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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS October 7, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Chinook returning to Elwha

Elwha River almost fully free

Strong season aided by removal of dams BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (3)

Three images from an Olympic National Park webcam trained on Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River show how the concrete dam looked originally in September 2011, upper left, how the 60-foot stub of the dam looked when crews placed explosives Saturday afternoon, lower left, and what remained Sunday morning, right photo, after the nighttime detonation. Story, Page A5

Adults, redds counted

A gold medalist four times over Dancer receives Seattle accolades BY DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Carol Hathaway Starts teaching Tuesday

SEQUIM — A decade ago, Carol Hathaway liked to go out swing dancing. One night, she saw Derek and Pamela Perkins float across the floor.

“Oh. I want to dance like that,” she remembers thinking. Hathaway, psychiatric nurse practitioner in Port Angeles by day and ballroom dancer by night, recently won four gold medals from the U.S. Terpsichore Association: in waltz, foxtrot, quick-step and tango. To earn these, she danced for 30 minutes before examiner Monique Hrouda of DanceSport

in Seattle, then took an oral test of dance terminology and analysis. “It was nerve-wracking,” Hathaway said last week. This week, she’s ready to teach waltz classes at the venue where Derek and Pamela taught for years: the Sequim Prairie Grange Hall, 290 Macleay Road. TURN

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — The 2013 fall chinook spawning season was one of the strongest since 1992, and the king salmon are moving into more new habitat in the Elwha River, according to fish biologists. “It is truly exciting to see the chinook finding their way into clear water tributaries and reaching the base of Glines Canyon Dam. This is what we have always known was coming,” Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum said during the run, which ended recently. On Sept. 17, a team of biologists from the Olympic National Park, Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, U.S. Geological Survey, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, and NOAA Fisheries surveyed more than 13 miles of the Elwha River and major tributaries.

They counted all the living and dead adult chinook and mapped the redds left behind by the spawning fish. Biologists walked and snorkeled the river from just below what remains of Glines Canyon Dam to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, as well as the lower portions of three of the river’s tributaries: Indian Creek, Hughes Creek, and Little River, said Rainey McKenna, park spokeswoman, early last week. During the one-day survey, the biologists counted 1,741 adult chinook and mapped 763 redds between the remnant of Glines Canyon Dam and the river mouth. Visual counts from the survey, added to the 1,797 adult chinook collected by Fish and Wildlife to meet stock preservation goals, brought the total number of observed adult chinook in the Elwha River to 3,528, McKenna said.

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The Shutdown: Day 7

Inslee: State feels impacts

BLESS YOU, LUCY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Rev. Gail Wheatley, left, of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church of Port Angeles blesses Lucy the goose, held by Alice Alexander of Joyce, at Sunday’s Blessing of the Animals, in celebration of the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals. More than 30 people attended the blessing at The Gateway downtown, where Wheatley blessed about 30 dogs, several cats, a rabbit — and Lucy the goose.

SEATTLE — Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that the impacts from a partial federal government shutdown are already being felt across the state. Inslee, a Democrat ALSO . . . and former congressman, ■ Sides look squarely blamed House to push Republicans and told shutdown reporters at a news contoward debt ference Sunday that the limit/A3 problems could be easily fixed if House Speaker John Boehner would bring a clean temporary spending bill up for a vote without conditions. “We cannot allow this inexplicable hatred of giving people health insurance to lead us into economic crisis,” Inslee said. “That’s where we’re headed.” Inslee said he is worried that the shutdown is slowing the state’s aerospace industry, hurting veterans’ programs and affecting services such as unemployment payments that depend on federal money.

BATHING BEAUTIES

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

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Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

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www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Berry, hubby welcome baby boy IT’S A BOY for Halle Berry and Olivier Martinez. A representative for the 47-year-old actress confirmed that the couple welcomed Berry their son Saturday. Publicist Meredith O’Sullivan Wasson offered no other details. E! News Martinez reported Berry delivered the baby at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. This is the second child for Berry.

She has a 5-year-old daughter, Nahla, with her ex-boyfriend, Gabriel Aubry. The two settled their custody battle in 2012. This is the first child for Martinez. The French actor and Berry married in July. Next up for the “Monster’s Ball” star is “Extant,” a 13-episode drama in which she plays an astronaut who comes back to Earth after a year alone in space. The show, to air next summer, is produced by Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Television and CBS Television Studios.

Benefit concert Neil Young will perform at a benefit for the Silverlake Conservatory of Music that Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea and Anthony Kiedis will host. The organization announced Friday that the event will take place Oct. 30 in Silverlake, Calif. Red Hot Chili Peppers also will perform. Flea founded the Silver-

lake Conservatory of Music in 2001. It facilitates music education and offers music lessons and Young scholarships. The RHCP bassist said he’s “grateful” for all the help given to the orgaFlea nization. He adds that Young performing “is the greatest blessing.” A silent auction will feature Kiedis donations from Marc Jacobs, Tony Hawk, Pearl Jam, Gucci and others, and artwork donated by Gus Van Sant, Shepard Fairey and Justin Bua.

SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S PUZZLE

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: What effect do you think the federal shutdown will end up having on the tea party movement?

Passings By The Associated Press

HERMAN WALLACE, 71, who spent more than four decades in solitary confinement in Louisiana died Friday, less than a week after a judge freed him and granted him a new trial. Mr. Wallace’s attorneys said he died at a supporter’s home in New Orleans. Mr. Wal- Mr. Wallace in 2008 lace had been diagnosed with terminal liver cancer and stopped receiving treatment. Mr. Wallace was held for years at the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. In 2009, he was moved from Angola to “closed-cell restriction” at Hunt Correctional in St. Gabriel, where he recently was taken to the prison’s hospital unit. Jackie Sumell, a longtime supporter of Mr. Wallace, said he was surrounded by friends and family when he died. He at one point told them, “I love you all,” according to Sumell. U.S. District Judge Brian Jackson in Baton Rouge had ordered Mr. Wallace released from prison Tuesday after granting him a new trial. Jackson ruled women were unconstitutionally excluded from the grand jury that indicted Mr. Wallace in the stabbing death of the 23-year-old guard, Brent Miller. A West Feliciana Parish grand jury re-indicted Mr. Wallace on charges connected to Miller’s death Thursday. Mr. Wallace and two

Preserve it other inmates held in solitary confinement for years came to be known as the “Angola 3.” He was serving a 50-year armed robbery sentence when Miller was stabbed to death. Mr. Wallace and fellow “Angola 3” member Albert Woodfox denied involvement in Miller’s killing, claiming they were targeted because they helped establish a prison chapter of the Black Panther Party at the Angola prison in 1971.

________ CARLO LIZZANI, 91, a much-lauded filmmaker of Italian Neorealism, has died, Italian state news media reported Saturday. The state RAI news agency and the ANSA news agency said Mr. Lizzani died after a fall from the Mr. Lizzani third-floor in 2007 balcony of his home in Rome and that authorities were investigating whether it was a suicide. Mr. Lizzani started out as a film critic, then as a writer, getting writing cred-

4.6%

its for Roberto Rossellini’s Help it 20.9% 1948 “Germany Year Zero” Have no effect 21.7% and as the screenwriter for Giuseppe De Santis’ 1950 Damage it 29.7% film “Bitter Rice,” which earned him an Oscar nomiDestroy it 16.2% nation. Undecided 6.8% The Academy of Italian Cinema awarded him best Total votes cast: 1,461 director for his 1968 film Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com “The Violent Four” about a NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those manhunt for bank robbers, peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be and best screenwriter for assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole. the 1996 film “Celluloide” about the making of Rossellini’s masterpiece “Rome, Setting it Straight citta’ aperta.” Corrections and clarifications He directed the Venice Film Festival from 1979The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fair1982 and was a member of ness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to the jury of the Berlin Film clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com. Festival in 1994.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago)

From an advertisement by Montgomery Ward department store, 113-115 W. First St., Port Angeles: ■ You’d expect to pay $50 for this world-range, 7-tube floor radio. Licensed by RCA; full-vision dial. Gets Europe! $34.95; $5 a month, down payment, carrying charge. ■ An ideal extra radio! 5-tube AC-DC, 5-inch super-dynamic speaker, plastic cabinet, lighted dial. Seen Around $9.95. Peninsula snapshots ■ All-white washer with famous Lovell wringer. ABOUT FOUR 20-gallon porcelain-finished DOZEN eggs sitting in a tub. Moving parts never cardboard holder on the need oil. $67.95. rear-window shelf of a car ■ Coal or wood range, traveling on First Street in strong steel body. MamPort Angeles . . . moth 12-loaf oven is porceWANTED! “Seen Around” lain-lined! Rust-resisting items. Send them to PDN News cooktop, insulated oven Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles door, burns 22½-inch wood. WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or $69.95; $6 monthly plus email news@peninsuladailynews. carrying charge. com.

1963 (50 years ago)

1988 (25 years ago)

Sekiu’s fishing season for this year is drawing to a close, and the resorts have taken up many of their boats. After a fine season over the summer, the fishing has slowed a great deal, and fewer visitors are coming to try their luck, resort owners report. C.Q. Resort, including C.Q. Cafe, has closed for the winter, but White Cove Resort and Restaurant will continue to be open for a time. Elsie King was in town over the weekend to close Sekiu Grocery for the winter. She returned Sunday to Ellensburg, where she teaches. Don Kerstetter of Renton, who clerked at the store up until the seasonal closure, has returned home as well.

After twice delaying a decision, the Sequim School District board wasted no time to end spanking as a form of student discipline. Directors chose to eliminate corporal punishment instead of an alternative proposal that would have allowed spanking with parental permission. The action was met with a round of applause by the audience at last night’s School Board meeting.

Laugh Lines ACCORDING TO A new report, over the last three years, Social Security overpaid recipients by $1.29 billion — thus establishing itself as the federal government’s most efficient program. Jay Leno

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Oct. 7, the 280th day of 2012. There are 85 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Oct. 7, 1929, former Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall, one of the main figures of the Teapot Dome scandal, went on trial in Washington, D.C., charged with accepting a bribe from oil tycoon Edward L. Doheny. Fall was found guilty and sentenced to a year in prison and fined $100,000; he ended up serving nine months. On this date: ■ In 1777, the second Battle of Saratoga began during the American Revolution. British forces under Gen. John Burgoyne surrendered 10 days later.

■ In 1849, author Edgar Allan Poe died in Baltimore at age 40. ■ In 1858, the fifth debate between Illinois senatorial candidates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in Galesburg. ■ In 1910, a major wildfire devastated the northern Minnesota towns of Spooner and Baudette, charring at least 300,000 acres. Some 40 people are believed to have died. ■ In 1982, the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical “Cats” opened on Broadway. The show closed Sept. 10, 2000, after a record 7,485 performances. ■ In 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro in the Mediterranean.

■ In 1991, University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill publicly accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriate comments when she worked for him; Thomas denied Hill’s allegations. ■ In 1992, trade representatives of the United States, Canada and Mexico initialed the North American Free Trade Agreement during a ceremony in San Antonio. ■ In 2001, the current war in Afghanistan started as the United States and Britain launched air attacks against military targets and Osama bin Laden’s training camps after the Sept. 11 attacks. ■ Ten years ago: California voters recalled Gov. Gray Davis

and elected Arnold Schwarzenegger their new governor. American scientists Alexei Abrikosov and Anthony Leggett and Russian Vitaly Ginzburg won the Nobel Prize in physics for their work in how matter can behave at extremely low temperatures. ■ Five years ago: Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa of Japan and Yoichiro Nambu of the United States won the Nobel Prize in physics. ■ One year ago: Venezuela’s National Electoral Council announced that President Hugo Chavez had won re-election for the third time. Chavez died in March at 58 after a two-year cancer battle.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 7, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Black Hills region digs out of sloppy mess RAPID CITY, S.D. — Residents in the Black Hills were navigating through a sloppy mess Sunday after warmer temperatures began melting recordsetting snowfall, leaving standing water on plowed roads rather than making its way through drainage systems. Law enforcement officials shifted their focus to recovery after having caught up with a backlog of emergency calls from the weekend storm that dumped 4 feet of snow near Deadwood and 3.5 feet near Lead. No fatalities were reported as a result of the bad weather. An estimated 5,000 people were still without power, down from more than 25,000 in the area Saturday.

until the Coast Guard reopened the mouth of the Mississippi River about 12:15 a.m. Sunday. “Our top priority was to keep a safe distance from the storm while we waited for the river to reopen,” said cruise line president and CEO Gerry Cahill. Elation had 2,447, passengers, and Conquest had 3,274.

High court to open

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court is beginning a new term today with controversial issues that offer the court’s conservative majority the chance to move aggressively to undo limits on campaign contributions, undermine claims of discrimination in housing and mortgage lending, and allow for more government-sanctioned prayer. Assuming the government shutdown doesn’t get in their way, the justices also will deal with a case that goes to the heart of the partisan impasse in Washington: whether and when Cruise ships early the president can use recess NEW ORLEANS — Two appointments to fill key posiCarnival Cruise Line ships tions without Senate confirmadelayed by former Tropical tion. Storm Karen were due in New The new term may be short Orleans within a half-hour of on the sort of high-profile bateach other Sunday, a day earlier tles over health care and gay than previously expected. marriage that marked the past The storm, which dissipated two years. But several cases ask Sunday, delayed arrival by a day the court to overrule prior decifor the Carnival Elation and sions — bold action in an instiless than half a day for the Car- tution that relies on the power nival Conquest, which had to of precedent. The Associated Press remain in the Gulf of Mexico

The Shutdown: Day 7

Boehner: No debt hike without yield by Obama Treasury’s Lew warns of Oct. 17 monetary crisis THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The United States moved closer to the possibility of the first-ever default on the government’s debt Sunday as Speaker John Boehner adamantly ruled out a House vote on a straightforward bill to boost the borrowing authority without concessions from President Barack Obama. With no resolution in sight, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew warned that Congress is “playing with fire” as he called on lawmakers to quickly pass legislation reopening the government and a measure increasing the nation’s $16.7 trillion debt limit. The government shutdown precipitated by the budget brinkmanship was heading toward its

seventh day today with hundreds of thousands of f e d e r a l employees furloughed, national parks closed and an array of government ser- Boehner vices on hold. Lew said Obama has not changed his opposition to coupling a bill to reopen the government and raise the borrowing authority with Republican demands for changes in the 3-year-old health care law and spending cuts. Boehner insisted that Obama must negotiate if the president wants to end the shutdown and avert a default that could trigger a financial crisis and recession that would echo the events of 2008 or worse. The 2008 financial crisis pushed the country into the worst recession since the Great Depres-

sion of the 1930s. “We’re not going to pass a clean debt limit increase,” the Ohio Republican said in a television interview. “I told the president, there’s no way we’re going to pass one. The votes are not in the House to pass a clean debt limit, and the president is risking default by not having a conversation with us.” In a series of Sunday television appearances, Lew warned that on Oct. 17, when he exhausts the bookkeeping maneuvers he has been using to keep borrowing, the threat of default would be imminent. “I’m telling you that on the 17th, we run out of the ability to borrow, and Congress is playing with fire,” Lew said. Lew said that while Treasury expects to have $30 billion of cash on hand Oct. 17, that money will be quickly exhausted in paying incoming bills given that the government’s payments can run up to $60 billion on a single day.

Briefly: World cally risky. The president’s spokesman Alfredo Scoccimarro did not say during his CHIHUAHUA, Mexico — An televised Satout-of-control monster truck shot urday into a crowd of spectators at a announcement Fernandez Mexican air show, killing at least eight people and hurting 80 oth- about Fernandez’s medical condition whether ers, dozens of them seriously. The driver was detained Sun- she will continue managing the day on suspicion of manslaughter. country from the presidential residence or take medical leave Carlos Gonzalez, spokesman for the Chihuahua state prosecu- and hand the government over tors’ office, said driver Francisco to Vice President Amado BouVelazquez appeared to have lost dou. In his announcement, Scoccicontrol of the truck after leaping over cars it was crushing during marro said the president had a demonstration at the Extreme suffered a previously undisclosed “skull trauma” Aug. 12, Aeroshow on Saturday. one day after the primaries. He Video taken by a spectator did not release any details about shows the truck making an inithe injury. tial pass over two cars, then making a second pass at higher 51 die in clashes speed, coming down sharply nose-first and bouncing violently CAIRO — Egypt’s Health before piling straight into the Ministry said 51 people have crowd, which stood directly in been killed in clashes between the path of the monster truck, security forces and supporters of unprotected by any wall or barthe ousted Islamist president. rier. Street battles raged for hours in Cairo, as demonstrators fired President must rest birdshot and threw firebombs at police who responded with gunBUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Cristina Fernandez’s govern- shots and tear gas. In some cases, pro-military ment was moving into crowds set upon supporters of uncharted political territory the former president, MohamSunday after doctors ordered the Argentine president to take med Morsi, with the two sides pelting each other with rocks. a month’s rest upon finding By late evening, several parts blood on her brain from a head of the city resembled combat injury. zones, with fires burning, black While the prescription may smoke rising and the crack of be good medicine, experts said removing such an important fig- gunfire piercing the air, thick ure from the campaign trail just with tear gas. Streets were strewn with debris. three weeks before congressioThe Associated Press nal elections could prove politi-

Monster truck wreck kills 8, hurts dozens

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEA

OF SHEEP

A waitress watches from a restaurant as sheep are led through the center of Madrid on Sunday. Spanish shepherds exercised their centuries-old defense of ancient grazing, migration and driving rights threatened by urban sprawl to drive their herds along the boulevards of the capital.

Libya demands explanation for U.S. raid inside its capital THE NEW YORK TIMES

TRIPOLI, Libya — A day after American commandos carried out raids in two African countries aimed at capturing fugitive terrorist suspects, Libya’s interim government Sunday demanded an explanation from the U.S. for what it called the “kidnapping” of a Libyan suspect. In the capital of Tripoli, Libyan civilians and political officials reacted with surprise and confusion. On Saturday, American troops

Quick Read

assisted by FBI and CIA agents seized Nazih Abdul-Hamed alRuqai, known by his nom de guerre, Abu Anas al-Liby, a suspected leader of al-Qaida, on the streets of Tripoli. At around the same time, a Navy SEAL team raided the seaside villa of a militant leader in a predawn firefight on the coast of Somalia. Abu Anas was indicted in 2000 for his role in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania and had a $5 million bounty on his head.

Libyan officials and members of Parliament said they could not comment on the raid because they did not know all the facts. Other Libyans said they were angered that the raid had caught their government by surprise and that foreign troops were conducting military operations in their country. Describing Abu Anas as “one of the world’s most wanted terrorists,” Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced that he was “was captured and is now in U.S. custody.”

. . . more news to start your day

West: 1 dead, 12 injured at motorcycle club’s dance

West: Ferry architecture firm expands to Alaska

Nation: ‘Gravity’ floats to top of box office list

World: Gunmen in Yemen kill envoy from Germany

A FRESNO, CALIF., motorcycle club’s annual dance, which draws bikers from all over the state, turned into a chaotic gunbattle that spilled into the streets, leaving one dead and 12 others wounded, authorities said. The Fresno County coroner on Sunday identified the fatality as 18-year-old Dejuan Gladney. The coroner didn’t list a hometown. The Fresno County Sheriff’s Department said shots were still being fired when the first of more than 100 officers and deputies arrived early Saturday. Sheriff’s spokesman Chris Curtice said about 500 people were at the dance inside the clubhouse.

A SEATTLE-BASED NAVAL architecture and marine engineering firm with a long involvement with Alaska ferries has opened an office in Ketchikan. “This move enables us to better serve our Alaska clients and to establish new relationships and deepen existing ones,” said Brian King, Elliott Bay Design Group’s vice president of engineering. Elliott Bay designed the Inter-Island Ferry Authority ferry Prince of Wales and currently is involved with the Alaska Marine Highway System’s design process for the new Alaska Class Ferry Day Boat project.

THE SANDRA BULLOCK-George Clooney space drama “Gravity” rocketed to the top of the box office and into industry record books during its opening weekend. The Warner Bros. adventure debuted with $55.55 million in North American ticket sales, according to studio estimates Sunday — the biggest October opening ever. The film also dominated the international box office, adding $27.4 million more overseas. Last week’s top movie, Sony’s “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” rolled into second place with $21.5 million. “Runner Runner” opened in third place with $7.6 million.

UNKNOWN GUNMEN KILLED a German embassy guard Sunday in an attack on a diplomatic vehicle in the Yemeni capital, a security official said. The two gunmen tried to kidnap the German citizen as he left a supermarket in Sanaa, killing him when he resisted before fleeing in a car, the official added. In a separate incident, armed tribesmen abducted a UNICEF employee in a northwestern suburb of Sanaa, other security officials said. They said the employee for the U.N. agency, a Sierra Leone national, was in his car with a Yemeni driver when they came under attack.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013 — (C)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Fish: 75% of ’13

PT cinema reopens doors run seen above to movie-goers, film fans Elwha Dam site

Uptown’s digital projector installed; remodel on hold

CONTINUED FROM A1 Since 1986, the average annual run size for Elwha chinook has been 2,777 adults. Sequim-based documentary filmmaker John Gussman filmed many of the fish returning in September, and has released videos of the big fish swimming upstream in the Elwha and several tributaries. The short film, titled “Going Home,” can be seen at www.vimeo. com/75830580. Gussman produced the film “Return of the River,” documenting the rise and fall of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams, and the return of the salmon to middle reaches of the Elwha River. “Return of the River” is available for viewing at www.elwhafilm.com.

Moving upstream Out of the total number counted in 2013, approximately 75 percent — 1,287 of the adult chinook and 592 of the redds — were observed upstream of the former Elwha Dam site, according to the fish count. The total count included adult chinook and redds observed in Indian Creek and Little River, which were recolonized by the salmon in 2012. Biologists also found redds and salmon in Hughes Creek, which did not have any last year, McKenna said. With the return of the rain, sediment flows have returned, turning the late summer’s clear water brown with particulates from the former lakes Mills and Aldwell. The resumption of the demolition of Glines Canyon Dam is expected to loosen additional sediment. “We are grateful for our partnerships with the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that are providing human created refuges in their hatchery facilities. With hatcheries providing a refuge during peak sediment flows, we can preserve native fish populations during this critical phase of the restoration process,” Creachbaum said. The Elwha River was historically one of the most productive salmon streams in the Pacific Northwest, home to all five species of Pacific salmon. Once dam removal is complete, fish biologists believe the Elwha River salmon and steelhead populations could grow to nearly 400,000 returning adult

BY CHARLIE BERMANT

Park is on top 10 list

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Uptown Theatre, which closed soon after the Port Townsend Film Festival ended Sept. 22, was scheduled to remain shuttered for six weeks and reopen as a fully renovated venue but the owner has changed his strategy. The theater at 1120 Lawrence St. is open this month. “The original idea was to do the digital conversion and the renovation all at the same time, but we would have been dark for six-to-eight weeks,” said Rick Wiley, who owns both the Uptown and the North Olympic Peninsula’s only drive-in theater, the WheelIn Motor Movie, which is at 210 Theatre Road just south of the junction of state Highways 19 and 20. “You can’t be closed for that long because you lose your continuity,” Wiley said. Instead, he plans to close later for renovation, with a target reopening date of Thanksgiving, according to his website, ptuptowntheatre.com. Wiley installed the new digital projector prior to the beginning of the Port Townsend Film Festival and was closed for the following week before reopening with “Prisoner” on Thursday. It will be followed this week by “Rush,” a movie about auto racing from director Ron Howard. Aside from the digital upgrade — which is

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK is on Fodor’s list of top 10 national parks to visit this fall. “Fall colors are scarce at Olympic National Park, with only occasional splashes from maple trees among the evergreen trees,” the wellknown travel website said. “But there’s an even bigger draw in autumn — salmon spawning season, when you can watch coho salmon leap up the Quillayute and Sol Duc rivers.” It recommends salmon viewers head to the Salmon Cascades in the Sol Duc River in October or taking the Hoh Visitor Center nature trail leading to a small tributary of the Hoh River in November. Also on the list were Mount Rainier National Park, Acadia National Park, Crater Lake National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Lassen Volcanic National Park, Redwood National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Yosemite National Park. You can find out what Fodor’s had to say about each park at fodors.com. Peninsula Daily News

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Uptown Theatre owner Rick Wiley operates the newly installed digital projector Friday. Wiley planned to close during the month of October but changed his mind last week. required for the theater to continue to show new movies — the space will get all new floors, carpets and seats along with a redesign that will turn the balcony into a VIP space. The redesign will reduce the current seating of 330 to about 260, Wiley said, but he expects the number of patrons to increase because the experience is more attractive.

