Issuu on Google+

Monday

Back home in Seattle

Rainy periods continue this week B10

A bigger Morse happy to return to Mariners B1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS January 28, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

Peninsula flu woes may be peaking Signs hopeful, but still early to tell for sure BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Flu activity may be cresting on North Olympic Peninsula and

around the region, health officials say. Based on the latest statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it “looks pretty strongly like we’re at the peak, at least in Western Washington,” Dr. Tom Locke, public health officer for Jefferson and Clallam counties, said. “But it’s a little too early to tell,” he added.

Of the 762 lab specimens statewide that were tested the week ending Jan. 19, 20.5 percent tested positive for influenza. That’s down from 33.3 percent the week ending Jan. 12 and 27.8 percent the week before. “We’re over the peak if that pattern holds,” Locke said. “This might be one of those

years when we have a rapid increase and a rapid decrease.” Locke added: “Given the various numbers, this week and into next week is going to be the peak of the influenza season.” “Then we’ll see a drop off,” he said. The state Department of Health said there have been 17 laboratory-confirmed flu deaths

so far this winter, 15 of which occurred in people 65 or older. None of those 17 deaths involved Clallam or Jefferson County residents. Most of the confirmed flu cases in Washington have been the H3N2 strain, which is associated with more severe symptoms than H1N1 and Influenza B. TURN

TO

FLU/A5

Irrigation Festival queen crowned Sequim High junior is sister of former princess BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — A 16-year-old Sequim High School junior whose sister was a princess in the 1990s was crowned queen of the 118th Sequim Irrigation Festival on Saturday night. Angela Bentley appeared in a red evening gown and recited a poem for the final judging at the annual scholarship pageant at Sequim High School. She was proclaimed queen and crowned by 2012 Princess Natalie Stevenson. “I’ve always seen the princesses; it looked really fun,” Bentley said in a Sunday interview. While it was her first experience with the pageant, she’s not the first Irrigation Festival royal in the family.

Royalty in 1990s Her sister, Molly Bentley, was selected as a princess in the Irrigation Festival pageant about 20 years ago. “She’s in Australia now,” Bentley said. Molly was unable to be in Sequim for the pageant, but she gave her kid sister tips for the scholarship competition during an earlier visit, Angela said. The new queen’s candidacy was sponsored by Pacific Mist Books, and she plans to volunteer with reading programs for area elementary school children. “I want to be a role model. I want to be there for them and not let them down,” she said.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The royal court for the 118th Sequim Irrigation Festival receives applause at the scholarship pageant shortly after they were crowned. From left are Princesses Christie Honroe, Danyelle Wilson and Lavee Hess and the 2013 queen, Angela Bentley, right. The 118th Sequim Irrigation Festival — the longest-running community festival in Washington state — will take place May 3-12 mainly in downtown Sequim, climaxed by the Grand Parade at noon on May 11. The theme for the 2013 festival is “Dancing through the Valley.” The royalty candidates are judged based

on a Thursday tea interview, a talent or journalism at New York University or creative display on stage, the answers to another New York school. two on-stage questions and the finale — an She, along with her court, Princesses evening gown competition. Lavee Hess, Christie Honroe and Danyelle Wilson, will act as ambassadors of Sequim Straight-A student and the Irrigation Festival throughout the Bentley, who maintains a 4.0 grade- year. point average, said she plans to major in

TURN

TO

ROYALTY/A5

End of an era: Last Peninsula Hallmark gift shop will close BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clerk Carol Browning of Phillips Hallmark in Sequim helps to wrap a Hallmark Precious Moment figure for customer Ilene Hassan.

Celebrate Valentine’s Day!

SEQUIM –– For nearly four decades, Mike and Willa Phillips have been in the business of being thoughtful. Come next month, however, the couple will close the doors on their Hallmark store in the Washington Plaza, 680 W. Washington St, where they’ve been for the past 15 years, for good. The couple owned and operated Hallmark stores in Sequim and Port Angeles for the past 37 years, dispensing friendship along with cards, holiday ornaments

A Sweet Deal for You!

Phone 360-452-4507 to secure your Sweet Deal TODAY!

TURN

TO

HALLMARK/A5

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 24th issue — 2 sections, 18 pages

730773

Subscribe, or renew, your subscription to Peninsula Daily News for a sweet deal, just $117 for 1 year and receive a $10 gift certificate for something sweet from (your choice) Necessities & Temptations, That Takes the Cake or Elevated Ice Cream & Candy Shop.

and a wide variety of keepsakes from Phillips Hallmark. “We’ve really enjoyed this business,” Willa Phillips said. “We’ve been through a lot with our customers, and we’ve really gotten to be good friends with a lot of them.” Willa said the store’s lease runs out at the end of February. It will likely stay open until Valentine’s Day, she said. Until then, every holiday will be celebrated inside the store, with special items for Christmas, Mother’s Day and St. Patrick’s Day all out for sale on the floor.

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION PENINSULA POLL

B5 B4 A7 B4 A6 B4 B10 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS WEATHER WORLD

B6 B1 B10 A3


A2

UpFront

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

Advertising is for EVERYONE! To place a classified ad: 360-452-8435 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday); fax: 360-417-3507 You can also place a classified ad 24/7 at peninsuladailynews. com or email: classified@ peninsuladailynews.com Display/retail: 360-417-3540 Legal advertising: 360-4528435 To place a death or memorial notice: 360-452-8435; fax: 360417-3507 Toll-free from outlying areas for all of the above: 800-826-7714 Monday through Friday

Circulation customer SERVICE! To subscribe, to change your delivery address, to suspend delivery temporarily or subscription bill questions: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-noon Sunday) You can also subscribe at peninsuladailynews.com, or by email: subscribe@ peninsuladailynews.com If you do not receive your newspaper by 6:30 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7:30 a.m. Sunday and holidays: 360-452-4507 or 800-826-7714 (6 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.noon Sunday) Subscription rates: $2.85 per week by carrier. By mail: $4.10 per week (four weeks minimum) to all states and APO boxes. Single copy prices: 75 cents daily, $1.50 Sunday Back copies: 360-452-2345 or 800-826-7714

Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

SAGs serve as glimpse to Oscars A PUZZLING ACADEMY Awards season sorted itself out a bit more Sunday with the Screen Actors Guild Awards, where top performers gathered to honor their own in what often is a prelude for who will go home with an Oscar. The awards show aired Sunday on TNT and TBS. Among nominees for the 19th annual guild awards were Oscar winners Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and Tommy Lee Jones for the Civil War epic “Lincoln”; Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway for the Victor Hugo musical adaptation “Les Miserables”; and Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper and Oscar recipient Robert DeNiro for the oddball romance “Silver Linings Playbook.” DeNiro and Jones were in an exclusive supportingactors group where all five nominees are past Oscar winners. The others are Alan Arkin for the Iran hostage-crisis thriller “Argo,” Javier Bardem for the James Bond adventure “Skyfall” and Philip Seymour Hoffman for the cult drama “The Master.” Oscar night on Feb. 24 looks more uncertain this time after some top directing prospects, including Ben Affleck for “Argo” and Kathryn Bigelow for “Zero Dark Thirty,” missed out on nominations. Both

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actor Dick Van Dyke, right, poses for a portrait with Screen Actors Guild President Ken Howard, in Beverly Hills, Calif., in October. Van Dyke was the recipient of the Life Achievement Award at Sunday’s annual SAG Awards. films were nominated for best picture, but a movie rarely wins the top Oscar if its director is not also in the running. Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” would seem the Oscar favorite with 12 nominations. Yet “Argo” and Affleck were surprise best-drama and director winners at the Golden Globes, and then there’s Saturday’s Producers Guild win for “Argo,” leaving the Oscar race looking like anybody’s guess.

The guild also presented an award for overall cast performance, its equivalent of a best-picture honor. The nominees were “Argo,” “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Les Miserables,” “Lincoln” and “Silver Linings Playbook.” Receiving the guild’s life-achievement award was Dick Van Dyke, whose award was presented by his 1960s sitcom’s creator and co-star, Carl Reiner, and Alec Baldwin.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: When do you complete your income taxes? Next few days

12.1%

February

36.4%

March

22.2%

April 1-15 Already done them

19.7% 9.7%

Total votes cast: 1,127 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

Passings By The Associated Press

JOZEF GLEMP, 83, cardinal and the longtime head of Poland’s influential Roman Catholic church at a time when it played a key role in the fight against communism, has died. Jozef Kloch, a church spokesman, said in a statement that Cardinal Glemp died Cardinal Wednesday Glemp evening in in 2005 Warsaw, Poland. Cardinal Glemp had been ill for many years, and the Polish news agency PAP said he had lung cancer. Cardinal Glemp oversaw the church at a critical time in its history and in that of Poland, a largely Catholic nation. He was the head of the Polish bishops’ conference from 1981 to 2004. Until 2009, he also held the role of primate, the top leadership role. His years of leadership largely coincided with the papacy of the Polish-born Pope John Paul II, who was elected pope in 1979.

KHANH NGUYEN, 86, a South Vietnamese general who briefly gained control of the government in a coup and went on to lead a “government in exile” in California, has died. Gen. Nguyen died Jan. 11 at a San Jose, Calif., hospital after struggling with Gen. Nguyen diabetescirca 1980 related health problems, said Chanh Nguyen Huu, who succeeded Gen. Nguyen as head of the Garden Grove, Calif.-based Government of Free Vietnam in Exile. In November 1960, Gen.

Laugh Lines THERE ONCE WAS a man name Barack, Whose re-election came as a shock. He raised the taxes I pay, And then turned marriage gay. And now he’s coming after your Glock. Stephen Colbert

Nguyen helped thwart a coup against the U.S.backed president Ngo Dinh Diem when he mistook the rebels for Viet Cong soldiers and rushed to the president’s defense. South Vietnamese generals overthrew Diem’s regime three years later, starting a volatile period of political unrest. Gen. Nguyen briefly took control of the government in a Jan. 30, 1964, coup but left Vietnam the following year after being forced out of power by other generals amid growing tension with U.S. military officials. He lived and worked in France for several years before settling in California with his wife and four children in 1977.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

BEHIND JOYCE BIBLE Church: two baby deer running at each other, jumping around and chasing each other . . .

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) A fish dinner and salty sea tales made up the appropriate combination with which Port Angeles teachers were regaled at the annual steelhead dinner prepared by the men of the City Teachers Association. The fish course was provided as promised in advance by the Izaak Waltons of the teaching staff. There were steelheads aplenty and to spare, and the men swore they were caught legitimately, regardless of accusations to the contrary. Capt. Christian T. Larsen, master of the University of Washington oceanographic “floating laboratory,” provided the sea stories.

1963 (50 years ago)

One million man-hours without lost time due to an accident were completed WANTED! “Seen Around” during 309 days of operation items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles by the Crown Zellerbach Corp. mill in Port Angeles. WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or Assistant Manager email news@peninsuladailynews. com. Charles Wheeler said

Crown Z employees were met today by company representatives handing out coffee passes to announce the safety record and thank them for it. Fibreboard Inc.’s Port Angeles mill also had a million man-hours without job time lost, occurring last week.

1988 (25 years ago) Gov. Booth Gardner said battling the state’s “two Washingtons” syndrome will require a major bootstrap program by the distressed areas, including Clallam and Jefferson counties. The governor and a 25-member statewide committee said that 21 of the state’s 39 counties are “distressed,” meaning they have jobless rates at least 20 percent above the state average as a result of the recession of 1981-82. To the contrary, aerospace, trade and service industries allowed the central Puget Sound area to prosper since the recession, said a committee report.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Jan. 28, the 28th day of 2013. There are 337 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Jan. 28, 1813, the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen was first published anonymously in London. On this date: ■ In 1547, England’s King Henry VIII died; he was succeeded by his 9-year-old son, Edward VI. ■ In 1853, Cuban revolutionary Jose Marti was born in Havana. ■ In 1915, the United States Coast Guard was created as President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill merging the Life-Saving Service

and Revenue Cutter Service. ■ In 1945, during World War II, Allied supplies began reaching China over the newly reopened Burma Road. ■ In 1973, a cease-fire officially went into effect in the Vietnam War. ■ In 1980, six U.S. diplomats who had avoided being taken hostage at their embassy in Tehran flew out of Iran with the help of Canadian diplomats. ■ In 1982, Italian anti-terrorism forces rescued U.S. Brig. Gen. James L. Dozier, 42 days after he had been kidnapped by the Red Brigades.

■ In 1986, the space shuttle Challenger exploded 73 seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, killing all seven crew members, including schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe. ■ In 1988, a 13-day standoff in Marion, Utah, between police and a polygamist clan ended in gunfire that killed a state corrections officer and seriously wounded the group’s leader, Addam Swapp. ■ Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, girding the nation for war, said in his State of the Union address that Saddam Hussein had shown “utter contempt” for the world community and had

to be held to account; Bush also pledged to help the ailing economy with lower taxes and a stronger health care system. ■ Five years ago: In a daring ambush, Iraqi insurgents blasted a U.S. patrol with a roadside bomb and showered survivors with gunfire from a mosque in Mosul; five American soldiers were killed in the explosion. A U.S. missile attack in Pakistan killed veteran al-Qaida leader Abu Laith al-Libi. ■ One year ago: The Arab League halted its observer mission in Syria because of escalating violence.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 28, 2013 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Senator pushing gun legislation not optimistic WASHINGTON — Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who’s leading the push to restore an assault weapon ban, acknowledged Sunday that the effort faces tough odds to pass Congress — and she blamed the nation’s largest gun-rights group. Feinstein, D-Calif., on Thursday introduced a bill that would prohibit 157 specific weapons and ammunition magazines that have Feinstein more than 10 rounds. The White House and fellow Democrats are skeptical the measure is going anywhere, given lawmakers who are looking toward re-election might fear pro-gun voters and the National Rifle Association. “This has always been an uphill fight. This has never been easy. This is the hardest of the hard,” Feinstein said. “They [the NRA] come after you. They put together large amounts of money to defeat you,” Feinstein said.

Oil spilled into river VICKSBURG, Miss. — A

barge carrying 80,000 gallons of oil hit a railroad bridge Sunday, spilling light crude into the Mississippi River and closing the waterway for eight miles in each direction, the Coast Guard said. A second barge was damaged. Investigators did not know how much had spilled, but an oily sheen was reported as far as three miles downriver of Vicksburg after the 1:12 a.m. accident, said Lt. Ryan Gomez of the Coast Guard’s office in Memphis, Tenn. The first barge was still leaking Sunday evening, and emergency workers set out booms to absorb and contain the oil, Gomez said.

7 killed in violence CHICAGO — Authorities said seven people were killed and six wounded in gun violence in one day. Among those killed Saturday was a 34-year-old man whose mother had already lost her three other children to shootings. Police said Ronnie Chambers, who was his mother’s youngest child, was shot in the head while sitting in a car. Police said two separate double-homicide shootings also occurred Saturday about 12 hours apart. Chicago’s homicide count eclipsed 500 last year for the first time since 2008. Chicago’s homicide rate was almost double in the early 1990s, averaging around 900. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Egypt leader sets curfew in trouble spots CAIRO — Egypt’s president has declared a 30-day state of emergency and curfew in the three Suez Canal provinces hit hardest by a wave of political violence that has left more than 50 dead in three days. An angry Mohammed Morsi vowed in a televised address Sunday he would not hesitate to take more action to stem the latest Morsi eruption of violence across much of the country. The three provinces are Port Said, Ismailia and Suez. Morsi also invited the nation’s political forces to a dialogue starting today to resolve the country’s latest crisis. The predominantly secular and liberal opposition has in the past declined Morsi’s offers of dialogue, arguing that he must first show a political will to meet some of its demands.

nine months. So far the French forces have met little resistance, though it remains unclear what battles may await them farther north. The Malian military blocked dozens of international journalists from trying to travel toward Timbuktu. Lt. Col. Diarran Kone, a spokesman for Mali’s defense minister, declined to give details Sunday about the advance on Timbuktu, citing the security of an ongoing operation. Timbuktu’s mayor, Ousmane Halle, is in the capital, Bamako, and he told The Associated Press he had no information about the remote town, where phone lines have been cut for days.

Mussolini praised

ROME — Former Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi praised Benito Mussolini for “having done good” despite the Fascist dictator’s anti-Jewish laws, immediately sparking expressions of outrage as Europe on Sunday held Holocaust remembrances. Berlusconi also defended Mussolini for allying himself with Hitler, saying he likely reasoned that it would be better to be on the winning side. The media mogul, whose conservative forces are polling second in voter surveys ahead of Troops off to Tumbuktu next month’s election, spoke to SEVARE, Mali — French and reporters on the sidelines of a Malian forces pushed toward ceremony in Milan to commemothe fabled desert town of Timrate the Holocaust. buktu on Sunday as the two“It is difficult now to put oneweek-long French mission gath- self in the shoes of who was ered momentum against the making decisions back then,” Islamist extremists who have Berlusconi said. The Associated Press ruled the north for more than

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Firefighters continue to fight a fire at a nightclub in the Brazilian college town of Santa Maria early Sunday.

Lifeless bodies block exit in nightclub fire At least 230 die; fireworks likely cause THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil — Bodies of patrons already dead appeared to block the only exit for others trying to flee smoke and flames from a nightclub fire early Sunday, killing more than 230 people — the world’s deadliest nightclub fire in more than a decade. Witnesses said a flare or firework lighted by band members might have started the blaze in Santa Maria, a university city of about 225,000 people. Television images showed smoke pouring out of the Kiss nightclub as shirtless young men who had attended a university party joined firefighters using axes and sledgehammers to pound at windows and walls to free those trapped inside. Guido Pedroso Melo, commander of the city’s fire department, told O Globo newspaper that firefighters had a hard time getting inside the club because “there was a barrier of bodies blocking the entrance.”

World’s deadliest nightclub fires HERE IS A look at some other biggest nightclub fires in the past century: ■ A blaze at the Lame Horse nightclub in Perm, Russia, broke out in December 2009 when an indoor fireworks display ignited a plastic ceiling decorated with branches, killing 152. ■ A December 2004 fire killed 194 people at an overcrowded working-class nightclub in Buenos Aires, Argentina, after a flare ignited ceiling foam. ■ A nightclub fire in Rhode Island in 2003 killed 100 people after pyrotechnics used as a stage prop by the 1980s rock band Great White set ablaze cheap soundproofing foam on the walls and ceiling. ■ A fire blamed on a welding accident tore through a disco in the central Chinese city of Luoyang in December 2000, killing 309 people. ■ A fire at the Ozone Disco Pub in 1996 in Quezon City, Philippines, killed 162 people, many of them students celebrating the end of the school year. ■ In 1977, 165 people perished and more than 200 were injured when the Beverly Hills Supper Club in Southgate, Kentucky, which touted itself as the Showplace of the Nation, burned to the ground. ■ A fire killed 492 people at Boston’s Cocoanut Grove club in 1942, the deadliest nightclub blaze in U.S. history. The fire led to the enactment of requirements for sprinkler systems and accessible exits with emergency lights not linked to the regular lighting system. ■ In 1940, a fire ignited the decorative Spanish moss draping the ceiling of the Rhythm Night Club in Natchez, Mississippi, killing 209 people. Hundreds of patrons ran to the only exit. The windows had been boarded shut to keep unwanted guests from sneaking in. The Associated Press

Desperately seeking help Teenagers sprinted from the scene desperately seeking help. Others carried injured and burned friends away in their arms. The fire spread so fast inside the packed club that firefighters and ambulances could do little to stop it, Silva said. Another survivor, Michele Pereira, told Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that she was near the stage when members of the band ignited flares that started the conflagration. “The band that was onstage began to use flares and, suddenly, they stopped the show and pointed them upward,” she said.

Quick Read

“At that point, the ceiling caught fire. It was really weak, but in a matter of seconds it spread.” Guitarist Rodrigo Martins told Radio Gaucha that the band Gurizada Fandangueira started playing at 2:15 a.m., “and we had played around five songs when I looked up and noticed the roof was burning.” “It might have happened because of the Sputnik, the machine we use to create a luminous effect with sparks. It’s harmless; we never had any trouble with it. “When the fire started, a guard

passed us a fire extinguisher, the singer tried to use it, but it wasn’t working.”

Band member dies He confirmed that accordion player Danilo Jacques, 28, died, while the five other members made it out safely. Police Maj. Cleberson Braida Bastianello said by telephone that the toll had risen to 233 with the death of a hospitalized victim — he said earlier that the death toll probably was made worse because the nightclub appeared to have just one exit through which patrons could exit.

. . . more news to start your day

Nation: Casey Anthony asks bankruptcy protection

Nation: Obama unsure about child playing football

Nation: ‘Hansel, Gretel’ movie stirs box offices

World: Authorities looking for missing musical band

CASEY ANTHONY HAS filed for bankruptcy in Florida, claiming $1,100 in assets and $792,000 in liabilities. Court records show that Anthony, who was acquitted of killing her 2-yearold daughter Caylee in 2011, filed in federal court in Tampa. Her listed debts include $500,000 for attorney fees and costs for her criminal defense lawyer; $145,660 for the Orange County Sheriff’s Office for a judgment covering investigative fees and costs related to the case; $68,540 for the Internal Revenue Service for taxes, interest and penalties; and $61,505 for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for court costs.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA is a big football fan with two daughters, but if he had a son, he says he’d “have to think long and hard” before letting him play because of the physical toll the game takes. “I think that those of us who love the sport are going to have to wrestle with the fact that it will probably change gradually to try to reduce some of the violence,” Obama told The New Republic. Republic. “In some cases, that may make it a little bit less exciting, but it will be a whole lot better for the players, and those of us who are fans maybe won’t have to examine our consciences quite as much.”

“HANSEL & GRETEL: Witch Hunters” cooked up $19 million in its opening weekend. Paramount’s R-rated action film update on the classic fairytale topped the box office, according to studio estimates Sunday. Other films opening over the weekend in the U.S. and Canada didn’t fare as well. The crime thriller “Parker,” starring Jason Statham and Jennifer Lopez, debuted in fifth place with $7 million, while Relativity Media’s raunchy ensemble comedy “Movie 43” opened in the seventh spot with $5 million. “Mama” starring Jessica Chastain dropped to second with $12.8 million.

AUTHORITIES IN NORTHERN Mexico still have no leads after searching two days for 20 people with a Colombian-style band who went missing after a private performance at a bar, an official with the Nuevo Leon State Investigation Agency said Sunday. The 20 people include 15 members of Kombo Kolombia and the band’s crew. People living near the bar in Hidalgo municipality south of the Texas border reported hearing gunshots about 4 a.m. Friday, following by the sound of vehicles speeding away, said a source with the state agency.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Park solicits input for wilderness plan PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK — What matters most to you in the national park that spans the North Olympic Peninsula? The public is asked to answer questions about their desires for the Olympic National Park as officials begin to develop a wilderness stewardship plan for management of the 95 percent of the park devoted to wilderness areas. Comments can be made at one of several workshops on the Peninsula in February or can be delivered by mail or by hand to the park superintendent’s office in Port Angeles.

“One of the first steps in any planning process is to learn what the public’s thoughts, q u e s t i o n s Creachbaum and concerns are,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. The plan will be developed in accordance with the Wilderness Act of 1964 and analyzed through an Environmental impact statement, of EIS, park officials said. The public comment period began Wednesday and will close March 23.

A notice of intent to prepare an EIS will be published in the Federal Register in the next few weeks. The park is soliciting answers to certain questions. They are: ■ What makes the wilderness area special to you and why? ■ When you visit the wilderness area, what activities and experiences are most important to you? ■ What do you think the issues are in the wilderness area? ■ Imagine you are visiting the wilderness area 20 years from now. What conditions, experiences, visitor services and facilities would

you like to see? Center, 42 Rice St. ■ Wednesday, Feb. 20, The public also is invited to make additional com- Forks — Department of Natural Resources Conferments and suggestions. ence Room, 411 Tillicum Lane. Public workshops Other workshops are Public workshops are planned in Amanda Park, scheduled from 5 p.m. to 7 Seattle, Silverdale and p.m. in Port Angeles, Shelton. Sequim, Sekiu and Forks. “The Olympic WilderHere are the dates and ness was designated by venues. Congress in 1988 and has ■ Tuesday, Feb. 5, Port become one of the most popAngeles — Jefferson Ele- ular wilderness destinamentary School gymna- tions in the country,” sium, 218 E. 12th St. Creachbaum said. ■ Thursday, Feb. 7, “We are excited to be Sequim — Trinity United moving ahead with a comMethodist Church, 100 S. prehensive plan for how we Blake Ave. protect and manage this ■ Tuesday, Feb. 19, area and are looking forSekiu — Sekiu Community ward to hearing thoughts

and ideas from our public.” More information about the Olympic Wilderness Stewardship Plan and planning process, including a public scoping newsletter, is available online at http:// parkplanning.nps.gov/ olymwild. Public comment can be made at http://tinyurl. com/b33olmn. Comments also can be mailed or delivered to Creachbaum, ATTN: Wilderness Stewardship Plan, Olympic National Park, 600 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, WA 98362 For more information, phone the park superintendent’s office at 360-5653004.

