; brother Maury Chodnowsky, and sister Evelyn Einbund. He is preceded in death by his parents and by his son-in-law, Bob Boardman. Honoring Sam’s adamant wishes, no memorial will be held. No flowers, please. Donations in Sam’s name may be sent to the Port Angeles Food Bank. Memories can be shared at Sam’s online guestbook by visiting www. legacy.com/obituaries/ peninsuladailynews.

The ONLY Locally Owned Funeral Home and Crematory Serving the people of Clallam County Immediate, Dependable and Affordable services 24 hours a day • Our staff has over 100 years experience

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■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is

in the neighborhood. Eventually, he acquired his own store and developed a philosophy of giving loans based on the person and not the merchandise. Business boomed after the veterans returned home from World War II, and the Liberty Collateral Company thrived until the ghetto riots of the 1960s touched Chicago. Sam’s business was untouched, but his insurance company refused to renew, and Sam and his crew were forced to shut down in 1968. After a 27-year hiatus, Sam decided to get back into pharmacy, working as an apprentice for a year until he was able to pass the state exam. He worked until 1985, whereupon he and Evelyn moved to Port Angeles, where their daughter Susan had put down roots and started a family.

Leah & Steve Ford

• 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 • 260 Monroe Road, Port Angeles, WA 98362 email: info@drennanford.com

Visit our Website: www.drennanford.com


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Pickles

Garfield

Momma

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

by Mell Lazarus

Rose is Rose

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Dennis the Menace

B11

Transgender should unveil status early

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

by Hank Ketcham

DEAR ABBY: I am a 30-year-old DEAR ABBY transgender woman who has just started her journey. I know that Feeling more comfortable in my Abigail skin, I have been going to some local Van Buren when I do, he will be mad, but it’s not hangouts with some friends from the first time that work and meeting straight men. STDs have been a My question is, when is it approproblem in our priate to disclose that I am a preoprelationship. Help! erative trans woman? Thinking I have tried online dating on of My Health trans-friendly websites, as well as visited the local transgender bar, but Dear Thinkthose men tend only to be looking for ing of Your sex, and I am looking for more than Health: One that. would think that a I would love your advice on the man who loves his wife would want matter. Starting My Journey to be absolutely positive that he wouldn’t give her a sexually transDear Starting: For your safety, it mitted infection. However, because your husband is important that you disclose your has given you one before, it is perstatus early, before there is any sex fectly logical that you tell him it is involved. If you don’t, the straight man could react violently and possi- the reason you want him to be tested before resuming your marital relably put you in danger. tionship. At this point, it would be a good idea to contact PFLAG (Parents, Dear Abby: I’m a single 32-yearFamilies and Friends of Lesbians old who lives across the country from and Gays) because it can put you in my family. touch with resources to help you I have two sets of grandparents through your journey. who both send me birthday and holiThe largest increase in new indiday cards containing checks. viduals reaching out to PFLAG is The problem is, I earn close to six now among people with “trans” figures, which is far more than my issues — and this includes both grandparents’ income in retirement, trans individuals and their family and I have only myself to support. members. I typically shred their checks It is critically important to seek out a culturally competent therapist when I receive them. Should I continue to do this, or to help you with specific issues. To should I tell them that as much as I find referrals and a local chapter, appreciate the sentiment, a simple visit pflag.org. card would be fine? Secretly Shredding in Seattle Dear Abby: My husband is in Afghanistan for a year. When he Dear S.S. in S.: When a check returns, I want to ask him to get isn’t cashed, it is obvious to the tested for STDs before we have sex. check writer, and it can cause probI do not have any specific reason to think he would be having sex with lems in balancing the person’s checkbook. someone while deployed, but let’s I think your solution to tell them face it: He’s a man, and a year is a long time to abstain when there are you no longer need the checks is a females present. good one. I have seen text messages from _________ his buddies that read, “What hapDear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, pens on deployment stays on deployalso known as Jeanne Phillips, and was ment,” regarding them cheating on founded by her mother, the late Pauline Philtheir spouses. lips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. How do I approach the subject in Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via the most effective way? email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Eugenia Last

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Apply yourself and you can make improvements to your life personally and professionally. A change will lift your spirits and encourage others to help you reach your goals. Taking the first step will make the difference. Love is highlighted. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Put more emphasis on money, investments, legalities and health issues. Protect what you have and make sure you read the fine print of any agreement or document that needs your signature. A change may be wanted but it will also be costly. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Emotional problems will set in if you are judgmental or if you aren’t upfront about your feelings. Love is in the stars, but so is conflict. Caution must be taken if you are harboring feelings of uncertainty or a change of heart. 2 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Organization and preparation will help you make the most of your day. Flirting with ideas that lead to enjoyment, trying something new or visiting an unfamiliar destination will lead to knowledge, new options and friendships. Be receptive and inviting. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Volunteer your services or take a serious approach to making a difference. Vocalize your position and your concerns and you will get a response. Don’t settle for less when you can get so much more. Reconnect with people who share your beliefs. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Consider your beliefs and where you see yourself in five years. Strategize and get your game plan in order. A partnership will weigh heavy in a decision you must make regarding your position or status. Speak up and move forward. 5 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): An emotional issue will surface and should be dealt with openly and immediately. Letting things fester will not be in your best interest. Love is on the rise, and you don’t want to mess up a romantic moment due to a mishap. 2 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t step back when you should be protecting your position. Make suggestions and stand up to whatever competition you face. A highspirited approach will show a unique and unexpected side of you that will leave an impression. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Discipline will be required. Focus on personal relationships and property investments. A new deal is likely to improve your lifestyle and expand the possibility of achieving your dreams, hopes and wishes for the future. Love is in the stars. 3 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Explore any possibility that allows you to use your imagination, creativity and experience. Travel or getting involved in community events or activities that have a unique cultural flavor will broaden your perspective, options and opinions. 4 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Being a participant will enable you to show your strengths. Getting involved in a cause or making your point heard will enhance your chance to take a lead position. Making a geographical move or even just expanding your interests will pay off. 4 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Emotional blackmail or deception may leave you in an awkward position. Don’t jeopardize what you’ve worked so hard to obtain. Step back, be reasonable and focus on making love, not war. Expand your options personally and financially. 3 stars

Candorville ❘ by Darrin Bell [Send feedback to pdncomics@gmail.com.]

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


B12

WeatherWatch

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013 Neah Bay 58/50

ellingham e llin n 69/53

Olympic Peninsula TODAY P.M . B R EEZ

DRIZZLE

Forks 69/49

Y

EE . BR P. M

64/52

Olympics Snow level: 7,500 ft.

ZY

Townsend 66/53

Sequim 66/50

E ZL IZ DR

Port Ludlow 68/52

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Yesterday

National TODAY forecast Nation

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 62 51 0.00 10.34 Forks 66 52 Trace 56.91 Seattle 72 55 0.00 16.71 Sequim 69 54 0.00 5.60 Hoquiam 64 54 0.00 31.73 Victoria 73 55 0.00 13.67 Port Townsend 69 54 0.00 10.73

Forecast highs for Friday, July 12

Billings 91° | 64°

San Francisco 66° | 54°

Aberdeen 70/51

Los Angeles 77° | 66° El Paso 100° | 75° Houston 100° | 79°

Almanac Last

New

First

Full

Chicago 79° | 63°

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Atlanta 86° | 72°

Fronts

Jul 29

Aug 6

Jul 15

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Low 52 64/52 66/56 70/58 74/57 Considerable Partly sunny; Sun returns with Nice day to start More sunshine Moonrise today cloudiness West End drizzle dry conditions the week and blue skies Moonset today Marine Weather

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 9 to 14 kt. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. Tonight: W wind 16 to 23 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. Saturday: W wind around 9 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Ocean: Variable winds becoming WNW 9 to 14 kt afternoon. WNW swell 4 to 5 ft at 8 seconds. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. Tonight: WNW wind 10 to 14 kt.

Tides

CANADA Victoria 68° | 50° Seattle 70° | 48° Olympia 73° | 48°

Spokane 75° | 52°

Tacoma 72° | 48° Yakima 84° | 54°

Astoria 70° | 54°

ORE.

© 2013 Wunderground.com

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Lo 73 68 71 57 66 73 75 73 72 73 70 60 71 74 76 62

9:12 p.m. 5:28 a.m. 10:14 a.m. 10:58 p.m.

Prc .85 .01 .35

.20 .17 .01 .17

Otlk Cldy Cldy PCldy PCldy Rain Rain Rain PCldy Rain Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Rain Clr Cldy

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 3:11 a.m. 7.2’ 9:50 a.m. -0.5’ 4:19 p.m. 7.1’ 10:15 p.m. 2.0’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 3:53 a.m. 6.8’ 10:24 a.m. 0.0’ 4:54 p.m. 7.3’ 11:04 p.m. 1.8’

SUNDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 4:43 a.m. 6.3’ 11:02 a.m. 5:32 p.m. 7.5’ 11:59 p.m.

Ht 0.5’ 1.6’

Port Angeles

5:12 a.m. 5.0’ 12:32 a.m. 4.1’ 7:03 p.m. 7.0’ 11:54 a.m. 0.3’

6:10 a.m. 4.7’ 1:19 a.m. 3.6’ 7:32 p.m. 7.0’ 12:31 p.m. 1.0’

7:17 a.m. 4.4’ 8:03 p.m. 6.9’

2:08 a.m. 1:10 p.m.

2.9’ 1.9’

Port Townsend

6:49 a.m. 6.2’ 8:40 p.m. 8.6’

1:45 a.m. 4.6’ 1:07 p.m. 0.3’

7:47 a.m. 5.8’ 9:09 p.m. 8.6’

2:32 a.m. 4.0’ 1:44 p.m. 1.1’

8:54 a.m. 5.4’ 9:40 p.m. 8.5’

3:21 a.m. 3.2’ 2:23 p.m. 2.1’

Dungeness Bay*

5:55 a.m. 5.6’ 1:07 a.m. 4.1’ 7:46 p.m. 7.7’ 12:29 p.m. 0.3’

6:53 a.m. 5.2’ 8:15 p.m. 7.7’

1:54 a.m. 3.6’ 1:06 p.m. 1.0’

8:00 a.m. 4.9’ 8:46 p.m. 7.7’

2:43 a.m. 1?45 p.m.

LaPush

2.9’ 1.9’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

NEW

2014 Subaru

FORESTER

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Jul 22

Nation/World Hi 84 94 98 72 83 87 89 100 88 95 92 82 100 86 93 82

New York 81° | 70°

Detroit 82° | 61°

Miami 88° | 77°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / © Peninsula Daily News

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 77° | 70°

Cold

TONIGHT

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 88° | 66°

Denver 95° | 66°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 69/55

Sunny

Seattle 70° | 48°

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 83 Casper 94 Charleston, S.C. 90 Charleston, W.Va. 87 Charlotte, N.C. 87 Cheyenne 87 Chicago 85 Cincinnati 89 Cleveland 87 Columbia, S.C. 90 Columbus, Ohio 90 Concord, N.H. 77 Dallas-Ft Worth 102 Dayton 90 Denver 93 Des Moines 86 Detroit 88 Duluth 80 El Paso 98 Evansville 87 Fairbanks 59 Fargo 82 Flagstaff 86 Grand Rapids 84 Great Falls 97 Greensboro, N.C. 88 Hartford Spgfld 87 Helena 95 Honolulu 88 Houston 97 Indianapolis 85 Jackson, Miss. 94 Jacksonville 90 Juneau 64 Kansas City 91 Key West 88 Las Vegas 109 Little Rock 100

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography © Weather Underground / The Associated Press

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 120 at Death Valley, Calif. ■ 37 at Hurricane Ridge, Wash., and 3 other locations. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

81 61 83 69 .01 Cldy Sioux Falls 70 .16 Cldy Los Angeles 91 69 .49 PCldy Syracuse 87 68 .25 54 Clr Louisville 97 76 PCldy Tampa 75 PCldy Lubbock 89 73 1.51 95 76 PCldy Topeka 68 .53 Cldy Memphis 94 68 88 77 .18 Cldy Tucson 72 .18 Rain Miami Beach 98 74 .12 PCldy Tulsa 56 PCldy Midland-Odessa 98 74 102 76 80 62 Clr Washington, D.C. 90 75 .57 64 Clr Milwaukee 83 64 Clr Wichita 69 .19 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 102 79 95 70 .87 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 67 .23 PCldy Nashville 84 68 .15 93 78 Rain Wilmington, Del. 88 76 .16 73 Rain New Orleans 85 76 Rain 67 1.18 Cldy New York City ________ 92 76 Rain 68 .24 Rain Norfolk, Va. 85 63 .03 PCldy 82 Cldy North Platte Hi Lo PCldy 65 .06 PCldy Oklahoma City 103 77 58 48 85 63 PCldy Auckland 64 PCldy Omaha 111 81 91 73 .01 Rain Baghdad 63 Clr Orlando 87 70 97 61 .01 Clr Beijing 64 .02 PCldy Pendleton 72 54 89 77 .05 Rain Berlin 53 Clr Philadelphia Brussels 68 53 104 88 Cldy 79 PCldy Phoenix Cairo 95 71 86 64 .71 Cldy 71 .03 Clr Pittsburgh 66 42 52 .12 Cldy Portland, Maine 65 64 .12 Cldy Calgary 77 59 80 55 Cldy Guadalajara 64 PCldy Portland, Ore. 93 83 85 74 Rain Hong Kong 56 .96 Rain Providence Jerusalem 85 65 60 PCldy Raleigh-Durham 89 73 .04 Rain Johannesburg 86 64 88 65 .04 Clr 58 PCldy Rapid City 96 67 95 73 Clr Kabul 71 1.40 Rain Reno 79 57 91 72 1.93 Rain London 73 .43 Rain Richmond 73 56 97 55 Clr Mexico City 59 PCldy Sacramento Montreal 78 58 88 68 .03 Clr 76 M Clr St Louis 79 59 90 77 .22 Cldy Moscow 78 Cldy St Petersburg 96 82 Cldy New Delhi 64 .05 PCldy Salt Lake City 104 74 77 57 99 78 PCldy Paris 76 .04 Rain San Antonio 71 67 Cldy Rio de Janeiro 80 62 74 Rain San Diego 84 66 68 54 Cldy Rome 48 Cldy San Francisco 68 50 68 Clr San Juan, P.R. 88 78 .06 PCldy Sydney 93 76 93 61 .05 Cldy Tokyo 74 .63 PCldy Santa Fe 77 60 65 53 .02 Clr Toronto 90 Cldy St Ste Marie 97 80 Cldy Vancouver 71 .02 PCldy Shreveport 68 52

PCldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Cldy PCldy Rain Cldy Cldy Rain

Otlk Sh Clr PCldy PCldy PCldy Clr PCldy Ts Cldy PCldy PCldy Clr PCldy Ts PCldy PCldy Ts PCldy Clr Clr PCldy Cldy Clr PCldy

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Peninsula Daily News

Friday, July 12, 2013 C1

2,500 0%

$

NGO DUERRA E UND DG DO 13 20 000 $30, SUV ROW 3RD D BEST EQUIPPE ***

POWER TO TOW WHATEVER MOVES YOU!

WILDER 97 Deer Park Road • Port Angeles (360)

www.wilderdodge.com

NEW 2013

CASH ALLOWANCE

– or –

TO 360HP T IN CLASS AVAILABLE V8 POWER UP

**

BES

452-3888

*0% ARP for Up to 60 Months, On Approval of Credit. Not all buyers will qualify. ***Based on Ward’s Midsize Sport Utility Vehicle segment. **Based on latest available competitive information and Ward’s segmentation. Excludes other vehicles built by Chrysler Group LLC. See Dealer for details. Plus tax, license and a negotiable $150 documentation fee. Ad expires 7/31/13.

TACOMA

WILDER Honda You Can Count On Us!

97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-9268 Check us out online at

www.wilderhonda.com

0.9

%APR *

You Can Count On Us!

GREAT SELECTION!

Double Cab 4x4

LONGEST-LASTING VEHICLES OF ANY FULL-LINE AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURER*

*Longevity based on Polk U.S. Vehicles In Operation registration statistics MY 1987-2012 as of October 2012. Full-line manufacturer based on car, SUV, minivan, compact and full-size pickup.

COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE FOR 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR COMPLETE PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA.

APR UP TO * 60 MOS.

WILDER

TOYOTA You Can Count On Us!

95 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles 1-800-927-9379 • 360-457-8511 Check us out online at

www.wildertoyota.com

SUPER SUMMER SAVINGS! 2013 Fit

2013 CR-V

2013 Civic 2013 Odyssey

2013 Pilot

0

2013 Ridgeline

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*0.9% APR Up to 60 Months, On Approval of Credit. Plus tax, license and a negotiable $150.00 documentary fee. Not all buyers will qualify. See Wilder Honda for details. Offer expires 7/31/13.

% 60 2013 APR*

ON ALL

NEW

MOS.

MODELS

*APR good on all new, unused 2013 Volkswagen models. Example: For 0% APR, monthly payment for every $1,000 you finance for 60 months is $16.67. APR offered to highly qualified customers on approved credit by Volkswagen Credit through participating dealers. No down payment required with approved credit. Not all customers will qualify for lowest rate. See Wilder VW for details. Offer valid in US only. Plus tax, license and $150.00 negotiable documentary fee. Offer expires 7/31/13.

WILDER VOLKSWAGEN You Can Count On Us!

97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles 1-800-927-9395 • 360-452-9268 Check us out online at

www.wildervw.com

WILDER CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED 2010 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3412A

$15,995

2012 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3462

$20,995

2011 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3411

$22,995

2011 HONDA CR-V EX-L AWD

SALE PRICE STK#P3455

$28,995

2006 HONDA PILOT EX 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#H6178A

$15,995

2008 DODGE NITRO R/T 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3443

$21,995

2010 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3439A

$22,995

2011 TOYOTA TACOMA ACCESS CAB 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#H6116A

$28,995

2011 MITSUBISHI ENDEAVOR LS AWD

SALE PRICE STK#P4616

$16,950

2008 HONDA CR-V EX AWD

SALE PRICE STK#P3485

$21,995

2007 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3361B

$22,995

2010 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3245B

$28,995

2008 GMC CANYON EXT CAB SLE1 4X4

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

SALE PRICE STK#J7846C

SALE PRICE

$16,995

STK#P3358

2012 TOYOTA RAV4 4DR WAGON

2008 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P4647

SALE PRICE

$22,950

STK#P4609B

SALE PRICE

$25,950

2003 LEXUS LX470 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P4659

$31,950

$22,950

2006 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE CAB TRD 4X4

2010 TOYOTA RAV4 LIMITED V6 AWD

STK#P3439A

$17,989

SALE PRICE STK#P3466

$25,995

2011 TOYOTA TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#P3346A

$31,995

2011 NISSAN LEAF SL

SALE PRICE STK#10346A

$19,995

2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#C7942A

$22,995

2008 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER SS V8 4X4

SALE PRICE STK#H6202B

$26,995

2010 LEXUS RX350 AWD

SALE PRICE STK#P4657

$34,950

Vehicles are one only and subject to prior sale. VINs posted at dealership. Sale price doesn’t include tax, license and documentation fees. A negotiable dealer documentary fee up to $150 may be added to the sale price. See Dealer for details. Ad expires 7/19/13.