Kickstarter campaign Wiley, whose family has owned and operated the two theaters for 66 years, has opened a Kickstarter

CONTINUED FROM A1 Derek Perkins said. It must not have shown. Starting Tuesday, she and assistants Jeff Stauffer ‘Lovely poise’ and Don Schwendeman will Hathaway “has lovely teach two kinds of waltz classes: American style at 7 poise,” said Hrouda, who p.m. and international style has been traveling the West as a USTA examiner for at 8 p.m. Students pay $7 per ses- seven years. In medals testing, sion or $12 for both. The Hrouda scores dancers on series will continue each timing, footwork, sway, Tuesday through Nov. 5. American-style waltz is alignment and partnering, relatively quick and easy, and then questions them on “which people love,” Hatha- their knowledge of steps. To be experts, dancers way said. The international style is more like fine din- must be able to not only demonstrate but also ing. The hall is no ballroom, describe their moves. For the gold, a perfect but it works just fine for those who have learned score is 100; Hathaway’s how to move from the Per- marks were in the 90s, ________ kins pair, who are American Hrouda added. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be ballroom-dance champions In completing the tests reached at 360-452-2345, ext. in the 1980s. professional dancers take, 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula There’s a kind of sym- “she knew her material dailynews.com. metry to Hathaway’s prog- very well.” Hathaway said that ever ress. When she went to take her medals tests in Seattle since she began studying, on Sept. 20, her teacher her desire was strong for Derek Perkins was her the kind of expertise the gold medals signify. But the dance partner. Setting the standard for excellence in skin care joy of moving to music is “She was nervous; I in Port Angeles for 13 years! think I was more nervous,” most important.

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anybody, she said. “You just jump in there. And you keep learning new things. You build on them, and before you know it, there you are,” dancing. “The main thing is having fun along the way.” Hathaway’s gold has yet to arrive in the mail. They will probably hang beside her past bronze and silver medals in her home studio. For teachers and students alike, moving well is a journey, not a destination. “There’s always another dance, another technique,” Hrouda said. As for Derek and Pamela Perkins, they have been dancing together since before they were married 58 years ago. More information about ballroom dance classes and private lessons is available by phoning 360-460-3836 or emailing hathaway00@ gmail.com.

She might have gone for those gold medals in 2012, but she was having hipreplacement surgery in Seattle. Dancing did not cause her hip disintegration, her doctors said. But “dance has kept you fit enough that you’ll do well” in recovery, they told her. For those wondering ________ whether to dip a toe onto Features Editor Diane Urbani the floor, Hathaway has de la Paz can be reached at 360only encouraging words. 452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. Don’t be intimidated by urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

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“When I go to competitions, I see how the competitors are so stressed out,” she said. Then there are the vendors who come to these contests. Hathaway saw one with a dazzling gown for sale. Price tag: $7,000. “I don’t see myself falling into that lifestyle,” she said. As both a student and a teacher of ballroom dance, Hathaway’s been giving classes and private lessons for the past five years.

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can to maintain your business model.” The Kickstarter campaign’s incentives are attached to contributions ranging from $25 to $10,000 with a bag of popcorn at the lower end and a package including a personal screening and a trip to a grand opening at the top. For the Uptown’s Kickstarter page go to tinyurl. com/pdn-kickstarter uptown.

Dancer: ‘Easy’ American style

salmon per year. Fishing is not permitted in the Elwha River during the $325 million restoration project that includes the demolition of two dams. The Dungeness River opened to fishing last week, with a limit of four coho per angler. The Sol Duc, Quillayute and Bogachiel rivers also can be fished. Dam removal progress can be montored by webcam at www.video-monitoring. com/construction/olympic/ js.htm The Olympic National Park website’s dam removal blog is not available at this time due to the federal shutdown.

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campaign for $40,000, about a third or a quarter of the renovation’s total cost. As of Saturday with 19 days to go, the campaign had raised $3,320 toward its goal. “The Kickstarter campaign is getting a really slow start, which is really concerning to me,” Wiley said. “My hope is that it builds momentum and a lot of people will contribute at the last minute. “We are not asking for a lot. We live close to the vest, and when you have a small business you do what you


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

A5

Reception scheduled Removal restarts on for Port Ludlow artist Glines Canyon Dam Structure’s remnants to be gone by September 2014

Watercolorist drawn to sun, colorful flowers

BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

BY DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT LUDLOW — Marti Mathis, a watercolorist drawn to sunshine and flowers, will be celebrated with an artist’s reception at the Columbia Bank lobby, 9500 Oak Bay Road, this Wednesday. Admission is free to the party from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Mathis’ new display of paintings, adjacent to the bank in the Port Ludlow Artists’ League Art Gallery, will stay up through October. The gallery is open from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Paint meets paper “I do paint a variety of subjects, but I love painting flowers because of the amazing colors and shapes, and the sunlight . . . dancing on the petals and leaves,� said Mathis. “When paint meets with wet paper . . . and a shape starts to emerge,� she added, “that makes my

Sunlit flowers by Marti Mathis are on display at the Port Ludlow Artists’ League Gallery, and a reception with the painter is set for Wednesday. heart beat a little faster, and I can’t wait to see the finished painting.� Mathis teaches a weekly watercolor class in her Port Ludlow studio. Potential students can reach her via

martimathis@wavecable. com.

________ Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5062, or at diane. urbani@peninsuladailynews.com.

Feiro classes to focus on biology of oceans BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Learn the differences between a sea cucumber and a lion head nudibranch, giant kelp from bull kelp, and differentiate among the varied species of sea stars that live in the water just off the North Olympic Peninsula beaches during classes at Feiro Marine Life Center. Feiro Marine Life Center staff members and guest marine biologists and oceanographers will teach, phylum by phylum, identification and life cycles of marine animals, plants and seaweeds that inhabit the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The eight-week program

includes classroom and laboratory, with opportunities for hands-on learning experiences including participating in plankton tows and beach seines to capture live animals for identification and examination.

Classes on Tuesdays

participants to volunteer at the center. Volunteers guide visitors at the center as a naturalist, work with school groups, prepare exhibits and displays, or clean and care for the live exhibits. Those with office and computer skills are also needed to assist office staff with administrative tasks. To register for the class, call Feiro Marine Life Center at 360-417-6254 or visit the center’s website at www.feiromarinelifecenter. org.

Classes meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning this Tuesday at the marine life center on City Pier, at the north end of Railroad Street. Class registration is $50. Scholarships are available. The final week of class ________ includes a trip to coastal tide pools, weather permitReporter Arwyn Rice can be ting. reached at 360-452-2345, ext. The eight-week course 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula meets the requirements for dailynews.com.

PORT ANGELES — A huge piece of Glines Canyon Dam was blasted away late Saturday as dam removal on the Elwha River resumed. Explosive charges set by demolition crews removed almost the entire eastern third of the remaining 60 feet of concrete dam, webcam photos show. But water did not immediately flow through the new gap because of tons of sediment behind the dam as well as rubble from the explosion that created temporary blockage between the current river channel and the new hole. With a section of the former 210-foot dam removed nearly to the original riverbed, workers will clear a passable fish channel on the floor of the river canyon before stopping work in November for the next fish window, according to Brian Krohmer, dam removal project manager. The last remnants of the dam are expected to be completely gone by September 2014. An estimated 800-square-foot hole was blasted into the dam stub, which stood about 60 feet above the original river bed. The dam’s demolition

process can be monitored by webcam via the PDN website, www.peninsuladailynews.com, and clicking on the link directly below the search engine window. Glines Canyon Dam and the 108-foot Elwha Dam, demolished in 2012, are part of a $325 million restoration effort to the Elwha River to a wild — and fishspawning — state in the nation’s largest planned dam-removal project. Dam-removal work can proceed during the partial federal government shutdown that has closed Olympic National Park to visitors because the project is already appropriated by Congress, according to park officials.

Spillway remains

unstable hillsides and provide cover for migrating and young salmon in riparian areas. The project was delayed in October 2012 due to sediment clogging the Elwha Water Treatment Plant’s intakes. Workers from Bozeman, Mont.-based Barnard Construction Co. Inc. started drilling blast holes in Glines Canyon Dam on Oct. 2, after the water plant clog was corrected.

Fish windows Fish spawning affects removal work in the river channel in October, January to April and July to protect migrating salmon — fingerlings migrating from clear tributaries to the ocean and adult salmon coming upstream to spawn. Salmon spawning ended in late September, and the only coho and chinook salmon remaining in the river are either naturally dying or dead, Olympic National Park spokeswoman Barb Maynes said last week. Young salmon live mostly in tributaries unaffected by the sediment. Clear-water refuge is also is provided by backup facilities such as the state Department of Fish and Wildlife rearing channel and the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe’s fish hatchery, Maynes said.

The Glines Canyon Dam spillway, now perched high on a cliff, far above the water level, remains in place and may become an overlook for visitors to view the restoration unfold in the valley that was revealed by the draining of Lake Mills. Geologists estimated that 34 million cubic yards of sediment were trapped behind the dams. About 8 million cubic yards have been released as the dams have been dismantled but not all the remaining sediment is ________ expected to flow downstream. Reporter Arwyn Rice can be Areas of sediment reached at 360-452-2345, ext. expected to remain in place 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula are being planted to anchor dailynews.com.

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Knights of Columbus seek donations during weekend PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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PORT TOWNSEND — Donations to aid individuals with disabilities will be solicited by the Knights of Columbus, Council No. 10532 in Port Townsend, on behalf of the Columbus Charities Fund on Columbus Day weekend, Friday and Saturday. Members of the Knights of Columbus will accept donations from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days in Port

Townsend at the QFC, 515 Sheridan St.; Aldrich’s Market, 940 Lawrence St.; and the Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St.; and in Port Hadlock at the QFC, 1890 Irondale Road.

Wearing yellow Knights members will wear yellow vests. Local donations will be divided between the Special Olympics and the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Briefly . . . Poet to read at venue on waterfront PORT ANGELES — The North Coast Writers, a Port Angeles-based group, will host a public reading by poet Sally Albiso at Wine on the Waterfront this Tuesday. Admission is free, though attendees may want to purchase food and drink at the wine bar, upstairs in The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave. In her 7 p.m. reading, Albiso will offer poems from An Undesirable Waywardness, a new chapbook featuring wry, post-modern retellings of traditional nursery rhymes. She’ll also read from her full-length manuscript Every Flame a Moon. Albiso has been nominated for two Pushcart Prizes and recently won the Robert Frost Foundation Poetry Award, among other honors. She grew up in Southern California, earned a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from the University of California at Los Angeles and a master’s in English with a creative writing emphasis from San Diego State University, and taught English at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, Calif. She joined the North Coast Writers and enjoyed a creative spurt since moving to the Port Angeles area a decade ago. Albiso has published her poetry in Crab Creek Review, Rattle, Comstock Review and Pontoon: An Anthology of Washington State Poets. For information about Tuesday’s event and the North Coast Writers, contact Suzann Bick at 360-

797-1245 or suzannbick@ yahoo.com.

PALOA benefit PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Light Opera Association, aka PALOA, will take over Smugglers Landing, a restaurant at The Landing mall, Tuesday evening. Fans of musical theater — and PALOA productions from “My Fair Lady” in 1995 to “South Pacific” in 2012 and “Guys and Dolls” in 2013 — are invited to enjoy food, drinks and entertainment from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., and half of each guest check will go to the theater troupe. Smugglers Landing owner Rick Mathis is hosting this fundraiser at his place at 115 E. Railroad Ave. For more information, phone 360-452-8299.

Reading slated PORT TOWNSEND — Poet and boat builder Matthew Nienow will read from his work at the Northwind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson St., this Thursday night. Admission is free to the 7 p.m. gathering. Nienow holds both a master’s of fine arts from the University of Washington and a degree in Traditional Small Craft from the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding. A 2013 Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellow, he also has received awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Elizabeth George Foundation and Washington state’s Artist Trust. For more about this and other literary and art events at the center, see www.NorthwindArts.org or phone 360-437-9081. Peninsula Daily News

ARWYN RICE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

A

PEEK UNDER THE HOOD

Joe Gladfelter of Port Angeles, center, checks under the hood of a 2014 Ford Mustang on Sunday, while his sons, Jason, 10, left and Jack, 8, right, watch. The Mustang was at the Price Ford “Drive One 4 UR School” event, a fundraiser to support Port Angeles High School technical education programs.

Charter forums set this week in multiple Jefferson locations PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Four forums concerning a proposal to create a homerule charter in Jefferson County are set this week. The proposal will be considered by voters on the Nov. 5 general election ballot. Ballots will be mailed to registered voters Oct. 16. In one measure, voters will approve or reject going ahead with the charter process. In others, they will elect five freeholders from each of three districts to write the

charter, which then must be approved by voters. Only if the measure to go ahead with the process is approved will the 15 freeholders be seated, five from each county commissioner district. Forums dealing with both the issues of the charter process and showcasing individual freeholder candidates have been held. Others coming up are: ■ A forum for District 1 freeholder candidates at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Port

Townsend Community Center, 620 Taylor St. ■ A noon Tuesday forum hosted by Port Townsend Rotary at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St. ■ A forum for District 2 freeholder candidates at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Chimacum Grange, 9572 Rhody Drive. ■ A 6:30 p.m. Thursday forum hosted by the county Republican Party at the Bay Club, 120 Spinnaker Place, Port Ludlow.

At the Thursday forum, all candidates who are running for five freeholder positions in District 3 in the November election are invited to introduce themselves, speak, and participate in questions and answers. For more information on the Jefferson County Republican-sponsored forum, phone Larry Hovde at 360-531-3368 or visit the party’s website at www.Jeff GOP.com.

Congress to continue fight over budget PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

WASHINGTON — This week, both the Senate and the House will continue to debate terms of a stopgap budget for fiscal 2014.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Wash-

ington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202224-3441 (fax, 202-2280514); Murray, 202-2242621 (fax, 202-224-0238); Kilmer, 202-225-5916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray. senate.gov; kilmer.house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula is located at 332 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. Hours are 9 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. It is staffed by Judith Morris, who may be contacted at judith. morris@mail.house.gov or 360-797-3623.

State legislators Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim

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attempts by H o u s e Republicans to restore funding for the District of Columbia budget and veterans’ education, employment and disabilMurray Cantwell Kilmer ity programs. Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. A yes vote was to reopen Write Van De Wege and federal parks, memorials Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box and museums. Kilmer voted yes. 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. ■ “CLEAN” BUDGET kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. VOTE: On a party-line vote steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. of 230 for and 194 against, jim@leg.wa.gov. House Republicans on Or you can call the Leg- Wednesday turned back a islative Hotline, 800-562- Democratic bid for an up-or6000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 down vote on a continuing p.m. Monday through Fri- resolution to immediately day (closed on holidays and fund the entire government from noon to 1 p.m.) and without GOP contingencies leave a detailed message, such as curbs on the Affordwhich will be emailed to able Care Act. Van De Wege, Tharinger or This is called a “clean Hargrove, or to all three. CR” in congressional parLinks to other state offi- lance. cials: secstate.wa.gov/ On this vote, the House elections/elected_officials. upheld a parliamentary rulaspx. ing that the Democratic motion was not germane to an underlying GOP meaLearn more sure (HJ Res 70, above). Websites following our A yes vote was to block state and national legisla- consideration of a “clean” tors: funding bill. ■ Followthemoney. Kilmer voted no. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ INDIVIDUAL MAN■ Vote-Smart.org — DATE, EMPLOYER How special interest groups CONTRIBUTIONS: Votrate legislators on the ing 228 for and 201 against, issues. the House on Sept. 30 amended HJ Res 59 to ■ NATIONAL PARKS, delay for one year the indiMUSEUMS: Voting 252 for vidual mandate at the heart and 173 against, the House of the Affordable Care Act. on Wednesday passed a This measure also GOP measure (HJ Res 70) sought to end employer to reopen the National Park subsidies of the healthService, Smithsonian Insti- insurance premiums paid tution, National Gallery of by members of Congress, Art and United States Holo- congressional staff memcaust Memorial Museum bers and many who work in during the ongoing, partial the White House. government shutdown. These individuals now The Senate then killed participate in the governthis measure while also ment-wide Federal Employturning back separate ees Health Benefits Pro-

Eye on Congress

gram (FEHBP), receiving employer (taxpayer) contributions to defray the cost of premiums. They would continue to receive these subsidies next year when they move their coverage — as they are required by law to do — from the federal plan to a private plan in the Affordable Care Act exchanges. Backers of this amendment said that subsidizing lawmakers’ insurance under the Affordable Care Act is preferential treatment. Opponents said it is a standard benefit in the U.S. workplace for employers to subsidize the cost of employees’ health insurance. A yes vote was to delay the health law’s employer mandate and end premium subsidies for congressional health insurance. Kilmer voted no. ■ NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH: Voting 254 for and 171 against, the House on Wednesday passed a measure (HJ Res 73) to exempt the National Institutes of Health budget from the partial government shutdown and put the agency back on a regular budget for the fiscal year that began Oct. 1. A yes vote was to reopen the NIH. Kilmer voted no. ■ VETERANS’ BENEFITS FUNDING: Voting 259 for and 157 against, the House on Thursday sent the Senate a measure (HJ Res 72) to restore funding of veterans’ education, employment and disability programs to levels in place before the ongoing, partial government shutdown. Sponsors said the bill would fund essential services for 30 days, while critics said it neglected other important programs for veterans. A yes vote was to restore funding for some veterans’ programs.

Kilmer voted yes. ■ “CLEAN” BUDGET, MEDICAL-DEVICES TAX: Voting 54 for and 46 against, the Senate on Sept. 30 approved a continuing resolution (HJ Res 59) to fund the government from Oct. 1 to Nov. 15. This “clean CR” contained no House-passed amendments. With this vote, the Senate also killed three GOP amendments — one to repeal the health law’s tax on medical devices, another to delay Obamacare for one year and a third to allow employers and insurers to refuse to insure items and procedures that conflict with their religious beliefs. There was no floor debate preceding this partyline vote. A yes vote was to approve a clean budget bill while retaining a tax on medical devices. Cantwell and Murray voted yes. ■ “CLEAN” BUDGET, INDIVIDUAL MANDATE: Voting 54 for and 46 against, the Senate on Sept. 30 approved yet another version of a continuing resolution (HJ Res 59) to fund the government from Oct. 1 to Nov. 15. With this vote, the Senate also killed House-passed amendments to delay the health law’s individual mandate and bar employer subsidies of health-insurance premiums for members of Congress, congressional staff members and many on the White House staff. There was no floor debate preceding this partyline vote. A yes vote was to approve a clean stopgap budget and uphold employer subsidies of congressional health insurance. Cantwell and Murray voted yes.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 7, 2013 PAGE

A7

Iran a China in Persian clothing? F

OR ANYONE WHO ENJOYS A good metaphor, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s visit to the United Nations has been a field day for sheep and wolves. Rouhani has been dubbed both a “wolf in Thomas L. sheep’s clothing” and a Friedman “sheep in wolf’s clothing” and Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu of Israel called Iran’s previous president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, “a wolf in wolf’s clothing.” The important question, though, is not who Rouhani is but what kind of country Iran’s regime wants it to be in the 21st century and what role nuclear power will play in shaping that identity. Seen from that perspective, there’s only one relevant question: Is Iran content to be a big North Korea or does it aspire to be a Persian China? North Korea built a small nuclear arsenal for two reasons: to protect that regime from threats from the outside and from threats from the inside. That is, North Korea’s leadership believes that nuclear weapons make it impervious to regime change from abroad and that the international isolation that has accompanied North Korea’s nuclear weapons program keeps its people down — on a permanent low-calorie diet of both food and information. It’s a foxy survival strategy for a crazy regime: a nuclear iron fist that keeps the world at bay with one hand and its own people isolated and weak with the other — all the while North Korea’s leaders gorge on imported fast cars and fast food. Iran’s leadership also sees a nuclear weapon as potential insurance against regime change from abroad, and surely some in Iran’s leadership, namely the Revolutionary Guards, benefit from the sanctions at home. The more isolated Iran is the less economic competition the Guards have for their vast network of industrial enterprises, the more valuable are their sanctions-busting smuggling ports and the

more isolated Iran’s people are from the very global trends that produce things like the 2009 Green Revolution. These hard-liners never want to see an American embassy in Tehran. But Iran is not North Korea. It’s a great civilization, with great human talent. It can’t keep its people isolated indefinitely. In theory, Iran’s regime does not have to keep the world out and its people down for Iran to be powerful. But do Iran’s leaders accept that theory? Some do. The decision to reenter negotiations is a clear signal that crucial players there do not think the status quo — crushing sanctions — is viable for them anymore. Because they are not North Korea, the sanctions are now threatening them with discontent from the inside.

B

UT HOW MUCH OF THEIR “nuclear insurance” are they ready to give up to be free of sanctions? Are they ready to sacrifice a single powerful weapon to become again a powerful country — to be more like a China, a half-friend, half-enemy, half-trading partner, half-geo-political rival to America, rather than a full-time opponent? This is what we have to test. “We’ve been trying for so long to use control dynamics to contain Iran that we’ve lost sight of the fact that we actually want the Iranians — specifically the ruling elites — to change their behavior,” said Col. Mark Mykleby, a retired Marine and co-author of “A National Strategic Narrative” for the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff. “I’m all about being tough as nails on

BILL DAY/CAGLE CARTOONS

them, and I sure don’t trust them, but I also believe we need to give them the option to change their behavior.” Added Nader Mousavizadeh, the Iranian-American co-founder of Macro Advisory Partners and a former top aide to U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan: “If we are prudent enough, strategic enough, and sufficiently disabused of our ability to remake countries in our own image, then we begin to see Iran as the potential China of the Middle East — with all the promise that holds, and all the challenges we know from just how hard the path with China’s been since [former President Richard M.] Nixon’s trip.” The process of getting there would be fitful, and surely ugly at times. But if done properly from Iran’s side and ours, it could lead to Iran’s gradual reintegration into the world economy, the empowerment of its educated, young middle class, “and the emergence in Iran of multiple centers of power, similar to that undergone by the Communist Party in Beijing over the past 30 years,” noted Mousavizadeh.

“Just like China.”

No, this is not ideal. “In a perfect world, we’d see a much speedier transition to a genuinely free society. But if a détente with the West can deny [Iran’s] regime the excuse of foreign enemies and foreign entanglements, Iran may then see its path to legitimacy also through reform and the enabling of the Iranian people’s immense economic, technological and educational potential.

