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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

October 29, 2012 | 75¢

Quakes jolt Canadian islands Sunday aftershocks follow 7.7 temblor PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SOURCES

Powerful earthquakes, including a moderate one midday, continued to rattle the ground and nerves of northern British Columbia on Sunday following a major magnitude 7.7 jolt the night before. No injuries or damage were reported following the 7.7-magnitude temblor that struck near the Haida Gwaii archipelago at 8:04 p.m. Saturday or the 6.4 quake that hit just before noon Sunday in the same area. More than 40 aftershocks, mostly minor, were recorded following the Saturday night jolt. The epicenters off Haida Gwaii — formerly known as the Queen Char-

RECYCLING

lotte Islands, ALSO . . . between Vancouver ■Few Island and Alaska Olympic — are more than Peninsula 600 miles north of residents feel the watery border quake/A4 that separates Canada from the U.S. in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and few North Olympic Peninsula residents reported feeling any (see accompanying report).

Biggest since 1949 Residents in parts of British Columbia were evacuated, but the province appeared to escape largely unscathed from the biggest quake in Canada since 1949.

But nerves are another story in an area not used to big earthquakes. A magnitude 5.8 aftershock came immediately after the 7.7 temblor Saturday night. Then on Sunday, a magnitude 5.1 aftershock struck at 9:17 a.m., followed by the 6.4 jolt at 11:55 a.m. All the quakes were centered about 100 miles south of Masset on Haida Gwaii, where the underwater North American and Pacific tectonic plates meet. Saturday night’s 7.7 quake was felt across a wide area of British Columbia, especially on Haida Gwaii and along the northern end of 290-milelong Vancouver Island. TURN TO QUAKES/A4

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Library set to move for renovations

APPLES INTO CIDER

Port Hadlock building getting $700,000 redo BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MARGARET MCKENZIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Kees Kolff, right, a board member for the nonprofit ReCyclery in Port Townsend, instructs some of the 50 people who attended the nonprofit’s first annual Halloween Harvest Party in the art of pressing apples into cider at the community bike shop at 1925 Blaine St. on Friday.

PORT HADLOCK — The Jefferson County Library is preparing for a scheduled renovation that will result in its operating out of a temporary location for several months. The aim is to make the library a more welcoming and modern facility, said Library Director Ray Serebrin. According to Meredith Wagner, the library’s assistant director, “We are going to start contacting our customers next week to let Serebrin them know that the remodel is happening.� “It is a big change for people,� she said, “but it is also an opportunity for people to learn what we are going to do with the remodel.� The library located at 620 Cedar Ave. in Port Hadlock is scheduled to close Dec. 2 and to reopen after about two weeks at its temporary location, 51 Colwell Road, which is across from Circle and Square Auto Care on Rhody Drive. The library will be moving portions of its collection to the 5,000-square-foot space, which is less than half the size of the current location. TURN TO LIBRARY/A4

PA budget may leave nonprofits out in cold BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Fifteen Port Angeles nonprofits that have historically received funding from the city could lose, on average, more than $3,500 apiece next year under a preliminary city budget made public last week. But the recommendation to excise more than $56,000 in funding to these nonprofits is far from

RE-ELECT

decided, and a number of City Council members have pledged to work with City Manager Dan McKeen to find ways to at least partially restore the money. The United Way of Clallam County serves as the shepherd for city funding to the15 nonprofits, which provide a range of health and social services to the city’s low-income, senior, and mentally and physically challenged populations.

Jody Moss, United Way of Clallam County’s executive director, said the group she heads not only distributes funds but also helps deter- Moss mine, with the help of City Council members, which nonprofits get what.

the United Way — $55,125 for the nonprofits and $1,125 for United Way administrative costs — is part of a balanced 2013 preliminary budget McKeen presented Tuesday at a City Council work session. McKeen presented a 2013 ‘Already struggling’ operating budget with $18.7 mil“It’s cuts to services that are lion in the general fund, which already kind of struggling,� she pays for most of the costs associated with the city’s departments. said. TURN TO NONPROFITS/A4 The $56,250 less in funding for

INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MIKE

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Paid for by: Committee to Re-Elect Mike Chapman, County Commissioner, P.O. Box 28, Port Angeles, WA 98362

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Moss said removing city funds set aside for United Way allocation from the city’s 2013 preliminary budget will hurt community members who receive benefits from these nonprofits.

IND.

CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD PENINSULA POLL

B5 B4 A7 B4 A6 B4 B10 A3 A2

PUZZLES/GAMES SPORTS SUDOKU WEATHER

B7 B1 A2 B10


A2

UpFront

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2012, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2012, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

Audit Bureau of Circulations

The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Rod Stewart shares tidbits from memoir ROCKER ROD STEWART has a debauched past, but some details about his hard partying ways should have always remained private. The 67-year-old crooner told “Access Hollywood” that he and Faces bandmate Ronnie Wood Stewart occasionally used cocaine suppositories in the 1970s. They came up with the creative method after snorting so much of the drug it burned a hole through Wood’s septum. Stewart was discussing the good times as part of publicity rounds for his new book, Rod: The Autobiography. “As far as the drugs are concerned, I was never an addict. I was never, you know, in rehab,” he said. “It never affected my family or my relationships or anything. I was just a social user.” But Wood’s neardestruction of his nasal passages didn’t stop either man from continued drug use. “We found another method of taking the drug,” he said. “We put them in a little pill like the French do them, [a] suppository. “We did that for a little while. Are we still on the air?” he added with a laugh. Touching on the subject of women, the infamous Casanova contended that he’s had far fewer flings than most assume. “I’ve got to be honest

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HAIL, HAIL

ROCK

&

ROLL

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

Chuck Berry performs during the tribute concert in his honor celebrating him as the 17th American Music Master on Saturday at the State Theater in Cleveland.

FRIDAY/SATURDAY QUESTION: With a few days passed to soak them in, do you think the presidential debates influenced your vote in any way?

with you. People try and say that I have had thousands of girls — I haven’t,” he said. “I’ve probably had 50 or 60.”

Yes

8.5%

Somewhat

6.7%

No Undecided 0.6%

Actor’s new son It’s a boy for Alex O’Loughlin and his girlfriend Malia Jones. The “Hawaii Five-0” star and his model girlfriend welcomed their first child together — a son — on Thursday, according to E! News. The couple has yet to reveal their baby’s name. Back in August, a representative for the actor confirmed to “Access Hollywood” that O’Loughlin was

Didn’t watch O’Loughlin

10.6%

Jones Total votes cast: 1,616

expecting a child with Jones. The new arrival is the second child for both O’Loughlin, 36, and Jones, 35. O’Loughlin has a teenage son, 15-year-old Saxon, from a previous relationship. Jones also has a son — Spike, 3 — whose dad is surfer Luke Stedman.

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Passings

Peninsula Lookback

By The Associated Press

From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NATINA REED, 32, R&B singer and member of the female group Blaque, was killed after being stuck by a car in metro Atlanta, authorities say. The Gwinnett County, Ga., Police Department said in a news release Sunday that Ms. Reed Ms. Reed was hit late in 2012 Friday while in the roadway at an intersection on U.S. Highway 29 near Lilburn, Ga. Police said the driver called 9-1-1 for help, and someone tried to revive Ms. Reed on the scene. She was later pronounced dead at Gwinnett Medical Center. It’s unclear why Ms. Reed was in the road. Police said the driver wasn’t at fault and won’t be charged. Blaque’s hits included “808” and “Bring It All to Me” in the late 1990s. Ms. Reed

73.6%

remove Russian rocket Teachers, principals and bases in Cuba, easing the Cuban missile crisis, is the ________ superintendents from all of result of American courage, Clallam and Jefferson counJACQUES BARZUN, U.S. Rep. Jack Westland, ties’ school districts — about R-Everett, said. 104, a courtly French 250 people — completed a “Every time we have American scholar with a two-day regional meeting taken a stand and stood bracing knowledge of Westtoday of the Washington firm, they have backed ern civilization who helped Education Association. down,” said Westland, found the field of cultural Although most of the whose congressional dishistory and in his 90s sessions at Roosevelt High trict includes the North wrote the epic if improbaSchool in Port Angeles Olympic Peninsula. ble best-seller From Dawn were geared to groups of He said because Cuba is to Decadence, has died. educators, evening sessions so close to the U.S., the Mr. Barzun, who taught in the auditorium also Soviet Union figured its for nearly 50 years at included the public. position was too vulneraColumbia University, died Special luncheons were ble. He does not count out Thursday in San Antonio, held for alumni of Western Berlin as a future trouble where he retired after seven Washington College of Edu- spot in tensions. decades in New York. His cation (Bellingham Normal) death was confirmed by his and Central Washington 1987 (25 years ago) son-in-law, Garvin Parfit. College of Education Hailed as “one of the last An armed robber called (Ellensburg Normal) as well thoroughgoing generalists,” in an order for two top-ofas members of the Peninthe historian and critic the-line pizzas from a Port sula Schoolmasters Club. wrote dozens of books and Angeles pizza delivery Homer Howe of Port hundreds of essays on topics Townsend was chairman of business, awaited for delivthat reflected a wide-rangery and then robbed the the schoolmasters’ event. ing intellect. His areas of delivery person of the pizexpertise encompassed eduzas and a soft drink. 1962 (50 years ago) cation, philosophy, etymolThe 21-year-old delivery Soviet Premier Nikita ogy, music, baseball, ghost person said she had a semiautomatic pistol jabbed in stories and detective novels. Khrushchev’s decision to was also in the movie “Bring It On,” released in 2000.

1937 (75 years ago)

her ribs when she was confronted by the robber in front of a vacant apartment on Francis Street. Police searched the area within minutes of the pizza/soda heist, but officers were unable to find the robber.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

YOUNG MAN JOGGING on the Olympic Discovery Trail in Sequim, wearing shorts and a sleeveless T-shirt in the rain at 46 degrees . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladailynews. com.

Laugh Lines NOT EVERY FAIRY tale begins with “Once upon a time.” Some begin with “After I am elected.” Your Monologue

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS MONDAY, Oct. 29, the 303rd day of 2012. There are 63 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Oct. 29, 1929, Wall Street crashed on “Black Tuesday,” heralding the beginning of America’s Great Depression. On this date: ■ In 1618, Sir Walter Raleigh, the English courtier, military adventurer and poet, was executed in London. ■ In 1787, the opera “Don Giovanni” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had its world premiere in Prague. ■ In 1901, President William

McKinley’s assassin, Leon Czolgosz, was electrocuted. ■ In 1923, the Republic of Turkey was proclaimed. ■ In 1940, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson drew the first number — 158 — in America’s first peacetime military draft. ■ In 1956, during the Suez Canal crisis, Israel invaded Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. ■ In 1960, a chartered plane carrying the California Polytechnic State University football team crashed on takeoff from Toledo, Ohio, killing 22 of the 48 people on board. ■ In 1966, the National Orga-

nization for Women was formally organized during a conference in Washington, D.C. ■ In 1979, on the 50th anniversary of the great stock market crash, anti-nuclear protesters tried but failed to shut down the New York Stock Exchange. ■ In 1998, Sen. John Glenn, at age 77, roared back into space aboard the shuttle Discovery, retracing the trail he’d blazed for America’s astronauts 36 years earlier. ■ Ten years ago: A Minneapolis memorial service for the late Sen. Paul Wellstone turned into a virtual political rally as friends and relatives urged Minnesotans

to honor his memory by putting a Democrat in his seat on Election Day. ■ Five years ago: A Moscow court sentenced Alexander Pichushkin, convicted of 48 murders, to life imprisonment, ending one of Russia’s worst serial killer cases. ■ One year ago: A “white Halloween” storm with record-setting snowfalls brought down trees across the northeastern U.S., knocking out power to millions; 39 deaths were blamed on the weather. A grain elevator explosion in Atchison, Kan., killed six people.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 29, 2012 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Obama is said to have enough electoral votes AMES, Iowa — President Barack Obama is poised to eke out a victory in the race for the 270 electoral votes needed to win re-election, having beaten back Republican Mitt Romney’s attempts to convert momentum from the debates into support in all-important Ohio. That’s according to an Associated Press analysis a week before Election Day. While the incumbent has the upper hand in the Obama electoral vote hunt, Romney has pulled even, or is slightly ahead, in polling in a few pivotal states, including Florida and Virginia. He also appears to have the advantage in North Carolina, the most conservative of the hotly contested nine states that will determine the winner. Romney is in a tight race with Obama for the popular vote but continues to have fewer routes than Obama to reach 270.

S.D. execution looms SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Torrential rains had washed away the blood so the searchers at first thought the pale form might be a mannequin. “I almost didn’t believe it,”

recalled former Lincoln County Sheriff Ken Albers, the first officer to approach the body of 9-year-old Becky O’Connell. The discovery that night in 1990 began a 22-year saga that is expected to end Tuesday, when Donald Moeller, who was convicted of abducting and murdering the girl, is scheduled to be put to death by lethal injection in the state penitentiary. After decades of appeals, Moeller, 60, now accepts his fate. But his death sentence in 1992 was the first handed down in South Dakota in 45 years. Until this month, there had been only one other execution in the state since the 1940s.

Ex-suspect to be freed NEW YORK — While prosecutors weigh what to do about a suspect who surfaced last spring in the landmark 1979 disappearance case of sandy-haired 6-year-old Etan Patz, the man who had been the prime suspect for years is about to go free after spending more than two decades in prison for molesting other children. Pedro Hernandez is now charged with Etan’s murder after police said he emerged as a suspect and confessed. A Pennsylvania inmate, Jose Ramos, had been declared responsible for Etan’s death in a civil court,. But the Manhattan district attorney’s office has said there isn’t enough evidence to charge him criminally. After serving 25 years on child molestation convictions, Ramos is set to be freed Nov. 7. The Associated Press

Evacuations ordered along the East Coast As Hurricane Sandy barreled north from the Caribbean — where it left nearly five dozen dead — to meet two other powerful winter storms, experts said the rare hybrid storm that follows THE ASSOCIATED PRESS will cause havoc from the East SHIP BOTTOM, N.J. — Forget Coast to the Great Lakes. distinctions like tropical storm or hurricane. Wherever it hits, the Not just coastal threat behemoth weather system gath“This is not a coastal threat ering in the eastern U.S. will alone,” said Craig Fugate, director afflict a third of the country with of the Federal Emergency Mansheets of rain, high winds and agement Agency. “This is a very heavy snow, said officials who large area.” warned millions in coastal areas New Jersey was set to close its to get out of the way. casinos this weekend, New York’s “We’re looking at impact of governor was considering shutgreater than 50 to 60 million peo- ting down the subways in case of ple,” said Louis Uccellini, head of flooding, and a half-dozen states environmental prediction for the warned residents to prepare for National Oceanic and Atmo- several days of lost power. Sandy weakened briefly Saturspheric Administration.

Casinos close ahead of storm

day but was soon back up to Category 1 strength, packing 75-mph winds about 335 miles southeast of Charleston, S.C., on Sunday. Experts said the storm was most likely to hit the southern New Jersey coastline by late today. Governors from North Carolina, where heavy rain was expected Sunday, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. The storm forced the presidential campaign to juggle schedules. Mitt Romney switched his schedule for the day to Ohio. First lady Michelle Obama canceled an appearance in New Hampshire for Tuesday, and President Obama canceled Virginia and Colorado events to monitor the storm. In Ship Bottom, north of Atlantic City, residents, under a voluntary evacuation order, spent Saturday packing.

Briefly: World THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ukrainians go to polls amid talk of fraud KIEV, Ukraine — Ukraine’s opposition parties alleged widespread violations in Sunday’s parliamentary vote, seen as a test of President Viktor Yanukovych’s commitment to democracy and European values. With the charismatic opposition leader, former Premier Yulia Tymoshenko in jail, the opposition split and regular Ukrainians disillusioned with politics, Yanukovych’s Party of Regions was expected to retain control over parliament despite his rollback on democracy. The West is paying close attention to the conduct of the vote in the strategic ex-Soviet state, which lies between Russia and the European Union. Ukraine’s relations with the West have soured over Tymoshenko’s jailing, which prompted the EU to freeze a partnership deal with Kiev. An election deemed unfair would likely turn Ukraine further from the West.

Nigerian church attack KADUNA, Nigeria — A suicide bomber rammed an SUV loaded with explosives into a Catholic church holding Mass on Sunday in northern Nigeria, killing at least seven people and wounding more than 100 others in an attack that sparked reprisal killings in the city, authori-

ties and witnesses said. As rescuers tried to reach the wounded in the Malali neighborhood of Kaduna, angry youths armed with machetes and clubs beat to death two Muslims passing by the stillsmoldering ruins of St. Rita’s Catholic church.

Arrest in abuse case LONDON — Police investigating child sex abuse allegations against the late BBC television host Jimmy Savile arrested former glam rock star and convicted sex offender Gary Glitter on Sunday, British media reported, raising further questions about whether Savile was at the center of a broader pedophile ring. Police would not directly identify the suspect arrested Sunday, but media including the BBC and Press Association Glitter reported he was the 68-year-old Glitter. The musician, whose real name is Paul Gadd, made it big with “Rock & Roll (Part 2),” a mostly instrumental anthem that is a staple at American sporting events, thanks to its catchy “hey” chorus. But he fell into disgrace after being convicted on child abuse charges in Vietnam. The Associated Press

WILD

AND WOOLY CROSSING

Shepherds lead a flock of more than 2,000 sheep through the center of Madrid on Sunday in an annual event to defend ancient grazing, migration and droving rights threatened by urban sprawl.

Recovery of girl shot in head ‘a miracle for us,’ father says THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — The father of a 15-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head by the Taliban described his daughter’s survival and ongoing recovery as miraculous Friday and said her shooting was a turning point for Pakistan. Malala Yousufzai is recovering at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, where she was flown for treatment and protection from Taliban threats after she was shot Oct. 9.

Advocated girls’ education The Islamist militants said they’re targeting Malala, who gained international recognition for advocating for girls’ education, because she promoted so-called Western thinking and secularism. Her father, Ziauddin, along with her mother and two brothers were reunited with her Thursday. A picture issued by the hospital showed the wounded teen, her head covered in a scarf, reclining in her hospital bed.

Quick Read

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Malala Yousufazi is shown at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, with her father, Ziauddin, and younger brothers Atal, right, and Khushal. Ziauddin Yousufzai said he initially feared he would need to prepare for his daughter’s funeral and that her status now is “a miracle for us. “She is recovering at an encouraging speed, and we are very happy,” he told reporter.

He expressed gratitude for prayers and well-wishes that have poured in from all over the world. “When she fell, the world stood. She will rise again, she will stand again. She can stand now,” Ziauddin Yousufzai said.

. . . more news to start your day

West: Shark falls from sky on California golf course

Nation: ‘Argo’ finally tops box office at $12.4 million

Nation: Penn State holds conference on sex abuse

World: Dead Sea shrinking at a record rate, experts say

NOBODY YELLED “FORE!” at a Southern California golf course when a 2-foot-long shark dropped out of the sky and flopped around on the 12th tee. The 2-pound leopard shark was apparently plucked from the ocean by a bird, then dropped on San Juan Hills Golf Club, Melissa McCormack, director of club operations, said Thursday. A course marshal saw something moving around on the tee and went to investigate. He found the shark bleeding with puncture wounds, where it seems the bird had held it in its grasp. The marshal and a golf course employee ended up driving the shark back to the ocean.

IT TOOK THREE weeks, but “Argo” found its way to the top of the box office. The Warner Bros. thriller from director and star Ben Affleck, inspired by the escue of six U.S. embassy workers during the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis, made nearly $12.4 million last weekend studio estimates. “Argo” had been in second place the past two weeks. Debuting at No. 3 was the sprawling, star-studded “Cloud Atlas,” which made a disappointing $9.4 million. The nearly three-hour drama was co-directed by Lana and Andy Wachowski and Tom Tykwer. At No. 2 was “Hotel Transylvania,” which took in $9.5 million.

HOPING TO RAISE awareness, Pennsylvania State University this week will hold a two-day conference starting today on child sex abuse, coming nearly a year after the release of grand-jury presentment outlining child rape and molestation by former assistant football coach, Jerry Sandusky. Keynote speakers include Elizabeth Smart, the Utah teen who was kidnapped, raped and held for months, and boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard, who also suffered sex abuse as a child. Experts will discuss the effect of abuse, the best and latest in treatment and prevention, the use of the Internet by pedophiles and other topics.

THE DEAD SEA is losing water at a record rate, prompting calls for Israel and Jordan to stop fertilizer makers from siphoning so much of the water whose restorative powers have attracted visitors since biblical times. The salty inland lake bordering the nations dropped a record 4.9 feet over the past 12 months because of industry use and evaporation, the Hydrological Service of Israel said. That’s the steepest Dead Sea decline since datakeeping started in the 1950s. Makers of potash, a raw material for fertilizer, are competing for water with the tourism industry on the Dead Sea, Israel’s most popular destination.


A4

PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Few on Peninsula here feel Nonprofits: big Canada quake Sunday City’s budget BY ARWYN RICE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Few people on the North Olympic Peninsula felt Saturday night’s magnitude 7.7 earthquake centered off the Haida Gwaii archipelago of British Columbia. A U.S. Geological Survey website included two “I felt itâ€? reports from Port Townsend but none from other areas of Jefferson or Clallam counties. Most reports of Washington residents feeling the quake — Canada’s biggest since 1949 — emanated from Seattle, Everett, Oak Harbor and points north. The quake triggered a tsunami alert, later canceled, in Port Angeles, Neah Bay and LaPush. A wave reached less than 5 inches in Port Angeles and LaPush, and 3½

inches in Neah Bay, according to the West Coast/ Alaska Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer, Alaska. No damage was reported at any of the three ports. “We didn’t notice a thing,� said Chuck Faires, harbormaster at Boat Haven Marina in Port Angeles. The Neah Bay harbormaster’s office reported that there was no known damage in the Makah Marina.

‘Higher ground’ In LaPush, no one felt the earthquake, but the Quileute tribe was given reason to celebrate its recent “higher ground� potlatch. Much of the Quileute reservation’s buildable land is located in a tsunami and

flood zone, and in January, Congress approved expanding Quileute lands to higher elevations of property that was Olympic National Park. In exchange, the Tribal Council guarantees public access through the reservation to national park beaches that are otherwise inaccessible. “The lasting elation felt from the joy and success of our ‘Tsunami Protection Act’ celebration 48 hours earlier was quickly tempered by concern and fear for our Canadian, Alaskan and Hawaiian neighbors. “We are relieved they were spared any destruction and devastation,� the Quileute Tribal Council said in a Sunday morning statement. The statement said Quileute law enforcement

contacted the state Emergency Management Division and were informed that the alert was called off for the Washington coast before reports of the earthquake reached news outlets. “We’d like to acknowledge them for their quick response in investigating the situation and ensuring that our people were out of harm’s way,� the Tribal Council said. “This event is a reminder that we are still in a very dangerous situation in the lower village, and we need to get the kids and elders out of there as quickly as humanly possible.�

________ Reporter Arwyn Rice can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5070, or at arwyn.rice@peninsula dailynews.com.