You Can Count On Us!

Check us out online at

www.wilderauto.com 24-hours a day!

95 & 97 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles

1-888-813-8545

37786738

WILDER AUTO


Classified

C2 FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

50+ YRS. Sale: Sat.S u n . , 9 - 3 p. m . , 4 9 4 Marsden off Mt. Pleasant. Toys, tools, quilt, cupboards, fur ntiure, crats, garden, bldg materials, jars. No earlies. Cash only. 5TH WHEEL: ‘02 32’ Cougar. All options, 2 slides, new tires, dishes/ linens incl. Priced to sell $10,500. (360)681-5274. .7 FTE Medical Careers Instructor .6 FTE Business Education Teacher At Port Angeles High School Speech and Language Pathologist At Port Angeles School District Apply at portangelesschools.org

CHEV: ‘86 El Camino, Conquista package. PS, PB, PW, PD, cruise, filt, full gages incl. tach., V8, auto, Gaylord bed cover with liner, factory ralley wheels, low miles, not smoked in, garage kept, gold/brown color, tan int. Very original! $11,586.86. (360)683-7789

CADILLAC: ‘92 De Ville. Gray, 122k, 6-way power seats, power locks and windows, climate control, A/C, cruise, all l e a t h e r, a l u m i nu m w h e e l s, n o n - s m o ke r, well-maintained, ver y nice cond., (4) mounted and studded snow tires incl. $2,400. (360)374-9455

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-3 p.m., 2110 Gardiner Beach Rd. Gorgeous queen metal-frame bed, vintage country TV cabinet, women’s clothing C A M P E R : 2 0 0 0 , 1 0 ’ 16-18, stein collection, S&S. Has all the good- curtains, linens, like new ies, very clean. $3,300. Christmas decorations, (360)374-6778 canvassed paintings and car pet remnant, other CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 household items, and ba, no smoking/pets much more! $500. (360)457-9698. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., EXPERIENCED Surgical 9-5 p.m., 111 Sparrow t e c h : R N / L P N / M A / Ct. TECH, per diem. Stop in or send resume to Sequim Same Day Sur- GARAGE Sale: Multiple family garage sale, Satgery, 777 N. 5th u r d ay. o n l y, 8 - 4 p. m . (360)582-2632 Fur niture, tools, toys, MISC: 6 burner gas Wolf f i s h t a n k , C D / DV D s , range, $1,800. 2 lg. ca- household items, lots of pacity refrigerators, $200 dishes, clothes, seasonea. Enclosed all metal al decorations, too much utility/concessions trail- to list. 218 E 9th - in the alley between 9th and er, $2,000. 10th. (360)477-1706

3020 Found

3023 Lost

FOUND: Dog. Black Lab with green collar, Discovery Trail, mile marker 3, Port Angeles. Is now at Olympic Peninsula Humane Society.

L O S T: C a t . Fe m a l e , long hair, calico, petit or med. size, very shy, “Kiki.” Last seen on W. 5th near H St. (360)477-0314

F O U N D : E ye g l a s s e s. Children’s, prescription. 16th and B St., P.A. (360)452-3319

LOST: Cat. Teenage kitty, 1 year old Russian Blue, gray color, microc h i p p e d , a n sw e r s t o “Midnight.” Lost in Pine F O U N D : K e y s . C a r Hill area, around 11th St. keys, house key, at Elks (360)460-9318 Field. Call to identify keychains. L O S T: K i t t e n . Ye l l ow (360)477-0210 and white neutered male, 7 mo. old, BayFOUND: Keys. Electron- w o o d V i l l a g e M o b i l e ic key, house key, and Park or Sun Meadows keychains, call to ID, Old c o m mu n i t y a r e a , S e O l y m p i c H i g h w ay by quim. (360)808-2722. State Patrol Building. (360)460-0715 LOST: Manual Scotty Downrigger, somewhere F O U N D : S t u f fe d t oy. between Por t Angeles Dog, with heart tag. En- and Freshwater Bay. nis and Baker, P.A. (360)452-2066 (360)808-2473 LOST: Scooter. ChilF O U N D : S w i s s a r my dren’s electric scooter, knife, gray/black case. last seen at park on 4th Found on Miller Peninand Pine, Sequim. sula near Cat Lake Rd. (360)681-0828 (360)797-0061

SEE THE MOST CURRENT REAL ESTATE LISTINGS: www.peninsula dailynews.com

GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8:30-4 p.m., 328 Vautier Rd. Troy-Bilt rototiller, air compressor, antique dining table and chairs, bedroom dresser and chest of drawers, paint sprayers, Rodda paint, 5x6’ new arched window, 2 side bars for ‘92‘95 Nissan, books, tables, chairs, pictures, collectibles, household, etc.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . , 8-12 noon, 1350 E. 8th near college. Quality c l o t h i n g : wo m e n ’s / men’s, lots of Aero/Hollister ladies extra small and men’s small, sports, P S P, X - B ox a n d W i i games, Yamaha piano, housewares, linens, jewelry and lots of misc.

MAZDA: ‘02 Miata LS. Excellent condition. 54K m i l e s . 6 s p e e d . A i r, c r u i s e , C D, p o w e r . $8,000. 452-4758. M I S C : Fr e e h o r s e. Young jersey dairy cow, $850. (360)477-1706.

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Sat. 8-2, Sun. 9-2, 46 GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-1 Harrington Rd., top of p.m., 129 W. Park Ave. Monroe Rd. Refrigerator, Lots of household lights! small furniture, househ o l d i t e m s, c l o t h i n g , GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 priced to sell. p.m., 2903 W. 18th St. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Lots of great stuff! Stuff from A-Z, Baby G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . - clothes newborn to 5t Sun., 10-3 p.m., 12 Fin- boys, gir ls. Women’s, dley Rd., take off Old men’s, juniors’ clothing. Olympic to Gasman Rd. Household items and C o l l e c t i bl e s, v i n t a g e more! Stop by 516 N. money, tools, RC boats, L a r c h Ave. , Po r t A n sailboat, kitchen, Elvis geles. Friday, 11-?, Sat.m e m o r a b i l i a , g a r d e n Sun. 9-? pond, new Sun RecumOlyPen now hiring. Enbent trike! try Level Tech Support In-home care available and backup installer pofor your loved ones. Ex- sition. Star ts at minip e r i e n c e d c a r i n g R N mum wage. Computer available, flexible hours, and/or Network experisalary negotiable. Call ence preferred. Willing to train the right person. Rae at 360-681-4271. Must be available MonKILLER Sale: Fri.-Sat., day through Saturday 9-3 p.m., 403 Marsden. 8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tons o’stuff! Garden, Email resume to collectibles, antiques, resumes@olypen.com crafts, sewing, you name GARAGE SALE ADS it! No earlies. Call for details. Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

NURSING OPPORTUNITIES • Clinical Informatics, RN, FT • Clinical Mgr/Home Health RN, FT • RN, OB, 32 hrs wk, E/N • RN CCU, 24 hrs wk, days • RN CCU, 32 hrs wk, nights • RN Cardiology Svs, as needed • RN CCU, as needed • RN ED, as needed • RN Short Stay, as needed

REMOVAL Technician: We are a family owned funeral home based out of Sequim, WA. We are looking for an individual that has excellent people skills, a clean driving record, able to lift 75 pounds, a professional appearance and a great a t t i t u d e w i t h f l ex i bl e hours. You will need to be available five days and five nights. No experience necessary. Email resume Attention Jeremy Wake to lindeprice funeral@gmail.com

ROOMMATE WANTED To share expenses for very nice home west of P.A. on 10+ acres. $450 mo., includes utilities, DirectTV. Must see. Call L o n n i e a f t e r 5 p. m . (360)477-9066. SALE: 7/13 and 14, 9-3 p.m. Kid stuff: swing set, bikes, toys, clothes, conver tible crib with mattress, womans mtn bike, vintage and misc. furnit u r e, w h e e l c h a i r, l i f t chair, new luggage, vintage log boom chains, and more. No earlies! 2808 W. Edgewood Dr. Cash only sale! SEQ. SCHOOL DIST. Seeking sub. bus drivers, will train. Apps. at 503 N. Sequim Ave. (360)582-3260

For details on these positions and others, visit www.olympic medical.org EOE

ROADRUNNER: 2008 16’ Roadrunner by Sun Valley travel trailer. Purchased new in 2009. Cheapo bias ply tires replaced with quality radials 2,000 miles ago. 3 burner stove top, microwave, A.C., Double bed, s h owe r, T V a n t e n n a . S W m o b i l e h o m e i n Everything works. Very park, nice 2 Br., 2 ba. l i g h t w e i g h t , c a n b e $16,000 price reduced if towed with V-6. $8,950. (360)379-1882 moved. (360)461-0907.

SMALL 2 bedroom, 1.75 bath. Near East Safeway, P.A. No smoking. S m a l l p e t o k . Wa t e r, sewer, garbage included. $675, First, last and deposit. (360)457-3194

THREE GALS ESTATE SALE 1316 W. 10th St. Sat.-Sun., 9-3 Push, pull or drag yourself up to this one! Sleep Number bed, refrigerator, freezer, Thule car topper, char broil BBQ, patio set and lots of garden stuff. Craft room loaded with bead crafts, k i t s ya r n a n d b o o k s. N ewe r B e r i n a s e r g e r with 100s of yards of material (quilter’s delight). Name brand plus size women’s clothes, purses, tons of 8M shoes and nice jewelry! Roll top desk, gun cabinet, fishing stuff and s a fe . L a d d e r s , s n o w blower and we’re even selling the carport! Awesome. WA N T E D : C l a s s A m o t o r h o m e. A p p r ox 26’-32’, Vortec engine, slide. (360)631-9211. YARD Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., 123 S. Peabody St., in blue Salvation Army Building. Due to construction, everything must go!

STORAGE YARD sale: Saturday LOCKER AUCTION 8-12 p.m. 605 S. ChamSat., 11 a.m., Monte bers St. English Self Storage, Units B42-43, C12, B63. www.peninsula Call 452-2500 to verify. dailynews.com

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General General General General General .7 FTE Medical Careers Instructor .6 FTE Business Education Teacher At Port Angeles High School Speech and Language Pathologist At Port Angeles School District Apply at portangelesschools.org A D M I N I S T R AT I V E Assistant: Will train the right person with computer skills and enthusiasm. Mon. through Fri. 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Drug free workplace. Submit resume in person by 7-18-13 to: Trillium Treatment Center, 528 West 8th Street, Port Angeles. IMMEDIATE OPENING Car pet cleaning tech. Must be experienced, self starter, able to work alone, mechanically inclined, good driving record, pass background check and pre-employment drug screen. Wage DOE. (360)565-1311.

Attention: LPN’s Needed! Immediate Hire! We’re looking for you! Come join our healthcare team at the Clallam County Jail & Juvenile Facility in Port Angeles, WA! Part and Full Time positions available! APPLY online TODAY at www.correction care.com/why-chc/311careers-about-us EOE CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Angeles area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. No phone calls.

AUTOMOTIVE technician. Modern, family run Auto Repair business seeking ASE cer tified technician for full-time position. We are seeking a professional with strong diagnostic skills and a professional work ethic. Competitive compensation and benefits, paid training, vacation and sick leave. We are a strong reputable business with a proven track record. AAA top shop award winning company. Work for a winner that cares. Only qualified applicants will be considered.Apply by email at tech@autoworkspt.com Mail Resume to 2313 3rd Street, Por t Townsend, WA 98368, fax resume to (360)385-5686 or apply in person. CAREGIVER needed, prefer CNA, HCA, but not necessar y. Call Cherrie, (360)683-3348

CAREGIVER: Pr ivate home, elderly couple, no smoking, exp. with refs. (360)457-6745, msg.

DUMP TRUCK Dr iver wanted for hauling from jobsite to dumpsite, must be seasoned driver able to pass ua, class A endorsment, easy on equipment and dependable. Jobsite located in Port Angeles, 40 hrs week, wage based on experiance.Job starts soon, send resume or contact info to 40hrweek@gmail.com

CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Sequim area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of in- EXPERIENCED dental surance and reliable ve- assistant wanted for h i c l e . E a r l y m o r n i n g prosthodontist office. delivery Monday through Please fax resume to Friday and Sunday. Fill (360)385-1277. out application at 305 W. First St., P.A. Call Dave EXPERIENCED Surgical at (360)460-2124. tech: RN/LPN/MA/ TECH, per diem. Stop in or send resume to Sequim Same Day SurCNA/RNA: Immediate gery, 777 N. 5th (360)582-2632 openings, part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home HOUSECLEANERS Care (360)457-9236. Seq/PA. P/T, reliable, dependable, bondable OFFICE POSITION Part-time, $10-$11 hr., exp. helpful, call HS diploma, business/ (360)504-9962 for application. sales exp., handle cash accurately, communica- GARAGE SALE ADS tion skills. Send resume: Call for details. PO Box 3180 360-452-8435 Port Angeles, WA 98382 1-800-826-7714

IMMEDIATE OPENING Car pet cleaning tech. Must be experienced, self starter, able to work alone, mechanically inclined, good driving record, pass background check and pre-employment drug screen. Wage DOE. (360)565-1311. INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE SPECIALIST Information & Assistance needs someone with good communication and computer skills with a focus on social networking and outreach in our Sequim office. Provides info and assistance to seniors, persons with disabilities, caregivers, and families in a friendly social service setting. Requirements: BA Soc Sci and 2 yrs direct service exp or 2 yrs relevant college and 4 yrs exp, WDL, auto ins. $13.03/hr, full benefit pkg. Call 800801-0050 for job desc & appl pkt. Closes 3:00 pm 7/24/13. I&A is an EOE.

KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497

Grab Their ATTENTION! Add: Pictures Borders Logos Bold Lines 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com or: marketplace. peninsuladaily news.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

4026 Employment 4026 Employment For Better or For Worse General General

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM

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DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General

Is now accepting applications for the following positions: • Full time unit director • Part time kindergarten teacher. Apply in person at 400 W. Fir St. Sequim 98382 or email mbudke@bgc-op.org

NURSING OPPORTUNITIES • Clinical Informatics, RN, FT • Clinical Mgr/Home Health RN, FT • RN, OB, 32 hrs wk, E/N • RN CCU, 24 hrs wk, days • RN CCU, 32 hrs wk, nights • RN Cardiology Svs, as needed • RN CCU, as needed • RN ED, as needed • RN Short Stay, as needed For details on these positions and others, visit www.olympic medical.org EOE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Circulation Department Customer Service/ Inside Sales If you have an outgoi n g p e r s o n a l i t y, a sense of humor, can mu l t i - t a s k a n d l ove people, this is a job for you! The circulation department is looking for someone to join our team! Full-time. $9.19 hr. plus commission. Benefits, paid holidays, vacations, sick time and 401K. Must be able to work in team oriented, fast paced environment and work Sundays 7 a.m.-noon, willing to be flexible and eager to lear n, have great computer skills and excellent phone manners. If this sounds like a job for you, please email your resume and cover letter with 3 references to Jasmine.birkland@ peninsuladaily news.com No Phone Calls Please

PART TIME Office Help. Hours: 7 a.m.-12 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Duties include but not limited to: Filing, answering phones, running errands. Must have drivers license. Starting pay: $9.25 per/hr. plus mileage. Please send resumes to P.O box 2109, Po r t A n g e l e s, WA 98362.

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Finance / saLes assistant · MS Office Proficient · Strong Organizational Skills · Creative

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

internet saLes cOOrdinatOr · · · · ·

OlyPen now hiring. Entry Level Tech Support and backup installer position. Star ts at minimum wage. Computer and/or Network experience preferred. Willing to train the right person. Must be available Monday through Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Email resume to resumes@olypen.com

KALALOCH LODGE has immediate openings for the following positions: Temporary Executive Housekeeper: Must have previous housekeeping and supervisory experience. Seasonal Housekeeping Supervisor: Must have previous housekeeping and supervisor y experience. Housekeepers Experienced Line Cooks: Must have a minimum of 6 months exper ie n c e. K i t c h e n H e l p Mercantile Clerks: Experience in a cash handling/convenience store setting is preferred. Most positions are seasonal/parttime. Applications are available by visiting Kalaloch Lodge, or online at www.thekala lochlodge.com. Contact Kalaloch Human Resources at ( 3 6 0 ) 9 6 2 - 2 2 7 1 ex t . 1013 with any questions. Completed applications can be dropped off at Kalaloch Lodge located at: 157151 Hwy 101, Forks, WA 98331 or faxed to: (360)962-3391. All applicants must be at l e a s t 1 8 ye a r s o l d . DNC at Kalaloch Lodge is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All applicants must successfully pass a preemployment drug screen and background check. Limited housing is available.

Quillayute Valley School District Is accepting applications for Health Service Coordinator. Please visit the district website at www.forks.wednet.edu or contact QVSD Administration Office at 360Preschool Co-Teacher 374-6262 ext. 267 for Part-time preschool co- position details and apteacher in a five-day per plication procedure. week Christian preschool. Early childhood RECEPTIONIST: Family educational experience practice has opening for is preferred. Contact full-time receptionist, inH o l y Tr i n i t y L u t h e ra n cludes Saturday. Wages Church at 452-2323 for DOE, benefits. Send resume to: a job description and apPeninsula Daily News plication. Application PDN#712/Receptionist deadline is July 15th. Port Angeles, WA 98362 PUBLIC WORKS Admin RECEPTIONIST/ Asst, City of Sequim, MEDICAL BILLER $2,979-3,904 mo., 3 yrs Rehab clinic has openadmin wor k exp. in a ing for motivated, orgaPerfect Summer Job public works, comm. deORDER FULFILLMENT velopment, construction, nized receptionist/expeTe m p o ra r y p a r t - t i m e, u t i l i t y o r e n g i n e e r i n g rienced medical biller. min. wage. Please email work env. + inter med. K n o w l e d g e o f C P T / H C P C, A / R m a n a g e resume to: nnewman computer skills. See ment, electronics and @starmaninc.com www.sequimwa.gov for p a p e r c l a i m s. Wa g e s job app - deadline DOE. Send inquiries/re7/24/13. sumes to: Peninsula Daily News Compose your PDN#713/Biller Classified Ad Port Angeles, WA 98362 on

OppOrtunities at price FOrd LincOLn

Building our e-commerce Marketing experience a plus Customer Service Driven Sales Consultant Strong communication skills Driven to succeed · Energetic

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

service technician

· Technical Certifications · Strong Customer Service Skills · Prior Ford Experience a plus

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

Our team enjOys

· Aggressive compensation · Full Benefits Package / Paid Vacations · Highest Volume Dealership on the Peninsula · Brand new state of the art facility

Equal Opportunity Employer

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out.