C

HINA’S LEADERS ARE NOT Boy Scouts, either. Yet we’ve found a stable, mutually beneficial relationship with Beijing as “frenemies.” I remain a skeptic that Iran’s regime can generate the internal consensus to make a similar transition. But then few thought China could either. Secretary of State John Kerry has the right attitude: No lifting of sanctions for anything less than the airtight closure to any possible weaponization of Iran’s nuclear program. That’s the only deal worth having, and the only way Iran will decide if it really is a China in Persian clothing — or something like that.

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears Mondays. Email him via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

Wanted: An end to budget games NOTE HOW THE tea party politicians routinely start their remarks with “the American people want.” And what “the American people want” conveniently coincides with their ideological preferences. It would seem that the American people — meaning a Froma Harrop massive majority — don’t want this government shutdown. So scrambling Republicans have come up with “modest” and “commonsense” proposals to end the impasse: We can keep the national parks open, they are offering. Also the Department of Veterans Affairs. Let’s just yank the tax on medical devices out of the Affordable Care Act or the requirement for contraception coverage. Simply delay the individual mandate. That’s all we ask, and we’ll reopen the government. What about the panda cam? They forgot the panda cam. The American people love watching Mei Xiang licking her adorable cub at the National Zoo. No government, no panda cam. You see where this is going. And that is why America’s leaders, Democrats and sane Republicans, must drive a stake in the heart of the idea that you can close down the government — and threaten economic meltdown by playing games with the debt ceiling — to win political concessions.

Nothing the tea party people demand can’t be had through the normal political process. It happens that a duly elected House and Senate passed “Obamacare.” And when asked, the U.S. Supreme Court said it’s cool with it. But if “the American people do not want Obamacare,” to quote Rep. Jim Bridenstine and other Republican radicals, they don’t have to have Obamacare. They can vote more right-wingers into office and do away with it. As the public grows ever testier over the shutdown, tea party extremists bleat more loudly about their “modest” and “common-sense” ideas for restarting the government. Here’s an analogy: Guy opens a restaurant. Mobster barges in demanding $10 a week or the place burns down. Owner says no. Mobster responds in wounded tone: “But $10 is such a modest request.” The more modest the Republican demands, the nuttier they sound. Pious posturing does not alter the fact that we’re viewing an extortion racket. Only unconditional defeat of this tactic can save the principle that you don’t shut down government to get this or that concession. Obama made a serious mistake by negotiating during past trumped-up crises. He’s been strong so far. Here’s a happy ending: Republican House Speaker John Boehner does what he should have long ago, sends a spending measure to the House to keep government going. It passes with Democratic and pragmatist Republican votes. Party hotheads may well respond

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by stripping Boehner of his speakership. Boehner can frame his action as a personal sacrifice, a patriotic act to stop the shutdown’s mounting damage — to the economy and to America’s reputation as a serious power. Republicans appalled by these antics can regroup and work to cut down the tea party coalition’s power and size come the next election. They’ve got to take the car keys away. Either that or Republicans will crash in districts with sophisticated electorates. As for the little tea party tyrants, they go on. Defeat is never a problem for them. They can return home blaming their loss on betrayal by “moderate” Republicans. They are martyrs, you see. But by the 2014 elections, the welcome reality of Obamacare will have sunk in, and even these folks probably won’t fight it. They’ll come up with new self-serving claims about “what the American people want.” What Americans need right now is an abject defeat of the idea that government shutdowns offer a respectable forum for negotiations. Pray that Obama stands firm on this.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her at fharrop@gmail.com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525 lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052 jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way, 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550 cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

D. CASTILLEJOS/CAGLE CARTOONS

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ PAUL GOTTLIEB, Commentary editor, 360-452-2345, ext. 5060 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 7, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, WEATHER In this section

B Seahawks

Pirates beat Penguins First-ranked PC men top No. 2 Clark PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seahawks wide receiver Jermaine Kearse, right, hauls in a touchdown in the end zone during Seattle’s loss to Indianapolis on Sunday.

Colts hand Hawks 1st loss BY MICHAEL MAROT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS — Russell Wilson threw two touchdown passes and ran for 102 yards Sunday. He felt as if he should have done more. On a day the Seahawks settled for four field goals and had a safety, Wilson watched as Andrew Luck again rallied the Colts late and led Indianapolis to a 34-28 victory. “We had a lot of situations today that we could have controlled a little bit better. For whatever reason, we didn’t make those,” Wilson said. “We’ve got to find a way to eliminate that situation. When we have a chance to separate the game, we need to make sure that we do that.” The Seahawks (4-1) certainly had chances. They just couldn’t convert as they suffered their first loss of the season. Despite holding the Colts to 317 yards of offense, rushing for 218 yards and keeping the ball nearly twice as long as Indianapolis (4-1) through the first three quarters, Seattle couldn’t put this one away because of mistakes.

Third-down struggles The Seahawks finished 2 of 12 on third downs, star cornerback Richard Sherman was called for pass interference on third-and-10 during the Colts’ go-ahead drive and they couldn’t recover a blocked punt in the end zone before it bounced out of bounds. Seattle had won nine straight regular-season games since last losing Nov. 25 at Miami. “We moved the ball really well. Had a lot of yards and all that. Russell was very resourceful, Marshawn was on today. The guys up front did the best they could,” coach Pete Carroll said. “We really struggled on third down. That was the difference. Those turned into field goals.” And against Luck, that’s always trouble.

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clark’s Langdon Roscoe, left, goes for a high kick in front of Peninsula College’s Chrisian Martinez during the first half of the Pirates’ 2-0 victory.

TURN

TO

TURN

PIRATES/B3

Cowboys fall behind by 21 in second quarter PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A big second quarter by Life Christian Academy sent Chimacum to 28-12 homecoming game loss at Memorial Field. After the Cowboys and Eagles played to a scoreless tie in the opening quarter, Life Christian scored three straight touchdowns to jump ahead 21-0. Chimacum responded with to straight touchdowns of its own, one Travis Pennington off a pass from Alex Morris on the final play of the first half and the other a fumble return by Drew Yackulic, to cut the Eagles’ lead to 28-12 in the third quarter. But Life Christian quarterback Taylor Roelofs ran for two touchdowns before the end of the third to push the advantage to 33-12. Roelofs passed for 227 yards and a touchdown and ran for 72 yards and three scores in Friday’s game. Yackulic caught four passes for 41 yards and Pennington

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Chimacum’s Drew Yackulic uses Life Christian Academy’s Hunter Haley (4) to tackle Taylor Roelofs (7) during the Cowboys’ homecoming game at Memorial Field. Yackulic led the Chimacum turn upfield. “Drew is just an excellent defense with 12 tackles (nine solo), including one play that player,” Cowboys coach Shawn had three receptions for 31 he stuffed by pushing Life Meacham said. “He just goes all out.” Christian blocker Hunter Haley yards. into Roelofs as he tried to Morris passed for 89 yards. TURN TO FOOTBALL/B3

Prep Football

Roughriders blank Port Townsend Peet’s two goals lead Port Angeles to league victory PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

HAWKS/B3

TO

Chimacum loses to Eagles 28-12

Colts relied on Luck He has led the Colts to nine fourth-quarter wins in 21 career games. Luck finished 16 of 29 for 229 yards with two touchdowns. Donald Brown scored on a 3-yard touchdown run with 8:55 to play, to give Indianapolis the lead for the final time of the day. “This is the most resilient team that I’ve ever been around,” coach Chuck Pagano said. “They’ve got more grit than anybody, any team I’ve been around.” Indianapolis has rebounded from its only loss with three straight wins, including victories over NFC powers San Francisco and Seattle. Now they have sole possession of the AFC South lead for the first time in the post-Peyton Manning era, too.

PORT ANGELES — Peninsula College won the battle of the top two teams in the men’s NWAACC rankings by shutting out Clark College 2-0 at Wally Sigmar Field. The Pirates also won the women’s game over Clark 4-0. “Fantastic result for us,” Peninsula men’s coach Andrew Chapman said. “We played a very tough game. Our guys played very smart.” Peninsula goalkeeper saved five shots to earn the shutout, and Kalei Gallarde scored both of the Pirates’ goals in Saturday’s game. “Kalei scored two really nice goals to get us the win,” Chapman said. Gallarde scored in the 18th and 32nd minutes. The second goal was set up by NWAACC assist leader Ash Apollon. It was Apollon’s 15th assist on the season. The Penguins (6-1, 10-2-1) are the first NWAACC team to hold Peninsula to less than three goals this season.

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Townsend goalkeepr Malia Henderson, races out to block a shot by Port Angeles’ Madison St. George.

PORT TOWNSEND — Callie Peet scored a pair of first-half goals to lead Port Angeles to a 5-0 win over Port Townsend in Olympic League girls soccer action at Memorial Field. Khaya Elliott started the scoring for the Roughriders off an assist by Kate Haworth. Peet then earned credit for goals in the 24th and 37th minutes. In the second half, Emma Moseley scored in the 60th minute, assisted by Maddie Boe. Mosely then set up Kylee Jeffers for a goal in the 67th minute. “Each goal [we] let in had it’s own element of misfortune, but as they say, ‘they all count,’” Port Townsend coach Colin Foden said after Thursday’s game. “Nevertheless, the game was

Preps far more even that the score suggests. “Jewel Johnson came close to scoring on at least three occasions, Lily Murock was creative and industrious, Rose Gitelman and Reilly Berkshire defiantly held their lines and Shenoa Snyder added strength to a defense that was ably led by Anne Meek.”

Riders in sixth Port Angeles improves to 3-6 on the season and currently holds the sixth-place spot in the Olympic League standings, a half-game ahead of North Mason (2-6). The Riders host fifth-place Bremerton (4-5) on Tuesday in an important league match. The Redskins (0-9) play at Kingston (7-2), which is tied for second place with Olympic, on Tuesday. TURN

TO

PREPS/B5


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Boys Tennis: North Mason at Port Angeles, 4 p.m.; Chimacum/Port Townsend at Sequim, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Life Christian at Chimacum, 5:45 p.m.

Tuesday Girls Soccer: Bellevue Christian at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Port Townsend at Kingston, 6:45 p.m.; Bremerton at Port Angeles, 6:45 p.m.; Forks at Adna, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Neah Bay at Crescent, 5 p.m.; Quilcene at Rainier Christian, 6 p.m.; Port Townsend at Kingston, 6:15 p.m.; Sequim at North Mason, 6:15 p.m.; Bremerton at Port Angeles, 6:15 p.m.; Elma at Forks, 7 p.m. Girls Swimming: Kingston at Port Angeles, 3 p.m.; Port Townsend at Sequim, 3:30 p.m. Boys Tennis: Port Angeles at Klahowya, 4 p.m.

Wednesday Cross Country: Port Angeles, North Kitsap at Klahowya, 4:30 p.m.; Port Townsend at Kingston, 4:30 p.m.; Sequim and Bremerton at North Mason, 5 p.m. Volleyball: Charles Wright at Chimacum, 5:45 p.m. Boys Tennis: Bremerton at Chimacum, 4 p.m.; Port Angeles at Kingston, 4 p.m. Men’s Soccer: Olympic at Peninsula College, 4 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Olympic at Peninsula College, 2 p.m.

Area Sports BMX Racing Port Angeles BMX Track Saturday Pot Luck 3 Strider 1. Isaiah Charles 10 Girls 1. Taylor “Chew Toy” Coleman 2. Taylee Rome 3. Amber Johnson 26-30 Cruiser 1. “Curious George” Williams 2. Robert “Face Plant” Williams 3. Mariah “The Wind” Fortman 5 & Under Intermediate 1. Jaron Tolliver 2. Carson Waddell 3. Dion Johnson 4. Rily Pippin 10 Expert 1. Moose Johnson 2. Deacon Charles 3. Cholena Morrison 28-35 Expert 1. Trent Owen 2. Greg Faris 3. Johntay Tolliver

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PIRATES

Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Football Saturday’s Scores Blanchet 75, Bainbridge 0 Cascade Christian 63, Bellevue Christian 12 Darrington 60, Seattle Lutheran 7 Evergreen Lutheran 30, Muckleshoot 24 Kent-Meridian 17, Spanaway Lake 13 Lopez 39, Tulalip Heritage 34 Mary Knight 34, Oakville 6 Olympia 28, South Kitsap 21 Pateros 60, Selkirk 24

NWAACC

34-218 205 1-14 2-39 0-0 15-31-1 2-5 2-38.5 2-1 7-85 31:22

29-109 208 0-0 4-107 1-0 16-29-0 2-21 3-31.0 2-2 3-35 28:38

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle, Lynch 17-102, Wilson 13-102, Turbin 4-14. Indianapolis, Richardson 18-56, D.Brown 6-37, Luck 4-9, Heyward-Bey 1-7. PASSING—Seattle, Wilson 15-31-1-210. Indianapolis, Luck 16-29-0-229. RECEIVING—Seattle, Baldwin 5-80, Tate 5-61, Willson 2-28, Kearse 1-28, Rice 1-8, Lynch 1-5. Indianapolis, Wayne 6-65, Hilton 5-140, Fleener 2-15, D.Brown 2-3, R.Hughes 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Seattle, Hauschka 48 (BK).

National Football League

Men’s Soccer Saturday North Idaho 4, Spokane 0 Wenatchee Valley 2, Treasure Valley 1 Walla Walla 0, Columbia Basin 0 (tie) Bellevue 3, S. Puget Sound 1 Peninsula 2, Clark 0 Pierce 2, Olympic 0 Edmonds 2, Whatcom 1 Skagit Valley 4, Shoreline 1 Highline 11, SW Oregon 0 Tacoma 2, Chemeketa 1

Women’s Soccer Saturday Spokane 3, Yakima Valley 0 Treasure Valley 1, Wenatchee Valley 1 (tie) Walla Walla 4, Columbia Basin 1 Treasure Valley 1, Wenatchee Valley 1 (tie) Peninsula 4, Clark 0 Lane 2, Bellevue 0 Olympic 3, Pierce 0 Edmonds 0, Whatcom 0 (tie) Shoreline 3, Skagit Valley 2 Highline 4, SW Oregon 0 Tacoma 7, Chemeketa 2 Everett 4, Green River 1

Football Colts 34, Seahawks 28 Seattle Indianapolis

12 7 9 0—28 7 10 6 11—34 First Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 42, 11:40. Sea—Tate 10 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 6:14. Sea—Kearse safety, 4:53. Ind—Hilton 73 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick), 1:04. Second Quarter Ind—Howell 61 blocked field goal return (Vinatieri kick), 13:06. Sea—Kearse 28 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 5:57. Ind—FG Vinatieri 41, :58. Third Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 36, 11:18. Sea—FG Hauschka 41, 8:12. Ind—Hilton 29 pass from Luck (pass failed), 4:16. Sea—FG Hauschka 46, :35. Fourth Quarter Ind—D.Brown 3 run (Wayne pass from Luck), 8:55. Ind—FG Vinatieri 49, 1:55. A—66,608. Sea 21 423

CARDINALS

Pittsburgh Pirates pinch runner Josh Harrison (5) scores from second base behind St. Louis Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina on a single by Pedro Alvarez in the eighth inning of Game 3 of a National League Division Series on Sunday in Pittsburgh. The Pirates won 5-3, taking a two games to one lead in the bestof-five series. Game 4 is today at noon on TBS.

Preps

First downs Total Net Yards

FLY PAST

Ind 20 317

NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 N.Y. Giants 0 5 0 .000 82 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 North W L T Pct PF Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 Chicago 3 2 0 .600 145 Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Denver 5 0 0 1.000 230 Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 East W L T Pct PF New England 4 1 0 .800 95 Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 Houston 2 2 0 .500 90 Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 Thursday’s Game Cleveland 37, Buffalo 24 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 22, Detroit 9 New Orleans 26, Chicago 18 Kansas City 26, Tennessee 17 St. Louis 34, Jacksonville 20 Cincinnati 13, New England 6 Indianapolis 34, Seattle 28 Baltimore 26, Miami 23 Philadelphia 36, N.Y. Giants 21 Arizona 22, Carolina 6

Denver 51, Dallas 48 Houston at San Francisco, late. San Diego at Oakland, late. Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington Today’s Game N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 5:40 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10 N.Y. Giants at Chicago, 5:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 Carolina at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Houston, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m. New Orleans at New England, 1:25 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Miami Monday, Oct. 14 Indianapolis at San Diego, 5:40 p.m.

College Football PA 81 95 95 141 PA 159 136 112 182 PA 73 58 104 70 PA 123 140 97 123 PA 139 58 102 91 PA 70 117 88 130 PA 79 95 105 163 PA 110 94 87 110

How AP Top 25 Fared No. 1 Alabama (5-0) beat Georgia State 45-3. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 2 Oregon (5-0) beat Colorado 57-16. Next: at No. 15 Washington, Saturday. No. 3 Clemson (5-0) beat Syracuse 49-14. Next: vs. Boston College, Saturday. No. 4 Ohio State (6-0) beat No. 16 Northwestern 40-30. Next: vs. Iowa, Saturday, Oct. 19. No. 5 Stanford (5-0) beat No. 15 Washington 31-28. Next: at Utah, Saturday. No. 6 Georgia (4-1) beat Tennessee 34-31, OT. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 7 Louisville (5-0) beat Temple 30-7. Next: vs. Rutgers, Thursday, Oct. 10. No. 8 Florida State (5-0) beat No. 25 Maryland 63-0. Next: at No. 3 Clemson, Saturday, Oct. 19. No. 9 Texas A&M (4-1) did not play. Next: at No. 24 Mississippi, Saturday, Oct. 12. No. 10 LSU (5-1) beat Mississippi State 59-26. Next: vs. No. 18 Florida, Saturday. No. 11 Oklahoma (5-0) beat TCU 20-17. Next: vs. Texas at Dallas, Saturday. No. 12 UCLA (4-0) beat Utah 34-27, Thursday. Next: vs. California, Saturday, Oct. 12. No. 13 South Carolina (4-1) beat Kentucky 35-28. Next: at Arkansas, Saturday. No. 14 Miami (5-0) beat Georgia Tech 45-30. Next: at North Carolina, Thursday, Oct. 17. No. 15 Washington (4-1) lost to No. 5 Stanford 31-28. Next: vs. No. 2 Oregon, Saturday. No. 16 Northwestern (4-1) lost to No. 4 Ohio State 40-30. Next: at Wisconsin, Saturday. No. 17 Baylor (4-0) beat West Virginia 73-42. Next: at Kansas State, Saturday. No. 18 Florida (4-1) beat Arkansas 30-10. Next: at No. 10 LSU, Saturday. No. 19 Michigan (5-0) beat Minnesota 42-13. Next: at Penn State, Saturday. No. 20 Texas Tech (5-0) beat Kansas 54-16. Next: vs. Iowa State, Saturday. No. 21 Oklahoma State (4-1) beat Kansas State 33-29. Next: vs. TCU, Saturday, Oct. 19. No. 22 Arizona State (3-2) lost to Notre Dame 37-34. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday. No. 23 Fresno State (5-0) beat Idaho 61-14. Next: vs. UNLV, Saturday, Oct. 19. No. 24 Mississippi (3-2) lost to Auburn 30-22. Next: vs. No. 9 Texas A&M, Saturday. No. 25 Maryland (4-1) lost to No. 8 Florida State 63-0. Next: vs. Virginia, Saturday.

Major Scores Saturday FAR WEST E. Washington 41, Weber St. 19 Fresno St. 61, Idaho 14 Montana 55, Portland St. 27 Montana St. 36, N. Arizona 7 New Mexico 66, New Mexico St. 17 North Dakota 28, Idaho St. 25

Oregon 57, Colorado 16 Sacramento St. 37, N. Colorado 21 San Diego 45, Mercer 13 San Jose St. 37, Hawaii 27 Stanford 31, Washington 28 Washington St. 44, California 22 Yale 24, Cal Poly 10 SOUTHWEST Alabama St. 34, Texas Southern 2 Baylor 73, West Virginia 42 Louisiana Tech 38, UTEP 35 McNeese St. 59, Cent. Arkansas 28 Oklahoma 20, TCU 17 Oklahoma St. 33, Kansas St. 29 Rice 30, Tulsa 27, OT Rutgers 55, SMU 52, 3OT MIDWEST Bowling Green 28, UMass 7 Butler 35, Stetson 15 Cent. Michigan 21, Miami (Ohio) 9 Dayton 40, Davidson 8 Drake 27, Jacksonville 17 Illinois St. 35, W. Illinois 21 Indiana 44, Penn St. 24 Michigan 42, Minnesota 13 Michigan St. 26, Iowa 14 N. Dakota St. 24, N. Iowa 23 N. Illinois 38, Kent St. 24 Nebraska 39, Illinois 19 Notre Dame 37, Arizona St. 34 Ohio 43, Akron 3 Ohio St. 40, Northwestern 30 S. Illinois 27, S. Dakota St. 24 South Dakota 17, Missouri St. 14 Texas Tech 54, Kansas 16 Toledo 47, W. Michigan 20 Youngstown St. 35, Indiana St. 24 EAST Boston College 48, Army 27 Brown 31, Rhode Island 14 Buffalo 42, E. Michigan 14 CCSU 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 29 Clemson 49, Syracuse 14 Colgate 41, Cornell 20 Duquesne 27, West Liberty 14 Fordham 52, Lehigh 34 Harvard 41, Holy Cross 35, 3OT Lafayette 31, Bucknell 7 Louisville 30, Temple 7 Maine 62, Delaware 28 Marist 37, Valparaiso 0 Monmouth (NJ) 35, Robert Morris 9 Navy 28, Air Force 10 Penn 37, Dartmouth 31, 4OT Princeton 53, Columbia 7 Stony Brook 21, Bryant 13 Towson 44, New Hampshire 28 Villanova 20, William & Mary 16 Wagner 23, Sacred Heart 20 SOUTH Alabama 45, Georgia St. 3 Alcorn St. 57, Warner 0 Auburn 30, Mississippi 22 Ball St. 48, Virginia 27 Bethune-Cookman 21, Delaware St. 7 Charleston Southern 28, North Greenville 14 Charlotte 53, Gardner-Webb 51 Chattanooga 42, W. Carolina 21 E. Kentucky 38, Austin Peay 3 East Carolina 24, Middle Tennessee 17 Elon 28, Furman 25 FAU 37, UAB 23 FIU 24, Southern Miss. 23 Florida 30, Arkansas 10 Florida St. 63, Maryland 0 Georgia 34, Tennessee 31, OT Jackson St. 42, Ark.-Pine Bluff 33 Jacksonville St. 41, UT-Martin 27 James Madison 40, Albany (NY) 13 LSU 59, Mississippi St. 26 Louisiana-Lafayette 48, Texas St. 24 MVSU 28, Alabama A&M 9 Marshall 34, UTSA 10 Miami 45, Georgia Tech 30 Missouri 51, Vanderbilt 28 Morehead St. 45, Campbell 36 Morgan St. 34, Florida A&M 21 Murray St. 35, Tennessee Tech 24 NC Central 37, Howard 28 Norfolk St. 26, Savannah St. 24

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Today 10 a.m. MLB NET Baseball MLB, Oakland Athletics vs. Detroit Tigers, American League Division Series, Game 3, Site: Detroit (Live) Noon (28) TBS Baseball MLB, St. Louis Cardinals vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, National League Division Series, Game 4, Site: Pittsburgh (Live) 3 p.m. TBS Baseball MLB, Boston Red Sox vs. Tampa Bay Rays, American League Division Series, Game 3, Site: St. Petersburg, Fla. (Live) 5:25 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, New York Jets vs. Atlanta Falcons Site: Georgia Dome - Atlanta (Live) 6:30 p.m. (28) TBS Baseball MLB, Atlanta Braves vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, National League Division Series, Game 4, Site: Los Angeles (Live) 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Women’s Soccer NCAA, Washington vs. UCLA (Live) Old Dominion 21, Liberty 17 Prairie View 31, Grambling St. 3 SC State 29, NC A&T 24 SE Louisiana 35, Incarnate Word 3 Samford 44, Georgia Southern 34 South Carolina 35, Kentucky 28 South Florida 26, Cincinnati 20 Tennessee St. 40, SE Missouri 16 The Citadel 31, Appalachian St. 28, OT Troy 34, South Alabama 33 Tulane 24, North Texas 21 UCF 24, Memphis 17 Virginia Tech 27, North Carolina 17 Wake Forest 28, NC State 13 Wofford 55, Presbyterian 14

New AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (55) 5-0 1,495 1 2. Oregon (5) 5-0 1,424 2 3. Clemson 5-0 1,359 3 4. Ohio St. 6-0 1,305 4 5. Stanford 5-0 1,278 5 6. Florida St. 5-0 1,158 8 7. Georgia 4-1 1,138 6 8. Louisville 5-0 1,051 7 9. Texas A&M 4-1 1,003 9 10. LSU 5-1 993 10 11. UCLA 4-0 844 12 12. Oklahoma 5-0 819 11 13. Miami 5-0 780 14 14. South Carolina 4-1 764 13 15. Baylor 4-0 681 17 16. Washington 4-1 556 15 17. Florida 4-1 536 18 18. Michigan 5-0 514 19 19. Northwestern 4-1 418 16 20. Texas Tech 5-0 358 20 21. Fresno St. 5-0 258 23 22. Oklahoma St. 4-1 204 21 23. N. Illinois 5-0 138 NR 24. Virginia Tech 5-1 115 NR 25. Missouri 5-0 105 NR Others receiving votes: Auburn 61, Notre Dame 50, Nebraska 35, Wisconsin 29, Michigan St. 16, UCF 7, Arizona St. 3, Mississippi 3, Rutgers 2.