Quakes: Evacuees crash concert CONTINUED FROM A1 fewer than six hours after small waves first hit the In Port Hardy, the larg- islands. The National Weather est city at the top of the island, hundreds of evacu- Service canceled tsunami ees from homes and motels advisories for Alaska, Washcrashed a concert that had ington, Oregon and Califorjust begun at the civic cen- nia. There were no immediter ate reports of damage, After an announcement that the center would be though one person died in a used as an evacuation cen- fatal crash in Hawaii near a ter, the concert continued road that was closed for all, the North Island because of the warning at Oahu’s north shore. Gazette reported. But “it looks like the damage and the risk are at 27-inch wave a very low level,� said ShirDennis Sinnott of the ley Bond, British Colum- Canadian Institute of bia’s minister responsible Ocean Science said a for emergency manage- 27-inch wave was recorded ment. off Langara Island on the “We’re certainly grate- northeast tip of Haida ful.� Gwaii. The Pacific Tsunami The islands are home to Warning Center lifted a about 5,000 people, many of tsunami advisory for them members of the Haida Hawaii on Sunday morning aboriginal group. just before 4 a.m. local time, A 21-inch wave reportthree hours after down- edly hit Winter Harbour on grading from a warning and the northeast coast of

Vancouver Island. People in coastal areas of Haida Gwaii were advised to move to higher ground. Urs Thomas, operator of the Golden Spruce hotel in Port Clements on Haida Gwaii, said there was no warning before everything began moving inside and outside the hotel. He said it lasted about three minutes. “It was a pretty good shock,� said Thomas, 59. “I looked at my boat outside. It was rocking. “Everything was moving. My truck was moving.� After the jolt, Thomas began to check the hotel. “The fixtures and everything were still swinging,� he said. “I had some picture frames coming down.� On Vancouver Island, residents rushed out of their homes when tsunami sirens sounded in Tofino on the Pacific Coast about 80 miles north of Neah Bay. One traveler said the

more than 100 carloads of people who traveled the tsunami route from Tofino to higher ground remained calm and orderly. Some, however, didn’t hear the sirens. A bride and groom were about to cut their wedding cake at Long Beach Lodge in Tofino when their wedding party was alerted by hotel staff. Loud music from a band had obliterated the sound of the warning siren. “People then scattered,� groom Ryan Gentles, 29, told the Victoria Times Colonist. The wedding party — all immediate family members, some in kilts — made it to designated high ground.

________ Information from the Victoria Times Colonist, the Canadian Press, Black Press Group Ltd. newspapers in Port Hardy and Prince Rupert and The Associated Press were used to compile this report.

Library: $6,000 shy of its goal CONTINUED FROM A1 crowded and needed more resources,� Serebrin said. “So we looked at other The temporary location will be a bare-bones opera- ways to accomplish this.� Instead of a massive tion with no wireless service and a smaller selection rebuild, the renovation projof materials, though patrons ect will add about 500 will be able to order items square feet to the public library area and reconfigfrom the main collection. The renovation is esti- ure that space in order to mated to cost $700,000, make the library holdings $300,000 from an ear- more accessible. marked library fund and the remainder through a Bookmobile replacement private fundraising camThe bookmobile barn paign. attached to the main buildAs of Friday the library was about $6,000 shy of the ing will be replaced by an goal, according to Serebrin. auxiliary building, and the The project is less ambi- current area will be renotions than an $8.4 million vated and used for storage. Displays will be streamplan that was defeated by lined to make the library the voters in August 2011. If it had been approved, more welcoming. Shelves will be reorithe measure would have raised property taxes by ented to better display the $44 a year for 20 years for a front of a book, while the house valued at $250,000, media will be moved to the which is the average home back corner “in the same value in the library district. way that a supermarket “After we lost the bond displays milk and eggs,� issue, the conditions that Serebrin said. Other improvements led to the proposal still existed; we were still over- include redesigned seating

and lounge space; improved layout to ease congestion; better lighting and the new self-checkout stations. Serebrin said the temporary location will be able to serve the basic needs of people who want to use the library with some restrictions. The most significant is a lack of space; lack of WiFi because there will be no place for people to sit down; and a parking lot that could have difficulty accommodating all of the patrons.

Worth the wait But once the project is finished, it will be worth the wait, Serebrin said. “When you come in here any afternoon, the place is jammed, and you see scores of people everywhere,� he said. “It gives us pain to cut back our services,� he said. “But we are doing this (renovation) for a greater purpose, to create a more

PA

navigable, comfortable and useful library for the public.� Serebrin acknowledged that libraries have changed from the days when librarians would intimidate anyone who dared to make a sound but said that some people still visit libraries in search of quiet. “For much of our clientele, who may be older, they have the idea that there may be a sense of tranquility and repose in a library.� he said. “Right now, we don’t have it at all, so part of the effort was to create zones of tranquillity that allow people to study, read and think and create a little bit of space that provides a sort of time out from the crazy world we are living in.�

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

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The First Step Family Support Center has historically received the greatest percentage of its budget for Port Angeles operations from the city’s allocation, according to United Way records. In 2012, the city gave First Step $3,500, which represents 47 percent of the program’s budget for providing resources and assistance to low-income parents with children less than a year old to 5 years old in Port Angeles. Nita Lynn, executive director of the Step Up center, said the drop-in center set up in a house at 325 East 6th St. that caters to about 450 people every month and provides free child resources, such as diapers, formula and a playroom, to families that would normally not be able to afford them. Lynn said she would most likely have to reduce hours at the Pdrop-in center if the city’s funding dries up, though she said she’ll continue working to collect funds from other sources, such as grants and donations. “I won’t give up,� Lynn said. “[The drop-in center] is a priority for us.� Lynn said she understands the city must prioritize money for what’s considered core services but said she feels the work done by nonprofits like hers also have a positive effect on public safety. “I don’t feel we should be competing against each other, but the definition of public safety and [public] health needs to be defined a little bit bigger,� she said. Despite her disappointment at the possibility of her group’s city funding ending next year, Lynn said she realizes the current economy is affecting everyone and that tough budget decisions have to be made. “We’re all in this together,� Lynn said. “I think we’re all looking for the same well-being.�

The presentation did not explicitly mention the $56,250 that the United Way of Clallam County may lose, though the reduction is addressed on Page 11 of the 2013 preliminary budget document released Wednesday. City Councilman Dan Di Guilio brought up the United Way cut in funding at the end of the work session. Di Guilio said he understood and appreciated the hard work McKeen and city staff put into the 2013 proposed budget but said he thought the funding priorities may need to be rearranged so as not to harm the city’s most vulnerable populations. “We’re jerking out the safety net for some of the most needy in our community,� Di Guilio said at the work session. “I’m not really happy about that.� In a Thursday interview, Di Guilio, who used to serve on the United Way Board of Directors but is no longer affiliated with the organization, reiterated his desire to work with city staff to find money to replace the funds the United Way may lose under the 213 preliminary budget. Many of the Port Angeles nonprofits to which United Way allocates city funds run preventative programs, Di Guilio said, the aim of which is to help the city’s neediest residents and, by proxy, reduce higher costs to the city over the long-term. ________ “Early intervention proReporter Jeremy Schwartz can grams are a way of prevent- be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. ing those costs down the 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsuroad,� Di Guilio said. ladailynews.com.

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That figure is about 5 percent, or about $1 million, less than the general fund amount in the city’s final 2012 budget. The city’s total operating budget for 2013 is expected to be $99.7 million, up nearly 4 p e r c e n t McKeen from last year, due primarily to increases in electricity costs. The city began budget discussions this Di Guilio year with an initial general fund deficit of about $840,000, due mostly to the sunset of federal grants for police department funding and reduced sales tax revenue, McKeen said. “Quite frankly, our revenues don’t support all the programs we want to provide,� McKeen said at the work session. “In fact, [revenues do not support] all the programs we had last year.� The 2013 proposed budget McKeen and city Chief Financial Officer Byron Olson presented covered expected revenues and expenditures for each city department, in addition to laying out what funding cuts need to be made to close the 2013 deficit. The cuts include eight eliminated city staff positions — two through layoffs and six through not filling vacant positions — and reductions in other employee-related costs.

In a Friday interview, McKeen said he had to prioritize the city’s core services, such as public safety and street maintenance, over continuing to fund health and human services through the United Way, though McKeen said he realizes helping the city’s most vulnerable populations is of dire importance. “One of the most difficult decisions balancing this year’s budget was cutting funding to health and human services,� he said. McKeen said he welcomes discussion with City Council members about reinstating that funding but said that “collective decisions will need to be made on where the funding will come from.� Of the $55,125 the city gave to 15 nonprofits last year, according to data provided by the United Way, the allocated funds representing 43 percent of what the nonprofits requested for 2012. The nonprofits currently getting funds range in size from national organizations with branches in Port Angeles, such as the Boys & Girls Clubs, to locally organized and run programs with only a handful of staff members.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

A5

State probes pharmacy tied to meningitis No tainted drugs shipped to Washington THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — None of the recalled drugs from a Massachusetts pharmacy linked to a deadly meningitis outbreak were shipped to Washington state, according to state Department of Health officials. But the state is now investigating a complaint it received against the company, the New England Compounding Center in

Framingham, Mass. The nature of the complaint was not disclosed, as is customary at this stage, The Seattle Times reported. The company is licensed in Washington as an out-ofstate pharmacy. The complaint was filed after an outbreak of fungal meningitis that has sickened those who received spinal injections of a steroid made by the company, mostly for pain. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials confirmed last week that the black fungus found in the company’s vials was the same fungus that has sickened 338 people across the U.S.,

causing 25 deaths. Washington has compounding pharmacies. But Donn Moyer, spokesman for the state Department of Health and Board of Pharmacy, told the Times none are doing the volume that the New England Compounding Center was doing, “which would qualify as ‘manufacturing.’�

Times reported. Any licensed pharmacist can compound ingredients. For example, it might be that a child needs a medication in a liquid form, but the drug only comes as a capsule. Or several ointments might be combined for a patient with a skin condition of unknown or multiple causes. Kelley-Ross pharmacy, in business since the 1920s, compounds ingredients in one of its four pharmacies. Ryan Oftebro, a pharmacist and co-owner of the company, said the ethical and legal standards are clear. “Making diaper cream to be used at a hospital bed-

FDA involvement In general, state pharmacy boards license pharmacies and their workers, but the federal Food and Drug Administration takes over when it can be determined that a company has become a manufacturer, the

side is one thing. Doing a mass production of an intrathecal [spinal] injection is another,� he told the Times. “I don’t think there should be a facility in the United States anywhere that is not an FDA-regulated facility that pumps out 17,000 doses of anything,� said Craig Toman, the managing member of Sound Prescriptions, which does business as Custom Prescriptions in Bellevue. He said his pharmacy mixes a latex-packagingfree injection for a local dentist with a patient with a severe allergy. “As we’ve all seen, that’s something that can affect a

tremendous amount of lives when something goes wrong,� Toman said. Both Kelly-Ross and Custom Prescriptions are accredited by the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board (PCAB). The board does on-site evaluations, requires pharmacies obtain ingredients from FDA-registered and/or licensed sources and reviews the pharmacies’ programs for testing compounded preparations, among other requirements. Accreditation is voluntary, Oftebro said, but the PCAB standard “should help reassure both the public and the prescribers.�

Immigrant license laws draw notice State requires no proof of U.S. residency BY MANUEL VALDES THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — The races for governor and attorney general have brought renewed attention to a proposal that would create a two-tiered driver’s license system in Washington to address the issue of driving by immigrants who can’t provide proof of legal U.S. residency. Washington and New Mexico remain the only two states in the country not to require proof of legal U.S. residency when applying for a driver’s license. Under the proposal known as the Utah model, a person who can’t prove U.S. residency can get a permit that allows them to drive, but the document is not a valid identification.

McKenna support

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CELEBRATING

THE MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND

Quileute Tribal School dancers perform Thursday at a potlatch at the Akalat Center in LaPush. The potlatch celebrated the tribe’s impending move to higher ground, a result of the Quileute Tribe Tsunami Protection Act, authored by U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks, D-Belfair, approved by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama in February. The law expands the tribe’s boundaries so it can move about 40 residents, the Quileute Tribal School and other facilities out of the tsunami zone. The move is not expected to be complete until 2017.

Tribal nursery focuses on native plants alpaca farm north of Arlington and moved its greenhouses up from the tribe’s property along the Stillaguamish River. The business is located at 25525 Dahl Road, which runs along the eastside of Interstate 5 just south of the Stanwood exit.

BY GALE FIEGE THE EVERETT HERALD

ARLINGTON — Banksavers Nursery is the state’s only tribal-owned native plant nursery, and one of the few around that focuses solely on plants native to Western Washington. Operated by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, Banksavers evolved from educational and social efforts to engage tribal members in learning about native plants and their traditional uses. Then it became a program in which the tribe grew native plants for its own salmon habitat projects, establishing wetlands and forests to mitigate for the tribe’s development in the county. After other jurisdictions began contracting for Banksaver plants and landscaping services, the tribe decided to step out as a wholesale and retail operation. A few years ago, the tribe bought a former

135 acres The 135-acre farm overlooks the Pilchuck Creek canyon on one side. Banksavers has four large greenhouses, potting sheds, landscaping materials and equipment and acres of 63 species of native plants potted up in neat rows. At full capacity, the pesticide-free, organic nursery has space for a half million plants. The operation, which gives preference to tribal members, employs 14 people. Stillaguamish tribal member Martin Allen has worked at the nursery for about four years. “It’s great to work for the tribe and great that the

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Retail and landscaping Banksavers director Mike Simpier and his assistant manager Steven Huntley are focusing now on the promotion of the retail and landscaping side of the business. Autumn is a good time to put native plants in residential gardens, Simpier said. “Summer isn’t the best time, and it especially wasn’t during that long stretch we just had without

rain,� Simpier said. “But now is a great time, with high rates of longevity and plant health. The thing about native plants is that eventually you won’t have to water them. And they’re good for the birds.� Plants sold in 1-gallon or 2-gallon pots go for from $5 to $10, with less expensive prices for wholesale orders. Historically, the Stillaguamish tribe’s nursery focused on salmon habitat restoration, which the tribe has done voluntarily throughout the Stillaguamish River watershed in partnership with regional nonprofits.

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In Utah, one industry that relies heavily on immigrant labor hasn’t seen much change since the law there was passed in 2005. “Certainly, there are labor shortages in our agricultural community, but we didn’t feel [the driver’s license law] had a significant impact,� said Sterling Brown, vice president of public policy at the Utah Farm Bureau Federation. “It has not had an immediate or significant impact on the agriculture community.� According to Utah Driver License Division data, the number of people applying for the Driving Privilege

tribe owns this nursery,� Allen said. “And sometimes the work is more than just work. It’s heartfelt when we plant cedar trees.� Western red cedars are one of the most important plants to Coast Salish tribes, who depended on the trees for canoes, clothing, homes and spiritual uses.

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Beyond that, the system creates a two-class society, he said. “They have big red letters saying for ‘driving privilege only,’� Garza said. “Anyone who shows that card — who may or may not be undocumented in the country — is a second-class citizen.� In 2010, the Utah Legislature created another driving permit for noncitizen legal residents, who initially could get the Driving Privilege Card. Still, nearly 160 legal immigrants have the permit. It’s not just immigrant rights groups that oppose the two-tier system. In 2011, a Republican state senator wanted to undo the law because he saw the driving permit as a magnet for illegal immigrants. In Washington, numerous bills to require proof of U.S. residency have been filed but have never made it the floor of any legislative chamber in recent memory.

LONNIE ARCHIBALD/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Republican gubernatorial candidate Rob McKenna backs the idea, and attorney general candidates Republican Reagan Dunn and Democrat Bob Ferguson speak of it favorably. “The idea that you should be able to obtain [a key identity document] without proving you’re a legal resident of the country is seriously mistaken,� McKenna said during a debate in Yakima earlier this month. McKenna’s opponent, Democrat Jay Inslee, has said he prefers keeping Washington’s current system in place. Over the years, this has been a contentious issue in Olympia that pits immigrant advocacy groups against conservatives. Immigrant groups argued that when illegal immigrants have access to driver’s licenses, it creates safer roads and allows them to purchase insurance. Opponents said that failing to ask for proof of U.S. residency invites identity fraud and could end up putting noncitizens in the state’s voter rolls.

Card has steadily climbed since 2005, from 21,600 to 38,997 in 2011. It peaked at 43,000 in 2008. That same year a state audit found that more than 75 percent of people who had the driving permit also had active car insurance, comparable to the 82 percent rate of drivers with a regular license. But now immigrant rights groups in Utah are worried about information sharing between the state and the federal government. In the 2011 legislative session, lawmakers changed the law to mandate the state to notify U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement if an applicant has a felony on this record. If the individual applying has a misdemeanor warrant outstanding, the state notifies the agency who sought the person’s arrest. Luis Garza, executive director of Comunidades Unidas, said he’s concerned that people with minor offenses such as traffic infractions will be caught in the dragnet. He’s also worried about the database of people applying for the driving permits being leaked.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Governor candidates head Report looks into home stretch of race at McKenna’s BY BRAD SHANNON MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

On a Saturday morning in Tacoma this month, Democrat Jay Inslee reminded a union hall crammed full of workers there is a tall crane on the Tacoma Tideflats with a 100-foot banner that reads, “Inslee for Jobs.” “I’m that Jay Inslee,” he said to the 200 labor volunteers, who were getting ready for a day of ringing doorbells for Democrats. “We need a governor that’s going to get up every single morning in the next four years doing everything under the sun to get jobs for the state of Washington. “I intend to be that governor.” A week later, Inslee’s Republican counterpart, Attorney General Rob McKenna, cast the race in a different light, telling minority groups gathering in south Seattle that the issue is more than whether people are better off today than four years ago. “I think the answer to that is pretty clearly no. The question to ask then is, ‘Will you be better off four years from now if you put the same people in charge who have been running state government for 28 years?’” McKenna said. “A lot of thoughtful people have considered that question, and they’ve concluded that what we need is change in direction. We need to put new people in charge in order to get the change we need in state government.’’ As Inslee and McKenna near the home stretch of their campaigns for governor, Inslee is sticking to big, overarching themes — highlighted by tax incentives for clean-energy jobs, health care reform and other ideas that are in many ways similar to the agenda of President Barack Obama, whom polls show is popular in this state. In contrast, McKenna is steering clear of national political themes, avoiding associations with the GOP

Jay Inslee Focuses on national issues

Rob McKenna Eyes on state concerns

ticket that is not likely to do well in the Evergreen State on Nov. 6. Instead, McKenna paints himself as a pragmatist who sued to overturn two elements of federal health reform but agrees with other pieces. And he talks about nearly three decades of Democratic control of the Governor’s Office, chronic state budget deficits, relatively low state investment in public schools and even his support for a woman’s right to choose an abortion.

efforts the past two weekends and other efforts by Washington Conservation Voters. “This is a very, very, very tight race,” Jeff Johnson, president of the Washington State Labor Council, told several hundred union activists in Tacoma this month before unleashing as many as 500 people for a door-to-door effort in five cities. “We are knocking the doors down. This week we had 179 people on the phones.’’ “The reason I’m voting for him is I don’t want privatizing in our government,” volunteer Phyllis Cherry, who works for the state Department of Corrections, said before going out to campaign. Cherry said she worries that handing state jobs to the private sector would take away health care coverage. “It’s about jobs. Familywage jobs,” added machinist Jerry Selman of Graham. Later, speaking to a reporter as he traveled between events, Inslee said he is open to considering the privatization of some state functions. But he said he thinks any economic advantage in doing that will be reduced once the federal Affordable Care Act is put in place in 2014. That is because more businesses will have to provide health care coverage for workers, eliminating the advantage they now enjoy

Mobilizing voters With ballots already out in the all-mail election statewide, the last of five debates behind the candidates and polls showing the race is a toss-up, both campaigns have been shifting gears to getting out the vote — with each side believing it is the key to victory in a state that trends Democratic. The candidates also are fanning out across the state. McKenna’s bus tour stops in Shelton, Olympia and Centralia. Inslee joins Gov. Chris Gregoire and several other Democrats at the reopening of the Grays Harbor Paper mill in Hoquiam today. Inslee also has been cheering on teams of doorto-door volunteers in several communities, including major “Labor Neighbor”

in bidding. Inslee’s get-out-the-vote effort also is relying on environmentalists. The Washington Conservation Voters led a major door-todoor effort in five cities in the month, including Issaquah, Bellingham and Olympia. The conservation group is an affiliate of the national League of Conservation Voters that endorsed Inslee — making him the league’s first gubernatorial endorsement in at least 30 years, as Inslee told about 60 volunteer door-bellers in Issaquah.

McKenna counters McKenna cites his fights to rein in a Canadian mine operator whose slag was polluting across the border into Lake Roosevelt and to get the federal government to clean up Hanford. He has been trying to match Democrats’ get-outthe-vote efforts, and he launched a major phonebank effort in 16 cities last weekend. “I really think my race will be decided by who has the better get-out-the-vote program,” McKenna told one phone bank group. And in Federal Way, he told another group of campaign volunteers: “It’s crunch time. . . . You need to identify 10 of your friends who are undecided or maybe not voting. You need to bring them over.’’ Judy Yu, a former trustee at Central Washington University and who worked as a campaign volunteer with a group that backed Democratic Gov. Gary Locke in 1996, said she likes McKenna’s approach to education and his call to reduce business regulations. She said she considers him a pragmatic leader who is pro-choice on abortion rights, and she is getting irritated by ads that question whether McKenna can be trusted on women’s health. “I don’t have no evidence he would do anything to limit a woman’s right to choose,” Yu said.

free traveling THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE — Washington’s Republican candidate for governor, Rob McKenna, has spent a lot of time as attorney general traveling on other people’s dime, The Seattle Times reported Sunday. The newspaper said McKenna accepted nearly three times as many privately paid trips and event tickets over the past seven years as his predecessor, Gov. Chris Gregoire, did during her last eight years as attorney general. Financial reports filed with the Public Disclosure Commission show that McKenna accepted $184,000 worth of free travel and events since taking office in 2005. They include two free trips to Israel, two to Taiwan and one each to France, the Middle East, Japan and China and India.

McKenna vs. Inslee The number of free trips McKenna accepted also is more than four times the number reported over a similar period by his gubernatorial opponent, Democrat Jay Inslee, who recently resigned his seat in Congress. The free trips are allowed under state law as long as they’re disclosed to the public, and McKenna said his extracurricular activities have helped him develop relationships that benefit Washingtonians. He also says he took the trips on his own time. “All the trips have been at no cost to state taxpayers,” McKenna said. “I do get vacation, and I get to use that vacation as I want.” He also said he was invited on many of the trips because he was elected attorney general when he was 42, and the groups considered him a young leader with a promising future.

McKenna’s travel began six days after he was first sworn in as Washington’s attorney general. His first stop was Washington, D.C., where he attended a conference paid for by the State Government Leadership Foundation, a Republican group that promotes a conservative legislative agenda and bankrolls campaign ads for GOP candidates. The three-day trip cost $1,108 and was followed by a $17,000 trip to Japan paid for by Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, two more conferences hosted by the conservative foundation, and a $2,400 trip to Hawaii, courtesy of a regional attorneys-general group. Both trips to Taiwan and one of the Israel trips were connected with delegations sponsored by the National Association of Attorneys General, a professional group. He was elected vice president of the organization in 2009, and its president in 2011. In addition to the foreign travel, he has taken about two trips a year to attend association meetings.

Building relationships Foreign governments are “looking to build a personal relationship with people who might become leaders of the country,” and stateside leaders develop deeper understandings of a range of issues involving trade, extradition and legal systems, said Jim McPherson, the association’s executive director. “There’s value in faceto-face meetings with the presidents of Taiwan and Israel and his or her staff,” McPherson said In 2007, a nonpartisan policy group based in Washington, D.C., The Aspen Institute, sent McKenna on an $18,000 trip to China and India in 2007.

