Page 1

www.elonnewsnetwork.com

facebook.com/elonnewsnetwork

@elonnewsnetwork

THE PENDULUM

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 Volume 45, Edition 5 Elon, North Carolina

THE GIRLS IN TOWN

Elon Community Church welcomes a new Girl Scout troop

Elon News Network

Understanding the union

Leila Wilhelm

Elon News Networks | @leilawilhelm

Freshman Sarah Daly recalls her time in the Girl Scouts of America as a troop member, mentor, friend and leader. She remembers that her local troop meeting room was the first space where she felt comfortable and confident. “Girl Scouts is one of those experiences that never leaves you,” Daly said. “The skills I learned during my time there have stayed with me through my transition to Elon.” Daly received her Gold Award, the highest honor in the Girl Scouts, shortly before being accepted to Elon University. She was an active member in her community throughout high school.

See Girl Scouts | pg. 10

ABBY GIBBS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

An Elon Faculty Forward supporter marches during the movement’s first public event on Nov. 29, 2018.

GRACE TERRY | DESIGN CHIEF

Claire Chiancone (right) comforts Karris Lambeth (left) as she covers her ears as lions roar during a Girl Scout event at the Conservator’s Center in Burlington on Saturday, Sept. 7.

Certified but still controversial, the debate over the legality of Elon Faculty Forward continues Anton L. Delgado

Managing Editor | @antonldelgado

The effort to expand Medicaid in NC Alamance County residents reach out to officials to close the Medicaid coverage gap Mackenzie Wilkes

Elon News Network | @macwilkes

GRAHAM — There’s a small house with painted hummingbirds on the side in southern Alamance County. It’s a food pantry that’s been around for six years. Lynne Pierce works there. She’s worked different jobs in the nonprofit sector for 20 years, serving the county through drug treatment programs and food pantries. “I have a master’s degree in education,” Pierce said. MEDICAID “I could be is health somewhere coverage provided else, but I by the state enjoy what I and federal do.” government H o w e v e r, Pierce can’t afford health care, and her job doesn’t provide it for her. She’s in the Medicaid coverage gap. The North Carolina Department of Human Health Services and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) do not keep data on who is in the coverage gap. A coverage gap is when a person’s income is too high to qualify for Medicaid, but too low to afford private insurance.

MACKENZIE WILKES | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Lynne Pierce, the executive director of a food pantry, sits in the lobby of the pantry in Graham on Thursday, Sept. 12.

As of July 2019, North Carolina is one of 15 states that has not expanded Medicaid, according to the Medicaid and CHIP Payment Access Commission. Currently, to potentially qualify for Medicaid or Health Choice in North Carolina, a person must be 65 years or older, blind or disabled, younger than 21, meet the low-income threshold based on family size or be in need of long-term care. Pierce said she did not expect to be in the Medicaid coverage gap, but as a single parent working in the nonprofit sector, she fell into it. “There is no way, as a single parent, I can afford insurance,”

NEWS • PAGE 6

The class of 2023 votes for its SGA representatives

THERE IS NO WAY, AS A SINGLE PARENT, I CAN AFFORD INSURANCE LYNNE PIERCE ALAMANCE COUNTY RESIDENT

Pierce said. “Because if I have to pay for insurance, then that means I’m taking food and other necessities out of my child’s mouth. That’s a decision that nobody should have to make.”

According to 2019 data from the CMS, 6,125 residents of Alamance County are enrolled in private insurance. In contrast, the NCDHHS data states that 38,086 Alamance County residents are enrolled in Medicaid. The US Census Bureau estimated in 2018 that Alamance County had a population of 166,436.

See Medicaid | pg. 5

LIFESTYLE • PAGE 12

New vegetables bring new customers to the Elon Farmer’s Market

By all legal means, there is now an adjunct faculty union on Elon University’s campus. Following nearly a yearlong back-andforth between the union and the university, the regional National Labor Relations Board certified the unionization of the Faculty Forward movement. As a certified union, Faculty Forward, which is represented by the Service Employees UNION International Union, can or labor union is an begin requesting organized collective association bargaining of workers negotiations with tasked to the university. protect their However, rights and E l o n ’ s interests administ rat ion continues to oppose the legality of the union’s formation. The university’s newest objection, officially titled a “Request for Review,” was filed just before 4 p.m. on Sept. 17. One of the issues the review is challenging is the actual right of faculty members to form a union — claiming that faculty roles are managerial. The request has gone to the NLRB headquarters in Washington, D.C. Under the 1935 National Labor Relations Act, the regional director’s certification of a union must be followed by collective bargaining negotiations. But the university’s “Request for Review” has continued to draw out the unionization process.

See Union | pg. 8-9

SPORTS • PAGE 14

Two athletes take on the role of protecting the Phoenix


2

extras

Wednesday september 18, 2019

THE PENDULUM A PUBLICATION OF

Established 1974 Volume 45, Edition 5 Elon News Network is a daily news organization that includes a newspaper, website, broadcasts and podcasts. Letters to the editor are welcome and should be typed, signed and emailed to enn@elon.edu as Word documents. ENN reserves the right to edit obscene and potentially libelous material. Lengthy letters may be trimmed to fit. All submissions become the property of ENN and will not be returned.

JACK HALEY

Executive Director of Elon News Network

ANTON L. DELGADO

Managing Editor of The Pendulum

GRACE MORRIS

News Director of Elon Local News

AMANDA GIBSON

Event Coverage Coordinator

JAZMIN BENDER

Social Media Coordinator

ALEX REYNOLDS

Sports Director

JACK MCINTYRE

Chief Copy Editor

MICHAEL ASCH

Opinions Editor

ALEX ROAT

Video Production Manager

REID COBB

Analytics Director

MAEVE ASHBROOK

New Member Coordinator

GRACE TERRY

Design Chief

ZACH OHMANN

Photo Editor

MAGGIE BROWN

Politics Editor

BRIAN REA

Enterprise Story Coordinator

EDITORIAL POLICY: ENN seeks to inspire, entertain and inform the Elon community by providing a voice for students and faculty, as well as serve as a forum for the meaningful exchange of ideas.

WHEN WE PUBLISH: The Pendulum publishes weekly on Wednesdays

Elon Local News broadcasts Mondays at 6 p.m.

ELN Morning broadcasts Thursdays at 10 a.m.

ELN Online Exclusive CORRECTIONS POLICY: ENN is committed to accurate coverage. When factual errors are made, we correct them promptly and in full, both online and in print. Online corrections state the error and the change at the top of the article. Corrections from the previous week’s print edition appear on this page.

Ted Thomas, Ella Williams, Olivia Parks, Taylor Truitt, Carolina Bunder and Nyah Phengsitthy contributed to the design of this edition. Matt Reichenbach, April Roberts, Nina Crocco and Thomas Denome contributed to

broadcasts Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m.

ENN Radio Podcast publishes Friday morning

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook Elon News Network

Twitter/Instagram/Snapchat @elonnewsnetwork

YouTube Elon News Network

Contact corrections@elonnewsnetwork.com to report a correction or a concern.

the copy editing of this edition.

games

corrections: Volume 44, Edition 4 NEWS The cutline for the photo of Chris Edwards’ memorial, featured in the Top Photos section, was misstated. It was a photo of friends and loved ones listening to a story about Edwards. The Pendulum regrets the mistake.

comic

LIFESTYLE In the article “Behind the Green Door” the address for the opening event was misstated. The show was held behind the Green Door by The Oak House. The Pendulum regrets the mistake. In the article “Elon cooking made easy” the name of the app was misstated. It is actually titled the “Food Companion.” The Pendulum regrets the mistake.

How to Play: Guess the missing word in the five clues, then find them in the word search below. Words can be found backwards, diagonal, etc. 1. Professor Emily _____ of the Department of Physical Therapy is conducting research that might help cross country runners avoid repeat stress fracture injuries. See Page 4 for answer. 2. Flat Out replaced _____ as the pizza place in Winter Garden Cafe this year. See Page 7 for answer. 3. _____ is the name of the yellow labrador that is hoping to compete in DockDogs WorldWide this year. See Page 11 for answer. 4. Peter _____ is the starting goalie for Elon’s men’s soccer team. See Page 14 for answer. 5. Originally from Iceland, freshman Katrin _____ is the Elon University women’s soccer team’s starting goalie. See Page 14 for answer.

See Page 5 for more on class auditing

calendar: Sept. 18 to 24 COMMON LECTURE OF ‘FUTURE FACE’ WITH ALEX WAGNER | 7:30 P.M. - 9 P.M. ALUMNI GYM

18

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS. UNCG | 3:30 P.M. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

20

WOMEN’S SOCCER VS UNCG | 7 P.M. UNCG

19 STUDENT TRAVEL TRAINING | 3 P.M. GLOBAL COMMONS

20

EID AL-ADHA CELEBRATION | 6 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. NUMEN LUMEN PAVILION

ART IN THE PARK | 10 A.M. -12 P.M., 2 P.M. - 4 P.M. BETH SCHMIDT PARK

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS LEHIGH | 10 A.M. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS UVA | 10 A.M. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

FOOTBALL VS. WAKE FOREST | 12 P.M. WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY

MEN’S SOCCER VS. HOFSTRA | 7 P.M. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY

19

21

19

21

20 21


extras

| top photos |

Wednesday september 18, 2019

3

IAN MYERS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

At the S’more’s Outdoors event outside of Koury Gym, seniors Abigal Krump and Gabe Kuhn feed the fire as students wait to roast marshmallows on Wednesday, Sept 11.