Man arrested for allegedly dealing meth PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — A 50-yearold Sequim man has been arrested for investigation of delivery of methamphetamine at his home on the 300 block of River Road near Sequim, Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team officials said. John D. Davis was arrested Thursday morning after OPNET developed probable cause that he sold methamphetamine on four occasions in October, team supervisor Jason Viada said.

Rob Nelson will present “Cruising Northern Europe” at a Winter Wanderlust series lecture Friday.

More penalties possible Davis’ case will be reviewed by the Clallam County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for possible charges. He could face additional penalties because of a school bus stop fewer than 200 feet from his home, Viada said. Davis was not listed on the Clallam County jail roster as of Friday afternoon. OPNET officials expected to find several others on the property when

Travel series to feature talk on European river cruise PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Winter Wanderlust series continues Friday with Rob Nelson on “Cruising Northern Europe.” Nelson cruised by yacht through the canals of Germany and Holland. Expecting to deliver a yacht from Keil, Germany, to Cadiz, Spain, severe weather forced a course change into Dover, England, with some wonderful detours along

the way. The weather conditions on this journey, however, were perilous. “It was the worst the boat had ever seen since launched, and she had tens of thousands of sea miles,” Nelson said. “I survived, and that changed me.” The altered course took Nelson on two major canal voyages that are rarely taken by cruisers. He will discuss the geography

and history of the region, architecture and people along the canals, and the camaraderie of the crew. The series continues at Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2333 San Juan Ave., at 7 p.m. each Friday through Feb. 22. Admission is $7, with youths younger than 18 admitted free. Email Christopher Overman at wanderlustadventures2013@gmail. com or visit tinyurl.com/bl2g5tv.

Elwha manager recognized for dam project

Briefly: State Driver hits two cyclists, kills one BELLINGHAM — The Washington State Patrol said a 57-year-old driver

struck and killed one bicyclist and injured another in Whatcom County before leaving the scene. The driver, Debra G. Peterson, was booked into Whatcom County Jail Sunday on investigation of hit and run. The Bellingham Herald

Health Notes PURE SESAME OIL TO RELIEVE NASAL DRYNESS

Missile launcher SEATTLE — Seattle police are tracking down the history of a nonfunctional missile launcher that showed up at a Satur-

by Joe Cammack, R.Ph. Many people experience problems with a dry nasal mucous membrane (lining of the nose), which is worse during the winter and in warm and dry inland climates or deserts, or in situations with low humidity such as long journeys by airplane and airconditioned environments, or after receiving radiation therapy to the nose. Isotonic sodium chloride solution (ISCS; normal saline) has long been the most commonly used therapy for nasal dryness but it has been shown that ISCS actually results in little change to the nasal lining. Pure pharmaceutical grade sesame oil (NF), administered as administered with 1 to 3 sprays in each nostril 3 times daily, has been shown to be significantly more effective than normal saline for treatment of nasal dryness and stuffiness. Sesame oil contains a high concentration of tocopherols (vitamin E) that might neutralize oxidants and prevent tissue damage and inflammation that would otherwise occur.

day weapons buyback event in Seattle. Detective Mark Jamieson said a man standing outside the buyback event bought the military weapon for $100 from another person at the event. The item, a singleuse device that had already been used, is a launch tube assembly for a Stinger portable surface-to-air missile. Jamieson said the launcher is a controlled military item and is not available to civilians through any surplus or disposal program offered by the government. The Associated Press

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The manager of the Elwha River restoration project for the National Park Service has been named a top newsmaker for 2012 by a national construction industry magazine. Brian Winter, the National Park Service’s point man on the $325 million Elwha River dam removal and restoration project, was named one of Engineer News-Record’s (ENR) Top 25 Newsmakers of 2012 this week and will join 24 other honorees at a gala in New York City on April 18.

Industry publication Winter, 57, was recognized for his work on the largest-ever dam removal and river-restoration proj-

• For New Computer Set-up or Tune-up • Home or Business Location

• Reasonable Rates

1C560149

31713627

Where you find products you want and the attention you need

30 Years Experience

Need to resolve a conflict?

Dave Grainger, CNE 360-379-4881 • 360-774-2467(cell)

1BSFOUJOH1MBOTr%JTTPMVUJPOTr'BNJMZ 8PSLQMBDFr4NBMM$MBJNT /FJHICPSIPPE

1-800-452-8024 www.pdrc.org Serving Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Partner Agency

2B695623

• Fast, Competent Service

424 East 2nd • Open 8 to 7 daily 8 to 5 Sat. • 12 to 4 Sun.

ect in the U.S. and profiled in the Jan. 28 issue of ENR, a weekly construction industry magazine published since 1917. Work is set to begin again no earlier than Feb. 4 on the once 210-foot-high Glines Canyon Dam, while the smaller Elwha Dam already has been removed completely. The removal of the two once-massive dams on the Elwha River will allow salmon and trout to access miles of spawning habitat kept from their reach for nearly 100 years. “Success, for me, has always been defined as restoration of natural ecosystem processes,” Winter told ENR. Read the full profile of Winter on ENR’s website: http://tinyurl.com/ ENRWinter.

Mediate... A Path to Resolution

• I Come to You No Hauling

Visit our website www.jimsrx.com 452-4200

said 38-year-old Steven Waterman and 51-year-old Daniel McKay were riding along Kendall Road on Saturday about 8:15 p.m. when they were hit by a 1994 Ford Escort. Waterman, from the Maple Falls area, died at the scene. McKay, also from the Maple Falls area, was taken to St. Joseph Medical Center for treatment.

they served the search warrant, Viada said. The drug enforcement team was assisted in serving the warrant by officers from federal, state and local agencies, Viada said. Two of the officers were marine interdiction agents from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which often patrols the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The agents found two people concealed within a boat that was on blocks behind the residence. One person inside the boat was wanted for a local warrant and was arrested along with Davis. “There were a total of six people detained in and near the home, and Davis was one of those people arrested,” Viada said. Viada said Davis is the only one likely to be charged. “This incident is a good example of why law enforcement supervisors are trained to prepare for operations by summoning additional resources just in case they are needed,” Viada said.


PeninsulaNorthwest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

(C) — MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

A5

PT Marine Science Center Flu: Vaccine in executive director to resign good supply on Peninsula

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — A sea change is brewing at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, now that its longtime executive director has announced her retirement. “I have informed my board and my staff that it is now time for me to retire,” said Anne Murphy, 61, on Friday. “I’m doing this now because the staff and the organization are in a good place,” she added. “We are all on the same page and have the same vision.” Murphy has served as the center’s executive director for 24 of its 30 years of existence. “It will be an interesting challenge to replace Anne,” said Linda Dacon, who chairs the marine science center’s board of directors. “She has been such a strong part of what we have done for so long,” Dacon said. Board members “are glad that she has generously agreed to stay with us until we find someone, so we aren’t rushed into making a decision or forced to appoint an interim director while we search,” Dacon added.

Job description Murphy and Dacon are developing a job description and have formed a search committee. The panel includes Dacon, board members Stephen Cunliffe and Eric Harrington, and citizen representatives Al Bergstein and Eveleen Muehlethaler. Dacon said that she’d like to post the job by midFebruary and that it could take until the fall to find a replacement. Murphy’s salary is about $60,000. She said she hoped that the center could offer up to $75,000 for a replacement. The facility, located at Fort Worden State Park, provides educational pro-

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Ann Murphy, executive director of the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, announced her retirement last week. grams and exhibits centered around the study and preservation of the Salish Sea. Recent projects include an exhibit about orcas in the sound centered around the carcass of a killer whale that was discovered in 2002 and a project that documented the effect of discarded plastic on marine wildlife. The marine science center has seven full time staff members and relies heavily on volunteers. “We have the best volunteers,” Murphy said, noting that they are of all ages.

‘Passion is their mission’ “When they come here, they know they aren’t going to just do a shift. Their passion is their mission,” she said. “They are meeting people and doing things that focuses on leaving a healthy legacy on the Salish Sea and one of the reasons they come back is because of how it makes them feel to accomplish something.” In 2009, Murphy earned

the Magnuson Puget Sound Legacy Award for exemplary service to Puget Sound and its marine life. The annual award by People For Puget Sound is named for Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, who passed legislation protecting marine mammals and prohibiting supertankers from entering Puget Sound. Murphy received the Eleanor Stopps Environmental Leadership Award in 2006, a marine science center award that recognizes people on the North Olympic Peninsula who are stewards of the environment and have demonstrated leadership in efforts to protect the natural world. It is named for a woman who was responsible for the 1982 establishment of the Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge. Eleanor Stopps died last April at the age of 92. After her retirement, Murphy plans to spend more time with her husband and do more traveling and gardening. She also wants to get into better physical shape, she said.

“She’ll really be missed,” said Program Director Jean Walat of Murphy. “She’s kept the organization on mission and financially stable through hard times and good times. “She’s really gutsy and doesn’t get scared off by things that might happen,” Walat said. “She takes on a task and makes it work.” The marine science center, which is on the beach at Fort Worden, consists of the Natural History Exhibit and the Marine Exhibit. Only the Natural History Exhibit is open during the winter, from Nov. 1 through March 31, with hours from noon to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youth from 6 to 17, and free for children 5 and under. Admission also is free for marine science center members. For more information, see www.ptmsc.org/index. html, phone 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932 or email info@ptmsc.org.

Royalty: Junior selections made CONTINUED FROM A1 That will include riding on floats in other regional parades and taking part in community and charity events. Bentley will receive a $1,000 scholarship. Each of the three princesses will receive a $750 scholarship for their participation in the event. Between a busy school schedule and the festival court’s duties, the four young women will have a challenging schedule for the coming year. “You need to prioritize,” Angela said. Also announced Saturday night was the 2013 Junior Royalty, selected based on an essay contest. The young students wrote on the question, based on the 2013 theme, “What would you see as you are dancing through the valley?” Dee Dee Dorrell, a student at Helen Haller Elementary, was named junior queen.

CONTINUED FROM A1 ples were the flu. While levels of non-influAll three strains are cov- enza respiratory illness are ered by this year’s vaccine, on the rise, Locke said those which remains in good sup- with true influenza are at the greatest risk of compliply at area pharmacies. New government figures cations. Influenza-like illness is show that flu cases seem to be leveling off nationwide defined as a fever of 100 but are still rising in the degrees or higher with a cough or sore throat. West. People who come down National statistics show with the flu can be sick with hospitalizations and deaths spiked last week, especially a fever for five to seven among the elderly, The days, and be contagious for Associated Press reported. 10 to 14 days. Health officials stress According to the Centers for Disease Control and hand hygiene and recomPrevention, eight children mend that people with the died from the flu last week, flu stay home for at least 24 bringing the nationwide hours after the fever is gone total of pediatric deaths to to avoid spreading the virus. 37. Rest, liquids and over About 100 children die the counter medicines are in an average flu season. common treatments. Antibiotics don’t work against a West to East viral illness. For more information, In Washington, the flu generally hits eastern visit the state health Washington before crossing department website at www.doh.wa.gov/ or the the Cascades. “This year, we’ve had the Centers for Disease Control website at www.cdc.gov/ opposite,” Locke said. The state Health Depart- flu/. ment said 22.8 percent of ________ western Washington lab Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be tests were confirmed influ- reached at 360-452-2345, ext. enza, and 18 percent of 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula eastern Washington sam- dailynews.com.

Hallmark: Most

send greetings over Internet CONTINUED FROM A1 keepsake ornaments and Precious Moments figuEven the fixtures and rines. Customers will be able shelving will be up for sale, to redeem their rewards Willa said. Technology has made it cards at other Gold Crown easier to contact loved ones, Hallmark stores, Willa said. The Phillips have five Willa said, reducing the employees who will be out need for the greeting cards that line the rows and rows of work when the store of shelving inside the Phil- closes. Before their 15 years in lips’ store. Sequim, the Phillips had a “People buy less cards,” Willa said. “Now, they con- Hallmark store in downnect over the Internet or town Port Angeles for 22 years. through text messages.” “It’s the economy. I don’t know if it’s following us or Nearest in Poulsbo what,” Willa said. The “devoted customers” ________ that have frequented the Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiPhillips’ store now will have tor Joe Smillie can be reached at travel to Poulsbo to pick up 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at the franchise’s trademark jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

Briefly: State Body found near burned out vehicle

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Irrigation Festival Junior Royalty are, from left, Dee Dee Dorrell, Logan Phipps, Chloe Stanford and Henry Hughes. They selection was based on essay contest based on the theme “what would you see as you are dancing through the valley?” Other junior royalty are Prince Logan Phipps, also a student at Helen Haller, and Princess Chloe Stan-

Reporter Arwyn Rice can be ford and Prince Henry Hughes, both students at reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Police shooting Greywolf Elementary 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula VANCOUVER, Wash. — School. dailynews.com. Police officers investigating

New styles and colors

Katherine Ottaway, MD

Mens and Womens AN INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE

AFFORDABLE HOUSING WITH ALL THE LUXURIES

C OMPARE

THESE FEATURES

New & Medicare Patients Welcome



Rent is 30% of your adjusted income and includes utilities (except Phone & Cable TV). Income Limits Apply.

251 S. Fifth Ave., Sequim

suncrestvillage@gres.com

22576541

360-681-3800 TDD 711



Let’s discuss your health history, questions and goals to collaborate on your health plan.

-Kitchens in all Apartments -Extra Storage in Each Apartment -Delicious & Nutritious Daily Meals -Bi-Weekly Housekeeping -Recreation & Activity Programs -Scheduled Transportation

You could be enjoying your retirement years, right now!

Takes time to listen and explain

Quimper Family Medicine 2120 Lawrence St. at Kearney, Port Townsend

360-385-3826

21578130

31723411

130 West Front St St., Port Ang Angeles 360-452-3741

peninsuladailynews.com

MONROE — Authorities in Snohomish County are investigating a body found near a burned out vehicle in a wooded area of Monroe. The sheriff’s office said a citizen called Saturday afternoon to report finding the body on private property. The dead person was found outside the vehicle. It’s not known if there is a connection between the vehicle and the property it was located on.

a series of armed robberies and a home invasion shooting in Vancouver fatally shot a 16-year-old armed suspect, authorities said Saturday. The teen was the primary suspect in the crime spree that occurred Friday, police said. Officers located Douglas E. Combs and another teen Friday night, and the encounter led to an officer opening fire, killing Combs, police said. The other teen, who is also 16, was arrested on firearms charges. Police said Combs was the prime suspect in a home invasion shooting and convenience store robbery early Friday morning and the armed robbery of a gas station store Friday night. The Associated Press


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Sen. Kerry nomination lawmakers top of Senate business sponsor bills PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

EMS levy begins in House, education reform in Senate BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

OLYMPIA — A bill sponsored by a 24th Legislative District representative that would allow fire districts and cities across the state to collect more tax dollars via emergency medical services levies had its first hearing last week. Meanwhile, the district’s state senator introduced legislation aimed at improving the Van De Wege state’s education system. S t a t e Rep. Kevin Van De W e g e , D-Sequim, is the prime sponsor of a Tharinger bill that would allow Washington fire districts and cities to collect up to 75 cents per $1,000 of assessed p r o p e r t y Hargrove valuation via an emergency medical services, or EMS, tax levy— designed to fund costs associated with ambulance service—rather than be limited to the current cap of 50 cents per $1,000. Van De Wege, a firefighter/paramedic lieutenant with Sequim-based Clallam County Fire District No. 3, said the bill would give fire districts struggling with declining assessed property values the ability to go to their respective taxpayers and ask for more EMS funds. “With assessed values going down, there’s no backstop, there’s no floor,” Van De Wege said, referring to the fact that EMS levies are not guaranteed to provide a minimum amount of funding if property assessments continue to drop.

Fire chiefs testify Van De Wege said the bill received supportive testimony from chiefs of some of the state’s larger fire departments, such as the city of Tacoma’s, during a public hearing on the bill at a Friday meeting of the House Finance Committee. Rep. Steve Tharinger, another Sequim Democrat and Van De Wege’s 24th District seat mate, vicechairs the Finance Committee. Tharinger and Van De Wege, along with state senator and Hoquiam Democrat Jim Hargrove, represent the 24th District, which comprises Clallam and Jefferson counties and a third of Grays Harbor County.

Heard no opposition

Eye on Olympia Olympia or anything,” Van De Wege said. Clallam County Fire District 3 and Clallam County Hospital District No. 1, which runs Forks Community Hospital, are the only Clallam taxing districts to collect EMS levies, while all but two of the seven fire districts in Jefferson County collect EMS levies at the capped 50-cent rate. Gordon Pomeroy, chief of East Jefferson Fire-Rescue, said he can’t imagine his district needing the additional levying capacity over the next year, but said the bill would help other districts to at least have that option. “I think, for the whole state, it’s probably a good idea to have that tool available,” Pomeroy said. EMS calls typically make up the highest percentage of responses for fire districts, Pomeroy explained, and comprise 74 percent of all the calls East Jefferson Fire-Rescue personnel respond to.

Education reform bill In other 24th Legislative District news, Hargrove last week introduced an education system reform bill that would, among other changes, allow state Learning Assistance Program to be used in more ways to help students with behavior difficulties. State Learning Assistance Program funds currently go to help students achieving below grade-level on the state’s assessment tests and 11th- and 12thgrade students at risk of not graduating, according to the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Hargrove’s bill, according to information provided by his staff, would allow Learning Assistance Program money to fund the work of parental involvement coordinators, who act as liaisons between schools and parents when students are dealing with behavior issues. The proposed legislation would also change the state teacher salary system so that a teacher’s salary is tied the teacher’s ability to positively impact student learning rather than the current salary method, which is based on years of service and academic degree achievement. Hargrove said the point of these changes is to allow the $4 billion in additional funding the state Supreme Court has ordered the legislature to funnel toward basic education to pay for targeted evidenced-based changes in the current education system rather than simply continue to fund existing programs. A state Supreme Court ruling last January, called the McCleary decision, determined the state is not meeting its constitutional obligation to fully fund basic education and must do so by 2018. The decision is named for Stephanie McCleary of Chimacum, a parent in the Chimacum School District and the lead petitioner of a lawsuit filed against the state alleging it was not meeting its state constitutional mandate of fully funding basic education.

Tharinger said the House Finance Committee did not hear any testimony in opposition to Van De Wege’s bill, though Tharinger said he thought the proposed levy increase cap should be examined more closely in relation to other levies paid by property owners. “It’s a question of looking at those in total and then making some decisions, I think,” Tharinger said. If the bill is approved and the EMS levy cap increased to 75 cents, Van De Wege said fire districts ________ would still have to put any Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can levy increases to a vote of be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. their residents. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula “It isn’t a tax hike from dailynews.com.

WASHINGTON — This week, the House will be in recess, while the Senate will vote on Hurricane Sandy disaster aid, a short-term increase in the nationaldebt limit and the nomination of Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., as secretary of state.

Contact legislators (clip and save) “Eye on Congress” is published in the Peninsula Daily News every Monday when Congress is in session about activities, roll call votes and legislation in the House and Senate. The North Olympic Peninsula’s legislators in Washington, D.C., are Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Mountlake Terrace), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Bothell) and Rep. Derek Kilmer (D-Gig Harbor). Contact information — The address for Cantwell and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Kilmer, U.S. House, Washington, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202-224-3441 (fax, 202228-0514); Murray, 202224-2621 (fax, 202-2240238); Kilmer, 202-2255916. Email via their websites: cantwell.senate.gov; murray.senate.gov; kilmer. house.gov. Kilmer’s North Olympic Peninsula office will open soon in Port Angeles. It will be staffed by Judith Morris, who may be contacted at judith.morris@ mail.house.gov or 360797-3623.

State legislators Jefferson and Clallam counties are represented in the part-time state Legislature by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the House majority whip; Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim Hargrove, D-Hoquiam. [See Eye on Olympia on this page.] Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege.kevin@leg. wa.gov; tharinger.steve@ leg.wa.gov; hargrove.jim@ leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-562-6000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/

Sen. Maria Cantwell D-Mountlake Terrace

Eye on Congress elections/elected_officials. aspx.

Learn more Websites following our state and national legislators: ■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues. ■ D E B T- L I M I T WAIVER: Voting 285 for and 144 against, the House on Wednesday passed a Republican bill (HR 325) to waive the statutory debt limit until May 19, thus allowing the Treasury to borrow above the current $16.4 trillion limit until then. The borrowing is needed to accommodate spending already approved by Congress. The bill also would impound House members’ and senators’ paychecks if either chamber were to fail to adopt what is known as a “congressional budget resolution” by the required date of April 15. Those fiscal blueprints set annual spending levels, make revenue and deficit projections and set rules for debating fiscal measures but lack the force of law. Under the bill, any impounded pay would be released to members no later than the end of the 113th Congress in January 2015. GOP leaders said this approach would not violate the Constitution’s ban on members of Congress varying their pay before a general election has intervened. Stated in the 27th Amendment, the ban is designed to keep lawmakers from accepting pay raises without first having to face voters in the next biennial congressional election. But Democratic critics used terms such as “institutionalized bribery” to denounce the “no budget, no

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3527.

North Olympic Peninsula Death Notices and Death and Memorial Notice obituaries appear online at

peninsuladailynews.com

Sen Patty Murray D-Bothell

Rep. Derek Kilmer D-Gig Harbor

pay” linkage. Drug Administration operA yes vote was to send ate most programs reauthothe bill to the Senate. rized by this bill. Kilmer voted yes. A yes vote was to pass the bill. ■ SOCIAL SECUKilmer voted yes. RITY, MEDICARE BENEFITS: Voting 151 for and ■ FILIBUSTER 277 against, the House on CHANGES: Senators on Wednesday defeated a Thursday adopted, 86 for Democratic motion to pre- and 9 against, a rule for the vent any congressional bud- 113th Congress that retains get resulting from HR 325 the 60-vote threshold for (above) from privatizing ending filibusters but takes Social Security; converting marginal steps to make filiMedicare into a voucher busters slightly less of an plan; reducing Medicaid or obstacle to the flow of legishome-nursing-care benefits; lation and nominations on cutting benefits for veter- the Senate floor. ans or active-duty military In part, the measure personnel and their fami- (S Res 16) gives the majorlies or reducing guaranteed ity and minority leaders health-insurance benefits tools for preventing filibusfor disabled persons or ters on motions to proceed senior citizens. to new bills, shortens filiA yes vote backed the busters against judicial Democratic motion. nominees below the Kilmer voted yes. Supreme Court level and executive-branch nominees ■ CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL ATTACKS ON below the Cabinet level, U.S.: Voting 395 for and 29 restricts filibusters against against, the House on Tues- conference reports and day renewed for five years gives the minority party several post-9/11 programs greater standing to offer to develop and deploy vac- amendments. By adopting this rule, cines and other medical countermeasures in the the Senate rebuffed sweepevent of chemical, biologi- ing changes sponsored cal, radioactive or nuclear mainly by Democratic Sens. Jeff Merkley of Oregon and attacks on America. Now awaiting Senate Tom Udall of New Mexico. Their most fundamental action, the bill (HR 307) also reauthorizes federal- change was to require senastate medical responses to tors to conduct talking filioutbreaks of infectious dis- busters on the Senate floor eases and natural disasters. rather just announce in Additionally, the bill advance, as they do under invests federal funds to existing rules, that they help state and local health plan to filibuster a bill or departments prepare for nomination. A yes vote was to tweak dealing with mass casualfilibuster rules for the 113th ties. The Department of Congress. Cantwell and Murray Health and Human Services and the Food and voted yes.