Baseball Postseason WILD CARD Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0 DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) American League Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0 Friday: Boston 12, Tampa Bay 2 Saturday: Boston 7, Tampa Bay 4 Today: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 11-3), 3:07 (TBS) x-Tuesday: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at Tampa Bay, 5:07 or 5:37 p.m. (TBS) x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston, 2:37 or 5:07 p.m. (TBS) Detroit 1, Oakland 1 Friday: Detroit 3, Oakland 2 Saturday: Oakland 1, Detroit 0 Today: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at Detroit (Sanchez 14-8), 10:07 a.m. (MLB) Tuesday: Oakland (Straily 10-8) at Detroit (Fister 14-9), 2:07 or 4:07 p.m. (TBS) x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland, 3:07 or 6:07 p.m. (TBS) National League Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1 Thursday: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1 Friday: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1 Sunday: Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3 Today: St. Louis (Wachia 4-1) at Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4), 12:07 p.m. (TBS) x-Wednesday: Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:07 or 5:07 p.m. (TBS) Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 1 Thursday: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1 Friday: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3 Sunday: Atlanta (Teheran 14-8) at Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8), late. (TBS) Today: Atlanta (Garcia 4-7) at Los Angeles (Nolasco 13-11), 6:37 p.m. (TBS) x-Wednesday: Los Angeles at Atlanta, 5:37 p.m. (TBS)

Transactions FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Signed P Brian Moorman.

HOCKEY National Hockey League WINNIPEG JETS — Assigned D Adam Pardy to St. John’s (AHL). Activated D Grant Clitsome from the injured reserve list.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

B3

Broncos survive scare in Dallas THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARLINGTON, Texas — Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos stayed unbeaten after Tony Romo made one late mistake in a record-setting game. Manning kept up his torrid pace with four touchdown passes, and Matt Prater kicked a 28-yard field goal as time expired for a 51-48 victory over the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday. Romo threw for 506 yards and five touchdowns, the first 500-yard game in Dallas history, but was intercepted by Danny TrevTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS athan at the Dallas 24 in the final 2 minutes to set up Indianapolis quarterback Andrew Luck, left, Prater’s winning kick. meets with Seahawks quarterback Russell The Broncos (5-0) got all Wilson following the Colts victory Sunday. the way down to the Dallas 1, then drained the clock to make sure Prater’s kick was the final play in a wild game. The teams combined for 1,039 yards of total offense CONTINUED FROM B1 lis to just 317 yards of offense, 120 of that coming in the second-highest scoring game in regulation in the fourth quarter. And all this came on a since the NFL-AFL merger The Seahawks also wacky day. in 1970, according to Both teams scored off a blocked a punt that STATS. bounced into the end zone blocked kick. The Cincinnati and Cleveand was recovered out of Seahawks ran for 218 land combined for 106 bounds for a safety. yards, averaged 6.4 yards After Seattle took a 12-0 points in the Browns’ 58-48 per carry, had better field lead, Luck got Indianapolis win in 2004. position and ran more than back into the game with a Dallas (2-3) took a 48-41 three dozen plays in Colts 73-yard touchdown pass to lead when Romo threw 79 territory as they played T.Y. Hilton, and the Colts yards to Dez Bryant to set keep away through the took the lead when Delano up a 4-yard scoring toss to first three quarters. Howell returned a blocked Cole Beasley. None of it mattered to field goal 61 yards for a Manning, who threw for Luck. He still found a way score. 414 yards, answered by to win. The Seahawks regained leading a nine-play, 73-yard On the decisive drive, he the lead 19-17 at halftime drive to Knowshon Moretook advantage of a pass and appeared to be in good no’s tying 1-yard score with interference call against shape after two quick field 2:44 remaining. Sherman, and got another goals in the third quarter. The Cowboys were on break when Pagano won a But after taking a 25-17 the verge of getting blown challenge on a third-down lead, Luck rallied the Colts out early in the second half spot that turned fourth again — and this time, he when they finally stopped down into a first down. made sure Wilson & Co. Manning and forced a field After consuming nearly got to watch it all from the goal. They later ended his seven minutes, he gave the sideline. streak of 227 passes withball to Brown, who squirted “I don’t think, anybody’s out an interception when through the middle for the built better to win these Morris Claiborne picked go-ahead score. close games, especially him off late in the third Luck then hooked up down the stretch, especially quarter. with his favorite receiver in the fourth quarter than Dallas converted the Reggie Wayne on a 2-point this team,” Pagano said. turnover into a 41-38 lead conversion pass and took Notes: Hilton caught on Romo’s 10-yard pass to nearly five more minutes five passes for a careerJason Witten, who had 121 off the clock to set up high 140 yards and two yards receiving and a touchAdam Vinatieri for a game- scores. down. sealing 49-yard field goal. ■ Colts defensive end The Broncos answered “A win is a win, if it was Robert Mathis was credited with a drive to Prater’s ugly, if it was great,” Luck with his 100th career sack tying 50-yard field goal. said. when he forced a fumble at “To come back, you hold the end of the first half. He Saints 26, on for dear life, but a added another in the secchance to beat a good team ond half. Bears 18 in front of our home fans, ■ Reggie Wayne caught CHICAGO — Drew to get back on track at six passes, leaving him four Brees passed to Jimmy home, we take a lot of pride short of the 1,000-yard Graham along the sideline. in that.” mark. He found the tight end Wilson went 15 of 31 for ■ Seattle was missing over the middle. 210 yards with two touchthree of its starting offenThey hooked up for long downs before throwing an sive linemen for the second plays and short ones, all interception on the straight game. over the field. Seahawks’ final play. ■ The two touchdown That New Orleans conHe ran 13 times for 102 passes by Luck matched nection was just too much yards, Lynch ran 17 times the total Seattle had for the Chicago Bears. for 102 yards, and the allowed in its first four Brees threw two touchdefense limited Indianapo- games. down passes, Graham tied an NFL record with another

Hawks: 34-28

Pirates: Win CONTINUED FROM B1

Despite the loss, they still hold a commanding nine-point lead in the NWAACC South Division. With 21 points, the Pirates (7-0, 13-0-1) also hold a nine-point lead over Highline in the West Division. Peninsula hosts lastplace Olympic (2-3-1, 3-5-1) on Wednesday.

Women’s Soccer Peninsula 4, Clark 0 PORT ANGELES — Kasie Lough saved three shots and earned the shutout for the second-place Pirates.

Bri Afoa scored a pair of first-half goals to help Peninsula go into half with a 2-0 lead. Alyssa Bertuleit assisted on Afoa’s first goal, while Hailey Berg set up the second. Afoa now has 13 goals on the season, which ranks third in the NWAACC behind Shoreline’s Hayley Warren (15) and Walla Walla’s Delaney Romero (14). In the second half, Afoa set up an Annie Armstrong goal in the 50th minute, and Bertuleit scored in the 80th minute off an assist by Miranda Sochacki. Peninsula (8-0, 9-2) hosts NWAACC West Division foe Olympic (4-2-2, 4-2-4) on Wednesday at Wally Sigmar Field.

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Bengals 13, Patriots 6

picked off Brady’s desperation pass inside the 5-yard line with 16 seconds left to clinch it. Brady had thrown a touchdown pass in 52 straight games, second-longest in NFL history behind Drew Brees. The Patriots were held out of the end zone for the first time since a 16-9 loss to the Jets on Sept. 20, 2009.

Chiefs 26, Titans 17 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jamaal Charles scored a 1-yard touchdown with 6:23 left, and the Chiefs rallied to keep up their perfect start. The Chiefs (5-0) are off to their best start since 2003, when they won their first nine games. This win came despite blowing a 13-0 halftime lead in this early AFC showdown between these surprising teams bouncing back after losing seasons. The Titans (3-2) couldn’t have been more out of synch in the first half with Ryan Fitzpatrick starting for Jake Locker, sidelined with his sprained right hip. He missed his first five passes and went three-andout on his first five series before guiding Tennessee to 17 straight points in the second half. Charles put the Chiefs ahead to stay, and they intercepted Fitzpatrick twice in the final 6:14. Ryan Succop kicked four field goals, including a 48-yarder.

CINCINNATI — BenJarvus Green-Ellis ran 1 yard in the fourth quarter for the game’s only touchdown, and the Cincinnati Bengals ended Tom Brady’s long streak of touchdown passes in defeating the previously unbeaten New England Patriots. The Bengals (3-2) sacked Cardinals 22, Brady four times and kept Panthers 6 New England (4-1) out of the end zone on a first-andGLENDALE, Ariz. — goal from the 1-yard line Arizona sacked Cam Newlate in the fourth quarter. ton seven times, once for a Adam “Pacman” Jones safety, and intercepted him

on three occasions to overcome a sluggish offensive performance. Daryl Washington, back after serving a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy, had two sacks and an interception for Arizona (3-2). Calais Campbell had two sacks, one for Arizona’s first regular-season safety in nine years, the other forcing a game-clinching fumble. Karlos Dansby also had two sacks and an interception. Carolina (1-3), playing for the first time since a 38-0 victory over the New York Giants two weeks ago, managed only Graham Gano’s field goals of 22 and 51 yards. Arizona’s Carson Palmer threw for a touchdown but was intercepted three times.

Rams 34, Jaguars 20 ST. LOUIS — Sam Bradford threw three touchdown passes and Matt Giordano’s 82-yard interception return was one of several big plays from the St. Louis defense against winless Jacksonville. Austin Pettis’ 31-yard TD catch with 5:45 to go was his second of the day and put the Rams (2-3) up by two scores. St. Louis, which had trailed by double digits in every game, established control with a 17-point second quarter after Jacksonville (0-5) had a pair of early leads. Jaguars quarterback Blaine Gabbert injured his left hamstring in the third quarter. Rookie left tackle Luke Joeckel was carted off with a right ankle injury in the first.

Football: Redskins rout Vason CONTINUED FROM B1

Morris had nine tackles and two pass deflections, and Pennington blocked a kick. Chimacum (0-2, 0-4) plays at Eatonville (2-0, 4-1) on Friday. The Cruisers are coming off a 55-14 win over Bow Valley College of Calgary, Alberta.

Lane Dotson and Dustin West got in on 11 tackles apiece, and both had a tackle for a loss. Quinn Dowling had two tackles for a loss. West, who was playing his first game for Chimacum, was praised by Meacham for his play at Port Townsend 48, linebacker. Vashon Island 14 “He’s very aggressive,” VASHON — The RedMeacham said. “He’s definitely going to help us out.” skins jumped to a 21-0 lead Dotson, Sam Golden and in the first quarter and Colton Shaw each had a never looked back. Matt Cain opened the sack for the Cowboys.

scoring with a 55-yard touchdown less than a minute into the game. Tim Russell scored a pair of touchdowns — a 18-yard run and a 10-yard reception from Jacob King — to make it 22-0 going into the second quarter. Russell also had a 20-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Cain scored on a 30-yard pass from David Sua. Port Townsend freshman Isaiah Mason added a 1-yard touchdown run, and King scored on a 98-yard interception return.

King (154 yards), Cain (102) and Russell (101) each ran for 100 yards for Port Townsend. King was 4 for 5 passing for 60 yards and a score, and Skyler Coppenrath caught three passes for 50 yards. Coppenrath had a sack and four tackles for a loss on defense. Next up for the Redskins (2-1, 4-1) is an important matchup against Cascade Christian (2-0, 5-0), currently ranked second in 1A, at Memorial Field on Friday night.

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100-yard game and the Saints beat the Bears 26-18 on Sunday to remain unbeaten. “We knew the formula coming into this game was to remain patient, to run the football effectively, to be very efficient in the passing game and to take care of the football, priority No. 1,” Brees said, “and we were able to do all those things.” Brees was 29-of-35 passing for 288 yards in his first victory in four career games at Soldier Field. Garrett Hartley matched a career high with four field goals as New Orleans (5-0) picked up its first win in Chicago since a 31-10 victory on Oct. 8, 2000. Graham continued his torrid start for the Saints, catching 10 balls for 135 yards in his fourth consecutive 100-yard game — matching an NFL record for a tight end. Tony Gonzalez was the first to accomplish the streak in 2000, and Graham matched the surge in 2011.

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B4

Fun ’n’ Advice

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

Dilbert

Red and Rover

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

Parents-in-law begin to get cozy

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Basset

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

DEAR ABBY: My son and his wife, “Carole,” have been married for two years. I was recently introduced to her father, “Ted,” who has been alone for 13 years. Carole told me later in no uncertain terms that I cannot have a romantic relationship with her father. Then she repeated the same thing to him. Do you think it’s right for adult children to dictate to their parents who they can and cannot see? Ted and I are perplexed. We really like each other and would like to see where this relationship could go. We laugh easily together, cook in the kitchen well together, can talk for hours and generally are very compatible. We have both discussed our pasts and have been honest with each other. What’s your opinion? Deserves to Be Happy in Florida

DEAR ABBY to convey? People who have addicVan Buren tions are usually in denial until they have no other choice but to face it. Your feeling guilty won’t help this situation. Being supportive of your longtime friend and making sure that when you’re together there is no wagering happening (i.e., on sporting events) would be helpful. The rest is up to him.

Abigail

Dear Abby: I recently ended a two-year relationship with my boyDear Deserves: Before the rela- friend. We are both 20. He was a tionship goes further, you and Ted great boyfriend — always patient, should step back and ask yourselves kind, gentle and loving. However, I what might happen if this romance was often impatient, short-tempered doesn’t work out. Would the hurt and controlling. feelings disrupt the family dynamic? These issues were my personal If this can be handled thoughtfully, problems. I always tried to work on with grace and maturity, I agree that them, but although it got better, I you deserve to be happy. knew I wasn’t treating him the way While adult offspring may try to I should. I ended things with him dictate what their parents can and because I felt guilty. cannot do, as mature adults, you do It has been a month now, and I’m not have to blindly accept it. having second thoughts about having ended it with an almost-perfect Dear Abby: I have been friends person. I miss him. Would it be with “Kurt” for many years. We met unwise to reach out to him again? during Little League, and as we got Broken Up but Not Over It older we stood up in each other’s wedding. He was my best man. Dear Not Over It: Not necessarKurt’s marriage is in trouble ily. But before you do, allow yourself because he has a gambling problem. a period of introspection during I feel guilty because I never said which you focus less on your missing anything to him about it when we him and concentrate on why you were together at the casino and he were abusive to him. A man with his was spending more money than he qualities deserves to be treated with could afford. I was with him only a more respect than you showed him. handful of times, but I still think I The truism, “If you don’t value should have spoken up. what you’ve got, you will lose it,” Should I have? Or would it have applies to relationships. mattered if I did? Kurt is going to Gamblers Anonymous meetings now, _________ trying to save his marriage. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, Guilty in Wisconsin

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby. com.7889-

Dear Guilty: You could have said something to your friend, but the question is, would Kurt have listened and accepted what you were trying by Mell Lazarus

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Look forward to an inheritance, settlement, contract or reimbursement. Make final alterations to a job or goal you are working toward. Romance is on the rise, and a promise someone made to you will be honored. 3 stars

Rose is Rose

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Keep life simple and refrain from sharing personal information. Emotional encounters will be difficult to handle and can lead to a dispute. A change in the dynamic of a partnership is likely to cause regrets. Avoid taking on added responsibilities. 3 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Pickles

by Brian Crane

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Choose your words wisely and pick and choose your battles. Focus on finances, medical issues and especially home and family. Nurturing and protecting what you have will be well worth your while. Someone may try to take advantage of your generosity. 2 stars

by Eugenia Last

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): By helping others, you will attract attention and the possibility of a position that interests you. A change at home will be positive. An investment will pay off and boost your status. Remain open regarding your plans. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Share your thoughts, feelings and plans. Get together with friends or consider getting involved in a community event. Avoid getting implicated in secret plans that might get you into trouble with someone you love. 4 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Show off a little, and you will make a good impression with someone who has something to offer you. A change of plans must not throw you off guard. Use your clout, knowledge, expertise and connections to keep things running smoothly. 4 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Look for alternate ways to use your skills. Talk to someone influential, and you will get the inside scoop about a better position. Problems at home will surface if you aren’t attentive. A change at home will help as well as promote love. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You have more choices than you realize. Look at your attributes, skills and connections, and you will discover that you can network your way to a better position. Someone will try to inch back into your life. Don’t be too accommodating. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll be offended easily and are best to keep your distance from people who tend to meddle and interfere. Put your effort into selfimprovement and meeting any deadline you’ve been given. Invest in your skills and your home. 2 stars

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have more control than you realize, so make a move or decision that suits you. Travel and socializing will promote new friendships. Love, romance and having fun should be your goal. Don’t let someone else disrupt your plans. 5 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Control your emotions. Listen, observe and save your thoughts until you have all the information you need to come up with a viable solution. Less anger and more help will ensure that you don’t upset someone you love. 3 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Focus on what you can do to improve your financial, emotional or physical wellbeing. Someone you work with will have a money issue that can end up costing you. Use innovative ideas to gain support and reinforce your goals. 5 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

B5

Preps: Riders sweep Redskins in volleyball CONTINUED FROM B1 currently tied for first place with North Kitsap and “The full squad was Sequim, hosts Bremerton together for the first time, (0-1, 0-7). and there was hope of a good result,” Foden said folSequim 3, lowing the loss to Port Klahowya 0 Angeles. SEQUIM — The Wolves “Although the score didn’t go the way [we] won in three sets to remain wanted, the way [we] played in a three-way tie for first was a great improvement.” place in the Olympic League with Port Angles and North Kitsap. Volleyball Sequim won 25-20, Port Angeles 3, 25-14, 25-23. The Wolves were led by Port Townsend 0 Alyse Armstrong, who had PORT TOWNSEND — The Roughriders held their 24 assists, two kills and one place at the top of the Olym- stuff block, and Caitlin Stofpic League standings with a ferahn’s 12 kills and two three-set win over the Red- stuffs. “We played very well as skins 25-13, 25-17, 25-15. Maddy Hinrichs had 13 a team,” Sequim coach Jenkills, 12 digs and served a nie Webber Heilman said of perfect 7 for 7 for Port Ange- Thursday’s match. “Alyse was setting well les. Holli Williams was 11/13 serving with three and spreading out our aces, 33 assists, one block, offense. Caitlin was getting four kills and four digs, some great swings at the while Kendra Harvey con- net, plus getting some good tributed 17 digs, two aces blocks. “Overall we were serving and served 16/16. Also for the Riders, well with 90 percent servBailee Jones had six kills, ing, which made it hard for and Brittany Norberg Klahowya to run their added kills, and served offense.” Hannah Hudson added 14/16 with 2 aces. Sarah Steinman finished with five 11 perfect passes and 24 digs, and Emma LeBlanc kills and a pair of digs. Megan Lee and Megan added 14 digs and was Juran led Port Townsend 24/24 serving with two aces. Kate Harker contributed with 14 and 12 digs, respecfive kills and two stuff tively. Rio Golden added four blocks to the Wolves’ win, kills and five digs, Amy Kylee Salazar had five kills Hemsley had four assists, and one stuff block, Emily Avery Selisch contributed Wallner had five kills, and three kills and Baili shaw seven digs and Sydney Munn finished with three finished with six digs. “It was the silly mistakes kills. Sequim (2-0, 5-3) plays that caught up with us in the end,” Redskins coach at North Mason (0-1, 1-7) on Tuesday night. Nettie Hawkins said. “PA is a well-rounded team, and ran a quicker Quilcene 3, tempo than us, and we Puget Sound seemed to be a step behind Adventist 0 the whole night. QUILCENE — The “There is always plenty of room for improvements.” Rangers remained undePort Townsend (1-1, 2-5) feated on the season by plays at Kingston (1-1, 3-3) opening 1B Sea-Tac League play with a three-set sweep on Tuesday. Port Angeles (2-0, 4-3), over the 613s.

Quilcene beat Puget Sound Adventist Academy 28-26, 25-17, 25-17. “This was our first league game and the first game was very close, but we stayed mentally strong and continued working hard,” Rangers coach Joni Crowell said of Thursday’s match. “We are a young team, so pressure situations are great for us to build our teamwork skills. “Our serving percentage was lower than it has been this season, so we will be focusing on serving under pressure and learning to keep hitting hard even when the score is close.” Quilcene senior Kiani Clissold was 10 for 12 serving with an ace, seven kills and four digs. Sammy Rae had an ace, five kills, two blocks and three digs. Freshman Allie Jones served 14/17 with a pair of aces, 19 assists and two tips for kill. Megan Weller contributed five aces, three kills and two digs; Katie Bailey was 10/11 serving five kills and three digs; and Bailey Kieffer had two aces, two kills and digs. The Rangers (6-0) play at Rainier Christian on Tuesday.

Seattle Christian 3, Chimacum 1 SEATAC — The Cowboys fell on the road to the Warriors in Nisqually League play 26-24, 22-25, 25-13, 25-19. “We had lots of good rallies but we just didn’t play consistently strong enough to win,” Chimacum coach Sally Dankert said after Wednesday’s game. Audrey Thacker had a personal-best match for the Cowboys with 11 kills, three blocks, 15 digs and one ace. Kiersten Snyder added 17 digs, three kills and was 100 percent serving. Also for Chimacum,

Olivia Baird had four kills, 12 digs and 1 ace; Lauren Thacker had four kills and two blocks; Alyssa Hamilton had three kills, one ace, four assists and nine digs; Megan Dukek had 20 assists, eight digs, two aces and one kill; and Sophia Thurston had two kills. The Cowboys (2-5) open up a three-match homestand today against Life Christian Academy.

Girls Swimming Port Angeles 112, North Kitsap 68

Reid won the 400 free relay (4:05.57). The Riders had the only two divers of the meet. Haili Farnam placed first with six points and Izi Livesay was second with four points. Port Angeles (4-1 overall) hosts Kingston (3-1) on Tuesday at William Shore Memorial Pool.