IAN MYERS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A Brazilian Capoeira dancer does a handstand during the Hispanic Heritage Month Kickoff event on Friday, Sept. 13.

BEN MUSE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Students look at a wall of photos in LaRose Student Commons during the first day of the building’s opening on Monday, Sept. 16.

CLARE GRANT | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Elon defensive specialist and freshman Alex Vanwestrienen bumps the volleyball against North Carolina Central on Tuesday, Sept. 10 in Schar Center.

SCAN FOR MORE ON LAROSE COMMONS 1. Open your phone camera 2. Focus on the QR code 3. Click pop-up link

SCAN FOR MORE ON GASPARD & DANCERS 1. Open your phone camera 2. Focus on the QR code 3. Click pop-up link

Members of Gaspard & Dancers perform a piece titled “L’Esprit” on Friday, Sept. 13 in McCrary Theatre.

CLARE GRANT | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


4

NEWS

Wednesday september 18, 2019

Internship requirements continue to affect students

The significance of experiential learning and the costs that come with it Lauren Singles

Elon News Network | @lauren_singles

Elon University requires students to complete at least two out of five Experiential Learning Requirements: study abroad, research, service-learning, leadership or an internship. Internships are included under this requirement because the university believes they allow students to experience the working world and develop professional skills. While Elon has made internships a priority, only two out of the six schools require students to complete one. The School of Communications and the Martha and Spencer Love School of Business have mandatory internship requirements. The School of Education and the College of Arts and Sciences, the other two undergraduate schools, do not. Elon also has two graduate schools without internship requirements — the School of Health Sciences and the School of Law. “One of the best ways to prepare for life after the university is to have an internship,” Executive Vice President Steven House said. According to House, Elon’s School of Law and School of Health Sciences both include graduate programs that require different experiential learning requirements.

House explained that rather than giving students mandatory internships, Elon graduate schools are focused on career-specific learning through clinical rotations, shadows and apprenticeships. “They have what they call preceptors and apprenticeships,” House said. “The reason they do it is to model it on [teaching] our undergraduates where it’s engaged and experiential.” Though the College of Arts and Sciences does not require internships for all of their majors, the school still offers internship

ONE OF THE BEST WAYS TO PREPARE FOR LIFE AFTER THE UNIVERSITY IS TO HAVE AN INTERNSHIP STEVEN HOUSE EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

elective credits. “Most all of the 50 majors or so in CAS allow students to have an internship for credit, so students can do an internship when they choose and it is encouraged by faculty,” Debby Wall, the director of internships for the Elon College of Arts and Sciences, said. Despite not having mandatory requirements, Wall said students in the College of Arts and Sciences often complete more internships

CORY WELLER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Student Professional Development Center hosted a Jobs and Internships Expo in Alumni Gym on Tuesday, Sept. 17.

than any other school. These essential learning experiences, while significant, can come with costs. Internship credits act the same as a regular university credit. If students can fit these credits under the number of allotted credit hours during the year, they are included in tuition. However, if students go above their 18-credit cap, or if they choose to complete internships over the summer, students must pay per credit hour. Summer credits cost $550 per credit and semester credits cost $1,149 per credit. Students have the option to participate in internships outside of university regulations, but they will not count toward ELR

requirements. On Tuesday Sept. 17, the Student Professional Development Center held a Job and Internship Expo on campus, offering students a place to talk with professionals and explore prospective career options. The expo focused on exposing students to a number of internships, co-ops and professional career opportunities. Companies like ESPN, LabCorp, Politico and local companies attended the expo, giving students of all majors a chance to speak with professionals. The variety of companies allowed students to speak with both larger corporations and smaller start-ups, adding diversity to the event.

IF YOU GO... Event: Graduate and Professional School Fair Date: Thursday, Oct. 31 from 3-6 p.m. Where: Moseley Center

On Thursday, Oct. 31, the SPDC will host a Graduate and Professional School Fair in Moseley Center to help students learn more about specific graduate programs. Representatives from graduate schools such as Wake Forest University, Drexel University and High Point University will be in attendance.

Physical therapy research extends beyond the classroom New rehabilitation research could lead to the prevention of stress fracture injuries for cross country runners

“Ankle strength and range of motion should be a part of rehabilitation due to its influence on postural stability,” Fonke said. Hannah Preeo, a member of the women’s cross country team, said runners “usually take two to three days a week to go easy [and] have some time to recover.” By constantly practicing, runners are able to build their endurance for competitions. “At the end of the day, it’s important just to listen to your body, when it’s hurting and when it needs healing,” Preeo said.

Corinne Rose

Elon News Network | @corinnerose2017

New research being conducted by Emily Fonke, a professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, may help prevent the injuries of collegiate cross country runners by reshaping rehabilitation. Fonke’s research is based on studying the forces affecting the body upon its impact with the ground. Her research studies this by looking into dynamic postural sway, or the ability to maintain the body’s center of gravity within the limits of stability. Fonke’s research poster was recognized as a promising component in scientifically grounded research among graduate students. She earned a $1,000 travel award, from the AMTI Force and Motion Foundation, to continue her research. This foundation focuses on aiding students who are pursuing future leadership positions in science and who have a core concentration in multi-axis force measurement which studies the multitude of outputting forces applied from a single direction. Fonke’s work is part of a virtual poster association, where research can be shared with like-minded students and experts. Prior to the start of her research, Elon University’s cross country team came to Fonke with concerns about the frequency of injuries “They wanted to know what they could do in rehabilitation to reduce the number of tibial injuries and stress fractures,” Fonke said. A stress fracture is common among professional and recreational runners. The progression of pain for stress fractures can be detrimental to the performance of cross country runners. The focal point of her research is centered

SPACIOUS COMMUTER HOUSE

FOR LEASE

PHOTO COURTESY OF ELON ATHLETICS

Sophomore Hannah Preeo, a member of Elon University’s women’s cross country team keeps pace during a race.

AT THE END OF THE DAY, IT’S IMPORTANT JUST TO LISTEN TO YOUR BODY, WHEN IT’S HURTING AND WHEN NEEDS HEALING HANNAH PREEO WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY SOPHOMORE around balance and the contrasting results when comparing an injured leg to an uninjured leg. “Balance is a predictor or identifying factor of a higher risk for stress factors,” Fonke said about her research methodology.

The basis of Fonke’s results concluded that ground reaction forces differ in the uninjured leg of a runner with previous injury history compared to a runner with no prior injury history. “The forces that the runner puts through the ground are different in the uninjured leg of the injured runner,” Fonke said. Fonke used a combination of machines employed to measure ground reaction and dispersion forces, or forces that are exerted on a body part in contact with the ground. Fonke described her work as “trying to find ways to perform daily tasks while you’re still injured.” During any running activity, the uninjured leg is receiving more force from the ground compared to the injured leg, making it more likely that the runner will experience another injury in the future. Muscles located in the lower segment of the body and motion synchronized in the ankle correlate to balance control. It is thus essential to increase “single-leg stance stability” as well as equalized force distribution.

Furnished rooms for rent: This large rambler group house is a 30-minute commute to Elon. The house o�ers a view of a golf course and nature preserve. The place is quiet, good for concentrating and studying. There are three bedrooms available for $500 a month (110-150 square feet) that share a bathroom. Security deposit is one month’s rent. Common areas include kitchen, brunch area, TV room and sun room. The fourth bedroom and the master bedroom is optional. Preference goes to seniors/graduate/medical/law and post-doctorate students who want to lease all rooms for one year lease. Single parties are welcome too. The house comes with cable/Wi-fi, HEPA filtered heat and air conditioning, ceiling fans, dishwasher, washer/ dryer, microwave and optional cleaning service. Please call Gregory Daly at 202-3021449 or email gdaly.pphs@gmail. com for details and to set a time to visit the house.


NEWS

Wednesday september 18, 2019

BRIDGING THE GAP:

EXPANDING MEDICAID IN NC

5

Auditing: Taking the class, without the tests Auditing program allows Elon community members to take courses and learn material Cate McCahill

Elon News Network | @cmccahill21

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY JOHN AUTRY

On Thursday, Sept. 12, Progress NC, the North Carlonia Association of Educators, Down Home North Carolina and the NAACP and other groups gathered for a rally in opposition to the veto override.