Death and Memorial Notice MERCEDES “MEDE” V. RHYNE April 9, 1925 January 21, 2013 Mercedes “Mede” V. Rhyne, of Port Angeles, Wash., passed away peacefully on January 21, 2013, at the age of 87. She was born to Carl and Tilda in North Dakota on April 9, 1925. Upon graduating from Minot Teacher’s College, Mede moved west and taught first grade in Pe Ell and Raymond, Wash. In 1946 she married Donald Rhyne Sr., and in 1951 they moved to Forks, Wash., where Donald began his career as a logging contractor. There, she taught church Sunday school, Brownie Scouts, and was a substitute teacher. She was active in Eastern Star and a happy bowler on Don’s company team. They lived their retirement years in Port Angeles, loved vacationing in Hawaii as well as traveling in their R.V. Later, they wintered in Yuma, Ariz. Soon after Don died in 2008 began a series of strokes, upon which she was caretaken by

Mrs. Rhyne her son Don Jr. They attended Lighthouse Christian Church. She was preceded in death by her husband of 62 years, Donald, Sr.; and by her young daughter Cindy Lee. She is survived by her daughter, Peggy (Rick) Oakes, of Eugene, Ore.; and son, Donald Jr., of Port Angeles; two grandchildren, Jake and Casey; and one greatgrandchild, Kylee. A graveside service near Chehalis, Wash., and a celebration of life in Port Angeles are planned in her honor. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of your choice.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 28, 2013 PAGE

A7 ... Create your own college degree by taking the best online courses from the best professors from around the globe ...

Higher education to the world L

ORD KNOWS THERE’S a lot of bad news in the world today to get you down. But there is one big thing happening that leaves me incredibly hopeful about the future, and that is the budding revolution in global online higher education. Nothing has more potential to lift more people out of poverty — Thomas L. Friedman by providing them an affordable education to get a job or improve in the job they have. Nothing has more potential to unlock a billion more brains to solve the world’s biggest problems. And nothing has more potential to enable us to reimagine higher education than the massive open online course, or MOOC, platforms that are being developed by the likes of Stanford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and companies like Coursera and Udacity. Last May, I wrote about Coursera — co-founded by the Stanford computer scientists Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng — just after it opened. Two weeks ago, I went back out to Palo Alto, Calif., to check in on them. When I visited last May, about 300,000 people were taking 38 courses taught by Stanford professors and a few other elite universities. Today, they have 2.4 million students, taking 214 courses from 33 universities, including eight international ones. Anant Agarwal, the former director of MIT’s artificial intelligence lab, is now president of edX, a nonprofit MOOC that MIT and Harvard are jointly building. Agarwal told me that since May, some 155,000 students from Agarwal around the world have taken edX’s first course: an MIT intro class on circuits. “That is greater than the total number of MIT alumni in its 150-year history,” he said. Yes, only a small percentage complete all the work, and even they still tend to be from the middle and upper classes of their societies, but I am convinced that within five years these platforms will reach a much broader demographic. Imagine how this might change U.S. foreign aid. For relatively little money, the U.S. could rent space in an Egyptian village, install two dozen computers and high-speed satellite Internet access, hire a

local teacher as a facilitator, and invite in any Egyptian who wanted to take online courses with the best professors in the world, subtitled in Arabic.

Y

ou just have to hear the stories told by the pioneers in this industry to appreciate its revolutionary potential. One of Koller’s favorites is about “Daniel,” a 17-year-old with autism who communicates mainly by computer. He took an online modern poetry class from Penn. He and his parents wrote that the combination of rigorous academic curriculum, which requires Daniel to stay on task, and the online learning system that does not strain his social skills, attention deficits or force him to Koller look anyone in the eye, enable him to better manage his autism. Koller shared a letter from Daniel, in which he wrote: “Please tell Coursera and Penn my story. I am a 17-year-old boy emerging from autism. I can’t yet sit still in a classroom so [your course] was my first real course ever. “During the course, I had to keep pace with the class, which is unheard-of in special ed. Now I know I can benefit from having to work hard and enjoy being in sync with the world.” One member of the Coursera team who recently took a Coursera course on sustainability told me that it was so much more interesting than a similar course he had taken as an undergrad. The online course included students from all over the world, from different climates, incomes levels and geographies, and, as a result, “the discussions that happened in that course were so much more valuable and interesting than with people of similar geography and income level” in a typical American college. Mitch Duneier, a Princeton sociology professor, wrote an essay in The Chronicle

In response, other students in Cairo in the same class invited him to meet at a teahouse, where they offered to help him stay in the course. A 15-year-old student in Mongolia, who took the same class as part of a blended course and received a perfect score on the final exam, added Agarwal, is now applying to MIT and the University of California, Berkeley. As we look to the future of higher education, said the MIT president, L. Rafael Reif, something that we now call a TILL HAFENBRAK/FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES “degree” will be a concept “connected of Higher Education in with bricks and mortar” — and traditional the fall about his expeon-campus experiences that will increasrience teaching a class ingly leverage technology and the Internet through Coursera: to enhance classroom and laboratory work. “A few months ago, Alongside that, though, said Reif, many just as the campus of universities will offer online courses to Princeton University students anywhere in the world, in which had grown nearly they will earn “credentials” — certificates silent after commencethat testify that they have done the work ment, 40,000 students and passed all the exams. from 113 countries Reif The process of developing credible crearrived here via the dentials that verify that the student has Internet to take a free course in introduc- adequately mastered the subject — and tory sociology. . . . did not cheat — and can be counted on by “My opening discussion of C. Wright employers is still being perfected by all Mills’ classic 1959 book, The Sociological the MOOCs. Imagination, was a close reading of the But once it is, this phenomenon will text, in which I reviewed a key chapter line really scale. by line. I asked students to follow along in their own copies, as I do in the lecture hall. can see a day soon where you’ll “When I give this lecture on the Princecreate your own college degree by ton campus, I usually receive a few penetaking the best online courses from trating questions. the best professors from around the world “In this case, however, within a few — some computing from Stanford, some hours of posting the online version, the entrepreneurship from Wharton, some course forums came alive with hundreds ethics from Brandeis, some literature from of comments and questions. Edinburgh — paying only the nominal fee “Several days later there were thoufor the certificates of completion. sands. . . . Within three weeks I had It will change teaching, learning and received more feedback on my sociological the pathway to employment. ideas than I had in a career of teaching, “There is a new world unfolding,” said which significantly influenced each of my Reif, “and everyone will have to adapt.” subsequent lectures and seminars.” ________

I

A

garwal of edX tells of a student in Cairo who was taking the circuits course and was having difficulty. In the class’s online forum, where students help each other with homework, he posted that he was dropping out.

Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email Friedman via nyti.ms/ friedmanmail.

Better thought, the second time around THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION initially billed France about $18 million to cover U.S. military support for its mission in Mali, while Canada offered similar services at no cost. Wall Street Journal columFroma nist Bret SteHarrop phens expressed shock at this alleged nickeland-diming, noting that $18 million is pocket change to a Washington spending over $10 billion a day. Stephens has a point, but look at it another way. Canada can pay for such minor defense needs even more easily than we can because the United States pays for all its major ones. Europeans likewise enjoy a strong defense, largely courtesy of the United States.

This reality undermines the neocon charge that America is going soft like Europe, letting its military weaken to expand comforts such as health coverage. Europe’s getting both but paying for only one. President Barack Obama subsequently agreed to rip up the bill. That said, a clear message that America no longer will be the world’s enforcer while other nations sit back in their eighth week of paid vacation seems a good start to the second term. Obama’s appointment of former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel as defense secretary also underscores his determination to change the terms of the deal with other rich countries on matters of defense. Hagel wants coalitions to share these duties. As an aside, making the case that this or that costs only 0.18 percent of $10 billion — so what’s the big deal? — has always been an odd approach. (Welfare advocates also make these kinds of arguments.)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

john.brewer@peninsuladailynews.com

REX WILSON

STEVE PERRY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

360-417-3530 rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com

360-417-3540 steve.perry@peninsuladailynews.com

MICHELLE LYNN

SUE STONEMAN

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS MANAGER

360-417-3510 360-417-3555 michelle.lynn@peninsuladailynews.com sue.stoneman@peninsuladailynews.com

If the U.S. government sent Froma Harrop a check for $5 million, that would be a mere 0.05 percent of the day’s outlays. But doing so makes no sense, much to my regret. Meanwhile, President Obama’s vow to pursue a liberal agenda in the second term is, contrary to conventional discourse, a good way to work across the aisle. The debates over health care and raising the debt ceiling got so nasty, in part, because Obama wouldn’t draw lines and defend them. Republicans couldn’t tell how far he’d compromise, fueling hopes on the fringes. Had Obama refused in 2011 to make raising the debt ceiling part of budget talks — as he does now — Republicans would be better off today. Threatening the full faith and credit of the United States as a negotiating tool didn’t win them many friends. Republicans have since smartened up. Rather than replay the creepy

drama of two years ago, they’ve put off the debt-ceiling vote for three months. (They’re still toying with it, but not terrifying world markets.) Republican Speaker John Boehner now tells the Democratic-majority Senate that it had better get off its duff and present the House with a budget avoiding deep automatic spending cuts. Sounds like a reasonable request. Other items on Obama’s “aggressive” liberal agenda should not be regarded as aggressive — or even liberal. Immigration reform could be doable, as more Republicans recognize that legalizing the status of otherwise law-abiding illegal residents in this country is politically astute. And restoring order in the program could include favoring immigrants with the skills American business needs. That the Obama administration already has begun enforcing the immigration laws should

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

make this a golden moment to win broad support for comprehensive reform. Global warming should not be a liberal-versus-conservative thing. The climate change pushing floodwaters into Brooklyn also scorches crops on the Texas panhandle. Anyhow, many solutions to global warming would also enhance energy independence, and who’d object to that? This may be optimistic, but the furies wreaking havoc in Obama’s first four years seem tuckered out. May an era of new thinking commence.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her via info@ creators.com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Wanted PA man returned to city from Calif. which the State Patrol bomb squad later disposed of. Nilsson was being held in Los Angeles County in November on charges of possessing illegal fireworks and offenses related to vandalizing his jail cell, though all but the fireworks possession charge were dismissed in favor of Nilsson’s extradiHomemade explosive tion to Port Angeles, accordNilsson was wanted by ing to Los Angeles County Port Angeles police starting Superior Court documents. Oct. 3 after a search at his ________ Port Angeles home failed to Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can find him but did recover a be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. small, pingpong-ball-sized 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula Andrew David Nilsson homemade explosive device, dailynews.com. Extradited to Port Angeles

Court papers describe Nilsson as possible mentally troubled, reportedly telling witnesses to the alleged abuse that he is “the catalyst of the apocalypse� and that reptilians aliens were to come to Earth in December and harvest human organs.

These charges stem from Nilsson’s alleged abuse of a single individual between Sept. 26-30 and the alleged subsequent threatening of 27, will make his second friends of that person, court appearance in Clallam documents said. County Superior Court at 9 Mental health a.m. Friday. He is charged with one During Nilsson’s first count of harassment/ court appearance Thursday, threats to kill and one count Clallam County Superior each of second-degree Court Judge S. Brooke Taya s s a u l t / s t r a n g u l a t i o n , lor set Nilsson’s bail at unlawful imprisonment, $100,000 and ordered a harassment/threats to kill mental health assessment and fourth-degree assault, to be done on Nilsson by all of which are domestic- Peninsula Behavioral violence-related. Health.

Suspect to face multiple domestic violence charges BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man will be arraigned this week on multiple domestic-violence charges after being shipped up from a jail in Los Angeles County last week. Andrew David Nilsson,

peninsuladailynews.com

1

Propane by:

2

Sewer & Drains by:

James W. Paulsen Owner

Courteous Friendly Service

ABSOLUTELY NO MESS Pellet Stove Service

TM

10

#SOOTS169ME

11

RooďŹ ng Supply by:

Licensed and Bonded Contractor # GEORGE D098NR

12

Hadlock Building Supply is a full service lumber yard, offering GAF rooďŹ ng. Port Hadlock, WA 98339 1-360-385-1771

1-800-859-3463

Fast Professional Service 100% Satisfaction Guarantee

NEW INSTALLATIONS

'$*')*"%(-$)'"! ) #,()"(-'$%#!)'  *'#(-*) !# #

901 Ness Corner Rd.

NORTHWEST, INC.

SERVICE

21570419

PROTECTED BY

21570418

Local Monitoring

SECU SECURITY SERVICES

Heat Pumps by:

AIR FLO HEATING 21570416

(360) 683-8332

683-6415 452-1051

SECURITY SYSTEMS

28654661

Quality Work – All at Competitive Prices!

r

CHIMNEY CLEANING REPAIRING SAFETY INSPECTIONS

21570409

Home Security by:

21570412

21570410

    

  ")!$ $$#) #

s r

6

Chimney Cleaning by:

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED STATE CONTR. REG. #MA-TH-EG244JT

Custom home designs Project Planning Renovations and additions Aging In Place/handicap access

"Residential & Commercial"

"Excavating & General Contracting"

117 N. LINCOLN ST. 457-6906

1-800-843-5277

GEORGE E. DICKINSON CONSTRUCTION, INC.

819 EAST 1ST ST. Port Angeles, WA

457-5277

24 HR. EMERGENCY SERVICE

by

9

Renovations by:

-/4/2#9#,%3s15!$3 #!23s3563s425#+3

MIRRORS TUB & SHOWER ENCLOSURES WOOD & STEEL DOORS

21570403

SEQUIM PORT ANGELES Sequim Village Ctr. 603 E. Front 683-7988 457-1144

8

Site Work by:

WINDOW REPLACEMENT STORE FRONTS ENTRANCE DOORS

21570400

7

Screens by:

5 Minute Approvals!

GLASS

Professional Care With Personal Service



21570392

contr#sunshp*077QP

  

     

  

Clallam & Jefferson Counties

Auto Sales by:

Serving Port Angeles, Sequim & Peninsula Since 1952

Insurance, Inc.

"!)( *&#'

Call us for safe reliable code compliant propane heating systems.

5 MATHEWS’ We Finance EVERYONE!

MM Fryer & Sons

Quality Heating Service Since 1980

4

Windows by:

21570407

Sunshine Propane

3

Insurance by:

) $#   

Toll Free: 1-800-750-1771

 ')&* " 683-3901

6

2C715602

Spotlight Your Business Here! Call Jeanette 360-417-7685

11 16

19 21

17

10

9

14 13

7

1

4 2 20

8

12

3

5

15 18

Painting by:

13

14

Garage Doors by:

Draperies Northwest

Murrey’s

T

Waste Connections

21

22

A Self-Service Dog Wash

HOURLY KENNEL OPTIONS

360-477-2883 Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Hwy 101 and Lake Farm Road

EXP. 3-1-13

23

24

RS Schmidt Enterprises Lic.# RSSCHSS8950F

CUSTOM BATHROOMS TURNKEY SERVICE, CALL US TODAY & SCHEDULE A FREE ESTIMATE!

452-7278 or 800-422-7854

& printing

360.385.3809

118 Taylor Street, Downtown P.T.

31729985

Call us for all your recycling needs!

Bathroom Remodeling by:

framing

$5 DOLLARS OFF Per Gallon

w w w. f r a m e w o r ks N W. c o m

ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES TELL US YOUR DREAM!

2A690076

(360) 457-9776

315 DECATUR ST. PORT TOWNSEND

www.OutOnALimbLandscape.com

20

Recycling by:

Do-It-Yourself ’ers Garden Coaching & Action Plans

457-8479

 

  

Tlympic Disp sal 31729980

We have the largest selection of fabrics on the Peninsula #USTOM$RAPERIESs3HADES #USTOM"ED3PREADS s&REE)N(OME%STIMATESs Call Jan Perry to SCHEDULEANAPPOINTMENT

360-457-8828 800-371-8828 Cont #MP-OV-EG D062MA

19

18

360-379-8025

andscape ervices 31729973

21570420

Draperies by:

Dog Services by:

Over 20 years experience Bonded Insured

360 452-3480

Spotlight Your Business Here! Call Jeanette 360-417-7685

31729977

21570421

INTERIOR | EXTERIOR

Casepp*962JG

17

Paint by:

2C716344

FULL PREPARATION FOR A QUALITY FINISH

457-8209

16

Frames by:

uon a 

AND

Competitive Rates

15

STINKYDOGUBATHE.COM

MP

Patrick Case, Owner

Landscape Help by:

Spotlight Your Business Here! Call Jeanette 360-417-7685

Spotlight Your Business Here! Call Jeanette 360-417-7685


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, January 28, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B Torrey Pines

M’s own Beast Mode Morse has a familiar nickname BY JOHN MCGRATH MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tiger Woods increased his lead at the Farmers Insurance Open in the third round at San Diego on Sunday.

Tiger takes control BY DOUG FERGUSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — The fog listed Sunday and revealed a familiar sight: Tiger Woods in command at Torrey Pines. Despite finishing with a bogey on the easiest hole of the back nine, Woods began to pull away from the field with a 3-under 69 in the third round to build a four-shot lead in the Farmers Insurance Open. Woods has only lost twice on the PGA Tour in 40 previous times that he has held the outright lead through 54 holes. Because fog wiped out all of Saturday, players were going as long as daylight allowed before returning today to complete the tournament. Woods, who was at 14-under 202, was likely to get in about six holes before darkness, and he didn’t bother switching to a red shirt for the start of the final round. Brad Fritsch, a PGA Tour rookie from Canada, had a 70 and was at 206. Erik Compton finished birdieeagle for a 71 and was alone in third, five shots behind. Asked about trying to chase Woods, Compton started laughing. “I’m trying to chase myself,” he said. Woods has won seven times at Torrey Pines as a pro, including a U.S. Open, and another win today would give him the most wins on any course. The tournament staff followed the final group along the back nine, ready to change the hole locations to get ready for the final round. Players had about 30 minutes to get something to eat and hit a few balls before going right back out. Woods had superb control of his tee shots and was rarely out of position on a day that began under a light drizzle and soon gave way to patchy clouds and clear views of the Pacific surf below the bluffs. Starting with a two-shot lead, he stretched that quickly with a tap-in birdie on the second hole and a beautiful tee shot to a left pin on the downhill par 3 to about 4 feet. The South Course played even longer with the soft conditions, and only seven players broke 70. Aaron Baddeley had the lowest score of the round with a 68. Woods managed to stretch his lead with pars, though he was always on the attack because of his position in the fairway. He missed a downhill birdie putt from 4 feet on the par-5 ninth, and then came back with a wedge that landed near the hole at No. 10 and spun back next to the cup before it settled 4 feet away for a birdie putt that he made. He led by as many as six strokes until Fritsch birdied the last hole and Woods, playing in the group behind, ran into trouble. His tee shot rolled up near the lip of the bunker, and he advanced it 70 yards into deep rough. He swung hard through the thick, wet grass into a greenside bunker, and then missed his 8-foot par putt. TURN

TO

PGA/B3

SEATTLE — Michael Morse returned Saturday to Seattle, the city that star outfielders Josh Hamilton and Justin Upton spurned for warmer climes with more accomplished baseball franchises. Morse enjoyed the 31⁄2 seasons he spent with the Washington Nationals, but on Jan. 13, when Nats general manager Mike Rizzo called to inform Morse he’d been traded to the Mariners, the guy with the perpetual smile had reason to smile some more. Hamilton decided the Los Angeles Angels were a better fit for his prodigious power, and Upton deigned Atlanta worthy of his considerable talent. It’s impossible to imagine either as happy as Morse was during the FanFest event at Safeco Field on Saturday. Almost four years after the Mariners traded him for journeyman outfielder Ryan Langerhans, Morse spent much of the afternoon hugging old friends. Morse being Morse, there were enough old friends to fill a convention hall. “This is where I pretty much started out,” Morse said as he glanced around Safeco Field from the first-base dugout. “There’s ties here. I love this city. The fans are amazing. In cities like this, you want to have a good team.” While his ability to see sunshine on a cloudy day hasn’t changed, the Michael Morse beginning his second tour with the Mariners hardly resembles

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michael Morse — he doesn’t go by Mike anymore — is back in Seattle after being traded by the Washington Nationals. Morse says he’s not the same player who left the Mariners in 2009. Mike Morse, the kid whose first tour was undermined by tough luck. For one, he’s now Michael, as in the biblical figure who rowed the boat ashore.

Now, he’s a Beast For two, the 6-foot-5 Morse looks more like a pro-football tight end than the big-league position player struggling to find a position he could play every day. “Before I was 215 pounds,” Morse said. “Now I’m about 245. Two different guys.” “He’s huge,” outfielder Michael Saunders, who has known Morse since their minorleague days in Tacoma, noted

Saturday. “But you know what? He was sort of the same size when he left. He’s just filled out a little bit. He’s on record as saying he left here as a boy and has come back as a man. “The guy is an animal. He’s known as ‘Beast Mode’ for a reason, right?” Morse acquired the nickname in Washington, where the opportunity to play regularly led to a 2011 breakout season — he hit .303, with 31 homers and 95 RBI — and his status as a cult favorite among Nationals fans. They put the “Beast Mode” tag on him, and Morse took it from there. He wore a “Beast Mode”

T-shirt, not realizing he’d wind up in a major sports market where “Beast Mode” is a synonym for Seattle Pro Bowl running back Marshawn Lynch. “I got a chance to play every day in D.C.,” Morse said, “and turned into ‘The Beast.’ ” The physical transformation has been augmented by an annual winter exercise regimen in Florida arranged by his once and future Mariners teammate Raul Ibañez. The gym sessions, similar to the workouts prospective NFL players participate in before the pre-draft combine, include everything from weightlifting to hot yoga. TURN

TO

M’S/B3

Crucial win for Pirates women boost in the NWAACC North Division standings. The Pirates are now tied for second place with Bellevue and Skagit Valley. All PENINSULA DAILY NEWS three teams are 5-2 in conferBELLEVUE — Jesse Ellis ence. Skagit Valley kept pace by and Taylor Larson combined stomping hapless Olympic for 27 points to spark the into the ground by a score of Peninsula College women’s 102-35 on Saturday. basketball team to a crucial Whatcom, which the 55-53 win against Bellevue. In the men’s game, though, Pirates next play on Feb. 2 after a bye Wednesday, leads the Bellevue Bulldogs got the division at 6-1, 13-6 oversome breathing room in the all. second half after a tight first Peninsula plays at Whathalf to beat the Pirates 80-69 com in Bellingham at 4 p.m. as the two schools split this coming Saturday. games. The Pirates, 10-7 overall, In the women’s game, the had to hold off the Bellevue tough Saturday road win Bulldogs after leading 31-21 gave the Pirates a needed

Men drop game for hoops split

at halftime. The Bulldogs, 12-8 overall, outscored the Pirates 32-24 in the second half but came up two points short. Ellis sank a team-high 14 points on 7 of 10 shooting from the field while Larson was right behind with 13 on 5 of 8 shooting from the field and 3 of 3 from the free-throw line. Demarea Caples had 18 points for the Bulldogs while Kaitlynn Bunger sank 16. Larson also had a strong day on the boards for the Pirates with seven rebounds while Abigail Jones broght down a game-high nine for Peninsula. Karli Brakes, meanwhile,

led the Pirates with gamehigh seven assists and three steals. Bunger had a team-high six boards and a blocked shot for Bellevue. The Pirates next home game will be Feb. 6 against Edmonds (1-6, 5-13).

Men’s Basketball Bellevue 80, Peninsula 69 BELLEVUE — Andrew Squiers’ double-double of 25 points and 13 rebounds sparked the Bulldogs against the Pirates on Saturday night. TURN

TO

PIRATES/B3

Djokovic completes Australian hat trick Third win in row for Serbian player BY JOHN PYE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MELBOURNE, Australia — No shirt ripping or bare-chested flexing this time. Novak Djokovic completed his work before midnight, defeating Andy Murray in four sets for his third consecutive Australian Open title and fourth overall. It was also the second time in three years Djokovic had beaten his longtime friend in this final. So the celebration was muted: a small victory shuffle, raised arms, a kiss for the trophy. No grand histrionics, although that’s not to say the moment was lost on him. “Winning it three in a row, it’s incredible,” Djokovic said after his 6-7 (2), 7-6 (3), 6-3, 6-2 victory Sunday night.

“It’s very thrilling. I’m full of joy right now. It’s going to give me a lot of confidence for the rest of the season, that’s for sure.” Nine other men had won consecutive Australian titles in the Open era, but none three straight years. One of them was Andre Agassi, who presented Djokovic with the trophy. A year ago, Djokovic began his season with an epic 5-hour, 53-minute five-set win over Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open, the longest Grand Slam final. He tore off his shirt to celebrate, the TV replays repeated constantly at this tournament. He mimicked that celebration after coming back to beat Stanislas Wawrinka in five hours in a surprisingly tough fourth-round victory this time. Since then, he’s looked every bit the No. 1 player. He said he played “perfectly” in his 89-minute win over

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serbia’s Novak Djokovic holds his trophy after defeating Britain’s Andy Murray in the final at the Australian Open in Melbourne, Australia. fourth-seeded David Ferrer in the semifinals Thursday night. Murray struggled to beat 17-time major winner Roger Federer in five sets in the semifinals Friday night, and still had the bad blisters on his feet to show for it in the final. In a final that had the mak-

ings of a classic when two of the best returners in tennis were unable to get a break of serve in the first two sets that lasted 2:13, the difference may have hinged on something as light as a feather. TURN

TO

OPEN/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Girls Basketball: Port Angeles C squad at Clallam Bay, 5:15 p.m.