Congress remains on recess until Nov. 12 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS NEWS SERVICES

Eye on Congress

WASHINGTON — Congress is on recess until — The address for Cantwell Nov. 12. and Murray is U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510; Contact legislators Dicks, U.S. House, Washing(clip and save) ton, D.C. 20515. Phone Cantwell at 202“Eye on Congress” is 224-3441 (fax, 202-228published in the Peninsula 0514); Murray, 202-224Daily News every Monday 2621 (fax, 202-224-0238); when Congress is in session Dicks, 800-947-6676 (fax, about activities, roll call 202-226-1176). votes and legislation in the Email via their websites: House and Senate. cantwell.senate.gov; murray. The North Olympic Pen- senate.gov; house.gov/dicks. insula’s legislators in WashDicks’ North Olympic Penington, D.C., are Sen. Maria insula office is at 332 E. Fifth Cantwell (D-Mountlake St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Terrace), Sen. Patty MurIt is open from 9 a.m. to ray (D-Bothell) and Rep. noon Tuesdays and 1 p.m. Norm Dicks (D-Belfair). to 4 p.m. Thursdays and by Contact information appointment.

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ture by Rep. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, the State legislators House majority whip; Rep. Tharinger, Jefferson and Clallam Steve D-Sequim; and Sen. Jim counties are represented in the part-time state Legisla- Hargrove, D-Hoquiam.

Write Van De Wege and Tharinger at P.O. Box 40600 (Hargrove at P.O. Box 40424), Olympia, WA 98504; email them at vandewege. kevin@leg.wa.gov; tharinger. steve@leg.wa.gov; hargrove. jim@leg.wa.gov. Or you can call the Legislative Hotline, 800-5626000, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday (closed on holidays and from noon to 1 p.m.) and leave a detailed message, which will be emailed to Van De Wege, Tharinger or

Hargrove, or to all three. Links to other state officials: secstate.wa.gov/ elections/elected_officials. aspx.

Learn more Websites following our state and national legislators: ■ Followthemoney. org — Campaign donors by industry, ZIP code and more ■ Vote-Smart.org — How special interest groups rate legislators on the issues.

Death and Memorial Notice BOOF McCREA April 18, 1924 October 21, 2012 Boof McCrea was born in Spokane, Washington, on April 18, 1924. He grew up in Seattle and Chewelah, Washington. Orphaned at age 9, he and his four siblings were embraced and raised by their aunt and uncle, Jim and Della Chalmers of Chewelah. He graduated in 1943 from Jenkins High School, Chewelah. Shortly after that he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served during World War II. After returning home, he married the love of his life, Jean Smith. His employment took them from Colville to Kalispell and then to Deer Lodge, Montana. It was in Deer Lodge that they raised their children, Randy and Cheryl, and made many lifelong friends.

Mr. McCrea In 1975, they pulled up roots and moved to Port Angeles, where Jean’s brother lived. He was always quick to add that he happily left his snow shovel in Montana. Boof loved the water and all its diverse activities. For a few years he owned a boat and enjoyed fishing. He knew which

ships were in the harbor, their destination and cargo. He would track all of this on the Internet, and was considered the computer guru of the senior set. Another aspect of the Peninsula that fascinated him was its history, and he was well-versed on the subject. Boof was involved in his church, and was a leader of the infamous First Presbyterian “Chain Gang,” a group of men who volunteer their time, talents and services to those in need. But mostly he gave quietly to others, from his garden and kitchen to his talents as a perfectionist handyman, and, of course, his computer skills. He treasured the fellowship of his coffee crew at the Fisherman’s Wharf Cafe. As his friend said about him, “He was a man among men.”

He cherished time with his grandchildren, Stephanie, Kelsie and Jordan. They can all tell tales of camping and beachcombing with Grandpa, and of course the walks on “Grandpa’s Trail.” They are now taking the next generation, Kaizer and Dylan, down the same trail. On October 21, 2012, Boof was peacefully called home by his Lord. He will be greatly missed but never forgotten by those whose lives he touched. There will be a celebration of Boof’s life at 11 a.m. on Saturday, November 10, 2012, at First Presbyterian Church, 139 W. Eighth Street in Port Angeles. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be made in his honor to the Port Angeles First Presbyterian Church or the Deer Lodge Rialto Community Theater.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 29, 2012 PAGE

A7

The deeper meaning of ‘pro-life’ HARD-LINE CONSERVATIVES HAVE gone to new extremes lately in opposing abortion. Last week, Richard MourThomas L. dock, the tea Friedman party-backed Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Indiana, declared during a debate that he was against abortion even in the event of rape because after much thought, he “came to realize that life is that gift from God. And even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen.” That came on the heels of the tea party-backed Republican U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh of Illinois saying after a recent debate that he opposed abortion even in cases where the life of the mother is in danger, because “with modern technology and science, you can’t find one instance” in which a woman would not survive without an abortion. “Health of the mother has become a tool for abortions anytime, for any reason,” Walsh said. That came in the wake of the

Senate hopeful in Missouri, U.S. Rep. Todd Akin, remarking that pregnancy as a result of “legitimate rape” is rare because “the female body has ways to try and shut that whole thing down.” These were not slips of the tongue. These are the authentic voices of an ever-more-assertive farright Republican base that is intent on using uncompromising positions on abortion to not only unseat more centrist Republicans — Mourdock defeated the moderate Republican Sen. Richard Lugar of Indiana in the primary — but to overturn the mainstream consensus in America on this issue. That consensus says that those who choose to oppose abortion in their own lives for reasons of faith or philosophy should be respected, but those women who want to make a different personal choice over what happens with their own bodies should be respected — and have the legal protection to do so, as well. But judging from the unscientific — borderline crazy — statements opposing abortion that we’re hearing lately, there is reason to believe that this delicate balance could be threatened if Mitt Romney and Rep. Paul Ryan, and their even more extreme allies, get elected.

So to those who want to protect a woman’s right to control what happens with her own body, let me offer just one piece of advice: To name something is to own it. If you can name an issue, you can own the issue. And we must stop letting Republicans name themselves “pro-life” and Democrats as “pro-choice.” It is a huge distortion. In my world, you don’t get to call yourself “pro-life” and be against common-sense gun control — like banning public access to the kind of semiautomatic assault rifle, designed for warfare, that was used recently in a Colorado theater. You don’t get to call yourself “pro-life” and want to shut down the Environmental Protection Agency, which ensures clean air and clean water, prevents childhood asthma, preserves biodiversity and combats climate change that could disrupt every life on the planet. You don’t get to call yourself “pro-life” and oppose programs like Head Start that provide basic education, health and nutrition for the most disadvantaged children. You can call yourself a “proconception-to-birth, indifferentto-life conservative.” I will never refer to someone who pickets

Peninsula Voices For Ref. 74 There are people who believe that a law in favor of same-sex marriage is unnecessary because the state of Washington approved the “everything but marriage” law. However, that word, “but,” is a big word. To those of you oppositesex couples who are married, ask yourself why didn’t you settle for domestic partnership. Marriage ensures notification if a spouse is hospitalized, especially in the intensive-care unit. Marriage also has tax advantages, including inheritance tax. And, also important, marriage is a statement to one’s community of family and friends of love and commitment. This should not be solely granted to

OUR

Planned Parenthood but lobbies against common-sense gun laws as “pro-life.” “Pro-life” can mean only one thing: Respect for the sanctity of life. And there is no way that respect for the sanctity of life can mean we are obligated to protect every fertilized egg in a woman’s body, no matter how that egg got fertilized, but we are not obligated to protect every living person from being shot with a concealed automatic weapon. I have no respect for someone who relies on voodoo science to declare that a woman’s body can distinguish a “legitimate” rape, but then declares — when 99 percent of all climate scientists conclude that climate change poses a danger to the sanctity of all life on the planet — that global warming is just a hoax. The term “pro-life” should be a shorthand for respect for the sanctity of life. But I will not let that label apply to people for whom sanctity for life begins at conception and ends at birth. What about the rest of life? Respect for the sanctity of life, if you believe that it begins at conception, cannot end at birth. That radical narrowing of our concern for the sanctity of life is leading to terrible

distortions in our society. Respect for life has to include respect for how that life is lived, enhanced and protected — not only at the moment of conception but afterward, in the course of that life. That’s why, for me, the most “pro-life” politician in America is New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. While he supports a woman’s right to choose, he has also used his position to promote a whole set of policies that enhance everyone’s quality of life — from his ban on smoking in bars and city parks to reduce cancer, to his ban on the sale in New York City of giant sugary drinks to combat obesity and diabetes, to his requirement for posting calorie counts on menus in chain restaurants, to his push to reinstate the expired federal ban on assault weapons and other forms of common-sense gun control, to his support for early childhood education, to his support for mitigating disruptive climate change. Now that is what I call “prolife.”

________ Thomas L. Friedman is a three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The New York Times. His column appears here every Monday. Email Friedman via nyti.ms/friedmanmail.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

opposite-sex couples. I hope that my grandchildren will be free to marry whomever they choose. I say, vote yes for Referendum 74. Marsha Melnick, Sequim

Against Ref. 74 When the homosexual community was given “everything but marriage” three short years ago, it seemed a generous and satisfactory compromise by acknowledging and protecting every citizen’s interests. Now the agenda continues and the word “marriage” itself is the goal. Shouldn’t an alternative lifestyle use an alternative term? Approving R-74 wouldn’t just legalize a second type of marriage but would actually make all marriage gender-neutral.

The words husband and wife, male and female, are actually struck — eliminated. Homosexual and heterosexual marriage would become moral and legal

equivalents with no distinction. Is this what we believe? Thirty-two states have voted on this question and 32 states have rejected gay “marriage.”

Where it has become law, it has been imposed upon the people. Is this fair? Clergy have an exception clause (for now), but business owners who sim-

ply disagreed and desired not to be involved in homosexual events have suffered lawsuits and outrageous judgments, even where no injury has occurred. In these states, something precious has been lost, the right to disagree. Do we want that here? Referendum 74 isn’t about how much we all like our gay friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members. It advances nothing for them and devastates the meaning of marriage for all. Please, in the privacy of your personal ballot, reject R-74. It is a very dangerous law. This is your moment to stand and defend something that matters. Connie Rosenquist, Port Townsend

‘Access’ to birth control doesn’t count MITT ROMNEY IS running ads explaining that he does not object to birth control. But no one questions his stance that Froma women should Harrop have, as the ads say, “access” to contraception. They already do. They also have access to Coach handbags and flights to Acapulco. And that’s where the Romney smokescreen, intended to close a gender gap favoring Democrats, needs clearing. Most women of childbearing age would consider birth control an essential part of their health care. But of the medical services employers must provide under the new health care law, Romney singles out birth control as one

thing that should be optional. Sure, most women can afford birth control. Women who lead disciplined lives would move heaven and Earth to manage their fertility. From a practical standpoint, these women can be counted on to take care of business. To them, this exclusion in coverage is merely insulting. But they are not the concern. The concern is women scraping by. Some live paycheck to paycheck, or don’t have one. Some are high school kids with no income stream. Some are strangers to the larger world of responsibility or lack the mental capacity to make sound decisions about unprotected sex. These are the women who may not dig into their empty or messy pockets for the $120 to $1,000 a year needed to buy contraception. Also, to obtain the pill, one must first visit a doctor and get a

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prescription. Organized women do what they must. Disorganized women don’t get around to it. Consider the low-income 24-year-old wanting to have sex with her boyfriend and not wanting to get pregnant. She knows where she can find birth control pills, but rather than spend a week’s pay to get there, she rationalizes: “This the ‘safe’ part of my monthly cycle. I probably won’t get pregnant, and so I’ll take the risk.” Next thing you know, she’s pregnant. She’ll either have an abortion or join the growing armies of unmarried women who have babies out of wedlock. The first scenario, an abortion, is anathema to social conservatives. The second scenario, another potentially dysfunctional family headed by a single parent, worries thinking Americans of most political persuasions. Not providing this mainstream pharmaceutical— free! — to the women who need it most is

crazy social policy. We know the politics. We know that the Catholic Church, being theologically opposed to birth control, has pushed for this exclusion. We know that the health care reforms make an exception for churches, but not for the hospitals, schools and other entities they run. But that should be exception enough. Romney wants to ban abortion except in cases of rape, incest and to save the life of the mother. I think early abortions should be easy to get but that abortion is a complex issue with strong views on all sides. Arguing over whether birth control should be basic of health care coverage is something else entirely and hard to fathom. The vast majority of American Catholics use birth control without apology. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation runs a program providing contraceptives in impover-

ished countries. Melinda Gates, a practicing Catholic, staunchly defends it. By being able to control their fertility, she argues, women can begin a “virtuous economic cycle.” Rich America has a poor country expanding within its borders. We, too, must help women in the poor America start a “virtuous economic cycle.” Yes, all women have “access” to birth control. But with effective contraception costing hundreds a year, otherwise responsible low-income women might take their chances and have sex without it. We can’t afford not to ensure that those who want birth control can get it.

________ Froma Harrop is a columnist for the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Her column appears every Monday. Contact her via info@ creators.com or in care of Creators Syndicate Inc., 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

NEWS DEPARTMENT

HAVE YOUR SAY

Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 leah.leach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 margaret.mckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525 brad.labrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 diane.urbani@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim and Port Townsend offices: See Page A2

■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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PeninsulaNorthwest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Monday, October 29, 2012 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, DEAR ABBY, WEATHER In this section

B Preps

Loggers knocked out of playoffs PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LOPEZ — The six-hour bus/ferry ride did its share of the damage to a Crescent Logger football team on a rain-drenched Saturday, and then a fired-up Lopez Lobo team did the rest as the Loggers were eliminated from the 1B playoffs with a 34-14 loss. Coming out flat against the Lobos — whether from the long trip or perhaps still feeling some of the hangover from a Neah Bay thrashing one week prior — the Loggers found themselves down quickly 8-0. “This was a tough pill to swallow,” Crescent coach Darrell Yount said. “For whatever reason, we came out flat, didn’t get any push up front on offense or defense. “And yet, still kind of hung around as we were able to get some huge hits and some key stops to keep the score very manageable.” The Lobos led early on the legs of an effective outside running game. Trailing 14-0 with three minutes to go in the first half, Crescent finally got its offense into gear with a long drive but stalled on the Lopez 20 with only 10 seconds remaining in the half. And that’s when the game took a huge turn as the Lobos scored on a back-breaking 80-yard run with seconds on the clock. That gave the Lobos a 22-0 halftime advantage. The third quarter was a defensive slugfest with neither offense able to finish drives resulting in a 0-0 standoff. The Lobos would strike first again in the fourth quarter, taking a 28-0 lead. With Crescent quarterback Beau Bamer out of the game because of a shoulder injury, Mike Zapien took the controls and, running out of the pistol, found Derrick Findley on his first play on a 31-yard sideline route for the Loggers’ first visit to paydirt. Zapien zipped a bullet to Findley for the successful conversion and it was 28-8. The Lobos went ahead 34-8 with only 3:45 on the clock. Crescent wasn’t quite done, though, as Eric Larson had other things on his mind, taking the ensuing kickoff 80 yards to the Lobo 10-yard line. Zapien would bang it in from there, two plays later, on a bullying run for what would be the final points at 34-14. “Miscues on offense, and the inability to finish drives kind of did us in, it turns out,” Yount said. “When we’re playing well and clicking on offense, we can make a comeback and put points on the board quickly. “But on the greasy, muddy field with a wet football, and a game Lobos team, it just proved to be too much on this day. But he said, “Hey, I’m proud of our kids’ efforts.” Leading the team with 12 tackles each were Zapien and Larson while Bamer had 11. With the loss, Crescent falls to 6-3 and is eliminated from postseason play. The Loggers will conclude the season with a crossover North Football League North vs. South game Saturday. Crescent probably will host a South Division team yet to be determined. “We’ll regroup and give it one more good effort to try to close out the season at 7-3,” Yount said. “We’ve had too good a season to have it all end now, but to be honest, in a playoff format that sends you eventually against the powers of the league — Lummi or Neah Bay — the scenario is very predictable.” Lopez 34, Crescent 14 Crescent Lopez

0 8

0 0 14 0 First Quarter

14— 14 12— 34

L—33 run (run conversion) Second Quarter L—17 pass (run failed) L—80 run (run conversion) Fourth Quarter L—1 run (run failed)

TURN

TO

PREPS/B2

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (2)

Seattle running back Marshawn Lynch (24) rushes a career-high 77 yards for a touchdown against the Detroit Lions in the first half Sunday in Detroit.

Defense lets down Late-minute rally gives Lions win over Hawks THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — The Seattle Seahawks had a great shot to avoid losing consecutive games for the first time this year. Seattle’s defense, though, couldn’t make a stop when one was needed. Titus Young caught his second touchdown pass from Matthew Stafford on a 1-yard slant with 20 seconds left, lifting the Detroit Lions to a 28-24 win over Seattle on Sunday. “We as a defense have to come up and make those plays,” Seahawks linebacker Bobby Wagner said. “The game was on us and we failed to make those plays.” Seattle’s offense did its part. The Seahawks went ahead 24-21 with 5:27 left when Zach Miller made a spectacular, 16-yard catch on a toss from Russell Wilson. But Seattle (4-4) couldn’t stop the Lions (3-4) on their last possession or hold them to a field goal that would’ve extended the game to overtime. “We’re disappointed that after that terrific drive, we couldn’t finish it off the way we wanted to,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “We didn’t get the stops on third down.” That was a problem for the Seahawks all afternoon, giving

up first downs on 12 of 16 third downs on defense, i n c l u d i n g Next Game three on Detroit’s last Sunday drive. vs. Vikings “ T h e y at Seattle kind of were Time: 1 p.m. able to do On TV: Ch. 13 what they wanted to do,” Carroll said. “They had a huge day on third down. Any one of those you stop and it’s a different game.” Stafford led the game-winning, 16-play possession that started at the Detroit 20. The drive began with a 15-yard pass to Calvin Johnson and was kept alive with thirddown conversion passes to Johnson in Lions territory and to Joique Bell that set up the winning score. Seattle, though, was the team that failed to hold onto the lead and ended up losing for the fourth time in five road games this year. Wilson was 25 of 35 for 236 yards with two TDs and an interception. Marshawn Lynch ran just 12 times for 105 yards, including a career-high 77-yard run early in the second quarter.

Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson throws a pass in the second half of Sunday’s game.

Tupper captures fourth Sequim boys, PA girls punch tickets to state PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAKEWOOD — Kyle Tupper of Port Angeles captured fourth place for the top North Olympic Peninsula performance at the West Central District cross country championships at American Lake Golf Course on Saturday. Joining Tupper at state will be the Port Angeles girls and Sequim boys teams as well as three runners from Port Townsend. Brittany Grant of Port Townsend was the top girls runner from the area at the

Distirct Cross Country Westside Classic with a 12thplace finish and will go to state along with fellow Port Townsend boys runners Ryan Clarke and Xavier Frank. Tupper, the top male performer from the Olympic League, finished fourth out of 88 2A runners with a time of 16 minutes, 51.6 seconds on the 5,000-meter course. Lindbergh’s Mohamud Abdi won the 2A boys race in 16:19.4. The Sequim boys claimed fourth place (top six teams to state) for a ticket to state with Peter Ohnstad, Adrian Clifford, Mikey Cobb and C.J. Daniels finishing in the top 25 for the

Wolves. The top 30 individuals qualify for state in 2A boys, so the top four Sequim runners would have gone to state on their own. Ohnstad led the Wolves by taking 18th place in 17:14.6, followed by Clifford, 20th in 17:22.9, Cobb, 24th in 17:29.1, 25, CJ Daniels 25th in 17:29.7. Other finishers for Sequim were Chris Jefko, 45th in 18:15.0, Dylan Chatters, 46th in 18:15.7 and Jackson Oliver, 48th in 18:18.9. Just missing qualifying for the boys was Peter Butler of Port Angeles, who finished in 33rd place in 17:53.7. Sumner won the 2A boys race with 83 points while Sequim had 114th for fourth place. TURN

TO

DISTRICT/B2

College Soccer

Pirates sweep PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

TACOMA — The Peninsula College men’s and women’s soccer teams tuned up for the playoffs by beating Tacoma. Both teams won by shutouts as the men and women blanked the Titans by identical 3-0 scores. “This was a tough game for us,” Peninsula men’s soccer coach Andrew Chapman said. “On a very wet and muddy field it was hard to get any flow to the game. We struggled in the first half but in the 65th minute we were able to finally break them down.” TURN

TO

SOCCER/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Wednesday Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Olympic, 3 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Olympic, 1 p.m.

Preps Football Saturday’s Scores Bainbridge 47, West Seattle 20 Blanchet 69, Cleveland 0 Columbia (Hunters)-Inchelium 74, Selkirk 32 Concrete 14, Orcas Island 6 Lake Quinault 34, Oakville 6 Lopez 34, Crescent 14 Newport 57, Inglemoor 7 Roosevelt 43, Eastlake 36 Vashon Island 34, Seattle Lutheran 6

Football Lions 28, Seahawks 24 Seattle Detroit

3 14 0 7—24 7 7 0 14—28 First Quarter Sea_FG Hauschka 23, 5:30. Det_Broyles 6 pass from Stafford (Hanson kick), :00. Second Quarter Sea_Lynch 77 run (Hauschka kick), 14:43. Sea_Rice 9 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 11:39. Det_T.Young 46 pass from Stafford (Hanson kick), 8:49. Fourth Quarter Det_Stafford 1 run (Hanson kick), 11:35. Sea_Miller 16 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 5:27. Det_T.Young 1 pass from Stafford (Hanson kick), :20. A_63,497. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Sea 21 369 19-133 236 3-29 4-68 1-0 25-35-1 0-0 3-48.3 1-1 2-10 25:17

Det 26 415 22-84 331 1-6 1-21 1-26 34-49-1 2-21 4-44.0 0-0 5-61 34:43

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING_Seattle, Lynch 12-105, Turbin 4-14, Wilson 1-9, Rice 1-3, Robinson 1-2. Detroit, LeShoure 10-46, Bell 7-25, Stafford 4-12, K.Smith 1-1. PASSING_Seattle, Wilson 25-35-1-236. Detroit, Stafford 34-49-1-352. RECEIVING_Seattle, Tate 7-64, Rice 6-55, Turbin 2-28, McCoy 2-27, Miller 2-22, Martin 2-17, Washington 2-16, Robinson 1-6, Lynch 1-1. Detroit, T.Young 9-100, Pettigrew 7-74, Scheffler 4-46, Bell 4-33, Johnson 3-46, Broyles 3-37, LeShoure 3-9, K.Smith 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS_Seattle, Hauschka 61 (SH).