MEDICAID | from cover Pierce said that there are often misconceptions about who needs Medicaid assistance. She said the stigma that people in rural communities can’t afford health insurance impedes Medicaid expansion. “Society [is] brought HOUSE BILL up [thinking] 966 that if you House BIll can’t afford 966 is an your basic approprianeeds such tions (budas health get) bill for care, that the current you’re poor, fiscal year you’re nonwhite, you’re uneducated, you’re lazy and you don’t care about your community, and all you want to do is take the hard working money on somebody else’s pocket,” Pierce said. “And that’s not true.” According to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act the federal government would cover 90% of the cost to expand Medicaid and North Carolina would cover the remaining 10%, starting in 2020. Pierce said she struggles with diabetes and high blood pressure. She said that upon diagnosis, she thought she was going to have to wait until she got paid to be able to afford her medication, and would have to give up her gas money and groceries for the week. Pierce had the opportunity to meet with Gov. Roy Cooper this summer to show how people who can’t afford health insurance can be everyday, working-class people. “It was great that Governor Cooper has taken up this battle,” Pierce said. “It’s going to be a hard battle to win, but I appreciate the fact that he’s listening.” Cooper has been advocating for Medicaid expansion in North Carolina throughout his term. He vetoed House Bill 966: 2019 Appropriations Act

in June because it did not include Medicaid expansion. However, on Sept. 11, the North Carolina House Republicans voted to override Cooper’s veto 55-15, with 50 members missing the vote. The Republican majority in the state house wants to transform the current Medicaid system. On the same day as the HB 966 vote, the house voted 54-15 to override the governor’s veto of HB 555: Medicaid Transformation Implementation, which would change the current Medicaid system from a fee-for service to a Medicaid managed care system. A managed care system would allow Medicaid providers to partner with health care providers and pay them a fixed amount of money per patient per month. In October 2018 the CMS approved the NC DHHS transition to managed care, effective January 1, 2019. HB 966 in conjunction with HB 555 allocates funds for managed care. The Alamance Chapter of Down Home North Carolina, an activist organization, has been advocating for Medicaid expansion. When Down Home heard about the House overriding the governor’s veto, its supporters headed for the capital. Dozens held signs saying “Shame on Speaker Moore” — a reference to Tim Moore, the speaker of the House who called the surprise vote on the veto override — gathering outside the General Assembly the following morning. Brigid Flaherty, cofounder and co-director of Down Home, said the organization felt the need to take action against the surprise override. “At Down Home, we felt like we had to go into a rapid response mode, because this was to us an ambush,” Flaherty said. “It was an ambush in our democracy.” Though Pierce did not protest at the General Assembly, she was angry about the override veto. Pierce has a host of worries because she is uninsured. She does not believe a family should have to worry about

BY THE NUMBERS

6,125

residents of Alamance County are enrolled in private insurance.

38,086

residents of Alamance County are enrolled in Medicaid.

166,436

is the total number of residents in Alamance County.

15

states, including North Carolina, have not expanded Medicaid.

IF I HAD TO GO TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM RIGHT NOW, THE FIRST THING THAT WOULD COME THROUGH MY MIND IS, ‘IS THIS GOING TO BE MY MORGAGE PAYMENT?’ LYNNE PIERCE ALAMANCE COUNTY RESIDENT

basic necessities, like she does, every day. “If I had to go to the emergency room right now, the first thing that would come through my mind is, ‘Is this going to be my mortgage payment?’” Pierce said. “I would not go unless it was life threatening. But you shouldn’t have to worry about losing your AFFORDABLE house, or CARE ACT losing your The Patient car or the Protection things that and Affordyou need to able Care Act also know as have to live.” Obamacare W h e n expanded Down Home Medicaid b e g a n , eligibility to F l a h e r t y adults with said that incomes up a f f o r d a b l e to 138 percent of the health care federal inwas a top come poverty priority for level Alamance C ounty. She said that the chapter was primarily organizing around the issue of health care. Pierce said she isn’t involved in politics. She describes herself as a moderate, who picks and chooses issues to focus on. She said that health care was something she had to speak up about. Cooper’s proposed compromise with the Republican majority legislature would be to expand health care coverage for more than 500,000 individuals in North Carolina. Dennis Riddell, the Republican District 63 representative presiding in Alamance County, voted in favor of the veto override of the state budget—HB 966. Riddell was unavailable for comment over phone and email. People such as Pierce hope that Medicaid expansion will pass in North Carolina eventually. “Until the House can find a balance and become bipartisan again, I don’t see any chance that it’s going to change until election time,” Pierce said.

20

NUMBER OF AUDITS

PHOTO COURTESY OF ____________________

As is expected of all Elon University students, senior Jordan DeVries met with her academic adviser before class registration. The psychology major and Lumen Scholar was interested in taking a class about drug action, but with her major and scholarship, DeVries didn’t have the time in her schedule to add another class — let alone do all the homework, assignments and studying that comes with a 300-level course. DeVries’ adviser had a solution — course auditing. Course auditing allows students, faculty and staff to attend a class and learn all of the material without having to complete any of the actual course work or receive a grade. Last spring, DeVries audited PSY 350: Principles of Drug Action. DeVries said that choosing to audit rather

STUDENTS AUDITING CLASSES

16 12 8 4 0

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

SEMESTERS

Fall 2019

than enroll in a course helped reduce the stress and pressure she felt surrounding the class. “Had I not been able to audit [the course], I probably still would have taken it, but it would have been much harder,” DeVries said. “I would have been a really sad, stressed person.” Students are able to audit any course of their choosing as long as they meet the required prerequisites and pay a fee of $270. To audit a course, students must first register for the class via OnTrack. Afterwards, the student must fill out the audit form on the Registrar’s website under the forms link. Once the form has been processed by the Registrar, students will receive an automated notification email and be charged the audit fee from the Bursar’s Office. Students do not need to receive permission from their adviser to audit a course, but communication and advice from their adviser is recommended, according to the Office of the Registrar. Town of Elon community members are also able to audit courses. However, any non-Elon students must first register as a visiting nondegree student and be approved by the Office of Admissions before registering to audit. Members of Elon’s faculty and staff account for the majority of individuals who audit courses, according to the Office of the Registrar. Alexander Taylor ’16, assistant registrar of communications, said the Office of the Registrar has been discussing ways to encourage interdisciplinary studies and furthered education through auditing. “But rather [than] just being able to take a course that might be challenging for them, [it] doesn’t have this like gross impact on what their future’s going to be like,” Taylor said. DeVries said class auditing helped her succeed in her other classes. “I learned a lot of things in that class that I wouldn’t have learned anywhere,” DeVries said. “It has given me a better ability to master content outside of that class.”


6

NEWS

Wednesday september 18, 2019

NEW LEADERS OF THE CLASS OF 2023 The Student Government Association freshman elections decide new representatives for the academic year

CLASS OF 2023 CANIDATES

Emery Eisner

Aidan Burnside

Elon News Network | @eisneremery

President: Alexis Alston Jumar Martin* Rachel Levine Vice President:

Elon University’s Student Government Association hosted its freshman elections on from September 16 to 17 via PhoenixConnect, according to an email sent to the student body by Executive President Jack Johnson. The elections, which were open only to freshman students, closed 5 p.m. on Tuesday, with the winners announced in downstairs Moseley later that evening at 6 p.m. Johnson told Elon News Network his advice to the freshman students running to fill the positions of 2023 class president, vice president, secretary and senator is that they should keep forging connections and relationships with their peers. “SGA is built to be a voice for the student body,” Johnson said. “Don’t quit … you win on your ability to connect with your peers.” Connecting with their peers might prove to be a more difficult task for freshman candidates, with roughly 1,675 members of the class and only six positions to be filled. This year, students are only running to fill four of those positions. Four students are running for 2023 class president, five running for vice president and one running for both secretary and senator. However, SGA adviser Jana Lynn Patterson, the dean of students, is hopeful that more students will get involved in this election. “We are excited that the Class of 2023

John Sloop Katie Leupold Erix Zappone Luke Stottlemire Victoria Seymore* Secretary: Kimberly Castano* Senator: Travor Molin* *winner of the election

EXCLUSIVE GROUP

Of the 1,675 students in the class of 2023, there were 11 candidates for just six positions.

ELON NEWS NETWORK PRESENTS

ENN RADIO

AVAILABLE ON SPOTIFY, SOUNDCLOUD AND APPLE MUSIC

THE PODCAST GIVES OUR AIUDIENCE A DEEPER LOOK BEHIND WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE TOWN, COUNTY, AND UNIVERSITY. PODCASTING IS AN ENGAGING MEDIUM TO DELIVER STORIES BECAUSE YOU CAN HAVE STORIES DELOVERED TO YOUR EARS ON THE GO. MACKEINZE WILKES SOPHOMORE, ENN RADIO HOST

CORY WELLER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

On the day of freshman elections, sophomore Class Senator Hailey Jurgens (left) and sophomore Vice President Ireland Horan (right) converse in the Student Government Association office on Tuesday, Sept. 17.

elections are underway and that many students are participating in races,” Patterson wrote in an email. “SGA serves as the representative voice of the student body and these positions on the senate are important voices on the senate. … Last year we had 672 first year students vote- we want to surpass that number this year.”