Tuesday Boys Basketball: Forks at Tenino, 7 p.m.; Bremerton at Port Townsend, 7 p.m.; North Kitsap at Sequim, 7 p.m.; Chimacum at Vashon Island, 7 p.m.; Quilcene at Evergreen Lutheran, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball: Chimacum at Vashon Island, 5:15 p.m.; Quilcene at Evergreen Lutheran, 5:30 p.m.; Forks at Tenino, 5:30 p.m.; Lake Quinault at Crescent, 6:30 p.m.; Port Townsend at Bremerton, 7 p.m.; Sequim at North Kitsap, 7 p.m. Boys Swimming: Olympic League Divisional Invitational at William Shore Memorial Pool in Port Angeles, diving at noon, swimming at 3:30 p.m.

WASHINGTON (12-8) Simmons 0-0 2-2 2, N’Diaye 3-5 1-2 7, Gaddy 4-7 3-5 13, Suggs 4-10 2-2 13, Wilcox 6-14 0-2 14, Stewart 0-0 0-0 0, Andrews 5-10 4-7 15, Jarreau 0-1 0-0 0, Kemp, Jr. 5-5 2-4 12. Totals 27-52 14-24 76.

Youth Sports

OREGON (18-2) Kazemi 4-4 3-4 11, Singler 7-9 3-4 18, Woods 3-10 2-2 8, Loyd 1-3 7-10 9, Dotson 3-5 2-4 8, Austin 2-3 3-4 7, Moore 2-4 5-7 9, Carter 0-0 0-0 0, Emory 4-7 2-2 11. Totals 26-45 27-37 81.

Wrestling

Basketball Saturday’s Scores BOYS BASKETBALL Asotin 64, Waitsburg-Prescott 29 Ballard 72, Newport 55 Bickleton 46, Trout Lake-Glenwood 16

10 a.m. (47) GOLF PGA, Farmers Insurance Open, Final Round, Site: Torrey Pines Golf Club - San Diego (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Pittsburgh vs. Louisville (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Women’s Basketball NCAA, Notre Dame vs. Tennessee (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Kansas vs. West Virginia (Live)

No. 16 OREGON 81, WASHINGTON 76

Wednesday

Preps

Today

Troy 71, Louisiana-Monroe 64, OT Tulane 73, Rice 66 UCF 74, SMU 65 UNC Asheville 69, High Point 58 UTEP 68, East Carolina 67 Virginia 65, Boston College 51 William & Mary 63, Towson 56

Boys Basketball: Crescent at Neah Bay, 8 p.m. Girls Basketball: Crescent at Neah Bay, 6:30 p.m.

JV/Olympic Mountain Folkstyle Wrestling Challenge Port Angeles A total of 117 individuals, mostly from the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas, competed in 27 different age/weight divisions at the first JV/ Olympic Mountain Folkstyle Wrestling Challenge. Medals were awarded to the top three wrestlers in each division. Medalists 5 yrs. old/45 lbs. Phoenix Flores (Olympic Mountain Wrestling Club) 1st; Azrael Harvey (OMWC) 2nd; Connor Batton (OMWC) 3rd. 5/45 Willow Harvey (OMWC) 1st; Dean Spaulding (OMWC) 2nd; Brandt Perry (OMWC) 3rd. 6/50 Jace Brady (Kingston Wrestling Academy) 1st; Walker Wheeler (Forks Wrestling Club) 2nd; Ben Gomez (KWA) 3rd. 6/60 Brody Lausche (FWC) 1st;Kendsie Thompson (FWC) 2nd; Cole Beeman (OMWC) 3rd. 6/62 Adrian Sanchez (FWC) 1st; George Powers (FWC) 2nd; Sawyer Graham (FWC). 7/77 Sloan Tumaua (FWC) 1st; Mike Dunn (FWC) 2nd; Hayden Cole (FWC) 3rd. 8/55 Connor Demorest (FWC) 1st; Ethan Abrams (OMWC) 2nd; Makayla Beaudoin (KWA) 3rd. 8/70 Jack Harrelson (OMWC) 1st; Connor FerroMay (FWC) 2nd; Luke Decker (FWC) 3rd. 9/60 Jake Weakley (FWC) 1st; Dalton Kilmer (FWC) 2nd; Ryan Rancourt (FWC) 3rd. 9/68 Hunter Tobin (Fairview Junior High School Club) 1st; Hiram Topham (Bainbridge Wrestling Club) 2nd; Matthew Wallerstedt (FWC) 3rd. 9/79 Holly Beadouin (KWA) 1st; Cru Demorest (FWC) 2nd; Daniel Cable (OMWC) 3rd. 9/90 Robbie Collier (KWA) 1st; Jason Kibe (OMWC) 2nd; Austin Graham (FWC) 3rd. 10/120 Samuel Oliffe (BWC) 1st; Daniel Defoe (BWC) 2nd; James Lawrence (OMWC) 3rd. 11/89 Colby Demorest (FWC) 1st; Keith Thompson (FWC) 2nd; Seth Davis (FWC) 3rd. 11/105 Riley Gale (OMWC) 1st; Shane Queen (FWC) 2nd; Grant Abrams (OMWC) 3rd. 13/84 Kaylomb Parrish (FJHS) 1st; Josue Lucas (FWC) 2nd; Nate Harrelson (OMWC) 3rd. 13/90 Cody Anderson (OMWC) 1st; Alec Acfalle (FJHS) 2nd; Oleg Maguire (BWC) 3rd. 13/125 Jayden Fernandez (FJHS) 1st; Anthony Hall (Sultan) 2nd; Daniel Martinez (FWC) 3rd. 13/150 Kyle Ignacio (FJHS) 1st; Arik Lundberg (Northwest Washington Wrestling Club) 2nd. High School 118 Marty Malland (Olympic High School) 1st; Curan Bradley (PAHS) 2nd; David Treese (PAHS) 3rd. HS 124 Brandon Melencio (OHS) 1st; Justice Roon (PAHS) 2nd; Cole Keehner (PAHS) 3rd. HS 132 Tyler Munson (OHS) 1st; Melvin Santos (OHS) 2nd; Dylan Walls (PAHS) 3rd. HS 145 Malcomb Cabornay (OHS) 1st; Jeremy Wojeck (OHS) 2nd; Michael Chong (PAHS) 3rd. HS 152 JP Smithson (PAHS) 1st; Andrew Harrelson (PAHS) 2nd; Micah Needham (PAHS) 3rd. HS 160 Ethan Szathmary (OHS) 1st; Bryce Chipley (OHS) 2nd; Sean O’Donnell (PAHS) 3rd. HS 189 Geordyn Shinard 1st; Zak Alderson (PAHS) 2nd; Chase Becar (OHS) 3rd. HS 285 Bryce Johnson (PAHS) 1st; Justin Moon (PAHS) 2nd; Anisi Tavui (OHS) 3rd.

SPORTS ON TV

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DRIVING

TOWARD HORIZON

...

Tiger Woods hits his tee shot on the par-3 third hole on the South Course at Torrey Pines during the third round of the Farmers Insurance Open PGA golf tournament Sunday in San Diego. Woods took a comfortable lead in the third round Sunday for position to win today’s final. Bothell 88, Redmond 48 Chelan 51, Brewster 44 Colfax 68, Springdale 39 Colton 55, Touchet 47 Columbia (Burbank) 49, Warden 33 Colville 47, Clarkston 46 Concrete 59, Orcas Island 46 Cusick 76, Curlew 40 Davenport 60, Northwest Christian (Colbert) 51 Davis 86, Eisenhower 38 DeSales 53, Dayton 41 East Valley (Yakima) 65, Selah 51 Eastmont 67, Moses Lake 37 Ephrata 69, Othello 39 Evergreen Lutheran 66, Rainier Christian 52 Hanford 54, Chiawana 48 Highland 67, Mabton 58 Inchelium 56, Columbia (Hunters) 47 Inglemoor 76, Eastlake 63 Issaquah 62, Garfield 59 Kamiakin 48, Walla Walla 38 Kiona-Benton 37, Connell 34 Kittitas 50, Liberty Bell 23 La Salle 63, Granger 57 LaCrosse/Washtucna 50, Pomeroy 38 Lake Quinault 55, Oakville 33 Lakeside (Seattle) 71, Auburn Mountainview 37 Lopez 62, Highland Christian Prep 44 Mary Knight 47, North River 17 Medical Lake 47, Cheney 45 Morton/White Pass 52, Adna 40 Mt. Rainier Lutheran 45, Quilcene 44 Naches Valley 56, Cle Elum/Roslyn 44 Odessa-Harrington 61, Wilbur-Creston 56 Pasco 60, Kennewick 47 Prosser 69, Ellensburg 66 Richland 85, Southridge 36 River View 45, Wahluke 42 Riverside Christian 66, Moses Lake Christian Academy 43 Roosevelt 52, Skyline 41 Seattle Academy 67, Graham-Kapowsin 40 Seattle Lutheran 52, Crosspoint Academy 34 Selkirk 46, Republic 34 St. George’s 59, Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 41 Sumner 65, Bonney Lake 49 Sunnyside Christian 52, Lyle-Wishram 44, OT Tekoa-Oakesdale 68, St. John-Endicott 67 Valley Christian 53, Almira/Coulee-Hartline 45 Vashon Island 50, Bellevue Christian 38 Wapato 64, Toppenish 49 Waterville 64, Entiat 39 Wellpinit 72, St. Michael’s 29 Wenatchee 57, Sunnyside 28 West Valley (Yakima) 76, Grandview 68 Zillah 89, Goldendale 40 GIRLS BASKETBALL Almira/Coulee-Hartline 74, Valley Christian 28 Asotin 49, Waitsburg-Prescott 42 Chelan 32, Brewster 30 Cheney 52, Medical Lake 24 Chiawana 64, Hanford 43 Colfax 57, Springdale 30 Colton 84, Touchet 22 Columbia (Burbank) 50, Warden 22 Columbia (Hunters) 61, Inchelium 25 Colville 50, Clarkston 42 Connell 66, Kiona-Benton 48 Crosspoint Academy 54, Seattle Lutheran 20 Cusick 60, Curlew 34 Davis 53, Eisenhower 40 Dayton 45, DeSales 40 East Valley (Yakima) 45, Selah 32 Ellensburg 55, Prosser 41 Ephrata 67, Othello 33 Evergreen Lutheran 47, Rainier Christian 10 Garfield-Palouse 34, Rosalia 33 Grandview 69, West Valley (Yakima) 54 Holy Names 58, Lakes 55 Kennewick 54, Pasco 38 La Salle 58, Granger 40 Lake Quinault 42, Oakville 26 Lincoln 47, Heritage 14 Mabton 48, Highland 10 Mt. Rainier Lutheran 49, Quilcene 25

Naches Valley 40, Cle Elum/Roslyn 36 Naselle 43, Ocosta 17 Northwest Christian (Colbert) 57, Davenport 23 Okanogan 50, Cashmere 30 Orcas Island 72, Concrete 54 Pomeroy 46, LaCrosse/Washtucna 17 Raymond 49, Northwest Christian (Lacey) 40 Republic 42, Selkirk 28 Richland 49, Southridge 31 Riverside Christian 59, Moses Lake Christian Academy 36 South Bend 50, Willapa Valley 37 St. George’s 52, Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 34 Sunnyside 56, Wenatchee 34 Sunnyside Christian 73, Lyle-Wishram 17 Tekoa-Oakesdale 60, St. John-Endicott 40 Trout Lake-Glenwood 48, Bickleton 36 Wahluke 52, River View 47 Walla Walla 62, Kamiakin 55 Wapato 64, Toppenish 54 Waterville 38, Entiat 18 Wellpinit 52, St. Michael’s 48 White Swan 59, Oroville 39 Wilbur-Creston 42, Odessa-Harrington 23 Winlock 57, Wishkah Valley 11 Zillah 72, Goldendale 18

College Basketball Men’s Results Saturday’s Major Scores FAR WEST Air Force 57, Wyoming 48 Arizona 74, Southern Cal 50 Arizona St. 78, UCLA 60 BYU 85, Portland 67 Cal Poly 75, CS Northridge 64 Colorado St. 74, Fresno St. 63 Gonzaga 66, San Francisco 52 Hawaii 78, UC Santa Barbara 73 Idaho 74, UTSA 70 Long Beach St. 81, UC Irvine 59 Louisiana Tech 51, Utah St. 48 Montana 76, Weber St. 74 Montana St. 61, Idaho St. 59, OT Nevada 75, Boise St. 59 North Dakota 81, N. Arizona 79 Oregon 81, Washington 76 Pacific 71, Cal St.-Fullerton 67 S. Utah 69, E. Washington 55 Sacramento St. 79, N. Colorado 72 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 84, Pepperdine 72 San Diego St. 55, New Mexico 34 Santa Clara 64, San Diego 50 Texas St. 86, Seattle 83 Texas-Arlington 66, San Jose St. 47 UC Davis 79, UC Riverside 72 Washington St. 71, Oregon St. 68 MIDWEST Akron 68, Buffalo 64 Ball St. 82, Miami (Ohio) 62 Butler 83, Temple 71 Chicago St. 62, Utah Valley 54 Dayton 72, Duquesne 56 Detroit 75, Loyola of Chicago 63 E. Illinois 78, SE Missouri 72, OT E. Michigan 42, N. Illinois 25 IPFW 80, IUPUI 79, OT Ill.-Chicago 55, Wright St. 49 Illinois St. 67, Evansville 62 Indiana St. 59, N. Iowa 58 Iowa St. 73, Kansas St. 67 Kansas 67, Oklahoma 54 Marquette 81, Providence 71 Missouri 81, Vanderbilt 59 Nebraska 64, Northwestern 49 Nebraska-Omaha 67, UMKC 59 Oakland 67, W. Illinois 60 Ohio 69, Kent St. 68 S. Dakota St. 69, N. Dakota St. 53 Toledo 75, Bowling Green 62 UT-Martin 65, SIU-Edwardsville 62 W. Michigan 76, Cent. Michigan 59 Wichita St. 73, Bradley 39 Wisconsin 45, Minnesota 44

Youngstown St. 73, Cleveland St. 59 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 63, FAU 38 Baylor 82, TCU 56 Cent. Arkansas 88, Lamar 59 Georgia 59, Texas A&M 52 Houston 66, UAB 61 Houston Baptist 94, Ecclesia 40 Oklahoma St. 80, West Virginia 66 Oral Roberts 75, McNeese St. 54 Prairie View 74, Alabama St. 72 Southern Miss. 62, Tulsa 59 Texas 73, Texas Tech 57 Texas Southern 89, Alabama A&M 56 UALR 62, North Texas 57 EAST Army 77, American U. 64 Boston U. 81, UMBC 75 Bucknell 65, Holy Cross 58 CCSU 72, St. Francis (NY) 70 Colgate 70, Navy 56 Cornell 66, Columbia 63 Drexel 68, Georgia St. 57 Fordham 66, Rhode Island 63 George Washington 82, Charlotte 54 Georgetown 53, Louisville 51 Harvard 82, Dartmouth 77, OT LIU Brooklyn 79, Bryant 78 NJIT 64, Texas-Pan American 51 New Hampshire 63, Binghamton 45 Ohio St. 65, Penn St. 51 Pittsburgh 93, DePaul 55 Quinnipiac 58, Fairleigh Dickinson 56 Robert Morris 76, Mount St. Mary’s 68 Sacred Heart 82, Monmouth (NJ) 68 Saint Joseph’s 59, Xavier 49 Saint Louis 67, St. Bonaventure 57 Stony Brook 79, Maine 69 UNC Wilmington 57, Hofstra 51 Vermont 50, Albany (NY) 43 Villanova 75, Syracuse 71, OT Wagner 81, St. Francis (Pa.) 56 Yale 76, Brown 64, OT SOUTH Alcorn St. 61, Southern U. 57 Ark.-Pine Bluff 79, Grambling St. 67 Belmont 85, E. Kentucky 74 Charleston Southern 79, Liberty 75 Coastal Carolina 73, Campbell 59 Coll. of Charleston 79, Wofford 50 Davidson 79, Appalachian St. 56 Delaware St. 68, Bethune-Cookman 52 Duke 84, Maryland 64 ETSU 89, North Florida 75 Elon 70, The Citadel 66 Florida 82, Mississippi St. 47 Florida A&M 55, Md.-Eastern Shore 54 Gardner-Webb 63, VMI 49 Georgia Southern 72, W. Carolina 66 Georgia Tech 82, Wake Forest 62 Jackson St. 60, MVSU 57 Jacksonville St. 65, Murray St. 64 James Madison 56, Old Dominion 46 Kentucky 75, LSU 70 La Salle 69, VCU 61 Memphis 73, Marshall 72 Mercer 71, Lipscomb 65 Middle Tennessee 72, W. Kentucky 53 Mississippi 63, Auburn 61 Morehead St. 78, Tennessee St. 69 Morgan St. 55, NC A&T 52 N. Kentucky 64, Kennesaw St. 53 NC Central 84, Coppin St. 75 NC State 91, North Carolina 83 New Orleans 94, Champion Baptist 54 Nicholls St. 70, Sam Houston St. 67, OT Norfolk St. 74, Hampton 67 Northwestern St. 61, Stephen F. Austin 57 Notre Dame 73, South Florida 65 Presbyterian 82, Longwood 71 Radford 58, Winthrop 57 SC-Upstate 79, Jacksonville 64 SE Louisiana 67, Texas A&M-CC 53 Savannah St. 64, SC State 49 South Carolina 75, Arkansas 54 Tennessee 54, Alabama 53 Tennessee Tech 70, Austin Peay 52

Halftime_Oregon 37-33. 3-Point Goals_Washington 8-12 (Suggs 3-3, Gaddy 2-3, Wilcox 2-3, Andrews 1-3), Oregon 2-8 (Singler 1-2, Emory 1-3, Loyd 0-1, Moore 0-2). Fouled Out_Gaddy. Rebounds_Washington 24 (Kemp, Jr., Simmons 6), Oregon 30 (Kazemi 11). Assists_ Washington 15 (Gaddy 5), Oregon 12 (Loyd 5). Total Fouls_Washington 27, Oregon 21. A_12,364.

Washington St. 71, Oregon St. 68 WASHINGTON ST. (11-9) Motum 5-9 7-8 20, Shelton 2-10 0-0 5, Ladd 10-11 2-2 23, Lacy 1-8 0-2 3, Woolridge 2-10 5-6 9, Leavitt 0-0 0-0 0, DiIorio 1-2 0-0 2, Longrus 0-0 0-0 0, Kernich-Drew 4-6 0-0 9. Totals 25-56 14-18 71. OREGON ST. (11-9) Reid 0-2 0-2 0, Collier 4-5 6-9 14, Burton 2-5 0-0 4, Starks 7-13 1-1 17, Nelson 6-13 0-1 14, Robbins 0-0 0-0 0, Barton 0-1 0-0 0, MorrisWalker 3-4 0-0 9, Moreland 3-6 0-0 7, Schaftenaar 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 26-55 7-13 68. Halftime_Oregon St. 33-29. 3-Point Goals_ Washington St. 7-25 (Motum 3-5, Ladd 1-1, Kernich-Drew 1-2, Shelton 1-6, Lacy 1-7, Woolridge 0-4), Oregon St. 9-25 (Morris-Walker 3-4, Nelson 2-5, Starks 2-7, Moreland 1-1, Schaftenaar 1-6, Reid 0-1, Barton 0-1). Fouled Out_ Moreland, Motum. Rebounds_Washington St. 39 (Motum, Shelton 10), Oregon St. 27 (Moreland 7). Assists_Washington St. 15 (Shelton 6), Oregon St. 17 (Starks 8). Total Fouls_Washington St. 14, Oregon St. 20. Technical_Oregon St. Bench. A_6,592.

S. Utah 69, E. Washington 55 E. WASHINGTON (4-15) Reuter 1-4 0-6 2, Jois 3-6 5-6 11, Seiferth 0-3 0-0 0, Kelly 3-9 0-0 7, Winford 2-9 2-2 7, Harvey 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 1-1 3-5 5, Dorsey 1-2 0-0 2, Jorg 0-0 0-0 0, Forbes 0-0 0-0 0, Chiverton 4-13 3-5 14, Hickert 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 18-54 13-24 55. S. UTAH (7-12) Stevenett 7-10 0-0 16, Jeffery 0-2 1-2 1, Cheesman 3-7 1-3 7, Heuir 6-14 5-5 17, Johnson 0-4 0-0 0, Ghormley 0-0 0-0 0, Nsenki 0-1 0-0 0, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Renfro 0-0 0-0 0, Collie 7-15 4-5 18, Koehler 0-0 0-0 0, Hanks 2-4 4-4 8, Hess 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 26-61 15-19 69. Halftime_E. Washington 33-31. 3-Point Goals_E. Washington 6-24 (Chiverton 3-8, Hickert 1-4, Kelly 1-5, Winford 1-5, Reuter 0-2), S. Utah 2-10 (Stevenett 2-2, Johnson 0-1, Hess 0-2, Collie 0-2, Heuir 0-3). Fouled Out_None. Rebounds_E. Washington 38 (Hickert, Jois 7), S. Utah 44 (Collie 9). Assists_E. Washington 8 (Hill, Jois, Kelly 2), S. Utah 13 (Johnson 6). Total Fouls_E. Washington 19, S. Utah 23. Technicals_Chiverton, Cheesman. A_3,081.

No. 10 GONZAGA 66, SAN FRANCISCO 52 SAN FRANCISCO (9-12) Christiansen 3-5 0-0 6, Dickerson 0-4 0-0 0, Doolin 3-6 1-2 7, Adams 3-6 0-0 9, Derksen 1-5 0-0 3, Parker 3-6 1-4 7, Rogers 1-7 0-0 3, Holmes 3-4 0-0 8, Xu 1-3 1-2 3, Hoffmann 0-3 0-0 0, Tollefsen 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 20-51 3-8 52. GONZAGA (19-2) Harris 5-11 1-3 12, Olynyk 5-12 2-3 13, Pangos 5-9 0-0 11, Bell 3-8 0-0 8, Dranginis 0-4 3-4 3, Dower 3-5 0-0 6, Stockton 2-3 0-0 5, Barham 2-2 0-0 6, Kamowski 1-4 0-0 2, Hart 0-0 0-1 0. Totals 26-58 6-11 66. Halftime_Gonzaga 43-21. 3-Point Goals_San Francisco 9-24 (Dickerson 0-2, Doolin 0-1, Adams 3-6, Derksen 1-2, Parker 0-1, Rogers 1-4, Holmes 2-3, Hoffmann 0-3, Tollefsen 2-2), Gonzaga 8-20 (Harris 1-2, Olynyk 1-1, Pangos 1-2, Bell 2-7, Dranginis 0-3, Dower 0-1, Stockton 1-2, Barham 2-2). Fouled Out_Dickerson. Rebounds_San Francisco 33 (Rogers 6), Gonzaga 37 (Harris 11). Assists_San Francisco 8 (Doolin 3), Gonzaga 15 (Stockton 4). Total Fouls_San Francisco 17, Gonzaga 10. A_6,000.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

B3

Open: Djokovic outlasts Murray in men’s final CONTINUED FROM B1 Preparing for a second serve at 2-2 in the second set tiebreaker, Murray was rocking back about to toss the ball when he stopped, paused and then walked onto the court and tried to grab a small white feather that was floating in his view. He went back to the baseline, bounced the ball another eight times and served too long. After being called for a double-fault, Murray knocked the ball away in anger and flung his arm down. He didn’t get close for the rest of the tiebreaker and was the first to drop serve in the match — in the eighth game of the third set. Djokovic broke him twice in the fourth set, which by then had turned into an easy march to victory. “It was strange,” said Djokovic, adding that it swung the momentum his way. “It obviously did. He made a crucial doublefault.” Murray didn’t blame his loss on the one distraction. “I mean, I could have served. It just caught my eye before I served. I thought it was a good idea to move it,” he said.