815441

Email Resume to NewCareer@PriceFord.com Or call Joel at 360-457-3333 to schedule an appointment

You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Friday, July 12, 2013 C3

REMOVAL Technician: We are a family owned funeral home based out of Sequim, WA. We are looking for an individual that has excellent people skills, a clean driving record, able to lift 75 pounds, a professional appearance and a great a t t i t u d e w i t h f l ex i bl e hours. You will need to be available five days and five nights. No experience necessary. Email resume Attention Jeremy Wake to lindeprice funeral@gmail.com REPAIR PLUMBER Full-time, good driving record. (360)683-7719. SEQ. SCHOOL DIST. Seeking sub. bus drivers, will train. Apps. at 503 N. Sequim Ave. (360)582-3260

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR Peninsula Daily News A d ve r t i s i n g D e p a r t ment is looking for a talented Special Sections Editor to produce quality special sections and adver tisersupported supplements. The successful candidate must be a skilled writer and digital photographer who can also paginate articles and photos using Adobe CS6 software on a Mac operating system (proficiency with Adobe InDesign and Photoshop required). Must be a self-star ter who can wo r k i n d e p e n d e n t l y and as part of a team in a fast-paced, deadl i n e - d r i ve n e nv i r o n ment. Journalism experience and knowledge of AP style preferred. This position is based out of the Port Angeles office. 20 hrs. wk, vacation, paid holidays. Email resumes to: specialsectionseditor @yahoo.com

4080 Employment Wanted FIELD MOWING Free estimates (360)460-2855

FIELD/PROPERTY Mowing. All terrain/all Peninsula Classified cond., competitive rates. 1-800-826-7714 Rototilling, post-hole digging, etc. (360)912-4701

by Lynn Johnston

4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County In-home care available for your loved ones. Experienced caring RN available, flexible hours, salary negotiable. Call Rae at 360-681-4271. Johns Lawns. Complete Lawn Care Ser vice, Commercial and Residential.Serving Port Angeles and Sequim.Free Estimates. (360)460-6387 email: johnslawns@olypen.com MOWING, PRUNING, BARKING Honest and dependable. (360)582-7142 RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570.

SEEKING ft position as executive assistant/ofTHE HOH TRIBE Is seeking a full time Hu- fice manager. Seattleite man Resource Direc- relocating. tor; HR Director’s job is jgordon65@earthlink.net to implement HR programs and policies, and YOUNG COUPLE early to manage every aspect s i x t i e s . Ava i l a bl e fo r of employee develop- spring cleanup, weeding, ment and relations. The t r i m m i n g , m u l c h i n g , main responsibility of the moss removal, complete HR director is to manage garden restoration and recruiting and staffing, misc. yard care. Excelperfor mance manage- lent references. (360)457-1213 ment, benefits and compensation administrat i o n , o r g a n i z a t i o n a l 105 Homes for Sale development, employee Clallam County counseling services, and training. The position will close July 23, 2013, 4 p.m. The Hoh Tribe is seeking proposals from qualified consultants or firms to provide professional Grant-writing and consulting services to the 2127 Driftwood Place Tribe. The Administrative Assistant will receive 3 Br., 2 bath, all appliproposals until 4:00 PM, ances included+ w/d. built in surround July 23, 2013. Please deliver via e-mail sound, French doors or regular mail by the t o s l a t e p a t i o, b i g specified date and time backyard, shed, douto: Kristina Currie at the ble attatched garage, Hoh Tribal Administra- fireplace, crown moldt i o n , P. O. B ox 2 1 9 6 , ing. great cul de sac neighborhood! call Forks, WA 98331 or Ta m m y n o w ! kristinac@ $169,000. hohtribe-nsn.org (360)457-9511 or 461-9066! Washington State University (WSU) is seeking an Extension Regional Specialist, E-2 in the area of 4-H Youth Development. The position is a full-time, 12-month, tenure-track faculty position located in Clall a m / J e f fe r s o n / K i t s a p C o u n t y, Wa s h i n g t o n . Required: Earned Master’s Degree in social sciences, human development, youth development, education, volunteerism or related field. Screening begins August 15, 2013. To apply visit: https://www.wsujobs. com. For questions about the position contact Lisa Clyde, EEO Coordinator, 509-3352822, eeo.coordinator@ wsu.edu EEO/AA/ADA.

BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN VIEW One level, 2,934 sf, 4 B r. , 2 . 5 b a t h , fa m i l y room, and den. 760 st attached garage, 1,440 s t c a r p o r t p u s p a t i o. Front and back decks. Shy 5 acres great for horse property or Lavender Far m with Bed & Breakfast, fully fenced with chain link fence. Located between Sequim and Port Angeles. MLS#271434. $389,000. JEAN (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE Very comfortable 3 br., 2 bath home at the end of the road privacy. Detached garage and partiallyfenced backyard, with an apple tree and mature shrubs along the fence line. MLS# 271095 $115,000 (360)912-3934 Emilie Thornton COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CONVENIENTLY LOCATED Fully fenced big back yard with nice mountain view. Spacious kitchen with abundant working space and cabinets. New heat pump and fo r c e d a i r f u r n a c e i n 2009. Roof was replaced around 2007. Raised garden beds and raspb e r r i e s i n b a ck ya r d . Some fruit trees. Garage has a work bench and laundr y sink. Storage shed in back yard for your gardening tools. shed in back yard for your gardening tools. $215,000 ML#271407/504423 Patty Brueckner (360)460-6152 TOWN & COUNTRY

FSBO $237,000 Open plan triple wide 2300 sf, 3 br., 2 bath, large bonus room or 4th bedroom. Mountain view on 1.01 acres, close to Discovery Trail, not in the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, extra large 28 x 36 (1008 sf) detached garage and workshop. (360)582-9782 GREAT PRICING! 3 Br., 2 bath in Parkwood. fresh landscaping backs up to greenbelt, carport with storage and workshop area, open floor plan and lots of light, newer roof. ML#271477/508539 $42,500 Tyler Conkle (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Just outside of city limits this 3 bedroom home has new carpets & paint throughout, covered patio, fenced backyard & ready for a new owner. Septic was recently inspected & pumped. Quiet dead end street location. $126,500. MLS#271430. Holly Coburn (360)461-2153 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

Pr iced for quick sale! R a r e Po r t A n g e l e s 4 plex with excellent rental history at $650 per month per unit, and centrally located. Coin operated laundry on site for additional income. Each unit has assigned covered parking space and on street parking, and assigned indoor storage area. Unit A features a fire place. MLS#270376. $279,000. Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

QUALITY AND BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN 3 Br., 2 bath, 2,261 sf, born in 2006, Hardwood, Italian tile, granite and more! 5 piece master suite with soak tub, 0.24 acre lot, beautifully landscaped, 672 sf garage with workspace and storage, salt water views, 2 covered decks. MLS# 271410 $375,000 360-417-2782 360-417-2793 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

SECLUDED RIVERFRONT Ver y special riverfront h o m e s i t e . E n j oy 1 2 + acres of fabulous Little Quil riverfront with excellent soils, large evergr e e n s a n d p a s t u r e d area. Secluded homesite with 25 gpm well and several outbuildings. Enjoy complete privacy and the soothing sounds of the river. New Zeland fencing and perfect for animals, farming, and a h o m e by t h e r i ve r. I t really doesn’t get any better than this one ! $149,000. MLS#316019. Jim Munn (360)765-4500 MUNN BRO’S HOOD CANAL PROPERTIES

LAKE SUTHERLAND! On the sunny side of the lake, 90’ of lake frontage w i t h l a r g e d o ck , a n d boathouse. 2 BR, 1.5 BA contemporary home with entertainment sized deck, and oversized shop/garage. MLS#271033 $486,000. CHUCK TURNER SOMETHING FOR COUNTRY FRIED 452-3333 EVERYONE! LIVING PORT ANGELES Just under ¾ acres, Ser ved up at its best! REALTY 3600 sf house w/9ft ceilBeautiful home, great LARGE YARD ings and complete in-law mountain views, 2.8 AFFORDABLE Super location in Se- u n i t , 3 B ay RV s h o p acres of elbow room, SEQUIM quim, this home has a G r e a t c o t t a g e h o m e landscaped, easy care large yard and a fenced w/12ft doors, and locatwithin easy walking dis- yard, RV parking with year yard. 2 Br., 2 bath, e d o n t h e D i s c o ve r y tance to shopping in Se- hookups, and a 768 SF 1184 sf.; open floor plan Trail. Some TLC needquim. 2 Br., 1 bath, 936 workshop/detached gar- living room/kitchen with ed, roof and cosmetic sf with hardwood floors, age. It’s priced right and a nice wood stove plus but priced $100,000 befresh paint, fenced yard waiting for you! Cedars furnace. Newer floors in low assessed value at and garage with alley Dungeness golf course kitchen and bathrooms. $189,900. MLS270753. Michaelle and Alan access. Current resi- is a short drive down the Easy access to shopBarnard dential use but commer- road, as is the Sequim ping, SARC and Discov(360)461-2153 Dungeness Rec area. cial zoning make this a WINDERMERE Don’t let this one slip ery Trail. versatile property. ML#271297. $149,900. PORT ANGELES away! ML#261026 $159,000 Gail Sumpter: 477-9361 NWMLS#509879 Gail Sumpter: 477-9361 STUNNING SALT WABlue Sky Real Estate $375,000 Blue Sky Real Estate TER VIEWS Sequim - 360-477-9189 Chuck Sequim - 360-477-9189 Early 20th century Wil(360)683-4844 LIKE NEW liamsburg Colonial, 4 Windermere Like new home in the Br., 5.5 bath, 3,222 SF, Real Estate much desired Parkwood 0.34 Acre Lot, Separate Sequim East C o m mu n i t y. 1 , 4 4 0 s f, Guest Quarters – 2 Br. new roof, 2 car attached and 2 bath, easy walk to garage, backs to a green downtown shopping, city b e l t . T h i s o n e ow n e r pier, restaurants, hospihome is only occupied in tal and medical offices, BEAUTIFUL HOME on the summer and is in views of harbor, Cana19.6 acres between Semint condition. da, Mt. Baker and Bequim and Port Angeles, $67,000. yond. 5 br., 5 bath, great for PATRICIA PARNELL MLS#271395. $450,000. enter taining, gour met (206)250-7352 Team Thomsen kitchen, deck, dramatic FOR SALE By Owner. BrokersGroup RE (360)417-2782 master suite, fireplace, $185,000. Immaculate, Professionals COLDWELL BANKER walk-in shower, hydro- spacious 1,848 sf on UPTOWN REALTY t h e ra py t u b. G a r d e n s 1.01 acres, between SeLYRE RIVER and vineyard. Perfect quim and Port Angeles. FRONTAGE mother-in-law apt with 2004 doublewide, 3 br., Custom 2 bed, 2 bath SUNLAND (Foursome own entrance or home 2 bath, large kitchen, Victorian home on 7.3 Dr.) townhome. 2 br., 2 office or B&B. 3182 Blue with breakfast bar, dinacres with approximately bath, den, newly upMountain Road. ing room, living room, 267’ of Lyre River front- dated. Stunning, spa$799,900 large family rm. Attached age, ideal for fishing. cious, updates include NWMLS 40941 2-car garage, storage Listen to the river from granite, travertine tile, Appt (360)461-3926 shed. Private septic and the wrap around front hickor y wood floors, well. (360)457-8345. porch and the deck off of carpet, paint, stainless PLACE YOUR the master suite. The appliances. 3rd fairAD ONLINE Visit our website at main floor features hard- way v i ew. G o l f c a r t With our new www.peninsula w o o d f l o o r s , c u s t o m g a r a g e . Ya r d m a i n Classified Wizard dailynews.com cabinets and trim. Spa- tained. Appt only. you can see your Or email us at $313,500. cious living room, formal ad before it prints! classified@ (208)407-2678 dining room with French www.peninsula peninsula doors to the porch & dailynews.com dailynews.com THINK OF THE kitchen with tile counterPOSSIBILITIES tops and pantry. Master Lindal Cedar 3 bedroom suite with sitting area, walk-in shower and jet- + a d e n , 3 b a t h r o o m home on 5 acres just 1 ted tub. $299,000. MLS#271013. mile to town. Classic Northwest Style w/cedar Kelly Johnson siding, wood clad crank (360)477-5876 out windows, metal roof, WINDERMERE tongue and groove vaultPORT ANGELES ed ceilings with beams, MOVE-IN-READY! wood floors, paved Enjoy views of the Strait d r i v e w a y & a w o o d and the Olympic Moun- stove. 2 car garage plus tain Range from this lov- a 1,440 square foot 3 i n g l y c a r e d fo r h o m e car detached shop. Exwhich is like new. Listen tensive lawns for all of to the soothing sounds your activities, RV parkof the fountain while re- ing with power & water, 2414 W Hennessy Lane, Port Angeles laxing in the spa-tub in Orchard, Barn & PastuJust outside of city limits this 3 bedroom privacy in the beautifully reasture. landscaped backyard. MLS#271463. home has new carpets & paint throughout, This home built in 2006 $439,000. Terry Neske covered patio, fenced backyard & ready features hardwood floor(360)477-5876 WINDERMERE for a new owner. Septic was recently ing in the living area and kitchen and tile flooring PORT ANGELES inspected & pumped. Quiet dead end i n t h e t w o f u l l b a t h WELL CARED FOR street location. 2414 W. Hennessy Lane. rooms. SUNLAND HOME MLS#271430/506361 $126,500 $243,000. MLS#270850. Newer roof and water Helga Filler Directions: Hwy 101 West, Right on Reddick, Right on heater,built in office in (360)461-0538 Hennessy OR Tumwater Truck Route, Right on Lauridsen Blvd, 3rd br and kitchen, rec WINDERMERE continue on to Edgewood Drive, Left on Reddick to Hennessy. roomand garage with PORT ANGELES separate workshop, livWESTSIDE P.A.: New ing room bump out gives h o m e, 3 B r. , 2 b a t h . roomy feel, easy care $165,000. 460-8891. yard with raised beds. WRE/Port Angeles ML#271489/509134 SEE THE MOST $250,000 Holly Coburn CURRENT REAL Deb Kahle (360) 457-0456 ESTATE LISTINGS: (360)683-6880 (360) 461-7633 www.peninsula WINDERMERE dailynews.com hcoburn@olypen.com SUNLAND

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Classified

C4 FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

GARAGE G ARAGE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

&

YARD SALES On the Peninsula 8120 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8142 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8180 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales 8183 Garage Sales Jefferson County Sequim Sequim PA - Central PA - Central PA - West PA - West PA - East PA - East GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., GARAGE Sale: Friday, 9-5 p.m., 111 Sparrow 1 0 a . m . , 1 2 8 1 T h r e e Ct. Crabs Rd. Briggs MOVING “Sale”: Sat., b o a t / t ra i l e r, d e s i g n e r 9-12:00 p.m., 4320 Lo- bags. pez Ave. Everything is free! I am also accepting GARAGE Sale: Friday donations for the Por t only, 8:30-2:30 p.m., Townsend Food Bank! 382 E. Anderson Rd. STORAGE Sale! Sun. Foldable shop crane, July 14, 9-5 p.m., All 7 ” M a g e l l a n G P S , Storage, 11383 Rhody Panasonic micro oven, D r . , P o r t H a d l o c k , hood ornaments, copacross from Shold Busi- per fire pit, diving/snorness Park. Moving out of k e l i n g e q u i p m e n t , state, everything must b r o n ze / p ew t e r s t a t go! Furniture, applianc- u e t t e s, s a x o p h o n e, es, plus lots of nice stuff. Sheffield Coffee/Tea service, really old phoCome check it out! tos, old floor and table lamps, sleeping bags, 8142 Garage Sales Hollywoodiana, rare books, art, NW Indian Sequim items, antique European pistol, the usual DUNGENESS stuff, more! COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE F r i . - S a t . , 8 - 3 p . m . , GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., Thornton loop and side 8-3 p.m., 2110 Gardiner streets. Furniture, sport- B e a c h R d . G o r g e o u s ing goods, jewelry, small queen metal-frame bed, appliances, lots of good- vintage country TV cabiies!! net, women’s clothing 16-18, stein collection, E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . - curtains, linens, like new Sun., 10-6 p.m., 92 Gulls Christmas decorations, Lane. Fur niture, patio canvassed paintings and furniture, lawn mower, car pet remnant, other tons and tons of clothes, household items, and pots and pans, dishes, much more! bed frames, pictures, assorted lamps, standing MAINS FARM COMMUfire pit, and 1920s treaNITY GARAGE SALE dle Singer sewing ma- Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m. Follow c h i n e , e x e r c i s e m a - signs from Cays Rd. and chines and bicycles. W. Anderson Rd., or W. E S TAT E S a l e : S a t . - Nelson Rd. Antiques, cySun., 8-5 p.m., no earl- cles, household, clothies! 123 E. Washington ing, toys, lots of variety St. Hutches, large bistro for everyone. table with (4) high-back chairs, tables, massage MOVING Sale: Fri., 93 table, toys, household p.m., 180 Choice Loop items, glass shelving in Eagle Mountain Esu n i t , g l a s swa r e, c o l - tates. No ear ly birds. lectibles, china, chande- Lots of furniture, toddler l i e r, m a ny, m a ny a n - and kid toys and clothes. tiques. Woolsey Court Condos Come make offers! M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : S a t . , 9 - 3 , E ve r g r e e n Place your ad at Farm Way and N. Littlepeninsula john. Don’t miss it!! dailynews.com

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 20 acres with custom built 3 Br, 3 bath log home, dramatic kitchen and living areas, upscale appliances, tile floors and granite counters, large deck off kitchen, 30x30 outbuilding with pad, daylight basement (kitchen, bath and living space). $419,000 ML#504234/271404 Team Schmidt (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

M U LT I - E S TAT E S a l e : Fr i . - S u n . , 9 - 4 p . m . , 10084 Old Olympic H i g h way. A p p l i a n c e s, kitchen and pocket knives, tools, household goods, electric scooters, electric lift chairs, jewelr y, furniture, yard and garden equipment, games, pictures, mirrors, Christmas decor and floral arrangements, fishing gear, lots of books and some antiques! PUMPKIN PATCH FLEA MARKET Sat., 8-4 p.m., corner of Hwy. 101 and KitchenDick Rd. Absolutely no early sales. $15 per space, no reservations needed. More info: (360)461-0940

8180 Garage Sales PA - Central 3 NEW FAMILIES PLUS all leftover from last sale MARKED DOWN CHEAP Rugs, lamps, vintage Va l e n t i n e s, t o n s o f decorator items, Tom & J e r r y b ow l s ( yo u think you don’t need one of these.....but you actually do!), small tools, TV stand, paper dolls, really nice plus s i ze c l o t h e s, d e s k , paint ball gun, comic b o o k s, P l ay s t a t i o n , DV D s, h o m e d e c o r, glassware, books, vintage China sets, 2 China cabinets, tavern style table top vending game, video games, (X-Box, Playstation), g o l f b a l l s, wo m a n ’s motorcycle helmet, etc. etc. Much much more! Sat., 8 a.m. 1021 S. Chase No earlies--at all.