DON’T QUIT … YOU WIN ON YOUR ABILITY TO CONNECT WITH YOUR PEERS JACK JOHNSON EXECUTIVE PRESIDENT


Wednesday, september 18, 2019 | page 7

OPINIONS

Flat Out vs Topio’s Andrew Resnick

Contributor

THOMAS DENOME | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

This fall, Flat Out replaced Topio’s as the newest addition to the Winter Garden Cafe.

The start of the school year has ushered in a number of new changes for Elon University. Many unpopular adjustments have come to campus this year, including the discontinuation of Elon SafeRides as well as a new policy for to-go boxes. However, one of the more popular changes among the student body is the replacement of Topio’s Pizza with a brand-new pizza place, Flat Out. Located in the Winter Garden Cafe near Lakeside Dining Hall, Flat Out

is consistently packed with students, making it one of the trendier locations on campus. Almost all of my friends raved about the new pizza location at the beginning of the year, so I decided to give it a try for the first time last week. After eating Flat Out twice so far this year, I’ve come to the wildly unpopular conclusion that Topio’s was far better than Flat Out. I’m definitely not a food critic, nor do I think I will ever be. I’m just

someone who likes good pizza, and I want to explain my claim. To me, one of the biggest flaws with Flat Out is it’s attempt to be fancy with it’s pizza. The different toppings and sauces used make it seem like Flat Out is a little too elegant for a college campus. Sure, the presentation is admirable, but that is the least of my worries when I’m getting pizza at one in the morning. Additionally, the portion size that Flat Out offers pales in comparison to

that of Topio’s. To someone like me, a college student with a large appetite and an even smaller budget, getting my hands on free and filling food is very important. Topio’s was the perfect fit for that need. Although the quality of food may not have been as good as Flat Out, it more than made up for it in its ability to fill me up. Don’t get me wrong, I understand that dining halls serve pizza very similar to Topio’s, and more importantly, it doesn’t cost Meal Dollars or meal plan swipes. However, in my opinion, from what you are getting by using either form of payment, Topio’s surpasses Flat Out. While it may not be the most popular opinion out there, I wholeheartedly believe that when given the choice between Topio’s or Flat Out, any reasonable college student would choose Topio’s. Appearance is absolutely something that should be recognized when it comes to food. However, it isn’t the main thing college students really look for when ordering food. Topio’s pizza doesn’t necessarily look unappetizing compared to Flat Out pizza. Also, Topio’s pizza was much more filling than Flat Out. Topio’s portions were larger and could last longer compared to Flat Out, which makes the spot invaluable to college students such as myself who struggle to keep up with their Meal Dollars or meal plan swipes from week to week. It may sound cheesy to say, but I’d take greasy Topio’s pizza over organic Flat Out pizza any day of the week.

GOT OPINIONS? ELON NEWS NETWORK WANTS YOUR VOICE TO BE HEARD. WHY JOIN:

NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. RELEVANT & TIMELY TOPICS. BECOME PUBLISHED. SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES & VIEWS. SERVE YOUR COMMUNITY.

WRITING FOR THE OPINIONS SECTION GAVE ME A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO PRACTICE CRAFTING AN ARGUMENT AND TO SHARE MY WORK AND VIEWS WITH THE WORLD. IT IS A GREAT WAY TO GET PUBLISHED.

MICHAEL ASCH OPINIONS DIRECTOR THE OPINIONS SECTION GIVES ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO ANALYZE ISSUES THAT AFFECT STUDENTS AND THE UNIVERSITY TO OFFER A PERSPECTIVE THAT PEOPLE MAY NOT HAVE CONSIDERED BEFOREHAND.

MACKENZIE WILKES COLUMNIST

CONTACT OPINIONS DIRECTOR: MASCH@ELON.EDU EMAIL US: ENN@ELON.EDU


8

Union

Wednesday september 18, 2019

FACULTY URGE Elon University objects to the union’s attempts to hold a vote. The case goes to the state NLRB office in WinstonSalem, which is eventually settled on Feb. 5, 2019.

NOV. 23, 2018

DEC. 7-14, 2018

MARCH 12, 2019

With the eligible faculty now decided on, the vote is held. Out of 283 eligible faculty, 112 voted for the union, 68 voted against it and 20 cast non-determinative challenged votes.

Elon Faculty Forward hosts its first public event, marching from the Academic Pavillions to the President’s Office. Faculty members in charge of the movement requested the university not complicate the unionization effort.

UNION | from cover The administration has made it clear that negotiations with the union will not proceed at this time. A university spokesman declined to comment. “Legally, Elon is allowed to go through all the procedural steps that the statute provides. That’s just part of the process that unions and universities have to go through,” said Eric Fink, associate professor of law. “Some unions might see a flaw in this because it gives the employer time to draw things out, but the employer deserves due process.” The NLRB’s decision is expected to be announced in the next 12 to 16 months. In the interim, Faculty Forward is planning to continue campaigning for negotiations to begin. Catherine Bush, assistant professor of biology, hopes that more public events will inform the Elon community about the union’s cause. She intends to hold these gatherings in an effort to keep the union at the forefront of the minds of administrators. “We want to get to the table now, so we are putting the pressure on,” Bush said. “It’s time for that.”

Fighting to unionize The idea of an Elon faculty union began in a classroom in McMichael Science Center. Bush has been working with representatives of SEIU since March 2018 to begin an on-campus union.

“It’s been 18 months in this process. … We would like to just get to the negotiating table at this point and have the university respect the decision that was made by the adjuncts,” Bush said. “This is a long walk to equality. I carry with me the stories of adjuncts that need help right now.” The union’s demands for adjunct faculty have remained mostly the same since last year: stabilizing job security, increasing adjunct wages and improving access to professional development. Since Faculty Forward’s first public event last November, the university has objected to the union’s formation at every stage of the process. “Our goal, as always, is to continue building a better, stronger Elon for everyone. I simply do not believe a labor union will effectively support that goal,” said President Connie Book in a video message sent only to faculty and staff days after the event. “We do not want to undermine our shared governance with a system in which outside lawyers negotiate our future and the ways we relate to one another.” To form a union, a vote must be held among all possible members. The university’s first objection was to the group of proposed eligible faculty. Following four NLRB hearings at the sub-regional office in Winston-Salem, the much-contested bargaining unit was decided. In March, the union vote was finally held. Of the 283 faculty in the bargaining unit, 112 voted for the union, 68 were against it and 20 cast non-determinative challenged votes — a voting rate of 70.7%. The university then filed an objection to the

WE WANT TO GET TO THE TABLE NOW, SO WE ARE PUTTING THE PRESSURE ON... IT’S TIME FOR THAT CATHERINE BUSH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY

1935 NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS ACT

is a foundational statute of U.S. labor laws which guarantees the right of private sector employees to organize into trade unions, engage in collective bargaining and take collective action.

BARGAINING UNIT

in labor relations, this is a group of employees with a clear and identifiable community of interest who under U.S. law are represented by a single labor union in collective bargaining and other dealings with management.

vote, which went to the regional NLRB office in Atlanta. On Sept. 3, nearly six months later, the regional office certified the unionization of the Elon Faculty Forward movement. Scott C. Thompson, the acting regional director of the NLRB, wrote in his “Decision and Certification of Representative” document: “The Employer’s Objections and subsequent exceptions are best analogized to a house of cards on which every level of the house is founded on false or faulty assumption and thus pressing any level of the house would have been enough to topple the house.” On Sept. 17, the university challenged the regional NLRB’s decision by filing a “Request for Review” with the national headquarters. In a faculty and staff-wide email, Executive Vice President Steven House stated that questions related to Elon’s “unique system of shared governance were not fully evaluated by the Regional Director of the NLRB.” The university’s “Request for Review” states


UNION

Wednesday september 18, 2019

TO UNIONIZE Elon University files objections to the NLRB recommendation that the union be certified.

MAY 31, 2019

9

Elon University files a “Request for Review” with the headquarters of the NLRB in Washington, D.C

SEPT. 3, 2019

SEPT. 17, 2019

The union is certified by acting regional director of the NLRB in Atlanta.

SCAN FOR MORE ON THE UNION 1. Open your phone camera 2. Focus on the QR code 3. Click the pop-up link

that the acting regional director “incorrectly analyzed the managerial employee question at Elon, finding that Elon’s parttime, limited term and visiting faculty were not managerial employees simply because they did not make up the majority in Elon’s shared governance committees.” The “shared governance committees” was in reference to the Academic Council, which includes an elected voting representative for part-time and adjunct faculty members. House wrote in his email that “it would be antithetical to our collaborative model to have a group of part-time faculty whose terms of employment are determined by a collective bargaining agreement, rather than our shared governance model.” Jill Auditori, instructor in political science and policy studies, is the lone representative of part-time faculty members. Auditori and 17 other faculty members make up the council. “It is important that I stay informed and in everyone’s best interest I take a neutral

REQUEST FOR REVIEW

is a legal step of the unionization process that asks the NLRB to review a specific case.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

is the negotiation of wages and other conditions of employment by an organized body of employees. Any collective bargaining agreement reached would affect all employees within the bargaining unit.