“Maybe it wasn’t because I obviously double-faulted. “You know, at this level it can come down to just a few points here or there. My biggest chance was at the beginning of the second set — didn’t quite get it. When Novak had his chance at the end of the third, he got his.” Djokovic had five breakpoint chances in the opening set, including four after having Murray at 0-40 in the seventh game, but wasn’t able to convert any of them. Then he surrendered the tiebreaker with six unforced errors. Murray appeared to be the stronger of the two at the time. He’d beaten Djokovic in their last Grand Slam encounter, the U.S. Open final, and had the Serb so off balance at times in the first set that he slipped to the court and took skin off his knee. Murray held serve to open the second set and had three break points at 0-40 in the second game, but Djokovic dug himself out of trouble and held. “After that I felt just mentally a little bit lighter and more confident on the court than I’ve done in the first hour or so,” Djokovic said. “I was serving better against him today in the first two sets than I’ve done in any of the match in the last two years.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Britain’s Andy Murray hits a return to Serbia’s Novak Djokovic during the men’s final at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia, on Sunday. Djokovic said he loves playing at Rod Laver Arena, where he won his first major title in 2008. He now has six Grand Slam titles altogether. Federer has won four of his 17 majors at Melbourne Park, and Agassi is the only other player to have won that many in Australia since 1968. Djokovic was just find-

ing his way at the top level when Agassi retired in 2006, but he had watched enough of the eight-time major winner to appreciate his impact. “He’s I think one of the players that changed the game — not just the game itself, but also the way the people see it,” Djokovic said. “So it was obviously a big

pleasure and honor for me to receive the trophy from him.” Agassi was among the VIPs in the crowd, along with actor Kevin Spacey and Victoria Azarenka, who won the women’s final in three sets against Li Na the previous night. Murray broke the 76-year drought for British

men at the majors when he won the U.S. Open last year and said he’ll leave Melbourne slightly more upbeat than he has after defeats here in previous years. “The last few months have been the best tennis of my life. I mean, I made Wimbledon final, won the Olympics, won the U.S. Open.”

PGA: Tiger in the lead M’s: Home of Beasts CONTINUED FROM B1

the tee only five times in the third round, though Still, it was an ominous always at the right angle to approach the green. sign. On his only other bogey, One week after he he missed the green by missed the cut in Abu about a foot and his chip Dhabi — thanks to a twocame out hot and ran some shot penalty he received after his ground for taking 7 feet by the hole. Because of the quick relief from an embedded lie turnaround, Fritsch didn’t on the fifth hole when the play in the final group with rules didn’t allow for it — Woods despite being the he looked good as ever. Woods has a 49-4 record closest player to him. He still felt the energy on the PGA Tour when he playing in the group ahead, has at least a share of the with a large gallery lining 54-hole lead, and it’s even both sides of the fairways. more daunting when the “I’ve never played in lead is his alone. The only two players to this atmosphere before, especially in front of Tiger,” come from behind to beat him over the final 18 holes Fritsch said. “So I think I handled it were Ed Fiori in the Quad well. It was fun, and I’ve City Classic in 1996 when got to do it over again.” Woods was a 20-year-old Fritsch chipped in for rookie, and Y.E. Yang in the birdie on the par-5 ninth, 2009 PGA Championship but then missed the green in Hazeltine. at No. 10 and the fairway In worldwide events, Thomas Bjorn (Dubai), Lee at No. 12, both leading to bogeys. Westwood (Germany) and He made pars the rest Graeme McDowell (Target of the way until a closing World Challenge) have birdie. made up deficits against Compton had the best him on the last day. finish, with some theatrics “I played well. I played to go along with it. really, really well,” Woods His 20-foot birdie putt said after his third round. on the 17th hung on the lip “It seemed like I was always in pretty good posi- of the cup as the gallery groaned. Compton pointed tion.” He was in the rough off at the ball just as gravity

took over and the ball disappeared, and he slammed down his fist as the crowd erupted with cheers. Then, he hit 2-iron from 240 yards into the middle of the green, and his eagle putt banged into the back of the cup and dropped down to put him in third place. “It was one of the coolest moments I’ve ever seen for me as a professional,” Compton said. “That was kind of neat. Tiger’s behind me, I’m trying to fight back, and it was on the lip. “Stayed there for a minute and then just the crowd’s reaction, my reaction. I don’t even know what I did. But it was great.” The day wasn’t so great for Billy Horschel, who started the third round two shots out of the lead and had to birdie the last hole to salvage a 76. He fell nine shots behind. The plan was for the final round to end at 2:30 p.m. for television, which would mean Horschel and as many as 15 other players wouldn’t have time to get to Phoenix for a qualifier and their only chance to get a spot in the Phoenix Open.

Washington defeats Ducks THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Kristi Kingma scored 20 points and two Washington players posted double-doubles as the Huskies defeated Oregon 66-53 on Sunday. Talia Walton had 18 points and 13 rebounds,

and Aminah Williams had 10 points and 12 rebounds for Washington (14-5, 6-2), which kept pace with No. 19 UCLA in sharing third place in the Pac-12. UCLA beat Arizona State 54-50 on Sunday. The Huskies never

trailed in the game and led by as many as 20 points, scoring 23 points off 16 Ducks turnovers. Ariel Thomas led Oregon (3-17, 1-7) with 14 points. Amanda Delgado scored 12.

CONTINUED FROM B1 outs, Morse tore up the Cactus League, hitting .492. Spring training stats are Morse “fell in love” with winter training after the dubious — hitters are fac2005 season, and hasn’t ing lots of pitchers targeted wavered in his commit- for Double-A — but, still, .492 is .492. ment. A few days into the reguMorse might have claimed the title of Seattle’s lar season, Morse, playing original “Beast Mode,” but right field, tore his labrum his path from the Rainiers diving for a ball. His year was done after to the Mariners was never five games, and so, it smooth. Take Morse’s first at-bat seemed, was his career with the Mariners. in the bigs. They sent him to Tacoma On May 31, 2005, in the seventh inning of what was after he survived the final looking like a lopsided spring-training cut in 2009, defeat to the Blue Jays at then sent him to the NationSafeco Field, manager Mike als for Langerhans. Listed as a shortstop Hargrove called on Morse to pinch-hit for second base- when he got to the Mariners in the 2004 trade packman Bret Boone. “I saw four or five age from the White Sox for pitches,” Morse recalled. pitcher Freddy Garcia, “The last one was a slider, Morse wasn’t a shortstop. A third baseman? down and away, for a strikeMaybe, sort of, except the out. “I got back in the dugout Mariners had an excepand heard ‘Boonie’ tell me, ‘I tional third baseman in Adrian Beltre. coulda done that.’ ” A first baseman? PerIn the spring of 2008, fresh off his winter work- haps, but so was Richie Sex-

son. Without a position, Morse languished in baseball’s version of purgatory — the I-5 shuttle between Safeco Field and Cheney Stadium — until the Nationals called. And yet Morse recalls those days fondly. Despite the awkward baptism against Blue Jays reliever Scott Downs, Morse hit .300 during his fourseason, 107-game career in Seattle. Now he’s home. Well, not exactly — home for Morse is in south Florida — but back in a place where he perhaps belonged all along. Why such affection for a city he’s experienced only in increments? “The restaurants,” Morse said. “The restaurants are the best, hands down. Really, it’s a little bit of everything. This is a beautiful city, man. This is the Emerald City.” Home of the Beasts.

Pirates: Play Bulldogs CONTINUED FROM B1 The win put Bellevue within a game of Peninsula in the tight North Division standings. Powerhouse Edmonds leads everybody in NWAACC with 8-0 division and 18-2 overall records while Peninsula and Whatcom are tied for second at 5-2 each. The Pirates are 14-6 overall while the Orcas of Bellingham are 13-6 overall.

Bellevue, meanwhile, sits in fourth place at 4-3, 12-7 overall. Peninsula has a bye Wednesday and then takes on No. 2 Whatcom there Feb. 2 and hosts No. 1 Edmonds on Feb. 6. Against the Bulldogs, Salim Gloyd led the Pirates with 18 points and eight rebounds while Donald Gaddy and Xavier Bazile popped in 15 points each. Gaddy ripped the nets with a 7 of 9 night in field goals.

Aaron Clark earned a game-high six steals while Gloyd added a blocked shot for the Pirates. The Bulldogs had two other players score in double figures as Tyler Stracener knocked down 16 points and teammate Daniel Greer added 14. Squiers had a standout all-around game for the Bulldogs as he had four assists and three steals to go with his double-double.

Briefly . . . Sequim picks 4 for athlete of week honors SEQUIM — Sequim High School recognized four athletes for athlete of the week honors for the past two weeks. Boys basketball player Jayson Brocklesby and girls bowler Kelsey VanDyken received the honors for this past week. Bricklesby poured in 32 points to lead the Wolves to a crucial 67-54 victory over Olympic. The win keeps the Wolves in a tie for first place in the Olympic League. VanDyken leads the Wolves

with a 114 average. She is in her second year of bowling and hopes to qualify for districts. Receiving athlete of the week honors for two weeks ago are boys diver Austin Clement and girls bowler Tennille Tosland. Clement has qualified for the district dive meet for the fourth consecutive year. He is aiming for a medal at the 2A state meet on Feb. 16. Tosland smashed her personal high with a 149 average to finish 10th in the league tournament. She entered the tournament with a 110 average and qualified for districts as a huge underdog.

Presidents Day Classic PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Parks and Recreation

Department and the Red Lion Inn are hosting the 19th annual Presidents Day Classic youth basketball tournament Feb. 16-17 with divisions for boys and girls teams from fifth grade through ninth grade. Each team is guaranteed four games, and there is a $250 entry fee. For more information, or to register, call Dan Estes at 360417-4557 or email at destes@ cityofpa.us.

PA athletes of week PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles High School recognized two athletes for student-athlete of the week honors for the week of Jan. 14-19. Honored were freshman wres-

tler Tyler Gale and senior gymnast Cecily Schwagler. Gale went 4-1 for the week with two big pins and a win against a state-ranked opponent. His only loss at the Dream Duals came by two points to the No. 1-ranked wrestler from Othello. Gale is also carrying straight As in his first semester in high school. Schwagler is the gymnastics captain, and continues to show great leadership. She is one of the Riders’ topfive gymnasts and has placed at every meet this year. Schwagler placed in the top 10 on three out of her four events and the top five in all-around at the most recent meet. She is growing each week in

her skills. In addition, sophomore Matt Robbins was named Roughrider wrestler of the week for Jan. 21-26. Robbins had an outstanding week with four pins in four matches, including three of those while wrestling up a weight class at 195 to lead the Roughriders to their second consecutive Olympic League championship. His work ethic was second to none, and he has worked hard to improve his grades as well. Gold wrestler of the week honors went to Josh Basden and silver wrestler of the week went to Bryce Johnson. Peninsula Daily News


B4

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: Although I love my 7-year-old daughter, “Emma,” I do not “like” her. It’s because I dislike my ex-husband, “Scott,” so much. He was verbally and emotionally abusive and left me while I was pregnant. The experience left me hurt and humiliated, and I continue to harbor resentment toward him. I’m happily remarried now, but Emma is a constant reminder of my bad marriage. I feel she’s selfish, rude, lazy and disrespectful — characteristics Scott possesses. I have little tolerance for her behavior, and I’m hard on her. Sometimes I feel like I’m talking to him instead of to a little girl. I have seen several therapists, but nobody has been able to help. I have been told, “Your child isn’t your ex so you need to get over it!” Compounding the problem is the daughter I have with my second husband, a little girl I adore beyond words. She’s sweet, kind, friendly and essentially the opposite of Emma. I love this child more than I love Emma, and I’m disgusted with myself for feeling this way. It was Scott who hurt me, but I can’t get past the hurt. Abby, what can I do? Distressed in Massachusetts

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Mell Lazarus

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are likely to face opposition. You will have to do things on your own if you want to reach your goals without interference. Not everyone you meet will be honest regarding motives or what they have to offer. 2 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Pick and choose what you do according to your needs, not someone else’s. It’s important to express how you feel if you want to get ahead. A personal matter can easily get blown out of proportion. 4 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You have more options than you realize. Don’t settle for less when you clearly want more. Use your imagination and you will find a way to get what you want. Take the initiative to make things happen. 3 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

surely it paid off. At first, she would Van Buren lean away, but eventually she would ask me to hold on ‘just one more minute.’ “My daughter is 24 now and on her own. Her life isn’t what I would have hoped for or expected, but that’s OK. I’m her touchstone for love and acceptance. I can’t imagine my life without her. Another Mom in California”

Abigail

Emma may be a difficult child, but she’s not stupid. She sees the difference between how you react to her half-sister and the way you treat her. A first step for you would be to apologize to her, put your arms around her and tell her that from now on you will try to do better as a mother. Emma didn’t ask to be born, and you owe her that.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Look at the relationships you are in and decide which are complimentary and which are not. Call in favors and make the most of the connections you have developed in the past. Put your dreams, hopes and wishes at the top of your list. 5 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: My husband and I have been married 10 years. We didn’t have a wedding. Instead, we went to the courthouse — just the Dear Distressed: Try harder to two of us with a couple of witnesses rebuild the bond you didn’t form — and had a small reception a few with Emma when she was born months later. because of your anger at her father. Having been a part of some very It can still be done, but it will take nice weddings recently, I mentioned work on your part. Emma’s behavior to my husband that I wished we may be the result of how you have would have done something more treated her, and if you can change, so special for our wedding. Now, he may she. wants to renew our vows with a huge I’ll share with you a letter I printed wedding ceremony. Would it be approseveral years ago from another mother priate to have a big ceremony now? who shared your problem: Wondering in Iowa “Dear Abby: The best advice I ever received for coping with my conDear Wondering: I think it’s a trary daughter was from a neighbor wonderful idea. Ten years of wedded who had a surly girl of her own. She bliss is something to celebrate, and I made a conscientious effort to be see no reason why you shouldn’t do more demonstrative to her daughter, it with the ceremony of your dreams. hug her more and hold on a little Other couples have done it, and so tighter to show her how valued she can you. was. _________ “I tried it with my daughter, going Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, out of my way several times a day to also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was express my love for her. It was awkfounded by her mother, the late Pauline Philward at first, but I persevered. I lips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. committed myself to loving that Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via unlovable being, and slowly but email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Difficult daughter is hard to love

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

by Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Change is heading your way. Embrace what’s being offered and you will end up in charge. Be honest about your financial position and don’t promise what you can’t deliver. Everything will ride on how practical and reliable you are. 3 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Travel, communication and trying your hand at something you would like to do for a living will all play in your favor. Embrace any alterations being made in your personal life and you will impress someone you love. 5 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Emotions will surface and truth will be of utmost importance. Pick up all the information you can that will help you avoid looking unprofessional. Don’t be afraid to give anything you pursue your own unique touch. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Money, health and legal matters must be taken care of. Unforeseen change will make it difficult for you to get what you want if you have too much clutter in your life. Stay on top of every situation you face. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t wait for others to do things for you. Be first in line to make a move and you will secure your position. A change of pace or location will help you see your personal and professional situation from a new perspective. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll have to address past regrets before you can move forward. Discipline will be required in order to pursue new goals. Focus on home, family and future security. Don’t let emotions stand in the way of what must be done. 3 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You can afford to be different. Walk away from anyone who wants you to conform or give in to a lifestyle that doesn’t work for you. Don’t limit your possibilities by trying to please others. It’s up to you to do your own thing. 2 stars

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Not everyone will be upfront with you. Ferret out secret information in order to keep the upper hand. Love is in the stars, but honesty regarding your current situation will be necessary if you want to start something new. Face facts head-on. 3 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 B5

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It!

PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

D

Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s OfďŹ ce Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

31688614

FENCING

TRACTOR

WINDOW WASHING

Lund Fencing

Call Bryan

360-461-4609

#LUNDFF*962K7

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch�

RDDARDD889JT

360-452-2054

AA

360-460-0518

  !457-9875

TV Repair

   

To Advertise

Deluna ’s Ent erpris e T REE S ERVIC E Licensed – Bonded – Insured

river1966@msn.com SEMPER FI

360-452-8435 OR

2C718962

31722893

L

360-683-4881

CALL NOW

1-800-826-7714

Free Quotes! (3 60) 461 -1 89 9 – OR –

    

29667464

CALL NOW

TREE SERVICES 2C722947

Karen’s Kare Ka r n s Personal Persona al Assistance al Assiis ista Services Tailored to your speciďŹ c needs

T&G PANELING RADIUS EDGE DECKING FENCING SIDING BEAMS SPECIALTY LUMBER ALL LUMBER DIMENSIONS AVAIL. B LU E M O U N TA I N (360) 452-3171 (360) 460-7466 UMBER

 Small Excavating JOHN KIMMEL-OWNER  Utility Install & contact@jkdirtworks.com Lot Clearing  Spring & Storm LIC 

  Clean-up

TV REPAIR

24614371

YOUR SOURCE FOR

PERSONAL ASSISTANT

Phone: 360 Ph 360-670-6329 0 670

360/

360-452-8435

QUALITY CEDAR PRODUCTS

360-452-5334 Fax: 360-452-5361

JK DIRTWORKS INC.

Expert Pruning

OR

We buy, sell, trade and consign appliances.

Military and Senior Discounts

26631940

23597511

LUMBER

3430 Hwy 101 E., Suite 16 Port Angeles, WA 98362 lwas@olypen.com

DIRT WORK

To Advertise

 

            

Mole Control

Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

tmccurdy@olypen.com

Full 6 Month Warranty

(360) 582-9382

Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com

(360) 457-1032 (360) 457-5131

       

Call for details or check us out on Facebook.

WINDOW/GUTTER CLEANING

Weddings Special Occasions Memorials, Lessons

YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showroom for lowest prices on:

Specializing in bookkeeping solutions for your small business.

Complete Lawn Care Hauling Garbage Runs Free Estimates BIG DISCOUNT for Seniors

683-8328

Thomas O. McCurdy Bagpiper

M-F 8-5 Sat. 10-3

EARLY BIRD LAWN CARE

PRUNING

BAGPIPER

APPLIANCE SERVICE INC.

* !(#"#%! *& !!$#  &""!#% * &$ $$%#%&"$ ! $&%%! *)#! )#!($ * ($(%&# $ 

LAWNCARE

195133545

APPLIANCES

 

Lena Washke Accounting Services, Inc.

2A691397

Port Angeles Sequim Port Townsend

26636738

Glen Spear Owner Lic#DONERRH943NA

ANTHONY’S SERVICE

$ $ $   $ ! 

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Call (360) 683-8332

(360) 460-3319

$" $  $#" 

COLUMC*955KD

1064%'614! ! *(056%..)4)46,*,)(

 +) 

  

Quality Work

    

Visit our website: 999(,'-,0510):'%8%6,10'1/ Locally Operated for since 1985

27648136

If it’s not right, it’s not Done Right!

Driveways - Utilities - Site Prep - Demolition Concrete Removal - Tree & Stump Removal Drainage & Storm Water Specialist Engineering Available - Rock Walls Lawn Restoration - Hydroseeding Top Soil - Compost - Bark

<!%1(5 4,8)9%;5 <4%(,0+ <#6,.,6,)5 <%0(5'%2,0+,).( 19,0+!16,..,0+ <"019!)/18%.

<..",6) 4)2,0'.7()5 %07*%'674)(1/)5 <%0(.)%4,0+%0( 47&&,0+ <")26,'";56)/5 <!1'-$%..5!1'-)4,)5

24608159

22588145

Decks & Fences Windows & Doors Concrete Roofs Tile

$ $    $! " $  

116 Barnes Rd., Sequim, WA

$ "$

(360) 683-7655 (360) 670-9274

# !" ! # #       #  !

Contr#KENNER1951P8

360-460-6176

CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Excavation and General Contracting

TREE SERVICE

Done Right Home Repair Remodels Appliances Handicap Access Painting Interior/Exterior

Columbus Construction

EXCAVATING/LANDSCAPING TREE SERVICE

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

GEORGE E. DICKINSON

22588172

HOME REPAIR

Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Maintenance

23590152

22588179

Reg#FINIST*932D0

REPAIR/REMODEL

23595179

Chad Lund

EXCAVATING/SEPTIC

Grounds Maintenance Specialist % #% % "%! %   % Installation and Repair 1C562759

Free Estimates Senior Discounts 20% Discount on Interior Painting

www.LundFencing.com

452-0755 775-6473

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

LAWN CARE

23590413

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

035076142

Roof & Gutter Cleaning Moss & Mildew Removal Window Cleaning

PAINTING

1-800-826-7714

Lic# DELUNE*933QT

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


Classified

B6 MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013

DOWN 1 Red planet 2 Ill-fated Biblical brother 3 Diddly, to Dalí 4 To-do list entry

SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

s

T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

FURNITURE: Living room Fur niture. Ikea Vreta Full Grain Leather Sofa, 2 Arm Chairs, and One large leather foot stool to Match. 2 Years old Perfect Condition. In Port Townsend 1500. (360)379-9520

3010 Announcements

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. SMOKING BRISKET Solution: 6 letters

T E X T U R E U C E B R A B E By Gareth Bain

5 Oscar winner for “Cat Ballou” 6 Part of FDA: Abbr. 7 Gets in one’s sights, with “at” 8 Campus sports org. 9 Tot’s belly 10 Tot’s drawing tool 11 Clumsy actor 12 Special forces weapon 13 Arthur who played Maude 19 Marseille Mrs. 21 The Big Apple, initially 24 Latin ballroom dances 25 Orange-yellow gemstones 26 Gets warmer, in a game 27 Taken in a breakin 28 Slept next to the trail, say 29 Upper limb 31 Sales rep 32 Opposite of post34 Weighing device 35 Somme summer 37 Global currency org.

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE The Peninsula Daily News is expanding it’s sales force. Opening for a well organized, creative professional with the ability to develop strong customer relationships. Manage an existing account base as well as developing new clients to meet ever changing marketing needs. Solid presentation skills a m u s t . C o m p e t i t i ve compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. Submit cover letter and resume to: Steve Perry Advertising Director Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 steve.perry@ peninsuladaily news.com

BEAUTY salon chair in established salon open. P.O. Box 2101, 98362.

