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Tinnitus If you hear a ringing in the ears that others cannot hear, you may have tinnitus. Almost everyone has experienced this ringing, at least shortterm. Many experience long-term issues with this disorder that are very bothersome. This subjective perception of sound inside your head may be described as ringing, roaring, buzzing, chirping, pulsing, or whooshing. It may be present in both ears or only one ear at all times or only sometimes. Hearing loss may or may not be associated with this ringing. Research is conflicting over the direct cause. Determining the cause of your symptoms may not be possible. Treatment options, however, are available, even if the cause is unknown. You are not alone. Many people suffer from at least a mild ringing at some time or another. This is not an imaginary disorder! Normal hearing and hearing impaired persons may contend with this issue. Those who experience this ringing on a more regular basis may be more greatly affected by its psychological and social effects than others. Quiet activities (e.g., reading, writing, etc.) may be extremely difficult in the presence of this noise. While the cause is difficult to pinpoint, some potential causes have been identified, including: noise exposure, hearing impairment, head or neck injury and trauma, migraines, ear canal obstructions, hypertension, vascular disorders, anemia, Meniere’s Peninsula Hearing Center (619) 569-1937 San Diego, CA (858) 768-0454 La Jolla, CA


disease, tumors, and even excessive use of caffeine or nicotine. Some medications considered ototoxic may also trigger symptoms. While stopping the noise may be impossible, the symptoms may be treated. After a thorough medical and hearing health history and evaluation, your physician or audiologist will discuss your treatment options. Possible related medical conditions (as in those listed above) may be treated first to see if the symptoms decrease. If the symptoms continue, noise suppression or sound desensitization therapies may be advised. Basic techniques may be recommended, including playing background noise (e.g., music, fans, noise machines). This background noise may help to suppress the perception of the internal noise to tolerable levels. Hearing aids or noise generators may be worn to also reduce the perceived noise. Tinnitus Retraining therapy programs that slowly acclimate the patient to the noise or Neuromonics devices may also reduce symptoms. If you are experiencing difficulty related to “noise in your head�, call a hearing healthcare professional today. Professionals are waiting to help you get through this! Contact your audiologist or physician to learn about your tinnitus options! Call us today or visit our website or watch our videos on YouTube.

Peninsula Hearing Center (619) 569-1937 San Diego, CA (858) 768-0454 La Jolla, CA

Tinnitus  

Tinnitus You are not alone. Many people suffer from at least a mild ringing at some time or another. This is not an imaginary disorder! Norm...

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