SERVICE EMPLOYEES INTERNATIONAL UNION

is an international organization that helps groups of workers unionize in different fields. It is the organization helping non-tenure track faculty members at Elon University unionize.

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

is an independent government agency that enforces U.S. labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices.

position,” Auditori said. “I feel like I am most effective for all of my constituents if I’m able to work well with both administration, with my academic council members, the faculty in my department and, of course, the adjuncts I was elected to represent.”

Defining faculty roles Elon is requesting that the NLRB review the role of faculty members on campus. According to administration, faculty at Elon hold a managerial role and therefore are not eligible to form a union. A similar argument was made by the administration at the private institution of the University of Southern California, when faculty members of the Roski School of Art and Design, in coordination with SEIU, attempted to form a union. Like Elon’s administration, USC opposed the faculty vote and continually challenged the union, eventually bringing the case to the NLRB headquarters. In March, the office ruled in favor of the university — agreeing that the faculty of Roski held managerial positions. Following the national ruling, SEIU decided to withdraw its petition to represent Roski faculty. The reason behind this decision was never made public. In an email following the NLRB decision, USC Provost Michael Quick wrote “the Academic Senate, faculty committees, and faculty councils remain free to work with administration on compensation, benefits, and

terms of employment. Faculty can continue to speak for themselves on those topics, without having to get union permission.” Elon cited the attempted unionization case at USC in its “Request for Review.” According to Fink, who worked in labor law for six years but is not representing either party in this case, the NLRB’s decision on Elon’s case will depend on the information presented to the office regarding the role faculty plays in making decisions on campus. “It’s usually a bad idea for federal courts to look deeply into internal institutional politics and representation, but the court’s decision will depend on the specific facts presented about non-tenured faculty representation and decision making at Elon,” Fink said. “Whether they think representation on the Academic Council is enough to make them managers, we will see.” The Bureau of Labor Statistics has been tracking union membership since 1983. In the last 35 years, data has shown the number of “wage and salary workers” belonging to unions decreased by more than half — from 20.1% to 10.5% in 2018. “There is an entire field of labor research that is trying to understand this phenomenon. Over the years, the industry of union avoidance has grown and that has helped employers crack down on union movements,” Fink said. “A combination of employer resistance and ineffective union response has definitely played a part in the national trend.”


WednesdaY, september 18, 2019 | page 10

LIFESTYLE

READY TO HELP OUT, WHENEVER NEEDED GIRL SCOUTS | from cover Chances are, many girls remember their days wearing the blue Daisy Sash, diligently selling cookies in front of a local grocery store. According to the Girl Scout Research Institute, nearly 60 million women have participated in the Girl Scouts of America during their childhood. This year, the Elon Community Church welcomed a new Girl Scout troop, 13214, made up of eight girls. They are a blended troop of Daisies and Brownies, meaning the girls are in first and second grade. Troop Leader Rosie DeMario said most of the girls get involved because of the strong bonds they form with their fellow troop members. “Of course they enjoy the badges, volunteer activities, cookie sales, but it really boils down to spending time with your friends,” DeMario said. DeMario believes that GIRL SCOUTS: a big takeaway from Girl a youth Scouts is learning how developement to build friendships that organization for girls that can survive even when hopes to times are tough. She leads prepare them the girls alongside Troop for a lifetime Mother Hannah Hendricks of leadership in hopes of showing young girls that it is OK to be strong and powerful. “I was disappointed to see the attitude toward female leaders and confident women portrayed through the media,” DeMario said. “I wanted to channel that into something good, something I knew I could do [to] make a difference, and Girl Scouts was a great fit.” In addition to female empowerment, the girls of Troop 13214 learn critical life skills: how to manage money, speak in public and help those in need with creative problem-solving. Most recently, on Saturday, Sept. 7, the troop participated in the annual Girl Scout Day at the Conservators Center in Burlington. Over 500 scouts participated in the actionpacked day where they joined in the fun to earn the Conservators Center Participation Patch. The event was centered around wildlife and included an educational tour of the Conservators Center, which is home to over 70 animals. The center’s mission is to reconnect people with wildlife, beginning with the young members of the Girl Scouts. “It gives the girls an opportunity to learn about the importance of conservation centers like this one,” DeMario said Caretakers at the center shared unique stories about the animals, and informed the scouts about habitats, diets and how they can get involved to help endangered species. These experiences not only educate the troop on a variety of different animals but instill in them the importance of wildlife, and of course, female empowerment. Experiences such as this will help these young girls prepare for a lifetime of achievement and give them the confidence to enter the workforce. This is the mission of current GSUSA CEO Anna Maria Chávez, who recently spoke about the “limitless capacity of girls” at a summit in New York City. Currently, Girl Scouts is expanding its programs in science, technology, engineering, math and education, which includes three new space-science badges. Recent data from Forbes reveals just how powerful Girl Scouts can be: 58 percent of female representatives elected to the 116th Congress are Girl Scout alumnae. At Elon University, collaboration with

GRACE TERRY | DESIGN CHIEF

Top: Girls Scouts and parents gather at the Conservator’s Center in Burlington for an event on Girl Scouts Day on Saturday, Sept. 7. Center: Karris Lambeth (left) and Quincy Emmet (right) pose with a tiger mural at the Conservator’s Center in Burlington on Saturday, Sept. 7. Bottom: Carson Lange (left) and Abby Lenig (right) make paper chains at the Conservator’s Center in Burlington on Saturday, Sept. 7.

GIRL SCOUTS IN THE GOVERNMENT

58%

of female representatives elected to the 116th Congress are Girl Scouts of America Alumnae, according to Forbes.

the Girl Scouts has involved cookie sales in Moseley Center, campus tours and celebrations such as the International Day of the Girl and Girl Scout Night. At these events, students are able to interact with and support the Girl Scouts of Alamance County, who are part of the Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont council. Elon’s chapter of the Kappa Delta sorority supports the Girl Scouts as a part of their national philanthropy. Each National Panhellenic Council sorority supports a philanthropic organization through service and fundraising. Each year, chapters of Kappa Delta across the country devote more than 125,000 service hours to working with Girl Scout troops in

I WANTED TO CHANNEL THAT INTO SOMETHING GOOD, SOMETHING I KNEW I COULD DO TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE, AND GIRL SCOUTS WAS A GREAT FIT ROSIE DEMARIO TROOP LEADER

their communities. According to junior Morgan Mathews, vice president of community service for Kappa Delta, working hands-on with the scouts in the community allows the members of her sorority to improve their leadership skills while also building meaningful relationships with young women. Mathews said that the relationship between the Girl Scouts and Kappa Delta gives members of her sorority the chance to be role models. They are able to demonstrate the ability of girls to be leaders, empower each other and build organizations filled with confidence. “Since the Girl Scouts will eventually be college women themselves, I think it is really important to build confidence at a young age,” Mathews said. Mathews also said girls growing up in today’s society can be quick to judge each other, so it is necessary to encourage girls to build themselves up and appreciate the relationships they have with one another.


lifestyle

Wednesday September 18, 2019

11

Friday night and the lights are low at Mamma Mia

MAEVE ASHBROOK | NEW MEMBER COORDINATOR

The cast of “Mamma Mia!” rehearses for the show, the week before it opens on Sunday, Sept. 15.

The popular international Greek love story dances its way into the Paramount Theater in Burlington

CHASING TAILS AND RECORDs MAE RUSSELL | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

DockDogs welcomes dogs of all skill sets for a chance to be a champion

Above: Summer, a 2-year-old Golden Retriever, particpates in her first DockDogs event on Saturday, Sept. 14.

Caitlin Rundle

Middle: Doni, is the No. 1 ranked dog for the Big Air event in the world. He particpated in the DockDog events in Burlington on Saturday, Sept. 14.

GRAHAM — A single leap is all it takes to be a champion. The world championship for DockDogs worldwide is this October in Dubuque, Iowa. Dogs from Graham and the rest of Alamance County are gearing up to compete on the international level. Deborah Feller, from Charleston, South Carolina, travels all over the country to compete in DockDogs. “My dog is Doni. He’s a yellow lab. He’s almost eight years old and is preparing to go to the World Championship,” Feller said. “He’s a super elite dog, which means he can jump 25 feet and higher. His average jump is about 26 or 27 feet.” Feller said that the event is a wild card competition, this means a victory within the division gives an automatic qualification for the world championship. Feller’s journey to the championship is eight years in the making. It all started when she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Feller’s life partner gave her a puppy with the hope of getting her out of bed. “By the time he was 12 weeks old, we had him at a friend’s house launching him into the pool. Our very first event was the wildlife expo in Charleston, South Carolina. And my dog did very well. At two years old, he jumped 18 feet,” Feller said. “We had so much fun, and Donnie won the event. He hit a 24 footer just right out of the box. It was great, so we were definitely hooked and we’ve been doing it ever since.” Holly Davis, another participant of DocksDogs Worldwide, brought her dog to its first event this year. She said

Bottom: People watch competitors at the DockDog events in Burlington, leap into a pool on Saturday, Sept. 14.