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

Unique property with expansive views of Por t Angeles Harbor, Ediz Hook , Vancouver Island and shipping lanes. One of a kind property right in the middle of town located on a dead end street with curving driveway to the home. Two level home 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths with main living on one level. Located on two city lots with manicured grounds in a park like setting. $389,900. MLS#271383. Jean Irvine (360)460-5601 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

MT. PLEASANT ACREAGE Level 6.69 acre parcel that would make a great horse property. Partiall y fe n c e d w i t h a h ay shed on property. PUD power. Private well will be needed. At one time perc’d for a mound septic system or partial fill. Dr iveway roughed in. M a n u fa c t u r e d h o m e s OK. Partial water and mountain views. $99,000. MLS#271200. Kelly Johnson (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

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ESTATE Sale: Sat. only, 9-3 p.m., 5004 Old Mill Rd. A whole lifetime of s t u f f ! To o l s , m e n ’ s c l o t h e s, h o u s ewa r e s, furniture, lots of beds, hunting gear, kitchenwares. G A R AG E S a l e : F i r s t sale in 30 years. Fri.Sat., 9 a.m., 235 Forest Ave., corner of Forest and Cherr y. We have everything! GARAGE Sale: Multiple family garage sale, Satu r d ay. o n l y, 8 - 4 p. m . Fur niture, tools, toys, f i s h t a n k , C D / DV D s , household items, lots of dishes, clothes, seasonal decorations, too much to list. 218 E 9th - in the alley between 9th and 10th.

SALE. Great Stuff, No Junk! July 13, Saturday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. 629 E 8th St. Vintage stuff, housewares, home décor, women’s Trek bike, snowshoes, kayak,and more - all in great condition. YARD Sale: Fri.-Sat.8-5, Sun. 9-12, 1126 Caroline. No early sales. 75 lb. pull hunting cross bow, assor ted swords, kitchen items, clothing. YARD Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., 123 S. Peabody St., in blue Salvation Army Building. Due to construction, everything must go!

YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-3 p.m., 110 Vashon Ave. Drill presses, reloading equipment and G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . , much more. 8-12 noon, 1350 E. 8th n e a r c o l l e g e. Q u a l i t y YARD Sale: Saturday, c l o t h i n g : w o m e n ’ s / 8-4 p.m., Sunday, 9-1 men’s, lots of Aero/Hol- p.m., off Mt. Angeles Rd. lister ladies extra small Approx. 2 miles above and men’s small, sports, Park Information Center. P S P, X - B ox a n d W i i V i n t a g e t a bl e c l o t h s, games, Yamaha piano, lace, collectibles, kitchen housewares, linens, jew- supplies, furniture, anelry and lots of misc. tiques, tools. Watch for signs! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-1 p.m., 129 W. Park Ave. 8182 Garage Sales Lots of household lights! G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . Sun., 9-4 p.m., turn right on Ennis off of Front St. 312 N. Ennis St. Furniture, antiques, collectibles, jewelry, craft items, tools, household items, etc.

PA - West

MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 550 Olympic Hot Springs Rd., 8 mi. west of P.A. off Hwy. 101. Household items, some furniture, and misc

E S TAT E S a l e : Fr i . Sat., 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., 7 4 S l e e py M e a d o w Lane 7 miles west on Hwy 112, turn left at Wasankar i Rd. then follow signs. Ever ything must go! Small furniture, kitchen items, Ger man Beer Steins, hundreds of CDs, DVD/VHS movies and books on tape, vinyl records, collectable plates, tools, John Deere and Craftsman riding mowers, patio set and so much more! Most items for $5, $3, $1 or less, even free items! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-2 p.m., 2903 W. 18th St. Lots of great stuff! GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p. m . , 3 2 2 C o l u m b u s Ave. Furniture, bedroom sets, clothes, home improvement items, toys. Two family sale with an array of items. Something for everyone!

SALE: 7/13 and 14, 9-3 p.m. Kid stuff: swing set, bikes, toys, clothes, conver tible crib with mattress, womans mtn bike, vintage and misc. furnit u r e , w h e e l c h a i r, l i f t chair, new luggage, vintage log boom chains, and more. No earlies! 2808 W. Edgewood Dr. Cash only sale!

DRIVEWAY Sale: Sat. 10-4 p.m., 3 mi. up O’Br ien Rd. on left. Furniture, shop equipment and much more. Early birds WILL wait. ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-4, 3984 Deer Park Rd. Collectibles, high end clothes, glassware, antiques, Jim Daily art, furniture, furs, much, much more. GARAGE Sale: 103 S. Ridgeview Dr. 4 Seasons Ranch. Sat., July 13, 9-4 p.m. Sewing fabric, a large selection of books, handcrafted end tables, live edge walnut slab table, ladies clothing, men’s jeans, prints and picture frames, a large selection of pressed flower cards, bookmarks, and pictures, some small appliances, 2 restored ant i q u e c h a i r s, 1 8 9 3 2 piece high voltage insulator, antique dishes, and glass, Rowe Pottery “butter churn” lamps (2), 145 piece license plate collection from ‘27-’90, 1960s pairs available for your classic, large dog crate, and a “man cave” special item.

THREE GALS ESTATE SALE 1316 W. 10th St. Sat.-Sun., 9-3 Push, pull or drag yourself up to this one! Sleep Number bed, refrigerator, freezer, Thule car topper, char broil BBQ, patio set and lots of garden stuff. Craft room loaded with bead crafts, k i t s ya r n a n d b o o k s. N ewe r B e r i n a s e r g e r with 100s of yards of material (quilter’s delight). Name brand plus size women’s clothes, purses, tons of 8M shoes and nice jewelry! Roll top desk, gun cabinet, fishing stuff and s a fe . L a d d e r s , s n o w blower and we’re even G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . selling the carport! Awe- Sun., 10-3 p.m., 12 Finsome. dley Rd., take off Old Olympic to Gasman Rd. YARD Sale: Sat.-Sun., C o l l e c t i bl e s , v i n t a g e 8-2 p.m., 2439 W. 14th money, tools, RC boats, St. Clothes, baby things, sailboat, kitchen, Elvis shoes, furniture. memorabilia, garden pond, new Sun Recumbent trike!

BARN Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8-5 p.m., 336 Benson Rd. Infant to size 3 girls, w o m e n ’s a n d m e n ’s c l o t h e s, t oy s, s h o e s, knickknacks and more. New things daily. Don’t G A R AG E S a l e : S a t . - miss this one! No earlies Sun., 9-4 p.m., turn right on Ennis off of Front St. M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : 312 N. Ennis St. Furni- Sat., 9-4 p.m., Sun., 9-2 t u r e , a n t i q u e s , c o l - p.m. 1831 W. 16th. Furlectibles, jewelry, craft niture, remodeling suritems, tools, household plus, cabinets, Foosball t a bl e, l o t s o f k i t c h e n items, etc. items, books, electronGARAGE Sale: Sunday ics, linens, and tons of only, 9-3 p.m., 1440 W. Christmas items. Every5th St., in alley. Antique thing must go on Sunr o cke r, b r e a d m a ke r, day--even the kitchen sink! child’s organ, mirros.

GARAGE Sale: Sat., 9-3 p.m., 4105 S. Bean Rd. M e n ’s i t e m s, e l e c t r i c tools, bench 6” planer, S t i h l c h a i n s aw, c i d e r press, vac sealer, etc.

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

408 For Sale Commercial

LIKE NEW Beautiful 1860 sf. one owner home in a newer neighborhood in Seq u i m . T h e h o m e fe a tures hardwood flooring in the living areas, propane fireplace in the S W m o b i l e h o m e i n great room, master suite park, nice 2 Br., 2 ba. with walk in closet, dou$16,000 price reduced if ble sinks, jetted tub, and moved. (360)461-0907. separate walk in shower. Out back is an inviting NEED EXTRA covered deck with beautifully landscaped yard CASH! that is fully fenced. $265,000. MLS#270772. Sell your Tom Blore (360)683-4116 Treasures! PETER BLACK REAL ESTATE

360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

HUGE Sale: Sat.-Sun., 8-?, 1675 Lower Elwha R d . A n t i q u e s p i n n i n g 8183 Garage Sales w h e e l , s h o p f i x t u r e s, PA - East hardware, electronics, appliances, jewelry, craft 50+ YRS. Sale: Sat.supplies, toys, clothes, S u n . , 9 - 3 p. m . , 4 9 4 b o o k s, e t c . Ko i p o n d Marsden off Mt. Pleaswith six beautiful koi. ant. Toys, tools, quilt, MOVING Sale: Fri. 12-5, c u p b o a r d s, f u r n t i u r e, S a t . 9 : 3 0 - 3 , 2 5 1 9 W. crats, garden, bldg ma10th St. Some furniture, terials, jars. No earlies. Cash only. small appliances, misc.

CENTRAL P.A. house rental. E. Vine and 11th. Views, 2 Br., 1 bath, d e n , l g . fe n c e d ya r d , $ 1 , 0 5 0 m o. , l a u n d r y, dwr, bsmt. Call: 1 (503)307-0747 JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba ...............$475 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$550 D 1 br 1 ba ...............$575 A 2 br 1 ba 950 sf ....$650 A 3 br 1 ba ...............$700 D 3 br 1 ba ...............$750 H 2 br 1 ba ...............$750 D 2 br 1 ba fplc ........$775 H 2 br 2 ba ...............$850 H 3+ br 2 ba .............$875 H 4 br 1.5 ba ............$950 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : S t u f f f r o m A - Z , B a by clothes newborn to 5t boys, gir ls. Women’s, men’s, juniors’ clothing. Household items and more! Stop by 516 N. L a r c h Ave. , Po r t A n geles. Friday, 11-?, Sat.Sun. 9-?

GARAGE Sale: Saturday, July 13, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 4607 Old Mill Road, Por t Angeles. Misc. household furniture, Misc. household and kitchen items, Misc. RV items, 30AMP RV Box. Other items: assorted quilting books, assor ted women’s clothing, spec i a l i ze d c r o s s r o a d s bike.

KILLER Sale: Fri.-Sat., 9-3 p.m., 403 Marsden. Tons o’stuff! Garden, collectibles, antiques, crafts, sewing, you name it! No earlies.

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri.-Sat., 9-2 p.m., 114 Island View Rd. (follow signs at C’est si Bon). Quality merchandise, kitchen/home/garden, tools/toolbox, refrigerators, recliner, heaters, m a s s a g e t a bl e, h a m mock, enter tainment c e n t e r, N o r i t a ke a n d Four Crown china, TVs, water cooler, some antiques and plenty more.

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Sat. 8-2, Sun. 9-2, 46 Harrington Rd., top of Monroe Rd. Refrigerator, small furniture, househ o l d i t e m s, c l o t h i n g , priced to sell.

STORAGE LOCKER AUCTION Sat., 11 a.m., Monte English Self Storage, Units B42-43, C12, B63. Call 452-2500 to verify. YA R D s a l e : S a t u r d ay 8-12 p.m. 605 S. Chambers St.

8435 Garage Sales - Other Areas DOLLAR Sale: Sat., 10-4 p.m., Burnt Mountain Rd., Beaver. Toys, water fountains, household goods, tools.

605 Apartments Clallam County

P.A.: 1 Br., downtown, P.A.: Amazing 2 Br., 2 m t n . v i e w. N o p e t s . ba, fenced. $850 mo., no pets. (360)452-1395. $550. (360)582-7241. P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, carport, no pets. $785, dep. (360)457-7012 P.A.: 3 Br., 2+ ba on short foot path to Discovery Trail, expansive, spectacular views of Elwha Valley & Olympics, no pets/smoking, secluded yet close to town. Lease $950 mo. incl. water. (360)461-0588. P. A . : 3 b r, 2 b a t h house. Lovely location across from golf course. Energy efficient, beautiful wood floors, stainless steel appliances. $1,050. (360)477-0710

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQ.: 2 Br., 1.5 bath, S o l m a r L a k e , F / L / D. $900. (360)460-1890. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 bath, laundry room, 1 car gar., no smoking. $850 incl. water/septic. 683-0932.

AT T R AC T I V E , s p a cious 1 Br.-$545, 2 Br.-$645, in P.A. New carpet, vert blinds, pvt patio, updated appliances, laundr y r ms, v i ew s, o n - s i t e m g r. Ask about our current discount. www.olympic square.com. 457-7200

SMALL 2 bedroom, 1.75 bath. Near East Safeway, P.A. No smoking. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 S m a l l p e t o k . Wa t e r, ba, no smoking/pets sewer, garbage includ$500. (360)457-9698. ed. $675, First, last and deposit. (360)457-3194 CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . 520 Rental Houses r$700. (360)452-3540.

Jefferson County LAKEFRONT Condo P. A . : 1 B r. a p t . $ 6 0 0 CARLSBORG : 2 Br., $1,100/mo., with lease. P.A.: 4 Br., 3 bath, 1 yr. W/D, carport, yard, pet Garb/water included, 2 l e a s e . $ 1 , 2 5 0 m o. , P.T.: 3 br., 2.5 bath. Bell mo., $300 dep., util. inStreet area (PT) home, cluded, no pets. bed, 1.5 bath, wash/dry. ok. $750. (360)683-8912 $1,250 dep. 457-3099. (360)457-6196. $1,100. (360)683-3441. Call (360)461-4890.

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DOWN 1 New England school with a campus in the French Alps

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. BLINDFOLDS Solution: 4 letters

G L I A T E H T N I P W B S M By John Lampkin

2 Indelibly 3 Peachy-keen 4 Cooperstown’s Mel 5 Evolved into 6 Juan’s “some” 7 Laundry challenge 8 Seminoles’ sch. 9 Certain leaf beetle’s target 10 Became anxious 11 Report on the site of the Humpty-Dumpty tragedy? 12 Candy heart message 13 “__ in China”: John Adams opera 18 Makes sound 23 So to speak 25 Cause of a sudden withdrawal 27 Shallot relatives 28 Dog-ear, e.g. 30 Hoping to score 32 Valuable rock nos. 33 Rock with promise

7/12/13 Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Drama about Trigger? 36 Tuba player’s mantra? 38 Suds holder 39 Mag wheels? 41 Like a bump on a log 45 __ curls 47 Accepts, as a resolution 49 Eye-popping shirt

RECLINERS: A pair of matching comfy recliners, mushroom/brown fabric in great condition. $250 for the pair. (360)683-3448

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

MAN LIFT: Genie 60’ S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 man lift, straight boom, Br., unfurnished $700 or good condition. $13,000. (360)775-0718 furnished. $800. (360)809-3656 SEMI END-DUMP WEST SIDE P.A.: 2 Br. TRAILER: 30’. Electric tar p system, excellent $600, 1st, last, damage. condition. $6,500/obo. (360)457-6252 (360)417-0153

665 Rental Duplex/Multiplexes

6080 Home Furnishings

CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Fireplace, garage. CHAIRS: (4) Low breakW / D. N o s m o k i n g o r fast room castered armchairs, excellent meduim pets. $800. 460-8797. b l u e u p h o l s t r y, p l u s brass and wood. Nearly 683 Rooms to Rent new condition, little use. C o s t $ 1 , 3 0 0 . S e l l fo r Roomshares $500/obo. (360)775-3449 P. A . : R o o m i n h o m e, $375 mo., share utilities, no pets. (360)417-5063. COUCH/LOVE SEAT: Tan with gold accents, ROOMMATE fa n t a s t i c c o n d i t i o n , WANTED barely used. $375/obo To share expenses for for both. very nice home west of (360)460-4491 P.A. on 10+ acres. $450 mo., includes utilities, DirectTV. Must see. Call FURNITURE: Classic L o n n i e a f t e r 5 p . m . burgandy button-back lounge chair and button(360)477-9066. top ottoman. $450. (360)477-8161 SEQUIM: Retired professional female seeks MISC: Dining set light housemate, char ming home, many amenities. ash, needs minor repair, $100. Baker’s rack, dark $450 mo. References. green wrought iron, (360)683-6339 6’x32”, 3 shelves, $50. Cabinet, 3 shelf, laminat1163 Commercial ed wood, $35. (360)683-2338 Rentals PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

OW Lee Patio Furniture. Made in America, premium steel. Set includes glass top table 42” x 72”, four dining chairs, umbrella and weighted base, two swivel rockers, round glass top table, chaise lounge. $799. (425)508-7575.

E M O I O S E A E L C E A E P

www.wonderword.com

N S L D H K R S F L P T S V R

B L B D S T T E O L A A S A I

L U F F T O O F H N L M G ‫ګ‬ T E A I ‫ګ‬ O N V S ‫ګ‬ N W E E K D R M R ‫ګ‬ O E A R P S L P A R D I C G O N A U U C Y E H N E S I P S D R T N O U R T I G R S E Y C E

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7/12

Adjust, Bandana, Block, Bluff, Close, Cloth, Cover, Donkey, Elastic, Flaps, Flights, Flying, Fold, Fools, Games, Garment, Goal, Guess, Knot, Learn, Martial Arts, Mask, Material, Mind, Open, Paper, Party, Pinata, Pin the Tail, Prevent, Procedure, Sensory, Shade, Sight, Skill, Sleep, Snug, Surprise, Taste Test, Tied, Tighten, Travel, Tricks, Trip, Wear, Wrap Yesterday’s Answer: Deepwater

GUWNS

RIFLE: Bolt action with open sights, close in size to M94 Winchester. Shoots 7.62x54R Milsurp ammo along with lighter loaded cast and jacketed reloads. Reloading tools, components, and cleaning kit included. $300. (360)457-1597

6075 Heavy Equipment

T A C F K N A Y L T I O E L R

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Enjoy Your First Month FREE and Pay Only $99 TO MOVE IN! (until July 15, 2 or 3 Br.) EVERGREEN COURT APTS (360)452-6996 2 and 3 Br. apts avail. $685 and $760. Some restrictions apply. Call today to schedule a tour. Managed by Sparrow, Inc.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

H T K C L S K N R A E G V L U

FOLYT

6115 Sporting Goods

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, remodeled, no pets/ smoke. $675. (360)670-9418 PELLET STOVE: Beautifl oak. $400. P.A.: Remodeled 1 br., (360)681-3747 no stairs, some utilities. $550. (425)881-7267.