CAREGIVER jobs available now. Benefits included. Flexible hours. F O U N D : E a r r i n g . I n Call P.A. (360)452-2129 women’s locker room at Sequim (360)582-1647 SARC. Item was given P.T. (360)344-3497 to SARC front desk staff. EXECUTIVE F O U N D : Key s. F i ve DIRECTOR OPENING keys on ring, on Race Habitat for Humanity of St., call to identify. Clallam County seeks (360)452-5967 strong, exper ienced FOUND: One key, with leader. For application packet, email red on it. In Sequim. executive@ (360)683-4139 habitatclallam.org Deadline Feb 8. No phone calls. EEO. 3023 Lost LOST: Cat. Flame Point Siamese, long white hair, blue eyes, Post Office area, P.A. (415)902-2293

LOST: Ring. Moonstone and sterling silver, PA Goodwill. Emotional att a c h m e n t ; r ewa r d o f fe r e d . ( 3 6 0 ) 7 9 7 - 1 5 1 5 OR (360)477-1242

4026 Employment General ACTIVITY DIRECTOR/ BUS DRIVER 30 hr. wk. Suncrest Villiage (360)681-3800 ADMIN Asst/Bookkeeping. Non-profit Multit a s ke r a n d C u s t o m e r Service QuickBooks Capable go2worksource.com

Friday’s Puzzle Solved Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

FAMILY EDUCATOR in Port Angeles. Working with preschool children and their families in a part day, part year Head Start program. 35 hours per week, 9.5 months. Applicants must have a minimum of an AA in Early Childhood Education and exper ience working with preschool aged children, BA in ECE preferred. Application and job description are available at OlyCAP, 803 W Park Ave, Por t To w n s e n d 3 6 0 - 3 8 5 2571; 228 W 1st St, Ste J, Port Angeles, 226 N Sequim Ave, Sequim; or online www.olycap.org. Closes when filled. EOE

MEDICAL ASSISTANT Part-time in physician off i c e. E x p e r i e n c e p r e ferred. Flexibility and computer skills a must. Send resume to PO AIDES/RNA OR CNA B OX 2 3 9 1 , Po r t A n Best wages, bonuses. g e l e s , WA 9 8 3 6 2 o r Wright’s. 457-9236. email to cathyv@olypen.com www.peninsula Closes 2-11-13 dailynews.com

C U M I N T S M O K E E T U C

P E P P E R E T U M I L I H C

© 2013 Universal Uclick

H C T N E T C J E S I O M S H

S L D A S R U A B A T R E A A

E E A A N I A S P A M A T L R

R A O M C I S T L P S K R T C

www.wonderword.com

F R V Y B P R S U O L T N D O

E E B R E W R A P B E N Y B R C C U R E I O O I A M L O S D ‫ګ‬ L ‫ګ‬ E D K A A E ‫ګ‬ A E L N M T A  S ‫ګ‬ R K R E S W E C I U E M  A L F I A R G O E N I W I A L G R L

H A R D W O O D M T J E R K Y

1/28

Join us on Facebook

Apple, Barbecue, Basting, Beef, Bread, Brisket, Charcoal, Chili, Clear, Cook, Cumin, Cured, Cute, Delicious, Flame, Foil, Fresh, Grain, Hardwood, Herb, Jerky, Juice, Juicy, Lamb, Marinate, Meat, Mustard, Oven, Pepper, Pork, Rest, Roast, Rolls, Salad, Salt, Sauces, Seasoned, Slicing, Slow, Smoke, Spicy, Steam, Temperature, Tender, Texture, Time, Trim, Wine, Wrap Yesterday’s Answer: Sketti THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

WORPL ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

UGREP (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Stretch the truth 41 Bathwater tester 42 Dairy farm sound 47 Late-night host Jimmy 49 Revolutionary Guevara 52 Inveterate faultfinder 53 Word with hug or therapy 55 Alpha’s opposite 57 Teensy amount

1/28/13

58 Fargo’s st. 59 Apples with screens 60 Karaoke prop 61 Many a folk song, composer-wise: Abbr. 62 “__ we forget” 63 Ryan of “Sleepless in Seattle” 64 Hosp. scan 65 1,000 G’s

AWEESS

HAGCEN Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A Yesterday's

4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale General General General Wanted Clallam County

3020 Found

F O U N D : C a t . O ra n g e and white male, no neutered, E. 11th and Albert area, P.A. (619)665-5457

1/28/13

D E L I C I O U S L I C I N G

Substitute Carrier for Motor Route Peninsula Daily News Circulation Dept. Is looking for an individuals interested in a Substitute Motor Rout in Port Angeles. Interested parties must be 18 yrs. of age, have a valid Washington State Drivers License and proof of insura n c e. E a r l y m o r n i n g delivery Monday through Friday and Sunday. Fill Home Health Director out application at 305 W. Full-time, M-F, rotating First St., Port Angeles. weekends. Must be able No calls. to work independently and manage up to 5 or more employees. Problem solver and excellent c u s t o m e r s e r v i c e a 4080 Employment must. AA degree, prior Wanted DME and management experience required of ALL around handyman, all successful applicants. most anything A to Z. Great pay and benefits. (360)775-8234 Apply at: BEFORE and After Jim’s Pharmacy Lawn and Landscape, 424 E. 2nd Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Fr e e b i d s , c o m p l e t e l aw n c a r e , b r u s h i n g , (behind the snow removal, spr ing P.A. post office) or special lawn renovation, email your resume to: senior discounts, dump lisaj@jimsrx.com runs, lawn consultations. EOE (360)461-2342. INSURANCE BRYANTSBESTBUILT. SERVICE GROUP Is looking for a personal R e m o d e l s A d d i t i o n s insurance account man- D e c k s O u t b u i l d i n g s ager in our Sequim of- Painting Repairs Handifice, 369 W. Washing- cap Rails InsuranceBids ton. Qualified candidates LEAD-SAFE Cer tified w i l l h ave ex p e r i e n c e call 360.460.5306 demonstrating superior Dennis’ Yard Work customer service, probPruning, hauling, barklem solving and exceldusting. Window cleanlent communication ing also. (360)457-5205. skills. Email resume to: trevorc@insurance ENVIOUS GREENS servicesgroup.com C o m p l e t e Ya r d C a r e Proper ty Mntnce. Specialty Pruning Gutters LICENSED NURSE Weed Pulling/Whacking Looking for versitle, caring individual, come D e l i v e r y & S p r e a d Bark/Rock Brush Clearjoin our great team! ing Debris Hauling SeContact Cherrie q u i m / P. A . a r e a 6 8 1 (360)683-3348 3521 cell: 808-9638 Firefighter/Paramedic Lateral Transfer Clallam County Fire District No. 2 is accepting application for Firefighte r / Pa r a m e d i c l a t e r a l transfer to fill an immediate opening. Details avaialble at 102 East Fifth St., Port Angeles. $34,830 annual salalry. Deadline to apply January 25, 4:00 pm. Equal Opprtunity Employer.

Medical Coordinator Responsible for advocating and managing the medical needs of adults with developmental disabilities. Medical experience preferred. Wage DOE. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. “ON-CALL” RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req H.S./GED & cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $11.41-13.25 hr., DOE. Resume to PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 Details at http://peninsula behavioral.org. EOE.

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

JUAREZ & SON’S HANDY M A N S E R V I C E S . Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problems projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248. M E LY N DA ’ S O r i g i nals: For all your sewing needs! Alterations, Repairs, Custom Designs, and Reconstruction of clothing. Call 360-797-1399. Reasonable prices with pick-up and delivery available. RUSSELL ANYTHING Call today 775-4570. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE Call 681-4429

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

NANNY: Newborn/infant nanny available part-time. Offering experience with twins, s p e c i a l n e e d s, a n d daycare background. Nursing degree. Attentive one-on-one care for your baby. Flexible schedule and rates. Excellent references. Call Kristel: (360) 6813579 (Home) or (507) 676-1945 (Cell).

105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

CHERRY HILL P.A. Spectacular cul-de-sac, forest like setting with mtn. steam below, LR, D R , 3 + + B r. , 3 . 5 b a , family room, sunroom, hardwood throughout, finished basement. $259,000 (360)477-5207

Classic 1920’s bunglalow, 2 Br., 1 bath, recently updated to preserve the charm. 504 E. 6th St., P.A. $119,900 Call (360)461-2438 COMMUNITY WATER Level lot, walking distance to Dungeness Spit, Blue Ribbon farms area, 1.28 acres with airfield access. $99,000 ML#218984/260937 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND CUSTOM HOME IN SUNLAND 3 Br., 2 bath, rambler in SunLand. Updated kitchen and bathrooms, bright family room with vaulted ceiling, large deck with built in seating, circular dr iveway and golf car t door off garage. $199,900 ML#263381/355443 Roland Miller (360)461-4116 TOWN & COUNTRY

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

ELEGANT WATERFRONT HOME Architectural elegance and exceptional design in this beautiful custom waterfront home in Sequim. This lovely home was intricately designed so that each room has s t u n n i n g wa t e r v i ew s and great views of Protection Island and the San Juan Islands. This homes no-bank waterfront location allows for easy beach access right out your back door. Situated near the end of a quite seaside lane this home is the ultimate in Waterfront Living. $679,000. Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 FANTASTIC NEW PRICE! B e a u t i f u l Tu r n K e y Craftsman house is fully landscaped and loaded with Charm! 2068 Sf., 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage. Upgraded cabin e t r y, b r e a k fa s t b a r, hardwood floors, tons of windows, a propane fireplace, formal dining and so much more! $228,950. Kimi Robertson (360)461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company G r e a t ra m bl e r i n d e sirable Four Seasons Ranch, close to the 7th green. Kitchen and both bathrooms have been recently updated. Kitchen has granite countertops, tiled back splash and stainless appliances. Sunken living room with fireplace. Amenities include 9 hole golf, clubhouse, pool, beach access, close to Discovery Trail, walking trails and barn for horse stabling. $204,500 MLS#263611 Jennifer Felton (360)460-8759 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES Harbor & Beyond VIEWS!! Unobstructed Views of the: Strait, Canada, Cascades & Mt. Baker Views, beautifully remodeled cottage, 2 / 2 / 1 4 1 0 S f. o n 0 . 4 0 acre lot, 735 Sf. Garage/Workshop, RV Parking, Sunroom/ Deck/Hot Tub/Patio. $339,900. MLS#270149. Team Thomsen (360)417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: BASIS PRINT ABSURD SOCKET Answer: When the guards at Alcatraz needed a rest, they took a — PRISON BREAK

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

Do what you love to do and MAKE MONEY at the same time! For a free CD and more information, please call: 206-745-2135 gin

By DAVID OUELLET

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Paper used for envelopes 7 Teensy kitchen invader 10 Thick-bodied river fish 14 Lessened 15 Critical hosp. area 16 Take down with a wrecking ball 17 Trade for cash 18 Musical based on ABBA songs 20 Golfer Snead’s nickname 22 “I don’t care which” 23 Naval petty officer 27 Lasting mark 30 __ and gown 33 John, Paul, George or Ringo 34 Go without food 36 “True __”: Wayne film 39 CFO’s degree 40 One on a board 43 Swiss peak 44 Gas in a sign 45 Knocks for a loop 46 Scallion relative 48 Space-saving abbr. 50 Team statistic 51 Finale 54 Selling fast 56 Whale or dolphin 63 Campbell’s soup slogan, and a hint to the puzzle theme found in 18-, 20-, 40- and 56-Across 66 “Seinfeld” woman 67 Albany’s canal 68 Actress Hagen 69 Sticky-toed lizards 70 Tadpole’s breathing organ 71 LPGA star Se Ri __ 72 Be agreeable

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

311 For Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Manufactured Homes Clallam County Clallam County Incredible setting with gr e a t s o u t h e r n ex p o sure, mature landscaping and mountain view. Very cozy and well kept home, Master suite with fireplace for ambiance. Detached shop and m a ny a d d i t i o n a l o u t buildings. $279,000 MLS#264082 Quint Boe (360)460-8759 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES IN THE HEART OF SEQUIM This new listing with 3 Br., 2-1/2 Baths enjoys a wonderful updated kitchen, open floor plan, laminate flooring, woodstove, lots of parking, fenced backyard, easy care landscaping, and is move-in ready. $169,000. ML#270110. Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY JUST LISTED! Great star ter home or rental investment, in the Pine Hill area near the Elk’s Playfield. On a large corner lot, with a detached garage. Move in ready! $84,000 MLS#270159. KATHY LOVE 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

MOVE IN READY Bright and cheerful home in Mains Far m. Beautifully landscaped front & back. Use your $5000 Buyer Bonus for something fun. $250,000 OLS#264298 NWMLS#409144 CATHY & SHERYL 360-683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEW PRICE! This 1728 Sf., home with 5 Br and 2 bath is conve n i e n t l y l o c a t e d b e tween Sequim and P.A. This is a site built home with plenty of room; it just needs a little TLC. Features include a fenced back yard, a nice wood stove, and community water. $139,000. ML#263136. Mike Fuller Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 360-477-9189 OLD WORLD CHARMER Well-built 1920’s home has had some recent updating: refinished hardwood floors, new vinyl floors, new wood burning stove and new kitchen appliances. Neat and cozy with lots of potential. Garage with storage loft, full basement with 2 finished rooms and fenced backyard. Way too cute for only $132,000 OLS#270154 NWMLS#439613 CHUCK 360-477-5322 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

MOBILE Home in sought after View Vista Senior Park in Port Angeles. This great mobile home is move-in ready with updated bathroom, two bedrooms, and electric ‘wood’ stove in living room. Beautiful view of straits outside front door. Asking $14,000 for this wonderful home, which also includes new washer and dryer. Call 1-253-709-1548

Compose your Classified Ad on

www.peninsula dailynews.com

TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

AIR RATCHET 1/2”, USA. $20. (360)457-4971 A N T I QU E S : D r e s s e r, $40. 1930s vanity, mirror, stool, $100. Chest, $20. (360)477-6295. A RT: Pe a c o ck s o n glass, double wood framed, 15x9, gold metal. $10. (360)797-1179. BACKPACKS: (2) backpacking packs, internal frame. $50 ea. (360)477-9240 BAR STOOLS: (3). $80. (360)928-9920 BED: Queen frame, mattress, box spr ing, nice. $50. (360)477-6295 BED: Queen, solid oak, headboard, excellent. $150. (360)457-8302. BOBBIN: Giant spool, wood, 36” diameter, 26” tall, perfect as flag pole. $10/obo. (360)797-1179. B O O K C A S E : C h e r r y, solid wood. $165. (360)670-2946 BOOKS: Harr y Potter hardcover books 1-7. $69/set.(360)775-0855. BOOTS: Women’s hiking boots, size 7, worn once. $20. (360)457-8860 BURLS: Cedar and maple, assorted sizes. $1050. (360)457-7884.

CRAFT TABLE: 6’ long, E U RO B E D : C o r s i c a CALENDAR FRAME Shih Tzu frame, wrought 30” wide, folding metal full, with frame, new. legs. $35. $180. (360)797-1353. iron, large, new. $15. (360)775-8881 (360)457-3274 FISHING LURES: DozC A R G O R A C K : F o r CRUTCHES/WALKERS en of salmon streamers, small truck with regular (3) sets, $5 ea.Walkers steely lures, misc items, bed (Tacoma/Dakota). (2), $10 and $15. carry bag. 457-6426. (360)452-9685 $200. (360)460-0460. FISHING REEL: AmbasCUP DISPENSER CARPET CLEANER sadeur Model 5600 Coca-Cola, cylinder, with BCX, red, new in box. $100/obo. 928-3464. metal cap, 9 oz cup size. $45. (360)460-5762. CASSETTE DECK $20. (360)457-3274. Sony TC-FX170, used, DISHWASHER: Maytag, FREE: Mattress. Double works fine, $25. w h i t e , b u i l t - i n , r u n s size. Comfort Air, elec(360)-477-4553 tric pump, good cond., good. $75. small leak. 417-1652. CB RADIOS: Teaber(360)683-7577 ry,$65. Cobra, $35. Incls FURNITURE: (2) End DRAFTING TABLE antennas and manuals. Solid pine, 3’ x 6’ x 3’, tables, $5 ea. Coffee ta360-681-8592 ble, $20. TV stand, glass large drawer, nice. $200. door, $10. 452-9146. CDS: Music CDs, H.S. (360)457-6343 Musical, Disney, StrawDRESSER: Antique, 2 F U T O N : F r a m e a n d berry Shortcake. $1 ea. (360)457-6431. across top, 2 on bottom. mattress, green. $150. (360)477-9240 $45. (360)477-8000. C H A I N S : A l p i n e, u n used, #1540 (15-16”), DRILL PRESS: Heavy- GRILL: Brinkman SS, duty bench, used very gas, wheels, easy start, new $106. Asking $35. little. $200. cheap. $25. (360)379-4134 (360)457-6845 (360)452-1277 C H A I N S : Fo r P i ck u p DROP CLOTH: Heavy truck, with tighteners, GUN: F/s VEF versaDuty canvas drop cloths, pack.410/.22 excellent original case. $30. 5 sizes $75. 457-6426. (360)683-0904 condition $200. (360)461-4847 CLOTHES HANGERS DVDS: Deadwood, 1st season, 12 hours, $25. HEADPHONES: WireWood, 12 ea. $10. Travelling Wilbur ys, 2 l e s s s p e a k e r h e a d (360)457-4971 cds, $15. 775-8881. p h o n e s , n e w i n b ox . COLLECTION: Ceramic horse collection, 15 piec- ENDTABLE: With door, $30. (360)452-1277. 26” diameter, good cones. $15. (360)683-5614. HUTCH: Maplewood. dition. $5. $120. (360)670-2946. CONCRETE SIDING (360)452-4583 252’ + concrete siding. J AC K E T: N e w, S e a ENT. CENTER: With or $100. (360)775-3834. without TV and remote. h a w k s , b l u e / g r a y trim/team logo, sixe LGDESK CHAIR $20 alone, $30 with TV. XLG. $89. 765-3948. $5/obo. 928-3464. (360)504-2602

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 B7

LAMP: Beautiful leaded PARTS WASHER: 40” x glass shade. $55. 27”, 9” deep, with sol(360)681-7579 vent tank. $25. (360)461-0527 LASER LEVEL: New in box, with small tripod PEWTER TRAY and mounting base. $60. Round, 12” diameter, (360)457-6845 new in box. $25. (360)683-4994 LEAD SHOT Clean/graphite, 25 lbs. PICKUP CAB: Toyota (360)457-4290 pickup cab. $200. (360)928-9920 MATTRESS: Beautyrest, queen mattress, box PLAY YARD: With exsprings. $120. t e n t i o n k i t , g r e a t fo r (360)683-1397 small pets. $75. (360)461-2241 MATTRESS: Full, 54” x 7 2 ” , w i t h b ox s p r i n g . $40. (360)452-5430. POOL TABLE: Full size, s o l i d wo o d , b e a u t i f u l M I C R OWAV E : W h i r l - shape, standard pockpool, 1.7 cf, ex. cond., ets. $200. 460-4171. white, under cabinet mount. $100. 457-6410. POSTER: “Lighthouses of America,” framed, 24” M I R RO R : Wo o d t r i m , x 36.” $25. 28” x 55.” $30. (360)683-0146 (360)477-8000 MISC: Camera tripod, $20. Formal dress, size 14, $20. (360)452-9146. MOTOR/PUMP: Hot tub motor and pump. $50/obo. (360)457-1382. MOUNTAIN BIKE: New, 24 speed, w/disc break pad, paid $299. $200. (360)809-0859 O F F I C E C H A I R : Fo r computer desk, with arms, adjustable, excel. cond. $50. 683-4856. PEDISTAL SINK: New, white, Glacier Bay. $50. (360)457-4966

E E F R E Eand Tuesdays A D SS FRMonday AD

R E C O R D S : 3 3 , W i t h S TA P L E R : B o s t i t c h TOYS: AFX electric race c o ve r s , D i n o, Fr a n k , w i d e c r o w n s t a p l e r, track, 4 cars, like new condition. $100/obo. Neil, Alhirt, Johkennoy. 40,000 staples. $100. (360)775-3834 (360)504-2602 $5-10. (360)477-8000. R E E L : A m b a s s a d e u r S TA P L E R : E l e c t r i c , B&D, with 21 bozes of C-3 L-R, new. $70. staples. $40. (360)452-8953 (360)683-9295 RIMS: (2), with tires, for STAPLER/NAIL GUN Jetta or Golf, 5 lug. $50 Air gun, Craftsman, 8 ea. (360)452-9685. boxes of nails. $40. (360)683-9295 RISHING ROD: St. Croix, 9’, Premier, with Diawa 50H and 50 lb S T E R E O : 2 C o n s o l stereo system (8 track braid (new). 379-4134. and records). $200. (360)683-9746 ROCKING CHAIR: Rust brown, swivel. $30. STEREO: AM/FM with (360)477-8000 dual cassette recorder/player, speakers. $20. RUGS: Matching, one 5’ (360)452-4583 x 7’, one runner. $45 for both. (360)775-0855. STONE: Cronin stone,

earth tones, 24.5 square SEWING MACHINE Good Ambassador, Ja- feet, edging. $110/obo. (360)683-7435 pan, carry case. $50. (360)681-2198 STRAT PACK: Squire, PRINTER/INK: HP s t r a t G - D E C j r. a m p. SEWING MACHINE DeskJet 930C color $125. (360)809-0859. printer, instructions, like Kenmore, barely used. $50/obo. (360)681-0668. new, ink. $90. SWIVEL ROCKER (360)683-0723 Ear th tone, new, ver y SEWING MACHINE comfortable. $150. Viking, $100/obo. PRINT: Train pr int by (360)775-2288 (360)928-3464 Don Breckon, 40” x 28”, TABLE: Dinning table, framed and matted. $60. SHUTTERS: 2 pair at 2’, w i t h c h a i r s , n i c e . (360)683-0146 and 2 pair at 4’. $5. $175/obo. (360)683-5614 (360)797-1119 P U L L E Y S : ( 4 ) Wo o d pulleys, (3) with hooks. SIGN LETTERS TA B L E : Fo r l a m p o r $120/obo. (190) 8” plastic letters b e d s i d e, w h i t e g l o s s (360)683-7435 and numbers for store wood, 24” x 18” x 10”. signs. $200. 775-6865. $15. (360)457-6431. P U N C H B OW L : 1 2 cups, pedestal, 8 hang- SILKS: Women’s silk top TOYS: Child-sized wood ing cups, 15” platter, and bottom, size sm. table, chairs. $20. crystal. $50. 683-9746. $10. (360)457-8860. (360)457-1382

M ail to : Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

TRACK: Lionel 0-gauge, 23 straight, 20 curve, 1 remote & two 022 switches. $30. 379-0209 TREADMILL: Profor m treadmill, like new. $125. (360)452-4373 TROLLING MOTOR New in box, battery powered. $150. (360)681-7579 TRUNKS: Antique. $15 ea. (360)681-0668. T U R N TA B L E : S o n y Phono PS-LX250H, works fine, like new $25. (360)-477-4553 TVRADIO: AM-FM B&W, 9”, good cond., for shop-garage. $7. (360)452-6974 VEST: Brown, all leather, size 36-38. $5. (360)452-6974 VEST: Simm’s Masterguide, ver t vest, new, XL. $125. (360)452-8953 WEDDING GOWN: Sz 8, petite length, empire waist, pear l, chiffon. $200. (360)460-0460.

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

B rin g yo u r ad s to : Peninsula Daily News 305 West 1st St., PA

• 2 Ads Per Week • 3 Lines • Private Party Only 505 Rental Houses Clallam County

605 Apartments Clallam County

CLEAN P.A. UNIT 1600 sf shop in industrial park with attached apart- A 2 Br., W/D............$650 (360)460-4089 ment, office. Between www.mchughrents.com seq/PA $800/mo. (360)460-5892 P.A.: 1 Br., $500/mo, 3 Br., 2 1/2 bath, 3-story. ground floor. First month Stainless appl. carpeted. prorated. Call for details: (360)452-4409 $1600. mon. First and deposit. 417-0861 P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., 4 Br. home on 2+ acres, required references, no 2.5 baths, 2600sf, 2 car pets, 2nd floor. $650. (360)670-9418 garage, $1600/mo 1st & last+$1500 dep. P.A.: Lg. 1 Br. apt., wa(360)460-2747 ter view, quiet, clean. CENTRAL P.A.: 3 Br., 2 $625 mo. (206)200-7244 bath, no pets/smoking. P.A.: Studio: $550, $300 $1,000. (360)452-7743. dep., util. included. No pets. (360)457-6196. JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Properties by Property Mgmt. Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba..............$500 Studio ....................$550 SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba, H 2 br 1 ba..... ..........$650 Sherwood Villiage conA 3 br 1.5 ba ............$875 do. $1,300 mo. inlcudes H 2 br 2 ba.5 ac... ..$1000 W/S/G. Ready Feb. 1st. (360)681-0253 H 3 br 2 ba .. 1.5 ac.$1200 H 3 br 3 ba ..........$1295 S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 H 4 br 3 ba.view .....$1200 Br., unfurnished or furH 4 br 2 ba .. bluff....$1500 nished. $700/$800. STORAGE UNITS (360)460-2113 From $40-$100 mo

360-417-2810 More Properties at www.jarentals.com

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

P.A.: 320 Fogarty Ave. 2 P.A.: 2 rooms for rent. br, 1 bath. Clean, quiet, $ 4 0 0 e a . , ve g e t a r i a n comfortable, washer/dry- household. 808-2662. er, deck, enclosed garage. No smoking/pets. F i r s t / L a s t / D e p o s i t . 1163 Commercial Rentals $750.00. Tel: 360-457-2195. PROPERTIES BY Properties by LANDMARK Landmark. portangeles452-1326 landmark.com

6042 Exercise Equipment

SEQ: 3 Br., 3 acres, water view. $950 mo. tourfactory.com/525687

OCTANE Fitness elliptiSEQUIM: 1 Br. on quiet cal. lists new at $3899 lot, $650, screening and (octanefitness.com) asklease requried. Eleana ing $2300 Ph. at (360)582-9330. 360-379-6926

SEQUIM: 2 Br. mobile, 1 ac, close to town, no smoking. $775 mo., 1st, last, damage. 670-6843.

S E Q U I M : 3 B r. , 2 . 5 bath, Mains Farm, 1 yr. lease. $1,200/mo, first, last, security. 775-1391.

SEQUIM: Sexy 1 Br., gar., ht pmp, wd. stove, storage, sat. TV, views, W/D. $785. 683-1073.

S U N L A N D : 3 B r. , 2 bath, garage, $975 f/l/d. No smoking, small pet only. (360)797-7251.

605 Apartments Clallam County

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1BR Apts. 2nd floor clean, light, $553$656 includes all utilities! No Smoke/pet maybe, 504-2668.