Elon News Network | @caitlinr_21

last year they tried it out just for fun and her dog enjoyed it so much that they decided to come back again this year. “We’ve been going to Indian Creek K9, giving her exercise because she’s a very busy dog who needs the exercise,” Davis said. Indian Creek K9 is a training facility for all dogs to help grow their skill sets in the DockDogs competition. “I met some people here and then ended up going to Indian

DONI’S AVERAGE JUMP DISTANCE

26-27

feet is the average distance Doni can jump in the DockDogs competitions.

Creek and met even more. Now I come here and a lot of the dogs that are competing here. I already know their handlers so it’s kind of interesting.” Graham hosted a DocksDogs WorldWide event last weekend. The competition had dogs jumping into a body of water off of a dock, either for distance or for height. The competition featured events including: Big Air, Speed Retrieve, Extreme Vertical and Iron Dog. The DockDogs website describes Big Air as the dog equivalent of the “long-jump” event in track and field, where the dog is placed on a dock and jumps as far as they can. Speed Retrieve is the newest event in the DockDog competition, where a toy is placed on the opposite side of a pool and the dogs race against the clock to swim and retrieve the toy. Extreme Vertical is a “highjump” for the dogs. A toy is placed above the water and the dog attempts to reach the toy as it is pulled up two inches each round. The final event, the Iron Dog, is a competition to see which dog is superior in all three events. They participate in Big Air, Speed Retrieve and Extreme Vertical. The best compiled score is the winner of this event. DockDogs is open to dogs of all shapes, sizes, breeds and skill sets — the only requirement is that the dog must be six months old.

Hannah Massen

Elon News Network | @massenhannah

While the story is known as a classic family drama, the Burlington Theater Company’s production of “Mamma Mia!” has become a true family affair. Chantel Burdick, who stars in the show as Donna, said her experience with the show began with her godmother and sister. “We watched it all together, and I can remember specifically when they did Dancing Queen in the movie, we all just got up and started dancing,” Burdick said. “That was just such a fun memory for me so I was like, even if I can be just a small part of something so fun, I just wanted to do it, so I did.” Burdick said she can relate most to her scenes with “The Dynamos,” but secretly enjoys the scenes she has with her character’s ex-boyfriend, Sam. “There’s a lot of animosity between the two of us, so that’s fun because it really allows me to be assertive and that’s not who I am normally,” Burdick said. Though Burdick did not know any of her fellow cast members when rehearsals began, she said she was welcomed with open arms. Joel Irvin, who plays Bill Anderson, said his favorite part of the play has been watching his wife, Lee Irvin, perform alongside Burdick as friends, both on-stage and off. According to Irvin, he, his wife and two daughters have been performing together for over a decade. He and his wife were at home in Illinois when they learned they had been cast in “Mamma Mia!” together, and have been living in their RV in Burlington for the last eight weeks in order to be a part of the show. “It gives us a chance to practice and it gives us a chance to see everything that Burlington and the area offers, which we love,” Irvin said. Irvin credits the show’s success to his director, Angela Dalton, who he says has a clear vision for the show’s choreography and music, and pays individual attention to every cast member. Trinity Evans, a senior theater major at Weaver Academy who plays Sophie, says it’s the dynamic between the cast members which makes this rendition of “Mamma Mia!” worth seeing. “I have a specific relationship with each of them, which I think makes the show even better than it is,” Evans said. “The bond that we have together is outstanding and it really shows on stage.” Burdick said she hopes the audience leaves full of joy after a night of singing and dancing along. “Come ready to have a good time,” Burdick said. “If you’re not in a good mood when you come, I promise you will be when you leave.” IF YOU GO Location: Paramount Theater, East Front St. Burlington Dates: Friday, Sept. 20 and Saturday, Sept. 21 at 8:00 p.m. and on Sunday, Sept. 22 at 2:00 p.m. Ticket Prices: $11 to $17


12

lifestyle

Wednesday september 18, 2019

The Farmer’s Market at Elon grows lettuce and community The long-running market’s new table is devoted to donating to people in need Thomas Denome

Elon News Network | @elonnewsnetwork

Elon Community Church’s weekly farmer’s market has been drawing in growers, bakers and makers for over a decade. The front of the church comes alive with business every Thursday afternoon. Sourdough bread and jams, locally grown vegetables, a lemonade stand and newly added hydroponic lettuce are all available at the market. Bob Martin, adjunct assistant professor of business law, runs a table at the market in partnership with Your Local Greens, a hydroponic plant in Burlington. According to Martin, the profits from the lettuce go towards a new program in partnership with the church to make the farmer’s market more accessible for people with Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. This connection will allow welfare recipients to spend their benefits on food and other items. “What we’ve done is sell [the lettuce] at a retail rate with the proceeds going to our farmer’s market fund,” Rev. Randy Orwig, a senior

pastor at Elon Community Church, said. “The farmer’s market fund funds [the] EBT. We are now able to take EBT cards here.” Orwig said the market also has attempted to offset the high prices of locally grown produce by matching any EBT card by spending dollar-for-dollar. Any money spent on an EBT card at the market will be doubled by the church. According to Martin,

THERE’S THIS GOOD FAMILY TYPE ATMOSPHERE, BUT WE LOVE THE STUDENTS TOO. THE STUDENTS PLAY A BIG PART CHRISTY THOMPSON REGULAR MARKET VENDOR

the main attraction of the lettuce is that it’s grown hydroponically, without soil in a mineral-rich water mixture. Your Local Greens grows their lettuce without pesticides in a sterile environment. “People love it,” Martin said. “We’ll get 40 pounds, and we’ll be sold out in an

hour.” According to Martin, the lettuce is selling well, bringing in $240 a week. Despite this success, Orwig says the community outreach aspect is still getting off the ground. The church is struggling to attract EBT card users and other people who are typically driven away from farmer’s markets by high prices. “What we’re realizing is that it’s going to take some time to build up clientele,” Orwig said. “A lot of people believe the myth that farmer’s markets are very expensive. To give people a deal that’s 50 cents on the dollar, we’ve got to get that news out to them.” In addition to Martin’s table, other local farmers and businesses set up shop outside the church. Christy Thompson, who has been a regular vendor at the market for nine years, said the community environment is what motivates her and her husband to come sell their produce every week. “It’s not our most profitable market, but it is profitable enough to come,” Thompson said. “There’s this good family type atmosphere, but we love the students too. The students play a big part.” Even on a hot summer day, many community members and students come out to buy produce and chat with the retailers.

THOMAS DENOME | STAFF PHOTGRAPHER

Bob Martin displays a bag of hydroponic lettuce sold at the weekly Farmer’s Market. The proceeds from the sales go to helping Electronic Benefit Transfer card users and other disadvantaged people.

Jill Nowack, who sells her jam at the market, said she loves the atmosphere of the market as well. Nowack began coming to the market while living in nearby Reidsville but still makes the trip from Kernersville, 40 miles away.

“I used to live closer,” Nowack said. “But I still come to this market. I love the variety of people.” The market — and the lettuce — certainly are popular among residents and students. Each week, groups of students crowd around a

teenager’s lemonade stand, while shoppers go from table to table saying hello to the sellers. “We get to know folks,” Martin said, before being interrupted by a regular coming to buy his weekly bag of lettuce.

Thrifting through Burlington’s ‘Hidden Treasure’ A local thrift store dedicates itself to offering high-quality products at fair prices Lauren Singles

Elon News Network | @lauren_singles

BURLINGTON — Situated in downtown Burlington, Barbara’s Hidden Treasures is a secret gem buried in Alamance County. Walking into the store, one instantly sees the variety of furniture, dining sets, decor and antique knick-knacks. The store is much larger than it seems from the outside and has three separate sections — each filled with unique items and interesting finds. Located behind Mayberry Restaurant & Ice Cream Creations, there’s no question where Barbara’s Hidden Treasures gets its name — but it’s more than just an everyday thrift shop. Barbara’s Hidden Treasures has a passion for assisting the community, which is grounded in their strong connection to downtown Burlington. Barbara Todd, the owner of the store, mentioned how she does home cleanouts, accepts donations and goes to yard sales to get the items she sells. In a county suffering from food insecurity and poverty, Todd strives to offer fair deals to struggling individuals in her area by selling items below commercial retail value and having negotiable prices. “I wouldn’t ever buy anything

JAZMIN BENDER | SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR

Barbara Todd (left), owner of Barbara’s Hidden Treasures, and employee Brandy Burkhead (right) share stories about thrifting.