National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF San Francisco5 2 0 .714 165 Arizona 4 3 0 .571 124 Seattle 4 4 0 .500 140 St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 137 East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 6 2 0 .750 234 Philadelphia 3 4 0 .429 120 Dallas 3 4 0 .429 137 Washington 3 5 0 .375 213 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 7 0 0 1.000 201 Tampa Bay 3 4 0 .429 184 New Orleans 2 4 0 .333 176 Carolina 1 6 0 .143 128 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 6 1 0 .857 185 Minnesota 5 3 0 .625 184 Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 208 Detroit 3 4 0 .429 161

PA 100 118 134 186 PA 161 155 162 227 PA 130 153 182 167 PA 100 167 170 174

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON

SPORTS ON TV

Today 8 a.m. (47) GOLF CHAMPS, AT&T Championship, Final Round, Site: TPC San Antonio - San Antonio, Texas Noon (47) GOLF PGA, CIMB Classic, Final Round, Site: The Mines Resort & Golf Club - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 4:30 p.m. (13) KCPQ Baseball MLB, San Francisco Giants vs. Detroit Tigers, World Series, Game 5, if necessary, Site: Comerica Park - Detroit (Live) 5:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NFL, San Francisco 49ers vs. Arizona Cardinals, Site: University of Phoenix Stadium - Glendale, Ariz. (Live)

Middle Tennessee 38, North Texas 21 Morehead St. 70, Campbell 28 NC A&T 30, Norfolk St. 9 Navy 56, East Carolina 28 North Carolina 43, NC State 35 Northwestern St. 27, Nicholls St. 26 Old Dominion 31, Delaware 26 Prairie View 49, Southern U. 29 SC State 41, Howard 23 SE Missouri 48, Austin Peay 27 South Carolina 38, Tennessee 35 Stony Brook 56, Presbyterian 17 Syracuse 37, South Florida 36 Tennessee St. 22, Tennessee Tech 21 Texas A&M 63, Auburn 21 Tulane 55, UAB 45 UCF 54, Marshall 17 Vanderbilt 49, UMass 7 W. Kentucky 14, FIU 6 Wofford 24, The Citadel 21

Top 25

WARRIORS

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady looks across the field during the second half of an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams at Wembley Stadium in London on Sunday.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 5 3 0 .625 262 Miami 4 3 0 .571 150 Buffalo 3 4 0 .429 171 N.Y. Jets 3 5 0 .375 168 South W L T Pct PF Houston 6 1 0 .857 216 Indianapolis 4 3 0 .571 136 Tennessee 3 5 0 .375 162 Jacksonville 1 6 0 .143 103 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 5 2 0 .714 174 Pittsburgh 4 3 0 .571 167 Cincinnati 3 4 0 .429 166 Cleveland 2 6 0 .250 154 West W L T Pct PF Denver 3 3 0 .500 170 San Diego 3 4 0 .429 154 Oakland 3 4 0 .429 139 Kansas City 1 6 0 .143 120

College Football PA 170 126 227 200 PA 128 171 257 188 PA 161 144 187 186 PA 138 144 187 209

Thursday’s Game Tampa Bay 36, Minnesota 17 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 24, Jacksonville 15 Indianapolis 19, Tennessee 13, OT Chicago 23, Carolina 22 Miami 30, N.Y. Jets 9 Cleveland 7, San Diego 6 Atlanta 30, Philadelphia 17 Detroit 28, Seattle 24 Pittsburgh 27, Washington 12 New England 45, St. Louis 7 Oakland 26, Kansas City 16 N.Y. Giants 29, Dallas 24 New Orleans at Denver, late. Open: Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Houston Today’s Game San Francisco at Arizona, 5:30 p.m.

Major Scores FAR WEST Utah St. 48, UTSA 17 Arizona 39, Southern Cal 36 Boise St. 45, Wyoming 14 Colorado St. 42, Hawaii 27 Fresno St. 49, New Mexico 32 Louisiana Tech 28, New Mexico St. 14 Montana 70, Idaho St. 24 Montana St. 55, North Dakota 10 N. Arizona 12, N. Colorado 10 Oregon 70, Colorado 14 Portland St. 49, UC Davis 21 S. Utah 30, E. Washington 27 Sacramento St. 35, Cal Poly 29 San Diego 41, Dayton 9 San Diego St. 24, UNLV 13 San Jose St. 31, Texas St. 20 Stanford 24, Washington St. 17 UCLA 45, Arizona St. 43 Utah 49, California 27 Washington 20, Oregon St. 17 MIDWEST Bowling Green 24, E. Michigan 3 Cent. Michigan 35, Akron 14 Illinois St. 33, N. Iowa 21 Indiana 31, Illinois 17 Indiana St. 45, South Dakota 14 Iowa St. 35, Baylor 21 Kansas St. 55, Texas Tech 24 Marist 44, Valparaiso 7 Miami (Ohio) 23, Ohio 20 Michigan St. 16, Wisconsin 13, OT Minnesota 44, Purdue 28 Missouri 33, Kentucky 10 Missouri St. 42, W. Illinois 3 N. Dakota St. 23, S. Illinois 17 N. Illinois 48, W. Michigan 34 Nebraska 23, Michigan 9 Northwestern 28, Iowa 17 S. Dakota St. 41, Youngstown St. 28 Texas 21, Kansas 17 SOUTHWEST Ark.-Pine Bluff 10, MVSU 0 Houston 45, UTEP 35 Mississippi 30, Arkansas 27

Notre Dame 30, Oklahoma 13 Oklahoma St. 36, TCU 14 Rice 44, Southern Miss. 17 SMU 44, Memphis 13 Sam Houston St. 56, Lamar 7 Texas Southern 23, Grambling St. 20 EAST Albany (NY) 23, Sacred Heart 20 Ball St. 30, Army 22 Boston College 20, Maryland 17 CCSU 32, St. Francis (Pa.) 30 Colgate 47, Bucknell 33 Columbia 26, Yale 22 Cornell 37, Princeton 35 Fordham 36, Holy Cross 32 Georgetown 20, Lafayette 17 Harvard 31, Dartmouth 14 Kent St. 35, Rutgers 23 Monmouth (NJ) 28, Duquesne 27 New Hampshire 40, Rhode Island 20 Ohio St. 35, Penn St. 23 Penn 20, Brown 17 Pittsburgh 47, Temple 17 Toledo 25, Buffalo 20 Towson 49, Villanova 35 Wagner 23, Robert Morris 13 SOUTH Alabama 38, Mississippi St. 7 Alabama St. 31, Alabama A&M 13 Appalachian St. 38, W. Carolina 27 BYU 41, Georgia Tech 17 Bethune-Cookman 42, NC Central 17 Butler 31, Davidson 20 Cent. Arkansas 34, SE Louisiana 14 Charleston Southern 42, Edward Waters 7 Coastal Carolina 36, Liberty 12 E. Illinois 24, E. Kentucky 7 FAU 34, Troy 27 Florida St. 48, Duke 7 Furman 31, Elon 17 Gardner-Webb 38, VMI 7 Georgia 17, Florida 9 Georgia Southern 39, Chattanooga 31, 3OT Hampton 21, Savannah St. 13 Jacksonville St. 38, Murray St. 35 James Madison 28, Georgia St. 21 Louisiana-Monroe 38, South Alabama 24 Maine 24, William & Mary 10 McNeese St. 35, Stephen F. Austin 24

The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 27, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (60) 8-0 1,500 1 2. Oregon 8-0 1,412 2 3. Kansas St. 8-0 1,382 4 4. Notre Dame 8-0 1,344 5 5. LSU 7-1 1,216 6 6. Ohio St. 9-0 1,158 9 7. Georgia 7-1 1,145 12 8. Florida 7-1 1,075 3 9. Florida St. 8-1 1,046 11 10. Clemson 7-1 914 14 11. South Carolina 7-2 823 17 12. Louisville 8-0 817 16 13. Oregon St. 6-1 762 7 14. Oklahoma 5-2 758 8 15. Stanford 6-2 627 19 16. Texas A&M 6-2 580 22 17. Mississippi St. 7-1 559 13 18. Southern Cal 6-2 418 10 19. Boise St. 7-1 406 21 20. Texas Tech 6-2 388 15 21. Nebraska 6-2 249 NR 22. Louisiana Tech 7-1 209 24 23. West Virginia 5-2 126 25 24. Arizona 5-3 106 NR 25. UCLA 6-2 103 NR Others receiving votes: Toledo 88, Rutgers 74, Oklahoma St. 72, Texas 55, Kent St. 33, Tulsa 17, N. Illinois 12, Washington 8, Northwestern 7, Ohio 4, Wisconsin 4, Michigan 2, LouisianaMonroe 1.

Baseball MLB Playoffs WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) All games televised by Fox San Francisco 3, Detroit 0 Wednesday: San Francisco 8, Detroit 3 Thursday: San Francisco 2, Detroit 0 Saturday: San Francisco 2, Detroit 0 Sunday: San Francisco at Detroit, late x-Today: San Francisco at Detroit, 5:07 p.m. x-Wednesday: Detroit at San Francisco, 5:07 p.m. x-Thursday: Detroit at San Francisco, 5:07 p.m.

Preps: Sequim wins league volleyball event CONTINUED FROM B1 League champion Sequim Wolves captured the league’s seeding C—Derek Findley 31 pass from Mike Zapien (Findley pass from tournament Saturday at Sequim Zapien) High School. L—54 pass (run failed) The Wolves beat Olympic 3-1 C—Zapien 5 run (run failed) Individual Stats in the semifinals and then Rushing— C: Zapien 11-90, Bamer 7-77, Larson 9-40, defeated powerhouse North KitFindley 4-7. sap 3-0 in the championship Passing—C: Zapien 3-4-1, 38 yards; Bamer 1-10-1, 6 yards. match. Returns—C: Larson 3-105. In the first match, Sequim beat the Trojans 25-12, 25-17, 23-25, Volleyball 25-18. Sequim wins tourney Ironically, Olympic was the SEQUIM — The Olympic only team in league to win a game

Port Angeles already qualified from the Wolves this season. place Vikings beat third-place for districts as the league’s No. 5 While Sequim beat the Trojans Klahowya 25-21, 25-22, 25-20. seed after losing to Olympic in a 3-1 in the regular season, it seeding playoff last week. blanked all of the other teams 3-0. An Olympic upset The Roughriders will open disIn the third-place seeding trict play against White River on Vikings get blanked match, fourth-place Olympic Friday at Franklin Pierce High The Vikings weren’t able to upset Klahowya 18-25, 25-15, School in Tacoma in the first take a game from the Wolves but 25-21, 25-22. round at 5 p.m. while the Wolves they stayed close in all three As the tournament champion, get a first-round bye. games. Sequim advances to the West Sequim opens against the Port Sequim won the championship Central District tourney as the Angeles-White River winner Satmatch 25-21, 25-22, 25-20. Olympic League’s No. 1 seed, the urday at 10 a.m. at Franklin In the semifinals, the second- No. 2 seed at districts. Pierce.

District: Port Townsend sends three to state CONTINUED FROM B1 Vikings took three of the top four places as Reagan Colyer was The Port Angeles, girls, mean- champion in 19:10.9. Sophomore Dusti Lucas was while, captured fifth place in 2A the top Roughrider as she claimed with a team score of 113 to grab 22nd in 21:18.6. the final state berth for girls. The Riders had five girls finish Fellow Olympic League team in the top 31. North Kitsap, ranked No. 2 in Lucas was followed by Annika state, dominated the girls meet by Pederson, 24th in 21:26.0, Elizataking first with a score of 46. The beth Stevenson, 25th in 21:30.8,

Willow Suess, 28th in 21:49.7, DashaPorter, 31st in 21:54.5. Also finishing for Port Angeles were Bailey Reader, 44th in 22:34.5, and Jolene Millsap, 47th in 22:44.4. Sequim’s Emily Webb and Siana Turner finished in the top 40 but just missed state berths because the cutoff for individual girls was the top 25.

Webb took 33rd while Turner finished 39th. Port Townsend, meanwhile, had three runners with outstanding performances in the 1A races. Grant claimed 12th place in 20:15.2 for a state berth. On the boys side, Clarke, just a sophomore,took 15th place in 17:16.4 while Frank was 19th in 17:22.1 out of 140 runners.

The top 25 1A boys qualified for the state meet. Charles Wright Academy won the boys race with a score of 101 while Meridian won the girls meet with 106. The state championships for all levels is scheduled for Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco this Saturday.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

B3

Field goal defeats Panthers THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Robbie Gould’s 41-yard field goal sailed through the uprights as time expired to lift the Chicago Bears to a 23-22 win over the Carolina Panthers on Sunday. The Panthers led 19-14 with just under seven minutes to play, but Cam Newton’s pass was intercepted by Tim Jennings and the cornerback took it 25 yards for a touchdown to give Chicago a 20-19 advantage. But Newton, who criticized the offense in a postgame tirade last week, led the Panthers (1-6) into field-goal range. Justin Medlock blasted a 43-yard field goal off the right upright but the ball ricocheted over the crossbar to give Carolina a 22-20 lead. Jay Cutler, who had an absolutely dreadful first half, led the Bears (6-1) down the field in nine plays to set up the Gould field goal, completing 6-of-7 passes on the drive for 52 yards. Cutler finished the game 19-for-28 passing for 186 yards, a touchdown and an interception. Matt Forte carried the ball 15 times for 70 yards and a score and Brandon Marshall had nine catches for 98 yards in the Bears’ fifth straight win. Newton was 20-for-39 through the air for 314 yards, but threw a pair of interceptions. Steve Smith hauled in seven balls for 118 yards, but dropped a sure touchdown with 2:43 to play.

Cleveland 7, San Diego 6 CLEVELAND — Trent Richardson’s 26-yard touchdown run early in the first quarter proved to be the difference as the Cleveland Browns held off the San Diego Chargers. Richardson, who played through a rib injury, carried the ball 24 times for 122 yards for the Browns (2-6), who have won two of three. Brandon Weeden completed 11-of-27 passes for 129 yards for Cleveland, which snapped a four-game skid against San Diego. Philip Rivers connected on 18-of-34 passes for 154 yards for the Chargers (3-4), who have lost three in a row. Ryan Mathews carried the ball 24 times for 95 yards.

Green Bay 24, Jacksonville 15 GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron Rodgers threw a pair of touchdown passes, lifting the suddenly resurgent Green Bay Packers over the

passing while Brown ended his day with 80 yards on 14 carries. Ballard ran for 55 yards on 12 carries in the triumph. Matt Hasselbeck threw for 236 yards on 22-of-29 passing with a touchdown — the 200th of his NFL career — while Chris Johnson had an impressive day on the ground for the Titans (3-5), who had a brief twogame winning streak snapped. Johnson rushed for 99 yards on 21 carries. Kendall Wright caught a touchdown pass and Rob Bironas kicked a pair of field goals in the setback.

Atlanta 30, Philadelphia 17

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago Bears kicker Robbie Gould (9) kicks a game-winning, 41-yard field goal in the closing seconds to beat the Carolina Panthers 23-22 during their game in Chicago on Sunday.

NFL Sunday Jacksonville Jaguars. Rodgers completed 22-of35 passes for 186 yards for the Packers (5-3), who have won three straight and four of five since a brazen Monday night theft in Seattle in late September. Randall Cobb and Donald Driver caught touchdown passes for Green Bay, which was without wide receiver Jordy Nelson due to a hamstring injury. Alex Green carried the ball 22 times for 54 yards. Blaine Gabbert played through a left shoulder injury and completed 27-of49 passes for 303 yards and a touchdown for the Jaguars (1-6), who have lost four in a row. Rashad Jennings started in place of an injured Maurice Jones-Drew and carried the ball 17 times for 59 yards for Jacksonville. He also caught six passes for 56 yards.

Miami 30, N.Y. Jets 9 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Matt Moore came off the bench to throw for 131 yards and a touchdown, and the Miami Dolphins dominated on defense and special teams en route to a convincing rout of the rival New York Jets at MetLife Stadium. Moore replaced Ryan Tannehill after the rookie first-round pick injured his left quadriceps on a sack by New York’s Calvin Pace during the Dolphins’ second

drive and completed 11-of19 passes without a turnover. He received plenty of support from a defense that sacked Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez four times and came up with two takeaways as Miami (4-3) registered its third straight win following a 1-3 start. The Dolphins also got a touchdown from Olivier Vernon on a blocked punt in building a commanding 20-0 halftime lead, while Daniel Thomas and Anthony Fasano each had scores to help Miami avenge a 23-20 home overtime loss to the Jets in Week 3. Sanchez finished 28-of54 for 283 yards with one touchdown and one interception for New York (3-5), which fell into last place in the AFC East with its second division defeat in a row. Ex-Dolphin Clyde Gates posted career bests of seven catches and 82 receiving yards in the setback, while Shonn Greene rushed for 77 yards on 15 carries. Tannehill did not return after landing awkwardly on Pace’s hit just over five minutes into the contest and made good on just 2-of-5 throws for 18 yards before exiting.

Pittsburgh 27, Washington 12 PITTSBURGH — Ben Roethlisberger tossed a trio of touchdown passes on Sunday as the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the Washington Redskins at Heinz Field. Roethlisberger threw for 222 yards on 24- of-33 passing and Jonathan Dwyer

carried the ball 17 times for 107 yards to lead the Steelers (4-3) to their sixth straight victory at home. Robert Griffin III struggled to find his rhythm all day, as the rookie signal caller completed just 16-of34 passes for 177 yards and one touchdown, while managing just eight rushing yards on six carries. Alfred Morris carried the ball 13 times for 59 yards for the Redskins (3-5), who have lost five straight games against the Steelers. Washington had rushed for over 100 yards in 13 straight games, but the stout Steelers’ defense held the Redskins’ ground attack to just 86 yards as a team.

New England 45, St. Louis 7 LONDON — The passrun combination of Tom Brady and Stevan Ridley proved to be too overpowering for the St. Louis Rams’ defense. Brady threw four touchdown passes, Ridley totaled 127 yards and a score on the ground and the New England Patriots engineered a tremendous allaround effort in a rout at Wembley Stadium. New England (5-3) reached the end zone on each of its first five possessions and set an NFL record by accumulating more than 350 yards of offense for the 17th consecutive game. The Patriots, who finished with 473 yards on Sunday, broke a tie with the 1999-2000 Rams. Brady had 304 yards and connected on 23-of-35 throws, eight of which were

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MINNEAPOLIS — Josh Freeman fired three touchdown passes and Doug Martin racked up over 200 total yards and two scores, as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers ended a nine-game road losing streak with the triumph over the Minnesota Vikings at Mall of America Field. Freeman threw for 262 yards on 19-of-36 passing, while Martin carried the ball 29 times for 135 yards and a rushing score and added three catches for 79 yards and a touchdown grab to help the Buccaneers (3-4) earn their first road victory since Sept. 18 of last season in Minnesota. Christian Ponder completed 19-of-35 passes for 251 yards, one touchdown and one interception and Adrian Peterson rushed for 123 yards and a touchdown.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Vick Ballard scored the game-winning touchdown in overtime and the Indianapolis Colts escaped with the win over the Tennessee Titans on Sunday at LP Field. The Colts won the coin toss and began the deciding drive from the 20. They handed the ball to Donald Brown on the first six consecutive plays of the drive and reached the Tennessee 36, where they faced a crucial 3rd-and-8. On that play, Andrew Luck stepped up into the pocket from the shotgun and hit Reggie Wayne over the middle for 20 yards and a first down at the Titans 16. After Ballard was stuffed on first down, Luck threw a short screen out to the left for Ballard, who rumbled toward the end zone and dove head-first, extending the ball over the pylon for the touchdown. The play was reviewed and confirmed, giving the win to the Colts (4-3), who snapped a 10-game road losing streak. Luck threw for 297 yards, one touchdown and one interception on 26-of-38

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CONTINUED FROM B1 team while Kendra Miner and Morgan Atchley had Omar Ambrocio, Hen- the others. rique Noujeimi and Daniel Gonzalez scored the goals Quick goal for the Pirates while Alex Miner got the party Martinez, Erick Urzua and going quickly with her goal Aaron Jeffery each had an coming at the 7-minute assist. mark. The Pirates outshot the Assists came from Titans 13-9. Deidra Woodward, Jordan Goalkeeper Guilherme Dinneen and Emilia SteAvelar had four saves in the fanko. game and recorded his The Pirates next play at eighth shutout of the sea- Olympic on Wednesday son. with the women’s game Record-breaking scorer starting at 1 p.m. and the Briana Afoa had one of the men’s match beginning at three goals for the women’s 3 p.m.

caught by Rob Gronkowski. Gronkowski ended with 146 yards and two touchdowns. The Rams (3-5) attacked the New England beleaguered secondary on the game’s opening series as Chris Givens hauled in a 50-yard touchdown pass from Sam Bradford.

PHILADELPHIA — Matt Ryan tossed touchdown passes on Atlanta’s first three possessions in the Falcons’ victory over the Philadelphia Eagles and new defensive coordinator Todd Bowles. Ryan, who was 17-of-20 for 197 yards in the opening 30 minutes, finished the day with 262 yards on 22-of29 efficiency for the Falcons (7-0), who are off to their best start in franchise history and remain the NFL’s lone unbeaten team. Julio Jones had five receptions for 123 yards and a touchdown in the win. Michael Vick was 21-of35 for 191 yards and a score for Philadelphia (3-4), which lost its first game coming off a bye week during the Andy Reid era. Reid had been 13-0 in his career coming off the idle week. LeSean McCoy had a rushing and receiving score in the setback.


B4

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

Dilbert

Garfield

Momma

DEAR ABBY: The other day at my in-laws’, my mother-in-law, father-in-law, “Bert,” and I were in their computer room. Bert has pictures of his family posted on his bulletin board, and we often look at them when we’re in the room. One of the photos he posted recently I found disturbing. It was of a young, well-endowed woman in her early 20s wearing a tight tube top. What disturbed me was that Bert has printed my 16-year-old daughter’s name underneath and the date “2017.” When I asked him about it, he said that was what she will look like at 21. My mother-in-law said she thought it was crude, and I think it’s unnerving for a grandfather to be picturing his only granddaughter in such a manner. We have a great family life, and I wouldn’t want that to end over a picture, but I don’t want to look at it, and I don’t think this is behavior that’s expected from a man in his 60s. How should I broach the subject that the photo needs to come down? Concerned Father from Great Lakes

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

DEAR ABBY Abigail Van Buren

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Down Deep: Yes. Tell your therapist that you are cycling into a depression. Your medications may need to be adjusted. Next, explore completing your high school education by getting a GED degree, which may widen your employment opportunities. Once you’re feeling better, you should consider whether you want to end the romantic relationship you have with your boyfriend. When your emotions are on an even keel, you’ll be better able to make that decision. P.S. If you’re not receiving child support, contact the department of social services in your state because your child’s father should have been contributing regularly. Dear Abby: When filling salt and pepper shakers that aren’t marked, does the salt go into the one with the fewer holes on the top? Please Pass the Salt Dear Please Pass The Salt: There is no set rule. Although traditionally the salt shaker is the one with more holes because doctors now advise Americans to cut back on our salt intake, it might make more sense to put it into the shaker with fewer holes.

Dear Abby: I’m a young mother who dropped out of high school because I didn’t have enough credits. I started a great job in fast food and have a very understanding boss. I met my boyfriend at work. We’ve lived together since before my son was born, and he has helped me to raise my boy. (His biological dad left me and has had no contact since I was two months pregnant.)

by Mell Lazarus

________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

Rose is Rose

ARIES (March 21-April 19): A change in the way you feel about your looks, image and love life will result in an overhaul. Aggressive action will be productive and bring positive results. There is a financial gain heading your way. Opportunity knocks -open the door. 3 stars by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Quickly size up your situation when dealing with partners, colleagues or peers quickly and make your move. Don’t hesitate, or you may be put in an uncompromising position. Use your intuition coupled with your knowledge and expertise to move forward. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Observation and keeping what you know to yourself will be what’s required if you want to get ahead. Don’t ruffle feathers or exaggerate a situation that could start a feud that suggests you meddled. Focus on love, selfimprovement and staying out of trouble. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t sit back waiting for things to come to you. Embrace change and adventure. Open your mind to new hobbies, people and places. Indulge in a creative endeavor that you can share with someone you love.