© 2013 Universal Uclick

G E I D S A R E A O I T H E S

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

6080 Home Furnishings

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

I R E E G A P P Y D S T S T R

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

PA: 1 Br., no pets/smoking $550. (360)457-1695

T I M O E A I S Y E N N R A S

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

605 Apartments Clallam County

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

T A A L P R T S U J D A E A T

SOFA: Broyhill sofa excellent condition. Paid $900 sacrifice for $325/obo. Antique rose floral in like new condition. 37” deep x 84 “ length. Located in Sherwood Village in Sequim Please call 461-0675.

JOHN BOAT: 12’, Aluminum. Good cond. $400. (360)452-8102.

S E A K AYA K : Fo l b o t G r e e n l a n d I I D o u bl e Folding Sea Kayak, Excellent condition, alumin u m f r a m e , r u d d e r, spray deck, spray skirts, S O FA : L a - Z - B oy, r e - many spare par ts and c l i n e s o n b o t h e n d s, extras. Strong, stable, seaworthy. $1,495/obo. gray. $500. (360)379-3727 (360)504-2112

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6140 Wanted & Trades

B OAT Fo r S a l e : L i vingston 14’ with 30 HP ES Honda OB, with Console, Calkins trailer. All in excellent cond! $3,200. (360)477-0200

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789.

B OAT Fo r S a l e : L i vingston 14’ with 30 HP ES Honda OB, with Console, Calkins trailer. All in excellent cond! $3,200. (360)477-0200 CHEV: ‘03 Venture ext. CARGO van. Only 13K orig. Carfax mi. 3 seats. $8,800. (360)775-3449. E S TAT E I T E M S : O a k clawfoot dining table, chairs, early 1900s, $400. Round oak clawfoot coffee table, 1900s, $175. Oak library table, barley twist and spool legs, $200. Lift chair, n e w e r, $ 7 0 0 . D e s k , 1 9 7 0 s , r o l l - t o p, o a k , $200. (360)460-2800. FREE: Moving boxes, large size. Also have B a n ke r s B oxe s a t $ 1 each. Call after 5 p.m., (360)797-1965 K AYA K : T h u l e k aya k rack, fits VW. $125. (360)437-0422 MISC: 6 burner gas Wolf range, $1,800. 2 lg. capacity refrigerators, $200 ea. Enclosed all metal utility/concessions trailer, $2,000. (360)477-1706

6115 Sporting Goods AR-15 $1,100 (360)670-8918 BAILEY: Total emersion sur vival suit, Sealine bag, USCG approved, X L s i ze, n eve r u s e d . $175. (360)452-8102.

WA N T E D : C l a s s A m o t o r h o m e. A p p r ox 26’-32’, Vortec engine, slide. (360)631-9211.

7/12/13

50 __ Rouge 51 Tumult 52 Manet’s medium 54 Bring up to speed 55 Race site for 300+ years 56 Rounded handtool parts 59 Rock band? 63 Previous to 64 IRA part: Abbr. 65 Dockworker’s gp.

DENCIU

PEHHNY

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: Yesterday’s

7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes SHORT Jack Russell: Female. Lady is 5 ye a r s o l d . S h e h a s been raised with kids and other dogs. We are moving and need to find her a good home. $200. Please Contact Jaime at (360)477-8718

7045 Tack, Feed & Supplies

(Answers tomorrow) CLOAK ADVENT BILLOW Jumbles: METAL Answer: Lassie was a bit depressed and feeling — “MELAN-COLLIE”

9802 5th Wheels

9808 Campers & Canopies

MOTORHOME: Dodge 5th WHEEL: 19’ Alpen‘76 Class C. 26’, good lite. No leaks. $3,295. (360)775-1288 cond., new tires, low miles, nonsmoker, in PA. 5TH WHEEL: 24’ Holi$5,000 firm. 460-7442. day Rambler Alumalite. Nice, clean condition, new rubber, with hitch. 9832 Tents & $3,000. (360)504-2647. Travel Trailers CAMPER TRAILER: ‘80 Holiday Rambler, Presidential 28’. New fridge and furnace. $3,500. (360)928-9436

TAIL FEATHER FARM Has a nice crop of both grass hay and alfalfa gra s s m i x h ay fo r $ 5 bale (we pay the tax)! Our hay is organically fe r t i l i ze d , we e d e d by hand-pulling or cutting, and field-dried. Contact Scot (360)460-7500.

9820 Motorhomes

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 ’90s-’00s first baseman Martinez 5 Batter like the wind 11 Best in a game 14 Whole thing, or its part 15 Maroon 16 Old ring leader? 17 Article about a bottle of whiskey? 19 Bar in the shower 20 Blowup cause 21 Prefix with bound 22 Loud salute 24 Bird’s-eye view provider 26 Folksy 29 Bar in the kitchen 31 Composer/ conductor Boulanger 32 Macy’s competitor 35 Black, to Jacques 37 Hardly a back rd. 40 Walked 41 Autobiography? 42 Unwanted growth 43 One born unfree 44 Beaver’s expletive? 45 Antarctic phenomena 46 They can make good impressions 48 Start to get going 50 Seriously involved 53 Antarctic phenomenon 57 Get going 58 Downwind 60 Put in service 61 Service-related: Abbr. 62 Essay for grammar class? 66 That niña 67 Faddish 68 King with a notable nape 69 King of Spain 70 Den piece 71 They evolved from wasp-like ancestors

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013 C5

ROADRUNNER: 2008 16’ Roadrunner by Sun Valley travel trailer. Purc h a s e d n ew i n 2 0 0 9 . Cheapo bias ply tires replaced with quality radials 2,000 miles ago. 3 burner stove top, microwave, A.C., Double bed, s h ow e r, T V a n t e n n a . Everything works. Very lightweight, can be towed with V-6. $8,950. (360)379-1882

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 29’ S u n S e e ke r C l a s s C. Only 8,000 mi., 2 tipouts, loaded, can’t use, WANTED: Old BB guns must sell. $40,000 firm. and pellet guns or parts (360)452-7870 after 6. and misc. 457-0814. MOTORHOME: ‘07 23H WANTED: Old carpet- Winnebago View. 20K, ing, larger sizes needed. Mercedes diesel, 16-20 mpg, excellent condition. TRAILER: ‘06 23’ KomWill pick up! 681-0719. fort. Loaded, immculate, $63,000. (253)312-9298 smooth sides, 1 slideMOTORHOME: ‘77 27’ out, $19,000 new. Sell 6135 Yard & El Dorado. A/C, excel- for $12,000/obo. Garden (360)797-1771 lent cond. $2,500 firm, as is. (360)457-5649. TOP SOIL: Free delivery T R A I L E R : Te r r y ‘ 0 2 in P.A. $20 yd, lawn/gar- MOTORHOME: ‘84 30’ 26W pull trailer. Slide, den ready. 452-1010 or S p o r t s c o a c h I I I . 4 5 4 new tires, with A/C and (360)460-1032. eng., rear queen bed, cold-weather package. full bath, new convection $10,500. (406)531-4114 7025 Farm Animals micro, new fridge, wood TRAVEL TRAILER cabinets, runs well, & Livestock clean, 47K miles. $6,800 Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide out, great cond., $9,500. (360)683-1851 (360)452-6677 M I S C : Fr e e h o r s e. Young jersey dairy cow, MOTORHOME: ‘85 21’ $850. (360)477-1706. Toyota Rogue. 56K mi., manual trans, sound en- 9802 5th Wheels gine, 6 new tires, needs 7035 General Pets work, rear bath, A/C cab a n d b o d y, s l e e p s 4 . 5TH WHEEL: ‘ 0 0 A l penlite. 36’, 3 slides. In $6,000/obo. very good shape. All acBERNESE (360)504-2619 or MOUNTAIN PUPPY (360)477-8807 mornings cessories. $15,900. (360)460-2081 Loving tri-color female, 10 wks. old. $1,150 in- MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ Toyota Slumberqueen. 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 0 2 3 2 ’ cludes food and shots. Low miles, 4 cyl., good Cougar. All options, 2 (360)683-7001 s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o slides, new tires, dishes/ linens incl. Priced to sell FREE: Horse. 7 year old health. $7,500/obo. $10,500. (360)681-5274. Morgan type mare, 14.2 (360)452-7246 hands, some professiona l t ra i n i n g , ex c e l l e n t MOTORHOME: ‘88 22’ ground manners, still Class A Winnebago. spunky. Beautiful and $4,000/obo. 912-1305. loves attention, and not MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ for a beginner rider. Fleetwood Southwind, (360)461-0205 Class A, 27,500 original PUPPIES: Dachshunds. miles, dual roof AC, lg. ( 1 ) fe m a l e c h o c o l a t e s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy - 5 T H W H E E L : ‘ 0 4 2 4 ’ smooth coat, (1) male draulic levelers, 2 TVs, C o u g a r. N e w f r i d g e black and tan long hair. rear camera, Onan gen- f r e e ze r, s l i d e, q u e e n 6.5 weeks old, ready in erator, neutral interior, bed, awning, near new must see. $23,999. one week. $400. condition, must see. (360)452-4136 (360)477-3385 $12,990. (360)457-0627.

5TH WHEEL: 26’ Alpenlite. New fridge/freezer, toilet, A/C, micro, dual batteries and propane tank, nice stereo, queen air adustable bed, awning, all in good condition, clean and ready to go. $3,850/obo. Leave message at (360)452-4790. 5TH WHEEL: 30’ Crossroads Patriot upgrade model, used twice overnight, immaculate, towable with half ton. Below book value at $38,750 includes slider hitch. 683-5682 or 541-980-5210 5TH WHEEL: ‘94 27’ Coachman Catalina. Great cond., single slide, new tires. $3,900/obo. (360)417-8840 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 29’ Alpen Lite, single slide, l ow u s a g e, ex c e l l e n t shape. $11,500/obo. (615)330-0022 5TH WHEEL: Fleetwood ‘98 Wilderness. Hitch included, 24L5C, clean, smoke-free, 1 slide, full bath, A/C, elec. jacks. $5,195. (360)452-7967. 5TH WHEEL: Sportking 1981, 18’. $850. (360)808-7545

9050 Marine Miscellaneous BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, trailer, 140 hp motor. $4,980. (360)683-3577. BOATS: 14’ Livingston, with Shorelander trailer, $495. New, 10’ Walker Bay, with EZ Loader, $995. (360)452-6677.

LANCE Lite: 2003 845 Truck Camper. Great condition-used twice. Roof air, queen bed, d i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o bed. Shwr stall/pan full h g h t . B l u e i n t e r i o r. Lots of storage. Length-16.5 ft. $8,995. Call (360)681-0172

CANOE: 13’, square stern, Old Town, excellent. $600. (360)797-1771.

CRESTLINER: ‘03 12’ aluminum, 8 HP Johnson motor, new trailer, with accessories. $2,000. (406)531-4114.

G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n cr uiser, flying br idge, single Cummins diesel low hours, radar, 9829 RV Spaces/ engine, VHF radio, CB, depth/ Storage f i s h f i n d e r , d i n g h y, d ow n r i g g e r s, 1 6 ’ x 3 2 ’ SEQUIM: RV space for boathouse. $27,500. rent, $400, $100 dep. all (360)457-0684 inclusive. (360)683-8561 Illness Forces Sale ‘89 16.5’ Searay Run 9050 Marine About, open bow with Miscellaneous s t e r n d r i ve a n d M e r Cruiser, completely re12.5’ ZODIAC with mo- stored, $13,500 investtor. 1998 Mark II C Zodi- e d , n e w e n g i n e , ak, set up with a 30 HP upholstery, galvanized Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel trailer, stainless steel tank, oars, air pump. prop and canvass cover. Motor has just been to $6,300/obo. 504-2113. the shop for a complete check up and is ready to LONESTAR: 17’, 100 hp go fishing. Great setup Johnson motor, 9.5 kickfor rivers or salt water. er, motor in great shape, $3,500. Inquiries please galvanized EZ-loader call, (360)531-0402. t r a i l e r, d e p t h f i n d e r, $2,500. (360)928-9436. APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, new 165 OMC with heat MANTA RAY: ‘97 19.5’, exchanger, recently ser- I/O . Needs work. viced outdrive, custom $1,500. (360)461-2056 trailer, new tires and brakes, pot puller, ex- S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n Oughtred whilly, sailtras. $5,000/obo. ing/rowing, better than (360)582-0892 n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h BAYLINER: 17’, 70 hp oars, trailer, many upYamaha, needs some g r a d e d a c c e s s o r i e s . engine work but runs. $7,250/obo. $1,500. (360)460-9365. (360)774-6720

KOMFORT: 1997 23F 5th Wheel. Great condition, New tires, water pump (2012) 2 skylights 2 twin beds, Awning, Purchase option of deluxe hitch, Chev PU tailgate, 1000 Trails Membership, Por table grey BAYLINER 2859. Price water tank. $5,000. reduced from $26,000 to (360)683-4552 $20,000. Selling because of health. Engine 9808 Campers & overhauled last year, outdrive replaced 3 yrs Canopies ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp kicker. Great electronics CAMPER: ‘11 10’ Alas- including radar, color kan cab-over. Original fish finder, GPS char t owner, excellent cond. plotter. Diesel heater, $9,000. (360)452-8968. custom cabinets and C A M P E R : 2 0 0 0 , 1 0 ’ master bed. Great boat S&S. Has all the good- f o r f i s h i n g . E l e c t r i c downriggers, rods and ies, very clean. $3,300. gear. Comfortable week(360)374-6778 end travel with stove, reCAMPER: ‘97 10’ Alpen- frigerator, shower and lite. TV, micro, self cont., head. Excellent condiexcellent cond. $6,000. tion. Call 327-3695. (360)928-9770 after 5. BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w PACKAGE: ‘85 Dodge Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruis350 and 11.5’ self con- er, freshwater cooling. tained camper. $3,900/obo. $1,900. (360)457-1153. (360)775-9653

PAC K AG E : ‘ 8 5 C h ev B O AT : 1 7 ’ , 9 0 H P truck, ‘85 Lance camper. Yamaha, galv. trailer. $3,000. (360)417-0951. $1,700. (360)457-8109.

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


Classified

C6 FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013 9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9053 Marine Power

S A I L B OAT : 2 1 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; , r e - 2003 Wellcraft Coastal 270 tractable keel, trailer, 7.5 Tournament Edition HP motor, exceptionally Approximately 80 hours clean. $3,950. on new Volvo Penta 375 (360)477-7068 horse 8.1, crate motor, approximately 20 hours SAILBOAT: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;81 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; C&C on new Volvo Penta outwith sails and new 8 hp dr ive, 9.9 high thr ust engine, sleeps 4, toi- new in 2008 with remote let/sink. $4,500/obo. control steering, beam is (360)808-7913 9 feet 9 inches, 5kw kohler gen set, air conditionS A I L B O AT : H o l d e r i n g a n d h e a t , m i c r o 14/Hobie One-Fourteen. w a v e , f r i d g e , s i n g l e E x c e l l e n t c o n d . , E Z burner electric or alcohol Loader galvanized trail- stove, vacu flush head, GPS fish finder. Located er. $1,700. on Orcas Island, (360)681-8528 $49,000. Call 360-317-7237. SLICKCRAFT: 1976 23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; inboard/outboard. 302 engine, boat and trailer. $5,200. (360)457-8190. 9817 Motorcycles

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9817 Motorcycles 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others BMW â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 328I SEDAN This one is in excellent condition, fully loaded, auto, 6 cyl, moon roof, leather and more. Low 44K mi. Must drive to CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;65 Impala. 283, appreciate. auto, good cond., runs. $18,950 $6,500/obo. 457-6359, Preview at: or (360)808-5081. heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 CADILLAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;78 Seville. Looks and runs like new, always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. $4,850. (360)928-9724.