Boys Tennis North Kitsap 6, Port Angeles 1 POULSBO — The Riders were handed their first loss of the season on the road against the undefeated Vikings (4-0, 6-0). “We had opportunities that we let slip away,” Port Angeles coach Brian Gundersen said. “We were in a lot of sets that could have gone either way, and we came up a bit short.” Daniel Manwell and Hayden Kays Erdmann were the Riders lone winners. The pair won the No. 2 singles match over Jake McCown and Adam Lemmon 7-6, 7-6. “Daniel and Hayden’s experience played a major role in their close victory,” Gunderson said. “They saved their best tennis for the biggest moments.” Connor Heilman and Tanner Gochnour lost a close No. 3 singles match to Joe Creason and Isaac Strewn 5-7, 6-1, 6-4. Port Angeles No. 3 singles player Nick Fritschler took Robbie Henshaw to the third set before falling 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Port Angeles (1-1, 4-1) hosts North Mason (0-2, 0-4) today.

POULSBO — The Roughriders improved to 4-0 in the Olympic League with a come-from-behind win over the Vikings. North Kitsap won the first event and jumped to an early lead 8-6. The Riders countered with a one-two-three sweep in the next event 200 freestyle and regained the lead 19-11, and retained it for the rest of the match. Brooke Sires took first in the crucial 200 free with a time of 2 minutes, 21.84 seconds. Jessica Burke finished second and Roisin Cowan-Kuist placed third. Port Angeles placed first in nine of 12 events and outscored the Vikings in eight of 12 events. Jane Macias and Ashlee Reid were double winners for the Riders. Macias won the 200 individual medley (2 minutes, 26.9 seconds) and 500 freestyle (5:53.67), while Reid took the 50 freestyle (26.83 seconds) and 100 backstroke (1:05.77). Carter Juskevich added a first-place finish for the Riders in the in the 100 breaststroke with a time of 1:14.53. Cross Country Port Angeles also had Clark, Suess win two relay wins. Hailey at Discover Bay Scott, Megan McKenna, PORT TOWNSEND — Cowan-Kuist and Sires took the 200 freestyle relay Port Townsend junior Ryan (1:58.30), and Audra Per- Clark continued his stellar rizo, Macias, Juskevich and season by winning the

three-way meet with Port Angeles and Sequim at Disovery Bay Golf Course. The girls varsity race was won by Roughriders sophomore Willow Suess. Clark took the boys varsity 5,000-meter race with a time of 17 minutes and 20.47 seconds. Port Angeles’ Peter Butler was second with a time of 17:33.20, while Sequim’s Brendon Despain finished third (17:36.36). The Wolves also had the next five placers (Peter Ohnstad, Mikey Cobb, Chris Jeffko, Jackson Oliver and Christian Ash), and placed first as a team with 25 points. Port Angeles was second with 47. Port Townsend had 71. Sequim’s Oscar Herrera won the JV race with a time of 20:15.43.

Suess wins girls race Suess won the 5,000meter girls race with a time of 21:49.18. The Riders took first place and had each of the top five finishers. Elizabeth Stevenson was second (21:56.10), Jolene Millsap placed third (23:22.19), Annika Pederson was fourth (23:34.33) and Taylor Jones placed fifth (23:52.46). Port Angeles had 15 points. The Riders claimed seven of the top 10 places. Erin Vig was the highest finisher for the second-place Wolves (61 points). Vig placed sixth with a time of 24:18.19. Hannah Trailer was Port Townsend’s highest placer in the girls race, placing ninth with a time of 24:43.68. Teammate Peri Muellner finished 10th (24:46.67). Stevens Middle School swept the middle school races, with Cameron Butler taking the boys race and Gracie Long winning on the girls side.

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3020 Found FOUND: CDs. In case, near Port Angeles Walmart, call to ID. (360)681-8009

3023 Lost LOST: Cat. Brown tabby, w h i t e t r i a n g l e o n chest, white paws, responds to “Celine,” microchipped, Dominion Terrace, Seq. 504-2417. LOST: Dog. Gold Pomeranian, microchipped, off O’Brien Rd., near Hwy 101. (360)912-4042

4026 Employment General COOK Apply in person at Downriggers

2 Available Positions SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST & SCHEDULER Versatile & responsible team player, for busy front office. Must have excellent interpersonal, customer svc., & keyboarding skills. Recent exper in health care office pref’d. F.T., w/benes S o m e eve. h r s. B a s e pay $12 hr. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. http://peninsula behavioral.org EOE

CAREGIVER needed, prefer CNA, HCA, but n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l Cherrie, (360)683-3348

ACCOUNTS Receivable Coordinator: Performs all functions of A/R. Degree preferred experience to substitute. Can do attitude and sense of humor a MUST! Drug Free Workplace. Email resumes to hr@sunset doitbest.com or drop off at 518 Marine Drive. D E N TA L A s s i s t a n t Looking for a motivated, f r i e n d l y t e a m p l aye r ! Must be certified. Awesome office and staff. Benefits included. Send resume today! DentistIn Sequim@gmail.com

Aw a r d w i n n i n g i n s u rance agency is seeking an experienced, Property & Casualty (P&C) licensed sales producer to join our Por t Towns e n d b a s e d a g e n c y. Great sales and customer service skills are a must. Insurance licensed preferred/will assist q u a l i f i e d c a n d i d a t e s, good organizational skills, above average computer skills (Windows, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel), 2 years plus of prior work experience preferred. Compensation will include: hourly salary, benefits, bonus, paid holidays, sick days/vacation pay. Star ting rate will be based upon experience and abilities. Send resume to: Allstate, 1304 West Sims Way, Po r t Tow n s e n d , WA 98368.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659 CARRIER ROUTE AVAILABLE Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Port Townsend area route. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle. Early morning delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill out application at 147 W. Washington, Sequim. Call Jasmine at (360)207-5577

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CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

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COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

FOUND: Keys. Toyota, on Vista Del Mar, Sequim, call to ID. (360)683-3790

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General General General


Classified

B6 MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. O SAY CAN YOU SEE Solution: 10 letters

A Z N A T S E M Y R O L G N S By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke

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C P E V R T U N E L R C P N B

E Y O E A B E R D O I E I A D

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R C V W R W M U T R R T N B E

E E A A E F O S E B R N A A Y

N S V E N R I M O O E L I R S

D E S A P H A W P R L V O H Y

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O N S E T S R M M A E O L H S H T A T B L S E U K S K R T O C S V N O ‫ګ‬ T T M ‫ګ‬ R I E ‫ګ‬ O S N F T G G ‫ګ‬ A T N A N O I L S S S F 10/7

American, Anthem, Arenas, Ballparks, Banner, Brave, Bursting, Dawns, Event, Flag, Fort, Free, Glare, Glory, Grave, Heart, History, Home, Land, Melody, Military, Motto, Music, Navy, Peace, Poem, Power, Proudly, Renditions, Rockets, Salute, Sing, Smith, Song, Sporting, Stand, Stanza, Stars, Steam, Stripes, Super Bowl, Trust, Tune, Verse, Victory, Wave Yesterday’s Answer: Animals THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ZISEE ©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

DARNB (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

34 Falco of “The Sopranos” 35 *Jalapeño, for one 37 Listen to 40 Polar explorer Richard 41 Menu words 44 Most off-the-wall 46 Sounded like a chicken 48 Buttocks, informally 50 Loos, for short

10/7/13

52 Necklace gem 54 Soft leather 55 Plumber’s concerns 56 Reek 57 Football game division 58 Hodgepodge 60 Real estate measurement 61 Curved 62 “That makes sense”

FOECEF

NUFSUG

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

DOWN 1 Labor leader who vanished in 1975 2 Range dividing Europe and Asia 3 Southwestern tablelands 4 Kiln users 5 Adaptable, electrically 6 Wilderness home 7 Rim 8 Reacts to a tearjerker 9 Pet’s home away from home 10 Some hotel lobbies 11 *Start-up capital 12 “Rule, Britannia” composer 13 Depressing situation, with “the” 21 Early Beatle Sutcliffe 25 Enjoy King and Koontz 27 Cohort of Curly 28 Future blossoms 29 Felt pain 31 Director Ephron 32 Kenton of jazz 33 Difficult

10/7/13

P O E M U S I C I A Y Y A U G

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: Yesterday's

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ACROSS 1 A dromedary has one 5 Smart guy? 10 Exec’s “I need it now!” 14 Black-and-white snack 15 Military training group 16 Actress Hatcher 17 Like a clock reading 5:05 at 5:00 18 “Eat!” 19 Tenant’s expense 20 *Space-saving computer monitor 22 Fateful March day 23 Equipment on a balance sheet, e.g. 24 Immunity builder 26 Cuban dance 30 Defective cars 33 Devious laughs 36 “That stings!” 38 Often __: about half the time 39 Foofaraw 40 Untidy waking-up hair condition, and what the first word of the answers to starred clues can be 42 Historical span 43 Posh 45 Freezer bag feature 46 Bluish hue 47 Go away 49 Southern speech feature 51 Turn out to be 53 Zodiac transition points 57 Arizona Indian 59 *Title racehorse in a 2003 film 63 Mont Blanc, par exemple 64 Rabbit relatives 65 Foreign Legion cap 66 Falsehoods 67 “Fame” singer Cara 68 First family’s garden site? 69 Oater stronghold 70 Tickle pink 71 Cubicle furnishing

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(Answers tomorrow) ENACT CHANGE SCRIPT Jumbles: ROYAL Answer: The pony with the negative attitude was — A “NEIGH-SAYER”

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General General General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County ON-CALL CNA/RNA: Immediate openings, part/full-time, MEDICAL ASSISTANT all shifts. Wright’s Home Join multi-disciplinar y team supporting consuCare (360)457-9236. mers with chronic mental illnesses in an outpatient CONTROLLER-Forest setting. Must be program Operations. Multi-task- grad & license-eligible. ing “operations” con- M e n t a l h e a l t h ex p e r troller responsible for pref’d. Resume to PBH, the preparation of fi- 118 E. 8th St., Port Angn a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s eles, WA 98362. http:// peninsulabehavioral.org and budgets. Directly EOE supervises three accounting positions. POSITION Knowledge of internal ANNOUNCEMENT controls and experience with annual aud- Entry or lateral firefightits is a requirement. er/paramedic. For more Minimum 4 yr. degree info and application visit and 5 yrs. manufactur- us at Clallamfire3.org. ing experience, Forest Products background RECEPTIONIST preferred but not rePar t-time, 20 hours quired. Send resume’ per week with some to Human Resources full-time for vacation fill Dept., PO Box 2469, in. Po r t A n g e l e s , WA If you have an outgo98362 EOE i n g p e r s o n a l i t y, a sense of humor and can multi-task, this is EXPERIENCED the job for you. PLUMBER The r ight candidate Full-time, benefits. should have excellent P.A., (360)452-8525 telephone manners, gr e a t p e o p l e s k i l l s, phone sales and acINTERIOR Finish: counting experience. L o o k i n g fo r a n ex p $10 per hour. tradesman in all areas Please email resume of home improvement. and cover letter with Tr u c k / t o o l s . W a g e 3 references to: DOE starting at 40K. hbotts@peninsula trina@bydesign dailynews.com groupinc.net No phone calls, please KWA HOMECARE Part/full-time Caregivers. Benefits, Flexible Hours. Call P.A. (360)452-2129 Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 MEDICAL BILLER Busy medical practice seeks experienced office/administrative manager and a medical billing specialist. Computer proficiency: QuickBooks, Microsoft o f f i c e , e m p l oy m e n t law, payroll, accounting, business liabilities. Email cover letter, resume and references: management@ paragon dermatology.com or fax (360)681-6222.

The La Push Police department has a job opening for a Police Officer in La Push, Washington. Please visit our website at www.quileutenation.org for a complete job description and job application. Or you may call (360)374-4366. Closes October 17, 2013 or until filled.

RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Full time, great benefits, M-F! Support the well-being of our residents through the creation of care plans, interaction with family members, and being a key m e m b e r o f o u r team. Must be a WA State licensed RN. Ideal candidate is experienced, personable, dependable, and enthusiastic. Give us a call to talk about the position and schedule a tour! Contact HR: (360)683-3348 550 W. Hendrickson Sequim, WA 98382

SHORT ORDER COOK Experienced. Apply in person Tues.-Thurs. 8-2, 612 S. Lincoln St., P.A. STYLIST with clientele wanted to lease a station in a newly remodeled salon. Join in a great, relaxed workplace in P.A. (360)461-0565

4080 Employment Wanted CAREGIVER: 35 years e x p . Pe r s o n a l c a r e , housekeeping, cooking, errands, etc. Good local refs. (360)504-2227. COMPUTER Care S a l e s a n d S e r v i c e. 21+yr exp. Desktop/Office computers built or upgraded. Virus removal.Free service call in Sequim. $20min chg outside. Forks/PT by apt. Email chet@olypen.com 808-9596 cell EXPERIENCED caregiver wants to assist you with respite care in your ow n h o m e w h i l e yo u take care of business. Light duty only. Avail. 1 0 - 5 p . m . d a i l y, n o weekends. (360)452-6447

AFFORDABLE PARKWOOD Very clean and well built 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,292 sf home in a great corner location in Par kwood. Easy care landscape with river rock and fruit trees, new carpet throughout, roomy kitchen, master bedroom with HOUSECLEANING Professional, efficient, private bath and walk-in fa s t . M y s u p p l i e s o r closet. MLS#271566. $47,999 yours, one time or ongoGail 477-9361 ing. (360)582-7643. Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189 HOUSEKEEPER Reasonable, efficient, reliable. (360)581-2349. A LOT OF HOUSE FOR ANY BUYER! RUSSELL This home has a lot of ANYTHING space, character and 775-4570 or 681-8582 yard with attached 2 car garage. Completely TAYLOR’S Proper ty fenced and adorned with Maintenance Available fruit trees with southern all year around for any exposure. Updates inl a w n c a r e n e e d e d , clude: kitchen, baths and moss removal and odd paint. Several new winj o b s . J u s t C a l l dows and heaters. New ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 1 - 5 2 6 0 o r gutters. Tons of storage. Large bedrooms. Cherry (360) 565-6660. hardwood floors. WalkAlways done to your ing distance to the hossatisfaction! pital, clinics, waterfront trail and bus stop. Seller YOUNG COUPLE Early currently rents out the S i x t i e s. ava i l a bl e fo r bedrooms, income proseasonal cleanup, weed- ducer. ing, trimming, mulching MLS#272122. $209,000. and moss removal. We Holly Coburn specialize in complete (360)457-0456 garden restorations. ExWINDERMERE cellent references. Call PORT ANGELES for free estimate (360)457-1213. A LOT TO OFFER! New paint and car pet 105 Homes for Sale t h r o u g h o u t . 1 , 3 7 6 s f, Large entertaining deck. Clallam County Private back yard, fenced, nicely land4 PLEX SEQUIM Newer low maintenance scaped with small fish 4 plex in great Sequim pond. 12’ x 14’ shop with location. Each unit is 2 power. Newer 200 AMP bedroom 1 ½ baths with electric service installed. laundry area and single Fenced dog run. Close c a r g a r a g e s . P r i va t e to Robin Hill Park, Dispatios and yard area. covery Trail & Lake SolThese units have separ- mar. What are you waitate water and power me- ing for! MLS#271986/538455 ters and could easily be $179,000 sold separately as conJeff Biles dos. Great place to put (360)477-6706 your money with excelTOWN & COUNTRY lent rental history at $800+ per unit! MLS#272144. $399,000. SELL YOUR HOME Brooke Nelson IN PENINSULA (360)417-2812 CLASSIFIED COLDWELL BANKER 1-800-826-7714 UPTOWN REALTY HANDYMAN for Hire: Property maintenance, painting, dump runs, minor home repairs, house washing, etc. Free estimates. Available anytime. Call (360)582-6207

BEST BUY ON THE BAY Waterfront home, panor a m i c v i ew s ! B u i l t i n 2002, 3,180 sf, 3 br, 2.5 bath, architect designed, quality custom build, upscale interior and exterior features, 1.41 acres, beach access, beautiful low maintenance gardens. MLS#272131. $825,000. Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

FSBO $237,000 Open plan triple wide 2300 sf, 3 br., 2 bath, large bonus room or 4th bedroom. Mountain view on 1.01 acres, close to Discovery Trail, not in the Carlsborg Urban Growth Area. Covered front porch, large rear deck, BIRD LOVERS extra large 28 x 36 DELIGHT! Valley views from living (1008 sf) detached gararea and patio, state of age and workshop. (360)582-9782 the ar t kitchen, 3 br., plus den over 1,700 sf, large concrete pad by garage, irrigation water ava i l a bl e fo r o u t d o o r use. MLS#469080/270720 $217,900 Deb Kahle (360) 683-6880 FSBO: Mountain View WINDERMERE Custom Home. 3 bdrm, SUNLAND 2.5 baths on 1 acre. SolCLALLAM BAY: 4.23 i d m a p l e c a b i n e t r y acres, A-frame home, 5 t h r o u g h o u t , p r o p a n e miles from Lake Ozette, cooking. In ground prescountry living with best surized irrigation water, fishing and hunting in electric heat pump, fully the area and marketable insulated, heated shop with 220V service. RV timber. $90,000. parking, 12x16 outbuild(360)963-2156 ing, many custom feaCOMPLETELY tures. $299,000. Call to REFURBISHED see (360)452-4347. 3 Br., 2 bath manufact u r e d h o m e, fe a t u r e s LITTLE HOUSE IN THE split br floor plan, brand WOODS new appliances, flooring, This new listing nestled fixtures and paint, free in the evergreens enjoys standing wood stove, the peace and privacy large deck, outbuildings, that we all long for, yet fruit trees and garden. it’s only 12 minutes to MLS#514447/271594 town, cozy home on 3 $149,500 acres with a pond. Terry Peterson $145,000. MLS#272153. (360)683-6880 Kathy Brown WINDERMERE (360)417-2785 SUNLAND COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY CUTE, CLEAN,COMFY, AND CONVENIENT! WHY PAY This little gem is a barSHIPPING ON g a i n o n a l l c o u n t s. 2 beds, 1 bath, newer roof, INTERNET wood stove, large kitchPURCHASES? en with nice appliances, and centrally located. SHOP LOCAL MLS#272112. $99,000. Pam Church 452-3333 peninsula PORT ANGELES dailynews.com REALTY

LOT WITH BARN This .39 acre lot comes with a barn and is located inside the city limits. All utilities are available for hook-up. Located on the west side of Port Angeles and on the Olympic Discovery Trail. MLS#271169. $39,000. Jeanine Cardiff (360)460-9221 JACE The Real Estate Company

SPACIOUS IN SUNLAND Water view side of hilltop dr., 3 br., 2 bath, over 2,000 SF, vaulted ceilings, FP, knotty pine, wood deck and cour tya r d p a t i o, d ay l i g h t basement with woodstove, enjoy community pool, tennis, clubhouse and beach. MLS#495367/271216 $210,000 Team Schmidt MT. PLEASANT AREA Mike: 460-0331 RAMBLER Irene: 460-4040 On 1.39 acres. Country WINDERMERE kitchen with breakfast SUNLAND bar, extensive orchard, berries, fenced garden STARTER OR area and dog run. Pond INVESTMENT with waterfall and lots of Adjacent to greenbelt in flowers. 28’x28’ atrium sunland, 2 and 2, 1,354 fo r f u n a n d h o b b i e s . sf, roof replaced in 2002, Small workshop off gar- PUD sealed duct work, a g e . A l l p r i v a t e , y e t backyard with flagstone close in. patio, 2 car garage with MLS#270626. $229,900. workbench and storage. Paul Beck MLS#550815/272169 (360)461-0644 $179,000 WINDERMERE Deb Kahle PORT ANGELES (360) 683-6880 WINDERMERE RIVER FRONT + SUNLAND SWEEPING VIEWS Not only do you have Strait to Elwha to MounGrab Their tain views from the bluff ATTENTION! outside this 4 bed, 3 bath 2,794 sf home on 5 Add: acres, but the lower picnic area is right on the fabled Elwha River. Do Pictures you like to travel? There’s a RV garage. There’s also an apar tBorders ment above one of the 2 g a ra g e s s o s o m e o n e c a n w a t c h o ve r yo u r Logos home while you’re on vacation. Great views Bold Lines from the master suite, living and dining rooms plus the extra bedroom 360-452-8435 and the office. Den/office has door leading to exte- 1-800-826-7714 rior. 2 double garages. 2 Pole buildings for picwww.peninsula nicking, storage. MLS#271909. $394,900. dailynews.com Brooke Nelson (360)417-2812 or: COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

306 Real Estate Farms/Ranches

W E S T O F P. A . : 1 2 JAMES & acres, private water sysASSOCIATES INC. tem, 3,000 sf home, pole Property Mgmt. barn, outbuildings, (360)417-2810 woods, fenced irrigated HOUSES/APT IN P.A. pasture, $525,000. Call A 1 br 1 ba ...............$500 for appt. (360)477-5274. A Studio util incl .......$500 H 2 br 1 ba ..............$600 505 Rental Houses A 2 br 1 ba ...............$700 H 3 br 1 ba ...............$700 Clallam County H 2 br 1.5 ba ............$875 CENTRAL P.A.: Lg. 2 H 3 br 2 ba ...............$900 Br., 1 ba, water view, no H 3 br 2 ba .............$1000 smoke/pets. $700, 1st, H 3+ br 1.5 ba ........$1200 H 4 br 2.5 ba ..........$1250 last dep. (360)457-3118. H 3 br 3 ba 5 ac .....$1500 Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

CHERRY HILL: 3 BR, 1 1/2 ba. $950. 1st and deposit. Owner is licensed real estate agent. (360)797-4802.

605 Apartments Clallam County

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013 B7

620 Apartments Jefferson County

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

SEQUIM: Fur nished 1 WASHER/DRYER Br. $380, plus electric. Magic Chef washer, 20 (360)417-9478. Email lb cpacity, $125. Super susanunpc@gmail.com capacity Kenmore dryer, 70 series, $125. (360)379-4100 1163 Commercial

P.A.: Quality, newer 2 P.T.: Fur nished, 1 br. Br., DW, W/D, NS, NP. apt. Avail. now! Are you $650. (360)796-3560. tired of keeping track of all those monthly utilities P.A.: West side studio. bills? Relax, if you have c l e a n , n e w e r, q u i e t , your own phone the rest 605 Apartments W / D , u t i l . i n c l . N o of your utilities are incl. Clallam County P.A.: 920 E. 10th St., smoke/pets. $600, $500 in the $960/mo. rent! near college, 3 Br., 2 ba, deposit. (360)460-8672, T h a t ’s r i g h t , e l e c t r i c, 2 car gar. $1,100. CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 before 1:00 p.m. heat, water, sewer, high(360)477-0865 ba, no smoking/pets. S E Q : 2 r o o m S t u d i o, speed internet and cable $500. (360)457-9698. TV. Also incl. is private $595. Walk to shopping! laundry, enterance, and tourfactory.com/367154 parking. No pets/smoke. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, Jenny, (360)379-8282 quiet, 2 Br., excellent S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 references required. Br., great location. $700, $700. (360)452-3540. $700 dep. 809-3656. P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, view, 1 SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 ba, inyr. lease. Small dog 35 cludes W/S/G. $1,100 lb. or less negotiable. month. (360)452-6452. $1,150 mo., $1,150 dep. Avail. now. 457-3099.