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

Gun & Knife

SHOW Buy A Sell A Trade nd

rd

Feb. 2 & 3

SAT. 9-5 A SUN. 9:30-3

Masonic Temple 622 S. Lincoln, Port Angeles WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

Sunday - Door Prizes! WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

$

6 General Admission

• No Pets, Livestock, Garage Sales or Firewood

1 OFF with this ad

WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW

NO PHONE CALLS

6050 Firearms & Ammunition GUNS: Winchester 270 cal. Model 70 featherweight Pre 1964 with 3 to 9 Leopold scope, good conditon, $1,500. Beretta 12 ga, over under shotgun, silver snipe, good condition, $700. (360)477-4838. PISTOLS: PUMA-191122, $350. 22 Mag. AMT, $550. (360)460-9854 STEYR: Model SPP (like uzi), 9mm, manual/warranty card, (3) 30 round and (1) 15 round Steyr mags, B&T upper to allow attachement of scopes, like new, less than 400 rounds fired. $1,350/obo (360)379-3699 WANTED: Bolt action 7mm Magnum reasonably priced. (360)681-4429

A Sweet Deal for You!

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREPLACE INSERT Regency, plus trim panel, vent piping and cap, great condition. $500. (360)582-9456. FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com TWO CORD SPECIAL $185 each. Tight grain fir. Next years wood. (360)477-8832

Subscribe, or renew, your subscription to Peninsula Daily News now for a sweet deal, just $117 for 1 year and receive a $10 gift certificate for something sweet from your choice of:

WOODSTOVE: Custom iron, 28.5” high, 27” deep, 22” wide, includes leather handeled fire tools, hod, outdoor covered wood holder. $500/ obo. (360)379-1804.

6075 Heavy Equipment DUMPTRUCK: ‘68 International, does run, scrap out or parts. $1,500. (360)797-4418 SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 32’. Electric tarp system, high lift tailgate, excellent condition. $15,000. (360)417-0153.

6080 Home Furnishings

DINING ROOM SET Drexel 72” long table and (2) 20” leaves (112” PDN Info- 360-202-7336 total), (2) armchairs, (8) s i d e c h a i r s, t a bl e t o p GUNS: Feather 9mm, pads to match, china 3 2 r o u n d r i f l e, $ 8 5 0 . cabinet, great! $1,000. (360)582-9456 Crescent Arms, 20 ga., side-by-side shotgun, $450. Ithica Model 37, DINING TABLE: Elegant Deer Slayer shotgun, 16 glass top, 3/4” tempered ga., with extra barrel, a n d b e v e l e d g l a s s , $500. Henry 22 cal., lev- 40”Wx80” long with contemporary marble treser action, $250. tle. $2,500 new. $700 (360)683-9899 firm. (360)531-2250. SIG & SAUER: .223 Holo, new in box, (3) 30 rd MISC: Leather loveseat, mag, all original paper- s a n d s t o n e, $ 7 5 . H o n w o r k . $ 2 , 5 0 0 . 5 0 0 4-drawer letter file cabir o u n d s W o l f a m m o , net, $25. Both excellent $375. (360)379-3699. condition. 360-457-6993. $

o r FA X to : (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

5A246724

S D A E E E R E F R F

E E FR

For items $200 and under

Peninsula Daily News Sweet Deal! Name: Address: City:

Phone:

1 year subscription or renewal for $117 ($18.20 off regular price) PAYMENT OPTIONS S CREDIT CARD (check one) PVisa PMastercard PAmerican Express

Card number: S CHECK OR MONEY ORDER Attach check or money order to this coupon.

Signature: Expiration date:

CVC number:

Choose one of the following Sweet Gift Certificates. Gift certificates will be mailed. S That Takes the Cake

S Necessities & Temptations

S Elevated Ice Cream

OFFER VALID FOR HOUSEHOLDS OR BUSINESSES IN THE NORMAL PDN DELIVERY AREA. THIS OFFER IS NOT VALID FOR MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS. PAYMENT MUST BE RECEIVED IN ORDER TO RECEIVE A SWEET GIFT CERTIFICATE. EXPIRES 02/15/2013.


Classified

B8 MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6115 Sporting Goods

FURNITURE: Living room furniture. Ikea Vreta Full Grain Leather Sofa, 2 Arm Chairs, and One large leather foot stool to Match. 2 Years old Perfect Condition. In Port Townsend 1500. (360)379-9520

MISC: Sofa bed,60” light green, like new, $300. Goulds GT20, 2 hp sing l e p h a s e p u m p, l ow hrs., $500. (360)460-2796

M I S C : B u s h n e l l X LT t r a i l c a m , n e w, $ 1 4 5 . Leupold RX1000 TBR rangefinder, $275. Americstep 17’ ladder tree stand, $125. Cabelas fixed tree stand, with 20’ o f s t e p s, n ew, $ 2 5 0 . Remmington 597, 22 long rifle, with 4x scope, $ 2 2 5 . Wa r r e n 9 k l b w i n c h , w i t h c o n t r o l s, $500. (360)452-7823

MISC: Stihl-046, $275. Stihl-066, $375. New rider grinder, $300. Lopi wood fireplace inser t, $250. 5’ Clawfoot bathtub, $75. 5’ jetted bathtub, $100. 280 sf acia hardwood 3/4 x 3”, beautiful, $1,100. (360)640-0568

FURNITURE: Living r o o m F u r n i t u r e. I ke a Vreta Full Grain Leather Sofa, 2 Arm Chairs, and One large leather foot stool to Match. 2 Years old Perfect Condition. In Port Townsend 1500. (360)379-9520 S OA K I N G T U B : R e model canceled, beautiMISC: Chest of 4 draw- ful white Maax, inside ers 30x17. 5x34, $55. tub size 28”x64”x17”, Pedestal dining table, o u t s i d e s i z e 3 5 ” x 7 1 ” 24x64, 4 leaves, 12”, 4 d r o p - i n s t y l e , s i d e c h a i r s , $ 2 5 0 . S m a l l mounted Moen brushed h u t c h , g l a s s d o o r s , chrome fixtures. $900/ d r a w e r a n d c a b i n e t , obo. (360)775-6865. 34x75x16, $300. (360)683-1006

MISC: Sofa, r ust colored, really good condition, lounge on one side (can be moved), $230. Q u e e n s i ze m a t t r e s s and box spring, $150. Round drop leaf table, oak brown/black with 2 chairs, $150. (360)457-1624

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6105 Musical Instruments

BALDWIN CONSOLE PIANO: Beautiful cherry finish with matching storage bench. Original owner. Very good condition. Price reduced considerably to sell fast. Moving. $995. (360) 582-3045

6125 Tools

7035 General Pets

9802 5th Wheels

F R E E : D o g . 1 1 m o. white Pit/Lab mix, male, brindle eyes, extremely loveable and fr iendly, kennel trained. (360)461-7399 or (360)452-9189

5TH WHEEL: ‘97 35’ Road Ranger. Toy hauler, big slide, gen. set, free hitch, awning. $8,500. (360)461-4310.

FREE TO GOOD HOME O l d e r fe m a l e p o i n t e r mix. She likes to walk and be outside, currently in training. Very gentile, friendly, very good dog. Not good with cats. For more information: (360)808-7033

CRAFTSMAN Contractor 10” Radial Arm Saw. $375 OBO, 3 HP; 1 1 0 / 2 2 0 . E x t r a s : Fo r $5.00 will accept credit card pmt. (360)379-0987

POODLES: AKC, males and females in a variety of colors, sizes (Small Toys - Miniatures) and ages. NO STANDARDS! Rehoming fee starts at $250. For more information and pictures: CUTTING torches. Two 360-452-2579 torches, two sets of Regulators, tanks and Carrier. Call Wayne at 9820 Motorhomes 360-461-3869. Will consider offers of Trades. BOUNDER: ‘86 motor WELDER: Hobar t 200 home, new condition, wire feed welder. $800 gas tank full, 90 gallon. or will trade for 10 hp 4 $7000 firm. stroke O/B motor. (360)452-2615 (360)460-6764 MOTOR HOME: ‘90 34’ Bounder. 35,000 miles, 6140 Wanted gas ‘454’ Chev V8, good & Trades condition, needs work. BOOKS WANTED! We $6,700/obo. 452-9611.

love books, we’ll buy WINNEBAGO ‘95 Adyours. 457-9789. venturer 34’, 45,500 m. CASH FOR ANTIQUES Gas 460 Ford, Banks Anything old-any amount ex h a u s t s y s t e m , n ew tires and brakes, rear (360)681-4120 view camera, hyd leveling jacks, 2 tv’s, new hot SPACE NEEDED water tank, non smoker, N o n - p r o f i t s p o r t s Drivers side door, 5.5 TRAILER: 16’ flat bed, league seeking 10,000 o n a n g e n e ra t o r, l i g h t heavy duty. $1,200. sf space for practice (360)460-6764 P I A N O : B a by G ra n d , and spor ting events, neutral interior, everything works and is in exSmith & Barnes, great etc. Warehouse, shop, cellent shape. $15,700. Write ads that get condition, reconditioned. garage, hangar, empty RESULTS (360)460-1981 $800 firm storage area, etc. Any (360)385-2559 flat space sitting empDescription 9832 Tents & ty, give us a call! Description Travel Trailers (206)890-8240 Description 6115 Sporting

G O L F C A RT : E Z - G O Car t, electric, loaded, C D p l aye r, a l u m i nu m wheels, tur n signal, horn, new batteries. $6,000. (360)461-0088.

Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Goods

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call 360-477-9659 HOME GYM: Complete G o l d ’s G y m , s t y l e G4394, Competitor Series with full assembly instructions. $300. (360)775-6865

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

WANTED: English riding show coat, black or Navy, girls size 10 or 12. (360)681-2747

ALJO 1991 24’ trailer, ver y good condition, $5,500. 460-8538.

AVION ‘95: 36’, has two slides. $11,500. (360)460-6909.

9808 Campers & Canopies

CAMPER: 2002 Lance Camper Model 845 for short bed. Exclnt cond-used twice. Extended cabover w/queen-size bed. D i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o b e d . S h ow e r i s f u l l hght. Fresh water flush toilet. Blue int. $8795. (360)477-4778

File No.: 7314.00734 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RAMP 2004SL3 Grantee: Heirs and Devisees of Janice M. Peltier, deceased Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2000-1054779 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043024 500055 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 6 Palo Verde Vista 7/46 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On February 8, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 6 in Palo Verde Vista, as recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, Page 46, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 921 West Oak Court Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/25/00, recorded on 11/03/00, under Auditor’s File No. 20001054779, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Janice M. Peltier, an Unmarried Woman, as Grantor, to Land Title Company of Kitsap County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Loancity.com, a California corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Bankers Trust Company as Trustee to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas as Trustee for RAMP 2004SL3, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2010-1255969. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 09/28/2012 Monthly Payments $25,733.05 Late Charges $1,121.43 Lender’s Fees & Costs $2,815.52 Total Arrearage $29,670.00 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $537.66 Statutory Mailings $14.64 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,311.30 Total Amount Due: $30,981.30 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $118,153.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/11/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 8, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Janice Peltier aka Janice M. Peltier, Deceased 921 West Oak Court Sequim, WA 98382 Alicia Martin, Administrator of the Estate of Janice Peltier aka Janice M. Peltier, Deceased 921 West Oak Court Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Janice Peltier aka Janice M. Peltier, Deceased 921 West Oak Court Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/07/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/07/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 09/28/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.00734) 1002.195327-File No. Legal No. 448463 Pub: Jan. 7, 28, 2013

Clallam County

TIDERUNNER: ‘03, 17’, cuddy, ‘03 suzuki 90hp, 4 stroke, 230 hrs, 012 Yamaha 9.9 4 stroke, 0 hrs, scotty electric downriggers. Call (360)4522 1 4 8 fo r m o r e i n fo. $16,000/obo.

& Parts

C H A I N H O I S T: 3 t o n Coffing model MA-30 BOAT: 19’ fiberglass, a l u m i n u m w i t h l o a d trailer, 140 hp motor, block. $300. great for fishing/crab. (360)775-6865 $5,120. (360)683-3577.

BOAT: Fiberglass, 12’, 9180 Automobiles $200. 4.5 HP Merc mo- Classics & Collect. t a r, $ 3 0 0 . ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 3 4761. BUICK: 1976 Skylark. Rare, 2 door, V-6, stick. B O AT H O U S E : # 6 8 $2,250/obo. 460-8610. P.A. Marina, 36’x18’. SEE MARINA OFFICE. Classic, all original, 1966 $1,000/obo. 683-3961 F-250 Ford Camper CAMPION: 18’, 90 and 6 Special. 390 Auto, original owner. $6,000/obo. hp Yamaha, galv. trailer. (360)390-8101 $5,000. (360)460-6647.

Clallam County

9292 Automobiles Others AUDI ‘95 90 SERIES With sunroof, sport tires, leather int., runs great. $4397/obo. 477-3834. BUICK: ‘01 Par k Ave. Ultra 4 dr, 71K. $6,500. (360)452-9893

BUICK ‘03 LESABRE LIMITED WANTED: Navigation On-Star, leather, custom turor for 1,600 ton Maswheels/tires, must see. ter NC. Weekends. $4,995 (360)775-7553 Budget Rent-A-Car Port Angeles (360)912-3583 9817 Motorcycles

CAMPER: 9.5’ Alpenlite Ltd. All extras, generator, A/C, dinette roll-out. H O N DA ‘ 7 3 Tr a i l 9 0 : 1250 miles, ran when $12,000. (360)417-2606 parked 6 years ago, one C A N O P Y : F u l l s i z e owner. $900. 271-0867. Chev standard, GlassH O N DA : ‘ 7 4 Tra i l 9 0 . lite, excellent condition. 1,600 mi. $1,200. $400. (808)634-4551. (360)582-7970 S U P E R H AW K : 2 0 0 2 Canopy From F350. 6ft x HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing 8ft 2.5 inches. Like new. A s p e n c a d e . 1 2 0 0 c c , Will consider offer of black/chrome, exc. cond. trade. Located in Forks. $3,500/obo. 417-0153. Call Wayne at 360-461-3869 9740 Auto Service

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles Classics & Collect. Others Others

EASTERN: ‘11 18’ center console, premium boat, like new, completely equipped, 50 hp Yamaha, under 50 hrs. in warranty, Load-r ite galv. trailer, many ext ra s, D own e a s t s t y l e. See easternboats.com FORD 1950 F-1 Pickup: $26,500. (360)477-6059 2 3 9 F l a t h e a d , V 8 , 3-speed overdrive, runs GLASTROM: 16’ open a n d l o o k s g r e a t ! bow boat, 25 hp John- $15,500/obo. son, Calkin trailer. $950. (360)379-6646 (360)385-3686 LANDSCAPE ‘94 dumptruck: $5,995 or trade. (360)928-3193

WANTED: Old BB guns CARSON: 2007 Utility and pellet guns or parts trailer, Single axle. Trailer has new rubber. Rear and misc. 457-0814. load for your toys. Will WANTED TO BUY haul a cord of dry wood. Salmon/bass plugs and F o r m o r e i n f o c a l l lures, P.A. Derby me- Wayne at 360-461-3869. morabilia (360)683-4791 NASH 2000 26’, excel- SAILBOAT: 22’ Aquarie n t c o n d i t i o n . us. Sailboat 22’ Aquarius 7035 General Pets l$8,000.(360)460-8538. on trailer. Like new 8hp Mercury outboard. Lots LOST: Dog. 2 yr. old fe- GARAGE SALE ADS of sails, plus many extras. Needs some tlc. Call for details. male Great Dane, gray/ $2,000.00 firm. 360-452-8435 black spots, white chest, (360)681-8017 1-800-826-7714 purple toenails, last seen in Discovery Bay area. 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices (360)765-3762

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. Custom, new inter ior, tires, rims, wiring and more. $9,250. 683-7768.

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

9931 Legal Notices Clallam County

File No.: 7023.102605 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Kelli Lausche, as her separate estate and John Hammond, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1223227 Tax Parcel ID No.: 56328 / 06-30-00-009150 Abbreviated Legal: E44’LOT 13 & W22’ LOT 14, BK 91, TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telep h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 1, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The Easterly 44 feet of Lot 13 and Westerly 22 feet Lot 14 in Block 91, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 127 West 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/24/08, recorded on 06/30/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1223227, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Kelli Lausche, a single person and John Hammond, a single person, each as her and his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, a Washington Stock Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Golf Savings Bank, a Washington Stock Savings Bank to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1279916. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/26/2012 Monthly Payments $12,176.08 Late Charges $487.06 Lender’s Fees & Costs $131.44 Total Arrearage $12,794.58 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $543.75 Title Report $758.80 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,406.55 Total Amount Due: $14,201.13 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $228,669.41, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 1, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS John Hammond 127 West 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of John Hammond 127 West 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Kelli Lausche 127 West 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kelli Lausche 127 West 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/25/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/25/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/26/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Neang Avila (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7023.102605) 1002.228624-File No. Pub: Jan. 28, Feb. 18, 2013 Legal No. 452900

CADILLAC ‘94 ELDORADO Nor thStar, Bluetooth, Pa n d o r a s t e r e o, 7 2 K orig mi., must see. $5,495 Budget Rent-A-Car Port Angeles (360)912-3583 CHEV: ‘70 Nova. High performance 350. $5,000. (360)645-2275. CHEVROLET ‘07 HHR LT WAGON 2.4L Ecotec 4 cylinder, automatic, alloy wheels, new tires, traction cont r o l , r u n n i n g b o a r d s, sunroof, privacy glass, key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, mirrors, and drivers seat, heated leather seats, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, MP3 CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 67,000 Miles! Kelley Blue Book Value of $11,311! Clean Carfax! Great fuel economy! The Heritage High Roof is o n e f u n l i t t l e wa g o n ! Priced to sell! Stop by Gray Motors Today! $9,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD: ‘05 Mustang GT. V8, 5 speed, 61K mi., new tires. $14,900. (360)582-0358

CHRYSLER ‘04 HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA SEBRING LIMITED Loaded interior, 4 cylin- Navigation, Infinity Blueder engine, automatic tooth, 27K. trans, power optoins, $21,450 98k miles blow out Budget Rent-A-Car priced. Port Angeles $3,250 (360)912-3583 LIPMAN’S AUTO (360) 452-5050 LINCOLN ‘02 LS: nice shape. $8,000. DODGE: ‘92 Dynasty. 4 (360)457-3645 dr, only 78K, fine cond. $2,500. (360)457-3903. LINCOLN ‘99 CONTINENTAL FORD ‘01 Mustang Co- 161k, well maintained, bra, blue book $11,700, d r i v e s b e a u t i f u l l y . N O S F l o w m a s t e r s , $2,900. (360)477-7775. $12,000. Call for more details. (360)775-1858. MERCURY ‘02 Sable: Auto star t, looks/runs FORD: ‘95 Mustang. good. $3500. Manual, needs head (360)460-0357 gasket, tires. $1,000. (360)809-0781 PONTIAC: ‘99 Sunfire. FORD: ‘95 Probe. 2 dr, Good cond., 5 speed. $1,800/obo. 460-1001. good body/tires, nice s t e r e o. N e e d s s o m e SCION ‘10 XD work. Won’t last! Fully loaded, 43K. $750/obo. 460-0518. $10,950 Budget Rent-A-Car GMC: ‘84 S15. 3000 Port Angeles miles on new long block, (360)912-3583 p a i n t a n d b o d y ve r y good. No rust. Mounted studs on wheels. $2,500/ SUBARU: ‘84 GL SW obo. (360)670-6100. 4 W D. 9 5 K o r i g i n a l , great condition, many G M C : ‘ 9 8 S U V. 4 d r, new parts, 5 stud tires 4WD, new motor, extras. with rims. $3,500/obo. $4,000. (360)452-6611. (360)460-9199 HONDA ‘09 ACCORD TOYOTA: ‘03 Corolla. 4 EX-L Leather, moon roof, 28K. Cyl, sun roof, air, good tires, fine auto. $9,000. $18,900 (360)928-9920 Budget Rent-A-Car Port Angeles T OYO TA : ‘ 0 7 P r i u s . (360)912-3583 73K. $12,500/obo. (360)582-9276 HONDA ‘87 ACCORD Good shape, recent TOYOTA ‘10 maintinence, automatic. CAROLLA S $1,100. (360)461-0938. Sport model, moon roof, NISSAN ‘09 ALTIMA SL ABS, 29K. 16K, moon roof, leather, $13,950 Bose, very nice. Budget Rent-A-Car $16,950 Port Angeles Budget Rent-A-Car (360)912-3583 Port Angeles VW ‘95 PASSAT VR-6 (360)912-3583 Manual trans, leather, loaded, Wolfsburg ediPlace your ad tion, V-6 engine, sun with the only roof, new starter, blow DAILY out priced! Classified $3,450 LIPMAN’S AUTO Section on the (360) 452-5050 Peninsula!

PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435 peninsula dailynews.com

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

C H E V: ‘ 0 3 S i l ve ra d o. Only 47K, 4WD, 1500 HD, tow pkg., all power, 5th wheel hitch, 6.0L turbo, great shape. $14,000/obo 417-8840 or 460-3306

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

TS No.: WA-10-343126-SH APN No.: 073007-438040 Title Order No.: 100092173-WA-GNO Grantor(s): DOUGLAS HAWES, VICKI HAWES Grantee(s): WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2007-1201941 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant To The Revised Code Of Washington 61.24, et. seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee will on 2/8/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 223 East 4th, Port Angeles, WA 98362 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Clallam, State of Washington, to wit: LOT 4 OF THE HAWLES LARGE LOT SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN VOLUME 2 OF LARGE LOT SUBDIVISIONS, PAGE 20, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO. 20061189201, RECORDS OF CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM, STATE OF WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 428 EAGLE RIDGE RD , PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/22/2007 recorded 05/29/2007, under 2007-1201941 records of Clallam County, Washington, from DOUGLAS HAWES AND, VICKI HAWES , HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to LAND TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $73,232.09 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $691,444.30, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/8/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 1/28/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 1/28/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated at any time after the 1/28/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the Sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME DOUGLAS HAWES AND, VICKI HAWES , HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 428 EAGLE RIDGE RD , PORT ANGELES, WA 98363 by both first class and certified mail on 2/12/2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee, and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property, described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS- The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORCLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 days from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National web site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&amp;searchstate=WA&amp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attor neys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/4/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-10-343126-SH P989818 1/7, 01/28/2013 Pub: Jan. 7, 28, 2013 Legal No. 447729


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others

DODGE: ‘01 Dakota. 4.7 liter, V8, 5 sp, rear limited slip axle, 4x4, 1 owner, 117K mi., very clean interior, never smoked CHEV ‘93 CHEYENNE in, maintenance records. M a n u a l t r a n s. , g o o d . $5,800. (360)683-2914. $1500/obo. 385-3686. DODGE ‘01 RAM 1500 CHEV: ‘94 Extend cab, EXTRA CAB SLT 2WD 4WD. $4,200 or trade for 5.9L (360) Magnum V8, Motorhome. 504-5664 automatic, alloy wheels, brand new tires, spray-in CHEVY ‘06 SILVERAbedliner, tow package, DO 1500 Z71 EXTEND- rear sliding window, 4 ED CAB 4X4 opening doors, power 5.3L Vor tec V8, Auto- w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, matic, K&N Intake, Flow- and mirrors, cruise conmaster exhaust, alloy trol, tilt, air conditioning, wheels, good r u bber, C D / C a s s e t t e s t e r e o, running boards, spray-in dual front airbags. Only bedliner, tow package, 85,000 Miles! Tried-andkeyless entry, 4 opening t r u e 3 6 0 V 8 e n g i n e ! doors, power windows, Ready to roll with brand door locks, mirrors, and new tires all the way drivers seat, cruise con- around! Priced way untrol,tilt, air conditioning, der the Kelley Blue Book Dual Zone Climate Con- value of $9,814! Stop by trol, OnStar, information Gray Motors today to center, dual front air- save big bucks on your bags. only 21,000 origi- next truck! nal miles on this beauty! $5,995 Like new condition inGRAY MOTORS side and out! All the right 457-4901 options! This truck graymotors.com shows the very best of care! Most dependable, D O D G E : ‘ 9 8 D a ko t a . longest lasting, full-size 1 6 0 K , 5. 2 L V 8 , gr e a t pickup on the road since running truck. $4,500/ 1981! You won’t find one obo. (360)461-7210. like it anywhere else! Stop by Gray Motors to- GMC ‘95 SIERRA 3500 4X4 6.5L DIESEL day! Crew cab, tow package, $20,995 turbo diesel, automatic GRAY MOTORS trans, power windows, 457-4901 mirrors, door locks, 6 graymotors.com seat belts, long bed, nice FORD ‘00 F250 Extend- tires, 160k miles, Blow e d C a b L a r i a t . V 1 0 , out priced! heavy duty, 160K, one $4,250 owner. Must sell. LIPMAN’S AUTO $4,500/obo. 460-7131. (360) 452-5050

CHEV ‘74 3/4 ton Custom Delux: All original, runs excel. $1,500/obo. (360)683-0763

FORD ‘95 F250HD SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 7 . 3 L Pow e r s t r o ke V 8 Turbo-Diesel, automatic, dual fuel tanks, alloy wheels, good toyo tires, running boards, bedliner, power windows and door locks, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, sony DODGE ‘99 Flatbed: CD stereo with aux inV8 Dodge Ram Flat- put, driving lights. Only bed pickup 4x4. White 137,000 Miles! Sparkling with detachable metal clean inside and out! sideboards and tool Ford’s best diesel enbox. Good condition, gine! Enough power for $4200 obo. For more all of your needs! Clean information or to see Carfax! These are getcall ting hard to find in this (360)461-4151. good of condition! Stop by Gray Motors today! $9,995 FORD: ‘08 F150 XLT. GRAY MOTORS 4x4 crew cab. Low mi., 457-4901 loaded! $18,500. graymotors.com (360)912-1599 TOYOTA ‘00 TUNDRA FORD: ‘79 F250 Super SR5 Cab. ‘460’, AT, tow pkg., B a n k s p o w e r p a c k , A u t o, 4 W D, V 8 , t o w pkg., one owner. 141K, runs/drives great. $6,950 $2,200. (360)460-7534. Budget Rent-A-Car FORD ‘85 F-250 SuperPort Angeles c a b : 4 x 4 , a u t o, 4 6 0 , (360)912-3583 $1,900/obo. 417-8250. TOYOTA ‘93 T100 4X4 FORD: ‘91 F150. Extra V- 6 , 5 s p e e d , 1 1 2 k cab, bedliner. $1,000. miles, new exhaust, (360)460-8155 s t r o n g r u n n e r, n e e d s tires FORD: ‘91 Ranger. 4 $4,250 Cyl, 5 speed, short bed, LIPMAN’S AUTO good tires. $2,000. (360) 452-5050 (360)928-9920

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7314.00488 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for GMACM Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-AR6 Grantee: Peter A. Stewart and Julie A. Stewart, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20051161682 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063015640010 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 1, Pinebook II Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 1, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Pinebrook II, as recorded in volume 9 of plats, page 23, records of Clallam County, Washington. And that portion conveyed by instrument recorded under Clallam County auditor’s file no. 723694. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Lot 1 of Pinebrook II, as recorded in volume 9 of plats, page 23, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 934 Benjamin Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/28/05, recorded on 07/28/05, under Auditor’s File No. 20051161682, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Peter A. Stewart and Julie A. Stewart, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for GMAC Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by GMAC Mortgage, LLC to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for GMACM Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-AR6, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20121284531. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/18/2012 Monthly Payments $27,144.48 Late Charges $999.84 Lender’s Fees & Costs $1,680.18 Total Arrearage $29,824.50 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $731.70 Statutory Mailings $39.04 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,529.74 Total Amount Due: $31,354.24 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $195,588.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 1, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Julie A. Stewart 934 Benjamin Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Julie A. Stewart 32 22nd Street Southwest Minot, ND 58701 Peter A. Stewart 934 Benjamin Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Peter A. Stewart 32 22nd Street Southwest Minot, ND 58701 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/28/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/29/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.nor thwesttr ustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/18/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.00488) 1002.197627-File No. Legal No. 452902 Pub: Jan. 28, Feb. 18, 2013

Celebrate Valentine’s Day!