HARLEY DAVIDSON â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 FXSTC. Custom softtail, 7k, Vance & Hine, ex. shape, garaged. $11,900. (360)683-8027. H.D.: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;84 FLHS. Only 500 ever made. 33.4k original miles, too much to list. Call for details. $12,000 to loving home. (360)460-8271

SCOOTER: 2007 Roketa Bali 250 Scooter. Fun and economical, 60 mpg. Original owner sellHONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 XR100R. ing. 1055 miles on it. E x c e l l e n t c o n d . , l o w This bike gets up and goes! Includes helmet miles. $1000/obo. and gloves. (360)477-9777 CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;86 El Camino, (360)374-6787 Conquista package. PS, H O N DA : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 1 X R 4 0 0 . PB, PW, PD, cruise, filt, Nice, ready for the trail. full gages incl. tach., V8, $2,600. (360)460-1207. 9805 ATVs auto, Gaylord bed cover with liner, factory ralley HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 CRF 250X. wheels, low miles, not Excellent shape. $2,900. QUAD: 90 cc Eton. 2 smoked in, garage kept, (360)461-3415 s t r o ke, l i ke n ew. R e - gold/brown color, tan int. TRAILER: EZ Loader, duced $1,300. 452-3213 Very original! tandem axle, 22-24â&#x20AC;&#x2122;. BMW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;74 R75/6. Air- HONDA: 2003 VT750 $11,586.86. $1,250. (360)460-9680. head Boxer, excellent A c e D e l u xe C r u i s e r. (360)683-7789 condition, 29K mi., new $3,750. (360)477-6968. 9180 Automobiles powder coat, shocks, alCLASSIFIED Classics & Collect. garaged. $3,500/ HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;85 Goldwing can help with all ways Aspencade. 1200cc, obo. (360)912-2679. black/chrome, exc. cond. your advertising $3,500/obo. 417-0153. needs: BMW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 HONDAS: (2). â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 CRF F O R D : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 3 2 R o a d s t e r. miles. Throttlemiester. Buying 100F, $1,300. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 CRF 540 all aluminum Hemi, BMW touring hard cas150F, $1,800. Both low The Blower Shop 871 Selling es. Corbin saddle. BMW miles, just ser viced, blower, custom ever yHiring aftermarket alarm. great starter bikes. thing, the best money $4,350. (425)508-7575. Trading (360)457-0255 AMC: Rare 1970 AMX - could buy. Serious inGoldspace@msn.com 2-seater, 390 V/8, 4 spd, quiries only. $250,000 MOTOR SCOOTER (360)461-4665 Call today! DIRTBIKE: Honda â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 2008 Jetmoto, 50cc, 350 95% original. $18,000/ obo. (360)928-9477. C R F 1 0 0 . L o o k s a n d miles, like new. $650. runs great. $750/obo. 9292 Automobiles 360-452-8435 (360)681-7560 (360)670-5282 CADILLAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 Sedan Others 1-800-826-7714 Deville. Mint condition, YAMAHA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;77 TT500. H A R L E Y : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 6 1 2 0 0 Custom and spare parts. original owner, 74,874 BUICK: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;01 Regal Tourwww.peninsula Sportster, 7k miles, mint. $1000/obo. mi., garaged. $4,500. ing. 107+K mi. $2,200/ (360)683-1288 afternoon obo. (702)366-4727. dailynews.com $6,900. (360)452-6677. (360)477-4007

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CADILLAC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 STS AWD V6 The ultimate in luxur y a n d h a n d l i n g p e r fo r mance, this car is immaculate inside and out, stunning white pearl paint, 66K mi. $17,500 heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

CADILLAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;92 De Ville. Gray, 122k, 6-way power seats, power locks and windows, climate control, A/C, cruise, all l e a t h e r, a l u m i nu m w h e e l s , n o n - s m o ke r, well-maintained, ver y nice cond., (4) mounted and studded snow tires incl. $2,400. (360)374-9455 CHEV â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05 COBALT 4 cyl., auto, A/C, power locks, CD. $6,395 Lowest in-house financing rate. The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 theotherguys.com

MINI COOPER â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 CLUB MAN Spor ty unique styling thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fan favorite for yo u n g a n d o l d a l i ke ! Spunky 4 cyl. combined with a 6 speed manual Getrag trans. makes h e a d s t u r n a s yo u â&#x20AC;&#x2122;r e cruising down the highway with BOTH of the moon-roofs open listening to the MINI Hi-Fi premium sound system. This car is not only FUN and responsive, but very economical to drive, getting 37 mpg or better on the open road. One d o e s n â&#x20AC;&#x2122; t wa n t t o s t o p driving and get out of the very comfortable leather seats. Oh! Did I mention the 3rd door for easy access to the rear seat. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss out on this exciting automobile. 39k. $17,750 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

TOAD: Saturn â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 VUE equiped with BlueOx tow bar and base plate. Pat r i o t b r a k e . L e a t h e r. Power seat. Heated front seats. $12,100. NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Maxima (360)457-0522 SE. V6, 5 speed, like new. $6,000. 9434 Pickup Trucks (360)683-1080 NISSAN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;89 300 ZX. Red. V6. Automatic. Tt o p. M a ny n ew p a r t s. $4,500/obo. (360)681-3579

PORCHE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 BOXTER CONVERTIBLE The Boxter convertible is all sports car! Powered by 2.7l, 6 cyl mid engine, 5 speed manual trans., producing 217 HP and still gets over 28 mpg while cruising in and out of cars on the highway! Ve r y l o w 8 9 k m i l e s ! Come in and test drive today! ONLY $14,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors MITSUBISHI: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 111 E. Front, P.A. E c l i p s e. B l a ck , gr e a t (360)912-3583 cond., 188k miles. $5,700. (360)460-2536. PORCHE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;88 944. 1 N I S S A N : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 1 A l t i m a . owner, 129,500 mi. , exStudded tires, gold color. cellent condition. $6,995. (360)452-4890 $800. (360)457-7753. PONTIAC: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03 Bonneville SSEi. Great-riding car, 90k miles, power everything, always garaged. $7,000/obo. (360)809-0356 VW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;78 Super Beetle conver tible. Runs good, good cond., manual trans. $5,500. (360)683-8032

SATURN: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 Aura. Low mi. $8,000. (360)796-4762

Others

BRUSHFIRE TRUCK 1981 4X4 1 ton dually, 4 speed manual with granny low, 5.7L V8, 250 gallon H2O tank, 4 yr old Honda GX690 generator, dual side diamond plate tool boxes, everything is in great operating condition and was meticulously maintained by an Eastern Washington fire depar tment. Try and find one this nice! $10,500 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

9935 General Legals

The North Olympic SalVW: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;72 Super Beetle. mon Coalition is seeking Great shape. $2,300/ Statements of Qualificaobo. (360)809-3656. tions from engineering firms skilled in habitat ADD A PHOTO TO restoration design work. Details at www.nosc.org YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! news and event tab. www.peninsula Legal No.495004 dailynews.com Pub: July 10, 12, 2013

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices

Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County CHEV: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;99 Malibu. $1,200/obo. (360)681-3820 NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH APN No.: 0630000086200000 Title C H RY S L E R : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 0 2 P T Cruiser LTD. Silver. 93K. Order No.: 080154401-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS $4,500/obo. 457-0238. NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. Deed DODGE: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;00 Intrepid. of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007 1200533 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY 1 1 5 k , 2 8 m p g , f r o n t GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Truswheel drive, new tires tee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County and chains. $3,500/obo. Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to (360)379-8755 the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered FIAT 2012 500 POP banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the This compact car took County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: ALL OF LOTS 5 AND 6 IN Europe by storm when it came out in 2007. It was BLOCK 86, TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, LOT 4 IN BLOCK 86, TOWNintroduced to the U.S. SITE OF PORT ANGELES, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 1 OF market in 2012. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pep- PLATS, PAGE 27, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXpy, ver y fuel efficient, CEPT ANY PORTION THEREOF LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DEand most of all fun to SCRIBED PROPERTY: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF drive! Auto, 4 cyl, anti- SAID LOT 4; THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT, 40 lock brakes, A/C, CD, FEET; THENCE SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 4 power windows/locks, al- TO A POINT 40 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY IN A DIRECT LINE TO THE SOUTHWEST um. wheels, and more. CORNER OF LOT 3; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID $12,900 LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 25 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY IN A DIPreview at: RECT LINE TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors SAID LOT 3 A POINT 25 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER 111 E. Front, P.A. THEREOF; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3 TO (360)912-3583 A POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 318 WEST 4TH STREET, PORT FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90 Taurus Wag- ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated on. Runs fine, body OK, 4/26/2007, recorded 4/30/2007, under 2007 1200533 records of CLALLAM has some issues. County, Washington, from JOSHUA S. ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS $850. (360)457-4399. HIS SEPARATE ESTATE, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSUAL TITLE FORD: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;94 Crown Vic- COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE toria. New tires, good ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial shape. $2,500. interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA(360)928-9920 TION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE HONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;06 Accord LX. ACCEPTANCE, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), V6, 49K. orig. owner, re- to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for Structured Asset cent maint. $12,500. Mortgage Investments II Inc. Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Trust (360)417-8859 2007-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AR4. II. No acHONDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 Civic Hy- tion commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or brid. $9,000. Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. (425)508-7575 The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to HONDA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 CIVIC CX pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $32,344.99 IV. HATCHBACK The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal 1.6L 4 cyl, 5 sp manual sum of $175,066.24, together with interest as provided in the Note from the trans! Silver ext in good 3/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The shape. Gray cloth int in above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and good cond. A/C, Pioneer the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale Premier CD player, dual will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesairbags, locally owned! sion or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III 34+ MPG! Great little fuel sipper at our No must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any Haggle price of only time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in $2,995! Carpenter Auto Center Paragraph III is cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally 681-5090 chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 KIA 2010 SOUL + days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or The name says it all. the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal Youthful, distinctively and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the styled unique looks, with terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A many features at an af- written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the fordable price. You get Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSHUA S. ARMthat soulful feeling cruis- STRONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE ESTATE ADDRESS 318 ing down the road, lis- WEST 4TH STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certening to the rich sound tified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower system equipped with and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of S i r i u s s a t e l l i t e ra d i o, Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on Bluetooth and steering the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has posseswheel audio controls. Yo u c a n c h a n g e t h e sion of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed tunes with fingertip con- as of 10/25/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth betrols. All of the above an low will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and over 30 mpg to boot. fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all 38K miles. their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objec$14,900 tions to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to Preview at: be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale purheckmanmotors.com suant to RC W 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waivHeckman Motors er of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sale. NOTICE TO OC111 E. Front, P.A. CUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sale is entitled to (360)912-3583 possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the L I N C O L N : â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; 8 8 To w n Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junC a r. C o z y 2 0 M P G . ior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th Runs great. Good body day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are and interior with some not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantrust spots. Good tires. occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in Brakes redone. All accessories work, includ- accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEi n g A / C, 1 3 0 k m i l e s. FORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DE$1,500 or best offer. Call LAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED (360)683-1683 IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if MAZDA: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;02 Miata LS. you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe Excellent condition. 54K sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assism i l e s . 6 s p e e d . A i r, tance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in c r u i s e , C D , p o w e r . determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact $8,000. 452-4758. the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: TollMERCEDES-BENZ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;98 free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: E320 SEDAN 103k orig mi! 3.2L V6, h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r a u t o t r a n s , l o a d e d ! ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States DepartWhite ext in great cond! ment of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or NaTan leather int in great tional Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling shape! Dual pwr seats, agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/inmoon roof, 6 disk CD, dex.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statetraction, side airbags, wide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsetinted windows, wood l o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : trim, climate control, al- http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including loy wheels! Real nice if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entiBenz at our No Haggle tled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purprice of only $6,995! chaserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further reCarpenter Auto Center course against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 681-5090 Agent, or the Beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this NISSAN â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;10 MAXIMA S loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders rightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A true sport sedan with against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT room for 5 passengers. A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT This is one fine road machine, auto, 3.5L V6, PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit 290 hp, moonroof, fully report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report loaded, fuel efficient. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 pretty much got it all. Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of 32K low miles. Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, $19,900 CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Preview at: Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 heckmanmotors.com (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com Heckman Motors TS No.: WA-08-225914-SH, A-4375384 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 111 E. Front, P.A. Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494529 (360)912-3583


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013 C7

9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Others Others Others Others Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County CHEV: ‘80 2 ton. ‘454’ engine, 4 sp, 2 sp rear axle, 3’ deck with 13’ dump bed, 70 gal. diesel tank. $2,000/obo. (360)457-4521 or 477-3964 after 6 p.m.

DODGE ‘00 DAKOTA CLUB CAB SLT 4X4 4.7L V8, Automatic, alloy wheels, matching fiberglass canopy, spray-in bedliner, tow package, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r CHEV: ‘85 pickup. 48K w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, original mi. $3,500/obo. mirrors, and drivers seat, (360)504-5664 cruise control, tilt, air CHEV: ‘88 Dually. Crew conditioning, CD/cassette stereo, dual front cab. $1,500. a i r b a g s . Ke l l e y B l u e (360)477-1761 Book Value of $12,066! Only 81,000 original miles! One owner! No accidents! Good condition inside and out! This Dakota delivers great power and capacity in a midsize package! Small 4.7L V8 for better fuel mileage! Come see the Peninsula’s truck source DODGE: ‘99 Ram 4X4 for over 55 Years! Stop F l a t b e d t r u c k . L o w by Gray Motors today! $8,995 miles, recent oil GRAY MOTORS change, transmission 457-4901 flush and filter changgraymotors.com es. 3/4 ton 360 engine. call 461-4151. Photos available by request. P r i c e r e d u c e d t o FORD: ‘92 Ranger. Ext. cab, 4L, 5 sp manual, $3500/obo. very good cond. inside FORD: ‘01 Ranger. 4x4, and out, always well sermatching canopy, good v i c e d a n d g a r a g e d , canopy. $2,500. Eves or running. $6,500. msg. (360)457-6199. 1-360-269-1208 or 1-360-269-1030

DODGE ‘06 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB 4X4 This truck literally has it all. 5.7 L HEMI V8 bighor n package, lift kit, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seat, tow package, sliding rear window, running boards, oversized off-road tires, premium alloy wheels and much more! What a truck! This lifted 4WD cruises down the highway remarkably smooth and cruises over almost any obstacle with its professionally installed liftkit. Talk about power! The 5.7 HEMI V8 has it all over the competition. One fine, well-appointed truck! $22,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

FORD ‘09 F150 KING RANCH 4X4 SUPER CREW This truck literally has it all! Full luxur y power, power moonroof, heated and cooled leather captains chairs, navigation system, SYNC voice activated communications and entertainment system. KING RANCH! Awesome truck! Priced right at $29,900 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD: ‘86 F250 XLT. Matching canopy. $1,500. 1-360-269-1208 or 1-3601269-1030.

FORD: ‘96 F150 Pickup. 6 cylinder, manual transmission, 2 WD, clean, D O D G E : ‘ 0 6 R a m . runs great. 153,000 Manual, 59k miles, ex- miles. Has new tires, cellent cond., reg. cab. Tonneau cover. Call $9,800. (360)477-6149. (360)477-4195 FORD: ‘92 F-350. Dually, extra cab, 460, AT, 9931 Legal Notices set up to tow gooseClallam County neck/bumper pole, 176k. $3,250/obo. NOTICE OF TRUSTEED (360)460-7534

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NOTICE OF TRUSTEED SALE TS No.: WA-11-484853-SH APN No.: 0430201290200000 Title Order No.: 110565726-WA-GNO Grantor(s): SHELLEY K SHAMP, MARK WARNER SHAMP Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007-1202947 Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: PARCEL “A” LOTS 1, 2 AND 3 OF ALAN ROHNOW SHORT PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 30 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 5, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 2002 1077685, BEING A SHORT PLAT OF LOT 1 AND A PORTION OF LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT RECORDED IN VOLUME 14 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 18, BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHD? 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. PARCEL”B” LOT 2 OF D. MCLEAN SHORT PLAT RECORDED MAY 17,1984 IN VOLUME 14 OF SHORT PLATS, PAGE 18, UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 554549, BEING A PORTION OF THE EAST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 4 WEST, W.M., CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; EXCEPT THAT PORTION DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2 OF SAID SHORT PLAT, SAID POINT BEING THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 87 degrees 59’ 31” EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 2, OF SAID SHORT PLAT, A DISTANCE OF 302.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 1 degrees 57’26” WEST, PARALLEL TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT, A DISTANCE OF 280.53 FEET;THENCE NORTH 75 degrees 00’22” WEST PARALLEL TO THE CENTERLINE OF HIGHWAY 101, A DISTANCE OF 310.26 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE NORTH 2 degrees 00’ 29” EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF LOT 2, A DISTANCE OF 210.81 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 259052 HIGHWAY 101, SEQUIM, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/29/2007, recorded 6/7/2007, under 2007-1202947 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from SHELLEY K SHAMP AND MARK WARNER SHAMP, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to CLALLAM TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The defaults) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $73,036.93 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $582,218.03, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 1/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME SHELLEY K SHAMP AND MARK WARNER SHAMP, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 259052 HIGHWAY 101, SEQUIM, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/10/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RC W 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/8/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-11-484853-SH,A-4376854 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494663

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NISSAN ‘04 FRONTIER CREW CAB SE 4X4 3.3L V6, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, matching fiberglass canopy, bedliner, tow package, privacy glass, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, Alpine CD stereo, dual front airbags. Only 102,000 original miles! One owner, Clean Carfax! Immaculate condition inside and out! Popular crew cab option! You won’t find one nicer than this! Come see the guys with over 55 years of providing great automotive value! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

REQUEST FOR BIDS Fish Passage Project Clallam Conser vation District invites bids for the construction of the Fielding Creek Tributary FORD: ‘87 F350. New Fish Passage Project. paint, tires, rims and Proposed contract work brakes. $1,595.97. Beincludes all construction fore 7 p.m. 457-8388. for removal and replaceFORD: ‘89 4X4 Longment of a road culvert bed. Auto/air, runs great. nineteen miles west of $2,500/obo. 457-5948. Por t Angeles. Sealed bids will be accepted unFORD: ‘98 F150. Rims, til 3:00 p.m. on July 23, tinted, black, extended cab. Priced to sell! 2013 at 1601 E. Front $1,875. (360)460-0518. St, Bldg/Ste A, Port Angeles, WA 98362. FORD: ‘99 14’ box truck. An on-site meeting for Diesel, 133k, good truck. interested contractors $7,800. (360)452-4738. will be held July 16, M A Z DA : ‘ 8 4 P i c k u p. 2013 at 3:00 p.m. BidRuns good, low miles. ding documents may be $1,200. (360)452-5126. requested by phone at (360) 452-1912 ext. 109, TOYOTA: ‘94. Ext. cab, by emailing me4 x 4 , c a n o py, l ow m i . $5,900. (360)452-4034. ghan.adamire@clal#1 Online Job Site on the Olympic lamcd.org or by visiting EMAIL US AT Peninsula the Conservation District classified@peninsula www.peninsula office at 1601 E. Front dailynews.com dailynews.com St., Bldg/Suite A in Port Angeles. 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Dated the 9th day of July Clallam County Clallam County 2013. Legal No. 496659 SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Pub: July 12, 2013

61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH APN No.: 063022-330240 Title Order No.: 6552740 Grantor(s): JAYNA STORY LAFFERTY, ARTHUR D LAFFERTY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY - ARLINGTON BRANCH. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 20081220032 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: Parcel “A” That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the point on the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87°19’20” East 485.11 feet from the Southwest corner thereof; Thence continuing South 87°19’20” East along said South line 95 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 450 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West 95 feet; Thence South 2° 40’ 40” West 450 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT the South 255 feet thereof. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. PARCEL “B” An easement for ingress, egress and utilities over and across that portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at a point of the South line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87° 19’ 20” East 286.31 feet from the Southwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 87° 19’ 20” East along said South line 403.80 feet to the Southeast corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence North 2° 31’ 40” East along the East line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 20 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West parallel with the said South line 387.27 feet; Thence North 8° 19’ 20” West 178.27 feet; Thence South 87° 19’ 20” East parallel with said South line 311.33 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 60 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West 95 feet; Thence North 2° 40’ 40” East 399.52 feet to the point on the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter lying South 87° 19’ 24” East 481.66 feet from the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing North 2° 40’ 40” East 5.28 feet to the South margin of the Plat of Brunch’s Panoramic Heights, as recorded under Auditor’s File No. 373011 in Volume 6 of Plats, page 23; Thence North 87° 57’ 05” West along said South margin 60 feet; Thence South 2° 40’ 40” West 4.62 feet to the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; Thence continuing South 2° 40’ 40” West 399.52 feet; Thence North 87° 19’ 20” West 188.37 feet; Thence South 8° 19’ 20” East 259.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 4/23/2008, recorded 4/28/2008, under 2008-1220032 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor(s), to JOAN H. ANDERSON, EVP ON BEHALF OF FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB., as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (“MERS”), AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. NATIONAL MORTGAGE COMPANY ARLINGTON BRANCH, (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Nationstar Mortgage, LLC . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $74,534.32 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $265,428.27, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2010, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JAYNA S. LAFFERTY AND ARTHUR D. LAFFERTY, WIFE AND HUSBAND ADDRESS 5733 SOUTH PASTORAL, PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/26/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-509550-SH, A-FN4375305 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494521

VENDOR LIST P.U.D. No. 1 of Clallam County is soliciting the names of vendors who would like to be included on a Vendor list for the purchase of major electric, water, and office material supply items over $15,000 in accordance with the State of Washington Requirements. If you would like to be included on the list, contact the P.U.D. Mater ials Super intendent, Charlie McCaughan at 360.565.3510. Legal No. 495164 Pub: July 12, 2013

SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY Cause No. 13-2-00105-8 Sheriff’s No. 13000448 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON in and for the County of Clallam

SOUND COMMUNITY BANK, a federally chartered savings bank, VS DANIEL J. BOYD, a single person; and LESLIE A. SOMMERVILLE, a single person, TO: DANIEL J. BOYD and LESLIE A. SOMMERVILLE

THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CLALLAM COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE UNDERSIGNED SHERIFF OF CLALLAM COUNTY TO SELL THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO SATISFY A JUDGMENT IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION. IF DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 102 BRUECKNER ROAD, SEQUIM, WA 98382 THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 8/02/2013 IN THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE CLALLAM COUNTY COURTHOUSE, ENTRANCE LOCATED AT 223 E. 4th STREET, PORT ANGELES, WASHINGTON.

THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $ 3 9 1 , 8 3 0 . 3 6 TO G E T H E R W I T H I N T E R E S T, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED June 18, 2013

W.L. Benedict, SHERIFF Clallam County, Washington By Kaylene Zellar #331, Civil Deputy 223 E. 4th Street, Suite 12, Port Angeles, WA 98362 TEL: 360.417.2266 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 30 N O RT H , R A N G E 4 W E S T, W. M . , C L A L L A M COUNTY, WASHINGTON. EXCEPT THAT PORTION, IF ANY, AS DISCLOSED BY CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 709678; ALSO EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO CLALLAM COUNTY FOR ROAD, AS DISCLOSED BY CLALLAM COUNTY AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 242001 AND 280138. SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Pub: July 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012 Legal No. 491636

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH APN No.: 063008-550570 Title Order No.: 080146772-WA-GNO Grantor(s): JOSH ARMSTRONG Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2005 1159435 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 8/9/2013, at 10:00 AM The main entrance to the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of CLALLAM, State of Washington, to-wit: LOTS 19 AND 20, BLOCK 5, MALLETTE’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWNSITE OF PORT ANGELES, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON; TOGETHER WITH THE SOUTH HALF HALF OF VACATED ALLEY ADJOINING, PUSUANT TO CR RESOLUTION NO. 8, 1996 RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 734777; EXCEPT THE WEST 3.5 FEET OF SAID LOT 19; ALSO EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO CLALLAM COUNTY FOR RIGHT-OF-WAY PURPOSE BY DOCUMENT RECORDED UNDER CLALLAM COUNTY RECORDING NO. 298062. SITUATE IN CLALLAM COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 6/21/2005, recorded 6/27/2005, under 2005 1159435 records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN, as Grantor(s), to OLYMPIC PENINSULA TITLE, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Trustee for Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., GreenPoint Mortgage Funding Trust 2005-AR4, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-AR4. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $54,188.84 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $137,791.19, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 8/9/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/29/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME JOSH ARMSTRONG, A MARRIED MAN ADDRESS 1247 SPRUCE STREET, PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph 1 above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 10/23/2012. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counsel o r s a n d a t t o r n e y s : Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 o r W e b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 04/04/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-08-224252-SH, A-4375385 07/12/2013, 08/02/2013 Pub: July 12, Aug. 2, 2013 Legal No. 494540


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Kingston Trio in concert | This week’s new movies

Peninsula

Guys & Dolls Above, among the guys in the Port Angeles Light Opera Association’s production of “Guys and Dolls”: Casey Sisneros, left, Gabriel Smith, Kyle Sholinder and Ceaj Broin.

Anna Unger, Alaynna Little and Annika Pederson are Hot Box club performers.

DIANE U RBANI

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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THE WEEK OF JULY 12-18, 2013


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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Coming Up men and women of all ages in the large cast. “Dearly Departed” is described as “a rollicking black comedy centered around the funeral of a trashy Southern patriarch and his wildly dysfunctional family.” “Dearly” will open Sept. 19 and run through Oct. 6 at the playhouse. Scripts are available at the reference desks at the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., and the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone director John Manno at 360-670-2067.

Shula Azhar sways onto PA waterfront PORT ANGELES — Shula Azhar, Port Angeles’ own bellydance troupe, is bringing its swords and veils to Wine on the Waterfront tonight. Usually the dancers perform on the first Friday of the month, but July is an exception. The lights come down around 7 p.m. at WoW, the all-ages venue upstairs in The Landing mall at 115 E. Railroad Ave. As always, there is no cover charge and more details can be found at 360565-VINO (8466).

More drawing

Salsa at castle PORT TOWNSEND — Second Sunday Salsa Night will happen in a different venue this month due to the closure of The Upstage. Manresa Castle, 651 Cleveland St., has a dance floor, so an intermediate salsa lesson will start at 7 p.m., a beginners’ session will follow at 7:30 and then Latin dancing — cha cha, rumba, merengue, salsa — with DJ’d music will con-

The Shula Azhar dance troupe will come inside Wine on the Waterfront in Port Angeles for a performance tonight. tinue from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is $7 for the whole night. For more details and to

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Purchase a PDN photo — on T-shirts, drink mugs or just the photo itself. www.peninsuladailynews. com Click on “Photo Gallery”

Live drawing

Auditions slated

PORT ANGELES — Another live drawing session is set for this Wednesday at Studio Bob, upstairs at 118½ E. Front St. Artists working in various media are welcome to arrive at 6 p.m. Doors will close at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $10 or $5 for students, and since the sessions involve a nude model, artists younger than 18 are asked to have a responsible adult present. For information, email Sarah@TuckerArt.com.

PORT ANGELES — Auditions for the Port Angeles Community Players production of the David Bottrell and Jesse Jones comedy “Dearly Departed” have been scheduled. The auditions will be held at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 19 and 20. Parts are available for

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Peninsula Spotlight, the North Olympic Peninsula’s weekly entertainment and arts magazine, welcomes items about coming events for its news columns and calendars. Sending information is easy: Q E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. Q Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. Q Mail it to Peninsula Spotlight, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to arrive 10 days before publication. Q Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 147-B W. Washington St., Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Phone Diane Urbani de la Paz, Peninsula Spotlight editor, at 360-452-2345, ext. 5062, weekdays.

be added to the Salsa Night mailing list, email Judy Rudolph at jr@ olympus.net.

PORT ANGELES — The Loom, a new lounge adjacent to Studio Bob at 118½ E. Front St., is hosting various activities for artists and art lovers. One is called “drink and draw,” in which sketch pads and pencils are available for those who don’t bring their own, and drinks, soft and otherwise, are poured from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the next two Thursdays, July 18 and 25. Drink and draw is open to all ages with no cover charge. “Drink or don’t,” added organizer Sarah Tucker. “There is no judgment of artistic talent. Give it a try for fun,” she said, “or be a model.” Models pose for 10 minutes, clothes on. To find out more about modeling, email Sarah@ TuckerArt.com or sign up on the list at The Loom upon arrival Thursday. Peninsula Daily News


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Sing with

gusto Kingston Trio to strum into Sequim on Saturday out of San Francisco, their sound was plain irre- The current Kingston Trio — from left, Rick Dougherty, Bill Zorn sistible, will bring folk hits to Sequim this Saturday evening. Grove recalls. and trumpet, and holds a Frank Sinatra and Elvis funny,” Grove promised. When the music flows, master’s in jazz composiPresley were big. But with “there’s something magic tion from the University of the young people, Grove that happens. It erases the Nevada at Las Vegas. And said, those guys were years . . . it’s the fountain then there’s his craving for passe; there was no new music teenagers could grab of youth for us.” Grove is the longest con- classical music. onto and say, “That’s mine.” “I’m a Chopin freak,” tinuous member of the trio; Grove said. Shane invited him to join Folk fascination He plays the Romantic the group 37 years ago. At that time Grove replaced Then, along came the three guys fascinated with Zorn, who had been a folk harmonies and Jamai- Kingston Trio singer for a few years before moving to can calypso music, hence England. the Kingston name. Shane, the last original “They sang with gusto member still with the trio, . . . and they looked like retired in 2004. Zorn they were looking for the returned to the group that next party,” Grove said. year, and Dougherty joined The trio’s album “Live in 2005. at the Hungry I,” recorded “My two partners are at a San Francisco club, was a smash in 1959, with incredibly talented,” said Grove. its “Wimoweh,” “Shady The Kingston Trio men Grove/Lonesome Traveller,” do other things in other cit“The Merry Minuet” and “Zombie Jamboree,” a song ies: Dougherty lives in Alameda, Calif., on San evoking the Caribbean Francisco Bay, Zorn lives in island of Trinidad. Phoenix, and Grove has In Kingston Trio shows been in Las Vegas for 16 these days, “we keep it years. He also plays piano light, entertaining and

and George Grove — composer’s music whenever he has some time to himself. So has he ever been to Kingston, Jamaica, that place that inspired his trio’s name and sound? “No, I haven’t,” Grove replied. “I’ve been working too hard.”

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talented musician. We’re looking forward to being with old friends.” PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Tickets are selling on a SEQUIM — With songs three-tiered basis: $25 for such as “Scotch and Soda,” general admission lawn “Tom Dooley” and “Zombie seating — people are urged Jamboree,” the Kingston to bring blankets or beach Trio wrote its name into chairs — and $40 for American musical history a reserved infield seating. good 50-plus years ago. For “golden circle” seats Today, a newer version in the front five rows, tickof the trio is singing those ets are $55. Outlets include songs, plus others like the Purple Haze Lavender “M.T.A.,” “A Worried Man” shop at 127 W. Washington and “They Call the Wind St. and Windermere Real Maria” on a national tour Estate at 842 E. Washingthat will stop in Sequim ton St., both in Sequim, this Saturday night. and Coog’s Budget CDs, Mark Pearson of the 111 W. Front St. in Port Brothers Four will open the Angeles, as well as www. show at 5 p.m. at the BrownPaperTickets.com. James Center for the Performing Arts, the outdoor Current incarnation venue just north of Carrie The current Kingston Blake Park at 202 N. Blake Ave. The event is part of Trio is composed of Grove, the Sequim centennial cel- who remembers hearing ebration and a prelude to the original trio back when Lavender Weekend of July he was an aspiring singer 19-21. in Nashville; Rick DoughGeorge Grove, a singer erty, a former member of and banjo man with the the Limeliters, and Bill trio since 1976, is eager to Zorn, who’s been both a spread some of that Kings- Limeliter and the leader of ton-style harmony here, the New Christy Minstrels. and to make music with Back in 1957 when the his contemporaries. Pearoriginal Kingston Trio — son, he added, is “a dear Dave Guard, Bob Shane friend and a marvelously and Nick Reynolds — came BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ


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Gathering of generations MAC to exhibit work of Jamestown S’Klallam family BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — A dress made of fair buckskin, a skipper paddle, a beaded “octopus bag”: These are a few of the works of art to appear this weekend in a new display at the Museum & Arts Center, 175 W. Cedar St. This is the Hall-Adams Family Exhibit, a revelation of art from three generations of Jamestown S’Klallam tribal members. The works are gathered inside the Jamestown

S’Klallam Longhouse, a permanent part of the museum known as the MAC. On Saturday, the public is invited to an opening celebration from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.; admission is free. To begin Saturday afternoon’s event, Jamestown S’Klallam spiritual leader Pat Adams will give a traditional blessing; a reception sponsored by 7 Cedars Casino will follow. This is a richly varied display, said Ann Adams, a Hall-Adams family member who helped coordinate it.

‘Amazing’ “It is so amazing,” she said, how the artists “can take an idea and transform it to a painting, carving or a beaded design . . . not to mention the time and patience it takes to create each item. “Some are done with a pattern and some from memory,” she added. The exhibit features a painted drum, a cradleboard, cedar hats and baskets, carvings, jewelry and many other

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ANGELINA REESE (2)

A buckskin dress, right, and a beaded “octopus bag,” above, are part of the Hall-Adams Family Exhibit to open this weekend at Sequim’s Museum & Arts Center. works in cedar and beads. Photographs are part of the display too. All of the contributing artists are descendants of

The Second Annual Meeting of the Reconstituted S’Klallam General Council (SGC) 37794610

will be held on Sunday July 21, 2013, at 1pm in the Chapel of the James and Tammoy Woodman Building 342 Guiles Road, Sequim, Washington.

the museum, while other family members are preparing additional demonstrations for other dates. The Hall-Adams Family Exhibit will stay on display through December. For

more details about it and other things to see at the museum, open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, visit www.MacSequim.org or phone 360-683-8110.

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The agenda includes several items in furtherance of the SKC’s purpose of advocating for the descendants of S’Klallam women previously excluded from tribal enrollment on the basis of their gender.Interested individuals, who cannot attend the meeting, may contact the SGC through the James and Tammoy Woodman Foundation at heachty@msn.com, or at (360)681-4860.

the late Harriette Hall Adams, daughter of Jacob “Jake” Hall. These artists include Ann, Korina, Mary, Pat and Stephanie Adams, Florence Adams Monson, Jeff Monson, Danielle Adams Lawson and Eilinhoir, Nacona and Raelynn Lawson. And Jeff Monson, a noted Jamestown S’Klallam tribal artist, has contributed a spiral walking stick, mask, skipper paddle and wooden rattle. Ann Adams will give a free art demonstration at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24, at

Call 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 www.peninsuladailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


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Events celebrate pride, diversity in community BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

‘CRIMES

OF THE

HEART’

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Aaron Campbell plays Doc and Lily Carignan is Lenny, one of three sisters with colorful pasts — and presents — in the dark comedy “Crimes of the Heart” at Olympic Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave. in Sequim. The play continues through July 21, with ticket information at 360-683-7326 and www.Olympic TheatreArts.org. DIANE URBANI

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PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Olympic Theatre Arts presents SARAH TUCKER

Dayna Stark, aka CayAnne Pepper, is among the performers in the True Colors Cabaret at Studio Bob this Saturday night. O’Hart; local seasoned performers including River, Sarah Tucker, Tana (aka Noxious Oxalis), and actor Sean Peck-Collier. Cabaretgoers will also see faces new to Port Angeles stages, such as CayAnne Pepper (aka Dayna Stark). Tucker, for her part, plans a mock burlesque piece, while River will deliver two spoken-word performances. “And if audience members watch closely,” she added, “they may notice my alter-ego doing two acts under another stage name.” River promised too that drawings for “fun, glittery things,” as in prizes, will be held during the True Colors party. And that’s just the early part of the evening. “Immediately following the cabaret — around 10 p.m. — is the Glitter Ball

dance party, to be DJ’d by local DJ Shmeejay as well as DJ Sappho from Portland [Ore.],” said River. Admission is $10 to cover both the True Colors Cabaret and the Glitter Ball; the party will go till 1 a.m. “Festivity-goers are encouraged to dress in their most colorful gear,” River said, “and there will be a glitter station for those who want to get sparkly but don’t have their own glitter supply at home. “I’m superexcited,” she said. “This is going to be a really fun event, and I hope to see lots of people there.” For more information about the Port Angeles Pride events, email rebel_ on_stage@yahoo.com and find the Allé Stage at Studio Bob on Facebook.

By Beth Henley, Winner of the 1981 Pulitzer Prize

ADMISSION General

$16 Active Military

$14 Youth (16 & under)

$11

Fri. & Sat. 7:30

July 5, 6, 12, 13, 19 & 20 Sun. 2:00 July 7, 14 & 21 Special Discount Performances Preview: Wednesday, July 3 at 7:30 All tickets $8 • OTA Members Free Wednesday, July 10 at 7:30 Admission by Donation

OTA Member

No Reserved Seats • Tickets Available at the Door Only

$14

Reserved seating tickets available at:

Olympic Theatre Arts 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim, WA

Box Office - 360.683.7326 Online at:

www.olympictheatrearts.org For Announcements, Coupons and Giveaways

facebook.com/olympictheatrearts

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PORT ANGELES — Seattle had its Pride Parade on June 24, Victoria had Pride Week culminating in the July 7 festival, and today, the Port Angeles Pride celebration begins. There was a time when such happenings were called “gay pride” events. In 2013, it’s simply River pride — in one’s own identity and in communitywide acceptance. And so Port Angeles Pride is open to everyone: the gay and transgender community as well as allies and people who want to “have a colorful, glittery time,” said Angie Huckstep River, one of the organizers of the three-part party and a member of the Rebels on Stage performance artists. First comes a familyfriendly potluck and hangout at 6 p.m. today at the Dream Playground, across from Civic Field at Race and Third streets. Face painting, tarot readings and, of course, free play on the playground will complement the potluck. So you know what to do: “Bring a dish to share,” River said. Saturday brings the big bash: the True Colors Cabaret and dance party. Beginning at 8 p.m., burlesque, drag and spokenword artists — and then some — will leap onto the Allé Stage at Studio Bob, the event space upstairs at 118½ E. Front St. Performers will include Seattle burlesque artists Paige Rustles and Queenie

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

COMING NEXT

In the Sawtooths August 8-18

SPONSORS Produced by Special Arrangement with Dramatists Play Service Our 2012-2013 Season Presenting Sponsor


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PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

Wild ride of love PALOA to present ‘Guys and Dolls’ Much to his chagrin, he found out its licensing fees were far more costly than PENINSULA DAILY NEWS other musicals. So Stephens PORT ANGELES — and the PALOA board went Between the Save a Soul shopping for another show. Mission and the mob, Amid the sea of possibilithere’s drama aplenty in ties, “Guys and Dolls” caught “Guys and Dolls” — but Stephens’ eye. Then Frank that’s only the half of it. Loesser’s songs — “Luck Be This big show, pulsing a Lady,” “Sit Down, You’re with a 20-piece orchestra, Rocking the Boat,” “Sue Me,” wily mobsters and Hot Box “A Bushel and a Peck” — Girls, opens tonight at last. reeled him in. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m. Next thing his “Grease” at the Port Angeles High cast knew, they were in the School Performing Arts Tony Award-winning tale of Center, 304 E. Park Ave., New York City’s underworld, and this first performance a highly unlikely love story is family night, with all complete with a trip to seats at $13. Havana. “Originally, I was excited Fast and furious about ‘Grease,’” said actor Kyle Sholinder of Port And as usual with Port Angeles. But when he was Angeles Light Opera Associ- recast as Society Max, a ation musicals, it’s a fast snappily dressed dude in and furious run. After “Guys and Dolls,” he tonight are just five more decided this was pretty shows: this Saturday and darned cool after all. next Thursday and Friday, The saga, set in 1950, is July 18 and 19, at 7:30 p.m. “intensely romantic,” added and matinees this Sunday Stephens. We see the righand next Saturday, July 20, teous Sarah Brown (Carissa at 2 p.m. Bowlby) and professional But “Guys and Dolls” gambler Sky Masterson wasn’t supposed to be the (Dalton Williamson) falling PALOA’s summer producin love despite their differtion at all. ences, and we watch Nathan The plan was to bring Detroit (Danny Willis) and “Grease,” that high school Miss Adelaide (Alaynna Litmusical, to the stage July tle), still tangling after being 12-20. Director Richard Ste- engaged for 14 years. phens began casting last spring. TURN TO PALOA/11 BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

DIANE URBANI

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PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Miss Adelaide (Alaynna Little) is growing tired of waiting for Nathan Detroit (Danny Willis), her fiance of 14 years.