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

Lately, I have been incredibly depressed. I’m nowhere I wanted to be in life, miserable in my relationship and have started to hate my job. I’m clinically diagnosed as bipolar and on medication. I have also been seeing a therapist since I was

very young. I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to throw my life away. I love my son and want the best for him. Any advice on how to pick myself up? Down Deep in Cleveland

Dear Concerned Father: Grandpa “Bert” appears to be a dirty old man. I’m not sure “you” should talk to him about this. It would have more impact if you, your wife and your mother-in-law do it together. When you do, tell him that putting your daughter’s name under the picture was in poor taste and you all want the picture with your daughter’s name shredded. (That way you’re sure it’s gone.) Privately, your wife should ask your daughter if Grandpa Bert has ever done anything that made her uncomfortable. If the answer is yes, confront him. If not, explain your concerns to your daughter, tell her you and your wife love her, and she can always come to you with any concerns of her own.

by Jim Davis

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tasteless photo worries father

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

by Eugenia Last

Take action. 4 stars

will pay off. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Being less opinionated and more perceptive will help keep the peace with friends, your lover or family members. Making alterations at home that support the needs of those you reside with will pay off. Love will get you what you want, criticism won’t. 5 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Lay low, spend very little and listen attentively to what others say. Making your changes based on what you already know works through the observations you’ve made. Love is in the stars, and sharing your feelings will lead to a closer bond. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You have the discipline and the upper hand, so let everyone know what you want. Use your skills to convince others to see things your way. Don’t argue when finding solutions is all that’s needed. A simpler lifestyle will help get you back on track. 5 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Home, family and striving to reach your professional goals will take top priority. You will make gains through an unexpected and unusual source. Good fortune is within reach and will allow you to follow a dream. 5 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Put more time and effort into mastering your skills and improving what you have to offer, who you are and the image you present. Love is highlighted, but recognizing who is sincere and who isn’t will be difficult. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Present your plans and ideas for the future and you will get an enthusiastic response and the help you need to move forward. Love is highlighted, and a promise can be made that will make your home life better and your future less stressful. 2 stars

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Spend more time on the relationships you have with partners. Open your mind to suggestions made by someone who comes from a different perspective or has experienced difficulties that you have not. A creative venture

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Finish what you start. Contracts, settlements and legal matters will favor you. A change in a partnership will be a force play, but in the end, it will be to your benefit. Being different will show your leadership ability. 4 stars

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 B5

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

NOON E N I L D A E D on’t Miss It! D

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Visit | www.peninsuladailynews.com Call: 360.452.8435 or 800.826.7714 | Fax: 360.417.3507 In Person: 305 W. 1st St., Port Angeles s Office Hours: Monday thru Friday – 8AM to 5PM

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T O D AY ’ S H O T T E S T

Craftsman snowblower, new, 24”, Self propelled, 6 fwd spds, 3 rev, Elec/ pull start, with 4 yr service repair warranty, & shear pins/oil kit. Package cost $850 ten mos. ago. Illness forces sale. N eve r u s e d . $ 5 5 0 . 0 0 firm. photos online. 9282223.

4026 Employment 4080 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale General Wanted Clallam County Clallam County

s

SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ NEW CLASSIFIEDS! GENERAL CLERICAL Versatile team player for busy front office. Must KITTENS. Free to good have excellent interperhome Tabby kittens; 7 sonal, customer service weeks old; box trained and keyboarding skills. and eating dry food. Call Recent exper. in health 360.912.3861 care office pref ’d. F.T. with benefits. Some eve. hrs. $10.90-$12.82 hr. to OIL STOVE: With tank. start, DOQ. Resume to: $600. 565-6274. PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.peninsula behavioral.org

Employment 3010 Announcements 4026 General Are you energetic and willing to work hard? Do you possess any or all of the following skills?

✿ ADOPT ✿ college sweethearts, successful bu s i n e s s ow n e r s, a t home-parents, home cooking, unconditional LOVE awaits baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-6168424 ATTENTION: We will find you best affordable contractor for your project. 775-0968. Winsome, lonesome, 80’s young gentleman, endowed with interesting l i fe a n d c o n s i d e ra bl e sensitive experiences, knowledge and intelligence; seeks gentle lady similarly endowed, to enj oy f u l f i l l m e n t o n t h e road of life together and share the most rewarding and wonderful years left to us both with a beloved dog. Send reply to Peninsula Daily News PDN#401/Gentleman Port Angeles, WA 98362

3020 Found F O U N D : B l a n ke t a n d saddle, found on Reservoir Rd. in Sequim. Call (360)670-3533 to ID. FOUND: Cat. Long-hair, ye l l ow eye s, f r i e n d l y. Near Dungeness Meadows, Sequim. (360)6836775

3023 Lost LOST: Cat. Gray and white, long haired, loving cat, will walk up to anyone. Near Dunlap Ave, Sequim. 360-774-2595 LOST: Keys. Green clip, multiple keys on ring, FOB. Possibly lost at Sequim High. (360)4606272.

4070 Business Opportunities Fitness Center: Hydraulic fitness equip., weights and cardio machines. Established clientele/low overhead. info: info@faststopfitness.com $50,000. 360-417-6869.

FOR SALE: Own an exciting business and cont r o l yo u r f u t u r e ! T H E BLACKBIRD COFFEEHOUSE is well established & producing GREAT PROFITS. Contact Adam for details: 3 6 0 - 2 2 4 - 9 4 3 6 ; bl a ck birdcoffee@gmail.com

Positive work ethic Mechanical aptitude Ability to follow directions Strong willingness to learn Ability to routinely show to work on time Then we want you on our team. Excellent wage and benefits package. Shift work/weekends required. Apply in person at Interfor 243701 Hwy 101 W. Port Angeles EEO/Drug Free Workplace Employer

CAREGIVER jobs available now. Benefits included. Flexible hours. Call P.A., 452-2129, Seq u i m , 5 8 2 - 1 6 4 7 , P. T. 344-3497. CAREGIVERS NEEDED Come join our team! A great place to work! We provide all training needed for state license. Contact Cherrie 360-683-3348

Estimator/Drafter for ornamental & structura l s t e e l fa b r i c a t o r. Must have math skills & creative ability to create shop-ready d raw i n g s fo r g a t e s, railings, & structural jobs. Ability to develop accurate estimates and create material cut lists for welders. Experience using AutoCAD 2010 computer software a must. Ability to work with the public, required. Must be detail oriented. FT. Wages DOE. Email resume to Kate@AllformWelding.com or fax to 360681-4465. No phone calls.

The Quileute Tribe has a job opening for a Human Services Director. This position is responsible for program development and planning, annual budget preparations, contract and grant development, monitoring, and repor ting for multiple programs. Must have a minimum of a B a c h e l o r ’s D e gr e e i n Social Services or equivalent field and five years’ exper ience administrating social services programs in a Tribal community preferred. Knowledge and experie n c e i n t h e fo l l ow i n g programs desired: ICW, TANF, Elder Ser vices, Yo u t h P r o gra m s, D o mestic Violence, Prevention programs, and Head Start. Salary $55,00065,000 or DOQ closes Nov 08, 2012 or until filled. Visit our website to obtain a job application and complete job description at www.quileutenation.org or call at (360)374-4366

The Quileute Tribe has a job opening for a General Ledger Accountant. This position will be responsible for monitoring programs and reporting, reconcile all balance sheets accounts monthly, monitor funding agency cash receipts to ensure that draw downs a r e b e i n g p e r fo r m e d . Works with auditor, assist in indirect cost proposal rate. Excel, word, email and accounting/purchasing software experience is required. Requires a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, or a n A A D e gr e e i n a c counting and three years’ experience relating to the duties and responsibilities detailed above may be substituted for the Bachelor’s Degree. Salary $41k-52k or D O Q c l o s e s N ov 0 8 , 2012 or until filled. Visit our website to obtain a job application and complete job description at www.quileutenation.org or call at (360)374-4366.

“ON-CALL” RESIDENTIAL AIDE Promote daily living skills of residents at 2 sites. Req H.S./GED & cooking/housekeeping skills. Work experience with chronic mental illness/substance abuse preferred. $11.41-13.25 hr., DOE. Resume to PBH, 118 E. 8th St., Port TOW TRUCK DRIVER Angeles, WA 98362 De- Part-time, on call. Must tails at http://peninsula pass WSP background behavioral.org. EOE. c h e ck a n d d r u g t e s t . Pick up applicaiton at PAINTERS WANTED 820 E. Front, P.A. Experience requried. In P.T. (360)379-4176. Support/Care Staff To work with developmentally disabled adults, no exper ience necessary, will train. $10 hr. to start. CNA’s encouraged to apply. Apply in person at 1020 Caroline, P.A. from 8-4 p.m.

TRACY’S INSULATION 4026 Employment Now Hiring Installers I m mediate Opening. General Good driving record, work ethic. Apply in perAIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. son at 261372 Hwy. 101, Sequim. (360)582-9600 Wright’s. 457-9236.

4080 Employment Wanted

Aaron’s Garden Serv. Pruning, weeding, fall clean up. (360)808-7276 JUAREZ & SON’S HANDY M A N S E R V I C E S . Quality work at a reasonable price. Can handle a wide array of problem projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, clean up, yard maintenance, and etc. Give us a call office 452-4939 or cell 460-8248.

AFFORDABLE EVENT ENTERTAINER! Add a Special touch to your L u n c h e o n , D i n ner,Dance/Party w/Live Enter tainment. Quality COTTAGE STYLE renditions pop tunes of BUILDING WITH EX5 0 ’s 6 0 ’s 7 0 ’s m o r e . www.charlieferris.com . CELLENT VISIBILITY! Refs/Rec.Booking Holi- The Compass Profesd ay eve n t s n ow. C a l l sional Building has been used as a counseling of460-4298 fice and for occupational ALL around handyman, therapy but could easily be converted into a resimost anything A to Z. dence or used as both. (360)775-8234 There is a large room Let me meet all your and four other rooms, a needs. Storm clean up, k i t c h e n a n d t w o h a l f roof and gutter cleaning, baths. Also included in a n d mu c h m o r e. C a l l the square footage is a Joe (360)775-9764. detached finished multipur pose room. With a MeLynda’s Originals: full price offer all furnishFo r a l l yo u r s ew i n g ings can be included. n e e d s . A l t e r a t i o n s , $159,900. MLS#262150. Helga Filler Custom Designs, Re(360)457-0456 pairs, and ReconstrucWINDERMERE tion of clothing. Call PORT ANGELES 360-797-1399. Reasonably pr iced with pick up and deliver y COUNTRY Living Ranch Home on acreage for available. sale by owner. Beautiful RENT-A-MAN Labor for end of the road privacy hire. Inside or out. Call on 2.5 acres w/optional adjacent parcels and we’ll talk. John available up to 20 acres. (360)775-5586 3 spacious bedrooms, 2 RUSSELL full baths, 1996 custom ANYTHING built 1825 sq. ft. home. Call today 775-4570. $335,000. Jerry, 360-460-2960. SCUBA DIVER FOR HIRE ELEGANT SUNLAND Call 681-4429 HOME Young couple, early six- A Stunningly Beautiful ties. available for fall H o m e w i t h o v e r clean up, moss removal, $110,000 dollars worth clean gutters and misc of renovations and upyard care. Excellent ref- grades. Intricately detailed custom cabinetry, erences. 360-457-1213 granite counters, crown moldings, bay windows, 105 Homes for Sale hardwood floors, french Clallam County doors and equally impressive outdoor living 2.5 Acres located in the spaces make this home Palo Alto area of Se- one of the most unique quim. Property already homes in Sequim. h a s w e l l a n d p o w e r. $378,900 Septic design is Jim Hardie available. Beautiful terriU-$ave Real Estate torial views. 775-7146 $61,500. FANTASTIC VIEWS Thelma Durham Strait, Mt. Baker, San (360)457-0456 Juan’s & Victoria, cusWINDERMERE tom built 3 Br., 3.5 bath, PORT ANGELES his/her master bathA GREAT DEAL! rooms, daylight base3 Br., 2 bath, with office ment & large garage, o n 2 . 4 7 l eve l a c r e s . raised garden beds. Easy care laminate floor$599,000 ing, lots of natural light. ML#379440/263815 Plenty of room for toys, Deb Kahle garden or critters. De683-6880 tached 2 car garWINDERMERE age/shop. SUNLAND $ 1 8 9 , 0 0 0 . MLS#263541/364752. IF YOU WANT Harriet Reyenga PRIVACY (360)460-8759 You need to see this WINDERMERE home and 5 acres. PORT ANGELES Manufactured home built in 2007, 3 Br., 2 bath, BEAUTIFUL CITY LOT 1,700 sf with open conNearly the last view lot cept living space. 960 sf o n W. 4 t h S t . i n PA . 3-car attached garage Close to waterfront so with work space. Temyou can hear the waves. p e r a t u r e c o n t r o l l e d Spectacular strait view. g r e e n h o u s e, fe n c e d G e n t l e s l o p e t o w a r d garden and a separate b e a u t i f u l wa t e r v i ew, fenced orchard. Southoversized city lot easy to ern exposure. Very pribuild on. Easy access - vate and quiet! utilities in at street or al- $219,000. MLS#264230. ley. Located in a fine esTeam Thomsen tablished area, across 417-2782 from Crown Park - Close COLDWELL BANKER to walking trails. UPTOWN REALTY $69,950. ML#261167. Call Jean IT’S 2 NICE 683-4844 2-level entr y home. 2 Windermere decks. 2 fireplaces. 2 car Real Estate garage. 3 beds and Sequim East you guessed it - 2 baths. Located in the city but BEAUTIFUL N ew o n e l eve l h o m e feels like country. Almost with unobstructed views 2 quiet. Fenced back of the Strait of Juan de yard nearly 2 times as Fuca, Dungeness Spit, b i g a s n o r m a l . Fr o n t Mt. Baker, and Protec- yard is nice 2. What’s tion Island. The great not 2 like? room features plenty of $175,000. MLS#263403. Dick Pilling windows to enjoy the 417-2811 views and let in the sun COLDWELL BANKER light. Covered wrap UPTOWN REALTY around porch for BBQ’s and watching the ships. PLACE YOUR 2 Br. plus a den/office. AD ONLINE Just minutes from town With our new in Eagle Crest Estates. Classified Wizard $239,000. MLS#261930. you can see your Kelly Johnson ad before it prints! (360)457-0456 www.peninsula WINDERMERE dailynews.com PORT ANGELES

IT’S TIME To get your plane out of the weather. Two hangers at William Fairchild Airport, a 2,400+ sf box hanger, or a 1,250 sf L h a n g e r. B o t h bu i l t i n 2006 with power bi-fold doors. Schedule an appointment TODAY. $65,000 to $115,000 Dave Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Last chance for COUNTRY IN THE CITY. Brick home on 6.3 acres just minutes from downtown Port Angeles. Five acres f o r e s t e d w i t h Va l l e y Creek. Three Bedrooms, one Bath, eating area in Kitchen and formal Dining, Laundry and storage. Stone fireplace with insert. Fenced Backyard a n d G r e e n h o u s e. A t tached Garage and detached Carport. All this and mountain view for $264,900. FSBO by appointment, call (360)477-0534

Modern 4 bedroom House for sale on Benson Rd, 4 Bedrooms,3 Bathroom, 2 Floors, 4166 sqft,1.40 Acre,garage,Fiber optic internet, New paint,New carpet,Paved driveway,big kitchen,Heat pump,furnace, pantry, lots of storage 360-670-4974 Bobcpifiber@gmail.com w w w. fo r s a l e b y o w n er.com /listing/4F02C NEED A PLACE TO PARK YOUR HORSE? There’s plenty of room to roam on this 2.82 Ac. Parcel. The barn is away from the mobile unit as is the workshop and storage shed. The 3 bedroom 2 bath home has new windows and is ready for move in. Check out the pleasant little creek that is on the p r o p e r t y. T h e l o t i s fenced and ready to hold your critters. $159,000. MLS#263503. Call Barc (360)417-8581 JACE The Real Estate Company NEW HOME IN SOLANA Features many upgrades such as granite, hardwood, and tile. Two bedrooms with a den/office. HOA takes care of the lawns, and you have access to the clubhouse, pool, putting greens, and walking trails. On a quiet cul-de-sac, so there is no through traffic. $266,500. ML#263686. Call the DODDS 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East NEW LISTING Retirement living at its best, age restricted to 50 and older. Open concept, immaculate, light and airy. 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,430 square feet. 2 car garage as well. Southern exposure. $189,500. MLS#264352. Jean Irvine 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY NICE STARTER HOME Great home in central Sequim with easy access to shopping, schools, and parks. 2 B r. , 2 b a t h , 1 , 1 8 4 s f home on large lot with fenced rear yard and dog run. New flooring in bathrooms and kitchen, wood stove and open floor plan. Private rear patio area with fruit trees, attached two car garage. Priced now at $139,900. Gail Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim - 477-9361

Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

5000900

• • ADOPT: Adoring young • TV producer & attorney, home-cooking, beaches, • spor ts await precious baby. Expenses paid. 1- • 800-562-8287

BEAUTIFUL, PRIVATE, PARKED OUT 3.5 ACRES. Water, power, phone in a n d w a i t i n g fo r yo u r dream home. New 36x42 shop, two 30 amp RV spots, and 7 month creek. NO CCR’s! $99,000. MLS#264228. PAM CHURCH 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County PRICED TO SELL Custom home on 1.80 acres, 3 Br., 2 baths, built 2007, 1,668 sf. 2 car attached garage, RV hook-ups, camp site close to the lake. Immaculate and well built. hardiplank siding, large covered deck , carpet and vinyl floors. all on one level. $225,000. MLS#363982. Carol or Nelson (360)670-9418 TOPPERS REAL ESTATE

PRIVATE PARADISE Beautiful 3 bedroom home on 3+ acres offers all kinds of choices. Lots of windows let in lots of sunshine in the main living areas including the aptly named sunroom. Downstairs could be a separate apar tment. There’s a sweet balcony off the master bedroom that overlooks the gardens. Lots of spaces for enjoying the outdoors especially the patio. $389,000. MLS #261752. PRICE IMPROVEMENT Pili Meyer Great deal in Alta Vista 417-2799 Estates. Large M’bdrm COLDWELL BANKER with attached bath. UPTOWN REALTY Kitchen with walk-in pantr y, skylight, & island. READY FOR PLANS Den/office space. 2 car Fantastic horse property attached garage, private incredible mt. view parfenced rear yard. Beauti- t i a l wa t e r v i ew s t o o ! ful mountain views. well, 4 bd septic in Close to stores, Discov- w/electricity to property ery Trail & Greywolf Ele- RV hookups are in! m e n t a r y. C o m m u n i t y $229,000 water system, pr ivate ML#348271/263232 septic with connection to Tanya Kerr community drain field. 683-6880 $146,999. ML#263116. WINDERMERE Call Chuck SUNLAND 683-4844 SEQUIM: FSBO, 781 N. Windermere Kendall Rd. Bright, ‘92, 3 Real Estate Br. home, 2 ba, with skySequim East light, forced air heat, PRIME SUNLAND heat pump, wood stove, LOCATION new metal roof, washer, Pond, water feature & dryer, stove, fridge, dishfairways views, 3 Br., 2 washer, 2 car garage, Bth, over 2,100 sf, dra- deck, fenced yard, with matic octagonal lr, white fruit trees. Close to town, brick fp & wet bar, beau- h a l f bl o ck t o wa l k i n g tiful master suite (tile trail. Move-in condition. shower/jetted tub). $189,000. $289,000 775-6205 or 683-1943 ML#349350/263246 STARTER HOME Team Schmidt This is a great star ter 683-6880 home close to bus route, WINDERMERE good Southern exposure SUNLAND for gardens. It is a must PRIVACY/SCENIC see at this price. VIEW $105,000. ML# 263857. Custom home nestled in Dan Blevins the woods. Designed for 417-2805 entertaining. Large living COLDWELL BANKER room, dining room, liUPTOWN REALTY brary or den/study. The kitchen is chef-ready This 4 Br., 4 bath counw i t h l o t s o f c a b i n e t try colonial farm home is s p a c e & a d e l i g h t f u l stately & offers a specbreakfast room overlook- tacular mtn. view on 5+ ing the backyard land- a c r e s c l o s e t o t o w n . scaping. Large cedar Served by both PUD & a deck for dining out or high capacity well. 4-stall BBQ-ing. Master suite is b a r n bu i l t i n 2 0 0 1 + o n m a i n l eve l , g u e s t 20x30 workshop. Pictuarea upstairs with 2 bed- r e s q u e w o o d e d a r e a rooms, full bath & loft. 2- with gazebo, trails & a car garage plus a huge s p r i n g . O p p o r t u n i t y outbuilding with hobby knocks on this well beroom or shop, bath & l o w a s s e s s e d v a l u e price! room for 2 RV’s. $ 3 7 4 , 9 0 0 . $599,000 MLS#264372/413612. ML#264020/392210 Holly Coburn Heidi Hansen (360)457-0456 (360)477-5322 WINDERMERE TOWN & COUNTRY PORT ANGELES WATCH THE PRO-AM Tu r n - Ke y h o m e w i t h FROM THE PATIO Beautiful 2 BR + Den, 2 southern exposure on a BA custom golf course very quiet street! Open h o m e w i t h 2 M a s t e r and spacious with a upBedroom Suites. Views dated gourmet kitchen. of the fairway from great Sunken living room has room, master bedroom a wood insert that heats and patio. Open floor the whole home reducplan with 3 skylights, ing your electric bill. 3 large windows and pro- bedroom 2 bath. Located in 4 Seasons Ranch. pane fireplace. $204,500. MLS#263611. $329,500 Jennifer Felton ML#264090/396328 (360)457-0456 Roland Miller WINDERMERE (360)461-4116 PORT ANGELES TOWN & COUNTRY

WOW! 2 Mf’d Homes on permanent foundations in excellent condition. Pr imary residence has fully enclosed sun porch & attached oversized garage with workshop. Additional rental residence has separate shop/garage + custom RV Shelter w/eclectic & dump + 2 smalle r s t o r a g e bu i l d i n g s. Each home has own well, septic & yard. $275,000. OLS#264384. Call Dave 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

YOU SHOULD SEE ME NOW! I am in my summer glor y. With a community waterfront site, don’t let summer get away. I am a delightful home with a “cabin” feel. My 1,788 sf is comprised of 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, wood burning fireplace, spacious kitchen and large living space with excellent lighting. Best of all my price was reduced to $189,000. ML#252379. Call Linda 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

120 Homes for Sale Jefferson County

SALE BY OWNER. House in P.T. 2 Br. 2 b a t h , A DA , $ 1 4 9 , 0 0 0 Renter avail. By Appt. Only 360-821-1047

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes

‘76 Mobile, Ex Cond, 14x70 55+ Park, PA. 2 B D / 2 B A . Wa t e r V i ew, Green Belt, $12,000. 360-452-8248

SEQUIM: ‘78 single wide mobile home, 55+ park, 2 Br., 2 bath, garage with spare room, large covered deck. $32,500. (360)385-4882.

SEQUIM: ‘79 dbl. wide, 2 Br., 2 ba, 2 sheds, 55+ park, upgrades in/out, lg. patio $45,000. 683-6294

SEQUIM: Newly remodeled mobile in 62 and older park, 2 Br., 2 ba. $21,500. (360)582-9330.

505 Rental Houses Clallam County

4 bdrm home on 2+ acres, 2.5 baths, 2600sf, 2 car garage, Lg deck & gardens $1600 mo + $1500 dep. Pets ok (360)460-2747

www.peninsula dailynews.com


Classified

B6 MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012

505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses 539 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Port Angeles JAMES & 4 b r / 3 b a . D bl G a ra g e. ASSOCIATES INC. ODT & beach access. Property Mgmt. Pets ok; NS; $1600/mo $ 1 5 0 0 s e c u r i t y. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. 360.461.9434. Info: A 1 br 1 ba util incl ...$650 www.rejww.net/4rent H 2 br 1 ba..............$650 H 2 br 2 ba ...............$735 DIAMOND POINT: 2 Br., H 5 br 1.5 ba ..........$1000 2 ba, most pets ok. $750 H 3+ br 2.5 ba...... ..$1400 mo. (360)681-0140. HOUSES/APT IN SEQ D 1 br 1 ba util incl ...$800 One bedroom cottage H 3 br 1.5 ba......... .$1000 for rent at 819 West 10th H 2 br 1.5 ba ..........$1000 Street - lst and last mths H 2 br 2 ba .............$1200 rent with $500 security H 3+ br 2 ba ...........$1350 deposit. One Small pet 360-417-2810 negotiable with deposit. More Properties at hardwood floors new tile www.jarentals.com washer/dryer included. Call (360)452-4933. No JOYCE: 3 Br, 1 bath, 10 smoking. $675 mth. acres. $975, first, last, $500 deposit. Pets OK. WEST SIDE P.A.: New(509)669-8502 e r 3 B r. , 2 b a , W / D, close to town, no smok- P.A.: 2413 Ryan Dr. 3 ing. $950 mo., $500 dep. Br., no pets/smoking. (360)460-8672 a.m. only $ 7 0 0 , 1 s t , l a s t , $ 7 0 0 or (360)670-9329 dep. 417-1688 msg.