PEOPLE WHO COME IN HERE ARE COMING IN HERE BECAUSE THEY WANT TO, NOT BECAUSE THEY HAVE TO BRANDY BURKHEAD EMPLOYEE AT HIDDEN TREASURES

new. I wouldn’t suggest for anybody to because it’s just overpriced. We get the same thing,” Todd said. “The reason I started it is to give back to the community. We give 98% of our stuff back to different charities.” Todd also spoke about the importance of community service, explaining how she opened her store to help the community that supported her. “So many people need stuff and can’t get it. I’ve just always been the type of person to give what I can,” Todd said.

GIVING BACK

98%

of the items collected by Barbara Todd of Hidden Treasures goes back to various charities.

Brandy Burkhead, an employee at the store, spoke about her love for thrift stores and what she enjoys most about her job. “Everybody who comes in here is happy. People love thrift shops. People who come in here are coming in here because they want to, not because they have to,” Burkhead said. “I most of all like to help people. If there’s something here that can help somebody, that they don’t have to pay above certain prices, I got you.” Burkhead talked about her upbringing and how her mother loved going to yard sales, which sparked her interest in thrifting. “My whole life, my mother has been a thrift shopper and that’s one of my big things — I love yard sales,” Burkhead said. Both Todd and Burkhead said they wouldn’t trade what they do for the world. Todd said their main goal is to help people. The store serves as a place where customers can get away from the inflated prices of traditional stores and instead find unique items at reduced and affordable prices. Speaking from her own experiences, Todd expressed how important supporting the community is, and how both she and Burkhead are dedicated to giving fair prices and learning about the people who frequently visit the store. “Everything is negotiable,” Burkhead said. “That’s what people want to do — they want to go to the thrift shop; they want to find a good deal.”


lifestyle

Wednesday September 18, 2019

13

ELON WATCHES

Turner Theatre: capers, magic creatures and churches

This week, the on-campus theater serves up a diverse set of movies and documentaries

TURNER THEATRE “HAIL SATAN?”

Emily Prins

Thursday, Sept. 19 7 p.m.

Elon News Network | @emilyprins2

Turner Theatre is a cozy 220-seat auditorium located in Elon University’s School of Communications. The theater opened in 2016 and shows movies and documentaries for Elon students, faculty and community members. While attendees are encouraged to bring their own food, snacks such as candy and popcorn are usually provided. Admission to Turner Theatre is free to all.

“Hail Satan?” What the hell is “The Satanic Temple”? In the award-winning documentary “Hail Satan?,” filmmaker Penny Lane gets to the root of the controversial pseudoreligious organization whose leaders are rebelling against the role of religion in the government by erecting Ten Commandment statues on state land around the country. The documentary explores the rise of modern Satanism, its primarily political beliefs and how its members are fighting for surprisingly moral causes: equality, secularism and inclusion. Ben Travis of Empire calls it “a devilishly funny documentary that blends improbable imagery, self-awareness

“MASTERMINDS” Friday, Sept. 20 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21 8 p.m. 10:30 pm.

and religious provocation with a genuine sense of political purpose.” While this movie might not leave you crying “hail Satan,” it may just change the way you think about religion, government and the American Satanist movement.

“SHREK” Sunday, Sept. 22 4 p.m. 8 p.m.

“Masterminds” Four hillbillies, a one-way ticket to Mexico and $17 million — “Masterminds,” based on a true story, is a comedic heist movie and revenge flick with a Bonnie and Clyde story all rolled into one. It satirizes how a couple of dimwitted southerners were able to pull off the biggest heist in U.S. history. Saturday Night Live favorites Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones join Zach Galifianakis and Owen Wilson in the cast. Joyce Slaton of Common Sense Media says “a brilliantly funny cast sinks its teeth into fresh dialogue and

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY IMDB

Top left: Jex Blackmore in “Hail Satan?”

hysterical visual gags in this heist film, which doesn’t take viewers anywhere they haven’t been before but is still a lot of fun.”

“Shrek” With a clever animation style, adept voice acting and memorable music, “Shrek” is an innovative animated movie with a plot that

subverts classic fairy tale tropes. When Shrek, a loner ogre, finds his desolate swamp invaded by fairytale creatures displaced by Lord Farquaad, he goes to the land of Duloc to reclaim it. He learns that in order to get his swamp back, he must rescue Princess Fiona and bring her back to be Farquaad’s bride. With a talking donkey at his side and a princess with a secret in

Top right: Owen Wilson and Mary Elizabeth Ellis in “Masterminds” Bottom: Mike Myers and Eddie Murphy voice Shrek and Donkey in the animated movie “Shrek”

his sight, Shrek learns the power of friendship and accepting others. This 2002 Best Animated Feature winner has something for everyone.

MAKE HEADLINES INTERESTED IN JOINING ELON NEWS NETWORK? WE’RE HIRING.

OPEN TEAMS: • Broadcast Production • Producing • Copy Editing • Social Media • Media Analytics • Advertising/Sales • Web • Photography • Design • •Reporting - News - Lifestyle - Sports - Opinions

COME TO PITCH MEETINGS: TUESDAYS AT 5 P.M. MCEWEN 108

EMAIL US: JOIN@ELONNEWSNETWORK.COM


Wednesday, september 18 , 2019 | page 14

SPORTS

PR TECTING THE PH ENIX Freshmen Peter Wentzel and Katrin Hauksdottir begin their Elon careers as starting goalies for the men’s and women’s soccer teams Caitlin Rundle | Elon News Network | @caitlin_21

MEN’S SOCCER

L

AST YEAR, ELON UNIVERSITY men’s soccer team graduated veteran goalie Matthew Jegier ’19, who had started and played in all but two games in his career as a Phoenix. He was named to the Colonial Athletic Association All-Rookie Team in 2017. The familiarity of Jegier was never going to be around forever, something head coach Marc Reeves has been preparing for. “We’re constantly having to turn over the team for the right reasons. Kids are graduating and going on to do amazing things,” Reeves said in an after-practice interview on August 26. “Like anything, you know he’s leaving so you plan for it.” Out of the three goalies currently on the roster, Reeves decided to give the starting spot to redshirt freshman Peter Wentzel. Wentzel did not play last season, but says he learned by watching Jegier and is ready to step in. “He was a great leader on and also off the field, that’s something I’m looking forward to stepping into,” Wentzel said. “It’s something I’ve been looking forward to, of course, coming from Germany. I had one year to prepare to get ready and I had [Jegier] in front of me, and now it’s my role.” Lucky for Wentzel, Jeiger is still just a phone call away. “Matt now lives in Charlotte. He’s nearby and works. I’m still talking to him on the phone quite a lot.” Wentzel said. Wentzel steps into the role as the Phoenix attempts to bounce back from a less than successful season last year. After going 7-5-6 in Reeves’ first season with the Phoenix, the team fell to a 5-8-2 record last year. This was one of the few times Reeves has ever gone under .500 in his career. This season, Wentzel has played in four full games, making a total of 12 saves in those games and giving up seven. His season high of saves came from the matchup against Rutgers University on Sept. 7 where he saved five shots in the 1-0 loss. “If you look at Peter, his size and presence in the goal and his power in terms of his ability to cover both poles very well and go out on crosses very well makes him a very solid goalkeeper,” Reeves said. “His improvement just needs to be his game management in terms of

WOMEN’S SOCCER his decisions and his distribution to continue to try and make sure we don’t put [the] team under any undue pressure.” Questions started forming after the game on Saturday, Sept. 14 against James Madison University during which Wentzel gave up six goals in one half. At halftime, Reeves took Wentzel out and replaced him with redshirt sophomore Alex Lorne, who saved one shot and kept the Phoenix to just a 6-0 shutout. “Lorne, I think, is an incredibly athletic shot stopper. He makes some incredible reaction saves and is very calm,” Reeves said. “He’s got decent size, but I think in modern college soccer the ball is in the box an awful lot, and being effective on his punches and catches and coming through traffic is something he continues to work on.” Lorne’s performance in the JMU game gave Reeves a decision to make about who would start in the Appalachian State University game on Sept. 17. “Anytime you give up six goals ... [there] needs to be some analysis and evaluation of the goalkeeping situation,” Reeves said. “We have spoken with all three goalkeepers and told them that [Lorne] will start versus App State. That’s a decision I’ve made based upon the scenarios.” There are currently four goalies Reeves is keeping an eye on, although freshman Cam Pelle will be taking a redshirt year due to a shoulder surgery. This leaves Wentzel, Lorne and redshirt senior Sam Loeffler. “Sam Loeffler has done a fantastic job in terms of being ready in training and making some fantastic reaction saves, big saves for sure,” Reeves said. “His general play in the goal can improve in terms of decisions and angles as to when to come out for certain breakaways or positioning in a goal to make more consistent saves.” Though Reeves is giving Lorne a chance to prove himself against Appalachian State, the starting goalkeeper position is still up for grabs. “Bottom line is we’re going to start Alex versus App State and see how he performs in the goal there and then reassess it again whether that’s at halftime or wherever that’s at the end of the game,” Reeves said.