P.A.: 1015 E. 4th St., 3+ br., 1.5 bath, first, deposit, $1,500. No smoke/ P.A.: Furnished Cottage. pets. (360)460-9958. $595. Water/Sewer pd. Owner is licensed real P.A.: 1 Br. cottage, par- estate agent. tially furnished, 1 block (360)797-4802 from Swains. Clean, no pets/smoke. $550, f/l, Properties by $400 dep. Refs. Landmark. portangeles(360)461-4980 landmark.com

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, mobile DISCO BAY: Waterfront, with addition, fruit trees, SEQ: 3 Br., near schools newly renovated 3 Br., 2 fenced 1/2 ac. $700 mo. and shopping. $995 mo. ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. tourfactory.com/1050525 (360)504-2599 $900. (360)460-2330. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath, on P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, gar. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 2 ba, Craig Ave., off Race. $1,100 mo. $1,100 se- W/D, no smoking/pets. $850 first/dep. 460-4294 curity. (360)417-0153. $725. Diane, 461-1500.

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br., and 2 Br. Apts. 2nd floor clean, light, $553-$661 incl. util! No smoke/pet maybe. (360)504-2668 P.A.: 1 Br., no pets/ smoking, view. $550. (360)457-1695

Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

P. A . : 2 B r. , n o p e t s. $675 mo., 1st, last, dep. (360)670-9418

www.peninsula dailynews.com

6010 Appliances

Rentals

6025 Building

OFFICE SPACE Materials FOR SALE OR LEASE Lease purchase possible. Call Mark DeRou- WINDOWS: Brown, alus i e a t R E / M A X E ve r - minum, great for shop or green (360)457-6600. gr e e n h o u s e, ( 2 ) 3 x 6 , (2) 4x6, (1) 4x8, PROPERTIES BY (1) 3030. LANDMARK 665 Rental Last chance $100. 452-1326 (360)681-8034 after 6 Duplex/Multiplexes S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h SEQ: Dplx in town, su- Ave., Boardwalk Square. (360)683-3256 per clean 2 Br., 1 ba. 6035 Cemetery Plots $750 mo. (360)460-4089 VETERINARIAN www.mchughrents.com CLINIC ON HWY 101 R e a d y t o o p e r a t e a s BURIAL SPACES: (3) clinic or use as office adjoining burial spaces, 683 Rooms to Rent space. Priced to Sell Im- located in the Garden of Roomshares mediately. Call Mark De- Devotion, Mt. Angeles Rousie at RE/MAX Ever- Memorial Park, P.A. ROOM for rent/house green (360)457-6600. (206)322-0665 share. Room for rent. Share house with full use of laundry, kitchen 6005 Antiques & etc. 300/mo., plus 1/2 of Collectibles CHECK OUT OUR all utilities. 1st and last NEW CLASSIFIED r e q ’d . M u s t b e t i d y. C O RVA I R : ‘ 6 3 Tu r b o WIZARD AT Share with single adult S p y d e r C o u p e . R e www.peninsula male 56 yrs old. Contact stored, loaded. $10,500. dailynews.com 360-452-9884. (360)683-5871

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

R I F L E S : S ava g e 1 1 0 7mm mag, 3x9 scope, $425. Enfield 308 Norma Mag, 4x32 scope, $325. Mauser 98, 8mm, 4x32, $ 3 2 5 . S a va g e S u p e r Sport, 30.06, $225. Evenings, (360)457-0943 TIKKA T3 Light Stainless bolt action 300WSM, with steel recoil lug and bolt shroud, DNZ scope rings, $625. Tikka T3 Light Stainless bolt action 7mm Remington Magnum with DNZ scope rings, $575. (360)775-1544

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

FALL SPECIAL: +/- 4 cords seasoned wood plus wood spliter. $1,250 firm. (360)452-4254.

FIRE LOGS Dump truck load, $300 plus gas. Madrona, $400 p l u s g a s. S p l i t Wo o d Available, $400. (360)732-4328

D •I •R •E •C •T •O •R •Y

FENCING

TRACTOR

TREE SERVICE MAINTENANCE LAWN CARE

Lund Fencing

No job too small!

TREE SERVICE Jami’s PROPERTY

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From Curb To Roof

FOX PAINTING

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

457-6582 808-0439

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681-0132 www.dungenesslandscaper.com

TREE SERVICE

39878036

Inc.

360.460.4784 360.452.3355

• Tree Removal • Tree Trimming • Wind Sailing of Trees

360-461-7180 360-912-2061

Contractors Lic. GARLACM*044ND

DesperateHousewives

, LLC

(360) 2317Experience 14 808 Years desperate.housewives411@gmail.com desperatehousewives.weebly.com

References available

SPECIAL Small Load Delivery.com Soils - Bark - Gravel

360-681-0722 Lic # SERVIOP965R7

CLEANING

Commercial & Residential Cleaning Licenced & Bonded

REPAIR/REMODEL

General Contractors Water/Fire Damage Expertise Complete Home and Business Repair

457-5186

4 yards of Beauty Bark $125 (Includes delivery) -Call for sample-

808-1517

808 too, 2317 If(360) you are desperate we will come to the rescue.

CARPET CARE

Pacific Northwest Carpet Care • Van Mounted Unit • True Steam Cleaning • Stain Protection • Odor Neutralizer

ALSO OFFERING: • Air duct cleaning • Floor Tile & Grout cleaning • Linoleum Cleaning

360-565-1311

Lic.#FLAWKTS873OE

CALL NOW To Advertise

360-452-8435 OR 1-800-826-7714

93313247

flawktreeservice@yahoo.com We offer Senior Discounts

ARLAND GROOFING

SMALL LOAD DELIVERY

39881502

38861384

No Car Too Small, No Truck Too Big! We will beat any written estimate. Senior Discounts. Gift Certificates Available, Year Round Service Available.

We go that extra mile for your tree care

Serving the entire Peninsula

681-4303 • 452-MOSS (6677)

39867319

Licensed, Bonded & Insured

WWW.HALLERINC.COM

26636628

Bill’s Auto Detailing

$400 OFF NEW ROOF

32740271

AUTO DETAILING

We Deliver! 360-452-4161 301 Business Park Loop Sequim, WA 98362 www.kentgypsum.com

INC.

POWER WASHING • ROOF SERVICES ASPHALT SEALING & STRIPING

Honest & Reliable at a reasonable price 36799296

3 6 0 - 4 52 - 3 7 0 6 • w w w . n w h g . n e t

The Pacific Northwest Experts in Drywall Products

ROOFING

33746190

Appliances

23597511

Flooring

Since 1987 24614371

SUPPLY, INCORPORATED

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

"Give Haller a Holler!!!"

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

DRYWALL

Reg#FINIST*932D0

MAINTENANCE

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

Design & Construction.

32736526

Landscapes for The Northwest Lifestyle

GYPSUM

Cabinets

195133545

Landscapes by

ockburn.INC

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing Free Estimates • Senior Discounts Licensed Bonded • Insured

Expert Pruning

683-8328

Washington State Contractors License LANDSCI963D2

Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

PAINTING

(360) 582-9382

Mole Control 35597509

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE

C

360-683-4881

PRUNING

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S. Eunice St. APPLIANCE 914 Port Angeles SERVICE INC. 457-9875

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APPLIANCES

AA

LAWNCARE

TV Repair

-$%t1MBTNBt1SPKFDUJPOt$35 7JOUBHF"VEJP&RVJQNFOU

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If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right! Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

PAINTING

32743866

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22588145

Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

Contractor # GEORGED098NR Mfd. Installer Certified: #M100DICK1ge991KA

(360) (360)

Contr#KENNER1951P8

TV REPAIR

Visit our website: www.dickinsonexcavation.com Locally Operated for since 1985

In s id e , O u ts id e , A ny s id e

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COLUMC*955KD

Call (360) 683-8332

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116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

Larry Muckley

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

Painting & Pressure Washing

Done Right Home Repair

• Raods/Driveways • Grading • Utilities • Landscaping, Field Mowing & Rotilling • Snow Removal

• Doors/Windows • Concrete Work • Drywall Repair

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HOME REPAIR

No Job Too Small

Excavation and General Contracting • All Site Prep - includes Manufactured Homes • Land Clearing and Grubbing • Septic Systems • Rock Walls & Rockeries

Quality Work

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360-460-0518

RDDARDD889JT

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Grounds Maintenance Specialist • Mowing • Trimming • Pruning • Tractor Work • Landscaping • Sprinkler Installation and Repair 32741372

Lic. # ANTOS*938K5

27648136

22588179

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ANTHONY’S SERVICE

Columbus Construction • Tile • Kitchen & Bath • Custom Woodwork • Water Damage/Rot

23590152

Chad Lund

REPAIR/REMODEL

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

23595179

www.LundFencing.com

Serving Jefferson & Clallam County

✓ Senior Discount ✓ Yard Service ✓ Odd Jobs ✓ Hauling ✓ Brush Removal ✓ Hedge Trimming ✓ Roof/Gutter Cleaning ✓ Tree Pruning

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Larry’s Home Maintenance

MAINTENANCE

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Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

452-0755 775-6473

3A688614 10-06

SERVICE


Classified

B8 MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9292 Automobiles Others

BUICK: ‘89 Regal Super S p o r t . V- 6 , 3 . 1 L , 151,607 miles. $800/obo. 775-6387.

CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. O r a n g e , T- t o p , 6 5 K miles. $6,000. Call for details. (360)775-9996.

S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n 2 6 ’ . P r o j e c t b o a t . C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 7 P T $3,500/obo, or trade. Cruiser. Excellent condi(360)477-7719 tion, low mi. $6,750. (360)775-5426 SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speeds t e r . T w i n R o t e x . DODGE: ‘03 Caravan. Looks good. $3,500. $5,000. (360)452-3213. (360)457-9162 AMMO: (6) bricks 22 LR CHAIN LINK: 45’ of 3/8” ammo. $150. galvanized chain link, (360)457-4409 like new. $75. (360)379-1532 ART: Koa Wood car ving, two dolphins, beauti- C H E S T F R E E Z E R : 9 cubic feet, less than 4 ful. $85. (360)681-7579. years old, hardly used. AUTOGRAPH: Signed $177 cash. 504-2696. photo of Betty White, from Betty White Show CHEST WADERS: Camo, new, never wor n, (1950s). $100. 681-2968 sz. 9, 1200 gram. $90. AUTOGRAPH: Wallace (360)640-0556 Beery, 1950s. $150. CLAMPS: Woodworkers (360)681-2968 clamps, heavy duty, proBEAM: 16’ x 4” x 10”, fessional, good cond. douglas fir. $45. $20. (985)290-5769. (360)452-7721. CLOTHING: Women’s BED FRAME: Pine pole, c l o t h i n g , 2 2 / 2 4 W, 1 8 head and footboards, full pieces, nice sweaters, size, ex. cond. $195. jeans. $36. 681-4768. (360)452-5180 COFFEE SET: 4 piece, B E D RO O M S E T: A n - travel, still in box. $13. tique, drawers, mirrored (360)457-5720 vanity, head and footCRAB POTS: (2), with board. $200. 457-4241. r o p e s a n d b o ey s. $ 8 B I C Y C L E : M e n ’ s 7 each. (360)460-3434. speed, full size cruiser. CRAB RING: With rope $150/obo. and boey. $8. (360)452-9685 (360)460-3434 B I R D C AG E : L a r g e , Stainless steel, wheels, DESK: Computer desk, 1 8 ” x 2 7 . 5 ” x 3 1 ” , 2 ’ l e g attractive wood, 29” x 50”, drawers, filing. $25. height. $50. 460-4039. (360)681-0528 BIRD CAGE: New, large corner, 71” x 31” x 47”. DESK: Computer desk with chair. $25. $150 firm. (360)808-9182. (360)683-6242 BLANKET: World War II DINING TABLE: OctaArmy blanket. $20. gon, with captain chairs. (360)681-0814 $50/obo. (360)808-9182. BLENDER: Like new, DOLLHOUSE: Kid Kraft Black and Decker. $20. Bratz/Barbie, furnished (360)681-7579 10 rooms. 36” x 36” x 53”. $100. 452-6086. BOOTS: Leather work boots, Danner, 10.5 D, DRESSER: 6’9”, drawers, mirror, oak. $200. new, never worn. $200. (360)797-4262 (360)460-0123 BOWFLEX: Bowflex Pro DVD SET: “Are You Bee x e r c i s e m a c h i n e , i n g S e r ve d ,” a l l e p i manual. $100. sodes, $129 value. (360)457-0763 $69. (360)928-0236. C AT T R E E : 4 3 ” h i g h and 53” high. $50/obo. (360)452-2118

EARRINGS: Vintage clip-ons, 20 pair. $1-$5 per pair. (360)683-9295.

FIGURINES: Two young H U T C H : E x . c o n d . , MISC: Weed eater, Toro children, French attire, s m a l l e r , n a r r o w , 3 700, electric leaf blower. 14”. $20 for pair. $15 and $8. shelves, 3 drawers. (360)457-6343 (360)457-3414 $185. (360)681-2720. FIRE STARTERS: Box JAZZ CD: Charlie Parkof 64. $10. e r, Ke n B u r n s J a z z , (360)452-7967 Verve. $5. (360)457-5790 FREE: 27” Zenith TV, good cond. JAZZ CD: Charlie Park(360)460-4929 er with Strings: The M a s t e r Ta k e s , J a z z FREE: Cell phone Heritage. $8. 457-5790. charger, LG Envy 3 cell phone. (360)477-5036. K I T C H E N A I D : H e av y FREE: Computer desk, duty pro model, raise bowl. $110. Cash only. you haul. (360)457-4215 (360)452-9121 FREE: Futon, queen, LAMP: 1930s glass covery good condition. lonial lady with harp. (360)582-9697 $65. (360)683-9295. FREE: Kombucha startL I F E JACKET: Iners. (206)795-4345. f l a t a b l e B F D, c a m o, F R E E : M o d e l T Fo r d adult, new in box. $80. spark coil and vibrators. (360)460-0123 (360)681-0528 MATTRESS: Queen, pilF U TO N : Q u e e n s i ze, low top. $100. wood frame, teal cover. (360)809-0985 $200. (360)452-5796. M I C R OWAV E : W h i r l GARDEN STOOL: Fold- pool, black, 1.6 cubic ft., ing, pockets for tools, 1200 watt, near new. Mintcraft, new. $20. $85. (360)681-8592. (360)457-6431 MIRRORS: 7, variety, all GENERATOR: 3 years framed, $5-$20. old, Steelcraft, 1300 (360)452-9685 watts, used once. $150 firm. (360)670-3836. M I S C : B a g B oy G o l f Cart, $8. Channel back GOLF CLUBS: Men’s, chair, $12. almost new Wilson (360)457-3414 “Staff,” excellent. $30. (360)385-2776. MISC: Cage, black, wire, GOLF CLUBS: Nice full dogs or birds, $25. Juicset, 3 woods, 9 irons, Ar- er, Jack La Lanne, $35. (360)452-9121 nold Palmer. $45. (360)385-2776 MISC: Graco Play and G R I L L : G a s, 2 ye a r s Pack, used twice, $40. old, needs some clean- Deluxe pressure cooker, $30. (360)681-0814. ing, good cond. $35. (360)683-8979 MISC: Hall tree, oak, HAT: Black, felt, top hat, mirror, $25. Table, rattan, 2 chairs, glass top, new. $70. $10. (360)477-4029 (360)379-1532

MIXER ATTACHMENT Kitchenaid stand mixer roto-sliver/shredder. $25. (360)683-4322. MIXER ATTACHMENT Kitchenaid stand mixer food/meat grinder. $25. (360)683-4322 M I X E R : M a g i c bu l l e t mixer system. $25. (360)457-4215 MODEL KIT: Submarine model kit, Robbe U-47, NIB 5’ long, motorized. $150. (360)504-2401. MONITOR: View-sonic, 19” CRT monitor. $50. (360)417-2641

PRINT: Cutthroat trout SWIVEL MOUNT: For a print, 24” x 30”, beauti- Cannon downrigger. fully matted and wood $40. (360)775-2288. framed. $45. 452-5180. TABLE: Hospital overR A K E : A l u m i n u m , 3 ’ bed table, adjustable, width, 7’ handle, for con- with wheels. $39. (360)928-0236 crete. $10. (360)457-4971 TA B L E S AW: C ra f t s REFRIGERATOR: 3.3 man 10” stationary, routC u b i c f t . , Ke n m o r e, e r t a b l e , d u s t b a g , manual. $200. 452-8123 small freezer. $65/obo. (360)452-2118 TABLES: Wood, 30” x RIFLE: Mauser 95 Car- 30”, $30. Wood, 30” x 47”, $40. (360)670-6195 bine MF6 Argentine. $200. (360)379-4134. TILE: New 2” x 2” ceRIMS: Set of stock 6 lug ramic tiles, 25 sheets, Toyota rims, from 4Run- 12” x 12” per box, 4 boxes. $50 ea. 452-2468. ner. $75/obo. (360)912-4536 TIRES: Studded, S A D D L E : W e s t e r n , P215/75R15, used one season, like new. $175. 15.5” seat. $75/obo. (360)477-1442 (360)457-7600.

M OTO R : 3 H P E ve n r ude Outboard motor, S AW B L A D E : 2 m a n TIRES: With r ims, 11 tires, 245x75x16”, 4 rims very little use, lake only. “Misery whip,” 5’ long. off F-250. $200. $150. (360)457-6431. $50. (360)452-7721. (360)775-9631 MOTOR: Electr ic out- SCREEN: Movie screen, TOOL SET: Craftsman board motor, no battery. for 8 or 16 mm, 1960s tool set, like new, 75 $100. (360)457-0643. Radiant PictureMaster, pieces. $75. great. $30. 452-8264. P L AY P E N : E x c e l l e n t (360)681-4834 condition. $60. SCUBA TANK: needs TV: Magnavox 13” color (360)417-5159 hydro, like new. $50. television. $25. (360)344-4184 POCKET CAROSEL (360)504-2070 Kodak Pocket Carosel, Proj., model 100, in orig. SHIRT: Men’s 5X, at- TV: Or computer monitractive Hawaiian, front tor, 40” screen, awebox. $100. 379-4134. buttons, pocket. some sound, needs POKER CHIPS: New, $10. (360)457-6343. stand. $100. 457-7600. 600 poker chips, in case. SHOE DRYER: Family WEDDING GOWN: Sz. $20. (360)460-2105. shoe dryer, new cond. 15-16, new, Bridal OrigiPOLISHER: Coleman $15. (360)683-9725. nal #2780. $35/obo. Powermate 10” wax-pol(360)683-7435 isher, new. $15. SINK: Deep utility with (360)683-9725 faucet and counter top, WOOD STOVE: 6” pipe, good cond. $50. 26” x 16” x 12”. $200. POPCORN POPPER (360)640-0556 (360)775-9631 West Bend Electric. $10. (360)457-5720 S T RO L L E R : J o g g i n g WORKBENCH: Jewelstroller, Schwinn, exc. ers workbench, seven PRESSURE WASHER drawers. $65. DeVillbiss 2600 PSI, 5 cond. $100. (360)417-5159 (360)344-4184 HP Honda. $200. (360)457-4971 S U I T: Wo m e n ’s bu s i - WORKING MODEL: RaH E AT E R : P r o p a n e , M I S C : P i n e a r m o i r e, large, with blower, great $25. Bakers rack, metal R A D I O F LY E R : F i r e ness suit, 20W, execu- dio controlled tank, 1/20 tive collection, lined, red scale, M1A1 Abrams. and oak, $30. truck, child’s riding toy. shape. $150. plaid. $35. 681-4768. $50/obo. (360)683-7435. (360)477-4029 $28. 457-4241. (360)681-4834

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• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only 6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6100 Misc. Merchandise

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

CIDER PRESSES N ew, l a r g e h a r d wo o d tub, motorized. $550. (360)461-0719

FIREWOOD SALE PAHS Class of 2014. $175/cord. 461-1078 or email jeffers3_5@msn.com. REAL FIREWOOD (360)460-3639

M I S C : Po w e r c h a i r / scooter, Aspire Quickie, MIi, great condition, new battery, $1,200. Ladies jacket, insulated leather, Mustang, medium, $75. (360)460-0546

6105 Musical Instruments

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood

8142 Garage Sales 9820 Motorhomes Sequim T H E E S TAT E S a l e ! Don’t miss all the great stuff we’ve got for you at 215 N. Sequim Ave. Fri.- Sat. 9-3 p.m. Midcentury modern teak, Stressless lift chairs, Tempurpedic king bed, linens, kitchen, garden, tools.

8182 Garage Sales PA - West

AUCTION: Angeles Mini Storage, 1 p.m. on October 10, 2013 at 919 W. L a u r i d s e n B l v d . , P. A . Tenants and Contents of U n i t s a s fo l l ow s : Z a char y Oravetz A-236, Edward Steiner A-233. Equipment PIANO: Kimball upright Call 452-2400 to verify. c o n s o l e p i a n o, c i r c a SEMI END-DUMP 1970, good cond., nutTRAILER: High lift-gate, meg brown. $1,500/obo. 7035 General Pets ex. cond. $15,000/obo. (360)477-1625 (360)417-0153 6110 Spas/Hot Tub P U P P I E S : Tr e e i n g Walker Coonhound 6080 Home Supplies Pups. Gorgeous, healthy Furnishings pups. Great for families or outdoor enthusiasts. CHAIR: Like new, Jim’s Mother is papered. FaPharmacy lift chair, full ther not registered, near I Need The Room recline, large size, light pure. Rehoming $300. Soak your stress blue, paid $1,300. Ask(360)808-7121 away! Soft exterior ing $650. surround lighting. All (360)797-3236 supplies! Works great! 9820 Motorhomes Nice wood encaseCONTOUR CHAIR: Has ment. Solid cover. electric heat, tilt and viCustom 20 jet fiberbration, good condition. MOTORHOME: ‘86 Ford glass spa. ‘99 Cole$275. (360)452-7940. Shasta Class C. 52K, man 400 Spectrum good condition, recently MISC: 38” round oak Series Lowboy. Acpurchased, not being pedestal table, $225. comadates 5 people. used, want to sell. Lane blanket chest, $75. 7.5’ x 6.25’ x 2.8’ $5,900. (360)457-6434. Chairs, (6), $180. 360-649-2715. Kitsap. (360)683-1006 MOTOR HOME: ‘88 38’ Beaver Motorcoach. Cat MISC: China hutch, 6115 Sporting 300 diesel, Allison trans, 1880s, $1,000. China 53K mi., has everything Goods hutch, small, 1920s, but slide-out. $27,000. made in Germany, $250. (360)477-1261 CANOE PADDLE Small Victor ian desk, chair, $160. Coffee ta- Bending Branches Sun- MOTORHOME: ‘94 32’ b l e , 1 9 5 0 s , D u n c a n shadow, 48” bent shaft, F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . Phyfe, $30. Basket, Ma- ex c e l l e n t c o n d . $ 8 0 . ‘454’ Chev engine, 67K kah made, work of art, (360)457-3654. mi., electric step, 7000 $1,500. (360)457-4277. watt Oman generator, g o o d t i r e s , i n v e r t e r, 6140 Wanted MISC: Sofas, $50-100. queen walk-around bed, & Trades Recliner, $50. Pump-up leveling jacks, 2 TVs, 2 salon chair, $50. Clean lg. solar panels, 2 room m a t t r e s s s e t , $ 1 0 0 . BOOKS WANTED! We A / C, b a ck u p c a m e ra , K i t c h e n c h a i r s , $ 1 0 . love books, we’ll buy w i n d o w aw n i n g s , 1 8 ’ White wood desk, $30. yours. 457-9789. awning, outside shower, Dining table, white, $30. WANTED: Good used ss wheel covers, electric Pool table, $100. Large 90-140 hp O/B motor. heated mirrors. $12,500 T V, $ 2 0 . DV D p l aye r, (360)457-7870 or best reasonable offer. $10. (360)461-4084 (360)457-4896 WANTED TO BUY R E C L I N E R : R e c l i n e r Salmon/bass plugs and MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ chair, brand new, bond- lures, P.A. Derby me- Fleetwood Southwind, ed leather, cream color. morabilia (360)683-4791 Class A, 27,500 original Paid $450. Asking $350. miles, dual roof AC, lg. (360)452-2529 s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy 6135 Yard & draulic levelers, 2 TVs, Garden rear camera, Onan gen6100 Misc. erator, neutral interior, Merchandise BIG BLOWOUT SALE must see. $23,999. Introducing The Gardens (360)452-4136 C A R H AU L E R : G o o d at Port Townsend, 321 condition, good deck/ Four Corners Rd. 30% MOTORHOME: Boundtires, electric brakes. off all plants, additional er ‘93, 31’. 454 Banks $1,850/obo. 10% off bark and topsoil. Power Pack, 55k, extras. (360)797-4175 $7,000. (206)920-0418. Starts Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MISC: Rock band style WOOD STOVE: Fron- p i a n o key b o a r d , w i t h t i e r, t a ke s 2 4 ” wo o d . case and travel covers, $325. (360)732-4328. $ 1 5 0 / o b o. Tr o m b o n e s (2), with cases, $50 each. (360)280-7380. 6075 Heavy

$1000 SPA

MOTOR HOME: ‘99 40’ Monaco Exec. Excellent cond., ‘450’ Cummins M11, Allison trans., lots of extras. $65,000/obo. (360)460-7200 MOTORHOME: Georgie boy Persuit. 25’, coach, ve r y c l e a n , ex c e l l e n t condition, 39.7k, brand new batter ies, walkaround bed, trailer hitch, body straight. $14,750. (360)477-2007 MOTORHOME: Rexhall ‘ 0 2 R o s e a i r. 3 2 ’ , 2 slides, basement model, hydraulic jacks, 12 cubic foot refrigerator with ice m a ke r, f i r e p l a c e, G M Motor. 47k miles, comes with everything! $48,000/obo. (360)452-6318. MOTORHOME: Winnebego ‘93 Adventure. 34’, ex. cond., nonsmokers, 65k miles, 2 roof air, hydraulic levelers, Onan generator, microwave, ice maker/fridge, 4 burner stove, laminate flooring, lots of storage, very livable. Possible trade for smaller pull trailer. $11,500. (360)565-6221.

or FAX to: (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

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9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9808 Campers & Canopies

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

R O A D M A S T E R To w Dolly. Model RM440, excellent condition, good tires, self steering wheels,electric brakes for easy secure transport. 620 lbs. empty with max weight of towed vehicle 4,380 lbs. $1,400/obo. (360)912-0030

C A M P E R : ‘ 0 3 L a n c e. Like new, used two short trips, for short bed pickup, air, queen bed, dinette, shower, toilet, lots of storage. $8,495. (360)681-0172

D AV E S C A D D E N : 2 man pontoon boat, will take Class IV rapids. $1,000 cash. 808-0422.