TRACTOR

SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba, sm. yard, carport. $675. tourfactory.com/922493 SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 bath, 341 Dungeness Meadows, pool, golf, security patrol. $900. 670-6160. SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fence, dog door. $1,200 1st, last, dep. 477-5417 SEQUIM: New 1 Br. cottage. $675 mo., utilities included. (360)683-4483 WANTED: 2 Br., room for 2 horses, retired carpenter, references. Mobile ok. 808-0611

683 Rooms to Rent 1163 Commercial Roomshares Rentals

P.A.: Furnished 1 Br. apt fireplace, views. $650 HOUSESHARE SEQUIM 2 FURN BDRS mo. (360)452-8760. in Lg Mobile $450/400 P.A.: Immaculate 2 Br., W/D TV WIFI All util inc. 1 bath, W/D. $700. Walk to town Bus r te. (360)808-4972 Fe m a l e N o n S m o k i n g / Drinking pref. See OnProperties by l i n e A d . R e fe r e n c e s . Landmark. portangeles- $200 Deposit. First/Delandmark.com posit/Negotiable Partial SEQUIM: 1 or 2 Br. in Last. (360)460-7593. quiet 8-plex. $600-$700. (360)460-2113 P.A.: 1 room for rent. Organic far m. $350 + 665 Rental utilities. 452-4021.

P.A.: Clean, modern, 3 P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke/ B r. , g a ra g e, n o p e t s. pets. $650, last, dep. $960. (360)452-1395. 452-1694 eves. P.A. House, clean, modern, 1 Br., 1 bath, quiet. No smoking. $675 includes all utilities.

605 Apartments Clallam County

605 Apartments Clallam County

CENTRAL P.A.: ConCENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 1 venient Unfur n. Apts. ba, close to Safeway, no 1 B R $ 4 7 7 t o $ 4 9 3 + fixed util. Storage smoking/pets. $550 mo. Rooms. No smoke/pet (360)460-5892 maybe. (360)504-2668. CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent E A S T P. A . : C l e a n , r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . quiet, 1 Br., W/G paid, W / D, n o s m o ke / p e t s. Duplex/Multiplexes $700. (360)452-3540. $475. (360)683-1012. SEQUIM: Studio, 500 sf, P.A.: 1 Br. apt., quiet, CENTRAL P.A.: Cute 1 granite, porch, views, all c l e a n , c a t s w i t h d e p. Br. duplex. $595 mo., utils. paid incl. satellite $575 mo. (206)200-7244 plus dep. (360)460-4089 mchughrents.com TV. $590. 683-1073 or (360)460-6355. P.A.: 2 Br., $625, inADD A PHOTO TO cludes W/G. Great locaYOUR AD FOR COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 tion. 808-5972. ONLY $10! Br, W/D, fireplace, new www.peninsula paint/carpet. $625, $625 www.peninsula dailynews.com dep., no pets. 452-3423. dailynews.com

1163 Commercial Rentals DOWNTOWN P.A.: 117 E. 1st, street level, above Michaels’ Restaurant, 3,400 sf. $2,500 mo. (360)457-9348 or (360)808-1690.

SEQUIM: Comm’l building, downtown, corner of Bell St./S. Sequim Ave. Approx. 4,000 sf, avail. 1/1/13. (360)452-8838.

6005 Antiques & Collectibles

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

GUNS: Mak 90 Sporter, with scope, $650. Colt 1911, series 70, Gold Cup National Match, $950. (360)683-9899

GUNS: Rifle & Shotgun. Winchester 270 cal. ANTIQUES: Private par- Model 70 featherweight PRE 1964 WITH 3 TO 9 ty, call for list. Leopold scope. Good (360)457-6092 conditon. $1500.00 Be12 Ga. Over Under 6045 Farm Fencing retta Shotgun. Silver & Equipment Snipe.Good condition. $700.00 360 477 4838 TRACTOR: ‘49 Ferguson TO20. $2,500/obo. Private collection sale P.J. (360)928-0250. Ruger Stainless mini 14 $ 5 5 0 . Wa l t h e r P - 2 2 PLACE YOUR $350. Glock 17 Gen3 AD ONLINE 9mm $600. Springfield With our new XD 40 $550. Mossberg Classified Wizard 500A 12ga $325. Winyou can see your ad before it prints! chester 1200 12ga $325. Revelation 12ga $225. www.peninsula Jason 460-7628 dailynews.com

2A560600-10/28

FENCING

605 Apartments Clallam County

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DOWN 1 The Fishes of the zodiac 2 Opposed (to)

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. GABRIELLE DOUGLAS Solution: 9 letters

T S T U V R T P U F I E E O R A E N R L L Y W I E S E D O T F S L O H I O O L B E P R R E R L I M I B  E B T P ‫ګ‬ E I M E I ‫ګ‬ A I U R O ‫ګ‬ M B N H W ‫ګ‬ C I T A B By Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel

3 Bon Appétit offering 4 Mountain retreat 5 BP merger partner 6 Drugstore name derived from the prescription symbol 7 Genesis sibling 8 Infield protection 9 Betting odds, e.g. 10 Bring into balance 11 Deli meat 12 Body shop quote: Abbr. 13 Many USMA grads 21 Card worth a fortune? 22 Squid relatives 25 Palm smartphone 26 Mail out 29 Belittle 30 Trinity member 33 Deer mom 34 “Sex for Dummies” author, familiarly 36 “__War”: Shatner novel 38 Rooftop rotator 39 Uncertain response

10/29/12

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

© 2012 Universal Uclick

A T L N Y V U C S I B A A T O

U E I E S M E O O E R L E M R

L X R M X D P N R T A A A L C

www.wonderword.com

T E D O E M S I O N L R D M A

S R L W O H F K C I O A E E N

A C O C I L Y E N N N D S Z H

N I G P I O F E E C A L N N O

M S S G S R G Y E L L E Y O J

Join us on Facebook

Y E H I G H B A R P O W E R L

G T E C H N I Q U E G A B B Y

10/29

Acrobatic, Arielle, Balance, Beam, Body, Brie, Bronze, Championships, Chow, Composition, Dance, December, Everett, Exercise, Flex, Flight, Floor, Form, Gabby, Gold, Gymnast, High Bar, Iowa, John, Joyelle, Leap, Line, London, Maroney, Medal, Olympic, Pose, Power, Ross, Routine, Salto, Sport, Technique, Time, Tokyo, Trials, Tumble, Turns, Vault, Wieber, Women Yesterday’s Answer: Producer THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

TROOB ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CORFE (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

40 Wide-screen technique introduced in the ’50s 41 Island in the Aegean 42 CSA general 47 Antipasto tidbits 49 Beach house, maybe 51 At one’s post 52 Wall-mounted candleholder

10/29/12

53 Embark 55 “Holy moly!” 57 “Date Night” actor Carell 58 Destroy, as documents 60 Miss Trueheart of “Dick Tracy” 61 Nobel Peace Prize city 62 Painter’s deg. 63 Caribbean liquor

MASNOL

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ACROSS 1 Golf pros regularly break it 4 Gemologist’s weight 9 Force back 14 “__ had it up to here!” 15 Single-celled critter 16 Bo’s’n’s “Hold it!” 17 Blink of an eye 18 Rocky, for one 19 Midterms and finals 20 Do-or-die moment 23 “Para __, oprima numero dos”: customer service option 24 Woos 27 Crystal ball consulter 28 Bringing up the rear 31 Cut back 32 Offbeat 35 Cowboy’s footwear 37 Pieces on a board 38 When the Brontës wrote 43 Cannes crony 44 Arrow-shooting god 45 Prez before Jack 46 Prefix with second 48 Computer operator 50 Bottom-line concern 54 Hole for a shoelace 56 Heart, soul, or heart and soul 59 Precisely 62 Cheer for a diva 64 Fragrant compound 65 Game based on crazy eights 66 Seethed 67 Underground Railroad traveler 68 Fort Worth sch. 69 Stockpile 70 Repaired, as a shoe 71 “But then again ...”

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 B7

GIRFTH Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: Yesterday's

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: PRESS CLASH TUNEUP EXPERT Answer: When the baby wouldn’t sleep, the parents got — REST LESS

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com FIREWOOD: Cord $170, delivered. Proceeds to P.A. Senior Class ‘13. (360)808-5999 FIREWOOD: Seasoned, $185 cord. Green, $150 cord. (360)461-3869. SEASONED FIR: Ready to burn. Price negotiable depending on location. Starting $170/cord. (360)797-3872

6065 Food & Farmer’s Market LOCKER BEEF. Farm Raised, Angus Cross. No hormones or steriods. Ray (360)681-8093

6075 Heavy Equipment BULLDOZER: “Classic” John Deere, model 40-C with blade, winch and c a n o p y. R u n s g o o d . $4,200. (360)302-5027. FORK LIFT: Battery operated, man powered. $600. 452-9296 days. MINI-EXCAVATOR: ‘05 Kubota 121. 1,900 hrs., 4 buckets. $22,000. (360)460-8514 SEMI END-DUMP: ‘85 Freightliner. 400 Cummins BCIII, 13 sp SQHD exc. cond. $18,000. (360)417-0153

6080 Home Furnishings M I S C : K i t c h e n t a bl e, cherr y and black, extends with 6 chairs, table top included, $550. Mission style TV stand, $150. Mission style coffee table, $100. England brand sofa, green tweed with tan cording, $300. (360)452-7781 MISC: Queen size Lane sofa bed, multi-color, excellent condition, $500/ o b o. H owa r d M i l l e r grandfather clock with curio shelf, perfect condition, medium oak, paid $2,300 selling for $500/ obo. (360)797-3730. MISC: Recliner Snuggler, cabin scene, $100. Sofa, comfor table, like new, creme color with pink/red floral, must see to appreciate, very pretty, $100. 683-2632.

GARDEN TILLER E N D TA B L E : 2 t i e r, made in 1959, 27 x 15, Small, gas engine, runs well. $35. 681-3522 gray and black. $15. (360)797-1179 GOLF BALLS: (12), E N T E R T A I N M E N T b r a n d n e w, P r e c e p t CENTER: Very nice, can brand. $25/obo. Aftersend pictures if interest- noons (360)452-1473. ed. $50. (360)477-3339. GUM BALL MACHINE FEEDER HOLDER: 6’, Looks like old type, like metal, decorative, holds n ew, w i t h g u m b a l l s. 2 hold feeders. $15. $50. (360)681-4834. (360)452-5180 HEATER: Presto heat FIGURINES: Assor ted dish from Costco, paid Hamilton Collection, in $65. Asking $30. original boxes. $15 ea, 5 (360)457-6343 for $60. 683-0791. HEDGE TRIMMER FIREPLACE SCREEN Electric, new. $25. Christmas theme. $35. (360)683-3486 (360)681-7579 HELMETS: HJC SyFIREPLACE TOOLS Max, silver, like new, XL Wall hanging, was $300. and L, with accessories. Asking $100. $150. (360)457-8824. (360)452-5548 HELMET: Women’s or F I S H I N G R O D : S t . young adult full face moCroix, 9’, premier. $180. torcycle helmet. $55. (360)379-4134 (360)452-6349 F I S H TA N K : 4 0 G a l , HITCH: 5th wheel hitch, acryllic, many extras, on 15k, new condition. enclosed oak cupboard. $200. (360)477-3839. $200. (360)452-5796. H U T C H : M a p l e, ve r y FREE: (2) pillowback c h a i r s, w i t h o t t o m a n , nice, 42” x 77”, (2) pieces. $100. need recovering. (360)452-9906 (360)681-6249

CHEST FREEZER $75. (360)452-7746.

CHRISTMAS TREE R ev. s t a n d , ex c e l l e n t B I R D C AG E : H e a r t - condition, ready to asshaped, standing, white. semble. $90. 683-3944. $20. (360)452-7647. CLOTHES: Home shopB O O K C A S E S : F o u r ping cloths, small, pant shelves, 36 x 36, $10. suits. $25. (360)457-5335 Six shelves, 25 x 50, $20. (360)797-1179. CLUBS: Arnold Palmer, BOOKS: 123 westerns, beautiful full set, wood, irons, premium bag. 71 mysteries, etc. $25. $100. (360)385-2776. (360)301-4156 CLUBS: Maxfli irons, BOOKS: Harr y Potter forged, new grips, ten hardcover, books 1-7. matched clubs, (4) irons. $69 for set. $50. (360)385-2776. (360)775-0855 COCKTAIL SET: (10) BRICKS: Originally from glasses, shaker, pouring fireplace, large pile, last unit, silver trim. $20. used for walkway. $40. (360)457-3414 (360)457-2909 C O M P U T E R : L a p t o p, BUFFET: Old Philippine with sleeve, Vaio, PGG mahogany, 5’ 3” long. 3G 5L, good condition. $100. (360)457-2909 $50. (360)683-2386. CAMPER: Homemade, for pickup, stove, icebox. $200. (360)683-4840.

CORN-STICK PAN Cast iron. $10. (360)457-9498

CARPET CLEANER Carpet/rug spray cleaner. $100/obo. (360)928-3464

COSTUMES: Adult, ghost, 3 pieces, $5. Cour t jester, 3 pieces, $15. (360)928-3447

CASE: For Kindle, new, DESK: Computer desk, never used. $25. After- good for office or room. FREE: 9 - 10’ Doug Fir, pressure treated, 4 X 6 $100. (360)417-9412. noons (360)452-1473. very good cond. DINING SET: Natural (360)457-0763 CD PLAYER: Panasonic 300, like new, ex-wife finish & terracotta tiles, (4) chairs, good condi- FREE: Christmas cacstole CDs. $100. tus, 12” clay pot. tion. $200. 681-8713. (360)460-9608 (360)565-8039 CERAMIC POT: Large, DOLLY: For Motorcycle, F R E E Z E R : Ke n m o r e, kind you push around g l a ze d bl u e, c e ra m i c your garage. 8” x 76”. older 7.2 CU, chest type, garden planter. $60. works well. $50. $40. (360)452-7313. (360)457-5790 (360)452-5652 DOUBLE BED: MatCHAIRS: White, stained tress, boxspr ings and FRIDGE: Kirkland Whirlr a t t a n , u p h o l s t e r e d f r a m e , S e a l y b r a n d . pool, works well, broken seats. 4 for $50/obo. $35/obo. (360)477-6100. handle. $50. (360)683-0997 (360)460-4107 ELECTRIC HEATER C H A I R : U p h o l s t e r e d , Heats up to 1,100 sf., F U R N I T U R E : “ L a n e ” old, channel back. $50. end table, and maple never opened or used. (360)457-3414 wall clock. $20 each. $200. (360)452-4254. (360)452-9685 CHEST: Cedar, 42” x END TABLE: Light col19” x 17”h, antique. HIDE A BED or, with door, 26” diame$50/obo. (360)681-7090. ter. $5. (360)452-4583. $50. (360)452-7746.

L AT H E : C r a f t s m a n wood lathe, bench, and tools. $125. (360)457-0960

RACCOONS: Raccoon plate and wooden sculpt u r e, b o t h n i c e, n ew. $20. (360)457-6343.

STEREO EQUIP.: JVC TV: Sony 54”, with res t e r e o r e c e i v e r, C D mote, not flat screen, explayer, Mitsubishi 120W cellent condition. $200. spkrs. $65. 452-6349. (360)477-4050

L U G G AG E : M a t c h i n g RECORDER: Vinyl to two-suiter and duffel. CD. $50. (360)460-5358. $65. (360)457-7942. RIFLE: Winchester M67, LUGGAGE: Samsonite, early single shot, .22, n ew, w h e e l s, p u l l - u p bolt action. $200. handle. $195. (360)457-6845 (360)202-0928 ROCKING CHAIR MASSAGE TABLE Large, wooden, with Therma Top, por table. cushions. $45. $150. (360)457-0763. (360)683-8771 MINI-FRIDGE: Near ly new, dorm-sized. $35. (360)452-5548 MISC: Dresser, 7 drawers, white, gilded hardware, $95. Dog Kennel, $45. (360)598-2800. MOTORCYCLE: 185suzuki quad, missing carb and plastic, runs w/carb. $200. (360)477-6634. NET FLOATS: Very old, wood, from Alaska, great shape. (13) for $50. (360)681-4834 OFFICE FURNITURE Desk, chair, file cabinet, excellent condition. $100. (360)797-1062.

PET STROLLER: FunJACKET: Girls/ladies ski time, zipper enclosure, jacket, down, blue. $38. for cat or dog. $90. (360)775-0855 (360)461-4065 JAC K E T: M e n ’s , X L , PICK UP: Tommy-Light. Pe n d l e t o n , w o o l , ex . $200 cash, trade, obo. condition, red and black. (206)941-6617 $75. (360)928-9705. PILLOWS: New in box, Jigsaw Puzzles: 1000 two side sleeper pillows, pieces, Hometown were $24. Asking Series. $4 ea. 681-4217. $12.00 each. 928-3447.

STEREOS: Pioneer, so- VACUUM: Hoover, upny, and LaFayette re- right, heavy duty, bagcievers. $50 each. less. $50. (360)452-9685 (360)457-9625 SUBWOOFER: Kicker, V E R T ICAL BLINDS: 10”, in custom box, for auto or truck, plays hard. (4) 34W x59H, (1) 60 x 80. $20obo. $100. (360)681-0595. (360)461-0833 TABLE: Breakfast table, WA F F L E I RO N : C a s t 36” round, (2) chairs, iron. $10. 457-9498. good condition. $30. ROTARY SAW: Black & (360)461-5528 WASHER AND DRYER Decker, new. $20. TABLE: Drop leaf, Dun$50 for both or $25 (360)683-0146 can Phyfe table. $125. each. Work Great. (360)457-1392 SEWING MACHINE (360)477-3339 Brother, new, in box, 20 TA B L E S A W : W i t h WASHER AND DRYER stitch function. $70. stand, 10” Craftsman, Amana, matching set, (360)460-4107 2.5 horse power. $90. $200. (360)681-7579. (360)681-6249 SEWING MACHINE: Elna, portable, metal. $75. WASHING MACHINE TEA CART: Gold color, (360)437-2537 GE, 6 speed, heavy duwith (2) glass shelves. ty. $45. (360)683-8771. $20. (360)452-7647. SEWING MACHINE Serger, white, superlock, WASHING MACHINE TIRES: 175 70 R13 4 spool. GE, works well. $50. HANKOOK Winter I Pike $75. (360)437-2537. (360)457-5335 studded tires (Full Set). $200/obo. 477-3339. SEWING MACHINEWEAVING EQUIPMENT Singer, electric. TIRES: (2) studded, like ( 2 ) l o o m s , w a r p i n g $100/obo. new, used less than one frame, books, etc. $180. (360)928-3464 season, P205/65 R15. (360)681-2827 S H O C K S : 7 9 C h e v, $100. (360)912-3811. WEIGHT BENCH New Gabriel, 2 front, 2 TOOLBOX: Aluminium, Gold’s Gym, Olympic, rear. $100. 460-9608 diamond plate, for full with bars, no weights. SHOP-VAC: Craftsman s i z e p i ck u p, l o ck i n g . $25. (360)460-0575. Lang Shop-Vac, with ac- $65. (360)457-7942. cessories. $25. TOOL BOX: Small, roll- WHEEL: 18”, chrome, like new, five hole, G.M. (360)457-0960 away. $20. $200. (360)379-4134. (360)457-4383 SHOT BOX: Aluminium, canopy, lights front, slid- TOOL BOX: With a va- WHEELCHAIR: Exceler, clean. $150. lent condition. $100. riety of tools. $30. (360)477-3839 (360)461-4065 (360)457-4383

Jigsaw Puzzles: Chas POWERSNAKE: Rigid. SHOTGUN: 410 shotWysocki, 1000 pieces. $200/obo, or trade. gun, K-Mart Special, sin$6 ea. 681-4217. gle shot. $30. (206)941-6617 (360)457-6845 JOINTER: 6”, mark 1, 1 PRINTER: HP PhotoSKEET SHOOTER HP, 1985 model, great smar t 7760, excellent shape. $175. c o n d i t i o n , n e e d s i n k . with 130 clay targets. $35. (360)683-0146. (360)683-5601 $25. (360)461-2487.

TRAINING COLLAR WHEELS: (4) 14”, 5 lug, Sound or shock, brand f r o m Toyo t a . $ 1 5 p e r new. $40. 681-3522. pair. (360)457-5817.

TREE STAND: Christ- WHEELS: (4) Aluminmas tree stand, large, ium, 15 x 10, 6 lug. $25 heavy duty. $15. each. (360)417-9412. (360)683-3486 KEYBOARD: Full size, P R I N T E R : X E R O X STEREO: AM/FM with TRIPOD: Velbon VE-3, WREATHS: Grapevine, Realistic keyboard, with Work Center YK50 CX dual cassette record- for cameras or spotting Darice brand, new for stand. $60/obo. er/player, speakers. $20. needs ink. $25. scopes, excellent cond. crafts, 8”. $1.00 ea (360)928-2223 (360)670-5933 (360)452-4583 360-461-2487 $15. (360)452-5180.