E

THOMAS DENOME AND CLARE GRANT | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS LON UNIVERSITY’S WOMEN’S Left: Starting goalie Peter Wentzel clears the ball SOCCER team has seen its fair share of during the men’s soccer game againsts Rutgers ups and downs over the years, with new Univeristy on Saturday, Sept. 7. coaches, strategies and players trying to improve the struggling program. This season, Right: Katrin Hauksdottir kicks the ball, as the one of the changes can be found in who stands starting goalie for the women’s soccer team, during a between the posts during games— freshman game against Liberty University on Thursday, Sept. 12. Katrin Hauksdottir, originally from Iceland. “We were made aware of Katrin in the ing time she was going to get on those teams. spring,” Head Coach Neil Payne said. “We “[Haukar] was the team I grew up in, but went to see her play and were very impressed, I changed teams [because] the coaches wantand we wanted to sign her straight away.” ed a more experienced goalie. I played a litHauksdottir said it was coaches like Payne tle ... but I wasn’t getting the experience on that convinced her to eventually come to Elon. the bench,” Hauksdottir said. “So, I changed Beyond the coaches that came to see her play, teams and found a team I was really good on Hauksdottir said she would called Keflavík and that was frequently FaceTime with the last team I played for.” the coaching staff so they The transfer to Keflavík could build a strong relawas made in March, and tionship by the time she Hauksdottir took advantage EVERYBODY IN decided where to go. of the time she had left on an “It was a good feeling to Icelandic team. Earlier this FRONT OF HER have someone I’ve talked to year, Keflavík was the runTRUSTS HER, AND enough to go do it,” Hauksner up in its domestic cup. dottir said. Hauksdottir’s efforts helped THAT KIND OF TRUST Payne said though put the team in the women’s IS CONTAGIOUS Hauksdottir is a freshman, division of the Pepsi League, she has what it takes to be a the top-tier women’s football THROUGH THE leader on the field. league in Iceland. OTHER LINES IN THE “Everybody in front “She comes with a ton of her trusts her, and that of experience,” Payne said. TEAM kind of trust is contagious “You can tell that in her play. through the other lines in You can tell that in her manNEIL PAYNE the team,” Payne said. nerisms on the field. She just In her time as a Phoenix, HEAD COACH looks like she’s played the Hauksdottir has started and game for a long time.” played in every match and However, all that expehas only allowed six goals in seven games this rience didn’t prepare Hauksdottir for the season. At this time last year, the Phoenix had changes she would have to make playing in given up 10. America. “She’s made a massive improvement to the “I wasn’t ready for the heat. It was tough in program,” Payne said. “She understands the the beginning,” Hauksdottir said. “But I also game well, how it’s not just about blocking had to adjust to the tempo, it’s much higher shots but it’s about your positioning relative to here.” where the ball is. It’s about having good feet. Though it is still early in the season, She’s just checking tons of boxes.” Hauksdottir is shaping up to be exactly what Before coming to Elon, Hauksdottir played the Phoenix needs in their time of rebuilding. on Knattspyrnudeild Keflavíkur, an Icelandic “She’s got a presence. It’s always important team. Previously, she played on Knattspyr- in that position to have a presence,” Payne nufélagið Haukar, a move Hauksdottir said said. “She commands the box and she’s been was made primarily based on how much play- massive for us this year.”


sports

Wednesday September 18, 2019

THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF THE JMU & ELON RIVALRY

Previewing the next five match-ups between the two historic conference rivals

15

MEN’S SOCCER: SEPT. 14

Alex Reynolds

Sports Director | @reynolds14__

I

N 2014, ELON UNIVERSITY left the Southern Conference to join the Colonial Athletic Association. The James Madison University Dukes joined the conference in 1985 and in recent years have been the dominant name in the CAA in nearly all sports. JMU joined the CAA during its inception in 1979 and since then have collected 88 conference championships across 18 D-1 sports. The Phoenix and Dukes have become unofficial rivals in the past five years due to close matches, back and forth series and connecting storylines. FILE PHOTO BY ELON NEWS NETWORK

The Elon University men’s soccer team has never lost to James Madison University. The Phoenix holds a winning record over the Dukes at 2-03. Yet, Elon is still considered an underdog when facing the Dukes. In 2018, the Phoenix traveled to Harrisonburg, Virginia in the regular season finale. JMU was 6-1 in Colonial Athletic Association play and was at the top of the conference. The heated matchup saw 40 total fouls given to each of the rival teams. The Elon defense held down the JMU attack while senior Jack Willbye found the back of the net in the 38’ to lift the Phoenix over the No. 25 team in the country. The Dukes would

go on to win the tournament and make a run all the way to the elite eight of the NCAA tournament. “It’s a new season. There are coaching changes, player personnel changes, skids graduate and new players coming in. You have to gel your group and get the most out of it,” said head coach Marc Reeves, ahead of the JMU game. Reeves was not wrong about it being a new season. The Dukes came to Rudd Field on Saturday and repaid the loss the Phoenix handed them last year. The Dukes stomped Elon 6-0. JMU improves their conference record to 2-0 while the Phoenix fall to 0-1 in the CAA.

FOOTBALL: SEPT. 28 The Elon University Phoenix pulled the upset of the year in 2018 when they toppled the Dukes in Harrisonburg 2724. Prior to the game, Elon hadn’t won a game against the Duke’s six tries. The win felt like a changing of the guard as the Phoenix came up victorious against the reigning Colonial Athletic Association Champions. However, the narrative changed when the leader of

the Phoenix, head coach Curt Cignetti, took up the head coaching role at JMU. The 2019 matchup will flip the script of the last game. Not only are the coaches different, but Cignetti and the Dukes will now travel to Rhodes Stadium on Phoenix family day. Former defensive coordinator Tony Trisciani, now the head coach for the Phoenix, recognizes the importance of this game for fans

but refuses to make the moment bigger than it is. “I’m sure everyone will be excited for that game when it does come but we got a lot of work to do before we get there,” Trisciani said regarding the upcoming season. The Phoenix will look to topple the CAA giants for the second year with all eyes on the former coach.

VOLLEYBALL: OCT. 10 PHOTO COURTESY OF TREVOR COCKBURN

If there’s one team that is eager to defeat the James Madison University Dukes, it’s the Phoenix’s volleyball team. Elon Volleyball is 0-10 against JMU, nine of the losses came within conference play. Despite the negative history, the veterans on the Phoenix squad know they have a chance to rewrite history this season. The past three matches between the Dukes and Phoenix have been settled in five sets. In their last meeting in the first round of the Colonial Athletic Association tournament, the Phoenix took the Dukes to the brink. The Phoenix battled back from a 2-1 deficit to force the No. 3 team in the conference to a fourth set on their own court. Senior blocker Nori Thomas said there are a number of the teams in the conference that the team is “itching to beat” one of them being the Dukes. Thomas said beating a team like JMU requires determination and teamwork. “The biggest thing we’ve tried to build in our four years here is all in and 100% that wants to be here and work together,” Thomas said.

WOMEN’S SOCCER: OCT. 20 Women’s soccer is another team that has yet to score a win against the Dukes. The Phoenix are 0-5 against James Madison University since joining the Colonial Athletic Association. Unlike the volleyball team, women’s soccer that’s Oct. 20 matchup against the Dukes is less about rivalry and more about redemption. In 2018, the Dukes handed the Phoenix their worst loss of the season 3-0. This year, the Phoenix returns three of their

top five points scored from last year who still have the taste of that loss in their mouth. The matchup will just as tough on the Phoenix as it was last year. The Dukes, who made it to the conference finals in 2018, return their top five scorers and their starting goalie in 2019. The one difference in this year’s matchup is that it will be the Dukes that have to travel to Elon to face the Phoenix on Rudd Field.

CLARE GRANTE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

WOMEN’S LACROSSE: TBD

CORY WELLER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The James Madison University Dukes are the dominant face in Colonial Athletic Association women’s lacrosse. In the past decade, the Dukes have won the CAA six times, been to the finals three additional times and have never been ranked lower than No. 2 in the conference. The Elon University Phoenix has yet to beat the Dukes in seven tries. The Phoenix team returning to Rudd Field in 2020 might be the team to give the program its first win. The team will see the return of the dynamic attack duo of Sophomore Mae McGlynn and 2019 CAA Rookie of the Year, Freshman Kaley Thompson. The two attackers combined for 85 points for the Phoenix last year. They also retained standout goalkeeper, Sophomore Paulina DiFatta, who transferred last year from Fairfield University. One could only think that with another year of offseason training and growth, the young lacrosse stars will be ready to take on the powerhouse Dukes.

FILE PHOTO BY JACK HARTMAN


Profile for The Pendulum

The Pendulum September 18, 2019  

The Pendulum September 18, 2019  

Profile for pendulum
Advertisement