9556 SUVs Others MERCURY: ‘00 Mountaineer. 2WD, V8, premium options, 21 mpg hwy $3,300. (360)452-7266.

9556 SUVs Others C H E V : ‘ 9 6 B l a z e r. 4x4, 184K, fully loaded, clean, exc. condition. $4,000/obo. (360)460-8631 FORD: ‘98 Explorer Limited. 141,300 mi., white, trailer package, 4 wheel drive, air conditioned, both front power seats, leather, loaded, excellent condition, one owner. 4 new studded tires go with it, on rims. $4,200/obo. 797-2117. JEEP: ‘78 CJ5. ‘350’ Chev. V8, 36”x13.5 tires, alum. weld wheels, headers, traction bars, Warn winch, electric fan. $10,000. (360)461-0088. SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai 4x4. 48K drive mi., like new, original mint cond., new top, tires, clutch, rebuilt trans, CD, tape, Reese tow bar, superior snow travel. First $4,500 takes. (360)460-6979. TOYOTA ‘02 RAV4 L Sunroof, 4WD. $10,875 Budget Rent-A-Car Port Angeles (360)912-3583

9730 Vans & Minivans Others C H E V ‘ 9 7 Va n : ( 7 ) pssngr, 45k mi on Jasper engi, recent R&R radiator, trans rebuild, etc. $3,1000/obo. 582-9179.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 B9

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County NO. 13 4 00018 1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM In the Matter of the Estate of: GENE L. NICKELL, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against he decedent must, before the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative, or the personal representative’s attorney, at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: January 28, 2013. Personal Representative: Shelly Harkovich Attorney for Personal Representative: Joseph B. Wolfley Address for Mailing or Service: 713 E. First St, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Dated: 1/16/13 WOLFLEY & WOLFLEY, P.S. By Joseph B. Wolfley, WSBA #14782 Pub: Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11, 2013 Legal No. 453098

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

File No.: 7037.97620 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Julie Anne Watkins, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003 1112809 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063016530050 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 19 of Second Plat if Oakcrest, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 5 of plats, page 23, records of Clallam County, Washington Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On March 1, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: Lot 19 of the second plat of Oakcrest, according to plat thereof recorded in Volume 5 of plats, page 13, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington Commonly known as: 3005 Oakcrest Loop Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/16/03, recorded on 07/18/03, under Auditor’s File No. 2003 1112809, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Julia Anne Watkins, An Unmarried Individual, As A Separate Estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, A Washington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, As A Reciever of Washington Mutual Bank to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1283755. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/23/2012 Monthly Payments $19,197.36 Lender’s Fees & Costs $600.21 Total Arrearage $19,797.57 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $750.00 Title Report $692.68 Statutory Mailings $30.90 Recording Costs $16.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,559.58 Total Amount Due: $21,357.15 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $148,279.65, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 1, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Julie Anne Watkins 3005 Oakcrest Loop Port Angeles, WA 98362 Julie Anne Watkins 1672 Woods Road East Port Orchard, WA 98366 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Julie Anne Watkins 3005 Oakcrest Loop Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Julie Anne Watkins 1672 Woods Road East Port Orchard, WA 98366 Julie Anne Watkins 10442 35th Avenue Southwest Seattle, WA 98146-1106 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Julie Anne Watkins 10442 35th Avenue Southwest Seattle, WA 98146-1106 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/12/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/12/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/23/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.97620) 1002.227297-File No. Pub: Jan. 28, Feb. 18, 2013 Legal No. 452903

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

CASE No.: 12 4 00408 1 NONPROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.42.030) IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM IN RE THE ESTATE OF DENNIS A. GESUALDI, Deceased. The notice agent named below has elected to give notice to creditors of the abovenamed decedent. As of the date of the filing of a copy of this notice with the court, the notice agent has no knowledge of any other person acting as notice agent or of the appointment of a personal representative of the decedent’s estate in the state of Washington. According to the records of the court as are available on the date of the filing of this notice with the court, a cause number regarding the decedent has not been issued to any other notice agent and a personal representative of the decedent’s estate has not been appointed. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.42.070 by serving upon or mailing to the notice agent or the notice agent’s lawyer at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty (30) days after the notice agent served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.42.020(2)(c); or (2) four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within the foregoing time period, the claim will be forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.42.050 and 11.42.060. This bar is effective as to claims against the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: Monday, January 21, 2013 This notice agent declares under penalty of perjury under the laws of the state of Washington on January 15, 2013, at Port Angeles, Washington, that the foregoing is true and correct. CARL LLOYD GAY Notice Agent Lawyer for estate: Carl Lloyd Gay, WSBA #9272 GREENAWAY, GAY & TULLOCH 829 East Eighth St., Suite A Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-3323 Pub: Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4, 2012 Legal No. 451621

File No.: 7037.77213 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. 2005-WMC1, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-WMC1 Grantee: Steve C. Parker, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005-1158685 Tax Parcel ID No.: 023015340030 Abbreviated Legal: PTN GOV LOT 4 S15-T30N-R2W Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telep h o n e : To l l - f r e e : 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - H O M E ( 1 - 8 7 7 - 8 9 4 - 4 6 6 3 ) . We b s i t e : http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On February 8, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: That portion of Government Lot 4, Section 15, Township 30 North, Range 2 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of said Government Lot 4; thence North 89 degrees 53’ 03” East along the North line of said Government Lot, 894.07 feet to the Northeast corner of the Plat of Johnson’s Discovery Bay View Tracts, as recorded under Volume 5 of Plats, Page 29, records of Clallam County, Washington; thence South 24 degrees 48’ 01” West along the Easterly line of said plat 51.825 feet to the point of beginning; thence South 69 degrees 07’ 13” East 154.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 14’ 20” West 38.415 feet; thence North 67 degrees 54’ 20” West 150.17 feet; thence North 24 degrees 48’ 01” East 34.795 feet to the point of beginning. Together with that portion of the North 6 chains of Second class tidelands in front of, adjacent to or abutting upon said tract. Together with the right of use boat launch as granted under instrument recorded June 29, 1967, under Auditor’s File No. 363662. Together with an easement for ingress, egress and utilities as described in document recorded June 03, 2005, under Clallam County Recording No. 2005-1157826. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 301 Diamond Shore Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/10/05, recorded on 06/16/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005-1158685, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Steve C. Parker, as Grantor, to Bishop & Lynch of King County, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for WMC Mortgage Corp. its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. 2005-WMC1, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-WMC1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2009-1240531. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/03/2012 Monthly Payments $45,860.23 Lender’s Fees & Costs $398.63 Total Arrearage $46,258.86 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Total Costs $0.00 Total Amount Due: $46,258.86 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $205,204.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 8, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/28/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Steve C Parker 301 Diamond Shore Ln Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Steve C Parker 301 Diamond Shore Ln Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/09/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/09/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/03/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.77213) 1002.192739-File No. Legal No. 448462 Pub: Jan. 7, 28, 2013

A Sweet Deal for You!

Phone 360-452-4507 to secure your Sweet Deal TODAY!

730773

Subscribe, or renew, your subscription to Peninsula Daily News for a sweet deal, just $117 for 1 year and receive a $10 gift certificate for something sweet from (your choice) Necessities & Temptations, That Takes the Cake or Elevated Ice Cream & Candy Shop.


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013 Neah Bay 46/41

Bellingham B elli el e lin n 43/38

â&#x17E;Ą

Olympic Peninsula TODAY RAIN

Forks 46/41

BREEZY Port RAIN Townsend 45/41

44/39

Sequim 44/40

ZY EE BR AIN R

Olympics Snow level: 2,000 ft.

Port Ludlow 44/40

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NationalTODAY forecast Nation

Yesterday Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 45 34 Trace 1.41 Forks 45 38 0.83 7.85 Seattle 47 40 0.04 3.31 Sequim 43 35 0.00 0.94 Hoquiam 45 36 0.39 5.12 Victoria 45 34 0.08 3.84 Port Townsend 43 39 0.02* 1.47

Forecast highs for Monday, Jan. 28

Billings 37° | 23°

San Francisco 57° | 46°

Last

New

First

Chicago 52° | 36°

Atlanta 63° | 41°

El Paso 64° | 36° Houston 75° | 63°

Miami 79° | 68°

â&#x17E;Ą

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

45/39 Cloudy and rainy

Low 39 Cloudy with rain

Marine Weather

THURSDAY

46/38 48/36 Mostly cloudy; Considerable small rain chances cloudiness

Fronts

CANADA

Seattle 45° | 39° Olympia 45° | 37°

Spokane 34° | 27°

Tacoma 45° | 36° Yakima 41° | 25°

Astoria 45° | 39°

ORE.

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 1:20 a.m. 7.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7:06 a.m. 2.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 12:50 p.m. 8.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7:32 p.m. -0.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Feb 3

Feb 10

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

Hi 21 57 66 07 47 60 28 70 34 54 58 26 39 25 81 25

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

5:08 p.m. 7:45 a.m. 7:22 p.m. 8:03 a.m.

Lo Prc Otlk 04 Clr 40 .11 PCldy 46 Clr -02 Clr 23 Cldy 42 Cldy 10 Clr 46 Cldy 24 Clr 29 Snow 48 Cldy 06 Cldy 29 .14 Cldy 14 Clr 67 Cldy 14 PCldy

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 1:51 a.m. 8.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7:46 a.m. 2.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1:29 p.m. 8.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8:05 p.m. 0.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

WEDNESDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 2:22 a.m. 8.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8:27 a.m. 2:10 p.m. 8.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 8:39 p.m.

Ht 2.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 0.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Port Angeles

4:15 a.m. 7.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2:42 p.m. 6.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

9:43 a.m. 4.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9:32 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

4:39 a.m. 7.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:23 a.m. 4.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3:33 p.m. 5.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:07 p.m. 0.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

5:05 a.m. 7.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:06 a.m. 4:29 p.m. 5.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:44 p.m.

3.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Port Townsend

5:52 a.m. 9.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:56 a.m. 5.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4:19 p.m. 7.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:45 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:16 a.m. 9.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:36 a.m. 4.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5:10 p.m. 7.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:20 p.m. 0.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:42 a.m. 9.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 12:19 p.m. 6:06 p.m. 6.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:57 p.m.

3.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1.4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Dungeness Bay*

4:58 a.m. 8.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:18 a.m. 4.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3:25 p.m. 6.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:07 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

5:22 a.m. 8.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:58 a.m. 4.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4:16 p.m. 6.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:42 p.m. 0.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

5:48 a.m. 8.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:41 a.m. 5:12 p.m. 6.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:19 p.m.

3.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Feb 17 Feb 25

Nation/World

Victoria 41° | 34°

Ocean: NW wind 20 to 25 kt. Wind waves 3 to 5 ft. W swell 12 ft at 11 seconds. Rain likely. Tonight, W wind 20 to 25 kt. Wind waves 4 to 6 ft. W swell 14 ft at 11 seconds.

LaPush

48/36 Clouds with sunbreaks

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 20 to 30 kt rising to 25 to 35 kt. Wind waves 5 to 7 ft. A chance of rain. Tonight, W wind 25 to 35 kt. Wind waves 5 to 7 ft.

Tides

FRIDAY

New York 37° | 27°

Detroit 46° | 30°

Washington D.C. 46° | 30°

Los Angeles 61° | 46°

Full

-10s

Burlington, Vt. 15 Casper 53 Charleston, S.C. 61 Charleston, W.Va. 31 Charlotte, N.C. 47 Cheyenne 50 Chicago 28 Cincinnati 33 Cleveland 24 Columbia, S.C. 59 Columbus, Ohio 29 Concord, N.H. 20 Dallas-Ft Worth 54 Dayton 27 Denver 53 Des Moines 37 Detroit 27 Duluth 17 El Paso 67 Evansville 38 Fairbanks -28 Fargo 18 Flagstaff 41 Grand Rapids 29 Great Falls 56 Greensboro, N.C. 39 Hartford Spgfld 25 Helena 46 Honolulu 78 Houston 78 Indianapolis 31 Jackson, Miss. 54 Jacksonville 76 Juneau 38 Kansas City 48 Key West 75 Las Vegas 59 Little Rock 49

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Cold

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Minneapolis 36° | 27°

Denver 59° | 27°

Almanac

Brinnon 42/37

Aberdeen 44/41

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 45° | 39°

*Reading taken in Nordland

â&#x153;źâ&#x153;ź â&#x153;ź

Sunny

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

05 Clr Los Angeles 37 Cldy Louisville 35 Clr Lubbock 19 PCldy Memphis 27 PCldy Miami Beach 34 PCldy Midland-Odessa 23 Cldy Milwaukee 19 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 10 Cldy Nashville 33 Clr New Orleans 12 Cldy New York City 10 Clr Norfolk, Va. 49 Cldy North Platte 12 Cldy Oklahoma City 32 .01 PCldy Omaha 32 .03 Cldy Orlando 12 Cldy Pendleton 13 .01 Cldy Philadelphia 50 PCldy Phoenix 20 Rain Pittsburgh -39 Cldy Portland, Maine 07 Cldy Portland, Ore. 37 1.20 Snow Providence 17 Snow Raleigh-Durham 32 Cldy Rapid City 24 Cldy Reno 07 Clr Richmond 32 Cldy Sacramento 74 .01 Cldy St Louis 56 Cldy St Petersburg 19 Rain Salt Lake City 47 PCldy San Antonio 52 PCldy San Diego 31 .10 Snow San Francisco 38 .06 Cldy San Juan, P.R. 70 Cldy Santa Fe 48 .08 Clr St Ste Marie 45 Cldy Shreveport

68 39 67 57 79 73 27 30 49 74 27 35 53 48 47 76 46 29 59 26 23 47 26 38 52 57 39 60 38 74 34 73 62 56 83 49 23 52

â&#x2013;  87 at Laredo, Texas

â&#x2013;  -9 at Whitefield, N.H.

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or â&#x20AC;&#x2122; feet

55 .02 Cldy Sioux Falls 33 32 Rain 24 PCldy Syracuse 19 07 .01 PCldy 48 Clr Tampa 76 54 Clr 47 Cldy Topeka 60 41 .08 Cldy 67 Cldy Tucson 69 51 .63 Cldy 57 Cldy Tulsa 55 46 Clr 22 Snow Washington, D.C. 37 27 PCldy 21 Snow Wichita 59 43 .01 Rain 28 Cldy Wilkes-Barre 23 05 .01 Clr 54 Cldy Del. 29 14 Clr 19 Clr Wilmington, _________________ 28 .05 PCldy Hi Lo Otlk 37 .18 Cldy 80 61 Clr 43 Cldy Auckland Baghdad 62 56 Rain 35 .14 Rain Beijing 40 22 Clr 48 PCldy 36 33 Cldy 29 Cldy Berlin 42 39 Cldy 17 Clr Brussels 67 47 Clr 58 1.18 Rain Cairo 07 Cldy Calgary 25 -3 PCldy 09 Clr Guadalajara 78 46 PCldy 40 .01 Rain Hong Kong 70 63 PCldy 11 Clr Jerusalem 58 41 PCldy 22 Cldy Johannesburg 76 61 Ts 28 Cldy Kabul 50 28 Clr 34 Snow London 49 48 Sh/Wind 24 PCldy Mexico City 75 47 PCldy 38 PCldy Montreal 23 20 Snow 28 Rain 16 13 PCldy 61 Clr Moscow 72 45 Clr 32 Snow New Delhi 46 42 Cldy 59 Rain Paris Rio de Janeiro 79 73 Ts 56 .08 Cldy 48 38 Rain 47 PCldy Rome 78 68 Ts 73 .04 PCldy Sydney 50 33 Clr 38 .16 Cldy Tokyo 38 35 Ice/Snow 10 Snow Toronto 46 Cldy Vancouver 41 39 Sh

Briefly . . . the shelter, were dead on arrival, were stolen or escaped and feral cats that were spayed/neutered and released. The euthanasia rate for the year was 6.9 percent, a decrease of more than 3 percent from 2011. The decision to euthanize is reserved as a last resort for only the untreatably ill and extremely aggressive animals. No animals are euthanized due to space issues or their length of time at the shelter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very exciting to see our euthanasia rate continue to drop,â&#x20AC;? said Executive Director Mary Beth Wegener. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having a veterinarian on staff has had a huge impact on reducing this number. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Shelter manager] Suzy Zustiak is committed to maintaining the health of our animals so that we can find them homes or place them with another rescue group.â&#x20AC;? For more information or to volunteer, phone the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society at 360457-8206.

Marinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story topic of lecture PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vaughn Sherman, the author of Sea Travels: Memoirs of a 20th Century Master Mariner, will speak at the Jefferson County Historical Society First Friday lecture this Friday. The book is the autobiography of Shermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncle, J. Holger Christensen. Christensen â&#x20AC;&#x153;was literally raised for the sea, starting with those childhood days when Dad tethered me to the mast of La Blancaâ&#x20AC;? as he ferried cargo throughout the Puget Sound. Sea Travels follows Christensen as he works his way from family deckhand to master mariner. The saga includes hard times and history, including taking President Harry S. Truman salmon fishing on Puget Sound and references to the historic explosion of the family boat in the Tacoma Narrows in 1928. The lecture series is held at Port Townsendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic City Hall, 540 Water St., at 7 p.m. the first Friday of each month. Admission is by donation, which supports historical society programs.

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CAMP FIRE

CANDY SALES BEGIN

Hunter Dougherty, 12, and Malcolm Drakeford, 12, sell two boxes of Camp Fire Candy to Sherri Ellis at Safeway on Third Street in Port Angeles on Saturday. Between now and Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, Camp Fire boys and girls will be conducting their annual candy sales on the weekends and after school at Safeway, Walmart, Albertsons and Swainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in General Store in Port Angeles, and in Forks. Selections include almond caramel clusters, mint patties and almond roca buttercrunch. The candy is $5 per box, and all proceeds will benefit the local council and its programs. For more information, phone Camp Fire USA Juan de Fuca Council at 360-457-8442.

military training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Merideth is a 1999 graduate of Port Angeles High School and the daughter of Henry Merideth of Port Angeles. She received an associate degree in 2002 from Peninsula College. Merideth completed an intensive eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an Associate in Applied Science through the Community College of the Air Force. Peninsula Daily News

Air Force graduate ferred to another shelter or rescue group, and 119 were euthanized. An additional 345 ani-

mals are classified as â&#x20AC;&#x153;other,â&#x20AC;? which includes animals that were reunited with their owner, died at

Now Showing pected Journeyâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Standâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parkerâ&#x20AC;? (R)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangster Squadâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hansel and Gretel Witch Huntersâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les Miserablesâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silver Linings Playbookâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zero Dark Thirtyâ&#x20AC;? (R)

â&#x2013;  The Rose Theatre, Port Townsend (360385-1089)

â&#x2013;  Lincoln Theater, Port

â&#x2013;  Uptown Theatre, Port Townsend (360-3853883)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broken Cityâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hobbit: An Unex-

4MJEJOH4DSFFOTt4DSFFO%PPST 8JOEPX4DSFFOTt$VTUPN4DSFFOT 3PMMBXBZ4DSFFOTt4PMBS4DSFFOT 1FU4DSFFOTt4DSFFO3PPNT

360.681.2442

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silver Linings Playbookâ&#x20AC;? (R) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zero Dark Thirtyâ&#x20AC;? (R)

#PENIN*961CF

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Django: Unchainedâ&#x20AC;? (R)

Pat Flood 417-8870 M.S., L. Ac.

$30 $300 300 00 31551571

3FQBJSTr1BSUTr/FX6TFEr"MM.BLFT 88BTIJOHUPOrrTFRVJNTFX!ZBIPPDPNrXXXTFRVJNTFXJOHDFOUFSDPN

Expert care, compassionately given. Focusing on eliminating pain & improving wellness.

26628896

Karenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sequim Sewing Center

21576529

NEW CLASSES

style G4394, Competitor Series, with full assembly instructions.

Pain-Free Is The Point!Š

and sign up for our

220 Carlsborg Rd. Sequim, WA

HOME GYM: Complete Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gym,

come see our

NEW FABRICS

Every Sunday in PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

20% OFF

â&#x2013;  Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-4527176)

Angeles (360-457-7997)

PENINSULA PROFILE

26639251

Admission is $10 at the door. Attendees can bring gardening questions for the WSU Master Gardener â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask Meâ&#x20AC;? table before and after the lecture. Garden irrigation Thompson will discuss PORT TOWNSEND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; theories of watering, how Irrigation instructor Jeff best to utilize each irrigaThompson will present tion method and the basics â&#x20AC;&#x153;Garden Irrigation Methodâ&#x20AC;? for an irrigation plan. from 10 a.m. to noon SaturFor more information, day. phone 360-385-3478. Thompson teaches irrigation at Edmonds ComYear in review munity College and is the owner of Keeping It Green, PORT ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a garden services company. The Olympic Peninsula The lecture is part of Humane Society took in the Jefferson County Mas- 1,719 animals in 2012, an ter Gardener Yard & Garincrease of 40 animals from den Lecture series, which 2011. meets each Saturday at the Of the animals entering Jefferson County Fairthe shelter, 853 were grounds, 4907 Landes St. adopted, 402 were trans-

SAN ANTONIO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Crystal A. Merideth has graduated from basic

Achievement and success on the North Olympic Peninsula.


PDN20130128C