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o r FA X to : (360)417-3507 Email: classified@peninsuladailynews.com

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5A246724

SET: Oriental blue print sofa, large chair and ottoman, excellent contition. $300/obo. (360)797-1407

ALL SEASON TIRES (2) Goodyear Fortera, P245/65/R17. $75 each. (360)598-2800


Classified

B8 MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 6080 Home Furnishings SOFA RECLINER: 90” long, microfiber, brown shade, like new. $350. (360)670-6230

6100 Misc. Merchandise C O O K S TOV E : C u t e wood cook stove, 20”x30”x5’. $450. (360)765-3771

7030 Horses HORSE: Beautiful female Arabian, 22 years old, needs experienced r i d e r, ow n e r c a n n o longer ride, must go to good home. $100. (360)457-6584

7035 General Pets

ADORABLE KITTENS All colors and sizes. $85. I bu y o l d H A M r a d i o PFOA (360)452-0414. equipment, tubes, hi-fi safehavenpfoa.org components, large speakers, etc. Call Steve FREE: Beautiful orange fe m a l e Ta b b y, sw e e t at (206)473-2608. and gentle, best PURR MISC: 18” steel Chev eve r ! A p p r ox . 1 8 m o. rims and tires, $195. 60 old, spayed June 2012, g a l . a n d 2 0 g a l . f i s h moving and can’t take tanks with lids, heaters, her with us. pumps and more, $95 Call (360)460-9374, both. 120 gal. propane leave message. tank, good shape, needs FREE: I’m looking for a paint, $150. nice elderly home, I am (360)461-3869 a fixed, 6 yr. old female MISC: Dewalt 14” radial cat and have long yellow arm saw, nice old one, hair, I do not do well with very heavy duty, mount- other pets or kids. I have ed on very nice trailer, my own bed but would i n c l u d e s 3 c a r b i d e rather sit on your lap and b l a d e s , $ 2 0 0 . 2 e n - wa t c h T V. I h ave my closed utility trailers, own litter box so I don’t One- 6’ long x 4.5’ wide have to go outside at x 4.5’ high, very heavy night. I can move to your duty, $350. One-8’ long, house in my carrier. x 6’ wide x 6.5’ high, (360)683-1625 $250. 681-8788. KITTENS. Free to good MISC: Generator 5kw, home Tabby kittens; 7 like new, star ts easy, weeks old; box trained $350. Tool box for full and eating dry food. Call s i ze p i ck u p, d i a m o n d 360.912.3861 plate, chrome finish, 2 locking doors, $150. 1.5 PUPPIES: Great Pyrehp electric water pump nees, Australian Shepwith pre filter pot, $200. herd and Black ? $100. (360)461-9103 3 each upright vacuum cleaners, like new, $20 Pure Bred Beagle Pupea. Cash only. pies. Beagle Puppies. (360)683-6130 $250 each. Ready M I S C : P o k e r t a b l e , 10/24/12 Call or Text (360)640-1610 wood, Kestell, a deluxe service top, new condiSHORKIE PUPPIES tion, $350/obo. Chairs, 2 registered, 1 girl, 1 4, Sampsonite, folding, boy. $800 ea. padded seat and back, (360)808-4123, lv msg $ 1 0 0 / o b o. 5 0 0 p o ke r chips, clear cover alumi- WANTED: Immediately, n u m c a s e , $ 5 0 / o b o . stud for small female Floor lamp, 29”H with dog in heat, prefer Pooshade, $35/obo. dle mix. (360)452-2951. (360)683-4856 MISC: Stained glass grinder, $50. New metal h e r b a n d s p i c e ra ck , $20. New portable DVD player, $50. Black table stand, $30. New Juiceman juicer, $60. Air popcor n popper, $9. New crockpot, $20. Solid wood, multi-use car t, $85. New H2O steam mop, $75. Poker table top, $25. Skeins of yarn, $2 ea. New citrus juicer, $12. (360)681-0494. M I S C : Wa r n 6 0 0 0 l b winch with brush guard, $350. Health Rider exerciser, $150. (360)928-3077 OIL STOVE: With tank. $600. 565-6274.

6105 Musical Instruments Baldwin Console Piano: beautiful cherry finish Baldwin console piano, with matching storage bench. One owner. Very good condition. Well maintained under smoke-free and pet-free environment. $1,995. (360)582-3045

9820 Motorhomes

ARC WELDER: Old Lincoln fleet-arc 280 amp A/C welder mounted on dolly. Very heavy duty. $150/obo. 681-8788.

6140 Wanted & Trades BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789. BUYING: vintage or old factory or custom knives. 1 or a collection. (360)457-0814 WANTED Bagpipes and other Celtic instruments, Scottish related items, clothing, etc. 457-1032.

6135 Yard & Garden Craftsman snowblower, new, 24”, Self propelled, 6 fwd spds, 3 rev, Elec/ pull start, with 4 yr service repair warranty, & shear pins/oil kit. Package cost $850 ten mos. ago. Illness forces sale. N eve r u s e d . $ 5 5 0 . 0 0 firm. photos online. 9282223. Native Plant Sale. It’s a great time to plant Native Plants just before it star ts to rain. M a ny va r i e t i e s a n d sizes of trees and shrubs at end of season pricing. Please call (360)582-1314 for more information.

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

TRAILER: ‘55 14’ Shasta. Ver y nice. $5,000. 417-3959 message.

9802 5th Wheels 1998 Kit RoadRanger 5th Wheel. 1998 Kit Road Ranger 5th Wheel with 13’ Slide-Out. All appliances in working order including air cond. Furnace. Must Sell $8,000. Call Terry (360)477-2756

32 ft. 5th. wheel, 2003 Mirage. Low road miles, 3 slides, power awning, rear kitchen, pull-out pantry, ceiling fan, computer desk, all-wood cabinets. $13,000. Chimacum. Email haroldberger@mac.com 5TH WHEEL: ‘00 35’ Alfa. 3 slides, perfect condition, everything works, many extras, must see to appreciate. $22,500/ obo. (360)683-2529.

5TH WHEEL: ‘91 35’ Hitchhiker Champagne edition. Two slide-outs, rear kitchen, fully furnished. Permanent skirting also available. $10,000. (360)797-0081

Cruising boat. 1981 Sea Ranger sedan style trawler 39’ LOA. Single engine Per kins diesel with bow thruster. Fully enclosed fly bridge. Comfor table salon; stateroom with queen bed; full shower in head;full-sized refrigerator/freezer plus freezer b ox i n l a z z a r e t ; n ew Westerbeke genset with “get-home” alternate power source from genset; new smar t charger/inver ter and battery bank; good electronics including radar and AIS receive. Cruises at 7.5 Kts on 2.5 gph. Max speed 9.0 Kts, 150 gal water and 535 gal fuel capacity. 15 hp Yamaha O/B on dinghy. Anchor with 300’ chain and stern tie spool. Fully equipped as USCG Auxiliary Ope ra t i o n a l Fa c i l i t y. We have cruised throughout Salish Sea and Inside Passage in this comfortable and sea-worthy boat. She works well in t h e N W e nv i r o n m e n t . Suitable for 2 people cruising or live-aboard. S e e i n Po r t L u d l o w. $99,500. (360)437-7996.

MOTOR HOME: ‘92 25’ Tioga Monterra Special. E350, 65K mi. $8,500. (360)457-6434.

NASH 2000 26’, excellent condition. $8,000.(360)460-8538.

OLYMPIC: 84 XL 18’. CAMPER: ‘03 Pasttime. 3.8 OMC inboard, new L i ke n ew, m a ny a d d - 9.9 mercury kicker, easy ons, solar panels, awn- load trailer. $4,500. (360)457-6448 ing, air cond., TV. $5,500. (360)461-6615. SEASWIRL: ‘90 21’. CAMPER: 9.5’ Alpenlite 190ob. $3,500. (360)452-6677 Lmtd. Like new, all bells and whistles. $16,000. (360)417-2606 9931 Legal Notices HUNTER’S SPECIAL 22’ camper. $900. (360)797-4041 PACKAGE: ‘85 F250 Supercab with 10’ cabover camper. $2,500/ obo. (360)417-0163.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous 2012 RANGER 25SC TUGBOAT. Loaded with custom features. Clean, new appearance. Locate d i n S e q u i m . Wa r m , d r y, c o m fo r t a bl e fo u r season cruising. Go to rangertugs.com/R-25sc for vir tual tour. Illness forces sale. $119,500. (509)312-0704. BELL BOY: 22’ cuddy cabin, V8 engine needs work. $1,800. (360)385-9019 BLUE WATER: ‘91 16’ V6 MercCruiser with trailer. $3,800/obo. (360)460-0236 BOAT: Fiberglass, 12’, $200. 4.5 HP Merc mot a r, $ 3 0 0 . ( 3 6 0 ) 6 8 3 4761.

B OAT T R A I L E R : 1 9 ’ single axle, galvanized, E Z L o a d b o a t t ra i l e r. T E N T T R A I L E R : ‘ 0 3 $1,350/obo. 809-0700. Coleman: Westlake, sleeps 9, furnance, wa- ROWING BOAT: Wood ter tank, water heater, L a p s t r a k e W h i t e h a l l , indoor/outdoor shower with traveling sail, 2 pair and more, ever ything of spruce spoon blade works. $5,000. oars, Sprit sail with mast (360)452-4327 and 2 rudder options, includes trailer bunk but T E N T T R A I L E R : ‘ 9 9 not trailer, will deliver in Dutchman. King/queen Puget Sound area. bed, excellent cond., re- $4,000. (360)775-5955. frigerator, furnace, A/C, tons of storage. $4,000. DRIFT BOAT: With trail(360)460-4157 er. $2,000. 461-6441.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County No. 11-2-00338-1 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF CLALLAM KAREN RUSHBY, a married woman, Plaintiff. vs. BRADLEY ELMER, a single man; GERAME PETERSEN, a single man; RYAN ELMER, a single man; Defendants. THE STATE OF WASINGTON, TO: GERMANE PETERSEN, a single man, Defendant above named: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the day of the fist publication of this summons, to-wit, within sixty (60) days after the 29th day of October, 2012, and defend the aboveentitled action in the above-entitled court, and Answer the Complaint of the Plaintiff, KAREN RUSHBY, a married woman, and serve a copy of your Answer upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff KAREN RUSHBY at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the Complaint and Amended Complaint, which as been filed with the Clerk of said Court. This action stems from personal injuries and damages Plaintiff, KAREN RUSHBY, sustained due to the negligence of the Defendants, GERAME PETERSEN, a single man; BRADLEY ELMER, a single man; and RYAN ELMER, a single man; which negligence was the proximate cause of personal injuries sustained by Plaintiff KAREN RUSHBY on August 2, 2009, when she was struck by a golf ball driven into Lake Sutherland from residential property located at 125 Poulsen Road, Clallam County, Washington. Ser vice by publication is authorized by RCW 4.28.100(2) and RCW 4.28.110. DATED this 25th day of October, 2012. McMENAMIN & McMENAMIN PS By: SHARI McMENAMIN, WSBA #12914 544 North Fifth Avenue Sequim, Washington 98382 Phone: (360) 683-8210 Legal No. 433891 Fax: (360) 683-8315 Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, Dec. 3, 2012

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

Clallam County

9817 Motorcycles

9805 ATVs

HARLEY: ‘04 Soft Tail QUAD: ‘05 Honda TRX Heritage. Black with lots 450R. Excellent cond. of extra chrome. 24,500 $2,500. (360)461-0157. mi., Beautiful bike, must see to appreciate. 9740 Auto Service $11,000. (360)477-3725.

& Parts

OLYMPIC: ‘92 26’ Super XL. Less than 800 hours on original engine and o u t d r i ve , S u z u k i , 1 5 h o r s e k i cke r h a s l ow hours. Rebuilt trailer with five like new tires. Hot and cold water, heater, stove, dinette. $24,750. 457-6162 or 809-3396

H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 S p o r t s t e r. 7 K m i l e s , mint. $7,900. 452-6677. H A R L E Y: ‘ 9 1 F X L R . c u s t o m s h o w r e a d y, S&S powered, wins every time. $11,500/obo. (360)452-4612, msg.

SABERCRAFT: 21’. 302 Inboard, Lorance GPS 5” screen with fish/depth finder, VHS, 15 hp kicker, good interior. Selling due to health. $4,000. 683-3682

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153. H O N DA : ‘ 8 5 M a g n a . Runs excellent. $1,600. (360)385-9019 QUAD: ‘07 Yamaha 700 Raptor. Like new, extras. Price reduced to $4,500. (360)452-3213 SUZUKI: ‘06 Boulevard C90T. 342 mi., like new, m a n y ex t r a s , a l w ay s garaged. $9,500. (360)461-1911

9805 ATVs

2005 Suzuki LT-Z 250 Quadspor t This quad has approximately 20 hours of ride time. It has a K&N Air Filter, Big Gun exhaust, Acerbis Handguards, and new battery. I t i s w h i t e w i t h bl u e frame. $2,250. 460-0405

UNIFLITE: ‘64 23’. Radio,, fathometer, GPS, radar, crab pot puller, POLARIS: 2011 Razor Yanmar diesel, trailer. LE Bobby Gorden se$6,000/obo. 460-1246. ries, excellent condition, low hours, used for famifun, no extreme riding, 9817 Motorcycles ly well maintained and always stored inside, HONDA: ‘08 CRF150R. windshield and roof top ex t ra p a r t s i n c l u d e d . ex t r a s. $ 1 1 , 4 0 0 o b o, 460-0187 or 460-9512 $2,000. evenings. (360)461-3367

9180 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles Classics & Collect. Others FORD: ‘27 T-Bucket, ‘350’ blower, rag top, f a s t a n d n i c e , C D. $17,500. Call before 7 p.m. (360)457-8388.

For Sale: 4 mounted studs, P/235/70R-16 o n 5 - 4 . 2 5 / 4 . 5 r i m s. $225/obo. 452-4112.

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

HONDA: ‘05 CRF80. Like new. $1,400. PONTOON: ‘06 10’ Out(360)460-8514. cast. Stainless steel frame, comes with flipHONDA: ‘79 CM400T per, oars, padded seats, road bike. 24,000 mi. K-pump. $600/obo. $900. 683-4761. (360)670-2015

Sailboat: 19’ Lightning Sailboat on trailer ready to go. Asking $1,500 or will take best offer. The boat is very solid for its age-the sails are ver y serviceable including the FORMOSA 41 KETCH spinnaker. (360)460-6231 ‘70. Beautiful sailboat, cabin totally rebuilt, new S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n engine (Yanmar), new 26’. Cr uise proven, a sails, needs bowsprit, real steal, lots of equipgreat liveaboard, was ment. As is. $3,500 or $79,500. Now $59,500. trade. (360)477-7719. (360)452-1531 SEA SWIRL: ‘82 16’. G L A S P LY : 2 6 ’ c a b i n 140 Chev engine, Merc cr uiser, flying br idge, outdrive, 4 stroke Honda single Cummins diesel 75 kicker, Calkins galv. engine, low hours, radar, t r a i l e r, 2 n ew S c o t t y VHF radio, CB, dept/fish downriggers, fishfinder, finder, dingy, down rig- good deck space, good gers, 16’x32’ boathouse. fishing boat. $3,000. $27,500. (360)457-0684. (360)477-3725 LIVINGSTON: 13’. With SELL OR TRADE all the necessary equip- 1 3 ’ L i v i n g s t o n , n e w ment, price is right and paint, trailer rebuilt, 30 ready to go, let’s talk. hp Yamaha, front steer$2,650/obo. 452-2712. ing, new eats, downrigger mounts, Lowrance MOOCHER; ‘91 16’ f i s h f i n d e r. Tr a d e fo r glass solid boat, Yamatravel trailer or 4x4 quad, ha ‘07 50 HP tiller with etc. $2,000/obo. full power, ‘08 6 HP high (360)460-1514 thrust, Scotty electrics, Lowrance electronics, STARCRAFT: ‘73 12’. e x c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n . aluminum, E. downrigger $6,500. (360)452-2148. $800. (360)928-3483.

Canopies

25’ 2004 Georgie Boy Landau 34K miles. Compact, easy to drive and maneuver, sleeps 4.2 slide outs, Wo r k h o r s e c h a s s i s, 8.1L Vor tec gas, tow package, BrakeMaster towing sys, 4KW Onan gen, hydraulic jacks, rear camera, driverside door, awning, 6 gal water heater, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD player, huge outside storage, bathroom with tub and shower, outside shower, roof A/C, wall htr, large dual power fridge, queen bed, microwave, range and oven. $40,000. (360)681-3020

Goods

6125 Tools

TRAILER: ‘00 26” Fleetwood slideout, $9,800. (360)452-6677

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

5TH WHEEL: ‘98 29’ Alpenlite. 1 tip-out, extras, ver y clean, ver y good condition. $12,500. OCEAN KAYAK: Prowl(360)460-9680 er Big Game, 12’ 9”x34”, retail $980, never used. 9808 Campers & $850. (360)303-2157.

MOTOR HOME: ‘95 32’ GUITAR: Custom built Winnebago Adventurer. STRAT, $600. Fender Excellent condition, 70K Mustang III amp, $200. mi. $8,250. 681-4045. 1 (360)417-2165 MUST SELL: ‘92 34’ MISC: Ibanez electric Bounder. 2,000 mi. on guitar, semi-acoustic, new 454 Chev 950 hp AS-50, Tobacco Sunbu- engine. $7,995/obo. rst, Dimarzio pickups, (360)683-8453 signed Hirabayashi $500 Fender amplifier 212, Ul9832 Tents & timate Chorus, $300. 2 Travel Trailers kayaks, White Water fiberglass, $75, plastic, $300. (360)683-7144. ALJO 1991 24’ trailer, ver y good condition, $5,500. 460-8538. 6115 Sporting Va l l e y A q u a n a u t LV 17’1” Poly Sea Kayak w/skeg used a dozen times over the last few years and kept in the garage when not in use. Some accessor ies included. $1300. Contact Kelly at 461-3255.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1978 CADILLAC SEV I L L E . B E AU T I F U L “LIKE NEW” CLASSIC. GOLD, LT YELLOW LEATHER, SUNR O O F, W H I T E WALLS, WIRE WHEELS. 75K MILES. M U S T S E E TO A P P R E C I AT E . $ 7 , 5 0 0 (360)928-9724 (206) 697-2005 ‘74 CHEVY LUV P/U project. Spec ed, short bed, rear fenders, mag wh, lwrd. $500 (360)6818881 daily 9-5.

FORD: ‘29 Model AA. 1 1/2 ton flatbed truck, complete frame off restoration. Updated 4 cyl. e n g i n e, hy d r. b ra ke s. $22,000. (360)683-3089. FORD: ‘50 F1 pickup. 239 flathead V8, 3 sp, overdr ive, r uns and drives great. $17,500. (360)379-6646 FORD: ‘62 Galaxie Sunliner Convertible. 69,400 mi., 390 ci and 300 hp a u t o, P / S, P / B, P / W, P/Se, radials, running lights, skirts, car cover, original paint, upholstery and carpets, new top. $24,500. (360)683-3385. Email for pictures Rrobert169@qwest.net

CROSLEY: ‘51 Wagon. Good body/runner. $4,000. (360)683-7847. DODGE: ‘71 1/2 ton short bed. V8, auto, factory power steering, Adventurer Sport, paint, interior and chrome redone, California truck, black on black, garaged. $15,000. (360)683-7789

2007 VW New Beetle Converible. Ver y good condition Only 62,250 miles Auto transmission Located in Sequim.

Others

CHEV: ‘79 L82 Corvette. Motor needs work. $4,000/obo. 809-0700. Classic, all original, 1966 F-250 Ford Camper Special. 390 Auto, original owner. $6,000/obo. (360)390-8101

2 0 0 2 L ex u s L S 4 3 0 . Excellent condition, Mystic Sea Opal with cream leather interior, V- 8 , 5 - s p e e d a u t o, 4-door sedan, 63K original miles, one owner, Leather, Navi, Sun/Moon roof, Luxury pkg., up to 28 MPG highway, garaged entire life. Email phone number to lsa@wr iteme.me for more information and owner contact. We will call you back. This is a beautiful luxury vehicle. $19,950.

MAZDA: ‘79 RX-7. Twin rotor, sport coupe, nice car, great driver. $2,250. (360)683-5871.

MERCEDES: ‘82 380SL. CHEV: ‘53 pickup resto- C o nve r t i bl e h a r d / s o f t ration project. $3,800. top, new tires/brakes, Cell (562)743-7718 Looks great. $5,750. (360)683-5614 or CHEV: ‘56 Belair. 6 cyl., (253)208-9640 auto, 4 door, paint, interior, chrome, re-done PLYMOUTH: ‘74 Duster. to stock, California car, Performance upgrades. 2nd owner, always gar- $9,250. 683-7768. aged. Not smoked in. $22,500. (360)683-7789. 9292 Automobiles CHEV: ‘63 Nova SS. 2 door hard top, V8, 2 sp power glide, project car. $5,200. (360)461-2056.

1995 TOYOTA PASEO 30+mpg, 5 sp manual with apprx 223k miles,factory alarm syst e m , a f t e r m a r ke t c d player, tinted windows, well maintained and serviced regularly. $2500 OBO,Please call 360-477-8852.

1995 CADILLAC STS, 4 DR AUTO, LEATHE R , AC, B O S E R A DIO, CD, CASSETTE. R E B U I LT T R A N S , NEWER TIRES, CHROME RIMS WITH EXTRA RIMS/TIRES. E L E C T E V E R YTHING. BEAUTIFUL CAR LIKE NEW WITH 108,000. (360)670-3841 OR (360)681-8650

2008 Lexus 430SC: Pebble Beach Addition. I f yo u eve r wa n t e d a b e a u t i f u l L ex u s , l o w mileage (19,200) for a 2008 Lexus 430 SC. It is a dark gray with the entire Pebble Beach Addition ad on’s. The top retracts to the trunk in 19 seconds. It really is a see to appreciate condition. The only reason I am selling is I have 5 vehicles and am cutting down to just two. If interested call (360) 385-0424. This will not last long. Rodney

HONDA ‘99 ACCORD EX. V6, auto, air, leathe r, r a d i o / C D, r e m o t e DODGE: ‘83 Rampage. FORD: ‘03 Mustang con- lock, records, runs great 21/25mpg, 198k miles Red, PK, needs work. vertabile. $6,800/obo. (360)460-2158 $1,900/obo. 582-0389. (360)808-1242

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7042.26746 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Green Tree Servicing LLC Grantee: Billie J. Dunscomb and Anthony S. Dunscomb, wife and husband Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1213728 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-035215 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 4 B1 352 TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e ow n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On November 9, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 4 in Block 352 of the Townsite of Port Angeles. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 914 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7207 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/17/07, recorded on 12/19/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1213728, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Billie J. Dunscomb and Anthony S. Dunscomb, wife and husband, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Abacus Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) as nominee for Abacus Mortgage, Inc., its successors and assigns to Green Tree Servicing LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1278384. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/05/2012 Monthly Payments $11,371.44 Late Charges $0.00 Lender’s Fees & Costs $287.40 Total Arrearage $11,658.84 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $659.07 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,428.07 Total Amount Due: $13,086.91 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $164,124.32, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 9, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Billie Dunscomb aka Billie J. Dunscomb 914 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7207 Anthony Dunscomb Anthony S. Dunscomb 914 West 11th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363-7207 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/04/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/04/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/05/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7042.26746) 1002.218133-File No. Pub: Oct. 8, 29, 2012 Legal No. 426937

File No.: 7023.100319 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Marie L Trillingham, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1210200 Tax Parcel ID No.: 06-30-00-037845 Abbreviated Legal: S2 LOTS 9 & 10 BLK 378 TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On November 9, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of CLALLAM, State of Washington: The South half of Lots 9 and 10 in Block 378 of the Townsite of Port Angeles Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1205 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/25/07, recorded on 10/05/07, under Auditor’s File No. 2007-1210200, records of CLALLAM County, Washington, from Marie L. Trillingham, a single person, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Eagle Home Mortgage, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Eagle Home Mortgage, Limited Liability Company to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1276359. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/06/2012 Monthly Payments $11,180.24 Late Charges $391.58 Lender’s Fees & Costs ($49.88) Total Arrearage $11,521.94 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $607.50 Title Report $625.47 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,326.97 Total Amount Due: $12,848.91 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $155,560.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 11/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 9, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Marie L. Trillingham 1205 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Marie L. Trillingham 1205 South Cherry Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/30/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/30/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/06/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 9 8 0 0 9 - 0 9 9 7 C o n t a c t : N e a n g A v i l a ( 4 2 5 ) 5 8 6 - 1 9 0 0 . ( T S # 7023.100319) 1002.217597-File No. Pub: Oct. 8 , 29, 2012 Legal No. 426938


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others P O N T I AC : ‘ 0 4 G ra n d Prix GT. $7,000. (360)461-4665 PORCHE: ‘02 Boxster S. 65K mi., black with black leather interior, 6 speed, all options, nice car. $18,500. (360)461-9635.

BU I C K : ‘ 0 0 L e S a b r e. 115K, like new, loaded, T OYO TA : ‘ 0 9 P r i u s . runs great. White, 58K, Nav, stereo, $3,500. (253)314-1258. B.U. camera. $18,000. (805)478-1696 CADILLAC: ‘78 Eldorado. 86K mi., looks very TOYOTA: ‘81 Cressida. good, runs great. $3,000 R u n s ex c e l l e n t , n e w firm. (360)928-5185. tires. $500. 683-7173. CADILLIC: ‘91. Front TRIUMPH: ‘79 Spitfire. damage, engine/tranny B o t h h a r d / s o f t t o p s . $1,500. (360)460-2931. good $500/obo. 457-3425. VW: ‘03 Passat. 70K, 6 CHEV: ‘97 Camaro con- sp manual, W8 sedan, vertible. 6 cyl. new mo- b l a c k / b l a c k l e a t h e r, tor, R16’s, mag wheels great condition. $12,000. (360)461-4514 $5,000. 452-1106.