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into other

WORLDS Second Weekend offers different points of view right in downtown PA

“Sunny Kopoho” by Ines Epperson is one of the views awaiting visitors to the Landing Art Gallery this weekend. music by Howly Slim, appetizers by Smuggler’s Landing and Epperson’s featured paintings of Alaska, Hawaii and France. The gallery’s new manager, Jeff Tocher, also invites the public to a simultaneous reception at the Landing Artists’ Studio next door. ■ Studio Bob, upstairs at 118½ E. Front St., hosts the 13th semiannual “Bring Your Own Art” show, with a wide spectrum of creations on display. The opening party is from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m. Saturday; then the exhibition will be open from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday. Then, for the rest of July, “BYOA” will be open from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. ■ Art Up Front, the studio beside Studio Bob, will also have an artists’ reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, so visitors can enjoy conversation and a view of downtown from Art Up Front’s big window.

PRE SEASON TICKETS

$13.00 Includes all 3 days entry to the Fair, all entertainment and Sunday Beef BBQ.

A $26.00 value!

Pre-Season Tickets available at the following locations Jefferson County Fair Office Port Townsend: Bank of America, Don’s Pharmacy, Penny Saver, PT Paper, QFC, PT Senior Center, Safeway and Swain’s Tri-Area: CHS Inc, Hadlock Bldg Supply, QFC, The Big Pig Thrift Store and Chimacum Chevron

Pre-Sale Season Tickets and Single Day Tickets

360-385-1013 Available now until August 8th – 10pm at Fair Office Single Day Ticket $4.00 – Good for any day of Fair.

email: jeffcofairground@olypen.com

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Slim will bring yodeler Sandy Summers, plus a bassist known as Raindance Kid and guitarist Bill PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Wolfe on stage to play. A $3 cover PORT ANGELES — Downtown charge supports the artists who host Port Angeles’ Second Weekend art this 8 p.m. event. festivities begin with two events on ■ Harbor Art, 110 E. Railroad First Street tonight, and forge ahead Ave., hosts the Second Saturday with five more Saturday. Seconds Sale from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Here’s a cross-section of the activiThis outdoor event, replete with ties, which are free unless otherwise specially priced art, features food and noted. drink on the deck and a view of the ■ The fine art photography of waterfront and MV Coho terminal. Ernst-Ulrich Schafer is on display in A portion of Saturday’s proceeds a new show at Karon’s Frame Center, will benefit the Port Angeles Arts 625 E. Front St. Art lovers are Council. invited to an opening reception today ■ Tropical music will fill Elliott’s at 6 p.m. Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St., Refreshments and conversation as Hawaii Amor, aka Roma Peters, will flow till 8 p.m., and guests will sings and plays ukulele Saturday have a chance to win a print by Scha- afternoon. fer. The free music awaits passers-by ■ Second Friday Art Rock, aka from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 2FAR, brings together painter Katie ■ “Golden Moments and Heavenly Carlson and singer Howly Slim for a Places” is the theme of Ines Epperson’s dance party tonight at Bar N9ne, 229 show at the Landing Art Gallery inside W. First St. The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave. While Carlson puts the music, An opening party beckons from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday with more dancers and drinks on her canvas, BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ

www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

peninsuladailynews.com


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Seize the day of Mozart Maguire x 2 = 1 evening of great music

Olympic Music Festival to feature tunes of master T-shirts concerts, the musicians play inside a restored QUILCENE — Two dairy barn, while listeners members from the Carpe sit inside or outside on the Diem String Quartet, Chas lawn beneath the trees. Wetherbee and Korine The farm gate opens at Fujiwara, will join sea11 a.m. Saturday and Sunsoned Olympic Music Festi- day for those who want to val players for two “Constroll and picnic; barn certs in the Barn” this doors open at 1 p.m. weekend. This is weekend No. 3 of Along with festival the Olympic Music Festifounder Alan Iglitzin, piaval, whose concerts connist Julio Elizalde, cellist tinue each Saturday and Jennifer Culp and clarinet- Sunday till Sept. 1 with ist-pianist Teddy Abrams, guest artists from across the Carpe Diem pair will North America. offer a festival within a fesFor more information tival. It’s all about Mozart, about this weekend’s perwith works for piano, clari- formances and those still to net and string quartet in a come this summer, phone varied program. 360-732-4800 or visit www. The music will start at OlympicMusicFestival.com. 2 p.m. both Saturday and Tickets for seats inside the Sunday at the Olympic barn can be purchased online or by phone, while Music Festival farm, 7360 lawn seating tickets are Center Road, and tickets sold at the farm gate only range from $18 to $33. on concert days. In casual, jeans-andPENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Foundation director to play with two bands on Saturday BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — As executive director of the Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts, Dan Maguire presents the Juan de Fuca Festival over Memorial Day weekend and concerts year-round — but he’s often onstage, not backstage. Maguire is part of Dan & the Juan de Fuca Band and Redwing, a pair of local groups. Saturday night brings an unusual event: Maguire playing in both. He’ll appear with his bandmates at Barhop Brewing, 124 W. Railroad Ave., for a Juan de Fuca Foundation benefit show starting at 8 p.m. There’s no cover charge to listen and dance to the music, though donations to the foundation are welcome. 2013 Juan de Fuca Festival T-shirts and tickets to a prize drawing will be available for purchase too.

CYBELLE CODISH

Teddy Abrams, an Olympic Music Festival regular since 2003 when he was just 15, returns to the festival this weekend.

Class C Cl lass as ss s of of 1973 1973 73 40 Year Reunion Friday August 2nd

Maguire originals

Saturday Aug 3rd at Seven Cedars Casino 6pm

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Both shows are open to the public.

Class members asked to RSVP at www.paclassof73.com Or call 602-361-9834

my living room,” quipped Maguire. Redwing, meanwhile, has more of a folk sound, with the players trading lead singing and lead licks. Maguire and Doug Parent play guitar alongside Jenny James on fiddle, while Neurath reappears to add his bass lines.

Traditional folk

at Red Lion Port Angeles 7pm

Fri Aug 2nd Art Show at 5 pm and Variety Show at 6pm in the Port Angeles High School auditorium.

Dan Maguire On stage Saturday night

Dan & the Juan de Fuca Band almost exclusively performs songs composed by Maguire over the past two years. While he sings and plays rhythm guitar, Clark Driese is the electric lead guitar man, Zorina Wolf supplies the percussion and Eric Neurath plays bass. “It’s great to finally have an opportunity to play these songs beyond

Many Redwing tunes are traditional folk fare, though Parent includes some of his originals in the set. For more information about the Barhop show, the Juan de Fuca Foundation or its season of concerts — to start with the ScotsIrish duo Men of Worth at the Peninsula College Little Theater on July 27 — phone 360-457-5411 or visit www.jffa.org.


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PS

Nightlife

Clallam County Port Angeles Barhop Brewery (124 W. Railroad Ave.) — The Hayshakers (blues/country), tonight, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Dan and the Juan de Fuca Band (rock/folk), Saturday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Bar N9ne (229 W. First St.) — 2nd Friday Art Event with Howly Slim and band, tonight, 8 p.m., $3; Karaoke, Sunday, 8 p.m.; Karaoke, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; open mic, Thursday, 9 p.m. Café New Day (102 W. Front St.) — John Manno (harp), Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Clark Driese and Eric Prust (jazz), Sunday, 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Castaways Night Club (1213 Marine Drive) — Jerry’s Country Jam, Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. C’est Si Bon (23 Cedar Park Road) — dinner show with Sarah Shea (jazz/standards), Sunday, 7 p.m. Dupuis Restaurant (256861 U.S. Highway 101) — Bob and Dave (blues), tonight and Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Elliott’s Antique Emporium (135 E. First St.) — Hawaii Amor (Hawaiian music and love songs solo on ukulele), Saturday, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fairmount Restaurant (1127 W. U.S. Highway 101) — Dave and Rosalie Secord’s Luck of the Draw Band, tonight, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; country jam and open mic, Sunday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Junction Roadhouse (U.S. Highway 101 and state Highway 112, junction) — Blu Meadows, tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight, $5; Junkyard Duo, Saturday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., cover; Joy in Mudville (roots),

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Wednesday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Chesnut Junction, Thursday, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Jefferson County Port Hadlock

Ajax Cafe (271 Water St.) The Loom / Studio Bob — Trevor Hanson (classical (118½ E. Front St.) — Chesnut Junction (rock, folk and guitar), Friday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. blues), tonight, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Port Angeles Senior Center (328 E. Seventh St.) — Wally’s Boys (ballroom dance favorites), Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., $5, first-timers free. R Bar (132 E. Front St) — Karaoke, Thursday, 8 p.m.

Sequim and Blyn The Cedars at Dungeness Stymie’s Bar and Grill (1965 Woodcock Road) — Locos Only (roots music), tonight, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Black Bear Diner (1471 E. Washington St.) —Gil Islas (world), Saturday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Krush (10181 Old Olympic Highway) — Sarah Shea (jazz), Saturday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oasis Sports Bar and Grill (301 E. Washington St.) — Dukes of Dabob (Dixieland jazz), tonight, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Olympic Express Big Band, Saturday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Richie Blue, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sequim Senior Activity Center (921 E. Hammond St.) — Victor’s All the Buzz open mic, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. (sign up 6 p.m.) 7 Cedars Casino (270756 U.S. Highway 101) — Funnadicts (rock/pop covers), tonight, 8 p.m. to midnight; Cris Switzer, in the Rainforest Bar tonight and Saturday, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Hell’s Belles (AC/DC tribute), Sunday, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wind Rose Cellars (143 W. Washington St.) — Chuck Easton and George Radebaugh (jazz), tonight, 6:30 p.m. to midnight; Bill Volmut (singer-songwriter), Saturday, 6:30 p.m. to midnight; Cort Armstrong and guests (country blues), Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Port Ludlow The Resort at Port Ludlow (1 Heron Road) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Saturday, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Trevor Hanson, Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Port Townsend Alchemy (842 Washington St.) — Trevor Hanson (classical guitar), Monday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Boiler Room (711 Water St.) — Open mic Thursday, sign up 7 p.m., starts at 8, an all ages venue. Northwest Maritime Center Cafe (421 Water St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, noon to 2 p.m. The Owl Sprit (218 Polk St.) — Steve Grandinetti (solo guitar), Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Port Townsend Brewing Co. (330 10th St.) — T.S. Fisher and the Smoothe Operators (blues), tonight, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Gerald Braude (solo guitar), Sunday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Dirty Beat Duo (drum ‘n’ bass), Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sirens (823 Water St.) — Rose’s Pawn Shop, (roots), Friday, 10 p.m., $10 cover; fiddler jam session, Tuesday, 7 p.m.; open mic, Wednesday, 9 p.m.; karaoke, Thursday, 9 p.m. Uptown Pub (1016 Lawrence St.) — Open mic hosted by Meredith, Tuesday, 8 p.m. This listing, which appears each Friday, announces live entertainment at nightspots in Clallam and Jefferson counties. Email live music information, with location, time and cover charge (if any) by noon on Tuesday to news@ peninsuladailynews.com, submit to the PDN online calendar at peninsuladailynews.com, phone 360-417-3527, or fax to 360-4173521.


PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

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PS At the Movies: Week of July 12-18 Port Angeles “Despicable Me 2” (PG — Animated) — Gru is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal in this sequel to the 2010 animated hit. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5 p.m., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “Grown Ups 2” (PG-13) — Lenny (Adam Sandler) has relocated his family back to the small town where he and his friends grew up. This time around, the grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their kids on a day notoriously full of surprises. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m., 7:15 p.m. and 9:20 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 12:45 p.m. and 2:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “The Heat (R) — Uptight FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) and foul-mouthed Boston cop Shannon Mullins (Melissa McCarthy) couldn’t be more incompatible. But when they join forces to bring down a ruthless drug lord, they become the last thing anyone expected — buddies. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 12:30 p.m. and 2:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. “The Lone Ranger (PG-13) — Native American spirit warrior Tonto

Where to find the cinemas ■ Deer Park Cinema: East Highway 101 at Deer Park Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-7176. ■ Lincoln Theater: 132 E. First St., Port Angeles; 360-457-7997. ■ The Rose Theatre: 235 Taylor St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1089. ■ Uptown Theatre: Lawrence and Polk streets, Port Townsend; 360-385-3883. ■ Wheel-In-Motor Drive In: 210 Theatre Road, Discovery Bay; 360-385-0859.

(Johnny Depp) recounts the untold tales that transformed John Reid (Armie Hammer), a man of the law, into a legend of justice, taking the audience on a runaway train of epic surprises and humorous friction as the two unlikely heroes must learn to work together and fight against greed and corruption. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. today through Sunday, plus 5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday. “Man of Steel” (PG-13) — In the newest reboot of the Superman franchise, a young journalist is forced to confront his secret extraterrestrial heritage when Earth is invaded by members of his race. At Lincoln

Theater. Showtimes 7 p.m. daily through Tuesday. “Monsters University” (G — Animated) — Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasn’t always the case. When these two mismatched monsters met, they couldn’t stand each other. The prequel to “Monsters, Inc.” unlocks the door to how Mike and Sully overcame their differences and became the best of friends. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:45 p.m. and 9:05 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 4:30 p.m. today through Sunday. “Pacific Rim” (PG-13) — As a war between humankind and monstrous sea creatures wages on, a former

pilot and a trainee are paired up to drive a seemingly obsolete special weapon in a desperate effort to save the world. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 6:50 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 4:15 p.m. today through Sunday. “White House Down” (PG-13) — While on a tour of the White House with his young daughter, a Capitol policeman (Channing Tatum) springs into action to save his child and protect the president (Jamie Foxx) from a heavily armed group of paramilitary invaders. At Lincoln Theater. Showtimes 9:45 p.m. daily through Tuesday, plus 4:20 p.m. today through Sunday. “World War Z” (PG-13) — United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) traverses the world in a race against time to stop a zombie pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatening to decimate humanity itself. At Deer Park Cinema. Showtimes 5:05 p.m., 7:25 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. daily, plus 12:30 p.m. and 2:45 p.m. today through Sunday.

Port Townsend “Despicable Me 2” (PG) — See synopsis in Port Angeles listings. At the Uptown Theatre. Showtimes 5 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today; 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 7:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday.

“The Heat” (R) — See synopsis in Port Angeles listings. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4:20 p.m. and 7:20 p.m. daily, plus 1:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. “World War Z” (PG-13) — See synopsis in Port Angeles listings. At Rose Theatre. Showtimes 4 p.m. (2D) and 7 p.m. (3D) today and Monday through Thursday, plus 2:15 p.m. (3D), 5 p.m. (2D), and 7:40 p.m. (3D) on Saturday and Sunday. “Now You See Me” (PG-13) — An elite FBI squad is matched in a game of cat and mouse against “The Four Horsemen,” a super-team of the world’s greatest illusionists, who pull off a series of daring heists against corrupt business leaders during their performances, showering the stolen profits on their audiences while staying one step ahead of the law. “This Is The End” (R) — Six celebrity friends are trapped in James Franco’s house after a series of strange and catastrophic events devastate Los Angeles. As the world unravels outside, dwindling supplies and cabin fever threaten to tear apart the friendships inside. Eventually, they are forced to leave the house, facing their fate and the true meaning of friendship and redemption At the Wheel-In Motor Movie. Box office opens at 8 p.m. today through Sunday with showtime at dusk.

PALOA: A ‘battle of the sexes’ CONTINUED FROM A1 she has some new experiences. “Guys and Dolls” is Detroit, as theater lovabout “the battle of the ers know, runs “the oldest, sexes,” Stephens said. “Peoestablished, permanent, floating crap game in New ple will see themselves in York” while his long-suffer- one of these couples.” ing fiancee, the star singer at the Hot Box Club, has Fresh & familiar about had it with waiting The production has for him to set a date. brought some fresh faces to Sarah, meanwhile, is the Port Angeles stage, Stedetermined to rid New phens noted. The gangsters York’s streets of sin. Gamand Hot Box girls — burbling is a big one, so you lesque dancers in short wouldn’t think she would participate in a bet involv- gold getups — are a flock of young actors. At the ing Masterson. same time, Don Scott and But since this is a wild Stephens himself, who ride of a love story, she plays the mobster Big does. Swept off to Cuba with this cool high roller, Jules, are theater veterans.

Back in 1994 when PALOA first did “Guys and Dolls,” Scott portrayed Detroit. This time he’s Sarah’s grandfather Arvide Abernathy, while his reallife grandson Daylin Scott plays gambler Benny Southwest.

director Stephanie Clark and choreographer Anna Unger have their players, singers and dancers in sharp shape. “They’re like chained up horses,” said Stephens, “just bursting to get out and show what they can do.” Tickets to “Guys and Rose to challenge Dolls” are $21 for section A This cast, Stephens said, and $17 for section B at has “had to work so much Northwest Fudge & Conharder with all of the fections, 108 W. First St., changes and drama leading Port Angeles, and at the up to doing this show . . . Sequim Gym, 145 E. Washyet they have risen to the ington St. in Sequim. challenge,” even embraced Reservations can also be it. made with a $2 credit-card He added that orchestra processing fee at www. conductor James Ray, vocal PALOA.org.

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Arvide Abernathy (Don Scott), center, confers with Sky Masterson (Dalton Williamson) about the fate of the Save a Soul Mission while Arvide’s granddaughter Sarah (Carissa Bowlby) listens. The three are part of the story of “Guys and Dolls,” opening tonight at the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 12, 2013

PENINSULA SPOTLIGHT

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