LONG DISTANCE No Problem!

FIBERFORM: 17’, deep V with 65 hp Merc. $2,000. (360)374-2069.

S&S: ‘83 9.5’ camper. Self-contained, stable lift HEWE: 17’ River Runner. 115 Mercur y jet, jack system, new fridge. $3,000. (360)452-9049. new 5 hp Ricker, depth sounder, GPS, lots of extras. $7,950. 9050 Marine (360)452-2162

Miscellaneous

APOLLO: 17’ Classic Runabout. 140 hp OMC I / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t T R AV E L Tr a i l e r w i t h condition. $3,100. KAYAK: $1,900. Cus(360)683-0146 Pick-up: Ford ‘88 F150 t o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . Pickup. $2,000 worth of Newfound Boat Works new tires and rims. 1997 APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, E x p l o r e r . B e a u t i f u l 21’ Chateau travel trail- new 165 OMC with heat sculptured cedar and er. Complete with A/C, exchanger, recently ser- basswood strip planked refrigerator, queen size viced outdrive, custom deck. A work of art. Padbed, bunk beds, micro- trailer, new tires and dled once, I have too wave, stove. Will sell brakes, pot puller, ex- many Kayaks! tras. $3,600/obo. separately or as a unit. (360)774-0439 (360)582-0892 $8,000. (360)681-4224 KAYAK: Hydrotech inBAYLINER: 22’ Cabin Cruiser. E-Z Load trailer. flatable Kayak with paddles, manual and stor$1,200/obo. 775-6075. age/carrying bag. Like 9802 5th Wheels BAYLINER 2859. Price new! Only used once! $160 reduced from $26,000 to 5th WHEEL: ‘03 32’ $20,000. Selling beCall (360)417-7685 Thor. 3 sliders with slide cause of health. Engine weekdays toppers, rear kitchen, overhauled last year, wood cabinets, roomy outdrive replaced 3 yrs KAYAKS: Two 12 foot and ready to roll or park. ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp s k i n k aya k s. C a l l fo r Chimacum. $9,500. kicker. Great electronics photo. $800 for pair or (760)415-1075 including radar, color $500 each. (360)683-8979 fish finder, GPS char t 5TH WHEEL: Carriage plotter. Diesel heater, ‘ 0 4 C a m e o . T h r e e c u s t o m c a b i n e t s a n d OLYMPIC: 17’ ‘84 88 slides, center kitchen master bed. Great boat Johnson and 8HP Merwith island. King bed. f o r f i s h i n g . E l e c t r i c cury, both two stroke. EZ Automatic HDTV Sat. on downriggers, rods and load trailer. $2,000. (360)452-3275 roof. In great condition, gear. Comfortable weekthis has been a non- end travel with stove, rePORTLAND PUDGY ‘06 smoking unit and no ani- frigerator, shower and mals. $19,250. Contact head. Excellent condi- multi-function dinghy, unsinkable, double via e-mail: tion. Call 327-3695. hulled, 7’8”x4’5”, can be bjgarbarino@hot mail.com or BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w used as life raft. $1,000. (360)437-0908 (360)390-8692 Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruiser, freshwater cooling. RACING SAILBOAT $3,900/obo. 28’ Star. Sails, genoa (360)775-9653 and trailer. $3,500. (360)963-2743

SOUTHWIND: ‘85 Class A. New brake booster, tires, and new fridge full of gas propane trip ready all lights work every system gone through over $3,000 just spent on system repairs health forces sale. Only 56,000 miles total on this vehicle. Only $6,000/obo. This is a must see and ready to go. 454 engine runs great Onan gen set has new star ter relay, w o r k s p e r fe c t l y. To w hitch both front and rear. Driver side door for easy access. Call and leave message if we don’t answer: (360)683-6575. FIFTH WHEEL: Forest R i ve r ‘ 0 6 W i l d c a t . 2 7 FW, nonsmoker, rig for 9832 Tents & boondocks, 4 solar panTravel Trailers els, 4 6V golf cart deep cycle batteries, XPower C E DA R C R E E K : ‘ 0 3 inverter, 3000 plus 3600 Deluxe. Ex. cond., alu- Onan Generator, Hijackminum frame, slide, walk er Hitch. $18,500/obo. around queen bed, din- Call Sonny, i n g t a bl e a n d c h a i r s, (360)952-2038. s o fa b e d , c l e a n a n d comfortable. $14,500. (360)683-4473 9808 Campers &

Canopies

RUNABOUT: ‘78 14’ boat, ‘78 EZ Load trailer, 7 0 h p O / B M e r c u r y, good cond Must sell! $1,500. (360)928-1170. B OAT / M OTO R : 1 6 ’ Starcraft fiberglass 1960 runabout with 75 hp Johnson and trailer. Not a love boat, but runs like a champ. $1,600. But w a i t . T h e r e ’s m o r e ! 1991, 20 hp Merc fresh from the shop with rebuilt carb, new plugs, lotza zip. $1,400. (360)582-0723

C A M P E R : O u t d o o r s - CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson Peninsula Classified man, bed, refrigerator, cedar strip, made in Port stove. $1,800. Townsend. $650. 1-800-826-7714 (360)417-9223 (360)683-0146

FORD: ‘96 Escort LX. 2 dr., needs work. $400/ SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra obo. (360)452-2468. C u d d y C l a s s i c . 1 2 0 FORD: 98 Taurus SE. 4 J o h n s o n , 7 . 5 H o n d a dr, sedan. Top shape. kicker. galv. trailer, life $3,500. 683-5817. jackets, 2 downriggers, s k i p o l e , w a t e r s k i s , H O N DA : ‘ 1 1 C i v i c . 4 rope, canvas and many d o o r, 1 2 k m i l e s, l i ke extras. $4,995/obo. Lo- new. $15,500. 461-5913. cated in Sequim. HONDA: ‘92 Prelude. (360)477-1011 N o n - V T E C, ( 4 ) ex t r a tires and rims. $2,500 cash. Call or text any time after 4 p.m., (360)461-5877 STERLING 1995 19’ C u d d y. T h i s fa bu l o u s boat is clean and lots of fun. It is powered by a 1995 Mercruiser 3.0L inboard engine and is towed on a 1995 Calkins trailer. Contact Travis Scott (360)460-2741. TIDE RUNNER: 18’, great boat, good shape, lots of extra goodies. $9,000/obo. 374-2646. W A L K E R B AY : 1 0 ’ molded hull boat, trolling motor, galv. trailer, all like new. $1,650. (360)681-8761

9817 Motorcycles DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K yellow, pristine, many upgraes. $4,900. Bryan (360)681-8699

HARLEY: ‘04 Davids o n N i g h t Tr a i n FXSTBi. 15300 miles. Extras! Can Deliver. Awesome bike! Brad (360)683-2273. Price reduced. $6,995. brad@stinton.com HONDAS: (2). ‘06 CRF 100F, $1,300. ‘05 CRF 150F, $1,800. Both low miles, just ser viced, great starter bikes. (360)457-0255

5A246724

A E E R F

M ail to: Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

FORD: ‘02 Taurus SE. 3.0 V6, auto, air, CD. $3,995. (360)457-1893.

JEEP: ‘96 Grand Cherokee Laredo. Nice ride. $2,000. (360)808-0565. L I N C O L N : ‘ 9 0 To w n Car. Call for details. $3,500. (360)683-9553.

LINCOLN ‘98 TOWN CAR SIGNATURE SERIES 4.6 liter V8, auto, A/C with dual zone climate control, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CASS with JBL audio, power windows and locks, keyless entry, dual power seats w/memory, full leather, ABS, traction control, alloy wheels. super clean 2-owner, non-smoker, only 95,000 miles, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. Very nice car, shows best of care! $4,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MERCEDES: ‘79 240D (diesel). 4 sp manual trans., excellent condition mechanically and physically, extensive upgrades, work orders in my file. $4,980/obo. Call me for details. Alan at (360)461-0175, Port Angeles.

MINI COOPER: ‘07 Convertible. Price reduced! Great car, no problems, fun and fast! 24K miles. This is a twice reduced price, and is firm, and if still in my possession when this ad runs out, I am just going to trade it in! This a DARN GOOD DEAL!! $16,500. (360)477-8377

K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X M U S TA N G : ‘ 8 5 G T 5 250F. Few aftermarket Speed convertable. 302 accessories, 2 stands, HO, loaded. $3,400/obo. (360)460-8610 set of tires. $2,300. (360)670-5321 OLDS: ‘95 Silhouette. YAMAHA: ‘06 YZF R1 122K, 7 pass, runs good $1,500/obo. 457-6895. 50th anniversary edition. 23k, clean title, comes PONTIAC: 2001 Bonnewith extras, ex. cond. ville SSEi. Bose Stereo, $7,000. (360)477-0017. H e a t e d Powe r S e a t s,

K e y l e s s E n t r y, F o g Lights, Leather, new battery and tires, A/C, Power Windows, plus much more. Only 74,000 Chevy Ralley Wheels: miles. 6,500. 1st designs, 14’s. Com(360)452-4867 plete caps & rings. Matched tires, fair tread. PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero SE $250. Winter tires: 18’s, Coupe. Rare automatic. matched, used one sea- C l e a r t i t l e . V 6 . N i c e son, Sequim to PA. $300 shape. Black with gray (360)683-7789. interior. 171,500 miles. Sunroof. Good transmisi o n , ex c e l l e n t s p o r t 9180 Automobiles stires. Power windows. Classics & Collect. Not a show car but a great driving fun sports car. $2,000. (360)452-1049

9740 Auto Service & Parts

S AT U R N : ‘ 0 1 C S 1 . 3 door, 79k, new clutch and brakes, 36 mpg. $3,400. (360)452-7370.

SUBARU ‘12 FORESTER 2.5X Economical 2.5 liter 4cyl, auto, all wheel drive, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, abs, only 19,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y, v e r y CHEV: ‘87 El Camino. c l e a n 1 - o w n e r, n o n Runs good, good body smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y and interior. $2,800/obo. report. (360)683-6079 $20,995 REID & JOHNSON DAT S U N : ‘ 7 2 2 4 0 Z MOTORS 457-9663 race car and trailer. reidandjohnson.com Red, spare engines, trans., wheels, tires TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, white, nav., leather, 5 and more! $10,000. CD change. $18,990. (360)385-5694 1 (805)478-1696 BUICK: Rare 1977 Buick SkyHawk. 81k original miles on this one of a kind car. Excellent mechanical with V6/Automatic. See on-line ad for details. Need the garage space. Clear title. $5K or best offer. (360)460-6162

9434 Pickup Trucks Others F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000/ obo. (360)582-1294. FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net

JEEPSTER: 1969 Commando, needs work. Engine was running when parked 3 years ago. Not many around, restored S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n can get $14,000+. Oughtred whilly, sail- $2,850. (360)531-3165. ing/rowing, better than n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h LINCOLN: ‘50 Cosmo. oars, trailer, many up- Good body and interior, g r a d e d a c c e s s o r i e s . does not run. $4,000. $7,250/obo. (360)683-1260 (360)774-6720 MAZDA: ‘94 RX7. Twin SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, t u r b o, l o t s o f p ow e r, Yanmar diesel, wheel m a n y m o d i f i c a t i o n s , s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, 59K, $14,000. Serious sleeps 4. $9,995. buyers only. 461-0847. (360)457-8221 PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am SAILBOAT: ‘69 Victory Original silver, 400 mo21’. With trailor. $1,500. tor, auto. $10,000. (360)509-4894 (360)457-6462

CHEV: ‘89 Pickup short bed, chrome rims, Tarp, automatic, ver y clean. $4,000/obo. (360)683-0979

CHEV: ‘91 1500. 4WD, ex t c a b, n e w m o t o r / trans $1,850. 460-6647.

CHEV: ‘93 1500. 4x4, lumber rack, AM/FM CD. $3,000/obo. 461-0657. CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed dump. $6,800. 457-3120 or (360)808-1749. FORD: ‘74 1/2 ton. Shor tbed, 50k miles on rebuilt 390 motor, 4 speed manual, r uns strong, new upholstry and tires, etc. Some light body rust--good project truck. $2,500 firm. (360)477-2684.

DODGE: ‘07 SLT 2500 4x4. 4 door, short bed, 5.9 turbo diesel, 24 valve auto, Leer shell, running boards, loaded, excellent condition, 112K mi. $26,000/obo (360)683-8810 DODGE: ‘92 Dakota 4WD. $2,000/ obo. (360)797-1198


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others DODGE ‘05 RAM 2500 CREW CAB SHORT BED SLT 4X4 5.9L Cummins HO 24V Turbo-Diesel, automatic, 17” alloy wheels, tow package, trailer brake controller, spray-in bedliner, diamond-plate toolbox/auxiliary fuel tank, buckstop bumper, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Priced way b a c k o f Ke l l e y B l u e Book! Immaculate condition inside and out! Loaded with options! Red and ready! This truck stands up tall! A real head-turner! Priced to sell! Stop by Gray Motors today! $26,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton white 4x4, 1 owner, very good condition. $23,000 (505)927-1248

9556 SUVs Others

FORD: ‘99 F350 Crew Cab, short bed, 7.3 diesel 4x4. $8,200/obo. (360)683-9645

HYUNDAI ‘05 SANTA FE 3.5L AWD SPORT UTILITY 3 . 5 L a u t o m a t i c, a l l oy wheels, new tires, roof rack, sunroof, tinted wind o w s , key l e s s e n t r y, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD/Cassette stereo, dual front and side impact airbags. Only 87,000 miles! Clean Carfax! Good condition inside and out! C o m e s e e w hy t h e s e Santa Fe’s have become so popular! Superb combination of AWD handling and a smooth ride! Stop by Gray Motors today! $8,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

TOYOTA: ‘00 Tacoma. V6, super charger and exhaust, 2 sets of wheels and tires, 161K FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 mi. $10,000/obo. utility SCELZI. 11’ com(360)683-8479, after 6 bo body with rack, 36,000 miles. $27,000. TOYOTA ‘05 TACOMA (360)531-1383 TRD DOUBLE CAB

TOYOTA : ‘ 0 9 A c c e s s Cab. 48500 miles, 4X4, auto, SR5, TRD off road, 14mo/23k mi warranty, tow, new Michelins, back up alarm, bed liner, bug guard, never off road, charcoal int., located in Sequim. $24,900. (301)788-2771

9556 SUVs Others

JEEP: ‘11 Patriot with CTV. Like new, 38.8K miles 2.4 L 16 valve, 2WD continuously Va r i a bl e Tr a n s a x l e I I (smooth “shifting”), air conditioning AM/FM/CD trailer hitch, split rear seats, side airbags, 28 30 MPG. $13,950. (360)385-0995 J E E P : ‘ 8 3 C J 7 . Ve r y good cond., rebuilt title. $5,200. (360)379-1277.

C H E V : ‘ 1 1 Tr ev e r s e . Gray, great condition. NISSAN: ‘02 Pathfinder $18,500. (605)214-0437 LE 4WD. 106k, automatC H E V: ‘ 9 0 S i l va r a d o ic leather heated seats, Suburban, 8k miles on sunroof, well maintained. new engine, 4WD, cap- $9,500. (360)683-1851. tain seats in front, bench seats back. $4,500. (360)681-7704 CHEVROLET ‘08 TRAILBLAZER LS 4 . 2 L i t e r 6 - c y l , a u t o, 4X4, A/C, cr uise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, luggage rack, tow package, side airbags, only 58,000 miles, very very clean 1-owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle histor y repor t. Near new condition. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

9556 SUVs Others TOYOTA: ‘04 4 Runn e r LT D. E x . c o n d . One owner, leather, heated seats, navigation, towing package, near new tires. Miles, 133,500, mostly highway. Mtce/svc records ava i l . , n o n - s m o ke r. $12,500 firm. (360)460-0060

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013 B9

9730 Vans & Minivans 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Others Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County F O R D : ‘ 9 7 A e r o s t a r. 160k, new bat., radiator, heater core, runs great. $1,500. (360)452-6052.

GMC ‘02 SAFARI (CHEV ASTRO) CARGO VAN Economical 4.3 liter V6, auto, A/C, power locks, safety bulkhead, ver y nice ladder rack, only 64,000 miles, clean and reliable 1-owner corpolease return, spot9730 Vans & Minivans rate less “Autocheck” vehicle Others history report. A proud addition to your business, affordable too! DODGE ‘03 $6,995 CARAVAN SE REID & JOHNSON 3.3L V6, automatic, tintMOTORS 457-9663 ed windows, roof rack, reidandjohnson.com key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, and mirrors, air condi- G M C : ‘ 9 1 V a n d u r a t i o n i n g , ke n wo o d C D Conv. van. 187K, some Stereo, dual front air- body damage, runs exbags. Only 93,000 origi- cellent. $1,500/obo. (360)681-0258 nal miles! Clean Carfax! Good condition inside a n d o u t ! T h e p e r fe c t 9931 Legal Notices practical people hauler! Clallam County Great fuel mileage! Priced to sell fast! Come On October 1st, 2013, see the Peninsula’s val- Washington State Uniue leaders for over 55 versity filed an applicayears! Stop by Gray Mo- t i o n w i t h t h e Fe d e ra l tors today! Communications Com$4,995 mission in Washington GRAY MOTORS D.C. for renewal of the li457-4901 cense for FM Translator graymotors.com Station K216GE, Forks, Washington. The transF O R D : ‘ 0 1 W i n d s t a r mitter site is located at SEL. 144k, lots of new O l y m p i c N a t u r a l R e par ts, looks and r uns source Center. The stagreat. $3,995. tion operates on Chan(360)452-9002. nel 91.1 FM with an effective radiated power of 0.130 kilowatts. The 9931 Legal Notices station rebroadcasts the programming of KNWP Clallam County 90.1 HD2, Port Angeles, Washington. Individuals AUCTION: Angeles Mini who wish to advise the Storage, 1 p.m. on Octo- FCC of facts relating to ber 10, 2013 at 919 W. the renewal application Laur idsen Blvd., P.A. and to whether this staTenants and Contents of tion has operated in the Units as follows: Za- public interest may file char y Oravetz A-236, comments and petitions Edward Steiner A-233. with the FCC, WashingCall 452-2400 to verify. ton DC 20554. Legal No. 518077 Legal No. 518167 Pub: Oct. 6, 7, 2013 Pub: Oct. 7, 2013