9434 Pickup Trucks Others

DODGE ‘08 RAM 2500 QUAD CAB BIGHORN LONGBED 4X4 6.7L Cummins turbo diesel, automatic, dual batt e r i e s , a l l oy w h e e l s , good tires, running boards, 5th wheel hitch, tow package, trailer brake controller, airbags, auxiliary fuel tank, keyless entr y, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, power sliding rear window, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Only 34,000 miles! Priced under Kelley Blue Book! Immaculate condition inside and out! Already set up for towing! Stop by Gray Motors today! $33,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com DODGE: ‘72 3/4 ton. Runs great, no dents, some rust. $700/obo. (360)531-3842

C h ev y ‘ 9 9 S i l v e r a d o G r e a t S h a p e . C h ev y Siverado pickup, ‘99 Extended Cab 4x4, 5.3L V8, autotran, SL package. Great shape, 1 owner, 130k mi. Blue Book $7700, asking $6900. Call 681-3507 or 360-301-0456.

FORD: ‘08 F150 XLT. 4x4 crew cab. Low mi., loaded! $18,500. 1951 Dodge truck. (360)912-1599 Beautiful maintained colFORD: ‘72 F100 1/2 ton. lector’s truck. Must see to appreciate. Original Runs/stops great, it’s 40 years old too! $1,200. miles 47K. $14,000. (847)302-7444 (360)385-0424

BUICK ‘08 LACROSSE CXL SEDAN CHRYSLER: ‘02 Town & C o u n t r y L i m i t e d . F u l l 3.8L Series III V6, automatic, chrome alloys, power, excellent. $5,500. (360)452-4827. good tires, backup assist sensors, keyless entry, FORD: ‘01 Mustang. V6, p owe r w i n d ow s, d o o r auto, good condition, locks, and mirrors, power programmable heated runs good, low mi. l e a t h e r s e a t s, c r u i s e $5,495. (360)582-0358. control, tilt, air conditionFORD: ‘05 Mustang GT. ing, dual zone climate V8, 5 speed, 61K mi., c o n t r o l , C D s t e r e o , new tires. $14,900. steering wheel controls, (360)582-0358 information center, onstar, dual front and side HYUNDAI: ‘05 Elantra. i m p a c t a i r b a g s. O n l y New clutch/timing belt. 14,000 miles! Priced un$3,200. (360)457-1056. der Kelley Blue Book! KIA: 2003 Rio. 5 spd, 4 Like new condition incylinder, less then 40K side and out! One owner, clean Carfax! Stop by miles. $7,500/obo. Gray Motors today! (360)808-1303 $16,995 GRAY MOTORS LEXUS: ‘99 ES300. 84K 457-4901 Mom’s V6, leather, mnrf. graymotors.com $8,700. (360)643-3363.

FORD: ‘86 F150. Excellent cond., runs great, recent tune up. $3,000/ obo. (360)531-3842. FORD: ‘88 Ranger Super cab. Auto, front/rear tanks, power windows/ seats, power steering, tilt wheel, cruise control, 92,384 mi. $2,900/obo. (360)457-0852 FORD: ‘91 F250. Ext. c a b X LT, ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , a u t o, 105K orig. mi., gooseneck/trailer hitches, trailer brakes, runs great. $2,495. (360)452-4362 or (360)808-5390. FORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. Ext. cab, 4WD, 4.0L 6 cyl, auto, premium tires/ wheels, spray-in bedline r, C D, s u p e r c l e a n , 180K. $4,100. 461-7566.

FORD: ‘96 F150. 4x4, MERCURY: ‘96 Sable. CHEV: ‘93 Pickup, good l o n g b e d , ex t r a c a b, sedan, good shape, new b o d y, n e e d s e n g i n e 5.0L, A/T, A/C, power, tires, needs transmis- work. $800/obo. 162K miles. $2,000/obo. (360)301-4721 sion. $450. 457-0578. (360)912-1100 OLDS: ‘99 Bravada. Loaded, leather $4,295/ obo. (360)928-2181.

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

GMC: ‘77 Sierra 6000 series. New 12’ bed. $1,300/obo. 775-1139.

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

GMC: ‘00. 3500 6.5L diesel utility truck, 151K, new injector pump, glow plugs and electric fuel pump. $7,150. (360)683-3425

CHEV: ‘99 Suburban. 1 owner vehicle with complete maintenance records, clean, well kept, s t r o n g r u n n i n g t r u ck , 251K mi., priced $1,000 below lowest Blue Book GMC: ‘00 Sierra 2500 value. $3,850. 452-2768. SLE. Ext. cab, 4x4, big blk, 128K, gr t shape, FORD ‘04 TAURUS nice tires/whls. $6,700/ SES obo. (360)477-6361. 76k orig mi! 3.0L DOHC 24v V6, auto, loaded! G M C : ‘ 0 8 C a n y o n . Gold metal exterior in Cruise, air conditioning, excellent cond! Tan cloth o n l y 1 4 , 0 0 0 m i . O n l y interior in great shape! $12,000. 360-385-3025 Pwr D/S seat, CD, A/C, G M C : ‘ 8 6 1 t o n 4 x 4 . Pwr windows, pwr door Fuel tank/pump, r uns locks, pwr mirrors, dual airbags, 2 owner! Spotgood. $4,000. 327-3342. less Carfax! VERY clean HONDA ‘04 PILOT EXL little Taurus at our No Haggle price of only AWD SPORT UTILITY $5,995! 3.5L VTEC V6, automatic, alloy wheels, roof Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 rack, privacy glass, keyless entr y, power winFORD ‘06 FIVE HUNdows, door locks, mirDRED SEL AWD!! rors, and drivers seat, heated leather seats, 3rd 36k orig mi!!! 3.0L Duratec V6, CVT auto trans, row seating, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, LOADED! Black exterior C D / c a s s e t t e s t e r e o , in like excel cond! Gray GPS navigation system, leather interior in excebackup assist sensors, l e n t s h a p e ! d u a l p w r dual front and side im- seats, moon roof, 6 disk pact airbags. Priced un- CD, cruise, tilt with cont, der Kelley Blue Book dual climate, wood trim, v a l u e ! O n l y 6 4 , 0 0 0 tinted windows, parking miles! Clean Carfax! Im- sensors, trac cont, alloys maculate condition in- w/ 90% rubber!! 1 ownside and out! Stop by er!! VERY nice 500 at our No Haggle price of Gray Motors today! only $14,995 $9,995! GRAY MOTORS Carpenter Auto Center 457-4901 681-5090 graymotors.com G M C ‘ 94 Suburban: NISSAN ‘02 SENTRA 1500, 4x4, 350, auto, SE-R SEDAN 2.5L DOHC 4 cylinder, A/C, 247,900 mi, family automatic, alloy wheels, car, very nice condition, sunroof, rear spoiler, strong, safe, reliable. key l e s s e n t r y, p ow e r $3200. 360-531-0854. w i n d ow s, d o o r l o ck s, JEEP: ‘04 Grand Cheroand mirrors, cruise con- kee Laredo. 123K, 6 cyl., trol, tilt, air conditioning, all power, 4WD, CD. CD stereo, dual front air- $7,800. (360)452-9314. bags. Sparkling clean inside and out! Great fuel JEEP: ‘87 Wrangler. Inmileage! Spor ty SE-R line 6 engine, 5 sp tranEdition! Stop by Gray ny, new top, lockers all Motors today! around, 101K. $3,900. $6,995 (360)452-3488 GRAY MOTORS SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai 457-4901 4x4. 46K drive mi., 30K graymotors.com tow mi., tan, very excelTOYOTA: ‘93 Ext. cab. lent condition, extremely V6, lots new. clean, original, stock, $3,500. (360)775-9707. new black top, rebuilt trans, clutch, tires, R e e s e t o w b a r, C B , 9556 SUVs tape. $5,000. 460-6979. Others CHEV: ‘96 Suburban. 3/4 ton, 6.5L, turbo diesel, leather, 206K, nice. $4,900. (360)301-4884

LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

NISSAN: ‘97 Pathfinder. 4x4. Runs great. $3,875/ obo (530)432-3619. SUBARU ‘99 LEGACY OUTBACK WAGON AWD 117k orig mi! 2.5L Flat 4 cyl, auto, loaded! 2 tone blue/pewter exterior in great cond! Gray cloth interior in great shape! PW, PDL, PM, CD/Cassette, tinted windows, cruise, tilt, A/C, alloys, 2 owner! Headgaskets/timing belt just done!! VERY clean little Subaru at our No Haggle price of only $6,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 T OYO TA : ‘ 0 1 R a v 4 . loaded tow hitch, 99K miles. $8,500. 683-6242. TOYOTA ‘01 SEQUOIA LIMITED 4X4 121k orig mi! 4.7L IForce V8, auto, LOADED!! Silver exterior in great cond! Gray leather inter ior in excellent shape! Dual pwr seats, moon roof, JBL 6 disk stereo, 3rd seat, rear air, climate cont, wood trim, side airbags, r unning boards, tow, tinted windows, alloys with 90% r u bb e r ! ! L o c a l t ra d e ! Very nice Sequoia at our No Haggle price of only $12,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

9730 Vans & Minivans Others DODGE: ‘99 Grand Caravan SE. 165K mi., many options, well cared for. $3,000. 457-6066 or (360)460-6178. FORD: ‘91 Aerostar van. V6, 5 speed, lots of new par ts, needs tranny work. $200. 457-4383. OLDSMOBILE: ‘01 GOS silver mist, gray lthr, tow package, excellent cond. 5,300. (360)683-6864. TOYOTA : ‘ 0 5 S i e n n a . Excellent condition, 1 owner, 89K, 20K on new tires/brakes. $12,300. (360)681-3714

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County File No.: 7306.20387 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Washington State Employees Credit Union Grantee: Douglas E. Campbell who also appears of record as Douglas Edward Campbell and as Doug Campbel, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003 1098569 Tax Parcel ID No.: 123113 310125 Abbreviated Legal: PTN. E 1/2 SW 12-31-12 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On November 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: The West 200 feet of the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 and the West 200 feet of that part of the SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 in Section 13, Township 31 North, Range 12 West, W.M., lying Northerly of the right of way for State Route 112. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 24373 Highway 112 Clallam Bay, WA 98326-9606 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/26/02, recorded on 01/02/03, under Auditor’s File No. 2003 1098569, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Douglas E. Campbell, a married man as his separate estate who also appears of record as Douglas Edward Campbell and Doug Campbell, as Grantor, to Evergreen Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Washington State Employees Credit Union, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/23/2012 Monthly Payments $4,291.20 Late Charges $88.45 Lender’s Fees & Costs $286.66 Total Arrearage $4,666.31 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $675.00 Title Report $419.51 Statutory Mailings $30.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,208.51 Total Amount Due: $5,874.82 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $66,222.23, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 30, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Douglas E. Campbell aka Douglas Campbell aka Douglas Edward Campbell 24373 Highway 112 Clallam, WA 98326-9606 Douglas E. Campbell aka Douglas Campbell aka Douglas Edward Campbell P.O. Box 341 Clallam Bay, WA 98326-0341 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas E. Campbell aka Douglas Campbell 24373 Highway 112 Clallam, WA 98326-9606 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Douglas E. Campbell aka Douglas Campbell P.O. Box 341 Clallam, WA 98326-0341 Laura Campbell 24373 Highway 112 Clallam, WA 98326-9606 Laura Campbell P.O. Box 341 Clallam, WA 98326-0341 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/21/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/21/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/23/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7306.20387) 1002.220525-File No. Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2012 Legal No. 432713

File No.: 7485.20028 Grantors: Lance E. Olsen, Trustee United States of America acting through the Rural Housing Service or successor agency, United States Department of Agriculture Grantee: Ramona L. Valadez, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1218886 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063010 501601 Abbreviated Legal: Pcl 1 (65sur/69) Ptn PS Co0op Colonys 2nd Addt. Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On November 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel 1 of Boundary Line Adjustment Survey, recorded March 19, 2008 in Volume 65 of Surveys, Page 69, under Clallam County Recording No. 2008-1217948, being a Boundary Line Adjustment of Lots C, D, 3 and F of Boundary Line Adjustment Survey recorded in Volume 61 of Surveys, Page 77, and Amended Boundary Line Adjustment Survey recorded in Volume 65 of Surveys, Page 24, being a portion of Blocks 11 and 16, Puget Sound Cooperative Colony’s Second Addition to Port Angeles, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 12, records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 507 Lopez Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 04/02/08, recorded on 04/07/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1218886, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Ramona L. Valadez, a single woman, as Grantor, to the United States of America acting through the State Director, USDA Rural Development for the State of WA, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of United States of America acting through the Rural Housing Service or successor agency, United States Department of Agriculture, as Beneficiary. The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/17/2012 Monthly Payments $1,408.42 Late Charges $0.00 Prior Accrued Late Charges $32.40 Total Arrearage $1,440.82 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $725.00 Title Report $249.32 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,068.32 Total Amount Due: $2,509.14 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $9,452.61, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/23/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 30, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Ramona L. Valadez 507 Lopez Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Ramona L. Valadez 507 Lopez Avenue Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/16/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/17/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/17/2012 Lance E. Olsen, Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7485.20028) 1002.216080-File No. Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2012 Legal No. 432717

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 B9 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County

File No.: 7037.94859 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. 2006-FRE2, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FRE2 Grantee: Susan Kathleen Witherow, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2005 1170362 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000023210 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 2, Blk 232, TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On November 9, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2, Block 232, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 106 West 7th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/23/05, recorded on 11/30/05, under Auditor’s File No. 2005 1170362, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Marvin H. Witherow Jr and Susan K. Witherow, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Corp. 2006-FRE2, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FRE2, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2009-1232129. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 08/08/2012 Monthly Payments $12,518.12 Lender’s Fees & Costs $431.76 Total Arrearage $12,949.88 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $506.25 Title Report $515.98 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,102.23 Total Amount Due: $14,052.11 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $103,790.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 9, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 10/29/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Marvin H Witherow Jr 106 West 7th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Susan K Witherow 106 West 7th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/22/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/23/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 08/08/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.94859) 1002.220753-File No. Pub: Oct. 8, 29, 2012 Legal No. 426939 File No.: 7081.23843 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Flagstar Bank, FSB Grantee: Thaddaeus J. Smith and Amy E. Smith, Husband and Wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1224823 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0630000199550000 Abbreviated Legal: L 12, BLK. 199 TPA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-8944 6 6 3 ) . W e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-5694287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear. I. On November 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 12, Block 199, Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 309 East 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/31/08, recorded on 08/04/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008-1224823, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Thaddaeus J Smith and Amy E Smith, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Joan H. Anderson, EVP on behalf of Flagstar Bank, FSB, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for TMBG Inc., a Washington Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for TMBG Inc., a Washington Corporation, its successors and assigns to Flagstar Bank, FSB, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2012-1280836. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 07/25/2012 Monthly Payments $5,660.15 Late Charges $226.40 Lender’s Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $5,886.55 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $725.00 Title Report $634.14 Statutory Mailings $20.00 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,477.14 Total Amount Due: $7,363.69 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $142,849.18, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on November 30, 2012. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee’s business on 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 11/19/12 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Thaddaeus J Smith aka Thaddaeus Smith 309 East 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Thaddaeus J Smith aka Thaddaeus Smith 20862 Nova Loop Bend, OR 97701 Amy E Smith aka Amy Smith 309 East 6th Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Amy E Smith aka Amy Smith 20862 Nova Loop Bend, OR 97701 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/18/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/19/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 07/25/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7081.23843) 1002.220068-File No. Pub: Oct. 29, Nov. 19, 2012 Legal No. 432715


B10

WeatherWatch

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 Neah Bay 53/49

Olympic Peninsula TODAY

BRE

Forks 55/48

55/47

57/50 Sequim 56/49

Olympics Snow level: 7,500 ft.

National TODAY forecast Nation

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 54 46 0.09 9.08 Forks 56 50 0.63 85.77 Seattle 58 49 0.25 29.81 Sequim 55 48 0.00 9.38 Hoquiam 56 50 0.62 51.27 Victoria 51 45 0.64 19.91 Port Townsend 52 45 0.13* 14.36

Port

BREEZY

RAIN

Yesterday

➥

Bellingham B elli el e lin li n 55/49

Port Ludlow 60/51

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forecast highs for Monday, Oct. 29

EZY N AI

R

➥

Aberdeen A 59/52

Billings 66° | 45°

San Francisco 73° | 55°

New

First

Chicago 50° | 41°

Atlanta 57° | 41°

El Paso 81° | 43° Houston 70° | 46°

Miami 73° | 61°

Fronts Cold

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

55/48 Rain and clouds

Low 45 Cloudy and showers

Marine Weather

57/46 Cloudy; rain likely

FRIDAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: E wind 5 to 15 kt becoming W 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon. Rain in the morning and likely in afternoon.

CANADA

Seattle 59° | 52° Olympia 57° | 52°

Spokane 57° | 46°

Tacoma 59° | 52° Yakima 66° | 48°

Astoria 55° | 52°

ORE.

Tides LaPush Port Angeles

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 12:55 a.m. 7.3’ 6:39 a.m. 2.3’ 12:32 p.m. 8.7’ 7:22 p.m. -0.4’ 4:12 a.m. 6.6’ 2:16 p.m. 6.6’

Š 2012 Wunderground.com

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset tomorrow

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Hi 63 59 56 32 68 68 65 63 68 39 53 33 52 60 70 48

Lo Prc Otlk 49 Cldy 38 Clr 32 PCldy 18 Clr 48 Cldy 50 Cldy 57 Rain 39 Clr 58 Rain 30 Snow 49 Clr 28 .01 Snow 44 Cldy 52 Cldy 56 PCldy 41 .44 Rain

WEDNESDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 2:13 a.m. 7.3’ 7:49 a.m. 1:34 p.m. 8.6’ 8:31 p.m.

Ht 2.9’ -0.3’

4:55 a.m. 6.8’ 2:40 p.m. 6.5’

9:47 a.m. 5.2’ 9:52 p.m. -0.5’

5:35 a.m. 7.0’ 10:31 a.m. 3:07 p.m. 6.3’ 10:25 p.m.

5.5’ -0.6’

Port Townsend

5:49 a.m. 8.2’ 10:18 a.m. 5.3’ 3:53 p.m. 8.1’ 10:34 p.m. -0.3’

6:32 a.m. 8.4’ 11:00 a.m. 5.8’ 4:17 p.m. 8.0’ 11:05 p.m. -0.6’

7:12 a.m. 8.6’ 11:44 a.m. 4:44 p.m. 7.8’ 11:38 p.m.

6.1’ -0.7’

Dungeness Bay*

4:55 a.m. 7.4’ 2:59 p.m. 7.3’

5:38 a.m. 7.6’ 10:22 a.m. 5.2’ 3:23 p.m. 7.2’ 10:27 p.m. -0.5’

6:18 a.m. 7.7’ 11:06 a.m. 3:50 p.m. 7.0’ 11:00 p.m.

5.5’ -0.6’

9:40 a.m. 4.8’ 9:56 p.m. -0.3’

-10s

5:59 p.m. 7:57 a.m. 5:50 p.m. 8:55 a.m.

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 1:35 a.m. 7.3’ 7:14 a.m. 2.6’ 1:03 p.m. 8.6’ 7:56 p.m. -0.4’

9:05 a.m. 4.8’ 9:21 p.m. -0.3’

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Nov 13 Nov 20 Oct 29

Nation/World

Victoria 55° | 48°

Ocean: SW wind 15 to 25 kt. easing to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon. Rain in the morning then showers likely in the afternoon.

Nov 6

55/45 55/44 Rainfall across Lots of clouds Peninsula and rain

Washington TODAY

New York 57° | 52°

Detroit 46° | 39°

Washington D.C. Sandy 57° | 55°

Los Angeles 84° | 61°

Full

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 65 Casper 47 Charleston, S.C. 68 Charleston, W.Va. 53 Charlotte, N.C. 73 Cheyenne 41 Chicago 48 Cincinnati 52 Cleveland 50 Columbia, S.C. 75 Columbus, Ohio 51 Concord, N.H. 66 Dallas-Ft Worth 59 Dayton 52 Denver 50 Des Moines 46 Detroit 56 Duluth 40 El Paso 67 Evansville 56 Fairbanks 26 Fargo 39 Flagstaff 62 Grand Rapids 52 Great Falls 35 Greensboro, N.C. 70 Hartford Spgfld 63 Helena 44 Honolulu 88 Houston 66 Indianapolis 53 Jackson, Miss. 59 Jacksonville 73 Juneau 33 Kansas City 46 Key West 82 Las Vegas 76 Little Rock 59

51 29 61 47 56 30 38 43 46 61 46 50 38 41 31 32 39 28 43 39 12 26 24 33 33 55 53 35 74 43 36 40 57 25 27 75 53 38

.10 .30

.10 .02

.22 .04 .04

Cldy Clr Cldy Rain Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Rain Cldy Rain Cldy Clr Cldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Snow Clr Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr PCldy Clr Clr Clr Clr PCldy Clr Clr

The Lower 48: TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States:

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

Cloudy

Minneapolis 48° | 27°

Denver 66° | 28°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 59° | 52°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 59/50

Sunny

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Seattle

91 56 56 57 85 56 44 43 53 64 65 67 49 54 46 72 49 67 86 50 61 61 67 66 46 70 67 79 52 77 59 64 84 78 94 56 47 52

60 42 29 38 71 33 36 29 46 49 56 61 19 35 36 62 48 57 60 43 48 59 52 58 24 40 58 51 35 69 46 51 58 57 80 25 36 52

.25

.26 .01 .37 .54

.28

.91

Clr PCldy PCldy Clr Clr Clr Cldy Cldy PCldy Clr Rain Rain Cldy Clr PCldy Clr Rain Rain Clr Rain Cldy Rain Cldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Rain Clr Clr Cldy Cldy Clr Clr Clr PCldy Clr PCldy Cldy

â– 95 at Corona,

Calif., and Fullerton, Calif. â– 9 at Anaheim, Calif.

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

Shreveport 59 41 Clr Sioux Falls 41 32 Cldy Spokane 43 41 .15 Cldy Syracuse 64 47 Cldy Tampa 78 68 Cldy Topeka 48 25 Clr Tucson 87 57 Clr Tulsa 54 28 Clr Washington, D.C. 70 60 Rain Wichita 50 28 PCldy Wilkes-Barre 63 54 Cldy Wilmington, Del. 67 54 .12 Rain _________________ Hi Lo Otlk Auckland 71 50 PCldy Baghdad 82 57 Clr Beijing 59 34 Clr Berlin 45 35 Sh Brussels 49 40 Sh Cairo 86 65 Clr Calgary 35 30 Snow Guadalajara 82 53 PCldy Hong Kong 82 69 Ts Jerusalem 79 59 Clr Johannesburg 74 56 Sh Kabul 74 46 Clr London 48 43 Fog/Cldy Mexico City 73 49 Ts Montreal 59 55 Sh/Wind Moscow 32 28 Cldy New Delhi 87 64 Clr Paris 55 37 Clr Rio de Janeiro 87 73 PCldy Rome 62 43 PCldy Sydney 73 59 Cldy Tokyo 65 53 Cldy Toronto 39 39 Rain/Wind Vancouver 52 50 Sh

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