NISSAN: ‘09 Murano SL FWD. Sport Utility 4-dr, 62,000 miles, AC, AT, cruise, tilt, leather seats, 4X4 FORD: ‘78 shor t bed. backup camera, AM/FM/ Ext. cab, 70K actual mi. 4.0L VVT-i V6, automatCD/XM with Bose sound ic, locking rear differen$1,200. (360)504-5664. system, dual power/ tial, alloy wheels, good heated front seats, powFORD: ‘84 Bronco. Re- tires, tow package, rear er windows and locks, s l i d i n g w i n d ow, 1 1 0 V liable. $500. keyless entry, tow pkg outlet, tinted windows, 4 (360)808-0565 and more. Extra clean, full doors, keyless entry, n o n s m o ke r, ex c e l l e n t FORD: ‘89 1/2 ton pick- p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r condition and well mainup. Real runner, 4.9 liter, l o c k s , a n d m i r r o r s , tained. $20,500. straight 6, 5 sp, new cruise control, tilt, air Call (360)797-1715 or tires/radiator. $2,800/ conditioning, CD stereo, DODGE: ‘98 Durango. (208)891-5868 obo. (360)504-2113. dual front airbags. Kelley 88k, trailer tow package, B l u e B o o k v a l u e o f a i r, p owe r s e a t s / w i n FORD: ‘94 F150 4WD. TOYOTA : ‘ 0 4 R a v - 4 . $27,731! Only 48,000 dows, 7 pass, loaded! Rhino back end, fiberoriginal miles! Immacu- $4,890. (360)452-2635. 111K mi., white, ver y glass top, good driver. good condition. $9,950. late condition inside and $2,500/obo out! Top of the line TRD GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. More info (360)808-0531 (360)797-4175 Package with an e-Lock- Auto trans, A/C, ‘350’, FORD: ‘96 F350 460 cid er! This is one Toyota 2 4 7 , 9 0 0 m i , s e a t s 8 , 9931 Legal Notices 4x4 Crew Cab. 114k 5 anyone would be proud great cond, well cared Clallam County speed A/C, good tires, to own! Stop by Gray for. $1,999. Call (360)531-0854 m a t c h i n g c a n o p y . Motors today! File No.: 7081.24414 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar $24,995 $7,850 firm. Call J E E P : ‘ 0 2 W r a n g l e r Bank, FSB Grantee: The Heirs and Devisees of Audrey Bloom, deceased Ref GRAY MOTORS (360)477-6218 Sierra. White, gray hard- to DOT Auditor File No.: 2010-1261082 Tax Parcel ID No.: 033018 800000 457-4901 top, straight 6 cyl., auto, 3943 Abbreviated Legal: Unit 943 Camden Court Condo. Ph. 16, Vol. 4, Pg. FORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 graymotors.com m u d a n d s n ow t i r e s, 80, AF#2004 1128817, Clallam Co., WA. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to door, king cab, 4WD, auto, air, CD, new trans., TOYOTA: ‘93 2WD pick- h e av y d u t y bu m p e r s, the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL wired for towing, CB, fog STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only radiator, alternator, bat- up. Canopy, runs good. 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT lights, 77k. $11,995. tery. $5,500/obo. $3,450/obo. 452-5126. DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LI(919)616-0302 (360)683-8145 CENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and leClallam County Clallam County Clallam County gal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you File No.: 8701.20139 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Planet may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and Servicing, LLC Grantee: Joseph I. Cowles, a married man as his separate es- referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Comtate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2010-1252732 Tax Parcel ID No.: 152824 mission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: 500125 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 6, Blk 1, Re-Plat of Rivers Bend Plat, Vol. 6, h t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r Pg. 51, Clallam County, WA. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States DepartCode of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BE- ment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569FORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS 4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLisfrom the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. tAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatyou are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe clear. I. On October 18, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clalsources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assis- lam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State tance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Tele- County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Unit 943, Camden Court Condop h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : minium Phase 16, recorded in Volume 4 of Condominiums, Page 80, accordh t t p : / / w w w . d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r - ing to the Declaration thereof recorded under Clallam County Recording No. ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Depart- 2004 1128817 and any Amendments thereto. Situate in Clallam County, State ment of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569- of Washington. Commonly known as: 1017 North Minstrel Road Sequim, WA 4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webLis- 98382-3003 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/29/10, retAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid corded on 12/30/10, under Auditor’s File No. 2010-1261082, records of Clalhotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys lam County, Washington, from Audrey Bloom, an unmarried individual, as Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what- Grantor, to Adelita A. Shubert on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to clear. I. On November 8, 2013, at 10:00 AM. inside the main lobby of the Clal- secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration lam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registrathe Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable tion Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Peninsula Mortgage, Inc., its succesat time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the sors and assigns to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive AsCounty(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 6 in Block 1 of Re-Plat of Riv- signments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1293798. *The Tax Parcel ers Bend Plat, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 51, ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or suof Washington. More Accurately Described as: Lot 6 in Block 1 of Re-plat of persede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action comRivers Bend Plat, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 6 of Plats, Page 51, menced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisrecords of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State faction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s of Washington. Commonly known as: 250 Rainbow Avenue Forks, WA 98331- default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary al9428 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/23/10, recorded leges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now on 06/09/10, under Auditor’s File No. 2010-1252732, records of Clallam in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 6/11/2013 County, Washington, from Joseph I. Cowles, a married man as his separate Monthly Payments $8,935.64 Late Charges $382.98 Lender’s Fees & Costs estate, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation $30.00 Total Arrearage $9,348.62 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely Fee $1,000.00 Title Report $790.24 Statutory Mailings $50.00 Recording as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,938.24 Total Amount Due: interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, $11,286.86 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of Inc. solely as nominee for Mortgage Investors Corporation, its successors and $225,833.50, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument assigns to Green Planet Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive As- evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are signments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20131289013. *The Tax Parcel ID due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statthe recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or super- ute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or imsede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action com- plied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on menced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satis- October 18, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any faction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary al- must be cured by 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a disconleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now tinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 07/03/2013 time before 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth Monthly Payments $14,624.24 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, ad$3,034.21 Total Arrearage $17,658.45 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trus- vances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and tee’s Fee $325.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $21.08 Recording costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/07/13 (11 days Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $444.08 Total Amount Due: before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guar$18,102.53 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of antor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the en$133,943.33, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument tire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by stat- transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the ute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or im- following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS The Estate of Audrey Bloom, plied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on deceased 1017 North Minstrel Road Sequim, WA 98382-3003 The Estate of November 8, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with Audrey Bloom, deceased c/o Bell & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law 433 North any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter Fifth Avenue, Suite A Sequim, WA 98382-4308 The Estate of Audrey Bloom, due, must be cured by 10/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a dis- deceased c/o Bell & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law P.O. Box 510 Sequim, WA continuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any 98382-4308 Heirs and Devisees of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Mintime before 10/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth strel Road Sequim, WA 98382-3003 Heirs and Devisees of Audrey Bloom, dein paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, ad- ceased c/o Bell & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law 433 North Fifth Avenue, Suite vances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and A Sequim, WA 98382-4308 Heirs and Devisees of Audrey Bloom, deceased costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/28/13 (11 days c/o Bell & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law P.O. Box 510 Sequim, WA 98382before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guar- 4308 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Minstrel Road Sequim, WA 98382-3003 Kimberly Boysen, Personantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the enal Representative of the Estate of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Mintire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, strel Road Sequim, WA 98382-3003 Kimberly Boysen, Personal Representafees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or tive c/o Bell & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law 433 North Fifth Avenue, Suite A Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was Sequim, WA 98382-4308 Kimberly Boysen, Personal Representative c/o Bell transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the & Davis PLLC, Attorney at Law P.O. Box 510 Sequim, WA 98382-4308 The following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Joseph I. Cowles aka Joseph Estate of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Minstrel Road, Unit 943 SeCowles 250 Rainbow Avenue Forks, WA 98331-9428 Joseph I. Cowles aka quim, WA 98382-3003 Heirs and Devisees of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 Joseph Cowles P.O. Box 2273 Forks, WA 98331-2273 Unknown Spouse North Minstrel Road, Unit 943 Sequim, WA 98382-3003 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Joseph I. Cowles aka Joseph Cowles 250 Rain- and/or Domestic Partner of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Minstrel bow Avenue Forks, WA 98331-9428 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Part- Road, Unit 943 Sequim, WA 98382-3003 Kimberly Boysen, Personal Reprener of Joseph I. Cowles aka Joseph Cowles P.O. Box 2273 Forks, WA 98331- sentative of the Estate of Audrey Bloom, deceased 1017 North Minstrel Road, 2273 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on Unit 943 Sequim, WA 98382-3003 by both first class and certified mail, return 05/31/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/31/13 receipt requested on 05/10/13, proof of which is in the possession of the TrusGrantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of de- tee; and on 05/10/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said fault or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conreal property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession spicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportu- IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be nity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in suit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the TrusTO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is enti- tee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the tled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day followagainst the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an ing the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occu- are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the pants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall prowritten notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auc- vide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustion may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by tee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northand www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/03/2013 Date Executed: westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 6/11/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized SignaBellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# ture P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lamber t 8701.20139) 1002.250176-File No. (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7081.24414) 1002.248954-File No. Pub: Oct. 7, 28, 2013 Legal No. 516909 Pub: Sept. 16, Oct. 7, 2013 Legal No. 511698

File No.: 7236.23776 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a Bank of New York, as Trustee, on behalf of the registered holders of Alternative Loan Trust 2007-OA7, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA7 Grantee: Paul J. Beck and Lin O. Beck, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20071195370 Tax Parcel ID No.: 62915 Abbreviated Legal: LT 17, BK A, SEABREEZE ESTATES 8/58 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On October 18, 2013, at 10:00 AM inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real proper ty “Proper ty”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 17, in Block A of Seabreeze Estates, as per plat thereof recorded in Volume 8 of Plats, Page , records of Clallam County Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2126 CLIPPER COVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/07, recorded on 01/31/07, under Auditor’s File No. 20071195370, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Paul J Beck, and Lin O Beck, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Countrywide Bank, N.A., its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the certificateholders of CWALT, Inc., Alternative Loan Trust 2007-OA7, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA7, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20111268840. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 07/11/2013 Monthly Payments $34,965.21 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $318.93 Total Arrearage $35,284.14 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $384.60 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $21.08 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $475.68 Total Amount Due: $35,759.82 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $259,140.84, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 18, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS PAUL J BECK 2126 CLIPPER COVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 PAUL J BECK 511 LK FARM RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 LIN O BECK 2126 CLIPPER COVE PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 LIN O BECK 511 LK FARM RD PORT ANGELES, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/10/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/10/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/11/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Kathy Taggart (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7236.23776) 1002.250967-File No. Pub: Sept. 16, Oct. 7, 2013 Legal No. 511695

File No.: 7037.102238 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WAMU Mortgage Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-PR3 Trust Grantee: Phyllis Darling and Donald T. Darling, wife and husband Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1176665 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000 036830 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 9 Bk 368 TPA, Clallam Co., WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On October 18, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 9 in Block 368, of the Townsite of Port Angeles; Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1234 West 12th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/15/06, recorded on 03/16/06, under Auditor’s File No. 2006 1176665, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Donald T. Darling and Phyllis Darling, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Co., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank F/K/A Washington Mutual Bank, FA to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WAMU Mortgage Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-PR3, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2013-1290695. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate as of 06/04/2013 Monthly Payments $10,519.36 Lender’s Fees & Costs $269.05 Total Arrearage $10,788.41 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $770.72 Statutory Mailings $43.08 Recording Costs $16.00 Postings $140.00 Total Costs $1,719.80 Total Amount Due: $12,508.21 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Pr incipal Balance of $219,085.71, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on October 18, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/07/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Donald T. Darling 1234 West 12th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Donald T. Darling 5122 South Mountain Terrace Way Port Angeles, WA 98362 Phyllis Darling 1234 West 12th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Phyllis Darling 5122 South Mountain Terrace Way Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/02/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/03/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 06/04/2013 Date Executed: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 5861900. (TS# 7037.102238) 1002.247152-File No. Pub: Sept. 16, Oct. 7, 2013 Legal No. 511705


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2013 Neah Bay 55/46

Bellingham g 57/48

Olympic Peninsula TODAY BREEZY & SHOWERS

Port Townsend 57/48

57/47

Olympics Snow level: 5,000 ft.

S Y ER EZ OW RE SH d B an

Forks 57/45

Sequim 57/46

Port Ludlow 58/47

Yesterday

National TODAY forecast Nation

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 61 39 0.00 17.09 Forks 72 47 0.00 71.39 Seattle 68 46 0.00 24.74 Sequim 60 44 0.00 8.69 Hoquiam 69 45 0.00 43.18 Victoria 61 49 0.00 19.22 Port Townsend 65 42 0.00* 15.56

Forecast highs for Monday, Oct. 7

Billings 72° | 45°

San Francisco 73° | 55°

Last

First

➥

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

55/45 Sunshine breaks

Marine Weather

58/47 Mostly sunny; few clouds

56/45 Mostly cloudy

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 3 to 5 ft. Showers likely. Tonight, W wind 20 to 30 kt. Wind waves 4 to 6 ft. Ocean: SW wind to 25 kt becoming W to 30 kt. Wind waves 3 to 5 ft. W swell 10 ft building to 13 ft. Showers. Tonight, W wind to 30 kt easing to 25 kt after midnight. Wind waves 3 to 5 ft. W swell 14 ft at 10 seconds.

Tides

57/44 Clouds roll back in

Full

Miami 90° | 73°

Fronts Cold

Oct 26

Nov 3

Oct 11

Victoria 55° | 50° Seattle 57° | 52° Olympia 55° | 52°

Spokane 59° | 45°

Tacoma 57° | 52° Yakima 66° | 41°

Astoria 59° | 50°

ORE.

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Hi 63 62 65 50 81 84 81 89 90 56 89 45 64 68 93 66

Burlington, Vt. 67 Casper 36 Charleston, S.C. 88 Charleston, W.Va. 85 Charlotte, N.C. 87 Cheyenne 47 Chicago 80 Cincinnati 79 Cleveland 77 Columbia, S.C. 90 Columbus, Ohio 83 Concord, N.H. 65 Dallas-Ft Worth 76 Dayton 78 Denver 60 Des Moines 63 Detroit 74 Duluth 48 El Paso 75 Evansville 78 Fairbanks 46 Fargo 54 Flagstaff 55 Grand Rapids 77 Great Falls 64 Greensboro, N.C. 88 Hartford Spgfld 73 Helena 64 Honolulu 86 Houston 93 Indianapolis 73 Jackson, Miss. 88 Jacksonville 85 Juneau 51 Kansas City 59 Key West 86 Las Vegas 76 Little Rock 83

Lo Prc Otlk 52 .18 Rain 39 Clr 37 Clr 43 Rain 57 Cldy 65 Rain 63 Cldy 54 .76 PCldy 65 PCldy 41 Clr 71 Rain 29 .25 PCldy 45 Clr 58 .06 Rain 74 Cldy 59 .11 Rain

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 3:26 a.m. 7.5’ 9:06 a.m. 2.3’ 2:59 p.m. 9.1’ 9:57 p.m. -0.8’

WEDNESDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 4:18 a.m. 7.2’ 9:53 a.m. 2.8’ 3:45 p.m. 8.8’ 10:49 p.m. -0.5’

Port Angeles

5:32 a.m. 6.6’ 10:48 a.m. 4.2’ 4:19 p.m. 6.6’ 11:13 p.m. -0.9’

6:28 a.m. 6.6’ 11:36 a.m. 4.8’ 4:56 p.m. 6.5’

7:28 a.m. 6.6’ 12:01 a.m. -1.1’ 5:37 a.m. 6.3’ 12:31 p.m. 5.2’

Port Townsend

7:09 a.m. 8.1’ 12:01 p.m. 4.7’ 5:56 p.m. 8.2’

8:05 a.m. 8.2’ 12:26 a.m. -1.0’ 6:33 p.m. 8.0’ 12:49 p.m. 5.3’

9:05 a.m. 8.2’ 7:14 p.m. 7.8’

Dungeness Bay*

6:15 a.m. 7.3’ 11:23 a.m. 4.2’ 5:02 p.m. 7.4’ 11:48 p.m. -0.9’

7:11 a.m. 7.4’ 12:11 p.m. 4.8’ 5:39 p.m. 7.2’

8:11 a.m. 7.4’ 12:35 a.m. -1.1’ 6:20 p.m. 7.0’ 1:06 p.m. 5.2’

1:13 a.m. -1.2’ 1:44 p.m. 5.8’

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Now Showing â–  Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2� (PG; animated) “Gravity� (PG-13) “Prisoners� (R) “Rush� (R) “Runner Runner� (R)

â–  Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “Don Jon� (R) “The Family� (R) “Riddick� (R)

0s

10s

“Blackfish� (PG-13) “Gravity� (PG-13) “Short Term 12� (R)

(21-and-older), Port Townsend (360-385-1089) “Blackfish� (PG-13) “Gravity� (PG-13) “Short Term 12� (R)

“Prisoners� (R)

Computer Bogging You Down? call DAVE, the Computer Doctor s&OR.EW#OMPUTER 3ET UPOR4UNE UP

Pressure Low

High

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

91 75 70 88 88 72 71 61 89 89 76 87 43 65 55 90 73 86 86 81 61 73 71 89 MM 70 92 84 79 90 58 91 85 80 87 59 50 86

PORT ANGELES — Graphic design and marketing firm Laurel Black Design is a winner in the 2013 American Graphic Design Awards national competition for a logo created for a Port Angelesbased law firm. Graphic designer Laurel Black said her design for Ripley Law Firm was selected from more than 8,000 submissions.

areas of excellence and opportunity for creative professionals. Fewer than 15 percent of submitted designs are recognized. Annual contest Ripley Law Firm at 618 S. Peabody St., For nearly five decades, headed by principal Ted Black said, Graphic Ripley, provides estate Design USA has sponsored annual design com- and legacy planning services to people and orgapetitions that spotlight

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 96 at Cotulla, Texas ■ 18 at Pine Ridge, S.D., and Window Rock, Ariz. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

46 42 60 Clr Sioux Falls 67 6.61 Rain Syracuse 66 56 .23 37 Clr Tampa 90 74 56 .47 PCldy Topeka 62 46 75 PCldy Tucson 84 50 44 Clr Tulsa 67 49 53 1.35 PCldy Washington, D.C. 89 69 42 .01 Cldy Wichita 66 45 70 .40 Rain Wilkes-Barre 83 65 .05 74 .19 Cldy Wilmington, Del. 86 67 65 Cldy ________ 68 Clr 34 Clr Hi Lo 47 Clr 63 53 42 .01 Rain Auckland Baghdad 81 55 72 PCldy 70 52 40 Clr Beijing 58 49 67 Cldy Berlin 64 48 64 Clr Brussels 80 64 66 .10 PCldy Cairo Calgary 62 35 50 Cldy 82 59 43 Clr Guadalajara 86 75 58 Rain Hong Kong 71 54 63 PCldy Jerusalem 76 51 MM MM Clr Johannesburg Kabul 86 60 35 Clr 64 55 67 Clr London 70 53 47 Clr Mexico City 75 51 51 .23 PCldy Montreal Moscow 48 47 78 Cldy 90 77 39 Clr New Delhi 63 52 56 .17 PCldy Paris 62 Clr Rio de Janeiro 76 63 72 59 57 Clr Rome 70 53 77 Cldy Sydney 81 71 36 Clr Tokyo 64 51 47 .48 Rain Toronto 58 1.18 PCldy Vancouver 54 46

nizations. Ripley chose Black to rebrand the firm to increase commuBlack nity awareness. “I appreciated Laurel’s experience and point of view,� Ripley said. “She took us through a process that was both enlightening and productive.� The Ripley logo and others that have received American Graphic Design Awards recognition in past years can be seen at www.laurelblack.com.

s(OMEOR"USINESS ,OCATION

Rain Rain Cldy Cldy Clr Clr PCldy Clr Cldy Cldy

Otlk Sh Clr PCldy PCldy PCldy Clr Clr Ts Clr Clr Rain Clr Cldy Ts Sh Cldy Clr PCldy PCldy Sh Sh Cldy Rain Rain

PT Library to hold fall media sale PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Friends of the Port Townsend Library will hold its annual fall used-book and -media sale at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., on Saturday. The sale opens at 8 a.m. for Friends and 9 a.m. for the general public, and ends at 3 p.m. Gently used books, CDs and DVDs for adults and children will be aavailable. Except for specially priced books, all adult items will cost $1 and children’s books 50 cents. Starting at 1 p.m., bags of books will sell for $2.50. For more information, phone 360-379-1061.

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AN INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE

AFFORDABLE HOUSING WITH ALL THE LUXURIES

s2EASONABLE2ATES

C OMPARE

33755946

Dave Grainger, CNE

Rent is 30% of your adjusted income and includes utilities (except Phone & Cable TV). Income Limits Apply.

WWW . SUNCRESTSRLIVING . COM

360-681-3800 TDD 711

You could be enjoying your retirement years, right now!

251 S. Fifth Ave., Sequim

suncrestvillage@gres.com

DON’T DUMP IT!

While generally it makes sense for your portfolio to become progressively more conservative as you grow older, it may be wise to consider maintaining at least a portion in growth investments. 3A883085

Financial Planner*

By planning carefully, investing wisely, and spending thoughtfully, you can increase the likelihood that your retirement will be a financially secure one. Contact Tracy Wealth Management to review your retirement goals and situation. * SECURITIES AND ADVISORY SERVICES OFFERED THROUGH FSC SECURITIES CORPORATION, MEMBER FINRA/SPIC TRACY WEALTH MANAGEMENT IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH FSC SECURITIES CORPORATION OR REGISTERED AS A BROKER-DEALER OR INVESTMENT ADVISOR.

1051/2 East First Street, Suite A • Port Angeles, WA 98362 • (360)452-9080 WWW.TRACYWEALTHMANAGEMENT.COM

D O N AT E USABLE STUFF

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H O W TO PA C K TO D O N AT E ?

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W O R K I N G TO M A K E WA S T E A R E S O U R C E Port Angeles

Sequim

2604 W. 18th St. Mon - Sat • 9 - 4:30

22 Gilbert Rd. 683-7862 Mon - Sat • 10 - 5:30

WWW.AROUNDAGAINSTORE.ORG

3A886908

Kevin Tracy

Partner Agency

Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Now Ope

You’ve worked hard your whole life anticipating the day you could finally retire. Well, that day has arrived! But with it comes the realization that you’ll need to carefully manage your assets so that your retirement savings will last. Traditional wisdom holds that retirees should value the safety of their principal above all else. For this reason, some people shift their investment portfolio to fixed-income based investments, such as bonds and money market accounts, as they approach retirement. The problem with this approach is that you’ll effectively lose purchasing power if the return on investments doesn’t keep up with inflation.

Other factors to consider:

1-800-452-8024 www.pdrc.org

cationsAngeles Two Lnoin Port

Reaching Retirement - Now What?

• Understanding retirement plan distribution options • Know your Social Security options • Planning for Required Minimum Distributions • Annual withdrawal rate from investments

1BSFOUJOH1MBOTr%JTTPMVUJPOTr'BNJMZ 8PSLQMBDFr4NBMM$MBJNT /FJHICPSIPPE 829790

‡(cell)

THESE FEATURES

-Kitchens in all Apartments -Extra Storage in Each Apartment -Delicious Daily Meals -Bi-Weekly Housekeeping -Recreation & Activity Programs -Scheduled Transportation

Mediate... A Path to Resolution 32732701

30 Years Experience

50s 60s

50 Rain Los Angeles 31 .02 Clr Louisville 67 Cldy Lubbock 62 PCldy Memphis 65 Cldy Miami Beach 40 MM Clr Midland-Odessa 53 .91 PCldy Milwaukee 66 2.28 Rain Mpls-St Paul 68 .61 Rain Nashville 63 PCldy New Orleans 67 .97 Rain New York City 53 Rain Norfolk, Va. 50 .25 Clr North Platte 65 2.04 Rain Oklahoma City 34 .01 Clr Omaha 45 Rain Orlando 68 .08 Rain Pendleton 48 .94 Rain Philadelphia 46 Clr Phoenix 56 3.01 Rain Pittsburgh 32 Cldy Portland, Maine 44 .61 PCldy Portland, Ore. 41 Clr Providence 67 .01 Rain Raleigh-Durham 50 Clr Rapid City 63 PCldy Reno 61 .39 Rain Richmond 36 Clr Sacramento 76 .02 Cldy St Louis 61 Cldy St Petersburg 64 Rain Salt Lake City 70 .08 Rain San Antonio 70 Cldy San Diego 36 .08 Cldy San Francisco 42 Cldy San Juan, P.R. 80 Cldy Santa Fe 56 Clr St Ste Marie 53 .21 Clr Shreveport

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

â–  The Starlight Room

s&AST #OMPETENT 3ERVICE

20s 30s 40s

PA graphic designer wins national kudo for firm’s logo

Port Townsend (360385-1089)

â–  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

â–  The Rose Theatre,

-0s

6:40 p.m. 7:24 a.m. 10:33 a.m. 8:14 p.m.

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 2:39 a.m. 7.8’ 8:25 a.m. 1.9’ 2:19 p.m. 9.2’ 9:10 p.m. -0.9’

LaPush

Warm Stationary

Oct 18

Nation/World

CANADA

New York 77° | 66°

Detroit 61° | 55°

Atlanta 70° | 59°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TUESDAY

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 86° | 70°

Los Angeles 84° | 63°

-10s

Low 47 Showers likely

Chicago 64° | 50°

El Paso 81° | 46° Houston 88° | 61°

New

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 66° | 43°

Denver 77° | 37°

Almanac

Brinnon 57/47

âœźâœź âœź

Sunny

Seattle 57° | 52°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Aberdeen de 59/47

TONIGHT

➥

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS


PDN20131007C